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Sample records for acutely dissociated neurons

  1. Run-down of the GABAA response under experimental ischaemia in acutely dissociated CA1 pyramidal neurones of the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Harata, N; Wu, J; Ishibashi, H; Ono, K; Akaike, N

    1997-01-01

    1. The effect of experimental ischaemia on the response to gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) was assessed in acutely dissociated CA1 pyramidal neurones of rats, using the patch-clamp technique. 2. Rapid application of 3 x 10(-5) M GABA induced a bicuculline-sensitive inward Cl- current (IGABA) at a holding potential (Vh) of -44 mV. The peak amplitude of IGABA showed a time-dependent decrease (run-down) when it was recorded with the conventional whole-cell mode without internal ATP. The run-down was not observed when the intracellular ATP concentration ([ATP]i) was maintained by the nystatin-perforated recording with an intracellular Na+ concentration ([Na+]i) of 0 mM. 3. When [Na+]i was increased to more than 30 mM, the IGABA run-down was observed even with the nystatin-perforated recording. 4. The IGABA run-down observed at 60 mM [Na+]i with the nystatin method was further enhanced under experimental ischaemia without changes in the reversal potential of IGABA. The enhanced run-down was suppressed by application of the Na+,K(+)-ATPase inhibitors, ouabain and SPAI-1. 5. IGABA run-down during ischaemia was also accompanied by an outward holding current and a concomitant increase in intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in 48.5% of the neurones. The outward current was a Ca(2+)-activated K+ current, which was blocked by 3 x 10(-7) M charybdotoxin. 6. In the inside-out mode of the single-channel analysis, GABA activated three subconductance states with conductances of 33.4, 22.7 and 15.2 pS. Reduction of ATP concentration from 2 to 0 mM on the intracellular side suppressed the channel activities, while an increase in Ca2+ concentration from 0.7 x 10(-9) to 1.1 x 10(-6) M had no effect. 7. These results suggest that ischaemia induces the run-down of the postsynaptic GABA response at the GABAA receptor level, and that this run-down is triggered by a decrease in [ATP]i. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:9161985

  2. Mechanical Dissociation of Retinal Neurons with Vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motomura, Tamami; Hayashida, Yuki; Murayama, Nobuki

    The neuromorphic device, which implements the functions of biological neural circuits by means of VLSI technology, has been collecting much attention in the engineering fields in the last decade. Concurrently, progress in neuroscience research has revealed the nonlinear computation in single neuron levels, suggesting that individual neurons are not merely the circuit elements but computational units. Thus, elucidating the properties of neuronal signal processing is thought to be an essential step for developing the next generation of neuromorphic devices. In the present study, we developed a method for dissociating single neurons from specific sublayers of mammalian retinas with using no proteolytic enzymes but rather combining tissue incubation in a low-Ca2+ medium and the vibro-dissociation technique developed for the slices of brains and spinal cords previously. Our method took shorter time of the procedure, and required less elaborated skill, than the conventional enzymatic method did; nevertheless it yielded enough number of the cells available for acute electrophysiological experiments. The isolated retinal neurons were useful for measuring the nonlinear membrane conductances as well as the spike firing properties under the perforated-patch whole-cell configuration. These neurons also enabled us to examine the effects of proteolytic enzymes on the membrane excitability in those cells.

  3. Self-organization and neuronal avalanches in networks of dissociated cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Pasquale, V; Massobrio, P; Bologna, L L; Chiappalone, M; Martinoia, S

    2008-06-01

    Dissociated cortical neurons from rat embryos cultured onto micro-electrode arrays exhibit characteristic patterns of electrophysiological activity, ranging from isolated spikes in the first days of development to highly synchronized bursts after 3-4 weeks in vitro. In this work we analyzed these features by considering the approach proposed by the self-organized criticality theory: we found that networks of dissociated cortical neurons also generate spontaneous events of spreading activity, previously observed in cortical slices, in the form of neuronal avalanches. Choosing an appropriate time scale of observation to detect such neuronal avalanches, we studied the dynamics by considering the spontaneous activity during acute recordings in mature cultures and following the development of the network. We observed different behaviors, i.e. sub-critical, critical or super-critical distributions of avalanche sizes and durations, depending on both the age and the development of cultures. In order to clarify this variability, neuronal avalanches were correlated with other statistical parameters describing the global activity of the network. Criticality was found in correspondence to medium synchronization among bursts and high ratio between bursting and spiking activity. Then, the action of specific drugs affecting global bursting dynamics (i.e. acetylcholine and bicuculline) was investigated to confirm the correlation between criticality and regulated balance between synchronization and variability in the bursting activity. Finally, a computational model of neuronal network was developed in order to interpret the experimental results and understand which parameters (e.g. connectivity, excitability) influence the distribution of avalanches. In summary, cortical neurons preserve their capability to self-organize in an effective network even when dissociated and cultured in vitro. The distribution of avalanche features seems to be critical in those cultures displaying

  4. Potentiation by sevoflurane of the gamma-aminobutyric acid-induced chloride current in acutely dissociated CA1 pyramidal neurones from rat hippocampus.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, J.; Harata, N.; Akaike, N.

    1996-01-01

    1. The effects of a new kind of volatile anaesthetic, sevoflurane (Sev), on gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-gated chloride current (Icl) in single neurones dissociated from the rat hippocampal CA1 area were examined using the nystatin perforated patch recording configuration under the voltage-clamp condition. All drugs were applied with a rapid perfusion system, termed the "Y-tube' method. 2. When the concentrations were higher than 3 x 10(-4) M, Sev, itself, induced an inward current (ISev) at a holding potential (VH) of -40 mV. The concentration-response curve of ISev was bell-shaped, with a suppressed peak and plateau currents at high concentrations (above 2 x 10(-3) M). The reversal potential of ISev (ESev) was close to the theoretical Cl- equilibrium potential, indicating that ISev was carried mainly by Cl-. 3. ISev was reversibly blocked by bicuculline (Bic), an antagonist of the GABAA receptor, in a concentration-dependent manner with a half-inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 7.2 x 10(-7) M. But ISev was insensitive to strychnine (Str), an antagonist of the glycine receptor. 4. At low concentrations (between 3 x 10(-4) and 10(-3) M), Sev markedly enhanced the 10(-6) M GABA induced current (IGABA) but reduced the IGABA with accelerating desensitization accompanied by a "hump' current after washout at high concentrations (higher than 2 x 10(-3) M). 5. Sev, 10(-3) M potentiated the current induced by low concentrations of GABA (between 10(-7) and 3 x 10(-6) M) but reduced the current induced by high concentrations (higher than 10(-5) M) of GABA with a clear acceleration of IGABA desensitization. 6. Sev, like pentobarbitone (PB), pregnanolone (PGN) or diazepam (DZP), potentiated the 10(-6) M GABA-induced response without shifting the reversal potential of IGABA. 7. ISev was augmented by PB, PGN, or DZP at concentrations that maximally potentiated IGABA, suggesting that Sev enhanced IGABA at a binding site distinct from that for PB, PGN, or DZP. 8. It is concluded

  5. Switch Function and Pathological Dissociation in Acute Psychiatric Inpatients

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Chui-De; Tseng, Mei-Chih Meg; Chien, Yi-Ling; Liao, Shih-Cheng; Liu, Chih-Min; Yeh, Yei-Yu; Hwu, Hai-Gwo

    2016-01-01

    Swift switching, along with atypical ability on updating and inhibition, has been found in non-clinical dissociators. However, whether swift switching is a cognitive endophenotype that intertwines with traumatisation and pathological dissociation remains unknown. Unspecified acute psychiatric patients were recruited to verify a hypothesis that pathological dissociation is associated with swift switching and traumatisation may explain this relationship. Behavioural measures of intellectual function and three executive functions including updating, switching and inhibition were administered, together with standardised scales to evaluate pathological dissociation and traumatisation. Our results showed superior control ability on switching and updating in inpatients who displayed more symptoms of pathological dissociation. When all three executive functions were entered as predictors, in addition to intellectual quotient and demographic variables to regress upon pathological dissociation, switching rather than updating remained the significant predictor. Importantly, the relationship between pathological dissociation and switching became non-significant when the effect of childhood trauma were controlled. The results support a trauma-related switching hypothesis which postulates swift switching as a cognitive endophenotype of pathological dissociation; traumatisation in childhood may explain the importance of swift switching. PMID:27123578

  6. Acute dissociation and cardiac reactivity to script-driven imagery in trauma-related disorders

    PubMed Central

    Sack, Martin; Cillien, Melanie; Hopper, James W.

    2012-01-01

    Background Potential acute protective functions of dissociation include modulation of stress-induced psychophysiological arousal. This study was designed to explore whether acute dissociative reactions during a stress experiment would override the effects of reexperiencing. Methods Psychophysiological reactions during exposure to script-driven trauma imagery were studied in relation to acute responses of reexperiencing and dissociative symptoms in 61 patients with histories of exposure to a variety of traumas. Acute symptomatic responses were assessed with the Responses to Script-Driven Imagery Scale (RSDI), and participants were divided into four groups by median splits of RSDI reexperiencing and dissociation subscale scores. Results In a comparison of the high RSDI reexperiencing groups with low versus high acute dissociative symptoms, the high dissociators exhibited significantly lower heart rate (HR) during trauma script and a significantly smaller script-induced decrease in parasympathetic cardiac activity. HR reactivity to the trauma script was negatively correlated with acute dissociative symptom severity. Conclusions Acute dissociative reactions are a potential moderator of response to experimental paradigms investigating psychologically traumatized populations. We therefore suggest that future research on psychophysiological stress reactions in traumatized samples should routinely assess for acute dissociative symptoms. PMID:23198029

  7. Feasibility Study of Odor Biosensor Using Dissociate Neuronal Culture with Gene Expression of Ionotropic Odorant Receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanada, Norio; Sakurai, Takeshi; Mitsuno, Hidefumi; Bakkum, Douglas; Kanzaki, Ryohei; Takahashi, Hirokazu

    We propose a highly sensitive and real-time odor biosensor by expressing ionotropic odorant receptors of insects into dissociated cultures of neurons of rats. The odorant-gated ion channel structure of insect odorant receptor is expected to allow easy functional expression into cells. The neuronal dissociated cultures of rats have two significant advantages: a long lifetime comparable to rats, i.e., a few years; and amplification ability from weak ionic currents of odorant receptors into easily detectable action potentials of neurons. In the present work, in order to show the feasibility of the proposed sensor, we attempt to express the pheromone receptors of silkmoth, Bombyx mori, into cultured neurons of rats. We demonstrate that 10% of neuronal cells transfected using Lipofectamine successfully expressed pheromone receptors, and that these cells showed significant increase of calcium signals by 50% at the presentation of pheromone.

  8. MDMA, cannabis, and cocaine produce acute dissociative symptoms.

    PubMed

    van Heugten-Van der Kloet, Dalena; Giesbrecht, Timo; van Wel, Janelle; Bosker, Wendy M; Kuypers, Kim P C; Theunissen, Eef L; Spronk, Desirée B; Jan Verkes, Robbert; Merckelbach, Harald; Ramaekers, Johannes G

    2015-08-30

    Some drugs of abuse may produce dissociative symptoms, but this aspect has been understudied. We explored the dissociative potential of three recreational drugs (3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), cannabis, and cocaine) during intoxication and compared their effects to literature reports of dissociative states in various samples. Two placebo-controlled studies were conducted. In Study 1 (N=16), participants received single doses of 25, 50, and 100 mg of MDMA, and placebo. In Study 2 (N=21), cannabis (THC 300 µg/kg), cocaine (HCl 300 mg), and placebo were administered. Dissociative symptoms as measured with the Clinician-Administered Dissociative States Scale (CADSS) significantly increased under the influence of MDMA and cannabis. To a lesser extent, this was also true for cocaine. Dissociative symptoms following MDMA and cannabis largely exceeded those observed in schizophrenia patients, were comparable with those observed in Special Forces soldiers undergoing survival training, but were lower compared with ketamine-induced dissociation. Cocaine produced dissociative symptoms that were comparable with those observed in schizophrenia patients, but markedly less than those in Special Forces soldiers and ketamine users. Thus, MDMA and cannabis can produce dissociative symptoms that resemble dissociative pathology. The study of drug induced dissociation is important, because it may shed light on the mechanisms involved in dissociative psychopathology.

  9. MDMA, cannabis, and cocaine produce acute dissociative symptoms.

    PubMed

    van Heugten-Van der Kloet, Dalena; Giesbrecht, Timo; van Wel, Janelle; Bosker, Wendy M; Kuypers, Kim P C; Theunissen, Eef L; Spronk, Desirée B; Jan Verkes, Robbert; Merckelbach, Harald; Ramaekers, Johannes G

    2015-08-30

    Some drugs of abuse may produce dissociative symptoms, but this aspect has been understudied. We explored the dissociative potential of three recreational drugs (3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), cannabis, and cocaine) during intoxication and compared their effects to literature reports of dissociative states in various samples. Two placebo-controlled studies were conducted. In Study 1 (N=16), participants received single doses of 25, 50, and 100 mg of MDMA, and placebo. In Study 2 (N=21), cannabis (THC 300 µg/kg), cocaine (HCl 300 mg), and placebo were administered. Dissociative symptoms as measured with the Clinician-Administered Dissociative States Scale (CADSS) significantly increased under the influence of MDMA and cannabis. To a lesser extent, this was also true for cocaine. Dissociative symptoms following MDMA and cannabis largely exceeded those observed in schizophrenia patients, were comparable with those observed in Special Forces soldiers undergoing survival training, but were lower compared with ketamine-induced dissociation. Cocaine produced dissociative symptoms that were comparable with those observed in schizophrenia patients, but markedly less than those in Special Forces soldiers and ketamine users. Thus, MDMA and cannabis can produce dissociative symptoms that resemble dissociative pathology. The study of drug induced dissociation is important, because it may shed light on the mechanisms involved in dissociative psychopathology. PMID:26003508

  10. Dissociation between sensing and metabolism of glucose in sugar sensing neurones

    PubMed Central

    Gonzàlez, J Antonio; Reimann, Frank; Burdakov, Denis

    2009-01-01

    Some of the neurones controlling sleep, appetite and hormone release act as specialized detectors of ambient glucose. Their sugar sensing is conventionally thought to involve glucokinase-dependent metabolism of glucose to ATP, which then alters membrane excitability by modulating ATP-dependent channels or transporters, such as ATP-inhibited K+ channels (KATP). However, recent studies also provide examples of both glucose-excited (GE) and glucose-inhibited (GI) neurones that sense glucose independently of such metabolic pathways. Two-thirds of hypothalamic GE neurones in primary cultures are also excited by the non-metabolizable glucose analogue α-methylglucopyranoside (α-MDG), which acts as a substrate for electrogenic (depolarizing) sodium–glucose cotransporter (SGLT). The excitatory responses to both glucose and α-MDG are abolished by arresting SGLT activity by sodium removal or the SGLT inhibitor phloridzin. Direct depolarization and excitation by glucose-triggered SGLT activity may ensure that GE neurones continue to sense glucose in ‘high-energy’ states, when KATP channels are closed. A major class of hypothalamic GI neurones, the orexin/hypocretin cells, also appear to use a non-metabolic sensing strategy. In these cells, glucose-induced hyperpolarization and inhibition are unaffected by glucokinase inhibitors such as alloxan, d-glucosamine, and N-acetyl-d-glucosamine, and mimicked by the non-metabolizable glucose analogue 2-deoxyglucose, but not by stimulating intracellular ATP production with lactate. The dissociation between sensing and metabolism of sugar may allow the brain to predict and prevent adverse changes in extracellular glucose levels with minimal impact on the flow of intracellular fuel. PMID:18981030

  11. Characterization of the hyperpolarization-activated chloride current in dissociated rat sympathetic neurons.

    PubMed

    Clark, S; Jordt, S E; Jentsch, T J; Mathie, A

    1998-02-01

    1. Dissociated rat superior cervical ganglion (SCG) neurons have been shown to possess a hyperpolarization-activated inwardly rectifying chloride current. The current was not altered by changes in external potassium concentration, replacing external cations with NMDG (N-methyl-D-glucamine) or by addition of 10 mM caesium or barium ions. 2. The reversal potential of the current was altered by changing external anions. The anion selectivity of the current was Cl- > Br- > I- > cyclamate. All substituted permeant anions also blocked the current. 3. The current was blocked by DIDS (4,4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulphonic acid), 9AC (anthracene-9-carboxylic acid) and NPPB (5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)benzoic acid) but was unaffected by SITS (4-acetamido-4'-isothiocyanatostilbene- 2,2'-disulphonic acid) and niflumic acid. The effective blockers were voltage dependent; DIDS and NPPB were more effective at depolarized potentials while 9AC was more effective at hyperpolarized potentials. 4. The current was enhanced by extracellular acidification and reduced by extracellular alkalinization. Reducing external osmolarity was without effect in conventional whole-cell recording but enhanced current amplitude in those perforated-patch recordings where little current was evident in control external solution. 5. The current in SCG neurons was blocked by external cadmium and zinc. ClC-2 chloride currents expressed in Xenopus oocytes were also sensitive to block by these divalent ions and by DIDS but the sensitivity of ClC-2 to block by cadmium ions was lower than that of the current in SCG neurons. 6. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) experiments showed the presence of mRNA for ClC-2 in SCG neurons but not in rat cerebellar granule cells which do not possess a hyperpolarization-activated Cl- current. 7. The data suggest that ClC-2 may be functionally expressed in rat SCG neurons. This current may play a role in regulating the internal chloride

  12. A fast flexible ink-jet printing method for patterning dissociated neurons in culture.

    PubMed

    Sanjana, Neville E; Fuller, Sawyer B

    2004-07-30

    We present a new technique that uses a custom-built ink-jet printer to fabricate precise micropatterns of cell adhesion materials for neural cell culture. Other work in neural cell patterning has employed photolithography or "soft lithographic" techniques such as micro-stamping, but such approaches are limited by their use of an un-alterable master pattern such as a mask or stamp master and can be resource-intensive. In contrast, ink-jet printing, used in low-cost desktop printers, patterns material by depositing microscopic droplets under robotic control in a programmable and inexpensive manner. We report the use of ink-jet printing to fabricate neuron-adhesive patterns such as islands and other shapes using poly(ethylene) glycol as the cell-repulsive material and a collagen/poly-D-lysine (PDL) mixture as the cell-adhesive material. We show that dissociated rat hippocampal neurons and glia grown at low densities on such patterns retain strong pattern adherence for over 25 days. The patterned neurons are comparable to control, un-patterned cells in electrophysiological properties and in immunocytochemical measurements of synaptic density and inhibitory cell distributions. We suggest that an inexpensive desktop printer may be an accessible tool for making micro-island cultures and other basic patterns. We also suggest that ink-jet printing may be extended to a range of developmental neuroscience studies, given its ability to more easily layer materials, build substrate-bound gradients, construct out-of-plane structure, and deposit sources of diffusible factors.

  13. Effects of acute spinalization on neurons of postural networks

    PubMed Central

    Zelenin, Pavel V.; Lyalka, Vladimir F.; Hsu, Li-Ju; Orlovsky, Grigori N.; Deliagina, Tatiana G.

    2016-01-01

    Postural limb reflexes (PLRs) represent a substantial component of postural corrections. Spinalization results in loss of postural functions, including disappearance of PLRs. The aim of the present study was to characterize the effects of acute spinalization on two populations of spinal neurons (F and E) mediating PLRs, which we characterized previously. For this purpose, in decerebrate rabbits spinalized at T12, responses of interneurons from L5 to stimulation causing PLRs before spinalization, were recorded. The results were compared to control data obtained in our previous study. We found that spinalization affected the distribution of F- and E-neurons across the spinal grey matter, caused a significant decrease in their activity, as well as disturbances in processing of posture-related sensory inputs. A two-fold decrease in the proportion of F-neurons in the intermediate grey matter was observed. Location of populations of F- and E-neurons exhibiting significant decrease in their activity was determined. A dramatic decrease of the efficacy of sensory input from the ipsilateral limb to F-neurons, and from the contralateral limb to E-neurons was found. These changes in operation of postural networks underlie the loss of postural control after spinalization, and represent a starting point for the development of spasticity. PMID:27302149

  14. Electrophysiological and metabolic effects of a convulsant barbiturate on dissociated mouse primary sensory neurons.

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, R J; Duchen, M R

    1995-01-01

    1. The convulsant barbiturate 5-(2-cyclohexylidene-ethyl)-5-ethyl barbituric acid (CHEB) depolarizes dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. We have applied microfluorimetric and whole-cell patch clamp techniques to investigate the mechanisms underlying this response in freshly dissociated mouse DRG cells. 2. Application of CHEB (2-200 microM) raised cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) rapidly and reversibly in 55% of eighty-three neurons tested. This population did not correlate with other classifications of sensory neurons based on either cell size or the expression of membrane currents. 3. The response was dependent on external calcium and was reduced by 81 +/- 22% by Ruthenium Red. A rise in [Ca2+]i was still seen with the membrane potential clamped at -70 mV, excluding membrane depolarization and activation of voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels as the principal mechanism for the response. 4. The rise in [Ca2+]i was associated with an increase in membrane conductance and a current, ICHEB, which was inward at -70 mV. Both the rise in [Ca2+]i and the current showed 'run-down' under whole-cell recording conditions. When K+ conductances were blocked, the reversal potential of ICHEB was close to 0 mV. This was independent of the Cl- reversal potential, suggesting that ICHEB is carried as a non-specific cation current. 5. In contrast to the change in [Ca2+]i, ICHEB was not dependent on external Ca2+ and the current was still seen when [Ca2+]i as strongly buffered by the pipette filling solution. These data suggest that CHEB opens a non-selective cation channel permeant to Ca2+, raising [Ca2+]i and further depolarizing the cell membrane potential. The exact nature of this conductance remains unknown. These actions could readily account for the convulsant actions of the drug, depolarizing neurons and increasing transmitter release. 6. It was also noted that CHEB increases autofluorescence derived from mitochondrial NAD(P)H. Further examination of this phenomenon using

  15. Differentiation of postmitotic neuroblasts into substance P-immunoreactive sensory neurons in dissociated cultures of chick dorsal root ganglion.

    PubMed

    Barakat, I; Droz, B

    1987-07-01

    Counts performed on dissociated cell cultures of E10 chick embryo dorsal root ganglia (DRG) showed after 4-6 days of culture a pronounced decline of the neuronal population in neuron-enriched cultures and a net gain in the number of ganglion cells in mixed DRG cell cultures (containing both neurons and nonneuronal cells). In the latter case, the increase in the number of neurons was found to depend on NGF and to average 119% in defined medium or 129% in horse serum-supplemented medium after 6 days of culture. The lack of [3H]thymidine incorporation into the neuronal population indicated that the newly formed ganglion cells were not generated by proliferation. On the contrary, the differentiation of postmitotic neuroblasts present in the nonneuronal cell compartment was supported by sequential microphotographs of selected fields taken every hour for 48-55 hr after 3 days of culture. Apparently nonneuronal flat dark cells exhibited morphological changes and gradually evolved into neuronal ovoid and refringent cell bodies with expanding neurites. The ultrastructural organization of these evolving cells corresponded to that of primitive or intermediate neuroblasts. The neuronal nature of these rounding up cell bodies was indeed confirmed by the progressive expression of various neuronal cell markers (150 and 200-kDa neurofilament triplets, neuron specific enolase, and D2/N-CAM). Besides a constant lack of immunoreactivity for tyrosine hydroxylase, somatostatin, parvalbumin, and calbindin-D 28K and a lack of cytoenzymatic activity for carbonic anhydrase, all the newly produced neurons expressed three main phenotypic characteristics: a small cell body, a strong immunoreactivity to MAG, and substance P. Hence, ganglion cells newly differentiated in culture would meet characteristics ascribed to small B sensory neurons and more specifically to a subpopulation of ganglion cells containing substance P-immunoreactive material.

  16. PPARα mediates acute effects of palmitoylethanolamide on sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Khasabova, Iryna A.; Xiong, Yee; Coicou, Lia G.; Piomelli, Daniele; Seybold, Virginia

    2012-01-01

    The amplitude of the depolarization-evoked Ca2+ transient is larger in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons from tumor-bearing mice compared to that of neurons from naive mice, and the change is mimicked by co-culturing DRG neurons with the fibrosarcoma cells used to generate the tumors (Khasabova et al., 2007). The effect of palmitoylethanolamide (PEA), a ligand for the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPARα), was determined on the evoked-Ca2+ transient in the co-culture condition. The level of PEA was reduced in DRG cells from tumor-bearing mice as well as those co-cultured with fibrosarcoma cells. Pretreatment with PEA, a synthetic PPARα agonist (GW7647), or ARN077, an inhibitor of the enzyme that hydrolyses PEA, acutely decreased the amplitude of the evoked Ca2+ transient in small DRG neurons co-cultured with fibrosarcoma cells. The PPARα antagonist GW6471 blocked the effect of each. In contrast, the PPARα agonist was without effect in the control condition, but the antagonist increased the amplitude of the Ca2+ transient suggesting that PPARα receptors are saturated by endogenous ligand under basal conditions. Effects of drugs on mechanical sensitivity in vivo paralleled their effects on DRG neurons in vitro. Local injection of ARN077 decreased mechanical hyperalgesia in tumor-bearing mice, and the effect was blocked by GW6471. These data support the conclusion that the activity of DRG neurons is rapidly modulated by PEA through a PPARα-dependent mechanism. Moreover, agents that increase the activity of PPARα may provide a therapeutic strategy to reduce tumor-evoked pain. PMID:22972997

  17. Calbindin-immunoreactive sensory neurons in dissociated dorsal root ganglion cell cultures of chick embryo: role of culture conditions.

    PubMed

    Barakat, I; Droz, B

    1989-12-01

    Immunoreactivity to calbindin D-28k, a vitamin D-dependent calcium-binding protein, is expressed by neuronal subpopulations of dorsal root ganglia (DRG) in the chick embryo. To determine whether the expression of this phenotypic characteristic is maintained in vitro and controlled by environmental factors, dissociated DRG cell cultures were performed under various conditions. Subpopulations of DRG cells cultured at embryonic day 10 displayed calbindin-immunoreactive cell bodies and neurites in both neuron-enriched or mixed DRG cell cultures. The number of calbindin-immunoreactive ganglion cells increased up to 7-10 days of culture independently of the changes occurring in the whole neuronal population. The presence of non-neuronal cells, which promotes the maturation of the sensory neurons, tended to reduce the percentage of calbindin-immunoreactive cell bodies. Addition of horse serum enhanced both the number of calbindin-positive neurons and the intensity of the immunostaining, but does not prevent the decline of the subpopulation of calbindin-immunoreactive neurons during the second week of culture; on the contrary, the addition of muscular extract to cultures at 10 days maintained the number of calbindin-expressing neurons. While calbindin-immunoreactive cell bodies grown in culture were small- or medium-sized, no correlation was found between cell size and immunostaining density. At the ultrastructural level, the calbindin immunoreaction was distributed throughout the neuroplasm. These results indicate that the expression of calbindin by sensory neurons grown in vitro may be modulated by horse serum-contained factors or interaction with non-neuronal cells. As distinct from horse serum, muscular extract is able to maintain the expression of calbindin by a subpopulation of DRG cells.

  18. Distinct effects of Abelson kinase mutations on myocytes and neurons in dissociated Drosophila embryonic cultures: mimicking of high temperature.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lijuan; Wu, Chun-Fang

    2014-01-01

    Abelson tyrosine kinase (Abl) is known to regulate axon guidance, muscle development, and cell-cell interaction in vivo. The Drosophila primary culture system offers advantages in exploring the cellular mechanisms mediated by Abl with utilizing various experimental manipulations. Here we demonstrate that single-embryo cultures exhibit stage-dependent characteristics of cellular differentiation and developmental progression in neurons and myocytes, as well as nerve-muscle contacts. In particular, muscle development critically depends on the stage of dissociated embryos. In wild-type (WT) cultures derived from embryos before stage 12, muscle cells remained within cell clusters and were rarely detected. Interestingly, abundant myocytes were spotted in Abl mutant cultures, exhibiting enhanced myocyte movement and fusion, as well as neuron-muscle contacts even in cultures dissociated from younger, stage 10 embryos. Notably, Abl myocytes frequently displayed well-expanded lamellipodia. Conversely, Abl neurons were characterized with fewer large veil-like lamellipodia, but instead had increased numbers of filopodia and darker nodes along neurites. These distinct phenotypes were equally evident in both homo- and hetero-zygous cultures (Abl/Abl vs. Abl/+) of different alleles (Abl(1) and Abl(4) ) indicating dominant mutational effects. Strikingly, in WT cultures derived from stage 10 embryos, high temperature (HT) incubation promoted muscle migration and fusion, partially mimicking the advanced muscle development typical of Abl cultures. However, HT enhanced neuronal growth with increased numbers of enlarged lamellipodia, distinct from the characteristic Abl neuronal morphology. Intriguingly, HT incubation also promoted Abl lamellipodia expansion, with a much greater effect on nerve cells than muscle. Our results suggest that Abl is an essential regulator for myocyte and neuron development and that high-temperature incubation partially mimics the faster muscle development

  19. Characterization of the Ca2+ current in freshly dissociated crustacean peptidergic neuronal somata.

    PubMed

    Richmond, J E; Sher, E; Cooke, I M

    1995-06-01

    1. Freshly dissociated neuronal somata of the crab (Cardisoma carnifex) X-organ were studied in the whole cell patch-clamp configuration. To characterize the Ca2+ currents in these somata, recordings were made under conditions designed to suppress K+ and Na+ currents. 2. In 52 mM external Ca2+ the threshold for activation of Ca2+ currents was above -40 mV, with peak amplitudes occurring around +10 to +20 mV. The full component of the current was available for activation at -50 mV because no current increase was observed when the holding potential was increased to -90 mV. These characteristics of the current characterize it as a high-voltage activated (HVA) current. 3. The Ca2+ current was almost completely (60-90%) inactivated within 200 ms at maximal current potentials (+10 to +20 mV). The decay was best described by a double-exponential function with a fast and slow component of inactivation (tau f = 12 ms and tau s = 64 ms). Both Sr2+ and Ba2+ substitutions reduced the rates of inactivation. 4. In double-pulse experiments, plots of variable prepulse potential versus test pulse current produced a U-shaped curve with test pulse currents showing maximal inactivation at potentials that produced maximal Ca2+ influx during the prepulse. Tail currents also displayed a U-shaped inactivation curve. The extent of current-dependent inactivation was sequentially reduced by Sr2+ and Ba2+ substitutions. These data suggest that inactivation in crab somata is predominantly Ca2+ dependent. The remaining inactivation of Ba2+ currents suggests that there is also a component of voltage-dependent inactivation in the somata. 5. Part of the inactivated Ca2+ current could be recovered during short (4-10 ms) hyperpolarizing pulses to -130 mV. The absolute extent of recovery from inactivation was greatest for currents carried by Ca2+ rather than Sr2+ or Ba2+. When voltage-dependent inactivation was dominant (Ba2+ currents), the relative amount of current recovered was greater. The data

  20. The chemokine interleukin-8 acutely reduces Ca(2+) currents in identified cholinergic septal neurons expressing CXCR1 and CXCR2 receptor mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Puma, C; Danik, M; Quirion, R; Ramon, F; Williams, S

    2001-09-01

    The chemokine IL-8 is known to be synthesized by glial cells in the brain. It has traditionally been shown to have an important role in neuroinflammation but recent evidence indicates that it may also be involved in rapid signaling in neurons. We investigated how IL-8 participates in rapid neuronal signaling by using a combination of whole-cell recording and single-cell RT-PCR on dissociated rat septal neurons. We show that IL-8 can acutely reduce Ca(2+) currents in septal neurons, an effect that was concentration-dependent, involved the closure of L- and N-type Ca(2+) channels, and the activation of G(ialpha1) and/or G(ialpha2) subtype(s) of G-proteins. Analysis of the mRNAs from the recorded neurons revealed that the latter were all cholinergic in nature. Moreover, we found that all cholinergic neurons that responded to IL-8, expressed mRNAs for either one or both IL-8 receptors CXCR1 and CXCR2. This is the first report of a chemokine that modulates ion channels in neurons via G-proteins, and the first demonstration that mRNAs for CXCR1 are expressed in the brain. Our results suggest that IL-8 release by glial cells in vivo may activate CXCR1 and CXCR2 receptors on cholinergic septal neurons and acutely modulate their excitability by closing calcium channels. PMID:11553670

  1. Functional dissociation in sweet taste receptor neurons between and within taste organs of Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Thoma, Vladimiros; Knapek, Stephan; Arai, Shogo; Hartl, Marion; Kohsaka, Hiroshi; Sirigrivatanawong, Pudith; Abe, Ayako; Hashimoto, Koichi; Tanimoto, Hiromu

    2016-02-19

    Finding food sources is essential for survival. Insects detect nutrients with external taste receptor neurons. Drosophila possesses multiple taste organs that are distributed throughout its body. However, the role of different taste organs in feeding remains poorly understood. By blocking subsets of sweet taste receptor neurons, we show that receptor neurons in the legs are required for immediate sugar choice. Furthermore, we identify two anatomically distinct classes of sweet taste receptor neurons in the leg. The axonal projections of one class terminate in the thoracic ganglia, whereas the other projects directly to the brain. These two classes are functionally distinct: the brain-projecting neurons are involved in feeding initiation, whereas the thoracic ganglia-projecting neurons play a role in sugar-dependent suppression of locomotion. Distinct receptor neurons for the same taste quality may coordinate early appetitive responses, taking advantage of the legs as the first appendages to contact food.

  2. Functional dissociation in sweet taste receptor neurons between and within taste organs of Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Thoma, Vladimiros; Knapek, Stephan; Arai, Shogo; Hartl, Marion; Kohsaka, Hiroshi; Sirigrivatanawong, Pudith; Abe, Ayako; Hashimoto, Koichi; Tanimoto, Hiromu

    2016-01-01

    Finding food sources is essential for survival. Insects detect nutrients with external taste receptor neurons. Drosophila possesses multiple taste organs that are distributed throughout its body. However, the role of different taste organs in feeding remains poorly understood. By blocking subsets of sweet taste receptor neurons, we show that receptor neurons in the legs are required for immediate sugar choice. Furthermore, we identify two anatomically distinct classes of sweet taste receptor neurons in the leg. The axonal projections of one class terminate in the thoracic ganglia, whereas the other projects directly to the brain. These two classes are functionally distinct: the brain-projecting neurons are involved in feeding initiation, whereas the thoracic ganglia-projecting neurons play a role in sugar-dependent suppression of locomotion. Distinct receptor neurons for the same taste quality may coordinate early appetitive responses, taking advantage of the legs as the first appendages to contact food. PMID:26893070

  3. Functional dissociation in sweet taste receptor neurons between and within taste organs of Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Thoma, Vladimiros; Knapek, Stephan; Arai, Shogo; Hartl, Marion; Kohsaka, Hiroshi; Sirigrivatanawong, Pudith; Abe, Ayako; Hashimoto, Koichi; Tanimoto, Hiromu

    2016-01-01

    Finding food sources is essential for survival. Insects detect nutrients with external taste receptor neurons. Drosophila possesses multiple taste organs that are distributed throughout its body. However, the role of different taste organs in feeding remains poorly understood. By blocking subsets of sweet taste receptor neurons, we show that receptor neurons in the legs are required for immediate sugar choice. Furthermore, we identify two anatomically distinct classes of sweet taste receptor neurons in the leg. The axonal projections of one class terminate in the thoracic ganglia, whereas the other projects directly to the brain. These two classes are functionally distinct: the brain-projecting neurons are involved in feeding initiation, whereas the thoracic ganglia-projecting neurons play a role in sugar-dependent suppression of locomotion. Distinct receptor neurons for the same taste quality may coordinate early appetitive responses, taking advantage of the legs as the first appendages to contact food. PMID:26893070

  4. Uptake and release of [3H]gamma-aminobutyric acid by embryonic spinal cord neurons in dissociated cell culture

    PubMed Central

    1979-01-01

    We have investigated the uptake and release of [3H]gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) by embryonic chick spinal cord cells maintained in culture. Cells dissociated from 4- or 7-d-old embryos were studied between 1 and 3 wk after plating. At 3 degrees C, [3H]GABA was accumulated by a high affinity (Km approximately equal to 4 microM) and a low affinity (Km approximately equal to 100 microM) mechanism. The high affinity transport was markedly inhibited in low Na+ media, by ouabain, at 0 degrees C, and by 2,4-diaminobutyric acid. Autoradiography, after incubation in 0.1 microM [3H]GABA, showed that approximately 50% (range = 30-70%) of the multipolar cells were labeled. These cells were neurons rather than glia; action potentials and/or synaptic potentials were recorded in cells subsequently found to be labeled. Non-neuronal, fibroblast-like cells and co-cultured myotubes were not labeled under the same conditions. The fact that not all of the neurons were labeled is consistent with the suggestion, based on studies of intact adult tissue, that high affinity transport of [3H]GABA may be unique to neurons that use GABA as a neurotransmitter. Our finding that none of fifteen physiologically identified cholinergic neurons, i.e., cells that innervated nearby myotubes, were heavily labeled after incubation in 0.1 microM [3H]GABA is significant in this regard. The newly taken up [3H]GABA was not metabolized in the short run. It was stored in a form that could be released when the neurons were depolarized in a high K+ (100 mM) medium. As expected for a neurotransmitter, the K+-evoked release was reversibly inhibited by reducing the extracellular Ca++/Mg++ ratio. PMID:457763

  5. Processing of Reelin by embryonic neurons is important for function in tissue but not in dissociated cultured neurons.

    PubMed

    Jossin, Yves; Gui, Lanrun; Goffinet, André M

    2007-04-18

    Reelin, the protein defective in reeler mutant mice, plays a key role during brain development. Reelin is processed proteolytically at two sites, and the central fragment mimics function in vitro. Here, we show that processing is functionally important in vivo, a question that could not be addressed in our previous study. New monoclonal antibodies directed against central Reelin block its binding to lipoprotein receptors and perturb cortical development in vitro, confirming the importance of the central fragment that is detected in tissue and body fluids. Processing occurs when Reelin is incubated with embryonic neurons in culture or with their supernatant, but inhibition of processing by a metalloproteinase blocker does not prevent Reelin signaling in neurons. Furthermore, neurons internalize similarly full-length or central Reelin. In contrast, inhibition of processing prevents signaling and perturbs cortical development in cultured embryonic brain slices. Moreover, in vivo, the concentration of central Reelin is dramatically and selectively increased in receptor-deficient tissue, suggesting its specific downregulation after binding to receptors and internalization. We propose that processing by end-migration neurons is required in tissue (where Reelin is likely anchored to the extracellular matrix) to release the central fragment that diffuses locally and signals to target cells, whereas, in vitro, all Reelin forms have indiscriminate access to cells, so that cleavage is not necessary for signaling.

  6. Dissociable Behavioral, Physiological and Neural Effects of Acute Glucose and Fructose Ingestion: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Wölnerhanssen, Bettina Karin; Meyer-Gerspach, Anne Christin; Schmidt, André; Zimak, Nina; Peterli, Ralph; Beglinger, Christoph; Borgwardt, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Previous research has revealed that glucose and fructose ingestion differentially modulate release of satiation hormones. Recent studies have begun to elucidate brain-gut interactions with neuroimaging approaches such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), but the neural mechanism underlying different behavioral and physiological effects of glucose and fructose are unclear. In this paper, we have used resting state functional MRI to explore whether acute glucose and fructose ingestion also induced dissociable effects in the neural system. Using a cross-over, double-blind, placebo-controlled design, we compared resting state functional connectivity (rsFC) strengths within the basal ganglia/limbic network in 12 healthy lean males. Each subject was administered fructose, glucose and placebo on three separate occasions. Subsequent correlation analysis was used to examine relations between rsFC findings and plasma concentrations of satiation hormones and subjective feelings of appetite. Glucose ingestion induced significantly greater elevations in plasma glucose, insulin, GLP-1 and GIP, while feelings of fullness increased and prospective food consumption decreased relative to fructose. Furthermore, glucose increased rsFC of the left caudatus and putamen, precuneus and lingual gyrus more than fructose, whereas within the basal ganglia/limbic network, fructose increased rsFC of the left amygdala, left hippocampus, right parahippocampus, orbitofrontal cortex and precentral gyrus more than glucose. Moreover, compared to fructose, the increased rsFC after glucose positively correlated with the glucose-induced increase in insulin. Our findings suggest that glucose and fructose induce dissociable effects on rsFC within the basal ganglia/limbic network, which are probably mediated by different insulin levels. A larger study would be recommended in order to confirm these findings.

  7. Acute Optogenetic Silencing of Orexin/Hypocretin Neurons Induces Slow-Wave Sleep in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tsunematsu, Tomomi; Kilduff, Thomas S.; Boyden, Edward S.; Takahashi, Satoru; Tominaga, Makoto; Yamanaka, Akihiro

    2013-01-01

    Orexin/hypocretin neurons have a crucial role in the regulation of sleep and wakefulness. To help determine how these neurons promote wakefulness, we generated transgenic mice in which orexin neurons expressed halorhodopsin (orexin/Halo mice), an orange light-activated neuronal silencer. Slice patch-clamp recordings of orexin neurons that expressed halorhodopsin demonstrated that orange light photic illumination immediately hyperpolarized membrane potential and inhibited orexin neuron discharge in proportion to illumination intensity. Acute silencing of orexin neurons in vivo during the day (the inactive period) induced synchronization of the electroencephalogram and a reduction in amplitude of the electromyogram that is characteristic of slow-wave sleep (SWS). In contrast, orexin neuron photoinhibition was ineffective during the night (active period). Acute photoinhibition of orexin neurons during the day in orexin/Halo mice also reduced discharge of neurons in an orexin terminal field, the dorsal raphe (DR) nucleus. However, serotonergic DR neurons exhibited normal discharge rates in mice lacking orexin neurons. Thus, although usually highly dependent on orexin neuronal activity, serotonergic DR neuronal activity can be regulated appropriately in the chronic absence of orexin input. Together, these results demonstrate that acute inhibition of orexin neurons results in time-of-day-dependent induction of SWS and in reduced firing rate of neurons in an efferent projection site thought to be involved in arousal state regulation. The results presented here advance our understanding of the role of orexin neurons in the regulation of sleep/wakefulness and may be relevant to the mechanisms that underlie symptom progression in narcolepsy. PMID:21775598

  8. Neuronal activity mediated regulation of glutamate transporter GLT‐1 surface diffusion in rat astrocytes in dissociated and slice cultures

    PubMed Central

    Al Awabdh, Sana; Gupta‐Agarwal, Swati; Sheehan, David F.; Muir, James; Norkett, Rosalind; Twelvetrees, Alison E.; Griffin, Lewis D.

    2016-01-01

    The astrocytic GLT‐1 (or EAAT2) is the major glutamate transporter for clearing synaptic glutamate. While the diffusion dynamics of neurotransmitter receptors at the neuronal surface are well understood, far less is known regarding the surface trafficking of transporters in subcellular domains of the astrocyte membrane. Here, we have used live‐cell imaging to study the mechanisms regulating GLT‐1 surface diffusion in astrocytes in dissociated and brain slice cultures. Using GFP‐time lapse imaging, we show that GLT‐1 forms stable clusters that are dispersed rapidly and reversibly upon glutamate treatment in a transporter activity‐dependent manner. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching and single particle tracking using quantum dots revealed that clustered GLT‐1 is more stable than diffuse GLT‐1 and that glutamate increases GLT‐1 surface diffusion in the astrocyte membrane. Interestingly, the two main GLT‐1 isoforms expressed in the brain, GLT‐1a and GLT‐1b, are both found to be stabilized opposed to synapses under basal conditions, with GLT‐1b more so. GLT‐1 surface mobility is increased in proximity to activated synapses and alterations of neuronal activity can bidirectionally modulate the dynamics of both GLT‐1 isoforms. Altogether, these data reveal that astrocytic GLT‐1 surface mobility, via its transport activity, is modulated during neuronal firing, which may be a key process for shaping glutamate clearance and glutamatergic synaptic transmission. GLIA 2016;64:1252–1264 PMID:27189737

  9. Acute effects of ACTH on dissociated adrenocortical cells: quantitative changes in mitochondria and lipid droplets.

    PubMed

    Zoller, L C; Malamed, S

    1975-08-01

    To study the role of certain organelles in steroidogenesis, dissociated rat adrenocortical cells were incubated for two hours with ACTH at a concentration that induces a high level of steroid production. Sections of ACTH treated and untreated cells were photographed in the electron microscope, and morphometric analysis was undertaken to assess possible ACTH-induced changes in total cell volume, volume density and numerical denisty of lipid droplets and mitochondria. There was no change in total cell volume. Lipid droplet volume density and numerical density decreased. Mitochondrial volume density did not change, but numerical density increased. The decrease in lipid droplet volume density indicates a rapid depletion of cholesterol for steroid production. This depletion is almost entirely due to the disappearance of lipid droplets, rather than to an overall diminution in their size, as shown by the decrease in lipid droplet numerical density. The mitochondrial data suggest that the adrenocortical cell has an adedquate mitochondrial apparatus to respond to acute ACTH stimulation with increased steroid output without an increase inmitochondrial volume.

  10. Acute psychosis associated with dissociated sleep-wakefulness state after mirtazapine treatment.

    PubMed

    Felthous, Alan R; Wenger, Philip J; Hoevet, Rod

    2010-04-01

    Tricyclic antidepressants decrease rapid eye movement (REM) sleep and may suppress sleep atonia. Reports indicate that these agents can induce visual hallucinations, sometimes characterized as hypnopompic or associated with a dissociated sleep-wakefulness state. In addition, disturbing dreams and confusional states were reported during clinical trials and in subsequent studies. To our knowledge, only two cases of nightmares associated with mirtazapine, a tetracyclic antidepressant, have been previously reported. We describe a 43-year-old Caucasian man with major depressive disorder who started mirtazapine 15 mg at bedtime because he had poor symptom control with other antidepressant drugs. Three days later, vivid dream activity was noted, evolving into realistic nightmares that the patient was not able to distinguish from reality on awakening. Acute paranoia was suspected, and haloperidol was started. The dream activity then ended, and within 3 days the patient was able to identify the dreams as unreality. Haloperidol was discontinued, but mirtazapine was continued, and the vivid dream activity persisted; however, reality testing when awake was intact. A short course of haloperidol restored the patient's reality testing, and mirtazapine was eventually replaced with bupropion. The unusual nocturnal activity resolved as a result. Clinicians should be aware of the possible transition from exceptionally vivid dreams to REM sleep behavior disorder and psychosis based on dream content as an adverse effect of mirtazapine.

  11. Spinal distribution of c-Fos activated neurons expressing enkephalin in acute and chronic pain models.

    PubMed

    Hossaini, Mehdi; Duraku, Liron S; Kohli, Somesh K; Jongen, Joost L M; Holstege, Jan C

    2014-01-16

    The endogenous opioid enkephalin is known to inhibit spinal nociceptive transmission. Here we investigated activation of spinal enkephalinergic neurons by determining the proportions of c-Fos expressing (activated) spinal neurons that were enkephalinergic after different acute and chronic peripheral nociceptive stimuli. The number of c-Fos-activated neurons in the dorsal horn was increased after hind paw injection of capsaicin, formalin or complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA, 1.5 hrs - 4 days). The numbers of these neurons that were enkephalinergic increased after paraformaldehyde, and at 20 hrs, but not 1.5 hrs or 4 days post-CFA as compared to saline. In the spared nerve injury (SNI) model of neuropathic pain, c-Fos expression was increased acutely (2 hrs) and chronically (2 weeks), and a greater number of these were enkephalinergic in the nerve-injured animals acutely compared to controls (sham-SNI). Combining all acute (=2 hrs) versus chronic (≥20 hrs) treatment groups, there was a significant decrease in the percentage of activated neurons that were enkephalinergic in superficial layers, but a significant increase in the deeper layers of the dorsal horn in the chronic treatment group. It is concluded that the overall percentage of c-Fos activated neurons that contained enkephalin was not significantly different between acute and chronic pain phases. However, the shift in localization of these neurons within the spinal dorsal horn indicates a noxious stimulus directed activation pattern.

  12. Assessment of general anaesthetic cytotoxicity in murine cortical neurones in dissociated culture.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Laura L; Tyson, Jennifer A; Stackpole, Emily E; Hokenson, Kristen E; Sherrill, Hanna; McKeon, Jeanne E; Kim, Sarah A; Edmands, Scott D; Suarez, Cristina; Hall, Adam C

    2011-04-28

    General anaesthetics are proposed to cause unconsciousness by modulating neuronal excitability in the mammalian brain through mechanisms that include enhancement of inhibitory GABA(A) receptor currents and suppression of excitatory glutamate receptor responses. Both intravenous and volatile agents may produce neurotoxic effects during early postnatal rodent brain development through similar mechanisms. In the following study, we investigated anaesthetic cytotoxicity in primary cortical neurones and glia from postnatal day 2-8 mice. Cultures at 4-20 days in vitro were exposed to combinations of ketamine (100 μM to 3 mM), nitrous oxide (75%, v/v) and/or isoflurane (1.5-5%, v/v) for 6-12 h. Neuronal survival and cell death were measured via microtubule associated protein 2 immunoassay and lactate dehydrogenase release assays, respectively. Clinically relevant anaesthetic concentrations of ketamine, nitrous oxide and isoflurane had no significant neurotoxic effects individually or when given as anaesthetic cocktails, even with up to 12 h exposure. This lack of neurotoxicity was observed regardless of whether cultures were prepared from postnatal day 0-2 or day 8 mice, and was also unaffected by number of days in vitro (DIV 4-20). Significant neurotoxic effects were only observed at supraclinical concentrations (e.g. 1-3 mM ketamine). Our study suggests that neurotoxicity previously reported in vivo is not due to direct cytotoxicity of anaesthetic agents, but results from other impacts of the anaesthetised state during early brain development. PMID:21277931

  13. Carbonic anhydrase activity in primary sensory neurons. II. Influence of environmental factors on the phenotypic expression of the enzyme in dissociated cultures of chicken dorsal root ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Barakat, I; Kazimierczak, J; Droz, B

    1986-01-01

    Neuronal subpopulations of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) cells in the chicken exhibit carbonic anhydrase (CA) activity. To determine whether CA activity is expressed by DRG cells maintained in in vitro cultures, dissociated DRG cells from 10-day-old chick embryos were cultured on a collagen substrate. The influence exerted by environmental factors on the enzyme expression was tested under various conditions of culture. Neuron-enriched cell cultures and mixed DRG-cell cultures (including numerous non-neuronal cells) were performed either in a defined medium or in a horse serum-supplemented medium. In all the tested conditions, subpopulations of cultured sensory neurons expressed CA activity in their cell bodies, while their neurites were rarely stained; in each case, the percentage of CA-positive neurons declined with the age of the cultures. The number and the persistence of neurons possessing CA activity as well as the intensity of the reaction were enhanced by addition of horse serum. In contrast, the expression of the neuronal CA activity was not affected by the presence of non-neuronal cells or by the rise of CO2 concentration. Thus, the appearance and disappearance of neuronal subpopulations expressing CA activity may be decisively influenced by factors contained in the horse serum. The loss of CA-positive neurons with time could result from a cell selection or from genetic repression. Analysis of the time curves does not support a preferential cell death of CA-positive neurons but suggests that the eventual conversion of CA-positive neurons into CA-negative neurons results from a loss of the enzyme activity. These results indicate that the phenotypic expression of cultured sensory neurons is dependent on defined environmental factors.

  14. Acetylcholine-evoked currents in cultured neurones dissociated from rat parasympathetic cardiac ganglia.

    PubMed Central

    Fieber, L A; Adams, D J

    1991-01-01

    1. The properties of acetylcholine (ACh)-activated ion channels of parasympathetic neurones from neonatal rat cardiac ganglia grown in tissue culture were examined using patch clamp recording techniques. Membrane currents evoked by ACh were mimicked by nicotine, attenuated by neuronal bungarotoxin, and unaffected by atropine, suggesting that the ACh-induced currents are mediated by nicotinic receptor activation. 2. The current-voltage (I-V) relationship for whole-cell ACh-evoked currents exhibited strong inward rectification and a reversal (zero current) potential of -3 mV (NaCl outside, CsCl inside). The rectification was not alleviated by changing the main permeant cation or by removal of divalent cations from the intracellular or extracellular solutions. Unitary ACh-activated currents exhibited a linear I-V relationship with slope conductances of 32 pS in cell-attached membrane patches and 38 pS in excised membrane patches with symmetrical CsCl solutions. 3. Acetylcholine-induced currents were reversibly inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by the ganglionic antagonists, mecamylamine (Kd = 37 nM) and hexamethonium (IC50 approximately 1 microM), as well as by the neuromuscular relaxant, d-tubocurarine (Kd = 3 microM). Inhibition of ACh-evoked currents by hexamethonium could not be described by a simple blocking model for drug-receptor interaction. 4. The amplitude of the ionic current through the open channel was dependent on the extracellular Na+ concentration. The direction of the shift in reversal potential upon replacement of NaCl by mannitol indicates that the neuronal nicotinic receptor channel is cation selective and the magnitude suggests a high cation to anion permeability ratio. The cation permeability (PX/PNa) followed the ionic selectivity sequence Cs+ (1.06) greater than Na+ (1.0) greater than Ca2+ (0.93). Anion substitution experiments showed a relative anion permeability, PCl/PNa less than or equal to 0.05. 5. The nicotinic ACh-activated channels

  15. Prefrontal cortex gates acute morphine action on dopamine neurons in the ventral tegmental area.

    PubMed

    Liu, Changliang; Fang, Xing; Wu, Qianqian; Jin, Guozhang; Zhen, Xuechu

    2015-08-01

    Morphine excites dopamine (DA) neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA), an effect mediated by both local and systemic mechanisms. While the importance of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) - VTA circuit in opiate addiction is well established, little is known about how the PFC regulates the activity of VTA DA neurons upon morphine stimulation. One major challenge is that VTA DA neurons are highly heterogeneous in terms of projection and regulation, making their responses to PFC manipulations variable. Our previous work has identified a subgroup of VTA DA neurons exhibiting significant slow oscillation in their firing sequence, and demonstrated that most of these neurons are functionally connected with the PFC. In the present study, we focus our efforts only on VTA DA neurons expressing strong slow oscillation, and report that blocking the neuronal activity in the PFC remarkably attenuates the morphine-induced excitation of these neurons. Using in vivo microdialysis, we find that inactivation of the PFC also reduces the morphine-induced elevation of DA levels in the nucleus accumbens (NAc). Furthermore, 24 h after only single morphine exposure, PFC-inactivation failed to prevent subsequent morphine challenge from exciting VTA DA neurons, which is paralleled by altered response of PFC pyramidal neurons to morphine stimulation. Our results indicate that the PFC gates acute morphine action on a subset of VTA DA neurons, which is highly plastic and can be functionally remodeled by morphine exposure.

  16. Dissociative identity disorder and the nurse-patient relationship in the acute care setting: an action research study.

    PubMed

    McAllister, M; Higson, D; McIntosh, W; O'Leary, S; Hargreaves, L; Murrell, L; Mullen, V; Lovell, F; Kearney, J; Sammon, D; Woelders, S; Adams, T; Davies-Cotter, D; Wilson, J; O'Brien, J

    2001-03-01

    This paper presents the results of an action research study into the acute care experience of Dissociative Identity Disorder. The study, which was grounded in principles of critical social science, utilized focus group interviews and narrative construction. Nurses and patients are under-represented in all clinical evaluation and their voices need to be heard if services are to be truly collaborative. Findings of the study extend intrapsychic theories of trauma to emphasize the interpersonal relationship between nurse and person who can work together to facilitate recovery from trauma, make connections both intra and interpersonally and build resilience.

  17. Ultrastructural Visualization of Individual Tegument Protein Dissociation during Entry of Herpes Simplex Virus 1 into Human and Rat Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Anupriya; Boadle, Ross A.; Kelly, Barbara J.; Diefenbach, Russell J.; Alam, Waafiqa; Cunningham, Anthony L.

    2012-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) enters neurons primarily by fusion of the viral envelope with the host cell plasma membrane, leading to the release of the capsid into the cytosol. The capsid travels via microtubule-mediated retrograde transport to the nuclear membrane, where the viral DNA is released for replication in the nucleus. In the present study, the composition and kinetics of incoming HSV-1 capsids during entry and retrograde transport in axons of human fetal and dissociated rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons were examined by wide-field deconvolution microscopy and transmission immunoelectron microscopy (TIEM). We show that HSV-1 tegument proteins, including VP16, VP22, most pUL37, and some pUL36, dissociated from the incoming virions. The inner tegument proteins, including pUL36 and some pUL37, remained associated with the capsid during virus entry and transit to the nucleus in the neuronal cell body. By TIEM, a progressive loss of tegument proteins, including VP16, VP22, most pUL37, and some pUL36, was observed, with most of the tegument dissociating at the plasma membrane of the axons and the neuronal cell body. Further dissociation occurred within the axons and the cytosol as the capsids moved to the nucleus, resulting in the release of free tegument proteins, especially VP16, VP22, pUL37, and some pUL36, into the cytosol. This study elucidates ultrastructurally the composition of HSV-1 capsids that encounter the microtubules in the core of human axons and the complement of free tegument proteins released into the cytosol during virus entry. PMID:22457528

  18. Acute effect of exposure of mollusk single neuron to 900-MHz mobile phone radiation.

    PubMed

    Partsvania, B; Sulaberidze, T; Shoshiashvili, L; Modebadze, Z

    2011-09-01

    The goal of the present work was to explore the influence of commercially available cell phone irradiation on the single neuron excitability and memory processes. A Transverse Electromagnetic Cell (TEM Cell) was used to expose single neurons of mollusk to the electromagnetic field. Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) method was used for modeling the TEM Cell and the electromagnetic field interactions with living nerve ganglion and neurons. Neuron electrophysiology was investigated using standard microelectrode technique. The specific absorption rate (SAR) deposited into the single neuron was calculated to be 0.63 W/kg with a temperature increment of 0.1°C. After acute exposure, average firing threshold of the action potentials was not changed. However, the average latent period was significantly decreased. This indicates that together with latent period the threshold and the time of habituation might be altered during exposure. However, these alterations are transient and only latent period remains on the changed level.

  19. Blockade of 5-HT3 receptor-mediated currents in dissociated frog sensory neurones by benzoxazine derivative, Y-25130.

    PubMed Central

    Yakushiji, T.; Akaike, N.

    1992-01-01

    1. The effect of Y-25130, ((+-)-N-(1-azabicyclo[2.2.2]oct-3-yl)-6-chloro-4-methyl-3-oxo-3,4-dih ydr o- 2H-1,4-benzoxazine-8-carboxamide hydrochloride), a high affinity 5-hydroxytryptamine3 (5-HT3) receptor ligand, was examined on the 5-HT-induced response in dissociated frog dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurones by use of the extremely rapid concentration-jump ('concentration-clamp') and the conventional whole-cell patch-clamp techniques. 2. 5-HT induced a rapid transient inward current associated with an increase in membrane conductance at a holding potential of -70 mV. The current amplitude increased sigmoidally as 5-HT concentration increased. The half-maximum value (Ka) and the Hill coefficient estimated from the concentration-response curve were 1.7 x 10(-5) M and 1.7, respectively. 3. The current-voltage (I-V) relationship of 5-HT-induced current (I5-HT) showed inward rectification at potentials more positive than -40 mV. The reversal potential (E5-HT) was -11 mV. The E5-HT value was unaffected by total replacement of intracellular K+ by Cs+, indicating that the 5-HT-gated channels might be large cation channels. 4. Both the activation and inactivation phases of I5-HT were single exponentials. The time constants of activation and inactivation (tau a and tau i) decreased with increasing 5-HT concentration. 5. The 5-HT response was mimicked by a selective 5-HT3 receptor agonist, 2-methyl-5-HT, but the maximum response induced was approximately 25% that of 5-HT.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1472977

  20. Electrophysiology of Hypothalamic Magnocellular Neurons In vitro: A Rhythmic Drive in Organotypic Cultures and Acute Slices

    PubMed Central

    Israel, Jean-Marc; Oliet, Stéphane H.; Ciofi, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Hypothalamic neurohormones are released in a pulsatile manner. The mechanisms of this pulsatility remain poorly understood and several hypotheses are available, depending upon the neuroendocrine system considered. Among these systems, hypothalamo-neurohypophyseal magnocellular neurons have been early-considered models, as they typically display an electrical activity consisting of bursts of action potentials that is optimal for the release of boluses of the neurohormones oxytocin and vasopressin. The cellular mechanisms underlying this bursting behavior have been studied in vitro, using either acute slices of the adult hypothalamus, or organotypic cultures of neonatal hypothalamic tissue. We have recently proposed, from experiments in organotypic cultures, that specific central pattern generator networks, upstream of magnocellular neurons, determine their bursting activity. Here, we have tested whether a similar hypothesis can be derived from in vitro experiments in acute slices of the adult hypothalamus. To this aim we have screened our electrophysiological recordings of the magnocellular neurons, previously obtained from acute slices, with an analysis of autocorrelation of action potentials to detect a rhythmic drive as we recently did for organotypic cultures. This confirmed that the bursting behavior of magnocellular neurons is governed by central pattern generator networks whose rhythmic drive, and thus probably integrity, is however less satisfactorily preserved in the acute slices from adult brains. PMID:27065780

  1. Neurochemical and toxic effects of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine and 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridine to rat serotonin neurons in dissociated cell cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, L.K.; Mytilineou, C. )

    1990-05-01

    Dissociated cell cultures from the pontine area of embryonic rat brain were used to study the sensitivity of serotonin (5-hydroxy-tryptamine (5-HT)) neurons to the neurotoxins 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) and 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridine (MPP+). Treatment with MPTP (up to 100 microM) for 7 days did not cause degeneration of 5-HT neurons. A 50% inhibition of (3H)5-HT uptake caused by 100 microM MPTP was a direct effect on the 5-HT uptake carrier, reversed by washing for 7 days. Incubation of cultures with MPTP increased the intraneuronal levels of 5-HT and reduced the levels of 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, suggesting a reduction in 5-HT metabolism. MPTP reduced monoamine oxidase activity in the cultures, which probably led to the reduction in 5-HT metabolism. Exposure to MPP+ (0.5-10 microM) for 4 to 7 days decreased (3H)5-HT uptake and induced loss of neurons stained with antibodies against 5-HT. Comparison between 5-HT and dopamine (DA) neurons indicated a differential sensitivity to MPP+ toxicity with DA neurons being more susceptible. Analysis of the competition of MPP+ with the natural substrates for uptake sites of 5-HT and DA neurons demonstrated higher affinity of MPP+ for DA compared to 5-HT neurons. The lower affinity of MPP+ for 5-HT neurons could be responsible for the accumulation of lower MPP+ levels observed in pontine cultures and explain the resistance of 5-HT neurons to this toxin.

  2. Mitochondrial fission is an acute and adaptive response in injured motor neurons

    PubMed Central

    Kiryu-Seo, Sumiko; Tamada, Hiromi; Kato, Yukina; Yasuda, Katsura; Ishihara, Naotada; Nomura, Masatoshi; Mihara, Katsuyoshi; Kiyama, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Successful recovery from neuronal damage requires a huge energy supply, which is provided by mitochondria. However, the physiological relevance of mitochondrial dynamics in damaged neurons in vivo is poorly understood. To address this issue, we established unique bacterial artificial chromosome transgenic (BAC Tg) mice, which develop and function normally, but in which neuronal injury induces labelling of mitochondria with green fluorescent protein (GFP) and expression of cre recombinase. GFP-labelled mitochondria in BAC Tg mice appear shorter in regenerating motor axons soon after nerve injury compared with mitochondria in non-injured axons, suggesting the importance of increased mitochondrial fission during the early phase of nerve regeneration. Crossing the BAC Tg mice with mice carrying a floxed dynamin-related protein 1 gene (Drp1), which is necessary for mitochondrial fission, ablates mitochondrial fission specifically in injured neurons. Injury-induced Drp1-deficient motor neurons show elongated or abnormally gigantic mitochondria, which have impaired membrane potential and axonal transport velocity during the early phase after injury, and eventually promote neuronal death. Our in vivo data suggest that acute and prominent mitochondrial fission during the early stage after nerve injury is an adaptive response and is involved in the maintenance of mitochondrial and neuronal integrity to prevent neurodegeneration. PMID:27319806

  3. Nucleus accumbens neuronal activity correlates to the animal's behavioral response to acute and chronic methylphenidate.

    PubMed

    Claussen, Catherine M; Chong, Samuel L; Dafny, Nachum

    2014-04-22

    Acute and chronic methylphenidate (MPD) exposure was recorded simultaneously for the rat's locomotor activity and the nucleus accumbens (NAc) neuronal activity. The evaluation of the neuronal events was based on the animal's behavior response to chronic MPD administration: 1) Animals exhibiting behavioral sensitization, 2) Animals exhibiting behavioral tolerance. The experiment lasted for 10days with four groups of animals; saline, 0.6, 2.5, and 10.0mg/kg MPD. For the main behavioral findings, about half of the animals exhibited behavioral sensitization or behavioral tolerance to 0.6, 2.5, and/or 10mg/kg MPD respectively. Three hundred and forty one NAc neuronal units were evaluated. Approximately 80% of NAc units responded to 0.6, 2.5, and 10.0mg/kg MPD. When the neuronal activity was analyzed based on the animals' behavioral response to chronic MPD exposure, significant differences were seen between the neuronal population responses recorded from animals that expressed behavioral sensitization when compared to the NAc neuronal responses recorded from animals exhibiting behavioral tolerance. Three types of neurophysiological sensitization and neurophysiological tolerance can be recognized following chronic MPD administration to the neuronal populations. Collectively, these findings show that the same dose of chronic MPD can elicit either behavioral tolerance or behavioral sensitization. Differential statistical analyses were used to verify our hypothesis that the neuronal activity recorded from animals exhibiting behavioral sensitization will respond differently to MPD compared to those animals exhibiting behavioral tolerance, thus, suggesting that it is essential to record the animal's behavior concomitantly with neuronal recordings.

  4. Caudate neuronal recording in freely behaving animals following acute and chronic dose response methylphenidate exposure.

    PubMed

    Claussen, Catherine M; Dafny, Nachum

    2015-09-01

    The misuse and abuse of the psychostimulant, methylphenidate (MPD) the drug of choice in the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has seen a sharp uprising in recent years among both youth and adults for its cognitive enhancing effects and for recreational purposes. This uprise in illicit use has lead to many questions concerning the long-term consequences of MPD exposure. The objective of this study was to record animal behavior concomitantly with the caudate nucleus (CN) neuronal activity following acute and repetitive (chronic) dose response exposure to methylphenidate (MPD). A saline control and three MPD dose (0.6, 2.5, and 10.0mg/kg) groups were used. Behaviorally, the same MPD dose in some animals following chronic MPD exposure elicited behavioral sensitization and other animals elicited behavioral tolerance. Based on this finding, the CN neuronal population recorded from animals expressing behavioral sensitization was also evaluated separately from CN neurons recorded from animals expressing behavioral tolerance to chronic MPD exposure, respectively. Significant differences in CN neuronal population responses between the behaviorally sensitized and the behaviorally tolerant animals were observed for the 2.5 and 10.0mg/kg MPD exposed groups. For 2.5mg/kg MPD, behaviorally sensitized animals responded by decreasing their firing rates while behaviorally tolerant animals showed mainly an increase in their firing rates. The CN neuronal responses recorded from the behaviorally sensitized animals following 10.0mg/kg MPD responded by increasing their firing rates whereas the CN neuronal recordings from the behaviorally tolerant animals showed that approximately half decreased their firing rates in response to 10.0mg/kg MPD exposure. The comparison of percentage change in neuronal firing rates showed that the behaviorally tolerant animals trended to exhibit increases in their neuronal firing rates at ED1 following initial MPD exposure and

  5. Caudate neuronal recording in freely behaving animals following acute and chronic dose response methylphenidate exposure

    PubMed Central

    Claussen, Catherine M; Dafny, Nachum

    2016-01-01

    The misuse and abuse of the psychostimulant, methylphenidate (MPD) the drug of choice in the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has seen a sharp uprising in recent years among both youth and adults for its cognitive enhancing effects and for recreational purposes. This uprise in illicit use has lead to many questions concerning the long term consequences of MPD exposure. The objective of this study was to record animal behavior concomitantly with the caudate nucleus (CN) neuronal activity following acute and repetitive (chronic) dose response exposure to methylphenidate (MPD). A saline control and three MPD dose (0.6, 2.5, and 10.0 mg/kg) groups were used. Behaviorally, the same MPD dose in some animals following chronic MPD exposure elicited behavioral sensitization and other animals elicited behavioral tolerance. Based on this finding, the CN neuronal population recorded from animals expressing behavioral sensitization were also evaluated separately from CN neurons recorded from animals expressing behavioral tolerance to chronic MPD exposure, respectively. Significant differences in CN neuronal population responses between the behaviorally sensitized and the behaviorally tolerant animals was observed for the 2.5 and 10.0 mg/kg MPD exposed groups. For 2.5 mg/kg MPD, behaviorally sensitized animals responded by decreasing their firing rates while behaviorally tolerant animals showed mainly an increase in their firing rates. The CN neuronal responses recorded from the behaviorally sensitized animals following 10.0 mg/kg MPD responded by increasing their firing rates whereas the CN neuronal recordings from the behaviorally tolerant animals showed that approximately half decreased their firing rates in response to 10.0 mg/kg MPD exposure. The comparison of percentage change in neuronal firing rates showed that the behaviorally tolerant animals trended to exhibit increases in their neuronal firing rates at ED1 following initial MPD exposure

  6. Calcium Imaging of AM Dyes Following Prolonged Incubation in Acute Neuronal Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Morley, John W.; Tapson, Jonathan; Breen, Paul P.; van Schaik, André

    2016-01-01

    Calcium-imaging is a sensitive method for monitoring calcium dynamics during neuronal activity. As intracellular calcium concentration is correlated to physiological and pathophysiological activity of neurons, calcium imaging with fluorescent indicators is one of the most commonly used techniques in neuroscience today. Current methodologies for loading calcium dyes into the tissue require prolonged incubation time (45–150 min), in addition to dissection and recovery time after the slicing procedure. This prolonged incubation curtails experimental time, as tissue is typically maintained for 6–8 hours after slicing. Using a recently introduced recovery chamber that extends the viability of acute brain slices to more than 24 hours, we tested the effectiveness of calcium AM staining following long incubation periods post cell loading and its impact on the functional properties of calcium signals in acute brain slices and wholemount retinae. We show that calcium dyes remain within cells and are fully functional >24 hours after loading. Moreover, the calcium dynamics recorded >24 hrs were similar to the calcium signals recorded in fresh tissue that was incubated for <4 hrs. These results indicate that long exposure of calcium AM dyes to the intracellular cytoplasm did not alter the intracellular calcium concentration, the functional range of the dye or viability of the neurons. This data extends our previous work showing that a custom recovery chamber can extend the viability of neuronal tissue, and reliable data for both electrophysiology and imaging can be obtained >24hrs after dissection. These methods will not only extend experimental time for those using acute neuronal tissue, but also may reduce the number of animals required to complete experimental goals. PMID:27183102

  7. Combined Exposure to Simulated Microgravity and Acute or Chronic Radiation Reduces Neuronal Network Integrity and Survival

    PubMed Central

    Quintens, Roel; Samari, Nada; de Saint-Georges, Louis; van Oostveldt, Patrick; Baatout, Sarah; Benotmane, Mohammed Abderrafi

    2016-01-01

    During orbital or interplanetary space flights, astronauts are exposed to cosmic radiations and microgravity. However, most earth-based studies on the potential health risks of space conditions have investigated the effects of these two conditions separately. This study aimed at assessing the combined effect of radiation exposure and microgravity on neuronal morphology and survival in vitro. In particular, we investigated the effects of simulated microgravity after acute (X-rays) or during chronic (Californium-252) exposure to ionizing radiation using mouse mature neuron cultures. Acute exposure to low (0.1 Gy) doses of X-rays caused a delay in neurite outgrowth and a reduction in soma size, while only the high dose impaired neuronal survival. Of interest, the strongest effect on neuronal morphology and survival was evident in cells exposed to microgravity and in particular in cells exposed to both microgravity and radiation. Removal of neurons from simulated microgravity for a period of 24 h was not sufficient to recover neurite length, whereas the soma size showed a clear re-adaptation to normal ground conditions. Genome-wide gene expression analysis confirmed a modulation of genes involved in neurite extension, cell survival and synaptic communication, suggesting that these changes might be responsible for the observed morphological effects. In general, the observed synergistic changes in neuronal network integrity and cell survival induced by simulated space conditions might help to better evaluate the astronaut's health risks and underline the importance of investigating the central nervous system and long-term cognition during and after a space flight. PMID:27203085

  8. Combined Exposure to Simulated Microgravity and Acute or Chronic Radiation Reduces Neuronal Network Integrity and Survival.

    PubMed

    Pani, Giuseppe; Verslegers, Mieke; Quintens, Roel; Samari, Nada; de Saint-Georges, Louis; van Oostveldt, Patrick; Baatout, Sarah; Benotmane, Mohammed Abderrafi

    2016-01-01

    During orbital or interplanetary space flights, astronauts are exposed to cosmic radiations and microgravity. However, most earth-based studies on the potential health risks of space conditions have investigated the effects of these two conditions separately. This study aimed at assessing the combined effect of radiation exposure and microgravity on neuronal morphology and survival in vitro. In particular, we investigated the effects of simulated microgravity after acute (X-rays) or during chronic (Californium-252) exposure to ionizing radiation using mouse mature neuron cultures. Acute exposure to low (0.1 Gy) doses of X-rays caused a delay in neurite outgrowth and a reduction in soma size, while only the high dose impaired neuronal survival. Of interest, the strongest effect on neuronal morphology and survival was evident in cells exposed to microgravity and in particular in cells exposed to both microgravity and radiation. Removal of neurons from simulated microgravity for a period of 24 h was not sufficient to recover neurite length, whereas the soma size showed a clear re-adaptation to normal ground conditions. Genome-wide gene expression analysis confirmed a modulation of genes involved in neurite extension, cell survival and synaptic communication, suggesting that these changes might be responsible for the observed morphological effects. In general, the observed synergistic changes in neuronal network integrity and cell survival induced by simulated space conditions might help to better evaluate the astronaut's health risks and underline the importance of investigating the central nervous system and long-term cognition during and after a space flight. PMID:27203085

  9. Single-cell resolution mapping of neuronal damage in acute focal cerebral ischemia using thallium autometallography.

    PubMed

    Stöber, Franziska; Baldauf, Kathrin; Ziabreva, Iryna; Harhausen, Denise; Zille, Marietta; Neubert, Jenni; Reymann, Klaus G; Scheich, Henning; Dirnagl, Ulrich; Schröder, Ulrich H; Wunder, Andreas; Goldschmidt, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Neuronal damage shortly after onset or after brief episodes of cerebral ischemia has remained difficult to assess with clinical and preclinical imaging techniques as well as with microscopical methods. We here show, in rodent models of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO), that neuronal damage in acute focal cerebral ischemia can be mapped with single-cell resolution using thallium autometallography (TlAMG), a histochemical technique for the detection of the K(+)-probe thallium (Tl(+)) in the brain. We intravenously injected rats and mice with thallium diethyldithiocarbamate (TlDDC), a lipophilic chelate complex that releases Tl(+) after crossing the blood-brain barrier. We found, within the territories of the affected arteries, areas of markedly reduced neuronal Tl(+) uptake in all animals at all time points studied ranging from 15 minutes to 24 hours after MCAO. In large lesions at early time points, areas with neuronal and astrocytic Tl(+) uptake below thresholds of detection were surrounded by putative penumbral zones with preserved but diminished Tl(+) uptake. At 24 hours, the areas of reduced Tl(+)uptake matched with areas delineated by established markers of neuronal damage. The results suggest the use of (201)TlDDC for preclinical and clinical single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging of hyperacute alterations in brain K(+) metabolism and prediction of tissue viability in cerebral ischemia.

  10. In vitro reactive nitrating species toxicity in dissociated spinal motor neurons from NFL (-/-) and hNFL (+/+) transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Strong, Michael; Sopper, Maggie; He, Bei Ping

    2003-06-01

    We utilized fetal spinal motor neurons isolated from either NFL (-/-) or hNFL (+/+) transgenic mice to determine whether the loss of the low molecular weight neurofilament protein (NFL) places spinal motor neurons at a greater risk for cell death triggered by reactive nitrating species (RNS). After 21 days in serum-free, antibiotic-free medium, both the NFL (-/-) and hNFL (+/+) motor neurons developed neurofilamentous aggregates. Cultures were then exposed to nitric oxide(100 microM NOC 5, 100 microM NOC 12, or 2 mM sodium nitroprusside) or to peroxynitrite (250 mM SIN-1) forvarying intervals. NFL (-/-) cultures demonstrated extensive numbers of apoptotic neurons within six hours and complete cell loss by 24 hours in response to NOC 5 and NOC 12. In contrast, apoptosis was only observed in the motor neurons derived from control (C57bl/6) or hNLF (+/+) mice at 24 hours. In response to 2 mM sodium nitroprusside, necrosis was induced in all cells within 60 minutes. In response to 250 mM SIN-1, both C57bl/6 and hNFL (+/+) cells survived to six hours with only minimal evidence of degeneration while NFL (-/-) motor neurons were necrotic by 60 minutes. These observations suggest that NFL deficient motor neurons are at an enhanced risk of cell death mediated by RNS.

  11. Apoptosis of Hippocampal Pyramidal Neurons Is Virus Independent in a Mouse Model of Acute Neurovirulent Picornavirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Buenz, Eric J.; Sauer, Brian M.; LaFrance-Corey, Reghann G.; Deb, Chandra; Denic, Aleksandar; German, Christopher L.; Howe, Charles L.

    2009-01-01

    Many viruses, including picornaviruses, have the potential to infect the central nervous system (CNS) and stimulate a neuroinflammatory immune response, especially in infants and young children. Cognitive deficits associated with CNS picornavirus infection result from injury and death of neurons that may occur due to direct viral infection or during the immune responses to virus in the brain. Previous studies have concluded that apoptosis of hippocampal neurons during picornavirus infection is a cell-autonomous event triggered by direct neuronal infection. However, these studies assessed neuron death at time points late in infection and during infections that lead to either death of the host or persistent viral infection. In contrast, many neurovirulent picornavirus infections are acute and transient, with rapid clearance of virus from the host. We provide evidence of hippocampal pathology in mice acutely infected with the Theiler’s murine encephalomyelitis picornavirus. We found that CA1 pyramidal neurons exhibited several hallmarks of apoptotic death, including caspase-3 activation, DNA fragmentation, and chromatin condensation within 72 hours of infection. Critically, we also found that many of the CA1 pyramidal neurons undergoing apoptosis were not infected with virus, indicating that neuronal cell death during acute picornavirus infection of the CNS occurs in a non–cell-autonomous manner. These observations suggest that therapeutic strategies other than antiviral interventions may be useful for neuroprotection during acute CNS picornavirus infection. PMID:19608874

  12. Apoptosis of hippocampal pyramidal neurons is virus independent in a mouse model of acute neurovirulent picornavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Buenz, Eric J; Sauer, Brian M; Lafrance-Corey, Reghann G; Deb, Chandra; Denic, Aleksandar; German, Christopher L; Howe, Charles L

    2009-08-01

    Many viruses, including picornaviruses, have the potential to infect the central nervous system (CNS) and stimulate a neuroinflammatory immune response, especially in infants and young children. Cognitive deficits associated with CNS picornavirus infection result from injury and death of neurons that may occur due to direct viral infection or during the immune responses to virus in the brain. Previous studies have concluded that apoptosis of hippocampal neurons during picornavirus infection is a cell-autonomous event triggered by direct neuronal infection. However, these studies assessed neuron death at time points late in infection and during infections that lead to either death of the host or persistent viral infection. In contrast, many neurovirulent picornavirus infections are acute and transient, with rapid clearance of virus from the host. We provide evidence of hippocampal pathology in mice acutely infected with the Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis picornavirus. We found that CA1 pyramidal neurons exhibited several hallmarks of apoptotic death, including caspase-3 activation, DNA fragmentation, and chromatin condensation within 72 hours of infection. Critically, we also found that many of the CA1 pyramidal neurons undergoing apoptosis were not infected with virus, indicating that neuronal cell death during acute picornavirus infection of the CNS occurs in a non-cell-autonomous manner. These observations suggest that therapeutic strategies other than antiviral interventions may be useful for neuroprotection during acute CNS picornavirus infection. PMID:19608874

  13. Dopamine Receptor Blockade Modulates the Rewarding and Aversive Properties of Nicotine via Dissociable Neuronal Activity Patterns in the Nucleus Accumbens

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ninglei; Laviolette, Steven R

    2014-01-01

    The mesolimbic pathway comprising the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and projection terminals in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) has been identified as a critical neural system involved in processing both the rewarding and aversive behavioral effects of nicotine. Transmission through dopamine (DA) receptors functionally modulates these effects directly within the NAc. Nevertheless, the neuronal mechanisms within the NAc responsible for these bivalent behavioral effects are presently not known. Using an unbiased conditioned place preference procedure combined with in vivo neuronal recordings, we examined the effects of nicotine reward and aversion conditioning on intra-NAc neuronal sub-population activity patterns. We report that intra-VTA doses of nicotine that differentially produce rewarding or aversive behavioral effects produce opposite effects on sub-populations of fast-spiking interneurons (FSIs) or medium spiny neurons (MSNs) within the shell region of the NAc (NAshell). Thus, while the rewarding effects of intra-VTA nicotine were associated with inhibition of FSI and activation of MSNs, the aversive effects of nicotine produced the opposite pattern of NAshell neuronal population activity. Blockade of DA transmission with a broad-spectrum DA receptor antagonist, α-flupenthixol, strongly inhibited the spontaneous activity of NAshell FSIs, and reversed the conditioning properties of intra-VTA nicotine, switching nicotine-conditioned responses from aversive to rewarding. Remarkably, DA receptor blockade switched intra-NAshell neuronal population activity from an aversion to a reward pattern, concomitant with the observed switch in behavioral conditioning effects. PMID:24896614

  14. Endoplasmic reticulum stress-regulated CXCR3 pathway mediates inflammation and neuronal injury in acute glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Y; Liu, H; Xu, Z; Yokota, H; Narayanan, S P; Lemtalsi, T; Smith, S B; Caldwell, R W; Caldwell, R B; Zhang, W

    2015-01-01

    Acute glaucoma is a leading cause of irreversible blindness in East Asia. The mechanisms underlying retinal neuronal injury induced by a sudden rise in intraocular pressure (IOP) remain obscure. Here we demonstrate that the activation of CXCL10/CXCR3 axis, which mediates the recruitment and activation of inflammatory cells, has a critical role in a mouse model of acute glaucoma. The mRNA and protein expression levels of CXCL10 and CXCR3 were significantly increased after IOP-induced retinal ischemia. Blockade of the CXCR3 pathway by deleting CXCR3 gene significantly attenuated ischemic injury-induced upregulation of inflammatory molecules (interleukin-1β and E-selectin), inhibited the recruitment of microglia/monocyte to the superficial retina, reduced peroxynitrite formation, and prevented the loss of neurons within the ganglion cell layer. In contrast, intravitreal delivery of CXCL10 increased leukocyte recruitment and retinal cell apoptosis. Inhibition of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress with chemical chaperones partially blocked ischemic injury-induced CXCL10 upregulation, whereas induction of ER stress with tunicamycin enhanced CXCL10 expression in retina and primary retinal ganglion cells. Interestingly, deleting CXCR3 attenuated ER stress-induced retinal cell death. In conclusion, these results indicate that ER stress-medicated activation of CXCL10/CXCR3 pathway has an important role in retinal inflammation and neuronal injury after high IOP-induced ischemia. PMID:26448323

  15. Incidence and Predictors of Acute Psychological Distress and Dissociation after Motor Vehicle Collision: a Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Gemma C.; Platts-Mills, Timothy F.; Liberzon, Israel; Bair, Eric; Swor, Robert; Peak, David; Jones, Jeffrey; Rathlev, Niels; Lee, David; Domeier, Robert; Hendry, Phyllis; McLean, Samuel A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The authors examined the incidence and predictors of peritraumatic distress and dissociation after one of the most common forms of civilian trauma exposure: motor vehicle collision (MVC). Methods In this study, patients presenting to the emergency department after MVC who were without serious injury and discharged to home after evaluation (n = 935) completed an emergency department interview evaluating sociodemographic, collision-related, and psychological characteristics. Results The incidence and predictors of distress (Peritraumatic Distress Inventory score ≥ 23) and dissociation (Michigan Critical Events Perception Scale score >3) were assessed. Distress was present in 355 of 935 patients (38%) and dissociation was present in 260 of 942 patients (28%). These outcomes showed only moderate correlation (r = 0.45), and had both shared and distinct predictors. Female gender, anxiety symptoms prior to MVC, and vehicle damage severity predicted both distress and dissociation. Higher socioeconomic status (higher education, higher income, full time employment) had a protective effect against distress but not dissociative symptoms. Better physical health and worse overall mental health were associated with increased risk of dissociation, but not distress. Distress but not dissociation was associated with lower patient confidence in recovery and a longer expected duration of recovery. Conclusion There are unique predictors of peritraumatic distress and dissociation. Further work is needed to better understand the neurobiology of peritraumatic distress and dissociation, and the influence of these peritraumatic outcomes on persistent psychological sequelae. PMID:24983475

  16. Dual PDF signaling pathways reset clocks via TIMELESS and acutely excite target neurons to control circadian behavior.

    PubMed

    Seluzicki, Adam; Flourakis, Matthieu; Kula-Eversole, Elzbieta; Zhang, Luoying; Kilman, Valerie; Allada, Ravi

    2014-03-01

    Molecular circadian clocks are interconnected via neural networks. In Drosophila, PIGMENT-DISPERSING FACTOR (PDF) acts as a master network regulator with dual functions in synchronizing molecular oscillations between disparate PDF(+) and PDF(-) circadian pacemaker neurons and controlling pacemaker neuron output. Yet the mechanisms by which PDF functions are not clear. We demonstrate that genetic inhibition of protein kinase A (PKA) in PDF(-) clock neurons can phenocopy PDF mutants while activated PKA can partially rescue PDF receptor mutants. PKA subunit transcripts are also under clock control in non-PDF DN1p neurons. To address the core clock target of PDF, we rescued per in PDF neurons of arrhythmic per⁰¹ mutants. PDF neuron rescue induced high amplitude rhythms in the clock component TIMELESS (TIM) in per-less DN1p neurons. Complete loss of PDF or PKA inhibition also results in reduced TIM levels in non-PDF neurons of per⁰¹ flies. To address how PDF impacts pacemaker neuron output, we focally applied PDF to DN1p neurons and found that it acutely depolarizes and increases firing rates of DN1p neurons. Surprisingly, these effects are reduced in the presence of an adenylate cyclase inhibitor, yet persist in the presence of PKA inhibition. We have provided evidence for a signaling mechanism (PKA) and a molecular target (TIM) by which PDF resets and synchronizes clocks and demonstrates an acute direct excitatory effect of PDF on target neurons to control neuronal output. The identification of TIM as a target of PDF signaling suggests it is a multimodal integrator of cell autonomous clock, environmental light, and neural network signaling. Moreover, these data reveal a bifurcation of PKA-dependent clock effects and PKA-independent output effects. Taken together, our results provide a molecular and cellular basis for the dual functions of PDF in clock resetting and pacemaker output. PMID:24643294

  17. Opposing effects of acute versus chronic blockade of frontal cortex somatostatin-positive inhibitory neurons on behavioral emotionality in mice.

    PubMed

    Soumier, Amelie; Sibille, Etienne

    2014-08-01

    Reduced expression of somatostatin (SST) is reported across chronic brain conditions including major depression and normal aging. SST is a signaling neuropeptide and marker of gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA) neurons, which specifically inhibit pyramidal neuron dendrites. Studies in auditory cortex suggest that chronic reduction in dendritic inhibition induces compensatory homeostatic adaptations that oppose the effects of acute inhibition. Whether such mechanisms occur in frontal cortex (FC) and affect behavioral outcome is not known. Here, we used two complementary viral vector strategies to examine the effects of acute vs chronic inhibition of SST-positive neurons on behavioral emotionality in adult mice. SST-IRES-Cre mice were injected in FC (prelimbic/precingulate) with CRE-dependent adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector encoding the engineered Gi/o-coupled human muscarinic M4 designer receptor exclusively activated by a designer drug (DREADD-hM4Di) or a control reporter (AAV-DIO-mCherry) for acute or chronic cellular inhibition. A separate cohort was injected with CRE-dependent AAV vectors expressing diphtheria toxin (DTA) to selectively ablate FC SST neurons. Mice were assessed for anxiety- and depressive-like behaviors (defined as emotionality). Results indicate that acute inhibition of FC SST neurons increased behavioral emotionality, whereas chronic inhibition decreased behavioral emotionality. Furthermore, ablation of FC SST neurons also decreased behavioral emotionality under baseline condition and after chronic stress. Together, our results reveal opposite effects of acute and chronic inhibition of FC SST neurons on behavioral emotionality and suggest the recruitment of homeostatic plasticity mechanisms that have implications for understanding the neurobiology of chronic brain conditions affecting dendritic-targeting inhibitory neurons.

  18. Effects of acute and chronic administration of neurosteroid dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate on neuronal excitability in mice

    PubMed Central

    Svob Strac, Dubravka; Vlainic, Josipa; Samardzic, Janko; Erhardt, Julija; Krsnik, Zeljka

    2016-01-01

    Background Neurosteroid dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) has been associated with important brain functions, including neuronal survival, memory, and behavior, showing therapeutic potential in various neuropsychiatric and cognitive disorders. However, the antagonistic effects of DHEAS on γ-amino-butyric acidA receptors and its facilitatory action on glutamatergic neurotransmission might lead to enhanced brain excitability and seizures and thus limit DHEAS therapeutic applications. The aim of this study was to investigate possible age and sex differences in the neuronal excitability of the mice following acute and chronic DHEAS administration. Methods DHEAS was administered intraperitoneally in male and female adult and old mice either acutely or repeatedly once daily for 4 weeks in a 10 mg/kg dose. To investigate the potential proconvulsant properties of DHEAS, we studied the effects of acute and chronic DHEAS treatment on picrotoxin-, pentylentetrazole-, and N-methyl-D-aspartate-induced seizures in mice. The effects of acute and chronic DHEAS administration on the locomotor activity, motor coordination, and body weight of the mice were also studied. We also investigated the effects of DHEAS treatment on [3H]flunitrazepam binding to the mouse brain membranes. Results DHEAS did not modify the locomotor activity, motor coordination, body weight, and brain [3H]flunitrazepam binding of male and female mice. The results failed to demonstrate significant effects of single- and long-term DHEAS treatment on the convulsive susceptibility in both adult and aged mice of both sexes. However, small but significant changes regarding sex differences in the susceptibility to seizures were observed following DHEAS administration to mice. Conclusion Although our findings suggest that DHEAS treatment might be safe for various potential therapeutic applications in adult as well as in old age, they also support subtle interaction of DHEAS with male and female hormonal status

  19. Effects of the neurotrophic factors BDNF, NT-3, and FGF2 on dissociated neurons of the cochlear nucleus.

    PubMed

    Rak, Kristen; Völker, Johannes; Frenz, Silke; Scherzad, Agmal; Schendzielorz, Philipp; Radeloff, Andreas; Jablonka, Sibylle; Hagen, Rudolf; Mlynski, Robert

    2014-08-20

    The cochlear nucleus is the first relay station for acoustic information in the auditory pathway and its cellular integrity is affected by hearing loss. Neurotrophic factors, which are known to regulate fundamental processes in the brain, are expressed in the cochlear nucleus and are regulated by the changes in the stimulation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the neurotrophins Brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and Neurotrophin 3 (NT-3) and the neurotrophic factor Fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) on primary cultured cells of the mouse cochlear nucleus. No effect on overall cell growth was detected after 8 days in culture by the factors applied. NT-3 had a strong impact on enhancement of neuronal survival, whereas BDNF stimulated neuronal survival and axonal outgrowth. Axonal branching was negatively affected by the administration of BDNF. FGF2 did not show any effect. The results presented represent fundamental research on auditory neurons, but might be one step toward defining novel therapeutic strategies in the future to prevent cochlear nucleus degeneration induced by hearing loss. PMID:24978398

  20. Brain correlates of language learning: the neuronal dissociation of rule-based versus similarity-based learning.

    PubMed

    Opitz, Bertram; Friederici, Angela D

    2004-09-29

    Language learning is one of the mysteries of human cognition. One of the crucial questions is the following: Does acquisition of grammatical knowledge depend primarily on abstract rules or on item-specific information? Although there is evidence that both mechanisms contribute to language acquisition, their relative importance during the process of language learning is unknown. Using an artificial grammar paradigm, we show by means of functional magnetic resonance imaging that the brain dissociates the two mechanisms: the left anterior hippocampus supports similarity-based learning, whereas the left ventral premotor cortex is selectively engaged by abstract rule processing. Moreover, data analysis over time on learning suggests that similarity-based learning plays a nonobligatory role during the initial phase, and that rule-based abstraction plays a crucial role during later learning.

  1. Dissociation of Increases in PGC-1α and Its Regulators from Exercise Intensity and Muscle Activation Following Acute Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Hankinson, Paul B.; Simpson, Craig A.; Little, Jonathan P.; Graham, Ryan B.; Gurd, Brendon J.

    2013-01-01

    Muscle activation as well as changes in peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1 alpha (PGC-1α) following high-intensity interval exercise (HIIE) were examined in young healthy men (n  = 8; age, 21.9±2.2 yrs; VO2peak, 53.1±6.4 ml/min/kg; peak work rate, 317±23.5 watts). On each of 3 visits HIIE was performed on a cycle ergometer at a target intensity of 73, 100, or 133% of peak work rate. Muscle biopsies were taken at rest and three hours after each exercise condition. Total work was not different between conditions (∼730 kJ) while average power output (73%, 237±21; 100%, 323±26; 133%, 384±35 watts) and EMG derived muscle activation (73%, 1262±605; 100%, 2089±737; 133%, 3029±1206 total integrated EMG per interval) increased in an intensity dependent fashion. PGC-1α mRNA was elevated after all three conditions (p<0.05), with a greater increase observed following the 100% condition (∼9 fold, p<0.05) compared to both the 73 and 133% conditions (∼4 fold). When expressed relative to muscle activation, the increase in PGC-1α mRNA for the 133% condition was less than that for the 73 and 100% conditions (p<0.05). SIRT1 mRNA was also elevated after all three conditions (∼1.4 fold, p<0.05), with no difference between conditions. These findings suggest that intensity-dependent increases in PGC-1α mRNA following submaximal exercise are largely due to increases in muscle recruitment. As well, the blunted response of PGC-1α mRNA expression following supramaximal exercise may indicate that signalling mediated activation of PGC-1α may also be blunted. We also indentify that increases in PDK4, SIRT1, and RIP140 mRNA following acute exercise are dissociated from exercise intensity and muscle activation, while increases in EGR1 are augmented with supramaximal HIIE (p<0.05). PMID:23951207

  2. Combined exposure to simulated microgravity and acute or chronic radiation reduces neuronal network integrity and cell survival

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benotmane, Rafi

    During orbital or interplanetary space flights, astronauts are exposed to cosmic radiations and microgravity. This study aimed at assessing the effect of these combined conditions on neuronal network density, cell morphology and survival, using well-connected mouse cortical neuron cultures. To this end, neurons were exposed to acute low and high doses of low LET (X-rays) radiation or to chronic low dose-rate of high LET neutron irradiation (Californium-252), under the simulated microgravity generated by the Random Positioning Machine (RPM, Dutch space). High content image analysis of cortical neurons positive for the neuronal marker βIII-tubulin unveiled a reduced neuronal network integrity and connectivity, and an altered cell morphology after exposure to acute/chronic radiation or to simulated microgravity. Additionally, in both conditions, a defect in DNA-repair efficiency was revealed by an increased number of γH2AX-positive foci, as well as an increased number of Annexin V-positive apoptotic neurons. Of interest, when combining both simulated space conditions, we noted a synergistic effect on neuronal network density, neuronal morphology, cell survival and DNA repair. Furthermore, these observations are in agreement with preliminary gene expression data, revealing modulations in cytoskeletal and apoptosis-related genes after exposure to simulated microgravity. In conclusion, the observed in vitro changes in neuronal network integrity and cell survival induced by space simulated conditions provide us with mechanistic understanding to evaluate health risks and the development of countermeasures to prevent neurological disorders in astronauts over long-term space travels. Acknowledgements: This work is supported partly by the EU-FP7 projects CEREBRAD (n° 295552)

  3. Spatiotemporal pattern of neuronal injury induced by DFP in rats: A model for delayed neuronal cell death following acute OP intoxication

    SciTech Connect

    Li Yonggang; Lein, Pamela J.; Liu Cuimei; Bruun, Donald A.; Tewolde, Teclemichael; Ford, Gregory; Ford, Byron D.

    2011-06-15

    Organophosphate (OP) neurotoxins cause acute cholinergic toxicity and seizures resulting in delayed brain damage and persistent neurological symptoms. Testing novel strategies for protecting against delayed effects of acute OP intoxication has been hampered by the lack of appropriate animal models. In this study, we characterize the spatiotemporal pattern of cellular injury after acute intoxication with the OP diisopropylfluorophosphate (DFP). Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats received pyridostigmine (0.1 mg/kg, im) and atropine methylnitrate (20 mg/kg, im) prior to DFP (9 mg/kg, ip) administration. All DFP-treated animals exhibited moderate to severe seizures within minutes after DFP injection but survived up to 72 h. AChE activity was significantly depressed in the cortex, hippocampus, subcortical brain tissue and cerebellum at 1 h post-DFP injection and this inhibition persisted for up to 72 h. Analysis of neuronal injury by Fluoro-Jade B (FJB) labeling revealed delayed neuronal cell death in the hippocampus, cortex, amygdala and thalamus, but not the cerebellum, starting at 4 h and persisting until 72 h after DFP treatment, although temporal profiles varied between brain regions. At 24 h post-DFP injection, the pattern of FJB labeling corresponded to TUNEL staining in most brain regions, and FJB-positive cells displayed reduced NeuN immunoreactivity but were not immunopositive for astrocytic (GFAP), oligodendroglial (O4) or macrophage/microglial (ED1) markers, demonstrating that DFP causes a region-specific delayed neuronal injury mediated in part by apoptosis. These findings indicate the feasibility of this model for testing neuroprotective strategies, and provide insight regarding therapeutic windows for effective pharmacological intervention following acute OP intoxication. - Research Highlights: > DFP induced neuronal FJB labeling starting at 4-8 h after treatment > The pattern of DFP-induced FJB labeling closely corresponded to TUNEL staining > FJB

  4. Effects of strongly anisosmotic and NaCl deficient solutions on muscimol- and glutamate evoked whole-cell currents in freshly dissociated hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Vreugdenhil, M; Somjen, G G; Wadman, W J

    1995-01-23

    Sudden exposure of dissociated hippocampal neurons to strongly hypo- or hyperosmotic solutions suppresses voltage gated Na+, K+ and Ca2+ currents. We investigated whether ligand gated ion currents were similarly shut down by exposure to anisosmotic solutions. The effect of hypo-osmotic, NaCl deficient (mannitol-substituted), or hyper-osmotic test solutions delivered from a flow pipette was tested on voltage gated Ca2+ currents and on currents and conductance changes evoked by brief administration of either the GABAA-agonist muscimol or glutamate. Hyper-osmotic solution caused cells to shrink, but cell membrane capacitance did not change. Muscimol-induced conductance increases were depressed by hypo-osmotic and by NaCl deficient solutions and often by hyper-osmotic solution. Voltage gated Ca2+ currents were depressed by anisosmotic, but not by NaCl deficient isosmotic solution. NMDA- and non-NMDA evoked conductance increases were depressed by hyperosmotic solution; hypo-osmotic and NaCl deficient solutions were not tested on glutamate induced currents. Ligand gated currents are suppressed by anisosmotic solutions more slowly than are voltage gated channels. The changes caused by anisosmotic and NaCl deficient solutions were much greater then expected from calculated electrochemical effects and are probably the result of change in receptor controlled channels. PMID:7536614

  5. Behavioral and neuronal recording of the nucleus accumbens in adolescent rats following acute and repetitive exposure to methylphenidate

    PubMed Central

    Frolov, Alexander; Reyes-Vasquez, Cruz

    2014-01-01

    The nucleus accumbens (NAc) has been shown to play a key role in the brain's response to methylphenidate (MPD). The present study focuses on neuronal recording from this structure. The study postulates that repetitive exposure to the same dose of MPD will elicit in some rats behavioral sensitization and in others tolerance. Furthermore, the study postulates that NAc neuronal activity recorded from animals expressing behavioral tolerance after repetitive MPD exposure will be significantly different from NAc neuronal activity recorded from animals expressing behavioral sensitization after repetitive MPD exposure at doses of 0.6, 2.5, 5.0, and 10.0 mg/kg. To test this, behavioral and neuronal activity was recorded concomitantly from the NAc of freely behaving adolescent rats (postnatal day 40) before and after acute and repetitive administration of four different MPD doses. Comparing the acute MPD effect to the repetitive MPD effect revealed that the acute response to MPD exhibited dose-response characteristics: an increase in behavioral activity correlated with increasing MPD doses. On the other hand, following repetitive MPD exposure, some animals exhibited attenuated behavior (tolerance), while others exhibited further increases in the recorded behavior (sensitization). Moreover, the neuronal activity following repetitive MPD exposure recorded in animals exhibiting behavioral sensitization was significantly different from neuronal activity recorded in animals exhibiting behavioral tolerance. This implies that when studying the effects of repetitive MPD administration on adolescent rats, it is advisable to simultaneously record both neuronal and behavioral activity and to evaluate all data based on the animals' behavioral response to the repetitive MPD exposure. PMID:25318764

  6. Acute restraint stress decreases dopamine synthesis and turnover in the median eminence: a model for the study of the inhibitory neuronal influences on tuberoinfundibular dopaminergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Demarest, K T; Moore, K E; Riegle, G D

    1985-11-01

    The effects of acute stress on serum prolactin concentrations and tuberoinfundibular dopaminergic (TIDA) neuronal activity were studied in female rats. TIDA neuronal activity was estimated by measuring the rate of dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) accumulation after the administration of a decarboxylase inhibitor (NSD 1015) and the rate of decline of dopamine (DA) after the administration of a tyrosine hydroxylase inhibitor (alpha-methyltyrosine) in the median eminence. Serum prolactin concentrations were increased following 30 min of supine immobilization (restraint stress), but returned to control levels by 2, 8, and 16 h after the onset of this stress. The rate of DOPA accumulation was decreased during the 30 min of restraint; it was still further reduced 2 h later but had returned to control levels 8 and 16 h later. No change in the rate of DOPA accumulation was observed in the striatum or neurointermediate lobe of the pituitary at any time after the start of restraint. Restraint stress also decreased the rate of DA turnover in the median eminence, but was without effect on the rates of DA turnover in the striatum or neurointermediate lobe. These results suggest that restraint stress activates an inhibitory neuronal pathway which decreases the activity of TIDA neurons and may be responsible, at least in part, for the increase in serum prolactin concentrations. The responsiveness of TIDA neurons to the stress-induced decrease in activity was not influenced by the time of day or the stage of the estrous cycle. Not all stressful manipulations decreased TIDA neuronal activity.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Nucleus accumbens neuronal activity correlates to the animal’s behavioral response to acute and chronic methylphenidate

    PubMed Central

    Claussen, Catherine M; Chong, Samuel L; Dafny, Nachum

    2014-01-01

    Acute and chronic Methylphenidate (MPD) exposure was recorded simultaneously for the rat’s locomotor activity and the nucleus accumbens (NAc) neuronal activity. The evaluation of the neuronal events was based on the animal’s behavior response to chronic MPD administration: 1) Animals exhibiting behavioral sensitization 2) Animals exhibiting behavioral tolerance. The experiment lasted for 10 days with four groups of animals; saline, 0.6, 2.5, and 10.0mg/kg MPD. For the main behavioral findings, about half of the animals exhibited behavioral sensitization or behavioral tolerance to 0.6, 2.5, and/or 10 mg/kg MPD respectively. Three hundred and forty one NAc neuronal units were evaluated. Approximately 80% of NAc units responded to 0.6, 2.5, and 10.0 mg/kg MPD. When the neuronal activity was analyzed based on the animals behavioral response to chronic MPD exposure, significant differences were seen between the neuronal populations responses recorded from animals that expressed behavioral sensitization when compared to the NAc neuronal responses recorded from animals exhibiting behavioral tolerance. Three types of neurophysiological sensitization and neurophysiological tolerance can be recognized following chronic MPD administration to the neuronal populations. Collectively, these findings show that the same dose of chronic MPD can elicit either behavioral tolerance or behavioral sensitization. Differential statistical analysis were used to verify our hypothesis that the neuronal activity recorded from animals exhibiting behavioral sensitization will respond differently to MPD compared to those animals exhibiting behavioral tolerance. Thus, suggesting that it is essential to record the animals behavior concomitantly with neuronal recordings. PMID:24534179

  8. Neuropathological characterization of spinal motor neuron degeneration processes induced by acute and chronic excitotoxic stimulus in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Jarquín, Uri Nimrod; Tapia, Ricardo

    2016-09-01

    Motor neuron (MN) diseases are characterized by progressive cell degeneration, and excitotoxicity has been postulated as a causal factor. Using two experimental procedures for inducing excitotoxic spinal MN degeneration in vivo, by acute and chronic overactivation of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazoleacetic acid (AMPA) receptors, we characterized the time course of the neuropathological changes. Electron transmission microscopy showed that acute AMPA perfusion by microdialysis caused MN swelling 1.5h after surgery and lysis with membrane rupture as early as 3h; no cleaved caspase 3 was detected by immunochemistry. Chronic AMPA infusion by osmotic minipumps induced a slow degeneration process along 5days, characterized by progressive changes: endoplasmic reticulum swelling, vacuolization of cytoplasm, vacuole fusion and cell membrane rupture. Quantification of these ultrastructural alterations showed that the increase of vacuolated area was at the expense of the nuclear area. Caspase 3 cleavage was observed since the first day of AMPA infusion. We conclude that acute AMPA-induced excitotoxicity induces MN loss by necrosis, while the progress of degeneration induced by chronic infusion is slow, starting with an early apoptotic process followed by necrosis. In both the acute and chronic procedures a correlation could be established between the loss of MN by necrosis, but not by caspase 3-linked apoptosis, and severe motor deficits and hindlimb paralysis. Our findings are relevant for understanding the mechanisms of neuron death in degenerative diseases and thus for the design of pharmacological therapeutic strategies. PMID:27320208

  9. Contrasting alterations to synaptic and intrinsic properties in upper-cervical superficial dorsal horn neurons following acute neck muscle inflammation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute and chronic pain in axial structures, like the back and neck, are difficult to treat, and have incidence as high as 15%. Surprisingly, most preclinical work on pain mechanisms focuses on cutaneous structures in the limbs and animal models of axial pain are not widely available. Accordingly, we developed a mouse model of acute cervical muscle inflammation and assessed the functional properties of superficial dorsal horn (SDH) neurons. Results Male C57/Bl6 mice (P24-P40) were deeply anaesthetised (urethane 2.2 g/kg i.p) and the rectus capitis major muscle (RCM) injected with 40 μl of 2% carrageenan. Sham animals received vehicle injection and controls remained anaesthetised for 2 hrs. Mice in each group were sacrificed at 2 hrs for analysis. c-Fos staining was used to determine the location of activated neurons. c-Fos labelling in carrageenan-injected mice was concentrated within ipsilateral (87% and 63% of labelled neurons in C1 and C2 segments, respectively) and contralateral laminae I - II with some expression in lateral lamina V. c-Fos expression remained below detectable levels in control and sham animals. In additional experiments, whole cell recordings were obtained from visualised SDH neurons in transverse slices in the ipsilateral C1 and C2 spinal segments. Resting membrane potential and input resistance were not altered. Mean spontaneous EPSC amplitude was reduced by ~20% in neurons from carrageenan-injected mice versus control and sham animals (20.63 ± 1.05 vs. 24.64 ± 0.91 and 25.87 ± 1.32 pA, respectively). The amplitude (238 ± 33 vs. 494 ± 96 and 593 ± 167 pA) and inactivation time constant (12.9 ± 1.5 vs. 22.1 ± 3.6 and 15.3 ± 1.4 ms) of the rapid A type potassium current (IAr), the dominant subthreshold current in SDH neurons, were reduced in carrageenan-injected mice. Conclusions Excitatory synaptic drive onto, and important intrinsic properties (i.e., IAr) within SDH neurons are

  10. Dissociative disorders.

    PubMed

    Kihlstrom, John F

    2005-01-01

    The dissociative disorders, including "psychogenic" or "functional" amnesia, fugue, dissociative identity disorder (DID, also known as multiple personality disorder), and depersonalization disorder, were once classified, along with conversion disorder, as forms of hysteria. The 1970s witnessed an "epidemic" of dissociative disorder, particularly DID, which may have reflected enthusiasm for the diagnosis more than its actual prevalence. Traditionally, the dissociative disorders have been attributed to trauma and other psychological stress, but the existing evidence favoring this hypothesis is plagued by poor methodology. Prospective studies of traumatized individuals reveal no convincing cases of amnesia not attributable to brain insult, injury, or disease. Treatment generally involves recovering and working through ostensibly repressed or dissociated memories of trauma; at present, there are few quantitative or controlled outcome studies. Experimental studies are few in number and have focused largely on state-dependent and implicit memory. Depersonalization disorder may be in line for the next "epidemic" of dissociation.

  11. Contributions of Bcl-xL to acute and long term changes in bioenergetics during neuronal plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Jonas, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria manufacture and release metabolites and manage calcium during neuronal activity and synaptic transmission, but whether long term alterations in mitochondrial function contribute to neuronal plasticity that underlies changes in organism behavior patterns is still poorly understood. Although normal neuronal plasticity may determine learning, in contrast a persistent decline in synaptic strength or neuronal excitability may portend neurite retraction and eventual somatic death. Anti-death proteins such as Bcl-xL provide neuroprotection at the neuronal soma during cell death stimuli, but also appear to enhance neurotransmitter release and synaptic growth and development. It is proposed that Bcl-xL performs these functions through its ability to regulate mitochondrial release of bioenergetic metabolites and calcium, its ability to rapidly alter mitochondrial positioning and morphology as well as its role in interacting with proteins that directly alter synaptic vesicle recycling. Bcl-xL translocates acutely to subcellular membranes during neuronal activity to achieve these changes. After stressful stimuli, pro-apoptotic cleaved delta N Bcl-xL (ΔN Bcl-xL)-induced mitochondrial ion channel activity leads to synaptic depression and this is regulated by caspase activation. During physiological states of decreased synaptic stimulation, loss of mitochondrial Bcl-xL and low level caspase activation occur prior to the onset of long term decline in synaptic efficacy. The degree to which Bcl-xL changes mitochondrial membrane permeability may control the direction of change in synaptic strength. The small molecule Bcl-xL inhibitor ABT-737 has been useful in defining the role of Bcl-xL in synaptic processes. Bcl-xL is crucial to the normal health of neurons and synapses and its malfunction may contribute to neurodegenerative disease. PMID:24240091

  12. Impaired Respiratory and Body Temperature Control Upon Acute Serotonergic Neuron Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Russell; Corcoran, Andrea; Brust, Rachael; Kim, Jun Chul; Richerson, George B.; Nattie, Eugene; Dymecki, Susan M.

    2013-01-01

    Physiological homeostasis is essential for organism survival. Highly responsive neuronal networks are involved but constituent neurons are just beginning to be resolved. To query brain serotonergic neurons in homeostasis, we used a synthetic GPCR (Di)-based neuronal silencing tool, mouse RC∷FPDi, designed for cell type-specific, ligand (clozapine-N-oxide, CNO)-inducible and reversible suppression of action potential firing. In mice harboring Di-expressing serotonergic neurons, CNO administration by systemic injection attenuated the chemoreflex that normally increases respiration in response to tissue CO2 elevation and acidosis. At the cellular level, CNO suppressed firing rate increases evoked by CO2/acidosis. Body thermoregulation at room temperature was also disrupted following CNO triggering of Di; core temperatures plummeted, then recovered. This work establishes that serotonergic neurons regulate life-sustaining respiratory and thermoregulatory networks, and demonstrates a noninvasive tool for mapping neuron function. PMID:21798952

  13. Dissociative amnesia.

    PubMed

    Staniloiu, Angelica; Markowitsch, Hans J

    2014-08-01

    Dissociative amnesia is one of the most enigmatic and controversial psychiatric disorders. In the past two decades, interest in the understanding of its pathophysiology has surged. In this report, we review new data about the epidemiology, neurobiology, and neuroimaging of dissociative amnesia and show how advances in memory research and neurobiology of dissociation inform proposed pathogenetic models of the disorder. Dissociative amnesia is characterised by functional impairment. Additionally, preliminary data suggest that affected people have an increased and possibly underestimated suicide risk. The prevalence of dissociative amnesia differs substantially across countries and populations. Symptoms and disease course also vary, indicating a possibly heterogeneous disorder. The accompanying clinical features differ across cultural groups. Most dissociative amnesias are retrograde, with memory impairments mainly involving the episodic-autobiographical memory domain. Anterograde dissociative amnesia occurring without significant retrograde memory impairments is rare. Functional neuroimaging studies of dissociative amnesia with prevailing retrograde memory impairments show changes in the network that subserves autobiographical memory. At present, no evidence-based treatments are available for dissociative amnesia and no broad framework exists for its rehabilitation. Further research is needed into its neurobiology, course, treatment options, and strategies to improve differential diagnoses.

  14. The effects of acute alcohol exposure on the response properties of neurons in visual cortex area 17 of cats

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Bo; Xia Jing; Li Guangxing; Zhou Yifeng

    2010-03-15

    Physiological and behavioral studies have demonstrated that a number of visual functions such as visual acuity, contrast sensitivity, and motion perception can be impaired by acute alcohol exposure. The orientation- and direction-selective responses of cells in primary visual cortex are thought to participate in the perception of form and motion. To investigate how orientation selectivity and direction selectivity of neurons are influenced by acute alcohol exposure in vivo, we used the extracellular single-unit recording technique to examine the response properties of neurons in primary visual cortex (A17) of adult cats. We found that alcohol reduces spontaneous activity, visual evoked unit responses, the signal-to-noise ratio, and orientation selectivity of A17 cells. In addition, small but detectable changes in both the preferred orientation/direction and the bandwidth of the orientation tuning curve of strongly orientation-biased A17 cells were observed after acute alcohol administration. Our findings may provide physiological evidence for some alcohol-related deficits in visual function observed in behavioral studies.

  15. Acute actions of marine toxin latrunculin A on the electrophysiological properties of cultured dorsal root ganglion neurones.

    PubMed

    Houssen, Wael E; Jaspars, Marcel; Wease, Kerrie N; Scott, Roderick H

    2006-01-01

    The effects of latrunculin A, isolated from the nudibranch Chromodoris sp., on the excitability of neonatal rat cultured dorsal root ganglion neurones were investigated using patch-clamp recording and Ca(2+) imaging techniques. Under current-clamp conditions, acute application of latrunculin A (100 microM) reversibly induced multiple action potential firing and significantly increased action potential duration. No significant effects on action potential peak amplitude, threshold of action potential firing, resting membrane potential and input resistance were observed. Under voltage-clamp conditions, significant and dose-dependent suppression of K(+) current was seen with 10-100 microM latrunculin A. Additionally, a significant difference between inhibition of the current measured at the peak and the end of a 100 ms voltage step was seen with 100 microM latrunculin A. Fura-2 fluorescence Ca(2+) imaging revealed that latrunculin A (100 microM) significantly inhibited Ca(2+) transients evoked by KCl-induced depolarisation in all neurones. In 36% of DRG neurones, latrunculin A alone had no effect on intracellular Ca(2+). In 64% of neurones, latrunculin A alone evoked a transient rise in intracellular Ca(2+). Moreover, latrunculin A (10-100 microM) significantly inhibited the mean high voltage-activated Ca(2+) current. The effects of latrunculin A on action potential firing and K(+) currents were attenuated by intracellular phalloidin, an indication that these effects are mediated through actin disruption. PMID:16280258

  16. Toll-like receptor 4 signaling in neurons of trigeminal ganglion contributes to nociception induced by acute pulpitis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jia-Ji; Du, Yi; Cai, Wen-Ke; Kuang, Rong; Chang, Ting; Zhang, Zhuo; Yang, Yong-Xiang; Sun, Chao; Li, Zhu-Yi; Kuang, Fang

    2015-01-01

    Pain caused by acute pulpitis (AP) is a common symptom in clinical settings. However, its underlying mechanisms have largely remained unknown. Using AP model, we demonstrated that dental injury caused severe pulp inflammation with up-regulated serum IL-1β. Assessment from head-withdrawal reflex thresholds (HWTs) and open-field test demonstrated nociceptive response at 1 day post injury. A consistent up-regulation of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in the trigeminal ganglion (TG) ipsilateral to the injured pulp was found; and downstream signaling components of TLR4, including MyD88, TRIF and NF-κB, and cytokines such as TNF-α and IL-1β, were also increased. Retrograde labeling indicated that most TLR4 positve neuron in the TG innnervated the pulp and TLR4 immunoreactivity was mainly in the medium and small neurons. Double labeling showed that the TLR4 expressing neurons in the ipsilateral TG were TRPV1 and CGRP positive, but IB4 negative. Furthermore, blocking TLR4 by eritoran (TLR4 antagonist) in TGs of the AP model significantly down-regulated MyD88, TRIF, NF-κB, TNF-α and IL-1β production and behavior of nociceptive response. Our findings suggest that TLR4 signaling in TG cells, particularly the peptidergic TRPV1 neurons, plays a key role in AP-induced nociception, and indicate that TLR4 signaling could be a potential therapeutic target for orofacial pain. PMID:26224622

  17. Administration of low dose estrogen attenuates gliosis and protects neurons in acute spinal cord injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Samantaray, Supriti; Das, Arabinda; Matzelle, Denise C; Yu, Shan P; Wei, Ling; Varma, Abhay; Ray, Swapan K; Banik, Naren L

    2016-03-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a debilitating condition with neurological deficits and loss of motor function that, depending on the severity, may lead to paralysis. The only treatment currently available is methylprednisolone, which is widely used and renders limited efficacy in SCI. Therefore, other therapeutic agents must be developed. The neuroprotective efficacy of estrogen in SCI was studied with a pre-clinical and pro-translational perspective. Acute SCI was induced in rats that were treated with low doses of estrogen (1, 5, 10, or 100 μg/kg) and compared with vehicle-treated injured rats or laminectomy control (sham) rats at 48 h post-SCI. Changes in gliosis and other pro-inflammatory responses, expression and activity of proteolytic enzymes (e.g., calpain, caspase-3), apoptosis of neurons in SCI, and cell death were monitored via Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Negligible pro-inflammatory responses or proteolytic events and very low levels of neuronal death were found in sham rats. In contrast, vehicle-treated SCI rats showed profound pro-inflammatory responses with reactive gliosis, elevated expression and activity of calpain and caspase-3, elevated Bax:Bcl-2 ratio, and high levels of neuronal death in lesion and caudal regions of the injured spinal cord. Estrogen treatment at each dose reduced pro-inflammatory and proteolytic activities and protected neurons in the caudal penumbra in acute SCI. Estrogen treatment at 10 μg was found to be as effective as 100 μg in ameliorating the above parameters in injured animals. Results from this investigation indicated that estrogen at a low dose could be a promising therapeutic agent for treating acute SCI. Experimental studies with low dose estrogen therapy in acute spinal cord injury (SCI) demonstrated the potential for multi-active beneficial outcomes. Estrogen has been found to ameliorate several degenerative pathways following SCI. Thus, such early protective effects may even lead to functional

  18. Effects of neuron-specific estrogen receptor (ER) α and ERβ deletion on the acute estrogen negative feedback mechanism in adult female mice.

    PubMed

    Cheong, Rachel Y; Porteous, Robert; Chambon, Pierre; Abrahám, István; Herbison, Allan E

    2014-04-01

    The negative feedback mechanism through which 17β-estradiol (E2) acts to suppress the activity of the GnRH neurons remains unclear. Using inducible and cell-specific genetic mouse models, we examined the estrogen receptor (ER) isoforms expressed by neurons that mediate acute estrogen negative feedback. Adult female mutant mice in which ERα was deleted from all neurons in the neonatal period failed to exhibit estrous cycles or negative feedback. Adult mutant female mice with neonatal neuronal ERβ deletion exhibited normal estrous cycles, but a failure of E2 to suppress LH secretion was seen in ovariectomized mice. Mutant mice with a GnRH neuron-selective deletion of ERβ exhibited normal cycles and negative feedback, suggesting no critical role for ERβ in GnRH neurons in acute negative feedback. To examine the adult roles of neurons expressing ERα, an inducible tamoxifen-based Cre-LoxP approach was used to ablate ERα from neurons that express calmodulin kinase IIα in adults. This resulted in mice with no estrous cycles, a normal increase in LH after ovariectomy, but an inability of E2 to suppress LH secretion. Finally, acute administration of ERα- and ERβ-selective agonists to adult ovariectomized wild-type mice revealed that activation of ERα suppressed LH secretion, whereas ERβ agonists had no effect. This study highlights the differences in adult reproductive phenotypes that result from neonatal vs adult ablation of ERα in the brain. Together, these experiments expand previous global knockout studies by demonstrating that neurons expressing ERα are essential and probably sufficient for the acute estrogen negative feedback mechanism in female mice. PMID:24476134

  19. Acute stress enhances adult rat hippocampal neurogenesis and activation of newborn neurons via secreted astrocytic FGF2.

    PubMed

    Kirby, Elizabeth D; Muroy, Sandra E; Sun, Wayne G; Covarrubias, David; Leong, Megan J; Barchas, Laurel A; Kaufer, Daniela

    2013-04-16

    Stress is a potent modulator of the mammalian brain. The highly conserved stress hormone response influences many brain regions, particularly the hippocampus, a region important for memory function. The effect of acute stress on the unique population of adult neural stem/progenitor cells (NPCs) that resides in the adult hippocampus is unclear. We found that acute stress increased hippocampal cell proliferation and astrocytic fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) expression. The effect of acute stress occurred independent of basolateral amygdala neural input and was mimicked by treating isolated NPCs with conditioned media from corticosterone-treated primary astrocytes. Neutralization of FGF2 revealed that astrocyte-secreted FGF2 mediated stress-hormone-induced NPC proliferation. 2 weeks, but not 2 days, after acute stress, rats also showed enhanced fear extinction memory coincident with enhanced activation of newborn neurons. Our findings suggest a beneficial role for brief stress on the hippocampus and improve understanding of the adaptive capacity of the brain. DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00362.001.

  20. A SUBSET OF VENTRAL TEGMENTAL AREA DOPAMINE NEURONS RESPONDS TO ACUTE ETHANOL

    PubMed Central

    MREJERU, A.; MARTIÍ-PRATS, L.; AVEGNO, E. M.; HARRISON, N. L.; SULZER, D.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms by which alcohol drinking promotes addiction in humans and self-administration in rodents remain obscure, but it is well known that alcohol can enhance dopamine (DA) neurotransmission from neurons of the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and increase DA levels within the nucleus accumbens and prefrontal cortex. We recorded from identified DA neuronal cell bodies within ventral midbrain slices prepared from a transgenic mouse line (TH-GFP) using long-term stable extracellular recordings in a variety of locations and carefully mapped the responses to applied ethanol (EtOH). We identified a subset of DA neurons in the medial VTA located within the rostral linear and interfascicular nuclei that fired spontaneously and exhibited a concentration-dependent increase of firing frequency in response to EtOH, with some neurons responsive to as little as 20 mM EtOH. Many of these medial VTA DA neurons were also insensitive to the D2 receptor agonist quinpirole. In contrast, DA neurons in the lateral VTA (located within the parabrachial pigmented and paranigral nuclei) were either unresponsive or responded only to 100 mM EtOH. Typically, these lateral VTA DA cells had very slow firing rates, and all exhibited inhibition by quinpirole via D2 “autoreceptors”. VTA non-DA cells did not show any significant response to low levels of EtOH. These findings are consistent with evidence for heterogeneity among midbrain DA neurons and provide an anatomical and pharmacological distinction between DA neuron sub-populations that will facilitate future mechanistic studies on the actions of EtOH in the VTA. PMID:25660505

  1. Diverse impact of acute and long-term extracellular proteolytic activity on plasticity of neuronal excitability

    PubMed Central

    Wójtowicz, Tomasz; Brzdąk, Patrycja; Mozrzymas, Jerzy W.

    2015-01-01

    Learning and memory require alteration in number and strength of existing synaptic connections. Extracellular proteolysis within the synapses has been shown to play a pivotal role in synaptic plasticity by determining synapse structure, function, and number. Although synaptic plasticity of excitatory synapses is generally acknowledged to play a crucial role in formation of memory traces, some components of neural plasticity are reflected by nonsynaptic changes. Since information in neural networks is ultimately conveyed with action potentials, scaling of neuronal excitability could significantly enhance or dampen the outcome of dendritic integration, boost neuronal information storage capacity and ultimately learning. However, the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. With this regard, several lines of evidence and our most recent study support a view that activity of extracellular proteases might affect information processing in neuronal networks by affecting targets beyond synapses. Here, we review the most recent studies addressing the impact of extracellular proteolysis on plasticity of neuronal excitability and discuss how enzymatic activity may alter input-output/transfer function of neurons, supporting cognitive processes. Interestingly, extracellular proteolysis may alter intrinsic neuronal excitability and excitation/inhibition balance both rapidly (time of minutes to hours) and in long-term window. Moreover, it appears that by cleavage of extracellular matrix (ECM) constituents, proteases may modulate function of ion channels or alter inhibitory drive and hence facilitate active participation of dendrites and axon initial segments (AISs) in adjusting neuronal input/output function. Altogether, a picture emerges whereby both rapid and long-term extracellular proteolysis may influence some aspects of information processing in neurons, such as initiation of action potential, spike frequency adaptation, properties of action potential and dendritic

  2. The Acute Phase of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Is Characterized by a Distance-Dependent Neuronal Hypoactivity

    PubMed Central

    Johnstone, Victoria P.A.; Shultz, Sandy R.; Yan, Edwin B.; O'Brien, Terence J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The consequences of mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) on neuronal functionality are only now being elucidated. We have now examined the changes in sensory encoding in the whisker-recipient barrel cortex and the brain tissue damage in the acute phase (24 h) after induction of TBI (n=9), with sham controls receiving surgery only (n=5). Injury was induced using the lateral fluid percussion injury method, which causes a mixture of focal and diffuse brain injury. Both population and single cell neuronal responses evoked by both simple and complex whisker stimuli revealed a suppression of activity that decreased with distance from the locus of injury both within a hemisphere and across hemispheres, with a greater extent of hypoactivity in ipsilateral barrel cortex compared with contralateral cortex. This was coupled with an increase in spontaneous output in Layer 5a, but only ipsilateral to the injury site. There was also disruption of axonal integrity in various regions in the ipsilateral but not contralateral hemisphere. These results complement our previous findings after mild diffuse-only TBI induced by the weight-drop impact acceleration method where, in the same acute post-injury phase, we found a similar depth-dependent hypoactivity in sensory cortex. This suggests a common sequelae of events in both diffuse TBI and mixed focal/diffuse TBI in the immediate post-injury period that then evolve over time to produce different long-term functional outcomes. PMID:24927383

  3. Effects of acute treadmill running at different intensities on activities of serotonin and corticotropin-releasing factor neurons, and anxiety- and depressive-like behaviors in rats.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Tomomi; Nishii, Ayu; Amemiya, Seiichiro; Kubota, Natsuko; Nishijima, Takeshi; Kita, Ichiro

    2016-02-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that physical exercise can reduce and prevent the incidence of stress-related psychiatric disorders, including depression and anxiety. Activation of serotonin (5-HT) neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) is implicated in antidepressant/anxiolytic properties. In addition, the incidence and symptoms of these disorders may involve dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis that is initiated by corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) neurons in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN). Thus, it is possible that physical exercise produces its antidepressant/anxiolytic effects by affecting these neuronal activities. However, the effects of acute physical exercise at different intensities on these neuronal activation and behavioral changes are still unclear. Here, we examined the activities of 5-HT neurons in the DRN and CRF neurons in the PVN during 30 min of treadmill running at different speeds (high speed, 25 m/min; low speed, 15m/min; control, only sitting on the treadmill) in male Wistar rats, using c-Fos/5-HT or CRF immunohistochemistry. We also performed the elevated plus maze test and the forced swim test to assess anxiety- and depressive-like behaviors, respectively. Acute treadmill running at low speed, but not high speed, significantly increased c-Fos expression in 5-HT neurons in the DRN compared to the control, whereas high-speed running significantly enhanced c-Fos expression in CRF neurons in the PVN compared with the control and low-speed running. Furthermore, low-speed running resulted in decreased anxiety- and depressive-like behaviors compared with high-speed running. These results suggest that acute physical exercise with mild and low stress can efficiently induce optimal neuronal activation that is involved in the antidepressant/anxiolytic effects.

  4. Acute exercise-induced activation of Phox2b-expressing neurons of the retrotrapezoid nucleus in rats may involve the hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Barna, B F; Takakura, A C; Moreira, T S

    2014-01-31

    The rat retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN) contains neurons that have a well-defined phenotype characterized by the presence of vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (VGLUT2) mRNA and a paired-like homeobox 2b (Phox2b)-immunoreactive (ir) nucleus and the absence of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH). These neurons are important to chemoreception. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that the chemically-coded RTN neurons (ccRTN) (Phox2b(+)/TH(-)) are activated during an acute episode of running exercise. Since most RTN neurons are excited by the activation of perifornical and lateral hypothalamus (PeF/LH), a region that regulates breathing during exercise, we also tested the hypothesis that PeF/LH projections to RTN neurons contribute to their activation during acute exercise. In adult male Wistar rats that underwent an acute episode of treadmill exercise, there was a significant increase in c-Fos immunoreactive (c-Fos-ir) in PeF/LH neurons and RTN neurons that were Phox2b(+)TH(-) (p<0.05) compared to rats that did not exercise. Also the retrograde tracer Fluoro-Gold that was injected into RTN was detected in c-Fos-ir PeF/LH (p<0.05). In summary, the ccRTN neurons (Phox2b(+)TH(-)) are excited by running exercise. Thus, ccRTN neurons may contribute to both the chemical drive to breath and the feed-forward control of breathing associated with exercise.

  5. [Brain histaminergic neurons in rats subjected to the acute effect of alcohol].

    PubMed

    Zimatkin, S M; Fedina, E M; Kuznetsova, V B

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to examine the effect of single injection of alcohol on histaminergic neurons of rat brain. The study included 41 male albino rats, histological, histochemical, electron microscopic and morphometric methods were used. It was found that 1 hour after the intraperitoneal administration of ethanol in a dose of 4 g/kg the neurons become more spherical, the activity of NADH and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenases in their cytoplasm decreased, but the activity of lactate dehydrogenase, type B monoaminooxidase and acid phosphatase increased, at the same time significant ultrastructural disturbances were observed. Six hours following alcohol administration, the signs of histaminergic neuronal damage were reduced while the features of structural and metabolic adaptation became more expressed.

  6. Intrinsic excitability changes induced by acute treatment of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons with exogenous amyloid β peptide

    PubMed Central

    Scullion, Sarah; Brown, Jon T.; Randall, Andrew D.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Accumulation of beta‐amyloid (Aβ) peptides in the human brain is a canonical pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Recent work in Aβ‐overexpressing transgenic mice indicates that increased brain Aβ levels can be associated with aberrant epileptiform activity. In line with this, such mice can also exhibit altered intrinsic excitability (IE) of cortical and hippocampal neurons: these observations may relate to the increased prevalence of seizures in AD patients. In this study, we examined what changes in IE are produced in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells after 2–5 h treatment with an oligomeric preparation of synthetic human Aβ 1–42 peptide. Whole cell current clamp recordings were compared between Aβ‐(500 nM) and vehicle‐(DMSO 0.05%) treated hippocampal slices obtained from mice. The soluble Aβ treatment did not produce alterations in sub‐threshold intrinsic properties, including membrane potential, input resistance, and hyperpolarization activated “sag”. Similarly, no changes were noted in the firing profile evoked by 500 ms square current supra‐threshold stimuli. However, Aβ 500 nM treatment resulted in the hyperpolarization of the action potential (AP) threshold. In addition, treatment with Aβ at 500 nM depressed the after‐hyperpolarization that followed both a single AP or 50 Hz trains of a number of APs between 5 and 25. These data suggest that acute exposure to soluble Aβ oligomers affects IE properties of CA1 pyramidal neurons differently from outcomes seen in transgenic models of amyloidopathy. However, in both chronic and acute models, the IE changes are toward hyperexcitability, reinforcing the idea that amyloidopathy and increased incidence in seizures might be causally related in AD patients. © 2014 The Authors Hippocampus Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25515596

  7. Intrinsic excitability changes induced by acute treatment of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons with exogenous amyloid β peptide.

    PubMed

    Tamagnini, Francesco; Scullion, Sarah; Brown, Jon T; Randall, Andrew D

    2015-07-01

    Accumulation of beta-amyloid (Aβ) peptides in the human brain is a canonical pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Recent work in Aβ-overexpressing transgenic mice indicates that increased brain Aβ levels can be associated with aberrant epileptiform activity. In line with this, such mice can also exhibit altered intrinsic excitability (IE) of cortical and hippocampal neurons: these observations may relate to the increased prevalence of seizures in AD patients. In this study, we examined what changes in IE are produced in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells after 2-5 h treatment with an oligomeric preparation of synthetic human Aβ 1-42 peptide. Whole cell current clamp recordings were compared between Aβ-(500 nM) and vehicle-(DMSO 0.05%) treated hippocampal slices obtained from mice. The soluble Aβ treatment did not produce alterations in sub-threshold intrinsic properties, including membrane potential, input resistance, and hyperpolarization activated "sag". Similarly, no changes were noted in the firing profile evoked by 500 ms square current supra-threshold stimuli. However, Aβ 500 nM treatment resulted in the hyperpolarization of the action potential (AP) threshold. In addition, treatment with Aβ at 500 nM depressed the after-hyperpolarization that followed both a single AP or 50 Hz trains of a number of APs between 5 and 25. These data suggest that acute exposure to soluble Aβ oligomers affects IE properties of CA1 pyramidal neurons differently from outcomes seen in transgenic models of amyloidopathy. However, in both chronic and acute models, the IE changes are toward hyperexcitability, reinforcing the idea that amyloidopathy and increased incidence in seizures might be causally related in AD patients.

  8. Stimulus-induced dissociation of neuronal firing rates and local field potential gamma power and its relationship to the blood oxygen level-dependent signal in macaque primary visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Bartolo, M J; Gieselmann, M A; Vuksanovic, V; Hunter, D; Sun, L; Chen, X; Delicato, L S; Thiele, A

    2011-01-01

    The functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal is regularly used to assign neuronal activity to cognitive function. Recent analyses have shown that the local field potential (LFP) gamma power is a better predictor of the fMRI BOLD signal than spiking activity. However, LFP gamma power and spiking activity are usually correlated, clouding the analysis of the neural basis of the BOLD signal. We show that changes in LFP gamma power and spiking activity in the primary visual cortex (V1) of the awake primate can be dissociated by using grating and plaid pattern stimuli, which differentially engage surround suppression and cross-orientation inhibition/facilitation within and between cortical columns. Grating presentation yielded substantial V1 LFP gamma frequency oscillations and significant multi-unit activity. Plaid pattern presentation significantly reduced the LFP gamma power while increasing population multi-unit activity. The fMRI BOLD activity followed the LFP gamma power changes, not the multi-unit activity. Inference of neuronal activity from the fMRI BOLD signal thus requires detailed a priori knowledge of how different stimuli or tasks activate the cortical network. PMID:22081989

  9. Alterations in neuronal morphology in infralimbic cortex predict resistance to fear extinction following acute stress

    PubMed Central

    Moench, Kelly M.; Maroun, Mouna; Kavushansky, Alexandra; Wellman, Cara

    2015-01-01

    Dysfunction in corticolimbic circuits that mediate the extinction of learned fear responses is thought to underlie the perseveration of fear in stress-related psychopathologies, including post-traumatic stress disorder. Chronic stress produces dendritic hypertrophy in basolateral amygdala (BLA) and dendritic hypotrophy in medial prefrontal cortex, whereas acute stress leads to hypotrophy in both BLA and prelimbic cortex. Additionally, both chronic and acute stress impair extinction retrieval. Here, we examined the effects of a single elevated platform stress on extinction learning and dendritic morphology in infralimbic cortex, a region considered to be critical for extinction. Acute stress produced resistance to extinction, as well as dendritic retraction in infralimbic cortex. Spine density on apical and basilar terminal branches was unaffected by stress. However, animals that underwent conditioning and extinction had decreased spine density on apical terminal branches. Thus, whereas dendritic morphology in infralimbic cortex appears to be particularly sensitive to stress, changes in spines may more sensitively reflect learning. Further, in stressed rats that underwent conditioning and extinction, the level of extinction learning was correlated with spine densities, in that rats with poorer extinction retrieval had more immature spines and fewer thin spines than rats with better extinction retrieval, suggesting that stress may have impaired learning-related spine plasticity. These results may have implications for understanding the role of medial prefrontal cortex in learning deficits associated with stress-related pathologies. PMID:26844245

  10. Transient global amnesia: implicit/explicit memory dissociation and PET assessment of brain perfusion and oxygen metabolism in the acute stage

    PubMed Central

    Eustache, F.; Desgranges, B.; Petit-Taboue, M.; de la Sayette, V.; Piot, V.; Sable, C.; Marchal, G.; Baron, J.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To assess explicit memory and two components of implicit memory—that is, perceptual-verbal skill learning and lexical-semantic priming effects—as well as resting cerebral blood flow (CBF) and oxygen metabolism (CMRO2) during the acute phase of transient global amnesia.
METHODS—In a 59 year old woman, whose amnestic episode fulfilled all current criteria for transient global amnesia, a neuropsychological protocol was administered, including word learning, story recall, categorical fluency, mirror reading, and word stem completion tasks. PET was performed using the 15O steady state inhalation method, while the patient still exhibited severe anterograde amnesia and was interleaved with the cognitive tests.
RESULTS—There was a clear cut dissociation between impaired long term episodic memory and preserved implicit memory for its two components. Categorical fluency was significantly altered, suggesting word retrieval strategy—rather than semantic memory—impairment. The PET study disclosed a reduced CMRO2 with relatively or fully preserved CBF in the left prefrontotemporal cortex and lentiform nucleus, and the reverse pattern over the left occipital cortex.
CONCLUSIONS—The PET alterations with patchy CBF-CMRO2 uncoupling would be compatible with a migraine-like phenomenon and indicate that the isolated assessment of perfusion in transient global amnesia may be misleading. The pattern of metabolic depression, with sparing of the hippocampal area, is one among the distinct patterns of brain dysfunction that underlie the (apparently) uniform clinical presentation of transient global amnesia. The finding of a left prefrontal hypometabolism in the face of impaired episodic memory and altered verbal fluency would fit present day concepts from PET activation studies about the role of this area in episodic and semantic memory encoding/retrieval. Likewise, the changes affecting the lenticular nucleus but sparing the caudate would be consistent

  11. NRF2 promotes neuronal survival in neurodegeneration and acute nerve damage

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Wenjun; MacColl Garfinkel, Alexandra E.; Li, Yiqing; Benowitz, Larry I.; Cepko, Constance L.

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress contributes to the loss of neurons in many disease conditions as well as during normal aging; however, small-molecule agents that reduce oxidation have not been successful in preventing neurodegeneration. Moreover, even if an efficacious systemic reduction of reactive oxygen and/or nitrogen species (ROS/NOS) could be achieved, detrimental side effects are likely, as these molecules regulate normal physiological processes. A more effective and targeted approach might be to augment the endogenous antioxidant defense mechanism only in the cells that suffer from oxidation. Here, we created several adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors to deliver genes that combat oxidation. These vectors encode the transcription factors NRF2 and/or PGC1a, which regulate hundreds of genes that combat oxidation and other forms of stress, or enzymes such as superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2) and catalase, which directly detoxify ROS. We tested the effectiveness of this approach in 3 models of photoreceptor degeneration and in a nerve crush model. AAV-mediated delivery of NRF2 was more effective than SOD2 and catalase, while expression of PGC1a accelerated photoreceptor death. Since the NRF2-mediated neuroprotective effects extended to photoreceptors and retinal ganglion cells, which are 2 very different types of neurons, these results suggest that this targeted approach may be broadly applicable to many diseases in which cells suffer from oxidative damage. PMID:25798616

  12. West Nile virus-induced acute flaccid paralysis is prevented by monoclonal antibody treatment when administered after infection of spinal cord neurons.

    PubMed

    Morrey, John D; Siddharthan, Venkatraman; Wang, Hong; Hall, Jeffery O; Skirpstunas, Ramona T; Olsen, Aaron L; Nordstrom, Jeffrey L; Koenig, Scott; Johnson, Syd; Diamond, Michael S

    2008-04-01

    Acute flaccid polio-like paralysis occurs during natural West Nile virus (WNV) infection in a subset of cases in animals and humans. To evaluate the pathology and the possibility for therapeutic intervention, the authors developed a model of acute flaccid paralysis by injecting WNV directly into the sciatic nerve or spinal cord of hamsters. By directly injecting selected sites of the nervous system with WNV, the authors mapped the lesions responsible for hind limb paralysis to the lumbar spinal cord. Immunohistochemical analysis of spinal cord sections from paralyzed hamsters revealed that WNV-infected neurons localized primarily to the ventral motor horn of the gray matter, consistent with the polio-like clinical presentation. Neuronal apoptosis and diminished cell function were identified by TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated BrdUTP nick end labeling) and choline acetyltransferase staining, respectively. Administration of hE16, a potently neutralizing humanized anti-WNV monoclonal antibody, 2 to 3 days after direct WNV infection of the spinal cord, significantly reduced paralysis and mortality. Additionally, a single injection of hE16 as late as 5 days after WNV inoculation of the sciatic nerve also prevented paralysis. Overall, these experiments establish that WNV-induced acute flaccid paralysis in hamsters is due to neuronal infection and injury in the lumbar spinal cord and that treatment with a therapeutic antibody prevents paralysis when administered after WNV infection of spinal cord neurons. PMID:18444087

  13. Selective vulnerability of motor neurons and dissociation of pre- and post-synaptic pathology at the neuromuscular junction in mouse models of spinal muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Murray, Lyndsay M; Comley, Laura H; Thomson, Derek; Parkinson, Nick; Talbot, Kevin; Gillingwater, Thomas H

    2008-04-01

    Proximal spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a common autosomal recessive childhood form of motor neuron disease. Previous studies have highlighted nerve- and muscle-specific events in SMA, including atrophy of muscle fibres and post-synaptic motor endplates, loss of lower motor neuron cell bodies and denervation of neuromuscular junctions caused by loss of pre-synaptic inputs. Here we have undertaken a detailed morphological investigation of neuromuscular synaptic pathology in the Smn-/-;SMN2 and Smn-/-;SMN2;Delta7 mouse models of SMA. We show that neuromuscular junctions in the transversus abdominis (TVA), levator auris longus (LAL) and lumbrical muscles were disrupted in both mouse models. Pre-synaptic inputs were lost and abnormal accumulations of neurofilament were present, even in early/mid-symptomatic animals in the most severely affected muscle groups. Neuromuscular pathology was more extensive in the postural TVA muscle compared with the fast-twitch LAL and lumbrical muscles. Pre-synaptic pathology in Smn-/-;SMN2;Delta7 mice was reduced compared with Smn-/-;SMN2 mice at late-symptomatic time-points, although post-synaptic pathology was equally severe. We demonstrate that shrinkage of motor endplates does not correlate with loss of motor nerve terminals, signifying that one can occur in the absence of the other. We also demonstrate selective vulnerability of a subpopulation of motor neurons in the caudal muscle band of the LAL. Paralysis with botulinum toxin resulted in less terminal sprouting and ectopic synapse formation in the caudal band compared with the rostral band, suggesting that motor units conforming to a Fast Synapsing (FaSyn) phenotype are likely to be more vulnerable than those with a Delayed Synapsing (DeSyn) phenotype. PMID:18065780

  14. Physiological evidence that pyramidal neurons lack functional water channels.

    PubMed

    Andrew, R David; Labron, Mark W; Boehnke, Susan E; Carnduff, Lisa; Kirov, Sergei A

    2007-04-01

    The physiological conditions that swell mammalian neurons are clinically important but contentious. Distinguishing the neuronal component of brain swelling requires viewing intact neuronal cell bodies, dendrites, and axons and measuring their changing volume in real time. Cultured or dissociated neuronal somata swell within minutes under acutely overhydrated conditions and shrink when strongly dehydrated. But paradoxically, most central nervous system (CNS) neurons do not express aquaporins, the membrane channels that conduct osmotically driven water. Using 2-photon laser scanning microscopy (2PLSM), we monitored neuronal volume under osmotic stress in real time. Specifically, the volume of pyramidal neurons in cerebral cortex and axon terminals comprising cerebellar mossy fibers was measured deep within live brain slices. The expected swelling or shrinking of the gray matter was confirmed by recording altered light transmittance and by indirectly measuring extracellular resistance over a wide osmotic range of -80 to +80 milliOsmoles (mOsm). Neurons expressing green fluorescent protein were then imaged with 2PLSM between -40 and +80 mOsm over 20 min. Surprisingly, pyramidal somata, dendrites, and spines steadfastly maintained their volume, as did the cerebellar axon terminals. This precluded a need for the neurons to acutely regulate volume, preserved their intrinsic electrophysiological stability, and confirmed that these CNS nerve cells lack functional aquaporins. Thus, whereas water easily permeates the aquaporin-rich endothelia and glia driving osmotic brain swelling, neurons tenatiously maintain their volume. However, these same neurons then swell dramatically upon oxygen/glucose deprivation or [K+]0 elevation, so prolonged depolarization (as during stroke or seizure) apparently swells neurons by opening nonaquaporin channels to water. PMID:16723408

  15. A microfluidic device to study neuronal and motor responses to acute chemical stimuli in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Candelier, Raphaël; Sriti Murmu, Meena; Alejo Romano, Sebastián; Jouary, Adrien; Debrégeas, Georges; Sumbre, Germán

    2015-01-01

    Zebrafish larva is a unique model for whole-brain functional imaging and to study sensory-motor integration in the vertebrate brain. To take full advantage of this system, one needs to design sensory environments that can mimic the complex spatiotemporal stimulus patterns experienced by the animal in natural conditions. We report on a novel open-ended microfluidic device that delivers pulses of chemical stimuli to agarose-restrained larvae with near-millisecond switching rate and unprecedented spatial and concentration accuracy and reproducibility. In combination with two-photon calcium imaging and recordings of tail movements, we found that stimuli of opposite hedonic values induced different circuit activity patterns. Moreover, by precisely controlling the duration of the stimulus (50–500 ms), we found that the probability of generating a gustatory-induced behavior is encoded by the number of neurons activated. This device may open new ways to dissect the neural-circuit principles underlying chemosensory perception. PMID:26194888

  16. Chronic stress alters the dendritic morphology of callosal neurons and the acute glutamate stress response in the rat medial prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Luczynski, Pauline; Moquin, Luc; Gratton, Alain

    2015-01-01

    We have previously reported that interhemispheric regulation of medial prefrontal cortex (PFC)-mediated stress responses is subserved by glutamate (GLU)- containing callosal neurons. Evidence of chronic stress-induced dendritic and spine atrophy among PFC pyramidal neurons led us to examine how chronic restraint stress (CRS) might alter the apical dendritic morphology of callosal neurons and the acute GLU stress responses in the left versus right PFC. Morphometric analyses of retrogradely labeled, dye-filled PFC callosal neurons revealed hemisphere-specific CRS-induced dendritic retraction; whereas significant dendritic atrophy occurred primarily within the distal arbor of left PFC neurons, it was observed within both the proximal and distal arbor of right PFC neurons. Overall, CRS also significantly reduced spine densities in both hemispheres with the greatest loss occurring among left PFC neurons, mostly at the distal extent of the arbor. While much of the overall decrease in dendritic spine density was accounted by the loss of thin spines, the density of mushroom-shaped spines, despite being fewer in number, was halved. Using microdialysis we found that, compared to controls, basal PFC GLU levels were significantly reduced in both hemispheres of CRS animals and that their GLU response to 30 min of tail-pinch stress was significantly prolonged in the left, but not the right PFC. Together, these findings show that a history of chronic stress alters the dendritic morphology and spine density of PFC callosal neurons and suggest a mechanism by which this might disrupt the interhemispheric regulation of PFC-mediated responses to subsequent stressors.

  17. A novel high channel-count system for acute multisite neuronal recordings.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Ulrich G; Folkers, Andre; Mösch, Florian; Malina, Thomas; Menne, Kerstin M L; Biella, Gerardo; Fagerstedt, Patriq; De Schutter, Erik; Jensen, Winnie; Yoshida, Ken; Hoehl, Dirk; Thomas, Uwe; Kindlundh, Maria G; Norlin, Peter; de Curtis, Marco

    2006-08-01

    Multisite recording represents a suitable condition to study microphysiology and network interactions in the central nervous system and, therefore, to understand brain functions. Several different materials and array configurations have been proposed for the development of new probes utilized to record brain activity from experimental animal models. We describe new multisite silicon probes that broaden the currently available application base for neuroscientists. The array arrangement of the probes recording sites was extended to increase their spatial resolution. Probes were integrated with a newly developed electronic hardware and novel software for advanced real-time processing and analysis. The new system, based on 32- and 64-electrode silicon probes, proved very valuable to record field potentials and single unit activity from the olfactory-limbic cortex of the in vitro isolated guinea-pig brain preparation and to acutely record unit activity at multiple sites from the cerebellar cortex in vivo. The potential advantages of the new system in comparison to the currently available technology are discussed.

  18. Non-competitive inhibition of GABAA responses by a new class of quinolones and non-steroidal anti-inflammatories in dissociated frog sensory neurones.

    PubMed Central

    Yakushiji, T.; Shirasaki, T.; Akaike, N.

    1992-01-01

    1. The interaction of a new class of quinolone antimicrobials (new quinolones) and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents (NSAIDs) with the GABAA receptor-Cl- channel complex was investigated in frog sensory neurones by use of the internal perfusion and 'concentration clamp' techniques. 2. The new quinolones and the NSAIDs (both 10(-6)-10(-5) M) had little effect on the GABA-induced chloride current (ICI) when applied separately. At a concentration of 10(-4) M the new quinolones, and to a lesser degree the NSAIDs, produced some suppression of the GABA response. 3. The co-administration of new quinolones and some NSAIDs (10(-6)-10(-14) M) resulted in a marked suppression of the GABA response. The size of this inhibition was dependent on the concentration of either the new quinolone or the NSAID tested. The inhibitory potency of new quinolones in combination with 4-biphenylacetic acid (BPAA) was in rank order norfloxacin (NFLX) much greater than enoxacin (ENX) greater than ciprofloxancin (CPFX) much greater than ofloxacin (OFLX), and that of NSAIDs in combination with ENX was BPAA much greater than indomethacin = ketoprofen greater than naproxen greater than ibuprofen greater than pranoprofen. Diclofenac, piroxicam and acetaminophen did not affect GABA responses in the presence of ENX. 4. In the presence of ENX or BPAA, there was a small shift to the right of the concentration-response curve for GABA without any effect on the maximum response. However, the co-administration of these drugs suppressed the maximum of the GABA concentration-response curve, indicating a non-competitive inhibition, for which no voltage-dependency was observed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1317734

  19. The stressed female brain: neuronal activity in the prelimbic but not infralimbic region of the medial prefrontal cortex suppresses learning after acute stress.

    PubMed

    Maeng, Lisa Y; Shors, Tracey J

    2013-01-01

    Women are nearly twice as likely as men to suffer from anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), indicating that many females are especially vulnerable to stressful life experience. A profound sex difference in the response to stress is also observed in laboratory animals. Acute exposure to an uncontrollable stressful event disrupts associative learning during classical eyeblink conditioning in female rats but enhances this same type of learning process in males. These sex differences in response to stress are dependent on neuronal activity in similar but also different brain regions. Neuronal activity in the basolateral nucleus of the amygdala (BLA) is necessary in both males and females. However, neuronal activity in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) during the stressor is necessary to modify learning in females but not in males. The mPFC is often divided into its prelimbic (PL) and infralimbic (IL) subregions, which differ both in structure and function. Through its connections to the BLA, we hypothesized that neuronal activity within the PL, but not IL, during the stressor is necessary to suppress learning in females. To test this hypothesis, either the PL or IL of adult female rats was bilaterally inactivated with GABAA agonist muscimol during acute inescapable swim stress. About 24 h later, all subjects were trained with classical eyeblink conditioning. Though stressed, females without neuronal activity in the PL learned well. In contrast, females with IL inactivation during the stressor did not learn well, behaving similarly to stressed vehicle-treated females. These data suggest that exposure to a stressful event critically engages the PL, but not IL, to disrupt associative learning in females. Together with previous studies, these data indicate that the PL communicates with the BLA to suppress learning after a stressful experience in females. This circuit may be similarly engaged in women who become cognitively impaired after stressful life

  20. Double Dissociation of Monoacylglycerol Lipase Inhibition and CB1 Antagonism in the Central Amygdala, Basolateral Amygdala, and the Interoceptive Insular Cortex on the Affective Properties of Acute Naloxone-Precipitated Morphine Withdrawal in Rats.

    PubMed

    Wills, Kiri L; Petrie, Gavin N; Millett, Geneva; Limebeer, Cheryl L; Rock, Erin M; Niphakis, Micah J; Cravatt, Benjamin F; Parker, Linda A

    2016-06-01

    Both CB1 receptor antagonism and agonism, in particular by 2-arachidonyl glycerol (2-AG), have been shown to reduce somatic symptoms of morphine withdrawal (MWD). Here we evaluated the effects of both systemic pretreatment with the monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) inhibitor MJN110 (which selectively elevates 2-AG) and central administration of both MJN110 and the CB1 antagonist (AM251) on the affective properties of MWD. Acute MWD induced place aversion occurs when naloxone is administered 24 h following a single exposure to a high dose of morphine. Systemic pretreatment with the MAGL inhibitor, MJN110, prevented the aversive effects of acute MWD by a CB1 receptor-dependent mechanism. Furthermore, in a double dissociation, AM251 infusions into the central amygdala, but MJN110 infusions into the basolateral amygdala, interfered with the naloxone-precipitated MWD induced place aversion. As well, MJN110, but not AM251, infusions into the interoceptive insular cortex (a region known to be activated in acute MWD) also prevented the establishment of the place aversion by a CB1 mechanism of action. These findings reveal the respective sites of action of systemically administered MJN110 and AM251 in regulating the aversive effects of MWD.

  1. Comparative cellular toxicity of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on human astrocyte and neuronal cells after acute and prolonged exposure.

    PubMed

    Coccini, Teresa; Grandi, Stefania; Lonati, Davide; Locatelli, Carlo; De Simone, Uliana

    2015-05-01

    Although in the last few decades, titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO₂NPs) have attracted extensive interest due to their use in wide range of applications, their influences on human health are still quite uncertain and less known. Evidence exists indicating TiO₂NPs ability to enter the brain, thus representing a realistic risk factor for both chronic and accidental exposure with the consequent needs for more detailed investigation on CNS. A rapid and effective in vitro test strategy has been applied to determine the effects of TiO₂NPs anatase isoform, on human glial (D384) and neuronal (SH-SY5Y) cell lines. Toxicity was assessed at different levels: mitochondrial function (by MTT), membrane integrity and cell morphology (by calcein AM/PI staining) after acute exposure (4-24-48 h) at doses from 1.5 to 250 μg/ml as well as growth and cell proliferation (by clonogenic test) after prolonged exposure (7-10 days) at sub-toxic concentrations (from 0.05 to 31 μg/ml). The cytotoxic effects of TiO₂NPs were compared with those caused by TiO₂ bulk counterpart treatment. Acute TiO₂NP exposure produced (i) dose- and time-dependent alterations of the mitochondrial function on D384 and SH-SY5Y cells starting at 31 and 15 μg/ml doses, respectively, after 24h exposure. SH-SY5Y were slightly more sensitive than D384 cells; and (ii) cell membrane damage occurring at 125 μg/ml after 24h exposure in both cerebral cells. Comparatively, the effects of TiO₂ bulk were less pronounced than those induced by nanoparticles in both cerebral cell lines. Prolonged exposure indicated that the proliferative capacity (colony size) was compromised at the extremely low TiO₂NP doses namely 1.5 μg/ml and 0.1 μg/ml for D384 and SH-SY5Y, respectively; cell sensitivity was still higher for SH-SY5Y compared to D384. Colony number decrease (15%) was also evidenced at ≥0.2 μg/ml TiO₂NP dose. Whereas, TiO₂ bulk treatment affected cell morphology only. TiO₂ internalization in SH

  2. The expectancy of threat and peritraumatic dissociation

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Pamela; Bryant, Richard A.; Silove, Derrick; Creamer, Mark; O'Donnell, Meaghan; McFarlane, Alexander C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Peritraumatic dissociation is one of the most critical acute responses to a traumatic experience, partly because it predicts subsequent posttraumatic stress disorder. Despite this, there is little understanding about the factors that influence peritraumatic dissociation. This study investigated the extent to which peritraumatic dissociation is predicted by the amount of perceived warning that participants had of the impact of the trauma. Method Randomized eligible admissions to four major trauma hospitals (N=243) were assessed during hospital admission with the Peritraumatic Dissociation Experiences Questionnaire (PDEQ) and the perceived warning that participants had before the trauma impact occurred. Results Whereas female gender predicted both Awareness and Derealization subscale scores on the PDEQ, perceived warning also predicted scores on the Derealization subscale. Conclusions This finding suggests that the degree of anticipated threat may contribute to peritraumatic dissociation. PMID:24363835

  3. Protein tyrosine kinase regulates α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor trafficking induced by acute hypoxia in cultured brainstem neurons.

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Yu, L C; Li, Y C

    2016-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the modulation effect of protein tyrosine kinase on postsynaptic a-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor trafficking induced by acute hypoxia in cultured brainstem neurons. The cultured neurons were exposed to 1% O2 and the expression of AMPA receptor subunit GluR2 on the cell surface was significantly increased, while total GluR2 was not markedly changed. Furthermore, the hypoxia-induced increase in GluR2 expression on the cell surface was partially blocked by the protein tyrosine kinase membrane-permeable inhibitor genistein. In contrast, both the protein tyrosine kinase agonist nerve growth factor and protein tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor vanadate promoted the hypoxia-induced increase of GluR2 expression on cell surface. Moreover, GluR2 could be phosphorylated by tyrosine under normoxia and hypoxia conditions in vitro on brainstem neurons, and tyrosine phosphorylation of GluR2 was significantly stronger under hypoxia conditions. Our results indicate that acute hypoxia induces the AMPA receptor subunit GluR2 to rapidly migrate to the cell membrane to modify the strength of the synapse. This study indicates that tyrosine phosphorylation of the receptor is an important pathway regulating the rapid migration of GluR2 in the postsynaptic domain induced by hypoxia. PMID:27525851

  4. Volatile Organic Compound Gamma-Butyrolactone Released upon Herpes Simplex Virus Type -1 Acute Infection Modulated Membrane Potential and Repressed Viral Infection in Human Neuron-Like Cells.

    PubMed

    Rochford, Kevin; Chen, Feng; Waguespack, Yan; Figliozzi, Robert W; Kharel, Madan K; Zhang, Qiaojuan; Martin-Caraballo, Miguel; Hsia, S Victor

    2016-01-01

    Herpes Simplex Virus Type -1 (HSV-1) infections can cause serious complications such as keratitis and encephalitis. The goal of this study was to identify any changes in the concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) produced during HSV-1 infection of epithelial cells that could potentially be used as an indicator of a response to stress. An additional objective was to study if any VOCs released from acute epithelial infection may influence subsequent neuronal infection to facilitate latency. To investigate these hypotheses, Vero cells were infected with HSV-1 and the emission of VOCs was analyzed using two-dimensional gas chromatograph/mass spectrometry (2D GC/MS). It was observed that the concentrations of gamma-butyrolactone (GBL) in particular changed significantly after a 24-hour infection. Since HSV-1 may establish latency in neurons after the acute infection, GBL was tested to determine if it exerts neuronal regulation of infection. The results indicated that GBL altered the resting membrane potential of differentiated LNCaP cells and promoted a non-permissive state of HSV-1 infection by repressing viral replication. These observations may provide useful clues towards understanding the complex signaling pathways that occur during the HSV-1 primary infection and establishment of viral latency. PMID:27537375

  5. Volatile Organic Compound Gamma-Butyrolactone Released upon Herpes Simplex Virus Type -1 Acute Infection Modulated Membrane Potential and Repressed Viral Infection in Human Neuron-Like Cells

    PubMed Central

    Waguespack, Yan; Figliozzi, Robert W.; Kharel, Madan K.; Zhang, Qiaojuan; Martin-Caraballo, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Herpes Simplex Virus Type -1 (HSV-1) infections can cause serious complications such as keratitis and encephalitis. The goal of this study was to identify any changes in the concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) produced during HSV-1 infection of epithelial cells that could potentially be used as an indicator of a response to stress. An additional objective was to study if any VOCs released from acute epithelial infection may influence subsequent neuronal infection to facilitate latency. To investigate these hypotheses, Vero cells were infected with HSV-1 and the emission of VOCs was analyzed using two-dimensional gas chromatograph/mass spectrometry (2D GC/MS). It was observed that the concentrations of gamma-butyrolactone (GBL) in particular changed significantly after a 24-hour infection. Since HSV-1 may establish latency in neurons after the acute infection, GBL was tested to determine if it exerts neuronal regulation of infection. The results indicated that GBL altered the resting membrane potential of differentiated LNCaP cells and promoted a non-permissive state of HSV-1 infection by repressing viral replication. These observations may provide useful clues towards understanding the complex signaling pathways that occur during the HSV-1 primary infection and establishment of viral latency. PMID:27537375

  6. Dissociative phenomenology of dissociative identity disorder.

    PubMed

    Dell, Paul F

    2002-01-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the dissociative phenomenology of dissociative identity disorder (DID). The Multidimensional Inventory of Dissociation (MID) was administered to 34 patients with DID, 23 patients with dissociative disorder not otherwise specified (DDNOS), 52 patients with mixed psychiatric disorders, and 58 normal individuals. DID patients obtained significantly higher scores than the other three groups on 27 dissociation-related variables. DDNOS patients had significantly higher scores than normals and mixed psychiatric patients on 17 and 15 dissociation-related variables, respectively. The findings of the present study are virtually identical to a large body of replicated findings about the dissociative phenomenology of DID. This broad range of dissociation-related phenomena, which routinely occurs in individuals with DID, is largely absent from the DSM-IV-TR account of DID. Factor analysis of the 11 dimensions of dissociation that are measured by the MID extracted only one factor that accounted for 85% of the variance. It was concluded that dissociation is a unifactorial taxon or natural type that has different aspects or epiphenomena (i.e., amnesia, depersonalization, voices, trance, etc.).

  7. Rho kinase inhibition following traumatic brain injury in mice promotes functional improvement and acute neuron survival but has little effect on neurogenesis, glial responses or neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Bye, Nicole; Christie, Kimberly J; Turbic, Alisa; Basrai, Harleen S; Turnley, Ann M

    2016-05-01

    Inhibition of the Rho/Rho kinase pathway has been shown to be beneficial in a variety of neural injuries and diseases. In this manuscript we investigate the role of Rho kinase inhibition in recovery from traumatic brain injury using a controlled cortical impact model in mice. Mice subjected to a moderately severe TBI were treated for 1 or 4 weeks with the Rho kinase inhibitor Y27632, and functional outcomes and neuronal and glial cell responses were analysed at 1, 7 and 35 days post-injury. We hypothesised that Y27632-treated mice would show functional improvement, with augmented recruitment of neuroblasts from the SVZ and enhanced survival of newborn neurons in the pericontusional cortex, with protection against neuronal degeneration, neuroinflammation and modulation of astrocyte reactivity and blood-brain-barrier permeability. While Rho kinase inhibition enhanced recovery of motor function after trauma, there were no substantial increases in the recruitment of DCX(+) neuroblasts or the number of BrdU(+) or EdU(+) labelled newborn neurons in the pericontusional cortex of Y27632-treated mice. Inhibition of Rho kinase significantly reduced the number of degenerating cortical neurons at 1day post-injury compared to saline controls but had no longer term effect on neuronal degeneration, with only modest effects on astrocytic reactivity and macrophage/microglial responses. Overall, this study showed that Rho kinase contributes to acute neurodegenerative processes in the injured cortex but does not play a significant role in SVZ neural precursor cell-derived adult neurogenesis, glial responses or blood-brain barrier permeability following a moderately severe brain injury. PMID:26896832

  8. Acute cocaine exposure weakens GABA(B) receptor-dependent G-protein-gated inwardly rectifying K+ signaling in dopamine neurons of the ventral tegmental area.

    PubMed

    Arora, Devinder; Hearing, Matthew; Haluk, Desirae M; Mirkovic, Kelsey; Fajardo-Serrano, Ana; Wessendorf, Martin W; Watanabe, Masahiko; Luján, Rafael; Wickman, Kevin

    2011-08-24

    Enhanced glutamatergic neurotransmission in dopamine (DA) neurons of the ventral tegmental area (VTA), triggered by a single cocaine injection, represents an early adaptation linked to the more enduring effects of abused drugs that characterize addiction. Here, we examined the impact of in vivo cocaine exposure on metabotropic inhibitory signaling involving G-protein-gated inwardly rectifying K(+) (Girk) channels in VTA DA neurons. Somatodendritic Girk currents evoked by the GABA(B) receptor (GABA(B)R) agonist baclofen were diminished in a dose-dependent manner in mice given a single cocaine injection. This adaptation persisted for 3-4 d, was specific for DA neurons of the VTA, and occurred in parallel with an increase in spontaneous glutamatergic neurotransmission. No additional suppression of GABA(B)R-Girk signaling was observed following repeated cocaine administration. While total Girk2 and GABA(B)R1 mRNA and protein levels were unaltered by cocaine exposure in VTA DA neurons, the cocaine-induced decrease in GABA(B)R-Girk signaling correlated with a reduction in Girk2-containing channels at the plasma membrane in VTA DA neurons. Systemic pretreatment with sulpiride, but not SCH23390 (7-chloro-3-methyl-1-phenyl-1,2,4,5-tetrahydro-3-benzazepin-8-ol), prevented the cocaine-induced suppression of GABA(B)R-Girk signaling, implicating D(2/3) DA receptor activation in this adaptation. The acute cocaine-induced weakening of somatodendritic Girk signaling complements the previously demonstrated cocaine-induced strengthening of glutamatergic neurotransmission, likely contributing to enhanced output of VTA DA neurons during the early stages of addiction. PMID:21865468

  9. Acute Effects of Transforming Growth Factor-β1 on Neuronal Excitability and Involvement in the Pain of Rats with Chronic Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoyu; Zheng, Hang; Zhu, Hong-Yan; Hu, Shufen; Wang, Shusheng; Jiang, Xinghong; Xu, Guang-Yin

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims This study was to investigate whether transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) plays a role in hyperalgesia in chronic pancreatitis (CP) and the underlying mechanisms. Methods CP was induced in male adult rats by intraductal injection of trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS). Abdominal hyperalgesia was assessed by referred somatic behaviors to mechanical stimulation of rat abdomen. Dil dye injected into the pancreas was used to label pancreas-specific dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. Whole cell patch clamp recordings and calcium imaging were performed to examine the effect of TGF-β1 on acutely isolated pancreas-specific DRG neurons. Western blot analysis was carried out to measure the expression of TGF-β1 and its receptors. Results TNBS injection significantly upregulated expression of TGF-β1 in the pancreas and DRGs, and TGF-β1 receptors in DRGs (T9-T13) in CP rats. Intrathecal injection of TGF-β receptor I antagonist SB431542 attenuated abdominal hyperalgesia in CP rats. TGF-β1 application depolarized the membrane potential and caused firing activity of DRG neurons. TGF-β1 application also reduced rheobase, hyperpolarized action potential threshold, and increased numbers of action potentials evoked by current injection of pancreas-specific DRG neurons. TGF-β1 application also increased the concentration of intracellular calcium of DRG neurons, which was inhibited by SB431542. Furthermore, intrathecal injection of TGF-β1 produced abdominal hyperalgesia in healthy rats. Conclusions These results suggest that TGF-β1 enhances neuronal excitability and increases the concentration of intracellular calcium. TGF-β1 and its receptors are involved in abdominal hyperalgesia in CP. This and future study might identify a potentially novel target for the treatment of abdominal pain in CP. PMID:26645248

  10. Rho kinase inhibition following traumatic brain injury in mice promotes functional improvement and acute neuron survival but has little effect on neurogenesis, glial responses or neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Bye, Nicole; Christie, Kimberly J; Turbic, Alisa; Basrai, Harleen S; Turnley, Ann M

    2016-05-01

    Inhibition of the Rho/Rho kinase pathway has been shown to be beneficial in a variety of neural injuries and diseases. In this manuscript we investigate the role of Rho kinase inhibition in recovery from traumatic brain injury using a controlled cortical impact model in mice. Mice subjected to a moderately severe TBI were treated for 1 or 4 weeks with the Rho kinase inhibitor Y27632, and functional outcomes and neuronal and glial cell responses were analysed at 1, 7 and 35 days post-injury. We hypothesised that Y27632-treated mice would show functional improvement, with augmented recruitment of neuroblasts from the SVZ and enhanced survival of newborn neurons in the pericontusional cortex, with protection against neuronal degeneration, neuroinflammation and modulation of astrocyte reactivity and blood-brain-barrier permeability. While Rho kinase inhibition enhanced recovery of motor function after trauma, there were no substantial increases in the recruitment of DCX(+) neuroblasts or the number of BrdU(+) or EdU(+) labelled newborn neurons in the pericontusional cortex of Y27632-treated mice. Inhibition of Rho kinase significantly reduced the number of degenerating cortical neurons at 1day post-injury compared to saline controls but had no longer term effect on neuronal degeneration, with only modest effects on astrocytic reactivity and macrophage/microglial responses. Overall, this study showed that Rho kinase contributes to acute neurodegenerative processes in the injured cortex but does not play a significant role in SVZ neural precursor cell-derived adult neurogenesis, glial responses or blood-brain barrier permeability following a moderately severe brain injury.

  11. Acute pancreatitis decreases the sensitivity of pancreas-projecting dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus neurones to group II metabotropic glutamate receptor agonists in rats

    PubMed Central

    Babic, Tanja; Travagli, R Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that pancreatic exocrine secretions (PES) are modulated by dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (DMV) neurones, whose activity is finely tuned by GABAergic and glutamatergic synaptic inputs. Group II metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR) decrease synaptic transmission to pancreas-projecting DMV neurones and increase PES. In the present study, we used a combination of in vivo and in vitro approaches aimed at characterising the effects of caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis (AP) on the vagal neurocircuitry modulating pancreatic functions. In control rats, microinjection of bicuculline into the DMV increased PES, whereas microinjections of kynurenic acid had no effect. Conversely, in AP rats, microinjection of bicuculline had no effect, whereas kynurenic acid decreased PES. DMV microinjections of the group II mGluR agonist APDC and whole cell recordings of excitatory currents in identified pancreas-projecting DMV neurones showed a reduced functional response in AP rats compared to controls. Moreover, these changes persisted up to 3 weeks following the induction of AP. These data demonstrate that AP increases the excitatory input to pancreas-projecting DMV neurones by decreasing the response of excitatory synaptic terminals to group II mGluR agonist. PMID:24445314

  12. Dissociating motor cortex from the motor

    PubMed Central

    Schieber, Marc H

    2011-01-01

    Abstract During closed-loop control of a brain–computer interface, neurons in the primary motor cortex can be intensely active even though the subject may be making no detectable movement or muscle contraction. How can neural activity in the primary motor cortex become dissociated from the movements and muscles of the native limb that it normally controls? Here we examine circumstances in which motor cortex activity is known to dissociate from movement – including mental imagery, visuo-motor dissociation and instructed delay. Many such motor cortex neurons may be related to muscle activity only indirectly. Furthermore, the integration of thousands of synaptic inputs by individual α-motoneurons means that under certain circumstances even cortico-motoneuronal cells, which make monosynaptic connections to α-motoneurons, can become dissociated from muscle activity. The natural ability of motor cortex neurons under voluntarily control to become dissociated from bodily movement may underlie the utility of this cortical area for controlling brain–computer interfaces. PMID:22005673

  13. Dissociated Vertical Deviation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Eye Terms Conditions Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Dissociated Vertical Deviation En Español Read in Chinese What is Dissociated Vertical Deviation (DVD)? DVD is ...

  14. Neuronal polarization in the developing cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Sakakibara, Akira; Hatanaka, Yumiko

    2015-01-01

    Cortical neurons consist of excitatory projection neurons and inhibitory GABAergic interneurons, whose connections construct highly organized neuronal circuits that control higher order information processing. Recent progress in live imaging has allowed us to examine how these neurons differentiate during development in vivo or in in vivo-like conditions. These analyses have revealed how the initial steps of polarization, in which neurons establish an axon, occur. Interestingly, both excitatory and inhibitory cortical neurons establish neuronal polarity de novo by undergoing a multipolar stage reminiscent of the manner in which polarity formation occurs in hippocampal neurons in dissociated culture. In this review, we focus on polarity formation in cortical neurons and describe their typical morphology and dynamic behavior during the polarization period. We also discuss cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying polarization, with reference to polarity formation in dissociated hippocampal neurons in vitro.

  15. Neurokinin B Causes Acute GnRH Secretion and Repression of GnRH Transcription in GT1–7 GnRH Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Glidewell-Kenney, Christine A.; Shao, Paul P.; Iyer, Anita K.; Grove, Anna M. H.; Meadows, Jason D.

    2013-01-01

    Genetic studies in human patients with idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (IHH) identified mutations in the genes that encode neurokinin B (NKB) and the neurokinin 3 receptor (NK3R). However, determining the mechanism whereby NKB regulates gonadotropin secretion has been difficult because of conflicting results from in vivo studies investigating the luteinizing hormone (LH) response to senktide, a NK3R agonist. NK3R is expressed in a subset of GnRH neurons and in kisspeptin neurons that are known to regulate GnRH secretion. Thus, one potential source of inconsistency is that NKB could produce opposing direct and indirect effects on GnRH secretion. Here, we employ the GT1-7 cell model to elucidate the direct effects of NKB on GnRH neuron function. We find that GT1-7 cells express NK3R and respond to acute senktide treatment with c-Fos induction and increased GnRH secretion. In contrast, long-term senktide treatment decreased GnRH secretion. Next, we focus on the examination of the mechanism underlying the long-term decrease in secretion and determine that senktide treatment represses transcription of GnRH. We further show that this repression of GnRH transcription may involve enhanced c-Fos protein binding at novel activator protein-1 (AP-1) half-sites identified in enhancer 1 and the promoter, as well as chromatin remodeling at the promoter of the GnRH gene. These data indicate that NKB could directly regulate secretion from NK3R-expressing GnRH neurons. Furthermore, whether the response is inhibitory or stimulatory toward GnRH secretion could depend on the history or length of exposure to NKB because of a repressive effect on GnRH transcription. PMID:23393128

  16. The role of S100B protein, neuron-specific enolase, and glial fibrillary acidic protein in the evaluation of hypoxic brain injury in acute carbon monoxide poisoning.

    PubMed

    Akdemir, H U; Yardan, T; Kati, C; Duran, L; Alacam, H; Yavuz, Y; Okuyucu, A

    2014-11-01

    The main purpose of this study was to assess the role of S100B protein, neuron-specific enolase (NSE), and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in the evaluation of hypoxic brain injury in acute carbon monoxide (CO)-poisoned patients. This cross-sectional study was conducted among the patients with acute CO poisoning who referred to the emergency department in a 1-year period. Serum levels of S100B protein, NSE, and GFAP were determined on admission. A total of 55 CO-poisoned patients (mean age ± standard deviation, 45 ± 20.3 years; 60% women) were included in the study. The control group consisted of 25 healthy adults. The patients were divided into two groups according to whether they were conscious or unconscious. The serum levels of S100B, NSE, and GFAP were higher in patients than that in the control group. There was no significant difference between unconscious and conscious patients with respect to these markers. There was a statistically significant difference between the conscious and unconscious patients and the control group in terms of S100B and NSE levels. There was also a statistically significant difference between the unconscious patients and the control group in terms of GFAP levels. Increased serum S100B, NSE, and GFAP levels are associated with acute CO poisoning. These biomarkers can be useful in assessing the clinical status of patients with CO poisoning.

  17. Acute Seizures in Old Age Leads to a Greater Loss of CA1 Pyramidal Neurons, an Increased Propensity for Developing Chronic TLE and a Severe Cognitive Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Hattiangady, Bharathi; Kuruba, Ramkumar; Shetty, Ashok K

    2011-02-01

    The aged population displays an enhanced risk for developing acute seizure (AS) activity. However, it is unclear whether AS activity in old age would result in a greater magnitude of hippocampal neurodegeneration and inflammation, and an increased predilection for developing chronic temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and cognitive dysfunction. Therefore, we addressed these issues in young-adult (5-months old) and aged (22-months old) F344 rats after three-hours of AS activity, induced through graded intraperitoneal injections of kainic acid (KA), and terminated through a diazepam injection. During the three-hours of AS activity, both young adult and aged groups exhibited similar numbers of stage-V motor seizures but the numbers of stage-IV motor seizures were greater in the aged group. In both age groups, three-hour AS activity induced degeneration of 50-55% of neurons in the dentate hilus, 22-32% of neurons in the granule cell layer and 49-52% neurons in the CA3 pyramidal cell layer without showing any interaction between the age and AS activity. However, degeneration of neurons in the CA1 pyramidal cell layer showed a clear interaction between the age and AS activity (12% in the young adult group and 56% in the aged group), suggesting that an advanced age makes the CA1 pyramidal neurons more susceptible to die with AS activity. The extent of inflammation measured through the numbers of activated microglial cells was similar between the two age groups. Interestingly, the predisposition for developing chronic TLE at 2-3 months after AS activity was 60% for young adult rats but 100% for aged rats. Moreover, both frequency & intensity of spontaneous recurrent seizures in the chronic phase after AS activity were 6-12 folds greater in aged rats than in young adult rats. Furthermore, aged rats lost their ability for spatial learning even in a scrupulous eleven-session water maze learning paradigm after AS activity, in divergence from young adult rats which retained the

  18. Patch-clamp recordings of rat neurons from acute brain slices of the somatosensory cortex during magnetic stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Pashut, Tamar; Magidov, Dafna; Ben-Porat, Hana; Wolfus, Shuki; Friedman, Alex; Perel, Eli; Lavidor, Michal; Bar-Gad, Izhar; Yeshurun, Yosef; Korngreen, Alon

    2014-01-01

    Although transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a popular tool for both basic research and clinical applications, its actions on nerve cells are only partially understood. We have previously predicted, using compartmental modeling, that magnetic stimulation of central nervous system neurons depolarized the soma followed by initiation of an action potential in the initial segment of the axon. The simulations also predict that neurons with low current threshold are more susceptible to magnetic stimulation. Here we tested these theoretical predictions by combining in vitro patch-clamp recordings from rat brain slices with magnetic stimulation and compartmental modeling. In agreement with the modeling, our recordings demonstrate the dependence of magnetic stimulation-triggered action potentials on the type and state of the neuron and its orientation within the magnetic field. Our results suggest that the observed effects of TMS are deeply rooted in the biophysical properties of single neurons in the central nervous system and provide a framework both for interpreting existing TMS data and developing new simulation-based tools and therapies. PMID:24917788

  19. Dopamine Modulates Spike Timing-Dependent Plasticity and Action Potential Properties in CA1 Pyramidal Neurons of Acute Rat Hippocampal Slices

    PubMed Central

    Edelmann, Elke; Lessmann, Volkmar

    2011-01-01

    Spike timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) is a cellular model of Hebbian synaptic plasticity which is believed to underlie memory formation. In an attempt to establish a STDP paradigm in CA1 of acute hippocampal slices from juvenile rats (P15–20), we found that changes in excitability resulting from different slice preparation protocols correlate with the success of STDP induction. Slice preparation with sucrose containing ACSF prolonged rise time, reduced frequency adaptation, and decreased latency of action potentials in CA1 pyramidal neurons compared to preparation in conventional ASCF, while other basal electrophysiological parameters remained unaffected. Whereas we observed prominent timing-dependent long-term potentiation (t-LTP) to 171 ± 10% of controls in conventional ACSF, STDP was absent in sucrose prepared slices. This sucrose-induced STDP deficit could not be rescued by stronger STDP paradigms, applying either more pre- and/or postsynaptic stimuli, or by a higher stimulation frequency. Importantly, slice preparation with sucrose containing ACSF did not eliminate theta-burst stimulation induced LTP in CA1 in field potential recordings in our rat hippocampal slices. Application of dopamine (for 10–20 min) to sucrose prepared slices completely rescued t-LTP and recovered action potential properties back to levels observed in ACSF prepared slices. Conversely, acute inhibition of D1 receptor signaling impaired t-LTP in ACSF prepared slices. No similar restoring effect for STDP as seen with dopamine was observed in response to the β-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol. ELISA measurements demonstrated a significant reduction of endogenous dopamine levels (to 61.9 ± 6.9% of ACSF values) in sucrose prepared slices. These results suggest that dopamine signaling is involved in regulating the efficiency to elicit STDP in CA1 pyramidal neurons. PMID:22065958

  20. Acute Molecular Perturbation of Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase with an Antisense Approach Enhances Neuronal Preservation and Functional Recovery after Contusive Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Maggio, Dominic M.; Chatzipanteli, Katina; Masters, Neil; Patel, Samik P.; Dietrich, W. Dalton

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) is a key mediator of inflammation and oxidative stress produced during pathological conditions, including neurodegenerative diseases and central nervous system (CNS) injury. iNOS is responsible for the formation of high levels of nitric oxide (NO). The production of highly reactive and cytotoxic NO species, such as peroxynitrite, plays an important role in secondary tissue damage. We have previously demonstrated that acute administration of iNOS antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) 3 h after moderate contusive spinal cord injury (SCI) potently inhibits iNOS-mediated increases in NO levels, leading to reduced blood–spinal cord barrier permeability, decreased neutrophil accumulation, and less neuronal cell death. In the current study we investigated if iNOS ASOs could also provide long-term (10-week) histological and behavioral improvements after moderate thoracic T8 contusive SCI. Adult rats were randomly assigned to three groups (n=10/group): SCI alone, SCI and mixed base control oligonucleotides (MBOs), or SCI and iNOS ASOs (200 nM). Oligonucleotides were administered by spinal superfusion 3 h after injury. Behavioral analysis (Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan [BBB] score and subscore) was employed weekly for 10 weeks post-SCI. Although animals treated with iNOS ASOs demonstrated no significant differences in BBB scores compared to controls, subscore analysis revealed a significant improvement in foot positioning, trunk stability, and tail clearance. Histologically, while no gross improvement in preserved white and gray matter was observed, greater numbers of surviving neurons were present adjacent to the lesion site in iNOS ASO-treated animals than controls. These results support the effectiveness of targeting iNOS acutely as a therapeutic approach after SCI. PMID:22708918

  1. Survival, Differentiation, and Migration of High-Purity Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell-derived Progenitor Motor Neurons in Fibrin Scaffolds after Sub-Acute Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    McCreedy, D A; Wilems, T S; Xu, H; Butts, J C; Brown, C R; Smith, A W; Sakiyama-Elbert, S E

    2014-11-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells can be differentiated into many neural cell types that hold great potential as cell replacement therapies following spinal cord injury (SCI). Coupling stem cell transplantation with biomaterial scaffolds can produce a unified combination therapy with several potential advantages including enhanced cell survival, greater transplant retention, reduced scarring, and improved integration at the transplant/host interface. Undesired cell types, however, are commonly present in ES-cell derived cultures due to the limited efficiency of most ES cell induction protocols. Heterogeneous cell populations can confound the interaction between the biomaterial and specific neural populations leading to undesired outcomes. In particular, biomaterials scaffolds may enhance tumor formation by promoting survival and proliferation of undifferentiated ES cells that can persist after induction. Methods for purification of specific ES cell-derived neural populations are necessary to recognize the full potential of combination therapies involving biomaterials and ES cell-derived neural populations. We previously developed a method for enriching ES cell-derived progenitor motor neurons (pMNs) induced from mouse ES cells via antibiotic selection and showed that the enriched cell populations are depleted of pluripotent stem cells. In this study, we demonstrate the survival and differentiation of enriched pMNs within three dimensional (3D) fibrin scaffolds in vitro and when transplanted into a sub-acute dorsal hemisection model of SCI into neurons, oligodendrocytes and astrocytes. PMID:25346848

  2. Effect of interaction between acute administration of morphine and cannabinoid compounds on spontaneous excitatory and inhibitory postsynaptic currents of magnocellular neurons of supraoptic nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Yousefpour, Mitra; Naderi, Nima; Motamedi, Fereshteh

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Opioids and cannabinoids are two important compounds that have been shown to influence the activity of magnocellular neurons (MCNs) of supraoptic nucleus (SON). The interaction between opioidergic and cannabinoidergic systems in various structures of the brain and spinal cord is now well established, but not in the MCNs of SON. Materials and methods: In this study, whole cell patch clamp recording of neurons in rat brain slice was used to investigate the effect of acute morphine and cannabinoid administration on spontaneous inhibitory and excitatory spostsynaptic currents (sIPSCs and sEPSCs) in MCNs. Results: Bath application of morphine produced an increase in sEPSCs frequency and a decrease in sIPSCs frequency. In contrast, bath application of URB597 (fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) inhibitor) produced a decrease in sEPSCs frequency but an increase in sIPSCs frequency. WIN55212-2 (cannabinoid receptor agonist) decreased both sIPSCs and sEPSCs frequencies of MCNs. Co-application of morphine and URB597 attenuated the effect of morphine on MCNs. Conclusion: Taken together, these data indicated that at the cellular level, pharmacological augmentation of endocannabinoids could attenuate morphine effects on MCNs. PMID:27482350

  3. Effect of nor-trimebutine on neuronal activation induced by a noxious stimulus or an acute colonic inflammation in the rat.

    PubMed

    Sinniger, Valérie; Mouchet, Patrick; Bonaz, Bruno

    2005-10-21

    Nor-trimebutine is the main metabolite of trimebutine that is used in the treatment of patients with irritable bowel syndrome. Nor-trimebutine has a blocking activity on sodium channels and a potent local anesthetic effect. These properties were used to investigate the effect of nor-trimebutine on spinal neuronal activation induced by models of noxious somato-visceral stimulus and acute colonic inflammation. Nor-trimebutine was administered in rats either subcutaneously 30 min before intraperitoneal administration of acetic acid or intracolonically 30 min before intracolonic infusion of trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid. Abdominal contractions were counted for 1 h as a marker of abdominal pain. c-fos expression was used as a marker of neuronal activation and revealed by immunohistochemistry 1h after intraperitoneal acetic acid injection and 2 h after colonic inflammation. Nor-trimebutine decreased Fos expression in the thoraco-lumbar (peritoneal irritation) and lumbo-sacral (colonic inflammation) spinal cord in laminae I, IIo V, VII and X. This effect was also observed in the sacral parasympathetic nucleus after colonic inflammation. Nor-trimebutine induced a significant decrease of abdominal contractions following intraperitoneal acetic acid injection. These data may explain the effectiveness of trimebutine in the therapy of abdominal pain in the irritable bowel syndrome. PMID:15978629

  4. Effect of acute ethanol on beta-endorphin secretion from rat fetal hypothalamic neurons in primary cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkar, D.K.; Minami, S. )

    1990-01-01

    To characterize the effect of ethanol on the hypothalamic {beta}-endorphin-containing neurons, rat fetal hypothalamic neurons were maintained in primary culture, and the secretion of {beta}-endorphin ({beta}-EP) was determined after ethanol challenges. Constant exposure to ethanol at doses of 6-50 mM produced a dose-dependent increase in basal secretion of {beta}-EP from these cultured cells. These doses of ethanol did not produce any significant effect on cell viability, DNA or protein content. The stimulated secretion of {beta}-EP following constant ethanol exposure is short-lasting. However, intermittent ethanol exposures maintained the ethanol stimulatory action on {beta}-EP secretion for a longer time. The magnitude of the {beta}-EP response to 50 mM ethanol is similar to that of the {beta}-EP response to 56 mM of potassium. Ethanol-stimulated {beta}-EP secretion required extracellular calcium and was blocked by a calcium channel blocker; a sodium channel blocker did not affect ethanol-stimulated secretion. These results suggest that the neuron culture system is a useful model for studying the cellular mechanisms involved in the ethanol-regulated hypothalamic opioid secretion.

  5. Acute tianeptine treatment selectively modulates neuronal activation in the central nucleus of the amygdala and attenuates fear extinction.

    PubMed

    Godsil, B P; Bontempi, B; Mailliet, F; Delagrange, P; Spedding, M; Jay, T M

    2015-11-01

    Antidepressant drugs are commonly prescribed treatments for anxiety disorders, and there is growing interest in understanding how these drugs impact fear extinction because extinction learning is pivotal to successful exposure-based therapy (EBT). A key objective within this domain is understanding how antidepressants alter the activation of specific elements of the limbic-based network that governs such fear processing. Chronic treatment with the antidepressant tianeptine has been shown to reduce the acquisition of extinction learning in rats, yet the drug's acute influence on activation in prefrontal and amygdalar regions, and on extinction learning are not well understood. To assess its influence on cellular activation, rats were injected with tianeptine and Fos immunoreactivity was measured in these regions. Acute tianeptine treatment selectively altered Fos expression within subdivisions of the central nucleus of the amygdala (CEA) in a bidirectional manner that varied in relation to ongoing activation within the capsular subdivision and its prefrontal and intra-amygdalar inputs. This pattern of results suggests that the drug can conditionally modulate the activation of CEA subdivisions, which contain microcircuits strongly implicated in fear processing. The effect of acute tianeptine was also examined with respect to the acquisition, consolidation and expression of fear extinction in rats. Acute tianeptine attenuated extinction learning as well as the recall of extinction memory, which underscores that acute dosing with the drug could alter learning during EBT. Together these findings provide a new perspective for understanding the mechanism supporting tianeptine's clinical efficacy, as well as its potential influence on CEA-based learning mechanisms. PMID:25560759

  6. Acute tianeptine treatment selectively modulates neuronal activation in the central nucleus of the amygdala and attenuates fear extinction.

    PubMed

    Godsil, B P; Bontempi, B; Mailliet, F; Delagrange, P; Spedding, M; Jay, T M

    2015-11-01

    Antidepressant drugs are commonly prescribed treatments for anxiety disorders, and there is growing interest in understanding how these drugs impact fear extinction because extinction learning is pivotal to successful exposure-based therapy (EBT). A key objective within this domain is understanding how antidepressants alter the activation of specific elements of the limbic-based network that governs such fear processing. Chronic treatment with the antidepressant tianeptine has been shown to reduce the acquisition of extinction learning in rats, yet the drug's acute influence on activation in prefrontal and amygdalar regions, and on extinction learning are not well understood. To assess its influence on cellular activation, rats were injected with tianeptine and Fos immunoreactivity was measured in these regions. Acute tianeptine treatment selectively altered Fos expression within subdivisions of the central nucleus of the amygdala (CEA) in a bidirectional manner that varied in relation to ongoing activation within the capsular subdivision and its prefrontal and intra-amygdalar inputs. This pattern of results suggests that the drug can conditionally modulate the activation of CEA subdivisions, which contain microcircuits strongly implicated in fear processing. The effect of acute tianeptine was also examined with respect to the acquisition, consolidation and expression of fear extinction in rats. Acute tianeptine attenuated extinction learning as well as the recall of extinction memory, which underscores that acute dosing with the drug could alter learning during EBT. Together these findings provide a new perspective for understanding the mechanism supporting tianeptine's clinical efficacy, as well as its potential influence on CEA-based learning mechanisms.

  7. The many faces of dissociation: opportunities for innovative research in psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Şar, Vedat

    2014-12-01

    It has been claimed that the progress of psychiatry has lagged behind that of other medical disciplines over the last few decades. This may suggest the need for innovative thinking and research in psychiatry, which should consider neglected areas as topics of interest in light of the potential progress which might be made in this regard. This review is concerned with one such field of psychiatry: dissociation and dissociative disorders. Dissociation is the ultimate form of human response to chronic developmental stress, because patients with dissociative disorders report the highest frequency of childhood abuse and/or neglect among all psychiatric disorders. The cardinal feature of dissociation is a disruption in one or more mental functions. Dissociative amnesia, depersonalization, derealization, identity confusion, and identity alterations are core phenomena of dissociative psychopathology which constitute a single dimension characterized by a spectrum of severity. While dissociative identity disorder (DID) is the most pervasive condition of all dissociative disorders, partial representations of this spectrum may be diagnosed as dissociative amnesia (with or without fugue), depersonalization disorder, and other specified dissociative disorders such as subthreshold DID, dissociative trance disorder, acute dissociative disorders, and identity disturbances due to exposure to oppression. In addition to constituting disorders in their own right, dissociation may accompany almost every psychiatric disorder and operate as a confounding factor in general psychiatry, including neurobiological and psycho-pharmacological research. While an anti- dissociative drug does not yet exist, appropriate psychotherapy leads to considerable improvement for many patients with dissociative disorders. PMID:25598819

  8. The many faces of dissociation: opportunities for innovative research in psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Şar, Vedat

    2014-12-01

    It has been claimed that the progress of psychiatry has lagged behind that of other medical disciplines over the last few decades. This may suggest the need for innovative thinking and research in psychiatry, which should consider neglected areas as topics of interest in light of the potential progress which might be made in this regard. This review is concerned with one such field of psychiatry: dissociation and dissociative disorders. Dissociation is the ultimate form of human response to chronic developmental stress, because patients with dissociative disorders report the highest frequency of childhood abuse and/or neglect among all psychiatric disorders. The cardinal feature of dissociation is a disruption in one or more mental functions. Dissociative amnesia, depersonalization, derealization, identity confusion, and identity alterations are core phenomena of dissociative psychopathology which constitute a single dimension characterized by a spectrum of severity. While dissociative identity disorder (DID) is the most pervasive condition of all dissociative disorders, partial representations of this spectrum may be diagnosed as dissociative amnesia (with or without fugue), depersonalization disorder, and other specified dissociative disorders such as subthreshold DID, dissociative trance disorder, acute dissociative disorders, and identity disturbances due to exposure to oppression. In addition to constituting disorders in their own right, dissociation may accompany almost every psychiatric disorder and operate as a confounding factor in general psychiatry, including neurobiological and psycho-pharmacological research. While an anti- dissociative drug does not yet exist, appropriate psychotherapy leads to considerable improvement for many patients with dissociative disorders.

  9. The Many Faces of Dissociation: Opportunities for Innovative Research in Psychiatry

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    It has been claimed that the progress of psychiatry has lagged behind that of other medical disciplines over the last few decades. This may suggest the need for innovative thinking and research in psychiatry, which should consider neglected areas as topics of interest in light of the potential progress which might be made in this regard. This review is concerned with one such field of psychiatry: dissociation and dissociative disorders. Dissociation is the ultimate form of human response to chronic developmental stress, because patients with dissociative disorders report the highest frequency of childhood abuse and/or neglect among all psychiatric disorders. The cardinal feature of dissociation is a disruption in one or more mental functions. Dissociative amnesia, depersonalization, derealization, identity confusion, and identity alterations are core phenomena of dissociative psychopathology which constitute a single dimension characterized by a spectrum of severity. While dissociative identity disorder (DID) is the most pervasive condition of all dissociative disorders, partial representations of this spectrum may be diagnosed as dissociative amnesia (with or without fugue), depersonalization disorder, and other specified dissociative disorders such as subthreshold DID, dissociative trance disorder, acute dissociative disorders, and identity disturbances due to exposure to oppression. In addition to constituting disorders in their own right, dissociation may accompany almost every psychiatric disorder and operate as a confounding factor in general psychiatry, including neurobiological and psycho-pharmacological research. While an anti- dissociative drug does not yet exist, appropriate psychotherapy leads to considerable improvement for many patients with dissociative disorders. PMID:25598819

  10. Left–right dissociation of hippocampal memory processes in mice

    PubMed Central

    Shipton, Olivia A.; El-Gaby, Mohamady; Apergis-Schoute, John; Deisseroth, Karl; Bannerman, David M.; Paulsen, Ole; Kohl, Michael M.

    2014-01-01

    Left–right asymmetries have likely evolved to make optimal use of bilaterian nervous systems; however, little is known about the synaptic and circuit mechanisms that support divergence of function between equivalent structures in each hemisphere. Here we examined whether lateralized hippocampal memory processing is present in mice, where hemispheric asymmetry at the CA3–CA1 pyramidal neuron synapse has recently been demonstrated, with different spine morphology, glutamate receptor content, and synaptic plasticity, depending on whether afferents originate in the left or right CA3. To address this question, we used optogenetics to acutely silence CA3 pyramidal neurons in either the left or right dorsal hippocampus while mice performed hippocampus-dependent memory tasks. We found that unilateral silencing of either the left or right CA3 was sufficient to impair short-term memory. However, a striking asymmetry emerged in long-term memory, wherein only left CA3 silencing impaired performance on an associative spatial long-term memory task, whereas right CA3 silencing had no effect. To explore whether synaptic properties intrinsic to the hippocampus might contribute to this left–right behavioral asymmetry, we investigated the expression of hippocampal long-term potentiation. Following the induction of long-term potentiation by high-frequency electrical stimulation, synapses between CA3 and CA1 pyramidal neurons were strengthened only when presynaptic input originated in the left CA3, confirming an asymmetry in synaptic properties. The dissociation of hippocampal long-term memory function between hemispheres suggests that memory is routed via distinct left–right pathways within the mouse hippocampus, and provides a promising approach to help elucidate the synaptic basis of long-term memory. PMID:25246561

  11. Left-right dissociation of hippocampal memory processes in mice.

    PubMed

    Shipton, Olivia A; El-Gaby, Mohamady; Apergis-Schoute, John; Deisseroth, Karl; Bannerman, David M; Paulsen, Ole; Kohl, Michael M

    2014-10-21

    Left-right asymmetries have likely evolved to make optimal use of bilaterian nervous systems; however, little is known about the synaptic and circuit mechanisms that support divergence of function between equivalent structures in each hemisphere. Here we examined whether lateralized hippocampal memory processing is present in mice, where hemispheric asymmetry at the CA3-CA1 pyramidal neuron synapse has recently been demonstrated, with different spine morphology, glutamate receptor content, and synaptic plasticity, depending on whether afferents originate in the left or right CA3. To address this question, we used optogenetics to acutely silence CA3 pyramidal neurons in either the left or right dorsal hippocampus while mice performed hippocampus-dependent memory tasks. We found that unilateral silencing of either the left or right CA3 was sufficient to impair short-term memory. However, a striking asymmetry emerged in long-term memory, wherein only left CA3 silencing impaired performance on an associative spatial long-term memory task, whereas right CA3 silencing had no effect. To explore whether synaptic properties intrinsic to the hippocampus might contribute to this left-right behavioral asymmetry, we investigated the expression of hippocampal long-term potentiation. Following the induction of long-term potentiation by high-frequency electrical stimulation, synapses between CA3 and CA1 pyramidal neurons were strengthened only when presynaptic input originated in the left CA3, confirming an asymmetry in synaptic properties. The dissociation of hippocampal long-term memory function between hemispheres suggests that memory is routed via distinct left-right pathways within the mouse hippocampus, and provides a promising approach to help elucidate the synaptic basis of long-term memory.

  12. The role of multifunctional drug therapy against carbamate induced neuronal toxicity during acute and chronic phase in rats.

    PubMed

    Chahal, Karan Singh; Prakash, Atish; Majeed, Abu Bakar Abdul

    2015-07-01

    The current study has been designed to examine the effect of multifunctional drug therapy on carbofuran induced acute (2.187 mg/kg, s.c.) and sub-acute (0.2187 mg/kg, s.c.) neurotoxicity in male wistar rats. Drug treatment which includes nimodipine (Ca(2+) channel blocker), diazepam, ropinirole (dopamine agonist) and GSPE (antioxidant) was started 2h after carbofuran administration. Morris water maze was employed for aiming spatial memory. Narrow beam walk and rotarod were employed for testing motor functions. Brain acetylcholinesterase activity, thiobarbituric acid reactive species, nitrite, reduced glutathione, catalase levels, and mitochondrial complexes were also estimated. Carbofuran treatment resulted in significant development of cognitive and motor functions manifested as impairment in learning and memory along with increased thiobarbituric acid reactive species, nitrite levels and decreased acetylcholinesterase activity, reduced glutathione, catalase levels, and mitochondrial complexes. The standard antidote therapy (atropine) was not able to provide neuroprotection but was able to provide symptomatic relief. The multifunctional drug therapy attenuated carbofuran induced cognitive and motor dysfunction, acetylcholinesterase activity and other biochemical parameters. The triple combination in sub-acute study may be avoided in future as two drug combinations provide adequate neuroprotection. Thus it can be concluded that standard antidotal therapy may not provide neuroprotection while the multifunctional drug therapy offers neuroprotection against carbofuran and may dramatically increase survival and life quality. PMID:26151868

  13. Lack of expression of the chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan neuron-glial antigen 2 on candidate stem cell populations in paediatric acute myeloid leukaemia/abn(11q23) and acute lymphoblastic leukaemia/t(4;11).

    PubMed

    Neudenberger, J; Hotfilder, M; Rosemann, A; Langebrake, C; Reinhardt, D; Pieters, R; Schrauder, A; Schrappe, M; Röttgers, S; Harbott, J; Vormoor, J

    2006-05-01

    It has increasingly been acknowledged that only a few leukaemic cells possess the capability to renew themselves and that only these self-renewing leukaemic stem cells are able to initiate relapses. Therefore, these leukaemic stem cells should be the target cells for therapy and for minimal residual disease (MRD) detection. Because of its presence on blasts of 11q23-rearranged high-risk leukaemic patients, neuron-glial antigen 2 (NG2) is thought to be a valuable marker for detecting leukaemic stem cells. Six acute myeloid leukaemia (AML)/abn(11q23) and three acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL)/t(4;11) samples were analysed by four-colour flow cytometry for NG2 expression on primitive cell populations. Candidate leukaemic cell populations were defined by the antigen profiles CD34+CD38- in AML and CD34+CD19-CD117+ in ALL. Surprisingly, in all patients these candidate stem cell populations were shown to lack expression of NG2. Instead, a correlation between the expression of the myeloid differentiation marker CD33 and increasing levels of NG2 on maturing cells could be demonstrated. Similarly, in ALL patients CD34+CD19+ cells showed a higher expression of NG2 mRNA compared with CD34+CD19-. Thus, NG2 appears to be upregulated with differentiation and not to be expressed on primitive disease-maintaining cells. This hampers the clinical use of NG2 as a therapeutic target and as a sensitive marker for MRD detection.

  14. The dissociative bond.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Nirit

    2013-01-01

    Dissociation leaves a psychic void and a lingering sense of psychic absence. How do 2 people bond while they are both suffering from dissociation? The author explores the notion of a dissociative bond that occurs in the aftermath of trauma--a bond that holds at its core an understanding and shared detachment from the self. Such a bond is confined to unspoken terms that are established in the relational unconscious. The author proposes understanding the dissociative bond as a transitional space that may not lead to full integration of dissociated knowledge yet offers some healing. This is exemplified by R. Prince's (2009) clinical case study. A relational perspective is adopted, focusing on the intersubjective aspects of a dyadic relationship. In the dissociative bond, recognition of the need to experience mutual dissociation can accommodate a psychic state that yearns for relationship when the psyche cannot fully confront past wounds. Such a bond speaks to the need to reestablish a sense of human relatedness and connection when both parties in the relationship suffer from disconnection. This bond is bound to a silence that becomes both a means of protection against the horror of traumatic memory and a way to convey unspoken gestures toward the other.

  15. The dissociative bond.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Nirit

    2013-01-01

    Dissociation leaves a psychic void and a lingering sense of psychic absence. How do 2 people bond while they are both suffering from dissociation? The author explores the notion of a dissociative bond that occurs in the aftermath of trauma--a bond that holds at its core an understanding and shared detachment from the self. Such a bond is confined to unspoken terms that are established in the relational unconscious. The author proposes understanding the dissociative bond as a transitional space that may not lead to full integration of dissociated knowledge yet offers some healing. This is exemplified by R. Prince's (2009) clinical case study. A relational perspective is adopted, focusing on the intersubjective aspects of a dyadic relationship. In the dissociative bond, recognition of the need to experience mutual dissociation can accommodate a psychic state that yearns for relationship when the psyche cannot fully confront past wounds. Such a bond speaks to the need to reestablish a sense of human relatedness and connection when both parties in the relationship suffer from disconnection. This bond is bound to a silence that becomes both a means of protection against the horror of traumatic memory and a way to convey unspoken gestures toward the other. PMID:23282044

  16. Acute administration of a small molecule p75NTR ligand does not prevent hippocampal neuron loss nor development of spontaneous seizures after pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus

    PubMed Central

    Grabenstatter, H.L.; Carlsen, J.; Raol, Y.H.; Yang, T.; Hund, D.; Del Angel, Y. Cruz; White, A.M.; Gonzalez, M.I.; Longo, F.M.; Russek, S.J.; Brooks-Kayal, A.R.

    2014-01-01

    Neurotrophins, such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), are initially expressed in a precursor form (e.g., proBDNF) and cleaved to form mature BDNF (mBDNF). Following pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus (SE), increases in neurotrophins regulate a wide variety of cell signaling pathways including pro-survival and cell-death machinery in a receptor-specific manner. ProBDNF preferentially binds to the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR), while mBDNF is the major ligand of the tropomyosin related kinase receptor (TrkB). To elucidate a potential role of p75NTR in acute stages of epileptogenesis, rats were injected prior to and at onset of SE with LM11A-31, a small molecule ligand that binds to p75NTR to promote survival signaling and inhibit neuronal cell death. Modulation of early p75NTR signaling and its effects on (1) electrographic SE, (2) SE-induced neurodegeneration, and (3) subsequent spontaneous seizures were examined following LM11A-31 administration. Despite an established neuroprotective effect of LM11A-31 in several animal models of neurodegenerative disorders (e.g., Alzheimer’s disease, traumatic brain injury, and spinal cord injury), high-dose LM11A-31 administration prior to and at onset of SE did not reduce the intensity of electrographic SE, prevent SE-induced neuronal cell injury, nor inhibit the progression of epileptogenesis. Further studies are required to understand the role of p75NTR activation during epileptogenesis and in seizure-induced cell injury in the hippocampus among other potential cellular pathologies contributing to the onset of spontaneous seizures. Additional studies utilizing more prolonged treatment with LM11A-31 are required to reach a definite conclusion on its potential neuroprotective role in epilepsy. PMID:24801281

  17. Generalised dissociative amnesia.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, S N; Jena, S; Saxena, S

    1993-12-01

    A case of generalised dissociative amnesia is presented, which illustrates several characteristic features of this uncommon condition. The case showed poor response to thiopentone interviews and in vivo cueing. Amnesia had persisted at six months follow up.

  18. TGFbeta2 mediates rapid inhibition of calcium influx in identified cholinergic basal forebrain neurons.

    PubMed

    Williams, Sylvain; Souchelnytskyi, Serhiy; Danik, Marc

    2002-02-01

    Transforming growth factors betas (TGFbetas) are known to have important roles in neuronal survival and can be upregulated in disease. However, unlike many other trophic factors, nothing is known about the rapid neurotransmitter-like actions of TGFbeta in the CNS. We explored this by examining the effects of TGFbeta on calcium influx of large enzymatically dissociated basal forebrain neurons. We show that brief application of TGFbeta2, but not TGFbeta1, to fura-2AM-loaded neurons reversibly and acutely (within seconds) inhibited K(+)-evoked calcium influx. Moreover, using single-cell RT-PCR, we confirmed that the large TGFbeta2-responsive neurons presented a cholinergic phenotype. Investigation of the signaling mechanism underlying TGFbeta2 actions using whole-cell recordings of calcium currents revealed that TGFbeta2-mediated responses were insensitive to the nonhydrolyzable GTP analogue GTPgammaS. However, TGFbeta2-mediated calcium current reductions were prevented by intracellular perfusion of a Smad2/3 peptide antagonist. Together, these results suggest that TGFbeta2 can acutely regulate the excitability of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons through an atypical signaling mechanism. PMID:11812008

  19. Scorpion toxin BmK I directly activates Nav1.8 in primary sensory neurons to induce neuronal hyperexcitability in rats.

    PubMed

    Ye, Pin; Jiao, Yunlu; Li, Zhenwei; Hua, Liming; Fu, Jin; Jiang, Feng; Liu, Tong; Ji, Yonghua

    2015-06-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) in primary sensory neurons play a key role in transmitting pain signals to the central nervous system. BmK I, a site-3 sodium channel-specific toxin from scorpion Buthus martensi Karsch, induces pain behaviors in rats. However, the subtypes of VGSCs targeted by BmK I were not entirely clear. We therefore investigated the effects of BmK I on the current amplitude, gating and kinetic properties of Nav1.8, which is associated with neuronal hyperexcitability in DRG neurons. It was found that BmK I dose-dependently increased Nav1.8 current in small-sized (<25 μm) acutely dissociated DRG neurons, which correlated with its inhibition on both fast and slow inactivation. Moreover, voltage-dependent activation and steady-state inactivation curves of Nav1.8 were shifted in a hyperpolarized direction. Thus, BmK I reduced the threshold of neuronal excitability and increased action potential firing in DRG neurons. In conclusion, our data clearly demonstrated that BmK I modulated Nav1.8 remarkably, suggesting BmK I as a valuable probe for studying Nav1.8. And Nav1.8 is an important target related to BmK I-evoked pain. PMID:25903152

  20. Divergent neuronal circuitries underlying acute orexigenic effects of peripheral or central ghrelin: critical role of brain accessibility.

    PubMed

    Cabral, A; Valdivia, S; Fernandez, G; Reynaldo, M; Perello, M

    2014-08-01

    Ghrelin is an octanoylated peptide hormone that potently and rapidly increases food intake. The orexigenic action of ghrelin involves the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC), which is accessible to plasma ghrelin and expresses high levels of the ghrelin receptor. Local administration of ghrelin in a variety of other brain nuclei also increases food intake. It is currently unclear, however, whether these non-ARC ghrelin brain targets are impacted by physiological increases of plasma ghrelin. Thus, the present study aimed to clarify which ghrelin brain targets participate in the short-term orexigenic actions of ghrelin. First, c-Fos induction into mouse brains centrally or peripherally treated with ghrelin was analysed. It was confirmed that peripherally administered ghrelin dose-dependently increases food intake and mainly activates c-Fos in ARC neurones. By contrast, centrally administered ghrelin activates c-Fos in a larger number of brain nuclei. To determine which nuclei are directly accessible to ghrelin, mice were centrally or peripherally injected with a fluorescent ghrelin tracer. It was found that peripherally injected tracer mainly accesses the ARC, whereas centrally injected tracer reaches most brain areas known to express ghrelin receptors. Subsequently, the effects of ghrelin were tested in ARC-ablated mice and it was found that these mice failed to increase food intake in response to peripherally administered ghrelin but fully responded to centrally administered ghrelin. ARC-ablated mice showed patterns of ghrelin-induced c-Fos expression similar to those seen in control mice with the exception of the ARC, where no c-Fos was found. Thus, peripheral ghrelin mainly accesses the ARC, which is required for the orexigenic effects of the hormone. Central ghrelin accesses a variety of nuclei, which can mediate the orexigenic effects of the hormone, even in the absence of an intact ARC.

  1. Acute Cocaine Induces Fast Activation of D1 Receptor and Progressive Deactivation of D2 Receptor Strial Neurons: In Vivo Optical Microprobe [Ca(superscript)2+]subscript)i Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Du, C.; Luo, Z.; Volkow, N.D.; Heintz, N.; Pan, Y.; Du, C.

    2011-09-14

    Cocaine induces fast dopamine increases in brain striatal regions, which are recognized to underlie its rewarding effects. Both dopamine D1 and D2 receptors are involved in cocaine's reward but the dynamic downstream consequences of cocaine effects in striatum are not fully understood. Here we used transgenic mice expressing EGFP under the control of either the D1 receptor (D1R) or the D2 receptor (D2R) gene and microprobe optical imaging to assess the dynamic changes in intracellular calcium ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} ) responses (used as marker of neuronal activation) to acute cocaine in vivo separately for D1R- versus D2R-expressing neurons in striatum. Acute cocaine (8 mg/kg, i.p.) rapidly increased [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} in D1R-expressing neurons (10.6 {+-} 3.2%) in striatum within 8.3 {+-} 2.3 min after cocaine administration after which the increases plateaued; these fast [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} increases were blocked by pretreatment with a D1R antagonist (SCH23390). In contrast, cocaine induced progressive decreases in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} in D2R-expressing neurons (10.4 {+-} 5.8%) continuously throughout the 30 min that followed cocaine administration; these slower [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} decreases were blocked by pretreatment with a D2R antagonist (raclopride). Since activation of striatal D1R-expressing neurons (direct-pathway) enhances cocaine reward, whereas activation of D2R expressing neurons suppresses it (indirect-pathway) (Lobo et al., 2010), this suggests that cocaine's rewarding effects entail both its fast stimulation ofD1R (resulting in abrupt activation of direct-pathway neurons) and a slower stimulation of D2R (resulting in longer-lasting deactivation of indirect-pathway neurons). We also provide direct in vivo evidence of D2R and D1R interactions in the striatal responses to acute cocaine administration.

  2. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor modulation of mu (mu) opioid receptors in adult rat sphenopalatine ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Margas, Wojciech; Mahmoud, Saifeldin; Ruiz-Velasco, Victor

    2010-01-01

    The sphenopalatine ganglion (SPG) neurons represent the parasympathetic branch of the autonomic nervous system involved in controlling cerebral blood flow. In the present study, we examined the coupling mechanism between mu (mu) opioid receptors (MOR) and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChR) with Ca(2+) channels in acutely dissociated adult rat SPG neurons. Successful MOR activation was recorded in approximately 40-45% of SPG neurons employing the whole cell variant of the patch-clamp technique. In addition, immunofluorescence assays indicated that MOR are not expressed in all SPG neurons while M(2) mAChR staining was evident in all neurons. The concentration-response relationships generated with morphine and [d-Ala2-N-Me-Phe4-Glycol5]-enkephalin (DAMGO) showed IC(50) values of 15.2 and 56.1 nM and maximal Ca(2+) current inhibition of 26.0 and 38.7%, respectively. Activation of MOR or M(2) mAChR with morphine or oxotremorine-methiodide (Oxo-M), respectively, resulted in voltage-dependent inhibition of Ca(2+) currents via coupling with Galpha(i/o) protein subunits. The acute prolonged exposure (10 min) of neurons to morphine or Oxo-M led to the homologous desensitization of MOR and M(2) mAChR, respectively. The prolonged stimulation of M(2) mAChR with Oxo-M resulted in heterologous desensitization of morphine-mediated Ca(2+) current inhibition, and was sensitive to the M(2) mAChR blocker methoctramine. On the other hand, when the neurons were exposed to morphine or DAMGO for 10 min, heterologous desensitization of M(2) mAChR was not observed. These results suggest that in rat SPG neurons activation of M(2) mAChR likely modulates opioid transmission in the brain vasculature to adequately maintain cerebral blood flow. PMID:19889856

  3. TRESK channel contribution to nociceptive sensory neurons excitability: modulation by nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Neuronal hyperexcitability is a crucial phenomenon underlying spontaneous and evoked pain. In invertebrate nociceptors, the S-type leak K+ channel (analogous to TREK-1 in mammals) plays a critical role of in determining neuronal excitability following nerve injury. Few data are available on the role of leak K2P channels after peripheral axotomy in mammals. Results Here we describe that rat sciatic nerve axotomy induces hyperexcitability of L4-L5 DRG sensory neurons and decreases TRESK (K2P18.1) expression, a channel with a major contribution to total leak current in DRGs. While the expression of other channels from the same family did not significantly change, injury markers ATF3 and Cacna2d1 were highly upregulated. Similarly, acute sensory neuron dissociation (in vitro axotomy) produced marked hyperexcitability and similar total background currents compared with neurons injured in vivo. In addition, the sanshool derivative IBA, which blocked TRESK currents in transfected HEK293 cells and DRGs, increased intracellular calcium in 49% of DRG neurons in culture. Most IBA-responding neurons (71%) also responded to the TRPV1 agonist capsaicin, indicating that they were nociceptors. Additional evidence of a biological role of TRESK channels was provided by behavioral evidence of pain (flinching and licking), in vivo electrophysiological evidence of C-nociceptor activation following IBA injection in the rat hindpaw, and increased sensitivity to painful pressure after TRESK knockdown in vivo. Conclusions In summary, our results clearly support an important role of TRESK channels in determining neuronal excitability in specific DRG neurons subpopulations, and show that axonal injury down-regulates TRESK channels, therefore contributing to neuronal hyperexcitability. PMID:21527011

  4. Dissociation as complex adaptation.

    PubMed

    Sel, R

    1997-03-01

    In this article the general theory of complex adaptive systems, substantiated by non-linear dynamics, will be used to put the dissociative disorders into a theoretical framework and clarify their genesis and presentation. When a system is far out of equilibrium, dissipative structures may be formed ('order out of chaos', as Prigogine (1) has put it). These structures provide the starting point for further evolution and co-evolution of competing groups of functional schemata divided on a bifurcation surface. Complex adaptation is almost inevitable in a complicated system (such as the brain) driven by non-linear dynamics. Dissociation is thus regarded as a consequence of adaptation to a chaotic environment rich in contrasts. In a sufficiently complex environment a person with dissociative identity disorder is more adapted and thus more likely to occur than a 'normal' monopersonality individual.

  5. Segregation and Crosstalk of D1 Receptor-Mediated Activation of ERK in Striatal Medium Spiny Neurons upon Acute Administration of Psychostimulants

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez-Arenas, Omar; Eriksson, Olivia; Hellgren Kotaleski, Jeanette

    2014-01-01

    The convergence of corticostriatal glutamate and dopamine from the midbrain in the striatal medium spiny neurons (MSN) triggers synaptic plasticity that underlies reinforcement learning and pathological conditions such as psychostimulant addiction. The increase in striatal dopamine produced by the acute administration of psychostimulants has been found to activate not only effectors of the AC5/cAMP/PKA signaling cascade such as GluR1, but also effectors of the NMDAR/Ca2+/RAS cascade such as ERK. The dopamine-triggered effects on both these cascades are mediated by D1R coupled to Golf but while the phosphorylation of GluR1 is affected by reductions in the available amount of Golf but not of D1R, the activation of ERK follows the opposite pattern. This segregation is puzzling considering that D1R-induced Golf activation monotonically increases with DA and that there is crosstalk from the AC5/cAMP/PKA cascade to the NMDAR/Ca2+/RAS cascade via a STEP (a tyrosine phosphatase). In this work, we developed a signaling model which accounts for this segregation based on the assumption that a common pool of D1R and Golf is distributed in two D1R/Golf signaling compartments. This model integrates a relatively large amount of experimental data for neurons in vivo and in vitro. We used it to explore the crosstalk topologies under which the sensitivities of the AC5/cAMP/PKA signaling cascade to reductions in D1R or Golf are transferred or not to the activation of ERK. We found that the sequestration of STEP by its substrate ERK together with the insensitivity of STEP activity on targets upstream of ERK (i.e. Fyn and NR2B) to PKA phosphorylation are able to explain the experimentally observed segregation. This model provides a quantitative framework for simulation based experiments to study signaling required for long term potentiation in MSNs. PMID:24499932

  6. Segregation and crosstalk of D1 receptor-mediated activation of ERK in striatal medium spiny neurons upon acute administration of psychostimulants.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez-Arenas, Omar; Eriksson, Olivia; Kotaleski, Jeanette Hellgren

    2014-01-01

    The convergence of corticostriatal glutamate and dopamine from the midbrain in the striatal medium spiny neurons (MSN) triggers synaptic plasticity that underlies reinforcement learning and pathological conditions such as psychostimulant addiction. The increase in striatal dopamine produced by the acute administration of psychostimulants has been found to activate not only effectors of the AC5/cAMP/PKA signaling cascade such as GluR1, but also effectors of the NMDAR/Ca(2+)/RAS cascade such as ERK. The dopamine-triggered effects on both these cascades are mediated by D1R coupled to Golf but while the phosphorylation of GluR1 is affected by reductions in the available amount of Golf but not of D1R, the activation of ERK follows the opposite pattern. This segregation is puzzling considering that D1R-induced Golf activation monotonically increases with DA and that there is crosstalk from the AC5/cAMP/PKA cascade to the NMDAR/Ca(2+)/RAS cascade via a STEP (a tyrosine phosphatase). In this work, we developed a signaling model which accounts for this segregation based on the assumption that a common pool of D1R and Golf is distributed in two D1R/Golf signaling compartments. This model integrates a relatively large amount of experimental data for neurons in vivo and in vitro. We used it to explore the crosstalk topologies under which the sensitivities of the AC5/cAMP/PKA signaling cascade to reductions in D1R or Golf are transferred or not to the activation of ERK. We found that the sequestration of STEP by its substrate ERK together with the insensitivity of STEP activity on targets upstream of ERK (i.e. Fyn and NR2B) to PKA phosphorylation are able to explain the experimentally observed segregation. This model provides a quantitative framework for simulation based experiments to study signaling required for long term potentiation in MSNs. PMID:24499932

  7. Dissociative Spectrum Disorders in the Primary Care Setting.

    PubMed

    Elmore, James L.

    2000-04-01

    Dissociative disorders have a lifetime prevalence of about 10%. Dissociative symptoms may occur in acute stress disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder, somatization disorder, substance abuse, trance and possession trance, Ganser's syndrome, and dissociative identity disorder, as well as in mood disorders, psychoses, and personality disorders. Dissociative symptoms and disorders are observed frequently among patients attending our rural South Carolina community mental health center. Given the prevalence of mental illness in primary care settings and the diagnostic difficulties encountered with dissociative disorders, such illness may be undiagnosed or misdiagnosed in primary care settings. We developed an intervention model that may be applicable to primary care settings or helpful to primary care physicians. Key points of the intervention are identification of dissociative symptoms, patient and family education, review of the origin of the symptoms as a method of coping with trauma, and supportive reinforcement of cognitive and relaxation skills during follow-up visits. Symptom recognition, Education of the family, Learning new skills, and Follow-up may be remembered by the mnemonic device SELF. We present several cases to illustrate dissociative symptoms and our intervention. Physicians and other professionals using the 4 steps and behavioral approaches will be able to better recognize and triage patients with dissociative symptoms. Behaviors previously thought to be secondary to psychosis or personality disorders may be seen in a new frame of reference, strengthening the therapeutic alliance while reducing distress and acting-out behaviors.

  8. Redox-Dependent Modulation of T-Type Ca2+ Channels in Sensory Neurons Contributes to Acute Anti-Nociceptive Effect of Substance P

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Dongyang; Huang, Sha; Gao, Haixia; Liu, Yani; Qi, Jinlong; Chen, Pingping; Wang, Caixue; Scragg, Jason L.; Vakurov, Alexander; Peers, Chris; Du, Xiaona

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Neuropeptide substance P (SP) is produced and released by a subset of peripheral sensory neurons that respond to tissue damage (nociceptors). SP exerts excitatory effects in the central nervous system, but peripheral SP actions are still poorly understood; therefore, here, we aimed at investigating these peripheral mechanisms. Results: SP acutely inhibited T-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channels in nociceptors. The effect was mediated by neurokinin 1 (NK1) receptor-induced stimulation of intracellular release of reactive oxygen species (ROS), as it can be prevented or reversed by the reducing agent dithiothreitol and mimicked by exogenous or endogenous ROS. This redox-mediated T-type Ca2+ channel inhibition operated through the modulation of CaV3.2 channel sensitivity to ambient zinc, as it can be prevented or reversed by zinc chelation and mimicked by exogenous zinc. Elimination of the zinc-binding site in CaV3.2 rendered the channel insensitive to SP-mediated inhibition. Importantly, peripherally applied SP significantly reduced bradykinin-induced nociception in rats in vivo; knock-down of CaV3.2 significantly reduced this anti-nociceptive effect. This atypical signaling cascade shared the initial steps with the SP-mediated augmentation of M-type K+ channels described earlier. Innovation: Our study established a mechanism underlying the peripheral anti-nociceptive effect of SP whereby this neuropeptide produces ROS-dependent inhibition of pro-algesic T-type Ca2+ current and concurrent enhancement of anti-algesic M-type K+ current. These findings will lead to a better understanding of mechanisms of endogenous analgesia. Conclusion: SP modulates T-type channel activity in nociceptors by a redox-dependent tuning of channel sensitivity to zinc; this novel modulatory pathway contributes to the peripheral anti-nociceptive effect of SP. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 25, 233–251. PMID:27306612

  9. Clinically relevant concentration of pregabalin has no acute inhibitory effect on excitation of dorsal horn neurons under normal or neuropathic pain conditions: An intracellular calcium-imaging study in spinal cord slices from adult rats.

    PubMed

    Baba, Hiroshi; Petrenko, Andrey B; Fujiwara, Naoshi

    2016-10-01

    Pregabalin is thought to exert its therapeutic effect in neuropathic pain via binding to α2δ-1 subunits of voltage-gated calcium (Ca(2+)) channels. However, the exact analgesic mechanism after its binding to α2δ-1 subunits remains largely unknown. Whether a clinical concentration of pregabalin (≈10μM) can cause acute inhibition of dorsal horn neurons in the spinal cord is controversial. To address this issue, we undertook intracellular Ca(2+)-imaging studies using spinal cord slices with an intact attached L5 dorsal root, and examined if pregabalin acutely inhibits the primary afferent stimulation-evoked excitation of dorsal horn neurons in normal rats and in rats with streptozotocin-induced painful diabetic neuropathy. Under normal conditions, stimulation of a dorsal root evoked Ca(2+) signals predominantly in the superficial dorsal horn. Clinically relevant (10μM) and a very high concentration of pregabalin (100μM) did not affect the intensity or spread of dorsal root stimulation-evoked Ca(2+) signals, whereas an extremely high dose of pregabalin (300μM) slightly but significantly attenuated Ca(2+) signals in normal rats and in diabetic neuropathic (DN) rats. There was no difference between normal rats and DN rats with regard to the extent of signal attenuation at all concentrations tested. These results suggest that the activity of dorsal horn neurons in the spinal cord is not inhibited acutely by clinical doses of pregabalin under normal or DN conditions. It is very unlikely that an acute inhibitory action in the dorsal horn is the main analgesic mechanism of pregabalin in neuropathic pain states. PMID:27543338

  10. Ketamine anesthesia helps preserve neuronal viability.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Ramatis B; Graham, Brett; Howlett, Marcus C H; Gravina, Fernanda S; Oliveira, Max W S; Imtiaz, Mohammad S; Callister, Robert J; Lim, Rebecca; Brichta, Alan M; van Helden, Dirk F

    2010-06-15

    The dissociative anesthetic ketamine that acts as an N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) antagonist has been reported to improve neurological damage after experimental ischemic challenges. Here we show that deep anesthesia with ketamine before euthanasia by decapitation improves the quality of neonatal mouse neuronal brain slice preparations. Specifically we found that neurons of the locus coeruleus (LC) and hypoglossal motor neurons had significantly higher input resistances, and LC neurons that generally are difficult to voltage control, could be more reliably voltage clamped compared to control neurons. PMID:20380852

  11. Dissociative Identity Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Tom

    2007-01-01

    Few psychological disorders in the Diagnostic Statistical Manual have generated as much controversy as Dissociative Identity Disorder (DID). For the past 35 years diagnoses of DID, previously referred to as Multiple Personality Disorder (MPD), have increased exponentially, causing various psychological researchers and clinicians to question the…

  12. Dissociation: the clinical realities.

    PubMed

    Frankel, F H

    1996-07-01

    An attempt was made by the authors of DSM-III to restrict its focus to the experimental, the observable, and the measurable. The intention was to free the nosology from the influence of unproven theories, and the philosophy was driven largely by the importance of research being able to identify diagnostic categories to facilitate the study of homogeneous groups. So it is of interest that the authors accepted dissociation-an ambiguous event linked to an explicit theoretical concept that had been introduced by Janet-as the basis for classification of clinical presentations that were formerly included under the rubric of hysteria, a similarly unclear category. Since DSM-III, there have been an increasing number of reports of dissociative experiences and dissociative identity disorder (formerly known as multiple personality disorder), but neither of these clinical presentations seems able to withstand the concern that it is dramatically influenced by environmental cues, e.g., the expectations of the therapist. Thus, a restricted phenomenological perspective does not fully appreciate the distorting potential of suggestibility and imagination on the nature of the emerging clinical picture. These factors might well have contributed to and laid the conceptual groundwork for the growth in the number of reports of dissociation.

  13. Dissociation and psychosis in dissociative identity disorder and schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Laddis, Andreas; Dell, Paul F

    2012-01-01

    Dissociative symptoms, first-rank symptoms of schizophrenia, and delusions were assessed in 40 schizophrenia patients and 40 dissociative identity disorder (DID) patients with the Multidimensional Inventory of Dissociation (MID). Schizophrenia patients were diagnosed with the Structured Clinical Interview for the DSM-IV Axis I Disorders; DID patients were diagnosed with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Dissociative Disorders-Revised. DID patients obtained significantly (a) higher dissociation scores; (b) higher passive-influence scores (first-rank symptoms); and (c) higher scores on scales that measure child voices, angry voices, persecutory voices, voices arguing, and voices commenting. Schizophrenia patients obtained significantly higher delusion scores than did DID patients. What is odd is that the dissociation scores of schizophrenia patients were unrelated to their reports of childhood maltreatment. Multiple regression analyses indicated that 81% of the variance in DID patients' dissociation scores was predicted by the MID's Ego-Alien Experiences Scale, whereas 92% of the variance in schizophrenia patients' dissociation scores was predicted by the MID's Voices Scale. We propose that schizophrenia patients' responses to the MID do not index the same pathology as do the responses of DID patients. We argue that neither phenomenological definitions of dissociation nor the current generation of dissociation instruments (which are uniformly phenomenological in nature) can distinguish between the dissociative phenomena of DID and what we suspect are just the dissociation-like phenomena of schizophrenia.

  14. Pathological Dissociation as Measured by the Child Dissociative Checklist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wherry, Jeffrey N.; Neil, Debra A.; Taylor, Tamara N.

    2009-01-01

    The component structure of the Child Dissociative Checklist was examined among abused children. A factor described as pathological dissociation emerged that was predicted by participants being male. There also were differences in pathological dissociation between groups of sexually abused and physically abused children. Replication of this factor…

  15. Lidocaine Inhibits HCN Currents in Rat Spinal Substantia Gelatinosa Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Tao; Liu, Nana; Lv, Minhua; Ma, Longxian; Peng, Huizhen; Peng, Sicong

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Lidocaine, which blocks voltage-gated sodium channels, is widely used in surgical anesthesia and pain management. Recently, it has been proposed that the hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide (HCN) channel is one of the other novel targets of lidocaine. Substantia gelatinosa in the spinal dorsal horn, which plays key roles in modulating nociceptive information from primary afferents, comprises heterogeneous interneurons that can be electrophysiologically categorized by firing pattern. Our previous study demonstrated that a substantial proportion of substantia gelatinosa neurons reveal the presence of HCN current (Ih); however, the roles of lidocaine and HCN channel expression in different types of substantia gelatinosa neurons remain unclear. METHODS: By using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique, we investigated the effect of lidocaine on Ih in rat substantia gelatinosa neurons of acute dissociated spinal cord slices. RESULTS: We found that lidocaine rapidly decreased the peak Ih amplitude with an IC50 of 80 μM. The inhibition rate on Ih was not significantly different with a second application of lidocaine in the same neuron. Tetrodotoxin, a sodium channel blocker, did not affect lidocaine’s effect on Ih. In addition, lidocaine shifted the half-activation potential of Ih from −109.7 to −114.9 mV and slowed activation. Moreover, the reversal potential of Ih was shifted by −7.5 mV by lidocaine. In the current clamp, lidocaine decreased the resting membrane potential, increased membrane resistance, delayed rebound depolarization latency, and reduced the rebound spike frequency. We further found that approximately 58% of substantia gelatinosa neurons examined expressed Ih, in which most of them were tonically firing. CONCLUSIONS: Our studies demonstrate that lidocaine strongly inhibits Ih in a reversible and concentration-dependent manner in substantia gelatinosa neurons, independent of tetrodotoxin-sensitive sodium channels. Thus, our

  16. Correlation of the electrophysiological profiles and sodium channel transcripts of individual rat dorsal root ganglia neurons.

    PubMed

    Thériault, Olivier; Chahine, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    Voltage gated sodium channels (Nav channels) play an important role in nociceptive transmission. They are intimately tied to the genesis and transmission of neuronal firing. Five different isoforms (Nav1.3, Nav1.6, Nav1.7, Nav1.8, and Nav1.9) have been linked to nociceptive responses. A change in the biophysical properties of these channels or in their expression levels occurs in different pathological pain states. However, the precise involvement of the isoforms in the genesis and transmission of nociceptive responses is unknown. The aim of the present study was to investigate the synergy between the different populations of Nav channels that give individual neurons a unique electrophysical profile. We used the patch-clamp technique in the whole-cell configuration to record Nav currents and action potentials from acutely dissociated small diameter DRG neurons (<30 μm) from adult rats. We also performed single cell qPCR on the same neurons. Our results revealed that there is a strong correlation between Nav currents and mRNA transcripts in individual neurons. A cluster analysis showed that subgroups formed by Nav channel transcripts by mRNA quantification have different biophysical properties. In addition, the firing frequency of the neurons was not affected by the relative populations of Nav channel. The synergy between populations of Nav channel in individual small diameter DRG neurons gives each neuron a unique electrophysiological profile. The Nav channel remodeling that occurs in different pathological pain states may be responsible for the sensitization of the neurons. PMID:25285069

  17. Three dimensions of dissociative amnesia.

    PubMed

    Dell, Paul F

    2013-01-01

    Principal axis factor analysis with promax rotation extracted 3 factors from the 42 memory and amnesia items of the Multidimensional Inventory of Dissociation (MID) database (N = 2,569): Discovering Dissociated Actions, Lapses of Recent Memory and Skills, and Gaps in Remote Memory. The 3 factors' shared variance ranged from 36% to 64%. Construed as scales, the 3 factor scales had Cronbach's alpha coefficients of .96, .94, and .93, respectively. The scales correlated strongly with mean Dissociative Experiences Scale scores, mean MID scores, and total scores on the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Dissociative Disorders-Revised (SCID-D-R). What is interesting is that the 3 amnesia factors exhibited a range of correlations with SCID-D-R Amnesia scores (.52, .63, and .70, respectively), suggesting that the SCID-D-R Amnesia score emphasizes gaps in remote memory over amnesias related to dissociative identity disorder. The 3 amnesia factor scales exhibited a clinically meaningful pattern of significant differences among dissociative identity disorder, dissociative disorder not otherwise specified-1, dissociative amnesia, depersonalization disorder, and nonclinical participants. The 3 amnesia factors may have greater clinical utility for frontline clinicians than (a) amnesia as discussed in the context of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, nosology of the dissociative disorders or (b) P. Janet's (1893/1977 ) 4-fold classification of dissociative amnesia. The author recommends systematic study of the phenomenological differences within specific dissociative symptoms and their differential relationship to specific dissociative disorders. PMID:23282045

  18. Three dimensions of dissociative amnesia.

    PubMed

    Dell, Paul F

    2013-01-01

    Principal axis factor analysis with promax rotation extracted 3 factors from the 42 memory and amnesia items of the Multidimensional Inventory of Dissociation (MID) database (N = 2,569): Discovering Dissociated Actions, Lapses of Recent Memory and Skills, and Gaps in Remote Memory. The 3 factors' shared variance ranged from 36% to 64%. Construed as scales, the 3 factor scales had Cronbach's alpha coefficients of .96, .94, and .93, respectively. The scales correlated strongly with mean Dissociative Experiences Scale scores, mean MID scores, and total scores on the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Dissociative Disorders-Revised (SCID-D-R). What is interesting is that the 3 amnesia factors exhibited a range of correlations with SCID-D-R Amnesia scores (.52, .63, and .70, respectively), suggesting that the SCID-D-R Amnesia score emphasizes gaps in remote memory over amnesias related to dissociative identity disorder. The 3 amnesia factor scales exhibited a clinically meaningful pattern of significant differences among dissociative identity disorder, dissociative disorder not otherwise specified-1, dissociative amnesia, depersonalization disorder, and nonclinical participants. The 3 amnesia factors may have greater clinical utility for frontline clinicians than (a) amnesia as discussed in the context of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, nosology of the dissociative disorders or (b) P. Janet's (1893/1977 ) 4-fold classification of dissociative amnesia. The author recommends systematic study of the phenomenological differences within specific dissociative symptoms and their differential relationship to specific dissociative disorders.

  19. The Comparison of the Effects of Acute and Repeated Morphine Administration on Fast Synaptic Transmission in Magnocellular Neurons of Supraoptic Nucleus, Plasma Vasopressin Levels, and Urine Volume of Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yousefpour, Mitra; Naderi, Nima; Mansouri, Zahra; Janahmadi, Mahyar; Alizadeh, Amir-Mohammad; Motamedi, Fereshteh

    2014-01-01

    The activity of the magnocellular neurons (MCNs) of supraoptic nucleus (SON) is regulated by a variety of excitatory and inhibitory inputs. Opioids are one of the important compounds that affect these inputs at SON synapses. In this study, whole-cell patch clamp recording of SON neurons was used to investigate the effect of acute and repeated morphine administration on spontaneous inhibitory and excitatory post synaptic currents (sIPSCs and sEPSCs) in MCNs. While acute bath application of morphine to brain slice of intact rat produced an increase in sEPSCs frequency and a decrease in sIPSCs frequency, repeated in-vivo administration of morphine produced opposite effect. Moreover, repetitive i.c.v. administration of morphine for three consecutive days caused significant increase in urine volume, but had no significant alteration in water consumption compared to control group. The increase in urine volume was consistent with a significant decrease in plasma arginine vasopressin (AVP) levels after repetitive i.p. morphine administration. The results suggest that acute administration of morphine stimulates whereas repeated administration of morphine inhibits the MCNs. Morphine-induced MCN inhibition could result in diminished plasma AVP levels and eventually an increase in urine volume of rats. PMID:25276199

  20. Estrogen Receptor Beta and 2-arachidonoylglycerol Mediate the Suppressive Effects of Estradiol on Frequency of Postsynaptic Currents in Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Neurons of Metestrous Mice: An Acute Slice Electrophysiological Study

    PubMed Central

    Bálint, Flóra; Liposits, Zsolt; Farkas, Imre

    2016-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons are controlled by 17β-estradiol (E2) contributing to the steroid feedback regulation of the reproductive axis. In rodents, E2 exerts a negative feedback effect upon GnRH neurons throughout the estrus-diestrus phase of the ovarian cycle. The present study was undertaken to reveal the role of estrogen receptor subtypes in the mediation of the E2 signal and elucidate the downstream molecular machinery of suppression. The effect of E2 administration at low physiological concentration (10 pM) on GnRH neurons in acute brain slices obtained from metestrous GnRH-green fluorescent protein (GFP) mice was studied under paradigms of blocking or activating estrogen receptor subtypes and interfering with retrograde 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) signaling. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings revealed that E2 significantly diminished the frequency of spontaneous postsynaptic currents (sPSCs) in GnRH neurons (49.62 ± 7.6%) which effect was abolished by application of the estrogen receptor (ER) α/β blocker Faslodex (1 μM). Pretreatment of the brain slices with cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) inverse agonist AM251 (1 μM) and intracellularly applied endocannabinoid synthesis blocker THL (10 μM) significantly attenuated the effect of E2 on the sPSCs. E2 remained effective in the presence of tetrodotoxin (TTX) indicating a direct action of E2 on GnRH cells. The ERβ specific agonist DPN (10 pM) also significantly decreased the frequency of miniature postsynaptic currents (mPSCs) in GnRH neurons. In addition, the suppressive effect of E2 was completely blocked by the selective ERβ antagonist PHTPP (1 μM) indicating that ERβ is required for the observed rapid effect of the E2. In contrast, the ERα agonist PPT (10 pM) or the membrane-associated G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPR30) agonist G1 (10 pM) had no significant effect on the frequency of mPSCs in these neurons. AM251 and tetrahydrolipstatin (THL) significantly abolished

  1. Dissociative ionization of biomolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Winifred

    2004-09-01

    Dissociative ionization (DI) by electron impact plays a role in many different applications, including low-temperature plasma processing, the study of space and astrophysical plasmas, and the study of biological damages by high-energy radiation. In the present study, our goal is to understand the health hazard to humans from exposure to radiation during an extended space flight. DI by secondary electrons can damage the DNA, either directly by causing a DNA lesion, or indirectly by producing radicals and cations that attack the DNA. The theoretical model employed makes use of the fact that electronic motion is much faster than nuclear motion, allowing DI to be treated as a two-step process. The first step is electron-impact ionization resulting in a dissociative state of the molecular ion with the same geometry as the neutral molecule. In the second step the ion relaxes from the initial geometry and undergoes unimolecular dissociation. Thus the DI cross section is given by the product of the ionization cross section and the dissociation probability. For the ionization process we use the improved binary-encounter dipole (iBED) model. For unimolecular dissociation, we use the multiconfigurational self-consistent field (MCSCF) method to determine the minimum energy pathways to possible product channels. This model has been applied to study the DI of H_2O, NH_3, and CH_4, and the results are in good agreement with experiment. The DI from the low-lying channels of benzene has also been studied and the dissociation products are compared with photoionization measurements. The DI of the DNA bases guanine and cytosine are then discussed. Of the four DNA bases, guanine has the largest ionization cross section and cytosine has the smallest. The guanine radical cation is considered to be one of the precursors to the primary, direct-type lesions formed in DNA when it is irradiated. Comparison of DI products of guanine and cytosine will be made to understand the differences in

  2. Imagining the impossible before breakfast: the relation between creativity, dissociation, and sleep.

    PubMed

    van Heugten-van der Kloet, Dalena; Cosgrave, Jan; Merckelbach, Harald; Haines, Ross; Golodetz, Stuart; Lynn, Steven Jay

    2015-01-01

    Dissociative symptoms have been related to higher rapid eye movement sleep density, a sleep phase during which hyperassociativity may occur. This may enhance artistic creativity during the day. To test this hypothesis, we conducted a creative photo contest to explore the relation between dissociation, sleep, and creativity. During the contest, participants (N = 72) took one photo per day for five consecutive days, based on specific daily themes (consisting of single words) and the instruction to take as creative a photo as possible each day. Furthermore, they completed daily measures of state dissociation and a short sleep diary. The photos and their captions were ranked by two professional photographers and two clinical psychologists based on creativity, originality, bizarreness, and quality. We expected that dissociative people would rank higher in the contest compared with low-dissociative participants, and that the most original photos would be taken on days when the participants scored highest on acute dissociation. We found that acute dissociation predicted a higher ranking on creativity. Poorer sleep quality and fewer hours of sleep predicted more bizarreness in the photos and captions. None of the trait measures could predict creativity. In sum, acute dissociation related to enhanced creativity. These findings contribute to our understanding of dissociative symptomatology. PMID:25859231

  3. Imagining the impossible before breakfast: the relation between creativity, dissociation, and sleep

    PubMed Central

    van Heugten - van der Kloet, Dalena; Cosgrave, Jan; Merckelbach, Harald; Haines, Ross; Golodetz, Stuart; Lynn, Steven Jay

    2015-01-01

    Dissociative symptoms have been related to higher rapid eye movement sleep density, a sleep phase during which hyperassociativity may occur. This may enhance artistic creativity during the day. To test this hypothesis, we conducted a creative photo contest to explore the relation between dissociation, sleep, and creativity. During the contest, participants (N = 72) took one photo per day for five consecutive days, based on specific daily themes (consisting of single words) and the instruction to take as creative a photo as possible each day. Furthermore, they completed daily measures of state dissociation and a short sleep diary. The photos and their captions were ranked by two professional photographers and two clinical psychologists based on creativity, originality, bizarreness, and quality. We expected that dissociative people would rank higher in the contest compared with low-dissociative participants, and that the most original photos would be taken on days when the participants scored highest on acute dissociation. We found that acute dissociation predicted a higher ranking on creativity. Poorer sleep quality and fewer hours of sleep predicted more bizarreness in the photos and captions. None of the trait measures could predict creativity. In sum, acute dissociation related to enhanced creativity. These findings contribute to our understanding of dissociative symptomatology. PMID:25859231

  4. The chemokine CXCL1/growth related oncogene increases sodium currents and neuronal excitability in small diameter sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun-Gang; Strong, Judith A; Xie, Wenrui; Yang, Rui-Hua; Coyle, Dennis E; Wick, Dayna M; Dorsey, Ericka D; Zhang, Jun-Ming

    2008-01-01

    Background Altered Na+ channel expression, enhanced excitability, and spontaneous activity occur in nerve-injury and inflammatory models of pathological pain, through poorly understood mechanisms. The cytokine GRO/KC (growth related oncogene; CXCL1) shows strong, rapid upregulation in dorsal root ganglion in both nerve injury and inflammatory models. Neurons and glia express its receptor (CXCR2). CXCL1 has well-known effects on immune cells, but little is known about its direct effects on neurons. Results We report that GRO/KC incubation (1.5 nM, overnight) caused marked upregulation of Na+ currents in acutely isolated small diameter rat (adult) sensory neurons in vitro. In both IB4-positive and IB4-negative sensory neurons, TTX-resistant and TTX-sensitive currents increased 2- to 4 fold, without altered voltage dependence or kinetic changes. These effects required long exposures, and were completely blocked by co-incubation with protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide. Amplification of cDNA from the neuronal cultures showed that 3 Na channel isoforms were predominant both before and after GRO/KC treatment (Nav 1.1, 1.7, and 1.8). TTX-sensitive isoforms 1.1 and 1.7 significantly increased 2 – 3 fold after GRO/KC incubation, while 1.8 showed a trend towards increased expression. Current clamp experiments showed that GRO/KC caused a marked increase in excitability, including resting potential depolarization, decreased rheobase, and lower action potential threshold. Neurons acquired a striking ability to fire repetitively; IB4-positive cells also showed marked broadening of action potentials. Immunohistochemical labelling confirmed that the CXCR2 receptor was present in most neurons both in dissociated cells and in DRG sections, as previously shown for neurons in the CNS. Conclusion Many studies on the role of chemokines in pain conditions have focused on their rapid and indirect effects on neurons, via release of inflammatory mediators from immune and glial cells

  5. Vestibular Neuronitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prevent Painful Swimmer's Ear Additional Content Medical News Vestibular Neuronitis By Lawrence R. Lustig, MD NOTE: This ... Drugs Herpes Zoster Oticus Meniere Disease Purulent Labyrinthitis Vestibular Neuronitis Vestibular neuronitis is a disorder characterized by ...

  6. [A dissociative patient].

    PubMed

    de Jongh, A; Abkhezr, S; Broers, D L M

    2009-08-01

    A 45-year-old woman attended a centre for special dental care. Initially, it seemed that the patient suffered from an extreme form of dental anxiety. However, the fact that she displayed 'dissociations' suggested that she had a severe psychiatric disorder, in this case Dissociative Identity Disorder. The key feature of this condition is a dysfunction of the normal integrative functions of identity, memory and consciousness. In such instances it is recommended to contact a psychologist or psychiatrist and the referring care provider to consider the consequences of the psychiatric condition regarding informed consent, treatment plan and actual treatment. Because it was not likely that the patient would respond to an intervention specifically aimed to reduce anxiety in the dental setting, dental treatment under general anesthesia was the best suited option.

  7. Dissociation and psychotic symptoms.

    PubMed

    Steingard, S; Frankel, F H

    1985-08-01

    The literature on hysterical or brief reactive psychosis reflects great diversity both in clinical description and theoretical formulation. The authors describe the case of a 17-year-old girl who presented with a diagnosis of bipolar affective disorder, rapid cycling type, but who, in fact, was experiencing dissociative episodes manifested as psychotic states. The patient's successful treatment with hypnosis is described, along with the clinical and theoretical implications of the case.

  8. Molecular and functional expression of cation-chloride cotransporters in dorsal root ganglion neurons during postnatal maturation

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Shihong; Garzon-Muvdi, Tomás; Di Fulvio, Mauricio; Chen, Yanfang; Delpire, Eric; Alvarez, Francisco J.

    2012-01-01

    GABA depolarizes and excites central neurons during early development, becoming inhibitory and hyperpolarizing with maturation. This “developmental shift” occurs abruptly, reflecting a decrease in intracellular Cl− concentration ([Cl−]i) and a hyperpolarizing shift in Cl− equilibrium potential due to upregulation of the K+-Cl− cotransporter KCC2b, a neuron-specific Cl− extruder. In contrast, primary afferent neurons (PANs) are depolarized by GABA throughout adulthood because of expression of NKCC1, a Na+-K+-2Cl− cotransporter that accumulates Cl− above equilibrium. The GABAA-mediated depolarization of PANs determines presynaptic inhibition in the spinal cord, a key mechanism gating somatosensory information. Little is known about developmental changes in Cl− transporter expression and Cl− homeostasis in PANs. Whether NKCC1 is expressed in PANs of all phenotypes or is restricted to subpopulations (e.g., nociceptors) is debatable. Likewise, whether PANs express KCC2s is controversial. We investigated NKCC1 and K+-Cl− cotransporter expression in rat and mouse dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons with molecular methods. Using fluorescence imaging microscopy, we measured [Cl−]i in acutely dissociated rat DRG neurons (P0–P21) loaded with N-(ethoxycarbonylmethyl)-6-methoxyquinolinium bromide and classified with phenotypic markers. DRG neurons of all sizes express two NKCC1 mRNAs, one full-length and a shorter splice variant lacking exon 21. Immunolabeling with validated antibodies revealed ubiquitous expression of NKCC1 in DRG neurons irrespective of postnatal age and phenotype. As maturation progresses [Cl−]i decreases gradually, persisting above equilibrium in >95% mature neurons. DRG neurons express mRNAs for KCC1, KCC3s, and KCC4, but not for KCC2s. Mechanisms underlying PANs' developmental changes in Cl− homeostasis are discussed and compared with those of central neurons. PMID:22457464

  9. New Hippocampal Neurons Mature Rapidly in Response to Ketamine But Are Not Required for Its Acute Antidepressant Effects on Neophagia in Rats123

    PubMed Central

    Soumier, Amelie; Carter, Rayna M.; Schoenfeld, Timothy J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Virtually all antidepressant agents increase the birth of granule neurons in the adult dentate gyrus in rodents, providing a key basis for the neurogenesis hypothesis of antidepressant action. The novel antidepressant ketamine, however, shows antidepressant activity in humans within hours, far too rapid for a mechanism involving neuronal birth. Ketamine could potentially act more rapidly by enhancing maturation of new neurons born weeks earlier. To test this possibility, we assessed the effects of S-ketamine (S-(+)-ketamine hydrochloride) injection on maturation, as well as birth and survival, of new dentate gyrus granule neurons in rats, using the immediate-early gene zif268, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, and BrdU, respectively. We show that S-ketamine has rapid effects on new neurons, increasing the proportion of functionally mature young granule neurons within 2 h. A single injection of S-ketamine also increased cell proliferation and functional maturation, and decreased depressive-like behavior, for at least 4 weeks in rats treated with long-term corticosterone administration (a depression model) and controls. However, the behavioral effects of S-ketamine on neophagia were unaffected by elimination of adult neurogenesis. Together, these results indicate that ketamine has surprisingly rapid and long-lasting effects on the recruitment of young neurons into hippocampal networks, but that ketamine has antidepressant-like effects that are independent of adult neurogenesis. PMID:27066531

  10. Differential properties of type I and type II benzodiazepine receptors in mammalian CNS neurones.

    PubMed Central

    Yakushiji, T.; Shirasaki, T.; Munakata, M.; Hirata, A.; Akaike, N.

    1993-01-01

    1. The effects of benzodiazepine receptor (BZR) partial agonists, Y-23684 and CL218,872, were compared with its full agonist, diazepam, on gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-induced Cl- current (ICl) in acutely dissociated rat cerebral cortex (CTX), cerebellar Purkinje (CPJ) and spinal ventral horn (SVH) neurones, by the whole-cell mode patch-clamp technique. 2. The GABA-induced responses were essentially the same in both SVH and CPJ neurones, but the KD value of the GABA response in CTX neurone was lower than those in the other two brain regions. 3. Enhancement of the GABA response by the two partial agonists was about one-third of that by diazepam in the SVH neurones (where type II subtype of BZR, BZ2, is predominant), whereas these partial agonists potentiated the GABA response as much as diazepam in CPJ neurones (where the type I subtype of BZR, BZ1, is predominant). In CTX neurones where both type I and II variants are expressed, the augmentation ratio of the GABA response by diazepam was between the values in CPJ and SVH neurones. 4. In concentration-response relationships of BZR partial agonists, the threshold concentrations, KD values and maximal augmentation ratio of the GABA response were similar in all CTX, CPJ and SVH neurones. Also, in all preparations, the threshold concentration and KD values of diazepam action were 10 fold less than those induced by partial agonists. 5. All BZR agonists shifted the concentration-response relationship for GABA to the left without changing the maximum current amplitude, indicating that activation of both BZ1 and BZ2 increase the affinity of the GABAA receptor for GABA.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8395299

  11. Recurrent dissociative fugue.

    PubMed

    Mamarde, Abhishek; Navkhare, Praveen; Singam, Amrita; Kanoje, Akash

    2013-10-01

    Dissociative fugue is a rarely reported diagnostic entity. It is one of the least understood and yet clinically one of the most fascinating disorders in mental health. Here, we describe a case of fugue in a 32-year-old man who was brought to mental hospital with complete loss of memory for events pertaining to identity of self. This case illustrates the nature of presentation in hospital setting like mental hospital and effort taken to reintegrate his identity and reunite with his family. PMID:24379504

  12. Recurrent dissociative fugue.

    PubMed

    Mamarde, Abhishek; Navkhare, Praveen; Singam, Amrita; Kanoje, Akash

    2013-10-01

    Dissociative fugue is a rarely reported diagnostic entity. It is one of the least understood and yet clinically one of the most fascinating disorders in mental health. Here, we describe a case of fugue in a 32-year-old man who was brought to mental hospital with complete loss of memory for events pertaining to identity of self. This case illustrates the nature of presentation in hospital setting like mental hospital and effort taken to reintegrate his identity and reunite with his family.

  13. Recurrent Dissociative Fugue

    PubMed Central

    Mamarde, Abhishek; Navkhare, Praveen; Singam, Amrita; Kanoje, Akash

    2013-01-01

    Dissociative fugue is a rarely reported diagnostic entity. It is one of the least understood and yet clinically one of the most fascinating disorders in mental health. Here, we describe a case of fugue in a 32-year-old man who was brought to mental hospital with complete loss of memory for events pertaining to identity of self. This case illustrates the nature of presentation in hospital setting like mental hospital and effort taken to reintegrate his identity and reunite with his family. PMID:24379504

  14. Functional connectivity in in vitro neuronal assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Poli, Daniele; Pastore, Vito P.; Massobrio, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Complex network topologies represent the necessary substrate to support complex brain functions. In this work, we reviewed in vitro neuronal networks coupled to Micro-Electrode Arrays (MEAs) as biological substrate. Networks of dissociated neurons developing in vitro and coupled to MEAs, represent a valid experimental model for studying the mechanisms governing the formation, organization and conservation of neuronal cell assemblies. In this review, we present some examples of the use of statistical Cluster Coefficients and Small World indices to infer topological rules underlying the dynamics exhibited by homogeneous and engineered neuronal networks. PMID:26500505

  15. THE DISSOCIATIVE TURN IN PSYCHOANALYSIS.

    PubMed

    Itzkowitz, Sheldon

    2015-06-01

    In his response to the Roundtable Discussions on what is effective in psychoanalytic psychotherapy, the author focuses on the renewed interest in the concept of dissociation that began to emerge toward the end of the 20th century. A contemporary psychoanalytic position informed by the impact of developmental trauma has led to an understanding of and interest in the dissociative mind. The actuality of trauma during infancy and early childhood is recognized as a key factor leading to the emergence of dissociative processes, the potential dissociative structuring of the mind, and mind being characterized by multiple, discontinuous, centers of consciousness. The therapeutic goal in the psychoanalytic work with fragmented patients is to establish communication and understanding between the dissociated self-states. The author offers two brief clinical examples of working with dissociated self-states.

  16. Neuronal beacon.

    PubMed

    Black, B; Mondal, A; Kim, Y; Mohanty, S K

    2013-07-01

    The controlled navigation of the axonal growth cone of a neuron toward the dendrite of its synaptic partner neuron is the fundamental process in forming neuronal circuitry. While a number of technologies have been pursued for axonal guidance over the past decades, they are either invasive or not controllable with high spatial and temporal resolution and are often limited by low guidance efficacy. Here, we report a neuronal beacon based on light for highly efficient and controlled guidance of cortical primary neurons.

  17. Dissociative state and competence.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu-Ju; Hsieh, Ming-Hsien; Liu, Shi-Kai

    2007-10-01

    This report presents the results of forensic evaluation of the civil competence of a case of alleged dissociative identity disorder (DID) and discusses whether such dissociative states substantially jeopardize civil competence. A 40-year-old woman claimed that she had had many personalities since her college days. From the age of 37 to 40, she shopped excessively, which left her with millions of dollars of debt. She ascribed her shopping to a certain identity state, over which she had no control. (In this article, we use the term identity state to replace personality as an objective description of a mental state.) She thus raised the petition of civil incompetence. During the forensic evaluation, it was found that the identity states were relatively stable and mutually aware of each other. The switch into another identity state was sometimes under voluntary control. The subject showed consistency and continuity in behavioral patterns across the different identity states, and no matter which identity state she was in, there was no evidence of impairment in her factual knowledge of social situations and her capacity for managing personal affairs. We hence concluded that she was civilly competent despite the claimed DID. Considering that the existence and diagnosis of DID are still under dispute and a diagnosis of DID alone is not sufficient to interdict a persons civil right, important clinical and forensic issues remain to be answered.

  18. Dissociative Electron Attachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arreola, Esmeralda; Esmeralda Arreola Collaboration; Leigh Hargreaves Collaboration

    Since the pioneering work of Boudiaffa et al., it has been understood that electrons, even with energies near or below the ionization threshold, are capable of initiating strand-breaks in human DNA. This discovery raised important questions for cancer treatments, since sub-ionizing electrons are known to be the most copiously produced secondary product of radiation therapy. But even to date these factors are largely excluded from dosimetry calculations. This lack of inclusion is, at least in part, certainly due to the dearth of fundamental data describing low-energy electron interactions with nucleotide molecules that form the basis of DNA. Understanding of how such slow electrons are able to damage DNA remains incomplete, but the strongly peaked nature of Boudiaffa et al.'s data gives strong hints at resonantly driven collision processes. DNA damage is therefore most likely driven by ``dissociative electron attachment'' (DEA). DEA is a rather complicated process to model due to the coupling of electronic and nuclear degrees of freedom in the molecule. At the California State University Fullerton, we are currently commissioning a new spectrometer to study dissociation channels, reaction rates and orientation effects in DEA collisions between slow electrons and nucleotide molecules. At the meeting we will present design parameters and commissioning data for this new apparatus.

  19. DIFFRACTION DISSOCIATION - 50 YEARS LATER.

    SciTech Connect

    WHITE, S.N.

    2005-04-27

    The field of Diffraction Dissociation, which is the subject of this workshop, began 50 years ago with the analysis of deuteron stripping in low energy collisions with nuclei. We return to the subject in a modern context- deuteron dissociation in {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV d-Au collisions recorded during the 2003 RHIC run in the PHENIX experiment. At RHIC energy, d {yields} n+p proceeds predominantly (90%) through Electromagnetic Dissociation and the remaining fraction via the hadronic shadowing described by Glauber. Since the dissociation cross section has a small theoretical error we adopt this process to normalize other cross sections measured in RHIC.

  20. Cryopreservation of adherent neuronal networks.

    PubMed

    Ma, Wu; O'Shaughnessy, Thomas; Chang, Eddie

    2006-07-31

    Neuronal networks have been widely used for neurophysiology, drug discovery and toxicity testing. An essential prerequisite for future widespread application of neuronal networks is the development of efficient cryopreservation protocols to facilitate their storage and transportation. Here is the first report on cryopreservation of mammalian adherent neuronal networks. Dissociated spinal cord cells were attached to a poly-d-lysine/laminin surface and allowed to form neuronal networks. Adherent neuronal networks were embedded in a thin film of collagen gel and loaded with trehalose prior to transfer to a freezing medium containing DMSO, FBS and culture medium. This was followed by a slow rate of cooling to -80 degrees C for 24 h and then storage for up to 2 months in liquid nitrogen at -196 degrees C. The three components: DMSO, collagen gel entrapment and trehalose loading combined provided the highest post-thaw viability, relative to individual or two component protocols. The post-thaw cells with this protocol demonstrated similar neuronal and astrocytic markers and morphological structure as those detected in unfrozen cells. Fluorescent dye FM1-43 staining revealed active recycling of synaptic vesicles upon depolarizing stimulation in the post-thaw neuronal networks. These results suggest that a combination of DMSO, collagen gel entrapment and trehalose loading can significantly improve conventional slow-cooling methods in cryopreservation of adherent neuronal networks.

  1. Hyperglycemia associated dissociative fugue (organic dissociative disorder) in an elderly

    PubMed Central

    Ram, Dushad; Ashoka, H. G; Gowdappa, Basavnna

    2015-01-01

    Inadequate glycemic control in patients with diabetes is known to be associated with psychiatric disorders such as depression, anxiety disorder, and cognitive impairment. However, dissociative syndrome has not been reported so far. Here we are reporting a case of repeated dissociative fugue associated with hyperglycemia, in an elderly with type II diabetes. Possible neurobiological mechanism has been discussed. PMID:26286620

  2. COMMUNICATION: Folate and S-adenosylmethionine modulate synaptic activity in cultured cortical neurons: acute differential impact on normal and apolipoprotein-deficient mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serra, Michael; Chan, Amy; Dubey, Maya; Gilman, Vladimir; Shea, Thomas B.

    2008-12-01

    Folate deficiency is accompanied by a decline in the cognitive neurotransmitter acetylcholine and a decline in cognitive performance in mice lacking apolipoprotein E (ApoE-/- mice), a low-density lipoprotein that regulates aspects of lipid metabolism. One direct consequence of folate deficiency is a decline in S-adenosylmethionine (SAM). Since dietary SAM supplementation maintains acetylcholine levels and cognitive performance in the absence of folate, we examined herein the impact of folate and SAM on neuronal synaptic activity. Embryonic cortical neurons from mice expressing or lacking ApoE (ApoE+/+ or -/-, respectively) were cultured for 1 month on multi-electrode arrays, and signaling was recorded. ApoE+/+ cultures displayed significantly more frequent spontaneous signals than ApoE-/- cultures. Supplementation with 166 µm SAM (not normally present in culture medium) increased signal frequency and decreased signal amplitude in ApoE+/+ cultures. SAM also increased the frequency of tightly clustered signal bursts. Folate deprivation reversibly reduced signal frequency in ApoE+/+ cultures; SAM supplementation maintained signal frequency despite folate deprivation. These findings support the importance of dietary supplementation with folate and SAM on neuronal health. Supplementation with 166 µm SAM did not alter signaling in ApoE-/- cultures, which may be a reflection of the reduced SAM levels in ApoE-/- mice. The differential impact of SAM on ApoE+/+ and -/- neurons underscores the combined impact of nutritional and genetic deficiencies on neuronal homeostasis.

  3. Dissociative States and Neural Complexity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bob, Petr; Svetlak, Miroslav

    2011-01-01

    Recent findings indicate that neural mechanisms of consciousness are related to integration of distributed neural assemblies. This neural integration is particularly vulnerable to past stressful experiences that can lead to disintegration and dissociation of consciousness. These findings suggest that dissociation could be described as a level of…

  4. Dissociation Patterns in Evolving Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, F. J.; Hernández, J. A.; Sánchez, F.

    2011-09-01

    The recent explosion and availability of mobility based technologies such as geographic information systems, cell phones equipped with built-in GPS, among others, are a valuable source of spatio-temporal data. However, only recently there have been works focused on identifying movement patterns in groups of moving entities. We focus on a particular movement pattern: dissociation. A dissociation pattern occurs when an entity that was once associated to a population, eventually separated from it and subsequently reintegrated it again. The backwarding and forwarding patterns are a type of dissociation where an entity stays behind or ahead of another entity, respectively. Dissociation really is a diversity generator, so instead avoiding it, taking advantage could be better to prevent premature convergence in evolutionary algorithms. In this work, we present formal mathematical definitions for these patterns. A discussion of how to use dissociation patterns as a mean to preserve diversity in evolutionary algorithms is also shown.

  5. Enhancement of an outwardly rectifying chloride channel in hippocampal pyramidal neurons after cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianguo; Chang, Quanzhong; Li, Xiaoming; Li, Xiawen; Qiao, Jiantian; Gao, Tianming

    2016-08-01

    Cerebral ischemia induces delayed, selective neuronal death in the CA1 region of the hippocampus. The underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear, but it is known that apoptosis is involved in this process. Chloride efflux has been implicated in the progression of apoptosis in various cell types. Using both the inside-out and whole-cell configurations of the patch-clamp technique, the present study characterized an outwardly rectifying chloride channel (ORCC) in acutely dissociated pyramid neurons in the hippocampus of adult rats. The channel had a nonlinear current-voltage relationship with a conductance of 42.26±1.2pS in the positive voltage range and 18.23±0.96pS in the negative voltage range, indicating an outward rectification pattern. The channel is Cl(-) selective, and the open probability is voltage-dependent. It can be blocked by the classical Cl(-) channel blockers DIDS, SITS, NPPB and glibenclamide. We examined the different changes in ORCC activity in CA1 and CA3 pyramidal neurons at 6, 24 and 48h after transient forebrain ischemia. In the vulnerable CA1 neurons, ORCC activity was persistently enhanced after ischemic insult, whereas in the invulnerable CA3 neurons, no significant changes occurred. Further analysis of channel kinetics suggested that multiple openings are a major contributor to the increase in channel activity after ischemia. Pharmacological blockade of the ORCC partly attenuated cell death in the hippocampal neurons. We propose that the enhanced activity of ORCC might contribute to selective neuronal damage in the CA1 region after cerebral ischemia, and that ORCC may be a therapeutic target against ischemia-induced cell death. PMID:27181516

  6. Neuropeptide FF receptors exhibit direct and anti-opioid effects on mice dorsal raphe nucleus neurons.

    PubMed

    Ding, Zhong; Zajac, Jean-Marie

    2014-10-01

    By using acutely dissociated dorsal raphe nucleus neurons (DRN) from young mice, direct and anti-opioid effects of Neuropeptide FF (NPFF) receptors were measured. The NPFF analog 1 DMe (10 µM) had no effect on resting Ca2+ channels but reduced the magnitude of Ca2+ transients induced by depolarization in 83.3% neurons tested, of which the inhibition rate is 45.4±2.9%. Pertussis toxin treatment reduced to 18.9% the number of responding neurons and attenuated by 47% the response of 1 DMe. In contrast, cholera toxin treatment had no significant effect. Eighteen minute perfusion with 1 DMe at a very low 10 nM concentration, that did not directly inhibit Ca2+ transients triggered by depolarization in every neuron, attenuated by 78% the inhibitory effect of Nociceptin/orphanin FQ (N/OFQ) on Ca2+ transients, but not that of by serotonin. These results demonstrated for the first time that NPFF receptors on mice DRN inhibit Ca2+ transients induced by depolarization via Gi/o protein and also exhibit a specific anti-opioid activity on nociceptin receptors, and that their specific anti-opioid activity is not a direct consequence of their activity on Ca2+ transients.

  7. The dissociative disorders. Rarely considered and underdiagnosed.

    PubMed

    Coons, P M

    1998-09-01

    A wide variety of dissociative disorders, including dissociative amnesia, dissociative fugue, depersonalization disorder, dissociative identity disorder, and various forms of dissociative disorder not otherwise specified. In many instances, these disorders are either underdiagnosed or misdiagnosed secondary to the clinician's mistaken belief that dissociative disorders are rare. Recent research shows that dissociative disorders may comprise 5% to 10% of psychiatric populations. This article reviews the epidemiology and clinical symptomatology of these disorders. In addition, various screening and diagnostic instruments, such as the DES, Structured Clinical Interview for Dissociative Disorders, and MMPI, are discussed.

  8. Are major dissociative disorders characterized by a qualitatively different kind of dissociation?

    PubMed

    Rodewald, Frauke; Dell, Paul F; Wilhelm-Gossling, Claudia; Gast, Ursula

    2011-01-01

    A total of 66 patients with a major dissociative disorder, 54 patients with nondissociative disorders, and 30 nonclinical controls were administered the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Dissociative Disorders-Revised, the Dissociative Experiences Scale, the Multidimensional Inventory of Dissociation, and the Symptom Checklist 90-Revised. Dissociative patients reported significantly more dissociative and nondissociative symptoms than did nondissociative patients and nonclinical controls. When general psychopathology was controlled, the dissociation scores of dissociative patients were still significantly higher than those of both other groups, whereas the dissociation scores of nondissociative patients and nonclinical controls no longer differed. These findings appear to be congruent with a typological model of dissociation that distinguishes between 2 qualitatively different kinds of dissociation. Specifically, the results of this study suggest that the dissociation that occurs in major dissociative disorders (i.e., dissociative identity disorder [DID] and dissociative disorder not otherwise specified, Type 1 [DDNOS-1]) is qualitatively different from the dissociation that occurs in persons who do not have a dissociative disorder. In contrast to previous research, the dissociation of persons who do not have a dissociative disorder is not limited to absorption; it covers a much wider range of phenomena. The authors hypothesize that different mechanisms produce the dissociation of persons with DID and DDNOS-1 as opposed to the dissociation of persons who do not have a dissociative disorder.

  9. Releasing the peri-neuronal net to patch-clamp neurons in adult CNS.

    PubMed

    Morales, Ezequiel; Fernandez, Fernando R; Sinclair, Suzanne; Molineux, Michael L; Mehaffey, W Hamish; Turner, Ray W

    2004-05-01

    The extracellular matrix of adult neural tissue contains chondroitin sulphated proteogylcans that form a dense peri-neuronal net surrounding the cell body and proximal dendrites of many neuronal classes. Development of the peri-neuronal net beyond approximately postnatal day 17 obscures visualization and often access by patch electrodes to neuronal membranes with the result that patch clamp recordings are most readily obtained from early postnatal animals. We describe a technique in which the surface tension of a sucrose-based medium promotes partial dissociation of thin tissue slices from adult tissue. Surface tension spreads the tissue and loosens the peri-neuronal net from neuronal membranes within minutes and in the absence of proteolytic enzymes. Furthermore, the extent of dissociation can be controlled so as to maintain the overall slice structure and allow identification of specific cell classes. Excellent structural preservation of neurons and dendrites can be obtained and full access by patch electrodes made possible for current- or voltage-clamp recordings in tissue well beyond the development of peri-neuronal nets. We demonstrate the feasibility of using this approach through patch recordings from neurons in the brainstem and cerebellum of adult gymnotiform fish and in deep cerebellar nuclei of rats as old as 6 months.

  10. Yonkenafil: a novel phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor induces neuronal network potentiation by a cGMP-dependent Nogo-R axis in acute experimental stroke.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuemei; Wang, Nannan; Liu, Yueyang; Liu, Yinglu; Zhang, Tianyu; Zhu, Lei; Wang, Yongfeng; Wu, Chunfu; Yang, Jingyu

    2014-11-01

    Yonkenafil is a novel phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitor. Here we evaluated the effect of yonkenafil on ischemic injury and its possible mechanism of action. Male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent middle cerebral artery occlusion, followed by intraperitoneal or intravenous treatment with yonkenafil starting 2h later. Behavioral tests were carried out on day 1 or day 7 after reperfusion. Nissl staining, Fluoro-Jade B staining and electron microscopy studies were carried out 24h post-stroke, together with an analysis of infarct volume and severity of edema. Levels of cGMP-dependent Nogo-66 receptor (Nogo-R) pathway components, hsp70, apaf-1, caspase-3, caspase-9, synaptophysin, PSD-95/neuronal nitric oxide synthases (nNOS), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)/tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) and nerve growth factor (NGF)/tropomyosin-related kinase A (TrkA) were also measured after 24h. Yonkenafil markedly inhibited infarction and edema, even when administration was delayed until 4h after stroke onset. This protection was associated with an improvement in neurological function and was sustained for 7d. Yonkenafil enlarged the range of penumbra, reduced ischemic cell apoptosis and the loss of neurons, and modulated the expression of proteins in the Nogo-R pathway. Moreover, yonkenafil protected the structure of synapses and increased the expression of synaptophysin, BDNF/TrkB and NGF/TrkA. In conclusion, yonkenafil protects neuronal networks from injury after stroke.

  11. Recurrent Episodes of Dissociative Fugue

    PubMed Central

    Angothu, Hareesh; Pabbathi, Lokeswar Reddy

    2016-01-01

    Dissociative fugue is rare entity to encounter with possible differentials of epilepsy and malingering. It is one of the dissociative disorders rarely seen in clinical practice more often because of the short lasting nature of this condition. This might also be because of organized travel of the individuals during the episodes and return to their families after the recovery from episodes. This is a case description of a patient who has experienced total three episodes of dissociative fugue. The patient has presented during the third episode and two prior episodes were diagnosed as fugue episodes retrospectively based on the history. Planned travel in this case by the patient to a distant location was prevented because of early diagnosis and constant vigilance till the recovery. As in this case, it may be more likely that persons with Dissociative fugue may develop similar episodes if they encounter exceptional perceived stress. However, such conclusions may require follow-up studies. PMID:27114633

  12. Relation of dissociative phenomena to levels of cerebrospinal fluid monoamine metabolites and beta-endorphin in patients with eating disorders: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Demitrack, M A; Putnam, F W; Rubinow, D R; Pigott, T A; Altemus, M; Krahn, D D; Gold, P W

    1993-10-01

    Dissociation is made manifest by a failure to integrate thoughts, feelings, memories, and actions into a unified sense of consciousness. Although dissociation is presumed to be a special state of consciousness manifested by state-dependent memory and physiology, the psychobiology of dissociation is poorly understood. In this study, we examined cerebrospinal fluid levels of the major monoamine metabolites and beta-endorphin in patients with eating disorders (11 with anorexia nervosa, 16 with bulimia nervosa), while they were acutely ill. Dissociative capacity was measured using the Dissociative Experiences Scale (DES). We provide evidence that neurochemical changes in dopaminergic, serotonergic, and opioid systems may be associated with the clinical expression of dissociation in patients with eating disorders during the acute phase of their illness. These preliminary results are compatible with previous studies of neurochemical disturbances in the eating disorders and suggest that future work in dissociation should specifically include examination of these neurobiologic systems.

  13. Dissociative disorders in DSM-5.

    PubMed

    Spiegel, David; Lewis-Fernández, Roberto; Lanius, Ruth; Vermetten, Eric; Simeon, Daphne; Friedman, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    The rationale, research literature, and proposed changes to the dissociative disorders and conversion disorder in the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) are presented. Dissociative identity disorder will include reference to possession as well as identity fragmentation, to make the disorder more applicable to culturally diverse situations. Dissociative amnesia will include dissociative fugue as a subtype, since fugue is a rare disorder that always involves amnesia but does not always include confused wandering or loss of personality identity. Depersonalization disorder will include derealization as well, since the two often co-occur. A dissociative subtype of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), defined by the presence of depersonalization or derealization in addition to other PTSD symptoms, is being recommended, based upon new epidemiological and neuroimaging evidence linking it to an early life history of adversity and a combination of frontal activation and limbic inhibition. Conversion disorder (functional neurological symptom disorder) will likely remain with the somatic symptom disorders, despite considerable dissociative comorbidity. PMID:23394228

  14. Dissociative disorders in DSM-5.

    PubMed

    Spiegel, David; Lewis-Fernández, Roberto; Lanius, Ruth; Vermetten, Eric; Simeon, Daphne; Friedman, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    The rationale, research literature, and proposed changes to the dissociative disorders and conversion disorder in the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) are presented. Dissociative identity disorder will include reference to possession as well as identity fragmentation, to make the disorder more applicable to culturally diverse situations. Dissociative amnesia will include dissociative fugue as a subtype, since fugue is a rare disorder that always involves amnesia but does not always include confused wandering or loss of personality identity. Depersonalization disorder will include derealization as well, since the two often co-occur. A dissociative subtype of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), defined by the presence of depersonalization or derealization in addition to other PTSD symptoms, is being recommended, based upon new epidemiological and neuroimaging evidence linking it to an early life history of adversity and a combination of frontal activation and limbic inhibition. Conversion disorder (functional neurological symptom disorder) will likely remain with the somatic symptom disorders, despite considerable dissociative comorbidity.

  15. Global functioning and disability in dissociative disorders.

    PubMed

    Mueller-Pfeiffer, Christoph; Rufibach, Kaspar; Perron, Noelle; Wyss, Daniela; Kuenzler, Cornelia; Prezewowsky, Cornelia; Pitman, Roger K; Rufer, Michael

    2012-12-30

    Dissociative disorders are frequent comorbid conditions of other mental disorders. Yet, there is controversy about their clinical relevance, and little systematic research has been done on how they influence global functioning. Outpatients and day care patients (N=160) of several psychiatric units in Switzerland were assessed with the Structured Clinical Interview for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM)-IV Axis I Disorders, Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Dissociative Disorders, Global Assessment of Functioning Scale, and World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule-II. The association between subjects with a dissociative disorder (N=30) and functional impairment after accounting for non-dissociative axis I disorders was evaluated by linear regression models. We found a proportion of 18.8% dissociative disorders (dissociative amnesia=0%, dissociative fugue=0.6%, depersonalization disorder=4.4%, dissociative identity disorder=7.5%, dissociative disorder-not-otherwise-specified=6.3%) across treatment settings. Adjusted for other axis I disorders, subjects with a comorbid dissociative identity disorder or dissociative disorder-not-otherwise-specified had a median global assessment of functioning score that was 0.86 and 0.88 times, respectively, the score of subjects without a comorbid dissociative disorder. These findings support the hypothesis that complex dissociative disorders, i.e., dissociative identity disorder and dissociative disorder-not-otherwise-specified, contribute to functional impairment above and beyond the impact of co-existing non-dissociative axis I disorders, and that they qualify as "serious mental illness".

  16. Network synchronization in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Penn, Yaron; Segal, Menahem; Moses, Elisha

    2016-03-22

    Oscillatory activity is widespread in dynamic neuronal networks. The main paradigm for the origin of periodicity consists of specialized pacemaking elements that synchronize and drive the rest of the network; however, other models exist. Here, we studied the spontaneous emergence of synchronized periodic bursting in a network of cultured dissociated neurons from rat hippocampus and cortex. Surprisingly, about 60% of all active neurons were self-sustained oscillators when disconnected, each with its own natural frequency. The individual neuron's tendency to oscillate and the corresponding oscillation frequency are controlled by its excitability. The single neuron intrinsic oscillations were blocked by riluzole, and are thus dependent on persistent sodium leak currents. Upon a gradual retrieval of connectivity, the synchrony evolves: Loose synchrony appears already at weak connectivity, with the oscillators converging to one common oscillation frequency, yet shifted in phase across the population. Further strengthening of the connectivity causes a reduction in the mean phase shifts until zero-lag is achieved, manifested by synchronous periodic network bursts. Interestingly, the frequency of network bursting matches the average of the intrinsic frequencies. Overall, the network behaves like other universal systems, where order emerges spontaneously by entrainment of independent rhythmic units. Although simplified with respect to circuitry in the brain, our results attribute a basic functional role for intrinsic single neuron excitability mechanisms in driving the network's activity and dynamics, contributing to our understanding of developing neural circuits.

  17. Network synchronization in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Penn, Yaron; Segal, Menahem; Moses, Elisha

    2016-03-22

    Oscillatory activity is widespread in dynamic neuronal networks. The main paradigm for the origin of periodicity consists of specialized pacemaking elements that synchronize and drive the rest of the network; however, other models exist. Here, we studied the spontaneous emergence of synchronized periodic bursting in a network of cultured dissociated neurons from rat hippocampus and cortex. Surprisingly, about 60% of all active neurons were self-sustained oscillators when disconnected, each with its own natural frequency. The individual neuron's tendency to oscillate and the corresponding oscillation frequency are controlled by its excitability. The single neuron intrinsic oscillations were blocked by riluzole, and are thus dependent on persistent sodium leak currents. Upon a gradual retrieval of connectivity, the synchrony evolves: Loose synchrony appears already at weak connectivity, with the oscillators converging to one common oscillation frequency, yet shifted in phase across the population. Further strengthening of the connectivity causes a reduction in the mean phase shifts until zero-lag is achieved, manifested by synchronous periodic network bursts. Interestingly, the frequency of network bursting matches the average of the intrinsic frequencies. Overall, the network behaves like other universal systems, where order emerges spontaneously by entrainment of independent rhythmic units. Although simplified with respect to circuitry in the brain, our results attribute a basic functional role for intrinsic single neuron excitability mechanisms in driving the network's activity and dynamics, contributing to our understanding of developing neural circuits. PMID:26961000

  18. Neuronal polarization.

    PubMed

    Takano, Tetsuya; Xu, Chundi; Funahashi, Yasuhiro; Namba, Takashi; Kaibuchi, Kozo

    2015-06-15

    Neurons are highly polarized cells with structurally and functionally distinct processes called axons and dendrites. This polarization underlies the directional flow of information in the central nervous system, so the establishment and maintenance of neuronal polarization is crucial for correct development and function. Great progress in our understanding of how neurons establish their polarity has been made through the use of cultured hippocampal neurons, while recent technological advances have enabled in vivo analysis of axon specification and elongation. This short review and accompanying poster highlight recent advances in this fascinating field, with an emphasis on the signaling mechanisms underlying axon and dendrite specification in vitro and in vivo.

  19. Dissociative experiences and dissociative minds: Exploring a nomological network of dissociative functioning.

    PubMed

    Schimmenti, Adriano

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the psychometric properties of the Dissociative Experiences Scale-II (DES-II) were tested in a sample of Italian adults, and a nomological network of dissociative functioning based on current psychodynamic research was examined. A total of 794 participants (55% females) ranging in age from 18 to 64 completed the DES-II and other measures of theory of mind, alexithymia, attachment style, and empathy. The Italian translation of the DES-II showed high internal consistency, adequate item-to-scale homogeneity, and good split-half reliability. A single-factor solution including the 8 items of pathological dissociation (DES-T) adequately fit the data. Participants who reported higher levels of dissociative experiences showed significantly lower scores on theory of mind and empathy than other participants. They also showed significantly higher scores on alexithymia, preoccupied attachment, and fearful attachment. Results of the study support the view that people who suffer from severe dissociative experiences may also have difficulties mentalizing and regulating affects and that they may feel uncomfortable in close relationships because they have a negative view of the self. This can inform clinical work with dissociative individuals, who could benefit from therapies that consider their potential problems with mentalization, empathy, affect regulation, and attachment.

  20. Dissociation During Intense Military Stress is Related to Subsequent Somatic Symptoms in Women

    PubMed Central

    Steffian, Lisa; Steffian, George; Doran, Anthony P.; Rasmusson, Ann M.; Morgan, CA

    2007-01-01

    Background: Research studies of the female response to intense stress are under-represented in the scientific literature; indeed, publications in female humans and animals number half those in male subjects. In addition, women have only recently entered more dangerous professions that were historically limited to men. The US Navy's survival course, therefore, offers a unique opportunity to examine, in a controlled manner, individual differences in the human female response to acute and realistic military stress. Method: The current study assessed the nature and prevalence of dissociative symptoms and other aspects of adaptive function in healthy female subjects experiencing acute, intense stress during US Navy survival training. Cognitive dissociation and previous exposure to traumatic events were assessed at baseline in 32 female service members prior to Navy survival training. At the conclusion of training, retrospectively rated levels of dissociation during peak training stress and current health symptoms were assessed. Results: Female subjects reported previous trauma (35%) and at least one symptom of dissociation at baseline prior to training (47%). Eighty-eight percent of subjects reported experiencing multiple symptoms of dissociation during peak training stress. Post-stress dissociation scores and stress-induced increases in dissociation, as well as prior cumulative exposure to potentially traumatic events, were significant predictors of post-stress health symptoms. Discussion: In this study, increases in dissociative symptoms during intense training stress, post-stress dissociation symptom levels, and prior cumulative exposure to stressful, potentially traumatic events predicted post-stress health symptoms in women. Prior studies in men have demonstrated correlations between neurobiological responses to stress and stress-associated levels of dissociation. Thus future studies in larger samples of women are needed to investigate the relationship between

  1. Subunit dissociation in fish hemoglobins.

    PubMed

    Edelstein, S J; McEwen, B; Gibson, Q H

    1976-12-10

    The tetramer-dimer dissociation equilibria (K 4,2) of several fish hemoglobins have been examined by sedimentation velocity measurements with a scanner-computer system for the ultracentrifuge and by flash photolysis measurements using rapid kinetic methods. Samples studied in detail included hemoglobins from a marine teleost, Brevoortia tyrannus (common name, menhaden); a fresh water teleost, Cyprinus carpio, (common name, carp); and an elasmobranch Prionace glauca (common name, blue shark). For all three species in the CO form at pH 7, in 0.1 M phosphate buffer, sedimentation coefficients of 4.3 S (typical of tetrameric hemoglobin) are observed in the micromolar concentration range. In contrast, mammalian hemoglobins dissociate appreciably to dimers under these conditions. The inability to detect dissociation in three fish hemoglobins at the lowest concentrations examined indicates that K 4,2 must have a value of 10(-8) M or less. In flash photolysis experiments on very dilute solutions in long path length cells, two kinetic components were detected with their proportions varying as expected for an equilibrium between tetramers (the slower component) and dimers (the faster component); values of K 4,2 for the three fish hemoglobins in the range 10(-9) to 10(-8) M were calculated from these data. Thus, the values of K 4,2 for liganded forms of the fish hemoglobins appear to be midway between the value for liganded human hemoglobin (K 4,2 approximately 10(-6) M) and unliganded human hemoglobin (K 4,2 approximately 10(-12) M). This conclusion is supported by measurements on solutions containing guanidine hydrochloride to enhance the degree of dissociation. All three fish hemoglobins are appreciably dissociated at guanidine concentrations of about 0.8 M, which is roughly midway between the guanidine concentrations needed to cause comparable dissociation of liganded human hemoglobin (about 0.4 M) and unliganded human hemoglobin (about 1.6 M). Kinetic measurements on

  2. Activity-dependent expression of ELAV/Hu RBPs and neuronal mRNAs in seizure and cocaine brain.

    PubMed

    Tiruchinapalli, Dhanrajan M; Caron, Marc G; Keene, Jack D

    2008-12-01

    Growing evidence indicates that both seizure (glutamate) and cocaine (dopamine) treatment modulate synaptic plasticity within the mesolimbic region of the CNS. Activation of glutamatergic neurons depends on the localized translation of neuronal mRNA products involved in modulating synaptic plasticity. In this study, we demonstrate the dendritic localization of HuR and HuD RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) and their association with neuronal mRNAs following these two paradigms of seizure and cocaine treatment. Both the ubiquitously expressed HuR and neuronal HuD RBPs were detected in different regions as well as within dendrites of the brain and in dissociated neurons. Quantitative analysis revealed an increase in HuR, HuD and p-glycogen synthase kinase 3beta (GSK3beta) protein levels as well as neuronal mRNAs encoding Homer, CaMKIIalpha, vascular early response gene, GAP-43, neuritin, and neuroligin protein products following either seizure or cocaine treatment. Inhibition of the Akt/GSK3beta signaling pathway by acute or chronic LiCl treatment revealed changes in HuR, HuD, pGSK3beta, p-Akt, and beta-catenin protein levels. In addition, a genetically engineered hyperdopaminergic mouse model (dopamine transporter knockout) revealed decreased expression of HuR protein levels, but no significant change was observed in HuD or fragile-X mental retardation protein RBPs. Finally, our data suggest that HuR and HuD RBPs potentially interact directly with neuronal mRNAs important for differentiation and synaptic plasticity. PMID:19014379

  3. Neuronal growth cone retraction relies upon proneurotrophin receptor signaling through Rac

    PubMed Central

    Deinhardt, Katrin; Kim, Taeho; Spellman, Daniel S.; Mains, Richard E.; Eipper, Betty A.; Neubert, Thomas A.; Chao, Moses V.; Hempstead, Barbara L.

    2012-01-01

    Growth of axons and dendrites is a dynamic process that involves guidance molecules, adhesion proteins, and neurotrophic factors. Although neurite extension during development has been extensively studied, the intracellular mechanisms that mediate neurite retraction are poorly understood. Here, we show that the proneurotrophin, proNGF, induces acute collapse of growth cones of cultured hippocampal neurons. This retraction is initiated by an interaction between p75NTR and the sortilin family member, SorCS2 (sortilin-related VPS10 domain containing receptor 2). Binding of proNGF to the p75NTR-SorCS2 complex induced growth cone retraction by initiating the dissociation of the guanine-nucleotide exchange factor Trio from the p75NTR- SorCS2 complex, resulting in decreased Rac activity, and consequently, growth cone collapse. The actin-bundling protein fascin also became inactivated, contributing to the destabilization and collapse of actin filaments. These results identify a bifunctional signaling mechanism by which proNGF regulates actin dynamics to modulate neuronal morphology acutely. PMID:22155786

  4. Multiphoton dissociative ionization of CS+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajput, Jyoti; Jochim, Bethany; Zohrabi, M.; Betsch, K. J.; Ablikim, U.; Berry, Ben; Severt, T.; Summers, A. M.; Armstrong, G. S. J.; Esry, B. D.; Carnes, K. D.; Ben-Itzhak, I.

    2015-05-01

    We have studied the dissociative photoionization of a CS+ molecular ion beam in the strong-field regime using <50 fs IR laser pulses (λ ~ 790 nm) from a 10 kHz, ~2 mJ (per pulse) Ti:Sapphire laser system. A coincidence three-dimensional momentum imaging method was used to measure all ions and neutrals formed during this multiphoton process. Two prominent channels were observed: charge-symmetric dissociation, yielding C+ + S+, and charge-asymmetric dissociation, yielding C + S2+. The differences between these two channels with reference to their relative production probability, energetics, and angular distributions is the focus of this work. This work was supported by the Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Division, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Office of Science, U.S. Department of Energy. BJ is also supported by DOE-SCGF (DE-AC05-06OR23100).

  5. [Dissociative identity disorder or schizophrenia?].

    PubMed

    Tschöke, S; Steinert, T

    2010-01-01

    We present a case of dissociative identity disorder in which Schneiderian first rank symptoms were present besides of various states of consciousness. Thus the diagnosis of schizophrenia had to be considered. Formally, the symptoms met ICD-10 criteria for schizophrenia. However, taking into account the lack of formal thought disorder and of negative symptoms as well as a typical history of severe and prolonged traumatisation, we did not diagnose a co-morbid schizophrenic disorder. There is good evidence for the existence of psychotic symptoms among patients with dissociative disorders. However, in clinical practice this differential diagnosis is rarely considered.

  6. Reversible intracellular translocation of KRas but not HRas in hippocampal neurons regulated by Ca2+/calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Fivaz, Marc; Meyer, Tobias

    2005-08-01

    The Ras/MAPK pathway regulates synaptic plasticity and cell survival in neurons of the central nervous system. Here, we show that KRas, but not HRas, acutely translocates from the plasma membrane (PM) to the Golgi complex and early/recycling endosomes in response to neuronal activity. Translocation is reversible and mediated by the polybasic-prenyl membrane targeting motif of KRas. We provide evidence that KRas translocation occurs through sequestration of the polybasic-prenyl motif by Ca2+/calmodulin (Ca2+/CaM) and subsequent release of KRas from the PM, in a process reminiscent of GDP dissociation inhibitor-mediated membrane recycling of Rab and Rho GTPases. KRas translocation was accompanied by partial intracellular redistribution of its activity. We conclude that the polybasic-prenyl motif acts as a Ca2+/CaM-regulated molecular switch that controls PM concentration of KRas and redistributes its activity to internal sites. Our data thus define a novel signaling mechanism that differentially regulates KRas and HRas localization and activity in neurons.

  7. Acute intracerebral treatment with amyloid-beta (1–42) alters the profile of neuronal oscillations that accompany LTP induction and results in impaired LTP in freely behaving rats

    PubMed Central

    Kalweit, Alexander Nikolai; Yang, Honghong; Colitti-Klausnitzer, Jens; Fülöp, Livia; Bozsó, Zsolt; Penke, Botond; Manahan-Vaughan, Denise

    2015-01-01

    Accumulation of amyloid plaques comprises one of the major hallmarks of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). In rodents, acute treatment with amyloid-beta (Aβ; 1–42) elicits immediate debilitating effects on hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP). Whereas LTP contributes to synaptic information storage, information is transferred across neurons by means of neuronal oscillations. Furthermore, changes in theta-gamma oscillations, that appear during high-frequency stimulation (HFS) to induce LTP, predict whether successful LTP will occur. Here, we explored if intra-cerebral treatment with Aβ(1–42), that prevents LTP, also results in alterations of hippocampal oscillations that occur during HFS of the perforant path-dentate gyrus synapse in 6-month-old behaving rats. HFS resulted in LTP that lasted for over 24 h. In Aβ-treated animals, LTP was significantly prevented. During HFS, spectral power for oscillations below 100 Hz (δ, θ, α, β and γ) was significantly higher in Aβ-treated animals compared to controls. In addition, the trough-to-peak amplitudes of theta and gamma cycles were higher during HFS in Aβ-treated animals. We also observed a lower amount of envelope-to-signal correlations during HFS in Aβ-treated animals. Overall, the characteristic profile of theta-gamma oscillations that accompany successful LTP induction was disrupted. These data indicate that alterations in network oscillations accompany Aβ-effects on hippocampal LTP. This may comprise an underlying mechanism through which disturbances in synaptic information storage and hippocampus-dependent memory occurs in AD. PMID:25999827

  8. Characterization of K+ currents and the cAMP-dependent modulation in cultured Drosophila mushroom body neurons identified by lacZ expression.

    PubMed

    Wright, N J; Zhong, Y

    1995-02-01

    Electrophysiological analysis of cultured neurons provides a potential approach toward understanding the physiological defects that may contribute to abnormal behavior exhibited by mutants of the fruit fly Drosophila. However, its application has been restricted by an inability to identify a particular functional or anatomical subpopulation of neurons from the CNS. To study neurons composing the CNS mushroom body proposed as a center for insect olfactory learning, we utilized a Drosophila enhancer detector line that expresses a lacZ reporter gene in these neurons and identified them in acutely dissociated larval CNS cultures by vital fluorescent staining. The patch-clamp analysis suggests that whole-cell voltage-activated K+ currents can be classified into two types in identified mushroom body neurons. Type 1 current comprises a TEA-sensitive slowly inactivating current and noninactivating component while type 2 current contains a 4-AP-sensitive transient A-current and a noninactivating component. Application of cAMP analogs induced distinct modulation of type 1 and type 2 currents. Our results demonstrate that the expression of the lacZ gene and the subsequent staining do not significantly alter the different types of K+ currents. This initial characterization provides a basis for further analysis of mutations that impair learning and memory resulting from an abnormal cAMP cascade preferentially expressed in the mushroom body.

  9. Network synchronization in hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Penn, Yaron; Segal, Menahem; Moses, Elisha

    2016-01-01

    Oscillatory activity is widespread in dynamic neuronal networks. The main paradigm for the origin of periodicity consists of specialized pacemaking elements that synchronize and drive the rest of the network; however, other models exist. Here, we studied the spontaneous emergence of synchronized periodic bursting in a network of cultured dissociated neurons from rat hippocampus and cortex. Surprisingly, about 60% of all active neurons were self-sustained oscillators when disconnected, each with its own natural frequency. The individual neuron’s tendency to oscillate and the corresponding oscillation frequency are controlled by its excitability. The single neuron intrinsic oscillations were blocked by riluzole, and are thus dependent on persistent sodium leak currents. Upon a gradual retrieval of connectivity, the synchrony evolves: Loose synchrony appears already at weak connectivity, with the oscillators converging to one common oscillation frequency, yet shifted in phase across the population. Further strengthening of the connectivity causes a reduction in the mean phase shifts until zero-lag is achieved, manifested by synchronous periodic network bursts. Interestingly, the frequency of network bursting matches the average of the intrinsic frequencies. Overall, the network behaves like other universal systems, where order emerges spontaneously by entrainment of independent rhythmic units. Although simplified with respect to circuitry in the brain, our results attribute a basic functional role for intrinsic single neuron excitability mechanisms in driving the network’s activity and dynamics, contributing to our understanding of developing neural circuits. PMID:26961000

  10. [Traditional and modern views of dissociation].

    PubMed

    Merza, Katalin; Kuritárné Szabó, Ildikó

    2012-01-01

    Dissociation is a failure to integrate aspects of identity, memory, perception, and consciousness. Dissociation is conceptualized as a dimensional process existing along a continuum from normal and relatively common dissociative experiences to severe and clinically relevant forms. There is a growing body of clinical and empirical evidence that dissociation may occur especially as a defense during trauma. In case of traumatic events dissociation considered as an attempt to maintain mental control just as physical control is lost. Dissociation can be either a symptom of some complex mental disorder or a distinct clinical entity categorized among dissociative and somatoform disorders in DSM-IV. The article describes the conceptual issues of dissociation and presents a new classification by Nijenhuis where the so-called somatoform dissociative symptoms are included as well in the list of dissociative symptoms. Finally, this paper summarizes the measures of dissociative phenomena and the cognitive-behavioral approaches of dissociation, and highlights the main features of the new structural dissociation model.

  11. Evidence for the exclusive expression of functional homomeric α7 nAChRs in hypothalamic histaminergic tuberomammillary neurons in rats.

    PubMed

    Tischkau, Shelley; Mhaskar, Yashanad; Uteshev, Victor V

    2014-03-20

    Hypothalamic histaminergic tuberomammillary (TM) neurons in rats express high densities of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) whose Ca(2+) permeability, kinetic and pharmacological properties are similar to those of heterologous homomeric α7 nAChRs. However, native α7 nAChR subunits can co-assemble with β or α5 nAChR subunits to form functional heteromeric α7-containing α7β or α7α5 nAChRs with kinetics and pharmacology similar to those of α7 homomers. Therefore, although TM nAChRs have been used as an ex vivo model of functional α7 homomers, the molecular makeup of TM nAChRs has not been determined and the expression of functional α7-containing heteromers in TM neurons has not been excluded. To determine the profile of TM nAChR subunit transcripts, we have conducted single-cell qRT-PCR experiments using acutely dissociated TM neurons in rats. TM neurons were found to express transcripts of only principal α3, α6 and α7 nAChR subunits. Transcripts of other known mammalian neuronal subunits (α2, α4-5, α9-10, β2-4) were not detected. In the absence of β and α5 subunits, the expression of functional α7-containing heteromers in TM neurons is highly unlikely because principal α3, α6 and α7 nAChR subunits alone are not known to form functional heteromeric nAChRs. These results support the exclusive expression of native functional α7 homomers in rat TM neurons and introduce these neurons as a unique reliable source of native functional homomeric α7 nAChRs suitable for ex vivo and in vitro pharmacological assays in developing selective α7 nAChR agents.

  12. Cutaneous and colonic rat DRG neurons differ with respect to both baseline and PGE2-induced changes in passive and active electrophysiological properties.

    PubMed

    Gold, Michael S; Traub, Richard J

    2004-06-01

    This study was designed to test the hypotheses that pain syndromes associated with specific body regions reflect unique properties of sensory neurons innervating these regions and/or unique responses of these afferents to tissue damage. Acutely dissociated adult rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons retrogradely labeled from either the colon or the glabrous skin of the hindpaw were studied by whole cell patch-clamp recording in current-clamp mode. Two populations of colonic afferent neurons were studied: pelvic afferents (arising from L(6), S(1), and S(2) DRG = LS DRG) and hypogastric/lumbar colonic afferents (arising from T(13), L(1), and L(2) DRG = TL DRG). Passive and active electrophysiological properties were studied before and after application prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)). We observed marked differences between cutaneous and colonic sensory neurons with respect to baseline passive and active electrophysiological properties as well as both the magnitude and pattern of PGE(2)-induced changes in excitability, passive, and active properties. There were also significant differences between TL and LS neurons with respect to baseline and PGE(2)-induced changes in several passive and active electrophysiological properties. Our results suggest that differences between cutaneous and colonic neurons reflect differences in pattern and/or density of ionic currents present in the plasma membrane. More interestingly, the ionic currents underlying the PGE(2)-induced sensitization of cutaneous neurons appeared to differ from those underlying the sensitization of colonic neurons. The implication of this observation is that it may be possible, in fact necessary, to treat pain arising from specific body regions with unique therapeutic interventions. PMID:14736864

  13. Anterograde fluorescent labeling of olfactory receptor neurons by Procion and Lucifer dyes.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, N

    1984-10-01

    The repetitive irrigation of lamprey and frog olfactory epithelia with the fluorescent dyes Procion yellow MX4R and Lucifer yellow VS, induced the uptake of these dyes by olfactory receptor neurons, resulting in selective staining of the latter. The stained receptors retained the dyes within their cytoplasm during cell dissociation procedures, which proved these fluorescent dyes to be useful cell markers for the identification of olfactory receptor neurons in dissociated cell mixtures.

  14. A novel versatile hybrid infusion-multielectrode recording (HIME) system for acute drug delivery and multisite acquisition of neuronal activity in freely moving mice

    PubMed Central

    Senkov, Oleg; Mironov, Andrey; Dityatev, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    To characterize information transfer in defined brain circuits involving multiple brain regions and to evaluate underlying molecular mechanisms and their dysregulation in major brain diseases, a simple and reliable system is ultimately required for electrophysiological recording of local field potentials (LFPs, or local EEG) in combination with local delivery of drugs, enzymes and gene expression-controlling viruses near the place of recording. Here we provide a new design of a versatile reusable hybrid infusion-recording (HIME) system which can be utilized in freely moving mice performing cognitive tasks. The HIME system allows monitoring neuronal activity in multiple layers in several brain structures. Here, we provide examples of bilateral injection and recordings of full spectrum of learning and memory related oscillations, i.e., theta (4–12 Hz), gamma (40–100) and ripple activity (130–150 Hz), in five hippocampal layers as well as in the CA1 and CA2 regions. Furthermore, the system is designed to be used for parallel recordings in the amygdala, cortex and other brain areas, before and after infusion of reagents of interest, either in or off a cognitive test. We anticipate that the HIME system can be particularly convenient to advance functional neuroglycobiological studies and molecular deciphering of mechanisms governing long-term memory consolidation. PMID:26594144

  15. Effects of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis sera on cultured cholinergic neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Touzeau, G.; Kato, A.C.

    1983-03-01

    Dissociated monolayer cultures of chick ciliary ganglion neurons have been used to study the effects of control and ALS sera. The cultured neurons survive and extend neurites for a minimum of 2 weeks in a standard tissue culture medium that contains 10% heat-inactivated human serum. Three parameters of the neurons have been examined when cultured in control and ALS sera for 8 to 12 days: (1) neuronal survival, (2) activity of the enzyme choline acetyltransferase, and (3) synthesis of /sup 3/H-acetylcholine using /sup 3/H-choline as precursor. ALS sera cause a small decrease in these three parameters, but this difference is not significant.

  16. The Cancer Chemotherapeutic Paclitaxel Increases Human and Rodent Sensory Neuron Responses to TRPV1 by Activation of TLR4

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Adamek, Pavel; Zhang, Haijun; Tatsui, Claudio Esteves; Rhines, Laurence D.; Mrozkova, Petra; Li, Qin; Kosturakis, Alyssa K.; Cassidy, Ryan M.; Harrison, Daniel S.; Cata, Juan P.; Sapire, Kenneth; Zhang, Hongmei; Kennamer-Chapman, Ross M.; Jawad, Abdul Basit; Ghetti, Andre; Yan, Jiusheng; Palecek, Jiri

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is dose limiting in paclitaxel cancer chemotherapy and can result in both acute pain during treatment and chronic persistent pain in cancer survivors. The hypothesis tested was that paclitaxel produces these adverse effects at least in part by sensitizing transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1) through Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling. The data show that paclitaxel-induced behavioral hypersensitivity is prevented and reversed by spinal administration of a TRPV1 antagonist. The number of TRPV1+ neurons is increased in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) in paclitaxel-treated rats and is colocalized with TLR4 in rat and human DRG neurons. Cotreatment of rats with lipopolysaccharide from the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides (LPS-RS), a TLR4 inhibitor, prevents the increase in numbers of TRPV1+ neurons by paclitaxel treatment. Perfusion of paclitaxel or the archetypal TLR4 agonist LPS activated both rat DRG and spinal neurons directly and produced acute sensitization of TRPV1 in both groups of cells via a TLR4-mediated mechanism. Paclitaxel and LPS sensitize TRPV1 in HEK293 cells stably expressing human TLR4 and transiently expressing human TRPV1. These physiological effects also are prevented by LPS-RS. Finally, paclitaxel activates and sensitizes TRPV1 responses directly in dissociated human DRG neurons. In summary, TLR4 was activated by paclitaxel and led to sensitization of TRPV1. This mechanism could contribute to paclitaxel-induced acute pain and chronic painful neuropathy. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT In this original work, it is shown for the first time that paclitaxel activates peripheral sensory and spinal neurons directly and sensitizes these cells to transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1)-mediated capsaicin responses via Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in multiple species. A direct functional interaction between TLR4 and TRPV1 is shown in rat and human dorsal root ganglion neurons, TLR4/TRPV1

  17. Establishment of Axon-Dendrite Polarity in Developing Neurons

    PubMed Central

    BARNES, Anthony P.; POLLEUX, Franck

    2011-01-01

    Neurons are among the most highly polarized cell type in the body and the polarization of axon and dendrites underlies the ability of neurons to integrate and transmit information in the brain. Significant progress has been made in the identification of the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the establishment of neuronal polarity using primarily in vitro approaches such as dissociated culture of rodent hippocampal and cortical neurons. This model has led to the predominant view suggesting that neuronal polarization is largely specified by stochastic, asymmetric activation of intracellular signaling pathways. Recent evidence shows that extracellular cues can play an instructive role during neuronal polarization in vitro and in vivo. In this review, we synthesize the recent data supporting an integrative model whereby extracellular cues orchestrate the intracellular signaling underlying the initial break of neuronal symmetry leading to axon-dendrite polarization. PMID:19400726

  18. Study of the dissociation of molecular hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vessot, R. F. C.

    1981-01-01

    Dissociators used to obtain an RF plasma discharge for hydrogen masers and the test system used for operation and evaluation of the dissociators are described. A compact sorption cartridge using a graphite matrix is tested as part of a hydrogen scavenging system. Testing of a vacuum enclosed hydrogen dissociator suitable for long term operation in space is described.

  19. Two-temperature models for nitrogen dissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, M. Lino; Guerra, V.; Loureiro, J.

    2007-12-01

    Accurate sets of nitrogen state-resolved dissociation rates have been reduced to two-temperature (translational T and vibrational Tv) dissociation rates. The analysis of such two-temperature dissociation rates shows evidence of two different dissociation behaviors. For Tv < 0.3 T dissociation proceeds predominantly from the lower-lying vibrational levels, whereas for Tv > 0.3 T dissociation proceeds predominantly form the near-dissociative vibrational levels, with an abrupt change of behavior at Tv = 0.3 T. These two-temperature sets have then been utilized as a benchmark for the comparison against popular multitemperature dissociation models (Park, Hansen, Marrone-Treanor, Hammerling, Losev-Shatalov, Gordiets, Kuznetsov, and Macheret-Fridman). This has allowed verifying the accuracy of each theoretical model, and additionally proposing adequate values for any semi-empirical parameters present in the different theories. The Macheret-Fridman model, who acknowledges the existence of the two aforementioned dissociation regimes, has been found to provide significantly more accurate results than the other models. Although these different theoretical approaches have been tested and validated solely for nitrogen dissociation processes, it is reasonable to expect that the general conclusions of this work, regarding the adequacy of the different dissociation models, could be extended to the description of arbitrary diatomic dissociation processes.

  20. Dissociative Functions in the Normal Mourning Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kauffman, Jeffrey

    1994-01-01

    Sees dissociative functions in mourning process as occurring in conjunction with integrative trends. Considers initial shock reaction in mourning as model of normal dissociation in mourning process. Dissociation is understood to be related to traumatic significance of death in human consciousness. Discerns four psychological categories of…

  1. Misattributing the Source of Self-Generated Representations Related to Dissociative and Psychotic Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Chui-De; Tseng, Mei-Chih Meg; Chien, Yi-Ling; Liao, Shih-Cheng; Liu, Chih-Min; Yeh, Yei-Yu; Hwu, Hai-Gwo

    2016-01-01

    Objective: An intertwined relationship has been found between dissociative and psychotic symptoms, as the two symptom clusters frequently co-occur, suggesting some shared risk factors. Using a source monitoring paradigm, previous studies have shown that patients with schizophrenia made more errors in source monitoring, suggesting that a weakened sense of individuality may be associated with psychotic symptoms. However, no studies have verified a relationship between sense of individuality and dissociation, and it is unclear whether an altered sense of individuality is a shared sociocognitive deficit underlying both dissociation and psychosis. Method: Data from 80 acute psychiatric patients with unspecified mental disorders were analyzed to test the hypothesis that an altered sense of individuality underlies dissociation and psychosis. Behavioral tasks, including tests of intelligence and source monitoring, as well as interview schedules and self-report measures of dissociative and psychotic symptoms, general psychopathology, and trauma history, were administered. Results: Significant correlations of medium effect sizes indicated an association between errors attributing the source of self-generated items and positive psychotic symptoms and the absorption and amnesia measures of dissociation. The associations with dissociative measures remained significant after the effects of intelligence, general psychopathology, and trauma history were excluded. Moreover, the relationships between source misattribution and dissociative measures remained marginally significant and significant after controlling for positive and negative psychotic symptoms, respectively. Limitations: Self-reported measures were collected from a small sample, and most of the participants were receiving medications when tested, which may have influenced their cognitive performance. Conclusions: A tendency to misidentify the source of self-generated items characterized both dissociation and psychosis

  2. Olfactory receptor neuron profiling using sandalwood odorants.

    PubMed

    Bieri, Stephan; Monastyrskaia, Katherine; Schilling, Boris

    2004-07-01

    The mammalian olfactory system can discriminate between volatile molecules with subtle differences in their molecular structures. Efforts in synthetic chemistry have delivered a myriad of smelling compounds of different qualities as well as many molecules with very similar olfactive properties. One important class of molecules in the fragrance industry are sandalwood odorants. Sandalwood oil and four synthetic sandalwood molecules were selected to study the activation profile of endogenous olfactory receptors when exposed to compounds from the same odorant family. Dissociated rat olfactory receptor neurons were exposed to the sandalwood molecules and the receptor activation studied by monitoring fluxes in the internal calcium concentration. Olfactory receptor neurons were identified that were specifically stimulated by sandalwood compounds. These neurons expressed olfactory receptors that can discriminate between sandalwood odorants with slight differences in their molecular structures. This is the first study in which an important class of perfume compounds was analyzed for its ability to activate endogenous olfactory receptors in olfactory receptor neurons.

  3. Partial dissociation in the neural bases of VSTM and imagery in the early visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Saad, Elyana; Wojciechowska, Maria; Silvanto, Juha

    2015-01-01

    Visual short-term memory (VSTM) and visual imagery are believed to involve overlapping neuronal representations in the early visual cortex. While a number of studies have provided evidence for this overlap, at the behavioral level VSTM and imagery are dissociable processes; this begs the question of how their neuronal mechanisms differ. Here we used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to examine whether the neural bases of imagery and VSTM maintenance are dissociable in the early visual cortex (EVC). We intentionally used a similar task for VSTM and imagery in order to equate their assessment. We hypothesized that any differential effect of TMS on VSTM and imagery would indicate that their neuronal bases differ at the level of EVC. In the “alone” condition, participants were asked to engage either in VSTM or imagery, whereas in the “concurrent” condition, each trial required both VSTM maintenance and imagery simultaneously. A dissociation between VSTM and imagery was observed for reaction times: TMS slowed down responses for VSTM but not for imagery. The impact of TMS on sensitivity did not differ between VSTM and imagery, but did depend on whether the tasks were carried concurrently or alone. This study shows that neural processes associated with VSTM and imagery in the early visual cortex can be partially dissociated. PMID:26026256

  4. [Dis-social personality disorder].

    PubMed

    Habermeyer, E; Herpertz, S C

    2006-05-01

    Deviant behavior is gaining in clinical importance if it is founded on stable, characteristic, and enduring patterns of psychopathologically relevant personality traits which have their onset in childhood or adolescence. The classification of these traits shows variations, so that a distinction between the ICD-10 diagnosis of dis-social personality disorder, DSM-IV diagnosis of antisocial personality disorder, and the concept "psychopathy" is necessary. Our knowledge about the biological basis of antisocial behavior includes neurophysiologic, psychophysiologic, and genetic findings. Also relevant are results of neurotransmitter studies and structural resp. functional neuroimaging findings. Psychosocial risk factors include parental deficits, rejection, disregard, unstable relations, and abuse. Efficient psychotherapeutic treatment is cognitive-behavioral. Pharmacologic treatment is largely "off-label". The diagnosis of antisocial and dis-social personality disorders allows no conclusions on criminal responsibility. In addition to psychiatric diagnostics, considerations on the severity of the disorder and its effects on the ability to inhibit actions are necessary.

  5. β-Arrestin-2 knockout prevents development of cellular μ-opioid receptor tolerance but does not affect opioid-withdrawal-related adaptations in single PAG neurons

    PubMed Central

    Connor, M; Bagley, E E; Chieng, B C; Christie, M J

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Tolerance to the behavioural effects of morphine is blunted in β-arrestin-2 knockout mice, but opioid withdrawal is largely unaffected. The cellular mechanisms of tolerance have been studied in some neurons from β-arrestin-2 knockouts, but tolerance and withdrawal mechanisms have not been examined at the cellular level in periaqueductal grey (PAG) neurons, which are crucial for central tolerance and withdrawal phenomena. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH μ-Opioid receptor (MOPr) inhibition of voltage-gated calcium channel currents (ICa) was examined by patch-clamp recordings from acutely dissociated PAG neurons from wild-type and β-arrestin-2 knockout mice treated chronically with morphine (CMT) or vehicle. Opioid withdrawal-induced activation of GABA transporter type 1 (GAT-1) currents was determined using perforated patch recordings from PAG neurons in brain slices. KEY RESULTS MOPr inhibition of ICa in PAG neurons was unaffected by β-arrestin-2 deletion. CMT impaired coupling of MOPrs to ICa in PAG neurons from wild-type mice, but this cellular tolerance was not observed in neurons from CMT β-arrestin-2 knockouts. However, β-arrestin-2 knockouts displayed similar opioid-withdrawal-induced activation of GAT-1 currents as wild-type PAG neurons. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS In β-arrestin-2 knockout mice, the central neurons involved in the anti-nociceptive actions of opioids also fail to develop cellular tolerance to opioids following chronic morphine. The results also provide the first cellular physiological evidence that opioid withdrawal is not disrupted by β-arrestin-2 deletion. However, the unaffected basal sensitivity to opioids in PAG neurons provides further evidence that changes in basal MOPr sensitivity cannot account for the enhanced acute nociceptive response to morphine reported in β-arrestin-2 knockouts. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Opioids: New Pathways to Functional Selectivity. To view the other

  6. Paraphilia from a dissociative perspective.

    PubMed

    Ross, Colin A

    2008-12-01

    A dissociative structural model of the psyche can account for a wide range of symptoms across many DSM-IV categories, including sexual compulsions and addictions. The model leads to a distinct overall plan of treatment and a set of operationalized interventions aimed at integration of the self, rather than suppression of impulses. The model could be tested first in epidemiological studies and later in treatment outcome studies.

  7. Dissociative Photoionization of Diethyl Ether.

    PubMed

    Voronova, Krisztina; Mozaffari Easter, Chrissa M; Covert, Kyle J; Bodi, Andras; Hemberger, Patrick; Sztáray, Bálint

    2015-10-29

    The dissociative photoionization of internal energy selected diethyl ether ions was investigated by imaging photoelectron photoion coincidence spectroscopy. In a large, 5 eV energy range Et2O(+) cations decay by two parallel and three sequential dissociative photoionization channels, which can be modeled well using statistical theory. The 0 K appearance energies of the CH3CHOCH2CH3(+) (H-loss, m/z = 73) and CH3CH2O═CH2(+) (methyl-loss, m/z = 59) fragment ions were determined to be 10.419 ± 0.015 and 10.484 ± 0.008 eV, respectively. The reemergence of the hydrogen-loss ion above 11 eV is attributed to transition-state (TS) switching, in which the second, outer TS is rate-determining at high internal energies. At 11.81 ± 0.05 eV, a secondary fragment of the CH3CHOCH2CH3(+) (m/z = 73) ion, protonated acetaldehyde, CH3CH═OH(+) (m/z = 45) appears. On the basis of the known thermochemical onset of this fragment, a reverse barrier of 325 meV was found. Two more sequential dissociation reactions were examined, namely, ethylene and formaldehyde losses from the methyl-loss daughter ion. The 0 K appearance energies of 11.85 ± 0.07 and 12.20 ± 0.08 eV, respectively, indicate no reverse barrier in these processes. The statistical model of the dissociative photoionization can also be used to predict the fractional ion abundances in threshold photoionization at large temperatures, which could be of use in, for example, combustion diagnostics. PMID:26444101

  8. Dissociative symptoms and REM sleep.

    PubMed

    van Heugten-van der Kloet, Dalena; Merckelbach, Harald; Lynn, Steven Jay

    2013-12-01

    Llewellyn has written a fascinating article about rapid eye movement (REM) dreams and how they promote the elaborative encoding of recent memories. The main message of her article is that hyperassociative and fluid cognitive processes during REM dreaming facilitate consolidation. We consider one potential implication of this analysis: the possibility that excessive or out-of-phase REM sleep fuels dissociative symptomatology. Further research is warranted to explore the psychopathological ramifications of Llewellyn's theory. PMID:24304772

  9. [Mirror neurons].

    PubMed

    Rubia Vila, Francisco José

    2011-01-01

    Mirror neurons were recently discovered in frontal brain areas of the monkey. They are activated when the animal makes a specific movement, but also when the animal observes the same movement in another animal. Some of them also respond to the emotional expression of other animals of the same species. These mirror neurons have also been found in humans. They respond to or "reflect" actions of other individuals in the brain and are thought to represent the basis for imitation and empathy and hence the neurobiological substrate for "theory of mind", the potential origin of language and the so-called moral instinct.

  10. [Differential diagnosis between dissociative disorders and schizophrenia].

    PubMed

    Shibayama, Masatoshi

    2011-01-01

    The differential diagnosis of dissociative disorders includes many psychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorders (especially bipolar II disorder), depressive disorder (especially atypical depression), epilepsy, Asperger syndrome, and borderline personality disorder. The theme of this paper is the differential diagnosis between dissociative disorders and schizophrenia. Schneiderian first-rank symptoms in schizophrenia are common in dissociative disorders, especially in dissociative identity disorder (DID). Many DID patients have been misdiagnosed as schizophrenics and treated with neuroleptics. We compared and examined Schneiderian symptoms of schizophrenia and those of dissociative disorders from a structural viewpoint. In dissociative disorders, delusional perception and somatic passivity are not seen. "Lateness" and "Precedence of the Other" originated from the concept of "Pattern Reversal" (H. Yasunaga)" is characteristic of schizophrenia. It is important to check these basic structure of schizophrenia in subjective experiences in differential diagnosis between dissociative disorders and schizophrenia.

  11. [Clinical Handling of Patients with Dissociative Disorders].

    PubMed

    Okano, Kenichiro

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the way informed psychiatrists are expected to handle dissociative patients in clinical situations, with a specific focus on dissociative identity disorders and dissociative fugue. On the initial interview with dissociative patients, information on their history of trauma and any nascent dissociative symptoms in their childhood should be carefully obtained. Their level of stress in their current life should also be assessed in order to understand their symptomatology, as well as to predict their future clinical course. A psychoeducational approach is crucial; it might be helpful to give information on dissociative disorder to these patients as well as their family members in order to promote their adherence to treatment. Regarding the symptomatology of dissociative disorders, detailed symptoms and the general clinical course are presented. It was stressed that dissociative identity disorder and dissociative fugue, the most high-profile dissociative disorders, are essentially different in their etiology and clinical presentation. Dissociative disorders are often confused with and misdiagnosed as psychotic disorders, such as schizophrenia. Other conditions considered in terms of the differential diagnosis include borderline personality disorder as well as temporal lobe epilepsy. Lastly, the therapeutic approach to dissociative identity disorder is discussed. Each dissociative identity should be understood as potentially representing some traumatically stressful event in the past. The therapist should be careful not to excessively promote the creation or elaboration of any dissociative identities. Three stages are proposed in the individual psychotherapeutic process. In the initial stage, a secure environment and stabilization of symptoms should be sought. The second stage consists of aiding the "host" personality to make use of other more adaptive coping skills in their life. The third stage involves coaching as well as continuous awareness of

  12. [Clinical Handling of Patients with Dissociative Disorders].

    PubMed

    Okano, Kenichiro

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the way informed psychiatrists are expected to handle dissociative patients in clinical situations, with a specific focus on dissociative identity disorders and dissociative fugue. On the initial interview with dissociative patients, information on their history of trauma and any nascent dissociative symptoms in their childhood should be carefully obtained. Their level of stress in their current life should also be assessed in order to understand their symptomatology, as well as to predict their future clinical course. A psychoeducational approach is crucial; it might be helpful to give information on dissociative disorder to these patients as well as their family members in order to promote their adherence to treatment. Regarding the symptomatology of dissociative disorders, detailed symptoms and the general clinical course are presented. It was stressed that dissociative identity disorder and dissociative fugue, the most high-profile dissociative disorders, are essentially different in their etiology and clinical presentation. Dissociative disorders are often confused with and misdiagnosed as psychotic disorders, such as schizophrenia. Other conditions considered in terms of the differential diagnosis include borderline personality disorder as well as temporal lobe epilepsy. Lastly, the therapeutic approach to dissociative identity disorder is discussed. Each dissociative identity should be understood as potentially representing some traumatically stressful event in the past. The therapist should be careful not to excessively promote the creation or elaboration of any dissociative identities. Three stages are proposed in the individual psychotherapeutic process. In the initial stage, a secure environment and stabilization of symptoms should be sought. The second stage consists of aiding the "host" personality to make use of other more adaptive coping skills in their life. The third stage involves coaching as well as continuous awareness of

  13. Neuritin 1 promotes neuronal migration.

    PubMed

    Zito, Arianna; Cartelli, Daniele; Cappelletti, Graziella; Cariboni, Anna; Andrews, William; Parnavelas, John; Poletti, Angelo; Galbiati, Mariarita

    2014-01-01

    Neuritin 1 (Nrn1 or cpg15-1) is an activity-dependent protein involved in synaptic plasticity during brain development, a process that relies upon neuronal migration. By analyzing Nrn1 expression, we found that it is highly expressed in a mouse model of migrating immortalized neurons (GN11 cells), but not in a mouse model of non-migrating neurons (GT1-7 cells). We thus hypothesized that Nrn1 might control neuronal migration. By using complementary assays, as Boyden's microchemotaxis, scratch-wounding and live cell imaging, we found that GN11 cell migration is enhanced when Nrn1 is overexpressed and decreased when Nrn1 is silenced. The effects of Nrn1 in promoting neuronal migration have been then confirmed ex vivo, on rat cortical interneurons, by Boyden chamber assays and focal electroporation of acute embryonic brain slices. Furthermore, we found that Nrn1 level modulation affects GN11 cell morphology. The process is also paralleled by Nrn1-induced α-tubulin post-translational modifications, a well-recognized marker of microtubule stability. Altogether, the data demonstrate a novel function of Nrn1 in promoting migration of neuronal cells and indicate that Nrn1 levels impact on microtubule stability. PMID:23212301

  14. GABAergic neurons of the medial septum play a nodal role in facilitation of nociception-induced affect.

    PubMed

    Ang, Seok Ting; Lee, Andy Thiam Huat; Foo, Fang Chee; Ng, Lynn; Low, Chian-Ming; Khanna, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    The present study explored the functional details of the influence of medial septal region (MSDB) on spectrum of nociceptive behaviours by manipulating intraseptal GABAergic mechanisms. Results showed that formalin-induced acute nociception was not affected by intraseptal microinjection of bicuculline, a GABAA receptor antagonist, or on selective lesion of septal GABAergic neurons. Indeed, the acute nociceptive responses were dissociated from the regulation of sensorimotor behaviour and generation of theta-rhythm by the GABAergic mechanisms in MSDB. The GABAergic lesion attenuated formalin-induced unconditioned cellular response in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and blocked formalin-induced conditioned place avoidance (F-CPA), and as well as the contextual fear induced on conditioning with brief footshock. The effects of lesion on nociceptive-conditioned cellular responses were, however, variable. Interestingly, the lesion attenuated the conditioned representation of experimental context in dorsal hippocampus field CA1 in the F-CPA task. Collectively, the preceding suggests that the MSDB is a nodal centre wherein the GABAergic neurons mediate nociceptive affect-motivation by regulating cellular mechanisms in ACC that confer an aversive value to the noxious stimulus. Further, in conjunction with a modulatory influence on hippocampal contextual processing, MSDB may integrate affect with context as part of associative learning in the F-CPA task. PMID:26487082

  15. GABAergic neurons of the medial septum play a nodal role in facilitation of nociception-induced affect

    PubMed Central

    Ang, Seok Ting; Lee, Andy Thiam Huat; Foo, Fang Chee; Ng, Lynn; Low, Chian-Ming; Khanna, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    The present study explored the functional details of the influence of medial septal region (MSDB) on spectrum of nociceptive behaviours by manipulating intraseptal GABAergic mechanisms. Results showed that formalin-induced acute nociception was not affected by intraseptal microinjection of bicuculline, a GABAA receptor antagonist, or on selective lesion of septal GABAergic neurons. Indeed, the acute nociceptive responses were dissociated from the regulation of sensorimotor behaviour and generation of theta-rhythm by the GABAergic mechanisms in MSDB. The GABAergic lesion attenuated formalin-induced unconditioned cellular response in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and blocked formalin-induced conditioned place avoidance (F-CPA), and as well as the contextual fear induced on conditioning with brief footshock. The effects of lesion on nociceptive-conditioned cellular responses were, however, variable. Interestingly, the lesion attenuated the conditioned representation of experimental context in dorsal hippocampus field CA1 in the F-CPA task. Collectively, the preceding suggests that the MSDB is a nodal centre wherein the GABAergic neurons mediate nociceptive affect-motivation by regulating cellular mechanisms in ACC that confer an aversive value to the noxious stimulus. Further, in conjunction with a modulatory influence on hippocampal contextual processing, MSDB may integrate affect with context as part of associative learning in the F-CPA task. PMID:26487082

  16. Dorsal Raphe Dopamine Neurons Represent the Experience of Social Isolation

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Gillian A.; Nieh, Edward H.; Vander Weele, Caitlin M.; Halbert, Sarah A.; Pradhan, Roma V.; Yosafat, Ariella S.; Glober, Gordon F.; Izadmehr, Ehsan M.; Thomas, Rain E.; Lacy, Gabrielle D.; Wildes, Craig P.; Ungless, Mark A.; Tye, Kay M.

    2016-01-01

    Summary The motivation to seek social contact may arise from either positive or negative emotional states, as social interaction can be rewarding and social isolation can be aversive. While ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopamine (DA) neurons may mediate social reward, a cellular substrate for the negative affective state of loneliness has remained elusive. Here, we identify a functional role for DA neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN), in which we observe synaptic changes following acute social isolation. DRN DA neurons show increased activity upon social contact following isolation, revealed by in vivo calcium imaging. Optogenetic activation of DRN DA neurons increases social preference but causes place avoidance. Furthermore, these neurons are necessary for promoting rebound sociability following an acute period of isolation. Finally, the degree to which these neurons modulate behavior is predicted by social rank, together supporting a role for DRN dopamine neurons in mediating a loneliness-like state. PaperClip PMID:26871628

  17. Dorsal Raphe Dopamine Neurons Represent the Experience of Social Isolation.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Gillian A; Nieh, Edward H; Vander Weele, Caitlin M; Halbert, Sarah A; Pradhan, Roma V; Yosafat, Ariella S; Glober, Gordon F; Izadmehr, Ehsan M; Thomas, Rain E; Lacy, Gabrielle D; Wildes, Craig P; Ungless, Mark A; Tye, Kay M

    2016-02-11

    The motivation to seek social contact may arise from either positive or negative emotional states, as social interaction can be rewarding and social isolation can be aversive. While ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopamine (DA) neurons may mediate social reward, a cellular substrate for the negative affective state of loneliness has remained elusive. Here, we identify a functional role for DA neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN), in which we observe synaptic changes following acute social isolation. DRN DA neurons show increased activity upon social contact following isolation, revealed by in vivo calcium imaging. Optogenetic activation of DRN DA neurons increases social preference but causes place avoidance. Furthermore, these neurons are necessary for promoting rebound sociability following an acute period of isolation. Finally, the degree to which these neurons modulate behavior is predicted by social rank, together supporting a role for DRN dopamine neurons in mediating a loneliness-like state. PAPERCLIP. PMID:26871628

  18. Dorsal Raphe Dopamine Neurons Represent the Experience of Social Isolation.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Gillian A; Nieh, Edward H; Vander Weele, Caitlin M; Halbert, Sarah A; Pradhan, Roma V; Yosafat, Ariella S; Glober, Gordon F; Izadmehr, Ehsan M; Thomas, Rain E; Lacy, Gabrielle D; Wildes, Craig P; Ungless, Mark A; Tye, Kay M

    2016-02-11

    The motivation to seek social contact may arise from either positive or negative emotional states, as social interaction can be rewarding and social isolation can be aversive. While ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopamine (DA) neurons may mediate social reward, a cellular substrate for the negative affective state of loneliness has remained elusive. Here, we identify a functional role for DA neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN), in which we observe synaptic changes following acute social isolation. DRN DA neurons show increased activity upon social contact following isolation, revealed by in vivo calcium imaging. Optogenetic activation of DRN DA neurons increases social preference but causes place avoidance. Furthermore, these neurons are necessary for promoting rebound sociability following an acute period of isolation. Finally, the degree to which these neurons modulate behavior is predicted by social rank, together supporting a role for DRN dopamine neurons in mediating a loneliness-like state. PAPERCLIP.

  19. Motor Neuron Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... called upper motor neurons ) are transmitted to nerve cells in the brain stem and spinal cord (called lower motor neurons ) and from them to particular muscles. Upper motor neurons direct the lower motor neurons ...

  20. Motor Neuron Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Motor Neuron Diseases Information Page Condensed from Motor Neuron Diseases ... and Information Publicaciones en Español What are Motor Neuron Diseases? The motor neuron diseases (MNDs) are a ...

  1. The emergence of spontaneous activity in neuronal cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlandi, J. G.; Alvarez-Lacalle, E.; Teller, S.; Soriano, J.; Casademunt, J.

    2013-01-01

    In vitro neuronal networks of dissociated hippocampal or cortical tissues are one of the most attractive model systems for the physics and neuroscience communities. Cultured neurons grow and mature, develop axons and dendrites, and quickly connect to their neighbors to establish a spontaneously active network within a week. The resulting neuronal network is characterized by a combination of excitatory and inhibitory neurons coupled through synaptic connections that interact in a highly nonlinear manner. The nonlinear behavior emerges from the dynamics of both the neurons' spiking activity and synaptic transmission, together with biological noise. These ingredients give rise to a rich repertoire of phenomena that are still poorly understood, including the emergence and maintenance of periodic spontaneous activity, avalanches, propagation of fronts and synchronization. In this work we present an overview on the rich activity of cultured neuronal networks, and detail the minimal theoretical considerations needed to describe experimental observations.

  2. Netrin-G1 regulates fear-like and anxiety-like behaviors in dissociable neural circuits

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qi; Sano, Chie; Masuda, Akira; Ando, Reiko; Tanaka, Mika; Itohara, Shigeyoshi

    2016-01-01

    In vertebrate mammals, distributed neural circuits in the brain are involved in emotion-related behavior. Netrin-G1 is a glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol-anchored synaptic adhesion molecule whose deficiency results in impaired fear-like and anxiety-like behaviors under specific circumstances. To understand the cell type and circuit specificity of these responses, we generated netrin-G1 conditional knockout mice with loss of expression in cortical excitatory neurons, inhibitory neurons, or thalamic neurons. Genetic deletion of netrin-G1 in cortical excitatory neurons resulted in altered anxiety-like behavior, but intact fear-like behavior, whereas loss of netrin-G1 in inhibitory neurons resulted in attenuated fear-like behavior, but intact anxiety-like behavior. These data indicate a remarkable double dissociation of fear-like and anxiety-like behaviors involving netrin-G1 in excitatory and inhibitory neurons, respectively. Our findings support a crucial role for netrin-G1 in dissociable neural circuits for the modulation of emotion-related behaviors, and provide genetic models for investigating the mechanisms underlying the dissociation. The results also suggest the involvement of glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol-anchored synaptic adhesion molecules in the development and pathogenesis of emotion-related behavior. PMID:27345935

  3. Dissociative Tendencies and Facilitated Emotional Processing

    PubMed Central

    Oathes, Desmond J.; Ray, William J.

    2009-01-01

    Dissociation is a process linked to lapses of attention, history of abuse or trauma, compromised emotional memory, and a disintegrated sense of self. It is theorized that dissociation stems from avoiding emotional information, especially negative emotion, to protect a fragile psyche. The present study tested whether or not dissociaters do actually avoid processing emotion by asking groups scoring high or low on the Dissociative Experiences Scale to judge the affective valence of several types of emotional stimuli. Manipulations of valence, modality (pictures or words), task complexity, and personal relevance lead to results suggesting that dissociation is linked to facilitated rather than deficient emotional processing. Our results are consistent with a theory that sensitivity to emotional material may be a contributing factor in subsequent dissociation to avoid further elaboration of upsetting emotion in these individuals. The findings for dissociation further exemplify the influence of individual differences in the link between cognition and emotion. PMID:18837615

  4. Neuronal Survival, Morphology and Outgrowth of Spiral Ganglion Neurons Using a Defined Growth Factor Combination

    PubMed Central

    Schwieger, Jana; Warnecke, Athanasia; Lenarz, Thomas; Esser, Karl-Heinz; Scheper, Verena

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The functionality of cochlear implants (CI) depends, among others, on the number and excitability of surviving spiral ganglion neurons (SGN). The spatial separation between the SGN, located in the bony axis of the inner ear, and the CI, which is inserted in the scala tympani, results in suboptimal performance of CI patients and may be decreased by attracting the SGN neurites towards the electrode contacts. Neurotrophic factors (NTFs) can support neuronal survival and neurite outgrowth. Methods Since brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is well known for its neuroprotective effect and ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) increases neurite outgrowth, we evaluated if the combination of BDNF and CNTF leads to an enhanced neuronal survival with extended neurite outgrowth. Both NTFs were added in effective high concentrations (BDNF 50ng/ml, CNTF 100ng/ml), alone and in combination, to cultured dissociated SGN of neonatal rats for 48 hours. Results The neuronal survival and neurite outgrowth were significantly higher in SGN treated with the combination of the two NTFs compared to treatment with each factor alone. Additionally, with respect to the morphology, the combination of BDNF and CNTF leads to a significantly higher number of bipolar neurons and a decreased number of neurons without neurites in culture. Conclusion The combination of BDNF and CNTF shows a great potential to increase the neuronal survival and the number of bipolar neurons in vitro and to regenerate retracted nerve fibers. PMID:26263175

  5. Dissociative identity disorder: Medicolegal challenges.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Helen M

    2011-01-01

    Persons with dissociative identity disorder (DID) often present in the criminal justice system rather than the mental health system and perplex experts in both professions. DID is a controversial diagnosis with important medicolegal implications. Defendants have claimed that they committed serious crimes, including rape or murder, while they were in a dissociated state. Asserting that their alter personality committed the bad act, defendants have pleaded not guilty by reason of insanity (NGRI). In such instances, forensic experts are asked to assess the defendant for DID and provide testimony in court. Debate continues over whether DID truly exists, whether expert testimony should be allowed into evidence, and whether it should exculpate defendants for their criminal acts. This article reviews historical and theoretical perspectives on DID, presents cases that illustrate the legal implications and controversies of raising an insanity defense based on multiple personalities, and examines the role of forensic experts asked to comment on DID with the goal of assisting clinicians in the medicolegal assessment of DID in relation to crimes.

  6. Dissociative recombination in planetary ionospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, J. L.

    1993-01-01

    Ionization in planetary atmospheres can be produced by solar photoionization, photoelectron impact ionization, and, in auroral regions, by impact of precipitating particles. This ionization is lost mainly in dissociative recombination (DR) of molecular ions. Although atomic ions cannot undergo DR, they can be transformed locally through ion-molecule reactions into molecular ions, or they may be transported vertically or horizontally to regions of the atmosphere where such transformations are possible. Because DR reactions tend to be very exothermic, they can be an important source of kinetically or internally excited fragments. In interplanetary thermospheres, the neutral densities decrease exponentially with altitude. Below the homopause (or turbopause), the atmosphere is assumed to be throughly mixed by convection and/or turbulence. Above the homopause, diffusion is the major transport mechanism, and each species is distributed according to its mass, with the logarithmic derivative of the density with repect to altitude given approximately by -1/H, where H = kT/mg is the scale height. In this expression, T is the neutral temperature, g is the local acceleratiion of gravity, and m is the mass of the species. Thus lighter species become relatively more abundant, and heavier species less abundant, as the altitude increases. This variation of the neutral composition can lead to changes in the ion composition; furthermore, as the neutral densities decrease, dissociative recombination becomes more important relative to ion-neutral reactions as a loss mechanism for molecular ions.

  7. Mirror writing and a dissociative identity disorder.

    PubMed

    Le, Catherine; Smith, Joyce; Cohen, Lewis

    2009-01-01

    Individuals with dissociative identity disorder (DID) have been known to show varied skills and talents as they change from one dissociative state to another. For example, case reports have described people who have changed their handedness or have spoken foreign languages during their dissociative states. During an interview with a patient with DID, a surprising talent emerged when she wrote a sentence for the Folstein Mini-Mental State Exam-mirror writing. It is not known whether her mirror writing had a deeper level of meaning; however, it does emphasize the idiosyncratic nature of dissociative identity disorder.

  8. Dissociative Recombination without a Curve Crossing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guberman, Steven L.

    1994-01-01

    Ab initio calculations show that a curve crossing is not always needed for a high dissociative- recombination cross section. For HeH(+), in which no neutral states cross the ion potential curve, dissociative recombination is driven by the nuclear kinetic-energy operator on adiabatic potential curves. The kinetic-energy derivative operator allows for capture into repulsive curves that are outside of the classical turning points for the nuclear motion. The dominant dissociative route is the C (2)Sigma(+) state leading to H(n = 2) atoms. An analogous mechanism is proposed for the dissociative recombination of H3(+).

  9. Differential effects of petit mal anticonvulsants and convulsants on thalamic neurones: GABA current blockade.

    PubMed Central

    Coulter, D. A.; Huguenard, J. R.; Prince, D. A.

    1990-01-01

    1. Currents evoked by applications of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) to acutely dissociated thalamic neurones were analysed by voltage-clamp techniques, and the effects of the anticonvulsant succinimides ethosuximide (ES) and alpha-methyl-alpha-phenylsuccinimide (MPS) and the convulsants tetramethylsuccinimide (TMS), picrotoxin, pentylenetetrazol (PTZ), and bicuculline methiodide were assessed. 2. TMS (1 microM-10 microM) reduced responses to iontophoretically applied GABA, as did picrotoxin (0.1-100 microM), PTZ (1-100 mM) and bicuculline (1-100 microM). 3. ES, in high concentrations (1-10 mM), reduced GABA responses to a lesser extent, and also occluded the reductions in GABA-evoked currents produced by TMS, picrotoxin, and PTZ. ES did not occlude the effects of bicuculline on GABA responses. Therefore, we propose that ES acts as a partial agonist at the picrotoxin GABA-blocking receptor. 4. MPS had no effect on GABA responses (at a concentration of 1 mM), and, like ES, occluded the GABA-blocking actions of TMS, apparently acting as a full antagonist. 5. The anticonvulsant actions of ES and MPS against TMS and PTZ-induced seizures may thus involve two independent mechanisms: (1) the occlusion of TMS and PTZ GABA-blocking effects; and (2) the previously described specific effect of ES and MPS on low-threshold calcium current of thalamic neurones. The latter cellular mechanism may be more closely related to petit mal anticonvulsant activity. PMID:2119843

  10. Effects of eugenol on Na+ currents in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jeong Seon; Kim, Tae Hoon; Lim, Jae-Min; Song, Jin-Ho

    2008-12-01

    Eugenol is an aromatic molecule found in several plants and widely used in dentistry for analgesic and antiseptic purposes. It inhibits pro-inflammatory mediators including nitric oxide synthase, cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase. It also regulates ion channels involved in pain signaling, such as TRPV1 receptor, high-voltage-activated Ca(2+) channels, NMDA receptor and GABA(A) receptor. The expression and functional properties of voltage-gated Na(+) channels in primary sensory neurons are altered following inflammation or nerve injury. To elucidate an involvement of Na(+) channels in the eugenol-induced analgesia we investigated the effects of eugenol on tetrodotoxin-sensitive (TTX-S) and tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTX-R) Na(+) currents in acutely dissociated rat dorsal root ganglion neurons. Eugenol inhibited TTX-S and TTX-R Na(+) currents in a concentration-dependent manner. The K(d) values were 308 muM and 543 muM, respectively. Eugenol did not influence the activation voltage of either type of Na(+) current. However, eugenol moved the steady-state inactivation curves of both Na(+) currents to a hyperpolarizing direction and reduced the maximal Na(+) current. Thus eugenol appears to inhibit Na(+) currents through its interaction with both resting and inactivated Na(+) channels. The recovery from inactivation of both Na(+) currents was slowed by eugenol. The eugenol inhibition of Na(+) currents was not dependent on the stimulus frequency. The inhibition of Na(+) currents is considered as one of the mechanisms by which eugenol exerts analgesia.

  11. F-spondin is a contact-repellent molecule for embryonic motor neurons

    PubMed Central

    Tzarfati-Majar, Vered; Burstyn-Cohen, Tal; Klar, Avihu

    2001-01-01

    The floor plate plays a key role in patterning axonal trajectory in the embryonic spinal cord by providing both long-range and local guidance cues that promote or inhibit axonal growth toward and across the ventral midline of the spinal cord, thus acting as an intermediate target for a number of crossing (commissural) and noncrossing (motor) axons. F-spondin, a secreted adhesion molecule expressed in the embryonic floor plate and the caudal somite of birds, plays a dual role in patterning the nervous system. It promotes adhesion and outgrowth of commissural axons and inhibits adhesion of neural crest cells. In the current study, we demonstrate that outgrowth of embryonic motor axons also is inhibited by F-spondin protein in a contact-repulsion fashion. Three independent lines of evidence support our hypothesis: substrate-attached F-spondin inhibits outgrowth of dissociated motor neurons in an outgrowth assay; F-spondin elicits acute growth cone collapse when applied to cultured motor neurons; and challenging ventral spinal cord explants with aggregates of HEK 293 cells expressing F-spondin, causes contact-repulsion of motor neurites. Structural–functional studies demonstrate that the processed carboxyl-half protein that contains the thrombospondin type 1 repeats is more prominent in inhibiting outgrowth, suggesting that the processing of F-spondin is important for enhancing its inhibitory activity. PMID:11287656

  12. The role of impulsivity in the association between childhood trauma and dissociative psychopathology: mediation versus moderation.

    PubMed

    Somer, Eli; Ginzburg, Karni; Kramer, Lilach

    2012-03-30

    Previous studies on survivors of childhood trauma documented associations between psychological dysregulation, impulsivity, and both behavioral and emotional manifestations of distress. Yet, the mechanism that links these variables remains unclear. The current study aims to examine the pattern of relations between a history of child abuse, impulsivity and dissociation. More specifically, it examines whether impulsivity serves as a moderator or mediator in the association between childhood trauma and dissociation. Eighty-one inpatients from the acute wards of two psychiatric hospitals participated in this study. Data were collected by clinician-administered questionnaires. A highly significant linear hierarchical regression analysis revealed that both psychiatric comorbidity and childhood trauma made unique contributions to the variance of dissociation. Yet, the significant association between childhood trauma and dissociation decreased when impulsivity was entered into the regression model. Our findings suggest that impulsivity mediates the association between childhood trauma and dissociative psychopathology and imply that the identification and treatment of impulsivity could be a potentially valuable clinical target in individuals with dissociative disorders.

  13. Dissociative symptoms and dissociative disorder comorbidity in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Belli, Hasan; Ural, Cenk; Vardar, Melek Kanarya; Yesılyurt, Sema; Oncu, Fatıh

    2012-10-01

    The present study attempted to assess the dissociative symptoms and overall dissociative disorder comorbidity in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). In addition, we examined the relationship between the severity of obsessive-compulsive symptoms and dissociative symptoms. All patients admitted for the first time to the psychiatric outpatient unit were included in the study. Seventy-eight patients had been diagnosed as having OCD during the 2-year study period. Patients had to meet the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition criteria for OCD. Most (76.9%; n = 60) of the patients were female, and 23.1% (n = 18) of the patients were male. Dissociation Questionnaire was used to measure dissociative symptoms. The Structured Clinical Interview for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition Dissociative Disorders interviews and Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Checklist and Severity Scale were used. Eleven (14%) of the patients with OCD had comorbid dissociative disorder. The most prevalent disorder in our study was dissociative depersonalization disorder. Dissociative amnesia and dissociative identity disorder were common as well. The mean Yale-Brown score was 23.37 ± 7.27 points. Dissociation Questionnaire scores were between 0.40 and 3.87 points, and the mean was 2.23 ± 0.76 points. There was a statistically significant positive correlation between Yale-Brown points and Dissociation Questionnaire points. We conclude that dissociative symptoms among patients with OCD should alert clinicians for the presence of a chronic and complex dissociative disorder. Clinicians may overlook an underlying dissociative process in patients who have severe symptoms of OCD. However, a lack of adequate response to cognitive-behavioral and drug therapy may be a consequence of dissociative process.

  14. Some Rat Sensory Neurons in Culture Express Characteristics of Differentiated Pain Sensory Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baccaglini, Paola I.; Hogan, Patrick G.

    1983-01-01

    Sensory neurons were dissociated from trigeminal ganglia or from dorsal root ganglia of rats, grown in culture, and examined for expression of properties of pain sensory cells. Many sensory neurons in culture are excited by low concentrations of capsaicin, reportedly a selective stimulus for pain sensory neurons. Many are excited by bradykinin, sensitized by prostaglandin E2, or specifically stained by an antiserum against substance P. These experiments provide a basis for the study of pain mechanisms in cell culture.

  15. PKC signaling mediates global enhancement of excitatory synaptogenesis in neurons triggered by local contact with astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Hama, Hiroshi; Hara, Chikako; Yamaguchi, Kazuhiko; Miyawaki, Atsushi

    2004-02-01

    Here we provide evidence that astrocytes affect neuronal synaptogenesis by the process of adhesion. Local contact with astrocytes via integrin receptors elicited protein kinase C (PKC) activation in individual dissociated neurons cultured in astrocyte-conditioned medium. This activation, initially focal, soon spread throughout the entire neuron. We then demonstrated pharmacologically that the arachidonic acid cascade, triggered by the integrin reception, is responsible for the global activation of PKC. Local astrocytic contact also facilitated excitatory synaptogenesis throughout the neuron, a process which could be blocked by inhibitors of both integrins and PKC. Thus, propagation of PKC signaling represents an underlying mechanism for global neuronal maturation following local astrocyte adhesion.

  16. Cystitis - acute

    MedlinePlus

    Uncomplicated urinary tract infection; UTI - acute; Acute bladder infection; Acute bacterial cystitis ... International clinical practice guidelines for the treatment of acute uncomplicated cystitis and pyelonephritis in women: A 2010 ...

  17. The multidimensional inventory of dissociation (MID): A comprehensive measure of pathological dissociation.

    PubMed

    Dell, Paul F

    2006-01-01

    This article describes the development and validation of the Multidimensional Inventory of Dissociation (MID). The MID is a 218-item, self-administered, multiscale instrument that comprehensively assesses the phenomenological domain of pathological dissociation and diagnoses the dissociative disorders. The MID measures 14 major facets of pathological dissociation; it has 23 dissociation diagnostic scales that simultaneously operationalize (1) the subjective/ phenomenological domain of pathological dissociation and (2) the hypothesized dissociative symptoms of dissociative identity disorder (Dell, 2001a). The MID was designed for clinical research and for diagnostic assessment of patients who present with a mixture of dissociative, posttraumatic, and borderline symptoms. The MID demonstrated internal reliability, temporal stability, convergent validity, discriminant validity, and construct validity. The MID also exhibited incremental validity over the Dissociative Experiences Scale (DES) by predicting an additional 18% of the variance in weighted abuse scores on the Traumatic Experiences Questionnaire (TEQ). Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) did not support a one-factor model of the MID's clinical scales (i.e., the 14 facets and the 23 diagnostic symptoms). In contrast, however, CFA of the MID's factor scales (Dell & Lawson, 2005) has strongly supported a one-factor model. It was concluded that both the MID's 168 dissociation items and the construct of pathological dissociation have a second-order, unifactorial structure.

  18. The differential diagnosis of epilepsy, pseudoseizures, dissociative identity disorder, and dissociative disorder not otherwise specified.

    PubMed

    Bowman, E S; Coons, P M

    2000-01-01

    The authors review the co-occurrences of dissociative symptoms and disorders with epilepsy and pseudo-seizures and examine newer diagnostic instruments that assist in accurate diagnosis of persons with concomitant seizure behaviors and dissociative symptoms. They also review seizure behaviors and electroencephalographic findings in persons with dissociative identity disorder (DID) and dissociative disorder not otherwise specified (DDNOS) and dissociative symptoms in persons with epilepsy and with pseudoseizures. Dissociative symptoms in 15 patients with epilepsy and 15 with pseudo-seizures were examined using the Dissociative Experiences Scale (DES) and the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Dissociative Disorders (SCID-D). On the SCID-D, pseudo-seizure patients had significantly higher dissociative symptom scores than epileptic patients, but DES scores did not reliably distinguish epileptic and pseudo-seizure patients. Misdiagnosis of persons with seizures and dissociative symptoms can be avoided by careful adherence to DSM dissociative disorder criteria, the use of video-EEG monitoring, and systematic assessment of dissociative symptoms with the SCID-D.

  19. Growth behavior of cochlear nucleus neuronal cells on semiconductor substrates.

    PubMed

    Rak, Kristen; Wasielewski, Natalia; Radeloff, Andreas; Scherzed, Agmal; Jablonka, Sibylle; Hagen, Rudolf; Mlynski, Robert

    2011-05-01

    Auditory brainstem implants provide sound information by direct stimulation of the cochlear nucleus to patients with dysfunctional or absent cranial nerve VIII. In contrast to patients with cochlear implants, the use of the auditory brainstem implants is less successful. This cannot be fully explained by the difference location of stimulation but a rather unspecific neuronal stimulation. The aim of this study was to further examine neuronal cells of the cochlear nucleus and to test their interactions with semiconductor substrates as a potential electrode material for improved auditory brainstem implants. The cochlear nuclei of postnatal day 7 rats were microsurgically dissected. The tissue was dissociated enzymatically and plated on coverslips as control and on the semiconductor substrates silicon or silicon nitride. After 4 days in culture the morphology and growth of dissociated cells was determined by fluorescence and scanning electron microscopy. Dissociated cells of the cochlear nucleus showed reduced cell growth on semiconductor substrates compared with controls. SEM analysis demonstrated close contact of neurons with supporting cells in culture and good adherence of neuronal growth cones on the used materials. These findings present basic knowledge for the development of neuron-electrode interfaces for future auditory brainstem implants. PMID:21370446

  20. Relationship between inter-stimulus-intervals and intervals of autonomous activities in a neuronal network.

    PubMed

    Ito, Hidekatsu; Minoshima, Wataru; Kudoh, Suguru N

    2015-08-01

    To investigate relationships between neuronal network activity and electrical stimulus, we analyzed autonomous activity before and after electrical stimulus. Recordings of autonomous activity were performed using dissociated culture of rat hippocampal neurons on a multi-electrodes array (MEA) dish. Single stimulus and pared stimuli were applied to a cultured neuronal network. Single stimulus was applied every 1 min, and paired stimuli was performed by two sequential stimuli every 1 min. As a result, the patterns of synchronized activities of a neuronal network were changed after stimulus. Especially, long range synchronous activities were induced by paired stimuli. When 1 s inter-stimulus-intervals (ISI) and 1.5 s ISI paired stimuli are applied to a neuronal network, relatively long range synchronous activities expressed in case of 1.5 s ISI. Temporal synchronous activity of neuronal network is changed according to inter-stimulus-intervals (ISI) of electrical stimulus. In other words, dissociated neuronal network can maintain given information in temporal pattern and a certain type of an information maintenance mechanism was considered to be implemented in a semi-artificial dissociated neuronal network. The result is useful toward manipulation technology of neuronal activity in a brain system.

  1. Assessing Neuronal Bioenergetic Status

    PubMed Central

    Zeiger, Stephanie L.H.; Stankowski, Jeannette N.; McLaughlin, BethAnn

    2013-01-01

    Drug discovery and therapeutic development for disorders of the central nervous system (CNS) represents one of the largest unmet markets in modern medicine. We have increasingly recognized that the lack of stringent assessment of mitochondrial function during the discovery process has resulted in drug recalls, black box warnings, and an urgent need to understand the metabolic liability of small molecules in neural systems. Given that the brain is the most energetically demanding organ, even modest perturbations in neuronal energetic pathways have been shown to impact growth, signaling, connectivity, and the restorative capacity of the CNS. In this work, we describe several tools to assess metabolic activity of primary neuronal cultures and neural cell lines using an acute model of injury induced by oxygen glucose deprivation. Methods include the measurement of total ATP and NADH, enzymatic assessment of lactate production by anaerobic respiration, as well as viability assays. We also present a modified screening method for assessing aerobic respiration of immortalized cell lines using galactose challenge. PMID:21815069

  2. Assessing neuronal bioenergetic status.

    PubMed

    Zeiger, Stephanie L H; Stankowski, Jeannette N; McLaughlin, BethAnn

    2011-01-01

    Drug discovery and therapeutic development for disorders of the central nervous system (CNS) represents one of the largest unmet markets in modern medicine. We have increasingly recognized that the lack of stringent assessment of mitochondrial function during the discovery process has resulted in drug recalls, black box warnings, and an urgent need to understand the metabolic liability of small molecules in neural systems. Given that the brain is the most energetically demanding organ, even modest perturbations in neuronal energetic pathways have been shown to impact growth, signaling, connectivity, and the restorative capacity of the CNS. In this work, we describe several tools to assess metabolic activity of primary neuronal cultures and neural cell lines using an acute model of injury induced by oxygen glucose deprivation. Methods include the measurement of total ATP and NADH, enzymatic assessment of lactate production by anaerobic respiration, as well as viability assays. We also present a modified screening method for assessing aerobic respiration of immortalized cell lines using galactose challenge.

  3. Molecular dissociation in dilute gas

    SciTech Connect

    Renfrow, S.N.; Duggan, J.L.; McDaniel, F.D. |

    1999-06-01

    The charge state distributions (CSD) produced during molecular dissociation are important to both Trace Element Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (TEAMS) and the ion implantation industry. The CSD of 1.3{endash}1.7 MeV SiN{sup +}, SiMg{sup +}, SiMn{sup +}, and SiZn{sup +} molecules have been measured for elements that do not form atomic negative ions (N, Mg, Mn, and Zn) using a NEC Tandem Pelletron accelerator. The molecules were produced in a Cs sputter negative ion source, accelerated, magnetically analyzed, and then passed through an N{sub 2} gas cell. The neutral and charged breakups where analyzed using an electrostatic deflector and measured with particle detectors. Equilibrium CSD were determined and comparisons made between molecular and atomic ion data. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. The Dissociative Recombination of OH(+)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guberman, Steven L.

    1995-01-01

    Theoretical quantum chemical calculations of the cross sections and rates for the dissociative recombination of the upsilon = 0 level of the ground state of OH(+) show that recombination occurs primarily along the 2 (2)Pi diabatic route. The products are 0((1)D) and a hot H atom with 6.1 eV kinetic energy. The coupling to the resonances is very small and the indirect recombination mechanism plays only a minor role. The recommended value for the rate coefficient is (6.3 +/- 0.7) x 10(exp -9)x (T(e)/1300)(exp -0.48) cu.cm/s for 10 less than T(e) less than 1000 K.

  5. Dissociative depression among women in the community.

    PubMed

    Sar, Vedat; Akyüz, Gamze; Oztürk, Erdinç; Alioğlu, Firdevs

    2013-01-01

    This study screened the prevalence and correlates of dissociative disorders among depressive women in the general population. The Dissociative Disorders Interview Schedule and the posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and borderline personality disorder sections of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV were administered to 628 women in 500 homes. The prevalence of current major depressive episode was 10.0%. Of the women, 26 (40.6%) had the lifetime diagnosis of a DSM-IV, dissociative disorder, yielding a prevalence of 4.1% for dissociative depression. This group was younger (mean age = 30.7 years) than the nondissociative depression women (mean age = 39.6 years). There was no difference between the 2 groups on comorbid somatization disorder, PTSD, or borderline personality disorder. Besides suicide attempts, the dissociative group was characterized by secondary features of dissociative identity disorder; Schneiderian symptoms; borderline personality disorder criteria; and extrasensory perceptions, including possession experiences. They reported suicidality, thoughts of guilt and worthlessness, diminished concentration and indecisiveness, and appetite and weight changes more frequently than the nondissociative group. Early cessation of school education and childhood sexual abuse were frequently reported by the dissociative depression group. With its distinct features, the concept of dissociative depression may facilitate understanding of treatment resistance in, development of better psychotherapy strategies for, and new thinking on the neurobiology and pharmacotherapy of depressive disorders. PMID:23796173

  6. Dissociation and the Development of Psychopathology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Putnam, Frank W.; Trickett, Penelope K.

    This paper reviews the research on dissociation and the development of psychopathology in children and adolescents. Definitions and dimensions of dissociation are addressed, noting its range from normative daydreaming to the extremes found in individuals with multiple personality disorder. Memory dysfunctions, disturbances of identity, passive…

  7. Dissociative depression among women in the community.

    PubMed

    Sar, Vedat; Akyüz, Gamze; Oztürk, Erdinç; Alioğlu, Firdevs

    2013-01-01

    This study screened the prevalence and correlates of dissociative disorders among depressive women in the general population. The Dissociative Disorders Interview Schedule and the posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and borderline personality disorder sections of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV were administered to 628 women in 500 homes. The prevalence of current major depressive episode was 10.0%. Of the women, 26 (40.6%) had the lifetime diagnosis of a DSM-IV, dissociative disorder, yielding a prevalence of 4.1% for dissociative depression. This group was younger (mean age = 30.7 years) than the nondissociative depression women (mean age = 39.6 years). There was no difference between the 2 groups on comorbid somatization disorder, PTSD, or borderline personality disorder. Besides suicide attempts, the dissociative group was characterized by secondary features of dissociative identity disorder; Schneiderian symptoms; borderline personality disorder criteria; and extrasensory perceptions, including possession experiences. They reported suicidality, thoughts of guilt and worthlessness, diminished concentration and indecisiveness, and appetite and weight changes more frequently than the nondissociative group. Early cessation of school education and childhood sexual abuse were frequently reported by the dissociative depression group. With its distinct features, the concept of dissociative depression may facilitate understanding of treatment resistance in, development of better psychotherapy strategies for, and new thinking on the neurobiology and pharmacotherapy of depressive disorders.

  8. Childhood Stuttering and Dissociations across Linguistic Domains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Julie D.; Pellowski, Mark W.; Conture, Edward G.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the possible presence of dissociations in the speech and language skills of young children who do (CWS) and do not stutter (CWNS) using a correlation-based statistical procedure [Bates, E., Appelbaum, M., Salcedo, J., Saygin, A. P., & Pizzamiglio, L. (2003). Quantifying dissociations in…

  9. [Dissociative disorder and self-injury].

    PubMed

    Noma, Shun'ichi

    2011-01-01

    Both the number of patients with dissociative disorder and that of those with self-injury have been increasing since the end of the twentieth century, suggesting that dissociation and self-injury might be closely related. When dissociative disorder coexists with self-injury, it implies self-punishment and a wish to be understood by others. Although many cases of self-injury observed since 2000 lacked traumatic experiences and were not accompanied by pathological dissociative symptoms, the patients did have dissociative tendencies. According to the results of our study examining self-injury in patients with eating disorders, we observed that self-injury, dissociative tendency and insulation from others are related to each other. This suggests that affects, sensations and representations are dissociated, losing their normal response order, and that the pervasive idea that "pain=secure" is formed in a patient from childhood based on influence from their parents. Self-injury appears to be an activation of this pervasive idea that is triggered by a stressful situation, when the dissociative psychological segmentation of effects and their representations are present in the background.

  10. Cognitive and dissociative manifestations in fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Leavitt, Frank; Katz, Robert S; Mills, Megan; Heard, Amy R

    2002-04-01

    Memory decline and mental confusion frequently complicate the clinical presentation of fibromyalgia; however, formal cognitive examination often does not support deterioration. This paradox was examined in the context of dissociation, a condition with many cognitive similarities. Dissociation refers to the separation of parts of experience from the mainstream of consciousness. A common example is highway hypnosis. Eighty-nine fibromyalgia (FM) patients and 64 other rheumatic disease patients were screened for memory decline and mental confusion using a questionnaire format. Pain, dissociation, affective distress, fatigue, sleep difficulty, and mental confusion were also assessed. Cognitive complaints (76.4%-43.8%) and dissociative symptoms (37.1%-1.9%) were overrepresented in patients with FM. Among FM patients with high dissociation, cognitive difficulties were reported by 95%; 100% of these cases reported that both memory and mental clarity were affected, a condition referred to as fibrofog. Dissociation in combination with fibrofog was associated with higher levels of FM symptom intensity and decreased mental well being. These findings suggest that dissociation may play a role in FM symptom amplification and may aid in comprehending the regularity of cognitive symptoms. Separating cases of fibrofog from cognitive conditions with actual brain damage is important. It may be prudent to add a test of dissociation as an adjunct to the evaluation of FM patients in cases of suspected fibrofog. Otherwise, test results may prove normal even in patients with disabling cognitive symptoms.

  11. A Hierarchical Process-Dissociation Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rouder, Jeffrey N.; Lu, Jun; Morey, Richard D.; Sun, Dongchu; Speckman, Paul L.

    2008-01-01

    In fitting the process-dissociation model (L. L. Jacoby, 1991) to observed data, researchers aggregate outcomes across participant, items, or both. T. Curran and D. L. Hintzman (1995) demonstrated how biases from aggregation may lead to artifactual support for the model. The authors develop a hierarchical process-dissociation model that does not…

  12. Kv4 Channels Underlie the Subthreshold-Operating A-type K-current in Nociceptive Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons.

    PubMed

    Phuket, Thanawath Ratanadilok Na; Covarrubias, Manuel

    2009-01-01

    The dorsal root ganglion (DRG) contains heterogeneous populations of sensory neurons including primary nociceptive neurons and C-fibers implicated in pain signaling. Recent studies have demonstrated DRG hyperexcitability associated with downregulation of A-type K(+) channels; however, the molecular correlate of the corresponding A-type K(+) current (I(A)) has remained hypothetical. Kv4 channels may underlie the I(A) in DRG neurons. We combined electrophysiology, molecular biology (Whole-Tissue and Single-Cell RT-PCR) and immunohistochemistry to investigate the molecular basis of the I(A) in acutely dissociated DRG neurons from 7- to 8-day-old rats. Whole-cell recordings demonstrate a robust tetraethylammonium-resistant (20 mM) and 4-aminopyridine-sensitive (5 mM) I(A). Matching Kv4 channel properties, activation and inactivation of this I(A) occur in the subthreshold range of membrane potentials and the rate of recovery from inactivation is rapid and voltage-dependent. Among Kv4 transcripts, the DRG expresses significant levels of Kv4.1 and Kv4.3 mRNAs. Also, single small-medium diameter DRG neurons ( approximately 30 mum) exhibit correlated frequent expression of mRNAs encoding Kv4.1 and Nav1.8, a known nociceptor marker. In contrast, the expressions of Kv1.4 and Kv4.2 mRNAs at the whole-tissue and single-cell levels are relatively low and infrequent. Kv4 protein expression in nociceptive DRG neurons was confirmed by immunohistochemistry, which demonstrates colocalization of Kv4.3 and Nav1.8, and negligible expression of Kv4.2. Furthermore, specific dominant-negative suppression and overexpression strategies confirmed the contribution of Kv4 channels to I(A) in DRG neurons. Contrasting the expression patterns of Kv4 channels in the central and peripheral nervous systems, we discuss possible functional roles of these channels in primary sensory neurons. PMID:19668710

  13. The Shutdown Dissociation Scale (Shut-D)

    PubMed Central

    Schalinski, Inga; Schauer, Maggie; Elbert, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The evolutionary model of the defense cascade by Schauer and Elbert (2010) provides a theoretical frame for a short interview to assess problems underlying and leading to the dissociative subtype of posttraumatic stress disorder. Based on known characteristics of the defense stages “fright,” “flag,” and “faint,” we designed a structured interview to assess the vulnerability for the respective types of dissociation. Most of the scales that assess dissociative phenomena are designed as self-report questionnaires. Their items are usually selected based on more heuristic considerations rather than a theoretical model and thus include anything from minor dissociative experiences to major pathological dissociation. The shutdown dissociation scale (Shut-D) was applied in several studies in patients with a history of multiple traumatic events and different disorders that have been shown previously to be prone to symptoms of dissociation. The goal of the present investigation was to obtain psychometric characteristics of the Shut-D (including factor structure, internal consistency, retest reliability, predictive, convergent and criterion-related concurrent validity). A total population of 225 patients and 68 healthy controls were accessed. Shut-D appears to have sufficient internal reliability, excellent retest reliability, high convergent validity, and satisfactory predictive validity, while the summed score of the scale reliably separates patients with exposure to trauma (in different diagnostic groups) from healthy controls. The Shut-D is a brief structured interview for assessing the vulnerability to dissociate as a consequence of exposure to traumatic stressors. The scale demonstrates high-quality psychometric properties and may be useful for researchers and clinicians in assessing shutdown dissociation as well as in predicting the risk of dissociative responding. PMID:25976478

  14. Dissociation and Memory Fragmentation in Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: An Evaluation of the Dissociative Encoding Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Bedard-Gilligan, Michele; Zoellner, Lori A.

    2012-01-01

    Several prominent theories of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) posit that peritraumatic dissociation results in insufficient encoding of the trauma memory and that persistent dissociation prevents memory elaboration, resulting in memory fragmentation and PTSD. In this review, we summarize the empirical literature on peritraumatic and trait dissociation and trauma narrative fragmentation as measured by meta-memory and rater/objective coding. Across 16 studies to date, the association between dissociation and fragmentation was most prominent when examining peritraumatic dissociation and patient's own ratings of memory fragmentation. This relationship did not hold when examining trait dissociation or rater-coded or computer-generated measures of fragmentation. Thus, initial evidence points more toward a strong self-reported association between constructs that is not supported on more objective fragmentation coding. Measurement overlap, construct ambiguity, and exclusion of potential confounds may underlie lack of a strong association between dissociation and objective-rated fragmentation. PMID:22348400

  15. Double dissociation of 'what' and 'where' processing in auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Lomber, Stephen G; Malhotra, Shveta

    2008-05-01

    Studies of cortical connections or neuronal function in different cerebral areas support the hypothesis that parallel cortical processing streams, similar to those identified in visual cortex, may exist in the auditory system. However, this model has not yet been behaviorally tested. We used reversible cooling deactivation to investigate whether the individual regions in cat nonprimary auditory cortex that are responsible for processing the pattern of an acoustic stimulus or localizing a sound in space could be doubly dissociated in the same animal. We found that bilateral deactivation of the posterior auditory field resulted in deficits in a sound-localization task, whereas bilateral deactivation of the anterior auditory field resulted in deficits in a pattern-discrimination task, but not vice versa. These findings support a model of cortical organization that proposes that identifying an acoustic stimulus ('what') and its spatial location ('where') are processed in separate streams in auditory cortex. PMID:18408717

  16. Agonist action of taurine on glycine receptors in rat supraoptic magnocellular neurones: possible role in osmoregulation.

    PubMed

    Hussy, N; Deleuze, C; Pantaloni, A; Desarménien, M G; Moos, F

    1997-08-01

    1. To evaluate the implication of taurine in the physiology of supraoptic neurones, we (i) investigated the agonist properties of taurine on glycine and GABAA receptors of supraoptic magnocellular neurones acutely dissociated from adult rats, using whole-cell voltage clamp, (ii) studied the effects of taurine and strychnine in vivo by extracellular recordings of supraoptic vasopressin neurones in anaesthetized rats, and (iii) measured the osmolarity-dependent release of endogenous taurine from isolated supraoptic nuclei by HPLC. 2. GABA, glycine and taurine evoked rapidly activating currents that all reversed close to the equilibrium potential for Cl-, indicating activation of Cl(-)-selective channels. Glycine-activated currents were reversibly blocked by strychnine (IC50 of 35 nM with 100 microM glycine), but were unaffected by the GABAA antagonist gabazine (1-3 microM). GABA-activated currents were reversibly antagonized by 3 microM gabazine, but not by strychnine (up to 1 microM). 3. Responses to 1 mM taurine were blocked by strychnine but not by gabazine and showed no additivity with glycine-induced currents, indicating selective activation of glycine receptors. Responses to 10 mM taurine were partially antagonized by gabazine, the residual current being blocked by strychnine. Thus, taurine is also a weak agonist of GABAA receptors. 4. In the presence of gabazine, taurine activated glycine receptors with an EC50 of 406 microM. Taurine activated at most 70% of maximal glycine currents, suggesting that it is a partial agonist of glycine receptors. 5. In vivo, locally applied strychnine (300 nM) increased and taurine (1 mM) decreased the basal electrical activity of vasopressin neurones in normally hydrated rats. The effect of strychnine was markedly more pronounced in water-loaded rats. 6. Taurine, which is concentrated in supraoptic glial cells, could be released from isolated supraoptic nuclei upon hyposmotic stimulation. Decreases in osmolarity of 15 and 30

  17. Dissociation dynamics in the dissociative electron attachment to carbon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nag, Pamir; Nandi, Dhananjay

    2015-05-01

    Dissociative electron attachment (DEA) to gas phase CO2 has been probed using a velocity slice imaging technique. DEA to CO2 produces only an O- ionic fragment and shows two major resonances located at 4.4 and 8.2 eV, respectively. The kinetic energy and angular distribution of the O- ions are measured around the second resonance with higher efficiency and sensitivity that provide details of the DEA dynamics. The kinetic energy distributions are in good agreement with the previous reports. However, the distinct angular distributions show substantial difference from the two recent studies within the limited electron energies. Our angular distribution results show two negative ion resonant states are involved in the underlying DEA process at the entire electron energies over the second resonance. We discussed the recent conflicting findings in the angular distribution results. The forward-backward asymmetry observed in the angular distributions is explained due to the interference effect of different partial waves associated with the attaching electron.

  18. Purification and culture of adult rat dorsal root ganglia neurons.

    PubMed

    Delree, P; Leprince, P; Schoenen, J; Moonen, G

    1989-06-01

    To study the trophic requirements of adult rat dorsal root ganglia neurons (DRG) in vitro, we developed a purification procedure that yields highly enriched neuronal cultures. Forty to fifty ganglia are dissected from the spinal column of an adult rat. After enzymatic and mechanical dissociation of the ganglia, myelin debris are eliminated by centrifugation on a Percoll gradient. The resulting cell suspension is layered onto a nylon mesh with a pore size of 10 microns. Most of the neurons, the diameter of which ranged from 17 microns to greater than 100 microns, are retained on the upper surface of the sieve; most of the non-neuronal cells with a caliber of less than 10 microns after trypsinization go through it. Recovery of neurons is achieved by reversing the mesh onto a Petri dish containing culture medium. Neurons to non-neurons ratio is 1 to 10 in the initial cell suspension and 1 to 1 after separation. When these purified neurons are seeded at a density of 3,000 neurons/cm2 in 6 mm polyornithine-laminin (PORN-LAM) coated wells, neuronal survival (assessed by the ability to extend neurites), measured after 48 hr of culture, is very low (from 0 to 16%). Addition of nerve growth factor (NGF) does not improve neuronal survival. However, when neurons are cultured in the presence of medium conditioned (CM) by astrocytes or Schwann cells, 60-80% of the seeded, dye-excluding neurons survive. So, purified adult DRG neurons require for their short-term survival and regeneration in culture, a trophic support that is present in conditioned medium from PNS or CNS glia.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. From state dissociation to status dissociatus.

    PubMed

    Antelmi, Elena; Ferri, Raffaele; Iranzo, Alex; Arnulf, Isabelle; Dauvilliers, Yves; Bhatia, Kailash P; Liguori, Rocco; Schenck, Carlos H; Plazzi, Giuseppe

    2016-08-01

    The states of being are conventionally defined by the simultaneous occurrence of behavioral, neurophysiological and autonomic descriptors. State dissociation disorders are due to the intrusion of features typical of a different state into an ongoing state. Disorders related to these conditions are classified according to the ongoing main state and comprise: 1) Dissociation from prevailing wakefulness as seen in hypnagogic or hypnopompic hallucinations, automatic behaviors, sleep drunkenness, cataplexy and sleep paralysis 2) Dissociation from rapid eye movement (REM) sleep as seen in REM sleep behavior disorder and lucid dreaming and 3) Dissociation from NREM sleep as seen in the disorders of arousal. The extreme expression of states dissociation is characterized by the asynchronous occurrence of the various components of the different states that prevents the recognition of any state of being. This condition has been named status dissociatus. According to the underlying disorders/diseases and to their severity, among status dissociatus we may recognize disorders in which such an extreme dissociation occurs only at night time or intermittently (i.e., autoimmune encephalopathies, narcolepsy type 1 and IgLON5 parasomnia), and others in which it occurs nearly continuously with complete loss of any conventionally defined state of being, and of the circadian pattern (agrypnia excitata). Here, we render a comprehensive review of all diseases/disorders associated with state dissociation and status dissociatus and propose a critical classification of this complex scenario. PMID:26431902

  20. From state dissociation to status dissociatus.

    PubMed

    Antelmi, Elena; Ferri, Raffaele; Iranzo, Alex; Arnulf, Isabelle; Dauvilliers, Yves; Bhatia, Kailash P; Liguori, Rocco; Schenck, Carlos H; Plazzi, Giuseppe

    2016-08-01

    The states of being are conventionally defined by the simultaneous occurrence of behavioral, neurophysiological and autonomic descriptors. State dissociation disorders are due to the intrusion of features typical of a different state into an ongoing state. Disorders related to these conditions are classified according to the ongoing main state and comprise: 1) Dissociation from prevailing wakefulness as seen in hypnagogic or hypnopompic hallucinations, automatic behaviors, sleep drunkenness, cataplexy and sleep paralysis 2) Dissociation from rapid eye movement (REM) sleep as seen in REM sleep behavior disorder and lucid dreaming and 3) Dissociation from NREM sleep as seen in the disorders of arousal. The extreme expression of states dissociation is characterized by the asynchronous occurrence of the various components of the different states that prevents the recognition of any state of being. This condition has been named status dissociatus. According to the underlying disorders/diseases and to their severity, among status dissociatus we may recognize disorders in which such an extreme dissociation occurs only at night time or intermittently (i.e., autoimmune encephalopathies, narcolepsy type 1 and IgLON5 parasomnia), and others in which it occurs nearly continuously with complete loss of any conventionally defined state of being, and of the circadian pattern (agrypnia excitata). Here, we render a comprehensive review of all diseases/disorders associated with state dissociation and status dissociatus and propose a critical classification of this complex scenario.

  1. Somatodendritic and excitatory postsynaptic distribution of neuron-type dystrophin isoform, Dp40, in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Takahiro; Itoh, Kyoko; Yaoi, Takeshi; Fushiki, Shinji

    2014-09-12

    The Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) gene produces multiple dystrophin (Dp) products due to the presence of several promoters. We previously reported the existence of a novel short isoform of Dp, Dp40, in adult mouse brain. However, the exact biochemical expression profile and cytological distribution of the Dp40 protein remain unknown. In this study, we generated a polyclonal antibody against the NH2-terminal region of the Dp40 and identified the expression profile of Dp40 in the mouse brain. Through an analysis using embryonic and postnatal mouse cerebrums, we found that Dp40 emerged from the early neonatal stages until adulthood, whereas Dp71, an another Dp short isoform, was highly detected in both prenatal and postnatal cerebrums. Intriguingly, relative expressions of Dp40 and Dp71 were prominent in cultured dissociated neurons and non-neuronal cells derived from mouse hippocampus, respectively. Furthermore, the immunocytological distribution of Dp40 was analyzed in dissociated cultured neurons, revealing that Dp40 is detected in the soma and its dendrites, but not in the axon. It is worthy to note that Dp40 is localized along the subplasmalemmal region of the dendritic shafts, as well as at excitatory postsynaptic sites. Thus, Dp40 was identified as a neuron-type Dp possibly involving dendritic and synaptic functions.

  2. Somatodendritic and excitatory postsynaptic distribution of neuron-type dystrophin isoform, Dp40, in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Takahiro; Itoh, Kyoko; Yaoi, Takeshi; Fushiki, Shinji

    2014-09-12

    The Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) gene produces multiple dystrophin (Dp) products due to the presence of several promoters. We previously reported the existence of a novel short isoform of Dp, Dp40, in adult mouse brain. However, the exact biochemical expression profile and cytological distribution of the Dp40 protein remain unknown. In this study, we generated a polyclonal antibody against the NH2-terminal region of the Dp40 and identified the expression profile of Dp40 in the mouse brain. Through an analysis using embryonic and postnatal mouse cerebrums, we found that Dp40 emerged from the early neonatal stages until adulthood, whereas Dp71, an another Dp short isoform, was highly detected in both prenatal and postnatal cerebrums. Intriguingly, relative expressions of Dp40 and Dp71 were prominent in cultured dissociated neurons and non-neuronal cells derived from mouse hippocampus, respectively. Furthermore, the immunocytological distribution of Dp40 was analyzed in dissociated cultured neurons, revealing that Dp40 is detected in the soma and its dendrites, but not in the axon. It is worthy to note that Dp40 is localized along the subplasmalemmal region of the dendritic shafts, as well as at excitatory postsynaptic sites. Thus, Dp40 was identified as a neuron-type Dp possibly involving dendritic and synaptic functions. PMID:25152393

  3. Dissociative identity disorder: a controversial diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Gillig, Paulette Marie

    2009-03-01

    A brief description of the controversies surrounding the diagnosis of dissociative identity disorder is presented, followed by a discussion of the proposed similarities and differences between dissociative identity disorder and borderline personality disorder. The phenomenon of autohypnosis in the context of early childhood sexual trauma and disordered attachment is discussed, as is the meaning of alters or alternate personalities. The author describes recent neurosciences research that may relate the symptoms of dissociative identity disorder to demonstrable disordered attention and memory processes. A clinical description of a typical patient presentation is included, plus some recommendations for approaches to treatment.

  4. Wavepacket theory of collisional dissociation in molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Kulander, K.

    1980-01-01

    An explicit integration scheme is used to solve the time dependent Schroedinger equation for wavepackets which model collisions in the collinear H + H/sub 2/ system. A realistic LEPS-type potential energy surface is used. Collision energies considered are above the dissociation threshold and probabilities for collision induced dissociation are reported. Also quantum mechanical state-to-state transition probabilities are generated. These results are compared to extensive classical trajectory calculations performed on this same system. The time evolution of the wavepacket densities is studied to understand the dynamics of the collinear collisional dissociation process.

  5. Dissociative Ionization of Pyridine by Electron Impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dateo, Christopher; Huo, Winifred; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In order to understand the damage of biomolecules by electrons, a process important in radiation damage, we undertake a study of the dissociative ionization (DI) of pyridine (C5H5N) from the low-lying ionization channels. The methodology used is the same as in the benzene study. While no experimental DI data are available, we compare the dissociation products from our calculations with the dissociative photoionization measurements of Tixier et al. using dipole (e, e(+) ion) coincidence spectroscopy. Comparisons with the DI of benzene is also made so as to understand the difference in DI between a heterocyclic and an aromatic molecule.

  6. Products of Dissociative Recombination in the Ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosby, Philip

    1996-01-01

    SRI International undertook a novel experimental measurement of the product states formed by dissociative ro-combination (DR) of C2(+), NO(+), and N2(+) as a function of both electron energy and reactant ion vibrational level. For these measurements we used a recently developed experimental technique for measuring dissociation product distributions that allows both the branching ratios to be accurately determined and the electronic and ro-vibrational state composition of the reactant ions to be specified. DR is the dominant electron loss mechanism in all regions of the ionosphere. In this process, electron attachment to the molecular ion produces an unstable neutral molecule that rapidly dissociates.

  7. Theory of dissociative tunneling ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svensmark, Jens; Tolstikhin, Oleg I.; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2016-05-01

    We present a theoretical study of the dissociative tunneling ionization process. Analytic expressions for the nuclear kinetic energy distribution of the ionization rates are derived. A particularly simple expression for the spectrum is found by using the Born-Oppenheimer (BO) approximation in conjunction with the reflection principle. These spectra are compared to exact non-BO ab initio spectra obtained through model calculations with a quantum mechanical treatment of both the electronic and nuclear degrees of freedom. In the regime where the BO approximation is applicable, imaging of the BO nuclear wave function is demonstrated to be possible through reverse use of the reflection principle, when accounting appropriately for the electronic ionization rate. A qualitative difference between the exact and BO wave functions in the asymptotic region of large electronic distances is shown. Additionally, the behavior of the wave function across the turning line is seen to be reminiscent of light refraction. For weak fields, where the BO approximation does not apply, the weak-field asymptotic theory describes the spectrum accurately.

  8. Dissociative recombination of CH4(+).

    PubMed

    Thomas, Richard D; Kashperka, Iryna; Vigren, E; Geppert, Wolf D; Hamberg, Mathias; Larsson, Mats; af Ugglas, Magnus; Zhaunerchyk, Vitali

    2013-10-01

    CH4(+) is an important molecular ion in the astrochemistry of diffuse clouds, dense clouds, cometary comae, and planetary ionospheres. However, the rate of one of the common destruction mechanisms for molecular ions in these regions, dissociative recombination (DR), is somewhat uncertain. Here, we present absolute measurements for the DR of CH4(+) made using the heavy ion storage ring CRYRING in Stockholm, Sweden. From our collision-energy dependent cross-sections, we infer a thermal rate constant of k(Te) = 1.71(±0.02) × 10(–6)(Te/300)(−0.66(±0.02)) cm3 s(–1) over the region of electron temperatures 10 ≤ Te ≤ 1000 K. At low collision energies, we have measured the branching fractions of the DR products to be CH4 (0.00 ± 0.00); CH3 + H (0.18 ± 0.03); CH2 + 2H (0.51 ± 0.03); CH2 + H2 (0.06 ± 0.01); CH + H2 + H (0.23 ± 0.01); and CH + 2H2 (0.02 ± 0.01), indicating that two or more C–H bonds are broken in 80% of all collisions.

  9. Widely expressed transcripts for chemokine receptor CXCR1 in identified glutamatergic, gamma-aminobutyric acidergic, and cholinergic neurons and astrocytes of the rat brain: a single-cell reverse transcription-multiplex polymerase chain reaction study.

    PubMed

    Danik, M; Puma, C; Quirion, R; Williams, S

    2003-10-15

    Increasing evidence suggests that the chemokine interleukin (IL)-8/CXCL8 plays important roles in CNS development, neuronal survival, modulation of excitability, and neuroimmune response. Recently, we have shown that CXCL8 can acutely modulate ion channel activity in septal neurons expressing receptors CXCR1 and/or CXCR2. This was a surprising finding, insofar as CXCR1 expression had not been described for the mammalian brain. Here we investigated whether CXCR1 transcripts are present in other brain regions, whether they are expressed at the single-cell level in molecularly identified neurons and astrocytes, and how they are regulated during early postnatal development. In addition, possible cellular colocalization of CXCR1 and CXCR2 transcripts was examined. Semiquantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) revealed that CXCR1 mRNAs were expressed in the septum, striatum, hippocampus, cerebellum, and cortex (temporoparietal and entorhinal) at different levels and appeared to be regulated independently from CXCR2 during development. By using RT multiplex PCR on acutely dissociated cells from these brain regions, we show that CXCR1 transcripts were expressed in 83% of 84 sampled neurons displaying cholinergic (choline acetyltransferase mRNAs), gamma-aminobutyric acidergic (glutamic acid decarboxylases 65 and 67 mRNAs), or glutamatergic (vesicular glutamate transporters 1 and 2 mRNAs) phenotypes. CXCR1 and CXCR2 transcripts were colocalized in 45% of neurons sampled and also were present in some glial fibrillary acidic protein mRNA-expressing astrocytes. This is the first study to demonstrate the widespread expression of CXCR1 transcripts in the brain and suggests that CXCR1 may have hitherto unsuspected roles in neuromodulation and inflammation. PMID:14515358

  10. [Pathogenesis of acute encephalitis and acute encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Shiomi, Masashi

    2011-03-01

    Many aspects of the pathogenesis of acute encephalitis and acute encephalopathy have been clarified in this decade, although many unknown mechanisms remain to be elucidated. According to progress of MRI and neuroimmunological analysis and the observation of clinical findings, many new syndromes were found, which enhanced our understanding of acute encephalitis and acute encephalopathy. The pathogenesis of encephalitis is divided into infection and immune mediated mechanisms. The antibodies to neuronal surface antigens(NSA) such as NMDA receptors, leucin-rich glioma inactivated 1 (LGI1) and aquaporin 4 were demonstrated in specific encephalitis, limbic encephalitis and neuromyelitis optica. Anti-NSA antibody encephalitis should be treated by immunotherapy such as corticosteroid and plasmapheresis. Acute encephalitis with refractory repetitive partial seizures (AERRPS) is a devastating postinfectious disease in children and adults, although the pathogenesis of AERRPS is poorly understood. Influenza associated encephalopathy(IAE) is characterized by it's high incidence in Japanese children between 1 year and 5 years of age, its onset in the first or the second day of illness and its high mortality (15-30%) and morbidity (25-40%). We proposed the classification of IAE with poor prognosis from the neuroradiological findings. Four types of encephalopathy seem to be differentiated from each other, acute necrotizing encephalopathy (ANE) type, hemorrhagic shock and encephalopathy syndrome (HSES) type, acute brain swelling (ABS) type, febrile convulsive status epilepticus (FCSE) type. The notable radiological features are thalamic lesions in ANE, diffuse cerebral cortical cytotoxic edema in HSES, reversible cerebral swelling in ABS which sometimes reaches lethal brain herniation, and in FCSE type, dendritic high signal in subcortical white matter by DWI ("bright tree appearance") appears simultaneously with the later onset of repetitive focal seizure. These four types are

  11. Colonic Hypersensitivity and Sensitization of Voltage-gated Sodium Channels in Primary Sensory Neurons in Rats with Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Ji; Song, Zhen-Yuan; Zhang, Hong-Hong; Qin, Xin; Hu, Shufen; Jiang, Xinghong; Xu, Guang-Yin

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Patients with long-standing diabetes often demonstrate intestinal dysfunction and abdominal pain. However, the pathophysiology of abdominal pain in diabetic patients remains elusive. The purpose of study was to determine roles of voltage-gated sodium channels in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) in colonic hypersensitivity of rats with diabetes. Methods Diabetic models were induced by a single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ; 65 mg/kg) in adult female rats, while the control rats received citrate buffer only. Behavioral responses to colorectal distention were used to determine colonic sensitivity in rats. Colon projection DRG neurons labeled with DiI were acutely dissociated for measuring excitability and sodium channel currents by whole-cell patch clamp recordings. Western blot analysis was employed to measure the expression of NaV1.7 and NaV1.8 of colon DRGs. Results STZ injection produced a significantly lower distention threshold than control rats in responding to colorectal distention. STZ injection also depolarized the resting membrane potentials, hyperpolarized action potential threshold, decreased rheobase and increased frequency of action potentials evoked by 2 and 3 times rheobase and ramp current stimulation. Furthermore, STZ injection enhanced neuronal sodium current densities of DRG neurons innervating the colon. STZ injection also led to a significant upregulation of NaV1.7 and NaV1.8 expression in colon DRGs compared with age and sex-matched control rats. Conclusions Our results suggest that enhanced neuronal excitability following STZ injection, which may be mediated by upregulation of NaV1.7 and NaV1.8 expression in DRGs, may play an important role in colonic hypersensitivity in rats with diabetes. PMID:26459453

  12. Neonatal maternal deprivation sensitizes voltage-gated sodium channel currents in colon-specific dorsal root ganglion neurons in rats.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shufen; Xiao, Ying; Zhu, Liyan; Li, Lin; Hu, Chuang-Ying; Jiang, Xinghong; Xu, Guang-Yin

    2013-02-15

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common gastrointestinal disorder characterized by abdominal pain in association with altered bowel movements. The underlying mechanisms of visceral hypersensitivity remain elusive. This study was designed to examine the role for sodium channels in a rat model of chronic visceral hyperalgesia induced by neonatal maternal deprivation (NMD). Abdominal withdrawal reflex (AWR) scores were performed on adult male rats. Colon-specific dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons were labeled with DiI and acutely dissociated for measuring excitability and sodium channel current under whole-cell patch-clamp configurations. The expression of Na(V)1.8 was analyzed by Western blot and quantitative real-time PCR. NMD significantly increased AWR scores, which lasted for ~6 wk in an association with hyperexcitability of colon DRG neurons. TTX-resistant but not TTX-sensitive sodium current density was greatly enhanced in colon DRG neurons in NMD rats. Compared with controls, activation curves showed a leftward shift in NMD rats whereas inactivation curves did not differ significantly. NMD markedly accelerated the activation time of peak current amplitude without any changes in inactivation time. Furthermore, NMD remarkably enhanced expression of Na(V)1.8 at protein levels but not at mRNA levels in colon-related DRGs. The expression of Na(V)1.9 was not altered after NMD. These data suggest that NMD enhances TTX-resistant sodium activity of colon DRG neurons, which is most likely mediated by a leftward shift of activation curve and by enhanced expression of Na(V)1.8 at protein levels, thus identifying a specific molecular mechanism underlying chronic visceral pain and sensitization in patients with IBS. PMID:23139220

  13. Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 Regulates Neuronal Circuit Development and Excitability.

    PubMed

    Murase, Sachiko; Lantz, Crystal L; Kim, Eunyoung; Gupta, Nitin; Higgins, Richard; Stopfer, Mark; Hoffman, Dax A; Quinlan, Elizabeth M

    2016-07-01

    In early postnatal development, naturally occurring cell death, dendritic outgrowth, and synaptogenesis sculpt neuronal ensembles into functional neuronal circuits. Here, we demonstrate that deletion of the extracellular proteinase matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) affects each of these processes, resulting in maladapted neuronal circuitry. MMP-9 deletion increases the number of CA1 pyramidal neurons but decreases dendritic length and complexity. Parallel changes in neuronal morphology are observed in primary visual cortex and persist into adulthood. Individual CA1 neurons in MMP-9(-/-) mice have enhanced input resistance and a significant increase in the frequency, but not amplitude, of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs). Additionally, deletion of MMP-9 significantly increases spontaneous neuronal activity in awake MMP-9(-/-) mice and enhances response to acute challenge by the excitotoxin kainate. Our data document a novel role for MMP-9-dependent proteolysis: the regulation of several aspects of circuit maturation to constrain excitability throughout life.

  14. Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 regulates neuronal circuit development and excitability

    PubMed Central

    Murase, Sachiko; Lantz, Crystal; Kim, Eunyoung; Gupta, Nitin; Higgins, Richard; Stopfer, Mark; Hoffman, Dax A.; Quinlan, Elizabeth M.

    2015-01-01

    In early postnatal development, naturally occurring cell death, dendritic outgrowth and synaptogenesis sculpt neuronal ensembles into functional neuronal circuits. Here we demonstrate that deletion of the extracellular proteinase MMP-9 affects each of these processes, resulting in maladapted neuronal circuitry. MMP-9 deletion increases the number of CA1 pyramidal neurons, but decreases dendritic length and complexity while dendritic spine density is unchanged. Parallel changes in neuronal morphology are observed in primary visual cortex, and persist into adulthood. Individual CA1 neurons in MMP-9−/− mice have enhanced input resistance and a significant increase in the frequency, but not amplitude, of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs). Additionally, deletion of MMP-9 significant increases spontaneous neuronal activity in awake MMP-9−/− mice and enhances response to acute challenge by the excitotoxin kainate. Thus MMP-9-dependent proteolysis regulates several aspects of circuit maturation to constrain excitability throughout life. PMID:26093382

  15. [Significance of and considerations relating to the diagnosis of dissociation].

    PubMed

    Koreki, Akihiro

    2011-01-01

    Dissociation involves a variety of clinical concepts, and some disorders are also similar to but not the same as dissociation. Dissociative disorder is considered to be a pathological phenomenon based on a psychological mechanism. Accurate diagnosis is very important to ensure that patients receive adequate treatment, although such consideration is not unique to dissociative disorder. Accordingly, there is a need to carefully distinguish dissociation from other disorders. In this article, we outline a number of dissociative and dissociative-like states from the symptoms of amnesia, depersonalization and switching. In particular, we highlight the differences between transient global amnesia and dissociative amnesia, and imaginary companions and dissociative alter personality. Additionally, as the symptoms of conditions such as dissociative amnesia and dissociative identity disorder are easily confused, we also made efforts to organize them.

  16. Electrophysiological recordings of patterned rat brain stem slice neurons.

    PubMed

    Lauer, L; Vogt, A; Yeung, C K; Knoll, W; Offenhäusser, A

    2002-08-01

    Dissociated neuronal cultures on substrates patterned with extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins have yielded much information in the past. However, although the culture of brain slices has many advantages over dissociated neuronal cultures, its feasibility on patterned substrates has not been demonstrated to date. In the present study, neuronal outgrowth from brain stem slices onto homogeneous control substrates, and onto laminin structures of grid- and line-shape was achieved. Cultures were evaluated by means of phase contrast microscopy, antibody staining, and patch-clamp measurements. Only patterns with line sizes of more than 4 microm yielded satisfactory neuronal outgrowth. The size of the nodes in the pattern influenced the nodal compliance of the spreading cells and the amount of unstructured overgrowth. Best grid patterns were 4 microm lines and 10 microm nodes, best line patterns were 4 microm lines and 20 microm nodes. On patterned substrates, average sodium and potassium currents were reduced by approximately 50% compared to controls, whereas area-normalized ion-currents were in the same order of magnitude. This indicates that as a consequence of the pattern-enforced geometrical confinement, neurons tend to have a smaller surface. In addition, neurons on patterned substrates were rapidly covered with glial overgrowth. This was shown by antibody staining. PMID:12102183

  17. Cortical neurons exposed to glutamate rapidly leak preloaded chromium 51

    SciTech Connect

    Maulucci-Gedde, M.; Choi, D.W.

    1987-05-01

    The acute toxic effects of excess glutamate exposure on cortical neurons in culture was followed using a novel adaptation of the /sup 51/Cr efflux assay. Although the acute, sodium-dependent phase of glutamate neurotoxicity may contribute to several acute disease settings, including sustained seizures and stroke, functional aspects of the phenomenon have not been previously studied. We report here that the earliest morphologic sign of glutamate neurotoxicity, neuronal swelling, is accompanied by a large efflux of complexed /sup 51/Cr from preloaded neurons in the first hour after exposure, and that this efflux is detectable as early as 15 min after the onset of glutamate exposure. We suggest that this pathological burst of /sup 51/Cr may result from glutamate-induced leakiness of neuronal cell membranes.

  18. Collision-induced gas phase dissociation rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, C. Frederick

    1990-01-01

    The Landau-Zener theory of reactive cross sections was applied to diatomic molecules dissociating from a ladder of vibrational states. The result predicts a dissociation rate that is quite well duplicated by an Arrhenius function having a preexponential temperature dependence of about T(sub -1/2), at least for inert collision partners. This relation fits experimental data reasonably well. The theory is then used to calculate the effect of vibrational nonequilibrium on dissociation rate. For Morse oscillators, the results are about the same as given by Hammerling, Kivel, and Teare in their analytic approximation for harmonic oscillators, though at very high temperature a correction for the partition function limit is included. The empirical correction for vibration nonequilibrium proposed by Park, which is a convenient algorithm for CFD calculations, is modified to prevent a drastic underestimation of dissociation rates that occurs with this method when vibrational temperature is much smaller than the kinetic temperature of the gas.

  19. Research Reports: Hallucinogens and Dissociative Drugs

    MedlinePlus

    ... in bizarre or dangerous behavior. Hallucinogens such as LSD, psilocybin, peyote, DMT, and ayahuasca cause emotions to ... Take Hallucinogenic or Dissociative Drugs? How Do Hallucinogens (LSD, Psilocybin, Peyote, DMT, and Ayahuasca) Affect the Brain ...

  20. Dissociative identity disorder presenting as dermatitis artefacta.

    PubMed

    Ozmen, Mine; Erdogan, Ayten; Aydemir, Ertugrul H; Oguz, Oya

    2006-06-01

    Dermatitis artefacta is a rare psychiatric condition characterized by rubbing of skin blisters and denial of self-infliction. Dissociation may be comorbid with self-injurious behavior. A background of emotional disturbances during formative years and in later life often results in feelings of isolation and insecurity, which can lead to dissociation as a primary defense mechanism used to overcome traumatic events. In this case report, we describe a female patient with dermatitis artefacta associated with dissociative identity disorder. The patient was a 14-year-old girl. Multiple large, deep ulcerations with unnatural shapes were seen on her left forearm. The ulcerations were thought to be self-inflicted. Psychiatric examination revealed that she had a different identity, and inflicted the lesions when this was assumed. This case leads us to suggest that patients with dermatitis artefacta might have comorbid dissociative experiences, which cannot be identified easily.

  1. [Neuronal network].

    PubMed

    Langmeier, M; Maresová, D

    2005-01-01

    Function of the central nervous system is based on mutual relations among the nerve cells. Description of nerve cells and their processes, including their contacts was enabled by improvement of optical features of the microscope and by the development of impregnation techniques. It is associated with the name of Antoni van Leeuwenhoek (1632-1723), J. Ev. Purkyne (1787-1869), Camillo Golgi (1843-1926), and Ramón y Cajal (1852-1934). Principal units of the neuronal network are the synapses. The term synapse was introduced into neurophysiology by Charles Scott Sherrington (1857-1952). Majority of the interactions between nerve cells is mediated by neurotransmitters acting at the receptors of the postsynaptic membrane or at the autoreceptors of the presynaptic part of the synapse. Attachment of the vesicles to the presynaptic membrane and the release of the neurotransmitter into the synaptic cleft depend on the intracellular calcium concentration and on the presence of several proteins in the presynaptic element.

  2. Acute Bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... tightness. There are two main types of bronchitis: acute and chronic. Most cases of acute bronchitis get better within several days. But your ... that cause colds and the flu often cause acute bronchitis. These viruses spread through the air when ...

  3. The Proinflammatory RAGE/NF-κB Pathway Is Involved in Neuronal Damage and Reactive Gliosis in a Model of Sleep Apnea by Intermittent Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Angelo, Maria Florencia; Aguirre, Alejandra; Avilés Reyes, Rolando X.; Villarreal, Alejandro; Lukin, Jerónimo; Melendez, Matías; Vanasco, Virginia; Barker, Phil; Alvarez, Silvia; Epstein, Alberto; Jerusalinsky, Diana; Ramos, Alberto Javier

    2014-01-01

    Sleep apnea (SA) causes long-lasting changes in neuronal circuitry, which persist even in patients successfully treated for the acute effects of the disease. Evidence obtained from the intermittent hypoxia (IH) experimental model of SA has shown neuronal death, impairment in learning and memory and reactive gliosis that may account for cognitive and structural alterations observed in human patients. However, little is known about the mechanism controlling these deleterious effects that may be useful as therapeutic targets in SA. The Receptor for Advanced Glycation End products (RAGE) and its downstream effector Nuclear Factor Kappa B (NF-κB) have been related to neuronal death and astroglial conversion to the pro-inflammatory neurodegenerative phenotype. RAGE expression and its ligand S100B were shown to be increased in experimental models of SA. We here used dissociated mixed hippocampal cell cultures and male Wistar rats exposed to IH cycles and observed that NF-κB is activated in glial cells and neurons after IH. To disclose the relative contribution of the S100B/RAGE/NF-κB pathway to neuronal damage and reactive gliosis after IH we performed sequential loss of function studies using RAGE or S100B neutralizing antibodies, a herpes simplex virus (HSV)-derived amplicon vector that induces the expression of RAGEΔcyto (dominant negative RAGE) and a chemical blocker of NF-κB. Our results show that NF-κB activation peaks 3 days after IH exposure, and that RAGE or NF-κB blockage during this critical period significantly improves neuronal survival and reduces reactive gliosis. Both in vitro and in vivo, S100B blockage altered reactive gliosis but did not have significant effects on neuronal survival. We conclude that both RAGE and downstream NF-κB signaling are centrally involved in the neuronal alterations found in SA models, and that blockage of these pathways is a tempting strategy for preventing neuronal degeneration and reactive gliosis in SA. PMID:25265561

  4. The relational treatment of dissociative identity disorder.

    PubMed

    Burton, N; Lane, R C

    2001-03-01

    The intent of this paper is to review the literature pertaining to the transference and countertransference components in the treatment of dissociative identity disorder. Aspects of transference and countertransference are presented and discussed within the relational psychoanalytic model. The functions of empathy, enactment, projective identification, and transitional objects are reviewed. Specific attitudes in the transference and countertransference are illuminated and major transference themes are discussed. Finally, a case vignette illustrates some of the central issues involved in the treatment of dissociative identity disorder.

  5. Engrailed Homeoprotein Protects Mesencephalic Dopaminergic Neurons from Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Rekaik, Hocine; Blaudin de Thé, François-Xavier; Fuchs, Julia; Massiani-Beaudoin, Olivia; Prochiantz, Alain; Joshi, Rajiv L.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Engrailed homeoproteins are expressed in adult dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra. In Engrailed1 heterozygous mice, these neurons start dying at 6 weeks, are more sensitive to oxidative stress, and progressively develop traits similar to those observed following an acute and strong oxidative stress inflected to wild-type neurons. These changes include DNA strand breaks and the modification (intensity and distribution) of several nuclear and nucleolar heterochromatin marks. Engrailed1 and Engrailed2 are biochemically equivalent transducing proteins previously used to antagonize dopaminergic neuron death in Engrailed1 heterozygous mice and in mouse models of Parkinson disease. Accordingly, we show that, following an acute oxidative stress, a single Engrailed2 injection restores all nuclear and nucleolar heterochromatin marks, decreases the number of DNA strand breaks, and protects dopaminergic neurons against apoptosis. PMID:26411690

  6. Neonatal colonic inflammation sensitizes voltage-gated Na(+) channels via upregulation of cystathionine β-synthetase expression in rat primary sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Qu, Ruobing; Tao, Jingde; Wang, Yongmeng; Zhou, Youlang; Wu, Geping; Xiao, Ying; Hu, Chuang-Ying; Jiang, Xinghong; Xu, Guang-Yin

    2013-05-01

    The pathogenesis of pain in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is poorly understood, and treatment remains difficult. We have previously reported that colon-specific dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons were hyperactive in a rat model of IBS induced by neonatal colonic inflammation (NCI). This study was designed to examine plasticity of voltage-gated Na(+) channel activities and roles for the endogenous hydrogen sulfide-producing enzyme cystathionine β-synthetase (CBS) in chronic visceral hyperalgesia. Abdominal withdrawal reflex (AWR) scores were recorded in response to graded colorectal distention in adult male rats as a measure of visceral hypersensitivity. Colon-specific DRG neurons were labeled with 1,1'-dioleyl-3,3,3',3-tetramethylindocarbocyanine methanesulfonate and acutely dissociated for measuring Na(+) channel currents. Western blot analysis was employed to detect changes in expressions of voltage-gated Na(+) (Na(V)) channel subtype 1.7, Na(V)1.8, and CBS. NCI significantly increased AWR scores when compared with age-matched controls. NCI also led to an ~2.5-fold increase in Na(+) current density in colon-specific DRG neurons. Furthermore, NCI dramatically enhanced expression of Na(V)1.7, Na(V)1.8, and CBS in colon-related DRGs. CBS was colocalized with Na(V)1.7 or -1.8 in colon-specific DRG neurons. Administration of O-(carboxymethyl)hydroxylamine hemihydrochloride (AOAA), an inhibitor for CBS, remarkably suppressed Na(+) current density and reduced expression of Na(V)1.7 and Na(V)1.8. More importantly, intraperitoneal or intrathecal application of AOAA attenuated AWR scores in NCI rats in a dose-dependent manner. These data suggest that NCI enhances Na(+) channel activity of colon DRG neurons, which is most likely mediated by upregulation of CBS expression, thus identifying a potential target for treatment for chronic visceral pain in patients with IBS. PMID:23449670

  7. The tactical-integration model for the treatment of dissociative identity disorder and allied dissociative disorders.

    PubMed

    Fine, C G

    1999-01-01

    The ebb and flow of the diagnosis of Dissociative Identity Disorder (DID) and other dissociative conditions has led to the evolution of theories and treatment modalities to resolve the fluctuating and ephemerous symptoms of these conditions. This paper summarizes the structured cognitive-behavioral-based treatment of dissociative disorders that will foster not only symptom relief but also an integration of the personalities and/or ego states into one mainstream of consciousness. This model of DID therapy is called the tactical integration model; it promotes proficiency over posttraumatic and dissociative symptoms, is collaborative and exploratory, and conveys a consistent message of empowerment to the patient.

  8. Subunit dissociations in natural and recombinant hemoglobins.

    PubMed

    Manning, L R; Jenkins, W T; Hess, J R; Vandegriff, K; Winslow, R M; Manning, J M

    1996-04-01

    A precise and rapid procedure employing gel filtration on Superose-12 to measure the tetramer-dimer dissociation constants of some natural and recombinant hemoglobins in the oxy conformation is described. Natural sickle hemoglobin was chosen to verify the validity of the results by comparing the values with those reported using an independent method not based on gel filtration. Recombinant sickle hemoglobin, as well as a sickle double mutant with a substitution at the Val-6(beta) receptor site, had approximately the same dissociation constant as natural sickle hemoglobin. Of the two recombinant hemoglobins with amino acid replacements in the alpha 1 beta 2 subunit interface, one was found to be extensively dissociated and the other completely dissociated. In addition, the absence of an effect of the allosteric regulators DPG and IHP on the dissociation constant was demonstrated. Thus, a tetramer dissociation constant can now be determined readily and used together with other criteria for characterization of hemoglobins and their interaction with small regulatory molecules. PMID:8845768

  9. Dissociative Ionization of Benzene by Electron Impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred; Dateo, Christopher; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We report a theoretical study of the dissociative ionization (DI) of benzene from the low-lying ionization channels. Our approach makes use of the fact that electron motion is much faster than nuclear motion and DI is treated as a two-step process. The first step is electron-impact ionization resulting in an ion with the same nuclear geometry as the neutral molecule. In the second step the nuclei relax from the initial geometry and undergo unimolecular dissociation. For the ionization process we use the improved binary-encounter dipole (iBED) model. For the unimolecular dissociation step, we study the steepest descent reaction path to the minimum of the ion potential energy surface. The path is used to analyze the probability of unimolecular dissociation and to determine the product distributions. Our analysis of the dissociation products and the thresholds of the productions are compared with the result dissociative photoionization measurements of Feng et al. The partial oscillator strengths from Feng et al. are then used in the iBED cross section calculations.

  10. Unimolecular dissociation of cyclopentadiene and indene

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, W.; Chattopadhyay, A.; Bersohn, R. )

    1991-05-01

    The dissociation of hydrogen atoms from the methylene group of cyclopentadiene (CP) and indene (ID) excited with a 193 nm photon has been studied by hydrogen atom laser induced fluorescence. The rate of dissociation of IND was 7.4{times}10{sup 6} s{sup {minus}1} but that of CP was too fast to measure. The ratio of H atoms to D atoms generated from 5-deuteriocyclopentadiene (5-dCP) was 3.91{plus minus}0.46. Rice--Ramsberger--Kassel--Marcus theory was used to calculate the rates of dissociation of CP and 5-dCP. The quantum yield for dissociating H atoms from CP was 0.85{plus minus}0.07. The ejected H atoms have a Maxwell velocity distribution with temperatures which are equal to the vibrational temperatures, 3690 and 2479 K for CP and IND, respectively. The most important result of the work is this confirmation of an earlier finding on a different set of molecules that the translational temperature of the fragments {ital after} the dissociation is equal to the vibrational temperature {ital before} the dissociation. This is explained by the assumption that the motion of the fast, light hydrogen atom is partly decoupled from that of the heavier, slower atoms.

  11. Fast kinetics of calcium dissociation from calsequestrin.

    PubMed

    Beltrán, Marianela; Barrientos, Genaro; Hidalgo, Cecilia

    2006-01-01

    We measured the kinetics of calcium dissociation from calsequestrin in solution or forming part of isolated junctional sarcoplasmic reticulum membranes by mixing calsequestrin equilibrated with calcium with calcium-free solutions in a stopped-flow system. In parallel, we measured the kinetics of the intrinsic fluorescence changes that take place following calcium dissociation from calsequestrin. We found that at 25 degrees C calcium dissociation was 10-fold faster for calsequestrin attached to junctional membranes (k = 109 s(-1)) than in solution. These results imply that calcium dissociation from calsequestrin in vivo is not rate limiting during excitation-contraction coupling. In addition, we found that the intrinsic fluorescence decrease for calsequestrin in solution or forming part of junctional membranes was significantly slower than the rates of calcium dissociation. The kinetics of intrinsic fluorescence changes had two components for calsequestrin associated to junctional membranes and only one for calsequestrin in solution; the faster component was 8-fold faster (k = 54.1 s(-1)) than the slower component (k = 6.9 s(-1)), which had the same k value as for calsequestrin in solution. These combined results suggest that the presence of calsequestrin at high concentrations in a restricted space, such as when bound to the junctional membrane, accelerates calcium dissociation and the resulting structural changes, presumably as a result of cooperative molecular interactions. PMID:17106581

  12. Penicillin-induced potentiation of glycine receptor-operated chloride current in rat ventro-medial hypothalamic neurones.

    PubMed Central

    Tokutomi, N.; Agopyan, N.; Akaike, N.

    1992-01-01

    1. Effects of penicillin G (PCN) on glycine (Gly)-evoked Cl- current (IGly) were investigated in acutely dissociated rat ventro-medial hypothalamic (VMH) neurones by the whole cell mode of patch clamp technique. 2. When PCN was applied simultaneously with Gly, PCN depressed IGly like a Cl- channel blocker. 3. The PCN-induced blocking action was clearly observed at a low PCN concentration (30 u), while the maximal blockade was achieved by 600 u (units per 10 ml) PCN. 4. When tested solution containing both PCN and Gly was quickly substituted with one containing Gly only, a new rebound-like transient current (I(T)) which also passed through Cl- channel, was elicited. 5. The peak amplitude of I(T) induced by PCN at concentrations higher than 100 u was greater than that induced by glycine alone. We termed this phenomenon PCN-induced potentiation of IGly. In all cells tested, PCN potentiated IGly. 6. At a lower PCN concentration below 30 u, I(T) generation was not clear in the presence of 10(-5) M gamma-aminobutyric acid. With PCN a higher concentration than 300 u, I(T) amplitude was greater than that of the original peak IGly. This was observed in 18 neurones out of 21. The maximal amplitude of the I(T) was achieved with 600 u PCN. PMID:1380385

  13. Discriminating among diagnostic categories using the Dissociative Disorders Interview Schedule.

    PubMed

    Ross, Colin A; Ellason, Joan Weathersbee

    2005-04-01

    The Dissociative Disorders Interview Schedule was administered to 1,308 subjects in eight diagnostic categories, including 296 with dissociative identity disorder. The study tested three hypotheses: (1) the Mahalanobis distance between dissociative identity disorder and each of seven other diagnostic categories would be large, (2) the closest diagnostic category to dissociative identity disorder would be dissociative disorder not otherwise specified, and (3) nondissociative diagnostic categories would be closer to each other than any one to dissociative identity disorder. All three hypotheses were confirmed by these data. The findings support the conclusion that dissociative identity disorder is a discrete category or taxon.

  14. Sexually dimorphic neuronal responses to social isolation

    PubMed Central

    Senst, Laura; Baimoukhametova, Dinara; Sterley, Toni-Lee; Bains, Jaideep Singh

    2016-01-01

    Many species use social networks to buffer the effects of stress. The mere absence of a social network, however, may also be stressful. We examined neuroendocrine, PVN CRH neurons and report that social isolation alters the intrinsic properties of these cells in sexually dimorphic fashion. Specifically, isolating preadolescent female mice from littermates for <24 hr increased first spike latency (FSL) and decreased excitability of CRH neurons. These changes were not evident in age-matched males. By contrast, subjecting either males (isolated or grouped) or group housed females to acute physical stress (swim), increased FSL. The increase in FSL following either social isolation or acute physical stress was blocked by the glucocorticoid synthesis inhibitor, metyrapone and mimicked by exogenous corticosterone. The increase in FSL results in a decrease in the excitability of CRH neurons. Our observations demonstrate that social isolation, but not acute physical stress has sex-specific effects on PVN CRH neurons. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18726.001 PMID:27725087

  15. Imaging neuronal responses in slice preparations of vomeronasal organ expressing a genetically encoded calcium sensor.

    PubMed

    Ma, Limei; Haga-Yamanaka, Sachiko; Yu, Qingfeng Elden; Qiu, Qiang; Kim, Sangseong; Yu, C Ron

    2011-01-01

    The vomeronasal organ (VNO) detects chemosensory signals that carry information about the social, sexual and reproductive status of the individuals within the same species. These intraspecies signals, the pheromones, as well as signals from some predators, activate the vomeronasal sensory neurons (VSNs) with high levels of specificity and sensitivity. At least three distinct families of G-protein coupled receptors, V1R, V2R and FPR, are expressed in VNO neurons to mediate the detection of the chemosensory cues. To understand how pheromone information is encoded by the VNO, it is critical to analyze the response profiles of individual VSNs to various stimuli and identify the specific receptors that mediate these responses. The neuroepithelia of VNO are enclosed in a pair of vomer bones. The semi-blind tubular structure of VNO has one open end (the vomeronasal duct) connecting to the nasal cavity. VSNs extend their dendrites to the lumen part of the VNO, where the pheromone cues are in contact with the receptors expressed at the dendritic knobs. The cell bodies of the VSNs form pseudo-stratified layers with V1R and V2R expressed in the apical and basal layers respectively. Several techniques have been utilized to monitor responses of VSNs to sensory stimuli. Among these techniques, acute slice preparation offers several advantages. First, compared to dissociated VSNs, slice preparations maintain the neurons in their native morphology and the dendrites of the cells stay relatively intact. Second, the cell bodies of the VSNs are easily accessible in coronal slice of the VNO to allow electrophysiology studies and imaging experiments as compared to whole epithelium and whole-mount preparations. Third, this method can be combined with molecular cloning techniques to allow receptor identification. Sensory stimulation elicits strong Ca2+ influx in VSNs that is indicative of receptor activation. We thus develop transgenic mice that express G-CaMP2 in the olfactory sensory

  16. Vertical nanowire electrode arrays as a scalable platform for intracellular interfacing to neuronal circuits

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Jacob T.; Jorgolli, Marsela; Shalek, Alex K.; Yoon, Myung-Han; Gertner, Rona S.; Park, Hongkun

    2014-01-01

    Deciphering the neuronal code - the rules by which neuronal circuits store and process information - is a major scientific challenge1,2. Currently, these efforts are impeded by a lack of experimental tools that are sensitive enough to quantify the strength of individual synaptic connections and also scalable enough to simultaneously measure and control a large number of mammalian neurons with single-cell resolution3,4. Here, we report a scalable intracellular electrode platform based on vertical nanowires that affords parallel electrical interfacing to multiple mammalian neurons. Specifically, we show that our vertical nanowire electrode arrays (VNEAs) can intracellularly record and stimulate neuronal activity in dissociated cultures of rat cortical neurons and can also be used to map multiple individual synaptic connections. The scalability of this platform, combined with its compatibility with silicon nanofabrication techniques, provides a clear path toward simultaneous, high-fidelity interfacing with hundreds of individual neurons. PMID:22231664

  17. Dissociations between developmental dyslexias and attention deficits

    PubMed Central

    Lukov, Limor; Friedmann, Naama; Shalev, Lilach; Khentov-Kraus, Lilach; Shalev, Nir; Lorber, Rakefet; Guggenheim, Revital

    2014-01-01

    We examine whether attention deficits underlie developmental dyslexia, or certain types of dyslexia, by presenting double dissociations between the two. We took into account the existence of distinct types of dyslexia and of attention deficits, and focused on dyslexias that may be thought to have an attentional basis: letter position dyslexia (LPD), in which letters migrate within words, attentional dyslexia (AD), in which letters migrate between words, neglect dyslexia, in which letters on one side of the word are omitted or substituted, and surface dyslexia, in which words are read via the sublexical route. We tested 110 children and adults with developmental dyslexia and/or attention deficits, using extensive batteries of reading and attention. For each participant, the existence of dyslexia and the dyslexia type were tested using reading tests that included stimuli sensitive to the various dyslexia types. Attention deficit and its type was established through attention tasks assessing sustained, selective, orienting, and executive attention functioning. Using this procedure, we identified 55 participants who showed a double dissociation between reading and attention: 28 had dyslexia with normal attention and 27 had attention deficits with normal reading. Importantly, each dyslexia with suspected attentional basis dissociated from attention: we found 21 individuals with LPD, 13 AD, 2 neglect dyslexia, and 12 surface dyslexia without attention deficits. Other dyslexia types (vowel dyslexia, phonological dyslexia, visual dyslexia) also dissociated from attention deficits. Examination of 55 additional individuals with both a specific dyslexia and a certain attention deficit found no attention function that was consistently linked with any dyslexia type. Specifically, LPD and AD dissociated from selective attention, neglect dyslexia dissociated from orienting, and surface dyslexia dissociated from sustained and executive attention. These results indicate that

  18. K*-charmonium dissociation cross sections and charmonium dissociation rates in hadronic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Feng-Rong; Ji, Shi-Tao; Xu, Xiao-Ming

    2016-08-01

    K*-charmonium dissociation reactions in hadronic matter are studied in the Born approximation, in the quark-interchange mechanism, and with a temperature-dependent quark potential. We obtain the temperature dependence of the unpolarized cross sections for the reactions K^* J/ψ to bar DD_s^ + ,bar D^* D_s^ + ,bar DD_s^{* + } , and bar D^* D_s^{* + } ; K^* χ _c to bar DD_s^ + ,bar D^* D_s^ + ,bar DD_s^{* + } , and bar D^* D_s^{* + } . We use the cross sections for charmonium dissociation in collisions with pions, ρ mesons, kaons, vector kaons, and η mesons to calculate the dissociation rates of charmonium with five types of mesons. Because of the temperature dependence of the meson masses, dissociation cross sections, and meson distribution functions, the charmonium dissociation rates generally increase with increasing temperature and decrease with increasing charmonium momentum from 2.2 GeV/c. We find that the first derivative of the dissociation rate with respect to the charmonium momentum is zero when the charmonium is at rest. While the η + ψ' and the η + χ c dissociation reactions can be neglected, the J/ ψ, ψ', and χ c dissociations are caused by collisions with pions, ρ mesons, kaons, vector kaons, and η mesons.

  19. Dissociation and vulnerability to psychotic experience. The Dissociative Experiences Scale and the MMPI-2.

    PubMed

    Allen, J G; Coyne, L

    1995-10-01

    Prior research on the MMPI has cautioned against misdiagnosing schizophrenia in patients with dissociative identity disorder. The present study examined the full spectrum of the dissociative experience in relation to MMPI-2 profiles. Ninety-eight women in treatment for trauma-related disorders completed the Dissociative Experiences Scale and the MMPI-2 in routine inpatient diagnostic evaluations. Consistent with prior research, severe dissociation was associated with high elevations on MMPI-2 scales typically associated with psychotic symptoms. Contrary to hypotheses, the ostensibly most benign form of dissociation, absorption and imaginative involvement, was somewhat more strongly related to MMPI-2 scores than the more pathognomonic forms of dissociation, depersonalization and amnesia. Although it should not be misdiagnosed, severe impairment on the MMPI in conjunction with dissociation should be taken seriously as suggesting vulnerability to psychotic experience. The dissociative retreat from the stressors of outer reality opens the door to the inner world of traumatic images and affects, along with compromised reality testing and disorganized thinking.

  20. Dissociation in borderline personality disorder: a detailed look.

    PubMed

    Korzekwa, Marilyn I; Dell, Paul F; Links, Paul S; Thabane, Lehana; Fougere, Philip

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to assess in detail the whole spectrum of normal and pathological dissociative experiences and dissociative disorder (DD) diagnoses in borderline personality disorder (BPD) as diagnosed with the Revised Diagnostic Interview for Borderlines. Dissociation was measured comprehensively in 21 BPD outpatients using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Dissociative Disorders-Revised, the Multidimensional Inventory of Dissociation (MID), the Dissociative Experiences Scale pathological taxon analysis, and the Somatoform Dissociation Questionnaire. The frequencies of DDs in this BPD sample were as follows: 24% no DD, 29% mild DD (dissociative amnesia and depersonalization disorder), 24% DD Not Otherwise Specified (DDNOS), and 24% dissociative identity disorder. With regard to the dissociative experiences endorsed, almost all patients reported identity confusion, unexplained mood changes, and depersonalization. Even those BPD patients with mild DD reported derealization, depersonalization, and dissociative amnesia. BPD patients with DDNOS reported frequent depersonalization, frequent amnesia, and notable experiences of identity alteration. BPD patients with dissociative identity disorder endorsed severe dissociative symptoms in all categories. Analysis of the MID pathological dissociation items revealed that 32% of the items were endorsed at a clinically significant level of frequency by more than 50% of our BPD patients. In conclusion, the frequencies of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed.) DDs in these patients with BPD were surprisingly high. Likewise, the "average" BPD patient endorsed a wide variety of recurrent pathological dissociative symptoms.

  1. Signal Propagation between Neuronal Populations Controlled by Micropatterning

    PubMed Central

    Albers, Jonas; Offenhäusser, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The central nervous system consists of an unfathomable number of functional networks enabling highly sophisticated information processing. Guided neuronal growth with a well-defined connectivity and accompanying polarity is essential for the formation of these networks. To investigate how two-dimensional protein patterns influence neuronal outgrowth with respect to connectivity and functional polarity between adjacent populations of neurons, a microstructured model system was established. Exclusive cell growth on patterned substrates was achieved by transferring a mixture of poly-l-lysine and laminin to a cell-repellent glass surface by microcontact printing. Triangular structures with different opening angle, height, and width were chosen as a pattern to achieve network formation with defined behavior at the junction of adjacent structures. These patterns were populated with dissociated primary cortical embryonic rat neurons and investigated with respect to their impact on neuronal outgrowth by immunofluorescence analysis, as well as their functional connectivity by calcium imaging. Here, we present a highly reproducible technique to devise neuronal networks in vitro with a predefined connectivity induced by the design of the gateway. Daisy-chained neuronal networks with predefined connectivity and functional polarity were produced using the presented micropatterning method. Controlling the direction of signal propagation among populations of neurons provides insights to network communication and offers the chance to investigate more about learning processes in networks by external manipulation of cells and signal cascades. PMID:27379230

  2. Signal Propagation between Neuronal Populations Controlled by Micropatterning.

    PubMed

    Albers, Jonas; Offenhäusser, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The central nervous system consists of an unfathomable number of functional networks enabling highly sophisticated information processing. Guided neuronal growth with a well-defined connectivity and accompanying polarity is essential for the formation of these networks. To investigate how two-dimensional protein patterns influence neuronal outgrowth with respect to connectivity and functional polarity between adjacent populations of neurons, a microstructured model system was established. Exclusive cell growth on patterned substrates was achieved by transferring a mixture of poly-l-lysine and laminin to a cell-repellent glass surface by microcontact printing. Triangular structures with different opening angle, height, and width were chosen as a pattern to achieve network formation with defined behavior at the junction of adjacent structures. These patterns were populated with dissociated primary cortical embryonic rat neurons and investigated with respect to their impact on neuronal outgrowth by immunofluorescence analysis, as well as their functional connectivity by calcium imaging. Here, we present a highly reproducible technique to devise neuronal networks in vitro with a predefined connectivity induced by the design of the gateway. Daisy-chained neuronal networks with predefined connectivity and functional polarity were produced using the presented micropatterning method. Controlling the direction of signal propagation among populations of neurons provides insights to network communication and offers the chance to investigate more about learning processes in networks by external manipulation of cells and signal cascades. PMID:27379230

  3. Isotope separation by photoselective dissociative electron capture

    DOEpatents

    Stevens, Charles G. [Pleasanton, CA

    1978-08-29

    A method of separating isotopes based on photoselective electron capture dissociation of molecules having an electron capture cross section dependence on the vibrational state of the molecule. A molecular isotope source material is irradiated to selectively excite those molecules containing a desired isotope to a predetermined vibrational state having associated therewith an electron capture energy region substantially non-overlapping with the electron capture energy ranges associated with the lowest vibration states of the molecules. The isotope source is also subjected to electrons having an energy corresponding to the non-overlapping electron capture region whereby the selectively excited molecules preferentially capture electrons and dissociate into negative ions and neutrals. The desired isotope may be in the negative ion product or in the neutral product depending upon the mechanism of dissociation of the particular isotope source used. The dissociation product enriched in the desired isotope is then separated from the reaction system by conventional means. Specifically, .sup.235 UF.sub.6 is separated from a UF.sub.6 mixture by selective excitation followed by dissociative electron capture into .sup.235 UF.sub.5 - and F.

  4. Isotope separation by photoselective dissociative electron capture

    DOEpatents

    Stevens, C.G.

    1978-08-29

    Disclosed is a method of separating isotopes based on photoselective electron capture dissociation of molecules having an electron capture cross section dependence on the vibrational state of the molecule. A molecular isotope source material is irradiated to selectively excite those molecules containing a desired isotope to a predetermined vibrational state having associated therewith an electron capture energy region substantially non-overlapping with the electron capture energy ranges associated with the lowest vibration states of the molecules. The isotope source is also subjected to electrons having an energy corresponding to the non-overlapping electron capture region whereby the selectively excited molecules preferentially capture electrons and dissociate into negative ions and neutrals. The desired isotope may be in the negative ion product or in the neutral product depending upon the mechanism of dissociation of the particular isotope source used. The dissociation product enriched in the desired isotope is then separated from the reaction system by conventional means. Specifically, [sup 235]UF[sub 6] is separated from a UF[sub 6] mixture by selective excitation followed by dissociative electron capture into [sup 235]UF[sub 5]- and F. 2 figs.

  5. Ion-induced dissociation dynamics of acetylene

    SciTech Connect

    De, Sankar; Rajput, Jyoti; Roy, A.; Safvan, C. P.; Ghosh, P. N.

    2008-02-15

    We report on the results of dissociation dynamics of multiple charged acetylene molecules formed in collision with 1.2 MeV Ar{sup 8+} projectiles. Using the coincidence map, we can separate out the different dissociation pathways between carbon and hydrogen ionic fragments as well as complete two-body breakup events. From the measured slopes of the coincidence islands for carbon atomic fragments and theoretical values determined from the charge and momentum distribution of the correlated particles, we observe a diatom like behavior of the C-C charged complex during dissociation of multiply charged C{sub 2}H{sub 2}. We conclude that this behavior in breakup dynamics is a signature of sequentiality in dissociation of this multiply charged molecular species. The shape and orientation of the islands give further information about the momentum balance in the fragmentation process of two- or many-body dissociation pathways. Kinetic energy release of different breakup channels are reported here and compared with values calculated from the pure Coulomb explosion model.

  6. Leptin influences the excitability of area postrema neurons.

    PubMed

    Smith, Pauline M; Brzezinska, Paulina; Hubert, Fabien; Mimee, Andrea; Maurice, Donald H; Ferguson, Alastair V

    2016-03-01

    The area postrema (AP) is a circumventricular organ with important roles in central autonomic regulation. This medullary structure has been shown to express the leptin receptor and has been suggested to have a role in modulating peripheral signals, indicating energy status. Using RT-PCR, we have confirmed the presence of mRNA for the leptin receptor, ObRb, in AP, and whole cell current-clamp recordings from dissociated AP neurons demonstrated that leptin influenced the excitability of 51% (42/82) of AP neurons. The majority of responsive neurons (62%) exhibited a depolarization (5.3 ± 0.7 mV), while the remaining affected cells (16/42) demonstrated hyperpolarizing effects (-5.96 ± 0.95 mV). Amylin was found to influence the same population of AP neurons. To elucidate the mechanism(s) of leptin and amylin actions in the AP, we used fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) to determine the effect of these peptides on cAMP levels in single AP neurons. Leptin and amylin were found to elevate cAMP levels in the same dissociated AP neurons (leptin: % total FRET response 25.3 ± 4.9, n = 14; amylin: % total FRET response 21.7 ± 3.1, n = 13). When leptin and amylin were coapplied, % total FRET response rose to 53.0 ± 8.3 (n = 6). The demonstration that leptin and amylin influence a subpopulation of AP neurons and that these two signaling molecules have additive effects on single AP neurons to increase cAMP, supports a role for the AP as a central nervous system location at which these circulating signals may act through common intracellular signaling pathways to influence central control of energy balance. PMID:26719304

  7. Leptin influences the excitability of area postrema neurons.

    PubMed

    Smith, Pauline M; Brzezinska, Paulina; Hubert, Fabien; Mimee, Andrea; Maurice, Donald H; Ferguson, Alastair V

    2016-03-01

    The area postrema (AP) is a circumventricular organ with important roles in central autonomic regulation. This medullary structure has been shown to express the leptin receptor and has been suggested to have a role in modulating peripheral signals, indicating energy status. Using RT-PCR, we have confirmed the presence of mRNA for the leptin receptor, ObRb, in AP, and whole cell current-clamp recordings from dissociated AP neurons demonstrated that leptin influenced the excitability of 51% (42/82) of AP neurons. The majority of responsive neurons (62%) exhibited a depolarization (5.3 ± 0.7 mV), while the remaining affected cells (16/42) demonstrated hyperpolarizing effects (-5.96 ± 0.95 mV). Amylin was found to influence the same population of AP neurons. To elucidate the mechanism(s) of leptin and amylin actions in the AP, we used fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) to determine the effect of these peptides on cAMP levels in single AP neurons. Leptin and amylin were found to elevate cAMP levels in the same dissociated AP neurons (leptin: % total FRET response 25.3 ± 4.9, n = 14; amylin: % total FRET response 21.7 ± 3.1, n = 13). When leptin and amylin were coapplied, % total FRET response rose to 53.0 ± 8.3 (n = 6). The demonstration that leptin and amylin influence a subpopulation of AP neurons and that these two signaling molecules have additive effects on single AP neurons to increase cAMP, supports a role for the AP as a central nervous system location at which these circulating signals may act through common intracellular signaling pathways to influence central control of energy balance.

  8. Electrophysiological evidence for functionally distinct neuronal populations in the human substantia nigra.

    PubMed

    Ramayya, Ashwin G; Zaghloul, Kareem A; Weidemann, Christoph T; Baltuch, Gordon H; Kahana, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    The human substantia nigra (SN) is thought to consist of two functionally distinct neuronal populations-dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the pars compacta subregion and GABA-ergic neurons in the pars reticulata subregion. However, a functional dissociation between these neuronal populations has not previously been demonstrated in the awake human. Here we obtained microelectrode recordings from the SN of patients undergoing deep brain stimulation (DBS) surgery for Parkinson's disease as they performed a two-alternative reinforcement learning task. Following positive feedback presentation, we found that putative DA and GABA neurons demonstrated distinct temporal dynamics. DA neurons demonstrated phasic increases in activity (250-500 ms post-feedback) whereas putative GABA neurons demonstrated more delayed and sustained increases in activity (500-1000 ms post-feedback). These results provide the first electrophysiological evidence for a functional dissociation between DA and GABA neurons in the human SN. We discuss possible functions for these neuronal responses based on previous findings in human and animal studies. PMID:25249957

  9. Somatodendritic and excitatory postsynaptic distribution of neuron-type dystrophin isoform, Dp40, in hippocampal neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Fujimoto, Takahiro; Itoh, Kyoko Yaoi, Takeshi; Fushiki, Shinji

    2014-09-12

    Highlights: • Identification of dystrophin (Dp) shortest isoform, Dp40, is a neuron-type Dp. • Dp40 expression is temporally and differentially regulated in comparison to Dp71. • Somatodendritic and nuclear localization of Dp40. • Dp40 is localized to excitatory postsynapses. • Dp40 might play roles in dendritic and synaptic functions. - Abstract: The Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) gene produces multiple dystrophin (Dp) products due to the presence of several promoters. We previously reported the existence of a novel short isoform of Dp, Dp40, in adult mouse brain. However, the exact biochemical expression profile and cytological distribution of the Dp40 protein remain unknown. In this study, we generated a polyclonal antibody against the NH{sub 2}-terminal region of the Dp40 and identified the expression profile of Dp40 in the mouse brain. Through an analysis using embryonic and postnatal mouse cerebrums, we found that Dp40 emerged from the early neonatal stages until adulthood, whereas Dp71, an another Dp short isoform, was highly detected in both prenatal and postnatal cerebrums. Intriguingly, relative expressions of Dp40 and Dp71 were prominent in cultured dissociated neurons and non-neuronal cells derived from mouse hippocampus, respectively. Furthermore, the immunocytological distribution of Dp40 was analyzed in dissociated cultured neurons, revealing that Dp40 is detected in the soma and its dendrites, but not in the axon. It is worthy to note that Dp40 is localized along the subplasmalemmal region of the dendritic shafts, as well as at excitatory postsynaptic sites. Thus, Dp40 was identified as a neuron-type Dp possibly involving dendritic and synaptic functions.

  10. The chemokine CCL2 increases Nav1.8 sodium channel activity in primary sensory neurons through a Gβγ-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Belkouch, Mounir; Dansereau, Marc-André; Réaux-Le Goazigo, Annabelle; Van Steenwinckel, Juliette; Beaudet, Nicolas; Chraibi, Ahmed; Melik-Parsadaniantz, Stéphane; Sarret, Philippe

    2011-12-14

    Changes in function of voltage-gated sodium channels in nociceptive primary sensory neurons participate in the development of peripheral hyperexcitability that occurs in neuropathic and inflammatory chronic pain conditions. Among them, the tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTX-R) sodium channel Na(v)1.8, primarily expressed by small- and medium-sized dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons, substantially contributes to the upstroke of action potential in these neurons. Compelling evidence also revealed that the chemokine CCL2 plays a critical role in chronic pain facilitation via its binding to CCR2 receptors. In this study, we therefore investigated the effects of CCL2 on the density and kinetic properties of TTX-R Na(v)1.8 currents in acutely small/medium dissociated lumbar DRG neurons from naive adult rats. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings demonstrated that CCL2 concentration-dependently increased TTX-resistant Na(v)1.8 current densities in both small- and medium-diameter sensory neurons. Incubation with CCL2 also shifted the activation and steady-state inactivation curves of Na(v)1.8 in a hyperpolarizing direction in small sensory neurons. No change in the activation and inactivation kinetics was, however, observed in medium-sized nociceptive neurons. Our electrophysiological recordings also demonstrated that the selective CCR2 antagonist INCB3344 [N-[2-[[(3S,4S)-1-E4-(1,3-benzodioxol-5-yl)-4-hydroxycyclohexyl]-4-ethoxy-3-pyrrolidinyl]amino]-2-oxoethyl]-3-(trifluoromethyl)benzamide] blocks the potentiation of Na(v)1.8 currents by CCL2 in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, the enhancement in Na(v)1.8 currents was prevented by pretreatment with pertussis toxin (PTX) or gallein (a Gβγ inhibitor), indicating the involvement of Gβγ released from PTX-sensitive G(i/o)-proteins in the cross talk between CCR2 and Na(v)1.8. Together, our data clearly demonstrate that CCL2 may excite primary sensory neurons by acting on the biophysical properties of Na(v)1.8 currents

  11. Characteristics of GABAergic and cholinergic neurons in perinuclear zone of mouse supraoptic nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Ennis, Matthew; Szabó, Gábor; Armstrong, William E.

    2014-01-01

    The perinuclear zone (PNZ) of the supraoptic nucleus (SON) contains some GABAergic and cholinergic neurons thought to innervate the SON proper. In mice expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) in association with glutamate decarboxylase (GAD)65 we found an abundance of GAD65-eGFP neurons in the PNZ, whereas in mice expressing GAD67-eGFP, there were few labeled PNZ neurons. In mice expressing choline acetyltransferase (ChAT)-eGFP, large, brightly fluorescent and small, dimly fluorescent ChAT-eGFP neurons were present in the PNZ. The small ChAT-eGFP and GAD65-eGFP neurons exhibited a low-threshold depolarizing potential consistent with a low-threshold spike, with little transient outward rectification. Large ChAT-eGFP neurons exhibited strong transient outward rectification and a large hyperpolarizing spike afterpotential, very similar to that of magnocellular vasopressin and oxytocin neurons. Thus the large soma and transient outward rectification of large ChAT-eGFP neurons suggest that these neurons would be difficult to distinguish from magnocellular SON neurons in dissociated preparations by these criteria. Large, but not small, ChAT-eGFP neurons were immunostained with ChAT antibody (AB144p). Reconstructed neurons revealed a few processes encroaching near and passing through the SON from all types but no clear evidence of a terminal axon arbor. Large ChAT-eGFP neurons were usually oriented vertically and had four or five dendrites with multiple branches and an axon with many collaterals and local arborizations. Small ChAT-eGFP neurons had a more restricted dendritic tree compared with parvocellular GAD65 neurons, the latter of which had long thin processes oriented mediolaterally. Thus many of the characteristics found previously in unidentified, small PNZ neurons are also found in identified GABAergic neurons and in a population of smaller ChAT-eGFP neurons. PMID:25376783

  12. Behavioral and Neural Correlates of Acute and Scheduled Hunger in C57BL/6 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gunapala, Keith M.; Parfyonov, Maksim; Chang, Chris H.; Mistlberger, Ralph E.; Steele, Andrew D.

    2014-01-01

    In rodents, daily feeding schedules induce food anticipatory activity (FAA) rhythms with formal properties suggesting mediation by food-entrained circadian oscillators (FEOs). The search for the neuronal substrate of FEOs responsible for FAA is an active area of research, but studies spanning several decades have yet to identify unequivocally a brain region required for FAA. Variability of results across studies leads to questions about underlying biology versus methodology. Here we describe in C57BL/6 male mice the effects of varying the ‘dose’ of caloric restriction (0%, 60%, 80%, 110%) on the expression of FAA as measured by a video-based analysis system, and on the induction of c-Fos in brain regions that have been implicated in FAA. We determined that more severe caloric restriction (60%) leads to a faster onset of FAA with increased magnitude. Using the 60% caloric restriction, we found little evidence for unique signatures of neuronal activation in the brains of mice anticipating a daily mealtime compared to mice that were fasted acutely or fed ad-libitum–even in regions such as the dorsomedial and ventrolateral hypothalamus, nucleus accumbens, and cerebellum that have previously been implicated in FAA. These results underscore the importance of feeding schedule parameters in determining quantitative features of FAA in mice, and demonstrate dissociations between behavioral FAA and neural activity in brain areas thought to harbor FEOs or participate in their entrainment or output. PMID:24806659

  13. Magnesium induces neuronal apoptosis by suppressing excitability

    PubMed Central

    Dribben, W H; Eisenman, L N; Mennerick, S

    2010-01-01

    In clinical obstetrics, magnesium sulfate (MgSO4) use is widespread, but effects on brain development are unknown. Many agents that depress neuronal excitability increase developmental neuroapoptosis. In this study, we used dissociated cultures of rodent hippocampus to examine the effects of Mg++ on excitability and survival. Mg++-induced caspase-3-associated cell loss at clinically relevant concentrations. Whole-cell patch-clamp techniques measured Mg++ effects on action potential threshold, action potential peak amplitude, spike number and changes in resting membrane potential. Mg++ depolarized action potential threshold, presumably from surface charge screening effects on voltage-gated sodium channels. Mg++ also decreased the number of action potentials in response to fixed current injection without affecting action potential peak amplitude. Surprisingly, Mg++ also depolarized neuronal resting potential in a concentration-dependent manner with a +5.2 mV shift at 10 mM. Voltage ramps suggested that Mg++ blocked a potassium conductance contributing to the resting potential. In spite of this depolarizing effect of Mg++, the net inhibitory effect of Mg++ nearly completely silenced neuronal network activity measured with multielectrode array recordings. We conclude that although Mg++ has complex effects on cellular excitability, the overall inhibitory influence of Mg++ decreases neuronal survival. Taken together with recent in vivo evidence, our results suggest that caution may be warranted in the use of Mg++ in clinical obstetrics and neonatology. PMID:21364668

  14. Age-related functional changes of the glutamate receptor channels in rat Meynert neurones.

    PubMed Central

    Akaike, N; Rhee, J S

    1997-01-01

    1. The developmental changes of glutamate receptors (GluRs) in acutely dissociated rat Meynert neurones were investigated using the conventional whole cell and nystatin perforated patch recording modes under voltage-clamp conditions. 2. The neurones became less responsive to N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) with age, most dramatically between 1 day and 2 weeks, while the responses to kainic acid (KA) and L-alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) gradually increased. The metabotropic GluR response appeared a few days after birth, but thereafter no further change was observed. 3. The decrease in the NMDA response during postnatal development was due to an abrupt reduction in the number of receptors without affecting the affinity, voltage-dependent Mg2+ blockade or high Ca2+ permeability (PCa/PCs approximately 7.0). 4. PCa/PCs in the presence of KA decreased from 2.8 in the 1-day-old (1D) rat neurones to 1.1 and 0.44 in the 2-week-old (2W) and 6-month-old (6M) rat neurones, respectively. The concentration-response relationship for KA shifted to the left with age. The KA response was not affected by NS-102, a KA-selective antagonist, thus indicating that the increased affinity of the receptor for the ligand resulted from the change in the AMPA receptor channel subunits. 5. The AMPA response in the presence of 10(-4) M cyclothiazide showed a change in the inward rectifying current-voltage relationship with age. The KA response was strongly cross-desensitized by the addition of AMPA and was also blocked by 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX), whereas a rapid desensitization of the AMPA response was removed in a concentration-dependent manner by cyclothiazide. These results indicate that the non-NMDA receptor channels are assembled from the subunits of the AMPA receptor family without the GluR-2 subunit, thus resulting in a high Ca2+ permeability. 6. The L-glutamate (Glu)-induced responses were more sensitive to DL-2-amino-5

  15. Type and Timing of Childhood Maltreatment and Severity of Shutdown Dissociation in Patients with Schizophrenia Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Schalinski, Inga; Teicher, Martin H.

    2015-01-01

    Dissociation, particularly the shutting down of sensory, motor and speech systems, has been proposed to emerge in susceptible individuals as a defensive response to traumatic stress. In contrast, other individuals show signs of hyperarousal to acute threat. A key question is whether exposure to particular types of stressful events during specific stages of development can program an individual to have a strong dissociative response to subsequent stressors. Vulnerability to ongoing shutdown dissociation was assessed in 75 inpatients (46M/29F, M = 31±10 years old) with schizophrenia spectrum disorder and related to number of traumatic events experienced or witnessed during childhood or adulthood. The Maltreatment and Abuse Chronology of Exposure (MACE) scale was used to collect retrospective recall of exposure to ten types of maltreatment during each year of childhood. Severity of shutdown dissociation was related to number of childhood but not adult traumatic events. Random forest regression with conditional trees indicated that type and timing of childhood maltreatment could predictably account for 31% of the variance (p < 0.003) in shutdown dissociation, with peak vulnerability occurring at 13-14 years of age and with exposure to emotional neglect followed by various forms of emotional abuse. These findings suggest that there may be windows of vulnerability to the development of shutdown dissociation. Results support the hypothesis that experienced events are more important than witnessed events, but challenge the hypothesis that “life-threatening” events are a critical determinant. PMID:25992568

  16. Type and timing of childhood maltreatment and severity of shutdown dissociation in patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Schalinski, Inga; Teicher, Martin H

    2015-01-01

    Dissociation, particularly the shutting down of sensory, motor and speech systems, has been proposed to emerge in susceptible individuals as a defensive response to traumatic stress. In contrast, other individuals show signs of hyperarousal to acute threat. A key question is whether exposure to particular types of stressful events during specific stages of development can program an individual to have a strong dissociative response to subsequent stressors. Vulnerability to ongoing shutdown dissociation was assessed in 75 inpatients (46 M/29 F, M = 31 ± 10 years old) with schizophrenia spectrum disorder and related to number of traumatic events experienced or witnessed during childhood or adulthood. The Maltreatment and Abuse Chronology of Exposure (MACE) scale was used to collect retrospective recall of exposure to ten types of maltreatment during each year of childhood. Severity of shutdown dissociation was related to number of childhood but not adult traumatic events. Random forest regression with conditional trees indicated that type and timing of childhood maltreatment could predictably account for 31% of the variance (p < 0.003) in shutdown dissociation, with peak vulnerability occurring at 13-14 years of age and with exposure to emotional neglect followed by various forms of emotional abuse. These findings suggest that there may be windows of vulnerability to the development of shutdown dissociation. Results support the hypothesis that experienced events are more important than witnessed events, but challenge the hypothesis that "life-threatening" events are a critical determinant. PMID:25992568

  17. Dissociation in virtual reality: depersonalization and derealization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garvey, Gregory P.

    2010-01-01

    This paper looks at virtual worlds such as Second Life7 (SL) as possible incubators of dissociation disorders as classified by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition3 (also known as the DSM-IV). Depersonalization is where "a person feels that he or she has changed in some way or is somehow unreal." Derealization when "the same beliefs are held about one's surroundings." Dissociative Identity Disorder (DID), previously known as multiple personality disorder fits users of Second Life who adopt "in-world" avatars and in effect, enact multiple distinct identities or personalities (known as alter egos or alters). Select questions from the Structured Clinical Interview for Depersonalization (SCI-DER)8 will be discussed as they might apply to the user's experience in Second Life. Finally I would like to consider the hypothesis that rather than a pathological disorder, dissociation is a normal response to the "artificial reality" of Second Life.

  18. Free energy calculations of gramicidin dimer dissociation.

    PubMed

    Wanasundara, Surajith N; Krishnamurthy, Vikram; Chung, Shin-Ho

    2011-11-24

    Molecular dynamics simulations, combined with umbrella sampling, is used to study how gramicidin A (gA) dimers dissociate in the lipid bilayer. The potential of mean force and intermolecular potential energy are computed as functions of the distance between center of masses of the two gA monomers in two directions of separation: parallel to the bilayer surface and parallel to the membrane normal. Results from this study show that the dissociation of gA dimers occurs via lateral displacement of gA monomers followed by tilting of dimers with respect to the lipid bilayer normal. It is found that the dissociation energy of gA dimers in the dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine bilayer is 14 kcal mol(-1) (~22 kT), which is approximately equal to the energy of breaking six intermolecular hydrogen bonds that stabilize the gA channel dimer.

  19. Electron Transfer Dissociation of Oligonucleotide Cations.

    PubMed

    Smith, Suncerae I; Brodbelt, Jennifer S

    2009-06-01

    Electron transfer dissociation (ETD) of multi-protonated 6 - 20-mer oligonucleotides and 12- and 14-mer duplexes is compared to collision activated dissociation (CAD). ETD causes efficient charge reduction of the multi-protonated oligonucleotides in addition to limited backbone cleavages to yield sequence ions of low abundance. Subsequent CAD of the charge-reduced oligonucleotides formed upon electron transfer, in a net process termed electron transfer collision activated dissociation (ETcaD), results in rich fragmentation in terms of w, a, z, and d products, with a marked decrease in the abundance of base loss ions and internal fragments. Complete sequencing was possible for nearly all oligonucleotides studied. ETcaD of an oligonucleotide duplex resulted in specific backbone cleavages, with conservation of weaker non-covalent bonds. PMID:20161288

  20. Psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy for patients with dissociative identity disorder.

    PubMed

    Gentile, Julie P; Dillon, Kristy S; Gillig, Paulette Marie

    2013-02-01

    There is a wide variety of what have been called "dissociative disorders," including dissociative amnesia, dissociative fugue, depersonalization disorder, dissociative identity disorder, and forms of dissociative disorder not otherwise specified. Some of these diagnoses, particularly dissociative identity disorder, are controversial and have been questioned by many clinicians over the years. The disorders may be under-diagnosed or misdiagnosed, but many persons who have experienced trauma report "dissociative" symptoms. Prevalence of dissociative disorders is unknown, but current estimates are higher than previously thought. This paper reviews clinical, phenomenological, and epidemiological data regarding diagnosis in general, and illustrates possible treatment interventions for dissociative identity disorder, with a focus on psychotherapy interventions and a review of current psychopharmacology recommendations as part of a comprehensive multidisciplinary treatment plan. PMID:23556139

  1. Psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy for patients with dissociative identity disorder.

    PubMed

    Gentile, Julie P; Dillon, Kristy S; Gillig, Paulette Marie

    2013-02-01

    There is a wide variety of what have been called "dissociative disorders," including dissociative amnesia, dissociative fugue, depersonalization disorder, dissociative identity disorder, and forms of dissociative disorder not otherwise specified. Some of these diagnoses, particularly dissociative identity disorder, are controversial and have been questioned by many clinicians over the years. The disorders may be under-diagnosed or misdiagnosed, but many persons who have experienced trauma report "dissociative" symptoms. Prevalence of dissociative disorders is unknown, but current estimates are higher than previously thought. This paper reviews clinical, phenomenological, and epidemiological data regarding diagnosis in general, and illustrates possible treatment interventions for dissociative identity disorder, with a focus on psychotherapy interventions and a review of current psychopharmacology recommendations as part of a comprehensive multidisciplinary treatment plan.

  2. Synaptic connectivity in engineered neuronal networks.

    PubMed

    Molnar, Peter; Kang, Jung-Fong; Bhargava, Neelima; Das, Mainak; Hickman, James J

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a method to organize cells in dissociated cultures using engineered chemical clues on a culture surface and determined their connectivity patterns. Although almost all elements of the synaptic transmission machinery can be studied separately in single cell models in dissociated cultures, the complex physiological interactions between these elements are usually lost. Thus, factors affecting synaptic transmission are generally studied in organotypic cultures, brain slices, or in vivo where the cellular architecture generally remains intact. However, by utilizing engineered neuronal networks complex phenomenon such as synaptic transmission or synaptic plasticity can be studied in a simple, functional, cell culture-based system. We have utilized self-assembled monolayers and photolithography to create the surface templates. Embryonic hippocampal cells, plated on the resultant patterns in serum-free medium, followed the surface clues and formed the engineered neuronal networks. Basic whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology was applied to characterize the synaptic connectivity in these engineered two-cell networks. The same technology has been used to pattern other cell types such as cardiomyocytes or skeletal muscle fibers.

  3. Blackbody Infrared Radiative Dissociation of Protonated Oligosaccharides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fentabil, Messele A.; Daneshfar, Rambod; Kitova, Elena N.; Klassen, John S.

    2011-12-01

    The dissociation pathways, kinetics, and energetics of protonated oligosaccharides in the gas phase were investigated using blackbody infrared radiative dissociation (BIRD). Time-resolved BIRD measurements were performed on singly protonated ions of cellohexaose (Cel6), which is composed of β-(1 → 4)-linked glucopyranose rings, and five malto-oligosaccharides (Malx, where x = 4-8), which are composed of α-(1 → 4)-linked glucopyranose units. At the temperatures investigated (85-160 °C), the oligosaccharides dissociate at the glycosidic linkages or by the loss of a water molecule to produce B- or Y-type ions. The Y ions dissociate to smaller Y or B ions, while the B ions yield exclusively smaller B ions. The sequential loss of water molecules from the smallest B ions (B1 and B2) also occurs. Rate constants for dissociation of the protonated oligosaccharides and the corresponding Arrhenius activation parameters (Ea and A) were determined. The Ea and A-factors measured for protonated Malx (x > 4) are indistinguishable within error (~19 kcal mol-1, 1010 s-1), which is consistent with the ions being in the rapid energy exchange limit. In contrast, the Arrhenius parameters for protonated Cel6 (24 kcal mol-1, 1012 s-1) are significantly larger. These results indicate that both the energy and entropy changes associated with the glycosidic bond cleavage are sensitive to the anomeric configuration. Based on the results of this study, it is proposed that formation of B and Y ions occurs through a common dissociation mechanism, with the position of the proton establishing whether a B or Y ion is formed upon glycosidic bond cleavage.

  4. Swirling flow of a dissociated gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfram, W. R., Jr.; Walker, W. F.

    1975-01-01

    Most physical applications of the swirling flow, defined as a vortex superimposed on an axial flow in the nozzle, involve high temperatures and the possibility of real gas effects. The generalized one-dimensional swirling flow in a converging-diverging nozzle is analyzed for equilibrium and frozen dissociation using the ideal dissociating gas model. Numerical results are provided to illustrate the major effects and to compare with results obtained for a perfect gas with constant ratio of specific heats. It is found that, even in the case of real gases, perfect gas calculations can give a good estimate of the reduction in mass flow due to swirl.

  5. Quantum Zeno control of coherent dissociation

    SciTech Connect

    Khripkov, C.; Vardi, A.

    2011-08-15

    We study the effect of dephasing on the coherent dissociation dynamics of an atom-molecule Bose-Einstein condensate. We show that when phase-noise intensity is strong with respect to the inverse correlation time of the stimulated process, dissociation is suppressed via a Bose enhanced quantum Zeno effect. This is complementary to the quantum Zeno control of phase-diffusion in a bimodal condensate by symmetric noise [Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 220403 (2008)] in that the controlled process here is phase formation and the required decoherence mechanism for its suppression is purely phase noise.

  6. Dissociation and recombination in an inhomogeneous gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuščer, Ivan

    1991-09-01

    The system of Boltzmann equations of Ludwig and Heil for a dissociating gas mixture is reviewed and reformulated in terms of differential cross sections. For the purpose of Monte Carlo simulations, collision models of the type of Borgnakke and Larsen are proposed. In case of short-lived transient flows of molecular gases and at not too high temperatures, simulation of scattering collisions is expected to suffice; the distribution function of the dissociated particles can be evaluated afterwards by integration, and recombination can be ignored.

  7. Identity and Introject in dissociative disorders.

    PubMed

    Alpher, V S

    1996-12-01

    The structural analysis of social behavior (SASB) shows promise for systematically examining identity issues in clinical populations. In this study, identity is assessed with the SASB in a sample of women with dissociative disorder (n = 25) and a nonpatient clinical contrast group (n = 25). The SASB Introject--a multivariate measure of identity--effectively differentiated the 2 samples. Despite greater self-directed hostility than the clinical contrast group, dissociative disorder patients showed lower levels of intrapsychic conflict. Implications for further research on identity and psychopathology are discussed.

  8. Dissociative identity disorder: a literature review.

    PubMed

    McAllister, M M

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents a review of the literature into dissociative identity disorder. This disorder, previously known as multiple personality disorder, is increasingly diagnosed, in part because of more focused diagnostic tools, but also because people are accessing services to assist with the longterm problems of early child abuse and neglect. Dissociative identity disorder is examined in the literature according to a variety of discourses, each of which suggest different ways of conceptualizing problems and therapeutic approaches. These discourses reviewed include: psychiatry, psychology, corporeality, feminism, social constructivism, anthropology, and postmodernism. The paper concludes with an examination of the nursing literature and suggests opportunities for nursing research into this complex mental health problem.

  9. The use of hypnosis with dissociative disorders.

    PubMed

    Kluft, R P

    1992-01-01

    The dissociative disorders are characterized by difficulties in the integration of memory and/or identity. Typically this is manifested by amnesia and either the development of alternate identities or an estrangement from one's own identity. Spontaneous and self-generated dissociative states and phenomena sharing much in common with those that can be induced with hypnosis are thought to play a major role in their development, symptomatology, and perpetuation. Medical heterohypnosis offers a powerful tool to reestablish a functional continuity of memory and identity in many such cases. The application of hypnotic interventions in the treatment of such conditions will be discussed, explored, and illustrated with clinical vignettes.

  10. Charge Transfer Dissociation of Complex Oligosaccharides: Comparison with Collision-Induced Dissociation and Extreme Ultraviolet Dissociative Photoionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ropartz, David; Li, Pengfei; Fanuel, Mathieu; Giuliani, Alexandre; Rogniaux, Hélène; Jackson, Glen P.

    2016-08-01

    The structural characterization of oligosaccharides still challenges the field of analytical chemistry. Tandem mass spectrometry offers many advantages toward this aim, although the generic fragmentation method (low-energy collision-induced dissociation) shows clear limitations and is often insufficient to retrieve some essential structural information on these molecules. In this work, we present the first application of helium charge transfer dissociation (He-CTD) to characterize the structure of complex oligosaccharides. We compare this method with low-energy collision-induced dissociation and extreme-ultraviolet dissociative photoionization (XUV-DPI), which was shown previously to ensure the successful characterization of complex glycans. Similarly to what could be obtained by XUV-DPI, He-CTD provides a complete description of the investigated structures by producing many informative cross-ring fragments and no ambiguous fragmentation. Unlike XUV-DPI, which is performed at a synchrotron source, He-CTD has the undeniable advantage of being implementable in a conventional benchtop ion trap in a conventional laboratory setting.

  11. Charge Transfer Dissociation of Complex Oligosaccharides: Comparison with Collision-Induced Dissociation and Extreme Ultraviolet Dissociative Photoionization.

    PubMed

    Ropartz, David; Li, Pengfei; Fanuel, Mathieu; Giuliani, Alexandre; Rogniaux, Hélène; Jackson, Glen P

    2016-10-01

    The structural characterization of oligosaccharides still challenges the field of analytical chemistry. Tandem mass spectrometry offers many advantages toward this aim, although the generic fragmentation method (low-energy collision-induced dissociation) shows clear limitations and is often insufficient to retrieve some essential structural information on these molecules. In this work, we present the first application of helium charge transfer dissociation (He-CTD) to characterize the structure of complex oligosaccharides. We compare this method with low-energy collision-induced dissociation and extreme-ultraviolet dissociative photoionization (XUV-DPI), which was shown previously to ensure the successful characterization of complex glycans. Similarly to what could be obtained by XUV-DPI, He-CTD provides a complete description of the investigated structures by producing many informative cross-ring fragments and no ambiguous fragmentation. Unlike XUV-DPI, which is performed at a synchrotron source, He-CTD has the undeniable advantage of being implementable in a conventional benchtop ion trap in a conventional laboratory setting. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:27582116

  12. Charge Transfer Dissociation of Complex Oligosaccharides: Comparison with Collision-Induced Dissociation and Extreme Ultraviolet Dissociative Photoionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ropartz, David; Li, Pengfei; Fanuel, Mathieu; Giuliani, Alexandre; Rogniaux, Hélène; Jackson, Glen P.

    2016-10-01

    The structural characterization of oligosaccharides still challenges the field of analytical chemistry. Tandem mass spectrometry offers many advantages toward this aim, although the generic fragmentation method (low-energy collision-induced dissociation) shows clear limitations and is often insufficient to retrieve some essential structural information on these molecules. In this work, we present the first application of helium charge transfer dissociation (He-CTD) to characterize the structure of complex oligosaccharides. We compare this method with low-energy collision-induced dissociation and extreme-ultraviolet dissociative photoionization (XUV-DPI), which was shown previously to ensure the successful characterization of complex glycans. Similarly to what could be obtained by XUV-DPI, He-CTD provides a complete description of the investigated structures by producing many informative cross-ring fragments and no ambiguous fragmentation. Unlike XUV-DPI, which is performed at a synchrotron source, He-CTD has the undeniable advantage of being implementable in a conventional benchtop ion trap in a conventional laboratory setting.

  13. Neuronal IFN signaling is dispensable for the establishment of HSV-1 latency.

    PubMed

    Rosato, Pamela C; Katzenell, Sarah; Pesola, Jean M; North, Brian; Coen, Donald M; Leib, David A

    2016-10-01

    IFN responses control acute HSV infection, but their role in regulating HSV latency is poorly understood. To address this we used mice lacking IFN signaling specifically in neural tissues. These mice supported a higher acute viral load in nervous tissue and delayed establishment of latency. While latent HSV-1 genome copies were equivalent, ganglia from neuronal IFN signaling-deficient mice unexpectedly supported reduced reactivation. IFNβ promoted survival of primary sensory neurons after infection with HSV-1, indicating a role for IFN signaling in sustaining neurons. We observed higher levels of latency associated transcripts (LATs) per HSV genome in mice lacking neuronal IFN signaling, consistent with a role for IFN in regulating LAT expression. These data show that neuronal IFN signaling modulates the expression of LAT and may conserve the pool of neurons available to harbor latent HSV-1 genome. The data also show that neuronal IFN signaling is dispensable for the establishment of latency. PMID:27518540

  14. Neuronal IFN signaling is dispensable for the establishment of HSV-1 latency.

    PubMed

    Rosato, Pamela C; Katzenell, Sarah; Pesola, Jean M; North, Brian; Coen, Donald M; Leib, David A

    2016-10-01

    IFN responses control acute HSV infection, but their role in regulating HSV latency is poorly understood. To address this we used mice lacking IFN signaling specifically in neural tissues. These mice supported a higher acute viral load in nervous tissue and delayed establishment of latency. While latent HSV-1 genome copies were equivalent, ganglia from neuronal IFN signaling-deficient mice unexpectedly supported reduced reactivation. IFNβ promoted survival of primary sensory neurons after infection with HSV-1, indicating a role for IFN signaling in sustaining neurons. We observed higher levels of latency associated transcripts (LATs) per HSV genome in mice lacking neuronal IFN signaling, consistent with a role for IFN in regulating LAT expression. These data show that neuronal IFN signaling modulates the expression of LAT and may conserve the pool of neurons available to harbor latent HSV-1 genome. The data also show that neuronal IFN signaling is dispensable for the establishment of latency.

  15. Dissociative detachment and memory impairment: reversible amnesia or encoding failure?

    PubMed

    Allen, J G; Console, D A; Lewis, L

    1999-01-01

    The authors propose that clinicians endeavor to differentiate between reversible and irreversible memory failures in patients with dissociative symptoms who report "memory gaps" and "lost time." The classic dissociative disorders, such as dissociative amnesia and dissociative identity disorder, entail reversible memory failures associated with encoding experience in altered states. The authors propose another realm of memory failures associated with severe dissociative detachment that may preclude the level of encoding of ongoing experience needed to support durable autobiographical memories. They describe how dissociative detachment may be intertwined with neurobiological factors that impair memory, and they spell out the significance of distinguishing reversible and irreversible memory impairment for diagnosis, patient education, psychotherapy, and research.

  16. Self-destructive behavior in patients with dissociative disorders.

    PubMed

    Saxe, Glenn N; Chawla, Neharika; Van der Kolk, Bessel

    2002-01-01

    Highrates of self-injury have been reported in patients with dissociative disorders, yet no prior study has directly compared these patients with other psychiatric patients. The present study assesses self-destructive behavior in a group of inpatients who have dissociative disorders compared to those who report few dissociative symptoms. These patients more frequently engage in self-destructive behaviors, use more methods of self-injury, and begin to injure themselves at an earlier age then patients who do not dissociate. Results have important implications for understanding the relationship between dissociation, childhood trauma, and self-injury and for assessment and treatment of patients with dissociative disorders.

  17. Glutamate and post-traumatic stress disorder: toward a psychobiology of dissociation.

    PubMed

    Chambers, R A; Bremner, J D; Moghaddam, B; Southwick, S M; Charney, D S; Krystal, J H

    1999-10-01

    Dissociative cognitive and perceptual alterations commonly occur at the time of traumatization and as an enduring feature of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). After stress exposure, dissociative symptoms are a predictor of the development of PTSD. Recent preclinical data suggest that stress stimulates the cortico-limbic release of glutamate. The glutamate that is released during stress in animal models influences behavior, induces a variety of changes in neural plasticity that may have long-lasting effects on brain function and behavior, and contributes to neural toxicity. Antagonist of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) subtype of glutamate receptor also stimulates transient cortico-limbic glutamate release in animals. Further, some of the effects of NMDA antagonists in animals are blocked by drugs that attenuate glutamate release. Clinical studies suggest that NMDA antagonists may transiently stimulate glutamate release and produce symptoms resembling dissociative states in humans. A recent study suggests that a drug that reduces glutamate release also attenuates the perceptual effects of the NMDA antagonist, ketamine, in humans. Because of the possible contributions of hyperglutamatergic states to the acute and long-lasting consequences of traumatic stress exposure, the therapeutic and neuroprotective potential of drugs that attenuate glutamate release should be explored in traumatized individuals with dissociative symptoms.

  18. Peritraumatic Distress and Dissociation in Prolonged Grief and Posttraumatic Stress Following Violent and Unexpected Deaths.

    PubMed

    Boelen, Paul A

    2015-01-01

    This study examined associations between the violence of a loss and the suddenness of a loss and symptom levels of prolonged grief disorder (PGD) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) after the death of a loved one. A further aim was to investigate whether peritraumatic distress (i.e., fear, helplessness, and horror) and peritraumatic dissociation mediate the emotional impact of violent losses and unexpected losses. We obtained self-reported data from 265 individuals bereaved in the previous 3 years by losses due to violent causes (17%) or illness (83%). Outcomes showed that participants who experienced violent losses (due to homicide, suicide, or accident) reported more PGD symptoms and PTSD symptoms compared to those confronted with illness loss. In this latter group, greater perceived unexpectedness was positively associated with PGD severity and PTSD severity. Multiple mediation analyses showed that the impact of violent loss and unexpectedness of the loss on PGD severity and PTSD severity was fully mediated by peritraumatic distress and dissociation; peritraumatic helplessness and peritraumatic dissociation (but not peritraumatic fear and horror) emerged as unique mediators. Findings suggest that both violent and unexpected losses exacerbate postloss psychopathology, which is at least partially because of such losses yielding more intense acute helplessness and dissociative responses. PMID:26156555

  19. Carbon monoxide dissociative attachment and resonant dissociation by electron-impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laporta, V.; Tennyson, J.; Celiberto, R.

    2016-02-01

    Low-energy dissociative electron attachment and resonant electron impact dissociation of CO molecule are considered. Ro-vibrationally resolved cross sections and rate coefficients for both the processes are calculated using an ab-initio model based on the low-lying \\text{X}{{}2}\\Pi resonance of CO-. Final results show that the cross sections increases very rapidly as a function of the ro-vibrational level; these cross sections should be useful for understanding kinetic dissociation of CO in strongly non-equilibrium plasmas.

  20. On the Dynamics of the Spontaneous Activity in Neuronal Networks

    PubMed Central

    Bonifazi, Paolo; Ruaro, Maria Elisabetta; Torre, Vincent

    2007-01-01

    Most neuronal networks, even in the absence of external stimuli, produce spontaneous bursts of spikes separated by periods of reduced activity. The origin and functional role of these neuronal events are still unclear. The present work shows that the spontaneous activity of two very different networks, intact leech ganglia and dissociated cultures of rat hippocampal neurons, share several features. Indeed, in both networks: i) the inter-spike intervals distribution of the spontaneous firing of single neurons is either regular or periodic or bursting, with the fraction of bursting neurons depending on the network activity; ii) bursts of spontaneous spikes have the same broad distributions of size and duration; iii) the degree of correlated activity increases with the bin width, and the power spectrum of the network firing rate has a 1/f behavior at low frequencies, indicating the existence of long-range temporal correlations; iv) the activity of excitatory synaptic pathways mediated by NMDA receptors is necessary for the onset of the long-range correlations and for the presence of large bursts; v) blockage of inhibitory synaptic pathways mediated by GABAA receptors causes instead an increase in the correlation among neurons and leads to a burst distribution composed only of very small and very large bursts. These results suggest that the spontaneous electrical activity in neuronal networks with different architectures and functions can have very similar properties and common dynamics. PMID:17502919

  1. The role of dimensionality in neuronal network dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Ulloa Severino, Francesco Paolo; Ban, Jelena; Song, Qin; Tang, Mingliang; Bianconi, Ginestra; Cheng, Guosheng; Torre, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Recent results from network theory show that complexity affects several dynamical properties of networks that favor synchronization. Here we show that synchronization in 2D and 3D neuronal networks is significantly different. Using dissociated hippocampal neurons we compared properties of cultures grown on a flat 2D substrates with those formed on 3D graphene foam scaffolds. Both 2D and 3D cultures had comparable glia to neuron ratio and the percentage of GABAergic inhibitory neurons. 3D cultures because of their dimension have many connections among distant neurons leading to small-world networks and their characteristic dynamics. After one week, calcium imaging revealed moderately synchronous activity in 2D networks, but the degree of synchrony of 3D networks was higher and had two regimes: a highly synchronized (HS) and a moderately synchronized (MS) regime. The HS regime was never observed in 2D networks. During the MS regime, neuronal assemblies in synchrony changed with time as observed in mammalian brains. After two weeks, the degree of synchrony in 3D networks decreased, as observed in vivo. These results show that dimensionality determines properties of neuronal networks and that several features of brain dynamics are a consequence of its 3D topology. PMID:27404281

  2. The role of dimensionality in neuronal network dynamics.

    PubMed

    Ulloa Severino, Francesco Paolo; Ban, Jelena; Song, Qin; Tang, Mingliang; Bianconi, Ginestra; Cheng, Guosheng; Torre, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Recent results from network theory show that complexity affects several dynamical properties of networks that favor synchronization. Here we show that synchronization in 2D and 3D neuronal networks is significantly different. Using dissociated hippocampal neurons we compared properties of cultures grown on a flat 2D substrates with those formed on 3D graphene foam scaffolds. Both 2D and 3D cultures had comparable glia to neuron ratio and the percentage of GABAergic inhibitory neurons. 3D cultures because of their dimension have many connections among distant neurons leading to small-world networks and their characteristic dynamics. After one week, calcium imaging revealed moderately synchronous activity in 2D networks, but the degree of synchrony of 3D networks was higher and had two regimes: a highly synchronized (HS) and a moderately synchronized (MS) regime. The HS regime was never observed in 2D networks. During the MS regime, neuronal assemblies in synchrony changed with time as observed in mammalian brains. After two weeks, the degree of synchrony in 3D networks decreased, as observed in vivo. These results show that dimensionality determines properties of neuronal networks and that several features of brain dynamics are a consequence of its 3D topology. PMID:27404281

  3. Acute brain trauma.

    PubMed

    Martin, G T

    2016-01-01

    In the 20th century, the complications of head injuries were controlled but not eliminated. The wars of the 21st century turned attention to blast, the instant of impact and the primary injury of concussion. Computer calculations have established that in the first 5 milliseconds after the impact, four independent injuries on the brain are inflicted: 1) impact and its shockwave, 2) deceleration, 3) rotation and 4) skull deformity with vibration (or resonance). The recovery, pathology and symptoms after acute brain trauma have always been something of a puzzle. The variability of these four modes of injury, along with a variable reserve of neurones, explains some of this problem.

  4. Double Dissociation between Reading and Spelling Deficits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moll, Kristina; Landerl, Karin

    2009-01-01

    In two studies dissociations between reading and spelling skills were examined. Study 1 reports equally high prevalence rates for isolated deficits in reading (7%) or spelling (6%) in a representative sample (N = 2,029) of German-speaking elementary school children. In Study 2, children with isolated deficits were presented with the same words to…

  5. Dispelling confusion about traumatic dissociative amnesia.

    PubMed

    McNally, Richard J

    2007-09-01

    How survivors of trauma remember--or forget--their most terrifying experiences lies at the core of one of the most bitter controversies in psychiatry and psychology: the debate regarding repressed memories of childhood sexual abuse. Most experts hold that traumatic events--those experienced as overwhelmingly terrifying and often life-threatening--are remembered very well; however, traumatic dissociative amnesia theorists disagree. Although acknowledging that traumatic events are usually memorable, these theorists nevertheless claim that a sizable minority of survivors are incapable of remembering their trauma. That is, the memory is stored but dissociated (or "repressed") from awareness. However, the evidence that these theorists adduce in support of the concept of traumatic dissociative amnesia is subject to other, more plausible interpretations. The purpose of this review is to dispel confusion regarding the controversial notion of dissociated (or repressed) memory for trauma and to show how people can recall memories of long-forgotten sexual abuse without these memories first having been repressed.

  6. EVIDENCE FOR CO DISSOCIATION ON RHODIUM SURFACES

    SciTech Connect

    Castner, D.G.; Dubois, L.H.; Sexton, B.A.; Somorjai, G.A.

    1980-06-01

    Carbon monoxide adsorbs molecularly on rhodium surfaces at 300K, but if the rhodium samples are heated in the presence of carbon monoxide, there is evidence for carbon-oxygen bond breaking at step and/or defect sites. The effects of step and defect site density, subsurface oxygen concentration, and oxygen dissolution into the rhodium lattice on CO dissociation are discussed.

  7. Subliminal processes, dissociation and the 'I'.

    PubMed

    Bob, Petr

    2003-06-01

    The study of unconscious processes leads to the hypothesis of the limit of consciousness, which involves two main kinds of psychic activity. The first represents psychic contents which are subliminal for their low energy, the second subliminal contents which are inaccessible to consciousness because they are dissociated in the subliminal region. Dissociation is a concept introduced by Pierre Janet for splitting consciousness due to traumatic events or during hypnosis. It takes a more general form in Hilgard's neo-dissociation theory of hypnotic phenomena and also in Jung's theory of the collective unconscious. Further generalization links it to the modern findings of explicit and implicit perception, leading to a shift in dissociation from hypothesis to clinical, experimental and theoretical reality. Studies in hypnosis also point to the existence of an integrative psychic entity, that comprises the conscious 'I'. Hilgard called this the hidden observer, and his findings represent empirical confirmation of Jung's term for the Self as mirror 'I', which leads to many important consequences for self-discovery and the meaning of life.

  8. Process Dissociation and Mixture Signal Detection Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeCarlo, Lawrence T.

    2008-01-01

    The process dissociation procedure was developed in an attempt to separate different processes involved in memory tasks. The procedure naturally lends itself to a formulation within a class of mixture signal detection models. The dual process model is shown to be a special case. The mixture signal detection model is applied to data from a widely…

  9. Psychometric properties of the Dissociative Experiences Scale.

    PubMed

    Dubester, K A; Braun, B G

    1995-04-01

    The test-retest reliability of the Dissociative Experiences Scale (DES; Bernstein EM, Putnam FW [1986] Development, reliability, and validity of a dissociation scale. The Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease 174:727-735) in a clinical sample was found to be .93 for the total DES score and .95, .89, and .82 for the three subscale scores of amnesia, depersonalization-derealization, and absorption (dissociative identity disorder [DID], DSM-IV), respectively. Test-retest reliabilities within diagnostic groups of multiple personality disorder, dissociative disorder not otherwise specified, and a general other category of psychiatric diagnoses were obtained for total and subscale scores on the DES. These ranged from .78 to .96. Tests of mean scores across the two test sessions showed the total and subscale scores to be temporally stable. The DES was also found to be highly internally consistent: Cronbach's alphas of .96 and .97 were observed for the total DES scores taken at times 1 and 2, respectively. Construct validity of the DES was demonstrated by differentiation among the subscale scores in a repeated-measures analysis of variance (F[2,154] = 32.03, p < or = .001). Normality and general distribution issues were also addressed and provided a rationale for using the DES with parametric statistics. Reasons why the DES (as it was originally designed) is not appropriate as a dependent measure in outcome research are discussed, along with needed future research. Implications of the findings for the clinical usefulness of the DES as a diagnostic instrument are noted.

  10. Thermal dissociation of copper chalcogenides during melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlova, L. M.; Glazov, V. M.; Asryan, A. A.

    1998-01-01

    An attempt was undertaken to describe the mechanism of dissociation of copper chalcogenides during melting. Two-stage schemes of the dissociation of the Cu2BVI compounds (BVI is S, Se, or Te) were proposed. It was suggested that in the copper-sulfur and copper-selenium melts, Cu2BVI and CuBVI associates exist, whereas in the copper tellurium systems, Cu2Te and Cu5Te3 associates exist. The interpretation of available data on magnetic susceptibility was given in terms of suggested associates in Cu-Te alloys. Nous avons essayé de décrire le mécanisme de dissociation des chalcogénures de cuivre pendant la fusion. Nous proposons des schémas à deux étapes de dissociation pour les composés Cu2BVI (BVI est S, Se, ou Te). Nous suggérons l'existence dans le bain fondu cuivre-soufre et cuivre-sélénium des associés du type Cu2BVI et CuBVI et dans le système cuivre-tellure Cu2Te et Cu5Te3. L'interprétation des données disponibles de susceptibilité magnétique est réalisée en termes de formation d'associés dans les alliages Cu-Te.

  11. Self-organization of repetitive spike patterns in developing neuronal networks in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jyh-Jang; Kilb, Werner; Luhmann, Heiko J

    2010-10-01

    The appearance of spontaneous correlated activity is a fundamental feature of developing neuronal networks in vivo and in vitro. To elucidate whether the ontogeny of correlated activity is paralleled by the appearance of specific spike patterns we used a template-matching algorithm to detect repetitive spike patterns in multi-electrode array recordings from cultures of dissociated mouse neocortical neurons between 6 and 15 days in vitro (div). These experiments demonstrated that the number of spiking neurons increased significantly between 6 and 15 div, while a significantly synchronized network activity appeared at 9 div and became the main discharge pattern in the subsequent div. Repetitive spike patterns with a low complexity were first observed at 8 div. The number of repetitive spike patterns in each dataset as well as their complexity and recurrence increased during development in vitro. The number of links between neurons implicated in repetitive spike patterns, as well as their strength, showed a gradual increase during development. About 8% of the spike sequences contributed to more than one repetitive spike patterns and were classified as core patterns. These results demonstrate for the first time that defined neuronal assemblies, as represented by repetitive spike patterns, appear quite early during development in vitro, around the time synchronized network burst become the dominant network pattern. In summary, these findings suggest that dissociated neurons can self-organize into complex neuronal networks that allow reliable flow and processing of neuronal information already during early phases of development.

  12. Acetaminophen Induces Apoptosis in Rat Cortical Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Posadas, Inmaculada; Santos, Pablo; Blanco, Almudena; Muñoz-Fernández, Maríangeles; Ceña, Valentín

    2010-01-01

    Background Acetaminophen (AAP) is widely prescribed for treatment of mild pain and fever in western countries. It is generally considered a safe drug and the most frequently reported adverse effect associated with acetaminophen is hepatotoxicity, which generally occurs after acute overdose. During AAP overdose, encephalopathy might develop and contribute to morbidity and mortality. Our hypothesis is that AAP causes direct neuronal toxicity contributing to the general AAP toxicity syndrome. Methodology/Principal Findings We report that AAP causes direct toxicity on rat cortical neurons both in vitro and in vivo as measured by LDH release. We have found that AAP causes concentration-dependent neuronal death in vitro at concentrations (1 and 2 mM) that are reached in human plasma during AAP overdose, and that are also reached in the cerebrospinal fluid of rats for 3 hours following i.p injection of AAP doses (250 and 500 mg/Kg) that are below those required to induce acute hepatic failure in rats. AAP also increases both neuronal cytochrome P450 isoform CYP2E1 enzymatic activity and protein levels as determined by Western blot, leading to neuronal death through mitochondrial–mediated mechanisms that involve cytochrome c release and caspase 3 activation. In addition, in vivo experiments show that i.p. AAP (250 and 500 mg/Kg) injection induces neuronal death in the rat cortex as measured by TUNEL, validating the in vitro data. Conclusions/Significance The data presented here establish, for the first time, a direct neurotoxic action by AAP both in vivo and in vitro in rats at doses below those required to produce hepatotoxicity and suggest that this neurotoxicity might be involved in the general toxic syndrome observed during patient APP overdose and, possibly, also when AAP doses in the upper dosing schedule are used, especially if other risk factors (moderate drinking, fasting, nutritional impairment) are present. PMID:21170329

  13. Experimental Dissociation of Methane Hydrates Through Depressurization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borgfeldt, T.; Flemings, P. B.; Meyer, D.; You, K.

    2015-12-01

    We dissociated methane hydrates by stepwise depressurization. The initial hydrates were formed by injecting gas into a cylindrical sample of brine-saturated, coarse-grained sand at hydrate-stable conditions with the intention of reaching three-phase equilibrium. The sample was initially at 1°C with a pore pressure of 1775 psi and a salinity of 7 wt. % NaBr. The depressurization setup consisted of one pump filled with tap water attached to the confining fluid port and a second pump attached to the inlet port where the methane was injected. Depressurization was conducted over sixteen hours at a constant temperature of 1°C. The pore pressure was stepwise reduced from 1775 psi to atmospheric pressure by pulling known volumes of gas from the sample. After each extraction, we recorded the instantaneous and equilibrium pore pressure. 0.503 moles of methane were removed from the sample. The pore pressure decreased smoothly and nonlinearly with the cumulative gas withdrawn from the sample. We interpret that hydrate began to dissociate immediately with depressurization, and it continued to dissociate when the pressure decreased below the three-phase pressure for 1°C and 0 wt. % salinity. Two breaks in slope in the pressure vs. mass extracted data are bounded by smooth, nonlinear curves with differing slopes on either side. We attribute the breaks to dissociation of three zones of hydrate concentration. We created a box model to simulate the experimental behavior. For a 10% initial gas saturation (estimated from the hydrate formation experiment and based on mass conservation), an initial hydrate saturation of 55% is required to match the total methane extracted from the sample. Future experiments will be conducted over a longer timespan while monitoring hydrate dissociation with CT imaging throughout the process.

  14. Excitatory cortical neurons with multipolar shape establish neuronal polarity by forming a tangentially oriented axon in the intermediate zone.

    PubMed

    Hatanaka, Yumiko; Yamauchi, Kenta

    2013-01-01

    The formation of axon-dendrite polarity is crucial for neuron to make the proper information flow within the brain. Although the processes of neuronal polarity formation have been extensively studied using neurons in dissociated culture, the corresponding developmental processes in vivo are still unclear. Here, we illuminate the initial steps of morphological polarization of excitatory cortical neurons in situ, by sparsely labeling their neuroepithelial progenitors using in utero electroporation and then examining their neuronal progeny in brain sections and in slice cultures. Morphological analysis showed that an axon-like long tangential process formed in progeny cells in the intermediate zone (IZ). Time-lapse imaging analysis using slice culture revealed that progeny cells with multipolar shape, after alternately extending and retracting their short processes for several hours, suddenly elongated a long process tangentially. These cells then transformed into a bipolar shape, extending a pia-directed leading process, and migrated radially leaving the tangential process behind, which gave rise to an "L-shaped" axon. Our findings suggest that neuronal polarity in these cells is established de novo from a nonpolarized stage in vivo and indicate that excitatory cortical neurons with multipolar shape in the IZ initiate axon outgrowth before radial migration into the cortical plate. PMID:22267309

  15. In utero electroporation followed by primary neuronal culture for studying gene function in subset of cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Rice, Heather; Suth, Seiyam; Cavanaugh, William; Bai, Jilin; Young-Pearse, Tracy L

    2010-10-08

    In vitro study of primary neuronal cultures allows for quantitative analyses of neurite outgrowth. In order to study how genetic alterations affect neuronal process outgrowth, shRNA or cDNA constructs can be introduced into primary neurons via chemical transfection or viral transduction. However, with primary cortical cells, a heterogeneous pool of cell types (glutamatergic neurons from different layers, inhibitory neurons, glial cells) are transfected using these methods. The use of in utero electroporation to introduce DNA constructs in the embryonic rodent cortex allows for certain subsets of cells to be targeted: while electroporation of early embryonic cortex targets deep layers of the cortex, electroporation at late embryonic timepoints targets more superficial layers. Further, differential placement of electrodes across the heads of individual embryos results in the targeting of dorsal-medial versus ventral-lateral regions of the cortex. Following electroporation, transfected cells can be dissected out, dissociated, and plated in vitro for quantitative analysis of neurite outgrowth. Here, we provide a step-by-step method to quantitatively measure neuronal process outgrowth in subsets of cortical cells. The basic protocol for in utero electroporation has been described in detail in two other JoVE articles from the Kriegstein lab. We will provide an overview of our protocol for in utero electroporation, focusing on the most important details, followed by a description of our protocol that applies in utero electroporation to the study of gene function in neuronal process outgrowth.

  16. Excitatory cortical neurons with multipolar shape establish neuronal polarity by forming a tangentially oriented axon in the intermediate zone.

    PubMed

    Hatanaka, Yumiko; Yamauchi, Kenta

    2013-01-01

    The formation of axon-dendrite polarity is crucial for neuron to make the proper information flow within the brain. Although the processes of neuronal polarity formation have been extensively studied using neurons in dissociated culture, the corresponding developmental processes in vivo are still unclear. Here, we illuminate the initial steps of morphological polarization of excitatory cortical neurons in situ, by sparsely labeling their neuroepithelial progenitors using in utero electroporation and then examining their neuronal progeny in brain sections and in slice cultures. Morphological analysis showed that an axon-like long tangential process formed in progeny cells in the intermediate zone (IZ). Time-lapse imaging analysis using slice culture revealed that progeny cells with multipolar shape, after alternately extending and retracting their short processes for several hours, suddenly elongated a long process tangentially. These cells then transformed into a bipolar shape, extending a pia-directed leading process, and migrated radially leaving the tangential process behind, which gave rise to an "L-shaped" axon. Our findings suggest that neuronal polarity in these cells is established de novo from a nonpolarized stage in vivo and indicate that excitatory cortical neurons with multipolar shape in the IZ initiate axon outgrowth before radial migration into the cortical plate.

  17. Thermal dissociation behavior and dissociation enthalpies of methane-carbon dioxide mixed hydrates

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, T.H.; Kneafsey, T.J.; Rees, E.V.L.

    2011-02-15

    Replacement of methane with carbon dioxide in hydrate has been proposed as a strategy for geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and/or production of methane (CH{sub 4}) from natural hydrate deposits. This replacement strategy requires a better understanding of the thermodynamic characteristics of binary mixtures of CH{sub 4} and CO{sub 2} hydrate (CH{sub 4}-CO{sub 2} mixed hydrates), as well as thermophysical property changes during gas exchange. This study explores the thermal dissociation behavior and dissociation enthalpies of CH{sub 4}-CO{sub 2} mixed hydrates. We prepared CH{sub 4}-CO{sub 2} mixed hydrate samples from two different, well-defined gas mixtures. During thermal dissociation of a CH{sub 4}-CO{sub 2} mixed hydrate sample, gas samples from the head space were periodically collected and analyzed using gas chromatography. The changes in CH{sub 4}-CO{sub 2} compositions in both the vapor phase and hydrate phase during dissociation were estimated based on the gas chromatography measurements. It was found that the CO{sub 2} concentration in the vapor phase became richer during dissociation because the initial hydrate composition contained relatively more CO{sub 2} than the vapor phase. The composition change in the vapor phase during hydrate dissociation affected the dissociation pressure and temperature; the richer CO{sub 2} in the vapor phase led to a lower dissociation pressure. Furthermore, the increase in CO{sub 2} concentration in the vapor phase enriched the hydrate in CO{sub 2}. The dissociation enthalpy of the CH{sub 4}-CO{sub 2} mixed hydrate was computed by fitting the Clausius-Clapeyron equation to the pressure-temperature (PT) trace of a dissociation test. It was observed that the dissociation enthalpy of the CH{sub 4}-CO{sub 2} mixed hydrate lays between the limiting values of pure CH{sub 4} hydrate and CO{sub 2} hydrate, increasing with the CO{sub 2} fraction in the hydrate phase.

  18. What contributes to predicting change in the treatment of dissociation: initial levels of dissociation, PTSD, or overall distress?

    PubMed

    Brand, Bethany L; Stadnik, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    Individuals with dissociative disorders (DDs) suffer from high levels of dissociation as well as posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and general distress. No research has investigated how changes in dissociation relate to changes in other symptoms over the course of treatment in patients with DD. Using a prospective, naturalistic design, we collected reports of symptoms from a sample of therapists and their patients diagnosed with dissociative identity disorder or dissociative disorder not otherwise specified who participated in the Treatment Outcome of Patients with Dissociative Disorders study. The patients completed surveys at intake (Time 1) into the study and at 30-month follow-up (Time 4). We found that dissociative symptoms, including amnesia, depersonalization/derealization, and absorption, at the initial assessment of the study ("initial") were related to initial levels of PTSD and general distress and that changes in dissociative symptoms were related to changes in PTSD and general distress. Initial dissociation was a significant predictor of change in dissociation at 30 months when we controlled for length of time for follow-up, length of time practicing therapy, and length of time treating dissociative patients. Our results suggest that a reduction in dissociative symptoms in DD patients is associated with reductions in the overall severity of dissociative, posttraumatic stress, and distress symptoms. PMID:23627481

  19. Childhood Traumatic Experiences, Dissociative Symptoms, and Dissociative Disorder Comorbidity Among Patients With Panic Disorder: A Preliminary Study.

    PubMed

    Ural, Cenk; Belli, Hasan; Akbudak, Mahir; Tabo, Abdulkadir

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed childhood trauma history, dissociative symptoms, and dissociative disorder comorbidity in patients with panic disorder (PD). A total of 92 psychotropic drug-naive patients with PD, recruited from outpatient clinics in the psychiatry department of a Turkish hospital, were involved in the study. Participants were assessed using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Dissociative Disorders (SCID-D), Dissociation Questionnaire, Panic and Agoraphobia Scale, Panic Disorder Severity Scale, and Childhood Trauma Questionnaire. Of the patients with PD, 18 (19%) had a comorbid dissociative disorder diagnosis on screening with the SCID-D. The most prevalent disorders were dissociative disorder not otherwise specified, dissociative amnesia, and depersonalization disorders. Patients with a high degree of dissociation symptoms and dissociative disorder comorbidity had more severe PD than those without (p < .05). All of the childhood trauma subscales used were correlated with the severity of symptoms of dissociation and PD. Among all of the subscales, the strongest relationship was with childhood emotional abuse. Logistic regression analysis showed that emotional abuse and severity of PD were independently associated with dissociative disorder. In our study, a significant proportion of the patients with PD had concurrent diagnoses of dissociative disorder. We conclude that the predominance of PD symptoms at admission should not lead the clinician to overlook the underlying dissociative process and associated traumatic experiences among these patients.

  20. What contributes to predicting change in the treatment of dissociation: initial levels of dissociation, PTSD, or overall distress?

    PubMed

    Brand, Bethany L; Stadnik, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    Individuals with dissociative disorders (DDs) suffer from high levels of dissociation as well as posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and general distress. No research has investigated how changes in dissociation relate to changes in other symptoms over the course of treatment in patients with DD. Using a prospective, naturalistic design, we collected reports of symptoms from a sample of therapists and their patients diagnosed with dissociative identity disorder or dissociative disorder not otherwise specified who participated in the Treatment Outcome of Patients with Dissociative Disorders study. The patients completed surveys at intake (Time 1) into the study and at 30-month follow-up (Time 4). We found that dissociative symptoms, including amnesia, depersonalization/derealization, and absorption, at the initial assessment of the study ("initial") were related to initial levels of PTSD and general distress and that changes in dissociative symptoms were related to changes in PTSD and general distress. Initial dissociation was a significant predictor of change in dissociation at 30 months when we controlled for length of time for follow-up, length of time practicing therapy, and length of time treating dissociative patients. Our results suggest that a reduction in dissociative symptoms in DD patients is associated with reductions in the overall severity of dissociative, posttraumatic stress, and distress symptoms.

  1. Forgetting heart break: a fascinating case of transient left ventricular apical ballooning syndrome associated with dissociative amnesia.

    PubMed

    Toussi, Amir; Bryk, Jodie; Alam, Abdulkader

    2014-01-01

    Transient left ventricular apical ballooning syndrome (TLVABS), also known as takotsubo cardiomyopathy, is characterized by transient left ventricular dysfunction, electrocardiographic changes, and release of myocardial enzymes that mimic acute myocardial infarction in patients without angiographic evidence of coronary artery disease. Most patients are post-menopausal women and an emotional or physiologic stressor frequently precedes the presentation. Psychogenic or dissociative amnesia is a memory disorder characterized by sudden retrograde memory loss with inability to recall personal information said to occur for a period of time ranging from hours to years after a stressful event. Interestingly, the mechanism of both disorders has been linked to plasma elevation in catecholamines. Here we present the case of a 66-year-old female diagnosed with both TLVABS and dissociative amnesia following the sudden unexpected death of her sister. To our knowledge, this is surprisingly the first report of the co-occurrence of TLVABS and dissociative amnesia, two processes with a potential shared underlying etiology.

  2. Dissociated sequential activity and stimulus encoding in the dorsomedial striatum during spatial working memory

    PubMed Central

    Akhlaghpour, Hessameddin; Wiskerke, Joost; Choi, Jung Yoon; Taliaferro, Joshua P; Au, Jennifer; Witten, Ilana B

    2016-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that the striatum has an important role in spatial working memory. The neural dynamics in the striatum have been described in tasks with short delay periods (1–4 s), but remain largely uncharacterized for tasks with longer delay periods. We collected and analyzed single unit recordings from the dorsomedial striatum of rats performing a spatial working memory task with delays up to 10 s. We found that neurons were activated sequentially, with the sequences spanning the entire delay period. Surprisingly, this sequential activity was dissociated from stimulus encoding activity, which was present in the same neurons, but preferentially appeared towards the onset of the delay period. These observations contrast with descriptions of sequential dynamics during similar tasks in other brains areas, and clarify the contribution of the striatum to spatial working memory. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19507.001 PMID:27636864

  3. In-Vacuum Dissociator for Atomic-Hydrogen Masers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vessot, R. F.

    1987-01-01

    Thermal control and vacuum sealing achieved while contamination avoided. Simple, relatively inexpensive molecular-hydrogen dissociator for atomic-hydrogen masers used on Earth or in vacuum of space. No air cooling required, and absence of elastomeric O-ring seals prevents contamination. In-vacuum dissociator for atomic hydrogen masers, hydrogen gas in glass dissociator dissociated by radio-frequency signal transmitted from surrounding 3-turn coil. Heat in glass conducted away by contacting metal surfaces.

  4. Does phasic trauma treatment make patients with dissociative identity disorder treatment more dissociative?

    PubMed

    Brand, Bethany; Loewenstein, Richard J

    2014-01-01

    Proponents of the iatrogenic model of the etiology of dissociative identity disorder (DID) have expressed concern that treatment focused on direct engagement and interaction with dissociated self-states harms DID patients. However, empirical data have shown that this type of DID treatment is beneficial. Analyzing data from the prospective Treatment of Patients With Dissociative Disorders (TOP DD) Study, we test empirically whether DID treatment is associated with clinically adverse manifestations of dissociated self-states: acting so differently that one feels like different people, hearing voices, and dissociative amnesia. We show that, over the course of the study, there were significant decreases in feeling like different people and hearing voices. These results indicate that this form of DID treatment does not lead to symptomatic worsening in these dimensions, as predicted by the iatrogenic model. Indeed, treatment provided by TOP DD therapists reduced, rather than increased, the extent to which patients experienced manifestations of pathological dissociation. Because severe symptomatology and impairment are associated with DID, iatrogenic harm may come from depriving DID patients of treatment that targets DID symptomatology. PMID:24377972

  5. Does phasic trauma treatment make patients with dissociative identity disorder treatment more dissociative?

    PubMed

    Brand, Bethany; Loewenstein, Richard J

    2014-01-01

    Proponents of the iatrogenic model of the etiology of dissociative identity disorder (DID) have expressed concern that treatment focused on direct engagement and interaction with dissociated self-states harms DID patients. However, empirical data have shown that this type of DID treatment is beneficial. Analyzing data from the prospective Treatment of Patients With Dissociative Disorders (TOP DD) Study, we test empirically whether DID treatment is associated with clinically adverse manifestations of dissociated self-states: acting so differently that one feels like different people, hearing voices, and dissociative amnesia. We show that, over the course of the study, there were significant decreases in feeling like different people and hearing voices. These results indicate that this form of DID treatment does not lead to symptomatic worsening in these dimensions, as predicted by the iatrogenic model. Indeed, treatment provided by TOP DD therapists reduced, rather than increased, the extent to which patients experienced manifestations of pathological dissociation. Because severe symptomatology and impairment are associated with DID, iatrogenic harm may come from depriving DID patients of treatment that targets DID symptomatology.

  6. Dissociated lower limb muscle involvement in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Simon, Neil G; Lee, Michael; Bae, Jong Seok; Mioshi, Eneida; Lin, Cindy S-Y; Pfluger, Casey M; Henderson, Robert D; Vucic, Steve; Swash, Michael; Burke, David; Kiernan, Matthew C

    2015-06-01

    It has been suggested that corticomotoneuronal drive to ankle dorsiflexors is greater than to ankle plantar flexor muscles, despite the finding that plantar flexors are no less active than TA during walking and standing. The present study was undertaken to determine whether there was differential involvement of distal lower limb muscles in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), to elucidate pathophysiological mechanisms of selective muscle involvement. Prospective studies were undertaken in 52 ALS patients, including clinical assessment, disease staging (revised ALS functional rating scale), Medical Research Council sum score, and a scale of upper motor neurone (UMN) dysfunction. Motor unit number estimates (MUNE) and compound muscle action potentials (CMAP) from ankle dorsiflexors and plantar flexors were used to provide objective measures. A novel 'split leg index' was calculated as follows: SLI = CMAPDF ÷ CMAPPF. In ALS, there was significantly greater reduction of MUNE and CMAP amplitude recorded from plantar flexors when compared to dorsiflexors, suggesting preferential involvement of plantar flexor muscles, underpinning a 'split leg' appearance. The SLI correlated with clinical plantar flexor strength (R= -0.56, p < 0.001). In no patient did the SLI suggest preferential dorsiflexor involvement. In subgroup analyses, mean SLI was greatest in lower limb-onset ALS. In conclusion, the present study has established dissociated involvement of muscles acting around the ankle in ALS. We suggest this reflects underlying differences in cortical, descending or local spinal modulation of these muscles. PMID:25845764

  7. Cognitive Processes in Dissociation: Comment on Giesbrecht et al. (2008)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bremner, J. Douglas

    2010-01-01

    In their recent review "Cognitive Processes in Dissociation: An Analysis of Core Theoretical Assumptions," published in "Psychological Bulletin", Giesbrecht, Lynn, Lilienfeld, and Merckelbach (2008) have challenged the widely accepted trauma theory of dissociation, which holds that dissociative symptoms are caused by traumatic stress. In doing so,…

  8. Cognitive Processes in Dissociation: An Analysis of Core Theoretical Assumptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giesbrecht, Timo; Lilienfield, Scott O.; Lynn, Steven Jay; Merckelbach, Harald

    2008-01-01

    Dissociation is typically defined as the lack of normal integration of thoughts, feelings, and experiences into consciousness and memory. The present article critically evaluates the research literature on cognitive processes in dissociation. The authors' review indicates that dissociation is characterized by subtle deficits in neuropsychological…

  9. A Neuron-Based Screening Platform for Optimizing Genetically-Encoded Calcium Indicators

    PubMed Central

    Schreiter, Eric R.; Hasseman, Jeremy P.; Tsegaye, Getahun; Fosque, Benjamin F.; Behnam, Reza; Shields, Brenda C.; Ramirez, Melissa; Kimmel, Bruce E.; Kerr, Rex A.; Jayaraman, Vivek; Looger, Loren L.; Svoboda, Karel; Kim, Douglas S.

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescent protein-based sensors for detecting neuronal activity have been developed largely based on non-neuronal screening systems. However, the dynamics of neuronal state variables (e.g., voltage, calcium, etc.) are typically very rapid compared to those of non-excitable cells. We developed an electrical stimulation and fluorescence imaging platform based on dissociated rat primary neuronal cultures. We describe its use in testing genetically-encoded calcium indicators (GECIs). Efficient neuronal GECI expression was achieved using lentiviruses containing a neuronal-selective gene promoter. Action potentials (APs) and thus neuronal calcium levels were quantitatively controlled by electrical field stimulation, and fluorescence images were recorded. Images were segmented to extract fluorescence signals corresponding to individual GECI-expressing neurons, which improved sensitivity over full-field measurements. We demonstrate the superiority of screening GECIs in neurons compared with solution measurements. Neuronal screening was useful for efficient identification of variants with both improved response kinetics and high signal amplitudes. This platform can be used to screen many types of sensors with cellular resolution under realistic conditions where neuronal state variables are in relevant ranges with respect to timing and amplitude. PMID:24155972

  10. Single serotonergic neurons that modulate aggression in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Alekseyenko, Olga V; Chan, Yick-Bun; Fernandez, Maria de la Paz; Bülow, Torsten; Pankratz, Michael J; Kravitz, Edward A

    2014-11-17

    Monoamine serotonin (5HT) has been linked to aggression for many years across species. However, elaboration of the neurochemical pathways that govern aggression has proven difficult because monoaminergic neurons also regulate other behaviors. There are approximately 100 serotonergic neurons in the Drosophila nervous system, and they influence sleep, circadian rhythms, memory, and courtship. In the Drosophila model of aggression, the acute shut down of the entire serotonergic system yields flies that fight less, whereas induced activation of 5HT neurons promotes aggression. Using intersectional genetics, we restricted the population of 5HT neurons that can be reproducibly manipulated to identify those that modulate aggression. Although similar approaches were used recently to find aggression-modulating dopaminergic and Fru(M)-positive peptidergic neurons, the downstream anatomical targets of the neurons that make up aggression-controlling circuits remain poorly understood. Here, we identified a symmetrical pair of serotonergic PLP neurons that are necessary for the proper escalation of aggression. Silencing these neurons reduced aggression in male flies, and activating them increased aggression in male flies. GFP reconstitution across synaptic partners (GRASP) analyses suggest that 5HT-PLP neurons form contacts with 5HT1A receptor-expressing neurons in two distinct anatomical regions of the brain. Activation of these 5HT1A receptor-expressing neurons, in turn, caused reductions in aggression. Our studies, therefore, suggest that aggression may be held in check, at least in part, by inhibitory input from 5HT1A receptor-bearing neurons, which can be released by activation of the 5HT-PLP neurons.

  11. Mast cells drive mesenteric afferent signalling during acute intestinal ischaemia

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wen; Kirkup, Anthony J; Grundy, David

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Acute intestinal ischaemia stimulates visceral afferent nerves but the mechanisms responsible for this excitation are not fully understood. Mast cells may participate in this process as they are known to signal to mesenteric afferents during intestinal anaphylaxis and contribute to early inflammation and neuronal damage in response to cerebral ischaemia. We therefore hypothesised that mast cells are early responders to acute intestinal ischaemia and their activation initiates rapid signalling to the CNS via the excitation of mesenteric afferents. Primary afferent firing was recorded from a mesenteric nerve bundle supplying a segment of jejunum in anaesthetized adult rats. Acute focal ischaemia was produced by clamping the mesenteric vessels for 8 min, and reperfusion followed removal of the vessel clip. Two episodes of ischaemia–reperfusion (I–R) separated by a 30 min interval were performed. Drugs or their vehicles were administered 10 min before the 2nd I–R episode. Ischaemia caused a reproducible, intense and biphasic afferent firing that was temporally dissociated from the concomitantly triggered complex pattern of intestinal motor activity. The L-type calcium channel blocker, nifedipine, significantly attenuated this afferent firing by a mechanism independent of its action on intestinal tone. Ischaemia-induced afferent firing was also abrogated by the mast cell stabilizer, doxantrazole, and the H1 histamine receptor antagonist, pyrilamine. In contrast, the nicotinic receptor antagonist, hexamethonium, and the N-type calcium channel toxin, ω-conotoxin GVIA, each reduced the ischaemia-evoked motor inhibition but not the concurrent afferent discharge. Similarly, the cyclooxygenase inhibitor, naproxen, had no effect on the ischaemic afferent response but reduced the intestinal tone shortly from the onset of ischaemia to the early period of reperfusion. These data support a critical role for mast cell-derived histamine in the direct chemoexcitation

  12. Progranulin is expressed within motor neurons and promotes neuronal cell survival

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Progranulin is a secreted high molecular weight growth factor bearing seven and one half copies of the cysteine-rich granulin-epithelin motif. While inappropriate over-expression of the progranulin gene has been associated with many cancers, haploinsufficiency leads to atrophy of the frontotemporal lobes and development of a form of dementia (frontotemporal lobar degeneration with ubiquitin positive inclusions, FTLD-U) associated with the formation of ubiquitinated inclusions. Recent reports indicate that progranulin has neurotrophic effects, which, if confirmed would make progranulin the only neuroprotective growth factor that has been associated genetically with a neurological disease in humans. Preliminary studies indicated high progranulin gene expression in spinal cord motor neurons. However, it is uncertain what the role of Progranulin is in normal or diseased motor neuron function. We have investigated progranulin gene expression and subcellular localization in cultured mouse embryonic motor neurons and examined the effect of progranulin over-expression and knockdown in the NSC-34 immortalized motor neuron cell line upon proliferation and survival. Results In situ hybridisation and immunohistochemical techniques revealed that the progranulin gene is highly expressed by motor neurons within the mouse spinal cord and in primary cultures of dissociated mouse embryonic spinal cord-dorsal root ganglia. Confocal microscopy coupled to immunocytochemistry together with the use of a progranulin-green fluorescent protein fusion construct revealed progranulin to be located within compartments of the secretory pathway including the Golgi apparatus. Stable transfection of the human progranulin gene into the NSC-34 motor neuron cell line stimulates the appearance of dendritic structures and provides sufficient trophic stimulus to survive serum deprivation for long periods (up to two months). This is mediated at least in part through an anti-apoptotic mechanism

  13. Cannabinoids excite circadian clock neurons.

    PubMed

    Acuna-Goycolea, Claudio; Obrietan, Karl; van den Pol, Anthony N

    2010-07-28

    Cannabinoids, the primary active agent in drugs of abuse such as marijuana and hashish, tend to generate a distorted sense of time. Here we study the effect of cannabinoids on the brain's circadian clock, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), using patch clamp and cell-attached electrophysiological recordings, RT-PCR, immunocytochemistry, and behavioral analysis. The SCN showed strong expression of the cannabinoid receptor CB1R, as detected with RT-PCR. SCN neurons, including those using GABA as a transmitter, and axons within the SCN, expressed CB1R immunoreactivity. Behaviorally, cannabinoids did not alter the endogenous free-running circadian rhythm in the mouse brain, but did attenuate the ability of the circadian clock to entrain to light zeitgebers. In the absence of light, infusion of the CB1R antagonist AM251 caused a modest phase shift, suggesting endocannabinoid modulation of clock timing. Interestingly, cannabinoids had no effect on glutamate release from the retinohypothalamic projection, suggesting a direct action of cannabinoids on the retinohypothalamic tract was unlikely to explain the inhibition of the phase shift. Within the SCN, cannabinoids were excitatory by a mechanism based on presynaptic CB1R attenuation of axonal GABA release. These data raise the possibility that the time dissociation described by cannabinoid users may result in part from altered circadian clock function and/or entrainment to environmental time cues. PMID:20668190

  14. Neuron adhesion and strengthening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocha, Aracely; Jian, Kuihuan; Ko, Gladys; Liang, Hong

    2010-07-01

    Understanding the neuron/material adhesion is important for neuron stimulation and growth. The current challenges remain in the lack of precision of measuring techniques and understanding the behavior of neuron. Here, we report a fluid shear method to investigate adhesion at the neuron/poly-D-lysine interface. In this study, the adhesion of 12-day-old chick embryo-retina neurons cultured on poly-D-lysine coated glass coverslips was measured via parallel disk rotational flow. The shear stress experienced by the cells increases with the disk radius. There is a critical point along the radius (Rc) where the stress experienced by the neurons equals their adhesion. The measured Rc can be used to calculate the neuron adhesion. Our results demonstrate that neurons adhered to the poly-D-lysine had a strain hardening effect. The adhesive shear stress of the neuron-material increased with applied shear (τa). When the τa reached or exceeded the value of 40 dyn/cm2, the adhesion remained constant at approximately 30 dyn/cm2. The present work allowed us not only to quantify the adhesive strength and force but also to evaluate the value of strain hardening at the neuron/poly-D-lysine interface.

  15. Temporal characteristics of gustatory responses in rat parabrachial neurons vary by stimulus and chemosensitive neuron type.

    PubMed

    Geran, Laura; Travers, Susan

    2013-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that temporal features of spike trains can increase the amount of information available for gustatory processing. However, the nature of these temporal characteristics and their relationship to different taste qualities and neuron types are not well-defined. The present study analyzed the time course of taste responses from parabrachial (PBN) neurons elicited by multiple applications of "sweet" (sucrose), "salty" (NaCl), "sour" (citric acid), and "bitter" (quinine and cycloheximide) stimuli in an acute preparation. Time course varied significantly by taste stimulus and best-stimulus classification. Across neurons, the ensemble code for the three electrolytes was similar initially but quinine diverged from NaCl and acid during the second 500 ms of stimulation and all four qualities became distinct just after 1s. This temporal evolution was reflected in significantly broader tuning during the initial response. Metric space analyses of quality discrimination by individual neurons showed that increases in information (H) afforded by temporal factors was usually explained by differences in rate envelope, which had a greater impact during the initial 2s (22.5% increase in H) compared to the later response (9.5%). Moreover, timing had a differential impact according to cell type, with between-quality discrimination in neurons activated maximally by NaCl or citric acid most affected. Timing was also found to dramatically improve within-quality discrimination (80% increase in H) in neurons that responded optimally to bitter stimuli (B-best). Spikes from B-best neurons were also more likely to occur in bursts. These findings suggest that among PBN taste neurons, time-dependent increases in mutual information can arise from stimulus- and neuron-specific differences in response envelope during the initial dynamic period. A stable rate code predominates in later epochs.

  16. Transgenic Mouse Models Enabling Photolabeling of Individual Neurons In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Peter, Manuel; Bathellier, Brice; Fontinha, Bruno; Pliota, Pinelopi; Haubensak, Wulf; Rumpel, Simon

    2013-01-01

    One of the biggest tasks in neuroscience is to explain activity patterns of individual neurons during behavior by their cellular characteristics and their connectivity within the neuronal network. To greatly facilitate linking in vivo experiments with a more detailed molecular or physiological analysis in vitro, we have generated and characterized genetically modified mice expressing photoactivatable GFP (PA-GFP) that allow conditional photolabeling of individual neurons. Repeated photolabeling at the soma reveals basic morphological features due to diffusion of activated PA-GFP into the dendrites. Neurons photolabeled in vivo can be re-identified in acute brain slices and targeted for electrophysiological recordings. We demonstrate the advantages of PA-GFP expressing mice by the correlation of in vivo firing rates of individual neurons with their expression levels of the immediate early gene c-fos. Generally, the mouse models described in this study enable the combination of various analytical approaches to characterize living cells, also beyond the neurosciences. PMID:23626779

  17. Ketamine protects hippocampal neurons from anoxia in vitro.

    PubMed

    Rothman, S M; Thurston, J H; Hauhart, R E; Clark, G D; Solomon, J S

    1987-06-01

    Ketamine, a dissociative, general anesthetic, blocks the excitation produced by activating one class of excitatory amino acid receptors, the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor in the rat. We have found that ketamine can protect hippocampal neurons in culture and slice from anoxia. When added to cultures immediately prior to anoxic exposure, ketamine prevented the neuronal destruction seen after a day of anoxia. Neurons appeared undamaged and had normal resting and action potentials. Adenosine triphosphate levels in ketamine-protected anoxic cultures were approximately two-thirds of normal controls. Ketamine also prevented the irreversible loss of the population spike seen in hippocampal slices after prolonged perfusion with anoxic buffer. These results suggest that ketamine may have therapeutic potential in preventing anoxic damage from stroke in man. PMID:2819768

  18. Decoding Neuronal Ensembles in the Human Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Hassabis, Demis; Chu, Carlton; Rees, Geraint; Weiskopf, Nikolaus; Molyneux, Peter D.; Maguire, Eleanor A.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Background The hippocampus underpins our ability to navigate, to form and recollect memories, and to imagine future experiences. How activity across millions of hippocampal neurons supports these functions is a fundamental question in neuroscience, wherein the size, sparseness, and organization of the hippocampal neural code are debated. Results Here, by using multivariate pattern classification and high spatial resolution functional MRI, we decoded activity across the population of neurons in the human medial temporal lobe while participants navigated in a virtual reality environment. Remarkably, we could accurately predict the position of an individual within this environment solely from the pattern of activity in his hippocampus even when visual input and task were held constant. Moreover, we observed a dissociation between responses in the hippocampus and parahippocampal gyrus, suggesting that they play differing roles in navigation. Conclusions These results show that highly abstracted representations of space are expressed in the human hippocampus. Furthermore, our findings have implications for understanding the hippocampal population code and suggest that, contrary to current consensus, neuronal ensembles representing place memories must be large and have an anisotropic structure. PMID:19285400

  19. Population coding in mouse visual cortex: response reliability and dissociability of stimulus tuning and noise correlation.

    PubMed

    Montijn, Jorrit S; Vinck, Martin; Pennartz, Cyriel M A

    2014-01-01

    The primary visual cortex is an excellent model system for investigating how neuronal populations encode information, because of well-documented relationships between stimulus characteristics and neuronal activation patterns. We used two-photon calcium imaging data to relate the performance of different methods for studying population coding (population vectors, template matching, and Bayesian decoding algorithms) to their underlying assumptions. We show that the variability of neuronal responses may hamper the decoding of population activity, and that a normalization to correct for this variability may be of critical importance for correct decoding of population activity. Second, by comparing noise correlations and stimulus tuning we find that these properties have dissociated anatomical correlates, even though noise correlations have been previously hypothesized to reflect common synaptic input. We hypothesize that noise correlations arise from large non-specific increases in spiking activity acting on many weak synapses simultaneously, while neuronal stimulus response properties are dependent on more reliable connections. Finally, this paper provides practical guidelines for further research on population coding and shows that population coding cannot be approximated by a simple summation of inputs, but is heavily influenced by factors such as input reliability and noise correlation structure.

  20. Population coding in mouse visual cortex: response reliability and dissociability of stimulus tuning and noise correlation

    PubMed Central

    Montijn, Jorrit S.; Vinck, Martin; Pennartz, Cyriel M. A.

    2014-01-01

    The primary visual cortex is an excellent model system for investigating how neuronal populations encode information, because of well-documented relationships between stimulus characteristics and neuronal activation patterns. We used two-photon calcium imaging data to relate the performance of different methods for studying population coding (population vectors, template matching, and Bayesian decoding algorithms) to their underlying assumptions. We show that the variability of neuronal responses may hamper the decoding of population activity, and that a normalization to correct for this variability may be of critical importance for correct decoding of population activity. Second, by comparing noise correlations and stimulus tuning we find that these properties have dissociated anatomical correlates, even though noise correlations have been previously hypothesized to reflect common synaptic input. We hypothesize that noise correlations arise from large non-specific increases in spiking activity acting on many weak synapses simultaneously, while neuronal stimulus response properties are dependent on more reliable connections. Finally, this paper provides practical guidelines for further research on population coding and shows that population coding cannot be approximated by a simple summation of inputs, but is heavily influenced by factors such as input reliability and noise correlation structure. PMID:24917812

  1. The dissociation energy of N2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Almloef, Jan; Deleeuw, Bradley J.; Taylor, Peter R.; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Siegbahn, Per

    1989-01-01

    The requirements for very accurate ab initio quantum chemical prediction of dissociation energies are examined using a detailed investigation of the nitrogen molecule. Although agreement with experiment to within 1 kcal/mol is not achieved even with the most elaborate multireference CI (configuration interaction) wave functions and largest basis sets currently feasible, it is possible to obtain agreement to within about 2 kcal/mol, or 1 percent of the dissociation energy. At this level it is necessary to account for core-valence correlation effects and to include up to h-type functions in the basis. The effect of i-type functions, the use of different reference configuration spaces, and basis set superposition error were also investigated. After discussing these results, the remaining sources of error in our best calculations are examined.

  2. The charmonium dissociation in an ''anomalous wind''

    DOE PAGES

    Sadofyev, Andrey V.; Yin, Yi

    2016-01-11

    We study the charmonium dissociation in a strongly coupled chiral plasma in the presence of magnetic field and axial charge imbalance. This type of plasma carries "anomalous flow" induced by the chiral anomaly and exhibits novel transport phenomena such as chiral magnetic effect. We found that the "anomalous flow" would modify the charmonium color screening length by using the gauge/gravity correspondence. We derive an analytical expression quantifying the "anomalous flow" experienced by a charmonium for a large class of chiral plasma with a gravity dual. We elaborate on the similarity and it qualitative difference between anomalous effects on the charmoniummore » color screening length which are model-dependent and those on the heavy quark drag force which are fixed by the second law of thermodynamics. As a result, we speculate on the possible charmonium dissociation induced by the chiral anomaly in heavy ion collisions.« less

  3. Theoretical dissociation energies for ionic molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langhoff, S. R.; Bauschlicher, C. W., Jr.; Partridge, H.

    1986-01-01

    Ab initio calculations at the self-consistent-field and singles plus doubles configuration-interaction level are used to determine accurate spectroscopic parameters for most of the alkali and alkaline-earth fluorides, chlorides, oxides, sulfides, hydroxides, and isocyanides. Numerical Hartree-Fock (NHF) calculations are performed on selected systems to ensure that the extended Slater basis sets employed for the diatomic systems are near the Hartree-Fock limit. Extended Gaussian basis sets of at least triple-zeta plus double polarization equality are employed for the triatomic system. With this model, correlation effects are relatively small, but invariably increase the theoretical dissociation energies. The importance of correlating the electrons on both the anion and the metal is discussed. The theoretical dissociation energies are critically compared with the literature to rule out disparate experimental values. Theoretical (sup 2)Pi - (sup 2)Sigma (sup +) energy separations are presented for the alkali oxides and sulfides.

  4. Fluid hydrogen at high density - Pressure dissociation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saumon, Didier; Chabrier, Gilles

    1991-01-01

    A model for the Helmholtz free energy of fluid hydrogen at high density and high temperature is developed. This model aims at describing both pressure and temperature dissociation and ionization and bears directly on equations of state of partially ionized plasmas, as encountered in astrophysical situations and high-pressure experiments. This paper focuses on a mixture of hydrogen atoms and molecules and is devoted to the study of the phenomenon of pressure dissociation at finite temperatures. In the present model, the strong interactions are described with realistic potentials and are computed with a modified Weeks-Chandler-Andersen fluid perturbation theory that reproduces Monte Carlo simulations to better than 3 percent. Theoretical Hugoniot curves derived from the model are in excellent agreement with experimental data.

  5. Grammatical category dissociation in multilingual aphasia.

    PubMed

    Faroqi-Shah, Yasmeen; Waked, Arifi N

    2010-03-01

    Word retrieval deficits for specific grammatical categories, such as verbs versus nouns, occur as a consequence of brain damage. Such deficits are informative about the nature of lexical organization in the human brain. This study examined retrieval of grammatical categories across three languages in a trilingual person with aphasia who spoke Arabic, French, and English. In order to delineate the nature of word production difficulty, comprehension was tested, and a variety of concomitant lexical-semantic variables were analysed. The patient demonstrated a consistent noun-verb dissociation in picture naming and narrative speech, with severely impaired production of verbs across all three languages. The cross-linguistically similar noun-verb dissociation, coupled with little evidence of semantic impairment, suggests that (a) the patient has a true "nonsemantic" grammatical category specific deficit, and (b) lexical organization in multilingual speakers shares grammatical class information between languages. The findings of this study contribute to our understanding of the architecture of lexical organization in bilinguals.

  6. Dynamics of Dissociative Electron Attachment to Methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rescigno, T. N.; Douguet, N.; Fonseca, S.; Orel, A. E.; Slaughter, D. S.; Belkacem, A.

    2015-05-01

    We present the results of a theoretical ad experimental study of dissociative electron attachment (DEA) to CH4. The total DEA cross section is dominated by a single broad peak centered near 10 eV, leading predominantly to H-/CH4 and CH2-/CH4dissociation channels. We will present evidence that both of these ion channels result from excitation of a triply degenerate Feshbach resonance (doubly excited negative ion state) of 2T2 symmetry whose parent is the lowest excited triplet state of the neutral molecule. We will present calculated angular distributions based on analysis of the entrance amplitudes obtained from the results of complex Kohn scattering calculations along with experimentally measured angular distributions obtained using the COLTRIMS method. Work performed under the auspices of the US DOE by the LBNL and supported by the U.S. DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences.

  7. Vibrational relaxation and dissociation in nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varghese, Philip L.; Gonzales, David A.

    1991-01-01

    Calculations of the vibrational and dissociation transition probabilities are made for N2-N2 and N2-N collisions by means of a semiclassical N-state approximation. The flaws in previous techniques are reviewed, with special attention given to the prediction of overtones. The method presented ignores the effects of molecular rotation and employs a revised extended Rydberg intermolecular potential to describe diatom-diatom and diatom-atom collisions. The collision velocities investigated exhibit probabilities of less than unity by means of the N-state method. The continuum is quantized to treat dissociation, and the collision results demonstrate probability enhancements for V-V-T transitions in both bound-bound and bound-free transitions. The technique is of particular interest for the theoretical modeling of reentry flows such as those encountered in aerobraking maneuvers.

  8. SCL-90 symptom patterns: indicators of dissociative disorders.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, Marlene; Barry, Declan T; Sholomskas, Diane; Hall, Pamela

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the SCL-90 profiles of adult outpatients with and without dissociative disorders. A total of 194 participants were administered the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Dissociative Disorders-Revised (SCID-D-R) and the Symptom Checklist-90 (SCL-90). Patients with dissociative identity disorder (DID) reported significantly higher SCL-90 Global Severity Index (GSI) and individual subscale scores than those without dissociative disorders. It is recommended that patients who are polysymptomatic on the SCL-90 be considered for follow-up dissociative symptom assessment to aid differential diagnosis and to inform subsequent treatment.

  9. Psychogenic or dissociative fugue: a clinical investigation of five cases.

    PubMed

    Coons, P M

    1999-06-01

    Dissociative fugue (formerly psychogenic fugue) is a rare and little understood dissociative disorder. Following a review of the pertinent literature, five cases of dissociative fugue are described. These cases were systematically studied with a comprehensive history, mental status examination, physical and neurological evaluation, review of previous medical and psychiatric records, and psychological testing including MMPI, WAIS-R, electroencephalogram, and Dissociative Experiences Scale. An unexpected finding was that, in some cases, associated criminal activity may allow the person with dissociative fugue to continue to function in spite of their loss of memory and original identity.

  10. Coulomb dissociation of {sup 27} P

    SciTech Connect

    Beceiro, S.; Cortina-Gil, D.; Suemmerer, K.

    2010-04-26

    The {sup 26}Al nucleus has a shorter life-time than the Universe showing that the nucleosynthesis of this element might be an ongoing process in stars. The reaction {sup 26}Si(p,gamma){sup 27} P competes with the production of {sup 26}Al. Coulomb dissociation of {sup 27} P is an indirect method to measure that reaction. An experiment was performed at GSI with a {sup 36}Ar primary beam at 500 MeV to measure this reaction.

  11. The Bond Dissociation Energies of 1-Butene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The bond dissociation energies of 1-butene and several calibration systems are computed using the G2(MP2) approach. The agreement between the calibration systems and experiment is very good. The computed values for 1-butene are compared with calibration systems and the agreement between the computed results for 1-butene and the "rule of thumb" values from the smaller systems is remarkably good.

  12. Bcl-2 accelerates the neuronal differentiation: new evidence approaching to the biofunction of bcl-2 in the neuronal system.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, A; Tsutomi, Y

    1998-08-10

    The proto-oncogene product Bcl-2 is unique in that it inhibits apoptosis rather than promoting cell proliferation. In the present study, we encountered a new possible role of Bcl-2 in the neuronal differentiation. Rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells have been known as the model of neuronal differentiation by the stimulation of NGF. Bcl-2 transfected PC12 (MB2) cells showed the accelerated neuronal differentiation, as compared with control PC12 (V4) cells. In addition, chemotherapeutic agents Taxol which has been known as neurotoxic compound, induced the acute neuronal cell atrophy and suppressed neuronal differentiation. This neuronal cell atrophy and suppression of neuronal differentiation were not due to apoptotic cell death. Interestingly, Bcl-2 rescued PC12 cells from both neuronal cell atrophy and suppression of neuronal differentiation. Taxol suppressed polymerization between neurofilament light and heavy (NF-L and NF-H), and MB2 cell extract rescued it. We, therefore, suggest the acceleration of polymerization between NF-L and NF-H as the new possible role of Bcl-2.

  13. Motor Neurons that Multitask

    PubMed Central

    Goulding, Martyn

    2013-01-01

    Animals use a form of sensory feedback termed proprioception to monitor their body position and modify the motor programs that control movement. In this issue of Neuron, Wen et al. (2012) provide evidence that a subset of motor neurons function as proprioceptors in C. elegans, where B-type motor neurons sense body curvature to control the bending movements that drive forward locomotion. PMID:23177952

  14. Mesmerising mirror neurons.

    PubMed

    Heyes, Cecilia

    2010-06-01

    Mirror neurons have been hailed as the key to understanding social cognition. I argue that three currents of thought-relating to evolution, atomism and telepathy-have magnified the perceived importance of mirror neurons. When they are understood to be a product of associative learning, rather than an adaptation for social cognition, mirror neurons are no longer mesmerising, but they continue to raise important questions about both the psychology of science and the neural bases of social cognition.

  15. Regional dissociated heterochrony in multivariate analysis.

    PubMed

    Mitteroecker, P; Gunz, P; Weber, G W; Bookstein, F L

    2004-12-01

    Heterochrony, the classic framework to study ontogeny and phylogeny, in essence relies on a univariate concept of shape. Though principal component plots of multivariate shape data seem to resemble classical bivariate allometric plots, the language of heterochrony cannot be translated directly into general multivariate methodology. We simulate idealized multivariate ontogenetic trajectories and demonstrate their behavior in principal component plots in shape space and in size-shape space. The concept of "dissociation", which is conventionally regarded as a change in the relationship between shape change and size change, appears to be algebraically the same as regional dissociation - the variation of apparent heterochrony by region. Only if the trajectories of two related species lie along exactly the same path in shape space can the classic terminology of heterochrony apply so that pure dissociation of size change against shape change can be detected. We demonstrate a geometric morphometric approach to these issues using adult and subadult crania of 48 Pan paniscus and 47 P. troglodytes. On each specimen we digitized 47 landmarks and 144 semilandmarks on ridge curves and the external neurocranial surface. The relation between these two species' growth trajectories is too complex for a simple summary in terms of global heterochrony.

  16. Dynamics of unimolecular dissociation of silylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    NoorBatcha, I.; Raff, Lionel M.; Thompson, Donald L.; Viswanathan, R.

    1986-04-01

    The semiempirical valence-bond surface formulated by Viswanathan et al. [J. Phys. Chem. 89, 1428 (1985)] for the unimolecular dissociation of SiH2 has been fitted to an analytical function of the type suggested by Murrell and co-workers [J. Phys. Chem. 88, 4887 (1984)]. The fitted surface accurately represents most of the experimental and CI results. The dynamics of the unimolecular dissociation of SiH2 to form Si and H2 have been investigated by classical trajectory methods on this fitted surface. The effect of describing the initial state of the molecule using normal and local mode approximations has been studied. In spite of the presence of the heavier atom, no bond or mode specificity is observed. The product energy distribution is found to be statistical. Using the RRK model, the high-pressure limiting rate coefficient is found to be k(T,∞)=3.38×1012 exp[-61.6 kcal mol-1/RT] s-1, which is less than the dissociation rate for SiH4. This has been attributed to the higher activation energy for SiH2 and to a statistical factor.

  17. Mechanistic studies of multipole storage assisted dissociation.

    PubMed

    Håkansson, K; Axelsson, J; Palmblad, M; Håkansson, P

    2000-03-01

    The degree and onset of fragmentation in multipole storage assisted dissociation (MSAD) have been investigated as functions of several hexapole parameters. Strict studies of hexapole charge density (number of ions injected) and hexapole storage time were made possible by placing a pulsed shutter in front of the entrance to the mass spectrometer. The results obtained show that the charge density is the most critical parameter, but also dependencies on storage time, radio-frequency (rf) -amplitude, and pressure are seen. From these data, and from simulations of the ion trajectories inside the hexapole, a mechanism for MSAD, similar to the ones for sustained off-resonance irradiation (SORI), and for low energy collisionally induced dissociation in the collision multipole of a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer, is proposed. It is believed that, at higher charge densities, ions are pushed to larger hexapole radii where the electric potential created by the rf field is higher, forcing the ions to oscillate radially to higher amplitudes and thereby reach higher (but still relatively low) kinetic energies. Multiple collisions with residual gas molecules at these elevated energies then heat up the molecules to their dissociation threshold. Further support for this mechanism is obtained from a comparison of MSAD and SORI spectra which are almost identical in appearance.

  18. Gas Hydrate Dissociation in the Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conroy, Devin; Smith, Stefan Llewellyn

    2006-11-01

    Methane gas is known to exist in extremely large quantities below the sea floor in the sediment of the deep and cold oceanic and in permafrost regions. Due to the large hydrostatic pressure and cool temperatures the gas reacts with the surrounding water to form a crystalline substance known as a gas hydrate. The fate of these reserves is very important to climate on earth because methane is a much more efficient greenhouse gas then carbon dioxide. The dissociation process in general can occur by either a decrease in pressure or an increase in temperature. In this study we concentrate on the latter. Once the hydrate dissociates, water and free gas remain above the phase boundary, occupying a larger volume than the original solid, and are be transported through the sediment. We have modeled this physical mechanism using volume averaged equations in a porous medium with a coupled two-phase flow. The movement of the phase boundary, which is proportional to the rate of heat transfer to this interface, is modeled as a Stefan type melting problem. The resultant governing equations are solved numerically, using a front fixing method to fix the phase boundary, to determine the rate of gas flux through the sediment and the dissociation rate.

  19. Dissociative recombination of N2H+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Santos, S. Fonseca; Ngassam, V.; Orel, A. E.; Larson, Å.

    2016-08-01

    The direct and indirect mechanisms of dissociative recombination of N2H+ are theoretically studied. At low energies, the electron capture is found to be driven by recombination into bound Rydberg states, while at collision energies above 0.1 eV, the direct capture and dissociation along electronic resonant states becomes important. Electron-scattering calculations using the complex Kohn variational method are performed to obtain the scattering matrix as well as energy positions and autoionization widths of resonant states. Potential-energy surfaces of electronic bound states of N2H and N2H+ are computed using structure calculations with the multireference configuration interaction method. The cross section for the indirect mechanism is calculated using a vibrational frame transformation of the elements of the scattering matrix at energies just above the ionization threshold. Here vibrational excitations of the ionic core from v =0 to v =1 and v =2 for all three normal modes are considered and autoionization is neglected. The cross section for the direct dissociation along electronic resonant states is computed with wave-packet calculations using the multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree method, where all three internal degrees of freedom are considered. The calculated cross sections are compared to measurements.

  20. Memory repression: brain mechanisms underlying dissociative amnesia.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Hirokazu; Fujii, Toshikatsu; Abe, Nobuhito; Suzuki, Maki; Takagi, Masahito; Mugikura, Shunji; Takahashi, Shoki; Mori, Etsuro

    2010-03-01

    Dissociative amnesia usually follows a stressful event and cannot be attributable to explicit brain damage. It is thought to reflect a reversible deficit in memory retrieval probably due to memory repression. However, the neural mechanisms underlying this condition are not clear. We used fMRI to investigate neural activity associated with memory retrieval in two patients with dissociative amnesia. For each patient, three categories of face photographs and three categories of people's names corresponding to the photographs were prepared: those of "recognizable" high school friends who were acquainted with and recognizable to the patients, those of "unrecognizable" colleagues who were actually acquainted with but unrecognizable to the patients due to their memory impairments, and "control" distracters who were unacquainted with the patients. During fMRI, the patients were visually presented with these stimuli and asked to indicate whether they were personally acquainted with them. In the comparison of the unrecognizable condition with the recognizable condition, we found increased activity in the pFC and decreased activity in the hippocampus in both patients. After treatment for retrograde amnesia, the altered pattern of brain activation disappeared in one patient whose retrograde memories were recovered, whereas it remained unchanged in the other patient whose retrograde memories were not recovered. Our findings provide direct evidence that memory repression in dissociative amnesia is associated with an altered pattern of neural activity, and they suggest the possibility that the pFC has an important role in inhibiting the activity of the hippocampus in memory repression.

  1. Prevalence of dissociative disorders among women in the general population.

    PubMed

    Sar, Vedat; Akyüz, Gamze; Doğan, Orhan

    2007-01-15

    This study sought to determine the prevalence of dissociative disorders among women in the general population, as assessed in a representative sample of a city in central Turkey. The Dissociative Disorders Interview Schedule (DDIS), the Borderline Personality Disorder section of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-III-R Personality Disorders (SCID-II), and the PTSD-Module of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-III-R (SCID) were administered to 628 women in 500 homes. The mean age of participants was 34.8 (S.D.=11.5, range: 18-65); 18.3% of participants (n=115) had a lifetime diagnosis of a dissociative disorder. Dissociative disorder not otherwise specified (DDNOS) was the most prevalent diagnosis (8.3%); 1.1% of the population was diagnosed as having dissociative identity disorder (DID). Participants with a dissociative disorder had borderline personality disorder, somatization disorder, major depression, PTSD, and history of suicide attempt more frequently than did participants without a dissociative disorder. Childhood sexual abuse, physical neglect, and emotional abuse were significant predictors of a dissociative disorder diagnosis. Only 28.7% of the dissociative participants had received psychiatric treatment previously. Because dissociative disorders are trauma-related, significant part of the adult clinical consequences of childhood trauma remains obscure in the minds of mental health professionals and of the overall community. Revisions in diagnostic criteria of dissociative disorders in the DSM-IV are recommended.

  2. Dissociative disorders among Chinese inpatients diagnosed with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Yu, Junhan; Ross, Colin A; Keyes, Benjamin B; Li, Ying; Dai, Yunfei; Zhang, Tianhong; Wang, Lanlan; Fan, Qing; Xiao, Zeping

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of dissociative disorders in a sample of Chinese psychiatric inpatients. Participants in the study were 569 consecutively admitted inpatients at Shanghai Mental Health Center, China, of whom 84.9% had a clinical diagnosis of schizophrenia based on the Chinese Classification and Diagnostic Criteria of Mental Disorders, Version 3. All participants completed a self-report measure of dissociation (the Dissociative Experiences Scale), and none had a prior diagnosis of a dissociative disorder. A total of 96 randomly selected participants were interviewed with a structured interview (the Dissociative Disorders Interview Schedule) and a clinical interview. These 96 patients did not differ significantly from the 473 patients who were not interviewed on any demographic measures or who did not complete the self-report dissociation measure. A total of 28 patients (15.3%, after weighting of the data) received a clinical diagnosis of a dissociative disorder based on Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed., text rev.) criteria. Dissociative identity disorder was diagnosed in 2 patients (0.53%, after weighting). Compared to the patients without a dissociative disorder, patients with dissociative disorders were significantly more likely to report childhood abuse (57.1% vs. 22.1%), but the 2 groups did not differ significantly on any demographic measures. Dissociative disorders were readily identified in an inpatient psychiatric population in China.

  3. Vasoactive intestinal peptide and electrical activity influence neuronal survival

    SciTech Connect

    Brenneman, D.E.; Eiden, L.E.

    1986-02-01

    Blockage of electrical activity in dissociated spinal cord cultures results in a significant loss of neurons during a critical period in development. Decreases in neuronal cell numbers and SVI-labeled tetanus toxin fixation produced by electrical blockage with tetrodotoxin (TTX) were prevented by addition of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) to the nutrient medium. The most effective concentration of VIP was 0.1 nM. At higher concentrations, the survival-enhancing effect of VIP on TTX-treated cultures was attenuated. Addition of the peptide alone had no significant effect on neuronal cell counts or tetanus toxin fixation. With the same experimental conditions, two closely related peptides, PHI-27 (peptide, histidyl-isoleucine amide) and secretin, were found not to increase the number of neurons in TTX-treated cultures. Interference with VIP action by VIP antiserum resulted in neuronal losses that were not significantly different from those observed after TTX treatment. These data indicate that under conditions of electrical blockade a neurotrophic action of VIP on neuronal survival can be demonstrated.

  4. Cognitive Processes in Dissociation: Comment on Giesbrecht et al. (2008)

    PubMed Central

    Bremner, J. Douglas

    2010-01-01

    In “Cognitive Processes in Dissociation: An Analysis of Core Theoretical Assumptions,” published in Psychological Bulletin, Giesbrecht, Lynn, Lilienfeld, and Merckelbach (2008) have challenged the widely accepted trauma theory of dissociation, which holds that dissociative symptoms are caused by traumatic stress. In doing so the authors outline a series of links between various constructs, such as fantasy proneness, cognitive failures, absorption, suggestibility, altered information-processing, dissociation, and amnesia, claiming that these linkages lead to the false conclusion that trauma causes dissociation. A review of the literature, however, shows that these are not necessarily related constructs. Careful examination of their arguments reveals no basis for the conclusion that there is no association between trauma and dissociation. The current comment offers a critical review and rebuttal of the argument of Giesbrecht et al. that there is no relationship between trauma and dissociation. PMID:20063920

  5. The dissociation constant of water at extreme conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Vazquez, Otto; Giacomazzi, Luigi; Pinilla, C.; Scandolo, Sandro

    2013-06-01

    Only one out of 107 water molecules is dissociated in liquid water at ambient conditions, but the concentration of dissociated molecules increases with pressure ad temperature, and water eventually reaches a fully dissociated state when pressure exceeds 50-100 GPa and temperature reaches a few thousand Kelvin. The behavior of the dissociation constant of water (pKa) at conditions intermediate between ambient and the fully dissociated state is poorly known. Yet, the water pKa is a parameter of primary importance in the aqueous geochemistry as it controls the solubility of ions in geological fluids. We present results of molecular dynamics calculations of the pKa water at extreme conditions. Free-energy differences between the undissociated and the dissociated state are calculated by thermodynamic integration along the dissociation path. The calculations are based on a recently developed all-atom polarizable force-field for water, parametrized on density-functional theory calculations.

  6. Childhood sexual abuse, dissociation, and adult self-destructive behavior.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Srednicki, O

    2001-01-01

    Female college students reporting a history of childhood sexual abuse (N=175) and not reporting a history of childhood sexual abuse (N=260) were compared on indices of six self-destructive behaviors, including drug use, alcohol abuse, binge eating, self-mutilation, risky sex, and suicidality. The samples were also compared on two measures of dissociation, the Trauma Symptom Checklist dissociation subscale and the Dissociative Experiences Scale. The CSA group had significantly higher mean scores on all the indices of self-destructive behavior except self-mutilation (where the mean difference approached significance), and on both measures of dissociation. One or both dissociation measures were related significantly to each index of self-destructive behavior except binge eating. Multiple regression mediation analyses provided support for the hypothesis that dissociation mediates the relationships between CSA and both drug use and alcohol abuse. Dissociation also explained significant variability when added to the regressions of risky sex and suicidality on CSA.

  7. Malingering dissociative identity disorder: objective and projective assessment.

    PubMed

    Labott, Susan M; Wallach, Heather R

    2002-04-01

    Verification of dissociative identity disorder presents challenges given the complex nature of the illness. This study addressed the concern that this disorder can be successfully malingered on objective and projective psychological tests. 50 undergraduate women were assigned to a Malingering or a Control condition, then completed the Rorschach Inkblot Test and the Dissociative Experiences Scale II. The Malingering group were asked to simulate dissociative identity disorder; controls received instructions to answer all materials honestly. Analysis indicated that malingerers were significantly more likely to endorse dissociative experiences on the Dissociative Experiences Scale II in the range common to patients with diagnosed dissociative identity disorder. However, on the Rorschach there were no significant differences between the two groups. Results suggest that the assessment of dissociative identity disorder requires a multifaceted approach with both objective and projective assessment tools. Research is needed to assess these issues in clinical populations.

  8. The older female patient with a complex chronic dissociative disorder.

    PubMed

    Kluft, Richard P

    2007-01-01

    Dissociative disorders are rarely considered in the diagnostic assessment of older women, despite the fact that the existence, appearance and characteristics of certain dissociative disorders in older populations has been known and described since the 1980s. This communication reviews the core phenomena of Dissociative Identity Disorder and related forms of Dissociative Disorder Not Otherwise Specified, the natural history of their phenomena from youth to old age, and describes common presentations of Dissociative Disorders in older women. It also reviews the treatment of complex chronic dissociative disorders and discusses alternative approaches to their psychotherapy in the older female patient. It is crucial to recognize and respect the importance of appreciating individual differences among older dissociative patients and to individualize their treatments accordingly.

  9. Different types of "dissociation" have different psychological mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Brown, Richard J

    2006-01-01

    The term "dissociation" has been used to describe a wide range of psychological and psychiatric phenomena. The popular conception of dissociation describes it as a unitary phenomenon, with only quantitative differences in severity between the various dissociative conditions. More recently, it has been argued that the available evidence is more consistent with a model that identifies at least two distinct categories of dissociative phenomena-"detachment" and "compartmentalization"- that have different definitions, mechanisms and treatment implications (Holmes, Brown, Mansell, Fearon, Hunter, Frasquilho & Oakley 2005). This paper presents evidence for this bipartite model of dissociation, followed by definitions and descriptions of detachment and compartmentalization. Possible psychological mechanisms underlying these phenomena are then discussed, with particular emphasis on the nature of compartmentalization in conversion disorder, hypnosis, dissociative amnesia and dissociative identity disorder.

  10. [Questionnaire on dissociative symptoms. German adaptation, reliability and validity of the American Dissociative Experience Scale (DES)].

    PubMed

    Freyberger, H J; Spitzer, C; Stieglitz, R D; Kuhn, G; Magdeburg, N; Bernstein-Carlson, E

    1998-06-01

    The "Fragebogen zu dissoziativen Symptomen (FDS)" represents the authorised German translation and adaptation of the "Dissociative Experience Scale" (DES; Bernstein and Putnam 1986). The original scale comprises 28 items covering dissociative experiences with regard to memory, identity, awareness and cognition according to DSM-III-R and DSM-IV. For the German version, 16 items were added to cover dissociative phenomena according to ICD-10, mainly pseudoneurological conversion symptoms. Reliability and validity of the German version were studied in a total sample of 813 persons and were compared to the results of the original version. Test-retest reliability of the FDS was rtt = 0.88 and Cronbach's consistency coefficient was alpha = 0.93, which is comparable to the results of the DES. The instrument differentiates between different samples (healthy control subjects, students, unselected neurological and psychiatric inpatients, neurological and psychiatric patients with a dissociative disorder and schizophrenics). The FDS is an easily applicable, reliable and valid measure to quantify dissociative experiences.

  11. Egr2-neurons control the adult respiratory response to hypercapnia

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Russell S.; Corcoran, Andrea E.; Brust, Rachael D.; Soriano, Laura P.; Nattie, Eugene E.; Dymecki, Susan M.

    2013-01-01

    ‘The early growth response 2 transcription factor, Egr2, establishes a population of brainstem neurons essential for normal breathing at birth. Egr2-null mice die perinatally of respiratory insufficiency characterized by subnormal respiratory rate and severe apneas. Here we bypass this lethality using a noninvasive pharmacogenetic approach to inducibly perturb neuron activity postnatally, and ask if Egr2-neurons control respiration in adult mice. We found that the normal ventilatory increase in response to elevated tissue CO2 was impaired, blunted by 63.1±8.7% after neuron perturbation due to deficits in both respiratory amplitude and frequency. By contrast, room-air breathing was unaffected, suggesting that the drive for baseline breathing may not require those Egr2-neurons manipulated here. Of the multiple brainstem sites proposed to affect ventilation in response to hypercapnia, only the retrotrapezoid nucleus, a portion of the serotonergic raphé, and a portion of the A5 nucleus have a history of Egr2 expression. We recently showed that acute inhibition of serotonergic neurons en masse blunts the CO2 chemoreflex in adults, causing a difference in hypercapnic response of ~50% after neuron perturbation through effects on respiratory amplitude only. The suppressed respiratory frequency upon perturbation of Egr2-neurons thus may stem from non-serotonergic neurons within the Egr2 domain. Perturbation of Egr2-neurons did not affect body temperature, even on exposure to ambient 4 °C. These findings support a model in which Egr2-neurons are a critical component of the respiratory chemoreflex into adulthood. Methodologically, these results highlight how pharmacogenetic approaches allow neuron function to be queried in unanesthetized adult animals, reaching beyond the roadblocks of developmental lethality and compensation as well as the anatomical disturbances associated with invasive methods. PMID:23261662

  12. Mechanisms of permanent loss of olfactory receptor neurons induced by the herbicide 2,6-dichlorobenzonitrile: Effects on stem cells and noninvolvement of acute induction of the inflammatory cytokine IL-6

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Fang; Fang, Cheng; Schnittke, Nikolai; Schwob, James E.; Ding, Xinxin

    2013-11-01

    We explored the mechanisms underlying the differential effects of two olfactory toxicants, the herbicide 2,6-dichlorobenzonitrile (DCBN) and the anti-thyroid drug methimazole (MMZ), on olfactory receptor neuron (ORN) regeneration in mouse olfactory epithelium (OE). DCBN, but not MMZ, induced inflammation-like pathological changes in OE, and DCBN increased interleukin IL-6 levels in nasal-wash fluid to much greater magnitude and duration than did MMZ. At 24 h after DCBN injection, the population of horizontal basal cells (HBCs; reserve, normally quiescent OE stem cells) lining the DMM became severely depleted as some of them detached from the basal lamina, and sloughed into the nasal cavity along with the globose basal cells (GBCs; heterogeneous population of stem and progenitor cells), neurons, and sustentacular cells of the neuroepithelium. In contrast, the layer of HBCs remained intact in MMZ-treated mice, as only the mature elements of the neuroepithelium were shed. Despite the respiratory metaplasia accompanying the greater severity of the DCBN lesion, residual HBCs that survived intoxication were activated by the injury and contributed to the metaplastic respiratory epithelium, as shown by tracing their descendants in a K5CreEr{sup T2}::fl(stop)TdTomato strain of mice in which recombination causes HBCs to express TdTomato in advance of the lesion. But, contrary to published observations with MMZ, the HBCs failed to form ORNs. A role for IL-6 in suppressing ORN regeneration in DCBN-treated mice was rejected by the failure of the anti-inflammatory drug dexamethasone to prevent the subsequent respiratory metaplasia in the DMM, suggesting that other factors lead to HBC neuro-incompetence. - Highlights: • The herbicide dichlobenil (DCBN) can damage olfactory epithelium stem cells. • Another olfactory toxicant, methimazole, leaves the olfactory stem cells intact. • DCBN, but not methimazole, induces a prolonged increase in nasal IL-6 levels. • Dexamethasone

  13. Dissociation and memory fragmentation in post-traumatic stress disorder: an evaluation of the dissociative encoding hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Bedard-Gilligan, Michele; Zoellner, Lori A

    2012-01-01

    Several prominent theories of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) posit that peritraumatic dissociation results in insufficient encoding of the trauma memory and that persistent dissociation prevents memory elaboration, resulting in memory fragmentation and PTSD. In this review we summarise the empirical literature on peritraumatic and trait dissociation and trauma narrative fragmentation as measured by meta-memory and rater/objective coding. Across 16 studies to date, the association between dissociation and fragmentation was most prominent when examining peritraumatic dissociation and patient's own ratings of memory fragmentation. This relationship did not hold when examining trait dissociation or rater-coded or computer-generated measures of fragmentation. Thus initial evidence points more towards a strong self-reported association between constructs that is not supported on more objective fragmentation coding. Measurement overlap, construct ambiguity, and exclusion of potential confounds may underlie lack of a strong association between dissociation and objective-rated fragmentation.

  14. Corticospinal mirror neurons.

    PubMed

    Kraskov, A; Philipp, R; Waldert, S; Vigneswaran, G; Quallo, M M; Lemon, R N

    2014-01-01

    Here, we report the properties of neurons with mirror-like characteristics that were identified as pyramidal tract neurons (PTNs) and recorded in the ventral premotor cortex (area F5) and primary motor cortex (M1) of three macaque monkeys. We analysed the neurons' discharge while the monkeys performed active grasp of either food or an object, and also while they observed an experimenter carrying out a similar range of grasps. A considerable proportion of tested PTNs showed clear mirror-like properties (52% F5 and 58% M1). Some PTNs exhibited 'classical' mirror neuron properties, increasing activity for both execution and observation, while others decreased their discharge during observation ('suppression mirror-neurons'). These experiments not only demonstrate the existence of PTNs as mirror neurons in M1, but also reveal some interesting differences between M1 and F5 mirror PTNs. Although observation-related changes in the discharge of PTNs must reach the spinal cord and will include some direct projections to motoneurons supplying grasping muscles, there was no EMG activity in these muscles during action observation. We suggest that the mirror neuron system is involved in the withholding of unwanted movement during action observation. Mirror neurons are differentially recruited in the behaviour that switches rapidly between making your own movements and observing those of others.

  15. Decision Making in Recurrent Neuronal Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao-Jing

    2009-01-01

    Decision making has recently emerged as a central theme in neurophysiological studies of cognition, and experimental and computational work has led to the proposal of a cortical circuit mechanism of elemental decision computations. This mechanism depends on slow recurrent synaptic excitation balanced by fast feedback inhibition, which not only instantiates attractor states for forming categorical choices but also long transients for gradually accumulating evidence in favor of or against alternative options. Such a circuit endowed with reward-dependent synaptic plasticity is able to produce adaptive choice behavior. While decision threshold is a core concept for reaction time tasks, it can be dissociated from a general decision rule. Moreover, perceptual decisions and value-based economic choices are described within a unified framework in which probabilistic choices result from irregular neuronal activity as well as iterative interactions of a decision maker with an uncertain environment or other unpredictable decision makers in a social group. PMID:18957215

  16. The role of water in gas hydrate dissociation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Circone, S.; Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.

    2004-01-01

    When raised to temperatures above the ice melting point, gas hydrates release their gas in well-defined, reproducible events that occur within self-maintained temperature ranges slightly below the ice point. This behavior is observed for structure I (carbon dioxide, methane) and structure II gas hydrates (methane-ethane, and propane), including those formed with either H2O- or D2O-host frameworks, and dissociated at either ambient or elevated pressure conditions. We hypothesize that at temperatures above the H2O (or D2O) melting point: (1) hydrate dissociation produces water + gas instead of ice + gas, (2) the endothermic dissociation reaction lowers the temperature of the sample, causing the water product to freeze, (3) this phase transition buffers the sample temperatures within a narrow temperature range just below the ice point until dissociation goes to completion, and (4) the temperature depression below the pure ice melting point correlates with the average rate of dissociation and arises from solution of the hydrate-forming gas, released by dissociation, in the water phase at elevated concentrations. In addition, for hydrate that is partially dissociated to ice + gas at lower temperatures and then heated to temperatures above the ice point, all remaining hydrate dissociates to gas + liquid water as existing barriers to dissociation disappear. The enhanced dissociation rates at warmer temperatures are probably associated with faster gas transport pathways arising from the formation of water product.

  17. NEURON and Python.

    PubMed

    Hines, Michael L; Davison, Andrew P; Muller, Eilif

    2009-01-01

    The NEURON simulation program now allows Python to be used, alone or in combination with NEURON's traditional Hoc interpreter. Adding Python to NEURON has the immediate benefit of making available a very extensive suite of analysis tools written for engineering and science. It also catalyzes NEURON software development by offering users a modern programming tool that is recognized for its flexibility and power to create and maintain complex programs. At the same time, nothing is lost because all existing models written in Hoc, including graphical user interface tools, continue to work without change and are also available within the Python context. An example of the benefits of Python availability is the use of the xml module in implementing NEURON's Import3D and CellBuild tools to read MorphML and NeuroML model specifications.

  18. A Simplified Method for Ultra-Low Density, Long-Term Primary Hippocampal Neuron Culture.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhongming; Piechowicz, Mariel; Qiu, Shenfeng

    2016-01-01

    Culturing primary hippocampal neurons in vitro facilitates mechanistic interrogation of many aspects of neuronal development. Dissociated embryonic hippocampal neurons can often grow successfully on glass coverslips at high density under serum-free conditions, but low density cultures typically require a supply of trophic factors by co-culturing them with a glia feeder layer, preparation of which can be time-consuming and laborious. In addition, the presence of glia may confound interpretation of results and preclude studies on neuron-specific mechanisms. Here, a simplified method is presented for ultra-low density (~2,000 neurons/cm2), long-term (>3 months) primary hippocampal neuron culture that is under serum free conditions and without glia cell support. Low density neurons are grown on poly-D-lysine coated coverslips, and flipped on high density neurons grown in a 24-well plate. Instead of using paraffin dots to create a space between the two neuronal layers, the experimenters can simply etch the plastic bottom of the well, on which the high density neurons reside, to create a microspace conducive to low density neuron growth. The co-culture can be easily maintained for >3 months without significant loss of low density neurons, thus facilitating the morphological and physiological study of these neurons. To illustrate this successful culture condition, data are provided to show profuse synapse formation in low density cells after prolonged culture. This co-culture system also facilitates the survival of sparse individual neurons grown in islands of poly-D-lysine substrates and thus the formation of autaptic connections. PMID:27022758

  19. Two Overlapping Regions within the N-Terminal Half of the Herpes Simplex Virus 1 E3 Ubiquitin Ligase ICP0 Facilitate the Degradation and Dissociation of PML and Dissociation of Sp100 from ND10

    PubMed Central

    Perusina Lanfranca, Mirna; Mostafa, Heba H.

    2013-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) establishes a lifelong latent infection in sensory neurons and can reactivate from latency under stress conditions. To promote lytic infection, the virus must interact with specific cellular factors to evade the host's antiviral defenses. The HSV-1 E3 ubiquitin ligase, infected cell protein 0 (ICP0), activates transcription of viral genes, in part, by mediating the degradation of certain cellular proteins that play a role in host antiviral mechanisms. One component of the cellular defenses that ICP0 disrupts is the suborganelle, nuclear domain 10 (ND10), by inducing the degradation and dissociation of the major organizer of ND10, a promyelocytic leukemia (PML) and ND10 constituent, Sp100. Because previously identified domains in ICP0 explain only partially how it directs the degradation and dissociation of PML and Sp100, we hypothesized that additional regions within ICP0 may contribute to these activities, which in turn facilitate efficient viral replication. To test this hypothesis, we used a series of ICP0 truncation mutants and examined PML protein levels and PML and Sp100 immunofluorescence staining in human embryonic lung cells. Our results demonstrate that two overlapping regions within the central N-terminal portion of ICP0 (residues 212 to 311) promoted the dissociation and degradation of PML and dissociation of Sp100 (residues 212 to 427). In conclusion, we have identified two additional regions in ICP0 involved in altering ND10 antiviral defenses in a cell culture model of HSV-1 infection. PMID:24089549

  20. Autophagy in acute brain injury.

    PubMed

    Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Bravo-San Pedro, José Manuel; Blomgren, Klas; Kroemer, Guido

    2016-08-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily ancient mechanism that ensures the lysosomal degradation of old, supernumerary or ectopic cytoplasmic entities. Most eukaryotic cells, including neurons, rely on proficient autophagic responses for the maintenance of homeostasis in response to stress. Accordingly, autophagy mediates neuroprotective effects following some forms of acute brain damage, including methamphetamine intoxication, spinal cord injury and subarachnoid haemorrhage. In some other circumstances, however, the autophagic machinery precipitates a peculiar form of cell death (known as autosis) that contributes to the aetiology of other types of acute brain damage, such as neonatal asphyxia. Here, we dissect the context-specific impact of autophagy on non-infectious acute brain injury, emphasizing the possible therapeutic application of pharmacological activators and inhibitors of this catabolic process for neuroprotection. PMID:27256553

  1. Hypothalamic CRH neurons orchestrate complex behaviours after stress

    PubMed Central

    Füzesi, Tamás; Daviu, Nuria; Wamsteeker Cusulin, Jaclyn I.; Bonin, Robert P.; Bains, Jaideep S.

    2016-01-01

    All organisms possess innate behavioural and physiological programmes that ensure survival. In order to have maximum adaptive benefit, these programmes must be sufficiently flexible to account for changes in the environment. Here we show that hypothalamic CRH neurons orchestrate an environmentally flexible repertoire of behaviours that emerge after acute stress in mice. Optical silencing of CRH neurons disrupts the organization of individual behaviours after acute stress. These behavioural patterns shift according to the environment after stress, but this environmental sensitivity is blunted by activation of PVN CRH neurons. These findings provide evidence that PVN CRH cells are part of a previously unexplored circuit that matches precise behavioural patterns to environmental context following stress. Overactivity in this network in the absence of stress may contribute to environmental ambivalence, resulting in context-inappropriate behavioural strategies. PMID:27306314

  2. Dissociating Stimulus-Driven Semantic and Phonological Effect During Reading and Naming

    PubMed Central

    Mechelli, Andrea; Josephs, Oliver; Lambon Ralph, Matthew A; McClelland, James L; Price, Cathy J

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to dissociate the neural correlates of semantic and phonological processes during word reading and picture naming. Previous studies have addressed this issue by contrasting tasks involving semantic and phonological decisions. However, these tasks engage verbal short-term memory and executive functions that are not required for reading and naming. Here, 20 subjects were instructed to overtly name written words and pictures of objects while their neuronal responses were measured using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Each trial consisted of a pair of successive stimuli that were either semantically related (e.g., “ROBIN-nest”), phonologically related (e.g., “BELL-belt”), unrelated (e.g., “KITE-lobster”), or semantically and phonologically identical (e.g., “FRIDGE-fridge”). In addition, a pair of stimuli could be presented in either the same modality (word-word or picture-picture) or a different modality (word-picture or picture-word). We report that semantically related pairs modulate neuronal responses in a left-lateralized network, including the pars orbitalis of the inferior frontal gyrus, the middle temporal gyrus, the angular gyrus, and the superior frontal gyrus. We propose that these areas are involved in stimulus-driven semantic processes. In contrast, phonologically related pairs modulate neuronal responses in bilateral insula. This region is therefore implicated in the discrimination of similar, competing phonological and articulatory codes. The above effects were detected with both words and pictures and did not differ between the two modalities even with a less conservative statistical threshold. In conclusion, this study dissociates the effects of semantic and phonological relatedness between successive items during reading and naming aloud. Hum Brain Mapp, 2007. © 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:16767767

  3. Collision-induced dissociation of fluoropyridinide anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Shuji; Lineberger, W. Carl; Bierbaum, Veronica M.

    2007-10-01

    Collision-induced dissociation of ortho-fluoro, meta-fluoro, and 2,6-difluoropyridinide anions are studied using the selected ion flow tube technique. Structures and energetics of the reactants, transition states, and products are calculated at the MP4(SDQ)/6-31 + G(d) level of theory based on the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) and/or MP2/6-31 + G(d) optimized geometries. The monofluoropyridinide anions (C5NH3F-) dissociate almost exclusively via loss of an HF molecule, i.e., C5NH2- + HF at low collision energies, in addition to loss of F- at higher energies. 2,6-Difluoropyridinide anions (C5NH2F2-) dissociate via successive loss of HF molecules to form C5NHF- then C5N- depending on the collision energy. The CID results strongly suggest formation of ring-intact pyridynide structures (C5NH2-, C5NHF-) with a bent triple bond embedded in the azine ring systems. Calculated reaction energy diagrams are totally consistent with the experimental observations. Didehydropyridynides C5NH2- and C5NHF- have substantial barriers to decomposition. Tetradehydropyridynide C5N- is a highly strained ring system and metastable with a predicted barrier of about 5 kcal mol-1 (20 kJ mol-1) toward ring-opening to a linear NCCCCC- structure. The observed C5N- species is most likely the linear anion under experimental conditions; however, the ring-intact C5N- pyridynide is a highly energetic species releasing about 80 kcal mol-1 (340 kJ mol-1) of energy upon the ring-opening.

  4. Spin–orbit interaction mediated molecular dissociation

    SciTech Connect

    Kokkonen, E. Jänkälä, K.; Kettunen, J. A.; Heinäsmäki, S.; Karpenko, A.; Huttula, M.; Löytynoja, T.

    2014-05-14

    The effect of the spin–orbit interaction to photofragmentation is investigated in the mercury(II) bromide (HgBr{sub 2}) molecule. Changes in the fragmentation between the two spin–orbit components of Hg 5d photoionization, as well as within the molecular-field-splitted levels of these components are observed. Dissociation subsequent to photoionization is studied with synchrotron radiation and photoelectron-photoion coincidence spectroscopy. The experimental results are accompanied by relativistic ab initio analysis of the photoelectron spectrum.

  5. On the dissociation energy of Mg2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Partridge, Harry; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Pettersson, Lars G. M.; Mclean, A. D.; Liu, Bowen

    1990-01-01

    The bonding in the X 1Sigma(+)g state of Mg2 is investigated using near-complete valence one-particle Slater and Gaussian basis sets containing up to h functions. It is shown that the four-electron complete CI limit can be approached using a sequence of either second-order CI (SOCI) or interacting correlated fragment (ICF) calculations. At the valence level, the best estimate of the dissociation energy D(e) was 464/cm. This is a lower limit and is probably within 5/cm of the complete basis value.

  6. Ritual homicide during dissociative trance disorder.

    PubMed

    Ferracuti, Stefano; DeMarco, Maria Civita

    2004-02-01

    A case report is described of a man who developed a single period of recurrent episodes of dissociative trance disorder (DTD) during a family stress. The cultural environment was permeated by thoughts and beliefs in magic. During one trance state, the man performed an exorcism on the 6-month-old baby of his brother-in-law, and the baby died from cerebral hemorrhage. In the 5-year follow-up, no other episodes of DTD developed, and the man is serving an 18-year sentence.

  7. Dissociative Ionization of Aromatic and Heterocyclic Molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred M.

    2003-01-01

    Space radiation poses a major health hazard to humans in space flight. The high-energy charged particles in space radiation ranging from protons to high atomic number, high-energy (HZE) particles, and the secondary species they produce, attack DNA, cells, and tissues. Of the potential hazards, long-term health effects such as carcinogenesis are likely linked to the DNA lesions caused by secondary electrons in the 1 - 30 eV range. Dissociative ionization (DI) is one of the electron collision processes that can damage the DNA, either directly by causing a DNA lesion, or indirectly by producing radicals and cations that attack the DNA. To understand this process, we have developed a theoretical model for DI. Our model makes use of the fact that electron motion is much faster than nuclear motion and assumes DI proceeds through a two-step process. The first step is electron-impact ionization resulting in a particular state of the molecular ion in the geometry of the neutral molecule. In the second step the ion undergoes unimolecular dissociation. Thus the DI cross section sigma(sup DI)(sub a) for channel a is given by sigma(sup DI)(sub a) = sigma(sup I)(sub a) P(sub D) with sigma(sup I)(sub a) the ionization cross section of channel a and P(sub D) the dissociation probability. This model has been applied to study the DI of H2O, NH3, and CH4, with results in good agreement with experiment. The ionization cross section sigma(sup I)(sub a) was calculated using the improved binary encounter-dipole model and the unimolecular dissociation probability P(sub D) obtained by following the minimum energy path determined by the gradients and Hessians of the electronic energy with respect to the nuclear coordinates of the ion. This model is used to study the DI from the low-lying channels of benzene and pyridine to understand the different product formation in aromatic and heterocyclic molecules. DI study of the DNA base thymine is underway. Solvent effects will also be discussed.

  8. A woman with dermatitis and dissociative periods.

    PubMed

    Wise, T N; Reading, A J

    1975-01-01

    A nineteen year old female with pustular eczema and dissociative spells is presented. The patient has a three year history of severe dermatitis beginning shortly after her marriage. Central dynamic issues appear to be difficulty separating from her mother and an ambivalent identification with a hostile father. The patient also describes fugue-like episodes which occur with emerging aggressive feelings. Psychological testing supported these hypotheses. The relevant literature describing the correlation between aggression and skin disease is reviewed. A final uniform formulation was tentatively proposed that this patient, in addition to a strong genetic component for atopic dermatitis, had her illness abetted by inability to cope with aggressive affects.

  9. An EP2 Agonist Facilitates NMDA-Induced Outward Currents and Inhibits Dendritic Beading through Activation of BK Channels in Mouse Cortical Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Yoshinori; Morinaga, Saori; Liu, Xia; Zhang, Jing; Wu, Zhou; Yokoyama, Takeshi; Nakanishi, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), a major metabolite of arachidonic acid produced by cyclooxygenase pathways, exerts its bioactive responses by activating four E-prostanoid receptor subtypes, EP1, EP2, EP3, and EP4. PGE2 enables modulating N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-mediated responses. However, the effect of E-prostanoid receptor agonists on large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (BK) channels, which are functionally coupled with NMDA receptors, remains unclear. Here, we showed that EP2 receptor-mediated signaling pathways increased NMDA-induced outward currents (INMDA-OUT), which are associated with the BK channel activation. Patch-clamp recordings from the acutely dissociated mouse cortical neurons revealed that an EP2 receptor agonist activated INMDA-OUT, whereas an EP3 receptor agonist reduced it. Agonists of EP1 or EP4 receptors showed no significant effects on INMDA-OUT. A direct perfusion of 3,5′-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) through the patch pipette facilitated INMDA-OUT, which was abolished by the presence of protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor. Furthermore, facilitation of INMDA-OUT caused by an EP2 receptor agonist was significantly suppressed by PKA inhibitor. Finally, the activation of BK channels through EP2 receptors facilitated the recovery phase of NMDA-induced dendritic beading in the primary cultured cortical neurons. These results suggest that a direct activation of BK channels by EP2 receptor-mediated signaling pathways plays neuroprotective roles in cortical neurons. PMID:27298516

  10. An EP2 Agonist Facilitates NMDA-Induced Outward Currents and Inhibits Dendritic Beading through Activation of BK Channels in Mouse Cortical Neurons.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Yoshinori; Morinaga, Saori; Liu, Xia; Zhang, Jing; Wu, Zhou; Yokoyama, Takeshi; Nakanishi, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), a major metabolite of arachidonic acid produced by cyclooxygenase pathways, exerts its bioactive responses by activating four E-prostanoid receptor subtypes, EP1, EP2, EP3, and EP4. PGE2 enables modulating N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-mediated responses. However, the effect of E-prostanoid receptor agonists on large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (BK) channels, which are functionally coupled with NMDA receptors, remains unclear. Here, we showed that EP2 receptor-mediated signaling pathways increased NMDA-induced outward currents (I NMDA-OUT), which are associated with the BK channel activation. Patch-clamp recordings from the acutely dissociated mouse cortical neurons revealed that an EP2 receptor agonist activated I NMDA-OUT, whereas an EP3 receptor agonist reduced it. Agonists of EP1 or EP4 receptors showed no significant effects on I NMDA-OUT. A direct perfusion of 3,5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) through the patch pipette facilitated I NMDA-OUT, which was abolished by the presence of protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor. Furthermore, facilitation of I NMDA-OUT caused by an EP2 receptor agonist was significantly suppressed by PKA inhibitor. Finally, the activation of BK channels through EP2 receptors facilitated the recovery phase of NMDA-induced dendritic beading in the primary cultured cortical neurons. These results suggest that a direct activation of BK channels by EP2 receptor-mediated signaling pathways plays neuroprotective roles in cortical neurons. PMID:27298516

  11. Strain-induced water dissociation on supported ultrathin oxide films

    PubMed Central

    Song, Zhenjun; Fan, Jing; Xu, Hu

    2016-01-01

    Controlling the dissociation of single water molecule on an insulating surface plays a crucial role in many catalytic reactions. In this work, we have identified the enhanced chemical reactivity of ultrathin MgO(100) films deposited on Mo(100) substrate that causes water dissociation. We reveal that the ability to split water on insulating surface closely depends on the lattice mismatch between ultrathin films and the underlying substrate, and substrate-induced in-plane tensile strain dramatically results in water dissociation on MgO(100). Three dissociative adsorption configurations of water with lower energy are predicted, and the structural transition going from molecular form to dissociative form is almost barrierless. Our results provide an effective avenue to achieve water dissociation at the single-molecule level and shed light on how to tune the chemical reactions of insulating surfaces by choosing the suitable substrates. PMID:26953105

  12. The responses of dissociative patients on the thematic apperception test.

    PubMed

    Pica, M; Beere, D; Lovinger, S; Dush, D

    2001-07-01

    This study compared the responses of dissociative inpatients and general inpatient psychiatric controls on the Thematic Apperception Test (TAT; Murray, 1943). We found the stories of dissociative participants to be characterized by a greater interpersonal distance and more trauma and dissociation responses than those of the controls. No significant differences were found regarding total number of emotional references, although references to positive emotions were almost nonexistent for the dissociative group. A post hoc analysis of the data found the testing behaviors of dissociative participants to be characterized by switching, trance states, intrainterview amnesias, and affectively loaded card rejections. Questions were raised regarding the relevancy of the findings to clinical practice and how they might explain some of the controversies surrounding the diagnosis of dissociative identity disorder (DID).

  13. Dissociative detachment relates to psychotic symptoms and personality decompensation.

    PubMed

    Allen, J G; Coyne, L; Console, D A

    1997-01-01

    Previous studies have addressed the prominence of psychotic symptoms in conjunction with multiple personality disorder (now dissociative identity disorder). The present study examines the relation between psychotic symptoms and a more pervasive form of dissociative disturbance, namely dissociative detachment. Two hundred sixty-six women in inpatient treatment for severe trauma-related disorders completed the Dissociative Experiences Scale (DES), and 102 of these patients also completed the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory (MCMI-III). A factor analysis of the DES yielded two dimensions of dissociative detachment: detachment from one's own actions and detachment from the self and the environment. Each of these DES dimensions relates strongly to the thought disorder and schizotypal personality disorder scales of the MCMI-III. We propose that severe dissociative detachment, by virtue of loosening the moorings in inner and outer reality, is conducive to psychotic symptoms and personality decompensation.

  14. Dissociated functional significance of decision-related activity in the primate dorsal stream.

    PubMed

    Katz, Leor N; Yates, Jacob L; Pillow, Jonathan W; Huk, Alexander C

    2016-07-04

    During decision making, neurons in multiple brain regions exhibit responses that are correlated with decisions. However, it remains uncertain whether or not various forms of decision-related activity are causally related to decision making. Here we address this question by recording and reversibly inactivating the lateral intraparietal (LIP) and middle temporal (MT) areas of rhesus macaques performing a motion direction discrimination task. Neurons in area LIP exhibited firing rate patterns that directly resembled the evidence accumulation process posited to govern decision making, with strong correlations between their response fluctuations and the animal's choices. Neurons in area MT, in contrast, exhibited weak correlations between their response fluctuations and choices, and had firing rate patterns consistent with their sensory role in motion encoding. The behavioural impact of pharmacological inactivation of each area was inversely related to their degree of decision-related activity: while inactivation of neurons in MT profoundly impaired psychophysical performance, inactivation in LIP had no measurable impact on decision-making performance, despite having silenced the very clusters that exhibited strong decision-related activity. Although LIP inactivation did not impair psychophysical behaviour, it did influence spatial selection and oculomotor metrics in a free-choice control task. The absence of an effect on perceptual decision making was stable over trials and sessions and was robust to changes in stimulus type and task geometry, arguing against several forms of compensation. Thus, decision-related signals in LIP do not appear to be critical for computing perceptual decisions, and may instead reflect secondary processes. Our findings highlight a dissociation between decision correlation and causation, showing that strong neuron-decision correlations do not necessarily offer direct access to the neural computations underlying decisions.

  15. Dissociated functional significance of decision-related activity in the primate dorsal stream.

    PubMed

    Katz, Leor N; Yates, Jacob L; Pillow, Jonathan W; Huk, Alexander C

    2016-07-14

    During decision making, neurons in multiple brain regions exhibit responses that are correlated with decisions. However, it remains uncertain whether or not various forms of decision-related activity are causally related to decision making. Here we address this question by recording and reversibly inactivating the lateral intraparietal (LIP) and middle temporal (MT) areas of rhesus macaques performing a motion direction discrimination task. Neurons in area LIP exhibited firing rate patterns that directly resembled the evidence accumulation process posited to govern decision making, with strong correlations between their response fluctuations and the animal's choices. Neurons in area MT, in contrast, exhibited weak correlations between their response fluctuations and choices, and had firing rate patterns consistent with their sensory role in motion encoding. The behavioural impact of pharmacological inactivation of each area was inversely related to their degree of decision-related activity: while inactivation of neurons in MT profoundly impaired psychophysical performance, inactivation in LIP had no measurable impact on decision-making performance, despite having silenced the very clusters that exhibited strong decision-related activity. Although LIP inactivation did not impair psychophysical behaviour, it did influence spatial selection and oculomotor metrics in a free-choice control task. The absence of an effect on perceptual decision making was stable over trials and sessions and was robust to changes in stimulus type and task geometry, arguing against several forms of compensation. Thus, decision-related signals in LIP do not appear to be critical for computing perceptual decisions, and may instead reflect secondary processes. Our findings highlight a dissociation between decision correlation and causation, showing that strong neuron-decision correlations do not necessarily offer direct access to the neural computations underlying decisions. PMID:27376476

  16. Multipole storage assisted dissociation, a novel in-source dissociation technique for electrospray ionization generated ions.

    PubMed

    Sannes-Lowery, K; Griffey, R H; Kruppa, G H; Speir, J P; Hofstadler, S A

    1998-01-01

    In this work we present a novel in-source dissociation scheme referred to as multipole storage assisted dissociation (MSAD) for electrospray ionization (ESI) generated ions in which dissociation is effected by employing extended ion accumulation intervals in a high pressure rf-only hexapole assembly prior to mass analysis. Following an extended ion accumulation interval in which ions are confined in the rf-only hexapole, ions are gated out of the hexapole, trapped, and mass analyzed in the trapped ion cell of a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometer. The accumulation region is comprised of an rf-only hexapole ion guide which separates two electrodes, a biased skimmer cone, and an auxiliary 'gate' electrode at the low pressure end of the hexapole. This technique should be applicable to other mass spectrometry platforms compatible with pulsed ionization sources including quadrupole ion traps, and time-of-flight mass analyzers. This concept is demonstrated with the dissociation of a small protein in which selective fragmentation is observed at labile amino acid linkages producing primarily y-type fragment ions.

  17. Ictal symptoms of anxiety, avoidance behaviour, and dissociation in patients with dissociative seizures

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, L H; Mellers, J D C

    2006-01-01

    Objective To examine anxiety related seizure symptoms and avoidance behaviour in adults with dissociative (psychogenic non‐epileptic) seizures (DS) in comparison with a group suffering from partial epilepsy. Methods 25 DS and 19 epilepsy patients completed an attack symptom measure, the hospital anxiety and depression scale, the dissociative experiences scale, and the fear questionnaire. Results DS patients reported the presence of significantly greater numbers of somatic symptoms of anxiety during their attacks than the epilepsy group, despite not reporting subjectively higher levels of anxiety. The DS patients also reported higher levels of agoraphobic‐type avoidance behaviour than the epilepsy group. Measures of dissociation were higher in the DS group, who also reported greater symptoms of depression. Conclusions The findings support a model whereby DS occur as a paroxysmal, dissociative response to heightened arousal in the absence of raised general anxiety levels. The model has practical implications for clinical assessment and treatment: in clinical practice, inquiry about these symptoms may help in the diagnosis of DS; with respect to treatment, the anxiety related symptoms and avoidance behaviour prevalent in DS are a potential focus for a cognitive behavioural approach analogous to that used in the treatment of other anxiety disorders. PMID:16614021

  18. Transporting mitochondria in neurons

    PubMed Central

    Course, Meredith M.; Wang, Xinnan

    2016-01-01

    Neurons demand vast and vacillating supplies of energy. As the key contributors of this energy, as well as primary pools of calcium and signaling molecules, mitochondria must be where the neuron needs them, when the neuron needs them. The unique architecture and length of neurons, however, make them a complex system for mitochondria to navigate. To add to this difficulty, mitochondria are synthesized mainly in the soma, but must be transported as far as the distant terminals of the neuron. Similarly, damaged mitochondria—which can cause oxidative stress to the neuron—must fuse with healthy mitochondria to repair the damage, return all the way back to the soma for disposal, or be eliminated at the terminals. Increasing evidence suggests that the improper distribution of mitochondria in neurons can lead to neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric disorders. Here, we will discuss the machinery and regulatory systems used to properly distribute mitochondria in neurons, and how this knowledge has been leveraged to better understand neurological dysfunction. PMID:27508065

  19. C1 neurons: the body's EMTs.

    PubMed

    Guyenet, Patrice G; Stornetta, Ruth L; Bochorishvili, Genrieta; Depuy, Seth D; Burke, Peter G R; Abbott, Stephen B G

    2013-08-01

    The C1 neurons reside in the rostral and intermediate portions of the ventrolateral medulla (RVLM, IVLM). They use glutamate as a fast transmitter and synthesize catecholamines plus various neuropeptides. These neurons regulate the hypothalamic pituitary axis via direct projections to the paraventricular nucleus and regulate the autonomic nervous system via projections to sympathetic and parasympathetic preganglionic neurons. The presympathetic C1 cells, located in the RVLM, are probably organized in a roughly viscerotopic manner and most of them regulate the circulation. C1 cells are variously activated by hypoglycemia, infection or inflammation, hypoxia, nociception, and hypotension and contribute to most glucoprivic responses. C1 cells also stimulate breathing and activate brain stem noradrenergic neurons including the locus coeruleus. Based on the various effects attributed to the C1 cells, their axonal projections and what is currently known of their synaptic inputs, subsets of C1 cells appear to be differentially recruited by pain, hypoxia, infection/inflammation, hemorrhage, and hypoglycemia to produce a repertoire of stereotyped autonomic, metabolic, and neuroendocrine responses that help the organism survive physical injury and its associated cohort of acute infection, hypoxia, hypotension, and blood loss. C1 cells may also contribute to glucose and cardiovascular homeostasis in the absence of such physical stresses, and C1 cell hyperactivity may contribute to the increase in sympathetic nerve activity associated with diseases such as hypertension. PMID:23697799

  20. Neuronal avalanches in spontaneous activity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Gerald; Petermann, Thomas; Havenith, Martha N; Yu, Shan; Singer, Wolf; Plenz, Dietmar; Nikolic, Danko

    2010-12-01

    Many complex systems give rise to events that are clustered in space and time, thereby establishing a correlation structure that is governed by power law statistics. In the cortex, such clusters of activity, called "neuronal avalanches," were recently found in local field potentials (LFPs) of spontaneous activity in acute cortex slices, slice cultures, the developing cortex of the anesthetized rat, and premotor and motor cortex of awake monkeys. At present, it is unclear whether neuronal avalanches also exist in the spontaneous LFPs and spike activity in vivo in sensory areas of the mature brain. To address this question, we recorded spontaneous LFPs and extracellular spiking activity with multiple 4 × 4 microelectrode arrays (Michigan Probes) in area 17 of adult cats under anesthesia. A cluster of events was defined as a consecutive sequence of time bins Δt (1-32 ms), each containing at least one LFP event or spike anywhere on the array. LFP cluster sizes consistently distributed according to a power law with a slope largely above -1.5. In two thirds of the corresponding experiments, spike clusters also displayed a power law that displayed a slightly steeper slope of -1.8 and was destroyed by subsampling operations. The power law in spike clusters was accompanied with stronger temporal correlations between spiking activities of neurons that spanned longer time periods compared with spike clusters lacking power law statistics. The results suggest that spontaneous activity of the visual cortex under anesthesia has the properties of neuronal avalanches.

  1. Proton- and ammonium-sensing by histaminergic neurons controlling wakefulness.

    PubMed

    Yanovsky, Yevgenij; Zigman, Jeffrey M; Kernder, Anna; Bein, Alisa; Sakata, Ichiro; Osborne-Lawrence, Sherri; Haas, Helmut L; Sergeeva, Olga A

    2012-01-01

    The histaminergic neurons in the tuberomamillary nucleus (TMN) of the posterior hypothalamus are involved in the control of arousal. These neurons are sensitive to hypercapnia as has been shown in experiments examining c-Fos expression, a marker for increased neuronal activity. We investigated the mechanisms through which TMN neurons respond to changes in extracellular levels of acid/CO(2). Recordings in rat brain slices revealed that acidification within the physiological range (pH from 7.4 to 7.0), as well as ammonium chloride (5 mM), excite histaminergic neurons. This excitation is significantly reduced by antagonists of type I metabotropic glutamate receptors and abolished by benzamil, an antagonist of acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) and Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger, or by ouabain which blocks Na(+)/K(+) ATPase. We detected variable combinations of 4 known types of ASICs in single TMN neurons, and observed activation of ASICs in single dissociated TMN neurons only at pH lower than 7.0. Thus, glutamate, which is known to be released by glial cells and orexinergic neurons, amplifies the acid/CO(2)-induced activation of TMN neurons. This amplification demands the coordinated function of metabotropic glutamate receptors, Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger and Na(+)/K(+) ATPase. We also developed a novel HDC-Cre transgenic reporter mouse line in which histaminergic TMN neurons can be visualized. In contrast to the rat, the mouse histaminergic neurons lacked the pH 7.0-induced excitation and displayed only a minimal response to the mGluR I agonist DHPG (0.5 μM). On the other hand, ammonium-induced excitation was similar in mouse and rat. These results are relevant for the understanding of the neuronal mechanisms controlling acid/CO(2)-induced arousal in hepatic encephalopathy and obstructive sleep apnoea. Moreover, the new HDC-Cre mouse model will be a useful tool for studying the physiological and pathophysiological roles of the histaminergic system.

  2. Proton- and ammonium-sensing by histaminergic neurons controlling wakefulness

    PubMed Central

    Yanovsky, Yevgenij; Zigman, Jeffrey M.; Kernder, Anna; Bein, Alisa; Sakata, Ichiro; Osborne-Lawrence, Sherri; Haas, Helmut L.; Sergeeva, Olga A.

    2012-01-01

    The histaminergic neurons in the tuberomamillary nucleus (TMN) of the posterior hypothalamus are involved in the control of arousal. These neurons are sensitive to hypercapnia as has been shown in experiments examining c-Fos expression, a marker for increased neuronal activity. We investigated the mechanisms through which TMN neurons respond to changes in extracellular levels of acid/CO2. Recordings in rat brain slices revealed that acidification within the physiological range (pH from 7.4 to 7.0), as well as ammonium chloride (5 mM), excite histaminergic neurons. This excitation is significantly reduced by antagonists of type I metabotropic glutamate receptors and abolished by benzamil, an antagonist of acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) and Na+/Ca2+ exchanger, or by ouabain which blocks Na+/K+ ATPase. We detected variable combinations of 4 known types of ASICs in single TMN neurons, and observed activation of ASICs in single dissociated TMN neurons only at pH lower than 7.0. Thus, glutamate, which is known to be released by glial cells and orexinergic neurons, amplifies the acid/CO2-induced activation of TMN neurons. This amplification demands the coordinated function of metabotropic glutamate receptors, Na+/Ca2+ exchanger and Na+/K+ ATPase. We also developed a novel HDC-Cre transgenic reporter mouse line in which histaminergic TMN neurons can be visualized. In contrast to the rat, the mouse histaminergic neurons lacked the pH 7.0-induced excitation and displayed only a minimal response to the mGluR I agonist DHPG (0.5 μM). On the other hand, ammonium-induced excitation was similar in mouse and rat. These results are relevant for the understanding of the neuronal mechanisms controlling acid/CO2-induced arousal in hepatic encephalopathy and obstructive sleep apnoea. Moreover, the new HDC-Cre mouse model will be a useful tool for studying the physiological and pathophysiological roles of the histaminergic system. PMID:22509157

  3. The dissociation of dense liquid nitrogen and shock cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, M.

    1987-07-01

    A theoretical model is used to examine the dissociation of shock-compressed liquid nitrogen. An important feature of the model is the introduction of a binding energy for the atomic state which leads to a volume-dependent dissociation energy. The model correctly predicts the highly unusual feature of shock cooling which is shown to be the consequence of the volume dependent dissociation energy.

  4. Dissociation of ribosomes into large and small subunits.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Maria C; Maguire, Bruce; Lake, James A

    2015-04-01

    Structural and functional studies of ribosomal subunits require the dissociation of intact ribosomes into individual small and large ribosomal subunits. The dissociation of the prokaryotic 70S ribosomes into the 50S and 30S subunits is achieved by dialysis against a buffer containing a lower Mg(2+) concentration. Eukaryotic 80S ribosomes are dissociated into 60S and 40S subunits by incubation in a buffer containing puromycin and higher KCl and Mg(2+) concentrations.

  5. Imaging the molecular dynamics of dissociative electron attachment to water

    SciTech Connect

    Adaniya, Hidihito; Rudek, B.; Osipov, Timur; Haxton, Dan; Weber, Thorsten; Rescigno, Thomas N.; McCurdy, C.W.; Belkacem, Ali

    2009-10-19

    Momentum imaging experiments on dissociative electron attachment to the water molecule are combined with ab initio theoretical calculations of the angular dependence of the quantum mechanical amplitude for electron attachment to provide a detailed picture of the molecular dynamics of dissociation attachment via the two lowest energy Feshbach resonances. The combination of momentum imaging experiments and theory can reveal dissociation dynamics for which the axial recoil approximation breaks down and thus provides a powerful reaction microscope for DEA to polyatomics.

  6. How microglia kill neurons.

    PubMed

    Brown, Guy C; Vilalta, Anna

    2015-12-01

    Microglia are resident brain macrophages that become inflammatory activated in most brain pathologies. Microglia normally protect neurons, but may accidentally kill neurons when attempting to limit infections or damage, and this may be more common with degenerative disease as there was no significant selection pressure on the aged brain in the past. A number of mechanisms by which activated microglia kill neurons have been identified, including: (i) stimulation of the phagocyte NADPH oxidase (PHOX) to produce superoxide and derivative oxidants, (ii) expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) producing NO and derivative oxidants, (iii) release of glutamate and glutaminase, (iv) release of TNFα, (v) release of cathepsin B, (vi) phagocytosis of stressed neurons, and (vii) decreased release of nutritive BDNF and IGF-1. PHOX stimulation contributes to microglial activation, but is not directly neurotoxic unless NO is present. NO is normally neuroprotective, but can react with superoxide to produce neurotoxic peroxynitrite, or in the presence of hypoxia inhibit mitochondrial respiration. Glutamate can be released by glia or neurons, but is neurotoxic only if the neurons are depolarised, for example as a result of mitochondrial inhibition. TNFα is normally neuroprotective, but can become toxic if caspase-8 or NF-κB activation are inhibited. If the above mechanisms do not kill neurons, they may still stress the neurons sufficiently to make them susceptible to phagocytosis by activated microglia. We review here whether microglial killing of neurons is an artefact, makes evolutionary sense or contributes in common neuropathologies and by what mechanisms. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Neuroprotection.

  7. Autobiographical memory specificity in dissociative identity disorder.

    PubMed

    Huntjens, Rafaële J C; Wessel, Ineke; Hermans, Dirk; van Minnen, Agnes

    2014-05-01

    A lack of adequate access to autobiographical knowledge has been related to psychopathology. More specifically, patients suffering from depression or a history of trauma have been found to be characterized by overgeneral memory, in other words, they show a relative difficulty in retrieving a specific event from memory located in time and place. Previous studies of overgeneral memory have not included patients with dissociative disorders. These patients are interesting to consider, as they are hypothesized to have the ability to selectively compartmentalize information linked to negative emotions. This study examined avoidance and overgeneral memory in patients with dissociative identity disorder (DID; n = 12). The patients completed the autobiographical memory test (AMT). Their performance was compared with control groups of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) patients (n = 26), healthy controls (n = 29), and DID simulators (n = 26). Specifically, we compared the performance of separate identity states in DID hypothesized to diverge in the use of avoidance as a coping strategy to deal with negative affect. No significant differences in memory specificity were found between the separate identities in DID. Irrespective of identity state, DID patients were characterized by a lack of memory specificity, which was similar to the lack of memory specificity found in PTSD patients. The converging results for DID and PTSD patients add empirical evidence for the role of overgeneral memory involved in the maintenance of posttraumatic psychopathology. PMID:24886016

  8. Autobiographical memory specificity in dissociative identity disorder.

    PubMed

    Huntjens, Rafaële J C; Wessel, Ineke; Hermans, Dirk; van Minnen, Agnes

    2014-05-01

    A lack of adequate access to autobiographical knowledge has been related to psychopathology. More specifically, patients suffering from depression or a history of trauma have been found to be characterized by overgeneral memory, in other words, they show a relative difficulty in retrieving a specific event from memory located in time and place. Previous studies of overgeneral memory have not included patients with dissociative disorders. These patients are interesting to consider, as they are hypothesized to have the ability to selectively compartmentalize information linked to negative emotions. This study examined avoidance and overgeneral memory in patients with dissociative identity disorder (DID; n = 12). The patients completed the autobiographical memory test (AMT). Their performance was compared with control groups of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) patients (n = 26), healthy controls (n = 29), and DID simulators (n = 26). Specifically, we compared the performance of separate identity states in DID hypothesized to diverge in the use of avoidance as a coping strategy to deal with negative affect. No significant differences in memory specificity were found between the separate identities in DID. Irrespective of identity state, DID patients were characterized by a lack of memory specificity, which was similar to the lack of memory specificity found in PTSD patients. The converging results for DID and PTSD patients add empirical evidence for the role of overgeneral memory involved in the maintenance of posttraumatic psychopathology.

  9. Dissociation of methane under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Guoying; Oganov, Artem R.; Ma, Yanming; Wang, Hui; Li, Peifang; Li, Yinwei; Iitaka, Toshiaki; Zou, Guangtian

    2010-10-01

    Methane is an extremely important energy source with a great abundance in nature and plays a significant role in planetary physics, being one of the major constituents of giant planets Uranus and Neptune. The stable crystal forms of methane under extreme conditions are of great fundamental interest. Using the ab initio evolutionary algorithm for crystal structure prediction, we found three novel insulating molecular structures with P212121, Pnma, and Cmcm space groups. Remarkably, under high pressure, methane becomes unstable and dissociates into ethane (C2H6) at 95 GPa, butane (C4H10) at 158 GPa, and further, carbon (diamond) and hydrogen above 287 GPa at zero temperature. We have computed the pressure-temperature phase diagram, which sheds light into the seemingly conflicting observations of the unusually low formation pressure of diamond at high temperature and the failure of experimental observation of dissociation at room temperature. Our results support the idea of diamond formation in the interiors of giant planets such as Neptune.

  10. Dissociation of methane under high pressure.

    PubMed

    Gao, Guoying; Oganov, Artem R; Ma, Yanming; Wang, Hui; Li, Peifang; Li, Yinwei; Iitaka, Toshiaki; Zou, Guangtian

    2010-10-14

    Methane is an extremely important energy source with a great abundance in nature and plays a significant role in planetary physics, being one of the major constituents of giant planets Uranus and Neptune. The stable crystal forms of methane under extreme conditions are of great fundamental interest. Using the ab initio evolutionary algorithm for crystal structure prediction, we found three novel insulating molecular structures with P2(1)2(1)2(1), Pnma, and Cmcm space groups. Remarkably, under high pressure, methane becomes unstable and dissociates into ethane (C(2)H(6)) at 95 GPa, butane (C(4)H(10)) at 158 GPa, and further, carbon (diamond) and hydrogen above 287 GPa at zero temperature. We have computed the pressure-temperature phase diagram, which sheds light into the seemingly conflicting observations of the unusually low formation pressure of diamond at high temperature and the failure of experimental observation of dissociation at room temperature. Our results support the idea of diamond formation in the interiors of giant planets such as Neptune.

  11. Dissociative phenomena and the question of responsibility.

    PubMed

    Halleck, S L

    1990-10-01

    There are many controversies regarding the prevalence, causation, possible iatrogenicity, and treatment of multiple personality disorder. Those who view the disorder as much more prevalent than has previously been suspected believe it is caused by experiences of severe child abuse and have used rather unorthodox techniques to help the patient relate the experience of abuse to current problems of dissociation. Other clinicians believe the disorder is overdiagnosed and that it may be created or made worse by therapists who unwittingly reinforce symptoms of dissociation. Many of the controversies about these issues can be clarified by considering the manner in which clinicians attribute responsibility for undesirable conduct associated with the disorder. In dealing with multiple personality patients, clinicians regularly must decide whether their therapeutic approach will emphasize the patient's responsibility for undesirable conduct or will minimize it. Practical and theoretical arguments can be made for both approaches. There are important consequences to patients using either approach, and particularly harmful consequences with inconsistent approaches. Clinical experience and wisdom dictate that until we have more objective data about the results of various forms of treatment, the preferred method of treatment of multiple personality patients should continue to focus upon maximizing their responsibility for any type of undesirable conduct.

  12. Vibrational nonequilibrium effects on diatomic dissociation rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, C. F.

    1993-01-01

    The collision-induced dissociation rate of diatomic molecules from a ladder of rotational and anharmonic vibrational states is developed, and the correction for vibrational nonequilibrium is considered. The result is similar to an analytic correction derived by Hammerling et al. (1959) for harmonic oscillators. An empirical correction algorithm suggested by Park (1987, 1990) gives similar results when vibrational temperature is comparable to kinetic temperature but underestimates the dissociation rate when vibrational temperature is small compared with the kinetic temperature. This algorithm uses an effective temperature in the experimentally determined Arrhenius expression for the rate coefficient, which is a weighted average of the vibrational and kinetic temperature, whereas theory indicates that kinetic temperature should appear only in the exponential term of the Arrhenius expression. Nevertheless, an effective temperature can always be found that will numerically duplicate the proper rate coefficient at any given condition, but a constant weighting factor cannot be expected to provide this. However, the algorithm can he adjusted to give reasonable results over a range of conditions if the geometric weighting factor is taken to be a simple linear function of the ratio of vibrational to kinetic temperature in the gas.

  13. Electron Transfer Dissociation of Milk Oligosaccharides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Liang; Costello, Catherine E.

    2011-06-01

    For structural identification of glycans, the classic collision-induced dissociation (CID) spectra are dominated by product ions that derived from glycosidic cleavages, which provide only sequence information. The peaks from cross-ring fragmentation are often absent or have very low abundances in such spectra. Electron transfer dissociation (ETD) is being applied to structural identification of carbohydrates for the first time, and results in some new and detailed information for glycan structural studies. A series of linear milk sugars was analyzed by a variety of fragmentation techniques such as MS/MS by CID and ETD, and MS3 by sequential CID/CID, CID/ETD, and ETD/CID. In CID spectra, the detected peaks were mainly generated via glycosidic cleavages. By comparison, ETD generated various types of abundant cross-ring cleavage ions. These complementary cross-ring cleavages clarified the different linkage types and branching patterns of the representative milk sugar samples. The utilization of different MS3 techniques made it possible to verify initial assignments and to detect the presence of multiple components in isobaric peaks. Fragment ion structures and pathways could be proposed to facilitate the interpretation of carbohydrate ETD spectra, and the main mechanisms were investigated. ETD should contribute substantially to confident structural analysis of a wide variety of oligosaccharides.

  14. Multigenerational Dissociation: A Framework for Building Narrative.

    PubMed

    McCollum, Sally E

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the concept of Multigenerational Dissociation (MGD), a behavior pattern that occurs in families in which violence and abuse are re-enacted from one generation to the next, accompanied by denial that the trauma occurred, or if it did, that it was destructive. While revictimization, reenactment, and the intergenerational transmission of trauma are discussed extensively in the literature, MGD helps to view them within a broad historical framework. This is useful for conceptualizing cases therapeutically, and it can also contribute to research on dissociation and recovered memories of trauma and abuse by demonstrating the value of narrative clinical data. Case material is used to illustrate how MGD occurs in people's lives and affects their memories, demonstrating how it becomes a frame within which to convey the dynamics of how traumatic experiences are remembered. This also demonstrates that when clinicians contribute their own narrative data to research on traumatic memory, the science is more accurate, relevant, and comprehensible to clinical and nonclinical researchers. PMID:26158318

  15. Communication: Imaging wavefunctions in dissociative photoionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott Hopkins, W.; Mackenzie, Stuart R.

    2011-08-01

    The dissociative ionization dynamics of excited electronic states of the xenon dimer, Xe2, have been studied using velocity map ion imaging (VMI). A one-colour, (2+1) resonant excitation scheme was employed to first excite and then ionize selected vibrational levels of the Xe2 6p 2[1/2]0 0_g^ + Rydberg state. Cationic fragments were then detected by the VMI. The data provide an outstanding example of the reflection principle in photodissociation with the full nodal structure of the Rydberg state wavefunctions clearly observed in the final Xe+ kinetic energy distributions without the need for scanning the excitation energy. Fitting of the observed distributions provides detailed and precise information on the form of the Xe2+ I(1/2g) potential energy curve involved which is in excellent agreement with the results of photoelectron imaging studies [Shubert and Pratt, J. Chem. Phys. 134, 044315 (2011), 10.1063/1.3533361]. Furthermore, the anisotropy of the product angular distributions yields information on the evolution of the electronic character of the ionic state with internuclear separation, R. The combination of the nature of dissociative ionization and the extent of the bound state wavefunctions provide information over an unusually wide range of internuclear separation R (ΔR > 0.75 Å). This would normally require scanning over a considerable energy region but is obtained in these studies at a fixed excitation energy.

  16. Dissociable behavioural outcomes of visual statistical learning

    PubMed Central

    Turk-Browne, Nicholas B.; Seitz, Aaron R.

    2016-01-01

    Statistical learning refers to the extraction of probabilistic relationships between stimuli and is increasingly used as a method to understand learning processes. However, numerous cognitive processes are sensitive to the statistical relationships between stimuli and any one measure of learning may conflate these processes; to date little research has focused on differentiating these processes. To understand how multiple processes underlie statistical learning, here we compared, within the same study, operational measures of learning from different tasks that may be differentially sensitive to these processes. In Experiment 1, participants were visually exposed to temporal regularities embedded in a stream of shapes. Their task was to periodically detect whether a shape, whose contrast was staircased to a threshold level, was present or absent. Afterwards, they completed a search task, where statistically predictable shapes were found more quickly. We used the search task to label shape pairs as “learned” or “non-learned”, and then used these labels to analyse the detection task. We found a dissociation between learning on the search task and the detection task where only non-learned pairs showed learning effects in the detection task. This finding was replicated in further experiments with recognition memory (Experiment 2) and associative learning tasks (Experiment 3). Taken together, these findings are consistent with the view that statistical learning may comprise a family of processes that can produce dissociable effects on different aspects of behaviour. PMID:27478399

  17. Dissociative excitation study of iron pentacarbonyl molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribar, Anita; Danko, Marián; Országh, Juraj; Ferreira da Silva, Filipe; Utke, Ivo; Matejčík, Štefan

    2015-04-01

    The processes of dissociative excitation (DE) and dissociative ionisation with excitation (DIE) of iron pentacarbonyl, Fe(CO)5, have been studied using a crossed electron-molecule beam experimental apparatus (Electron Induced Fluorescence Apparatus, EIFA). Using EIFA we were able to record the emission spectrum of the molecule in the UV-VIS range, as well as the photon efficiency curves initiated by electron impact. The emission spectrum of Fe(CO)5 initiated by impact of 50 eV electrons was recorded in the spectral range between 200 nm and 470 nm. It shows a high density of emission lines and bands (mainly iron lines and carbonyl bands). Additionally, we ha