Science.gov

Sample records for acutely dissociated neurons

  1. A perfusion chamber for physiological studies with acutely dissociated neurons.

    PubMed

    Wonderlin, W F; Weinreich, D

    1987-11-01

    We describe a recording chamber that immobilizes acutely dissociated neurons on an ultra-fine mesh grid positioned above a moving stream of perfusate. This chamber is easily fabricated and has two attributes for single-electrode voltage-clamp or patch-clamp recording: (1) shallow immersion (less than 20 micron) of the neurons, and (2) stable recording with rapid perfusion rates. PMID:3695568

  2. Subtype Identification in Acutely Dissociated Rat Nodose Ganglion Neurons Based on Morphologic Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xiao-Long; Xu, Wen-Xiao; Yan, Zhen-Yu; Qian, Zhao; Xu, Bing; Liu, Yang; Han, Li-Min; Gao, Rui-Chen; Li, Jun-Nan; Yuan, Mei; Zhao, Chong-Bao; Qiao, Guo-fen; Li, Bai-Yan

    2013-01-01

    Nodose ganglia are composed of A-, Ah- and C-type neurons. Despite their important roles in regulating visceral afferent function, including cardiovascular, pulmonary, and gastrointestinal homeostasis, information about subtype-specific expression, molecular identity, and function of individual ion transporting proteins is scarce. Although experiments utilizing the sliced ganglion preparation have provided valuable insights into the electrophysiological properties of nodose ganglion neuron subtypes, detailed characterization of their electrical phenotypes will require measurements in isolated cells. One major unresolved problem, however, is the difficulty to unambiguously identify the subtype of isolated nodose ganglion neurons without current-clamp recording, because the magnitude of conduction velocity in the corresponding afferent fiber, a reliable marker to discriminate subtypes in situ, can no longer be determined. Here, we present data supporting the notion that application of an algorithm regarding to microscopic structural characteristics, such as neuron shape evaluated by the ratio between shortest and longest axis, neuron surface characteristics, like membrane roughness, and axon attachment, enables specific and sensitive subtype identification of acutely dissociated rat nodose ganglion neurons, by which the accuracy of identification is further validated by electrophysiological markers and overall positive predictive rates is 89.26% (90.04%, 76.47%, and 98.21% for A-, Ah, and C-type, respectively). This approach should aid in gaining insight into the molecular correlates underlying phenotypic heterogeneity of nodose ganglia. Additionally, several critical points that help for neuron identification and afferent conduction calibration are also discussed. PMID:23904796

  3. NAAG reduces NMDA receptor current in CA1 hippocampal pyramidal neurons of acute slices and dissociated neurons.

    PubMed

    Bergeron, Richard; Coyle, Joseph T; Tsai, Guochan; Greene, Robert W

    2005-01-01

    N-acetylaspartylglutamate (NAAG) is an abundant neuropeptide in the nervous system, yet its functions are not well understood. Pyramidal neurons of the CA1 sector of acutely prepared hippocampal slices were recorded using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. At low concentrations (20 microM), NAAG reduced isolated N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-mediated synaptic currents or NMDA-induced currents. The NAAG-induced change in the NMDA concentration/response curve suggested that the antagonism was not competitive. However, the NAAG-induced change in the concentration/response curve for the NMDAR co-agonist, glycine, indicated that glycine can overcome the NAAG antagonism. The antagonism of the NMDAR induced by NAAG was still observed in the presence of LY-341495, a potent and selective mGluR3 antagonist. Moreover, in dissociated pyramidal neurons of the CA1 region, NAAG also reduced the NMDA current and this effect was reversed by glycine. These results suggest that NAAG reduces the NMDA currents in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons. PMID:15354184

  4. Mechanical Dissociation of Retinal Neurons with Vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motomura, Tamami; Hayashida, Yuki; Murayama, Nobuki

    The neuromorphic device, which implements the functions of biological neural circuits by means of VLSI technology, has been collecting much attention in the engineering fields in the last decade. Concurrently, progress in neuroscience research has revealed the nonlinear computation in single neuron levels, suggesting that individual neurons are not merely the circuit elements but computational units. Thus, elucidating the properties of neuronal signal processing is thought to be an essential step for developing the next generation of neuromorphic devices. In the present study, we developed a method for dissociating single neurons from specific sublayers of mammalian retinas with using no proteolytic enzymes but rather combining tissue incubation in a low-Ca2+ medium and the vibro-dissociation technique developed for the slices of brains and spinal cords previously. Our method took shorter time of the procedure, and required less elaborated skill, than the conventional enzymatic method did; nevertheless it yielded enough number of the cells available for acute electrophysiological experiments. The isolated retinal neurons were useful for measuring the nonlinear membrane conductances as well as the spike firing properties under the perforated-patch whole-cell configuration. These neurons also enabled us to examine the effects of proteolytic enzymes on the membrane excitability in those cells.

  5. Dissociated ciliary ganglion neurons in vitro: survival and synapse formation.

    PubMed Central

    Nishi, R; Berg, D K

    1977-01-01

    Normally, about half of the ciliary ganglion neurons in 8-day-old chick embryos die before day 14 in ovo. However, when dissociated ciliary ganglion neurons were prepared from either 8- or 14-day-old embryos and grown in cell culture with skeletal myotubes, essentially all of the neurons survived for at least 3 weeks. Many of the neurons formed functional synapses on myotubes under these conditions; some neuromuscular synapses could be detected as early as 20 hr after addition of the ganglion cells to muscle cultures. In contrast, most neurons from 8-day embryos survived for only a few days when grown alone on either polyornithine- or collagen-coated dishes. These results suggest that neurons destined to die in ovo can be rescued when grown in cell culture with myotubes and that under these conditions the neurons develop and express differentiated properties. Images PMID:270756

  6. Acute lower motor neuron tetraparesis.

    PubMed

    Añor, Sònia

    2014-11-01

    Flaccid nonambulatory tetraparesis or tetraplegia is an infrequent neurologic presentation; it is characteristic of neuromuscular disease (lower motor neuron [LMN] disease) rather than spinal cord disease. Paresis beginning in the pelvic limbs and progressing to the thoracic limbs resulting in flaccid tetraparesis or tetraplegia within 24 to 72 hours is a common presentation of peripheral nerve or neuromuscular junction disease. Complete body flaccidity develops with severe decrease or complete loss of spinal reflexes in pelvic and thoracic limbs. Animals with acute generalized LMN tetraparesis commonly show severe motor dysfunction in all limbs and severe generalized weakness in all muscles. PMID:25441630

  7. Live cell calcium imaging of dissociated vomeronasal neurons.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Angeldeep; Dey, Sandeepa; Stowers, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Sensory neurons in the vomeronasal organ (VNO) are thought to mediate a specialized olfactory response. Currently, very little is known about the identity of stimulating ligands or their cognate receptors that initiate neural activation. Each sensory neuron is thought to express 1 of approximately 250 variants of Vmn1Rs, Vmn2Rs (A, B, or D), or FPRs which enables it to be tuned to a subset of ligands (Touhara and Vosshall, Annu Rev Physiol 71:307-332, 2009). The logic of how different sources of native odors or purified ligands are detected by this complex sensory repertoire remains mostly unknown. Here, we describe a method to compare and analyze the response of VNO sensory neurons to multiple stimuli using conventional calcium imaging. This method differs from other olfactory imaging approaches in that we dissociate the tightly packed sensory epithelium into individual single cells. The advantages of this approach include (1) the use of a relatively simple approach and inexpensive microscopy, (2) comparative analysis of several hundreds of neurons to multiple stimuli with single-cell resolution, and (3) the possibility of isolating single cells of interest to further analyze by molecular biology techniques including in situ RNA hybridization, immunofluorescence, or creating single-cell cDNA libraries (Malnic et al., Cell 96:713-723, 1999). PMID:24014362

  8. Switch Function and Pathological Dissociation in Acute Psychiatric Inpatients

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Chui-De; Tseng, Mei-Chih Meg; Chien, Yi-Ling; Liao, Shih-Cheng; Liu, Chih-Min; Yeh, Yei-Yu; Hwu, Hai-Gwo

    2016-01-01

    Swift switching, along with atypical ability on updating and inhibition, has been found in non-clinical dissociators. However, whether swift switching is a cognitive endophenotype that intertwines with traumatisation and pathological dissociation remains unknown. Unspecified acute psychiatric patients were recruited to verify a hypothesis that pathological dissociation is associated with swift switching and traumatisation may explain this relationship. Behavioural measures of intellectual function and three executive functions including updating, switching and inhibition were administered, together with standardised scales to evaluate pathological dissociation and traumatisation. Our results showed superior control ability on switching and updating in inpatients who displayed more symptoms of pathological dissociation. When all three executive functions were entered as predictors, in addition to intellectual quotient and demographic variables to regress upon pathological dissociation, switching rather than updating remained the significant predictor. Importantly, the relationship between pathological dissociation and switching became non-significant when the effect of childhood trauma were controlled. The results support a trauma-related switching hypothesis which postulates swift switching as a cognitive endophenotype of pathological dissociation; traumatisation in childhood may explain the importance of swift switching. PMID:27123578

  9. Dissociation of neuronal, electrodermal, and evaluative responses in disgust extinction.

    PubMed

    Klucken, Tim; Schweckendiek, Jan; Merz, Christian J; Vaitl, Dieter; Stark, Rudolf

    2013-06-01

    Disgust extinction is an important mechanism relevant for the treatment of psychiatric disorders. However, only a few studies have investigated disgust extinction. Moreover, because disgust sensitivity (DS) is considered as a relevant factor for learning processes, this study also investigated the potential relationship between DS and disgust extinction learning. The aim of this study was to explore the neuronal correlates of disgust extinction, as well as changes in skin conductance responses (SCRs) and evaluative conditioning. Twenty subjects were exposed to a differential extinction paradigm, in which a previous conditioned, and now unreinforced, stimulus (conditioned stimulus, CS+) was compared to a second stimulus (CS-), which was previously not associated with the unconditioned stimulus (UCS). Extinction learning was measured on three different response levels (BOLD responses, SCRs, and evaluative conditioning). Regarding evaluative conditioning, the CS+ was rated as more unpleasant than the CS-. Interestingly, significantly increased amygdala responses and SCRs toward to the CS- were observed. Finally, a (negative) trend was found between DS scores and BOLD responses of the prefrontal cortex. The present findings showed a dissociation of different response levels. The increased CS- responses could be explained by the assumption that the increased amygdala activity may reflect a safety learning signal during the first extinction trials and the subjective focus may therefore shift from the CS+ to the CS-. The correlation finding supports previous studies postulating that DS hampers extinction processes. The present results point toward dissociations between the response levels in context of extinction processes. PMID:23731074

  10. Feasibility Study of Odor Biosensor Using Dissociate Neuronal Culture with Gene Expression of Ionotropic Odorant Receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanada, Norio; Sakurai, Takeshi; Mitsuno, Hidefumi; Bakkum, Douglas; Kanzaki, Ryohei; Takahashi, Hirokazu

    We propose a highly sensitive and real-time odor biosensor by expressing ionotropic odorant receptors of insects into dissociated cultures of neurons of rats. The odorant-gated ion channel structure of insect odorant receptor is expected to allow easy functional expression into cells. The neuronal dissociated cultures of rats have two significant advantages: a long lifetime comparable to rats, i.e., a few years; and amplification ability from weak ionic currents of odorant receptors into easily detectable action potentials of neurons. In the present work, in order to show the feasibility of the proposed sensor, we attempt to express the pheromone receptors of silkmoth, Bombyx mori, into cultured neurons of rats. We demonstrate that 10% of neuronal cells transfected using Lipofectamine successfully expressed pheromone receptors, and that these cells showed significant increase of calcium signals by 50% at the presentation of pheromone.

  11. MDMA, cannabis, and cocaine produce acute dissociative symptoms.

    PubMed

    van Heugten-Van der Kloet, Dalena; Giesbrecht, Timo; van Wel, Janelle; Bosker, Wendy M; Kuypers, Kim P C; Theunissen, Eef L; Spronk, Desirée B; Jan Verkes, Robbert; Merckelbach, Harald; Ramaekers, Johannes G

    2015-08-30

    Some drugs of abuse may produce dissociative symptoms, but this aspect has been understudied. We explored the dissociative potential of three recreational drugs (3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), cannabis, and cocaine) during intoxication and compared their effects to literature reports of dissociative states in various samples. Two placebo-controlled studies were conducted. In Study 1 (N=16), participants received single doses of 25, 50, and 100 mg of MDMA, and placebo. In Study 2 (N=21), cannabis (THC 300 µg/kg), cocaine (HCl 300 mg), and placebo were administered. Dissociative symptoms as measured with the Clinician-Administered Dissociative States Scale (CADSS) significantly increased under the influence of MDMA and cannabis. To a lesser extent, this was also true for cocaine. Dissociative symptoms following MDMA and cannabis largely exceeded those observed in schizophrenia patients, were comparable with those observed in Special Forces soldiers undergoing survival training, but were lower compared with ketamine-induced dissociation. Cocaine produced dissociative symptoms that were comparable with those observed in schizophrenia patients, but markedly less than those in Special Forces soldiers and ketamine users. Thus, MDMA and cannabis can produce dissociative symptoms that resemble dissociative pathology. The study of drug induced dissociation is important, because it may shed light on the mechanisms involved in dissociative psychopathology. PMID:26003508

  12. Attenuated inhibition by levofloxacin, l-isomer of ofloxacin, on GABA response in the dissociated rat hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Imanishi, T; Akahane, K; Akaike, N

    1995-06-30

    The effects of ofloxacin (OFLX) and its isomers, levofloxacin (LVFX) and DR-3354, on the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-induced Cl- current in acutely dissociated rat hippocampal CA1 neurons were investigated using nystatin perforated patch recording configuration under voltage-clamp conditions. At 10(-5) M these 3 compounds themselves did not affect the GABA response. Biphenylacetic acid (BPA) at 10(-5) M also had no effect on the GABA response, but BPA greatly suppressed the GABA response in combination with these 3 compounds without affecting the reversal potential of GABA response. The inhibitory effects of OFLX and DR-3354 on the GABA response were stronger than that of LVFX. LVFX inhibited the response in a competitive and voltage-independent manner. The results suggest that LVFX has lower CNS adverse effects, such as convulsions, compared to OFLX. PMID:7478164

  13. Acute Stimulation of Transplanted Neurons Improves Motoneuron Survival, Axon Growth, and Muscle Reinnervation

    PubMed Central

    Grumbles, Robert M.; Liu, Yang; Thomas, Christie M.; Wood, Patrick M.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Few options exist for treatment of pervasive motoneuron death after spinal cord injury or in neurodegenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Local transplantation of embryonic motoneurons into an axotomized peripheral nerve is a promising approach to arrest the atrophy of denervated muscles; however, muscle reinnervation is limited by poor motoneuron survival. The aim of the present study was to test whether acute electrical stimulation of transplanted embryonic neurons promotes motoneuron survival, axon growth, and muscle reinnervation. The sciatic nerve of adult Fischer rats was transected to mimic the widespread denervation seen after disease or injury. Acutely dissociated rat embryonic ventral spinal cord cells were transplanted into the distal tibial nerve stump as a neuron source for muscle reinnervation. Immediately post-transplantation, the cells were stimulated at 20 Hz for 1 h. Other groups were used to control for the cell transplantation and stimulation. When neurons were stimulated acutely, there were significantly more neurons, including cholinergic neurons, 10 weeks after transplantation. This led to enhanced numbers of myelinated axons, reinnervation of more muscle fibers, and more medial and lateral gastrocnemius muscles were functionally connected to the transplant. Reinnervation reduced muscle atrophy significantly. These data support the concept that electrical stimulation rescues transplanted motoneurons and facilitates muscle reinnervation. PMID:23544978

  14. Three-dimensional micro-electrode array for recording dissociated neuronal cultures.

    PubMed

    Musick, Katherine; Khatami, David; Wheeler, Bruce C

    2009-07-21

    This work demonstrates the design, fabrication, packaging, characterization, and functionality of an electrically and fluidically active three-dimensional micro-electrode array (3D MEA) for use with neuronal cell cultures. The successful function of the device implies that this basic concept-construction of a 3D array with a layered approach-can be utilized as the basis for a new family of neural electrode arrays. The 3D MEA prototype consists of a stack of individually patterned thin films that form a cell chamber conducive to maintaining and recording the electrical activity of a long-term three-dimensional network of rat cortical neurons. Silicon electrode layers contain a polymer grid for neural branching, growth, and network formation. Along the walls of these electrode layers lie exposed gold electrodes which permit recording and stimulation of the neuronal electrical activity. Silicone elastomer micro-fluidic layers provide a means for loading dissociated neurons into the structure and serve as the artificial vasculature for nutrient supply and aeration. The fluidic layers also serve as insulation for the micro-electrodes. Cells have been shown to survive in the 3D MEA for up to 28 days, with spontaneous and evoked electrical recordings performed in that time. The micro-fluidic capability was demonstrated by flowing in the drug tetrotodoxin to influence the activity of the culture. PMID:19568672

  15. Peritraumatic dissociation mediates the relationship between acute panic and chronic posttraumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Richard A; Brooks, Robert; Silove, Derrick; Creamer, Mark; O'Donnell, Meaghan; McFarlane, Alexander C

    2011-05-01

    Although peritraumatic dissociation predicts subsequent posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), little is understood about the mechanism of this relationship. This study examines the role of panic during trauma in the relationship between peritraumatic dissociation and subsequent PTSD. Randomized eligible admissions to 4 major trauma hospitals across Australia (n=244) were assessed during hospital admission and within one month of trauma exposure for panic, peritraumatic dissociation and PTSD symptoms, and subsequently re-assessed for PTSD three months after the initial assessment (n=208). Twenty (9.6%) patients met criteria for PTSD at 3-months post injury. Structural equation modeling supported the proposition that peritraumatic derealization (a subset of dissociation) mediated the effect of panic reactions during trauma and subsequent PTSD symptoms. The mediation model indicated that panic reactions are linked to severity of subsequent PTSD via derealization, indicating a significant indirect relationship. Whereas peritraumatic derealization is associated with chronic PTSD symptoms, this relationship is influenced by initial acute panic responses. PMID:21457945

  16. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor acutely inhibits AMPA-mediated currents in developing sensory relay neurons.

    PubMed

    Balkowiec, A; Kunze, D L; Katz, D M

    2000-03-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is expressed by many primary sensory neurons that no longer require neurotrophins for survival, indicating that BDNF may be used as a signaling molecule by the afferents themselves. Because many primary afferents also express glutamate, we investigated the possibility that BDNF modulates glutamatergic AMPA responses of newborn second-order sensory relay neurons. Perforated-patch, voltage-clamp recordings were made from dissociated neurons of the brainstem nucleus tractus solitarius (nTS), a region that receives massive primary afferent input from BDNF-containing neurons in the nodose and petrosal cranial sensory ganglia. Electrophysiological analysis was combined in some experiments with anterograde labeling of primary afferent terminals to specifically analyze responses of identified second-order neurons. Our data demonstrate that BDNF strongly inhibits AMPA-mediated currents in a large subset of nTS cells. Specifically, AMPA responses were either completely abolished or markedly inhibited by BDNF in 73% of postnatal day (P0) cells and in 82% of identified P5 second-order sensory relay neurons. This effect of BDNF is mimicked by NT-4, but not NGF, and blocked by the Trk tyrosine kinase inhibitor K252a, consistent with a requirement for TrkB receptor activation. Moreover, analysis of TrkB expression in culture revealed a close correlation between the percentage of nTS neurons in which BDNF inhibits AMPA currents and the percentage of neurons that exhibit TrkB immunoreactivity. These data document a previously undefined mechanism of acute modulation of AMPA responses by BDNF and indicate that BDNF may regulate glutamatergic transmission at primary afferent synapses. PMID:10684891

  17. Characterization of the hyperpolarization-activated chloride current in dissociated rat sympathetic neurons.

    PubMed

    Clark, S; Jordt, S E; Jentsch, T J; Mathie, A

    1998-02-01

    1. Dissociated rat superior cervical ganglion (SCG) neurons have been shown to possess a hyperpolarization-activated inwardly rectifying chloride current. The current was not altered by changes in external potassium concentration, replacing external cations with NMDG (N-methyl-D-glucamine) or by addition of 10 mM caesium or barium ions. 2. The reversal potential of the current was altered by changing external anions. The anion selectivity of the current was Cl- > Br- > I- > cyclamate. All substituted permeant anions also blocked the current. 3. The current was blocked by DIDS (4,4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulphonic acid), 9AC (anthracene-9-carboxylic acid) and NPPB (5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)benzoic acid) but was unaffected by SITS (4-acetamido-4'-isothiocyanatostilbene- 2,2'-disulphonic acid) and niflumic acid. The effective blockers were voltage dependent; DIDS and NPPB were more effective at depolarized potentials while 9AC was more effective at hyperpolarized potentials. 4. The current was enhanced by extracellular acidification and reduced by extracellular alkalinization. Reducing external osmolarity was without effect in conventional whole-cell recording but enhanced current amplitude in those perforated-patch recordings where little current was evident in control external solution. 5. The current in SCG neurons was blocked by external cadmium and zinc. ClC-2 chloride currents expressed in Xenopus oocytes were also sensitive to block by these divalent ions and by DIDS but the sensitivity of ClC-2 to block by cadmium ions was lower than that of the current in SCG neurons. 6. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) experiments showed the presence of mRNA for ClC-2 in SCG neurons but not in rat cerebellar granule cells which do not possess a hyperpolarization-activated Cl- current. 7. The data suggest that ClC-2 may be functionally expressed in rat SCG neurons. This current may play a role in regulating the internal chloride

  18. Traumatic bereavement, acute dissociation, and posttraumatic stress: 14 years after the MS Estonia disaster.

    PubMed

    Arnberg, Filip K; Eriksson, Nils-Gustaf; Hultman, Christina M; Lundin, Tom

    2011-04-01

    This prospective longitudinal study aimed to examine posttraumatic stress in survivors 14 years after a ferry disaster, and estimate short- and long-term changes in stress associated with traumatic bereavement and acute dissociation. There were 852 people who perished in the disaster, 137 survived. The 51 Swedish survivors were surveyed with the Impact of Event Scale-Revised (IES-R) at 3 months, 1, 3, and 14 years (response rates 82%, 65%, 51%, and 69%). Symptoms decreased from 3 months to 1 year; no change was found thereafter. After 14 years, 27% reported significant symptoms. Traumatic bereavement, but not acute dissociation, was associated with long-term symptom elevation. Chronic posttraumatic stress can persist in a minority of survivors, and traumatic bereavement appears to hinder recovery. PMID:21442665

  19. A fast flexible ink-jet printing method for patterning dissociated neurons in culture.

    PubMed

    Sanjana, Neville E; Fuller, Sawyer B

    2004-07-30

    We present a new technique that uses a custom-built ink-jet printer to fabricate precise micropatterns of cell adhesion materials for neural cell culture. Other work in neural cell patterning has employed photolithography or "soft lithographic" techniques such as micro-stamping, but such approaches are limited by their use of an un-alterable master pattern such as a mask or stamp master and can be resource-intensive. In contrast, ink-jet printing, used in low-cost desktop printers, patterns material by depositing microscopic droplets under robotic control in a programmable and inexpensive manner. We report the use of ink-jet printing to fabricate neuron-adhesive patterns such as islands and other shapes using poly(ethylene) glycol as the cell-repulsive material and a collagen/poly-D-lysine (PDL) mixture as the cell-adhesive material. We show that dissociated rat hippocampal neurons and glia grown at low densities on such patterns retain strong pattern adherence for over 25 days. The patterned neurons are comparable to control, un-patterned cells in electrophysiological properties and in immunocytochemical measurements of synaptic density and inhibitory cell distributions. We suggest that an inexpensive desktop printer may be an accessible tool for making micro-island cultures and other basic patterns. We also suggest that ink-jet printing may be extended to a range of developmental neuroscience studies, given its ability to more easily layer materials, build substrate-bound gradients, construct out-of-plane structure, and deposit sources of diffusible factors. PMID:15183267

  20. Effects of acute spinalization on neurons of postural networks

    PubMed Central

    Zelenin, Pavel V.; Lyalka, Vladimir F.; Hsu, Li-Ju; Orlovsky, Grigori N.; Deliagina, Tatiana G.

    2016-01-01

    Postural limb reflexes (PLRs) represent a substantial component of postural corrections. Spinalization results in loss of postural functions, including disappearance of PLRs. The aim of the present study was to characterize the effects of acute spinalization on two populations of spinal neurons (F and E) mediating PLRs, which we characterized previously. For this purpose, in decerebrate rabbits spinalized at T12, responses of interneurons from L5 to stimulation causing PLRs before spinalization, were recorded. The results were compared to control data obtained in our previous study. We found that spinalization affected the distribution of F- and E-neurons across the spinal grey matter, caused a significant decrease in their activity, as well as disturbances in processing of posture-related sensory inputs. A two-fold decrease in the proportion of F-neurons in the intermediate grey matter was observed. Location of populations of F- and E-neurons exhibiting significant decrease in their activity was determined. A dramatic decrease of the efficacy of sensory input from the ipsilateral limb to F-neurons, and from the contralateral limb to E-neurons was found. These changes in operation of postural networks underlie the loss of postural control after spinalization, and represent a starting point for the development of spasticity. PMID:27302149

  1. Effects of acute spinalization on neurons of postural networks.

    PubMed

    Zelenin, Pavel V; Lyalka, Vladimir F; Hsu, Li-Ju; Orlovsky, Grigori N; Deliagina, Tatiana G

    2016-01-01

    Postural limb reflexes (PLRs) represent a substantial component of postural corrections. Spinalization results in loss of postural functions, including disappearance of PLRs. The aim of the present study was to characterize the effects of acute spinalization on two populations of spinal neurons (F and E) mediating PLRs, which we characterized previously. For this purpose, in decerebrate rabbits spinalized at T12, responses of interneurons from L5 to stimulation causing PLRs before spinalization, were recorded. The results were compared to control data obtained in our previous study. We found that spinalization affected the distribution of F- and E-neurons across the spinal grey matter, caused a significant decrease in their activity, as well as disturbances in processing of posture-related sensory inputs. A two-fold decrease in the proportion of F-neurons in the intermediate grey matter was observed. Location of populations of F- and E-neurons exhibiting significant decrease in their activity was determined. A dramatic decrease of the efficacy of sensory input from the ipsilateral limb to F-neurons, and from the contralateral limb to E-neurons was found. These changes in operation of postural networks underlie the loss of postural control after spinalization, and represent a starting point for the development of spasticity. PMID:27302149

  2. Neuronal mechanism for acute mechanosensitivity in tactile-foraging waterfowl

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Eve R.; Mastrotto, Marco; Laursen, Willem J.; Schulz, Vincent P.; Goodman, Jena B.; Funk, Owen H.; Gallagher, Patrick G.; Gracheva, Elena O.; Bagriantsev, Sviatoslav N.

    2014-01-01

    Relying almost exclusively on their acute sense of touch, tactile-foraging birds can feed in murky water, but the cellular mechanism is unknown. Mechanical stimuli activate specialized cutaneous end organs in the bill, innervated by trigeminal afferents. We report that trigeminal ganglia (TG) of domestic and wild tactile-foraging ducks exhibit numerical expansion of large-diameter mechanoreceptive neurons expressing the mechano-gated ion channel Piezo2. These features are not found in visually foraging birds. Moreover, in the duck, the expansion of mechanoreceptors occurs at the expense of thermosensors. Direct mechanical stimulation of duck TG neurons evokes high-amplitude depolarizing current with a low threshold of activation, high signal amplification gain, and slow kinetics of inactivation. Together, these factors contribute to efficient conversion of light mechanical stimuli into neuronal excitation. Our results reveal an evolutionary strategy to hone tactile perception in vertebrates at the level of primary afferents. PMID:25246547

  3. Assessing DSM-5 latent subtypes of acute stress disorder dissociative or intrusive?

    PubMed

    Armour, Cherie; Hansen, Maj

    2015-02-28

    Acute Stress Disorder (ASD) was first included in the DSM-IV in 1994. It was proposed to account for traumatic responding in the early post trauma phase and to act as an identifier for later Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). Unlike PTSD it included a number of dissociative indicators. The revised DSM-5 PTSD criterion included a dissociative-PTSD subtype. The current study assessed if a dissociative-ASD subtype may be present for DSM-5 ASD. Moreover, we assessed if a number of risk factors resulted in an increased probability of membership in symptomatic compared to a baseline ASD profile. We used data from 450 bank robbery victims. Latent profile analysis (LPA) was used to uncover latent profiles of ASD. Multinomial logistic regression was used to determine if female gender, age, social support, peritraumatic panic, somatization, and number of trauma exposures increased or decreased the probability of profile membership. Four latent profiles were uncovered and included an intrusion rather than dissociative subtype. Increased age and social support decreased the probability of individuals being grouped into the intrusion subtype whereas increased peritraumatic panic and somatization increased the probability of individuals being grouped into the intrusion subtype. Findings are discussed in regard to the ICD-11 and the DSM-5. PMID:25535010

  4. Spatiotemporal memory is an intrinsic property of networks of dissociated cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Ju, Han; Dranias, Mark R; Banumurthy, Gokulakrishna; VanDongen, Antonius M J

    2015-03-01

    The ability to process complex spatiotemporal information is a fundamental process underlying the behavior of all higher organisms. However, how the brain processes information in the temporal domain remains incompletely understood. We have explored the spatiotemporal information-processing capability of networks formed from dissociated rat E18 cortical neurons growing in culture. By combining optogenetics with microelectrode array recording, we show that these randomly organized cortical microcircuits are able to process complex spatiotemporal information, allowing the identification of a large number of temporal sequences and classification of musical styles. These experiments uncovered spatiotemporal memory processes lasting several seconds. Neural network simulations indicated that both short-term synaptic plasticity and recurrent connections are required for the emergence of this capability. Interestingly, NMDA receptor function is not a requisite for these short-term spatiotemporal memory processes. Indeed, blocking the NMDA receptor with the antagonist APV significantly improved the temporal processing ability of the networks, by reducing spontaneously occurring network bursts. These highly synchronized events have disastrous effects on spatiotemporal information processing, by transiently erasing short-term memory. These results show that the ability to process and integrate complex spatiotemporal information is an intrinsic property of generic cortical networks that does not require specifically designed circuits. PMID:25740531

  5. ACUTE ETHANOL SUPPRESSES GLUTAMATERGIC NEUROTRANSMISSION THROUGH ENDOCANNABINOIDS IN HIPPOCAMPAL NEURONS

    PubMed Central

    Basavarajappa, Balapal S.; Ninan, Ipe; Arancio, Ottavio

    2008-01-01

    Ethanol exposure during fetal development is a leading cause of long-term cognitive impairments. Studies suggest that ethanol exposure have deleterious effects on the hippocampus, a brain region that is important for learning and memory. Ethanol exerts its effects, in part, via alterations in glutamatergic neurotransmission, which is critical for the maturation of neuronal circuits during development. The current literature strongly supports the growing evidence that ethanol inhibits glutamate release in the neonatal CA1 hippocampal region. However, the exact molecular mechanism responsible for this effect is not well understood. In this study, we show that ethanol enhances endocannabinoid (EC) levels in cultured hippocampal neurons, possibly through calcium pathways. Acute ethanol depresses miniature postsynaptic current (mEPSC) frequencies without affecting their amplitude. This suggests that ethanol inhibits glutamate release. The CB1 receptors (CB1Rs) present on presynaptic neurons are not altered by acute ethanol. The CB1R antagonist SR 141716A reverses ethanol-induced depression of mEPSC frequency. Drugs that are known to enhance the in vivo function of ECs occlude ethanol effects on mEPSC frequency. Chelation of postsynaptic calcium by EGTA antagonizes ethanol-induced depression of mEPSC frequency. The activation of CB1R with the selective agonist WIN55,212-2 also suppresses the mEPSC frequency. This WIN55,212-2 effect is similar to the ethanol effects and is reversed by SR141716A. In addition, tetani-induced excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) are depressed by acute ethanol. SR141716A significantly reverses ethanol effects on evoked EPSC amplitude in a dual recording preparation. These observations, taken together, suggest the participation of ECs as retrograde messengers in the ethanol-induced depression of synaptic activities. PMID:18796007

  6. The dissociative anaesthetics, ketamine and phencyclidine, selectively reduce excitation of central mammalian neurones by N-methyl-aspartate.

    PubMed Central

    Anis, N. A.; Berry, S. C.; Burton, N. R.; Lodge, D.

    1983-01-01

    The interaction of two dissociative anaesthetics, ketamine and phencyclidine, with the responses of spinal neurones to the electrophoretic administration of amino acids and acetylcholine was studied in decerebrate or pentobarbitone-anaesthetized cats and rats. Both ketamine and phencyclidine selectively blocked excitation by N-methyl-aspartate (NMA) with little effect on excitation by quisqualate and kainate. Ketamine reduced responses to L-aspartate somewhat more than those of L-glutamate; the sensitivity of responses to these two putative transmitters was between that to NMA on one hand and that to quisqualate or kainate on the other. On Renshaw cells, ketamine and phencyclidine reduced responses to acetylcholine less than those to NMA but more than those to quisqualate or kainate. Dorsal root-evoked synaptic excitation of Renshaw cells was reduced to a greater extent than that following ventral root excitation. Intravenous ketamine, 2.5-20 mg/kg, and phencyclidine, 0.2-0.5 mg/kg, also selectively blocked excitation of neurones by NMA. Ketamine showed no consistent or selective effect on inhibition of spinal neurones by electrophoretically administered glycine or gamma-aminobutyricacid (GABA). The results suggest that reduction of synaptic excitation mediated via NMA receptors contributes to the anaesthetic/analgesic properties of these two dissociative anaesthetics. PMID:6317114

  7. Functional dissociation in sweet taste receptor neurons between and within taste organs of Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Thoma, Vladimiros; Knapek, Stephan; Arai, Shogo; Hartl, Marion; Kohsaka, Hiroshi; Sirigrivatanawong, Pudith; Abe, Ayako; Hashimoto, Koichi; Tanimoto, Hiromu

    2016-01-01

    Finding food sources is essential for survival. Insects detect nutrients with external taste receptor neurons. Drosophila possesses multiple taste organs that are distributed throughout its body. However, the role of different taste organs in feeding remains poorly understood. By blocking subsets of sweet taste receptor neurons, we show that receptor neurons in the legs are required for immediate sugar choice. Furthermore, we identify two anatomically distinct classes of sweet taste receptor neurons in the leg. The axonal projections of one class terminate in the thoracic ganglia, whereas the other projects directly to the brain. These two classes are functionally distinct: the brain-projecting neurons are involved in feeding initiation, whereas the thoracic ganglia-projecting neurons play a role in sugar-dependent suppression of locomotion. Distinct receptor neurons for the same taste quality may coordinate early appetitive responses, taking advantage of the legs as the first appendages to contact food. PMID:26893070

  8. Functional dissociation in sweet taste receptor neurons between and within taste organs of Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Thoma, Vladimiros; Knapek, Stephan; Arai, Shogo; Hartl, Marion; Kohsaka, Hiroshi; Sirigrivatanawong, Pudith; Abe, Ayako; Hashimoto, Koichi; Tanimoto, Hiromu

    2016-01-01

    Finding food sources is essential for survival. Insects detect nutrients with external taste receptor neurons. Drosophila possesses multiple taste organs that are distributed throughout its body. However, the role of different taste organs in feeding remains poorly understood. By blocking subsets of sweet taste receptor neurons, we show that receptor neurons in the legs are required for immediate sugar choice. Furthermore, we identify two anatomically distinct classes of sweet taste receptor neurons in the leg. The axonal projections of one class terminate in the thoracic ganglia, whereas the other projects directly to the brain. These two classes are functionally distinct: the brain-projecting neurons are involved in feeding initiation, whereas the thoracic ganglia-projecting neurons play a role in sugar-dependent suppression of locomotion. Distinct receptor neurons for the same taste quality may coordinate early appetitive responses, taking advantage of the legs as the first appendages to contact food. PMID:26893070

  9. Dissociation of response variability from firing rate effects in frontal eye field neurons during visual stimulation, working memory, and attention.

    PubMed

    Chang, Mindy H; Armstrong, Katherine M; Moore, Tirin

    2012-02-01

    Recent studies suggest that trial-to-trial variability of neuronal spiking responses may provide important information about behavioral state. Observed changes in variability during sensory stimulation, attention, motor preparation, and visual discrimination suggest that variability may reflect the engagement of neurons in a behavioral task. We examined changes in spiking variability of frontal eye field (FEF) neurons in a change detection task requiring monkeys to remember a visually cued location and direct attention to that location while ignoring distracters elsewhere. In this task, the firing rates (FRs) of FEF neurons not only continuously reflect the location of the remembered cue and select targets, but also predict detection performance on a trial-by-trial basis. Changes in FEF response variability, as measured by the Fano factor (FF), showed clear dissociations from changes in FR. The FF declined in response to visual stimulation at all tested locations, even in the opposite hemifield, indicating much broader spatial tuning of the FF compared with the FR. Furthermore, despite robust spatial modulation of the FR throughout all epochs of the task, spatial tuning of the FF did not persist throughout the delay period, nor did it show attentional modulation. These results indicate that changes in variability, at least in the FEF, are most effectively driven by visual stimulation, while behavioral engagement is not sufficient. Instead, changes in variability may reflect shifts in the balance between feedforward and recurrent sources of excitatory drive. PMID:22323732

  10. Analysis of neuronal cells of dissociated primary culture on high-density CMOS electrode array.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Eiko; Mita, Takeshi; Hubert, Julien; Bakkum, Douglas; Frey, Urs; Hierlemann, Andreas; Takahashi, Hirokazu; Ikegami, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Spontaneous development of neuronal cells was recorded around 4-34 days in vitro (DIV) with high-density CMOS array, which enables detailed study of the spatio-temporal activity of neuronal culture. We used the CMOS array to characterize the evolution of the inter-spike interval (ISI) distribution from putative single neurons, and estimate the network structure based on transfer entropy analysis, where each node corresponds to a single neuron. We observed that the ISI distributions gradually obeyed the power law with maturation of the network. The amount of information transferred between neurons increased at the early stage of development, but decreased as the network matured. These results suggest that both ISI and transfer entropy were very useful for characterizing the dynamic development of cultured neural cells over a few weeks. PMID:24109870

  11. Dissociable Behavioral, Physiological and Neural Effects of Acute Glucose and Fructose Ingestion: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, André; Zimak, Nina; Peterli, Ralph; Beglinger, Christoph; Borgwardt, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Previous research has revealed that glucose and fructose ingestion differentially modulate release of satiation hormones. Recent studies have begun to elucidate brain-gut interactions with neuroimaging approaches such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), but the neural mechanism underlying different behavioral and physiological effects of glucose and fructose are unclear. In this paper, we have used resting state functional MRI to explore whether acute glucose and fructose ingestion also induced dissociable effects in the neural system. Using a cross-over, double-blind, placebo-controlled design, we compared resting state functional connectivity (rsFC) strengths within the basal ganglia/limbic network in 12 healthy lean males. Each subject was administered fructose, glucose and placebo on three separate occasions. Subsequent correlation analysis was used to examine relations between rsFC findings and plasma concentrations of satiation hormones and subjective feelings of appetite. Glucose ingestion induced significantly greater elevations in plasma glucose, insulin, GLP-1 and GIP, while feelings of fullness increased and prospective food consumption decreased relative to fructose. Furthermore, glucose increased rsFC of the left caudatus and putamen, precuneus and lingual gyrus more than fructose, whereas within the basal ganglia/limbic network, fructose increased rsFC of the left amygdala, left hippocampus, right parahippocampus, orbitofrontal cortex and precentral gyrus more than glucose. Moreover, compared to fructose, the increased rsFC after glucose positively correlated with the glucose-induced increase in insulin. Our findings suggest that glucose and fructose induce dissociable effects on rsFC within the basal ganglia/limbic network, which are probably mediated by different insulin levels. A larger study would be recommended in order to confirm these findings. PMID:26107810

  12. Sleep active cortical neurons expressing neuronal nitric oxide synthase are active after both acute sleep deprivation and chronic sleep restriction.

    PubMed

    Zielinski, M R; Kim, Y; Karpova, S A; Winston, S; McCarley, R W; Strecker, R E; Gerashchenko, D

    2013-09-01

    Non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep electroencephalographic (EEG) delta power (~0.5-4 Hz), also known as slow wave activity (SWA), is typically enhanced after acute sleep deprivation (SD) but not after chronic sleep restriction (CSR). Recently, sleep-active cortical neurons expressing neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) were identified and associated with enhanced SWA after short acute bouts of SD (i.e., 6h). However, the relationship between cortical nNOS neuronal activity and SWA during CSR is unknown. We compared the activity of cortical neurons expressing nNOS (via c-Fos and nNOS immuno-reactivity, respectively) and sleep in rats in three conditions: (1) after 18-h of acute SD; (2) after five consecutive days of sleep restriction (SR) (18-h SD per day with 6h ad libitum sleep opportunity per day); (3) and time-of-day matched ad libitum sleep controls. Cortical nNOS neuronal activity was enhanced during sleep after both 18-h SD and 5 days of SR treatments compared to control treatments. SWA and NREM sleep delta energy (the product of NREM sleep duration and SWA) were positively correlated with enhanced cortical nNOS neuronal activity after 18-h SD but not 5days of SR. That neurons expressing nNOS were active after longer amounts of acute SD (18h vs. 6h reported in the literature) and were correlated with SWA further suggest that these cells might regulate SWA. However, since these neurons were active after CSR when SWA was not enhanced, these findings suggest that mechanisms downstream of their activation are altered during CSR. PMID:23685166

  13. Neuronal activity mediated regulation of glutamate transporter GLT-1 surface diffusion in rat astrocytes in dissociated and slice cultures.

    PubMed

    Al Awabdh, Sana; Gupta-Agarwal, Swati; Sheehan, David F; Muir, James; Norkett, Rosalind; Twelvetrees, Alison E; Griffin, Lewis D; Kittler, Josef T

    2016-07-01

    The astrocytic GLT-1 (or EAAT2) is the major glutamate transporter for clearing synaptic glutamate. While the diffusion dynamics of neurotransmitter receptors at the neuronal surface are well understood, far less is known regarding the surface trafficking of transporters in subcellular domains of the astrocyte membrane. Here, we have used live-cell imaging to study the mechanisms regulating GLT-1 surface diffusion in astrocytes in dissociated and brain slice cultures. Using GFP-time lapse imaging, we show that GLT-1 forms stable clusters that are dispersed rapidly and reversibly upon glutamate treatment in a transporter activity-dependent manner. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching and single particle tracking using quantum dots revealed that clustered GLT-1 is more stable than diffuse GLT-1 and that glutamate increases GLT-1 surface diffusion in the astrocyte membrane. Interestingly, the two main GLT-1 isoforms expressed in the brain, GLT-1a and GLT-1b, are both found to be stabilized opposed to synapses under basal conditions, with GLT-1b more so. GLT-1 surface mobility is increased in proximity to activated synapses and alterations of neuronal activity can bidirectionally modulate the dynamics of both GLT-1 isoforms. Altogether, these data reveal that astrocytic GLT-1 surface mobility, via its transport activity, is modulated during neuronal firing, which may be a key process for shaping glutamate clearance and glutamatergic synaptic transmission. GLIA 2016;64:1252-1264. PMID:27189737

  14. Neuronal activity mediated regulation of glutamate transporter GLT‐1 surface diffusion in rat astrocytes in dissociated and slice cultures

    PubMed Central

    Al Awabdh, Sana; Gupta‐Agarwal, Swati; Sheehan, David F.; Muir, James; Norkett, Rosalind; Twelvetrees, Alison E.; Griffin, Lewis D.

    2016-01-01

    The astrocytic GLT‐1 (or EAAT2) is the major glutamate transporter for clearing synaptic glutamate. While the diffusion dynamics of neurotransmitter receptors at the neuronal surface are well understood, far less is known regarding the surface trafficking of transporters in subcellular domains of the astrocyte membrane. Here, we have used live‐cell imaging to study the mechanisms regulating GLT‐1 surface diffusion in astrocytes in dissociated and brain slice cultures. Using GFP‐time lapse imaging, we show that GLT‐1 forms stable clusters that are dispersed rapidly and reversibly upon glutamate treatment in a transporter activity‐dependent manner. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching and single particle tracking using quantum dots revealed that clustered GLT‐1 is more stable than diffuse GLT‐1 and that glutamate increases GLT‐1 surface diffusion in the astrocyte membrane. Interestingly, the two main GLT‐1 isoforms expressed in the brain, GLT‐1a and GLT‐1b, are both found to be stabilized opposed to synapses under basal conditions, with GLT‐1b more so. GLT‐1 surface mobility is increased in proximity to activated synapses and alterations of neuronal activity can bidirectionally modulate the dynamics of both GLT‐1 isoforms. Altogether, these data reveal that astrocytic GLT‐1 surface mobility, via its transport activity, is modulated during neuronal firing, which may be a key process for shaping glutamate clearance and glutamatergic synaptic transmission. GLIA 2016;64:1252–1264 PMID:27189737

  15. Dendritic regression dissociated from neuronal death but associated with partial deafferentation in aging rat supraoptic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Flood, D G; Coleman, P D

    1993-01-01

    As neurons are lost in normal aging, the dendrites of surviving neighbor neurons may proliferate, regress, or remain unchanged. In the case of age-related dendritic regression, it has been difficult to distinguish whether the regression precedes neuronal death or whether it is a consequence of loss of afferent supply. The rat supraoptic nucleus (SON) represents a model system in which there is no age-related loss of neurons, but in which there is an age-related loss of afferents. The magnocellular neurosecretory neurons of the SON, that produce vasopressin and oxytocin for release in the posterior pituitary, were studied in male Fischer 344 rats at 3, 12, 20, 27, 30, and 32 months of age. Counts in Nissl-stained sections showed no neuronal loss with age, and confirmed similar findings in other strains of rat and in mouse and human. Nucleolar size increased between 3 and 12 months of age, due, in part, to nucleolar fusion, and was unchanged between 12 and 32 months of age, indicating maintenance of general cellular function in old age. Dendritic extent quantified in Golgi-stained tissue increased between 3 and 12 months of age, was stable between 12 and 20 months, and decreased between 20 and 27 months. We interpret the increase between 3 and 12 months as a late maturational change. Dendritic regression between 20 and 27 months was probably the result of deafferentation due to the preceding age-related loss of the noradrenergic input to the SON from the ventral medulla. PMID:7507575

  16. Cytotoxic actions of FTY720, a novel immunosuppressant, on thymocytes and brain neurons dissociated from the rat.

    PubMed

    Oyama, Y; Chikahisa, L; Kanemaru, K; Nakata, M; Noguchi, S; Nagano, T; Okazaki, E; Hirata, A

    1998-04-01

    Effects of FTY720 (2-amino-2-(2-[4-octylphenyl]ethyl)-1,3-propanediol HCl), a novel immunosuppressant, were examined on neurons and thymocytes respectively dissociated from rat brains and thymus glands using a flow cytometer to see if FTY720 exerts cytotoxic actions not only on spleen cells as previously reported but also on the other cells. FTY720 at a concentration of 10 microM deteriorated almost all of the thymocytes, while it was not the case for brain neurons. FTY720 increased the intracellular concentration of Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) of thymocytes in both the presence and absence of external Ca2+, although the [Ca2+]i increased by FTY720 in the presence of external Ca2+ was much greater than that in the absence of external Ca2+. Thus, FTY720 may increase the membrane permeability of Ca2+ and release Ca2+ from intracellular Ca2+ stores in thymocytes. Furthermore, the number of thymocytes stained with ethidium, a dye impermeant to intact membranes, time-dependently increased after drug application. Therefore, FTY720 at concentrations of 3 - 10 microM non-specifically increases the membrane permeability of thymocytes, resulting in necrotic cell death, although FTY720 at micromolar concentrations was reported to induce apoptosis of spleen cells. PMID:9623716

  17. Acute lower motor neuron syndrome and spinal cord gray matter hyperintensities in HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Michael R.; Chad, David A.; Venna, Nagagopal

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To describe a novel manifestation of lower motor neuron disease in patients with well-controlled HIV infection. Methods: A retrospective study was performed to identify HIV-positive individuals with acute, painful lower motor neuron diseases. Results: Six patients were identified with HIV and lower motor neuron disease. Two patients met the inclusion criteria of well-controlled, chronic HIV infection and an acute, painful, unilateral lower motor neuron paralytic syndrome affecting the distal portion of the upper limb. These patients had segmental T2-hyperintense lesions in the central gray matter of the cervical spinal cord on MRI. One patient stabilized and the second patient improved with immunomodulatory therapy. Conclusions: This newly described syndrome expands the clinical spectrum of lower motor neuron diseases in HIV. PMID:26015990

  18. Acetylcholine-evoked currents in cultured neurones dissociated from rat parasympathetic cardiac ganglia.

    PubMed Central

    Fieber, L A; Adams, D J

    1991-01-01

    1. The properties of acetylcholine (ACh)-activated ion channels of parasympathetic neurones from neonatal rat cardiac ganglia grown in tissue culture were examined using patch clamp recording techniques. Membrane currents evoked by ACh were mimicked by nicotine, attenuated by neuronal bungarotoxin, and unaffected by atropine, suggesting that the ACh-induced currents are mediated by nicotinic receptor activation. 2. The current-voltage (I-V) relationship for whole-cell ACh-evoked currents exhibited strong inward rectification and a reversal (zero current) potential of -3 mV (NaCl outside, CsCl inside). The rectification was not alleviated by changing the main permeant cation or by removal of divalent cations from the intracellular or extracellular solutions. Unitary ACh-activated currents exhibited a linear I-V relationship with slope conductances of 32 pS in cell-attached membrane patches and 38 pS in excised membrane patches with symmetrical CsCl solutions. 3. Acetylcholine-induced currents were reversibly inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by the ganglionic antagonists, mecamylamine (Kd = 37 nM) and hexamethonium (IC50 approximately 1 microM), as well as by the neuromuscular relaxant, d-tubocurarine (Kd = 3 microM). Inhibition of ACh-evoked currents by hexamethonium could not be described by a simple blocking model for drug-receptor interaction. 4. The amplitude of the ionic current through the open channel was dependent on the extracellular Na+ concentration. The direction of the shift in reversal potential upon replacement of NaCl by mannitol indicates that the neuronal nicotinic receptor channel is cation selective and the magnitude suggests a high cation to anion permeability ratio. The cation permeability (PX/PNa) followed the ionic selectivity sequence Cs+ (1.06) greater than Na+ (1.0) greater than Ca2+ (0.93). Anion substitution experiments showed a relative anion permeability, PCl/PNa less than or equal to 0.05. 5. The nicotinic ACh-activated channels

  19. Acute selective ablation of rat insulin promoter-expressing (RIPHER) neurons defines their orexigenic nature

    PubMed Central

    Rother, Eva; Belgardt, Bengt F.; Tsaousidou, Eva; Hampel, Brigitte; Waisman, Ari; Myers, Martin G.; Brüning, Jens C.

    2012-01-01

    Rat insulin promoter (RIP)-expressing neurons in the hypothalamus control body weight and energy homeostasis. However, genetic approaches to study the role of these neurons have been limited by the fact that RIP expression is predominantly found in pancreatic β-cells, which impedes selective targeting of neurons. To define the function of hypothalamic RIP-expressing neurons, we set out to acutely and selectively eliminate them via diphtheria toxin-mediated ablation. Therefore, the diphtheria toxin receptor transgene was specifically expressed upon RIP-specific Cre recombination using a RIP-Cre line first described by Herrera (RIPHER-Cre) [Herrera PL (2000) Development 127:2317–2322]. Using proopiomelanocortin–expressing cells located in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus and in the pituitary gland as a model, we established a unique protocol of intracerebroventricular application of diphtheria toxin to efficiently ablate hypothalamic cells with no concomitant effect on pituitary proopiomelanocortin–expressing corticotrophs in the mouse. Using this approach to ablate RIPHER neurons in the brain, but not in the pancreas, resulted in decreased food intake and loss of body weight and fat mass. In addition, ablation of RIPHER neurons caused increased c-Fos immunoreactivity of neurons in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus. Moreover, transsynaptic tracing of RIPHER neurons revealed labeling of neurons located in the PVN and dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus. Thus, our experiments indicate that RIPHER neurons inhibit anorexigenic neurons in the PVN, revealing a basic orexigenic nature of these cells. PMID:23064638

  20. Ultrastructural Visualization of Individual Tegument Protein Dissociation during Entry of Herpes Simplex Virus 1 into Human and Rat Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Anupriya; Boadle, Ross A.; Kelly, Barbara J.; Diefenbach, Russell J.; Alam, Waafiqa; Cunningham, Anthony L.

    2012-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) enters neurons primarily by fusion of the viral envelope with the host cell plasma membrane, leading to the release of the capsid into the cytosol. The capsid travels via microtubule-mediated retrograde transport to the nuclear membrane, where the viral DNA is released for replication in the nucleus. In the present study, the composition and kinetics of incoming HSV-1 capsids during entry and retrograde transport in axons of human fetal and dissociated rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons were examined by wide-field deconvolution microscopy and transmission immunoelectron microscopy (TIEM). We show that HSV-1 tegument proteins, including VP16, VP22, most pUL37, and some pUL36, dissociated from the incoming virions. The inner tegument proteins, including pUL36 and some pUL37, remained associated with the capsid during virus entry and transit to the nucleus in the neuronal cell body. By TIEM, a progressive loss of tegument proteins, including VP16, VP22, most pUL37, and some pUL36, was observed, with most of the tegument dissociating at the plasma membrane of the axons and the neuronal cell body. Further dissociation occurred within the axons and the cytosol as the capsids moved to the nucleus, resulting in the release of free tegument proteins, especially VP16, VP22, pUL37, and some pUL36, into the cytosol. This study elucidates ultrastructurally the composition of HSV-1 capsids that encounter the microtubules in the core of human axons and the complement of free tegument proteins released into the cytosol during virus entry. PMID:22457528

  1. Electrical excitability of outgrowing neurites of embryonic neurones in cultures of dissociated neural plate of Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed Central

    Willard, A L

    1980-01-01

    1. I have studied the electrical excitability of outgrowing processes of individual neurones in cultures made from dissociated neural plates of embryos of Xenopus laevis prior to the time of neurite outgrowth in vivo. 2. The electrical excitability of neurites was tested by stimulating them extracellularly and recording responses with an intracellular electrode in their cell bodies; neurites were excitable at all times examined. 3. The ionic basis of the excitability of neurites was tested by recording from cells while changing the composition of the salines perfusing the cultures. 4. In cultures less than 10 hr old, all neurites tested made responses which depended on Ca2+. The action potentials of the cell bodies were also Ca2+-dependent at these times. 5. Between 10 and 12 hr in culture, a time at which the cell bodies still made Ca2+-dependent action potentials, neurites acquired the ability to make Na+-dependent responses. At these times, two-thirds of neurites tested retained the ability to produce divalent cation-dependent action potentials when perfused with solutions of isotonic Ba2+. 6. After 12 hr in culture, no neurites were observed to make Ca2+-or Ba2+-dependent responses; only Na+-dependent responses were observed. Cells continued to initiate and elongate new neurites until about 24 hr in culture. Thus neurites sent out at different times in culture differed in their development of excitability. 7. Cell bodies making exclusively Ca2+-dependent action potentials could be found until about 15 hr in culture, after which time a Na+-dependent component appeared. Cell bodies could then be observed to make action potentials which depended on both Ca2+ and Na+ until about 3 days in culture. After 3 days, most cell bodies made predominately Na+-dependent action potentials. Unlike the neurites, cell bodies retained the ability to make action potentials in isotonic Ba2+ for as long as the cultures were maintained (up to 5 days). 8. The possibility that changes

  2. Electrophysiology of Hypothalamic Magnocellular Neurons In vitro: A Rhythmic Drive in Organotypic Cultures and Acute Slices

    PubMed Central

    Israel, Jean-Marc; Oliet, Stéphane H.; Ciofi, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Hypothalamic neurohormones are released in a pulsatile manner. The mechanisms of this pulsatility remain poorly understood and several hypotheses are available, depending upon the neuroendocrine system considered. Among these systems, hypothalamo-neurohypophyseal magnocellular neurons have been early-considered models, as they typically display an electrical activity consisting of bursts of action potentials that is optimal for the release of boluses of the neurohormones oxytocin and vasopressin. The cellular mechanisms underlying this bursting behavior have been studied in vitro, using either acute slices of the adult hypothalamus, or organotypic cultures of neonatal hypothalamic tissue. We have recently proposed, from experiments in organotypic cultures, that specific central pattern generator networks, upstream of magnocellular neurons, determine their bursting activity. Here, we have tested whether a similar hypothesis can be derived from in vitro experiments in acute slices of the adult hypothalamus. To this aim we have screened our electrophysiological recordings of the magnocellular neurons, previously obtained from acute slices, with an analysis of autocorrelation of action potentials to detect a rhythmic drive as we recently did for organotypic cultures. This confirmed that the bursting behavior of magnocellular neurons is governed by central pattern generator networks whose rhythmic drive, and thus probably integrity, is however less satisfactorily preserved in the acute slices from adult brains. PMID:27065780

  3. Mitochondrial fission is an acute and adaptive response in injured motor neurons.

    PubMed

    Kiryu-Seo, Sumiko; Tamada, Hiromi; Kato, Yukina; Yasuda, Katsura; Ishihara, Naotada; Nomura, Masatoshi; Mihara, Katsuyoshi; Kiyama, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Successful recovery from neuronal damage requires a huge energy supply, which is provided by mitochondria. However, the physiological relevance of mitochondrial dynamics in damaged neurons in vivo is poorly understood. To address this issue, we established unique bacterial artificial chromosome transgenic (BAC Tg) mice, which develop and function normally, but in which neuronal injury induces labelling of mitochondria with green fluorescent protein (GFP) and expression of cre recombinase. GFP-labelled mitochondria in BAC Tg mice appear shorter in regenerating motor axons soon after nerve injury compared with mitochondria in non-injured axons, suggesting the importance of increased mitochondrial fission during the early phase of nerve regeneration. Crossing the BAC Tg mice with mice carrying a floxed dynamin-related protein 1 gene (Drp1), which is necessary for mitochondrial fission, ablates mitochondrial fission specifically in injured neurons. Injury-induced Drp1-deficient motor neurons show elongated or abnormally gigantic mitochondria, which have impaired membrane potential and axonal transport velocity during the early phase after injury, and eventually promote neuronal death. Our in vivo data suggest that acute and prominent mitochondrial fission during the early stage after nerve injury is an adaptive response and is involved in the maintenance of mitochondrial and neuronal integrity to prevent neurodegeneration. PMID:27319806

  4. Mitochondrial fission is an acute and adaptive response in injured motor neurons

    PubMed Central

    Kiryu-Seo, Sumiko; Tamada, Hiromi; Kato, Yukina; Yasuda, Katsura; Ishihara, Naotada; Nomura, Masatoshi; Mihara, Katsuyoshi; Kiyama, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Successful recovery from neuronal damage requires a huge energy supply, which is provided by mitochondria. However, the physiological relevance of mitochondrial dynamics in damaged neurons in vivo is poorly understood. To address this issue, we established unique bacterial artificial chromosome transgenic (BAC Tg) mice, which develop and function normally, but in which neuronal injury induces labelling of mitochondria with green fluorescent protein (GFP) and expression of cre recombinase. GFP-labelled mitochondria in BAC Tg mice appear shorter in regenerating motor axons soon after nerve injury compared with mitochondria in non-injured axons, suggesting the importance of increased mitochondrial fission during the early phase of nerve regeneration. Crossing the BAC Tg mice with mice carrying a floxed dynamin-related protein 1 gene (Drp1), which is necessary for mitochondrial fission, ablates mitochondrial fission specifically in injured neurons. Injury-induced Drp1-deficient motor neurons show elongated or abnormally gigantic mitochondria, which have impaired membrane potential and axonal transport velocity during the early phase after injury, and eventually promote neuronal death. Our in vivo data suggest that acute and prominent mitochondrial fission during the early stage after nerve injury is an adaptive response and is involved in the maintenance of mitochondrial and neuronal integrity to prevent neurodegeneration. PMID:27319806

  5. Acute lipopolysaccharide exposure facilitates epileptiform activity via enhanced excitatory synaptic transmission and neuronal excitability in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Fei; Liu, Zhiqiang; Ren, Wei; Jiang, Wen

    2014-01-01

    Growing evidence indicates brain inflammation has been involved in the genesis of seizures. However, the direct effect of acute inflammation on neuronal circuits is not well known. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) has been used extensively to stimulate brain inflammatory responses both in vivo and in vitro. Here, we observed the contribution of inflammation induced by 10 μg/mL LPS to the excitability of neuronal circuits in acute hippocampal slices. When slices were incubated with LPS for 30 minutes, significant increased concentration of tumor necrosis factor α and interleukin 1β were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In electrophysiological recordings, we found that frequency of epileptiform discharges and spikes per burst increased 30 minutes after LPS application. LPS enhanced evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents but did not modify evoked inhibitory postsynaptic currents. In addition, exposure to LPS enhanced the excitability of CA1 pyramidal neurons, as demonstrated by a decrease in rheobase and an increase in action potential frequency elicited by depolarizing current injection. Our observations suggest that acute inflammation induced by LPS facilitates epileptiform activity in vitro and that enhancement of excitatory synaptic transmission and neuronal excitability may contribute to this facilitation. These results may provide new clues for treating seizures associated with brain inflammatory disease. PMID:25170268

  6. Segregation of acute leptin and insulin effects in distinct populations of arcuate POMC neurons

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Kevin W.; Margatho, Lisandra O.; Lee, Charlotte E.; Choi, Michelle; Lee, Syann; Scott, Michael M.; Elias, Carol F.; Elmquist, Joel K.

    2010-01-01

    Acute leptin administration results in a depolarization and concomitant increase in the firing rate of a subpopulation of arcuate POMC cells. This rapid activation of POMC cells has been implicated as a cellular correlate of leptin effects on energy balance. In contrast to leptin, insulin inhibits the activity of some POMC neurons. Several studies have described a “cross-talk” between leptin and insulin within the mediobasal hypothalamus via the intracellular enzyme, phosphoinositol-3-kinase (PI3K). Interestingly, both insulin and leptin regulate POMC cellular activity by activation of PI3K, however it is unclear if leptin and insulin effects are observed in similar or distinct populations of POMC cells. We therefore used dual label immunohistochemistry/in situ hybridization and whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology to map insulin and leptin responsive arcuate POMC neurons. Leptin-induced Fos activity within arcuate POMC neurons was localized separate from POMC neurons which express insulin receptor. Moreover, acute responses to leptin and insulin were largely segregated in distinct sub-populations of POMC cells. Collectively, these data suggest that cross-talk between leptin and insulin occurs within a network of cells rather than within individual POMC neurons. PMID:20164331

  7. Acute intermittent optogenetic stimulation of nucleus tractus solitarius neurons induces sympathetic long-term facilitation

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Kenta; Lalley, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Acute intermittent hypoxia (AIH) induces sympathetic and phrenic long-term facilitation (LTF), defined as a sustained increase in nerve discharge. We investigated the effects of AIH and acute intermittent optogenetic (AIO) stimulation of neurons labeled with AAV-CaMKIIa, hChR2(H134R), and mCherry in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) of anesthetized, vagotomized, and mechanically ventilated rats. We measured renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA), phrenic nerve activity (PNA), power spectral density, and coherence, and we made cross-correlation measurements to determine how AIO stimulation and AIH affected synchronization between PNA and RSNA. Sixty minutes after AIH produced by ventilation with 10% oxygen in balanced nitrogen, RSNA and PNA amplitude increased by 80% and by 130%, respectively (P < 0.01). Sixty minutes after AIO stimulation, RSNA and PNA amplitude increased by 60% and 100%, respectively, (P < 0.01). These results suggest that acute intermittent stimulation of NTS neurons can induce renal sympathetic and phrenic LTF in the absence of hypoxia or chemoreceptor afferent activation. We also found that while acute intermittent optogenetic and hypoxic stimulations increased respiration-related RSNA modulation (P < 0.01), they did not increase synchronization between central respiratory drive and RSNA. We conclude that mechanisms that induce LTF originate within the caudal NTS and extend to other interconnecting neuronal elements of the central nervous cardiorespiratory network. PMID:25519734

  8. Repetitive acute intermittent hypoxia increases growth/neurotrophic factor expression in non-respiratory motor neurons.

    PubMed

    Satriotomo, I; Nichols, N L; Dale, E A; Emery, A T; Dahlberg, J M; Mitchell, G S

    2016-05-13

    Repetitive acute intermittent hypoxia (rAIH) increases growth/trophic factor expression in respiratory motor neurons, thereby eliciting spinal respiratory motor plasticity and/or neuroprotection. Here we demonstrate that rAIH effects are not unique to respiratory motor neurons, but are also expressed in non-respiratory, spinal alpha motor neurons and upper motor neurons of the motor cortex. In specific, we used immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence to assess growth/trophic factor protein expression in spinal sections from rats exposed to AIH three times per week for 10weeks (3×wAIH). 3×wAIH increased brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), its high-affinity receptor, tropomyosin receptor kinase B (TrkB), and phosphorylated TrkB (pTrkB) immunoreactivity in putative alpha motor neurons of spinal cervical 7 (C7) and lumbar 3 (L3) segments, as well as in upper motor neurons of the primary motor cortex (M1). 3×wAIH also increased immunoreactivity of vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA), the high-affinity VEGFA receptor (VEGFR-2) and an important VEGF gene regulator, hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α). Thus, rAIH effects on growth/trophic factors are characteristic of non-respiratory as well as respiratory motor neurons. rAIH may be a useful tool in the treatment of disorders causing paralysis, such as spinal injury and motor neuron disease, as a pretreatment to enhance motor neuron survival during disease, or as preconditioning for cell-transplant therapies. PMID:26944605

  9. Nucleus accumbens neuronal activity in freely behaving rats is modulated following acute and chronic methylphenidate administration.

    PubMed

    Chong, Samuel L; Claussen, Catherine M; Dafny, Nachum

    2012-03-10

    Methylphenidate (MPD) is a psychostimulant that enhances dopaminergic neurotransmission in the central nervous system by using mechanisms similar to cocaine and amphetamine. The mode of action of brain circuitry responsible for an animal's neuronal response to MPD is not fully understood. The nucleus accumbens (NAc) has been implicated in regulating the rewarding effects of psychostimulants. The present study used permanently implanted microelectrodes to investigate the acute and chronic effects of MPD on the firing rates of NAc neuronal units in freely behaving rats. On experimental day 1 (ED1), following a saline injection (control), a 30 min baseline neuronal recording was obtained immediately followed by a 2.5 mg/kg i.p. MPD injection and subsequent 60 min neuronal recording. Daily 2.5 mg/kg MPD injections were given on ED2 through ED6 followed by 3 washout days (ED7 to ED9). On ED10, neuronal recordings were resumed from the same animal after a saline and MPD (rechallenge) injection exactly as obtained on ED1. Sixty-seven NAc neuronal units exhibited similar wave shape, form and amplitude on ED1 and ED10 and their firing rates were used for analysis. MPD administration on ED1 elicited firing rate increases and decreases in 54% of NAc units when compared to their baselines. Six consecutive MPD administrations altered the neuronal baseline firing rates of 85% of NAc units. MPD rechallenge on ED10 elicited significant changes in 63% of NAc units. These alterations in firing rates are hypothesized to be through mechanisms that include D1 and D2-like DA receptor induced cellular adaptation and homeostatic adaptations/deregulation caused by acute and chronic MPD administration. PMID:22248440

  10. Calcium Imaging of AM Dyes Following Prolonged Incubation in Acute Neuronal Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Morley, John W.; Tapson, Jonathan; Breen, Paul P.; van Schaik, André

    2016-01-01

    Calcium-imaging is a sensitive method for monitoring calcium dynamics during neuronal activity. As intracellular calcium concentration is correlated to physiological and pathophysiological activity of neurons, calcium imaging with fluorescent indicators is one of the most commonly used techniques in neuroscience today. Current methodologies for loading calcium dyes into the tissue require prolonged incubation time (45–150 min), in addition to dissection and recovery time after the slicing procedure. This prolonged incubation curtails experimental time, as tissue is typically maintained for 6–8 hours after slicing. Using a recently introduced recovery chamber that extends the viability of acute brain slices to more than 24 hours, we tested the effectiveness of calcium AM staining following long incubation periods post cell loading and its impact on the functional properties of calcium signals in acute brain slices and wholemount retinae. We show that calcium dyes remain within cells and are fully functional >24 hours after loading. Moreover, the calcium dynamics recorded >24 hrs were similar to the calcium signals recorded in fresh tissue that was incubated for <4 hrs. These results indicate that long exposure of calcium AM dyes to the intracellular cytoplasm did not alter the intracellular calcium concentration, the functional range of the dye or viability of the neurons. This data extends our previous work showing that a custom recovery chamber can extend the viability of neuronal tissue, and reliable data for both electrophysiology and imaging can be obtained >24hrs after dissection. These methods will not only extend experimental time for those using acute neuronal tissue, but also may reduce the number of animals required to complete experimental goals. PMID:27183102

  11. Combined Exposure to Simulated Microgravity and Acute or Chronic Radiation Reduces Neuronal Network Integrity and Survival

    PubMed Central

    Quintens, Roel; Samari, Nada; de Saint-Georges, Louis; van Oostveldt, Patrick; Baatout, Sarah; Benotmane, Mohammed Abderrafi

    2016-01-01

    During orbital or interplanetary space flights, astronauts are exposed to cosmic radiations and microgravity. However, most earth-based studies on the potential health risks of space conditions have investigated the effects of these two conditions separately. This study aimed at assessing the combined effect of radiation exposure and microgravity on neuronal morphology and survival in vitro. In particular, we investigated the effects of simulated microgravity after acute (X-rays) or during chronic (Californium-252) exposure to ionizing radiation using mouse mature neuron cultures. Acute exposure to low (0.1 Gy) doses of X-rays caused a delay in neurite outgrowth and a reduction in soma size, while only the high dose impaired neuronal survival. Of interest, the strongest effect on neuronal morphology and survival was evident in cells exposed to microgravity and in particular in cells exposed to both microgravity and radiation. Removal of neurons from simulated microgravity for a period of 24 h was not sufficient to recover neurite length, whereas the soma size showed a clear re-adaptation to normal ground conditions. Genome-wide gene expression analysis confirmed a modulation of genes involved in neurite extension, cell survival and synaptic communication, suggesting that these changes might be responsible for the observed morphological effects. In general, the observed synergistic changes in neuronal network integrity and cell survival induced by simulated space conditions might help to better evaluate the astronaut's health risks and underline the importance of investigating the central nervous system and long-term cognition during and after a space flight. PMID:27203085

  12. Combined Exposure to Simulated Microgravity and Acute or Chronic Radiation Reduces Neuronal Network Integrity and Survival.

    PubMed

    Pani, Giuseppe; Verslegers, Mieke; Quintens, Roel; Samari, Nada; de Saint-Georges, Louis; van Oostveldt, Patrick; Baatout, Sarah; Benotmane, Mohammed Abderrafi

    2016-01-01

    During orbital or interplanetary space flights, astronauts are exposed to cosmic radiations and microgravity. However, most earth-based studies on the potential health risks of space conditions have investigated the effects of these two conditions separately. This study aimed at assessing the combined effect of radiation exposure and microgravity on neuronal morphology and survival in vitro. In particular, we investigated the effects of simulated microgravity after acute (X-rays) or during chronic (Californium-252) exposure to ionizing radiation using mouse mature neuron cultures. Acute exposure to low (0.1 Gy) doses of X-rays caused a delay in neurite outgrowth and a reduction in soma size, while only the high dose impaired neuronal survival. Of interest, the strongest effect on neuronal morphology and survival was evident in cells exposed to microgravity and in particular in cells exposed to both microgravity and radiation. Removal of neurons from simulated microgravity for a period of 24 h was not sufficient to recover neurite length, whereas the soma size showed a clear re-adaptation to normal ground conditions. Genome-wide gene expression analysis confirmed a modulation of genes involved in neurite extension, cell survival and synaptic communication, suggesting that these changes might be responsible for the observed morphological effects. In general, the observed synergistic changes in neuronal network integrity and cell survival induced by simulated space conditions might help to better evaluate the astronaut's health risks and underline the importance of investigating the central nervous system and long-term cognition during and after a space flight. PMID:27203085

  13. Dissociated functional connectivity profiles for motor and attention deficits in acute right-hemisphere stroke.

    PubMed

    Baldassarre, Antonello; Ramsey, Lenny; Rengachary, Jennifer; Zinn, Kristi; Siegel, Joshua S; Metcalf, Nicholas V; Strube, Michael J; Snyder, Abraham Z; Corbetta, Maurizio; Shulman, Gordon L

    2016-07-01

    Strokes often cause multiple behavioural deficits that are correlated at the population level. Here, we show that motor and attention deficits are selectively associated with abnormal patterns of resting state functional connectivity in the dorsal attention and motor networks. We measured attention and motor deficits in 44 right hemisphere-damaged patients with a first-time stroke at 1-2 weeks post-onset. The motor battery included tests that evaluated deficits in both upper and lower extremities. The attention battery assessed both spatial and non-spatial attention deficits. Summary measures for motor and attention deficits were identified through principal component analyses on the raw behavioural scores. Functional connectivity in structurally normal cortex was estimated based on the temporal correlation of blood oxygenation level-dependent signals measured at rest with functional magnetic resonance imaging. Any correlation between motor and attention deficits and between functional connectivity in the dorsal attention network and motor networks that might spuriously affect the relationship between each deficit and functional connectivity was statistically removed. We report a double dissociation between abnormal functional connectivity patterns and attention and motor deficits, respectively. Attention deficits were significantly more correlated with abnormal interhemispheric functional connectivity within the dorsal attention network than motor networks, while motor deficits were significantly more correlated with abnormal interhemispheric functional connectivity patterns within the motor networks than dorsal attention network. These findings indicate that functional connectivity patterns in structurally normal cortex following a stroke link abnormal physiology in brain networks to the corresponding behavioural deficits. PMID:27225794

  14. Erythropoietin administration protects retinal neurons from acute ischemia-reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Junk, Anna K.; Mammis, Antonios; Savitz, Sean I.; Singh, Manjeet; Roth, Steven; Malhotra, Samit; Rosenbaum, Pearl S.; Cerami, Anthony; Brines, Michael; Rosenbaum, Daniel M.

    2002-01-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) plays an important role in the brain's response to neuronal injury. Systemic administration of recombinant human EPO (rhEPO) protects neurons from injury after middle cerebral artery occlusion, traumatic brain injury, neuroinflammation, and excitotoxicity. Protection is in part mediated by antiapoptotic mechanisms. We conducted parallel studies of rhEPO in a model of transient global retinal ischemia induced by raising intraocular pressure, which is a clinically relevant model for retinal diseases. We observed abundant expression of EPO receptor (EPO-R) throughout the ischemic retina. Neutralization of endogenous EPO with soluble EPO-R exacerbated ischemic injury, which supports a crucial role for an endogenous EPO/EPO-R system in the survival and recovery of neurons after an ischemic insult. Systemic administration of rhEPO before or immediately after retinal ischemia not only reduced histopathological damage but also promoted functional recovery as assessed by electroretinography. Exogenous EPO also significantly diminished terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP end labeling labeling of neurons in the ischemic retina, implying an antiapoptotic mechanism of action. These results further establish EPO as a neuroprotective agent in acute neuronal ischemic injury. PMID:12130665

  15. Comparative patch-clamp studies with freshly dissociated rat hippocampal and striatal neurons on the NMDA receptor antagonistic effects of amantadine and memantine.

    PubMed

    Parsons, C G; Panchenko, V A; Pinchenko, V O; Tsyndrenko, A Y; Krishtal, O A

    1996-03-01

    Patch- and concentration-clamp techniques were used to compare the effects of the uncompetitive N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists (+)-MK-801 (dizocilpine, (+)-5-methyl-10, 11-dihydro-5H-dibenzocyclohepten-5, 10-imine maleate), ketamine, memantine (1-amino-3,5-dimethyladamantane) and amantadine (1-amino-adamantane) on agonist-induced inward currents in freshly dissociated rat hippocampal and striatal neurons. In hippocampal neurons, ketamine (5 microM), menantine (10 microM) and amantadine (100 microM) selectively antagonized inward current responses to NMDA (500 microM plus glycine 5 microM) in a voltage-dependent manner without affecting responses to (s)-alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazoleproprionic acid (100 microM) or gamma-aminobutyric acid (10 microM). The NMDA receptor antagonistic effect of all four agents was typical of open channel blockade. The kinetics of blockade/unblockade was inversely related to antagonist affinity. In hippocampal neurons amantadine was the least potent NMDA receptor antagonist (IC50 18.6 +/- 0.9 microM) and showed the fastest blocking kinetics, whereas (+)-MK-801 was the most potent (IC50 0.12 +/- 0.01 microM) and showed the slowest blocking kinetics. Memantine (IC50 1.04 +/- 0.26 microM) and ketamine (IC50 0.43 +/- 0.10 microM) were almost equipotent and had similar, intermediate blocking kinetics. In striatal neurons recorded under identical conditions (+)-MK-801, ketamine and memantine were 3- to 4-fold less potent whereas amantadine was somewhat more potent than on hippocampal neurons. This could offer an explanation for the better clinical profile of amantadine in Parkinson's disease, as therapeutically relevant concentrations of amantadine are likely to be more active in the striatum whereas memantine is likely to be more active in other structures. PMID:8963435

  16. Electrophysiological properties and chemosensitivity of acutely dissociated trigeminal somata innervating the cornea.

    PubMed

    Veiga Moreira, T H; Gover, T D; Weinreich, D

    2007-09-01

    Adult rat sensory trigeminal ganglion neurons innervating the cornea (cTGNs) were isolated and identified following retrograde dye labeling with FM1-43. Using standard whole-cell patch clamp recording techniques, cTGNs could be subdivided by their action potential (AP) duration. Fast cTGNs had AP durations <1 ms (40%) while slow cTGNs had AP durations >1 ms and an inflection on the repolarization phase of the AP. With the exception of membrane input resistance, the passive membrane properties of fast cTGNs were different from those of slow cTGNs (capacitance: 61+/-4.5 pF vs. 42+/-2.6 pF, resting membrane potential: -59+/-0.7 mV vs. -53+/-0.9 mV, for fast and slow cTGNs respectively). Active membrane properties also differed between fast and slow cTGNs. Slow cTGNs had a higher AP threshold (-25+/-1.6 mV vs. -38+/-0.8 mV), a larger rheobase (14+/-1.9 pA/pF vs. 6.8+/-1.0 pA/pF), and a smaller AP undershoot (-56+/-1.7 mV vs. -67+/-2.5 mV). The AP overshoot, however was similar between the two types of neurons (46+/-3.1 mV vs. 48+/-4 mV). Slow cTGNs were depolarized by capsaicin (1 microM, 80%) and 60% of their APs were blocked by tetrodotoxin (TTX) (100 nM). Fast cTGNs were unaffected by capsaicin and 100% of their APs were blocked by TTX. Similarly, cTGNs were also heterogeneous with respect to their responses to exogenous ATP and 5-HT. The current work shows that cTGNs have distinctive electrophysiological properties and chemosensitivity profiles. These characteristics may mirror the distinct properties of corneal sensory nerve terminals. The availability of isolated identified cTGNs constitutes a tractable model system to investigate the biophysical and pharmacological properties of corneal sensory nerve terminals. PMID:17706884

  17. Apoptosis of hippocampal pyramidal neurons is virus independent in a mouse model of acute neurovirulent picornavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Buenz, Eric J; Sauer, Brian M; Lafrance-Corey, Reghann G; Deb, Chandra; Denic, Aleksandar; German, Christopher L; Howe, Charles L

    2009-08-01

    Many viruses, including picornaviruses, have the potential to infect the central nervous system (CNS) and stimulate a neuroinflammatory immune response, especially in infants and young children. Cognitive deficits associated with CNS picornavirus infection result from injury and death of neurons that may occur due to direct viral infection or during the immune responses to virus in the brain. Previous studies have concluded that apoptosis of hippocampal neurons during picornavirus infection is a cell-autonomous event triggered by direct neuronal infection. However, these studies assessed neuron death at time points late in infection and during infections that lead to either death of the host or persistent viral infection. In contrast, many neurovirulent picornavirus infections are acute and transient, with rapid clearance of virus from the host. We provide evidence of hippocampal pathology in mice acutely infected with the Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis picornavirus. We found that CA1 pyramidal neurons exhibited several hallmarks of apoptotic death, including caspase-3 activation, DNA fragmentation, and chromatin condensation within 72 hours of infection. Critically, we also found that many of the CA1 pyramidal neurons undergoing apoptosis were not infected with virus, indicating that neuronal cell death during acute picornavirus infection of the CNS occurs in a non-cell-autonomous manner. These observations suggest that therapeutic strategies other than antiviral interventions may be useful for neuroprotection during acute CNS picornavirus infection. PMID:19608874

  18. Dopamine Receptor Blockade Modulates the Rewarding and Aversive Properties of Nicotine via Dissociable Neuronal Activity Patterns in the Nucleus Accumbens

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ninglei; Laviolette, Steven R

    2014-01-01

    The mesolimbic pathway comprising the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and projection terminals in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) has been identified as a critical neural system involved in processing both the rewarding and aversive behavioral effects of nicotine. Transmission through dopamine (DA) receptors functionally modulates these effects directly within the NAc. Nevertheless, the neuronal mechanisms within the NAc responsible for these bivalent behavioral effects are presently not known. Using an unbiased conditioned place preference procedure combined with in vivo neuronal recordings, we examined the effects of nicotine reward and aversion conditioning on intra-NAc neuronal sub-population activity patterns. We report that intra-VTA doses of nicotine that differentially produce rewarding or aversive behavioral effects produce opposite effects on sub-populations of fast-spiking interneurons (FSIs) or medium spiny neurons (MSNs) within the shell region of the NAc (NAshell). Thus, while the rewarding effects of intra-VTA nicotine were associated with inhibition of FSI and activation of MSNs, the aversive effects of nicotine produced the opposite pattern of NAshell neuronal population activity. Blockade of DA transmission with a broad-spectrum DA receptor antagonist, α-flupenthixol, strongly inhibited the spontaneous activity of NAshell FSIs, and reversed the conditioning properties of intra-VTA nicotine, switching nicotine-conditioned responses from aversive to rewarding. Remarkably, DA receptor blockade switched intra-NAshell neuronal population activity from an aversion to a reward pattern, concomitant with the observed switch in behavioral conditioning effects. PMID:24896614

  19. Endoplasmic reticulum stress-regulated CXCR3 pathway mediates inflammation and neuronal injury in acute glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Y; Liu, H; Xu, Z; Yokota, H; Narayanan, S P; Lemtalsi, T; Smith, S B; Caldwell, R W; Caldwell, R B; Zhang, W

    2015-01-01

    Acute glaucoma is a leading cause of irreversible blindness in East Asia. The mechanisms underlying retinal neuronal injury induced by a sudden rise in intraocular pressure (IOP) remain obscure. Here we demonstrate that the activation of CXCL10/CXCR3 axis, which mediates the recruitment and activation of inflammatory cells, has a critical role in a mouse model of acute glaucoma. The mRNA and protein expression levels of CXCL10 and CXCR3 were significantly increased after IOP-induced retinal ischemia. Blockade of the CXCR3 pathway by deleting CXCR3 gene significantly attenuated ischemic injury-induced upregulation of inflammatory molecules (interleukin-1β and E-selectin), inhibited the recruitment of microglia/monocyte to the superficial retina, reduced peroxynitrite formation, and prevented the loss of neurons within the ganglion cell layer. In contrast, intravitreal delivery of CXCL10 increased leukocyte recruitment and retinal cell apoptosis. Inhibition of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress with chemical chaperones partially blocked ischemic injury-induced CXCL10 upregulation, whereas induction of ER stress with tunicamycin enhanced CXCL10 expression in retina and primary retinal ganglion cells. Interestingly, deleting CXCR3 attenuated ER stress-induced retinal cell death. In conclusion, these results indicate that ER stress-medicated activation of CXCL10/CXCR3 pathway has an important role in retinal inflammation and neuronal injury after high IOP-induced ischemia. PMID:26448323

  20. Acute Neuronal Injury and Blood Genomic Profiles in a Nonhuman Primate Model for Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Mercado, Rafael; Ford, Gregory D; Xu, Zhenfeng; Kraiselburd, Edmundo N; Martinez, Melween I; Eterović, Vesna A; Colon, Edgar; Rodriguez, Idia V; Portilla, Peter; Ferchmin, Pedro A; Gierbolini, Lynette; Rodriguez-Carrasquillo, Maria; Powell, Michael D; Pulliam, John VK; McCraw, Casey O; Gates, Alicia; Ford, Byron D

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this study was to characterize acute neuronal injury in a novel nonhuman primate (NHP) ischemic stroke model by using multiple outcome measures. Silk sutures were inserted into the M1 segment of the middle cerebral artery of rhesus macaques to achieve permanent occlusion of the vessel. The sutures were introduced via the femoral artery by using endovascular microcatheterization techniques. Within hours after middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO), infarction was detectable by using diffusion-weighted MRI imaging. The infarcts expanded by 24 h after MCAO and then were detectable on T2-weighted images. The infarcts seen by MRI were consistent with neuronal injury demonstrated histologically. Neurobehavioral function after MCAO was determined by using 2 neurologic testing scales. Neurologic assessments indicated that impairment after ischemia was limited to motor function in the contralateral arm; other neurologic and behavioral parameters were largely unaffected. We also used microarrays to examine gene expression profiles in peripheral blood mononuclear cells after MCAO-induced ischemia. Several genes were altered in a time-dependent manner after MCAO, suggesting that this ischemia model may be suitable for identifying blood biomarkers associated with the presence and severity of ischemia. This NHP stroke model likely will facilitate the elucidation of mechanisms associated with acute neuronal injury after ischemia. In addition, the ability to identify candidate blood biomarkers in NHP after ischemia may prompt the development of new strategies for the diagnosis and treatment of ischemic stroke in humans. PMID:23114047

  1. Effects of acute and chronic administration of neurosteroid dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate on neuronal excitability in mice

    PubMed Central

    Svob Strac, Dubravka; Vlainic, Josipa; Samardzic, Janko; Erhardt, Julija; Krsnik, Zeljka

    2016-01-01

    Background Neurosteroid dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) has been associated with important brain functions, including neuronal survival, memory, and behavior, showing therapeutic potential in various neuropsychiatric and cognitive disorders. However, the antagonistic effects of DHEAS on γ-amino-butyric acidA receptors and its facilitatory action on glutamatergic neurotransmission might lead to enhanced brain excitability and seizures and thus limit DHEAS therapeutic applications. The aim of this study was to investigate possible age and sex differences in the neuronal excitability of the mice following acute and chronic DHEAS administration. Methods DHEAS was administered intraperitoneally in male and female adult and old mice either acutely or repeatedly once daily for 4 weeks in a 10 mg/kg dose. To investigate the potential proconvulsant properties of DHEAS, we studied the effects of acute and chronic DHEAS treatment on picrotoxin-, pentylentetrazole-, and N-methyl-D-aspartate-induced seizures in mice. The effects of acute and chronic DHEAS administration on the locomotor activity, motor coordination, and body weight of the mice were also studied. We also investigated the effects of DHEAS treatment on [3H]flunitrazepam binding to the mouse brain membranes. Results DHEAS did not modify the locomotor activity, motor coordination, body weight, and brain [3H]flunitrazepam binding of male and female mice. The results failed to demonstrate significant effects of single- and long-term DHEAS treatment on the convulsive susceptibility in both adult and aged mice of both sexes. However, small but significant changes regarding sex differences in the susceptibility to seizures were observed following DHEAS administration to mice. Conclusion Although our findings suggest that DHEAS treatment might be safe for various potential therapeutic applications in adult as well as in old age, they also support subtle interaction of DHEAS with male and female hormonal status

  2. The Role of Parkin in the Differential Susceptibility of Tuberoinfundibular and Nigrostriatal Dopamine Neurons to Acute Toxicant Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Benskey, Matthew J.; Manfredsson, Fredric P.; Lookingland, Keith J.; Goudreau, John L.

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson Disease causes degeneration of nigrostriatal dopamine (DA) neurons, while tuberoinfundibular DA neurons remain unaffected. A similar pattern is observed following exposure to 1-methy-4-phenyl-1, 2, 3, 6-tetrahydropyradine (MPTP). The mechanism of tuberoinfundibular neuronal recovery from MPTP is associated with up-regulation of parkin protein. Here we tested if parkin mediates tuberoinfundibular neuronal recovery from MPTP by knocking-down parkin in tuberoinfundibular neurons using recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV), expressing a short hairpin RNA (shRNA) directed toward parkin. Following knockdown, axon terminal DA and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) concentrations were analyzed 24 hours post-MPTP administration. rAAV-shRNA-mediated knockdown of endogenous parkin rendered tuberoinfundibular neurons susceptible to MPTP induced terminal DA loss, but not TH loss, within 24 hours post-MPTP. To determine if the neuroprotective benefits of parkin up-regulation could be translated to nigrostriatal neurons, rAAV expressing human parkin was injected into the substantia nigra of mice and axon terminal DA and TH concentrations were analyzed 24 hours post-MPTP. Nigral parkin over-expression prevented loss of TH in the axon terminals and soma of nigrostriatal neurons, but had no effect on terminal DA loss within 24h post-MPTP. These data show that parkin is necessary for the recovery of terminal DA concentrations within tuberoinfundibular neurons following acute MPTP administration, and parkin can rescue MPTP-induced decreases in TH within nigrostriatal neurons. PMID:25447324

  3. Neuron specific enolase: a promising therapeutic target in acute spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Haque, Azizul; Ray, Swapan K; Cox, April; Banik, Naren L

    2016-06-01

    Enolase is a multifunctional protein, which is expressed abundantly in the cytosol. Upon stimulatory signals, enolase can traffic to cell surface and contribute to different pathologies including injury, autoimmunity, infection, inflammation, and cancer. Cell-surface expression of enolase is often detected on activated macrophages, microglia/macrophages, microglia, and astrocytes, promoting extracellular matrix degradation, production of pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines, and invasion of inflammatory cells in the sites of injury and inflammation. Inflammatory stimulation also induces translocation of enolase from the cytosolic pool to the cell surface where it can act as a plasminogen receptor and promote extracellular matrix degradation and tissue damage. Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating debilitating condition characterized by progressive pathological changes including complex and evolving molecular cascades, and insights into the role of enolase in multiple inflammatory events have not yet been fully elucidated. Neuronal damage following SCI is associated with an elevation of neuron specific enolase (NSE), which is also known to play a role in the pathogenesis of hypoxic-ischemic brain injury. Thus, NSE is now considered as a biomarker in ischemic brain damage, and it has recently been suggested to be a biomarker in traumatic brain injury (TBI), stroke and anoxic encephalopathy after cardiac arrest and acute SCI as well. This review article gives an overview of the current basic research and clinical studies on the role of multifunctional enolase in neurotrauma, with a special emphasis on NSE in acute SCI. PMID:26847611

  4. The role of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase in neuronal steroidogenesis under acute inflammation.

    PubMed

    Sadasivam, Mohanraj; Ramatchandirin, Balamurugan; Balakrishnan, Sivasangari; Selvaraj, Karthikeyan; Prahalathan, Chidambaram

    2014-12-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) is a key gluconeogenic enzyme found in many tissues throughout the body including brain. In the present study, we have investigated the effect of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on PEPCK and its role in neuronal steroidogenesis. Adult female albino rats were administered LPS (5mg/kg body weight) to induce acute inflammation. LPS administration resulted in a significant increase of PEPCK mRNA expression with concomitant increase in mRNA levels of steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein and other steroidogenic enzymes including 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3β-HSD), 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (17β-HSD) and aromatase in brain tissue. Further, the inhibition of PEPCK expression by glipizide significantly decreased the mRNA expression of steroidogenic proteins and concurrently increased the mRNA levels of proinflammatory cytokines under LPS administration. The results of this study suggest a novel finding that PEPCK may have an important role in neuronal steroidogenesis; which serves as an adaptive response under inflammation. PMID:25256278

  5. Effects of the neurotrophic factors BDNF, NT-3, and FGF2 on dissociated neurons of the cochlear nucleus.

    PubMed

    Rak, Kristen; Völker, Johannes; Frenz, Silke; Scherzad, Agmal; Schendzielorz, Philipp; Radeloff, Andreas; Jablonka, Sibylle; Hagen, Rudolf; Mlynski, Robert

    2014-08-20

    The cochlear nucleus is the first relay station for acoustic information in the auditory pathway and its cellular integrity is affected by hearing loss. Neurotrophic factors, which are known to regulate fundamental processes in the brain, are expressed in the cochlear nucleus and are regulated by the changes in the stimulation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the neurotrophins Brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and Neurotrophin 3 (NT-3) and the neurotrophic factor Fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) on primary cultured cells of the mouse cochlear nucleus. No effect on overall cell growth was detected after 8 days in culture by the factors applied. NT-3 had a strong impact on enhancement of neuronal survival, whereas BDNF stimulated neuronal survival and axonal outgrowth. Axonal branching was negatively affected by the administration of BDNF. FGF2 did not show any effect. The results presented represent fundamental research on auditory neurons, but might be one step toward defining novel therapeutic strategies in the future to prevent cochlear nucleus degeneration induced by hearing loss. PMID:24978398

  6. Modifications of the input currents on VTA dopamine neurons following acute versus chronic cocaine exposure.

    PubMed

    Michaeli, Avner; Matzner, Henry; Poltyrev, Tatyana; Yaka, Rami

    2012-03-01

    Excitatory synapses on dopamine (DA) neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) are modulated following exposure to various addictive drugs, including cocaine. Previously we have shown that cocaine affects GABA(A) receptor (GABA(A)R)-mediated neurotransmission in VTA DA neurons. This finding led us to reexamine the modulation of the excitatory synapse on these neurons in response to cocaine exposure, while the activity of GABA(A)R is uninterrupted. Using rat brain slices, evoked post synaptic currents (ePSC) were monitored and inhibitors of NMDA receptor (NMDAR) and AMPA receptor (AMPAR) were gradually added to inhibitors-free bath solution. Modifications in the efficacy of the excitatory synapses were evaluated by comparing AMPAR-mediated and NMDAR-mediated currents (AMPA/NMDA ratio). The lack of GABA(A)R inhibitors enabled us to examine parallel changes in the relation between GABA(A)R-mediated and NMDAR-mediated currents (GABA(A)/NMDA ratio). First, we found that AMPA/NMDA ratio measured under complete availability of GABA(A)R, is significantly higher than the ratio measured under GABA(A)R blockade. In addition, GABA(A)/NMDA ratio, but not AMPA/NMDA ratio, is augmented a few hours following in vitro acute cocaine exposure. When measured 24 h after in vivo single cocaine injection, no change in GABA(A)/NMDA ratio was observed, however, the AMPA/NMDA ratio was found to be significantly higher. Finally, a decrease in both ratios was detected in rats repeatedly injected with cocaine. Taken together, these results lead to a better understanding of the means by which cocaine modifies synaptic inputs on VTA DA neurons. The parallel changes in GABA(A)/NMDA ratio may suggest an interaction between inhibitory and excitatory neural systems. PMID:22197515

  7. Acute oral administration of low doses of methylphenidate targets calretinin neurons in the rat septal area

    PubMed Central

    García-Avilés, Álvaro; Albert-Gascó, Héctor; Arnal-Vicente, Isabel; Elhajj, Ebtisam; Sanjuan-Arias, Julio; Sanchez-Perez, Ana María; Olucha-Bordonau, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Methylphenidate (MPD) is a commonly administered drug to treat children suffering from attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Alterations in septal driven hippocampal theta rhythm may underlie attention deficits observed in these patients. Amongst others, the septo-hippocampal connections have long been acknowledged to be important in preserving hippocampal function. Thus, we wanted to ascertain if MPD administration, which improves attention in patients, could affect septal areas connecting with hippocampus. We used low and orally administered MPD doses (1.3, 2.7 and 5 mg/Kg) to rats what mimics the dosage range in humans. In our model, we observed no effect when using 1.3 mg/Kg MPD; whereas 2.7 and 5 mg/Kg induced a significant increase in c-fos expression specifically in the medial septum (MS), an area intimately connected to the hippocampus. We analyzed dopaminergic areas such as nucleus accumbens and striatum, and found that only 5 mg/Kg induced c-fos levels increase. In these areas tyrosine hydroxylase correlated well with c-fos staining, whereas in the MS the sparse tyrosine hydroxylase fibers did not overlap with c-fos positive neurons. Double immunofluorescence of c-fos with neuronal markers in the septal area revealed that co-localization with choline acethyl transferase, parvalbumin, and calbindin with c-fos did not change with MPD treatment; whereas, calretinin and c-fos double labeled neurons increased after MPD administration. Altogether, these results suggest that low and acute doses of methylphenidate primary target specific populations of caltretinin medial septal neurons. PMID:25852493

  8. Combined exposure to simulated microgravity and acute or chronic radiation reduces neuronal network integrity and cell survival

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benotmane, Rafi

    During orbital or interplanetary space flights, astronauts are exposed to cosmic radiations and microgravity. This study aimed at assessing the effect of these combined conditions on neuronal network density, cell morphology and survival, using well-connected mouse cortical neuron cultures. To this end, neurons were exposed to acute low and high doses of low LET (X-rays) radiation or to chronic low dose-rate of high LET neutron irradiation (Californium-252), under the simulated microgravity generated by the Random Positioning Machine (RPM, Dutch space). High content image analysis of cortical neurons positive for the neuronal marker βIII-tubulin unveiled a reduced neuronal network integrity and connectivity, and an altered cell morphology after exposure to acute/chronic radiation or to simulated microgravity. Additionally, in both conditions, a defect in DNA-repair efficiency was revealed by an increased number of γH2AX-positive foci, as well as an increased number of Annexin V-positive apoptotic neurons. Of interest, when combining both simulated space conditions, we noted a synergistic effect on neuronal network density, neuronal morphology, cell survival and DNA repair. Furthermore, these observations are in agreement with preliminary gene expression data, revealing modulations in cytoskeletal and apoptosis-related genes after exposure to simulated microgravity. In conclusion, the observed in vitro changes in neuronal network integrity and cell survival induced by space simulated conditions provide us with mechanistic understanding to evaluate health risks and the development of countermeasures to prevent neurological disorders in astronauts over long-term space travels. Acknowledgements: This work is supported partly by the EU-FP7 projects CEREBRAD (n° 295552)

  9. Dissociation of Increases in PGC-1α and Its Regulators from Exercise Intensity and Muscle Activation Following Acute Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Hankinson, Paul B.; Simpson, Craig A.; Little, Jonathan P.; Graham, Ryan B.; Gurd, Brendon J.

    2013-01-01

    Muscle activation as well as changes in peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1 alpha (PGC-1α) following high-intensity interval exercise (HIIE) were examined in young healthy men (n  = 8; age, 21.9±2.2 yrs; VO2peak, 53.1±6.4 ml/min/kg; peak work rate, 317±23.5 watts). On each of 3 visits HIIE was performed on a cycle ergometer at a target intensity of 73, 100, or 133% of peak work rate. Muscle biopsies were taken at rest and three hours after each exercise condition. Total work was not different between conditions (∼730 kJ) while average power output (73%, 237±21; 100%, 323±26; 133%, 384±35 watts) and EMG derived muscle activation (73%, 1262±605; 100%, 2089±737; 133%, 3029±1206 total integrated EMG per interval) increased in an intensity dependent fashion. PGC-1α mRNA was elevated after all three conditions (p<0.05), with a greater increase observed following the 100% condition (∼9 fold, p<0.05) compared to both the 73 and 133% conditions (∼4 fold). When expressed relative to muscle activation, the increase in PGC-1α mRNA for the 133% condition was less than that for the 73 and 100% conditions (p<0.05). SIRT1 mRNA was also elevated after all three conditions (∼1.4 fold, p<0.05), with no difference between conditions. These findings suggest that intensity-dependent increases in PGC-1α mRNA following submaximal exercise are largely due to increases in muscle recruitment. As well, the blunted response of PGC-1α mRNA expression following supramaximal exercise may indicate that signalling mediated activation of PGC-1α may also be blunted. We also indentify that increases in PDK4, SIRT1, and RIP140 mRNA following acute exercise are dissociated from exercise intensity and muscle activation, while increases in EGR1 are augmented with supramaximal HIIE (p<0.05). PMID:23951207

  10. Spatiotemporal pattern of neuronal injury induced by DFP in rats: A model for delayed neuronal cell death following acute OP intoxication

    SciTech Connect

    Li Yonggang; Lein, Pamela J.; Liu Cuimei; Bruun, Donald A.; Tewolde, Teclemichael; Ford, Gregory; Ford, Byron D.

    2011-06-15

    Organophosphate (OP) neurotoxins cause acute cholinergic toxicity and seizures resulting in delayed brain damage and persistent neurological symptoms. Testing novel strategies for protecting against delayed effects of acute OP intoxication has been hampered by the lack of appropriate animal models. In this study, we characterize the spatiotemporal pattern of cellular injury after acute intoxication with the OP diisopropylfluorophosphate (DFP). Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats received pyridostigmine (0.1 mg/kg, im) and atropine methylnitrate (20 mg/kg, im) prior to DFP (9 mg/kg, ip) administration. All DFP-treated animals exhibited moderate to severe seizures within minutes after DFP injection but survived up to 72 h. AChE activity was significantly depressed in the cortex, hippocampus, subcortical brain tissue and cerebellum at 1 h post-DFP injection and this inhibition persisted for up to 72 h. Analysis of neuronal injury by Fluoro-Jade B (FJB) labeling revealed delayed neuronal cell death in the hippocampus, cortex, amygdala and thalamus, but not the cerebellum, starting at 4 h and persisting until 72 h after DFP treatment, although temporal profiles varied between brain regions. At 24 h post-DFP injection, the pattern of FJB labeling corresponded to TUNEL staining in most brain regions, and FJB-positive cells displayed reduced NeuN immunoreactivity but were not immunopositive for astrocytic (GFAP), oligodendroglial (O4) or macrophage/microglial (ED1) markers, demonstrating that DFP causes a region-specific delayed neuronal injury mediated in part by apoptosis. These findings indicate the feasibility of this model for testing neuroprotective strategies, and provide insight regarding therapeutic windows for effective pharmacological intervention following acute OP intoxication. - Research Highlights: > DFP induced neuronal FJB labeling starting at 4-8 h after treatment > The pattern of DFP-induced FJB labeling closely corresponded to TUNEL staining > FJB

  11. Acute upregulation of neuronal mitochondrial type-1 cannabinoid receptor and it's role in metabolic defects and neuronal apoptosis after TBI.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhen; Lv, Xiao-Ai; Dai, Qun; Ge, Yu-Qing; Xu, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic defects and neuronal apoptosis initiated by traumatic brain injury (TBI) contribute to subsequent neurodegeneration. They are all regulated by mechanisms centered around mitochondrion. Type-1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1) is a G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) enriched on neuronal plasma membrane. Recent evidences point to the substantial presence of CB1 receptors on neuronal mitochondrial outer membranes (mtCB1) and the activation of mtCB1 influences aerobic respiration via inhibiting mitochondrial cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)/protein kinase A (PKA)/complex I pathway. The expression and role of neuronal mtCB1 under TBI are unknown. Using TBI models of cultured neurons, wild type and CB1 knockout mice, we found mtCB1 quickly upregulated after TBI. Activation of mtCB1 promoted metabolic defects accompanied with ATP shortage but protected neurons from apoptosis. Selective activation of plasma membrane CB1 showed no effects on neuronal metabolism and apoptosis. Activation of mtCB1 receptors inhibited mitochondrial cAMP/PKA/complex I and resulted in exacerbated metabolic defects accompanied with a higher ratio of ATP reduction to oxygen consumption decrease as well as neuronal apoptosis. Further research found the remarkable accumulation of protein kinase B (AKT) on neuronal mitochondria following TBI and the activation of mtCB1 upregulated mitochondrial AKT/complex V activity. Upregulation of mitochondrial AKT/complex V activity showed anti-apoptosis effects and alleviated ATP shortage in metabolic defects. Taken together, we have identified mtCB1 quickly upregulate after TBI and a dual role the mtCB1 might play in metabolic defects and neuronal apoptosis initiated by TBI: the inhibition of mitochondrial cAMP/PKA/complex I aggravates metabolic defects, energy insufficiency as well as neuronal apoptosis, but the coactivation of mitochondrial AKT/complex V mitigates energy insufficiency and neuronal apoptosis. PMID:27485212

  12. Motor-Neuron Pool Excitability of the Lower Leg Muscles After Acute Lateral Ankle Sprain

    PubMed Central

    Klykken, Lindsey W.; Pietrosimone, Brian G.; Kim, Kyung-Min; Ingersoll, Christopher D.; Hertel, Jay

    2011-01-01

    Context: Neuromuscular deficits in leg muscles that are associated with arthrogenic muscle inhibition have been reported in people with chronic ankle instability, yet whether these neuromuscular alterations are present in individuals with acute sprains is unknown. Objective: To compare the effect of acute lateral ankle sprain on the motor-neuron pool excitability (MNPE) of injured leg muscles with that of uninjured contralateral leg muscles and the leg muscles of healthy controls. Design: Case-control study. Setting: Laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Ten individuals with acute ankle sprains (6 females, 4 males; age = 19.2 ± 3.8 years, height = 169.4 ± 8.5 cm, mass = 66.3 ±11.6 kg) and 10 healthy individuals (6 females, 4 males; age = 20.6 ± 4.0 years, height = 169.9 ± 10.6 cm, mass = 66.3 ± 10.2 kg) participated. Intervention(s): The independent variables were group (acute ankle sprain, healthy) and limb (injured, uninjured). Separate dependent t tests were used to determine differences in MNPE between legs. Main Outcome Measure(s): The MNPE of the soleus, fibularis longus, and tibialis anterior was measured by the maximal Hoffmann reflex (Hmax) and maximal muscle response (Mmax) and was then normalized using the Hmax:Mmax ratio. Results: The soleus MNPE in the ankle-sprain group was higher in the injured limb (Hmax:Mmax = 0.63; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.46, 0.80) than in the uninjured limb (Hmax:Mmax = 0.47; 95% CI, 0.08, 0.93) (t6 = 3.62, P = .01). In the acute ankle-sprain group, tibialis anterior MNPE tended to be lower in the injured ankle (Hmax:Mmax = 0.06; 95% CI, 0.01, 0.10) than in the uninjured ankle (Hmax:Mmax = 0.22; 95% CI, 0.09, 0.35), but this finding was not different (t9 = −2.01, P = .07). No differences were detected between injured (0.22; 95% CI, 0.14, 0.29) and uninjured (0.25; 95% CI, 0.12, 0.38) ankles for the fibularis longus in the ankle-sprain group (t9 = −0.739, P = .48). We found no side-to-side differences in

  13. Effects of strongly anisosmotic and NaCl deficient solutions on muscimol- and glutamate evoked whole-cell currents in freshly dissociated hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Vreugdenhil, M; Somjen, G G; Wadman, W J

    1995-01-23

    Sudden exposure of dissociated hippocampal neurons to strongly hypo- or hyperosmotic solutions suppresses voltage gated Na+, K+ and Ca2+ currents. We investigated whether ligand gated ion currents were similarly shut down by exposure to anisosmotic solutions. The effect of hypo-osmotic, NaCl deficient (mannitol-substituted), or hyper-osmotic test solutions delivered from a flow pipette was tested on voltage gated Ca2+ currents and on currents and conductance changes evoked by brief administration of either the GABAA-agonist muscimol or glutamate. Hyper-osmotic solution caused cells to shrink, but cell membrane capacitance did not change. Muscimol-induced conductance increases were depressed by hypo-osmotic and by NaCl deficient solutions and often by hyper-osmotic solution. Voltage gated Ca2+ currents were depressed by anisosmotic, but not by NaCl deficient isosmotic solution. NMDA- and non-NMDA evoked conductance increases were depressed by hyperosmotic solution; hypo-osmotic and NaCl deficient solutions were not tested on glutamate induced currents. Ligand gated currents are suppressed by anisosmotic solutions more slowly than are voltage gated channels. The changes caused by anisosmotic and NaCl deficient solutions were much greater then expected from calculated electrochemical effects and are probably the result of change in receptor controlled channels. PMID:7536614

  14. The Effects of NMDA Antagonists on Neuronal Activity in Cat Spinal Cord Evoked by Acute Inflammation in the Knee Joint.

    PubMed

    Schaible, Hans-Georg; Grubb, Blair D.; Neugebauer, Volker; Oppmann, Maria

    1991-01-01

    In alpha-chloralose-anaesthetized, spinalized cats we examined the effects of NMDA antagonists on the discharges of 71 spinal neurons which had afferent input from the knee joint. These neurons were rendered hyperexcitable by acute arthritis in the knee induced by kaolin and carrageenan. They were located in the deep dorsal and ventral horn and some of them had ascending axons. The N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) antagonists ketamine and d-2-amino-5-phosphonovalerate (AP5), were administered ionophoretically, and ketamine was also administered intravenously. In some of the experiments the antagonists were tested against the agonists NMDA and quisqualate. The effects of the NMDA antagonists consisted of a significant reduction in the resting activity of neurons and/or the responses of the same neurons to mechanical stimulation of the inflamed knee. Intravenous ketamine was most effective in suppressing the resting and mechanically evoked activity in 25 of 26 neurons tested. Ionophoretically applied ketamine had a suppressive effect in 11 of 21 neurons, and AP5 decreased activity in 17 of 24 cells. The reduction in the resting and/or the mechanically evoked discharges was achieved with doses of the antagonists which suppressed the responses to NMDA but not those to quisqualate. These results suggest that NMDA receptors are involved in the enhanced responses and basal activity of spinal neurons induced by inflammation in the periphery. PMID:12106256

  15. Nucleus accumbens neuronal activity correlates to the animal’s behavioral response to acute and chronic methylphenidate

    PubMed Central

    Claussen, Catherine M; Chong, Samuel L; Dafny, Nachum

    2014-01-01

    Acute and chronic Methylphenidate (MPD) exposure was recorded simultaneously for the rat’s locomotor activity and the nucleus accumbens (NAc) neuronal activity. The evaluation of the neuronal events was based on the animal’s behavior response to chronic MPD administration: 1) Animals exhibiting behavioral sensitization 2) Animals exhibiting behavioral tolerance. The experiment lasted for 10 days with four groups of animals; saline, 0.6, 2.5, and 10.0mg/kg MPD. For the main behavioral findings, about half of the animals exhibited behavioral sensitization or behavioral tolerance to 0.6, 2.5, and/or 10 mg/kg MPD respectively. Three hundred and forty one NAc neuronal units were evaluated. Approximately 80% of NAc units responded to 0.6, 2.5, and 10.0 mg/kg MPD. When the neuronal activity was analyzed based on the animals behavioral response to chronic MPD exposure, significant differences were seen between the neuronal populations responses recorded from animals that expressed behavioral sensitization when compared to the NAc neuronal responses recorded from animals exhibiting behavioral tolerance. Three types of neurophysiological sensitization and neurophysiological tolerance can be recognized following chronic MPD administration to the neuronal populations. Collectively, these findings show that the same dose of chronic MPD can elicit either behavioral tolerance or behavioral sensitization. Differential statistical analysis were used to verify our hypothesis that the neuronal activity recorded from animals exhibiting behavioral sensitization will respond differently to MPD compared to those animals exhibiting behavioral tolerance. Thus, suggesting that it is essential to record the animals behavior concomitantly with neuronal recordings. PMID:24534179

  16. Neuronal and inducible nitric oxide synthase upregulation in the rat medial prefrontal cortex following acute restraint stress: A dataset.

    PubMed

    Spiers, Jereme G; Chen, Hsiao-Jou Cortina; Lee, Johnny K; Sernia, Conrad; Lavidis, Nickolas A

    2016-03-01

    This data article provides additional evidence on gene expression changes in the neuronal and inducible isoforms of nitric oxide synthase in the medial prefrontal cortex following acute stress. Male Wistar rats aged 6-8 weeks were exposed to control or restraint stress conditions for up to four hours in the dark cycle after which the brain was removed and the medial prefrontal cortex isolated by cryodissection. Following RNA extraction and cDNA synthesis, gene expression data were measured using quantitative real-time PCR. The mRNA levels of the neuronal and inducible nitric oxide synthase isoforms, and the inhibitory subunit of NF-κB, I kappa B alpha were determined using the ΔΔCT method relative to control animals. This data article presents complementary results related to the research article entitled 'Acute restraint stress induces specific changes in nitric oxide production and inflammatory markers in the rat hippocampus and striatum' [1]. PMID:26909371

  17. Neuropathological characterization of spinal motor neuron degeneration processes induced by acute and chronic excitotoxic stimulus in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Jarquín, Uri Nimrod; Tapia, Ricardo

    2016-09-01

    Motor neuron (MN) diseases are characterized by progressive cell degeneration, and excitotoxicity has been postulated as a causal factor. Using two experimental procedures for inducing excitotoxic spinal MN degeneration in vivo, by acute and chronic overactivation of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazoleacetic acid (AMPA) receptors, we characterized the time course of the neuropathological changes. Electron transmission microscopy showed that acute AMPA perfusion by microdialysis caused MN swelling 1.5h after surgery and lysis with membrane rupture as early as 3h; no cleaved caspase 3 was detected by immunochemistry. Chronic AMPA infusion by osmotic minipumps induced a slow degeneration process along 5days, characterized by progressive changes: endoplasmic reticulum swelling, vacuolization of cytoplasm, vacuole fusion and cell membrane rupture. Quantification of these ultrastructural alterations showed that the increase of vacuolated area was at the expense of the nuclear area. Caspase 3 cleavage was observed since the first day of AMPA infusion. We conclude that acute AMPA-induced excitotoxicity induces MN loss by necrosis, while the progress of degeneration induced by chronic infusion is slow, starting with an early apoptotic process followed by necrosis. In both the acute and chronic procedures a correlation could be established between the loss of MN by necrosis, but not by caspase 3-linked apoptosis, and severe motor deficits and hindlimb paralysis. Our findings are relevant for understanding the mechanisms of neuron death in degenerative diseases and thus for the design of pharmacological therapeutic strategies. PMID:27320208

  18. Contrasting alterations to synaptic and intrinsic properties in upper-cervical superficial dorsal horn neurons following acute neck muscle inflammation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute and chronic pain in axial structures, like the back and neck, are difficult to treat, and have incidence as high as 15%. Surprisingly, most preclinical work on pain mechanisms focuses on cutaneous structures in the limbs and animal models of axial pain are not widely available. Accordingly, we developed a mouse model of acute cervical muscle inflammation and assessed the functional properties of superficial dorsal horn (SDH) neurons. Results Male C57/Bl6 mice (P24-P40) were deeply anaesthetised (urethane 2.2 g/kg i.p) and the rectus capitis major muscle (RCM) injected with 40 μl of 2% carrageenan. Sham animals received vehicle injection and controls remained anaesthetised for 2 hrs. Mice in each group were sacrificed at 2 hrs for analysis. c-Fos staining was used to determine the location of activated neurons. c-Fos labelling in carrageenan-injected mice was concentrated within ipsilateral (87% and 63% of labelled neurons in C1 and C2 segments, respectively) and contralateral laminae I - II with some expression in lateral lamina V. c-Fos expression remained below detectable levels in control and sham animals. In additional experiments, whole cell recordings were obtained from visualised SDH neurons in transverse slices in the ipsilateral C1 and C2 spinal segments. Resting membrane potential and input resistance were not altered. Mean spontaneous EPSC amplitude was reduced by ~20% in neurons from carrageenan-injected mice versus control and sham animals (20.63 ± 1.05 vs. 24.64 ± 0.91 and 25.87 ± 1.32 pA, respectively). The amplitude (238 ± 33 vs. 494 ± 96 and 593 ± 167 pA) and inactivation time constant (12.9 ± 1.5 vs. 22.1 ± 3.6 and 15.3 ± 1.4 ms) of the rapid A type potassium current (IAr), the dominant subthreshold current in SDH neurons, were reduced in carrageenan-injected mice. Conclusions Excitatory synaptic drive onto, and important intrinsic properties (i.e., IAr) within SDH neurons are

  19. Impaired Respiratory and Body Temperature Control Upon Acute Serotonergic Neuron Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Russell; Corcoran, Andrea; Brust, Rachael; Kim, Jun Chul; Richerson, George B.; Nattie, Eugene; Dymecki, Susan M.

    2013-01-01

    Physiological homeostasis is essential for organism survival. Highly responsive neuronal networks are involved but constituent neurons are just beginning to be resolved. To query brain serotonergic neurons in homeostasis, we used a synthetic GPCR (Di)-based neuronal silencing tool, mouse RC∷FPDi, designed for cell type-specific, ligand (clozapine-N-oxide, CNO)-inducible and reversible suppression of action potential firing. In mice harboring Di-expressing serotonergic neurons, CNO administration by systemic injection attenuated the chemoreflex that normally increases respiration in response to tissue CO2 elevation and acidosis. At the cellular level, CNO suppressed firing rate increases evoked by CO2/acidosis. Body thermoregulation at room temperature was also disrupted following CNO triggering of Di; core temperatures plummeted, then recovered. This work establishes that serotonergic neurons regulate life-sustaining respiratory and thermoregulatory networks, and demonstrates a noninvasive tool for mapping neuron function. PMID:21798952

  20. CFTR mediates noradrenaline-induced ATP efflux from DRG neurons

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    In our earlier study, noradrenaline (NA) stimulated ATP release from dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons as mediated via β3 adrenoceptors linked to Gs protein involving protein kinase A (PKA) activation, to cause allodynia. The present study was conducted to understand how ATP is released from DRG neurons. In an outside-out patch-clamp configuration from acutely dissociated rat DRG neurons, single-channel currents, sensitive to the P2X receptor inhibitor PPADS, were evoked by approaching the patch-electrode tip close to a neuron, indicating that ATP is released from DRG neurons, to activate P2X receptor. NA increased the frequency of the single-channel events, but such NA effect was not found for DRG neurons transfected with the siRNA to silence the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. In the immunocytochemical study using acutely dissociated rat DRG cells, CFTR was expressed in neurons alone, but not satellite cells, fibroblasts, or Schwann cells. It is concluded from these results that CFTR mediates NA-induced ATP efflux from DRG neurons as an ATP channel. PMID:21943397

  1. Morphofunctional alterations in ventral tegmental area dopamine neurons in acute and prolonged opiates withdrawal. A computational perspective.

    PubMed

    Enrico, P; Migliore, M; Spiga, S; Mulas, G; Caboni, F; Diana, M

    2016-05-13

    Dopamine (DA) neurons of the ventral tegmental area (VTA) play a key role in the neurobiological basis of goal-directed behaviors and addiction. Morphine (MOR) withdrawal induces acute and long-term changes in the morphology and physiology of VTA DA cells, but the mechanisms underlying these modifications are poorly understood. Because of their predictive value, computational models are a powerful tool in neurobiological research, and are often used to gain further insights and deeper understanding on the molecular and physiological mechanisms underlying the development of various psychiatric disorders. Here we present a biophysical model of a DA VTA neuron based on 3D morphological reconstruction and electrophysiological data, showing how opiates withdrawal-driven morphological and electrophysiological changes could affect the firing rate and discharge pattern. The model findings suggest how and to what extent a change in the balance of GABA/GLU inputs can take into account the experimentally observed hypofunction of VTA DA neurons during acute and prolonged withdrawal, whereas morphological changes may play a role in the increased excitability of VTA DA cell to opiate administration observed during opiate withdrawal. PMID:26899424

  2. The effects of acute alcohol exposure on the response properties of neurons in visual cortex area 17 of cats

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Bo; Xia Jing; Li Guangxing; Zhou Yifeng

    2010-03-15

    Physiological and behavioral studies have demonstrated that a number of visual functions such as visual acuity, contrast sensitivity, and motion perception can be impaired by acute alcohol exposure. The orientation- and direction-selective responses of cells in primary visual cortex are thought to participate in the perception of form and motion. To investigate how orientation selectivity and direction selectivity of neurons are influenced by acute alcohol exposure in vivo, we used the extracellular single-unit recording technique to examine the response properties of neurons in primary visual cortex (A17) of adult cats. We found that alcohol reduces spontaneous activity, visual evoked unit responses, the signal-to-noise ratio, and orientation selectivity of A17 cells. In addition, small but detectable changes in both the preferred orientation/direction and the bandwidth of the orientation tuning curve of strongly orientation-biased A17 cells were observed after acute alcohol administration. Our findings may provide physiological evidence for some alcohol-related deficits in visual function observed in behavioral studies.

  3. Toll-like receptor 4 signaling in neurons of trigeminal ganglion contributes to nociception induced by acute pulpitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jia-Ji; Du, Yi; Cai, Wen-Ke; Kuang, Rong; Chang, Ting; Zhang, Zhuo; Yang, Yong-Xiang; Sun, Chao; Li, Zhu-Yi; Kuang, Fang

    2015-01-01

    Pain caused by acute pulpitis (AP) is a common symptom in clinical settings. However, its underlying mechanisms have largely remained unknown. Using AP model, we demonstrated that dental injury caused severe pulp inflammation with up-regulated serum IL-1β. Assessment from head-withdrawal reflex thresholds (HWTs) and open-field test demonstrated nociceptive response at 1 day post injury. A consistent up-regulation of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in the trigeminal ganglion (TG) ipsilateral to the injured pulp was found; and downstream signaling components of TLR4, including MyD88, TRIF and NF-κB, and cytokines such as TNF-α and IL-1β, were also increased. Retrograde labeling indicated that most TLR4 positve neuron in the TG innnervated the pulp and TLR4 immunoreactivity was mainly in the medium and small neurons. Double labeling showed that the TLR4 expressing neurons in the ipsilateral TG were TRPV1 and CGRP positive, but IB4 negative. Furthermore, blocking TLR4 by eritoran (TLR4 antagonist) in TGs of the AP model significantly down-regulated MyD88, TRIF, NF-κB, TNF-α and IL-1β production and behavior of nociceptive response. Our findings suggest that TLR4 signaling in TG cells, particularly the peptidergic TRPV1 neurons, plays a key role in AP-induced nociception, and indicate that TLR4 signaling could be a potential therapeutic target for orofacial pain. PMID:26224622

  4. Toll-like receptor 4 signaling in neurons of trigeminal ganglion contributes to nociception induced by acute pulpitis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jia-Ji; Du, Yi; Cai, Wen-Ke; Kuang, Rong; Chang, Ting; Zhang, Zhuo; Yang, Yong-Xiang; Sun, Chao; Li, Zhu-Yi; Kuang, Fang

    2015-01-01

    Pain caused by acute pulpitis (AP) is a common symptom in clinical settings. However, its underlying mechanisms have largely remained unknown. Using AP model, we demonstrated that dental injury caused severe pulp inflammation with up-regulated serum IL-1β. Assessment from head-withdrawal reflex thresholds (HWTs) and open-field test demonstrated nociceptive response at 1 day post injury. A consistent up-regulation of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in the trigeminal ganglion (TG) ipsilateral to the injured pulp was found; and downstream signaling components of TLR4, including MyD88, TRIF and NF-κB, and cytokines such as TNF-α and IL-1β, were also increased. Retrograde labeling indicated that most TLR4 positve neuron in the TG innnervated the pulp and TLR4 immunoreactivity was mainly in the medium and small neurons. Double labeling showed that the TLR4 expressing neurons in the ipsilateral TG were TRPV1 and CGRP positive, but IB4 negative. Furthermore, blocking TLR4 by eritoran (TLR4 antagonist) in TGs of the AP model significantly down-regulated MyD88, TRIF, NF-κB, TNF-α and IL-1β production and behavior of nociceptive response. Our findings suggest that TLR4 signaling in TG cells, particularly the peptidergic TRPV1 neurons, plays a key role in AP-induced nociception, and indicate that TLR4 signaling could be a potential therapeutic target for orofacial pain. PMID:26224622

  5. Administration of low dose estrogen attenuates gliosis and protects neurons in acute spinal cord injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Samantaray, Supriti; Das, Arabinda; Matzelle, Denise C; Yu, Shan P; Wei, Ling; Varma, Abhay; Ray, Swapan K; Banik, Naren L

    2016-03-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a debilitating condition with neurological deficits and loss of motor function that, depending on the severity, may lead to paralysis. The only treatment currently available is methylprednisolone, which is widely used and renders limited efficacy in SCI. Therefore, other therapeutic agents must be developed. The neuroprotective efficacy of estrogen in SCI was studied with a pre-clinical and pro-translational perspective. Acute SCI was induced in rats that were treated with low doses of estrogen (1, 5, 10, or 100 μg/kg) and compared with vehicle-treated injured rats or laminectomy control (sham) rats at 48 h post-SCI. Changes in gliosis and other pro-inflammatory responses, expression and activity of proteolytic enzymes (e.g., calpain, caspase-3), apoptosis of neurons in SCI, and cell death were monitored via Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Negligible pro-inflammatory responses or proteolytic events and very low levels of neuronal death were found in sham rats. In contrast, vehicle-treated SCI rats showed profound pro-inflammatory responses with reactive gliosis, elevated expression and activity of calpain and caspase-3, elevated Bax:Bcl-2 ratio, and high levels of neuronal death in lesion and caudal regions of the injured spinal cord. Estrogen treatment at each dose reduced pro-inflammatory and proteolytic activities and protected neurons in the caudal penumbra in acute SCI. Estrogen treatment at 10 μg was found to be as effective as 100 μg in ameliorating the above parameters in injured animals. Results from this investigation indicated that estrogen at a low dose could be a promising therapeutic agent for treating acute SCI. Experimental studies with low dose estrogen therapy in acute spinal cord injury (SCI) demonstrated the potential for multi-active beneficial outcomes. Estrogen has been found to ameliorate several degenerative pathways following SCI. Thus, such early protective effects may even lead to functional

  6. Acute pressure on the sciatic nerve results in rapid inhibition of the wide dynamic range neuronal response

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Acute pressure on the sciatic nerve has recently been reported to provide rapid short-term relief of pain in patients with various pathologies. Wide dynamic range (WDR) neurons transmit nociceptive information from the dorsal horn to higher brain centers. In the present study, we examined the effect of a 2-min application of sciatic nerve pressure on WDR neuronal activity in anesthetized male Sprague–Dawley rats. Results Experiments were carried out on 41 male Sprague–Dawley albino rats weighing 160–280 grams. Dorsal horn WDR neurons were identified on the basis of characteristic responses to mechanical stimuli applied to the cutaneous receptive field. Acute pressure was applied for 2 min to the sciatic nerve using a small vascular clip. The responses of WDR neurons to three mechanical stimuli applied to the cutaneous receptive field were recorded before, and 2, 5 and 20 min after cessation of the 2-min pressure application on the sciatic nerve. Two-min pressure applied to the sciatic nerve caused rapid attenuation of the WDR response to pinching, pressure and brushing stimuli applied to the cutaneous receptive field. Maximal attenuation of the WDR response to pinching and pressure was noted 5 min after release of the 2-min pressure on the sciatic nerve. The mean firing rate decreased from 31.7±1.7 Hz to 13±1.4 Hz upon pinching (p < 0.001), from 31.2±2.3 Hz to 10.9±1.4 Hz (p < 0.001) when pressure was applied, and from 18.9±1.2 Hz to 7.6±1.1 Hz (p < 0.001) upon brushing. Thereafter, the mean firing rates gradually recovered. Conclusions Our results indicate that acute pressure applied to the sciatic nerve exerts a rapid inhibitory effect on the WDR response to both noxious and innocuous stimuli. Our results may partially explain the rapid analgesic effect of acute sciatic nerve pressure noted in clinical studies, and also suggest a new model for the study of pain. PMID:23211003

  7. Acute stress enhances adult rat hippocampal neurogenesis and activation of newborn neurons via secreted astrocytic FGF2

    PubMed Central

    Kirby, Elizabeth D; Muroy, Sandra E; Sun, Wayne G; Covarrubias, David; Leong, Megan J; Barchas, Laurel A; Kaufer, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    Stress is a potent modulator of the mammalian brain. The highly conserved stress hormone response influences many brain regions, particularly the hippocampus, a region important for memory function. The effect of acute stress on the unique population of adult neural stem/progenitor cells (NPCs) that resides in the adult hippocampus is unclear. We found that acute stress increased hippocampal cell proliferation and astrocytic fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) expression. The effect of acute stress occurred independent of basolateral amygdala neural input and was mimicked by treating isolated NPCs with conditioned media from corticosterone-treated primary astrocytes. Neutralization of FGF2 revealed that astrocyte-secreted FGF2 mediated stress-hormone-induced NPC proliferation. 2 weeks, but not 2 days, after acute stress, rats also showed enhanced fear extinction memory coincident with enhanced activation of newborn neurons. Our findings suggest a beneficial role for brief stress on the hippocampus and improve understanding of the adaptive capacity of the brain. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00362.001 PMID:23599891

  8. Diverse impact of acute and long-term extracellular proteolytic activity on plasticity of neuronal excitability

    PubMed Central

    Wójtowicz, Tomasz; Brzdąk, Patrycja; Mozrzymas, Jerzy W.

    2015-01-01

    Learning and memory require alteration in number and strength of existing synaptic connections. Extracellular proteolysis within the synapses has been shown to play a pivotal role in synaptic plasticity by determining synapse structure, function, and number. Although synaptic plasticity of excitatory synapses is generally acknowledged to play a crucial role in formation of memory traces, some components of neural plasticity are reflected by nonsynaptic changes. Since information in neural networks is ultimately conveyed with action potentials, scaling of neuronal excitability could significantly enhance or dampen the outcome of dendritic integration, boost neuronal information storage capacity and ultimately learning. However, the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. With this regard, several lines of evidence and our most recent study support a view that activity of extracellular proteases might affect information processing in neuronal networks by affecting targets beyond synapses. Here, we review the most recent studies addressing the impact of extracellular proteolysis on plasticity of neuronal excitability and discuss how enzymatic activity may alter input-output/transfer function of neurons, supporting cognitive processes. Interestingly, extracellular proteolysis may alter intrinsic neuronal excitability and excitation/inhibition balance both rapidly (time of minutes to hours) and in long-term window. Moreover, it appears that by cleavage of extracellular matrix (ECM) constituents, proteases may modulate function of ion channels or alter inhibitory drive and hence facilitate active participation of dendrites and axon initial segments (AISs) in adjusting neuronal input/output function. Altogether, a picture emerges whereby both rapid and long-term extracellular proteolysis may influence some aspects of information processing in neurons, such as initiation of action potential, spike frequency adaptation, properties of action potential and dendritic

  9. Dual Electrophysiological Recordings of Synaptically-evoked Astroglial and Neuronal Responses in Acute Hippocampal Slices

    PubMed Central

    Rouach, Nathalie

    2012-01-01

    Astrocytes form together with neurons tripartite synapses, where they integrate and modulate neuronal activity. Indeed, astrocytes sense neuronal inputs through activation of their ion channels and neurotransmitter receptors, and process information in part through activity-dependent release of gliotransmitters. Furthermore, astrocytes constitute the main uptake system for glutamate, contribute to potassium spatial buffering, as well as to GABA clearance. These cells therefore constantly monitor synaptic activity, and are thereby sensitive indicators for alterations in synaptically-released glutamate, GABA and extracellular potassium levels. Additionally, alterations in astroglial uptake activity or buffering capacity can have severe effects on neuronal functions, and might be overlooked when characterizing physiopathological situations or knockout mice. Dual recording of neuronal and astroglial activities is therefore an important method to study alterations in synaptic strength associated to concomitant changes in astroglial uptake and buffering capacities. Here we describe how to prepare hippocampal slices, how to identify stratum radiatum astrocytes, and how to record simultaneously neuronal and astroglial electrophysiological responses. Furthermore, we describe how to isolate pharmacologically the synaptically-evoked astroglial currents. PMID:23222635

  10. The Acute Phase of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Is Characterized by a Distance-Dependent Neuronal Hypoactivity

    PubMed Central

    Johnstone, Victoria P.A.; Shultz, Sandy R.; Yan, Edwin B.; O'Brien, Terence J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The consequences of mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) on neuronal functionality are only now being elucidated. We have now examined the changes in sensory encoding in the whisker-recipient barrel cortex and the brain tissue damage in the acute phase (24 h) after induction of TBI (n=9), with sham controls receiving surgery only (n=5). Injury was induced using the lateral fluid percussion injury method, which causes a mixture of focal and diffuse brain injury. Both population and single cell neuronal responses evoked by both simple and complex whisker stimuli revealed a suppression of activity that decreased with distance from the locus of injury both within a hemisphere and across hemispheres, with a greater extent of hypoactivity in ipsilateral barrel cortex compared with contralateral cortex. This was coupled with an increase in spontaneous output in Layer 5a, but only ipsilateral to the injury site. There was also disruption of axonal integrity in various regions in the ipsilateral but not contralateral hemisphere. These results complement our previous findings after mild diffuse-only TBI induced by the weight-drop impact acceleration method where, in the same acute post-injury phase, we found a similar depth-dependent hypoactivity in sensory cortex. This suggests a common sequelae of events in both diffuse TBI and mixed focal/diffuse TBI in the immediate post-injury period that then evolve over time to produce different long-term functional outcomes. PMID:24927383

  11. Effects of acute treadmill running at different intensities on activities of serotonin and corticotropin-releasing factor neurons, and anxiety- and depressive-like behaviors in rats.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Tomomi; Nishii, Ayu; Amemiya, Seiichiro; Kubota, Natsuko; Nishijima, Takeshi; Kita, Ichiro

    2016-02-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that physical exercise can reduce and prevent the incidence of stress-related psychiatric disorders, including depression and anxiety. Activation of serotonin (5-HT) neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) is implicated in antidepressant/anxiolytic properties. In addition, the incidence and symptoms of these disorders may involve dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis that is initiated by corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) neurons in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN). Thus, it is possible that physical exercise produces its antidepressant/anxiolytic effects by affecting these neuronal activities. However, the effects of acute physical exercise at different intensities on these neuronal activation and behavioral changes are still unclear. Here, we examined the activities of 5-HT neurons in the DRN and CRF neurons in the PVN during 30 min of treadmill running at different speeds (high speed, 25 m/min; low speed, 15m/min; control, only sitting on the treadmill) in male Wistar rats, using c-Fos/5-HT or CRF immunohistochemistry. We also performed the elevated plus maze test and the forced swim test to assess anxiety- and depressive-like behaviors, respectively. Acute treadmill running at low speed, but not high speed, significantly increased c-Fos expression in 5-HT neurons in the DRN compared to the control, whereas high-speed running significantly enhanced c-Fos expression in CRF neurons in the PVN compared with the control and low-speed running. Furthermore, low-speed running resulted in decreased anxiety- and depressive-like behaviors compared with high-speed running. These results suggest that acute physical exercise with mild and low stress can efficiently induce optimal neuronal activation that is involved in the antidepressant/anxiolytic effects. PMID:26542811

  12. Spondylopelvic dissociation.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Matthew P; Smith, Harvey E; Schuster, James M; Donegan, Derek; Mehta, Samir; Ahn, Jaimo

    2014-01-01

    Spondylopelvic dissociation is a complex injury pattern resulting in multiplanar instability of the lumbopelvis. These injuries have traditionally been known as "suicide jumper's fractures" and have recently increased in prevalence as a result of under-vehicle explosions seen in the past decade of military conflicts in the Middle East. The hallmarks of spondylopelvic dissociation are bilateral vertical sacral fractures with a horizontal component, resulting in lumbosacral instability in the sagittal and axial planes. Surgical treatment has evolved greatly and both percutaneous and open options are available, with triangular osteosynthesis being the most relied on method of fixation. PMID:24267208

  13. A LAT-associated function reduces productive-cycle gene expression during acute infection of murine sensory neurons with herpes simplex virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Garber, D A; Schaffer, P A; Knipe, D M

    1997-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) persists in the human population by establishing long-term latent infections followed by periodic reactivation and transmission. Latent infection of sensory neurons is characterized by repression of viral productive-cycle gene expression, with abundant transcription limited to a single locus that encodes the latency-associated transcripts (LATs). We have observed that LAT- deletion mutant viruses express viral productive-cycle genes in greater numbers of murine trigeminal ganglion neurons than LAT+ HSV type 1 at early times during acute infection but show reduced reactivation from latent infection. Thus, a viral function associated with the LAT region exerts an effect at an early stage of neuronal infection to reduce productive-cycle viral gene expression. These results provide the first evidence that the virus plays an active role in down-regulating productive infection during acute infection of sensory neurons. The effect of down-regulation of productive-cycle gene expression during acute infection may contribute to viral evasion from the host immune responses and to reduced cytopathic effects, thereby facilitating neuronal survival and the establishment of latency. PMID:9223478

  14. Intrinsic excitability changes induced by acute treatment of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons with exogenous amyloid β peptide.

    PubMed

    Tamagnini, Francesco; Scullion, Sarah; Brown, Jon T; Randall, Andrew D

    2015-07-01

    Accumulation of beta-amyloid (Aβ) peptides in the human brain is a canonical pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Recent work in Aβ-overexpressing transgenic mice indicates that increased brain Aβ levels can be associated with aberrant epileptiform activity. In line with this, such mice can also exhibit altered intrinsic excitability (IE) of cortical and hippocampal neurons: these observations may relate to the increased prevalence of seizures in AD patients. In this study, we examined what changes in IE are produced in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells after 2-5 h treatment with an oligomeric preparation of synthetic human Aβ 1-42 peptide. Whole cell current clamp recordings were compared between Aβ-(500 nM) and vehicle-(DMSO 0.05%) treated hippocampal slices obtained from mice. The soluble Aβ treatment did not produce alterations in sub-threshold intrinsic properties, including membrane potential, input resistance, and hyperpolarization activated "sag". Similarly, no changes were noted in the firing profile evoked by 500 ms square current supra-threshold stimuli. However, Aβ 500 nM treatment resulted in the hyperpolarization of the action potential (AP) threshold. In addition, treatment with Aβ at 500 nM depressed the after-hyperpolarization that followed both a single AP or 50 Hz trains of a number of APs between 5 and 25. These data suggest that acute exposure to soluble Aβ oligomers affects IE properties of CA1 pyramidal neurons differently from outcomes seen in transgenic models of amyloidopathy. However, in both chronic and acute models, the IE changes are toward hyperexcitability, reinforcing the idea that amyloidopathy and increased incidence in seizures might be causally related in AD patients. PMID:25515596

  15. Intrinsic excitability changes induced by acute treatment of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons with exogenous amyloid β peptide

    PubMed Central

    Scullion, Sarah; Brown, Jon T.; Randall, Andrew D.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Accumulation of beta‐amyloid (Aβ) peptides in the human brain is a canonical pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Recent work in Aβ‐overexpressing transgenic mice indicates that increased brain Aβ levels can be associated with aberrant epileptiform activity. In line with this, such mice can also exhibit altered intrinsic excitability (IE) of cortical and hippocampal neurons: these observations may relate to the increased prevalence of seizures in AD patients. In this study, we examined what changes in IE are produced in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells after 2–5 h treatment with an oligomeric preparation of synthetic human Aβ 1–42 peptide. Whole cell current clamp recordings were compared between Aβ‐(500 nM) and vehicle‐(DMSO 0.05%) treated hippocampal slices obtained from mice. The soluble Aβ treatment did not produce alterations in sub‐threshold intrinsic properties, including membrane potential, input resistance, and hyperpolarization activated “sag”. Similarly, no changes were noted in the firing profile evoked by 500 ms square current supra‐threshold stimuli. However, Aβ 500 nM treatment resulted in the hyperpolarization of the action potential (AP) threshold. In addition, treatment with Aβ at 500 nM depressed the after‐hyperpolarization that followed both a single AP or 50 Hz trains of a number of APs between 5 and 25. These data suggest that acute exposure to soluble Aβ oligomers affects IE properties of CA1 pyramidal neurons differently from outcomes seen in transgenic models of amyloidopathy. However, in both chronic and acute models, the IE changes are toward hyperexcitability, reinforcing the idea that amyloidopathy and increased incidence in seizures might be causally related in AD patients. © 2014 The Authors Hippocampus Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25515596

  16. Ablation of huntingtin in adult neurons is nondeleterious but its depletion in young mice causes acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guohao; Liu, Xudong; Gaertig, Marta A; Li, Shihua; Li, Xiao-Jiang

    2016-03-22

    The Huntington's disease (HD) protein, huntingtin (HTT), is essential for early development. Because suppressing the expression of mutantHTTis an important approach to treat the disease, we must first understand the normal function of Htt in adults versus younger animals. Using inducibleHttknockout mice, we found thatHttdepletion does not lead to adult neurodegeneration or animal death at >4 mo of age, which was also verified by selectively depletingHttin neurons. On the other hand, young Htt KO mice die at 2 mo of age of acute pancreatitis due to the degeneration of pancreatic acinar cells. Importantly, Htt interacts with the trypsin inhibitor, serine protease inhibitor Kazal-type 3 (Spink3), to inhibit activation of digestive enzymes in acinar cells in young mice, and transgenicHTTcan rescue the early death of Htt KO mice. These findings point out age- and cell type-dependent vital functions of Htt and the safety of knocking down neuronal Htt expression in adult brains as a treatment. PMID:26951659

  17. Prevention of acute/severe hypoglycemia-induced neuron death by lactate administration.

    PubMed

    Won, Seok Joon; Jang, Bong Geom; Yoo, Byung Hoon; Sohn, Min; Lee, Min Woo; Choi, Bo Young; Kim, Jin Hee; Song, Hong Ki; Suh, Sang Won

    2012-06-01

    Hypoglycemia-induced cerebral neuropathy can occur in patients with diabetes who attempt tight control of blood glucose and may lead to cognitive dysfunction. Accumulating evidence from animal models suggests that hypoglycemia-induced neuronal death is not a simple result of glucose deprivation, but is instead the end result of a multifactorial process. In particular, the excessive activation of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) consumes cytosolic nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)), resulting in energy failure. In this study, we investigate whether lactate administration in the absence of cytosolic NAD(+) affords neuroprotection against hypoglycemia-induced neuronal death. Intraperitoneal injection of sodium L-lactate corrected arterial blood pH and blood lactate concentration after hypoglycemia. Lactate administered without glucose was not sufficient to promote electroencephalogram recovery from an isoelectric state during hypoglycemia. However, supplementation of glucose with lactate reduced neuronal death by ∼80% in the hippocampus. Hypoglycemia-induced superoxide production and microglia activation was also substantially reduced by administration of lactate. Taken together, these results suggest an intriguing possibility: that increasing brain lactate following hypoglycemia offsets the decrease in NAD(+) due to overactivation of PARP-1 by acting as an alternative energy substrate that can effectively bypass glycolysis and be fed directly to the citric acid cycle to maintain cellular ATP levels. PMID:22453629

  18. Stimulus-induced dissociation of neuronal firing rates and local field potential gamma power and its relationship to the blood oxygen level-dependent signal in macaque primary visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Bartolo, M J; Gieselmann, M A; Vuksanovic, V; Hunter, D; Sun, L; Chen, X; Delicato, L S; Thiele, A

    2011-01-01

    The functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal is regularly used to assign neuronal activity to cognitive function. Recent analyses have shown that the local field potential (LFP) gamma power is a better predictor of the fMRI BOLD signal than spiking activity. However, LFP gamma power and spiking activity are usually correlated, clouding the analysis of the neural basis of the BOLD signal. We show that changes in LFP gamma power and spiking activity in the primary visual cortex (V1) of the awake primate can be dissociated by using grating and plaid pattern stimuli, which differentially engage surround suppression and cross-orientation inhibition/facilitation within and between cortical columns. Grating presentation yielded substantial V1 LFP gamma frequency oscillations and significant multi-unit activity. Plaid pattern presentation significantly reduced the LFP gamma power while increasing population multi-unit activity. The fMRI BOLD activity followed the LFP gamma power changes, not the multi-unit activity. Inference of neuronal activity from the fMRI BOLD signal thus requires detailed a priori knowledge of how different stimuli or tasks activate the cortical network. PMID:22081989

  19. Alterations in neuronal morphology in infralimbic cortex predict resistance to fear extinction following acute stress

    PubMed Central

    Moench, Kelly M.; Maroun, Mouna; Kavushansky, Alexandra; Wellman, Cara

    2015-01-01

    Dysfunction in corticolimbic circuits that mediate the extinction of learned fear responses is thought to underlie the perseveration of fear in stress-related psychopathologies, including post-traumatic stress disorder. Chronic stress produces dendritic hypertrophy in basolateral amygdala (BLA) and dendritic hypotrophy in medial prefrontal cortex, whereas acute stress leads to hypotrophy in both BLA and prelimbic cortex. Additionally, both chronic and acute stress impair extinction retrieval. Here, we examined the effects of a single elevated platform stress on extinction learning and dendritic morphology in infralimbic cortex, a region considered to be critical for extinction. Acute stress produced resistance to extinction, as well as dendritic retraction in infralimbic cortex. Spine density on apical and basilar terminal branches was unaffected by stress. However, animals that underwent conditioning and extinction had decreased spine density on apical terminal branches. Thus, whereas dendritic morphology in infralimbic cortex appears to be particularly sensitive to stress, changes in spines may more sensitively reflect learning. Further, in stressed rats that underwent conditioning and extinction, the level of extinction learning was correlated with spine densities, in that rats with poorer extinction retrieval had more immature spines and fewer thin spines than rats with better extinction retrieval, suggesting that stress may have impaired learning-related spine plasticity. These results may have implications for understanding the role of medial prefrontal cortex in learning deficits associated with stress-related pathologies. PMID:26844245

  20. Alterations in neuronal morphology in infralimbic cortex predict resistance to fear extinction following acute stress.

    PubMed

    Moench, Kelly M; Maroun, Mouna; Kavushansky, Alexandra; Wellman, Cara

    2016-06-01

    Dysfunction in corticolimbic circuits that mediate the extinction of learned fear responses is thought to underlie the perseveration of fear in stress-related psychopathologies, including post-traumatic stress disorder. Chronic stress produces dendritic hypertrophy in basolateral amygdala (BLA) and dendritic hypotrophy in medial prefrontal cortex, whereas acute stress leads to hypotrophy in both BLA and prelimbic cortex. Additionally, both chronic and acute stress impair extinction retrieval. Here, we examined the effects of a single elevated platform stress on extinction learning and dendritic morphology in infralimbic cortex, a region considered to be critical for extinction. Acute stress produced resistance to extinction, as well as dendritic retraction in infralimbic cortex. Spine density on apical and basilar terminal branches was unaffected by stress. However, animals that underwent conditioning and extinction had decreased spine density on apical terminal branches. Thus, whereas dendritic morphology in infralimbic cortex appears to be particularly sensitive to stress, changes in spines may more sensitively reflect learning. Further, in stressed rats that underwent conditioning and extinction, the level of extinction learning was correlated with spine densities, in that rats with poorer extinction retrieval had more immature spines and fewer thin spines than rats with better extinction retrieval, suggesting that stress may have impaired learning-related spine plasticity. These results may have implications for understanding the role of medial prefrontal cortex in learning deficits associated with stress-related pathologies. PMID:26844245

  1. Neuroprotective effect of acute melatonin treatment on hippocampal neurons against irradiation by inhibition of caspase-3

    PubMed Central

    LI, JIANGUO; ZHANG, GUOWEI; MENG, ZHUANGZHI; WANG, LINGZHAN; LIU, HAIYING; LIU, QIANG; BUREN, BATU

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal cell apoptosis is associated with various factors that induce neurological damage, including radiation exposure. When administered prior to exposure to radiation, a protective agent may prevent cellular and molecular injury. The present study aimed to investigate whether melatonin exerts a neuroprotective effect by inhibiting the caspase cell death pathway. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were administered melatonin (100 mg/kg body weight) 30 min prior to radiation exposure in red light during the evening. In order to elucidate whether melatonin has a neuroprotective role, immunohistochemistry, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling, Nissl staining, reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction, reactive oxygen species analysis and western blotting were performed. At 24 h post-melatonin treatment, caspase-3 mRNA and protein expression levels were significantly decreased. These results demonstrated that melatonin may protect hippocampal neurons via the inhibition of caspase-3 when exposed to irradiation. Therefore, caspase-3 inhibition serves a neuroprotective and antioxidant role in the interventional treatment of melatonin. The results of the present study suggested that melatonin may have a potential therapeutic effect against irradiation; however, further studies are required in order to elucidate the underlying antioxidant mechanisms. PMID:27313671

  2. NRF2 promotes neuronal survival in neurodegeneration and acute nerve damage

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Wenjun; MacColl Garfinkel, Alexandra E.; Li, Yiqing; Benowitz, Larry I.; Cepko, Constance L.

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress contributes to the loss of neurons in many disease conditions as well as during normal aging; however, small-molecule agents that reduce oxidation have not been successful in preventing neurodegeneration. Moreover, even if an efficacious systemic reduction of reactive oxygen and/or nitrogen species (ROS/NOS) could be achieved, detrimental side effects are likely, as these molecules regulate normal physiological processes. A more effective and targeted approach might be to augment the endogenous antioxidant defense mechanism only in the cells that suffer from oxidation. Here, we created several adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors to deliver genes that combat oxidation. These vectors encode the transcription factors NRF2 and/or PGC1a, which regulate hundreds of genes that combat oxidation and other forms of stress, or enzymes such as superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2) and catalase, which directly detoxify ROS. We tested the effectiveness of this approach in 3 models of photoreceptor degeneration and in a nerve crush model. AAV-mediated delivery of NRF2 was more effective than SOD2 and catalase, while expression of PGC1a accelerated photoreceptor death. Since the NRF2-mediated neuroprotective effects extended to photoreceptors and retinal ganglion cells, which are 2 very different types of neurons, these results suggest that this targeted approach may be broadly applicable to many diseases in which cells suffer from oxidative damage. PMID:25798616

  3. N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-mediated mitochondrial Ca(2+) overload in acute excitotoxic motor neuron death: a mechanism distinct from chronic neurotoxicity after Ca(2+) influx.

    PubMed

    Urushitani, M; Nakamizo, T; Inoue, R; Sawada, H; Kihara, T; Honda, K; Akaike, A; Shimohama, S

    2001-03-01

    Mitochondrial uptake of Ca(2+) has recently been found to play an important role in glutamate-induced neurotoxicity (GNT) as well as in the activation of Ca(2+)-dependent molecules, such as calmodulin and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), in the cytoplasm. Prolonged exposure to glutamate injures motor neurons predominantly through the activation of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-nNOS, as previously reported, and is, in part, associated with the pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). In the present study, we investigated how mitochondrial uptake of Ca(2+) is involved in GNT in spinal motor neurons. Acute excitotoxicity induced by exposure to 0.5 mM glutamate for 5 min was found in both motor and nonmotor neurons in cultured spinal cords from rat embryos and was dependent on extracellular Ca(2+) and on N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor activation. Mitochondrial uncouplers markedly blocked acute excitotoxicity, and membrane-permeable superoxide dismutase mimics attenuated acute excitotoxicity induced by glutamate and NMDA but not by alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionate (AMPA) or kainate. Fluorimetric analysis showed that mitochondrial Ca(2+) was elevated promptly with subsequent accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the mitochondria. An NMDA receptor antagonist and a mitochondrial uncoupler eliminated the increase in fluorescence of mitochondrial Ca(2+) and ROS indicators. These data indicate that acute excitotoxicity in spinal neurons is mediated by mitochondrial Ca(2+) overload and ROS generation through the activation of NMDA receptors. This mechanism is different from that of chronic GNT. PMID:11223912

  4. Selective vulnerability of motor neurons and dissociation of pre- and post-synaptic pathology at the neuromuscular junction in mouse models of spinal muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Murray, Lyndsay M; Comley, Laura H; Thomson, Derek; Parkinson, Nick; Talbot, Kevin; Gillingwater, Thomas H

    2008-04-01

    Proximal spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a common autosomal recessive childhood form of motor neuron disease. Previous studies have highlighted nerve- and muscle-specific events in SMA, including atrophy of muscle fibres and post-synaptic motor endplates, loss of lower motor neuron cell bodies and denervation of neuromuscular junctions caused by loss of pre-synaptic inputs. Here we have undertaken a detailed morphological investigation of neuromuscular synaptic pathology in the Smn-/-;SMN2 and Smn-/-;SMN2;Delta7 mouse models of SMA. We show that neuromuscular junctions in the transversus abdominis (TVA), levator auris longus (LAL) and lumbrical muscles were disrupted in both mouse models. Pre-synaptic inputs were lost and abnormal accumulations of neurofilament were present, even in early/mid-symptomatic animals in the most severely affected muscle groups. Neuromuscular pathology was more extensive in the postural TVA muscle compared with the fast-twitch LAL and lumbrical muscles. Pre-synaptic pathology in Smn-/-;SMN2;Delta7 mice was reduced compared with Smn-/-;SMN2 mice at late-symptomatic time-points, although post-synaptic pathology was equally severe. We demonstrate that shrinkage of motor endplates does not correlate with loss of motor nerve terminals, signifying that one can occur in the absence of the other. We also demonstrate selective vulnerability of a subpopulation of motor neurons in the caudal muscle band of the LAL. Paralysis with botulinum toxin resulted in less terminal sprouting and ectopic synapse formation in the caudal band compared with the rostral band, suggesting that motor units conforming to a Fast Synapsing (FaSyn) phenotype are likely to be more vulnerable than those with a Delayed Synapsing (DeSyn) phenotype. PMID:18065780

  5. G-Protein Modulation of Voltage-Gated Ca2+ Channels from Isolated Adult Rat Superior Cervical Ganglion Neurons.

    PubMed

    Lu, Van B; Ikeda, Stephen R

    2016-01-01

    Sympathetic neurons isolated from adult rat superior cervical ganglia (SCG) are a well-established model to study G-protein modulation of voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels (VGCCs). SCG neurons can be easily dissociated and are amendable to heterologous expression of genes, including genetic tools to study G-protein signaling pathways, within a time frame to maintain good spatial voltage-clamp control of membrane potential during electrophysiological recordings (8-36 h postdissociation). This protocol focuses on examining G-protein modulation of VGCCs; however, the procedures and experimental setup for acute application of agonists can be applied to study modulation of other ion channels (e.g., M-current, G-protein-coupled inwardly rectifying K(+) channels). We also discuss some common sources of artifacts that can arise during acute drug application onto dissociated neurons, which can mislead interpretation of results. PMID:27140920

  6. Acute and long-term exposure to chlorpyrifos induces cell death of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons through AChE variants alteration.

    PubMed

    del Pino, Javier; Moyano, Paula; Anadon, María José; García, José Manuel; Díaz, María Jesús; García, Jimena; Frejo, María Teresa

    2015-10-01

    Chlorpyrifos (CPF) is one of the most widely used organophosphates insecticides that has been reported to induce cognitive disorders both after acute and repeated administration similar to those induced in Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the mechanisms through which it induces these effects are unknown. On the other hand, the cholinergic system, mainly basal forebrain cholinergic neurons, is involved in learning and memory regulation, and an alteration of cholinergic transmission or/and cholinergic cell loss could induce these effects. In this regard, it has been reported that CPF can affect cholinergic transmission, and alter AChE variants, which have been shown to be related with basal forebrain cholinergic neuronal loss. According to these data, we hypothesized that CPF could induce basal forebrain cholinergic neuronal loss through cholinergic transmission and AChE variants alteration. To prove this hypothesis, we evaluated in septal SN56 basal forebrain cholinergic neurons, the CPF toxic effects after 24h and 14 days exposure on neuronal viability and the cholinergic mechanisms related to it. This study shows that CPF impaired cholinergic transmission, induced AChE inhibition and, only after long-term exposure, increased CHT expression, which suggests that acetylcholine levels alteration could be mediated by these actions. Moreover, CPF induces, after acute and long-term exposure, cell death in cholinergic neurons in the basal forebrain and this effect is independent of AChE inhibition and acetylcholine alteration, but was mediated partially by AChE variants alteration. Our present results provide a new understanding of the mechanisms contributing to the harmful effects of CPF on neuronal function and viability, and the possible relevance of CPF in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26210949

  7. Dissociable influences of primary auditory cortex and the posterior auditory field on neuronal responses in the dorsal zone of auditory cortex

    PubMed Central

    Kok, Melanie A.; Stolzberg, Daniel; Brown, Trecia A.

    2014-01-01

    Current models of hierarchical processing in auditory cortex have been based principally on anatomical connectivity while functional interactions between individual regions have remained largely unexplored. Previous cortical deactivation studies in the cat have addressed functional reciprocal connectivity between primary auditory cortex (A1) and other hierarchically lower level fields. The present study sought to assess the functional contribution of inputs along multiple stages of the current hierarchical model to a higher order area, the dorsal zone (DZ) of auditory cortex, in the anaesthetized cat. Cryoloops were placed over A1 and posterior auditory field (PAF). Multiunit neuronal responses to noise burst and tonal stimuli were recorded in DZ during cortical deactivation of each field individually and in concert. Deactivation of A1 suppressed peak neuronal responses in DZ regardless of stimulus and resulted in increased minimum thresholds and reduced absolute bandwidths for tone frequency receptive fields in DZ. PAF deactivation had less robust effects on DZ firing rates and receptive fields compared with A1 deactivation, and combined A1/PAF cooling was largely driven by the effects of A1 deactivation at the population level. These results provide physiological support for the current anatomically based model of both serial and parallel processing schemes in auditory cortical hierarchical organization. PMID:25339709

  8. Dissociable influences of primary auditory cortex and the posterior auditory field on neuronal responses in the dorsal zone of auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Kok, Melanie A; Stolzberg, Daniel; Brown, Trecia A; Lomber, Stephen G

    2015-01-15

    Current models of hierarchical processing in auditory cortex have been based principally on anatomical connectivity while functional interactions between individual regions have remained largely unexplored. Previous cortical deactivation studies in the cat have addressed functional reciprocal connectivity between primary auditory cortex (A1) and other hierarchically lower level fields. The present study sought to assess the functional contribution of inputs along multiple stages of the current hierarchical model to a higher order area, the dorsal zone (DZ) of auditory cortex, in the anaesthetized cat. Cryoloops were placed over A1 and posterior auditory field (PAF). Multiunit neuronal responses to noise burst and tonal stimuli were recorded in DZ during cortical deactivation of each field individually and in concert. Deactivation of A1 suppressed peak neuronal responses in DZ regardless of stimulus and resulted in increased minimum thresholds and reduced absolute bandwidths for tone frequency receptive fields in DZ. PAF deactivation had less robust effects on DZ firing rates and receptive fields compared with A1 deactivation, and combined A1/PAF cooling was largely driven by the effects of A1 deactivation at the population level. These results provide physiological support for the current anatomically based model of both serial and parallel processing schemes in auditory cortical hierarchical organization. PMID:25339709

  9. Physiological evidence that pyramidal neurons lack functional water channels.

    PubMed

    Andrew, R David; Labron, Mark W; Boehnke, Susan E; Carnduff, Lisa; Kirov, Sergei A

    2007-04-01

    The physiological conditions that swell mammalian neurons are clinically important but contentious. Distinguishing the neuronal component of brain swelling requires viewing intact neuronal cell bodies, dendrites, and axons and measuring their changing volume in real time. Cultured or dissociated neuronal somata swell within minutes under acutely overhydrated conditions and shrink when strongly dehydrated. But paradoxically, most central nervous system (CNS) neurons do not express aquaporins, the membrane channels that conduct osmotically driven water. Using 2-photon laser scanning microscopy (2PLSM), we monitored neuronal volume under osmotic stress in real time. Specifically, the volume of pyramidal neurons in cerebral cortex and axon terminals comprising cerebellar mossy fibers was measured deep within live brain slices. The expected swelling or shrinking of the gray matter was confirmed by recording altered light transmittance and by indirectly measuring extracellular resistance over a wide osmotic range of -80 to +80 milliOsmoles (mOsm). Neurons expressing green fluorescent protein were then imaged with 2PLSM between -40 and +80 mOsm over 20 min. Surprisingly, pyramidal somata, dendrites, and spines steadfastly maintained their volume, as did the cerebellar axon terminals. This precluded a need for the neurons to acutely regulate volume, preserved their intrinsic electrophysiological stability, and confirmed that these CNS nerve cells lack functional aquaporins. Thus, whereas water easily permeates the aquaporin-rich endothelia and glia driving osmotic brain swelling, neurons tenatiously maintain their volume. However, these same neurons then swell dramatically upon oxygen/glucose deprivation or [K+]0 elevation, so prolonged depolarization (as during stroke or seizure) apparently swells neurons by opening nonaquaporin channels to water. PMID:16723408

  10. A microfluidic device to study neuronal and motor responses to acute chemical stimuli in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Candelier, Raphaël; Sriti Murmu, Meena; Alejo Romano, Sebastián; Jouary, Adrien; Debrégeas, Georges; Sumbre, Germán

    2015-01-01

    Zebrafish larva is a unique model for whole-brain functional imaging and to study sensory-motor integration in the vertebrate brain. To take full advantage of this system, one needs to design sensory environments that can mimic the complex spatiotemporal stimulus patterns experienced by the animal in natural conditions. We report on a novel open-ended microfluidic device that delivers pulses of chemical stimuli to agarose-restrained larvae with near-millisecond switching rate and unprecedented spatial and concentration accuracy and reproducibility. In combination with two-photon calcium imaging and recordings of tail movements, we found that stimuli of opposite hedonic values induced different circuit activity patterns. Moreover, by precisely controlling the duration of the stimulus (50–500 ms), we found that the probability of generating a gustatory-induced behavior is encoded by the number of neurons activated. This device may open new ways to dissect the neural-circuit principles underlying chemosensory perception. PMID:26194888

  11. Optical recording of fast neuronal membrane potential transients in acute mammalian brain slices by second-harmonic generation microscopy.

    PubMed

    Dombeck, Daniel A; Sacconi, Leonardo; Blanchard-Desce, Mireille; Webb, Watt W

    2005-11-01

    Although nonlinear microscopy and fast (approximately 1 ms) membrane potential (Vm) recording have proven valuable for neuroscience applications, their potentially powerful combination has not yet been shown for studies of Vm activity deep in intact tissue. We show that laser illumination of neurons in acute rat brain slices intracellularly filled with FM4-64 dye generates an intense second-harmonic generation (SHG) signal from somatic and dendritic plasma membranes with high contrast >125 microm below the slice surface. The SHG signal provides a linear response to DeltaVm of approximately 7.5%/100 mV. By averaging repeated line scans (approximately 50), we show the ability to record action potentials (APs) optically with a signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of approximately 7-8. We also show recording of fast Vm steps from the dendritic arbor at depths inaccessible with previous methods. The high membrane contrast and linear response of SHG to DeltaVm provides the advantage that signal changes are not degraded by background and can be directly quantified in terms of DeltaVm. Experimental comparison of SHG and two-photon fluorescence Vm recording with the best known probes for each showed that the SHG technique is superior for Vm recording in brain slice applications, with FM4-64 as the best tested SHG Vm probe. PMID:16093337

  12. Sumatriptan Inhibits TRPV1 Channels in Trigeminal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Evans, M. Steven; Cheng, Xiangying; Jeffry, Joseph A.; Disney, Kimberly E.; Premkumar, Louis S.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To understand a possible role for transient potential receptor vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) ion channels in sumatriptan relief of pain mediated by trigeminal nociceptors. Background TRPV1 channels are expressed in small nociceptive sensory neurons. In dorsal root ganglia (DRG), TRPV1-containing nociceptors mediate certain types of inflammatory pain. Neurogenic inflammation of cerebral dura and blood vessels in the trigeminal nociceptive system is thought to be important in migraine pain, but the ion channels important in transducing migraine pain are not known. Sumatriptan is an agent effective in treatment of migraine and cluster headache. We hypothesized that sumatriptan might modulate activity of TRPV1 channels found in the trigeminal nociceptive system. Methods We used immunohistochemistry to detect the presence of TRPV1 channel protein, whole cell recording in acutely dissociated trigeminal ganglia (TG) to detect functionality of TRPV1 channels, and whole cell recording in trigeminal nucleus caudalis (TNC) to detect effects on release of neurotransmitters from trigeminal neurons onto second order sensory neurons. Effects specifically on TG neurons that project to cerebral dura were assessed by labeling dural nociceptors with DiI. Results Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that TRPV1 channels are present in cerebral dura, trigeminal ganglion, and in the trigeminal nucleus caudalis. Capsaicin, a TRPV1 agonist, produced depolarization and repetitive action potential firing in current clamp recordings and large inward currents in voltage clamp recordings from acutely dissociated TG neurons, demonstrating that TRPV1 channels are functional in trigeminal neurons. Capsaicin increased spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs) in neurons of layer II in TNC slices, showing that these channels have a physiological effect on central synaptic transmission. Sumatriptan (10 μM), a selective anti-migraine drug inhibited TRPV1-mediated inward currents in TG. and

  13. Non-competitive inhibition of GABAA responses by a new class of quinolones and non-steroidal anti-inflammatories in dissociated frog sensory neurones.

    PubMed Central

    Yakushiji, T.; Shirasaki, T.; Akaike, N.

    1992-01-01

    1. The interaction of a new class of quinolone antimicrobials (new quinolones) and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents (NSAIDs) with the GABAA receptor-Cl- channel complex was investigated in frog sensory neurones by use of the internal perfusion and 'concentration clamp' techniques. 2. The new quinolones and the NSAIDs (both 10(-6)-10(-5) M) had little effect on the GABA-induced chloride current (ICI) when applied separately. At a concentration of 10(-4) M the new quinolones, and to a lesser degree the NSAIDs, produced some suppression of the GABA response. 3. The co-administration of new quinolones and some NSAIDs (10(-6)-10(-14) M) resulted in a marked suppression of the GABA response. The size of this inhibition was dependent on the concentration of either the new quinolone or the NSAID tested. The inhibitory potency of new quinolones in combination with 4-biphenylacetic acid (BPAA) was in rank order norfloxacin (NFLX) much greater than enoxacin (ENX) greater than ciprofloxancin (CPFX) much greater than ofloxacin (OFLX), and that of NSAIDs in combination with ENX was BPAA much greater than indomethacin = ketoprofen greater than naproxen greater than ibuprofen greater than pranoprofen. Diclofenac, piroxicam and acetaminophen did not affect GABA responses in the presence of ENX. 4. In the presence of ENX or BPAA, there was a small shift to the right of the concentration-response curve for GABA without any effect on the maximum response. However, the co-administration of these drugs suppressed the maximum of the GABA concentration-response curve, indicating a non-competitive inhibition, for which no voltage-dependency was observed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1317734

  14. Non-competitive inhibition of GABAA responses by a new class of quinolones and non-steroidal anti-inflammatories in dissociated frog sensory neurones.

    PubMed

    Yakushiji, T; Shirasaki, T; Akaike, N

    1992-01-01

    1. The interaction of a new class of quinolone antimicrobials (new quinolones) and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents (NSAIDs) with the GABAA receptor-Cl- channel complex was investigated in frog sensory neurones by use of the internal perfusion and 'concentration clamp' techniques. 2. The new quinolones and the NSAIDs (both 10(-6)-10(-5) M) had little effect on the GABA-induced chloride current (ICI) when applied separately. At a concentration of 10(-4) M the new quinolones, and to a lesser degree the NSAIDs, produced some suppression of the GABA response. 3. The co-administration of new quinolones and some NSAIDs (10(-6)-10(-14) M) resulted in a marked suppression of the GABA response. The size of this inhibition was dependent on the concentration of either the new quinolone or the NSAID tested. The inhibitory potency of new quinolones in combination with 4-biphenylacetic acid (BPAA) was in rank order norfloxacin (NFLX) much greater than enoxacin (ENX) greater than ciprofloxancin (CPFX) much greater than ofloxacin (OFLX), and that of NSAIDs in combination with ENX was BPAA much greater than indomethacin = ketoprofen greater than naproxen greater than ibuprofen greater than pranoprofen. Diclofenac, piroxicam and acetaminophen did not affect GABA responses in the presence of ENX. 4. In the presence of ENX or BPAA, there was a small shift to the right of the concentration-response curve for GABA without any effect on the maximum response. However, the co-administration of these drugs suppressed the maximum of the GABA concentration-response curve, indicating a non-competitive inhibition, for which no voltage-dependency was observed.5. Simultaneous administration of ENX and BPAA also suppressed pentobarbitone (PB)-gated Icl. On the other hand, both PB and phenobarbitone reversed the inhibition of GABA-induced Ic, by coadministration of ENX and BPAA.6. The effect on GABAA responses of co-administration of new quinolones and NSAIDs was not via an interaction with

  15. Acute exposure to ethanol potentiates human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Tat-induced Ca(2+) overload and neuronal death in cultured rat cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Brailoiu, Eugen; Brailoiu, G Cristina; Mameli, Giuseppe; Dolei, Antonina; Sawaya, Bassel E; Dun, Nae J

    2006-02-01

    A significant number of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected patients are alcoholics. Either alcohol or HIV alone induces morphological and functional damage to the nervous system. HIV-1 Tat is a potent transcriptional activator of the viral promoter, with the ability to modulate a number of cellular regulatory circuits including apoptosis and to cause neuronal injury. To further evaluate the involvement of alcohol in neuronal injury, the authors examined the effect of ethanol on Tat-induced calcium responses in rat cerebral cortical neurons, using microfluorimetric calcium determination. HIV Tat protein (10 or 500 nM) elicited two types of calcium responses in cortical neurons: a fast-onset, short-lasting response and a slow-onset, sustained response. The responses were concentration-dependent and diminished in calcium-free saline. A short exposure to ethanol (50 mM) potentiated both types of calcium response, which was markedly decreased when the cells were pretreated with BAPTA-AM (20 microM). In addition, an increase in the neurotoxic effect of Tat, which was assessed by trypan blue exclusion assay, was observed. The result led the authors to conclude that alcohol exposure significantly potentiates Tat-induced calcium overload and neuronal death. PMID:16595370

  16. The stressed female brain: neuronal activity in the prelimbic but not infralimbic region of the medial prefrontal cortex suppresses learning after acute stress.

    PubMed

    Maeng, Lisa Y; Shors, Tracey J

    2013-01-01

    Women are nearly twice as likely as men to suffer from anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), indicating that many females are especially vulnerable to stressful life experience. A profound sex difference in the response to stress is also observed in laboratory animals. Acute exposure to an uncontrollable stressful event disrupts associative learning during classical eyeblink conditioning in female rats but enhances this same type of learning process in males. These sex differences in response to stress are dependent on neuronal activity in similar but also different brain regions. Neuronal activity in the basolateral nucleus of the amygdala (BLA) is necessary in both males and females. However, neuronal activity in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) during the stressor is necessary to modify learning in females but not in males. The mPFC is often divided into its prelimbic (PL) and infralimbic (IL) subregions, which differ both in structure and function. Through its connections to the BLA, we hypothesized that neuronal activity within the PL, but not IL, during the stressor is necessary to suppress learning in females. To test this hypothesis, either the PL or IL of adult female rats was bilaterally inactivated with GABAA agonist muscimol during acute inescapable swim stress. About 24 h later, all subjects were trained with classical eyeblink conditioning. Though stressed, females without neuronal activity in the PL learned well. In contrast, females with IL inactivation during the stressor did not learn well, behaving similarly to stressed vehicle-treated females. These data suggest that exposure to a stressful event critically engages the PL, but not IL, to disrupt associative learning in females. Together with previous studies, these data indicate that the PL communicates with the BLA to suppress learning after a stressful experience in females. This circuit may be similarly engaged in women who become cognitively impaired after stressful life

  17. Double Dissociation of Monoacylglycerol Lipase Inhibition and CB1 Antagonism in the Central Amygdala, Basolateral Amygdala, and the Interoceptive Insular Cortex on the Affective Properties of Acute Naloxone-Precipitated Morphine Withdrawal in Rats.

    PubMed

    Wills, Kiri L; Petrie, Gavin N; Millett, Geneva; Limebeer, Cheryl L; Rock, Erin M; Niphakis, Micah J; Cravatt, Benjamin F; Parker, Linda A

    2016-06-01

    Both CB1 receptor antagonism and agonism, in particular by 2-arachidonyl glycerol (2-AG), have been shown to reduce somatic symptoms of morphine withdrawal (MWD). Here we evaluated the effects of both systemic pretreatment with the monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) inhibitor MJN110 (which selectively elevates 2-AG) and central administration of both MJN110 and the CB1 antagonist (AM251) on the affective properties of MWD. Acute MWD induced place aversion occurs when naloxone is administered 24 h following a single exposure to a high dose of morphine. Systemic pretreatment with the MAGL inhibitor, MJN110, prevented the aversive effects of acute MWD by a CB1 receptor-dependent mechanism. Furthermore, in a double dissociation, AM251 infusions into the central amygdala, but MJN110 infusions into the basolateral amygdala, interfered with the naloxone-precipitated MWD induced place aversion. As well, MJN110, but not AM251, infusions into the interoceptive insular cortex (a region known to be activated in acute MWD) also prevented the establishment of the place aversion by a CB1 mechanism of action. These findings reveal the respective sites of action of systemically administered MJN110 and AM251 in regulating the aversive effects of MWD. PMID:26647976

  18. Comparative cellular toxicity of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on human astrocyte and neuronal cells after acute and prolonged exposure.

    PubMed

    Coccini, Teresa; Grandi, Stefania; Lonati, Davide; Locatelli, Carlo; De Simone, Uliana

    2015-05-01

    Although in the last few decades, titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO₂NPs) have attracted extensive interest due to their use in wide range of applications, their influences on human health are still quite uncertain and less known. Evidence exists indicating TiO₂NPs ability to enter the brain, thus representing a realistic risk factor for both chronic and accidental exposure with the consequent needs for more detailed investigation on CNS. A rapid and effective in vitro test strategy has been applied to determine the effects of TiO₂NPs anatase isoform, on human glial (D384) and neuronal (SH-SY5Y) cell lines. Toxicity was assessed at different levels: mitochondrial function (by MTT), membrane integrity and cell morphology (by calcein AM/PI staining) after acute exposure (4-24-48 h) at doses from 1.5 to 250 μg/ml as well as growth and cell proliferation (by clonogenic test) after prolonged exposure (7-10 days) at sub-toxic concentrations (from 0.05 to 31 μg/ml). The cytotoxic effects of TiO₂NPs were compared with those caused by TiO₂ bulk counterpart treatment. Acute TiO₂NP exposure produced (i) dose- and time-dependent alterations of the mitochondrial function on D384 and SH-SY5Y cells starting at 31 and 15 μg/ml doses, respectively, after 24h exposure. SH-SY5Y were slightly more sensitive than D384 cells; and (ii) cell membrane damage occurring at 125 μg/ml after 24h exposure in both cerebral cells. Comparatively, the effects of TiO₂ bulk were less pronounced than those induced by nanoparticles in both cerebral cell lines. Prolonged exposure indicated that the proliferative capacity (colony size) was compromised at the extremely low TiO₂NP doses namely 1.5 μg/ml and 0.1 μg/ml for D384 and SH-SY5Y, respectively; cell sensitivity was still higher for SH-SY5Y compared to D384. Colony number decrease (15%) was also evidenced at ≥0.2 μg/ml TiO₂NP dose. Whereas, TiO₂ bulk treatment affected cell morphology only. TiO₂ internalization in SH

  19. Protein tyrosine kinase regulates α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor trafficking induced by acute hypoxia in cultured brainstem neurons.

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Yu, L C; Li, Y C

    2016-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the modulation effect of protein tyrosine kinase on postsynaptic a-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor trafficking induced by acute hypoxia in cultured brainstem neurons. The cultured neurons were exposed to 1% O2 and the expression of AMPA receptor subunit GluR2 on the cell surface was significantly increased, while total GluR2 was not markedly changed. Furthermore, the hypoxia-induced increase in GluR2 expression on the cell surface was partially blocked by the protein tyrosine kinase membrane-permeable inhibitor genistein. In contrast, both the protein tyrosine kinase agonist nerve growth factor and protein tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor vanadate promoted the hypoxia-induced increase of GluR2 expression on cell surface. Moreover, GluR2 could be phosphorylated by tyrosine under normoxia and hypoxia conditions in vitro on brainstem neurons, and tyrosine phosphorylation of GluR2 was significantly stronger under hypoxia conditions. Our results indicate that acute hypoxia induces the AMPA receptor subunit GluR2 to rapidly migrate to the cell membrane to modify the strength of the synapse. This study indicates that tyrosine phosphorylation of the receptor is an important pathway regulating the rapid migration of GluR2 in the postsynaptic domain induced by hypoxia. PMID:27525851

  20. Volatile Organic Compound Gamma-Butyrolactone Released upon Herpes Simplex Virus Type -1 Acute Infection Modulated Membrane Potential and Repressed Viral Infection in Human Neuron-Like Cells

    PubMed Central

    Waguespack, Yan; Figliozzi, Robert W.; Kharel, Madan K.; Zhang, Qiaojuan; Martin-Caraballo, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Herpes Simplex Virus Type -1 (HSV-1) infections can cause serious complications such as keratitis and encephalitis. The goal of this study was to identify any changes in the concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) produced during HSV-1 infection of epithelial cells that could potentially be used as an indicator of a response to stress. An additional objective was to study if any VOCs released from acute epithelial infection may influence subsequent neuronal infection to facilitate latency. To investigate these hypotheses, Vero cells were infected with HSV-1 and the emission of VOCs was analyzed using two-dimensional gas chromatograph/mass spectrometry (2D GC/MS). It was observed that the concentrations of gamma-butyrolactone (GBL) in particular changed significantly after a 24-hour infection. Since HSV-1 may establish latency in neurons after the acute infection, GBL was tested to determine if it exerts neuronal regulation of infection. The results indicated that GBL altered the resting membrane potential of differentiated LNCaP cells and promoted a non-permissive state of HSV-1 infection by repressing viral replication. These observations may provide useful clues towards understanding the complex signaling pathways that occur during the HSV-1 primary infection and establishment of viral latency. PMID:27537375

  1. Volatile Organic Compound Gamma-Butyrolactone Released upon Herpes Simplex Virus Type -1 Acute Infection Modulated Membrane Potential and Repressed Viral Infection in Human Neuron-Like Cells.

    PubMed

    Rochford, Kevin; Chen, Feng; Waguespack, Yan; Figliozzi, Robert W; Kharel, Madan K; Zhang, Qiaojuan; Martin-Caraballo, Miguel; Hsia, S Victor

    2016-01-01

    Herpes Simplex Virus Type -1 (HSV-1) infections can cause serious complications such as keratitis and encephalitis. The goal of this study was to identify any changes in the concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) produced during HSV-1 infection of epithelial cells that could potentially be used as an indicator of a response to stress. An additional objective was to study if any VOCs released from acute epithelial infection may influence subsequent neuronal infection to facilitate latency. To investigate these hypotheses, Vero cells were infected with HSV-1 and the emission of VOCs was analyzed using two-dimensional gas chromatograph/mass spectrometry (2D GC/MS). It was observed that the concentrations of gamma-butyrolactone (GBL) in particular changed significantly after a 24-hour infection. Since HSV-1 may establish latency in neurons after the acute infection, GBL was tested to determine if it exerts neuronal regulation of infection. The results indicated that GBL altered the resting membrane potential of differentiated LNCaP cells and promoted a non-permissive state of HSV-1 infection by repressing viral replication. These observations may provide useful clues towards understanding the complex signaling pathways that occur during the HSV-1 primary infection and establishment of viral latency. PMID:27537375

  2. Rho kinase inhibition following traumatic brain injury in mice promotes functional improvement and acute neuron survival but has little effect on neurogenesis, glial responses or neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Bye, Nicole; Christie, Kimberly J; Turbic, Alisa; Basrai, Harleen S; Turnley, Ann M

    2016-05-01

    Inhibition of the Rho/Rho kinase pathway has been shown to be beneficial in a variety of neural injuries and diseases. In this manuscript we investigate the role of Rho kinase inhibition in recovery from traumatic brain injury using a controlled cortical impact model in mice. Mice subjected to a moderately severe TBI were treated for 1 or 4weeks with the Rho kinase inhibitor Y27632, and functional outcomes and neuronal and glial cell responses were analysed at 1, 7 and 35days post-injury. We hypothesised that Y27632-treated mice would show functional improvement, with augmented recruitment of neuroblasts from the SVZ and enhanced survival of newborn neurons in the pericontusional cortex, with protection against neuronal degeneration, neuroinflammation and modulation of astrocyte reactivity and blood-brain-barrier permeability. While Rho kinase inhibition enhanced recovery of motor function after trauma, there were no substantial increases in the recruitment of DCX(+) neuroblasts or the number of BrdU(+) or EdU(+) labelled newborn neurons in the pericontusional cortex of Y27632-treated mice. Inhibition of Rho kinase significantly reduced the number of degenerating cortical neurons at 1day post-injury compared to saline controls but had no longer term effect on neuronal degeneration, with only modest effects on astrocytic reactivity and macrophage/microglial responses. Overall, this study showed that Rho kinase contributes to acute neurodegenerative processes in the injured cortex but does not play a significant role in SVZ neural precursor cell-derived adult neurogenesis, glial responses or blood-brain barrier permeability following a moderately severe brain injury. PMID:26896832

  3. Acute Effects of Transforming Growth Factor-β1 on Neuronal Excitability and Involvement in the Pain of Rats with Chronic Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoyu; Zheng, Hang; Zhu, Hong-Yan; Hu, Shufen; Wang, Shusheng; Jiang, Xinghong; Xu, Guang-Yin

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims This study was to investigate whether transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) plays a role in hyperalgesia in chronic pancreatitis (CP) and the underlying mechanisms. Methods CP was induced in male adult rats by intraductal injection of trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS). Abdominal hyperalgesia was assessed by referred somatic behaviors to mechanical stimulation of rat abdomen. Dil dye injected into the pancreas was used to label pancreas-specific dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. Whole cell patch clamp recordings and calcium imaging were performed to examine the effect of TGF-β1 on acutely isolated pancreas-specific DRG neurons. Western blot analysis was carried out to measure the expression of TGF-β1 and its receptors. Results TNBS injection significantly upregulated expression of TGF-β1 in the pancreas and DRGs, and TGF-β1 receptors in DRGs (T9-T13) in CP rats. Intrathecal injection of TGF-β receptor I antagonist SB431542 attenuated abdominal hyperalgesia in CP rats. TGF-β1 application depolarized the membrane potential and caused firing activity of DRG neurons. TGF-β1 application also reduced rheobase, hyperpolarized action potential threshold, and increased numbers of action potentials evoked by current injection of pancreas-specific DRG neurons. TGF-β1 application also increased the concentration of intracellular calcium of DRG neurons, which was inhibited by SB431542. Furthermore, intrathecal injection of TGF-β1 produced abdominal hyperalgesia in healthy rats. Conclusions These results suggest that TGF-β1 enhances neuronal excitability and increases the concentration of intracellular calcium. TGF-β1 and its receptors are involved in abdominal hyperalgesia in CP. This and future study might identify a potentially novel target for the treatment of abdominal pain in CP. PMID:26645248

  4. Acute pancreatitis decreases the sensitivity of pancreas-projecting dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus neurones to group II metabotropic glutamate receptor agonists in rats

    PubMed Central

    Babic, Tanja; Travagli, R Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that pancreatic exocrine secretions (PES) are modulated by dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (DMV) neurones, whose activity is finely tuned by GABAergic and glutamatergic synaptic inputs. Group II metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR) decrease synaptic transmission to pancreas-projecting DMV neurones and increase PES. In the present study, we used a combination of in vivo and in vitro approaches aimed at characterising the effects of caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis (AP) on the vagal neurocircuitry modulating pancreatic functions. In control rats, microinjection of bicuculline into the DMV increased PES, whereas microinjections of kynurenic acid had no effect. Conversely, in AP rats, microinjection of bicuculline had no effect, whereas kynurenic acid decreased PES. DMV microinjections of the group II mGluR agonist APDC and whole cell recordings of excitatory currents in identified pancreas-projecting DMV neurones showed a reduced functional response in AP rats compared to controls. Moreover, these changes persisted up to 3 weeks following the induction of AP. These data demonstrate that AP increases the excitatory input to pancreas-projecting DMV neurones by decreasing the response of excitatory synaptic terminals to group II mGluR agonist. PMID:24445314

  5. Acute and chronic cocaine differentially alter the subcellular distribution of AMPA GluR1 subunits in region-specific neurons within the mouse ventral tegmental area

    PubMed Central

    Lane, D.A.; Jaferi, A.; Kreek, M.J.; Pickel, V.M.

    2010-01-01

    Cocaine administration increases AMPA GluR1 expression and receptor-mediated activation of the ventral tegmental area (VTA). Functionality is determined, however, by surface availability of these receptors in transmitter- and VTA-region-specific neurons, which may also be affected by cocaine. To test this hypothesis, we used electron microscopic immunolabeling of AMPA GluR1 subunits and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH; the enzyme needed for dopamine synthesis), in the cortical-associated parabrachial (PB) and in the limbic-associated paranigral (PN) VTA of adult male C57BL/6 mice receiving either a single injection (acute) or repeated escalating-doses for 14 days (chronic) of cocaine. Acute cocaine resulted in opposing VTA-region-specific changes in TH-containing dopaminergic dendrites. TH-labeled dendrites within the PB VTA showed increased cytoplasmic GluR1 immunogold particle density consistent with decreased AMPA receptor-mediated glutamatergic transmission. Conversely, TH-labeled dendrites within the PN VTA showed greater surface expression of GluR1 with increases in both synaptic and plasmalemmal GluR1 immunogold density after a single injection of cocaine. These changes diminished in both VTA subregions after chronic cocaine administration. In contrast, non-TH-containing (presumably GABAergic) dendrites showed VTA-region-specific changes only after repeated cocaine administration such that synaptic GluR1 decreased in the PB, but increased in the PN VTA. Taken together, these findings provide ultrastructural evidence suggesting that chronic cocaine not only reverses the respective depression and facilitation of mesocortical (PB) and mesolimbic (PN) dopaminergic neurons elicited by acute cocaine, but also differentially affects synaptic availability of these receptors in non-dopaminergic neurons of each region. These adaptations may contribute to increased cocaine seeking/relapse and decreased reward that is reported with chronic cocaine use. PMID:20553819

  6. Chronic Intermittent Ethanol Exposure Enhances the Excitability and Synaptic Plasticity of Lateral Orbitofrontal Cortex Neurons and Induces a Tolerance to the Acute Inhibitory Actions of Ethanol.

    PubMed

    Nimitvilai, Sudarat; Lopez, Marcelo F; Mulholland, Patrick J; Woodward, John J

    2016-03-01

    Alcoholism is associated with changes in brain reward and control systems, including the prefrontal cortex. In prefrontal areas, the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) has been suggested to have an important role in the development of alcohol-abuse disorders and studies from this laboratory demonstrate that OFC-mediated behaviors are impaired in alcohol-dependent animals. However, it is not known whether chronic alcohol (ethanol) exposure alters the fundamental properties of OFC neurons. In this study, mice were exposed to repeated cycles of chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) exposure to induce dependence and whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology was used to examine the effects of CIE treatment on lateral OFC (lOFC) neuron excitability, synaptic transmission, and plasticity. Repeated cycles of CIE exposure and withdrawal enhanced current-evoked action potential (AP) spiking and this was accompanied by a reduction in the after-hyperpolarization and a decrease in the functional activity of SK channels. CIE mice also showed an increase in the AMPA/NMDA ratio, and this was associated with an increase in GluA1/GluA2 AMPA receptor expression and a decrease in GluN2B NMDA receptor subunits. Following CIE treatment, lOFC neurons displayed a persistent long-term potentiation of glutamatergic synaptic transmission following a spike-timing-dependent protocol. Lastly, CIE treatment diminished the inhibitory effect of acute ethanol on AP spiking of lOFC neurons and reduced expression of the GlyT1 transporter. Taken together, these results suggest that chronic exposure to ethanol leads to enhanced intrinsic excitability and glutamatergic synaptic signaling of lOFC neurons. These alterations may contribute to the impairment of OFC-dependent behaviors in alcohol-dependent individuals. PMID:26286839

  7. NEURON-SPECIFIC PHOSPHOPROTEINS AS BIOCHEMICAL INDICATORS OF NEUROTOXICITY: EFFECTS OF ACUTE ADMINISTRATION OF TRIMETHYLTIN TO THE ADULT RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The cytoarchitecture of the adult central nervous system is expressed by proteins specific to individual cell types. In this investigation, a subclass of these proteins, the neuron-specific phosphoproteins, was examined after the administration of trimethyltin (TMT), a neurotoxic...

  8. Dissociated Vertical Deviation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Eye Terms Conditions Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Dissociated Vertical Deviation En Español Read in Chinese What is Dissociated Vertical Deviation (DVD)? DVD is ...

  9. Neurokinin B Causes Acute GnRH Secretion and Repression of GnRH Transcription in GT1–7 GnRH Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Glidewell-Kenney, Christine A.; Shao, Paul P.; Iyer, Anita K.; Grove, Anna M. H.; Meadows, Jason D.

    2013-01-01

    Genetic studies in human patients with idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (IHH) identified mutations in the genes that encode neurokinin B (NKB) and the neurokinin 3 receptor (NK3R). However, determining the mechanism whereby NKB regulates gonadotropin secretion has been difficult because of conflicting results from in vivo studies investigating the luteinizing hormone (LH) response to senktide, a NK3R agonist. NK3R is expressed in a subset of GnRH neurons and in kisspeptin neurons that are known to regulate GnRH secretion. Thus, one potential source of inconsistency is that NKB could produce opposing direct and indirect effects on GnRH secretion. Here, we employ the GT1-7 cell model to elucidate the direct effects of NKB on GnRH neuron function. We find that GT1-7 cells express NK3R and respond to acute senktide treatment with c-Fos induction and increased GnRH secretion. In contrast, long-term senktide treatment decreased GnRH secretion. Next, we focus on the examination of the mechanism underlying the long-term decrease in secretion and determine that senktide treatment represses transcription of GnRH. We further show that this repression of GnRH transcription may involve enhanced c-Fos protein binding at novel activator protein-1 (AP-1) half-sites identified in enhancer 1 and the promoter, as well as chromatin remodeling at the promoter of the GnRH gene. These data indicate that NKB could directly regulate secretion from NK3R-expressing GnRH neurons. Furthermore, whether the response is inhibitory or stimulatory toward GnRH secretion could depend on the history or length of exposure to NKB because of a repressive effect on GnRH transcription. PMID:23393128

  10. Acute Seizures in Old Age Leads to a Greater Loss of CA1 Pyramidal Neurons, an Increased Propensity for Developing Chronic TLE and a Severe Cognitive Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Hattiangady, Bharathi; Kuruba, Ramkumar; Shetty, Ashok K

    2011-02-01

    The aged population displays an enhanced risk for developing acute seizure (AS) activity. However, it is unclear whether AS activity in old age would result in a greater magnitude of hippocampal neurodegeneration and inflammation, and an increased predilection for developing chronic temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and cognitive dysfunction. Therefore, we addressed these issues in young-adult (5-months old) and aged (22-months old) F344 rats after three-hours of AS activity, induced through graded intraperitoneal injections of kainic acid (KA), and terminated through a diazepam injection. During the three-hours of AS activity, both young adult and aged groups exhibited similar numbers of stage-V motor seizures but the numbers of stage-IV motor seizures were greater in the aged group. In both age groups, three-hour AS activity induced degeneration of 50-55% of neurons in the dentate hilus, 22-32% of neurons in the granule cell layer and 49-52% neurons in the CA3 pyramidal cell layer without showing any interaction between the age and AS activity. However, degeneration of neurons in the CA1 pyramidal cell layer showed a clear interaction between the age and AS activity (12% in the young adult group and 56% in the aged group), suggesting that an advanced age makes the CA1 pyramidal neurons more susceptible to die with AS activity. The extent of inflammation measured through the numbers of activated microglial cells was similar between the two age groups. Interestingly, the predisposition for developing chronic TLE at 2-3 months after AS activity was 60% for young adult rats but 100% for aged rats. Moreover, both frequency & intensity of spontaneous recurrent seizures in the chronic phase after AS activity were 6-12 folds greater in aged rats than in young adult rats. Furthermore, aged rats lost their ability for spatial learning even in a scrupulous eleven-session water maze learning paradigm after AS activity, in divergence from young adult rats which retained the

  11. Patch-clamp recordings of rat neurons from acute brain slices of the somatosensory cortex during magnetic stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Pashut, Tamar; Magidov, Dafna; Ben-Porat, Hana; Wolfus, Shuki; Friedman, Alex; Perel, Eli; Lavidor, Michal; Bar-Gad, Izhar; Yeshurun, Yosef; Korngreen, Alon

    2014-01-01

    Although transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a popular tool for both basic research and clinical applications, its actions on nerve cells are only partially understood. We have previously predicted, using compartmental modeling, that magnetic stimulation of central nervous system neurons depolarized the soma followed by initiation of an action potential in the initial segment of the axon. The simulations also predict that neurons with low current threshold are more susceptible to magnetic stimulation. Here we tested these theoretical predictions by combining in vitro patch-clamp recordings from rat brain slices with magnetic stimulation and compartmental modeling. In agreement with the modeling, our recordings demonstrate the dependence of magnetic stimulation-triggered action potentials on the type and state of the neuron and its orientation within the magnetic field. Our results suggest that the observed effects of TMS are deeply rooted in the biophysical properties of single neurons in the central nervous system and provide a framework both for interpreting existing TMS data and developing new simulation-based tools and therapies. PMID:24917788

  12. Dopamine Modulates Spike Timing-Dependent Plasticity and Action Potential Properties in CA1 Pyramidal Neurons of Acute Rat Hippocampal Slices

    PubMed Central

    Edelmann, Elke; Lessmann, Volkmar

    2011-01-01

    Spike timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) is a cellular model of Hebbian synaptic plasticity which is believed to underlie memory formation. In an attempt to establish a STDP paradigm in CA1 of acute hippocampal slices from juvenile rats (P15–20), we found that changes in excitability resulting from different slice preparation protocols correlate with the success of STDP induction. Slice preparation with sucrose containing ACSF prolonged rise time, reduced frequency adaptation, and decreased latency of action potentials in CA1 pyramidal neurons compared to preparation in conventional ASCF, while other basal electrophysiological parameters remained unaffected. Whereas we observed prominent timing-dependent long-term potentiation (t-LTP) to 171 ± 10% of controls in conventional ACSF, STDP was absent in sucrose prepared slices. This sucrose-induced STDP deficit could not be rescued by stronger STDP paradigms, applying either more pre- and/or postsynaptic stimuli, or by a higher stimulation frequency. Importantly, slice preparation with sucrose containing ACSF did not eliminate theta-burst stimulation induced LTP in CA1 in field potential recordings in our rat hippocampal slices. Application of dopamine (for 10–20 min) to sucrose prepared slices completely rescued t-LTP and recovered action potential properties back to levels observed in ACSF prepared slices. Conversely, acute inhibition of D1 receptor signaling impaired t-LTP in ACSF prepared slices. No similar restoring effect for STDP as seen with dopamine was observed in response to the β-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol. ELISA measurements demonstrated a significant reduction of endogenous dopamine levels (to 61.9 ± 6.9% of ACSF values) in sucrose prepared slices. These results suggest that dopamine signaling is involved in regulating the efficiency to elicit STDP in CA1 pyramidal neurons. PMID:22065958

  13. Does acute, intense stimulation of oxytocin neurones in the supraoptic nucleus increase their content of oxytocin mRNA?

    PubMed

    Sumner, B E; Kawata, M; Russell, J A

    1989-06-12

    We investigated whether a sustained increase in oxytocin secretion, with or without enhanced electrical activity of the cell-bodies of oxytocin neurones, leads to a rapid increase in oxytocin mRNA content in these neurones. To stimulate oxytocin release, naloxone (2.5 mg/kg i.v. twice, 30 min apart) was given to urethane-anaesthetized female rats after intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) morphine or vehicle infusion for 5 days; in the latter, naloxone acts on the neurohypophysis to increase oxytocin release without affecting the electrical activity of oxytocin neurone cell-bodies, but in the former, naloxone acts both on the neucohypophysis and on the cell-bodies to excite them electrically. Oxytocin content in peripheral plasma was measured intermittently by radioimmunoassay for 4 h after i.v. naloxone or vehicle, then the brain was removed and cryostat sections were cut through the supraoptic nucleus (SON). Oxytocin mRNA content in individual neurones (25-50 per rat) was measured semiquantitatively by in situ hybridisation histochemistry, using a tritiated synthetic cDNA 25-mer oligonucleotide probe, autoradiographical visualisation, and computer-assisted image-analysis to measure silver grain density. Nalaxone increased oxytocin content in plasma 7-fold for at least 40 min in i.c.v. vehicle-infused rats, and 40-fold for at least 40 min in i.c.v. morphine-infused rats. Naloxone had no significant effect on the oxytocin mRNA content in labelled cells in the SON, and no effect on the proportion of labelled cells, in either the i.c.v. morphine- or i.c.v. vehicle-infused rats.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2743158

  14. NAAG peptidase inhibitor reduces acute neuronal degeneration and astrocyte damage following lateral fluid percussion TBI in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Chunlong; Zhao, Xueren; Sarva, Jayaprakash; Kozikowski, Alan; Neale, Joseph H; Lyeth, Bruce G

    2005-02-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) produces a rapid and excessive elevation in extracellular glutamate associated with excitotoxicity and secondary brain pathology. The peptide neurotransmitter Nacetylaspartylglutamate (NAAG) suppresses glutamate transmission through selective activation of presynaptic Group II metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 3 (mGluR3). Thus, inhibition of NAAG peptidase activity and the prolong presence of synaptic NAAG were hypothesized to have significant potential for cellular protection following TBI. In the present study, a novel NAAG peptidase inhibitor, ZJ-43, was used in four different doses (0, 50, 100, or 150 mg/kg). Each dose was repeatedly administered i.p. (n=5/group) by multiple injections at three times (0 time, 8 h, 16 h) after moderate lateral fluid percussion TBI in the rat. An additional group was co-administered ZJ-43 (150 mg/kg) and the Group II mGluR antagonist, LY341495 (1 mg/kg), which was predicted to abolish any protective effects of ZJ-43. Rats were euthanized at 24 h after TBI, and brains were processed with a selective marker for degenerating neurons (Fluoro-Jade B) and a marker for astrocytes (GFAP). Ipsilateral neuronal degeneration and bilateral astrocyte loss in the CA2/3 regions of the hippocampus were quantified using stereological techniques. Compared with vehicle, ZJ-43 significantly reduced the number of the ipsilateral degenerating neurons (p<0.01) with the greatest neuroprotection at the 50 mg/kg dose. Moreover, LY341495 successfully abolished the protective effects of ZJ-43. 50 mg/kg of ZJ-43 also significantly reduced the ipsilateral astrocyte loss (p<0.05). We conclude that the NAAG peptidase inhibitor ZJ-43 is a potential novel strategy to reduce both neuronal and astrocyte damage associated with the glutamate excitotoxicity after TBI. PMID:15716632

  15. Radiogenic changes in the behavior and physiology of the spontaneously hypertensive rat: evidence for a dissociation between acute hypotension and incapacitation

    SciTech Connect

    Mickley, G.A.; Teitelbaum, H.; Parker, G.A.; Vieras, F.; Dennison, B.A.; Bonney, C.H.

    1982-07-01

    Immediately following exposure to a sufficiently large dose of ionizing radiation, rats and several other species experience a transient period of acute hypotension and an accompanying deficit in performance. Although significant correlations have been reported between the drop in blood pressure and the early transient incapacitation (ETI) and a causal relationship has been suggested, the extent to which hypotension precipitates the occurrence of the behavioral deficits remains uncertain. The present experiments investigated both radiogenic blood pressure and performance changes in a strain of rat bred for hypertension (spontaneously hypertensive rat: SHR) in order to determine if high blood pressure might attenuate ETI. Although male SHRs experienced a severe ETI and a drop in blood pressure, much of the data is inconsistent with the hypothesis that hypotension causes performance decrements. In an additional series of studies, blood volume and serum chemistry data were analyzed. Male SHRs were significantly higher than normotensive controls on several blood chemistry determinations. Exposure to ionizing radiation, more often than not, enhanced these differences. These results could not be explained on the basis of radiogenic blood volume fluctuations.

  16. Effect of nor-trimebutine on neuronal activation induced by a noxious stimulus or an acute colonic inflammation in the rat.

    PubMed

    Sinniger, Valérie; Mouchet, Patrick; Bonaz, Bruno

    2005-10-21

    Nor-trimebutine is the main metabolite of trimebutine that is used in the treatment of patients with irritable bowel syndrome. Nor-trimebutine has a blocking activity on sodium channels and a potent local anesthetic effect. These properties were used to investigate the effect of nor-trimebutine on spinal neuronal activation induced by models of noxious somato-visceral stimulus and acute colonic inflammation. Nor-trimebutine was administered in rats either subcutaneously 30 min before intraperitoneal administration of acetic acid or intracolonically 30 min before intracolonic infusion of trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid. Abdominal contractions were counted for 1 h as a marker of abdominal pain. c-fos expression was used as a marker of neuronal activation and revealed by immunohistochemistry 1h after intraperitoneal acetic acid injection and 2 h after colonic inflammation. Nor-trimebutine decreased Fos expression in the thoraco-lumbar (peritoneal irritation) and lumbo-sacral (colonic inflammation) spinal cord in laminae I, IIo V, VII and X. This effect was also observed in the sacral parasympathetic nucleus after colonic inflammation. Nor-trimebutine induced a significant decrease of abdominal contractions following intraperitoneal acetic acid injection. These data may explain the effectiveness of trimebutine in the therapy of abdominal pain in the irritable bowel syndrome. PMID:15978629

  17. Effect of interaction between acute administration of morphine and cannabinoid compounds on spontaneous excitatory and inhibitory postsynaptic currents of magnocellular neurons of supraoptic nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Yousefpour, Mitra; Naderi, Nima; Motamedi, Fereshteh

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Opioids and cannabinoids are two important compounds that have been shown to influence the activity of magnocellular neurons (MCNs) of supraoptic nucleus (SON). The interaction between opioidergic and cannabinoidergic systems in various structures of the brain and spinal cord is now well established, but not in the MCNs of SON. Materials and methods: In this study, whole cell patch clamp recording of neurons in rat brain slice was used to investigate the effect of acute morphine and cannabinoid administration on spontaneous inhibitory and excitatory spostsynaptic currents (sIPSCs and sEPSCs) in MCNs. Results: Bath application of morphine produced an increase in sEPSCs frequency and a decrease in sIPSCs frequency. In contrast, bath application of URB597 (fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) inhibitor) produced a decrease in sEPSCs frequency but an increase in sIPSCs frequency. WIN55212-2 (cannabinoid receptor agonist) decreased both sIPSCs and sEPSCs frequencies of MCNs. Co-application of morphine and URB597 attenuated the effect of morphine on MCNs. Conclusion: Taken together, these data indicated that at the cellular level, pharmacological augmentation of endocannabinoids could attenuate morphine effects on MCNs. PMID:27482350

  18. Effect of acute ethanol on beta-endorphin secretion from rat fetal hypothalamic neurons in primary cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkar, D.K.; Minami, S. )

    1990-01-01

    To characterize the effect of ethanol on the hypothalamic {beta}-endorphin-containing neurons, rat fetal hypothalamic neurons were maintained in primary culture, and the secretion of {beta}-endorphin ({beta}-EP) was determined after ethanol challenges. Constant exposure to ethanol at doses of 6-50 mM produced a dose-dependent increase in basal secretion of {beta}-EP from these cultured cells. These doses of ethanol did not produce any significant effect on cell viability, DNA or protein content. The stimulated secretion of {beta}-EP following constant ethanol exposure is short-lasting. However, intermittent ethanol exposures maintained the ethanol stimulatory action on {beta}-EP secretion for a longer time. The magnitude of the {beta}-EP response to 50 mM ethanol is similar to that of the {beta}-EP response to 56 mM of potassium. Ethanol-stimulated {beta}-EP secretion required extracellular calcium and was blocked by a calcium channel blocker; a sodium channel blocker did not affect ethanol-stimulated secretion. These results suggest that the neuron culture system is a useful model for studying the cellular mechanisms involved in the ethanol-regulated hypothalamic opioid secretion.

  19. Cryopreserved rat cortical cells develop functional neuronal networks on microelectrode arrays.

    PubMed

    Otto, Frauke; Görtz, Philipp; Fleischer, Wiebke; Siebler, Mario

    2003-09-30

    Neurons growing on microelectrode arrays (MEAs) are promising tools to investigate principal neuronal network mechanisms and network responses to pharmaceutical substances. However, broad application of these tools, e.g. in pharmaceutical substance screening, requires neuronal cells that provide stable activity on MEAs. Cryopreserved cortical neurons (CCx) from embryonic rats were cultured on MEAs and their immunocytochemical and electrophysiological properties were compared with acutely dissociated neurons (Cx). Both cell types formed neuritic networks and expressed the neuron-specific markers microtubule associated protein 2, synaptophysin, neurofilament and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Spontaneous spike activity (SSA) was recorded after 9 up to 74 days in vitro (DIV) in CCx and from 5 to 30 DIV in Cx, respectively. Cx and CCx exhibited synchronized burst activity with similar spiking characteristics. Tetrodotoxin (TTX) abolished the SSA of both cell types reversibly. In CCx SSA-inhibition occurred with an IC50 of 1.1 nM for TTX, 161 microM for magnesium, 18 microM for D,L-2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (APV) and 1 microM for GABA. CCx cells were easy to handle and developed long living, stable and active neuronal networks on MEAs with similar characteristics as Cx. Thus, these neurochips seem to be suitable for studying neuronal network properties and screening in pharmaceutical research. PMID:12948560

  20. Acute tianeptine treatment selectively modulates neuronal activation in the central nucleus of the amygdala and attenuates fear extinction.

    PubMed

    Godsil, B P; Bontempi, B; Mailliet, F; Delagrange, P; Spedding, M; Jay, T M

    2015-11-01

    Antidepressant drugs are commonly prescribed treatments for anxiety disorders, and there is growing interest in understanding how these drugs impact fear extinction because extinction learning is pivotal to successful exposure-based therapy (EBT). A key objective within this domain is understanding how antidepressants alter the activation of specific elements of the limbic-based network that governs such fear processing. Chronic treatment with the antidepressant tianeptine has been shown to reduce the acquisition of extinction learning in rats, yet the drug's acute influence on activation in prefrontal and amygdalar regions, and on extinction learning are not well understood. To assess its influence on cellular activation, rats were injected with tianeptine and Fos immunoreactivity was measured in these regions. Acute tianeptine treatment selectively altered Fos expression within subdivisions of the central nucleus of the amygdala (CEA) in a bidirectional manner that varied in relation to ongoing activation within the capsular subdivision and its prefrontal and intra-amygdalar inputs. This pattern of results suggests that the drug can conditionally modulate the activation of CEA subdivisions, which contain microcircuits strongly implicated in fear processing. The effect of acute tianeptine was also examined with respect to the acquisition, consolidation and expression of fear extinction in rats. Acute tianeptine attenuated extinction learning as well as the recall of extinction memory, which underscores that acute dosing with the drug could alter learning during EBT. Together these findings provide a new perspective for understanding the mechanism supporting tianeptine's clinical efficacy, as well as its potential influence on CEA-based learning mechanisms. PMID:25560759

  1. Left–right dissociation of hippocampal memory processes in mice

    PubMed Central

    Shipton, Olivia A.; El-Gaby, Mohamady; Apergis-Schoute, John; Deisseroth, Karl; Bannerman, David M.; Paulsen, Ole; Kohl, Michael M.

    2014-01-01

    Left–right asymmetries have likely evolved to make optimal use of bilaterian nervous systems; however, little is known about the synaptic and circuit mechanisms that support divergence of function between equivalent structures in each hemisphere. Here we examined whether lateralized hippocampal memory processing is present in mice, where hemispheric asymmetry at the CA3–CA1 pyramidal neuron synapse has recently been demonstrated, with different spine morphology, glutamate receptor content, and synaptic plasticity, depending on whether afferents originate in the left or right CA3. To address this question, we used optogenetics to acutely silence CA3 pyramidal neurons in either the left or right dorsal hippocampus while mice performed hippocampus-dependent memory tasks. We found that unilateral silencing of either the left or right CA3 was sufficient to impair short-term memory. However, a striking asymmetry emerged in long-term memory, wherein only left CA3 silencing impaired performance on an associative spatial long-term memory task, whereas right CA3 silencing had no effect. To explore whether synaptic properties intrinsic to the hippocampus might contribute to this left–right behavioral asymmetry, we investigated the expression of hippocampal long-term potentiation. Following the induction of long-term potentiation by high-frequency electrical stimulation, synapses between CA3 and CA1 pyramidal neurons were strengthened only when presynaptic input originated in the left CA3, confirming an asymmetry in synaptic properties. The dissociation of hippocampal long-term memory function between hemispheres suggests that memory is routed via distinct left–right pathways within the mouse hippocampus, and provides a promising approach to help elucidate the synaptic basis of long-term memory. PMID:25246561

  2. The many faces of dissociation: opportunities for innovative research in psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Şar, Vedat

    2014-12-01

    It has been claimed that the progress of psychiatry has lagged behind that of other medical disciplines over the last few decades. This may suggest the need for innovative thinking and research in psychiatry, which should consider neglected areas as topics of interest in light of the potential progress which might be made in this regard. This review is concerned with one such field of psychiatry: dissociation and dissociative disorders. Dissociation is the ultimate form of human response to chronic developmental stress, because patients with dissociative disorders report the highest frequency of childhood abuse and/or neglect among all psychiatric disorders. The cardinal feature of dissociation is a disruption in one or more mental functions. Dissociative amnesia, depersonalization, derealization, identity confusion, and identity alterations are core phenomena of dissociative psychopathology which constitute a single dimension characterized by a spectrum of severity. While dissociative identity disorder (DID) is the most pervasive condition of all dissociative disorders, partial representations of this spectrum may be diagnosed as dissociative amnesia (with or without fugue), depersonalization disorder, and other specified dissociative disorders such as subthreshold DID, dissociative trance disorder, acute dissociative disorders, and identity disturbances due to exposure to oppression. In addition to constituting disorders in their own right, dissociation may accompany almost every psychiatric disorder and operate as a confounding factor in general psychiatry, including neurobiological and psycho-pharmacological research. While an anti- dissociative drug does not yet exist, appropriate psychotherapy leads to considerable improvement for many patients with dissociative disorders. PMID:25598819

  3. The Many Faces of Dissociation: Opportunities for Innovative Research in Psychiatry

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    It has been claimed that the progress of psychiatry has lagged behind that of other medical disciplines over the last few decades. This may suggest the need for innovative thinking and research in psychiatry, which should consider neglected areas as topics of interest in light of the potential progress which might be made in this regard. This review is concerned with one such field of psychiatry: dissociation and dissociative disorders. Dissociation is the ultimate form of human response to chronic developmental stress, because patients with dissociative disorders report the highest frequency of childhood abuse and/or neglect among all psychiatric disorders. The cardinal feature of dissociation is a disruption in one or more mental functions. Dissociative amnesia, depersonalization, derealization, identity confusion, and identity alterations are core phenomena of dissociative psychopathology which constitute a single dimension characterized by a spectrum of severity. While dissociative identity disorder (DID) is the most pervasive condition of all dissociative disorders, partial representations of this spectrum may be diagnosed as dissociative amnesia (with or without fugue), depersonalization disorder, and other specified dissociative disorders such as subthreshold DID, dissociative trance disorder, acute dissociative disorders, and identity disturbances due to exposure to oppression. In addition to constituting disorders in their own right, dissociation may accompany almost every psychiatric disorder and operate as a confounding factor in general psychiatry, including neurobiological and psycho-pharmacological research. While an anti- dissociative drug does not yet exist, appropriate psychotherapy leads to considerable improvement for many patients with dissociative disorders. PMID:25598819

  4. The role of multifunctional drug therapy against carbamate induced neuronal toxicity during acute and chronic phase in rats.

    PubMed

    Chahal, Karan Singh; Prakash, Atish; Majeed, Abu Bakar Abdul

    2015-07-01

    The current study has been designed to examine the effect of multifunctional drug therapy on carbofuran induced acute (2.187 mg/kg, s.c.) and sub-acute (0.2187 mg/kg, s.c.) neurotoxicity in male wistar rats. Drug treatment which includes nimodipine (Ca(2+) channel blocker), diazepam, ropinirole (dopamine agonist) and GSPE (antioxidant) was started 2h after carbofuran administration. Morris water maze was employed for aiming spatial memory. Narrow beam walk and rotarod were employed for testing motor functions. Brain acetylcholinesterase activity, thiobarbituric acid reactive species, nitrite, reduced glutathione, catalase levels, and mitochondrial complexes were also estimated. Carbofuran treatment resulted in significant development of cognitive and motor functions manifested as impairment in learning and memory along with increased thiobarbituric acid reactive species, nitrite levels and decreased acetylcholinesterase activity, reduced glutathione, catalase levels, and mitochondrial complexes. The standard antidote therapy (atropine) was not able to provide neuroprotection but was able to provide symptomatic relief. The multifunctional drug therapy attenuated carbofuran induced cognitive and motor dysfunction, acetylcholinesterase activity and other biochemical parameters. The triple combination in sub-acute study may be avoided in future as two drug combinations provide adequate neuroprotection. Thus it can be concluded that standard antidotal therapy may not provide neuroprotection while the multifunctional drug therapy offers neuroprotection against carbofuran and may dramatically increase survival and life quality. PMID:26151868

  5. [Forensic medical assessment of vascular and neuronal lesions in the brain associated with acute blood loss and anemia].

    PubMed

    Indiaminov, S I

    2010-01-01

    Brain tissues available for examination in the present study were obtained from 30 subjects who died from the blood loss following injuries to blood vessels and internal organs inflicted by sharp objects. The study revealed variable character of tanatogenesis induced by acute blood loss and anemia. Tanatogenesis associated with injuries to the heart and major blood vessels is most likely due to the deficiency of blood in the microcirculatory system developing in the terminal period. The main tanatogenic factors in subjects with multiple injuries to peripheral vessels are vascular dystonia and abnormal rheological properties of blood. PMID:20394188

  6. The dissociative bond.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Nirit

    2013-01-01

    Dissociation leaves a psychic void and a lingering sense of psychic absence. How do 2 people bond while they are both suffering from dissociation? The author explores the notion of a dissociative bond that occurs in the aftermath of trauma--a bond that holds at its core an understanding and shared detachment from the self. Such a bond is confined to unspoken terms that are established in the relational unconscious. The author proposes understanding the dissociative bond as a transitional space that may not lead to full integration of dissociated knowledge yet offers some healing. This is exemplified by R. Prince's (2009) clinical case study. A relational perspective is adopted, focusing on the intersubjective aspects of a dyadic relationship. In the dissociative bond, recognition of the need to experience mutual dissociation can accommodate a psychic state that yearns for relationship when the psyche cannot fully confront past wounds. Such a bond speaks to the need to reestablish a sense of human relatedness and connection when both parties in the relationship suffer from disconnection. This bond is bound to a silence that becomes both a means of protection against the horror of traumatic memory and a way to convey unspoken gestures toward the other. PMID:23282044

  7. Acute administration of a small molecule p75NTR ligand does not prevent hippocampal neuron loss nor development of spontaneous seizures after pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus

    PubMed Central

    Grabenstatter, H.L.; Carlsen, J.; Raol, Y.H.; Yang, T.; Hund, D.; Del Angel, Y. Cruz; White, A.M.; Gonzalez, M.I.; Longo, F.M.; Russek, S.J.; Brooks-Kayal, A.R.

    2014-01-01

    Neurotrophins, such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), are initially expressed in a precursor form (e.g., proBDNF) and cleaved to form mature BDNF (mBDNF). Following pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus (SE), increases in neurotrophins regulate a wide variety of cell signaling pathways including pro-survival and cell-death machinery in a receptor-specific manner. ProBDNF preferentially binds to the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR), while mBDNF is the major ligand of the tropomyosin related kinase receptor (TrkB). To elucidate a potential role of p75NTR in acute stages of epileptogenesis, rats were injected prior to and at onset of SE with LM11A-31, a small molecule ligand that binds to p75NTR to promote survival signaling and inhibit neuronal cell death. Modulation of early p75NTR signaling and its effects on (1) electrographic SE, (2) SE-induced neurodegeneration, and (3) subsequent spontaneous seizures were examined following LM11A-31 administration. Despite an established neuroprotective effect of LM11A-31 in several animal models of neurodegenerative disorders (e.g., Alzheimer’s disease, traumatic brain injury, and spinal cord injury), high-dose LM11A-31 administration prior to and at onset of SE did not reduce the intensity of electrographic SE, prevent SE-induced neuronal cell injury, nor inhibit the progression of epileptogenesis. Further studies are required to understand the role of p75NTR activation during epileptogenesis and in seizure-induced cell injury in the hippocampus among other potential cellular pathologies contributing to the onset of spontaneous seizures. Additional studies utilizing more prolonged treatment with LM11A-31 are required to reach a definite conclusion on its potential neuroprotective role in epilepsy. PMID:24801281

  8. Acute Cocaine Induces Fast Activation of D1 Receptor and Progressive Deactivation of D2 Receptor Strial Neurons: In Vivo Optical Microprobe [Ca(superscript)2+]subscript)i Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Du, C.; Luo, Z.; Volkow, N.D.; Heintz, N.; Pan, Y.; Du, C.

    2011-09-14

    Cocaine induces fast dopamine increases in brain striatal regions, which are recognized to underlie its rewarding effects. Both dopamine D1 and D2 receptors are involved in cocaine's reward but the dynamic downstream consequences of cocaine effects in striatum are not fully understood. Here we used transgenic mice expressing EGFP under the control of either the D1 receptor (D1R) or the D2 receptor (D2R) gene and microprobe optical imaging to assess the dynamic changes in intracellular calcium ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} ) responses (used as marker of neuronal activation) to acute cocaine in vivo separately for D1R- versus D2R-expressing neurons in striatum. Acute cocaine (8 mg/kg, i.p.) rapidly increased [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} in D1R-expressing neurons (10.6 {+-} 3.2%) in striatum within 8.3 {+-} 2.3 min after cocaine administration after which the increases plateaued; these fast [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} increases were blocked by pretreatment with a D1R antagonist (SCH23390). In contrast, cocaine induced progressive decreases in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} in D2R-expressing neurons (10.4 {+-} 5.8%) continuously throughout the 30 min that followed cocaine administration; these slower [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} decreases were blocked by pretreatment with a D2R antagonist (raclopride). Since activation of striatal D1R-expressing neurons (direct-pathway) enhances cocaine reward, whereas activation of D2R expressing neurons suppresses it (indirect-pathway) (Lobo et al., 2010), this suggests that cocaine's rewarding effects entail both its fast stimulation ofD1R (resulting in abrupt activation of direct-pathway neurons) and a slower stimulation of D2R (resulting in longer-lasting deactivation of indirect-pathway neurons). We also provide direct in vivo evidence of D2R and D1R interactions in the striatal responses to acute cocaine administration.

  9. Discrete cell gene profiling of ventral tegmental dopamine neurons after acute and chronic cocaine self-administration.

    PubMed

    Backes, Eric; Hemby, Scott E

    2003-11-01

    Chronic cocaine administration induces a number of biochemical alterations within the mesolimbic dopamine system that may mediate various aspects of the addictive process such as sensitization, craving, withdrawal, and relapse. In the present study, rats were allowed to self-administer cocaine (0.5 mg/infusion) for 1 or 20 days. Tyrosine hydroxylase immunopositive cells were microdissected from the ventral tegmental area (VTA) using laser capture microdissection, and changes in the abundances of 95 mRNAs were assessed using cDNA macroarrays. Five GABA-A receptor subunit mRNAs (alpha4, alpha6, beta2, gamma2, and delta) were down-regulated at both 1 and 20 days of cocaine self-administration. In contrast, the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2alpha), GABA-A alpha1, and Galphai2 were significantly increased at both time points. Additionally, calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IIalpha mRNA levels were increased initially followed by a slight decrease after 20 days, whereas neuronal nitric-oxide synthase mRNA levels were initially decreased but returned to near control levels by day 20. These results indicate that alterations of specific GABA-A receptor subtypes and other signal transduction transcripts seem to be specific neuroadaptations associated with cocaine self-administration. Moreover, as subunit composition determines the functional properties of GABA-A receptors, the observed changes may indicate alterations in the excitability of dopamine transmission underlying long-term biochemical and behavioral effects of cocaine. PMID:12966149

  10. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor modulation of mu (mu) opioid receptors in adult rat sphenopalatine ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Margas, Wojciech; Mahmoud, Saifeldin; Ruiz-Velasco, Victor

    2010-01-01

    The sphenopalatine ganglion (SPG) neurons represent the parasympathetic branch of the autonomic nervous system involved in controlling cerebral blood flow. In the present study, we examined the coupling mechanism between mu (mu) opioid receptors (MOR) and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChR) with Ca(2+) channels in acutely dissociated adult rat SPG neurons. Successful MOR activation was recorded in approximately 40-45% of SPG neurons employing the whole cell variant of the patch-clamp technique. In addition, immunofluorescence assays indicated that MOR are not expressed in all SPG neurons while M(2) mAChR staining was evident in all neurons. The concentration-response relationships generated with morphine and [d-Ala2-N-Me-Phe4-Glycol5]-enkephalin (DAMGO) showed IC(50) values of 15.2 and 56.1 nM and maximal Ca(2+) current inhibition of 26.0 and 38.7%, respectively. Activation of MOR or M(2) mAChR with morphine or oxotremorine-methiodide (Oxo-M), respectively, resulted in voltage-dependent inhibition of Ca(2+) currents via coupling with Galpha(i/o) protein subunits. The acute prolonged exposure (10 min) of neurons to morphine or Oxo-M led to the homologous desensitization of MOR and M(2) mAChR, respectively. The prolonged stimulation of M(2) mAChR with Oxo-M resulted in heterologous desensitization of morphine-mediated Ca(2+) current inhibition, and was sensitive to the M(2) mAChR blocker methoctramine. On the other hand, when the neurons were exposed to morphine or DAMGO for 10 min, heterologous desensitization of M(2) mAChR was not observed. These results suggest that in rat SPG neurons activation of M(2) mAChR likely modulates opioid transmission in the brain vasculature to adequately maintain cerebral blood flow. PMID:19889856

  11. TRESK channel contribution to nociceptive sensory neurons excitability: modulation by nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Neuronal hyperexcitability is a crucial phenomenon underlying spontaneous and evoked pain. In invertebrate nociceptors, the S-type leak K+ channel (analogous to TREK-1 in mammals) plays a critical role of in determining neuronal excitability following nerve injury. Few data are available on the role of leak K2P channels after peripheral axotomy in mammals. Results Here we describe that rat sciatic nerve axotomy induces hyperexcitability of L4-L5 DRG sensory neurons and decreases TRESK (K2P18.1) expression, a channel with a major contribution to total leak current in DRGs. While the expression of other channels from the same family did not significantly change, injury markers ATF3 and Cacna2d1 were highly upregulated. Similarly, acute sensory neuron dissociation (in vitro axotomy) produced marked hyperexcitability and similar total background currents compared with neurons injured in vivo. In addition, the sanshool derivative IBA, which blocked TRESK currents in transfected HEK293 cells and DRGs, increased intracellular calcium in 49% of DRG neurons in culture. Most IBA-responding neurons (71%) also responded to the TRPV1 agonist capsaicin, indicating that they were nociceptors. Additional evidence of a biological role of TRESK channels was provided by behavioral evidence of pain (flinching and licking), in vivo electrophysiological evidence of C-nociceptor activation following IBA injection in the rat hindpaw, and increased sensitivity to painful pressure after TRESK knockdown in vivo. Conclusions In summary, our results clearly support an important role of TRESK channels in determining neuronal excitability in specific DRG neurons subpopulations, and show that axonal injury down-regulates TRESK channels, therefore contributing to neuronal hyperexcitability. PMID:21527011

  12. Dissociation of diatomic gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, C. F.

    1991-01-01

    The Landau-Zener theory of reactive cross sections has been applied to diatomic molecules dissociating from a ladder of rotational and vibrational states. Although the preexponential factor of the Arrhenius rate expression is shown to be a complex function of the dimensionless activation energy, the average over all states in the ladder is well represented by a single factor that varies about as T exp (-n), where the coefficient n is the order of unity. This relation agrees very well with experimental data for dissociation of O2 and N2, for example. The results validate previous empirical assignment of a single preexponential factor in the Arrhenius expression and justify the extrapolation of the expression well beyond the range of data. The theory is then used to calculate the effect of vibrational nonequilibrium on dissociation rate. For Morse oscillators the results are about the same as for harmonic oscillators, and the dissociation from a ladder of equilibrium rotational and nonequilibrium vibrational states is close to an analytic approximation provided by Hammerling, Kivel, and Teare for harmonic oscillators all dissociating from the ground rotational state.

  13. Segregation and crosstalk of D1 receptor-mediated activation of ERK in striatal medium spiny neurons upon acute administration of psychostimulants.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez-Arenas, Omar; Eriksson, Olivia; Kotaleski, Jeanette Hellgren

    2014-01-01

    The convergence of corticostriatal glutamate and dopamine from the midbrain in the striatal medium spiny neurons (MSN) triggers synaptic plasticity that underlies reinforcement learning and pathological conditions such as psychostimulant addiction. The increase in striatal dopamine produced by the acute administration of psychostimulants has been found to activate not only effectors of the AC5/cAMP/PKA signaling cascade such as GluR1, but also effectors of the NMDAR/Ca(2+)/RAS cascade such as ERK. The dopamine-triggered effects on both these cascades are mediated by D1R coupled to Golf but while the phosphorylation of GluR1 is affected by reductions in the available amount of Golf but not of D1R, the activation of ERK follows the opposite pattern. This segregation is puzzling considering that D1R-induced Golf activation monotonically increases with DA and that there is crosstalk from the AC5/cAMP/PKA cascade to the NMDAR/Ca(2+)/RAS cascade via a STEP (a tyrosine phosphatase). In this work, we developed a signaling model which accounts for this segregation based on the assumption that a common pool of D1R and Golf is distributed in two D1R/Golf signaling compartments. This model integrates a relatively large amount of experimental data for neurons in vivo and in vitro. We used it to explore the crosstalk topologies under which the sensitivities of the AC5/cAMP/PKA signaling cascade to reductions in D1R or Golf are transferred or not to the activation of ERK. We found that the sequestration of STEP by its substrate ERK together with the insensitivity of STEP activity on targets upstream of ERK (i.e. Fyn and NR2B) to PKA phosphorylation are able to explain the experimentally observed segregation. This model provides a quantitative framework for simulation based experiments to study signaling required for long term potentiation in MSNs. PMID:24499932

  14. Dissociative Spectrum Disorders in the Primary Care Setting.

    PubMed

    Elmore, James L.

    2000-04-01

    Dissociative disorders have a lifetime prevalence of about 10%. Dissociative symptoms may occur in acute stress disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder, somatization disorder, substance abuse, trance and possession trance, Ganser's syndrome, and dissociative identity disorder, as well as in mood disorders, psychoses, and personality disorders. Dissociative symptoms and disorders are observed frequently among patients attending our rural South Carolina community mental health center. Given the prevalence of mental illness in primary care settings and the diagnostic difficulties encountered with dissociative disorders, such illness may be undiagnosed or misdiagnosed in primary care settings. We developed an intervention model that may be applicable to primary care settings or helpful to primary care physicians. Key points of the intervention are identification of dissociative symptoms, patient and family education, review of the origin of the symptoms as a method of coping with trauma, and supportive reinforcement of cognitive and relaxation skills during follow-up visits. Symptom recognition, Education of the family, Learning new skills, and Follow-up may be remembered by the mnemonic device SELF. We present several cases to illustrate dissociative symptoms and our intervention. Physicians and other professionals using the 4 steps and behavioral approaches will be able to better recognize and triage patients with dissociative symptoms. Behaviors previously thought to be secondary to psychosis or personality disorders may be seen in a new frame of reference, strengthening the therapeutic alliance while reducing distress and acting-out behaviors. PMID:15014580

  15. Dissociative Spectrum Disorders in the Primary Care Setting

    PubMed Central

    Elmore, James L.

    2000-01-01

    Dissociative disorders have a lifetime prevalence of about 10%. Dissociative symptoms may occur in acute stress disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder, somatization disorder, substance abuse, trance and possession trance, Ganser's syndrome, and dissociative identity disorder, as well as in mood disorders, psychoses, and personality disorders. Dissociative symptoms and disorders are observed frequently among patients attending our rural South Carolina community mental health center. Given the prevalence of mental illness in primary care settings and the diagnostic difficulties encountered with dissociative disorders, such illness may be undiagnosed or misdiagnosed in primary care settings. We developed an intervention model that may be applicable to primary care settings or helpful to primary care physicians. Key points of the intervention are identification of dissociative symptoms, patient and family education, review of the origin of the symptoms as a method of coping with trauma, and supportive reinforcement of cognitive and relaxation skills during follow-up visits. Symptom recognition, Education of the family, Learning new skills, and Follow-up may be remembered by the mnemonic device SELF. We present several cases to illustrate dissociative symptoms and our intervention. Physicians and other professionals using the 4 steps and behavioral approaches will be able to better recognize and triage patients with dissociative symptoms. Behaviors previously thought to be secondary to psychosis or personality disorders may be seen in a new frame of reference, strengthening the therapeutic alliance while reducing distress and acting-out behaviors. PMID:15014580

  16. Redox-Dependent Modulation of T-Type Ca2+ Channels in Sensory Neurons Contributes to Acute Anti-Nociceptive Effect of Substance P

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Dongyang; Huang, Sha; Gao, Haixia; Liu, Yani; Qi, Jinlong; Chen, Pingping; Wang, Caixue; Scragg, Jason L.; Vakurov, Alexander; Peers, Chris; Du, Xiaona

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Neuropeptide substance P (SP) is produced and released by a subset of peripheral sensory neurons that respond to tissue damage (nociceptors). SP exerts excitatory effects in the central nervous system, but peripheral SP actions are still poorly understood; therefore, here, we aimed at investigating these peripheral mechanisms. Results: SP acutely inhibited T-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channels in nociceptors. The effect was mediated by neurokinin 1 (NK1) receptor-induced stimulation of intracellular release of reactive oxygen species (ROS), as it can be prevented or reversed by the reducing agent dithiothreitol and mimicked by exogenous or endogenous ROS. This redox-mediated T-type Ca2+ channel inhibition operated through the modulation of CaV3.2 channel sensitivity to ambient zinc, as it can be prevented or reversed by zinc chelation and mimicked by exogenous zinc. Elimination of the zinc-binding site in CaV3.2 rendered the channel insensitive to SP-mediated inhibition. Importantly, peripherally applied SP significantly reduced bradykinin-induced nociception in rats in vivo; knock-down of CaV3.2 significantly reduced this anti-nociceptive effect. This atypical signaling cascade shared the initial steps with the SP-mediated augmentation of M-type K+ channels described earlier. Innovation: Our study established a mechanism underlying the peripheral anti-nociceptive effect of SP whereby this neuropeptide produces ROS-dependent inhibition of pro-algesic T-type Ca2+ current and concurrent enhancement of anti-algesic M-type K+ current. These findings will lead to a better understanding of mechanisms of endogenous analgesia. Conclusion: SP modulates T-type channel activity in nociceptors by a redox-dependent tuning of channel sensitivity to zinc; this novel modulatory pathway contributes to the peripheral anti-nociceptive effect of SP. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 25, 233–251. PMID:27306612

  17. Clinically relevant concentration of pregabalin has no acute inhibitory effect on excitation of dorsal horn neurons under normal or neuropathic pain conditions: An intracellular calcium-imaging study in spinal cord slices from adult rats.

    PubMed

    Baba, Hiroshi; Petrenko, Andrey B; Fujiwara, Naoshi

    2016-10-01

    Pregabalin is thought to exert its therapeutic effect in neuropathic pain via binding to α2δ-1 subunits of voltage-gated calcium (Ca(2+)) channels. However, the exact analgesic mechanism after its binding to α2δ-1 subunits remains largely unknown. Whether a clinical concentration of pregabalin (≈10μM) can cause acute inhibition of dorsal horn neurons in the spinal cord is controversial. To address this issue, we undertook intracellular Ca(2+)-imaging studies using spinal cord slices with an intact attached L5 dorsal root, and examined if pregabalin acutely inhibits the primary afferent stimulation-evoked excitation of dorsal horn neurons in normal rats and in rats with streptozotocin-induced painful diabetic neuropathy. Under normal conditions, stimulation of a dorsal root evoked Ca(2+) signals predominantly in the superficial dorsal horn. Clinically relevant (10μM) and a very high concentration of pregabalin (100μM) did not affect the intensity or spread of dorsal root stimulation-evoked Ca(2+) signals, whereas an extremely high dose of pregabalin (300μM) slightly but significantly attenuated Ca(2+) signals in normal rats and in diabetic neuropathic (DN) rats. There was no difference between normal rats and DN rats with regard to the extent of signal attenuation at all concentrations tested. These results suggest that the activity of dorsal horn neurons in the spinal cord is not inhibited acutely by clinical doses of pregabalin under normal or DN conditions. It is very unlikely that an acute inhibitory action in the dorsal horn is the main analgesic mechanism of pregabalin in neuropathic pain states. PMID:27543338

  18. Lidocaine Inhibits HCN Currents in Rat Spinal Substantia Gelatinosa Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Tao; Liu, Nana; Lv, Minhua; Ma, Longxian; Peng, Huizhen; Peng, Sicong

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Lidocaine, which blocks voltage-gated sodium channels, is widely used in surgical anesthesia and pain management. Recently, it has been proposed that the hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide (HCN) channel is one of the other novel targets of lidocaine. Substantia gelatinosa in the spinal dorsal horn, which plays key roles in modulating nociceptive information from primary afferents, comprises heterogeneous interneurons that can be electrophysiologically categorized by firing pattern. Our previous study demonstrated that a substantial proportion of substantia gelatinosa neurons reveal the presence of HCN current (Ih); however, the roles of lidocaine and HCN channel expression in different types of substantia gelatinosa neurons remain unclear. METHODS: By using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique, we investigated the effect of lidocaine on Ih in rat substantia gelatinosa neurons of acute dissociated spinal cord slices. RESULTS: We found that lidocaine rapidly decreased the peak Ih amplitude with an IC50 of 80 μM. The inhibition rate on Ih was not significantly different with a second application of lidocaine in the same neuron. Tetrodotoxin, a sodium channel blocker, did not affect lidocaine’s effect on Ih. In addition, lidocaine shifted the half-activation potential of Ih from −109.7 to −114.9 mV and slowed activation. Moreover, the reversal potential of Ih was shifted by −7.5 mV by lidocaine. In the current clamp, lidocaine decreased the resting membrane potential, increased membrane resistance, delayed rebound depolarization latency, and reduced the rebound spike frequency. We further found that approximately 58% of substantia gelatinosa neurons examined expressed Ih, in which most of them were tonically firing. CONCLUSIONS: Our studies demonstrate that lidocaine strongly inhibits Ih in a reversible and concentration-dependent manner in substantia gelatinosa neurons, independent of tetrodotoxin-sensitive sodium channels. Thus, our

  19. Dissociative Reactions to Incest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, J. Mark

    In contrast to Freud's later and revised view of the etiology of hysterical, or dissociative, symptoms, it is now known that real, and not fantasized, sexual experiences in childhood are experienced in disociative symptomatology. It is useful to understand that incest involves both traumatic events, that is, incidents of sexual violation per se,…

  20. Dissociative Identity Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Tom

    2007-01-01

    Few psychological disorders in the Diagnostic Statistical Manual have generated as much controversy as Dissociative Identity Disorder (DID). For the past 35 years diagnoses of DID, previously referred to as Multiple Personality Disorder (MPD), have increased exponentially, causing various psychological researchers and clinicians to question the…

  1. Dissociation and psychosis in dissociative identity disorder and schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Laddis, Andreas; Dell, Paul F

    2012-01-01

    Dissociative symptoms, first-rank symptoms of schizophrenia, and delusions were assessed in 40 schizophrenia patients and 40 dissociative identity disorder (DID) patients with the Multidimensional Inventory of Dissociation (MID). Schizophrenia patients were diagnosed with the Structured Clinical Interview for the DSM-IV Axis I Disorders; DID patients were diagnosed with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Dissociative Disorders-Revised. DID patients obtained significantly (a) higher dissociation scores; (b) higher passive-influence scores (first-rank symptoms); and (c) higher scores on scales that measure child voices, angry voices, persecutory voices, voices arguing, and voices commenting. Schizophrenia patients obtained significantly higher delusion scores than did DID patients. What is odd is that the dissociation scores of schizophrenia patients were unrelated to their reports of childhood maltreatment. Multiple regression analyses indicated that 81% of the variance in DID patients' dissociation scores was predicted by the MID's Ego-Alien Experiences Scale, whereas 92% of the variance in schizophrenia patients' dissociation scores was predicted by the MID's Voices Scale. We propose that schizophrenia patients' responses to the MID do not index the same pathology as do the responses of DID patients. We argue that neither phenomenological definitions of dissociation nor the current generation of dissociation instruments (which are uniformly phenomenological in nature) can distinguish between the dissociative phenomena of DID and what we suspect are just the dissociation-like phenomena of schizophrenia. PMID:22651674

  2. Pathological Dissociation as Measured by the Child Dissociative Checklist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wherry, Jeffrey N.; Neil, Debra A.; Taylor, Tamara N.

    2009-01-01

    The component structure of the Child Dissociative Checklist was examined among abused children. A factor described as pathological dissociation emerged that was predicted by participants being male. There also were differences in pathological dissociation between groups of sexually abused and physically abused children. Replication of this factor…

  3. Estrogen Receptor Beta and 2-arachidonoylglycerol Mediate the Suppressive Effects of Estradiol on Frequency of Postsynaptic Currents in Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Neurons of Metestrous Mice: An Acute Slice Electrophysiological Study

    PubMed Central

    Bálint, Flóra; Liposits, Zsolt; Farkas, Imre

    2016-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons are controlled by 17β-estradiol (E2) contributing to the steroid feedback regulation of the reproductive axis. In rodents, E2 exerts a negative feedback effect upon GnRH neurons throughout the estrus-diestrus phase of the ovarian cycle. The present study was undertaken to reveal the role of estrogen receptor subtypes in the mediation of the E2 signal and elucidate the downstream molecular machinery of suppression. The effect of E2 administration at low physiological concentration (10 pM) on GnRH neurons in acute brain slices obtained from metestrous GnRH-green fluorescent protein (GFP) mice was studied under paradigms of blocking or activating estrogen receptor subtypes and interfering with retrograde 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) signaling. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings revealed that E2 significantly diminished the frequency of spontaneous postsynaptic currents (sPSCs) in GnRH neurons (49.62 ± 7.6%) which effect was abolished by application of the estrogen receptor (ER) α/β blocker Faslodex (1 μM). Pretreatment of the brain slices with cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) inverse agonist AM251 (1 μM) and intracellularly applied endocannabinoid synthesis blocker THL (10 μM) significantly attenuated the effect of E2 on the sPSCs. E2 remained effective in the presence of tetrodotoxin (TTX) indicating a direct action of E2 on GnRH cells. The ERβ specific agonist DPN (10 pM) also significantly decreased the frequency of miniature postsynaptic currents (mPSCs) in GnRH neurons. In addition, the suppressive effect of E2 was completely blocked by the selective ERβ antagonist PHTPP (1 μM) indicating that ERβ is required for the observed rapid effect of the E2. In contrast, the ERα agonist PPT (10 pM) or the membrane-associated G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPR30) agonist G1 (10 pM) had no significant effect on the frequency of mPSCs in these neurons. AM251 and tetrahydrolipstatin (THL) significantly abolished

  4. Three dimensions of dissociative amnesia.

    PubMed

    Dell, Paul F

    2013-01-01

    Principal axis factor analysis with promax rotation extracted 3 factors from the 42 memory and amnesia items of the Multidimensional Inventory of Dissociation (MID) database (N = 2,569): Discovering Dissociated Actions, Lapses of Recent Memory and Skills, and Gaps in Remote Memory. The 3 factors' shared variance ranged from 36% to 64%. Construed as scales, the 3 factor scales had Cronbach's alpha coefficients of .96, .94, and .93, respectively. The scales correlated strongly with mean Dissociative Experiences Scale scores, mean MID scores, and total scores on the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Dissociative Disorders-Revised (SCID-D-R). What is interesting is that the 3 amnesia factors exhibited a range of correlations with SCID-D-R Amnesia scores (.52, .63, and .70, respectively), suggesting that the SCID-D-R Amnesia score emphasizes gaps in remote memory over amnesias related to dissociative identity disorder. The 3 amnesia factor scales exhibited a clinically meaningful pattern of significant differences among dissociative identity disorder, dissociative disorder not otherwise specified-1, dissociative amnesia, depersonalization disorder, and nonclinical participants. The 3 amnesia factors may have greater clinical utility for frontline clinicians than (a) amnesia as discussed in the context of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, nosology of the dissociative disorders or (b) P. Janet's (1893/1977 ) 4-fold classification of dissociative amnesia. The author recommends systematic study of the phenomenological differences within specific dissociative symptoms and their differential relationship to specific dissociative disorders. PMID:23282045

  5. Vestibular Neuronitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prevent Painful Swimmer's Ear Additional Content Medical News Vestibular Neuronitis By Lawrence R. Lustig, MD NOTE: This ... Drugs Herpes Zoster Oticus Meniere Disease Purulent Labyrinthitis Vestibular Neuronitis Vestibular neuronitis is a disorder characterized by ...

  6. Imagining the impossible before breakfast: the relation between creativity, dissociation, and sleep

    PubMed Central

    van Heugten - van der Kloet, Dalena; Cosgrave, Jan; Merckelbach, Harald; Haines, Ross; Golodetz, Stuart; Lynn, Steven Jay

    2015-01-01

    Dissociative symptoms have been related to higher rapid eye movement sleep density, a sleep phase during which hyperassociativity may occur. This may enhance artistic creativity during the day. To test this hypothesis, we conducted a creative photo contest to explore the relation between dissociation, sleep, and creativity. During the contest, participants (N = 72) took one photo per day for five consecutive days, based on specific daily themes (consisting of single words) and the instruction to take as creative a photo as possible each day. Furthermore, they completed daily measures of state dissociation and a short sleep diary. The photos and their captions were ranked by two professional photographers and two clinical psychologists based on creativity, originality, bizarreness, and quality. We expected that dissociative people would rank higher in the contest compared with low-dissociative participants, and that the most original photos would be taken on days when the participants scored highest on acute dissociation. We found that acute dissociation predicted a higher ranking on creativity. Poorer sleep quality and fewer hours of sleep predicted more bizarreness in the photos and captions. None of the trait measures could predict creativity. In sum, acute dissociation related to enhanced creativity. These findings contribute to our understanding of dissociative symptomatology. PMID:25859231

  7. Imagining the impossible before breakfast: the relation between creativity, dissociation, and sleep.

    PubMed

    van Heugten-van der Kloet, Dalena; Cosgrave, Jan; Merckelbach, Harald; Haines, Ross; Golodetz, Stuart; Lynn, Steven Jay

    2015-01-01

    Dissociative symptoms have been related to higher rapid eye movement sleep density, a sleep phase during which hyperassociativity may occur. This may enhance artistic creativity during the day. To test this hypothesis, we conducted a creative photo contest to explore the relation between dissociation, sleep, and creativity. During the contest, participants (N = 72) took one photo per day for five consecutive days, based on specific daily themes (consisting of single words) and the instruction to take as creative a photo as possible each day. Furthermore, they completed daily measures of state dissociation and a short sleep diary. The photos and their captions were ranked by two professional photographers and two clinical psychologists based on creativity, originality, bizarreness, and quality. We expected that dissociative people would rank higher in the contest compared with low-dissociative participants, and that the most original photos would be taken on days when the participants scored highest on acute dissociation. We found that acute dissociation predicted a higher ranking on creativity. Poorer sleep quality and fewer hours of sleep predicted more bizarreness in the photos and captions. None of the trait measures could predict creativity. In sum, acute dissociation related to enhanced creativity. These findings contribute to our understanding of dissociative symptomatology. PMID:25859231

  8. Neuron-Specific Enolase Is Correlated to Compromised Cerebral Metabolism in Patients Suffering from Acute Bacterial Meningitis; An Observational Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Bartek, Jiri; Thelin, Eric Peter; Ghatan, Per Hamid; Glimaker, Martin; Bellander, Bo-Michael

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Patients suffering from acute bacterial meningitis (ABM) with a decreased level of consciousness have been shown to have an improved clinical outcome if treated with an intracranial pressure (ICP) guided therapy. By using intracranial microdialysis (MD) to monitor cerebral metabolism in combination with serum samples of biomarkers indicating brain tissue injury, S100B and Neuron Specific Enolase (NSE), additional information might be provided. The aim of this study was to evaluate biomarkers in serum and MD parameters in patients with ABM. Methods From a prior study on patients (n = 52) with a confirmed ABM and impaired consciousness (GCS ≤ 9, or GCS = 10 combined with lumbar spinal opening pressure > 400 mmH2O), a subgroup of patients (n = 21) monitored with intracerebral MD and biomarkers was included in the present study. All patients were treated in the NICU with intracranial pressure (ICP) guided therapy. Serum biomarkers were obtained at admission and every 12 hours. The MD parameters glucose, lactate, pyruvate and glycerol were analyzed. Outcome was assessed at 12–55 months after discharge from hospital. Mann-Whitney U-Test and Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed rank test were applied. Results The included patients had a mean GCS of 8 (range, 3–10) on admission and increased ICP (>20 mmHg) was observed in 62% (n = 13/21) of the patients. Patients with a lactate:pyruvate ratio (LPR) >40 (n = 9/21, 43%) had significantly higher peak levels of serum NSE (p = 0.03), with similar, although non-significant observations made in patients with high levels of glycerol (>500 μmol/L, p = 0.11) and those with a metabolic crisis (Glucose <0.8 mmol/L, LPR >25, p = 0.09). No associations between serum S100B and MD parameters were found. Furthermore, median MD glucose levels decreased significantly between day 1 (0–24h) and day 3 (48–72h) after admission to the NICU (p = 0.0001). No correlation between MD parameters or biomarkers and outcome was found

  9. Dissociation and psychotic symptoms.

    PubMed

    Steingard, S; Frankel, F H

    1985-08-01

    The literature on hysterical or brief reactive psychosis reflects great diversity both in clinical description and theoretical formulation. The authors describe the case of a 17-year-old girl who presented with a diagnosis of bipolar affective disorder, rapid cycling type, but who, in fact, was experiencing dissociative episodes manifested as psychotic states. The patient's successful treatment with hypnosis is described, along with the clinical and theoretical implications of the case. PMID:4025593

  10. Molecular and functional expression of cation-chloride cotransporters in dorsal root ganglion neurons during postnatal maturation

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Shihong; Garzon-Muvdi, Tomás; Di Fulvio, Mauricio; Chen, Yanfang; Delpire, Eric; Alvarez, Francisco J.

    2012-01-01

    GABA depolarizes and excites central neurons during early development, becoming inhibitory and hyperpolarizing with maturation. This “developmental shift” occurs abruptly, reflecting a decrease in intracellular Cl− concentration ([Cl−]i) and a hyperpolarizing shift in Cl− equilibrium potential due to upregulation of the K+-Cl− cotransporter KCC2b, a neuron-specific Cl− extruder. In contrast, primary afferent neurons (PANs) are depolarized by GABA throughout adulthood because of expression of NKCC1, a Na+-K+-2Cl− cotransporter that accumulates Cl− above equilibrium. The GABAA-mediated depolarization of PANs determines presynaptic inhibition in the spinal cord, a key mechanism gating somatosensory information. Little is known about developmental changes in Cl− transporter expression and Cl− homeostasis in PANs. Whether NKCC1 is expressed in PANs of all phenotypes or is restricted to subpopulations (e.g., nociceptors) is debatable. Likewise, whether PANs express KCC2s is controversial. We investigated NKCC1 and K+-Cl− cotransporter expression in rat and mouse dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons with molecular methods. Using fluorescence imaging microscopy, we measured [Cl−]i in acutely dissociated rat DRG neurons (P0–P21) loaded with N-(ethoxycarbonylmethyl)-6-methoxyquinolinium bromide and classified with phenotypic markers. DRG neurons of all sizes express two NKCC1 mRNAs, one full-length and a shorter splice variant lacking exon 21. Immunolabeling with validated antibodies revealed ubiquitous expression of NKCC1 in DRG neurons irrespective of postnatal age and phenotype. As maturation progresses [Cl−]i decreases gradually, persisting above equilibrium in >95% mature neurons. DRG neurons express mRNAs for KCC1, KCC3s, and KCC4, but not for KCC2s. Mechanisms underlying PANs' developmental changes in Cl− homeostasis are discussed and compared with those of central neurons. PMID:22457464

  11. New Hippocampal Neurons Mature Rapidly in Response to Ketamine But Are Not Required for Its Acute Antidepressant Effects on Neophagia in Rats123

    PubMed Central

    Soumier, Amelie; Carter, Rayna M.; Schoenfeld, Timothy J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Virtually all antidepressant agents increase the birth of granule neurons in the adult dentate gyrus in rodents, providing a key basis for the neurogenesis hypothesis of antidepressant action. The novel antidepressant ketamine, however, shows antidepressant activity in humans within hours, far too rapid for a mechanism involving neuronal birth. Ketamine could potentially act more rapidly by enhancing maturation of new neurons born weeks earlier. To test this possibility, we assessed the effects of S-ketamine (S-(+)-ketamine hydrochloride) injection on maturation, as well as birth and survival, of new dentate gyrus granule neurons in rats, using the immediate-early gene zif268, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, and BrdU, respectively. We show that S-ketamine has rapid effects on new neurons, increasing the proportion of functionally mature young granule neurons within 2 h. A single injection of S-ketamine also increased cell proliferation and functional maturation, and decreased depressive-like behavior, for at least 4 weeks in rats treated with long-term corticosterone administration (a depression model) and controls. However, the behavioral effects of S-ketamine on neophagia were unaffected by elimination of adult neurogenesis. Together, these results indicate that ketamine has surprisingly rapid and long-lasting effects on the recruitment of young neurons into hippocampal networks, but that ketamine has antidepressant-like effects that are independent of adult neurogenesis. PMID:27066531

  12. Differential properties of type I and type II benzodiazepine receptors in mammalian CNS neurones.

    PubMed Central

    Yakushiji, T.; Shirasaki, T.; Munakata, M.; Hirata, A.; Akaike, N.

    1993-01-01

    1. The effects of benzodiazepine receptor (BZR) partial agonists, Y-23684 and CL218,872, were compared with its full agonist, diazepam, on gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-induced Cl- current (ICl) in acutely dissociated rat cerebral cortex (CTX), cerebellar Purkinje (CPJ) and spinal ventral horn (SVH) neurones, by the whole-cell mode patch-clamp technique. 2. The GABA-induced responses were essentially the same in both SVH and CPJ neurones, but the KD value of the GABA response in CTX neurone was lower than those in the other two brain regions. 3. Enhancement of the GABA response by the two partial agonists was about one-third of that by diazepam in the SVH neurones (where type II subtype of BZR, BZ2, is predominant), whereas these partial agonists potentiated the GABA response as much as diazepam in CPJ neurones (where the type I subtype of BZR, BZ1, is predominant). In CTX neurones where both type I and II variants are expressed, the augmentation ratio of the GABA response by diazepam was between the values in CPJ and SVH neurones. 4. In concentration-response relationships of BZR partial agonists, the threshold concentrations, KD values and maximal augmentation ratio of the GABA response were similar in all CTX, CPJ and SVH neurones. Also, in all preparations, the threshold concentration and KD values of diazepam action were 10 fold less than those induced by partial agonists. 5. All BZR agonists shifted the concentration-response relationship for GABA to the left without changing the maximum current amplitude, indicating that activation of both BZ1 and BZ2 increase the affinity of the GABAA receptor for GABA.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8395299

  13. Functional connectivity in in vitro neuronal assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Poli, Daniele; Pastore, Vito P.; Massobrio, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Complex network topologies represent the necessary substrate to support complex brain functions. In this work, we reviewed in vitro neuronal networks coupled to Micro-Electrode Arrays (MEAs) as biological substrate. Networks of dissociated neurons developing in vitro and coupled to MEAs, represent a valid experimental model for studying the mechanisms governing the formation, organization and conservation of neuronal cell assemblies. In this review, we present some examples of the use of statistical Cluster Coefficients and Small World indices to infer topological rules underlying the dynamics exhibited by homogeneous and engineered neuronal networks. PMID:26500505

  14. Recurrent dissociative fugue.

    PubMed

    Mamarde, Abhishek; Navkhare, Praveen; Singam, Amrita; Kanoje, Akash

    2013-10-01

    Dissociative fugue is a rarely reported diagnostic entity. It is one of the least understood and yet clinically one of the most fascinating disorders in mental health. Here, we describe a case of fugue in a 32-year-old man who was brought to mental hospital with complete loss of memory for events pertaining to identity of self. This case illustrates the nature of presentation in hospital setting like mental hospital and effort taken to reintegrate his identity and reunite with his family. PMID:24379504

  15. THE DISSOCIATIVE TURN IN PSYCHOANALYSIS.

    PubMed

    Itzkowitz, Sheldon

    2015-06-01

    In his response to the Roundtable Discussions on what is effective in psychoanalytic psychotherapy, the author focuses on the renewed interest in the concept of dissociation that began to emerge toward the end of the 20th century. A contemporary psychoanalytic position informed by the impact of developmental trauma has led to an understanding of and interest in the dissociative mind. The actuality of trauma during infancy and early childhood is recognized as a key factor leading to the emergence of dissociative processes, the potential dissociative structuring of the mind, and mind being characterized by multiple, discontinuous, centers of consciousness. The therapeutic goal in the psychoanalytic work with fragmented patients is to establish communication and understanding between the dissociated self-states. The author offers two brief clinical examples of working with dissociated self-states. PMID:26177756

  16. Oxytocin-induced membrane hyperpolarization in pain-sensitive dorsal root ganglia neurons mediated by Ca(2+)/nNOS/NO/KATP pathway.

    PubMed

    Gong, L; Gao, F; Li, J; Li, J; Yu, X; Ma, X; Zheng, W; Cui, S; Liu, K; Zhang, M; Kunze, W; Liu, C Y

    2015-03-19

    Oxytocin (OT) plays an important role in pain modulation and antinociception in the central nervous system. However, little is known about its peripheral effects. This study was conducted to investigate the effect of OT on the electrical properties of neurons in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and the underlying mechanisms. DRG neurons from adult rats were acutely dissociated and cultured. Intracellular Ca(2+) was determined by fluorescent microscopy using an indicator dye. The electrical properties of DRG neurons were tested by patch-clamp recording. The oxytocin receptor (OTR) and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) on DRG neurons were assessed with immunofluorescence assays. OTR co-localized with nNOS in most of Isolectin B4 (IB4)-binding cultured DRG neurons in rats. OT decreased the excitability, increased the outward current, and evoked the membrane hyperpolarization in cultured DRG neurons. Sodium nitroprusside (SNP), the donor of nitric oxide (NO), exerted similar effects as OT on the membrane potential of cultured DRG neurons. OT increased the production of NO in DRGs and cultured DRG neurons. Pre-treatment of the OTR antagonist atosiban or the selective nNOS inhibitor N-Propyl-l-arginine (NPLA) significantly attenuated the hyperpolarization effect evoked by OT. OT produced a concentration-dependent increase in intracellular Ca(2+) in DRG neurons that responds to capsaicin, which can be attenuated by atosiban, but not by NPLA. OT-evoked membrane hyperpolarization and increase of outward current were distinctly attenuated by glibenclamide, a blocker of ATP-sensitive K(+) (KATP) channel. OT might be an endogenous antinociceptive agent and the peripheral antinociceptive effects of OT are mediated by activation of the Ca(2+)/nNOS/NO/KATP pathway in DRG neurons. PMID:25617653

  17. Dissociative Electron Attachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arreola, Esmeralda; Esmeralda Arreola Collaboration; Leigh Hargreaves Collaboration

    Since the pioneering work of Boudiaffa et al., it has been understood that electrons, even with energies near or below the ionization threshold, are capable of initiating strand-breaks in human DNA. This discovery raised important questions for cancer treatments, since sub-ionizing electrons are known to be the most copiously produced secondary product of radiation therapy. But even to date these factors are largely excluded from dosimetry calculations. This lack of inclusion is, at least in part, certainly due to the dearth of fundamental data describing low-energy electron interactions with nucleotide molecules that form the basis of DNA. Understanding of how such slow electrons are able to damage DNA remains incomplete, but the strongly peaked nature of Boudiaffa et al.'s data gives strong hints at resonantly driven collision processes. DNA damage is therefore most likely driven by ``dissociative electron attachment'' (DEA). DEA is a rather complicated process to model due to the coupling of electronic and nuclear degrees of freedom in the molecule. At the California State University Fullerton, we are currently commissioning a new spectrometer to study dissociation channels, reaction rates and orientation effects in DEA collisions between slow electrons and nucleotide molecules. At the meeting we will present design parameters and commissioning data for this new apparatus.

  18. Taurine activates excitatory non-synaptic glycine receptors on dopamine neurones in ventral tegmental area of young rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fushun; Xiao, Cheng; Ye, Jiang Hong

    2005-01-01

    The physiological and pharmacological properties of taurine-induced responses were investigated in dopaminergic (DA) neurones from the ventral tegmental area (VTA) of young rats aged 1–13 postnatal days, either in acute brain slices or acutely dissociated neurones. When whole-cell responses were recorded from current-clamped neurones using the gramicidin-perforated technique, the application of taurine (0.01–30 mm) accelerated firings and induced membrane depolarization. In voltage-clamped neurones, taurine induced a current which was antagonized by strychnine and by picrotoxin, but not by bicuculline. In addition, taurine-induced current showed complete cross-desensitization with glycine-activated currents but not with γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-activated currents. Thus, taurine is a full agonist of the glycine receptors (GlyRs) in the VTA. Further studies found that taurine acted mainly on non-synaptic GlyRs. The application of 20 μm bicuculline abolished the spontaneous inhibitory post-synaptic currents (IPSCs) in 40/45 neurones, and 93% of the evoked IPSCs. The addition of 1 μm strychnine completely eliminated the remaining IPSCs. These results suggest that GABAergic IPSCs predominate, and that functional glycinergic synapses are present in a subset of the VTA neurones. The application of 1 μm strychnine alone induced an outward current, suggesting that these neurones were exposed to tonically released taurine/glycine. In conclusion, by activating non-synaptic GlyRs, taurine may act as an excitatory extra-synaptic neurotransmitter in the VTA during early development. PMID:15817633

  19. COMMUNICATION: Folate and S-adenosylmethionine modulate synaptic activity in cultured cortical neurons: acute differential impact on normal and apolipoprotein-deficient mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serra, Michael; Chan, Amy; Dubey, Maya; Gilman, Vladimir; Shea, Thomas B.

    2008-12-01

    Folate deficiency is accompanied by a decline in the cognitive neurotransmitter acetylcholine and a decline in cognitive performance in mice lacking apolipoprotein E (ApoE-/- mice), a low-density lipoprotein that regulates aspects of lipid metabolism. One direct consequence of folate deficiency is a decline in S-adenosylmethionine (SAM). Since dietary SAM supplementation maintains acetylcholine levels and cognitive performance in the absence of folate, we examined herein the impact of folate and SAM on neuronal synaptic activity. Embryonic cortical neurons from mice expressing or lacking ApoE (ApoE+/+ or -/-, respectively) were cultured for 1 month on multi-electrode arrays, and signaling was recorded. ApoE+/+ cultures displayed significantly more frequent spontaneous signals than ApoE-/- cultures. Supplementation with 166 µm SAM (not normally present in culture medium) increased signal frequency and decreased signal amplitude in ApoE+/+ cultures. SAM also increased the frequency of tightly clustered signal bursts. Folate deprivation reversibly reduced signal frequency in ApoE+/+ cultures; SAM supplementation maintained signal frequency despite folate deprivation. These findings support the importance of dietary supplementation with folate and SAM on neuronal health. Supplementation with 166 µm SAM did not alter signaling in ApoE-/- cultures, which may be a reflection of the reduced SAM levels in ApoE-/- mice. The differential impact of SAM on ApoE+/+ and -/- neurons underscores the combined impact of nutritional and genetic deficiencies on neuronal homeostasis.

  20. Hyperglycemia associated dissociative fugue (organic dissociative disorder) in an elderly

    PubMed Central

    Ram, Dushad; Ashoka, H. G; Gowdappa, Basavnna

    2015-01-01

    Inadequate glycemic control in patients with diabetes is known to be associated with psychiatric disorders such as depression, anxiety disorder, and cognitive impairment. However, dissociative syndrome has not been reported so far. Here we are reporting a case of repeated dissociative fugue associated with hyperglycemia, in an elderly with type II diabetes. Possible neurobiological mechanism has been discussed. PMID:26286620

  1. The acute effect in rats of 3,4-methylenedioxyethamphetamine (MDEA, "eve") on body temperature and long term degeneration of 5-HT neurones in brain: a comparison with MDMA ("ecstasy").

    PubMed

    Colado, M I; Granados, R; O'Shea, E; Esteban, B; Green, A R

    1999-06-01

    Administration of a single dose of the recreationally used drug 3,4-methylenedioxyethamphetamine (MDEA or "eve") to Dark Agouti rats resulted in an acute dose-dependent hyperthermic response. The peak effect and duration of hyperthermia of a dose of MDEA of 35 mg/kg intraperitoneally was similar to a dose of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA or "ecstasy") of 15 mg/kg intraperitoneally. Seven days later this dose of MDMA produced a marked (approximately 50%) loss of 5-HT and its metabolite 5-HIAA in cortex, hippocampus and striatum and a similar loss of [3H]-paroxetine binding in cortex: these losses reflecting the MDMA-induced neurotoxic degeneration of 5-HT nerve endings. In contrast, administration of MDEA (15, 25 or 35 mg/kg), even at the highest dose, produced only a 20% loss in cortex and hippocampus and no decrease in striatum. The neurotoxic effect of MDEA was only weakly dose-dependent. Neither MDEA (35 mg/kg) nor MDMA (15 mg/kg) altered striatal dopamine content 7 days later. MDEA appeared to have about half the potency of MDMA in inducing acute hyperthermia and 25% of the potency in inducing degeneration of cerebral 5-HT neurones. However since higher doses of MDEA (compared to MDMA) are probably necessary to induce mood changing effects, these data do not support any contention that this compound is a "safer" recreational drug than MDMA in terms of either acute toxicity or long term neurodegeneration. PMID:10401727

  2. Enhancement of an outwardly rectifying chloride channel in hippocampal pyramidal neurons after cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianguo; Chang, Quanzhong; Li, Xiaoming; Li, Xiawen; Qiao, Jiantian; Gao, Tianming

    2016-08-01

    Cerebral ischemia induces delayed, selective neuronal death in the CA1 region of the hippocampus. The underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear, but it is known that apoptosis is involved in this process. Chloride efflux has been implicated in the progression of apoptosis in various cell types. Using both the inside-out and whole-cell configurations of the patch-clamp technique, the present study characterized an outwardly rectifying chloride channel (ORCC) in acutely dissociated pyramid neurons in the hippocampus of adult rats. The channel had a nonlinear current-voltage relationship with a conductance of 42.26±1.2pS in the positive voltage range and 18.23±0.96pS in the negative voltage range, indicating an outward rectification pattern. The channel is Cl(-) selective, and the open probability is voltage-dependent. It can be blocked by the classical Cl(-) channel blockers DIDS, SITS, NPPB and glibenclamide. We examined the different changes in ORCC activity in CA1 and CA3 pyramidal neurons at 6, 24 and 48h after transient forebrain ischemia. In the vulnerable CA1 neurons, ORCC activity was persistently enhanced after ischemic insult, whereas in the invulnerable CA3 neurons, no significant changes occurred. Further analysis of channel kinetics suggested that multiple openings are a major contributor to the increase in channel activity after ischemia. Pharmacological blockade of the ORCC partly attenuated cell death in the hippocampal neurons. We propose that the enhanced activity of ORCC might contribute to selective neuronal damage in the CA1 region after cerebral ischemia, and that ORCC may be a therapeutic target against ischemia-induced cell death. PMID:27181516

  3. Evaluation of Ca2+ permeability of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in hypothalamic histaminergic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Uteshev, Victor V.

    2010-01-01

    Hypothalamic histaminergic tuberomammillary (TM) neurons express nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) with kinetic and pharmacological properties resembling those of highly Ca2+ permeable α7 nAChRs. However, the Ca2+ permeability of TM nAChR channels has not been determined. To directly evaluate the Ca2+ permeability of TM nAChRs, patch-clamp recordings were conducted using non-cultured acutely dissociated TM neurons and external solutions containing low (2 mM) and high (20 mM) concentrations of Ca2+. A shift in the reversal potentials was determined from the current–voltage relationships and the permeability ratio, PCa/PNa, was estimated within the Goldman-Hodgkin-Katz constant field approximation. TM nAChRs were found to be highly Ca2+ permeable with the permeability ratio, PCa/PNa(nAChR) being ∼5.9 and the fractional Ca2+ current, Pf(nAChR) being ∼10.1% at −60 mV. As a positive control for the applied methods and analysis, the permeability ratio, PCa/PNa(NMDAR) being ∼8.3 and the fractional Ca2+ current, Pf(NMDAR) being ∼13.6% at −60 mV for NMDA receptors were determined using non-cultured acutely dissociated hippocampal pyramidal neurons and found similar to previously reported values. Therefore, these results demonstrate that native TM nAChRs are highly Ca2+ permeable, but ∼1.4 fold less permeable to Ca2+ than native hippocampal pyramidal NMDA receptors. PMID:20043042

  4. Dissociative States and Neural Complexity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bob, Petr; Svetlak, Miroslav

    2011-01-01

    Recent findings indicate that neural mechanisms of consciousness are related to integration of distributed neural assemblies. This neural integration is particularly vulnerable to past stressful experiences that can lead to disintegration and dissociation of consciousness. These findings suggest that dissociation could be described as a level of…

  5. Botulinum toxin type a (150 kDa) decreases exaggerated neurotransmitter release from trigeminal ganglion neurons and relieves neuropathy behaviors induced by infraorbital nerve constriction.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Y; Matsuka, Y; Spigelman, I; Ishihara, Y; Yamamoto, Y; Sonoyama, W; Kamioka, H; Yamashiro, T; Kuboki, T; Oguma, K

    2009-04-10

    Many patients with trigeminal neuropathies suffer severe chronic pain which is inadequately alleviated with centrally-acting drugs. These drugs also possess severe side effects making compliance difficult. One strategy is to develop new treatments without central side effects by targeting peripheral sensory neurons, since sensory neuron excitability and neurotransmitter release increase in chronic pain states. Such treatments may include the highly purified botulinum toxin type A 150 kDa (BoNT/A) which reportedly blocks vesicular neurotransmitter release. We set out to determine if experimental trigeminal neuropathy induced by infraorbital nerve constriction (IoNC) in rats could alter neurotransmitter release from somata of trigeminal sensory neurons and if it could be attenuated by BoNT/A. Thus, we monitored the secretory activity of acutely dissociated trigeminal ganglion (TRG) neurons from naïve and IoNC rats by measuring the fluorescence intensity of the membrane-uptake marker (N-(3-triethylammoniumpropyl)-4-(6-(4-(diethylamino)phenyl)hexatrienyl)pyridinium dibromide (FM4-64). FM4-64 staining showed that neurons possess a pool of recycled vesicles which could be released by high KCl (75 mM) application. BoNT/A pre-treatment of acutely dissociated TRG neurons from naïve rats significantly reduced the rate of FM4-64 dye release. Neurons isolated from TRG ipsilateral to IoNC exhibited significantly faster onset of FM4-64 release than neurons contralateral to IoNC (sham surgery). IoNC also produced long-lasting ipsilateral tactile allodynia, measured as large decreases of withdrawal thresholds to mechanical stimulation. Intradermal injection of BoNT/A in the area of infraorbital branch of the trigeminal nerve (IoN) innervation alleviated IoNC-induced mechanical allodynia and reduced the exaggerated FM4-64 release in TRG neurons from these rats. Our results suggest that BoNT/A decreases neuropathic pain behaviors by decreasing the exaggerated neurotransmitter

  6. Changes in the electrical properties of chick ciliary ganglion neurones during embryonic development.

    PubMed Central

    Dourado, M M; Dryer, S E

    1992-01-01

    1. Whole-cell recording techniques were used to examine the expression of ionic currents in chick ciliary ganglion neurones dissociated acutely at various stages of embryonic development. Currents were also examined in dissociated cells that had been maintained in vitro for several days. 2. Voltage-activated, tetrodotoxin (TTX)-sensitive Na+ currents (INa) could be detected in all cells tested between stage 25 and stage 40 (embryonic days 4.5-14). INa increased in both amplitude and density throughout development, but no obvious changes in kinetics or sensitivity to TTX were observed. 3. High-threshold Ca2+ currents (ICa) were also detectable between stage 25 and stage 40. ICa increased in both amplitude and density throughout this time. No obvious changes in kinetics or voltage dependence were observed. 4. Delayed rectifier K+ currents (IDR) and A-currents (IA) could be detected in Ca(2+)-free salines, and distinguished on the basis of differences in kinetics, voltage dependence, and sensitivity to tetraethylammonium (TEA). IA was either absent, or present at very low densities at stages 26-30, but showed a sharp increase in density thereafter. In contrast, IDR was detectable as early as stage 25, and did not display a significant increase in density during development. 5. Ca(2+)-activated K+ currents (IK(Ca)) were either undetectable or present at very low density between stage 26 and stage 30 (embryonic days 5-9) but showed a large increase in amplitude and density thereafter. 6. Ionic currents were examined in age-matched cells dissociated acutely on embryonic day 13, or isolated on embryonic day 9 and maintained in vitro for an additional 4 days. Most of the cells maintained in culture for 4 days did not express detectable IK(Ca), and had significantly reduced IA compared to acutely isolated controls. The cultured cells expressed normal densities of IDR, ICa and INa. 7. All ionic currents increased in amplitude during normal embryonic development, and all but

  7. Kv4 Channels Underlie the Subthreshold-Operating A-type K+-current in Nociceptive Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Phuket, Thanawath Ratanadilok Na; Covarrubias, Manuel

    2009-01-01

    The dorsal root ganglion (DRG) contains heterogeneous populations of sensory neurons including primary nociceptive neurons and C-fibers implicated in pain signaling. Recent studies have demonstrated DRG hyperexcitability associated with downregulation of A-type K+ channels; however, the molecular correlate of the corresponding A-type K+ current (IA) has remained hypothetical. Kv4 channels may underlie the IA in DRG neurons. We combined electrophysiology, molecular biology (Whole-Tissue and Single-Cell RT-PCR) and immunohistochemistry to investigate the molecular basis of the IA in acutely dissociated DRG neurons from 7- to 8-day-old rats. Whole-cell recordings demonstrate a robust tetraethylammonium-resistant (20 mM) and 4-aminopyridine-sensitive (5 mM) IA. Matching Kv4 channel properties, activation and inactivation of this IA occur in the subthreshold range of membrane potentials and the rate of recovery from inactivation is rapid and voltage-dependent. Among Kv4 transcripts, the DRG expresses significant levels of Kv4.1 and Kv4.3 mRNAs. Also, single small-medium diameter DRG neurons (∼30 μm) exhibit correlated frequent expression of mRNAs encoding Kv4.1 and Nav1.8, a known nociceptor marker. In contrast, the expressions of Kv1.4 and Kv4.2 mRNAs at the whole-tissue and single-cell levels are relatively low and infrequent. Kv4 protein expression in nociceptive DRG neurons was confirmed by immunohistochemistry, which demonstrates colocalization of Kv4.3 and Nav1.8, and negligible expression of Kv4.2. Furthermore, specific dominant-negative suppression and overexpression strategies confirmed the contribution of Kv4 channels to IA in DRG neurons. Contrasting the expression patterns of Kv4 channels in the central and peripheral nervous systems, we discuss possible functional roles of these channels in primary sensory neurons. PMID:19668710

  8. Pharyngeal pumping inhibition and avoidance by acute exposure to high CO2 levels are both regulated by the BAG neurons via different molecular pathways.

    PubMed

    Sharabi, Kfir; Charar, Chayki; Gruenbaum, Yosef

    2015-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) is a key molecule in many biological processes. Studies in humans, mice, D. melanogaster, C. elegans, unicellular organisms and plants have shed light on the molecular pathways activated by elevated levels of CO2. However, the mechanisms that organisms use to sense and respond to high CO2 levels remain largely unknown. Previous work has shown that C. elegans quickly avoid elevated CO2 levels using mechanisms that involve the BAG, ASE and AFD neurons via cGMP- and calcium- signaling pathways. Here, we discuss our recent finding that exposure of C. elegans to high CO2 levels leads to a very rapid cessation in the contraction of the pharynx muscles. Surprisingly, none of the tested CO2 avoidance mutants affected the rapid pumping inhibition response to elevated CO2 levels. A forward genetic screen identified that the hid-1-mediated pathway of dense core vesicle maturation regulates the pumping inhibition, probably through affecting neuropeptide secretion. Genetic studies and laser ablation experiments showed that the CO2 response of the pharyngeal muscle pumping is regulated by the BAG neurons, the same neurons that mediate CO2 avoidance. PMID:26430557

  9. Dissociative absorption: An empirically unique, clinically relevant, dissociative factor.

    PubMed

    Soffer-Dudek, Nirit; Lassri, Dana; Soffer-Dudek, Nir; Shahar, Golan

    2015-11-01

    Research of dissociative absorption has raised two questions: (a) Is absorption a unique dissociative factor within a three-factor structure, or a part of one general dissociative factor? Even when three factors are found, the specificity of the absorption factor is questionable. (b) Is absorption implicated in psychopathology? Although commonly viewed as "non-clinical" dissociation, absorption was recently hypothesized to be specifically associated with obsessive-compulsive symptoms. To address these questions, we conducted exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses on 679 undergraduates. Analyses supported the three-factor model, and a "purified" absorption scale was extracted from the original inclusive absorption factor. The purified scale predicted several psychopathology scales. As hypothesized, absorption was a stronger predictor of obsessive-compulsive symptoms than of general psychopathology. In addition, absorption was the only dissociative scale that longitudinally predicted obsessive-compulsive symptoms. We conclude that absorption is a unique and clinically relevant dissociative tendency that is particularly meaningful to obsessive-compulsive symptoms. PMID:26241024

  10. Recurrent Episodes of Dissociative Fugue

    PubMed Central

    Angothu, Hareesh; Pabbathi, Lokeswar Reddy

    2016-01-01

    Dissociative fugue is rare entity to encounter with possible differentials of epilepsy and malingering. It is one of the dissociative disorders rarely seen in clinical practice more often because of the short lasting nature of this condition. This might also be because of organized travel of the individuals during the episodes and return to their families after the recovery from episodes. This is a case description of a patient who has experienced total three episodes of dissociative fugue. The patient has presented during the third episode and two prior episodes were diagnosed as fugue episodes retrospectively based on the history. Planned travel in this case by the patient to a distant location was prevented because of early diagnosis and constant vigilance till the recovery. As in this case, it may be more likely that persons with Dissociative fugue may develop similar episodes if they encounter exceptional perceived stress. However, such conclusions may require follow-up studies. PMID:27114633

  11. NMDA receptor properties in rat supraoptic magnocellular neurons: characterization and postnatal development.

    PubMed

    Hussy, N; Boissin-Agasse, L; Richard, P; Desarménien, M G

    1997-07-01

    Hypothalamo-neurohypophysial magnocellular neurons display specific electrical activities in relation to the mode of release of their hormonal content (vasopressin or oxytocin). These activities are under strong glutamatergic excitatory control. The implication of NMDA receptors in the control of vasopressinergic and oxytocinergic neurons is still a matter of debate. We here report the first detailed characterization of functional properties of NMDA receptors in voltage-clamped magnocellular neurons acutely dissociated from the supraoptic nucleus. All cells responded to NMDA with currents that reversed polarity around 0 mV and were inhibited by D-2-amino-5-phosphonovalerate (D-APV) and by 100 microM extracellular Mg2+ (at -80 mV). Sensitivity to the co-agonist glycine (EC50, 2 microM) was low compared with most other neuronal preparations. The receptors displayed low sensitivity to ifenprodil, were insensitive to glycine-independent potentiation by spermine, and had a unitary conductance of 50 pS. No evidence was found for two distinct cell populations, suggesting that oxytocinergic and vasopressinergic neurons express similar NMDA receptors. Characterization of NMDA receptors at different postnatal ages revealed a transient increase in density of NMDA currents during the second postnatal week. This was accompanied by a specific decrease in sensitivity to D-APV, with no change in NMDA sensitivity or any other properties studied. Supraoptic NMDA receptors thus present characteristics that strikingly resemble those of reconstituted receptors composed of NR1 and NR2A subunits. Understanding the functional significance of the development of NMDA receptors in the supraoptic nucleus will require further knowledge about the maturation of neuronal excitability, synaptic connections and neurohormone release mechanisms. PMID:9240401

  12. Activity-dependent hyperpolarization of EGABA is absent in cutaneous DRG neurons from inflamed rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yi; Zhang, Xiu-Lin; Gold, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    A shift in GABAA signaling from inhibition to excitation in primary afferent neurons appears to contribute to the inflammation-induced increase in afferent input to the central nervous system (CNS). An activity-dependent depolarization of the GABA equilibrium potential (EGABA) has been described in CNS neurons which drives a shift in GABAA signaling from inhibition to excitation. The purpose of the present study was to determine if such an activity-dependent depolarization of EGABA occurs in primary afferents and whether the depolarization is amplified with persistent inflammation. Acutely dissociated retrogradely labeled cutaneous DRG neurons from naïve and inflamed rats were studied with gramicidin perforated patch recording. Rather than a depolarization, 200 action potentials delivered at 2 Hz resulted in a ~10 mV hyperpolarization of EGABA in cutaneous neurons from naïve rats. No such hyperpolarization was observed in neurons from inflamed rats. The shift in EGABA was not blocked by 10 µM bumetanide. Furthermore, because activity-dependent hyperpolarization of EGABA was fully manifest in the absence of HCO3− in the bath solution, this shift was not dependent on a change in HCO3−-Cl− exchanger activity, despite evidence of HCO3−-Cl− exchangers in DRG neurons that may contribute to the establishment of EGABA in the presence of HCO3−. While the mechanism underlying the activity-dependent hyperpolarization of EGABA has yet to be identified, because this mechanism appears to function as a form of feedback inhibition, facilitating GABA mediated inhibition of afferent activity, it may serve as a novel target for the treatment of inflammatory pain. PMID:24135545

  13. Neuronal polarization.

    PubMed

    Takano, Tetsuya; Xu, Chundi; Funahashi, Yasuhiro; Namba, Takashi; Kaibuchi, Kozo

    2015-06-15

    Neurons are highly polarized cells with structurally and functionally distinct processes called axons and dendrites. This polarization underlies the directional flow of information in the central nervous system, so the establishment and maintenance of neuronal polarization is crucial for correct development and function. Great progress in our understanding of how neurons establish their polarity has been made through the use of cultured hippocampal neurons, while recent technological advances have enabled in vivo analysis of axon specification and elongation. This short review and accompanying poster highlight recent advances in this fascinating field, with an emphasis on the signaling mechanisms underlying axon and dendrite specification in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26081570

  14. Cooperative effects of neuronal ensembles.

    PubMed

    Rose, G; Siebler, M

    1995-01-01

    Electrophysiological properties of neurons as the basic cellular elements of the central nervous system and their synaptic connections are well characterized down to a molecular level. However, the behavior of complex noisy networks formed by these constituents usually cannot simply be derived from the knowledge of its microscopic parameters. As a consequence, cooperative phenomena based on the interaction of neurons were postulated. This is a report on a study of global network spike activity as a function of synaptic interaction. We performed experiments in dissociated cultured hippocampal neurons and, for comparison, simulations of a mathematical model closely related to electrophysiology. Numeric analyses revealed that at a critical level of synaptic connectivity the firing behavior undergoes a phase transition. This cooperative effect depends crucially on the interaction of numerous cells and cannot be attributed to the spike threshold of individual neurons. In the experiment a drastic increase in the firing level was observed upon increase of synaptic efficacy by lowering of the extracellular magnesium concentration, which is compatible with our theoretical predictions. This "on-off" phenomenon demonstrates that even in small neuronal ensembles collective behavior can emerge which is not explained by the characteristics of single neurons. PMID:8542966

  15. Network synchronization in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Penn, Yaron; Segal, Menahem; Moses, Elisha

    2016-03-22

    Oscillatory activity is widespread in dynamic neuronal networks. The main paradigm for the origin of periodicity consists of specialized pacemaking elements that synchronize and drive the rest of the network; however, other models exist. Here, we studied the spontaneous emergence of synchronized periodic bursting in a network of cultured dissociated neurons from rat hippocampus and cortex. Surprisingly, about 60% of all active neurons were self-sustained oscillators when disconnected, each with its own natural frequency. The individual neuron's tendency to oscillate and the corresponding oscillation frequency are controlled by its excitability. The single neuron intrinsic oscillations were blocked by riluzole, and are thus dependent on persistent sodium leak currents. Upon a gradual retrieval of connectivity, the synchrony evolves: Loose synchrony appears already at weak connectivity, with the oscillators converging to one common oscillation frequency, yet shifted in phase across the population. Further strengthening of the connectivity causes a reduction in the mean phase shifts until zero-lag is achieved, manifested by synchronous periodic network bursts. Interestingly, the frequency of network bursting matches the average of the intrinsic frequencies. Overall, the network behaves like other universal systems, where order emerges spontaneously by entrainment of independent rhythmic units. Although simplified with respect to circuitry in the brain, our results attribute a basic functional role for intrinsic single neuron excitability mechanisms in driving the network's activity and dynamics, contributing to our understanding of developing neural circuits. PMID:26961000

  16. Dissociative disorders in DSM-5.

    PubMed

    Spiegel, David; Lewis-Fernández, Roberto; Lanius, Ruth; Vermetten, Eric; Simeon, Daphne; Friedman, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    The rationale, research literature, and proposed changes to the dissociative disorders and conversion disorder in the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) are presented. Dissociative identity disorder will include reference to possession as well as identity fragmentation, to make the disorder more applicable to culturally diverse situations. Dissociative amnesia will include dissociative fugue as a subtype, since fugue is a rare disorder that always involves amnesia but does not always include confused wandering or loss of personality identity. Depersonalization disorder will include derealization as well, since the two often co-occur. A dissociative subtype of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), defined by the presence of depersonalization or derealization in addition to other PTSD symptoms, is being recommended, based upon new epidemiological and neuroimaging evidence linking it to an early life history of adversity and a combination of frontal activation and limbic inhibition. Conversion disorder (functional neurological symptom disorder) will likely remain with the somatic symptom disorders, despite considerable dissociative comorbidity. PMID:23394228

  17. Global functioning and disability in dissociative disorders.

    PubMed

    Mueller-Pfeiffer, Christoph; Rufibach, Kaspar; Perron, Noelle; Wyss, Daniela; Kuenzler, Cornelia; Prezewowsky, Cornelia; Pitman, Roger K; Rufer, Michael

    2012-12-30

    Dissociative disorders are frequent comorbid conditions of other mental disorders. Yet, there is controversy about their clinical relevance, and little systematic research has been done on how they influence global functioning. Outpatients and day care patients (N=160) of several psychiatric units in Switzerland were assessed with the Structured Clinical Interview for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM)-IV Axis I Disorders, Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Dissociative Disorders, Global Assessment of Functioning Scale, and World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule-II. The association between subjects with a dissociative disorder (N=30) and functional impairment after accounting for non-dissociative axis I disorders was evaluated by linear regression models. We found a proportion of 18.8% dissociative disorders (dissociative amnesia=0%, dissociative fugue=0.6%, depersonalization disorder=4.4%, dissociative identity disorder=7.5%, dissociative disorder-not-otherwise-specified=6.3%) across treatment settings. Adjusted for other axis I disorders, subjects with a comorbid dissociative identity disorder or dissociative disorder-not-otherwise-specified had a median global assessment of functioning score that was 0.86 and 0.88 times, respectively, the score of subjects without a comorbid dissociative disorder. These findings support the hypothesis that complex dissociative disorders, i.e., dissociative identity disorder and dissociative disorder-not-otherwise-specified, contribute to functional impairment above and beyond the impact of co-existing non-dissociative axis I disorders, and that they qualify as "serious mental illness". PMID:22578820

  18. A-Kinase Anchoring Protein 79/150 Coordinates Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor Sensitization of Peripheral Sensory Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Szteyn, Kalina; Rowan, Matthew P.; Gomez, Ruben; Du, Junhui; Carlton, Susan M.; Jeske, Nathaniel A.

    2016-01-01

    Glutamate serves as the primary excitatory neurotransmitter in the nervous system. Previous studies have identified a role for glutamate and group I metabotropic receptors as targets for study in peripheral inflammatory pain. However, the coordination of signaling events that transpire from receptor activation to afferent neuronal sensitization has not been explored. Herein, we identify that scaffolding protein A-Kinase Anchoring Protein 79/150 (AKAP150) coordinates increased peripheral thermal sensitivity following group I metabotropic receptor (mGluR5) activation. In both acute and persistent models of thermal somatosensory behavior, we report that mGluR5 sensitization requires AKAP150 expression. Furthermore, electrophysiological approaches designed to record afferent neuronal activity reveal that mGluR5 sensitization also requires functional AKAP150 expression. In dissociated primary afferent neurons, mGluR5 activation increases TRPV1 responses in an AKAP dependent manner through a mechanism that induces AKAP association with TRPV1. Experimental results presented herein identify a mechanism of receptor-driven scaffolding association with ion channel targets. Importantly, this mechanism could prove significant in the search for therapeutic targets that repress episodes of acute pain from becoming chronic in nature. PMID:26172554

  19. Effects of aluminum chloride on sodium current, transient outward potassium current and delayed rectifier potassium current in acutely isolated rat hippocampal CA1 neurons.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Nie, Aifang; Bai, Wei; Meng, Ziqiang

    2004-09-01

    The effects of aluminum chloride (AlCl3) on sodium current (INa), the transient outward potassium (IA) and delayed rectifier potassium currents (IK) in hippocampal CA1 neurons of rats were studied using the whole cell patch-clamp technique. AlCl3 decreased INa, IA, and IK in a partly reversible, dose and voltage-dependent manner. AlCl3 prolonged the time to peak of INa, and increased the inactivation time constants of INa and IA . In addition, 1000 microM AlCl3 shifted the voltage dependence of steady-state activation of INa, IA and IK toward positive potential, and the voltage dependence of steady-state inactivation of INa, IA toward negative potential. These results imply that AlCl3 could affect the activation and inactivation courses of sodium current and potassium current of rat hippocampal CA1 neurons, which may contribute to damage of the central nervous system by aluminum. PMID:15234075

  20. Dissociative experiences and dissociative minds: Exploring a nomological network of dissociative functioning.

    PubMed

    Schimmenti, Adriano

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the psychometric properties of the Dissociative Experiences Scale-II (DES-II) were tested in a sample of Italian adults, and a nomological network of dissociative functioning based on current psychodynamic research was examined. A total of 794 participants (55% females) ranging in age from 18 to 64 completed the DES-II and other measures of theory of mind, alexithymia, attachment style, and empathy. The Italian translation of the DES-II showed high internal consistency, adequate item-to-scale homogeneity, and good split-half reliability. A single-factor solution including the 8 items of pathological dissociation (DES-T) adequately fit the data. Participants who reported higher levels of dissociative experiences showed significantly lower scores on theory of mind and empathy than other participants. They also showed significantly higher scores on alexithymia, preoccupied attachment, and fearful attachment. Results of the study support the view that people who suffer from severe dissociative experiences may also have difficulties mentalizing and regulating affects and that they may feel uncomfortable in close relationships because they have a negative view of the self. This can inform clinical work with dissociative individuals, who could benefit from therapies that consider their potential problems with mentalization, empathy, affect regulation, and attachment. PMID:26507547

  1. Dissociative symptomatology in cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Civilotti, Cristina; Castelli, Lorys; Binaschi, Luca; Cussino, Martina; Tesio, Valentina; Di Fini, Giulia; Veglia, Fabio; Torta, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The utilization of the post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) diagnostic spectrum is currently being debated to categorize psychological adjustment in cancer patients. The aims of this study were to: (1) evaluate the presence of cancer-related traumatic dissociative symptomatology in a sample of cancer patients; (2) examine the correlation of cancer-related dissociation and sociodemographic and medical variables, anxiety, depression, and post-traumatic stress symptomatology; (3) investigate the predictors of cancer-related dissociation. Methods: Ninety-two mixed cancer patients (mean age: 58.94, ds = 10.13) recruited from two hospitals in northern Italy were administered a questionnaire on sociodemographic and medical characteristics, the Karnofsky Scale to measure the level of patient activity and medical care requirements, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) to evaluate the presence of anxiety and depression, the Impact of Event Scale Revised (IES-R) to assess the severity of intrusion, avoidance, and hypervigilance, and the Peritraumatic Dissociative Experiences Questionnaire (PDEQ) to quantify the traumatic dissociative symptomatology. Results: 31.5% of participants report a PDEQ score above the cutoff. The results indicated that dissociative symptomatology was positively correlated with HADS scores (HADS-Anxiety: r = 0.476, p < 0.001; HADS-Depression: r = 0.364, p < 0.001) and with IES-R scores (IES-R-Intrusion: r = 0.698, p < 0.001; IES-R-Avoidance: r = 0.619, p < 0.001; IES-R- Hypervigilance: r = 0.681, p < 0.001). A stepwise regression analysis was performed in order to find the predictors of cancer-related traumatic dissociative symptomatology. The results converged on a three predictor model revealing that IES-R-Intrusion, IES-R-Avoidance, and IES-R-Hyperarousal accounted for 53.9% of the explained variance. Conclusion: These findings allow us to hypothesize a specific psychological reaction which may be ascribed to the traumatic

  2. Neuronal arithmetic

    PubMed Central

    Silver, R. Angus

    2016-01-01

    The vast computational power of the brain has traditionally been viewed as arising from the complex connectivity of neural networks, in which an individual neuron acts as a simple linear summation and thresholding device. However, recent studies show that individual neurons utilize a wealth of nonlinear mechanisms to transform synaptic input into output firing. These mechanisms can arise from synaptic plasticity, synaptic noise, and somatic and dendritic conductances. This tool kit of nonlinear mechanisms confers considerable computational power on both morphologically simple and more complex neurons, enabling them to perform a range of arithmetic operations on signals encoded in a variety of different ways. PMID:20531421

  3. Acute intracerebral treatment with amyloid-beta (1–42) alters the profile of neuronal oscillations that accompany LTP induction and results in impaired LTP in freely behaving rats

    PubMed Central

    Kalweit, Alexander Nikolai; Yang, Honghong; Colitti-Klausnitzer, Jens; Fülöp, Livia; Bozsó, Zsolt; Penke, Botond; Manahan-Vaughan, Denise

    2015-01-01

    Accumulation of amyloid plaques comprises one of the major hallmarks of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). In rodents, acute treatment with amyloid-beta (Aβ; 1–42) elicits immediate debilitating effects on hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP). Whereas LTP contributes to synaptic information storage, information is transferred across neurons by means of neuronal oscillations. Furthermore, changes in theta-gamma oscillations, that appear during high-frequency stimulation (HFS) to induce LTP, predict whether successful LTP will occur. Here, we explored if intra-cerebral treatment with Aβ(1–42), that prevents LTP, also results in alterations of hippocampal oscillations that occur during HFS of the perforant path-dentate gyrus synapse in 6-month-old behaving rats. HFS resulted in LTP that lasted for over 24 h. In Aβ-treated animals, LTP was significantly prevented. During HFS, spectral power for oscillations below 100 Hz (δ, θ, α, β and γ) was significantly higher in Aβ-treated animals compared to controls. In addition, the trough-to-peak amplitudes of theta and gamma cycles were higher during HFS in Aβ-treated animals. We also observed a lower amount of envelope-to-signal correlations during HFS in Aβ-treated animals. Overall, the characteristic profile of theta-gamma oscillations that accompany successful LTP induction was disrupted. These data indicate that alterations in network oscillations accompany Aβ-effects on hippocampal LTP. This may comprise an underlying mechanism through which disturbances in synaptic information storage and hippocampus-dependent memory occurs in AD. PMID:25999827

  4. Diffraction dissociation at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkovszky, László; Orava, Risto; Salii, Andrii

    2013-04-01

    We report on recent calculations of low missing mass single (SD) and double (DD) diffractive dissociation at LHC energies. The calculations are based on a dual-Regge model, dominated by a single Pomeron exchange. The diffractively excited states lie on the nucleon trajectory N*, appended by the isolated Roper resonance. Detailed predictions for the squared momentum transfer and missing mass dependence of the differential and integrated single-and double diffraction dissociation in the kinematical range of present and future LHC measurements are given.

  5. Diffraction dissociation at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkovszky, Laszlo; Orava, Risto; Salii, Andrii

    2013-04-15

    We report on recent calculations of low missing mass single (SD) and double (DD) diffractive dissociation at LHC energies. The calculations are based on a dual-Regge model, dominated by a single Pomeron exchange. The diffractively excited states lie on the nucleon trajectory N*, appended by the isolated Roper resonance. Detailed predictions for the squared momentum transfer and missing mass dependence of the differential and integrated single-and double diffraction dissociation in the kinematical range of present and future LHC measurements are given.

  6. Dissociation of pleasure in psychopathology.

    PubMed

    Brown, S L

    1981-01-01

    This paper analyzes the development of the concept of dissociation from 19th century psychological theory through 20th century neurophysiological thought. Recent research is discussed, indicating that normal individuals show an "association" between emitted pleasurable behavior and self-perception of pleasurable activity, whereas depressives and schizophrenics show a lack of association, or "dissociation," between these measures. concomitantly, depressives show an abnormal degree of association between the experience and expression of negative affect. Such a discrepancy in systems of affect is considered as both an important pathological element in mental disorder and also as a valuable new research tool for studying etiology, differential diagnosis, and therapeutic efficacy in psychobiological illness. PMID:7005394

  7. Mental Stress in Atopic Dermatitis – Neuronal Plasticity and the Cholinergic System Are Affected in Atopic Dermatitis and in Response to Acute Experimental Mental Stress in a Randomized Controlled Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Eva Milena Johanne; Michenko, Anna; Kupfer, Jörg; Kummer, Wolfgang; Wiegand, Silke; Niemeier, Volker; Potekaev, Nikolay; Lvov, Andrey; Gieler, Uwe

    2014-01-01

    Rationale In mouse models for atopic dermatitis (AD) hypothalamus pituitary adrenal axis (HPA) dysfunction and neuropeptide-dependent neurogenic inflammation explain stress-aggravated flares to some extent. Lately, cholinergic signaling has emerged as a link between innate and adaptive immunity as well as stress responses in chronic inflammatory diseases. Here we aim to determine in humans the impact of acute stress on neuro-immune interaction as well as on the non-neuronal cholinergic system (NNCS). Methods Skin biopsies were obtained from 22 individuals (AD patients and matched healthy control subjects) before and after the Trier social stress test (TSST). To assess neuro-immune interaction, nerve fiber (NF)-density, NF-mast cell contacts and mast cell activation were determined by immunohistomorphometry. To evaluate NNCS effects, expression of secreted mammal Ly-6/urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor-related protein (SLURP) 1 and 2 (endogenous nicotinic acetylcholine receptor ligands) and their main corresponding receptors were assessed by quantitative RT-PCR. Results With respect to neuro-immune interaction we found higher numbers of NGF+ dermal NF in lesional compared to non-lesional AD but lower numbers of Gap43+ growing NF at baseline. Mast cell-NF contacts correlated with SCORAD and itch in lesional skin. With respect to the NNCS, nicotinic acetylcholine receptor α7 (α7nAChR) mRNA was significantly lower in lesional AD skin at baseline. After TSST, PGP 9.5+ NF numbers dropped in lesional AD as did their contacts with mast cells. NGF+ NF now correlated with SCORAD and mast cell-NF contacts with itch in non-lesional skin. At the same time, SLURP-2 levels increased in lesional AD skin. Conclusions In humans chronic inflammatory and highly acute psycho-emotional stress interact to modulate cutaneous neuro-immune communication and NNCS marker expression. These findings may have consequences for understanding and treatment of chronic inflammatory

  8. A novel versatile hybrid infusion-multielectrode recording (HIME) system for acute drug delivery and multisite acquisition of neuronal activity in freely moving mice

    PubMed Central

    Senkov, Oleg; Mironov, Andrey; Dityatev, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    To characterize information transfer in defined brain circuits involving multiple brain regions and to evaluate underlying molecular mechanisms and their dysregulation in major brain diseases, a simple and reliable system is ultimately required for electrophysiological recording of local field potentials (LFPs, or local EEG) in combination with local delivery of drugs, enzymes and gene expression-controlling viruses near the place of recording. Here we provide a new design of a versatile reusable hybrid infusion-recording (HIME) system which can be utilized in freely moving mice performing cognitive tasks. The HIME system allows monitoring neuronal activity in multiple layers in several brain structures. Here, we provide examples of bilateral injection and recordings of full spectrum of learning and memory related oscillations, i.e., theta (4–12 Hz), gamma (40–100) and ripple activity (130–150 Hz), in five hippocampal layers as well as in the CA1 and CA2 regions. Furthermore, the system is designed to be used for parallel recordings in the amygdala, cortex and other brain areas, before and after infusion of reagents of interest, either in or off a cognitive test. We anticipate that the HIME system can be particularly convenient to advance functional neuroglycobiological studies and molecular deciphering of mechanisms governing long-term memory consolidation. PMID:26594144

  9. [Gender differences in dissociative disorders].

    PubMed

    Spitzer, C; Freyberger, H J

    2008-01-01

    The relationship between mental illness, on the one hand, and sex and gender, on the other hand, has received interest since the beginning of medicine in antique times. A prototypical example of a seemingly woman-specific disease is hysteria. The term itself, which is derived from the Greek word for womb, denotes a psychosexual dimension comprising the current attitude towards sexuality and the dominating gender relationship. In addition, the colourful history of hysteria indicates that illness is not exclusively determined by biological factors, but also significantly by socio-cultural influences, for example in the treatment of hysterical women. Even nowadays, there is a wide-spread belief that dissociative symptoms and disorders, which have succeeded hysteria in current classification systems, are predominantly seen in women. However, empirical studies in the general population and in different clinical samples using sound instruments have indicated that dissociative symptoms do not differ between the genders. The seemingly dominance of dissociative disorders in women may also depend on the socio-cultural context, because men with dissociative disorders usually do not enter the general health system, but rather the legal system, i.e. they can be found in jail or forensic institutions. PMID:18185968

  10. Effects of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis sera on cultured cholinergic neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Touzeau, G.; Kato, A.C.

    1983-03-01

    Dissociated monolayer cultures of chick ciliary ganglion neurons have been used to study the effects of control and ALS sera. The cultured neurons survive and extend neurites for a minimum of 2 weeks in a standard tissue culture medium that contains 10% heat-inactivated human serum. Three parameters of the neurons have been examined when cultured in control and ALS sera for 8 to 12 days: (1) neuronal survival, (2) activity of the enzyme choline acetyltransferase, and (3) synthesis of /sup 3/H-acetylcholine using /sup 3/H-choline as precursor. ALS sera cause a small decrease in these three parameters, but this difference is not significant.

  11. The Cancer Chemotherapeutic Paclitaxel Increases Human and Rodent Sensory Neuron Responses to TRPV1 by Activation of TLR4

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Adamek, Pavel; Zhang, Haijun; Tatsui, Claudio Esteves; Rhines, Laurence D.; Mrozkova, Petra; Li, Qin; Kosturakis, Alyssa K.; Cassidy, Ryan M.; Harrison, Daniel S.; Cata, Juan P.; Sapire, Kenneth; Zhang, Hongmei; Kennamer-Chapman, Ross M.; Jawad, Abdul Basit; Ghetti, Andre; Yan, Jiusheng; Palecek, Jiri

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is dose limiting in paclitaxel cancer chemotherapy and can result in both acute pain during treatment and chronic persistent pain in cancer survivors. The hypothesis tested was that paclitaxel produces these adverse effects at least in part by sensitizing transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1) through Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling. The data show that paclitaxel-induced behavioral hypersensitivity is prevented and reversed by spinal administration of a TRPV1 antagonist. The number of TRPV1+ neurons is increased in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) in paclitaxel-treated rats and is colocalized with TLR4 in rat and human DRG neurons. Cotreatment of rats with lipopolysaccharide from the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides (LPS-RS), a TLR4 inhibitor, prevents the increase in numbers of TRPV1+ neurons by paclitaxel treatment. Perfusion of paclitaxel or the archetypal TLR4 agonist LPS activated both rat DRG and spinal neurons directly and produced acute sensitization of TRPV1 in both groups of cells via a TLR4-mediated mechanism. Paclitaxel and LPS sensitize TRPV1 in HEK293 cells stably expressing human TLR4 and transiently expressing human TRPV1. These physiological effects also are prevented by LPS-RS. Finally, paclitaxel activates and sensitizes TRPV1 responses directly in dissociated human DRG neurons. In summary, TLR4 was activated by paclitaxel and led to sensitization of TRPV1. This mechanism could contribute to paclitaxel-induced acute pain and chronic painful neuropathy. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT In this original work, it is shown for the first time that paclitaxel activates peripheral sensory and spinal neurons directly and sensitizes these cells to transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1)-mediated capsaicin responses via Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in multiple species. A direct functional interaction between TLR4 and TRPV1 is shown in rat and human dorsal root ganglion neurons, TLR4/TRPV1

  12. No evidence of a role for neuronal nitric oxide synthase in the nucleus tractus solitarius in ventilatory responses to acute or chronic hypoxia in awake rats

    PubMed Central

    Pamenter, Matthew E.; Go, Ariel; Fu, Zhenxing

    2015-01-01

    When exposed to a hypoxic environment, the body's first response is a reflex increase in ventilation, termed the hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR). With chronic sustained hypoxia (CSH), such as during acclimatization to high altitude, an additional time-dependent increase in ventilation occurs, which increases the HVR and is termed ventilatory acclimatization to hypoxia (VAH). This secondary increase persists after exposure to CSH and involves plasticity within the circuits in the central nervous system that control breathing. The mechanisms of HVR plasticity are currently poorly understood. We hypothesized that changes in neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) activity or expression in the nucleus tractus solitarius contribute to this plasticity and underlie VAH in rats. To test this, we treated rats held in normoxia or 10% O2 (CSH, PiO2 = 70 Torr) for 7–9 days and measured ventilation in conscious, unrestrained animals before and after microinjecting the general NOS antagonist L-NG-Nitroarginine methyl ester into the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) or systemically injecting the nNOS-specific antagonist S-methyl-l-thiocitrulline. Localization of injection sites in the NTS was confirmed by histology following the experiment. We found that 1) neither NTS-specific nor systemic nNOS antagonism had any effect on hypoxia-mediated changes in breathing or metabolism (P > 0.05), but 2) nNOS protein expression was increased in the middle and caudal NTS by CSH. A persistent HVR after nNOS blockade in the NTS contrasts with results in awake mice, and our findings do not support the hypotheses that nNOS in the NTS contribute to the HVR or VAH in awake rats. PMID:25571988

  13. Two-temperature models for nitrogen dissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, M. Lino; Guerra, V.; Loureiro, J.

    2007-12-01

    Accurate sets of nitrogen state-resolved dissociation rates have been reduced to two-temperature (translational T and vibrational Tv) dissociation rates. The analysis of such two-temperature dissociation rates shows evidence of two different dissociation behaviors. For Tv < 0.3 T dissociation proceeds predominantly from the lower-lying vibrational levels, whereas for Tv > 0.3 T dissociation proceeds predominantly form the near-dissociative vibrational levels, with an abrupt change of behavior at Tv = 0.3 T. These two-temperature sets have then been utilized as a benchmark for the comparison against popular multitemperature dissociation models (Park, Hansen, Marrone-Treanor, Hammerling, Losev-Shatalov, Gordiets, Kuznetsov, and Macheret-Fridman). This has allowed verifying the accuracy of each theoretical model, and additionally proposing adequate values for any semi-empirical parameters present in the different theories. The Macheret-Fridman model, who acknowledges the existence of the two aforementioned dissociation regimes, has been found to provide significantly more accurate results than the other models. Although these different theoretical approaches have been tested and validated solely for nitrogen dissociation processes, it is reasonable to expect that the general conclusions of this work, regarding the adequacy of the different dissociation models, could be extended to the description of arbitrary diatomic dissociation processes.

  14. Study of the dissociation of molecular hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vessot, R. F. C.

    1981-01-01

    Dissociators used to obtain an RF plasma discharge for hydrogen masers and the test system used for operation and evaluation of the dissociators are described. A compact sorption cartridge using a graphite matrix is tested as part of a hydrogen scavenging system. Testing of a vacuum enclosed hydrogen dissociator suitable for long term operation in space is described.

  15. Misattributing the Source of Self-Generated Representations Related to Dissociative and Psychotic Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Chui-De; Tseng, Mei-Chih Meg; Chien, Yi-Ling; Liao, Shih-Cheng; Liu, Chih-Min; Yeh, Yei-Yu; Hwu, Hai-Gwo

    2016-01-01

    Objective: An intertwined relationship has been found between dissociative and psychotic symptoms, as the two symptom clusters frequently co-occur, suggesting some shared risk factors. Using a source monitoring paradigm, previous studies have shown that patients with schizophrenia made more errors in source monitoring, suggesting that a weakened sense of individuality may be associated with psychotic symptoms. However, no studies have verified a relationship between sense of individuality and dissociation, and it is unclear whether an altered sense of individuality is a shared sociocognitive deficit underlying both dissociation and psychosis. Method: Data from 80 acute psychiatric patients with unspecified mental disorders were analyzed to test the hypothesis that an altered sense of individuality underlies dissociation and psychosis. Behavioral tasks, including tests of intelligence and source monitoring, as well as interview schedules and self-report measures of dissociative and psychotic symptoms, general psychopathology, and trauma history, were administered. Results: Significant correlations of medium effect sizes indicated an association between errors attributing the source of self-generated items and positive psychotic symptoms and the absorption and amnesia measures of dissociation. The associations with dissociative measures remained significant after the effects of intelligence, general psychopathology, and trauma history were excluded. Moreover, the relationships between source misattribution and dissociative measures remained marginally significant and significant after controlling for positive and negative psychotic symptoms, respectively. Limitations: Self-reported measures were collected from a small sample, and most of the participants were receiving medications when tested, which may have influenced their cognitive performance. Conclusions: A tendency to misidentify the source of self-generated items characterized both dissociation and psychosis

  16. Coulomb dissociation of N,2120

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Röder, Marko; Adachi, Tatsuya; Aksyutina, Yulia; Alcantara, Juan; Altstadt, Sebastian; Alvarez-Pol, Hector; Ashwood, Nicholas; Atar, Leyla; Aumann, Thomas; Avdeichikov, Vladimir; Barr, M.; Beceiro, Saul; Bemmerer, Daniel; Benlliure, Jose; Bertulani, Carlos; Boretzky, Konstanze; Borge, Maria J. G.; Burgunder, G.; Caamaño, Manuel; Caesar, Christoph; Casarejos, Enrique; Catford, Wilton; Cederkäll, Joakim; Chakraborty, S.; Chartier, Marielle; Chulkov, Leonid; Cortina-Gil, Dolores; Crespo, Raquel; Datta Pramanik, Ushasi; Diaz-Fernandez, Paloma; Dillmann, Iris; Elekes, Zoltan; Enders, Joachim; Ershova, Olga; Estrade, A.; Farinon, F.; Fraile, Luis M.; Freer, Martin; Freudenberger, M.; Fynbo, Hans; Galaviz, Daniel; Geissel, Hans; Gernhäuser, Roman; Göbel, Kathrin; Golubev, Pavel; Gonzalez Diaz, D.; Hagdahl, Julius; Heftrich, Tanja; Heil, Michael; Heine, Marcel; Heinz, Andreas; Henriques, Ana; Holl, Matthias; Ickert, G.; Ignatov, Alexander; Jakobsson, Bo; Johansson, Hâkan; Jonson, Björn; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, Nasser; Kanungo, Rituparna; Kelic-Heil, Aleksandra; Knöbel, Ronja; Kröll, Thorsten; Krücken, Reiner; Kurcewicz, J.; Kurz, Nikolaus; Labiche, Marc; Langer, Christoph; Le Bleis, Tudi; Lemmon, Roy; Lepyoshkina, Olga; Lindberg, Simon; Machado, Jorge; Marganiec, Justyna; Mostazo Caro, Magdalena; Movsesyan, Alina; Najafi, Mohammad Ali; Nilsson, Thomas; Nociforo, Chiara; Panin, Valerii; Paschalis, Stefanos; Perea, Angel; Petri, Marina; Pietri, S.; Plag, Ralf; Prochazka, A.; Rahaman, Md. Anisur; Rastrepina, Ganna; Reifarth, Rene; Ribeiro, Guillermo; Ricciardi, M. Valentina; Rigollet, Catherine; Riisager, Karsten; Rossi, Dominic; Sanchez del Rio Saez, Jose; Savran, Deniz; Scheit, Heiko; Simon, Haik; Sorlin, Olivier; Stoica, V.; Streicher, Branislav; Taylor, Jon; Tengblad, Olof; Terashima, Satoru; Thies, Ronja; Togano, Yasuhiro; Uberseder, Ethan; Van de Walle, J.; Velho, Paulo; Volkov, Vasily; Wagner, Andreas; Wamers, Felix; Weick, Helmut; Weigand, Mario; Wheldon, Carl; Wilson, G.; Wimmer, Christine; Winfield, J. S.; Woods, Philip; Yakorev, Dmitry; Zhukov, Mikhail; Zilges, Andreas; Zuber, Kai; R3B Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    Neutron-rich light nuclei and their reactions play an important role in the creation of chemical elements. Here, data from a Coulomb dissociation experiment on N,2120 are reported. Relativistic N,2120 ions impinged on a lead target and the Coulomb dissociation cross section was determined in a kinematically complete experiment. Using the detailed balance theorem, the 19N (n ,γ )20N and 20N (n ,γ ) 21N excitation functions and thermonuclear reaction rates have been determined. The 19 (n ,γ )20N rate is up to a factor of 5 higher at T <1 GK with respect to previous theoretical calculations, leading to a 10% decrease in the predicted fluorine abundance.

  17. [Prison psychosis and dissociative disorders].

    PubMed

    al Chaabani, S; Bataille, M

    2002-12-01

    Through a few clinical case histories stemming from their daily activities at the psychiatric section of the Lantin Prison, the authors propose to revisit the classic concept of Prison psychosis. They broaden its limits to include other psychotic and dissociative phenomena common to the jail population. This requires a strict differential diagnosis, allowing to eliminate some similar pathologies; nevertheless, some difficulties and imperfections persist. The development of the psychosis, the input from the jail architecture and milieu, the predisposing as well as facilitating factors linked to the personality of the inmate, and triggering phenomena are discussed. Finally, the comorbidity between these psychotic/dissociative phenomena and the borderline & histrionic personality disorders is envisaged. PMID:12632838

  18. [Dis-social personality disorder].

    PubMed

    Habermeyer, E; Herpertz, S C

    2006-05-01

    Deviant behavior is gaining in clinical importance if it is founded on stable, characteristic, and enduring patterns of psychopathologically relevant personality traits which have their onset in childhood or adolescence. The classification of these traits shows variations, so that a distinction between the ICD-10 diagnosis of dis-social personality disorder, DSM-IV diagnosis of antisocial personality disorder, and the concept "psychopathy" is necessary. Our knowledge about the biological basis of antisocial behavior includes neurophysiologic, psychophysiologic, and genetic findings. Also relevant are results of neurotransmitter studies and structural resp. functional neuroimaging findings. Psychosocial risk factors include parental deficits, rejection, disregard, unstable relations, and abuse. Efficient psychotherapeutic treatment is cognitive-behavioral. Pharmacologic treatment is largely "off-label". The diagnosis of antisocial and dis-social personality disorders allows no conclusions on criminal responsibility. In addition to psychiatric diagnostics, considerations on the severity of the disorder and its effects on the ability to inhibit actions are necessary. PMID:16609871

  19. Dorsal Raphe Dopamine Neurons Represent the Experience of Social Isolation.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Gillian A; Nieh, Edward H; Vander Weele, Caitlin M; Halbert, Sarah A; Pradhan, Roma V; Yosafat, Ariella S; Glober, Gordon F; Izadmehr, Ehsan M; Thomas, Rain E; Lacy, Gabrielle D; Wildes, Craig P; Ungless, Mark A; Tye, Kay M

    2016-02-11

    The motivation to seek social contact may arise from either positive or negative emotional states, as social interaction can be rewarding and social isolation can be aversive. While ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopamine (DA) neurons may mediate social reward, a cellular substrate for the negative affective state of loneliness has remained elusive. Here, we identify a functional role for DA neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN), in which we observe synaptic changes following acute social isolation. DRN DA neurons show increased activity upon social contact following isolation, revealed by in vivo calcium imaging. Optogenetic activation of DRN DA neurons increases social preference but causes place avoidance. Furthermore, these neurons are necessary for promoting rebound sociability following an acute period of isolation. Finally, the degree to which these neurons modulate behavior is predicted by social rank, together supporting a role for DRN dopamine neurons in mediating a loneliness-like state. PAPERCLIP. PMID:26871628

  20. Dorsal Raphe Dopamine Neurons Represent the Experience of Social Isolation

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Gillian A.; Nieh, Edward H.; Vander Weele, Caitlin M.; Halbert, Sarah A.; Pradhan, Roma V.; Yosafat, Ariella S.; Glober, Gordon F.; Izadmehr, Ehsan M.; Thomas, Rain E.; Lacy, Gabrielle D.; Wildes, Craig P.; Ungless, Mark A.; Tye, Kay M.

    2016-01-01

    Summary The motivation to seek social contact may arise from either positive or negative emotional states, as social interaction can be rewarding and social isolation can be aversive. While ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopamine (DA) neurons may mediate social reward, a cellular substrate for the negative affective state of loneliness has remained elusive. Here, we identify a functional role for DA neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN), in which we observe synaptic changes following acute social isolation. DRN DA neurons show increased activity upon social contact following isolation, revealed by in vivo calcium imaging. Optogenetic activation of DRN DA neurons increases social preference but causes place avoidance. Furthermore, these neurons are necessary for promoting rebound sociability following an acute period of isolation. Finally, the degree to which these neurons modulate behavior is predicted by social rank, together supporting a role for DRN dopamine neurons in mediating a loneliness-like state. PaperClip PMID:26871628

  1. SV2 mediates entry of tetanus neurotoxin into central neurons.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Felix L; Dong, Min; Yao, Jun; Tepp, William H; Lin, Guangyun; Johnson, Eric A; Chapman, Edwin R

    2010-01-01

    Tetanus neurotoxin causes the disease tetanus, which is characterized by rigid paralysis. The toxin acts by inhibiting the release of neurotransmitters from inhibitory neurons in the spinal cord that innervate motor neurons and is unique among the clostridial neurotoxins due to its ability to shuttle from the periphery to the central nervous system. Tetanus neurotoxin is thought to interact with a high affinity receptor complex that is composed of lipid and protein components; however, the identity of the protein receptor remains elusive. In the current study, we demonstrate that toxin binding, to dissociated hippocampal and spinal cord neurons, is greatly enhanced by driving synaptic vesicle exocytosis. Moreover, tetanus neurotoxin entry and subsequent cleavage of synaptobrevin II, the substrate for this toxin, was also dependent on synaptic vesicle recycling. Next, we identified the potential synaptic vesicle binding protein for the toxin and found that it corresponded to SV2; tetanus neurotoxin was unable to cleave synaptobrevin II in SV2 knockout neurons. Toxin entry into knockout neurons was rescued by infecting with viruses that express SV2A or SV2B. Tetanus toxin elicited the hyper excitability in dissociated spinal cord neurons - due to preferential loss of inhibitory transmission - that is characteristic of the disease. Surprisingly, in dissociated cortical cultures, low concentrations of the toxin preferentially acted on excitatory neurons. Further examination of the distribution of SV2A and SV2B in both spinal cord and cortical neurons revealed that SV2B is to a large extent localized to excitatory terminals, while SV2A is localized to inhibitory terminals. Therefore, the distinct effects of tetanus toxin on cortical and spinal cord neurons are not due to differential expression of SV2 isoforms. In summary, the findings reported here indicate that SV2A and SV2B mediate binding and entry of tetanus neurotoxin into central neurons. PMID:21124874

  2. [Clinical Handling of Patients with Dissociative Disorders].

    PubMed

    Okano, Kenichiro

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the way informed psychiatrists are expected to handle dissociative patients in clinical situations, with a specific focus on dissociative identity disorders and dissociative fugue. On the initial interview with dissociative patients, information on their history of trauma and any nascent dissociative symptoms in their childhood should be carefully obtained. Their level of stress in their current life should also be assessed in order to understand their symptomatology, as well as to predict their future clinical course. A psychoeducational approach is crucial; it might be helpful to give information on dissociative disorder to these patients as well as their family members in order to promote their adherence to treatment. Regarding the symptomatology of dissociative disorders, detailed symptoms and the general clinical course are presented. It was stressed that dissociative identity disorder and dissociative fugue, the most high-profile dissociative disorders, are essentially different in their etiology and clinical presentation. Dissociative disorders are often confused with and misdiagnosed as psychotic disorders, such as schizophrenia. Other conditions considered in terms of the differential diagnosis include borderline personality disorder as well as temporal lobe epilepsy. Lastly, the therapeutic approach to dissociative identity disorder is discussed. Each dissociative identity should be understood as potentially representing some traumatically stressful event in the past. The therapist should be careful not to excessively promote the creation or elaboration of any dissociative identities. Three stages are proposed in the individual psychotherapeutic process. In the initial stage, a secure environment and stabilization of symptoms should be sought. The second stage consists of aiding the "host" personality to make use of other more adaptive coping skills in their life. The third stage involves coaching as well as continuous awareness of

  3. Motor Neuron Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Motor Neuron Diseases Information Page Condensed from Motor Neuron Diseases ... and Information Publicaciones en Español What are Motor Neuron Diseases? The motor neuron diseases (MNDs) are a ...

  4. Motor Neuron Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... called upper motor neurons ) are transmitted to nerve cells in the brain stem and spinal cord (called lower motor neurons ) and from them to particular muscles. Upper motor neurons direct the lower motor neurons ...

  5. GABAergic neurons of the medial septum play a nodal role in facilitation of nociception-induced affect

    PubMed Central

    Ang, Seok Ting; Lee, Andy Thiam Huat; Foo, Fang Chee; Ng, Lynn; Low, Chian-Ming; Khanna, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    The present study explored the functional details of the influence of medial septal region (MSDB) on spectrum of nociceptive behaviours by manipulating intraseptal GABAergic mechanisms. Results showed that formalin-induced acute nociception was not affected by intraseptal microinjection of bicuculline, a GABAA receptor antagonist, or on selective lesion of septal GABAergic neurons. Indeed, the acute nociceptive responses were dissociated from the regulation of sensorimotor behaviour and generation of theta-rhythm by the GABAergic mechanisms in MSDB. The GABAergic lesion attenuated formalin-induced unconditioned cellular response in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and blocked formalin-induced conditioned place avoidance (F-CPA), and as well as the contextual fear induced on conditioning with brief footshock. The effects of lesion on nociceptive-conditioned cellular responses were, however, variable. Interestingly, the lesion attenuated the conditioned representation of experimental context in dorsal hippocampus field CA1 in the F-CPA task. Collectively, the preceding suggests that the MSDB is a nodal centre wherein the GABAergic neurons mediate nociceptive affect-motivation by regulating cellular mechanisms in ACC that confer an aversive value to the noxious stimulus. Further, in conjunction with a modulatory influence on hippocampal contextual processing, MSDB may integrate affect with context as part of associative learning in the F-CPA task. PMID:26487082

  6. Dissociation in borderline personality disorder: Disturbed cognitive and emotional inhibition and its neural correlates.

    PubMed

    Winter, Dorina; Krause-Utz, Annegret; Lis, Stefanie; Chiu, Chui-De; Lanius, Ruth A; Schriner, Friederike; Bohus, Martin; Schmahl, Christian

    2015-09-30

    Evidence is heterogeneous regarding whether patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD) display disturbed emotional inhibition in the emotional Stroop task. Previous findings suggest that state dissociation may influence cognitive inhibition of task-irrelevant material, particularly with negative content. Our aim was to examine performance in an emotional Stroop task including negative, neutral, and positive words in BPD patients and healthy controls during functional magnetic resonance imaging. In advance, half of the BPD patients underwent a dissociation induction using script-driven imagery. BPD patients without dissociation induction showed behavioural performance comparable to that of healthy controls but displayed stronger neural responses, especially to positive stimuli, in the superior temporal gyrus, dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, and anterior cingulate cortex. BPD patients with dissociation induction showed overall slower and less accurate responses as well as increased reaction times for negative versus neutral words compared with BPD patients without dissociation induction. Moreover, they showed comparatively decreased neuronal activity in the fusiform gyrus and parietal cortices independent of valence, but elevated activity in the left inferior frontal gyrus in response to negative versus neutral words. In conclusion, experimentally induced dissociation in BPD was associated with inefficient cognitive inhibition, particularly of negative stimuli, in the emotional Stroop task. PMID:26254542

  7. The emergence of spontaneous activity in neuronal cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlandi, J. G.; Alvarez-Lacalle, E.; Teller, S.; Soriano, J.; Casademunt, J.

    2013-01-01

    In vitro neuronal networks of dissociated hippocampal or cortical tissues are one of the most attractive model systems for the physics and neuroscience communities. Cultured neurons grow and mature, develop axons and dendrites, and quickly connect to their neighbors to establish a spontaneously active network within a week. The resulting neuronal network is characterized by a combination of excitatory and inhibitory neurons coupled through synaptic connections that interact in a highly nonlinear manner. The nonlinear behavior emerges from the dynamics of both the neurons' spiking activity and synaptic transmission, together with biological noise. These ingredients give rise to a rich repertoire of phenomena that are still poorly understood, including the emergence and maintenance of periodic spontaneous activity, avalanches, propagation of fronts and synchronization. In this work we present an overview on the rich activity of cultured neuronal networks, and detail the minimal theoretical considerations needed to describe experimental observations.

  8. Membrane potential dye imaging of ventromedial hypothalamus neurons from adult mice to study glucose sensing.

    PubMed

    Vazirani, Reema P; Fioramonti, Xavier; Routh, Vanessa H

    2013-01-01

    Studies of neuronal activity are often performed using neurons from rodents less than 2 months of age due to the technical difficulties associated with increasing connective tissue and decreased neuronal viability that occur with age. Here, we describe a methodology for the dissociation of healthy hypothalamic neurons from adult-aged mice. The ability to study neurons from adult-aged mice allows the use of disease models that manifest at a later age and might be more developmentally accurate for certain studies. Fluorescence imaging of dissociated neurons can be used to study the activity of a population of neurons, as opposed to using electrophysiology to study a single neuron. This is particularly useful when studying a heterogeneous neuronal population in which the desired neuronal type is rare such as for hypothalamic glucose sensing neurons. We utilized membrane potential dye imaging of adult ventromedial hypothalamic neurons to study their responses to changes in extracellular glucose. Glucose sensing neurons are believed to play a role in central regulation of energy balance. The ability to study glucose sensing in adult rodents is particularly useful since the predominance of diseases related to dysfunctional energy balance (e.g. obesity) increase with age. PMID:24326343

  9. Membrane Potential Dye Imaging of Ventromedial Hypothalamus Neurons From Adult Mice to Study Glucose Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Vazirani, Reema P.; Fioramonti, Xavier; Routh, Vanessa H.

    2013-01-01

    Studies of neuronal activity are often performed using neurons from rodents less than 2 months of age due to the technical difficulties associated with increasing connective tissue and decreased neuronal viability that occur with age. Here, we describe a methodology for the dissociation of healthy hypothalamic neurons from adult-aged mice. The ability to study neurons from adult-aged mice allows the use of disease models that manifest at a later age and might be more developmentally accurate for certain studies. Fluorescence imaging of dissociated neurons can be used to study the activity of a population of neurons, as opposed to using electrophysiology to study a single neuron. This is particularly useful when studying a heterogeneous neuronal population in which the desired neuronal type is rare such as for hypothalamic glucose sensing neurons. We utilized membrane potential dye imaging of adult ventromedial hypothalamic neurons to study their responses to changes in extracellular glucose. Glucose sensing neurons are believed to play a role in central regulation of energy balance. The ability to study glucose sensing in adult rodents is particularly useful since the predominance of diseases related to dysfunctional energy balance (e.g. obesity) increase with age. PMID:24326343

  10. The influence of current stress on dissociative experiences: an exploratory study in a non-clinical population.

    PubMed

    De Wachter, Dirk; Lange, Alfred; Vanderlinden, Johan; Pouw, Joyce; Strubbe, Ernst

    2006-01-01

    In this study, the relationship between current stress, as perceived by an individual, and dissociative phenomena is explored. All subjects were in an acute and naturally caused stress-situation-sudden threat of dismissal from their jobs in a large multinational corporation. Dissociation and stress were measured at two different times over three months. Since information campaigns and psychological support programs were offered to all participants, levels of stress were expected to decrease significantly. The data show that dissociative experiences are elevated when subjects experience high levels of current stress, though scores fall within the normal non-pathological range. Furthermore, it appears that a decrease in stress level is associated with a significant decrease of dissociative symptoms. The results support a one-directional causal relationship: a decrease in perceived stress leads to a decrease in dissociative phenomena. PMID:16618697

  11. Netrin-G1 regulates fear-like and anxiety-like behaviors in dissociable neural circuits

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qi; Sano, Chie; Masuda, Akira; Ando, Reiko; Tanaka, Mika; Itohara, Shigeyoshi

    2016-01-01

    In vertebrate mammals, distributed neural circuits in the brain are involved in emotion-related behavior. Netrin-G1 is a glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol-anchored synaptic adhesion molecule whose deficiency results in impaired fear-like and anxiety-like behaviors under specific circumstances. To understand the cell type and circuit specificity of these responses, we generated netrin-G1 conditional knockout mice with loss of expression in cortical excitatory neurons, inhibitory neurons, or thalamic neurons. Genetic deletion of netrin-G1 in cortical excitatory neurons resulted in altered anxiety-like behavior, but intact fear-like behavior, whereas loss of netrin-G1 in inhibitory neurons resulted in attenuated fear-like behavior, but intact anxiety-like behavior. These data indicate a remarkable double dissociation of fear-like and anxiety-like behaviors involving netrin-G1 in excitatory and inhibitory neurons, respectively. Our findings support a crucial role for netrin-G1 in dissociable neural circuits for the modulation of emotion-related behaviors, and provide genetic models for investigating the mechanisms underlying the dissociation. The results also suggest the involvement of glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol-anchored synaptic adhesion molecules in the development and pathogenesis of emotion-related behavior. PMID:27345935

  12. Netrin-G1 regulates fear-like and anxiety-like behaviors in dissociable neural circuits.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qi; Sano, Chie; Masuda, Akira; Ando, Reiko; Tanaka, Mika; Itohara, Shigeyoshi

    2016-01-01

    In vertebrate mammals, distributed neural circuits in the brain are involved in emotion-related behavior. Netrin-G1 is a glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol-anchored synaptic adhesion molecule whose deficiency results in impaired fear-like and anxiety-like behaviors under specific circumstances. To understand the cell type and circuit specificity of these responses, we generated netrin-G1 conditional knockout mice with loss of expression in cortical excitatory neurons, inhibitory neurons, or thalamic neurons. Genetic deletion of netrin-G1 in cortical excitatory neurons resulted in altered anxiety-like behavior, but intact fear-like behavior, whereas loss of netrin-G1 in inhibitory neurons resulted in attenuated fear-like behavior, but intact anxiety-like behavior. These data indicate a remarkable double dissociation of fear-like and anxiety-like behaviors involving netrin-G1 in excitatory and inhibitory neurons, respectively. Our findings support a crucial role for netrin-G1 in dissociable neural circuits for the modulation of emotion-related behaviors, and provide genetic models for investigating the mechanisms underlying the dissociation. The results also suggest the involvement of glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol-anchored synaptic adhesion molecules in the development and pathogenesis of emotion-related behavior. PMID:27345935

  13. Strain- and Age-dependent Hippocampal Neuron Sodium Currents Correlate with Epilepsy Severity in Dravet Syndrome Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mistry, Akshitkumar M.; Thompson, Christopher H.; Miller, Alison R.; Vanoye, Carlos G.; George, Alfred L.; Kearney, Jennifer A.

    2014-01-01

    Heterozygous loss-of-function SCN1A mutations cause Dravet syndrome, an epileptic encephalopathy of infancy that exhibits variable clinical severity. We utilized a heterozygous Scn1a knockout (Scn1a+/−) mouse model of Dravet syndrome to investigate the basis for phenotype variability. These animals exhibit strain-dependent seizure severity and survival. Scn1a+/− mice on strain 129S6/SvEvTac (129.Scn1a+/−) have no overt phenotype and normal survival compared with Scn1a+/− mice bred to C57BL/6J (F1.Scn1a+/−) that have severe epilepsy and premature lethality. We tested the hypothesis that strain differences in sodium current (INa) density in hippocampal neurons contribute to these divergent phenotypes. Whole-cell voltage-clamp recording was performed on acutely-dissociated hippocampal neurons from postnatal day 21–24 (P21–24) 129.Scn1a+/− or F1.Scn1a+/− mice and wild-type littermates. INa density was lower in GABAergic interneurons from F1.Scn1a+/− mice compared to wild-type littermates, while on the 129 strain there was no difference in GABAergic interneuron INa between 129.Scn1a+/− mice and wild-type littermate controls. By contrast, INa density was elevated in pyramidal neurons from both 129.Scn1a+/− and F1.Scn1a+/− mice, and was correlated with more frequent spontaneous action potential firing in these neurons, as well as more sustained firing in F1.Scn1a+/− neurons. We also observed age-dependent differences in pyramidal neuron INa density between wild-type and Scn1a+/− animals. We conclude that preserved INa density in GABAergic interneurons contributes to the milder phenotype of 129.Scn1a+/− mice. Furthermore, elevated INa density in excitatory pyramidal neurons at P21–24 correlates with age-dependent onset of lethality in F1.Scn1a+/− mice. Our findings illustrate differences in hippocampal neurons that may underlie strain- and age-dependent phenotype severity in a Dravet syndrome mouse model, and emphasize a contribution of

  14. A novel modulatory binding site for zinc on the GABAA receptor complex in cultured rat neurones.

    PubMed Central

    Smart, T G

    1992-01-01

    1. The properties of gamma-aminobutyric acidA (GABAA) receptor-ion channel complexes and the interaction with the transition metal zinc, were studied on rat sympathetic and cerebellar neurones in dissociated culture using patch clamp recording techniques. 2. The antagonism of GABA-induced membrane currents by zinc on sympathetic neurones was subject to developmental influence. Using embryonic sympathetic neurones acutely cultured for 24-72 h, GABA responses were more depressed by zinc when compared to responses evoked on adult neurones cultured for the same period. For neurones developing in vivo, the percentage inhibition of GABA responses produced by zinc in embryonic neurones was estimated to decline by 50% after 48.2 days following birth. 3. Embryonic sympathetic neurones maintained in culture for prolonged periods (40-50 days in vitro, DIV) became less sensitive to zinc when compared to neurones cultured for shorter periods (10-20 DIV). The decrease in the zinc inhibition for neurones maintained in vitro proceeded at an apparent rate of 0.55% per day. 4. Activation of the GABA receptor by muscimol (0.2-2 microM) was also antagonized by zinc (50-100 microM). 5. Lowering the pH of the perfusing Krebs solution did not affect the inhibition of GABA responses by zinc on sympathetic neurones. 6. Modulation of the GABAA receptor by some benzodiazepines, a barbiturate, a steroid based on pregnanolone, or antagonists bicuculline and picrotoxinin, did not interfere with the antagonism exerted by zinc on sympathetic neurones. A novel binding site for zinc on the GABAA receptor is proposed. 7. Analysis of the GABA-activated current noise on sympathetic neurones revealed two kinetic components to the power spectra requiring a double Lorentzian fit. The time constant describing the fast component (tau 2, 2.1 ms) was unaffected by zinc, whereas the slow component time constant (tau 1, 21.7 ms) was slightly reduced to 17.1 ms. 8. The apparent single-channel conductance for

  15. Redox mechanism of S-nitrosothiol modulation of neuronal CaV3.2 T-type calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeonghan; Nelson, Michael T; Rose, Kirstin E; Todorovic, Slobodan M

    2013-10-01

    T-type calcium channels in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) have a central function in tuning neuronal excitability and are implicated in sensory processing including pain. Previous studies have implicated redox agents in control of T-channel activity; however, the mechanisms involved are not completely understood. Here, we recorded T-type calcium currents from acutely dissociated DRG neurons from young rats and investigated the mechanisms of CaV3.2 T-type channel modulation by S-nitrosothiols (SNOs). We found that extracellular application of S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) and S-nitroso-N-acetyl-penicillamine rapidly reduced T-type current amplitudes. GSNO did not affect voltage dependence of steady-state inactivation and macroscopic current kinetics of T-type channels. The effects of GSNO were abolished by pretreatment of the cells with N-ethylmaleimide, an irreversible alkylating agent, but not by pretreatment with 1H-(1,2,4) oxadiazolo (4,3-a) quinoxalin-1-one, a specific soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor, suggesting a potential effect of GSNO on putative extracellular thiol residues on T-type channels. Expression of wild-type CaV3.2 channels or a quadruple Cys-Ala mutant in human embryonic kidney cells revealed that Cys residues in repeats I and II on the extracellular face of the channel were required for channel inhibition by GSNO. We propose that SNO-related molecules in vivo may lead to alterations of T-type channel-dependent neuronal excitability in sensory neurons and in the central nervous system in both physiological and pathological conditions such as neuronal ischemia/hypoxia. PMID:23813099

  16. Religious Dissociation and Economic Appraisal in Brazil.

    PubMed

    François Dengah, H J

    2016-04-01

    Research on the association between religion and health often neglects to provide an explicit theoretical mechanism of influence between faith and well-being. This research posits that dissociative behaviors, such as glossolalia, may provide a biological pathway that influences both physiological and psychological health. This paper argues that religious dissociation acts as a moderator between economic stressors and psychobiological appraisal. Brazil, with its economic inequality and preponderance of religious dissociative rituals, provides an ideal context to examine religious dissociation as a moderator of stress. Utilizing data from a cross section of Brazilian faiths, this paper examines: (1) Whether individuals with low socioeconomic status preferentially participate and experience religious dissociative states and (2) whether dissociative states are correlated with greater psychological appraisal of status. PMID:25687180

  17. Dissociative Tendencies and Facilitated Emotional Processing

    PubMed Central

    Oathes, Desmond J.; Ray, William J.

    2009-01-01

    Dissociation is a process linked to lapses of attention, history of abuse or trauma, compromised emotional memory, and a disintegrated sense of self. It is theorized that dissociation stems from avoiding emotional information, especially negative emotion, to protect a fragile psyche. The present study tested whether or not dissociaters do actually avoid processing emotion by asking groups scoring high or low on the Dissociative Experiences Scale to judge the affective valence of several types of emotional stimuli. Manipulations of valence, modality (pictures or words), task complexity, and personal relevance lead to results suggesting that dissociation is linked to facilitated rather than deficient emotional processing. Our results are consistent with a theory that sensitivity to emotional material may be a contributing factor in subsequent dissociation to avoid further elaboration of upsetting emotion in these individuals. The findings for dissociation further exemplify the influence of individual differences in the link between cognition and emotion. PMID:18837615

  18. F-spondin is a contact-repellent molecule for embryonic motor neurons

    PubMed Central

    Tzarfati-Majar, Vered; Burstyn-Cohen, Tal; Klar, Avihu

    2001-01-01

    The floor plate plays a key role in patterning axonal trajectory in the embryonic spinal cord by providing both long-range and local guidance cues that promote or inhibit axonal growth toward and across the ventral midline of the spinal cord, thus acting as an intermediate target for a number of crossing (commissural) and noncrossing (motor) axons. F-spondin, a secreted adhesion molecule expressed in the embryonic floor plate and the caudal somite of birds, plays a dual role in patterning the nervous system. It promotes adhesion and outgrowth of commissural axons and inhibits adhesion of neural crest cells. In the current study, we demonstrate that outgrowth of embryonic motor axons also is inhibited by F-spondin protein in a contact-repulsion fashion. Three independent lines of evidence support our hypothesis: substrate-attached F-spondin inhibits outgrowth of dissociated motor neurons in an outgrowth assay; F-spondin elicits acute growth cone collapse when applied to cultured motor neurons; and challenging ventral spinal cord explants with aggregates of HEK 293 cells expressing F-spondin, causes contact-repulsion of motor neurites. Structural–functional studies demonstrate that the processed carboxyl-half protein that contains the thrombospondin type 1 repeats is more prominent in inhibiting outgrowth, suggesting that the processing of F-spondin is important for enhancing its inhibitory activity. PMID:11287656

  19. Coulomb Dissociation of 27P

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beceiro Novo, S.; Sümmerer, K.; Cortina-Gil, D.; Wimmer, C.; Plag, R.; Alvarez-Pol, H.; Aumann, T.; Behr, K.; Boretzky, K.; Casarejos, E.; Chatillon, A.; Datta-Pramanik, U.; Elekes, Z.; Fulop, Z.; Galaviz, D.; Geissel, H.; Giron, S.; Greife, U.; Hammache, F.; Heil, M.; Hoffman, J.; Johansson, H.; Karagiannis, C.; Kiselev, O.; Kurz, N.; Larsson, K.; Le Bleis, T.; Litvinov, Y.; Mahata, K.; Muentz, C.; Nociforo, C.; Ott, W.; Paschalis, S.; Prokopowicz, W.; Rodriguez-Tajes, C.; Rossi, D.; Simon, H.; Stanoiu, M.; Stroth, J.; Typel, S.; Wagner, A.; Wamers, F.; Weick, H.

    2012-09-01

    In this work the astrophysical 26Si(p,γ)27P reaction is studied using the Coulomb dissociation technique. We performed a 27P Coulomb Dissociation experiment at GSI, Darmstadt (28 May-5 June 2007) using the ALADIN-LAND setup which allows complete-kinematic studies. A secondary 27P beam at 498 AMeV impinging a 515mg/cm2 Pb target was used. The relative energy of the outgoing system (26Si+p) is measured obtaining the resonant states of the 27P. Preliminary results show four resonant states measured at 0.36±0.07, 0.88±0.09, 1.5±0.2, 2.3±0.3 MeV and evidence of a higher state at around 3.1 MeV. The preliminary total cross section obtained for relative energies between 0 and 3 MeV has been measured and yields 55±7 mb.

  20. Dissociative recombination in planetary ionospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, J. L.

    1993-01-01

    Ionization in planetary atmospheres can be produced by solar photoionization, photoelectron impact ionization, and, in auroral regions, by impact of precipitating particles. This ionization is lost mainly in dissociative recombination (DR) of molecular ions. Although atomic ions cannot undergo DR, they can be transformed locally through ion-molecule reactions into molecular ions, or they may be transported vertically or horizontally to regions of the atmosphere where such transformations are possible. Because DR reactions tend to be very exothermic, they can be an important source of kinetically or internally excited fragments. In interplanetary thermospheres, the neutral densities decrease exponentially with altitude. Below the homopause (or turbopause), the atmosphere is assumed to be throughly mixed by convection and/or turbulence. Above the homopause, diffusion is the major transport mechanism, and each species is distributed according to its mass, with the logarithmic derivative of the density with repect to altitude given approximately by -1/H, where H = kT/mg is the scale height. In this expression, T is the neutral temperature, g is the local acceleratiion of gravity, and m is the mass of the species. Thus lighter species become relatively more abundant, and heavier species less abundant, as the altitude increases. This variation of the neutral composition can lead to changes in the ion composition; furthermore, as the neutral densities decrease, dissociative recombination becomes more important relative to ion-neutral reactions as a loss mechanism for molecular ions.

  1. Dissociative Recombination without a Curve Crossing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guberman, Steven L.

    1994-01-01

    Ab initio calculations show that a curve crossing is not always needed for a high dissociative- recombination cross section. For HeH(+), in which no neutral states cross the ion potential curve, dissociative recombination is driven by the nuclear kinetic-energy operator on adiabatic potential curves. The kinetic-energy derivative operator allows for capture into repulsive curves that are outside of the classical turning points for the nuclear motion. The dominant dissociative route is the C (2)Sigma(+) state leading to H(n = 2) atoms. An analogous mechanism is proposed for the dissociative recombination of H3(+).

  2. Some Rat Sensory Neurons in Culture Express Characteristics of Differentiated Pain Sensory Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baccaglini, Paola I.; Hogan, Patrick G.

    1983-01-01

    Sensory neurons were dissociated from trigeminal ganglia or from dorsal root ganglia of rats, grown in culture, and examined for expression of properties of pain sensory cells. Many sensory neurons in culture are excited by low concentrations of capsaicin, reportedly a selective stimulus for pain sensory neurons. Many are excited by bradykinin, sensitized by prostaglandin E2, or specifically stained by an antiserum against substance P. These experiments provide a basis for the study of pain mechanisms in cell culture.

  3. Guiding neuronal development with in situ microfabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaehr, Bryan; Allen, Richard; Javier, David J.; Currie, John; Shear, Jason B.

    2004-11-01

    We report the ability to modify microscopic 3D topographies within dissociated cultures, providing a means to alter the development of neurons as they extend neurites and establish interconnections. In this approach, multiphoton excitation is used to focally excite noncytotoxic photosensitizers that promote protein crosslinking, such as BSA, into matrices having feature sizes 250 nm. Barriers, growth lanes, and pinning structures comprised of crosslinked proteins are fabricated under conditions that do not compromise the viability of neurons both on short time scales and over periods of days. In addition, the ability to fabricate functional microstructures from crosslinked avidin enables submicrometer localization of controllable quantities of biotinylated ligands, such as indicators and biological effectors. Feasibility is demonstrated for using in situ microfabrication to guide the contact position of cortical neurons with micrometer accuracy, opening the possibility for engineering well defined sets of synaptic interactions. biofabrication | multiphoton cell patterning | growth cone

  4. Degree of somatoform and psychological dissociation in dissociative disorder is correlated with reported trauma.

    PubMed

    Nijenhuis, E R; Spinhoven, P; van Dyck, R; van der Hart, O; Vanderlinden, J

    1998-10-01

    In this study, the prevalence and severity of traumatic experiences as reported by patients with dissociative disorders and with other DSM-IV psychiatric diagnoses were compared. Furthermore, the predictive value of emotional, physical, and sexual trauma with respect to somatoform and psychological dissociation was analyzed. In contrast with comparison patients, dissociative disorder patients reported severe and multifaceted traumatization. Physical and sexual trauma predicted somatoform dissociation, sexual trauma predicted psychological dissociation as well. According to the memories of the dissociative disorder patients, this abuse occurred in an emotionally neglectful and abusive social context. Pathological dissociation was best predicted by early onset of reported intense, chronic and multiple traumatization. Methodological limitations restricting causal inferences between reported trauma and dissociation are discussed. PMID:9870223

  5. Dissociative symptoms and dissociative disorder comorbidity in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Belli, Hasan; Ural, Cenk; Vardar, Melek Kanarya; Yesılyurt, Sema; Oncu, Fatıh

    2012-10-01

    The present study attempted to assess the dissociative symptoms and overall dissociative disorder comorbidity in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). In addition, we examined the relationship between the severity of obsessive-compulsive symptoms and dissociative symptoms. All patients admitted for the first time to the psychiatric outpatient unit were included in the study. Seventy-eight patients had been diagnosed as having OCD during the 2-year study period. Patients had to meet the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition criteria for OCD. Most (76.9%; n = 60) of the patients were female, and 23.1% (n = 18) of the patients were male. Dissociation Questionnaire was used to measure dissociative symptoms. The Structured Clinical Interview for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition Dissociative Disorders interviews and Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Checklist and Severity Scale were used. Eleven (14%) of the patients with OCD had comorbid dissociative disorder. The most prevalent disorder in our study was dissociative depersonalization disorder. Dissociative amnesia and dissociative identity disorder were common as well. The mean Yale-Brown score was 23.37 ± 7.27 points. Dissociation Questionnaire scores were between 0.40 and 3.87 points, and the mean was 2.23 ± 0.76 points. There was a statistically significant positive correlation between Yale-Brown points and Dissociation Questionnaire points. We conclude that dissociative symptoms among patients with OCD should alert clinicians for the presence of a chronic and complex dissociative disorder. Clinicians may overlook an underlying dissociative process in patients who have severe symptoms of OCD. However, a lack of adequate response to cognitive-behavioral and drug therapy may be a consequence of dissociative process. PMID:22425531

  6. Growth behavior of cochlear nucleus neuronal cells on semiconductor substrates.

    PubMed

    Rak, Kristen; Wasielewski, Natalia; Radeloff, Andreas; Scherzed, Agmal; Jablonka, Sibylle; Hagen, Rudolf; Mlynski, Robert

    2011-05-01

    Auditory brainstem implants provide sound information by direct stimulation of the cochlear nucleus to patients with dysfunctional or absent cranial nerve VIII. In contrast to patients with cochlear implants, the use of the auditory brainstem implants is less successful. This cannot be fully explained by the difference location of stimulation but a rather unspecific neuronal stimulation. The aim of this study was to further examine neuronal cells of the cochlear nucleus and to test their interactions with semiconductor substrates as a potential electrode material for improved auditory brainstem implants. The cochlear nuclei of postnatal day 7 rats were microsurgically dissected. The tissue was dissociated enzymatically and plated on coverslips as control and on the semiconductor substrates silicon or silicon nitride. After 4 days in culture the morphology and growth of dissociated cells was determined by fluorescence and scanning electron microscopy. Dissociated cells of the cochlear nucleus showed reduced cell growth on semiconductor substrates compared with controls. SEM analysis demonstrated close contact of neurons with supporting cells in culture and good adherence of neuronal growth cones on the used materials. These findings present basic knowledge for the development of neuron-electrode interfaces for future auditory brainstem implants. PMID:21370446

  7. Neuron changes in a mollusk in response to proteolytic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Sotnikov, O S; Lukovnikova, M V; Vasyagina, N Yu; Laktionova, A A; Paramonova, N M

    2010-09-01

    The aims of the present work were to investigate the structure of neurons after treatment with proteases and to identify possible recovery of interneuronal syncytial connections. In the first series of experiments, phase-contrast microscopy studies of live dissociated neurons from ganglia of the mollusk Lymnaea stagnalis treated with 0.4% pronase solution demonstrated retraction of nerve processes and biphasic changes in cell body volume. At stage I, at an average of 82.5 min, neuron body volume decreased by 12.1%, after which it increased by a mean of 14.1%. Signs of neuron viability in Ringer's solution were seen for an average of 828 min; survival time in pronase solution was 1.4 times shorter. In the second series of experiments, studies of neuron ultrastructure showed many cases of persistence of mitochondria, the rough and smooth endoplasmic reticulum (ER), Golgi complex, light and granular vesicles, nuclear structure, and neuroplasm optical density. Cells coming close together after centrifugation formed intracellular clefts of uniform width (about 20 nm). There were very rare cases of points at which membranes came into contact. There were no signs of syncytial connections. Lengthening and fusion of smooth ER cisterns separated fragments of neuron bodies from relatively undamaged cells. Some neurons were damaged, with multiple vacuoles formed form swollen mitochondria and ER cisterns. Fragments of nerve processes formed on dissociation were surrounded by a normal outer cell membrane. PMID:20652422

  8. Molecular dissociation in dilute gas

    SciTech Connect

    Renfrow, S.N.; Duggan, J.L.; McDaniel, F.D. |

    1999-06-01

    The charge state distributions (CSD) produced during molecular dissociation are important to both Trace Element Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (TEAMS) and the ion implantation industry. The CSD of 1.3{endash}1.7 MeV SiN{sup +}, SiMg{sup +}, SiMn{sup +}, and SiZn{sup +} molecules have been measured for elements that do not form atomic negative ions (N, Mg, Mn, and Zn) using a NEC Tandem Pelletron accelerator. The molecules were produced in a Cs sputter negative ion source, accelerated, magnetically analyzed, and then passed through an N{sub 2} gas cell. The neutral and charged breakups where analyzed using an electrostatic deflector and measured with particle detectors. Equilibrium CSD were determined and comparisons made between molecular and atomic ion data. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  9. The Dissociative Recombination of OH(+)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guberman, Steven L.

    1995-01-01

    Theoretical quantum chemical calculations of the cross sections and rates for the dissociative recombination of the upsilon = 0 level of the ground state of OH(+) show that recombination occurs primarily along the 2 (2)Pi diabatic route. The products are 0((1)D) and a hot H atom with 6.1 eV kinetic energy. The coupling to the resonances is very small and the indirect recombination mechanism plays only a minor role. The recommended value for the rate coefficient is (6.3 +/- 0.7) x 10(exp -9)x (T(e)/1300)(exp -0.48) cu.cm/s for 10 less than T(e) less than 1000 K.

  10. Dissociative recombination of highly symmetric polyatomic ions.

    PubMed

    Douguet, Nicolas; Orel, Ann E; Greene, Chris H; Kokoouline, Viatcheslav

    2012-01-13

    A general first-principles theory of dissociative recombination is developed for highly symmetric molecular ions and applied to H(3)O(+) and CH(3)(+), which play an important role in astrophysical, combustion, and laboratory plasma environments. The theoretical cross sections obtained for the dissociative recombination of the two ions are in good agreement with existing experimental data from storage ring experiments. PMID:22324682

  11. A Hierarchical Process-Dissociation Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rouder, Jeffrey N.; Lu, Jun; Morey, Richard D.; Sun, Dongchu; Speckman, Paul L.

    2008-01-01

    In fitting the process-dissociation model (L. L. Jacoby, 1991) to observed data, researchers aggregate outcomes across participant, items, or both. T. Curran and D. L. Hintzman (1995) demonstrated how biases from aggregation may lead to artifactual support for the model. The authors develop a hierarchical process-dissociation model that does not…

  12. Dissociation and the Development of Psychopathology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Putnam, Frank W.; Trickett, Penelope K.

    This paper reviews the research on dissociation and the development of psychopathology in children and adolescents. Definitions and dimensions of dissociation are addressed, noting its range from normative daydreaming to the extremes found in individuals with multiple personality disorder. Memory dysfunctions, disturbances of identity, passive…

  13. Dissociative depression among women in the community.

    PubMed

    Sar, Vedat; Akyüz, Gamze; Oztürk, Erdinç; Alioğlu, Firdevs

    2013-01-01

    This study screened the prevalence and correlates of dissociative disorders among depressive women in the general population. The Dissociative Disorders Interview Schedule and the posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and borderline personality disorder sections of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV were administered to 628 women in 500 homes. The prevalence of current major depressive episode was 10.0%. Of the women, 26 (40.6%) had the lifetime diagnosis of a DSM-IV, dissociative disorder, yielding a prevalence of 4.1% for dissociative depression. This group was younger (mean age = 30.7 years) than the nondissociative depression women (mean age = 39.6 years). There was no difference between the 2 groups on comorbid somatization disorder, PTSD, or borderline personality disorder. Besides suicide attempts, the dissociative group was characterized by secondary features of dissociative identity disorder; Schneiderian symptoms; borderline personality disorder criteria; and extrasensory perceptions, including possession experiences. They reported suicidality, thoughts of guilt and worthlessness, diminished concentration and indecisiveness, and appetite and weight changes more frequently than the nondissociative group. Early cessation of school education and childhood sexual abuse were frequently reported by the dissociative depression group. With its distinct features, the concept of dissociative depression may facilitate understanding of treatment resistance in, development of better psychotherapy strategies for, and new thinking on the neurobiology and pharmacotherapy of depressive disorders. PMID:23796173

  14. Acute Glucose Response Properties Beyond Feeding.

    PubMed

    Burnett, C Joseph; Krashes, Michael J

    2016-05-01

    Hypothalamic AgRP neurons potently coordinate feeding behavior to ensure an organism's viability. However, their acute role in glucose-regulatory function remains to be addressed. Steculorum et al. now report that activation of a specific set of AgRP neurons results in an impairment of insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in brown fat through a myogenic signature program. PMID:27052261

  15. Recent developments in the theory of dissociation

    PubMed Central

    SPITZER, CARSTEN; BARNOW, SVEN; FREYBERGER, HARALD J; GRABE, HANS JOERGEN

    2006-01-01

    Although the construct of dissociation was introduced into psychiatry at the end of the 19th century by Pierre Janet, the term still lacks a coherent conceptualization, which is partially reflected by differences in the classification of dissociative and conversion disorders in ICD-10 and DSM-IV. Given the clinical significance of dissociative psychopathology in numerous clinical conditions, it is very valuable that various efforts have been made to refine and to specify current conceptualizations in recent years. The most promising and convincing approaches converge in subdividing dissociation into qualitatively different types, i.e. pathological versus non-pathological dissociation, and "detachment" versus "compartmentalization". We review these concepts and discuss their scientific and clinical potential as well as their limitations. PMID:16946940

  16. Double dissociation of 'what' and 'where' processing in auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Lomber, Stephen G; Malhotra, Shveta

    2008-05-01

    Studies of cortical connections or neuronal function in different cerebral areas support the hypothesis that parallel cortical processing streams, similar to those identified in visual cortex, may exist in the auditory system. However, this model has not yet been behaviorally tested. We used reversible cooling deactivation to investigate whether the individual regions in cat nonprimary auditory cortex that are responsible for processing the pattern of an acoustic stimulus or localizing a sound in space could be doubly dissociated in the same animal. We found that bilateral deactivation of the posterior auditory field resulted in deficits in a sound-localization task, whereas bilateral deactivation of the anterior auditory field resulted in deficits in a pattern-discrimination task, but not vice versa. These findings support a model of cortical organization that proposes that identifying an acoustic stimulus ('what') and its spatial location ('where') are processed in separate streams in auditory cortex. PMID:18408717

  17. The Shutdown Dissociation Scale (Shut-D)

    PubMed Central

    Schalinski, Inga; Schauer, Maggie; Elbert, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The evolutionary model of the defense cascade by Schauer and Elbert (2010) provides a theoretical frame for a short interview to assess problems underlying and leading to the dissociative subtype of posttraumatic stress disorder. Based on known characteristics of the defense stages “fright,” “flag,” and “faint,” we designed a structured interview to assess the vulnerability for the respective types of dissociation. Most of the scales that assess dissociative phenomena are designed as self-report questionnaires. Their items are usually selected based on more heuristic considerations rather than a theoretical model and thus include anything from minor dissociative experiences to major pathological dissociation. The shutdown dissociation scale (Shut-D) was applied in several studies in patients with a history of multiple traumatic events and different disorders that have been shown previously to be prone to symptoms of dissociation. The goal of the present investigation was to obtain psychometric characteristics of the Shut-D (including factor structure, internal consistency, retest reliability, predictive, convergent and criterion-related concurrent validity). A total population of 225 patients and 68 healthy controls were accessed. Shut-D appears to have sufficient internal reliability, excellent retest reliability, high convergent validity, and satisfactory predictive validity, while the summed score of the scale reliably separates patients with exposure to trauma (in different diagnostic groups) from healthy controls. The Shut-D is a brief structured interview for assessing the vulnerability to dissociate as a consequence of exposure to traumatic stressors. The scale demonstrates high-quality psychometric properties and may be useful for researchers and clinicians in assessing shutdown dissociation as well as in predicting the risk of dissociative responding. PMID:25976478

  18. Agonist action of taurine on glycine receptors in rat supraoptic magnocellular neurones: possible role in osmoregulation.

    PubMed

    Hussy, N; Deleuze, C; Pantaloni, A; Desarménien, M G; Moos, F

    1997-08-01

    1. To evaluate the implication of taurine in the physiology of supraoptic neurones, we (i) investigated the agonist properties of taurine on glycine and GABAA receptors of supraoptic magnocellular neurones acutely dissociated from adult rats, using whole-cell voltage clamp, (ii) studied the effects of taurine and strychnine in vivo by extracellular recordings of supraoptic vasopressin neurones in anaesthetized rats, and (iii) measured the osmolarity-dependent release of endogenous taurine from isolated supraoptic nuclei by HPLC. 2. GABA, glycine and taurine evoked rapidly activating currents that all reversed close to the equilibrium potential for Cl-, indicating activation of Cl(-)-selective channels. Glycine-activated currents were reversibly blocked by strychnine (IC50 of 35 nM with 100 microM glycine), but were unaffected by the GABAA antagonist gabazine (1-3 microM). GABA-activated currents were reversibly antagonized by 3 microM gabazine, but not by strychnine (up to 1 microM). 3. Responses to 1 mM taurine were blocked by strychnine but not by gabazine and showed no additivity with glycine-induced currents, indicating selective activation of glycine receptors. Responses to 10 mM taurine were partially antagonized by gabazine, the residual current being blocked by strychnine. Thus, taurine is also a weak agonist of GABAA receptors. 4. In the presence of gabazine, taurine activated glycine receptors with an EC50 of 406 microM. Taurine activated at most 70% of maximal glycine currents, suggesting that it is a partial agonist of glycine receptors. 5. In vivo, locally applied strychnine (300 nM) increased and taurine (1 mM) decreased the basal electrical activity of vasopressin neurones in normally hydrated rats. The effect of strychnine was markedly more pronounced in water-loaded rats. 6. Taurine, which is concentrated in supraoptic glial cells, could be released from isolated supraoptic nuclei upon hyposmotic stimulation. Decreases in osmolarity of 15 and 30

  19. Dissociation and Memory Fragmentation in Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: An Evaluation of the Dissociative Encoding Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Bedard-Gilligan, Michele; Zoellner, Lori A.

    2012-01-01

    Several prominent theories of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) posit that peritraumatic dissociation results in insufficient encoding of the trauma memory and that persistent dissociation prevents memory elaboration, resulting in memory fragmentation and PTSD. In this review, we summarize the empirical literature on peritraumatic and trait dissociation and trauma narrative fragmentation as measured by meta-memory and rater/objective coding. Across 16 studies to date, the association between dissociation and fragmentation was most prominent when examining peritraumatic dissociation and patient's own ratings of memory fragmentation. This relationship did not hold when examining trait dissociation or rater-coded or computer-generated measures of fragmentation. Thus, initial evidence points more toward a strong self-reported association between constructs that is not supported on more objective fragmentation coding. Measurement overlap, construct ambiguity, and exclusion of potential confounds may underlie lack of a strong association between dissociation and objective-rated fragmentation. PMID:22348400

  20. Somatodendritic and excitatory postsynaptic distribution of neuron-type dystrophin isoform, Dp40, in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Takahiro; Itoh, Kyoko; Yaoi, Takeshi; Fushiki, Shinji

    2014-09-12

    The Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) gene produces multiple dystrophin (Dp) products due to the presence of several promoters. We previously reported the existence of a novel short isoform of Dp, Dp40, in adult mouse brain. However, the exact biochemical expression profile and cytological distribution of the Dp40 protein remain unknown. In this study, we generated a polyclonal antibody against the NH2-terminal region of the Dp40 and identified the expression profile of Dp40 in the mouse brain. Through an analysis using embryonic and postnatal mouse cerebrums, we found that Dp40 emerged from the early neonatal stages until adulthood, whereas Dp71, an another Dp short isoform, was highly detected in both prenatal and postnatal cerebrums. Intriguingly, relative expressions of Dp40 and Dp71 were prominent in cultured dissociated neurons and non-neuronal cells derived from mouse hippocampus, respectively. Furthermore, the immunocytological distribution of Dp40 was analyzed in dissociated cultured neurons, revealing that Dp40 is detected in the soma and its dendrites, but not in the axon. It is worthy to note that Dp40 is localized along the subplasmalemmal region of the dendritic shafts, as well as at excitatory postsynaptic sites. Thus, Dp40 was identified as a neuron-type Dp possibly involving dendritic and synaptic functions. PMID:25152393

  1. From state dissociation to status dissociatus.

    PubMed

    Antelmi, Elena; Ferri, Raffaele; Iranzo, Alex; Arnulf, Isabelle; Dauvilliers, Yves; Bhatia, Kailash P; Liguori, Rocco; Schenck, Carlos H; Plazzi, Giuseppe

    2016-08-01

    The states of being are conventionally defined by the simultaneous occurrence of behavioral, neurophysiological and autonomic descriptors. State dissociation disorders are due to the intrusion of features typical of a different state into an ongoing state. Disorders related to these conditions are classified according to the ongoing main state and comprise: 1) Dissociation from prevailing wakefulness as seen in hypnagogic or hypnopompic hallucinations, automatic behaviors, sleep drunkenness, cataplexy and sleep paralysis 2) Dissociation from rapid eye movement (REM) sleep as seen in REM sleep behavior disorder and lucid dreaming and 3) Dissociation from NREM sleep as seen in the disorders of arousal. The extreme expression of states dissociation is characterized by the asynchronous occurrence of the various components of the different states that prevents the recognition of any state of being. This condition has been named status dissociatus. According to the underlying disorders/diseases and to their severity, among status dissociatus we may recognize disorders in which such an extreme dissociation occurs only at night time or intermittently (i.e., autoimmune encephalopathies, narcolepsy type 1 and IgLON5 parasomnia), and others in which it occurs nearly continuously with complete loss of any conventionally defined state of being, and of the circadian pattern (agrypnia excitata). Here, we render a comprehensive review of all diseases/disorders associated with state dissociation and status dissociatus and propose a critical classification of this complex scenario. PMID:26431902

  2. Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 Regulates Neuronal Circuit Development and Excitability.

    PubMed

    Murase, Sachiko; Lantz, Crystal L; Kim, Eunyoung; Gupta, Nitin; Higgins, Richard; Stopfer, Mark; Hoffman, Dax A; Quinlan, Elizabeth M

    2016-07-01

    In early postnatal development, naturally occurring cell death, dendritic outgrowth, and synaptogenesis sculpt neuronal ensembles into functional neuronal circuits. Here, we demonstrate that deletion of the extracellular proteinase matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) affects each of these processes, resulting in maladapted neuronal circuitry. MMP-9 deletion increases the number of CA1 pyramidal neurons but decreases dendritic length and complexity. Parallel changes in neuronal morphology are observed in primary visual cortex and persist into adulthood. Individual CA1 neurons in MMP-9(-/-) mice have enhanced input resistance and a significant increase in the frequency, but not amplitude, of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs). Additionally, deletion of MMP-9 significantly increases spontaneous neuronal activity in awake MMP-9(-/-) mice and enhances response to acute challenge by the excitotoxin kainate. Our data document a novel role for MMP-9-dependent proteolysis: the regulation of several aspects of circuit maturation to constrain excitability throughout life. PMID:26093382

  3. Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 regulates neuronal circuit development and excitability

    PubMed Central

    Murase, Sachiko; Lantz, Crystal; Kim, Eunyoung; Gupta, Nitin; Higgins, Richard; Stopfer, Mark; Hoffman, Dax A.; Quinlan, Elizabeth M.

    2015-01-01

    In early postnatal development, naturally occurring cell death, dendritic outgrowth and synaptogenesis sculpt neuronal ensembles into functional neuronal circuits. Here we demonstrate that deletion of the extracellular proteinase MMP-9 affects each of these processes, resulting in maladapted neuronal circuitry. MMP-9 deletion increases the number of CA1 pyramidal neurons, but decreases dendritic length and complexity while dendritic spine density is unchanged. Parallel changes in neuronal morphology are observed in primary visual cortex, and persist into adulthood. Individual CA1 neurons in MMP-9−/− mice have enhanced input resistance and a significant increase in the frequency, but not amplitude, of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs). Additionally, deletion of MMP-9 significant increases spontaneous neuronal activity in awake MMP-9−/− mice and enhances response to acute challenge by the excitotoxin kainate. Thus MMP-9-dependent proteolysis regulates several aspects of circuit maturation to constrain excitability throughout life. PMID:26093382

  4. Colonic Hypersensitivity and Sensitization of Voltage-gated Sodium Channels in Primary Sensory Neurons in Rats with Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Ji; Song, Zhen-Yuan; Zhang, Hong-Hong; Qin, Xin; Hu, Shufen; Jiang, Xinghong; Xu, Guang-Yin

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Patients with long-standing diabetes often demonstrate intestinal dysfunction and abdominal pain. However, the pathophysiology of abdominal pain in diabetic patients remains elusive. The purpose of study was to determine roles of voltage-gated sodium channels in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) in colonic hypersensitivity of rats with diabetes. Methods Diabetic models were induced by a single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ; 65 mg/kg) in adult female rats, while the control rats received citrate buffer only. Behavioral responses to colorectal distention were used to determine colonic sensitivity in rats. Colon projection DRG neurons labeled with DiI were acutely dissociated for measuring excitability and sodium channel currents by whole-cell patch clamp recordings. Western blot analysis was employed to measure the expression of NaV1.7 and NaV1.8 of colon DRGs. Results STZ injection produced a significantly lower distention threshold than control rats in responding to colorectal distention. STZ injection also depolarized the resting membrane potentials, hyperpolarized action potential threshold, decreased rheobase and increased frequency of action potentials evoked by 2 and 3 times rheobase and ramp current stimulation. Furthermore, STZ injection enhanced neuronal sodium current densities of DRG neurons innervating the colon. STZ injection also led to a significant upregulation of NaV1.7 and NaV1.8 expression in colon DRGs compared with age and sex-matched control rats. Conclusions Our results suggest that enhanced neuronal excitability following STZ injection, which may be mediated by upregulation of NaV1.7 and NaV1.8 expression in DRGs, may play an important role in colonic hypersensitivity in rats with diabetes. PMID:26459453

  5. Theory of dissociative tunneling ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svensmark, Jens; Tolstikhin, Oleg I.; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2016-05-01

    We present a theoretical study of the dissociative tunneling ionization process. Analytic expressions for the nuclear kinetic energy distribution of the ionization rates are derived. A particularly simple expression for the spectrum is found by using the Born-Oppenheimer (BO) approximation in conjunction with the reflection principle. These spectra are compared to exact non-BO ab initio spectra obtained through model calculations with a quantum mechanical treatment of both the electronic and nuclear degrees of freedom. In the regime where the BO approximation is applicable, imaging of the BO nuclear wave function is demonstrated to be possible through reverse use of the reflection principle, when accounting appropriately for the electronic ionization rate. A qualitative difference between the exact and BO wave functions in the asymptotic region of large electronic distances is shown. Additionally, the behavior of the wave function across the turning line is seen to be reminiscent of light refraction. For weak fields, where the BO approximation does not apply, the weak-field asymptotic theory describes the spectrum accurately.

  6. Dissociative Ionization of Pyridine by Electron Impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dateo, Christopher; Huo, Winifred; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In order to understand the damage of biomolecules by electrons, a process important in radiation damage, we undertake a study of the dissociative ionization (DI) of pyridine (C5H5N) from the low-lying ionization channels. The methodology used is the same as in the benzene study. While no experimental DI data are available, we compare the dissociation products from our calculations with the dissociative photoionization measurements of Tixier et al. using dipole (e, e(+) ion) coincidence spectroscopy. Comparisons with the DI of benzene is also made so as to understand the difference in DI between a heterocyclic and an aromatic molecule.

  7. Dissociation of Natural and Artificial Methane Hydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misyura, S. Y.

    2016-02-01

    Present work deals with natural and artificial methane hydrate dissociation. The heating of the powder produced due to the temperature difference between the external air and the powder. The dissociation rate was determined by gravimetric method. The range of the partial self-preservation for the natural hydrate is significantly longer than for the artificial one and moved to higher temperatures. The destruction of the natural sample is slower than the artificial one. The time-averaged dissociation rate for the artificial sample is equal to 1,25 %/s and for the natural hydrate corresponds to 0,59 %/s.

  8. Products of Dissociative Recombination in the Ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosby, Philip

    1996-01-01

    SRI International undertook a novel experimental measurement of the product states formed by dissociative ro-combination (DR) of C2(+), NO(+), and N2(+) as a function of both electron energy and reactant ion vibrational level. For these measurements we used a recently developed experimental technique for measuring dissociation product distributions that allows both the branching ratios to be accurately determined and the electronic and ro-vibrational state composition of the reactant ions to be specified. DR is the dominant electron loss mechanism in all regions of the ionosphere. In this process, electron attachment to the molecular ion produces an unstable neutral molecule that rapidly dissociates.

  9. Wavepacket theory of collisional dissociation in molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Kulander, K.

    1980-01-01

    An explicit integration scheme is used to solve the time dependent Schroedinger equation for wavepackets which model collisions in the collinear H + H/sub 2/ system. A realistic LEPS-type potential energy surface is used. Collision energies considered are above the dissociation threshold and probabilities for collision induced dissociation are reported. Also quantum mechanical state-to-state transition probabilities are generated. These results are compared to extensive classical trajectory calculations performed on this same system. The time evolution of the wavepacket densities is studied to understand the dynamics of the collinear collisional dissociation process.

  10. Electrophysiological recordings of patterned rat brain stem slice neurons.

    PubMed

    Lauer, L; Vogt, A; Yeung, C K; Knoll, W; Offenhäusser, A

    2002-08-01

    Dissociated neuronal cultures on substrates patterned with extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins have yielded much information in the past. However, although the culture of brain slices has many advantages over dissociated neuronal cultures, its feasibility on patterned substrates has not been demonstrated to date. In the present study, neuronal outgrowth from brain stem slices onto homogeneous control substrates, and onto laminin structures of grid- and line-shape was achieved. Cultures were evaluated by means of phase contrast microscopy, antibody staining, and patch-clamp measurements. Only patterns with line sizes of more than 4 microm yielded satisfactory neuronal outgrowth. The size of the nodes in the pattern influenced the nodal compliance of the spreading cells and the amount of unstructured overgrowth. Best grid patterns were 4 microm lines and 10 microm nodes, best line patterns were 4 microm lines and 20 microm nodes. On patterned substrates, average sodium and potassium currents were reduced by approximately 50% compared to controls, whereas area-normalized ion-currents were in the same order of magnitude. This indicates that as a consequence of the pattern-enforced geometrical confinement, neurons tend to have a smaller surface. In addition, neurons on patterned substrates were rapidly covered with glial overgrowth. This was shown by antibody staining. PMID:12102183

  11. Cortical neurons exposed to glutamate rapidly leak preloaded chromium 51

    SciTech Connect

    Maulucci-Gedde, M.; Choi, D.W.

    1987-05-01

    The acute toxic effects of excess glutamate exposure on cortical neurons in culture was followed using a novel adaptation of the /sup 51/Cr efflux assay. Although the acute, sodium-dependent phase of glutamate neurotoxicity may contribute to several acute disease settings, including sustained seizures and stroke, functional aspects of the phenomenon have not been previously studied. We report here that the earliest morphologic sign of glutamate neurotoxicity, neuronal swelling, is accompanied by a large efflux of complexed /sup 51/Cr from preloaded neurons in the first hour after exposure, and that this efflux is detectable as early as 15 min after the onset of glutamate exposure. We suggest that this pathological burst of /sup 51/Cr may result from glutamate-induced leakiness of neuronal cell membranes.

  12. Engineering connectivity by multiscale micropatterning of individual populations of neurons.

    PubMed

    Albers, Jonas; Toma, Koji; Offenhäusser, Andreas

    2015-02-01

    Functional networks are the basis of information processing in the central nervous system. Essential for their formation are guided neuronal growth as well as controlled connectivity and information flow. The basis of neuronal development is generated by guiding cues and geometric constraints. To investigate the neuronal growth and connectivity of adjacent neuronal networks, two-dimensional protein patterns were created. A mixture of poly-L-lysine and laminin was transferred onto a silanized glass surface by microcontact printing. The structures were populated with dissociated primary cortical embryonic rat neurons. Triangular structures with diverse opening angles, height, and design were chosen as two-dimensional structures to allow network formation with constricted gateways. Neuronal development was observed by immunohistochemistry to pursue the influence of the chosen structures on the neuronal outgrowth. Neurons were stained for MAP2, while poly-L-lysine was FITC labeled. With this study we present an easy-to-use technique to engineer two-dimensional networks in vitro with defined gateways. The presented micropatterning method is used to generate daisy-chained neuronal networks with predefined connectivity. Signal propagation among geometrically constrained networks can easily be monitored by calcium-sensitive dyes, providing insights into network communication in vitro. PMID:25512037

  13. The Proinflammatory RAGE/NF-κB Pathway Is Involved in Neuronal Damage and Reactive Gliosis in a Model of Sleep Apnea by Intermittent Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Angelo, Maria Florencia; Aguirre, Alejandra; Avilés Reyes, Rolando X.; Villarreal, Alejandro; Lukin, Jerónimo; Melendez, Matías; Vanasco, Virginia; Barker, Phil; Alvarez, Silvia; Epstein, Alberto; Jerusalinsky, Diana; Ramos, Alberto Javier

    2014-01-01

    Sleep apnea (SA) causes long-lasting changes in neuronal circuitry, which persist even in patients successfully treated for the acute effects of the disease. Evidence obtained from the intermittent hypoxia (IH) experimental model of SA has shown neuronal death, impairment in learning and memory and reactive gliosis that may account for cognitive and structural alterations observed in human patients. However, little is known about the mechanism controlling these deleterious effects that may be useful as therapeutic targets in SA. The Receptor for Advanced Glycation End products (RAGE) and its downstream effector Nuclear Factor Kappa B (NF-κB) have been related to neuronal death and astroglial conversion to the pro-inflammatory neurodegenerative phenotype. RAGE expression and its ligand S100B were shown to be increased in experimental models of SA. We here used dissociated mixed hippocampal cell cultures and male Wistar rats exposed to IH cycles and observed that NF-κB is activated in glial cells and neurons after IH. To disclose the relative contribution of the S100B/RAGE/NF-κB pathway to neuronal damage and reactive gliosis after IH we performed sequential loss of function studies using RAGE or S100B neutralizing antibodies, a herpes simplex virus (HSV)-derived amplicon vector that induces the expression of RAGEΔcyto (dominant negative RAGE) and a chemical blocker of NF-κB. Our results show that NF-κB activation peaks 3 days after IH exposure, and that RAGE or NF-κB blockage during this critical period significantly improves neuronal survival and reduces reactive gliosis. Both in vitro and in vivo, S100B blockage altered reactive gliosis but did not have significant effects on neuronal survival. We conclude that both RAGE and downstream NF-κB signaling are centrally involved in the neuronal alterations found in SA models, and that blockage of these pathways is a tempting strategy for preventing neuronal degeneration and reactive gliosis in SA. PMID:25265561

  14. Acute Bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... or though physical contact (for example, on unwashed hands). Being exposed to tobacco smoke, air pollution, dusts, vapors, and fumes can also cause acute bronchitis. Less often, bacteria can also cause acute bronchitis. To diagnose acute ...

  15. Cystitis - acute

    MedlinePlus

    Uncomplicated urinary tract infection; UTI - acute; Acute bladder infection; Acute bacterial cystitis ... control. Menopause also increases the risk for a urinary tract infection. The following also increase your chances of having ...

  16. Dissociative identity disorder presenting as dermatitis artefacta.

    PubMed

    Ozmen, Mine; Erdogan, Ayten; Aydemir, Ertugrul H; Oguz, Oya

    2006-06-01

    Dermatitis artefacta is a rare psychiatric condition characterized by rubbing of skin blisters and denial of self-infliction. Dissociation may be comorbid with self-injurious behavior. A background of emotional disturbances during formative years and in later life often results in feelings of isolation and insecurity, which can lead to dissociation as a primary defense mechanism used to overcome traumatic events. In this case report, we describe a female patient with dermatitis artefacta associated with dissociative identity disorder. The patient was a 14-year-old girl. Multiple large, deep ulcerations with unnatural shapes were seen on her left forearm. The ulcerations were thought to be self-inflicted. Psychiatric examination revealed that she had a different identity, and inflicted the lesions when this was assumed. This case leads us to suggest that patients with dermatitis artefacta might have comorbid dissociative experiences, which cannot be identified easily. PMID:16796649

  17. Collision-induced gas phase dissociation rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, C. Frederick

    1990-01-01

    The Landau-Zener theory of reactive cross sections was applied to diatomic molecules dissociating from a ladder of vibrational states. The result predicts a dissociation rate that is quite well duplicated by an Arrhenius function having a preexponential temperature dependence of about T(sub -1/2), at least for inert collision partners. This relation fits experimental data reasonably well. The theory is then used to calculate the effect of vibrational nonequilibrium on dissociation rate. For Morse oscillators, the results are about the same as given by Hammerling, Kivel, and Teare in their analytic approximation for harmonic oscillators, though at very high temperature a correction for the partition function limit is included. The empirical correction for vibration nonequilibrium proposed by Park, which is a convenient algorithm for CFD calculations, is modified to prevent a drastic underestimation of dissociation rates that occurs with this method when vibrational temperature is much smaller than the kinetic temperature of the gas.

  18. Research Reports: Hallucinogens and Dissociative Drugs

    MedlinePlus

    ... in bizarre or dangerous behavior. Hallucinogens such as LSD, psilocybin, peyote, DMT, and ayahuasca cause emotions to ... Take Hallucinogenic or Dissociative Drugs? How Do Hallucinogens (LSD, Psilocybin, Peyote, DMT, and Ayahuasca) Affect the Brain ...

  19. Dissociation energy of molecules in dense gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunc, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    A general approach is presented for calculating the reduction of the dissociation energy of diatomic molecules immersed in a dense (n = less than 10 exp 22/cu cm) gas of molecules and atoms. The dissociation energy of a molecule in a dense gas differs from that of the molecule in vacuum because the intermolecular forces change the intramolecular dynamics of the molecule, and, consequently, the energy of the molecular bond.

  20. Dissociative Ionization of Benzene by Electron Impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred; Dateo, Christopher; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We report a theoretical study of the dissociative ionization (DI) of benzene from the low-lying ionization channels. Our approach makes use of the fact that electron motion is much faster than nuclear motion and DI is treated as a two-step process. The first step is electron-impact ionization resulting in an ion with the same nuclear geometry as the neutral molecule. In the second step the nuclei relax from the initial geometry and undergo unimolecular dissociation. For the ionization process we use the improved binary-encounter dipole (iBED) model. For the unimolecular dissociation step, we study the steepest descent reaction path to the minimum of the ion potential energy surface. The path is used to analyze the probability of unimolecular dissociation and to determine the product distributions. Our analysis of the dissociation products and the thresholds of the productions are compared with the result dissociative photoionization measurements of Feng et al. The partial oscillator strengths from Feng et al. are then used in the iBED cross section calculations.

  1. Collision induced dissociation of alpha hydroxy acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandu, Mary L.; Grubbs, Thomas; Kater, Marcus; Desaire, Heather

    2006-03-01

    Alpha hydroxy acids typically dissociate in tandem mass spectrometric experiments to produce product ions representing a neutral loss of 46 Da (CH2O2) in negative ion mode. Although it is widely accepted that the carboxylate group is lost in the dissociation process, the origin of the remaining two hydrogens is unclear. The current study utilizes an alpha hydroxy acid chemical library and deuterium labeling experiments to identify the origin of the two hydrogens lost during dissociation. Secondly, this study investigates the lower m/z region of the CID spectrum, a region previously unexplored, to aid in characterizing the dissociation mechanism. Further experiments testing the energy requirements and time parameters of the dissociation also are consistent with criteria previously defined for ion-neutral complex formation. In addition to describing the mechanism for the loss of CH2O2, we have conducted experiments that demonstrate the important chemical features of molecules that can prevent alpha hydroxy acids from undergoing the loss of 46 Da. By understanding the chemical composition of the 46 Da loss, the dissociation mechanism responsible for the loss, and the factors that hinder this mechanistic pathway, chemical information about alpha hydroxy acids can be obtained from their CID data.

  2. Unimolecular dissociation of cyclopentadiene and indene

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, W.; Chattopadhyay, A.; Bersohn, R. )

    1991-05-01

    The dissociation of hydrogen atoms from the methylene group of cyclopentadiene (CP) and indene (ID) excited with a 193 nm photon has been studied by hydrogen atom laser induced fluorescence. The rate of dissociation of IND was 7.4{times}10{sup 6} s{sup {minus}1} but that of CP was too fast to measure. The ratio of H atoms to D atoms generated from 5-deuteriocyclopentadiene (5-dCP) was 3.91{plus minus}0.46. Rice--Ramsberger--Kassel--Marcus theory was used to calculate the rates of dissociation of CP and 5-dCP. The quantum yield for dissociating H atoms from CP was 0.85{plus minus}0.07. The ejected H atoms have a Maxwell velocity distribution with temperatures which are equal to the vibrational temperatures, 3690 and 2479 K for CP and IND, respectively. The most important result of the work is this confirmation of an earlier finding on a different set of molecules that the translational temperature of the fragments {ital after} the dissociation is equal to the vibrational temperature {ital before} the dissociation. This is explained by the assumption that the motion of the fast, light hydrogen atom is partly decoupled from that of the heavier, slower atoms.

  3. Imaging neuronal responses in slice preparations of vomeronasal organ expressing a genetically encoded calcium sensor.

    PubMed

    Ma, Limei; Haga-Yamanaka, Sachiko; Yu, Qingfeng Elden; Qiu, Qiang; Kim, Sangseong; Yu, C Ron

    2011-01-01

    The vomeronasal organ (VNO) detects chemosensory signals that carry information about the social, sexual and reproductive status of the individuals within the same species. These intraspecies signals, the pheromones, as well as signals from some predators, activate the vomeronasal sensory neurons (VSNs) with high levels of specificity and sensitivity. At least three distinct families of G-protein coupled receptors, V1R, V2R and FPR, are expressed in VNO neurons to mediate the detection of the chemosensory cues. To understand how pheromone information is encoded by the VNO, it is critical to analyze the response profiles of individual VSNs to various stimuli and identify the specific receptors that mediate these responses. The neuroepithelia of VNO are enclosed in a pair of vomer bones. The semi-blind tubular structure of VNO has one open end (the vomeronasal duct) connecting to the nasal cavity. VSNs extend their dendrites to the lumen part of the VNO, where the pheromone cues are in contact with the receptors expressed at the dendritic knobs. The cell bodies of the VSNs form pseudo-stratified layers with V1R and V2R expressed in the apical and basal layers respectively. Several techniques have been utilized to monitor responses of VSNs to sensory stimuli. Among these techniques, acute slice preparation offers several advantages. First, compared to dissociated VSNs, slice preparations maintain the neurons in their native morphology and the dendrites of the cells stay relatively intact. Second, the cell bodies of the VSNs are easily accessible in coronal slice of the VNO to allow electrophysiology studies and imaging experiments as compared to whole epithelium and whole-mount preparations. Third, this method can be combined with molecular cloning techniques to allow receptor identification. Sensory stimulation elicits strong Ca2+ influx in VSNs that is indicative of receptor activation. We thus develop transgenic mice that express G-CaMP2 in the olfactory sensory

  4. Protracted elevation of neuronal nitric oxide synthase immunoreactivity in axotomised adult pudendal motor neurons

    PubMed Central

    PULLEN, A. H.; HUMPHREYS, P.

    1999-01-01

    Neuronal nitric oxide synthase immunoreactivity (NOS1-ir) in sacral motor neurons of normal adult cats was compared with that in cats surviving 1–10 wk after unilateral transection and ligation of the pudendal nerve. Levels of immunostaining were measured by microdensitometry. In nonoperated cats 60% of motor neurons in the ventrolateral nucleus (VL) and Onuf's nucleus (ON) showed high levels of NOS1-ir with lower NOS1-ir in 40%. Following axotomy, motor neurons in ON on both sides of the cord showed an acute rise in mean level of NOS1-ir at 1 wk, with a further increase at 2 wk. Mean levels of NOS1-ir in the ipsilateral and contralateral ON remained elevated at 10 wk after axotomy. Elevation of NOS1-ir occurred in the VL with a similar time-course to that in ON, implying a wider response in motor nuclei synaptically coupled to ON. Measurements of neuronal size in ON and VL revealed an increase in neuronal size in ON but not VL, indicating increased NOS1-ir in ON was not an artifact of neuronal atrophy. The proportion of motor neurons in ON and VL possessing higher levels of NOS1-ir increased from 60% in controls to 100% at 2–3 wk postaxotomy. The proportion slightly declined by 8 wk due to re-emergence of motor neurons exhibiting low NOS1-ir, but remained greater than normal at 10 wk in both nuclei. Based on evidence from related analyses of synaptology, we argue that acute axotomy induced alterations in presynaptic complement which increased overall Ca2+ influx and thereby stimulated NOS1-ir. PMID:10445823

  5. Thermal dissociation behavior and dissociation enthalpies of methane-carbon dioxide mixed hydrates.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Tae-Hyuk; Kneafsey, Timothy J; Rees, Emily V L

    2011-06-30

    Replacement of methane with carbon dioxide in hydrate has been proposed as a strategy for geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO(2)) and/or production of methane (CH(4)) from natural hydrate deposits. This replacement strategy requires a better understanding of the thermodynamic characteristics of binary mixtures of CH(4) and CO(2) hydrate (CH(4)-CO(2) mixed hydrates), as well as thermophysical property changes during gas exchange. This study explores the thermal dissociation behavior and dissociation enthalpies of CH(4)-CO(2) mixed hydrates. We prepared CH(4)-CO(2) mixed hydrate samples from two different, well-defined gas mixtures. During thermal dissociation of a CH(4)-CO(2) mixed hydrate sample, gas samples from the head space were periodically collected and analyzed using gas chromatography. The changes in CH(4)-CO(2) compositions in both the vapor phase and hydrate phase during dissociation were estimated based on the gas chromatography measurements. It was found that the CO(2) concentration in the vapor phase became richer during dissociation because the initial hydrate composition contained relatively more CO(2) than the vapor phase. The composition change in the vapor phase during hydrate dissociation affected the dissociation pressure and temperature; the richer CO(2) in the vapor phase led to a lower dissociation pressure. Furthermore, the increase in CO(2) concentration in the vapor phase enriched the hydrate in CO(2). The dissociation enthalpy of the CH(4)-CO(2) mixed hydrate was computed by fitting the Clausius-Clapeyron equation to the pressure-temperature (PT) trace of a dissociation test. It was observed that the dissociation enthalpy of the CH(4)-CO(2) mixed hydrate lays between the limiting values of pure CH(4) hydrate and CO(2) hydrate, increasing with the CO(2) fraction in the hydrate phase. PMID:21604671

  6. Signal Propagation between Neuronal Populations Controlled by Micropatterning

    PubMed Central

    Albers, Jonas; Offenhäusser, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The central nervous system consists of an unfathomable number of functional networks enabling highly sophisticated information processing. Guided neuronal growth with a well-defined connectivity and accompanying polarity is essential for the formation of these networks. To investigate how two-dimensional protein patterns influence neuronal outgrowth with respect to connectivity and functional polarity between adjacent populations of neurons, a microstructured model system was established. Exclusive cell growth on patterned substrates was achieved by transferring a mixture of poly-l-lysine and laminin to a cell-repellent glass surface by microcontact printing. Triangular structures with different opening angle, height, and width were chosen as a pattern to achieve network formation with defined behavior at the junction of adjacent structures. These patterns were populated with dissociated primary cortical embryonic rat neurons and investigated with respect to their impact on neuronal outgrowth by immunofluorescence analysis, as well as their functional connectivity by calcium imaging. Here, we present a highly reproducible technique to devise neuronal networks in vitro with a predefined connectivity induced by the design of the gateway. Daisy-chained neuronal networks with predefined connectivity and functional polarity were produced using the presented micropatterning method. Controlling the direction of signal propagation among populations of neurons provides insights to network communication and offers the chance to investigate more about learning processes in networks by external manipulation of cells and signal cascades. PMID:27379230

  7. Signal Propagation between Neuronal Populations Controlled by Micropatterning.

    PubMed

    Albers, Jonas; Offenhäusser, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The central nervous system consists of an unfathomable number of functional networks enabling highly sophisticated information processing. Guided neuronal growth with a well-defined connectivity and accompanying polarity is essential for the formation of these networks. To investigate how two-dimensional protein patterns influence neuronal outgrowth with respect to connectivity and functional polarity between adjacent populations of neurons, a microstructured model system was established. Exclusive cell growth on patterned substrates was achieved by transferring a mixture of poly-l-lysine and laminin to a cell-repellent glass surface by microcontact printing. Triangular structures with different opening angle, height, and width were chosen as a pattern to achieve network formation with defined behavior at the junction of adjacent structures. These patterns were populated with dissociated primary cortical embryonic rat neurons and investigated with respect to their impact on neuronal outgrowth by immunofluorescence analysis, as well as their functional connectivity by calcium imaging. Here, we present a highly reproducible technique to devise neuronal networks in vitro with a predefined connectivity induced by the design of the gateway. Daisy-chained neuronal networks with predefined connectivity and functional polarity were produced using the presented micropatterning method. Controlling the direction of signal propagation among populations of neurons provides insights to network communication and offers the chance to investigate more about learning processes in networks by external manipulation of cells and signal cascades. PMID:27379230

  8. Dissociations between developmental dyslexias and attention deficits

    PubMed Central

    Lukov, Limor; Friedmann, Naama; Shalev, Lilach; Khentov-Kraus, Lilach; Shalev, Nir; Lorber, Rakefet; Guggenheim, Revital

    2014-01-01

    We examine whether attention deficits underlie developmental dyslexia, or certain types of dyslexia, by presenting double dissociations between the two. We took into account the existence of distinct types of dyslexia and of attention deficits, and focused on dyslexias that may be thought to have an attentional basis: letter position dyslexia (LPD), in which letters migrate within words, attentional dyslexia (AD), in which letters migrate between words, neglect dyslexia, in which letters on one side of the word are omitted or substituted, and surface dyslexia, in which words are read via the sublexical route. We tested 110 children and adults with developmental dyslexia and/or attention deficits, using extensive batteries of reading and attention. For each participant, the existence of dyslexia and the dyslexia type were tested using reading tests that included stimuli sensitive to the various dyslexia types. Attention deficit and its type was established through attention tasks assessing sustained, selective, orienting, and executive attention functioning. Using this procedure, we identified 55 participants who showed a double dissociation between reading and attention: 28 had dyslexia with normal attention and 27 had attention deficits with normal reading. Importantly, each dyslexia with suspected attentional basis dissociated from attention: we found 21 individuals with LPD, 13 AD, 2 neglect dyslexia, and 12 surface dyslexia without attention deficits. Other dyslexia types (vowel dyslexia, phonological dyslexia, visual dyslexia) also dissociated from attention deficits. Examination of 55 additional individuals with both a specific dyslexia and a certain attention deficit found no attention function that was consistently linked with any dyslexia type. Specifically, LPD and AD dissociated from selective attention, neglect dyslexia dissociated from orienting, and surface dyslexia dissociated from sustained and executive attention. These results indicate that

  9. Electrophysiological evidence for functionally distinct neuronal populations in the human substantia nigra.

    PubMed

    Ramayya, Ashwin G; Zaghloul, Kareem A; Weidemann, Christoph T; Baltuch, Gordon H; Kahana, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    The human substantia nigra (SN) is thought to consist of two functionally distinct neuronal populations-dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the pars compacta subregion and GABA-ergic neurons in the pars reticulata subregion. However, a functional dissociation between these neuronal populations has not previously been demonstrated in the awake human. Here we obtained microelectrode recordings from the SN of patients undergoing deep brain stimulation (DBS) surgery for Parkinson's disease as they performed a two-alternative reinforcement learning task. Following positive feedback presentation, we found that putative DA and GABA neurons demonstrated distinct temporal dynamics. DA neurons demonstrated phasic increases in activity (250-500 ms post-feedback) whereas putative GABA neurons demonstrated more delayed and sustained increases in activity (500-1000 ms post-feedback). These results provide the first electrophysiological evidence for a functional dissociation between DA and GABA neurons in the human SN. We discuss possible functions for these neuronal responses based on previous findings in human and animal studies. PMID:25249957

  10. Somatodendritic and excitatory postsynaptic distribution of neuron-type dystrophin isoform, Dp40, in hippocampal neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Fujimoto, Takahiro; Itoh, Kyoko Yaoi, Takeshi; Fushiki, Shinji

    2014-09-12

    Highlights: • Identification of dystrophin (Dp) shortest isoform, Dp40, is a neuron-type Dp. • Dp40 expression is temporally and differentially regulated in comparison to Dp71. • Somatodendritic and nuclear localization of Dp40. • Dp40 is localized to excitatory postsynapses. • Dp40 might play roles in dendritic and synaptic functions. - Abstract: The Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) gene produces multiple dystrophin (Dp) products due to the presence of several promoters. We previously reported the existence of a novel short isoform of Dp, Dp40, in adult mouse brain. However, the exact biochemical expression profile and cytological distribution of the Dp40 protein remain unknown. In this study, we generated a polyclonal antibody against the NH{sub 2}-terminal region of the Dp40 and identified the expression profile of Dp40 in the mouse brain. Through an analysis using embryonic and postnatal mouse cerebrums, we found that Dp40 emerged from the early neonatal stages until adulthood, whereas Dp71, an another Dp short isoform, was highly detected in both prenatal and postnatal cerebrums. Intriguingly, relative expressions of Dp40 and Dp71 were prominent in cultured dissociated neurons and non-neuronal cells derived from mouse hippocampus, respectively. Furthermore, the immunocytological distribution of Dp40 was analyzed in dissociated cultured neurons, revealing that Dp40 is detected in the soma and its dendrites, but not in the axon. It is worthy to note that Dp40 is localized along the subplasmalemmal region of the dendritic shafts, as well as at excitatory postsynaptic sites. Thus, Dp40 was identified as a neuron-type Dp possibly involving dendritic and synaptic functions.

  11. Isolation of Sensory Neurons of Aplysia californica for Patch Clamp Recordings of Glutamatergic Currents

    PubMed Central

    Fieber, Lynne A.; Carlson, Stephen L.; Kempsell, Andrew T.; Greer, Justin B.; Schmale, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    The marine gastropod mollusk Aplysia californica has a venerable history as a model of nervous system function, with particular significance in studies of learning and memory. The typical preparations for such studies are ones in which the sensory and motoneurons are left intact in a minimally dissected animal, or a technically elaborate neuronal co-culture of individual sensory and motoneurons. Less common is the isolated neuronal preparation in which small clusters of nominally homogeneous neurons are dissociated into single cells in short term culture. Such isolated cells are useful for the biophysical characterization of ion currents using patch clamp techniques, and targeted modulation of these conductances. A protocol for preparing such cultures is described. The protocol takes advantage of the easily identifiable glutamatergic sensory neurons of the pleural and buccal ganglia, and describes their dissociation and minimal maintenance in culture for several days without serum. PMID:23892672

  12. Refractive index change in dissociating shocked benzene

    SciTech Connect

    Erskine, D.J.

    1994-06-01

    A calculation is made of the refractive index of a shocked solution of hydrocarbon species and spheroidal carbon particles that would be the dissociation products of benzene. The results is evaluated for benzene shocked to 15 GPa, both for an arbitrary endpoint distribution of products and reactant, and for a specific endpoint distribution suggested by a statistical-mechanical calculation. In the case of diamond particles, the refractive index is predicted to decrease by a small amount (from 1.96 to 1.75) as the dissociation proceeds. In the case of graphite particles of large oblateness, the refractive index could increase significantly through the dissociation (from 1.96 to 2.75 for infinitely oblate platelets). Thus the measurement of the time dependent refractive index through the dissociation of shocked benzene can indicate the morphology of the carbon particulates as well as the time scale for this reaction. We propose using the refractive index as a measure of completion of the dissociation reaction. This would allow a determination of the instantaneous amount of carbon in particulate form, information which is valuable in conjunction with Mie scattering experiments for example.

  13. Intrinsic disorder accelerates dissociation rather than association.

    PubMed

    Umezawa, Koji; Ohnuki, Jun; Higo, Junichi; Takano, Mitsunori

    2016-08-01

    The intrinsically disordered protein (IDP) has distinct properties both physically and biologically: it often becomes folded when binding to the target and is frequently involved in signal transduction. The physical property seems to be compatible with the biological property where fast association and dissociation between IDP and the target are required. While fast association has been well studied, fueled by the fly-casting mechanism, the dissociation kinetics has received less attention. We here study how the intrinsic disorder affects the dissociation kinetics, as well as the association kinetics, paying attention to the interaction strength at the binding site (i.e., the quality of the "fly lure"). Coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation of the pKID-KIX system, a well-studied IDP system, shows that the association rate becomes larger as the disorder-inducing flexibility that was imparted to the model is increased, but the acceleration is marginal and turns into deceleration as the quality of the fly lure is worsened. In contrast, the dissociation rate is greatly enhanced as the disorder is increased, indicating that intrinsic disorder serves for rapid signal switching more effectively through dissociation than association. Proteins 2016; 84:1124-1133. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27122223

  14. Ion-induced dissociation dynamics of acetylene

    SciTech Connect

    De, Sankar; Rajput, Jyoti; Roy, A.; Safvan, C. P.; Ghosh, P. N.

    2008-02-15

    We report on the results of dissociation dynamics of multiple charged acetylene molecules formed in collision with 1.2 MeV Ar{sup 8+} projectiles. Using the coincidence map, we can separate out the different dissociation pathways between carbon and hydrogen ionic fragments as well as complete two-body breakup events. From the measured slopes of the coincidence islands for carbon atomic fragments and theoretical values determined from the charge and momentum distribution of the correlated particles, we observe a diatom like behavior of the C-C charged complex during dissociation of multiply charged C{sub 2}H{sub 2}. We conclude that this behavior in breakup dynamics is a signature of sequentiality in dissociation of this multiply charged molecular species. The shape and orientation of the islands give further information about the momentum balance in the fragmentation process of two- or many-body dissociation pathways. Kinetic energy release of different breakup channels are reported here and compared with values calculated from the pure Coulomb explosion model.

  15. Isotope separation by photoselective dissociative electron capture

    DOEpatents

    Stevens, Charles G. [Pleasanton, CA

    1978-08-29

    A method of separating isotopes based on photoselective electron capture dissociation of molecules having an electron capture cross section dependence on the vibrational state of the molecule. A molecular isotope source material is irradiated to selectively excite those molecules containing a desired isotope to a predetermined vibrational state having associated therewith an electron capture energy region substantially non-overlapping with the electron capture energy ranges associated with the lowest vibration states of the molecules. The isotope source is also subjected to electrons having an energy corresponding to the non-overlapping electron capture region whereby the selectively excited molecules preferentially capture electrons and dissociate into negative ions and neutrals. The desired isotope may be in the negative ion product or in the neutral product depending upon the mechanism of dissociation of the particular isotope source used. The dissociation product enriched in the desired isotope is then separated from the reaction system by conventional means. Specifically, .sup.235 UF.sub.6 is separated from a UF.sub.6 mixture by selective excitation followed by dissociative electron capture into .sup.235 UF.sub.5 - and F.

  16. Isotope separation by photoselective dissociative electron capture

    DOEpatents

    Stevens, C.G.

    1978-08-29

    Disclosed is a method of separating isotopes based on photoselective electron capture dissociation of molecules having an electron capture cross section dependence on the vibrational state of the molecule. A molecular isotope source material is irradiated to selectively excite those molecules containing a desired isotope to a predetermined vibrational state having associated therewith an electron capture energy region substantially non-overlapping with the electron capture energy ranges associated with the lowest vibration states of the molecules. The isotope source is also subjected to electrons having an energy corresponding to the non-overlapping electron capture region whereby the selectively excited molecules preferentially capture electrons and dissociate into negative ions and neutrals. The desired isotope may be in the negative ion product or in the neutral product depending upon the mechanism of dissociation of the particular isotope source used. The dissociation product enriched in the desired isotope is then separated from the reaction system by conventional means. Specifically, [sup 235]UF[sub 6] is separated from a UF[sub 6] mixture by selective excitation followed by dissociative electron capture into [sup 235]UF[sub 5]- and F. 2 figs.

  17. Phasic and Sustained Fear are Pharmacologically Dissociable in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Miles, Leigh; Davis, Michael; Walker, David

    2011-01-01

    Previous findings suggest differences in the neuroanatomical substrates of short- (seconds) vs longer-duration (minutes) fear responses. We now report that phasic and sustained fear can also be differentiated pharmacologically, based on their response to several treatments that either are or are not clinically effective anxiolytics. For these experiments, short- or long-duration clicker stimuli were paired with footshock. Acoustic startle amplitude was later measured in the absence of the clicker, or within seconds (phasic fear) or minutes (sustained fear) of its onset. Before testing, rats received a single injection of vehicle, the benzodiazepine chlordiazepoxide, the 5HT1A agonist and dopamine D2 antagonist buspirone, the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine, or a 3-week treatment with either vehicle or fluoxetine. Chlordiazepoxide blocked sustained, but not phasic startle increases. Acute buspirone, which is not anxiolytic in human beings, did not affect sustained startle increases, but did disrupt phasic increases. Chronic fluoxetine blocked sustained startle increases and unreliably reduced phasic increases; acute fluoxetine affected neither. The results indicate that phasic and sustained fear responses can be pharmacologically dissociated, further validating this distinction, and suggest that sustained startle increases may be especially useful as anxiety models and anxiolytic screens. PMID:21471958

  18. Dissociation in virtual reality: depersonalization and derealization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garvey, Gregory P.

    2010-01-01

    This paper looks at virtual worlds such as Second Life7 (SL) as possible incubators of dissociation disorders as classified by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition3 (also known as the DSM-IV). Depersonalization is where "a person feels that he or she has changed in some way or is somehow unreal." Derealization when "the same beliefs are held about one's surroundings." Dissociative Identity Disorder (DID), previously known as multiple personality disorder fits users of Second Life who adopt "in-world" avatars and in effect, enact multiple distinct identities or personalities (known as alter egos or alters). Select questions from the Structured Clinical Interview for Depersonalization (SCI-DER)8 will be discussed as they might apply to the user's experience in Second Life. Finally I would like to consider the hypothesis that rather than a pathological disorder, dissociation is a normal response to the "artificial reality" of Second Life.

  19. Electron Transfer Dissociation of Oligonucleotide Cations.

    PubMed

    Smith, Suncerae I; Brodbelt, Jennifer S

    2009-06-01

    Electron transfer dissociation (ETD) of multi-protonated 6 - 20-mer oligonucleotides and 12- and 14-mer duplexes is compared to collision activated dissociation (CAD). ETD causes efficient charge reduction of the multi-protonated oligonucleotides in addition to limited backbone cleavages to yield sequence ions of low abundance. Subsequent CAD of the charge-reduced oligonucleotides formed upon electron transfer, in a net process termed electron transfer collision activated dissociation (ETcaD), results in rich fragmentation in terms of w, a, z, and d products, with a marked decrease in the abundance of base loss ions and internal fragments. Complete sequencing was possible for nearly all oligonucleotides studied. ETcaD of an oligonucleotide duplex resulted in specific backbone cleavages, with conservation of weaker non-covalent bonds. PMID:20161288

  20. Type and Timing of Childhood Maltreatment and Severity of Shutdown Dissociation in Patients with Schizophrenia Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Schalinski, Inga; Teicher, Martin H.

    2015-01-01

    Dissociation, particularly the shutting down of sensory, motor and speech systems, has been proposed to emerge in susceptible individuals as a defensive response to traumatic stress. In contrast, other individuals show signs of hyperarousal to acute threat. A key question is whether exposure to particular types of stressful events during specific stages of development can program an individual to have a strong dissociative response to subsequent stressors. Vulnerability to ongoing shutdown dissociation was assessed in 75 inpatients (46M/29F, M = 31±10 years old) with schizophrenia spectrum disorder and related to number of traumatic events experienced or witnessed during childhood or adulthood. The Maltreatment and Abuse Chronology of Exposure (MACE) scale was used to collect retrospective recall of exposure to ten types of maltreatment during each year of childhood. Severity of shutdown dissociation was related to number of childhood but not adult traumatic events. Random forest regression with conditional trees indicated that type and timing of childhood maltreatment could predictably account for 31% of the variance (p < 0.003) in shutdown dissociation, with peak vulnerability occurring at 13-14 years of age and with exposure to emotional neglect followed by various forms of emotional abuse. These findings suggest that there may be windows of vulnerability to the development of shutdown dissociation. Results support the hypothesis that experienced events are more important than witnessed events, but challenge the hypothesis that “life-threatening” events are a critical determinant. PMID:25992568

  1. A preliminary study of cortisol and norepinephrine reactivity to psychosocial stress in borderline personality disorder with high and low dissociation.

    PubMed

    Simeon, Daphne; Knutelska, Margaret; Smith, Lisa; Baker, Bryann R; Hollander, Eric

    2007-01-15

    The goal of the current study was to investigate subjective and neurohormonal reactivity to acute psychosocial stress in borderline personality disorder (BPD) as a function of dissociative symptoms. Five BPD subjects with high dissociation, 8 BPD subjects with low dissociation, and 11 healthy control subjects were compared in basal urinary cortisol and norepinephrine, as well as in plasma cortisol and norepinephrine reactivity to the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST). Subjective stress rating and emotional response to the TSST were also measured. The three groups differed significantly in cortisol stress reactivity, with the high-dissociation BPD group demonstrating the most robust response. The three groups did not significantly differ in norepinephrine stress reactivity. In the combined BPD sample, dissociation severity tended to be inversely correlated with basal urinary norepinephrine, was positively correlated with norepinephrine stress reactivity. Childhood trauma was inversely correlated with basal urinary cortisol. In conclusion, despite its small sample size this pilot study suggests that dissociative symptomatology may be a marker of heightened biological vulnerability to stress in BPD, and merits further study. PMID:17169436

  2. Psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy for patients with dissociative identity disorder.

    PubMed

    Gentile, Julie P; Dillon, Kristy S; Gillig, Paulette Marie

    2013-02-01

    There is a wide variety of what have been called "dissociative disorders," including dissociative amnesia, dissociative fugue, depersonalization disorder, dissociative identity disorder, and forms of dissociative disorder not otherwise specified. Some of these diagnoses, particularly dissociative identity disorder, are controversial and have been questioned by many clinicians over the years. The disorders may be under-diagnosed or misdiagnosed, but many persons who have experienced trauma report "dissociative" symptoms. Prevalence of dissociative disorders is unknown, but current estimates are higher than previously thought. This paper reviews clinical, phenomenological, and epidemiological data regarding diagnosis in general, and illustrates possible treatment interventions for dissociative identity disorder, with a focus on psychotherapy interventions and a review of current psychopharmacology recommendations as part of a comprehensive multidisciplinary treatment plan. PMID:23556139

  3. Swirling flow of a dissociated gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfram, W. R., Jr.; Walker, W. F.

    1975-01-01

    Most physical applications of the swirling flow, defined as a vortex superimposed on an axial flow in the nozzle, involve high temperatures and the possibility of real gas effects. The generalized one-dimensional swirling flow in a converging-diverging nozzle is analyzed for equilibrium and frozen dissociation using the ideal dissociating gas model. Numerical results are provided to illustrate the major effects and to compare with results obtained for a perfect gas with constant ratio of specific heats. It is found that, even in the case of real gases, perfect gas calculations can give a good estimate of the reduction in mass flow due to swirl.

  4. Dissociation of ultracold molecules with Feshbach resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Duerr, Stephan; Volz, Thomas; Rempe, Gerhard

    2004-09-01

    Ultracold molecules are associated from an atomic Bose-Einstein condensate by ramping a magnetic field across a Feshbach resonance. The reverse ramp dissociates the molecules. The kinetic energy released in the dissociation process is used to measure the widths of four Feshbach resonances in {sup 87}Rb. This method to determine the width works remarkably well for narrow resonances even in the presence of significant magnetic-field noise. In addition, a quasimonoenergetic atomic wave is created by jumping the magnetic field across the Feshbach resonance.

  5. Dissociation and recombination in an inhomogeneous gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuščer, Ivan

    1991-09-01

    The system of Boltzmann equations of Ludwig and Heil for a dissociating gas mixture is reviewed and reformulated in terms of differential cross sections. For the purpose of Monte Carlo simulations, collision models of the type of Borgnakke and Larsen are proposed. In case of short-lived transient flows of molecular gases and at not too high temperatures, simulation of scattering collisions is expected to suffice; the distribution function of the dissociated particles can be evaluated afterwards by integration, and recombination can be ignored.

  6. Quantum Zeno control of coherent dissociation

    SciTech Connect

    Khripkov, C.; Vardi, A.

    2011-08-15

    We study the effect of dephasing on the coherent dissociation dynamics of an atom-molecule Bose-Einstein condensate. We show that when phase-noise intensity is strong with respect to the inverse correlation time of the stimulated process, dissociation is suppressed via a Bose enhanced quantum Zeno effect. This is complementary to the quantum Zeno control of phase-diffusion in a bimodal condensate by symmetric noise [Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 220403 (2008)] in that the controlled process here is phase formation and the required decoherence mechanism for its suppression is purely phase noise.

  7. Peritraumatic Distress and Dissociation in Prolonged Grief and Posttraumatic Stress Following Violent and Unexpected Deaths.

    PubMed

    Boelen, Paul A

    2015-01-01

    This study examined associations between the violence of a loss and the suddenness of a loss and symptom levels of prolonged grief disorder (PGD) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) after the death of a loved one. A further aim was to investigate whether peritraumatic distress (i.e., fear, helplessness, and horror) and peritraumatic dissociation mediate the emotional impact of violent losses and unexpected losses. We obtained self-reported data from 265 individuals bereaved in the previous 3 years by losses due to violent causes (17%) or illness (83%). Outcomes showed that participants who experienced violent losses (due to homicide, suicide, or accident) reported more PGD symptoms and PTSD symptoms compared to those confronted with illness loss. In this latter group, greater perceived unexpectedness was positively associated with PGD severity and PTSD severity. Multiple mediation analyses showed that the impact of violent loss and unexpectedness of the loss on PGD severity and PTSD severity was fully mediated by peritraumatic distress and dissociation; peritraumatic helplessness and peritraumatic dissociation (but not peritraumatic fear and horror) emerged as unique mediators. Findings suggest that both violent and unexpected losses exacerbate postloss psychopathology, which is at least partially because of such losses yielding more intense acute helplessness and dissociative responses. PMID:26156555

  8. The role of dimensionality in neuronal network dynamics.

    PubMed

    Ulloa Severino, Francesco Paolo; Ban, Jelena; Song, Qin; Tang, Mingliang; Bianconi, Ginestra; Cheng, Guosheng; Torre, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Recent results from network theory show that complexity affects several dynamical properties of networks that favor synchronization. Here we show that synchronization in 2D and 3D neuronal networks is significantly different. Using dissociated hippocampal neurons we compared properties of cultures grown on a flat 2D substrates with those formed on 3D graphene foam scaffolds. Both 2D and 3D cultures had comparable glia to neuron ratio and the percentage of GABAergic inhibitory neurons. 3D cultures because of their dimension have many connections among distant neurons leading to small-world networks and their characteristic dynamics. After one week, calcium imaging revealed moderately synchronous activity in 2D networks, but the degree of synchrony of 3D networks was higher and had two regimes: a highly synchronized (HS) and a moderately synchronized (MS) regime. The HS regime was never observed in 2D networks. During the MS regime, neuronal assemblies in synchrony changed with time as observed in mammalian brains. After two weeks, the degree of synchrony in 3D networks decreased, as observed in vivo. These results show that dimensionality determines properties of neuronal networks and that several features of brain dynamics are a consequence of its 3D topology. PMID:27404281

  9. The role of dimensionality in neuronal network dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Ulloa Severino, Francesco Paolo; Ban, Jelena; Song, Qin; Tang, Mingliang; Bianconi, Ginestra; Cheng, Guosheng; Torre, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Recent results from network theory show that complexity affects several dynamical properties of networks that favor synchronization. Here we show that synchronization in 2D and 3D neuronal networks is significantly different. Using dissociated hippocampal neurons we compared properties of cultures grown on a flat 2D substrates with those formed on 3D graphene foam scaffolds. Both 2D and 3D cultures had comparable glia to neuron ratio and the percentage of GABAergic inhibitory neurons. 3D cultures because of their dimension have many connections among distant neurons leading to small-world networks and their characteristic dynamics. After one week, calcium imaging revealed moderately synchronous activity in 2D networks, but the degree of synchrony of 3D networks was higher and had two regimes: a highly synchronized (HS) and a moderately synchronized (MS) regime. The HS regime was never observed in 2D networks. During the MS regime, neuronal assemblies in synchrony changed with time as observed in mammalian brains. After two weeks, the degree of synchrony in 3D networks decreased, as observed in vivo. These results show that dimensionality determines properties of neuronal networks and that several features of brain dynamics are a consequence of its 3D topology. PMID:27404281

  10. Carbon monoxide dissociative attachment and resonant dissociation by electron-impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laporta, V.; Tennyson, J.; Celiberto, R.

    2016-02-01

    Low-energy dissociative electron attachment and resonant electron impact dissociation of CO molecule are considered. Ro-vibrationally resolved cross sections and rate coefficients for both the processes are calculated using an ab-initio model based on the low-lying \\text{X}{{}2}\\Pi resonance of CO-. Final results show that the cross sections increases very rapidly as a function of the ro-vibrational level; these cross sections should be useful for understanding kinetic dissociation of CO in strongly non-equilibrium plasmas.

  11. High voltage-activated Ca2+ currents in rat supraoptic neurones: biophysical properties and expression of the various channel alpha1 subunits.

    PubMed

    Joux, N; Chevaleyre, V; Alonso, G; Boissin-Agasse, L; Moos, F C; Desarménien, M G; Hussy, N

    2001-07-01

    The diversity of Ca2+ currents was studied in voltage-clamped acutely dissociated neurones from the rat supraoptic nucleus (SON), and the expression of the various corresponding pore-forming alpha1 subunits determined by immunohistochemistry. We observed the presence of all high voltage-activated L-, N-, P/Q- and R-type currents. We did not observe low-voltage-activated T-type current. The multimodal current/voltage relationships of L- and R-type currents indicated further heterogeneity within these current types, each exhibiting two components that differed by a high (-20 mV) and a lower (-40 mV) threshold potential of activation. L- and R-type currents were fast activating and showed time-dependent inactivation, conversely to N- and P/Q-type currents, which activated more slowly and did not inactivate. The immunocytochemical staining indicated that the soma and proximal dendrites of SON neurones were immunoreactive for Cav1.2, Cav1.3 (forming L-type channels), Cav2.1 (P/Q-type), Cav2.2 (N-type) and Cav2.3 subunits (R-type). Each subunit exhibited further specificity in its distribution throughout the nucleus, and we particularly observed strong immunostaining of Cav1.3 and Cav2.3 subunits within the dendritic zone of the SON. These data show a high heterogeneity of Ca2+ channels in SON. neurones, both in their functional properties and cellular distribution. The lower threshold and rapidly activating L- and R-type currents should underlie major Ca2+ entry during action potentials, while the slower and higher threshold N- and P/Q-type currents should be preferentially recruited during burst activity. It will be of key interest to determine their respective role in the numerous Ca2+-dependent events that control the activity and physiology of SON neurones PMID:11442778

  12. Mitochondria buffer non-toxic calcium loads and release calcium through the mitochondrial permeability transition pore and sodium/calcium exchanger in rat basal forebrain neurons.

    PubMed

    Murchison, D; Griffith, W H

    2000-01-31

    Mitochondria participate in intracellular Ca2+ buffering and signalling. They are also major mediators of cell death. Toxic Ca2+ accumulation in mitochondria is widely believed to initiate cell death in many cell types by opening the permeability transition pore (PTP). In non-neuronal cells, the PTP has been implicated as a Ca2+ release mechanism in physiological Ca2+ signalling. In neurons, Ca2+ release from mitochondria has been attributed primarily to mitochondrial Na+/Ca2+ exchange. Using fura-2 ratiometric microfluorimetry in acutely dissociated rat basal forebrain neurons, we show that mitochondria are able to buffer non-toxic Ca2+ loads arising from caffeine-sensitive internal stores or from extracellular influx through voltage gated channels. We also show that these non-toxic Ca2+ loads are reversibly released from mitochondria through the PTP and the Na+/Ca2+ exchanger. Evoked Ca2+ transients have characteristic peak and shoulder features mediated by mitochondrial buffering and release. Depolarizing mitochondria with carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP, 5 microM) causes release of mitochondrial Ca2+ and prevents Ca2+ uptake. In CCCP, the magnitudes of evoked Ca2+ transients are increased, and the peak and shoulder features are eliminated. The PTP antagonist, cyclosporin A, (CSA, 2 microM) and the Na+/Ca2+ exchange blocker, clonazepam, (CLO, 20 microM) reversibly inhibited both the shoulder features of evoked Ca2+ transients and Ca2+ transients associated with CCCP application. We suggest that central neuronal mitochondria buffer and release Ca2+ through the PTP and Na+/Ca2+ exchanger during physiological Ca2+ signalling. We also suggest that CLO blocks both the PTP and the mitochondrial Na+/Ca2+ exchanger. PMID:10784115

  13. Acute Bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    Bronchitis is an inflammation of the bronchial tubes, the airways that carry air to your lungs. It ... chest tightness. There are two main types of bronchitis: acute and chronic. Most cases of acute bronchitis ...

  14. Excitatory cortical neurons with multipolar shape establish neuronal polarity by forming a tangentially oriented axon in the intermediate zone.

    PubMed

    Hatanaka, Yumiko; Yamauchi, Kenta

    2013-01-01

    The formation of axon-dendrite polarity is crucial for neuron to make the proper information flow within the brain. Although the processes of neuronal polarity formation have been extensively studied using neurons in dissociated culture, the corresponding developmental processes in vivo are still unclear. Here, we illuminate the initial steps of morphological polarization of excitatory cortical neurons in situ, by sparsely labeling their neuroepithelial progenitors using in utero electroporation and then examining their neuronal progeny in brain sections and in slice cultures. Morphological analysis showed that an axon-like long tangential process formed in progeny cells in the intermediate zone (IZ). Time-lapse imaging analysis using slice culture revealed that progeny cells with multipolar shape, after alternately extending and retracting their short processes for several hours, suddenly elongated a long process tangentially. These cells then transformed into a bipolar shape, extending a pia-directed leading process, and migrated radially leaving the tangential process behind, which gave rise to an "L-shaped" axon. Our findings suggest that neuronal polarity in these cells is established de novo from a nonpolarized stage in vivo and indicate that excitatory cortical neurons with multipolar shape in the IZ initiate axon outgrowth before radial migration into the cortical plate. PMID:22267309

  15. Kinetic ion thermometers for electron transfer dissociation.

    PubMed

    Pepin, Robert; Tureček, František

    2015-02-19

    Peptide fragment ions of the z-type were used as kinetic ion thermometers to gauge the internal energy of peptide cation-radicals produced by electron transfer in the gas-phase. Electron transfer dissociation (ETD)-produced z2 ions containing the leucine residue, z2(Leu-Lys) and z2(Leu-Arg), were found to undergo spontaneous dissociation by loss of C3H7 that was monitored by time-resolved kinetic measurements on the time scale of the linear ion trap mass spectrometer. Kinetic modeling of the dissociations, including collisional cooling and product loss by neutralization, provided unimolecular rate constants for dissociation that were converted to the z ion internal energies using RRKM theory. The internal energy of z2(Leu-Lys) and z2(Leu-Arg) fragment ions was found to decrease with the increasing size of the precursor peptide ion, indicating vibrational energy partitioning between the ion and neutral fragments and ergodic behavior. The experimentally determined excitation in the peptide cation-radicals upon electron transfer (285-327 kJ mol(-1)) was found to be lower than that theoretically calculated from the reaction exothermicity. The reasons for this missing energy are discussed. PMID:25594857

  16. Double Dissociation between Reading and Spelling Deficits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moll, Kristina; Landerl, Karin

    2009-01-01

    In two studies dissociations between reading and spelling skills were examined. Study 1 reports equally high prevalence rates for isolated deficits in reading (7%) or spelling (6%) in a representative sample (N = 2,029) of German-speaking elementary school children. In Study 2, children with isolated deficits were presented with the same words to…

  17. EVIDENCE FOR CO DISSOCIATION ON RHODIUM SURFACES

    SciTech Connect

    Castner, D.G.; Dubois, L.H.; Sexton, B.A.; Somorjai, G.A.

    1980-06-01

    Carbon monoxide adsorbs molecularly on rhodium surfaces at 300K, but if the rhodium samples are heated in the presence of carbon monoxide, there is evidence for carbon-oxygen bond breaking at step and/or defect sites. The effects of step and defect site density, subsurface oxygen concentration, and oxygen dissolution into the rhodium lattice on CO dissociation are discussed.

  18. Experimental Dissociation of Methane Hydrates Through Depressurization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borgfeldt, T.; Flemings, P. B.; Meyer, D.; You, K.

    2015-12-01

    We dissociated methane hydrates by stepwise depressurization. The initial hydrates were formed by injecting gas into a cylindrical sample of brine-saturated, coarse-grained sand at hydrate-stable conditions with the intention of reaching three-phase equilibrium. The sample was initially at 1°C with a pore pressure of 1775 psi and a salinity of 7 wt. % NaBr. The depressurization setup consisted of one pump filled with tap water attached to the confining fluid port and a second pump attached to the inlet port where the methane was injected. Depressurization was conducted over sixteen hours at a constant temperature of 1°C. The pore pressure was stepwise reduced from 1775 psi to atmospheric pressure by pulling known volumes of gas from the sample. After each extraction, we recorded the instantaneous and equilibrium pore pressure. 0.503 moles of methane were removed from the sample. The pore pressure decreased smoothly and nonlinearly with the cumulative gas withdrawn from the sample. We interpret that hydrate began to dissociate immediately with depressurization, and it continued to dissociate when the pressure decreased below the three-phase pressure for 1°C and 0 wt. % salinity. Two breaks in slope in the pressure vs. mass extracted data are bounded by smooth, nonlinear curves with differing slopes on either side. We attribute the breaks to dissociation of three zones of hydrate concentration. We created a box model to simulate the experimental behavior. For a 10% initial gas saturation (estimated from the hydrate formation experiment and based on mass conservation), an initial hydrate saturation of 55% is required to match the total methane extracted from the sample. Future experiments will be conducted over a longer timespan while monitoring hydrate dissociation with CT imaging throughout the process.

  19. Thermal dissociation behavior and dissociation enthalpies of methane-carbon dioxide mixed hydrates

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, T.H.; Kneafsey, T.J.; Rees, E.V.L.

    2011-02-15

    Replacement of methane with carbon dioxide in hydrate has been proposed as a strategy for geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and/or production of methane (CH{sub 4}) from natural hydrate deposits. This replacement strategy requires a better understanding of the thermodynamic characteristics of binary mixtures of CH{sub 4} and CO{sub 2} hydrate (CH{sub 4}-CO{sub 2} mixed hydrates), as well as thermophysical property changes during gas exchange. This study explores the thermal dissociation behavior and dissociation enthalpies of CH{sub 4}-CO{sub 2} mixed hydrates. We prepared CH{sub 4}-CO{sub 2} mixed hydrate samples from two different, well-defined gas mixtures. During thermal dissociation of a CH{sub 4}-CO{sub 2} mixed hydrate sample, gas samples from the head space were periodically collected and analyzed using gas chromatography. The changes in CH{sub 4}-CO{sub 2} compositions in both the vapor phase and hydrate phase during dissociation were estimated based on the gas chromatography measurements. It was found that the CO{sub 2} concentration in the vapor phase became richer during dissociation because the initial hydrate composition contained relatively more CO{sub 2} than the vapor phase. The composition change in the vapor phase during hydrate dissociation affected the dissociation pressure and temperature; the richer CO{sub 2} in the vapor phase led to a lower dissociation pressure. Furthermore, the increase in CO{sub 2} concentration in the vapor phase enriched the hydrate in CO{sub 2}. The dissociation enthalpy of the CH{sub 4}-CO{sub 2} mixed hydrate was computed by fitting the Clausius-Clapeyron equation to the pressure-temperature (PT) trace of a dissociation test. It was observed that the dissociation enthalpy of the CH{sub 4}-CO{sub 2} mixed hydrate lays between the limiting values of pure CH{sub 4} hydrate and CO{sub 2} hydrate, increasing with the CO{sub 2} fraction in the hydrate phase.

  20. Single serotonergic neurons that modulate aggression in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Alekseyenko, Olga V; Chan, Yick-Bun; Fernandez, Maria de la Paz; Bülow, Torsten; Pankratz, Michael J; Kravitz, Edward A

    2014-11-17

    Monoamine serotonin (5HT) has been linked to aggression for many years across species. However, elaboration of the neurochemical pathways that govern aggression has proven difficult because monoaminergic neurons also regulate other behaviors. There are approximately 100 serotonergic neurons in the Drosophila nervous system, and they influence sleep, circadian rhythms, memory, and courtship. In the Drosophila model of aggression, the acute shut down of the entire serotonergic system yields flies that fight less, whereas induced activation of 5HT neurons promotes aggression. Using intersectional genetics, we restricted the population of 5HT neurons that can be reproducibly manipulated to identify those that modulate aggression. Although similar approaches were used recently to find aggression-modulating dopaminergic and Fru(M)-positive peptidergic neurons, the downstream anatomical targets of the neurons that make up aggression-controlling circuits remain poorly understood. Here, we identified a symmetrical pair of serotonergic PLP neurons that are necessary for the proper escalation of aggression. Silencing these neurons reduced aggression in male flies, and activating them increased aggression in male flies. GFP reconstitution across synaptic partners (GRASP) analyses suggest that 5HT-PLP neurons form contacts with 5HT1A receptor-expressing neurons in two distinct anatomical regions of the brain. Activation of these 5HT1A receptor-expressing neurons, in turn, caused reductions in aggression. Our studies, therefore, suggest that aggression may be held in check, at least in part, by inhibitory input from 5HT1A receptor-bearing neurons, which can be released by activation of the 5HT-PLP neurons. PMID:25447998

  1. Single serotonergic neurons that modulate aggression in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Alekseyenko, Olga V.; Chan, Yick-Bun; de la Paz Fernandez, Maria; Bülow, Torsten; Pankratz, Michael J.; Kravitz, Edward A.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Monoamine serotonin (5HT) has been linked to aggression for many years across species [1–3]. However, elaboration of the neurochemical pathways that govern aggression has proven difficult because monoaminergic neurons also regulate other behaviors [4, 5]. There are about 100 serotonergic neurons in the Drosophila nervous system and they influence sleep [6], circadian rhythms [7], memory [8, 9] and courtship [10]. In the Drosophila model of aggression [11] the acute shut down of the entire serotonergic system yields flies that fight less, while induced activation of 5HT neurons promotes aggression [12]. Using intersectional genetics we restricted the population of 5HT neurons that can be reproducibly manipulated to identify those that modulate aggression. Although similar approaches were used recently to find aggression-modulating dopaminergic [13] and FruM –positive peptidergic [14] neurons, the downstream anatomical targets of the neurons that make up aggression-controlling circuits remain poorly understood. Here we identified a symmetrical pair of serotonergic PLP neurons that are necessary for the proper escalation of aggression. Silencing these neurons reduced, and activating them increased aggression in male flies. GFP reconstitution across synaptic partners (GRASP) [15] analyses suggests that 5HT-PLP neurons form contacts with 5HT1A receptor - expressing neurons in two distinct anatomical regions of the brain. Activation of these 5HT1A receptor-expressing neurons, in turn, caused reductions in aggression. Our studies, therefore, suggest that aggression may be held in check, at least in part, by inhibitory input from 5HT1A receptor-bearing neurons, which can be released by activation of the 5HT-PLP neurons. PMID:25447998

  2. Psychotherapy and Pharmacotherapy for Patients with Dissociative Identity Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Gentile, Julie P.; Dillon, Kristy S.

    2013-01-01

    There is a wide variety of what have been called “dissociative disorders,” including dissociative amnesia, dissociative fugue, depersonalization disorder, dissociative identity disorder, and forms of dissociative disorder not otherwise specified. Some of these diagnoses, particularly dissociative identity disorder, are controversial and have been questioned by many clinicians over the years. The disorders may be under-diagnosed or misdiagnosed, but many persons who have experienced trauma report “dissociative” symptoms. Prevalence of dissociative disorders is unknown, but current estimates are higher than previously thought. This paper reviews clinical, phenomenological, and epidemiological data regarding diagnosis in general, and illustrates possible treatment interventions for dissociative identity disorder, with a focus on psychotherapy interventions and a review of current psychopharmacology recommendations as part of a comprehensive multidisciplinary treatment plan. PMID:23556139

  3. Immunohistological demonstration of CaV3.2 T-type voltage-gated calcium channel expression in soma of dorsal root ganglion neurons and peripheral axons of rat and mouse.

    PubMed

    Rose, K E; Lunardi, N; Boscolo, A; Dong, X; Erisir, A; Jevtovic-Todorovic, V; Todorovic, S M

    2013-10-10

    Previous behavioral studies have revealed that CaV3.2 T-type calcium channels support peripheral nociceptive transmission and electrophysiological studies have established the presence of T-currents in putative nociceptive sensory neurons of dorsal root ganglion (DRG). To date, however, the localization pattern of this key nociceptive channel in the soma and peripheral axons of these cells has not been demonstrated due to lack of isoform-selective anti-CaV3.2 antibodies. In the present study a new polyclonal CaV3.2 antibody is used to localize CaV3.2 expression in rodent DRG neurons using different staining techniques including confocal and electron microscopy (EM). Confocal microscopy of both acutely dissociated cells and short-term cultures demonstrated strong immunofluorescence of anti-CaV3.2 antibody that was largely confined to smaller diameter DRG neurons where it co-localized with established immuno-markers of unmyelinated nociceptors, such as, CGRP, IB4 and peripherin. In contrast, a smaller proportion of these CaV3.2-labeled DRG cells also co-expressed neurofilament 200 (NF200), a marker of myelinated sensory neurons. In the rat sciatic nerve preparation, confocal microscopy demonstrated anti-CaV3.2 immunofluorescence which was co-localized with both peripherin and NF200. Further, EM revealed immuno-gold labeling of CaV3.2 preferentially in association with unmyelinated sensory fibers from mouse sciatic nerve. Finally, we demonstrated the expression of CaV3.2 channels in peripheral nerve endings of mouse hindpaw skin as shown by co-localization with Mrgpd-GFP-positive fibers. The CaV3.2 expression within the soma and peripheral axons of nociceptive sensory neurons further demonstrates the importance of this channel in peripheral pain transmission. PMID:23867767

  4. What contributes to predicting change in the treatment of dissociation: initial levels of dissociation, PTSD, or overall distress?

    PubMed

    Brand, Bethany L; Stadnik, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    Individuals with dissociative disorders (DDs) suffer from high levels of dissociation as well as posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and general distress. No research has investigated how changes in dissociation relate to changes in other symptoms over the course of treatment in patients with DD. Using a prospective, naturalistic design, we collected reports of symptoms from a sample of therapists and their patients diagnosed with dissociative identity disorder or dissociative disorder not otherwise specified who participated in the Treatment Outcome of Patients with Dissociative Disorders study. The patients completed surveys at intake (Time 1) into the study and at 30-month follow-up (Time 4). We found that dissociative symptoms, including amnesia, depersonalization/derealization, and absorption, at the initial assessment of the study ("initial") were related to initial levels of PTSD and general distress and that changes in dissociative symptoms were related to changes in PTSD and general distress. Initial dissociation was a significant predictor of change in dissociation at 30 months when we controlled for length of time for follow-up, length of time practicing therapy, and length of time treating dissociative patients. Our results suggest that a reduction in dissociative symptoms in DD patients is associated with reductions in the overall severity of dissociative, posttraumatic stress, and distress symptoms. PMID:23627481

  5. Dissociation of acetaldehyde in intense laser field: Coulomb explosion or field-assisted dissociation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elshakre, Mohamed E.; Gao, Lirong; Tang, Xiaoping; Wang, Sufan; Shu, Yafei; Kong, Fanao

    2003-09-01

    Dissociation of acetaldehyde in moderate strong laser field of 1013-1014W/cm2 was investigated. Singly charged parent ion CH3CHO+ and fragmental ions CH3+, CHO+, C2H4+, O+, CH2CHO+, and H+ were produced by 800 nm laser of 100 fs pulse duration and recorded by time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The CH3+ fragment further dissociated to CH2+, CH+, and C+ ions at higher intensity. Ab initio calculated results show that the singly-, doubly-, and triply charged parent ions are stable. So, the dissociation mechanism was not due to Coulomb explosion of multicharged ion. A field-assisted dissociation (FAD) theory, which assumes that only one bond undergoes dissociation while the rest of the molecular geometry stays unchanged, was employed to treat the dissociation dynamics. Accordingly, the dressed potential energy surfaces of the ground state for the parent and the fragment ions were calculated. Corresponding quasiclassical trajectory calculations show that the bond ruptures take place in the order of C-C, C-O, and C-H, agreeing with the observation. The observed angular dependence and charge distribution of the product ions can also be interpreted by the FAD theory.

  6. Does phasic trauma treatment make patients with dissociative identity disorder treatment more dissociative?

    PubMed

    Brand, Bethany; Loewenstein, Richard J

    2014-01-01

    Proponents of the iatrogenic model of the etiology of dissociative identity disorder (DID) have expressed concern that treatment focused on direct engagement and interaction with dissociated self-states harms DID patients. However, empirical data have shown that this type of DID treatment is beneficial. Analyzing data from the prospective Treatment of Patients With Dissociative Disorders (TOP DD) Study, we test empirically whether DID treatment is associated with clinically adverse manifestations of dissociated self-states: acting so differently that one feels like different people, hearing voices, and dissociative amnesia. We show that, over the course of the study, there were significant decreases in feeling like different people and hearing voices. These results indicate that this form of DID treatment does not lead to symptomatic worsening in these dimensions, as predicted by the iatrogenic model. Indeed, treatment provided by TOP DD therapists reduced, rather than increased, the extent to which patients experienced manifestations of pathological dissociation. Because severe symptomatology and impairment are associated with DID, iatrogenic harm may come from depriving DID patients of treatment that targets DID symptomatology. PMID:24377972

  7. In-Vacuum Dissociator for Atomic-Hydrogen Masers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vessot, R. F.

    1987-01-01

    Thermal control and vacuum sealing achieved while contamination avoided. Simple, relatively inexpensive molecular-hydrogen dissociator for atomic-hydrogen masers used on Earth or in vacuum of space. No air cooling required, and absence of elastomeric O-ring seals prevents contamination. In-vacuum dissociator for atomic hydrogen masers, hydrogen gas in glass dissociator dissociated by radio-frequency signal transmitted from surrounding 3-turn coil. Heat in glass conducted away by contacting metal surfaces.

  8. Dissociated lower limb muscle involvement in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Simon, Neil G; Lee, Michael; Bae, Jong Seok; Mioshi, Eneida; Lin, Cindy S-Y; Pfluger, Casey M; Henderson, Robert D; Vucic, Steve; Swash, Michael; Burke, David; Kiernan, Matthew C

    2015-06-01

    It has been suggested that corticomotoneuronal drive to ankle dorsiflexors is greater than to ankle plantar flexor muscles, despite the finding that plantar flexors are no less active than TA during walking and standing. The present study was undertaken to determine whether there was differential involvement of distal lower limb muscles in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), to elucidate pathophysiological mechanisms of selective muscle involvement. Prospective studies were undertaken in 52 ALS patients, including clinical assessment, disease staging (revised ALS functional rating scale), Medical Research Council sum score, and a scale of upper motor neurone (UMN) dysfunction. Motor unit number estimates (MUNE) and compound muscle action potentials (CMAP) from ankle dorsiflexors and plantar flexors were used to provide objective measures. A novel 'split leg index' was calculated as follows: SLI = CMAPDF ÷ CMAPPF. In ALS, there was significantly greater reduction of MUNE and CMAP amplitude recorded from plantar flexors when compared to dorsiflexors, suggesting preferential involvement of plantar flexor muscles, underpinning a 'split leg' appearance. The SLI correlated with clinical plantar flexor strength (R= -0.56, p < 0.001). In no patient did the SLI suggest preferential dorsiflexor involvement. In subgroup analyses, mean SLI was greatest in lower limb-onset ALS. In conclusion, the present study has established dissociated involvement of muscles acting around the ankle in ALS. We suggest this reflects underlying differences in cortical, descending or local spinal modulation of these muscles. PMID:25845764

  9. Temporal Characteristics of Gustatory Responses in Rat Parabrachial Neurons Vary by Stimulus and Chemosensitive Neuron Type

    PubMed Central

    Geran, Laura; Travers, Susan

    2013-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that temporal features of spike trains can increase the amount of information available for gustatory processing. However, the nature of these temporal characteristics and their relationship to different taste qualities and neuron types are not well-defined. The present study analyzed the time course of taste responses from parabrachial (PBN) neurons elicited by multiple applications of “sweet” (sucrose), “salty” (NaCl), “sour” (citric acid), and “bitter” (quinine and cycloheximide) stimuli in an acute preparation. Time course varied significantly by taste stimulus and best-stimulus classification. Across neurons, the ensemble code for the three electrolytes was similar initially but quinine diverged from NaCl and acid during the second 500ms of stimulation and all four qualities became distinct just after 1s. This temporal evolution was reflected in significantly broader tuning during the initial response. Metric space analyses of quality discrimination by individual neurons showed that increases in information (H) afforded by temporal factors was usually explained by differences in rate envelope, which had a greater impact during the initial 2s (22.5% increase in H) compared to the later response (9.5%). Moreover, timing had a differential impact according to cell type, with between-quality discrimination in neurons activated maximally by NaCl or citric acid most affected. Timing was also found to dramatically improve within-quality discrimination (80% increase in H) in neurons that responded optimally to bitter stimuli (B-best). Spikes from B-best neurons were also more likely to occur in bursts. These findings suggest that among PBN taste neurons, time-dependent increases in mutual information can arise from stimulus- and neuron-specific differences in response envelope during the initial dynamic period. A stable rate code predominates in later epochs. PMID:24124597

  10. Cognitive Processes in Dissociation: Comment on Giesbrecht et al. (2008)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bremner, J. Douglas

    2010-01-01

    In their recent review "Cognitive Processes in Dissociation: An Analysis of Core Theoretical Assumptions," published in "Psychological Bulletin", Giesbrecht, Lynn, Lilienfeld, and Merckelbach (2008) have challenged the widely accepted trauma theory of dissociation, which holds that dissociative symptoms are caused by traumatic stress. In doing so,…

  11. 21 CFR 886.1910 - Spectacle dissociation test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Spectacle dissociation test system. 886.1910... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1910 Spectacle dissociation test system. (a) Identification. A spectacle dissociation test system is an AC-powered or...

  12. 21 CFR 886.1910 - Spectacle dissociation test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Spectacle dissociation test system. 886.1910... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1910 Spectacle dissociation test system. (a) Identification. A spectacle dissociation test system is an AC-powered or...

  13. 21 CFR 886.1910 - Spectacle dissociation test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Spectacle dissociation test system. 886.1910... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1910 Spectacle dissociation test system. (a) Identification. A spectacle dissociation test system is an AC-powered or...

  14. 21 CFR 886.1910 - Spectacle dissociation test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Spectacle dissociation test system. 886.1910... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1910 Spectacle dissociation test system. (a) Identification. A spectacle dissociation test system is an AC-powered or...

  15. Development, Reliability, and Validity of a Child Dissociation Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Putnam, Frank W.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Evaluation of the Child Dissociative Checklist found it to be a reliable and valid observer report measure of dissociation in children, including sexually abused girls and children with dissociative disorder and with multiple personality disorder. The checklist, which is appended, is intended as a clinical screening instrument and research measure…

  16. Speech-Language Dissociations, Distractibility, and Childhood Stuttering

    PubMed Central

    Conture, Edward G.; Walden, Tedra A.; Lambert, Warren E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study investigated the relation among speech-language dissociations, attentional distractibility, and childhood stuttering. Method Participants were 82 preschool-age children who stutter (CWS) and 120 who do not stutter (CWNS). Correlation-based statistics (Bates, Appelbaum, Salcedo, Saygin, & Pizzamiglio, 2003) identified dissociations across 5 norm-based speech-language subtests. The Behavioral Style Questionnaire Distractibility subscale measured attentional distractibility. Analyses addressed (a) between-groups differences in the number of children exhibiting speech-language dissociations; (b) between-groups distractibility differences; (c) the relation between distractibility and speech-language dissociations; and (d) whether interactions between distractibility and dissociations predicted the frequency of total, stuttered, and nonstuttered disfluencies. Results More preschool-age CWS exhibited speech-language dissociations compared with CWNS, and more boys exhibited dissociations compared with girls. In addition, male CWS were less distractible than female CWS and female CWNS. For CWS, but not CWNS, less distractibility (i.e., greater attention) was associated with more speech-language dissociations. Last, interactions between distractibility and dissociations did not predict speech disfluencies in CWS or CWNS. Conclusions The present findings suggest that for preschool-age CWS, attentional processes are associated with speech-language dissociations. Future investigations are warranted to better understand the directionality of effect of this association (e.g., inefficient attentional processes → speech-language dissociations vs. inefficient attentional processes ← speech-language dissociations). PMID:26126203

  17. Cognitive Processes in Dissociation: An Analysis of Core Theoretical Assumptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giesbrecht, Timo; Lilienfield, Scott O.; Lynn, Steven Jay; Merckelbach, Harald

    2008-01-01

    Dissociation is typically defined as the lack of normal integration of thoughts, feelings, and experiences into consciousness and memory. The present article critically evaluates the research literature on cognitive processes in dissociation. The authors' review indicates that dissociation is characterized by subtle deficits in neuropsychological…

  18. Rate coefficients for dissociative attachment and resonant electron-impact dissociation involving vibrationally excited O{sub 2} molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Laporta, V.; Celiberto, R.; Tennyson, J.

    2014-12-09

    Rate coefficients for dissociative electron attachment and electron-impact dissociation processes, involving vibrationally excited molecular oxygen, are presented. Analytical fits of the calculated numerical data, useful in the applications, are also provided.

  19. Ketamine protects hippocampal neurons from anoxia in vitro.

    PubMed

    Rothman, S M; Thurston, J H; Hauhart, R E; Clark, G D; Solomon, J S

    1987-06-01

    Ketamine, a dissociative, general anesthetic, blocks the excitation produced by activating one class of excitatory amino acid receptors, the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor in the rat. We have found that ketamine can protect hippocampal neurons in culture and slice from anoxia. When added to cultures immediately prior to anoxic exposure, ketamine prevented the neuronal destruction seen after a day of anoxia. Neurons appeared undamaged and had normal resting and action potentials. Adenosine triphosphate levels in ketamine-protected anoxic cultures were approximately two-thirds of normal controls. Ketamine also prevented the irreversible loss of the population spike seen in hippocampal slices after prolonged perfusion with anoxic buffer. These results suggest that ketamine may have therapeutic potential in preventing anoxic damage from stroke in man. PMID:2819768

  20. Developing neuronal networks: Self-organized criticality predicts the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Jiangbo; Gong, Hui; Li, Xiangning; Luo, Qingming

    2013-01-01

    Self-organized criticality emerged in neural activity is one of the key concepts to describe the formation and the function of developing neuronal networks. The relationship between critical dynamics and neural development is both theoretically and experimentally appealing. However, whereas it is well-known that cortical networks exhibit a rich repertoire of activity patterns at different stages during in vitro maturation, dynamical activity patterns through the entire neural development still remains unclear. Here we show that a series of metastable network states emerged in the developing and ``aging'' process of hippocampal networks cultured from dissociated rat neurons. The unidirectional sequence of state transitions could be only observed in networks showing power-law scaling of distributed neuronal avalanches. Our data suggest that self-organized criticality may guide spontaneous activity into a sequential succession of homeostatically-regulated transient patterns during development, which may help to predict the tendency of neural development at early ages in the future.

  1. Dorsal–Ventral Gradient for Neuronal Plasticity in the Embryonic Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Pineda, Ricardo H.; Ribera, Angeles B.

    2008-01-01

    Within the developing Xenopus spinal cord, voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channel genes display different expression patterns, many of which occur in opposing dorsal–ventral gradients. Regional differences in Kv gene expression would predict different patterns of potassium current (IKv) regulation. However, during the first 24 h of postmitotic differentiation, all primary spinal neurons undergo a temporally coordinated upregulation of IKv density that shortens the duration of the action potential. Here, we tested whether spinal neurons demonstrate regional differences in IKv regulation subsequent to action potential maturation. We show that two types of neurons, I and II, can be identified in culture on the basis of biophysical and pharmacological properties of IKv and different firing patterns. Chronic increases in extracellular potassium, a signature of high neuronal activity, do not alter excitability properties of either neuron type. However, elevating extracellular potassium acutely after the period of action potential maturation leads to different changes in membrane properties of the two types of neurons. IKv of type I neurons gains sensitivity to the blocker XE991, whereas type II neurons increase IKv density and fire fewer action potentials. Moreover, by recording from neurons in vivo, we found that primary spinal neurons can be identified as either type I or type II. Type I neurons predominate in dorsal regions, whereas type II neurons localize to ventral regions. The findings reveal a dorsal–ventral gradient for IKv regulation and a novel form of neuronal plasticity in spinal cord neurons. PMID:18385340

  2. Mesmerising mirror neurons.

    PubMed

    Heyes, Cecilia

    2010-06-01

    Mirror neurons have been hailed as the key to understanding social cognition. I argue that three currents of thought-relating to evolution, atomism and telepathy-have magnified the perceived importance of mirror neurons. When they are understood to be a product of associative learning, rather than an adaptation for social cognition, mirror neurons are no longer mesmerising, but they continue to raise important questions about both the psychology of science and the neural bases of social cognition. PMID:20167276

  3. Expression of GFP-tagged neuronal glutamate transporters in cerebellar Purkinje neurons.

    PubMed

    Meera, Pratap; Dodson, Paul D; Karakossian, Movses H; Otis, Thomas S

    2005-11-01

    Of the five excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs) identified, two genes are expressed by neurons (EAAT3 and EAAT4) and give rise to transporters confined to neuronal cell bodies and dendrites. At an ultrastructural level, EAAT3 and EAAT4 proteins are clustered at the edges of postsynaptic densities of excitatory synapses. This pattern of localization suggests that postsynaptic EAATs may help to limit spillover of glutamate from excitatory synapses. In an effort to study transporter localization in living neurons and ultimately to manipulate uptake at intact synapses, we have developed viral reagents encoding neuronal EAATs tagged with GFP. We demonstrate that these fusion proteins are capable of Na(+)-dependent glutamate uptake, that they generate ionic conductances indistinguishable from their wild-type counterparts, and that GFP does not alter their glutamate dose-dependence. Two-photon microscopy was used to examine fusion protein expression in Purkinje neurons in acute cerebellar slices. Both EAAT3-GFP and EAAT4-GFP were observed at high levels in the dendritic spines of transfected Purkinje neurons. These findings indicate that functional EAAT fusion proteins can be synthesized and appropriately trafficked to postsynaptic compartments. Furthermore, they validate a powerful system for looking at EAAT function in situ. PMID:16212990

  4. Population coding in mouse visual cortex: response reliability and dissociability of stimulus tuning and noise correlation

    PubMed Central

    Montijn, Jorrit S.; Vinck, Martin; Pennartz, Cyriel M. A.

    2014-01-01

    The primary visual cortex is an excellent model system for investigating how neuronal populations encode information, because of well-documented relationships between stimulus characteristics and neuronal activation patterns. We used two-photon calcium imaging data to relate the performance of different methods for studying population coding (population vectors, template matching, and Bayesian decoding algorithms) to their underlying assumptions. We show that the variability of neuronal responses may hamper the decoding of population activity, and that a normalization to correct for this variability may be of critical importance for correct decoding of population activity. Second, by comparing noise correlations and stimulus tuning we find that these properties have dissociated anatomical correlates, even though noise correlations have been previously hypothesized to reflect common synaptic input. We hypothesize that noise correlations arise from large non-specific increases in spiking activity acting on many weak synapses simultaneously, while neuronal stimulus response properties are dependent on more reliable connections. Finally, this paper provides practical guidelines for further research on population coding and shows that population coding cannot be approximated by a simple summation of inputs, but is heavily influenced by factors such as input reliability and noise correlation structure. PMID:24917812

  5. Neural depolarization triggers Mg2+ influx in rat hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, R; Shindo, Y; Karube, T; Hotta, K; Suzuki, K; Oka, K

    2015-12-01

    Homeostasis of magnesium ion (Mg(2+)) plays key roles in healthy neuronal functions, and deficiency of Mg(2+) is involved in various neuronal diseases. In neurons, we have reported that excitotoxicity induced by excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate increases intracellular Mg(2+) concentration ([Mg(2+)]i). However, it has not been revealed whether neuronal activity under physiological condition modulates [Mg(2+)]i. The aim of this study is to explore the direct relationship between neural activity and [Mg(2+)]i dynamics. In rat primary-dissociated hippocampal neurons, the [Mg(2+)]i and [Ca(2+)]i dynamics were simultaneously visualized with a highly selective fluorescent Mg(2+) probe, KMG-104, and a fluorescent Ca(2+) probe, Fura Red, respectively. [Mg(2+)]i increase concomitant with neural activity by direct current stimulation was observed in neurons plated on an indium-tin oxide (ITO) glass electrode, which enables fluorescent imaging during neural stimulation. The neural activity-dependent [Mg(2+)]i increase was also detected in neurons whose excitability was enhanced by the treatment of a voltage-gated K(+) channel blocker, tetraethylammonium (TEA) at the timings of spontaneous Ca(2+) increase. Furthermore, the [Mg(2+)]i increase was abolished in Mg(2+)-free extracellular medium, indicating [Mg(2+)]i increase is due to Mg(2+) influx induced by neural activity. The direct neuronal depolarization by veratridine, a Na(+) channel opener, induced [Mg(2+)]i increase, and this [Mg(2+)]i increase was suppressed by the pretreatment of a non-specific Mg(2+) channel inhibitor, 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB). Overall, activity-dependent [Mg(2+)]i increase results from Mg(2+) influx through 2-APB-sensitive channels in rat hippocampal neurons. PMID:26455951

  6. Orientation-dependent dissociative charge transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, W.; Prior, M.H.; Braeuning, H.

    1998-01-01

    Recoil-ion momentum spectroscopy and molecular fragment imaging techniques are combined to study dissociative electron capture from He by HeH{sup +} at 0.20-a.u. collision velocity. Groups of final HeH states which dissociate to ground or excited H and He atoms are separated. For each group, the experiment provides two-dimensional H fragment distributions with respect to the collision plane and for fixed transverse momentum transfer. These patterns show that the capture probability is highest for HeH{sup +} ions with their axis oriented normal to the scattering plane for two of the three groups populated. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  7. Vibrational relaxation and dissociation in nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varghese, Philip L.; Gonzales, David A.

    1991-01-01

    Calculations of the vibrational and dissociation transition probabilities are made for N2-N2 and N2-N collisions by means of a semiclassical N-state approximation. The flaws in previous techniques are reviewed, with special attention given to the prediction of overtones. The method presented ignores the effects of molecular rotation and employs a revised extended Rydberg intermolecular potential to describe diatom-diatom and diatom-atom collisions. The collision velocities investigated exhibit probabilities of less than unity by means of the N-state method. The continuum is quantized to treat dissociation, and the collision results demonstrate probability enhancements for V-V-T transitions in both bound-bound and bound-free transitions. The technique is of particular interest for the theoretical modeling of reentry flows such as those encountered in aerobraking maneuvers.

  8. The dissociation energy of N2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Almloef, Jan; Deleeuw, Bradley J.; Taylor, Peter R.; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Siegbahn, Per

    1989-01-01

    The requirements for very accurate ab initio quantum chemical prediction of dissociation energies are examined using a detailed investigation of the nitrogen molecule. Although agreement with experiment to within 1 kcal/mol is not achieved even with the most elaborate multireference CI (configuration interaction) wave functions and largest basis sets currently feasible, it is possible to obtain agreement to within about 2 kcal/mol, or 1 percent of the dissociation energy. At this level it is necessary to account for core-valence correlation effects and to include up to h-type functions in the basis. The effect of i-type functions, the use of different reference configuration spaces, and basis set superposition error were also investigated. After discussing these results, the remaining sources of error in our best calculations are examined.

  9. Vibration dissociation coupling in nonequilibrium flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Candler, Graham V.

    1992-01-01

    The final report on research between North Carolina State University and the NASA Ames Research Center is presented. The research was aimed at using the Schwartz, Slawsky, Herzfeld (SSH) theory to simulate the vibrational relaxation of nitrogen molecules undergoing dissociation or recombination over a wide range of conditions. The results of these simulations were then treated as exact, and they were used to develop a model for the coupled vibration-dissociation process. This new model is simple enough to be used in computational fluid dynamics codes, but still captures the physics of the complex process. The model is used to simulate the flow over typical geometries to test it and to determine how much impact it has on the flow field. The key elements of this research are summarized.

  10. Fluid hydrogen at high density - Pressure dissociation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saumon, Didier; Chabrier, Gilles

    1991-01-01

    A model for the Helmholtz free energy of fluid hydrogen at high density and high temperature is developed. This model aims at describing both pressure and temperature dissociation and ionization and bears directly on equations of state of partially ionized plasmas, as encountered in astrophysical situations and high-pressure experiments. This paper focuses on a mixture of hydrogen atoms and molecules and is devoted to the study of the phenomenon of pressure dissociation at finite temperatures. In the present model, the strong interactions are described with realistic potentials and are computed with a modified Weeks-Chandler-Andersen fluid perturbation theory that reproduces Monte Carlo simulations to better than 3 percent. Theoretical Hugoniot curves derived from the model are in excellent agreement with experimental data.

  11. The charmonium dissociation in an ''anomalous wind''

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sadofyev, Andrey V.; Yin, Yi

    2016-01-11

    We study the charmonium dissociation in a strongly coupled chiral plasma in the presence of magnetic field and axial charge imbalance. This type of plasma carries "anomalous flow" induced by the chiral anomaly and exhibits novel transport phenomena such as chiral magnetic effect. We found that the "anomalous flow" would modify the charmonium color screening length by using the gauge/gravity correspondence. We derive an analytical expression quantifying the "anomalous flow" experienced by a charmonium for a large class of chiral plasma with a gravity dual. We elaborate on the similarity and it qualitative difference between anomalous effects on the charmoniummore » color screening length which are model-dependent and those on the heavy quark drag force which are fixed by the second law of thermodynamics. As a result, we speculate on the possible charmonium dissociation induced by the chiral anomaly in heavy ion collisions.« less

  12. On the dissociation pathways of nitrobenzene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosmidis, C.; Ledingham, K. W. D.; Clark, A.; Marshall, A.; Jennings, R.; Sander, J.; Singhal, R. P.

    1994-08-01

    The fragmentation of nitrobenzene has been studied in the wavelength range 225-275 nm using a single dye laser, frequency doubled, in conjunction with a time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer. The parent (C6H5NO2+), nitrosobenzene (C6H5NO+), phenoxy (C6H5O+) and phenyl (C6H5+) ions were all observed in addition to many other lighter daughter fragments. The formation of the nitrobenzene, phenoxy and phenyl ions are all explained invoking pathways where dissociation of the parent molecule from an excited state takes place first, followed by ionization after the absorption of further photons (DI) by the fragmented neutrals. Ionization of the parent molecule to states which are dissociative (ID) can explain the increase in the production of phenyl ions at wavelengths shorter than 230 nm.

  13. The charmonium dissociation in an "anomalous wind"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadofyev, Andrey V.; Yin, Yi

    2016-01-01

    We study the charmonium dissociation in a strongly coupled chiral plasma in the presence of magnetic field and axial charge imbalance. This type of plasma carries "anomalous flow" induced by the chiral anomaly and exhibits novel transport phenomena such as chiral magnetic effect. We found that the "anomalous flow" would modify the charmonium color screening length by using the gauge/gravity correspondence. We derive an analytical expression quantifying the "anomalous flow" experienced by a charmonium for a large class of chiral plasma with a gravity dual. We elaborate on the similarity and qualitative difference between anomalous effects on the charmonium color screening length which are model-dependent and those on the heavy quark drag force which are fixed by the second law of thermodynamics. We speculate on the possible charmonium dissociation induced by the chiral anomaly in heavy ion collisions.

  14. Theoretical dissociation energies for ionic molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langhoff, S. R.; Bauschlicher, C. W., Jr.; Partridge, H.

    1986-01-01

    Ab initio calculations at the self-consistent-field and singles plus doubles configuration-interaction level are used to determine accurate spectroscopic parameters for most of the alkali and alkaline-earth fluorides, chlorides, oxides, sulfides, hydroxides, and isocyanides. Numerical Hartree-Fock (NHF) calculations are performed on selected systems to ensure that the extended Slater basis sets employed for the diatomic systems are near the Hartree-Fock limit. Extended Gaussian basis sets of at least triple-zeta plus double polarization equality are employed for the triatomic system. With this model, correlation effects are relatively small, but invariably increase the theoretical dissociation energies. The importance of correlating the electrons on both the anion and the metal is discussed. The theoretical dissociation energies are critically compared with the literature to rule out disparate experimental values. Theoretical (sup 2)Pi - (sup 2)Sigma (sup +) energy separations are presented for the alkali oxides and sulfides.

  15. Dynamics of Dissociative Electron Attachment to Methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rescigno, T. N.; Douguet, N.; Fonseca, S.; Orel, A. E.; Slaughter, D. S.; Belkacem, A.

    2015-05-01

    We present the results of a theoretical ad experimental study of dissociative electron attachment (DEA) to CH4. The total DEA cross section is dominated by a single broad peak centered near 10 eV, leading predominantly to H-/CH4 and CH2-/CH4dissociation channels. We will present evidence that both of these ion channels result from excitation of a triply degenerate Feshbach resonance (doubly excited negative ion state) of 2T2 symmetry whose parent is the lowest excited triplet state of the neutral molecule. We will present calculated angular distributions based on analysis of the entrance amplitudes obtained from the results of complex Kohn scattering calculations along with experimentally measured angular distributions obtained using the COLTRIMS method. Work performed under the auspices of the US DOE by the LBNL and supported by the U.S. DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences.

  16. Dissociative Disorders: Between Neurosis and Psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Devillé, C.; Moeglin, C.; Sentissi, O.

    2014-01-01

    Dissociative disorders are a set of disorders defined by a disturbance affecting functions that are normally integrated with a prevalence of 2.4 percent in industrialised countries. These disorders are often poorly diagnosed or misdiagnosed because of sharing common clinical features with psychotic disorders, but requiring a very different trajectory of care. Repeated clinical situations in a crisis centre in Geneva provided us with a critical overview of current evidence of knowledge in clinical and etiopathological field about dissociative disorders. Because of their multiple expressions and the overlap with psychotic disorders, we focused on the clinical aspects using three different situations to better understand their specificity and to extend our thinking to the relevance of terms “neurosis” and “psychosis.” Finally, we hope that this work might help physicians and psychiatrists to become more aware of this complex set of disorders while making a diagnosis. PMID:25405051

  17. Egr2-neurons control the adult respiratory response to hypercapnia

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Russell S.; Corcoran, Andrea E.; Brust, Rachael D.; Soriano, Laura P.; Nattie, Eugene E.; Dymecki, Susan M.

    2013-01-01

    ‘The early growth response 2 transcription factor, Egr2, establishes a population of brainstem neurons essential for normal breathing at birth. Egr2-null mice die perinatally of respiratory insufficiency characterized by subnormal respiratory rate and severe apneas. Here we bypass this lethality using a noninvasive pharmacogenetic approach to inducibly perturb neuron activity postnatally, and ask if Egr2-neurons control respiration in adult mice. We found that the normal ventilatory increase in response to elevated tissue CO2 was impaired, blunted by 63.1±8.7% after neuron perturbation due to deficits in both respiratory amplitude and frequency. By contrast, room-air breathing was unaffected, suggesting that the drive for baseline breathing may not require those Egr2-neurons manipulated here. Of the multiple brainstem sites proposed to affect ventilation in response to hypercapnia, only the retrotrapezoid nucleus, a portion of the serotonergic raphé, and a portion of the A5 nucleus have a history of Egr2 expression. We recently showed that acute inhibition of serotonergic neurons en masse blunts the CO2 chemoreflex in adults, causing a difference in hypercapnic response of ~50% after neuron perturbation through effects on respiratory amplitude only. The suppressed respiratory frequency upon perturbation of Egr2-neurons thus may stem from non-serotonergic neurons within the Egr2 domain. Perturbation of Egr2-neurons did not affect body temperature, even on exposure to ambient 4 °C. These findings support a model in which Egr2-neurons are a critical component of the respiratory chemoreflex into adulthood. Methodologically, these results highlight how pharmacogenetic approaches allow neuron function to be queried in unanesthetized adult animals, reaching beyond the roadblocks of developmental lethality and compensation as well as the anatomical disturbances associated with invasive methods. PMID:23261662

  18. Dissociative Recombination Dynamics of the Ozone Cation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhaunerchyk, Vitali; Geppert, W.; sterdahl, F.; Larsson, Mats; Thomas, R. D.; Bahati Musafiri, Eric; Bannister, Mark E; Fogle, Mark R.; Vane, C Randy

    2008-02-01

    The dissociative recombination of the ozone cation has been studied at the heavy-ion storage ring CRYRING. The total cross section and branching fractions have been measured. The cross section from {approx}0eV to 0.2 eV follows a nearly E{sup -1} dependence, which was theoretically predicted to be a characteristic of the direct dissociative recombination mechanism. The thermal rate coefficient has been deduced from the cross section to be 7.37x10{sup -7}(T/300){sup -0.55}cm{sup 3}s{sup -1}. The branching fraction analysis carried out at {approx}0eV interaction energy has shown a strong propensity (94%) to dissociate through the three-body channel. Due to the overwhelming dominance of this channel it has been investigated in more detail. Of the six energetically available three-body pathways only three are significantly populated, such that the production of O(S1) is highly unfavored and all atomic oxygen fragments are predominantly formed in P3 and D1 states. Analysis of the breakup geometries has been performed by means of the Dalitz plot. It is observed that the molecules dissociating through the O(P3)+O(P3)+O(P3) and O(P3)+O(P3)+O(D1) channels have an open linear geometry where the cleavage of two valence bonds occurs preferentially in unison, while the O(P3)+O(D1)+O(D1) breakup might proceed partly through a sequential mechanism.

  19. Dynamics of dissociative electron attachment to ammonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rescigno, T. N.; Trevisan, C. S.; Orel, A. E.; Slaughter, D. S.; Adaniya, H.; Belkacem, A.; Weyland, Marvin; Dorn, Alexander; McCurdy, C. W.

    2016-05-01

    Ab initio theoretical studies and momentum-imaging experiments are combined to provide a consistent picture of the dynamics of dissociative electron attachment to ammonia through its 5.5- and 10.5-eV resonance channels. The present study clarifies the character and symmetry of the anion states involved and the dynamics that leads to the observed fragment-ion channels, their branching ratios, and angular distributions.

  20. The Bond Dissociation Energies of 1-Butene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The bond dissociation energies of 1-butene and several calibration systems are computed using the G2(MP2) approach. The agreement between the calibration systems and experiment is very good. The computed values for 1-butene are compared with calibration systems and the agreement between the computed results for 1-butene and the "rule of thumb" values from the smaller systems is remarkably good.

  1. Dissociating intentional learning from relative novelty responses in the medial temporal lobe.

    PubMed

    Strange, Bryan A; Hurlemann, René; Duggins, Andrew; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Dolan, Raymond J

    2005-03-01

    The establishment of a role for medial temporal lobe (MTL) structures in episodic memory has led to an investigative focus on the specific contributions and interactions between constituent MTL regions, including the hippocampus and surrounding medial temporal cortices. By dissociating an intentional stimulus-category learning condition from a passive viewing condition, we demonstrate, using fMRI, that novelty- and familiarity-driven responses in human anterior and posterior hippocampus, respectively, only occur during intentional learning. With increasing familiarity of stimulus-category associations, there is a shift in neuronal responses from anterior to posterior hippocampal regions. This anterior/posterior response gradient may reflect a weighting of functional hippocampal architecture related to encoding of novel and retrieval of familiar information. By contrast, perirhinal cortex is engaged by novel stimuli irrespective of task, highlighting this region as a component of a generic familiarity discrimination system. By introducing distinct stimulus types, we further demonstrate that these MTL responses are independent of stimulus complexity. Different patterns of activity for intentional learning vs. passive viewing indicate that intentional encoding/retrieval of stimulus-category associations and automatic novelty/familiarity assessment of stimuli are processed in anatomically dissociable neuronal ensembles within the MTL memory system. PMID:15734343

  2. Traumatic Memories in Acute Stress Disorder: An Analysis of Narratives before and after Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moulds, Michelle L.; Bryant, Richard A.

    2005-01-01

    The dissociative reactions in acute stress disorder purportedly impede encoding and organization of traumatic memories and consequently impair the individual's ability to retrieve trauma-related details. A qualitative examination was conducted on trauma narratives of individuals with acute stress disorder (N = 15) prior to cognitive behavior…

  3. Spontaneous dissociation of bipolar hip hemiarthroplasty in a patient with nerve palsy: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Yuenyongviwat, Varah; Iamthanaporn, Khanin; Hongnaparak, Theerawit

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Dislocation after bipolar hemiarthroplasty is a common complication but dissociation of the prosthesis is rare. There are some reports of bipolar hemiarthroplasty dissociation at the inner head and outer shell. However, there are limited reports on acute spontaneous dissociation of the head and neck at the taper interface in bipolar hemiarthroplasty. Presentation of case A 65-year-old female had cemented bipolar hemi hip replacement after fixation failure of a dynamic hip screw. She had left lower limb weakness for ten years after previous spinal surgery. At the sixth week of postoperation, the patient had dissociation of the components of the bipolar hemiarthroplasty at the femoral head and neck junction. The patient had open reduction and femoral head revision. There was no re-dislocation at one-year follow-up. Discussion Dissociation of bipolar hemiarthroplasty is a complex complication that can happen from the modularity of the implant. This condition requires operative treatment. The mechanism and cause of failure should be identified before the operation. Conclusion To prevent this condition, preoperative planning and proper techniques should be done as an index procedure. In the case of marked shortening of the limb after an operation in patients with lower limb muscle weakness, we hypothesize that early full weight bearing with immediate use of a shoe lift might help prevent this condition. PMID:26339788

  4. Dissociative recombination of N2H+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Santos, S. Fonseca; Ngassam, V.; Orel, A. E.; Larson, Å.

    2016-08-01

    The direct and indirect mechanisms of dissociative recombination of N2H+ are theoretically studied. At low energies, the electron capture is found to be driven by recombination into bound Rydberg states, while at collision energies above 0.1 eV, the direct capture and dissociation along electronic resonant states becomes important. Electron-scattering calculations using the complex Kohn variational method are performed to obtain the scattering matrix as well as energy positions and autoionization widths of resonant states. Potential-energy surfaces of electronic bound states of N2H and N2H+ are computed using structure calculations with the multireference configuration interaction method. The cross section for the indirect mechanism is calculated using a vibrational frame transformation of the elements of the scattering matrix at energies just above the ionization threshold. Here vibrational excitations of the ionic core from v =0 to v =1 and v =2 for all three normal modes are considered and autoionization is neglected. The cross section for the direct dissociation along electronic resonant states is computed with wave-packet calculations using the multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree method, where all three internal degrees of freedom are considered. The calculated cross sections are compared to measurements.

  5. Kinetics of single DNA hairpin dissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, William; Crocker, John

    2010-03-01

    Over the past decade, groups have used a variety of single molecule techniques to study the unfolding and unbinding of nucleic acids, proteins and other biomolecules. While some experiments on the dissociation of nucleic acids find exponential lifetime distributions, as expected for a process governed by a single rate-limiting pathway, other experiments find nonexponential lifetime distributions. In our work, we address this discrepancy by probing the force dependence of a single DNA hairpin under thermal dissociation. We use a scanning line optical tweezers instrument to measure the bound lifetimes of two DNA-coated microspheres under negligible applied tension. The two microspheres share a user-specified potential along the scan direction and are strongly confined in the perpendicular dimensions. The trapping laser intensity is modulated synchronously with a resonant scanning mirror to null all optical contributions to the pair interaction potential near contact. In addition, the laser polarization can be rotated to produce a continuously adjustable optical repulsion, allowing the instrument to double as a passive force clamp over a modest range of applied tensions. This unique experimental approach allows us to investigate many of the proposed explanations for nonexponential kinetics in nucleic acid dissociation that have, until now, been difficult to isolate.

  6. The infrared multiphoton dissociation of three nitrolkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wodtke, A. M.; Hintsa, E. J.; Lee, Y. T.

    1986-01-01

    Infrared multiphoton dissociation in a molecular beam has been studied in order to elucidate the collision free, 'thermal' chemistry and dynamics of nitromethane, nitroethane and 2-nitropropane. The isomerization of CH3NO2 to CH3ONO was observed by detecting the CH3O and NO products from the dissociation of the very internally hot, isomerized nitromethane. A novel application of RRKM theory was used to estimate the barrier height to isomerization at 55.5 kcal/mol. The barrier height determination method was tested and found to give excellent results by applying it to the determintaion of the barrier height to HONO elimination from nitroethane, a value which is well known from activation energy measurements. The method was then applied to the case of HONO elimination from 2-nitropropane and it appears that there is good to believe that the barrier height is 3-5 kcal/mol lower in 2-nitropropane than in nitroethane. The success of this method for determining barrier heights shows how a microscopic molecular beam experiment, using infrared multiphoton dissociation where the concept of temperature has no place, can be quantitatively related to pyrolysis experiments which are conducted under collisional, thermal conditions and measure phenomenological quantities such as activation energies.

  7. Regional dissociated heterochrony in multivariate analysis.

    PubMed

    Mitteroecker, P; Gunz, P; Weber, G W; Bookstein, F L

    2004-12-01

    Heterochrony, the classic framework to study ontogeny and phylogeny, in essence relies on a univariate concept of shape. Though principal component plots of multivariate shape data seem to resemble classical bivariate allometric plots, the language of heterochrony cannot be translated directly into general multivariate methodology. We simulate idealized multivariate ontogenetic trajectories and demonstrate their behavior in principal component plots in shape space and in size-shape space. The concept of "dissociation", which is conventionally regarded as a change in the relationship between shape change and size change, appears to be algebraically the same as regional dissociation - the variation of apparent heterochrony by region. Only if the trajectories of two related species lie along exactly the same path in shape space can the classic terminology of heterochrony apply so that pure dissociation of size change against shape change can be detected. We demonstrate a geometric morphometric approach to these issues using adult and subadult crania of 48 Pan paniscus and 47 P. troglodytes. On each specimen we digitized 47 landmarks and 144 semilandmarks on ridge curves and the external neurocranial surface. The relation between these two species' growth trajectories is too complex for a simple summary in terms of global heterochrony. PMID:15646279

  8. Gas Hydrate Dissociation in the Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conroy, Devin; Smith, Stefan Llewellyn

    2006-11-01

    Methane gas is known to exist in extremely large quantities below the sea floor in the sediment of the deep and cold oceanic and in permafrost regions. Due to the large hydrostatic pressure and cool temperatures the gas reacts with the surrounding water to form a crystalline substance known as a gas hydrate. The fate of these reserves is very important to climate on earth because methane is a much more efficient greenhouse gas then carbon dioxide. The dissociation process in general can occur by either a decrease in pressure or an increase in temperature. In this study we concentrate on the latter. Once the hydrate dissociates, water and free gas remain above the phase boundary, occupying a larger volume than the original solid, and are be transported through the sediment. We have modeled this physical mechanism using volume averaged equations in a porous medium with a coupled two-phase flow. The movement of the phase boundary, which is proportional to the rate of heat transfer to this interface, is modeled as a Stefan type melting problem. The resultant governing equations are solved numerically, using a front fixing method to fix the phase boundary, to determine the rate of gas flux through the sediment and the dissociation rate.

  9. How thioredoxin dissociates its mixed disulfide.

    PubMed

    Roos, Goedele; Foloppe, Nicolas; Van Laer, Koen; Wyns, Lode; Nilsson, Lennart; Geerlings, Paul; Messens, Joris

    2009-08-01

    The dissociation mechanism of the thioredoxin (Trx) mixed disulfide complexes is unknown and has been debated for more than twenty years. Specifically, opposing arguments for the activation of the nucleophilic cysteine as a thiolate during the dissociation of the complex have been put forward. As a key model, the complex between Trx and its endogenous substrate, arsenate reductase (ArsC), was used. In this structure, a Cys29(Trx)-Cys89(ArsC) intermediate disulfide is formed by the nucleophilic attack of Cys29(Trx) on the exposed Cys82(ArsC)-Cys89(ArsC) in oxidized ArsC. With theoretical reactivity analysis, molecular dynamics simulations, and biochemical complex formation experiments with Cys-mutants, Trx mixed disulfide dissociation was studied. We observed that the conformational changes around the intermediate disulfide bring Cys32(Trx) in contact with Cys29(Trx). Cys32(Trx) is activated for its nucleophilic attack by hydrogen bonds, and Cys32(Trx) is found to be more reactive than Cys82(ArsC). Additionally, Cys32(Trx) directs its nucleophilic attack on the more susceptible Cys29(Trx) and not on Cys89(ArsC). This multidisciplinary approach provides fresh insights into a universal thiol/disulfide exchange reaction mechanism that results in reduced substrate and oxidized Trx. PMID:19675666

  10. Mechanisms of permanent loss of olfactory receptor neurons induced by the herbicide 2,6-dichlorobenzonitrile: Effects on stem cells and noninvolvement of acute induction of the inflammatory cytokine IL-6

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Fang; Fang, Cheng; Schnittke, Nikolai; Schwob, James E.; Ding, Xinxin

    2013-11-01

    We explored the mechanisms underlying the differential effects of two olfactory toxicants, the herbicide 2,6-dichlorobenzonitrile (DCBN) and the anti-thyroid drug methimazole (MMZ), on olfactory receptor neuron (ORN) regeneration in mouse olfactory epithelium (OE). DCBN, but not MMZ, induced inflammation-like pathological changes in OE, and DCBN increased interleukin IL-6 levels in nasal-wash fluid to much greater magnitude and duration than did MMZ. At 24 h after DCBN injection, the population of horizontal basal cells (HBCs; reserve, normally quiescent OE stem cells) lining the DMM became severely depleted as some of them detached from the basal lamina, and sloughed into the nasal cavity along with the globose basal cells (GBCs; heterogeneous population of stem and progenitor cells), neurons, and sustentacular cells of the neuroepithelium. In contrast, the layer of HBCs remained intact in MMZ-treated mice, as only the mature elements of the neuroepithelium were shed. Despite the respiratory metaplasia accompanying the greater severity of the DCBN lesion, residual HBCs that survived intoxication were activated by the injury and contributed to the metaplastic respiratory epithelium, as shown by tracing their descendants in a K5CreEr{sup T2}::fl(stop)TdTomato strain of mice in which recombination causes HBCs to express TdTomato in advance of the lesion. But, contrary to published observations with MMZ, the HBCs failed to form ORNs. A role for IL-6 in suppressing ORN regeneration in DCBN-treated mice was rejected by the failure of the anti-inflammatory drug dexamethasone to prevent the subsequent respiratory metaplasia in the DMM, suggesting that other factors lead to HBC neuro-incompetence. - Highlights: • The herbicide dichlobenil (DCBN) can damage olfactory epithelium stem cells. • Another olfactory toxicant, methimazole, leaves the olfactory stem cells intact. • DCBN, but not methimazole, induces a prolonged increase in nasal IL-6 levels. • Dexamethasone

  11. Dissociative Disorders Among Chinese Inpatients Diagnosed With Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Junhan; Ross, Colin A.; Keyes, Benjamin B.; Li, Ying; Dai, Yunfei; Zhang, Tianhong; Wang, Lanlan; Fan, Qing; Xiao, Zeping

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess the prevalence of dissociative disorders in a sample of Chinese psychiatric inpatients. Participants in the study consisted of 569 consecutively admitted inpatients at Shanghai Mental Health Center, China, of whom 84.9% had a clinical diagnosis of schizophrenia based on the Chinese Classification and Diagnostic Criteria for Mental Disorders, Version 3 (CCMD-3). All participants completed a self-report measure of dissociation, the Dissociative Experiences Scale (DES) and none had a prior diagnosis of a dissociative disorder. Ninety-six randomly selected participants were interviewed with a structured interview, the Dissociative Disorders Interview Schedule (DDIS) and a clinical interview. These 96 patients did not differ significantly from the 473 patients who were not interviewed on any demographic measures or on the self-report measure dissociation. A total of 28 (15.3%, after weighting of the data) patients received a clinical diagnosis of a dissociative disorder based on DSM-IV-TR criteria. Dissociative identity disorder was diagnosed in 2 (0.53%, after weighting) patients. Compared to the patients without a dissociative disorder, patients with dissociative disorders were significantly more likely to report childhood abuse (57.1% versus 22.1%), but the two groups did not differ significantly on any demographic measures. Dissociative disorders were readily identified in an inpatient psychiatric population in China. PMID:20603768

  12. Dissociation, PTSD, and substance abuse: an empirical study.

    PubMed

    Najavits, Lisa M; Walsh, Marybeth

    2012-01-01

    Few studies have examined the relationship between posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), substance use disorder, and dissociation. We studied 77 women with current PTSD and substance dependence, classified into high- versus low-dissociation groups per the Dissociative Experiences Scale. They were compared on trauma- and substance-related symptoms, cognitions, coping skills, social adjustment, trauma history, psychiatric symptoms, and self-harm/suicidal behaviors. We found the high-dissociation group consistently more impaired than the low-dissociation group. Also, the sample overall evidenced relatively high levels of dissociation, indicating that even in the presence of recent substance use, dissociation remains a major psychological phenomenon. Indeed, the high-dissociation group reported stronger expectation that substances could manage their psychiatric symptoms. The high-dissociation group also had more trauma-related symptoms and childhood histories of emotional abuse and physical neglect. The discussion addresses methodology, the "chemical dissociation" hypothesis, and the need for a more nuanced understanding of how substances are experienced in relation to dissociative phenomena. PMID:22211445

  13. Acute nephritic syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Glomerulonephritis - acute; Acute glomerulonephritis; Nephritis syndrome - acute ... Acute nephritic syndrome is often caused by an immune response triggered by an infection or other disease. Common causes ...

  14. Size-dependent dissociation of carbon monoxide on cobalt nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Tuxen, Anders; Carenco, Sophie; Chintapalli, Mahati; Chuang, Cheng-Hao; Escudero, Carlos; Pach, Elzbieta; Jiang, Peng; Borondics, Ferenc; Beberwyck, Brandon; Alivisatos, A Paul; Thornton, Geoff; Pong, Way-Faung; Guo, Jinghua; Perez, Ruben; Besenbacher, Flemming; Salmeron, Miquel

    2013-02-13

    In situ soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) was employed to study the adsorption and dissociation of carbon monoxide molecules on cobalt nanoparticles with sizes ranging from 4 to 15 nm. The majority of CO molecules adsorb molecularly on the surface of the nanoparticles, but some undergo dissociative adsorption, leading to oxide species on the surface of the nanoparticles. We found that the tendency of CO to undergo dissociation depends critically on the size of the Co nanoparticles. Indeed, CO molecules dissociate much more efficiently on the larger nanoparticles (15 nm) than on the smaller particles (4 nm). We further observed a strong increase in the dissociation rate of adsorbed CO upon exposure to hydrogen, clearly demonstrating that the CO dissociation on cobalt nanoparticles is assisted by hydrogen. Our results suggest that the ability of cobalt nanoparticles to dissociate hydrogen is the main parameter determining the reactivity of cobalt nanoparticles in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. PMID:23339635

  15. Development, reliability, and validity of a child dissociation scale.

    PubMed

    Putnam, F W; Helmers, K; Trickett, P K

    1993-01-01

    Dissociation is a complex psychophysiological process that ranges along a continuum from minor, normal dissociation to Axis I psychopathology. High levels of dissociation are associated with increased self-destructive behaviors and other symptoms. Although several validated measures of dissociation exist for adults, no measures are available for children. The Child Dissociative Checklist (CDC) was developed to meet this need and is a reliable and valid observer report measure of dissociation in children. The CDC had a 1-year test-retest reliability coefficient of rho = .69 (N = 73, p = .0001) in a sample of normal and sexually abused girls. The CDC had high discriminant validity among four test samples including: normal control girls, sexually abused girls, boys and girls with dissociative disorder NOS and boys and girls with multiple personality disorder. The CDC is intended as a clinical screening instrument and as a research measure. The CDC is not designed to be used as a diagnostic instrument. PMID:8287286

  16. Exploring the relationships between dissociation, victimization, and juvenile sexual offending.

    PubMed

    Leibowitz, George S; Laser, Julie A; Burton, David L

    2011-01-01

    An etiological model of sexually abusive behavior including dissociation could have utility for researchers and treatment providers working with sexually abusive youth with trauma histories. This article explores relationships between dissociation, victimization, and juvenile sexual offending. Self-reported data on dissociation and 5 types of abuse were collected from 2 racially/ethnically diverse groups of sexually abusive and general delinquent male adolescents (n = 502). Bivariate analysis showed significant correlations between all types of child abuse and dissociation with the exception of emotional neglect. Hierarchical logistic regression analysis indicated that dissociation was significant in predicting sexual offender status. Moreover, dissociation, sexual victimization, and physical abuse showed significant effects in predicting membership in the sexual offender group. The results confirm the need for additional research in the areas of assessment and treatment of dissociation among sexually abusive youth. PMID:21240737

  17. Ab initio calculations of dissociative attachment and dissociative recombination of electrons and polyatomic species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haxton, Daniel

    2009-05-01

    Interactions of free electrons with neutral and positively charged molecular species play a role in various physical systems. In interstellar space, reactions such as dissociative recombination determine the balance of various charged and neutral species. In a laboratory equipped with an apparatus like a COLTRIMS device, the dissociative attachment process can be used as a microscope to study polyatomic molecular dynamics. We discuss the theoretical and numerical methods used to calculate dissociative attachment and dissociative recombination of electrons with larger molecules from first principles. Studies using these methods are complimentary to other methods that yield more approximate reaction rates at greatly lesser numerical cost; they may yield precise information about the dissociation dynamics, product distribution, and differential cross section that approximate methods cannot. We discuss calculations performed to date on the target species H2O, NO2, and LiH2^+. We discuss the scaling of our numerical methods with the number of atoms, and the prospects of applying them to tetra-atomics.

  18. Zero-Point Energy Constraint for Unimolecular Dissociation Reactions. Giving Trajectories Multiple Chances To Dissociate Correctly.

    PubMed

    Paul, Amit K; Hase, William L

    2016-01-28

    A zero-point energy (ZPE) constraint model is proposed for classical trajectory simulations of unimolecular decomposition and applied to CH4* → H + CH3 decomposition. With this model trajectories are not allowed to dissociate unless they have ZPE in the CH3 product. If not, they are returned to the CH4* region of phase space and, if necessary, given additional opportunities to dissociate with ZPE. The lifetime for dissociation of an individual trajectory is the time it takes to dissociate with ZPE in CH3, including multiple possible returns to CH4*. With this ZPE constraint the dissociation of CH4* is exponential in time as expected for intrinsic RRKM dynamics and the resulting rate constant is in good agreement with the harmonic quantum value of RRKM theory. In contrast, a model that discards trajectories without ZPE in the reaction products gives a CH4* → H + CH3 rate constant that agrees with the classical and not quantum RRKM value. The rate constant for the purely classical simulation indicates that anharmonicity may be important and the rate constant from the ZPE constrained classical trajectory simulation may not represent the complete anharmonicity of the RRKM quantum dynamics. The ZPE constraint model proposed here is compared with previous models for restricting ZPE flow in intramolecular dynamics, and connecting product and reactant/product quantum energy levels in chemical dynamics simulations. PMID:26738691

  19. Dissociative depression among women with fibromyalgia or rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kilic, Ozge; Sar, Vedat; Taycan, Okan; Aksoy-Poyraz, Cana; Erol, Turgut C; Tecer, Ozlem; Emul, Murat H; Ozmen, Mine

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to inquire about the possible relations of childhood trauma, anger, and dissociation to depression among women with fibromyalgia or rheumatoid arthritis. Fifty female patients diagnosed as having fibromyalgia (n = 30) or rheumatoid arthritis (n = 20) participated in the study. The Childhood Trauma Questionnaire, Somatoform Dissociation Questionnaire (SDQ), Dissociation Questionnaire (DIS-Q), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Spielberger State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory, and Dissociative Disorders Interview Schedule were administered to all participants. Women with a lifetime diagnosis of depressive disorder had higher scores for somatoform and psychoform dissociation than the nondepressive patients. However, childhood trauma scores did not differ between the 2 groups. In regression analysis, current severity of depression (BDI) was predicted by psychoform dissociation (DIS-Q) and lower education, and lifetime diagnosis of major depression was predicted by somatoform dissociation (SDQ). Whereas childhood emotional neglect predicted somatoform dissociation, psychoform dissociation was predicted by childhood sexual abuse. Mental processing of anger seems to be 1 of the dimensions of psychodynamics in trauma-related depressive conditions. In the context of the perceived threat of loss of control due to expressed anger and mental disintegration, somatoform dissociation seems to contribute to overmodulation of emotions in dissociative depression. Among patients suffering from physical illness with possible psychosomatic dimensions, assessment of somatoform dissociation in addition to psychoform dissociation may be helpful to understand diverse psychopathological trajectories emerging in the aftermath of childhood adversities. The recently proposed category of "dissociative depression" (Sar, 2011) seems to be a promising concept for future research on psychosomatic aspects of traumatic stress. PMID:24228798

  20. Dissociative symptoms and dissociative disorders comorbidity in obsessive compulsive disorder: Symptom screening, diagnostic tools and reflections on treatment.

    PubMed

    Belli, Hasan

    2014-08-16

    Borderline personality disorder, conversion disorder and obsessive compulsive disorder frequently have dissociative symptoms. The literature has demonstrated that the level of dissociation might be correlated with the severity of obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) and that those not responding to treatment had high dissociative symptoms. The structured clinical interview for DSM-IV dissociative disorders, dissociation questionnaire, somatoform dissociation questionnaire and dissociative experiences scale can be used for screening dissociative symptoms and detecting dissociative disorders in patients with OCD. However, a history of neglect and abuse during childhood is linked to a risk factor in the pathogenesis of dissociative psychopathology in adults. The childhood trauma questionnaire-53 and childhood trauma questionnaire-40 can be used for this purpose. Clinicians should not fail to notice the hidden dissociative symptoms and childhood traumatic experiences in OCD cases with severe symptoms that are resistant to treatment. Symptom screening and diagnostic tools used for this purpose should be known. Knowing how to treat these pathologies in patients who are diagnosed with OCD can be crucial. PMID:25133142

  1. Quantum neuron design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrman, Elizabeth; Steck, James

    2014-03-01

    In previous work, we have developed quantum systems that can learn and do information processing much like artificial neural networks. These learning methods have some advantages over other implementations of quantum computing in that they construct their own algorithms and could be robust to noise and decoherence. Here we take the next step, by designing quantum neurons that have some of the important behaviors of biological neurons, yet have the advantage of being complex valued and having quantum computing power. Our neuron model consists of a two-level system coupled to a Gaussian bath representing the environment. Simulations of a interconnected network of these neurons show that the model can both learn standard AI tasks, as similar networks of classical neurons have been shown to do, and, in addition, perform quantum mechanical calculations.

  2. Delayed functional expression of neuronal chemokine receptors following focal nerve demyelination in the rat: a mechanism for the development of chronic sensitization of peripheral nociceptors

    PubMed Central

    Bhangoo, Sonia; Ren, Dongjun; Miller, Richard J; Henry, Kenneth J; Lineswala, Jayana; Hamdouchi, Chafiq; Li, Baolin; Monahan, Patrick E; Chan, David M; Ripsch, Matthew S; White, Fletcher A

    2007-01-01

    Background Animal and clinical studies have revealed that focal peripheral nerve axon demyelination is accompanied by nociceptive pain behavior. C-C and C-X-C chemokines and their receptors have been strongly implicated in demyelinating polyneuropathies and persistent pain syndromes. Herein, we studied the degree to which chronic nociceptive pain behavior is correlated with the neuronal expression of chemokines and their receptors following unilateral lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC)-induced focal demyelination of the sciatic nerve in rats. Results Focal nerve demyelination increased behavioral reflex responsiveness to mechanical stimuli between postoperative day (POD) 3 and POD28 in both the hindpaw ipsilateral and contralateral to the nerve injury. This behavior was accompanied by a bilateral increase in the numbers of primary sensory neurons expressing the chemokine receptors CCR2, CCR5, and CXCR4 by POD14, with no change in the pattern of CXCR3 expression. Significant increases in the numbers of neurons expressing the chemokines monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1/CCL2), Regulated on Activation, Normal T Expressed and Secreted (RANTES/CCL5) and interferon γ-inducing protein-10 (IP-10/CXCL10) were also evident following nerve injury, although neuronal expression pattern of stromal cell derived factor-1α (SDF1/CXCL12) did not change. Functional studies demonstrated that acutely dissociated sensory neurons derived from LPC-injured animals responded with increased [Ca2+]i following exposure to MCP-1, IP-10, SDF1 and RANTES on POD 14 and 28, but these responses were largely absent by POD35. On days 14 and 28, rats received either saline or a CCR2 receptor antagonist isomer (CCR2 RA-[R]) or its inactive enantiomer (CCR2 RA-[S]) by intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection. CCR2 RA-[R] treatment of nerve-injured rats produced stereospecific bilateral reversal of tactile hyperalgesia. Conclusion These results suggest that the presence of chemokine signaling by both injured

  3. NMDA spike/plateau potentials in dendrites of thalamocortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Augustinaite, Sigita; Kuhn, Bernd; Helm, Paul Johannes; Heggelund, Paul

    2014-08-13

    Dendritic NMDA spike/plateau potentials, first discovered in cortical pyramidal neurons, provide supralinear integration of synaptic inputs on thin and distal dendrites, thereby increasing the impact of these inputs on the soma. The more specific functional role of these potentials has been difficult to clarify, partly due to the complex circuitry of cortical neurons. Thalamocortical (TC) neurons in the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus participate in simpler circuits. They receive their primary afferent input from retina and send their output to visual cortex. Cortex, in turn, regulates this output through massive feedback to distal dendrites of the TC neurons. The TC neurons can operate in two modes related to behavioral states: burst mode prevailing during sleep, when T-type calcium bursts largely disrupt the transfer of signals from retina to cortex, and tonic mode, which provides reliable transfer of retinal signals to cortex during wakefulness. We studied dendritic potentials in TC neurons with combined two-photon calcium imaging and whole-cell recording of responses to local dendritic glutamate iontophoresis in acute brain slices from mice. We found that NMDA spike/plateaus can be elicited locally at distal dendrites of TC neurons. We suggest that these dendritic potentials have important functions in the cortical regulation of thalamocortical transmission. NMDA spike/plateaus can induce shifts in the functional mode from burst to tonic by blockade of T-type calcium conductances. Moreover, in tonic mode, they can facilitate the transfer of retinal signals to cortex by depolarization of TC neurons. PMID:25122891

  4. Hypothalamic CRH neurons orchestrate complex behaviours after stress

    PubMed Central

    Füzesi, Tamás; Daviu, Nuria; Wamsteeker Cusulin, Jaclyn I.; Bonin, Robert P.; Bains, Jaideep S.

    2016-01-01

    All organisms possess innate behavioural and physiological programmes that ensure survival. In order to have maximum adaptive benefit, these programmes must be sufficiently flexible to account for changes in the environment. Here we show that hypothalamic CRH neurons orchestrate an environmentally flexible repertoire of behaviours that emerge after acute stress in mice. Optical silencing of CRH neurons disrupts the organization of individual behaviours after acute stress. These behavioural patterns shift according to the environment after stress, but this environmental sensitivity is blunted by activation of PVN CRH neurons. These findings provide evidence that PVN CRH cells are part of a previously unexplored circuit that matches precise behavioural patterns to environmental context following stress. Overactivity in this network in the absence of stress may contribute to environmental ambivalence, resulting in context-inappropriate behavioural strategies. PMID:27306314

  5. Autophagy in acute brain injury.

    PubMed

    Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Bravo-San Pedro, José Manuel; Blomgren, Klas; Kroemer, Guido

    2016-08-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily ancient mechanism that ensures the lysosomal degradation of old, supernumerary or ectopic cytoplasmic entities. Most eukaryotic cells, including neurons, rely on proficient autophagic responses for the maintenance of homeostasis in response to stress. Accordingly, autophagy mediates neuroprotective effects following some forms of acute brain damage, including methamphetamine intoxication, spinal cord injury and subarachnoid haemorrhage. In some other circumstances, however, the autophagic machinery precipitates a peculiar form of cell death (known as autosis) that contributes to the aetiology of other types of acute brain damage, such as neonatal asphyxia. Here, we dissect the context-specific impact of autophagy on non-infectious acute brain injury, emphasizing the possible therapeutic application of pharmacological activators and inhibitors of this catabolic process for neuroprotection. PMID:27256553

  6. Acute sacroiliitis.

    PubMed

    Slobodin, Gleb; Rimar, Doron; Boulman, Nina; Kaly, Lisa; Rozenbaum, Michael; Rosner, Itzhak; Odeh, Majed

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to review the data on the etiology, risk factors, clinical presentations, and diagnosis of acute sacroiliitis. A Pubmed search utilizing the indexing term "acute sacroiliitis" was conducted and the data pertinent to the aim of the review was extracted and organized in accordance with the preplanned structure of the manuscript. The diagnosis of acute sacroiliitis is often challenging because of both the relative rarity of this presentation and diverse character of acute sacroiliac pain, frequently mimicking other, more prevalent disorders. Technetium bone scintigraphy can localize the disease process to the sacroiliac joint, while computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging can be used for the detailed characterization and the extent of the disease as well as the diagnosis of complications. Pyogenic sacroiliitis is by far the most common cause of acute sacroiliitis. Brucellosis, acute sacroiliitis in the course of reactive arthritis, and crystalline-induced sacroiliitis frequently imitate pyogenic sacroiliitis. Acute sacroiliitis can rarely be also related to hematological malignancies or treatment with isotretinoin. Awareness to the possibility of acute sacroiliitis and a thorough physical examination are the necessary prerequisites to its timely diagnosis, while the appropriate laboratory and imaging studies should confirm the precise diagnosis and direct the appropriate treatment strategy. PMID:26847855

  7. Dissociation, PTSD, and Substance Abuse: An Empirical Study

    PubMed Central

    Najavits, Lisa; Walsh, Marybeth

    2012-01-01

    Few studies have examined the relationship between posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), substance use disorder (SUD) and dissociation. We studied 77 women with current PTSD and substance dependence, classified into high- versus low-dissociation on the Dissociative Experiences Scale. They were compared on trauma- and substance-related symptoms, cognitions, coping skills, social adjustment, trauma history, psychiatric symptoms, and self-harm/suicidal behaviors. We found the high-dissociation group consistently more impaired than the low-dissociation group. Also, the sample overall evidenced relatively high levels of dissociation, indicating that even in the presence of recent substance use, dissociation remains a major psychological phenomenon. Indeed, the high-dissociation group reported stronger expectation that substances could manage their psychiatric symptoms. The high-dissociation group also had more trauma-related symptoms and childhood histories of emotional abuse and physical neglect. Discussion addresses methodology, the “chemical dissociation” hypothesis, and the need for more nuanced understanding of how substances are experienced in relation to dissociative phenomena. PMID:22211445

  8. The role of water in gas hydrate dissociation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Circone, S.; Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.

    2004-01-01

    When raised to temperatures above the ice melting point, gas hydrates release their gas in well-defined, reproducible events that occur within self-maintained temperature ranges slightly below the ice point. This behavior is observed for structure I (carbon dioxide, methane) and structure II gas hydrates (methane-ethane, and propane), including those formed with either H2O- or D2O-host frameworks, and dissociated at either ambient or elevated pressure conditions. We hypothesize that at temperatures above the H2O (or D2O) melting point: (1) hydrate dissociation produces water + gas instead of ice + gas, (2) the endothermic dissociation reaction lowers the temperature of the sample, causing the water product to freeze, (3) this phase transition buffers the sample temperatures within a narrow temperature range just below the ice point until dissociation goes to completion, and (4) the temperature depression below the pure ice melting point correlates with the average rate of dissociation and arises from solution of the hydrate-forming gas, released by dissociation, in the water phase at elevated concentrations. In addition, for hydrate that is partially dissociated to ice + gas at lower temperatures and then heated to temperatures above the ice point, all remaining hydrate dissociates to gas + liquid water as existing barriers to dissociation disappear. The enhanced dissociation rates at warmer temperatures are probably associated with faster gas transport pathways arising from the formation of water product.

  9. Calcium currents in rat thalamocortical relay neurones: kinetic properties of the transient, low-threshold current.

    PubMed

    Coulter, D A; Huguenard, J R; Prince, D A

    1989-07-01

    1. Calcium currents were recorded with whole-cell voltage-clamp procedures in relay neurones of the rat thalamus which had been acutely isolated by an enzymatic dissociation procedure. 2. Low-threshold and high-threshold Ca2+ currents were elicited by depolarizing voltage steps from holding potentials more negative than -60 mV. A transient current, analogous to the T-current in sensory neurones, was activated at low threshold near -65 mV and was completely inactivating at command steps up to -35 mV. Voltage steps to more depolarized levels activated a high-threshold current that inactivated slowly and incompletely during a 200 ms step depolarization. 3. The high-threshold current contained both non-inactivating and slowly inactivating components which were insensitive and sensitive to holding potential, respectively. 4. A 'T-type' current was prominent in relay neurones, in both absolute terms (350 pA peak current average) and in relation to high-threshold currents. The average ratio of maximum transient to maximum sustained current was greater than 2. 5. T-current could be modelled in a manner analogous to that employed for the fast Na+ current underlying action potential generation, using the m3h format. The rate of activation of T-current was voltage dependent, with a time constant (tau m) varying between 8 and 2 ms at command potentials of -60 to -10 mV at 23 degrees C. The rate of inactivation was also voltage dependent, and the time constant tau h varied between 50 and 20 ms over the same voltage range. With command potentials more positive than -35 mV, the inactivation of Ca2+ current could no longer be fitted by a single exponential. 6. Steady-state inactivation of T-current could be well fitted by a Boltzman equation with slope factor of 6.3 and half-inactivated voltage of -83.5 mV. 7. Recovery from inactivation of T-current was not exponential. The major component of recovery (70-80% of total) was not very voltage sensitive at potentials more negative

  10. Calcium currents in rat thalamocortical relay neurones: kinetic properties of the transient, low-threshold current.

    PubMed Central

    Coulter, D A; Huguenard, J R; Prince, D A

    1989-01-01

    1. Calcium currents were recorded with whole-cell voltage-clamp procedures in relay neurones of the rat thalamus which had been acutely isolated by an enzymatic dissociation procedure. 2. Low-threshold and high-threshold Ca2+ currents were elicited by depolarizing voltage steps from holding potentials more negative than -60 mV. A transient current, analogous to the T-current in sensory neurones, was activated at low threshold near -65 mV and was completely inactivating at command steps up to -35 mV. Voltage steps to more depolarized levels activated a high-threshold current that inactivated slowly and incompletely during a 200 ms step depolarization. 3. The high-threshold current contained both non-inactivating and slowly inactivating components which were insensitive and sensitive to holding potential, respectively. 4. A 'T-type' current was prominent in relay neurones, in both absolute terms (350 pA peak current average) and in relation to high-threshold currents. The average ratio of maximum transient to maximum sustained current was greater than 2. 5. T-current could be modelled in a manner analogous to that employed for the fast Na+ current underlying action potential generation, using the m3h format. The rate of activation of T-current was voltage dependent, with a time constant (tau m) varying between 8 and 2 ms at command potentials of -60 to -10 mV at 23 degrees C. The rate of inactivation was also voltage dependent, and the time constant tau h varied between 50 and 20 ms over the same voltage range. With command potentials more positive than -35 mV, the inactivation of Ca2+ current could no longer be fitted by a single exponential. 6. Steady-state inactivation of T-current could be well fitted by a Boltzman equation with slope factor of 6.3 and half-inactivated voltage of -83.5 mV. 7. Recovery from inactivation of T-current was not exponential. The major component of recovery (70-80% of total) was not very voltage sensitive at potentials more negative

  11. Dissociating Stimulus-Driven Semantic and Phonological Effect During Reading and Naming

    PubMed Central

    Mechelli, Andrea; Josephs, Oliver; Lambon Ralph, Matthew A; McClelland, James L; Price, Cathy J

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to dissociate the neural correlates of semantic and phonological processes during word reading and picture naming. Previous studies have addressed this issue by contrasting tasks involving semantic and phonological decisions. However, these tasks engage verbal short-term memory and executive functions that are not required for reading and naming. Here, 20 subjects were instructed to overtly name written words and pictures of objects while their neuronal responses were measured using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Each trial consisted of a pair of successive stimuli that were either semantically related (e.g., “ROBIN-nest”), phonologically related (e.g., “BELL-belt”), unrelated (e.g., “KITE-lobster”), or semantically and phonologically identical (e.g., “FRIDGE-fridge”). In addition, a pair of stimuli could be presented in either the same modality (word-word or picture-picture) or a different modality (word-picture or picture-word). We report that semantically related pairs modulate neuronal responses in a left-lateralized network, including the pars orbitalis of the inferior frontal gyrus, the middle temporal gyrus, the angular gyrus, and the superior frontal gyrus. We propose that these areas are involved in stimulus-driven semantic processes. In contrast, phonologically related pairs modulate neuronal responses in bilateral insula. This region is therefore implicated in the discrimination of similar, competing phonological and articulatory codes. The above effects were detected with both words and pictures and did not differ between the two modalities even with a less conservative statistical threshold. In conclusion, this study dissociates the effects of semantic and phonological relatedness between successive items during reading and naming aloud. Hum Brain Mapp, 2007. © 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:16767767

  12. Dissociating stimulus-driven semantic and phonological effect during reading and naming.

    PubMed

    Mechelli, Andrea; Josephs, Oliver; Lambon Ralph, Matthew A; McClelland, James L; Price, Cathy J

    2007-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to dissociate the neural correlates of semantic and phonological processes during word reading and picture naming. Previous studies have addressed this issue by contrasting tasks involving semantic and phonological decisions. However, these tasks engage verbal short-term memory and executive functions that are not required for reading and naming. Here, 20 subjects were instructed to overtly name written words and pictures of objects while their neuronal responses were measured using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Each trial consisted of a pair of successive stimuli that were either semantically related (e.g., "ROBIN-nest"), phonologically related (e.g., "BELL-belt"), unrelated (e.g., "KITE-lobster"), or semantically and phonologically identical (e.g., "FRIDGE-fridge"). In addition, a pair of stimuli could be presented in either the same modality (word-word or picture-picture) or a different modality (word-picture or picture-word). We report that semantically related pairs modulate neuronal responses in a left-lateralized network, including the pars orbitalis of the inferior frontal gyrus, the middle temporal gyrus, the angular gyrus, and the superior frontal gyrus. We propose that these areas are involved in stimulus-driven semantic processes. In contrast, phonologically related pairs modulate neuronal responses in bilateral insula. This region is therefore implicated in the discrimination of similar, competing phonological and articulatory codes. The above effects were detected with both words and pictures and did not differ between the two modalities even with a less conservative statistical threshold. In conclusion, this study dissociates the effects of semantic and phonological relatedness between successive items during reading and naming aloud. PMID:16767767

  13. Imagination and dissociation in hypnotic responding.

    PubMed

    Bowers, K S

    1992-10-01

    A neodissociative model of mind is better equipped than a social-psychological model to deal with the complexities of hypnosis, and of human behavior generally. It recognizes, as Coe's (1992) model does not, that behavior can be more automatically activated than strategically enacted. In particular, Coe's emphasis on human behavior as purposeful and goal directed does not distinguish between goal-directed behavior that serves a purpose, and goal-directed behavior that is performed on purpose. It is this distinction that permits goal-directed behavior to be dissociated from a person's conscious plans and intentions. In addition to offering a critique of Coe's "limited process" view of hypnosis, 4 main points are made in the interest of developing a slightly modified, neodissociation view of hypnosis. First, it is argued that goal-directed fantasies are more limited in their ability to mediate hypnotic responding than is commonly appreciated; as well, they do not seem to account for the nonvolitional quality of hypnotic responding. Second, it is argued that hypnotic ability is not unidimensional, with compliance and social influence more apt to account for the low than for the high hypnotizable's responsiveness to suggestion. Third, compared to low hypnotizables, the hypnotic responsiveness of high hypnotizables seems more likely to result from dissociated control. In other words, for high hypnotizables, hypnotic suggestions may often directly activate subsystems of cognitive control. Consequently, the need for executive initiative and effort to produce hypnotically suggested behavior is minimized, and such responses are therefore experienced as nonvolitional. Fourth and finally, while goal-directed fantasies typically accompany hypnotically suggested responses, they are in many cases more a marker of dissociated control than a mediator of suggested effects. PMID:1468834

  14. Transporting mitochondria in neurons

    PubMed Central

    Course, Meredith M.; Wang, Xinnan

    2016-01-01

    Neurons demand vast and vacillating supplies of energy. As the key contributors of this energy, as well as primary pools of calcium and signaling molecules, mitochondria must be where the neuron needs them, when the neuron needs them. The unique architecture and length of neurons, however, make them a complex system for mitochondria to navigate. To add to this difficulty, mitochondria are synthesized mainly in the soma, but must be transported as far as the distant terminals of the neuron. Similarly, damaged mitochondria—which can cause oxidative stress to the neuron—must fuse with healthy mitochondria to repair the damage, return all the way back to the soma for disposal, or be eliminated at the terminals. Increasing evidence suggests that the improper distribution of mitochondria in neurons can lead to neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric disorders. Here, we will discuss the machinery and regulatory systems used to properly distribute mitochondria in neurons, and how this knowledge has been leveraged to better understand neurological dysfunction. PMID:27508065

  15. An EP2 Agonist Facilitates NMDA-Induced Outward Currents and Inhibits Dendritic Beading through Activation of BK Channels in Mouse Cortical Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Yoshinori; Morinaga, Saori; Liu, Xia; Zhang, Jing; Wu, Zhou; Yokoyama, Takeshi; Nakanishi, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), a major metabolite of arachidonic acid produced by cyclooxygenase pathways, exerts its bioactive responses by activating four E-prostanoid receptor subtypes, EP1, EP2, EP3, and EP4. PGE2 enables modulating N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-mediated responses. However, the effect of E-prostanoid receptor agonists on large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (BK) channels, which are functionally coupled with NMDA receptors, remains unclear. Here, we showed that EP2 receptor-mediated signaling pathways increased NMDA-induced outward currents (INMDA-OUT), which are associated with the BK channel activation. Patch-clamp recordings from the acutely dissociated mouse cortical neurons revealed that an EP2 receptor agonist activated INMDA-OUT, whereas an EP3 receptor agonist reduced it. Agonists of EP1 or EP4 receptors showed no significant effects on INMDA-OUT. A direct perfusion of 3,5′-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) through the patch pipette facilitated INMDA-OUT, which was abolished by the presence of protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor. Furthermore, facilitation of INMDA-OUT caused by an EP2 receptor agonist was significantly suppressed by PKA inhibitor. Finally, the activation of BK channels through EP2 receptors facilitated the recovery phase of NMDA-induced dendritic beading in the primary cultured cortical neurons. These results suggest that a direct activation of BK channels by EP2 receptor-mediated signaling pathways plays neuroprotective roles in cortical neurons. PMID:27298516

  16. An EP2 Agonist Facilitates NMDA-Induced Outward Currents and Inhibits Dendritic Beading through Activation of BK Channels in Mouse Cortical Neurons.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Yoshinori; Morinaga, Saori; Liu, Xia; Zhang, Jing; Wu, Zhou; Yokoyama, Takeshi; Nakanishi, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), a major metabolite of arachidonic acid produced by cyclooxygenase pathways, exerts its bioactive responses by activating four E-prostanoid receptor subtypes, EP1, EP2, EP3, and EP4. PGE2 enables modulating N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-mediated responses. However, the effect of E-prostanoid receptor agonists on large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (BK) channels, which are functionally coupled with NMDA receptors, remains unclear. Here, we showed that EP2 receptor-mediated signaling pathways increased NMDA-induced outward currents (I NMDA-OUT), which are associated with the BK channel activation. Patch-clamp recordings from the acutely dissociated mouse cortical neurons revealed that an EP2 receptor agonist activated I NMDA-OUT, whereas an EP3 receptor agonist reduced it. Agonists of EP1 or EP4 receptors showed no significant effects on I NMDA-OUT. A direct perfusion of 3,5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) through the patch pipette facilitated I NMDA-OUT, which was abolished by the presence of protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor. Furthermore, facilitation of I NMDA-OUT caused by an EP2 receptor agonist was significantly suppressed by PKA inhibitor. Finally, the activation of BK channels through EP2 receptors facilitated the recovery phase of NMDA-induced dendritic beading in the primary cultured cortical neurons. These results suggest that a direct activation of BK channels by EP2 receptor-mediated signaling pathways plays neuroprotective roles in cortical neurons. PMID:27298516

  17. C1 neurons: the body's EMTs.

    PubMed

    Guyenet, Patrice G; Stornetta, Ruth L; Bochorishvili, Genrieta; Depuy, Seth D; Burke, Peter G R; Abbott, Stephen B G

    2013-08-01

    The C1 neurons reside in the rostral and intermediate portions of the ventrolateral medulla (RVLM, IVLM). They use glutamate as a fast transmitter and synthesize catecholamines plus various neuropeptides. These neurons regulate the hypothalamic pituitary axis via direct projections to the paraventricular nucleus and regulate the autonomic nervous system via projections to sympathetic and parasympathetic preganglionic neurons. The presympathetic C1 cells, located in the RVLM, are probably organized in a roughly viscerotopic manner and most of them regulate the circulation. C1 cells are variously activated by hypoglycemia, infection or inflammation, hypoxia, nociception, and hypotension and contribute to most glucoprivic responses. C1 cells also stimulate breathing and activate brain stem noradrenergic neurons including the locus coeruleus. Based on the various effects attributed to the C1 cells, their axonal projections and what is currently known of their synaptic inputs, subsets of C1 cells appear to be differentially recruited by pain, hypoxia, infection/inflammation, hemorrhage, and hypoglycemia to produce a repertoire of stereotyped autonomic, metabolic, and neuroendocrine responses that help the organism survive physical injury and its associated cohort of acute infection, hypoxia, hypotension, and blood loss. C1 cells may also contribute to glucose and cardiovascular homeostasis in the absence of such physical stresses, and C1 cell hyperactivity may contribute to the increase in sympathetic nerve activity associated with diseases such as hypertension. PMID:23697799

  18. C1 neurons: the body's EMTs

    PubMed Central

    Stornetta, Ruth L.; Bochorishvili, Genrieta; DePuy, Seth D.; Burke, Peter G. R.; Abbott, Stephen B. G.

    2013-01-01

    The C1 neurons reside in the rostral and intermediate portions of the ventrolateral medulla (RVLM, IVLM). They use glutamate as a fast transmitter and synthesize catecholamines plus various neuropeptides. These neurons regulate the hypothalamic pituitary axis via direct projections to the paraventricular nucleus and regulate the autonomic nervous system via projections to sympathetic and parasympathetic preganglionic neurons. The presympathetic C1 cells, located in the RVLM, are probably organized in a roughly viscerotopic manner and most of them regulate the circulation. C1 cells are variously activated by hypoglycemia, infection or inflammation, hypoxia, nociception, and hypotension and contribute to most glucoprivic responses. C1 cells also stimulate breathing and activate brain stem noradrenergic neurons including the locus coeruleus. Based on the various effects attributed to the C1 cells, their axonal projections and what is currently known of their synaptic inputs, subsets of C1 cells appear to be differentially recruited by pain, hypoxia, infection/inflammation, hemorrhage, and hypoglycemia to produce a repertoire of stereotyped autonomic, metabolic, and neuroendocrine responses that help the organism survive physical injury and its associated cohort of acute infection, hypoxia, hypotension, and blood loss. C1 cells may also contribute to glucose and cardiovascular homeostasis in the absence of such physical stresses, and C1 cell hyperactivity may contribute to the increase in sympathetic nerve activity associated with diseases such as hypertension. PMID:23697799

  19. Occipitocervical dissociation-incidence, evaluation, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Kasliwal, Manish K; Fontes, Ricardo B; Traynelis, Vincent C

    2016-09-01

    Traumatic occipitocervical dissociation (OCD) results from ligamentous injury to the craniocervical junction and is associated with a high rate of mortality and significant neurologic morbidity. The diagnosis is frequently missed on initial lateral cervical spinal radiographs mainly due to inadequate visualization of radiological landmarks and low degree of suspicion. Widespread availability of multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) of the spine and development of better diagnostic radiological criteria has allowed timely diagnosis and good clinical outcome following posterior occipitocervical fusion and instrumentation for a pathology that was once considered uniformly fatal. The present paper reviews the clinical features, diagnosis, and management of OCD in light of most recent literature. PMID:27255101

  20. On the dissociation energy of Mg2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Partridge, Harry; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Pettersson, Lars G. M.; Mclean, A. D.; Liu, Bowen

    1990-01-01

    The bonding in the X 1Sigma(+)g state of Mg2 is investigated using near-complete valence one-particle Slater and Gaussian basis sets containing up to h functions. It is shown that the four-electron complete CI limit can be approached using a sequence of either second-order CI (SOCI) or interacting correlated fragment (ICF) calculations. At the valence level, the best estimate of the dissociation energy D(e) was 464/cm. This is a lower limit and is probably within 5/cm of the complete basis value.

  1. Spin–orbit interaction mediated molecular dissociation

    SciTech Connect

    Kokkonen, E. Jänkälä, K.; Kettunen, J. A.; Heinäsmäki, S.; Karpenko, A.; Huttula, M.; Löytynoja, T.

    2014-05-14

    The effect of the spin–orbit interaction to photofragmentation is investigated in the mercury(II) bromide (HgBr{sub 2}) molecule. Changes in the fragmentation between the two spin–orbit components of Hg 5d photoionization, as well as within the molecular-field-splitted levels of these components are observed. Dissociation subsequent to photoionization is studied with synchrotron radiation and photoelectron-photoion coincidence spectroscopy. The experimental results are accompanied by relativistic ab initio analysis of the photoelectron spectrum.

  2. Dissociative Ionization of Aromatic and Heterocyclic Molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred M.

    2003-01-01

    Space radiation poses a major health hazard to humans in space flight. The high-energy charged particles in space radiation ranging from protons to high atomic number, high-energy (HZE) particles, and the secondary species they produce, attack DNA, cells, and tissues. Of the potential hazards, long-term health effects such as carcinogenesis are likely linked to the DNA lesions caused by secondary electrons in the 1 - 30 eV range. Dissociative ionization (DI) is one of the electron collision processes that can damage the DNA, either directly by causing a DNA lesion, or indirectly by producing radicals and cations that attack the DNA. To understand this process, we have developed a theoretical model for DI. Our model makes use of the fact that electron motion is much faster than nuclear motion and assumes DI proceeds through a two-step process. The first step is electron-impact ionization resulting in a particular state of the molecular ion in the geometry of the neutral molecule. In the second step the ion undergoes unimolecular dissociation. Thus the DI cross section sigma(sup DI)(sub a) for channel a is given by sigma(sup DI)(sub a) = sigma(sup I)(sub a) P(sub D) with sigma(sup I)(sub a) the ionization cross section of channel a and P(sub D) the dissociation probability. This model has been applied to study the DI of H2O, NH3, and CH4, with results in good agreement with experiment. The ionization cross section sigma(sup I)(sub a) was calculated using the improved binary encounter-dipole model and the unimolecular dissociation probability P(sub D) obtained by following the minimum energy path determined by the gradients and Hessians of the electronic energy with respect to the nuclear coordinates of the ion. This model is used to study the DI from the low-lying channels of benzene and pyridine to understand the different product formation in aromatic and heterocyclic molecules. DI study of the DNA base thymine is underway. Solvent effects will also be discussed.

  3. Towards an accurate dissociative potential for water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akin-Ojo, Omololu

    2014-03-01

    Most models of water describe the molecule as rigid, i.e., with fixed bond angles and bond lengths, or as flexible in which the bond angles and bond lengths vary but the chemical bonds cannot be broken. In this work we present our progress in the development of a water model which allows for the breaking and formation of chemical bonds. The force field was obtained by fitting ab initio (not DFT) energies, forces, and molecular properties. The ability of the model to predict properties of water at ambient and extreme conditions will be presented. We will also report on the modeling of small clusters of water using the dissociative force field.

  4. Generation of Neuronal Progenitor Cells and Neurons from Mouse Sleeping Beauty Transposon–Generated Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Klincumhom, Nuttha; Pirity, Melinda K.; Berzsenyi, Sara; Ujhelly, Olga; Muenthaisong, Suchitra; Rungarunlert, Sasitorn; Tharasanit, Theerawat; Techakumphu, Mongkol

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells can be used as models of neuronal differentiation for the investigation of mammalian neurogenesis, pharmacological testing, and development of cell-based therapies. Recently, mouse iPS cell lines have been generated by Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon-mediated transgenesis (SB-iPS). In this study, we determined for the first time the differentiation potential of mouse SB-iPS cells to form neuronal progenitor cells (NPCs) and neurons. Undifferentiated SB-iPS and ES cells were aggregated into embryoid bodies (EBs) and cultured in neuronal differentiation medium supplemented with 5 μM all-trans retinoic acid. Thereafter, EBs were dissociated and plated to observe further neuronal differentiation. Samples were fixed on days 10 and 14 for immunocytochemistry staining using the NPC markers Pax6 and Nestin and the neuron marker βIII-tubulin/Tuj1. Nestin-labeled cells were analyzed further by flow cytometry. Our results demonstrated that SB-iPS cells can generate NPCs and differentiate further into neurons in culture, although SB-iPS cells produced less nestin-positive cells than ESCs (6.12±1.61 vs. 74.36±1.65, respectively). In conclusion, the efficiency of generating SB-iPS cells–derived NPCs needs to be improved. However, given the considerable potential of SB-iPS cells for drug testing and as therapeutic models in neurological disorders, continuing investigation of their neuronal differentiation ability is required. PMID:22917491

  5. How microglia kill neurons.

    PubMed

    Brown, Guy C; Vilalta, Anna

    2015-12-01

    Microglia are resident brain macrophages that become inflammatory activated in most brain pathologies. Microglia normally protect neurons, but may accidentally kill neurons when attempting to limit infections or damage, and this may be more common with degenerative disease as there was no significant selection pressure on the aged brain in the past. A number of mechanisms by which activated microglia kill neurons have been identified, including: (i) stimulation of the phagocyte NADPH oxidase (PHOX) to produce superoxide and derivative oxidants, (ii) expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) producing NO and derivative oxidants, (iii) release of glutamate and glutaminase, (iv) release of TNFα, (v) release of cathepsin B, (vi) phagocytosis of stressed neurons, and (vii) decreased release of nutritive BDNF and IGF-1. PHOX stimulation contributes to microglial activation, but is not directly neurotoxic unless NO is present. NO is normally neuroprotective, but can react with superoxide to produce neurotoxic peroxynitrite, or in the presence of hypoxia inhibit mitochondrial respiration. Glutamate can be released by glia or neurons, but is neurotoxic only if the neurons are depolarised, for example as a result of mitochondrial inhibition. TNFα is normally neuroprotective, but can become toxic if caspase-8 or NF-κB activation are inhibited. If the above mechanisms do not kill neurons, they may still stress the neurons sufficiently to make them susceptible to phagocytosis by activated microglia. We review here whether microglial killing of neurons is an artefact, makes evolutionary sense or contributes in common neuropathologies and by what mechanisms. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Neuroprotection. PMID:26341532

  6. Neuronal Functions of ESCRTs

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Fen-Biao

    2012-01-01

    The endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRTs) regulate protein trafficking from endosomes to lysosomes. Recent studies have shown that ESCRTs are involved in various cellular processes, including membrane scission, microRNA function, viral budding, and the autophagy pathway in many tissues, including the nervous system. Indeed, dysfunctional ESCRTs are associated with neurodegeneration. However, it remains largely elusive how ESCRTs act in post-mitotic neurons, a highly specialized cell type that requires dynamic changes in neuronal structures and signaling for proper function. This review focuses on our current understandings of the functions of ESCRTs in neuronal morphology, synaptic plasticity, and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:22438674

  7. Dissociated functional significance of decision-related activity in the primate dorsal stream.

    PubMed

    Katz, Leor N; Yates, Jacob L; Pillow, Jonathan W; Huk, Alexander C

    2016-07-14

    During decision making, neurons in multiple brain regions exhibit responses that are correlated with decisions. However, it remains uncertain whether or not various forms of decision-related activity are causally related to decision making. Here we address this question by recording and reversibly inactivating the lateral intraparietal (LIP) and middle temporal (MT) areas of rhesus macaques performing a motion direction discrimination task. Neurons in area LIP exhibited firing rate patterns that directly resembled the evidence accumulation process posited to govern decision making, with strong correlations between their response fluctuations and the animal's choices. Neurons in area MT, in contrast, exhibited weak correlations between their response fluctuations and choices, and had firing rate patterns consistent with their sensory role in motion encoding. The behavioural impact of pharmacological inactivation of each area was inversely related to their degree of decision-related activity: while inactivation of neurons in MT profoundly impaired psychophysical performance, inactivation in LIP had no measurable impact on decision-making performance, despite having silenced the very clusters that exhibited strong decision-related activity. Although LIP inactivation did not impair psychophysical behaviour, it did influence spatial selection and oculomotor metrics in a free-choice control task. The absence of an effect on perceptual decision making was stable over trials and sessions and was robust to changes in stimulus type and task geometry, arguing against several forms of compensation. Thus, decision-related signals in LIP do not appear to be critical for computing perceptual decisions, and may instead reflect secondary processes. Our findings highlight a dissociation between decision correlation and causation, showing that strong neuron-decision correlations do not necessarily offer direct access to the neural computations underlying decisions. PMID:27376476

  8. A large scale chemical screen for regulators of the arginase 1 promoter identifies the soy isoflavone, daidzein as a clinically approved, small molecule that can promote neuronal protection or regeneration via a cAMP-independent pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Thong C.; Campana, Aline; Lange, Philipp S.; Lee, Hsin-Hwa; Banerjee, Kasturi; Bryson, J. Barney; Mahishi, Lata; Alam, Shabnam; Giger, Roman J.; Barnes, Stephen; Morris, Sidney M.; Willis, Dianna E.; Twiss, Jeffrey L.; Filbin, Marie T.; Ratan, Rajiv R.

    2011-01-01

    An ideal therapeutic for stroke or spinal cord injury should promote survival and regeneration in the CNS. Arginase 1 (Arg1) has been shown to protect motor neurons from trophic factor deprivation and allow sensory neurons to overcome neurite outgrowth inhibition by myelin proteins. To identify small molecules that capture Arg1’s protective and regenerative properties, we screened a hippocampal cell line stably expressing the proximal promoter region of the arginase 1 gene fused to a reporter gene against a library of compounds containing clinically approved drugs. This screen identified daidzein as a transcriptional inducer of Arg1. Both CNS and PNS neurons primed in vitro with daidzein overcame neurite outgrowth inhibition from MAG, which was mirrored by acutely dissociated and cultured sensory neurons primed in vivo by intrathecal or subcutaneous daidzein infusion. Further, daidzein was effective in promoting axonal regeneration in vivo in an optic nerve crush model when given intraocularly without lens damage, or most importantly, when given subcutaneously after injury. Mechanistically, daidzein requires transcription and induction of Arg1 activity for its ability to overcome myelin inhibition. In contrast to canonical Arg1 activators, daidzein increases Arg1 without increasing CREB phosphorylation, suggesting its effects are cAMP-independent. Accordingly, it may circumvent known CNS side effects of some cAMP modulators. Indeed, daidzein appears to be safe as it has been widely consumed in soy products, crosses the blood-brain barrier, and is effective without pretreatment, making it an ideal candidate for development as a therapeutic for spinal cord injury or stroke. PMID:20071539

  9. Dissociative experience and cultural neuroscience: narrative, metaphor and mechanism.

    PubMed

    Seligman, Rebecca; Kirmayer, Laurence J

    2008-03-01

    Approaches to trance and possession in anthropology have tended to use outmoded models drawn from psychodynamic theory or treated such dissociative phenomena as purely discursive processes of attributing action and experience to agencies other than the self. Within psychology and psychiatry, understanding of dissociative disorders has been hindered by polemical "either/or" arguments: either dissociative disorders are real, spontaneous alterations in brain states that reflect basic neurobiological phenomena, or they are imaginary, socially constructed role performances dictated by interpersonal expectations, power dynamics and cultural scripts. In this paper, we outline an approach to dissociative phenomena, including trance, possession and spiritual and healing practices, that integrates the neuropsychological notions of underlying mechanism with sociocultural processes of the narrative construction and social presentation of the self. This integrative model, grounded in a cultural neuroscience, can advance ethnographic studies of dissociation and inform clinical approaches to dissociation through careful consideration of the impact of social context. PMID:18213511

  10. Strain-induced water dissociation on supported ultrathin oxide films

    PubMed Central

    Song, Zhenjun; Fan, Jing; Xu, Hu

    2016-01-01

    Controlling the dissociation of single water molecule on an insulating surface plays a crucial role in many catalytic reactions. In this work, we have identified the enhanced chemical reactivity of ultrathin MgO(100) films deposited on Mo(100) substrate that causes water dissociation. We reveal that the ability to split water on insulating surface closely depends on the lattice mismatch between ultrathin films and the underlying substrate, and substrate-induced in-plane tensile strain dramatically results in water dissociation on MgO(100). Three dissociative adsorption configurations of water with lower energy are predicted, and the structural transition going from molecular form to dissociative form is almost barrierless. Our results provide an effective avenue to achieve water dissociation at the single-molecule level and shed light on how to tune the chemical reactions of insulating surfaces by choosing the suitable substrates. PMID:26953105

  11. Being in rhythm: dissociative attunement in therapeutic process.

    PubMed

    Hopenwasser, Karen

    2008-01-01

    Dissociative attunement is a profound rhythmic encounter in therapeutic treatment. Attunement is a synchronized awareness of implicit knowing that is nonlinear and bidirectional. Empathically attuned clinicians are like microtonal tuning forks. They resonate with a variety of emotional pitches and will resonate with nuanced shifting of emotional tone. This resonance is the basis of dissociative attunement. Concepts such as empathic attunement, affect attunement, "the unthought known," "implicit relational knowing," and "a two-person unconscious" help us to understand unique aspects of projective identification, transference, and countertransference within the dissociative frame. However, "dissociative" attunements are systemically self-emergent moments in which multiple self-states are shared by means other than projection. Using clinical vignettes, I demonstrate how dissociative attunement can paradoxically appear to be misattunement. By synthesizing scientific and theoretical concepts applied to these clinical moments, we can understand dissociative attunement as a therapeutic tool as well as a pathway to vicarious traumatization. PMID:19042783

  12. Strain-induced water dissociation on supported ultrathin oxide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Zhenjun; Fan, Jing; Xu, Hu

    2016-03-01

    Controlling the dissociation of single water molecule on an insulating surface plays a crucial role in many catalytic reactions. In this work, we have identified the enhanced chemical reactivity of ultrathin MgO(100) films deposited on Mo(100) substrate that causes water dissociation. We reveal that the ability to split water on insulating surface closely depends on the lattice mismatch between ultrathin films and the underlying substrate, and substrate-induced in-plane tensile strain dramatically results in water dissociation on MgO(100). Three dissociative adsorption configurations of water with lower energy are predicted, and the structural transition going from molecular form to dissociative form is almost barrierless. Our results provide an effective avenue to achieve water dissociation at the single-molecule level and shed light on how to tune the chemical reactions of insulating surfaces by choosing the suitable substrates.

  13. Dissociative detachment relates to psychotic symptoms and personality decompensation.

    PubMed

    Allen, J G; Coyne, L; Console, D A

    1997-01-01

    Previous studies have addressed the prominence of psychotic symptoms in conjunction with multiple personality disorder (now dissociative identity disorder). The present study examines the relation between psychotic symptoms and a more pervasive form of dissociative disturbance, namely dissociative detachment. Two hundred sixty-six women in inpatient treatment for severe trauma-related disorders completed the Dissociative Experiences Scale (DES), and 102 of these patients also completed the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory (MCMI-III). A factor analysis of the DES yielded two dimensions of dissociative detachment: detachment from one's own actions and detachment from the self and the environment. Each of these DES dimensions relates strongly to the thought disorder and schizotypal personality disorder scales of the MCMI-III. We propose that severe dissociative detachment, by virtue of loosening the moorings in inner and outer reality, is conducive to psychotic symptoms and personality decompensation. PMID:9406738

  14. Dissociation in individuals denying trauma exposure: findings from two samples.

    PubMed

    Briere, John; Runtz, Marsha

    2015-06-01

    A number of studies suggest that dissociation is reliably related to trauma exposure, and that inadequate regulation of posttraumatic distress may be a significant factor. We examined whether affect dysregulation predicts dissociation in those denying any lifetime exposure to trauma. These relationships were evaluated in a general population sample and a second sample of nontraumatized university students. In the first study, multivariate analyses indicated that, along with gender, affect dysregulation was a relatively strong predictor, accounting for 27% of the variance in dissociation. In the replication study, dissociation was associated with affect dysregulation, but not gender. Affect dysregulation seems to predict dissociative symptomatology in nontraumatized individuals. It is hypothesized that emotional distress, whether from trauma or other etiologies, motivates dissociation to the extent that it challenges the individual's compromised capacity for affect regulation. Treatment implications may include the potential helpfulness of interventions that increase emotion regulation skills. PMID:25974057

  15. The relationship between catatonia and dissociation: A preliminary investigation.

    PubMed

    Ross, Colin A; Browning, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Unlike the relationship between dissociation and Schneiderian first-rank symptoms, the relationship between dissociation and catatonia has not been investigated empirically. In order to gather some initial data about catatonia, dissociation, and childhood adverse experiences, we administered the Bush-Francis Catatonia Scale (BFCS), the Dissociative Experiences Scale (DES), the Adverse Childhood Experiences Questionnaire, and the Dissociative Disorders Interview Schedule to 100 inpatients in a hospital trauma program. The average DES score was 44.1 (SD = 22.4), and 86 participants were in the DES-Taxon. The average score on the BFCS was 7.7 (SD = 10.3); 81 participants scored 2 or higher, and 67 scored 5 or higher. The results showed that, in this sample, catatonic symptoms are frequent and related to adverse childhood experiences but seem to be a separate symptom category from both dissociation and psychosis. PMID:26751346

  16. Ictal symptoms of anxiety, avoidance behaviour, and dissociation in patients with dissociative seizures

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, L H; Mellers, J D C

    2006-01-01

    Objective To examine anxiety related seizure symptoms and avoidance behaviour in adults with dissociative (psychogenic non‐epileptic) seizures (DS) in comparison with a group suffering from partial epilepsy. Methods 25 DS and 19 epilepsy patients completed an attack symptom measure, the hospital anxiety and depression scale, the dissociative experiences scale, and the fear questionnaire. Results DS patients reported the presence of significantly greater numbers of somatic symptoms of anxiety during their attacks than the epilepsy group, despite not reporting subjectively higher levels of anxiety. The DS patients also reported higher levels of agoraphobic‐type avoidance behaviour than the epilepsy group. Measures of dissociation were higher in the DS group, who also reported greater symptoms of depression. Conclusions The findings support a model whereby DS occur as a paroxysmal, dissociative response to heightened arousal in the absence of raised general anxiety levels. The model has practical implications for clinical assessment and treatment: in clinical practice, inquiry about these symptoms may help in the diagnosis of DS; with respect to treatment, the anxiety related symptoms and avoidance behaviour prevalent in DS are a potential focus for a cognitive behavioural approach analogous to that used in the treatment of other anxiety disorders. PMID:16614021

  17. Motivation and Affective Judgments Differentially Recruit Neurons in the Primate Dorsolateral Prefrontal and Anterior Cingulate Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Amemori, Ken-ichi; Amemori, Satoko

    2015-01-01

    The judgment of whether to accept or to reject an offer is determined by positive and negative affect related to the offer, but affect also induces motivational responses. Rewarding and aversive cues influence the firing rates of many neurons in primate prefrontal and cingulate neocortical regions, but it still is unclear whether neurons in these regions are related to affective judgment or to motivation. To address this issue, we recorded simultaneously the neuronal spike activities of single units in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) and the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) of macaque monkeys as they performed approach–avoidance (Ap–Av) and approach–approach (Ap–Ap) decision-making tasks that can behaviorally dissociate affective judgment and motivation. Notably, neurons having activity correlated with motivational condition could be distinguished from neurons having activity related to affective judgment, especially in the Ap–Av task. Although many neurons in both regions exhibited similar, selective patterns of task-related activity, we found a larger proportion of neurons activated in low motivational conditions in the dlPFC than in the ACC, and the onset of this activity was significantly earlier in the dlPFC than in the ACC. Furthermore, the temporal onsets of affective judgment represented by neuronal activities were significantly slower in the low motivational conditions than in the other conditions. These findings suggest that motivation and affective judgment both recruit dlPFC and ACC neurons but with differential degrees of involvement and timing. PMID:25653353

  18. Painful nerve injury increases plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase activity in axotomized sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase (PMCA) is the principal means by which sensory neurons expel Ca2+ and thereby regulate the concentration of cytoplasmic Ca2+ and the processes controlled by this critical second messenger. We have previously found that painful nerve injury decreases resting cytoplasmic Ca2+ levels and activity-induced cytoplasmic Ca2+ accumulation in axotomized sensory neurons. Here we examine the contribution of PMCA after nerve injury in a rat model of neuropathic pain. Results PMCA function was isolated in dissociated sensory neurons by blocking intracellular Ca2+ sequestration with thapsigargin, and cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration was recorded with Fura-2 fluorometry. Compared to control neurons, the rate at which depolarization-induced Ca2+ transients resolved was increased in axotomized neurons after spinal nerve ligation, indicating accelerated PMCA function. Electrophysiological recordings showed that blockade of PMCA by vanadate prolonged the action potential afterhyperpolarization, and also decreased the rate at which neurons could fire repetitively. Conclusion We found that PMCA function is elevated in axotomized sensory neurons, which contributes to neuronal hyperexcitability. Accelerated PMCA function in the primary sensory neuron may contribute to the generation of neuropathic pain, and thus its modulation could provide a new pathway for peripheral treatment of post-traumatic neuropathic pain. PMID:22713297

  19. Motivation and affective judgments differentially recruit neurons in the primate dorsolateral prefrontal and anterior cingulate cortex.

    PubMed

    Amemori, Ken-ichi; Amemori, Satoko; Graybiel, Ann M

    2015-02-01

    The judgment of whether to accept or to reject an offer is determined by positive and negative affect related to the offer, but affect also induces motivational responses. Rewarding and aversive cues influence the firing rates of many neurons in primate prefrontal and cingulate neocortical regions, but it still is unclear whether neurons in these regions are related to affective judgment or to motivation. To address this issue, we recorded simultaneously the neuronal spike activities of single units in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) and the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) of macaque monkeys as they performed approach-avoidance (Ap-Av) and approach-approach (Ap-Ap) decision-making tasks that can behaviorally dissociate affective judgment and motivation. Notably, neurons having activity correlated with motivational condition could be distinguished from neurons having activity related to affective judgment, especially in the Ap-Av task. Although many neurons in both regions exhibited similar, selective patterns of task-related activity, we found a larger proportion of neurons activated in low motivational conditions in the dlPFC than in the ACC, and the onset of this activity was significantly earlier in the dlPFC than in the ACC. Furthermore, the temporal onsets of affective judgment represented by neuronal activities were significantly slower in the low motivational conditions than in the other conditions. These findings suggest that motivation and affective judgment both recruit dlPFC and ACC neurons but with differential degrees of involvement and timing. PMID:25653353

  20. Cold shock induces apoptosis of dorsal root ganglion neurons plated on infrared windows.

    PubMed

    Aboualizadeh, Ebrahim; Mattson, Eric C; O'Hara, Crystal L; Smith, Amanda K; Stucky, Cheryl L; Hirschmugl, Carol J

    2015-06-21

    The chemical status of live sensory neurons is accessible with infrared microspectroscopy of appropriately prepared cells. In this paper, individual dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons have been prepared with two different protocols, and plated on glass cover slips, BaF2 and CaF2 substrates. The first protocol exposes the intact DRGs to 4 °C for between 20-30 minutes before dissociating individual neurons and plating 2 hours later. The second protocol maintains the neurons at 23 °C for the entire duration of the sample preparation. The visual appearance of the neurons is similar. The viability was assessed by means of trypan blue exclusion method to determine the viability of the neurons. The neurons prepared under the first protocol (cold exposure) and plated on BaF2 reveal a distinct chemical signature and chemical distribution that is different from the other sample preparations described in the paper. Importantly, results for other sample preparation methods, using various substrates and temperature protocols, when compared across the overlapping spectral bandwidth, present normal chemical distribution within the neurons. The unusual chemically specific spatial variation is dominated by a lack of protein and carbohydrates in the center of the neurons and signatures of unraveling DNA are detected. We suggest that cold shock leads to apoptosis of DRGs, followed by osmotic stress originating from ion gradients across the cell membrane leading to cell lysis. PMID:26000346

  1. BMP7-induced dendritic growth in sympathetic neurons requires p75(NTR) signaling.

    PubMed

    Courter, Lauren A; Shaffo, Frances C; Ghogha, Atefeh; Parrish, Diana J; Lorentz, Christina U; Habecker, Beth A; Lein, Pamela J

    2016-09-01

    Dendritic morphology is a critical determinant of neuronal connectivity, and in postganglionic sympathetic neurons, tonic activity correlates directly with the size of the dendritic arbor. Thus, identifying signaling mechanisms that regulate dendritic arborization of sympathetic neurons is important to understanding how functional neural circuitry is established and maintained in the sympathetic nervous system. Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) promote dendritic growth in sympathetic neurons; however, downstream signaling events that link BMP receptor activation to dendritic growth are poorly characterized. We previously reported that BMP7 upregulates p75(NTR) mRNA in cultured sympathetic neurons. This receptor is implicated in controlling dendritic growth in central neurons but whether p75(NTR) regulates dendritic growth in peripheral neurons is not known. Here, we demonstrate that BMP7 increases p75(NTR) protein in cultured sympathetic neurons, and this effect is blocked by pharmacologic inhibition of signaling via BMP type I receptor. BMP7 does not trigger dendritic growth in sympathetic neurons dissociated from superior cervical ganglia (SCG) of p75(NTR) nullizygous mice, and overexpression of p75(NTR) in p75(NTR) -/- neurons is sufficient to cause dendritic growth even in the absence of BMP7. Morphometric analyses of SCG from wild-type versus p75(NTR) nullizygous mice at 3, 6, and 12 to 16 weeks of age indicated that genetic deletion of p75(NTR) does not prevent dendritic growth but does stunt dendritic maturation in sympathetic neurons. These data support the hypotheses that p75(NTR) is involved in downstream signaling events that mediate BMP7-induced dendritic growth in sympathetic neurons, and suggest that p75(NTR) signaling positively modulates dendritic complexity in sympathetic neurons in vivo. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol 76: 1003-1013, 2016. PMID:26663679

  2. Ketamine effects on somatosensory cortical single neurons and on behavior in rats.

    PubMed

    Patel, I M; Chapin, J K

    1990-06-01

    cortical neuronal excitation and sensory suppression in the same cortical region may explain in part the mechanism of dissociative anesthesia and hallucinatory side effects observed in humans during emergence from ketamine anesthesia. PMID:2344058

  3. Imaging the molecular dynamics of dissociative electron attachment to water

    SciTech Connect

    Adaniya, Hidihito; Rudek, B.; Osipov, Timur; Haxton, Dan; Weber, Thorsten; Rescigno, Thomas N.; McCurdy, C.W.; Belkacem, Ali

    2009-10-19

    Momentum imaging experiments on dissociative electron attachment to the water molecule are combined with ab initio theoretical calculations of the angular dependence of the quantum mechanical amplitude for electron attachment to provide a detailed picture of the molecular dynamics of dissociation attachment via the two lowest energy Feshbach resonances. The combination of momentum imaging experiments and theory can reveal dissociation dynamics for which the axial recoil approximation breaks down and thus provides a powerful reaction microscope for DEA to polyatomics.

  4. Acute malocclusion.

    PubMed

    Dupont, John S

    2006-01-01

    Acute malocclusion can result from disturbances in the maxillary/mandibular tooth relationship. These alterations in the occlusal position can result from high fillings, sinus problems, abscesses, periodontal disease, and moving or erupting teeth. Conditions seen less frequently include acute malocclusions secondary to an event (such as trauma) that make a stable dental relationship an unstable one. Patients can demonstrate any of a number of clinical conditions that interfere with their comfort and ability to function. This article provides information on some of the less familiar causes of acute malocclusion. PMID:16689064

  5. Autobiographical memory specificity in dissociative identity disorder.

    PubMed

    Huntjens, Rafaële J C; Wessel, Ineke; Hermans, Dirk; van Minnen, Agnes

    2014-05-01

    A lack of adequate access to autobiographical knowledge has been related to psychopathology. More specifically, patients suffering from depression or a history of trauma have been found to be characterized by overgeneral memory, in other words, they show a relative difficulty in retrieving a specific event from memory located in time and place. Previous studies of overgeneral memory have not included patients with dissociative disorders. These patients are interesting to consider, as they are hypothesized to have the ability to selectively compartmentalize information linked to negative emotions. This study examined avoidance and overgeneral memory in patients with dissociative identity disorder (DID; n = 12). The patients completed the autobiographical memory test (AMT). Their performance was compared with control groups of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) patients (n = 26), healthy controls (n = 29), and DID simulators (n = 26). Specifically, we compared the performance of separate identity states in DID hypothesized to diverge in the use of avoidance as a coping strategy to deal with negative affect. No significant differences in memory specificity were found between the separate identities in DID. Irrespective of identity state, DID patients were characterized by a lack of memory specificity, which was similar to the lack of memory specificity found in PTSD patients. The converging results for DID and PTSD patients add empirical evidence for the role of overgeneral memory involved in the maintenance of posttraumatic psychopathology. PMID:24886016

  6. Dissociation of silica at high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, Damien; Boehly, Tom

    2005-07-01

    Measurements of the temperature and optical reflectivity of quartz and fused silica under shock loading from 100 to 1000 GPa have revealed evidence for dissociation of silica between ˜150 and 400 GPa. Using attenuating laser-driven shock waves a continuous record of the temperature and reflectivity dependence on pressure has been obtained in both materials allowing the specific heat capacity and electronic conductivity to be deduced. Results show that between 150 and 400 GPa the specific heat rises significantly above that expected from the Dulong-Petit law, indicating the presence of a latent energy. Coincident with this anomalous specific heat is a rapid rise in electronic conductivity. Both these observables suggest that dissociation is occurring in the dense fluid. In addition temperature measurements near 5000 K detect a discontinuity at the melt transition, as measured earlier on gas gun experiments. This work was performed under the auspices of the US DOE by LLNL under Contract No. W-7405-ENG-48 and by the University of Rochester under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC03-92SF19460.

  7. Grammatical category dissociation in multilingual aphasia.

    PubMed

    Faroqi-Shah, Yasmeen; Waked, Arifi N

    2010-03-01

    Word retrieval deficits for specific grammatical categories, such as verbs versus nouns, occur as a consequence of brain damage. Such deficits are informative about the nature of lexical organization in the human brain. This study examined retrieval of grammatical categories across three languages in a trilingual person with aphasia who spoke Arabic, French, and English. In order to delineate the nature of word production difficulty, comprehension was tested, and a variety of concomitant lexical-semantic variables were analysed. The patient demonstrated a consistent noun-verb dissociation in picture naming and narrative speech, with severely impaired production of verbs across all three languages. The cross-linguistically similar noun-verb dissociation, coupled with little evidence of semantic impairment, suggests that (a) the patient has a true "nonsemantic" grammatical category specific deficit, and (b) lexical organization in multilingual speakers shares grammatical class information between languages. The findings of this study contribute to our understanding of the architecture of lexical organization in bilinguals. PMID:20830631

  8. Multigenerational Dissociation: A Framework for Building Narrative.

    PubMed

    McCollum, Sally E

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the concept of Multigenerational Dissociation (MGD), a behavior pattern that occurs in families in which violence and abuse are re-enacted from one generation to the next, accompanied by denial that the trauma occurred, or if it did, that it was destructive. While revictimization, reenactment, and the intergenerational transmission of trauma are discussed extensively in the literature, MGD helps to view them within a broad historical framework. This is useful for conceptualizing cases therapeutically, and it can also contribute to research on dissociation and recovered memories of trauma and abuse by demonstrating the value of narrative clinical data. Case material is used to illustrate how MGD occurs in people's lives and affects their memories, demonstrating how it becomes a frame within which to convey the dynamics of how traumatic experiences are remembered. This also demonstrates that when clinicians contribute their own narrative data to research on traumatic memory, the science is more accurate, relevant, and comprehensible to clinical and nonclinical researchers. PMID:26158318

  9. Dissociative excitation study of iron pentacarbonyl molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribar, Anita; Danko, Marián; Országh, Juraj; Ferreira da Silva, Filipe; Utke, Ivo; Matejčík, Štefan

    2015-04-01

    The processes of dissociative excitation (DE) and dissociative ionisation with excitation (DIE) of iron pentacarbonyl, Fe(CO)5, have been studied using a crossed electron-molecule beam experimental apparatus (Electron Induced Fluorescence Apparatus, EIFA). Using EIFA we were able to record the emission spectrum of the molecule in the UV-VIS range, as well as the photon efficiency curves initiated by electron impact. The emission spectrum of Fe(CO)5 initiated by impact of 50 eV electrons was recorded in the spectral range between 200 nm and 470 nm. It shows a high density of emission lines and bands (mainly iron lines and carbonyl bands). Additionally, we have measured photon efficiency curves (PECs) as a function of the electron impact energy for several lines and bands. On the basis of the PECs we have discussed the reaction mechanism and the energetics of the reactions associated with the DE and DIE processes. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Elementary Processes with Atoms and Molecules in Isolated and Aggregated States", edited by Friedrich Aumayr, Bratislav Marinkovic, Štefan Matejčík, John Tanis and Kurt H. Becker.

  10. Dissociable behavioural outcomes of visual statistical learning

    PubMed Central

    Turk-Browne, Nicholas B.; Seitz, Aaron R.

    2016-01-01

    Statistical learning refers to the extraction of probabilistic relationships between stimuli and is increasingly used as a method to understand learning processes. However, numerous cognitive processes are sensitive to the statistical relationships between stimuli and any one measure of learning may conflate these processes; to date little research has focused on differentiating these processes. To understand how multiple processes underlie statistical learning, here we compared, within the same study, operational measures of learning from different tasks that may be differentially sensitive to these processes. In Experiment 1, participants were visually exposed to temporal regularities embedded in a stream of shapes. Their task was to periodically detect whether a shape, whose contrast was staircased to a threshold level, was present or absent. Afterwards, they completed a search task, where statistically predictable shapes were found more quickly. We used the search task to label shape pairs as “learned” or “non-learned”, and then used these labels to analyse the detection task. We found a dissociation between learning on the search task and the detection task where only non-learned pairs showed learning effects in the detection task. This finding was replicated in further experiments with recognition memory (Experiment 2) and associative learning tasks (Experiment 3). Taken together, these findings are consistent with the view that statistical learning may comprise a family of processes that can produce dissociable effects on different aspects of behaviour.

  11. Dissociative recombination of molecular ions with electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnsen, Rainer

    1990-01-01

    An overview is presented for the present state of the art of laboratory measurements of the dissociative recombination of molecular ions with electrons. Most work has focussed on obtaining rates and their temperature dependence, as these are of primary interest for model calculations of ionospheres. A comparison of data obtained using the microwave afterglow method, the flowing afterglow technique, and the merged beam technique shows that generally the agreement is quite good, but there are some serious discrepancies, especially in the case of H(3+) recombination, that need to be resolved. Results of some earlier experimental work need to be reexamined in the light of more recent developments. Such cases are pointed out and a compilation of rate coefficients that have withstood scrutiny is presented. Recent advances in experimental methods, such as the use of laser-in-duced fluorescence, make it possible to identify some neutral products of dissociative recombination. What has been done so far and what results one might expect from future work are briefly reviewed.

  12. Dissociation of methane under high pressure.

    PubMed

    Gao, Guoying; Oganov, Artem R; Ma, Yanming; Wang, Hui; Li, Peifang; Li, Yinwei; Iitaka, Toshiaki; Zou, Guangtian

    2010-10-14

    Methane is an extremely important energy source with a great abundance in nature and plays a significant role in planetary physics, being one of the major constituents of giant planets Uranus and Neptune. The stable crystal forms of methane under extreme conditions are of great fundamental interest. Using the ab initio evolutionary algorithm for crystal structure prediction, we found three novel insulating molecular structures with P2(1)2(1)2(1), Pnma, and Cmcm space groups. Remarkably, under high pressure, methane becomes unstable and dissociates into ethane (C(2)H(6)) at 95 GPa, butane (C(4)H(10)) at 158 GPa, and further, carbon (diamond) and hydrogen above 287 GPa at zero temperature. We have computed the pressure-temperature phase diagram, which sheds light into the seemingly conflicting observations of the unusually low formation pressure of diamond at high temperature and the failure of experimental observation of dissociation at room temperature. Our results support the idea of diamond formation in the interiors of giant planets such as Neptune. PMID:20950018

  13. Neuromorphic silicon neuron circuits.

    PubMed

    Indiveri, Giacomo; Linares-Barranco, Bernabé; Hamilton, Tara Julia; van Schaik, André; Etienne-Cummings, Ralph; Delbruck, Tobi; Liu, Shih-Chii; Dudek, Piotr; Häfliger, Philipp; Renaud, Sylvie; Schemmel, Johannes; Cauwenberghs, Gert; Arthur, John; Hynna, Kai; Folowosele, Fopefolu; Saighi, Sylvain; Serrano-Gotarredona, Teresa; Wijekoon, Jayawan; Wang, Yingxue; Boahen, Kwabena

    2011-01-01

    Hardware implementations of spiking neurons can be extremely useful for a large variety of applications, ranging from high-speed modeling of large-scale neural systems to real-time behaving systems, to bidirectional brain-machine interfaces. The specific circuit solutions used to implement silicon neurons depend on the application requirements. In this paper we describe the most common building blocks and techniques used to implement these circuits, and present an overview of a wide range of neuromorphic silicon neurons, which implement different computational models, ranging from biophysically realistic and conductance-based Hodgkin-Huxley models to bi-dimensional generalized adaptive integrate and fire models. We compare the different design methodologies used for each silicon neuron design described, and demonstrate their features with experimental results, measured from a wide range of fabricated VLSI chips. PMID:21747754

  14. Neuronal ubiquitin homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Hallengren, Jada; Chen, Ping-Chung; Wilson, Scott M.

    2013-01-01

    Neurons have highly specialized intracellular compartments that facilitate the development and activity of the nervous system. Ubiquitination is a post-translational modification that controls many aspects of neuronal function by regulating protein abundance. Disruption of this signaling pathway has been demonstrated in neurological disorders such as Parkinson’s disease, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Angleman Syndrome. Since many neurological disorders exhibit ubiquitinated protein aggregates, the loss of neuronal ubiquitin homeostasis may be an important contributor of disease. This review discusses the mechanisms utilized by neurons to control the free pool of ubiquitin necessary for normal nervous system development and function as well as new roles of protein ubiquitination in regulating synaptic activity. PMID:23686613

  15. Neuromorphic Silicon Neuron Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Indiveri, Giacomo; Linares-Barranco, Bernabé; Hamilton, Tara Julia; van Schaik, André; Etienne-Cummings, Ralph; Delbruck, Tobi; Liu, Shih-Chii; Dudek, Piotr; Häfliger, Philipp; Renaud, Sylvie; Schemmel, Johannes; Cauwenberghs, Gert; Arthur, John; Hynna, Kai; Folowosele, Fopefolu; Saighi, Sylvain; Serrano-Gotarredona, Teresa; Wijekoon, Jayawan; Wang, Yingxue; Boahen, Kwabena

    2011-01-01

    Hardware implementations of spiking neurons can be extremely useful for a large variety of applications, ranging from high-speed modeling of large-scale neural systems to real-time behaving systems, to bidirectional brain–machine interfaces. The specific circuit solutions used to implement silicon neurons depend on the application requirements. In this paper we describe the most common building blocks and techniques used to implement these circuits, and present an overview of a wide range of neuromorphic silicon neurons, which implement different computational models, ranging from biophysically realistic and conductance-based Hodgkin–Huxley models to bi-dimensional generalized adaptive integrate and fire models. We compare the different design methodologies used for each silicon neuron design described, and demonstrate their features with experimental results, measured from a wide range of fabricated VLSI chips. PMID:21747754

  16. Stimulation of Slack K(+) Channels Alters Mass at the Plasma Membrane by Triggering Dissociation of a Phosphatase-Regulatory Complex.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Matthew R; Brown, Maile R; Kronengold, Jack; Zhang, Yalan; Jenkins, David P; Barcia, Gulia; Nabbout, Rima; Bausch, Anne E; Ruth, Peter; Lukowski, Robert; Navaratnam, Dhasakumar S; Kaczmarek, Leonard K

    2016-08-30

    Human mutations in the cytoplasmic C-terminal domain of Slack sodium-activated potassium (KNa) channels result in childhood epilepsy with severe intellectual disability. Slack currents can be increased by pharmacological activators or by phosphorylation of a Slack C-terminal residue by protein kinase C. Using an optical biosensor assay, we find that Slack channel stimulation in neurons or transfected cells produces loss of mass near the plasma membrane. Slack mutants associated with intellectual disability fail to trigger any change in mass. The loss of mass results from the dissociation of the protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) targeting protein, Phactr-1, from the channel. Phactr1 dissociation is specific to wild-type Slack channels and is not observed when related potassium channels are stimulated. Our findings suggest that Slack channels are coupled to cytoplasmic signaling pathways and that dysregulation of this coupling may trigger the aberrant intellectual development associated with specific childhood epilepsies. PMID:27545877

  17. The vibrational dynamics of 3D HOCl above dissociation

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Yi-Der; Reichl, L. E.; Jung, Christof

    2015-03-28

    We explore the classical vibrational dynamics of the HOCl molecule for energies above the dissociation energy of the molecule. Above dissociation, we find that the classical dynamics is dominated by an invariant manifold which appears to stabilize two periodic orbits at energies significantly above the dissociation energy. These stable periodic orbits can hold a large number of quantum states and likely can support a significant quasibound state of the molecule, well above the dissociation energy. The classical dynamics and the lifetime of quantum states on the invariant manifold are determined.

  18. Childhood maltreatment and intimate partner violence in dissociative disorder patients

    PubMed Central

    Webermann, Aliya R.; Brand, Bethany L.; Chasson, Gregory S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Childhood maltreatment (CM) is a risk factor for subsequent intimate partner violence (IPV) in adulthood, with high rates of retrospectively reported CM among IPV victims and perpetrators. A theorized mechanism of the link between CM and IPV is dissociation. Dissociation may allow perpetrators of violence to remain emotionally distant from their behavior and minimize empathy toward those they victimize, enabling them to commit acts of violence similar to their own experiences. Indeed, elevated rates of dissociation and dissociative disorders (DD) have been found among IPV survivors and perpetrators. In addition, in pilot studies, DD clinicians have reported high levels of violent behavior among DD patients. Objective The present study investigates IPV among DD patients with Dissociative Identity Disorder and Dissociative Disorder Not Otherwise Specified, a group with CM rates of 80–95% and severe dissociative symptoms. Methods DD clinicians reported on rates of CM and IPV among 275 DD patients in outpatient treatment. DD patients also completed a self-report measure of dissociation. Analyses assessed the associations between CM typologies and IPV, as well as trait dissociation and IPV. Results Physical and emotional child abuse were associated with physical IPV, and childhood witnessing of domestic violence (DV) and childhood neglect were associated with emotional IPV. Conclusions The present study is the first to provide empirical support for a possible CM to adult IPV developmental trajectory among DD patients. Future research is needed to better understand the link between CM and IPV among those with trauma and DD. PMID:25279109

  19. Autocatalytic water dissociation on Cu(110) at near ambient conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Mulleregan, Alice; Andersson, Klas; Ketteler, Guido; Bluhm, Hendrik; Yamamoto, Susumu; Ogasawara, Hirohito; Pettersson, Lars G.M.; Salmeron, Miquel; Nilsson, Anders

    2007-05-16

    Autocatalytic dissociation of water on the Cu(110) metal surface is demonstrated based on X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies carried out in-situ under near ambient conditions of water vapor pressure (1 Torr) and temperature (275-520 K). The autocatalytic reaction is explained as the result of the strong hydrogen-bond in the H{sub 2}O-OH complex of the dissociated final state, which lowers the water dissociation barrier according to the Broensted-Evans-Polanyi relations. A simple chemical bonding picture is presented which predicts autocatalytic water dissociation to be a general phenomenon on metal surfaces.

  20. Psychometric validation of the State Scale of Dissociation (SSD).

    PubMed

    Krüger, Christa; Mace, Chris J

    2002-03-01

    Although dissociative phenomena are often transient features of mental states, existing measures of dissociation are designed to measure enduring traits. A new present-state self-report measure, sensitive to changes in dissociative states, was therefore developed and psychometrically validated. Fifty-six items were formulated to measure state features, and sorted according to seven subscales: derealization, depersonalization, identity confusion, identity alteration, conversion, amnesia and hypermnesia. The State Scale of Dissociation (SSD) was administered with other psychiatric scales (DES, BDI, BAI, SCI-PANSS) to 130 participants with DSM-IV major depressive disorder schizophrenia, alcohol withdrawal, dissociative disorders and controls. In these sample populations, the SSD was demonstrated as a valid and reliable measure of changes in and the severity of dissociative states. Discriminant validity, content, concurrent, predictive, internal criterion-related, internal construct and convergent validities, and internal consistency and split-half reliability were confirmed statistically. Clinical observations of dissociative states, and their comorbidity with symptoms of depression and psychotic illness, were confirmed empirically. The SSD, an acceptable, valid and reliable scale measuring state features of dissociation at the time of completion, was obtained. This is a prerequisite for further investigation of correlations between changes in dissociative states and concurrent physiological parameters. PMID:12006198

  1. The vibrational dynamics of 3D HOCl above dissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yi-Der; Reichl, L. E.; Jung, Christof

    2015-03-01

    We explore the classical vibrational dynamics of the HOCl molecule for energies above the dissociation energy of the molecule. Above dissociation, we find that the classical dynamics is dominated by an invariant manifold which appears to stabilize two periodic orbits at energies significantly above the dissociation energy. These stable periodic orbits can hold a large number of quantum states and likely can support a significant quasibound state of the molecule, well above the dissociation energy. The classical dynamics and the lifetime of quantum states on the invariant manifold are determined.

  2. The Vibrational Dynamics of 3D HOCl Above Dissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yi-Der; Reichl, Linda; Jung, Christof

    2015-03-01

    We have analyzed the vibrational dynamics of HOCl above dissociation using a 3D energy surface which governs the vibrational dynamics of HOCl above dissociation. The dynamics is dominated by an invariant manifold which is transversally unstable for small spacing between Cl and HO complex, and stable for large spacing. Above dissociation, the InM separates two mirror image periodic orbits, embedded in a large chaotic sea, that can hold a large number of quantum states. These periodic orbits have the capability of forming significant quasibound states of the molecule above dissociation. Welch Foundation.

  3. Dissociability of free and peptidyl-tRNA bound ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Surguchov, A P; Fominykch, E S; Lyzlova, L V

    1978-06-16

    The influence of peptidyl-tRNA on the dissociation of yeast 80 S ribosomes into subunits was studied. For this purpose temperature-sensitive (ts) suppressor strain of yeast Saccharomyces cervisiae carrying a defect in peptide chain termination was used. It was found that peptidyl-tRNA did not influence the dissociation of ribosomes either at high salt concentration or in the presence of dissociation factor (DF) from yeast. After dissociation of yeast ribosomes in 0.5 M KCl, peptidyl-tRNA remains bound to the 60 S subunit. Some characteristics of the termination process and release of nascent polypeptides from yeast ribosomes are discussed. PMID:355860

  4. Dissociation curves of diatomic molecules: A DC-DFT study

    SciTech Connect

    Sim, Eunji; Kim, Min-Cheol; Burke, Kieron

    2015-12-31

    We investigate dissociation of diatomic molecules using standard density functional theory (DFT) and density-corrected density functional theory (DC-DFT) compared with CCSD(T) results as reference. The results show the difference between the HOMO values of dissociated atomic species often can be used as an indicator whether DFT would predict the correct dissociation limit. DFT predicts incorrect dissociation limits and charge distribution in molecules or molecular ions when the fragments have large HOMO differences, while DC-DFT and CCSD(T) do not. The criteria for large HOMO difference is about 2 ∼ 4 eV.

  5. Controls on Gas Hydrate Formation and Dissociation

    SciTech Connect

    Miriam Kastner; Ian MacDonald

    2006-03-03

    The main objectives of the project were to monitor, characterize, and quantify in situ the rates of formation and dissociation of methane hydrates at and near the seafloor in the northern Gulf of Mexico, with a focus on the Bush Hill seafloor hydrate mound; to record the linkages between physical and chemical parameters of the deposits over the course of one year, by emphasizing the response of the hydrate mound to temperature and chemical perturbations; and to document the seafloor and water column environmental impacts of hydrate formation and dissociation. For these, monitoring the dynamics of gas hydrate formation and dissociation was required. The objectives were achieved by an integrated field and laboratory scientific study, particularly by monitoring in situ formation and dissociation of the outcropping gas hydrate mound and of the associated gas-rich sediments. In addition to monitoring with the MOSQUITOs, fluid flow rates and temperature, continuously sampling in situ pore fluids for the chemistry, and imaging the hydrate mound, pore fluids from cores, peepers and gas hydrate samples from the mound were as well sampled and analyzed for chemical and isotopic compositions. In order to determine the impact of gas hydrate dissociation and/or methane venting across the seafloor on the ocean and atmosphere, the overlying seawater was sampled and thoroughly analyzed chemically and for methane C isotope ratios. At Bush hill the pore fluid chemistry varies significantly over short distances as well as within some of the specific sites monitored for 440 days, and gas venting is primarily focused. The pore fluid chemistry in the tub-warm and mussel shell fields clearly documented active gas hydrate and authigenic carbonate formation during the monitoring period. The advecting fluid is depleted in sulfate, Ca Mg, and Sr and is rich in methane; at the main vent sites the fluid is methane supersaturated, thus bubble plumes form. The subsurface hydrology exhibits both

  6. Products of Dissociative Recombination in the Ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosby, Philip

    1996-01-01

    SRI International undertook a novel experimental measurement of the product states formed by dissociative recombination (DR) of O2(+), NO(+), and N2(+) as a function of both electron energy and reactant ion vibrational level. For these measurements we used a recently developed experimental technique for measuring dissociation product distributions that allows both the branching ratios to be accurately determined and the electronic and rovibrational state composition of the reactant ions to be specified. DR is the dominant electron loss mechanism in all regions of the ionosphere. In this process, electron attachment to the molecular ion produces an unstable neutral molecule that rapidly dissociates. For a molecular ion such as O2(+), the dissociation recombination reaction is (1) O2(+) + e yields O + O + W. The atomic products of this reaction, in this case two oxygen atoms, can be produced in a variety of excited states and with a variety of kinetic energies, as represented by W in Eq. (1). These atoms are not only active in the neutral chemistry of the ionosphere, but are also especially important because their optical emissions are often used to infer in situ concentrations of the parent molecular ion and ambient electron densities. Many laboratory measurements have been made of DR reaction rates under a wide range of electron temperatures, but very little is known about the actual distributions among the final states of the atomic products. This lack of knowledge seriously limits the validity and effectiveness of efforts to model both natural and man-made ionospheric disturbances. Bates recently identified major deficiencies in the currently accepted branching ratios for O2(+) as they relate to blue and green line emission measurements in the nocturnal F-region. During our two-year effort, we partially satisfied our ambitious goals. We constructed and operated a variable pressure, electron-impact ion source and a high pressure, hollow-cathode discharge ion

  7. A Novel Population of Wake-Promoting GABAergic Neurons in the Ventral Lateral Hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Venner, Anne; Anaclet, Christelle; Broadhurst, Rebecca Y; Saper, Clifford B; Fuller, Patrick M

    2016-08-22

    The largest synaptic input to the sleep-promoting ventrolateral preoptic area (VLPO) [1] arises from the lateral hypothalamus [2], a brain area associated with arousal [3-5]. However, the neurochemical identity of the majority of these VLPO-projecting neurons within the lateral hypothalamus (LH), as well as their function in the arousal network, remains unknown. Herein we describe a population of VLPO-projecting neurons in the LH that express the vesicular GABA transporter (VGAT; a marker for GABA-releasing neurons). In addition to the VLPO, these neurons also project to several other established sleep and arousal nodes, including the tuberomammillary nucleus, ventral periaqueductal gray, and locus coeruleus. Selective and acute chemogenetic activation of LH VGAT(+) neurons was profoundly wake promoting, whereas acute inhibition increased sleep. Because of its direct and massive inputs to the VLPO, this population may play a particularly important role in sleep-wake switching. PMID:27426511

  8. NeuronBank: A Tool for Cataloging Neuronal Circuitry

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Paul S.; Calin-Jageman, Robert; Dhawan, Akshaye; Frederick, Chad; Guo, Shuman; Dissanayaka, Rasanjalee; Hiremath, Naveen; Ma, Wenjun; Shen, Xiuyn; Wang, Hsui C.; Yang, Hong; Prasad, Sushil; Sunderraman, Rajshekhar; Zhu, Ying

    2010-01-01

    The basic unit of any nervous system is the neuron. Therefore, understanding the operation of nervous systems ultimately requires an inventory of their constituent neurons and synaptic connectivity, which form neural circuits. The presence of uniquely identifiable neurons or classes of neurons in many invertebrates has facilitated the construction of cellular-level connectivity diagrams that can be generalized across individuals within a species. Homologous neurons can also be recognized across species. Here we describe NeuronBank.org, a web-based tool that we are developing for cataloging, searching, and analyzing neuronal circuitry within and across species. Information from a single species is represented in an individual branch of NeuronBank. Users can search within a branch or perform queries across branches to look for similarities in neuronal circuits across species. The branches allow for an extensible ontology so that additional characteristics can be added as knowledge grows. Each entry in NeuronBank generates a unique accession ID, allowing it to be easily cited. There is also an automatic link to a Wiki page allowing an encyclopedic explanation of the entry. All of the 44 previously published neurons plus one previously unpublished neuron from the mollusc, Tritonia diomedea, have been entered into a branch of NeuronBank as have 4 previously published neurons from the mollusc, Melibe leonina. The ability to organize information about neuronal circuits will make this information more accessible, ultimately aiding research on these important models. PMID:20428500

  9. Acute Bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... bronchitis? Acute bronchitis is almost always caused by viruses that attack the lining of the bronchial tree ... infection. As your body fights back against these viruses, more swelling occurs and more mucus is produced. ...

  10. Acute Pericarditis

    MedlinePlus

    ... large pericardial effusions). Acute pericarditis usually responds to colchicine or NSAIDs (such as aspirin and ibuprofen ) taken ... reduce pain but relieves it by reducing inflammation. Colchicine also decreases the chance of pericarditis returning later. ...

  11. Somatostatin triggers rhythmic electrical firing in hypothalamic GHRH neurons

    PubMed Central

    Osterstock, Guillaume; Mitutsova, Violeta; Barre, Alexander; Granier, Manon; Fontanaud, Pierre; Chazalon, Marine; Carmignac, Danielle; Robinson, Iain C. A. F.; Low, Malcolm J.; Plesnila, Nikolaus; Hodson, David J.; Mollard, Patrice; Méry, Pierre-François

    2016-01-01

    Hypothalamic growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) neurons orchestrate body growth/maturation and have been implicated in feeding responses and ageing. However, the electrical patterns that dictate GHRH neuron functions have remained elusive. Since the inhibitory neuropeptide somatostatin (SST) is considered to be a primary oscillator of the GH axis, we examined its acute effects on GHRH neurons in brain slices from male and female GHRH-GFP mice. At the cellular level, SST irregularly suppressed GHRH neuron electrical activity, leading to slow oscillations at the population level. This resulted from an initial inhibitory action at the GHRH neuron level via K+ channel activation, followed by a delayed, sst1/sst2 receptor-dependent unbalancing of glutamatergic and GABAergic synaptic inputs. The oscillation patterns induced by SST were sexually dimorphic, and could be explained by differential actions of SST on both GABAergic and glutamatergic currents. Thus, a tripartite neuronal circuit involving a fast hyperpolarization and a dual regulation of synaptic inputs appeared sufficient in pacing the activity of the GHRH neuronal population. These “feed-forward loops” may represent basic building blocks involved in the regulation of GHRH release and its downstream sexual specific functions. PMID:27072430

  12. Acute stress in adulthood impoverishes social choices and triggers aggressiveness in preclinical models

    PubMed Central

    Nosjean, Anne; Cressant, Arnaud; de Chaumont, Fabrice; Olivo-Marin, Jean-Christophe; Chauveau, Frédéric; Granon, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    Adult C57BL/6J mice are known to exhibit high level of social flexibility while mice lacking the β2 subunit of nicotinic receptors (β2−/− mice) present social rigidity. We asked ourselves what would be the consequences of a restraint acute stress (45 min) on social interactions in adult mice of both genotypes, hence the contribution of neuronal nicotinic receptors in this process. We therefore dissected social interaction complexity of stressed and not stressed dyads of mice in a social interaction task. We also measured plasma corticosterone levels in our experimental conditions. We showed that a single stress exposure occurring in adulthood reduced and disorganized social interaction complexity in both C57BL/6J and β2−/− mice. These stress-induced maladaptive social interactions involved alteration of distinct social categories and strategies in both genotypes, suggesting a dissociable impact of stress depending on the functioning of the cholinergic nicotinic system. In both genotypes, social behaviors under stress were coupled to aggressive reactions with no plasma corticosterone changes. Thus, aggressiveness appeared a general response independent of nicotinic function. We demonstrate here that a single stress exposure occurring in adulthood is sufficient to impoverish social interactions: stress impaired social flexibility in C57BL/6J mice whereas it reinforced β2−/− mice behavioral rigidity. PMID:25610381

  13. Neuron-glia synapses in the brain.

    PubMed

    Bergles, Dwight E; Jabs, Ronald; Steinhäuser, Christian

    2010-05-01

    The ability to investigate the electrophysiological properties of individual cells in acute brain tissue led to the discovery that many glial cells have the capacity to respond rapidly to neuronal activity. In particular, a distinct class of neuroglial cells known as NG2 cells, which exhibit many of the properties that have been described for glial subtypes such as complex cells, polydendrocytes, synantocytes and GluR cells, express ionotropic receptors for glutamate and GABA. In both gray and white matter, NG2 cells form direct synaptic junctions with axons, which enable transient activation of these receptors. Electrophysiological analyses have shown that these neuron-glia synapses exhibit all the hallmarks of 'classical' neuron-neuron synapses, including rapid activation, quantized responses, facilitation and depression, and presynaptic inhibition. Electron microscopy indicates that axons form morphologically distinct junctions at discrete sites along processes of NG2 cells, suggesting that NG2 cells are an overt target of axonal projections. AMPA receptors expressed by NG2 cells exhibit varying degrees of Ca(2+) permeability, depending on the brain region and stage of development, and in white matter NG2 cells have also been shown to express functional NMDA receptors. Ca(2+) influx through AMPA receptors following repetitive stimulation can trigger long term potentiation of synaptic currents in NG2 cells. The expression of receptors with significant Ca(2+) permeability may increase the susceptibility of NG2 cells to excitotoxic injury. Future studies using transgenic mice in which expression of receptors can be manipulated selectively in NG2 cells have to define the functions of this enigmatic neuron-glia signaling in the normal and diseased CNS. PMID:20018210

  14. Neuronal avalanches and learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Arcangelis, Lucilla

    2011-05-01

    Networks of living neurons represent one of the most fascinating systems of biology. If the physical and chemical mechanisms at the basis of the functioning of a single neuron are quite well understood, the collective behaviour of a system of many neurons is an extremely intriguing subject. Crucial ingredient of this complex behaviour is the plasticity property of the network, namely the capacity to adapt and evolve depending on the level of activity. This plastic ability is believed, nowadays, to be at the basis of learning and memory in real brains. Spontaneous neuronal activity has recently shown features in common to other complex systems. Experimental data have, in fact, shown that electrical information propagates in a cortex slice via an avalanche mode. These avalanches are characterized by a power law distribution for the size and duration, features found in other problems in the context of the physics of complex systems and successful models have been developed to describe their behaviour. In this contribution we discuss a statistical mechanical model for the complex activity in a neuronal network. The model implements the main physiological properties of living neurons and is able to reproduce recent experimental results. Then, we discuss the learning abilities of this neuronal network. Learning occurs via plastic adaptation of synaptic strengths by a non-uniform negative feedback mechanism. The system is able to learn all the tested rules, in particular the exclusive OR (XOR) and a random rule with three inputs. The learning dynamics exhibits universal features as function of the strength of plastic adaptation. Any rule could be learned provided that the plastic adaptation is sufficiently slow.

  15. Role of nucleus of the solitary tract noradrenergic neurons in post-stress cardiovascular and hormonal control in male rats

    PubMed Central

    Bundzikova-Osacka, Jana; Ghosal, Sriparna; Packard, Benjamin A.; Ulrich-Lai, Yvonne M.; Herman, James P.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic stress causes hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis hyperactivity and cardiovascular dyshomeostasis. Noradrenergic neurons in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) are considered to play a role in these changes. Here, we tested the hypothesis that NTS noradrenergic A2 neurons are required for cardiovascular and HPA axis responses to both acute and chronic stress. Adult male rats received bilateral microinjection into the NTS of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) to lesion A2 neurons [cardiovascular study, n= 5; HPA study, n= 5], or vehicle [cardiovascular study, n= 6; HPA study, n= 4]. Rats were exposed to acute restraint stress followed by 14 days of chronic variable stress (CVS). On the last day of testing, rats were placed in a novel elevated plus maze (EPM) to test post-CVS stress responses. Lesions of NTS A2 neurons reduced the tachycardic response to acute restraint, confirming that A2 neurons promote sympathetic activation following acute stress. In addition, CVS increased the ratio of low frequency to high frequency power for heart rate variability, indicative of sympathovagal imbalance, and this effect was significantly attenuated by 6-OHDA lesion. Lesions of NTS A2 neurons reduced acute restraint-induced corticosterone secretion, but did not affect the corticosterone response to the EPM, indicating that A2 neurons promote acute HPA axis responses, but are not involved in CVS-mediated HPA axis sensitization. Collectively, these data indicate that A2 neurons promote both cardiovascular and HPA axis responses to acute stress. Moreover, A2 catecholaminergic neurons may contribute to the potentially deleterious enhancement of sympathetic drive following chronic stress. PMID:25765732

  16. Acetylated histone H3 increases nucleosome dissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Marek; Manohar, Mridula; Ottesen, Jennifer; Poirier, Michael

    2009-03-01

    Chromatin's basic unit structure is the nucleosome, i.e. genomic DNA wrapped around a particular class of proteins -- histones -- which due to their physical hindrance, block vital biological processes, such as DNA repair, DNA replication, and RNA transcription. Histone post-translational modifications, which are known to exist in vivo, are hypothesized to regulate these biological processes by directly altering DNA-histone interactions and thus nucleosome structure and stability. Using magnetic tweezers technique we studied the acetylation of histone H3 in the dyad region, i.e. at K115 and K122, on reconstituted arrays of nucleosomes under constant external force. Based on the measured increase in the probability of dissociation of modified nucleosomes, we infer that this double modification could facilitate histone chaperone mediated nucleosome disassembly in vivo.

  17. Dissociative electron attachment studies on acetone

    SciTech Connect

    Prabhudesai, Vaibhav S. Tadsare, Vishvesh; Ghosh, Sanat; Gope, Krishnendu; Davis, Daly; Krishnakumar, E.

    2014-10-28

    Dissociative electron attachment (DEA) to acetone is studied in terms of the absolute cross section for various fragment channels in the electron energy range of 0–20 eV. H{sup −} is found to be the most dominant fragment followed by O{sup −} and OH{sup −} with only one resonance peak between 8 and 9 eV. The DEA dynamics is studied by measuring the angular distribution and kinetic energy distribution of fragment anions using Velocity Slice Imaging technique. The kinetic energy and angular distribution of H{sup −} and O{sup −} fragments suggest a many body break-up for the lone resonance observed. The ab initio calculations show that electron is captured in the multi-centered anti-bonding molecular orbital which would lead to a many body break-up of the resonance.

  18. The appearance and development of neurotransmitter sensitivity in Xenopus embryonic spinal neurones in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Bixby, J L; Spitzer, N C

    1984-01-01

    We have determined the time of onset and examined some of the properties of neurotransmitter sensitivity in Xenopus spinal neurones developing in dissociated cell culture. These cells are initially insensitive, but acquire responses to several agonists over a period of 6 h. Nearly one-third of the neurones were depolarized by gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) or by both GABA and glycine; these cells were not affected by glutamate. The reversal potential of the ionophoretic GABA response is -35 mV. These neurones are likely to be Rohon-Beard neurones. Roughly two-thirds of the neurones were depolarized by glutamate and hyperpolarized by GABA and by glycine. The reversal potential of the ionophoretic GABA response is -58 mV. These neurones are likely to include motoneurones. A quantitative measure of the sensitivity to a given GABA dose was obtained at early and intermediate stages of development. The mean 'sensitivity index' (ionophoretic sensitivity/input resistance) for both classes of neurones in vitro was initially the same as that seen in Rohon-Beard neurones in vivo. This sensitivity index did not increase with time in culture to attain the value at intermediate stages in vivo. The development of chemosensitivity in Rohon-Beard-like neurones in these cultures resembles that of Rohon-Beard neurones in the spinal cord with respect to the time of onset of responses to GABA, the reversal potential, pharmacology and desensitization of these responses, and the spectrum of agonists to which they are sensitive. It differs in the absence of a developmental increase in sensitivity to GABA. The development of chemosensitivity in motoneurone-like neurones in these cultures parallels that of Rohon-Beard-like neurones, with respect to the time of onset and level of sensitivity, as well as susceptibility to pharmacological blockers. Several features of normal neurotransmitter sensitivity, like features of the action potential, differentiate in culture in the absence of normal

  19. Molecular Dissociation Induced by Electron Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Andreas

    2009-05-01

    Free electrons can efficiently break molecules or molecular ions in low-energy collisions by the processes of dissociative recombination or attachment. These processes make slow electrons efficient chemical agents in many environments. For dissociative recombination, in particular, studies of the underlying reaction paths and mechanisms have become possible on a uniquely elementary level in recent years both for theory and experiment. On the experimental side, collisions can be prepared at resolved collision energies down to the meV (10 Kelvin) level, increasingly gaining control also over the initial molecular quantum level, and individual events are detected and kinematically analyzed by fast-beam coincidence fragment imaging. Experiments are reported from the ion cooler ring TSR in Heidelberg. Stored beams of molecular ions cooled in their external and internal degrees of freedom are collinearly merged with intense and cold electron beams from cryogenic GaAs photocathodes, recently shown to yield fast cooling of the center-of-mass motion also for heavy and correspondingly slow molecular ion beams. To reconstruct the molecular fragmentation events multiparticle imaging can now be used systematically with collision energies set a wide range, especially aiming at specific electron capture resonances. Thus, for CF^+ it is found that the electronic state of the C fragment (^3P or ^1D) switches resonantly when the collision energy is changed by only a small fraction. As a new powerful tool, an energy-sensitive multi-strip surface-barrier detector (EMU) has been set up to measure with near-unity efficiency the masses of all fragments together with their hit positions in high-multiplicity events. Among many uses, this device allows internal molecular excitations to be derived for individual chemical channels in polyatomic fragmentation. New results will be presented in particular on the breakup of the hydronium ion (D3O^+).

  20. Memory Abilities in Williams Syndrome: Dissociation or Developmental Delay Hypothesis?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sampaio, Adriana; Sousa, Nuno; Fernandez, Montse; Henriques, Margarida; Goncalves, Oscar F.

    2008-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a neurodevelopmental genetic disorder often described as being characterized by a dissociative cognitive architecture, in which profound impairments of visuo-spatial cognition contrast with relative preservation of linguistic, face recognition and auditory short-memory abilities. This asymmetric and dissociative cognition…

  1. Coherent dissociation of relativistic {sup 9}C nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Krivenkov, D. O.; Artemenkov, D. A.; Bradnova, V.; Vokal, S.; Zarubin, P. I. Zarubina, I. G.; Kondratieva, N. V.; Malakhov, A. I.; Moiseenko, A. A.; Orlova, G. I.; Peresadko, N. G.; Polukhina, N. G.; Rukoyatkin, P. A.; Rusakova, V. V.; Sarkisyan, V. R.; Stanoeva, R.; Haiduc, M.; Kharlamov, S. P.

    2010-12-15

    Results on the coherent dissociation of relativistic {sup 9}C nuclei in a nuclear track emulsion are described. These results include the charge topology and kinematical features of final states. Events of {sup 9}C {yields} 3{sup 3}He coherent dissociation are identified.

  2. Errors of Logic and Scholarship Concerning Dissociative Identity Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Colin A.

    2009-01-01

    The author reviewed a two-part critique of dissociative identity disorder published in the "Canadian Journal of Psychiatry". The two papers contain errors of logic and scholarship. Contrary to the conclusions in the critique, dissociative identity disorder has established diagnostic reliability and concurrent validity, the trauma histories of…

  3. The rise and fall of dissociative identity disorder.

    PubMed

    Paris, Joel

    2012-12-01

    Dissociative identity disorder (DID), once considered rare, was frequently diagnosed during the 1980s and 1990s, after which interest declined. This is the trajectory of a medical fad. DID was based on poorly conceived theories and used potentially damaging treatment methods. The problem continues, given that the DSM-5 includes DID and accords dissociative disorders a separate chapter in its manual. PMID:23197123

  4. Dissociative Disorders in Children: Behavioral Profiles and Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Putnam, Frank W.

    1993-01-01

    Clinical research has established a connection between childhood trauma and the development of dissociative disorders in adults. Pathological dissociation produces a range of symptoms and behaviors such as amnesias, rapid shifts in mood and behavior, and auditory and visual hallucinations. Many of these symptoms are misdiagnosed as attention,…

  5. Early Indicators of Pathological Dissociation in Sexually Abused Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McElroy, Linda Provus

    1992-01-01

    This paper reviews factors in the professional neglect of multiple personality disorder (MPD) and sexual abuse in childhood, as well as recent diagnostic developments in childhood dissociative disorders. The identification of subtle dissociative symptomatology in children is illustrated, and two case examples are presented. (Author)

  6. Modeling the electron-impact dissociation of methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziółkowski, Marcin; Vikár, Anna; Mayes, Maricris Lodriguito; Bencsura, Ákos; Lendvay, György; Schatz, George C.

    2012-12-01

    The product yield of the electron-impact dissociation of methane has been studied with a combination of three theoretical methods: R-matrix theory to determine the electronically inelastic collisional excitation cross sections, high-level electronic structure methods to determine excited states energies and derivative couplings, and trajectory surface hopping (TSH) calculations to determine branching in the dissociation of the methane excited states to give CH3, CH2, and CH. The calculations involve the lowest 24 excited-state potential surfaces of methane, up to the ionization energy. According to the R-matrix calculations, electron impact preferentially produces triplet excited states, especially for electron kinetic energies close to the dissociation threshold. The potential surfaces of excited states are characterized by numerous avoided and real crossings such that the TSH calculations show rapid cascading down to the lowest excited singlet or triplet states, and then slower the dissociation of these lowest states. Product branching for electron-impact dissociation was therefore estimated by combining the electron-impact excitation cross sections with TSH product branching ratios that were obtained from the lowest singlet and triplet states, with the singlet dissociation giving a comparable formation of CH2 and CH3 while triplet dissociation gives CH3 exclusively. The overall branching in electron-impact dissociation is dominated by CH3 over CH2. A small branching yield for CH is also predicted.

  7. RAIRS observation of photoinduced dissociation of NO on Ni(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magkoev, Tamerlan T.; Song, Moon-Bong; Fukutani, Katsuyuki; Murata, Yoshitada

    1995-06-01

    The properties of the {NO}/{Ni(111) } system under nanosecond ultraviolet laser light irradiation are studied by reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy. It is found that adsorbed NO molecules are dissociated by laser light. Dissociation proceeds effectively in a dilute NO layer, whereas it is suppressed in a saturated overlayer.

  8. Self-Destructive Behavior in People with Dissociative Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saxe, Glenn N.; Chawla, Neharika; Van der Kolk, Bessel

    2002-01-01

    Study assesses self-destructive behavior in a group of inpatients who have dissociative disorders compared to those who report few dissociative symptoms. Results reveal that these patients more frequently engage in self-destructive behaviors, use more methods of self-injury, and begin to injure themselves at an earlier age then patients who do not…

  9. Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) - children

    MedlinePlus

    Acute myelogenous leukemia - children; AML; Acute myeloid leukemia - children; Acute granulocytic leukemia - children; Acute myeloblastic leukemia - children; Acute non-lymphocytic leukemia (ANLL) - children

  10. Membrane potential dynamics of axons in cultured hippocampal neurons probed by second-harmonic-generation imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuriya, Mutsuo; Yasui, Masato

    2010-03-01

    The electrical properties of axons critically influence the nature of communication between neurons. However, due to their small size, direct measurement of membrane potential dynamics in intact and complex mammalian axons has been a challenge. Furthermore, quantitative optical measurements of axonal membrane potential dynamics have not been available. To characterize the basic principles of somatic voltage signal propagation in intact axonal arbors, second-harmonic-generation (SHG) imaging is applied to cultured mouse hippocampal neurons. When FM4-64 is applied extracellularly to dissociated neurons, whole axonal arbors are visualized by SHG imaging. Upon action potential generation by somatic current injection, nonattenuating action potentials are recorded in intact axonal arbors. Interestingly, however, both current- and voltage-clamp recordings suggest that nonregenerative subthreshold somatic voltage changes at the soma are poorly conveyed to these axonal sites. These results reveal the nature of membrane potential dynamics of cultured hippocampal neurons, and further show the possibility of SHG imaging in physiological investigations of axons.

  11. Direct Activation of Sleep-Promoting VLPO Neurons by Volatile Anesthetics Contributes to Anesthetic Hypnosis

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Jason T; Chen, Jingqiu; Han, Bo; Meng, Qing Cheng; Veasey, Sigrid C; Beck, Sheryl G; Kelz, Max B

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background Despite seventeen decades of continuous clinical use, the neuronal mechanisms through which volatile anesthetics act to produce unconsciousness remain obscure. One emerging possibility is that anesthetics exert their hypnotic effects by hijacking endogenous arousal circuits. A key sleep-promoting component of this circuitry is the ventrolateral preoptic nucleus (VLPO), a hypothalamic region containing both state-independent neurons and neurons that preferentially fire during natural sleep. Results Using c-Fos immunohistochemistry as a biomarker for antecedent neuronal activity, we show that isoflurane and halothane increase the number of active neurons in the VLPO, but only when mice are sedated or unconscious. Destroying VLPO neurons produces an acute resistance to isoflurane-induced hypnosis. Electrophysiological studies prove that the neurons depolarized by isoflurane belong to the subpopulation of VLPO neurons responsible for promoting natural sleep, while neighboring non-sleep-active VLPO neurons are unaffected by isoflurane. Finally, we show that this anesthetic-induced depolarization is not solely due to a presynaptic inhibition of wake-active neurons as previously hypothesized, but rather is due to a direct postsynaptic effect on VLPO neurons themselves arising from the closing of a background potassium conductance. Conclusions Cumulatively, this work demonstrates that anesthetics are capable of directly activating endogenous sleep-promoting networks and that such actions contribute to their hypnotic properties. PMID:23103189

  12. Peritraumatic dissociation after loss: latent structure and associations with psychopathology.

    PubMed

    Boelen, Paul A; Keijsers, Loes; van den Hout, Marcel A

    2012-04-01

    This study investigated the factor-structure of retrospectively assessed peritraumatic dissociation in the moments surrounding the death of a loved one and concurrent and prospective associations of such peritraumatic dissociation with loss-related emotional distress. Data were available from 168 people, bereaved in the preceding year. They completed the Peritraumatic Dissociative Experiences Questionnaire with their loss as the index event, together with measures of prolonged grief disorder, depression, and posttraumatic stress disorder; 117 completed symptom measures again 1 year later. Confirmatory factor analysis comparing the fit of four competing models showed that the eight-item one-factor model found in the first study using the Peritraumatic Dissociative Experiences Questionnaire provided the best fit to the data. Peritraumatic dissociation predicted concurrent and prospective symptom levels even when controlling for neuroticism and demographic and loss-related variables. PMID:22456592

  13. Controllable dissociations of PH3 molecules on Si(001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qin; Lei, Yanhua; Shao, Xiji; Ming, Fangfei; Xu, Hu; Wang, Kedong; Xiao, Xudong

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate for the first time to our knowledge that controllable dissociation of PH3 adsorption products PH x (x = 2, 1) can be realized by STM (scanning tunneling microscope) manipulation techniques at room temperature. Five dissociative products and their geometric structures are identified via combining STM experiments and first-principle calculations and simulations. In total we realize nine kinds of controllable dissociations by applying a voltage pulse among the PH3-related structures on Si(001). The dissociation rates of the five most common reactions are measured by the I-t spectrum method as a function of voltage. The suddenly increased dissociation rate at 3.3 V indicates a transition from multivibrational excitation to single-step excitation induced by inelastic tunneling electrons. Our studies prove that selectively breaking the chemical bonds of a single molecule on semiconductor surface by STM manipulation technique is feasible.

  14. Dissociation of methane hydrate in aqueous NaCl solutions.

    PubMed

    Yagasaki, Takuma; Matsumoto, Masakazu; Andoh, Yoshimichi; Okazaki, Susumu; Tanaka, Hideki

    2014-10-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of the dissociation of methane hydrate in aqueous NaCl solutions are performed. It is shown that the dissociation of the hydrate is accelerated by the formation of methane bubbles both in NaCl solutions and in pure water. We find two significant effects on the kinetics of the hydrate dissociation by NaCl. One is slowing down in an early stage before bubble formation, and another is swift bubble formation that enhances the dissociation. These effects arise from the low solubility of methane in NaCl solution, which gives rise to a nonuniform spatial distribution of solvated methane in the aqueous phase. We also demonstrate that bubbles form near the hydrate interface in dense NaCl solutions and that the hydrate dissociation proceeds inhomogeneously due to the bubbles. PMID:25237735

  15. Dissociative Symptoms and Mother's Marital Status in Young Adult Population

    PubMed Central

    Bob, Petr; Selesova, Petra; Raboch, Jiri; Kukla, Lubomir

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Current findings suggest that mother's marital status indicating father's absence or conflicting relationship to father may be specifically related to dissociation and other stress-related symptoms. We have assessed relationships of mother's marital status, dissociative symptoms, and other psychopathological manifestations in a sample of 19 years’ old young adults (N = 364) participating in European longitudinal study (European Longitudinal Study of Parenthood and Childhood). The results show clinically significant manifestations of dissociative symptoms in young adult men whose mothers were fatherless and in women whose mothers were re-married. Other psychopathological symptoms did not reach clinically significant manifestations. The results suggest that significant factor related to high level of dissociative symptoms in men growing in fatherless families might be linked with disturbed and conflicting attachment to a father's figure and pathological dependent attachment to mother. In women dissociative symptoms likely are linked to conflicting relationship between mother and daughter associated with stepfather’ presence in the family. PMID:25590849

  16. Dissociation rate constant of the biotin-streptavidin complex.

    PubMed

    Piran, U; Riordan, W J

    1990-10-01

    We measured the dissociation rate constants of the biotin/streptavidin and biotin/egg avidin complexes by following the release of radiolabeled biotin from the preformed complexes in the presence of excess unlabeled biotin. For separation of bound and free labeled biotin we employed ultrafiltration with disposable microconcentrators. The dissociation rate constant for underivatized streptavidin was 2.4 x 10(-6) s-1, or approximately 30-fold higher than that observed for egg avidin 7.5 x 10(-8) s-1). The value for streptavidin was further increased after derivatization with an acridinium ester label. Both biotin binding proteins exhibited a faster initial phase, suggesting binding site heterogeneity due to partial subunit dissociation or denaturation. The convenience of the method and the relatively fast dissociation of biotin from streptavidin render the dissociation rate constant a practical experimental criterion for monitoring the integrity of the binding site during purification and derivatization procedures. PMID:2212686

  17. Controllable dissociations of PH3 molecules on Si(001).

    PubMed

    Liu, Qin; Lei, Yanhua; Shao, Xiji; Ming, Fangfei; Xu, Hu; Wang, Kedong; Xiao, Xudong

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate for the first time to our knowledge that controllable dissociation of PH3 adsorption products PHx (x = 2, 1) can be realized by STM (scanning tunneling microscope) manipulation techniques at room temperature. Five dissociative products and their geometric structures are identified via combining STM experiments and first-principle calculations and simulations. In total we realize nine kinds of controllable dissociations by applying a voltage pulse among the PH3-related structures on Si(001). The dissociation rates of the five most common reactions are measured by the I-t spectrum method as a function of voltage. The suddenly increased dissociation rate at 3.3 V indicates a transition from multivibrational excitation to single-step excitation induced by inelastic tunneling electrons. Our studies prove that selectively breaking the chemical bonds of a single molecule on semiconductor surface by STM manipulation technique is feasible. PMID:26894452

  18. Promotion of Methane Hydrate Dissociation by Underwater Ultrasonic Wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Hikaru; Takata, Makoto; Tajima, Daisuke; Tsuyuki, Kenichirou

    2006-05-01

    The methane hydrate that exists in the abyssal floor is receiving attention as a nonconventional type of natural gas resource. An efficient dissociation technology is necessary and indispensable to achieve a steady supply of methane from methane hydrate because it does not easily dissociate in a stable environment of high pressure and low temperature. We consider that underwater ultrasonic wave irradiation may be a method of promoting the dissociation of methane hydrate on the basis of the facilitator effect. We carried out a preliminary examination using dry ice at various pressures, water temperatures, and input electric power. Methane hydrate was similarly examined. As a result, it was clarified that the dissociation time was shorted by the ultrasonic wave, and the wave was effective when the water temperature was low at the time of dissociation.

  19. Dissociation of gadolinium chelates in mice: relationship to chemical characteristics.

    PubMed

    Wedeking, P; Kumar, K; Tweedle, M F

    1992-01-01

    Tissue distributions of seven 153Gd-labeled Gd chelates were determined at five residence intervals (5 min to 14 days) following intravenous administration of 0.4 mmol/kg to mice. Relationships were sought among physicochemical parameters: thermodynamic and conditional (pH 7.4) equilibrium stability constants (log K and log K'), acid dissociation rate constants (k(obs)), lipophilicity (log P), overall charge, and size (molecular weight). Size and lipophilicity did not correlate with tissue distributions. There were possible correlations between anionic charge and rapid, early renal excretion and between stability constants and long-term residual Gd deposition. Strong correlations (r greater than 0.99) were found between acid dissociation rates and long-term deposition of Gd in the whole body, liver, and femur. This is attributed to dissociation of Gd from the chelates in vivo. Acid dissociation rates may be useful in predicting dissociation of Gd from chelates in vivo. PMID:1501535

  20. Unresolved mourning, supernatural beliefs and dissociation: a mediation analysis.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Paula; Jaque, S Victoria

    2014-01-01

    Unresolved mourning is marked by disorganized behavior and states of mind. In this study, we speculated that pathological dissociation would mediate the effects of unresolved mourning on supernatural beliefs. This hypothesis was determined based on findings that indicate an association between higher levels of dissociation, stronger beliefs in the supernatural and unresolved mourning. We examined two groups of participants, one classified as non-unresolved (non-U) (n = 56) and the other as unresolved (n = 26) (U) with respect to past loss/trauma as measured by the Adult Attachment Interview (AAI). Two self-report instruments were administered to measure supernatural beliefs and dissociation. As hypothesized, the multivariate analysis of variance indicated mean differences between the two groups. The unresolved group had greater belief in the supernatural and more pathological dissociative processes. The mediation analysis demonstrated that pathological dissociation fully mediated the effects of unresolved mourning on supernatural beliefs. PMID:24913392

  1. Generation and transplantation of reprogrammed human neurons in the brain using 3D microtopographic scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Aaron L.; Bennett, Neal K.; Francis, Nicola L.; Halikere, Apoorva; Clarke, Stephen; Moore, Jennifer C.; Hart, Ronald P.; Paradiso, Kenneth; Wernig, Marius; Kohn, Joachim; Pang, Zhiping P.; Moghe, Prabhas V.

    2016-01-01

    Cell replacement therapy with human pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons has the potential to ameliorate neurodegenerative dysfunction and central nervous system injuries, but reprogrammed neurons are dissociated and spatially disorganized during transplantation, rendering poor cell survival, functionality and engraftment in vivo. Here, we present the design of three-dimensional (3D) microtopographic scaffolds, using tunable electrospun microfibrous polymeric substrates that promote in situ stem cell neuronal reprogramming, neural network establishment and support neuronal engraftment into the brain. Scaffold-supported, reprogrammed neuronal networks were successfully grafted into organotypic hippocampal brain slices, showing an ∼3.5-fold improvement in neurite outgrowth and increased action potential firing relative to injected isolated cells. Transplantation of scaffold-supported neuronal networks into mouse brain striatum improved survival ∼38-fold at the injection site relative to injected isolated cells, and allowed delivery of multiple neuronal subtypes. Thus, 3D microscale biomaterials represent a promising platform for the transplantation of therapeutic human neurons with broad neuro-regenerative relevance. PMID:26983594

  2. Importance of being Nernst: Synaptic activity and functional relevance in stem cell-derived neurons

    PubMed Central

    Bradford, Aaron B; McNutt, Patrick M

    2015-01-01

    Functional synaptogenesis and network emergence are signature endpoints of neurogenesis. These behaviors provide higher-order confirmation that biochemical and cellular processes necessary for neurotransmitter release, post-synaptic detection and network propagation of neuronal activity have been properly expressed and coordinated among cells. The development of synaptic neurotransmission can therefore be considered a defining property of neurons. Although dissociated primary neuron cultures readily form functioning synapses and network behaviors in vitro, continuously cultured neurogenic cell lines have historically failed to meet these criteria. Therefore, in vitro-derived neuron models that develop synaptic transmission are critically needed for a wide array of studies, including molecular neuroscience, developmental neurogenesis, disease research and neurotoxicology. Over the last decade, neurons derived from various stem cell lines have shown varying ability to develop into functionally mature neurons. In this review, we will discuss the neurogenic potential of various stem cells populations, addressing strengths and weaknesses of each, with particular attention to the emergence of functional behaviors. We will propose methods to functionally characterize new stem cell-derived neuron (SCN) platforms to improve their reliability as physiological relevant models. Finally, we will review how synaptically active SCNs can be applied to accelerate research in a variety of areas. Ultimately, emphasizing the critical importance of synaptic activity and network responses as a marker of neuronal maturation is anticipated to result in in vitro findings that better translate to efficacious clinical treatments. PMID:26240679

  3. Lower Motor Neuron Findings after Upper Motor Neuron Injury: Insights from Postoperative Supplementary Motor Area Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Florman, Jeffrey E.; Duffau, Hugues; Rughani, Anand I.

    2013-01-01

    Hypertonia and hyperreflexia are classically described responses to upper motor neuron injury. However, acute hypotonia and areflexia with motor deficit are hallmark findings after many central nervous system insults such as acute stroke and spinal shock. Historic theories to explain these contradictory findings have implicated a number of potential mechanisms mostly relying on the loss of descending corticospinal input as the underlying etiology. Unfortunately, these simple descriptions consistently fail to adequately explain the pathophysiology and connectivity leading to acute hyporeflexia and delayed hyperreflexia that result from such insult. This article highlights the common observation of acute hyporeflexia after central nervous system insults and explores the underlying anatomy and physiology. Further, evidence for the underlying connectivity is presented and implicates the dominant role of supraspinal inhibitory influence originating in the supplementary motor area descending through the corticospinal tracts. Unlike traditional explanations, this theory more adequately explains the findings of postoperative supplementary motor area syndrome in which hyporeflexia motor deficit is observed acutely in the face of intact primary motor cortex connections to the spinal cord. Further, the proposed connectivity can be generalized to help explain other insults including stroke, atonic seizures, and spinal shock. PMID:23508473

  4. An improved method for patch clamp recording and calcium imaging of neurons in the intact dorsal root ganglion in rats

    PubMed Central

    Hayar, Abdallah; Gu, Chunping; Al-Chaer, Elie D.

    2008-01-01

    The properties of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons have been mostly investigated in culture of dissociated cells, and it is uncertain whether these cells maintain the electrophysiological properties of the intact DRG neurons. Few attempts have been made to record from DRG neurons in the intact ganglion using the patch clamp technique. In this study, rat DRGs were dissected and incubated for at least 1 hour at 37°C in collagenase (10 mg/ml). We used oblique epi-illumination to visualize DRG neurons and perform patch clamp recordings. All DRG neurons exhibited strong delayed rectifier potassium current and a high threshold for spike generation (−15 mV) that rendered the cells very weakly excitable, generating only one action potential upon strong current injection (>300 pA). It is therefore possible that cultured DRG neurons, commonly used in studies of pain processing, may be hyperexcitable because they acquired "neuropathic" properties due to the injury induced by their dissociation. Electrical stimulation of the attached root produced an antidromic spike in the soma that could be blocked by intracellular hyperpolarization or high frequency stimulation. Imaging intracellular calcium concentration with Oregon Green BAPTA-1 indicates that antidromic stimulation caused a long-lasting increase in intracellular calcium concentration mostly near the cell membrane. This study describes a simple approach to examine the electrophysiological and pharmacological properties and intracellular calcium signaling in DRG neurons in the intact ganglion where the effects of somatic spike invasion can be studied as well. PMID:18588915

  5. Kappe neurons, a novel population of olfactory sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ahuja, Gaurav; Nia, Shahrzad Bozorg; Zapilko, Veronika; Shiriagin, Vladimir; Kowatschew, Daniel; Oka, Yuichiro; Korsching, Sigrun I.

    2014-01-01

    Perception of olfactory stimuli is mediated by distinct populations of olfactory sensory neurons, each with a characteristic set of morphological as well as functional parameters. Beyond two large populations of ciliated and microvillous neurons, a third population, crypt neurons, has been identified in teleost and cartilaginous fishes. We report here a novel, fourth olfactory sensory neuron population in zebrafish, which we named kappe neurons for their characteristic shape. Kappe neurons are identified by their Go-like immunoreactivity, and show a distinct spatial distribution within the olfactory epithelium, similar to, but significantly different from that of crypt neurons. Furthermore, kappe neurons project to a single identified target glomerulus within the olfactory bulb, mdg5 of the mediodorsal cluster, whereas crypt neurons are known to project exclusively to the mdg2 glomerulus. Kappe neurons are negative for established markers of ciliated, microvillous and crypt neurons, but appear to have microvilli. Kappe neurons constitute the fourth type of olfactory sensory neurons reported in teleost fishes and their existence suggests that encoding of olfactory stimuli may require a higher complexity than hitherto assumed already in the peripheral olfactory system. PMID:24509431