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Sample records for acutely ill patient

  1. Prevention of deterioration in acutely ill patients in hospital.

    PubMed

    Steen, Colin

    The shift towards providing critical care in general wards has changed the way acutely ill patients are identified, treated and managed in hospital. This requires the expertise of knowledgeable, informed and capable staff. Effective education and appropriate knowledge and skills are required to aid identification of the deteriorating patient and provide prompt, timely and appropriate intervention to prevent further deterioration and possibly death. This article provides information about a systematic approach that will enable healthcare professionals to intervene to prevent deterioration in acutely ill patients.

  2. A patient-centered research agenda for the care of the acutely ill older patient

    PubMed Central

    Wald, Heidi L.; Leykum, Luci K.; Mattison, Melissa L. P.; Vasilevskis, Eduard E.; Meltzer, David O.

    2015-01-01

    Hospitalists and others acute care providers are limited by gaps in evidence addressing the needs of the acutely ill older adult population. The Society of Hospital Medicine (SHM) sponsored the Acute Care of Older Patients (ACOP) Priority Setting Partnership to develop a research agenda focused on bridging this gap. Informed by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) framework for identification and prioritization of research areas, we adapted a methodology developed by the James Lind Alliance to engage diverse stakeholders in the research agenda setting process. The work of the Partnership proceeded through four steps: convening, consulting, collating, and prioritizing. First, the steering committee convened a Partnership of 18 stakeholder organizations in May 2013. Next, stakeholder organizations surveyed members to identify important unanswered questions in the acute care of older persons, receiving 1299 responses from 580 individuals. Finally, an extensive and structured process of collation and prioritization resulted in a final list of ten research questions in the following areas: advanced care planning, care transitions, delirium, dementia, depression, medications, models of care, physical function, surgery, and training. With the changing demographics of the hospitalized population, a workforce with limited geriatrics training, and gaps in evidence to inform clinical decision-making for acutely ill older patients, the identified research questions deserve the highest priority in directing future research efforts to improve care for the older hospitalized patient and enrich training. PMID:25877486

  3. A patient-centered research agenda for the care of the acutely ill older patient.

    PubMed

    Wald, Heidi L; Leykum, Luci K; Mattison, Melissa L P; Vasilevskis, Eduard E; Meltzer, David O

    2015-05-01

    Hospitalists and others acute-care providers are limited by gaps in evidence addressing the needs of the acutely ill older adult population. The Society of Hospital Medicine sponsored the Acute Care of Older Patients Priority Setting Partnership to develop a research agenda focused on bridging this gap. Informed by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute framework for identification and prioritization of research areas, we adapted a methodology developed by the James Lind Alliance to engage diverse stakeholders in the research agenda setting process. The work of the Partnership proceeded through 4 steps: convening, consulting, collating, and prioritizing. First, the steering committee convened a partnership of 18 stakeholder organizations in May 2013. Next, stakeholder organizations surveyed members to identify important unanswered questions in the acute care of older persons, receiving 1299 responses from 580 individuals. Finally, an extensive and structured process of collation and prioritization resulted in a final list of 10 research questions in the following areas: advanced-care planning, care transitions, delirium, dementia, depression, medications, models of care, physical function, surgery, and training. With the changing demographics of the hospitalized population, a workforce with limited geriatrics training, and gaps in evidence to inform clinical decision making for acutely ill older patients, the identified research questions deserve the highest priority in directing future research efforts to improve care for the older hospitalized patient and enrich training.

  4. Extended duration of thromboprophylaxis in acutely ill medical patients: optimizing therapy?

    PubMed

    Turpie, A G G

    2007-01-01

    Summary. Patients who are hospitalized for an acute medical illness are at risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE). Current evidence-based guidelines recommend prophylaxis with unfractionated heparin or low-molecular-weight heparin in acutely ill medical patients who are admitted to hospital with congestive heart failure, severe respiratory disease, or who are bedridden with an additional VTE risk factor. The need for thromboprophylaxis is therefore clear in this patient population; however, the optimal duration of prophylaxis in these patients is less clear. In patients undergoing orthopedic or cancer surgery, extended-duration prophylaxis has been shown to be superior to placebo. To date, however, no large-scale clinical trials have assessed the benefits of extended-duration prophylaxis in acutely ill medical patients. This review therefore focuses on the VTE risk profile of acutely ill medical patients, examines the currently available literature for evidence of a potential benefit of extended-duration prophylaxis in these patients, and provides a rationale for the testing of such a hypothesis in a randomized clinical trial.

  5. The economic impact of the insured patients with severe chronic and acute illnesses: a qualitative approach

    PubMed Central

    Aji, Budi; Yamamoto, Shelby Suzanne; Sauerborn, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    Background Little research has focused on the economic hardship among the insured with severe illnesses and high treatment costs, in particular, the consequence of poorer insurance coverage for high-cost illnesses. Therefore, we presented the case for identifying the experiences of insured patients with severe chronic and acute illnesses. This study identified a qualitative understanding of the economic impact of severe chronic and acute illnesses and household strategies to deal with high treatment costs. Design Interviews were conducted with 19 insured households of three different health insurance programs with a family member that had been hospitalized for severe chronic or acute illnesses in either Banyumas or Margono Sukarjo hospitals in Banyumas, Central Java, Indonesia. A thematic analysis was applied to guide the interpretation of the data. Results Insured households with a family member that had been hospitalized for severe chronic and acute illnesses were greatly affected by the high treatment costs. Four major issues emerged from this qualitative study: insured patients are still burdened with high out-of-pocket payments, households adopt various strategies to cope with the high cost of treatments, households experience financial hardships, and positive and negative perceptions of the insured regarding their health insurance coverage for acute and chronic illnesses. Conclusions Askes and Jamsostek patients faced financial burdens from high cost sharing for hospital amenities, non-covered drugs, and treatments and other indirect costs. Meanwhile, Jamkesmas beneficiaries faced no financial burden for related medical services but were rather burdened with indirect costs for the carers. Households relied on internal resources to cover hospital bills as the first strategy, which included the mobilization of savings, sale of assets, and borrowing of money. External support was tapped secondarily and included financial support from extended family members

  6. Extended-duration rivaroxaban thromboprophylaxis in acutely ill medical patients: MAGELLAN study protocol.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Alexander Thomas; Spiro, Theodore Erich; Büller, Harry Roger; Haskell, Lloyd; Hu, Dayi; Hull, Russell; Mebazaa, Alexandre; Merli, Geno; Schellong, Sebastian; Spyropoulos, Alex; Tapson, Victor

    2011-05-01

    Patients with acute medical illnesses are at increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE), a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. Thromboprophylaxis is recommended in these patients but questions remain regarding the optimal duration of therapy. The aim of this study is to determine whether oral rivaroxaban is non-inferior to standard-duration (approximately 10 days) subcutaneous (s.c.) enoxaparin for the prevention of VTE in acutely ill medical patients, and whether extended-duration (approximately 5 weeks) rivaroxaban is superior to standard-duration enoxaparin. Patients aged 40 years or older and hospitalized for various acute medical illnesses with risk factors for VTE randomly receive either s.c. enoxaparin 40 mg once daily (od) for 10 ± 4 days or oral rivaroxaban 10 mg od for 35 ± 4 days. The primary efficacy outcomes are the composite of asymptomatic proximal deep vein thrombosis (DVT), symptomatic DVT, symptomatic non-fatal pulmonary embolism (PE), and VTE-related death up to day 10 + 4 and up to day 35 + 4. The primary safety outcome is the composite of treatment-emergent major bleeding and clinically relevant non-major bleeding. As of July 2010, 8,101 patients from 52 countries have been randomized. These patients have a broad range of medical conditions: approximately one-third were diagnosed with acute heart failure, just under one-third were diagnosed with acute infectious disease, and just under one-quarter were diagnosed with acute respiratory insufficiency. MAGELLAN will determine the efficacy, safety, and pharmacological profile of oral rivaroxaban for the prevention of VTE in a diverse population of medically ill patients and the potential of extended-duration therapy to reduce incidence of VTE.

  7. Infectious etiologies of acute febrile illness among patients seeking health care in south-central Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Kasper, Matthew R; Blair, Patrick J; Touch, Sok; Sokhal, Buth; Yasuda, Chadwick Y; Williams, Maya; Richards, Allen L; Burgess, Timothy H; Wierzba, Thomas F; Putnam, Shannon D

    2012-02-01

    The agents of human febrile illness can vary by region and country suggesting that diagnosis, treatment, and control programs need to be based on a methodical evaluation of area-specific etiologies. From December 2006 to December 2009, 9,997 individuals presenting with acute febrile illness at nine health care clinics in south-central Cambodia were enrolled in a study to elucidate the etiologies. Upon enrollment, respiratory specimens, whole blood, and serum were collected. Testing was performed for viral, bacterial, and parasitic pathogens. Etiologies were identified in 38.0% of patients. Influenza was the most frequent pathogen, followed by dengue, malaria, and bacterial pathogens isolated from blood culture. In addition, 3.5% of enrolled patients were infected with more than one pathogen. Our data provide the first systematic assessment of the etiologies of acute febrile illness in south-central Cambodia. Data from syndromic-based surveillance studies can help guide public health responses in developing nations.

  8. Quantitative Evaluation of the Severity of Acute Illness in Adult Patients with Tick-Borne Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Bogovic, Petra; Logar, Mateja; Avsic-Zupanc, Tatjana; Strle, Franc; Lotric-Furlan, Stanka

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to quantify the severity of acute illness in patients with tick-borne encephalitis and to ascertain this approach by comparing it to standard clinical assessment. We designed scoring system for quantification of the severity of acute illness in patients with tick-borne encephalitis. Certain number of points was allotted to the presence, intensity, and duration of individual symptoms/signs. According to the obtained score the disease was classified as mild, moderate, and severe. Tick-borne encephalitis was assessed clinically as mild when only signs/symptoms of meningeal involvement were found, moderate in case of monofocal neurological signs and/or mild to moderate signs/symptoms of central nervous system dysfunction, and severe in patients with multifocal neurological signs and/or symptoms of severe dysfunction of central nervous system. By designed scoring system 282 adult patients, 146 males and 136 females, average aged 52.2 ± 15.5 years (range 15–82 years), with confirmed tick-borne encephalitis, were prospectively assessed. In 279/282 (98.9%) patients the severity according to clinical assessment matched with the score ranges for mild, moderate, and severe disease. The proposed approach enables precise and straightforward appraisal of the severity of acute illness and could be useful for comparison of findings within/between study groups. PMID:24895617

  9. Outcome in noncritically ill patients with acute kidney injury requiring dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Fagugli, Riccardo Maria; Patera, Francesco; Battistoni, Sara; Tripepi, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Acute kidney injury requiring dialysis (AKI-D) treatment has significantly increased in incidence over the years, with more than 400 new cases per million population/y, 2/3 of which concern noncritically ill patients. In these patients, there are little data on mortality or on information of care organization and its impact on outcome. Specialty training and integrated teams, as well as a high volume of activity, seem to be linked to better hospital outcome. The study investigates mortality of patients admitted to and in-care of nephrology (NEPHROpts), a closed-staff organization, and to other medical wards (MEDpts), representing a model of open-staff organization. This is a single center, case–control cohort study derived from a prospective epidemiology investigation on patients with AKI-D admitted to or in-care of the Hospital of Perugia during the period 2007 to 2014. Noncritically ill AKI-D patients were analyzed: inclusion and exclusion criteria were defined to avoid possible bias on the cause of hospital admittance and comorbidities, and a propensity score (PS) matching was performed. Six hundred fifty-four noncritically ill patients were observed and 296 fulfilled inclusion/exclusion criteria. PS matching resulted in 2 groups: 100 NEPHROpts and 100 MEDpts. Characteristics, comorbidities, acute kidney injury causes, risk–injury–failure acute kidney injury criteria, and simplified acute physiology score (SAPS 2) were similar. Mortality was 36%, and a difference was reported between NEPHROpts and MEDpts (20% vs 52%, χ2 = 23.2, P < 0.001). Patients who died differed in age, serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen/s.Creatinine ratio, dialysis urea reduction rate (URR), SAPS 2 and Charlson score; they presented a higher rate of heart disease, and a larger proportion required noradrenaline/dopamine for shock. After correction for mortality risk factors, multivariate Cox analysis revealed that site of treatment (medical vs nephrology wards

  10. Risk assessment models for venous thromboembolism in acutely ill medical patients. A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Stuck, Anna K; Spirk, David; Schaudt, Jil; Kucher, Nils

    2017-04-03

    Although the use of thromboprophylaxis is recommended for acutely ill medical patients at increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE), it remains unclear which risk assessment model (RAM) should be routinely used to identify at-risk patients requiring thromboprophylaxis. We therefore aimed to describe existing RAMs, and to compare these tools in terms of validity and applicability for clinical decision-making. We performed a comprehensive systematic search in MEDLINE from the date of initiation until May 2016 for studies in acutely ill medical patients investigating validity of RAMs for VTE. Two reviewers independently screened the title, abstract, and full text, and evaluated the characteristics of studies, and the composition, evidence of validation, and results on validity of the RAMs. We included 11 studies assessing eight RAMs: 4-Element RAM, Caprini RAM, a full logistic model, Geneva risk score, IMPROVE-RAM, Kucher Model, a "Multivariable Model", and Padua Prediction Score. The 4-Element RAM, IMPROVE-RAM, Multivariable Model, and full logistic model had derivation by identifying factors with predictive power. The other four RAMs were empirically generated based on consensus guidelines, published data, and clinical expertise. The Kucher Model, the Padua Prediction Score, the Geneva Risk Score and the IMPROVE-RAM underwent multicenter external validation. The Kucher Model, the Padua Prediction Score, and the Geneva Risk Score improved rates of thromboprophylaxis or clinical outcomes. In conclusion, existing RAMs to evaluate the need of thromboprophylaxis in acutely ill medical patients are difficult to compare and none fulfills the criteria of an ideal RAM. Nevertheless, the adequacy of thromboprophylaxis may be improved by implementing one of the validated RAMs.

  11. Septic versus non-septic acute kidney injury in critically ill patients: characteristics and clinical outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Marília Galvão; Dantas, João Gabriel Athayde de Oliveira; Levi, Talita Machado; Rocha, Mário de Seixas; de Souza, Sérgio Pinto; Boa-Sorte, Ney; de Moura, Carlos Geraldo Guerreiro; Cruz, Constança Margarida Sampaio

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to describe and compare the characteristics and clinical outcomes of patients with septic and non-septic acute kidney injury. Methods This study evaluated an open cohort of 117 critically ill patients with acute kidney injury who were consecutively admitted to an intensive care unit, excluding patients with a history of advanced-stage chronic kidney disease, kidney transplantation, hospitalization or death in a period shorter than 24 hours. The presence of sepsis and in-hospital death were the exposure and primary variables in this study, respectively. A confounding analysis was performed using logistic regression. Results No significant differences were found between the mean ages of the groups with septic and non-septic acute kidney injury [65.30±21.27 years versus 66.35±12.82 years, respectively; p=0.75]. In the septic and non-septic acute kidney injury groups, a predominance of females (57.4% versus 52.4%, respectively; p=0.49) and Afro-descendants (81.5% versus 76.2%, respectively; p=0.49) was observed. Compared with the non-septic patients, the patients with sepsis had a higher mean Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score [21.73±7.26 versus 15.75±5.98; p<0.001)] and a higher mean water balance (p=0.001). Arterial hypertension (p=0.01) and heart failure (p<0.001) were more common in the non-septic patients. Septic acute kidney injury was associated with a greater number of patients who required dialysis (p=0.001) and a greater number of deaths (p<0.001); however, renal function recovery was more common in this group (p=0.01). Sepsis (OR: 3.88; 95%CI: 1.51-10.00) and an Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score >18.5 (OR: 9.77; 95%CI: 3.73-25.58) were associated with death in the multivariate analysis. Conclusion Sepsis was an independent predictor of death. Significant differences were found between the characteristics and clinical outcomes of patients with septic versus non-septic acute kidney

  12. Assessment of acutely mentally ill patients' satisfaction of care: there is a difference among ethnic groups.

    PubMed

    Anders, Robert L; Olson, Tom; Bader, Julia

    2007-03-01

    The relationship between quality of care and patient satisfaction has been documented. The specific research aim related to this study is to determine if differences exist among Caucasians, Asians, and Pacific Islanders who are hospitalized for an acute mental illness with regard to their perceived satisfaction with the care. The results of the overall study have been reported elsewhere. The sample was composed of 138 patients, of whom 34.7% were Caucasian, 31.2% Pacific Islanders, and 34.8% Asians. Within 24 hours of discharge, patients completed the Perceptions of Care instrument. Caucasians were over-represented in our sample in comparison to their percentage in the general population of Hawaii. These patients were significantly more satisfied (p = .04) with their care than the other ethnic groups. No single variable was found to specifically indicate why they were more satisfied than Pacific Islanders and Asians.

  13. Acute Kidney Injury Classified by Serum Creatinine and Urine Output in Critically Ill Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Córdova-Sánchez, Bertha M; Herrera-Gómez, Ángel; Ñamendys-Silva, Silvio A

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is common in critically ill patients and is associated with higher mortality. Cancer patients are at an increased risk of AKI. Our objective was to determine the incidence of AKI in our critically ill cancer patients, using the criteria of serum creatinine (SCr) and urine output (UO) proposed by the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO). Methods. We performed a retrospective cohort analysis of a prospectively collected database at the intensive care unit (ICU) of the Instituto Nacional de Cancerología from January 2013 to March 2015. Results. We classified AKI according to the KDIGO definition. We included 389 patients; using the SCr criterion, 192 (49.4%) had AKI; using the UO criterion, 219 (56.3%) had AKI. Using both criteria, we diagnosed AKI in 69.4% of patients. All stages were independently associated with six-month mortality; stage 1 HR was 2.04 (95% CI 1.14-3.68, p = 0.017), stage 2 HR was 2.73 (95% CI 1.53-4.88, p = 0.001), and stage 3 HR was 4.5 (95% CI 2.25-8.02, p < 0.001). Patients who fulfilled both criteria had a higher mortality compared with patients who fulfilled just one criterion (HR 3.56, 95% CI 2.03-6.24, p < 0.001). Conclusion. We diagnosed AKI in 69.4% of patients. All AKI stages were associated with higher risk of death at six months, even for patients who fulfilled just one AKI criterion.

  14. [Dysphagia management of acute and long-term critically ill intensive care patients].

    PubMed

    Zielske, J; Bohne, S; Axer, H; Brunkhorst, F M; Guntinas-Lichius, O

    2014-10-01

    Dysphagia is a severe complication in critically ill patients and affects more than half the patients in an intensive care unit. Dysphagia also has a strong impact on morbidity and mortality. Risk factors for the development of dysphagia are neurological diseases, age >55-70 years, intubation >7 days and sepsis. With increasing numbers of long-term survivors chronic dysphagia is becoming an increasing problem. There is not much knowledge on the influence of specific diseases, including the direct impact of sepsis on the development of dysphagia. Fiberoptic evaluation of swallowing is a standardized tool for bedside evaluation, helping to plan swallowing training during the acute phase and to decrease the rate of chronic dysphagia. For evaluation of chronic dysphagia even more extensive diagnostic tools as well as several options of stepwise rehabilitation using restitution, compensation and adaption strategies for swallowing exist. Currently it seems that these options are not being sufficiently utilized. In general, there is a need for controlled clinical trials analyzing specific swallowing rehabilitation concepts for former critically ill patients and long-term survivors.

  15. Prevention of venous thromboembolism in hospitalized acutely ill medical patients: focus on the clinical utility of (low-dose) fondaparinux.

    PubMed

    Di Nisio, Marcello; Porreca, Ettore

    2013-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a frequent complication among acutely ill medical patients hospitalized for congestive heart failure, acute respiratory insufficiency, rheumatologic disorders, and acute infectious and/or inflammatory diseases. Based on robust data from randomized controlled studies and meta-analyses showing a reduced incidence of VTE by 40% to about 60% with pharmacologic thromboprophylaxis, prevention of VTE with low molecular weight heparin (LMWH), unfractionated heparin (UFH), or fondaparinux is currently recommended in all at-risk hospitalized acutely ill medical patients. In patients who are bleeding or are at high risk for major bleeding, mechanical prophylaxis with graduated compression stockings or intermittent pneumatic compression may be suggested. Thromboprophylaxis is generally continued for 6 to 14 days or for the duration of hospitalization. Selected cases could benefit from extended thromboprophylaxis beyond this period, although the risk of major bleeding remains a concern, and additional studies are needed to identify patients who may benefit from prolonged prophylaxis. For hospitalized acutely ill medical patients with renal insufficiency, a low dose (1.5 mg once daily) of fondaparinux or prophylactic LMWH subcutaneously appears to have a safe profile, although proper evaluation in randomized studies is lacking. The evidence on the use of prophylaxis for VTE in this latter group of patients, as well as in those at higher risk of bleeding complications, such as patients with thrombocytopenia, remains scarce. For critically ill patients hospitalized in intensive care units with no contraindications, LMWH or UFH are recommended, with frequent and careful assessment of the risk of bleeding. In this review, we discuss the evidence for use of thromboprophylaxis for VTE in acutely ill hospitalized medical patients, with a focus on (low-dose) fondaparinux.

  16. Outcome of Critically ill Patients with Acute Kidney Injury using the AKIN Criteria

    PubMed Central

    Mandelbaum, Tal; Scott, Daniel J; Lee, Joon; Mark, Roger G.; Malhotra, Atul; Waikar, Sushrut S.; Howell, Michael D.; Talmor, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Objective Acute kidney injury (AKI) affects 5–7% of all hospitalized patients with a much higher incidence in the critically ill. The Acute Kidney Injury Network proposed a definition in which serum creatinine rises (>0.3mg/dl) and/or oliguria (<0.5/ml/kg/h) for a period of 6 hours are used to detect AKI. Accurate urine output measurements as well as serum creatinine values from our database were used to detect patients with AKI and calculate their corresponding mortality risk and length of stay. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting 7 intensive care units at, a large, academic, tertiary medical center. Patients Adult patients without evidence of end stage renal disease, with more than 2 creatinine measurements and at least a 6 hours urine output recording, who were admitted to the ICU between 2001 and 2007. Interventions Medical records of all the patients were reviewed. Demographic information, lab results, charted data, discharge diagnoses, physiological data and patient outcomes were extracted from the MIMIC-II database using a SQL query. Measurements and main results From 19,677 adult patient records, 14,524 patients met the inclusion criteria. 57% developed AKI during their ICU stay. In-hospital mortality rates were: 13.9%, 16.4%, 33.8% for AKI 1, 2 and 3 respectively compared to only 6.2% in patients without AKI (p<0.0001). After adjusting for multiple covariates AKI was associated with increased hospital mortality (OR 1.4 and 1.3 for AKI1 and AKI2 and 2.5 for AKI3; p<0.0001). Using multivariate logistic regression, we found that in patients who developed AKI, urine output alone was a better mortality predictor than creatinine alone or the combination of both. Conclusions More than 50% of our critically ill patients developed some stage of AKI resulting in stage-wise increased mortality risk. However, the mortality risk associated with AKI stages 1 and 2 does not differ significantly. In light of these findings reevaluation of the AKIN staging

  17. Furosemide is associated with acute kidney injury in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Levi, T.M.; Rocha, M.S.; Almeida, D.N.; Martins, R.T.C.; Silva, M.G.C.; Santana, N.C.P.; Sanjuan, I.T.; Cruz, C.M.S.

    2012-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is common in critically ill patients. Diuretics are used without any evidence demonstrating a beneficial effect on renal function. The objective of the present study is to determine the incidence of AKI in an intensive care unit (ICU) and if there is an association between the use of furosemide and the development of AKI. The study involved a hospital cohort in which 344 patients were consecutively enrolled from January 2010 to January 2011. A total of 132 patients (75 females and 57 males, average age 64 years) remained for analysis. Most exclusions were related to ICU discharge in the first 24 h. Laboratory, sociodemographic and clinical data were collected until the development of AKI, medical discharge or patient death. The incidence of AKI was 55% (95%CI = 46-64). The predictors of AKI found by univariate analysis were septic shock: OR = 3.12, 95%CI = 1.36-7.14; use of furosemide: OR = 3.27, 95%CI = 1.57-6.80, and age: OR = 1.02, 95%CI = 1.00-1.04. Analysis of the subgroup of patients with septic shock showed that the odds ratio of furosemide was 5.5 (95%CI = 1.16-26.02) for development of AKI. Age, use of furosemide, and septic shock were predictors of AKI in critically ill patients. Use of furosemide in the subgroup of patients with sepsis/septic shock increased (68.4%) the chance of development of AKI when compared to the sample as a whole (43.9%) PMID:22641414

  18. Frequency of Epstein - Barr Virus in Patients Presenting with Acute Febrile Illness in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Masakhwe, Clement; Ochanda, Horace; Nyakoe, Nancy; Ochiel, Daniel; Waitumbi, John

    2016-01-01

    Background Most acute febrile illnesses (AFI) are usually not associated with a specific diagnosis because of limitations of available diagnostics. This study reports on the frequency of EBV viremia and viral load in children and adults presenting with febrile illness in hospitals in Kenya. Methodology/Principal Findings A pathogen surveillance study was conducted on patients presenting with AFI (N = 796) at outpatient departments in 8 hospitals located in diverse regions of Kenya. Enrollment criterion to the study was fever without a readily diagnosable infection. All the patients had AFI not attributable to the common causes of fever in Kenyan hospitals, such as malaria or rickettsiae, leptospira, brucella and salmonella and they were hence categorized as having AFI of unknown etiology. EBV was detected in blood using quantitative TaqMan-based qPCR targeting a highly conserved BALF5 gene. The overall frequency of EBV viremia in this population was 29.2%, with significantly higher proportion in younger children of <5years (33.8%, p = 0.039) compared to patients aged ≥5 years (26.3% for 5–15 years or 18.8% for >15 years). With respect to geographical localities, the frequency of EBV viremia was higher in the Lake Victoria region (36.4%), compared to Kisii highland (24.6%), Coastal region (22.2%) and Semi-Arid region (25%). Furthermore, patients from the malaria endemic coastal region and the Lake Victoria region presented with significantly higher viremia than individuals from other regions of Kenya. Conclusions/Significance This study provides profiles of EBV in patients with AFI from diverse eco-regions of Kenya. Of significant interest is the high frequency of EBV viremia in younger children. The observed high frequencies of EBV viremia and elevated viral loads in residents of high malaria transmission areas are probably related to malaria induced immune activation and resultant expansion of EBV infected B-cells. PMID:27163791

  19. Safety of performing fiberoptic bronchoscopy in critically ill hypoxemic patients with acute respiratory failure

    PubMed Central

    Cracco, Christophe; Fartoukh, Muriel; Prodanovic, Hélène; Azoulay, Elie; Chenivesse, Cécile; Lorut, Christine; Beduneau, Gaëtan; Bui, Hoang Nam; Taille, Camille; Brochard, Laurent; Demoule, Alexandre; Maitre, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    Background Safety of fibreoptic bronchoscopy (FOB) in nonintubated critically ill patients with acute respiratory failure have not been extensively evaluated. We aimed to measure the incidence of intubation and need to increase ventilatory support following FOB and to identify predictive factors of this event. Methods A prospective multicenter observational study was carried out in 8 French adult intensive care units. 169 FOB performed in patients with a PaO2/FiO2 ratio equal or less than 300 were analyzed. Our main end point was intubation rate. The secondary end point was rate of increased ventilatory support defined as greater than a 50% increase in oxygen requirement, the need to start non invasive-positive pressure ventilation (NI-PPV) or increase NI-PPV support. Results Within 24 hours, an increase in ventilatory support was required following 59 (35%) bronchoscopies, of which 25 (15%) led to endotracheal intubation. The existence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (OR:5.2 [1.6–17.8], p=0.007) or immunosuppression (OR : 5.4 [1.7–17.2], p=0.004) were significantly associated with the need for intubation in multivariable analysis. None of the baseline physiological parameters including the PaO2/FiO2 ratio was associated with intubation. Conclusion Bronchoscopy is often followed by an increase in ventilatory support in hypoxemic critically ill patients, but less frequently by the need for intubation. COPD, immunosuppression are associated with a need for invasive ventilation in the following 24 hours. PMID:23070123

  20. Clinical relevance of multiple respiratory virus detection in adult patients with acute respiratory illness.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seong-Ho; Chung, Jin-Won; Kim, Hye Ryoun

    2015-04-01

    Because increasing numbers of nasopharyngeal swab specimens from adult patients with acute respiratory illness (ARI) are being tested by respiratory virus (RV) multiplex reverse transcriptase PCR (RVM-RT-PCR), multiple RV detection (MRVD) is being encountered more frequently. However, the clinical relevance of MRVD in adult patients has rarely been evaluated. The clinical characteristics of hospitalized adult patients with ARI and MRVD by RVM-RT-PCR tests were compared to those of patients with single RV detection (SRVD) during a single year at a tertiary care center. MRVD was observed in 26 of the 190 adult patients (13.7%). The patients with MRVD had a higher incidence of chronic lung disease than the patients with SRVD (34.6% versus 15.9%, crude odds ratio [OR]=2.81, 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.13 to 6.98, P=0.03). Although the former were more likely than the latter to receive mechanical ventilation (19.2% versus 6.7%, crude OR=3.31, 95% CI=1.05 to 10.47, P=0.049), the length of hospital stay (median, 7 versus 6.5 days; P=0.66), and the in-hospital mortality rate (7.7% versus 4.3%, crude OR=1.87, 95% CI=0.37 to 9.53, P=0.35) were not different between the two groups. In multivariate analysis, chronic lung disease was associated with MRVD (adjusted OR=3.08, 95% CI=1.12 to 8.46, P=0.03). In summary, it was not uncommon to encounter adult patients with ARI and MRVD by RVM-RT-PCR tests of nasopharyngeal swab specimens. MRVD was associated with chronic lung disease rather than the severity of the ARI.

  1. Facial Emotion Processing in Acutely Ill and Euthymic Patients with Pediatric Bipolar Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schenkel, Lindsay S.; Pavuluri, Mani N.; Herbener, Ellen S.; Harral, Erin M.; Sweeney, John A.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Past investigations indicate facial emotion-processing abnormalities in pediatric bipolar disorder (PBD) subjects. However, the extent to which these deficits represent state- and trait-related factors is unclear. We investigated facial affect processing in acutely ill and clinically stabilized children with PBD and matched healthy…

  2. Fecal incontinence in acutely and critically ill patients: options in management.

    PubMed

    Beitz, Janice M

    2006-12-01

    Fecal incontinence presents a major challenge in the comprehensive nursing care of acutely and critically ill patients. When manifested as diarrhea, the effects of fecal incontinence can range from mild (superficial skin irritation) to profound (severe perineal dermatitis, dehydration, electrolyte imbalance, and sepsis). Fecal incontinence has many etiologies and risk factors. These include damage to the anal sphincter or pelvic floor, liquid stool consistency, abnormal colonic transport, and decreased intestinal capacity. To avoid or minimize complications, the cause of diarrhea should be addressed, fecal leakage prevented, stool contained, and skin integrity preserved. Management options addressing these goals include diet, pharmacological therapy, and the use of containment products. Management options and their respective advantages and disadvantages are presented with a special focus on safety issues. Diverse approaches are safe only if they are knowledgeably selected, carefully instituted, and constantly monitored for their effects on patient outcomes. Research to identify which options work best in selected clinical situations and which combinations of therapies are most effective is needed.

  3. Reducing Length of Acute Inpatient Hospitalization Using a Residential Step Down Model for Patients with Serious Mental Illness.

    PubMed

    Zarzar, Theodore; Sheitman, Brian; Cook, Alan; Robbins, Brian

    2017-02-23

    Psychiatric inpatient bed numbers have been markedly reduced in recent decades often resulting in long emergency department wait times for acutely ill psychiatric patients. The authors describe a model utilizing short-term residential treatment to substitute for acute inpatient care when the barrier to discharge for patients with serious mental illness (SMI) is finding appropriate community placement. Thirty-eight patients (community hospital (n = 30) and a state hospital (n = 8)) were included. Clinical variables, pre-/post-step down length of stay, and adverse outcomes are reported. Thirty of the 38 patients completed treatment on the residential unit and were discharged to the community. Five of the patients required readmission to an inpatient unit and the other three had pre-planned state hospital discharges. The majority of patients with SMI awaiting placement can be stepped down to residential treatment, potentially freeing up an inpatient bed for an acutely ill patient. Reforms in healthcare funding are necessary to incentivize such an approach on a larger scale, despite likely cost savings.

  4. Alkaline phosphatase: a possible treatment for sepsis-associated acute kidney injury in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Peters, Esther; Heemskerk, Suzanne; Masereeuw, Rosalinde; Pickkers, Peter

    2014-06-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common disease in the intensive care unit and accounts for high morbidity and mortality. Sepsis, the predominant cause of AKI in this setting, involves a complex pathogenesis in which renal inflammation and hypoxia are believed to play an important role. A new therapy should be aimed at targeting both these processes, and the enzyme alkaline phosphatase, with its dual mode of action, might be a promising candidate. First, alkaline phosphatase is able to reduce inflammation through dephosphorylation and thereby detoxification of endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide), which is an important mediator of sepsis. Second, adenosine triphosphate, released during cellular stress caused by inflammation and hypoxia, has detrimental effects but can be converted by alkaline phosphatase into adenosine with anti-inflammatory and tissue-protective effects. These postulated beneficial effects of alkaline phosphatase have been confirmed in animal experiments and two phase 2a clinical trials showing that kidney function improved in critically ill patients with sepsis-associated AKI. Because renal inflammation and hypoxia also are observed commonly in AKI induced by other causes, it would be of interest to investigate the therapeutic effect of alkaline phosphatase in these nephropathies as well.

  5. Acute fluid shifts influence the assessment of serum vitamin D status in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Recent reports have highlighted the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency and suggested an association with excess mortality in critically ill patients. Serum vitamin D concentrations in these studies were measured following resuscitation. It is unclear whether aggressive fluid resuscitation independently influences serum vitamin D. Methods Nineteen patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass were studied. Serum 25(OH)D3, 1α,25(OH)2D3, parathyroid hormone, C-reactive protein (CRP), and ionised calcium were measured at five defined timepoints: T1 - baseline, T2 - 5 minutes after onset of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) (time of maximal fluid effect), T3 - on return to the intensive care unit, T4 - 24 hrs after surgery and T5 - 5 days after surgery. Linear mixed models were used to compare measures at T2-T5 with baseline measures. Results Acute fluid loading resulted in a 35% reduction in 25(OH)D3 (59 ± 16 to 38 ± 14 nmol/L, P < 0.0001) and a 45% reduction in 1α,25(OH)2D3 (99 ± 40 to 54 ± 22 pmol/L P < 0.0001) and i(Ca) (P < 0.01), with elevation in parathyroid hormone (P < 0.0001). Serum 25(OH)D3 returned to baseline only at T5 while 1α,25(OH)2D3 demonstrated an overshoot above baseline at T5 (P < 0.0001). There was a delayed rise in CRP at T4 and T5; this was not associated with a reduction in vitamin D levels at these time points. Conclusions Hemodilution significantly lowers serum 25(OH)D3 and 1α,25(OH)2D3, which may take up to 24 hours to resolve. Moreover, delayed overshoot of 1α,25(OH)2D3 needs consideration. We urge caution in interpreting serum vitamin D in critically ill patients in the context of major resuscitation, and would advocate repeating the measurement once the effects of the resuscitation have abated. PMID:21110839

  6. AKI-CLIF-SOFA: a novel prognostic score for critically ill cirrhotic patients with acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Dan-Qin; Zheng, Chen-Fei; Liu, Wen-Yue; Van Poucke, Sven; Mao, Zhi; Shi, Ke-Qing; Wang, Xiao-Dong; Wang, Ji-Dong; Zheng, Ming-Hua

    2017-01-01

    Critically ill cirrhotic patients with acute kidney injury (AKI) are associated with high mortality rates. The aims of this study were to develop a specific prognostic score for critically ill cirrhotic patients with AKI, the acute kidney injury - Chronic Liver Failure - Sequential Organ Failure- Assessment score (AKI-CLIF-SOFA) score. This study focused on 527 cirrhotic patients with AKI admitted to intensive care unit and constructed a new scoring system, the AKI-CLIF-SOFA, which can be used to prognostically assess mortality in these patient population. Parameters included in this model were analysed by cox regression. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (auROC) of AKI-CLIF-SOFA scoring system was 0.74 in 30 days, 0.74 in 90 days, 0.72 in 270 days and 0.72 in 365 days. Additionally, this study demonstrated that the new model had more discriminatory power than chronic liver failure- sequential organ failure assessment score (CLIF-SOFA), SOFA, model for end stage liver disease (MELD), kidney disease improving global outcomes (KDIGO) and simplified acute physiology score II (SAPS II) (auROC: 0.72, 0.66, 0.64, 0.62, 0.63 and 0.65 respectively, all P < 0.05) for the prediction of the 365-days mortality. Therefore, AKI-CLIF-SOFA demonstrated a valuable discriminative ability compared with KDIGO, CLIF-SOFA, MELD, SAPS II and SOFA in critically ill cirrhotic patients with AKI. PMID:28114104

  7. N-Acetylcysteine Administration Prevents Nonthyroidal Illness Syndrome in Patients With Acute Myocardial Infarction: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Vidart, Josi; Wajner, Simone Magagnin; Leite, Rogério Sarmento; Manica, André; Schaan, Beatriz D.; Larsen, P. Reed

    2014-01-01

    Context: The acute phase of the nonthyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS) is characterized by low T3 and high rT3 levels, affecting up to 75% of critically ill patients. Oxidative stress has been implicated as a causative factor of the disturbed peripheral thyroid hormone metabolism. Objective: The objective of the study was to investigate whether N-acetylcysteine (NAC), a potent intracellular antioxidant, can prevent NTIS in patients with acute myocardial infarction. Design: This was a randomized, multicenter clinical trial. Settings: Consecutive patients admitted to the emergency and intensive care units of two tertiary hospitals in southern Brazil were recruited. Patients and intervention included 67 patients were randomized to receive NAC or placebo during 48 hours. Baseline characteristics and blood samples for thyroid hormones and oxidative parameters were collected. Main Outcome: Variation of serum T3 and rT3 levels was measured. Results: Baseline characteristics were similar between groups (all P > .05). T3 levels decreased in the placebo group at 12 hours of follow-up (P = .002) but not in NAC-treated patients (P = .10). Baseline rT3 levels were elevated in both groups and decreased over the initial 48 hours in the NAC-treated patients (P = .003) but not in the control group (P = .75). The free T4 and TSH levels were virtually identical between the groups throughout the study period (P > .05). Measurement of total antioxidant status and total carbonyl content demonstrated that oxidative balance was deranged in acute myocardial infarction patients, whereas NAC corrected these alterations (P < .001). Conclusions: NAC administration prevents the derangement in thyroid hormone concentrations commonly occurring in the acute phase of acute myocardial infarction, indicating that oxidative stress is involved in the NTIS pathophysiology. PMID:25148231

  8. Diurnal salivary cortisol measurement in the neurosurgical-surgical intensive care unit in critically ill acute trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Bartanusz, Viktor; Corneille, Michael G; Sordo, Salvador; Gildea, Marianne; Michalek, Joel E; Nair, Prakash V; Stewart, Ronald M; Jezova, Daniela

    2014-12-01

    Acute trauma patients represent a specific subgroup of the critically ill population due to sudden and dramatic changes in homeostasis and consequently extreme demands on the activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis. Salivary cortisol is an accepted surrogate for serum free cortisol in the assessment of HPA axis function. The purpose of this study was (1) to establish the feasibility of salivary cortisol measurement in acute trauma patients in the neurosurgical-surgical intensive care unit (NSICU), and (2) to determine the diurnal pattern of salivary cortisol in the acute phase after injury. Saliva from 50 acute trauma patients was prospectively collected twice a day at 6AM and 4PM during the first week after injury in the NSICU. Mean PM cortisol concentrations were significantly higher in subjects versus controls (p<0.001). Subjects failed to develop the expected PM versus AM decrease in cortisol concentration seen in controls (p=0.005). Salivary cortisol did not vary significantly with baseline Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), Injury Severity Score, sex, injury type, ethnicity, or age. When comparing mean AM and PM salivary cortisol by GCS severity category (GCS ⩽8 and GCS >8) the AM salivary cortisol was significantly higher in patients with GCS ⩽8 (p=0.002). The results show a loss of diurnal cortisol variation in acute trauma patient in the NSICU during the first week of hospitalization. Patients with severe brain injury had higher morning cortisol levels than those with mild/moderate brain injury.

  9. Surrogate medical decision making on behalf of a never-competent, profoundly intellectually disabled patient who is acutely ill.

    PubMed

    Venkat, Arvind

    2012-01-01

    With the improvements in medical care and resultant increase in life expectancy of the intellectually disabled, it will become more common for healthcare providers to be confronted by ethical dilemmas in the care of this patient population. Many of the dilemmas will focus on what is in the best interest of patients who have never been able to express their wishes with regard to medical and end-of-life care and who should be empowered to exercise surrogate medical decision-making authority on their behalf. A case is presented that exemplifies the ethical and legal tensions surrounding surrogate medical decision making for acutely ill, never-competent, profoundly intellectually disabled patients.

  10. Experience with a Simplified Computer Based Intensive Care Monitoring System in the Management of Acutely Ill Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hadley, H. Roger; Rutherford, Harold G.; Smith, Louis L.; Briggs, Burton A.; Neilsen, Ivan R.; Rau, Richard

    1979-01-01

    The need exists for a simplified and ecomonical computer based monitoring system for critically ill surgical patients. Such a system would enjoy widespread use in surgical intensive care units in regional, as well as larger community hospitals. We have assembled such a system which provides digital readout of the usual physiologic parameters, and also provide computer storage of accumulated data for review and evaluation of patient care. The computer provides graphic and digital display and digital printout for subsequent inclusion in the patient records. Most frequent indications for this system include the development of acute respiratory insufficiency or acute circulatory failure due to invasive sepsis and/or severe arteriosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Information most beneficial in patient care included measurement of cardiac output;alveolar arterial oxygen gradient. ImagesFigure 1Figure 5Figure 9Figure 11

  11. Fluid overload and survival in critically ill patients with acute kidney injury receiving continuous renal replacement therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Il Young; Kim, Joo Hui; Lee, Dong Won; Lee, Soo Bong; Rhee, Harin; Seong, Eun Young; Kwak, Ihm Soo

    2017-01-01

    Background Fluid overload is known to be associated with increased mortality in patients with acute kidney injury (AKI) who are critically ill. In this study, we intended to uncover whether the adverse effect of fluid overload on survival could be applied to all of the patients with AKI who received continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT). Methods We analyzed 341 patients with AKI who received CRRT in our intensive care units. The presence of fluid overload was defined as a minimum 10% increase in body weight from the baseline. Demographics, comorbid diseases, clinical data, severity of illness [the sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) score, number of vasopressors, diagnosis of sepsis, use of ventilator] upon ICU admission, fluid overload status, and time elapsed from AKI diagnosis until CRRT initiation were reviewed from the medical charts. Results Patients with total fluid overload from 3 days before CRRT initiation to ICU discharge had a significantly lower survival rate after ICU admission, as compared to patients with no fluid overload (P < 0.001). Among patients with sepsis (P < 0.001) or with high SOFA scores (P < 0.001), there was a significant difference in survival of the patients with and without fluid overload. In patients without sepsis or with low SOFA score, there was no significant difference in survival of patients irrespective of fluid overload. Conclusion Our study demonstrates that the adverse effect of fluid overload on survival is more evident in patients with sepsis or with more severe illness, and that it might not apply to patients without sepsis or with less severe illness. PMID:28196107

  12. Outcome in noncritically ill patients with acute kidney injury requiring dialysis: Effects of differing medical staffs and organizations.

    PubMed

    Fagugli, Riccardo Maria; Patera, Francesco; Battistoni, Sara; Tripepi, Giovanni

    2016-07-01

    Acute kidney injury requiring dialysis (AKI-D) treatment has significantly increased in incidence over the years, with more than 400 new cases per million population/y, 2/3 of which concern noncritically ill patients. In these patients, there are little data on mortality or on information of care organization and its impact on outcome. Specialty training and integrated teams, as well as a high volume of activity, seem to be linked to better hospital outcome. The study investigates mortality of patients admitted to and in-care of nephrology (NEPHROpts), a closed-staff organization, and to other medical wards (MEDpts), representing a model of open-staff organization.This is a single center, case-control cohort study derived from a prospective epidemiology investigation on patients with AKI-D admitted to or in-care of the Hospital of Perugia during the period 2007 to 2014. Noncritically ill AKI-D patients were analyzed: inclusion and exclusion criteria were defined to avoid possible bias on the cause of hospital admittance and comorbidities, and a propensity score (PS) matching was performed.Six hundred fifty-four noncritically ill patients were observed and 296 fulfilled inclusion/exclusion criteria. PS matching resulted in 2 groups: 100 NEPHROpts and 100 MEDpts. Characteristics, comorbidities, acute kidney injury causes, risk-injury-failure acute kidney injury criteria, and simplified acute physiology score (SAPS 2) were similar. Mortality was 36%, and a difference was reported between NEPHROpts and MEDpts (20% vs 52%, χ = 23.2, P < 0.001). Patients who died differed in age, serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen/s.Creatinine ratio, dialysis urea reduction rate (URR), SAPS 2 and Charlson score; they presented a higher rate of heart disease, and a larger proportion required noradrenaline/dopamine for shock. After correction for mortality risk factors, multivariate Cox analysis revealed that site of treatment (medical vs nephrology wards) represents an

  13. The social practice of rescue: the safety implications of acute illness trajectories and patient categorisation in medical and maternity settings.

    PubMed

    Mackintosh, Nicola; Sandall, Jane

    2016-02-01

    The normative position in acute hospital care when a patient is seriously ill is to resuscitate and rescue. However, a number of UK and international reports have highlighted problems with the lack of timely recognition, treatment and referral of patients whose condition is deteriorating while being cared for on hospital wards. This article explores the social practice of rescue, and the structural and cultural influences that guide the categorisation and ordering of acutely ill patients in different hospital settings. We draw on Strauss et al.'s notion of the patient trajectory and link this with the impact of categorisation practices, thus extending insights beyond those gained from emergency department triage to care management processes further downstream on the hospital ward. Using ethnographic data collected from medical wards and maternity care settings in two UK inner city hospitals, we explore how differences in population, cultural norms, categorisation work and trajectories of clinical deterioration interlink and influence patient safety. An analysis of the variation in findings between care settings and patient groups enables us to consider socio-political influences and the specifics of how staff manage trade-offs linked to the enactment of core values such as safety and equity in practice.

  14. Unsuspected rickettsioses among patients with acute febrile illness, Sri Lanka, 2007.

    PubMed

    Reller, Megan E; Bodinayake, Champica; Nagahawatte, Ajith; Devasiri, Vasantha; Kodikara-Arachichi, Wasantha; Strouse, John J; Flom, Judith E; Østbye, Truls; Woods, Christopher W; Dumler, J Stephen

    2012-05-01

    We studied rickettsioses in southern Sri Lanka. Of 883 febrile patients with paired serum samples, 156 (17.7%) had acute rickettsioses; rickettsioses were unsuspected at presentation. Additionally, 342 (38.7%) had exposure to spotted fever and/or typhus group rickettsioses and 121 (13.7%) scrub typhus. Increased awareness of rickettsioses and better tests are needed.

  15. Clinical Impact of Blood Culture Results in Acutely Ill Hospitalized Adult Patients With Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Vender, Robert J.; Vender, Robert L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Blood cultures are obtained clinically to confirm site and source of acute infection as well as to guide effective antibiotic therapies. Patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) are at risk for blood stream infection (BSI) as identified from positive blood culture results. Methods A retrospective chart review was performed of 190 adult CF patients from January 1, 2001 through December 1, 2015. All positive blood culture results were identified as to clinical relevance and source of BSI. Results There were a total of 3,053 blood cultures. One hundred fifty-one positive blood cultures were considered pathogenic and clinically significant. Venous access device-related BSI was identified in 31 evaluable patients and 106 blood cultures. Nineteen patients and 45 positive blood cultures were attributable to organ-specific sources. Conclusion Two patterns of BSI were identified: 1) venous access device infections without causal mortality and 2) organ-specific site infections with associated 26% mortality. PMID:27829951

  16. Validation of the Personal and Social Performance (PSP) Scale in a German sample of acutely ill patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Juckel, Georg; Schaub, Daniela; Fuchs, Nina; Naumann, Ute; Uhl, Idun; Witthaus, Henning; Hargarter, Ludger; Bierhoff, Hans-Werner; Brüne, Martin

    2008-09-01

    In trying to more broadly define outcome in the efficient long-term treatment of patients with schizophrenia it is necessary to consider not only a reduction in psychopathological symptoms but also a successful psychosocial reintegration. Thus, a more exact assessment of psychosocial functioning is needed. Since the GAF (Global Assessment of Functioning) scale and the SOFAS (Social and Occupational Functioning Assessment Scale) are less operationalized and confuse psychosocial facts with psychopathological symptoms, the Personal and Social Performance (PSP) scale was developed [Morosini, P.L., Magliano, L., Brambilla, L., Ugolini, S., Pioli, R. (2000). Development, reliability and acceptability of a new version of the DSM-IV Social and Occupational Functioning Assessment Scale (SOFAS) to assess routine social functioning. Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica, 1001, 323-329.] containing the four main areas "socially useful activities, personal and social relationships, self-care, as well as disturbing and aggressive behaviour". Validation of the PSP scale was conducted in a sample of 62 patients with acute schizophrenia. Rating instruments were PSP, GAF, SOFAS, PANSS, CGI, and Mini-ICF-P (Mini-ICF-Rating for Mental Disorders). The results showed good reliability with alpha=.64-.84, high test-retest reliability as well as good inter-rater reliability for the PSP scale. Furthermore, PSP proved good validity with high correlations to GAF (r=.91), SOFAS (r=.91), and Mini-ICF-P (r=-.69). The hypothesis that more critically ill patients would show lower scores on PSP than lesser ill patients was only confirmed for PANSS negative symptoms. Thus, the findings prove the PSP scale to be a reliable and valid instrument for assessing social functioning of patients with schizophrenia during the course of treatment as well as in the acute state.

  17. Pharmacokinetics of fluconazole in critically ill patients with acute kidney injury receiving sustained low-efficiency diafiltration.

    PubMed

    Sinnollareddy, Mahipal G; Roberts, Michael S; Lipman, Jeffrey; Robertson, Thomas A; Peake, Sandra L; Roberts, Jason A

    2015-02-01

    Fluconazole is a widely used antifungal agent in critically ill patients. It is predominantly (60-80%) excreted unchanged in urine. Sustained low-efficiency diafiltration (SLED-f) is increasingly being utilised in critically ill patients because of its practical advantages over continuous renal replacement therapy. To date, the effect of SLED-f on fluconazole pharmacokinetics and dosing has not been studied. The objective of this study was to describe the pharmacokinetics of fluconazole in critically ill patients with acute kidney injury receiving SLED-f and to compare this with other forms of renal replacement therapy. Serial blood samples were collected at pre- and post-filter ports within the SLED-f circuit during SLED-f and from an arterial catheter before and after SLED-f from three patients during one session. Fluconazole concentrations were measured using a validated chromatography method. Median clearance (CL) and 24-h area under the concentration-time curve (AUC0-24) were 2.1L/h and 152 mg·h/L, respectively, whilst receiving SLED-f. Moreover, 72% of fluconazole was cleared by a single SLED-f session (6h) compared with previous reports of 33-38% clearance by a 4-h intermittent haemodialysis session. CL and AUC0-24 were comparable with previous observations in a pre-dilution mode of continuous venovenous haemodiafiltration. The observed rebound concentration of fluconazole post SLED-f was <2%. Although a definitive dosing recommendation is not possible due to the small patient number, it is clear that doses >200mg daily are likely to be required to achieve the PK/PD target for common pathogens because of significant fluconazole clearance by SLED-f.

  18. Prevention of venous thromboembolism in acutely ill medical patients after the results of recent trials with the new oral anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    Imberti, Davide; Benedetti, Raffaella; Ageno, Walter

    2013-12-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a common potentially life-threatening complication in acutely ill medical patients; over 70 % of the fatal episodes of pulmonary embolism during hospitalization occur in non-surgical patients. In the absence of thromboprophylaxis, the incidence of venographically detected deep vein thrombosis is about 15 % in medical patients. Several trials and meta-analyses have clearly demonstrated the prophylactic role of unfractionated heparin, low molecular weight heparin and fondaparinux. Although over the past few years the knowledge of epidemiology, clinical features and prophylaxis in medical patients has significantly improved, there remain a number of controversial areas that require further investigation. Newer VTE risk assessment models have been proposed to select high risk hospitalized medical patients, but they still require external validation; scarce data are available to stratify patients to identify their individual bleeding risk. The optimal duration of thromboprophylaxis in medical patients is still a matter of debate; currently, extended prophylaxis after discharge is not recommended, but it may be required for subgroup of patients with persistently high VTE risk and a negligible risk of bleeding. Based on the results of recent studies, the new oral anticoagulants appear to have a very limited role, if any. However, a better risk stratification of patients who have a persistently increased risk of VTE is warranted to improve the risk to benefit profile of any anticoagulant drug to be used in this setting.

  19. Incidence and risk factors of acute kidney injury associated with continuous intravenous high-dose vancomycin in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Lacave, Guillaume; Caille, Vincent; Bruneel, Fabrice; Palette, Catherine; Legriel, Stéphane; Grimaldi, David; Eurin, Mathilde; Bedos, Jean-Pierre

    2017-01-01

    Abstract For vancomycin therapy of severe infections, the Infectious Diseases Society of America recommends high vancomycin trough levels, whose potential for inducing nephrotoxicity is controversial. We evaluated the incidence and risk factors of acute kidney injury (AKI) in critically ill patients given continuous intravenous vancomycin with target serum vancomycin levels of 20 to 30 mg/L. We retrospectively studied 107 continuous intravenous vancomycin treatments of ≥48 hours’ duration with at least 2 serum vancomycin levels ≥20 mg/L in critically ill patients. Nephrotoxicity was defined according to the Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes Clinical Practice Guideline for AKI (ie, serum creatinine elevation by ≥26.5 μmoL/L or to ≥1.5 times baseline). Risk factors for AKI were identified by univariate and multivariate analyses. AKI developed in 31 (29%) courses. Higher serum vancomycin levels were associated with AKI (P < 0.01). Factors independently associated with AKI were highest serum vancomycin ≥40 mg/L (odds ratio [OR], 3.75; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.40–10.37; P < 0.01), higher cumulative number of organ failures (OR, 2.63 95%CI, 1.42–5.31; P < 0.01), and cirrhosis of the liver (OR, 5.58; 95%CI, 1.08–31.59; P = 0.04). In this study, 29% of critically ill patients had AKI develop during continuous intravenous vancomycin therapy targeting serum levels of 20 to 30 mg/L. Serum vancomycin level ≥40 mg/L was independently associated with AKI. PMID:28207512

  20. Differential Impact of Hyperglycemia in Critically Ill Patients: Significance in Acute Myocardial Infarction but Not in Sepsis?

    PubMed Central

    Wernly, Bernhard; Lichtenauer, Michael; Franz, Marcus; Kabisch, Bjoern; Muessig, Johanna; Masyuk, Maryna; Kelm, Malte; Hoppe, Uta C.; Jung, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Hyperglycemia is a common condition in critically ill patients admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU). These patients represent an inhomogeneous collective and hyperglycemia might need different evaluation depending on the underlying disorder. To elucidate this, we investigated and compared associations of severe hyperglycemia (>200 mg/dL) and mortality in patients admitted to an ICU for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) or sepsis as the two most frequent admission diagnoses. From 2006 to 2009, 2551 patients 69 (58–77) years; 1544 male; 337 patients suffering from type 2 diabetes (T2DM)) who were admitted because of either AMI or sepsis to an ICU in a tertiary care hospital were investigated retrospectively. Follow-up of patients was performed between May 2013 and November 2013. In a Cox regression analysis, maximum glucose concentration at the day of admission was associated with mortality in the overall cohort (HR = 1.006, 95% CI: 1.004–1.009; p < 0.001) and in patients suffering from myocardial infarction (HR = 1.101, 95% CI: 1.075–1.127; p < 0.001) but only in trend in patients admitted to an ICU for sepsis (HR = 1.030, 95% CI: 0.998–1.062; p = 0.07). Severe hyperglycemia was associated with adverse intra-ICU mortality in the overall cohort (23% vs. 13%; p < 0.001) and patients admitted for AMI (15% vs. 5%; p < 0.001) but not for septic patients (39% vs. 40%; p = 0.48). A medical history of type 2 diabetes (n = 337; 13%) was not associated with increased intra-ICU mortality (15% vs. 15%; p = 0.93) but in patients with severe hyperglycemia and/or a known medical history of type 2 diabetes considered in combination, an increased mortality in AMI patients (intra-ICU 5% vs. 13%; p < 0.001) but not in septic patients (intra-ICU 38% vs. 41%; p = 0.53) could be evidenced. The presence of hyperglycemia in critically ill patients has differential impact within the different etiological groups. Hyperglycemia in AMI patients might identify a sicker patient

  1. The Relationship between Poverty and Healthcare Seeking among Patients Hospitalized with Acute Febrile Illnesses in Chittagong, Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Herdman, M Trent; Maude, Richard James; Chowdhury, Md Safiqul; Kingston, Hugh W F; Jeeyapant, Atthanee; Samad, Rasheda; Karim, Rezaul; Dondorp, Arjen M; Hossain, Md Amir

    2016-01-01

    Delays in seeking appropriate healthcare can increase the case fatality of acute febrile illnesses, and circuitous routes of care-seeking can have a catastrophic financial impact upon patients in low-income settings. To investigate the relationship between poverty and pre-hospital delays for patients with acute febrile illnesses, we recruited a cross-sectional, convenience sample of 527 acutely ill adults and children aged over 6 months, with a documented fever ≥38.0 °C and symptoms of up to 14 days' duration, presenting to a tertiary referral hospital in Chittagong, Bangladesh, over the course of one year from September 2011 to September 2012. Participants were classified according to the socioeconomic status of their households, defined by the Oxford Poverty and Human Development Initiative's multidimensional poverty index (MPI). 51% of participants were classified as multidimensionally poor (MPI>0.33). Median time from onset of any symptoms to arrival at hospital was 22 hours longer for MPI poor adults compared to non-poor adults (123 vs. 101 hours) rising to a difference of 26 hours with adjustment in a multivariate regression model (95% confidence interval 7 to 46 hours; P = 0.009). There was no difference in delays for children from poor and non-poor households (97 vs. 119 hours; P = 0.394). Case fatality was 5.9% vs. 0.8% in poor and non-poor individuals respectively (P = 0.001)-5.1% vs. 0.0% for poor and non-poor adults (P = 0.010) and 6.4% vs. 1.8% for poor and non-poor children (P = 0.083). Deaths were attributed to central nervous system infection (11), malaria (3), urinary tract infection (2), gastrointestinal infection (1) and undifferentiated sepsis (1). Both poor and non-poor households relied predominantly upon the (often informal) private sector for medical advice before reaching the referral hospital, but MPI poor participants were less likely to have consulted a qualified doctor. Poor participants were more likely to attribute delays in

  2. The Relationship between Poverty and Healthcare Seeking among Patients Hospitalized with Acute Febrile Illnesses in Chittagong, Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Herdman, M. Trent; Maude, Richard James; Chowdhury, Md. Safiqul; Kingston, Hugh W. F.; Jeeyapant, Atthanee; Samad, Rasheda; Karim, Rezaul; Dondorp, Arjen M.; Hossain, Md. Amir

    2016-01-01

    Delays in seeking appropriate healthcare can increase the case fatality of acute febrile illnesses, and circuitous routes of care-seeking can have a catastrophic financial impact upon patients in low-income settings. To investigate the relationship between poverty and pre-hospital delays for patients with acute febrile illnesses, we recruited a cross-sectional, convenience sample of 527 acutely ill adults and children aged over 6 months, with a documented fever ≥38.0°C and symptoms of up to 14 days’ duration, presenting to a tertiary referral hospital in Chittagong, Bangladesh, over the course of one year from September 2011 to September 2012. Participants were classified according to the socioeconomic status of their households, defined by the Oxford Poverty and Human Development Initiative’s multidimensional poverty index (MPI). 51% of participants were classified as multidimensionally poor (MPI>0.33). Median time from onset of any symptoms to arrival at hospital was 22 hours longer for MPI poor adults compared to non-poor adults (123 vs. 101 hours) rising to a difference of 26 hours with adjustment in a multivariate regression model (95% confidence interval 7 to 46 hours; P = 0.009). There was no difference in delays for children from poor and non-poor households (97 vs. 119 hours; P = 0.394). Case fatality was 5.9% vs. 0.8% in poor and non-poor individuals respectively (P = 0.001)—5.1% vs. 0.0% for poor and non-poor adults (P = 0.010) and 6.4% vs. 1.8% for poor and non-poor children (P = 0.083). Deaths were attributed to central nervous system infection (11), malaria (3), urinary tract infection (2), gastrointestinal infection (1) and undifferentiated sepsis (1). Both poor and non-poor households relied predominantly upon the (often informal) private sector for medical advice before reaching the referral hospital, but MPI poor participants were less likely to have consulted a qualified doctor. Poor participants were more likely to attribute delays in

  3. Study Design of the Microcirculatory Shock Occurrence in Acutely Ill Patients (microSOAP): an International Multicenter Observational Study of Sublingual Microcirculatory Alterations in Intensive Care Patients

    PubMed Central

    Vellinga, Namkje A. R.; Boerma, E. Christiaan; Koopmans, Matty; Donati, Abele; Dubin, Arnaldo; Shapiro, Nathan I.; Pearse, Rupert M.; Bakker, Jan; Ince, Can

    2012-01-01

    Objective. Sublingual microcirculatory alterations are associated with an adverse prognosis in several critical illness subgroups. Up to now, single-center studies have reported on sublingual microcirculatory alterations in ICU patient subgroups, but an extensive evaluation of the prevalence of these alterations is lacking. We present the study design of an international multicenter observational study to investigate the prevalence of microcirculatory alterations in critically ill: the Microcirculatory Shock Occurrence in Acutely ill Patients (microSOAP). Methods. 36 ICU's worldwide have participated in this study aiming for inclusion of over 500 evaluable patients. To enable communication and data collection, a website, an Open Clinica 3.0 database, and image uploading software have been designed. A one-session assessment of the sublingual microcirculation using Sidestream Dark Field imaging and data collection on patient characteristics has been performed in every ICU patient >18 years, regardless of underlying disease. Statistical analysis will provide insight in the prevalence and severity of sublingual alterations, its relation to systemic hemodynamic variables, disease, therapy, and outcome. Conclusion. This study will be the largest microcirculation study ever performed. It is expected that this study will also establish a basis for future studies related to the microcirculation in critically ill. PMID:22666566

  4. Investigation of a Potential Zoonotic Transmission of Orthoreovirus Associated with Acute Influenza-Like Illness in an Adult Patient

    PubMed Central

    Chua, Kaw Bing; Voon, Kenny; Yu, Meng; Keniscope, Canady; Abdul Rasid, Kasri; Wang, Lin-Fa

    2011-01-01

    Bats are increasingly being recognized as important reservoir hosts for a large number of viruses, some of them can be highly virulent when they infect human and livestock animals. Among the new bat zoonotic viruses discovered in recent years, several reoviruses (respiratory enteric orphan viruses) were found to be able to cause acute respiratory infections in humans, which included Melaka and Kampar viruses discovered in Malaysia, all of them belong to the genus Orthoreovirus, family Reoviridae. In this report, we describe the isolation of a highly related virus from an adult patient who suffered acute respiratory illness in Malaysia. Although there was no direct evidence of bat origin, epidemiological study indicated the potential exposure of the patient to bats before the onset of disease. The current study further demonstrates that spillover events of different strains of related orthoreoviruses from bats to humans are occurring on a regular basis, which calls for more intensive and systematic surveillances to fully assess the true public health impact of these newly discovered bat-borne zoonotic reoviruses. PMID:22022394

  5. Investigation of a potential zoonotic transmission of orthoreovirus associated with acute influenza-like illness in an adult patient.

    PubMed

    Chua, Kaw Bing; Voon, Kenny; Yu, Meng; Keniscope, Canady; Abdul Rasid, Kasri; Wang, Lin-Fa

    2011-01-01

    Bats are increasingly being recognized as important reservoir hosts for a large number of viruses, some of them can be highly virulent when they infect human and livestock animals. Among the new bat zoonotic viruses discovered in recent years, several reoviruses (respiratory enteric orphan viruses) were found to be able to cause acute respiratory infections in humans, which included Melaka and Kampar viruses discovered in Malaysia, all of them belong to the genus Orthoreovirus, family Reoviridae. In this report, we describe the isolation of a highly related virus from an adult patient who suffered acute respiratory illness in Malaysia. Although there was no direct evidence of bat origin, epidemiological study indicated the potential exposure of the patient to bats before the onset of disease. The current study further demonstrates that spillover events of different strains of related orthoreoviruses from bats to humans are occurring on a regular basis, which calls for more intensive and systematic surveillances to fully assess the true public health impact of these newly discovered bat-borne zoonotic reoviruses.

  6. Hospital-Based Surveillance for Infectious Etiologies among Patients with Acute Febrile Illness in Georgia, 2008–2011

    PubMed Central

    Kuchuloria, Tinatin; Imnadze, Paata; Mamuchishvili, Nana; Chokheli, Maiko; Tsertsvadze, Tengiz; Endeladze, Marina; Mshvidobadze, Ketevan; Gatserelia, Lana; Makhviladze, Manana; Kanashvili, Marine; Mikautadze, Teona; Nanuashvili, Alexander; Kiknavelidze, Khatuni; Kokaia, Nora; Makharadze, Manana; Clark, Danielle V.; Bautista, Christian T.; Farrell, Margaret; Fadeel, Moustafa Abdel; Maksoud, Mohamed Abdel; Pimentel, Guillermo; House, Brent; Hepburn, Matthew J.; Rivard, Robert G.

    2016-01-01

    Information on the infectious causes of undifferentiated acute febrile illness (AFI) in Georgia is essential for effective treatment and prevention. In May 2008, a hospital-based AFI surveillance was initiated at six hospitals in Georgia. Patients aged ≥ 4 years with fever ≥ 38°C for ≥ 48 hours were eligible for surveillance. Blood culture and serologic testing were conducted for Leptospira spp., Brucella spp., West Nile virus (WNV), Crimean–Congo hemorrhagic fever virus, Coxiella burnetii, tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV), hantavirus, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi), and Rickettsia typhi. Of 537 subjects enrolled, 70% were outpatients, 54% were males, and the mean age was 37 years. Patients reported having fatigue (89%), rigors (87%), sweating (83%), pain in joints (49%), and sleep disturbances (42%). Thirty-nine (7%) patients were seropositive for R. typhi, 37 (7%) for Brucella spp., 36 (7%) for TBEV, 12 (2%) for Leptospira spp., 10 (2%) for C. burnetii, and three (0.6%) for S. Typhi. None of the febrile patients tested positive for WNV antibodies. Of the patients, 73% were negative for all pathogens. Our results indicate that most of the targeted pathogens are present in Georgia, and highlight the importance of enhancing laboratory capacity for these infectious diseases. PMID:26438032

  7. Quinine allergy causing acute severe systemic illness: report of 4 patients manifesting multiple hematologic, renal, and hepatic abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    2003-01-01

    Quinine is widely used for the common symptom of leg cramps. Quinine tablets require a prescription, but quinine and the product from which it is derived, cinchona, are also available without prescription. They are components of over-the-counter remedies for many common symptoms, of nutrition products, and of beverages such as tonic water and bitter lemon. Although quinine has been used for centuries, initially as an extract from the bark of the cinchona tree, allergic reactions to quinine can be severe and can affect multiple organs. These allergic reactions can cause thrombocytopenia, neutropenia, anemia, disseminated intravascular coagulation, acute renal failure, liver toxicity, and neurological abnormalities. Because quinine use is often intermittent, defining quinine as a cause of an acute disorder may be difficult. Moreover, since quinine use is often self-regulated, patients may not mention it in response to direct questions about medication use, adding to diagnostic difficulty. The diversity and severity of quinine-associated disorders and the difficulties of diagnosis are illustrated by the presentation of 4 case histories. Awareness of the variety of potential quinine-associated reactions is important for accurate diagnosis and critical for prevention of recurrent illness. PMID:16278718

  8. Acute effects of physiotherapeutic respiratory maneuvers in critically ill patients with craniocerebral trauma

    PubMed Central

    de Cerqueira Neto, Manoel Luiz; Moura, Álvaro Vieira; Cerqueira, Telma Cristina Fontes; Aquim, Esperidião Elias; Reá-Neto, Álvaro; Oliveira, Mirella Cristine; da Silva Júnior, Walderi Monteiro; Santana-Filho, Valter J.; Herminia Scola, Rosana

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects of physiotherapeutic respiratory maneuvers on cerebral and cardiovascular hemodynamics and blood gas variables. METHOD: A descriptive, longitudinal, prospective, nonrandomized clinical trial that included 20 critical patients with severe craniocerebral trauma who were receiving mechanical ventilation and who were admitted to the intensive care unit. Each patient was subjected to the physiotherapeutic maneuvers of vibrocompression and increased manual expiratory flow (5 minutes on each hemithorax), along with subsequent airway suctioning with prior instillation of saline solution, hyperinflation and hyperoxygenation. Variables related to cardiovascular and cerebral hemodynamics and blood gas variables were recorded after each vibrocompression, increased manual expiratory flow and airway suctioning maneuver and 10 minutes after the end of airway suctioning. RESULTS: The hemodynamic and blood gas variables were maintained during vibrocompression and increased manual expiratory flow maneuvers; however, there were increases in mean arterial pressure, intracranial pressure, heart rate, pulmonary arterial pressure and pulmonary capillary pressure during airway suctioning. All of the values returned to baseline 10 minutes after the end of airway suctioning. CONCLUSION: Respiratory physiotherapy can be safely performed on patients with severe craniocerebral trauma. Additional caution must be taken when performing airway suctioning because this technique alters cerebral and cardiovascular hemodynamics, even in sedated and paralyzed patients. PMID:24141836

  9. End-of-life issues in the acute and critically ill patient

    PubMed Central

    Savory, Eric A; Marco, Catherine A

    2009-01-01

    The challenges of end-of-life care require emergency physicians to utilize a multifaceted and dynamic skill set. Such skills include medical therapies to relieve pain and other symptoms near the end-of-life. Physicians must also demonstrate aptitude in comfort care, communication, cultural competency, and ethical principles. It is imperative that emergency physicians demonstrate a fundamental understanding of end-of-life issues in order to employ the versatile, multidisciplinary approach required to provide the highest quality end-of-life care for patients and their families. PMID:19386133

  10. Acute Undifferentiated Febrile Illness in Patients Presenting to a Tertiary Care Hospital in South India: Clinical Spectrum and Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Abhilash, Kundavaram Paul Prabhakar; Jeevan, Jonathan Arul; Mitra, Shubhanker; Paul, Nirvin; Murugan, Thimiri Palani; Rangaraj, Ajay; David, Sandeep; Hansdak, Samuel George; Prakash, John Antony Jude; Abraham, Asha Mary; Ramasami, Prakash; Sathyendra, Sowmya; Sudarsanam, Thambu David; Varghese, George M

    2016-01-01

    Background: Acute undifferentiated febrile illness (AUFI) may have similar clinical presentation, and the etiology is varied and region specific. Materials and Methods: This prospective observational study was conducted in a tertiary hospital in South India. All adult patients presenting with AUFI of 3–14 days duration were evaluated for etiology, and the differences in presentation and outcome were analyzed. Results: The study cohort included 1258 patients. A microbiological cause was identified in 82.5% of our patients. Scrub typhus was the most common cause of AUFI (35.9%) followed by dengue (30.6%), malaria (10.4%), enteric fever (3.7%), and leptospirosis (0.6%). Both scrub typhus and dengue fever peaked during the monsoon season and the cooler months, whereas no seasonality was observed with enteric fever and malaria. The mean time to presentation was longer in enteric fever (9.9 [4.7] days) and scrub typhus (8.2 [3.2] days). Bleeding manifestations were seen in 7.7% of patients, mostly associated with dengue (14%), scrub typhus (4.2%), and malaria (4.6%). The requirement of supplemental oxygen, invasive ventilation, and inotropes was higher in scrub typhus, leptospirosis, and malaria. The overall mortality rate was 3.3% and was highest with scrub typhus (4.6%) followed by dengue fever (2.3%). Significant clinical predictors of scrub typhus were breathlessness (odds ratio [OR]: 4.96; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.38–7.3), total whole blood cell count >10,000 cells/mm3 (OR: 2.31; 95% CI: 1.64–3.24), serum albumin <3.5 g % (OR: 2.32; 95% CI: 1.68–3.2). Overt bleeding manifestations (OR: 2.98; 95% CI: 1.84–4.84), and a platelet count of <150,000 cells/mm3 (OR: 2.09; 95% CI: 1.47–2.98) were independent predictors of dengue fever. Conclusion: The similarity in clinical presentation and diversity of etiological agents demonstrates the complexity of diagnosis and treatment of AUFI in South India. The etiological profile will be of use in the development

  11. The Relationship Between Intrinsic and Extrinsic Factors and Central Venous Catheter Infections in the Acutely Ill Patient

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-01

    patient. Extrinsic factors include central venous catheter insertion variables such as type of catheter, experience of person who inserted catheter...contact, common-vehicle, airborne and vectorborne. Diseases or infections that are spread by contact require exposure to the source either directly ( person ...to- person ), indirectly (microorganism is passed to an intermediate object) or droplet spread (passage of infectious agent through air). Illnesses

  12. Effect of antiplatelet therapy on mortality and acute lung injury in critically ill patients: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mohananey, Divyanshu; Sethi, Jaskaran; Villablanca, Pedro A.; Ali, Muhammad S.; Kumar, Rohit; Baruah, Anushka; Bhatia, Nirmanmoh; Agrawal, Sahil; Hussain, Zeeshan; Shamoun, Fadi E.; Augoustides, John T.; Ramakrishna, Harish

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Platelet function is intricately linked to the pathophysiology of critical Illness, and some studies have shown that antiplatelet therapy (APT) may decrease mortality and incidence of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in these patients. Our objective was to understand the efficacy of APT by conducting a meta-analysis. Materials and Methods: We conducted a meta-analysis using PubMed, Central, Embase, The Cochrane Central Register, the ClinicalTrials.gov Website, and Google Scholar. Studies were included if they investigated critically ill patients receiving antiplatelet therapy and mentioned the outcomes being studied (mortality, duration of hospitalization, ARDS, and need for mechanical ventilation). Results: We found that there was a significant reduction in all-cause mortality in patients on APT compared to control (odds ratio [OR]: 0.83; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.70–0.97). Both the incidence of acute lung injury/ARDS (OR: 0.67; 95% CI: 0.57–0.78) and need for mechanical ventilation (OR: 0.74; 95% CI: 0.60–0.91) were lower in the antiplatelet group. No significant difference in duration of hospitalization was observed between the two groups (standardized mean difference: −0.02; 95% CI: −0.11–0.07). Conclusion: Our meta-analysis suggests that critically ill patients who are on APT have an improved survival, decreased incidence of ARDS, and decreased need for mechanical ventilation. PMID:27716693

  13. Acute and long-term dysphagia in critically ill patients with severe sepsis: results of a prospective controlled observational study.

    PubMed

    Zielske, Joerg; Bohne, Silvia; Brunkhorst, Frank M; Axer, Hubertus; Guntinas-Lichius, Orlando

    2014-11-01

    Dysphagia is a major risk factor for morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients treated in intensive care units (ICUs). Structured otorhinolaryngological data on dysphagia in ICU survivors with severe sepsis are missing. In a prospective study, 30 ICU patients with severe sepsis and thirty without sepsis as control group were examined using bedside fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing after 14 days in the ICU (T1) and 4 months after onset of critical illness (T2). Swallowing dysfunction was assessed using the Penetration-Aspiration Scale (PAS). The Functional Oral Intake Scale was applied to evaluate the diet needed. Primary endpoint was the burden of dysphagia defined as PAS score >5. At T1, 19 of 30 severe sepsis patients showed aspiration with a PAS score >5, compared to 7 of 30 in critically ill patients without severe sepsis (p = 0.002). Severe sepsis and tracheostomy were independent risk factors for severe dysphagia with aspiration (PAS > 5) at T1 (p = 0.042 and 0.006, respectively). 4-month mortality (T2) was 57 % in severe sepsis patients compared to 20 % in patients without severe sepsis (p = 0.006). At T2, more severe sepsis survivors were tracheostomy-dependent and needed more often tube or parenteral feeding (p = 0.014 and p = 0.040, respectively). Multivariate analysis revealed tracheostomy at T1 as independent risk factor for severe dysphagia at T2 (p = 0.030). Severe sepsis appears to be a relevant risk factor for long-term dysphagia. An otorhinolaryngological evaluation of dysphagia at ICU discharge is mandatory for survivors of severe critical illness to plan specific swallowing rehabilitation programs.

  14. A feasible strategy for preventing blood clots in critically ill patients with acute kidney injury (FBI): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous pharmacokinetic trials suggested that 40 mg subcutaneous enoxaparin once daily provided inadequate thromboprophylaxis for intensive care unit patients. Critically ill patients with acute kidney injury are at increased risk of venous thromboembolism and yet are often excluded from these trials. We hypothesized that for critically ill patients with acute kidney injury receiving continuous renal replacement therapy, a dose of 1 mg/kg enoxaparin subcutaneously once daily would improve thromboprophylaxis without increasing the risk of bleeding. In addition, we seek to utilize urine output prior to discontinuing dialysis, and low neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin in dialysis-free intervals, as markers of renal recovery. Methods/Design In a multicenter, double-blind randomized controlled trial in progress at three intensive care units across Denmark, we randomly assign eligible critically ill adults with acute kidney injury into a treatment (1 mg/kg enoxaparin subcutaneously once daily) or control arm (40 mg enoxaparin subcutaneously once daily) upon commencement of continuous renal replacement therapy. We calculated that with 133 patients in each group, the study would have 80% power to show a 40% reduction in the relative risk of venous thromboembolism with 1 mg/kg enoxaparin, at a two-sided alpha level of 0.05. An interim analysis will be conducted after the first 67 patients have been included in each group. Enrolment began in March 2013, and will continue for two years. The primary outcome is the occurrence of venous thromboembolism. Secondary outcomes include anti-factor Xa activity, bleeding, heparin-induced thrombocytopenia, filter lifespan, length of stay, ventilator free days, and mortality. We will also monitor neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin and urine volume to determine whether they can be used as prognostic factors for renal recovery. Discussion Critically ill unit patients with acute kidney injury present a

  15. Acute Colonic Pseudo-Obstruction with Feeding Intolerance in Critically Ill Patients: A Study according to Gut Wall Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Chenyan; Xie, Tingbin; Li, Jun; Cheng, Minhua; Shi, Jialiang; Gao, Tao; Xi, Fengchan; Shen, Juanhong; Cao, Chun

    2017-01-01

    Objective. To compare the differences between acute colonic pseudo-obstruction (ACPO) with and without acute gut wall thickening. Methods. ACPO patients with feeding tolerance were divided into ACPO with no obvious gut wall thickening (ACPO-NT) group and ACPO with obvious acute gut wall thickening (ACPO-T) group according to computed tomography and abdominal radiographs. Patients' condition, responses to supportive measures, pharmacologic therapy, endoscopic decompression, and surgeries and outcomes were compared. Results. Patients in ACPO-T group had a significantly higher APACHE II (11.82 versus 8.25, p = 0.008) and SOFA scores (6.47 versus 3.54, p < 0.001) and a significantly higher 28-day mortality (17.78% versus 4.16%, p = 0.032) and longer intensive care unit stage (4 versus 16 d, p < 0.001). Patients in ACPO-NT group were more likely to be responsive to supportive treatment (62.50% versus 24.44%, p < 0.001), neostigmine (77.78% versus 17.64%, p < 0.001), and colonoscopic decompression (75% versus 42.86%, p = 0.318) than those in ACPO-T group. Of the patients who underwent ileostomy, 81.25% gained benefits. Conclusions. ACPO patients with gut wall thickening are more severe and are less likely to be responsive to nonsurgical treatment. Ileostomy may be a good option for ACPO patients with gut wall thickening who are irresponsive to nonsurgical treatment. PMID:28386273

  16. Undiagnosed acute viral febrile illnesses, Sierra Leone.

    PubMed

    Schoepp, Randal J; Rossi, Cynthia A; Khan, Sheik H; Goba, Augustine; Fair, Joseph N

    2014-07-01

    Sierra Leone in West Africa is in a Lassa fever-hyperendemic region that also includes Guinea and Liberia. Each year, suspected Lassa fever cases result in submission of ≈500-700 samples to the Kenema Government Hospital Lassa Diagnostic Laboratory in eastern Sierra Leone. Generally only 30%-40% of samples tested are positive for Lassa virus (LASV) antigen and/or LASV-specific IgM; thus, 60%-70% of these patients have acute diseases of unknown origin. To investigate what other arthropod-borne and hemorrhagic fever viral diseases might cause serious illness in this region and mimic Lassa fever, we tested patient serum samples that were negative for malaria parasites and LASV. Using IgM-capture ELISAs, we evaluated samples for antibodies to arthropod-borne and other hemorrhagic fever viruses. Approximately 25% of LASV-negative patients had IgM to dengue, West Nile, yellow fever, Rift Valley fever, chikungunya, Ebola, and Marburg viruses but not to Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus.

  17. The critically ill immunosuppressed patient

    SciTech Connect

    Parrillo, J.E.; Masur, H. )

    1987-01-01

    This book discusses the papers on the diagnosis and management of immunosuppressed patient. Some of the topics are: life-threatening organ failure in immunosuppressed patients; diagnosis and therapy of respiratory disease in the immunosuppressed patient; CNS complication of immunosuppression; infections; antineoplastic therapy of immunosuppressed patient; radiation therapy-issues in critically ill patient; AIDS; and management of bone marrow transplant patients.

  18. Analysis of Risk Factors for Severe Acute Respiratory Infection and Pneumonia and among Adult Patients with Acute Respiratory Illness during 2011-2014 Influenza Seasons in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Wie, Seong-Heon; Jeong, Hye Won; Kim, Young Keun; Park, Kyung Hwa; Kim, Shin Woo; Lee, Sun Hee

    2016-01-01

    Background The World Health Organization recommends the surveillance of influenza-like illness (ILI) and severe acute respiratory infection (SARI) to respond effectively to both seasonal influenza epidemics and pandemics. In Korea, the “Hospital-based Influenza Morbidity and Mortality (HIMM)” surveillance system has been operated to monitor ILI and SARI occurrences. Materials and Methods A multi-center prospective observational study was conducted. Adult patients with acute respiratory infection (ARI) were enrolled during the 2011-12, 2012-2013, and 2013-2014 influenza seasons at the 10 university hospitals using the HIMM surveillance system. With respect to SARI and pneumonia development, risk profiles were analyzed in patients with ARI in Korea. Results A total of 5,459 cases were eligible for this analysis. Among 5,459 cases with ARI, 2,887 cases (52.9%) were identified that they had influenza infection. Among enrolled cases, 750 cases belonged to the SARI group, while 4,709 cases belonged to the non-SARI group. With respect to pneumonia development, 317 cases were accompanied by pneumonia, and 5,142 cases were not. Multivariate analyses revealed that the following factors were associated with an increased risk of SARI: Old age (≥65 years) (odds ratio [OR] 2.69, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.2-3.32), chronic heart disease (CHD) (OR 2.24, 95% CI 1.68-2.98), cerebrovascular disease (CVD) (OR 1.49, 95% CI 1.05-2.10), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (OR 2.34, 95% CI 1.48-3.69), asthma (OR 2.33, 95% CI 1.62-3.36), chronic kidney disease (CKD) (OR 2.62, 95% CI 1.73-3.99), chronic liver disease (OR 1.71, 95% CI 1.04-2.81), and autoimmune diseases (OR 2.53, 1.57-4.08). Multivariate analyses revealed that the following factors were independent risk factors for pneumonia development: Old age (≥65 years) (OR 5.71, 95% CI 4.10-7.94), CHD (OR 1.54, 95% CI 1.07-2.22), COPD (OR 2.34, 95% CI 1.48-3.69), asthma (OR 2.33, 95% CI 1.62-3.36), CKD (OR 2.62, 95

  19. Risk Factors for Development of Acute Kidney Injury in Critically Ill Patients: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies

    PubMed Central

    Cartin-Ceba, Rodrigo; Kashiouris, Markos; Plataki, Maria; Kor, Daryl J.; Gajic, Ognjen; Casey, Edward T.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a frequent complication of critically ill patients. The impact of different risk factors associated with this entity in the ICU setting is unknown. Objectives. The purpose of this research was to assess the risk factors associated with the development of AKI in critically ill patients by meta-analyses of observational studies. Data Extraction. Two reviewers independently and in duplicate used a standardized form to collect data from published reports. Authors were contacted for missing data. The Newcastle-Ottawa scale assessed study quality. Data Synthesis. Data from 31 diverse studies that enrolled 504,535 critically ill individuals from a wide variety of ICUs were included. Separate random-effects meta-analyses demonstrated a significantly increased risk of AKI with older age, diabetes, hypertension, higher baseline creatinine, heart failure, sepsis/systemic inflammatory response syndrome, use of nephrotoxic drugs, higher severity of disease scores, use of vasopressors/inotropes, high risk surgery, emergency surgery, use of intra-aortic balloon pump, and longer time in cardiopulmonary bypass pump. Conclusion. The best available evidence suggests an association of AKI with 13 different risk factors in subjects admitted to the ICU. Predictive models for identification of high risk individuals for developing AKI in all types of ICU are required. PMID:23227318

  20. Data on respiratory variables in critically ill patients with acute respiratory failure placed on proportional assist ventilation with load adjustable gain factors (PAV+).

    PubMed

    Georgopoulos, Dimitris; Xirouchaki, Nectaria; Tzanakis, Nikolaos; Younes, Magdy

    2016-09-01

    The data show respiratory variables in 108 critically ill patients with acute respiratory failure placed on proportional assist ventilation with load adjustable gain factors (PAV+) after at least 36 h on passive mechanical ventilation. PAV+ was continued for 48 h until the patients met pre-defined criteria either for switching to controlled modes or for breathing without ventilator assistance. Data during passive mechanical ventilation and during PAV+ are reported. Data are acquired from the whole population, as well as from patients with and without acute respiratory distress syndrome. The reported variables are tidal volume, driving pressure (ΔP, the difference between static end-inspiratory plateau pressure and positive end-expiratory airway pressure), respiratory system compliance and resistance, and arterial blood gasses. The data are supplemental to our original research article, which described individual ΔP in these patients and examined how it related to ΔP when the same patients were ventilated with passive mechanical ventilation using the currently accepted lung-protective strategy "Driving pressure during assisted mechanical ventilation. Is it controlled by patient brain?" [1].

  1. Diastolic dysfunction in the critically ill patient.

    PubMed

    Suárez, J C; López, P; Mancebo, J; Zapata, L

    2016-11-01

    Left ventricular diastolic dysfunction is a common finding in critically ill patients. It is characterized by a progressive deterioration of the relaxation and the compliance of the left ventricle. Two-dimensional and Doppler echocardiography is a cornerstone in its diagnosis. Acute pulmonary edema associated with hypertensive crisis is the most frequent presentation of diastolic dysfunction critically ill patients. Myocardial ischemia, sepsis and weaning failure from mechanical ventilation also may be associated with diastolic dysfunction. The treatment is based on the reduction of pulmonary congestion and left ventricular filling pressures. Some studies have found a prognostic role of diastolic dysfunction in some diseases such as sepsis. The present review aims to analyze thoroughly the echocardiographic diagnosis and the most frequent scenarios in critically ill patients in whom diastolic dysfunction plays a key role.

  2. CLINICAL CHARACTERISTICS, OUTCOMES AND RISK FACTORS FOR DEATH AMONG CRITICALLY ILL PATIENTS WITH HIV-RELATED ACUTE KIDNEY INJURY

    PubMed Central

    LUNA, Leonardo Duarte Sobreira; SOARES, Douglas de Sousa; JUNIOR, Geraldo Bezerra da SILVA; CAVALCANTE, Malena Gadelha; MALVEIRA, Lara Raissa Cavalcante; MENESES, Gdayllon Cavalcante; PEREIRA, Eanes Delgado Barros; DAHER, Elizabeth De Francesco

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Background: The aim of this study is to describe clinical characteristics, outcomes and risk factors for death among patients with HIV-related acute kidney injury (AKI) admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU). Methods: A retrospective study was conducted with HIV-infected AKI patients admitted to the ICU of an infectious diseases hospital in Fortaleza, Brazil. All the patients with confirmed diagnosis of HIV and AKI admitted from January 2004 to December 2011 were included. A comparison between survivors and non-survivors was performed. Risk factors for death were investigated. Results: Among 256 AKI patients admitted to the ICU in the study period, 73 were identified as HIV-infected, with a predominance of male patients (83.6%), and the mean age was 41.2 ± 10.4 years. Non-survivor patients presented higher APACHE II scores (61.4 ± 19 vs. 38.6 ± 18, p = 0.004), used more vasoconstrictors (70.9 vs. 37.5%, p = 0.02) and needed more mechanical ventilation - MV (81.1 vs. 35.3%, p = 0.001). There were 55 deaths (75.3%), most of them (53.4%) due to septic shock. Independent risk factors for mortality were septic shock (OR = 14.2, 95% CI = 2.0-96.9, p = 0.007) and respiratory insufficiency with need of MV (OR = 27.6, 95% CI = 5.0-153.0, p < 0.001). Conclusion: Non-survivor HIV-infected patients with AKI admitted to the ICU presented higher severity APACHE II scores, more respiratory damage and hemodynamic impairment than survivors. Septic shock and respiratory insufficiency were independently associated to death. PMID:27410912

  3. Incidence and risk factors of acute kidney injury associated with continuous intravenous high-dose vancomycin in critically ill patients: A retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Lacave, Guillaume; Caille, Vincent; Bruneel, Fabrice; Palette, Catherine; Legriel, Stéphane; Grimaldi, David; Eurin, Mathilde; Bedos, Jean-Pierre

    2017-02-01

    For vancomycin therapy of severe infections, the Infectious Diseases Society of America recommends high vancomycin trough levels, whose potential for inducing nephrotoxicity is controversial. We evaluated the incidence and risk factors of acute kidney injury (AKI) in critically ill patients given continuous intravenous vancomycin with target serum vancomycin levels of 20 to 30 mg/L.We retrospectively studied 107 continuous intravenous vancomycin treatments of ≥48 hours' duration with at least 2 serum vancomycin levels ≥20 mg/L in critically ill patients. Nephrotoxicity was defined according to the Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes Clinical Practice Guideline for AKI (ie, serum creatinine elevation by ≥26.5 μmoL/L or to ≥1.5 times baseline). Risk factors for AKI were identified by univariate and multivariate analyses.AKI developed in 31 (29%) courses. Higher serum vancomycin levels were associated with AKI (P < 0.01). Factors independently associated with AKI were highest serum vancomycin ≥40 mg/L (odds ratio [OR], 3.75; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.40-10.37; P < 0.01), higher cumulative number of organ failures (OR, 2.63 95%CI, 1.42-5.31; P < 0.01), and cirrhosis of the liver (OR, 5.58; 95%CI, 1.08-31.59; P = 0.04).In this study, 29% of critically ill patients had AKI develop during continuous intravenous vancomycin therapy targeting serum levels of 20 to 30 mg/L. Serum vancomycin level ≥40 mg/L was independently associated with AKI.

  4. Host gene expression classifiers diagnose acute respiratory illness etiology

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Marshall; Burke, Thomas; Ko, Emily R.; McClain, Micah T.; Hudson, Lori L.; Mazur, Anna; Freeman, Debra H.; Veldman, Tim; Langley, Raymond J.; Quackenbush, Eugenia B.; Glickman, Seth W.; Cairns, Charles B.; Jaehne, Anja K.; Rivers, Emanuel P.; Otero, Ronny M.; Zaas, Aimee K.; Kingsmore, Stephen F.; Lucas, Joseph; Fowler, Vance G.; Carin, Lawrence; Ginsburg, Geoffrey S.; Woods, Christopher W.

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory infections caused by bacterial or viral pathogens are among the most common reasons for seeking medical care. Despite improvements in pathogen-based diagnostics, most patients receive inappropriate antibiotics. Host response biomarkers offer an alternative diagnostic approach to direct antimicrobial use. This observational, cohort study determined whether host gene expression patterns discriminate non-infectious from infectious illness, and bacterial from viral causes of acute respiratory infection in the acute care setting. Peripheral whole blood gene expression from 273 subjects with community-onset acute respiratory infection (ARI) or non-infectious illness as well as 44 healthy controls was measured using microarrays. Sparse logistic regression was used to develop classifiers for bacterial ARI (71 probes), viral ARI (33 probes), or a non-infectious cause of illness (26 probes). Overall accuracy was 87% (238/273 concordant with clinical adjudication), which was more accurate than procalcitonin (78%, p<0.03) and three published classifiers of bacterial vs. viral infection (78-83%). The classifiers developed here externally validated in five publicly available datasets (AUC 0.90-0.99). A sixth publically available dataset included twenty-five patients with co-identification of bacterial and viral pathogens. Applying the ARI classifiers defined four distinct groups: a host response to bacterial ARI; viral ARI; co-infection; and neither a bacterial nor viral response. These findings create an opportunity to develop and utilize host gene expression classifiers as diagnostic platforms to combat inappropriate antibiotic use and emerging antibiotic resistance. PMID:26791949

  5. Neutrophil Gelatinase-Associated Lipocalin as a Diagnostic Marker for Acute Kidney Injury in Oliguric Critically Ill Patients: A Post-Hoc Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Egal, Mohamud; de Geus, Hilde R.H.; Groeneveld, A.B. Johan

    2016-01-01

    Background Oliguria occurs frequently in critically ill patients, challenging clinicians to distinguish functional adaptation from serum-creatinine-defined acute kidney injury (AKIsCr). We investigated neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL)'s ability to differentiate between these 2 conditions. Methods This is a post-hoc analysis of a prospective cohort of adult critically ill patients. Patients without oliguria within the first 6 h of admission were excluded. Plasma and urinary NGAL were measured at 4 h after admission. AKIsCr was defined using the AKI network criteria with pre-admission serum creatinine or lowest serum creatinine value during the admission as the baseline value. Hazard ratios for AKIsCr occurrence within 72 h were calculated using Cox regression and adjusted for risk factors such as sepsis, pre-admission serum creatinine, and urinary output. Positive predictive values (PPV) and negative predictive values (NPV) were calculated for the optimal cutoffs for NGAL. Results Oliguria occurred in 176 patients, and 61 (35%) patients developed AKIsCr. NGAL was a predictor for AKIsCr in univariate and multivariate analysis. When NGAL was added to a multivariate model including sepsis, pre-admission serum creatinine and lowest hourly urine output, it outperformed the latter model (plasma p = 0.001; urinary p = 0.048). Cutoff values for AKIsCr were 280 ng/ml for plasma (PPV 80%; NPV 79%), and 250 ng/ml for urinary NGAL (PPV 58%; NPV 78%). Conclusions NGAL can be used to distinguish oliguria due to the functional adaptation from AKIsCr, directing resources to patients more likely to develop AKIsCr. PMID:27505067

  6. Prevalence of patients with acute febrile illnesses and positive dengue NS1 tests in a tertiary hospital in Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Asigau, Viola; Lavu, Evelyn K; McBride, William J H; Biloh, Eric; Naroi, Francis; Koana, Egi; Ferguson, John K; Laman, Moses

    2015-01-01

    Because the prevalence of dengue fever in urban settings in Papua New Guinea is unknown, we investigated the presence of dengue using the NS1 antigen test in an outpatient-based prospective observational study at Port Moresby General Hospital. Of 140 patients with acute febrile illnesses, dengue fever was diagnosed in 14.9% (20 of 134; 95% confidence interval [95% CI] = 9.6-22.4). Malaria (2 of 137; 1.5%; 95% CI = 0.3-5.7), chikungunya (3 of 140; 2.1%; 95% CI = 0.6-6.6), and bacterial bloodstream infections (0 of 80; 0%; 95% CI = 0-5.7) were uncommon. Dengue fever should no longer be considered rare in Papua New Guinea.

  7. Polyneuropathy in critically ill patients.

    PubMed Central

    Bolton, C F; Gilbert, J J; Hahn, A F; Sibbald, W J

    1984-01-01

    Five patients developed a severe motor and sensory polyneuropathy at the peak of critical illness (sepsis and multiorgan dysfunction complicating a variety of primary illnesses). Difficulties in weaning from the ventilator as the critical illness subsided and the development of flaccid and areflexic limbs were early clinical signs. However, electrophysiological studies, especially needle electrode examination of skeletal muscle, provided the definite evidence of polyneuropathy. The cause is uncertain, but the electrophysiological and morphological features indicate a primary axonal polyneuropathy with sparing of the central nervous system. Nutritional factors may have played a role, since the polyneuropathy improved in all five patients after total parenteral nutrition had been started, including the three patients who later died of unrelated causes. The features allow diagnosis during life, and encourage continued intensive management since recovery from the polyneuropathy may occur. Images PMID:6094735

  8. Prospective surveillance study of acute respiratory infections, influenza-like illness and seasonal influenza vaccine in a cohort of juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Acute respiratory infections (ARI) are frequent in children and complications can occur in patients with chronic diseases. We evaluated the frequency and impact of ARI and influenza-like illness (ILI) episodes on disease activity, and the immunogenicity and safety of influenza vaccine in a cohort of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients. Methods Surveillance of respiratory viruses was conducted in JIA patients during ARI season (March to August) in two consecutive years: 2007 (61 patients) and 2008 (63 patients). Patients with ARI or ILI had respiratory samples collected for virus detection by real time PCR. In 2008, 44 patients were immunized with influenza vaccine. JIA activity index (ACRPed30) was assessed during both surveillance periods. Influenza hemagglutination inhibition antibody titers were measured before and 30-40 days after vaccination. Results During the study period 105 ARI episodes were reported and 26.6% of them were ILI. Of 33 samples collected, 60% were positive for at least one virus. Influenza and rhinovirus were the most frequently detected, in 30% of the samples. Of the 50 JIA flares observed, 20% were temporally associated to ARI. Influenza seroprotection rates were higher than 70% (91-100%) for all strains, and seroconversion rates exceeded 40% (74-93%). In general, response to influenza vaccine was not influenced by therapy or disease activity, but patients using anti-TNF alpha drugs presented lower seroconversion to H1N1 strain. No significant differences were found in ACRPed30 after vaccination and no patient reported ILI for 6 months after vaccination. Conclusion ARI episodes are relatively frequent in JIA patients and may have a role triggering JIA flares. Trivalent split influenza vaccine seems to be immunogenic and safe in JIA patients. PMID:23510667

  9. Are critically ill older patients treated differently than similarly ill younger patients?

    PubMed Central

    Stillman, A E; Braitman, L E; Grant, R J

    1998-01-01

    Our goal was to determine whether critically ill older patients are treated differently than middle-aged patients. If so, what factors besides age contribute to that difference? Internal medicine residents (n = 46) and practicing internists (n = 41) received 8 clinical vignettes of 4 critically ill 85-year-old patients and 4 critically ill 50-year-old patients. Each patient had a distinct premorbid mental and physical state. Each respondent selected from 4 levels of therapeutic aggressiveness for each patient. The main outcome measure was the proportion of physicians who intended to treat the older of each matched pair of patients less aggressively than the younger one (that is, downgraded for age). Eight physicians (9%) treated a previously unimpaired 85-year-old patient less aggressively than a comparable 50-year-old patient. When the matched patients were either premorbidly mentally or physically impaired (but not both), about 20% of physicians downgraded for age. Most downgraded for age in matched patients who were premorbidly both mentally and physically impaired. We conclude that age alone does not engender much therapeutic bias against older patients as long as they are physically and mentally intact before the onset of their acute illness. As premorbid disabilities multiply, older patients may be treated less aggressively than younger ones with similar impairments and clinical presentations. PMID:9771155

  10. Undiagnosed Acute Viral Febrile Illnesses, Sierra Leone

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-01

    illness in this region and mimic Lassa fever, we tested patient serum samples that were negative for malaria parasites and LASV. Using IgM-capture...hyperendemic region and initially are screened for malaria by thick blood smear and, if negative, are tested for LASV. LASV infection is determined by the...display a currently valid OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE 07 JUL 2014 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2014 to 00-00-2014 4. TITLE AND

  11. Rhabdomyolysis in Critically Ill Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kuzmanovska, Biljana; Cvetkovska, Emilija; Kuzmanovski, Igor; Jankulovski, Nikola; Shosholcheva, Mirjana; Kartalov, Andrijan; Spirovska, Tatjana

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Rhabdomyolysis is a syndrome of injury of skeletal muscles associated with myoglobinuria, muscle weakness, electrolyte imbalance and often, acute kidney injury as severe complication. The aim: of this study is to detect the incidence of rhabdomyolysis in critically ill patients in the surgical intensive care unit (ICU), and to raise awareness of this medical condition and its treatment among the clinicians. Material and methods: A retrospective review of all surgical and trauma patients admitted to surgical ICU of the University Surgical Clinic “Mother Teresa” in Skopje, Macedonia, from January 1st till December 31st 2015 was performed. Patients medical records were screened for available serum creatine kinase (CK) with levels > 200 U/l, presence of myoglobin in the serum in levels > 80 ng/ml, or if they had a clinical diagnosis of rhabdomyolysis by an attending doctor. Descriptive statistical methods were used to analyze the collected data. Results: Out of totally 1084 patients hospitalized in the ICU, 93 were diagnosed with rhabdomyolysis during the course of one year. 82(88%) patients were trauma patients, while 11(12%) were surgical non trauma patients. 7(7.5%) patients diagnosed with rhabdomyolysis developed acute kidney injury (AKI) that required dialysis. Average values of serum myoglobin levels were 230 ng/ml, with highest values of > 5000 ng/ml. Patients who developed AKI had serum myoglobin levels above 2000 ng/ml. Average values of serum CK levels were 400 U/l, with highest value of 21600 U/l. Patients who developed AKI had serum CK levels above 3000 U/l. Conclusion: Regular monitoring and early detection of elevated serum CK and myoglobin levels in critically ill surgical and trauma patients is recommended in order to recognize and treat rhabdomyolysis in timely manner and thus prevent development of AKI. PMID:27703296

  12. Oxidative stress in severe acute illness

    PubMed Central

    Bar-Or, David; Bar-Or, Raphael; Rael, Leonard T.; Brody, Edward N.

    2015-01-01

    The overall redox potential of a cell is primarily determined by oxidizable/reducible chemical pairs, including glutathione–glutathione disulfide, reduced thioredoxin–oxidized thioredoxin, and NAD+–NADH (and NADP–NADPH). Current methods for evaluating oxidative stress rely on detecting levels of individual byproducts of oxidative damage or by determining the total levels or activity of individual antioxidant enzymes. Oxidation–reduction potential (ORP), on the other hand, is an integrated, comprehensive measure of the balance between total (known and unknown) pro-oxidant and antioxidant components in a biological system. Much emphasis has been placed on the role of oxidative stress in chronic diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease and atherosclerosis. The role of oxidative stress in acute diseases often seen in the emergency room and intensive care unit is considerable. New tools for the rapid, inexpensive measurement of both redox potential and total redox capacity should aid in introducing a new body of literature on the role of oxidative stress in acute illness and how to screen and monitor for potentially beneficial pharmacologic agents. PMID:25644686

  13. Delirium in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Slooter, A J C; Van De Leur, R R; Zaal, I J

    2017-01-01

    Delirium is common in critically ill patients and associated with increased length of stay in the intensive care unit (ICU) and long-term cognitive impairment. The pathophysiology of delirium has been explained by neuroinflammation, an aberrant stress response, neurotransmitter imbalances, and neuronal network alterations. Delirium develops mostly in vulnerable patients (e.g., elderly and cognitively impaired) in the throes of a critical illness. Delirium is by definition due to an underlying condition and can be identified at ICU admission using prediction models. Treatment of delirium can be improved with frequent monitoring, as early detection and subsequent treatment of the underlying condition can improve outcome. Cautious use or avoidance of benzodiazepines may reduce the likelihood of developing delirium. Nonpharmacologic strategies with early mobilization, reducing causes for sleep deprivation, and reorientation measures may be effective in the prevention of delirium. Antipsychotics are effective in treating hallucinations and agitation, but do not reduce the duration of delirium. Combined pain, agitation, and delirium protocols seem to improve the outcome of critically ill patients and may reduce delirium incidence.

  14. Increased S100B+ NK cell counts in acutely ill schizophrenia patients are correlated with the free cortisol index, but not with S100B serum levels.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Johann; Westphal, Sabine; Schroeter, Matthias L; Schiltz, Kolja; Jordan, Wolfgang; Müller, Ulf J; Bernstein, Hans-Gert; Bogerts, Bernhard; Schmidt, Reinhold E; Jacobs, Roland

    2012-05-01

    Several studies have provided evidence for increased S100B serum concentrations in schizophrenia. The pathophysiological significance of this finding is still uncertain because S100B is involved in many cellular mechanisms and is not astrocyte-specific as was previously assumed. S100B is also expressed by subsets of CD3+ CD8+ T cells and natural killer (NK) cells and may therefore be linked to the immune hypothesis of schizophrenia. We have quantified S100B+ CD3+ CD8+ T cells and NK cells by flow cytometry in the peripheral blood of 26 acutely ill schizophrenia cases and 32 matched controls. In parallel, S100B concentrations and the free cortisol index (FCI), a surrogate marker for stress axis activity, were determined in serum samples from the same blood draw. Psychopathology was monitored using the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS). The patient group had increased S100B+ NK cell counts (P=0.045), which correlated with the FCI (r=0.299, P=0.026) but not with the PANSS or the elevated (P=0.021) S100B serum concentrations. S100B+ CD3+ CD8+ T cell counts were not significantly changed in the patient group and did neither correlate with the FCI and PANSS, nor with S100B serum concentrations. In conclusion, despite the observation of an increase in S100B+ NK cells in schizophrenia patients, the lack of a correlation with serum S100B concentrations suggests that these cells are probably not a major source of S100B in the blood of schizophrenia patients. Notably, elevated S100B+ NK cell counts may be linked with stress axis activation.

  15. Thyroid function in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Fliers, Eric; Bianco, Antonio C; Langouche, Lies; Boelen, Anita

    2015-10-01

    Patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) typically present with decreased concentrations of plasma tri-iodothyronine, low thyroxine, and normal range or slightly decreased concentration of thyroid-stimulating hormone. This ensemble of changes is collectively known as non-thyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS). The extent of NTIS is associated with prognosis, but no proof exists for causality of this association. Initially, NTIS is a consequence of the acute phase response to systemic illness and macronutrient restriction, which might be beneficial. Pathogenesis of NTIS in long-term critical illness is more complex and includes suppression of hypothalamic thyrotropin-releasing hormone, accounting for persistently reduced secretion of thyroid-stimulating hormone despite low plasma thyroid hormone. In some cases distinguishing between NTIS and severe hypothyroidism, which is a rare primary cause for admission to the ICU, can be difficult. Infusion of hypothalamic-releasing factors can reactivate the thyroid axis in patients with NTIS, inducing an anabolic response. Whether this approach has a clinical benefit in terms of outcome is unknown. In this Series paper, we discuss diagnostic aspects, pathogenesis, and implications of NTIS as well as its distinction from severe, primary thyroid disorders in patients in the ICU.

  16. Towards the Burden of Human Leptospirosis: Duration of Acute Illness and Occurrence of Post-Leptospirosis Symptoms of Patients in The Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    Straetemans, Masja; Alba, Sandra; Goeijenbier, Marco; van Gorp, Eric C. M.; Boer, Kimberly R.; Wagenaar, Jiri F. P.; Hartskeerl, Rudy A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Leptospirosis is a global zoonotic disease. Although important for the assessment of the burden of leptospirosis, data on the duration of the illness and the occurrence of post-leptospirosis complaints are not well documented. Hence the main objective of this study was to estimate the occurrence of persistent complaints and duration of hospital stay in laboratory confirmed leptospirosis patients in the Netherlands during 1985 to 2010. Additionally, several risk factors potentially impacting on the occurrence of post-leptospirosis complaints were investigated. Methods/Principal Findings The duration of the acute phase of leptospirosis was 16 days (IQR 12–23); 10 days (IQR 7–16) were spent hospitalized. Eighteen fatal cases were excluded from this analysis. Complaints of leptospirosis patients by passive case investigations (CPC) derived from files on ambulant consultations occurring one month after hospital discharge, revealed persistent complaints in 108 of 236 (45.8%) laboratory confirmed cases. Data on persistent complaints after acute leptospirosis (PCAC), assessed in 225 laboratory confirmed leptospirosis cases collected through questionnaires during 1985-1993, indicated 68 (30.2%) PCAC cases. Frequently reported complaints included (extreme) fatigue, myalgia, malaise, headache, and a weak physical condition. These complaints prolonged in 21.1% of the cases beyond 24 months after onset of disease. There was no association between post-leptospirosis complaints and hospitalization. However, individuals admitted at the intensive care unit (ICU) were twice as likely to have continuing complaints after discharge adjusting for age and dialysis (OR 2.0 95% CI 0.8-4.8). No significant association could be found between prolongation of complaints and infecting serogroup, although subgroup analysis suggest that infection with serogroups Sejroe (OR 4.8, 95%CI 0.9-27.0) and icterohaemorrhagiae (OR 2.0, 95%CI 0.9-4.3 CI) are more likely to result in CPC than

  17. Multifaceted Intervention to Prevent Venous Thromboembolism in Patients Hospitalized for Acute Medical Illness: A Multicenter Cluster-Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Pierre-Marie; Rachas, Antoine; Meyer, Guy; Le Gal, Grégoire; Durieux, Pierre; El Kouri, Dominique; Honnart, Didier; Schmidt, Jeannot; Legall, Catherine; Hausfater, Pierre; Chrétien, Jean-Marie; Mottier, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Background Misuse of thromboprophylaxis may increase preventable complications for hospitalized medical patients. Objectives To assess the net clinical benefit of a multifaceted intervention in emergency wards (educational lectures, posters, pocket cards, computerized clinical decision support systems and, where feasible, electronic reminders) for the prevention of venous thromboembolism. Patients/Methods Prospective cluster-randomized trial in 27 hospitals. After a pre-intervention period, centers were randomized as either intervention (n = 13) or control (n = 14). All patients over 40 years old, admitted to the emergency room, and hospitalized in a medical ward were included, totaling 1,402 (712 intervention and 690 control) and 15,351 (8,359 intervention and 6,992 control) in the pre-intervention and intervention periods, respectively. Results Symptomatic venous thromboembolism or major bleeding (primary outcome) occurred at 3 months in 3.1% and 3.2% of patients in the intervention and control groups, respectively (adjusted odds ratio: 1.02 [95% confidence interval: 0.78–1.34]). The rates of thromboembolism (1.9% vs. 1.9%), major bleedings (1.2% vs. 1.3%), and mortality (11.3% vs. 11.1%) did not differ between the groups. Between the pre-intervention and intervention periods, the proportion of patients who received prophylactic anticoagulant treatment more steeply increased in the intervention group (from 35.0% to 48.2%: +13.2%) than the control (40.7% to 44.1%: +3.4%), while the rate of adequate thromboprophylaxis remained stable in both groups (52.4% to 50.9%: -1.5%; 49.1% to 48.8%: -0.3%). Conclusions Our intervention neither improved adequate prophylaxis nor reduced the rates of clinical events. New strategies are required to improve thromboembolism prevention for hospitalized medical patients. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01212393 PMID:27227406

  18. Acute high-altitude illness: a clinically orientated review

    PubMed Central

    Smedley, Tom

    2013-01-01

    Acute high-altitude illness is an encompassing term for the range of pathology that the unacclimatised individual can develop at increased altitude. This includes acute mountain sickness, high-altitude cerebral oedema and high-altitude pulmonary oedema. These conditions represent an increasing clinical problem as more individuals are exposed to the hypobaric hypoxic environment of high altitude for both work and leisure. In this review of acute high-altitude illness, the epidemiology, risk factors and pathophysiology are explored, before their prevention and treatment are discussed. Appropriate ascent rate remains the most effective acute high-altitude illness prevention, with pharmacological prophylaxis indicated in selected individuals. Descent is the definitive treatment for acute high-altitude illness, with the adjuncts of oxygen and specific drug therapies. PMID:26516505

  19. Liver Illness and Psychiatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Carrier, Paul; Debette-Gratien, Marilyne; Girard, Murielle; Jacques, Jérémie; Nubukpo, Philippe; Loustaud-Ratti, Véronique

    2016-01-01

    Patients with psychiatric disorders are usually more exposed to multiple somatic illnesses, including liver diseases. Specific links are established between psychiatric disorders and alcohol hepatitis, hepatitis B, and hepatitis C in the population as a whole, and specifically in drug abusers. Metabolic syndrome criteria, and associated steatosis or non-alcoholic steato-hepatitis (NASH) are frequent in patients with chronic psychiatric disorders under psychotropic drugs, and should be screened. Some psychiatric medications, such as neuroleptics, mood stabilizers, and a few antidepressants, are often associated with drug-induced liver injury (DILI). In patients with advanced chronic liver diseases, the prescription of some specific psychiatric treatments should be avoided. Psychiatric disorders can be a limiting factor in the decision-making and following up for liver transplantation. PMID:28123443

  20. Extended-duration versus short-duration pharmacological thromboprophylaxis in acutely Ill hospitalized medical patients: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Liew, Aaron Y L; Piran, Siavash; Eikelboom, John W; Douketis, James D

    2017-04-01

    Extended-duration pharmacological thromboprophylaxis, for at least 28 days, is effective for the prevention of symptomatic venous thromboembolism (VTE) in high-risk surgical patients but is of uncertain benefit in hospitalized medical patients. We aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of extended-duration thromboprophylaxis in hospitalized medical patients. We conducted a systematic PubMed, Medline and EMBASE literature search until June 2016 and a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials which compared extended-duration with short-duration thromboprophylaxis in hospitalized medical patients. Four randomized controlled trials comparing extended-duration prophylaxis (24-47 days) with short-duration prophylaxis (6-14 days) in a total of 34,068 acutely ill hospitalized medical patients were included. When compared with short-duration prophylaxis, extended-duration prophylaxis was associated with a decrease in symptomatic proximal or distal deep vein thrombosis (DVT) [relative risk (RR) = 0.52; 95% confidence interval (Cl): 0.35-0.77: p = 0.001; absolute risk reduction (ARR) = 0.32%, number needed to treat (NNT) = 313], and symptomatic non-fatal pulmonary embolism (RR = 0.61; 95% Cl 0.38-0.99: p = 0.04; ARR = 0.16%; NNT = 625), an increase in major bleeding (RR = 2.08; 95% Cl 1.50-2.90: p < 0.0001, absolute risk increase = 0.41%, number needed to harm = 244), and no significant reduction in VTE-related mortality (RR = 0.69; 95% Cl 0.45-1.06: p = 0.09) or all-cause mortality (RR = 1.00; 95% CI 0.89-1.12; p = 0.95). There was heterogeneity for major bleeding due to results from the APEX trial (no difference between betrixaban and enoxaparin). Compared with short-duration thromboprophylaxis, extended-duration treatment reduces the risk for symptomatic DVT and non-fatal pulmonary embolism. Extended treatment with apixaban, enoxaparin and rivaroxaban but not betrixaban increases the risk for major

  1. Treating nonthyroidal illness syndrome in the critically ill patient: still a matter of controversy.

    PubMed

    Bello, G; Paliani, G; Annetta, M G; Pontecorvi, A; Antonelli, M

    2009-08-01

    The nonthyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS) is a clinical condition of abnormal thyroid function tests observed in patients with acute or chronic systemic illnesses. The laboratory parameters of NTIS usually include low serum levels of triiodothyronine, with normal or low levels of thyroxine and normal or low levels of thyroid-stimulating hormone. It is still a matter of controversy whether the NTIS represents a protective adaptation of the organism to a stressful event or a maladaptive response to illness that needs correction. Multiple studies have investigated the effect of thyroid hormone replacement therapy in certain clinical situations, such as caloric restriction, cardiac disease, acute renal failure, brain-dead potential donors, and burn patients. Treating patients with NTIS seems not to be harmful, but there is no persuasive evidence that it is beneficial. The administration of hypothalamic releasing factors in patients with NTIS appears to be safe and effective in improving metabolism and restoring the anterior pituitary pulsatile secretion in the chronic phase of critical illness. However, also this promising strategy needs to be explored further. Anyhow, an extremely prudent approach is needed if treatment is given. Much of the data appearing in the literature on the treatment of NTIS encourage further randomized controlled trials on large number of patients. At present, however, we believe that there is no indication for treating thyroid hormone abnormalities in critically ill patients until convincing proof of efficacy and safety is provided.

  2. Mayaro Virus in Child with Acute Febrile Illness, Haiti, 2015.

    PubMed

    Lednicky, John; De Rochars, Valery Madsen Beau; Elbadry, Maha; Loeb, Julia; Telisma, Taina; Chavannes, Sonese; Anilis, Gina; Cella, Eleonora; Ciccozzi, Massinno; Okech, Bernard; Salemi, Marco; Morris, J Glenn

    2016-11-01

    Mayaro virus has been associated with small outbreaks in northern South America. We isolated this virus from a child with acute febrile illness in rural Haiti, confirming its role as a cause of mosquitoborne illness in the Caribbean region. The clinical presentation can mimic that of chikungunya, dengue, and Zika virus infections.

  3. Mayaro Virus in Child with Acute Febrile Illness, Haiti, 2015

    PubMed Central

    Lednicky, John; De Rochars, Valery Madsen Beau; Elbadry, Maha; Loeb, Julia; Telisma, Taina; Chavannes, Sonese; Anilis, Gina; Cella, Eleonora; Ciccozzi, Massinno; Okech, Bernard; Salemi, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Mayaro virus has been associated with small outbreaks in northern South America. We isolated this virus from a child with acute febrile illness in rural Haiti, confirming its role as a cause of mosquitoborne illness in the Caribbean region. The clinical presentation can mimic that of chikungunya, dengue, and Zika virus infections. PMID:27767924

  4. Development and validation of the Thai version of the 4 ‘A’s Test for delirium screening in hospitalized elderly patients with acute medical illnesses

    PubMed Central

    Kuladee, Sanchai; Prachason, Thanavadee

    2016-01-01

    Background The English version of the 4 ‘A’s Test (4AT) is a rapid screening tool for delirium with a high sensitivity and specificity among hospitalized elderly patients. Objective To develop the Thai version of the 4AT (4AT-T) and assess its validity. Subjects and setting A total of 97 elderly patients aged 60 years or above who were admitted to the general medical wards were included. Methods Both authors independently translated the English version of the 4AT into Thai and thereafter developed a single reconciled forward translation by consensus. Back translation was performed by a bilingual native English speaker and it was then reviewed to ensure its agreement with the original one. After 24 hours of admission, subjects were enrolled and clinical data collected. Definite diagnosis of delirium was made by a psychiatrist using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition, Text-Revision criteria and the 6-item Thai Delirium Rating Scale; the 4AT was then administered to participants by nurses within 30 minutes. A 4AT score ≥4 was considered positive for delirium screening. The optimal cut-off point of the 4AT-T was identified by Youden’s index. Results In all, 24 out of 97 participants met the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition, Text-Revision criteria for delirium. At a cut-off score of 4 or greater, the 4AT-T exhibited satisfactory diagnostic performance with a sensitivity of 83.3% (95% confidence interval (CI): 62.6%–95.3%) and specificity of 86.3% (95% CI: 76.3%–93.2%). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.92. The specified score provided maximal Youden’s index, suggesting an optimal criterion value for delirium screening. Conclusion The 4AT-T is a valid delirium-screening instrument for hospitalized elderly patients with acute medical illnesses. PMID:26966365

  5. Understanding smoking after acute illness: An application of the sentinel event method.

    PubMed

    O'Hea, Erin; Abar, Beau; Bock, Beth; Chapman, Gretchen; Boudreaux, Edwin D

    2015-01-01

    The sentinel event theory provides a stepwise approach for building models to understand how negative events can spark health behaviour change. This study tested a preliminary model using the sentinel events method in a sample (N = 300) of smokers who sought care for acute cardiac symptoms. Patients completed measures on: smoking-related causal attribution, perceived severity of the acute illness event, illness-related fear and intentions to quit smoking. Patients were followed up one week after the health event and a seven-day timeline follow back was completed to determine abstinence from tobacco. Structural equation models were performed using average predictor scale scores at baseline, as well as three different time anchors for ratings of illness severity and illness-related fear. Quit intentions, actual illness severity and age were the consistent, positive and independent predictors of seven-day point prevalence abstinence. Additional research on the influences of perceptions and emotional reactions is warranted.

  6. From Data Patterns to Mechanistic Models in Acute Critical Illness

    PubMed Central

    Aerts, Jean-Marie; Haddad, Wassim M.; An, Gary; Vodovotz, Yoram

    2014-01-01

    The complexity of the physiologic and inflammatory response in acute critical illness has stymied the accurate diagnosis and development of therapies. The Society for Complex Acute Illness was formed a decade ago with the goal of leveraging multiple complex systems approaches in order to address this unmet need. Two main paths of development have characterized the Society’s approach: i) data pattern analysis, either defining the diagnostic/prognostic utility of complexity metrics of physiological signals or multivariate analyses of molecular and genetic data, and ii) mechanistic mathematical and computational modeling, all being performed with an explicit translational goal. Here, we summarize the progress to date on each of these approaches, along with pitfalls inherent in the use of each approach alone. We suggest that the next decade holds the potential to merge these approaches, connecting patient diagnosis to treatment via mechanism-based dynamical system modeling and feedback control, and allowing extrapolation from physiologic signals to biomarkers to novel drug candidates. As a predicate example, we focus on the role of data-driven and mechanistic models in neuroscience, and the impact that merging these modeling approaches can have on general anesthesia. PMID:24768566

  7. Can Illness Perceptions Predict Lower Heart Rate Variability following Acute Myocardial Infarction?

    PubMed Central

    Princip, Mary; Scholz, Marco; Meister-Langraf, Rebecca E.; Barth, Jürgen; Schnyder, Ulrich; Znoj, Hansjörg; Schmid, Jean-Paul; Thayer, Julian F.; von Känel, Roland

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Decreased heart rate variability (HRV) has been reported to be a predictor of mortality after myocardial infarction (MI). Patients' beliefs and perceptions concerning their illness may play a role in decreased HRV. This study investigated if illness perceptions predict HRV at 3 months following acute MI. Methods: 130 patients referred to a tertiary cardiology center, were examined within 48 h and 3 months following acute MI. At admission, patients' cognitive representations of their MI were assessed using the German version of the self-rated Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire (Brief IPQ). At admission and after 3 months (follow-up), frequency and time domain measures of HRV were obtained from 5-min electrocardiogram (ECG) recordings during stable supine resting. Results: Linear hierarchical regression showed that the Brief IPQ dimensions timeline (β coefficient = 0.29; p = 0.044), personal control (β = 0.47; p = 0.008) and illness understanding (β = 0.43; p = 0.014) were significant predictors of HRV, adjusted for age, gender, baseline HRV, diabetes, beta-blockers, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), attendance of cardiac rehabilitation, and depressive symptoms. Conclusions: As patients' negative perceptions of their illness are associated with lower HRV following acute MI, a brief illness perception questionnaire may help to identify patients who might benefit from a specific illness perceptions intervention. PMID:27917140

  8. Regional analgesia in postsurgical critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Moliner Velázquez, S; Rubio Haro, R; De Andrés Serrano, C; De Andrés Ibáñez, J

    2017-03-01

    Regional analgesia intrinsically, based on its physiological effects, is routinely used for the perioperative treatment of pain associated with surgical procedures. However, in other areas such as the non-surgical treatment of acute pain for patients in a critical condition, it has not been subjected to specific prospective studies. If we confine ourselves to the physiological effects of the nerve block, in a situation of stress, the indications for regional anaesthesia in this group of patients extend to the management of a wide variety of medical as well as postsurgical conditions, of trauma patients and of other painful procedures performed in the patient's bed. The critical patient certainly must be analyzed individually as their own primary conditions is of vital importance, as well as any associated conditions they have developed that can potentially increase the risk of systemic toxicity or morbidity, such as, coagulopathies, infection, immunosuppressive states, sedation and problems associated with mechanical ventilation. This review aims to assess the role of regional analgesia in critically ill patients, placing it within the algorithm decision tree of the professional responsible for patients in critical care units, all based on the evidence of potential benefits according to the published literature.

  9. New Insights toward the Acute Non-Thyroidal Illness Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wajner, Simone Magagnin; Maia, Ana Luiza

    2012-01-01

    The non-thyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS) refers to changes in serum thyroid hormone levels observed in critically ill patients in the absence of hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid primary dysfunction. Affected individuals have low T3, elevated rT3, and inappropriately normal TSH levels. The pathophysiological mechanisms are poorly understood but the acute and chronic changes in pituitary-thyroid function are probably the consequence of the action of multiple factors. The early phase seems to reflect changes occurring primarily in the peripheral thyroid hormone metabolism, best seen in humans since 80-90% of the circulating T3 are derived from the pro-hormone T4. The conversion of T4 to T3 is catalyzed by type 1 (D1) and type 2 (D2) deiodinases via outer-ring deiodination. In contrast, type 3 deiodinase (D3) catalyzes the inactivation of both T4 and T3. Over the last decades, several studies have attempted to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the changes on circulating thyroid hormones in NTIS. Increased inflammatory cytokines, which occurs in response to virtually any illness, has long been speculated to play a role in derangements of deiodinase expression. On the other hand, oxidative stress due to augmented reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation is characteristic of many diseases that are associated with NTIS. Changes in the intracellular redox state may disrupt deiodinase function by independent mechanisms, which might include depletion of the as yet unidentified endogenous thiol cofactor. Here we aim to present an updated picture of the advances in understanding the mechanisms that result in the fall of thyroid hormone levels in the acute phase of NTIS.

  10. Critical illness neuromyopathy and the role of physical therapy and rehabilitation in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Fan, Eddy

    2012-06-01

    Neuromuscular complications of critical illness are common, and can be severe and persistent, with substantial impairment in physical function and long-term quality of life. While the etiology of ICU-acquired weakness (ICUAW) is multifactorial, both direct (ie, critical illness neuromyopathy) and indirect (ie, immobility/disuse atrophy) complications of critical illness contribute to it. ICUAW is often difficult to diagnose clinically during the acute phase of critical illness, due to the frequent use of deep sedation, encephalopathy, and delirium, which impair physical examination for patient strength. Despite its limitations, physical examination is the starting point for identification of ICUAW in the cooperative patient. Given the relative cost, invasiveness, and need for expertise, electrophysiological testing and/or muscle biopsy may be reserved for weak patients with slower than expected improvement on serial clinical examination. Currently there are limited interventions to prevent or treat ICUAW, with tight glycemic control having the greatest supporting evidence. There is a paucity of clinical trials evaluating the specific role of early rehabilitation in the chronic critically ill. However, a number of studies support the benefit of intensive rehabilitation in patients receiving chronic mechanical ventilation. Furthermore, emerging data demonstrate the safety, feasibility, and potential benefit of early mobility in critically ill patients, with the need for multicenter randomized trials to evaluate potential short- and long-term benefits of early mobility, including the potential to prevent the need for prolonged mechanical ventilation and/or the development of chronic critical illness, and other novel treatments on patients' muscle strength, physical function, quality of life, and resource utilization. Finally, the barriers, feasibility, and efficacy of early mobility in both medical and other ICUs (eg, surgical, neurological, pediatric), as well as in

  11. A Clinical Study of Acute Kidney Injury in Tropical Acute Febrile Illness

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Ajay; Prabhu, Mangalore Venkatraya

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Tropical Acute Febrile Illness (TAFI) is one of the most common causes of morbidity within the community. Acute Kidney Injury (AKI) due to infective and non infective causes is a major complication. Presence of AKI is a major cause of mortality among patients with TAFI. Aim To study the spectrum of tropical acute febrile illness; the proportion, spectrum and staging of acute kidney injury; Renal Replacement Therapy (RRT) initiation and in-hospital mortality. Materials and Methods A total of 600 TAFI patients were prospectively studied at a tertiary care centre in coastal Karnataka between September 2012 and September 2014 for the aetiology of TAFI; the development and staging of AKI based on Kidney disease: Improving global outcomes (KDIGO) guidelines; the initiation of RRT and in-hospital mortality. Statistical Analysis: Data analysis was done using SPSS version 17.0 with statistical significance calculated using chi-square and Fisher’s exact t-test for which p-value <0.05 was considered significant. Results The spectrum of TAFI, in decreasing order, was vivax malaria, leptospirosis, dengue fever, falciparum malaria, mixed malaria, enteric fever, scrub typhus and the most common aetiology was malaria. The proportion of AKI was 54%. The most common cause of AKI, its stages 2 and 3, RRT initiation and in-hospital mortality was leptospirosis; and AKI stage 1 was dengue fever. KDIGO AKI stage 1, 2 and 3 was seen in 46.9%, 31.2% and 21.9% of AKI patients, respectively. RRT initiation was required in 10.2% of AKI patients and in-hospital mortality was 3% among all patients. AKI, RRT initiationand in-hospital mortality were significantly associated with older age, fever duration and other presenting complaints, examination findings, renal function and other parameters, leptospirosis, dengue fever, falciparum malaria. Conclusion The aetiology in about half of TAFI patients in coastal Karnataka was malaria. More than 50% develop AKI with greater than one

  12. Human Herpesvirus 6 Infection Presenting as an Acute Febrile Illness Associated with Thrombocytopenia and Leukopenia

    PubMed Central

    Avšič-Županc, Tatjana; Uršič, Tina; Petrovec, Miroslav

    2016-01-01

    We present an infant with acute fever, thrombocytopenia, and leukopenia, coming from an endemic region for tick-borne encephalitis, human granulocytic anaplasmosis, and hantavirus infection. The primary human herpesvirus 6 infection was diagnosed by seroconversion of specific IgM and IgG and by identification of viral DNA in the acute patient's serum. The patient did not show skin rash suggestive of exanthema subitum during the course of illness. PMID:27980872

  13. Acute kidney injury in critically ill patients with haematological malignancies: results of a multicentre cohort study from the Groupe de Recherche en Réanimation Respiratoire en Onco-Hématologie

    PubMed Central

    Darmon, Michael; Vincent, François; Canet, Emmanuel; Mokart, Djamel; Pène, Frédéric; Kouatchet, Achille; Mayaux, Julien; Nyunga, Martine; Bruneel, Fabrice; Rabbat, Antoine; Lebert, Christine; Perez, Pierre; Renault, Anne; Meert, Anne-Pascale; Benoit, Dominique; Hamidfar, Rebecca; Jourdain, Mercé; Schlemmer, Benoit; Chevret, Sylvie; Lemiale, Virginie; Azoulay, Elie

    2015-01-01

    Background Cancer patients are at high risk for acute kidney injury (AKI), which is associated with high morbidity and mortality. We sought to appraise the incidence, risk factors, and outcome of AKI in a large multicentre cohort study of critically ill patients with haematological malignancies. Methods We used a retrospective analysis of a prospectively collected database. The study was carried out in 17 university or university-affiliated centres in France and Belgium between 2010 and 2012. AKI was defined according to the Acute Kidney Injury Network (AKIN) definition. Results Of the 1011 patients admitted into the intensive care unit (ICU) during the study period, 1009 were included in this study. According to the AKIN definition, 671 patients (66.5%) developed an AKI during their ICU stay, of which 258 patients (38.4%) were AKI stage 1, 75 patients (11.2%) AKI stage 2 and 338 patients (50.4%) AKI stage 3. After adjustment for confounders, main adverse risk factors of AKI were older age, severity [non-renal Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA)], history of hypertension, tumour lysis syndrome, exposure to nephrotoxic agents and myeloma. Hospital mortality was 44.3% in patients with AKI and 25.4% in patients without AKI (P < 0.0001). After adjustment for confounders, AKI was independently associated with hospital mortality [OR 1.65 (95% CI 1.19–2.29)]. Overall, 271 patients required renal replacement therapy (RRT), of whom 57.2% died during their hospital stay as compared with 31.2% (P < 0.0001) in those not requiring RRT. Conclusion Two-thirds of critically ill patients with haematological malignancies developed AKI. Hospital mortality in this population of patients developing AKI or requiring RRT is close to that in general ICU population. PMID:26597921

  14. [Metabolic emergencies in critically ill cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Namendys-Silva, Silvio A; Hernández-Garay, Marisol; García-Guillén, Francisco J; Correa-García, Paulina; Herrera Gómez, Angel; Meneses-García, Abelardo

    2013-11-01

    Severe metabolic alterations frequently occur in critically ill cancer patients; hypercalcemia, hypocalcemia, hyponatremia, tumor lysis syndrome, metabolic complications of renal failure and lactic acidosis. Cancer patients with metabolic emergencies should be treated in a medical oncology department or an intensive care unit. Most metabolic emergencies can be treated properly when they are identified early. The clinician should consider that the prognosis of critically ill cancer patients depends on their primary disease, comorbidities and organ failure.

  15. Antiphospholipid antibodies in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Vassalo, Juliana; Spector, Nelson; de Meis, Ernesto; Soares, Márcio; Salluh, Jorge Ibrain Figueira

    2014-01-01

    Antiphospholipid antibodies are responsible for a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations. Venous, arterial and microvascular thrombosis and severe catastrophic cases account for a large morbidly/mortality. Through the connection between the immune, inflammatory and hemostatic systems, it is possible that these antibodies may contribute to the development of organ dysfunction and are associated with poor short and long-term prognoses in critically ill patients. We performed a search of the PubMed/MedLine database for articles written during the period from January 2000 to February 2013 to evaluate the frequency of antiphospholipid antibodies in critically ill patients and their impact on the outcomes of these patients. Only eight original studies involving critically ill patients were found. However, the development of antiphospholipid antibodies in critically ill patients seems to be frequent, but more studies are necessary to clarify their pathogenic role and implications for clinical practice. PMID:25028953

  16. The devil is in the detail: Acute Guillain–Barré syndrome camouflaged as neurosarcoidosis in a critically ill patient admitted to an Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Sarada, Pooja Prathapan; Sundararajan, Krishnaswamy

    2016-01-01

    Guillain–Barré syndrome (GBS) is an acute demyelinating polyneuropathy, usually evoked by antecedent infection. Sarcoidosis is a multisystem chronic granulomatous disorder with neurological involvement occurring in a minority. We present a case of a 43-year-old Caucasian man who presented with acute ascending polyradiculoneuropathy with a recent diagnosis of pulmonary sarcoidosis. The absence of acute flaccid paralysis excluded a clinical diagnosis of GBS in the first instance. Subsequently, a rapid onset of proximal weakness with multi-organ failure led to the diagnosis of GBS, which necessitated intravenous immunoglobulin and plasmapheresis to which the patient responded adequately, and he was subsequently discharged home. Neurosarcoidosis often masquerades as other disorders, leading to a diagnostic dilemma; also, the occurrence of a GBS-like clinical phenotype secondary to neurosarcoidosis may make diagnosing coexisting GBS a therapeutic challenge. This article not only serves to exemplify the rare association of neurosarcoidosis with GBS but also highlights the need for a high index of clinical suspicion for GBS and accurate history taking in any patient who may present with rapidly progressing weakness to an Intensive Care Unit. PMID:27303139

  17. Burden of self-reported acute gastrointestinal illness in Cuba.

    PubMed

    Aguiar Prieto, Pablo; Finley, Rita L; Muchaal, P K; Guerin, Michele T; Isaacs, Sandy; Domínguez, Arnaldo Castro; Coutín Marie, Gisele; Perez, Enrique

    2009-06-01

    Acute gastrointestinal illness is an important public-health issue worldwide. Burden-of-illness studies have not previously been conducted in Cuba. The objective of the study was to determine the magnitude, distribution, and burden of self-reported acute gastrointestinal illness in Cuba. A retrospective, cross-sectional survey was conducted in three sentinel sites during June-July 2005 (rainy season) and during November 2005-January 2006 (dry season). Households were randomly selected from a list maintained by the medical offices in each site. One individual per household was selected to complete a questionnaire in a face-to-face interview. The case definition was three or more bouts of loose stools in a 24-hour period within the last 30 days. In total, 97.3% of 6,576 interviews were completed. The overall prevalence of acute gastrointestinal illness was 10.6%. The risk of acute gastrointestinal illness was higher during the rainy season (odds ratio [OR]=3.85, 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.18-4.66) in children (OR=3.12, 95% CI 2.24-4.36) and teens (OR=2.27, 95% CI 1.51-3.41) compared to people aged 25-54 years, in males (OR=1.24, 95% CI 1.04-1.47), and in the municipality of Santiago de Cuba (OR=1.33, 95% CI 1.11-1.61). Of 680 cases, 17.1-38.1% visited a physician, depending on sentinel site. Of the cases who visited a physician, 33.3-53.9% were requested to submit a stool sample, and of those, 72.7-100.0% complied. Of the cases who sought medical care, 16.7-61.5% and 0-31.6% were treated with antidiarrhoeals and antibiotics respectively. Acute gastrointestinal illness represented a substantial burden of health compared to developed countries. Targeting the identified risk factors when allocating resources for education, food safety, and infrastructure might lower the morbidity associated with acute gastrointestinal illness.

  18. Burden of Self-reported Acute Gastrointestinal Illness in Cuba

    PubMed Central

    Prieto, Pablo Aguiar; Finley, Rita L.; Guerin, Michele T.; Isaacs, Sandy; Domínguez, Arnaldo Castro; Marie, Gisele Coutín; Perez, Enrique

    2009-01-01

    Acute gastrointestinal illness is an important public-health issue worldwide. Burden-of-illness studies have not previously been conducted in Cuba. The objective of the study was to determine the magnitude, distribution, and burden of self-reported acute gastrointestinal illness in Cuba. A retrospective, cross-sectional survey was conducted in three sentinel sites during June-July 2005 (rainy season) and during November 2005–January 2006 (dry season). Households were randomly selected from a list maintained by the medical offices in each site. One individual per household was selected to complete a questionnaire in a face-to-face interview. The case definition was three or more bouts of loose stools in a 24-hour period within the last 30 days. In total, 97.3% of 6,576 interviews were completed. The overall prevalence of acute gastrointestinal illness was 10.6%. The risk of acute gastrointestinal illness was higher during the rainy season (odds ratio [OR]=3.85, 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.18-4.66) in children (OR=3.12, 95% CI 2.24-4.36) and teens (OR=2.27, 95% CI 1.51-3.41) compared to people aged 25-54 years, in males (OR=1.24, 95% CI 1.04-1.47), and in the municipality of Santiago de Cuba (OR=1.33, 95% CI 1.11-1.61). Of 680 cases, 17.1-38.1% visited a physician, depending on sentinel site. Of the cases who visited a physician, 33.3-53.9% were requested to submit a stool sample, and of those, 72.7-100.0% complied. Of the cases who sought medical care, 16.7- 61.5% and 0-31.6% were treated with antidiarrhoeals and antibiotics respectively. Acute gastrointestinal illness represented a substantial burden of health compared to developed countries. Targeting the identified risk factors when allocating resources for education, food safety, and infrastructure might lower the morbidity associated with acute gastrointestinal illness. PMID:19507750

  19. Mental illness and the dental patient.

    PubMed

    Longley, Alison J; Doyle, Patricia E

    2003-01-01

    Virtually every oral health care practice includes patients with mental illness. This continuing education (CE) course gives a practical overview of common psychiatric disorders, their effects on oral and dental health, and conditions associated with mental illness that affect oral health treatment. Following a brief description of mental illnesses, information on conducting a mental health interview and making a psychiatric referral are provided. Oral health problems associated with mental illness and factors affecting treatment delivery are discussed, as well as ideas for avoiding potentially dangerous medication interactions and working with fearful, suspicious, or cognitively impaired patients. Ways in which dental hygienists can work with case managers to provide much needed oral health care to patients whose illness is severe or chronic are covered. Examples are given of work with clients illustrating principles described in the text. The purpose of this course is to provide oral health personnel the information they need to knowledgeably care for patients who have mental illness. Successful completion will be assessed with a post-test to be completed after reading the article in its entirety, including figures and case-reports. Two continuing education course credit hours will be awarded following successful completion of the post-test.

  20. Copeptin Predicts Mortality in Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Krychtiuk, Konstantin A.; Honeder, Maria C.; Lenz, Max; Maurer, Gerald; Wojta, Johann; Heinz, Gottfried; Huber, Kurt; Speidl, Walter S.

    2017-01-01

    Background Critically ill patients admitted to a medical intensive care unit exhibit a high mortality rate irrespective of the cause of admission. Besides its role in fluid and electrolyte balance, vasopressin has been described as a stress hormone. Copeptin, the C-terminal portion of provasopressin mirrors vasopressin levels and has been described as a reliable biomarker for the individual’s stress level and was associated with outcome in various disease entities. The aim of this study was to analyze whether circulating levels of copeptin at ICU admission are associated with 30-day mortality. Methods In this single-center prospective observational study including 225 consecutive patients admitted to a tertiary medical ICU at a university hospital, blood was taken at ICU admission and copeptin levels were measured using a commercially available automated sandwich immunofluorescent assay. Results Median acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II score was 20 and 30-day mortality was 25%. Median copeptin admission levels were significantly higher in non-survivors as compared with survivors (77.6 IQR 30.7–179.3 pmol/L versus 45.6 IQR 19.6–109.6 pmol/L; p = 0.025). Patients with serum levels of copeptin in the third tertile at admission had a 2.4-fold (95% CI 1.2–4.6; p = 0.01) increased mortality risk as compared to patients in the first tertile. When analyzing patients according to cause of admission, copeptin was only predictive of 30-day mortality in patients admitted due to medical causes as opposed to those admitted after cardiac surgery, as medical patients with levels of copeptin in the highest tertile had a 3.3-fold (95% CI 1.66.8, p = 0.002) risk of dying independent from APACHE II score, primary diagnosis, vasopressor use and need for mechanical ventilation. Conclusion Circulating levels of copeptin at ICU admission independently predict 30-day mortality in patients admitted to a medical ICU. PMID:28118414

  1. Bedside echocardiography in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Casaroto, Eduardo; Mohovic, Tatiana; Pinto, Lilian Moreira; de Lara, Tais Rodrigues

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The echocardiography has become a vital tool in the diagnosis of critically ill patients. The use of echocardiography by intensivists has been increasing since the 1990’s. This tool has become a common procedure for the cardiovascular assessment of critically ill patients, especially because it is non-invasive and can be applied in fast and guided manner at the bedside. Physicians with basic training in echocardiography, both from intensive care unit or emergency department, can assess the left ventricle function properly with good accuracy compared with assessment made by cardiologists. The change of treatment approach based on echocardiographic findings is commonly seen after examination of unstable patient. This brief review focuses on growing importance of echocardiography as an useful tool for management of critically ill patients in the intensive care setting along with the cardiac output assessment using this resource. PMID:26761560

  2. Obesity, Acute Kidney Injury, and Mortality in Critical Illness

    PubMed Central

    Danziger, John; Chen, Ken; Lee, Joon; Feng, Mengling; Mark, Roger G.; Celi, Leo Anthony; Mukamal, Kenneth J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Although obesity is associated with risk for chronic kidney disease (CKD) and improved survival, less is known about the associations of obesity with risk of acute kidney injury (AKI) and post-AKI mortality. Methods In a single-center inception cohort of almost 15,000 critically ill patients, we evaluated the association of obesity with AKI and AKI severity, as well as in-hospital and one-year survival. AKI was defined using the Kidney Disease Outcome Quality Initiative criteria. Results The AKI incidence rates for normal, overweight, Class I, II, and III Obesity were 18.6, 20.6, 22.5, 24.3 and 24.0 percent respectively, and the adjusted odds ratios of AKI were 1.18 [95% CI 1.06–1.31], 1.35 [1.19–1.53], 1.47 [1.25–1.73], 1.59 [1.31–1.87], compared to normal weight, respectively. Each 5 kg/m2 increase in body mass index (BMI) was associated with a 10% risk [95% CI 1.06–1.24; p<0.001] of more severe AKI. Within-hospital and one-year survival rates associated with the AKI episodes were similar across BMI categories. In conclusion, obesity is a risk factor for AKI injury, which is associated with increased short- and long-term mortality. PMID:26496453

  3. Hypomagnesemia in Critically Ill Sepsis Patients.

    PubMed

    Velissaris, Dimitrios; Karamouzos, Vassilios; Pierrakos, Charalampos; Aretha, Diamanto; Karanikolas, Menelaos

    2015-12-01

    Magnesium (Mg), also known as "the forgotten electrolyte", is the fourth most abundant cation overall and the second most abundant intracellular cation in the body. Mg deficiency has been implicated in the pathophysiology of many diseases. This article is a review of the literature regarding Mg abnormalities with emphasis on the implications of hypomagnesemia in critical illness and on treatment options for hypomagnesemia in critically ill patients with sepsis. Hypomagnesemia is common in critically ill patients, and there is strong, consistent clinical evidence, largely from observational studies, showing that hypomagnesemia is significantly associated with increased need for mechanical ventilation, prolonged ICU stay and increased mortality. Although the mechanism linking hypomagnesemia with poor clinical outcomes is not known, experimental data suggest mechanisms contributing to such outcomes. However, at the present time, there is no clear evidence that magnesium supplementation improves outcomes in critically ill patients with hypomagnesemia. Large, well-designed clinical trials are needed to evaluate the role of magnesium therapy for improving outcomes in critically ill patients with sepsis.

  4. Management of critically ill patients with diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Silva-Perez, Livier Josefina; Benitez-Lopez, Mario Alberto; Varon, Joseph; Surani, Salim

    2017-01-01

    Disorders of glucose homeostasis, such as stress-induced hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia, are common complications in patients in the intensive care unit. Patients with preexisting diabetes mellitus (DM) are more susceptible to hyperglycemia, as well as a higher risk from glucose overcorrection, that may results in severe hypoglycemia. In critically ill patients with DM, it is recommended to maintain a blood glucose range between 140-180 mg/dL. In neurological patients and surgical patients, tighter glycemic control (i.e., 110-140 mg/d) is recommended if hypoglycemia can be properly avoided. There is limited evidence that shows that critically ill diabetic patients with a glycosylated hemoglobin levels above 7% may benefit from looser glycemic control, in order to reduce the risk of hypoglycemia and significant glycemic variability. PMID:28344751

  5. External Validation and Recalibration of Risk Prediction Models for Acute Traumatic Brain Injury among Critically Ill Adult Patients in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Harrison, David A; Griggs, Kathryn A; Prabhu, Gita; Gomes, Manuel; Lecky, Fiona E; Hutchinson, Peter J A; Menon, David K; Rowan, Kathryn M

    2015-10-01

    This study validates risk prediction models for acute traumatic brain injury (TBI) in critical care units in the United Kingdom and recalibrates the models to this population. The Risk Adjustment In Neurocritical care (RAIN) Study was a prospective, observational cohort study in 67 adult critical care units. Adult patients admitted to critical care following acute TBI with a last pre-sedation Glasgow Coma Scale score of less than 15 were recruited. The primary outcomes were mortality and unfavorable outcome (death or severe disability, assessed using the Extended Glasgow Outcome Scale) at six months following TBI. Of 3626 critical care unit admissions, 2975 were analyzed. Following imputation of missing outcomes, mortality at six months was 25.7% and unfavorable outcome 57.4%. Ten risk prediction models were validated from Hukkelhoven and colleagues, the Medical Research Council (MRC) Corticosteroid Randomisation After Significant Head Injury (CRASH) Trial Collaborators, and the International Mission for Prognosis and Analysis of Clinical Trials in TBI (IMPACT) group. The model with the best discrimination was the IMPACT "Lab" model (C index, 0.779 for mortality and 0.713 for unfavorable outcome). This model was well calibrated for mortality at six months but substantially under-predicted the risk of unfavorable outcome. Recalibration of the models resulted in small improvements in discrimination and excellent calibration for all models. The risk prediction models demonstrated sufficient statistical performance to support their use in research and audit but fell below the level required to guide individual patient decision-making. The published models for unfavorable outcome at six months had poor calibration in the UK critical care setting and the models recalibrated to this setting should be used in future research.

  6. External Validation and Recalibration of Risk Prediction Models for Acute Traumatic Brain Injury among Critically Ill Adult Patients in the United Kingdom

    PubMed Central

    Griggs, Kathryn A.; Prabhu, Gita; Gomes, Manuel; Lecky, Fiona E.; Hutchinson, Peter J. A.; Menon, David K.; Rowan, Kathryn M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This study validates risk prediction models for acute traumatic brain injury (TBI) in critical care units in the United Kingdom and recalibrates the models to this population. The Risk Adjustment In Neurocritical care (RAIN) Study was a prospective, observational cohort study in 67 adult critical care units. Adult patients admitted to critical care following acute TBI with a last pre-sedation Glasgow Coma Scale score of less than 15 were recruited. The primary outcomes were mortality and unfavorable outcome (death or severe disability, assessed using the Extended Glasgow Outcome Scale) at six months following TBI. Of 3626 critical care unit admissions, 2975 were analyzed. Following imputation of missing outcomes, mortality at six months was 25.7% and unfavorable outcome 57.4%. Ten risk prediction models were validated from Hukkelhoven and colleagues, the Medical Research Council (MRC) Corticosteroid Randomisation After Significant Head Injury (CRASH) Trial Collaborators, and the International Mission for Prognosis and Analysis of Clinical Trials in TBI (IMPACT) group. The model with the best discrimination was the IMPACT “Lab” model (C index, 0.779 for mortality and 0.713 for unfavorable outcome). This model was well calibrated for mortality at six months but substantially under-predicted the risk of unfavorable outcome. Recalibration of the models resulted in small improvements in discrimination and excellent calibration for all models. The risk prediction models demonstrated sufficient statistical performance to support their use in research and audit but fell below the level required to guide individual patient decision-making. The published models for unfavorable outcome at six months had poor calibration in the UK critical care setting and the models recalibrated to this setting should be used in future research. PMID:25898072

  7. Psychoneuroimmunology in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    DeKeyser, Freda

    2003-02-01

    Psychoneuroimmunology is the study of the interactions among behavior, neural, and endocrine functions and the immune system. The purpose of this review is to briefly summarize the evidence concerning interactions among behavior, the neuroendocrine system, and the immune system, and to show how this evidence relates to critical care patients. It has been shown that the immune function of many patients in the intensive care unit is suppressed as a result of trauma, sepsis, or profound physiologic and psychological stress. Three of the most common stressors among patients in the intensive care unit are pain, sleep deprivation, and fear or anxiety. Findings have shown each of these stressors to be associated with decreased immune functioning. Nurses have an important responsibility to protect their patients from infection and promote their ability to heal. Several actions are suggested that can help the nurse achieve these goals. It is hoped that nurses would keep these interactions in mind while caring for their patients in the intensive care unit.

  8. Lung ultrasound in critically ill patients: a new diagnostic tool.

    PubMed

    Dexheimer Neto, Felippe Leopoldo; Dalcin, Paulo de Tarso Roth; Teixeira, Cassiano; Beltrami, Flávia Gabe

    2012-01-01

    The evaluation of critically ill patients using lung ultrasound, even if performed by nonspecialists, has recently garnered greater interest. Because lung ultrasound is based on the fact that every acute illness reduces lung aeration, it can provide information that complements the physical examination and clinical impression, the main advantage being that it is a bedside tool. The objective of this review was to evaluate the clinical applications of lung ultrasound by searching the PubMed and the Brazilian Virtual Library of Health databases. We used the following search terms (in Portuguese and English): ultrasound; lung; and critical care. In addition to the most relevant articles, we also reviewed specialized textbooks. The data show that lung ultrasound is useful in the differential diagnosis of pulmonary infiltrates, having good accuracy in identifying consolidations and interstitial syndrome. In addition, lung ultrasound has been widely used in the evaluation and treatment of pleural effusions, as well as in the identification of pneumothorax. This technique can also be useful in the immediate evaluation of patients with dyspnea or acute respiratory failure. Other described applications include monitoring treatment response and increasing the safety of invasive procedures. Although specific criteria regarding training and certification are still lacking, lung ultrasound is a fast, inexpensive, and widely available tool. This technique should progressively come to be more widely incorporated into the care of critically ill patients.

  9. [PHARMACONUTRITION IN SEVERELY ILL PATIENT].

    PubMed

    Burgos Peláez, Rosa; Escudero Álvarez, Elena; García Almeida, Jose Manuel; García de Lorenzo, Abelardo; García Luna, Pedro Pablo; Gil Hernández, Angel; Matos Adames, Alfredo; Molina Soria, Juan Bautista; Montejo González, Juan Carlos; Sánchez Alvarez, Carmen; Perez de la Cruz, Antonio

    2015-08-01

    "Pharmaconutrient" is a term applicable to those compounds which. in addition to their nutritional function, play a role as aids in the treatment of patients with severe pathologies, including sepsis, trauma, burns and major surgery, In general, enrichment of enteral an parenteral formulas with pharmaconutrients contribute to positively modulate the inflammatory response, infection and controlling the internal milieu, which in turn can be evaluated through lower mortality, hospital and intensive care units stay, days of mechanical ventilation and other parameters allowing to asses their effects. Arginine, glutamine, nucleotides, omega-3 fatty acids and antioxidant micronutrients, make up the nucleus of pharmaconutrients used with that aim, usually as mixtures of them. In the present review current evidence about the effects, indications, limitations, doses, potential adverse risks and even counter-indications is analysed.

  10. Is albumin administration in the acutely ill associated with increased mortality? Results of the SOAP study

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Jean-Louis; Sakr, Yasser; Reinhart, Konrad; Sprung, Charles L; Gerlach, Herwig; Ranieri, V Marco

    2005-01-01

    Introduction Albumin administration in the critically ill has been the subject of some controversy. We investigated the use of albumin solutions in European intensive care units (ICUs) and its relationship to outcome. Methods In a cohort, multicenter, observational study, all patients admitted to one of the participating ICUs between 1 May and 15 May 2002 were followed up until death, hospital discharge, or for 60 days. Patients were classified according to whether or not they received albumin at any time during their ICU stay. Results Of 3,147 admitted patients, 354 (11.2%) received albumin and 2,793 (88.8%) did not. Patients who received albumin were more likely to have cancer or liver cirrhosis, to be surgical admissions, and to have sepsis. They had a longer length of ICU stay and a higher mortality rate, but were also more severely ill, as manifested by higher simplified acute physiology score (SAPS) II and sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) scores than the other patients. A Cox proportional hazard model indicated that albumin administration was significantly associated with decreased 30-day survival. Moreover, in 339 pairs matched according to a propensity score, ICU and hospital mortality rates were higher in the patients who had received albumin than in those who had not (34.8 versus 20.9% and 41.3 versus 27.7%, respectively, both p < 0.001). Conclusion Albumin administration was associated with decreased survival in this population of acutely ill patients. Further prospective randomized controlled trials are needed to examine the effects of albumin administration in sub-groups of acutely ill patients. PMID:16356223

  11. Urinary Biomarkers IGFBP7 and TIMP-2 for the Diagnostic Assessment of Transient and Persistent Acute Kidney Injury in Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Daubin, Delphine; Cristol, Jean Paul; Dupuy, Anne Marie; Kuster, Nils; Besnard, Noémie; Platon, Laura; Buzançais, Aurèle; Brunot, Vincent; Garnier, Fanny; Jonquet, Olivier; Klouche, Kada

    2017-01-01

    Objective The capability of urinary TIMP-2 (tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase) and IGFBP7 (insulin-like growth factor binding protein)—NephroCheck Test (NC) = ([TIMP-2] x [IGFBP7]) / 1000)—to predict renal recovery from acute kidney injury (AKI) has been poorly studied. The aim of this study was to assess the performance of measurements of ([TIMP-2] x [IGFBP7]) / 1000) over 24 hours to differentiate transient from persistent AKI. Methods Of 460 consecutive adult patients admitted to the ICU, 101 were prospectively studied: 56 men, 62 (52–71) years old. A fresh urine sample was collected at H0, H4, H12 and H24 to determine ([TIMP-2] x [IGFBP7]) / 1000) levels. Areas under the curves of Delta NC H4-Ho and H12-H4 and serum creatinine (sCr) for detection of AKI recovery were compared. Results Forty-one (40.6%) patient were diagnosed with AKI: 27 transient and 14 persistent AKI. At admission (H0), AKI patients had a significantly higher NC score than patients without AKI (0.43 [0.07–2.06] vs 0.15 [0.07–0.35], p = 0.027). In AKI groups, transient AKI have a higher NC, at H0 and H4, than persistent AKI (0.87 [0.09–2.82] vs 0.13 [0.05–0.66] p = 0.035 and 0.13 [0.07–0.61] vs 0.05 [0.02–0.13] p = 0.013). Thereafter, NC level decreased in both AKI groups with a Delta NC score H4-H0 and H12-H4 significantly more important in transient AKI. Roc curves showed however that delta NC scores did not discriminate between transient and persistent AKI. Conclusion In our population, absolute urinary levels of NC score were higher at early hours after ICU admission (H0 and H4) in transient AKI as compared to persistent AKI patients. NC variations (Delta NC scores) over the first 12 hours may indicate the AKI’s evolving nature with a more significant decrease in case of transient AKI but were not able to differentiate transient from persistent AKI. PMID:28085896

  12. Working as a doctor when acutely ill: comments made by doctors responding to United Kingdom surveys

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Fay; Goldacre, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Summary Objectives We undertook multi-purpose surveys of doctors who qualified in the United Kingdom between 1993 and 2012. Doctors were asked specific questions about their careers and were asked to comment about any aspect of their training or work. We report doctors’ comments about working whilst acutely ill. Design Self-completed questionnaire surveys. Setting United Kingdom. Participants Nine cohorts of doctors, comprising all United Kingdom medical qualifiers of 1993, 1996, 1999, 2000, 2002, 2005, 2008, 2009 and 2012. Main outcome measures Comments made by doctors about working when ill, in surveys one, five and 10 years after graduation. Results The response rate, overall, was 57.4% (38,613/67,224 doctors). Free-text comments were provided by 30.7% (11,859/38,613). Three-hundred and twenty one doctors (2.7% of those who wrote comments) wrote about working when feeling acutely ill. Working with Exhaustion/fatigue was the most frequent topic raised (195 doctors), followed by problems with Taking time off for illness (112), and general comments on Physical/mental health problems (66). Other topics raised included Support from others, Leaving or adapting/coping with the situation, Bullying, the Doctor’s ability to care for patients and Death/bereavement. Arrangements for cover due to illness were regarded as insufficient by some respondents; some wrote that doctors were expected to work harder and longer to cover for colleagues absent because of illness. Conclusions We recommend that employers ensure that it is not unduly difficult for doctors to take time off work when ill, and that employers review their strategies for covering ill doctors who are off work. PMID:27066264

  13. Epidemiology of Acute Kidney Injury in Critically Ill Children and Young Adults.

    PubMed

    Kaddourah, Ahmad; Basu, Rajit K; Bagshaw, Sean M; Goldstein, Stuart L

    2017-01-05

    Background The epidemiologic characteristics of children and young adults with acute kidney injury have been described in single-center and retrospective studies. We conducted a multinational, prospective study involving patients admitted to pediatric intensive care units to define the incremental risk of death and complications associated with severe acute kidney injury. Methods We used the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes criteria to define acute kidney injury. Severe acute kidney injury was defined as stage 2 or 3 acute kidney injury (plasma creatinine level ≥2 times the baseline level or urine output <0.5 ml per kilogram of body weight per hour for ≥12 hours) and was assessed for the first 7 days of intensive care. All patients 3 months to 25 years of age who were admitted to 1 of 32 participating units were screened during 3 consecutive months. The primary outcome was 28-day mortality. Results A total of 4683 patients were evaluated; acute kidney injury developed in 1261 patients (26.9%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 25.6 to 28.2), and severe acute kidney injury developed in 543 patients (11.6%; 95% CI, 10.7 to 12.5). Severe acute kidney injury conferred an increased risk of death by day 28 after adjustment for 16 covariates (adjusted odds ratio, 1.77; 95% CI, 1.17 to 2.68); death occurred in 60 of the 543 patients (11.0%) with severe acute kidney injury versus 105 of the 4140 patients (2.5%) without severe acute kidney injury (P<0.001). Severe acute kidney injury was associated with increased use of mechanical ventilation and renal-replacement therapy. A stepwise increase in 28-day mortality was associated with worsening severity of acute kidney injury (P<0.001 by log-rank test). Assessment of acute kidney injury according to the plasma creatinine level alone failed to identify acute kidney injury in 67.2% of the patients with low urine output. Conclusions Acute kidney injury is common and is associated with poor outcomes, including increased

  14. [Evaluation and treatment of the critically ill cirrhotic patient].

    PubMed

    Fernández, Javier; Aracil, Carles; Solà, Elsa; Soriano, Germán; Cinta Cardona, Maria; Coll, Susanna; Genescà, Joan; Hombrados, Manoli; Morillas, Rosa; Martín-Llahí, Marta; Pardo, Albert; Sánchez, Jordi; Vargas, Victor; Xiol, Xavier; Ginès, Pere

    2016-11-01

    Cirrhotic patients often develop severe complications requiring ICU admission. Grade III-IV hepatic encephalopathy, septic shock, acute-on-chronic liver failure and variceal bleeding are clinical decompensations that need a specific therapeutic approach in cirrhosis. The increased effectiveness of the treatments currently used in this setting and the spread of liver transplantation programs have substantially improved the prognosis of critically ill cirrhotic patients, which has facilitated their admission to critical care units. However, gastroenterologists and intensivists have limited knowledge of the pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of these complications and of the prognostic evaluation of critically ill cirrhotic patients. Cirrhotic patients present alterations in systemic and splanchnic hemodynamics, coagulation and immune dysfunction what further increase the complexity of the treatment, the risk of developing new complications and mortality in comparison with the general population. These differential characteristics have important diagnostic and therapeutic implications that must be known by general intensivists. In this context, the Catalan Society of Gastroenterology and Hepatology requested a group of experts to draft a position paper on the assessment and treatment of critically ill cirrhotic patients. This article describes the recommendations agreed upon at the consensus meetings and their main conclusions.

  15. The disease pyramid for acute gastrointestinal illness in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Lake, R J; Adlam, S B; Perera, S; Campbell, D M; Baker, M G

    2010-10-01

    The disease pyramid of under-ascertainment for surveillance of acute gastrointestinal illness (AGI) in New Zealand has been estimated using 2005-2007 data on notifiable diseases, a community telephone survey, and a survey of diagnostic laboratories. For each notified case of AGI there were an estimated 222 cases in the community, about 49 of which visited a general practitioner. Faecal samples were requested from about 15 of these cases, and 13 samples were provided. Of the faecal samples, pathogens were detected in about three cases. These ratios are similar to those reported in other developed countries, and provide baseline measurements of the AGI burden in the New Zealand community.

  16. Acute Appendicitis in Patients with Acute Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ki Up; Kim, Jin Kyeung; Won, Jong Ho; Hong, Dae Sik; Park, Hee Sook; Park, Kyeung Kyu

    1993-01-01

    The decision to operate for abdominal pain in patients with leukopenia can be exceedingly difficult. Surgical exploration may be the only effective way to differentiate acute appendicitis from other causes, but it involves considerable risk of infectious complications due to immunesuppression. Leukemic patients, who presented significant RLQ pain, had been indicated for operation, despite having advanced disease or having had received chemotherapy or steroids. Four adult leukemia patients, complicated by acute appendictis, were reviewed. Two patients were in induction chemotherapy, one receiving salvage chemotheapy due to relapse and the other was in conservative treatment. Two patients were acute myelocytic leukemia (AML), one had acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), and the other had aleukemic leukemia. All patients underwent appendectomy and recovered without complication. Our experience supports the theory that the surgical management of appendicitis in acute leukemia is the most effective way, in spite of leukopenia. PMID:8268146

  17. Unsuspected Leptospirosis Is a Cause of Acute Febrile Illness in Nicaragua

    PubMed Central

    Reller, Megan E.; Wunder, Elsio A.; Miles, Jeremy J.; Flom, Judith E.; Mayorga, Orlando; Woods, Christopher W.; Ko, Albert I.; Dumler, J. Stephen; Matute, Armando J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Epidemic severe leptospirosis was recognized in Nicaragua in 1995, but unrecognized epidemic and endemic disease remains unstudied. Methodology/Principal Findings To determine the burden of and risk factors associated with symptomatic leptospirosis in Nicaragua, we prospectively studied patients presenting with fever at a large teaching hospital. Epidemiologic and clinical features were systematically recorded, and paired sera tested by IgM-ELISA to identify patients with probable and possible acute leptospirosis. Microscopic Agglutination Test and PCR were used to confirm acute leptospirosis. Among 704 patients with paired sera tested by MAT, 44 had acute leptospirosis. Patients with acute leptospirosis were more likely to present during rainy months and to report rural residence and fresh water exposure. The sensitivity of clinical impression and acute-phase IgM detected by ELISA were poor. Conclusions/Significance Leptospirosis is a common (6.3%) but unrecognized cause of acute febrile illness in Nicaragua. Rapid point-of-care tests to support early diagnosis and treatment as well as tests to support population-based studies to delineate the epidemiology, incidence, and clinical spectrum of leptospirosis, both ideally pathogen-based, are needed. PMID:25058149

  18. Illness denial questionnaire for patients and caregivers

    PubMed Central

    Rossi Ferrario, Silvia; Giorgi, Ines; Baiardi, Paola; Giuntoli, Laura; Balestroni, Gianluigi; Cerutti, Paola; Manera, Marina; Gabanelli, Paola; Solara, Valentina; Fornara, Roberta; Luisetti, Michela; Omarini, Pierangela; Omarini, Giovanna; Vidotto, Giulio

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Interest in assessing denial is still present, despite the criticisms concerning its definition and measurement. We tried to develop a questionnaire (Illness Denial Questionnaire, IDQ) assessing patients’ and caregivers’ denial in relation to their illness/disturbance. Patients and methods After a preliminary study, a final version of 24 dichotomous items (true/false) was selected. We hypothesized a theoretical model with three dimensions: denial of negative emotions, resistance to change, and conscious avoidance, the first two composing the actual Denial and the last representing an independent component of the illness denial behavior. The IDQ was administered to 400 subjects (219 patients and 181 caregivers) together with the Anxiety–Depression Questionnaire – Reduced form (AD-R), in order to assess concurrent validity. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA), internal consistency indices (Cronbach’s α and McDonald’s ω), and test–retest analysis were performed. Results CFA and internal consistency indices (Cronbach’s α: 0.87–0.96) indicated a clear and meaningful three-factor structure of IDQ, for both patients and caregivers. Further analyses showed good concurrent validity, with Denial and its subscale negatively associated with anxiety and depression and avoidance positively associated with anxiety and depression. The IDQ also showed a good stability (r from 0.71 to 0.87). Conclusion The IDQ demonstrated good psychometric properties. Denial of negative emotions and resistance to change seem to contribute to a real expression of denial, and conscious avoidance seems to constitute a further step in the process of cognitive–affective elaboration of the illness. PMID:28356745

  19. Asthmatics with exacerbation during acute respiratory illness exhibit unique transcriptional signatures within the nasal mucosa

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute respiratory illness is the leading cause of asthma exacerbations yet the mechanisms underlying this association remain unclear. To address the deficiencies in our understanding of the molecular events characterizing acute respiratory illness-induced asthma exacerbations, we undertook a transcriptional profiling study of the nasal mucosa over the course of acute respiratory illness amongst individuals with a history of asthma, allergic rhinitis and no underlying respiratory disease. Methods Transcriptional profiling experiments were performed using the Agilent Whole Human Genome 4X44K array platform. Time point-based microarray and principal component analyses were conducted to identify and distinguish acute respiratory illness-associated transcriptional profiles over the course of our study. Gene enrichment analysis was conducted to identify biological processes over-represented within each acute respiratory illness-associated profile, and gene expression was subsequently confirmed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Results We found that acute respiratory illness is characterized by dynamic, time-specific transcriptional profiles whose magnitudes of expression are influenced by underlying respiratory disease and the mucosal repair signature evoked during acute respiratory illness. Most strikingly, we report that people with asthma who experience acute respiratory illness-induced exacerbations are characterized by a reduced but prolonged inflammatory immune response, inadequate activation of mucosal repair, and the expression of a newly described exacerbation-specific transcriptional signature. Conclusion Findings from our study represent a significant contribution towards clarifying the complex molecular interactions that typify acute respiratory illness-induced asthma exacerbations. PMID:24433494

  20. Endocrine and metabolic considerations in critically ill patients 4

    PubMed Central

    Fliers, Eric; Bianco, Antonio C; Langouche, Lies; Boelen, Anita

    2016-01-01

    Patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) typically present with decreased concentrations of plasma tri-iodothyronine, low thyroxine, and normal range or slightly decreased concentration of thyroid-stimulating hormone. This ensemble of changes is collectively known as non-thyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS). The extent of NTIS is associated with prognosis, but no proof exists for causality of this association. Initially, NTIS is a consequence of the acute phase response to systemic illness and macronutrient restriction, which might be beneficial. Pathogenesis of NTIS in long-term critical illness is more complex and includes suppression of hypothalamic thyrotropin-releasing hormone, accounting for persistently reduced secretion of thyroid-stimulating hormone despite low plasma thyroid hormone. In some cases distinguishing between NTIS and severe hypothyroidism, which is a rare primary cause for admission to the ICU, can be difficult. Infusion of hypothalamic-releasing factors can reactivate the thyroid axis in patients with NTIS, inducing an anabolic response. Whether this approach has a clinical benefit in terms of outcome is unknown. In this Series paper, we discuss diagnostic aspects, pathogenesis, and implications of NTIS as well as its distinction from severe, primary thyroid disorders in patients in the ICU. PMID:26071885

  1. Immunoinflammatory Response in Critically Ill Patients: Severe Sepsis and/or Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Popovic, Nada; Djordjevic, Dragan

    2013-01-01

    Immunoinflammatory response in critically ill patients is very complex. This review explores some of the new elements of immunoinflammatory response in severe sepsis, tumor necrosis factor-alpha in severe acute pancreatitis as a clinical example of immune response in sepsis, immune response in severe trauma with or without secondary sepsis, and genetic aspects of host immuno-inflammatory response to various insults in critically ill patients. PMID:24371374

  2. Predictive Performance of the Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS) II and the Initial Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) Score in Acutely Ill Intensive Care Patients: Post-Hoc Analyses of the SUP-ICU Inception Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Møller, Morten Hylander; Krag, Mette; Perner, Anders; Hjortrup, Peter Buhl

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Severity scores including the Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS) II and the Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score are used in intensive care units (ICUs) to assess disease severity, predict mortality and in research. We aimed to assess the predictive performance of SAPS II and the initial SOFA score for in-hospital and 90-day mortality in a contemporary international cohort. Methods This was a post-hoc study of the Stress Ulcer Prophylaxis in the Intensive Care Unit (SUP-ICU) inception cohort study, which included acutely ill adults from ICUs across 11 countries (n = 1034). We compared the discrimination of SAPS II and initial SOFA scores, compared the discrimination of SAPS II in our cohort with the original cohort, assessed the calibration of SAPS II customised to our cohort, and compared the discrimination for 90-day mortality vs. in-hospital mortality for both scores. Discrimination was evaluated using areas under the receiver operating characteristics curves (AUROC). Calibration was evaluated using Hosmer-Lemeshow’s goodness-of-fit Ĉ-statistic. Results AUROC for in-hospital mortality was 0.80 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.77–0.83) for SAPS II and 0.73 (95% CI 0.69–0.76) for initial SOFA score (P<0.001 for the comparison). Calibration of the customised SAPS II for predicting in-hospital mortality was adequate (P = 0.60). Discrimination of SAPS II was reduced compared with the original SAPS II validation sample (AUROC 0.80 vs. 0.86; P = 0.001). AUROC for 90-day mortality was 0.79 (95% CI 0.76–0.82; P = 0.74 for comparison with in-hospital mortality) for SAPS II and 0.71 (95% CI 0.68–0.75; P = 0.66 for comparison with in-hospital mortality) for the initial SOFA score. Conclusions The predictive performance of SAPS II was similar for in-hospital and 90-day mortality and superior to that of the initial SOFA score, but SAPS II’s performance has decreased over time. Use of a contemporary severity score with improved predictive

  3. Acute kidney injury in the cancer patient.

    PubMed

    Campbell, G Adam; Hu, Daniel; Okusa, Mark D

    2014-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a frequent and significant complication of cancer and cancer therapy. Cancer patients frequently encounter risk factors for AKI including older age, CKD, prerenal conditions, sepsis, exposure to nephrotoxins, and obstructive physiology. AKI can also be secondary to paraneoplastic conditions, including glomerulonephritis and microangiopathic processes. This complication can have significant consequences, including effects on patients' ability to continue to receive therapy for their malignancy. This review will serve to summarize potential etiologies of AKI that present in patients with cancer as well as to highlight specific patient populations, such as the critically ill cancer patient.

  4. Pathogenesis of acute respiratory illness caused by human parainfluenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Schomacker, Henrick; Schaap-Nutt, Anne; Collins, Peter L; Schmidt, Alexander C

    2012-06-01

    Human parainfluenza viruses (HPIVs) are a common cause of acute respiratory illness throughout life. Infants, children, and the immunocompromised are the most likely to develop severe disease. HPIV1 and HPIV2 are best known to cause croup while HPIV3 is a common cause of bronchiolitis and pneumonia. HPIVs replicate productively in respiratory epithelial cells and do not spread systemically unless the host is severely immunocompromised. Molecular studies have delineated how HPIVs evade and block cellular innate immune responses to permit efficient replication, local spread, and host-to-host transmission. Studies using ex vivo human airway epithelium have focused on virus tropism, cellular pathology and the epithelial inflammatory response, elucidating how events early in infection shape the adaptive immune response and disease outcome.

  5. Antibiotic dose optimization in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Cotta, M O; Roberts, J A; Lipman, J

    2015-12-01

    The judicious use of existing antibiotics is essential for preserving their activity against infections. In the era of multi-drug resistance, this is of particular importance in clinical areas characterized by high antibiotic use, such as the ICU. Antibiotic dose optimization in critically ill patients requires sound knowledge not only of the altered physiology in serious infections - including severe sepsis, septic shock and ventilator-associated pneumonia - but also of the pathogen-drug exposure relationship (i.e. pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic index). An important consideration is the fact that extreme shifts in organ function, such as those seen in hyperdynamic patients or those with multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, can have an impact upon drug exposure, and constant vigilance is required when reviewing antibiotic dosing regimens in the critically ill. The use of continuous renal replacement therapy and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation remain important interventions in these patients; however, both of these treatments can have a profound effect on antibiotic exposure. We suggest placing emphasis on the use of therapeutic drug monitoring and dose individualization when optimizing therapy in these settings.

  6. Optimizing antimicrobial therapy in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Vitrat, Virginie; Hautefeuille, Serge; Janssen, Cécile; Bougon, David; Sirodot, Michel; Pagani, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    Critically ill patients with infection in the intensive care unit (ICU) would certainly benefit from timely bacterial identification and effective antimicrobial treatment. Diagnostic techniques have clearly improved in the last years and allow earlier identification of bacterial strains in some cases, but these techniques are still quite expensive and not readily available in all institutions. Moreover, the ever increasing rates of resistance to antimicrobials, especially in Gram-negative pathogens, are threatening the outcome for such patients because of the lack of effective medical treatment; ICU physicians are therefore resorting to combination therapies to overcome resistance, with the direct consequence of promoting further resistance. A more appropriate use of available antimicrobials in the ICU should be pursued, and adjustments in doses and dosing through pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics have recently shown promising results in improving outcomes and reducing antimicrobial resistance. The aim of multidisciplinary antimicrobial stewardship programs is to improve antimicrobial prescription, and in this review we analyze the available experiences of such programs carried out in ICUs, with emphasis on results, challenges, and pitfalls. Any effective intervention aimed at improving antibiotic usage in ICUs must be brought about at the present time; otherwise, we will face the challenge of intractable infections in critically ill patients in the near future. PMID:25349478

  7. Estimating the burden of acute gastrointestinal illness in Grenada.

    PubMed

    Glasgow, Lindonne M; Forde, Martin S; Antoine, Samuel C; Pérez, Enrique; Indar, Lisa

    2013-12-01

    This is the first study conducted in Grenada, with a population of approximately 108,000, to quantify the magnitude, distribution, and burden of self-reported acute gastroenteritis (AGE). A retrospective population survey was conducted in October 2008 and April 2009 and a laboratory survey from October 2008 to September 2009. The estimated monthly prevalence of AGE was 10.7% (95% CI 9.0-12.6; 1.4 episodes/ person-year), with a median of 3 days of illness. Of those who reported AGE, 31% sought medical care (stool samples were requested from 12.5%); 10% took antibiotics; 45% took non-prescribed medication; and 81% reported restricted activity. Prevalence of AGE was significantly higher among children aged <5 years (23.5%, p < 0.001). Of the AGE stool samples submitted to the laboratory for analysis, 12.1% were positive for a foodborne pathogen. Salmonella enteritidis was the most common foodborne pathogen associated with AGE-related illness. The estimated percentage of underreporting of syndromic AGE to the Ministry of Health was 69%. In addition, for every laboratory-confirmed foodborne/AGE pathogen, it was estimated that there were 316 additional cases occurring in the population. The minimum estimated cost associated with treatment for AGE was US$ 703,950 each year, showing that AGE has a potentially significant economic impact in Grenada.

  8. Estimating the Burden of Acute Gastrointestinal Illness in Grenada

    PubMed Central

    Glasgow, Lindonne M.; Antoine, Samuel C.; Pérez, Enrique; Indar, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    This is the first study conducted in Grenada, with a population of approximately 108,000, to quantify the magnitude, distribution, and burden of self-reported acute gastroenteritis (AGE). A retrospective population survey was conducted in October 2008 and April 2009 and a laboratory survey from October 2008 to September 2009. The estimated monthly prevalence of AGE was 10.7% (95% CI 9.0-12.6; 1.4 episodes/person-year), with a median of 3 days of illness. Of those who reported AGE, 31% sought medical care (stool samples were requested from 12.5%); 10% took antibiotics; 45% took non-prescribed medication; and 81% reported restricted activity. Prevalence of AGE was significantly higher among children aged <5 years (23.5%, p<0.001). Of the AGE stool samples submitted to the laboratory for analysis, 12.1% were positive for a foodborne pathogen. Salmonella enteritidis was the most common foodborne pathogen associated with AGE-related illness. The estimated percentage of underreporting of syndromic AGE to the Ministry of Health was 69%. In addition, for every laboratory-confirmed foodborne/AGE pathogen, it was estimated that there were 316 additional cases occurring in the population. The minimum estimated cost associated with treatment for AGE was US$ 703,950 each year, showing that AGE has a potentially significant economic impact in Grenada.

  9. Detection of respiratory viruses and the associated chemokine responses in serious acute respiratory illness

    PubMed Central

    Sumino, Kaharu C.; Walter, Michael J.; Mikols, Cassandra L.; Thompson, Samantha A.; Gaudreault-Keener, Monique; Arens, Max. Q.; Agapov, Eugene; Hormozdi, David; Gaynor, Anne M.; Holtzman, Michael J.; Storch, Gregory A.

    2010-01-01

    Background A specific diagnosis of a lower respiratory viral infection is often difficult despite frequent clinical suspicion. This low diagnostic yield may be improved by use of sensitive detection methods and biomarkers. Methods We investigated the prevalence, clinical predictors and inflammatory mediator profile of respiratory viral infection in serious acute respiratory illness. Sequential bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluids from all patients hospitalized with acute respiratory illness over 12 months (n=283) were tested for the presence of 17 respiratory viruses by multiplex PCR assay and for newly-discovered respiratory viruses (bocavirus, WU and KI polyomaviruses) by single-target PCR. BAL samples also underwent conventional testing (direct immunoflorescence and viral culture) for respiratory virus at the clinician’s discretion. 27 inflammatory mediators were measured in subset of the patients (n=64) using a multiplex immunoassay. Results We detected 39 respiratory viruses in 37 (13.1% of total) patients by molecular testing, including rhinovirus (n=13), influenza virus (n=8), respiratory syncytial virus (n=6), human metapneumovirus (n=3), coronavirus NL63 (n=2), parainfluenza virus (n=2), adenovirus (n=1), and newly-discovered viruses (n=4). Molecular methods were 3.8-fold more sensitive than conventional methods. Clinical characteristics alone were insufficient to separate patients with and without respiratory virus. The presence of respiratory virus was associated with increased levels of interferon-γ-inducible protein 10 (IP -10)(p<0.001) and eotaxin-1 (p=0.017) in BAL. Conclusions Respiratory viruses can be found in patients with serious acute respiratory illness by use of PCR assays more frequently than previously appreciated. IP-10 may be a useful biomarker for respiratory viral infection. PMID:20627924

  10. Unsuspected Dengue as a Cause of Acute Febrile Illness in Children and Adults in Western Nicaragua

    PubMed Central

    Reller, Megan E.; de Silva, Aravinda M.; Miles, Jeremy J.; Jadi, Ramesh S.; Broadwater, Anne; Walker, Katie; Woods, Christopher; Mayorga, Orlando; Matute, Armando

    2016-01-01

    Background Dengue is an emerging infectious disease of global significance. Suspected dengue, especially in children in Nicaragua’s heavily-urbanized capital of Managua, has been well documented, but unsuspected dengue among children and adults with undifferentitated fever has not. Methodology/Principal Findings To prospectively study dengue in semi-urban and rural western Nicaragua, we obtained epidemiologic and clinical data as well as acute and convalescent sera (2 to 4 weeks after onset of illness) from a convenience sample (enrollment Monday to Saturday daytime to early evening) of consecutively enrolled patients (n = 740) aged ≥ 1 years presenting with acute febrile illness. We tested paired sera for dengue IgG and IgM and serotyped dengue virus using reverse transcriptase-PCR. Among 740 febrile patients enrolled, 90% had paired sera. We found 470 (63.5%) were seropositive for dengue at enrollment. The dengue seroprevalance increased with age and reached >90% in people over the age of 20 years. We identified acute dengue (serotypes 1 and 2) in 38 (5.1%) patients. Only 8.1% (3/37) of confirmed cases were suspected clinically. Conclusions/Significance Dengue is an important and largely unrecognized cause of fever in rural western Nicaragua. Since Zika virus is transmitted by the same vector and has been associated with severe congenital infections, the population we studied is at particular risk for being devastated by the Zika epidemic that has now reached Central America. PMID:27792777

  11. Illness perception in Polish patients with chronic diseases: Psychometric properties of the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Nowicka-Sauer, Katarzyna; Banaszkiewicz, Dorota; Staśkiewicz, Izabela; Kopczyński, Piotr; Hajduk, Adam; Czuszyńska, Zenobia; Ejdys, Mariola; Szostakiewicz, Małgorzata; Sablińska, Agnieszka; Kałużna, Anna; Tomaszewska, Magda; Siebert, Janusz

    2016-08-01

    The study evaluates the psychometric properties of a Polish translation of the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire. A total of 276 patients with chronic conditions (58.7% women) completed the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. The internal consistency of the Polish Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire measured with Cronbach's alpha was satisfactory (α = 0.74). Structural validity was demonstrated by significant inter-correlations between the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire components. Discriminant validity was supported by the fact that the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire enables patients with various conditions to be differentiated. Significant correlations were found between Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire and depression and anxiety levels. The Polish Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire thus evaluated is a reliable and valid tool.

  12. Nitrogen Balance and Protein Requirements for Critically Ill Older Patients

    PubMed Central

    Dickerson, Roland N.

    2016-01-01

    Critically ill older patients with sarcopenia experience greater morbidity and mortality than younger patients. It is anticipated that unabated protein catabolism would be detrimental for the critically ill older patient. Healthy older subjects experience a diminished response to protein supplementation when compared to their younger counterparts, but this anabolic resistance can be overcome by increasing protein intake. Preliminary evidence suggests that older patients may respond differently to protein intake than younger patients during critical illness as well. If sufficient protein intake is given, older patients can achieve a similar nitrogen accretion response as younger patients even during critical illness. However, there is concern among some clinicians that increasing protein intake in older patients during critical illness may lead to azotemia due to decreased renal functional reserve which may augment the propensity towards worsened renal function and worsened clinical outcomes. Current evidence regarding protein requirements, nitrogen balance, ureagenesis, and clinical outcomes during nutritional therapy for critically ill older patients is reviewed. PMID:27096868

  13. Prospective Evaluation for Respiratory Pathogens in Children With Sickle Cell Disease and Acute Respiratory Illness

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Ashok; Wang, Winfred C.; Gaur, Aditya; Smith, Teresa; Gu, Zhengming; Kang, Guolian; Leung, Wing; Hayden, Randall T.

    2015-01-01

    Background Human rhinovirus (HRV), human coronavirus (hCoV), human bocavirus (hBoV), and human metapneumovirus (hMPV) infections in children with sickle cell disease have not been well studied. Procedure Nasopharyngeal wash specimens were prospectively collected from 60 children with sickle cell disease and acute respiratory illness, over a 1-year period. Samples were tested with multiplexed-PCR, using an automated system for nine respiratory viruses, Chlamydophila pneumoniae, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, and Bordetella pertussis. Clinical characteristics and distribution of respiratory viruses in patients with and without acute chest syndrome (ACS) were evaluated. Results A respiratory virus was detected in 47 (78%) patients. Nine (15%) patients had ACS; a respiratory virus was detected in all of them. The demographic characteristics of patients with and without ACS were similar. HRV was the most common virus, detected in 29 of 47 (62%) patients. Logistic regression showed no association between ACS and detection of HRV, hCoV, hBoV, hMPV, and other respiratory pathogens. Co-infection with at least one additional respiratory virus was seen in 14 (30%) infected patients, and was not significantly higher in patients with ACS (P=0.10). Co-infections with more than two respiratory viruses were seen in seven patients, all in patients without ACS. Bacterial pathogens were not detected. Conclusion HRV was the most common virus detected in children with sickle cell disease and acute respiratory illness, and was not associated with increased morbidity. Larger prospective studies with asymptomatic controls are needed to study the association of these emerging respiratory viruses with ACS in children with sickle cell disease. PMID:24123899

  14. Nutritional Assessment in Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hejazi, Najmeh; Mazloom, Zohreh; Zand, Farid; Rezaianzadeh, Abbas; Amini, Afshin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Malnutrition is an important factor in the survival of critically ill patients. The purpose of the present study was to assess the nutritional status of patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) on the days of admission and discharge via a detailed nutritional assessment. Methods: Totally, 125 patients were followed up from admission to discharge at 8ICUs in Shiraz, Iran. The patients’ nutritional status was assessed using subjective global assessment (SGA), anthropometric measurements, biochemical indices, and body composition indicators. Diet prescription and intake was also evaluated. Results: Malnutrition prevalence significantly increased on the day of discharge (58.62%) compared to the day of admission (28.8%) according to SGA (P<0.001). The patients’ weight, mid-upper-arm circumference, mid-arm muscle circumference, triceps skinfold thickness, and calf circumference decreased significantly as well (P<0.001). Lean mass weight and body cell mass also decreased significantly (P<0.001). Biochemical indices showed no notable changes except for magnesium, which decreased significantly (P=0.013). A negative significant correlation was observed between malnutrition on discharge day and anthropometric measurements. Positive and significant correlations were observed between the number of days without enteral feeding, days delayed from ICU admission to the commencement of enteral feeding, and the length of ICU stay and malnutrition on discharge day. Energy and protein intakes were significantly less than the prescribed diet (26.26% and 26.48%, respectively). Conclusion: Malnutrition on discharge day increased in the patients in the ICU according to SGA. Anthropometric measurements were better predictors of the nutritional outcome of our critically ill patients than were biochemical tests. PMID:27217600

  15. Tracing patients from acute psychiatric wards.

    PubMed Central

    Double, D; MacPherson, R; Wong, T

    1993-01-01

    A random sample of those admitted to acute psychiatric wards in Sheffield in 1985 was traced to establish whether or not the patients were homeless 5 years later. Contrary to expectations none were found to be homeless. Although the proportion of mentally ill amongst the homeless may be significantly high, the number discharged from psychiatric hospital, at least in Sheffield, living consistently 'on the streets' or staying regularly in night shelters seems small as a proportion of all discharges. PMID:8410893

  16. Access to medicines for acute illness in middle income countries in Central America

    PubMed Central

    Emmerick, Isabel Cristina Martins; Luiza, Vera Lucia; Camacho, Luiz Antonio Bastos; Ross-Degnan, Dennis

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze the main predictors of access to medicines for persons who experienced acute health conditions. METHODS This was a cross-sectional analytic study, based on data from household surveys. We examined the predictors of: (1) seeking care for acute illness in the formal health care system and (2) obtaining all medicines sought for the acute condition. RESULTS The significant predictors of seeking health care for acute illnesses were urban geographic location, head of household with secondary school education or above, age under 15, severity of illness perceived by the respondent, and having health insurance. The most important predictor of obtaining full access to medicines was seeking care in the formal health care system. People who sought care in the formal system were three times more likely to receive all the medicines sought (OR 3.0, 95%CI 2.3;4.0). For those who sought care in the formal health system, the strongest predictors of full access to medicines were seeking care in the private sector, having secondary school education or above, and positive perceptions of quality of health care and medicines in public sector health facilities. For patients who did not seek care in the formal health system, full access to medicines was more likely in Honduras or Nicaragua than in Guatemala. Urban geographic location, higher economic status, and male gender were also significant predictors. CONCLUSIONS A substantial part of the population in these three countries sought and obtained medicines outside of the formal health care system, which may compromise quality of care and pose a risk to patients. Determinants of full access to medicines inside and outside the formal health care system differ, and thus may require different strategies to improve access to medicines.  PMID:24626545

  17. New-Onset Diabetes After Acute and Critical Illness: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Jivanji, Chirag J; Asrani, Varsha M; Windsor, John A; Petrov, Maxim S

    2017-03-13

    Hyperglycemia is commonly observed during acute and critical illness. Recent studies have investigated the risk of developing diabetes after acute and critical illness, but the relationship between degree of in-hospital hyperglycemia and new-onset diabetes has not been investigated. This study examines the evidence for the relationship between in-hospital hyperglycemia and prevalence of new-onset diabetes after acute and critical illness. A literature search was performed of the MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Scopus databases for relevant studies published from January 1, 2000, through August 4, 2016. Patients with no history of diabetes before hospital discharge were included in the systematic review. In-hospital glucose concentration was classified as normoglycemia, mild hyperglycemia, or severe hyperglycemia for the meta-analysis. Twenty-three studies were included in the systematic review, and 18 of these (111,078 patients) met the eligibility criteria for the meta-analysis. The prevalence of new-onset diabetes was significantly related to in-hospital glucose concentration and was 4% (95% CI, 2%-7%), 12% (95% CI, 9%-15%), and 28% (95% CI, 18%-39%) for patients with normoglycemia, mild hyperglycemia, and severe hyperglycemia, respectively. The prevalence of new-onset diabetes was not influenced by disease setting, follow-up duration, or study design. In summary, this study found stepwise growth in the prevalence of new-onset diabetes with increasing in-hospital glucose concentration. Patients with severe hyperglycemia are at the highest risk, with 28% developing diabetes after hospital discharge.

  18. Infections in critically ill burn patients.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, F; Mas, D; Rubio, M; Garcia-Hierro, P

    2016-04-01

    Severe burn patients are one subset of critically patients in which the burn injury increases the risk of infection, systemic inflammatory response and sepsis. The infections are usually related to devices and to the burn wound. Most infections, as in other critically ill patients, are preceded by colonization of the digestive tract and the preventative measures include selective digestive decontamination and hygienic measures. Early excision of deep burn wound and appropriate use of topical antimicrobials and dressings are considered of paramount importance in the treatment of burns. Severe burn patients usually have some level of systemic inflammation. The difficulty to differentiate inflammation from sepsis is relevant since therapy differs between patients with and those without sepsis. The delay in prescribing antimicrobials increases morbidity and mortality. Moreover, the widespread use of antibiotics for all such patients is likely to increase antibiotic resistance, and costs. Unfortunately the clinical usefulness of biomarkers for differential diagnosis between inflammation and sepsis has not been yet properly evaluated. Severe burn injury induces physiological response that significantly alters drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. These alterations impact antimicrobials distribution and excretion. Nevertheless the current available literature shows that there is a paucity of information to support routine dose recommendations.

  19. Monitoring the critically ill surgical patient.

    PubMed Central

    Holliday, R L; Doris, P J

    1979-01-01

    Critically ill surgical patients account for approximately half the patients in an active multidisciplinary critical care unit. Hypovolemia and sepsis are common in such patients and affect a number of organ systems. Monitoring these systems provides therapeutically relevant information that may decrease morbidity and improve patient survival. Circulatory hemodynamics may be assessed by direct measurement of the arterial blood pressure, central venous and pulmonary artery pressure monitoring and cardiac output determination; the data thus obtained are valuable in guiding fluid replacement in the hypovolemic individual. The respiratory status may be assessed by bedside spirometry and measurement of arterial blood gas tensions to gauge pulmonary function and the need for assisted ventilation. Renal dysfunction is common in such patients; careful analysis of both urine and blood may identify prerenal as opposed to renal and postrenal factors. Monitoring of the gastrointestinal tract, especially for hemorrhage, is important. Finally, careful attention to nutritional status and provision of adequate protein and energy intake by mouth or by vein is a vital component of the optimal care of these patients. PMID:115566

  20. Does Illness Perception Predict Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in Patients with Myocardial Infarction?

    PubMed Central

    OFLAZ, Serap; YÜKSEL, Şahika; ŞEN, Fatma; ÖZDEMİROĞLU, Filiz; KURT, Ramazan; OFLAZ, Hüseyin; KAŞIKCIOĞLU, Erdem

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Myocardial infarction (MI) as a life-threatening event, carrying high risk of recurrence and chronic disabling complications, increases the risk of developing acute stress disorder (ASD), posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), or both. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between illness perceptions and having ASD, PTSD, or both in patients after MI. Method Seventy-six patients diagnosed with acute MI were enrolled into our prospective study. We evaluated patients during the first week and six months after MI. Patients were assessed by using the Clinician Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS), the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS), the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HARS), the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire (BIPQ), and a semi-structured interview for socio-demographic characteristics during both the first and second evaluations. Results Acute stress disorder (ASD) developed in 9.2% of patients and PTSD developed in 11.9% of patients with MI. Illness perception factors of ‘consequences, identity and concern’ predicted the occurrence of both ASD and PTSD, whereas ‘emotion’ predicted only PTSD. Conclusion The factors of illness perceptions predicted the induction of ASD and PTSD in patients who had acute MI.

  1. Cytokines and Metabolic Patterns in Pediatric Patients with Critical Illness

    PubMed Central

    Briassoulis, George; Venkataraman, Shekhar; Thompson, Ann

    2010-01-01

    It is not known if cytokines, which are cell-derived mediators released during the host immune response to stress, affect metabolic response to stress during critical illness. The aim of this prospective study was to determine whether the metabolic response to stress is related to the inflammatory interleukin-6 (IL-6), 10 (IL-10), and other stress mediators' responses and to assess their relationships with different feeding patterns, nutritional markers, the severity of illness as assessed by the Multiple Organ System Failure (MOSF), the Pediatric Risk of Mortality Score (PRISM), systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), and mortality in critically ill children. Patients were classified as hypermetabolic, normometabolic, and hypometabolic when the measured resting energy expenditures (REE) were >110%, 90–110% and, <90% of the predicted basal metabolic rate, respectively. The initial predominance of the hypometabolic pattern (48.6%) declined within 1 week of acute stress (20%), and the hypermetabolic patterns dominated only after 2 weeks (60%). Only oxygen consumption (VO2) and carbon dioxide production (VCO2) (P < .0001) but none of the cytokines and nutritional markers, were independently associated with a hypometabolic pattern. REE correlated with the IL-10 but not PRISM. In the presence of SIRS or sepsis, CRP, IL-6, IL-10, Prognostic Inflammatory and Nutritional Index (NI), and triglycerides—but not glucose, VO2, or VCO2 increased significantly. High IL-10 levels (P = .0000) and low measured REE (P = .0000) were independently associated with mortality (11.7%), which was higher in the hypometabolic compared to other metabolic patterns (P < .005). Our results showed that only VO2 and VCO2, but not IL-6 or IL-10, were associated with a hypometabolic pattern which predominated the acute phase of stress, and was associated with increased mortality. Although in SIRS or sepsis, the cytokine response was reliably reflected by increases in NI and

  2. Adaptation to different noninvasive ventilation masks in critically ill patients*

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Renata Matos; Timenetsky, Karina Tavares; Neves, Renata Cristina Miranda; Shigemichi, Liane Hirano; Kanda, Sandra Sayuri; Maekawa, Carla; Silva, Eliezer; Eid, Raquel Afonso Caserta

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify which noninvasive ventilation (NIV) masks are most commonly used and the problems related to the adaptation to such masks in critically ill patients admitted to a hospital in the city of São Paulo, Brazil. METHODS: An observational study involving patients ≥ 18 years of age admitted to intensive care units and submitted to NIV. The reason for NIV use, type of mask, NIV regimen, adaptation to the mask, and reasons for non-adaptation to the mask were investigated. RESULTS: We evaluated 245 patients, with a median age of 82 years. Acute respiratory failure was the most common reason for NIV use (in 71.3%). Total face masks were the most commonly used (in 74.7%), followed by full face masks and near-total face masks (in 24.5% and 0.8%, respectively). Intermittent NIV was used in 82.4% of the patients. Adequate adaptation to the mask was found in 76% of the patients. Masks had to be replaced by another type of mask in 24% of the patients. Adequate adaptation to total face masks and full face masks was found in 75.5% and 80.0% of the patients, respectively. Non-adaptation occurred in the 2 patients using near-total facial masks. The most common reason for non-adaptation was the shape of the face, in 30.5% of the patients. CONCLUSIONS: In our sample, acute respiratory failure was the most common reason for NIV use, and total face masks were the most commonly used. The most common reason for non-adaptation to the mask was the shape of the face, which was resolved by changing the type of mask employed. PMID:24068269

  3. Comparing the validity of different measures of illness severity: a hospital-level analysis for acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Gandjour, Afschin; Ku-Goto, Meei-Hsiang; Ho, Vivian

    2012-08-01

    The aim of the study is to assess the validity of three measures of illness severity (prior year's hospital expenditures, Charlson and Elixhauser indices), by analysing the effect of introducing report cards on hospitals treating patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Medicare claims data were obtained for 1992-1997 for AMI patients aged 65+. We used differences-in-differences regression analysis to assess the impact of report cards introduced in New Jersey and Pennsylvania on the illness severity of AMI patients with and without coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery (relative to states without report cards). The analysis was conducted at the hospital level. For validation we used raw mortality and re-admission trends for AMI patients. While prior hospital expenditures suggest a considerable change in the illness severity of AMI patients in Pennsylvania relative to other states, raw mortality and re-admission trends in Pennsylvania are relatively consistent with the trend in the rest of the USA. In line with raw mortality and re-admission data, the Charlson and Elixhauser indices do not imply a considerable change in the severity of AMI patients in Pennsylvania. For CABG patients, illness severity - as measured by all three severity measurement methods - decreased after introduction of report cards, particularly in Pennsylvania. In conclusion, for AMI patients the Charlson and Elixhauser indices are a more valid measure of illness severity than prior year's hospital expenditures. After report cards were introduced, healthier AMI patients were more likely to receive CABG surgery, while sicker patients were avoided.

  4. Ineffective chronic illness behaviour in a patient with long-term non-psychotic psychiatric illness.

    PubMed

    Koekkoek, Bauke; van Tilburg, Willem

    2010-11-29

    This case report offers a different perspective on a patient with a long-term non-psychotic psychiatric disorder that was difficult to specify. The patient, a man in his 50s, was unable to profit from outpatient treatment and became increasingly dependent on mental healthcare - which could not be understood based on his history and psychiatric symptoms alone. By separating symptoms from illness behaviour, the negative course of this patient's treatment is analysed. Focusing on ineffective chronic illness behaviour by the patient, and mutual ineffective treatment behaviour by the clinicians, it becomes clear that basic requirements of effective treatment were unmet. By making a proper diagnosis, clarifying expectations and offering a suitable therapy, ineffective illness behaviour was diminished and this 'difficult' case became much easier for both patient and clinicians. The illness behaviour framework offers a useful, systematic tool to analyse difficulties between patients and clinicians beyond psychiatric symptoms or explanations.

  5. Anxiety in Terminally Ill Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kolva, Elissa; Rosenfeld, Barry; Pessin, Hayley; Breitbart, William; Brescia, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Context Anxiety in terminal cancer is linked to diminished quality of life, yet overall it is poorly understood with regard to prevalence and relationship to other aspects of psychological distress. Objectives This study examines anxiety in terminally ill cancer patients, including the prevalence of anxiety symptoms, the relationship between anxiety and depression, differences in anxiety between participants receiving inpatient palliative care and those receiving outpatient care, and characteristics that distinguish highly anxious from less anxious patients. Methods Participants were 194 patients with terminal cancer. Approximately half (n = 103) were receiving inpatient care in a palliative care facility and half (n = 91) were receiving outpatient care in a tertiary care cancer center. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale was used to assess anxiety and depression, and was administered along with measures of hopelessness, desire for hastened death, and social support. Results Moderately elevated anxiety symptoms were found in 18.6% of participants (n = 36) and 12.4% (n = 24) had clinically significant anxiety symptoms. Level of anxiety did not differ between the two treatment settings. However, participants receiving palliative care reported significantly higher levels of depression and desire for hastened death. A multivariate prediction model indicated that belief in an afterlife, social support, and anxiolytic and antidepressant use were unique, significant predictors of anxiety. Conclusion Severity of anxiety symptoms did not differ between the study sites, suggesting that anxiety may differ from depression and desire for hastened death in the course that it takes over the duration of terminal cancer. PMID:21565460

  6. Acute gastrointestinal illness in two Inuit communities: burden of illness in Rigolet and Iqaluit, Canada.

    PubMed

    Harper, S L; Edge, V L; Ford, J; Thomas, M K; Pearl, D L; Shirley, J; McEwen, S A

    2015-10-01

    Food- and waterborne disease is thought to be high in some Canadian Indigenous communities; however, the burden of acute gastrointestinal illness (AGI) is not well understood due to limited availability and quality of surveillance data. This study estimated the burden of community-level self-reported AGI in the Inuit communities of Rigolet, Nunatsiavut, and Iqaluit, Nunavut, Canada. Cross-sectional retrospective surveys captured information on AGI and potential environmental risk factors. Multivariable logistic regression models identified potential AGI risk factors. The annual incidence of AGI ranged from 2·9-3·9 cases/person per year in Rigolet and Iqaluit. In Rigolet, increased spending on obtaining country foods, a homeless person in the house, not visiting a cabin recently, exposure to puppies, and alternative sources of drinking water were associated with increased odds of AGI. In Iqaluit, eating country fish often, exposure to cats, employment status of the person responsible for food preparation, not washing the countertop with soap after preparing meat, a homeless person in the house, and overcrowding were associated with increased odds of AGI. The results highlight the need for systematic data collection to better understand and support previously anecdotal indications of high AGI incidence, as well as insights into unique AGI environmental risk factors in Indigenous populations.

  7. Protein for the critically ill patient--what and when?

    PubMed

    Plank, L D

    2013-05-01

    Critical illness is characterised by catabolism of the skeletal muscle that releases amino acids for protein synthesis to support tissue repair, immune defence and inflammatory and acute-phase responses. Protein requirements for these patients have generally been based on levels that result in the lowest catabolic rates or most favourable nitrogen balance. The definition of these levels, in particular, in relation to indexing to a measure of patient weight or lean body mass, is controversial. Furthermore, optimal nitrogen balance may not necessarily equate to best clinical outcome. There is some evidence that administration of specific amino acids may be advantageous at least during the early or most catabolic phases of illness, in order to support the specific amino acid requirements of the metabolic pathways activated by the injury or infection. Current widely used guidelines differ in the protein prescription they recommend and in the timing of administration in relation to intensive care admission. A pressing need exists for well-designed randomised trials that compare differing levels of protein or amino acid provision, and the timing of this provision, for their effects on clinical endpoints.

  8. A relationship between acute respiratory illnesses and weather.

    PubMed

    Costilla-Esquivel, A; Corona-Villavicencio, F; Velasco-Castañón, J G; Medina-DE LA Garza, C E; Martínez-Villarreal, R T; Cortes-Hernández, D E; Ramírez-López, L E; González-Farías, G

    2014-07-01

    Weekly data from 7 years (2004-2010) of primary-care counts of acute respiratory illnesses (ARIs) and local weather readings were used to adjust a multivariate time-series vector error correction model with covariates (VECMX). Weather variables were included through a partial least squares index that consisted of weekly minimum temperature (coefficient = - 0·26), weekly median of relative humidity (coefficient = 0·22) and weekly accumulated rainfall (coefficient = 0·5). The VECMX long-term test reported significance for trend (0·01, P = 0·00) and weather index (1·69, P = 0·00). Short-term relationship was influenced by seasonality. The model accounted for 76% of the variability in the series (adj. R 2 = 0·76), and the co-integration diagnostics confirmed its appropriateness. The procedure is easily reproducible by researchers in all climates, can be used to identify relevant weather fluctuations affecting the incidence of ARIs, and could help clarify the influence of contact rates on the spread of these diseases.

  9. Telehomecare for patients with multiple chronic illnesses

    PubMed Central

    Liddy, Clare; Dusseault, Joanne J.; Dahrouge, Simone; Hogg, William; Lemelin, Jacques; Humber, Jennie

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine the feasibility and efficacy of integrating home health monitoring into a primary care setting. DESIGN A mixed method was used for this pilot study. It included in-depth interviews, focus groups, and surveys. SETTING A semirural family health network in eastern Ontario comprising 8 physicians and 5 nurses caring for approximately 10 000 patients. PARTICIPANTS Purposeful sample of 22 patients chosen from the experimental group of 120 patients 50 years old or older in a larger randomized controlled trial (N = 240). These patients had chronic illnesses and were identified as being at risk based on objective criteria and physician assessment. INTERVENTIONS Between November 2004 and March 2006, 3 nurse practitioners and a pharmacist installed telehomecare units with 1 or more peripheral devices (eg, blood-pressure monitor, weight scale, glucometer) in patients’ homes. The nurse practitioners incorporated individualized instructions for using the unit into each patient’s care plan. Patients used the units every morning for collecting data, entering values into the system either manually or directly through supplied peripherals. The information was transferred to a secure server and was then uploaded to a secure Web-based application that allowed care providers to access and review it from any location with Internet access. The devices were monitored in the office on weekdays by the nurse practitioners. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Acceptance and use of the units, patients’ and care providers’ satisfaction with the system, and patients’ demographic and health characteristics. RESULTS All 22 patients, 12 men and 10 women with an average age of 73 years (range 60 to 88 years), agreed to participate. Most were retired, and a few were receiving community services. Common diagnoses included hypertension, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. All patients had blood pressure monitors installed, 11 had wired weight

  10. [Mood and illness-related stress in dialysed patients].

    PubMed

    Laudański, Krzysztof; Nowak, Zbigniew; Wańkowicz, Zofia

    2002-11-01

    The aim of the paper was to evaluate the mood and attitude to the illness-related stress and correlations between them among patients treated with haemodialysis (HD) or continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD). The following psychological questionnaires were used: the Cognitive Stress Appreciation Questionnaire (CSAQ), the Social Appreciation Questionnaire and the Profile of Mood States. The total of 26 HD (17M, 9F) and 28 CAPD (17M, 11F) patients were studied. The control group (CONTR) consisted of 48 (26M, 22F) healthy volunteers who filled the questionnaires as if they had a "bad cold". The dispositional attitude to the stress was similar in the studied groups. The dialysed patients evaluated their disease-related stress mainly as a threat as compared to the healthy volunteers (p < 0.01). Additionally, HD patients evaluated their disease as a loss as compared to the CAPD group and CONTR group (p < 0.05). In HD and CAPD patients Confusion-Bewilderment had significantly higher values in comparison to the healthy group (p < 0.01), whereas only HD group had higher values of Fatigue-Inertia as compared to CAPD and control groups (p < 0.01). Additionally our results showed a significant correlation between evaluation of renal disease as a loss and Fatigue--Inertia emotion in the HD group (r = 0.89; p < 0.01). From the psychological point of view CAPD seems to be better than HD, since the patients treated by this method evaluated better their mood and illness-related stress, similarly as the healthy volunteers suffering from acute infectious disease.

  11. Zuclopenthixol acetate for acute schizophrenia and similar serious mental illnesses

    PubMed Central

    Jayakody, Kaushadh; Gibson, Roger Carl; Kumar, Ajit; Gunadasa, Shalmini

    2014-01-01

    Background Medication used for acute aggression in psychiatry must have rapid onset of effect, low frequency of administration and low levels of adverse effects. Zuclopenthixol acetate is said to have these properties. Objectives To estimate the clinical effects of zuclopenthixol acetate for the management of acute aggression or violence thought to be due to serious mental illnesses, in comparison to other drugs used to treat similar conditions. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia’s Group Trials Register (July 2011). We supplemented this by citation searching and personal contact with authors and relevant pharmaceutical companies. Selection criteria All randomised clinical trials involving people thought to have serious mental illnesses comparing zuclopenthixol acetate with other drugs. Data collection and analysis Two review authors extracted and cross-checked data independently. We calculated fixed-effect relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for dichotomous data. We analysed by intention-to-treat. We used mean differences (MD) for continuous variables. Main results We found no data for the primary outcome, tranquillisation. Compared with haloperidol, zuclopenthixol acetate was no more sedating at two hours (n = 40, 1 RCT, RR 0.60, 95% CI 0.27 to 1.34). People given zuclopenthixol acetate were not at reduced risk of being given supplementary antipsychotics (n = 134, 3 RCTs, RR 1.49, 95% CI 0.97 to 2.30) although additional use of benzodiazepines was less (n = 50, 1 RCT, RR 0.03, 95% CI 0.00 to 0.47). People given zuclopenthixol acetate had fewer injections over seven days compared with those allocated to haloperidol IM (n = 70, 1 RCT, RR 0.39, 95% CI 0.18 to 0.84, NNT 4, CI 3 to 14). We found no data on more episodes of aggression or harm to self or others. One trial (n = 148) reported no significant difference in adverse effects for people receiving zuclopenthixol acetate compared with those allocated haloperidol at one, three

  12. The chronic illness problem inventory: problem-oriented psychosocial assessment of patients with chronic illness.

    PubMed

    Kames, L D; Naliboff, B D; Heinrich, R L; Schag, C C

    1984-01-01

    Two studies are presented which describe the development of a problem-oriented psychosocial screening instrument for use in health care settings. Reliability and validity data are presented on the Chronic Illness Problem Inventory (CIPI) which demonstrate its ability to document accurately patient's specific problems in areas of physical limitations, psychosocial functioning, health care behaviors and marital adjustment. A study is also presented which compares the problems of patients with three distinct chronic illnesses: pain, obesity, and respiratory ailments. Results indicate a significantly greater severity of problems for pain patients and especially patients with multiple pain complaints. Problem areas common to all three illness groups are discussed in the context of providing better comprehensive treatment for chronically ill patients.

  13. Evaluation and Management of Critically Ill Children with Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Askenazi, David

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of the review Acute kidney injury (AKI) has replaced the term acute renal failure and new definitions have been proposed to allow earlier detection. Recent epidemiology data show that the etiology of pediatric AKI has changed and the indications for initiation of renal replacement therapy have evolved. This review will highlight recent studies on the diagnosis of AKI, review the differential diagnosis, highlight the importance of cumulative fluid overload and provide key management strategies for the pediatric patient with AKI. Recent findings Over the last decade serum creatinine based categorical definitions of AKI have been accepted and improve our ability to detect AKI early in the disease process. Evidence based modifications of these definitions have occurred. Higher degree of fluid overload portends poor outcomes in critically ill patients. Significant improvements in our understanding of the pathophysiology of glomerular/vascular causes of AKI have occurred. Summary Categorical definitions of AKI have shown that higher that AKI portends poor outcomes even when adjustment of severity of illness and other confounders. As higher degrees of fluid overload are independently associated with poor outcomes, strategies to prevent and/or treat fluid overload are likely to improve outcomes. PMID:21191296

  14. The right to information for the terminally ill patient.

    PubMed Central

    Osuna, E; Pérez-Cárceles, M D; Esteban, M A; Luna, A

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To analyse the attitudes of medical personnel towards terminally ill patients and their right to be fully informed. DESIGN: Self-administered questionnaire composed of 56 closed questions. SETTING: Three general hospitals and eleven health centres in Granada (Spain). The sample comprised 168 doctors and 207 nurses. RESULTS: A high percentage of medical personnel (24.1%) do not think that informing the terminally ill would help them face their illness with greater serenity. Eighty-four per cent think the patient's own home is the best place to die: 8.9% of the subjects questioned state that the would not like to be informed of an incurable illness. CONCLUSION: In our opinion any information given should depend on the patient's personality, the stage of the illness and family circumstances. Our study confirms that a hospital is not the ideal environment for attending to the needs of the terminally ill and their families. PMID:9602997

  15. Risk of viral acute gastrointestinal illness from non-disinfected drinking water distribution systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Acute gastrointestinal illness (AGI) resulting from pathogens directly entering the piping of drinking water distribution systems is insufficiently understood. Here, we estimate AGI incidence attributable to virus intrusions into non-disinfecting municipal distribution systems. Viruses were enumerat...

  16. Etiology of acute undifferentiated febrile illness in the Amazon basin of Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Manock, Stephen R; Jacobsen, Kathryn H; de Bravo, Narcisa Brito; Russell, Kevin L; Negrete, Monica; Olson, James G; Sanchez, José L; Blair, Patrick J; Smalligan, Roger D; Quist, Brad K; Espín, Juan Freire; Espinoza, Willan R; MacCormick, Fiona; Fleming, Lila C; Kochel, Tadeusz

    2009-07-01

    We conducted a longitudinal observational study of 533 patients presenting to two hospitals in the Ecuadorean Amazon basin with acute undifferentiated febrile illness (AUFI) from 2001 through 2004. Viral isolation, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), IgM seroconversion, and malaria smears identified pathogens responsible for fever in 122 (40.1%) of 304 patients who provided both acute and convalescent blood samples. Leptospirosis was found in 40 (13.2%), malaria in 38 (12.5%), rickettsioses in 18 (5.9%), dengue fever in 16 (5.3%), Q fever in 15 (4.9%), brucellosis in 4 (1.3%), Ilhéus infection in 3 (1.0%), and Venezuelan equine encephalitis (VEE), Oropouche, and St. Louis encephalitis virus infections in less than 1% of these patients. Viral isolation and RT-PCR on another 229 participants who provided only acute samples identified 3 cases of dengue fever, 2 of VEE, and 1 of Ilhéus. None of these pathogens, except for malaria, had previously been detected in the study area.

  17. Attitudes of Jordanian mental health nurses toward mental illness and patients with mental illness.

    PubMed

    Hamdan-Mansour, Ayman M; Wardam, Lina A

    2009-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine Jordanian mental health nurses' attitudes toward mental illness and patients with mental illness. A descriptive correlational design was utilized to collect data from 92 mental health nurses in Jordan. Data was collected on nurses' attitudes toward mental illness and patients with mental disorder and their satisfaction with nursing care delivery. The Jordanian mental health nurses who participated in this study had negative attitudes toward mental illness and toward patients with mental disorders. About 60% of the mental health nurses had perceived patients with mental illness to be dangerous, immature, dirty, cold hearted, harmful, and pessimistic. In only two descriptions-being polite and adult-did nurses have positive perception about patients with mental illness. Mental health nurse were not satisfied with nursing care delivery. More than 70% of nurses were proud to be a mental health nurse. Age and gender were significant influential factors in forming the nurses' attitudes or satisfaction. Immediate intervention is needed to improve the quality of patient care provided by mental health nurses.

  18. Asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) in human blood: effects of extended haemodialysis in the critically ill patient with acute kidney injury, protein binding to human serum albumin and proteolysis by thermolysin.

    PubMed

    Sitar, Mustafa Erinc; Kayacelebi, Arslan Arinc; Beckmann, Bibiana; Kielstein, Jan T; Tsikas, Dimitrios

    2015-09-01

    Free, non-protein bound asymmetrically guanidine-dimethylated arginine (ADMA) is an endogenous inhibitor of nitric oxide (NO) synthesis. Human erythrocytic membrane comprises considerable amounts of large (>50 kDa) ADMA-containing proteins. Location in the erythrocyte membrane and identity and physiological functions of ADMA-containing proteins are unrevealed. In healthy subjects, the concentration of free ADMA in heparinised plasma is almost identical to that of serum. We hypothesised that the robustness of free ADMA concentration in human blood is due to a remarkable resistance of erythrocytic ADMA-containing proteins against proteases. In vivo, we investigated the course of the concentration of ADMA in serum and EDTA plasma of a critically ill patient with acute kidney injury during extended haemodialysis. In vitro, we studied the effects of thermolysin, a useful experimental proteolytic enzyme of erythrocyte membrane proteins, on erythrocytic ADMA. The protein binding (PB) of ADMA to human serum albumin (HSA) was also determined. In these studies, ADMA was measured by a previously reported, fully validated GC-MS/MS method. We measured almost identical ADMA concentrations in plasma and serum samples of the patient. During dialysis, the circulating ADMA concentration decreased slowly and moderately indicating removal of this substance, which was however much less than expected from its low molecular weight (202 Da) and high water solubility. After dialysis, circulating ADMA concentration increased again, a phenomenon called rebound, and ADMA reached higher levels compared to the baseline. The PB value of ADMA to HSA was about 30 %. This surprisingly high PB value of ADMA to HSA may be an explanation for the rather poor dialysance of ADMA. Washed human erythrocytes suspended in phosphate-buffered physiological saline were found not to release appreciable amounts of free and ADMA-containing proteins. The lack of effect of coagulation or anticoagulation on the

  19. Borrelia crocidurae infection in acutely febrile patients, Senegal.

    PubMed

    Mediannikov, Oleg; Socolovschi, Cristina; Bassene, Hubert; Diatta, Georges; Ratmanov, Pavel; Fenollar, Florence; Sokhna, Cheikh; Raoult, Didier

    2014-08-01

    As malaria cases in Africa decline, other causes of acute febrile illness are being explored. To determine incidence of Borrelia crocidurae infection during June 2010-October 2011, we collected 1,566 blood specimens from febrile patients in Senegal. Incidence was high (7.3%). New treatment strategies, possibly doxycycline, might be indicated for febrile patients.

  20. A Therapeutic Confrontation Approach to Treating Patients with Factitious Illness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wedel, Kenneth R.

    1971-01-01

    Patients suffering from factitious illness present complex problems for themselves and hospital personnel. This article describes a multidisciplinary intervention through confrontation approach that has proved to be successful with such patients. (Author)

  1. Enhanced Surveillance for Fatal Dengue-Like Acute Febrile Illness in Puerto Rico, 2010-2012

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, Aidsa; Torres-Velasquez, Brenda; Hunsperger, Elizabeth A.; Munoz-Jordan, Jorge L.; Sharp, Tyler M.; Rivera, Irma; Sanabria, Dario; Blau, Dianna M.; Galloway, Renee; Torres, Jose; Rodriguez, Rosa; Serrano, Javier; Chávez, Carlos; Dávila, Francisco; Perez-Padilla, Janice; Ellis, Esther M.; Caballero, Gladys; Wright, Laura; Zaki, Sherif R.; Deseda, Carmen; Rodriguez, Edda; Margolis, Harold S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Dengue is a leading cause of morbidity throughout the tropics; however, accurate population-based estimates of mortality rates are not available. Methods/Principal Findings We established the Enhanced Fatal Acute Febrile Illness Surveillance System (EFASS) to estimate dengue mortality rates in Puerto Rico. Healthcare professionals submitted serum and tissue specimens from patients who died from a dengue-like acute febrile illness, and death certificates were reviewed to identify additional cases. Specimens were tested for markers of dengue virus (DENV) infection by molecular, immunologic, and immunohistochemical methods, and were also tested for West Nile virus, Leptospira spp., and other pathogens based on histopathologic findings. Medical records were reviewed and clinical data abstracted. A total of 311 deaths were identified, of which 58 (19%) were DENV laboratory-positive. Dengue mortality rates were 1.05 per 100,000 population in 2010, 0.16 in 2011 and 0.36 in 2012. Dengue mortality was highest among adults 19–64 years and seniors ≥65 years (1.17 and 1.66 deaths per 100,000, respectively). Other pathogens identified included 34 Leptospira spp. cases and one case of Burkholderia pseudomallei and Neisseria meningitidis. Conclusions/Significance EFASS showed that dengue mortality rates among adults were higher than reported for influenza, and identified a leptospirosis outbreak and index cases of melioidosis and meningitis. PMID:27727271

  2. Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease masquerading as acute demyelinating encephalomyelitis-like illness.

    PubMed

    Kim, Gun-Ha; Kim, Kyoung Min; Suh, Sang-Il; Ki, Chang-Seok; Eun, Baik-Lin

    2014-07-01

    X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMTX1) is a clinically heterogeneous hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy with X-linked transmission. Common clinical manifestations of CMTX1 disease, as in other forms of Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease, are distal muscle wasting and weakness, hyporeflexia, distal sensory disturbance, and foot deformities. Mutations in the connexin-32 gene (gap junction protein β1 [GJB1]) are responsible for CMTX1 disease. In this report, we describe a patient with CMTX1 disease presenting with recurrent attacks of transient and episodic acute demyelinating encephalomyelitis (ADEM)-like symptoms without previous signs of lower extremity weakness or foot deformities; the patient, as well as his asymptomatic mother, exhibited a novel GJB1 mutation (p.Met1Ile). Differential diagnosis of recurrent and transient ADEM-like illness, if unexplained, should include the possibility of CMTX1 disease.

  3. Checklist for early recognition and treatment of acute illness: International collaboration to improve critical care practice.

    PubMed

    Vukoja, Marija; Kashyap, Rahul; Gavrilovic, Srdjan; Dong, Yue; Kilickaya, Oguz; Gajic, Ognjen

    2015-02-04

    Processes to ensure world-wide best-practice for critical care delivery are likely to minimize preventable death, disability and costly complications for any healthcare system's sickest patients, but no large-scale efforts have so far been undertaken towards these goals. The advances in medical informatics and human factors engineering have provided possibility for novel and user-friendly clinical decision support tools that can be applied in a complex and busy hospital setting. To facilitate timely and accurate best-practice delivery in critically ill patients international group of intensive care unit (ICU) physicians and researchers developed a simple decision support tool: Checklist for Early Recognition and Treatment of Acute Illness (CERTAIN). The tool has been refined and tested in high fidelity simulated clinical environment and has been shown to improve performance of clinical providers faced with simulated emergencies. The aim of this international educational intervention is to implement CERTAIN into clinical practice in hospital settings with variable resources (included those in low income countries) and evaluate the impact of the tool on the care processes and patient outcomes. To accomplish our aims, CERTAIN will be uniformly available on either mobile or fixed computing devices (as well as a backup paper version) and applied in a standardized manner in the ICUs of diverse hospitals. To ensure the effectiveness of the proposed intervention, access to CERTAIN is coupled with structured training of bedside ICU providers.

  4. Acute Pancreatitis in a Patient with Complicated Falciparum Malaria.

    PubMed

    Barman, Bhupen; Bhattacharya, Prasanta Kumar; Lynrah, Kryshan G; Ete, Tony; Issar, Neel Kanth

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is one of the most common protozoan diseases, especially in tropical countries. The clinical manifestation of malaria, especially falciparum malaria varies from mild acute febrile illness to life threatening severe systemic complications involving one or more organ systems. We would like to report a case of complicated falciparum malaria involving cerebral, renal, hepatic system along with acute pancreatitis. The patient was successfully treated with anti malarial and other supportive treatment. To the best of our knowledge there are very few reports of acute pancreatitis due to malaria. Falciparum malaria therefore should be added to the list of infectious agents causing acute pancreatitis especially in areas where malaria is endemic.

  5. Acute Pancreatitis in a Patient with Complicated Falciparum Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Prasanta Kumar; Lynrah, Kryshan G; Ete, Tony; Issar, Neel Kanth

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is one of the most common protozoan diseases, especially in tropical countries. The clinical manifestation of malaria, especially falciparum malaria varies from mild acute febrile illness to life threatening severe systemic complications involving one or more organ systems. We would like to report a case of complicated falciparum malaria involving cerebral, renal, hepatic system along with acute pancreatitis. The patient was successfully treated with anti malarial and other supportive treatment. To the best of our knowledge there are very few reports of acute pancreatitis due to malaria. Falciparum malaria therefore should be added to the list of infectious agents causing acute pancreatitis especially in areas where malaria is endemic. PMID:26894117

  6. The design and rationale for the Acute Medically Ill Venous Thromboembolism Prevention with Extended Duration Betrixaban (APEX) study.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Alexander T; Harrington, Robert; Goldhaber, Samuel Z; Hull, Russell; Gibson, C Michael; Hernandez, Adrian F; Kitt, Michael M; Lorenz, Todd J

    2014-03-01

    Randomized clinical trials have identified a population of acute medically ill patients who remain at risk for venous thromboembolism (VTE) beyond the standard duration of therapy and hospital discharge. The aim of the APEX study is to determine whether extended administration of oral betrixaban (35-42 days) is superior to a standard short course of prophylaxis with subcutaneous enoxaparin (10 ± 4 days followed by placebo) in patients with known risk factors for post-discharge VTE. Patients initially are randomized to receive either betrixaban or enoxaparin (and matching placebo) in a double dummy design. Following a standard duration period of enoxaparin treatment (with placebo tablets) or betrixaban (with placebo injections), patients receive only betrixaban (or alternative matching placebo). Patients are considered for enrollment if they are older than 40 years, have a specified medical illness, and restricted mobility. They must also meet the APEX criteria for increased VTE risk (aged ≥75 years, baseline D-Dimer ≥2× upper the limit of "normal", or 2 additional ancillary risk factors for VTE). The primary efficacy end point is the composite of asymptomatic proximal deep venous thrombosis, symptomatic deep venous thrombosis, non-fatal (pulmonary embolus) pulmonary embolism, or VTE-related death through day 35. The primary safety outcome is the occurrence of major bleeding. We hypothesize that extended duration betrixaban VTE prophylaxis will be safe and more effective than standard short duration enoxaparin in preventing VTE in acute medically ill patients with known risk factors for post hospital discharge VTE.

  7. Urinary Biomarkers Indicative of Apoptosis and Acute Kidney Injury in the Critically Ill

    PubMed Central

    Vaara, Suvi T.; Lakkisto, Päivi; Immonen, Katariina; Tikkanen, Ilkka; Ala-Kokko, Tero; Pettilä, Ville

    2016-01-01

    Background Apoptosis is a key mechanism involved in ischemic acute kidney injury (AKI), but its role in septic AKI is controversial. Biomarkers indicative of apoptosis could potentially detect developing AKI prior to its clinical diagnosis. Methods As a part of the multicenter, observational FINNAKI study, we performed a pilot study among critically ill patients who developed AKI (n = 30) matched to critically ill patients without AKI (n = 30). We explored the urine and plasma levels of cytokeratin-18 neoepitope M30 (CK-18 M30), cell-free DNA, and heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) at intensive care unit (ICU) admission and 24h thereafter, before the clinical diagnosis of AKI defined by the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes -creatinine and urine output criteria. Furthermore, we performed a validation study in 197 consecutive patients in the FINNAKI cohort and analyzed the urine sample at ICU admission for CK-18 M30 levels. Results In the pilot study, the urine or plasma levels of measured biomarkers at ICU admission, at 24h, or their maximum value did not differ significantly between AKI and non-AKI patients. Among 20 AKI patients without severe sepsis, the urine CK-18 M30 levels were significantly higher at 24h (median 116.0, IQR [32.3–233.0] U/L) than among those 20 patients who did not develop AKI (46.0 [0.0–54.0] U/L), P = 0.020. Neither urine cell-free DNA nor HSP70 levels significantly differed between AKI and non-AKI patients regardless of the presence of severe sepsis. In the validation study, urine CK-18 M30 level at ICU admission was not significantly higher among patients developing AKI compared to non-AKI patients regardless of the presence of severe sepsis or CKD. Conclusions Our findings do not support that apoptosis detected with CK-18 M30 level would be useful in assessing the development of AKI in the critically ill. Urine HSP or cell-free DNA levels did not differ between AKI and non-AKI patients. PMID:26918334

  8. Assessing Hopelessness in Terminally Ill Cancer Patients: Development of the Hopelessness Assessment in Illness Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Rosenfeld, Barry; Pessin, Hayley; Lewis, Charles; Abbey, Jennifer; Olden, Megan; Sachs, Emily; Amakawa, Lia; Kolva, Elissa; Brescia, Robert; Breitbart, William

    2013-01-01

    Hopelessness has become an increasingly important construct in palliative care research, yet concerns exist regarding the utility of existing measures when applied to patients with a terminal illness. This article describes a series of studies focused on the exploration, development, and analysis of a measure of hopelessness specifically intended for use with terminally ill cancer patients. The 1st stage of measure development involved interviews with 13 palliative care experts and 30 terminally ill patients. Qualitative analysis of the patient interviews culminated in the development of a set of potential questionnaire items. In the 2nd study phase, we evaluated these preliminary items with a sample of 314 participants, using item response theory and classical test theory to identify optimal items and response format. These analyses generated an 8-item measure that we tested in a final study phase, using a 3rd sample (n = 228) to assess reliability and concurrent validity. These analyses demonstrated strong support for the Hopelessness Assessment in Illness Questionnaire providing greater explanatory power than existing measures of hopelessness and found little evidence that this assessment was confounded by illness-related variables (e.g., prognosis). In summary, these 3 studies suggest that this brief measure of hopelessness is particularly useful for palliative care settings. Further research is needed to assess the applicability of the measure to other populations and contexts. PMID:21443366

  9. The pharmacologic approach to the critically ill patient

    SciTech Connect

    Chernow, B. )

    1988-01-01

    This book contains papers addressing the pharmacologic approach to the critically ill patient. Chapter topics include: Radiation injury; Red cell substitutes: a current appraisal; and Psychopharmacology in the ICU.

  10. [Dialysis dose quantification in critically ill patients].

    PubMed

    Casino, Francesco Gaetano

    2010-01-01

    Acute kidney injury affects about 35% of intensive care unit patients. Renal replacement therapy is required in about 5% of such patients and is associated with a mortality rate as high as 50% to 80%. The latter is likely more related to the failure of extrarenal organs than to an insufficient dialysis dose. This could explain, at least in part, the findings of 2 recent trials (VA/ NIH and RENAL) where the expected dose-outcome relationship was not confirmed. These results cannot be taken to infer that assessing the dialysis dose is no longer required. The contrary is true, in that the common finding of large differences between prescribed and delivered doses calls for accurate dose assessment, at least to avoid underdialysis. The minimum adequate levels are now a Kt/V urea of 1.2 to 1.4 three times a week (3x/wk) on intermittent hemodialysis (IHD), and an effluent of 20 mL/kg/h for 85% of the time on continuous renal replacement therapy (CRTT). Both these parameters can be easily measured but are far from ideal indices because they account neither for residual renal function nor for irregular dose delivery. The equivalent renal urea clearance (EKRjc), by expressing the averaged renal+dialytic urea clearance over the whole treatment period, is able to account for the above factors. Although assessing EKRjc is quite complex, for regular 3x/wk IHD one could use the formula EKRjc=10 Kt/V+1 to compute that a Kt/V of 1.2 and 1.4 corresponds to an EKRjc of 13 and 15 mL/min, respectively. On the other hand, the hourly effluent per kg is numerically similar to EKRjc. On this basis it can be calculated that in non-prediluted really continuous treatment, the recommended CRRT dose (EKRjc=20 mL/min) is 33% higher than the EKRjc of 15 mL/min, corresponding to the recommended Kt/V of 1.4 on 3x/wk IHD.

  11. Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI): a clinical review with emphasis on the critically ill.

    PubMed

    Benson, Alexander B; Moss, Marc; Silliman, Christopher C

    2009-11-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is the leading cause of transfusion-related morbidity and mortality world-wide. Although first described in 1983, it took two decades to develop consensus definitions, which remain controversial. The pathogenesis of TRALI is related to the infusion of donor antibodies that recognize leucocyte antigens in the transfused host or the infusion of lipids and other biological response modifiers that accumulate during the storage or processing of blood components. TRALI appears to be the result of at least two sequential events and treatment is supportive. This review demonstrates that critically ill patients are more susceptible to TRALI and require special attention by critical care specialists, haematologists and transfusion medicine experts. Further research is required into TRALI and its pathogenesis so that transfusions are safer and administered appropriately. Avoidance including male-only transfusion practises, the use of leucoreduced components, fresher blood/blood components and solvent detergent plasma are also discussed.

  12. The influence of antibiotics and other factors on reconsultation for acute lower respiratory tract illness in primary care.

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, W F; Macfarlane, J T; Macfarlane, R M; Lewis, S

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Antibiotics are prescribed to the majority of patients consulting their general practitioner (GP) for lower respiratory tract illness (LRTi). A common reason for prescription is the belief that antibiotics reduce re-attendance; a motive supported by the high reconsultation rates for this largely self-limiting illness. Information about reconsultation following treatment of LRTi, and the factors that influence it, is scarce. AIM: To explore factors associated with reconsultation after initial management of LRTi. METHOD: Analysis of data collected prospectively during presentation of acute LRTi in primary care. RESULTS: Seventy-six per cent of 518 patients were prescribed antibiotics, and 30% reconsulted for similar symptoms within the next 28 days (29% of those who were given antibiotics and 33% of those who were not). Forty-one per cent of patients who had seen their GP 15 or more times in the previous two years reconsulted, compared with 13% of those who had made fewer than five visits. Reconsultation was more common in patients with a history of underlying disease (38.6% versus 24.3%) and in patients who reported dyspnoea (41.5% versus 24.3%). CONCLUSION: Reconsultation is common in acute LRTi and is associated with a heightened consulting habit prior to the index consultation, the presence of previous ill health, and dyspnoea. It appears not to be influenced by prescribing antibiotics. PMID:9463983

  13. Hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome and Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever as causes of acute undifferentiated febrile illness in Bulgaria.

    PubMed

    Christova, Iva; Younan, Rasha; Taseva, Evgenia; Gladnishka, Teodora; Trifonova, Iva; Ivanova, Vladislava; Spik, Kristin; Schmaljohn, Connie; Mohareb, Emad

    2013-03-01

    Hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) and Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) are the 2 widespread viral hemorrhagic fevers occurring in Europe. HFRS is distributed throughout Europe, and CCHF has been reported mainly on the Balkan Peninsula and Russia. Both hemorrhagic fevers are endemic in Bulgaria. We investigated to what extent acute undifferentiated febrile illness in Bulgaria could be due to hantaviruses or to CCHF virus. Using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs), we tested serum samples from 527 patients with acute febrile illness for antibodies against hantaviruses and CCHF virus. Immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibodies against hantaviruses were detected in 15 (2.8%) of the patients. Of the 15 hantavirus-positive patients, 8 (1.5%) were positive for Dobrava virus (DOBV), 5 (0.9%) were positive for Puumala virus (PUUV), and the remaining 2 were positive for both hantaviruses. A plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT) confirmed 4 of the 10 DOBV-positive samples. PRNT was negative for all PUUV-positive samples. Serologic evidence of recent CCHF virus infection was found in 13 (2.5%) of the patients. Interestingly, HFRS and CCHF were not only detected in well-known endemic areas of Bulgaria but also in nonendemic regions. Our results suggested that in endemic countries, CCHF and/or HFRS might appear as a nonspecific febrile illness in a certain proportion of patients. Physicians must be aware of possible viral hemorrhagic fever cases, even if hemorrhages or renal impairment are not manifested.

  14. Acute hepatitis C in patients receiving hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Griveas, I; Germanidis, G; Visvardis, G; Morice, Y; Perelson, A S; Pawlotsky, J M; Papadopoulou, D

    2007-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is frequent in patients with end-stage renal disease treated by chronic dialysis, with a prevalence varying from 10-65% according to the geographical data. The prevalence is significantly associated with the duration of dialysis and the number of transfused blood products[1,2] and has dramatically declined with efficient blood screening.[3] We studied patients with acute HCV infection in a dialysis unit. The diagnosis was based on both anti-HCV detection and HCV-RNA detection. Other virological tools including HCV genotype determination was also used to tailor treatment to the individual patient and determine its efficacy for a one-year follow-up period. Seventeen patients (7 male and 10 female, mean age: 63.7 +/- 11.6 SD) with acute hepatitis C were enrolled to our study. All of them were followed up for a period of one year after the diagnosis was established. Phylogenetic analysis distinguished two separate HCV subtypes 1b, which were both responsible for this acute infection (see Figure 1). These types did not differ in their behavior on the clinical situation of our patients, as confirmed by the fact that in both groups of patients, there was only one patient who presented with acute illness. Six patients of our study group, three months after the acute infection, received pegylated interferon (Peg-IFNa2a) 135 mug for a six-month period. Four of them responded very well to therapy and at the first determination HCV RNA was below the cutoff point. One of our patients with very high HCV levels (HCV RNA > 50,000,000 IU/mL), despite receiving the same therapy, did not respond well and developed cirrhosis. In conclusion, it is clear from our experience that better information is needed about the current incidence, prevalence, and risk factors for HCV infection in dialysis patients. Algorithms for the diagnosis and management of hepatitis C should be developed by academic societies. Routine screening for hepatitis C also would allow

  15. Update: outbreak of acute febrile illness among athletes participating in Eco-Challenge-Sabah 2000--Borneo, Malaysia, 2000.

    PubMed

    2001-01-19

    During September 7-11, 2000, CDC was notified by the Idaho Department of Health, the Los Angeles County Department of Health Services, and the GeoSentinel Global Surveillance Network of at least 20 cases of acute febrile illness in three countries; all ill patients had participated in the Eco-Challenge-Sabah 2000 multisport expedition race in Borneo, Malaysia, during August 21-September 3, 2000. Participants included athletes from 29 U.S. states and 26 countries. This report updates the ongoing investigation of this outbreak through December 2, which suggests that Leptospira were the cause of illness and that water from the Segama River was the primary source of infection. Participants in adventure sports and exotic tourism should be aware of potential exposure to unusual and emerging infectious agents.

  16. Dengue and Scrub Typhus Coinfection in a Patient Presenting with Febrile Illness

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Dengue fever and scrub typhus are common causes of acute febrile illness of unclear origin in Asia. Though coinfections of many vector-borne diseases have been described, articles on dengue and scrub typhus coinfection are distinctly limited. In case of coinfection with dengue and scrub typhus, vigilant monitoring of vitals, platelets transfusion, and timely treatment with doxycycline are necessary. High degree of suspicion has to be made for coinfection in a patient presenting with febrile illness with thrombocytopenia and deranged laboratory parameters in postmonsoon season in endemic regions in Asia. PMID:28386493

  17. Acute coronary syndrome and decompression illness: a challenge for the diving physician.

    PubMed

    Brauzzi, Marco; Andreozzi, Fabio; De Fina, Laura; Tanasi, Paolo; Falini, Stefano

    2013-12-01

    Decompression illness (DCI) is a syndrome with diverse clinical manifestations but in which cardiac symptoms are rare. In the presence of cardiac symptoms, the necessity to rule out an acute coronary syndrome (ACS) which requires prompt treatment may result in delay to appropriate recompression treatment. We describe three cases with cardiologic symptoms referred to our centre by the Emergency Department (ED) of our facility. The first was a 48-year-old woman who lost consciousness during a dive and required cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The final diagnosis was acute myocardial infarction and the patient did not undergo recompression treatment. The second case was that of a 27-year-old man who complained of tachycardia, dyspnoea and vertigo soon after a dive. He was referred by helicopter ambulance and in the ED was diagnosed with new-onset atrial fibrillation. Recompression resulted in disappearance of his vertigo, and sinus rhythm was restored pharmacologically. The third case was a 43-year-old man, with a history of coronary artery disease, who had undergone coronary artery bypass grafting three years previously. After a repetitive dive without adequate decompression, he complained of crushing retrosternal pain and numbness in the upper left arm. All cardiovascular examinations were negative and the patient was recompressed, with resolution of his symptoms. Features to consider in arriving at the correct differential diagnosis in divers presenting with cardiac symptoms are discussed in the light of these three illustrative cases.

  18. Two episodes of acute illness in a machine shop

    SciTech Connect

    Sinks, T.; Kerndt, P.R.; Wallingford, K.M.

    1989-08-01

    Following an explosion in a machine shop and temporary plant closure, on the day the plant returned to full operations a degreaser malfunctioned. Workers in the assembly room were exposed to trichloroethylene levels later estimated to have exceeded 220 ppm (OSHA PEL 100 ppm). The plant was evacuated and the degreaser taken out of operation. Blood testing for carbon monoxide (CO) on five employees found carboxyhemoglobin levels in excess of normal. The plant reopened the following morning. Over the next two weeks, 15 employees were seen by the plant nurses for similar complaints; although all returned to work, their carboxyhemoglobin levels, later found to be inaccurate, were reported by a local medical clinic to range from 13.7 to 20.0 percent. At the end of the second week, another outbreak of illness occurred, but carboxyhemoglobin, trichloroethylene, fluorocarbons, and methylene chloride were not elevated in all 17 persons tested; plant-wide monitoring for CO found no elevated levels. During the first outbreak of illness, cases were 2.26 times as likely to have entered the assembly room as noncases. During the second outbreak, cases were no more likely than noncases to have entered the assembly room. We believe the explosion, earlier toxic exposures and illness, and the misleading blood test results led to plant-wide anxiety which culminated in a collective stress reaction and the second outbreak. An open meeting with all employees, informing them of our findings, provided reassurance and no further episodes of illness occurred in this workforce.

  19. Illness perception patterns in patients with Coronary Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Kunschitz, E; Friedrich, O; Schöppl, Ch; Maitz, J; Sipötz, J

    2016-12-23

    The purpose of this study is to identify patterns of illness perception in patients with angiografically verified Coronary Artery Disease. A total of 166 patients (age: 64.4 ± 12.1, 80.7% male) were recruited after angiography. Cluster analysis on the items of the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire was used to identify patterns of illness perception. The resulting groups were characterized with regard to Quality of Life (MacNew), anxiety and depression (GAD-7 and PHQ-9) and resilience (RS-13). The analysis revealed 4 distinct groups differing with regard to the items covering the perception of the physical and emotional impact of disease. Stronger perceptions in these domains were associated with lower Health Related Quality of Life and higher levels of emotional distress. Group 1 (33.1%) reported the strongest perceptions of the physical and emotional impact of disease and expressed low treatment control, high chronic timeline and significantly higher levels of depression than the other groups. Group 2 (27.7%) was characterized by more moderate perceptions of the emotional and physical impact of disease together with low scores on illness coherence and chronic timeline. Groups 3 (25.3%) and 4 (13.9%) reported smaller physical and emotional impact of illness but differed in chronic timeline. Our results correspond largely to recent findings in patients with other chronic diseases. Further research is needed to explore if stratification of patients according patterns of illness perception can help to inform patient-physician communication strategies.

  20. Frequency and outcome of patients with nonthyroidal illness syndrome in a medical intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Plikat, Katharina; Langgartner, Julia; Buettner, Roland; Bollheimer, L Cornelius; Woenckhaus, Ulrike; Schölmerich, Jürgen; Wrede, Christian E

    2007-02-01

    Acute and chronic critical conditions are associated with reduced serum levels of free triiodothyronine (FT(3)), free thyroxine FT(4), and thyrotropin, known as nonthyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS). It is still controversial whether these changes reflect a protective mechanism or a maladaptive process during prolonged illness. However, larger studies to determine the prevalence of the NTIS and its association with outcome in medical intensive care units (ICUs) are missing. Complete thyroid hormone levels from 247 of 743 patients admitted to our ICU between October 2002 and February 2004 were retrospectively evaluated. From these patients, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health II scores, ICU mortality, length of stay, mechanical ventilation, and concomitant medication were recorded. Ninety-seven patients (44.1%) had low FT(3) levels indicating an NTIS, either with normal (23.6%) or reduced (20.5%) serum thyrotropin levels. Of 97 patients with NTIS, 24 (23.3%) also showed reduced serum FT(4) levels. The NTIS was significantly associated with Acute Physiology and Chronic Health II scores, mortality, length of stay, and mechanical ventilation. In a multivariate Cox regression analysis, the combination of low FT(3) and low FT(4) was an independent risk factor for survival. Nonthyroidal illness syndrome is frequent at a medical ICU. A reduction of FT(4) together with FT(3) is associated with an increase in mortality and might reflect a maladaptive process, thereby worsening the disease.

  1. Assessing Hopelessness in Terminally Ill Cancer Patients: Development of the Hopelessness Assessment in Illness Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenfeld, Barry; Pessin, Hayley; Lewis, Charles; Abbey, Jennifer; Olden, Megan; Sachs, Emily; Amakawa, Lia; Kolva, Elissa; Brescia, Robert; Breitbart, William

    2011-01-01

    Hopelessness has become an increasingly important construct in palliative care research, yet concerns exist regarding the utility of existing measures when applied to patients with a terminal illness. This article describes a series of studies focused on the exploration, development, and analysis of a measure of hopelessness specifically intended…

  2. Pulmonary arterial hypertension in critically ill elderly patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yun-yun; Xu, Fan; Chu, Ming; Bi, Li-qing

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To assess the incidence, possible risk factors and prognosis of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) in critically ill elderly patients. Methods: We selected 122 cases admitted to the ICU, ages 60–93 years old. An echocardiography examination was performed within four days after admission to the ICU. PAH is usually suspected if the patient’s pulmonary artery systolic pressure ≥ 40 mmHg. We collected echocardiography data, relevant clinical data and routine laboratory data; we then used a statistical method to analyze the risk factors for PAH in critically ill elderly patients and examined its impact on the prognosis. Results: Total 51 patients were diagnosed with PAH. The prevalence of critically ill elderly patients with PAH was 41.8%. The ANOVA analysis showed that if patients had COPD (P = 0.031) and/or respiratory failure (P = 0.021), they were more prone to PAH. An enlarged left atrium (P = 0.038) and/or right ventricle (P = 0.029), a declining left ventricle fractional shortening rate (P = 0.038), and an elevated amount of the brain natriuretic peptides (P = 0.046) were all associated with the occurrence of PAH. Multivariate regression analysis showed that the left atrial diameter (P = 0.045) was the risk factor in critically ill elderly patients with PAH. The 30-day mortality rate was 33.3% for elderly patients with PAH, which is statistically significant (P = 0.035) when compared with the mortality rate of patients with normal pulmonary artery pressure. Our multivariate regression analysis also showed that, for critically ill elderly patients admitted in the ICU, PAH (P = 0.039) is risk factor for increased mortality. Conclusions: A higher incidence of PAH occurs in critically ill elderly patients. PAH is more likely to occur in patients with an enlarged left atrium, and these problems adversely impact the prognosis. PMID:28367167

  3. Acute illnesses among Los Angeles County lifeguards according to worksite exposures.

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, C S; Barron, M E

    1989-01-01

    Due to public concern regarding the potential adverse health effects of exposure to Santa Monica Bay waters, a case-control study of acute illnesses among Los Angeles County lifeguards was conducted. Workers' compensation claimants (N = 112) were matched to healthy lifeguards working in the same year and having the same job classification. Conditional logistic regression showed that the southernmost worksites of the bay were associated with all acute illnesses (OR = 14.4, 95% CI = 4.7, 44.8) and with ear infections (OR = 12.5, 95% CI = 2.9, 53.4). PMID:2817175

  4. Nighttime Intensivist Staffing and Mortality among Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, David J.; Angus, Derek C.; Barnato, Amber E.; Kramer, Andrew A.; Kahn, Jeremy M.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Hospitals are increasingly adopting 24-hour intensivist physician staffing as a strategy to improve intensive care unit (ICU) outcomes. However, the degree to which nighttime intensivists are associated with improvements in the quality of ICU care is unknown. METHODS We conducted a retrospective cohort study involving ICUs that participated in the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) clinical information system from 2009 through 2010, linking a survey of ICU staffing practices with patient-level outcomes data from adult ICU admissions. Multivariate models were used to assess the relationship between nighttime intensivist staffing and in-hospital mortality among ICU patients, with adjustment for daytime intensivist staffing, severity of illness, and case mix. We conducted a confirmatory analysis in a second, population-based cohort of hospitals in Pennsylvania from which less detailed data were available. RESULTS The analysis with the use of the APACHE database included 65,752 patients admitted to 49 ICUs in 25 hospitals. In ICUs with low-intensity daytime staffing, nighttime intensivist staffing was associated with a reduction in risk-adjusted in-hospital mortality (adjusted odds ratio for death, 0.62; P = 0.04). Among ICUs with high-intensity daytime staffing, nighttime intensivist staffing conferred no benefit with respect to risk-adjusted in-hospital mortality (odds ratio, 1.08; P = 0.78). In the verification cohort, there was a similar relationship among daytime staffing, nighttime staffing, and in-hospital mortality. The interaction between nighttime staffing and daytime staffing was not significant (P = 0.18), yet the direction of the findings were similar to those in the APACHE cohort. CONCLUSIONS The addition of nighttime intensivist staffing to a low-intensity daytime staffing model was associated with reduced mortality. However, a reduction in mortality was not seen in ICUs with high-intensity daytime staffing. (Funded by the

  5. Dealing with patients and employees who seek significance through illness.

    PubMed

    Davidhizar, R

    2000-12-01

    Some people whom the health care manager encounters--employees as well as patients--seem to find their significance in being ill, partaking of the supposed benefits of being sick. For a variety of reasons, even the attention garnered in this manner may not be enough to meet an individual's needs so the behavior continues and intensifies. There are, however, several reasonable strategies available for dealing with persons who pursue illness for the underlying purpose of gaining attention.

  6. First Identification and Description of Rickettsioses and Q Fever as Causes of Acute Febrile Illness in Nicaragua

    PubMed Central

    Reller, Megan E.; Chikeka, Ijeuru; Miles, Jeremy J.; Dumler, J. Stephen; Woods, Christopher W.; Mayorga, Orlando; Matute, Armando J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Rickettsial infections and Q fever present similarly to other acute febrile illnesses, but are infrequently diagnosed because of limited diagnostic tools. Despite sporadic reports, rickettsial infections and Q fever have not been prospectively studied in Central America. Methodology/Principal Findings We enrolled consecutive patients presenting with undifferentiated fever in western Nicaragua and collected epidemiologic and clinical data and acute and convalescent sera. We used ELISA for screening and paired sera to confirm acute (≥4-fold rise in titer) spotted fever and typhus group rickettsial infections and Q fever as well as past (stable titer) infections. Characteristics associated with both acute and past infection were assessed. Conclusions/Significance We enrolled 825 patients and identified acute rickettsial infections and acute Q fever in 0.9% and 1.3%, respectively. Clinical features were non-specific and neither rickettsial infections nor Q fever were considered or treated. Further study is warranted to define the burden of these infections in Central America. PMID:28036394

  7. The Creative Use of Psychotherapy with Terminally Ill AIDS Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraenkel, William A.

    One clinical psychologist who worked with terminally ill, end-stage Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) patients in a hospice type setting experienced more than 150 deaths over an 18-month time period. Many of the patients denied that they had AIDS; some distinguished between having AIDS and testing positive for Human Immunodeficiency Virus…

  8. Wellbeing, illness perception and coping strategies in Italian Celiac patients.

    PubMed

    Baiardini, I; Braido, F; Menoni, S; Bellandi, G; Savi, E; Canonica, G W; Macchia, D

    2012-01-01

    The clinical features of Celiac Disease (CD) are heterogeneous and both severity and extent of villous atrophy do not correlate with clinical presentation. This study aims to evaluate the psychological wellbeing of CD patients with a similar clinical pattern and to explore whether patients with different levels of wellbeing differed in illness perception and coping strategies. CD outpatients with proven diagnosis filled in validated questionnaires to investigate wellbeing (PGWBI), illness perception (IPQ-R) and coping style (COPE). One hundred and four patients underwent data analysis. Compared to Italian reference sample, CD patients reported a significantly reduced PGWBI total score (p<0.001), self-control (p<0.001), general health (p=0.002) and vitality (p<0.001) and increased anxiety (p=0.009). 7.7% of patients reported a positive wellbeing, 40.4% distress absence, 28.8% a moderate distress and 23.1% a severe distress. Patients with distress showed a different illness perception and reported more frequently two dysfunctional strategies: focus on and venting emotions (p= 0.009) and substance abuse (p= 0.01) compared to those having a positive wellbeing. A high percentage of CD patients experience distress and differ from those who reach wellbeing in illness perception and use of coping strategies. Assessing subjective viewpoint with standardized methods can provide useful information for a better management of CD patients.

  9. Difficulties of Diabetic Patients in Learning about Their Illness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonnet, Caroline; Gagnayre, Remi; d'Ivernois, Jean Francois

    2001-01-01

    Examines the difficulties experienced by diabetic patients in learning about their illness. Diabetic people (N=138) were questioned by means of a closed answer questionnaire. Results reveal that patients easily acquired manual skills, yet numerous learning difficulties were associated with the skills required to solve problems and make decisions,…

  10. Diminishing willingness to pay per quality-adjusted life year: valuing acute foodborne illness.

    PubMed

    Haninger, Kevin; Hammitt, James K

    2011-09-01

    We design and conduct a stated-preference survey to estimate willingness to pay (WTP) to reduce foodborne risk of acute illness and to test whether WTP is proportional to the corresponding gain in expected quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). If QALYs measure utility for health, then economic theory requires WTP to be nearly proportional to changes in both health quality and duration of illness and WTP could be estimated by multiplying the expected change in QALYs by an appropriate monetary value. WTP is elicited using double-bounded, dichotomous-choice questions in which respondents (randomly selected from the U.S. general adult population, n = 2,858) decide whether to purchase a more expensive food to reduce the risk of foodborne illness. Health risks vary by baseline probability of illness, reduction in probability, duration and severity of illness, and conditional probability of mortality. The expected gain in QALYs is calculated using respondent-assessed decrements in health-related quality of life if ill combined with the duration of illness and reduction in probability specified in the survey. We find sharply diminishing marginal WTP for severity and duration of illness prevented. Our results suggest that individuals do not have a constant rate of WTP per QALY, which implies that WTP cannot be accurately estimated by multiplying the change in QALYs by an appropriate monetary value.

  11. ILLNESS IS WORK: Revisiting the concept of illness careers and recognizing the identity work of patients with ME/CFS.

    PubMed

    Grue, Jan

    2016-07-01

    The concept of careers has an extensive history in the sociology of health and illness. Among other things, the notion of a career has been used to describe the changing identities of patients diagnosed with mental illness, to identify distinct stages in the progression of various illnesses, and to recognize the cooperative efforts of hospitalized patients. However, the career concept may be reanalyzed as part of an analytical metaphor that makes salient both the agency of people with illnesses and the social structures in which they are enmeshed. This metaphor, ILLNESS IS WORK, can valorize and aid understanding of the identity work and actions of patients with chronic illnesses, particularly illnesses with a low degree of social recognition and medical prestige such as myalgic encephalopathy and chronic fatigue syndrome.

  12. Pertussis immunisation and serious acute neurological illness in children.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, D L; Ross, E M; Alderslade, R; Bellman, M H; Rawson, N S

    1981-01-01

    The first 1000 cases notified to the National Childhood Encephalopathy Study were analysed. The diagnoses included encephalitis/encephalopathy, prolonged convulsions, infantile spasms, and Reye's syndrome. Eighty-eight of the children had had a recent infectious disease, including 19 with pertussis. Only 35 of the notified children (3.5%) had received pertussis antigen within seven days before becoming ill. Of 1955 control children matched for age, sex, and area of residence, 34 (1.7%) had been immunised with pertussis vaccine within the seven days before the date on which they became of the same age as the corresponding notified child. The relative risk of a notified child having had pertussis immunisation within that time interval was 2.4 (p less than 0.001). Of the 35 notified children, 32 had no previous neurological abnormality. A year later two had died, nine had developmental retardation, and 21 were normal. A significance association was shown between serious neurological illness and pertussis vaccine, though cases were few and most children recovered completely. PMID:6786580

  13. Parents' help-seeking behaviours during acute childhood illness at home: A contribution to explanatory theory.

    PubMed

    Neill, Sarah J; Jones, Caroline H D; Lakhanpaul, Monica; Roland, Damian T; Thompson, Matthew J

    2016-03-01

    Uncertainty and anxiety surround parents' decisions to seek medical help for an acutely ill child. Consultation rates for children are rising, yet little is known about factors that influence parents' help-seeking behaviours. We used focus groups and interviews to examine how 27 parents of children under five years, from a range of socioeconomic groups in the East Midlands of England, use information to make decisions during acute childhood illness at home. This article reports findings elucidating factors that influence help-seeking behaviours. Parents reported that decision-making during acute childhood illness was influenced by a range of personal, social and health service factors. Principal among these was parents' concern to do the right thing for their child. Their ability to assess the severity of the illness was influenced by knowledge and experience of childhood illness. When parents were unable to access their general practitioner (GP), feared criticism from or had lost trust in their GP, some parents reported using services elsewhere such as Accident and Emergency. These findings contribute to explanatory theory concerning parents' help-seeking behaviours. Professional and political solutions have not reduced demand; therefore, collaborative approaches involving the public and professionals are now needed to improve parents' access to information.

  14. Early Mobilization and Rehabilitation of Patients Who Are Critically Ill.

    PubMed

    Hashem, Mohamed D; Parker, Ann M; Needham, Dale M

    2016-09-01

    Neuromuscular disorders are increasingly recognized as a cause of both short- and long-term physical morbidity in survivors of critical illness. This recognition has given rise to research aimed at better understanding the risk factors and mechanisms associated with neuromuscular dysfunction and physical impairment associated with critical illness, as well as possible interventions to prevent or treat these issues. Among potential risk factors, bed rest is an important modifiable risk factor. Early mobilization and rehabilitation of patients who are critically ill may help prevent or mitigate the sequelae of bed rest and improve patient outcomes. Research studies and quality improvement projects have demonstrated that early mobilization and rehabilitation are safe and feasible in patients who are critically ill, with potential benefits including improved physical functioning and decreased duration of mechanical ventilation, intensive care, and hospital stay. Despite these findings, early mobilization and rehabilitation are still uncommon in routine clinical practice, with many perceived barriers. This review summarizes potential risk factors for neuromuscular dysfunction and physical impairment associated with critical illness, highlights the potential role of early mobilization and rehabilitation in improving patient outcomes, and discusses some of the commonly perceived barriers to early mobilization and strategies for overcoming them.

  15. Screening and Management of Delirium in Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Farina, Nicholas; Smithburger, Pamela

    2015-01-01

    Delirium is highly prevalent in the critically ill population and has been associated with numerous negative outcomes including increased mortality. The presentation of a delirious patient in the intensive care unit (ICU) is characterized by a fluctuating cognitive status and inattention that varies dramatically among patients. Delirium can present in 3 different motoric subtypes: hyperactive, hypoactive, and mixed. Two tools, the Intensive Care Delirium Screening Checklist and Confusion Assessment ICU, are validated and recommended for the detection of delirium in critically ill patients. The identification of delirium in a critically ill patient should be facilitated using one of these tools. An intermediate form of delirium known as subsyndromal delirium also exists, although the significance of this syndrome is largely unknown. Another phenomenon known as sedation-related delirium has been recently described, although more research is needed to understand its significance. Patients in the ICU are exposed to many risk factors for developing delirium; controlling these risk factors is essential for preventing delirium development in critically ill patients. Nonpharmacologic interventions have been shown to prevent patients from developing delirium. Prevention is crucial because once delirium develops pharmacologic therapy is limited. PMID:26715799

  16. Emergency room visits for acute gastrointestinal illness following flooding: A case-crossover study

    EPA Science Inventory

    Climate change may alter the frequency of precipitation and flooding which can increase fecal-oral transmission of acute gastrointestinal illness (AGI) through contact with contaminated items or water. Few studies have quantified the risk associated with flood events in the Unite...

  17. Nasopharyngeal Pneumococcal Density and Evolution of Acute Respiratory Illnesses in Young Children, Peru, 2009–2011

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Roger R.; Howard, Leigh M.; Griffin, Marie R.; Edwards, Kathryn M.; Zhu, Yuwei; Williams, John V.; Vidal, Jorge E.; Klugman, Keith P.; Gil, Ana I.; Lanata, Claudio F.

    2016-01-01

    We examined nasopharyngeal pneumococcal colonization density patterns surrounding acute respiratory illnesses (ARI) in young children in Peru. Pneumococcal densities were dynamic, gradually increasing leading up to an ARI, peaking during the ARI, and decreasing after the ARI. Rhinovirus co-infection was associated with higher pneumococcal densities. PMID:27767919

  18. Echocardiographic approach to cardiac tamponade in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    McCanny, Peter; Colreavy, Frances

    2016-12-24

    Cardiac tamponade should be considered in a critically ill patient in whom the cause of haemodynamic shock is unclear. When considering tamponade, transthoracic echocardiography plays an essential role and is the initial investigation of choice. Diagnostic sensitivity of transthoracic echocardiography is dependent on image quality, and in some cases a transoesophageal approach may be required to confirm the diagnosis. Knowledge of the pathophysiology and echocardiographic features of cardiac tamponade are essential for the practicing Intensivist. This review presents an approach to the recognition, diagnosis, and treatment of cardiac tamponade in critically ill patients.

  19. Nursing the critically ill surgical patient in Zambia.

    PubMed

    Carter, Chris; Snell, David

    2016-11-10

    Critical illness in the developing world is a substantial burden for individuals, families, communities and healthcare services. The management of these patients will depend on the resources available. Simple conditions such as a fractured leg or a strangulated hernia can have devastating effects on individuals, families and communities. The recent Lancet Commission on Global Surgery and the World Health Organization promise to strengthen emergency and essential care will increase the focus on surgical services within the developing world. This article provides an overview of nursing the critically ill surgical patient in Zambia, a lower middle income country (LMIC) in sub-Saharan Africa.

  20. [Patient-caregiver relationship: when illness blogs step in].

    PubMed

    Rondi, Céline; Berney, Alexandre

    2014-02-12

    The use of social media as a communication tool is rapidly growing in the community, and more specifically in patients, through illness blogs. This has been true for several years in North America, but is becoming a reality in Europe as well. We report here the first results of studies on the putative psychological benefits and risks of illness blogs for their authors. We also explore the possible impact of blogging on the patient-caregiver relationship. Social media are expected to have a growing influence in certain areas of health care. Physicians should therefore stay informed about them, take advantage of their benefits, and anticipate their risks.

  1. Measuring Illness Behavior in Patients with Systemic Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Merz, Erin L.; Malcarne, Vanessa L.; Roesch, Scott C.; Sharif, Roozbeh; Harper, Brock E.; Draeger, Hilda T.; Gonzalez, Emilio B.; Nair, Deepthi K.; McNearney, Terry A.; Assassi, Shervin; Mayes, Maureen D.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Illness behaviors (cognitive, affective, and behavioral reactions) among individuals with systemic sclerosis (SSc) are of clinical concern due to relationships between these behaviors and physical and mental-health quality of life such as pain and symptoms of depression. Self-report measures with good psychometric properties can aid in the accurate assessment of illness behavior. The Illness Behavior Questionnaire (IBQ) was designed to measure abnormal illness behaviors; however, despite its long-standing use, there is disagreement regarding its subscales. The goal of the present study was to evaluate the validity of the IBQ in a cohort of patients with SSc. Methods Patients with SSc (N = 278) completed the IBQ at enrollment to the Genetics versus ENvironment In Scleroderma Outcome Study (GENISOS). Structural validity of previously derived factor solutions was investigated using confirmatory factor analysis. Exploratory factor analysis was utilized to derive SSc-specific subscales. Results None of the previously derived structural models were supported for SSc patients. Exploratory factor analysis supported a SSc-specific factor structure with 5 subscales. Validity analyses suggested that the subscales were generally independent of disease severity, but were correlated with other health outcomes (i.e., fatigue, pain, disability, social support, mental health). Conclusion The proposed subscales are recommended for use in SSc, and can be utilized to capture illness behavior that may be of clinical concern. PMID:23097280

  2. Needs, Perceived Support, and Hospital Readmissions in Patients with Severe Mental Illness.

    PubMed

    Guzman-Parra, Jose; Moreno-Küstner, Berta; Rivas, Fabio; Alba-Vallejo, Mercedes; Hernandez-Pedrosa, Javier; Mayoral-Cleries, Fermin

    2017-02-07

    People with severe mental illness have multiple and complex needs that often are not addressed. The purpose of this study was to analyse needs and support perceived and the relationship with hospital readmission. We assessed 100 patients with severe mental illness at discharge from an acute inpatient unit in terms of needs (Camberwell Assessment of Needs), clinical status (The Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale), and social functioning (Personal and Social Performance); we also followed up these patients for 1 year. The group of patients who were readmitted had more total needs than did the non-readmitted, in addition to more unmet needs, although the differences were not significant. The highest risk factor for rehospitalisation was the number of previous admissions. In addition, the help of informal carers in alleviating psychological distress was associated with the risk of readmission. The main conclusion concerns the role of the psychological support provided by informal networks in preventing readmission.

  3. Pulmonary penetration of piperacillin and tazobactam in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Felton, TW; McCalman, K; Malagon, I; Isalska, B; Whalley, S; Goodwin, J; Bentley, AM; Hope, WW

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary infections in critically ill patients are common and associated with high morbidity and mortality. Piperacillin-tazobactam is a frequently used therapy in critically ill patients with pulmonary infection. Antibiotic concentrations in the lung reflect target site antibiotic concentrations in patients with pneumonia. The aim of this study was to assess the plasma and intra-pulmonary pharmacokinetics (PK) of piperacillin-tazobactam in critically ill patients administered standard piperacillin-tazobactam regimens. A population PK model was developed to describe plasma and intra-pulmonary piperacillin and tazobactam concentrations. The probability of piperacillin exposures reaching pharmacodynamic endpoints and the impact of pulmonary permeability on piperacillin and tazobactam pulmonary penetration was explored. The median piperacillin and tazobactam pulmonary penetration ratio was 49.3% and 121.2%, respectively. Pulmonary piperacillin and tazobactam concentration were unpredictable and negatively correlated to pulmonary permeability. Current piperacillin-tazobactam regimens may be insufficient to treat pneumonia caused by piperacillin-tazobactam susceptible organisms in some critically ill patients. PMID:24926779

  4. Immunological abnormalities in the syndrome of poliomyelitis-like illness associated with acute bronchial asthma (Hopkin's syndrome).

    PubMed Central

    Manson, J I; Thong, Y H

    1980-01-01

    In recent years an unusual syndrome of poliomyelitis-like illness, associated with acute bronchial asthma, has been reported from different parts of the world. A further 3 cases are described in this paper. Although the condition resembles poliomyelitis in most respects, particularly with regard to the severe permanent residual weakness usually observed, consistent evidence of a viral aetiology has not been forthcoming. Tests of immune function suggested the presence of varying degrees of nonspecific immune deficiency in our 3 patients, but evidence of viral invasion was inconclusive. It is suggested that a combination of immune deficiency with the stress of the acute asthma attack rendered the patients susceptible to invasion of the anterior horn cells by a viral agent, which may have been of external origin, or may have existed in a latent form within the host. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7377814

  5. Geriatric multidimensional assessment for elderly patients with acute respiratory diseases.

    PubMed

    Bellelli, Giuseppe; Bruni, Adriana; Malerba, Mara; Mazzone, Andrea; Aliberti, Stefano; Pesci, Alberto; Annoni, Giorgio

    2014-04-01

    The case of an 87-year-old woman who falls at home and is admitted to the Emergency Department of an acute hospital with delirium exemplify a common situation that physicians face in their everyday clinical practice. We describe the typical context of frailty in which acute illnesses frequently present in frail elderly patients and, in particular, the relationship between comorbidity, disability and frailty. We also report the current knowledge about frailty theories and we focus on the "atypical" presentation of many acute illnesses. Major attention is devoted on delirium and on mobility impairment, two of the most common atypical symptoms of elderly frail subjects. Finally we describe the evidence on the comprehensive geriatric assessment, i.e., the method that is required to identify and understand the ultimate needs of elderly complex subjects.

  6. [Guidelines for specialized nutritional and metabolic support in the critically-ill patient. Update. Consensus of the Spanish Society of Intensive Care Medicine and Coronary Units-Spanish Society of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (SEMICYUC-SENPE): acute renal failure].

    PubMed

    López Martínez, J; Sánchez-Izquierdo Riera, J A; Jiménez Jiménez, F J

    2011-11-01

    Nutritional support in acute renal failure must take into account the patient's catabolism and the treatment of the renal failure. Hypermetabolic failure is common in these patients, requiring continuous renal replacement therapy or daily hemodialysis. In patients with normal catabolism (urea nitrogen below 10 g/day) and preserved diuresis, conservative treatment can be attempted. In these patients, relatively hypoproteic nutritional support is essential, using proteins with high biological value and limiting fluid and electrolyte intake according to the patient's individual requirements. Micronutrient intake should be adjusted, the only buffering agent used being bicarbonate. Limitations on fluid, electrolyte and nitrogen intake no longer apply when extrarenal clearance techniques are used but intake of these substances should be modified according to the type of clearance. Depending on their hemofiltration flow, continuous renal replacement systems require high daily nitrogen intake, which can sometimes reach 2.5 g protein/kg. The amount of volume replacement can induce energy overload and therefore the use of glucose-free replacement fluids and glucose-free dialysis or a glucose concentration of 1 g/L, with bicarbonate as a buffer, is recommended. Monitoring of electrolyte levels (especially those of phosphorus, potassium and magnesium) and of micronutrients is essential and administration of these substances should be individually-tailored.

  7. Managing critically Ill hematology patients: Time to think differently.

    PubMed

    Azoulay, Elie; Pène, Frédéric; Darmon, Michael; Lengliné, Etienne; Benoit, Dominique; Soares, Marcio; Vincent, Francois; Bruneel, Fabrice; Perez, Pierre; Lemiale, Virginie; Mokart, Djamel

    2015-11-01

    The number of patients living with hematological malignancies (HMs) has increased steadily over time. This is the result of intensive and effective treatments that also increase the probability of infiltrative, infectious or toxic life threatening event. Over the last two decades, the number of patients with HMs admitted to the ICU increased and their mortality has dropped sharply. ICU patients with HMs require an extensive diagnostic workup and the optimal use of ICU treatments to identify the reason for ICU admission and the nature of the complication that explains organ dysfunctions. Mortality of ARDS or septic shock is up to 50%, respectively. In this review, the authors share their experience with managing critically ill patients with HMs. They discuss the main aspects of the diagnostic and therapeutic management of critically ill patients with HMs and argue that outcomes have improved over time and that many classic determinants of mortality have become irrelevant.

  8. Spiritual Care For Jewish Patients Facing A Life Threatening Illness

    PubMed Central

    Bluman, Rabbi Olga F.; Klein, Linda; Thomas, Jay; Ferrell, Betty

    2013-01-01

    Providing biopsychosocial/spiritual care for patients facing a life threatening illness can be complex, and this complexity can be amplified when a patient identifies as Jewish. A common but incorrect assumption is that a person who identifies him or herself as Jewish abides by the tenets of the Jewish religion. However, many Jews consider themselves Jewish in an ethnic or cultural sense rather than connected to a religion or belief in God. This case report presents an ethnic/cultural Jew with a life threatening illness of advanced lung cancer. Despite evidence of spiritual/existential suffering, this patient declined spiritual care. From an analysis of this case and clinical experience, we suggest exploratory questions that clinicians can use in response to common questions or statements made by such patients. This exploration may lead to a chaplain referral and we highlight interventions that chaplains and clinicians may find helpful as they come alongside Jewish patients. PMID:23614173

  9. Acute HIV illness following blood transfusion in three African children.

    PubMed

    Colebunders, R; Greenberg, A E; Francis, H; Kabote, N; Izaley, L; Nguyen-Dinh, P; Quinn, T C; Van der Groen, G; Curran, J W; Piot, P

    1988-04-01

    Three children are described in whom pre-transfusion samples were HIV-seronegative and post-transfusional samples, obtained within 1 week after transfusion, were HIV-seropositive. Two of them developed a transient fever within 1 week of receiving the blood transfusion, and a transient generalized skin eruption which lasted for about 2 weeks. All three developed persistent generalized lymphadenopathy. One child developed a lumbar herpes zoster 7 months after transfusion. IgM Western blots demonstrated the presence of antibodies to protein bands p17, p24 and p55 in all three children. These three case reports suggest that children who receive a seropositive blood transfusion are at high risk for developing acute manifestations of HIV infection.

  10. Hyperglycemia in Critically Ill Patients: Management and Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Godinjak, Amina; Iglica, Amer; Burekovic, Azra; Jusufovic, Selma; Ajanovic, Anes; Tancica, Ira; Kukuljac, Adis

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Hyperglycemia is a common complication of critical illness. Patients in intensive care unit with stress hyperglycemia have significantly higher mortality (31%) compared to patients with previously confirmed diabetes (10%) or normoglycemia (11.3%). Stress hyperglycemia is associated with increased risk of critical illness polyneuropathy (CIP) and prolonged mechanical ventilation. Intensive monitoring and insulin therapy according to the protocol are an important part of the treatment of critically ill patients. Objective: To evaluate the incidence of stress hyperglycemia, complications and outcome in critically ill patients in our Medical intensive care unit. Materials and methods: This study included 100 patients hospitalized in Medical intensive care unit during the period January 2014–March 2015 which were divided into three groups: Diabetes mellitus, stress-hyperglycemia and normoglycemia. During the retrospective-prospective observational clinical investigation the following data was obtained: age, gender, SAPS, admission diagnosis, average daily blood glucose, highest blood glucose level, glycemic variability, vasopressor and corticosteroid therapy, days on mechanical ventilation, total days of hospitalization in Medical intensive care unit, and outcome. Results: Patients with DM treated with a continuous insulin infusion did not have significantly more complications than patients with normoglycemia, unlike patients with stress hyperglycemia, which had more severe prognosis. There was a significant difference between the maximum level of blood glucose in recovered and patients with adverse outcome (p = 0.0277). Glycemic variability (difference between max. and min. blood glucose) was the strongest predictor of adverse outcome. The difference in glycemic variability between the stress-hyperglycemia and normoglycemic group was statistically significant (p = 0.0066). There was no statistically significant difference in duration of mechanical

  11. Management of parenteral nutrition in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Cotogni, Paolo

    2017-01-01

    Artificial nutrition (AN) is necessary to meet the nutritional requirements of critically ill patients at nutrition risk because undernutrition determines a poorer prognosis in these patients. There is debate over which route of delivery of AN provides better outcomes and lesser complications. This review describes the management of parenteral nutrition (PN) in critically ill patients. The first aim is to discuss what should be done in order that the PN is safe. The second aim is to dispel “myths” about PN-related complications and show how prevention and monitoring are able to reach the goal of “near zero” PN complications. Finally, in this review is discussed the controversial issue of the route for delivering AN in critically ill patients. The fighting against PN complications should consider: (1) an appropriate blood glucose control; (2) the use of olive oil- and fish oil-based lipid emulsions alternative to soybean oil-based ones; (3) the adoption of insertion and care bundles for central venous access devices; and (4) the implementation of a policy of targeting “near zero” catheter-related bloodstream infections. Adopting all these strategies, the goal of “near zero” PN complications is achievable. If accurately managed, PN can be safely provided for most critically ill patients without expecting a relevant incidence of PN-related complications. Moreover, the use of protocols for the management of nutritional support and the presence of nutrition support teams may decrease PN-related complications. In conclusion, the key messages about the management of PN in critically ill patients are two. First, the dangers of PN-related complications have been exaggerated because complications are uncommon; moreover, infectious complications, as mechanical complications, are more properly catheter-related and not PN-related complications. Second, when enteral nutrition is not feasible or tolerated, PN is as effective and safe as enteral nutrition. PMID

  12. An investigation on illness perception and adherence among hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Chih-Yin; Chang, Chueh; Chen, Chih-Dao

    2012-08-01

    Successful blood pressure (BP) control requires good adherence to medication and specific health-related behaviors. However, the BP control rate is not optimal, and limited research has focused on the patient's perspective. This study aimed at investigating the illness perceptions of hypertensive patients and how they relate to drug adherence. One hundred and seventeen hypertensive patients enrolled in this study, and data were collected in a family physician clinic of a medical center located in northern Taiwan. The Illness Perception Questionnaire was administered, and medication adherence and demographic data were also collected. Results showed the patients' perceptions of their hypertension, that it was a chronically severe but stable disease, and the patients were confident in the effectiveness of medical treatments and their ability to control their disease. The participants were divided into three clusters by cluster analysis. There were 46.15% participants in the first cluster; they had less negative belief in their illness consequence and less negative emotional responses, but a low personal sense of control. The second cluster (11.97%) had more negative emotional responses and more negative beliefs in their illness consequence, but these individuals scored highly on their personal sense of control and treatment control beliefs. The third cluster (41.88%) had scores between clusters 1 and 2. Cluster 1 had the best drug adherence, and cluster 2 had the worst drug adherence (χ(2) = 7.67, p < 0.05). It may be beneficial for clinical physicians to pay attention to patients' illness perceptions, including their negative emotional response and symptoms, in order to improve their drug adherence.

  13. Management of parenteral nutrition in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Cotogni, Paolo

    2017-02-04

    Artificial nutrition (AN) is necessary to meet the nutritional requirements of critically ill patients at nutrition risk because undernutrition determines a poorer prognosis in these patients. There is debate over which route of delivery of AN provides better outcomes and lesser complications. This review describes the management of parenteral nutrition (PN) in critically ill patients. The first aim is to discuss what should be done in order that the PN is safe. The second aim is to dispel "myths" about PN-related complications and show how prevention and monitoring are able to reach the goal of "near zero" PN complications. Finally, in this review is discussed the controversial issue of the route for delivering AN in critically ill patients. The fighting against PN complications should consider: (1) an appropriate blood glucose control; (2) the use of olive oil- and fish oil-based lipid emulsions alternative to soybean oil-based ones; (3) the adoption of insertion and care bundles for central venous access devices; and (4) the implementation of a policy of targeting "near zero" catheter-related bloodstream infections. Adopting all these strategies, the goal of "near zero" PN complications is achievable. If accurately managed, PN can be safely provided for most critically ill patients without expecting a relevant incidence of PN-related complications. Moreover, the use of protocols for the management of nutritional support and the presence of nutrition support teams may decrease PN-related complications. In conclusion, the key messages about the management of PN in critically ill patients are two. First, the dangers of PN-related complications have been exaggerated because complications are uncommon; moreover, infectious complications, as mechanical complications, are more properly catheter-related and not PN-related complications. Second, when enteral nutrition is not feasible or tolerated, PN is as effective and safe as enteral nutrition.

  14. Distinct Features of Nonthyroidal Illness in Critically Ill Patients With Infectious Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Woo Kyung; Hwang, Sena; Kim, Daham; Lee, Seul Gi; Jeong, Seonhyang; Seol, Mi-Youn; Kim, Hyunji; Ku, Cheol Ryong; Shin, Dong Yeop; Chung, Woong Youn; Lee, Eun Jig; Lee, Jandee; Jo, Young Suk

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Nonthyroidal illness (NTI), often observed in critically ill patients, arises through diverse alterations in the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis. However, the causal relationship between underlying disease and NTI diversity in critically ill patients is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to examine NTI severity and adverse outcomes in critically ill patients with respect to their underlying disease(s). The medical records of 616 patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) between January 2009 and October 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients with known diseases or taking medications that affect thyroid function were excluded. All-cause mortality (ACM) and length of stay (LOS) in the ICU were assessed as adverse outcomes. The enrolled patients (n = 213) were divided into the following 4 groups according to the severity of NTI at the nadir of their thyroid function test (TFT): normal (n = 11, 5.2%), mild NTI (n = 113, 53.1%), moderate NTI (n = 78, 36.6%), and severe NTI (n = 11, 5.2%). There was no significant difference between the groups in terms of age and gender. NTI severity showed a significantly strong association with ACM (P < 0.0001) and a significant positive association with LOS in the ICU (P = 0.031). After adjusting for age, gender, and current medications affecting TFT, increasing NTI severity led to increased ACM (odds ratio = 3.101; 95% confidence interval = 1.711–5.618; P < 0.0001). Notably, the prevalence of moderate-to-severe NTI was markedly higher in patients with infectious disease than in those with noninfectious disease (P = 0.012). Consistent with this, serum C-reactive protein levels were higher in patients with moderate-to-severe NTI (P = 0.016). NTI severity is associated with increased ACM, LOS, and underlying infectious disease. Future studies will focus on the biological and clinical implications of infectious disease on the HPT axis. PMID

  15. Human factors in the management of the critically ill patient.

    PubMed

    Bion, J F; Abrusci, T; Hibbert, P

    2010-07-01

    Unreliable delivery of best practice care is a major component of medical error. Critically ill patients are particularly susceptible to error and unreliable care. Human factors analysis, widely used in industry, provides insights into how interactions between organizations, tasks, and the individual worker impact on human behaviour and affect systems reliability. We adopt a human factors approach to examine determinants of clinical reliability in the management of critically ill patients. We conducted a narrative review based on a Medline search (1950-March 2010) combining intensive/critical care (units) with medical errors, patient safety, or delivery of healthcare; keyword and Internet search 'human factors' or 'ergonomics'. Critical illness represents a high-risk, complex system spanning speciality and geographical boundaries. Substantial opportunities exist for improving the safety and reliability of care of critically ill patients at the level of the task, the individual healthcare provider, and the organization or system. Task standardization (best practice guidelines) and simplification (bundling or checklists) should be implemented where scientific evidence is strong, or adopted subject to further research ('dynamic standardization'). Technical interventions should be embedded in everyday practice by the adjunctive use of non-technical (behavioural) interventions. These include executive 'adoption' of clinical areas, systematic methods for identifying hazards and reflective learning from error, and a range of techniques for improving teamworking and communication. Human factors analysis provides a useful framework for understanding and rectifying the causes of error and unreliability, particularly in complex systems such as critical care.

  16. Gerontology & Policies for Not Treating Terminally Ill Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarrett, William H.

    Proposals have been developed to clarify physician responsibility in withholding treatment to terminally ill patients. These proposals seek to provide a legal shield against malpractice proceedings and to reduce confusion over how to resolve high medical costs through standardizing procedures for withholding treatment. When first published,…

  17. Consent for Dental Therapy in Severely Ill Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Litch, C. Scott; Liggett, Martha L.

    1992-01-01

    Legal standards for informed consent are discussed in the context of dental care for the elderly and severely ill. Variations in state common law and legislation are analyzed, focusing on differences between practitioner-oriented and patient-oriented approaches to informed consent. Implications for educators and practitioners are examined.…

  18. Physiological effects of nonthyroidal illness syndrome in patients after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Spratt, D I; Frohnauer, M; Cyr-Alves, H; Kramer, R S; Lucas, F L; Morton, J R; Cox, D F; Becker, K; Devlin, J T

    2007-07-01

    In a prospective randomized placebo-controlled study, we assessed potential physiological effects of nonthyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS) in acute illness. Coronary artery bypass graft surgery was employed as a prospective model of acute illness and NTIS. Triiodothyronine (T(3)) or placebo was infused for 24 h after surgery, with a T(3) dose selected to maintain postoperative serum T(3) concentrations at preoperative levels. Patients were evaluated before coronary artery bypass graft and during the postoperative period. Cardiovascular function was monitored with Swan-Ganz catheter measurements and ECG. Urinary nitrogen excretion and L-[1-(13)C]leucine flux were used to evaluate protein metabolism. Serum measurements of relevant hormones, iron, and total iron-binding capacity were used to assess effects on sex steroid, growth hormone axis, and iron responses to illness. Cardiovascular function was not affected by T(3) infusion, except for a transient higher cardiac index in the T(3) group 6 h after surgery (3.04 +/- 0.12 for T(3) and 2.53 +/- 0.08 for placebo, P = 0.0016). Protein metabolism was not affected; changes in urinary nitrogen excretion and L-[1-(13)C]leucine flux were equivalent in the two groups (P = 0.35 and P = 0.95, respectively). No differences were observed in changes in testosterone, estrogens, growth hormone, insulin-like growth hormone I, iron, or total iron-binding capacity between T(3) and placebo groups. We conclude that, in the early stages of major illness, the decrease in circulating T(3) concentrations in NTIS has only a minimal transient physiological impact on cardiac function and plays no significant role in protecting against protein catabolism or modulating other endocrine responses or iron responses to illness.

  19. [Guidelines for specialized nutritional and metabolic support in the critically ill-patient. Update. Consensus of the Spanish Society of Intensive Care Medicine and Coronary Units-Spanish Society of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (SEMICYUC-SENPE): severe acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Bordejé Laguna, L; Lorencio Cárdenas, C; Acosta Escribano, J

    2011-11-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) causes local and systemic complications leading to high catabolic, hypermetabolic and hyperdynamic stress states with marked morbidity and mortality. In the last decade, nutritional support has become a key element in the treatment of SAP. Thus, specialized nutrition is indicated from admission, with enteral nutrition being preferred to parenteral nutrition. Enteral nutrition should be initiated early using infusion through the jejunum beyond the ligament of Treitz to minimize pancreatic stress. There are no specific studies that establish the type of diet to be used but experts recommend the use of polymeric diets. Parenteral nutrition, without a specific formula, is indicated in patients with SAP who are intolerant to enteral nutrition or when the clinical signs of pancreatitis are exacerbated or aggravated by enteral nutrition. Even so, a minimal level of enteral infusion should be maintained to preserve the trophic effect of the intestinal mucosa. In the last few years, several studies of the administration of immunomodulatory diets in patients with SAP have been carried out to demonstrate their effects on the course of the disease. However, there are few clear recommendations on the prognostic benefits of pharmaconutrient enriched diets in these patients. There is substantial scientific evidence suggesting that the only clear indication for pharmaconutrition in patients with SAP is parenteral glutamine administration, which is recommended by all clinical guidelines with distinct grades of evidence.

  20. Metabolic syndrome in patients with severe mental illness in Gorgan

    PubMed Central

    Kamkar, Mohammad Zaman; Sanagoo, Akram; Zargarani, Fatemeh; Jouybari, Leila; Marjani, Abdoljalal

    2016-01-01

    Background: Metabolic syndrome is commonly associated with cardiovascular diseases and psychiatric mental illness. Hence, we aimed to assess the metabolic syndrome among severe mental illness (SMI). Materials and Methods: The study included 267 patients who were referred to the psychiatric unit at 5th Azar Education Hospital of Golestan University of Medical Sciences in Gorgan, Iran. Results: The mean waist circumference, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, triglyceride and fasting blood glucose levels were significantly higher in the SMI with metabolic syndrome, but the high density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol was significantly lower. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in SMI patients was 20.60%. There were significant differences in the mean of waist circumference, systolic (except for women) and diastolic blood pressure, triglyceride, HDL-cholesterol and fasting blood glucose in men and women with metabolic syndrome when compared with subjects without metabolic syndrome. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in SMI women was higher than men. The most age distribution was in range of 30-39 years old. The most prevalence of metabolic syndrome was in age groups 50-59 years old. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was increased from 30 to 59 years old. Conclusion: The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in patients with SMI in Gorgan is almost similar to those observed in Asian countries. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was lower than western countries. These observations may be due to cultural differences in the region. It should be mention that the families of mental illness subjects in our country believe that their patients must be cared better than people without mental illness. These findings of this study suggest that mental illness patients are at risk of metabolic syndrome. According to our results, risk factors such as age and gender differences may play an important role in the presence of metabolic syndrome. In our country, women do less

  1. Nomenclature for renal replacement therapy and blood purification techniques in critically ill patients: practical applications.

    PubMed

    Villa, Gianluca; Neri, Mauro; Bellomo, Rinaldo; Cerda, Jorge; De Gaudio, A Raffaele; De Rosa, Silvia; Garzotto, Francesco; Honore, Patrick M; Kellum, John; Lorenzin, Anna; Payen, Didier; Ricci, Zaccaria; Samoni, Sara; Vincent, Jean-Louis; Wendon, Julia; Zaccaria, Marta; Ronco, Claudio

    2016-10-10

    This article reports the conclusions of the second part of a consensus expert conference on the nomenclature of renal replacement therapy (RRT) techniques currently utilized to manage acute kidney injury and other organ dysfunction syndromes in critically ill patients. A multidisciplinary approach was taken to achieve harmonization of definitions, components, techniques, and operations of the extracorporeal therapies. The article describes the RRT techniques in detail with the relevant technology, procedures, and phases of treatment and key aspects of volume management/fluid balance in critically ill patients. In addition, the article describes recent developments in other extracorporeal therapies, including therapeutic plasma exchange, multiple organ support therapy, liver support, lung support, and blood purification in sepsis. This is a consensus report on nomenclature harmonization in extracorporeal blood purification therapies, such as hemofiltration, plasma exchange, multiple organ support therapies, and blood purification in sepsis.

  2. Chloride toxicity in critically ill patients: What's the evidence?

    PubMed

    Soussi, Sabri; Ferry, Axelle; Chaussard, Maité; Legrand, Matthieu

    2016-07-28

    Crystalloids have become the fluid of choice in critically ill patients and in the operating room both for fluid resuscitation and fluid maintenance. Among crystalloids, NaCl 0.9% has been the most widely used fluid. However, emerging evidence suggests that administration of 0.9% saline could be harmful mainly through high chloride content and that the use of fluid with low chloride content may be preferable in major surgery and intensive care patients. Administration of NaCl 0.9% is the leading cause of metabolic hyperchloraemic acidosis in critically ill patients and side effects might target coagulation, renal function, and ultimately increase mortality. More balanced solutions therefore may be used especially when large amount of fluids are administered in high-risk patients. In this review, we discuss physiological background favouring the use of balanced solutions as well as the most recent clinical data regarding the use of crystalloid solutions in critically ill patients and patients undergoing major surgery.

  3. Studying nursing interventions in acutely ill, cognitively impaired older adults

    PubMed Central

    McCauley, Kathleen; Bradway, Christine; Hirschman, Karen B; Naylor, Mary D

    2015-01-01

    Background Between one and two of every five hospitalized older adults have cognitive deficits, often not accurately assessed or well managed. Cognitive impairment adds substantially to the complexity of these patients’ care, places them at high risk for poor outcomes and increases the cost of health care. Methods We describe three evidence-based interventions, each capitalizing on the unique contributions of nurses and designed to improve outcomes of hospitalized older adults who have cognitive deficits. Interventions of varying intensity were compared across three hospitals (Phase I) and subsequently within the same hospitals (Phase II). All enrolled patients were screened during their index hospitalizations and cognitive deficits were communicated to relevant health care team members (Augmented Standard Care-ASC, lowest intensity). At one hospital, ASC was the only intervention. Patients at a second hospital also had care influenced by specially prepared registered nurses (Resource Nurse Care-RNC, medium intensity). Finally, patients at third hospital also received advanced practice nurse coordinated care (Transitional Care Model-TCM, higher intensity). In Phase II, newly enrolled patients at these same hospitals all received the TCM. We summarize major themes from review of multiple data sources and researcher recollections related to facilitators and barriers to implementing a complex research study. Findings Effective implementation of the three intervention strategies depended on clinician engagement and communication; degree of participation by nurses in the educational program with subsequent practice improvement; and success of advanced practice nurses in implementing the TCM with both with patients, family caregivers and clinicians. Implications Based on lessons learned in implementing complex research studies within the “real world” of clinical practice settings, recommendations focus on strengthening facilitators, minimizing barriers and gaining

  4. Development and application of an enzyme immunoassay for coronavirus OC43 antibody in acute respiratory illness.

    PubMed Central

    Gill, E P; Dominguez, E A; Greenberg, S B; Atmar, R L; Hogue, B G; Baxter, B D; Couch, R B

    1994-01-01

    Study of coronavirus OC43 infections has been limited because of the lack of sensitive cell culture systems and serologic assays. To improve this circumstance, we developed an indirect enzyme immunoassay (EIA) to detect serum antibody to OC43. Antigen (100 ng) prepared by polyethylene glycol precipitation provided optimal results without a postcoat procedure. Evaluation of intraplate variation indicated that a > or = 2.5-fold increase in serum titer was significant. Sixteen of 18 (89%) paired serum samples with previously identified, reproducible increases in the level of hemagglutination inhibition (HAI) antibody to OC43 also showed significant increases as detected by EIA. Specificity for the EIA was established with paired sera obtained from persons given influenza immunizations or experiencing a respiratory infection. No rise in antibody titers occurred among 33 persons with documented coronavirus 229E infection. EIA was then performed on each of 419 paired serum samples from ambulatory chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients and healthy older adults, from asthmatic adults presenting for emergency room treatment, and from persons hospitalized with acute respiratory symptoms. Twenty-three antibody rises to OC43 were detected; only nine of these were detected by the HAI test, and the HAI test did not detect any increases in antibody titers that were not detected by EIA. Nineteen of 25 coronavirus OC43 infections for which a month of infection could be assigned occurred between November and February. Overall, 4.4% of acute respiratory illnesses in the studied populations were associated with a coronavirus OC43 infection. PMID:7814468

  5. How music-inspired weeping can help terminally ill patients.

    PubMed

    Norton, Kay

    2011-09-01

    Music's power to improve the 'human condition' has been acknowledged since ancient times. Something as counter-intuitive as weeping in response to music can ameliorate suffering for a time even for terminally ill patients. Several benefits-including catharsis, communication, and experiencing vitality-can be associated with grieving in response to "sad" music. In addressing the potential rewards of such an activity for terminally ill patients, this author combines concepts from philosopher Jerrold R. Levinson's article, entitled "Music and Negative Emotion," an illustration from a major motion picture, and supporting research from medical reports and aesthetic writings. Carefully offering this experience is recommended for patients who retain the capacity to express preference.

  6. Nonprofessional Care in Chronic Critically Ill Patient: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Dehkordi, Leila Mardanian; Babashahi, Monireh; Irajpour, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Decision-making about patients with critical condition transfer from Intensive Care Unit to the general wards be delegated to their families. The aim of the study was explaining the experiences of family caregiver's about care of chronic critically ill patient. Methods: This study was conducted with a qualitative content analysis using unstructured interview. Participants were selected purposively from May 2014 to May 2015 and data collection continued until data saturation. Analysis was based on conventional content analysis. Results: Participants’ experiences classified into three main categories as following: nonprofessional care, enhancing factors of care, and inhibiting factors of care. Conclusions: Finding of the current study showed different aspects of care. Care of chronic critically ill patients is a long-term process that affected by different factors. It seems that the exploration of caregivers needs and planning supportive interventions based on their needs improve the quality of care. PMID:28028426

  7. "Feelings are facts": illness perceptions in patients with lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Hoogerwerf, M A; Ninaber, M K; Willems, L N A; Kaptein, A A

    2012-08-01

    Given the high degree of psychosocial problems in patients with lung cancer, quality medical care would benefit from exploring and addressing and providing potential solutions for these problems. Patients with recently diagnosed non-small-cell lung cancer filled out a questionnaire that assessed illness perceptions and made a drawing of how they perceived their diseased lungs look. They also participated in an interview about the impact of lung cancer in their lives. Scores on the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire indicated that patients score low on 'concern', 'emotional response' and 'timeline', indicating they hope to be cured from lung cancer. Patients drew the tumor larger than it is on the chest radiograph. The drawings are moderately accurate representations of the patients' lungs. In the interviews patients often expressed their hopes of being cured and how thinking positively would help. Patients who made a more accurate drawing of their lungs had less optimistic views about their prognosis. These views are more in line with the prognosis their physician would give them. However, few patients made an accurate drawing. This study contributes to a better insight into what patients believe and feel about their disease. Suggestions for taking patient perceptions into account are provided.

  8. Magnitude and distribution of acute, self-reported gastrointestinal illness in a Canadian community.

    PubMed Central

    Majowicz, S. E.; Doré, K.; Flint, J. A.; Edge, V. L.; Read, S.; Buffett, M. C.; McEwen, S.; McNab, W. B.; Stacey, D.; Sockett, P.; Wilson, J. B.

    2004-01-01

    To estimate the magnitude and distribution of self-reported, acute gastrointestinal illness in a Canadian-based population, we conducted a retrospective, cross-sectional telephone survey of approximately 3500 randomly selected residents of the city of Hamilton (Ontario, Canada) from February 2001 to February 2002. The observed monthly prevalence was 10% (95 % CI 9.94-10.14) and the incidence rate was 1.3 (95 % CI 1.1-1.4) episodes per person-year; this is within the range of estimates from other developed countries. The prevalence was higher in females and in those aged < 10 years and 20-24 years. Overall, prevalence peaked in April and October, but a different temporal distribution was observed for those aged < 10 years. Although these data were derived from one community, they demonstrate that the epidemiology of acute gastrointestinal illness in a Canadian-based population is similar to that reported for other developed countries. PMID:15310162

  9. Acute Nonoccupational Pesticide-Related Illness and Injury - United States, 2007-2011.

    PubMed

    Namulanda, Gonza; Monti, Michele M; Mulay, Prakash; Higgins, Sheila; Lackovic, Michelle; Schwartz, Abby; Prado, Joanne Bonnar; Waltz, Justin; Mitchell, Yvette; Calvert, Geoffrey M

    2016-10-14

    CDC's National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) collects data on acute pesticide-related illness and injury reported by 12 states (California, Florida, Iowa, Louisiana, Michigan, North Carolina, Nebraska, New Mexico, New York, Oregon, Texas, and Washington). This report summarizes the data on illnesses and injuries arising from nonoccupational exposure to conventional pesticides that were reported during 2007-2011. Conventional pesticides include insecticides, herbicides, fungicides, and fumigants. They exclude disinfectants (e.g., chlorine and hypochlorites) and biological pesticides (1). This report is a part of the Summary of Notifiable Noninfectious Conditions and Disease Outbreaks - United States, which encompasses various surveillance years but is being published in 2016 (2). The Summary of Notifiable Noninfectious Conditions and Disease Outbreaks appears in the same volume of MMWR as the annual Summary of Notifiable Infectious Diseases (3). In a separate report, data on illnesses and injuries from occupational exposure to conventional pesticides during 2007-2011 are summarized (4).

  10. Assessment of patient satisfaction of mentally ill patients hospitalized in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Thapinta, Darawan; Anders, Robert L; Wiwatkunupakan, Srinuan; Kitsumban, Voranut; Vadtanapong, Siriluck

    2004-12-01

    Psychiatric patients' satisfaction with their hospital care has not been reported in the Western literature. The concept of asking psychiatric patients about their perceptions of care is relatively new. The purpose of the present investigation was to assess the satisfaction of the care received by a group of acutely mentally ill hospitalized Thai patients. This post-test design examined a random sample of 182 persons hospitalized between 1 March 2000 and 31 July 2000. Using a validated Perception of Care instrument, research assistants assessed patient satisfaction. Patients rated the care as average with none of the items achieving a very good or excellent score. The lowest scoring items were receiving information about their rights, consistency of information provided, and the ease of obtaining information. Women tended to be more satisfied with care as were patients over the age of 55 years (P = 0.02). Patients with a diagnosis of schizophrenia were more satisfied with the care than other patients (P = 0.05). It is unknown if satisfaction levels are similar in other institutions in Thailand. None of the areas received excellent or very good ratings. The findings of this study were shared with the staff at the study site. There appears to be a need to develop performance improvement activities designed to address the areas identified as needing improvement. Replication of this study in other Thailand sites would provide an opportunity for agencies to benchmark their findings. By consenting to be a part of this study the staff and patients have taken a positive step forward to improve patient satisfaction with care.

  11. Coping strategies of rural families of critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Hunsucker, S; Flannery, J; Frank, D

    2000-04-01

    This study explored the coping strategies of families of critically ill patients in a rural Southern Appalachian setting. A convenience sample of 30 family members of 22 critically ill patients in two rural hospitals completed the Jaloweic Coping Scale. The five most frequently used coping methods were helping, thinking positively, worrying about the problem, trying to find out more about the problem and trying to handle things one step at a time. The five most effective coping strategies were talking the problem over with friends, praying, thinking about the good things in life, trying to handle things one step at a time and trying to see the good side of the situation. Findings contradicted many of the more "negative" descriptions of Appalachian people in the literature. Similarities outweighed differences when comparing the coping styles of rural and urban populations. Findings suggest that coping strategies must be considered for positive outcomes in the delivery of care to such a rural population.

  12. Lactate and lactate clearance in acute cardiac care patients

    PubMed Central

    Lazzeri, Chiara; Picariello, Claudio; Dini, Carlotta Sorini; Gensini, Gian Franco; Valente, Serafina

    2012-01-01

    Hyperlactataemia is commonly used as a diagnostic and prognostic tool in intensive care settings. Recent studies documented that serial lactate measurements over time (or lactate clearance), may be clinically more reliable than lactate absolute value for risk stratification in different pathological conditions. While the negative prognostic role of hyperlactataemia in several critical ill diseases (such as sepsis and trauma) is well established, data in patients with acute cardiac conditions (i.e. acute coronary syndromes) are scarce and controversial. The present paper provides an overview of the current available evidence on the clinical role of lactic acid levels and lactate clearance in acute cardiac settings (acute coronary syndromes, cardiogenic shock, cardiac surgery), focusing on its prognostic role. PMID:24062898

  13. Care of the acutely ill adult - an essential guide for nurses Fiona Creed Care of the acutely ill adult - an essential guide for nurses and Christine Spiers (Eds) Oxford University Press 576pp £27.95 978 0 19 956438 5 0199564388 [Formula: see text].

    PubMed

    2011-06-08

    This guide is an invaluable resource for nurses and nursing students. It contains the key information to update and review the essential knowledge and skills needed to recognise the acutely ill patient and to respond accordingly. The essential link between a sound theory base and delivery of effective care is clearly and practically demonstrated throughout.

  14. Possible induction of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM)-like demyelinating illness by intrathecal mesenchymal stem cell injection.

    PubMed

    Kishk, Nirmeen A; Abokrysha, Noha T; Gabr, Hala

    2013-02-01

    We report a 27-year-old woman with an episode of encephalitis and optic neuritis, followed by autologous bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplants and possible induction of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis-like demyelinating illness.

  15. Illness perception differences between Russian- and Hebrew-speaking Israeli oncology patients.

    PubMed

    Popov, Nadia; Heruti, Irit; Levy, Sigal; Lulav-Grinwald, Doron; Bar-Sela, Gil

    2014-03-01

    Illness perception influences health and illness behaviors. This study was designed to estimate illness perception differences between Russian-speaking and Hebrew-speaking Israeli oncology patients. Changes in illness perception associated with time spent in Israel among Russian-speaking patients were also evaluated. Additionally, we evaluated differences in illness perception of patients exposed to Chernobyl's consequences. A total of 144 oncology patients (77 Hebrew-speaking, 67 Russian-speaking) completed personal data questionnaires and The illness perception questionnaire revised, translated into Russian for this study. Significantly more Russian-speaking oncology patients perceived their illness as chronic and having negative consequences on life (p < .01). Russian-speaking oncology patients tend to have a more negative perception of cancer compared to Hebrew-speaking patients. Time spent in Israel may create more positive perceptions of cancer among these patients. No illness perception differences were found concerning Chernobyl consequences.

  16. Acute undifferentiated febrile illness in rural Cambodia: a 3-year prospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Tara C; Siv, Sovannaroth; Khim, Nimol; Kim, Saorin; Fleischmann, Erna; Ariey, Frédéric; Buchy, Philippe; Guillard, Bertrand; González, Iveth J; Christophel, Eva-Maria; Abdur, Rashid; von Sonnenburg, Frank; Bell, David; Menard, Didier

    2014-01-01

    In the past decade, malaria control has been successfully implemented in Cambodia, leading to a substantial decrease in reported cases. Wide-spread use of malaria rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) has revealed a large burden of malaria-negative fever cases, for which no clinical management guidelines exist at peripheral level health facilities. As a first step towards developing such guidelines, a 3-year cross-sectional prospective observational study was designed to investigate the causes of acute malaria-negative febrile illness in Cambodia. From January 2008 to December 2010, 1193 febrile patients and 282 non-febrile individuals were recruited from three health centers in eastern and western Cambodia. Malaria RDTs and routine clinical examination were performed on site by health center staff. Venous samples and nasopharyngeal throat swabs were collected and analysed by molecular diagnostic tests. Blood cultures and blood smears were also taken from all febrile individuals. Molecular testing was applied for malaria parasites, Leptospira, Rickettsia, O. tsutsugamushi, Dengue- and Influenza virus. At least one pathogen was identified in 73.3% (874/1193) of febrile patient samples. Most frequent pathogens detected were P. vivax (33.4%), P. falciparum (26.5%), pathogenic Leptospira (9.4%), Influenza viruses (8.9%), Dengue viruses (6.3%), O. tsutsugamushi (3.9%), Rickettsia (0.2%), and P. knowlesi (0.1%). In the control group, a potential pathogen was identified in 40.4%, most commonly malaria parasites and Leptospira. Clinic-based diagnosis of malaria RDT-negative cases was poorly predictive for pathogen and appropriate treatment. Additional investigations are needed to understand their impact on clinical disease and epidemiology, and the possible role of therapies such as doxycycline, since many of these pathogens were seen in non-febrile subjects.

  17. Acute Undifferentiated Febrile Illness in Rural Cambodia: A 3-Year Prospective Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Tara C.; Siv, Sovannaroth; Khim, Nimol; Kim, Saorin; Fleischmann, Erna; Ariey, Frédéric; Buchy, Philippe; Guillard, Bertrand; González, Iveth J.; Christophel, Eva-Maria; Abdur, Rashid; von Sonnenburg, Frank; Bell, David; Menard, Didier

    2014-01-01

    In the past decade, malaria control has been successfully implemented in Cambodia, leading to a substantial decrease in reported cases. Wide-spread use of malaria rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) has revealed a large burden of malaria-negative fever cases, for which no clinical management guidelines exist at peripheral level health facilities. As a first step towards developing such guidelines, a 3-year cross-sectional prospective observational study was designed to investigate the causes of acute malaria-negative febrile illness in Cambodia. From January 2008 to December 2010, 1193 febrile patients and 282 non-febrile individuals were recruited from three health centers in eastern and western Cambodia. Malaria RDTs and routine clinical examination were performed on site by health center staff. Venous samples and nasopharyngeal throat swabs were collected and analysed by molecular diagnostic tests. Blood cultures and blood smears were also taken from all febrile individuals. Molecular testing was applied for malaria parasites, Leptospira, Rickettsia, O. tsutsugamushi, Dengue- and Influenza virus. At least one pathogen was identified in 73.3% (874/1193) of febrile patient samples. Most frequent pathogens detected were P. vivax (33.4%), P. falciparum (26.5%), pathogenic Leptospira (9.4%), Influenza viruses (8.9%), Dengue viruses (6.3%), O. tsutsugamushi (3.9%), Rickettsia (0.2%), and P. knowlesi (0.1%). In the control group, a potential pathogen was identified in 40.4%, most commonly malaria parasites and Leptospira. Clinic-based diagnosis of malaria RDT-negative cases was poorly predictive for pathogen and appropriate treatment. Additional investigations are needed to understand their impact on clinical disease and epidemiology, and the possible role of therapies such as doxycycline, since many of these pathogens were seen in non-febrile subjects. PMID:24755844

  18. Diagnosing phaeochromocytoma/paraganglioma in a patient presenting with critical illness: biochemistry versus imaging.

    PubMed

    Amar, Laurence; Eisenhofer, Graeme

    2015-09-01

    Phaeochromocytomas and paragangliomas (PPGLs) are revealed by acute cardiovascular complications involving end-organ damage in up to 20% of cases, a presentation associated with particularly high risk for mortality. Among such cases, PPGLs should be considered in patients with unexplained left ventricular failure, multi-organ failure, hypertensive crises or shock. The diagnosis of PPGL commonly relies on measurements of metanephrines in plasma or urine. However, acute critical illness is usually associated with sympathoadrenal activation. Thus, levels of metanephrines in patients in an acute emergency or intensive care setting, whether treated or not with vasoactive drugs, usually cannot be used to reliably diagnose PPGL. Delays in provision of diagnostic test results, particularly when these require 24-h urine collections, may also be incompatible for any need for rapid decisions on patient management or therapeutic interventions. The acute emergency situation therefore represents one exception to the rule where imaging studies to search for a PPGL may be undertaken without biochemical evidence of a catecholamine-producing tumour.

  19. Concepts of trust among patients with serious illness.

    PubMed

    Mechanic, D; Meyer, S

    2000-09-01

    This paper examines conceptions of trust among three groups of respondents diagnosed with either breast cancer, Lyme disease or mental illness. Interviews were carried out using an open-ended interview guide to explore how patients made assessments of trust in their doctors and health care plans. The guide followed a conceptual approach that asked questions about competence, agency/fiduciary responsibility, control, disclosure and confidentiality. Respondents were given ample opportunity to raise other areas of concern. The data were organized using the NUDIST software package for the analysis of non-numerical and unstructured qualitative data. Patients viewed trust as an iterative process and commonly tested their physicians against their knowledge and expectations. Interpersonal competence, involving caring, concern and compassion, was the most common aspect of trust reported, with listening as a central focus. Most patient comments referred to learnable skills and not simply to personality characteristics. Technical competence also received high priority but was often assessed by reputation or interpersonal cues. Patients were much concerned that doctors be their agents and fight for their interests with health care plans. Disclosure and confidentiality were less common concerns; most patients anticipated that doctors would be honest with them and respect their confidences. Patients' responses also appeared to vary by their disease, their socio-demographic characteristics, their involvement with self-help groups, and how their illness conditions unfolded.

  20. Acute Neurological Illness in a Kidney Transplant Recipient Following Infection With Enterovirus-D68: An Emerging Infection?

    PubMed

    Wali, R K; Lee, A H; Kam, J C; Jonsson, J; Thatcher, A; Poretz, D; Ambardar, S; Piper, J; Lynch, C; Kulkarni, S; Cochran, J; Djurkovic, S

    2015-12-01

    We report the first case of enterovirus-D68 infection in an adult living-donor kidney transplant recipient who developed rapidly progressive bulbar weakness and acute flaccid limb paralysis following an upper respiratory infection. We present a 45-year-old gentleman who underwent pre-emptive living-donor kidney transplantation for IgA nephropathy. Eight weeks following transplantation, he developed an acute respiratory illness from enterovirus/rhinovirus that was detectable in nasopharyngeal (NP) swabs. Within 24 h of onset of respiratory symptoms, the patient developed binocular diplopia which rapidly progressed to multiple cranial nerve dysfunctions (acute bulbar syndrome) over the next 24 h. Within the next 48 h, asymmetric flaccid paralysis of the left arm and urinary retention developed. While his neurological symptoms were evolving, the Centers for Disease Control reported that the enterovirus strain from the NP swabs was, in fact, Enterovirus-D68 (EV-D68). Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain demonstrated unique gray matter and anterior horn cell changes in the midbrain and spinal cord, respectively. Constellation of these neurological symptoms and signs was suggestive for postinfectious encephalomyelitis (acute disseminated encephalomyelitis [ADEM]) from EV-D68. Treatment based on the principles of ADEM included intensive physical therapy and other supportive measures, which resulted in a steady albeit slow improvement in his left arm and bulbar weakness, while maintaining stable allograft function.

  1. Enteral nutrition intolerance in critically ill septic burn patients.

    PubMed

    Lavrentieva, Athina; Kontakiotis, Theodore; Bitzani, Militsa

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the frequency of enteral feeding intolerance in critically ill septic burn patients, the effect of enteral feeding intolerance on the efficacy of feeding, the correlation between the infection marker (procalcitonin [PCT]) and the nutrition status marker (prealbumin) and the impact of feeding intolerance on the outcome of septic burn patients. From January 2009 to December 2012 the data of all burn patients with the diagnosis of sepsis who were placed on enteral nutrition were analyzed. Septic patients were divided into two groups: group A, septic patients who developed feeding intolerance; group B, septic patients who did not develop feeding intolerance. Demographic and clinical characteristics of patients were analyzed and compared. The diagnosis of sepsis was applied to 29% of all patients. Of these patients 35% developed intolerance to enteral feeding throughout the septic period. A statistically significant increase in mean PCT level and a decrease in prealbumin level was observed during the sepsis period. Group A patients had statistically significant lower mean caloric intake, higher PCT:prealbumin ratio, higher pneumonia incidence, higher Sequential Organ Failure Assessment Maximum Score, a longer duration of mechanical ventilation, and a higher mortality rate in comparison with the septic patients without gastric feeding intolerance. The authors concluded that a high percentage of septic burn patients developed enteral feeding intolerance. Enteral feeding intolerance seems to have a negative impact on the patients' nutritional status, morbidity, and mortality.

  2. Enteral nutrition in the hemodynamically unstable critically ill patient.

    PubMed

    Flordelís Lasierra, J L; Pérez-Vela, J L; Montejo González, J C

    2015-01-01

    The benefit of enteral nutrition in critically ill patients has been demonstrated by several studies, especially when it is started early, in the first 24-48h of stay in the Intensive Care Unit, and this practice is currently advised by the main clinical guidelines. The start of enteral nutrition is controversial in patients with hemodynamic failure, since it may trigger intestinal ischemia. However, there are data from experimental studies in animals, as well as from observational studies in humans that allow for hypotheses regarding its beneficial effect and safety. Interventional clinical trials are needed to confirm these findings.

  3. Nutrient stimulation of mesenteric blood flow - implications for older critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thu AN; Abdelhamid, Yasmine Ali; Phillips, Liza K; Chapple, Leeanne S; Horowitz, Michael; Jones, Karen L; Deane, Adam M

    2017-01-01

    Nutrient ingestion induces a substantial increase in mesenteric blood flow. In older persons (aged ≥ 65 years), particularly those with chronic medical conditions, the cardiovascular compensatory response may be inadequate to maintain systemic blood pressure during mesenteric blood pooling, leading to postprandial hypotension. In older ambulatory persons, postprandial hypotension is an important pathophysiological condition associated with an increased propensity for syncope, falls, coronary vascular events, stroke and death. In older critically ill patients, the administration of enteral nutrition acutely increases mesenteric blood flow, but whether this pathophysiological response is protective, or precipitates mesenteric ischaemia, is unknown. There are an increasing number of older patients surviving admission to intensive care units, who are likely to be at increased risk of postprandial hypotension, both during, and after, their stay in hospital. In this review, we describe the prevalence, impact and mechanisms of postprandial hypotension in older people and provide an overview of the impact of postprandial hypotension on feeding prescriptions in older critically ill patients. Finally, we provide evidence that postprandial hypotension is likely to be an unrecognised problem in older survivors of critical illness and discuss potential options for management. PMID:28224105

  4. The ABO Histo-Blood Group and AKI in Critically Ill Patients with Trauma or Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Brian J.; Mangalmurti, Nilam S.; Nguyen, Tam D.; Holena, Daniel N.; Wu, Qufei; Nguyen, Ethan T.; Reilly, Muredach P.; Lanken, Paul N.; Christie, Jason D.; Meyer, Nuala J.; Shashaty, Michael G.S.

    2015-01-01

    Background and objective ABO blood types are determined by antigen modifications on glycoproteins and glycolipids and associated with altered plasma levels of inflammatory and endothelial injury markers implicated in AKI pathogenesis. We sought to determine the association of ABO blood types with AKI risk in critically ill patients with trauma or sepsis. Design, setting, participants, & measurements We conducted two prospective cohort studies at an urban, academic, level I trauma center and tertiary referral center; 497 patients with trauma admitted to the surgical intensive care unit between 2005 and 2010 with an injury severity score >15 and 759 patients with severe sepsis admitted to the medical intensive care unit between 2008 and 2013 were followed for 6 days for the development of incident AKI. AKI was defined by Acute Kidney Injury Network creatinine and dialysis criteria. Results Of 497 patients with trauma, 134 developed AKI (27%). In multivariable analysis, blood type A was associated with higher AKI risk relative to type O among patients of European descent (n=229; adjusted risk, 0.28 versus 0.14; risk difference, 0.14; 95% confidence interval, 0.03 to 0.24; P=0.02). Of 759 patients with sepsis, AKI developed in 326 (43%). Blood type A again conferred higher AKI risk relative to type O among patients of European descent (n=437; adjusted risk, 0.53 versus 0.40; risk difference, 0.14; 95% confidence interval, 0.04 to 0.23; P=0.01). Findings were similar when analysis was restricted to those patients who did not develop acute respiratory distress syndrome or were not transfused. We did not detect a significant association between blood type and AKI risk among individuals of African descent in either cohort. Conclusions Blood type A is independently associated with AKI risk in critically ill patients with trauma or severe sepsis of European descent, suggesting a role for ABO glycans in AKI susceptibility. PMID:26342043

  5. Evaluation of Care Provided to Terminally Ill Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loomis, Margaret T.; Williams, T. Franklin

    1983-01-01

    Studied the quality of terminal care in 40 patients in an acute care facility and a chronic care facility. Minimial difficulty was observed in making the transition from active to comfort care. An evaluation method and a model of terminal care emphasizing improved communication and emotional support are proposed. (Author/JAC)

  6. The Saudi clinical practice guideline for the prophylaxis of venous thromboembolism in medical and critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hameed, Fahad M.; Al-Dorzi, Hasan M.; Abdelaal, Mohamed A.; Alaklabi, Ali; Bakhsh, Ebtisam; Alomi, Yousef A.; Baik, Mohammad Al; Aldahan, Salah; Schünemann, Holger; Brozek, Jan; Wiercioch, Wojtek; Darzi, Andrea J.; Waziry, Reem; Akl, Elie A.

    2016-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) acquired during hospitalization is common, yet preventable by the proper implementation of thromboprophylaxis which remains to be underutilized worldwide. As a result of an initiative by the Saudi Ministry of Health to improve medical practices in the country, an expert panel led by the Saudi Association for Venous Thrombo Embolism (SAVTE; a subsidiary of the Saudi Thoracic Society) with the methodological guidance of the McMaster University Guideline working group, produced this clinical practice guideline to assist healthcare providers in VTE prevention. The expert part panel issued ten recommendations addressing 10 prioritized questions in the following areas: thromboprophylaxis in acutely ill medical patients (Recommendations 1-5), thromboprophylaxis in critically ill medical patients (Recommendations 6-9), and thromboprophylaxis in chronically ill patients (Recommendation 10). The corresponding recommendations were generated following the GRADE (Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation) approach. PMID:27761572

  7. Acute, Severe Cryptosporidiosis in an Immunocompetent Pediatric Patient

    PubMed Central

    Tallant, Caitlin; Huddleston, Patrick; Alshanberi, Asim

    2016-01-01

    Severe diarrheal illness in children can be attributed to a number of different microbiological agents. Without appropriate microbiological testing of stool samples, patients who present with multiple days of severe diarrhea might have a delay in proper diagnosis and treatment. Here, we report a case of an immunocompetent pediatric patient presenting with acute cryptosporidiosis. Humans and bovine species are known hosts of cryptosporidium and several studies have evaluated the zoonotic transmission of cryptosporidium from cattle to humans. Adding diagnostic tests for cryptosporidium like Ziehl-Neelsen staining of stool or fecal rapid antigen detection techniques should be considered in the workup of patients presenting with undifferentiated, severe diarrheal illness, especially in those who have close contact with livestock. PMID:27478580

  8. IGF-I concentration and changes in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Hajsadeghi, Shokoufeh; Khamseh, Mohammad Ebrahim; Gholami, Saeid; Kerman, Scott Reza Jafarian; Gohardehi, Golnar; Moghadam, Negar Seifi; Sabet, Azade Shafiee; Moradi, Masoud; Mollahoseini, Reza; Najafi, Mehri; Keramati, Mohammad Reza

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-I) is an anabolic growth factor that affects nitrogen balance and its changing trend is not clearly understood in critically ill patients. This study was carried out to evaluate the association between serum IGF-I levels and its changing trend in critically ill patients. METHODS: In this nested case-control study, all consecutive patients admitted to the medical ICU of Rasoul-e-Akram and Firuzgar hospital (Tehran, Iran) from January through October 2008 were included. IGF1 concentration was measured within the first 24h of ICU admission and the fourth, seventh and tenth day since admission. Patients were followed until discharge from ICU or expiration. RESULTS: The study population consisted of 90 patients (mean age: 58.01 ± 22.56), 31 (34.4%) of who died and 59 (65.6%) were discharged. On admission, 43 patients (47.7%) had low IGF-I levels, whereas 47 (52.3%) had normal or high levels. The concentration of IGF-I was not significantly different in every 4 measurements between expired and discharged patients. Significant decrease was seen between first to fourth day IGF-I concentration (p = 0.005). Changing trend was not statistically different in two groups of patients. CONCLUSIONS: There was no relation between low IGF-I concentration on admission day and increased adverse outcome, but overall these patients had lower IGF1. No clear association was found between changing trend of IGF1 and mortality. Stress on admission time may cause decreasing pattern of IGF-I in the first 4 days of admission. PMID:22091227

  9. Acute viral hepatitis E presenting with haemolytic anaemia and acute renal failure in a patient with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Tomar, Laxmikant Ramkumarsingh; Aggarwal, Amitesh; Jain, Piyush; Rajpal, Surender; Agarwal, Mukul P

    2015-10-01

    The association of acute hepatitis E viral (HEV) infection with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency leading to extensive intravascular haemolysis is a very rare clinical entity. Here we discuss such a patient, who presented with acute HEV illness, developed severe intravascular haemolysis and unusually high levels of bilirubin, complicated by acute renal failure (ARF), and was later on found to have a deficiency of G6PD. The patient recovered completely with haemodialysis and supportive management.

  10. Clinical associations of host genetic variations in the genes of cytokines in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Belopolskaya, O B; Smelaya, T V; Moroz, V V; Golubev, A M; Salnikova, L E

    2015-06-01

    Host genetic variations may influence a changing profile of biochemical markers and outcome in patients with trauma/injury. The objective of this study was to assess clinical associations of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the genes of cytokines in critically ill patients. A total of 430 patients were genotyped for SNPs in the genes of pro- (IL1B, IL6, IL8) and anti-inflammatory (IL4, IL10, IL13) cytokines. The main end-points were sepsis, mortality and adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We evaluated the dynamic levels of bilirubin, blood urea nitrogen, creatine kinase, creatinine and lactate dehydrogenase in five points of measurements (between 1 and 14 days after admission) and correlated them with SNPs. High-producing alleles of proinflammatory cytokines protected patients against sepsis (IL1B -511A and IL8 -251A) and mortality (IL1B -511A). High-producing alleles of anti-inflammatory cytokines IL4 -589T and IL13 431A (144Gln) were less frequent in ARDS patients. The carriers of IL6 -174C/C genotypes were prone to the increased levels of biochemical markers and acute kidney and liver insufficiency. Genotype-dependent differences in the levels of biochemical indicators gradually increased to a maximal value on the 14th day after admission. These findings suggest that genetic variability in pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines may contribute to different clinical phenotypes in patients at high risk of critical illness.

  11. Terminally ill cancer patients' wish to hasten death.

    PubMed

    Kelly, B; Burnett, P; Pelusi, D; Badger, S; Varghese, F; Robertson, M

    2002-07-01

    This exploratory study investigated factors associated with the wish to hasten death among a sample of terminally ill cancer patients. Semi-structured interviews conducted on a total of 72 hospice and home palliative care patients were subjected to qualitative analysis using QSR-NUDIST. The main themes to emerge suggested that patients with a high wish to hasten death had greater concerns with physical symptoms and psychological suffering, perceived themselves to be more of a burden to others, and experienced higher levels of demoralization, while also reporting less confidence in symptom control, fewer social supports, less satisfaction with life experiences and fewer religious beliefs when compared with patients who had a moderate or no wish to hasten death. The implications of these findings will be discussed.

  12. Characteristics of patients with influenza-like illness, severe acture respiratory illness, and laboratory-confirmed influenza at a major children's hospital in Angola, 2009-2011.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Yolanda; Oliveira, Erika; Vasconcelos, Jocelyne; Cohen, Adam L; Francisco, Moises

    2012-12-15

    There are no published data on influenza trends in Angola, where pneumonia is a leading cause of death among young children. This study aims to describe the seasonal trends, types, and subtypes of influenza virus recovered from patients with respiratory illness who were admitted to the major children's hospital in Angola from May 2009 through April 2011. Nasal and oral swabs were collected from patients seen in the outpatient clinic with influenza-like illness (ILI) or hospitalized with severe acute respiratory illness (SARI) and tested for influenza virus by polymerase chain reaction assays. Of 691 samples collected, 334 (48%) were from case patients with ILI, and 357 (52%) were from case patients with SARI. Most (86%) of these children were <5 years of age. Thirty-nine samples (47% SARI, 53% outpatient) tested positive for influenza virus, including 2009 pandemic influenza A virus subtype H1N1 (A[H1N1]pdm09; n = 9), influenza A virus subtype H3, likely H3N2 (n = 12), and influenza B virus (n = 18). The proportion of specimens positive for influenza virus was 5% for ILI cases and 6% for SARI cases. After the peak of A(H1N1)pdm09 infection from May through September of 2009, additional peaks of ILI and SARI were seen, especially during February-April 2010. Influenza virus causes a small but preventable number of pneumonia cases among children in Angola.

  13. Focus on peripherally inserted central catheters in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Cotogni, Paolo; Pittiruti, Mauro

    2014-01-01

    Venous access devices are of pivotal importance for an increasing number of critically ill patients in a variety of disease states and in a variety of clinical settings (emergency, intensive care, surgery) and for different purposes (fluids or drugs infusions, parenteral nutrition, antibiotic therapy, hemodynamic monitoring, procedures of dialysis/apheresis). However, healthcare professionals are commonly worried about the possible consequences that may result using a central venous access device (CVAD) (mainly, bloodstream infections and thrombosis), both peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) and centrally inserted central catheters (CICCs). This review aims to discuss indications, insertion techniques, and care of PICCs in critically ill patients. PICCs have many advantages over standard CICCs. First of all, their insertion is easy and safe -due to their placement into peripheral veins of the arm- and the advantage of a central location of catheter tip suitable for all osmolarity and pH solutions. Using the ultrasound-guidance for the PICC insertion, the risk of hemothorax and pneumothorax can be avoided, as well as the possibility of primary malposition is very low. PICC placement is also appropriate to avoid post-procedural hemorrhage in patients with an abnormal coagulative state who need a CVAD. Some limits previously ascribed to PICCs (i.e., low flow rates, difficult central venous pressure monitoring, lack of safety for radio-diagnostic procedures, single-lumen) have delayed their start up in the intensive care units as common practice. Though, the recent development of power-injectable PICCs overcomes these technical limitations and PICCs have started to spread in critical care settings. Two important take-home messages may be drawn from this review. First, the incidence of complications varies depending on venous accesses and healthcare professionals should be aware of the different clinical performance as well as of the different risks

  14. [Pulmonary-renal crosstalk in the critically ill patient].

    PubMed

    Donoso F, Alejandro; Arriagada S, Daniela; Cruces R, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Despite advances in the development of renal replacement therapy, mortality of acute renal failure remains high, especially when occurring simultaneously with distant organic failure as it is in the case of the acute respiratory distress syndrome. In this update, birideccional deleterious relationship between lung and kidney on the setting of organ dysfunction is reviewed, which presents important clinical aspects of knowing. Specifically, the renal effects of acute respiratory distress syndrome and the use of positive-pressure mechanical ventilation are discussed, being ventilator induced lung injury one of the most common models for studying the lung-kidney crosstalk. The role of renal failure induced by mechanical ventilation (ventilator-induced kidney injury) in the pathogenesis of acute renal failure is emphasized. We also analyze the impact of the acute renal failure in the lung, recognizing an increase in pulmonary vascular permeability, inflammation, and alteration of sodium and water channels in the alveolar epithelial. This conceptual model can be the basis for the development of new therapeutic strategies to use in patients with multiple organ dysfunction syndrome.

  15. Caregivers' Illness Perceptions Contribute to Quality of Life in Head and Neck Cancer Patients at Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Amy E; Morton, Randall; Broadbent, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the contribution of patient and caregiver illness perceptions to the quality of life of head and neck cancer (HNC) patients. Ninety-eight patients and their caregivers (n = 80) completed questionnaires at diagnosis. Caregivers' illness perceptions were significantly more negative than patients with respect to consequences, timeline, treatment, concern, and the emotional impact of HNC. The interaction between some patient and caregiver illness perceptions explained additional variance in patient quality of life, above and beyond patients' own illness perceptions. These findings suggest that caregivers should be included in psychological interventions to improve HNC patient quality of life.

  16. Acute Monocytic Leukemia Masquerading Behçet's Disease-Like Illness at Onset in an Elderly Female

    PubMed Central

    Koba, Shigeru; Sekioka, Toshio; Takeda, Sorou; Miyagawa-Hayashino, Aya; Nishimura, Keisuke

    2016-01-01

    A previously healthy 74-year-old Japanese female was hospitalized with fever and high C-reactive protein. She developed palatal herpangina-like aphthous ulcers, localized intestinal wall thickening, terminal ileum ulcers, and an erythematous acneiform rash; thus Behçet's disease-like illness was suspected. Significant peripheral blood acute monocytosis developed during her hospitalization and acute monocytic leukemia (FAB M5b) with normal karyotype was diagnosed. By immunostaining, the infiltrating cells in the skin and the terminal ileum were identified as monocytic leukemic cells. This case exhibited a unique initial presentation of Behçet's disease-like illness associated with acute monocytic leukemia. PMID:27610252

  17. Inter-hospital transport of critically ill patients; expect surprises

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Inter-hospital transport of critically ill patients is increasing. When performed by specialized retrieval teams there are less adverse events compared to transport by ambulance. These transports are performed with technical equipment also used in an Intensive Care Unit (ICU). As a consequence technical problems may arise and have to be dealt with on the road. In this study, all technical problems encountered while transporting patients with our mobile intensive care unit service (MICU) were evaluated. Methods From March 2009 until August 2011 all transports were reviewed for technical problems. The cause, solution and, where relevant, its influence on protocol were stated. Results In this period of 30 months, 353 patients were transported. In total 55 technical problems were encountered. We provide examples of how they influenced transport and how they may be resolved. Conclusion The use of technical equipment is part of intensive care medicine. Wherever this kind of equipment is used, technical problems will occur. During inter-hospital transports, without extra personnel or technical assistance, the transport team is dependent on its own ability to resolve these problems. Therefore, we emphasize the importance of having some technical understanding of the equipment used and the importance of training to anticipate, prevent and resolve technical problems. Being an outstanding intensivist on the ICU does not necessarily mean being qualified for transporting the critically ill as well. Although these are lessons derived from inter-hospital transport, they may also apply to intra-hospital transport. PMID:22326110

  18. Powered intraosseous device (EZ-IO) for critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Oksan, Derinoz; Ayfer, Keles

    2013-07-01

    We reviewed the charts of 25 patients who underwent powered intraosseous line insertion between July 1, 2008 and August 31, 2010 to determine its users, indications, procedural details, success rates, and complications. Intraosseous (IO) line was inserted in the anteromedial aspect of the proximal tibia in all patients. The first attempt was successful in 80%, and the median duration for insertion of the IO line was 4 hours. Extravasation was the most common complication. Ninety-six percent of the physicians had undergone prior training in IO insertion. Because of its high success and short procedure time, IO access should be the first alternative to failed vascular access in critically ill children. Training in IO should be extended to all who care for pediatric patients in inpatient as well as in prehospital and emergency department settings.

  19. Caring for critically ill oldest old patients: a clinical review.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Nicola; Tibullo, Loredana; Landi, Emanuela; Carifi, Giovanni; Pirone, Alfonso; Pippo, Antonio; Alviggi, Immacolata; Tizzano, Renato; Salsano, Elisa; Di Grezia, Francesco; Vargas, Maria

    2016-10-19

    Despite technological advances, the mortality rate for critically ill oldest old patients remains high. The intensive caring should be able to combine technology and a deep humanity considering that the patients are living the last part of their lives. In addition to the traditional goals of ICU of reducing morbidity and mortality, of maintaining organ functions and restoring health, caring for seriously oldest old patients should take into account their end-of-life preferences, the advance or proxy directives if available, the prognosis, the communication, their life expectancy and the impact of multimorbidity. The aim of this review was to focus on all these aspects with an emphasis on some intensive procedures such as mechanical ventilation, noninvasive mechanical ventilation, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, renal replacement therapy, hemodynamic support, evaluation of delirium and malnutrition in this heterogeneous frail ICU population.

  20. Update in the management of critically ill burned patients.

    PubMed

    Lorente, J A; Amaya-Villar, R

    2016-01-01

    The management of critically ill burn patients is challenging. These patients have to be managed in specialized centers, where the expertise of physicians and nursing personnel guarantees the best treatment. Mortality of burn patients has improved over the past decades due to a better understanding of burn shock pathophysiology, optimal surgical management, infection control and nutritional support. Indeed, a more aggressive resuscitation, early excision and grafting, the judicious use of topical antibiotics, and the provision of an adequate calorie and protein intake are key to attain best survival results. General advances in critical care have also to be implemented, including protective ventilation, glycemic control, selective decontamination of the digestive tract, and implementation of sedation protocols.

  1. Concept analysis of good death in terminally ill patients.

    PubMed

    Granda-Cameron, Clara; Houldin, Arlene

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this concept analysis of good death was to examine the attributes of a good death and explore the changes of the concept over time and its impact on terminally ill patients. The method used for this analysis was the Rodgers' evolutionary method. A literature search was completed using Medline Ovid and Journal Storage (JSTOR).The findings describe the evolution of the good death concept over time from the prehistoric era followed by premodern, modern, and postmodern times. In addition, information is presented about surrogate terms, attributes, antecedents, and consequences associated with good death followed by analysis and discussion of the findings. General attributes of a good death include pain and symptom management, awareness of death, patient's dignity, family presence, family support, and communication among patient, family, and health care providers.

  2. Echocardiographic Hemodynamic Monitoring in the Critically Ill Patient

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Bermejo, Francisco J; Ruiz-Bailén, Manuel; Guerrero-De-Mier, Manuel; López-Álvaro, Julián

    2011-01-01

    Echocardiography has shown to be an essential diagnostic tool in the critically ill patient's assessment. In this scenario the initial fluid therapy, such as it is recommended in the actual clinical guidelines, not always provides the desired results and maintains a considerable incidence of cardiorrespiratory insufficiency. Echocardiography can council us on these patients' clinical handling, not only the initial fluid therapy but also on the best-suited election of the vasoactive/inotropic treatment and the early detection of complications. It contributes as well to improving the etiological diagnosis, allowing one to know the heart performance with more precision. The objective of this manuscript is to review the more important parameters that can assist the intensivist in theragnosis of hemodynamically unstable patients. PMID:22758613

  3. A critical appraisal of point-of-care coagulation testing in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Levi, M; Hunt, B J

    2015-11-01

    Derangement of the coagulation system is a common phenomenon in critically ill patients, who may present with severe bleeding and/or conditions associated with a prothrombotic state. Monitoring of this coagulopathy can be performed with conventional coagulation assays; however, point-of-care tests have become increasingly attractive, because not only do they yield a more rapid result than clinical laboratory testing, but they may also provide a more complete picture of the condition of the hemostatic system. There are many potential areas of study and applications of point-of-care hemostatic testing in critical care, including patients who present with massive blood loss, patients with a hypercoagulable state (such as in disseminated intravascular coagulation), and monitoring of antiplatelet treatment for acute arterial thrombosis, mostly acute coronary syndromes. However, the limitations of near-patient hemostatic testing has not been fully appreciated, and are discussed here. The currently available evidence indicates that point-of-care tests may be applied to guide appropriate blood product transfusion and the use of hemostatic agents to correct the hemostatic defect or to ameliorate antithrombotic treatment. Disappointingly, however, only in cardiac surgery is there adequate evidence to show that application of near-patient thromboelastography leads to an improvement in clinically relevant outcomes, such as reductions in bleeding-related morbidity and mortality, and cost-effectiveness. More research is required to validate the utility and cost-effectiveness of near-patient hemostatic testing in other areas, especially in traumatic bleeding and postpartum hemorrhage.

  4. [Quick guide to communicate important news to terminally ill patients].

    PubMed

    Ghio, P; Dell'Orco, L

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this work is to be able to publish the information concerning communication with cancer patients as recommended in England. The observation and the study protocol during the stay abroad have been given the opportunity to stylize specific information on the methodology of communication of important information to terminally ill patients. It seems readily apparent as they characterized by both technical precision and sensivity to emotions and descriptions for the individual patient. How is shared by all chronic pain is predominantly complex emotion, a mix of additions and perceived physical and emotional pain - emotional. Because accurate information is beneficial to the patient and that really is not turned, so to speak, a "bullet" it is necessary that you have created, over time, a concrete "therapeutic alliance" between body physician, patient and possibly family. This arises, for sure, even at first accepted the patient during the clinical visit attentive to detail, is renewed in the definition of the common objective to be achieved, so analgesia and it is expressed in the certainty that the physician provides all the resources realistically available. It is then up to the sensitivity of the operator, doctor and/or nurse, described in the "take charge" find, from time to time, the words and manners, verbal and nonverbal, to respond fully to questions of the patient same.

  5. Practice of strict glycemic control in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Marcus J; de Graaff, Mart J; Royakkers, Annic A N M; van Braam Houckgeest, Floris; van der Sluijs, Johannes P; Kieft, Hans; Spronk, Peter E

    2008-11-01

    Blood glucose control aiming at normoglycemia, frequently referred to as "strict glycemic control", decreases mortality and morbidity of critically ill patients. We searched the medical literature for export opinions, surveys, and clinical reports on blood glucose control in intensive care medicine. While strict glycemic control has been recommended standard of care for critically ill patients, the risk of severe hypoglycemia with strict glycemic control is frequently mentioned by experts. Some rationalize this risk, though others strongly point out the high incidence of hypoglycemia to be (one) reason not to perform strict glycemic control. Implementation of strict glycemic control is far from complete in intensive care units across the world. Frequently local guidelines accept higher blood glucose levels than those with strict glycemic control. Only a minority of retrieved manuscripts are on blood glucose regimens with the lower targets as with strict glycemic control. Hypoglycemia certainly is encountered with blood glucose control, in particular with strict glycemic control. Reports show intensive care-nurses can adequately and safely perform strict glycemic control. Implementation of strict glycemic control is far from complete, at least in part because of the feared risks of hypoglycemia. The preference for hyperglycemia over intermittent hypoglycemia is irrational, however, because there is causal evidence of harm for the former but only associative evidence of harm for the latter. For several reasons it is wise to have strict glycemic control being a nurse-based strategy.

  6. Use of inotropes and vasopressor agents in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Bangash, Mansoor N; Kong, Ming-Li; Pearse, Rupert M

    2012-01-01

    Inotropes and vasopressors are biologically and clinically important compounds that originate from different pharmacological groups and act at some of the most fundamental receptor and signal transduction systems in the body. More than 20 such agents are in common clinical use, yet few reviews of their pharmacology exist outside of physiology and pharmacology textbooks. Despite widespread use in critically ill patients, understanding of the clinical effects of these drugs in pathological states is poor. The purpose of this article is to describe the pharmacology and clinical applications of inotropic and vasopressor agents in critically ill patients. LINKED ARTICLES This article is commented on by Bracht et al., pp. 2009–2011 and De Backer and Scolletta, pp. 2012–2014 of this issue. To view Bracht et al. visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1476-5381.2011.01776.x and to view De Backer and Scolletta visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1476-5381.2011.01746.x PMID:21740415

  7. The question of disclosing the diagnosis to terminally ill patients.

    PubMed

    Hartwich, P

    1979-07-04

    The question of disclosing the diagnosis to terminally ill patients was investigated by means of a semi-standardized interview of 56 subjects who had been 'told the truth' about their condition. The effects and interdependence of the factors of age, personality structure (EPI neuroticism scale), duration of knowledge, social contact, and religiousness, on the patient's ability to cope with the information were examined. The process of adjustment was assessed according to the stages proposed by Kübler-Ross (1969). Using the statistical model of path analysis, it was possible to evaluate these individual factors and present linearly their interrelationships. These results can offer medical staff the following guidelines: Three factors (a) advanced years, (b) good social contact, and (c) optimally unneurotic personality structure, provide the optimum conditions for a positive adjustment to the disclosure of a diagnosis of fatal illness. If, however, only one or two of these factors are involved, or if they are evident only to a slight degree, then conditions for telling the truth are less positive. On the other hand, in the case of (a) youth, (b) restricted social contact, and (c) a more markedly neurotic person, particular caution is recommended, since the danger of a negative reaction, and indeed even of suicide, must be reckoned with.

  8. Leptospirosis as frequent cause of acute febrile illness in southern Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Reller, Megan E; Bodinayake, Champika; Nagahawatte, Ajith; Devasiri, Vasantha; Kodikara-Arachichi, Wasantha; Strouse, John J; Flom, Judith E; Dumler, J Stephen; Woods, Christopher W

    2011-09-01

    To determine the proportion of fevers caused by leptospirosis, we obtained serum specimens and epidemiologic and clinical data from patients in Galle, Sri Lanka, March-October 2007. Immunoglobulin M ELISA was performed on paired serum specimens to diagnose acute (seroconversion or 4-fold titer rise) or past (titer without rise) leptospirosis and seroprevalence (acute). We compared (individually) the diagnostic yield of acute-phase specimens and clinical impression with paired specimens for acute leptospirosis. Of 889 patients with paired specimens, 120 had acute leptosoirosis and 241 had past leptospirosis. The sensitivity and specificity of acute-phase serum specimens were 17.5% (95% confidence interval [CI] 11.2%-25.5%) and 69.2% (95% CI 65.5%-72.7%), respectively, and of clinical impression 22.9% (95% CI 15.4%-32.0%) and 91.7% (95% CI 89.2%-93.8%), respectively. For identifying acute leptospirosis, clinical impression is insensitive, and immunoglobulin M results are more insensitive and costly. Rapid, pathogen-based tests for early diagnosis are needed.

  9. Leptospirosis as Frequent Cause of Acute Febrile Illness in Southern Sri Lanka

    PubMed Central

    Bodinayake, Champika; Nagahawatte, Ajith; Devasiri, Vasantha; Kodikara-Arachichi, Wasantha; Strouse, John J.; Flom, Judith E.; Dumler, J. Stephen; Woods, Christopher W.

    2011-01-01

    To determine the proportion of fevers caused by leptospirosis, we obtained serum specimens and epidemiologic and clinical data from patients in Galle, Sri Lanka, March–October 2007. Immunoglobulin M ELISA was performed on paired serum specimens to diagnose acute (seroconversion or 4-fold titer rise) or past (titer without rise) leptospirosis and seroprevalence (acute). We compared (individually) the diagnostic yield of acute-phase specimens and clinical impression with paired specimens for acute leptospirosis. Of 889 patients with paired specimens, 120 had acute leptosoirosis and 241 had past leptospirosis. The sensitivity and specificity of acute-phase serum specimens were 17.5% (95% confidence interval [CI] 11.2%–25.5%) and 69.2% (95% CI 65.5%–72.7%), respectively, and of clinical impression 22.9% (95% CI 15.4%–32.0%) and 91.7% (95% CI 89.2%–93.8%), respectively. For identifying acute leptospirosis, clinical impression is insensitive, and immunoglobulin M results are more insensitive and costly. Rapid, pathogen-based tests for early diagnosis are needed. PMID:21888794

  10. Albumin administration in the acutely ill: what is new and where next?

    PubMed

    Vincent, Jean-Louis; Russell, James A; Jacob, Matthias; Martin, Greg; Guidet, Bertrand; Wernerman, Jan; Ferrer, Ricard; Roca, Ricard Ferrer; McCluskey, Stuart A; Gattinoni, Luciano

    2014-07-16

    Albumin solutions have been used worldwide for the treatment of critically ill patients since they became commercially available in the 1940s. However, their use has become the subject of criticism and debate in more recent years. Importantly, all fluid solutions have potential benefits and drawbacks. Large multicenter randomized studies have provided valuable data regarding the safety of albumin solutions, and have begun to clarify which groups of patients are most likely to benefit from their use. However, many questions remain related to where exactly albumin fits within our fluid choices. Here, we briefly summarize some of the physiology and history of albumin use in intensive care before offering some evidence-based guidance for albumin use in critically ill patients.

  11. Albumin administration in the acutely ill: what is new and where next?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Albumin solutions have been used worldwide for the treatment of critically ill patients since they became commercially available in the 1940s. However, their use has become the subject of criticism and debate in more recent years. Importantly, all fluid solutions have potential benefits and drawbacks. Large multicenter randomized studies have provided valuable data regarding the safety of albumin solutions, and have begun to clarify which groups of patients are most likely to benefit from their use. However, many questions remain related to where exactly albumin fits within our fluid choices. Here, we briefly summarize some of the physiology and history of albumin use in intensive care before offering some evidence-based guidance for albumin use in critically ill patients. PMID:25042164

  12. Predictors of Inadequate Linezolid Concentrations after Standard Dosing in Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Taubert, Max; Maier, Barbara; Frechen, Sebastian; Scharf, Christina; Holdt, Lesca-Miriam; Frey, Lorenz; Vogeser, Michael; Fuhr, Uwe; Zander, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Adequate linezolid blood concentrations have been shown to be associated with an improved clinical outcome. Our goal was to assess new predictors of inadequate linezolid concentrations often observed in critically ill patients. Fifty-two critically ill patients with severe infections receiving standard dosing of linezolid participated in this prospective observational study. Serum samples (median, 32 per patient) were taken on four consecutive days, and total linezolid concentrations were quantified. Covariates influencing linezolid pharmacokinetics were identified by multivariate analysis and a population pharmacokinetic model. Target attainment (area under the concentration-time curve over 12 h [AUC12]/MIC ratio of >50; MIC = 2 mg/liter) was calculated for both the study patients and a simulated independent patient group (n = 67,000). Target attainment was observed for only 36% of the population on both days 1 and 4. Independent covariates related to significant decreases of linezolid concentrations included higher weight, creatinine clearance rates, and fibrinogen and antithrombin concentrations, lower concentrations of lactate, and the presence of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Linezolid clearance was increased in ARDS patients (by 82%) and in patients with elevated fibrinogen or decreased lactate concentrations. In simulated patients, most covariates, including fibrinogen and lactate concentrations and weight, showed quantitatively minor effects on target attainment (difference of ≤9% between the first and fourth quartiles of the respective parameters). In contrast, the presence of ARDS had the strongest influence, with only ≤6% of simulated patients reaching this target. In conclusion, the presence of ARDS was identified as a new and strong predictor of insufficient linezolid concentrations, which might cause treatment failure. Insufficient concentrations might also be a major problem in patients with combined alterations of other covariate

  13. Liver dysfunction associated with artificial nutrition in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Grau, Teodoro; Bonet, Alfonso; Rubio, Mercedes; Mateo, Dolores; Farré, Mercé; Acosta, José Antonio; Blesa, Antonio; Montejo, Juan Carlos; de Lorenzo, Abelardo García; Mesejo, Alfonso

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Liver dysfunction associated with artificial nutrition in critically ill patients is a complication that seems to be frequent, but it has not been assessed previously in a large cohort of critically ill patients. Methods We conducted a prospective cohort study of incidence in 40 intensive care units. Different liver dysfunction patterns were defined: (a) cholestasis: alkaline phosphatase of more than 280 IU/l, gamma-glutamyl-transferase of more than 50 IU/l, or bilirubin of more than 1.2 mg/dl; (b) liver necrosis: aspartate aminotransferase of more than 40 IU/l or alanine aminotransferase of more than 42 IU/l, plus bilirubin of more than 1.2 mg/dl or international normalized ratio of more than 1.4; and (c) mixed pattern: alkaline phosphatase of more than 280 IU/l or gamma-glutamyl-transferase of more than 50 IU/l, plus aspartate aminotransferase of more than 40 IU/l or alanine aminotransferase of more than 42 IU/l. Results Seven hundred and twenty-five of 3,409 patients received artificial nutrition: 303 received total parenteral nutrition (TPN) and 422 received enteral nutrition (EN). Twenty-three percent of patients developed liver dysfunction: 30% in the TPN group and 18% in the EN group. The univariate analysis showed an association between liver dysfunction and TPN (p < 0.001), Multiple Organ Dysfunction Score on admission (p < 0.001), sepsis (p < 0.001), early use of artificial nutrition (p < 0.03), and malnutrition (p < 0.01). In the multivariate analysis, liver dysfunction was associated with TPN (p < 0.001), sepsis (p < 0.02), early use of artificial nutrition (p < 0.03), and calculated energy requirements of more than 25 kcal/kg per day (p < 0.05). Conclusion TPN, sepsis, and excessive calculated energy requirements appear as risk factors for developing liver dysfunction. Septic critically ill patients should not be fed with excessive caloric amounts, particularly when TPN is employed. Administering artificial nutrition in the first 24 hours

  14. Acute gastrointestinal illness following a prolonged community-wide water emergency.

    PubMed

    Gargano, J W; Freeland, A L; Morrison, M A; Stevens, K; Zajac, L; Wolkon, A; Hightower, A; Miller, M D; Brunkard, J M

    2015-10-01

    The drinking water infrastructure in the United States is ageing; extreme weather events place additional stress on water systems that can lead to interruptions in the delivery of safe drinking water. We investigated the association between household exposures to water service problems and acute gastrointestinal illness (AGI) and acute respiratory illness (ARI) in Alabama communities that experienced a freeze-related community-wide water emergency. Following the water emergency, investigators conducted a household survey. Logistic regression models were used to estimate adjusted prevalence ratios (aPR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for self-reported AGI and ARI by water exposures. AGI was higher in households that lost water service for ⩾7 days (aPR 2·4, 95% CI 1·1-5·2) and experienced low water pressure for ⩾7 days (aPR 3·6, 95% CI 1·4-9·0) compared to households that experienced normal service and pressure; prevalence of AGI increased with increasing duration of water service interruptions. Investments in the ageing drinking water infrastructure are needed to prevent future low-pressure events and to maintain uninterrupted access to the fundamental public health protection provided by safe water supplies. Households and communities need to increase their awareness of and preparedness for water emergencies to mitigate adverse health impacts.

  15. Thyrostimulin deficiency does not alter peripheral responses to acute inflammation-induced nonthyroidal illness.

    PubMed

    van Zeijl, Clementine J J; Surovtseva, Olga V; Kwakkel, Joan; van Beeren, Hermina C; Bassett, J H Duncan; Duncan Bassett, J H; Williams, Graham R; Wiersinga, Wilmar M; Fliers, Eric; Boelen, Anita

    2014-09-15

    Thyrostimulin, a putative glycoprotein hormone, comprises the subunits GPA2 and GPB5 and activates the TSH receptor (TSHR). The observation that proinflammatory cytokines stimulate GPB5 transcription suggested a role for thyrostimulin in the pathogenesis of nonthyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS). In the present study, we induced acute inflammation by LPS administration to GPB5(-/-) and WT mice to evaluate the role of thyrostimulin in peripheral thyroid hormone metabolism during NTIS. In addition to serum thyroid hormone concentrations, we studied mRNA expression and activity of deiodinase types I, II, and III (D1, D2, and D3) in peripheral T3 target tissues, including liver, muscle, and white and brown adipose tissue (WAT and BAT), of which the latter three express the TSHR. LPS decreased serum free (f)T4 and fT3 indexes to a similar extent in GPB5(-/-) and WT mice. Serum reverse (r)T3 did not change following LPS administration. LPS also induced significant alterations in tissue D1, D2, and D3 mRNA and activity levels, but only the LPS-induced increase in WAT D2 mRNA expression differed between GPB5(-/-) and WT mice. In conclusion, lacking GPB5 during acute illness does not affect the LPS-induced decrease of serum thyroid hormones while resulting in subtle changes in tissue D2 expression that are unlikely to be mediated via the TSHR.

  16. Tachypnoea is a good predictor of hypoxia in acutely ill infants under 2 months

    PubMed Central

    Rajesh, V; Singhi, S.; Kataria, S.; SILVERMAN, M.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To evaluate the respiratory rate as an indicator of hypoxia in infants < 2 months of age.
SETTING—Pediatric emergency unit of an urban teaching hospital.
SUBJECTS—200 infants < 2 months, with symptom(s) of any acute illness.
METHODS—Respiratory rate (by observation method), and oxygen saturation (SaO2) by means of a pulse oximeter were recorded at admission. Infants were categorised by presence or absence of hypoxia (SaO2 ⩽ 90%).
RESULTS—The respiratory rate was ⩾ 50/min in 120 (60%), ⩾ 60/min in 101 (50.5%), and ⩾ 70/min in 58 (29%) infants. Hypoxia (SaO2⩽ 90%) was seen in 77 (38.5%) infants. Respiratory rate and SaO2 showed a significant negative correlation (r = −0.39). Respiratory rate ⩾ 60/min predicted hypoxia with 80% sensitivity and 68% specificity.
CONCLUSION—These results indicates that a respiratory rate > 60/min is a good predictor of hypoxia in infants under 2 months of age brought to the emergency service of an urban hospital for any symptom(s) of acute illness.

 PMID:10630912

  17. The burden of acute gastrointestinal illness in Ontario, Canada, 2005–2006

    PubMed Central

    SARGEANT, J. M.; MAJOWICZ, S. E.; SNELGROVE, J.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY A retrospective, cross-sectional telephone survey (n=2090) was conducted in Ontario, Canada, between May 2005 and April 2006, to determine the burden of acute gastrointestinal illness in the population. The 4-week prevalence was 8·56% (95% CI 7·36–9·76); in households with more than one resident, 35% of cases reported someone else in their household had similar symptoms at the same time. The annual adjusted incidence rate was 1·17 (95% CI 0·99–1·35) episodes per person-year, with higher rates in females, rural residents, and in the winter and spring. Health care was sought by 22% of cases, of which 33% were asked to provide a stool sample. Interestingly, 2·2% of cases who did not visit a health-care provider reported self-administering antibiotics. Overall, acute gastrointestinal illness appears to pose a significant burden in the Ontario population. Further research into the specific aetiologies and risk factors is now needed to better target intervention strategies. PMID:17565767

  18. Cytomegalovirus Reactivation in Critically-Ill Immunocompetent Patients

    PubMed Central

    Limaye, Ajit P.; Kirby, Katharine A.; Rubenfeld, Gordon D.; Leisenring, Wendy M.; Bulger, Eileen M.; Neff, Margaret J.; Gibran, Nicole S.; Huang, Meei-Li; Santo, Tracy K.; Corey, Lawrence; Boeckh, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Context Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is associated with adverse clinical outcomes in immunosuppressed persons, but the incidence and association of CMV reactivation with adverse outcomes in persons lacking evidence of immunosuppression (“immunocompetent”) with critical illness have not been well-defined. Objective To determine the association of CMV reactivation with intensive care unit (ICU) and hospital length of stay in critically-ill immunocompetent persons. Methods We prospectively assessed CMV plasma DNAemia by real-time PCR twice weekly and clinical outcomes in a cohort of CMV seropositive, immunocompetent adults admitted to an ICU. Clinical parameters were assessed by personnel blinded to CMV PCR results. Risk factors for CMV reactivation and association with hospital and ICU length of stay (LOS) were assessed by multivariable logistic regression and proportional odds models. Setting Six ICU’s at two separate hospitals at a large tertiary care academic medical center between 2004–2006. Participants A total of 120 critically-ill, CMV seropositive adults lacking evidence of immunosuppression. Main Outcome Measures Association of CMV reactivation with prolonged hospital length of stay or death. Results The primary composite endpoint of continued hospitalization (n=35) or death (n=10) at 30 days occurred in 45 (35%) of the 120 patients. CMV viremia at any level or > 1,000 copies/ml occurred in 33% (39 of 120, 95% confidence interval [CI] 24%–41%) and 20% (24 of 120, 95% CI 13%–28%), at a median of 12 days (range 3–57) and 26 days (range 9–56), respectively. By logistic regression, CMV infection at any level (adjusted OR: 4.3 [1.6–11.9], p = 0.005), >1,000 copies/ml (adjusted OR 13.9 [3.2–60], p < 0.001), or average CMV area under the curve [AUC] (adjusted OR 2.1 [1.3–3.2], p < 0.001), was independently associated with hospitalization or death by 30 days. In multivariable partial proportional odds models, both CMV seven-day moving

  19. [Tissue oxygen saturation in the critically ill patient].

    PubMed

    Gruartmoner, G; Mesquida, J; Baigorri, F

    2014-05-01

    Hemodynamic resuscitation seeks to correct global macrocirculatory parameters of pressure and flow. However, current evidence has shown that despite the normalization of these global parameters, microcirculatory and regional perfusion alterations can persist, and these alterations have been independently associated with a poorer patient prognosis. This in turn has lead to growing interest in new technologies for exploring regional circulation and microcirculation. Near infra-red spectroscopy allows us to monitor tissue oxygen saturation, and has been proposed as a noninvasive, continuous and easy-to-obtain measure of regional circulation. The present review aims to summarize the existing evidence on near infra-red spectroscopy and its potential clinical role in the resuscitation of critically ill patients in shock.

  20. [Cytokine imbalance in critically ill patients: SIRS and CARS].

    PubMed

    Murata, A; Kikuchi, M; Mishima, S; Sakaki, S; Goto, H; Matsuoka, T; Tanaka, H; Yukioka, T; Shimazaki, S

    1999-07-01

    It remains difficult to treat severely ill patients, especially those who have sepsis and subsequent multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. We propose the hypothesis that the pathophysiology in the sequential sepsis and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome may be strongly related to the imbalance between inflammatory cytokines and antiinflammatory cytokines induced for the host defense to active neutrophils and endothelial cells. Thus we attempted to develop cytokine modulation therapy to normalize the cytokine balance in the host defense system. In this review, we elucidate the relationship between cytokine imbalance and SIRS/CARS in patients with severe burn injury. Furthermore, we examine the possible usage of G-CSF to amplify neutrophil function, and clarify the reasons why various innovative therapies against sepsis have failed.

  1. Caloric requirement of the critically ill septic patient

    SciTech Connect

    Shizgal, H.M.; Martin, M.F.

    1988-04-01

    The caloric requirement of the critically ill septic patient was determined by measuring body composition, by multiple isotope dilution, before and at 2-wk intervals while receiving total parenteral nutrition (TPN) in 86 septic and 57 nonseptic malnourished patients. All patients received a TPN solution containing 25% dextrose and 2.75% crystalline amino acids. The body composition of the nonseptic patients, who received 51.9 +/- 1.5 kcal/kg.day, improved significantly, while that of the septic patients, receiving 46.8 +/- 1.1 kcal/kg.day was only maintained. The relationship between caloric intake and the restoration of a malnourished body cell mass (BCM) was determined for each group by correlating, using multiple linear regression, the mean daily change in the BCM with the caloric intake and the nutritional state, as determined by body composition. According to the resultant regressions, an intake of 35.1 and 50.7 kcal/kg.day was required to maintain the BCM of the septic and nonseptic patients, respectively. To restore a depleted BCM, caloric intakes in excess of this amount are required.

  2. Management of critically ill surgical patients Case reports.

    PubMed

    Mangiante, Gerardo; Padoan, Roberto; Mengardo, Valentina; Bencivenga, Maria; de Manzoni, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    The acute abdomen (AA) still remains a challenging situation for surgeons. New pathological conditions have been imposed to our attention in this field in recent years. The definition of abdominal compartmental syndrome (ACS) in surgical practice and the introduction of new biological matrices, with the concepts of tension-free (TS) repair of incisional hernias, prompted us to set up new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of patients with AA. Thus we reviewed the cases of AA that we observed in recent years in which we performed a laparostomy in order to prevent or to treat an ACS. They are all cases of acute abdomen (AA), but from different origin, including chronic diseases, as in the course of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and acute pancreatitis. In all the cases, the open abdominal cavity was covered with a polyethylene sheet. The edges of the wound were sutured to the plastic sheet, and a traction exerted by a device that causes a negative pressure was added. This method was adopted in several cases without randomization, and resulted in excellent patient's outcomes.

  3. Antithrombin III Doses Rounded to Available Vial Sizes in Critically Ill Pediatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Stockton, Winifred M.; Padilla-Tolentino, Eimeira

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Children have decreased levels of antithrombin III (AT III) compared to adults. These levels may be further decreased during acute illness. Administration of exogenous AT III can increase anticoagulant efficacy. The objective of this study was to evaluate AT III doses rounded to available vial sizes compared to partial vial doses in critically ill pediatric patients, including patients receiving extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) and continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT). METHOD This retrospective review evaluated pediatric patients 0–18 years of age admitted to a 24-bed medical/surgical pediatric intensive care unit between June 1, 2012, and December 31, 2014, who received plasma-derived AT III. Patients received unfractionated heparin, low-molecular-weight heparin, or no anticoagulation. This review included patients who received ECMO and CRRT. RESULTS Eighty doses of AT III were administered to 24 patients (38 full vial size doses and 42 partial vial size doses). The AT III level following dose administration was ≥80% for 26 full vial doses (70%) and 16 partial vial doses (41%; p = 0.010). For patients who received multiple doses of AT III, the median time between doses was 45 hours following full vial doses, and 23 hours following partial vial doses (p = 0.011). Seven patients (29%) had documentation of new or increased bleeding. The median waste prevented from rounding doses to full vial sizes was 363 units. CONCLUSIONS After receiving AT III doses rounded to full vial sizes, patients were more likely to have a therapeutic AT III level and a longer interval between administrations. Rounding AT III doses to full vial sizes reduces waste and can result in cost savings.

  4. Interhospital Transport System for Critically Ill Patients: Mobile Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation without a Ventilator

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Hye Ju; Cho, Woo Hyun; Park, Jong Myung; Kim, Dohyung

    2017-01-01

    Background Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) has been successfully used as a method for the interhospital transportation of critically ill patients. In South Korea, a well-established ECMO interhospital transport system is lacking due to limited resources. We developed a simplified ECMO transport system without mechanical ventilation for use by public emergency medical services. Methods Eighteen patients utilized our ECMO transport system from December 2011 to September 2015. We retrospectively analyzed the indications for ECMO, the patient status during transport, and the patient outcomes. Results All transport was conducted on the ground by ambulance. The distances covered ranged from 26 to 408 km (mean, 65.9±88.1 km) and the average transport time was 56.1±57.3 minutes (range, 30 to 280 minutes). All patients were transported without adverse events. After transport, 4 patients (22.2%) underwent lung transplantation because of interstitial lung disease. Eight patients who had severe acute respiratory distress syndrome showed recovery of heart and lung function after ECMO therapy. A total of 13 patients (70.6%) were successfully taken off ECMO, and 11 patients (61.1%) survived. Conclusion Our ECMO transport system without mechanical ventilation can be considered a safe and useful method for interhospital transport and could be a good alternative option for ECMO transport in Korean hospitals with limited resources. PMID:28180097

  5. Patient and spouse illness beliefs and quality of life in prostate cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Lisa M.; Mohamed, Nihal E.; Winkel, Gary; Diefenbach, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Among married prostate cancer (PC) patients, the spouse is often the primary provider of emotional support and personal care. However, few studies have investigated spouses’ illness beliefs (i.e., about disease duration and treatment control) and their impact on patients’ quality of life (QOL). Spouses’ beliefs about disease duration (timeline) were hypothesised to mediate relationships between spouses’ treatment control beliefs and patients’ QOL six months later. Methods Fifty-three patients, who underwent localised treatment for PC, and their spouses, completed an illness beliefs measure (the revised Illness Perception Questionnaire). Patients completed a QOL measure (the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy – General) six months later. Results Spouse timeline beliefs mediated the association between spouse treatment control beliefs and patient QOL six months later (total indirect effect = −0.71, 95% CI 0.02-2.03). That is, spouse beliefs that the treatment would control their loved one's illness led to beliefs that the disease would be of shorter duration, which in turn led to improved patient QOL six months later. This relationship did not occur with patients’ beliefs. Conclusions Results highlight the important influence of spouse illness beliefs over time on patient QOL with implications for clinical care and dyadic research. PMID:22971045

  6. Viral hemorrhagic fever cases in the country of Georgia: Acute Febrile Illness Surveillance Study results.

    PubMed

    Kuchuloria, Tinatin; Imnadze, Paata; Chokheli, Maiko; Tsertsvadze, Tengiz; Endeladze, Marina; Mshvidobadze, Ketevan; Clark, Danielle V; Bautista, Christian T; Abdel Fadeel, Moustafa; Pimentel, Guillermo; House, Brent; Hepburn, Matthew J; Wölfel, Silke; Wölfel, Roman; Rivard, Robert G

    2014-08-01

    Minimal information is available on the incidence of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) virus and hantavirus infections in Georgia. From 2008 to 2011, 537 patients with fever ≥ 38°C for ≥ 48 hours without a diagnosis were enrolled into a sentinel surveillance study to investigate the incidence of nine pathogens, including CCHF virus and hantavirus. Of 14 patients with a hemorrhagic fever syndrome, 3 patients tested positive for CCHF virus immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibodies. Two of the patients enrolled in the study had acute renal failure. These 2 of 537 enrolled patients were the only patients in the study positive for hantavirus IgM antibodies. These results suggest that CCHF virus and hantavirus are contributing causes of acute febrile syndromes of infectious origin in Georgia. These findings support introduction of critical diagnostic approaches and confirm the need for additional surveillance in Georgia.

  7. Daptomycin Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics in Septic and Critically Ill Patients.

    PubMed

    D'Avolio, Antonio; Pensi, Debora; Baietto, Lorena; Pacini, Giovanni; Di Perri, Giovanni; De Rosa, Francesco Giuseppe

    2016-08-01

    Infections, including sepsis, are associated with high mortality rates in critically ill patients in the intensive care unit (ICU). Appropriate antibiotic selection and adequate dosing are important for improving patient outcomes. Daptomycin is bactericidal in bloodstream infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus and other Gram-positive pathogens cultured in ICU patients. The drug has concentration-dependent activity, and the area under the curve/minimum inhibitory concentration ratio is the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) index that best correlates with daptomycin activity, whereas toxicity correlates well with daptomycin plasma trough concentrations (or minimum concentration [C min]). Adequate daptomycin exposure can be difficult to achieve in ICU patients; multiple PK alterations can result in highly variable plasma concentrations, which are difficult to predict. For this reason, therapeutic drug monitoring could help clinicians optimize daptomycin dosing, thus improving efficacy while decreasing the likelihood of serious adverse events. This paper reviews the literature on daptomycin in ICU patients with sepsis, focusing on dosing and PK and PD parameters.

  8. Continuous infusion of antibiotics in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Smuszkiewicz, Piotr; Szałek, Edyta; Tomczak, Hanna; Grześkowiak, Edmund

    2013-02-01

    Antibiotics are the most commonly used drugs in intensive care unit patients and their supply should be based on pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic rules. The changes that occur in septic patients who are critically ill may be responsible for subtherapeutic antibiotic concentrations leading to poorer clinical outcomes. Evolving in time the disturbed pathophysiology in severe sepsis (high cardiac output, glomerular hyperfiltration) and therapeutic interventions (e.g. haemodynamically active drugs, mechanical ventilation, renal replacement therapy) alters antibiotic pharmacokinetics mainly through an increase in the volume of distribution and altered drug clearance. The lack of new and efficacious drugs and increased bacterial resistance are current problems of contemporary antibiotic therapy. Although intermittent administration is a standard clinical practice, alternative methods of antibiotic administration are sought, which may potentialise effects and reduce toxicity as well as contribute to inhibition of bacterial resistance. A wide range of studies prove that the application of continuous infusion of time-dependent antibiotics (beta-lactams, glycopeptides) is more rational than standard intermittent administration. However, there are also studies which do not confirm the advantage of one method over the other. In spite of controversy the continuous administration of this group of antibiotics is common practice, because the results of both studies point to the higher efficacy of this method in critically ill patients. Authors reviewed the literature to determine whether any clinical benefits exist for administration of time-dependent antibiotics by continuous infusion. Definite specification of the clinical advantage of administration this way over standard dosage requires a large-scale multi-centre randomised controlled trial.

  9. Resting energy expenditure in critically ill patients: Evaluation methods and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Sanches, Ana Cláudia Soncini; Góes, Cassiana Regina de; Bufarah, Marina Nogueira Berbel; Balbi, André Luiz; Ponce, Daniela

    2016-10-01

    Patients on intensive care present systemic, metabolic, and hormonal alterations that may adversely affect their nutritional condition and lead to fast and important depletion of lean mass and malnutrition. Several factors and medical conditions can influence the energy expenditure (EE) of critically ill patients, such as age, gender, surgery, serious infections, medications, ventilation modality, and organ dysfunction. Clinical conditions that can present with EE change include acute kidney injury, a complex disorder commonly seen in critically ill patients with manifestations that can range from minimum elevations in serum creatinine to renal failure requiring dialysis. The nutritional needs of this population are therefore complex, and determining the resting energy expenditure is essential to adjust the nutritional supply and to plan a proper diet, ensuring that energy requirements are met and avoiding complications associated with overfeeding and underfeeding. Several evaluation methods of EE in this population have been described, but all of them have limitations. Such methods include direct calorimetry, doubly labeled water, indirect calorimetry (IC), various predictive equations, and, more recently, the rule of thumb (kcal/kg of body weight). Currently, IC is considered the gold standard.

  10. Clinical Conundrums in Management of Hypothyroidism in Critically Ill Geriatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sehgal, Vishal; Bajwa, Sukhminder Jit Singh; Sehgal, Rinku; Bajaj, Anurag

    2014-01-01

    Context: Articles in various international and national bibliographic indices were extensively searched with an emphasis on thyroid and hypothyroid disorders, hypothyroidism in elderly hospitalized patients, hypothyroidism in critically ill geriatric population, thyroxine in elderly hypothyroid, drug interactions and thyroid hormones, and thyroid functions in elderly. Evidence acquisition: Entrez (including PubMed), NIH.gov, Medscape.com, WebMD.com, MedHelp.org, Search Medica, MD consult, yahoo.com, and google.com were searched. Manual search was performed on various textbooks of medicine, critical care, pharmacology, and endocrinology. Results: Thyroid function tests in elderly hospitalized patients must be interpreted with circumspection. The elderly are often exposed to high iodide content and critical care settings. This may occur because of either decreased iodine excretion or very high intake of iodine. This is especially true for elderly population with underlying acute or chronic kidney diseases or both. Amiodarone, with a very high iodine content, is also often used in this set of population. Moreover, other medications including iodinated contrast are often used in the critical care settings. These may affect different steps of thyroid hormone metabolism, and thereby complicate the interpretation of thyroid function tests. Conclusions: The current review is aimed at analyzing and managing various clinical aspects of hypothyroidism in hospitalized elderly, and critically ill geriatric patients. PMID:24719636

  11. The role of endocrine mechanisms in ventilator-associated lung injury in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Penesova, A; Galusova, A; Vigas, M; Vlcek, M; Imrich, R; Majek, M

    2012-07-01

    The critically ill subjects are represented by a heterogeneous group of patients suffering from a life-threatening event of different origin, e.g. trauma, cardiopulmonary failure, surgery or sepsis. The majority of these patients are dependent on the artificial lung ventilation, which means a life-saving chance for them. However, the artificial lung ventilation may trigger ventilation-associated lung injury (VALI). The mechanical ventilation at higher volumes (volutrauma) and pressure (barotrauma) can cause histological changes in the lungs including impairments in the gap and adherens junctions and desmosomes. The injured lung epithelium may lead to an impairment of the surfactant production and function, and this may not only contribute to the pathophysiology of VALI but also to acute respiratory distress syndrome. Other components of VALI are atelectrauma and toxic effects of the oxygen. Collectively, all these effects may result in a lung inflammation associated with a subsequent profibrotic changes, endothelial dysfunction, and activation of the local and systemic endocrine responses such as the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). The present review is aimed to describe some of the pathophysiologic aspects of VALI providing a basis for novel therapeutic strategies in the critically ill patients.

  12. Meaninglessness in terminally ill cancer patients: a randomized controlled study.

    PubMed

    Morita, Tatsuya; Murata, Hisayuki; Kishi, Emi; Miyashita, Mitsunori; Yamaguchi, Takuhiro; Uchitomi, Yosuke

    2009-04-01

    Although recent empirical studies reveal that fostering patients' perception of meaning in their lives is an essential task for palliative care clinicians, few studies have reported the effects of training programs for nurses specifically aimed at improving these skills. The primary aim of this randomized controlled trial was to determine the effects of an educational workshop focusing on patients' feelings of meaninglessness on nurses' confidence, self-reported practice, and attitudes toward caring for such patients, in addition to burnout and meaning of life. The study was designed as a single-institution, randomized controlled trial using a waiting list control. The intervention consisted of eight 180-minute training sessions over four months, including lectures and exercises using structured assessment. A total of 41 nurses were randomly allocated to three groups, which were separately trained, and all were evaluated four times at three-month intervals (before intervention, between each intervention, and after the last intervention). Assessments included validated Confidence and Self-Reported Practice scales, the Attitudes Toward Caring for Patients Feeling Meaningless Scale (including willingness to help, positive appraisal, and helplessness items), the Maslach Burnout Scale, job satisfaction, and the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Spiritual (FACIT-Sp). One participant withdrew from the study before the baseline evaluation, and the remaining 40 nurses completed the study. The nurses were all female and had a mean age of 31+/-6.4, and mean clinical experience of 8.9+/-5.5 years. There were no significant differences in background among the groups. The intervention effects were statistically significant on the Confidence Scale, the Self-Reported Practice Scale, and the willingness to help, positive appraisal, and helplessness subscales, in addition to the overall levels of burnout, emotional exhaustion, personal accomplishment, job satisfaction

  13. Acute illness associated with use of pest strips - seven U.S. States and Canada, 2000-2013.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Rebecca J; Sievert, Jennifer; Prado, Joanne; Buhl, Kaci; Stone, Dave L; Forrester, Mathias; Higgins, Shelia; Mitchell, Yvette; Schwartz, Abby; Calvert, Geoffrey M

    2014-01-17

    Dichlorvos-impregnated resin strips (DDVP pest strips) are among the few organophosphate products still available for indoor residential use. The residential uses for most other organophosphate products, including most DDVP products, were canceled because they posed unreasonable risks to children. DDVP pest strips act by inhibiting acetylcholinesterase activity in the brain and nerves of insect pests and are designed to gradually release DDVP vapor for up to 4 months. Acute illnesses in humans associated with nonlethal acute exposures usually resolve completely, but recovery is not always rapid. To assess the frequency of acute illnesses associated with DDVP pest strips, cases from 2000 through June 2013 were sought from the 12 states that participate in the Sentinel Event Notification System for Occupational Risks (SENSOR)-Pesticides Program, the National Pesticide Information Center (NPIC), and Health Canada.* A total of 31 acute DDVP pest strip-related illness cases were identified in seven U.S. states and Canada. The majority of these illnesses resulted from use of the product in commonly occupied living areas (e.g., kitchens and bedrooms), in violation of label directions. Although 26 of the 31 cases involved mild health effects of short duration, five persons had moderate health effects. Illnesses caused by excess exposure to DDVP pest strips can be reduced by educating the public about the proper usage of DDVP pest strips and with improvements in label directions.

  14. Sleep after critical illness: Study of survivors of acute respiratory distress syndrome and systematic review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Dhooria, Sahajal; Sehgal, Inderpaul Singh; Agrawal, Anshu Kumar; Agarwal, Ritesh; Aggarwal, Ashutosh Nath; Behera, Digambar

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: This study aims to evaluate the sleep quality, architecture, sleep-related quality of life, and sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) survivors early after discharge. Materials and Methods: In this prospective, observational study, consecutive patients with ARDS discharged from the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) underwent evaluation with Epworth sleepiness scale (ESS), Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire (FOSQ), and overnight polysomnography. Patients having one or more of the following characteristics were classified as having abnormal sleep: ESS>10, PSQI>5, FOSQ <17.9, apnea–hypopnea index (AHI) ≥5, or AHI during rapid eye movement (REM) sleep ≥5. Results: Twenty patients (median interquartile range [IQR] age of 24 [22–28] years, 11 [55%] females) were included in the study. Acute febrile illness of unknown etiology with multi-organ dysfunction syndrome was the most common underlying etiology for ARDS. The median (IQR) PaO2/FiO2 ratio and APACHE II scores on admission were 176 (151–191.5) and 14 (14–16), respectively. The median (IQR) duration of stay in the ICU was 10 days (7.3–19.5). The overall sleep efficiency (median [IQR], 54% [32.3–65.4%]) was poor. None of the patients had ESS>10, seven (35%) had global PSQI>5 and one had FOSQ <17.9. Ten (50%) patients had at least one characteristic that suggested abnormal sleep (4 insomnia, 2 central sleep apnea, 1 obstructive sleep apnea, 1 REM-SDB, and 2 with a high PSQI, but no specific sleep abnormality). Conclusions: Sleep disturbances are common in ARDS survivors early after discharge from the ICU. PMID:27390455

  15. Contextual factors associated with health care service utilization for children with acute childhood illnesses in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Lilford, Richard J.

    2017-01-01

    Objective To examine the independent contribution of individual, community and state-level factors to health care service utilization for children with acute childhood illnesses in Nigeria. Materials and methods The study was based on secondary analyses of cross-sectional population-based data from the 2013 Nigeria Demographic and Health Survey (DHS). Multilevel logistic regression models were applied to the data on 6,427 under-five children who used or did not use health care service when they were sick (level 1), nested within 896 communities (level 2) from 37 states (level 3). Results About one-quarter of the mothers were between 15 and 24 years old and almost half of them did not have formal education (47%). While only 30% of the children utilized health service when they were sick, close to 67% lived in the rural area. In the fully adjusted model, mothers with higher education attainment (Adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 1.63; 95% credible interval [CrI] = 1.31–2.03), from rich households (aOR = 1.76; 95% CrI = 1.35–2.25), with access to media (radio, television or magazine) (aOR = 1.18; 95% CrI = 1.08–1.29), and engaging in employment (aOR = 1.18; 95% CrI = 1.02–1.37) were significantly more likely to have used healthcare services for acute childhood illnesses. On the other hand, women who experienced difficulty getting to health facilities (aOR = 0.87; 95% CrI = 0.75–0.99) were less likely to have used health service for their children. Conclusions Our findings highlight that utilization of healthcare service for acute childhood illnesses was influenced by not only maternal factors but also community-level factors, suggesting that public health strategies should recognise this complex web of individual composition and contextual composition factors to guide provision of healthcare services. Such interventions could include: increase in female school enrolment, provision of interest-free loans for small and medium scale enterprises, introduction of

  16. Arboviral Etiologies of Acute Febrile Illnesses in Western South America, 2000–2007

    PubMed Central

    Forshey, Brett M.; Guevara, Carolina; Laguna-Torres, V. Alberto; Cespedes, Manuel; Vargas, Jorge; Gianella, Alberto; Vallejo, Efrain; Madrid, César; Aguayo, Nicolas; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Suarez, Victor; Morales, Ana Maria; Beingolea, Luis; Reyes, Nora; Perez, Juan; Negrete, Monica; Rocha, Claudio; Morrison, Amy C.; Russell, Kevin L.; J. Blair, Patrick; Olson, James G.; Kochel, Tadeusz J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses) are among the most common agents of human febrile illness worldwide and the most important emerging pathogens, causing multiple notable epidemics of human disease over recent decades. Despite the public health relevance, little is know about the geographic distribution, relative impact, and risk factors for arbovirus infection in many regions of the world. Our objectives were to describe the arboviruses associated with acute undifferentiated febrile illness in participating clinics in four countries in South America and to provide detailed epidemiological analysis of arbovirus infection in Iquitos, Peru, where more extensive monitoring was conducted. Methodology/Findings A clinic-based syndromic surveillance system was implemented in 13 locations in Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia, and Paraguay. Serum samples and demographic information were collected from febrile participants reporting to local health clinics or hospitals. Acute-phase sera were tested for viral infection by immunofluorescence assay or RT-PCR, while acute- and convalescent-phase sera were tested for pathogen-specific IgM by ELISA. Between May 2000 and December 2007, 20,880 participants were included in the study, with evidence for recent arbovirus infection detected for 6,793 (32.5%). Dengue viruses (Flavivirus) were the most common arbovirus infections, totaling 26.0% of febrile episodes, with DENV-3 as the most common serotype. Alphavirus (Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus [VEEV] and Mayaro virus [MAYV]) and Orthobunyavirus (Oropouche virus [OROV], Group C viruses, and Guaroa virus) infections were both observed in approximately 3% of febrile episodes. In Iquitos, risk factors for VEEV and MAYV infection included being male and reporting to a rural (vs urban) clinic. In contrast, OROV infection was similar between sexes and type of clinic. Conclusions/Significance Our data provide a better understanding of the geographic range of arboviruses in South

  17. Hospital Triage System for Adult Patients Using an Influenza-Like Illness Scoring System during the 2009 Pandemic—Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Noriega, Eduardo; Gonzalez-Diaz, Esteban; Morfin-Otero, Rayo; Gomez-Abundis, Gerardo F.; Briseño-Ramirez, Jaime; Perez-Gomez, Hector Raul; Lopez-Gatell, Hugo; Alpuche-Aranda, Celia M.; Ramírez, Ernesto; López, Irma; Iguala, Miguel; Chapela, Ietza Bojórquez; Zavala, Ethel Palacios; Hernández, Mauricio; Stuart, Tammy L.; Villarino, Margarita Elsa; Widdowson, Marc-Alain; Waterman, Steve; Uyeki, Timothy; Azziz-Baumgartner, Eduardo

    2010-01-01

    Background Pandemic influenza A (H1N1) virus emerged during 2009. To help clinicians triage adults with acute respiratory illness, a scoring system for influenza-like illness (ILI) was implemented at Hospital Civil de Guadalajara, Mexico. Methods A medical history, laboratory and radiology results were collected on emergency room (ER) patients with acute respiratory illness to calculate an ILI-score. Patients were evaluated for admission by their ILI-score and clinicians' assessment of risk for developing complications. Nasal and throat swabs were collected from intermediate and high-risk patients for influenza testing by RT-PCR. The disposition and ILI-score of those oseltamivir-treated versus untreated, clinical characteristics of 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) patients versus test-negative patients were compared by Pearson's Χ2, Fisher's Exact, and Wilcoxon rank-sum tests. Results Of 1840 ER patients, 230 were initially hospitalized (mean ILI-score = 15), and the rest were discharged, including 286 ambulatory patients given oseltamivir (median ILI-score = 11), and 1324 untreated (median ILI-score = 5). Fourteen (1%) untreated patients returned, and 3 were hospitalized on oseltamivir (median ILI-score  = 19). Of 371 patients tested by RT-PCR, 104 (28%) had pandemic influenza and 42 (11%) had seasonal influenza A detected. Twenty (91%) of 22 imaged hospitalized pandemic influenza patients had bilateral infiltrates compared to 23 (38%) of 61 imaged hospital test-negative patients (p<0.001). One patient with confirmed pandemic influenza presented 6 days after symptom onset, required mechanical ventilation, and died. Conclusions The triaging system that used an ILI-score complimented clinicians' judgment of who needed oseltamivir and inpatient care and helped hospital staff manage a surge in demand for services. PMID:20498718

  18. Early glycemic control in critically ill patients with burn injury.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Claire V; Coffey, Rebecca; Cook, Charles H; Gerlach, Anthony T; Miller, Sidney F

    2011-01-01

    Glucose management in patients with burn injury is often difficult because of their hypermetabolic state with associated hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, and insulin resistance. Recent studies suggest that time to glycemic control is associated with improved outcomes. The authors sought to determine the influence of early glycemic control on the outcomes of critically ill patients with burn injury. A retrospective analysis was performed at the Ohio State University Medical Center. Patients hospitalized with burn injury were enrolled if they were admitted to the intensive care unit between March 1, 2006, and February 28, 2009. Early glycemic control was defined as the achievement of a mean daily blood glucose of ≤150 mg/dl for at least two consecutive days by postburn day 3. Forty-six patients made up the study cohort with 26 achieving early glycemic control and 20 who did not. The two groups were similar at baseline with regard to age, pre-existing diabetes, APACHE II score and burn size and depth. There were no differences in number of surgical interventions, infectious complications, or length of stay between patients who achieved or failed early glycemic control. Failure of early glycemic control was, however, associated with significantly higher mortality both by univariate (35.0 vs 7.7%, P = .03) and multivariate analyses (hazard ratio 6.754 [1.16-39.24], P = .03) adjusting for age, TBSA, and inhalation injury. Failure to achieve early glycemic control in patients with burn injury is associated with an increased risk of mortality. However, further prospective controlled trials are needed to establish causality of this association.

  19. Associations between perceived chronic care quality, perceived patient centeredness, and illness representations among persons with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Joseph; Iyer, Neeraj N; Collins, William B

    2014-01-01

    Patient beliefs about their illness can motivate behaviors consistent with good disease management. Perceived high-quality chronic care would be expected to increase likelihood of having such beliefs. Associations between perceived quality of chronic care and illness representations, and associations between patient centeredness and illness representations were assessed among persons with diabetes. A mail survey of diabetic patients visiting a multispecialty physician network serving urban and suburban populations in a large midwestern city was conducted. The Patient Assessment of Chronic Illness Care-5A questionnaire was used to assess perceived chronic care quality and patient centeredness. The Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire was used to assess illness representations. Of 500 mailed surveys, 89 completed surveys were returned. The sample consisted mostly of retirees (61%), Whites (81%), and women (60%). Higher perceived chronic care quality was associated with better disease understanding of diabetes (0.24, p = .05). Patients reporting higher patient centeredness (or lower patient-centeredness scores) indicated better disease understanding (-0.26, p = .04) and those reporting higher patient centeredness (or lower patient-centeredness scores) perceived less impact of illness (0.29, p = .02). Chronic care quality as defined in the Chronic Care Model and consistency of chronic care with patient expectations (patient centeredness) was associated with illness representations favorable for good self-care management.

  20. Psychobiological personality dimensions in two environmental-illness patient groups.

    PubMed

    Bergdahl, Jan; Mårell, Lena; Bergdahl, Maud; Perris, Hjördis

    2005-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the psychobiological personality dimensions in two subgroups of patients with environmental illness (EI). Fifty-nine patients, 34 women and 25 men (aged 32-69 years), were referred for symptoms allegedly caused by abnormal sensitivity to either dental fillings (DF; n=26) or electromagnetic fields (EMF; n=33). For the evaluation of personality, the Swedish 238-item version of the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI) was used. Compared with a control group, the EMF group scored higher on the temperament dimension Persistence. The DF group scored higher on the TCI subscales Harm Avoidance (fatigability and asthenia) and Self-Directedness (self-acceptance). Women scored higher than men did on the Novelty Seeking and Reward Dependence (RD) dimensions in the DF group and on RD in the control group, indicating an inherited gender difference. No differences were found between men and women in the EMF group. Our results indicate that the high level of persistence found in the EMF group and the high level of fatigability and asthenia in combination with high self-acceptance found in the DF group represent vulnerable personalities. No significant differences were found between the two patient groups, indicating that these groups are quite similar regarding personality. This vulnerability can be expressed as various mental and somatic symptoms, which can be interpreted as EI symptoms by the affected individual.

  1. Does Mental Illness Stigma Contribute to Adolescent Standardized Patients' Discomfort With Simulations of Mental Illness and Adverse Psychosocial Experiences?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, Mark D.; Johnson, Samantha; Niec, Anne; Pietrantonio, Anna Marie; High, Bradley; MacMillan, Harriet; Eva, Kevin W.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Adolescent mental illness stigma-related factors may contribute to adolescent standardized patients' (ASP) discomfort with simulations of psychiatric conditions/adverse psychosocial experiences. Paradoxically, however, ASP involvement may provide a stigma-reduction strategy. This article reports an investigation of this hypothetical…

  2. [Technology integration and process management. Concept and implementation of a new platform for simultaneous diagnosis and therapy of acutely ill and injured patients and for elective computer assisted surgery (CAS)].

    PubMed

    Messmer, P; Jacob, A L; Fries, E; Gross, T; Suhm, N; Steinbrich, W; Frede, K E; Schneider, T; Regazzoni, P

    2001-10-01

    Modern imaging and computer technology gain more and more importance in surgery. This is true for elective and emergency diagnosis and treatment. However integration of technology and optimization of process management is severely behind. A new diagnostic-therapeutic platform should balance this deficit. The platform is composed of a fully equipped operation room environment with integrated high end computer-tomography with navigation, a digital subtraction angiography and an OR- and imaging-table particularly developed for this set-up. The platform may be used for elective diagnosis, for diagnosis and therapy in polytraumatized patients in one and the same location (one stop shop) and for computer assisted surgery (CAS). Bringing the technology to the patient and not the patient to the technology can save time consuming and potentially dangerous transports and expensive personnel can be reduced. Navigation-technology and high quality intra-operative imaging expand the spectrum of minimally invasive surgery.

  3. There is need for antigen-based rapid diagnostic tests to identify common acute tropical illnesses.

    PubMed

    Wilde, Henry; Suankratay, Chusana

    2007-01-01

    Enteric fever, typhus, leptospirosis, dengue, melioidosis, and tuberculous meningitis present urgent diagnostic problems that require experience and clinical judgment to make early evidence-based management decisions. Basic and applied research dealing with reliable antigen-based diagnostics has been published and confirmed for several of these infections. This should have initiated commercial production but has not. Established international firms see little profit in such diagnostic kits since they would be used in poor countries with little prospects for return of investment capital. We attempt to illustrate this issue, using common causes of acute febrile illnesses in the Southeast Asian region. We believe that rapid diagnostic technology could prevent significant delay in starting appropriate therapy, reduce hospital expenses, and even save lives.

  4. The implementation of community-based crisis services for people with acute psychiatric illness.

    PubMed

    Finch, S J; Burgess, P M; Herrman, H E

    1991-06-01

    This article describes three recently established community-based crisis services for people with acute psychiatric illness. Data were obtained from local information systems developed in the early phase of service operation. Patterns of service were found to vary among the teams in terms of the frequency of contact with the client, the period of contact with the client and the overall numbers of contacts. Such diversification of services reflects, at least in part, the differences in the service networks within which the new services were Such diversification of services is inevitable and creative, and the evaluation of these services must consider not only the short-term impact of crisis services, but also the impact of the network of care services on longer term outcomes for the client.

  5. Intrafacility transportation of patients with acute brain injury.

    PubMed

    Tu, Hsinfen

    2014-06-01

    Patients with acute brain injury (ABI) frequently require diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in the areas located outside of the intensive care unit. Transports can be risky for critically ill patients with ABI. Secondary brain injury can occur during the transport from causes such as ischemia, hypotension, hypoxia, hypercapnia, and cerebral edema. Preparation and implementation of preventive procedures including pretransport assessment, monitoring during transport, and posttransport examination and documentation for transports of patients with ABI deem to be necessary. The purpose of this article is to review the typical risks associated with the transports of the patients with ABI out of the intensive care unit and to propose the strategies that can be used to minimize the risks of secondary brain injury.

  6. USING COMPUTATIONAL PATIENTS TO EVALUATE ILLNESS MECHANISMS IN SCHIZOPHRENIA

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Ralph E.; Grasemann, Uli; Gueorguieva, Ralitza; Quinlan, Donald; Lane, Douglas; Miikkulainen, Risto

    2011-01-01

    Background Various malfunctions involving working memory, semantics, prediction error, and dopamine neuromodulation have been hypothesized to cause disorganized speech and delusions in schizophrenia. Computational models may provide insights into why some mechanisms are unlikely, suggest alternative mechanisms, and tie together explanations of seemingly disparate symptoms and experimental findings. Methods Eight corresponding illness mechanisms were simulated in DISCERN, an artificial neural network model of narrative understanding and recall. For this study, DISCERN learned sets of “autobiographical” and “impersonal” crime stories with associated emotion-coding. In addition, 20 healthy controls and 37 patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder matched for age, gender and parental education were studied using a delayed story-recall task. A goodness-of-fit analysis was performed to determine the mechanism best reproducing narrative breakdown profiles generated by healthy controls and patients with schizophrenia. Evidence of delusion-like narratives was sought in simulations best matching the narrative breakdown profile of patients. Results All mechanisms were equivalent in matching the narrative breakdown profile of healthy controls. However, exaggerated prediction-error signaling during consolidation of episodic memories, termed hyperlearning, was statistically superior to other mechanisms in matching the narrative breakdown profile of patients. These simulations also systematically confused “autobiographical” agents with “impersonal” crime story agents to model fixed, self-referential delusions. Conclusions Findings suggest that exaggerated prediction-error signaling in schizophrenia intermingles and corrupts narrative memories when incorporated into long-term storage, thereby disrupting narrative language and producing fixed delusional narratives. If further validated by clinical studies, these computational patients could provide a

  7. The young patient with acute bloody diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    Ninan, S; Hamlin, J

    2014-01-01

    Acute bloody diarrhoea may be commonly encountered in the acute medical unit. Among young patients, the main differential diagnoses are acute infectious colitis, and first presentation of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). A combination of clinical, laboratory, radiological, endoscopic and histological investigations are required to make the diagnosis. If inflammatory bowel disease is suspected, then the patient should be admitted to a specialist gastroenterology ward and receive input from the surgical team, IBD nurses and specialist stoma nurses. Intravenous steroid therapy for acute severe disease should be started before stool cultures are back unless there is a strong clinical suspicion of amoebiasis. All patients require thromboprophylaxis and close attention paid to fluid balance and nutritional requirements. Daily clinical review is required. The Travis criteria may be employed at day 3 to assess the likelihood of requiring surgery and plans for rescue therapy, medical or surgical should be made between day 3-7 if the patient is not responding adequately to initial medical therapy.

  8. Acute appendicitis in the geriatric patient.

    PubMed

    Hall, A; Wright, T M

    1976-02-01

    Fifty patients over 60 with proven acute appendictis are analyzed with regards to the preoperative clinical picture, diagnosis, operative findings and management, and the role of associated medical diseases.

  9. Host Biomarkers for Distinguishing Bacterial from Non-Bacterial Causes of Acute Febrile Illness: A Comprehensive Review

    PubMed Central

    Kapasi, Anokhi J.; Dittrich, Sabine; González, Iveth J.; Rodwell, Timothy C.

    2016-01-01

    Background In resource limited settings acute febrile illnesses are often treated empirically due to a lack of reliable, rapid point-of-care diagnostics. This contributes to the indiscriminate use of antimicrobial drugs and poor treatment outcomes. The aim of this comprehensive review was to summarize the diagnostic performance of host biomarkers capable of differentiating bacterial from non-bacterial infections to guide the use of antibiotics. Methods Online databases of published literature were searched from January 2010 through April 2015. English language studies that evaluated the performance of one or more host biomarker in differentiating bacterial from non-bacterial infection in patients were included. Key information extracted included author information, study methods, population, pathogens, clinical information, and biomarker performance data. Study quality was assessed using a combination of validated criteria from the QUADAS and Lijmer checklists. Biomarkers were categorized as hematologic factors, inflammatory molecules, cytokines, cell surface or metabolic markers, other host biomarkers, host transcripts, clinical biometrics, and combinations of markers. Findings Of the 193 citations identified, 59 studies that evaluated over 112 host biomarkers were selected. Most studies involved patient populations from high-income countries, while 19% involved populations from low- and middle-income countries. The most frequently evaluated host biomarkers were C-reactive protein (61%), white blood cell count (44%) and procalcitonin (34%). Study quality scores ranged from 23.1% to 92.3%. There were 9 high performance host biomarkers or combinations, with sensitivity and specificity of ≥85% or either sensitivity or specificity was reported to be 100%. Five host biomarkers were considered weak markers as they lacked statistically significant performance in discriminating between bacterial and non-bacterial infections. Discussion This manuscript provides a summary

  10. Patient Attitudes Regarding the Cost of Illness in Cancer Care

    PubMed Central

    Varner, Ashley; Ellis, Erin; Ebner, Stephen; Moxley, John; Siegrist, Erika; Weng, David

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose. The cost of illness in cancer care and the subsequent distress has attracted scrutiny. Guidelines recommend enhanced discussion of costs, assuming this will reduce both stress and costs. Little is known about patient attitudes about cost considerations influencing treatment decisions. Methods. A convenience-sample survey of patients currently receiving radiation and/or intravenous chemotherapy at an outpatient cancer center was performed. Assessments included prevalence and extent of financial burden, level of financial distress, attitudes about using costs to influence treatment decisions, and frequency or desirability of cost discussions with oncologists. Results. A total of 132 participants (94%) responded. Overall, 47% reported high financial stress, 30.8% felt well informed about costs prior to treatment, and 71% rarely spoke to their oncologists about cost. More than 71% of patients did not want either society’s or personal costs to influence treatment, and this result did not change based on degree of financial stress. Even when asked to assume that lower cost regimens were equally effective, only 28% would definitely want the lower cost regimen. Patients did not believe it was the oncologist’s duty to perform cost discussions. Conclusion. Even insured patients have a high degree of financial distress. Most, including those with the highest levels of distress, did not speak often with oncologists about costs and were strongly adverse to having cost considerations influence choice of regimen. The findings suggest that patients are not cost sensitive with regard to treatment decisions. Oncologists will require improved tools to have meaningful cost discussion, as recommended by the American Society of Clinical Oncology. Implications for Practice: This study raises important questions regarding optimal communication with patients about costs. If patients are not cost sensitive regarding treatment decisions, they will not be full

  11. Delirium in acute promyelocytic leukemia patients: two case reports

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Delirium is a frequently misdiagnosed and inadequately treated neuropsychiatric complication most commonly observed in terminally ill cancer patients. To our knowledge this is the first report describing delirium in two patients aged less than 60 years and enrolled in an intensive chemotherapeutic protocol for acute promyelocytic leukemia. Case presentation Two female Caucasian acute promyelocytic leukemia patients aged 46 and 56 years developed delirium during their induction treatment with all-trans retinoic acid and idarubicin. In both cases symptoms were initially attributed to all-trans retinoic acid that was therefore immediately suspended. In these two patients several situations may have contribute to the delirium: in patient 1 a previous psychiatric disorder, concomitant treatments with steroids and benzodiazepines, a severe infection and central nervous system bleeding while in patient 2 steroid treatment and isolation. In patient 1 delirium was treated with short-term low-doses of haloperidol while in patient 2 non-pharmacologic interventions had a beneficial role. When the diagnosis of delirium was clear, induction treatment was resumed and both patients completed their therapeutic program without any relapse of the psychiatric symptoms. Both patients are alive and in complete remission as far as their leukemia is concerned. Conclusions We suggest that patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia eligible to intensive chemotherapy should be carefully evaluated by a multisciplinary team including psychiatrists in order to early recognize symptoms of delirium and avoid inadequate treatments. In case of delirium, both pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic interventions may be considered. PMID:24237998

  12. Dosing of antibiotics in critically ill patients undergoing renal replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Kielstein, Jan T; Burkhardt, Olaf

    2011-12-01

    On September 11, 1945 Maria Schafstaat was the first patient who successfully underwent a dialysis treatment for acute kidney injury (AKI), formerly known as acute renal failure. Since then, the number of patients with AKI is increasing worldwide. Today AKI is generally one feature of a multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS), which develops in response to major surgery, cardiogenic shock or sepsis. Several clinical studies have shown that early and appropriate antibiotic therapy in those patients is of utter importance, yet it remains one of the most difficult challenges to meet. Even in critically ill patients with conserved renal function a myriad of pathophysiological changes, resulting in increased volume of distribution, decreased protein binding and altered hepatic drug clearance, makes appropriate antibiotic dosin difficult. Adequate pharmacotherapy, i.e. dose of anti-infective agens is becoming even more complicated if it has to be tailored to counteract their removal by different modes and intensities of renal replacement therapy. This review summarizes our sparse knowledge about pharmacokinetic studies and dosing recommendations of drugs in patients with AKI undergoing continuous renal replacement therapies (CRRTs) such as continuous venovenous hemofiltration (CVVH) as well as extended dialysis (ED), an increasingly used method to treat patients with AKI in the intensive care setting. We reflect on failure of several large prospective controlled studies to show a survival benefit of higher doses of renal replacement therapy, a finding that might be caused by the fact that we still adhere to dosing guidelines for antibiotics which are at best ineffectual but might also lead to potentially dangerous underdosing of these life saving drugs. Lastly we address possible strategies to overcome the lack of knowledge, the lack of data and the lack of interest in this important area of critical care medicine. Improvement of clinical outcomes and reduction of

  13. Mental Representations of Illness in Patients with Gestational Trophoblastic Disease: How Do Patients Perceive Their Condition?

    PubMed Central

    Di Mattei, Valentina E.; Carnelli, Letizia; Mazzetti, Martina; Bernardi, Martina; Di Pierro, Rossella; Bergamini, Alice; Mangili, Giorgia; Candiani, Massimo; Sarno, Lucio

    2016-01-01

    Background Gestational Trophoblastic Disease comprises a group of benign and malignant disorders that derive from the placenta. Using Leventhal’s Common-Sense Model as a theoretical framework, this paper examines illness perception in women who have been diagnosed with this disease. Methods Thirty-one women diagnosed with Gestational Trophoblastic Disease in a hospital in Italy were asked to complete the Illness Perception Questionnaire-Revised to measure the following: illness Identity, illness opinions and causes of Gestational Trophoblastic Disease. Results High mean scores were observed in the Emotional representations and Treatment control subscales. A significant difference emerged between hydatidiform mole patients and those with gestational trophoblastic neoplasia on the Identity subscale. A significant correlation emerged between “time since diagnosis” and the Treatment control subscale. Discussion This study is the first to investigate illness perception in Gestational Trophoblastic Disease. From a clinical perspective the results highlight the need for multidisciplinary support programs to promote a more realistic illness perception. PMID:27101144

  14. Early enteral and parenteral nutrition on immune functions of neurocritically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Qi, S Y; Wang, W T; Chen, C Y; Chu, Z D; Liu, X J; Liu, X J

    2016-01-01

    , and there was a statistical significance between the groups (p < 0.05); the EN + EPN group and EN + SPN group exceeded the EN group in total lymphocyte count (TLC), and the difference had a statistical significance (p less than 0.05). These results demonstrate that neurocritically ill patients achieving the target energy can avoid malnutrition and immunodeficiency; serum protein decrease can cause malnutrition after one week of EN support; and enteral and parenteral nutrition can improve nutritional and immune indicators of neurocritically ill patients in the acute phase. In addition, EPN is more likely to improve malnutrition and immune functions of critical patients than SPN.

  15. Monocyte Profiles in Critically Ill Patients With Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Sepsis

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-02

    Pseudomonas Infections; Pseudomonas Septicemia; Pseudomonas; Pneumonia; Pseudomonal Bacteraemia; Pseudomonas Urinary Tract Infection; Pseudomonas Gastrointestinal Tract Infection; Sepsis; Sepsis, Severe; Critically Ill

  16. Hormonal supplementation in endocrine dysfunction in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Duława, Anna; Bułdak, Łukasz; Krysiak, Robert; Okopień, Bogusław

    2007-01-01

    One of the greatest challenges for a physician is a critically ill patient. Regardless of the reason for an admission to the Intensive Care Units (ICU) (e.g. myocardial infarction, severe pneumonia, trauma or many others) each of the above-mentioned conditions impairs homeostasis including instability of the endocrine system. The observed alterations in serum glucose level or clinical signs of hormonal imbalance alarm practitioners and prompt them to an intervention. However, side-effects of administered drugs have to be always considered, because every intervention in the endocrine system may have various consequences or prove itself maleficent. Since critical condition causes numerous changes in the hormonal system, the definition of endocrine gland failure in the ICU patients should differ from the definition related to the general population. This review is aimed at describing alterations, diagnosis and treatment options for an impaired carbohydrate metabolism and inadequate response of the adrenal and thyroid endocrine axis. It has been written in order to aid the choice between "the watch and wait strategy" and aggressive pharmacological intervention. Furthermore, several standard and innovative therapeutic procedures were described and, if possible, compared. Recent articles have been included in order to show current views on the up-to-date clinical approach.

  17. A LONGITUDINAL STUDY OF POOR SLEEP AFTER INPATIENT POST-ACUTE REHABILITATION: THE ROLE OF DEPRESSION AND PRE-ILLNESS SLEEP QUALITY

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Jennifer L.; Jouldjian, Stella; Mitchell, Michael N.; Josephson, Karen R.; Alessi, Cathy A.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To explore the unique impact of poor sleep and symptoms of depression on sleep quality for up to one year after inpatient post-acute rehabilitation among older adults. Design Prospective longitudinal cohort study. Setting Two in-patient post-acute rehabilitation facilities Participants 245 individuals over age 65 years (mean age=80 years, 38% female) Interventions None. Measurements Sleep quality was assessed with the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) during the post-acute care stay twice to evaluate pre-illness sleep quality and sleep quality during the post-acute care stay, and again at 3, 6, 9 and 12-months follow-up. Demographics, symptoms of depression, cognitive functioning, and comorbidities were also assessed. Results Across time points, sleep was significantly disturbed for many individuals. Nested regression models predicting PSQI total score at 3, 6, 9 and 12 months showed that variables entered in Block 1 (age, gender, cognitive functioning and comorbidities) were significant predictors of poor sleep at 6-months, but not at 3, 9 or 12 months follow-up. Depression (Block 2) and pre-illness PSQI total score (Block 3) were significant predictors of PSQI total score at all follow-up time points. PSQI total score during post-acute care (Block 4) explained a significant proportion of variance only at the 3-month follow-up. Conclusions This study confirms that chronic poor sleep is common among older adults during post-acute rehabilitation, and resolution of sleep disturbance after acute health events may be a lengthy process. Our findings expand understanding of the role of depressive symptoms and pre-existing sleep complaints in predicting poor sleep over time among these vulnerable older adults. PMID:22617164

  18. Alteration of the sublingual microvascular glycocalyx in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Donati, Abele; Damiani, Elisa; Domizi, Roberta; Romano, Rocco; Adrario, Erica; Pelaia, Paolo; Ince, Can; Singer, Mervyn

    2013-11-01

    Glycocalyx degradation may contribute to microvascular dysfunction and tissue hypoperfusion during systemic inflammation and sepsis. In this observational study we evaluated the alteration of the sublingual microvascular glycocalyx in 16 healthy volunteers and 50 critically ill patients. Sidestream Dark Field images of the sublingual microcirculation were automatically analyzed by dedicated software. The Perfused Boundary Region (PBR) was calculated as the dimensions of the permeable part of the glycocalyx allowing the penetration of circulating red blood cells, providing an index of glycocalyx damage. The PBR was increased in ICU patients compared to healthy controls (2.7 [2.59-2.88] vs. 2.46 [2.37-2.59]μm, p<0.0001) and tended to be higher in the 32 septic patients compared to non-septics (2.77 [2.62-2.93] vs. 2.67 [2.55-2.75]μm, p=0.05), suggesting more severe glycocalyx alterations. A PBR of 2.76 showed the best discriminative ability towards the presence of sepsis (sensitivity: 50%, specificity: 83%; area under the receiver operating characteristic curve: 0.67, 95% CI 0.52-0.82, p=0.05). A weak positive correlation was found between PBR and heart rate (r=0.3, p=0.03). In 17 septic patients, a correlation was found between PBR and number of rolling leukocytes in post-capillary venules (RL/venule) (r=0.55, p=0.02), confirming that glycocalyx shedding enhances leukocyte-endothelium interaction.

  19. Acute Muscular Sarcocystosis: an international investigation among ill travelers returning from Tioman Island, Malaysia, 2011 and 2012

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two provider-based traveler-focused networks allowed for the detection of a large outbreak of acute muscular sarcocystosis (AMS). Clinicians evaluating travelers returning ill from Malaysia with fever and myalgia noted the biphasic aspect of the disease, the later onset of elevated CPK and eosinophi...

  20. Acute Muscular Sarcocystosis: An International Investigation Among Ill Travelers Returning From Tioman Island, Malaysia, 2011–2012

    PubMed Central

    Esposito, Douglas H.; Stich, August; Epelboin, Loïc; Malvy, Denis; Han, Pauline V.; Bottieau, Emmanuel; da Silva, Alexandre; Zanger, Philipp; Slesak, Günther; van Genderen, Perry J. J.; Rosenthal, Benjamin M.; Cramer, Jakob P.; Visser, Leo G.; Muñoz, José; Drew, Clifton P.; Goldsmith, Cynthia S.; Steiner, Florian; Wagner, Noémie; Grobusch, Martin P.; Plier, D. Adam; Tappe, Dennis; Sotir, Mark J.; Brown, Clive; Brunette, Gary W.; Fayer, Ronald; von Sonnenburg, Frank; Neumayr, Andreas; Kozarsky, Phyllis E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Through 2 international traveler-focused surveillance networks (GeoSentinel and TropNet), we identified and investigated a large outbreak of acute muscular sarcocystosis (AMS), a rarely reported zoonosis caused by a protozoan parasite of the genus Sarcocystis, associated with travel to Tioman Island, Malaysia, during 2011–2012. Methods Clinicians reporting patients with suspected AMS to GeoSentinel submitted demographic, clinical, itinerary, and exposure data. We defined a probable case as travel to Tioman Island after 1 March 2011, eosinophilia (>5%), clinical or laboratory-supported myositis, and negative trichinellosis serology. Case confirmation required histologic observation of sarcocysts or isolation of Sarcocystis species DNA from muscle biopsy. Results Sixty-eight patients met the case definition (62 probable and 6 confirmed). All but 2 resided in Europe; all were tourists and traveled mostly during the summer months. The most frequent symptoms reported were myalgia (100%), fatigue (91%), fever (82%), headache (59%), and arthralgia (29%); onset clustered during 2 distinct periods: “early” during the second and “late” during the sixth week after departure from the island. Blood eosinophilia and elevated serum creatinine phosphokinase (CPK) levels were observed beginning during the fifth week after departure. Sarcocystis nesbitti DNA was recovered from 1 muscle biopsy. Conclusions Clinicians evaluating travelers returning ill from Malaysia with myalgia, with or without fever, should consider AMS, noting the apparent biphasic aspect of the disease, the later onset of elevated CPK and eosinophilia, and the possibility for relapses. The exact source of infection among travelers to Tioman Island remains unclear but needs to be determined to prevent future illnesses. PMID:25091309

  1. Perceived Stress in Chronic Illness: A Comparative Analysis of Four Diseases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Revenson, Tracey A.; Felton, Barbara J.

    Most studies of stress and coping processes among patients with serious illnesses have focused on acute illness states. Far less research has involved systematic examination of the types and frequency of illness-related stresses experienced by individuals living with chronic illness. To compare the nature and degree of illness-related stress posed…

  2. Acute epiglottitis: A review of 50 patients.

    PubMed

    Lon, Shafkat Ahmad; Lateef, Mohd; Sajad, Mir

    2006-04-01

    We reviewed 50 patients admitted to the department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head & Neck Surgery of Govt Medical College Srinagar from September 19% to September 2002 diagnosed with acute epiglottitis. Male were more commonly involved than females in the ratio of 2.8:1 with only 6 cases younger than 10 years of age. The highest incidence was in the month of January (22%). The common symptoms of acute epiglottitis were sorethroat(92%) and odynophagia(88%). Any patient with sudden onset of these symptoms should be suspected of having acute epiglottitis and should have an indirect laryngoscopy. Blood culture was obtained in 20 cases Cultures were positive only in 5 cases, out of which 4 were positive for Hemophilus influenzae type B. Throat cultures were not obtamed The primary treatment of acute epiglottitis is intravenous antibiotics, steriods, and humidified air. Treacheostomy was needed only in 4 patients. There were no deaths.

  3. Epidemiology and Outcomes in Critically Ill Patients with Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection in the Era of Combination Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Bagshaw, Sean M.; Eurich, Dean T.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. The impact of critical illness on survival of HIV-infected patients in the era of antiretroviral therapy remains uncertain. We describe the epidemiology of critical illness in this population and identify predictors of mortality. Materials and Methods. Retrospective cohort of HIV-infected patients was admitted to intensive care from 2002 to 2014. Patient sociodemographics, comorbidities, case-mix, illness severity, and 30-day mortality were captured. Multivariable Cox regression analyses were performed to identify predictors of mortality. Results. Of 282 patients, mean age was 44 years (SD 10) and 169 (59%) were male. Median (IQR) CD4 count and plasma viral load (PVL) were 125 cells/mm3 (30–300) and 28,000 copies/mL (110–270,000). Fifty-five (20%) patients died within 30 days. Factors independently associated with mortality included APACHE II score (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] 1.12; 95% CI 1.08–1.16; p < 0.001), cirrhosis (aHR 2.30; 95% CI 1.12–4.73; p = 0.024), coronary artery disease (aHR 6.98; 95% CI 2.20–22.13; p = 0.001), and duration of HIV infection (aHR 1.07 per year; 95% CI 1.02–1.13; p = 0.01). CD4 count and PVL were not associated with mortality. Conclusions. Mortality from an episode of critical illness in HIV-infected patients remains high but appears to be driven by acute illness severity and HIV-unrelated comorbid disease rather than degree of immune suppression. PMID:28348607

  4. Outcomes in Critically Ill Patients with Cancer-Related Complications

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Viviane B. L.; Vassalo, Juliana; Silva, Ulysses V. A.; Caruso, Pedro; Torelly, André P.; Silva, Eliezer; Teles, José M. M.; Knibel, Marcos; Rezende, Ederlon; Netto, José J. S.; Piras, Claudio; Azevedo, Luciano C. P.; Bozza, Fernando A.; Spector, Nelson; Salluh, Jorge I. F.; Soares, Marcio

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cancer patients are at risk for severe complications related to the underlying malignancy or its treatment and, therefore, usually require admission to intensive care units (ICU). Here, we evaluated the clinical characteristics and outcomes in this subgroup of patients. Materials and Methods Secondary analysis of two prospective cohorts of cancer patients admitted to ICUs. We used multivariable logistic regression to identify variables associated with hospital mortality. Results Out of 2,028 patients, 456 (23%) had cancer-related complications. Compared to those without cancer-related complications, they more frequently had worse performance status (PS) (57% vs 36% with PS≥2), active malignancy (95% vs 58%), need for vasopressors (45% vs 34%), mechanical ventilation (70% vs 51%) and dialysis (12% vs 8%) (P<0.001 for all analyses). ICU (47% vs. 27%) and hospital (63% vs. 38%) mortality rates were also higher in patients with cancer-related complications (P<0.001). Chemo/radiation therapy-induced toxicity (6%), venous thromboembolism (5%), respiratory failure (4%), gastrointestinal involvement (3%) and vena cava syndrome (VCS) (2%) were the most frequent cancer-related complications. In multivariable analysis, the presence of cancer-related complications per se was not associated with mortality [odds ratio (OR) = 1.25 (95% confidence interval, 0.94–1.66), P = 0.131]. However, among the individual cancer-related complications, VCS [OR = 3.79 (1.11–12.92), P = 0.033], gastrointestinal involvement [OR = 3.05 (1.57–5.91), P = <0.001] and respiratory failure [OR = 1.96(1.04–3.71), P = 0.038] were independently associated with in-hospital mortality. Conclusions The prognostic impact of cancer-related complications was variable. Although some complications were associated with worse outcomes, the presence of an acute cancer-related complication per se should not guide decisions to admit a patient to ICU. PMID:27764143

  5. Pharmacokinetics of liposomal amphotericin B (Ambisome) in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Heinemann, V; Bosse, D; Jehn, U; Kähny, B; Wachholz, K; Debus, A; Scholz, P; Kolb, H J; Wilmanns, W

    1997-06-01

    The liposomal formulation of amphotericin B (AmBisome) greatly reduces the acute and chronic side effects of the parent drug. The present study describes the pharmacokinetic characteristics of AmBisome applied to 10 patients at a dose of 2.8 to 3.0 mg/kg of body weight and compares them to the pharmacokinetics observed in 6 patients treated with amphotericin B deoxycholate at the standard dose of 1.0 mg/kg. Interpatient variabilities of amphotericin B peak concentrations (Cmax) and areas under concentration-time curves (AUC) were 8- to 10-fold greater for patients treated with AmBisome than for patients treated with amphotericin B deoxycholate. At the threefold greater dose of AmBisome, median Cmaxs were 8.4-fold higher (14.4 versus 1.7 microg/ml) and median AUCs exceeded those observed with amphotericin B deoxycholate by 9-fold. This was in part explained by a 5.7-fold lower volume of distribution (0.42 liters/kg) in AmBisome-treated patients. The elimination of amphotericin B from serum was biphasic for both formulations. However, the apparent half-life of elimination was twofold shorter for AmBisome (P = 0.03). Neither hemodialysis nor hemofiltration had a significant impact on AmBisome pharmacokinetics as analyzed in one patient. In conclusion, the liposomal formulation of amphotericin B significantly (P = 0.001) reduces the volume of drug distribution, thereby allowing for greater drug concentrations in serum. The low toxicity of AmBisome therefore cannot readily be explained by its serum pharmacokinetics.

  6. Illness Perception and Information Behaviour of Patients with Rare Chronic Diseases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katavic, Snježana Stanarevic; Tanackovic, Sanjica Faletar; Badurina, Boris

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: This study examined possible correlations between health information behaviour and illness perception among patients with rare chronic diseases. Illness perception is related to coping strategies used by patients, and some health information behaviour practices may be associated with better coping and more positive perception of…

  7. Illness perception of dropout patients followed up at bipolar outpatient clinic, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Oflaz, Serap; Guveli, Hulya; Kalelioglu, Tevfik; Akyazı, Senem; Yıldızhan, Eren; Kılıc, Kasım Candas; Basyigit, Sehnaz; Ozdemiroglu, Filiz; Akyuz, Fatma; Gokce, Esra; Bag, Sevda; Kurt, Erhan; Oral, Esat Timucin

    2015-06-01

    Dropout is a common problem in the treatment of psychiatric illnesses including bipolar disorders (BD). The aim of the present study is to investigate illness perceptions of dropout patients with BD. A cross sectional study was done on the participants who attended the Mood Disorder Outpatient Clinic at least 3 times from January 2003 through June 2008, and then failed to attend clinic till to the last one year, 2009, determined as dropout. Thirty-nine dropout patients and 39 attendent patients with BD were recruited for this study. A sociodemographic form and brief illness perception questionnaire were used to capture data. The main reasons of patients with BD for dropout were difficulties of transport (31%), to visit another doctor (26%), giving up drugs (13%) and low education level (59%) is significant for dropout patients. The dropout patients reported that their illness did not critically influence their lives, their treatment had failed to control their illnesses, they had no symptoms, and that their illness did not emotionally affect them. In conclusion, the nonattendance of patients with serious mental illness can result in non-compliance of therapeutic drug regimens, and a recurrence of the appearance symptoms. The perception of illness in dropout patients with BD may be important for understanding and preventing nonattendance.

  8. Body Consciousness, Illness-Related Impairment, and Patient Adherence in Hemodialysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, Alan J.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Examined the joint effects of private body consciousness (PBC) and degree of illness-related physical impairment on treatment regimen adherence in a sample of 52 hemodialysis patients. Predicted the effect of PBC on adherence would vary as a function of patients' level of illness-related physical impairment. Results are discussed in terms of…

  9. Critically ill obstetric patients in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Demirkiran, O; Dikmen, Y; Utku, T; Urkmez, S

    2003-10-01

    We aimed to determine the morbidity and mortality among obstetric patients admitted to the intensive care unit. In this study, we analyzed retrospectively all obstetric admissions to a multi-disciplinary intensive care unit over a five-year period. Obstetric patients were identified from 4733 consecutive intensive care unit admissions. Maternal age, gestation of newborns, mode of delivery, presence of coexisting medical problems, duration of stay, admission diagnosis, specific intensive care interventions (mechanical ventilation, continuous veno-venous hemofiltration, central venous catheterization, and arterial cannulation), outcome, maternal mortality, and acute physiology and chronic health evaluation (APACHE) II score were recorded. Obstetric patients (n=125) represented 2.64% of all intensive care unit admissions and 0.89% of all deliveries during the five-year period. The overall mortality of those admitted to the intensive care unit was 10.4%. Maternal age and gestation of newborns were similar in survivors and non-survivors. There were significant differences in length of stay and APACHE II score between survivors and non-survivors P < 0.05. The commonest cause of intensive care unit admission was preeclampsia/eclampsia (73.6%) followed by post-partum hemorrhage (11.2%). Intensive care specialists should be familiar with these complications of pregnancy and should work closely with obstetricians.

  10. Co-enrollment of critically ill patients into multiple studies: patterns, predictors and consequences

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Research on co-enrollment practices and their impact are limited in the ICU setting. The objectives of this study were: 1) to describe patterns and predictors of co-enrollment of patients in a thromboprophylaxis trial, and 2) to examine the consequences of co-enrollment on clinical and trial outcomes. Methods In an observational analysis of an international thromboprophylaxis trial in 67 ICUs, we examined the co-enrollment of critically ill medical-surgical patients into more than one study, and examined the clinical and trial outcomes among co-enrolled and non-co-enrolled patients. Results Among 3,746 patients enrolled in PROTECT (Prophylaxis for ThromboEmbolism in Critical Care Trial), 713 (19.0%) were co-enrolled in at least one other study (53.6% in a randomized trial, 37.0% in an observational study and 9.4% in both). Six factors independently associated with co-enrollment (all P < 0.001) were illness severity (odds ratio (OR) 1.35, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.19 to 1.53 for each 10-point Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score increase), substitute decision-makers providing consent, rather than patients (OR 3.31, 2.03 to 5.41), experience of persons inviting consent (OR 2.67, 1.74 to 4.11 for persons with > 10 years' experience compared to persons with none), center size (all ORs > 10 for ICUs with > 15 beds), affiliation with trials groups (OR 5.59, 3.49 to 8.95), and main trial rather than pilot phase (all ORs > 8 for recruitment year beyond the pilot). Co-enrollment did not influence clinical or trial outcomes or risk of adverse events. Conclusions Co-enrollment was strongly associated with features of the patients, research personnel, setting and study. Co-enrollment had no impact on trial results, and appeared safe, acceptable and feasible. Transparent reporting, scholarly discourse, ethical analysis and further research are needed on the complex topic of co-enrollment during critical illness. PMID:23298553

  11. Acute Illness Protocol for Organic Acidemias: Methylmalonic Acidemia and Propionic Acidemia.

    PubMed

    Aldubayan, Saud H; Rodan, Lance H; Berry, Gerard T; Levy, Harvey L

    2017-02-01

    Inborn errors of metabolism (IEM) are genetic disorders that disrupt enzyme activity, cellular transport, or energy production. They are individually rare, but collectively have an incidence of 1:1000. Most patients with IEMs are followed by a physician with expertise in Biochemical Genetics (Metabolism), but may present outside of this setting. Because IEMs can present acutely with life-threatening crises that require specific interventions, it is critical for the emergency medicine physicians, pediatricians, internists, and critical care physicians as well as biochemical geneticists to be familiar with the initial assessment and management of patients with these disorders. Appropriate early care can be lifesaving. This protocol is not designed to replace the expert consultation of a biochemical geneticist but rather to improve early care and increase the level of comfort of the acute care physician with initial management of organic acidemias until specialty consultation is obtained.

  12. Proximal gastric motility in critically ill patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Nam Q; Fraser, Robert J; Bryant, Laura K; Chapman, Marianne; Holloway, Richard H

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the proximal gastric motor response to duodenal nutrients in critically ill patients with long-standing type 2 diabetes mellitus. METHODS: Proximal gastric motility was assessed (using a barostat) in 10 critically ill patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (59 ± 3 years) during two 60-min duodenal infusions of Ensure® (1 and 2 kcal/min), in random order, separated by 2 h fasting. Data were compared with 15 non-diabetic critically ill patients (48 ± 5 years) and 10 healthy volunteers (28 ± 3 years). RESULTS: Baseline proximal gastric volumes were similar between the three groups. In diabetic patients, proximal gastric relaxation during 1 kcal/min nutrient infusion was similar to non-diabetic patients and healthy controls. In contrast, relaxation during 2 kcal/min infusion was initially reduced in diabetic patients (p < 0.05) but increased to a level similar to healthy humans, unlike non-diabetic patients where relaxation was impaired throughout the infusion. Duodenal nutrient stimulation reduced the fundic wave frequency in a dose-dependent fashion in both the critically ill diabetic patients and healthy subjects, but not in critically ill patients without diabetes. Fundic wave frequency in diabetic patients and healthy subjects was greater than in non-diabetic patients. CONCLUSION: In patients with diabetes mellitus, proximal gastric motility is less disturbed than non-diabetic patients during critical illness, suggesting that these patients may not be at greater risk of delayed gastric emptying. PMID:17226907

  13. Factors associated with the recovery of activities of daily living after hospitalization for acute medical illness: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Goto, Ryohei; Watanabe, Hiroki; Tsutsumi, Madoka; Kanamori, Takeshige; Maeno, Tetsuhiro; Yanagi, Hisako

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the factors associated with the recovery rate of activities of daily living of elderly patients hospitalized for acute medical illness. [Subjects and Methods] A total of 238 elderly patients were enrolled in this study. The main outcome measure was the functional independence measure score which was used as an assessment of activities of daily living. The participants were divided into 2 groups based on their activities of daily living before onset: the independent group and the partially dependent group. The participants of each group were further divided into 2 subgroups based on recovery rates of activities of daily living: the high-recovery group (80%) and the low-recovery group (<80%). The factors associated with the recovery rate were examined using multivariate logistic regression analysis. [Results] The factors associated with the recovery rate were: days of inactivity and cognitive status at the start of rehabilitation for the independent group, and days of inactivity and nutritional status at the start of rehabilitation for the partially dependent group. [Conclusion] The results of this study suggest that the important factors for return to normal activities of daily living are: days of inactivity and cognitive status for the independent group; and days of inactivity and management of nutrition for the partially dependent group. PMID:27821931

  14. Therapeutic efficacy of nutritional support by percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy in critically ill patients: A self-control clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Fei; Gao, Ya-Ling; Liu, Zheng-Jin; Hu, Yi-Qun

    2017-01-01

    Background & Objective: Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) is a procedure to provide enteral nutrition for critically ill patients. It is commonly used in clinical practice; however, the widespread use of PEG is controversial. Our objective was to evaluate the therapeutic effect of nutritional support by PEG in these critically ill patients. Methods: A total of 64 critically ill patients including 41 males and 23 females (aged 23-84) were identified by the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II scoring system during September 2004 to June 2012. The nutritional status before and after PEG was mainly assessed by the tricep skinfold thickness and serum albumin level. The nutritional status and pathological condition were assessed at 4, 8 and 12 weeks before and after PEG feeding. The assessment was according to the classical method of the human nutritional status. Follow-up was performed at one month, three months and 1.5 year after gastrostomy. Statistical analysis was performed by SPSS 11.5 software. The incidence of inhalation pneumonia and gastroesophageal regurgitation was compared by chi square (χ2) test. P<0.05 were considered statistically significant. Results: Among the 64 patients, 9 patients died of their former diseases or related symptoms. Postoperative follow-up showed that both nutritional status and complications were improved after PEG in 55 patients (P<0.05). The serum albumin and tricep skinfold thickness levels were significantly increased. The incidence of hypoglycemia, hypocalcemia, hypokalemia and hyponatremia were lower than pre-operation. The frequencies of complications were significantly reduced. No severe complications occurred in any patient. Conclusions: Our study confirmed that PEG was a good long-term route of nutritional supply with no serious complications for critically ill patients. PMID:28367176

  15. Design Considerations for Post-Acute Care mHealth: Patient Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Sanger, Patrick; Hartzler, Andrea; Lober, William B; Evans, Heather L; Pratt, Wanda

    2014-01-01

    Many current mobile health applications ("apps") and most previous research have been directed at management of chronic illnesses. However, little is known about patient preferences and design considerations for apps intended to help in a post-acute setting. Our team is developing an mHealth platform to engage patients in wound tracking to identify and manage surgical site infections (SSI) after hospital discharge. Post-discharge SSIs are a major source of morbidity and expense, and occur at a critical care transition when patients are physically and emotionally stressed. Through interviews with surgical patients who experienced SSI, we derived design considerations for such a post-acute care app. Key design qualities include: meeting basic accessibility, usability and security needs; encouraging patient-centeredness; facilitating better, more predictable communication; and supporting personalized management by providers. We illustrate our application of these guiding design considerations and propose a new framework for mHealth design based on illness duration and intensity.

  16. Prognoses of seriously ill hospitalized patients on the days before death: implications for patient care and public policy.

    PubMed

    Lynn, J; Harrell, F; Cohn, F; Wagner, D; Connors, A F

    1997-02-01

    Troubling aspects of the experiences of patients at the ends of their lives have fueled interest in special benefits or privileges for this group. There is a presumption that being "at the end of life" is discernible. This study examines this presumption using data from two previously collected databases: the Study to Understand Prognoses and Preferences for Outcomes and Risks of Treatments (SUPPORT) and the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation III (APACHE III). Both studies generated multivariable estimates of survival prognosis for hospitalized patients. SUPPORT included 9,105 patients with one of nine serious illnesses in five hospitals over 4 yrs, of whom 2,360 died in the hospital and 4,537 died within 180 days of entry into the study. The APACHE III database describes 2,750 deaths in 16,622 ICU patients in 40 hospitals. The relationship of median estimates with time to death were examined for each source of data, for different diseases, and for ICU settings of care. In SUPPORT, the median predicted chance of survival for 2 months on the day before actual death was .17 (interquartile range, .02-.40) and was .51 (.31-.66) 1 wk before death. Median prognoses varied substantially among diseases: the median for congestive heart failure patients was a .62 chance of living 2 months on the day before death, while lung cancer had only a .17 chance and coma patients only an .11 chance. Median prognostication estimates were not much different when given by physicians and were only a little more pessimistic in APACHE (median estimate for hospital survival on the day before death was .14 and 7 days before was .45). To make plans about care and to optimally support most dying persons and families, conversations must occur while the patient still has a considerable chance of surviving the current episode of illness. Using statistical estimates of prognosis to designate a category of "terminally ill" patients for public policy purposes is unavoidably arbitrary

  17. Manual muscle testing: a method of measuring extremity muscle strength applied to critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Ciesla, Nancy; Dinglas, Victor; Fan, Eddy; Kho, Michelle; Kuramoto, Jill; Needham, Dale

    2011-04-12

    Survivors of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and other causes of critical illness often have generalized weakness, reduced exercise tolerance, and persistent nerve and muscle impairments after hospital discharge. Using an explicit protocol with a structured approach to training and quality assurance of research staff, manual muscle testing (MMT) is a highly reliable method for assessing strength, using a standardized clinical examination, for patients following ARDS, and can be completed with mechanically ventilated patients who can tolerate sitting upright in bed and are able to follow two-step commands. (7, 8) This video demonstrates a protocol for MMT, which has been taught to ≥ 43 research staff who have performed >800 assessments on >280 ARDS survivors. Modifications for the bedridden patient are included. Each muscle is tested with specific techniques for positioning, stabilization, resistance, and palpation for each score of the 6-point ordinal Medical Research Council scale. Three upper and three lower extremity muscles are graded in this protocol: shoulder abduction, elbow flexion, wrist extension, hip flexion, knee extension, and ankle dorsiflexion. These muscles were chosen based on the standard approach for evaluating patients for ICU-acquired weakness used in prior publications. (1,2).

  18. Discharging patients from acute care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Helen

    2016-02-10

    Planning for patient discharge is an essential element of any admission to an acute setting, but may often be left until the patient is almost ready to leave hospital. This article emphasises why discharge planning is important and lists the essential principles that should be addressed to ensure that patients leave at an optimum time, feeling confident and safe to do so. Early assessment, early planning and co-ordination of all the teams involved in the patient's care are essential. Effective communication between the various teams and with the patient and their family or carer(s) is necessary. Patients should leave hospital with all the information, medications and equipment they require. Appropriate plans should have been developed and communicated to the receiving community or non-acute team. When patient discharge is effective, complications as a result of extended lengths of hospital stay are prevented, hospital beds are used efficiently and readmissions are reduced.

  19. Venous thromboembolism risk and prophylaxis in hospitalised medically ill patients. The ENDORSE Global Survey.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Jean-Francois; Cohen, Alexander T; Tapson, Victor F; Goldhaber, Samuel Z; Kakkar, Ajay K; Deslandes, Bruno; Huang, Wei; Anderson, Frederick A

    2010-04-01

    Limited data are available regarding the risk for venous thromboembolism (VTE) and VTE prophylaxis use in hospitalised medically ill patients. We analysed data from the global ENDORSE survey to evaluate VTE risk and prophylaxis use in this population according to diagnosis, baseline characteristics, and country. Data on patient characteristics, VTE risk, and prophylaxis use were abstracted from hospital charts. VTE risk and prophylaxis use were evaluated according to the 2004 American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP) guidelines. Multivariable analysis was performed to identify factors associated with use of ACCP-recommended prophylaxis. Data were evaluated for 37,356 hospitalised medical patients across 32 countries. VTE risk varied according to medical diagnosis, from 31.2% of patients with gastrointestinal/hepatobiliary diseases to 100% of patients with acute heart failure, active non-infectious respiratory disease, or pulmonary infection (global rate, 41.5%). Among those at risk for VTE, ACCP-recommended prophylaxis was used in 24.4% haemorrhagic stroke patients and 40-45% of cardiopulmonary disease patients (global rate, 39.5%). Large differences in prophylaxis use were observed among countries. Markers of disease severity, including central venous catheters, mechanical ventilation, and admission to intensive care units, were strongly associated with use of ACCP-recommended prophylaxis. In conclusion, VTE risk varies according to medical diagnosis. Less than 40% of at-risk hospitalised medical patients receive ACCP-recommended prophylaxis. Prophylaxis use appears to be associated with disease severity rather than medical diagnosis. These data support the necessity to improve implementation of available guidelines for evaluating VTE risk and providing prophylaxis to hospitalised medical patients.

  20. Fluid and electrolyte overload in critically ill patients: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Besen, Bruno Adler Maccagnan Pinheiro; Gobatto, André Luiz Nunes; Melro, Lívia Maria Garcia; Maciel, Alexandre Toledo; Park, Marcelo

    2015-01-01

    Fluids are considered the cornerstone of therapy for many shock states, particularly states that are associated with relative or absolute hypovolemia. Fluids are also commonly used for many other purposes, such as renal protection from endogenous and exogenous substances, for the safe dilution of medications and as “maintenance” fluids. However, a large amount of evidence from the last decade has shown that fluids can have deleterious effects on several organ functions, both from excessive amounts of fluids and from their non-physiological electrolyte composition. Additionally, fluid prescription is more common in patients with systemic inflammatory response syndrome whose kidneys may have impaired mechanisms of electrolyte and free water excretion. These processes have been studied as separate entities (hypernatremia, hyperchloremic acidosis and progressive fluid accumulation) leading to worse outcomes in many clinical scenarios, including but not limited to acute kidney injury, worsening respiratory function, higher mortality and higher hospital and intensive care unit length-of-stays. In this review, we synthesize this evidence and describe this phenomenon as fluid and electrolyte overload with potentially deleterious effects. Finally, we propose a strategy to safely use fluids and thereafter wean patients from fluids, along with other caveats to be considered when dealing with fluids in the intensive care unit. PMID:25938027

  1. Causal attribution and illness perception: a cross-sectional study in Mexican patients with psychosis.

    PubMed

    Gómez-de-Regil, Lizzette

    2014-01-01

    Health psychology researchers have begun to focus greater attention on people's beliefs about health/illness since these beliefs can clearly affect behavior. This cross-sectional study aimed at (1) identifying the most common factors psychotic patients attribute their illness to and (2) assessing the association between causal attribution and illness perception (cognitive, emotional, and comprehensibility dimensions). Sixty-two patients (56.5% females) who had been treated for psychosis at a public psychiatric hospital in Mexico answered the Angermeyer and Klusmann Illness Attribution Scale and the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire. Results showed that most patients attributed psychosis onset to social factors and that attribution to their personality might have an overwhelmingly negative effect on their lives. Acknowledging psychotic patient attributional beliefs and considering them in clinical practice could improve treatment efficacy and overall recovery success. This is particularly important in psychosis, since symptoms are often severe and/or persistent and require long-term treatment.

  2. Causal Attribution and Illness Perception: A Cross-Sectional Study in Mexican Patients with Psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-de-Regil, Lizzette

    2014-01-01

    Health psychology researchers have begun to focus greater attention on people's beliefs about health/illness since these beliefs can clearly affect behavior. This cross-sectional study aimed at (1) identifying the most common factors psychotic patients attribute their illness to and (2) assessing the association between causal attribution and illness perception (cognitive, emotional, and comprehensibility dimensions). Sixty-two patients (56.5% females) who had been treated for psychosis at a public psychiatric hospital in Mexico answered the Angermeyer and Klusmann Illness Attribution Scale and the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire. Results showed that most patients attributed psychosis onset to social factors and that attribution to their personality might have an overwhelmingly negative effect on their lives. Acknowledging psychotic patient attributional beliefs and considering them in clinical practice could improve treatment efficacy and overall recovery success. This is particularly important in psychosis, since symptoms are often severe and/or persistent and require long-term treatment. PMID:25525628

  3. Management of ionizing radiation injuries and illnesses, part 4: acute radiation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Doran M; Iddins, Carol J; Parrillo, Steven J; Glassman, Erik S; Goans, Ronald E

    2014-09-01

    To provide proper medical care for patients after a radiation incident, it is necessary to make the correct diagnosis in a timely manner and to ascertain the relative magnitude of the incident. The present article addresses the clinical diagnosis and management of high-dose radiation injuries and illnesses in the first 24 to 72 hours after a radiologic or nuclear incident. To evaluate the magnitude of a high-dose incident, it is important for the health physicist, physician, and radiobiologist to work together and to assess many variables, including medical history and physical examination results; the timing of prodromal signs and symptoms (eg, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, transient incapacitation, hypotension, and other signs and symptoms suggestive of high-level exposure); and the incident history, including system geometry, source-patient distance, and the suspected radiation dose distribution.

  4. Alkalosis in Critically Ill Patients with Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Jazrawi, Allan; Miller, Jan; Baigi, Amir; Chew, Michelle

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Although metabolic alkalosis is a common occurrence in intensive care units (ICUs), no study has evaluated its prevalence or outcomes in patients with severe sepsis or septic shock. Methods This is a retrospective cohort study of critically ill patients suffering from severe sepsis and septic shock admitted to the ICUs of Halmstad and Varberg County hospitals. From 910 patient records, 627 patients met the inclusion criteria. We investigated the relationship between metabolic alkalosis and mortality. Further, we studied the relationship between metabolic alkalosis and ICU length of stay (LOS). Results Metabolic alkalosis was associated with decreased 30-day and 12-month mortalities. This effect was however lost when a multivariate analysis was conducted, correcting for age, gender, pH on admission, base excess (BE) on admission, Simplified Acute Physiology Score III (SAPS III) and acute kidney injury (AKI). We then analyzed for any dose-response effect between the severity of metabolic alkalosis and mortality and found no relationship. Bivariate analysis showed that metabolic alkalosis had a significant effect on the length of ICU stay. When adjusting for age, sex, pH at admission, BE at admission, SAPS III and AKI in a multivariate analysis, metabolic alkalosis significantly contributed to prolonged ICU length of stay. In two separate sensitivity analyses pure metabolic alkalosis and late metabolic alkalosis (time of onset >48 hours) were the only significant predictor of increased ICU length of stay. Conclusion Metabolic alkalosis did not have any effect on 30-day and 12-month mortalities after adjusting for age, sex, SAPS III-score, pH and BE on admission and AKI in a multivariate analysis. The presence of metabolic alkalosis was independently associated with an increased ICU length of stay. PMID:28045915

  5. Belief in supernatural causes of mental illness among Malay patients: impact on treatment.

    PubMed

    Razali, S M; Khan, U A; Hasanah, C I

    1996-10-01

    The concept of aetiology of mental illness in 134 Malay patients was investigated by means of a 20-item checklist. About 53% of the patients attributed their illnesses to supernatural agents. Witchcraft and possession by evil spirits were regarded as common causes of illness. The number of patients who believed in supernatural causes of their mental illness was significantly higher among those who had consulted bomohs (Malay traditional healers) than among those who had not consulted them. The belief that mental illness is caused by supernatural agents is firmly held by bomohs, who reinforce this notion in those who seek their advice. Belief in supernatural causes of mental illness was not significantly associated with age, gender, level of education or occupation of the patients. Patients who believed in supernatural causes of mental illness were also found to show poor drug compliance, and the number of such patients at 6 months follow-up was significantly lower than the corresponding figure for those who did not believe in supernatural causes. The importance of understanding the patients' cultural background when treating psychiatric patients is highlighted.

  6. Determining the Community Prevalence of Acute Gastrointestinal Illness and Gaps in Surveillance of Acute Gastroenteritis and Foodborne Diseases in Guyana

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed-Rambaran, Pheona; Wilson, Alexis; James, Colin; Indar, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Guyana is an English-speaking country in South America and, culturally, it is part of the Caribbean. Objective of this study was to determine the community prevalence and true burden and economic impact of acute gastroenteritis (AGE) and foodborne diseases (FBDs) in Guyana. A cross-sectional population-based survey was conducted in 7 of the 10 regions in Guyana during August and November 2009 to capture the high- and low-AGE season respectively. Overall, 1,254 individual surveys were administered at a response rate of 96.5%. The overall monthly prevalence of self-reported cases of AGE was 7.7% (97 cases) (95% CI 6.3-9.3), and the yearly incidence was 1.0 episodes per person-year. The highest monthly prevalence of AGE was observed in region 4 (8.9%) and in children aged 1-4 year(s) (12.7%). Of the 97 AGE cases, 23% sought medical care; 65% reported spending time at home due to their illness [range 1-20 day(s), mean 2.7 days], of whom 51% required other individuals to look after them while ill. The maximum number of stools per 24 hours ranged from 3 to 9 (mean 4.5), and number of days an individual suffered from AGE ranged from 1 to 21 day(s) (mean 2.7 days). The burden of syndromic AGE cases in the population for 2009 was estimated to be 131,012 cases compared to the reported 30,468 cases (76.7% underreporting), which implies that, for every syndromic case of AGE reported, there were additional 4.3 cases occurring in the community. For every laboratory-confirmed case of FBD/AGE pathogen reported, it was estimated that approximately 2,881 more cases were occurring in the population. Giardia was the most common foodborne pathogen isolated. The minimum estimated annual cost associated with the treatment for AGE was US$ 2,358,233.2, showing that AGE and FBD pose a huge economic burden on Guyana. Underreporting of AGE and foodborne pathogens, stool collection, and laboratory capacity were major gaps, affecting the surveillance of AGE in Guyana.

  7. Timing of Acute Palliative Care Consultation in Critically Ill Patients

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-03

    Multiple Organ Failure; End Stage Cardiac Failure; End Stage Chronic Obstructive Airways Disease; Chronic Kidney Disease Stage 5; Hepatic Encephalopathy; Sepsis; Dementia; Multiple Sclerosis; Parkinson's Disease; In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest; Solid Organ Cancer

  8. A Patient with Acute Kidney Pain and High Blood Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Soulen, Michael C.

    2015-01-01

    This case presented challenging diagnostic and management issues in a young healthy man who presented with abdominal pain and new-onset hypertension. The differential diagnosis evolved over the course of the clinical presentation. The patient had severe vascular involvement of his renal and basal cerebral arteries that initially was assumed to be due to a vasculitic process or hypercoagulable state. Finally it became apparent that the patient did not have a systemic illness but rather a localized vascular disease most likely due to segmental arterial mediolysis, a rare, under-recognized condition that can potentially be fatal. This condition is often difficult to distinguish from fibromuscular dysplasia. It is important to recognize and correctly diagnose the condition, particularly in the acute phase of the disease, because delay in diagnosis can contribute to morbidity and mortality. PMID:25583291

  9. A patient with acute kidney pain and high blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Debbie L; Soulen, Michael C

    2015-04-07

    This case presented challenging diagnostic and management issues in a young healthy man who presented with abdominal pain and new-onset hypertension. The differential diagnosis evolved over the course of the clinical presentation. The patient had severe vascular involvement of his renal and basal cerebral arteries that initially was assumed to be due to a vasculitic process or hypercoagulable state. Finally it became apparent that the patient did not have a systemic illness but rather a localized vascular disease most likely due to segmental arterial mediolysis, a rare, under-recognized condition that can potentially be fatal. This condition is often difficult to distinguish from fibromuscular dysplasia. It is important to recognize and correctly diagnose the condition, particularly in the acute phase of the disease, because delay in diagnosis can contribute to morbidity and mortality.

  10. All patient refined-diagnostic related group and case mix index in acute care palliative medicine.

    PubMed

    Lagman, Ruth L; Walsh, Declan; Davis, Mellar P; Young, Brett

    2007-03-01

    The All Patient Refined-Diagnostic Related Group (APR-DRG) is a modification of the traditional DRG that adds four classes of illness severity and four classes of mortality risk. The APR-DRG is a more accurate assessment of the complexity of care. When individuals with advanced illness are admitted to an acute inpatient palliative medicine unit, there may be a perception that they receive less intense acute care. Most of these patients, however, are multisymptomatic, have several comorbidities, and are older. For all patients admitted to the unit, a guide was followed by staff physicians to document clinical information that included the site(s) of malignancy, site(s) of metastases, disease complications, disease-related symptoms, and comorbidities. We then prospectively compared DRGs, APR-DRGs, and case mix index (CMI) from January 1-June 30, 2003, and February 1-July 31,2004, before and after the use of the guide. The overall mean severity of illness (ASOI) increased by 25% (P < 0.05). The mean CMI increased by 12% (P < 0.05). The average length of stay over the same period increased slightly from 8.97 to 9.56 days. Systematic documentation of clinical findings using a specific tool for patients admitted to an acute inpatient palliative medicine unit based on APR-DRG classifications captured a higher severity of illness and may better reflect resource utilization.

  11. Fluconazole dosing predictions in critically-ill patients receiving prolonged intermittent renal replacement therapy: a Monte Carlo simulation approach.

    PubMed

    Gharibian, Katherine N; Mueller, Bruce A

    2016-07-01

    Fluconazole is a renally-eliminated antifungal commonly used to treat Candida species infections. In critically-ill patients receiving prolonged intermittent renal replacement therapy (PIRRT), limited pharmacokinetic (PK) data are available to guide fluconazole dosing. We used previously-published fluconazole clearance data and PK data of critically-ill patients with acute kidney injury to develop a PK model with the goal of determining a therapeutic dosing regimen for critically-ill patients receiving PIRRT. Monte Carlo simulations were performed to create a virtual cohort of patients receiving different fluconazole dosing regimens. Plasma drug concentration-time profiles were evaluated on the probability of attaining a mean 24-hour area under the drug concentration-time curve to minimum inhibitory concentration ratio (AUC24h : MIC) of 100 during the initial 48 hours of antifungal therapy. At the susceptibility breakpoint of Candida albicans (2 mg/L), 93 - 96% of simulated subjects receiving PIRRT attained the pharmacodynamic target with a fluconazole 800-mg loading dose plus 400 mg twice daily (q12h or pre and post PIRRT) regimen. Monte Carlo simulations of a PK model of PIRRT provided a basis for the development of an informed fluconazole dosing recommendation when PK data was limited. This finding should be validated in the clinical setting.

  12. Influence of Daily Fluid Balance prior to Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy on Outcomes in Critically Ill Patients.

    PubMed

    Han, Min Jee; Park, Ki Hyun; Shin, Jung-Ho; Kim, Su Hyun

    2016-08-01

    Positive fluid balance is a risk factor for mortality in critically ill patients, especially those requiring continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT). However, the association between daily fluid balance and various organ impairments remains unclear. This study investigated the impacts of daily fluid balance prior to CRRT on organ dysfunction, as well as mortality in critically ill patients. We identified daily fluid balance between intensive care unit (ICU) admission and CRRT initiation. According to daily fluid balance, the time to CRRT initiation and the rate of organ failure based on the sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) score were assessed. We recruited 100 patients who experienced CRRT for acute kidney injury. CRRT was initiated within 2 [0, 4] days. The time to CRRT initiation was shortened in proportion to daily fluid balance, even after the adjustment for the renal SOFA score at ICU admission (HR 1.14, P = 0.007). Based on the SOFA score, positive daily fluid balance was associated with respiratory, cardiovascular, nervous, and coagulation failure, independent of each initial SOFA score at ICU admission (HR 1.36, 1.26, 1.24 and 2.26, all P < 0.05). Ultimately, we found that positive fluid balance was related with an increase in the rate of 28-day mortality (HR 1.14, P = 0.012). Positive daily fluid balance may accelerate the requirement for CRRT, moreover, it can be associated with an increased risk of multiple organ failure in critically ill patients.

  13. Influence of Daily Fluid Balance prior to Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy on Outcomes in Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Positive fluid balance is a risk factor for mortality in critically ill patients, especially those requiring continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT). However, the association between daily fluid balance and various organ impairments remains unclear. This study investigated the impacts of daily fluid balance prior to CRRT on organ dysfunction, as well as mortality in critically ill patients. We identified daily fluid balance between intensive care unit (ICU) admission and CRRT initiation. According to daily fluid balance, the time to CRRT initiation and the rate of organ failure based on the sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) score were assessed. We recruited 100 patients who experienced CRRT for acute kidney injury. CRRT was initiated within 2 [0, 4] days. The time to CRRT initiation was shortened in proportion to daily fluid balance, even after the adjustment for the renal SOFA score at ICU admission (HR 1.14, P = 0.007). Based on the SOFA score, positive daily fluid balance was associated with respiratory, cardiovascular, nervous, and coagulation failure, independent of each initial SOFA score at ICU admission (HR 1.36, 1.26, 1.24 and 2.26, all P < 0.05). Ultimately, we found that positive fluid balance was related with an increase in the rate of 28-day mortality (HR 1.14, P = 0.012). Positive daily fluid balance may accelerate the requirement for CRRT, moreover, it can be associated with an increased risk of multiple organ failure in critically ill patients. PMID:27478348

  14. Food safety for the solid organ transplant patient: preventing foodborne illness while on chronic immunosuppressive drugs.

    PubMed

    Obayashi, Patricia A C

    2012-12-01

    Issues regarding food safety are seen increasingly in the news; outbreaks of foodborne illness have been associated with public health concerns ranging from mild illness to death. For the solid organ transplant patient, immunosuppressive and antibacterial drugs, which maintain transplant organ function, can expose the transplant patient to increased risk of foodborne illness from bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites. This review article describes the clinical consequences, sources of foodborne illness, and food safety practices needed to minimize risks to the solid organ transplant patient who must take lifelong immunosuppressive drugs. All members of the transplant team share responsibility for education of the solid organ transplant patient in preventing infections. The registered dietitian, as part of the transplant team, is the recognized expert in providing food safety education in the context of medical nutrition therapy to solid organ transplant patients, the patients' caregivers, and other healthcare providers.

  15. Quality nursing care for hospitalized patients with advanced illness: concept development.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Shigeko; Baggs, Judith G; Knafl, Kathleen A

    2010-08-01

    The quality of nursing care as perceived by hospitalized patients with advanced illness has not been examined. A concept of quality nursing care for this population was developed by integrating the literature on constructs defining quality nursing care with empirical findings from interviews of 16 patients with advanced illness. Quality nursing care was characterized as competence and personal caring supported by professionalism and delivered with an appropriate demeanor. Although the attributes of competence, caring, professionalism, and demeanor were identified as common components of quality care across various patient populations, the caring domain increased in importance when patients with advanced illness perceived themselves as vulnerable. Assessment of quality nursing care for patients with advanced illness needs to include measures of patient perceptions of vulnerability.

  16. Acute Gastrointestinal Illness Risks in North Carolina Community Water Systems: A Methodological Comparison.

    PubMed

    DeFelice, Nicholas B; Johnston, Jill E; Gibson, Jacqueline MacDonald

    2015-08-18

    The magnitude and spatial variability of acute gastrointestinal illness (AGI) cases attributable to microbial contamination of U.S. community drinking water systems are not well characterized. We compared three approaches (drinking water attributable risk, quantitative microbial risk assessment, and population intervention model) to estimate the annual number of emergency department visits for AGI attributable to microorganisms in North Carolina community water systems. All three methods used 2007-2013 water monitoring and emergency department data obtained from state agencies. The drinking water attributable risk method, which was the basis for previous U.S. Environmental Protection Agency national risk assessments, estimated that 7.9% of annual emergency department visits for AGI are attributable to microbial contamination of community water systems. However, the other methods' estimates were more than 2 orders of magnitude lower, each attributing 0.047% of annual emergency department visits for AGI to community water system contamination. The differences in results between the drinking water attributable risk method, which has been the main basis for previous national risk estimates, and the other two approaches highlight the need to improve methods for estimating endemic waterborne disease risks, in order to prioritize investments to improve community drinking water systems.

  17. Risk of viral acute gastrointestinal illness from nondisinfected drinking water distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Lambertini, Elisabetta; Borchardt, Mark A; Kieke, Burney A; Spencer, Susan K; Loge, Frank J

    2012-09-04

    Acute gastrointestinal illness (AGI) resulting from pathogens directly entering the piping of drinking water distribution systems is insufficiently understood. Here, we estimate AGI incidence from virus intrusions into the distribution systems of 14 nondisinfecting, groundwater-source, community water systems. Water samples for virus quantification were collected monthly at wells and households during four 12-week periods in 2006-2007. Ultraviolet (UV) disinfection was installed on the communities' wellheads during one study year; UV was absent the other year. UV was intended to eliminate virus contributions from the wells and without residual disinfectant present in these systems, any increase in virus concentration downstream at household taps represented virus contributions from the distribution system (Approach 1). During no-UV periods, distribution system viruses were estimated by the difference between well water and household tap virus concentrations (Approach 2). For both approaches, a Monte Carlo risk assessment framework was used to estimate AGI risk from distribution systems using study-specific exposure-response relationships. Depending on the exposure-response relationship selected, AGI risk from the distribution systems was 0.0180-0.0661 and 0.001-0.1047 episodes/person-year estimated by Approaches 1 and 2, respectively. These values represented 0.1-4.9% of AGI risk from all exposure routes, and 1.6-67.8% of risk related to drinking water exposure. Virus intrusions into nondisinfected drinking water distribution systems can contribute to sporadic AGI.

  18. Burden of Acute Gastrointestinal Illness in Gálvez, Argentina, 2007

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Enrique; Majowicz, Shannon E.; Reid-Smith, Richard; Albil, Silvia; Monteverde, Marcos; McEwen, Scott A.

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated the magnitude and distribution of acute gastrointestinal illness (GI) in Gálvez, Argentina, and assessed the outcome of a seven-day versus 30-day recall period in survey methodology. A cross-sectional population survey, with either a seven-day or a 30-day retrospective recall period, was conducted through door-to-door visits to randomly-selected residents during the ‘high’ and the ‘low’ seasons of GI in the community. Comparisons were made between the annual incidence rates obtained using the seven-day and the 30-day recall period. Using the 30-day recall period, the mean annual incidence rates was 0.43 (low season of GI) and 0.49 (high season of GI) episodes per person-year. Using the seven-day recall period, the mean annual incidence rate was 0.76 (low season of GI) and 2.66 (high season of GI) episodes per person-year. This study highlights the significant burden of GI in a South American community and confirms the importance of seasonality when investigating GI in the population. The findings suggest that a longer recall period may underestimate the burden of GI in retrospective population surveys of GI. PMID:20411678

  19. Efficacy and safety of extended thromboprophylaxis for medically ill patients. A meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Dentali, Francesco; Mumoli, Nicola; Prisco, Domenico; Fontanella, Andrea; Di Minno, Matteo Nicola Dario

    2017-02-28

    Compelling evidence suggests that the risk of pulmonary embolism (PE) and deep-vein thrombosis (DVT) persists after hospital discharge in acutely-ill medical patients. However, no studies consistently supported the routine use of extended-duration thromboprophylaxis (ET) in this setting. We performed a meta-analysis to assess efficacy and safety of ET in acutely-ill medical patients. Efficacy outcome was defined by the prevention of symptomatic DVT, PE, venous thromboembolism (VTE) and VTE-related mortality. Safety outcome was the occurrence of major bleeding (MB) and fatal bleeding (FB). Pooled odds ratios (ORs) and 95 % confidence intervals (95 %CI) were calculated for each outcome using a random effects model. Four RCTs for a total of 28,105 acutely-ill medical patients were included. ET was associated with a significantly lower risk of DVT (0.3 % vs 0.6 %, OR 0.504, 95 %CI: 0.287-0.885) and VTE (0.5 % vs 1.0 %, OR: 0.544, 95 %CI: 0.297-0.997); a non-significantly lower risk of PE (0.3 % vs 0.4 %, OR 0.633, 95 %CI: 0.388-1.034) and of VTE-related mortality (0.2 % vs 0.3 %, OR 0.687, 95 %CI: 0.445-1.059) and with a significantly higher risk of MB (0.8 % vs 0.4 %, OR 2.095, 95 %CI: 1.333-3.295). No difference in FB was found (0.06 % vs 0.03 %, OR 1.79, 95 %CI: 0.384-8.325). The risk benefit analysis showed that the NNT for DVT was 339, for VTE was 239, and the NNH for MB was 247. Results of our meta-analyses focused on clinical important outcomes did not support a general use of antithrombotic prophylaxis beyond the period of hospitalization in acutely-ill medical patients.

  20. Patients' Perceived Involvement in Care Scale: relationship to attitudes about illness and medical care.

    PubMed

    Lerman, C E; Brody, D S; Caputo, G C; Smith, D G; Lazaro, C G; Wolfson, H G

    1990-01-01

    This report describes the development of the Perceived Involvement in Care Scale (PICS), a self-report questionnaire for patients, and its relation to primary care patients' attitudes regarding their illnesses and the management of them. The questionnaire was administered to three independent samples of adult primary care patients. Patients' satisfaction and their attitudes regarding their illnesses are evaluated after their medical visits. This instrument is designed to examine three relatively distinct factors: 1) doctor facilitation of patient involvement, 2) level of information exchange, and 3) patient participation in decision making. Of these factors, doctor facilitation and patient decision making were related significantly to patients' satisfaction with care. Doctor facilitation and information exchange related consistently to patients' perceptions of post-visit changes in their understanding, reassurance, perceived control over illness, and expectations for improvement in functioning. The role of physicians in enhancing patient involvement in care and the potential therapeutic benefits of physician facilitative behavior are addressed.

  1. Neglected disease in mentally ill patients: Major tuberculosis outbreak in a psychiatric hospital.

    PubMed

    Zmak, Ljiljana; Obrovac, Mihaela; Lovric, Zvjezdana; Jankovic Makek, Mateja; Katalinic Jankovic, Vera

    2017-04-01

    As tuberculosis incidence decreases, the possibility of overlooking the disease increases, especially in vulnerable populations. We describe here a major tuberculosis outbreak among mentally ill patients in Croatia, focusing on 1 regional hospital where most patients were hospitalized. The outbreak emphasizes the vulnerability of mentally ill patients to tuberculosis infection and the complexity of infection control measures in psychiatric institutions. The awareness of tuberculosis in these settings should be maintained to interrupt prolonged exposure and avoid unnecessary infection.

  2. RBC Storage Effect on Coagulation, Microparticles and Microchimerism in Critically Ill Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    mechanisms of adverse effects related to RBC storage age in critically ill patients. To date we have enrolled 130 patients at the three clinical sites in...Prospective clinical studies investigating the mechanisms and clinical outcomes associated with increased or decreased RBC storage age in critically ill...patients including traumatic injury have not been performed. The ABLE study presents a unique and probably one-time opportunity to investigate mechanisms

  3. Efficacy of renal replacement therapy in critically ill patients: a propensity analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Although renal replacement therapy (RRT) is a common procedure in critically ill patients with acute kidney injury (AKI), its efficacy remains uncertain. Patients who receive RRT usually have higher mortality rates than those who do not. However, many differences exist in severity patterns between patients with and those without RRT and available results are further confounded by treatment selection bias since no consensus on indications for RRT has been reached so far. Our aim was to account for these biases to accurately assess RRT efficacy, with special attention to RRT timing. Methods We performed a propensity analysis using data of the French longitudinal prospective multicenter Outcomerea database. Two propensity scores for RRT were built to match patients who received RRT to controls who did not despite having a close probability of receiving the procedure. AKI was defined according to RIFLE criteria. The association between RRT and hospital mortality was examined through multivariate conditional logistic regression analyses to control for residual confounding. Sensitivity analyses were conducted to examine the impact of RRT timing. Results Among the 2846 study patients, 545 (19%) received RRT. Crude mortality rates were higher in patients with than in those without RRT (38% vs 17.5%, P < 0.001). After matching and adjustment, RRT was not associated with a reduced hospital mortality. The two propensity models yielded concordant results. Conclusions In our study population, RRT failed to reduce hospital mortality. This result emphasizes the need for randomized studies comparing RRT to conservative management in selected ICU patients, with special focus on RRT timing. PMID:23254304

  4. Assessing Patient Management Plans of Doctors and Medical Students: An Illness Script Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monajemi, Alireza; Schmidt, Henk G.; Rikers, Remy M. J. P.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Illness script theory offers explanations for expert-novice differences in clinical reasoning. However, it has mainly focused on diagnostic (Dx) performance, while patient management (Mx) has been largely ignored. The aim of the present study was to show the role of Mx knowledge in illness script development and how it relates to…

  5. Contemporary use of antibiotics in 1089 adults presenting with acute lower respiratory tract illness in general practice in the U.K.: implications for developing management guidelines.

    PubMed

    Macfarlane, J; Lewis, S A; Macfarlane, R; Holmes, W

    1997-08-01

    Respiratory symptoms are the most common cause of general practitioner (GP) consultation, and hospital-based specialists are often called on to provide management guidelines, particularly in the area of antibiotic prescribing. The present authors have assessed factors associated with antibiotic use by 115 GPs when managing 1089 adults with an acute lower respiratory tract illness, including cough. They prescribed antibiotics to three-quarters of patients, but felt antibiotics to be definitely indicated in less than one-third of these cases and not needed in one-fifth. Univariate analysis revealed that antibiotics were prescribed more frequently by older GPs for older patients in the presence of underlying disease, discoloured sputum, shortness of breath, wheeze, fever, signs on chest examination, and 'other factors'. Multivariate logistic regression confirmed an independent effect for all these findings except for the presence of underlying disease, shortness of breath and wheeze. 'Other factors' included patient 'pressure' and social factors, and GP work pressure or prior experience with the patient. These factors were an important influence on prescribing, especially if the GP felt an antibiotic was not indicated. Amoxycillin was the first choice (58% of total) except where the patient had recently received antibiotics for the same illness. Broader spectrum antibiotics were used more commonly in patients with chronic lung disease, discoloured sputum, chest signs on examination and where the GP felt antibiotics were indicated. However, these antibiotics were also prescribed to 14% of previously well patients. General practitioners used a wide variety of terms to describe the illness with little consistency or structure. The decision concerning the use and choice of antibiotics and the confidence with which the GP makes that decision is a complex interaction between patient, doctor and disease, being affected not only by clinical features but also by the social and

  6. Illness perception and fibromyalgia impact on female patients from Spain and the Netherlands: do cultural differences exist?

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Montero, Pedro J; Van Wilgen, C Paul; Segura-Jiménez, Victor; Carbonell-Baeza, Ana; Delgado-Fernández, Manuel

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the differences in illness perception and overall impact on fibromyalgia females from Spain and the Netherlands. A total of 325 fibromyalgia females from Spain (54.3 ± 7.1 years) and the Netherlands (51.8 ± 7.2 years) participated in the study. Illness perception and impact of fibromyalgia were assessed by the Revised Illness Perception Questionnaire and the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire, respectively. Spanish fibromyalgia females perceived more symptoms related to their fibromyalgia (identity) such as nausea, breathlessness, wheezing or fatigue (P < 0.001) and had greater emotional representation (P < 0.01). Dutch fibromyalgia females experienced less timeline (acute/chronic) and consequences (all, P < 0.05), had a better cyclical timeline, personal control, treatment control and illness coherence (all, P < 0.001). Spanish fibromyalgia females reported higher impact of fibromyalgia than Dutch females (61.2 + 14.8 vs. 54.9 + 16.4, respectively; P < 0.001), but the effect size was small (Cohen's d = 0.41) . Impact of fibromyalgia and negative views of fibromyalgia were higher in Spanish fibromyalgia females, whereas Dutch fibromyalgia females presented higher score of positive beliefs about the controllability of the illness. Psychological interventions which help patients to cope with their illness perception might lead to an improvement of the impact of the disease on fibromyalgia females.

  7. Short-term exposure to ambient particulate matter and emergency ambulance dispatch for acute illness in Japan.

    PubMed

    Tasmin, Saira; Ueda, Kayo; Stickley, Andrew; Yasumoto, Shinya; Phung, Vera Ling Hui; Oishi, Mizuki; Yasukouchi, Shusuke; Uehara, Yamato; Michikawa, Takehiro; Nitta, Hiroshi

    2016-10-01

    Short-term exposure to air pollution may be linked to negative health outcomes that require an emergency medical response. However, few studies have been undertaken on this phenomenon to date. The aim of this study therefore was to examine the association between short-term exposure to ambient suspended particulate matter (SPM) and emergency ambulance dispatches (EADs) for acute illness in Japan. Daily EAD data, daily mean SPM and meteorological data were obtained for four prefectures in the Kanto region of Japan for the period from 2007 to 2011. The area-specific association between daily EAD for acute illness and SPM was explored using generalized linear models while controlling for ambient temperature, relative humidity, seasonality, long-term trends, day of the week and public holidays. Stratified analyses were conducted to evaluate the modifying effects of age, sex and medical conditions. Area-specific estimates were combined using meta-analyses. For the total study period the mean level of SPM was 23.7μg/m(3). In general, higher SPM was associated with a significant increase in EAD for acute illness [estimated pooled relative risk (RR): 1.008, 95% CI: 1.007 to 1.010 per 10μg/m(3) increase in SPM at lag 0-1]. The effects of SPM on EAD for acute illness were significantly greater for moderate/mild medical conditions (e.g. cases that resulted in <3weeks hospitalization or no hospitalization) when compared to severe medical conditions (e.g. critical cases, and cases that led to >3weeks hospitalization or which resulted in death). Using EAD data, this study has shown the adverse health effects of ambient air pollution. This highlights the importance of reducing the level of air pollution in order to maintain population health and well-being.

  8. Outbreak of acute febrile respiratory illness caused by human adenovirus B P14H11F14 in a military training camp in Shandong China.

    PubMed

    Dongliu, Yuan; Guoliang, Yang; Haocheng, Xu; Shuaijia, Qing; Li, Bing; Yanglei, Jia

    2016-09-01

    This study reports an outbreak of acute febrile respiratory illness caused by human adenovirus B [P14H11F14] in a military training center in China between May and June 2014. In total, 164 military personnel were affected, and two patients were admitted into the intensive care unit of the military regional central hospital. A HAdV-B [P14H11F14] virus was confirmed as the etiological pathogen of this acute outbreak of febrile respiratory illness based on clinical manifestations, epidemiological characteristics, specific molecular detection results, phylogenetic analysis, and serological assays. The virus was isolated by the rhabdomyosarcoma cell culture method, and the complete sequences of the E1A, penton base, hexon, and fiber genes were determined and deposited in the GenBank database. Phylogenetic and sequence homology analyses indicated that the isolated strain is most closely related to some HAdV-55 strains from mainland China. However, this strain appeared to be less virulent than former HAdV-55 strains. According to the chest X-ray results of 31 affected patients, there was no radiological evidence of pneumonia. The most frequent symptoms in these patients were sore throat (95.12 %, 156/164) and tonsillitis (93.29 %, 153/164). During the course of the outbreak, incorrect response measures and some potential risk factors, such as fire training and marching training, may have exacerbated the spread of the infection. This outbreak illustrates the urgent need to improve the epidemiological and etiological surveillance of HAdV infections and to improve the ability of doctors and health officials in basic units of the Chinese army to respond effectively to febrile respiratory illness.

  9. The Impact of Macro-and Micronutrients on Predicting Outcomes of Critically Ill Patients Requiring Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Somlaw, Nicha; Lakananurak, Narisorn; Dissayabutra, Thasinas; Phonork, Chayanat; Leelahavanichkul, Asada; Tiranathanagul, Khajohn; Susantithapong, Paweena; Loaveeravat, Passisd; Suwachittanont, Nattachai; Wirotwan, Thaksa-on; Praditpornsilpa, Kearkiat; Tungsanga, Kriang; Eiam-Ong, Somchai; Kittiskulnam, Piyawan

    2016-01-01

    Critically ill patients with acute kidney injury (AKI) who receive renal replacement therapy (RRT) have very high mortality rate. During RRT, there are markedly loss of macro- and micronutrients which may cause malnutrition and result in impaired renal recovery and patient survival. We aimed to examine the predictive role of macro- and micronutrients on survival and renal outcomes in critically ill patients undergoing continuous RRT (CRRT). This prospective observational study enrolled critically ill patients requiring CRRT at Intensive Care Unit of King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital from November 2012 until November 2013. The serum, urine, and effluent fluid were serially collected on the first three days to calculate protein metabolism including dietary protein intake (DPI), nitrogen balance, and normalized protein catabolic rate (nPCR). Serum zinc, selenium, and copper were measured for micronutrients analysis on the first three days of CRRT. Survivor was defined as being alive on day 28 after initiation of CRRT.Dialysis status on day 28 was also determined. Of the 70 critically ill patients requiring CRRT, 27 patients (37.5%) survived on day 28. The DPI and serum albumin of survivors were significantly higher than non-survivors (0.8± 0.2 vs 0.5 ±0.3g/kg/day, p = 0.001, and 3.2±0.5 vs 2.9±0.5 g/dL, p = 0.03, respectively) while other markers were comparable. The DPI alone predicted patient survival with area under the curve (AUC) of 0.69. A combined clinical model predicted survival with AUC of 0.78. When adjusted for differences in albumin level, clinical severity score (APACHEII and SOFA score), and serum creatinine at initiation of CRRT, DPI still independently predicted survival (odds ratio 4.62, p = 0.009). The serum levels of micronutrients in both groups were comparable and unaltered following CRRT. Regarding renal outcome, patients in the dialysis independent group had higher serum albumin levels than the dialysis dependent group, p = 0.01. In

  10. Macroergonomic factors in the patient work system: examining the context of patients with chronic illness.

    PubMed

    Holden, Richard J; Valdez, Rupa S; Schubert, Christiane C; Thompson, Morgan J; Hundt, Ann S

    2017-01-01

    Human factors/ergonomics recognises work as embedded in and shaped by levels of social, physical and organisational context. This study investigates the contextual or macroergonomic factors present in the health-related work performed by patients. We performed a secondary content analysis of findings from three studies of the work of chronically ill patients and their informal caregivers. Our resulting consolidated macroergonomic patient work system model identified 17 factors across physical, social and organisational domains and household and community levels. These factors are illustrated with examples from the three studies and discussed as having positive, negative or varying effects on health and health behaviour. We present three brief case studies to illustrate how macroergonomic factors combine across domains and levels to shape performance in expected and unexpected ways. Findings demonstrate not only the importance of context for patients' health-related activities but also specific factors to consider in future research, design and policy efforts. Practitioner Summary: Health-related activities of patients are embedded in and shaped by levels of social, physical and organisational context. This paper combined findings from three studies to specify 17 contextual or macroergonomic factors in home- and community-based work systems of chronically ill patients. These factors have research, design and policy implications.

  11. Clinical versus Actuarial Predictions of Violence in Patients with Mental Illness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, William; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Compared accuracy of an actuarial procedure for the prediction of community violence by patients with mental illnesses to accuracy of clinicians' concern ratings of patient violence. Data came from a study of 357 pairs of patients seen in a psychiatric emergency room. Actuarial predictions based only on patients' histories of violence were more…

  12. Nursing students identify fears regarding working with diverse critically ill patients: development of guidelines for caring for diverse critically ill older adults.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Sheila

    2013-01-01

    Undergraduate students need to gain more exposure to communicating, assessing, and planning appropriate care and evaluating outcomes of care with diverse critically ill geriatric patients. This project developed teaching strategies that facilitated additional opportunities for gaining these valuable learning experiences for students. Nurse educators can use the Guidelines for Caring for Diverse Critically Ill Older Adults, the case study and simulation examples, and topical outline to assist them in teaching critical care students and nurses about diverse critically ill older adults.

  13. Anesthetic management of patients with acute stroke.

    PubMed

    Flexman, Alana M; Donovan, Anne L; Gelb, Adrian W

    2012-06-01

    Stroke is a major cause of death and disability. Anesthesiologists are likely to encounter patients with stroke and must be aware of the anesthetic considerations for these patients. Intravenous thrombolysis and intra-arterial thrombolysis are effective treatments for acuteischemic stroke as well as evolving endovascular techniques such as mechanical clot retrieval. Recent retrospective studies have found an association between general anesthesia and poor clinical outcome. The results of these studies have several limitations, and current evidence is inadequate to guide the choice of anesthesia in patients with acute stroke. The choice of anesthesia must be based on individual patient factors until further research is completed.

  14. Immediate intralipid clearance from plasma in critically ill patients after a single-dose injection

    SciTech Connect

    Lindh, A.; Roessner, S.

    1987-09-01

    Plasma fractional removal rates (k2) of Intralipid injected in parallel with /sup 125/I albumin were analyzed in five healthy males and nine critically ill patients. The k2 values of critically ill patients were similar to those of healthy subjects. However, the initial plasma concentrations of Intralipid calculated by extrapolation to zero-time (y0) were markedly different. The mean y0 value in the critically ill patients was 43% that of healthy subjects. No plasma loss of /sup 125/I albumin occurred throughout the test. Intralipid to /sup 125/I albumin plasma concentration ratios during the removal phase paralleled the curves obtained from the iv fat tolerance test. This suggests that these ratios depend on Intralipid clearance rather than leakage from the circulation. The immediate loss of Intralipid suggests that the pulmonary vasculature, the first capillary bed through which the emulsion passes, could be the site where a substantial uptake of the emulsion occurs in critically ill patients.

  15. Isolation of Aspergillus spp. from the respiratory tract in critically ill patients: risk factors, clinical presentation and outcome

    PubMed Central

    Garnacho-Montero, José; Amaya-Villar, Rosario; Ortiz-Leyba, Carlos; León, Cristóbal; Álvarez-Lerma, Francisco; Nolla-Salas, Juan; Iruretagoyena, José R; Barcenilla, Fernando

    2005-01-01

    Introduction Our aims were to assess risk factors, clinical features, management and outcomes in critically ill patients in whom Aspergillus spp. were isolated from respiratory secretions, using a database from a study designed to assess fungal infections. Methods A multicentre prospective study was conducted over a 9-month period in 73 intensive care units (ICUs) and included patients with an ICU stay longer than 7 days. Tracheal aspirate and urine samples, and oropharyngeal and gastric swabs were collected and cultured each week. On admission to the ICU and at the initiation of antifungal therapy, the severity of illness was evaluated using the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score. Retrospectively, isolation of Aspergillus spp. was considered to reflect colonization if the patient did not fulfil criteria for pneumonia, and infection if the patient met criteria for pulmonary infection and if the clinician in charge considered the isolation to be clinically valuable. Risk factors, antifungal use and duration of therapy were noted. Results Out of a total of 1756 patients, Aspergillus spp. were recovered in 36. Treatment with steroids (odds ratio = 4.5) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (odds ratio = 2.9) were significantly associated with Aspergillus spp. isolation in multivariate analysis. In 14 patients isolation of Aspergillus spp. was interpreted as colonization, in 20 it was interpreted as invasive aspergillosis, and two cases were not classified. The mortality rates were 50% in the colonization group and 80% in the invasive infection group. Autopsy was performed in five patients with clinically suspected infection and confirmed the diagnosis in all of these cases. Conclusion In critically ill patients, treatment should be considered if features of pulmonary infection are present and Aspergillus spp. are isolated from respiratory secretions. PMID:15987390

  16. Capgras-like syndrome in a patient with an acute urinary tract infection

    PubMed Central

    Salviati, Massimo; Bersani, Francesco Saverio; Macrì, Francesco; Fojanesi, Marta; Minichino, Amedeo; Gallo, Mariana; De Michele, Francesco; Chiaie, Roberto Delle; Biondi, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Delusional misidentification syndromes are a group of delusional phenomena in which patients misidentify familiar persons, objects, or themselves, believing that they have been replaced or transformed. In 25%–40% of cases, misidentification syndromes have been reported in association with organic illness. We report an acute episode of Capgras-like delusion lasting 8 days, focused on the idea that people were robots with human bodies, in association with an acute urinary infection. To our knowledge, this is the first case report associating urinary tract infection with Capgras-like syndrome. Awareness of the prevalence of delusional misidentification syndromes associated with acute medical illness should promote diligence on the part of clinicians in recognizing this disorder. PMID:23355784

  17. A regressional analysis of maladaptive rumination, illness perception and negative emotional outcomes in Asian patients suffering from depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yanxia; Tang, Catherine; Liow, Chiew Shan; Ng, Winnie Wei Ni; Ho, Cyrus Su Hui; Ho, Roger Chun Mun

    2014-12-01

    Although illness perception has been shown to be associated with illness outcomes in various chronic physical diseases, the association of illness perception and rumination are not well elucidated in mental disorders. This study aims to investigate the mediational effects of adaptive and maladaptive rumination in the relationship between illness perception and negative emotions (depression, anxiety and stress) in male and female patients (N=110) suffering from depressive disorders. The results showed that maladaptive rumination mediated the relationship between illness perception and negative emotions in both male and female depressive patients. However, no mediating effects of adaptive rumination were found in the relationship between illness perception and negative emotion. Maladaptive rumination mediated the relationship between perceived identity, chronicity of illness, consequences of illness and emotional representation of illness and negative emotions in males. It also mediated the relationship between perceived identity and emotional representation of illness and negative emotions in females. The results, possible clinical implications and limitations of this study are also discussed.

  18. Healthcare-seeking behaviors for acute respiratory illness in two communities of Java, Indonesia: a cross-sectional survey.

    PubMed

    Praptiningsih, Catharina Y; Lafond, Kathryn E; Wahyuningrum, Yunita; Storms, Aaron D; Mangiri, Amalya; Iuliano, Angela D; Samaan, Gina; Titaley, Christiana R; Yelda, Fitra; Kreslake, Jennifer; Storey, Douglas; Uyeki, Timothy M

    2016-06-01

    Understanding healthcare-seeking patterns for respiratory illness can help improve estimations of disease burden and inform public health interventions to control acute respiratory disease in Indonesia. The objectives of this study were to describe healthcare-seeking behaviors for respiratory illnesses in one rural and one urban community in Western Java, and to explore the factors that affect care seeking. From February 8, 2012 to March 1, 2012, a survey was conducted in 2520 households in the East Jakarta and Bogor districts to identify reported recent respiratory illnesses, as well as all hospitalizations from the previous 12-month period. We found that 4% (10% of those less than 5years) of people had respiratory disease resulting in a visit to a healthcare provider in the past 2weeks; these episodes were most commonly treated at government (33%) or private (44%) clinics. Forty-five people (0.4% of those surveyed) had respiratory hospitalizations in the past year, and just over half of these (24/45, 53%) occurred at a public hospital. Public health programs targeting respiratory disease in this region should account for care at private hospitals and clinics, as well as illnesses that are treated at home, in order to capture the true burden of illness in these communities.

  19. Violent victimization of adult patients with severe mental illness: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Latalova, Klara; Kamaradova, Dana; Prasko, Jan

    2014-01-01

    The aims of this paper are to review data on the prevalence and correlates of violent victimization of persons with severe mental illness, to critically evaluate the literature, and to explore possible approaches for future research. PubMed/MEDLINE and PsycINFO databases were searched using several terms related to severe mental illness in successive combinations with terms describing victimization. The searches identified 34 studies. Nine epidemiological studies indicate that patients with severe mental illness are more likely to be violently victimized than other community members. Young age, comorbid substance use, and homelessness are risk factors for victimization. Victimized patients are more likely to engage in violent behavior than other members of the community. Violent victimization of persons with severe mental illness has long-term adverse consequences for the course of their illness, and further impairs the quality of lives of patients and their families. Victimization of persons with severe mental illness is a serious medical and social problem. Prevention and management of victimization should become a part of routine clinical care for patients with severe mental illness. PMID:25336958

  20. Factor Structure and Psychometric Properties of the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire in Turkish Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Karataş, Tuğba; Özen, Şükrü; Kutlutürkan, Sevinç

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The main aim of this study was to investigate the factor structure and psychometric properties of the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire (BIPQ) in Turkish cancer patients. Methods: This methodological study involved 135 cancer patients. Statistical methods included confirmatory or exploratory factor analysis and Cronbach alpha coefficients for internal consistency. Results: The values of fit indices are within the acceptable range. The alpha coefficients for emotional illness representations, cognitive illness representations, and total scale are 0.83, 0.80, and 0.85, respectively. Conclusions: The results confirm the two-factor structure of the Turkish BIPQ and demonstrate its reliability and validity. PMID:28217734

  1. [Biography-oriented diagnostics in counselling of patients with chronic illness].

    PubMed

    Darmann-Finck, Ingrid; Sahm, Martina

    2006-10-01

    The article examines two concepts of counselling of patients by nurses that are popular in the German-speaking area with regard to their underlying scientific standpoint and ideals and their implications on counselling-process and -result. The authors determine that both concepts disregard the biographic construction processes which are so important for coping with and tackling chronic illness. The article concludes with a discussion of prospective use of biographic diagnostics in counselling of patients with chronic illness.

  2. Viruses in Nondisinfected Drinking Water from Municipal Wells and Community Incidence of Acute Gastrointestinal Illness

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Susan K.; Kieke, Burney A.; Lambertini, Elisabetta; Loge, Frank J.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Groundwater supplies for drinking water are frequently contaminated with low levels of human enteric virus genomes, yet evidence for waterborne disease transmission is lacking. Objectives: We related quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR)–measured enteric viruses in the tap water of 14 Wisconsin communities supplied by nondisinfected groundwater to acute gastrointestinal illness (AGI) incidence. Methods: AGI incidence was estimated from health diaries completed weekly by households within each study community during four 12-week periods. Water samples were collected monthly from five to eight households per community. Viruses were measured by qPCR, and infectivity assessed by cell culture. AGI incidence was related to virus measures using Poisson regression with random effects. Results: Communities and time periods with the highest virus measures had correspondingly high AGI incidence. This association was particularly strong for norovirus genogroup I (NoV-GI) and between adult AGI and enteroviruses when echovirus serotypes predominated. At mean concentrations of 1 and 0.8 genomic copies/L of NoV-GI and enteroviruses, respectively, the AGI incidence rate ratios (i.e., relative risk) increased by 30%. Adenoviruses were common, but tap-water concentrations were low and not positively associated with AGI. The estimated fraction of AGI attributable to tap-water–borne viruses was between 6% and 22%, depending on the virus exposure–AGI incidence model selected, and could have been as high as 63% among children < 5 years of age during the period when NoV-GI was abundant in drinking water. Conclusions: The majority of groundwater-source public water systems in the United States produce water without disinfection, and our findings suggest that populations served by such systems may be exposed to waterborne viruses and consequent health risks. PMID:22659405

  3. Healthcare use for acute gastrointestinal illness in two Inuit communities: Rigolet and Iqaluit, Canada†

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Sherilee L.; Edge, Victoria L.; Ford, James; Thomas, M. Kate; Pearl, David; Shirley, Jamal; McEwen, Scott A.

    2015-01-01

    Background The incidence of self-reported acute gastrointestinal illness (AGI) in Rigolet, Nunatsiavut, and Iqaluit, Nunavut, is higher than reported elsewhere in Canada; as such, understanding AGI-related healthcare use is important for healthcare provision, public health practice and surveillance of AGI. Objectives This study described symptoms, severity and duration of self-reported AGI in the general population and examined the incidence and factors associated with healthcare utilization for AGI in these 2 Inuit communities. Design Cross-sectional survey data were analysed using multivariable exact logistic regression to examine factors associated with individuals’ self-reported healthcare and over-the-counter (OTC) medication utilization related to AGI symptoms. Results In Rigolet, few AGI cases used healthcare services [4.8% (95% CI=1.5–14.4%)]; in Iqaluit, some cases used healthcare services [16.9% (95% CI=11.2–24.7%)]. Missing traditional activities due to AGI (OR=3.8; 95% CI=1.18–12.4) and taking OTC medication for AGI symptoms (OR=3.8; 95% CI=1.2–15.1) were associated with increased odds of using healthcare services in Iqaluit. In both communities, AGI severity and secondary symptoms (extreme tiredness, headache, muscle pains, chills) were significantly associated with increased odds of taking OTC medication. Conclusions While rates of self-reported AGI were higher in Inuit communities compared to non-Inuit communities in Canada, there were lower rates of AGI-related healthcare use in Inuit communities compared to other regions in Canada. As such, the rates of healthcare use for a given disease can differ between Inuit and non-Inuit communities, and caution should be exercised in making comparisons between Inuit and non-Inuit health outcomes based solely on clinic records and healthcare use. PMID:26001982

  4. HIV positive patients first presenting with an AIDS defining illness: characteristics and survival.

    PubMed Central

    Poznansky, M. C.; Coker, R.; Skinner, C.; Hill, A.; Bailey, S.; Whitaker, L.; Renton, A.; Weber, J.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To study the presentation and survival of patients who present with their first diagnosis of being HIV positive at the same time as their AIDS defining illness. DESIGN--Retrospective study of patients presenting with AIDS between 1991 and 1993. SETTING--Department of genitourinary medicine, St Mary's Hospital, London. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--AIDS defining illness at presentation and survival after diagnosis of AIDS. RESULTS--Between January 1991 and December 1993, 97 out of 436 patients (22%) presented with their first AIDS defining illness coincident with their first positive result of an HIV test (group B). The remaining 339 patients (78%) had tested positive for HIV-1 infection within the previous eight years and had consequently been followed up in clinics before developing their first AIDS defining illness (group A). The two groups of patients did not differ in age and sex distribution, risk factors for HIV-1 infection, nationality, country of origin, or haematological variables determined at the time of the AIDS defining illness. However, the defining illnesses differed between the two groups. Illnesses associated with severe immunodeficiency (the wasting syndrome, cryptosporidiosis, and cytomegalovirus infection) were seen almost exclusively in group A whereas extrapulmonary tuberculosis and Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia were more common in group B. The survival of patients in group B after the onset of AIDS was significantly longer than that of patients in group A as determined by Kaplan-Meier log rank analysis (P = 0.0026). CONCLUSIONS--Subjects who are HIV positive and present late are a challenge to the control of the spread of HIV infection because they progress from asymptomatic HIV infection to AIDS without receiving health care. The finding that presentation with an AIDS defining illness coincident with a positive result in an HIV test did not have a detrimental effect on survival gives insights into the effects of medical intervention on

  5. How does uncertainty shape patient experience in advanced illness? A secondary analysis of qualitative data

    PubMed Central

    Etkind, Simon Noah; Bristowe, Katherine; Bailey, Katharine; Selman, Lucy Ellen; Murtagh, Fliss EM

    2016-01-01

    Background: Uncertainty is common in advanced illness but is infrequently studied in this context. If poorly addressed, uncertainty can lead to adverse patient outcomes. Aim: We aimed to understand patient experiences of uncertainty in advanced illness and develop a typology of patients’ responses and preferences to inform practice. Design: Secondary analysis of qualitative interview transcripts. Studies were assessed for inclusion and interviews were sampled using maximum-variation sampling. Analysis used a thematic approach with 10% of coding cross-checked to enhance reliability. Setting/participants: Qualitative interviews from six studies including patients with heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, renal disease, cancer and liver failure. Results: A total of 30 transcripts were analysed. Median age was 75 (range, 43–95), 12 patients were women. The impact of uncertainty was frequently discussed: the main related themes were engagement with illness, information needs, patient priorities and the period of time that patients mainly focused their attention on (temporal focus). A typology of patient responses to uncertainty was developed from these themes. Conclusion: Uncertainty influences patient experience in advanced illness through affecting patients’ information needs, preferences and future priorities for care. Our typology aids understanding of how patients with advanced illness respond to uncertainty. Assessment of these three factors may be a useful starting point to guide clinical assessment and shared decision making. PMID:27129679

  6. Correlations Between Awareness of Illness (Insight) and History of Addiction in Heroin-Addicted Patients

    PubMed Central

    Maremmani, Angelo Giovanni Icro; Rovai, Luca; Rugani, Fabio; Pacini, Matteo; Lamanna, Francesco; Bacciardi, Silvia; Perugi, Giulio; Deltito, Joseph; Dell’Osso, Liliana; Maremmani, Icro

    2012-01-01

    In a group of 1066 heroin addicts, who were seeking treatment for opioid agonist treatment, we looked for differences in historical, demographic, and clinical characteristics, between patients with different levels of awareness of illness (insight). The results showed that, in the cohort studied, a majority of subjects lacked insight into their heroin-use behavior. Compared with the impaired-insight group, those who possessed insight into their illness showed significantly greater awareness of past social, somatic, and psychopathological impairments, and had a greater number of past treatment-seeking events for heroin addiction. In contrast with other psychiatric illnesses, the presence of awareness appears to be related to the passing of time and to the worsening of the illness. Methodologies to improve the insight of patients should, therefore, be targeted more directly on patients early in their history of heroin dependence, because the risk of lack of insight is greatest during this period. PMID:22787450

  7. Understanding the suffering of a patient with an illness: signs, context and strategies.

    PubMed

    Hueso Montoro, César; Siles González, José; Amezcua, Manuel; Bonill de Las Nieves, Candela; Pastor Montero, Sonia; Celdrán Mañas, Miriam

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to understand the suffering of a patient with an illness, by using a secondary research method, that is, a qualitative meta-study. The primary data source of the meta-study includes "biographical reports". This project is based on a case study, in which the first-hand experiences of a patient with an illness were collected. The findings of the reports were compiled using the Archivos de la Memoria collection of the Index Foundation (Granada, Spain) and journals specialized in editing these materials. A selection of 20 biographical reports was targeted. The results of the meta-study show that suffering is a multidimensional process within a framework of ambiguous feelings. The suffering involves family and social network participation. Patients develop a range of strategies to overcome the illness. One of the effects is the fear of illness relapse or worsening.

  8. Characteristics and outcomes of critically ill Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander patients in North Queensland.

    PubMed

    Trout, M I; Henson, G; Senthuran, S

    2015-03-01

    A retrospective cohort analysis of an admission database for the intensive care unit at The Townsville Hospital was undertaken to describe the characteristics and short-term outcomes of critically ill Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients. The Townsville Hospital is the tertiary referral centre for Northern Queensland and services a region in which Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people constitute 9.6% of the population. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients were significantly younger and had higher rates of invasive mechanical ventilation, emergency admissions and transfers from another hospital. Despite these factors, intensive care mortality did not differ between groups (9.4% versus 7.7%, P=0.1). Higher Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation III-j scores were noted in the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population requiring emergency admission (65 versus 60, P=0.022) but were lower for elective admission (38 versus 42, P <0.001). Despite higher predicted hospital mortality for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients requiring emergency admission, no significant difference was observed (20.1% versus 19.1%, P=0.656). In a severity adjusted model, Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander status did not statistically significantly alter the risk of death (odds ratio 0.88, 95% confidence interval 0.65, 1.2, P=0.398). Though Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients requiring intensive care differed in admission characteristics, mortality was comparable to other critically ill patients.

  9. Working Alliance in Patients with Severe Mental Illness Who Need a Crisis Intervention Plan.

    PubMed

    Ruchlewska, Asia; Kamperman, Astrid M; van der Gaag, Mark; Wierdsma, André I; Mulder, Niels C L

    2016-01-01

    Working alliance has been characterized as an important predictor of positive treatment outcomes. We examined whether illness insight, psychosocial functioning, social support and locus of control were associated with working alliance as perceived by both patient and clinician. We assessed 195 outpatients with psychotic or bipolar disorders. Our findings indicated that patients rated the alliance more positively when they experienced a greater need for treatment, fewer behavioral and social problems, and more psychiatric symptoms. Clinicians rated the alliance more positively in patients who reported fewer social problems and better illness insight. Patients' demographic characteristics, including being female and married, were also positively related to the clinician-rated alliance. Our results suggest that patients and clinicians have divergent perceptions of the alliance. Clinicians may need help developing awareness of the goals and tasks of patients with certain characteristics, i.e., singles, men, those with poor illness insight and those who report poor social functioning.

  10. 'Non-compliance' as illness management: Hemodialysis patients' descriptions of adversarial patient-clinician interactions.

    PubMed

    Allen, Dawn; Wainwright, Megan; Hutchinson, Thomas

    2011-07-01

    With only 50% of patients in developed countries following the therapies prescribed for them by health professionals, "non-compliance" is commonly described as causing increases in morbidity, hospital visits, and overall healthcare costs. A plethora of non-compliance studies have failed to identify consistent predictors for, or solutions to, patients' non-compliance. Our longitudinal (September 2006-September 2008) participatory action research (PAR) focused on (a) understanding hemodialysis patients' perspectives on the challenges and solutions to living well with their chronic illness and (b) taking action to improve this population's quality of life. The study's participants included seven purposefully sampled patients in two hospital hemodialysis units in Canada. A small sample size was essential to accommodate our commitment to conducting a PAR study with this patient population whose unpredictable health status presented significant challenges to recruitment, follow-up interviews, and participation in data analysis. Data collection and analysis over 2 years included over 100 h of ethnographic field observation, bi-weekly unrecorded and 12 audio-recorded in-dialysis interviews, five video-recorded life-history interviews, two video-recorded focus groups, and five video-recorded dialysis treatment sessions. Thematic content analysis drew attention to patients' descriptions of adversarial interactions with health professionals. In these interactions, three points of tension were identified: (a) between whole person care and "assembly line" treatment, (b) between patient knowledge and medical expertise, and (c) between shared decision-making and "digging to find out". The article concludes that these adversarial relationships are indicative of a lack of trust stemming from health professionals' failure to interact with patients as whole persons with unique expertise on their bodies, their experience of illness, and their lives.

  11. Thromboprophylaxis patterns and determinants in critically ill patients: a multicenter audit

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Heparin is safe and prevents venous thromboembolism in critical illness. We aimed to determine the guideline concordance for thromboprophylaxis in critically ill patients and its predictors, and to analyze factors associated with the use of low molecular weight heparin (LMWH), as it may be associated with a lower risk of pulmonary embolism and heparin-induced thrombocytopenia without increasing the bleeding risk. Methods We performed a retrospective audit in 28 North American intensive care units (ICUs), including all consecutive medical-surgical patients admitted in November 2011. We documented ICU thromboprophylaxis and reasons for omission. Guideline concordance was determined by adding days in which patients without contraindications received thromboprophylaxis to days in which patients with contraindications did not receive it, divided by the total number of patient-days. We used multilevel logistic regression including time-varying, center and patient-level covariates to determine the predictors of guideline concordance and use of LMWH. Results We enrolled 1,935 patients (62.3 ± 16.7 years, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation [APACHE] II score 19.1 ± 8.3). Patients received thromboprophylaxis with unfractionated heparin (UFH) (54.0%) or LMWH (27.6%). Guideline concordance occurred for 95.5% patient-days and was more likely in patients who were sicker (odds ratio (OR) 1.49, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.17, 1.75 per 10-point increase in APACHE II), heavier (OR 1.32, 95% CI 1.05, 1.65 per 10-m/kg2 increase in body mass index), had cancer (OR 3.22, 95% CI 1.81, 5.72), previous venous thromboembolism (OR 3.94, 95% CI 1.46,10.66), and received mechanical ventilation (OR 1.83, 95% CI 1.32,2.52). Reasons for not receiving thromboprophylaxis were high risk of bleeding (44.5%), current bleeding (16.3%), no reason (12.9%), recent or upcoming invasive procedure (10.2%), nighttime admission or discharge (9.7%), and life

  12. Noninvasive ventilation during the weaning process in chronically critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Sancho, Jesus; Servera, Emilio; Jara-Palomares, Luis; Barrot, Emilia; Sanchez-Oro-Gómez, Raquel; Gómez de Terreros, F Javier; Martín-Vicente, M Jesús; Utrabo, Isabel; Núñez, M Belen; Binimelis, Alicia; Sala, Ernest; Zamora, Enrique; Segrelles, Gonzalo; Ortega-Gonzalez, Angel; Masa, Fernando

    2016-10-01

    Chronically critically ill patients often undergo prolonged mechanical ventilation. The role of noninvasive ventilation (NIV) during weaning of these patients remains unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the value of NIV and whether a parameter can predict the need for NIV in chronically critically ill patients during the weaning process. We conducted a prospective study that included chronically critically ill patients admitted to Spanish respiratory care units. The weaning method used consisted of progressive periods of spontaneous breathing trials. Patients were transferred to NIV when it proved impossible to increase the duration of spontaneous breathing trials beyond 18 h. 231 chronically critically ill patients were included in the study. 198 (85.71%) patients achieved weaning success (mean weaning time 25.45±16.71 days), of whom 40 (21.4%) needed NIV during the weaning process. The variable which predicted the need for NIV was arterial carbon dioxide tension at respiratory care unit admission (OR 1.08 (95% CI 1.01-1.15), p=0.013), with a cut-off point of 45.5 mmHg (sensitivity 0.76, specificity 0.67, positive predictive value 0.76, negative predictive value 0.97). NIV is a useful tool during weaning in chronically critically ill patients. Hypercapnia despite mechanical ventilation at respiratory care unit admission is the main predictor of the need for NIV during weaning.

  13. Noninvasive ventilation during the weaning process in chronically critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Servera, Emilio; Barrot, Emilia; Sanchez-Oro-Gómez, Raquel; Gómez de Terreros, F. Javier; Martín-Vicente, M. Jesús; Utrabo, Isabel; Núñez, M. Belen; Binimelis, Alicia; Sala, Ernest; Zamora, Enrique; Segrelles, Gonzalo; Ortega-Gonzalez, Angel; Masa, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Chronically critically ill patients often undergo prolonged mechanical ventilation. The role of noninvasive ventilation (NIV) during weaning of these patients remains unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the value of NIV and whether a parameter can predict the need for NIV in chronically critically ill patients during the weaning process. We conducted a prospective study that included chronically critically ill patients admitted to Spanish respiratory care units. The weaning method used consisted of progressive periods of spontaneous breathing trials. Patients were transferred to NIV when it proved impossible to increase the duration of spontaneous breathing trials beyond 18 h. 231 chronically critically ill patients were included in the study. 198 (85.71%) patients achieved weaning success (mean weaning time 25.45±16.71 days), of whom 40 (21.4%) needed NIV during the weaning process. The variable which predicted the need for NIV was arterial carbon dioxide tension at respiratory care unit admission (OR 1.08 (95% CI 1.01–1.15), p=0.013), with a cut-off point of 45.5 mmHg (sensitivity 0.76, specificity 0.67, positive predictive value 0.76, negative predictive value 0.97). NIV is a useful tool during weaning in chronically critically ill patients. Hypercapnia despite mechanical ventilation at respiratory care unit admission is the main predictor of the need for NIV during weaning. PMID:28053973

  14. UNITED STATES DENTAL PROFESSIONALS’ PERCEPTIONS OF DENTAL ANXIETY AND NEED FOR SEDATION IN PATIENTS WITH MENTAL ILLNESS

    PubMed Central

    Heaton, Lisa J.; Hyatt, Halee A.; Huggins, Kimberly Hanson; Milgrom, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Dental fear is a barrier to receiving dental care, particularly for those patients who also suffer from mental illnesses. The current study examined United States dental professionals’ perceptions of dental fear experienced by patients with mental illness, and frequency of sedation of patients with and without mental illness. Dentists and dental staff members (n = 187) completed a survey about their experiences in treating patients with mental illness. More participants agreed (79.8%) than disagreed (20.2%) that patients with mental illness have more anxiety regarding dental treatment (p < .001) than dental patients without mental illness. Further, significantly more participants reported mentally ill patients’ anxiety is “possibly” or “definitely” a barrier to both receiving (96.8%; p < .001) and providing (76.9%; p < .01) dental treatment. Despite reporting more fear in these patients, there were no significant differences in frequency of sedation procedures between those with and without mental illness, regardless of type of sedation (p’s > .05). This lack of difference in sedation for mentally ill patients suggests hesitancy on the part of dental providers to sedate patients with mental illness and highlights a lack of clinical guidelines for this population in the US. Suggestions are given for the assessment and clinical management of patients with mental illness. PMID:24876662

  15. Rehabilitation of Critical Illness Polyneuropathy and Myopathy Patients: An Observational Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novak, Primoz; Vidmar, Gaj; Kuret, Zala; Bizovicar, Natasa

    2011-01-01

    Critical illness polyneuropathy and myopathy (CIPNM) frequently develops in patients hospitalized in intensive care units. The number of patients with CIPNM admitted to inpatient rehabilitation is increasing. The aim of this study was to comprehensively evaluate the outcome of their rehabilitation. Twenty-seven patients with CIPNM were included in…

  16. Internalized Stigma of Mental Illness among Schizophrenic Patients and Their Families (Comparative Study)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahmoud, Sahar; Zaki, Rania A.

    2015-01-01

    This study was a comparative study aiming to assess the extent of internalized stigma of mental illness among patients with schizophrenia & identify stigma as perceived by family members caring schizophrenic patients. The study was conducted in two settings 1st clinic was outpatient clinic for psychiatric patient affiliated to Abbasia…

  17. Acute Kidney Injury in Patients with Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Russ, Kirk B.; Stevens, Todd M; Singal, Ashwani K.

    2015-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) occurs commonly in patients with advanced cirrhosis and negatively impacts pre- and post-transplant outcomes. Physiologic changes that occur in patients with decompensated cirrhosis with ascites, place these patients at high risk of AKI. The most common causes of AKI in cirrhosis include prerenal injury, acute tubular necrosis (ATN), and the hepatorenal syndrome (HRS), accounting for more than 80% of AKI in this population. Distinguishing between these causes is particularly important for prognostication and treatment. Treatment of Type 1 HRS with vasoconstrictors and albumin improves short term survival and renal function in some patients while awaiting liver transplantation. Patients with HRS who fail to respond to medical therapy or those with severe renal failure of other etiology may require renal replacement therapy. Simultaneous liver kidney transplant (SLK) is needed in many of these patients to improve their post-transplant outcomes. However, the criteria to select patients who would benefit from SLK transplantation are based on consensus and lack strong evidence to support them. In this regard, novel serum and/or urinary biomarkers such as neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, interleukins-6 and 18, kidney injury molecule-1, fatty acid binding protein, and endothelin-1 are emerging with a potential for accurately differentiating common causes of AKI. Prospective studies are needed on the use of these biomarkers to predict accurately renal function recovery after liver transplantation alone in order to optimize personalized use of SLK. PMID:26623266

  18. [Social capital, poverty and self-perception of family support in cases of acute respiratory illness].

    PubMed

    Hamui-Sutton, Alicia; Ponce-Rosas R, E Raúl; Irigoyen-Coria, Arnulfo; Halabe-Cherem, José

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to correlate the socio structural variables of the Simplified Index of Family Poverty with the self-perception of resources that conform social capital among patients with acute respiratory disease (ARD). We used a qualitative and quantitative methodology. The sample included 848 cases distributed in seven Rural Medicine Units of Mexico. We considered three pathways described by Kawachi where social capital might have an impact on individual health. The bivariate correlation and discriminant analysis showed that when there is evidence of poverty in the family, the statistically significant differences are mainly observed in self-perception. Moral support of sons and daughters is thereby increased when there is an ARD. We concluded that when there is a higher index of family poverty there is a decreased access to social resources when a family member is diagnosed with an ARD.

  19. Diaphragm Muscle Fiber Weakness and Ubiquitin–Proteasome Activation in Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hooijman, Pleuni E.; Beishuizen, Albertus; Witt, Christian C.; de Waard, Monique C.; Girbes, Armand R. J.; Spoelstra-de Man, Angelique M. E.; Niessen, Hans W. M.; Manders, Emmy; van Hees, Hieronymus W. H.; van den Brom, Charissa E.; Silderhuis, Vera; Lawlor, Michael W.; Labeit, Siegfried; Stienen, Ger J. M.; Hartemink, Koen J.; Paul, Marinus A.; Heunks, Leo M. A.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: The clinical significance of diaphragm weakness in critically ill patients is evident: it prolongs ventilator dependency, and increases morbidity and duration of hospital stay. To date, the nature of diaphragm weakness and its underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms are poorly understood. Objectives: We hypothesized that diaphragm muscle fibers of mechanically ventilated critically ill patients display atrophy and contractile weakness, and that the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway is activated in the diaphragm. Methods: We obtained diaphragm muscle biopsies from 22 critically ill patients who received mechanical ventilation before surgery and compared these with biopsies obtained from patients during thoracic surgery for resection of a suspected early lung malignancy (control subjects). In a proof-of-concept study in a muscle-specific ring finger protein-1 (MuRF-1) knockout mouse model, we evaluated the role of the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway in the development of contractile weakness during mechanical ventilation. Measurements and Main Results: Both slow- and fast-twitch diaphragm muscle fibers of critically ill patients had approximately 25% smaller cross-sectional area, and had contractile force reduced by half or more. Markers of the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway were significantly up-regulated in the diaphragm of critically ill patients. Finally, MuRF-1 knockout mice were protected against the development of diaphragm contractile weakness during mechanical ventilation. Conclusions: These findings show that diaphragm muscle fibers of critically ill patients display atrophy and severe contractile weakness, and in the diaphragm of critically ill patients the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway is activated. This study provides rationale for the development of treatment strategies that target the contractility of diaphragm fibers to facilitate weaning. PMID:25760684

  20. Analyzing GeoSentinel surveillance data: a comparison of methods to explore acute gastrointestinal illness among international travelers.

    PubMed

    Mues, Katherine E; Esposito, Douglas H; Han, Pauline V; Jentes, Emily S; Sotir, Mark J; Brown, Clive

    2014-02-01

    GeoSentinel is a global surveillance network of travel medicine clinics that collect data from ill international travelers. Analyses have relied on proportionate morbidity calculations, but proportionate morbidity cannot estimate disease risk because healthy travelers are not included in the denominator. The authors evaluated the use of a case-control design, controlling for GeoSentinel site and date of clinic visit, to calculate a reporting odds ratio (ROR). The association between region of travel and acute gastrointestinal illness was evaluated. All analyses found that the association with acute gastrointestinal illness was greatest among those who traveled to North Africa and South-Central Asia. There was consistency in the magnitude of the ROR and proportionate morbidity ratio (PMR) in regions such as the Caribbean. However, in other regions, the matched ROR was noticeably different than the PMR. The case-control ROR may be preferred for single-disease/syndrome analytical studies using GeoSentinel surveillance data or other surveillance data.

  1. Oncologic Patients' Knowledge Expectations and Cognitive Capacities During Illness Trajectory: Analysis of Critical Moments and Factors.

    PubMed

    Heli, Vaartio-Rajalin; Helena, Leino-Kilpi; Liisa, Iire; Kimmo, Lehtonen; Heikki, Minn

    2015-01-01

    Cancer and its management affect patients' cognitive resources and education needs in several ways. The objective of this study is to identify significant factors affecting cognitive resources and knowledge expectations of adult patients with cancer during the course of their illness trajectory. Current or former patients with cancer (n = 53) were recruited to focus group interviews and individual in-depth interviews. The informants' knowledge expectations vary during their illness trajectory and are affected by personal, situational, and clinical factors. These should be acknowledged to provide person-centered, holistic nursing care and patient education.

  2. How does illness severity influence depression, health satisfaction and life satisfaction in patients with cardiovascular disease? The mediating role of illness perception and self-efficacy beliefs.

    PubMed

    Steca, P; Greco, A; Monzani, D; Politi, A; Gestra, R; Ferrari, G; Malfatto, G; Parati, G

    2013-01-01

    Numerous empirical studies have investigated the relationships between cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and patients' psychological well-being, with a focus almost exclusively on its dark side. Very little is known on the impact of illness severity on both negative and positive indicators of patients' well-being, as well as on the psychosocial variables that may mediate this association. Aim of the study was to investigate the impact of illness severity on depression as well as on health satisfaction and life satisfaction of patients undergoing a cardiovascular rehabilitation. It also aimed at testing the mediation of illness perception and self-efficacy beliefs in managing cardiac risk factors. The study involved 172 patients (mean age = 66.43 years; SD = 9.99 years; 76.2% men). Illness severity was measured in terms of left ventricular ejection fraction at discharge from the cardiology department, whereas all psychological dimensions were assessed one week later. Results showed significant relationships among illness severity, depression and health satisfaction that were fully mediated by illness perception and self-efficacy beliefs, but not significant relation between disease severity and life satisfaction (χ2 (1) = 2.30, p = n.s.). Overall, findings underline the importance of working on illness perception and self-efficacy beliefs to contrast depression and to improve health and life satisfaction in patients with CVD.

  3. [Phenomenology of serial homicide of critically ill elderly patients by patient care personnel].

    PubMed

    Maisch, H

    1996-01-01

    The study represents a completely new criminological phenomenon among homicide offenses: the killing of many very old terminally or incurably ill patients in hospitals and sometimes nursing homes. These homicides are a worldwide phenomenon. Six distinguishing indications of this phenomenon are differentiated from the traditional homicide criminology. Some statistical data of 11 nurses are presented, sentenced between 1976 and 1993 in the Federal Republic of Germany, Austria, Norway, the Netherlands, and in the United States of America. Centerpiece of this description is the differentiation of ten important characteristics of these homicidal acts. It is not possible to discuss the motives of this crime in detail.

  4. 'Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool' predicts mortality and length of hospital stay in acutely ill elderly.

    PubMed

    Stratton, Rebecca J; King, Claire L; Stroud, Mike A; Jackson, Alan A; Elia, Marinos

    2006-02-01

    Malnutrition and its impact on clinical outcome may be underestimated in hospitalised elderly as many screening procedures require measurements of weight and height that cannot often be undertaken in sick elderly patients. The 'Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool' ('MUST') has been developed to screen all adults, even if weight and/or height cannot be measured, enabling more complete information on malnutrition prevalence and its impact on clinical outcome to be obtained. In the present study, 150 consecutively admitted elderly patients (age 85 (sd 5.5) years) were recruited prospectively, screened with 'MUST' and clinical outcome recorded. Although only 56 % of patients could be weighed, all (n 150) could be screened with 'MUST'; 58 % were at malnutrition risk and these individuals had greater mortality (in-hospital and post-discharge, P<0.01) and longer hospital stays (P=0.02) than those at low risk. Both 'MUST' categorisation and component scores (BMI, weight loss, acute disease) were significantly related to mortality (P<0.03). Those patients with no measured or recalled weight ('MUST' subjective criteria used) had a greater risk of malnutrition (P=0.01) and a poorer clinical outcome (P<0.002) than those who could be weighed and, within both groups, clinical outcome was worse in those at risk of malnutrition. The present study suggests that 'MUST' predicts clinical outcome in hospitalised elderly, in whom malnutrition is common (58 %). In those who cannot be weighed, a higher prevalence of malnutrition and associated poorer clinical outcome supports the importance of routine screening with a tool, like 'MUST', that can be used to screen all patients.

  5. Human Enterovirus 109: a Novel Interspecies Recombinant Enterovirus Isolated from a Case of Acute Pediatric Respiratory Illness in Nicaragua▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Yozwiak, Nathan L.; Skewes-Cox, Peter; Gordon, Aubree; Saborio, Saira; Kuan, Guillermina; Balmaseda, Angel; Ganem, Don; Harris, Eva; DeRisi, Joseph L.

    2010-01-01

    Enteroviruses (Picornaviridae family) are a common cause of human illness worldwide and are associated with diverse clinical syndromes, including asymptomatic infection, respiratory illness, gastroenteritis, and meningitis. In this study, we report the identification and complete genome sequence of a novel enterovirus isolated from a case of acute respiratory illness in a Nicaraguan child. Unbiased deep sequencing of nucleic acids from a nose and throat swab sample enabled rapid recovery of the full-genome sequence. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that human enterovirus 109 (EV109) is most closely related to serotypes of human enterovirus species C (HEV-C) in all genomic regions except the 5′ untranslated region (5′ UTR). Bootstrap analysis indicates that the 5′ UTR of EV109 is likely the product of an interspecies recombination event between ancestral members of the HEV-A and HEV-C groups. Overall, the EV109 coding region shares 67 to 72% nucleotide sequence identity with its nearest relatives. EV109 isolates were detected in 5/310 (1.6%) of nose and throat swab samples collected from children in a pediatric cohort study of influenza-like illness in Managua, Nicaragua, between June 2007 and June 2008. Further experimentation is required to more fully characterize the pathogenic role, disease associations, and global distribution of EV109. PMID:20592079

  6. Illness perceptions, negative emotions, and pain in patients with noncardiac chest pain.

    PubMed

    Israel, Jared I; White, Kamila S; Gervino, Ernest V

    2015-03-01

    Illness-specific cognitions are associated with outcomes in numerous health conditions, however, little is known about their role in noncardiac chest pain (NCCP). NCCP is prevalent, impairing, and associated with elevated health care utilization. Our objective was to investigate the relations between illness perceptions, emotion, and pain in a sample of 196 adult patients diagnosed with NCCP. We found that negative illness perceptions were associated with greater anxiety, depression, chest pain, and pain-related life interference while controlling for the effects of demographic and pain-related variables. These results expand current NCCP theory and may inform future treatment development.

  7. Cystatin C in critically ill patients treated with continuous venovenous hemofiltration.

    PubMed

    Baas, Marije C; Bouman, Catherine S C; Hoek, Frans J; Krediet, Raymond T; Schultz, Marcus J

    2006-10-01

    Assessment of residual renal function in critically ill patients with acute renal failure (ARF) treated with continuous venovenous hemofiltration (CVVH) is difficult. Cystatin C (CysC) is a low-molecular-weight protein (13.3 kDa) removed from the body by glomerular filtration. Its serum concentration has been advocated for assessment of renal function in patients with kidney disease. To investigate whether the removal of CysC by CVVH is likely to influence its serum concentration, concentrations of CysC were measured in 3 consecutive samples in 18 patients with oliguric ARF treated with CVVH (2 L/hr). Samples were taken from the afferent and efferent blood lines and from the ultrafiltrate line. Concentrations of CysC did not change during the time interval studied. The mean serum concentrations of CysC were 2.25+/-0.45 mg/L in the afferent and 2.19+/-0.56 mg/L in the efferent samples (NS); ultrafiltrate concentrations of CysC were 1.01+/-0.45 mg/L. The sieving coefficient of CysC was 0.52+/-0.20; the clearance of CysC was 17.3+/-6.6 mL/min; and the quantity of CysC removed averaged 2.13 mg/hr. During CVVH (2 L/hr), the quantity of CysC removed is less than 30% of its production and no rapid changes in its serum concentration are observed. Therefore, CVVH (2 L/hr) is unlikely to influence serum concentrations of CysC significantly, which suggests that it can be used to monitor residual renal function during CVVH.

  8. Giving meaning to illness: An investigation of self-defining memories in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Voltzenlogel, Virginie; Ernst, Alexandra; de Sèze, Jérôme; Brassat, David; Manning, Liliann; Berna, Fabrice

    2016-10-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) patients are often unable to adequately fulfill their established roles due to physical disabilities and cognitive changes, making this chronic illness particularly threatening to personal identity. Twenty-five MS patients and 25 healthy controls were asked to recall five self-defining memories (SDM). Overall characteristics of SDM did not differ between patients and controls; MS patients displayed preserved capacity to draw meaning upon past events. Moreover, almost two-thirds of MS patients mentioned at least one illness related SDM and about 25% of patients' SDM referred to MS. These memories were experienced as more negative and associated with more tension than other SDM but led toward more positive emotion and less negative emotion over time; they were also more central and more integrated to the personal identity. We concluded that self-challenging events due to MS may trigger both cognitive and emotional processes enabling the integration of illness in patients' self-representations.

  9. The microbiome and critical illness

    PubMed Central

    Dickson, Robert P

    2016-01-01

    The central role of the microbiome in critical illness is supported by a half century of experimental and clinical study. The physiological effects of critical illness and the clinical interventions of intensive care substantially alter the microbiome. In turn, the microbiome predicts patients’ susceptibility to disease, and manipulation of the microbiome has prevented or modulated critical illness in animal models and clinical trials. This Review surveys the microbial ecology of critically ill patients, presents the facts and unanswered questions surrounding gut-derived sepsis, and explores the radically altered ecosystem of the injured alveolus. The revolution in culture-independent microbiology has provided the tools needed to target the microbiome rationally for the prevention and treatment of critical illness, holding great promise to improve the acute and chronic outcomes of the critically ill. PMID:26700442

  10. [Occupational status and prospects of psychiatric patients. Correlation between earning status and development of psychiatric illness].

    PubMed

    Moos, Manfred; Wolfersdorf, Manfred

    2003-05-01

    According to a study in two clinics in the region of "Oberfranken" (1997) employment or unemployment has a different effect on the development of the mental illness: According to therapist inside opinion women suffered more from paid employment, men, however, from unemployment. In comparisons between the different diagnosis groups comparatively unfavourable effects of unemployment on the development of the illness of, addicted people became evident, negative effects of paid employment, however, were particularly found with patients suffering from F4 disorders (ICD-10).

  11. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy for acalculous cholecystitis in a neutropenic patient after chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Ejduk, Anna; Wróblewski, Tadeusz; Szczepanik, Andrzej B.

    2014-01-01

    Acute acalculous cholecystitis (ACC) is most frequently reported in critically ill patients following sepsis, extensive injury or surgery. It is rather uncommon as a chemotherapy-induced complication, which is usually life-threatening in neutropenic patients subjected to myelosuppressive therapy. A 23-year-old patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia was subjected to myelosuppressive chemotherapy (cyclophosphamide, cytarabine, pegaspargase). After the first chemotherapy cycle the patient was neutropenic and feverish; she presented with vomiting and pain in the right epigastrium. Ultrasound demonstrated an acalculous gallbladder with wall thickening up to 14 mm. The ACC was diagnosed. Medical therapy included a broad spectrum antibiotic regimen and granulocyte-colony stimulating factors. On the second day after ACC diagnosis the patient's general condition worsened. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy was performed. The resected gallbladder showed no signs of bacterial or leukemic infiltrates. The postoperative course was uneventful. In the management of neutropenic patients with ACC surgical treatment is as important as pharmacological therapy. PMID:25337176

  12. Acute kidney injury in the pregnant patient.

    PubMed

    Nwoko, Rosemary; Plecas, Darko; Garovic, Vesna D

    2012-12-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is costly and is associated with increased mortality and morbidity. An understanding of the renal physiologic changes that occur during pregnancy is essential for proper evaluation, diagnosis, and management of AKI. As in the general population, AKI can occur from prerenal, intrinsic, and post-renal causes. Major causes of pre-renal azotemia include hyperemesis gravidarum and uterine hemorrhage in the setting of placental abruption. Intrinsic etiologies include infections from acute pyelonephritis and septic abortion, bilateral cortical necrosis, and acute tubular necrosis. Particular attention should be paid to specific conditions that lead to AKI during the second and third trimesters, such as preeclampsia, HELLP syndrome, acute fatty liver of pregnancy, and TTP-HUS. For each of these disorders, delivery of the fetus is the recommended therapeutic option, with additional therapies indicated for each specific disease entity. An understanding of the various etiologies of AKI in the pregnant patient is key to the appropriate clinical management, prevention of adverse maternal outcomes, and safe delivery of the fetus. In pregnant women with pre-existing kidney disease, the degree of renal dysfunction is the major determining factor of pregnancy outcomes, which may further be complicated by a prior history of hypertension.

  13. Micronutrients as adjunct therapy of acute illness in children: impact on the episode outcome and policy implications of current findings.

    PubMed

    Mahalanabis, D; Bhan, M K

    2001-05-01

    Role of micronutrients namely vitamin A, zinc and folate, as adjunct therapy of illness episodes in children in developing countries have been discussed in the light of health policy. Apart from a selective review, attempts have been made to statistically combine results of several studies to address policy issues. In children, vitamin A supplementation during illness has (a) a profound effect in reducing mortality in measles, (b) possibly a significant effect in reducing persistent diarrhea episodes in children with acute diarrhea, and (c) no benefit in pneumonia. Use of large dose vitamin A is recommended during measles episodes but not in non-measles pneumonia. Its use in acute diarrhea is debatable but recommended in persistent diarrhea and in severe malnutrition as a component of a micronutrient mixture. Large dose vitamin A supplementation should be used with caution in young infants as there are unresolved concerns about its safety particularly, bulging fontanelle observed in infants when co-administered at immunization. In children, zinc supplementation during illness, (a) had a marked effect in reducing prolonged episodes and a modest effect on episode duration in acute diarrhea, (b) resulted in reduced rate of treatment failure and death in persistent diarrhea, (c) had no effect in measles and non-measles pneumonia, and (d) probably had a detrimental effect of increasing death rate when a large dose was used in severely malnourished children. The desirability of routine zinc supplementation therapy of undernourished children with acute diarrhea should be assessed further. Concerning policy, zinc supplementation as a component of a micronutrient mixture is recommended in the rehabilitation of severely malnourished children and in persistent diarrhea. However, recommendation for its routine use in all cases of acute diarrhea in children needs additional studies on effectiveness, cost, operations and safety. In two randomized controlled trials folate has

  14. Therapeutic monitoring of amikacin and gentamicin in critically and noncritically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Kovačević, Tijana; Avram, Sanja; Milaković, Dragana; Špirić, Nikolina; Kovačević, Pedja

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) enables individualization in the treatment to optimize clinical benefit and minimize drugs' side effects. Critically ill septic patients represent a challenge for antimicrobial treatment because of pathophysiological impact of sepsis on pharmacokinetics of drugs. The aim of this study was to assess the appropriateness of gentamicin and amikacin dosing in critically and noncritically ill patients, as well as to estimate the need for its regular therapeutic monitoring. Subjects and Methods: It was a prospective study which included 31 patients on gentamicin and 16 patients on amikacin from four different units who met the inclusion criteria. Trough concentrations of drugs were measured in serum just before third or fourth dose of antibiotic, whereas peak concentrations were measured in serum 1 h after the completion of drug administration (steady state). Relevant data on patients' clinical course of disease, comorbidities, and concomitant medication were collected from medical charts in order to identify their possible influence on drugs' concentrations. Results: Peak concentrations of amikacin were in reference range in 81.8% critically ill and in 80% of noncritically ill patients (P = 0.931). Peak concentrations of gentamicin were in reference range in 88.9% critically ill and in 77.3% of noncritically ill patients (P = 0.457). Conclusion: Serum concentrations of aminoglycosides (amikacin and gentamicin) were in reference range in most of the patients in our study, suggesting that dosing of these drugs in the University Hospital Clinical Center, Banja Luka, was adequate. In patients without kidney or liver disease, regular TDM of aminoglycosides is not necessary. PMID:27330257

  15. Risk factors for early invasive fungal disease in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Gurmeet; Pitoyo, Ceva Wicaksono; Aditianingsih, Dita; Rumende, Cleopas Martin

    2016-01-01

    Background: The incidence of invasive fungal disease (IFD) is increasing worldwide in the past two to three decades. Critically ill patients in Intensive Care Units are more vulnerable to fungal infection. Early detection and treatment are important to decrease morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients. Objective: Our study aimed to assess factors associated with early IFD in critically ill patients. Materials and Methods: This prospective cohort study was conducted in critically ill patients, from March to September 2015. Total number of patients (74) in this study was drawn based on one of the risk factors (human immunodeficiency virus). Specimens were collected on day 5–7 of hospitalization. Multivariate analysis with logistic regression was performed for factors, with P < 0.25 in bivariate analysis. Results: Two hundred and six patients were enrolled in this study. Seventy-four patients were with IFD, majority were males (52.7%), mean age was 58 years (range 18–79), mean Leon's score was 3 (score range 2–5), majority group was nonsurgical/nontrauma (72.9%), and mean fungal isolation was positive on day 5. Candida sp. (92.2%) is the most frquently isolated fungal infection. Urine culture yielded the highest number of fungal isolates (70.1%). Mortality rate in this study was 50%. In multivariate analysis, diabetes mellitus (DM) (P = 0.018, odds ratio 2.078, 95% confidence interval 1.135–3.803) was found as an independent factor associated with early IFD critically ill patients. Conclusion: DM is a significant factor for the incidence of early IFD in critically ill patients. PMID:27994377

  16. Acceptance of illness and satisfaction with life among malaria patients in rivers state, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Health condition is one of the basic factors affecting satisfaction with life, and the level of illness acceptance. The purpose of the study was to analyse the level of illness acceptance, the level of satisfaction with life among malaria patients, and the level of trust placed in the physician and the nurse. Methods The study employs the method of diagnostic survey based on standardised AIS and SWLS scales, as well as Anderson and Dedrick’s PPTS and PNTS scales. Results The average AIS level was 12 points, while the average level of SwL at the SWLS scale was 16.5 points. The average level of trust in the physician and the nurse amounted to 50.6 points and 51.4 points, respectively. The correlation between the level of illness acceptance and self-evaluated satisfaction with life was statistically significant, with R = 0.56. The marital status influenced the level of illness acceptance with p < 0.05 and the level of satisfaction with life with p < 0.05. The employment status affected the level of satisfaction with life with p < 0.05 and the level of illness acceptance with p < 0.05. Conclusions The majority of malaria patients did not accept their illness, while the level of satisfaction with life was low. The majority of respondents trusted their physician and nurse. There is a statistically significant correlation between the level of illness acceptance and the self-evaluated satisfaction with life. The marital status had a statistically significant effect on the acceptance of illness and the satisfaction with life. The individuals who had a job demonstrated higher levels of quality of life and illness acceptance. PMID:24885562

  17. Illness Perception in Primary Cutaneous T-cell Lymphomas: What Patients Believe About Their Disease.

    PubMed

    Eder, Johanna; Kammerstätter, Martina; Erhart, Friedrich; Mairhofer-Muri, Daniela; Trautinger, Franz

    2016-03-01

    There is currently no information available on illness perception in primary cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCL). The aim of this study was therefore to gather initial information on disease understanding and interpretation in patients with CTCL. Consecutive patients from a hospital-based primary cutaneous lymphoma ward completed the Revised Illness Perception Questionnaire (IPQ-R) on 2 consecutive visits. A total of 24 patients with different variants of CTCL were included in the study. Patients experienced their condition as being long-lasting, but not fundamentally affecting their lives. Patients had poor belief in personal control, but strong belief in treatment control. They did not show a good understanding of their disease, and had a moderately negative emotional response to their illness. In conclusion, the IPQ-R provides a feasible and reproducible tool for measurement and better understanding of illness perception in patients with CTCL. Knowledge of patients' attitudes towards their disease should enable optimization of the patient-physician relationship and patient care.

  18. Scrub typhus presenting as an acute abdomen.

    PubMed

    Kundavaram, Abhilash Pp; Das, Sohini; George, Varghese M

    2014-01-01

    Scrub typhus is a mite-borne infectious disease caused by Orientia tsutsugamushi, which presents as an acute febrile illness with headache, myalgia, breathlessness, and an eschar, a pathognomonic sign, in a varying proportion of patients. However, this illness can present unusually with fever and severe abdominal pain mimicking acute abdomen. A careful search for an eschar in all patients with an acute febrile illness would provide a valuable diagnostic clue and avoid unnecessary investigations and surgical exploration.

  19. [Urinary tract colonization and infection in critically ill patients].

    PubMed

    López, M J; Cortés, J A

    2012-03-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) account for 20-50% of all hospital-acquired infections occurring in the intensive care unit (ICU). In some reports UTI was found to be more frequent than hospital-acquired pneumonia and intravascular device bacteremia, with a greater incidence in developing countries. The risk factors associated with the appearance of UTI include the severity of illness at the time of admission to the ICU, female status, prolonged urinary catheterization or a longer ICU stay and poor urinary catheter management - mainly disconnection of the closed system. about the present study offers data on the epidemiology of UTI in the ICU, the identified risk factors, etiology, diagnosis, impact upon morbidity and mortality, and the measures to prevent its appearance.

  20. A Comparative Study of Terminally Ill Hospice and Hospital Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Labus, Janet G.; Dambrot, Faye H.

    1986-01-01

    Investigated differences between 28 hospice and 28 hospital patients who died. Comparison found that hospice patients were younger, had more people living in the home, and had shorter disease history. Age, number of people living in the home, and primary cancer site significantly discriminated between hospice and hospital patients and predicted…

  1. Respiratory viruses in patients with influenza-like illness in Senegal: Focus on human respiratory adenoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Niang, Mbayame Ndiaye; Diop, Ndeye Sokhna; Fall, Amary; Kiori, Davy E.; Sarr, Fatoumata Diene; Sy, Sara; Goudiaby, Déborah; Barry, Mamadou Aliou; Fall, Malick; Dia, Ndongo

    2017-01-01

    Background Human adenoviruses (HAdVs) are highly contagious pathogens that are associated with a wide spectrum of human illnesses involving the respiratory tract. In the present study, we investigate the epidemiologic and viral molecular features of HAdVs circulating in Senegal after 4 consecutive years of sentinel surveillance of influenza-like Illness cases. Methodology and results From January 2012 to December 2015 swabs were collected from consenting ILI outpatients. Adenoviral detection is performed by rRT-PCR with the Anyplex™ II RV16 Detection kit (Seegene) and molecular characterization was performed using a partial hexon gene sequence. 6381 samples were collected. More than half of patients (51.7%; 3297/6381) were children of ≤ 5 years. 1967 (30.8%) were positive for HAdV with 1561 (79.4%) found in co-infection with at least one another respiratory virus. The most common co-detections were with influenza viruses (53.1%; 1045/1967), rhinoviruses (30%; 591/1967), enteroviruses (18.5%; 364/1967) and RSV (13.5%; 266/1967). Children under 5 were the most infected group (62.2%; 1224/1967; p <0.05). We noted that HAdV was detected throughout the year at a high level with detection peaks of different amplitudes without any clear seasonality. Phylogenetic analysis revealed species HAdV-C in majority, species HAdV-B and one HAdV- 4 genome type. The 9 HAdV-B species like strains from Senegal grouped with genome types HAdV-7, HAdV-55 and HAdV-11 as shown by a phylogenetic branch with a high bootstrap value of (88%). Conclusion In conclusion, the results of the present study suggest strong year-round HAdV activity in Senegal, especially in children up to 5 years of age. Molecular studies revealed that the dominant species in circulation in patients with ILI appears to be HAdV-C and HAdV-B species. The circulation of though HAdV-7 and HAdV-55 genome types is of note as these serotypes are recognized causes of more severe and even fatal acute respiratory infections

  2. Reducing Emergency Department Visits for Acute Gastrointestinal Illnesses in North Carolina (USA) by Extending Community Water Service

    PubMed Central

    DeFelice, Nicholas B.; Johnston, Jill E.; Gibson, Jacqueline MacDonald

    2016-01-01

    Background: Previous analyses have suggested that unregulated private drinking water wells carry a higher risk of exposure to microbial contamination than regulated community water systems. In North Carolina, ~35% of the state’s population relies on private wells, but the health impact associated with widespread reliance on such unregulated drinking water sources is unknown. Objectives: We estimated the total number of emergency department visits for acute gastrointestinal illness (AGI) attributable to microbial contamination in private wells in North Carolina per year, the costs of those visits, and the potential health benefits of extending regulated water service to households currently relying on private wells for their drinking water. Methods: We developed a population intervention model using 2007–2013 data from all 122 North Carolina emergency departments along with microbial contamination data for all 2,120 community water systems and for 16,138 private well water samples collected since 2008. Results: An estimated 29,400 (95% CI: 26,600, 32,200) emergency department visits per year for acute gastrointestinal illness were attributable to microbial contamination in drinking water, constituting approximately 7.3% (95% CI: 6.6, 7.9%) of all AGI-related visits. Of these attributable cases, 99% (29,200; 95% CI: 26,500, 31,900) were associated with private well contamination. The estimated statewide annual cost of emergency department visits attributable to microbiological contamination of drinking water is 40.2 million USD (95% CI: 2.58 million USD, 193 million USD), of which 39.9 million USD (95% CI: 2.56 million USD, 192 million USD) is estimated to arise from private well contamination. An estimated 2,920 (95% CI: 2,650, 3,190) annual emergency department visits could be prevented by extending community water service to 10% of the population currently relying on private wells. Conclusions: This research provides new evidence that extending regulated

  3. Prealbumin is Not Sensitive Indicator of Nutrition and Prognosis in Critical Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Seung Hui; Lee, Jong Seok; Chae, Sang Hee; Ahn, Bo Sook; Chang, Dong Jin

    2005-01-01

    It was reported that 30-50% of inpatients are in a malnutrition status. Measuring the prealbumin level is a sensitive and cost-effective method for assessing the severity of illness in critically or chronically ill patients. However it is uncertain whether or not the prealbumin level correlates with the level of nutrition support and outcomes in critically ill patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate serum prealbumin level as an indicator of the effectiveness of nutrition support and the prognosis in critically ill patients. Forty-four patients who received total parenteral nutrition for more than 7 days at an intensive care unit (ICU) were studied. The serum prealbumin was measured at the initial time of nutrition support and at the almost seventh day since the first measurement. The patients were allocated into two groups. In Group 1 (n=31) and 2 (n=13), the prealbumin level increased and decreased, respectively. Age, APACHE II score, nutrition status, nutritional requirement and amount of supply, mortality, hospital day and ICU day in the two groups were compared. The serum prealbumin level increased in 31 out of the 44 patients. The average calorie intake was 1334 Kcal/day (83% of energy requirement) in Group 1 and 1170 kcal/day (76% of energy requirement) in Group 2 (p=0.131). The mortality was 42% in Group 1 and 54% in Group 2 (p=0.673). The average hospital day/ ICU day in Groups 1 and 2 were 80 days/38 days and 60 days/31 days respectively. In conclusion, in critically ill patients, the serum prealbumin level did not respond sensitively to nutritional support. In addition an increase in the prealbumin level dose not indicate a better prognosis for critically ill patients. PMID:15744801

  4. Kinetic Patterns of Candida albicans Germ Tube Antibody in Critically Ill Patients: Influence on Mortality▿

    PubMed Central

    Zaragoza, Rafael; Pemán, Javier; Quindós, Guillermo; Iruretagoyena, Jose R.; Cuétara, María S.; Ramírez, Paula; Gómez, Maria D.; Camarena, Juan J.; Viudes, Angel; Pontón, José

    2009-01-01

    The influence of kinetic patterns of Candida albicans germ tube antibodies (CAGTA) on mortality was analyzed in six intensive care units. Statistically significant lower mortality rates were found in patients with patterns of increasing CAGTA titers who had been treated with antifungal agents. Thus, antifungal treatment should be considered when CAGTA titers are increasing in critically ill patients. PMID:19675223

  5. Dental Hygiene Students' Preparation for Treatment of Patients with Mental Illnesses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lemon, Sherry; Reveal, Marge

    1991-01-01

    A survey of 138 dental hygiene programs gathered information on didactic and clinical experiences for preparing students to treat patients with mental illnesses. Although most curricula addressed the issue, inadequate time was allotted. Over half did not provide oral care to these patients; few felt the community's need was met. (MSE)

  6. A prospective evaluation of propylene glycol clearance and accumulation during continuous-infusion lorazepam in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Nelsen, Jamie L; Haas, Curtis E; Habtemariam, Bahru; Kaufman, David C; Partridge, Amy; Welle, Stephen; Forrest, Alan

    2008-01-01

    Propylene glycol is a commonly used diluent in several pharmaceutical preparations, including the sedative lorazepam. Fifty critically ill patients receiving continuous-infusion lorazepam for a minimum of 36 hours were prospectively evaluated to determine the extent of propylene glycol accumulation over time, characterize propylene glycol clearance in the presence of critical illness, and develop a pharmacokinetic model that would predict clearance based on patient-specific clinical, laboratory, and demographic factors. In this cohort, the median lorazepam infusion rate was 2.1 mg/h (0.5-18). Propylene glycol concentration correlated poorly with osmolality, osmol gap, and lactate. In all, 8 patients (16%) had significant propylene glycol accumulation (>25mg/dL). When propylene glycol concentrations were >25 mg/dL, the median lorazepam infusion rate before sample collection was higher, 6.4 (1.9-11.3) versus 2.0 (0.5-7.4) mg/h (P =.0003). A linear first-order model with interoccasion variability on clearance adjusted for total body weight and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score predicted propylene glycol concentration.

  7. Antibiotic Dosing in Patients With Acute Kidney Injury: "Enough But Not Too Much".

    PubMed

    Lewis, Susan J; Mueller, Bruce A

    2016-03-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that antibiotic dosing in critically ill patients with acute kidney injury (AKI) often does not achieve pharmacodynamic goals, and the continued high mortality rate due to infectious causes appears to confirm these findings. Although there are compelling reasons why clinicians should use more aggressive antibiotic dosing, particularly in patients receiving aggressive renal replacement therapies, concerns for toxicity associated with higher doses are real. The presence of multisystem organ failure and polypharmacy predispose these patients to drug toxicity. This article examines the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic consequences of critical illness, AKI, and renal replacement therapy and describes potential solutions to help clinicians give "enough but not too much" in these very complicated patients.

  8. Quality of Life of Patients After an Acute Coronary Event: Hospital Discharge

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Cristiane Maria Carvalho Costa; Macedo, Luciana Bilitario; Gomes, Lilian Tapioca Jones Cunha; de Oliveira, Paula Luzia Seixas Pereira; Albuquerque, Iana Verena Santana; Lemos, Amanda Queiroz; Brasil, Cristina Aires; Prado, Eloisa Pires Ferreira; Macedo, Pedro Santiago; de Oliveira, Francisco Tiago Oliveira; dos Reis, Helena Franca Correia; Darze, Eduardo Sahade; Guimaraes, Armenio Costa

    2014-01-01

    Background The acute coronary syndrome (ACS) has a high morbi-mortality rate, including physical deficiencies and functional limitations with impact on quality of life. Cardiovascular rehabilitation 1 (CVR1) should begin as early as possible, to enable improvement in functional capacity and quality of life. Previous studies have shown association of cardiovascular diseases with quality of life, in which depression and anxiety are the domains most altered. The aim of the study is to verify the impact of an acute coronary event on quality of life at the moment of hospital discharge. Methodology This was a cross-sectional study, with ACS patients hospitalized in ICU of a private hospital in the city of Salvador, Brazil, submitted to CVR1. The quality of life questionnaire Euroqol-5D was applied on discharge from hospital. Patients included in the study were those with ACV, who had medical permission to walk, had not been submitted to acute surgical treatment, were time and space oriented, and over the age of 18 years. Patients excluded from the study were those with cognitive, orthopedic and neurological problems, who used orthesis on a lower limb, and were in any condition of risk at the time of beginning with CVR1. Data were collected by a previously trained ICU team. Results Data were collected of 63 patients who revealed compromise in the domains of pain/feeling ill (20.63%) and anxiety/depression (38.09%). Statistical significance was observed in the association between sex and pain/feeling ill (P < 0.01), sex and anxiety/depression (P < 0.01), diabetes and mobility (P < 0.01), hereditary factors and anxiety/depression (p < 0.01), BMI and pain/feeling ill (P < 0.01). Conclusion In this sample of patients, on discharge from hospital after ACS, the pain/feeling ill and anxiety/depression domains were shown to be compromised. PMID:25110540

  9. Does RBC Storage Age Effect Inflammation, Immune Function and Susceptibility to Transfusion Associated Microchimerism in Critically Ill Patients? Adverse Effects of RBC Storage in Critically Ill Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    STATEMENT Approved for public release; distribution unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The study aim is to investigate specific mechanisms of...the mechanisms and clinical outcomes associated with increased or decreased RBC storage age in critically ill patients including traumatic injury have...not been performed. The ABLE study presents a unique and probably one-time opportunity to investigate mechanisms in the context of clinical

  10. Illness perception in patients with coronary artery disease: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Al-Smadi, Ahmed Mohammad; Ashour, Ala; Hweidi, Issa; Gharaibeh, Besher; Fitzsimons, Donna

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to conduct a systematic review that investigates the differences in illness perception with age and gender in patients diagnosed with coronary artery disease. Previous studies show some discrepancies regarding the influence of age and gender on the specific dimensions of coronary artery disease patients' illness perception. A systematic review using a narrative synthesis process included preliminary synthesis, exploration of relationships and assessment of the robustness of the synthesis and findings was conducted. Search terms were used to identify research studies published between 1996 and December 2014 across four key databases: CINAHL, Medline, PsycINFO and Web of Science. A total of 14 studies met the inclusion criteria of the review. The review found that men had a stronger perception that their own behaviour had caused their illness than women. In addition, older patients had lower perceptions of the consequences and chronicity of their illness. This analysis concludes that some dimensions of illness perception vary according to age and gender of patients with coronary artery disease. These differences should be taken into consideration, particularly when providing health education and cardiac rehabilitation.

  11. Traditional and alternative therapy for mental illness in Jamaica: patients' conceptions and practitioners' attitudes.

    PubMed

    James, Caryl C A B; Peltzer, Karl

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate traditional and alternative therapy for mental illness in Jamaica: patients' conceptions and practitioners' attitudes. The sample included 60 psychiatric patients selected from Ward 21 at the University of the West Indies, Kingston as well as Princess Margaret outpatient clinic, and 30 Afro-centric psychiatric nurses, psychiatrist and clinical psychologists from Kingston and St. Thomas, Jamaica. Patients were interviewed with the Short Explanatory Model Interview (SEMI) and practitioners completed a self administered questionnaire on attitudes towards traditional and alternative medicine. Results indicate that among psychiatric patients more than a third expressed the belief that the overall cause of their mental illness was as a result of supernatural factors. In general, the majority of patients felt that their perception of their problems did not concur with the western practitioner, which in turn caused distress for these patients. In case for those who also sought traditional medicine, they were more inclined to feel pleased about their interaction and the treatment they received. Results from western trained practitioners found that although they acknowledged that traditional medicine plays a major role in the treatment of mental illness among psychiatric patients the treatment was not advantageous. For the most part when all three traditional approaches were examined alternative medicine seemed more favourable than traditional healing and traditional herbal treatment. There is a need to develop models of collaboration that promote a workable relationship between the two healing systems in treating mental illness.

  12. Is non-thyroidal illness syndrome a predictor for prolonged weaning in intubated chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients?

    PubMed Central

    Yasar, Zehra; Kirakli, Cenk; Cimen, Pınar; Ucar, Zeynep Zeren; Talay, Fahrettin; Tibet, Gultekin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Non-thyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS) is considered to be associated with adverse outcomes in intensive care unit (ICU) patients. In this study, we evaluated the association between NTIS and prolonged weaning in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients admitted to the ICU. Materials and methods: In total, 125 patients with COPD admitted to our ICU who underwent invasive mechanical ventilation (MV) were enrolled. We collected each patient’s baseline characteristics including Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score, body mass index (BMI), and thyroid hormones 24 h after ICU admission. The presence of pulmonary infection was also recorded. The primary outcome was prolonged weaning, defined as patients who failed at least three weaning attempts or required > 7 days of weaning after the first spontaneous breathing trial. Results: Of the 127 patients studied, 64 had normal thyroid function tests and 61 had NTIS. Patients with NTIS had significantly higher APACHE II scores, prolonged weaning, and pulmonary infection. Patients with NTIS had a higher risk for prolonged weaning (odds ratio, OR = 3.21; 95% CI = 1.31-7.83).The presence of pulmonary infection was also an independent risk factors for prolonged weaning. Conclusions: NTIS may be an independent predictor for prolonged weaning in intubated COPD patients. PMID:26309710

  13. Acyclovir reduces the duration of fever in patients with infectious mononucleosis-like illness.

    PubMed

    Usami, Osamu; Saitoh, Hiroki; Ashino, Yugo; Hattori, Toshio

    2013-01-01

    Acyclovir is known for its antiviral activity against some pathogenic viruses such as the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) that causes infectious mononucleosis (IM) and IM-like illness. Therefore, we empirically administered acyclovir to patients with suspected EBV-IM and IM like-illness, upon their admission to our hospital. We admitted 25 patients, who were hospitalized for fever and lymphadenopathy, to the Tohoku University Hospital Infectious Disease Ward. As part of treatment, 8 of these patients were given acyclovir (750 mg/day) with their consent and were assigned to the acyclovir group; the remaining 17 patients were assigned to the control group. The mean age of acyclovir patients (all men) was 42±5.2 years, and that of control patients (13 men and 4 women) was 31±3.0 years. The cause of illness was confirmed as EBV-IM in 6 patients (1, acyclovir; 5, control), and remained unknown for the other 19 IM-like illness patients (7, acyclovir; 12, control). A shorter duration of hospitalization and fever was observed in the acyclovir compared to that in the control patients (hospitalization duration: 16±3.7 vs. 27±7.7 days, P=0.36; fever duration: 4.5±1.8 vs. 18±6.5 days, P=0.04). Additionally, serum amyloid A (SAA) levels were lower in acyclovir than that in control patients (98±37 vs. 505±204 µg/mL, P=0.02). Therefore, we propose that acyclovir is a potential therapeutic agent for both EBV-IM and IM like-illnesses. Future studies should further examine its mechanism of action.

  14. Association of oliguria with the development of acute kidney injury in the critically ill.

    PubMed

    Vaara, Suvi T; Parviainen, Ilkka; Pettilä, Ville; Nisula, Sara; Inkinen, Outi; Uusaro, Ari

    2016-01-01

    Urine output (UO) criterion may increase the sensitivity of the definition of acute kidney injury (AKI). We determined whether the empirically derived definition for oliguria(<0.5 ml/kg/h) is independently associated with adverse outcome. Data analysis included hourly recorded UO from the prospective, multicenter FINNAKI study conducted in 16 Finnish intensive care units. Confounder-adjusted association of oliguria of different severity and duration primarily with the development of AKI defined by creatinine criterion (Cr-AKI) or renal replacement therapy(RRT) was assessed. Secondarily, we determined the association of oliguria with 90-day mortality. Of the 1966 patients analyzed for the development of AKI, 454 (23.1%) reached this endpoint. Within this AKI cohort, 312 (68.7%)developed Cr-AKI, 21 (4.6%) commenced RRT without Cr-AKI, and 121 (26.7%) commenced RRT with Cr-AKI. Episodes of severe oliguria (<0.1 ml/kg/h) for more than 3 h were independently associated with the development of Cr-AKI or RRT. The shortest periods of consecutive oliguria independently associated with an increased risk for 90-day mortality were 6–12 h of oliguria from 0.3 to <0.5 ml/kg/h, over 6 h of oliguria from 0.1 to <0.3 ml/kg/h, and severe oliguria lasting over 3 h.Thus, our findings underlie the importance of hourly UO measurements.

  15. Acute coronary syndromes in patients with HIV

    PubMed Central

    Seecheran, Valmiki K.; Giddings, Stanley L.

    2017-01-01

    Highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART) has considerably increased the life expectancy of patients infected with HIV. Coronary artery disease is a leading cause of mortality in patients infected with HIV. This is primarily attributed to their increased survival, HAART-induced metabolic derangements, and to HIV itself. The pathophysiology of atherosclerosis in HIV is both multifactorial and complex – involving direct endothelial injury and dysfunction, hypercoagulability, and a significant contribution from traditional cardiac risk factors. The advent of HAART has since heralded a remarkable improvement in outcomes, but at the expense of other unforeseen issues. It is thus of paramount importance to swiftly recognize and manage acute coronary syndromes in HIV-infected patients to attenuate adverse complications, which should translate into improved clinical outcomes. PMID:27845996

  16. Development of disaster pamphlets based on health needs of patients with chronic illnesses.

    PubMed

    Motoki, Emi; Mori, Kikuko; Kaji, Hidesuke; Nonami, Yoko; Fukano, Chika; Kayano, Tomonori; Kawada, Terue; Kimura, Yukari; Yasui, Kumiko; Ueki, Hiroko; Ugai, Kazuhiro

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this research was to develop a pamphlet that would enable patients with diabetes, rheumatic diseases, chronic respiratory disease, and dialysis treatment to be aware of changes in their physical conditions at an early stage of a disaster, cope with these changes, maintain self-care measures, and recover their health. Illness-specific pamphlets were produced based on disaster-related literature, news articles, surveys of victims of the Great Hanshin-Awaji Earthquake Disaster and Typhoon Tokage, and other sources. Each pamphlet consisted of seven sections-each section includes items common to all illnesses as well as items specific to each illness. The first section, "Physical Self-Care", contains a checklist of 18 common physical symptoms as well as symptoms specific to each illness, and goes on to explain what the symptoms may indicate and what should be done about them. The main aim of the "Changes in Mental Health Conditions" section is to detect posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) at an early stage. The section "Preventing the Deterioration of Chronic Illnesses" is designed to prevent the worsening of each illness through the provision of information on cold prevention, adjustment to the living environment, and ways of coping with stress. In the sections, "Medication Control" and "Importance of Having Medical Examinations", spaces are provided to list medications currently being used and details of the hospital address, in order to ensure the continued use of medications. The section, "Preparing for Evacuations" gives a list of everyday items and medical items needed to be prepared for a disaster. Finally, the "Methods of Contact in an Emergency" section provides details of how to use the voicemail service. The following content-specific to each illness also was explained in detail: (1) for diabetes, complications arising from the deterioration of the illness, attention to nutrition, and insulin management; (2) for rheumatic diseases, a checklist of

  17. THE ADOPTION OF BUDDHISM'S PRINCIPLES AS A MEANS OF IMPROVING PHYSICIANS' WORK WITH TERMINALLY ILL PATIENTS.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Ruth

    2014-10-01

    The medical approach as summarized by Leibowitz--"We must treat the person, not just the disease"--highlights the importance of treating the sick person and not only the illness' pathology. This approach calls for healing not only the physical side, but also--and mainly--the mental aspect of the patient. One of the goals of this article is to turn physicians' attention towards the compassion necessary in treating a person with a severe or chronic illness, or a person who is dying--precisely because sometimes there is no medical cure for the physical state of such a patient. Therefore, physicians' attention does need to be directed to providing emotional assistance to such a patient. Sometimes, the emotional strength the patient draws from the medical team that is treating him can change his view of, and approach to, the illness, and can enable his body to muster the emotional strength necessary to deal with his situation. Buddhism's approach enables the sick patient to experience his illness in a different way, by making peace with one's situation and, sometimes, even viewing the situation differently--viewing the illness as a type of renewal. Buddhism, therefore, enables a sick person to choose a different point of view when his energy is exhausted and he loses hope, providing quality of life to patients. In such a situation, a sick person finds emotional strength in the knowledge that the end of his life is actually a renewal somewhere else. The limited life expectancy of the terminally ill patient demands that he be able to spend his time with minimal concerns and worries, and does not leave much time for treating the emotional side--the patient's fear. In light of this fact, the patient's ability to look ahead and grasp at hope is the most important issue. As much as possible, this is accomplished in an atmosphere of acceptance and with the absence, or reduction, of fear. The freedom to decide for oneself how to behave, according to one's own approach, is what

  18. The influence of illness severity on health satisfaction in patients with cardiovascular disease: the mediating role of illness perception and self-efficacy beliefs.

    PubMed

    Greco, Andrea; Steca, Patrizia; Pozzi, Roberta; Monzani, Dario; Malfatto, Gabriella; Parati, Gianfranco

    2015-01-01

    The importance of psychological factors in improving conditions of cardiovascular disease (CVD) patients is stressed by the guidelines for their prevention and rehabilitation, but little is known about the impact of illness severity on patients' well-being, and on the psychosocial variables that may mediate this association. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of illness perception and self-efficacy beliefs on the relationship between illness severity and health satisfaction in 75 CVD patients undergoing rehabilitation (80% men; mean age = 65.44) at the St. Luca Hospital, Istituto Auxologico Italiano, Milan, Italy. Illness severity was measured in terms of left ventricular ejection fraction; psychological factors were assessed at the beginning and end of rehabilitation. Results from path analyses showed that the relationships among CVD severity and health satisfaction were mediated by illness perception and self-efficacy beliefs. Findings underscored the importance of considering illness representations and self-efficacy beliefs to improve well-being in CVD patients.

  19. Pharmacological and Mechanical Thromboprophylaxis in Critically Ill Patients: a Network Meta-Analysis of 12 Trials

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Thromboprophylaxis for venous thromboembolism is widely used in critically ill patients. However, only limited evidence exists regarding the efficacy and safety of the various thromboprophylaxis techniques, especially mechanical thromboprophylaxis. Therefore, we performed meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared the overall incidence of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) for between unfractionated heparin (UFH), low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH), and intermittent pneumatic compression (IPC) in critically ill patients. A Bayesian random effects model for multiple treatment comparisons was constructed. The primary outcome measure was the overall incidence of DVT at the longest follow-up. The secondary outcome measure was the incidence of major bleeding, as defined by the original trials. Our analysis included 8,622 patients from 12 RCTs. The incidence of DVT was significantly lower in patients treated with UFH (OR, 0.45; 95% CrI, 0.22–0.83) or LMWH (OR, 0.38; 95% CrI, 0.18–0.72) than in patients in the control group. IPC was associated with a reduced incidence of DVT compared to the control group, but the effect was not statistically significant (OR, 0.50; 95% CrI, 0.20–1.23). The risk of DVT was similar for patients treated with UFH and LMWH (OR, 1.16; 95% CrI, 0.68–2.11). The risk of major bleeding was similar between the treatment groups in medical critically ill patients and also in critically ill patients with a high risk of bleeding. In critically ill patients, the efficacy of mechanical thromboprophylaxis in reducing the risk of DVT is not as robust as those of pharmacological thromboprophylaxis. PMID:27709864

  20. Soluble CD73 in Critically Ill Septic Patients – Data from the Prospective FINNAKI Study

    PubMed Central

    Vaara, Suvi T.; Hollmén, Maija; Korhonen, Anna-Maija; Maksimow, Mikael; Ala-Kokko, Tero; Salmi, Marko; Jalkanen, Sirpa; Pettilä, Ville

    2016-01-01

    Background CD73 dephosphorylates adenosine monophosphate to adenosine that is an anti-inflammatory molecule inhibiting immune activation and vascular leakage. Therefore, CD73 could be an interesting mediator both in sepsis and acute kidney injury (AKI). We aimed to explore the soluble CD73 (sCD73) levels and their evolution in critically ill patients with severe sepsis and, second, to scrutinize the potential association of sCD73 levels with AKI and 90-day mortality. Methods This was a post-hoc laboratory analysis of the prospective, observational FINNAKI study conducted in 17 Finnish ICU during 5 months in 2011–2012. Plasma samples of 588 patients admitted with severe sepsis/shock or with developing severe sepsis were analyzed at 0h (ICU admission) and 24h, and additionally, on day 3 or day 5 from a subset of the patients. Results The median [IQR] sCD73 levels at 0h were 5.11 [3.29–8.28] ng/mL and they decreased significantly from 0h to 4.14 [2.88–7.11] ng/mL at 24h, P<0.001. From 24h to Day 3 (n = 132) the sCD73 levels rose to 5.18 [2.98–8.83] ng/mL (P = 0.373) and from 24h to Day 5 (n = 224) to 5.52 [3.57–8.90] ng/mL (P<0.001). Patients with AKI had higher sCD73 values at 0h and at 24h compared to those without AKI. Non-survivors with severe sepsis, but not with septic shock, had higher CD73 levels at each time-point compared to survivors. After multivariable adjustments, sCD73 levels at 0h associated independently neither with the development of AKI nor 90-day mortality. Conclusions Compared to normal population, the sCD73 levels were generally low at 0h, showed a decrease to 24h, and later an increase by day 5. The sCD73 levels do not seem useful in predicting the development of AKI or 90-day mortality among patients with severe sepsis or shock. PMID:27732656

  1. Ketoconazole hepatotoxicity in a patient treated for environmental illness and systemic candidiasis

    SciTech Connect

    Brusko, C.S.; Marten, J.T. )

    1991-12-01

    Environmental illness, a hypothesized disease caused by exposure to substances such as combustion products, pesticides, food additives, and Candida albicans, is discussed. The case of a patient with environmental illness and systemic candidiasis for six weeks with ketoconazole, liver enzyme concentrations increased. One month after discontinuation of ketoconazole, the liver enzyme concentrations decreased; however, over the next five months, liver enzymes and bilirubin increased. The patient developed encephalopathy and eventually was transferred to a medical center for possible liver transplant. A review of the literature pertaining to ketoconazole hepatotoxicity is also presented.16 references.

  2. [Ways of maintaining oral hygiene in disabled and chronically ill patients--review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Gerreth, Karolina

    2013-01-01

    Disabled and chronically ill patients face many obstacles in maintaining oral hygiene at an appropriate level. Such a situation is caused, inter alia, by the fact that those people are less predisposed manually, but also by a lack of understanding of the need for carrying out systematic hygienic measures by disabled themselves as well as their parents or caregivers. Technical difficulties during the procedure of teeth cleaning are also a problem. Currently, specialized products designed to help disabled and chronically ill patients and their caregivers to perform daily preventive treatments are available on the market.

  3. Diagnostic imaging of the acutely injured patient

    SciTech Connect

    Berquist, T.H.

    1985-01-01

    This book provides an analysis of pathophysiologic concepts of trauma and reviews the effectiveness of the available imaging modalities in acute trauma of various organ system. Topics covered are chest injuries; abdominal trauma; fractures of long bones; the foot and ankle; the knee; hand and wrist; the elbow; the shoulder; the pelvis hips; the spine; the skull and facial trauma and the clinical assessment of multiple injuries patients. Comparative evaluation of diagnostic techniques of radiography is discussed. Normal anatomy and bone fractures along with soft-tissue injuries are described.

  4. [Treatment of acute porphyrias. The importance of follow-up of patients and carriers].

    PubMed

    Tasnádi, Gyöngyi; Bor, Márta; Pusztai, Agnes

    2003-05-11

    Acute porphyrias are caused by the inherited decreased activity of the enzymes of the heme biosynthesis pathway. Depending on the affected enzyme there are 4 types of them: acute intermittent porphyria, porphyria variegata, coproporphyria and delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase deficient porphyria, listed in order of their frequency. Basically the clinical picture is the same in the four types of acute porphyria. The most frequent complaints and symptoms are: cramping abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, muscle weakness of the limbs then, in the advanced phase, there is a red-colored urine, hyponatremia, subileus, acute psychosis and Landry-type paralysis. Without proper treatment death is caused by respiratory paralysis or serious arrhythmia. In case of suspicion of acute porphyria it is mandatory to identify the type of the acute porphyria and the actual status of the patient. The later indicates what kind of treatment should be used. In the acute phase the early therapy with heme arginate is the treatment of choice. Since the clinical symptoms are precipitated by endogenous or exogenous inducing factors--most often by drugs-, the drugs negatively affecting the heme biosynthesis should be omitted at once even in the suspicion of acute porphyria. The role of the inducing factors in the manifestation of the clinical symptoms makes possible the prevention. It is possible to avoid the inducing factors and this way to prevent the acute attack if the acute porphyrias are recognized in time and the patients and the carriers are under regular control. The patients receive special identification card and the up-to-date list of safe drugs. They can use only these drugs in any kind of illness. Other drugs should be considered as porphyrinogenic since it is impossible to predict based on their chemical structure if they negatively affect the heme biosynthesis.

  5. Population-based estimate of the burden of acute gastrointestinal illness in Jiangsu province, China, 2010-2011.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Y J; Dai, Y; Yuan, B J; Zhen, S Q; Tang, Z; Wu, G L; Wang, Y; Zhou, M H; Chen, Y

    2013-05-01

    To determine the burden and distribution of acute gastrointestinal illness (AGI) in the population, a cross-sectional, monthly face-to-face survey of 10 959 residents was conducted in Jiangsu province between July 2010 and June 2011. The adjusted monthly prevalence was 4.7% with 0.63 AGI episodes/person per year. The prevalence was the highest in children aged <5 years and lowest in persons aged ≥ 65 years. A bimodal seasonal distribution was observed with peaks in summer and winter. Regional difference of AGI prevalence was substantial [lowest 0.5% in Taicang, highest 15.1% in Xinqu (Wuxi prefecture)]. Healthcare was sought by 38.4% of the ill respondents. The use of antibiotics was reported by 65·2% of the ill respondents and 38.9% took antidiarrhoeals. In the multivariable model, gender, education, season, sentinel site and travel were significant risk factors of being a case of AGI. These results highlight the substantial burden of AGI and the risk factors associated with AGI in Jiangsu province, China.

  6. Psychological distress and somatisation as prognostic factors in patients with musculoskeletal illness in general practice.

    PubMed Central

    Jørgensen, C K; Fink, P; Olesen, F

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Musculoskeletal illness is a common cause of absenteeism from work, workers' compensation, and disability retirement, and accounts for 9.3% to 17% of patient contacts in general practice. To understand the increase in self-reported musculoskeletal illness and to improve treatment and prevention, it is important to know which factors to target when dealing with these patients. AIM: To investigate whether the prognosis for patients with musculoskeletal illness referred to physiotherapy from general practice can be predicted by the presence of psychological distress and somatisation identified by a general practitioner (GP) and standard questionnaires. METHOD: A multi-practice survey based on questionnaires (index and three-month follow-up). Nine hundred and five consecutive patients referred to physiotherapy from 124 different general practices in Denmark were included. Outcome measures were physical health change, sick leave, patient self-rated improvement, and change in use of medication. RESULTS: Psychological distress and somatisation rated by both GPs and standard questionnaires acted with almost no exception as significant predictors of all four outcome measures. CONCLUSION: Psychological distress and somatisation are important factors when considering preventive initiatives and treatment of patients with musculoskeletal illness in general practice. PMID:10954933

  7. Islamic views on artificial nutrition and hydration in terminally ill patients.

    PubMed

    Alsolamy, Sami

    2014-02-01

    Withholding and withdrawing artificial nutrition and hydration from terminally ill patients poses many ethical challenges. The literature provides little information about the Islamic beliefs, attitudes, and laws related to these challenges. Artificial nutrition and hydration may be futile and reduce quality of life. They can also harm the terminally ill patient because of complications such as aspiration pneumonia, dyspnea, nausea, diarrhea, and hypervolemia. From the perspective of Islam, rules governing the care of terminally ill patients are derived from the principle that injury and harm should be prevented or avoided. The hastening of death by the withdrawal of food and drink is forbidden, but Islamic law permits the withdrawal of futile, death-delaying treatment, including life support. Nutritional support is considered basic care and not medical treatment, and there is an obligation to provide nutrition and hydration for the dying person unless it shortens life, causes more harm than benefit, or is contrary to an advance directive that is consistent with Islamic law. The decision about withholding or withdrawing artificial nutrition and hydration from the terminally ill Muslim patient is made with informed consent, considering the clinical context of minimizing harm to the patient, with input from the patient, family members, health care providers, and religious scholars.

  8. Abnormal Breathing Patterns Predict Extubation Failure in Neurocritically Ill Patients