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Sample records for acutely depressed patients

  1. Increased activities of both superoxide dismutase and catalase were indicators of acute depressive episodes in patients with major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Meng-Chang; Huang, Tiao-Lai

    2016-01-30

    Oxidative stress may play an important role in the pathophysiology of major depressive disorder (MDD). The aim of this study was to investigate the serum levels of oxidative stress biomarkers and S100B in patients with MDD in an acute phase, and evaluate the changes in superoxide dismutase (SOD), protein carbonyl content (PCC), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), 8-hydroxy 2'-deoxyguanosine after treatment (8-OHdG), catalase (CAT), thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and S100B. We consecutively enrolled 21 MDD inpatients in an acute phase and 40 healthy subjects. Serum oxidative stress markers were measured with assay kits. Serum SOD and CAT activities in MDD patients in an acute phase were significantly higher than those of healthy subjects, and serum PCC levels were significantly lower. The HAM-D scores had a significantly positive association with S100B levels. Eighteen depressed patients were followed up, and there was no significant difference among all of the markers after treatment. In conclusion, our results suggest that increased activities of both SOD and CAT might be indicators of acute depressive episodes in MDD patients.

  2. Clinical implications of anterior S-T segment depression in patients with acute inferior myocardial infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Croft, C.H.; Woodward, W.; Nicod, P.; Corbett, J.R.; Lewis, S.E.; Willerson, J.T.; Rude, R.E.

    1982-09-01

    To assess various factors associated with anterior S-T segment depression during acute inferior myocardial infarction, 47 consecutive patients with electrocardiographic evidence of a first transmural inferior infarction were studied prospectively with radionuclide ventriculography an average of 7.3 hours (range 2.9 to 15.3) after the onset of symptoms. Thirty-nine patients (Group I) had anterior S-T depression in the initial electrocardiogram and 8 (Group II) did not have such reciprocal changes. There was no difference between the two groups in left ventricular end-diastolic or end-diastolic volume index or left ventricular ejection fraction. Stroke volume index was greater in Group I than in Group II. There were no group differences in left ventricular total or regional wall motion scores. A weak correlation existed between the quantities (mV) or inferior S-T segment elevation and reciprocal S-T depression. No relation between anterior S-T segment depression and the left ventricular end-diastolic volume index could be demonstrated; the extent of left ventricular apical and right ventricular wall motion abnormalities, both frequently associated with inferior infarction, did not correlate with the quantity of anterior S-T depression. These data show that anterior S-T segment depression occurs commonly during the early evolution of transmural inferior infarction, is not generally a marker of functionally significant anterior ischemia and cannot be used to predict left ventricular function in individual patients. Anterior S-T segment depression may be determined by reciprocal mechanisms.

  3. The use of statins for the treatment of depression in patients with acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kim, S W; Bae, K Y; Kim, J M; Shin, I S; Hong, Y J; Ahn, Y; Jeong, M H; Berk, M; Yoon, J S

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of statins for the treatment of depression in individuals with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). We used 1-year follow-up data of a 24-week double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of escitalopram and a naturalistic prospective observational cohort study. Of 446 participants with comorbid depressive disorders and ACS at baseline, 300 participated in a randomised escitalopram trial and the remaining 146 participated in a naturalistic observational study. The participants in the two studies were approached for a 1-year follow-up investigation. Treatment response rates, defined as a ⩾50% reduction in the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D) and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) scores, were used as the outcome variables. In the escitalopram trial, both HAM-D and BDI response rates were highest in patients taking escitalopram and statins together and lowest in patients receiving neither medication. Logistic regression analyses revealed that statin use was significantly associated with higher response rates on both the HAM-D and BDI at 1 year, whereas no such associations were found for escitalopram. In the naturalistic observational study, the response rates at 1 year did not differ significantly by statin use. Instead, the HAM-D response rate was significantly higher in patients taking lipophilic statins than in those who did not. In conclusion, statins may be effective for the treatment of depression independent of medical status and escitalopram use, and they may potentiate the antidepressant action of serotonergic antidepressants in patients with ACS. PMID:26285130

  4. Rates and predictors of depression status among caregivers of patients with COPD hospitalized for acute exacerbations: a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Bernabeu-Mora, Roberto; García-Guillamón, Gloria; Montilla-Herrador, Joaquina; Escolar-Reina, Pilar; García-Vidal, José Antonio; Medina-Mirapeix, Francesc

    2016-01-01

    Background Hospitalization is common for acute exacerbation of COPD, but little is known about its impact on the mental health of caregivers. Objective The aim of this study was to determine the rates and predictors of depressive symptoms in caregivers at the time of hospitalization for acute exacerbation of COPD and to identify the probability and predictors of subsequent changes in depressive status 3 months after discharge. Materials and methods This was a prospective study. Depression symptoms were measured in 87 caregivers of patients hospitalized for exacerbation at hospitalization and 3 months after discharge. We measured factors from four domains: context of care, caregiving demands, caregiver resources, and patient characteristics. Univariate and multivariate multiple logistic regressions were used to determine the predictors of depression at hospitalization and subsequent changes at 3 months. Results A total of 45 caregivers reported depression at the time of hospitalization. After multiple adjustments, spousal relationship, dyspnea, and severe airflow limitation were the strongest independent predictors of depression at hospitalization. Of these 45 caregivers, 40% had a remission of their depression 3 months after discharge. In contrast, 16.7% of caregivers who were not depressive at hospitalization became depressive at 3 months. Caregivers caring >20 hours per week for patients with dependencies had decreased odds of remission, and patients having dependencies after discharge increased the odds of caregivers becoming depressed. Conclusion Depressive symptoms are common among caregivers when patients are hospitalized for exacerbation of COPD. Although illness factors are determinants of depression at hospitalization, patient dependence determines fluctuations in the depressive status of caregivers. PMID:28008245

  5. Confluence of Depression and Acute Psychological Stress Among Patients With Stable Coronary Heart Disease: Effects on Myocardial Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Burg, Matthew M.; Meadows, Judith; Shimbo, Daichi; Davidson, Karina W.; Schwartz, Joseph E.; Soufer, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Background Depression is prevalent in coronary heart disease (CHD) patients and increases risk for acute coronary syndrome (ACS) recurrence and mortality despite optimal medical care. The pathways underlying this risk remain elusive. Psychological stress (PS) can provoke impairment in myocardial perfusion and trigger ACS. A confluence of acute PS with depression might reveal coronary vascular mechanisms of risk. We tested whether depression increased risk for impaired myocardial perfusion during acute PS among patients with stable CHD. Methods and Results Patients (N=146) completed the Beck Depression Inventory‐I (BDI‐I), a measure of depression linked to recurrent ACS and post‐ACS mortality, and underwent single‐photon emission computed tomography myocardial perfusion imaging at rest and during acute PS. The likelihood of new/worsening impairment in myocardial perfusion from baseline to PS as a function of depression severity was tested. On the BDI‐I, 41 patients scored in the normal range, 48 in the high normal range, and 57 in the depressed range previously linked to CHD prognosis. A BDI‐I score in the depressed range was associated with a significantly greater likelihood of new/worsening impairment in myocardial perfusion from baseline to PS (odds ratio =2.89, 95% CI: 1.26 to 6.63, P=0.012). This remained significant in models controlling ACS recurrence/mortality risk factors and medications. There was no effect for selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor medications. Conclusions Depressed patients with CHD are particularly susceptible to impairment in myocardial perfusion during PS. The confluence of PS with depression may contribute to a better understanding of the depression‐associated risk for ACS recurrence and mortality. PMID:25359402

  6. Weight change in older depressed patients during acute pharmacotherapy with paroxetine and nortriptyline: a double-blind randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Weber, E; Stack, J; Pollock, B G; Mulsant, B; Begley, A; Mazumdar, S; Reynolds CF3rd

    2000-01-01

    The authors examined weight change in 32 elderly patients treated for 12 weeks with either nortriptyline or paroxetine during acute-phase pharmacotherapy. Random assignment to treatment and double-blind assessment of weight change were performed, including ascertainment of premorbid (i.e., pre-depression) weight. Pretreatment severity of depression was correlated with weight loss during the depressive episode and depression-related weight loss, in turn, correlated with weight regained during antidepressant treatment. There was no differential weight change associated with nortriptyline vs. paroxetine. Rather, subjects in both groups approximated their premorbid weights by 12 weeks of acute-phase pharmacotherapy with either agent. However, additional investigation of weight change during continuation and maintenance pharmacotherapy is necessary and would be clinically useful for the long-term management of elderly patients with depression.

  7. Association between N-terminal proB-type Natriuretic Peptide and Depressive Symptoms in Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Yan; Jia, Jiao; Sa, Jian; Qiu, Li-Xia; Cui, Yue-Hua; Zhang, Yue-An; Yang, Hong; Liu, Gui-Fen

    2017-01-01

    Background: While depression and certain cardiac biomarkers are associated with acute myocardial infarction (AMI), the relationship between them remains largely unexplored. We examined the association between depressive symptoms and biomarkers in patients with AMI. Methods: We performed a cross-sectional study using data from 103 patients with AMI between March 2013 and September 2014. The levels of depression, N-terminal proB-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), and troponin I (TnI) were measured at baseline. The patients were divided into two groups: those with depressive symptoms and those without depressive symptoms according to Zung Self-rating Depression Scale (SDS) score. Baseline comparisons between two groups were made using Student's t-test for continuous variables, Chi-square or Fisher's exact test for categorical variables, and Wilcoxon test for variables in skewed distribution. Binomial logistic regression and multivariate linear regression were performed to assess the association between depressive symptoms and biomarkers while adjusting for demographic and clinical variables. Results: Patients with depressive symptoms had significantly higher NT-proBNP levels as compared to patients without depressive symptoms (1135.0 [131.5, 2474.0] vs. 384.0 [133.0, 990.0], Z = −2.470, P = 0.013). Depressive symptoms were associated with higher NT-proBNP levels (odds ratio [OR] = 2.348, 95% CI: 1.344 to 4.103, P = 0.003) and higher body mass index (OR = 1.169, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.016 to 1.345, P = 0.029). The total SDS score was associated with the NT-proBNP level (β = 0.327, 95% CI: 1.674 to 6.119, P = 0.001) after multivariable adjustment. In particular, NT-proBNP was associated with three of the depressive dimensions, including core depression (β = 0.299, 95% CI: 0.551 to 2.428, P = 0.002), cognitive depression (β = 0.320, 95% CI: 0.476 to 1.811, P = 0.001), and somatic depression (β = 0.333, 95% CI: 0.240 to 0.847, P = 0.001). Neither the

  8. Electroconvulsive therapy exerts mainly acute molecular changes in serum of major depressive disorder patients.

    PubMed

    Stelzhammer, Viktoria; Guest, Paul C; Rothermundt, Matthias; Sondermann, Carina; Michael, Nikolaus; Schwarz, Emanuel; Rahmoune, Hassan; Bahn, Sabine

    2013-10-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is mainly used to treat medication resistant major depressive disorder (MDD) patients, with a remission rate of up to 90%. However, little is known about the serum molecular changes induced by this treatment. Understanding the mechanisms of action of ECT at the molecular level could lead to identification of response markers and potential new drug targets for more effective antidepressant treatments. We have carried out a pilot study which analysed serum samples of MDD patients who received a series of ECT treatments over 4 weeks. Patients received only ECT treatments over the first two weeks and a combination of ECT and antidepressant drugs (AD) over the subsequent two weeks. Blood serum analyses were carried out using a combination of multiplex Human MAP® immunoassay and liquid-chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS(E)) profiling. This showed that ECT had a predominant acute effect on the levels of serum proteins and small molecules, with changes at the beginning of ECT treatment and after administration of the ECT+AD combination treatment. This suggested a positive interaction between the two types of treatment. Changed molecules included BDNF, CD40L, IL-8, IL-13, EGF, IGF-1, pancreatic polypeptide, SCF, sortilin-1 and others which have already been implicated in MDD pathophysiology. We conclude that ECT appears to exert mainly acute effects on serum molecules.

  9. Anxiety and depression in the acute porphyrias.

    PubMed

    Millward, L M; Kelly, P; King, A; Peters, T J

    2005-01-01

    A previous study of self-rated psychosocial aspects in patients with acute porphyria found that depression, and particularly anxiety, is more common in porphyria patients than in the general population or general medical outpatient attenders. Nearly half of the sample (46%) reported at least some problem with anxiety and/or depression: anxiety caseness was 26% and depression caseness was 13%. This paper extends our previous observations and investigates further the associations between porphyria and anxiety, depression and general mental health in 90 patients (58 acute intermittent porphyria, 32 variegate porphyria). The findings of this study confirm that anxiety is raised in patients with acute intermittent porphyria and with variegate porphyria, in both males and females, compared to the normative population and, using a series of questionnaires exploring the physical and psychosocial features of anxiety, that this anxiety is experienced as a 'relatively stable personality trait', rather than a 'transitory emotional state' (i.e. intrinsic rather than secondary to the porphyria).

  10. Combining Antidepressants in Acute Treatment of Depression: A Meta-Analysis of 38 Studies Including 4511 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Henssler, Jonathan; Bschor, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Combining antidepressants (ADs) for therapy of acute depression is frequently employed, but randomized studies have yielded conflicting results. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis aimed at determining efficacy and tolerability of combination therapy. Methods: MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, and CENTRAL databases were systematically searched through March 2014 for controlled studies comparing combinations of ADs with AD monotherapy in adult patients suffering from acute depression. The prespecified primary outcome was standardized mean difference (SMD), secondary outcomes were response, remission, and dropouts. Results: Among 8688 articles screened, 38 studies were eligible, including 4511 patients. Combination treatment was statistically, significantly superior to monotherapy (SMD 0.29; 95% CI 0.16 to 0.42). During monotherapy, slightly fewer patients dropped out due to adverse events (OR 0.90; 95% CI 0.53 to 1.53). Studies were heterogeneous (I2 = 63%), and there was indication of moderate publication bias (fail-safe N for an effect of 0.1:44), but results remained robust across prespecified secondary outcomes and subgroups, including analyses restricted to randomized controlled trials and low risk of bias studies. Meta-regression revealed an association of SMD with difference in imipramine-equivalent dose. Combining a reuptake inhibitor with an antagonist of presynaptic α2-autoreceptors was superior to other combinations. Conclusion: Combining ADs seems to be superior to monotherapy with only slightly more patients dropping out. Combining a reuptake inhibitor with an antagonist of presynaptic α2-autoreceptors seems to be significantly more effective than other combinations. Overall, our search revealed a dearth of well-designed studies. PMID:27582451

  11. The Impact of Comorbid Depression on Educational Inequality in Survival after Acute Coronary Syndrome in a Cohort of 83 062 Patients and a Matched Reference Population

    PubMed Central

    Osler, Merete; Prescott, Eva; Wium-Andersen, Ida Kim; Ibfelt, Else Helene; Jørgensen, Martin Balslev; Andersen, Per Kragh; Jørgensen, Terese Sara Høj; Wium-Andersen, Marie Kim; Mårtensson, Solvej

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with low socioeconomic position have higher rates of mortality after diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome (ACS), but little is known about the mechanisms behind this social inequality. The aim of the present study was to examine whether any educational inequality in survival after ACS was influenced by comorbid conditions including depression. Methods From 2001 to 2009 all first-time ACS patients were identified in the Danish National Patient Registry. This cohort of 83 062 ACS patients and a matched reference population were followed for incident depression and mortality until December 2012 by linkage to person, patients and prescription registries. Educational status was defined at study entry and the impact of potential confounders and mediators (age, gender, cohabitation status, somatic comorbidity and depression) on the relation between education and mortality were identified by drawing a directed acyclic graph and analysed using multiple Cox regression analyses. Findings During follow-up, 29 583(35.6%) of ACS patients and 19 105(22.9%) of the reference population died. Cox regression analyses showed an increased mortality in the lowest educated compared to those with high education in both ACS patients and the reference population. Adjustment for previous and incident depression or other covariables only attenuated the relations slightly. This pattern of associations was seen for mortality after 30 days, 1 year and during total follow-up. Conclusion In this study the relative excess mortality rate in lower educated ACS patients was comparable with the excess risk associated with low education in the background population. This educational inequality in survival remained after adjustment for somatic comorbidity and depression. PMID:26513652

  12. Acute Phase Cognitive Therapy for Recurrent Major Depressive Disorder: Who Drops Out and How Much do Patient Skills Influence Response?

    PubMed Central

    Jarrett, Robin B.; Minhajuddin, Abu; Kangas, Julie L.; Friedman, Edward S.; Callan, Judith A.; Thase, Michael E.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The aims were to predict cognitive therapy (CT) noncompletion and to determine, relative to other putative predictors, the extent to which the patient skills in CT for recurrent major depressive disorder predicted response in a large, two-site trial. Method Among 523 outpatients aged 18-70, exposed to 12-14 weeks of CT, 21.6% dropped out. Of the 410 completers, 26.1% did not respond. To predict these outcomes, we conducted logistic regression analyses of demographics, pre-treatment illness characteristics and psychosocial measures, and mid-treatment therapeutic alliance. Results The 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD17) scores at entry predicted drop-out and nonresponse. Patients working for pay, of non-Hispanic white race, who were older, or had more education were significantly more likely to complete. Controlling for HRSD17, significant predictors of nonresponse included: lower scores on the Skills of Cognitive Therapy-Observer Version (SoCT-O), not working for pay, history of only two depressive episodes, greater pre-treatment social impairment. Mid-phase symptom reduction was a strong predictor of final outcome. Conclusions These prognostic indicators forecast which patients tend to be optimal candidates for standard CT, as well as which patients may benefit from changes in therapy, its focus, or from alternate modalities of treatment. Pending replication, the findings underscore the importance of promoting patients’ understanding and use of CT skills, as well as reducing depressive symptoms early. Future research may determine the extent to which these findings generalize to other therapies, providers who vary in competency, and patients with other depressive subtypes or disorders. PMID:23485420

  13. Predictive value of homocysteine for depression after acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Hee Ju; Stewart, Robert; Bae, Kyung Yeol; Kim, Sung Wan; Shin, Il Seon; Kang, Hyuno; Moon, Won Jin; Hong, Young Joon; Ahn, Youngkeun; Jeong, Myung Ho; Yoon, Jin Sang; Kim, Jae Min

    2016-01-01

    We investigated roles of plasma homocysteine and MTHFR gene in relation to risks and treatment responses of depression in ACS. A sample of 969 patients with recent ACS were recruited and 711 followed 1 year later. In addition, of 378 baseline participants with depressive disorder, 255 were randomized to a 24-week double blind trial of escitalopram (N = 127) or placebo (N = 128). A higher homocysteine concentration was independently associated with prevalent depressive disorder at baseline irrespective of MTHFR genotype; and with both incident and persistent depressive disorder at follow-up only in the presence of TT genotype. MTHFR genotype was not itself associated with depressive disorder after ACS. No associations were found with 24-week antidepressant treatment responses. Plasma homocysteine could be a biomarker for depressive disorder particularly in the acute phase of ACS. Focused interventions for those with higher homocysteine level and MTHFR TT genotype might reduce the risk of later depressive disorder. PMID:27626182

  14. Acute renal failure induced by markedly decreased appetite secondary to a depressive episode after discontinuation of long-term lithium therapy in an elderly patient with bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Okada, Akira

    2014-05-16

    Some elderly patients on chronic lithium therapy for bipolar disorder and their doctors may be faced with a therapeutic dilemma over whether or not to continue prescribing/taking lithium given their increased risk of reduced renal function. We present the case of a 78-year-old woman with bipolar disorder who discontinued lithium therapy due to increased risk factors for renal injury. After discontinuation, she experienced markedly decreased appetite secondary to a depressive episode, and developed acute renal failure, which subsequently progressed to a more advanced stage of chronic kidney disease. This case suggests that extreme care must be taken to prevent the recurrence of depression in elderly patients with bipolar disorder who discontinue lithium therapy, even when they had been emotionally stable for a long time while receiving lithium. Medications other than lithium for bipolar disorder may be needed at the time lithium therapy is discontinued.

  15. Intramuscular ketamine in acute depression: A report on two cases

    PubMed Central

    Harihar, Chilukuri; Dasari, Padmavathy; Srinivas, Jakka Sriramulu

    2013-01-01

    It takes about 2 weeks for the onset of antidepressant action of drugs while electroconvulsive therapy though faster, is a cumbersome procedure requiring an anaesthetist and at least a minor operation theatre. Recent studies have shown that Ketamine, when given to severely depressed patients in the dose of 0.5 mg/kg as a slow intravenous infusion over 40 minutes, brought about acute relief from depression and amelioration of suicidal risk within a few hours. The improvement, however, was transient and lasted for up to a week but could be sustained by further weekly or biweekly injections. As the dose of ketamine administered was found to be safe, it was now tried in the intramuscular route in two severely depressed patients with similar rapid improvement. The cases are reported here which pave way for an easier mode of treating acute depression. PMID:23825857

  16. Fractal correlation properties of R-R interval dynamics and mortality in patients with depressed left ventricular function after an acute myocardial infarction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huikuri, H. V.; Makikallio, T. H.; Peng, C. K.; Goldberger, A. L.; Hintze, U.; Moller, M.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Preliminary data suggest that the analysis of R-R interval variability by fractal analysis methods may provide clinically useful information on patients with heart failure. The purpose of this study was to compare the prognostic power of new fractal and traditional measures of R-R interval variability as predictors of death after acute myocardial infarction. METHODS AND RESULTS: Time and frequency domain heart rate (HR) variability measures, along with short- and long-term correlation (fractal) properties of R-R intervals (exponents alpha(1) and alpha(2)) and power-law scaling of the power spectra (exponent beta), were assessed from 24-hour Holter recordings in 446 survivors of acute myocardial infarction with a depressed left ventricular function (ejection fraction patients died (25.6%), with 75 deaths classified as arrhythmic (17.0%) and 28 as nonarrhythmic (6.3%) cardiac deaths. Several traditional and fractal measures of R-R interval variability were significant univariate predictors of all-cause mortality. Reduced short-term scaling exponent alpha(1) was the most powerful R-R interval variability measure as a predictor of all-cause mortality (alpha(1) <0.75, relative risk 3.0, 95% confidence interval 2.5 to 4.2, P<0.001). It remained an independent predictor of death (P<0.001) after adjustment for other postinfarction risk markers, such as age, ejection fraction, NYHA class, and medication. Reduced alpha(1) predicted both arrhythmic death (P<0.001) and nonarrhythmic cardiac death (P<0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Analysis of the fractal characteristics of short-term R-R interval dynamics yields more powerful prognostic information than the traditional measures of HR variability among patients with depressed left ventricular function after an acute myocardial infarction.

  17. Fractal analysis of heart rate dynamics as a predictor of mortality in patients with depressed left ventricular function after acute myocardial infarction. TRACE Investigators. TRAndolapril Cardiac Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Makikallio, T. H.; Hoiber, S.; Kober, L.; Torp-Pedersen, C.; Peng, C. K.; Goldberger, A. L.; Huikuri, H. V.

    1999-01-01

    A number of new methods have been recently developed to quantify complex heart rate (HR) dynamics based on nonlinear and fractal analysis, but their value in risk stratification has not been evaluated. This study was designed to determine whether selected new dynamic analysis methods of HR variability predict mortality in patients with depressed left ventricular (LV) function after acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Traditional time- and frequency-domain HR variability indexes along with short-term fractal-like correlation properties of RR intervals (exponent alpha) and power-law scaling (exponent beta) were studied in 159 patients with depressed LV function (ejection fraction <35%) after an AMI. By the end of 4-year follow-up, 72 patients (45%) had died and 87 (55%) were still alive. Short-term scaling exponent alpha (1.07 +/- 0.26 vs 0.90 +/- 0.26, p <0.001) and power-law slope beta (-1.35 +/- 0.23 vs -1.44 +/- 0.25, p <0.05) differed between survivors and those who died, but none of the traditional HR variability measures differed between these groups. Among all analyzed variables, reduced scaling exponent alpha (<0.85) was the best univariable predictor of mortality (relative risk 3.17, 95% confidence interval 1.96 to 5.15, p <0.0001), with positive and negative predictive accuracies of 65% and 86%, respectively. In the multivariable Cox proportional hazards analysis, mortality was independently predicted by the reduced exponent alpha (p <0.001) after adjustment for several clinical variables and LV function. A short-term fractal-like scaling exponent was the most powerful HR variability index in predicting mortality in patients with depressed LV function. Reduction in fractal correlation properties implies more random short-term HR dynamics in patients with increased risk of death after AMI.

  18. Depression and the Suicidal Patient.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Dick C; Tran, Mina; Shah, Asim A; Matorin, Anu

    2015-11-01

    Depression is the most common psychiatric illness in the general community, with 3% to 4% of depressives dying by suicide today. Studies have shown that depression has considerable morbidity and mortality. This article focuses on depressed patients and their management within the emergency department. Understanding the intricacies of the interview process and identifying which patients need immediate attention are important skills for the emergency physician.

  19. Substance Use, Depression and Mental Health Functioning in Patients Seeking Acute Medical Care in an Inner-City ED

    PubMed Central

    Walton, Maureen A.; Barry, Kristin L.; Cunningham, Rebecca M.; Chermack, Stephen T.; Blow, Frederic C.

    2012-01-01

    The study investigated the behavioral health of a consecutive sample of 5,641 adult emergency department (ED) patients aged 19 through 60 presenting for medical care in a large, inner-city hospital emergency department. Twenty-three percent met criteria for major depression; average mental health functioning, as measured by the mental health component of the SF-12, was half of a standard deviation lower than in the general population; 15% met criteria for alcohol or drug abuse/dependence in the past year. Comorbidity was high. These behavioral health disorders may complicate treatment and diagnosis of the chief presenting complaint. These findings, coupled with the high rates of these disorders, suggest the importance of screening and either beginning appropriate treatment or offering appropriate referral for such disorders in ED settings. PMID:21086057

  20. Depressive Symptoms and Impaired Physical Function after Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Colantuoni, Elizabeth; Mendez-Tellez, Pedro A.; Dinglas, Victor D.; Shanholtz, Carl; Husain, Nadia; Dennison, Cheryl R.; Herridge, Margaret S.; Pronovost, Peter J.; Needham, Dale M.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale: Survivors of acute lung injury (ALI) frequently have substantial depressive symptoms and physical impairment, but the longitudinal epidemiology of these conditions remains unclear. Objectives: To evaluate the 2-year incidence and duration of depressive symptoms and physical impairment after ALI, as well as risk factors for these conditions. Methods: This prospective, longitudinal cohort study recruited patients from 13 intensive care units (ICUs) in four hospitals, with follow-up 3, 6, 12, and 24 months after ALI. The outcomes were Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale depression score greater than or equal to 8 (“depressive symptoms”) in patients without a history of depression before ALI, and two or more dependencies in instrumental activities of daily living (“impaired physical function”) in patients without baseline impairment. Measurements and Main Results: During 2-year follow-up of 186 ALI survivors, the cumulative incidences of depressive symptoms and impaired physical function were 40 and 66%, respectively, with greatest incidence by 3-month follow-up; modal durations were greater than 21 months for each outcome. Risk factors for incident depressive symptoms were education 12 years or less, baseline disability or unemployment, higher baseline medical comorbidity, and lower blood glucose in the ICU. Risk factors for incident impaired physical function were longer ICU stay and prior depressive symptoms. Conclusions: Incident depressive symptoms and impaired physical function are common and long-lasting during the first 2 years after ALI. Interventions targeting potentially modifiable risk factors (e.g., substantial depressive symptoms in early recovery) should be evaluated to improve ALI survivors’ long-term outcomes. PMID:22161158

  1. Maternal Depressive Symptoms in Pediatric Major Depressive Disorder: Relationship to Acute Treatment Outcome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennard, Betsy D.; Hughes, Jennifer L.; Stewart, Sunita M.; Mayes, Taryn; Nightingale-Teresi, Jeanne; Tao, Rongrong; Carmody, Thomas; Emslie, Graham J.

    2008-01-01

    A study examined maternal depressive symptoms at the beginning and end of acute pediatric treatment of children with major depressive disorder (MDD). Results suggested a direct and possible reciprocal association between maternal and child depression severity.

  2. Evaluating the impact of depression, anxiety & autonomic function on health related quality of life, vocational functioning and health care utilisation in acute coronary syndrome patients: the ADVENT study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Depression and anxiety are highly prevalent and co-morbid in acute coronary syndrome patients. Somatic and cognitive subtypes of depression and anxiety in acute coronary syndrome have been shown to be associated with mortality although their association with patient outcomes is unknown, as are the mechanisms that underpin these associations. We are conducting a prospective cohort study which aims to examine in acute coronary syndrome patients: (1) the role of somatic subtypes of depression and anxiety as predictors of health related quality of life outcomes; (2) how somatic subtypes of depression and anxiety relate to long term vocational functioning and healthcare utilisation; and (3) the role of the autonomic nervous system assessed by heart rate variability as a moderator of these associations. Methods Patients are being screened after index admission for acute coronary syndrome at a single, high volume centre, MonashHeart, Monash Health, Victoria, Australia. The inclusion criterion is all patients aged > 21 years old and fluent in English admitted to MonashHeart, Monash Health with a diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome. The primary outcome is mean health related quality of life (Short Form-36) Physical and Mental Health Summary scores at 12 and 24 months in subtypes with somatic symptoms of depression and anxiety. Depressive domains are assessed by the Beck Depression Inventory II and the Cardiac Depression Scale. Anxiety is measured using the Speilberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and the Crown Crisp Phobic Anxiety questionnaire. Secondary outcomes include clinical variables, healthcare service utilisation and vocational functioning. Discussion This manuscript presents the protocol for a prospective cohort study which will investigate the role of somatic subtypes of depression and anxiety as predictors of health related quality of life, long-term vocational functioning and health service use, and the role of the autonomic nervous system in

  3. Depressive symptoms in schizophrenic patients.

    PubMed

    Gozdzik-Zelazny, A; Borecki, L; Pokorski, M

    2011-12-02

    Distinction between true negative and depressive symptoms in schizophrenia is difficult. In the present study we seek to establish the psychological profile of depression-prone schizophrenic patients. We addressed the issue by comparing the expression of psychological indices, such as the feelings of being in control of events, anxiety, mood, and the style of coping with stress in depressive and non-depressive schizophrenics. We also analyzed the strength of the association of these indices with the presence of depressive symptoms. A total of 49 patients (18 women and 31 men, aged 23-59) were enrolled into the study, consisting of a self-reported psychometric survey. We found that the prevalence of clinically significant depression in schizophrenic patients was 61%. The factors which contributed to the intensification of depressive symptoms were the external locus of control, anxiety, gloomy mood, and the emotion-oriented coping with stress. We conclude that psychological testing may discern those schizophrenic patients who would be at risk of depression development and may help separate the blurred boundaries between depressive and negative symptoms of schizophrenia.

  4. Tele-Interpersonal Psychotherapy Acutely Reduces Depressive Symptoms in Depressed HIV-Infected Rural Persons: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Heckman, Timothy G; Heckman, Bernadette D; Anderson, Timothy; Lovejoy, Travis I; Markowitz, John C; Shen, Ye; Sutton, Mark

    2016-04-26

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive rural individuals carry a 1.3-times greater risk of a depressive diagnosis than their urban counterparts. This randomized clinical trial tested whether telephone-administered interpersonal psychotherapy (tele-IPT) acutely relieved depressive symptoms in 132 HIV-infected rural persons from 28 states diagnosed with Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-IV major depressive disorder (MDD), partially remitted MDD, or dysthymic disorder. Patients were randomized to either 9 sessions of one-on-one tele-IPT (n = 70) or standard care (SC; n = 62). A series of intent-to-treat (ITT), therapy completer, and sensitivity analyses assessed changes in depressive symptoms, interpersonal problems, and social support from pre- to postintervention. Across all analyses, tele-IPT patients reported significantly lower depressive symptoms and interpersonal problems than SC controls; 22% of tele-IPT patients were categorized as a priori "responders" who reported 50% or higher reductions in depressive symptoms compared to only 4% of SC controls in ITT analyses. Brief tele-IPT acutely decreased depressive symptoms and interpersonal problems in depressed rural people living with HIV.

  5. Acute Appendicitis in Patients with Acute Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ki Up; Kim, Jin Kyeung; Won, Jong Ho; Hong, Dae Sik; Park, Hee Sook; Park, Kyeung Kyu

    1993-01-01

    The decision to operate for abdominal pain in patients with leukopenia can be exceedingly difficult. Surgical exploration may be the only effective way to differentiate acute appendicitis from other causes, but it involves considerable risk of infectious complications due to immunesuppression. Leukemic patients, who presented significant RLQ pain, had been indicated for operation, despite having advanced disease or having had received chemotherapy or steroids. Four adult leukemia patients, complicated by acute appendictis, were reviewed. Two patients were in induction chemotherapy, one receiving salvage chemotheapy due to relapse and the other was in conservative treatment. Two patients were acute myelocytic leukemia (AML), one had acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), and the other had aleukemic leukemia. All patients underwent appendectomy and recovered without complication. Our experience supports the theory that the surgical management of appendicitis in acute leukemia is the most effective way, in spite of leukopenia. PMID:8268146

  6. Depression and major depressive disorder in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Takeshi; Kitagawa, Mayumi; Tanaka, Teruaki; Nakagawa, Shin; Koyama, Tsukasa

    2010-01-15

    The prevalence of depression in Parkinson's disease (PD) varies greatly. In this study, we investigated major depressive disorder (MDD) and depressive symptoms without MDD in patients with PD. The psychopathological characteristics of depressive symptoms were assessed by a psychiatric interview. A total of 105 Japanese patients with PD without dementia were included. The Japanese version of the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) with a cutoff score of 13/14 was used to screen for depression. Using a structured interview, a comprehensive psychiatric evaluation of patients with BDI-II scores >13 (high BDI patients) was completed using the criteria of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM)-IV-TR. Forty patients (38%) had a BDI-II >13, but 29 did not show any depressed mood. Five cases met the criteria for MDD (three current, two past) and one patient was diagnosed with minor depressive disorder. A slight depressed mood that was associated with worrying about PD was seen in 6 of 34 patients without any depressive disorder and fluctuated with aggravation of PD symptoms in two of these patients. For the diagnosis of MDD, the number of positive items from the DSM-IV-TR definition of MDD is most important and useful for differentiating MDD and non-MDD. The low-prevalence rate of MDD in our patient population suggests that PD may be a psychological stressor for MDD, but does not necessarily induce MDD.

  7. Prevention of poststroke depression with milnacipran in patients with acute ischemic stroke: a double-blind randomized placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ching-Shu; Wu, Chen-Long; Chou, Shih-Yong; Tsang, Hin-Yeung; Hung, Tai-Hsin; Su, Jian-An

    2011-09-01

    Poststroke depression (PSD) is one of the most frequent neuropsychiatric consequences of stroke. It has been shown to be associated with both impaired recovery and increased mortality. The purpose of this study is to investigate the prophylactic effect of milnacipran in PSD. Ninety-two patients were enrolled in the 12 months of this double-blind randomized placebo-controlled trial. The assessment was performed at baseline, and at the first, third, sixth, ninth and 12th month after enrollment. The definition of PSD was in accordance with the diagnostic criteria of major depressive episode based on the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual, fourth edition. Forty-six patients were randomized to the treatment group with milnacipran and another 46 patients to the placebo group. No significant differences were found between the two groups in terms of sex (P=0.83), age (P=0.08), marital status (P=0.66), occupation (P=0.22), educational level (P=0.29), and drug side-effects (P=0.73). The incidence of depression in the two groups was 2.22% and 15.22%, respectively. Milnacipran was proved to have a statistically significant advantage in preventing PSD (P<0.05). In conclusion, milnacipran could prevent the development of depression in the first year following a stroke and is safe to use without significant adverse effects in stroke patients.

  8. Depression Often Untreated in Dialysis Patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163270.html Depression Often Untreated in Dialysis Patients Sometimes it's the ... 26, 2017 THURSDAY, Jan. 26, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Depression is common among kidney failure patients undergoing dialysis. ...

  9. Validity of Sudden Gains in Acute Phase Treatment of Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vittengl, Jeffrey R.; Clark, Lee Anna; Jarrett, Robin B.

    2005-01-01

    The authors examined the validity of sudden gains identified with T. Z. Tang and R. J. DeRubeis's (1999) method in 2 clinical data sets that involved treatment of major depressive disorder (N=227). Sudden gains replicated among self- and clinician reports of depressive symptoms and predicted better psychosocial functioning at the acute phase…

  10. Social support resources and post-acute recovery for older adults with major depression.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong; Morrow-Howell, Nancy; Proctor, Enola; Rubin, Eugene

    2013-08-01

    This study assessed the relationships between older patients' social support resources and depressive symptoms and psychosocial functioning at 6 months following a psychiatric hospital discharge. The data used in this study were extracted from a prospective study titled "Service Use of Depressed Elders after Acute Care" (National Institute of Mental Health-56208). This sample included 148 older patients who participated in the initial and the 6-month follow-up assessment. Ordinary Least Squares regression (OLS) was used to examine important social support resources in relation to older patients' depressive symptoms and psychosocial functioning. A vast majority of patients were embedded in a social support network that consisted of acquaintances and confidants. Patients' depressive symptoms were related to availability of a confidant and the extent to which they spent time with others. However, patients' psychosocial functioning was not related to social support resources assessed in this study.

  11. Predictors of Longitudinal Outcomes after Unstable Response to Acute Phase Cognitive Therapy for Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Vittengl, Jeffrey R.; Clark, Lee Anna; Thase, Michael E.; Jarrett, Robin B.

    2015-01-01

    After patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) respond to acute-phase cognitive therapy (CT), continuation-phase treatments may be applied to improve long-term outcomes. We clarified which CT responders experience remission, recovery, relapse, and recurrence by testing baseline demographic, clinical, and personality variables. The sample of CT responders at higher risk of relapse (N = 241) was randomized to 8 months of continuation-phase CT (C-CT), double-blinded fluoxetine or pill placebo, and followed 24 months (Jarrett & Thase, 2010). Patients with lower positive emotionality and behavioral activation at the end of acute-phase CT showed increased risk for relapse/recurrence of MDD. In addition, patients with lower positive emotionality and behavioral activation, as well as higher residual depression (including emotional, cognitive, and social facets), showed decreased probability of remission (≥6 continuous weeks of minimal or absent symptoms) after acute-phase CT. Finally, patients with greater residual depression, as well as younger age and earlier MDD onset, showed decreased probability of recovery (≥35 continuous weeks of minimal or absent symptoms) after acute-phase CT. Moderator analyses did not reveal differential prediction across the continuation phase treatment arms. These results may help clinicians gauge the prognoses and need for continuation treatment among MDD patients who respond to acute-phase CT. PMID:25985046

  12. Serotonergic genes and depressive disorder in acute coronary syndrome: The Korean depression in ACS (K-DEPACS) study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Min; Stewart, Robert; Kang, Hee-Ju; Bae, Kyung-Yeol; Kim, Sung-Wan; Shin, Il-Seon; Hong, Young Joon; Ahn, Youngkeun; Jeong, Myung Ho; Park, Sung-Woo; Kim, Young-Hoon; Yoon, Jin-Sang

    2015-06-01

    Genes coding for the serotonergic pathway have been associated with depressive disorders. However, these associations have rarely been tested in acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients vulnerable to depression. This study aimed to investigate whether polymorphisms of serotonin transporter (5-HTT) and serotonin 2a receptor (5-HTR2a) genes are associated with occurrence of depressive disorder in ACS. 969 patients with recently developed ACS were recruited at baseline, and 711 were followed 1 year thereafter. Depressive disorder was diagnosed according to DSM-IV criteria, and analysed as an outcome at baseline (prevalence), and follow up (incidence and persistence). Genotypes were ascertained for 5-HTTLPR, STin2 VNTR, 5-HTR2a 102T/C, and 5-HTR2a 1438A/G. Logistic regression models were used to investigate associations. The 5-HTTLPR s/s genotype was independently associated with depressive disorder prevalence and persistence following ACS, but no significant associations were found with the other polymorphisms. ACS patients with the 5-HTTLPR s allele are thus potentially susceptible to depressive disorder in the early phase after ACS, and with its persistence over the subsequent year.

  13. Interactive associations of depression and sleep apnea with adverse clinical outcomes after acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Hayano, Junichiro; Carney, Robert M.; Watanabe, Eiichi; Kawai, Kiyohiro; Kodama, Itsuo; Stein, Phyllis K.; Watkins, Lana L.; Freedland, Kenneth E.; Blumenthal, James A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Depression and sleep apnea (SA) are common among patients after acute myocardial infarction (AMI), and both are associated with increased risk for adverse outcomes. We tested the hypothesis that there is an interaction between depression and SA in relation to prognosis in post-AMI patients. Methods Participants were 337 depressed and 379 nondepressed post-AMI patients who participated in a substudy of the Enhancing Recovery in Coronary Heart Disease (ENRICHD) clinical trial. SA was identified from Holter ECG at the entry by an algorithm that detects cyclic variation of heart rate. Results During a median follow-up of 25 months, 43 (6.0%) of patients died and 83 (11.6%) either died or experienced a recurrent AMI. Among 94 patients with both depression and SA, these endpoints occurred in 20 (21.3%) and 25 (26.6%), the prevalence that was 6.9 and 3.9 times higher than predicted probabilities by ENRICHD clinical risk scores (P <.001 for both). In the patients with depression alone, SA alone, or neither, the frequencies did not differ significantly from the predicted probability. Although both depression and SA predicted death and the combined endpoint, we observed depression by SA interactions (P = .03 and .02). SA independently predicted these endpoints in depressed (P <.001 and P = .001), but not in nondepressed patients (P = .73 and .84). Similarly, depression independently predicted these endpoints in SA (P <.001 for both), but not in non-SA patients (P = .61 and .12). Conclusion The combination of depression and SA estimated by CVHR is associated with long-term adverse clinical outcomes after AMI. PMID:23023681

  14. Depressive Symptoms Are Associated with Mental Stress-Induced Myocardial Ischemia after Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Jingkai; Pimple, Pratik; Shah, Amit J.; Rooks, Cherie; Bremner, J. Douglas; Nye, Jonathon A.; Ibeanu, Ijeoma; Murrah, Nancy; Shallenberger, Lucy; Raggi, Paolo; Vaccarino, Viola

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Depression is an adverse prognostic factor after an acute myocardial infarction (MI), and an increased propensity toward emotionally-driven myocardial ischemia may play a role. We aimed to examine the association between depressive symptoms and mental stress-induced myocardial ischemia in young survivors of an MI. Methods We studied 98 patients (49 women and 49 men) age 38–60 years who were hospitalized for acute MI in the previous 6 months. Patients underwent myocardial perfusion imaging at rest, after mental stress (speech task), and after exercise or pharmacological stress. A summed difference score (SDS), obtained with observer-independent software, was used to quantify myocardial ischemia under both stress conditions. The Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) was used to measure depressive symptoms, which were analyzed as overall score, and as separate somatic and cognitive depressive symptom scores. Results There was a significant positive association between depressive symptoms and SDS with mental stress, denoting more ischemia. After adjustment for demographic and lifestyle factors, disease severity and medications, each incremental depressive symptom was associated with 0.14 points higher SDS. When somatic and cognitive depressive symptoms were examined separately, both somatic [β = 0.17, 95% CI: (0.04, 0.30), p = 0.01] and cognitive symptoms [β = 0.31, 95% CI: (0.07, 0.56), p = 0.01] were significantly associated with mental stress-induced ischemia. Depressive symptoms were not associated with ischemia induced by exercise or pharmacological stress. Conclusion Among young post-MI patients, higher levels of both cognitive and somatic depressive symptoms are associated with a higher propensity to develop myocardial ischemia with mental stress, but not with physical (exercise or pharmacological) stress. PMID:25061993

  15. Characterising acute coronary syndrome-associated depression: Let the data speak.

    PubMed

    Vollmer-Conna, Uté; Cvejic, Erin; Granville Smith, Isabelle; Hadzi-Pavlovic, Dusan; Parker, Gordon

    2015-08-01

    Depression in the context of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is understood to confer increased morbidity and mortality risk. The pathophysiological mechanisms underlying this association remain poorly understood, although several candidates including inflammation, cardiac autonomic dysregulation, and behavioural factors are viewed as of key importance. No single bio-behavioural explanatory model of ACS-associated depression has emerged, likely due the substantial heterogeneity across both conditions. We studied 344 patients with ACS; 45 fulfilled diagnostic (DSM-IV) criteria for a major depressive episode occurring within 1-month of ACS, and 13 had ongoing major depression that pre-dated ACS and continued through to 1 month post-ACS. We employed two statistical methods (multinomial logistic regression; and latent class analysis) and a range of immunological, autonomic and nutritional markers in an attempt to characterise a biological basis for ACS-associated depression. Regression modelling failed to accurately predict categorical group membership of ACS-associated depression. An alternative data-driven approach produced a three-class solution, with the derived classes differing on measure of C-reactive protein, vitamin D, omega-6:omega-3 ratio, heart rate variability, and age (all p⩽0.004). The majority of participants with ACS-associated and ongoing depression were members of the class characterised by the greatest biological disturbance. Patients with depression differed from those without depression on a range of psychological trait and state variables; additionally reporting poorer sleep quality, higher levels of social isolation, and functional impairment, but had similar biological profiles. Patients with ongoing depression generally had higher scores on these psychological/behavioural measures. Our novel analytic approach identified a combination of biomarkers suggestive of a role for immune, autonomic, and nutritional pathways in the manifestation of

  16. Understanding Heroin Overdose: A Study of the Acute Respiratory Depressant Effects of Injected Pharmaceutical Heroin.

    PubMed

    Jolley, Caroline J; Bell, James; Rafferty, Gerrard F; Moxham, John; Strang, John

    2015-01-01

    Opioids are respiratory depressants and heroin/opioid overdose is a major contributor to the excess mortality of heroin addicts. The individual and situational variability of respiratory depression caused by intravenous heroin is poorly understood. This study used advanced respiratory monitoring to follow the time course and severity of acute opioid-induced respiratory depression. 10 patients (9/10 with chronic airflow obstruction) undergoing supervised injectable opioid treatment for heroin addiction received their usual prescribed dose of injectable opioid (diamorphine or methadone) (IOT), and their usual prescribed dose of oral opioid (methadone or sustained release oral morphine) after 30 minutes. The main outcome measures were pulse oximetry (SpO2%), end-tidal CO2% (ETCO2%) and neural respiratory drive (NRD) (quantified using parasternal intercostal muscle electromyography). Significant respiratory depression was defined as absence of inspiratory airflow >10s, SpO2% < 90% for >10s and ETCO2% per breath >6.5%. Increases in ETCO2% indicated significant respiratory depression following IOT in 8/10 patients at 30 minutes. In contrast, SpO2% indicated significant respiratory depression in only 4/10 patients, with small absolute changes in SpO2% at 30 minutes. A decline in NRD from baseline to 30 minutes post IOT was also observed, but was not statistically significant. Baseline NRD and opioid-induced drop in SpO2% were inversely related. We conclude that significant acute respiratory depression is commonly induced by opioid drugs prescribed to treat opioid addiction. Hypoventilation is reliably detected by capnography, but not by SpO2% alone. Chronic suppression of NRD in the presence of underlying lung disease may be a risk factor for acute opioid-induced respiratory depression.

  17. Cognitive Modification in Depressed, Suicidal Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck, Aaron T.

    The author describes his "Target Approach" to counseling depressed and/or suicidal patients. By tailoring a technique to selected characteristics ("targets") of the depression as well as to the personality of the patient, more effective counseling is achieved. This target approach involves 3 steps: (1) breaking the problem of…

  18. Screening for Depression Patients in Family Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Alic, Alma; Pranjic, Nurka; Selmanovic, Senada; Alibasic, Esad; Alic, Fahrudin; Ramic, Enisa; Spahic-Sarajlic, Selvedina

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Goal: The aims are to establish the prevalence of newfound, unidentified cases of depressive disorder by screening with the Becks Depression scale; To establish a comparative relationship with self-identified cases of depression in the patients in the family medicine; To assess the significance of the BDI in screening practice of family medicine. Patients and methods: A prospective study was conducted anonymously by Beck's Depression scale (Beck Depression Questionnaire org.-BDI) and specially created short questionnaire. The study included 250 randomly selected patients (20-60 years), users of services in family medicine in “Dom Zdravlja” Zenica, and the final number of respondents with included in the study was 126 (51 male, 75 female; response or response rate 50.4%). Exclusion factor was previously diagnosed and treated mental disorder. Participation was voluntary and respondents acknowledge the validity of completing the questionnaire. BDI consists of 21 items. Answers to questions about symptoms were ranked according to the Likert type scale responses from 0-4 (from irrelevant to very much). Respondents expressed themselves on personal perception of depression, whether are or not depressed. Results: Depression was observed in 48% of patients compared to 31% in self estimate depression analyzed the questionnaires. The negative trend in the misrecognition of depression is -17% (48:31). Depression was significantly more frequent in unemployed compared to employed respondents (p=0.001). The leading symptom in both sexes is the perception of lost hope (59% of cases). Conclusion: All respondents in family medicine care in Zenica showed a high percentage of newly detected (17%) patients with previously unrecognized depression. BDI is a really simple and effective screening tool for the detection and identification of persons with symptoms of depression. PMID:24783910

  19. Cortisol response to acute stress in asthma: Moderation by depressive mood.

    PubMed

    Trueba, Ana F; Simon, Erica; Auchus, Richard J; Ritz, Thomas

    2016-05-15

    Both individuals with asthma and depression show signs of a dysregulated hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis. However, little is known about the cortisol response to stress in the context of co-occurring asthma and depressive mood. Thirty-nine individuals with asthma and 41 healthy controls underwent a combined speech and mental arithmetic stressor. During the course of the laboratory session, salivary cortisol was collected 5 times, with 1 sample at 0min before the stressor and 4 samples at 0, 15, 30 and 45min after the stressor. Depressive mood in the past week was assessed with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale at the beginning of the session. Depressive symptoms moderated cortisol response to the acute stressor, but only among asthmatic patients. Higher depressive mood was associated with a significant increase in cortisol, whereas low depressive mood was associated with no cortisol response. In healthy participants, depressive mood had no substantial effect on cortisol response to the stressor. These findings suggest that depressive mood and chronic inflammatory diseases such as asthma can interact to augment cortisol response to stress.

  20. The Day-to-Day Acute Effect of Wake Therapy in Patients with Major Depression Using the HAM-D6 as Primary Outcome Measure: Results from a Randomised Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Martiny, Klaus; Refsgaard, Else; Lund, Vibeke; Lunde, Marianne; Sørensen, Lene; Thougaard, Britta; Lindberg, Lone; Bech, Per

    2013-01-01

    Background This paper reports day-to-day data for from a one-week intervention phase, part of a 9-weeks randomised parallel study with patient having major depression (data from weekly visits have been reported). Wake therapy (sleep deprivation) has an established antidepressant effect with onset of action within hours. Deterioration on the following night’s sleep is, however, common, and we used daily light therapy and sleep time stabilisation as a preventive measure. In particular, we evaluated the day-to-day acute effect of and tolerance to sleep deprivation and examined predictors of response. Methods Patients were assessed at psychiatric inpatient wards. In the wake group (n = 36), patients did three wake therapies in combination with light therapy each morning together with sleep time stabilisation. In the exercise group (n = 38), patients did daily exercise. Hamilton subscale scores were primary outcome (not blinded), secondary outcome was self-assessment data from the Preskorn scale and sleep. Results Patients in the wake therapy group had an immediate, large, stable, and statistically significant better antidepressant effect than patients in the exercise group with response rates at day5 of 75.0%/25.1% and remission rates of 58.6%/6.0%, respectively. The response and remission rates were diminished at day8 with response rates of 41.9%/10.1% and remission rates of 19.4%/4.7%, respectively. Patients and ward personnel found the method applicable with few side effects. Positive diurnal variation (mood better in the evening) predicted a larger response to wake therapy. In the wake group napping on days after intervention predicted greater deterioration on day8. Conclusions The intervention induced an acute antidepressant response without relapse between wake nights but with a diminishing effect after intervention. Development is still needed to secure maintenance of response. Avoiding napping in the days after wake therapy is important. Trial

  1. Effect of Tianeptine on Depressed Tinnitus Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Soo Min; Lim, Sae Hee; Oh, Dong Ju; Kim, Sung Kyun; Jung, Hak Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Tianeptine is a tricyclic antidepressant that has a novel pharmacological property: it increases the reuptake of 5-hydroxytryptamine. Recent studies have reported that the prevalence of depression is greater in patients with tinnitus than in control subjects who do not have tinnitus. The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy of tianeptine for the relief of tinnitus, especially in patients with depressive mood. Subjects and Methods Among a total of 52 tinnitus patients, 15 had depressive mood. The depressed tinnitus patients were prescribed Stablon® 12.5 mg once daily for 1 month without any other drug. We assessed the severity of tinnitus, level of depression, and the quality of sleep in these patients by using the Tinnitus Handicap Inventory (THI), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). Hearing impairment and severity of tinnitus were measured with pure tone audiometry, speech audiometry, and tinnitograms. These evaluations were conducted before and after medication treatment. Results For the 15 depressed tinnitus patients, THI scores significantly correlated with BDI and PSQI scores prior to medication treatment. These results showed that the discomfort of tinnitus was closely related to depression and sleep disorder. After medication treatment, THI and BDI scores significantly decreased, indicating that tinnitus and depression improved. However, no significant alteration in PSQI score was observed, indicating that there was no improvement in sleep quality. Conclusions In the treatment of depressed tinnitus patients, tianeptine might be an efficient drug to treat both tinnitus and depression. However, tianeptine is unlikely to improve the quality of sleep in these patients. PMID:27626082

  2. Usefulness of the QRS-T angle to improve long-term risk stratification of patients with acute myocardial infarction and depressed left ventricular ejection fraction.

    PubMed

    Raposeiras-Roubín, Sergio; Virgós-Lamela, Alejandro; Bouzas-Cruz, Noelia; López-López, Andrea; Castiñeira-Busto, María; Fernández-Garda, Rita; García-Castelo, Alberto; Rodríguez-Mañero, Moisés; García-Acuña, José María; Abu-Assi, Emad; González-Juanatey, José Ramón

    2014-04-15

    In light of the low cost, the widespread availability of the electrocardiogram, and the increasing economic burden of the health-related problems, we aimed to analyze the prognostic value of automatic frontal QRS-T angle to predict mortality in patients with left ventricular (LV) systolic dysfunction after acute myocardial infarction (AMI). About 467 consecutive patients discharged with diagnosis of AMI and with LV ejection fraction ≤40% were followed during 3.9 years (2.1 to 5.9). From them, 217 patients (47.5%) died. The frontal QRS-T angle was higher in patients who died (116.6±52.8 vs 77.9±55.1, respectively, p<0.001). The QRS-T angle value of 90° was the most accurate to predict all-cause cardiac death. After multivariate analysis, frontal QRS-T angle remained as an excellent predictor of all-cause and cardiac deaths, increasing the mortality 6% per each 10°. For the global mortality, the hazard ratio for a QRS-T angle>90° was 2.180 (1.558 to 3.050), and for the combined end point of cardiac death and appropriate implantable cardioverter defribrillator therapy, it was 2.385 (1.570 to 3.623). This independent predictive value was maintained even after adjusting by bundle brunch block, ST-elevation AMI, and its localization. In conclusion, a wide automatic frontal QRS-T angle (>90°) is a good discriminator of long-term mortality in patients with LV systolic dysfunction after an AMI. The ability to easily measure it from a standard 12-lead electrocardiogram together with its prognostic value makes the frontal QRS-T angle an attractive tool to help clinicians to improve risk stratification of those patients.

  3. Depression and its treatment in cardiac patients.

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, F

    1993-01-01

    In general medical-surgical hospital services, depression is the most common reason for seeking psychiatric consultation in behalf of patients with cardiovascular disease. The nontreatment of depression or the use of a psychotropic agent mismatched to a patient's particular cardiac condition or individual sensitivities has considerable negative impact. Therefore, a systematic approach should be used in the differential diagnosis of depression in cardiac patients, to eliminate other psychiatric disorders and to assure the correct treatment strategy. Physicians can develop an appropriate rationale for the use of a psychopharmacologic regimen in cardiovascular settings through recognition of the diagnostic criteria for depression and through comprehensive knowledge of the pharmacologic properties and possible cardiovascular effects of these vital treatments. Standard and alternative pharmacotherapies for depression in cardiac patients are reviewed. PMID:8219822

  4. Management of depression in elderly stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Lökk, Johan; Delbari, Ahmad

    2010-01-01

    Poststroke depression (PSD) in elderly patients has been considered the most common neuropsychiatric consequence of stroke up to 6–24 months after stroke onset. When depression appears within days after stroke onset, it is likely to remit, whereas depression at 3 months is likely to be sustained for 1 year. One of the major problems posed by elderly stroke patients is how to identify and optimally manage PSD. This review provides insight to identification and management of depression in elderly stroke patients. Depression following stroke is less likely to include dysphoria and more likely characterized by vegetative signs and symptoms compared with other forms of late-life depression, and clinicians should rely more on nonsomatic symptoms rather than somatic symptoms. Evaluation and diagnosis of depression among elderly stroke patients are more complex due to vague symptoms of depression, overlapping signs and symptoms of stroke and depression, lack of properly trained health care personnel, and insufficient assessment tools for proper diagnosis. Major goals of treatment are to reduce depressive symptoms, improve mood and quality of life, and reduce the risk of medical complications including relapse. Antidepressants (ADs) are generally not indicated in mild forms because the balance of benefit and risk is not satisfactory in elderly stroke patients. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are the first choice of PSD treatment in elderly patients due to their lower potential for drug interaction and side effects, which are more common with tricyclic ADs. Recently, stimulant medications have emerged as promising new therapeutic interventions for PSD and are now the subject of rigorous clinical trials. Cognitive behavioral therapy can also be useful, and electroconvulsive therapy is available for patients with severe refractory PSD. PMID:20856917

  5. Quetiapine reduces irritability and risk of suicide in patients with agitated depression.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Akiyoshi; Matsumoto, Hideo

    2013-07-20

    Patients who suffer from agitated depression accompanied by psychomotor agitation and irritability are prone to suicidal ideation and attempts and must therefore be diagnosed and treated with utmost care. Clinically, there have been more than a few cases of suicidal attempts that seemed to have been provoked by careless prescription of antidepressant medication. In the present study, administration of quetiapine to 3 patients in the acute phase of agitated depression resulted in rapid improvement in irritability and alleviation of depression. Depression in these 3 patients was caused by chronic (persistent) anxiety and tension. During the acute phase, the patients evidenced psychomotor agitation and irritability, often experiencing a sudden, overwhelming urge to commit suicide. Findings from the present study suggest that treatment with quetiapine in patients with this type of agitated depression can quickly alleviate symptoms of anxiety and irritability and reduce the risk of suicide.

  6. Electroconvulsive therapy for depression following acute coronary syndromes: a concern for the anesthesiologist.

    PubMed

    Pourafkari, Nosratollah; Pourafkari, Leili; Nader, Nader D

    2016-06-01

    The prevalence of depression in patients with cardiovascular disease is higher than general population and especially following an acute coronary syndrome (ACS), a significant number of patients report a wide spectrum of behavioral and mood changes attributable to clinical depression. Treatment of depression following ACS event is particularly challenging since most of the therapeutic modalities are associated with increasing the systemic sympathetic tone from neurogenic or pharmacologic sources. Increased activity of the adrenergic and catecholamine activity may further deter the myocardial oxygen supply and demand therefore treating depression should be carefully evaluated for its risk benefit ratio. Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is recommended for patients with severe depression, in whom behavioral and pharmacologic treatments have failed. Patients who refuse to take medications or present with any psychological emergency such as harming self or others, are also candidates for ECT. ECT is also associated with sudden surges of catecholamines and may cause recurrent myocardial ischemia and fatal dysrhythmias in patients convalescing from an ACS event. Herein, we provide an overview and practical guidelines for management of patients presented for ECT following ACS.

  7. Anterior ST depression with acute transmural inferior infarction due to posterior infarction. A vectorcardiographic and scintigraphic study

    SciTech Connect

    Mukharji, J.; Murray, S.; Lewis, S.E.; Croft, C.H.; Corbett, J.R.; Willerson, J.T.; Rude, R.E.

    1984-07-01

    The hypothesis that anterior ST segment depression represents concomitant posterior infarction was tested in 49 patients admitted with a first transmural inferior myocardial infarction. Anterior ST depression was defined as 0.1 mV or more ST depression in leads V1, V2 or V3 on an electrocardiogram recorded within 18 hours of infarction. Serial vectorcardiograms and technetium pyrophosphate scans were obtained. Eighty percent of the patients (39 of 49) had anterior ST depression. Of these 39 patients, 34% fulfilled vectorcardiographic criteria for posterior infarction, and 60% had pyrophosphate scanning evidence of posterior infarction. Early anterior ST depression was neither highly sensitive (84%) nor specific (20%) for the detection of posterior infarction as defined by pyrophosphate imaging. Of patients with persistent anterior ST depression (greater than 72 hours), 87% had posterior infarction detected by pyrophosphate scan. In patients with inferior myocardial infarction, vectorcardiographic evidence of posterior infarction correlated poorly with pyrophosphate imaging data. Right ventricular infarction was present on pyrophosphate imaging in 40% of patients with pyrophosphate changes of posterior infarction but without vectorcardiographic evidence of posterior infarction. It is concluded that: 1) the majority of patients with acute inferior myocardial infarction have anterior ST segment depression; 2) early anterior ST segment depression in such patients is not a specific marker for posterior infarction; and 3) standard vectorcardiographic criteria for transmural posterior infarction may be inaccurate in patients with concomitant transmural inferior myocardial infarction or right ventricular infarction, or both.

  8. Mood disturbance and depression in Arab women following hospitalisation from acute cardiac conditions: a cross-sectional study from Qatar

    PubMed Central

    Donnelly, Tam Truong; Al Suwaidi, Jassim Mohd; Al-Qahtani, Awad; Asaad, Nidal; Fung, Tak; Singh, Rajvir; Qader, Najlaa Abdul

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Depression is associated with increased morbidity and mortality rates among cardiovascular patients. Depressed patients have three times higher risk of death than those who are not. We sought to determine the presence of depressive symptoms, and whether gender and age are associated with depression among Arab patients hospitalised with cardiac conditions in a Middle Eastern country. Setting Using a non-probability convenient sampling technique, a cross-sectional survey was conducted with 1000 Arab patients ≥20 years who were admitted to cardiology units between 2013 and 2014 at the Heart Hospital in Qatar. Patients were interviewed 3 days after admission following the cardiac event. Surveys included demographic and clinical characteristics, and the Arabic version of the Beck Depression Inventory Second Edition (BDI-II). Depression was assessed by BDI-II clinical classification scale. Results 15% of the patients had mild mood disturbance and 5% had symptoms of clinical depression. Twice as many females than males suffered from mild mood disturbance and clinical depression symptoms, the majority of females were in the age group 50 years and above, whereas males were in the age group 40–49 years. χ2 Tests and multivariate logistic regression analyses indicated that gender and age were statistically significantly related to depression (p<0.001 for all). Conclusions Older Arab women are more likely to develop mood disturbance and depression after being hospitalised with acute cardiac condition. Gender and age differences approach, and routine screening for depression should be conducted with all cardiovascular patients, especially for females in the older age groups. Mental health counselling should be available for all cardiovascular patients who exhibit depressive symptoms. PMID:27388362

  9. Depressive rumination and cognitive processes associated with depression in breast cancer patients and their spouses.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Jennifer L; Wagner, Christina D; Bigatti, Silvia M; Storniolo, Anna Maria

    2014-12-01

    Depression is common among patients with breast cancer (BC) and their spouses. The diagnosis of BC often results in negative cognitive processes, such as appraisals of harm/loss, intrusive thoughts, and depressive rumination, all of which contribute to the occurrence of depression in both the patient and spouse. The present research is a cross-sectional exploration of the mediating role of depressive rumination in the relationships of intrusive thoughts and appraisal of harm/loss with depression, in a sample of 56 BC patients and their partners. We hypothesized that depressive rumination would mediate the relationships between cognitive processes and depression in both BC patient and their partners. Participants completed self-report measures of depressive symptoms, depressive rumination, cognitive appraisals, and intrusive thoughts. Path analyses using hierarchical linear regression were conducted to assess the relationships among variables. Results indicated that for BC patients, harm/loss appraisals and intrusive thoughts had direct effects on depression; only harm/loss appraisals had indirect effects through depressive rumination. For partners, both harm/loss appraisal and intrusive thoughts had direct effects on depression, and both had indirect effects through depressive rumination. Dyadic analysis showed no relation of partner cognitive variables with patient depression or patient cognitive variables with partner depression. Findings show that the perseverative practice of dwelling on these negative thoughts of loss and harm relates to depressive symptoms. Rumination may act as 1 possible mechanism by which intrusive thoughts and harm/loss appraisals lead to depressive symptoms.

  10. Psychomotor Retardation in Elderly Untreated Depressed Patients

    PubMed Central

    Beheydt, Lieve Lia; Schrijvers, Didier; Docx, Lise; Bouckaert, Filip; Hulstijn, Wouter; Sabbe, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Background: Psychomotor retardation (PR) is one of the core features in depression according to DSM V (1), but also aging in itself causes cognitive and psychomotor slowing. This is the first study investigating PR in relation to cognitive functioning and to the concomitant effect of depression and aging in a geriatric population ruling out contending effects of psychotropic medication. Methods: A group of 28 non-demented depressed elderly is compared to a matched control group of 20 healthy elderly. All participants underwent a test battery containing clinical depression measures, cognitive measures of processing speed, executive function and memory, clinical ratings of PR, and objective computerized fine motor skill-tests. Statistical analysis consisted of a General Linear Method multivariate analysis of variance to compare the clinical, cognitive, and psychomotor outcomes of the two groups. Results: Patients performed worse on all clinical, cognitive, and PR measures. Both groups showed an effect of cognitive load on fine motor function but the influence was significantly larger for patients than for healthy elderly except for the initiation time. Limitations: Due to the restrictive inclusion criteria, only a relatively limited sample size could be obtained. Conclusion: With a medication free sample, an additive effect of depression and aging on cognition and PR in geriatric patients was found. As this effect was independent of demand of effort (by varying the cognitive load), it was apparently not a motivational slowing effect of depression. PMID:25674065

  11. Extreme Response Style in Recurrent and Chronically Depressed Patients: Change with Antidepressant Administration and Stability during Continuation Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Timothy J.; Feldman, Greg; Harley, Rebecca; Fresco, David M.; Graves, Lesley; Holmes, Avram; Bogdan, Ryan; Papakostas, George I.; Bohn, Laurie; Lury, R. Alana; Fava, Maurizio; Segal, Zindel V.

    2007-01-01

    The authors examined extreme response style in recurrently and chronically depressed patients, assessing its role in therapeutic outcome. During the acute phase, outpatients with major depressive disorder (N = 384) were treated with fluoxetine for 8 weeks. Remitted patients (n = 132) entered a continuation phase during which their fluoxetine dose…

  12. Cortisol reaction in success and failure condition in endogenous depressed patients and controls.

    PubMed

    Croes, S; Merz, P; Netter, P

    1993-01-01

    The authors studied differences in cortisol response to controllable and uncontrollable stress and its relationship to Seligman's theory of learned helplessness in hospitalized unipolar depressed patients (11 nontreated, acutely depressed; 11 treated patients) and 11 age and sex matched controls hospitalized for traumatic surgery. Control and lack of control were achieved by induction of success and failure in a simple number addition test and applied in balanced order on 2 consecutive days. Saliva cortisol samples were collected before and after the test. No group differences in baseline cortisol levels were observed. Cortisol increased after uncontrollable and decreased after controllable stress in control patients, whereas cortisol decreased after both conditions in the acutely depressed group and less so in the treated group, although they were as emotionally upset after failure as controls. Thus, the normally observed ability of the neuroendocrine system to discriminate between controllable and uncontrollable stress deteriorates with increasing severity of depression.

  13. Scurvy in a patient with depression.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chen-Wang; Chen, Ming-Jen; Wang, Tsang-En; Chang, Wen-Hsiung; Lin, Ching-Chung; Liu, Chia-Yuan

    2007-05-01

    Scurvy is a nearly-forgotten disease in developed countries where adequate nutrition is easily available. It still may occur, however, when, for a variety of reasons, people fail to eat a diet containing adequate vitamin C. We report the case of a 52-year-old patient with depression who developed scurvy.

  14. [Myocardial depression in the burn patient].

    PubMed

    Carrillo-Esper, Raúl; Sánchez-Zúñiga, Martín de Jesús

    2006-01-01

    Myocardial depression and heart failure are frequent complications in critically ill burn patients. The physiopathology is complex and involves the activation of inflammatory pathways, ischemia-reperfusion, oxidative stress and endothelial lesion. Diagnosis should be made early by means of hemodynamic monitoring. Treatment is accomplished by inotropics that act on different pathways of the contractile function and immune response associated with antioxidants and allopurinol.

  15. Relationship between religiosity and psychopathology in patients with depression

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Swapnil; Avasthi, Ajit; Kumar, Suresh

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To compare the psychopathology between depressed patients with low religiosity and those with high religiosity and to correlate the level of religiosity with the psychopathology in the psychiatric clinic of a general hospital in Chandigarh, North India. Materials and Methods: Thirty depressed patients with low religiosity and 30 patients with high religiosity were assessed on the Religiosity Scale, Beck Depression Inventory, Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, Beck Hopelessness Scale and Suicidal Intent Questionnaire. Results: In the patients with depression, hopelessness and suicidal intent correlated negatively with the level of religiosity. Conclusion: In depressed patients, hopelessness and suicidal intent are inversely related to the level of religiosity. PMID:22303042

  16. Adjunctive agomelatine therapy in the treatment of acute bipolar II depression: a preliminary open label study

    PubMed Central

    Fornaro, Michele; McCarthy, Michael J; De Berardis, Domenico; De Pasquale, Concetta; Tabaton, Massimo; Martino, Matteo; Colicchio, Salvatore; Cattaneo, Carlo Ignazio; D’Angelo, Emanuela; Fornaro, Pantaleo

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The circadian rhythm hypothesis of bipolar disorder (BD) suggests a role for melatonin in regulating mood, thus extending the interest toward the melatonergic antidepressant agomelatine as well as type I (acute) or II cases of bipolar depression. Patients and methods Twenty-eight depressed BD-II patients received open label agomelatine (25 mg/bedtime) for 6 consecutive weeks as an adjunct to treatment with lithium or valproate, followed by an optional treatment extension of 30 weeks. Measures included the Hamilton depression scale, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, the Clinical Global Impression Scale–Bipolar Version, Young Mania Rating Scale, and body mass index. Results Intent to treat analysis results demonstrated that 18 of the 28 subjects (64%) showed medication response after 6 weeks (primary study endpoint), while 24 of the 28 subjects (86%) responded by 36 weeks. When examining primary mood stabilizer treatment, 12 of the 17 (70.6%) valproate and six of the 11 (54.5%) lithium patients responded by the first endpoint. At 36 weeks, 14 valproate treated (82.4%) and 10 lithium treated (90.9%) subjects responded. At 36 weeks, there was a slight yet statistically significant (P = 0.001) reduction in body mass index and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index scores compared to respective baseline values, regardless of mood stabilizer/outcome. Treatment related drop-out cases included four patients (14.28%) at week 6 two valproate-treated subjects with pseudo-vertigo and drug-induced hypomania, respectively, and two lithium-treated subjects with insomnia and mania, respectively. Week 36 drop outs were two hypomanic cases, one per group. Conclusion Agomelatine 25 mg/day was an effective and well-tolerated adjunct to valproate/lithium for acute depression in BD-II, suggesting the need for confirmation by future double blind, controlled clinical trials. PMID:23430979

  17. Exploration of Depressive Symptoms in African American Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Amy Y.; Gary, Faye; Zhu, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Background Accurately assessing depression in African American cancer patients is difficult because of the similarities of physical symptoms observed in cancer and depression. Aim To identify universal and distinctive depressive symptoms in African American cancer patients. Methods Seventy-four cancer patients (34 depressed and 23 nondepressed African Americans, and 17 depressed Whites) were interviewed. Qualitative and quantitative analyses were conducted. Results Compared to nondepressed African Americans, depressed African Americans reported irritability, social isolation, insomnia, fatigue, and crying (p ≤ .05) more frequently over time. Compared to depressed Whites, they reported sadness, frustration, and intrusive thoughts less frequently (p ≤ .05), but insomnia and fatigue more frequently (p ≤ .05) during cancer treatment. There was little racial difference at the time of interview. Conclusion Depressed African American cancer patients may benefit from more culturally sensitive depression measures that consider symptoms of irritability, social isolation, and altered expressions of depressive mood. PMID:25564890

  18. SHARED, NOT UNIQUE, COMPONENTS OF PERSONALITY AND PSYCHOSOCIAL FUNCTIONING PREDICT DEPRESSION SEVERITY AFTER ACUTE-PHASE COGNITIVE THERAPY

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Lee Anna; Vittengl, Jeffrey R.; Kraft, Dolores; Jarrett, Robin B.

    2005-01-01

    In a sample of 100 patients with recurrent major depression, we collected depression severity data early and late in acute-phase cognitive therapy, plus a wide range of psychosocial variables that have been studied extensively in depression research, including measures of interpersonal, cognitive, and social functioning, and personality traits using an inventory that is linked with the Big-Three tradition in personality assessment theory. By assessing this broad range of variables in a single study, we could examine the extent to which relations of these variables with depression were due to (a) a common factor shared across this diverse set of constructs, (b) factors shared among each type of construct (personality vs. psychosocial measures), or (c) specific aspects of the individual measures. Only the most general factor shared across the personality and psychosocial variables predicted later depression. PMID:14632375

  19. Anterior ST segment depression in acute inferior myocardial infarction as a marker of greater inferior, apical, and posterolateral damage

    SciTech Connect

    Ruddy, T.D.; Yasuda, T.; Gold, H.K.; Leinbach, R.C.; Newell, J.B.; McKusick, K.A.; Boucher, C.A.; Strauss, H.W.

    1986-12-01

    The clinical significance of anterior precordial ST segment depression during acute inferior myocardial infarction was evaluated in 67 consecutive patients early after onset of symptoms with gated blood pool scans, thallium-201 perfusion images, and 12-lead ECGs. Patients with anterior ST depression (n = 33) had depressed mean values for left ventricular ejection fraction (54 +/- 2% (mean +/- S.E.M.) vs 59 +/- 2%; p = 0.02), cardiac index (3.1 +/- 0.2 vs 3.6 +/- 0.2 L/m2; p = 0.03), and ratio of systolic blood pressure to end-systolic volume (2.0 +/- 0.1 vs 2.5 +/- 0.3 mm Hg/ml; p = 0.04) compared to patients with no anterior ST depression (n = 34). Patients with anterior ST depression had (1) lower mean wall motion values for the inferior, apical, and inferior posterolateral segments (p less than 0.05) and (2) greater reductions in thallium-201 uptake in the inferior and posterolateral regions (p less than 0.05). However, anterior and septal (1) wall motion and (2) thallium-201 uptake were similar in patients with and without ST depression. Thus, anterior precordial ST segment depression in patients with acute inferior wall myocardial infarction represents more than a reciprocal electrical phenomenon. It identifies patients with more severe wall motion impairment and greater hypoperfusion of the inferior and adjacent segments. The poorer global left ventricular function in these patients is a result of more extensive inferior infarction and not of remote septal or anterior injury.

  20. Depression Treatment Preferences in Older Primary Care Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gum, Amber M.; Arean, Patricia A.; Hunkeler, Enid; Tang, Lingqi; Katon, Wayne; Hitchcock, Polly; Steffens, David C.; Dickens, Jeanne; Unutzer, Jurgen

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: For depressed older primary care patients, this study aimed to examine (a) characteristics associated with depression treatment preferences; (b) predictors of receiving preferred treatment; and (c) whether receiving preferred treatment predicted satisfaction and depression outcomes. Design and Methods: Data are from 1,602 depressed older…

  1. [Are Depressed People Aggressive People? Differences Between General Population and Depressive Patients].

    PubMed

    Otte, Stefanie; Lang, Fabian U; Vasic, Nenad; Shenar, Riad; Rasche, Katharina; Ramb, Charlotte; Dudeck, Manuela; Streb, Judith

    2017-01-01

    IntroductionThe study aimed to investigate the relationship between depression and aggression. Material and Methods681 depressive and non-depressive subjects of the general population as well as 132 depressive patients completed the Beck Depression Inventory Revised (BDI-II) as well as the Short Questionnaire for Gathering Factors of Aggressiveness (K-FAF). ResultsDepressive patients and depressive subjects of the general population did not merely report the highest levels of self-aggressiveness but also reached the highest scores on the scales of reactive and proactive aggression, indicating a high level of externalizing aggressiveness. DiscussionThe results support the neurobiological approach of the etiology of depressive disorders. Conclusions For future research of depressive disorders and aggression the investigation of the mediating roles of a low serotonin-level is recommended.

  2. [Depression among older nursing home patients. A review].

    PubMed

    Jongenelis, K; Pot, A M; Eisses, A M H; Beekman, A T F; Kluiter, H; van Tilburg, W; Ribbe, M W

    2003-04-01

    Depression is a common disorder in later life. The prevalence of depression in aged nursing home patients in 36 studies in various countries was reviewed. Results show prevalence rates ranging from 2% to 61%. Average prevalences were calculated for depressive symptoms, minor depression and major depression each. The averages thus found are 43.9% for depressive symptoms, 25.7% for minor depression and 15.5% for major depression. In order to find an explanation for the variation in occurrence of depression in nursing homes, factors that may have influenced the results are described. Both the definition of depression and the kind of instrument used in measuring depression appear to be highly responsible for the variations found.

  3. Precordial ST segment depression during acute inferior myocardial infarction: early thallium-201 scintigraphic evidence of adjacent posterolateral or inferoseptal involvement

    SciTech Connect

    Lew, A.S.; Weiss, A.T.; Shah, P.K.; Maddahi, J.; Peter, T.; Ganz, W.; Swan, H.J.; Berman, D.S.

    1985-02-01

    To investigate the myocardial perfusion correlates of precordial ST segment depression during acute inferior myocardial infarction, a rest thallium-201 scintigram and a closely timed 12 lead electrocardiogram were obtained within 6 hours of the onset of infarction in 44 patients admitted with their first acute inferior myocardial infarction. Thirty-six patients demonstrated precordial ST segment depression (group 1) and eight did not (group 2). A perfusion defect involving the inferior wall was present in all 44 patients. Additional perfusion defects of the adjacent posterolateral wall (n . 20), the ventricular septum (n . 9) or both (n . 6) were present in 35 of 36 patients from group 1 compared with only 1 of 8 patients from group 2 (p less than 0.001). There was no significant difference in the frequency of multivessel coronary artery disease or disease of the left anterior descending artery between group 1 and group 2 or between patients with and those without a thallium-201 perfusion defect involving the ventricular septum. Thus, precordial ST segment depression during an acute inferior myocardial infarction is associated with thallium-201 scintigraphic evidence of more extensive involvement of the adjacent posterolateral or inferoseptal myocardial segments, which probably reflects the extent and pattern of distribution of the artery of infarction, rather than the presence of coexistent multivessel coronary artery disease or disease of the left anterior descending artery.

  4. Effect of low-frequency transcranial magnetic stimulation on an affective go/no-go task in patients with major depression: role of stimulation site and depression severity.

    PubMed

    Bermpohl, Felix; Fregni, Felipe; Boggio, Paulo S; Thut, Gregor; Northoff, Georg; Otachi, Patricia T M; Rigonatti, Sergio P; Marcolin, Marco A; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2006-01-30

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) holds promise as a therapeutic tool in major depression. However, a means to assess the effects of a single rTMS session on mood to guide subsequent sessions would be desirable. The present study examined the effects of a single rTMS session on an affective go/no-go task known to measure emotional-cognitive deficits associated with major depression. Ten patients with an acute episode of unipolar major depression and eight partially or completely remitted (improved) patients underwent 1 Hz rTMS over the left and right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex prior to task performance. TMS over the mesial occipital cortex was used as a control. We observed significantly improved performance in depressed patients following right prefrontal rTMS. This beneficial effect declined with decreasing depression severity and tended to reverse in the improved group. Left prefrontal rTMS had no significant effect in the depressed group, but it resulted in impaired task performance in the improved group. Our findings indicate that the acute response of depressed patients to rTMS varies with the stimulation site and depression severity. Further studies are needed to determine whether the present paradigm could be used to predict antidepressant treatment success or to individualize stimulation parameters according to specific pathology.

  5. Diagnosing Depression in Chronic Pain Patients: DSM-IV Major Depressive Disorder vs. Beck Depression Inventory (BDI)

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Diagnosing depression in chronic pain is challenging due to overlapping somatic symptoms. In questionnaires, such as the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), responses may be influenced more by pain than by the severity of depression. In addition, previous studies have suggested that symptoms of negative self-image, a key element in depression, are uncommon in chronic pain-related depression. The object of this study is to assess the relationship of the somatic and cognitive-emotional items of BDI with the diagnosis of depression, pain intensity, and disability. Methods One hundred consecutive chronic pain patients completed the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM Disorders (SCID) for the diagnosis of major depressive disorder (MDD) according to DSM-IV. Two subscales of BDI (negative view of self and somatic-physical function) were created according to the factor model presented by Morley. Results In the regression analysis, the somatic-physical function factor associated with MDD, while the negative view of self factor did not. Patients with MDD had higher scores in several of the BDI items when analysed separately. Insomnia and weight loss were not dependent on the depression diagnosis. Limitations The relatively small sample size and the selected patient sample limit the generalisability of the results. Conclusions Somatic symptoms of depression are also common in chronic pain and should not be excluded when diagnosing depression in pain patients. Regardless of the assessment method, diagnosing depression in chronic pain remains a challenge and requires careful interpretation of symptoms. PMID:27008161

  6. Acute efficacy of fluoxetine versus sertraline and paroxetine in major depressive disorder including effects of baseline insomnia.

    PubMed

    Fava, Maurizio; Hoog, Sharon L; Judge, Rajinder A; Kopp, Joan B; Nilsson, Mary E; Gonzales, Jill S

    2002-04-01

    This study assessed whether fluoxetine, sertraline, and paroxetine differ in efficacy and tolerability in depressed patients and the impact of baseline insomnia on outcomes. Patients (N = 284) with DSM-IV major depressive disorder were randomly assigned in a double-blind fashion to fluoxetine, paroxetine, or sertraline for 10 to 16 weeks of treatment. Using the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D) sleep disturbance factor score, patients were categorized into low (<4) or high (>or=4) baseline insomnia subgroups. Changes in depression and insomnia were assessed. Safety assessments included treatment-emergent adverse events (AEs), reasons for discontinuation, and AEs leading to discontinuation. In addition, AEs were evaluated within insomnia subgroups to determine emergence of activation or sedation. Depression improvement, assessed with the HAM-D-17 total score, was similar among treatments in all patients (p = 0.365) and the high (p = 0.853) and low insomnia (p = 0.415) subgroups. Insomnia improvement, assessed with the HAM-D sleep disturbance factor score, was similar among treatments in all patients (p = 0.868) and in the high (p = 0.852) and low insomnia (p = 0.982) subgroups. Analyses revealed no significant differences between treatments in the percentages of patients with substantial worsening, any worsening, worsening at endpoint, or improvement at endpoint in the HAM-D sleep disturbance factor in either insomnia subgroup. Treatments were well tolerated in most patients. No significant differences between treatments in the incidence of AEs suggestive of activation or sedation were seen in the insomnia subgroups. These data show no significant differences in acute treatment efficacy and tolerability across fluoxetine, sertraline, and paroxetine in major depressive disorder patients. Improvement in overall depression and in associated insomnia was achieved by most patients regardless of baseline insomnia.

  7. Caring for Depression in Older Home Health Patients.

    PubMed

    Bruce, Martha L

    2015-11-01

    Depression is common in older home health patients and increases their risk of adverse outcomes. Depression screening is required by Medicare's Outcome and Assessment Information Set. The Depression Care for Patients at Home (CAREPATH) was developed as a feasible strategy for home health nurses to manage depression in their patients. The protocol builds on nurses' existing clinical skills and is designed to fit within routine home visits. Major components include ongoing clinical assessment, care coordination, medication management, education, and goal setting. In a randomized trial, Depression CAREPATH patients had greater improvement in depressive symptoms compared to usual care. The difference between groups was significant at 3 months, growing larger and more clinically meaningful over 1 year. The intervention had no impact on patient length of stay, number of home visits, or duration of visits. Thus, nurses can play a pivotal role in the long-term course and outcomes of patients with depression.

  8. Platelet serotonin concentration and depressive symptoms in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Peitl, Vjekoslav; Vidrih, Branka; Karlović, Zoran; Getaldić, Biserka; Peitl, Milena; Karlović, Dalibor

    2016-05-30

    Depressive symptoms seem to be frequent in schizophrenia, but so far they have received less attention than other symptom domains. Impaired serotonergic neurotransmission has been implicated in the pathogenesis of depression and schizophrenia. The objectives of this study were to investigate platelet serotonin concentrations in schizophrenic patients with and without depressive symptoms, and to investigate the association between platelet serotonin concentrations and symptoms of schizophrenia, mostly depressive symptoms. A total of 364 patients were included in the study, 237 of which had significant depressive symptoms. Significant depressive symptoms were defined by the cut-off score of 7 or more on Calgary Depression Rating Scale (CDSS). Platelet serotonin concentrations were assessed by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Prevalence of depression in patients with schizophrenia was 65.1%. Schizophrenic patients with depressive symptoms showed lower platelet serotonin concentrations (mean±SD; 490.6±401.2) compared to schizophrenic patients without depressive symptoms (mean±SD; 660.9±471.5). An inverse correlation was established between platelet serotonin concentration and depressive symptoms, with more severe symptoms being associated with lower platelet serotonin concentrations. Depressive symptoms in schizophrenic patients may be associated with reduced concentrations of platelet serotonin.

  9. Family Functioning and Mood Disorders: A Comparison between Patients with Major Depressive Disorder and Bipolar I Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinstock, Lauren M.; Keitner, Gabor I.; Ryan, Christine E.; Solomon, David A.; Miller, Ivan W.

    2006-01-01

    Within a sample of patients with major depressive disorder (MDD; n = 121) and bipolar affective disorder (BPAD; n = 69), the authors examined (a) diagnostic differences in family functioning at acute episode, (b) diagnostic differences in family functioning at episode recovery, (c) within-group changes in family functioning from acute episode to…

  10. Early Prediction of Acute Antidepressant Treatment Response and Remission in Pediatric Major Depressive Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tao, Rongrong; Emslie, Graham; Mayes, Taryn; Nakonezny, Paul; Kennard, Betsy; Hughes, Carroll

    2009-01-01

    The rate of symptom improvement during the early weeks of acute fluoxetine treatment is a good indicator of remission. This finding was made after evaluating the outcome of the fluoxetine treatment on 168 children and adults with depression.

  11. Managing medical comorbidities in patients with depression to improve prognosis.

    PubMed

    Thase, Michael E

    2016-02-01

    Medical comorbidities contribute to poor antidepressant response, treatment resistance, and poor outcomes in many patients with depression. Depression can co-occur with thyroid conditions, chronic pain conditions, central nervous system disorders, and more. Inflammatory conditions such as diabetes and obesity are also associated with depression, and the connection between inflammation and depression may lead to testing that could better match patients to specific antidepressant treatment. Interventions for patients with depression and a comorbid medical condition include careful selection of antidepressant therapy as well as psychotherapy and adjunctive agents.

  12. 2D-DIGE proteome analysis on the platelet proteins of patients with major depression

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Platelet activation is related to the psychopathology of major depression. We attempted to search and identify protein biomarkers from the platelets of patients with major depression. High resolution two-dimensional Differential Gel Electrophoresis (2D-DIGE), the matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), Western blot, and bioinformatic tools were applied to examine the platelet proteins of 10 patients with major depression and 10 healthy controls. Results The levels of 8 proteins were significantly different between the patients with major depression in the acute phase and healthy controls. The levels of protein disulfide-isomerase A3 (PDIA3) and F-actin-capping protein subunit beta (CAPZB) were higher in patients with major depression than in healthy controls. The levels of fibrinogen beta chain (FIBB), fibrinogen gamma chain (FIBG), retinoic acid receptor beta (RARB), glutathione peroxidase 1 (GPX1), SH3 domain-containing protein 19 (SH319), and T-complex protein 1 subunit beta (TCPB) were lower in patients with major depression than in healthy controls. Conclusions Platelet provided valuable information about the pathways and processes of inflammation/immunity, oxidative stress, and neurogenesis, related to major depression. PMID:24383611

  13. Major depression in panic disorder patients with comorbid social phobia.

    PubMed

    Reiter, S R; Otto, M W; Pollack, M H; Rosenbaum, J F

    1991-07-01

    Rates of depression among panic disorder patients are particularly elevated in patients with comorbid social phobia. However, it is unclear whether this association is specific to social phobia, or whether any comorbid anxiety disorder increases the risk of depression. We assessed 100 panic disorder patients and found a significantly higher incidence of lifetime major depression for panic patients with comorbid social phobia or generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). Panic patients with comorbid social phobia had significantly higher scores on measures of dysfunctional attitudes and lower scores on measures of assertiveness; these variables may mediate the link between social phobia and depression in this population.

  14. Predictors and Moderators of Acute Outcome in the Treatment for Adolescents with Depression Study (TADS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curry, John; Rohde, Paul; Simons, Anne; Silva, Susan; Vitiello, Benedetto; Kratochvil, Christopher; Reinecke, Mark; Feeny, Norah; Wells, Karen; Pathak, Sanjeev; Weller, Elizabeth; Rosenberg, David; Kennard, Betsy; Robins, Michele; Ginsburg, Golda; March, John

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To identify predictors and moderators of response to acute treatments among depressed adolescents (N = 439) randomly assigned to fluoxetine, cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), both fluoxetine and CBT, or clinical management with pill placebo in the Treatment for Adolescents With Depression Study (TADS). Method: Potential baseline…

  15. High Risk of Depressive Disorders in Patients With Gout

    PubMed Central

    Changchien, Te-Chang; Yen, Yung-Chieh; Lin, Cheng-Li; Lin, Ming-Chia; Liang, Ji-An; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Metabolic abnormalities are common in patients with depressive disorders. However, the relationship between gout and depression is unclear. We explored the causal relationship among gout, antigout medication, and the associated risk of incidental depressive disorders. In this nationwide cohort study, we sampled data from the National Health Insurance Research Database to recruit 34,050 patients with gout as the gout cohort and 68,100 controls (without gout) as the nongout cohort. Our primary endpoint was the diagnosis of depressive disorders during follow-up. The overall study population was followed up until depression diagnosis, withdrawal from the NHI program, or the end of the study. The differences in demographic and clinical characteristics between both cohorts were determined using the Chi-square test for categorical variables and the t-test for continuous variables. Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to examine the effect of gout on the risk of depression, represented using the hazard ratio with the 95% confidence interval. Patients with gout exhibited a higher risk of depressive disorders than controls did. The risk of depressive disorders increased with age and was higher in female patients and those with hypertension, stroke, and coronary artery disease. Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug and prednisolone use was associated with a reduced risk of depression. Patients with gout who had received antigout medication exhibited a reduced risk of depressive disorders compared with nongout patients. Our findings support that gout increases the risk of depressive disorders, and that antigout medication use reduces the risk. PMID:26717394

  16. Pharmacological and Non-pharmacological Treatment Options for Depression and Depressive Symptoms in Hemodialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Grigoriou, Stefania S.; Karatzaferi, Christina; Sakkas, Giorgos K.

    2015-01-01

    Depression is a mental disorder with a high prevalence among patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD). It is reported that depression afflicts approximately 20-30% of this patient population, being associated, amongst other, with high mortality rate, low adherence to medication and low perceived quality of life. There is a variety of medications known to be effective for the treatment of depression but due to poor adherence to treatment as well as due to the high need for medications addressing other ESRD comorbidities, depression often remains untreated. According to the literature, depression is under-diagnosed and undertreated in the majority of the patients with chronic kidney disease. In the current review the main pharmacological and non-pharmacological approaches and research outcomes for the management of depressive symptoms in hemodialysis patients are discussed. PMID:26973957

  17. [Depression in Patients with Age-Related Macular Degeneration].

    PubMed

    Narváez, Yamile Reveiz; Gómez-Restrepo, Carlos

    2012-09-01

    Age-related macular degeneration is a cause for disability in the elderly since it greatly affects their quality of life and increases depression likelihood. This article discusses the negative effect depression has on patients with age-related macular degeneration and summarizes the interventions available for decreasing their depression index.

  18. Treatment response for acute depression is not associated with number of previous episodes: lack of evidence for a clinical staging model for major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Dodd, Seetal; Berk, Michael; Kelin, Katarina; Mancini, Michele; Schacht, Alexander

    2013-09-05

    Mental illness has been observed to follow a neuroprogressive course, commencing with prodrome, then onset, recurrence and finally chronic illness. In bipolar disorder and schizophrenia responsiveness to treatment mirrors these stages of illness progression, with greater response to treatment in the earlier stages of illness and greater treatment resistance in chronic late stage illness. Using data from 5627 participants in 15 controlled trials of duloxetine, comparator arm (paroxetine, venlafaxine, escitalopram) or placebo for the treatment of an acute depressive episode, the relationship between treatment response and number of previous depressive episodes was determined. Data was dichotomised for comparisons between participants who had >3 previous episodes (n=1697) or ≤3 previous episodes (n=3930), and additionally for no previous episodes (n=1381) or at least one previous episode (n=4246). Analyses were conducted by study arm for each clinical trial, and results were then pooled. There was no significant difference between treatment response and number of previous depressive episodes. This unexpected finding suggests that treatments to reduce symptoms of depression during acute illness do not lose efficacy for patients with a longer history of illness.

  19. The Natural History of Insomnia: Acute Insomnia and First-onset Depression

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Jason G.; Perlis, Michael L.; Bastien, Célyne H.; Gardani, Maria; Espie, Colin A.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: While many studies have examined the association between insomnia and depression, no studies have evaluated these associations (1) within a narrow time frame, (2) with specific reference to acute and chronic insomnia, and (3) using polysomnography. In the present study, the association between insomnia and first-onset depression was evaluated taking into account these considerations. Design: A mixed-model inception design. Setting: Academic research laboratory. Participants: Fifty-four individuals (acute insomnia [n = 33], normal sleepers [n = 21]) with no reported history of a sleep disorder, chronic medical condition, or psychiatric illness. Interventions: N/A. Measurements and Results: Participants were assessed at baseline (2 nights of polysomnography and psychometric measures of stress and mood) and insomnia and depression status were reassessed at 3 months. Individuals with acute insomnia exhibited more stress, poorer mood, worse subjective sleep continuity, increased N2 sleep, and decreased N3 sleep. Individuals who transitioned to chronic insomnia exhibited (at baseline) shorter REM latencies and reduced N3 sleep. Individuals who exhibited this pattern in the transition from acute to chronic insomnia were also more likely to develop first-onset depression (9.26%) as compared to those who remitted from insomnia (1.85%) or were normal sleepers (1.85%). Conclusion: The transition from acute to chronic insomnia is presaged by baseline differences in sleep architecture that have, in the past, been ascribed to Major Depression, either as heritable traits or as acquired traits from prior episodes of depression. The present findings suggest that the “sleep architecture stigmata” of depression may actually develop over the course transitioning from acute to chronic insomnia. Citation: Ellis JG; Perlis ML; Bastien CH; Gardani M; Espie CA. The natural history of insomnia: acute insomnia and first-onset depression. SLEEP 2014;37(1):97-106. PMID

  20. Co-morbid anxiety and depression among pulmonary tuberculosis patients.

    PubMed

    Aamir, Siddiqua; Aisha

    2010-10-01

    The need to recognize and manage psychiatric co-morbidity in tuberculosis (TB) patients in primary care settings in order to improve adherence to the treatment is now well documented. Pulmonary TB patients at the District TB Control Office and TB Centre in Haripur from December 2007 to March 2008 were evalute in order to assess the frequency of anxiety and depression and continuation of treatment. Forty seven out of 65 (72%) TB patients had severe/moderate level of anxiety and depression according to Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Fourteen (22%) TB patients with co-morbid anxiety and depression showed multi drug-resistance (MDR-TB).

  1. Concordance between clinician and patient ratings as predictors of response, remission, and recurrence in major depressive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Dunlop, Boadie W.; Li, Thomas; Kornstein, Susan G.; Friedman, Edward S.; Rothschild, Anthony J.; Pedersen, Ron; Ninan, Philip; Keller, Martin; Trivedi, Madhukar H.

    2013-01-01

    We conducted a secondary analysis of data from the Prevention of Recurrent Episodes of Depression With Venlafaxine Extended Release (ER) for Two Years (PREVENT) trial to evaluate whether discrepancies between clinician and patient ratings of depression severity were predictive of response, remission, and recurrence during treatment for a depressive episode. Patients who self-rated depression severity in concordance with the clinician (“concordant patients”) were defined as having a standardized patient-rated Inventory of Depressive Symptoms-Self Report (IDS-SR30) score minus standardized clinician-rated Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D17) score <1 SD from mean. Non-concordant patients (“underrating patients” [−1 SD], “overrating patients” [+1 SD]) were identified. Cohorts were compared for remission and response on the HAM-D17, Clinician Global Impression–Severity (CGI-S), and IDS-SR30 during acute and continuation therapy and time to recurrence during maintenance therapy. During acute treatment female patients were more likely to overrate their depression severity compared to the clinician; older age predicted overrating during continuation treatment. Overrating patients had a slower onset of response on the HAM-D17 during acute treatment (P = 0.004). There were no differences between cohorts for remission or response on the HAM-D17 or CGI-S. Overrating patients at week 10 had lower remission and response rates on the IDS-SR30 during continuation therapy (32% and 50%, respectively; P ≤ 0.001) compared with underrating patients (76%, 77%) or concordant patients (64%, 78%). Patient concordance at the end of continuation therapy did not predict recurrence during maintenance therapy, indicating that patient rating scales may be useful in tracking recurrence during maintenance therapy. Poor agreement between patient- and clinician-ratings of depression severity is primarily a state phenomenon, although it is trait-like for some patients

  2. A systematic review on the role of anticonvulsants in the treatment of acute bipolar depression.

    PubMed

    Reinares, María; Rosa, Adriane R; Franco, Carolina; Goikolea, José Manuel; Fountoulakis, Kostas; Siamouli, Melina; Gonda, Xenia; Frangou, Sophia; Vieta, Eduard

    2013-03-01

    Despite the high morbidity and mortality associated with bipolar depression, the optimal treatment for this phase is still a matter of debate. The aim of the current review was to provide updated evidence about the efficacy and tolerability of anticonvulsants in the treatment of acute bipolar depression. A comprehensive review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating the use of anticonvulsants for the treatment of acute bipolar depression up to June 2011 was conducted by means of the PubMed-Medline database. Eligibility criteria included active comparator-controlled or placebo-controlled randomized studies involving monotherapy or combination therapy. A total of 18 RCTs fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Studies supported the efficacy of divalproex as monotherapy in acute bipolar depression but small sample size was a common methodological limitation. Findings were inconclusive for lamotrigine and carbamazepine although overall lamotrigine may have a beneficial but modest effect. Negative results were found for levetiracetam and gabapentin but the evidence base on these agents is scant. All anticonvulsants were generally well tolerated. No double-blind RCTs were found for the use of other anticonvulsants such as oxcarbazepine, licarbazepine, zonisamide, retigabine, pregabalin, tiagabine, felbamate and vigabatrine in the acute treatment of bipolar depression. To sum up, taking into consideration the efficacy and tolerability profiles of anticonvulsants, current evidence supports the use of divalproex and lamotrigine in the treatment of acute bipolar depression. However, available data for most other anticonvulsants are inconclusive and further RCTs with larger sample sizes are needed before drawing firm conclusions.

  3. Divergent Relationship of Depression Severity to Social Reward Responses Among Patients with Bipolar Versus Unipolar Depression

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Anup; Satterthwaite, Theodore D.; Vandekar, Lillie; Katchmar, Natalie; Daldal, Aylin; Ruparel, Kosha; A.Elliott, Mark; Baldassano, Claudia; Thase, Michael E.; Gur, Raquel E.; Kable, Joseph W.; Wolf, Daniel H.

    2016-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies of mood disorders demonstrate abnormalities in brain regions implicated in reward processing. However, there is a paucity of research investigating how social rewards affect reward circuit activity in these disorders. Here, we evaluated the relationship of both diagnostic category and dimensional depression severity to reward system function in bipolar and unipolar depression. In total, 86 adults were included, including 24 patients with bipolar depression, 24 patients with unipolar depression, and 38 healthy comparison subjects. Participants completed a social reward task during 3T BOLD fMRI. On average, diagnostic groups did not differ in activation to social reward. However, greater depression severity significantly correlated with reduced bilateral ventral striatum activation to social reward in the bipolar depressed group, but not the unipolar depressed group. In addition, decreased left orbitofrontal cortical activation correlated with more severe symptoms in bipolar depression, but not unipolar depression. These differential dimensional effects resulted in a significant voxelwise group by depression severity interaction. Taken together, these results provide initial evidence that deficits in social reward processing are differentially related to depression severity in the two disorders. PMID:27295401

  4. Efficacy and safety of vortioxetine (Lu AA21004), 15 and 20 mg/day: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, duloxetine-referenced study in the acute treatment of adult patients with major depressive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Loft, Henrik; Olsen, Christina Kurre

    2014-01-01

    This study assessed the efficacy, tolerability and safety of vortioxetine versus placebo in adults with recurrent major depressive disorder. This double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study included 608 patients [Montgomery–Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) total score≥26 and Clinical Global Impression – Severity score≥4]. Patients were randomly assigned (1 : 1 : 1 : 1) to vortioxetine 15 mg/day, vortioxetine 20 mg/day, duloxetine 60 mg/day or placebo. The primary efficacy endpoint was change from baseline in MADRS total score at week 8 (mixed model for repeated measurements). Key secondary endpoints were: MADRS responders; Clinical Global Impression – Improvement scale score; MADRS total score in patients with baseline Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale ≥20; remission (MADRS≤10); and Sheehan Disability Scale total score at week 8. On the primary efficacy endpoint, both vortioxetine doses were statistically significantly superior to placebo, with a mean difference to placebo (n=158) of −5.5 (vortioxetine 15 mg, P<0.0001, n=149) and −7.1 MADRS points (vortioxetine 20 mg, P<0.0001, n=151). Duloxetine (n=146) separated from placebo, thus validating the study. In all key secondary analyses, both vortioxetine doses were statistically significantly superior to placebo. Vortioxetine treatment was well tolerated; common adverse events (incidence≥5%) were nausea, headache, diarrhea, dry mouth and dizziness. No clinically relevant changes were seen in clinical safety laboratory values, weight, ECG or vital signs parameters. Vortioxetine was efficacious and well tolerated in the treatment of patients with major depressive disorder. PMID:24257717

  5. Efficacy and safety of vortioxetine (Lu AA21004), 15 and 20 mg/day: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, duloxetine-referenced study in the acute treatment of adult patients with major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Boulenger, Jean-Philippe; Loft, Henrik; Olsen, Christina Kurre

    2014-05-01

    This study assessed the efficacy, tolerability and safety of vortioxetine versus placebo in adults with recurrent major depressive disorder. This double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study included 608 patients [Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) total score ≥ 26 and Clinical Global Impression - Severity score ≥ 4]. Patients were randomly assigned (1 : 1 : 1 : 1) to vortioxetine 15 mg/day, vortioxetine 20 mg/day, duloxetine 60 mg/day or placebo. The primary efficacy endpoint was change from baseline in MADRS total score at week 8 (mixed model for repeated measurements). Key secondary endpoints were: MADRS responders; Clinical Global Impression - Improvement scale score; MADRS total score in patients with baseline Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale ≥ 20; remission (MADRS ≤ 10); and Sheehan Disability Scale total score at week 8. On the primary efficacy endpoint, both vortioxetine doses were statistically significantly superior to placebo, with a mean difference to placebo (n = 158) of -5.5 (vortioxetine 15 mg, P < 0.0001, n = 149) and -7.1 MADRS points (vortioxetine 20 mg, P < 0.0001, n = 151). Duloxetine (n = 146) separated from placebo, thus validating the study. In all key secondary analyses, both vortioxetine doses were statistically significantly superior to placebo. Vortioxetine treatment was well tolerated; common adverse events (incidence ≥ 5%) were nausea, headache, diarrhea, dry mouth and dizziness. No clinically relevant changes were seen in clinical safety laboratory values, weight, ECG or vital signs parameters. Vortioxetine was efficacious and well tolerated in the treatment of patients with major depressive disorder.

  6. Similarities in acute phase protein response during hibernation in black bears and major depression in humans: A response to underlying metabolic depression?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tsiouris, J.A.; Chauhan, V.P.S.; Sheikh, A.M.; Chauhan, A.; Malik, M.; Vaughan, M.R.

    2004-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of hibernation with mild hypothermia and the stress of captivity on levels of six acute-phase proteins (APPs) in serial samples of serum from 11 wild and 6 captive black bears (Ursus americanus Pallas, 1780) during active and hibernating states. We hypothesize that during hibernation with mild hypothermia, bears would show an APP response similar to that observed in major depression. Enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay was used to measure alpha2-macroglobulin and C-reactive protein, and a nephelometer to measure alpha1-antitrypsin, haptoglobin, ceruloplasmin, and transferrin. Levels of all other proteins except ceruloplasmin were significantly elevated during hibernation in both wild and captive bears at the p < 0.05 to p < 0.001 level. Alpha 2-macroglobulin and C-reactive-protein levels were increased in captive versus wild bears in both active and hibernating states at the p < 0.01 to p < 0.0001 level. During hibernation with mild hypothermia, black bears do not show immunosuppression, but show an increased APP response similar to that in patients with major depression. This APP response is explained as an adaptive response to the underlying metabolic depression in both conditions. Metabolic depression in hibernating bears is suggested as a natural model for research to explain the neurobiology of depression.

  7. Neurohormonal and Inflammatory Hyper-Responsiveness to Acute Mental Stress in Depression

    PubMed Central

    Weinstein, Ali A.; Deuster, Patricia A.; Francis, Jennifer L.; Bonsall, Robert W.; Tracy, Russell P.; Kop, Willem J.

    2010-01-01

    Depression is associated with dysregulated hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis function, overactivity of the sympathoadrenal system, and increased levels of inflammation markers. It is not known whether these biological processes are disproportionately elevated in response to acute negative emotional arousal by mental stress (MS). The present study investigates responses of neurohormones and inflammatory markers to MS in 14 clinically depressed (age: 42±10 years; 50% female) and 14 non-depressed control participants (age: 39±6 years; 50% female). Heightened acute MS reactivity was documented in depressed participants (adrenocorticotropic hormone, ρ=0.001; Norepinephrine, ρ=0.042; Epinephrine, ρ=0.039), and a delayed increase in cortisol was observed (ρ=0.002). Inflammation markers increased more strongly in depressed vs. non-depressed participants (IL-6, ρ=0.027; tumor necrosis factor-alpha, ρ=0.050; and recovery C-reactive protein, ρ=0.003). It is concluded that depressed individuals display hyper-reactivity of neuroimmunological markers in response to acute negative emotions. This hyper-reactivity may serve a pathologic role in the elevated morbidity and mortality risk associated with depression. PMID:20117167

  8. Depression among patients with type-II diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mohammad Akmal; Sultan, Sayed Mohammad; Nazli, Rubina; Akhtar, Tasleem; Khan, Mudasar Ahmad; Sher, Nabila; Aslam, Hina

    2014-10-01

    This study aimed to determine the frequency of depression among patients with type-II diabetes mellitus in Peshawar at Khyber Teaching Hospital, Peshawar, from March to September 2010. Depression was assessed by using Beck Depressive Inventory-II (BDI-II). Out of 140 patients with type-II diabetes, 85 (61%) were women and 55 (39%) were men. Mean age was 45±7.45 years. Eighty four (60%) patients presented with severe depression. Depression was higher in females than males and widows. Depression was high in diabetic patients, especially in females and widows. It is of essence that psychiatric attention may be necessary to be incorporated in diabetes care both for prevention and treatment.

  9. Effects of acute tryptophan depletion on raphé functional connectivity in depression

    PubMed Central

    Weinstein, Jodi J.; Rogers, Baxter P.; Taylor, Warren D.; Boyd, Brian D.; Cowan, Ronald L.; Shelton, K. Maureen; Salomon, Ronald M.

    2015-01-01

    Depression remains a great societal burden and a major treatment challenge. Most antidepressant medications target serotonergic raphé nuclei. Acute tryptophan depletion (ATD) modulates serotonin function. To better understand the raphé's role in mood networks, we studied raphé functional connectivity in depression. Fifteen depressed patients were treated with sertraline for 12 weeks and scanned during ATD and sham conditions. Based on our previous findings in a separate cohort, resting state MRI functional connectivity between raphé and other depression-related regions (ROIs) was analyzed in narrow frequency bands. ATD decreased raphé functional connectivity with the bilateral thalamus within 0.025–0.05 Hz, and also decreased raphé functional connectivity with the right pregenual anterior cingulate cortex within 0.05–0.1 Hz. Using the control broadband filtlter 0.01–0.1 Hz, no significant differences in raphé-ROI functional connectivity were observed. Post-hoc analysis by remission status suggested increased raphé functional connectivity with left pregenual anterior cingulate cortex in remitters (n = 10) and decreased raphé functional connectivity with left thalamus in non-remitters (n = 5), both within 0.025–0.05 Hz. Reducing serotonin function appears to alter coordination of these mood-related networks in specific, low frequency ranges. For examination of effects of reduced serotonin function on mood-related networks, specific low frequency BOLD fMRI signals can identify regions implicated in neural circuitry and may enable clinically-relevant interpretation of functional connectivity measures. The biological significance of these low frequency signals detected in the raphé merits further study. PMID:26411798

  10. [Severe depression : life events, patient history].

    PubMed

    Lançon, C

    2009-12-01

    The relationships between severe depression, life events and personality are complex. However, sexual abuse and maltreatment during childhood contribute towards vulnerability to depressive disorders. Maltreatment in childhood does not appear to be linked to any particular personality disorder. An < insecure > type of bonding appears to be a vulnerability factor both for anxiety and depressive disorders in adulthood.

  11. Correlation between patient and clinician assessments of depression severity in the PREVENT study☆

    PubMed Central

    Dunlop, Boadie W.; Li, Thomas; Kornstein, Susan G.; Friedman, Edward S.; Rothschild, Anthony J.; Pedersen, Ron; Ninan, Philip; Keller, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Background The degree of agreement between patient- and clinician-rated scales of depressive severity varies widely. This study analyzed agreement between commonly used depression rating scales in the Prevention of Recurrent Episodes of Depression with Venlafaxine Extended Release (ER) for Two Years (PREVENT) trial. Methods The PREVENT trial was a multiphase, randomized, double-blind study of patients with recurrent major depressive disorder. This secondary analysis evaluated acute (10 weeks) and continuation phase (6 months) data. Pearson correlation coefficients at each acute-phase (weekly) and continuation-phase (monthly) visit were calculated for patient-rated (30-item Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology-Self-Rated [IDS-SR30] and clinician-rated (17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression [HAM-D17] and Clinical Global Impressions-Severity [CGI-S]) measures and for response and remission. Results Data from 1,047 patients were analyzed. The respective correlation coefficients at baseline, week 10, and month 6 were: IDS-SR30: HAM-D17: 0.46, 0.75, 0.70; and for IDS-SR30: CGI-S 0.28, 0.67, 0.65. Agreement between IDS-SR30- and HAM-D17-defined remission and response was relatively poor: week 10, 0.52 and 0.34, respectively; month 6, 0.45 and 0.32, respectively. Conclusions These findings suggest that patient-rated measures of depression severity do not correspond strongly with clinician ratings, and are particularly poor prior to the initiation of treatment. PMID:20304503

  12. Comparison of Temperamental Features, Anxiety, and Depression Levels Between Non-Cardiac Angina and Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    GÜMÜŞER, Fatih; ALTINBAŞ, Kürşat; ÇAĞLAR, İlker Murat; UNGAN, İsmail

    2014-01-01

    Introduction In many studies that are aimed to determine the psychological profile of patients admitted to the emergency unit with non-cardiac angina (NCA), it was indicated that psychiatric problems, less effective problem-solving, and alexithymia are more common in NCA compared with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients. In this study, aiming to find predictive psychological clinical features, we compared the temperament, anxiety, and depression scores of patients with NCA and ACS. Methods Sociodemographic variables of 63 patients (n=41 NCA, n=22 ACS) who were admitted to the emergency unit with chest pain were recorded. TEMPS-A scale was used for defining temperamental features, and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) was used to measure anxiety and depression levels of patients in both groups. Sociodemographic variables and TEMPS-A and HADS scores were compared with χ2 and independent-groups t-test between the NCA and ACS groups. Results The NCA and ACS groups were similar in terms of sociodemographic variables. There was no statistical difference between groups in HDS (p=.12) and HAS (p=.39) scores and TEMPS-A scale depressive (p=.41), cyclothymic (p=.08), hyperthymic (p=.06), and anxious (p=.29) temperament scores. But, irritable temperament scores were significantly higher in the NCS group (p=.04). Conclusion We believe that our findings will provide a basis for further studies in the diagnosis and treatment of NCA by contributing to the definition of NCA patients’ psychological profiles.

  13. [Bogus contract between psychiatrists and patients with depression].

    PubMed

    Ihara, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    Why are patients with depression so disappointed with their psychiatric treatment? One of the causes of their disappointment is a 'bogus contract' (Smith, 2001) between patients and psychiatrists. Patients tend to idealize modern psychiatry as if it could solve many of their problems, including social ones. Psychiatrists, however, know that modern psychiatry has limited powers and that they cannot solve all problems, especially social ones. There is a huge mismatch between what psychiatrists are trained for and what they are required to do. In fact, the biological model of depression is inadequate to help depressive patients, particularly patients with psycho-social problems. It has long been believed that antidepressant medications represent the best established treatment for major depressive disorder. Recent meta-analyses (Kirsch et al., 2008; Fournier et al., 2010), however, found little evidence that anti-depressants have a specific pharmacological effect relative to a pill placebo for patients with mild or moderate symptoms. This may be owing partly to the fact that depression is associated with ineluctable life events like separation, interpersonal conflicts, unexpected adversities, etc., that are central to being human. Both patients and psychiatrists should be aware of the limitations of psychiatric treatment. A more realistic relationship is required between patients and psychiatrists. Psychiatrists should be open about their limitations. Patients cannot leave social problems to psychiatrists. However, some chronically depressed patients may be capable of managing their social problems. In such cases, respecting patients' autonomy promotes clinical practice and prevents them from entering a state of chronic patienthood.

  14. Monitoring Hospitalized Adult Patients for Opioid-Induced Sedation and Respiratory Depression.

    PubMed

    Jungquist, Carla R; Smith, Kirsten; Nicely, Kelly L Wiltse; Polomano, Rosemary C

    2017-03-01

    : Opioid analgesics are commonly administered to hospitalized patients to treat acute pain, but these drugs put patients at risk for serious adverse events, such as unintended advancing sedation, respiratory depression, and death. Nurses play an important role in keeping patients safe by making clinical decisions about the frequency and intensity with which patients receiving IV and epidural opioids should be monitored. To make sound clinical judgments, nurses must be aware of the factors that place patients at elevated risk for adverse opioid-related effects and know how to screen and assess patients for these risks. The authors review the literature on unintended advancing sedation and respiratory depression associated with opioid administration and present evidence-based recommendations for clinical decision making and patient monitoring, using both nursing assessments and electronic technologies.

  15. The young patient with acute bloody diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    Ninan, S; Hamlin, J

    2014-01-01

    Acute bloody diarrhoea may be commonly encountered in the acute medical unit. Among young patients, the main differential diagnoses are acute infectious colitis, and first presentation of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). A combination of clinical, laboratory, radiological, endoscopic and histological investigations are required to make the diagnosis. If inflammatory bowel disease is suspected, then the patient should be admitted to a specialist gastroenterology ward and receive input from the surgical team, IBD nurses and specialist stoma nurses. Intravenous steroid therapy for acute severe disease should be started before stool cultures are back unless there is a strong clinical suspicion of amoebiasis. All patients require thromboprophylaxis and close attention paid to fluid balance and nutritional requirements. Daily clinical review is required. The Travis criteria may be employed at day 3 to assess the likelihood of requiring surgery and plans for rescue therapy, medical or surgical should be made between day 3-7 if the patient is not responding adequately to initial medical therapy.

  16. Acute appendicitis in the geriatric patient.

    PubMed

    Hall, A; Wright, T M

    1976-02-01

    Fifty patients over 60 with proven acute appendictis are analyzed with regards to the preoperative clinical picture, diagnosis, operative findings and management, and the role of associated medical diseases.

  17. Co-occurring depressive symptoms in the older patient with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Kasckow, John W; Zisook, Sidney

    2008-01-01

    symptoms. If major depression persists, adding an SSRI is a reasonable next step; one needs to start with a low dose and then cautiously titrate upward to reduce depressive symptoms. If remission is not achieved after an adequate treatment duration (8-12 weeks) or with an adequate dose (similar to that used for major depression without schizophrenia), switching to another agent or adding augmenting therapy is recommended.We recommend treating an acute first episode of depression for at least 6-9 months and consideration of longer treatment for patients with residual symptoms, very severe or highly co-morbid major depression, ongoing episodes or recurrent episodes. Psychosocial interventions aimed at improving adherence, quality of life and function are also recommended. For patients with schizophrenia and subsyndromal depression, a similar approach is recommended.Psychosis accompanying major depression in patients without schizophrenia is common in elderly patients and is considered a primary mood disorder; for these reasons, it is an important syndrome to consider in the differential diagnosis of older patients with mood and thought disturbance. Treatment for this condition has involved electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) as well as combinations of antidepressant and antipsychotic medications. Recent evidence suggests that combination treatment may not be any more effective than antidepressant treatment alone and ECT may be more efficacious overall.

  18. Depression in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Garvey, Christine

    2012-05-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in adults in the United States and worldwide. Depression is a common comorbidity in this population, but often goes undiagnosed in persons with COPD. Because the presence of depression has the potential to negatively impact COPD-related outcomes, it is essential for health care practitioners involved in the care of patients with COPD to diagnose and treat COPD and the associated comorbidities, including depression. Although there is a lack of comprehensive guidelines for treating depression in those with COPD, an algorithm has been proposed to screen and manage depression in these patients. Several questionnaires are available that can be used to assess and assist in diagnosing depression in these patients. Following diagnosis, antidepressant therapy should be considered along with nonpharmacological strategies, such as pulmonary rehabilitation and cognitive behavioral therapy.

  19. Thyroid hormones association with depression severity and clinical outcome in patients with major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Berent, Dominika; Zboralski, Krzysztof; Orzechowska, Agata; Gałecki, Piotr

    2014-01-01

    The clinical implications of thyroid hormones in depression have been studied extensively and still remains disputable. Supplementation of thyroid hormones is considered to augment and accelerate antidepressant treatment. Studies on the role of thyroid hormones in depression deliver contradictory results. Here we assess theirs impact on depression severity and final clinical outcome in patients with major depression. Thyrotropin, free thyroxine (FT4), and free triiodothyronine (FT3) concentrations were measured with automated quantitative enzyme immunoassay. Depression severity and final clinical outcome were rated with 17-itemic Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression [HDRS(17)] and Clinical Global Impression Scales for severity and for improvement (CGIs, CGIi). FT3 and FT4 concentrations were significantly positively correlated with clinical improvement evaluated with CGIi (R = 0.38, P = 0.012; R = 0.33, P = 0.034, respectively). There was a significant correlation between FT4 concentrations and depression severity assessed in HDRS(17) (R = 0.31, P = 0.047). Male patients presented significantly higher FT3 serum levels (Z = 2.34, P = 0.018) and significantly greater clinical improvement (Z = 2.36, P = 0.018) when compared to female patients. We conclude that free thyroid hormones concentrations are associated with depression severity and have an impact on final clinical outcome. It can be more efficient to augment and accelerate the treatment of major depressive disorder with triiodothyronine instead of levothyroxine because of individual differences in thyroid hormones metabolism.

  20. Borderline personality features in depressed or anxious patients.

    PubMed

    Distel, Marijn A; Smit, Johannes H; Spinhoven, Philip; Penninx, Brenda W J H

    2016-07-30

    Anxiety and depression frequently co-occur with borderline personality disorder. Relatively little research examined the presence of borderline personality features and its main domains (affective instability, identity problems, negative relationships and self-harm) in individuals with remitted and current anxiety and depression. Participants with current (n=597) or remitted (n=1115) anxiety and/or depression and healthy controls (n=431) were selected from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety. Assessments included the Personality Assessment Inventory - Borderline Features Scale and several clinical characteristics of anxiety and depression. Borderline personality features were more common in depression than in anxiety. Current comorbid anxiety and depression was associated with most borderline personality features. Anxiety and depression status explained 29.7% of the variance in borderline personality features and 3.8% (self-harm) to 31% (identity problems) of the variance in the four domains. A large part of the variance was shared between anxiety and depression but both disorders also explained a significant amount of unique variance. The severity of anxiety and depression and the level of daily dysfunctioning was positively associated with borderline personality features. Individuals with a longer duration of anxiety and depression showed more affective instability and identity problems. These findings suggest that patients with anxiety and depression may benefit from an assessment of personality pathology as it may have implications for psychological and pharmacological treatment.

  1. Chronotypes in patients with nonseasonal depressive disorder: Distribution, stability and association with clinical variables.

    PubMed

    Müller, Matthias Johannes; Cabanel, Nicole; Olschinski, Christiane; Jochim, Dorothee; Kundermann, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    The individual's chronotype is regarded as rather stable trait with substantial heritability and normal distribution of the "morningness-eveningness" dimension in the general population. Eveningness has been related to the risk of developing affective, particularly depressive, disorders. However, age and other sociobiological factors may influence chronotypes. The present study investigated the distribution, stability, and clinical correlates of chronotype and morningness-eveningness in hospitalized patients with affective disorder. Chronotype was assessed with the morningness-eveningness questionnaire (MEQ) in 93 patients with nonseasonal depressive syndrome (85% major depression; 15% depressive adjustment disorder) after admission, and in 19 patients again before discharge. Distribution, stability and correlations of MEQ scores with clinical variables were calculated. Additionally, a literature analysis of chronotype distributions in samples of nondepressed persons and patients with nonseasonal depression was carried out. MEQ scores (mean 49 ± 11, range 23-75, higher scores indicate morningness) in 93 acutely depressed inpatients (age 41 ± 14 years, range 18-75 years; 63% women; hospitalization 48 ± 22 days; BDI-II 32 ± 11) were normally distributed (Shapiro-Wilk test; W = 0.993, p = 0.920) with 59.1% intermediate types, 19.4% evening types, and 21.5% morning types. MEQ change scores from admission to discharge were nonsignificant (-1.3 ± 5.0; paired t-test, t18 = -1.09; p = 0.29) despite significantly improved depression scores (-19.4 ± 7.6; paired t-test, t18 = 11.2, p < 0.001). Age (r = 0.24), and depression scores (r = -0.21) correlated significantly (p < 0.05) with MEQ scores; associations with sex and hospitalization duration were nonsignificant. The present study and literature findings revealed that the frequency of evening types is not clearly elevated in depression, but morning types are

  2. Psychosocial and neurocognitive profiles in depressed patients with major depressive disorder and bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Godard, Julie; Grondin, Simon; Baruch, Philippe; Lafleur, Martin F

    2011-12-30

    Previous studies have revealed psychosocial and cognitive impairments in patients during depression. The primary aim of this study was to investigate whether patients with major depression (MDD) and bipolar disorder (BD) differ in psychosocial and neurocognitive profiles. A second aim was to examine whether cognitive impairments are homogeneous among depressed patients. Patients with MDD (n=16) and BD (n=14) were enrolled during a major depressive episode. About half of them had comorbidities, including personality, substance use, and anxiety disorders. Information was collected about symptomatology and psychosocial functioning, whereas an exhaustive neuropsychological battery was administered to assess cognition. During a depressive episode, MDD and BD patients had global psychosocial dysfunction, characterized by occupational and relational impairments. A cognitive slowing was also observed, as well as deficits related to alertness, spontaneous flexibility, sustained and divided attention. Moreover, severity of depression and cognitive functions were significantly associated with psychosocial functioning. In the case of severe mood disorders, psychosocial and neurocognitive functioning seem similar among MDD and BD patients during a depressive episode. In addition to an altered daily functioning, the neurocognitive profile was heterogeneous with regard to the nature and extent of cognitive deficits. Executive functions, as well as verbal learning and memory, were preserved better than attentional processes.

  3. Zinc in thalassemic patients and its relation with depression.

    PubMed

    Moafi, Alireza; Mobaraki, Gholamhossein; Taheri, Seyed Sadr; Heidarzadeh, Abtin; Shahabi, Iraj; Majidi, Farshad

    2008-01-01

    Studies have shown that there is a relationship between zinc levels and depression. Thalassemic patients are at risk of zinc deficiency due to various causes including Desferal injection. The aim of this study, therefore, is to investigate hair zinc levels in thalassemic patients and their association with depression. For the purposes of this survey, 50 patients with major thalassemia between 10-20 years old were selected randomly. The patients' hair zinc concentration was compared with a control group of similarly aged healthy individuals. Simultaneously, their psychological status was evaluated with either the "Beck" or "Marya Kovacs" test (according to age) so that the relation between depression and zinc concentration could be assessed. The mean hair zinc concentration in patients was more than the controls (193.96 +/- 92.4 ppm vs 149.6 +/- 72.21 ppm). Zinc deficiency was present in 10% of the patients, and 52% had some degree of depression. There was a reverse correlation between zinc deficiency and blood transfusion rate (p < 0.05). Also, while there were more incidences of depression among the zinc deficient patients, the difference was not significant. Regarding the high prevalence of depression and insignificant relation to the zinc deficiency in these thalassemic patients, this research suggests the need for further consideration concerning patients' psychological status, the risk factors of zinc deficiency, as well as extended assessment into other causes of depression.

  4. Acute epiglottitis: A review of 50 patients.

    PubMed

    Lon, Shafkat Ahmad; Lateef, Mohd; Sajad, Mir

    2006-04-01

    We reviewed 50 patients admitted to the department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head & Neck Surgery of Govt Medical College Srinagar from September 19% to September 2002 diagnosed with acute epiglottitis. Male were more commonly involved than females in the ratio of 2.8:1 with only 6 cases younger than 10 years of age. The highest incidence was in the month of January (22%). The common symptoms of acute epiglottitis were sorethroat(92%) and odynophagia(88%). Any patient with sudden onset of these symptoms should be suspected of having acute epiglottitis and should have an indirect laryngoscopy. Blood culture was obtained in 20 cases Cultures were positive only in 5 cases, out of which 4 were positive for Hemophilus influenzae type B. Throat cultures were not obtamed The primary treatment of acute epiglottitis is intravenous antibiotics, steriods, and humidified air. Treacheostomy was needed only in 4 patients. There were no deaths.

  5. Transcranial direct current stimulation in a patient with therapy-resistant major depression.

    PubMed

    Palm, Ulrich; Keeser, Daniel; Schiller, Christina; Fintescu, Zoe; Reisinger, Eva; Baghai, Thomas C; Mulert, Christoph; Padberg, Frank

    2009-01-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) has been reported to exert significant antidepressant effects in patients with major depression. Several recent studies found an improvement of depressive symptoms in drug-free patients. Here we report the case of a 66-year-old female patient suffering from recurrent major depressive episodes who underwent anodal tDCS of the left dorsolateral PFC over 4 weeks as an add-on treatment to a stable antidepressant medication. Only a modest improvement of depressive symptoms was observed after tDCS, i.e. reduction of the baseline scores in the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale from 23 to 19 and in the Beck Depression Inventory from 27 to 20. However, there was an increase from 52 to 90% in the Regensburg Verbal Fluency Test. In addition, EEG was used to assess the acute effects of tDCS. Low resolution brain electromagnetic tomography (LORETA) showed a left unilateral focal effect (25-40% reduced power) in the delta, theta and alpha frequency bands. The same effect appeared in the surface analysis of the EEG. The absolute, as well as the relative power decreased significantly in the delta, theta and alpha bands after a comparison of the spectral analysis. Though tDCS over 4 weeks did not exert clinically meaningful antidepressant effects in this case of therapy-resistant depression, the findings for cognitive measures and EEG suggest that beneficial effects may occur in depressed subjects and future studies need to further explore this approach also in therapy-resistant major depression.

  6. Depression and suicidal ideation in dermatology patients with acne, alopecia areata, atopic dermatitis and psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Gupta, M A; Gupta, A K

    1998-11-01

    We examined the prevalence of depression (measured by the Carroll Rating Scale for Depression, CRSD), wishes to be dead and acute suicidal ideation among 480 patients with dermatological disorders that may be cosmetically disfiguring, i.e. non-cystic facial acne (n = 72; 5.6% suicidal ideation), alopecia areata (n = 45; 0% suicidal ideation), atopic dermatitis (n = 146; 2.1% suicidal ideation) and psoriasis (79 outpatients, 2.5% suicidal ideation and 138 inpatients, 7.2% suicidal ideation). Analysis of variance revealed that the severely affected psoriasis inpatients (mean +/- SD total body surface area affected: 52 +/- 23.4%) had the highest (P < 0.05) CRSD score, followed by the patients with mild to moderate acne; both scores were in the range for clinical depression (CRSD score > 10). The 5.6-7.2% prevalence of active suicidal ideation among the psoriasis and acne patients was higher than the 2.4-3.3% prevalence reported among general medical patients. Our findings highlight the importance of recognizing psychiatric comorbidity, especially depression, among dermatology patients and indicate that in some instances even clinically mild to moderate disease such as non-cystic facial acne can be associated with significant depression and suicidal ideation.

  7. Anhedonia and emotional word memory in patients with depression.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wen-Hua; Wang, Ling-Zhi; Zhao, Su-Hua; Ning, Yu-Ping; Chan, Raymond C K

    2012-12-30

    Anhedonia is a key diagnostic criterion for major depression. Investigating the relation between the specific symptoms and emotional processing may help to understand the underlying cognitive mechanism of anhedonia in depression. In this study, we explored the potential association between memory for emotional words and anhedonia in 71 patients with depression and 61 healthy individuals. An emotional word-rating task was administered to assess self-reported emotional experience to words on both valence and arousal dimensions, and subsequent recall and recognition memory for these words. Depressed patients demonstrated a reduction in pleasure and arousal experience to positive words, but an increase in arousal experience to negative words. Depressed patients also displayed a lower overall memory performance in recall measure and a bias to memory of more negative words. Moreover, state anhedonia and trait anhedonia were associated with attenuated positive experience and enhanced negative experience in patients with depression only. Higher levels of anhedonia and depression severity were also associated with fewer positive words and more negative words memory. Patients with depression displayed a flat pattern of emotional experience to positive stimuli and a tendency towards rating negative stimuli more intensely.

  8. Anomalous stress reactions in patients suffering from depression and anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Brierley, Harry; Jamieson, Robin

    1974-01-01

    An experiment is reported in which the forearm muscle blood flow of a group of patients with mixed depressions is compared with that of a group of patients with anxiety states. The blood flow was measured under relaxed conditions and during the presentation of a noise `stress'. The measurements obtained under stressed conditions show that, while the blood flow of those with anxiety states fell with repetition of the stress noise, that of the depressive patients increased. A similar pattern was shown by the relaxed measurements but here the difference was not statistically significant. There was also suggestion that stress produced a fall in blood flow in depressive subjects and an increase in patients with anxiety states. These results tend to support the hypothesis that depressive patients show something akin to a freeze response to stress, while patients with anxiety states show an arousal response. PMID:4838916

  9. Anhedonia is associated with blunted reward sensitivity in first-degree relatives of patients with major depression

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wen-hua; Roiser, Jonathan P.; Wang, Ling-zhi; Zhu, Yu-hua; Huang, Jia; Neumann, David L.; Shum, David H. K.; Cheung, Eric F.C.; Chan, Raymond C. K.

    2017-01-01

    Background Anhedonia is a cardinal feature of major depression and is hypothesized to be driven by low motivation, in particular blunted reward sensitivity. It has been suggested to be a marker that represents a genetic predisposition to this disorder. However, little is known about the mechanisms underlying this heightened risk in unaffected first-degree relatives of patients with major depression. We previously demonstrated abnormal reward biases in acutely depressed patients. The present study aimed to examine the development of reward bias in first-degree relatives of patients with major depression. Methods Forty-seven first-degree relatives of patients with major depression (26 females, age 18-52) and 60 healthy controls with no family history of depression (34 females, age 21-48) were recruited. A probabilistically rewarded difficult visual discrimination task, in which participants were instructed about the contingencies, was used to assess blunted reward sensitivity. A response bias towards the more frequently rewarded stimulus (termed “reward bias”) was the primary outcome variable in this study. Participants also completed self-reported measures of anhedonia and depressive symptoms. Results Compared with the control group, relatives of patients with major depression with sub-clinical depressive symptoms displayed a blunted reward bias. Relatives without symptoms displayed largely intact motivational processing on both self-report and experimental measures. The degree of anhedonia was associated with attenuated reward bias in first-degree relatives of patients with major depression, especially in those with sub-clinical symptoms. Limitations The study did not include a depressed patient group, which restricted our ability to interpret the observed group differences. Conclusions Blunted reward sensitivity may be largely manifested in a subgroup of relatives with high levels of depressive symptoms. PMID:26590511

  10. Depression and sexual desire: an exploratory study in psychiatric patients.

    PubMed

    Lourenço, Mário; Azevedo, Leandra Pinheiro; Gouveia, José Luís

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to study the relation between depression and its effect on the sexual desire in psychiatric patients. The sample comprised 89 patients from the Psychiatric and Mental Health Department of Alto Ave's Hospital Center, Entidade Publica Empresarial. The obtained results in this exploratory study revealed that depressive symptomatology severity is directly related with sexual desire. Variables gender, age, and working status, as well as, sociocultural levels indicated important and significant differences between patients.

  11. Aptitude-based assignment of nurses to depressed patients.

    PubMed

    Haspeslagh, M; Eeckloo, K; Delesie, L B

    2012-08-01

    In psychiatric units, head nurses face the daily challenge of assigning nurses to patients. The 'match' between a patient and a nurse is not always optimal. This can hinder the therapeutic relationship. Aptitude is an important component of competence, especially for psychiatric nurses involved in therapeutic relationships. In this study, we undertook explorative research to investigate possible relationships between nurse aptitudes and outcomes in depressed patients. We found statistically significant relationships between specific nurse aptitudes, along professional rank, and particular patient outcomes. During the hospital stay, patients' depressive feelings change as they recover. Our results indicate that, as a patient's depressive feelings change, another type of nurse, one with an aptitude that supports the patient's current needs, should be assigned to care for that patient. This suggestion is at odds with current practises of assigning a patient to one nurse for the entire hospital stay.

  12. Discharging patients from acute care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Helen

    2016-02-10

    Planning for patient discharge is an essential element of any admission to an acute setting, but may often be left until the patient is almost ready to leave hospital. This article emphasises why discharge planning is important and lists the essential principles that should be addressed to ensure that patients leave at an optimum time, feeling confident and safe to do so. Early assessment, early planning and co-ordination of all the teams involved in the patient's care are essential. Effective communication between the various teams and with the patient and their family or carer(s) is necessary. Patients should leave hospital with all the information, medications and equipment they require. Appropriate plans should have been developed and communicated to the receiving community or non-acute team. When patient discharge is effective, complications as a result of extended lengths of hospital stay are prevented, hospital beds are used efficiently and readmissions are reduced.

  13. Assessing the Cognitive Regulation of Emotion in Depressed Stroke Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Margaret A.; Andrewes, David G.

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated the psychometric properties of a simple scale for measuring positive interpersonal attitudes of depressed stroke patients, with regard to their cognitive limitations. Two versions of the Attitudes Towards Relationships Scale were developed and administered to depressed stroke (n = 48) and control rheumatic/orthopaedic (n = 45)…

  14. Correlates of Suicidality among Patients with Psychotic Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaffer, Ayal; Flint, Alastair J.; Smith, Eric; Rothschild, Anthony J.; Mulsant, Benoit H.; Szanto, Katalin; Peasley-Miklus, Catherine; Heo, Moonseong; Papademetriou, Eros; Meyers, Barnett S.

    2008-01-01

    The independent association of age and other factors with suicidality in patients with major depression with psychotic features was examined. Of the 183 study participants, 21% had a suicide attempt during the current episode. Male gender, Hispanic background, past suicide attempt, higher depression scores, and higher cognitive scores were each…

  15. Electroconvulsive therapy in patient with psychotic depression and multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Urban-Kowalczyk, Małgorzata; Rudecki, Tomasz; Wróblewski, Dariusz; Smigielski, Janusz; Kałużyńska, Olga; Rabe-Jabłońska, Jolanta

    2014-08-01

    Safety of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in depressive patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) is still discussed and based solely on case reports. This kind of therapy was used in both unipolar depression and depression in bipolar disorder. It was suggested that ECT might cause the deterioration of neurological state (new MS lesions in magnetic resonance imaging). Moreover, there were also data indicating some anesthesiological complications and difficulties in patients with MS. We have presented a case of a patient who was treated with ECT and developed grand mal seizure after 14th electroconvulsive treatment.

  16. Subclinical depressive symptoms affect responses to acute psychosocial stress in healthy premenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Benson, S; Arck, P C; Blois, S; Schedlowski, M; Elsenbruch, S

    2011-01-01

    Subclinical depressive symptoms constitute a primary risk factor for major depression as well as for cardiovascular conditions, which may be mediated by endocrine or immune alterations. The aim of this study was to assess the association between the extent of subclinical depressive symptoms and neuroendocrine and immune cell responses to acute psychosocial stress in healthy females. In N = 33 healthy premenopausal women, state anxiety, plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone and serum cortisol, and interleukin-6 (IL-6) concentration responses to public speaking stress were assessed. Beck depression inventory (BDI) scores were entered as a covariate in the analyses. The IL-6 response was significantly associated with BDI scores (p < 0.05). Secondary analyses revealed that women with more subclinical depressive symptoms demonstrated a reduced stress-induced increase in circulating IL-6 level (p < 0.05). By contrast, stress-induced neuroendocrine activation was not associated with depressive symptoms. Hence, subclinical depressive symptoms were associated with IL-6 responses to stress in young, healthy women. Unexpectedly, there was a reduced increase of serum IL-6 level in response to stress. Effects of depressive symptoms on the IL-6 response to stress may differ between subclinical and major depression.

  17. Pharmacotherapy of Acute Bipolar Depression in Adults: An Evidence Based Approach

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In the majority of cases of bipolar disorder, manic episodes are usually brief and typically responsive to currently available psychopharmacological agents. In contrast, depressive manifestations are more prevalent and persistent, and can present as major depressive/mixed episodes or residual interepisode symptoms. The depressive phase is often associated with other neuropsychiatric conditions, such as anxiety spectrum disorders, substance use disorders, stressor-related disorders, and eating disorders. It is viewed as a systemic disease with associated ailments such as metabolic syndrome, diabetes mellitus, and cardiovascular disease. There is an increased rate of mortality not only from suicide, but also from concomitant physical illness. This scenario is made worse by the fact that depressive symptoms, which represent the main disease burden, are often refractory to existing psychotropic drugs. As such, there is a pressing need for novel agents that are efficacious in acute depressive exacerbations, and also have applicable value in preventing recurrent episodes. The rationale of the present review is to delineate the pharmacotherapy of the depressive phase of bipolar disorder with medications for which there is evidence in the form of observational, open-label, or double-blind randomized controlled studies. In the treatment of acute bipolar depression in adults, a comprehensive appraisal of the extant literature reveals that among mood stabilizers, the most robust proof of efficacy exists for divalproex sodium; while atypical antipsychotics, which include olanzapine, quetiapine, lurasidone, and cariprazine, are also effective, as demonstrated in controlled trials. PMID:27274384

  18. A patient-centered research agenda for the care of the acutely ill older patient

    PubMed Central

    Wald, Heidi L.; Leykum, Luci K.; Mattison, Melissa L. P.; Vasilevskis, Eduard E.; Meltzer, David O.

    2015-01-01

    Hospitalists and others acute care providers are limited by gaps in evidence addressing the needs of the acutely ill older adult population. The Society of Hospital Medicine (SHM) sponsored the Acute Care of Older Patients (ACOP) Priority Setting Partnership to develop a research agenda focused on bridging this gap. Informed by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) framework for identification and prioritization of research areas, we adapted a methodology developed by the James Lind Alliance to engage diverse stakeholders in the research agenda setting process. The work of the Partnership proceeded through four steps: convening, consulting, collating, and prioritizing. First, the steering committee convened a Partnership of 18 stakeholder organizations in May 2013. Next, stakeholder organizations surveyed members to identify important unanswered questions in the acute care of older persons, receiving 1299 responses from 580 individuals. Finally, an extensive and structured process of collation and prioritization resulted in a final list of ten research questions in the following areas: advanced care planning, care transitions, delirium, dementia, depression, medications, models of care, physical function, surgery, and training. With the changing demographics of the hospitalized population, a workforce with limited geriatrics training, and gaps in evidence to inform clinical decision-making for acutely ill older patients, the identified research questions deserve the highest priority in directing future research efforts to improve care for the older hospitalized patient and enrich training. PMID:25877486

  19. A patient-centered research agenda for the care of the acutely ill older patient.

    PubMed

    Wald, Heidi L; Leykum, Luci K; Mattison, Melissa L P; Vasilevskis, Eduard E; Meltzer, David O

    2015-05-01

    Hospitalists and others acute-care providers are limited by gaps in evidence addressing the needs of the acutely ill older adult population. The Society of Hospital Medicine sponsored the Acute Care of Older Patients Priority Setting Partnership to develop a research agenda focused on bridging this gap. Informed by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute framework for identification and prioritization of research areas, we adapted a methodology developed by the James Lind Alliance to engage diverse stakeholders in the research agenda setting process. The work of the Partnership proceeded through 4 steps: convening, consulting, collating, and prioritizing. First, the steering committee convened a partnership of 18 stakeholder organizations in May 2013. Next, stakeholder organizations surveyed members to identify important unanswered questions in the acute care of older persons, receiving 1299 responses from 580 individuals. Finally, an extensive and structured process of collation and prioritization resulted in a final list of 10 research questions in the following areas: advanced-care planning, care transitions, delirium, dementia, depression, medications, models of care, physical function, surgery, and training. With the changing demographics of the hospitalized population, a workforce with limited geriatrics training, and gaps in evidence to inform clinical decision making for acutely ill older patients, the identified research questions deserve the highest priority in directing future research efforts to improve care for the older hospitalized patient and enrich training.

  20. Mitochondrial respiration in blood platelets of depressive patients.

    PubMed

    Hroudová, Jana; Fišar, Zdeněk; Kitzlerová, Eva; Zvěřová, Martina; Raboch, Jiří

    2013-11-01

    Recent evidences include mitochondrial dysfunctions in pathophysiology of mood disorders. We examined association between depressive disorders and mitochondrial respiration using both intact and permeabilized blood platelets. In intact platelets, physiological respiration, maximal capacity of electron transport system and respiratory rate after complex I inhibition were decreased in depressive patients, who reached partial remission, compared to healthy controls. Respiratory rates were unchanged in several respiratory states in permeabilized platelets. Results indicate that changes in respiratory rate in intact platelets can be used as biological marker of depressive disorder. The hypothesis that decreased mitochondrial respiratory rate participate in pathophysiology of depression was supported.

  1. Memory mood congruency phenomenon in bipolar I disorder and major depression disorder patients

    PubMed Central

    Delgado, V.B.; Kapczinski, F.; Chaves, M.L.F.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate memory performance in tasks with and without affective content (to confirm the mood congruency phenomenon) in acutely admitted patients with bipolar I disorder (BD) and major depression disorder (MDD) and in healthy participants. Seventy-eight participants (24 BD, 29 MDD, and 25 healthy controls) were evaluated. Three word lists were used as the memory task with affective content (positive, negative and indifferent). Psychiatric symptoms were also evaluated with rating scales (Young Mania Rating Scale for mania and Hamilton Depression Rating Scale for depression). Patients were selected during the first week of hospitalization. BD patients showed higher scores in the word span with positive tone than MDD patients and healthy controls (P = 0.002). No other difference was observed for tests with affective tone. MDD patients presented significantly lower scores in the Mini-Mental State Exam, logical memory test, visual recognition span, and digit span, while BD patients presented lower scores in the visual recognition test and digit span. Mood congruency effect was found for word span with positive tone among BD patients but no similar effect was observed among MDD patients for negative items. MDD patients presented more memory impairment than BD patients, but BD patients also showed memory impairment. PMID:22714812

  2. Immunological differences between patients with major depression and somatization syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rief, W; Pilger, F; Ihle, D; Bosmans, E; Egyed, B; Maes, M

    2001-12-31

    There is some evidence that major depression is accompanied by activation of the inflammatory response system (IRS). There is also evidence that proinflammatory cytokines and induction of IRS activation are associated with sickness behavior in experimental animals. However, no research has examined the IRS in somatization disorder. The aim of this study was to examine possible immunological differences between major depression, somatization and healthy controls. We measured the following IRS variables in patients with major depression (n=36), somatization syndrome (SSI-8; n=37), major depression and somatization (n=40) and healthy controls (n=37): interleukin-6 (IL-6); interleukin-1-receptor-antagonist (IL-1RA); plasma soluble interleukin-6 receptor (IL-6R); soluble suppressor/cytotoxic antigen (CD8); leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF-R); and Clara cell protein (CC16), an endogenous anticytokine. Serum CD8 concentrations were significantly increased in patients with major depression compared with concentrations in patients with somatization syndrome, whereas concentrations in normal controls were intermediate between those of the two groups of patients. Serum CC16 was significantly lower in major depression than in healthy controls. The highest CC16 scores were found in patients with somatization syndrome. Somatizing patients have significantly lower serum IL-6 values than normal controls and depressed patients. The present results indicate (1) an activation of the IRS in depression with signs of T-cell activation (increased CD8), monocytic activation (IL-1RA) and a lowered anti-inflammatory capacity of the serum (lower CC16) and (2) an immune alteration in somatizing syndrome, such as monocytic activation (increased IL-1RA) and indicators of lowered T-lymphocytic activity (lowered CD8 and IL-6). These results suggest different immune alterations in somatization syndrome and depression.

  3. The expression of depression among Javanese patients with major depressive disorder: a concept mapping study.

    PubMed

    Brintnell, E Sharon; Sommer, Ryan W; Kuncoro, Bambang; Setiawan, G Pandu; Bailey, Patricia

    2013-08-01

    In this study, we explored the presentation of clinical depression in Java, Indonesia. Interviews were conducted with 20 Javanese patients (male and female) with major depressive disorder from both lower and higher socioeconomic levels. The recruited participants came from provincial and private mental health hospitals in the cities of Solo, Yogykarta (Jogja), Jakarta, and Malang on the island of Java, Indonesia. Concept mapping methodology using multidimensional scaling and hierarchical cluster analysis was used to identify underlying themes in the expression of depressive phenomena in this Indonesian population. The results identified themes that grouped into six clusters: interpersonal relationships, hopelessness, physical/somatic, poverty of thought, discourage, and defeat. Findings give support to the view that culture influences the expression of Indonesian depressive phenomenology, which nevertheless has some common roots with Western clinical pictures of the disorder. Cultural influences may mask symptoms of the disorder to clinicians. Diagnostic and assessment tools must be carefully selected to ensure they address culturally specific expressions of depression.

  4. A test of the tripartite model's prediction of anhedonia's specificity to depression: patients with major depression versus patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Joiner, Thomas E; Brown, Jessica S; Metalsky, Gerald I

    2003-08-01

    The tripartite model of depression and anxiety suggests that anhedonia represents a relatively specific marker of depression. A strong version of this view is that anhedonic symptoms would particularly characterize depressed patients, even when compared to another diagnostic group-schizophrenic patients-for whom anhedonic symptoms represent a well-studied feature. This prediction was tested among 102 VA psychiatric inpatients (95 men), ages 21-72 (M=43.56; S.D.=8.47), all of whom received diagnoses of either major depression (n=50) or schizophrenia (n=52) based on structured diagnostic interviews. As predicted, patients with major depression scored significantly higher on the anhedonic symptoms scale of the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) than did patients with schizophrenia. However, there was no difference between the two groups on the BDI total score or the BDI non-anhedonic symptoms score. Consistent with the tripartite model, anhedonic symptoms were more related to depressive vs. schizophrenic diagnostic status, whereas non-anhedonic depressive symptoms were not. Within the study's limitations, results were interpreted as relatively strong support for the validity and extension of the tripartite model.

  5. Depression

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Depression About Depression Click for more information Depression is more than ... that contribute to depression. Is It Grief or Depression? Sometimes it can be difficult to distinguish grief ...

  6. Depressive symptomatology differentiates subgroups of patients with seasonal affective disorder.

    PubMed

    Goel, Namni; Terman, Michael; Terman, Jiuan Su

    2002-01-01

    Patients with seasonal affective disorder (SAD) may vary in symptoms of their depressed winter mood state, as we showed previously for nondepressed (manic, hypomanic, hyperthymic, euthymic) springtime states [Goel et al., 1999]. Identification of such differences during depression may be useful in predicting differences in treatment efficacy or analyzing the pathogenesis of the disorder. In a cross-sectional analysis, we determined whether 165 patients with Bipolar Disorder (I, II) or Major Depressive Disorder (MDD), both with seasonal pattern, showed different symptom profiles while depressed. Assessment was by the Structured Interview Guide for the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale-Seasonal Affective Disorder Version (SIGH-SAD), which includes a set of items for atypical symptoms. We identified subgroup differences in SAD based on categories specified for nonseasonal depression, using multivariate analysis of variance and discriminant analysis. Patients with Bipolar Disorder (I and II) were more depressed (had higher SIGH-SAD scores) and showed more psychomotor agitation and social withdrawal than those with MDD. Bipolar I patients had more psychomotor retardation, late insomnia, and social withdrawal than bipolar II patients. Men showed more obsessions/compulsions and suicidality than women, while women showed more weight gain and early insomnia. Whites showed more guilt and fatigability than blacks, while blacks showed more hypochondriasis and social withdrawal. Darker-eyed patients were significantly more depressed and fatigued than blue-eyed patients. Single and divorced or separated patients showed more hypochondriasis and diurnal variation than married patients. Employed patients showed more atypical symptoms than unemployed patients, although most of the subgroup distinctions lay on the Hamilton Scale. These results comprise a set of biological and sociocultural factors-including race, gender, and marital and employment status-which contribute to depressive

  7. The Relationship of Depression to Work Status during the Acute Period of Low Back Pain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaudet, Joanne; Rasch, John

    1988-01-01

    Investigated relationship of Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) scores to employment status and time since injury among persons with acute low back pain. Work status was unrelated to BDI scores. Participants 5 to 6 months post-injury scored higher than participants l month post-injury; participants working 5 to 6 months post-injury scored higher than…

  8. Reduced Venous Blood Basophil Count and Anxious Depression in Patients with Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Ji Hyun; Kim, Hee-Jin; Fava, Maurizio; Mischoulon, David; Papakostas, George I; Nierenberg, Andrew; Heo, Jung-Yoon

    2016-01-01

    Objective Anxious depression has a distinct neurobiology, clinical course and treatment response from non-anxious depression. Role of inflammation in anxious depression has not been examined. As an exploratory study to characterize the role of inflammation on a development of anxious depression, we aimed to determine the relationship between white blood cell (WBC) subset counts and anxiety in individuals with major depressive disorder (MDD). Methods A total of 709 patients who were newly diagnosed with MDD were recruited. Anxiety levels of participants were evaluated using the Anxiety/ Somatization subitem of the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale. The association between WBC subset fraction and anxiety was evaluated. Results Basophil and eosinophil sub-fractions showed significant negative correlations with HAM-D anxiety/somatization factor scores (basophils: r=-0.092, p=0.014 and eosinophils: r=-0.075, p=0.046). When an anxiety score (a sum of somatic and psychic anxiety) was entered as a dependent variable, only basophils showed significant negative association with the anxiety scores after adjusting for all other WBC subset counts and demographic factors (t=-2.57, p=0.010). Conclusion This study showed that anxious depression had a decreased basophil subfraction, which might be associated with involvement of inflammation in development of anxious depression. PMID:27247599

  9. Prevalence of anxiety and depressive symptoms among patients with hypothyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Bathla, Manish; Singh, Manpreet; Relan, Pankaj

    2016-01-01

    Context: The association between depression and thyroid function is well known. Both conditions express many similar symptoms, thus making the diagnosis and treatment difficult. Aims: To find the prevalence of anxiety and depressive symptoms among patients with hypothyroid. Settings and Design: Cross-sectional study. Materials and Methodology: A total of 100 patients diagnosed as hypothyroidism were evaluated using Hamilton depression rating scale (HDRS) and Hamilton scale for anxiety (HAM-A). Statistical Analysis Used: The data were analyzed using the SPSS for Windows version 17.0 software. The quantitative data were expressed in number and percentage. The results obtained were compared using the Chi-square test. Results: Females constituted 70% of the sample. A total of 60% reported some degree of depression based on HDRS (males – 56.63% and females – 64.29%) whereas about 63% out of the total patients screened showed some degree of anxiety (males –56.66% and females – 65.72%) based on HAM-A. The most common depressive symptom among the males was depressed mood (73.33%) and among females was gastrointestinal somatic symptoms (68.54%). The most common anxiety symptom among the males was depressed mood (70.0%) and among females was anxious mood (92.85%). Conclusions: Psychiatric symptoms/disorders are common in patients with thyroid dysfunction. PMID:27366712

  10. Acute kidney injury in the cancer patient.

    PubMed

    Campbell, G Adam; Hu, Daniel; Okusa, Mark D

    2014-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a frequent and significant complication of cancer and cancer therapy. Cancer patients frequently encounter risk factors for AKI including older age, CKD, prerenal conditions, sepsis, exposure to nephrotoxins, and obstructive physiology. AKI can also be secondary to paraneoplastic conditions, including glomerulonephritis and microangiopathic processes. This complication can have significant consequences, including effects on patients' ability to continue to receive therapy for their malignancy. This review will serve to summarize potential etiologies of AKI that present in patients with cancer as well as to highlight specific patient populations, such as the critically ill cancer patient.

  11. Depressive Symptoms and Spiritual Wellbeing in Asymptomatic Heart Failure Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Paul J.; Wilson, Kathleen; Iqbal, Navaid; Iqbal, Fatima; Alvarez, Milagros; Pung, Meredith A.; Wachmann, Katherine; Rutledge, Thomas; Maglione, Jeanne; Zisook, Sid; Dimsdale, Joel E.; Lunde, Ottar; Greenberg, Barry H.; Maisel, Alan; Raisinghani, Ajit; Natarajan, Loki; Jain, Shamini; Hufford, David J.; Redwine, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Depression adversely predicts prognosis in individuals with symptomatic heart failure. In some clinical populations, spiritual wellness is considered to be a protective factor against depressive symptoms. This study examined associations among depressive symptoms, spiritual wellbeing, sleep, fatigue, functional capacity, and inflammatory biomarkers in 132 men and women with asymptomatic stage B heart failure (age 66.5 years ±10.5). Approximately 32% of the patients scored ≥10 on the Beck Depression Inventory, indicating potentially clinically relevant depressive symptoms. Multiple regression analysis predicting f ewer depressive symptoms included the following significant variables: a lower inflammatory score comprised of disease-relevant biomarkers (p<0.02), less fatigue (p<0.001), better sleep (p<0.04), and more spiritual wellbeing (p<0.01) (overall model F=26.6, p<0.001, adjusted R square = 0.629). Further analyses indicated that the meaning (p<0.01) and peace (p<0.01) subscales, but not the faith (p=0.332) subscale, of spiritual wellbeing were independently associated with fewer depressive symptoms. Interventions aimed at increasing spiritual wellbeing in patients lives, and specifically meaning and peace, may be a potential treatment target for depressive symptoms asymptomatic heart failure. PMID:25533643

  12. Neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio in patients with major depressive disorder undergoing no pharmacological therapy.

    PubMed

    Demir, Süleyman; Atli, Abdullah; Bulut, Mahmut; İbiloğlu, Aslıhan Okan; Güneş, Mehmet; Kaya, Mehmet Cemal; Demirpençe, Özlem; Sır, Aytekin

    2015-01-01

    Studies attempting to clarify the relationship between major depressive disorder (MDD) and the immune system have been increasing in recent years. It was reported that increased production of the main proinflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin-1, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and that of acute phase reactants may play a role in the etiopathogenesis of depression. Stress and depression were reported to increase leukocyte and neutrophil counts and to decrease lymphocyte count. Biological determinants affecting the diagnosis, therapy, and prognosis of depression are quite limited. Therefore, new etiological models are needed to explain the pathophysiology of depression. In recent years, neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) was determined to be a good indicator of inflammatory status. There is no study in the literature investigating NLR in MDD. This study aims to examine the role of inflammation in the etiology of depression based on the NLR in MDD patients who are undergoing no pharmacological therapy. A total of 41 patients diagnosed with MDD, who received no antidepressant therapy within the past 1 month, were included in the study, which took place between January and March 2015. The control group consisted of 47 healthy subjects with no psychiatric disorders. A sociodemographic information form and a Beck Depression Scale were administered, and the blood was taken for biochemical analysis. Significant differences were identified in the NLR, neutrophil count, lymphocyte percentage, and leukocyte values of the patient group when compared with the control group (P<0.05). Our study is the first in which NLR was investigated in MDD. The findings of the study reveal that NLR tends to be higher in patients with MDD, and a high NLR value supports the view that inflammation is a critical factor in the etiology of MDD.

  13. Acute hepatitis C in patients receiving hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Griveas, I; Germanidis, G; Visvardis, G; Morice, Y; Perelson, A S; Pawlotsky, J M; Papadopoulou, D

    2007-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is frequent in patients with end-stage renal disease treated by chronic dialysis, with a prevalence varying from 10-65% according to the geographical data. The prevalence is significantly associated with the duration of dialysis and the number of transfused blood products[1,2] and has dramatically declined with efficient blood screening.[3] We studied patients with acute HCV infection in a dialysis unit. The diagnosis was based on both anti-HCV detection and HCV-RNA detection. Other virological tools including HCV genotype determination was also used to tailor treatment to the individual patient and determine its efficacy for a one-year follow-up period. Seventeen patients (7 male and 10 female, mean age: 63.7 +/- 11.6 SD) with acute hepatitis C were enrolled to our study. All of them were followed up for a period of one year after the diagnosis was established. Phylogenetic analysis distinguished two separate HCV subtypes 1b, which were both responsible for this acute infection (see Figure 1). These types did not differ in their behavior on the clinical situation of our patients, as confirmed by the fact that in both groups of patients, there was only one patient who presented with acute illness. Six patients of our study group, three months after the acute infection, received pegylated interferon (Peg-IFNa2a) 135 mug for a six-month period. Four of them responded very well to therapy and at the first determination HCV RNA was below the cutoff point. One of our patients with very high HCV levels (HCV RNA > 50,000,000 IU/mL), despite receiving the same therapy, did not respond well and developed cirrhosis. In conclusion, it is clear from our experience that better information is needed about the current incidence, prevalence, and risk factors for HCV infection in dialysis patients. Algorithms for the diagnosis and management of hepatitis C should be developed by academic societies. Routine screening for hepatitis C also would allow

  14. The patient experience of depression and remission: focus group results.

    PubMed

    Frank, Lori; Matza, Louis S; Hanlon, Jennifer; Mannix, Sally; Revicki, Dennis A; Feltner, Douglas; Morlock, Robert J

    2007-08-01

    Few depression measures were developed with the patient perspective. To obtain patient views on depression and early symptom resolution, 4 focus groups (N=31) were conducted. Patients also completed the Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomology (Self-Report), SF-36, and a rating of the bothersomeness and significance of 12 symptoms of depression. Transcripts were reviewed for major themes. Irritability was a key symptom and it remitted earlier than others. Important to participants were low mood, low energy, lack of motivation, lack of focus/concentration, feelings of guilt, self-critical thoughts, feeling overwhelmed, lack of enjoyment, hypersomnia, restlessness, anger, and irritability. Gender differences emerged; most men reported irritability as one of the first symptoms to remit; for women, motivation level and energy commonly remitted first. Results suggest that new measures of treatment outcome should encompass irritability, anger, and ability to cope with life stressors.

  15. Association between Serum Magnesium Levels and Depression in Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Yingying; Zhao, Kai; Luan, Xiaoqian; Liu, Zhihua; Cai, Yan; Wang, Qiongzhang; Zhu, Beilei; He, Jincai

    2016-01-01

    Post-stroke depression (PSD) is a common psychiatric complication of stroke that is associated with a poor outcome in stroke patients. Our aim was to assess the association between the serum magnesium levels and the presence of PSD in Chinese patients. Two hundred nine stroke patients were included in the study. Depressive symptoms were measured by the 17-Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression at 3 months after stroke. Based on the depressive symptoms, diagnoses of depression were made in line with the DSM-IV criteria for PSD. Serum magnesium levels were evaluated using the dimethyl aniline blue colorimetric method at admission. Multivariate analyses were conducted using logistic regression models. Further, 120 normal subjects were recruited, and their serum magnesium levels were also measured as control. At 3 months, fifty-nine patients (28.2%) were diagnosed as PSD. The serum magnesium levels were significantly lower in both PSD patients and non-PSD patients than in normal subjects (p < 0.001). Indeed, patients with PSD showed lower serum magnesium levels (p < 0.001) than did non-PSD patients at admission. In the multivariate analyses, after adjusting for potential variables, we found that an increased risk of PSD was associated with serum magnesium levels ≤ 0.84mmol/L (OR 2.614, 95% CI 1.178-5.798, p=0.018). Low serum magnesium levels at admission were found to be associated with the presence of PSD at 3 months after stroke. PMID:28053818

  16. Self-stigma in depressive patients: Association of cognitive schemata, depression, and self-esteem.

    PubMed

    Shimotsu, Sakie; Horikawa, Naoshi

    2016-12-01

    Many empirical studies have indicated that various psychosocial and psychiatric variables are correlated with levels of self-stigma. Treatment methods for reducing self-stigma have been investigated in recent years, especially those examining the relationship between negative cognitive schemata and self-stigma. This study examined the relationship of self-stigma with cognitive schemata, depression, and self-esteem in depressive patients. Furthermore, structural equation modeling (SEM) was conducted to evaluate three hypothetical models. Study participants were 110 patients with depression (54 men, 56 women; mean age=45.65years, SD=12.68; 83 diagnosed with mood disorders; 22 with neurotic, stress-related, or somatoform disorders; and 5 with other disorders) attending a psychiatric service. Outcomes were measured using the Japanese versions of the Devaluation-Discrimination Scale, Dysfunctional Attitude Scale, Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale, and Rosenberg's Self Esteem Scale. The analysis indicated a better fit of the model that assumed self-stigma as mediator, suggesting that cognitive schemata influence self-stigma, while self-stigma affects depression and self-esteem. The tested models using SEM indicated that (1) self-stigma has the potential to mediate the relationship between cognitive schemata and depression, and (2) depression and self-stigma have a similar influence on self-esteem. Although low self-esteem is considered one of the symptoms of depression, when we aim to recover self-esteem, we do not only observe improvement in depressive symptoms; thus, approaches that focus on the reduction of self-stigma are probably valid.

  17. Exercise for Depressive Symptoms in Stroke Patients: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Eng, Janice J.; Reime, Birgit

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective was to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of studies that examined the effects of structured exercise on depressive symptoms in stroke patients. Methods We searched for published randomized controlled trials which evaluated the effect of structured exercise programs (e.g., functional, resistance or aerobic training) on depressive symptoms. The mean effect size, a 95% confidence interval (CI) and I-squared (I2) for heterogeneity were estimated. Sensitivity analyses were conducted. Results Thirteen studies (n=1022) were included in the meta-analysis. Exercise resulted in less depressive symptoms immediately after the exercise program ended, SMD=−0.13 [95%CI = −0.26, −0.01], I2 =6%, p=0.03, but these effects were not retained with longer term follow-up. Exercise appeared to have a positive effect on depressive symptoms across both the subacute (≤ 6 months post-stroke) and chronic stage of recovery (> 6 months). There was a significant effect of exercise on depressive symptoms when higher intensity studies were pooled, but not for lower intensity exercise protocols. Antidepressant medication use was not documented in the majority of studies and thus, its potential confounding interaction with exercise could not be assessed. Conclusions Exercise may be a potential treatment to prevent or reduce depressive symptoms in individuals with sub-acute and chronic stroke. PMID:24535729

  18. Anesthetic management of patients with acute stroke.

    PubMed

    Flexman, Alana M; Donovan, Anne L; Gelb, Adrian W

    2012-06-01

    Stroke is a major cause of death and disability. Anesthesiologists are likely to encounter patients with stroke and must be aware of the anesthetic considerations for these patients. Intravenous thrombolysis and intra-arterial thrombolysis are effective treatments for acuteischemic stroke as well as evolving endovascular techniques such as mechanical clot retrieval. Recent retrospective studies have found an association between general anesthesia and poor clinical outcome. The results of these studies have several limitations, and current evidence is inadequate to guide the choice of anesthesia in patients with acute stroke. The choice of anesthesia must be based on individual patient factors until further research is completed.

  19. Depression in patients with Parkinson's disease: impact on functioning.

    PubMed

    Stella, Florindo; Banzato, Claudio E M; Barasnevicius Quagliato, Elizabeth M A; Viana, Maura Aparecida

    2008-09-15

    Depression is a frequently observed neuropsychiatric phenomenon in Parkinson's disease (PD) and it has been lately considered as a manifestation of such disease. The aim of the study was to investigate the relationship between depression and clinical aspects of PD and to assess the impact of the co-occurrence of such condition on the burden imposed by PD. Fifty outpatients diagnosed with idiopathic PD according to the London Brain Bank criteria were examined. PD was evaluated using Hoehn & Yahr staging (H&Y), United Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) and Schwab & England (S&E) functional capacity evaluation. A semi-structured clinical interview was used. The diagnosis of PD was made by neurologist experts on movement disorders, and the diagnosis of depression was made by a psychiatrist, according to the ICD-10 diagnostic criteria. Depressive symptoms were additionally measured using the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Scale. The analysis of quantitative data was performed using descriptive statistics, univariate linear regression, T-Student Test and ANOVA. Seventeen (34%) patients were diagnosed as clinically depressed and, when compared to the non-depressed ones, presented the following results: H&Y: 3.2 vs. 2.8; UPDRS total: 75.7 vs. 65.3; S&E: 53.5% vs. 65.8% and PD duration: 114.4 months vs. 125.8 months. Depressed patients showed more advanced staging (H&Y), a more severe global clinical condition (UPDRS) and also a greater decrease in their functional capacity (S&E). These data reinforce the hypothesis that depression is associated to poorer functioning in patients with PD.

  20. Auditory hallucinations in tinnitus patients: Emotional relationships and depression

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Rosa Maria Rodrigues dos; Sanchez, Tanit Ganz; Bento, Ricardo Ferreira; Lucia, Mara Cristina Souza de

    2012-01-01

    Summary Introduction: Over the last few years, our Tinnitus Research Group has identified an increasing number of patients with tinnitus who also complained of repeated perception of complex sounds, such as music and voices. Such hallucinatory phenomena motivated us to study their possible relation to the patients' psyches. Aims: To assess whether hallucinatory phenomena were related to the patients' psychosis and/or depression, and clarify their content and function in the patients' psyches. Method: Ten subjects (8 women; mean age = 65.7 years) were selected by otolaryngologists and evaluated by the same psychologists through semi-structured interviews, the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, and psychoanalysis interviews. Results: We found no association between auditory hallucinations and psychosis; instead, this phenomenon was associated with depressive aspects. The patients' discourse revealed that hallucinatory phenomena played unconscious roles in their emotional life. In all cases, there was a remarkable and strong tendency to recall/repeat unpleasant facts/situations, which tended to exacerbate the distress caused by the tinnitus and hallucinatory phenomena and worsen depressive aspects. Conclusions: There is an important relationship between tinnitus, hallucinatory phenomena, and depression based on persistent recall of facts/situations leading to psychic distress. The knowledge of such findings represents a further step towards the need to adapt the treatment of this particular subgroup of tinnitus patients through interdisciplinary teamwork. Prospective. PMID:25991952

  1. Effects of paroxetine-mediated inhibition of GRK2 expression on depression and cardiovascular function in patients with myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Xiuqing; Wang, Qing; Guo, Rui; Xu, Lingling; Chen, Qin M; Hou, Yinglong

    2016-01-01

    Background Paroxetine is a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor utilized in the treatment of depression and anxiety disorders. Recent studies have identified paroxetine as a G protein-coupled receptor kinase-2 (GRK2) inhibitor capable of reversing cardiac dysfunction and remodeling in experimental models of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). We determine the clinical importance of paroxetine on cardiac functions in patients having AMI with depression (AMID) in comparison with fluoxetine, an unrelated selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor that does not inhibit GRK2. Methods Diagnosis of depression was based on the 17-item Hamilton Depression Scale and Self-rating Depression Scale in AMI patients after hospital admission. AMID patients were randomly assigned to paroxetine or fluoxetine for treatment of depression. Heart rate variability and cardiac function were evaluated. GRK2 protein levels were measured using peripheral lymphocytes and Western blot. Results GRK2 expression in AMID patients was significantly higher than that in AMI patients without depression. In AMID patients, GRK2 levels were positively correlated with the 17-item Hamilton Depression Scale and the Self-rating Depression Scale scores, and negatively correlated with heart rate variability. Treatment of AMID patients with paroxetine significantly reduced the expression of GRK2, normalized the autonomic nervous system function, and improved cardiac performance. In contrast, fluoxetine normalized the autonomic nervous system but did not reduce the expression of GRK2 nor improved cardiac performance. Conclusion This study suggests that paroxetine is effective for improving cardiac function in patients with AMID and such effect correlates with GRK2 reduction. PMID:27695334

  2. Personality disorders, depression, and coping styles in Argentinean bulimic patients.

    PubMed

    Gongora, Vanesa C; van der Staak, Cees P F; Derksen, Jan J L

    2004-06-01

    This study investigates the coping styles of bulimic patients with personality disorders (PDs) and the effects of the level of depression on the relations between PDs and coping. The sample consisted of 75 Argentinean bulimic outpatients engaged in treatment. Patients completed the SCID II (Structural Interview for DSM IV-Personality Disorders), COPE (Coping Inventory), and the SCL-90-R (Symptom Checklist-90-Revised). No differences in the coping styles of bulimic patients with or without a PD were found. However, when three specific PDs were considered-Avoidant, Obsessive-Compulsive, or Borderline PDs-clear differences in the coping styles of the bulimics were found. However, the differences disappeared when depression was controlled. Regarding the severity of the three specific PDs, coping styles were only found to be associated with the Avoidant PD. Depression showed to affect the relations between coping styles and two specific PDs-Avoidant and Borderline PDs-in bulimic patients.

  3. Attitudes and beliefs of patients with chronic depression toward antidepressants and depression

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Sabrina Anne; Ab Rahman, Ab Fatah; Hassali, Mohamed Azmi Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Background Many patients have erroneous views with regard to depression and its management, and it was noted that these attitudes and beliefs significantly affected their adherence rates. Objectives The primary aim of this study was to determine the attitudes and beliefs of patients with depression toward depression and antidepressants. A secondary aim was to assess the influence of ethnicity on patients’ attitudes and beliefs. Patients and methods The study involved patients with chronic depression being followed up at an outpatient clinic at a government-run hospital in Malaysia. Patients’ attitudes and beliefs were assessed using the Antidepressant Compliance Questionnaire. Results A total of 104 patients of Malay, Chinese, and Indian ethnic groups met the selection criteria. Chinese patients had significantly negative attitudes and beliefs toward depression and antidepressants compared to Malays and Indians (b=-8.96, t103=-3.22; P<0.05). Component analysis revealed that 59% of patients believed that antidepressants can cause a person to have less control over their thoughts and feelings, while 67% believed that antidepressants could alter one’s personality; 60% believed it was okay to take fewer tablets on days when they felt better, while 66% believed that antidepressants helped solve their emotional problems and helped them worry less. Conclusion Patients had an overall positive view as to the benefits of antidepressants, but the majority had incorrect views as to the acceptable dosing of antidepressants and had concerns about the safety of the medication. Assessing patients’ attitudes and beliefs, as well as the impact of their respective cultures, can be used in tailoring psychoeducation sessions accordingly. PMID:26064052

  4. Mianserin and imipramine in the treatment of elderly depressed patients.

    PubMed

    Eklund, K; Dunbar, G C; Pinder, R M; Steffensen, K

    1985-01-01

    Fifty elderly depressed patients were randomly assigned to double-blind treatment, using a flexible dose schedule, with either mianserin 20-60 mg or imipramine 75-150 mg. Medication was continued for four weeks. Eleven patients withdrew from the study. At the end of treatment there were no significant differences between mianserin and imipramine in antidepressant efficacy. A significantly greater number of side-effects occurred in the imipramine group (dry mouth, days 7 and 14; faintness, dizziness, weakness, day 21). When treating elderly depressed patients mianserin may be preferred to imipramine because of a lower incidence of induced side-effects.

  5. Alteration of Heart Rate Variability in Patients of Depression

    PubMed Central

    Mondal, Sunita; Bandhu, Rajiv; Kataria, Dinesh; Gandhi, Asha

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Altered cardiac autonomic functions in form of reduced Heart Rate Variability (HRV) have been found to be associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in depressive patients. Aim To investigate the relationship between HRV measures, which is a non-invasive marker of autonomic nervous system and depression. Materials and Methods The study included a convenient sample size of drug naive depressive patients (n=30) diagnosed on basis of ICD-10 and compared with age and gender matched healthy volunteers (n=30). Five minute ECG recording was done for HRV analysis and frequency domain measures like LF (Low Frequency), HF (High Frequency), LF/HF ratio as well as time domain measures like SDNN (Standard Deviation of all NN interval) and RMSSD (Root Mean Square of Successive differences of NN intervals) were obtained. Results In the frequency domain parameters, values of LF (nu) and LF/HF Ratio were found to be significantly higher (p<0.001) whereas, that of HF (nu) was significantly lower (p<0.001) in depression group as compared to control group. However, in the time domain parameters, no significant difference was observed in SDNN and RMSSD values in between the two groups. Conclusion HRV recordings showed significant changes in frequency domain parameters in the patients suffering from depression. Thus, it could be said from our study that autonomic imbalance reflecting enhanced sympathetic activation relative to parasympathetic component is associated with depression. PMID:28208852

  6. A LONGITUDINAL STUDY OF POOR SLEEP AFTER INPATIENT POST-ACUTE REHABILITATION: THE ROLE OF DEPRESSION AND PRE-ILLNESS SLEEP QUALITY

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Jennifer L.; Jouldjian, Stella; Mitchell, Michael N.; Josephson, Karen R.; Alessi, Cathy A.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To explore the unique impact of poor sleep and symptoms of depression on sleep quality for up to one year after inpatient post-acute rehabilitation among older adults. Design Prospective longitudinal cohort study. Setting Two in-patient post-acute rehabilitation facilities Participants 245 individuals over age 65 years (mean age=80 years, 38% female) Interventions None. Measurements Sleep quality was assessed with the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) during the post-acute care stay twice to evaluate pre-illness sleep quality and sleep quality during the post-acute care stay, and again at 3, 6, 9 and 12-months follow-up. Demographics, symptoms of depression, cognitive functioning, and comorbidities were also assessed. Results Across time points, sleep was significantly disturbed for many individuals. Nested regression models predicting PSQI total score at 3, 6, 9 and 12 months showed that variables entered in Block 1 (age, gender, cognitive functioning and comorbidities) were significant predictors of poor sleep at 6-months, but not at 3, 9 or 12 months follow-up. Depression (Block 2) and pre-illness PSQI total score (Block 3) were significant predictors of PSQI total score at all follow-up time points. PSQI total score during post-acute care (Block 4) explained a significant proportion of variance only at the 3-month follow-up. Conclusions This study confirms that chronic poor sleep is common among older adults during post-acute rehabilitation, and resolution of sleep disturbance after acute health events may be a lengthy process. Our findings expand understanding of the role of depressive symptoms and pre-existing sleep complaints in predicting poor sleep over time among these vulnerable older adults. PMID:22617164

  7. Mental health professionals’ attitudes toward patients with PTSD and depression

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Thomas; Moergeli, Hanspeter; Kohler, Michaela; Carraro, Giovanni E.; Schnyder, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Background To date, mental health professionals’ attitudes toward posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), compared to other psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia or depression, have rarely been studied. Objective We assessed mental health professionals’ attitudes toward patients with PTSD compared to patients suffering from depression. Method Case vignettes of a patient with either PTSD or depression were presented to two samples of mental health professionals: attendees of a conference on posttraumatic stress (N=226) or of a lecture for psychiatry residents (N=112). Participants subsequently completed a questionnaire that assessed their attitude reactions to the presented case. Results Participants showed similarly positive attitudes toward depression and PTSD. PTSD elicited a more favorable attitude with regard to prosocial reactions, estimated dependency, attributed responsibility, and interest in the case, particularly in mental health professionals specializing in psychotraumatology. Across diagnoses, higher age and longer professional experience were associated with more positive attitudes toward patients. Conclusions Mental health professionals’ positive attitudes toward patients with depression and PTSD correlate with their specific knowledge about the disorder, their level of professional training, and their years of professional experience. Limitations The instruments used, although based on established theoretical concepts in attitude research, were not validated in their present versions. PMID:26507340

  8. Assessment of depression in medical patients: A systematic review of the utility of the Beck Depression Inventory-II

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuan-Pang; Gorenstein, Clarice

    2013-01-01

    To perform a systematic review of the utility of the Beck Depression Inventory for detecting depression in medical settings, this article focuses on the revised version of the scale (Beck Depression Inventory-II), which was reformulated according to the DSM-IV criteria for major depression. We examined relevant investigations with the Beck Depression Inventory-II for measuring depression in medical settings to provide guidelines for practicing clinicians. Considering the inclusion and exclusion criteria seventy articles were retained. Validation studies of the Beck Depression Inventory-II, in both primary care and hospital settings, were found for clinics of cardiology, neurology, obstetrics, brain injury, nephrology, chronic pain, chronic fatigue, oncology, and infectious disease. The Beck Depression Inventory-II showed high reliability and good correlation with measures of depression and anxiety. Its threshold for detecting depression varied according to the type of patients, suggesting the need for adjusted cut-off points. The somatic and cognitive-affective dimension described the latent structure of the instrument. The Beck Depression Inventory-II can be easily adapted in most clinical conditions for detecting major depression and recommending an appropriate intervention. Although this scale represents a sound path for detecting depression in patients with medical conditions, the clinician should seek evidence for how to interpret the score before using the Beck Depression Inventory-II to make clinical decisions. PMID:24141845

  9. Antidepressant Effects of a Single Dose of Ayahuasca in Patients With Recurrent Depression: A SPECT Study.

    PubMed

    Sanches, Rafael Faria; de Lima Osório, Flávia; Dos Santos, Rafael G; Macedo, Ligia R H; Maia-de-Oliveira, João Paulo; Wichert-Ana, Lauro; de Araujo, Draulio Barros; Riba, Jordi; Crippa, José Alexandre S; Hallak, Jaime E C

    2016-02-01

    Ayahuasca is an Amazonian botanical hallucinogenic brew which contains dimethyltryptamine, a 5-HT2A receptor agonist, and harmine, a monoamine-oxidase A inhibitor. Our group recently reported that ayahuasca administration was associated with fast-acting antidepressive effects in 6 depressive patients. The objective of the present work was to assess the antidepressive potentials of ayahuasca in a bigger sample and to investigate its effects on regional cerebral blood flow. In an open-label trial conducted in an inpatient psychiatric unit, 17 patients with recurrent depression received an oral dose of ayahuasca (2.2 mL/kg) and were evaluated with the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression, the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale, the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale, the Young Mania Rating Scale, and the Clinician Administered Dissociative States Scale during acute ayahuasca effects and 1, 7, 14, and 21 days after drug intake. Blood perfusion was assessed eight hours after drug administration by means of single photon emission tomography. Ayahuasca administration was associated with increased psychoactivity (Clinician Administered Dissociative States Scale) and significant score decreases in depression-related scales (Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression, Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale, Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale) from 80 minutes to day 21. Increased blood perfusion in the left nucleus accumbens, right insula and left subgenual area, brain regions implicated in the regulation of mood and emotions, were observed after ayahuasca intake. Ayahuasca was well tolerated. Vomiting was the only adverse effect recorded, being reported by 47% of the volunteers. Our results suggest that ayahuasca may have fast-acting and sustained antidepressive properties. These results should be replicated in randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials.

  10. Depressed REM Sleep Behavior Disorder Patients Are Less Likely to Recall Enacted Dreams than Non-Depressed Ones

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyeong Gon; Choi, Jae Won; Lee, Yu Jin

    2016-01-01

    Objective REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is associated with psychiatric symptoms, such as anxiety and alexithymia. However, only a few studies on the relationship between depression and RBD have been published. In this study, we investigated the occurrence of depression and associated factors in patients with RBD. Methods In total 94 patients (mean age: 61.9±12.7 years, male: 70.2%) diagnosed as RBD were examined using detailed clinical histories, the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), and nocturnal polysomnography (PSG). Results The mean BDI score of all patients was 12.4±10.3 and 44.7% of RBD patients showed depressed mood (BDI >11 points). Depressed RBD patients were less able to recall enacted dreams than were non-depressed patients (61.9% vs. 86.5%, p=0.008). Logistic regression analysis showed that failure to recall enacted dreams was significantly associated with depression, after controlling for confounding variables including the respiratory disturbance index and a history of psychiatric disorders (odds ratio=0.323, p=0.041). Conclusion In this study, 44.7% of RBD patients were found to suffer from depressed mood. And, depression was found to be associated with reduced ability to recall enacted dreams. We suggest that routine evaluation of depression be performed in RBD patients, particularly when failure to recall enacted dreams is evident. We speculate that such failure may be associated with emotional dysregulation or neurodegeneration. PMID:27081385

  11. Acute Kidney Injury in Patients with Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Russ, Kirk B.; Stevens, Todd M; Singal, Ashwani K.

    2015-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) occurs commonly in patients with advanced cirrhosis and negatively impacts pre- and post-transplant outcomes. Physiologic changes that occur in patients with decompensated cirrhosis with ascites, place these patients at high risk of AKI. The most common causes of AKI in cirrhosis include prerenal injury, acute tubular necrosis (ATN), and the hepatorenal syndrome (HRS), accounting for more than 80% of AKI in this population. Distinguishing between these causes is particularly important for prognostication and treatment. Treatment of Type 1 HRS with vasoconstrictors and albumin improves short term survival and renal function in some patients while awaiting liver transplantation. Patients with HRS who fail to respond to medical therapy or those with severe renal failure of other etiology may require renal replacement therapy. Simultaneous liver kidney transplant (SLK) is needed in many of these patients to improve their post-transplant outcomes. However, the criteria to select patients who would benefit from SLK transplantation are based on consensus and lack strong evidence to support them. In this regard, novel serum and/or urinary biomarkers such as neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, interleukins-6 and 18, kidney injury molecule-1, fatty acid binding protein, and endothelin-1 are emerging with a potential for accurately differentiating common causes of AKI. Prospective studies are needed on the use of these biomarkers to predict accurately renal function recovery after liver transplantation alone in order to optimize personalized use of SLK. PMID:26623266

  12. Patient experience of computerised therapy for depression in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Knowles, Sarah E; Lovell, Karina; Bower, Peter; Gilbody, Simon; Littlewood, Elizabeth; Lester, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore patient experience of computerised cognitive behaviour therapy (cCBT) for depression in a pragmatic randomised controlled trial (Randomised Evaluation of the Effectiveness and Acceptability of Computerised Therapy, REEACT). Design Qualitative semistructured interviews with 36 participants. Participants Depressed patients with a Patient Health Questionnaire 9 of 10 or above recruited into the REEACT randomised controlled trial. Setting Primary care settings in England. Results Participant experience was on a continuum, with some patients unable or unwilling to accept psychological therapy without interpersonal contact while others appreciated the enhanced anonymity and flexibility of cCBT. The majority of patients were ambivalent, recognising the potential benefits offered by cCBT but struggling with challenges posed by the severity of their illness, lack of support and limited personalisation of programme content. Low completion rates were commonly reported, although more positive patients reported greater engagement. Both positive and ambivalent patients perceived a need for monitoring or follow-up to support completion, while negative patients reported deliberate non-adherence due to dissatisfaction with the programme. Patients also reported that severity of depression impacted on engagement, and viewed cCBT as unsuitable for patients undergoing more severe depressive episodes. Conclusions The study demonstrates both the unique demands and benefits of computerised therapy. cCBT was preferred by some patients and rejected by others, but the majority of patients were ambivalent about the therapy. cCBT could be offered within a menu of options in stepped care if matched appropriately to individual patients or could be offered with enhanced support to appeal to a greater number of patients. Trial registration number ISRCTN91947481. PMID:26621513

  13. Tracing patients from acute psychiatric wards.

    PubMed Central

    Double, D; MacPherson, R; Wong, T

    1993-01-01

    A random sample of those admitted to acute psychiatric wards in Sheffield in 1985 was traced to establish whether or not the patients were homeless 5 years later. Contrary to expectations none were found to be homeless. Although the proportion of mentally ill amongst the homeless may be significantly high, the number discharged from psychiatric hospital, at least in Sheffield, living consistently 'on the streets' or staying regularly in night shelters seems small as a proportion of all discharges. PMID:8410893

  14. Depressive symptoms and major depressive disorder in patients affected by subclinical hypothyroidism: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Demartini, Benedetta; Ranieri, Rebecca; Masu, Annamaria; Selle, Valerio; Scarone, Silvio; Gambini, Orsola

    2014-08-01

    The relationship between subclinical hypothyroidism and depression is still controversial. Our objective was to compare the prevalence of depressive symptoms and major depressive disorder in a population of patients affected by subclinical hypothyroidism and a control group without thyroid disease. The authors enrolled 123 consecutive outpatients affected by subclinical hypothyroidism undergoing follow-up at the endocrinology department of San Paolo Hospital in Milan and 123 controls without thyroid disease under the charge of general physicians.All patients and controls underwent an evaluation by means of a psychiatric interview; Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D); Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS); and serum thyroid stimulating hormone, free T4, and free T3 levels. Patients were also screened for thyroid peroxidase antibodies and thyroglobulin antibodies. Patients affected by subclinical hypothyroidism had a prevalence of depressive symptoms of 63.4% at HAM-D and 64.2% at MADRS; 22 patients (17.9%) had a diagnosis of depressive episode (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision criteria). The control group had a prevalence of depressive symptoms of 27.6% at HAM-D and 29.3% at MADRS, and only seven controls had a diagnosis of depressive episode. The prevalence of depressive symptoms between these two groups was statistically different. This study underlines a strong association between subclinical hypothyroidism and depressive symptoms, which could have some important diagnostic and therapeutic implications in the clinical practice.

  15. Acute bilateral parotitis occurring during venlafaxine titration in an adolescent female with major depression.

    PubMed

    Bonnet, U; Khalil-Boutros, Y

    2014-01-01

    Parotitis is a fairly uncommon adverse drug reaction of psychopharmacological treatment. Here, we report on an acute bilateral parotitis, which was associated with titration of venlafaxine in a 20-year-old female suffering from a severe depressive episode. The parotitis recovered quickly with oral penicillin and was most likely caused by bacteria assumed to spread from oral flora into Stensen's duct as a complication of pronounced venlafaxine-induced xerostomia.

  16. Do acute psychological and psychobiological responses to trauma predict subsequent symptom severities of PTSD and depression?

    PubMed Central

    Ehring, Thomas; Ehlers, Anke; Cleare, Anthony J.; Glucksman, Edward

    2008-01-01

    The study investigated the relationship between the acute psychological and psychobiological trauma response and the subsequent development of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depressive symptoms in 53 accident survivors attending an emergency department. Lower levels of salivary cortisol measured in the emergency room predicted greater symptom levels of PTSD and depression 6 months later, and lower diastolic blood pressure, past emotional problems, greater dissociation and data-driven processing predicted greater PTSD symptoms. Heart rate was not predictive. Low cortisol levels correlated with data-driven processing during the accident, and, in female participants only, with prior trauma and prior emotional problems. Higher evening cortisol 6 months after the accident correlated with PTSD and depressive symptoms at 6 months, but this relationship was no longer significant when levels of pain were controlled. The results support the role of the acute response to trauma in the development and maintenance of PTSD and provide promising preliminary evidence for a meaningful relationship between psychobiological and psychological factors in the acute trauma phase. PMID:18789538

  17. Acute and long-term effectiveness of clozapine in treatment-resistant psychotic depression.

    PubMed

    Ranjan, R; Meltzer, H Y

    1996-08-15

    The treatment of refractory major depression, including the psychotic subtype, is a therapeutic challenge. Three cases of resistant psychotic depression were treated with clozapine monotherapy, an atypical antipsychotic drug effective in treatment-resistant schizophrenia and mania. Both psychotic and mood symptoms responded well to clozapine monotherapy, although response was delayed in one case. Tardive dyskinesia improved markedly, and tardive dystonia improved moderately in one patient. No patient relapsed during a follow-up period of 4-6 years of clozapine treatment. Clozapine was well-tolerated with few side effects. These observations suggest controlled trials of clozapine in the treatment of psychotic depression that fails to respond to electroconvulsive therapy or typical neuroleptics plus tricyclic antidepressants are indicated. The same is true for the use of clozapine in maintenance treatment for psychotic depression in those cases in which typical neuroleptic drugs are required, in order to reduce the risk of tardive dyskinesia and dystonia.

  18. Dysfunctional Attitudes Scale Perfectionism: A Predictor and Partial Mediator of Acute Treatment Outcome among Clinically Depressed Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Rachel H.; Silva, Susan G.; Reinecke, Mark A.; Curry, John F.; Ginsburg, Golda S.; Kratochvil, Christopher J.; March, John S.

    2009-01-01

    The effect of perfectionism on acute treatment outcomes was explored in a randomized controlled trial of 439 clinically depressed adolescents (12-17 years of age) enrolled in the Treatment for Adolescents with Depression Study (TADS) who received cognitive behavior therapy (CBT), fluoxetine, a combination of CBT and FLX, or pill placebo. Measures…

  19. Acute kidney injury in the pregnant patient.

    PubMed

    Nwoko, Rosemary; Plecas, Darko; Garovic, Vesna D

    2012-12-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is costly and is associated with increased mortality and morbidity. An understanding of the renal physiologic changes that occur during pregnancy is essential for proper evaluation, diagnosis, and management of AKI. As in the general population, AKI can occur from prerenal, intrinsic, and post-renal causes. Major causes of pre-renal azotemia include hyperemesis gravidarum and uterine hemorrhage in the setting of placental abruption. Intrinsic etiologies include infections from acute pyelonephritis and septic abortion, bilateral cortical necrosis, and acute tubular necrosis. Particular attention should be paid to specific conditions that lead to AKI during the second and third trimesters, such as preeclampsia, HELLP syndrome, acute fatty liver of pregnancy, and TTP-HUS. For each of these disorders, delivery of the fetus is the recommended therapeutic option, with additional therapies indicated for each specific disease entity. An understanding of the various etiologies of AKI in the pregnant patient is key to the appropriate clinical management, prevention of adverse maternal outcomes, and safe delivery of the fetus. In pregnant women with pre-existing kidney disease, the degree of renal dysfunction is the major determining factor of pregnancy outcomes, which may further be complicated by a prior history of hypertension.

  20. Altered fecal microbiota composition in patients with major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Haiyin; Ling, Zongxin; Zhang, Yonghua; Mao, Hongjin; Ma, Zhanping; Yin, Yan; Wang, Weihong; Tang, Wenxin; Tan, Zhonglin; Shi, Jianfei; Li, Lanjuan; Ruan, Bing

    2015-08-01

    Studies using animal models have shown that depression affects the stability of the microbiota, but the actual structure and composition in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) are not well understood. Here, we analyzed fecal samples from 46 patients with depression (29 active-MDD and 17 responded-MDD) and 30 healthy controls (HCs). High-throughput pyrosequencing showed that, according to the Shannon index, increased fecal bacterial α-diversity was found in the active-MDD (A-MDD) vs. the HC group but not in the responded-MDD (R-MDD) vs. the HC group. Bacteroidetes, Proteobacteria, and Actinobacteria strongly increased in level, whereas that of Firmicutes was significantly reduced in the A-MDD and R-MDD groups compared with the HC group. Despite profound interindividual variability, levels of several predominant genera were significantly different between the MDD and HC groups. Most notably, the MDD groups had increased levels of Enterobacteriaceae and Alistipes but reduced levels of Faecalibacterium. A negative correlation was observed between Faecalibacterium and the severity of depressive symptoms. These findings enable a better understanding of changes in the fecal microbiota composition in such patients, showing either a predominance of some potentially harmful bacterial groups or a reduction in beneficial bacterial genera. Further studies are warranted to elucidate the temporal and causal relationships between gut microbiota and depression and to evaluate the suitability of the microbiome as a biomarker.

  1. Antidepressant medication can improve hypertension in elderly patients with depression.

    PubMed

    Fu, Wenjing; Ma, Lina; Zhao, Xiaoling; Li, Yun; Zhu, Hong; Yang, Wei; Liu, Chuan; Liu, Jia; Han, Rui; Liu, Huizhen

    2015-12-01

    We explored the influence of antidepressant therapy on blood pressure and quality of life in elderly patients with hypertension. Depression occurs at a higher rate in patients with hypertension than in the normal population. It has been reported that depressive symptoms lead to poorer hypertension control, resulting in the development of complications. We conducted a randomized, parallel group study. A total of 70 elderly patients with hypertension in the period of August 2008 to March 2011 were divided into two groups based on their antihypertensive therapy, a control group (amlodipine, 5 mg daily; n=35) and a therapy group (amlodipine, 5mg daily; citalopram, 20 mg daily; n=35). We compared 24 hour, daytime, and nighttime measurements of systolic and diastolic blood pressure, in addition to quality of life, assessed using the Hamilton rating scale for depression, and a 36 item Short Form quality of life questionnaire (SF-36). Both groups were followed for 3 months. At the end of 3 months, all blood pressure levels were significantly lower in the therapy group than in the control group. The other scores (with the exception of the physical function subcategory of the SF-36 quality of life scale) were significantly higher. Our study indicates that clinicians should be aware of depressive symptoms in elderly patients with hypertension, and should consider antidepressant therapy in these patients.

  2. Relationship of depression in participants with nonspecific acute or subacute low back pain and no-pain by age distribution

    PubMed Central

    Calvo-Lobo, Cesar; Vilar Fernández, Juan Manuel; Becerro-de-Bengoa-Vallejo, Ricardo; Losa-Iglesias, Marta Elena; Rodríguez-Sanz, David; Palomo López, Patricia; López López, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose Nonspecific low back pain (LBP) is the most prevalent musculoskeletal condition in various age ranges and is associated with depression. The aim of this study was to determine the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) scores in participants with nonspecific LBP and no-pain by age distribution. Methods A case–control study was carried out following the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology criteria. A sample of 332 participants, divided into the following age categories: 19–24 (n=11), 25–39 (n=66), 40–64 (n=90), 65–79 (n=124), and ≥80 (n=41) years was recruited from domiciliary visits and an outpatient clinic. The BDI scores were self-reported in participants with nonspecific acute or subacute (≤3 months) LBP (n=166) and no-pain (n=166). Results The BDI scores, mean ± standard deviation, showed statistically significant differences (p<0.001) between participants with nonspecific acute or subacute LBP (9.590±6.370) and no-pain (5.825±5.113). Significantly higher BDI scores were obtained from participants with nonspecific acute and subacute LBP in those aged 40–64 years (p<0.001; 9.140±6.074 vs 4.700±3.777) and 65–79 years (p<0.001; 10.672±6.126 vs 6.210±5.052). Differences were not significant in younger patients aged 19–24 (p=0.494; 5.000±2.646 vs 8.250±7.498), 25–39 (p=0.138; 5.440±5.245 vs 3.634±4.397), and in those aged ≥80 years (p=0.094; 13.625±6.1331 vs 10.440±5.591). Conclusion Participants with nonspecific acute and subacute LBP present higher BDI depression scores, influenced by age distribution. Specifically, patients in the age range from 40 to 80 years with LBP could require more psychological care in addition to any medical or physical therapy. Nevertheless, physical factors, different outcomes, and larger sample size should be considered in future studies. PMID:28138263

  3. Quality of Life of Patients After an Acute Coronary Event: Hospital Discharge

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Cristiane Maria Carvalho Costa; Macedo, Luciana Bilitario; Gomes, Lilian Tapioca Jones Cunha; de Oliveira, Paula Luzia Seixas Pereira; Albuquerque, Iana Verena Santana; Lemos, Amanda Queiroz; Brasil, Cristina Aires; Prado, Eloisa Pires Ferreira; Macedo, Pedro Santiago; de Oliveira, Francisco Tiago Oliveira; dos Reis, Helena Franca Correia; Darze, Eduardo Sahade; Guimaraes, Armenio Costa

    2014-01-01

    Background The acute coronary syndrome (ACS) has a high morbi-mortality rate, including physical deficiencies and functional limitations with impact on quality of life. Cardiovascular rehabilitation 1 (CVR1) should begin as early as possible, to enable improvement in functional capacity and quality of life. Previous studies have shown association of cardiovascular diseases with quality of life, in which depression and anxiety are the domains most altered. The aim of the study is to verify the impact of an acute coronary event on quality of life at the moment of hospital discharge. Methodology This was a cross-sectional study, with ACS patients hospitalized in ICU of a private hospital in the city of Salvador, Brazil, submitted to CVR1. The quality of life questionnaire Euroqol-5D was applied on discharge from hospital. Patients included in the study were those with ACV, who had medical permission to walk, had not been submitted to acute surgical treatment, were time and space oriented, and over the age of 18 years. Patients excluded from the study were those with cognitive, orthopedic and neurological problems, who used orthesis on a lower limb, and were in any condition of risk at the time of beginning with CVR1. Data were collected by a previously trained ICU team. Results Data were collected of 63 patients who revealed compromise in the domains of pain/feeling ill (20.63%) and anxiety/depression (38.09%). Statistical significance was observed in the association between sex and pain/feeling ill (P < 0.01), sex and anxiety/depression (P < 0.01), diabetes and mobility (P < 0.01), hereditary factors and anxiety/depression (p < 0.01), BMI and pain/feeling ill (P < 0.01). Conclusion In this sample of patients, on discharge from hospital after ACS, the pain/feeling ill and anxiety/depression domains were shown to be compromised. PMID:25110540

  4. Health-Related Quality of Life, Depression, Anxiety, and Self-Image in Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Baytan, Birol; Aşut, Çiğdem; Çırpan Kantarcıoğlu, Arzu; Sezgin Evim, Melike; Güneş, Adalet Meral

    2016-01-01

    Objective: With increasing survival rates in childhood acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), the long-term side effects of treatment have become important. Our aim was to investigate health-related quality of life, depression, anxiety, and self-image among ALL survivors. Materials and Methods: Fifty patients diagnosed with ALL and their siblings were enrolled. The Kovacs Children’s Depression Inventory, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, Offer Self-Image Questionnaire, and Pediatric Quality of Life InventoryTM were used for collecting data. ANOVA tests were used to determine if there were any significant differences between groups. Results: ALL survivors had higher depression, more anxiety symptoms, lower quality of life, and more negative self-image when compared to their siblings. Conclusion: Continuous diagnostic and interventional mental health services might be necessary for possible emotional side effects of treatment during and after the treatment. Rehabilitation and follow-up programs should be implemented for children during and after treatment for ALL. PMID:27094799

  5. Acute stress disorder, depression, and tobacco use in disaster workers following 9/11.

    PubMed

    Biggs, Quinn M; Fullerton, Carol S; Reeves, James J; Grieger, Thomas A; Reissman, Dori; Ursano, Robert J

    2010-10-01

    Early posttraumatic psychiatric disorders have not been well studied in disaster workers. This study examined the rates of probable acute stress disorder (ASD), probable depression, increased tobacco use, and their associated risk factors in 9/11 World Trade Center disaster workers. Surveys were obtained from 90 disaster workers (e.g., medical personnel, police, firefighters, search and rescue) 2-3 weeks after 9/11. Nearly 15% of disaster workers had probable ASD and 26% had probable depression. Probable ASD and depression were highly related to functional impairment. The risk for ASD was increased for those with 9/11-specific disaster exposures, more pre-9/11 trauma exposures, and the peritraumatic dissociative symptom of altered sense of time. Disaster workers who were younger, non-White, or who had increasing numbers of peritraumatic dissociative symptoms were more likely to have probable depression. More than half of tobacco users increased their tobacco use after 9/11. Additionally, all tobacco users with probable ASD and almost all tobacco users with probable depression increased tobacco use. Rapid mobilization of resources for early screening and intervention and health promotion campaigns aimed at improving adverse health-related behaviors may be helpful for this high-risk group.

  6. A Systematic Review of the Evidence for the Treatment of Acute Depression in Bipolar I Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Cerullo, Michael A.; Strakowski, Stephen M.

    2013-01-01

    In this article we examined evidence for the acute treatment of depression in bipolar I disorder, focusing on double-blind, placebo-controlled studies with a definite primary outcome measure and published in peer review journals. Quetiapine and olanzapine/fluoxetine are currently approved by the FDA for the treatment of bipolar depression and a number of additional agents (including other atypical antipsychotics, mood stabilizers, antidepressants, and novel compounds) have been studied with varying degrees of efficacy. The medication with the most evidence for efficacy in bipolar depression is quetiapine with five studies showing positive efficacy compared to placebo. In contrast five studies of lamotrigine were negative although meta-analyses of the pooled have found some treatment effects. Two studies of olanzapine and olanzapine/fluoxetine and three small studies of divalproex showed significant efficacy in treating bipolar depression. Two studies of aripiprazole found no differences compared to placebo. Early research on lithium in bipolar depression had significant methodological flaws and only one study of lithium met our primary search criteria. To better understand the role of anti-depressants we also examined studies of antidepressants as adjunctive treatment of bipolar depression in participants taking mood stabilizers or atypical antipsychotics. These studies reported mixed results for a variety of antidepressants but the majority found no differences compared to placebo. Other studies of adjunctive treatment were also discussed. There has been one positive adjunctive study each of lamotrigine, omega-3 fatty acids, modafinil, and Armodafinil while there was one negative trial each of omega-3 fatty acids, ziprasidone, and levetiracetam. PMID:23507138

  7. Acute stress, depression, and anxiety symptoms among English and Spanish speaking children with recent trauma exposure.

    PubMed

    Barber, Beth A; Kohl, Krista L; Kassam-Adams, Nancy; Gold, Jeffrey I

    2014-03-01

    A growing literature suggests the clinical importance of acute stress disorder symptoms in youth following potentially traumatic events. A multisite sample of English and Spanish speaking children and adolescents (N = 479) between the ages of 8-17, along with their caregivers completed interviews and self-report questionnaires between 2 days and 1 month following the event. The results indicate that children with greater total acute stress symptoms reported greater depressive (r = .41, p < .01) and anxiety symptoms (r = .53, p < .01). Examining specific acute stress subscales, reexperiencing was correlated with anxiety (r = .47, p < .01) and arousal was correlated with depression (r = .50, p < .01) and anxiety (r = .55, p < .01). Age was inversely associated with total acute stress symptoms (r = -.24, p < .01), reexperiencing (r = -.17, p < .01), avoidance (r = -.27, p < .01), and arousal (r = -.19, p < .01) and gender was related to total anxiety symptoms (Spearman's ρ = .17, p < .01). The current study supports the importance of screening acute stress symptoms and other mental health outcomes following a potentially traumatic event in children and adolescents. Early screening may enable clinicians to identify and acutely intervene to support children's psychological and physical recovery.

  8. [Investigation of the effects of cytoflavin on symptoms of depression and autonomic dysfunction in patients with organic depressive disorder].

    PubMed

    Gudkova, A N; Osinovskaia, N A; Polunina, A G; Gekht, A B

    2013-01-01

    The present observational study addressed effects of cytoflavin as an adjunctive nootropic therapy in patients with organic depressive disorder (F06.36). 54 female and 46 male in-patients were included into the study. All patients received standard antidepressant therapy (controls) and 48 patients additionally received 2 pills of cytoflavin twice per day. Age, gender distribution, education and severity of depression were equal in cytoflavin and control groups. The follow-up assessment at discharge showed a significantly more pronounced decline in the severity of depression symptoms in patients receiving cytoflavin in comparison with the controls. Importantly, the effect of cytoflavin on the depression symptoms was prominent only in females. Moreover, women receiving cytoflavin demonstrated the more pronounced normalization of autonomic regulation in comparison with control women. The present results allow to recommend cytoflavin in dose 4 pills daily as an adjunctive therapy in female patients with organic depressive disorder.

  9. Investigation of Anxiety and Depression in Patients with Chronic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Gerontoukou, Evangelia-Ioanna; Michaelidoy, Sofia; Rekleiti, Maria; Saridi, Maria; Souliotis, Kyriakos

    2015-01-01

    The health of an individual depends on both his/her physical and psychological condition. In recent years it has been observed that chronic patients have frequently an affected psycho-emotional state. The purpose of this study is to investigate anxiety and depression in patients with chronic diseases and the correlation of the results with daily physical activity levels and individual health levels, as well comorbidity. This study included patients with chronic diseases that were treated in a local general hospital or were visiting often outpatient clinics of the same hospital due to their condition. The sample in this particular study included 204 patients; 118 of them were women and 86 men. From the total sample that participated in our research, 118 (57.8%) were females and the majority of the participants were secondary/basic education graduates (67%), married (71%), living in urban areas (53%). Hypertension was the most frequent chronic disease in our sample, followed by hypercholesterolemia and diabetes mellitus. Comparing the occurrence of depression and anxiety symptoms in both questionnaires in relation to the expected frequency in the general population, significant levels of depression and anxiety symptoms were recorded. Taking into consideration the findings of this research, anxiety and depression symptoms can have profound effects regarding the control of chronic diseases, the patients’ quality of life and their general health. PMID:26973961

  10. Validity of the Beck Depression Inventory with Eating Disorder Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pulos, Steven

    1996-01-01

    The factor structure of the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) was studied with a subsample of 93 bulimic women from a total sample of 110 women with eating disorders. Results suggested that the BDI appears to assess a unidimensional construct in patients with eating disorders. (SLD)

  11. Prospective Evaluation of Pretreatment Executive Cognitive Impairment and Depression in Patients Referred for Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, Clifton D. Schillerstrom, Jason E.; Jones, William E.; Boersma, Melissa; Royall, Donald R.; Fuss, Martin

    2008-10-01

    Purpose: Cancer patients are at risk of cognitive impairment and depression. We sought to ascertain the prevalence of executive, visuospatial, memory, and general cognitive performance deficits before radiotherapy in a radiation oncology clinic referral population and correlate the neurocognitive measures with the depression symptom burden. Methods and Materials: A total of 122 sequential patients referred for radiotherapy evaluation were administered a test battery composed of the Executive Interview (EXIT25), Executive Clock Drawing Task (CLOX1 and CLOX2), Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE), Memory Impairment Screen (MIS), and Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS). The mean age {+-} standard deviation was 58 {+-} 17 years. Of 122 patients, 24 (20%) had been referred for breast cancer, 21 (17%) for gastrointestinal cancer, 17 (14%) for genitourinary disease, and 8 (7%) for brain lesions; the rest were a variety of tumor sites. The cognitive performance among the tumor cohorts was compared using Bonferroni-corrected analysis of variance and Tukey-Kramer tests. Pearson correlation coefficients were determined between each cognitive instrument and the GDS. Results: Of the 122 patients, 52 (43%) exhibited a detectable executive cognition decrement on one or more test measures. Five percent had poor memory performance (MIS), 18% had poor visuospatial performance (CLOX2), and 13% had poor global cognition (MMSE). Patients with brain tumors performed substantially worse on the EXIT25. No between-group differences were found for CLOX1, CLOX2, MIS, or GDS performance. The EXIT25 scores correlated significantly with the GDS scores (r = 0.26, p = 0.005). Conclusions: The results of this study have shown that patients referred for radiotherapy exhibit cognitive impairment profiles comparable to those observed in acutely ill medical inpatients. Executive control impairment appears more prevalent than global cognitive deficits, visuospatial impairment, or depression.

  12. Understanding Facial Expressions of Pain in Patients With Depression.

    PubMed

    Lautenbacher, Stefan; Bär, Karl-Juergen; Eisold, Patricia; Kunz, Miriam

    2016-12-02

    Although depression is associated with more clinical pain complaints, psychophysical data sometimes point to hypoalgesic alterations. Studying the more reflex-like facial expression of pain in patients with depression may offer a new perspective. Facial and psychophysical responses to nonpainful and painful heat stimuli were studied in 23 patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) and 23 matched control participants. As psychophysical data, pain thresholds, tolerance thresholds, and self-report were assessed. Facial responses were videotaped and subjected offline to Facial Action Coding System analysis. One of the key facial responses of pain, which is a known facial signal of negative affect (contraction of the eyebrows), was significantly increased in MDD patients. Moreover, facial expressions and pain ratings were strongly correlated in MDD patients, whereas these 2 response systems were-in line with established findings-only weakly related in healthy participants. Pain psychophysics was unaltered in MDD patients compared with healthy control participants. In conclusion, the facial expression of pain in MDD patients indicates rather hyper- than hypoalgesia, with enhanced affective pain processing. Moreover, the linkage between subjective and facial responses was much stronger in MDD patients, which may be due to a reduced influence of social display rules, which normally complicate this relationship.

  13. Overgeneral autobiographical memory at baseline predicts depressive symptoms at follow-up in patients with first-episode depression.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yansong; Zhang, Fuquan; Wang, Zhiqiang; Cao, Leiming; Wang, Jun; Na, Aiguo; Sun, Yujun; Zhao, Xudong

    2016-09-30

    Previous studies have shown that overgeneral autobiographical memory (OGM) is a characteristic of depression. However, there are no studies to explore the association between baseline OGM and depressive symptoms at follow-up in patients with first-episode depression (FE). This study investigated whether baseline OGM predicts depressive symptoms at follow-up in patients with FE. We recruited 125 patients with FE. The participants were divided into remitted group and non-remitted group according to the severity of their depression at 12 months follow-up. The measures consisted of the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, Ruminative Response Scale, and Autobiographical Memory Test. Hierarchical linear regression analyses and bootstrap mediation analyses were conducted. The results showed that non-remitted patients had more OGM at baseline. Baseline OGM predicted depressive symptoms at follow-up in patients with FE. Rumination mediated the relationship between baseline OGM and depressive symptoms at follow-up. Our findings highlight OGM as a vulnerability factor involved in the maintenance of depression in patients with FE.

  14. Acute coronary syndromes in patients with HIV

    PubMed Central

    Seecheran, Valmiki K.; Giddings, Stanley L.

    2017-01-01

    Highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART) has considerably increased the life expectancy of patients infected with HIV. Coronary artery disease is a leading cause of mortality in patients infected with HIV. This is primarily attributed to their increased survival, HAART-induced metabolic derangements, and to HIV itself. The pathophysiology of atherosclerosis in HIV is both multifactorial and complex – involving direct endothelial injury and dysfunction, hypercoagulability, and a significant contribution from traditional cardiac risk factors. The advent of HAART has since heralded a remarkable improvement in outcomes, but at the expense of other unforeseen issues. It is thus of paramount importance to swiftly recognize and manage acute coronary syndromes in HIV-infected patients to attenuate adverse complications, which should translate into improved clinical outcomes. PMID:27845996

  15. Serum cytokines and anxiety in adolescent depression patients: Gender effect.

    PubMed

    Pallavi, Pooja; Sagar, Rajesh; Mehta, Manju; Sharma, Subhadra; Subramanium, Arulselvi; Shamshi, Farah; Sengupta, Utpal; Pandey, Ravindra M; Mukhopadhyay, Asok K

    2015-09-30

    The present study compares the serum cytokine levels between adolescent depression patients and healthy controls and assesses correlation between depression, anxiety scores and serum levels of eight cytokines. Study also checked the variation in serum levels with medication status (medication free/naïve vs. patients on medication). Following clinical and psychometric assessment of 77 adolescent (aged 13-18 years) depression patients (49 males and 28 females; 56 medication free/naïve) and 54 healthy controls (25 males, 29 females), eight cytokines (IL-1β, IL-2, IL-6, IL-10, TNF-α, IFN-γ, TGF-β1 and IL-17A {denoted IL-17 throughout}) were measured in serum using ELISA. Depressed adolescents had significantly high levels of IL-2 (p<0.001) and IL-6 (p=0.03) as compared to controls. The female population skewed the result of one cytokine (IL-6) in patients. Anxiety scores showed positive correlation (only in female patients) with IL-1β, IL-10 and negative correlation with TGF-β1 and IL-17. The gender effect in relationship between anxiety and cytokines was not straightforward. On comparing study groups on the medication/naïve status, IL-2 and TGF-β1 showed significant difference between the groups (p<0.001, p=0.007 higher in medicated). Depression in adolescents was associated with elevation of proinflammatory serum cytokines with a gender bias for females. Anxiety scores correlated negatively with TGF-β1 and IL-17.

  16. Depression of serum calcium by increased plasma free fatty acids in the rat: a mechanism for hypocalcemia in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Warshaw, A L; Lee, K H; Napier, T W; Fournier, P O; Duchainey, D; Axelrod, L

    1985-10-01

    Some patients with hypertriglyceridemia and acute pancreatitis have marked hypocalcemia and high levels of plasma free fatty acids (FFAs). This study tests the hypothesis that increased plasma FFAs can significantly reduce the calcium level in vivo, a phenomenon which is different from local formation of calcium soaps due to lipolysis of adipose tissue lipids. Free fatty acid elevation was induced in rats by the administration of heparin and by the infusion of triglycerides. The results show that, compared with controls, induction of elevated FFA (from 1.57 +/- 0.08 mEq/L to 5.64 +/- 0.35, mean +/- SEM) causes the concentration of calcium to fall rapidly (from 9.04 +/- 0.06 mg/dl to 8.42 +/- 0.10, p less than 0.001). There is a significant (p less than 0.001) positive correlation between spontaneous baseline concentration of FFA and the responsiveness of calcium concentration to FFA challenge. At near-normal levels of FFA there is a significant (p less than 0.001) correlation between the magnitude of increased FFA concentration and decreased calcium concentration. Additional studies in vivo and in vitro show that elevated plasma triglycerides per se did not interfere with measurement of calcium concentration; however, FFA-albumin complexes bind calcium and lower its measured value. These findings suggest that (a) changes in the concentration of FFA occurring spontaneously may affect measured serum calcium concentration; (b) the observed depression of serum calcium concentration may be due in part to intravascular sequestration of calcium by FFA, but increased flux of circulating calcium-FFA complexes into extravascular and intracellular sites may also be important; (c) the markedly increased FFA concentration in some patients with acute pancreatitis may contribute significantly to hypocalcemia and calcium flux in these patients. As parathyroid hormone secretion, function, or integrity may be impaired in pancreatitis, the depressant effect of FFA could be even

  17. Diagnostic imaging of the acutely injured patient

    SciTech Connect

    Berquist, T.H.

    1985-01-01

    This book provides an analysis of pathophysiologic concepts of trauma and reviews the effectiveness of the available imaging modalities in acute trauma of various organ system. Topics covered are chest injuries; abdominal trauma; fractures of long bones; the foot and ankle; the knee; hand and wrist; the elbow; the shoulder; the pelvis hips; the spine; the skull and facial trauma and the clinical assessment of multiple injuries patients. Comparative evaluation of diagnostic techniques of radiography is discussed. Normal anatomy and bone fractures along with soft-tissue injuries are described.

  18. Atypical Antipsychotics in the Treatment of Acute Bipolar Depression with Mixed Features: A Systematic Review and Exploratory Meta-Analysis of Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Fornaro, Michele; Stubbs, Brendon; De Berardis, Domenico; Perna, Giampaolo; Valchera, Alessandro; Veronese, Nicola; Solmi, Marco; Ganança, Licínia

    2016-01-01

    Evidence supporting the use of second generation antipsychotics (SGAs) in the treatment of acute depression with mixed features (MFs) associated with bipolar disorder (BD) is scarce and equivocal. Therefore, we conducted a systematic review and preliminary meta-analysis investigating SGAs in the treatment of acute BD depression with MFs. Two authors independently searched major electronic databases from 1990 until September 2015 for randomized (placebo-) controlled trials (RCTs) or open-label clinical trials investigating the efficacy of SGAs in the treatment of acute bipolar depression with MFs. A random-effect meta-analysis calculating the standardized mean difference (SMD) between SGA and placebo for the mean baseline to endpoint change in depression as well as manic symptoms score was computed based on 95% confidence intervals (CI). Six RCTs and one open-label placebo-controlled studies (including post-hoc reports) representing 1023 patients were included. Participants received either ziprasidone, olanzapine, lurasidone, quetiapine or asenapine for an average of 6.5 weeks across the included studies. Meta-analysis with Duval and Tweedie adjustment for publication bias demonstrated that SGA resulted in significant improvements of (hypo-)manic symptoms of bipolar mixed depression as assessed by the means of the total scores of the Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS) (SMD −0.74, 95% CI −1.20 to −0.28, n SGA = 907, control = 652). Meta-analysis demonstrated that participants in receipt of SGA (n = 979) experienced a large improvement in the Montgomery–Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) scores (SMD −1.08, 95% CI −1.35 to −0.81, p < 0.001) vs. placebo (n = 678). Publication and measurement biases and relative paucity of studies. Overall, SGAs appear to offer favorable improvements in MADRS and YMRS scores vs. placebo. Nevertheless, given the preliminary nature of the present report, additional original studies are required to allow more reliable and

  19. Temporomandibular disorders, otologic symptoms and depression levels in tinnitus patients.

    PubMed

    Hilgenberg, P B; Saldanha, A D D; Cunha, C O; Rubo, J H; Conti, P C R

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and otologic symptoms in patients with and without tinnitus. The influence of the level of depression was also addressed. The tinnitus group was comprised of 100 patients with tinnitus, and control group was comprised of 100 individuals without tinnitus. All subjects were evaluated using the research diagnostic criteria for temporomandibular disorders (RDC/TMD) to determine the presence of TMD and depression level. Chi-square, Spearman Correlation and Mann-Whitney tests were used in statistical analysis, with a 5% significance level. TMD signs and symptoms were detected in 85% of patients with tinnitus and in 55% of controls (P≤0·001). The severity of pain and higher depression levels were positively associated with tinnitus (P≤0·001). It was concluded that tinnitus is associated with TMD and with otalgia, dizziness/vertigo, stuffy sensations, hypoacusis sensation and hyperacusis, as well as with higher depression levels.

  20. The effect of escitalopram on sleep problems in depressed patients.

    PubMed

    Lader, M; Andersen, H F; Baekdal, T

    2005-07-01

    The results from three 8-week escitalopram studies in major depressive disorder are presented with respect to efficacy and the effect on sleep quality, both in the full population and the subpopulation of patients with sleep problems at baseline. Analysis of pooled data from these randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, studies in which citalopram was the active reference, showed a significant improvement for escitalopram-treated patients (n = 52.0) in the Montgomery-Asberg depression rating scale (MADRS) item 4 ('reduced sleep') scores at weeks 6 and 8 compared with placebo (n=398; p < 0.01) and at weeks 4, 6 and 8 (n = 403; p < 0.05) compared with citalopram.Escitalopram-treated patients with sleep problems (MADRS item 4 score > or = 4; n = 254) at baseline showed a statistically significant improvement in mean MADRS item 4 scores at weeks 4, 6 and 8 compared with patients treated with placebo (n = 191; p < 0.05) or citalopram (n = 193; p < 0.01). These patients also showed a statistically significant (p < 0.05) and clinically relevant improvement in MADRS total score after escitalopram treatment compared with citalopram at weeks 1, 4, 6 and 8 (observed cases) and endpoint (-2.45; last observation carried forward [LOCF]). Statistical significance in favour of escitalopram versus placebo treatment was found at all visits, including endpoint (-4.2; LOCF).Thus, these post-hoc analyses suggest that escitalopram has a significant beneficial effect compared with placebo or citalopram in reducing sleep disturbance in patients suffering from major depressive disorder. The effect of escitalopram in improving 'reduced sleep' scores was clearly seen in patients with more severe sleep disturbance at baseline. A further prospective study is needed to establish this useful clinical effect in insomniac depressives.

  1. A systematic review of the evidence for the treatment of acute depression in bipolar I disorder.

    PubMed

    Cerullo, Michael A; Strakowski, Stephen M

    2013-08-01

    In this article, we examined evidence for the acute treatment of depression in bipolar I disorder, focusing on double-blind, placebo-controlled studies with a definite primary outcome measure and published in peer review journals. Quetiapine and olanzapine/fluoxetine are currently approved by the FDA for the treatment of bipolar depression, and a number of additional agents (including other atypical antipsychotics, mood stabilizers, antidepressants, and novel compounds) have been studied with varying degrees of efficacy. The medication with the most evidence for efficacy in bipolar depression is quetiapine, with five studies showing positive efficacy compared to placebo. In contrast, five studies of lamotrigine were negative, although meta-analyses of the pooled have found some treatment effects. Two studies of olanzapine and olanzapine/fluoxetine and three small studies of divalproex showed significant efficacy in treating bipolar depression. Two studies of aripiprazole found no differences compared to placebo. Early research on lithium in bipolar depression had significant methodological flaws, and only one study of lithium met our primary search criteria. To better understand the role of antidepressants, we also examined studies of antidepressants as adjunctive treatment of bipolar depression in participants taking mood stabilizers or atypical antipsychotics. These studies reported mixed results for a variety of antidepressants, but the majority found no differences compared to placebo. Other studies of adjunctive treatment were also discussed. There has been one positive adjunctive study each of lamotrigine, omega-3 fatty acids, modafinil, and armodafinil, while there was one negative trial each of omega-3 fatty acids, ziprasidone, and levetiracetam.

  2. Identifying Patients with Depression Using Free-text Clinical Documents.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Li; Baughman, Amy W; Lei, Victor J; Lai, Kenneth H; Navathe, Amol S; Chang, Frank; Sordo, Margarita; Topaz, Maxim; Zhong, Feiran; Murrali, Madhavan; Navathe, Shamkant; Rocha, Roberto A

    2015-01-01

    About 1 in 10 adults are reported to exhibit clinical depression and the associated personal, societal, and economic costs are significant. In this study, we applied the MTERMS NLP system and machine learning classification algorithms to identify patients with depression using discharge summaries. Domain experts reviewed both the training and test cases, and classified these cases as depression with a high, intermediate, and low confidence. For depression cases with high confidence, all of the algorithms we tested performed similarly, with MTERMS' knowledge-based decision tree slightly better than the machine learning classifiers, achieving an F-measure of 89.6%. MTERMS also achieved the highest F-measure (70.6%) on intermediate confidence cases. The RIPPER rule learner was the best performing machine learning method, with an F-measure of 70.0%, and a higher precision but lower recall than MTERMS. The proposed NLP-based approach was able to identify a significant portion of the depression cases (about 20%) that were not on the coded diagnosis list.

  3. Postpartum Depression

    MedlinePlus

    ... Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Postpartum Depression Home For Patients Search FAQs Postpartum Depression Page ... Postpartum Depression FAQ091, December 2013 PDF Format Postpartum Depression Labor, Delivery, and Postpartum Care What are the ...

  4. Ultrasonic evaluation of patients with acute right upper quadrant pain.

    PubMed

    Laing, F C; Federle, M P; Jeffrey, R B; Brown, T W

    1981-08-01

    To define the role of ultrasound in evaluating acute right upper quadrant pain, a prospective study was performed on 52 patients having clinically suspected acute cholecystitis. Ultrasonographic determination of acute or chronic cholecystitis, or diagnosis of a normal gallbladder, was based on analysis of location of tenderness, calculi, sludge, and wall thickness. The diagnosis of acute cholecystitis (34.6% of patients) was based on the highly significant observations of focal gallbladder tenderness and calculi. Sludge and wall thickening were also statistically significant, but to a lesser degree. Cholelithiasis allowed differentiation of patients with chronic cholecystitis (32.7%) from patients with normal gallbladders (32.7%). Neither of these two groups had significant focal gallbladder tenderness, sludge, or thickened walls. Because acute cholecystitis is found in the minority of patients with acute right upper quadrant pain, and because ultrasound is rapid, accurate, and noninvasive, it should be the initial modality used to evaluate these patients.

  5. Patient-Centered Technological Assessment and Monitoring of Depression for Low-Income Patients

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shinyi; Vidyanti, Irene; Liu, Pai; Hawkins, Caitlin; Ramirez, Magaly; Guterman, Jeffrey; Gross-Schulman, Sandra; Sklaroff, Laura Myerchin; Ell, Kathleen

    2014-01-01

    Depression is a significant challenge for ambulatory care because it worsens health status and outcomes, increases health care utilizations and costs, and elevates suicide risk. An automatic telephonic assessment (ATA) system that links with tasks and alerts to providers may improve quality of depression care and increase provider productivity. We used ATA system in a trial to assess and monitor depressive symptoms of 444 safety-net primary care patients with diabetes. We assessed system properties, evaluated preliminary clinical outcomes, and estimated cost savings. The ATA system is feasible, reliable, valid, safe, and likely cost-effective for depression screening and monitoring for low-income primary care population. PMID:24525531

  6. The effects of acute tryptophan depletion on speech and behavioural mimicry in individuals at familial risk for depression.

    PubMed

    Hogenelst, Koen; Sarampalis, Anastasios; Leander, N Pontus; Müller, Barbara C N; Schoevers, Robert A; aan het Rot, Marije

    2016-03-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) has been associated with abnormalities in speech and behavioural mimicry. These abnormalities may contribute to the impairments in interpersonal functioning that are often seen in MDD patients. MDD has also been associated with disturbances in the brain serotonin system, but the extent to which serotonin regulates speech and behavioural mimicry remains unclear. In a randomized, double-blind, crossover study, we induced acute tryptophan depletion (ATD) in individuals with or without a family history of MDD. Five hours afterwards, participants engaged in two behavioural-mimicry experiments in which speech and behaviour were recorded. ATD reduced the time participants waited before speaking, which might indicate increased impulsivity. However, ATD did not significantly alter speech otherwise, nor did it affect mimicry. This suggests that a brief lowering of brain serotonin has limited effects on verbal and non-verbal social behaviour. The null findings may be due to low test sensitivity, but they otherwise suggest that low serotonin has little effect on social interaction quality in never-depressed individuals. It remains possible that recovered MDD patients are more strongly affected.

  7. Acute Pain and Depressive Symptoms: Independent Predictors of Insomnia Symptoms among Adults with Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Moscou-Jackson, Gyasi; Allen, Jerilyn; Kozachik, Sharon; Smith, Michael T.; Budhathoki, Chakra; Haywood, Carlton

    2015-01-01

    Background No studies to-date have systematically investigated insomnia symptoms among adults with sickle cell disease (SCD). The purpose of this study was to 1) describe the prevalence of insomnia symptoms and 2) identify bio-psychosocial predictors in community-dwelling adults with Sickle Cell Disease. Methods Cross-sectional analysis of baseline data from 263 African-American adults with SCD (aged 18 years or older). Measures included the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI), Center for Epidemiologic Studies in Depression scale, Urban Life Stress Scale, Brief Pain Inventory, and a chronic pain item. SCD genotype was extracted from the medical record. Results A slight majority (55%) of the sample reported clinically significant insomnia symptomatology (ISI ≥10), which suggests that insomnia symptoms are prevalent among community-dwelling African-American adults with SCD. While insomnia symptoms were associated with a number of bio-psychosocial characteristics, depressive symptoms and acute pain were the only independent predictors. Conclusion Given the high number of participants reporting clinically significant insomnia symptoms, nurses should screen for insomnia symptoms and to explore interventions to promote better sleep among adults with SCD with an emphasis on recommending treatment for pain and depression. In addition, current pain and depression interventions in this population could add insomnia measures and assess the effect of the intervention on insomnia symptomatology as a secondary outcome. PMID:26673730

  8. Risk of anxiety and depressive disorders in patients with myocardial infarction: A nationwide population-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Feng, Hsin-Pei; Chien, Wu-Chien; Cheng, Wei-Tung; Chung, Chi-Hsiang; Cheng, Shu-Meng; Tzeng, Wen-Chii

    2016-08-01

    Anxiety and depressive symptoms are associated with adverse cardiovascular events after an acute myocardial infarction (MI). However, most studies focusing on anxiety or depression have used rating scales or self-report methods rather than clinical diagnosis. This study aimed to investigate the association between psychiatrist-diagnosed psychiatric disorders and cardiovascular prognosis.We sampled data from the National Health Insurance Research Database; 1396 patients with MI were recruited as the study cohort and 13,960 patients without MI were recruited as the comparison cohort. Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to examine the effect of MI on the risk of anxiety and depressive disorders.During the first 2 years of follow-up, patients with MI exhibited a significantly higher risk of anxiety disorders (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] = 5.06, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 4.61-5.54) and depressive disorders (adjusted HR = 7.23, 95% CI: 4.88-10.88) than those without MI did. Greater risk for anxiety and depressive disorders was observed among women and patients aged 45 to 64 years following an acute MI. Patients with post-MI anxiety had a 9.37-fold (95% CI: 4.45-19.70) higher risk of recurrent MI than those without MI did after adjustment for age, sex, socioeconomic status, and comorbidities.This nationwide population-based cohort study provides evidence that MI increases the risk of anxiety and depressive disorders during the first 2 years post-MI, and post-MI anxiety disorders are associated with a higher risk of recurrent MI.

  9. Physical Activity of Depressed Patients and Their Motivation to Exercise: Nordic Walking in Family Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suija, Kadri; Pechter, Ulle; Kalda, Ruth; Tahepold, Heli; Maaroos, Jaak; Maaroos, Heidi-Ingrid

    2009-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to find out how motivated depressed patients are to exercise regularly, to measure the physical activity of depressed patients and to find out how regular Nordic Walking affects the mood and physical fitness of depressed patients. A cross-sectional study was carried out. Three years after the Prediction of Primary…

  10. 76 FR 63355 - Proposed Information Collection (Prevalence and Clinical course of Depression Among patients with...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-12

    ... Collection (Prevalence and Clinical course of Depression Among patients with Heart Failure); Comment Request... information needed to identify the patterns of depression in heart failure patients. DATES: Written comments...: Prevalence and Clinical Course of Depression Among Patients with Heart Failure, VA HSR&D, Nursing...

  11. Evaluation of depressive symptoms in patients with coronary artery disease using the Montgomery Åsberg Depression Rating Scale.

    PubMed

    Bunevicius, Adomas; Staniute, Margarita; Brozaitiene, Julija; Pommer, Antoinette M; Pop, Victor J M; Montgomery, Stuart A; Bunevicius, Robertas

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate, in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), factor structure and psychometric properties of the Montgomery Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) to identify patients with current major depressive episode (MDE). The construct validity of the MADRS against self-rating scales was also evaluated. Consecutive 522 CAD patients at admission to the cardiac rehabilitation program were interviewed for the severity of depressive symptoms using the MADRS and for current MDE using the structured MINI International Neuropsychiatric Interview. Also, all patients completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and the Beck Depression Inventory-II. The MADRS had one-factor structure and high internal consistency (Cronbach's coefficient α=0.82). Confirmative factor analysis indicated an adequate fit: comparative fit index=0.95, normed fit index=0.91, and root mean square error of approximation=0.07. At a cut-off value of 10 or higher, the MADRS had good psychometric properties for the identification of current MDE (positive predictive value=42%, with sensitivity=88% and specificity=85%). There was also a moderate to strong correlation of MADRS scores with scores on self-rating depression scales. In sum, in CAD patients undergoing rehabilitation, the MADRS is a unidimensional instrument with high internal consistency and can be used for the identification of depressed CAD patients. The association between MADRS and self-rating depression scores is moderate to strong.

  12. Malnutrition in Patients with Acute Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Bouziana, Stella D.; Tziomalos, Konstantinos

    2011-01-01

    Stroke is a devastating event that carries a potential for long-term disability. Malnutrition is frequently observed in patients with stroke, and dysphagia contributes to malnutrition risk. During both the acute phase of stroke and rehabilitation, specific nutritional interventions in the context of a multidisciplinary team effort can enhance the recovery of neurocognitive function. Early identification and management of malnutrition with dietary modifications or specific therapeutic strategies to ensure adequate nutritional intake should receive more attention, since poor nutritional status appears to exacerbate brain damage and to contribute to adverse outcome. The main purpose of nutritional intervention should be the prevention or treatment of complications resulting from energy-protein deficit. This paper reviews the evaluation and management of malnutrition and the use of specialized nutrition support in patients with stroke. Emphasis is given to enteral tube and oral feeding and to strategies to wean from tube feeding. PMID:22254136

  13. Association between depression and survival in Chinese amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Wei, Qianqian; Zheng, Zhenzhen; Guo, Xiaoyan; Ou, Ruwei; Chen, Xueping; Huang, Rui; Yang, Jing; Shang, Huifang

    2016-04-01

    To determine the prevalence of depression, to identify correlated factors for depression, and to explore the impact on the progression or survival of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) by depression in a Chinese population. A total of 166 ALS patients were recruited. Diagnosis of depression disorders and the severity of depression were established by using the fourth diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders, Hamilton Depression Rating Scale-24 items (HDRS-24) and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Major depression was found in 15 patients (9.6 %). The multiple regression analysis showed that a lower ALS Functional Rating Scale-Revised (ALSFRS-R) score was correlated with increasing HDRS scores and BDI scores (P = 0.018 and P = 0.012). No significant difference in the median survival time between ALS patients with and without depression was revealed by Kaplan-Meier analysis (log-rank P = 0.282). Cox hazard model showed that the presence of depression in ALS was unrelated to the survival, while the severity of depression in ALS was correlated with the survival. The presence and severity of depression in ALS did not correlate with the progression of ALS. Major depression in ALS is uncommon. Depression evaluation should be given to ALS patients, especially those with lower ALSFRS-R score. The severity of depression may be associated with the survival; however, depression does not worse the progression of ALS.

  14. Psychological vulnerabilities in patients with major depression vs panic disorder.

    PubMed

    Cox, B J; Enns, M W; Walker, J R; Kjernisted, K; Pidlubny, S R

    2001-05-01

    The tripartite model (Clark & Watson, 1991: Clark, L. A., & Watson, D. (1991). Tripartite model of anxiety and depression: Psychometric evidence and taxonomic implications. Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 100, 316-336) posits that anxiety and depression share nonspecific features of neuroticism but that somatic arousal appears unique to anxiety, and low positive affect appears unique to depression. The present study controlled for these higher-order effects and evaluated the relative contributions of four, specific lower-order vulnerabilities (anxiety sensitivity, rumination, self-criticism, self-oriented perfectionism). Participants were 38 depressed patients and 38 patients with panic disorder matched as closely as possible for age and gender, and all were diagnosed using the same structured interview by an experienced clinician. Results from hierarchical logistic regression analysis were consistent with predictions from the tripartite model in that only the unique features of arousal and positive affectivity differentiated the two diagnostic groups. At a lower-order level, only anxiety sensitivity (and its facet of fear of physical symptoms) and a ruminative response style demonstrated incremental predictive ability. The discussion focuses on the relationships among these higher-order and lower-order variables, and their potential importance for understanding specific manifestations of psychopathology.

  15. Depression, Anxiety, and Anger in Patients with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    BALIKCI, Adem; ERDEM, Murat; KESKIN, Uğur; BOZKURT ZINCIR, Selma; GÜLSÜN, Murat; ÖZÇELIK, Fatih; AKGÜL, Emin Özgür; AKARSU, Süleyman; ÖZTOSUN, Muzaffer; ERGÜN, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) is a syndrome of heterogeneous nature, affecting multiple systems, particularly the endocrine system. We propose to investigate the possible relationships among hormonal changes, levels of anxiety, depression, and anger in patients with PCOS. Method Forty-four female patients with PCOS and 44 body mass index (BMI )-matched healthy women participated in this study. We measured the sociodemographic features, some serum hormonal levels (insulin, gonadotropins, prolactin, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS), thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), triiodothyronine (T3), thyroxine (T4), 17 OH-progesterone, and total and free testosterone), and some other biochemical parameters of the participants. Also, all participants completed the Trait Anger-Anger Expression Scale (STAS), Beck Depression, and Beck Anxiety Inventories. We evaluated the psychiatric scale scores obtained from PCOS patients and control subjects. We used the independent-samples t-test for parametric data to evaluate normal distribution, and Mann-Whitney U-test was used for both abnormally distributed and nonparametric data. We used Pearson correlation analysis to evaluate the potential connection between the two groups’ data. Results The mean ages of the patients with PCOS and control subjects who participated in this study were 27.3±5.6 and 27.4±6.1 years, respectively. The measures of BMI, insulin, luteinizing hormone (LH), DHEAS, and total testosterone serum levels in the patient group were significantly higher than in the control group (p<.05). There was a statistically significant positive correlation between Beck anxiety scores and serum DHEAS levels (Pearson r=.4366, P=.0001). We found significant differences between the two groups in terms of trait anger, anger control, outward and inward anger, anxiety level, and depression scores (P<.05). Conclusion Anxiety symptoms indicate a stronger relationship compared to depression with DHEAS serum levels

  16. [Preventive and cessation therapy of mental disorders in patients with the acute coronary syndrome].

    PubMed

    Medvedev, V E; Epifanov, A V; Zverev, K V

    2012-01-01

    An open prospective trial of 93 inpatients divided into two main groups (61 patients) - with mental disorders (31) and without mental disorders (30) and a comparison group (32 patients) was carried out. All patients survived the acute coronary syndrome (myocardial infarction, unstable angina). The efficacy and safety of both preventive and cessation therapy with pantogam active in mean doses 1.8 and 1.2 g /daily, respectively, was demonstrated in respect of heterogeneous depressive, anxiety and somatoform disorders of the neurotic level.

  17. Dietary Treatment Options for Depression among Diabetic Patient, Focusing on Macronutrients

    PubMed Central

    Azadbakht, Leila

    2013-01-01

    There is a bidirectional adverse association between diabetes and depression. The odds for experiencing depressive symptoms in diabetic patients are two times more than nondiabetic persons, and depression is an independent predictor for the onset of diabetes. However, depression has been approximately unrecognized and untreated in two-thirds of diabetic patients, which may lead to worsened diabetes complications. A cornerstone strategy for managing depression among diabetic patients is the use of diet to improve both health problems. Because of similar pathophysiology for chronic diseases and depression, it seems that similar dietary recommendations could be useful. However, few studies have been conducted among diabetic patients. Regarding the complications of diabetes such as renal diseases and coronary heart diseases, the proper range of various macronutrients should be clarified in depressed diabetic patients as well as the proper type of each macronutrient. In this paper, we reviewed the available data on the treatment of depression in diabetic patients. PMID:24199205

  18. Motivational deficits in effort-based decision making in individuals with subsyndromal depression, first-episode and remitted depression patients.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xin-Hua; Huang, Jia; Zhu, Cui-Ying; Wang, Ye-Fei; Cheung, Eric F C; Chan, Raymond C K; Xie, Guang-Rong

    2014-12-30

    Anhedonia is a hallmark symptom of major depressive disorder (MDD). Preliminary findings suggest that anhedonia is characterized by reduced reward anticipation and motivation of obtaining reward. However, relatively little is known about reward-based decision-making in depression. We tested the hypothesis that anhedonia in MDD may reflect specific impairments in motivation on reward-based decision-making and the deficits might be associated with depressive symptoms severity. In study 1, individuals with and without depressive symptoms performed the modified version of the Effort Expenditure for Rewards Task (EEfRT), a behavioral measure of cost/benefit decision-making. In study 2, MDD patients, remitted MDD patients and healthy controls were recruited for the same procedures. We found evidence for decreased willingness to make effort for rewards among individuals with subsyndromal depression; the effect was amplified in MDD patients, but dissipated in patients with remitted depression. We also found that reduced anticipatory and consummatory pleasure predicted decreased willingness to expend efforts to obtain rewards in MDD patients. For individuals with subsyndromal depression, the impairments were correlated with anticipatory anhedonia but not consummatory anhedonia. These data offer novel evidence that motivational deficits in MDD are correlated with depression severity and predicted by self-reported anhedonia.

  19. Chronobiology, cognitive function and depressive symptoms in surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Melissa Voigt

    2014-09-01

    Biological rhythms are essential for the regulation of many life processes. Disturbances of the circadian rhythm are known to affect human health, performance and well-being and the negative consequences are numerous and widespread. Cognitive dysfunction, fatigue, pain, sleep disturbances and mood disorders, such as anxiety and depression, are common problems arising around the time of surgery or in the course of a cancer diagnosis and subsequent treatment period. The importance of investigating prevention or treatment possibilities in these populations is significant due to the extent of the problems and the derived consequences on morbidity and mortality. Genetic predisposition to these problems is also an issue in focus. In this thesis we initially investigated whether the specific clock gene genotype PER(5/5) was associated with the development of postoperative cognitive dysfunction one week after non-cardiac surgery. We did not find any association, although this could have been due to the size of the study. Yet, if PER3(5/5) is associated with a higher incidence of postoperative cognitive dysfunction, the risk seems to be only modestly increased and by less than 10%. Melatonin is a hormone with well-known chronobiotic and hypnotic effects. In addition, exogenous melatonin is also known to have anxiolytic, analgesic, antidepressant and positive cognitive effects. Based on the lack of studies investigating these effects of melatonin, we conducted the MELODY trial in which we investigated the effect of 6 mg oral melatonin on depressive symptoms, anxiety, sleep, cognitive function and fatigue in patients with breast cancer in a three month time period after surgery. Melatonin had an effect on reducing the risk of developing depressive symptoms and also increased sleep efficiency perioperatively and total sleep time postoperatively. No effect was found on anxiety, sleep quality, sleepiness, general well-being or pain, however melatonin seemed to positively

  20. Depression in patients with mastocytosis: prevalence, features and effects of masitinib therapy.

    PubMed

    Moura, Daniela Silva; Sultan, Serge; Georgin-Lavialle, Sophie; Pillet, Nathalie; Montestruc, François; Gineste, Paul; Barete, Stéphane; Damaj, Gandhi; Moussy, Alain; Lortholary, Olivier; Hermine, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    Depression in patients with mastocytosis is often reported but its prevalence and characteristics are not precisely described. In addition, the impact of therapies targeting mast cells proliferation, differentiation and degranulation on psychic symptoms of depression have never been investigated. Our objective was to determine the prevalence and to describe features of depression in a large cohort of mastocytosis patients (n = 288) and to investigate the therapeutic impact of the protein kinase inhibitor masitinib in depression symptoms. The description of depression was based on the analysis of a database with Hamilton scores using Principal Component Analysis (PCA). Efficacy of masitinib therapy was evaluated using non parametric Wilcoxon test for paired data within a three months period (n = 35). Our results show that patients with indolent mastocytosis present an elevated prevalence of depression (64%). Depression was moderate in 56% but severe in 8% of cases. Core symptoms (such as psychic anxiety, depressed mood, work and interests) characterized depression in mastocytosis patients. Masitinib therapy was associated with significant improvement (67% of the cases) of overall depression, with 75% of recovery cases. Global Quality of Life slightly improved after masitinib therapy and did not predicted depression improvement. In conclusion, depression is very frequent in mastocytosis patients and masitinib therapy is associated with the reduction its psychic experiences. We conclude that depression in mastocytosis may originate from processes related to mast cells activation. Masitinib could therefore be a useful treatment for mastocytosis patients with depression and anxiety symptoms.

  1. Managing patients with acute urinary retention.

    PubMed

    Kuppusamy, Shanggar; Gillatt, David

    2011-04-01

    Acute urinary retention (AUR) is more than ten times more common in men than women. In men it tends to occur in the elderly; the risk of AUR is higher in men > 70 years. The causes in men can be divided into precipitated or occurring spontaneously. These can be further divided according to the mechanism i.e. obstructive, neurological and myogenic. Spontaneous AUR, caused by progression of BPH leading to a mechanical obstruction of the bladder outlet, is the most common cause of AUR. The typical presentation of AUR is a patient complaining of a sudden inability to urinate associated with progressive abdominal distension which is usually painful. The pain increases in intensity with increasing distension of the bladder. An abdominal examination should reveal a distended bladder which can be confirmed by a dull percussion note. A digital rectal examination is vital to gain information on prostatic enlargement (benign or malignant), faecal load in rectum, anal tone and presence of other masses. Urinalysis and culture should be carried out on a sample obtained after catheterisation to rule out infection. Renal function should be assessed to see if there has been damage to the upper tracts. It is better not to perform a PSA test in this situation as it will invariably be raised due to distension of the bladder and catheter insertion. If catheter insertion fails then a urological consultation is required for insertion of a suprapubic catheter. Admission is essential if the patient is: unwell with urosepsis; has abnormal renal function needing investigation and fluid monitoring; has acute neurological problems; or cannot take care of the catheter. Trial without catheter needs to be planned and the ideal time to do this is within 2-3 days so that the patient can pass urine naturally.

  2. Depressants

    MedlinePlus

    ... of depressants, including alcohol and the illegal drugs GHB and Rohypnol , come in liquid or powder form ... by prescription only. Some depressants, including Rohypnol and GHB, are illegal in the United States. Illegal possession ...

  3. Depression

    MedlinePlus

    ... There are a variety of causes, including genetic, biological, environmental, and psychological factors. Depression can happen at ... are effective treatments for depression, including antidepressants, talk therapy, or both. NIH: National Institute of Mental Health

  4. Depression

    MedlinePlus

    ... the winter months, when there is less natural sunlight. Return to top What causes depression? There is ... alone. Others with moderate to severe depression might benefit from antidepressants. It may take a few weeks ...

  5. Depression

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003213.htm Depression - overview To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Depression may be described as feeling sad, blue, unhappy, ...

  6. Depression

    MedlinePlus

    ... is in crisis, get help quickly. Reprints Share Depression Basics Download PDF Download ePub Order a free ... a serious but treatable mood disorder. What is depression? Everyone feels sad or low sometimes, but these ...

  7. Autobiographical memory specificity in patients with tinnitus versus patients with depression and normal controls.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Gerhard; Hesser, Hugo; Cima, Rilana F F; Weise, Cornelia

    2013-01-01

    Several studies show that patients with depression and post-traumatic stress disorder respond with fewer specific autobiographical memories in a cued memory task (i.e. the autobiographical memory test; AMT) compared to healthy controls. One previous study found this phenomenon among tinnitus patients as well (Andersson, Ingerholt, & Jansson, 2003). The aim of this study was to replicate the previous study with an additional control group of depressed patients and memory errors as measured with the AMT as an additional outcome. We included 20 normal hearing tinnitus patients, 20 healthy controls and 20 persons diagnosed with clinical depression. The AMT was administered together with self-report measures of depression, anxiety and tinnitus distress. Both the tinnitus and depression groups differed from the healthy control group in that they reported fewer specific autobiographical memories. There were, however, differences between the tinnitus and depression groups in terms of the errors made on the AMT. The depression group had more overgeneral memories than the normal control group, whereas the tinnitus group did not differ from the control group on this memory error. The tinnitus group had more semantic associations and non-memories than the other two groups, suggesting that executive functioning may play a role for the tinnitus group when completing the AMT. Clinical and theoretical implications of the findings are discussed.

  8. Relationship Suicide, Cognitive Functions, and Depression in Patients with Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    KOCATÜRK, Bülent Kenan; EŞSİZOĞLU, Altan; AKSARAY, Gökay; AKARSU, Ferdane Özlem; MUSMUL, Ahmet

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to compare schizophrenic patients with and without a suicide attempt history in terms of sociodemographic and clinical features and cognitive functions and to determine the predictive factors for suicide attempt history. Methods In this study, we assessed and compared 70 patients with schizophrenia, 27 patients with a suicide attempt history, and 43 patients without a suicide attempt history. The cognitive functions of patients were assessed by the Stroop test, Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST), and Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test. In order to evaluate clinical symptoms, the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) and Calgary Depression Scale for Schizophrenia (CDSS) were used. Results In this study, the number of hospitalizations, PANSS general psychopathology subscale score, CDSS total score, suicide item score, and WCST total number of responses (WCST1) were significantly higher among the patients with a suicide attempt history. The WCST1 and CDSS total scores were predicted using the suicide attempt history. Conclusion Revealing the factors related to suicidal behavior in patients with schizophrenia contributes to the prevention of suicide. Studies with long-term follow-up and with a larger sample group are required for the investigation of relationship suicide, cognitive impairment, which is one of the core symptoms of schizophrenia, and depression.

  9. Acute pancreatitis in patients with pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shaojun; Tian, Bole

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a rare manifestation of pancreatic cancer (PC). The relationship between AP and PC remains less distinct. From January 2009 to November 2015, 47consecutive patients with PC who presented with AP were reviewed for this study. Clinical features, clinicopathologic variables, postoperative complications, and follow-up evaluations of patients were documented in detail from our database. In order to identify cutoff threshold time for surgery, receiver operating curve (ROC) was built according to patients with or without postoperative complications. Cumulative rate of survival was calculated by using the Kaplan–Meier method. The study was conducted in accordance with the principles of the Declaration of Helsinki and the guidelines of West China Hospital. This study included 35 men (74.5%) and 12 women (25.5%) (mean age: 52 years), with a median follow-up of 40 months. AP was clinically mild in 45 (95.7%) and severe in 2 (4.3%). The diagnosis of PC was delayed by 2 to 660 days (median 101 days). Thirty-nine (83.0%) cases underwent surgery. Eight (17.0%) cases performed biopsies only. Of 39 patients, radical surgery was performed in 32 (82.1%) cases and palliative in 7 (19.9%) cases. Two (8.0%) patients were needed for vascular resection and reconstruction. Postoperative complications occurred in 12 (30.8%) patients. About 24.5 days was the best cutoff point, with an area under curve (AUC) of 0.727 (P = 0.025, 95% confidence interval: 0.555–0.8999). The survival rate of patients at 1 year was 23.4%. The median survival in patients with vascular resection and reconstruction was 18 months, compared with 10 months in patients without vascular resection (P = 0.042). For the primary stage (T), Tix was identified in 3 patients, the survival of whom were 5, 28, 50 months, respectively. And 2 of them were still alive at the follow-up period. The severity of AP was mainly mild. Surgical intervention after 24.5 days may benefit for

  10. Mood induction in depressive patients: a comparative multidimensional approach.

    PubMed

    Falkenberg, Irina; Kohn, Nils; Schoepker, Regina; Habel, Ute

    2012-01-01

    Anhedonia, reduced positive affect and enhanced negative affect are integral characteristics of major depressive disorder (MDD). Emotion dysregulation, e.g. in terms of different emotion processing deficits, has consistently been reported. The aim of the present study was to investigate mood changes in depressive patients using a multidimensional approach for the measurement of emotional reactivity to mood induction procedures. Experimentally, mood states can be altered using various mood induction procedures. The present study aimed at validating two different positive mood induction procedures in patients with MDD and investigating which procedure is more effective and applicable in detecting dysfunctions in MDD. The first procedure relied on the presentation of happy vs. neutral faces, while the second used funny vs. neutral cartoons. Emotional reactivity was assessed in 16 depressed and 16 healthy subjects using self-report measures, measurements of electrodermal activity and standardized analyses of facial responses. Positive mood induction was successful in both procedures according to subjective ratings in patients and controls. In the cartoon condition, however, a discrepancy between reduced facial activity and concurrently enhanced autonomous reactivity was found in patients. Relying on a multidimensional assessment technique, a more comprehensive estimate of dysfunctions in emotional reactivity in MDD was available than by self-report measures alone and this was unsheathed especially by the mood induction procedure relying on cartoons. The divergent facial and autonomic responses in the presence of unaffected subjective reactivity suggest an underlying deficit in the patients' ability to express the felt arousal to funny cartoons. Our results encourage the application of both procedures in functional imaging studies for investigating the neural substrates of emotion dysregulation in MDD patients. Mood induction via cartoons appears to be superior to mood

  11. Is Valproate Depressogenic in Patients Remitting from Acute Mania? Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Priya

    2015-01-01

    Valproate is an effective antimanic agent and is recommended as a first-line medication in the treatment of acute mania. Current evidence based guidelines recommend that valproate should be given as a loading dose as it produces a rapid antimanic and antipsychotic response with minimal side-effects. However, no clear guidelines are available on the appropriate dosing or serum levels of valproate in the continuation or maintenance phase of bipolar disorder. We present 4 clinical cases to hypothesize that the higher doses of valproate, such as those used in the treatment of acute mania, may cause a depressive switch. So consideration should be given to reducing the dose of valproate if a patient develops depressive symptoms following recovery from the manic episode, as a therapeutic strategy. The cases also indicate that relatively lower doses and serum levels of valproate are effective in the maintenance phase compared to those needed in the acute manic phase of bipolar disorder. This is the first set of case series that questions the depressogenic potential of valproate in patients remitting from an acute manic episode. It highlights that different doses and serum levels of valproate may be therapeutic in different phases of bipolar disorder. PMID:26664794

  12. Humor, laughter, and the cerebellum: insights from patients with acute cerebellar stroke.

    PubMed

    Frank, B; Andrzejewski, K; Göricke, S; Wondzinski, E; Siebler, M; Wild, B; Timmann, D

    2013-12-01

    Extent of cerebellar involvement in cognition and emotion is still a topic of ongoing research. In particular, the cerebellar role in humor processing and control of laughter is not well known. A hypermetric dysregulation of affective behavior has been assumed in cerebellar damage. Thus, we aimed at investigating humor comprehension and appreciation as well as the expression of laughter in 21 patients in the acute or subacute state after stroke restricted to the cerebellum, and in the same number of matched healthy control subjects. Patients with acute and subacute cerebellar damage showed preserved comprehension and appreciation of humor using a validated humor test evaluating comprehension, funniness and aversiveness of cartoons ("3WD Humor Test"). Additionally, there was no difference when compared to healthy controls in the number and intensity of facial reactions and laughter while observing jokes, humorous cartoons, or video sketches measured by the Facial Action Coding System. However, as depression scores were significantly increased in patients with cerebellar stroke, a concealing effect of accompanying depression cannot be excluded. Current findings add to descriptions in the literature that cognitive or affective disorders in patients with lesions restricted to the cerebellum, even in the acute state after damage, are frequently mild and might only be present in more sensitive or specific tests.

  13. Investigation into the acceptability of door locking to staff, patients, and visitors on acute psychiatric wards.

    PubMed

    Muir-Cochrane, Eimear; van der Merwe, Marie; Nijman, Henk; Haglund, Kristina; Simpson, Alan; Bowers, Len

    2012-02-01

    There is disagreement among psychiatric professionals about whether the doors of acute psychiatric wards should be kept locked to prevent patients from leaving and harming themselves or others. This study explored patient, staff, and visitor perceptions about the acceptability of locking the ward door on acute psychiatric inpatient wards. Interviews were conducted with 14 registered nurses, 15 patients, and six visitors from three different acute wards. Findings revealed commonalities across all groups, with general agreement that locking the door reduced absconding. Staff expressed feelings of guilt, embarrassment, and fear of being blamed when a patient absconded. Staff also reported that open wards created anxious vigilance to prevent an abscond and increased workload in allocating staff to watch the door, whereas staff on partially-locked doors also perceived an increased workload in letting people in and out of the ward. Patients had mixed feelings about the status of the door, expressing depression, a sense of stigma, and low self-esteem when the door was locked. The issue of balancing safety and security on acute psychiatric wards against the autonomy of patients is not easily resolved, and requires focused research to develop innovative nursing practices.

  14. Hepatic steatosis depresses alpha-1-antitrypsin levels in human and rat acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qian; Du, Jianjun; Yu, Pengfei; Bai, Bin; Zhao, Zhanwei; Wang, Shiqi; Zhu, Junjie; Feng, Quanxin; Gao, Yun; Zhao, Qingchuan; Liu, Chaoxu

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic steatosis (HS) can exacerbate acute pancreatitis (AP). This study aimed to investigate the relation between α1-antitrypsin (AAT) and acute pancreatitis when patients have HS. Using proteomic profiling, we identified 18 differently expressed proteins pots in the serum of rats with or without HS after surgical establishment of AP. AAT was found to be one of the significantly down-regulated proteins. AAT levels were significantly lower in hepatic steatosis acute pancreatitis (HSAP) than in non-HSAP (NHSAP) (P < 0.001). To explore the clinical significance of these observations, we measured the levels of AAT in the serum of 240 patients with HSAP, NHSAP, fatty liver disease (FLD), or no disease. Compared with healthy controls, serum AAT levels in patients with NHSAP were significantly higher (P < 0.01), while in patients with HSAP serum AAT levels were significantly lower (P < 0.01). Further studies showed that acute physiology and chronic health evaluation (APACHE-II) scores were negatively correlated with serum AAT levels (r = −0.85, P < 0.01). In conclusion, low serum levels of AAT in patients with HSAP are correlated with disease severity and AAT may represent a potential target for therapies aiming to improve pancreatitis. PMID:26634430

  15. Hepatic steatosis depresses alpha-1-antitrypsin levels in human and rat acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian; Du, Jianjun; Yu, Pengfei; Bai, Bin; Zhao, Zhanwei; Wang, Shiqi; Zhu, Junjie; Feng, Quanxin; Gao, Yun; Zhao, Qingchuan; Liu, Chaoxu

    2015-12-04

    Hepatic steatosis (HS) can exacerbate acute pancreatitis (AP). This study aimed to investigate the relation between α1-antitrypsin (AAT) and acute pancreatitis when patients have HS. Using proteomic profiling, we identified 18 differently expressed proteins pots in the serum of rats with or without HS after surgical establishment of AP. AAT was found to be one of the significantly down-regulated proteins. AAT levels were significantly lower in hepatic steatosis acute pancreatitis (HSAP) than in non-HSAP (NHSAP) (P < 0.001). To explore the clinical significance of these observations, we measured the levels of AAT in the serum of 240 patients with HSAP, NHSAP, fatty liver disease (FLD), or no disease. Compared with healthy controls, serum AAT levels in patients with NHSAP were significantly higher (P < 0.01), while in patients with HSAP serum AAT levels were significantly lower (P < 0.01). Further studies showed that acute physiology and chronic health evaluation (APACHE-II) scores were negatively correlated with serum AAT levels (r = -0.85, P < 0.01). In conclusion, low serum levels of AAT in patients with HSAP are correlated with disease severity and AAT may represent a potential target for therapies aiming to improve pancreatitis.

  16. Valued Life Activities, Smoking Cessation, and Mood in Post-Acute Coronary Syndrome Patients

    PubMed Central

    Busch, Andrew M.; Srour, John Fani; Arrighi, James A.; Kahler, Christopher W.; Borrelli, Belinda

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Continued engagement in valued life activities is a protective factor for depression and has been linked to readiness to quit smoking in medical populations, but has never been examined among Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS) patients. The purpose of this study is to investigate relationships among valued life activities, mood, and smoking post-ACS. Methods Participants were 54 post-ACS patients who were smoking before ACS hospitalization. Data on mood, smoking status, engagement in valued activities, restriction of valued activities, and satisfactory replacement of restricted activities was collected 1-12 months post-ACS. Results Depressive symptoms were associated with both less valued activity engagement and greater valued activity restriction. Positive affect was associated with greater valued activity engagement and negative affect was associated with greater valued activity restriction. Satisfactory replacement of restricted activities was associated with greater positive affect, fewer depressive symptoms, and quitting smoking post-ACS. The majority of these relationships remained significant after controlling for relevant covariates, including physical functioning. Conclusions Valued activity restriction and engagement may contribute to depressed mood and failure to quit smoking in ACS patients. Psychotherapies that target greater engagement in valued life activities deserve further investigation in ACS patients. PMID:25471466

  17. Correlates and outcomes of depressed out-patients with greater and fewer anxious symptoms: a CO-MED report.

    PubMed

    Chan, Herng Nieng; Rush, A John; Nierenberg, Andrew A; Trivedi, Madhukar; Wisniewski, Stephen R; Balasubramani, G K; Friedman, Edward S; Gaynes, Bradley N; Davis, Lori; Morris, David; Fava, Maurizio

    2012-11-01

    The objective of this paper was to determine whether the presence of more vs. fewer anxious symptom features, at baseline, are associated with other clinical features and treatment outcomes in out-patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). This single-blind, randomized trial enrolled 665 MDD out-patients to compare the efficacy of two antidepressant medication combinations against escitalopram after 12-wk acute treatment and follow-up (total 28 wk). The sample was divided into those with greater (vs. fewer) anxiety features using the anxiety/somatization subscale of the baseline 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression. Baseline sociodemographic and clinical features, treatment features and outcomes compared these two groups. Overall, 74.7% of participants met the threshold for 'anxious features'. They were more likely to be female, have other concurrent anxiety disorders, more severe depression, more lethargic and melancholic features and poorer cognitive and physical functioning, quality of life and work and social adjustment. In acute treatment, participants with anxious features received comparatively higher doses of mirtazapine and venlafaxine and reported more side-effects. The groups with and without anxious features did not differ in treatment outcomes and side-effect burden. Despite being associated with a distinct clinical profile, baseline anxious features were not clinically useful in predicting acute treatment outcomes or differential treatment response.

  18. Patients' Experience of Winter Depression and Light Room Treatment

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Background. There is a need for more knowledge on the effects of light room treatment in patients with seasonal affective disorder and to explore patients' subjective experience of the disease and the treatment. Methods. This was a descriptive and explorative study applying qualitative content analysis. A purposeful sample of 18 psychiatric outpatients with a major depressive disorder with a seasonal pattern and a pretreatment score ≥12 on the 9-item Montgomery-Åsberg Depression self-rating scale was included (10 women and 8 men, aged 24–65 years). All patients had completed light room treatment (≥7/10 consecutive weekdays). Data was collected two weeks after treatment using a semistructured interview guide. Results. Patients described a clear seasonal pattern and a profound struggle to adapt to seasonal changes during the winter, including deterioration in sleep, daily rhythms, energy level, mood, activity, and cognitive functioning. Everyday life was affected with reduced work capacity, social withdrawal, and disturbed relations with family and friends. The light room treatment resulted in a radical and rapid improvement in all the major symptoms with only mild and transient side effects. Discussion. The results indicate that light room treatment is essential for some patients' ability to cope with seasonal affective disorder. PMID:28293623

  19. Magnetization transfer imaging of suicidal patients with major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ziqi; Zhang, Huawei; Jia, Zhiyun; Zhong, Jingjie; Huang, Xiaoqi; Du, Mingying; Chen, Lizhou; Kuang, Weihong; Sweeney, John A; Gong, Qiyong

    2015-04-08

    Magnetization transfer imaging (MTI) provides a quantitative measure of the macromolecular structural integrity of brain tissue, as represented by magnetization transfer ratio (MTR). In this study, we utilized MTI to identify biophysical alterations in MDD patients with a history of suicide attempts relative to MDD patients without such history. The participants were 36 medication-free MDD patients, with (N = 17) and without (N = 19) a history of a suicide attempt, and 28 healthy controls matched for age and gender. Whole brain voxel-based analysis was used to compare MTR across three groups and to analyze correlations with symptom severity and illness duration. We identified decreased MTR in left inferior parietal lobule and right superior parietal lobule in suicide attempters relative to both non-attempters and controls. Non-attempters also showed significantly reduced MTR in left inferior parietal lobule relative to controls, as well as an MTR reduction in left cerebellum. These abnormalities were not correlated with symptom severity or illness duration. Depressed patients with a history of suicide attempt showed bilateral abnormalities in parietal cortex compared to nonsuicidal depressed patients and healthy controls. Parietal lobe abnormalities might cause attentional dysfunction and impaired decision making to increase risk for suicidal behavior in MDD.

  20. Self-reported everyday memory and depression in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Bruce, Jared M; Arnett, Peter A

    2004-04-01

    Depression and memory difficulties are among the most common complaints voiced by patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Nevertheless, little is known about how depression might affect patients' perceptions of their memory difficulties. The present investigation was designed to explore this issue. Results supported a model that integrates aspects of Beck's theory of depression and the concept of depressive realism. Consistent with the depressive realism literature, nondepressed MS patients significantly overestimated their everyday memory compared with their actual performance on verbal memory and attention/concentration indices, whereas moderately depressed patients' everyday memory ratings mirrored their actual neuropsychological performance. Supporting Beck's negative cognitive schema notion, mildly depressed patients significantly overestimated their memory difficulties. Implications for the treatment of memory problems among MS patients are discussed.

  1. Neurologic Disorders in Immunocompetent Patients with Autochthonous Acute Hepatitis E

    PubMed Central

    Perrin, H. Blasco; Cintas, P.; Abravanel, F.; Gérolami, R.; d'Alteroche, L.; Raynal, J.-N.; Alric, L.; Dupuis, E.; Prudhomme, L.; Vaucher, E.; Couzigou, P.; Liversain, J.-M.; Bureau, C.; Vinel, J.-P.; Kamar, N.; Izopet, J.

    2015-01-01

    Neurologic disorders, mainly Guillain-Barré syndrome and Parsonage–Turner syndrome (PTS), have been described in patients with hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection in industrialized and developing countries. We report a wider range of neurologic disorders in nonimmunocompromised patients with acute HEV infection. Data from 15 French immunocompetent patients with acute HEV infection and neurologic disorders were retrospectively recorded from January 2006 through June 2013. The disorders could be divided into 4 main entities: mononeuritis multiplex, PTS, meningoradiculitis, and acute demyelinating neuropathy. HEV infection was treated with ribavirin in 3 patients (for PTS or mononeuritis multiplex). One patient was treated with corticosteroids (for mononeuropathy multiplex), and 5 others received intravenous immunoglobulin (for PTS, meningoradiculitis, Guillain-Barré syndrome, or Miller Fisher syndrome). We conclude that pleiotropic neurologic disorders are seen in HEV-infected immunocompetent patients. Patients with acute neurologic manifestations and aminotransferase abnormalities should be screened for HEV infection. PMID:26490255

  2. Methadone, monoamine oxidase, and depression: opioid distribution and acute effects on enzyme activity

    SciTech Connect

    Kaufmann, C.A.; Kreek, M.J.; Raghunath, J.; Arns, P.

    1983-09-01

    Narcotic withdrawal is often accompanied by an atypical depression which responds to resumption of narcotics. It was hypothesized that methadone might exert its antidepressant effects through monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibition. The current study examined /sub 3/H-methadone distribution in rat brain and effects on regional MAO activity with acute doses (2.5 mg/kg) which approximate those found during chronic methadone maintenance in man. Limbic areas (amygdala, basomedial hypothalamus, caudate-putamen, hippocampus, preoptic nucleus), as well as pituitary and liver were assayed for MAO activity and methadone concentration. MAO activities did not differ significantly in acute methadone or saline-treated cage-mates at 1 or 24 hr. The concentrations of methadone at 1 hr ranged between 17 and 223 ng/100 mg wet wt tissue in the preoptic nucleus and pituitary, respectively. No significant correlation was found between change in MAO activity (MAO methadone/MAO saline) and methadone concentration in any region at 1 or 24 hr. This study does not support the hypothesis that methadone acts as an antidepressant through MAO inhibition, at least not following acute administration of this exogenous opioid.

  3. Depression, antidepressant therapies, and erectile dysfunction: clinical trials of sildenafil citrate (Viagra) in treated and untreated patients with depression.

    PubMed

    Nurnberg, H George; Seidman, Stuart N; Gelenberg, Alan J; Fava, Maurizio; Rosen, Raymond; Shabsigh, Ridwan

    2002-09-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) and depression are highly prevalent conditions and frequently occur concomitantly in predisposed individuals. Men with ED and depression are also likely to have other comorbid conditions, including diabetes, hypertension, and heart disease. Because ED is also a common adverse effect of some medications for these conditions, patients are frequently noncompliant with treatment. Sildenafil citrate (Viagra) is effective in treating ED of a broad range of etiologies, suggesting that it may be equally beneficial in patients with ED that is associated with depressive symptoms and in those with ED resulting from serotonergic reuptake inhibitor (SRI) antidepressant treatment. We review the results of 3 randomized, placebo-controlled trials and a retrospective analysis of data pooled from 10 clinical trials that examine the efficacy of sildenafil in treating ED associated with depression and as an adverse effect of SRI treatment. The results suggest that sildenafil is efficacious as a first-line treatment for ED in men with untreated minor depression, in men with ED that is refractory to successful SRI treatment of depression, and in those whose depression was successfully treated but who developed ED as a consequence of SRI treatment. Given the complex interrelations among ED, depression, and other comorbid conditions, the key to proper management is a comprehensive evaluation, including sexual function, and an accurate differential diagnosis.

  4. Intravenous immunoglobulin treatment for acute fulminant inflammatory cardiomyopathy: Series of six patients and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Goland, Sorel; Czer, Lawrence SC; Siegel, Robert J; Tabak, Steven; Jordan, Stanley; Luthringer, Daniel; Mirocha, James; Coleman, Bernice; Kass, Robert M; Trento, Alfredo

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although an autoimmune mechanism has been postulated for myocarditis and acute-onset inflammatory dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), immunomodulatory treatment strategies are still under investigation. METHODS AND RESULTS: The clinical data of six patients with acute inflammatory DCM referred for evaluation for possible heart transplantation were reviewed. All patients were admitted with acute congestive heart failure and severely impaired left ventricular (LV) function and were treated with high-dose (2 g/kg) intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG). The diagnosis of acute inflammatory DCM was based on recent onset of congestive heart failure (New York Heart Association functional class III or IV) with severely depressed LV ejection fraction ([LVEF] 30% or lower) occurring shortly after viral-like illness. All patients had inflammation on endomyocardial biopsy or elevated cardiac enzymes, as well as a normal coronary angiogram. All patients were in New York Heart Association class I or II at the time of hospital discharge. The mean LVEF improved from 21.7±7.5% at baseline to 50.3±8.6% at discharge (P=0.005). Four patients had complete recovery (LVEF 50% or higher) and two patients had partial LV recovery. Patients were followed for a median 13.2 months (range two to 24 months) and had a mean LVEF of 53±6% (P not significant versus LVEF at discharge). CONCLUSIONS: Therapy with intravenous high-dose IVIG may be a potentially useful treatment in selected patients if given early in the course of acute fulminant inflammatory DCM. A randomized, prospective trial is warranted to prove the real benefit of IVIG in this patient population. PMID:18612500

  5. Self-Report of Depressive Symptoms in Low Back Pain Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crisson, James; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Presents two studies designed to examine the self-report of depressive symptoms in low back pain patients (N=134). Both studies found that patients were more likely to report somatic than cognitive symptoms of depression. Patients with multiple physical findings were not more likely to report somatic symptoms than patients with few physical…

  6. Relationship between anxiety, depression, and morbidity in adult asthma patients

    PubMed Central

    Rimington, L; Davies, D; Lowe, D; Pearson, M

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Symptoms of disease reported by patients reflect the effects of the disease process within the individual and the person's physical and mental ability to tolerate or otherwise cope with the limitations on their functioning. This study examines the relationship between asthma symptoms, disease severity, and psychological status in patients being managed in routine primary healthcare settings.
METHODS—One hundred and fourteen subjects from four GP practices, two inner city and two suburban, were studied. Symptoms were assessed by means of the Asthma Quality of Life questionnaire (AQLQ) and a locally devised Q score, and psychological status with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression (HAD) scale. Spirometric values and details of current asthma treatment (BTS asthma guidelines treatment step) were recorded as markers of asthma severity.
RESULTS—Symptoms as measured by AQLQ correlated with peak expiratory flow (rS = 0.40) and with BTS guidelines treatment step (rS =0.25). Similarly, the Q score correlated with peak expiratory flow (rS = 0.44) and with BTS guidelines treatment step (rS =0.42). Similar levels of correlation of forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) with symptoms were reported. HAD anxiety and depression scores also correlated to a similar extent with these two symptom scores, but there was hardly any correlation with lung function. Logistic regression analysis showed that HAD scores help to explain symptom scores over and above the effects of lung function and BTS guidelines treatment step. Symptoms, depression, and anxiety were higher for inner city patients while little difference was observed in objective measures of asthma.
CONCLUSIONS—Asthma guidelines suggest that changing levels of symptoms should be used to monitor the effectiveness of treatment. These data suggest that reported symptoms may be misleading and unreliable because they may reflect non-asthma factors that cannot be expected to respond to changes in

  7. Outcomes in patients with mixed phenotype acute leukemia in Morocco.

    PubMed

    Bachir, Fatima; Zerrouk, Jihane; Howard, Scott C; Graoui, Omar; Lahjouji, Ali; Hessissen, Leila; Bennani, Sanae; Quessar, Assmae; El Aouad, Rajae

    2014-08-01

    Mixed phenotype acute leukemia (MPAL) includes biphenotypic and bilineal types of leukemia, which constitute rare subtypes that require individualized therapy. Outcomes in Moroccan patients with MPAL are unknown. Among 1264 patients with acute leukemia, 20 were classified as having MPAL, including 17 with biphenotypic acute leukemia (1.3%) and 3 with bilineal leukemia (0.2%). There were 8 adults and 12 children. In 12 cases (60%), leukemic blasts expressed myeloid and T-lymphoid antigens, and, in 5 cases (25%), leukemic blasts expressed B lymphoid antigens plus myeloid antigens. Patients were initially treated on protocols for acute myeloid leukemia (n=4), acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL, n=14), or with palliative care (n=2). The probability of survival at 2 years in MPAL cases was 52%± 14%. Six of the 12 patients younger than 15 years remain alive versus 1 of 8 adult patients. Patients treated with ALL-directed therapy had significantly higher overall survival than those treated with acute myeloid leukemia-directed therapy (P=0.003). There was no association between the phenotypic characteristics and the clinical outcome (P=0.83). In conclusion, MPAL represents 1.5% of acute leukemia in Morocco. The prognosis is poor, but initial treatment with therapy directed toward ALL, improved supportive care, and the prevention of abandonment of therapy may improve outcomes in this subgroup of patients.

  8. Depression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strock, Margaret

    Approximately ten percent of the population suffers from a depressive illness each year. Although the economic cost is high, the cost in human suffering is immeasurable. To help educate the population about this disorder, this paper presents a definition of depression and its common manifestations. The symptoms that people often experience are…

  9. Chronic and Acute Stress, Gender, and Serotonin Transporter Gene-Environment Interactions Predicting Depression Symptoms in Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammen, Constance; Brennan, Patricia A.; Keenan-Miller, Danielle; Hazel, Nicholas A.; Najman, Jake M.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Many recent studies of serotonin transporter gene by environment effects predicting depression have used stress assessments with undefined or poor psychometric methods, possibly contributing to wide variation in findings. The present study attempted to distinguish between effects of acute and chronic stress to predict depressive…

  10. Development of a positive psychology intervention for patients with acute cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Huffman, Jeff C; Mastromauro, Carol A; Boehm, Julia K; Seabrook, Rita; Fricchione, Gregory L; Denninger, John W; Lyubomirsky, Sonja

    2011-09-29

    The management of depression and other negative psychological states in cardiac patients has been a focus of multiple treatment trials, though such trials have not led to substantial improvements in cardiac outcomes. In contrast, there has been minimal focus on interventions to increase positive psychological states in cardiac patients, despite the fact that optimism and other positive states have been associated with superior cardiovascular outcomes. Our objective was to develop an 8-week, phone-based positive psychology intervention for patients hospitalized with acute cardiac disease (acute coronary syndrome or decompensated heart failure). Such an intervention would consist of positive psychology exercises adapted for this specific population, and it would need to be feasible for practitioners and patients in real-world settings. By adapting exercises that were previously validated in healthy individuals, we were able to generate a positive psychology telemedicine intervention for cardiac patients that focused on optimism, kindness, and gratitude. In addition, we successfully created a companion treatment manual for subjects to enhance the educational aspects of the intervention and facilitate completion of exercises. Finally, we successfully performed a small pilot trial of this intervention, and found that the positive psychology intervention appeared to be feasible and well-accepted in a cohort of patients with acute cardiac illness. Future studies should further develop this promising intervention and examine its impact on psychological and medical outcomes in this vulnerable population of cardiac patients.

  11. Differential gene expression in patients with subsyndromal symptomatic depression and major depressive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zezhi; Wang, Qingzhong; Wang, Xuemei; Yuan, Chengmei; Wang, Zuowei; Hong, Wu; Lu, Weihong; Cao, Lan; Chen, Jun; Wang, Yong; Yu, Shunying; Zhou, Yimin; Yi, Zhenghui; Fang, Yiru

    2017-01-01

    Background Subsyndromal symptomatic depression (SSD) is a subtype of subthreshold depressive and can lead to significant psychosocial functional impairment. Although the pathogenesis of major depressive disorder (MDD) and SSD still remains poorly understood, a set of studies have found that many same genetic factors play important roles in the etiology of these two disorders. Nowadays, the differential gene expression between MDD and SSD is still unknown. In our previous study, we compared the expression profile and made the classification with the leukocytes by using whole-genome cRNA microarrays among drug-free first-episode subjects with SSD, MDD and matched healthy controls (8 subjects in each group), and finally determined 48 gene expression signatures. Based on these findings, we further clarify whether these genes mRNA was different expressed in peripheral blood in patients with SSD, MDD and healthy controls (60 subjects respectively) Method With the help of the quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR), we gained gene relative expression levels among the three groups. Results We found that there are three of the forty eight co-regulated genes had differential expression in peripheral blood among the three groups, which are CD84, STRN, CTNS gene (F = 3.528, p = 0.034; F = 3.382, p = 0.039; F = 3.801, p = 0.026, respectively) while there were no significant differences for other genes. Conclusion CD84, STRN, CTNS gene may have significant value for performing diagnostic functions and classifying SSD, MDD and healthy controls. PMID:28333931

  12. Association Between Specific Depression Symptoms and Glycemic Control Among Patients With Comorbid Type 2 Diabetes and Provisional Depression

    PubMed Central

    Czech, Stephanie J.; Orsillo, Susan M.; Pirraglia, Paul A.; English, Thomas M.; Connell, Alexa J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether specific depression symptoms are associated with glycemic control independent of potential demographic and clinical covariates among primary care patients with comorbid type 2 diabetes and provisional threshold or subthreshold depression. Method: We examined a convenience sample of patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes and provisional threshold or subthreshold depression (N = 82) at 2 family health centers. Cases were identified using a population-based registry of patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes (ICD-9 codes 250.00 for controlled type 2 diabetes and 250.02 for uncontrolled type 2 diabetes). Data from patients with a primary care provider appointment from the beginning of April 2011 through the end of June 2012 and with at least one 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) depression screener and a glycated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) laboratory test between 2 weeks before and 10 weeks after PHQ-9 screening were eligible for inclusion. We defined provisional threshold or subthreshold depression using PHQ-9 scoring criteria, which were designed to yield provisional diagnostic information about major depressive disorder based on DSM-5 diagnostic criteria. Results: Patients reporting higher severity of sleep problems on the PHQ-9 had significantly higher HbA1c levels (mean = 8.48, SD = 2.17) compared to patients reporting lower severity or absence of this symptom (mean = 7.19, SD = 1.34, t48.88 = −3.13, P = .003). Problems with sleep contributed unique variance on glycemic control (β = 0.27, P = .02) when controlling for potential clinical and demographic covariates, with those reporting more sleep difficulties having higher HbA1c levels. Conclusions: For patients with type 2 diabetes and provisional threshold or subthreshold depression, it may be prudent to aggressively address sleep problems as a potential mechanism toward improving diabetes control. PMID:26835160

  13. SMART phones and the acute respiratory patient.

    PubMed

    Gleeson, L; Alam, J; Lane, S

    2012-05-01

    Definition of Respiratory Failure using PaO2 alone is confounded when patients are commenced on oxygen therapy prior to arterial blood gas (ABG) measurement. Furthermore, classification of Respiratory Failure as Type 1 or Type 2 using PaCO2 alone can give an inaccurate account of events as both types can co-exist. 100 consecutive presentations of acute respiratory distress were assessed initially using PaO2, and subsequently PaO2/FiO2 ratio, to diagnose Respiratory Failure. Respiratory Failure cases were classified as Type 1 or Type 2 initially using PaCO2, and subsequently alveolar-arterial (A-a) gradient. Any resultant change in management was documented. Of 100 presentations, an additional 16 cases were diagnosed as Respiratory Failure using PaO2/FiO2 ratio in place of PaO2 alone (p = 0.0338). Of 57 cases of Respiratory Failure, 22 cases classified as Type 2 using PaCO2 alone were reclassified as Type 1 using A-a gradient (p < 0.001). Of these 22 cases, management changed in 18.

  14. A circulating myocardial depressant substance in humans with septic shock. Septic shock patients with a reduced ejection fraction have a circulating factor that depresses in vitro myocardial cell performance.

    PubMed Central

    Parrillo, J E; Burch, C; Shelhamer, J H; Parker, M M; Natanson, C; Schuette, W

    1985-01-01

    We have previously described a subpopulation of patients with septic shock who had a reversible depression of radionuclide-determined left ventricular ejection fraction (EF). To investigate the mechanism of this myocardial depression, an in vitro model of mammalian myocardial cell performance was established employing primary spontaneously beating rat myocardial cells. The contraction of a single cardiac cell was quantitated by recording the changes in area occupied by the cell during contraction and relaxation. In 20 septic shock patients during the acute phase, the mean left ventricular EF was decreased (mean = 0.33, normal mean = 0.50), and serum obtained during this acute phase induced a mean (+/- standard error of the mean) 33 +/- 4% decrease in extent and 25 +/- 4% decrease in velocity of myocardial cell shortening during contraction (P less than 0.001). In contrast, serum obtained from 11 of these same patients before shock (n = 2) or after recovery (n = 9) of the left ventricular EF (mean = 0.50) showed a return toward normal in extent and velocity of shortening (P less than 0.001). Sera from 17 critically ill nonseptic patients, from 10 patients with structural heart disease as a cause for a depressed EF, and from 12 healthy laboratory personnel, induced no significant changes in in vitro myocardial cell performance. In 20 patients during the acute phase of septic shock, the decreased EF in vivo demonstrated a significant correlation (r = +0.52, P less than 0.01) with a decrease in the extent of myocardial cell shortening in vitro. The quantitative and temporal correlation between the decreased left ventricular EF and this serum myocardial depressant substance argues for a pathophysiologic role for this depressant substance in producing the reversible cardiomyopathy seen during septic shock in humans. Images PMID:4056039

  15. An interdisciplinary approach to dialysis decision-making in the CKD patient with depression.

    PubMed

    Schell, Jane O; Bova-Collis, Renee; Eneanya, Nwamaka D

    2014-07-01

    Depression and depressive symptoms are common in advanced kidney disease and are associated with poor outcomes. For those with CKD not on dialysis, depression may influence how patients cope and prepare for their disease and its management, including decisions about dialysis treatment. Patient self-reported scales exist to better identify depression; how to incorporate these scales into clinical practice and assist with treatment decision-making is less clear. We present a case-based discussion of depressive symptoms in patients with advanced kidney disease not on dialysis. We highlight the contribution of underlying somatic and psychosocial factors in the assessment and management of depression. We further define the role of the interdisciplinary care team, including palliative care and hospice medicine, to assist with symptom management and end-of-life care for CKD patients with depression.

  16. High Risk of Depressive Disorders in Patients With Gout: A Nationwide Population-Based Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Changchien, Te-Chang; Yen, Yung-Chieh; Lin, Cheng-Li; Lin, Ming-Chia; Liang, Ji-An; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-12-01

    Metabolic abnormalities are common in patients with depressive disorders. However, the relationship between gout and depression is unclear. We explored the causal relationship among gout, antigout medication, and the associated risk of incidental depressive disorders.In this nationwide cohort study, we sampled data from the National Health Insurance Research Database to recruit 34,050 patients with gout as the gout cohort and 68,100 controls (without gout) as the nongout cohort. Our primary endpoint was the diagnosis of depressive disorders during follow-up. The overall study population was followed up until depression diagnosis, withdrawal from the NHI program, or the end of the study. The differences in demographic and clinical characteristics between both cohorts were determined using the Chi-square test for categorical variables and the t-test for continuous variables. Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to examine the effect of gout on the risk of depression, represented using the hazard ratio with the 95% confidence interval.Patients with gout exhibited a higher risk of depressive disorders than controls did. The risk of depressive disorders increased with age and was higher in female patients and those with hypertension, stroke, and coronary artery disease. Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug and prednisolone use was associated with a reduced risk of depression. Patients with gout who had received antigout medication exhibited a reduced risk of depressive disorders compared with nongout patients.Our findings support that gout increases the risk of depressive disorders, and that antigout medication use reduces the risk.

  17. Impact of depression, fatigue and disability on quality of life in Chinese patients with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kelong; Fan, Yongping; Hu, Rui; Yang, Tao; Li, Kangning

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate and analyze the main factors that influence the quality of life (QOL) of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. The QOL (multiple sclerosis impact scale), disability (expanded disability status scale), fatigue (modified fatigue impact scale) and depression (Beck Depression Inventory) were assessed in 100 MS patients. Correlation analysis shows that QOL is positively correlated with disability status, fatigue and depression, i.e., the more severe the disability, fatigue and depression, the worse the QOL. Multiple linear regression analysis indicated that Expanded Disability Status Scale grade and fatigue have important predictive value on the somatic QOL of MS patients. On the other hand, depression and fatigue have important predictive value on the mental QOL of MS patients. The QOL of MS patients is influenced by various factors, nursing care that focuses on patient disability, fatigue and depression should be strengthened.

  18. Depression and anxiety among patients with somatoform disorders, panic disorder, and other depressive/anxiety disorders in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei-Lieh; Chen, Tzu-Ting; Chen, I-Ming; Ma, Huei-Mei; Lee, Ming-Tzu; Liao, Shih-Cheng; Gau, Shur-Fen

    2016-07-30

    The aim of this study is to compare the severity of depression and anxiety in individuals with somatoform disorders, panic disorder, other depressive/anxiety disorders, and healthy controls in a Han Chinese population. According to the DSM-IV-TR-based diagnostic interviews, we recruited 152 subjects with somatoform disorders (SG), 56 with panic disorder (PG), 85 with other depressive/anxiety disorders (OG), and 179 without any psychiatric disorder (NG). The four groups reported on the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) and Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) for depressive and anxiety symptoms, respectively. Correlation analysis and multivariate regression analysis were used to determine the effects of demographic factors and psychiatric diagnoses on depressive and anxiety symptoms separately. BDI-II scores were not significantly different in SG, PG, and OG but were higher than NG. SG and PG had the highest BAI scores, whereas NG had the lowest. Multiple linear regression analyses revealed that the associated factors for BDI-II were gender, residential location, somatoform disorders, panic disorder, major depressive disorder (MDD), and generalized anxiety disorder, whereas BAI was significantly associated with somatoform disorders, panic disorder, and MDD. Our results strongly suggest the inclusion of clinical assessment of depressive and anxious symptoms in patients with somatoform disorders.

  19. Manipulation of Thought Content as a Determinant of Mood and Corrugator Electromyographic Activity in Depressed Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teasdale, John D.; Bancroft, Judy

    1977-01-01

    Examines the effects of unhappy thoughts on mood and corrugator EMG (electromyographic activity) in depressed patients. Its purpose was to obtain evidence relevant to cognitive models of depression and to examine the usefulness of corrugator EMG as an indicator of depressed mood. (Author/RK)

  20. The association of major depressive episode and personality traits in patients with fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    de Melo Santos, Danyella; Lage, Laís Verderame; Jabur, Eleonora Kehl; Kaziyama, Helena Hideko Seguchi; Iosifescu, Dan V; de Lucia, Mara Cristina Souza; Fráguas, Renério

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Personality traits have been associated with primary depression. However, it is not known whether this association takes place in the case of depression comorbid with fibromyalgia. OBJECTIVE: The authors investigated the association between a current major depressive episode and temperament traits (e.g., harm avoidance). METHOD: A sample of 69 adult female patients with fibromyalgia was assessed with the Temperament and Character Inventory. Psychiatric diagnoses were assessed with the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview severity of depressive symptomatology with the Beck Depression Inventory, and anxiety symptomatology with the IDATE-state and pain intensity with a visual analog scale. RESULTS: A current major depressive episode was diagnosed in 28 (40.5%) of the patients. They presented higher levels of harm avoidance and lower levels of cooperativeness and self-directedness compared with non-depressed patients, which is consistent with the Temperament and Character Inventory profile of subjects with primary depression. However, in contrast to previous results in primary depression, no association between a major depressive episode and self-transcendence was found. CONCLUSIONS: The results highlight specific features of depression in fibromyalgia subjects and may prove important for enhancing the diagnosis and prognosis of depression in fibromyalgia patients. PMID:21808861

  1. Differential Effectiveness of Depression Disease Management for Rural and Urban Primary Care Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Scott J.; Xu, Stanley; Dong, Fran; Fortney, John; Rost, Kathryn

    2006-01-01

    Context: Federally qualified health centers across the country are adopting depression disease management programs following federally mandated training; however, little is known about the relative effectiveness of depression disease management in rural versus urban patient populations. Purpose: To explore whether a depression disease management…

  2. 76 FR 78740 - Agency Information Collection (Prevalence and Clinical Course of Depression Among Patients With...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-19

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Prevalence and Clinical Course of Depression Among Patients With... Control No. 2900- 0719.'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Titles: Prevalence and Clinical Course of Depression.... Abstracts: The data collected will be used to evaluate the prevalence of clinical depression and...

  3. The Scars of Childhood Adversity: Minor Stress Sensitivity and Depressive Symptoms in Remitted Recurrently Depressed Adult Patients

    PubMed Central

    Burger, Huibert; Elgersma, Hermien; Riper, Heleen; Cuijpers, Pim; Dekker, Jack; Smit, Filip; Bockting, Claudi

    2014-01-01

    Background Childhood adversity may lead to depressive relapse through its long-lasting influence on stress sensitivity. In line with the stress sensitization hypothesis, minor (daily) stress is associated with depressive relapse. Therefore, we examine the impact of childhood adversity on daily stress and its predictive value on prospectively assessed depressive symptoms in recurrently depressed patients. Method Daily stress was assessed in recurrently depressed adult patients, enrolled into two randomized trials while remitted. The reported intensity and frequency of dependent and independent daily stress was assessed at baseline. Independent stress is externally generated, for example an accident happening to a friend, while dependent stress is internally generated, for example getting into a fight with a neighbor. Hierarchical regression analyses were performed with childhood adversity, independent and dependent daily stress as predictor variables of prospectively measured depressive symptoms after three months of follow-up (n = 138). Results We found that childhood adversity was not significantly associated with a higher frequency and intensity of daily stress. The intensity of both independent and dependent daily stress was predictive of depressive symptom levels at follow-up (unadjusted models respectively: B = 0.47, t = 2.05, p = 0.041, 95% CI = 0.02–0.92; B = 0.29, t = 2.20, p = 0.028, 95% CI = 0.03–0.55). No associations were found between childhood adversity and depressive symptoms at follow-up. Conclusion No evidence was found supporting stress sensitization due to the experience of childhood adversity in this recurrently depressed but remitted patient group. Nevertheless, our research indicates that daily stress might be a target for preventive treatment. Trial Registration Trial A: Nederlands Trial Register NTR1907 Trial B: Nederlands Trial Register NTR2503 PMID:25393812

  4. Acute suppurative parotitis in a 33-day-old patient.

    PubMed

    Avcu, Gulhadiye; Belet, Nursen; Karli, Arzu; Sensoy, Gulnar

    2015-06-01

    Acute suppurative parotitis is a rare disease in childhood. Its incidence is higher in premature newborns. Parotid swelling and pus drainage from Stenson's duct is pathognomonic, and Staphylococcus aureus is the causative agent in most cases. Here, a 33-day-old patient with acute suppurative parotitis is presented.

  5. Assessment and treatment of patients with acute unstable bradycardia.

    PubMed

    Swift, Jennie

    Bradycardia is a slow heart rate that can lead to cardiac arrest or occur after initial resuscitation following cardiac arrest. This article provides information on acute unstable bradycardia and common arrhythmias. It focuses on the assessment of patients with acute bradycardia and how the presence or absence of adverse clinical features, in conjunction with an arrhythmia, dictates the necessity and choice of treatment.

  6. Central autonomic network mediates cardiovascular responses to acute inflammation: Relevance to increased cardiovascular risk in depression?

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Neil A.; Cooper, Ella; Voon, Valerie; Miles, Ken; Critchley, Hugo D.

    2013-01-01

    Inflammation is a risk factor for both depression and cardiovascular disease. Depressed mood is also a cardiovascular risk factor. To date, research into mechanisms through which inflammation impacts cardiovascular health rarely takes into account central effects on autonomic cardiovascular control, instead emphasizing direct effects of peripheral inflammatory responses on endothelial reactivity and myocardial function. However, brain responses to inflammation engage neural systems for motivational and homeostatic control and are expressed through depressed mood state and changes in autonomic cardiovascular regulation. Here we combined an inflammatory challenge, known to evoke an acute reduction in mood, with neuroimaging to identify the functional brain substrates underlying potentially detrimental changes in autonomic cardiovascular control. We first demonstrated that alterations in the balance of low to high frequency (LF/HF) changes in heart rate variability (a measure of baroreflex sensitivity) could account for some of the inflammation-evoked changes in diastolic blood pressure, indicating a central (rather than solely local endothelial) origin. Accompanying alterations in regional brain metabolism (measured using 18FDG-PET) were analysed to localise central mechanisms of inflammation-induced changes in cardiovascular state: three discrete regions previously implicated in stressor-evoked blood pressure reactivity, the dorsal anterior and posterior cingulate and pons, strongly mediated the relationship between inflammation and blood pressure. Moreover, activity changes within each region predicted the inflammation-induced shift in LF/HF balance. These data are consistent with a centrally-driven component originating within brain areas supporting stressor evoked blood pressure reactivity. Together our findings highlight mechanisms binding psychological and physiological well-being and their perturbation by peripheral inflammation. PMID:23416033

  7. Remission and Recovery in the Treatment for Adolescents with Depression Study (TADS): Acute and Long-Term Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennard, Betsy D.; Silva, Susan G.; Tonev, Simon; Rohde, Paul; Hughes, Jennifer L.; Vitiello, Benedetto; Kratochvil, Christopher J.; Curry, John F.; Emslie, Graham J.; Reinecke, Mark; March, John

    2009-01-01

    The remission and recovery rates of adolescent patients with depression who were treated with fluoxetine, cognitive-behavioral therapy, their combination, and placebos were examined through a multisite clinical trial. It is concluded that most depressed adolescents who received such therapies achieved remission at the end of nine months.

  8. Randomized Trial of Behavioral Activation, Cognitive Therapy, and Antidepressant Medication in the Acute Treatment of Adults with Major Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dimidjian, Sona; Hollon, Steven D.; Dobson, Keith S.; Schmaling, Karen B.; Kohlenberg, Robert J.; Addis, Michael E.; Gallop, Robert; McGlinchey, Joseph B.; Markley, David K.; Gollan, Jackie K.; Atkins, David C.; Dunner, David L.; Jacobson, Neil S.

    2006-01-01

    Antidepressant medication is considered the current standard for severe depression, and cognitive therapy is the most widely investigated psychosocial treatment for depression. However, not all patients want to take medication, and cognitive therapy has not demonstrated consistent efficacy across trials. Moreover, dismantling designs have…

  9. Acute Pancreatitis in a Patient with Complicated Falciparum Malaria.

    PubMed

    Barman, Bhupen; Bhattacharya, Prasanta Kumar; Lynrah, Kryshan G; Ete, Tony; Issar, Neel Kanth

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is one of the most common protozoan diseases, especially in tropical countries. The clinical manifestation of malaria, especially falciparum malaria varies from mild acute febrile illness to life threatening severe systemic complications involving one or more organ systems. We would like to report a case of complicated falciparum malaria involving cerebral, renal, hepatic system along with acute pancreatitis. The patient was successfully treated with anti malarial and other supportive treatment. To the best of our knowledge there are very few reports of acute pancreatitis due to malaria. Falciparum malaria therefore should be added to the list of infectious agents causing acute pancreatitis especially in areas where malaria is endemic.

  10. Acute Pancreatitis in a Patient with Complicated Falciparum Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Prasanta Kumar; Lynrah, Kryshan G; Ete, Tony; Issar, Neel Kanth

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is one of the most common protozoan diseases, especially in tropical countries. The clinical manifestation of malaria, especially falciparum malaria varies from mild acute febrile illness to life threatening severe systemic complications involving one or more organ systems. We would like to report a case of complicated falciparum malaria involving cerebral, renal, hepatic system along with acute pancreatitis. The patient was successfully treated with anti malarial and other supportive treatment. To the best of our knowledge there are very few reports of acute pancreatitis due to malaria. Falciparum malaria therefore should be added to the list of infectious agents causing acute pancreatitis especially in areas where malaria is endemic. PMID:26894117

  11. Bacteriology of aspiration pneumonia in patients with acute coma.

    PubMed

    Lauterbach, Enise; Voss, Frederik; Gerigk, Roland; Lauterbach, Michael

    2014-12-01

    Loss of protective airway reflexes in patients with acute coma puts these patients at risk of aspiration pneumonia complicating the course of the primary disease. Available data vary considerably with regard to bacteriology, role of anaerobic bacteria, and antibiotic treatment. Our objective was to research the bacteriology of aspiration pneumonia in acute coma patients who were not pre-treated with antibiotics or hospitalized within 30 days prior to the event. We prospectively analyzed 127 patient records from adult patients admitted, intubated and ventilated to a tertiary medical intensive care unit with acute coma. Bacteriology and antibiotic resistance testing from tracheal aspirate sampled within 24 h after admission, blood cultures, ICU scores (APACHE II, SOFA), hematology, and clinical chemistry were assessed. Patients were followed up until death or hospital discharge. The majority of patients with acute coma suffered from acute cardiovascular disorders, predominantly myocardial infarction, followed by poisonings, and coma of unknown cause. In a majority of our patients, microaspiration resulted in overt infection. Most frequently S. aureus, H. influenzae, and S. pneumoniae were isolated. Anaerobic bacteria (Bacteroides spec., Fusobacteria, Prevotella spec.) were isolated from tracheal aspirate in a minority of patients, and predominantly as part of a mixed infection. Antibiotic monotherapy with a 2nd generation cephalosporin, or a 3rd generation gyrase inhibitor, was most effective in our patients regardless of the presence of anaerobic bacteria.

  12. Cognitive Function before and during Treatment with Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors in Patients with Depression or Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. Identification of adverse effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) is of great importance due to their extensive use in medicine. Some studies have reported the effects of SSRIs on cognitive functions, but the results are conflicting. This study was designed to assess the effect of these drugs on cognition of patients with depression or obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Methods. Patients with depression or OCD, naïve to therapy, and candidates of receiving one drug from SSRI class, voluntarily, entered this study. Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) test was the tool to assess their cognitive functions. MMSE scores of each patient were recorded prior to taking SSRIs and at weeks 3, 5, and 8 of drug therapy. Results. 50 patients met our inclusion criteria, with a baseline mean MMSE score of 23.94. At 3, 5, and 8 weeks of treatment, the mean scores were 22.1, 21.4, and 20.66, respectively. With a p value of <0.0001, the gradual decline was statistically significant. Conclusion. The MMSE scores of our patients showed a gradual decline over the consecutive weeks after taking SSRI drugs. It seems that the use of SSRIs in patients with depression or OCD, can cause cognitive dysfunction in the acute phase of treatment. PMID:27597949

  13. Are There Gender-Specific Risk Factors for Suicidal Activity among Patients with Schizophrenia and Depression?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Kalman J.; Harrow, Martin; Faull, Robert N.

    2012-01-01

    Are there gender-specific risk factors for suicidal activity among patients with schizophrenia and depression? A total of 74 schizophrenia patients (51 men, 23 women) and 77 unipolar nonpsychotic depressed patients (26 men, 51 women) from the Chicago Follow-up Study were studied prospectively at 2 years posthospitalization and again at 7.5 years.…

  14. PREVALENCE OF DEPRESSION AND ITS GRADING IN PATIENTS WITH CORONARY HEART DISEASE.

    PubMed

    Rasputina, L; Rasputin, V; Ovcharuk, M; Serhiichuk, O; Broniuk, A

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of our work was to determine a prevalence of depression and its distribution by grades in patients with a coronary heart disease, namely - with the myocardial infarction. The study involved 125 patients of average age 64.2±4.7 years, treated at cardiology department for myocardial infarction. The first stage was a depression screening using PHQ - 2 questionnaire. In case of positive answer to at least one question, we assessed the severity of depression using a PHQ-9 tool. We established, that PHQ-2 questionnaire questions for screening depressive disorders were positively answered by 80 patients (64.3%). Total signs of depression of various severity grades was diagnosed in 68 patients (54.4%). Minimal depression was diagnosed in 25 (36.8%) patients, mild depression - in 20 (29.4%) patients, moderately severe disease - in 16 (23.6%) patients, and severe depression - in 7 (10.2%) patients. The severity of depression was clearly related to age, gender of patients, comorbid diseases, and a history of MI and revascularization.

  15. Retaining Low-Income Minority Cancer Patients in a Depression Treatment Intervention Trial: Lessons Learned.

    PubMed

    Wells, Anjanette A; Palinkas, Lawrence A; Williams, Sha-Lai L; Ell, Kathleen

    2015-08-01

    Previously published work finds significant benefit from medical and behavioral health team care among safety-net patients with major depression. This qualitative study assessed clinical social worker, psychiatrist and patient navigator strategies to increase depression treatment among low-income minority cancer patients participating in the ADAPt-C clinical depression trial. Patient care retention strategies were elicited through in-depth, semi-structured interviews with nine behavioral health providers. Using grounded theory, concepts from the literature and dropout barriers identified by patients, guided interview prompts. Retention strategies clustered around five dropout barriers: (1) informational, (2) instrumental, (3) provider-patient therapeutic alliance, (4) clinic setting, and (5) depression treatment. All strategies emphasized the importance of communication between providers and patients. Findings suggest that strong therapeutic alliance and telephone facilitates collaborative team provider communication and depression treatment retention among patients in safety-net oncology care systems.

  16. Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy for Acute Cholecystitis in Elderly Patients

    PubMed Central

    Filho, Euler de Medeiros Ázaro; Galvão, Thales Delmondes; Ettinger, João Eduardo Marques de Menezes; Silva Reis, Jadson Murilo; Lima, Marcos; Fahel, Edvaldo

    2006-01-01

    Background: Acute cholecystitis is the major complication of biliary lithiasis, for which laparoscopic treatment has been established as the standard therapy. With longer life expectancy, acute cholecystitis has often been seen in elderly patients (>65 years old) and is often accompanied by comorbity and severe complications. We sought to compare the outcome of laparoscopic treatment for acute cholecystitis with special focus on comparison between elderly and nonelderly patients. Method: This study was a prospective analysis of 190 patients who underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy due to acute cholecystitis or chronic acute cholecystitis, comparing elderly and nonelderly patients. Results: Of 190 patients, 39 (21%) were elderly (>65 years old) and 151 (79%) were not elderly (≤65 years), with conversion rates of 10.3% and 6.6% (P=0.49), respectively. The incidence of postoperative complications in elderly and nonelderly patients were the following, respectively: atelectasis 5.1% and 2.0% (P=0.27); respiratory infection 5.1% and 2.7% (P=0.6); bile leakage 5.1% and 2.0% (P=0.27), and intraabdominal abscess 1 case (0.7%) and no incidence (P=1). Conclusion: According to our data, laparoscopic cholecystectomy is a safe and efficient procedure for the treatment of acute cholecystitis in patients older than 65 years of age. PMID:17575761

  17. Correlates and Escitalopram Treatment Effects on Sleep Disturbance in Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome: K-DEPACS and EsDEPACS

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae-Min; Stewart, Robert; Bae, Kyung-Yeol; Kang, Hee-Ju; Kim, Sung-Wan; Shin, Il-Seon; Hong, Young Joon; Ahn, Youngkeun; Jeong, Myung Ho; Yoon, Jin-Sang

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: To investigate the correlates of sleep disturbance and to assess escitalopram treatment effects of depression on sleep disturbance in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Design: A cross-sectional study in patients with ACS within 2 w post-ACS, and a 24-w double-blind controlled trial of escitalopram against placebo for patients with ACS who have comorbid depressive disorders. Setting: A university hospital in South Korea. Participants: There were 1,152 patients with ACS who were consecutively recruited. Of 446 patients with comorbid depressive disorders, 300 were randomized to the trial. Measurements and Results: Sleep disturbance was evaluated by the Leeds Sleep Evaluation Questionnaire. Demographic and clinical characteristics were assessed, including cardiovascular risk factors, current cardiac status, and depressive symptoms. Depressive symptoms were most strongly and consistently associated with sleep disturbance. In addition, older age, female sex, hypertension, and more severe ACS status were associated with certain aspects of sleep disturbance. Escitalopram was significantly superior to placebo for improving sleep disturbance over the 24-w treatment period. These effects were substantially explained by improvement in depressive symptoms. Conclusions: Depression screening is indicated in patients with acute coronary syndrome with sleep disturbance. Successful treatment of depression has beneficial effects on sleep outcomes in these patients. Clinical Trials Information: ClinicalTrial.gov identifier for the 24-w drug trial, NCT00419471. Citation: Kim JM, Stewart R, Bae KY, Kang HJ, Kim SW, Shin IS, Hong YJ, Ahn Y, Jeong MH, Yoon JS. Correlates and escitalopram treatment effects on sleep disturbance in patients with acute coronary syndrome: K-DEPACS and EsDEPACS. SLEEP 2015;38(7):1105–1111. PMID:25581916

  18. Inflammation markers and Major Depressive Disorder in Patients with Chronic Heart Failure: Results from the Sertraline Against Depression and Heart Disease in Chronic Heart Failure (SADHART-CHF) study

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Glen L.; Prybol, Kevin; Boyle, Stephen H.; Hall, Russell; Streilein, Robert D; Steffens, David C.; Krishnan, Ranga; Rogers, Joseph G.; O’Connor, Christopher M.; Jiang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Background Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) and Chronic Heart Failure (CHF) have in common heightening states of inflammation, manifested by elevated inflammation markers such as C-reactive protein (CRP). This study compared inflammatory biomarker profiles in CHF patients with MDD to those without MDD. Methods The study recruited patients admitted to inpatient care for acute heart failure exacerbations, after psychiatric diagnostic interview. Patients with Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) scores < 10 and with no prior history of depression served as the non-depressed reference group (n = 25). MDD severity was defined as: Mild (BDI 10–15; n = 48); Moderate (BDI 16–23; n = 51); and Severe (BDI ≥ 24; n = 33). A Bio-Plex assay measured 18 inflammation markers. Ordinal logistic models were used to examine the association of MDD severity and biomarker levels. Results Adjusting for age, sex, statin use, BMI, LVEF, tobacco use, and NHYA class the MDD overall group variable was significantly associated with elevated interleukin (IL) −2 (p = .019), IL-4 (p = .020), IL-6 (p = .026),, interferon (INF)-γ (p = .010), monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP-1) (p = .002), macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP-1β) (p = .003) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α (p = .004). MDD severity subgroups had a greater probability of elevated IL-6, IL-8, IFN-γ, MCP-1, MIP-1β, and TNF-α compared to none-depressed group. The non-depressed group had greater probability of elevated IL-17 (p < 0.001) and IL-1β (p < 0.01). Conclusions MDD in CHF patients was associated with altered inflammation marker levels compared to CHF patients who had no depression. Whether effective depression treatment will normalize the altered inflammation marker levels requires further study. PMID:26186432

  19. Depression in chronic low back pain patients: diagnostic efficiency of three self-report questionnaires.

    PubMed

    Love, A W

    1987-01-01

    Three self-report questionnaires (the Beck Depression Inventory, the MMPI-D scale, and the depression subscale of the Middlesex Hospital Questionnaire) were examined to see how accurately they could identify chronic low back pain patients who were suffering depression, as defined by DSM-III criteria. According to these criteria, 25% of a sample of 68 patients currently were depressed, a rate comparable to those reported by other studies that have used standardized criteria. On the basis of relative conditional probability ratios, the BDI was shown to be the most efficient instrument for identifying these cases and represents an excellent screening device for depression with this population. The individual items of the BDI then were examined, and the conditional probability ratios revealed that several may be helpful as indicators of possible depression among chronic low back pain patients. The relationship between depression and chronic pain is reconsidered in the light of these results.

  20. Depressants

    MedlinePlus

    ... with other drugs to add to the other drugs ’ high or to deal with their side effects. Abusers take higher doses than people taking the drugs under a doctor ’ s supervision for therapeutic purposes. Depressants ...

  1. Chronic but not acute Li+ treatment prevents behavioral depression in rats.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, N A; Pereira, D G; Hermini, A H

    1995-09-01

    The effect of lithium administration on the learned helplessness model of depression was investigated. Female Wistar rats (190-210 g) received either tap water alone (N = 156) or 20 mM LiCL provided chronically (30 days; N = 127) or acutely (5 days; N = 22) in the drinking water. Three days before the end of treatment, each group was divided into two subgroups which received either inescapable shock (IS) or no shock (NS) treatment in shuttle boxes. All groups were subsequently submitted to an escape test on the following day and then sacrificed one day after the escape test, when blood samples were taken to measure serum Li+, Na+ and K+ concentrations by flame photometry. There were no significant differences in serum Na+ amongst the 4 groups. Chronically treated NS and IS rats both presented an increase in serum K+ compared to the control rats. The IS and not the NS chronically treated rats presented increased serum Li+ levels which cannot be accounted for in terms of differences in Li+ intake. The IS group treated chronically with lithium had a better escape performance than the IS group receiving either tap water or acute Li+ administration. We conclude that chronic but not acute Li+ treatment at a serum level within the prophylactic range (0.5 mEq/l) is able to prevent learned helplessness in the rat. These results agree with the data obtained in clinical practice indicating that Li+ is only effective after chronic administration and that Li(+)-induced hyperkalemia is a side effect.

  2. Personal and Psychosocial Risk Factors for Physical and Mental Health Outcomes and Course of Depression among Depressed Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherbourne, Cathy Donald; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Data from 604 depressed patients in The Medical Outcomes Study showed improvements in measures of functioning and well-being associated with patients who were employed, drank less alcohol, had active coping styles and higher levels of social support, who had active and less avoidant coping styles, who were physically active, and who had fewer…

  3. Low Tidal Volume Ventilation in Patients Without Acute Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Tang, Weibing; Wang, Zhi; Liu, Ye; Zhu, Jing

    2015-05-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome is a life threatening respiratory condition characterized by breakdown of the alveolar-capillary barrier, leading to flooding of the alveolar space producing the classical chest radiograph of bilateral pulmonary infiltrates. In this study, we employed lung protective ventilation strategies in patients without acute lung injury (ALI) to determine whether mechanical ventilation with lower tidal volume would provide more clinical benefits to patients without ALI.

  4. The impact of depression in older patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma.

    PubMed

    Connolly, M J; Yohannes, A M

    2016-10-01

    Respiratory diseases are common in older people. However, the impact of comorbid depression in older patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma has not been fully explored. This narrative review examines the impact of comorbid depression and its management in COPD and asthma in older adults. The causes of depression in patients with COPD and asthma are multifactorial and include physical, physiological and behavioural factors. Depression is associated with hospital readmission in older adults with asthma and COPD. We focus on the most current literature that has examined the efficacy of pulmonary rehabilitation (PR), cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) and antidepressant drug therapy for patients with depression in the context of COPD and asthma. Our findings indicate that PR and CBT are beneficial in improving depressive symptoms and quality of life in short-term intervention studies. However, the long-term efficacy of CBT and PR is unknown. To date, the efficacy of antidepressant drug therapy for depression in patients with COPD and asthma is inconclusive. In addition, there has been no clear evidence that antidepressants can induce remission of depression or ameliorate dyspnoea or physiological indices of COPD. Factors that contribute to 'inadequate' assessment and treatment of depression in patients with COPD and asthma may include misconception of the disease by patients and their caregivers and stigma attached to depression. Thus, well-controlled randomized controlled trials are needed.

  5. Comparison of physician-rating and self-rating scales for patients with major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ching-Hua; Lu, Mei-Jou; Wong, Julielynn; Chen, Cheng-Chung

    2014-12-01

    Physician-rating scales remain the standard in antidepressant clinical trials. The current study aimed to examine the discrepancies between physician-rating scales and self-rating scales for symptoms and functioning, before and after treatment, in newly hospitalized patients. A total of 131 acutely ill inpatients with major depressive disorder were enrolled to receive 20 mg of fluoxetine daily for 6 weeks. Symptom severity and functioning were assessed at baseline and again at week 6. Symptom severity was rated using the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS-17) and the Zung Self-rating Depression Scale (ZDS). Functioning was measured by the Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF) and the Work and Social Adjustment Scale (WSAS). Pearson correlation coefficients (r) between HDRS-17 and ZDS and between GAF and WSAS were calculated at week 0 and week 6. Sensitivity to change was measured using effect sizes. One-hundred twelve patients completed the 6-week trial. After 6 weeks of treatment, correlations between HDRS-17 and ZDS or correlations between GAF and WSAS became larger from baseline to end point. All correlations were statistically significant (P < 0.001). Effect sizes measured by physician-rating scales (ie, HDRS-17 and GAF) were larger than by self-rating scales (ie, ZDS and WSAS). Correlations between baseline physician-rating scale scores and self-rating scale scores improved after 6 weeks of treatment. Physician-rating scales had larger effect sizes than self-rating scales. Physician-rating scales were more sensitive in detecting symptom or functional changes than self-rating scales.

  6. Particulate Air Pollution as a Risk Factor for ST-segment Depression in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Kai Jen; Coull, Brent A.; Zanobetti, Antonella; Suh, Helen; Schwartz, Joel; Stone, Peter H.; Litonjua, Augusto; Speizer, Frank E.; Gold, Diane R.

    2009-01-01

    Background The association of particulate matter (PM) with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality is well documented. PM-induced ischemia is considered a potential mechanism linking PM to adverse cardiovascular outcomes. Methods and Results In a repeated-measures study including 5,979 observations on 48 patients aged 43–75 years, we investigated associations of ambient pollution with ST-segment level changes averaged over half-hour periods, measured in the modified V5 position by 24-hr Holter electrocardiogram monitoring. Each patient was observed up to 4 times within one year after a percutaneous intervention for myocardial infarction, acute coronary syndrome without infarction, or stable coronary artery disease without acute coronary syndrome. Elevation in fine particles (PM2.5) and black carbon (BC) levels predicted depression of half-hour averaged ST-segment levels. An interquartile increase in the previous 24-h mean BC level was associated with a 1.50-fold increased in risk of ST-segment depression ≥0.1 mm (95% CI: 1.19, 1.89) and a −0.031 mm (95% CI: −0.042, −0.019) decrease in half-hour averaged ST-segment level (continuous outcome). Effects were greatest within the first month after hospitalization, and for patients with myocardial infarction during hospitalization or with diabetes. Conclusions ST-segment depression is associated with increased exposure to PM2.5 and BC in cardiac patients. The risk of pollution-associated ST-segment depression may be greatest in those with myocardial injury in the first month after the cardiac event. PMID:18779445

  7. Accuracy of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale for identifying depression in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Christoph; Sievi, Noriane A; Clarenbach, Christian F; Schwarz, Esther Irene; Schlatzer, Christian; Brack, Thomas; Brutsche, Martin; Frey, Martin; Irani, Sarosh; Leuppi, Jörg D; Rüdiger, Jochen; Thurnheer, Robert; Kohler, Malcolm

    2014-01-01

    Psychological morbidity is common in chronic respiratory diseases. The diagnostic accuracy of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and risk factors for comorbid depression in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are addressed. Consecutive COPD patients (GOLD stage I-IV, 40-75 years old) were enrolled in a multicentre, cross-sectional cohort study. Diagnosis of depression was ascertained through clinical records. Lung function, HADS score, 6-minute walking test (6-MWT), MRC dyspnoea score, and COPD Assessment Test (CAT) were evaluated. Two hundred fifty-nine COPD patients (mean age 62.5 years; 32% female; mean FEV1 48% predicted) were included. Patients diagnosed with depression (29/259; 11.2%) had significantly higher HADS-D and HADS-Total scores than nondepressed patients (median (quartiles) HADS-D 6 [4; 9] versus 4 [2; 7], median HADS-Total 14 [10; 20] versus 8 [5; 14]). Receiver-operating characteristic plots showed moderate accuracy for HADS-D, AUC 0.662 (95%CI 0.601-0.719), and HADS-Total, AUC 0.681 (95%CI 0.620-0.737), with optimal cut-off scores of >5 and >9, respectively. Sensitivity and specificity were 62.1% and 62.6% for HADS-D compared to 75.9% and 55.2% for HADS-Total. Age, comorbidities, sex, and lower airflow limitation predicted depression. The HADS exhibits low diagnostic accuracy for depression in COPD patients. Younger men with comorbidities are at increased risk for depression.

  8. Accuracy of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale for Identifying Depression in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Nowak, Christoph; Sievi, Noriane A.; Clarenbach, Christian F.; Schwarz, Esther Irene; Schlatzer, Christian; Brack, Thomas; Brutsche, Martin; Frey, Martin; Irani, Sarosh; Leuppi, Jörg D.; Rüdiger, Jochen; Thurnheer, Robert; Kohler, Malcolm

    2014-01-01

    Psychological morbidity is common in chronic respiratory diseases. The diagnostic accuracy of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and risk factors for comorbid depression in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are addressed. Consecutive COPD patients (GOLD stage I–IV, 40–75 years old) were enrolled in a multicentre, cross-sectional cohort study. Diagnosis of depression was ascertained through clinical records. Lung function, HADS score, 6-minute walking test (6-MWT), MRC dyspnoea score, and COPD Assessment Test (CAT) were evaluated. Two hundred fifty-nine COPD patients (mean age 62.5 years; 32% female; mean FEV1 48% predicted) were included. Patients diagnosed with depression (29/259; 11.2%) had significantly higher HADS-D and HADS-Total scores than nondepressed patients (median (quartiles) HADS-D 6 [4; 9] versus 4 [2; 7], median HADS-Total 14 [10; 20] versus 8 [5; 14]). Receiver-operating characteristic plots showed moderate accuracy for HADS-D, AUC 0.662 (95%CI 0.601–0.719), and HADS-Total, AUC 0.681 (95%CI 0.620–0.737), with optimal cut-off scores of >5 and >9, respectively. Sensitivity and specificity were 62.1% and 62.6% for HADS-D compared to 75.9% and 55.2% for HADS-Total. Age, comorbidities, sex, and lower airflow limitation predicted depression. The HADS exhibits low diagnostic accuracy for depression in COPD patients. Younger men with comorbidities are at increased risk for depression. PMID:25548667

  9. Altered DNA methylation of glucose transporter 1 and glucose transporter 4 in patients with major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Kahl, Kai G; Georgi, Karsten; Bleich, Stefan; Muschler, Marc; Hillemacher, Thomas; Hilfiker-Kleinert, Denise; Schweiger, Ulrich; Ding, Xiaoqi; Kotsiari, Alexandra; Frieling, Helge

    2016-05-01

    Alterations in brain glucose metabolism and in peripheral glucose metabolism have frequently been observed in major depressive disorder (MDD). The insulin independent glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1) plays a key role in brain metabolism while the insulin-dependent GLUT4 is the major glucose transporter for skeletal and cardiac muscle. We therefore examined methylation of GLUT1 and GLUT4 in fifty-two depressed inpatients and compared data to eighteen healthy comparison subjects. DNA methylation of the core promoter regions of GLUT1 and GLUT4 was assessed by bisulfite sequencing. Further factors determined were fasting glucose, cortisol, insulin, interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). We found significantly increased methylation of the GLUT1 in depressed inpatients compared to healthy comparison subjects (CG). Further findings comprise increased concentrations of fasting cortisol, glucose, insulin, and increased IL-6 and TNF-α. After six weeks of inpatient treatment, significantly lower GLUT1 methylation was observed in remitted patients compared to non-remitters. GLUT4 methylation was not different between depressed patients and CG, and did not differ between remitted and non-remitted patients. Although preliminary we conclude from our results that the acute phase of major depressive disorder is associated with increased GLUT1 methylation and mild insulin resistance. The successful treatment of depression is associated with normalization of GLUT1 methylation in remitters, indicating that this condition may be reversible. Failure of normalization of GLUT1 methylation in non-remitters may point to a possible role of impeded brain glucose metabolism in the maintenance of MDD.

  10. Unrevealed Depression Involves Dysfunctional Coping Strategies in Crohn's Disease Patients in Clinical Remission

    PubMed Central

    Viganò, Caterina; Calzolari, Roberta; Marinaccio, Paola Marianna; Bezzio, Cristina; Furfaro, Federica; Ba, Gabriella; Maconi, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims. This study investigated the proportion of CD patients in clinical remission with clinical depression, and coping strategies in those with severe depressive disorders. Materials and Methods. One hundred consecutive CD patients in clinical remission were screened for anxiety and depression by using Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and patients with depressive symptoms were further investigated by means of Cognitive Behavioural Assessment 2.0 and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Afterwards the coping strategies were assessed through the Brief-COPE questionnaire. Results. Twenty-one patients had anxious symptoms and 16 had depressive symptoms with or without anxiety. Seven of these patients (43.8%) showed significant depressive symptoms. Compared to patients without psychiatric disorders, these patients showed significant lower score in “positive reframing” (p: 0.017) and in “planning” (p: 0.046) and higher score in “use of instrumental social support” (p < 0.001), in “denial” scale (p: 0.001), and in “use of emotional social support” (p: 0.003). Conclusions. Depressed CD patients in clinical remission may have dysfunctional coping strategies, meaning that they may not be able to implement functional strategies to manage at best stress related with their disease. PMID:26823663

  11. Transcranial sonography findings related to depression in parkinsonian disorders: cross-sectional study in 126 patients.

    PubMed

    Bouwmans, Angela E P; Weber, Wim E J; Leentjens, Albert F G; Mess, Werner H

    2016-01-01

    Background. Transcranial sonography (TCS) has emerged as a potential diagnostic tool for Parkinson's disease. Recent research has suggested that abnormal echogenicity of substantia nigra, raphe nuclei and third ventricle is associated with increased risk of depression among these patients. We sought to reproduce these findings in an ongoing larger study of patients with parkinsonian syndromes. Methods. A total of 126 patients with parkinsonian symptoms underwent the Hamilton Depression Scale, and TCS of the substantia nigra (SN) (n = 126), the raphe nuclei (RN) (n = 80) and the third ventricle (n = 57). We then calculated the correlation between depression and hyper-echogenic SN, hypo-echogenic RN and a wider third ventricle. Results. In patients with PD we found no significant difference of the SN between non-depressed and depressed patients (46% vs. 22%; p = 0.18). Non-depressed patients with other parkinsonisms more often had hyperechogenicity of the SN than depressed patients (51% vs. 0%; p = 0.01). We found no relation between depression and the echogenicity of the RN or the width of the third ventricle. Conclusions. In patients with parkinsonian syndromes, we found no association between depression and hyper-echogenic SN, hypo-echogenic RN or a wider third ventricle, as determined by transcranial sonography.

  12. Transcranial sonography findings related to depression in parkinsonian disorders: cross-sectional study in 126 patients

    PubMed Central

    Bouwmans, Angela E.P.; Leentjens, Albert F.G.; Mess, Werner H.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Transcranial sonography (TCS) has emerged as a potential diagnostic tool for Parkinson’s disease. Recent research has suggested that abnormal echogenicity of substantia nigra, raphe nuclei and third ventricle is associated with increased risk of depression among these patients. We sought to reproduce these findings in an ongoing larger study of patients with parkinsonian syndromes. Methods. A total of 126 patients with parkinsonian symptoms underwent the Hamilton Depression Scale, and TCS of the substantia nigra (SN) (n = 126), the raphe nuclei (RN) (n = 80) and the third ventricle (n = 57). We then calculated the correlation between depression and hyper-echogenic SN, hypo-echogenic RN and a wider third ventricle. Results. In patients with PD we found no significant difference of the SN between non-depressed and depressed patients (46% vs. 22%; p = 0.18). Non-depressed patients with other parkinsonisms more often had hyperechogenicity of the SN than depressed patients (51% vs. 0%; p = 0.01). We found no relation between depression and the echogenicity of the RN or the width of the third ventricle. Conclusions. In patients with parkinsonian syndromes, we found no association between depression and hyper-echogenic SN, hypo-echogenic RN or a wider third ventricle, as determined by transcranial sonography. PMID:27231659

  13. General practitioners views and experiences in managing depression in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Yohannes, Abebaw Mengistu

    2012-12-01

    Up to 40% of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) suffer from comorbid depression. However, there is little data available on the perceptions and experiences of general practitioners (GPs) on the management of depression in patients with COPD. The study investigated GPs' views about recognizing and treating depression in patients with COPD. A postal survey of 3957 GPs in England about their views on recognizing and treating depression in patients with COPD was conducted. Participants were drawn from the General Medical Services statistics database maintained by the Department of Health. A total of 3957 GPs were mailed. Of these, 857 (22%) complete responses were received. Seventy two percent of the GPs reported screening for depression regularly in patients with COPD. Over 95% of the GPs' views were that depression interferes with the self-management of COPD and 584 (67%) thought that it exacerbates the symptoms of COPD. However, over two-fifths of GPs were concerned that convincing COPD patients with comorbid depression to receive appropriate treatment was a challenge. Barriers for treatment of comorbid depression in patients with COPD include lack of adequate provision of psychological services and long waiting times for psychological treatment. It is encouraging that most GPs were vigilant and proactively screening for depression. However, there is limited immediate access and provision to psychological therapies to refer COPD patients for treatment in the primary care setting. Further study is required.

  14. Metformin may produce antidepressant effects through improvement of cognitive function among depressed patients with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Guo, Min; Mi, Jia; Jiang, Qiu-Ming; Xu, Jin-Mei; Tang, Ying-Ying; Tian, Geng; Wang, Bin

    2014-09-01

    Diabetes mellitus and depressive disorders are both common chronic diseases that increase functional disability and social burden. Cognitive impairment is a potentially debilitating feature of depression. Previous evidence indicates that the antidiabetic drug metformin could be suitable for diabetic patients with cognitive impairment. However, there is no direct evidence from clinical studies that metformin treatment improves cognitive function in diabetic patients suffering from depression. In the present study, 58 participants diagnosed with depression and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) were recruited and divided into two groups, one treated with metformin and the other treated with placebo for 24 weeks. Cognitive function, depressive behaviour and diabetes improvement were evaluated. Chronic treatment with metformin for 24 weeks improved cognitive performance, as assessed by the Wechsler Memory Scale-Revised, in depressed patients with T2DM. In addition, metformin significantly improved depressive performance and changed the glucose metabolism in depressed patients with diabetes. Depressive symptoms were negatively correlated with cognitive performance in metformin-treated participants. Furthermore, associations were observed between the parameters of blood glucose metabolism and the depression phenotype. These findings suggest that chronic treatment with metformin has antidepressant behavioural effects and that improved cognitive function is involved in the therapeutic outcome of metformin. The results of the present study also raise the possibility that supplementary administration of antidiabetic medications may enhance the recovery of depression, comorbid with T2DM, through improvements in cognitive performance.

  15. Challenges in comparing the acute cognitive outcomes of high-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (HF-rTMS) vs. electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in major depression: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Kedzior, Karina Karolina; Schuchinsky, Maria; Gerkensmeier, Imke; Loo, Colleen

    2017-03-02

    The present study aimed to systematically compare the cognitive outcomes of high-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (HF-rTMS) and electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in head-to-head studies with major depression (MDD) patients. A systematic literature search identified six studies with 219 MDD patients that were too heterogeneous to reliably detect meaningful differences in acute cognitive outcomes after ECT vs. HF-rTMS. Cognitive effects of brain stimulation vary depending on the timeframe and methods of assessment, stimulation parameters, and maintenance treatment. Thus, acute and longer-term differences in cognitive outcomes both need to be investigated at precisely defined timeframes and with similar instruments assessing comparable functions.

  16. Percutaneous trigeminal ganglion radiofrequency thermocoagulation alleviates anxiety and depression disorders in patients with classic trigeminal neuralgia

    PubMed Central

    Tang, YuanZhang; Ma, Ling; Li, Na; Guo, Yuna; Yang, Liqiang; Wu, Baishan; Yue, Jianning; Wang, Qi; Liu, Jingjie; Ni, Jia-xiang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Trigeminal neuralgia (TN) is a neurological condition that presents as excruciating facial pain. Depression and anxiety are commonly associated with TN; however, anxiety and depression disorders in patients with TN and the effects of the various therapeutic strategies for TN on these disorders are not well studied. To evaluate depression and anxiety in patients with trigeminal neuralgia (TN), identify factors that predict their occurrence and study the effect of the percutaneous trigeminal ganglion radiofrequency thermocoagulation (PRT) procedure for alleviating pain on depression and anxiety. Patients with classic TN, who received PRT treatment, were consecutively recruited between October 2014 and October 2015. Severity of pain was determined using the visual analogue scale (VAS) score. Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI) and Beck anxiety Inventory (BAI) were used to evaluate depression and anxiety disorders pre- and post-PRT. Medical, demographic, and psychosocial backgrounds were also assessed as predictive factors. A BDI score of ≥14 represented depression and BAI score of ≥45 represented anxiety. VAS, BDI, and BAI scores were collected at the time of admission and on the day of discharge. Of the 167 patients who participated in the study, 121 (72.5%) had depression and 34 (20.4%) suffered anxiety. Pre-PRT procedure, female sex, age >50 years, ineffective treatment, and high pain intensity (VAS ≥7) predicted the development of depression and anxiety. Post-PRT procedure, all patients who experienced pain relief also reported amelioration of depression and anxiety. A considerable percentage of patients with TN developed depression and anxiety. Patients who were female, older than 50 years, or suffered from failure treatment and severe pain (VAS>7), were at higher risk of depression and anxiety development. Complete alleviation of pain by using surgical PRT could immediately attenuate depressive and anxiety disorders associated with TN. PMID

  17. Epidemiology, Diagnosis, and Management of Depression in Patients With CKD

    PubMed Central

    Hedayati, S. Susan; Finkelstein, Fredric O.

    2011-01-01

    CASE PRESENTATION A 58-year-old Hispanic man who has been dialysis dependent for 2 years because of diabetic nephropathy reports depressive symptoms during dialysis rounds. For the past 6 weeks, he has had reduced energy and difficulty sleeping and concentrating. He reports a loss of interest in his usual hobbies and family activities and notes an increasing sense of feeling worthless and guilty. He denies suicidal ideation. Medical history includes diabetic retinopathy and neuropathy, coronary artery disease treated with 4-vessel coronary artery bypass grafting 3 years ago, ischemic cardiomyopathy with an ejection fraction of 30%, and cerebrovascular disease. His wife recently has been given a diagnosis of breast cancer. His medications are aspirin, metoprolol, lisinopril, simvastatin, sevelamer, and epoetin alfa. His blood pressure is 130/75 mm Hg, pulse is 65 beats/min, and cardiac and pulmonary examination results are unremarkable. He is interviewed by the social worker in the dialysis unit, who diagnoses clinical depression by using standard Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (Fourth Edition) (DSM IV) criteria. The patient refuses to discuss his problems with the social worker and declines further psychiatric evaluation. His nephrologist discusses a trial of antidepressant medication, but the patient refuses to use additional medication. During the next month, the patient presents with greater interdialytic weight gains and begins to come late for dialysis sessions. He then presents to a dialysis session reporting dyspnea and orthopnea and is found to have a 10-kg weight gain. On physical examination, blood pressure is 196/96 mm Hg and he has increased jugular venous pressure and bibasilar crackles. He is admitted to the hospital with a diagnosis of congestive heart failure. PMID:19592143

  18. Structural Asymmetry of Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex Correlates with Depressive Symptoms: Evidence from Healthy Individuals and Patients with Major Depressive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Mao, Yu; Wei, Dongtao; Yang, Junyi; Du, Xue; Xie, Peng; Qiu, Jiang

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we investigated the role of structural asymmetry of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) in the continuum of depression from healthy individuals to patients. Structural magnetic resonance imaging was performed in 70 patients with major depressive disorder (MDD), 49 matched controls, and 349 healthy university students to calculate structural asymmetry indexes of the DLPFC. First-episode, treatment-naive MDD patients showed a relatively lower asymmetry index than healthy controls, and their asymmetry index was negatively correlated with the depressive symptoms. This abnormality was normalized by antidepressants in medicated MDD patients. Furthermore, the asymmetry index was negatively correlated with the depressive symptoms in university students; this was replicated at two time points in a subgroup of students, suggesting good test-retest reliability. Our findings are consistent with previous studies that support the imbalance hypothesis of MDD and suggest a potential structural basis underlying the functional asymmetry of the DLPFC in depression. In future, the structural index of the DLPFC may become a potential biomarker to evaluate individuals' risk for the onset of MDD.

  19. The Effects of Music Therapy on Anxiety and Depression of Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jasemi, Madineh; Aazami, Sanaz; Zabihi, Roghaieh Esmaili

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Cancer patients often suffer from anxiety and depression. Various methods are used to alleviate anxiety and depression, but most of them have side effects. Music therapy can be used as a noninvasive method to reduce anxiety and depression. This study aimed to examine the effect of music therapy on anxiety and depression in patients with cancer. Materials and Methods: This quasi-experimental study was conducted attaching hospitals in Urmia city. A total number of sixty patients with depression and anxiety were recruited using random sampling method and divided into two groups of control and intervention. Patients in intervention group listened to light music at least 20 min per day for 3 days. The degree of patients’ anxiety and depression was assessed by Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale at baseline and 3 days after music therapy. Data were analyzed by SPSS version 13 using t-test, Pearson, and ANOVA tests. Results: The results showed no significant differences between demographic variable of intervention and control groups. Our findings indicated a significant decrease in the level of depression and anxiety among intervention group. There were significant relationships between anxiety, depression, and sex (P < 0.001, r = 0.42) as well as education (P = 0.003, r = 0.37). Conclusion: This study revealed positive effects of music therapy on decreasing level of depression and anxiety in patients with cancer. Therefore, it is recommended to include music therapy in the nursing care. PMID:27803568

  20. Epidemiology and treatment of depression in patients with chronic medical illness

    PubMed Central

    J. Katon, Wayne.

    2011-01-01

    There is a bidirectional relationship between depression and chronic medical disorders. The adverse health risk behaviors and psychobiological changes associated with depression increase the risk for chronic medical disorders, and biological changes and complications associated with chronic medical disorders may precipitate depressive episodes. Comorbid depression is associated with increased medical symptom burden, functional impairment, medical costs, poor adherence to self-care regimens, and increased risk of morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic medical disorders. Depression may worsen the course of medical disorders because of its effect on proinflammatory factors, hypothalamic-pituitary axis, autonomic nervous system, and metabolic factors, in addition to being associated with a higher risk of obesity, sedentary lifestyle, smoking, and poor adherence to medical regimens. Both evidence-based psychotherapies and antidepressant medication are efficacious treatments for depression. Collaborative depression care has been shown to be an effective way to deliver these treatments to large primary care populations with depression and chronic medical illness. PMID:21485743

  1. Serum ApoB levels in depressive patients: associated with cognitive deficits

    PubMed Central

    Hui, Li; Han, Mei; Du, Xiang Dong; Zhang, Bao Hua; He, Shu Chang; Shao, Tian Nan; Yin, Guang Zhong

    2017-01-01

    Cognitive deficits have been regarded as one of the most significant clinical symptoms of depressive disorder. Accumulating evidence has shown that apolipoprotein B (ApoB) levels, which are responsible for inducing neurodegeneration, may be involved in cognitive deficits. This study examines cognitive deficits, and the correlation of serum ApoB levels with cognitive deficits of depressive disorder. 90 depressive patients and 90 healthy controls with matched age and gender were recruited. Cognition was assessed using the Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status (RBANS). Serum ApoB levels in depressive patients were measured by immunoturbidimetric method. Our results showed that depressive patients had lower scores of cognition including RBANS total score and subscales of language and delayed memory (all, p < 0.001) than healthy controls after controlling for the variables. The differences in cognitive functions also passed Bonferroni corrections. Serum ApoB levels were negatively correlated with delayed memory score in depressive patients (r = −0.30, p = 0.01). Furthermore, stepwise multivariate regression analysis indicated that serum ApoB levels independently contributed to delayed memory in depressive patients (t = −2.68, p = 0.01). Our findings support that serum ApoB levels may be involved in delayed memory decline in depressive patients. Depressive patients also experience greater cognitive deficits, especially in delayed memory and language than healthy controls. PMID:28054633

  2. Identifying and managing patients with delirium in acute care settings.

    PubMed

    Bond, Penny; Goudie, Karen

    2015-11-01

    Delirium is an acute medical emergency affecting about one in eight acute hospital inpatients. It is associated with poor outcomes, is more prevalent in older people and it is estimated that half of all patients receiving intensive care or surgery for a hip fracture will be affected. Despite its prevalence and impact, delirium is not reliably identified or well managed. Improving the identification and management of patients with delirium has been a focus for the national improving older people's acute care work programme in NHS Scotland. A delirium toolkit has been developed, which includes the 4AT rapid assessment test, information for patients and carers and a care bundle for managing delirium based on existing guidance. This toolkit has been tested and implemented by teams from a range of acute care settings to support improvements in the identification and immediate management of delirium.

  3. Prevalence of Depressive Symptoms Amongst Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART) Patients in AIDSRelief Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Atukunda, Ruth; Imakit, Richard; Memiah, Peter

    2013-01-01

    There is limited data on the prevalence of depression in HIV and AIDS patients in Sub-Saharan Africa and little resources have been allocated to address this issue. Depression affects patient adherence to treatment and predisposes patients to resistance which poses a public health threat. It also affects quality of life and productivity of patients. From August 2008 to March 2009, 731 patient adherence surveys were administered to assess disease, treatment knowledge and services received. The primary variable of interest was patients’ level of depressive symptoms score, constructed using factor analysis from five survey questions relating to: sadness, need to be alone, hopelessness and confusion and was categorized as no depressive symptoms (score 0), low depressive symptoms (score 1-2), moderate depressive symptoms (score 3-4) and high depressive symptoms (score 5-10). Majority of the patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) (59%) were found to have depressive symptoms and this was more among women than men (66% vs 43%). There was some association of depressive symptoms with non-disclosure (70% of those who had not disclosed had depressive symptoms compared to 53% among those who had disclosed). There is a high prevalence of depressive symptoms among adult patients on HAART. There is need for in-depth evaluation to find out the root causes of depressive symptoms among HAART patients in AIDSRelief clinics. There is need to integrate mental health management in HIV care and treatment as well as training the existing health workers on mental health management. PMID:28299108

  4. Comparisons of the tolerability and sensitivity of quetiapine-XR in the acute treatment of schizophrenia, bipolar mania, bipolar depression, major depressive disorder, and generalized anxiety disorder

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zuowei; Kemp, David E.; Chan, Philip K.; Fang, Yiru; Ganocy, Stephen J.; Calabrese, Joseph R.; Gao, Keming

    2012-01-01

    Quetiapine extended-release (quetiapine-XR) has been studied in patients with schizophrenia, bipolar mania, bipolar depression, major depressive disorder (MDD), and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). The purpose of this study was to compare the tolerability and sensitivity of quetiapine-XR among these psychiatric conditions. The discontinuation due to adverse events (DAEs) and reported somnolence in randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies of quetiapine-XR in these psychiatric conditions were examined. The absolute risk reduction or increase and the number needed to treat to benefit (NNTB) or harm (NNTH) for DAEs and reported somnolence of quetiapine-XR ≥300 mg/d relative to placebo were estimated. Data from one study in schizophrenia (n=465), one in mania (n=316), one in bipolar depression (n=280), two in refractory MDD (n=624), two in MDD (n=669) and three in GAD (n=1109) were available. The risk for DAEs of quetiapine-XR relative to placebo was significantly increased in bipolar depression (NNTH=9), refractory MDD (NNTH=8), MDD (NNTH=9), and GAD (NNTH=5), but not in schizophrenia and mania. The risk for reported somnolence of quetiapine-XR relative to placebo was significantly increased in schizophrenia (600 mg/d NNTH=15 and 800 mg/d NNTH=11), mania (NNTH=8), bipolar depression (NNTH=4), refractory MDD (NNTH=5), MDD (NNTH=5) and GAD (NNTH=5). These results suggest that patients with GAD had the poorest tolerability during treatment with quetiapine-XR, but they had a similar sensitivity as those with bipolar depression and MDD. Patients with schizophrenia or mania had a higher tolerability and a lower sensitivity than those with bipolar depression, MDD, or GAD. PMID:20875219

  5. Longitudinal relationships between anxiety, depression, and pain: results from a two-year cohort study of lower extremity trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Renan C; Wegener, Stephen T; Heins, Sara E; Haythornthwaite, Jennifer A; Mackenzie, Ellen J; Bosse, Michael J

    2013-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that pain, depression, and anxiety are common after trauma. A longitudinal relationship between depression, anxiety, and chronic pain has been hypothesized. Severe lower extremity trauma patients (n = 545) were followed at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months after injury using a visual analog "present pain intensity" scale and the depression and anxiety scales of the Brief Symptom Inventory. Structural model results are presented as Standardized Regression Weights (SRW). Multiple imputation was used to account for missing data. A single structural model including all longitudinal pain intensity, anxiety symptoms, and depression symptoms time-points yielded excellent fit measures. Pain weakly predicted depression (3-6 months SRW = 0.07, P = .05; 6-12 months SRW = 0.06, P = .10) and anxiety (3-6 months SRW = 0.05, P = .21; 6-12 months SRW = 0.08, P = .03) during the first year after injury, and did not predict either construct beyond 1 year. Depression did not predict pain over any time period. In contrast, anxiety predicted pain over all time periods (3-6 months SRW = 0.11, P = .012; 6-12 months SRW = 0.14, P = .0065; 12-24 months SRW = 0.18, P < .0001). The results suggest that in the early phase after trauma, pain predicts anxiety and depression, but the magnitude of these relationships are smaller than the longitudinal relationship from anxiety to pain over this period. In the late (or chronic) phase after injury, the longitudinal relationship from anxiety on pain nearly doubles and is the only significant relationship. Despite missing data and a single item measure of pain intensity, these results provide evidence that negative mood, specifically anxiety, has an important role in the persistence of acute pain.

  6. Managing Acute Complications Of Sickle Cell Disease In Pediatric Patients.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Sathyaseelan; Chao, Jennifer H

    2016-11-01

    Sickle cell disease is a chronic hematologic disease with a variety of acute, and often recurring, complications. Vaso-occlusive crisis, a unique but common presentation in sickle cell disease, can be challenging to manage. Acute chest syndrome is the leading cause of death in patients with sickle cell disease, occurring in more than half of patients who are hospitalized with a vaso-occlusive crisis. Uncommon diagnoses in children, such as stroke, priapism, and transient red cell aplasia, occur more frequently in patients with sickle cell disease and necessitate a degree of familiarity with the disease process and its management. Patients with sickle cell trait generally have a benign course, but are also subject to serious complications. This issue provides a current review of evidence-based management of the most common acute complications of sickle cell disease seen in pediatric patients in the emergency department.

  7. Liver Function Test Abnormalities in Depressed Patients Treated with Antidepressants: A Real-World Systematic Observational Study in Psychiatric Settings

    PubMed Central

    Verstuyft, Céline; Corruble, Emmanuelle; Perlemuter, Gabriel; Colle, Romain

    2016-01-01

    Background Concerning the risk of antidepressant induced liver injury, it is not clear whether psychiatrists perform a liver function test (LFT) and whether an increase in aminotransferase levels should contraindicate antidepressant treatment. Aim To evaluate LFT availability, the prevalence of LFT abnormalities and the probable cause of an altered LFT in patients with a major depressive episode (MDE) requiring an antidepressant drug. Methods We studied LFT evaluation in a real world psychiatric setting, in a sample of 321 consecutive patients with a current major depressive episode (MDE) requiring an antidepressant drug treatment, but without current alcohol or drug dependence or unstable medical disease. Results An LFT is performed in 36.1% (116/321) of depressed patients. One fifth of antidepressant-treated patients who had an LFT evaluation had abnormal results. The most frequent causes of LFT abnormalities were: NAFLD (nonalcoholic fatty liver disease) (7/321; 2.1%), acute alcohol consumption (4/321; 1.2%), antidepressant-induced liver injury (3/321; 0.9%), hepatitis C virus infection (2/321; 0.6%) and heart failure (1/321; 0.3%). The cause of LFT abnormalities was unknown in 32% of patients (8/25) due to the absence of etiological investigations. Conclusion These results demonstrate that an LFT is infrequently performed by psychiatrists in depressed patients requiring an antidepressant drug. Baseline LFT assessment and observations during the first six months of antidepressant treatment may be useful for detection of patients with pre-existing liver disease such as NAFLD, and early identification of cases of antidepressant-induced liver injury. An increase in aminotransferase levels may be related to an underlying liver disease, but does not contraindicate antidepressant treatment. PMID:27171561

  8. Depression symptoms reduce physical activity in COPD patients: a prospective multicenter study

    PubMed Central

    Dueñas-Espín, Iván; Demeyer, Heleen; Gimeno-Santos, Elena; Polkey, Michael I; Hopkinson, Nicholas S; Rabinovich, Roberto A; Dobbels, Fabienne; Karlsson, Niklas; Troosters, Thierry; Garcia-Aymerich, Judith

    2016-01-01

    Background The role of anxiety and depression in the physical activity (PA) of patients with COPD is controversial. We prospectively assessed the effect of symptoms of anxiety and depression on PA in COPD patients. Methods We evaluated anxiety and depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale [HADS]), PA (Dynaport® accelerometer), and other relevant characteristics in 220 COPD patients from five European countries at baseline and at 6 and 12 months of follow-up. HADS score was categorized as: no symptoms (score 0–7), suggested (8–10), and probable (>11) anxiety or depression. We estimated the association between anxiety and depression at t (baseline and 6 months) and PA at t+1 (6 and 12 months) using regression models with a repeated measures approach. Results Patients had a mean (standard deviation) age of 67 (8) years, forced expiratory volume in 1 second 57 (20)% predicted. At baseline, the prevalence of probable anxiety and depression was 10% and 5%, respectively. In multivariable models adjusted by confounders and previous PA, patients performed 81 fewer steps/day (95% confidence interval, −149 to −12, P=0.02) per extra point in HADS-depression score. HADS-anxiety symptoms were not associated with PA. Conclusion In COPD patients, symptoms of depression are prospectively associated with a measurable reduction in PA 6 months later. PMID:27354787

  9. Venlafaxine-associated serotonin syndrome causing severe rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure in a patient with idiopathic Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Rajapakse, Senaka; Abeynaike, Lakshan; Wickramarathne, Thanushi

    2010-10-01

    A 43-year-old male patient with idiopathic Parkinson disease, on dopaminergic therapy, was admitted with confusion and agitation, diaphoresis, and hyperkinesia after the commencement of the serotonin-noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor venlafaxine 2 weeks prior for depression. He was found to have severe rhabdomyolysis and developed acute renal failure. The most likely diagnosis was serotonin syndrome induced by venlafaxine, although neuroleptic malignant syndrome was also considered. The differential diagnosis, atypical features in this presentation, and possible mechanisms are discussed.

  10. The impact of depressive symptoms on patient-provider communication in HIV care.

    PubMed

    Jonassaint, Charles R; Haywood, Carlton; Korthuis, Philip Todd; Cooper, Lisa A; Saha, Somnath; Sharp, Victoria; Cohn, Jonathon; Moore, Richard D; Beach, Mary Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Persons with HIV who develop depression have worse medical adherence and outcomes. Poor patient-provider communication may play a role in these outcomes. This cross-sectional study evaluated the influence of patient depression on the quality of patient-provider communication. Patient-provider visits (n=406) at four HIV care sites were audio-recorded and coded with the Roter Interaction Analysis System (RIAS). Negative binomial and linear regressions using generalized estimating equations tested the association of depressive symptoms, as measured by the Center for Epidemiology Studies Depression scale (CES-D), with RIAS measures and postvisit patient-rated quality of care and provider-reported regard for his or her patient. The patients, averaged 45 years of age (range =20-77), were predominately male (n=286, 68.5%), of black race (n=250, 60%), and on antiretroviral medications (n=334, 80%). Women had greater mean CES-D depression scores (12.0) than men (10.6; p=0.03). There were no age, race, or education differences in depression scores. Visits with patients reporting severe depressive symptoms compared to those reporting none/mild depressive symptoms were longer and speech speed was slower. Patients with severe depressive symptoms did more emotional rapport building but less social rapport building, and their providers did more data gathering/counseling (ps<0.05). In postvisit questionnaires, providers reported lower levels of positive regard for, and rated more negatively patients reporting more depressive symptoms (p<0.01). In turn, patients reporting more depressive symptoms felt less respected and were less likely to report that their provider knows them as a person than none/mild depressive symptoms patients (ps<0.05). Greater psychosocial needs of patients presenting with depressive symptoms and limited time/resources to address these needs may partially contribute to providers' negative attitudes regarding their patients with depressive symptoms. These

  11. The Emergence of Suicidal Ideation during the Post-Hospital Treatment of Depressed Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaudiano, Brandon A.; Andover, Margaret S.; Miller, Ivan W.

    2008-01-01

    There is a paucity of research on the emergence of suicidal ideation in recently hospitalized patients undergoing treatment for depression. As part of a larger clinical trial, patients (N = 103) with major depression without suicidal ideation at hospital discharge were followed for up to 6 months while receiving study-related outpatient…

  12. Distinguishing Symptoms of Grief and Depression in a Cohort of Advanced Cancer Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobsen, Juliet C.; Zhang, Baohui; Block, Susan D.; Maciejewski, Paul K.; Prigerson, Holly G.

    2010-01-01

    Several studies have shown that the symptoms of grief are different from symptoms of depression among bereaved family members. This study is an attempt to replicate this finding among advanced cancer patients and examine clinical correlates of patient grief and depression. Analyses were conducted on data from interviews with 123 advanced cancer…

  13. Depression and intelligence in patients with Parkinson's disease and deep-brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Schadt, Courtney R; Cox, Katie L; Tramontana, Michael G; Byrne, Daniel W; Davis, Thomas L; Fang, John Y; Konrad, Peter E; Padaliya, Bhavna; Mutter, Robert W; Gill, Chandler E; Richardson, Caralee R; Charles, P David

    2006-07-01

    The goal of this study is to examine the association of depression with intelligence and education in patients with Parkinson's disease treated with bilateral subthalamic nucleus stimulation (STN-DBS). The literature has been contradictory concerning depression in Parkinson's disease patients. Some studies have shown less depression in Parkinson's disease patients with more education not treated with STN-DBS. Other recently published studies indicate that STN-DBS improves the depression associated with Parkinson's disease. No studies have examined the correlation of these factors with depression in Parkinson's disease patients treated with STN-DBS. We administered the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) pre- and postoperatively to 21 Parkinson's disease patients (seven women, 14 men, ages 49-75) who underwent STN-DBS. The postoperative scores of the lower 50th percentile (n=8) of the Verbal Comprehensive Index of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS-III) decreased significantly (P=0.036), while the upper 50th percentile (n=13) remained nearly constant (P=0.802). Furthermore, as the education increased from highschool to graduate level, patients demonstrated less improvement in depressive symptoms postoperatively. These findings suggest that Parkinson's disease patients with lower intelligence test scores and less education benefit more with regards to depressive symptomatology after STN-DBS than patients with higher scores and education.

  14. Diabetes Distress and Depressive Symptoms: A Dyadic Investigation of Older Patients and Their Spouses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franks, Melissa M.; Lucas, Todd; Stephens, Mary Ann Parris; Rook, Karen S.; Gonzalez, Richard

    2010-01-01

    In this dyadic study, we examined diabetes distress experienced by male and female patients and their spouses (N = 185 couples), and its association with depressive symptoms using the Actor-Partner Interdependence Model. Diabetes-related distress reported by both patients and spouses was associated with each partner's own depressive symptoms…

  15. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy: Innovations for Cardiopulmonary Patients with Depression and Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cully, Jeffrey A.; Paukert, Amber; Falco, Jessica; Stanley, Melinda

    2009-01-01

    Medically ill patients face unique physical and emotional challenges that place them at increased risk for symptoms of depression and anxiety. Despite high prevalence and significant impact, depression and anxiety are infrequently treated in the medically ill because of a variety of patient, provider, and system factors. The current article…

  16. Association of sleep disturbances with cognitive impairment and depression in maintenance memodialysis patients

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There are few data on the relationship of sleep with measures of cognitive function and symptoms of depression in dialysis patients. We evaluated the relationship of sleep with cognitive function and symptoms of depression in 168 hemodialysis patients, using multivariable linear and logistic regress...

  17. A patient with seminal vesiculitis prior to acute chlamydial epididymitis.

    PubMed

    Furuya, Ryoji; Takahashi, Satoshi; Furuya, Seiji; Takeyama, Koh; Tsukamoto, Taiji

    2005-10-01

    This is the first report of a case of seminal vesiculitis prior to acute chlamydial epididymitis. At the first visit to the clinic, the patient wished to check whether he had Chlamydia trachomatis in his genital tract, because his wife had been diagnosed as having chlamydial cervicitis. He had no specific symptoms at that time; however, transrectal ultrasonograpy (TRUS) revealed swelling of seminal vesicles, which suggested the presence of seminal vesiculitis. Two days after the first visit, he had high-grade fever and was diagnosed as having acute epididymitis caused by C. trachomatis. We had previously reported that seminal vesiculitis was always complicated with acute epididymitis, so this case could provide important evidence that seminal vesiculitis might precede acute epididymitis. It suggested that acute epididymitis could be affected by seminal vesiculitis via the retrograde transmission route.

  18. Flavopiridol, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-10-07

    Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  19. Effect of an aerobic training program as complementary therapy in patients with moderate depression.

    PubMed

    de la Cerda, Pablo; Cervelló, Eduardo; Cocca, Armando; Viciana, Jesús

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of an aerobic training program as complementary therapy in patients suffering from moderate depression. 82 female patients weredivided into a group that received traditional pharmacotherapy (Fluoxetine 20 mg) and a group that received pharmacotherapy plus an aerobic training program. This program was carried out for eight consecutive weeks, three days per week, and included gymnastics, dancing, and walking. Depressive symptoms were measured with the Beck Depression Inventory and the ICD-10 Guide for Depression Diagnosis, both administered before and after treatments. The results confirm the effectiveness of the aerobic training program as a complementary therapy to diminish depressive symptoms in patients suffering from moderate depression.

  20. Multiple aberrations in shared inflammatory and oxidative & nitrosative stress (IO&NS) pathways explain the co-association of depression and cardiovascular disorder (CVD), and the increased risk for CVD and due mortality in depressed patients.

    PubMed

    Maes, Michael; Ruckoanich, Piyanuj; Chang, Young Seun; Mahanonda, Nithi; Berk, Michael

    2011-04-29

    There is evidence that there is a bidirectional relationship between major depression and cardiovascular disorder (CVD): depressed patients are a population at risk for increased cardiac morbidity and mortality, and depression is more frequent in patients who suffer from CVD. There is also evidence that inflammatory and oxidative and nitrosative stress (IO&NS) pathways underpin the common pathophysiology of both CVD and major depression. Activation of these pathways may increase risk for both disorders and contribute to shared risk. The shared IO&NS pathways that may contribute to CVD and depression comprise the following: increased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, like interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-2, IL-6, IL-8, IL-12, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interferon-γ; T cell activation; increased acute phase proteins, like C-reactive protein, haptoglobin, fibrinogen and α1-antitrypsin; complement factors; increased LPS load through bacterial translocation and subsequent gut-derived inflammation; induction of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase with increased levels of tryptophan catabolites; decreased levels of antioxidants, like coenzyme Q10, zinc, vitamin E, glutathione and glutathione peroxidase; increased O&NS characterized by oxidative damage to low density lipoprotein (LDL) and phospholipid inositol, increased malondialdehyde, and damage to DNA and mitochondria; increased nitrosative stress; and decreased ω3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). The complex interplay between the abovementioned IO&NS pathways in depression results in pro-atherogenic effects and should be regarded as a risk factor to future clinical CVD and due mortality. We suggest that major depression should be added as a risk factor to the Charlson "comorbidity" index. It is advised that patients with (sub)chronic or recurrent major depression should routinely be assessed by serology tests to predict if they have an increased risk to cardiovascular disorders.

  1. Depressants

    MedlinePlus

    ... crime punishable by hefty fines and jail time. How Can Someone Quit? Quitting depressants can be very difficult. A person who tries to stop taking the drugs can have tremors, breathing problems, and seizures, go into a coma, or even die. Because the body's systems get used to the ...

  2. [Activation of caspases in lymphocytes of patients with depression and anxiety].

    PubMed

    Gerasimovich, E S; Yakovlev, A A; Druzhkova, T A; Grishkina, M N; Guekht, A B; Gulyaeva, N V

    2016-01-01

    The processes in the nervous and immune systems are closely interrelated. In particular, increased apoptosis was reported in lymphocytes of patients with depression. The aim of this study was to assess activities of proteases associated with cell death in lymphocytes of patient with personality disorders accompanied by depression and anxiety. In patients with personality disorders associated with organic brain dysfunction caspase activities were reduced in patients with depression and increased in patients with anxiety. The results may be useful for elucidation of pathogenetic mechanisms of personality disorders and in search of new biomarkers of these diseases.

  3. Depressive Symptoms: Mediator of Event-Free Survival in Patients With Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Hammash, Muna H; Lennie, Terry A; Crawford, Timothy; Heo, Seongkum; Chung, Misook L; Biddle, Martha J; Dekker, Rebecca; Wu, Jia-Rong; Rayens, Mary Kay; Moser, Debra K

    2016-07-13

    Depressive symptoms and poor health perceptions are predictors of higher hospitalization and mortality rates (heart failure [HF]). However, the association between depressive symptoms and health perceptions as they affect event-free survival outcomes in patients with HF has not been studied. The purpose of this secondary analysis was to determine whether depressive symptoms mediate the relationship between health perceptions and event-free survival in patients with HF. A total of 458 HF patients (61.6 ± 12 years, 55% New York Heart Association Class III/IV) responded to one-item health perception question and completed the Patient Health Questionnaire-9. Event-free survival data were collected for up to 4 years. Multiple regression and Cox proportional hazards regression analysis showed that depressive symptoms mediated the relationship between health perceptions and event-free survival. Decreasing depressive symptoms is essential to improve event-free survival in patients with HF.

  4. Distressing visual mental images in depressed patients and healthy controls - Are they one and the same?

    PubMed

    Weßlau, Charlotte; Lieberz, Klara; Oertel-Knöchel, Viola; Steil, Regina

    2016-12-30

    Negative mental images are common in a range of mental disorders. So far, only inconclusive evidence has been obtained for depression specificity. We assessed the disparities and similarities of a variety of imagery characteristics in 17 patients suffering from depressive disorders and 17 healthy matched controls who all reported negative mental images. The number of intrusive images, their frequency, and the associated distress were significantly greater for the depressed individuals. Compared with non-depressed controls, negative images during depression were more frequently triggered by internal factors and led to depression-related emotions. Approximately 30% of the images in the depressed group did not consist of actual memories of real-life events. No significant differences in vividness or perceived controllability were observed, but the depressed patients experienced significantly more bodily symptoms during the intrusions than the healthy controls. The results indicate that the central characteristics of the negative mental images of depressed and non-depressed individuals are distinguishable, despite some similarities, and may contribute to depressive symptoms.

  5. Ketamine Therapy for Treatment-resistant Depression in a Patient with Multiple Sclerosis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Messer, Michael M.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Depression is a common condition among patients with multiple sclerosis and often becomes resistant to oral antidepressants. We report a patient with multiple sclerosis who developed severe treatment-resistant depression and who was successfully treated with intravenous ketamine over the period of two years. Methods: Ketamine treatment protocol included an initial series of six treatments administered every other day, followed by a maintenance schedule. Ketamine was administered intravenously at 0.5mg/kg of ideal body weight over 40 minutes. Depression symptoms were measured using Beck Depression Index. Results: The patient’s Beck Depression Index score prior to initiating ketamine treatment was 38, corresponding to severe depression. Response to treatment, defined as 50-percent reduction in Beck Depression Index score, was observed after five treatments. For this patient, the maintenance schedule ranged from a weekly treatment to one treatment every three weeks. During the two-year observation period, this patient was able to maintain a stable non-depressed mood and had no worsening of her MS symptoms. Conclusion: Ketamine may be an alternative treatment for resistant depression and may have a special use in patients with multiple sclerosis. PMID:28386522

  6. Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy in patients with late-life depression: A case series

    PubMed Central

    Mathur, Sonal; Sharma, Mahendra Prakash; Bharath, Srikala

    2016-01-01

    Depression is the most common mental illness in the elderly, and cost-effective treatments are required. Therefore, this study is aimed at evaluating the effectiveness of a mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) on depressive symptoms, mindfulness skills, acceptance, and quality of life across four domains in patients with late-onset depression. A single case design with pre- and post-assessment was adopted. Five patients meeting the specified inclusion and exclusion criteria were recruited for the study and assessed on the behavioral analysis pro forma, geriatric depression scale, Hamilton depression rating scale, Kentucky inventory of mindfulness skills, Acceptance and Action Questionnaire II, The World Health Organization quality of life Assessment Brief version (WHOQO-L-BREF). The therapeutic program consisted of education regarding the nature of depression, training in formal and informal mindfulness meditation, and cognitive restructuring. A total of 8 sessions over 8 weeks were conducted for each patient. The results of this study indicate clinically significant improvement in the severity of depression, mindfulness skills, acceptance, and overall quality of life in all 5 patients. Eight-week MBCT program has led to reduction in depression and increased mindfulness skills, acceptance, and overall quality of life in patients with late-life depression. PMID:27512325

  7. Association of pro-inflammatory cytokines, cortisol and depression in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Du, Yi-jie; Yang, Chang-jiang; Li, Bei; Wu, Xiao; Lv, Yu-bao; Jin, Hua-liang; Cao, Yu-xue; Sun, Jing; Luo, Qing-li; Gong, Wei-yi; Zhang, Hong-ying; Liu, Bao-jun; Wu, Jin-Ffng; Dong, Jing-cheng

    2014-08-01

    Evidence suggests that pro-inflammatory cytokines and cortisol play a crucial role in the etiology of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and depression. Depression occurs commonly among COPD patients and an earlier diagnosis would be beneficial. This study investigated the associations between depression, sputum cytokines and salivary cortisol in COPD patients. The diurnal rhythms of sputum IL-1, IL-6, TNF-α and salivary cortisol were measured in COPD patients with depression compared to those only with depression, or COPD and healthy controls. The area under the diurnal variation curves (AUC) over the 24h time course and relative diurnal variation (VAR) were calculated while correlation and regression analysis were performed. Patients with co-morbid depression and COPD showed an increasing sputum IL-1, sputum TNF-α AUC and a decreasing salivary cortisol VAR (P<0.001). The combination of sputum TNF-α AUC, sputum IL-1 AUC, sputum IL-6 AUC and salivary cortisol VAR performed best as a potential biomarker in the diagnosis of depression in COPD patients, with a sensitivity of 94.74% and a specificity of 96.67%. Positive correlations were found between sputum IL-1 AUC and sputum TNF-α AUC versus depressive symptoms, respectively a negative correlation was found between salivary cortisol VAR and depression. They were independently associated with depression in logistic regression models. Depression in COPD is associated with higher 24-h overall levels of sputum IL-1, TNF-α and flattened diurnal salivary cortisol. These non-invasive sputum and salivary biomarkers may serve as a simple clinical tool for the early diagnosis of depression in COPD patients.

  8. Prevention of deterioration in acutely ill patients in hospital.

    PubMed

    Steen, Colin

    The shift towards providing critical care in general wards has changed the way acutely ill patients are identified, treated and managed in hospital. This requires the expertise of knowledgeable, informed and capable staff. Effective education and appropriate knowledge and skills are required to aid identification of the deteriorating patient and provide prompt, timely and appropriate intervention to prevent further deterioration and possibly death. This article provides information about a systematic approach that will enable healthcare professionals to intervene to prevent deterioration in acutely ill patients.

  9. Acute coronary syndrome among older patients: a review.

    PubMed

    Veerasamy, Murugapathy; Edwards, Richard; Ford, Gary; Kirkwood, Tom; Newton, Julia; Jones, Dave; Kunadian, Vijay

    2015-01-01

    Ischemic heart disease is the leading cause of mortality worldwide. Due to advances in medicine in the past few decades, life expectancy has increased resulting in an aging population in developed and developing countries. Acute coronary syndrome causes greater morbidity and mortality in this group of older patients, which appears to be due to age-related comorbidities. This review examines the incidence and prevalence of acute coronary syndrome among older patients, examines current treatment strategies, and evaluates the predictors of adverse outcomes. In particular, the impact of frailty on outcomes and the need for frailty assessment in developing future research and management strategies among older patients are discussed.

  10. Treatment of hyperglycaemia in patients with acute stroke.

    PubMed

    Castilla-Guerra, L; Fernández-Moreno, M C; Hewitt, J

    2016-03-01

    The proportion of diabetic patients who are hospitalised for stroke has been increasing in recent years, currently reaching almost a third of all cases of stroke. In addition, about half of patients with acute stroke present hyperglycaemia in the first hours of the stroke. Although hyperglycaemia in the acute phase of stroke is associated with a poor prognosis, its treatment is currently a topic of debate. There is no evidence that the adminstration of intravenous insulin to these patients offers benefits in terms of the evolution of the stroke. New studies in development, such as the SHINE study (Stroke Hyperglycemia Insulin Network Effort), may contribute to clarifying the role of intensive control of glycaemia during the acute phase of the stroke. Ultimately, patients who have presented with stroke should be screened for diabetes.

  11. Depression in diabetic patients attending University of Gondar Hospital Diabetic Clinic, Northwest Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Birhanu, Anteneh Messele; Alemu, Fekadu Mazengia; Ashenafie, Tesfaye Demeke; Balcha, Shitaye Alemu; Dachew, Berihun Assefa

    2016-01-01

    Background Diabetes mellitus, frequently associated with comorbid depression, contributes to the double burden of individual patients and community. Depression remains undiagnosed in as many as 50%–75% of diabetes cases. This study aimed to determine the prevalence and associated factors of depression among diabetic patients attending the University of Gondar Hospital Diabetic Clinic, Northwest Ethiopia. Methods An institution-based cross-sectional study was conducted from March to May 2014 among 422 sampled diabetic patients attending the University of Gondar Hospital Diabetic Clinic. The participants were selected using systematic random sampling. Data were collected by face-to-face interview using a standardized and pretested questionnaire linked with patient record review. Depression was assessed using the Patient Health Questionnaire-9. Data were entered to EPI INFO version 7 and analyzed by SPSS version 20 software. Binary logistic regression analysis was performed to identify factors associated with depression. Results A total of 415 diabetic patients participated in the study with a response rate of 98.3%. The prevalence of depression among diabetic patients was found to be 15.4% (95% confidence interval (CI): 11.7–19.2). Only religion (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] =2.65 and 95% CI: 1.1–6.0) and duration of diabetes (AOR =0.27 and 95% CI: 0.07–0.92) were the factors associated with depression among diabetic patients. Conclusion The prevalence of depression was low as compared to other similar studies elsewhere. Disease (diabetes) duration of 10 years and above and being a Muslim religion follower (as compared to Christian) were the factors significantly associated with depression. Early screening of depression and treating depression as a routine component of diabetes care are recommended. Further research with a large sample size, wider geographical coverage, and segregation of type of diabetes mellitus is recommended. PMID:27274296

  12. Recognition of emotion from moving facial and prosodic stimuli in depressed patients

    PubMed Central

    Kan, Y; Mimura, M; Kamijima, K; Kawamura, M

    2004-01-01

    Background: It has been suggested that depressed patients have a "negative bias" in recognising other people's emotions; however, the detailed structure of this negative bias is not fully understood. Objectives: To examine the ability of depressed patients to recognise emotion, using moving facial and prosodic expressions of emotion. Methods: 16 depressed patients and 20 matched (non-depressed) controls selected one basic emotion (happiness, sadness, anger, fear, surprise, or disgust) that best described the emotional state represented by moving face and prosody. Results: There was no significant difference between depressed patients and controls in their recognition of facial expressions of emotion. However, the depressed patients were impaired relative to controls in their recognition of surprise from prosodic emotions, judging it to be more negative. Conclusions: We suggest that depressed patients tend to interpret neutral emotions, such as surprise, as negative. Considering that the deficit was seen only for prosodic emotive stimuli, it would appear that stimulus clarity influences the recognition of emotion. These findings provide valuable information on how depressed patients behave in complicated emotional and social situations. PMID:15548479

  13. Depression and Barriers to Mental Health Care in Older Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Weinberger, Mark I.; Bruce, Martha L.; Roth, Andrew J.; Breitbart, William; Nelson, Christian J.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To review the literature on depression in cancer patients with a particular focus on depression assessment and barriers to mental health treatment in older cancer patients. Design We conducted a review of the literature on depression and barriers to mental health treatment in older cancer patients. Results Depression is prevalent in cancer patients. However, little is known about prevalence rates of depression in older adults with cancer, assessing depression in older cancer patients and barriers that impede proper mental health treatment in this sample. Conclusion Improved diagnostic clarity and a better understanding of barriers to mental health treatment can help clarify and facilitate mental health referrals and ultimately improve access to care among older cancer patients in need. Continuing to consider the complexities associated with diagnosing depression in older cancer patients is necessary. Further work may be needed to develop new diagnostic measures for such detection, determine the prevalence of depression among older cancer and ways in which to overcome barriers to mental health care. PMID:21157847

  14. Borrelia crocidurae infection in acutely febrile patients, Senegal.

    PubMed

    Mediannikov, Oleg; Socolovschi, Cristina; Bassene, Hubert; Diatta, Georges; Ratmanov, Pavel; Fenollar, Florence; Sokhna, Cheikh; Raoult, Didier

    2014-08-01

    As malaria cases in Africa decline, other causes of acute febrile illness are being explored. To determine incidence of Borrelia crocidurae infection during June 2010-October 2011, we collected 1,566 blood specimens from febrile patients in Senegal. Incidence was high (7.3%). New treatment strategies, possibly doxycycline, might be indicated for febrile patients.

  15. Depression and suicidal behavior in acne patients treated with isotretinoin: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Marqueling, Ann L; Zane, Lee T

    2005-06-01

    Isotretinoin (13-cis retinoic acid) is an effective treatment for severe cystic or recalcitrant acne vulgaris; however, concerns have been raised regarding its potential association with depression and suicidal behavior. We sought to explore the proposed relationship between isotretinoin use and the risk of depression and attempted and completed suicide in patients with acne vulgaris by performing a systematic literature search for studies reporting primary data on depression and suicidal behavior in patients treated with isotretinoin for acne vulgaris. Nine studies met the qualifying criteria for our analysis. Rates of depression among isotretinoin users ranged from 1% to 11% across studies, with similar rates in oral antibiotic control groups. Overall, studies comparing depression before and after treatment did not show a statistically significant increase in depression diagnoses or depressive symptoms. Some, in fact, demonstrated a trend toward fewer or less severe depressive symptoms after isotretinoin therapy. This decrease was particularly evident in patients with pretreatment scores in the moderate or clinical depression range. No correlation between isotretinoin use and suicidal behavior was reported, although only one retrospective study presented data on this topic. Although the current literature does not support a causative association between isotretinoin use and depression, there are important limitations to many of the studies. The available data on suicidal behavior during isotretinoin treatment are insufficient to establish a meaningful causative association.

  16. Depression and suicidal behavior in acne patients treated with isotretinoin: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Marqueling, Ann L; Zane, Lee T

    2007-12-01

    Isotretinoin (13-cis retinoic acid) is an effective treatment for severe cystic or recalcitrant acne vulgaris; however, concerns have been raised regarding its potential association with depression and suicidal behavior. We sought to explore the proposed relationship between isotretinoin use and the risk of depression and attempted and completed suicide in patients with acne vulgaris by performing a systematic literature search for studies reporting primary data on depression and suicidal behavior in patients treated with isotretinoin for acne vulgaris. Nine studies met the qualifying criteria for our analysis. Rates of depression among isotretinoin users ranged from 1% to 11% across studies, with similar rates in oral antibiotic control groups. Overall, studies comparing depression before and after treatment did not show a statistically significant increase in depression diagnoses or depressive symptoms. Some, in fact, demonstrated a trend toward fewer or less severe depressive symptoms after isotretinoin therapy. This decrease was particularly evident in patients with pretreatment scores in the moderate or clinical depression range. No correlation between isotretinoin use and suicidal behavior was reported, although only one retrospective study presented data on this topic. Although the current literature does not support a causative association between isotretinoin use and depression, there are important limitations to many of the studies. The available data on suicidal behavior during isotretinoin treatment are insufficient to establish a meaningful causative association.

  17. [Methohexital clearance in patients with acute hepatitis (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Richter, E; Gallenkamp, H; Heusler, H; Zilly, W; Breimer, D D

    1979-10-26

    Pharmacokinetics of methohexital were studied in patients with acute hepatitis and after a treatment period either with "essential phospholipids" or phenobarbital. During the acute phase the distribution of methohexital was significantly altered. No change had been observed in the methohexital clearance. During remission the distribution of methohexital was in a normal range. After treatment with phenobarbital the methohexital clearance increased significantly whereas no change was observed after treatment with "essential phospholipids".

  18. The effects of anti-depressants on depression symptom scores at 12 months follow-up in patients with cardiometabolic disease: Results from a large primary care cohort

    PubMed Central

    Jani, Bhautesh Dinesh; Purves, David; Barry, Sarah J. E.; McCowan, Colin; Cavanagh, Jonathan; Mair, Frances S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Evidence on the long-term usefulness of anti-depressants in managing depression in cardiometabolic disease is limited. Aim: We examined the effects of anti-depressant prescribing on depressive symptoms at 12 months follow-up in patients with cardiometabolic disease and a positive depression screening result at baseline. Design and Setting: We retrospectively reviewed routine UK primary care data for patients with coronary heart disease, diabetes and previous stroke for the year 2008–2009. 35,537 patients with one of the three above diseases underwent depression screening using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS-D). Of 7080 patients with a positive screening result (HADS-D ≥ 8), 3933 (55.5%) patients had a repeat HADS-D recorded at 12 months follow-up. Methods: We compared the change in HADS-D at follow-up and remission rate in those who were prescribed anti-depressants (n = 223) against those who were not (n = 3710). Results: The mean change in HADS-D from baseline, for the nonprescribed group was similar to the reduction observed in patients who were continuously prescribed (n = 93) with anti-depressants during follow-up. Patients who were prescribed intermittently (n = 72) or only one (n = 58) prescription during follow-up had a lower reduction in HADS-D compared to the nonprescribed group. There was no difference in remission rates between continuously prescribed and the nonprescribed group, but remission was lower in patients prescribed intermittently and single prescription. Conclusion: Improvement in depressive symptoms in patients with cardiometabolic disease at 12 months was not any better in patients prescribed with anti-depressants compared to the nonprescribed group. The role of anti-depressants in the management of depression in cardiometabolic disease merits further investigation. PMID:26286616

  19. Association between pneumonia in acute stroke stage and 3-year mortality in patients with acute first-ever ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yi-Jing; Weng, Wei-Chieh; Su, Feng-Chieh; Peng, Tsung-I; Chien, Yu-Yi; Wu, Chia-Lun; Lee, Kuang-Yung; Wei, Yi-Chia; Lin, Shun-Wen; Zhu, Jun-Xiao; Huang, Wen-Yi

    2016-11-01

    The influence of pneumonia in acute stroke stage on the clinical presentation and long-term outcomes of patients with acute ischemic stroke is still controversial. We investigate the influence of pneumonia in acute stroke stage on the 3-year outcomes of patients with acute first-ever ischemic stroke. Nine-hundred and thirty-four patients with acute first-ever ischemic stroke were enrolled and had been followed for 3years. Patients were divided into two groups according to whether pneumonia occurred during acute stroke stage or not. Clinical presentations, risk factors for stroke, laboratory data, co-morbidities, and outcomes were recorded. The result showed that a total of 100 patients (10.7%) had pneumonia in acute stroke stage. The prevalence of older age, atrial fibrillation was significantly higher in patients with pneumonia in acute stroke stage. Total anterior circulation syndrome and posterior circulation syndrome occurred more frequently among patients with pneumonia in acute stroke stage (P<0.001 and P=0.009, respectively). Multivariate Cox regression revealed that pneumonia in acute stroke stage is a significant predictor of 3-year mortality (hazard ratio=6.39, 95% confidence interval=4.03-10.11, P<0.001). In conclusion, pneumonia during the acute stroke stage is associated with increased risk of 3-year mortality. Interventions to prevent pneumonia in acute stroke stage might improve ischemic stroke outcome.

  20. The moderating influence of nicotine and smoking on resting-state mood and EEG changes in remitted depressed patients during tryptophan depletion.

    PubMed

    Knott, Verner; Bisserbe, Jean-Claude; Shah, Dhrasti; Thompson, Andrea; Bowers, Hayley; Blais, Crystal; Ilivitsky, Vadim

    2013-12-01

    Comorbidity between depression and tobacco use may reflect self-medication of serotonergically mediated mood dysregulation, which has been associated with aberrant cortical activation and hemispheric asymmetry in patients with major depressive disorders (MDD). This randomized, double-blind study in 28 remitted MDD patients examined the moderating effects of acute nicotine and smoker vs. nonsmoker status on mood and EEG changes accompanying transient reductions in serotonin induced by acute tryptophan depletion (ATD). In smokers, who exhibited greater posterior high alpha power and increased left frontal low alpha power (signs of deactivation) compared to nonsmokers, ATD increased self-ratings of depressed mood and elevated left frontal and right parietal high alpha power (i.e. further cortical deactivation). Smokers were not affected by nicotine administration. In nonsmokers, ATD did not influence depression ratings, but it reduced vigor ratings and increased frontal and posterior theta power; both of which were blocked by acute nicotine. These findings indicate a role for nicotinic receptors in disordered mood.

  1. Cognitive behavioral therapy for depression in Japanese Parkinson’s disease patients: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Shinmei, Issei; Kobayashi, Kei; Oe, Yuki; Takagishi, Yuriko; Kanie, Ayako; Ito, Masaya; Takebayashi, Yoshitake; Murata, Miho; Horikoshi, Masaru; Dobkin, Roseanne D

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study evaluated the feasibility of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for Japanese Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients with depression. To increase cultural acceptability, we developed the CBT program using manga, a type of Japanese comic novel. Methods Participants included 19 non-demented PD patients who had depressive symptoms (GRID-Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression score ≥8). A CBT program comprising six sessions was individually administered. We evaluated the feasibility and safety of the CBT program in terms of the dropout rate and occurrence of adverse events. The primary outcome was depressive symptom reduction in the GRID-Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression upon completion of CBT. Secondary outcomes included changes in the self-report measures of depression (Beck Depression Inventory-II, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale-Depression), anxiety (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale-Anxiety, State and Trait Anxiety Inventory, Overall Anxiety Severity and Impairment Scale), functional impairment, and quality of life (Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey). Results Of the 19 participants (mean age =63.8 years, standard deviation [SD] =9.9 years; mean Hohen–Yahr score =1.7, SD =0.8), one patient (5%) withdrew. No severe adverse event was observed. The patients reported significant improvements in depression (Hedges’ g =−1.02, 95% confidence interval =−1.62 to −0.39). The effects were maintained over a 3-month follow-up period. Most of the secondary outcome measurements showed a small-to-moderate but nonsignificant effect size from baseline to post-intervention. Conclusion This study provides preliminary evidence that CBT is feasible among Japanese PD patients with depression. Similar approaches may be effective for people with PD from other cultural backgrounds. The results warrant replication in a randomized controlled trial. PMID:27354802

  2. Management of patients after recovering from acute severe biliary pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Dedemadi, Georgia; Nikolopoulos, Manolis; Kalaitzopoulos, Ioannis; Sgourakis, George

    2016-01-01

    Cholelithiasis is the most common cause of acute pancreatitis, accounting 35%-60% of cases. Around 15%-20% of patients suffer a severe attack with high morbidity and mortality rates. As far as treatment is concerned, the optimum method of late management of patients with severe acute biliary pancreatitis is still contentious and the main question is over the correct timing of every intervention. Patients after recovering from an acute episode of severe biliary pancreatitis can be offered alternative options in their management, including cholecystectomy, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) and sphincterotomy, or no definitive treatment. Delaying cholecystectomy until after resolution of the inflammatory process, usually not earlier than 6 wk after onset of acute pancreatitis, seems to be a safe policy. ERCP and sphincterotomy on index admission prevent recurrent episodes of pancreatitis until cholecystectomy is performed, but if used for definitive treatment, they can be a valuable tool for patients unfit for surgery. Some patients who survive severe biliary pancreatitis may develop pseudocysts or walled-off necrosis. Management of pseudocysts with minimally invasive techniques, if not therapeutic, can be used as a bridge to definitive operative treatment, which includes delayed cholecystectomy and concurrent pseudocyst drainage in some patients. A management algorithm has been developed for patients surviving severe biliary pancreatitis according to the currently published data in the literature. PMID:27678352

  3. Depression and medication adherence among older Korean patients with hypertension: Mediating role of self-efficacy.

    PubMed

    Son, Youn-Jung; Won, Mi Hwa

    2017-02-13

    Many studies have reported the negative effects of depression on adherence to antihypertensive medication. However, little is known about the mechanism underlying this relationship in elderly patients with hypertension. The aim of this cross-sectional study is to examine the mediating role of self-efficacy in the relationship between depression and medication adherence among older patients with hypertension. The data were collected from October to December 2014. A total of 255 older patients with hypertension were assessed using the Geriatric Depression Scale, the Self-efficacy for Appropriate Medication Use Scale, and the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale. Hierarchical linear regression analysis and the Sobel test were used to examine the mediating role of self-efficacy in the relationship between depression and medication adherence. Depression and self-efficacy were statistically significant predictors of medication adherence in older patients with hypertension. Self-efficacy partially mediated the relationship between depression and medication adherence. Interventions targeting self-efficacy could increase the confidence of patients in their ability to actively take their medicines. Moreover, health care providers should be aware of the importance of early detection of depression in older patients with hypertension. Future studies with longitudinal data are warranted to clarify the multidirectional relationships between depression, self-efficacy, and medication adherence.

  4. Frequency of psychological and somatic symptoms in patients with major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, Haroon Rashid; Arshad, Nadia; Javed, Faeza; Asif, Aftab

    2010-09-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is one of the most commonly encountered psychiatric disorders in primary care. Depression is primarily a psychological illness; however, patients usually present with somatic symptoms. This pattern of presentation quite often poses a risk for patients with MDD due to the fact that general practitioners commonly attribute the cause of somatic symptoms to organic illnesses, thereby misdiagnosing patients. The current study focuses on the frequency of psychological and somatic symptoms in patients with major depressive disorder. The study is a cross-sectional survey using non-probability purposive sampling technique. The authors administered a self-developed questionnaire on 900 patients (male and female) diagnosed with major depressive disorder based on Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-IV-TR (DSM-IV-TR). The data was analyzed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences-10 (SPSS-10). Females presented with a higher frequency of somatic symptoms as compared to psychological symptoms, whereas males presented with a higher frequency of psychological symptoms as compared to somatic symptoms. These findings emphasize the imperative need for health care professionals to have a thorough understanding of major depressive disorder. The disabling effects of depression can be minimized and prognosis of such patients improved to the point of remission if depression is promptly diagnosed without ambiguity, and intensively treated based on the physician's comprehensive knowledge of the symptomatology of major depressive disorder.

  5. Study of the Serum Copper Levels in Patients with Major Depressive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Styczeń, Krzysztof; Sowa-Kućma, Magdalena; Siwek, Marcin; Dudek, Dominika; Reczyński, Witold; Misztak, Paulina; Szewczyk, Bernadeta; Topór-Mądry, Roman; Opoka, Włodzimierz; Nowak, Gabriel

    2016-12-01

    Copper may be involved in the pathophysiology of depression. Clinical data on this issue are very limited and not conclusive. The purpose of the study was to determine the copper concentration in the serum of patients with major depressive disorder and to discuss its potential clinical usefulness as a biomarker of the disease. A case-control clinical study included 69 patients with current depressive episode, 45 patients in remission and 50 healthy volunteers. Cu concentration was measured by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). The mean serum copper level in depressed patients was slightly lower (by 11 %; not statistically significant) than in the control group. Furthermore, there was no significant difference in Cu(2+) concentration between depressive episode and remission, nor between remission and control group. In the remission group were observed significant correlations between copper levels and the average number of relapses over the past years or time of remission. There was no correlation between serum copper and severity of depression, as measured by HDRS and MADRS. The obtained results showed no significant differences between the copper concentration in the blood serum of patients (both with current depressive episode and in remission) and healthy volunteers, as well as the lack of correlations between the copper level in the active stage of the disease and clinical features of the population. Our study is the first conducted on such a large population of patients, so the results may be particularly important and reliable source of knowledge about the potential role of copper in depression.

  6. Depression.

    PubMed

    McCarron, Robert M; Vanderlip, Erik R; Rado, Jeffrey

    2016-10-04

    This issue provides a clinical overview of depression, focusing on screening, diagnosis, treatment, and practice improvement. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self-Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing divisions and with the assistance of additional science writers and physician writers.

  7. Bupropion versus sertraline in the treatment of depressive patients with binge eating disorder: retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Calandra, Carmela; Russo, Rina Giuseppa; Luca, Maria

    2012-06-01

    This study sought to compare Bupropion versus Sertraline in the treatment of depressed patients with Binge Eating Disorder (BED) prescribed off-label. Medical records of outpatients with diagnosis of BED and Depression (DSM-IV-TR criteria) were selected: 15 patients were treated with bupropion 150 mg/per day, and 15 with sertraline 200 mg/per day. During the screening and control visits (2°-6°-14°-24° week), the selected patients were first weighed and then evaluated using the following questionnaires: Binge Eating Disorder-Clinical Interview (BEDCI), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), State-Trait Anxiety Inventory X (STAI-X) and Arizona Sexual Experience Scale (ASEX). Both drugs reduced anxious-depressive symptoms and binge frequency: Bupropion showed a better effectiveness in reducing weight and improving sexual performances; weight loss related to it was proportional to the body mass index. Bupropion may be associated with more weight loss in BED, depressed patients than sertraline.

  8. Executive function and depressive symptoms of retardation in nonelderly stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Sobreiro, Matildes F M; Miotto, Eliane Correa; Terroni, Luisa; Tinone, Gisela; Iosifescu, Dan V; de Lucia, Mara C S; Scaff, Milberto; Leite, Claudia da Costa; Amaro, Edson; Fraguas, Renerio

    2014-01-01

    The depression-executive dysfunction syndrome, a late-onset depression of vascular origin with executive dysfunction and psychomotor retardation, has also been described after stroke. We verified whether this syndrome also occurs in nonelderly stroke patients by investigating the association between domains of depressive symptoms with executive functions in 87 first-ever ischemic stroke patients. The retardation domain of the 31-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression was associated with decreased performance on verbal fluency (assessed with FAS). The association was maintained for younger patients (aged <60 years) after adjusting for confounders. This result supports the clinical presentation of depression-executive dysfunction syndrome in younger stroke patients. Confirmation of this finding, its neural correlates, and clinical implication deserve further investigation.

  9. Depression Dimensions: Integrating Clinical Signs and Symptoms from the Perspectives of Clinicians and Patients

    PubMed Central

    Vares, Edgar Arrua; Salum, Giovanni Abrahão; Spanemberg, Lucas; Caldieraro, Marco Antônio; Fleck, Marcelo P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Several studies have recognized that depression is a multidimensional construct, although the scales that are currently available have been shown to be limited in terms of the ability to investigate the multidimensionality of depression. The objective of this study is to integrate information from instruments that measure depression from different perspectives–a self-report symptomatic scale, a clinician-rated scale, and a clinician-rated scale of depressive signs–in order to investigate the multiple dimensions underlying the depressive construct. Methods A sample of 399 patients from a mood disorders outpatient unit was investigated with the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS), and the Core Assessment of Psychomotor Change (CORE). Exploratory Factor Analysis (EFA) and Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA) were used to investigate underlying dimensions of depression, including item level analysis with factor loadings and item thresholds. Results A solution of six depression dimensions has shown good-fit to the data, with no cross-loading items, and good interpretability. Item-level analysis revealed that the multidimensional depressive construct might be organized into a continuum of severity in the following ascending order: sexual, cognitive, insomnia, appetite, non-interactiveness/motor retardation, and agitation. Conclusion An integration of both signs and symptoms, as well as the perspectives of clinicians and patients, might be a good clinical and research alternative for the investigation of multidimensional issues within the depressive syndrome. As predicted by theoretical models of depression, the melancholic aspects of depression (non-interactiveness/motor retardation and agitation) lie at the severe end of the depressive continuum. PMID:26313556

  10. Low-income cancer patients in depression treatment: dropouts and completers.

    PubMed

    Wells, Anjanette A; Palinkas, Lawrence A; Shon, En-Jung; Ell, Kathleen

    2013-10-01

    This study aims to explore reasons for depression treatment dropout among low-income, minority women with depression and cancer. Semi-structured telephone interviews are conducted with 20, predominately Latina, patients who dropped out of depression treatment and 10 who completed. Transcripts analyzed using techniques rooted in grounded theory. Treatment completion barriers cluster according to Meichenbaum and Turk's (Facilitating treatment adherence: A practitioner's guidebook, Plenum Press, New York, 1987) five adherence dimensions: (a) Barriers to Treatment (informational, instrumental, cultural [language, discrimination]); (b) Disease Features (emotional burden of cancer/depression); (c) Cancer/Depression Treatment Regimens; (d) Provider-Patient Relationship (depression treatment dissatisfaction); and (e) Clinical Setting (hospital organizational issues). Although both groups describe multiple overlapping dimensions of barriers, completers seem more motivated and satisfied with treatment, possibly due to completers experiencing the positive treatment effects after the first several sessions. More research should be conducted to determine the most effective clinical treatment methods for this population.

  11. Identifying anxiety and depressive disorders among primary care patients: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    el-Rufaie, O E; Albar, A A; Al-Dabal, B K

    1988-03-01

    One stage case-identification method, using the Arabic Version of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HAD) was applied in a pilot study for estimating the prevalence of depressive and anxiety disorders among a group of Saudi primary care attenders. The validity of the Arabic Version of the HAD scale was previously tested and found valid with high sensitivity and specificity. The total prevalence rate of depression was 17% and that of anxiety was 16%. Seven percent of the sample suffered both depression and anxiety i.e. the total percentage of patients with depression, anxiety or both was 26%. Higher morbidity of depression was recorded among females and a higher morbidity of anxiety among male patients.

  12. Stressful life events and depressive symptoms among symptomatic long QT syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    Hintsa, Taina; Jokela, Markus; Elovainio, Marko; Määttänen, Ilmari; Swan, Heikki; Hintsanen, Mirka; Toivonen, Lauri; Kontula, Kimmo; Keltikangas-Järvinen, Liisa

    2016-04-01

    We examined whether long QT syndrome status moderates the association between stressful life events and depressive symptoms. Participants were 562 (n= 246 symptomatic) long QT syndrome mutation carriers. Depressive symptoms were measured with a modified version of the Beck's Depression Inventory. There was an interaction between long QT syndrome status and stressful life events on depressive symptoms. In the symptomatic long QT syndrome patients, stressful life events were associated with depressive symptoms (B= 0.24, p< 0.001). In the asymptomatic long QT syndrome mutation carriers, this association was 62.5 percent weaker (B= 0.09, p= 0.057). Compared to asymptomatic long QT syndrome mutation carriers, symptomatic long QT syndrome patients are more sensitive to the depressive effects of stressful life events.

  13. The contribution of attachment security and social support to depressive symptoms in patients with metastatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Rodin, Gary; Walsh, Andrew; Zimmermann, Camilla; Gagliese, Lucia; Jones, Jennifer; Shepherd, Frances A; Moore, Malcolm; Braun, Michal; Donner, Allan; Mikulincer, Mario

    2007-12-01

    The present study examines the association between disease-related factors, perceived social support, attachment security (i.e. attachment anxiety and avoidance), and the occurrence of depressive symptoms in a sample of patients with metastatic gastrointestinal or lung cancer. Results from a sample of 326 cancer outpatients with advanced disease indicate that disease-related factors are significantly associated with the occurrence of depressive symptoms, and the latter are inversely related to the degree of attachment anxiety and avoidance, and perceived social support. Attachment security (on the dimension of anxious attachment) significantly buffered the effect of disease-related factors on depressive symptoms, and perceived social support mediated the relationship between attachment security and depressive symptoms. The buffering effect of attachment security on depressive symptoms and its partial mediation through social support suggest that the interaction of individual, social, and disease-related factors contribute to the emergence of depressive symptoms in patients with metastatic cancer.

  14. Abdominal ultrasound in patients with acute right upper quadrant pain.

    PubMed

    Philbrick, T H; Kaude, J V; McInnis, A N; Wright, P G

    1981-01-01

    Ultrasonography was performed as the first imaging procedure in 100 patients who presented with acute right upper quadrant pain suggestive of cholecystitis or cholelithiasis. In the final analysis 46 patients were found to have gallbladder disease (40 patients with cholelithiasis, 5 with acalculous cholecystitis, and 1 with a cholesterol polyp in the gallbladder). In 22 of 54 patients with a normal gallbladder, other abdominal disease was found. The error rate for ultrasound was 5%, and in 4 patients ultrasound was not the suitable procedure for the diagnosis. In 91 patients the ultrasonographic diagnosis was correct.

  15. Trajectories of depressive symptoms in patients undergoing interferon treatment are predicted by baseline sleep quality

    PubMed Central

    Marron, Megan M.; Anderson, Stewart J.; Garrity, Jessica; Reynolds, Charles F.; Lotrich, Francis E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Some patients with hepatitis C (HCV) starting interferon-α (IFN-α) experience depression, although many patients do not develop depressive symptoms. We have found that poor sleep is associated with increased depressive symptoms on average. It is unknown whether this association holds generally or is driven by a specific, distinct subgroup. This investigation first determined whether patterns of change in depressive symptoms form clinically meaningful, distinct sub-groups; and then tested the extent to which sleep disturbances are associated with a less favorable depression trajectory. Method Group-based trajectory modeling was used on 124 HCV patients who started IFN-α therapy. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) assessed pre-treatment sleep, the Beck Depression Inventory minus the sleep question (BDI-s) assessed depression over time, and the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV provided categorical diagnoses. Results Three distinct subgroups were found, where each subgroup shared similar patterns of depressive symptoms over time. The groups were characterized as “non-depressed”, “slow increase”, and “rapid increase”. The non-depressed subgroup (44.4%) experienced low depressive symptoms with little change over time. In comparison, all rapid increasers (11.3%) were diagnosed with a mood disorder by 12 weeks of treatment. The PSQI was strongly associated with group membership,. where the odds of developing a rapid increase was elevated 39% for every unit score increase in the PSQI compared to individuals who remained non-depressed (OR=1.39, 95%CI=1.07–1.80, adjusted for depression at baseline). Conclusion Only a distinct sub-population of people is notably vulnerable to a developing a rapid increase in depression symptoms during IFN-α therapy. This group may be identifiable by their markedly poor sleep prior to IFN-α therapy. PMID:26407225

  16. Spanish consensus on the physical health of patients with depressive disorders.

    PubMed

    Giner, José; Saiz Ruiz, Jerónimo; Bobes, Julio; Zamorano, Enric; López, Francisco; Hernando, Teresa; Rico-Villademoros, Fernando; Álamo, Cecilio; Cervilla, Jorge A; Ibáñez Cuadrado, Ángela; Ibáñez Guerra, Elena; López, Silvia; Morán, Pedro; Palao, Diego J; Romacho, Montserrat

    2014-01-01

    Comorbidity between depression and physical illnesses is very common and has a significant impact on the health and management of the patient. With the support of the Sociedades Españolas de Psiquiatría y Psiquiatría Biológica, and Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN) a consensus was prepared on physical health in patients with depression and is summarized in the present work. The literature review highlighted the high frequency of cardiovascular and endocrine-metabolic disorders in patients with depression such as diabetes and obesity, thus making the primary and secondary prevention recommendations for patients with cardiovascular or metabolic risk applicable to patients with depression. Comorbidity between depression and chronic pain is also frequent, and requires an integrated therapeutic approach. The presence of physical illness in patients with depression may condition, but not preclude, the pharmacological treatment; drug selection should take into account potential side-effect and drug-drug interactions. On the other hand, psychotherapy may contribute to the patient's recovery. Overall, coordination between the primary care physician, the psychiatrist and other health professionals involved is essential for the management of patients with depression and concomitant physical illness.

  17. Development of a Korean Version of the Perceived Deficits Questionnaire-Depression for Patients with Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae-Min; Hong, Jin-Pyo; Kim, Sang-Dae; Kang, Hee-Ju; Lee, Yong-Sung

    2016-01-01

    Objective Cognitive symptoms are an important component of depression and the Perceived Deficits Questionnaire-Depression is one of only a few instruments available for the subjective assessment of cognitive dysfunction in depression. Thus, the present study aimed to validate a Korean version of the PDQ-D (K-PDQ-D) using patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). Methods This study included 128 MDD patients who were assessed at study entry and 86 of these patients were then completed 12 weeks of antidepressant monotherapy. All subjects were assessed with the K-PDQ-D, the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS), the Sheehan Disability Scale (SDS), the EuroQol-5 dimensions questionnaire (EQ-5D), and the number of sick leave days taken in the previous week. The internal consistency, Guttman’s split-half and test-retest reliabilities, factorial analyses, and concurrent and predictive validities of the K-PDQ-D were investigated. Results The K-PDQ-D exhibited excellent internal consistency and reliabilities, and was composed of four factors with high coefficients of determination. The concurrent validity analyses revealed that the K-PDQ-D scores were significantly correlated with the MADRS, SDS, and EQ-5D scores and the number of sick leave days taken. The K-PDQ-D scores at study entry significantly predicted changes in sick leave days and EQ-5D score from study entry to the 12-week endpoint. Conclusion The newly developed K-PDQ-D is a reliable and valid instrument for the evaluation of subjective cognitive symptoms in MDD patients. The K-PDQ-D may assist in the gathering of unique information regarding subjective cognitive complaints, which is important for the comprehensive evaluation of patients with MDD. PMID:26792037

  18. Factors associated with study completion in patients with premature acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Background Factors associated with study completion in younger adults are not well understood. This study sought to describe psychosocial, clinical, and demographic features associated with completion of a study of men and women with premature acute coronary syndrome. Methods As part of the GENdEr and Sex determInantS of cardiovascular disease: From bench to beyond-Premature Acute Coronary Syndrome (GENESIS-PRAXY) study, demographic, psychosocial, and clinical variables were assessed in 1213 patients hospitalized for acute coronary syndrome (≤ 55 years; 30% women). Patients were followed for 12 months. Dropouts withdrew from the study or were lost to follow-up after 12 months; completers were still enrolled after 12 months. Results Of 1213 patients initially enrolled, 777 (64.1%) completed 12-month follow-up. Fully adjusted models suggested that being older (OR = 1.04, 95% CI [1.01, 1.06]), higher subjective social status within one’s country (OR = 1.11, 95% CI [1.01, 1.22]), being free of type II diabetes, (OR = 0.66, 95% CI [0.45, 0.97]), non-smoking status (OR = 0.70, 95% CI [0.51, 0.95]) and being free of depression (OR = 1.52, 95% CI [1.11, 2.07]) were independently associated with study completion. Conclusions Recruitment/retention strategies targeting individuals who smoke, are younger, have low subjective social status within one’s country, have diabetes, or have depression may improve participant follow-up in cardiovascular cohort studies. PMID:28301532

  19. Successful selective arterial thrombolysis in patient with acute abdominal thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Tsekov, Christo; Loukova, Anelia; Gelev, Valeri

    2016-06-01

    The paper reports successful thrombolysis conducted in 64 years old woman admitted to the clinic with clinical and angiographic data for acute surgical abdomen caused by acute tromboembolia of arteria mesenterica superior (AMS). The therapeutic approach required to undertake lifesaving decision on i.e. surgical vs. invasive treatment in conditions of emergency. Finally, it was decided to undertake invasive treatment with successful restoration of blood flow in the related artery. The patient was discharged from the clinic with considerable clinical improvement on the fifth day of her stay. The case report includes discussion on issues relating the consequence of the diagnostic and interventional procedures in such patients, opportunities for conducting emergency thrombolysis in acute embolia of AMS and preventive measures in patients with high tromboembolic risk.

  20. The relationship between anxiety, depression and illness perception in tberculosis patients in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Objective As the rates of TB world over have increased during the past 10 years, there has been a growing awareness of depression and its role in the outcome of chronic disorders. Though depression is common in patients with TB no study as yet has examined the prevalence of depression in this group in Pakistan. We aimed to determine the presence of depression, anxiety and illness perceptions in patients suffering from Tuberculosis (TB) in Pakistan. Methods 108 consecutive outpatients with tuberculosis completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale (HADS) and the Illness Perception Questionnaire (IPQ). Results Out of 108 patients, 50 (46.3%) were depressed and 51 (47.2%) had anxiety. Raised depression and anxiety scores were associated with an increase in the number of symptoms reported (HADS Depression: r = 0.346, p = < 0.001), more serious perceived consequences (HADS Depression: r = 0.279, p = 0.004, HADS Anxiety: r = 0.234, p = 0.017) and less control over their illness (HADS Depression: r = 0.239, p = 0.014, HADS Anxiety: r = 0.271, p = 0.005). Conclusion We found that about a half of patients in our sample met the criteria for probable depression and anxiety based on HADS score. Negative illness perceptions were clearly related to reports of mood symptoms. As depression and lack of perceived control over illness in those suffering from tuberculosis are reported to be independent predictors of poor adherence further studies to investigate their relationship with medication adherence are required. PMID:18302758

  1. Unexplained Painful Physical Symptoms in Patients with Major Depressive Disorder: Prevalence, Pathophysiology and Management.

    PubMed

    Jaracz, Jan; Gattner, Karolina; Jaracz, Krystyna; Górna, Krystyna

    2016-04-01

    Patients with major depression often report pain. In this article, we review the current literature regarding the prevalence and consequences, as well as the pathophysiology, of unexplained painful physical symptoms (UPPS) in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). UPPS are experienced by approximately two-thirds of depressed patients. The presence of UPPS makes a correct diagnosis of depression more difficult. Moreover, UPPS are a predictor of a poor response to treatment and a more chronic course of depression. Pain, in the course of depression, also has a negative impact on functioning and quality of life. Frequent comorbidity of depression and UPPS has inspired the formulation of an hypothesis regarding a shared neurobiological mechanism of both conditions. Evidence from neuroimaging studies has shown that frontal-limbic dysfunction in depression may explain abnormal pain processing, leading to the presence of UPPS. Increased levels of proinflamatory cytokines and substance P in patients with MDD may also clarify the pathophysiology of UPPS. Finally, dysfunction of the descending serotonergic and noradrenergic pathways that normally suppress ascending sensations has been proposed as a core mechanism of UPPS. Psychological factors such as catastrophizing also play a role in both depression and chronic pain. Therefore, pharmacological treatment and/or cognitive therapy are recommended in the treatment of depression with UPPS. Some data suggest that serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) are more effective than selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in the alleviation of depression and UPPS. However, the pooled analysis of eight randomised clinical trials showed similar efficacy of duloxetine (an SNRI) and paroxetine (an SSRI) in reducing UPPS in depression. Further integrative studies examining genetic factors (e.g. polymorphisms of genes for interleukins, serotonin transporter and receptors), molecular factors (e.g. cytokines

  2. Burden of respiratory viruses in patients with acute respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Schnell, David; Gits-Muselli, Maud; Canet, Emmanuel; Lemiale, Virginie; Schlemmer, Benoît; Simon, François; Azoulay, Elie; Legoff, Jérôme

    2014-07-01

    Respiratory viruses (RVs) are ubiquitous pathogens that represent a major cause of community-acquired pneumonia and chronic pulmonary diseases exacerbations. However, their contribution to acute respiratory failure events requiring intensive care unit admission in the era of rapid multiplex molecular assay deserves further evaluation. This study investigated the burden of viral infections in non immunocompromised patients admitted to the intensive care unit for acute respiratory failure using a multiplex molecular assay. Patients were investigated for RVs using immunofluoresence testing and a commercial multiplex molecular assay, and for bacteria using conventional culture. Half the patients (34/70, 49%) had a documented RVs infection. No other pathogen was found in 24 (71%) patients. Viral infection was detected more frequently in patients with obstructive respiratory diseases (64% vs. 29%; P = 0.0075). Multiplex molecular assay should be considered as an usefull diagnostic tool in patients admitted to the intensive care unit with acute respiratory failure, especially those with acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma.

  3. Effect of 3 weeks treatment with yohimbine on salivary secretion in healthy volunteers and in depressed patients treated with tricyclic antidepressants.

    PubMed Central

    Bagheri, H; Schmitt, L; Berlan, M; Montastruc, J L

    1992-01-01

    The effect of yohimbine treatment (4 mg three times daily) for 3 weeks on salivary secretion was investigated. In healthy volunteers, acute administration of yohimbine increased salivary volume within 1 h to a similar extent before and at the end of the treatment period. In depressed patients treated with tricyclic antidepressants (and exhibiting a reduced salivary flow), yohimbine also acutely increased salivary volume. In contrast, the alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonist failed to modify resting values measured in the morning (i.e. 10 and 14 h after the last administration in healthy volunteers and depressed patients respectively). This result indicates that alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonists may have a potential therapeutic use in the treatment of dry mouth caused by tricyclic antidepressant drugs. PMID:1362888

  4. Depression and anxiety in patients with hematological malignancies, prevalence, and associated factors

    PubMed Central

    Abuelgasim, Khadega A.; Ahmed, Gasmelseed Y.; Alqahtani, Jamilah A.; Alayed, Aseel M.; Alaskar, Ahmed S.; Malik, Mansoor A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To study the prevalence and associated factors of depression and anxiety in hematological cancers (HC) patients. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional survey in all HC patients at King Abdulaziz Medical City (KAMC), Riyadh, Saudi Arabia between March 2014 and June 2015. We excluded patients with depression, or generalized anxiety disorder. We conducted a structured face to face interview using an internally developed and validated questionnaire (Patient Health Questionnaire-9 and Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 patient’s questionnaire with all participants). Results: Among 211 participants, depression was detected in 98 (46.5%) and anxiety was detected in 47 (22.3%). Thirty-eight (18.1%) had concurrent anxiety and depression. Multiple co-morbidities and tense home atmosphere were predictive for anxiety and depression. We found no association between gender, smoking, income, or being on active therapy and depression or anxiety. Conclusions: Depression and anxiety are highly prevalent in HC patients in KAMC. Health care providers should screen HC cancers for depression and anxiety; as early intervention possibly improve their disease outcome and will likely enhance their psychological wellbeing. PMID:27464865

  5. Anxiety and depression in patients with advanced macular degeneration: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Cimarolli, Verena R; Casten, Robin J; Rovner, Barry W; Heyl, Vera; Sörensen, Silvia; Horowitz, Amy

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) – despite advances in prevention and medical treatment options – remains prevalent among older adults, often resulting in functional losses that negatively affect the mental health of older adults. In particular, the prevalence of both anxiety and depression in patients with AMD is high. Along with medical treatment options, low vision rehabilitation and AMD-specific behavioral and self-management programs have been developed and have demonstrated effectiveness in improving the mental health of AMD patients. This article reviews the prevalence of anxiety and depression in patients with advanced AMD, discusses potential mechanisms accounting for the development of depression and anxiety in AMD patients, presents the state-of the-art of available interventions for addressing anxiety and depression in AMD patients, and delineates recommendations for eye care professionals regarding how to screen for these two prevalent mental health problems and how to facilitate appropriate treatment for patients with AMD. PMID:26766899

  6. [Evaluation of depressive symptoms and resilience in patients on pharmacotherapeutic follow-up].

    PubMed

    Gomes, N C; Abrão, P H O; Fernandes, M R; Beijo, L A; Marques, L A M

    2017-03-07

    This study aimed to carry out the pharmacotherapeutic follow-up of patients with depression and to assess its impact on the resilience of the patients. Patients were followed-up for 8 months. The pharmacist evaluated depressive symptoms, resilience, and the need for pharmaceutical intervention. The measurement tools used were the Dader method, PHQ-9, and a resilience scale. Data were analysed using BioStat 5.0 software and the performing of the Wilcoxon and Pearson correlation tests. There was a reduction in the rate of depressive symptoms from 12.9 to 5.2 (P<.0001), and an increase in the resilience score from 112.4 to 149.0 (P<.0001). Pharmaceutical interventions were made to resolve the drug related problems in the form of oral communication between pharmacist-patient or pharmacist-patient-doctor. The pharmaceutical care was effective in decreasing depression and contributed to the increased resilience of patients.

  7. Endovascular treatment for acute pulmonary embolism in neurological patient

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Gunchan; Paul, Birinder S; Gautam, Parshotam L; Mohan, Bishav; Sharma, Shruti

    2015-01-01

    Among the spectrum of venous thrombo-embolic disease, acute pulmonary embolism accounts for the most life threatening manifestations with mortality exceeding 50%. It can affect many patient populations across various disciplines, hence immediate attention and aggressive treatment is crucial. With the advancement of technologies, various catheter-based devices are available to treat massive or submassive PE. In this paper we report two patients of acute pulmonary embolism with neurological issues where the life threatening emergency was successfully managed by utilizing endovascular directed thrombolytic reperfusion therapy. PMID:26609298

  8. Depression and Insomnia in Patients With Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis Taking Tumor Necrosis Factor Antagonists.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chun-Ying; Chang, Yun-Ting; Juan, Chao-Kuei; Shen, Jui-Lung; Lin, Yu-Pu; Shieh, Jeng-Jer; Liu, Han-Nan; Chen, Yi-Ju

    2016-05-01

    Psoriasis patients with moderate to severe disease often present with depression and insomnia. Treatment targeting both psoriasis and psychological comorbidities is needed to improve the quality of life of these patients.In this nationwide cohort study, a total of 980 patients with psoriatic arthritis or psoriasis who had received nonbiological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs and biologics therapy between 2009 and 2012 were identified. The prevalence rates of patients taking medications for depression and insomnia were compared before and after biologics therapy. Logistic regression method was used to investigate the risk factors for depression and insomnia. Further stratified analyses were performed to examine the prevalence of use of medications for depression and insomnia among different patient subgroups.The prevalence of patients taking regular antidepressants before starting biologics therapy was about 20%. There was a more than 40% reduction in this prevalence after biologics therapy for 2 years. Age higher than 45 years, female sex, presence of comorbidities, and psoriatic arthritis were independently associated with depression and insomnia. Further stratified analyses revealed a more rapid and significant reduction in depression/insomnia in those undergoing continuous biologics therapy, younger than 45 years, without psoriatic arthritis and not taking concomitant methotrexate, when compared with their counterparts.The results suggest that biologics therapy may be associated with reduced rates of depression and insomnia, and a reduced rate of regular antidepressants use in psoriasis patients.

  9. Neurocognition in depression: patients on and off medication versus healthy comparison subjects.

    PubMed

    Gualtieri, C Thomas; Johnson, Lynda G; Benedict, Kenneth B

    2006-01-01

    Patients with depression have neuropsychological deficits in attention, memory, psychomotor speed, processing speed, and executive function. It is not clear, however, whether neurocognition in depression is impaired in a global or nonspecific way or if specific cognitive domains are selectively impaired. This naturalistic cross-sectional study employed a computerized neurocognitive screening battery to evaluate 38 depressed, drug-free patients, compared to 31 patients who responded to antidepressant monotherapy and to 69 healthy comparison subjects. There was evidence for global neuropsychological impairment in untreated depressed patients. In patients who had been successfully treated, performance was improved but not normalized. There was also evidence for specific depression-related deficits in executive function and processing speed but not in memory, psychomotor speed, or reaction time. Although depressed patients have global neurocognitive impairments, deficits in certain cognitive domains are more important than in others. In particular, impairments are noted in tests of executive control and in tests that demand effortful attention. Information processing speed is also impaired but not reaction time. Computerized testing in the clinic setting demonstrates a range of neurocognitive problems in patients with depression. These problems may have a bearing on treatment and outcome.

  10. Depression and Insomnia in Patients With Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis Taking Tumor Necrosis Factor Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chun-Ying; Chang, Yun-Ting; Juan, Chao-Kuei; Shen, Jui-Lung; Lin, Yu-Pu; Shieh, Jeng-Jer; Liu, Han-Nan; Chen, Yi-Ju

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Psoriasis patients with moderate to severe disease often present with depression and insomnia. Treatment targeting both psoriasis and psychological comorbidities is needed to improve the quality of life of these patients. In this nationwide cohort study, a total of 980 patients with psoriatic arthritis or psoriasis who had received nonbiological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs and biologics therapy between 2009 and 2012 were identified. The prevalence rates of patients taking medications for depression and insomnia were compared before and after biologics therapy. Logistic regression method was used to investigate the risk factors for depression and insomnia. Further stratified analyses were performed to examine the prevalence of use of medications for depression and insomnia among different patient subgroups. The prevalence of patients taking regular antidepressants before starting biologics therapy was about 20%. There was a more than 40% reduction in this prevalence after biologics therapy for 2 years. Age higher than 45 years, female sex, presence of comorbidities, and psoriatic arthritis were independently associated with depression and insomnia. Further stratified analyses revealed a more rapid and significant reduction in depression/insomnia in those undergoing continuous biologics therapy, younger than 45 years, without psoriatic arthritis and not taking concomitant methotrexate, when compared with their counterparts. The results suggest that biologics therapy may be associated with reduced rates of depression and insomnia, and a reduced rate of regular antidepressants use in psoriasis patients. PMID:27258525

  11. Lactate and lactate clearance in acute cardiac care patients

    PubMed Central

    Lazzeri, Chiara; Picariello, Claudio; Dini, Carlotta Sorini; Gensini, Gian Franco; Valente, Serafina

    2012-01-01

    Hyperlactataemia is commonly used as a diagnostic and prognostic tool in intensive care settings. Recent studies documented that serial lactate measurements over time (or lactate clearance), may be clinically more reliable than lactate absolute value for risk stratification in different pathological conditions. While the negative prognostic role of hyperlactataemia in several critical ill diseases (such as sepsis and trauma) is well established, data in patients with acute cardiac conditions (i.e. acute coronary syndromes) are scarce and controversial. The present paper provides an overview of the current available evidence on the clinical role of lactic acid levels and lactate clearance in acute cardiac settings (acute coronary syndromes, cardiogenic shock, cardiac surgery), focusing on its prognostic role. PMID:24062898

  12. Prevalence and predictors of depression in Iranian patients with multiple sclerosis: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Seyed Saadat, Seyed Mohammad; Hosseininezhad, Mozaffar; Bakhshayesh, Babak; Seyed Saadat, Seyedeh Nastaran; Nabizadeh, Seyedeh Parand

    2014-05-01

    Depression is a frequent symptom in multiple sclerosis (MS) which has a negative impact on quality of life and cognitive status. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence and associated factors of depression, and status of antidepressant use in Iranian MS patients. One-hundred and sixty patients with definite MS were included. Demographic and clinical characteristics were recorded. Fatigue and depression were evaluated using the fatigue severity scale and Beck depression inventory-II. Cognitive performance and disability were examined by mini-mental status examination and expanded disability status scale. Multiple logistic regressions were used to determine the associated factors of depression and antidepressant use. The prevalence of depression and severe depression was 59.4 and 18.1 %, respectively. However, only 21.1 % of patients were on antidepressant treatment, while the prevalence of unrecognized/untreated depression was found to be as high as 44.1 %. Multivariable analysis showed that fatigue (P < 0.0001, OR = 5.98, 95 % CI = 2.9-12.3) and older age (P = 0.027, OR = 2.24, 95 % CI = 1.09-4.6) were associated with depression in MS patient. A significant association was found between fatigue and antidepressant use (P = 0.001, OR = 6.81, 95 % CI = 2.26-20.48). Our findings demonstrate that depression is significantly associated with fatigue and older age, regardless of other factors. Moreover, despite the high prevalence of depression in MS, most patients do not receive adequate treatment.

  13. A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Pilot Study of Quetiapine-XR Monotherapy or Adjunctive Therapy to Antidepressant in Acute Major Depressive Disorder with Current Generalized Anxiety Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ranran; Wu, Renrong; Chen, Jun; Kemp, David E.; Ren, Ming; Conroy, Carla; Chan, Philip; Serrano, Mary Beth; Ganocy, Stephen J.; Calabrese, Joseph R.; Gao, Keming

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To pilot efficacy and safety data of quetiapine-XR monotherapy or adjunctive therapy to antidepressant(s) in the acute treatment of MDD with current generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). Methods The Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview was used to ascertain the diagnosis of DSM-IV Axis I disorders. Eligible patients were randomly assigned to quetiapine-XR or placebo for up to 8 weeks. Changes from baseline to endpoint in Hamilton Depression Rating Scale-17 items (HAMD-17), Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HAM-A), Clinical Global Impression-Severity (CGI-S), Quick Inventory of Depression Symptomatology-16 items Self-Report (QIDS-16-SR) total scores, and other outcome measures were analyzed with the last observation carried forward strategy and/or mixed-effects modeling for repeated measures. Results Of the 34 patients screened, 23 patients were randomized to receive quetiapine-XR (n = 11) or placebo (n = 12), with 5 and 4 completing the study, respectively. The mean dose of quetiapine-XR was 154 ± 91 mg/d. The change from baseline to endpoint in the total scores of HAMD-17, HAM-A, QIDS-16-SR, and CGI-S were significant in the quetiapine-XR group, but only the change in HAM-A total score was significant in the placebo group. The differences in these changes between the two groups were only significant in CGI-S scores, with the rest of numerical larger in the quetiapine-XR group. The most common side effects from quetiapine-XR were dry mouth, somnolence/sedation, and fatigue. Conclusions In this pilot study, quetiapine-XR was numerically superior to placebo in reducing depressive and anxiety symptoms in patients with MDD and current GAD. Large sample studies are warranted to support or refute these preliminary findings. PMID:27738370

  14. Anxiety and Depression Among Patients With Different Types of Vestibular Peripheral Vertigo

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Qing; Yu, Lisheng; Shi, Dongmei; Ke, Xingxing; Zhang, Hua

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Numerous studies have been published on comorbid anxiety and depression in patients with vertigo. However, very few studies have separately described and analyzed anxiety or depression in patients with different types of vestibular peripheral vertigo. The present study investigated anxiety and depression among patients with 4 different types of peripheral vertigo. A total of 129 patients with 4 types of peripheral vertigo, namely, benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV, n = 49), migrainous vertigo (MV, n = 37), Menière disease (MD, n = 28), and vestibular neuritis (VN, n = 15), were included in the present study. Otological and neurootological examinations were carefully performed, and self-rating anxiety scale and self-rating depression scale were used to evaluate anxiety and depression. Patients were divided into 2 groups, according to the vestibular function: normal and abnormal vestibular function. There was no significant difference in the risk of anxiety/depression between these 2 groups. However, for patients with the 4 different vertigo types, the prevalence of anxiety (MV = 45.9%, MD = 50%) and depression (MV = 27%, MD = 28.6%) was significantly higher in the patients with MV or MD than those with BPPV or VN (P < 0.05). Vestibular function is not significantly associated with the risk of anxiety/depression. Anxiety/depression is more common in patients with MV or MD than those with BPPV or VN. This may be due to the different mechanisms involved in these 4 types of vertigo, as well as differences in the prevention and self-control of the patients against the vertigo. PMID:25654382

  15. Anxiety and depression among patients with different types of vestibular peripheral vertigo.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Qing; Yu, Lisheng; Shi, Dongmei; Ke, Xingxing; Zhang, Hua

    2015-02-01

    Numerous studies have been published on comorbid anxiety and depression in patients with vertigo. However, very few studies have separately described and analyzed anxiety or depression in patients with different types of vestibular peripheral vertigo. The present study investigated anxiety and depression among patients with 4 different types of peripheral vertigo. A total of 129 patients with 4 types of peripheral vertigo, namely, benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV, n = 49), migrainous vertigo (MV, n = 37), Menière disease (MD, n = 28), and vestibular neuritis (VN, n = 15), were included in the present study. Otological and neurootological examinations were carefully performed, and self-rating anxiety scale and self-rating depression scale were used to evaluate anxiety and depression. Patients were divided into 2 groups, according to the vestibular function: normal and abnormal vestibular function. There was no significant difference in the risk of anxiety/depression between these 2 groups. However, for patients with the 4 different vertigo types, the prevalence of anxiety (MV = 45.9%, MD = 50%) and depression (MV = 27%, MD = 28.6%) was significantly higher in the patients with MV or MD than those with BPPV or VN (P < 0.05). Vestibular function is not significantly associated with the risk of anxiety/depression. Anxiety/depression is more common in patients with MV or MD than those with BPPV or VN. This may be due to the different mechanisms involved in these 4 types of vertigo, as well as differences in the prevention and self-control of the patients against the vertigo.

  16. Invasive coronary angiography in patients with acute exacerbated COPD and elevated plasma troponin

    PubMed Central

    Pizarro, Carmen; Herweg-Steffens, Neele; Buchenroth, Martin; Schulte, Wolfgang; Schaefer, Christian; Hammerstingl, Christoph; Werner, Nikos; Nickenig, Georg; Skowasch, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Background In acute exacerbation of COPD, increased plasma levels of cardiac troponin are frequent and associated with increased mortality. Thus, we aimed at prospectively determining the diagnostic value of coronary angiography in patients with exacerbated COPD and concomitantly elevated cardiac troponin. Patients and methods A total of 88 patients (mean age 72.9±9.2 years, 56.8% male) hospitalized for acute exacerbation of COPD with elevated plasma troponin were included. All patients underwent coronary angiography within 72 hours after hospitalization. Complementary 12-lead electrocardiogram, transthoracic echocardiography, pulmonary function, and angiological testing were performed. Results Coronary angiography objectified the presence of ischemic heart disease (IHD) in 59 patients (67.0%), of whom 34 patients (38.6% of total study population) underwent percutaneous coronary intervention. Among these 34 intervened patients, the vast majority (n=26, 76.5%) had no previously known IHD, whereas only eight out of 34 patients (23.5%) presented an IHD history. Patients requiring coronary intervention showed significantly reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (45.8%±13.1% vs 55.1%±13.3%, P=0.01) and a significantly more frequent electrocardiographic ST-segment depression (20.6% vs 7.4%, P=0.01). Neither additional laboratory parameters for inflammation and myocardial injury nor lung functional measurements differed significantly between the groups. Conclusion Angiographically confirmed IHD that required revascularization occurred in 38.6% of exacerbated COPD patients with elevated cardiac troponin. In this considerable portion of patients, coronary angiography emerged to be of diagnostic and therapeutic value. PMID:27695304

  17. Circulating endothelial progenitor cells in Chinese patients with acute stroke.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wei-jun; Zhu, Ding-liang; Yang, Guo-yuan; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Hai-ya; Ji, Kai-da; Lu, Yi-ming; Gao, Ping-jin

    2009-04-01

    To test the hypothesis that a mobilization of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) occurs after acute cerebrovascular diseases, we evaluated the number of EPCs in the process of acute stroke. A total of 203 individuals were examined, including 100 patients with ischemic strokes, 36 patients with hemorrhagic strokes and 67 healthy controls. Ninety-eight patients were observed at days 1, 7, 14 and 28 after acute stroke. Circulating EPCs were defined by the surface markers CD133/KDR and analyzed by flow cytometry. Serum high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) concentrations were determined by particle-enhanced immunonephelometry using the N high sensitivity CRP Reagent. Patients with acute stroke had lower numbers of EPCs (0.037+/-0.001/100 peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PMNCs) vs. 0.06+/-0.002/100 PMNCs, P<0.05) and higher levels of serum hs-CRP (1.99 vs. 0.03 mg per 100 ml, P<0.05) than control subjects after adjusting for age, sex, body mass index (BMI) and blood pressure. There were no differences in EPCs counts or serum hs-CRP levels between patients with ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke. In univariate analyses, BMI, age, systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure, low-density lipoprotein (LDL), total cholesterol (T-cho), blood glucose and hs-CRP (P<0.001) were inversely correlated with EPCs counts. Multivariate analyses showed SBP and total cholesterol as independent predictors of EPCs levels. The number of EPCs gradually increased at day 7 after acute onset, remained elevated at day 14; and returned to baseline by day 28. Our results suggest a possible contribution of circulating EPCs in acute stroke. SBP and total cholesterol are independent factors of reduced EPCs numbers. A transient early increment of EPCs may result from the mobilization of EPCs in response to stroke stress.

  18. Cerebrospinal Fluid Proteome of Patients with Acute Lyme Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Angel, Thomas E.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Smith, Robert P.; Pasternack, Mark S.; Elias, Susan; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Shukla, Anil K.; Gilmore, Edward C.; McCarthy, Carol; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.

    2012-10-05

    Acute Lyme disease results from transmission of and infection by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi following a tick bite. During acute infection, bacteria can disseminate to the central nervous system (CNS) leading to the development of Lyme meningitis. Here we have analyzed pooled cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) allowing for a deep view into the proteome for a cohort of patients with early-disseminated Lyme disease and CSF inflammation leading to the identification of proteins that reflect host responses, which are distinct for subjects with acute Lyme disease. Additionally, we analyzed individual patient samples and quantified changes in protein abundance employing label-free quantitative mass spectrometry based methods. The measured changes in protein abundances reflect the impact of acute Lyme disease on the CNS as presented in CSF. We have identified 89 proteins that differ significantly in abundance in patients with acute Lyme disease. A number of the differentially abundant proteins have been found to be localized to brain synapse and thus constitute important leads for better understanding of the neurological consequence of disseminated Lyme disease.

  19. The geriatric patient: use of acute geriatrics units in the emergency care of elderly patients in France.

    PubMed

    Somme, D; Lazarovici, C; Dramé, M; Blanc, P; Lang, P O; Gauvain, J B; Voisin, T; Gonthier, R; De Wazières, B; Jeandel, C; Couturier, P; Blanchard, F; Saint-Jean, O

    2011-01-01

    We studied the factors influencing the choice of admission to Geriatrics units, instead of other acute hospital units after an emergency visit. We report the results from a cohort of 1283 randomly selected patients aged >75 years hospitalized in emergency and representative of the French University hospital system. All patients underwent geriatric assessment. Baseline characteristics of patients admitted to Geriatrics and other units were compared. A center effect influencing the use of Geriatrics units during emergencies was also investigated. Admission to a Geriatrics unit during the acute care episode occurred in 499 cases (40.3%). By multivariate analysis, 4 factors were related to admission to a Geriatrics unit: cognitive disorder: odds ratio (OR)=1.79 (1.38-2.32) (95% confidence interval=95% CI); "failure to thrive" syndrome OR=1.54 (1.01-2.35), depression: OR=1.42 (1.12-1.83) or loss of Activities of Daily Living (ADL): OR=1.35 (1.04-1.75). The emergency volume of the hospital was inversely related to the use of Geriatrics units, with high variation that could be explained by other unstudied factors. In the French University Emergency Healthcare system, the "geriatrics patient" is defined by the existence of cognitive disorder, psychological symptoms or installed loss of autonomy. Nevertheless, considerable nation-wide variation was observed underlining the need to clarify and reinforce this discipline in the emergency healthcare system.

  20. Resilience as a correlate of acute stress disorder symptoms in patients with acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Meister, Rebecca E; Weber, Tania; Princip, Mary; Schnyder, Ulrich; Barth, Jürgen; Znoj, Hansjörg; Schmid, Jean-Paul; von Känel, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Myocardial infarction (MI) may be experienced as a traumatic event causing acute stress disorder (ASD). This mental disorder has an impact on the daily life of patients and is associated with the development of post-traumatic stress disorder. Trait resilience has been shown to be a protective factor for post-traumatic stress disorder, but its association with ASD in patients with MI is elusive and was examined in this study. Methods We investigated 71 consecutive patients with acute MI within 48 h of having stable haemodynamic conditions established and for 3 months thereafter. All patients completed the Acute Stress Disorder Scale and the Resilience Scale to self-rate the severity of ASD symptoms and trait resilience, respectively. Results Hierarchical regression analysis showed that greater resilience was associated with lower symptoms of ASD independent of covariates (b=−0.22, p<0.05). Post hoc analysis revealed resilience level to be inversely associated with the ASD symptom clusters of re-experiencing (b=−0.05, p<0.05) and arousal (b=−0.09, p<0.05), but not with dissociation and avoidance. Conclusions The findings suggest that patients with acute MI with higher trait resilience experience relatively fewer symptoms of ASD during MI. Resilience was particularly associated with re-experiencing and arousal symptoms. Our findings contribute to a better understanding of resilience as a potentially important correlate of ASD in the context of traumatic situations such as acute MI. These results emphasise the importance of identifying patients with low resilience in medical settings and to offer them adequate support. PMID:26568834

  1. Rhythm and conduction analysis of patients with acute rheumatic fever.

    PubMed

    Balli, Sevket; Oflaz, Mehmet Burhan; Kibar, Ayse Esin; Ece, Ibrahim

    2013-02-01

    Various rhythm and conduction abnormalities can develop in acute rheumatic fever. This study investigated rhythm and conduction abnormalities in children with acute rheumatic fever using a standard 12-lead electrocardiogram and 24-h rhythm Holter recordings. This multicenter retrospective study, performed between August 2011 and March 2012, enrolled 73 consecutive children with acute rheumatic fever. Standard electrocardiography was used to measure PR and corrected QT intervals. Holter recordings were evaluated for all the patients, and 52 of the patients (71.2 %) had carditis that was either isolated or together with other major criteria. A positive correlation was detected between carditis and the mean PR interval on standard electrocardiography, but this was not significant (p > 0.05). Standard electrocardiography showed a significant positive correlation between PR and corrected QT intervals (p = 0.03; r = 0.55). Standard electrocardiography showed only three patients (4.2 %) with premature contractions, whereas 24-h electrocardiography showed 26 patients (35.6 %) with premature contractions. Carditis was positively correlated with premature contractions (p < 0.01; r = 0.57). One patient with junctional rhythm and one patient with left bundle block were detected by standard electrocardiography. Whereas some patients with carditis exhibited no arrhythmic evidence on standard electrocardiograms, complete atrioventricular block, supraventricular tachycardia, and Mobitz type 1 block were observed on 24-h Holter recordings. A positive correlation also was observed between the presence of premature contractions and serum levels of acute-phase reactants (p = 0.03; r = 0.62). These findings led to the conclusion that rhythm and conduction disorders in acute rheumatic fever are more common than previously thought.

  2. Comparative efficacy and acceptability of first-generation and second-generation antidepressants in the acute treatment of major depression: protocol for a network meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Salanti, Georgia; Atkinson, Lauren Z; Leucht, Stefan; Ruhe, Henricus G; Turner, Erick H; Chaimani, Anna; Ogawa, Yusuke; Takeshima, Nozomi; Hayasaka, Yu; Imai, Hissei; Shinohara, Kiyomi; Suganuma, Aya; Watanabe, Norio; Stockton, Sarah; Geddes, John R

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Many antidepressants are indicated for the treatment of major depression. Two network meta-analyses have provided the most comprehensive assessments to date, accounting for both direct and indirect comparisons; however, these reported conflicting interpretation of results. Here, we present a protocol for a systematic review and network meta-analysis aimed at updating the evidence base and comparing all second-generation as well as selected first-generation antidepressants in terms of efficacy and acceptability in the acute treatment of major depression. Methods and analysis We will include all randomised controlled trials reported as double-blind and comparing one active drug with another or with placebo in the acute phase treatment of major depression in adults. We are interested in comparing the following active agents: agomelatine, amitriptyline, bupropion, citalopram, clomipramine, desvenlafaxine, duloxetine, escitalopram, fluoxetine, fluvoxamine, levomilnacipran, milnacipran, mirtazapine, nefazodone, paroxetine, reboxetine, sertraline, trazodone, venlafaxine, vilazodone and vortioxetine. The main outcomes will be the proportion of patients who responded to or dropped out of the allocated treatment. Published and unpublished studies will be sought through relevant database searches, trial registries and websites; all reference selection and data extraction will be conducted by at least two independent reviewers. We will conduct a random effects network meta-analysis to synthesise all evidence for each outcome and obtain a comprehensive ranking of all treatments. To rank the various treatments for each outcome, we will use the surface under the cumulative ranking curve and the mean ranks. We will employ local as well as global methods to evaluate consistency. We will fit our model in a Bayesian framework using OpenBUGS, and produce results and various checks in Stata and R. We will also assess the quality of evidence contributing to network

  3. Smartphone-based ecological momentary assessment for Chinese patients with depression: An exploratory study in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Hung, Shan; Li, Min-Shan; Chen, Yen-Lin; Chiang, Jung-Hsien; Chen, Ying-Yeh; Hung, Galen Chin-Lun

    2016-10-01

    Mobile mental health has a potential to improve the recognition and management of Chinese patients with depression. Currently, evidence regarding ecological momentary assessment (EMA) for depressive disorder mostly originates from Western studies. Herein, we examined the validity of smartphone-based EMA for depression in Chinese patients and explored the determinants of use. A smartphone application, iHOPE, was used to perform daily EMA of depression, anxiety, sleep and cognitive performance. Outpatients with depressive disorder were recruited to use iHOPE for 8 weeks. Clinical characteristics and smartphone use patterns were assessed at baseline. We enrolled 59 Chinese patients with depression. In 8 weeks, participants interacted with iHOPE for an average of 10.8 (SD=12.3) days; a trend of decreased frequency of use (p=0.03) was observed. Scores of HAM-D at baseline was associated with, of the first 2 weeks, scores of PHQ-9 (p=0.005), EMA of depression (p=0.003) and anxiety (p<0.001), and poorer sleep quality (p=0.023). Among the demographic, clinical and smartphone-use variables examined, only limited internet package for smartphone (<500M per month) predicted higher use of iHOPE (p=0.04). The present study provides initial evidence for the feasibility of smartphone-based EMA in Chinese patients with depression. Level of engagement needs to be improved before determining its clinical usefulness.

  4. The Relation between Changes in Patients' Interpersonal Impact Messages and Outcome in Treatment for Chronic Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Constantino, Michael J.; Laws, Holly B.; Arnow, Bruce A.; Klein, Daniel N.; Rothbaum, Barbara O.; Manber, Rachel

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Interpersonal theories posit that chronically depressed individuals have hostile and submissive styles in their social interactions, which may undermine their interpersonal effectiveness and maintain their depression. Recent findings support this theory and also show that patients' interpersonal impact messages, as perceived by their…

  5. Predictors of Abdominal Pain in Depressed Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Srinath, Arvind I.; Goyal, Alka; Zimmerman, Lori A.; Newara, Melissa C.; Kirshner, Margaret A.; McCarthy, F. Nicole; Keljo, David; Binion, David; Bousvaros, Athos; DeMaso, David R.; Youk, Ada; Szigethy, Eva M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Pediatric patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have high rates of abdominal pain. The study aims were to (1) Evaluate biological and psychological correlates of abdominal pain in depressed youth with IBD, (2) Determine predictors of abdominal pain in Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). Methods 765 patients ages 9–17 with IBD seen over 3 years at two sites were screened for depression. Depressed youth completed comprehensive assessments for abdominal pain, psychological (depression and anxiety), and biological (IBD-related, through disease activity indices and laboratory values) realms. Results 217 patients with IBD (161 CD, 56 UC) were depressed. 163 (120 CD, 43 UC) patients had complete API scores. In CD, abdominal pain was associated with depression (r=0.33; p<0.001), diarrhea (r=0.34; p=0.001), ESR (r=0.22; p=0.02), low albumin (r=0.24; p=.01), weight loss (r=0.33; p=0.001), and abdominal tenderness (r=0.38, p=0.002). A multivariate model with these significant correlates represented 32% of the variance in pain. Only depression (p=0.03), weight loss (p=0.04), and abdominal tenderness (p=0.01) predicted pain for CD patients. In UC, pain was associated with depression (r=0.46; p=0.002) and nocturnal stools (r=.32; p=.046). In the multivariate model with these significant correlates 23% of the variance was explained, and only depression (p=0.02) predicted pain. Conclusions The psychological state of pediatric patients with IBD may increase the sensitivity to abdominal pain. Thus, screening for and treating comorbid depression may prevent excessive medical testing and unnecessary escalation of IBD medications. PMID:24983975

  6. The Effect of Self-Transcendence on Depression in Cognitively Intact Nursing Home Patients

    PubMed Central

    Haugan, Gørill; Innstrand, Siw Tone

    2012-01-01

    Aims. This study's aim was to test the effects of self-transcendence on depression among cognitively intact nursing home patients. Background. Depression is considered the most frequent mental disorder among the elderly population. Specifically, the depression rate among nursing home patients is three to four times higher than that among community-dwelling elderly. Therefore, finding new and alternative ways to prevent and decrease depression is of great importance for nursing home patients' well-being. Self-transcendence is related to spiritual as well as nonspiritual factors, and it is described as a correlate and resource for well-being among vulnerable populations and at the end of life. Methods. A two-factor construct of the self-transcendence scale (interpersonal and intrapersonal) and the hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS) was applied. A sample of 202 cognitively intact nursing home patients in central Norway was selected to respond to the questionnaires in 2008/2009. Results. A hypothesized SEM model demonstrated significant direct relationships and total effects of self-transcendence on depression. Conclusion and Implication for Practice. Facilitating patients' self-transcendence, both interpersonally and intrapersonally, might decrease depression among cognitively intact nursing home patients. PMID:23738199

  7. The effect of self-transcendence on depression in cognitively intact nursing home patients.

    PubMed

    Haugan, Gørill; Innstrand, Siw Tone

    2012-01-01

    Aims. This study's aim was to test the effects of self-transcendence on depression among cognitively intact nursing home patients. Background. Depression is considered the most frequent mental disorder among the elderly population. Specifically, the depression rate among nursing home patients is three to four times higher than that among community-dwelling elderly. Therefore, finding new and alternative ways to prevent and decrease depression is of great importance for nursing home patients' well-being. Self-transcendence is related to spiritual as well as nonspiritual factors, and it is described as a correlate and resource for well-being among vulnerable populations and at the end of life. Methods. A two-factor construct of the self-transcendence scale (interpersonal and intrapersonal) and the hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS) was applied. A sample of 202 cognitively intact nursing home patients in central Norway was selected to respond to the questionnaires in 2008/2009. Results. A hypothesized SEM model demonstrated significant direct relationships and total effects of self-transcendence on depression. Conclusion and Implication for Practice. Facilitating patients' self-transcendence, both interpersonally and intrapersonally, might decrease depression among cognitively intact nursing home patients.

  8. Effect of transcranial direct current stimulation of stroke patients on depression and quality of life

    PubMed Central

    An, Tae-Gyu; Kim, Soo-Han; Kim, Ko-Un

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to assess the effects of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) on depression and quality of life (QOL) in patients with stroke, by conducting conventional occupational therapy with and without tDCS on 20 patients each. [Subjects and Methods] The experimental group (N=20) received both tDCS and conventional occupational therapy, while the control group (N=20) received false tDCS and conventional occupational therapy. The treatment was conducted 20 times over a four-week period; each session was 30 minutes long. The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) was administered to score the depression levels in patients before and after the intervention, while the stroke-specific quality of life (SS-QOL) was measured to compare the QOL. [Result] Following the intervention, the patients in the experimental group showed a significant decrease in depression and an increase in the QOL. In contrast, the control group showed no significant changes in depression or QOL. Our findings indicate that tDCS decreased depression while increasing QOL in patients with stroke. [Conclusion] In other words, our study confirmed that the application of tDCS during stroke rehabilitation improves the depression symptoms and QOL in patients. PMID:28356641

  9. Depressive symptoms in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: do stress and coping matter?

    PubMed

    Shah, Bijal M; Gupchup, Gireesh V; Borrego, Matthew E; Raisch, Dennis W; Knapp, Katherine K

    2012-04-01

    This article examines the relationship among diabetes-related stress, appraisal, coping and depressive symptoms in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) using the transactional model of stress and coping (TMSC) as the theoretical framework. In this cross-sectional study, a convenience sample of 201 patients with T2DM was recruited from three outpatient clinics. Patients with depressive symptoms reported significantly more diabetes-related stress than patients without depressive symptoms. The results of path analysis suggest that patients who experience greater diabetes-related stress or greater depressive symptoms have a negative appraisal of their diabetes. Negative appraisal is, in turn, associated with greater use of avoidance, passive resignation and diabetes integration coping and lesser use of problem-focused coping. Avoidance, passive resignation and diabetes integration coping are, in turn, related to greater depressive symptoms or greater diabetes-related stress. Overall, the results of this study support the TMSC as a framework to elucidate the relationships among diabetes-related stress, appraisal, coping and depressive symptoms in patients with T2DM. However, given the cross-sectional nature of the study, we are unable to elucidate the directionality of the relationship between stress and depressive symptoms. Implications of the findings and the need for longitudinal studies to evaluate these relationships are discussed.

  10. Elderly depression diagnostic of diabetic patients by brain tissue pulsatility imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachemi, Mélouka Elkateb; Remeniéras, Jean-pierre; Desmidt, Thomas; Camus, Vincent; Tranquart, François

    2010-01-01

    Pulsatile motion of brain parenchyma results from cardiac and breathing cycles and consists in a rapid displacement in systole, with slow diastolic recovery. Based on the vascular depression concept and recent studies where a correlation was found between cerebral haemodynamics and depression in the elderly, we emitted the hypothesis that tissue brain motion due to perfusion is correlated to elderly depression associated with cardiovascular risk factors. Tissue Pulsatlity Imaging (TPI) is a new ultrasound technique developed firstly at the University of Washington to assess the brain tissue motion. We used TPI technique to measure the brain displacement of two groups of elderly patients with diabetes as a vascular risk factor. The first group is composed of 11 depressed diabetic patients. The second group is composed of 12 diabetic patients without depressive symptoms. Transcranial acquisitions were performed with a 1.8 MHz ultrasound phased array probe through the right temporal bone window. The acquisition of six cardiac cycles was realized on each patient with a frame rate of 23 frames/s. Displacements estimation was performed by off-line analysis. A significant decrease in brain pulsatility was observed in the group of depressed patients compared to the group of non depressed patients. Mean displacement magnitude was about 44±7 μm in the first group and 68±13 μm in the second group.

  11. [Study of noradrenaline metabolism in depressed patients by the determination of plasma dihydroxyphenylethylene glycol].

    PubMed

    Lôo, H; Scatton, B; Dennis, T; Benkelfat, C; Gay, C; Poirier-Littré, M F; Garreau, M; Vanelle, J M; Olié, J P; Deniker, P

    1983-01-01

    The plasmatic levels of free, sulfoconjugated and total dihydroxyphenylethyleneglycol (DOPEG), the main deaminated metabolite of noradrenaline, have been measured in thirty DSM3 major depressive inpatients and in thirty healthy controls matched for sex and age. DOPEG levels have been measured by a radioenzymatic assay. Almost fifty per cent of depressed inpatients were D.S.T. non suppressors, thirteen patients were unipolar and thirteen bipolar. Plasmatic DOPEG levels were significantly lower in depressed patients as compared to healthy controls despite a wide interindividual range of DOPEG values. However, the ratio of free over conjugated DOPEG was not statistically different in the two groups. DOPEG levels were slightly higher in the female population of healthy volunteers but not in the depressed patients. In the healthy volunteers, but not in depressed patients, there was a trend for free DOPEG to increase and for conjugated DOPEG to decrease with age. There was no statistical correlation between the DOPEG levels and Hamilton Depression Scores. Also plasmatic DOPEG values were not different in uni or bipolar patients and in DST suppressor or DST non suppressor inpatients. The significance of the decrease of plasmatic DOPEG levels in depressed patients is discussed: this diminution may reflect a deficiency in noradrenaline metabolism in CNS or else may be attributed to other factors e.g. alteration in circadian rhythms, differences in motor activity, in level of anxiety, in sleep and feeding behaviors; cotreatment with benzodiazepine and opiate compounds; monoamine oxidase activity.

  12. A test of the effects of acute sleep deprivation on general and specific self-reported anxiety and depressive symptoms: an experimental extension.

    PubMed

    Babson, Kimberly A; Trainor, Casey D; Feldner, Matthew T; Blumenthal, Heidemarie

    2010-09-01

    Evidence indicates acute sleep deprivation affects negative mood states. The present study experimentally tested the effects of acute sleep deprivation on self-reported symptoms of state anxiety and depression as well as general distress among 88 physically and psychologically healthy adults. As hypothesized, the effects of acute sleep deprivation increased state anxiety and depression, as well as general distress, relative to a normal night of sleep control condition. Based on the tripartite model of anxiety and depression, these findings replicate and extend prior research by suggesting sleep deprivation among individuals without current Axis I disorders increases both state symptoms of anxiety and depression specifically, and general distress more broadly. Extending this work to clinical samples and prospectively testing mechanisms underlying these effects are important future directions in this area of research.

  13. The Effects of Lavandula Angustifolia Mill Infusion on Depression in Patients Using Citalopram: A comparison Study

    PubMed Central

    Nikfarjam, Masoud; Parvin, Neda; Assarzadegan, Naziheh; Asghari, Shabnam

    2013-01-01

    Background Many herbs have been used to treat psychiatric disorders including anxiety and depression in traditional medicine. Objectives This study was carried out to determine the effect of using Lavandula angustifilia infusion on depression in patients taking Citalopram. Patients and Methods Among all patients referred to the Hajar Hospital psychiatric clinic, Shahrekord, Iran, 80 patients who met the criteria of major depression according to the structured interviews and the Hamilton questionnaire for Depression were included in the study. They were randomly assigned into two groups of experimental treatment group and standard treatment group at this study. In standard treatment group, the patients were given Citalopram 20 mg. In experimental treatment group, the patients took 2 cups of the infusion of 5 g dried Lavandula angustifilia in addition to tablet Citalopram 20 mg twice a day. The patients were followed up for four and eight weeks of the study onset using Hamilton Scale questionnaire and treatment side effects form. Data were analyzed using student t-test, pair t-test and chi square. Results After four weeks of the trial onset, the mean depression score according to the Hamilton Scale for Depression was 17.5 ± 3.5 in the standard treatment group and 15.2 ± 3.6 in the experimental treatment group (P < 0.05). After eight weeks, it was 16.8±4.6 and 14.8±4 respectively (P < 0.01). In addition, the most commonly observed adverse effects were nausea (12.8 %) and confusion (10%). In terms of side effects, there were no significant differences between two groups. Conclusions Considering the results of this study, Lavandula angustifilia infusion has some positive therapeutic effects on depressed patients most importantly decreases mean depression score and might be used alone or as an adjunct to other anti-depressant drugs. PMID:24578844

  14. Depressive symptoms are associated with reduced neutrophil function in hip fracture patients.

    PubMed

    Duggal, Niharika Arora; Upton, Jane; Phillips, Anna C; Hampson, Peter; Lord, Janet M

    2013-10-01

    Hip fracture is a common trauma in older adults with a high incidence of depression, which relates to poorer prognosis including increased risk of infection. Ageing is accompanied by reduced immunity, termed immunesenescence, resulting in increased susceptibility to infection. We examined whether physical trauma (hip fracture) and psychological distress (depressive symptoms) had additive effects upon the aged immune system that might contribute to poor outcomes after injury. Neutrophil function was assessed in 101 hip fracture patients (81 female) 6 weeks and 6 months after injury and 43 healthy age-matched controls (28 female). Thirty eight fracture patients had depressive symptoms at 6 weeks. No difference in neutrophil phagocytosis of Escherichia coli was observed between controls and hip fracture patients, but superoxide production was significantly reduced in hip fracture patients with depressive symptoms compared with patients without symptoms (p=.001) or controls (p=.004) at 6 weeks. Superoxide production improved 6 months following fracture to the level seen in controls. We detected elevated serum cortisol, reduced dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEAS) and an increased cortisol:DHEAS ratio in fracture patients with depressive symptoms compared with patients without depressive symptoms or controls at 6 weeks and 6 months after injury. Serum IL6, TNFα and IL10 were higher among patients with depressive symptoms at 6 weeks. The cortisol:DHEAS ratio and IL6 levels related to depressive symptom scores but not to neutrophil function. In conclusion, depressive symptoms related to poorer neutrophil function after hip fracture, but this was not driven by changes in stress hormone or cytokine levels.

  15. Management of acute stroke in patients taking novel oral anticoagulants

    PubMed Central

    Hankey, Graeme J; Norrving, Bo; Hacke, Werner; Steiner, Thorsten

    2014-01-01

    Each year, 1·0–2·0% of individuals with atrial fibrillation and 0·1–0·2% of those with venous thromboembolism who are receiving one of the novel oral anticoagulants (dabigatran, rivaroxaban, or apixaban) can be expected to experience an acute ischemic stroke. Additionally, 0·2–0·5% of individuals with atrial fibrillation who are receiving one of the novel oral anticoagulants can be expected to experience an intracranial hemorrhage. This opinion piece addresses the current literature and offers practical approaches to the management of patients receiving novel oral anticoagulants who present with an ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke. Specifically, we discuss the role of thrombolysis in anticoagulated patients with acute ischemic stroke and factors to consider concerning restarting anticoagulation after acute ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke. PMID:24891030

  16. [Pseudotumorous cardiac infiltration in a patient with acute monoblastic leukemia].

    PubMed

    Orts, M; Ribera, J M; Calatrava, A; Larrouse, E; Catalán, R; Navarro, J T; Millá, F; Feliu, E

    1996-04-13

    Although cardiac infiltration is common in advanced stage of acute leukaemia, it is not usually diagnosed at life and it is extremely rare for it to become pseudotumoral. A 25-years-old patient with an acute monoblastic leukaemia who had a leukaemic infiltration which affected the main part of the left ventricle at the time of diagnosis, is referred. The heart infiltration was detected by a two dimension echocardiography. In spite of a massive infiltration, heart failure was not present and the left ventricle's ejection fraction was 50%. Even though chemotherapy was administered, the patient died four days after diagnosis due to septic shock of respiratory origin. The most relevant autopsy finding was a widespread pseudotumoral infiltration of the left ventricle, the back side of the right ventricle and the interventricular wall. The pseudotumoral infiltration of the heart by acute leukaemia is uncommon and must be differentiated from granulocytic sarcoma. The usefulness of the different diagnostic procedures is discussed.

  17. Manifestations of interpersonal dependency and depressive subtypes in outpatient psychotherapy patients.

    PubMed

    Huprich, Steven; Rosen, Alexandra; Kiss, Andrea

    2013-08-01

    The present study investigated the relationship between normative and pathological dependency and anaclitic and introjective depressive experiences among 71 patients participating in outpatient psychotherapy at a university-based psychology clinic. We examined the interrelationships among the Relationship Profile Test subscales, the Depressive Experiences Questionnaire subscales and the Outcome Questionnaire-45.2. Results indicated that destructive overdependence was positively correlated with anaclitic and introjective depression and negatively correlated with overall perceptions of mental health. Dysfunctional detachment was positively correlated with introjective depression and negatively correlated with generalized perceptions of one's own mental health. Healthy dependency was negatively correlated with introjective depression and positively correlated with mental health. These results not only support the construct validity of the Relationship Profile Test but also shed light on a link between depression, dependence and self-criticism.

  18. Relationship of Suicidal Ideation and Behavior to Attachment Style in Patients with Major Depression

    PubMed Central

    ÖZER, Ürün; YILDIRIM, Ejder Akgün; ERKOÇ, Şahap Nurettin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The attachment theory aims to understand close relationships in adulthood based on the relationship of a child with the caregiver. Attachment styles are classified as secure, preoccupied, fearful and dismissing, which are the subtypes of insecure attachment style. Insecure attachment is suggested to be related to depression and suicide. In this study, the relationship of suicidal ideation and behavior to attachment style is investigated in patients diagnosed with major depression. Methods Sixty-two patients diagnosed with major depressive disorder according to the DSM-IV-TR criteria were taken and divided into two groups, 31 patients with and 31 patients without a past suicide attempt. Sixty healthy volunteers matched with the patients for age, gender and education and comprised the control group. Sociodemographic and clinical data form, Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders (SCID-I), Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS), Experiences in Close Relationships Scale (ECR), Scale of Suicidal Ideation and Suicidal Behavior Scale were applied to the groups. Results In the patients with depression, ECR anxiety and avoidance scores were found to be higher compared with those in the control group. There were no differences in the anxiety and avoidance scores between the patients with and without suicide attempt. The rate of participants who showed secure attachment style in the control group was higher than that of those with depression. In the patients with fearful attachment style, the suicide attempt rate was found to be higher than the other groups. A positively significant relationship was detected between ECR anxiety score and scores of HDRS suicide item, Scale of Suicidal Ideation and Suicidal Behavior Scale. Conclusion Patients with depression were more anxious and more avoidant and showed more insecure attachment. In patients with depression with fearful attachment style, suicide attempts were more common.

  19. [Sexuality in acute myocardial infarction patients].

    PubMed

    Casado Dones, Ma J; de Andrés Gimeno, B; Moreno González, C; Fernández Balcones, C; Cruz Martín, R Ma; Colmenar García, C

    2002-01-01

    We as nurses in the Coronary Unit we do not see the sexuality of the patients sufficiently addressed neither by us nor by the patients themselves. In this article we are trying to analize the reasons and to emphasize the need to include this subject in our Nursing Problem List. In it we explaine the fears and the wrong ideas that we have identified in our patients. The sexual function is not affected by a myocardial infarction but psychological factors, age, drugs and other associated diseases might be a reason. A quiet enviroment, a fit training plan and looking for personalise proper alternatives may help the patient to start a satisfactory sexual life again.

  20. Assessment and treatment of patients with acute tachyarrhythmia.

    PubMed

    Swift, Jennie

    A tachyarrhythmia is defined as a heart rate greater than 100 beats per minute in conjunction with abnormal cardiac conduction. This article aims to inform nurses and other healthcare professionals about the predominant acute tachyarrhythmias. It focuses on the assessment and management of patients with this condition using case study examples.

  1. QUALITY OF LIFE, PAIN, ANXIETY AND DEPRESSION IN PATIENTS SURGICALLY TREATED WITH CANCER OF RECTUM

    PubMed Central

    SANTOS, Letácio José Freire; GARCIA, João Batista dos Santos; PACHECO, Jairo Sousa; VIEIRA, Érica Brandão de Morais; dos SANTOS, Alcione Miranda

    2014-01-01

    Background The rectum cancer is associated with high rates of complications and morbidities with great impact on the lives of affected individuals. Aim To evaluate quality of life, pain, anxiety and depression in patients treated for medium and lower rectum cancer, submitted to surgical intervention. Methods A descriptive cross-sectional study. Eighty-eight records of patients with medium and lower rectum cancer, submitted to surgical intervention were selected, and enrolled. Forty-seven patients died within the study period, and the other 41 were studied. Question forms EORTC QLQ-C30 and EORTC QLQ-CR38 were used to assess quality of life. Pain evaluation was carried out using the Visual Analogical Scale, depression and anxiety were assessed through Depression Inventories and Beck's Anxiety, respectively. The correlation between pain intensity, depression and anxiety was carried out, and between these and the EORTC QLQ-C30 General Scale for Health Status and overall quality of life, as well as the EORTC QLQ-CR38 functional and symptom scales. Results Of the 41 patients of the study, 52% presented pain, depression in 47%, and anxiety in 39%. There was a marking positive correlation between pain intensity and depression. There was a moderate negative correlation between depression and general health status, and overall quality of life as well as pain intensity with the latter. There was a statistically significant negative correlation between future depression perspective and sexual function, and also a strong positive correlation between depression and sexual impairments. A positive correlation between anxiety and gastro-intestinal problems, both statistically significant, was observed. Conclusion Evaluation scales showed detriment on quality life evaluation, besides an elevated incidence of pain, depression, and anxiety; a correlation among these, and factors which influence on the quality of life of post-surgical medium and lower rectum cancer patients was

  2. Cerebrospinal fluid proteome of patients with acute Lyme disease

    PubMed Central

    Angel, Thomas E.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Smith, Robert P.; Pasternack, Mark S.; Elias, Susan; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Shukla, Anil; Gilmore, Edward C.; McCarthy, Carol; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Warren, H. Shaw

    2012-01-01

    During acute Lyme disease, bacteria can disseminate to the central nervous system (CNS) leading to the development of meningitis and other neurologic symptoms. Here we have analyzed pooled cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) allowing a deep view into the proteome for patients diagnosed with early-disseminated Lyme disease and CSF inflammation. Additionally, we analyzed individual patient samples and quantified differences in protein abundance employing label-free quantitative mass spectrometry based methods. We identified 108 proteins that differ significantly in abundance in patients with acute Lyme disease from controls. Comparison between infected patients and control subjects revealed differences in proteins in the CSF associated with cell death localized to brain synapses and others that likely originate from brain parenchyma. PMID:22900834

  3. Connection between Depression and Inability to Fill Prescriptions in Rural FQHC Patients with Chronic Disease.

    PubMed

    Smalley, K Bryant; Warren, Jacob C; Barefoot, K Nikki

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this paper was to (1) examine the rates of elevated depression symptoms among a sample of rural Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC) patients with chronic disease and (2) determine if an inability to afford general prescription medications within the past 12 months is a significant predictor of depression symptoms among these patients. These data came from Project EDUCATE, an ongoing five-year study designed to be a large-scale, multifocal examination of the needs and experiences of rural FQHC patients with hypertension and/or diabetes. A total of 497 rural FQHC patients completed surveys (including a series of psychosocial questions, the Multigroup Ethnic Identity Measure and the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression scale) as part of phase one of the project; 438 of these with complete data are included in the current analytic sample. Results revealed that 53.0% of the sample screened positive for depression, and over half of those who screened positive reported not being able to afford their prescription medications at least once within the past 12 months (51.3% vs. 26.3% non-depressed). Further, even after controlling for age, ethnic identity attachment, sex, education level, employment status, income, insurance status, recent inability to afford needed medical care, hypertensive status, mental health diagnosis, and family history of mental illness, patients who could not afford to fill their prescriptions in the past 12 months were 2.6 times as likely to screen positive for depression (ORADJ = 2.476, p = 0.002) as those who could afford their medications. Overall, results of this study suggest that, among rural patients diagnosed with chronic disease, depressive symptomatology may be alarmingly high and an inability to afford medications may be an important risk factor for depression symptoms. These results highlight the need for increased attention to prescription medication affordability among rural patients with chronic disease in

  4. Connection between Depression and Inability to Fill Prescriptions in Rural FQHC Patients with Chronic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Smalley, K. Bryant; Warren, Jacob C.; Barefoot, K. Nikki

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to (1) examine the rates of elevated depression symptoms among a sample of rural Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC) patients with chronic disease and (2) determine if an inability to afford general prescription medications within the past 12 months is a significant predictor of depression symptoms among these patients. These data came from Project EDUCATE, an ongoing five-year study designed to be a large-scale, multifocal examination of the needs and experiences of rural FQHC patients with hypertension and/or diabetes. A total of 497 rural FQHC patients completed surveys (including a series of psychosocial questions, the Multigroup Ethnic Identity Measure and the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression scale) as part of phase one of the project; 438 of these with complete data are included in the current analytic sample. Results revealed that 53.0% of the sample screened positive for depression, and over half of those who screened positive reported not being able to afford their prescription medications at least once within the past 12 months (51.3% vs. 26.3% non-depressed). Further, even after controlling for age, ethnic identity attachment, sex, education level, employment status, income, insurance status, recent inability to afford needed medical care, hypertensive status, mental health diagnosis, and family history of mental illness, patients who could not afford to fill their prescriptions in the past 12 months were 2.6 times as likely to screen positive for depression (ORADJ = 2.476, p = 0.002) as those who could afford their medications. Overall, results of this study suggest that, among rural patients diagnosed with chronic disease, depressive symptomatology may be alarmingly high and an inability to afford medications may be an important risk factor for depression symptoms. These results highlight the need for increased attention to prescription medication affordability among rural patients with chronic disease in

  5. Diagnosis and Treatment of Depression in Patients With Congestive Heart Failure: A Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Stern, Theodore A.; Hebert, Kathy A.; Musselman, Dominique L.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Major depressive disorder (MDD) can be challenging to diagnose in patients with congestive heart failure, who often suffer from fatigue, insomnia, weight changes, and other neurovegetative symptoms that overlap with those of depression. Pathophysiologic mechanisms (eg, inflammation, autonomic nervous system dysfunction, cardiac arrhythmias, and altered platelet function) connect depression and congestive heart failure. Objective: We sought to review the prevalence, diagnosis, neurobiology, and treatment of depression associated with congestive heart failure. Data Sources: A search of all English-language articles between January 2003 and January 2013 was conducted using the search terms congestive heart failure and depression. Study Selection: We found 1,498 article abstracts and 19 articles (meta-analyses, systematic reviews, and original research articles) that were selected for inclusion, as they contained information about our focus on diagnosis, treatment, and pathophysiology of depression associated with congestive heart failure. The search was augmented with manual review of reference lists of articles from the initial search. Articles selected for review were determined by author consensus. Data Extraction: The prevalence, diagnosis, neurobiology, and treatment of depression associated with congestive heart failure were reviewed. Particular attention was paid to the safety, efficacy, and tolerability of antidepressant medications commonly used to treat depression and how their side-effect profiles impact the pathophysiology of congestive heart failure. Drug-drug interactions between antidepressant medications and medications used to treat congestive heart failure were examined. Results: MDD is highly prevalent in patients with congestive heart failure. Moreover, the prevalence and severity of depression correlate with the degree of cardiac dysfunction and development of congestive heart failure. Depression increases the risk of congestive heart

  6. Vitamin D deficiency is significantly associated with depression in patients with chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Jhee, Jong Hyun; Kim, Hyoungnae; Park, Seohyun; Yun, Hae-Ryong; Jung, Su-Young; Kee, Youn Kyung; Yoon, Chang-Yun; Park, Jung Tak; Han, Seung Hyeok; Kang, Shin-Wook; Yoo, Tae-Hyun

    2017-01-01

    Background Depression is reported to be the most common psychological problem in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Several studies have reported that lower levels of serum vitamin D are significantly associated with depression. Both vitamin D deficiency and depression are prevalent in patients with CKD, yet the relationship between these two factors remains poorly understood. This study aimed to investigate the association between vitamin D levels and depression among CKD patients. Methods Totally, 21,257 individuals who participated in the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES V, VI) from 2010–2014 were screened for the study; 533 CKD patients were included. Vitamin D deficiency was defined as serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 [25(OH)D3] ≤10 ng/mL. Patients were divided into vitamin D deficient or sufficient groups. Depression was screened for using the Korean version of the WHO Composite International Diagnostic Interview-Short Form. The association between vitamin D deficiency and depression was evaluated by multivariate logistic regression analysis. Results The mean participant age was 70.1±9.4 years; 262 patients (49.2%) were male. The median 25(OH)D3 level was 19.1±6.9 ng/mL. The prevalence of depression was higher in CKD patients than in the general population (14.3 vs. 11.1%, P = 0.03). Additionally, the prevalence of depression was significantly higher in CKD patients with (vs. without) vitamin D deficiency (32.5% vs. 50.0%, P<0.001). Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that vitamin D deficiency was a significant independent predictor of depression after adjusting for confounding factors (adjusted odds ratio, 6.15; 95% confidence interval, 2.02–8.75; P = 0.001). Conclusion Depression was highly prevalent in CKD patients, in whom vitamin D deficiency was a significant independent predictor of depression. Therefore, management of vitamin D deficiency might help prevent depression in CKD patients. PMID

  7. Pets, depression and long term survival in community living patients following myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Friedmann, Erika; Thomas, Sue A.; Son, Heesook

    2011-01-01

    Evidence supports the contribution of depression, anxiety, and poor social support to mortality of hospitalized myocardial infarction (MI) patients. The contribution of depression to survival is independent of disease severity. Pet ownership, a non-human form of social support, has also been associated with one year survival of post-MI patients. The current study addresses whether pet ownership contributes independently to long term survival beyond the contributions of depression, anxiety, or low social support in post-MI patients who have already survived at least 6 months. Data from patients (N = 460) enrolled in the “Psychosocial Responses in the Home Automated External Defibrillator Trial (PR-HAT)”were used. Seventeen patients died during a median follow-up of 2.8 years. In Cox proportional hazards regression model that included depression, lack of pet ownership, and the interaction between depression and lack of pet ownership, not owning a pet was the only significant independent predictor of mortality (p = 0.036). The interaction between pet ownership and depression tended to be significant indicating that the effect of pet ownership on survival in this group of people who have supportive spouses/companions living with them may relate to depression. PMID:21857770

  8. Efficacy of vilazodone on anxiety symptoms in patients with major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Thase, Michael E; Chen, Dalei; Edwards, John; Ruth, Adam

    2014-11-01

    Anxiety symptoms are prevalent in patients with major depressive disorder. A post-hoc analysis of two phase III trials was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of vilazodone on depression-related anxiety. Using the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD17) Anxiety/Somatization subscale, patients were classified as anxious or nonanxious. Improvements in depressive symptoms were based on least squares mean changes in HAMD17 and Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale total scores. Anxiety symptoms in the anxious subgroup were evaluated using Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HAMA) total and subscale (Psychic Anxiety, Somatic Anxiety) scores, HAMD17 Anxiety/Somatization subscale and item (Psychic Anxiety, Somatic Anxiety) scores, and the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale Inner Tension item score. Most of the pooled study population [82.0% (708/863)] was classified with anxious depression. After 8 weeks of treatment, least squares mean differences between vilazodone and placebo for changes in HAMA total and HAMD17 Anxiety/Somatization subscale scores were -1.82 (95% confidence interval -2.81 to -0.83; P<0.001) and -0.75 (95% confidence interval -1.17 to -0.32; P<0.001), respectively. Statistically significant improvements with vilazodone were also found on all other anxiety-related measures, except the HAMA Somatic Anxiety subscale. Vilazodone may be effective in treating patients with major depressive disorder who exhibit somatic and/or psychic symptoms of anxiety.

  9. Postmortem diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction in patients with acute respiratory failure - demographics, etiologic and pulmonary histologic analysis

    PubMed Central

    de Matos Soeiro, Alexandre; Ruppert, Aline D; Canzian, Mauro; Capelozzi, Vera L; Serrano, Carlos V

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Acute respiratory failure is present in 5% of patients with acute myocardial infarction and is responsible for 20% to 30% of the fatal post-acute myocardial infarction. The role of inflammation associated with pulmonary edema as a cause of acute respiratory failure post-acute myocardial infarction remains to be determined. We aimed to describe the demographics, etiologic data and histological pulmonary findings obtained through autopsies of patients who died during the period from 1990 to 2008 due to acute respiratory failure with no diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction during life. METHODS: This study considers 4,223 autopsies of patients who died of acute respiratory failure that was not preceded by any particular diagnosis while they were alive. The diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction was given in 218 (4.63%) patients. The age, sex and major associated diseases were recorded for each patient. Pulmonary histopathology was categorized as follows: diffuse alveolar damage, pulmonary edema, alveolar hemorrhage and lymphoplasmacytic interstitial pneumonia. The odds ratio of acute myocardial infarction associated with specific histopathology was determined by logistic regression. RESULTS: In total, 147 men were included in the study. The mean age at the time of death was 64 years. Pulmonary histopathology revealed pulmonary edema as well as the presence of diffuse alveolar damage in 72.9% of patients. Bacterial bronchopneumonia was present in 11.9% of patients, systemic arterial hypertension in 10.1% and dilated cardiomyopathy in 6.9%. A multivariate analysis demonstrated a significant positive association between acute myocardial infarction with diffuse alveolar damage and pulmonary edema. CONCLUSIONS: For the first time, we demonstrated that in autopsies of patients with acute respiratory failure as the cause of death, 5% were diagnosed with acute myocardial infarction. Pulmonary histology revealed a significant inflammatory response, which has

  10. Decreasing Falls in Acute Care Medical Patients: An Integrative Review.

    PubMed

    Rowan, Leslie; Veenema, Tener Goodwin

    2017-02-06

    Falls in acute care medical patients are a complex problem impacted by the constantly changing risk factors affecting this population. This integrative literature review analyzes current evidence to determine factors that continue to make falls a top patient safety problem within the medical unit microsystem. The goal of this review is to develop an evidence-based structure to guide process improvement and effective use of organization resources.

  11. MR imaging of the acutely injured patient with cervical traction.

    PubMed

    McArdle, C B; Wright, J W; Prevost, W J; Dornfest, D J; Amparo, E G

    1986-04-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the patient with acute cervical injury is important because of the potential prognostic significance of the appearance of the spinal cord at the time of injury. However, cervical traction may involve equipment incompatible with the magnetic environment, and transferring the patient to the imaging table may make it difficult to maintain traction. The authors describe a simple, inexpensive, and reliable method for providing cervical traction within the magnet room.

  12. Acute renal failure in liver transplant patients: Indian study.

    PubMed

    Naik, Pradeep; Premsagar, B; Mallikarjuna, M

    2015-01-01

    The acute renal failure is the frequent medical complication observed in liver transplant patients. The objective of this study was to determine the cause of acute renal failure in post liver transplant patients. A total of 70 patients who underwent (cadaveric 52, live 18) liver transplantation were categorized based on clinical presentation into two groups, namely hepatorenal failure (HRF, n = 29), and Hepatic failure (HF, n = 41). All the patients after the liver transplant had received tacrolimus, mycophenolate and steroids. We analyzed the modification of diet in renal disease, (MDRD) serum urea, creatinine and albumin before and after 5th and 30th day of liver transplant and data was categorized into survivors and non-survivors group. In HRF survivor group, serum creatinine, and urea levels were high and, albumin, MDRD were low in pre- transplant and reached to normal levels on 30th day of post transplant, and 79.3 % of patients in this group showed resumption of normal kidney function. On the contrary in HRF nonsurvivor group, we did not observed any significant difference and 20.7 % of patients showed irreversible changes after the liver transplant. In HF survivor group, 82.9 % of liver failure patients did not show any deviation in serum creatinine, urea, albumin and MDRD, whereas in HF non survivor group, 17.1 % of liver failure patients who had HCV positive before the transplant developed acute renal failure. The levels of creatinine, urea, albumin and MDRD were normal before the transplant and on day 30th, the levels of albumin and MDRD were significantly low whereas serum urea, creatinine levels were high. In conclusion, based on these observations, an diagnosis and treatment of Acute renal failure is important among the liver transplantation cases in the early postoperative period.

  13. A new chronobiological approach to discriminate between acute and chronic depression using peripheral temperature, rest-activity, and light exposure parameters

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Circadian theories for major depressive disorder have suggested that the rhythm of the circadian pacemaker is misaligned. Stable phase relationships between internal rhythms, such as temperature and rest/activity, and the external day-night cycle, are considered to be crucial for adapting to life in the external environmental. Therefore, the relationship and possible alterations among (i) light exposure, (ii) activity rhythm, and (iii) temperature rhythm could be important factors in clinical depression. This study aimed to investigate the rhythmic alterations in depression and evaluate the ability of chronobiological parameters to discriminate between healthy subjects and depressed patients. Methods Thirty female subjects, including healthy subjects, depressed patients in the first episode, and major recurrent depression patients. Symptoms were assessed using Hamilton Depression Scale, Beck Depression Inventory and Montgomery-Äsberg Scale. Motor activity, temperature, and light values were determined for 7 days by actigraph, and circadian rhythms were calculated. Results Depressed groups showed a lower amplitude in the circadian rhythm of activity and light exposure, but a higher amplitude in the rhythm of peripheral temperature. The correlation between temperature and activity values was different in the day and night among the control and depressed groups. For the same level of activity, depressed patients had lowest temperature values during the day. The amplitudes of temperature and activity were the highest discriminant parameters. Conclusions These results indicate that the study of rhythms is useful for diagnosis and therapy for depressive mood disorders. PMID:23510455

  14. Gastrointestinal decontamination in the acutely poisoned patient

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Objective To define the role of gastrointestinal (GI) decontamination of the poisoned patient. Data Sources A computer-based PubMed/MEDLINE search of the literature on GI decontamination in the poisoned patient with cross referencing of sources. Study Selection and Data Extraction Clinical, animal and in vitro studies were reviewed for clinical relevance to GI decontamination of the poisoned patient. Data Synthesis The literature suggests that previously, widely used, aggressive approaches including the use of ipecac syrup, gastric lavage, and cathartics are now rarely recommended. Whole bowel irrigation is still often recommended for slow-release drugs, metals, and patients who "pack" or "stuff" foreign bodies filled with drugs of abuse, but with little quality data to support it. Activated charcoal (AC), single or multiple doses, was also a previous mainstay of GI decontamination, but the utility of AC is now recognized to be limited and more time dependent than previously practiced. These recommendations have resulted in several treatment guidelines that are mostly based on retrospective analysis, animal studies or small case series, and rarely based on randomized clinical trials. Conclusions The current literature supports limited use of GI decontamination of the poisoned patient. PMID:21992527

  15. Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale in patients with tinnitus and hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Gomaa, Mohammed Abdel Motaal; Elmagd, Manal Hassan Abo; Elbadry, Mohammed Mohammed; Kader, Rafeek Mohammed Abdel

    2014-08-01

    The study was proposed to evaluate co-morbid depression, anxiety and stress associated with tinnitus patients. The study was done on 196 subjects: 100 patients suffering from subjective tinnitus associated with hearing loss (tinnitus group), 45 patients suffering from hearing loss only (hearing loss group) and 50 healthy subjects not suffering from tinnitus or hearing loss (control group); the age ranges from 20 to 60 years old. The studied sample was subjected to full ear, nose and throat examinations and audiological evaluation. Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS) was developed by Levibond H and Levibond F to assess three self-report scales designed to measure the negative emotional status of depression, anxiety and stress. All patients and control group were evaluated by DASS. (1) Depression: males were affected more than females. All patients over 60 years were affected by depression. The duration of tinnitus seems correlating with the severity of depression. Only 2 patients (4.3 %) of the hearing loss group suffer from depression. (2) Anxiety: 90 % of males suffer from anxiety as compared to 83.3 % females. The age group 20-29 years old suffers more than other age groups. Only 4 patients (8.7 %) of hearing loss group suffer from anxiety. (3) Stress: females seem to be affected by the stress (76.7 %) more than males (67.5). Patients in age group 30-39 suffer the most from the disease. There is a direct correlation between duration of tinnitus and severity of stress. No one of the hearing loss group suffers from stress. In conclusion, depression, anxiety and stress should be taken into consideration in the treatment of patients suffering from tinnitus.

  16. A comparison of depression scores between aesthetic and functional rhinoplasty patients.

    PubMed

    Naraghi, Mohsen; Atari, Mohammad

    2015-04-01

    Depression is a mood state of sadness, gloom, and pessimistic ideation with loss of interest or pleasure in normal activities. This mood disorder has been reported to occur more frequently among cosmetic surgery patients. The purpose of the current study was to compare the score of depression among aesthetic rhinoplasty candidates and functional rhinoplasty patients as control group. The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and Depression (DE) subscale of Symptom Check List-90-Revised (SCL-90-R) were administered on a sample of aesthetic rhinoplasty patients (n=21) as well as a sample of functional rhinoplasty patients (n=21). Those with both cosmetic and functional purposes were categorized regarding their primary objective. Questionnaires were given to patients preoperatively. Cohen's d was also calculated as a measure of Effect Size (ES). BDI and SCL-90-R-DE scores were analyzed using t-test for independent groups. Statistical analyses suggested that the mean BDI and SCL-90-R-DE scores of aesthetic surgery patients were significantly higher than those of functional surgery patients (P<0.05). The results showed that age, sex, and Socio-Economic Status (SES) were not significantly different between the two groups as they can be capable of influencing the depression score. Effect size was above the moderate level: d=0.51, d=0.72 for BDI and SCL-90-R-DE, respectively. Using two different depression instruments, the findings of this study showed that aesthetic rhinoplasty patients were more depressed in comparison with functional rhinoplasty patients. The measures of ES also supported the hypothesis that aesthetic rhinoplasty candidates had higher scores in depression.

  17. HIV patient and provider feedback on a telehealth collaborative care for depression intervention.

    PubMed

    Drummond, Karen L; Painter, Jacob T; Curran, Geoffrey M; Stanley, Regina; Gifford, Allen L; Rodriguez-Barradas, Maria; Rimland, David; Monson, Thomas P; Pyne, Jeffrey M

    2017-03-01

    In the HIV Translating Initiatives for Depression into Effective Solutions project, we conducted a randomized controlled effectiveness and implementation trial comparing depression collaborative care with enhanced usual care in Veterans Health Administration HIV clinics in the US. An offsite HIV depression care team including a psychiatrist, a depression care manager (DCM), and a clinical pharmacist provided collaborative care using a stepped-care model of treatment and made recommendations to providers through the electronic health record system. The DCM delivered care management to HIV patients through phone calls, performing routine assessments and providing counseling in self-management and problem-solving. The DCM documented all calls in each patient's electronic medical record. In this paper we present results from interviews conducted with patients and clinical staff in a multi-stage formative evaluation (FE). We conducted semi-structured FE interviews with 26 HIV patients and 30 clinical staff at the three participating sites during and after the trial period to gather their experiences and perspectives concerning the intervention components. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed using rapid content analysis techniques. Patients reported high satisfaction with the depression care manager (DCM) phone calls. Both HIV and mental health providers reported that the DCM's chart notes in the electronic health record were very helpful, and most felt that a dedicated DCM for HIV patients is ideal to meet patient needs. Sites encountered barriers to achieving and maintaining universal depression screening, but had greater success when such screening was incorporated into routine intake processes. FE results demonstrated that depression care management via telehealth from an offsite team is acceptable and helpful to both HIV patients and their providers. Given that a centralized offsite depression care team can deliver effective, cost-effective, cost

  18. The effects of complementary and alternative medicine on the speech of patients with depression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraas, Michael; Solloway, Michele

    2004-05-01

    It is well documented that patients suffering from depression exhibit articulatory timing deficits and speech that is monotonous and lacking pitch variation. Traditional remediation of depression has left many patients with adverse side effects and ineffective outcomes. Recent studies indicate that many Americans are seeking complementary and alternative forms of medicine to supplement traditional therapy approaches. The current investigation wishes to determine the efficacy of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) on the remediation of speech deficits associated with depression. Subjects with depression and normal controls will participate in an 8-week treatment session using polarity therapy, a form of CAM. Subjects will be recorded producing a series of spontaneous and narrative speech samples. Acoustic analysis of mean fundamental frequency (F0), variation in F0 (standard deviation of F0), average rate of F0 change, and pause and utterance durations will be conducted. Differences pre- and post-CAM therapy between subjects with depression and normal controls will be discussed.

  19. [Treatment of patients with acute asthma exacerbation].

    PubMed

    Ostojić, Jelena; Mose, Jakov

    2009-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the airways. The global prevalence of asthma ranges from 1% to 18% of the population, so it remains a common problem with enormous medical and economic impacts. In majority of patients, asthma can be well controlled with simple regimens of inhaled anti-inflammatory and bronchodilating medications. However, some patients tend to suffer from poorly controlled disease in terms of chronic symptoms with episodic severe exacerbations. Major factors that may be related to the emergency department visits and hospitalisation include prior severe attacks, nonadherence to therapeutic regimens, inadequate use of inhaled corticosteroids, poor self-management skills, frequent use of inhaled short-acting beta-agonists, cigarette smoking, poor socioeconomic status and age over 40 years. Severe exacerbations of asthma are life-threatening medical emergencies and require careful brief assesment, treatment according to current GINA (Global Initiative for Asthma) guidelines with periodic reassesment of patient's response to therapy usually in an emergency department.

  20. GERSTMANN’S SYNDROME IN ACUTE STROKE PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Zukic, Sanela; Mrkonjic, Zamir; Sinanovic, Osman; Vidovic, Mirjana; Kojic, Biljana

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Gerstmann in 1924. observed in a few patients a concomitant impairment in discriminating their own fingers, writing by hand, distinguishing left from right and performing calculations. He claimed that this tetrad of symptoms constituted a syndromal entity, assigned it to a lesion of the dominant parietal lobe. Since than, Gerstmann`s syndrome (GS) was enigma for neuropsychologists. The aim of this study was to analyze frequency and clinical features of GS among acute stroke patients. Patients and methods: We prospectively analyzed 194 acute stroke patients (average age 65±11.06 years, male 113 (58.2%), female 81 (41.8%) hospitalized at department of Neurology, University Clinical Center tuzla, during the six mounths in 2010. For clinical assessment of agraphia, alexia and acalculia we used Minessota test for differential diagnosis of aphasia’s. Results: Among these acute stroke patients, 59 (30.40%) had alexia, agraphia and acalculia or different combinations of these disorders. two patients (3.4%) had agraphia and acalculia associated with other part of tetrad of GS: fi nger agnosia and left-right disorientation. they both where men, right handed, and cranial computed tomography scan showed ischemic lesion in the left parietal and left temporoparietal lobe. Conclusion: Gerstmann`s syndrome is rare clinical entity, and has the high value in localization and the lesion is mainly localized to angular gyrus of the dominant hemisphere. PMID:23378691

  1. Management of Patients Admitted with Acute Decompensated Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Krim, Selim R.; Campbell, Patrick T.; Desai, Sapna; Mandras, Stacy; Patel, Hamang; Eiswirth, Clement; Ventura, Hector O.

    2015-01-01

    Background Hospital admission for the treatment of acute decompensated heart failure is an unfortunate certainty in the vast majority of patients with heart failure. Regardless of the etiology, inpatient treatment for acute decompensated heart failure portends a worsening prognosis. Methods This review identifies patients with heart failure who need inpatient therapy and provides an overview of recommended therapies and management of these patients in the hospital setting. Results Inpatient therapy for patients with acute decompensated heart failure should be directed at decongestion and symptom improvement. Clinicians should also treat possible precipitating events, identify comorbid conditions that may exacerbate heart failure, evaluate and update current guideline-directed medical therapy, and perform risk stratification for all patients. Finally, efforts should be made to educate patients about the importance of restricting salt and fluid, monitoring daily weights, and adhering to a graded exercise program. Conclusion Early discharge follow-up and continued optimization of guideline-directed medical therapy are key to preventing future heart failure readmissions. PMID:26413005

  2. [Exploratory study of amitriptyline resistance in depressed patients: results of WHO French collaborating center on depressions resistant to treatments].

    PubMed

    Loas, G; Rose, D; Nowaczkowski, P; Lernout, P; Duron, B

    1996-06-01

    A multicountry, multicentre double-blind study in a group of depressives, coordinated by the Mental Health Division of the World Health Association (WHO) has been done. The goal of the study is to determine whether the therapeutic effects of amitriptyline can be enhanced and potentiated by combining it with an antioxydant (gingko biloba). An exploratory study has preceded the main study which had the objective to estimate the proportion of non-response patient to amitriptyline. We report the results concerning the French center. 23 inpatients meet the ICD-10 criteria for depression (F32 and F33) and were treated during 6 weeks by amitriptyline with the initial daily dose of 50 mg until the maximum dose of 200 mg. The proportion of non-responsive patient to amitriptyline was 34.78 (95% confidence interval : 15.32 to 54.24%), all clinically deteriorated.

  3. Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) Reduces the Association Between Depressive Symptoms and Suicidal Cognitions in Patients With a History of Suicidal Depression

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objective: In patients with a history of suicidal depression, recurrence of depressive symptoms can easily reactivate suicidal thinking. In this study, we investigated whether training in mindfulness, which is aimed at helping patients “decenter” from negative thinking, could help weaken the link between depressive symptoms and suicidal cognitions. Method: Analyses were based on data from a recent randomized controlled trial, in which previously suicidal patients were allocated to mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT), an active control treatment, cognitive psychoeducation (CPE), which did not include any meditation practice, or treatment as usual (TAU). After the end of the treatment phase, we compared the associations between depressive symptoms, as assessed through self-reports on the Beck Depression Inventory–II (Beck, Steer, & Brown, 1996), and suicidal thinking, as assessed through the Suicidal Cognitions Scale (Rudd et al., 2001). Results: In patients with minimal to moderate symptoms at the time of assessment, comparisons of the correlations between depressive symptoms and suicidal cognitions showed significant differences between the groups. Although suicidal cognitions were significantly related to levels of symptoms in the 2 control groups, there was no such relation in the MBCT group. Conclusion: The findings suggest that, in patients with a history of suicidal depression, training in mindfulness can help to weaken the association between depressive symptoms and suicidal thinking, and thus reduce an important vulnerability for relapse to suicidal depression. PMID:26302249

  4. Impact of Treatment for Depression on Desire for Hastened Death in Patients With Advanced AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Breitbart, William; Rosenfeld, Barry; Gibson, Christopher; Kramer, Michael; Li, Yuelin; Tomarken, Alexis; Nelson, Christian; Pessin, Hayley; Esch, Julie; Galietta, Michele; Garcia, Nerina; Brechtl, John; Schuster, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite the development of multi-drug regimens for HIV, palliative care and quality-of-life issues in patients with advanced AIDS remain important areas of clinical investigation. Objective Authors assessed the impact of treatment for depression on desire for hastened death in patients with advanced AIDS. Method Patients with advanced AIDS (N=372) were interviewed shortly after admission to a palliative-care facility, and were reinterviewed monthly for the next 2 months. Patients diagnosed with a major depressive syndrome were provided with antidepressant treatment and reinterviewed weekly. Desire for hastened death was assessed with two questionnaire measures. Results Desire for death was highly associated with depression, and it decreased dramatically in patients who responded to antidepressant treatment. Little change in desire for hastened death was observed in patients whose depression did not improve. Although improved depression was not significantly associated with the use of antidepressant medication, those individuals prescribed antidepressant medication showed the largest decreases in desire for hastened death. Discussion Successful treatment for depression appears to substantially decrease desire for hastened death in patients with advanced AIDS. The authors discuss implications of these findings for palliative-care treatment and the physician-assisted suicide debate. PMID:20332284

  5. Evidence-based nursing-sensitive indicators for patients hospitalized with depression in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Thapinta, Darawan; Anders, Robert L; Mahatnirunkul, Suwat; Srikosai, Soontaree

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this study was to develop and validate nursing-sensitive indicators for patients hospitalized with depression in Thailand. The initial draft, consisting of 12 categories with 37 subcategories, was then evaluated by experts in the US and Thailand. Hospital records were then utilized to evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of the indicators. The finalized instrument consisted of 11 categories with 43 items with a validity of .98 and internal consistency of .88. This is the first set of indicators developed to evaluate nursing-sensitivity for patients hospitalized with a diagnosis of depression in Thailand. Having nursing indicators for depressed patients provides nurses with concrete tools to evaluate their work with depressed patients, allowing these staff to assess their work in a very specific, methodical, and consistent manner. When problems are discovered, both the staff and administration can work to address these issues through training, procedural changes, and departmental shifts.

  6. Depression and sleep disturbance in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Haejung; Kim, InAh; Lim, Yeonjung; Jung, Hee Young; Park, Hye-Kyung

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this study was to examine the unique contributions of sleep disturbance to depression in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) after controlling for other contributing variables, including patient characteristics, self-efficacy, and physical activity. One hundred thirty-one outpatients diagnosed with COPD from 3 hospitals in South Korea participated in the study. Data were collected from March to June 2010 and analyzed with descriptive statistics, Pearson correlation, and hierarchical multiple regression using the SPSS WIN program. The level of depression reported in this study was 13.84. Sleep disturbance, not living with a spouse, and self-efficacy were all predictors of depression and accounted for 45% of the variance. These findings show the need to screen routinely for sleep disturbance in patients with COPD and support potential benefits of interventions to enhance self-efficacy and quality of sleep in reducing depression in COPD patients.

  7. Delirium in acute promyelocytic leukemia patients: two case reports

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Delirium is a frequently misdiagnosed and inadequately treated neuropsychiatric complication most commonly observed in terminally ill cancer patients. To our knowledge this is the first report describing delirium in two patients aged less than 60 years and enrolled in an intensive chemotherapeutic protocol for acute promyelocytic leukemia. Case presentation Two female Caucasian acute promyelocytic leukemia patients aged 46 and 56 years developed delirium during their induction treatment with all-trans retinoic acid and idarubicin. In both cases symptoms were initially attributed to all-trans retinoic acid that was therefore immediately suspended. In these two patients several situations may have contribute to the delirium: in patient 1 a previous psychiatric disorder, concomitant treatments with steroids and benzodiazepines, a severe infection and central nervous system bleeding while in patient 2 steroid treatment and isolation. In patient 1 delirium was treated with short-term low-doses of haloperidol while in patient 2 non-pharmacologic interventions had a beneficial role. When the diagnosis of delirium was clear, induction treatment was resumed and both patients completed their therapeutic program without any relapse of the psychiatric symptoms. Both patients are alive and in complete remission as far as their leukemia is concerned. Conclusions We suggest that patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia eligible to intensive chemotherapy should be carefully evaluated by a multisciplinary team including psychiatrists in order to early recognize symptoms of delirium and avoid inadequate treatments. In case of delirium, both pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic interventions may be considered. PMID:24237998

  8. Measuring depressive symptoms among treatment-resistant seizure disorder patients: POMS Depression scale as an alternative to the BDI-II.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Nathan M; Szaflarski, Jerzy P; Szaflarski, Magdalena; Kent, Glenn P; Schefft, Bruce K; Howe, Steven R; Privitera, Michael D

    2005-09-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is the most prevalent psychiatric comorbidity among patients with treatment-resistant seizures. The Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) is often used to measure the severity of self-reported depressive symptoms among patients with seizure disorders. In contrast, researchers often use the Profile of Mood States (POMS) Depression (D) scale to assess depressed mood among other medical patient groups. The clinical significance of POMS-D scores among seizure disorder patients is not clear. In this study, we computed the correlation of POMS-D and BDI-II scores, determined a formula for converting POMS-D scores to BDI-II scores, and computed the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) of the POMS-D among seizure disorder patients. Two BDI-II cutoffs (BDI-II16 and 20) were used as criteria for significant reported depressive symptoms. We found a strong correlation between POMS-D and BDI-II scores. Analyses indicated that POMS-D scores strongly predict BDI-II scores. In addition, the sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV values obtained demonstrated that POMS-D scores accurately classify seizure disorder patients who endorse significant depressive symptoms. These results suggest that the POMS-D may be effective in measuring reported depressive symptoms among seizure disorder patients.

  9. Antimuscarinic Agent Treatment Affecting Patient-Reported Outcomes in Overactive Bladder Syndrome With Depressive Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We investigated improvements in overactive bladder symptoms and depressive symptoms after solifenacin treatment in overactive bladder patients with or without depressive symptoms. Methods We performed a prospective study of patients who had been diagnosed with overactive bladder from July 2013 to June 2014. Based on the Beck Depression Inventory questionnaire, the test subjects were divided into group 1, without depressive symptoms (0–9 points), and group 2, with depressive symptoms (10 or more points). The patients were administered 5 mg of solifenacin for 3 months. The following outcomes were analyzed at the first visit, 4 weeks, and 12 weeks: the overactive bladder symptom score (OABSS), International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), patients’ perceptions of their bladder condition, and the Beck Depression Inventory. Results A total of 72 patients participated, and 52 patients completed the study. Most outcome measures showed improvements in both groups at weeks 4 and 12. Especially in group 2, the questionnaires showed significant improvements from baseline to week 12, indicating that solifenacin was effective at treating overactive bladder symptoms (group 1 vs. group 2: OABSS, −2.67±0.80 vs. −3.00±0.77; P<0.01; IPSS-total, −2.14±2.15 vs. −4.94±1.70; P<0.01). Statistically significant decreases in the Beck Depression Inventory score from baseline to weeks 4 and 12 were observed in group 2 (group 1 vs. group 2: 1.43±0.74 vs. −2.68±4.05 at week 4, P<0.001; 0.10±3.37 vs. −5.52±5.82 at week 12, P<0.001). Conclusions In overactive bladder patients with depressive symptoms, solifenacin can help improve quality of life and depressive symptoms at the same time. PMID:28043114

  10. The role of 5-HT1A receptors in mediating acute negative effects of antidepressants: implications in pediatric depression.

    PubMed

    Rahn, K A; Cao, Y-J; Hendrix, C W; Kaplin, A I

    2015-05-05

    Acute antidepressant exposure elevates the frequency of impulsive behavior and suicidal thoughts in children and adolescents with major depressive disorder (MDD). Long-term antidepressant treatment, however, is beneficial for pediatric MDD, so it is necessary to explore novel treatments that prevent the potentially dangerous consequences of acute antidepressant initiation. In the present study, a treatment strategy designed to reverse the acute negative behavioral effects of antidepressants was tested in rodents. Co-administration of the 5-HT1A receptor (5-HT1AR) antagonist WAY-100635 reversed the negative effects of acute fluoxetine, a serotonin reuptake inhibitor, but not reboxetine, a norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, supporting the involvement of 5-HT1AR in mediating the negative consequences of acute selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) treatment. No 5-HT1AR antagonists are currently approved for use in pediatric populations, so alternative strategies should be explored. One such strategy was suggested based on the hypothesis that the rate of 5-HT1AR activation and the subsequent inhibition of serotonergic neuron activity caused by acute SSRI administration is proportional to the loading rate of an antidepressant. Existing pharmacological data were examined, and significant correlations were observed between the half-life of antidepressants and the rate of suicide-related events (SREs). Specifically, antidepressants with longer half-lives have lower rates of SREs. On the basis of these data, novel dosing strategies were developed for five antidepressants to mimic the pharmacological profile of the antidepressant with the longest half-life, fluoxetine. These dosing strategies could be used to decrease the rate of SREs associated with acute antidepressant treatment in pediatric MDD until an improved pharmacological treatment is developed.

  11. [Association of obesity and depression].

    PubMed

    Rihmer, Zoltán; Purebl, György; Faludi, Gábor; Halmy, László

    2008-10-01

    It has been long known that the frequency of overweight and obese people is higher among depressed and bipolar patients than in the general population. The marked alteration of body weight (and appetite) is one of the most frequent of the 9 symptoms of major depressive episode, and these symptoms occur during recurrent episodes of depression with a remarkably high consequence. According to studies with representative adult population samples, in case of obesity (BMI over 30) unipolar or bipolar depression is significantly more frequently (20-45%) observable. Since in case of depressed patients appetite and body weight reduction is observable during the acute phase, the more frequent obesity in case of depressed patients is related (primarily) not only to depressive episodes, but rather to lifestyle factors, to diabetes mellitus also more frequently occurring in depressed patients, to comorbid bulimia, and probably to genetic-biological factors (as well as to pharmacotherapy in case of medicated patients). At the same time, according to certain studies, circadian symptoms of depression give rise to such metabolic processes in the body which eventually lead to obesity and insulin resistance. According to studies in unipolar and bipolar patients, 57-68% of patients is overweight or obese, and the rate of metabolic syndrome was found to be between 25-49% in bipolar patients. The rate of metabolic syndrome is further increased by pharmacotherapy. Low total and HDL cholesterol level increases the risk for depression and suicide and recent studies suggest that omega-3-fatty acids possess antidepressive efficacy. Certain lifestyle factors relevant to healthy metabolism (calorie reduction in food intake, regular exercise) may be protective factors related to depression as well. The depression- and possibly suicide-provoking effect of sibutramine and rimonabant used in the pharmacotherapy of obesity is one of the greatest recent challenges for professionals and patients

  12. [Preliminary research on multi-neurotransmitters' change regulation in 120 depression patients' brains].

    PubMed

    Chi, Ming; Qing, Xue-Mei; Pan, Yan-Shu; Xu, Feng-Quan; Liu, Chao; Zhang, Cheng; Xu, Zhen-Hua

    2014-04-01

    In view of the effective traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) in the treatment of clinical depression, the mechanism is not clear, this study attempts to research the cause of depression in a complex situation to lay the foundation for the next step of TCM curative effect evaluation. Based on the brain wave of 120 depression patients and 40 ordinary person, the change regulation of acetylcholine, dopamine, norepinephrine, depression neurotransmitters and excited neurotransmitters in the whole and various encephalic regions' multi-neurotransmitters of depression patients-serotonin are analysed by search of encephalo-telex (SET) system, which lays the foundation for the diagnosis of depression. The result showed that: contrased with the normal person group, the mean value of the six neurotransmitters in depression patients group are: (1) in the whole encephalic region of depression patients group the dopamine fall (P < 0.05), and in the double centralregions, right temporal region and right parietal region distinct fall (P < 0.01); (2) in the right temporal region of depression patients group the serotonin rise (P < 0.05); (3) in the right central region, left parietal region of depression patients group the acetylcholine fall (P < 0.05), left rear temporal region fall obviously (P < 0.01). The correlation research between antagonizing pairs of neurotransmitters and neurotransmitters: (1) the three antagonizing pairs of neurotransmitters-serotonin and dopamine, acetylcholine and norepinephrine, depression neurotransmitters and excited neurotransmitters, in ordinary person group and depression patients group are characterizeed by middle or strong negative correlation. Serotonin and dopamine, which are characterized by weak negative correlation in the right rear temporal region of ordinary person group, are characterized by strong negative correlation in the other encephalic regions and the whole encephalic (ordinary person group except the right rear temporal region

  13. Quality of life, anxiety and depression in Turkish breast cancer patients and in their husbands.

    PubMed

    Alacacioglu, Ahmet; Yavuzsen, Tugba; Dirioz, Meliha; Yilmaz, Ugur

    2009-12-01

    The aim of the present study is to investigate anxiety and depression levels and quality of life of Turkish breast cancer patients and their husbands with Beck depression, STAI scoring system, and EORTC-QLQ-C30 quality of life scale. Fifty-five patients with breast cancer undergoing chemotherapy who applied to Dokuz Eylul University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, and their husbands were included in this study. The series of forms including the questions regarding the demographic characteristics of the patient, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), and EORTC-QLQ-C30 (version 3) were completed during face-to-face interviews by trained interviewers for determination of the psychological status and quality of life of the patients. The mean Beck depression scores of patients and their husbands were 13 +/- 9.3 (range 2-46) and 7.9 +/- 5.7 (range 0-27) (P = 0.001). The mean STAI scores of patients and their husbands were 44.9 +/- 8.7 (range 20-58) and 41.7 +/- 8.0 (range 26-59) (P = 0.09).Twenty-nine percent of the patients and 5.4% of the husbands (Beck Depression scores > or = 17 points) were determined as depressive. It was determined that the EORTC-QLQ C30 physical and social function scales of the patients were significantly lower than their husbands. The difference of global quality of life scores and other function scales (role, cognitive, emotional function scales) between patients and their husbands were not significant. It was found that depression of breast cancer patients were significantly higher than their husbands. But there was no significant difference between the EORTC-QLQ C30 global quality of life scores and STAI scores of the breast cancer patients and their husbands.

  14. CLINICAL AND THERAPEUTIC CORRELATIONS IN PATIENTS WITH SLIGHT ACUTE PANCREATITIS

    PubMed Central

    MUNHOZ-FILHO, Clewis Henri; BATIGÁLIA, Fernando; FUNES, Hamilton Luiz Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Background Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease of the pancreas due to enzymatic autodigestion which can cause necrosis or multiple organ failure; its pathophysiology is not fully known yet. Aim To evaluate the correlation between clinical and therapeutic data in patients with mild acute pancreatitis. Methods A retrospective study in 55 medical records of patients admitted with acute mild pancreatitis was realized to analyze the association between age, leukocytosis, serum glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase and lactate dehydrogenase, glucose, antibiotics, time admission and Ranson´s scores. Results There was a positive association between less intensive care (strict hydration, analgesia and monitoring of vital signs), early antibiotic therapy (monotherapy), early return to diet after 48 hours and laboratory control of the serum amylase and lipase (high in the first week and decreasing after 10 days, without any prognostic value). Conclusions Changes in the management of patients with mild acute pancreatitis, such as enteral nutrition, rational use of lower spectrum antibiotics and intensive care, have contributed significantly to the reduction of hospitalization time and mortality. PMID:25861064

  15. The contribution of adult attachment and perceived social support to depressive symptoms in patients with HIV.

    PubMed

    Hinnen, Chris; Schreuder, Imke; Jong, Eefje; van Duijn, Miranda; Dahmen, Rutger; van Gorp, Eric C M

    2012-01-01

    The present study investigated the relationship between adult attachment style and depressive symptomatology in patients with HIV. Moreover, perceived social support was investigated as a potential mediator between adult attachment and depressive symptoms. A sample of 233 HIV-infected patients (90% male) completed questionnaires assessing adult attachment style (Relationship Questionnaire), depressive symptoms (Beck Depression Inventory), and perceived social support (Medical Outcomes Study Social Support Survey). After controlling for demographic and medical variables, an insecure adult attachment style was found to be strongly related with depressive symptoms. Half of the insecurely attached patients reported clinically elevated levels of distress, while one in nine securely attached patients reported elevated levels of distress (χ(2)=32.25, p=0.001). Moreover, the association between attachment style and depressive symptomatology was found to be partly mediated through perceived social support. This study strongly supports the notion that an insecure attachment style is a vulnerability factor for developing depressive symptoms that would warrant clinical attention when confronted with a chronic illness such as HIV. The clinical implications of these findings are discussed.

  16. Associations of Preexisting Depression and Anxiety With Hospitalization in Patients With Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chamberlain, Alanna M.; Vickers, Kristin S.; Colligan, Robert C.; Weston, Susan A.; Rummans, Teresa A.; Roger, Véronique L.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the risk of hospitalization and death in relation to preexisting depression and anxiety among patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD). PATIENTS AND METHODS: The cohort consisted of 799 Olmsted County, MN, residents diagnosed with CVD (myocardial infarction or heart failure) from January 1, 1979, to December 31, 2009, who completed a Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) prior to their event. The MMPI was used to identify depression and anxiety, and participants were followed up for hospitalizations and death during an average of 6.2 years. RESULTS: Depression and anxiety were identified in 282 (35%) and 210 (26%) participants, respectively. After adjustment, depression and anxiety were independently associated with a 28% (95% confidence interval [CI], 8%-51%) and 26% (95% CI, 3%-53%) increased risk of being hospitalized, respectively. Depression also conferred an increased risk of all-cause mortality of similar magnitude, whereas the hazard ratio for anxiety was not statistically significant. The combined occurrence of depression and anxiety led to a 35% (95% CI, 8%-71%) increase in the risk of hospitalizations. CONCLUSION: Among patients with CVD, both preexisting depression and anxiety, occurring on average 17 years before the CVD event, independently predict hospitalizations. In addition, the 2 conditions may act synergistically on increasing health care utilization in patients with CVD. PMID:22033250

  17. Towards a new conceptualization of depression in older adult cancer patients: a review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Saracino, Rebecca M.; Rosenfeld, Barry; Nelson, Christian J.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Identifying depression in older adults with cancer presents a set of unique challenges, as it combines the confounding influences of cancer and its treatment with the developmental changes associated with aging. This paper reviews the phenomenology of depression in older adults, and individuals diagnosed with cancer. Method PsychInfo, PubMed, Web of Science, and Google Scholar databases were searched for English-language studies addressing the phenomenology, symptoms, or assessment of depression in older adults and those with cancer. Results The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders (DSM) criteria that appear to be relevant to both older adults and cancer patients are anhedonia, concentration difficulties, sleep disturbances, psychomotor retardation/agitation, and loss of energy. Possible alternative criteria that may be important considerations included constructs such as loss of purpose, loneliness, and irritability in older adults. Among cancer patients, tearfulness, social withdrawal, and not participating in treatment despite ability to do so were identified as potentially important symptoms. Conclusions Current DSM criteria may not adequately assess depression in older cancer patients and alternative criteria may be important to inform the understanding and identification of depression in this population. Enhancing diagnostic accuracy of depression is important as both the over-diagnosis and under-diagnosis is accompanied with significant costs. Thus, continued research exploring the phenomenology and identifying effective indicators of depression in older cancer patients is needed. PMID:26312455

  18. The effects of combined hyperbaric oxygen therapy on patients with post-stroke depression.

    PubMed

    Yan, Dong; Shan, Jin; Ze, Yu; Xiao-Yan, Zeng; Xiao-Hua, Hu

    2015-05-01

    [Purpose] To observe the effect of combined hyperbaric oxygen therapy on patients with post-stroke depression. [Subjects] Ninety patients with post-stroke depression were randomly divided into 3 groups: fluoxetine treatment group (n = 30), hyperbaric oxygen therapy group (n = 30), and hyperbaric oxygen combined treatment group (n = 30). [Methods] Fluoxetine treatment group received anti-depression drugs (fluoxetine, 20 mg/day), hyperbaric oxygen therapy group received hyperbaric oxygen (once a day, 5 days/week), hyperbaric oxygen combined treatment group received fluoxetine and hyperbaric oxygen treatments as described above. All patients received routine rehabilitation therapy. Hamilton Depression Scale (HAMD), and Scandinavian Stroke Scale (SSS) scores were evaluated before and at the end of 4th week. The total effective rate of depression release between the 3 groups was also compared at the end of study. [Results] The end scores of HAMD and SSS in the 3 groups were significantly lower than those before treatment. The total effective rate of combined hyperbaric oxygen therapy group after treatment was higher than the other two groups. [Conclusions] Combined hyperbaric oxygen therapy plays an important role in the treatment of patients with post-stroke depression. The total effective rate of combined hyperbaric oxygen therapy was higher than other routine anti post-stroke depression treatments.

  19. [Morita Therapy to Treat Depression: When and How to Encourage Patients to Join Activities].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Kei

    2015-01-01

    The author discusses how Morita therapy is used to treat depression, illustrated with a clinical case, and makes comparisons between Morita therapy and behavioral activation (BA). The author further examines the issue of when and how to encourage patients to join activities in clinical practice in Japan. Both Morita therapy and BA share at least a common view that it is effective to activate patients' constructive behavior at a certain point in depression treatment. However, BA therapists, compared to Morita therapists, seem to pay less attention to the necessity of resting and the appropriate timing for introducing behavioral activation. There may be some contextual differences between depressive patients in Japan and those in North America. In the case of Japanese patients, exhaustion from overwork is often considered a factor triggering the development of depression. At the same time, the Morita-based pathogenic model of depression seems different from BA's model of the same disorder. BA's approach to understanding depression may be considered a psychological (behavioristic) model. In this model, the cause of depression lies in: (a) a lack of positive reinforcement, and (b) negative reinforcement resulting from avoidance of the experience of discomfort. Therefore, the basic strategy of BA is to release depressive patients from an avoidant lifestyle, which serves as a basis for negative reinforcement, and to redirect the patients toward activities which offer the experience of positive reinforcement BA is primarily practiced by clinical psychologists in the U. S. while psychiatrists prescribe medication as a medical service. On the other hand, the clinical practice of treating depression in Japan is based primarily on medical models of depression. This is also true of Morita therapy, but in a broad sense. While those who follow medical models in a narrow sense try to identify the cause of illness and then remove it, Morita therapists pay more attention to the

  20. Cognitive Therapy to Prevent Depressive Relapse in Adults

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The high prevalence, frequent relapse, and recurrence of major depressive disorder (MDD) increase its personal and societal costs. Cognitive therapy (CT) aims to decrease depressive symptoms and prevent relapse/recurrence. We review prevention evidence for acute, continuation, and maintenance CTs for patients whose depression is active, remitted, and recovered, respectively. Evidence suggests that patients relapse less often after discontinuing acute phase CT versus discontinuing pharmacotherapy. Continuation CT further decreases relapse relative to inactive controls and similarly to active pharmacotherapy. Maintenance CT may decrease recurrence but needs rigorous evaluation. Post-acute CT’s preventive effects appear greater for higher-risk patients (e.g., with residual depressive symptoms, unstable acute-phase treatment response, childhood trauma, more prior depressive episodes), although risks may vary by specific CTs. PMID:25729758

  1. Older patients undergoing dialysis treatment: cognitive functioning, depressive mood and health-related quality of life.

    PubMed

    Tyrrell, J; Paturel, L; Cadec, B; Capezzali, E; Poussin, G

    2005-07-01

    An increasing number of older patients receive dialysis treatment to compensate for deficient kidneys due to end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Ethical questions arise about the benefits of dialysis when a patient appears unwilling or unable to comply with this treatment procedure. Such attitudes and behaviour may be due to psychological factors, but these are not routinely assessed. The purpose of this study was to evaluate levels of cognitive impairment, depressive mood and self-reported quality of life in older dialysis patients (>70 years). A total of 51 outpatients receiving dialysis were assessed by psychologists, using a depression scale (MADRS), two cognitive tests (MMSE and BEC 96), and a quality of life questionnaire (NHP). Sixty percent of the patients were depressed, and between 30-47% had cognitive impairment. Almost half of the depressed patients were also cognitively impaired. The scores for self-reported quality of life varied widely within the sample. Cognitive impairment and depressive mood are often overlooked and underestimated in this population. Regular assessments of depressive mood, cognitive ability and quality of life are recommended, given the prevalence of problems in these domains for older dialysis patients. The information obtained should assist staff as they reflect on individual cases where the benefits of continuing treatment are being examined.

  2. Glutamate level detection by magnetic resonance spectroscopy in patients with post-stroke depression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuan; Li, Yue-Hua; Li, Ming-Hua; Lu, Jing; Zhao, Jun-Gong; Sun, Xiao-Jiang; Zhang, Bin; Ye, Jian-Lin

    2012-02-01

    In recent studies, the glutamate (Glu) level has been quantified using the modified STEAM sequence on 3T MRI. We enrolled 15 healthy volunteers and a group of 51 patients who experienced stroke for the first time and had a good prognosis. The patients with infarction were divided into three groups according to their scores by using the DSM-IV diagnostic criteria for major depressive disorder and the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS). We studied the association between post-stroke depression and (1)H-MRS measurements in unaffected frontal lobes. Single-voxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) was performed to assess N-acetylaspartate/creatine (NAA)/Cr, (Glu)/Cr, choline (Cho)/Cr, and myoinositol (mI)/Cr ratios in stroke patients. The 11 patients (21.5%) who met the criteria for depression and 9 patients (17.6%) who had a high score for HDRS, (>14) but were not depressed, had a significantly higher Glu/Cr ratio than patients who scored ≤14 on HDRS and control groups (p < 0.001). No differences were found in NAA/Cr, Cho/Cr, or mI/Cr between the groups after stroke. These findings suggest that post-stroke depression is accompanied by changes in glutamate levels in the frontal lobe.

  3. Turkish hysterectomy and mastectomy patients - depression, body image, sexual problems and spouse relationships.

    PubMed

    Keskin, Gulseren; Gumus, Aysun Babacan

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare hysterectomy and mastectomy patients in terms of depression, body image, sexual problems and spouse relations. The study group comprised 94 patients being treated in Ege University Radiation Oncology Clinic, Tulay Aktas Oncology Hospital, Izmir Aegean Obstetrics and Gynecology Training and Research Hospital for breast and gynecological cancer (42 patients underwent mastectomy, 52 patient underwent hysterectomy). Five scales were used in the study: Sociodemographic Data Form, Beck Depression Scale, Body Image Scale, Dyadic Adjustment Scale, Golombok Rust Sexual Functions Scale. Mastectomy patients were more depressive than hysterectomy patients (t = 2.78, p < 0.01). Body image levels of the patients were bad but there was no significant difference between the two patient groups (p > 0.05). Hysterectomy patients had more problems in terms of vaginismus (t = 2.32, p < 0.05), avoidance of sexual intercourse (t = 2.31, p < 0.05), communication (t = 2.06, p < 0.05), and frequency of sexual intercourse than mastectomy patients (t = 2.10, p < 0.05). As compared with compliance levels between patients and spouses; hysterectomy patients had more problems related to expression of emotions than mastectomy patients (t = 2.12, p < 0.05). In conclusion, body image was negative, mastectomy was associated with more depression and hysterectomy with greater sexual problems and difficulties with spouse relationships.

  4. Acute Time to Response in the Treatment for Adolescents with Depression Study (TADS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kratochvil, Christopher; Emslie, Graham; Silva, Susan; McNulty, Steve; Walkup, John; Curry, John; Reinecke, Mark; Vitiello, Benedetto; Rohde, Paul; Feeny, Nora; Casat, Charles; Pathak, Sanjeev; Weller, Elizabeth; May, Diane; Mayes, Taryn; Robins, Michele; March, John

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To examine the time to response for both pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy in the Treatment for Adolescents with Depression Study (TADS). Method: Adolescents (N = 439, ages 12 to 17 years) with major depressive disorder were randomized to fluoxetine (FLX), cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), their combination (COMB), or pill placebo…

  5. Cross-Sectional and Longitudinal Relationships between Depressive Symptoms and Brain Atrophy in MS Patients

    PubMed Central

    Stuke, Heiner; Hanken, Katrin; Hirsch, Jochen; Klein, Jan; Wittig, Fabian; Kastrup, Andreas; Hildebrandt, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Depressive symptoms are a frequent and distressing phenomenon in Multiple Sclerosis (MS) patients. Cross-sectional research links these symptoms to reduced brain gray matter volumes in parts of the prefrontal and temporal lobe as well as subcortical structures like the hippocampus, nucleus caudatus and globus pallidus. Nevertheless, prospective relationships between regional gray matter volume and the course of depressive symptoms are poorly understood. Methods: Forty-four patients with relapsing–remitting or secondary progressive MS participated in a prospective study with two assessments of depressive symptoms and high-resolution MRI with an inter-test-interval of 17 months. Relationships between baseline gray matter volume and baseline depressive symptoms, as well as prospective associations between the development of atrophy and depression were assessed using voxel-based morphometry (VBM). Results: Cross-sectional analyses revealed an association between depressive symptoms and gray matter loss in the left temporal lobe. Prospective analysis showed that gray matter losses in the right middle cingulate and middle frontal gyrus at baseline predicted increasing depressive symptoms during follow-up. Increase in depressive symptoms was related to a concomitant increase in atrophy in the left thalamus and right globus pallidus. Discussion: Our results fit well into the concept of a disturbed cortico–striatal–pallido–thalamic loop in depression. In this framework, progressive gray matter loss in limbic basal ganglia structures including globus pallidus and thalamus may lead to depression-typical deficits in hedonic motivation, whereas atrophy of the prefrontal cortex may contribute to maladaptive coping strategies, promoting an unfavorable development of depressive symptoms. PMID:28018194

  6. Early prediction of major depression in chronic hepatitis C patients during peg-interferon α-2b treatment by assessment of vegetative-depressive symptoms after four weeks

    PubMed Central

    Robaeys, Geert; De Bie, Jozef; Wichers, Marieke C; Bruckers, Liesbeth; Nevens, Frederik; Michielsen, Peter; Van Ranst, Marc; Buntinx, Frank

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To study the predictive value of the vegetative-depressive symptoms of the Zung Depression Rating Scale for the occurrence of depression during treatment with peg-interferon α-2b of chronic hepatitis C (CHC) patients. METHODS: The predictive value of vegetative-depressive symptoms at 4 wk of treatment for the occurrence of a subsequent diagnosis of major depressive disorder (MDD) was studied in CHC patients infected after substance use in a prospective, multi-center treatment trial in Belgium. The presence of vegetative-depressive symptoms was assessed using the Zung Scale before and 4 wk after the start of antiviral treatment. RESULTS: Out of 49 eligible patients, 19 (39%) developed MDD. The area under the ROC curve of the vegetative Zung subscale was 0.73, P = 0.004. The sensitivity at a cut-point of > 15/35 was 95% (95% CI: 74-100). The positive predictive value equalled 44% (95% CI: 29-60). CONCLUSION: In this group of Belgian CHC patients infected after substance use, antiviral treatment caused a considerable risk of depression. Seven vegetative-depressive symptoms of the Zung scale at wk 4 of treatment predicted 95% of all emerging depressions, at a price of 56% false positive test results. PMID:17963300

  7. Geriatric multidimensional assessment for elderly patients with acute respiratory diseases.

    PubMed

    Bellelli, Giuseppe; Bruni, Adriana; Malerba, Mara; Mazzone, Andrea; Aliberti, Stefano; Pesci, Alberto; Annoni, Giorgio

    2014-04-01

    The case of an 87-year-old woman who falls at home and is admitted to the Emergency Department of an acute hospital with delirium exemplify a common situation that physicians face in their everyday clinical practice. We describe the typical context of frailty in which acute illnesses frequently present in frail elderly patients and, in particular, the relationship between comorbidity, disability and frailty. We also report the current knowledge about frailty theories and we focus on the "atypical" presentation of many acute illnesses. Major attention is devoted on delirium and on mobility impairment, two of the most common atypical symptoms of elderly frail subjects. Finally we describe the evidence on the comprehensive geriatric assessment, i.e., the method that is required to identify and understand the ultimate needs of elderly complex subjects.

  8. Impact of psychotherapy on insomnia symptoms in patients with depression and multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Baron, Kelly Glazer; Corden, Marya; Jin, Ling; Mohr, David C

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the prevalence of insomnia in multiple sclerosis patients with comorbid depression, associations between psychological symptoms, multiple sclerosis symptoms and insomnia, and to test effects of a 16-week protocol-based psychotherapy intervention for depression on insomnia symptoms. Participants with multiple sclerosis and depression (n = 127) were randomized to telephone administered cognitive behavioral therapy and telephone administered supportive emotion-focused therapy. Multiple sclerosis functional limitation was measured at baseline. Depression, insomnia, anxiety and quality of life were evaluated at pre treatment, mid treatment (8 weeks), and post treatment (16 weeks). Prevalence of insomnia ≥3 times per week was 78% at pre treatment and 43% at post treatment. Insomnia at baseline was associated with depression, multiple sclerosis related mood symptoms and anxiety. Middle of the night awakenings were associated with swallowing and speech problems. Improvements in insomnia were associated with improvement in depression and anxiety. Participants with residual insomnia were more likely to have major depressive disorder, greater multiple sclerosis severity, elevated anxiety and lower mental components of quality of life. Results demonstrate rates of insomnia in patients with comorbid multiple sclerosis and depression are higher than those reported in the general multiple sclerosis population and additional insomnia treatment is indicated beyond the treatment of comorbid psychological disorders.

  9. Investigating Factors Associated with Depression of Type 2 Diabetic Retinopathy Patients in China

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Duo; Dong, Qing; Gu, Zhifeng

    2015-01-01

    Aims and objectives To assess the depression status of type 2 diabetic retinopathy patients in Nantong China and to identify factors associated with depression. Methods Two hundred and ninety-four patients with type 2 diabetic retinopathy were recruited from the Affiliated Hospital of Nantong University. The severity of DR was measured in the worse eye. Depressive symptoms were assessed with the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D); the quality of life was measured with the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form 36 (SF-36). The logistic regression analyses were used to identify the independent factors of depression. Results The mean age of the study subjects was 57.77 years (SD: 9.64). Approximately 35.7% of subjects reported depressive symptoms (n = 105).Multiple logistic regression analyses showed that female gender (p = 0.014), low monthly income (p = 0.01), poor vision in the better eye (P = 0.002), laser treatment history (p = 0.01) were significant risk factors for depression. The quality of life of individuals with CES-D score<16 was significantly better compared with individuals with CES-D score≥16. Conclusion The reported depressive symptoms among type 2 diabetic retinopathy population is higher in Nantong China. Gender, salary, vision acuity and treatment history were important risk factors linked to this disorder in the Chinese type 2 diabetic retinopathy population from Nantong. More attention by medical care personnel needs to be paid to the psychological health of this population. PMID:26151365

  10. Conceptual Models of Depression in Primary Care Patients: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Karasz, Alison; Garcia, Nerina; Ferri, Lucia

    2009-01-01

    Conventional psychiatric treatment models are based on a biopsychiatric model of depression. A plausible explanation for low rates of depression treatment utilization among ethnic minorities and the poor is that members of these communities do not share the cultural assumptions underlying the biopsychiatric model. The study examined conceptual models of depression among depressed patients from various ethnic groups, focusing on the degree to which patients’ conceptual models ‘matched’ a biopsychiatric model of depression. The sample included 74 primary care patients from three ethnic groups screening positive for depression. We administered qualitative interviews assessing patients’ conceptual representations of depression. The analysis proceeded in two phases. The first phase involved a strategy called ‘quantitizing’ the qualitative data. A rating scheme was developed and applied to the data by a rater blind to study hypotheses. The data was subjected to statistical analyses. The second phase of the analysis involved the analysis of thematic data using standard qualitative techniques. Study hypotheses were largely supported. The qualitative analysis provided a detailed picture of primary care patients’ conceptual models of depression and suggested interesting directions for future research. PMID:20182550

  11. Risk Factors for Delirium During Acute and Subacute Stages of Various Disorders in Patients Admitted to Rehabilitation Units

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess the risk factors for delirium in patients admitted to a rehabilitation unit for acute or subacute neurological or musculoskeletal disorders. Methods We reviewed the medical records of 537 patients admitted to a rehabilitation unit and selected 398 patients in the acute or subacute stage of various neurological or musculoskeletal disorders. Among them, patients who had suffered from delirium were categorized into the delirium group (n=65), and the other patients were categorized into the non-delirium group (n=333). As potential risk factors for delirium, the patients' diagnosis, underlying disease, demographic data, hospital stay duration, surgery, and laboratory findings were reviewed, and the differences between the two groups with respect to independent risk factors were analyzed. Results The average age in the delirium group was higher; the hospital stay and pre-transfer periods were longer. A large proportion of the patients were admitted for musculoskeletal disorders, and many patients had diabetes mellitus, dementia, and depression as underlying diseases. Laboratory tests revealed increases in the white blood cells (WBC), glucose, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), total bilirubin, aspartate transaminase (AST), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels in the delirium group, while the hemoglobin, calcium, phosphorus, protein, albumin, and potassium levels were decreased. Depression, musculoskeletal disorders, traumatic brain injury, elevated WBC, BUN, AST, and CRP levels, and decreased potassium and phosphorus levels were identified as independent risk factors for delirium. Conclusion Risk factors treatable before delirium onset were identified in rehabilitation patients in acute and subacute stages of various disorders. Early diagnosis and prevention of these risk factors could decrease delirium occurrence and increase rehabilitation effectiveness. PMID:28119839

  12. Pleural effusions in patients with acute leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Faiz, Saadia A; Bashoura, Lara; Lei, Xiudong; Sampat, Keeran R; Brown, Tiffany C; Eapen, George A; Morice, Rodolfo C; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Jimenez, Carlos A

    2013-02-01

    Pleural effusions are rarely observed in patients with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS)/myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN). Therefore the underlying etiology of pleural effusions and the efficacy and safety of pleural procedures in this population has not been well studied. In a retrospective review of cases from 1997 to 2007, we identified 111 patients with acute leukemia or MDS/MPN who underwent pleural procedures. Clinical characteristics were reviewed, and survival outcomes were estimated by Kaplan-Meier methods. A total of 270 pleural procedures were performed in 111 patients (69 AML, 27 ALL, 15 MDS/MPN). The main indications for pleural procedures were possible infection (49%) and respiratory symptoms (48%), and concomitant clinical symptoms included fever (34%), dyspnea (74%), chest pain (24%) and cough (37%). Most patients had active disease (61%). The most frequent etiology of pleural effusions was infection (47%), followed by malignancy (36%). Severe thrombocytopenia (platelet count < 20 × 10(3)/µL) was present in 43% of the procedures, yet the procedural complication rate was only 1.9%. Multivariate analysis revealed that older age, AML, MDS/MPN and active disease status were associated with a shorter median overall survival. Infection and malignant involvement are the most common causes of pleural effusion in patients with acute leukemia or MDS. After optimizing platelet count and coagulopathy, thoracentesis may be performed safely and with high diagnostic yield in this population. Survival in these patients is determined by the response to treatment of the hematologic malignancy.

  13. Neuroanatomical Predictors of Awakening in Acutely Comatose Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kowalski, Robert G.; Buitrago, Manuel M.; Duckworth, Josh; Chonka, Zachary D.; Puttgen, H. Adrian; Stevens, Robert D.; Geocadin, Romergryko G.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Lateral brain displacement has been associated with loss of consciousness and poor outcome in a range of acute neurologic disorders. We studied the association between lateral brain displacement and awakening from acute coma. Methods This prospective observational study included all new onset coma patients admitted to the Neurosciences Critical Care Unit (NCCU) over 12 consecutive months. Head computed tomography (CT) scans were analyzed independently at coma onset, after awakening, and at follow-up. Primary outcome measure was awakening, defined as the ability to follow commands before hospital discharge. Secondary outcome measures were discharge Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), modified Rankin Scale, Glasgow Outcome Scale, and hospital and NCCU lengths of stay. Results Of the 85 patients studied, the mean age was 58 ± 16 years, 51% were female, and 78% had cerebrovascular etiology of coma. Fifty-one percent of patients had midline shift on head CT at coma onset and 43 (51%) patients awakened. In a multivariate analysis, independent predictors of awakening were younger age (odds ratio [OR] = 1.039, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.002–1.079, p = 0.040), higher GCS score at coma onset (OR = 1.455, 95% CI = 1.157–1.831, p = 0.001), nontraumatic coma etiology (OR = 4.464, 95% CI = 1.011–19.608, p = 0.048), lesser pineal shift on follow-up CT (OR = 1.316, 95% CI = 1.073–1.615, p = 0.009), and reduction or no increase in pineal shift on follow-up CT (OR = 11.628, 95% CI = 2.207–62.500, p = 0.004). Interpretation Reversal and/or limitation of lateral brain displacement are associated with acute awakening in comatose patients. These findings suggest objective parameters to guide prognosis and treatment in patients with acute onset of coma. PMID:25628166

  14. Effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor on treating tinnitus in patients stratified for presence of depression or anxiety.

    PubMed

    Oishi, Naoki; Kanzaki, Sho; Shinden, Seiichi; Saito, Hideyuki; Inoue, Yasuhiro; Ogawa, Kaoru

    2010-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, paroxetine, on treating tinnitus.Tinnitus patients stratified for the presence of depression and anxiety were studied retrospectively. Fifty-six patients were observed for more than 6 months. They were initially treated with paroxetine only at a dose of 10 mg/day for 2-4 weeks; thereafter, the dose was increased to 20 mg/day. Tinnitus distress was evaluated with the Tinnitus Handicap Inventory (THI) and with visual analog scales (VASs) for tinnitus loudness and annoyance. Depression and anxiety were measured with the Self-Rating Depression Scale (SDS) and the trait section of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI). The patients were grouped according to their SDS and STAI scores, and each variable was compared at baseline and the 6-month follow-up. Changes among these variables were also examined to determine whether reduced tinnitus distress was related to the improvement of depression or anxiety. Patients with both depression and anxiety showed better results (decrease in THI, VASs, SDS and STAI scores) than patients with anxiety alone, or patients without depression and anxiety. In patients with depression and anxiety, changes in tinnitus variables and changes in depression and anxiety scores were strongly correlated. In other patients, however, changes in tinnitus variables and changes in depression and anxiety scores were not correlated. These results suggest that paroxetine is effective in treating distressed tinnitus patients with depression and anxiety by reducing their tinnitus severity as well as their depression and anxiety.

  15. The acute response of plasma brain-derived neurotrophic factor as a result of exercise in major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, Gunnar; Lira, Claudia Mallea; Johansson, Jon; Wisén, Anita; Wohlfart, Björn; Ekman, Rolf; Westrin, Asa

    2009-10-30

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and other neurotrophins are believed to play an important role in affective disorders. In this study we investigated plasma-BDNF response during an incremental exercise test in 18 patients suffering from moderate major depressive disorder (MDD) and 18 controls. The patients were not treated with antidepressants or neuroleptics. Possible associations between plasma plasma-BDNF levels, dexamethasone suppression test cortisol levels and Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) scores were also tested. No difference in basal BDNF levels between patients and controls was found. BDNF increased significantly during exercise in both male and female patients as well as in male controls, with no significant differences between the groups. BDNF levels declined after exercise, but after 60 min of rest BDNF levels showed tendencies to increase again in male patients. No correlation between BDNF and cortisol or MADRS scores was found. We conclude that unmedicated patients with moderate depression and normal activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis do not have a disturbed peripheral BDNF release during exercise. The BDNF increase 60 min after interruption of exercise in male patients might indicate up-regulated BDNF synthesis, but this needs to be further investigated in future studies.

  16. Does early improvement in depressive symptoms predict subsequent remission in patients with depression who are treated with duloxetine?

    PubMed Central

    Sueki, Akitsugu; Suzuki, Eriko; Takahashi, Hitoshi; Ishigooka, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose In this prospective study, we examined whether early reduction in depressive symptoms predicts later remission to duloxetine in the treatment of depression, as monitored using the Montgomery–Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS). Patients and methods Among the 106 patients who were enrolled in this study, 67 were included in the statistical analysis. A clinical evaluation using the MADRS was performed at weeks 0, 4, 8, 12, and 16 after commencing treatment. For each time point, the MADRS total score was separated into three components: dysphoria, retardation, and vegetative scores. Results Remission was defined as an MADRS total score of ≤10 at end point. From our univariate logistic regression analysis, we found that improvements in both the MADRS total score and the dysphoria score at week 4 had a significant interaction with subsequent remission. Furthermore, age and sex were significant predictors of remission. There was an increase of approximately 4% in the odds of remission for each unit increase in age, and female sex had an odds of remission of 0.318 times that of male sex (remission rate for men was 73.1% [19/26] and for women 46.3% [19/41]). However, in the multivariate model using the change from baseline in the total MADRS, dysphoria, retardation, and vegetative scores at week 4, in which age and sex were included as covariates, only sex retained significance, except for an improvement in the dysphoria score. Conclusion No significant interaction was found between early response to duloxetine and eventual remission in this study. Sex difference was found to be a predictor of subsequent remission in patients with depression who were treated with duloxetine, with the male sex having greater odds of remission. PMID:27307739

  17. Symptom predictors of response to electroconvulsive therapy in older patients with treatment-resistant depression