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Sample records for acutely isolated hippocampal

  1. Potassium currents in acutely isolated human hippocampal dentate granule cells.

    PubMed Central

    Beck, H; Clusmann, H; Kral, T; Schramm, J; Heinemann, U; Elger, C E

    1997-01-01

    1. Properties of voltage- and Ca(2+)-dependent K+ currents were investigated in thirty-four dentate granule cells acutely isolated from the resected hippocampus of eleven patients with therapy-refractory temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). 2. When intracellular Ca2+ was strongly buffered with 11.5 mM EGTA-1 mM Ca2+ in the recording pipette, K+ currents (IK) with a slow activation and biexponential time-dependent decay could be elicited, which showed a threshold for activation around -30 mV. 3. A contribution of Ca(2+)-dependent K+ currents became apparent with intracellular solution containing 1 mM BAPTA-0.1 mM Ca2+. Superfusion of low-Ca2+ extracellular solution blocked 43% of outward currents in this recording configuration. Outward current components could also be blocked by substituting 5 mM Ba2+ for extracellular Ca2+ (78%), or by application of 100 microM Cd2+ (25%). 4. The Ca(2+)-dependent K+ currents could be pharmacologically subdivided into two components. One component was sensitive to 500 microM tetraethylammmonium (TEA; 41%) and 10 nM charybdotoxin (CTX; 47.2%). The blocking effects of 10 nM CTX and 500 microM TEA were not additive, suggesting that both agents block the same conductance. A second, smaller outward current component was blocked by 50 nM apamin (13%). 5. A transient A-type K+ current could be observed in six neurones and showed a fast monoexponential time-dependent inactivation with a steady-state voltage dependence that was distinct from that of IK. The A-type current was blocked by 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) but not by TEA or low-Ca2+ solution. 6. We conclude that outward currents in human hippocampal dentate granule cells can be separated into at least four types by their kinetic and pharmacological properties. These include at least one voltage-dependent current similar to those observed in mammalian hippocampal neurones, and two Ca(2+)-dependent K+ currents that most probably correspond to SK- and BK-type currents. A classical A-type current

  2. Influences of nanoparticle zinc oxide on acutely isolated rat hippocampal CA3 pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jingxia; Xu, Lanju; Zhang, Tao; Ren, Guogang; Yang, Zhuo

    2009-03-01

    The effects of zinc oxide nanoparticles (nano-ZnO) on the properties of voltage-dependent sodium, potassium currents and evoked action potentials were studied in acutely isolated rat hippocampal CA3 pyramidal neurons at postnatal ages of 10-14 days rats using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. The results indicated that: (1) in the present of final concentration of 10(-4)g/ml nano-ZnO, the current-voltage curve of sodium current (I(Na)) was decreased, and the peak amplitudes of I(Na) were increased considerably from -50 to +20mV (p<0.05). Meanwhile, the inactivation and the recovery from inactivation of I(Na) were also promoted by the nano-ZnO solution (10(-4)g/ml) (p<0.01). However, the steady-state activation curve of I(Na) was not shifted by the nano-ZnO. (2) The amplitudes of transient outward potassium current (I(A)) were increased by the nano-ZnO solution (10(-4)g/ml), while the current-voltage curve of delayed rectifier potassium current (I(K)) was significantly increased from +20 to +90mV (p<0.05). However, it is apparent that the nano-ZnO solution did not shift the steady-state activation curve of I(A) and I(K), and neither had significant effects on the inactivation and the recovery from inactivation of I(A). (3) Peak amplitude and overshoot of the evoked single action potential were increased and half-width was diminished in the presence of the 10(-4)g/ml nano-ZnO solution (p<0.05). Simultaneously, a prolonged depolarizing current injection enhanced (p<0.05) repetitive firing evoked firing rate. These results suggested that 10(-4)g/ml nano-ZnO solution can lead to an enhancement in the current amplitudes of I(Na) and I(K) by increasing the opening number of sodium channels, delaying rectifier potassium channels, and enhancing the excitability of neurons, which lead to Na(+) influx and the accumulation of intracellular Na(+), as well as K(+) efflux plus the loss of cytoplasmic K(+). These may disturb the ionic homeostasis and the physiological

  3. Effects of extracellular delta-aminolaevulinic acid on sodium currents in acutely isolated rat hippocampal CA1 neurons.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lang; Yan, Dan; Gu, Yan; Sun, Li-Guang; Ruan, Di-Yun

    2005-12-01

    The effects of delta-aminolaevulinic acid (ALA) on voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC) currents (I(Na)) in acutely isolated hippocampal CA1 neurons from 10- to 12-day-old Wistar rats were examined by using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique under voltage-clamp conditions. ALA from 0.01 microm to 20 microm was applied to the recorded neurons. Low concentrations of ALA (0.01-1.0 microM) increased I(Na) amplitude, whereas high concentrations of ALA (5.0-20.0 microM) decreased it. The average I(Na) amplitude reached a maximum of 117.4 +/- 3.9% (n = 9, P < 0.05) with 0.1 microM ALA, and decreased to 78.1 +/- 3.8% (n = 13, P < 0.05) with 10 microm ALA. ALA shifted the steady-state activation and inactivation curves of I(Na) in the hyperpolarizing direction with different V0.5, suggesting that ALA could depress the opening threshold of the voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC) and thus increase the excitability of neurons through facilitating the opening of VGSC. The time course of recovery from inactivation was significantly prolonged at both low and high concentrations of ALA, whereas either low or high concentrations of ALA had no significant effect on the attenuation of I(Na) during stimulation at 5 Hz, indicating that the effect of ALA on VGSC is state-independent. Furthermore, we found that application of ascorbic acid, which blocks pro-oxidative effects in neurons, could prevent the increase of I(Na) amplitude at low concentrations of ALA. Baclofen, an agonist of GABAb receptors, induced some similar effects to ALA on VGSC, whereas bicuculline, an antagonist of GABAa receptors, could not prevent ALA-induced effects on VGSC. These results suggested that ALA regulated VGSC mainly through its pro-oxidative effects and GABAb receptor-mediated effects.

  4. Neuroprotection against diisopropylfluorophosphate in acute hippocampal slices

    PubMed Central

    Ferchmin, P. A.; Pérez, Dinely; Cuadrado, Brenda L.; Carrasco, Marimée; Martins, Antonio H.; Eterović, Vesna A.

    2015-01-01

    Diisopropylfluorophosphate (DFP) is an irreversible inhibitor of acetylcholine esterase (AChE) and a surrogate of the organophosphorus (OP) nerve agent sarin. The neurotoxicity of DFP was assessed as a reduction of population spike (PS) area elicited by synaptic stimulation in acute hippocampal slices. Two classical antidotes, atropine, and pralidoxime, and two novel antidotes, 4R-cembranotriene-diol (4R) and a caspase 9 inhibitor, were tested. Atropine, pralidoxime, and 4R significantly protected when applied 30 min after DFP. The caspase inhibitor was neuroprotective when applied 5–10 min before or after DFP, suggesting that early synaptic apoptosis is responsible for the loss of PSs. It is likely that apoptosis starts at the synapses and, if antidotes are not applied, descends to the cell bodies, causing death. The acute slice is a reliable tool for mechanistic studies, and the assessment of neurotoxicity and neuroprotection with PS areas is, in general, pharmacologically congruent with in vivo results and predicts the effect of drugs in vivo. 4R was first found to be neuroprotective in slices and later we demonstrated that 4R is neuroprotective in vivo. The mechanism of neurotoxicity of OPs is not well understood, and there is a need for novel antidotes that could be discovered using acute slices. PMID:26438150

  5. Acute unilateral isolated ptosis

    PubMed Central

    Court, Jennifer Helen; Janicek, David

    2015-01-01

    A 64-year-old man presented with a 2-day history of acute onset painless left ptosis. He had no other symptoms; importantly pupils were equal and reactive and eye movements were full. There was no palpable mass or swelling. He was systemically well with no headache, other focal neurological signs, or symptoms of fatigue. CT imaging showed swelling of the levator palpebrae superioris suggestive of myositis. After showing no improvement over 5 days the patient started oral prednisolone 30 mg reducing over 12 weeks. The ptosis resolved quickly and the patient remains symptom free at 6 months follow-up. Acute ptosis may indicate serious pathology. Differential diagnoses include a posterior communicating artery aneurysm causing a partial or complete third nerve palsy, Horner’s syndrome, and myasthenia gravis. A careful history and examination must be taken. Orbital myositis typically involves the extraocular muscles causing pain and diplopia. Isolated levator myositis is rare. PMID:25564592

  6. Effects of acute hippocampal stimulation on EEG dynamics.

    PubMed

    Nair, Sandeep P; Sackellares, J Chris; Shiau, Deng-Shan; Norman, Wendy M; Dance, Linda K; Pardalos, Panos M; Principe, Jose C; Carney, Paul R

    2006-01-01

    Progressive preictal dynamical convergence and postictal divergence of dynamical EEG descriptors among brain regions has been reported in human temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and in a rodent model of TLE. There are also reports of anticonvulsant effects of high frequency stimulation of the hippocampus in humans. We postulate that this anticonvulsant effect is due to dynamical resetting by the electrical stimulation. The following study investigated the effects of acute hippocampal electrical stimulation on dynamical transitions in the brain of a spontaneously seizing animal model of TLE to test the hypothesis of divergence in dynamical values by electrical stimulation of the hippocampus.

  7. Acute ethanol suppresses glutamatergic neurotransmission through endocannabinoids in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Basavarajappa, Balapal S; Ninan, Ipe; Arancio, Ottavio

    2008-11-01

    Ethanol exposure during fetal development is a leading cause of long-term cognitive impairments. Studies suggest that ethanol exposure have deleterious effects on the hippocampus, a brain region that is important for learning and memory. Ethanol exerts its effects, in part, via alterations in glutamatergic neurotransmission, which is critical for the maturation of neuronal circuits during development. The current literature strongly supports the growing evidence that ethanol inhibits glutamate release in the neonatal CA1 hippocampal region. However, the exact molecular mechanism responsible for this effect is not well understood. In this study, we show that ethanol enhances endocannabinoid (EC) levels in cultured hippocampal neurons, possibly through calcium pathways. Acute ethanol depresses miniature post-synaptic current (mEPSC) frequencies without affecting their amplitude. This suggests that ethanol inhibits glutamate release. The CB1 receptors (CB1Rs) present on pre-synaptic neurons are not altered by acute ethanol. The CB1R antagonist SR 141716A reverses ethanol-induced depression of mEPSC frequency. Drugs that are known to enhance the in vivo function of ECs occlude ethanol effects on mEPSC frequency. Chelation of post-synaptic calcium by EGTA antagonizes ethanol-induced depression of mEPSC frequency. The activation of CB1R with the selective agonist WIN55,212-2 also suppresses the mEPSC frequency. This WIN55,212-2 effect is similar to the ethanol effects and is reversed by SR141716A. In addition, tetani-induced excitatory post-synaptic currents (EPSCs) are depressed by acute ethanol. SR141716A significantly reverses ethanol effects on evoked EPSC amplitude in a dual recording preparation. These observations, taken together, suggest the participation of ECs as retrograde messengers in the ethanol-induced depression of synaptic activities.

  8. Modifications of excitatory and inhibitory transmission in rat hippocampal pyramidal neurons by acute lithium treatment.

    PubMed

    Wakita, Masahito; Nagami, Hideaki; Takase, Yuko; Nakanishi, Ryoji; Kotani, Naoki; Akaike, Norio

    2015-08-01

    The acute effects of high-dose Li(+) treatment on glutamatergic and GABAergic transmissions were studied in the "synaptic bouton" preparation of isolated rat hippocampal pyramidal neurons by using focal electrical stimulation. Both action potential-dependent glutamatergic excitatory and GABAergic inhibitory postsynaptic currents (eEPSC and eIPSC, respectively) were dose-dependently inhibited in the external media containing 30-150 mM Li(+), but the sensitivity for Li(+) was greater tendency for eEPSCs than for eIPSCs. When the effects of Li(+) on glutamate or GABAA receptor-mediated whole-cell responses (IGlu and IGABA) elicited by an exogenous application of glutamate or GABA were examined in the postsynaptic soma membrane of CA3 neurons, Li(+) slightly inhibited both IGlu and IGABA at the 150 mM Li(+) concentration. Present results suggest that acute treatment with high concentrations of Li(+) acts preferentially on presynaptic terminals, and that the Li(+)-induced inhibition may be greater for excitatory than for inhibitory transmission.

  9. Neonatal isolation enhances hippocampal dentate response to tetanization in freely moving juvenile male rats.

    PubMed

    Kehoe, P; Hoffman, J H; Austin-LaFrance, R J; Bronzino, J D

    1995-12-01

    The impact of early neonatal isolation on measures of hippocampal neuronal plasticity was examined in freely moving male rats at 30 days of age. Beginning on Postnatal (PN) Day 2, one-half of pups from each experimental litter were individually isolated from the nest, dam, and siblings for a period of 1 h per day over PN Days 2-9, while their siblings remained in the nest. In addition, randomly selected litters served as unhandled controls. On PN Day 26 all pups were weaned and chronically implanted for recording of evoked field potentials and induction of hippocampal longterm potentiation. At 30 days of age, pups from the three treatment groups (isolated, nonisolated siblings, and unhandled controls) were tested for their ability to establish and maintain long-term potentiation across the perforant path/hippocampal dentate granule cell synapse. Changes in population EPSP slope and population spike amplitude (PSA) recorded following tetanization were used to assess the effects of neonatal isolation of hippocampal response measures. No significant between-group differences were obtained for input/output response curves constructed prior to tetanization. All three groups showed immediate and significant enhancement of the PSA measure at 15 min posttetanization. The level of PSA enhancement obtained from previously isolated pups was significantly greater than that obtained from both the nonisolated sibling and unhandled control groups.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Acute pentobarbital treatment impairs spatial learning and memory and hippocampal long-term potentiation in rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Tan, Tao; Tu, Man; He, Wenting; Dong, Zhifang; Han, Huili

    2015-10-01

    Reports of the effects of pentobarbital on learning and memory are contradictory. Some studies have not shown any interference with learning and memory, whereas others have shown that pentobarbital impairs memory and that these impairments can last for long periods. However, it is unclear whether acute local microinjections of pentobarbital affect learning and memory, and if so, the potential mechanisms are also unclear. Here, we reported that the intra-hippocampal infusion of pentobarbital (8.0mM, 1μl per side) significantly impaired hippocampus-dependent spatial learning and memory retrieval. Moreover, in vitro electrophysiological recordings revealed that these behavioral changes were accompanied by impaired hippocampal CA1 long-term potentiation (LTP) and suppressed neuronal excitability as reflected by a decrease in the number of action potentials (APs). These results suggest that acute pentobarbital application causes spatial learning and memory deficits that might be attributable to the suppression of synaptic plasticity and neuronal excitability.

  11. Spontaneous rhythmic field potentials of isolated mouse hippocampal-subicular-entorhinal cortices in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wu, C P; Huang, H L; Asl, M Nassiri; He, J W; Gillis, J; Skinner, F K; Zhang, L

    2006-10-15

    The rodent hippocampal circuit is capable of exhibiting in vitro spontaneous rhythmic field potentials (SRFPs) of 1-4 Hz that originate from the CA3 area and spread to the CA1 area. These SRFPs are largely correlated with GABA-A IPSPs in pyramidal neurons and repetitive discharges in inhibitory interneurons. As such, their generation is thought to result from cooperative network activities involving both pyramidal neurons and GABAergic interneurons. Considering that the hippocampus, subiculum and entorhinal cortex function as an integrated system crucial for memory and cognition, it is of interest to know whether similar SRFPs occur in hippocampal output structures (that is, the subiculum and entorhinal cortex), and if so, to understand the cellular basis of these subicular and entorhinal SRFPs as well as their temporal relation to hippocampal SRFPs. We explored these issues in the present study using thick hippocampal-subicular-entorhinal cortical slices prepared from adult mice. SRFPs were found to spread from the CA1 area to the subicular and entorhinal cortical areas. Subicular and entorhinal cortical SRFPs were correlated with mixed IPSPs/EPSPs in local pyramidal neurons, and their generation was dependent upon the activities of GABA-A and AMPA glutamate receptors. In addition, the isolated subicular circuit could elicit SRFPs independent of CA3 inputs. We hypothesize that the SRFPs represent a basal oscillatory activity of the hippocampal-subicular-entorhinal cortices and that the subiculum functions as both a relay and an amplifier, spreading the SRFPs from the hippocampus to the entorhinal cortex.

  12. Acute Exercise Improves Prefrontal Cortex but not Hippocampal Function in Healthy Adults.

    PubMed

    Basso, Julia C; Shang, Andrea; Elman, Meredith; Karmouta, Ryan; Suzuki, Wendy A

    2015-11-01

    The effects of acute aerobic exercise on cognitive functions in humans have been the subject of much investigation; however, these studies are limited by several factors, including a lack of randomized controlled designs, focus on only a single cognitive function, and testing during or shortly after exercise. Using a randomized controlled design, the present study asked how a single bout of aerobic exercise affects a range of frontal- and medial temporal lobe-dependent cognitive functions and how long these effects last. We randomly assigned 85 subjects to either a vigorous intensity acute aerobic exercise group or a video watching control group. All subjects completed a battery of cognitive tasks both before and 30, 60, 90, or 120 min after the intervention. This battery included the Hopkins Verbal Learning Test-Revised, the Modified Benton Visual Retention Test, the Stroop Color and Word Test, the Symbol Digit Modalities Test, the Digit Span Test, the Trail Making Test, and the Controlled Oral Word Association Test. Based on these measures, composite scores were formed to independently assess prefrontal cortex- and hippocampal-dependent cognition. A three-way mixed Analysis of Variance was used to determine whether differences existed between groups in the change in cognitive function from pre- to post-intervention testing. Acute exercise improved prefrontal cortex- but not hippocampal-dependent functioning, with no differences found between delay groups. Vigorous acute aerobic exercise has beneficial effects on prefrontal cortex-dependent cognition and these effects can last for up to 2 hr after exercise.

  13. Genome-wide alterations in hippocampal 5-hydroxymethylcytosine links plasticity genes to acute stress

    PubMed Central

    Li, Sisi; Papale, Ligia A.; Zhang, Qi; Madrid, Andy; Chen, Li; Chopra, Pankaj; Keleş, Sündüz; Jin, Peng; Alisch, Reid S.

    2015-01-01

    Environmental stress is among the most important contributors to increased susceptibility to develop psychiatric disorders, including anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder. While even acute stress alters gene expression, the molecular mechanisms underlying these changes remain largely unknown. 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) is a novel environmentally sensitive DNA modification that is highly enriched in post-mitotic neurons and is associated with active transcription of neuronal genes. Recently, we found a hippocampal increase of 5hmC in the glucocorticoid receptor gene (Nr3c1) following acute stress, warranting a deeper investigation of stress-related 5hmC levels. Here, we used an established chemical labeling and affinity purification method coupled with high-throughput sequencing technology to generate the first genome-wide profile of hippocampal 5hmC following exposure to acute restraint stress and a one-hour recovery. This approach found a genome-wide disruption in 5hmC associated with acute stress response, primarily in genic regions, and identified known and potentially novel stress-related targets that have a significant enrichment for neuronal ontological functions. Integration of these data with hippocampal gene expression data from these same mice found stress-related hydroxymethylation correlated to altered transcript levels and sequence motif predictions indicated that 5hmC may function by mediating transcription factor binding to these transcripts. Together, these data reveal an environmental impact on this newly discovered epigenetic mark in the brain and represent a critical step toward understanding stress-related epigenetic mechanisms that alter gene expression and can lead to the development of psychiatric disorders. PMID:26598390

  14. Motor skill learning and offline-changes in TGA patients with acute hippocampal CA1 lesions.

    PubMed

    Döhring, Juliane; Stoldt, Anne; Witt, Karsten; Schönfeld, Robby; Deuschl, Günther; Born, Jan; Bartsch, Thorsten

    2017-04-01

    Learning and the formation of memory are reflected in various memory systems in the human brain such as the hippocampus based declarative memory system and the striatum-cortex based system involved in motor sequence learning. It is a matter of debate how both memory systems interact in humans during learning and consolidation and how this interaction is influenced by sleep. We studied the effect of an acute dysfunction of hippocampal CA1 neurons on the acquisition (on-line condition) and off-line changes of a motor skill in patients with a transient global amnesia (TGA). Sixteen patients (68 ± 4.4 yrs) were studied in the acute phase and during follow-up using a declarative and procedural test, and were compared to controls. Acute TGA patients displayed profound deficits in all declarative memory functions. During the acute amnestic phase, patients were able to acquire the motor skill task reflected by increasing finger tapping speed across the on-line condition, albeit to a lesser degree than during follow-up or compared to controls. Retrieval two days later indicated a greater off-line gain in motor speed in patients than controls. Moreover, this gain in motor skill performance was negatively correlated to the declarative learning deficit. Our results suggest a differential interaction between procedural and declarative memory systems during acquisition and consolidation of motor sequences in older humans. During acquisition, hippocampal dysfunction attenuates fast learning and thus unmasks the slow and rigid learning curve of striatum-based procedural learning. The stronger gains in the post-consolidation condition in motor skill in CA1 lesioned patients indicate a facilitated consolidation process probably occurring during sleep, and suggest a competitive interaction between the memory systems. These findings might be a reflection of network reorganization and plasticity in older humans and in the presence of CA1 hippocampal pathology.

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings of Mumps Meningoencephalitis with Bilateral Hippocampal Lesions without Preceding Acute Parotitis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Ah Reum; Lim, Myung Kwan; Kang, Young Hye; Cho, Soon Gu; Choi, Seong Hye; Baek, Ji Hyeon

    2017-01-01

    Meningitis is a common central nervous system (CNS) complication of the mumps, a viral infection, but encephalitis and meningoencephalitis are less common in mumps. We describe magnetic resonance imaging findings of acute mumps meningoencephalitis in a 32-year-old male who showed bilateral hippocampal lesions without preceding parotitis. Although it is rare, hippocampal involvement should be considered a CNS complication of mumps infection. PMID:28246518

  16. Social isolation prevents exercise-induced proliferation of hippocampal progenitor cells in female rats.

    PubMed

    Leasure, J Leigh; Decker, Linda

    2009-10-01

    Social isolation negatively affects the behavior and health of laboratory rats. Recently, it has been found that social isolation retards exercise-induced neurogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) of male rats (Stranahan et al. (2006) Nat Neurosci 9:526-533). Since male and female rats react differently to housing changes and exercise opportunities, we investigated whether social isolation would also suppress the exercise-dependent increase in proliferation of dentate gyrus progenitor cells in females. Accordingly, female rats were housed either alone (isolated) or in groups (social) with (exercise) or without (sedentary) the opportunity to run in an exercise wheel. Proliferating progenitor cells were labeled with bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU). As expected, exercise increased the number of BrdU+ cells in socially housed animals. However, isolation prevented this running-induced increase. Our results expand upon previous findings by showing that the female brain is also susceptible to the suppressive effect of social isolation on exercise-induced neurogenesis.

  17. The Effect of Acute and Chronic Social Stress on the Hippocampal Transcriptome in Mice.

    PubMed

    Stankiewicz, Adrian M; Goscik, Joanna; Majewska, Alicja; Swiergiel, Artur H; Juszczak, Grzegorz R

    2015-01-01

    Psychogenic stress contributes to the formation of brain pathology. Using gene expression microarrays, we analyzed the hippocampal transcriptome of mice subjected to acute and chronic social stress of different duration. The longest period of social stress altered the expression of the highest number of genes and most of the stress-induced changes in transcription were reversible after 5 days of rest. Chronic stress affected genes involved in the functioning of the vascular system (Alas2, Hbb-b1, Hba-a2, Hba-a1), injury response (Vwf, Mgp, Cfh, Fbln5, Col3a1, Ctgf) and inflammation (S100a8, S100a9, Ctla2a, Ctla2b, Lcn2, Lrg1, Rsad2, Isg20). The results suggest that stress may affect brain functions through the stress-induced dysfunction of the vascular system. An important issue raised in our work is also the risk of the contamination of brain tissue samples with choroid plexus. Such contamination would result in a consistent up- or down-regulation of genes, such as Ttr, Igf2, Igfbp2, Prlr, Enpp2, Sostdc1, 1500015O10RIK (Ecrg4), Kl, Clic6, Kcne2, F5, Slc4a5, and Aqp1. Our study suggests that some of the previously reported, supposedly specific changes in hippocampal gene expression, may be a result of the inclusion of choroid plexus in the hippocampal samples.

  18. The Effect of Acute and Chronic Social Stress on the Hippocampal Transcriptome in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Stankiewicz, Adrian M.; Goscik, Joanna; Majewska, Alicja; Swiergiel, Artur H.; Juszczak, Grzegorz R.

    2015-01-01

    Psychogenic stress contributes to the formation of brain pathology. Using gene expression microarrays, we analyzed the hippocampal transcriptome of mice subjected to acute and chronic social stress of different duration. The longest period of social stress altered the expression of the highest number of genes and most of the stress-induced changes in transcription were reversible after 5 days of rest. Chronic stress affected genes involved in the functioning of the vascular system (Alas2, Hbb-b1, Hba-a2, Hba-a1), injury response (Vwf, Mgp, Cfh, Fbln5, Col3a1, Ctgf) and inflammation (S100a8, S100a9, Ctla2a, Ctla2b, Lcn2, Lrg1, Rsad2, Isg20). The results suggest that stress may affect brain functions through the stress-induced dysfunction of the vascular system. An important issue raised in our work is also the risk of the contamination of brain tissue samples with choroid plexus. Such contamination would result in a consistent up- or down-regulation of genes, such as Ttr, Igf2, Igfbp2, Prlr, Enpp2, Sostdc1, 1500015O10RIK (Ecrg4), Kl, Clic6, Kcne2, F5, Slc4a5, and Aqp1. Our study suggests that some of the previously reported, supposedly specific changes in hippocampal gene expression, may be a result of the inclusion of choroid plexus in the hippocampal samples. PMID:26556046

  19. Electron Tomographic Structure and Protein Composition of Isolated Rat Cerebellar, Hippocampal and Cortical Postsynaptic Densities

    PubMed Central

    Farley, MM; Swulius, MT; Waxham, MN

    2015-01-01

    Electron tomography and immunogold labeling were used to analyze similarities and differences in the morphology and protein composition of postsynaptic densities (PSDs) isolated from adult rat cerebella, hippocampi, and cortices. There were similarities in physical dimensions and gross morphology between cortical, hippocampal and most cerebellar PSDs, although the morphology among cerebellar PSDs could be categorized into three distinct groups. The majority of cerebellar PSDs were composed of dense regions of protein, similar to cortical and hippocampal PSDs, while others were either composed of granular or latticelike protein regions. Significant differences were found in protein composition and organization across PSDs from the different brain regions. The signaling protein, βCaMKII, was found to be a major component of each PSD type and was more abundant than αCaMKII in both hippocampal and cerebellar PSDs. The scaffold molecule PSD-95, a major component of cortical PSDs, was found absent in a fraction of cerebellar PSDs and when present was clustered in its distribution. In contrast, immunogold labeling for the proteasome was significantly more abundant in cerebellar and hippocampal PSDs than cortical PSDs. Together, these results indicate that PSDs exhibit remarkable diversity in their composition and morphology, presumably as a reflection of the unique functional demands placed on different synapses. PMID:26215919

  20. Effect of early isolation on signal transfer in the entorhinal cortex-dentate-hippocampal system.

    PubMed

    Bartesaghi, R; Raffi, M; Ciani, E

    2006-02-01

    Deprivation of socio-sensory interactions during early life impairs brain function in adulthood. In previous investigations we showed that early isolation severely affects neuron development in several structures of the hippocampal region, including the entorhinal cortex. In the present study we investigated the effects of early isolation on signal processing along the entorhinal cortex-dentate-CA3-CA1 system, a major memory circuit of the hippocampal region. Male and female guinea-pigs were assigned at 6-7 days of age to either a social or an isolated environment. At 90-100 days of age the animals were anesthetized and field potentials were recorded from the entorhinal cortex-dentate-CA3-CA1 circuit, driven by dorsal psalterium commissural volleys. Analysis of the input-output function in the different structures showed that in isolated males there was a small reduction in the input-output function of the population excitatory postsynaptic potential and population spike evoked in layer II of the entorhinal cortex. No changes occurred in isolated females. In isolated males and females there was a reduction in the input-output function of the population excitatory postsynaptic potential and population spike evoked in the dentate gyrus, CA3 and CA1, but this effect was larger in males. In isolated males, but not in females, the population spike/population excitatory postsynaptic potential ratio was reduced in all investigated structures, indicating that in males the size of the discharged neuron population was reduced more than due to the decreased input. Results show that isolation reduces the synaptic function in the whole entorhinal cortex-dentate gyrus-CA3-CA1 system. While the entorhinal cortex was moderately impaired, the dentate-hippocampal system was more severely affected. The impairment in the signal transfer along the entorhinal cortex-dentate gyrus-CA3-CA1 system was heavier in males, confirming the larger susceptibility of this sex to early experience

  1. Acute death of astrocytes in blast-exposed rat organotypic hippocampal slice cultures.

    PubMed

    Miller, Anna P; Shah, Alok S; Aperi, Brandy V; Kurpad, Shekar N; Stemper, Brian D; Glavaski-Joksimovic, Aleksandra

    2017-01-01

    Blast traumatic brain injury (bTBI) affects civilians, soldiers, and veterans worldwide and presents significant health concerns. The mechanisms of neurodegeneration following bTBI remain elusive and current therapies are largely ineffective. It is important to better characterize blast-evoked cellular changes and underlying mechanisms in order to develop more effective therapies. In the present study, our group utilized rat organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHCs) as an in vitro system to model bTBI. OHCs were exposed to either 138 ± 22 kPa (low) or 273 ± 23 kPa (high) overpressures using an open-ended helium-driven shock tube, or were assigned to sham control group. At 2 hours (h) following injury, we have characterized the astrocytic response to a blast overpressure. Immunostaining against the astrocytic marker glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) revealed acute shearing and morphological changes in astrocytes, including clasmatodendrosis. Moreover, overlap of GFAP immunostaining and propidium iodide (PI) indicated astrocytic death. Quantification of the number of dead astrocytes per counting area in the hippocampal cornu Ammonis 1 region (CA1), demonstrated a significant increase in dead astrocytes in the low- and high-blast, compared to sham control OHCs. However only a small number of GFAP-expressing astrocytes were co-labeled with the apoptotic marker Annexin V, suggesting necrosis as the primary type of cell death in the acute phase following blast exposure. Moreover, western blot analyses revealed calpain mediated breakdown of GFAP. The dextran exclusion additionally indicated membrane disruption as a potential mechanism of acute astrocytic death. Furthermore, although blast exposure did not evoke significant changes in glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1) expression, loss of GLT-1-expressing astrocytes suggests dysregulation of glutamate uptake following injury. Our data illustrate the profound effect of blast overpressure on astrocytes in OHCs at 2 h

  2. Acute death of astrocytes in blast-exposed rat organotypic hippocampal slice cultures

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Anna P.; Shah, Alok S.; Aperi, Brandy V.; Kurpad, Shekar N.; Stemper, Brian D.; Glavaski-Joksimovic, Aleksandra

    2017-01-01

    Blast traumatic brain injury (bTBI) affects civilians, soldiers, and veterans worldwide and presents significant health concerns. The mechanisms of neurodegeneration following bTBI remain elusive and current therapies are largely ineffective. It is important to better characterize blast-evoked cellular changes and underlying mechanisms in order to develop more effective therapies. In the present study, our group utilized rat organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHCs) as an in vitro system to model bTBI. OHCs were exposed to either 138 ± 22 kPa (low) or 273 ± 23 kPa (high) overpressures using an open-ended helium-driven shock tube, or were assigned to sham control group. At 2 hours (h) following injury, we have characterized the astrocytic response to a blast overpressure. Immunostaining against the astrocytic marker glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) revealed acute shearing and morphological changes in astrocytes, including clasmatodendrosis. Moreover, overlap of GFAP immunostaining and propidium iodide (PI) indicated astrocytic death. Quantification of the number of dead astrocytes per counting area in the hippocampal cornu Ammonis 1 region (CA1), demonstrated a significant increase in dead astrocytes in the low- and high-blast, compared to sham control OHCs. However only a small number of GFAP-expressing astrocytes were co-labeled with the apoptotic marker Annexin V, suggesting necrosis as the primary type of cell death in the acute phase following blast exposure. Moreover, western blot analyses revealed calpain mediated breakdown of GFAP. The dextran exclusion additionally indicated membrane disruption as a potential mechanism of acute astrocytic death. Furthermore, although blast exposure did not evoke significant changes in glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1) expression, loss of GLT-1-expressing astrocytes suggests dysregulation of glutamate uptake following injury. Our data illustrate the profound effect of blast overpressure on astrocytes in OHCs at 2 h

  3. Long-Term Potentiation by Theta-Burst Stimulation Using Extracellular Field Potential Recordings in Acute Hippocampal Slices.

    PubMed

    Abrahamsson, Therese; Lalanne, Txomin; Watt, Alanna J; Sjöström, P Jesper

    2016-06-01

    This protocol describes how to carry out theta-burst long-term potentiation (LTP) with extracellular field recordings in acute rodent hippocampal slices. This method is relatively simple and noninvasive and provides a way to sample many neurons simultaneously, making it suitable for applications requiring higher throughput than whole-cell recording.

  4. Long-Term Potentiation by Theta-Burst Stimulation using Extracellular Field Potential Recordings in Acute Hippocampal Slices

    PubMed Central

    Abrahamsson, Therese; Lalanne, Txomin; Watt, Alanna J.; Sjöström, P. Jesper

    2017-01-01

    This protocol describes how to carry out theta-burst long-term potentiation (LTP) with extracellular field recordings in acute rodent hippocampal slices. This method is relatively simple and noninvasive and provides a way to sample many neurons simultaneously, making it suitable for applications requiring higher throughput than whole-cell recording. PMID:27250947

  5. Subchronic MK-801 treatment and post-weaning social isolation in rats: differential effects on locomotor activity and hippocampal long-term potentiation.

    PubMed

    Ashby, Donovan M; Habib, Diala; Dringenberg, Hans C; Reynolds, James N; Beninger, Richard J

    2010-09-01

    Subchronic NMDA receptor antagonist treatment and post-weaning social isolation are two animal models of schizophrenia symptoms. However, behavioral and physiological changes following a combination of these two procedures have not been investigated. Thus, we examined effects of a novel, "double hit" model combining these two treatments, comparing them to standard models involving only NMDA antagonist treatment or social isolation. Male, Sprague-Dawley rats were either group-housed or maintained in social isolation (starting at postnatal day [PD] 21 and continuing throughout the study). Each housing condition was further subdivided into two groups, receiving either subchronic treatment with either saline or MK-801 (0.5mg/kg, i.p., 2xday for seven days starting at PD 56). Post-weaning social isolation increased locomotor activity (assessed at PD 70) in response to a novel environment and an acute amphetamine injection, while subchronic MK-801 increased only amphetamine induced locomotor activity. Subsequent electrophysiological experiments (under urethane anesthesia) assessing changes in plasticity of hippocampal synapses showed that subchronic MK-801 treatment resulted in an increase in long-term potentiation in area CA1 in response to high frequency stimulation of the contralateral CA3 area, while housing condition had no effect. No other changes in hippocampal electrophysiology (input-output curves, paired-pulse facilitation) were observed. These data are the first to demonstrate an enhancement in hippocampal long-term plasticity in vivo following subchronic MK-801 administration, an effect that may be related to the well-characterized changes in glutamatergic and GABAergic systems seen after subchronic NMDA receptor blockade. That lack of additive or synergistic effects in the "double hit model" suggests that combining isolation and subchronic MK-801 treatment does not necessarily produce greater behavioral or physiological dysfunction than that seen with either

  6. Klüver-bucy syndrome with isolated bilateral hippocampal atrophy following status epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Park, Hong-Kyun; Kim, Kyeong-Joon; Moon, Hye-Jin; Kim, Seon-Jeong; Yun, Chang-Ho; Park, Seong-Ho

    2012-03-01

    Klüver-Bucy syndrome may result from affection of various location of brain. We report a case of Klüver-Bucy syndrome associated with isolated bilateral hippocampal atrophy without any abnormal lesion in other areas following status epilepticus. A 31-year-old man who had no significant medical history presented with status epilepticus after encephalitis of unknown etiology. He had been recovered from status epilepticus three weeks later, but afterwards he developed Klüver-Bucy syndrome: hyperphagia, hypersexuality, hypermetamorphosis, anterograde amnesia and dysosmia. Initial brain MRI showed T2 hyperintensity and swelling of isolated bilateral hippocampus, especially CA1 region without any abnormal lesion in other areas. One month later, follow-up brain MRI showed isolated bilateral hippocampal atrophy. This is a meaningful case report because this case differs from other reports of Klüver-Bucy syndrome in humans in that the anatomic abnormalities revealed by MRI were very selective. We report this case because this case is very educative for above reason. Moreover, this report would give us additional information of the relationship between human behavior and limbic system.

  7. Investigation of Synaptic Tagging/Capture and Cross-capture using Acute Hippocampal Slices from Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Mahesh Shivarama; Sharma, Mahima; Hui, Neo Sin; Dasgupta, Ananya; Gopinadhan, Suma; Sajikumar, Sreedharan

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic tagging and capture (STC) and cross-tagging are two important mechanisms at cellular level that explain how synapse-specificity and associativity is achieved in neurons within a specific time frame. These long-term plasticity-related processes are the leading candidate models to study the basis of memory formation and persistence at the cellular level. Both STC and cross-tagging involve two serial processes: (1) setting of the synaptic tag as triggered by a specific pattern of stimulation, and (2) synaptic capture, whereby the synaptic tag interacts with newly synthesized plasticity-related proteins (PRPs). Much of the understanding about the concepts of STC and cross-tagging arises from the studies done in CA1 region of the hippocampus and because of the technical complexity many of the laboratories are still unable to study these processes. Experimental conditions for the preparation of hippocampal slices and the recording of stable late-LTP/LTD are extremely important to study synaptic tagging/cross-tagging. This video article describes the experimental procedures to study long-term plasticity processes such as STC and cross-tagging in the CA1 pyramidal neurons using stable, long-term field-potential recordings from acute hippocampal slices of rats. PMID:26381286

  8. Investigation of Synaptic Tagging/Capture and Cross-capture using Acute Hippocampal Slices from Rodents.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Mahesh Shivarama; Sharma, Mahima; Hui, Neo Sin; Dasgupta, Ananya; Gopinadhan, Suma; Sajikumar, Sreedharan

    2015-09-04

    Synaptic tagging and capture (STC) and cross-tagging are two important mechanisms at cellular level that explain how synapse-specificity and associativity is achieved in neurons within a specific time frame. These long-term plasticity-related processes are the leading candidate models to study the basis of memory formation and persistence at the cellular level. Both STC and cross-tagging involve two serial processes: (1) setting of the synaptic tag as triggered by a specific pattern of stimulation, and (2) synaptic capture, whereby the synaptic tag interacts with newly synthesized plasticity-related proteins (PRPs). Much of the understanding about the concepts of STC and cross-tagging arises from the studies done in CA1 region of the hippocampus and because of the technical complexity many of the laboratories are still unable to study these processes. Experimental conditions for the preparation of hippocampal slices and the recording of stable late-LTP/LTD are extremely important to study synaptic tagging/cross-tagging. This video article describes the experimental procedures to study long-term plasticity processes such as STC and cross-tagging in the CA1 pyramidal neurons using stable, long-term field-potential recordings from acute hippocampal slices of rats.

  9. Short-term memory deficits correlate with hippocampal-thalamic functional connectivity alterations following acute sleep restriction.

    PubMed

    Chengyang, Li; Daqing, Huang; Jianlin, Qi; Haisheng, Chang; Qingqing, Meng; Jin, Wang; Jiajia, Liu; Enmao, Ye; Yongcong, Shao; Xi, Zhang

    2016-07-21

    Acute sleep restriction heavily influences cognitive function, affecting executive processes such as attention, response inhibition, and memory. Previous neuroimaging studies have suggested a link between hippocampal activity and short-term memory function. However, the specific contribution of the hippocampus to the decline of short-term memory following sleep restriction has yet to be established. In the current study, we utilized resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to examine the association between hippocampal functional connectivity (FC) and the decline of short-term memory following total sleep deprivation (TSD). Twenty healthy adult males aged 20.9 ± 2.3 years (age range, 18-24 years) were enrolled in a within-subject crossover study. Short-term memory and FC were assessed using a Delay-matching short-term memory test and a resting-state fMRI scan before and after TSD. Seed-based correlation analysis was performed using fMRI data for the left and right hippocampus to identify differences in hippocampal FC following TSD. Subjects demonstrated reduced alertness and a decline in short-term memory performance following TSD. Moreover, fMRI analysis identified reduced hippocampal FC with the superior frontal gyrus (SFG), temporal regions, and supplementary motor area. In addition, an increase in FC between the hippocampus and bilateral thalamus was observed, the extent of which correlated with short-term memory performance following TSD. Our findings indicate that the disruption of hippocampal-cortical connectivity is linked to the decline in short-term memory observed after acute sleep restriction. Such results provide further evidence that support the cognitive impairment model of sleep deprivation.

  10. KCNQ/Kv7 channel activator flupirtine protects against acute stress-induced impairments of spatial memory retrieval and hippocampal LTP in rats.

    PubMed

    Li, C; Huang, P; Lu, Q; Zhou, M; Guo, L; Xu, X

    2014-11-07

    Spatial memory retrieval and hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) are impaired by stress. KCNQ/Kv7 channels are closely associated with memory and the KCNQ/Kv7 channel activator flupirtine represents neuroprotective effects. This study aims to test whether KCNQ/Kv7 channel activation prevents acute stress-induced impairments of spatial memory retrieval and hippocampal LTP. Rats were placed on an elevated platform in the middle of a bright room for 30 min to evoke acute stress. The expression of KCNQ/Kv7 subunits was analyzed at 1, 3 and 12 h after stress by Western blotting. Spatial memory was examined by the Morris water maze (MWM) and the field excitatory postsynaptic potential (fEPSP) in the hippocampal CA1 area was recorded in vivo. Acute stress transiently decreased the expression of KCNQ2 and KCNQ3 in the hippocampus. Acute stress impaired the spatial memory retrieval and hippocampal LTP, the KCNQ/Kv7 channel activator flupirtine prevented the impairments, and the protective effects of flupirtine were blocked by XE-991 (10,10-bis(4-Pyridinylmethyl)-9(10H)-anthracenone), a selective KCNQ channel blocker. Furthermore, acute stress decreased the phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) at Ser9 in the hippocampus, and flupirtine inhibited the reduction. These results suggest that the KCNQ/Kv7 channels may be a potential target for protecting both hippocampal synaptic plasticity and spatial memory retrieval from acute stress influences.

  11. Isolated Primary Blast Inhibits Long-Term Potentiation in Organotypic Hippocampal Slice Cultures.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Edward W; Effgen, Gwen B; Patel, Tapan P; Meaney, David F; Bass, Cameron R Dale; Morrison, Barclay

    2016-04-01

    Over the last 13 years, traumatic brain injury (TBI) has affected over 230,000 U.S. service members through the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan, mostly as a result of exposure to blast events. Blast-induced TBI (bTBI) is multi-phasic, with the penetrating and inertia-driven phases having been extensively studied. The effects of primary blast injury, caused by the shockwave interacting with the brain, remain unclear. Earlier in vivo studies in mice and rats have reported mixed results for primary blast effects on behavior and memory. Using a previously developed shock tube and in vitro sample receiver, we investigated the effect of isolated primary blast on the electrophysiological function of rat organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHSC). We found that pure primary blast exposure inhibited long-term potentiation (LTP), the electrophysiological correlate of memory, with a threshold between 9 and 39 kPa·ms impulse. This deficit occurred well below a previously identified threshold for cell death (184 kPa·ms), supporting our previously published finding that primary blast can cause changes in brain function in the absence of cell death. Other functional measures such as spontaneous activity, network synchronization, stimulus-response curves, and paired-pulse ratios (PPRs) were less affected by primary blast exposure, as compared with LTP. This is the first study to identify a tissue-level tolerance threshold for electrophysiological changes in neuronal function to isolated primary blast.

  12. Acute pneumonia in Zimbabwe: bacterial isolates by lung aspiration.

    PubMed Central

    Ikeogu, M O

    1988-01-01

    Forty children, aged 2 months to 11 years, with severe acute pneumonia were investigated by needle aspiration of the lung. Fourteen organisms were isolated in only 13 patients. Streptococcus pneumoniae was isolated in six patients, Staphylococcus aureus in three, and Haemophilus influenzae in two. Two patients had mixed organisms. PMID:3196056

  13. Resveratrol suppresses calcium-mediated microglial activation and rescues hippocampal neurons of adult rats following acute bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed

    Sheu, Ji-Nan; Liao, Wen-Chieh; Wu, Un-In; Shyu, Ling-Yuh; Mai, Fu-Der; Chen, Li-You; Chen, Mei-Jung; Youn, Su-Chung; Chang, Hung-Ming

    2013-03-01

    Acute bacterial meningitis (ABM) is a serious disease with severe neurological sequelae. The intense calcium-mediated microglial activation and subsequently pro-inflammatory cytokine release plays an important role in eliciting ABM-related oxidative damage. Considering resveratrol possesses significant anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative properties, the present study aims to determine whether resveratrol would exert beneficial effects on hippocampal neurons following ABM. ABM was induced by inoculating Klebsiella pneumoniae into adult rats intraventricularly. The time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS), Griffonia simplicifolia isolectin-B4 (GSA-IB4) and ionized calcium binding adaptor molecule 1 (Iba1) immunohistochemistry, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay as well as malondialdehyde (MDA) measurement were used to examine the calcium expression, microglial activation, pro-inflammatory cytokine level, and extent of oxidative stress, respectively. In ABM rats, strong calcium signaling associated with enhanced microglial activation was observed in hippocampus. Increased microglial expression was coincided with intense production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and oxidative damage. However, in rats receiving resveratrol after ABM, the calcium intensity, microglial activation, pro-inflammatory cytokine and MDA levels were all significantly decreased. Quantitative data showed that much more hippocampal neurons were survived in resveratrol-treated rats following ABM. As resveratrol successfully rescues hippocampal neurons from ABM by suppressing the calcium-mediated microglial activation, therapeutic use of resveratrol may act as a promising strategy to counteract the ABM-induced neurological damage.

  14. Intrinsic excitability changes induced by acute treatment of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons with exogenous amyloid β peptide.

    PubMed

    Tamagnini, Francesco; Scullion, Sarah; Brown, Jon T; Randall, Andrew D

    2015-07-01

    Accumulation of beta-amyloid (Aβ) peptides in the human brain is a canonical pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Recent work in Aβ-overexpressing transgenic mice indicates that increased brain Aβ levels can be associated with aberrant epileptiform activity. In line with this, such mice can also exhibit altered intrinsic excitability (IE) of cortical and hippocampal neurons: these observations may relate to the increased prevalence of seizures in AD patients. In this study, we examined what changes in IE are produced in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells after 2-5 h treatment with an oligomeric preparation of synthetic human Aβ 1-42 peptide. Whole cell current clamp recordings were compared between Aβ-(500 nM) and vehicle-(DMSO 0.05%) treated hippocampal slices obtained from mice. The soluble Aβ treatment did not produce alterations in sub-threshold intrinsic properties, including membrane potential, input resistance, and hyperpolarization activated "sag". Similarly, no changes were noted in the firing profile evoked by 500 ms square current supra-threshold stimuli. However, Aβ 500 nM treatment resulted in the hyperpolarization of the action potential (AP) threshold. In addition, treatment with Aβ at 500 nM depressed the after-hyperpolarization that followed both a single AP or 50 Hz trains of a number of APs between 5 and 25. These data suggest that acute exposure to soluble Aβ oligomers affects IE properties of CA1 pyramidal neurons differently from outcomes seen in transgenic models of amyloidopathy. However, in both chronic and acute models, the IE changes are toward hyperexcitability, reinforcing the idea that amyloidopathy and increased incidence in seizures might be causally related in AD patients.

  15. Reduced Hippocampal Dendritic Spine Density and BDNF Expression following Acute Postnatal Exposure to Di(2-Ethylhexyl) Phthalate in Male Long Evans Rats

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Catherine A.; Holahan, Matthew R.

    2014-01-01

    Early developmental exposure to di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) has been linked to a variety of neurodevelopmental changes, particularly in rodents. The primary goal of this work was to establish whether acute postnatal exposure to a low dose of DEHP would alter hippocampal dendritic morphology and BDNF and caspase-3 mRNA expression in male and female Long Evans rats. Treatment with DEHP in male rats led to a reduction in spine density on basal and apical dendrites of neurons in the CA3 dorsal hippocampal region compared to vehicle-treated male controls. Dorsal hippocampal BDNF mRNA expression was also down-regulated in male rats exposed to DEHP. No differences in hippocampal spine density or BDNF mRNA expression were observed in female rats treated with DEHP compared to controls. DEHP treatment did not affect hippocampal caspase-3 mRNA expression in male or female rats. These results suggest a gender-specific vulnerability to early developmental DEHP exposure in male rats whereby postnatal DEHP exposure may interfere with normal synaptogenesis and connectivity in the hippocampus. Decreased expression of BDNF mRNA may represent a molecular mechanism underlying the reduction in dendritic spine density observed in hippocampal CA3 neurons. These findings provide initial evidence for a link between developmental exposure to DEHP, reduced levels of BDNF and hippocampal atrophy in male rats. PMID:25295592

  16. Reduced hippocampal dendritic spine density and BDNF expression following acute postnatal exposure to di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate in male Long Evans rats.

    PubMed

    Smith, Catherine A; Holahan, Matthew R

    2014-01-01

    Early developmental exposure to di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) has been linked to a variety of neurodevelopmental changes, particularly in rodents. The primary goal of this work was to establish whether acute postnatal exposure to a low dose of DEHP would alter hippocampal dendritic morphology and BDNF and caspase-3 mRNA expression in male and female Long Evans rats. Treatment with DEHP in male rats led to a reduction in spine density on basal and apical dendrites of neurons in the CA3 dorsal hippocampal region compared to vehicle-treated male controls. Dorsal hippocampal BDNF mRNA expression was also down-regulated in male rats exposed to DEHP. No differences in hippocampal spine density or BDNF mRNA expression were observed in female rats treated with DEHP compared to controls. DEHP treatment did not affect hippocampal caspase-3 mRNA expression in male or female rats. These results suggest a gender-specific vulnerability to early developmental DEHP exposure in male rats whereby postnatal DEHP exposure may interfere with normal synaptogenesis and connectivity in the hippocampus. Decreased expression of BDNF mRNA may represent a molecular mechanism underlying the reduction in dendritic spine density observed in hippocampal CA3 neurons. These findings provide initial evidence for a link between developmental exposure to DEHP, reduced levels of BDNF and hippocampal atrophy in male rats.

  17. Exogenous hydrogen sulfide eliminates spatial memory retrieval impairment and hippocampal CA1 LTD enhancement caused by acute stress via promoting glutamate uptake.

    PubMed

    He, Jin; Guo, Ruixian; Qiu, Pengxin; Su, Xingwen; Yan, Guangmei; Feng, Jianqiang

    2017-03-20

    Acute stress impairs the hippocampus-dependent spatial memory retrieval, and its synaptic mechanisms are associated with hippocampal CA1 long-term depression (LTD) enhancement in the adult rats. Endogenous hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is recognized as a novel gasotransmitter and has the neural protective roles. However, very little attention has been paid to understanding the effects of H2S on spatial memory retrieval impairment. We observed the protective effects of NaHS (a donor of H2S) against spatial memory retrieval impairment caused by acute stress and its synaptic mechanisms. Our results showed that NaHS abolished spatial memory retrieval impairment and hippocampal CA1 LTD enhancement caused by acute stress, but not by glutamate transporter inhibitor l-trans-pyrrolidine-2,4-dicarboxylic (tPDC), indicating that the activation of glutamate transporters is necessary for exogenous H2S to exert its roles. Moreover, NaHS restored the decreased glutamate uptake in the hippocampal CA1 synaptosomal fraction caused by acute stress. Dithiothreitol (DTT, a disulfide reducing agent) abolished a decrease in the glutamate uptake caused by acute stress, and NaHS eradicated the decreased glutamate uptake caused by 5,5'-dithio-bis(2-nitrobenzoic)acid (DTNB, a thiol oxidizing agent), collectively, revealing that exogenous H2S increases glutamate uptake by reducing disulfide bonds of the glutamate transporters. Additionally, NaHS inhibited the increased expression level of phosphorylated c-Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) in the hippocampal CA1 region caused by acute stress. The JNK inhibitor SP600125 eliminated spatial memory retrieval impairment, hippocampal CA1 LTD enhancement and the decreased glutamate uptake caused by acute stress, indicating that exogenous H2S exerts these roles by inhibiting the activation of JNK signaling pathway.

  18. Acute hippocampal BDNF restores motivational and forced swim performance after corticosterone

    PubMed Central

    Gourley, Shannon L.; Kiraly, Drew D.; Howell, Jessica L.; Olausson, Peter; Taylor, Jane R.

    2008-01-01

    Background Alterations in cellular survival and plasticity are implicated in the neurobiology of depression, based primarily on the characterization of antidepressant efficacy in naïve rodents, rather than on models that capture the debilitating and protracted feelings of anhedonia and loss of motivation that are core features of depression. Methods In adult male mice, we evaluated persistent effects of oral corticosterone (CORT) exposure on anhedonic-like behavior, immobility in the forced swim test (FST), motivational performance in the progressive ratio task, and later endogenous CORT secretion. After verifying long-term decreases in hippocampal Brain-derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) and cAMP Response Element Binding protein phosphorylation (pCREB), the ability of direct hippocampal BDNF microinfusion after CORT exposure to reverse deficits was investigated. Results Prior CORT exposure decreased sucrose consumption, appetitive responding, and FST mobility without long-term effects on water:quinine discrimination and endogenous CORT secretion. Critically, BDNF replacement mimicked chronic antidepressant treatment (ADT) by reversing CORT-induced reductions in instrumental performance and FST mobility. Conclusions Together these findings link persistent alterations in hippocampal BDNF expression and CREB transcriptional activity with a persistent depressive-like state—as opposed to ADT efficacy. These results identify hippocampal BDNF as an essential molecular substrate that bidirectionally regulates appetitive instrumental behavior. Additionally, we suggest this CORT model may provide a powerful tool for future investigation into the neurobiology of complex stress-associated depressive symptoms that persist long after stress exposure itself. PMID:18675955

  19. Efficacy of a new charge-balanced biphasic electrical stimulus in the isolated sciatic nerve and the hippocampal slice.

    PubMed

    Cappaert, Natalie L M; Ramekers, Dyan; Martens, Hubert C F; Wadman, Wytse J

    2013-02-01

    Most deep brain stimulators apply rectangular monophasic voltage pulses. By modifying the stimulus shape, it is possible to optimize stimulus efficacy and find the best compromise between clinical effect, minimal side effects and power consumption of the stimulus generator. In this study, we compared the efficacy of three types of charge-balanced biphasic pulses (CBBPs, nominal duration 100 μs) in isolated sciatic nerves and in in vitro hippocampal brain slices of the rat. Using these two models, we tested the efficacy of several stimulus shapes exclusively on axons (in the sciatic nerve) and compared the effect with that of stimuli in the more complex neuronal network of the hippocampal slice by considering the stimulus-response relation. We showed that (i) adding an interphase gap (IPG, range 100-500 μs) to the CBBP enhances stimulus efficacy in the rat sciatic nerve and (ii) that this type of stimuli (CBBP with IPG) is also more effective in hippocampal slices. This benefit was similar for both models of voltage and current stimulation. In our two models, asymmetric CBBPs were less beneficial. Therefore, CBBPs with IPG appear to be well suited for application to DBS, since they enhance efficacy, extend battery life and potentially reduce harmful side effects.

  20. The electrophysiology of the olfactory-hippocampal circuit in the isolated and perfused adult mammalian brain in vitro.

    PubMed

    de Curtis, M; Paré, D; Llinás, R R

    1991-10-01

    The viability and general electrophysiological properties of the limbic system in the adult mammalian brain isolated and maintained in vitro by arterial perfusion are described. The isolated brain preparation combines the advantages of intact synaptic connectivity and accessibility of different areas of the encephalic mass with those of the in vitro approach, i.e., stability and control of the ionic environment. Extracellular field potential as well as intracellular recordings were performed at different levels in the limbic system of isolated adult guinea pig brains. The results demonstrate that in the piriform, entorhinal, and hippocampal cortices, the intrinsic electrical properties of individual cells as well as the spontaneous and evoked electrical activity in the neuronal ensembles they comprise, were virtually identical to those observed in vivo. The properties of the limbic system loop were determined.

  1. Changes in C57BL6 Mouse Hippocampal Transcriptome Induced by Hypergravity Mimic Acute Corticosterone-Induced Stress

    PubMed Central

    Pulga, Alice; Porte, Yves; Morel, Jean-Luc

    2016-01-01

    Centrifugation is a widely used procedure to study the impact of altered gravity on Earth, as observed during spaceflights, allowing us to understand how a long-term physical constraint can condition the mammalian physiology. It is known that mice, placed in classical cages and maintained during 21 days in a centrifuge at 3G gravity level, undergo physiological adaptations due to hypergravity, and/or stress. Indeed, an increase of corticosterone levels has been previously measured in the plasma of 3G-exposed mice. Corticosterone is known to modify neuronal activity during memory processes. Although learning and memory performances cannot be assessed during the centrifugation, literature largely described a large panel of proteins (channels, second messengers, transcription factors, structural proteins) which expressions are modified during memory processing. Thus, we used the Illumina technology to compare the whole hippocampal transcriptome of three groups of C57Bl6/J mice, in order to gain insights into the effects of hypergravity on cerebral functions. Namely, a group of 21 days 3G-centrifuged mice was compared to (1) a group subjected to an acute corticosterone injection, (2) a group receiving a transdermal chronic administration of corticosterone during 21 days, and (3) aged mice because aging could be characterized by a decrease of hippocampus functions and memory impairment. Our results suggest that hypergravity stress induced by corticosterone administration and aging modulate the expression of genes in the hippocampus. However, the modulations of the transcriptome observed in these conditions are not identical. Hypergravity affects per-se the hippocampus transcriptome and probably modifies its activity. Hypergravity induced changes in hippocampal transcriptome were more similar to acute injection than chronic diffusion of corticosterone or aging. PMID:28082866

  2. Changes in intrinsic inhibition in isolated hippocampal slices during ethanol withdrawal; lack of correlation with withdrawal hyperexcitability.

    PubMed Central

    Whittington, M. A.; Little, H. J.; Lambert, J. D.

    1992-01-01

    1. Intracellular recordings were made from pyramidal cells in area CA1 in mouse isolated hippocampal slices, after chronic ethanol treatment in vivo. 2. Fast i.p.s.ps were isolated by injection of the impaled neurones with QX314 (to block fast sodium currents and the slow i.p.s.p.) and stimulating the interneurones in the presence of the glutamatergic blockers, CNQX and APV. 3. The isolated fast-inhibitory postsynaptic potential (f.-i.p.s.p.) was measured at intervals during the 7 h withdrawal period. The reversal potential and sensitivity to bicuculline suggested that the isolated f.-i.p.s.p. was mediated by activation of the GABAA receptor-chloride ionophore complex. 4. Measurement of stimulus-response relationships for the f.-i.p.s.ps revealed an initial increase in the maximum size of the i.p.s.p., evoked from a membrane potential of -50 mV, seen at 2 h into ethanol withdrawal. This was attributed to a negative shift in the reversal potential, Ei.p.s.p., with no observed change in conductance, Gi.p.s.p. 5. No differences in f.-i.p.s.ps evoked during ethanol withdrawal or in control slices were seen at 4 h or 6 h. At these times, epileptiform activity was seen in previous field potential recordings. 6. Paired pulse depression of the f.-i.p.s.p. was significantly increased at 2 h into withdrawal, when a 150 ms pulse interval was used. No differences were seen at later times in the ethanol withdrawal period. 7. The results suggest that ethanol withdrawal hyperexcitability in isolated hippocampal slices is not caused by primary decreases in inhibition mediated by the GABAA receptor-chloride ionophore complex.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1330182

  3. Acute Alterations of Somatodendritic Action Potential Dynamics in Hippocampal CA1 Pyramidal Cells after Kainate-Induced Status Epilepticus in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Minge, Daniel; Bähring, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Pathophysiological remodeling processes at an early stage of an acquired epilepsy are critical but not well understood. Therefore, we examined acute changes in action potential (AP) dynamics immediately following status epilepticus (SE) in mice. SE was induced by intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of kainate, and behavioral manifestation of SE was monitored for 3–4 h. After this time interval CA1 pyramidal cells were studied ex vivo with whole-cell current-clamp and Ca2+ imaging techniques in a hippocampal slice preparation. Following acute SE both resting potential and firing threshold were modestly depolarized (2–5 mV). No changes were seen in input resistance or membrane time constant, but AP latency was prolonged and AP upstroke velocity reduced following acute SE. All cells showed an increase in AP halfwidth and regular (rather than burst) firing, and in a fraction of cells the notch, typically preceding spike afterdepolarization (ADP), was absent following acute SE. Notably, the typical attenuation of backpropagating action potential (b-AP)-induced Ca2+ signals along the apical dendrite was strengthened following acute SE. The effects of acute SE on the retrograde spread of excitation were mimicked by applying the Kv4 current potentiating drug NS5806. Our data unveil a reduced somatodendritic excitability in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells immediately after acute SE with a possible involvement of both Na+ and K+ current components. PMID:22039527

  4. Basic presynaptic functions in hippocampal neurons are not affected by acute or chronic lithium treatment.

    PubMed

    Lueke, Katharina; Kaiser, Tobias; Svetlitchny, Alexei; Welzel, Oliver; Wenzel, Eva M; Tyagarajan, Shiva; Kornhuber, Johannes; Groemer, Teja W

    2014-02-01

    Lithium is an effective mood-stabilizer in the treatment of bipolar affective disorder. While glycogen synthase kinase 3-mediated and inositol depletion-dependent effects of lithium have been described extensively in literature, there is very little knowledge about the consequences of lithium treatment on vesicle recycling and neurotransmitter availability. In the present study we have examined acute and chronic effects of lithium on synaptic vesicle recycling using primary hippocampal neurons. We found that exocytosis of readily releasable pool vesicles as well as recycling pool vesicles was unaffected by acute and chronic treatment within the therapeutic range or at higher lithium concentrations. Consistent with this observation, we also noticed that the network activity and number of active synapses within the network were also not significantly altered after lithium treatment. Taken together, as lithium treatment does not affect synaptic vesicle release at even high concentrations, our data suggest that therapeutic effects of lithium in bipolar affective disorder are not directly related to presynaptic function.

  5. Ovarian hormone deficiency reduces intrinsic excitability and abolishes acute estrogen sensitivity in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wendy W.; Adelman, John P.; Maylie, James

    2011-01-01

    Premature and uncompensated loss of ovarian hormones following ovariectomy (OVX) elevates the risks of cognitive impairment and dementia. These risks are prevented with estrogen (E2)-containing hormone replacement therapy initiated shortly following OVX but not after substantial delay. Currently the cellular bases underlying these clinical findings are unknown. At the cellular level, intrinsic membrane properties regulate the efficiency of synaptic inputs to initiate output action potentials (APs), thereby affecting neuronal communication hence cognitive processing. This study tested the hypothesis that in CA1 pyramidal neurons, intrinsic membrane properties and their acute regulation by E2 require ovarian hormones for maintenance. Whole-cell current clamp recordings were performed on neurons from ~7 months old OVX rats that experienced either short-term (10 days, control OVX) or long-term (5 months, OVXLT) ovarian hormone deficiency. The results reveal that long-term hormone deficiency reduced intrinsic membrane excitability (IE) as measured by the number of evoked action potentials (APs) and firing duration for a given current injection. This was accompanied by AP broadening, an increased slow afterhyperpolarization (sAHP), and faster accumulation of NaV channel inactivation during repetitive firing. In the control OVX neurons, E2 acutely increased IE and reduced the sAHP. In contrast, acute regulation of IE by E2 was absent in the OVXLT neurons. Since the degree of IE of hippocampal pyramidal neurons is positively related with hippocampus-dependent learning ability, and modulation of IE is observed following successful learning, these findings provide a framework for understanding hormone deficiency-related cognitive impairment and the critical window for therapy initiation. PMID:21325532

  6. Osteopontin Expression in Acute Immune Response Mediates Hippocampal Synaptogenesis and Adaptive Outcome Following Cortical Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Julie L.; Reeves, Thomas M.; Phillips, Linda L.

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) produces axotomy, deafferentation and reactive synaptogenesis. Inflammation influences synaptic repair, and the novel brain cytokine osteopontin (OPN) has potential to support axon regeneration through exposure of its integrin receptor binding sites. This study explored whether OPN secretion and proteolysis by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) mediate the initial degenerative phase of synaptogenesis, targeting reactive neuroglia to affect successful repair. Adult rats received unilateral entorhinal cortex lesion (UEC) modeling adaptive synaptic plasticity. Over the first week postinjury, hippocampal OPN protein and mRNA were assayed and histology performed. At 1–2d, OPN protein increased up to 51 fold, and was localized within activated, mobilized glia. OPN transcript also increased over 50 fold, predominantly within reactive microglia. OPN fragments known to be derived from MMP proteolysis were elevated at 1d, consistent with prior reports of UEC glial activation and enzyme production. Postinjury minocycline immunosuppression attenuated MMP-9 gelatinase activity, which was correlated with reduction of neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (LCN2) expression, and reduced OPN fragment generation. The antibiotic also attenuated removal of synapsin-1 positive axons from the deafferented zone. OPN KO mice subjected to UEC had similar reduction of hippocampal MMP-9 activity, as well as lower synapsin-1 breakdown over the deafferented zone. MAP1B and N-cadherin, surrogates of cytoarchitecture and synaptic adhesion, were not affected. OPN KO mice with UEC exhibited time dependent cognitive deficits during the synaptogenic phase of recovery. This study demonstrates that OPN can mediate immune response during TBI synaptic repair, positively influencing synapse reorganization and functional recovery. PMID:25151457

  7. Effects of social isolation and enriched environment on behavior of adult Swiss mice do not require hippocampal neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Silva, Cristiane Felisbino; Duarte, Filipe Silveira; Lima, Thereza Christina Monteiro De; de Oliveira, Cilene Lino

    2011-11-20

    Housing conditions are important determinants of animal behavior. Their impact on behavioral output depends on the behavior of interest, species, strain, and age of the animal evaluated. In the present study, male Swiss mice reared from weaning up to 8 weeks in social isolation (SI8), in enriched environment (EE8) or in standard environment (SE8) were evaluated in the elevated plus-maze (EPM), open-field (OFT) and tail-suspension (TST) tests. The effect of housing for 6 weeks in EE followed by 2 weeks in SI (EE6SI2) and the opposite condition (SI6EE2) was also studied. Housing conditions are reported to affect hippocampal neurogenesis; therefore, the expression of doublecortin (DCX) in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus (DG) of these mice was monitored. Data showed that SI8, EE8 and EE6SI2 reduced the stretching-attend postures in the EPM and explored more the center of the apparatus when compared to SE8. The time and the number of entries in the closed arms of the EPM was not affected indicating that effects of housing conditions in the EPM were not consequence of motor activity alteration. Accordingly, EE8 mice exploration of the OFT was similar to SE8. However, the SI8 mice explored the OFT more than the EE8 mice, suggesting hyperactivity induced by isolation. Behavior of Swiss mice in the TST was not altered, indicating that this test was not sensitive to the environmental changes in this mice strain. Compared to SE8, EE8 did not affect the number of DCX cells, whereas SI8, EE6SI2, and SI6EE2 decreased it. Taken together, our data suggest that the behavior of adult Swiss mice in the EPM and OFT was affected by environmental changes but that these changes seem to be independent of hippocampal neurogenesis.

  8. Acute deep brain stimulation in the thalamic reticular nucleus protects against acute stress and modulates initial events of adult hippocampal neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Magdaleno-Madrigal, Víctor Manuel; Pantoja-Jiménez, Christopher Rodrigo; Bazaldúa, Adrián; Fernández-Mas, Rodrigo; Almazán-Alvarado, Salvador; Bolaños-Alejos, Fernanda; Ortíz-López, Leonardo; Ramírez-Rodriguez, Gerardo Bernabé

    2016-11-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is used as an alternative therapeutic procedure for pharmacoresistant psychiatric disorders. Recently the thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN) gained attention due to the description of a novel pathway from the amygdala to this nucleus suggesting that may be differentially disrupted in mood disorders. The limbic system is implicated in the regulation of these disorders that are accompanied by neuroplastic changes. The hippocampus is highly plastic and shows the generation of new neurons, process affected by stress but positively regulated by antidepressant drugs. We explored the impact of applying acute DBS to the TRN (DBS-TRN) in male Wistar rats exposed to acute stress caused by the forced-swim Porsolt's test (FST) and on initial events of hippocampal neurogenesis. After the first session of forced-swim, rats were randomly subdivided in a DBS-TRN and a Sham group. Stimulated rats received 10min of DBS, thus the depressant-like behavior reflected as immobility was evaluated in the second session of forced-swim. Locomotricity was evaluated in the open field test. Cell proliferation and doublecortin-associated cells were quantified in the hippocampus of other cohorts of rats. No effects of electrode implantation were found in locomotricity. Acute DBS-TRN reduced immobility in comparison to the Sham group (p<0.001). DBS-TRN increased cell proliferation (Ki67 or BrdU-positive cells; p=0.02, p=0.02) and the number of doublecortin-cells compared to the Sham group (p<0.02). Similar effects were found in rats previously exposed to the first session of forced-swim. Our data could suggest that TRN brain region may be a promising target for DBS to treat intractable depression.

  9. Down-Regulation of Hippocampal Genes Regulating Dopaminergic, GABAergic, and Glutamatergic Function Following Combined Neonatal Phencyclidine and Post-Weaning Social Isolation of Rats as a Neurodevelopmental Model for Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Gaskin, Philip LR; Toledo-Rodriguez, Maria; Alexander, Stephen PH

    2016-01-01

    Background: Dysfunction of dopaminergic, GABAergic, and glutamatergic function underlies many core symptoms of schizophrenia. Combined neonatal injection of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, phencyclidine (PCP), and post-weaning social isolation of rats produces a behavioral syndrome with translational relevance to several core symptoms of schizophrenia. This study uses DNA microarray to characterize alterations in hippocampal neurotransmitter-related gene expression and examines the ability of the sodium channel blocker, lamotrigine, to reverse behavioral changes in this model. Methods: Fifty-four male Lister-hooded rat pups either received phencyclidine (PCP, 10mg/kg, s.c.) on post-natal days (PND) 7, 9, and 11 before being weaned on PND 23 into separate cages (isolation; PCP-SI; n = 31) or received vehicle injection and group-housing (2–4 per cage; V-GH; n = 23) from weaning. The effect of lamotrigine on locomotor activity, novel object recognition, and prepulse inhibition of acoustic startle was examined (PND 60–75) and drug-free hippocampal gene expression on PND 70. Results: Acute lamotrigine (10–15mg/kg i.p.) reversed the hyperactivity and novel object recognition impairment induced by PCP-SI but had no effect on the prepulse inhibition deficit. Microarray revealed small but significant down-regulation of hippocampal genes involved in glutamate metabolism, dopamine neurotransmission, and GABA receptor signaling and in specific schizophrenia-linked genes, including parvalbumin (PVALB) and GAD67, in PCP-SI rats, which resemble changes reported in schizophrenia. Conclusions: Findings indicate that alterations in dopamine neurotransmission, glutamate metabolism, and GABA signaling may contribute to some of the behavioral deficits observed following PCP-SI, and that lamotrigine may have some utility as an adjunctive therapy to improve certain cognitive deficits symptoms in schizophrenia. PMID:27382048

  10. Neuroprotective effect of acute melatonin treatment on hippocampal neurons against irradiation by inhibition of caspase-3

    PubMed Central

    LI, JIANGUO; ZHANG, GUOWEI; MENG, ZHUANGZHI; WANG, LINGZHAN; LIU, HAIYING; LIU, QIANG; BUREN, BATU

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal cell apoptosis is associated with various factors that induce neurological damage, including radiation exposure. When administered prior to exposure to radiation, a protective agent may prevent cellular and molecular injury. The present study aimed to investigate whether melatonin exerts a neuroprotective effect by inhibiting the caspase cell death pathway. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were administered melatonin (100 mg/kg body weight) 30 min prior to radiation exposure in red light during the evening. In order to elucidate whether melatonin has a neuroprotective role, immunohistochemistry, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling, Nissl staining, reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction, reactive oxygen species analysis and western blotting were performed. At 24 h post-melatonin treatment, caspase-3 mRNA and protein expression levels were significantly decreased. These results demonstrated that melatonin may protect hippocampal neurons via the inhibition of caspase-3 when exposed to irradiation. Therefore, caspase-3 inhibition serves a neuroprotective and antioxidant role in the interventional treatment of melatonin. The results of the present study suggested that melatonin may have a potential therapeutic effect against irradiation; however, further studies are required in order to elucidate the underlying antioxidant mechanisms. PMID:27313671

  11. Fingolimod Limits Acute Aβ Neurotoxicity and Promotes Synaptic Versus Extrasynaptic NMDA Receptor Functionality in Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Pooja; Gabrielli, Martina; Ponzoni, Luisa; Pelucchi, Silvia; Stravalaci, Matteo; Beeg, Marten; Mazzitelli, Sonia; Braida, Daniela; Sala, Mariaelvina; Boda, Enrica; Buffo, Annalisa; Gobbi, Marco; Gardoni, Fabrizio; Matteoli, Michela; Marcello, Elena; Verderio, Claudia

    2017-01-01

    Fingolimod, also known as FTY720, is an analogue of the sphingolipid sphingosine, which has been proved to be neuroprotective in rodent models of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Several cellular and molecular targets underlying the neuroprotective effects of FTY720 have been recently identified. However, whether the drug directly protects neurons from toxicity of amyloid-beta (Aβ) still remains poorly defined. Using a combination of biochemical assays, live imaging and electrophysiology we demonstrate that FTY720 induces a rapid increase in GLUN2A-containing neuroprotective NMDARs on the surface of dendritic spines in cultured hippocampal neurons. In addition, the drug mobilizes extrasynaptic GLUN2B-containing NMDARs, which are coupled to cell death, to the synapses. Altered ratio of synaptic/extrasynaptic NMDARs decreases calcium responsiveness of neurons to neurotoxic soluble Aβ 1–42 and renders neurons resistant to early alteration of calcium homeostasis. The fast defensive response of FTY720 occurs through a Sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor (S1P-R) -dependent mechanism, as it is lost in the presence of S1P-R1 and S1P-R3 antagonists. We propose that rapid synaptic relocation of NMDARs might have direct impact on amelioration of cognitive performance in transgenic APPswe/PS1dE9 AD mice upon sub-chronic treatment with FTY720. PMID:28134307

  12. Altered Hippocampal Lipid Profile Following Acute Postnatal Exposure to Di(2-Ethylhexyl) Phthalate in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Catherine A.; Farmer, Kyle; Lee, Hyunmin; Holahan, Matthew R.; Smith, Jeffrey C.

    2015-01-01

    Slight changes in the abundance of certain lipid species in the brain may drastically alter normal neurodevelopment via membrane stability, cell signalling, and cell survival. Previous findings have demonstrated that postnatal exposure to di (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) disrupts normal axonal and neural development in the hippocampus. The goal of the current study was to determine whether postnatal exposure to DEHP alters the lipid profile in the hippocampus during postnatal development. Systemic treatment with 10 mg/kg DEHP during postnatal development led to elevated levels of phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin in the hippocampus of female rats. There was no effect of DEHP exposure on the overall abundance of phosphatidylcholine or sphingomyelin in male rats or of lysophosphatidylcholine in male or female rats. Individual analyses of each identified lipid species revealed 10 phosphatidylcholine and six sphingomyelin lipids in DEHP-treated females and a single lysophosphatidylcholine in DEHP-treated males with a two-fold or higher increase in relative abundance. Our results are congruent with previous work that found that postnatal exposure to DEHP had a near-selective detrimental effect on hippocampal development in males but not females. Together, results suggest a neuroprotective effect of these elevated lipid species in females. PMID:26516880

  13. Acute low dose of MK-801 prevents memory deficits without altering hippocampal DARPP-32 expression and BDNF levels in sepsis survivor rats.

    PubMed

    Cassol-Jr, Omar J; Comim, Clarissa M; Constantino, Larissa S; Rosa, Daniela V F; Mango, Luiz Alexandre V; Stertz, Laura; Kapczinski, Flávio; Romano-Silva, Marco A; Quevedo, João; Dal-Pizzol, Felipe

    2011-01-01

    Sepsis is characterized by an intense inflammatory reaction with potential neurotoxic effects in the central nervous system and damage to memory and learning ability. We assessed the effects of acute low dose of MK-801 on the memory impairment, hippocampal BDNF levels and DARPP-32 expression ten days after sepsis. Under anesthesia, male Wistar rats underwent either cecal ligation and perforation (CLP) or sham. Then, the animals received either a single systemic injection of MK-801 (0.025 mg/kg) or saline solution. Ten days after CLP, the animals were submitted to the step-down inhibitory avoidance and object recognition tests. Also, the hippocampal BDNF protein levels and DARPP-32 expression were evaluated. MK-801 prevented cognitive impairment, but did not affect the hippocampal BDNF levels. DARPP-32 expression was significantly different only in the animals submitted to sepsis that received MK-801 treatment. Thus, we demonstrated that a single low dose of MK-801 prevented memory impairment without altering hippocampal DARPP-32 expression and BDNF levels.

  14. Novel Human Reovirus Isolated from Children with Acute Necrotizing Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ouattara, Louise A.; Barin, Francis; Barthez, Marie Anne; Bonnaud, Bertrand; Roingeard, Philippe; Goudeau, Alain; Castelnau, Pierre; Vernet, Guy; Komurian-Pradel, Florence

    2011-01-01

    For many encephalitis cases, the cause remains unidentified. After 2 children (from the same family) received a diagnosis of acute necrotizing encephalopathy at Centre Hospitalier Universitaire (Tours, France), we attempted to identify the etiologic agent. Because clinical samples from the 2 patients were negative for all pathogens tested, urine and throat swab specimens were added to epithelial cells, and virus isolates detected were characterized by molecular analysis and electron microscopy. We identified a novel reovirus strain (serotype 2), MRV2Tou05, which seems to be closely related to porcine and human strains. A specific antibody response directed against this new reovirus strain was observed in convalescent-phase serum specimens from the patients, whereas no response was observed in 38 serum specimens from 38 healthy adults. This novel reovirus is a new etiologic agent of encephalitis. PMID:21801621

  15. Acute self-suppression of corticosteroidogenesis in isolated adrenocortical cells.

    PubMed

    Carsia, R V; Malamed, S

    1979-10-01

    The relation between steroidogenesis induced by ACTH and that induced by exogenous concentrations of glucocorticoids was studied in isolated adrenocortical cells. Exogenous corticosterone and cortisol, in concentrations within the production capacity of the adrenal gland, suppressed steroidogenesis induced by ACTH in rat and beef cells, respectively. The precursors pregnenolone and progesterone enhanced steroidogenesis in both rat and beef cells. Aldosterone in rat cells and 17 beta-estradiol in rat and beef cells had little if any effect on steroidogenesis. Either suppression or stimulation by exogenous steroids was acute, that is, after 2-h incubation for rat cells and 1-h incubation for beef cells. A direct suppressive action of end product glucocorticoids is indicated. This observed self-suppression of adrenocortical cells suggests the existence of a mechanism for the find adjustment of steroidogenesis that operates in addition to the classical control exerted by the anterior pituitary.

  16. Isolation of CA1 nuclear enriched fractions from hippocampal slices to study activity-dependent nuclear import of synapto-nuclear messenger proteins.

    PubMed

    Yuanxiang, Pingan; Bera, Sujoy; Karpova, Anna; Kreutz, Michael R; Mikhaylova, Marina

    2014-08-10

    Studying activity dependent protein expression, subcellular translocation, or phosphorylation is essential to understand the underlying cellular mechanisms of synaptic plasticity. Long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD) induced in acute hippocampal slices are widely accepted as cellular models of learning and memory. There are numerous studies that use live cell imaging or immunohistochemistry approaches to visualize activity dependent protein dynamics. However these methods rely on the suitability of antibodies for immunocytochemistry or overexpression of fluorescence-tagged proteins in single neurons. Immunoblotting of proteins is an alternative method providing independent confirmation of the findings. The first limiting factor in preparation of subcellular fractions from individual tetanized hippocampal slices is the low amount of material. Second, the handling procedure is crucial because even very short and minor manipulations of living slices might induce activation of certain signaling cascades. Here we describe an optimized workflow in order to obtain sufficient quantity of nuclear enriched fraction of sufficient purity from the CA1 region of acute hippocampal slices from rat brain. As a representative example we show that the ERK1/2 phosphorylated form of the synapto-nuclear protein messenger Jacob actively translocates to the nucleus upon induction of LTP and can be detected in a nuclear enriched fraction from CA1 neurons.

  17. Metabotropic glutamate response in acutely dissociated hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurones of the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Shirasaki, T; Harata, N; Akaike, N

    1994-01-01

    1. The metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) response was investigated in dissociated rat hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurones using conventional and nystatin-perforated whole-cell modes of the patch recording configuration. 2. In the perforated patch recording configuration, the application of glutamate (Glu), quisqualate (QA), aspartate (Asp) and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) induced a slow outward current superimposed on a fast ionotropic inward current, whereas alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate (AMPA) and kainate (KA) induced only an ionotropic inward current at a holding potential (VH) of -20 mV. A specific agonist of the mGlu receptor (mGluR), trans-1-aminocyclopentane-1,3-dicarboxylate (tACPD), induced an outward current in approximately 80% of the neurones tested. Asp- and NMDA-induced outward currents were antagonized by D-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoate (D-AP5) whereas Glu-, QA- and tACPD-induced outward currents were not antagonized by 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX), 6,7-dinitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (DNQX) and D-AP5, indicating that the mGlu response is an outward current component. 3. L-2-Amino-3-phosphonopropionate (L-AP3) and DL-2-amino-4-phosphonobutyrate (AP4) did not block the mGlu response. 4. The relative potencies of mGlu agonists were QA > Glu > tACPD. The threshold and EC50 values of metabotropic outward currents were 10-100 times lower than those of the ionotropic inward current (iGlu response). 5. The reversal potential of the mGlu response (EmGlu) was close to EK (K+ equilibrium potential), and it shifted 59.5 mV for a tenfold change in extracellular K+ concentration. 6. In Ca(2+)-free external solution, the mGlu response was elicited by an initial application of Glu, but subsequent applications failed to induce the response. There was also an increase in the intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) during the application of Glu and QA but not of AMPA, indicating Ca2+ release from an intracellular Ca2+ store. 7

  18. Modification of hippocampal markers of synaptic plasticity by memantine in animal models of acute and repeated restraint stress: implications for memory and behavior.

    PubMed

    Amin, Shaimaa Nasr; El-Aidi, Ahmed Amro; Ali, Mohamed Mostafa; Attia, Yasser Mahmoud; Rashed, Laila Ahmed

    2015-06-01

    Stress is any condition that impairs the balance of the organism physiologically or psychologically. The response to stress involves several neurohormonal consequences. Glutamate is the primary excitatory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, and its release is increased by stress that predisposes to excitotoxicity in the brain. Memantine is an uncompetitive N-methyl D-aspartate glutamatergic receptors antagonist and has shown beneficial effect on cognitive function especially in Alzheimer's disease. The aim of the work was to investigate memantine effect on memory and behavior in animal models of acute and repeated restraint stress with the evaluation of serum markers of stress and the expression of hippocampal markers of synaptic plasticity. Forty-two male rats were divided into seven groups (six rats/group): control, acute restraint stress, acute restraint stress with Memantine, repeated restraint stress, repeated restraint stress with Memantine and Memantine groups (two subgroups as positive control). Spatial working memory and behavior were assessed by performance in Y-maze. We evaluated serum cortisol, tumor necrotic factor, interleukin-6 and hippocampal expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor, synaptophysin and calcium-/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II. Our results revealed that Memantine improved spatial working memory in repeated stress, decreased serum level of stress markers and modified the hippocampal synaptic plasticity markers in both patterns of stress exposure; in ARS, Memantine upregulated the expression of synaptophysin and brain-derived neurotrophic factor and downregulated the expression of calcium-/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, and in repeated restraint stress, it upregulated the expression of synaptophysin and downregulated calcium-/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II expression.

  19. Early mood behavioral changes following exposure to monotonous environment during isolation stress is associated with altered hippocampal synaptic plasticity in male rats.

    PubMed

    Das, Saroj Kumar; Baitharu, Iswar; Barhwal, Kalpana; Hota, Sunil Kumar; Singh, Shashi Bala

    2016-01-26

    Social isolation stress and its effect on mood have been well reported, but the effect of monotony (a state of repetition of events for a considerable period of time without variation) on mood and hippocampal synaptic plasticity needs to be addressed. Present study was conducted on male Sprague-Dawley rats. Singly housed (SH) rats were subjected to monotony stress by physical, visual and pheromonal separation in specially designed animal segregation chamber. Fluoxetine (a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor) was administered orally. Behavioral assessment showed anxiety and depression like traits in SH group. Monotony stress exposure to SH group resulted in increased pyknosis, decreased apical dendritic arborization and increased asymmetric (excitatory) synapses with the corresponding decrease in the symmetric (inhibitory) synapses in the hippocampal CA3 region. Monotonous environment during isolation stress also decreased the serotonin level and reduced the expression of synaptophysin and pCREB in the hippocampus. Fluoxetine administration to singly housed rats resulted in amelioration of altered mood along with improvement in serotonin and decrease in excitatory synaptic density but no change in altered inhibitory synaptic density in the hippocampus. These findings suggest that monotony during isolation contributes to early impairment in mood state by altering hippocampal synaptic density and neuronal morphology.

  20. Hippocampal stroke.

    PubMed

    Szabo, Kristina

    2014-01-01

    The first to link disturbance of memory and lesions of the medial temporal lobe was the Russian neurologist von Bechterew, who in 1989 presented the brain of a 60-year-old man who had suffered from severe amnesia. Autopsy showed bilateral damage of the medial temporal lobe. Several following postmortem case studies confirmed the association between permanent amnesia and bitemporal stroke. Reports of transient memory deficits in unilateral stroke in combination with other neurological and neuropsychological deficits followed. With the advent of brain imaging, persistent or transient amnesia as the sole or primary manifestation of acute - mostly left-sided - hippocampal stroke was described. With the use of modern MRI techniques the identification of typical ischemic stroke lesion patterns affecting the hippocampus has become possible. Although overt cognitive deficits in unilateral hippocampal stroke seem to be rare, a careful neuropsychological examination might be necessary to detect resulting neuropsychological deficits including disturbances of verbal and nonverbal episodic long-term memory and spatial orientation.

  1. Treatment of Experimental Acute Radiation Disease in Mice with Probiotics, Quinolones, and General Gnotobiological Isolation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-09-01

    Armed Forces Ra ioloy Research Institute Treatment of Experimental Acute Radiation Disease in Mice with Probiotics , Quinolones, and General...Gnotobiological Isolation Russia State Medical University 19990119 114 Treatment of Experimental Acute Radiation Disease in Mice with Probiotics , Quinolones...effects of antibiotics and probiotics (Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus) in mice irradiated with 7 Gy. The effects were studied in normal mice and mice

  2. Comparison of Virulence Markers of Peritoneal and Fallopian Tube Isolates with Endocervical Neisseria gonorrhoeae Isolates from Women with Acute Salpingitis

    PubMed Central

    Draper, D. L.; James, J. F.; Brooks, G. F.; Sweet, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae strains which cause acute salpingitis are presumed to ascend the genital tract from the cervix. Previous studies utilized isolates obtained from endocervical canal cultures, although it was not known if the isolates truly represented the organisms present in the fallopian tubes. In this study, we compared N. gonorrhoeae isolates from endocervical canal cultures with fallopian tube or peritoneal cul-de-sac isolates or isolates from both sites obtained at laparoscopy. Potential virulence markers were studied, including colony phenotype, auxotype, antimicrobial agent susceptibility, protein patterns on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and susceptibility to normal human serum. Six of seven cervical isolates had the same antibiograms and molecular weight for major outer membrane proteins as those of the corresponding peritoneal isolates. Auxotypes also were the same and included prototrophic, proline-requiring, and proline-and-arginine-requiring isolates. The isolates as a group appeared to be very susceptible to the bactericidal action of pooled serum from normal women. Colony phenotypes varied between sites; the fallopian tubecul-de-sac isolates were predominantly of transparent phenotype and piliated. The cervical isolates were either mixtures of equal quantities of opaque and transparent phenotypes or predominantly opaque phenotype. By these markers, patients' N. gonorrhoeae cervical isolates appeared to be the same as their isolates from fallopian tubes except for a difference or shift in colony phenotype. Images Fig. 1 PMID:6769811

  3. Acute p38-mediated inhibition of NMDA-induced outward currents in hippocampal CA1 neurons by interleukin-1beta.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ruoyu; Sun, Li; Hayashi, Yoshinori; Liu, Xia; Koyama, Susumu; Wu, Zhou; Nakanishi, Hiroshi

    2010-04-01

    Interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) is a potent pro-inflammatory cytokine that is primarily produced by microglia in the brain. IL-1beta inhibits N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA)-induced outward currents (I(NMDA-OUT)) through IL-1 type I receptor (IL-1RI) in hippocampal CA1 neurons (Zhang, R., Yamada, J., Hayashi, Y., Wu, Z, Koyama, S., Nakanishi, H., 2008. Inhibition of NMDA-induced outward currents by interleukin-1beta in hippocampal neurons, Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 372, 816-820). Although IL-1RI is associated with mitogen-activated protein kinases, their involvement in the effect of IL-1beta on I(NMDA-OUT) remains unclear. In the present study, we demonstrate that IL-1beta caused activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and that the p38 inhibitor SB203580 significantly blocked the effect of IL-1beta on I(NMDA-OUT) in hippocampal CA1 neurons. Furthermore, the intracellular perfusion of active recombinant p38alpha significantly decreased the mean amplitude of I(NMDA-OUT). In neurons prepared from inflamed hippocampus, the mean amplitude of I(NMDA-OUT) was significantly reduced. In the inflamed hippocampus, IL-1beta and IL-1RI were expressed mainly in microglia and neurons, respectively. These results suggest that IL-1beta increases the excitability of hippocampal CA1 neurons in the p38-dependent inhibition of I(NMDA-OUT).

  4. Acute bilateral isolated foot drop: Report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Kertmen, H.; Gürer, B.; Yimaz, E. R.; Sekerci, Z.

    2015-01-01

    Foot drop is defined as the weakness of the foot and ankle dorsiflexion. Acute unilateral foot drop is a well-documented entity, whereas bilateral foot drop is rarely documented. Slowly progressing bilateral foot drop may occur with various metabolic causes, parasagittal intracranial pathologies, and cauda equina syndrome. Acute onset of bilateral foot drop due to disc herniation is extremely rare. Here we present two cases of acute bilateral foot drop due to disc herniation. The first patient was a 45-year-old man presented with acute bilateral foot drop, without any sign of the cauda equina syndrome. Lumbar magnetic resonance imaging of the patient revealed L4-5 disc herniation. To our knowledge, this is the first presented case of acute bilateral foot drop without any signs of cauda equina syndrome caused by L4-5 disc herniation. The second patient was a 50-year-old man who was also presented with acute bilateral foot drop, and had T12-L1 disc herniation with intradural extension. Also this is the first presented case of T12-L1 disc herniation with intradural extension causing acute bilateral foot drop. We performed emergent decompressive laminectomy to both of the patients and extrude disc materials were excised. Both of the patients were recovered with favorable outcome. PMID:25972945

  5. Repeated Acute Oral Exposure to Cannabis sativa Impaired Neurocognitive Behaviours and Cortico-hippocampal Architectonics in Wistar Rats.

    PubMed

    Imam, A; Ajao, M S; Akinola, O B; Ajibola, M I; Ibrahim, A; Amin, A; Abdulmajeed, W I; Lawal, Z A; Ali-Oluwafuyi, A

    2017-03-06

    The most abused illicit drug in both the developing and the developed world is Cannabis disposing users to varying forms of personality disorders. However, the effects of cannabis on cortico-hippocampal architecture and cognitive behaviours still remain elusive.  The present study investigated the neuro-cognitive implications of oral cannabis use in rats. Eighteen adult Wistar rats were randomly grouped to three. Saline was administered to the control rats, cannabis (20 mg/kg) to the experimental group I, while Scopolamine (1 mg/kg. ip) was administered to the last group as a standard measure for the cannabis induced cognitive impairment. All treatments lasted for seven consecutive days. Open Field Test (OFT) was used to assess locomotor activities, Elevated Plus Maze (EPM) for anxiety-like behaviour, and Y maze paradigm for spatial memory and data subjected to ANOVA and T test respectively. Thereafter, rats were sacrificed and brains removed for histopathological studies. Cannabis significantly reduced rearing frequencies in the OFT and EPM, and increased freezing period in the OFT. It also reduced percentage alternation similar to scopolamine in the Y maze, and these effects were coupled with alterations in the cortico-hippocampal neuronal architectures. These results point to the detrimental impacts of cannabis on cortico-hippocampal neuronal architecture and morphology, and consequently cognitive deficits.

  6. Dopamine Modulates Spike Timing-Dependent Plasticity and Action Potential Properties in CA1 Pyramidal Neurons of Acute Rat Hippocampal Slices

    PubMed Central

    Edelmann, Elke; Lessmann, Volkmar

    2011-01-01

    Spike timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) is a cellular model of Hebbian synaptic plasticity which is believed to underlie memory formation. In an attempt to establish a STDP paradigm in CA1 of acute hippocampal slices from juvenile rats (P15–20), we found that changes in excitability resulting from different slice preparation protocols correlate with the success of STDP induction. Slice preparation with sucrose containing ACSF prolonged rise time, reduced frequency adaptation, and decreased latency of action potentials in CA1 pyramidal neurons compared to preparation in conventional ASCF, while other basal electrophysiological parameters remained unaffected. Whereas we observed prominent timing-dependent long-term potentiation (t-LTP) to 171 ± 10% of controls in conventional ACSF, STDP was absent in sucrose prepared slices. This sucrose-induced STDP deficit could not be rescued by stronger STDP paradigms, applying either more pre- and/or postsynaptic stimuli, or by a higher stimulation frequency. Importantly, slice preparation with sucrose containing ACSF did not eliminate theta-burst stimulation induced LTP in CA1 in field potential recordings in our rat hippocampal slices. Application of dopamine (for 10–20 min) to sucrose prepared slices completely rescued t-LTP and recovered action potential properties back to levels observed in ACSF prepared slices. Conversely, acute inhibition of D1 receptor signaling impaired t-LTP in ACSF prepared slices. No similar restoring effect for STDP as seen with dopamine was observed in response to the β-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol. ELISA measurements demonstrated a significant reduction of endogenous dopamine levels (to 61.9 ± 6.9% of ACSF values) in sucrose prepared slices. These results suggest that dopamine signaling is involved in regulating the efficiency to elicit STDP in CA1 pyramidal neurons. PMID:22065958

  7. Transient impairment of hippocampus-dependent learning and memory in relatively low-dose of acute radiation syndrome is associated with inhibition of hippocampal neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joong-Sun; Lee, Hae-June; Kim, Jong Choon; Kang, Seong Soo; Bae, Chun-Sik; Shin, Taekyun; Jin, Jae-Kwang; Kim, Sung Ho; Wang, Hongbing; Moon, Changjong

    2008-09-01

    Neurogenesis in the adult hippocampus, which occurs constitutively, is vulnerable to ionizing radiation. In the relatively low-dose exposure of acute radiation syndrome (ARS), the change in the adult hippocampal function is poorly understood. This study analyzed the changes in apoptotic cell death and neurogenesis in the DGs of hippocampi from adult ICR mice with single whole-body gamma-irradiation using the TUNEL method and immunohistochemical markers of neurogenesis, Ki-67 and doublecortin (DCX). In addition, the hippocampus-dependent learning and memory tasks after single whole-body gamma-irradiation were examined in order to evaluate the hippocampus-related behavioral dysfunction in the relatively low-dose exposure of ARS. The number of TUNEL-positive apoptotic nuclei in the dentate gyrus (DG) was increased 6-12 h after acute gamma-irradiation (a single dose of 0.5 to 4 Gy). In contrast, the number of Ki-67- and DCX-positive cells began to decrease significantly 6 h postirradiation, reaching its lowest level 24 h after irradiation. The level of Ki-67 and DCX immunoreactivity decreased in a dose-dependent manner within the range of irradiation applied (0-4 Gy). In passive avoidance and object recognition memory test, the mice trained 1 day after acute irradiation (2 Gy) showed significant memory deficits, compared with the sham controls. In conclusion, the pattern of the hippocampus-dependent memory dysfunction is consistent with the change in neurogenesis after acute irradiation. It is suggested that a relatively low dose of ARS in adult ICR mice is sufficiently detrimental to interrupt the functioning of the hippocampus, including learning and memory, possibly through the inhibition of neurogenesis.

  8. [Acute cerebral ischemia: an unusual clinical presentation of isolated left ventricular noncompaction in an adult patient].

    PubMed

    Fiorencis, Andrea; Quadretti, Laura; Bacich, Daniela; Chiodi, Elisabetta; Mele, Donato; Fiorencis, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Isolated left ventricular noncompaction in adults is uncommon. The most frequent clinical manifestations are heart failure due to left ventricular systolic dysfunction and supraventricular and ventricular arrhythmias, which may be sustained and associated with sudden death. Thromboembolic complications are also possible. We report the case of an adult patient with isolated left ventricular noncompaction who came to our observation because of acute cerebral ischemia, an initial presentation of the disease only rarely described.

  9. Effects of acute and chronic psychological stress on isolated islets' insulin release.

    PubMed

    Zardooz, Homeira; Zahediasl, Saleh; Rostamkhani, Fatemeh; Farrokhi, Babak; Nasiraei, Shiva; Kazeminezhad, Behrang; Gholampour, Roohollah

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of acute and chronic psychological stress on glucose-stimulated insulin secretion from isolated pancreatic islets. Male Wistar rats were divided into two control and stressed groups; each further was allocated into fed and fasted groups. Stress was induced by communication box for one (acute), fifteen and thirty (chronic) days. After islet isolation, their number, size and insulin output were assessed. Plasma corticosterone level was determined. In fasted animals, acute stress increased basal and post stress plasma corticosterone level, while 30 days stress decreased it compared to day 1. In fed rats, acute stress increased only post stress plasma corticosterone concentration, however, after 15 days stress, it was decreased compared to day 1. Acute stress did not change insulin output; however, the insulin output was higher in the fed acutely stressed rats at 8.3 and 16.7 mM glucose than fasted ones. Chronic stress increased insulin output on day 15 in the fasted animals but decreased it on day 30 in the fed animals at 8.3 and 16.7 mM glucose. In the fasted control rats insulin output was lower than fed ones. In the chronic stressed rats insulin output at 8.3 and 16.7 mM glucose was higher in the fasted than fed rats. The number of islets increased in the fasted rats following 15 days stress. This study indicated that the response of the isolated islets from acute and chronically stressed rats are different and depends on the feeding status.

  10. Catecholaminergic responses in vas deferens isolated from rats submitted to acute swimming stress.

    PubMed

    Chies, A B; Pereira, O C

    1995-09-01

    The study was performed to examine the responses to catecholamines in vas deferens isolated from rats submitted to acute swimming-induced stress. It was demonstrated that acute stress induces a significant subsensitivity of rat vas deferens to norepinephrine. This subsensitivity was inhibited when the experiment was carried out in the presence of either cocaine (10-5 M) or timolol (10-5 M). On the other hand, the rat vas deferens sensitivity to methoxamine was significantly increased by acute swimming-induced stress. Thus, despite acute swimming stress inducing a reduction in response to norepinephrine, the alpha1-adrenoceptor-mediated contractile response was increased. Additionally there were increases in neuronal uptake and beta2-adrenoceptor activity that opposes the alpha1-adrenoceptor activity. Integrated, these phenomena are responsible for the rat vas deferens subsensitivity to norepinephrine which may be involved in body homeostasis in stressogenic situations.

  11. Capsule Expression and Genotypic Differences among Staphylococcus aureus Isolates from Patients with Chronic or Acute Osteomyelitis▿

    PubMed Central

    Lattar, Santiago M.; Tuchscherr, Lorena P. N.; Caccuri, Roberto L.; Centrón, Daniela; Becker, Karsten; Alonso, Claudio A.; Barberis, Claudia; Miranda, Graciela; Buzzola, Fernanda R.; von Eiff, Christof; Sordelli, Daniel O.

    2009-01-01

    There is ample evidence that Staphylococcus aureus capsular polysaccharide (CP) promotes virulence. Loss of capsule expression, however, may lead to S. aureus persistence in a chronically infected host. This study was conducted to determine the relative prevalence of nonencapsulated S. aureus in patients with chronic and acute osteomyelitis. Only 76/118 (64%) S. aureus isolates from patients with osteomyelitis expressed CP, whereas all 50 isolates from blood cultures of patients with infections other than osteoarticular infections expressed CP (P = 0.0001). A significantly higher prevalence of nonencapsulated S. aureus was found in patients with chronic osteomyelitis (53%) than in those with acute osteomyelitis (21%) (P = 0.0046). S. aureus isolates obtained from multiple specimens from five of six patients with chronic osteomyelitis exhibited phenotypic (expression of CP, α-hemolysin, β-hemolysin, slime, and the small-colony variant phenotype) and/or genotypic (pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and spa typing) differences. Nonencapsulated S. aureus was recovered from at least one specimen from each chronic osteomyelitis patient. Fourteen isolates obtained from two patients with acute osteomyelitis were indistinguishable from each other within each group, and all produced CP5. In conclusion, we demonstrated that nonencapsulated S. aureus is more frequently isolated from patients with chronic osteomyelitis than from those with acute osteomyelitis, suggesting that loss of CP expression may be advantageous to S. aureus during chronic infection. Our findings on multiple S. aureus isolates from individual patients allow us to suggest that selection of nonencapsulated S. aureus is likely to have occurred in the patient during long-term bone infection. PMID:19273557

  12. Growth hormone acutely increases glucose output by hepatocytes isolated from hypophysectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Blake, W L; Clarke, S D

    1989-08-01

    A series of experiments using isolated rat hepatocytes was carried out to establish rat liver cells in suspension as a physiological model for examining GH responses, and to determine whether acute recombinant bovine GH (rbGH) treatment of rat liver cells increased glucose output and/or suppressed fatty acid synthesis from lactate. Rat liver cells were isolated by collagenase perfusion and incubated in short-term (less than 60 min) suspension. The amount of insulin, glucagon or vasopressin required to elicit a half-maximal response was within the physiological range of the circulating hormone. When hepatocytes from normal rats were acutely (less than 60 min) treated with 0, 0.1, 10, 100 or 1000 nmol rbGH/l, rates of hepatocyte glucose output and fatty acid synthesis were unaltered. In addition, acute rbGH treatment (1000 nmol/l) did not alter hepatocyte responsiveness to insulin or vasopressin. However, acute rbGH treatment of hepatocytes isolated from hypophysectomized rats significantly (P less than 0.05) increased the rate of glucose output twofold and moderately (P less than 0.10) enhanced fatty acid synthesis. The accelerated rate of glucose production was not accompanied by an increase in the amount of glycogen phosphorylase-a. The observations with liver cells from hypophysectomized rats are not consistent with a GH receptor-transducing mechanism which is like that for glucagon (adenylate cyclase-linked) or insulin (tyrosine kinase-linked).

  13. [Compensatory factors in acute failure of the isolated heart].

    PubMed

    Kapel'ko, V I; Novikova, N A; Golikov, M A

    1986-05-01

    The cardiac output of isolated guinea-pig hearts fell during progressive infusion of Ca2+-complexon, EGTA, or oxidative phosphorylation inhibitor dinitrophenol. Moderate doses of EGTA (0.3-0.6 mM) caused an apparent diminution of the left-ventricular +dP/dt and aortic pressure amplitude but did not influence cardiac output, which was maintained due to a prolongation of the contraction time. When the left-atrial cavity was greatly reduced by ligation, cardiac output fell by 40 per cent while left-ventricular systolic pressure and +dP/dt remained unchanged. In these conditions, EGTA in the same concentration reduced cardiac output by 30 per cent thus proving the important role of the left atrium in the compensation of hypocalcemic heart failure. On the contrary, the infusion of dinitrophenol shortened contraction time and increased myocardial rigidity. The latter change facilitated force development thus contributing to a lesser fall of +dP/dt and aortic pressure amplitude at equal diminution of cardiac output as compared to EGTA action. However, this compensation required a higher elevation of the filling pressure for inflow maintenance.

  14. Physical exercise and acute restraint stress differentially modulate hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor transcripts and epigenetic mechanisms in mice.

    PubMed

    Ieraci, Alessandro; Mallei, Alessandra; Musazzi, Laura; Popoli, Maurizio

    2015-11-01

    Physical exercise and stressful experiences have been shown to exert opposite effects on behavioral functions and brain plasticity, partly by involving the action of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Although epigenetic modifications are known to play a pivotal role in the regulation of the different BDNF transcripts, it is poorly understood whether epigenetic mechanisms are also implied in the BDNF modulation induced by physical exercise and stress. Here, we show that total BDNF mRNA levels and BDNF transcripts 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, and 7 were reduced immediately after acute restraint stress (RS) in the hippocampus of mice, and returned to control levels 24 h after the stress session. On the contrary, exercise increased BDNF mRNA expression and counteracted the stress-induced decrease of BDNF transcripts. Physical exercise-induced up-regulation of BDNF transcripts was accounted for by increase in histone H3 acetylated levels at specific BDNF promoters, whereas the histone H3 trimethylated lysine 27 and dimethylated lysine 9 levels were unaffected. Acute RS did not change the levels of acetylated and methylated histone H3 at the BDNF promoters. Furthermore, we found that physical exercise and RS were able to differentially modulate the histone deacetylases mRNA levels. Finally, we report that a single treatment with histone deacetylase inhibitors, prior to acute stress exposure, prevented the down-regulation of total BDNF and BDNF transcripts 1, 2, 3, and 6, partially reproducing the effect of physical exercise. Overall, these results suggest that physical exercise and stress are able to differentially modulate the expression of BDNF transcripts by possible different epigenetic mechanisms.

  15. Acute metabolic effects of ammonia on the enzymes of glutamate metabolism in isolated astroglial cells.

    PubMed

    Subbalakshmi, G Y; Murthy, C R

    1983-01-01

    Enzymes of glutamate metabolism were studied in the astrocytes isolated from rats injected with a large dose of ammonium acetate and compared with those isolated from controls. The activities of glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and glutaminase decreased while those of glutamine synthetase (GS) and aspartate aminotransferase (AAT) increased both in convulsive and comatose states. The activity of alanine aminotransferase (A1AT) increased only in convulsive state. The results suggested that glutamate required for the formation of glutamine in astrocytes might have its origin in nerve endings and the depletion of citric acid cycle intermediates might occur in nerve endings at least in acute ammonia toxicity.

  16. Chronic Psychosocial Stress and Negative Feedback Inhibition: Enhanced Hippocampal Glucocorticoid Signaling despite Lower Cytoplasmic GR Expression

    PubMed Central

    Füchsl, Andrea M.; Reber, Stefan O.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic subordinate colony housing (CSC), a pre-clinically validated mouse model for chronic psychosocial stress, results in increased basal and acute stress-induced plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) levels. We assessed CSC effects on hippocampal glucocorticoid (GC) receptor (GR), mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), and FK506 binding protein (FKBP51) expression, acute heterotypic stressor-induced GR translocation, as well as GC effects on gene expression and cell viability in isolated hippocampal cells. CSC mice showed decreased GR mRNA and cytoplasmic protein levels compared with single-housed control (SHC) mice. Basal and acute stress-induced nuclear GR protein expression were comparable between CSC and SHC mice, as were MR and FKBP51 mRNA and/or cytoplasmic protein levels. In vitro the effect of corticosterone (CORT) on hippocampal cell viability and gene transcription was more pronounced in CSC versus SHC mice. In summary, CSC mice show an, if at all, increased hippocampal GC signaling capacity despite lower cytoplasmic GR protein expression, making negative feedback deficits in the hippocampus unlikely to contribute to the increased ACTH drive following CSC. PMID:27057751

  17. Chronic Psychosocial Stress and Negative Feedback Inhibition: Enhanced Hippocampal Glucocorticoid Signaling despite Lower Cytoplasmic GR Expression.

    PubMed

    Füchsl, Andrea M; Reber, Stefan O

    2016-01-01

    Chronic subordinate colony housing (CSC), a pre-clinically validated mouse model for chronic psychosocial stress, results in increased basal and acute stress-induced plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) levels. We assessed CSC effects on hippocampal glucocorticoid (GC) receptor (GR), mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), and FK506 binding protein (FKBP51) expression, acute heterotypic stressor-induced GR translocation, as well as GC effects on gene expression and cell viability in isolated hippocampal cells. CSC mice showed decreased GR mRNA and cytoplasmic protein levels compared with single-housed control (SHC) mice. Basal and acute stress-induced nuclear GR protein expression were comparable between CSC and SHC mice, as were MR and FKBP51 mRNA and/or cytoplasmic protein levels. In vitro the effect of corticosterone (CORT) on hippocampal cell viability and gene transcription was more pronounced in CSC versus SHC mice. In summary, CSC mice show an, if at all, increased hippocampal GC signaling capacity despite lower cytoplasmic GR protein expression, making negative feedback deficits in the hippocampus unlikely to contribute to the increased ACTH drive following CSC.

  18. Clodronate inhibits the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines and NO by isolated microglial cells and reduces the number of proliferating glial cells in excitotoxically injured organotypic hippocampal slice cultures.

    PubMed

    Dehghani, Faramarz; Conrad, Ariane; Kohl, Angelika; Korf, Horst-Werner; Hailer, Nils P

    2004-10-01

    Treatment of excitotoxically injured organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHSC) with clodronate is known to result in the inhibition of microglial activation. We hypothesized that this is due to direct effects of clodronate on microglial cells, and investigated microglial proliferation in OHSC, and cytokine and NO secretion in isolated microglial cells. N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) lesioning of OHSC resulted in a massive increase in the number of proliferating, bromo-desoxy-uridine (BrdU)-labeled cells that was reduced to control levels after treatment with clodronate (0.1, 1, 10 microg/ml). Triple-labeling revealed that clodronate abrogated the proliferation of both glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-labeled astrocytes and Griffonia simplicifolia isolectin B4 (IB4)-labeled microglial cells. Furthermore, isolated microglial cells were treated with clodronate after stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF). Clodronate (0.01, 0.1, 1 microg/ml) significantly down-regulated the LPS-stimulated microglial secretion of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, Interleukin (IL)-1beta and NO, but not of IL-6. In contrast, clodronate significantly reduced the microglial IL-6-release induced by M-CSF, indicating different intracellular pathways. The number and morphology of isolated microglial cells did not change significantly after treatment with clodronate. In summary, the number of proliferating microglial cells and astrocytes after excitotoxic injury is reduced to control levels after treatment with clodronate. Furthermore, clodronate inhibits microglial secretion of proinflammatory cytokines and NO. Clodronate could therefore prove to be a useful tool in the investigation of interactions between damaged neurons and microglial cells.

  19. Coxiella burnetii Isolates Cause Genogroup-Specific Virulence in Mouse and Guinea Pig Models of Acute Q Fever▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Russell-Lodrigue, K. E.; Andoh, M.; Poels, M. W. J.; Shive, H. R.; Weeks, B. R.; Zhang, G. Q.; Tersteeg, C.; Masegi, T.; Hotta, A.; Yamaguchi, T.; Fukushi, H.; Hirai, K.; McMurray, D. N.; Samuel, J. E.

    2009-01-01

    Q fever is a zoonotic disease of worldwide significance caused by the obligate intracellular bacterium Coxiella burnetii. Humans with Q fever may experience an acute flu-like illness and pneumonia and/or chronic hepatitis or endocarditis. Various markers demonstrate significant phylogenetic separation between and clustering among isolates from acute and chronic human disease. The clinical and pathological responses to infection with phase I C. burnetii isolates from the following four genomic groups were evaluated in immunocompetent and immunocompromised mice and in guinea pig infection models: group I (Nine Mile, African, and Ohio), group IV (Priscilla and P), group V (G and S), and group VI (Dugway). Isolates from all of the groups produced disease in the SCID mouse model, and genogroup-consistent trends were noted in cytokine production in response to infection in the immunocompetent-mouse model. Guinea pigs developed severe acute disease when aerosol challenged with group I isolates, mild to moderate acute disease in response to group V isolates, and no acute disease when infected with group IV and VI isolates. C. burnetii isolates have a range of disease potentials; isolates within the same genomic group cause similar pathological responses, and there is a clear distinction in strain virulence between these genomic groups. PMID:19786560

  20. Isolated fat pad sign in acute elbow injury: is it clinically relevant?

    PubMed

    Jie, Kim E; van Dam, Lisette F; Hammacher, Eric R

    2016-06-01

    An isolated fat pad sign (i.e. joint effusion without a visible fracture), commonly seen in acute elbow injury, is associated with occult fracture and treated as such. However, the clinical relevance of an isolated fat pad is unclear, thereby questioning the need for specialized follow-up. In this study, 111 patients (median age 15 years, interquartile range 9-27 years) with an isolated fat pad sign after acute elbow injury were included. The clinical relevance of an isolated fat pad sign was derived from descriptives on pain, elbow function, treatment change, number of revisits and recovery time after 1 week follow-up and long-term follow-up. Treatment alterations were rarely made and none of the patients needed an operative intervention; also, none of the patients had persistent symptoms. The median recovery time was 3 weeks (interquartile range 2-12 weeks). This study shows that, unless symptoms persist or worsen, regular follow-up at a specialized outpatient clinic is not needed.

  1. Plastic isolators for treatment of acute leukaemia patients under "germ-free" conditions.

    PubMed Central

    Trexler, P C; Spiers, A S; Gaya, H

    1975-01-01

    A gnotobiotic isolation system based on those developed in veterinary research has been constructed for hospital use. Fifteen patients with leukaemia and neutropenia spent a total of 110 weeks in plastic isolators, and none acquired any infection. Endogenous flora was effectively suppressed by topical antiseptics and gastrointestinal decontamination effected with nonabsorbable antibiotics. The isolator system was acceptable to patients and staff and much cheaper than the use of sterile rooms. Other advantages of the system are portability, easy storage, and use on ordinary open wards without prejudice to the microbiological protection afforded. It is as yet uncertain whether protective environments of this type will substantially improve the outcome of treatment for the acute leukaemias. PMID:1203666

  2. Isolated oculomotor nerve palsy resulting from acute traumatic tentorial subdural hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Victoria; Kouliev, Timur

    2016-01-01

    Acute subdural hematoma (SDH) resulting from head trauma is a potentially life-threatening condition that requires expedient diagnosis and intervention to ensure optimal patient outcomes. Rapidly expanding or large hematomas, elevated intracranial pressure, and associated complications of brain herniation are associated with high mortality rates and poor recovery of neurological function. However, smaller bleeds (clot thickness <10 mm) or hematomas occurring in infrequent locations, such as the tentorium cerebelli, may be difficult to recognize and patients may present with unusual or subtle signs and symptoms, including isolated cranial nerve palsies. Knowledge of neuroanatomy supported by modern neuroimaging can greatly aid in recognition and diagnosis of such lesions. In this report, we present a case of isolated oculomotor nerve palsy resulting from compressive tentorial SDH following blunt head trauma, review the literature concerning similar cases, and make recommendations regarding the diagnosis of SDH in patients presenting with isolated cranial nerve palsies. PMID:27843362

  3. Social isolation rearing-induced impairment of the hippocampal neurogenesis is associated with deficits in spatial memory and emotion-related behaviors in juvenile mice.

    PubMed

    Ibi, Daisuke; Takuma, Kazuhiro; Koike, Hiroyuki; Mizoguchi, Hiroyuki; Tsuritani, Katsuki; Kuwahara, Yusuke; Kamei, Hiroyuki; Nagai, Taku; Yoneda, Yukio; Nabeshima, Toshitaka; Yamada, Kiyofumi

    2008-05-01

    Experiences during brain development may influence the pathogenesis of developmental disorders. Thus, social isolation (SI) rearing after weaning is a useful animal model for studying the pathological mechanisms of such psychiatric diseases. In this study, we examined the effect of SI on neurogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) relating to memory and emotion-related behaviors. When newly divided cells were labeled with 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) before SI, the number of BrdU-positive cells and the rate of differentiation into neurons were significantly decreased after 4-week SI compared with those in group-housed mice. Repeated treatment of fluoxetine prevented the SI-induced impairment of survival of newly divided cells and ameliorated spatial memory impairment and part of aggression in SI mice. Furthermore, we investigated the changes in gene expression in the DG of SI mice by using DNA microarray and real-time PCR. We finally found that SI reduced the expression of development-related genes Nurr1 and Npas4. These findings suggest that communication in juvenile is important in the survival and differentiation of newly divided cells, which may be associated with memory and aggression, and raise the possibility that the reduced expression of Nurr1 and/or Npas4 may contribute to the impairment of neurogenesis and memory and aggression induced by SI.

  4. Acute Isolated Dysarthria Is Associated with a High Risk of Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Beliavsky, Alina; Perry, Jeffrey J.; Dowlatshahi, Dar; Wasserman, Jason; Sivilotti, Marco L.A.; Sutherland, Jane; Worster, Andrew; Émond, Marcel; Stotts, Grant; Jin, Albert Y.; Oczkowski, Wieslaw J.; Sahlas, Demetrios J.; Murray, Heather E.; MacKey, Ariane; Verreault, Steve; Wells, George A.; Stiell, Ian G.; Sharma, Mukul

    2014-01-01

    Background Isolated dysarthria is an uncommon presentation of transient ischemic attack (TIA)/minor stroke and has a broad differential diagnosis. There is little information in the literature about how often this presentation is confirmed to be a TIA/stroke, and therefore there is debate about the risk of subsequent vascular events. Given the uncertain prognosis, it is unclear how to best manage patients presenting to the emergency department (ED) with isolated dysarthria. The objective of this study was to prospectively identify and follow a cohort of patients presenting to EDs with isolated dysarthria in order to explore their natural history and risk of recurrent cerebrovascular events. Specifically, we sought to determine early outcomes of individuals with this nonspecific and atypical presentation in order to appropriately expedite their management. Methods Patients with isolated dysarthria having presented to 8 Canadian EDs between October 2006 and April 2009 were analyzed as part of a prospective multicenter cohort study of patients with acute neurological symptoms as assessed by emergency physicians. The study inclusion criteria were age ≥18 years, a normal level of consciousness, and a symptom onset <1 week prior to presentation without an established nonvascular etiology. The primary outcome was a subsequent stroke within 90 days of the index visit. The secondary outcomes were the rate of TIA, myocardial infarction, and death. Isolated dysarthria was defined as slurring with imprecise articulation but without evidence of language dysfunction. The overall rate of stroke in this cohort was compared with that predicted by the median ABCD2 score for this group. Results Between 2006 and 2009, 1,528 patients were enrolled and had a 90-day follow-up. Of these, 43 patients presented with isolated acute-onset dysarthria (2.8%). Recurrent stroke occurred in 6/43 (14.0%) within 90 days of enrollment. The predicted maximal 90-day stroke rate was 9.8% (based on a

  5. Isolated polio-like syndrome after tick-borne encephalitis presenting with acute hyperckemia.

    PubMed

    Zambito Marsala, Sandro; Francavilla, Ermenegildo; Gioulis, Manuela; Candeago, Rosa Maria; Mondardini, Valeria; Gentile, Manrico; Ferracci, Franco; Guzzo, Francesco; Granata, Carmela; Marchini, Corrado

    2012-06-01

    Tick borne encephalitis virus infection usually shows a biphasic course. In the first stage of illness symptoms are similar to a flu-like syndrome, then after a defervescence period, fever may represent with neurological manifestations ranging from mild meningitis to severe encephalomyelitis. We report the clinical case of an adult man presented with an acute proximal hyposthenia, severe hyperckemia, clinical and laboratoristic evidence of acute tick borne virus infection. This virus has a favourite tropism for the anterior horn cells of the cervical spine segment. Polio-like syndrome, usually affecting the upper limbs, is the clinical phenotype of an infection of the cervical motoneurons. Usually myelitis is associated to severe encephalitis and a complete diagnosis may be difficult in comatose patients. Rarely, an isolated polio-like syndrome may be the sole neurological complication of tick-borne encephalitis.

  6. Isolation studies reveal a shift in the cultivable microbiome of oak affected with Acute Oak Decline.

    PubMed

    Denman, Sandra; Plummer, Sarah; Kirk, Susan; Peace, Andrew; McDonald, James E

    2016-10-01

    Acute Oak Decline is a syndrome within the Oak Decline complex in Britain. Profuse stem bleeding and larval galleries of the native buprestid, Agrilus biguttatus characterize the disease. A systematic study comparing healthy with diseased trees was undertaken. This work reports the result of isolations from healthy trees, diseased and non-symptomatic tissue within AOD affected trees, at five sites in England. Bacteria and fungi were identified using the DNA gyrase B gene, or ITS 1 sequencing. A significantly higher proportion of diseased tissues (82%) yielded more bacteria than either healthy (18%) or non-symptomatic tissue in diseased trees (33%). Overall bacterial community compositions varied at each site, but significant similarities were evident in diseased tissues at all sites. Enterobacteriaceae dominated in diseased trees whereas Pseudomonadaceae dominated healthy trees. Significant associations between diseased tissues and certain bacterial species occurred, implying that the cause of tissue necrosis was not due to random microbiota. Brenneria goodwinii and Gibbsiella quercinecans were key species consistently isolated from diseased tissue; Rahnella victoriana and an un-named Pseudomonas taxon were also frequently isolated from both healthy and diseased trees. Most fungi isolated were from the outer bark and had no significant association with tree health status. It was concluded that there was a shift in the cultivatable bacterial microbiome of diseased trees, with Enterobacteriaceae strongly represented in symptomatic but not healthy tissues. No single species dominated the isolations from diseased tissues and the tissue degradation in AOD is therefore likely to have a polymicrobial cause.

  7. Macrolide resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae isolated from Argentinian pediatric patients suffering from acute otitis media.

    PubMed

    Reijtman, Vanesa; Gagetti, Paula; Faccone, Diego; Fossati, Sofía; Sommerfleck, Patricia; Hernández, Claudia; Bernáldez, Patricia; Lopardo, Horacio; Corso, Alejandra

    2013-01-01

    Macrolide-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae emerged in Argentina in 1995, representing 26% of invasive infection isolates in children under 5 years old. The objectives of this study were to describe the prevalence of ermB and mefA genes in macrolide-resistant S. pneumoniae isolates from acute otitis media (AOM) and to determine their genetic relatedness. Between May 2009 and August 2010, 126 S. pneumoniae isolates from 324 otherwise healthy children with a first episode of AOM were included. Twenty six of these isolates (20.6%) were resistant to erythromycin. Most frequent serotypes were: 14 (46.2%), 6A (23.1%), 19F (7.7%) and 9V (7.7%). Twenty (76.9%) carried the mefA gene, 5 (19.2%) have the ermB gene, and 1 (3.9%) both ermB + mefA. Ten clonal types were identified, mostly related to Sweden(15A)-25/ST782 (SLV63), CloneB(6A)/ST473 and England(14)-9/ ST9. This is the first study assessing the mechanisms of macrolide resistance in pneumococci isolates from pediatric AOM in Argentina and their genetic relatedness.

  8. Endostreptosin: isolation of the probable immunogen of acute post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis (PSGN).

    PubMed Central

    Cronin, W; Deol, H; Azadegan, A; Lange, K

    1989-01-01

    It is now generally accepted that acute post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis (PSGN) is the consequence of the formation of antigen-antibody-complement complexes on the basement membrane of the glomerulus and that the antigen is of streptococcal origin. In cases of acute PSGN a high titre of specific antibodies to a streptococcal cytoplasmic extract can be found at the very beginning of the disease. This cytoplasmic antigen which we called endostreptosin (ESS) is probably the pathogenetic antigen of glomerulonephritis. It is deposited on the subendothelial side of the basement membrane in the first few days of the disease and is rapidly covered by newly-formed and specific antibody and complement with resultant immune injury causing signs and symptoms of symptomatic but also frequently asymptomatic acute glomerulonephritis. To further characterize and isolate ESS we used immunoaffinity chromatography and Western blotting techniques. PAGE analysis of the affinity-isolated ESS revealed the major component to have a molecular weight of approximately 45 kD. Sera from patients with PSGN or sera of rabbits immunized with affinity-isolated ESS reacted by Western blotting with at least one antigenic component with a molecular weight of approximately 45 kD. Normal human sera or the sera of non-immunized rabbits failed to demonstrate activity against this antigen. The basement membranes of the glomeruli of patients with very early PSGN stain with fluorescein-labelled gammaglobulin of patients with glomerulonephritis. This staining can be prevented when these sera are pre-absorbed with ESS but not by pre-absorption with intact cells or cytoplasmic extracts of other bacteria. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 5 PMID:2667818

  9. Isolated testicular relapse in boys with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia: treatment and outcome.

    PubMed Central

    Tiedemann, J; Chessells, J M; Sandland, R M

    1982-01-01

    In 22 boys among a group of 169 with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia the first relapse occurred in the testis. In 14 of these late isolated testicular relapse was detected on routine biopsy or became apparent after treatment was electively stopped. Eleven of these boys were treated with reinduction, irradiation of 2400 rads to both testicles, intrathecal methotrexate, and two years of chemotherapy; 10 remained well and were in second complete remission from two and a half to five and a half years later. It is concluded that boys with late isolated testicular relapse fare better than those with late marrow relapse and may have a change of long-term disease-free survival. Images p1616-a PMID:6814673

  10. [Blocking action of Nephila clavata spider toxin on ionic currents activated by glutamate and its agonists in isolated hippocampal neurons].

    PubMed

    Kiskin, N I; Kliuchko, E M; Kryshtal', O A; Tsyndrenko, A Ia; Akaike, N

    1989-01-01

    The blocking action of the Nephila clavata spider neurotoxin was studied using the concentration clamp method in isolated neurons of the rat hippocampus. Crude venom JSTX blocked L-glutamate-, quisqualate- and kainate-activated ionic currents mediated by activation of the non-N-methyl-D-aspartate (non-NMDA) membrane receptors. Ionic currents elicited by all agonists were depressed by crude JSTX venom to 34-35% of its initial amplitude with no recovery during prolonged washing. An active fraction of JSTX venom blocked ionic currents almost completely, but its action was partially reversible. The concentration dependences of blocking kinetics allowed determining the rate constants of JSTX interaction with glutamate receptors. It is supposed that JSTX blocks the non-NMDA ionic channels in some of their open states and may be one of useful tools in further biochemical and electrophysiological characterization of the glutamate-mediated synaptic transmission.

  11. Arylbenzofuran isolated from Dalbergia odorifera suppresses lipopolysaccharide-induced mouse BV2 microglial cell activation, which protects mouse hippocampal HT22 cells death from neuroinflammation-mediated toxicity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Sung; Jeong, Gil-Saeng

    2014-04-05

    Neuroinflammation is a key mechanism against infection, injury, and trauma in the central nervous system (CNS). The heartwood of Dalbergia odorifera T. Chen is an important source of traditional Korean and Chinese medicines. (2R, 3R)-Obtusafuran (1) and isoparvifuran (2) are arylbenzofuran compounds isolated from D. odorifera. This study determined the efficacy of (1) and (2) in modulating the regulation of anti-inflammatory activity through the upregulation of heme oxygenase (HO)-1 in BV2 microglia. Compound (1) inhibited the protein expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), iNOS-derived nitric oxide (NO), cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, and COX-2-derived prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated mouse BV2 microglia. (2R, 3R)-Obtusafuran (1) also reduced tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) production, and these anti-neuroinflammatory effects were shown to be correlated with the suppression of the phosphorylation and degradation of inhibitor of nuclear factor kappa B-α (IκB-α), and nuclear factor kappa B nuclear (NF-κB) translocation and DNA binding activity. In addition, (1) upregulated HO-1 expression via nuclear translocation of nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) in mouse BV2 microglia. Using tin protoporphyrin (SnPP), an HO activity inhibitor, we verified that the inhibitory effects of (1) on the proinflammatory mediators and proteins were associated with the induction of HO-1 expression. Activated microglia-mediated cell death of mouse hippocampal HT22 cells was significantly repressed by (1). Our data suggest that (2R, 3R)-obtusafuran (1) has therapeutic potential against neurodegenerative diseases caused by neuroinflammation.

  12. Single and combined effects of carbamazepine and vinpocetine on depolarization-induced changes in Na+, Ca2+ and glutamate release in hippocampal isolated nerve endings.

    PubMed

    Sitges, María; Chiu, Luz María; Nekrassov, Vladimir

    2006-07-01

    The single and combined effects of carbamazepine and vinpocetine on the release of the excitatory amino acid neurotransmitter glutamate, on the rise in internal Na+ (Na(i), as determined with SBFI), and on the rise in internal Ca2+ (Ca(i), as determined with fura-2) induced by an increased permeability of presynaptic Na+ channels, with veratridine, or by an increased permeability of presynaptic Ca2+ channels with high K+, were investigated in isolated hippocampal nerve endings. The present study shows that carbamazepine and vinpocetine, both inhibit dose dependently the release of preloaded [3H]Glu induced by veratridine. However, carbamazepine is two orders of magnitude less potent than vinpocetine. The calculated IC(50)'s for carbamazepine and vinpocetine to inhibit veratridine-induced [3H]Glu release are 200 and 2 microM, respectively. Consistently 150 microM carbamazepine and 1.5 microM vinpocetine reduce the veratridine-induced rise in Na(i) in a similar extent. The single effects of carbamazepine and of vinpocetine on the presynaptic Na+ channel mediated responses, namely the rise in Na(i) and the release of Glu induced by veratridine, are additive. Responses that depend on the entrance of external Ca2+ via presynaptic Ca2+ channels, such as the release of [3H]Glu and the rise in Ca(i) induced by high K+, are insensitive to 300 microM carbamazepine and slightly reduced by 5 microM vinpocetine. It is concluded that the additive effects of carbamazepine, which is one of the most common antiepileptic drugs, and vinpocetine that besides its known neuroprotective action and antiepileptic potential is a memory enhancer, may perhaps be advantageous in the treatment of epileptic patients.

  13. Isolating single primary rat hippocampal neurons & astrocytes on ultra-thin patterned parylene-C/silicon dioxide substrates.

    PubMed

    Unsworth, Charles P; Delivopoulos, Evangelos; Gillespie, Trudi; Murray, Alan F

    2011-04-01

    We report here the patterning of primary rat neurons and astrocytes from the postnatal hippocampus on ultra-thin parylene-C deposited on a silicon dioxide substrate, following observations of neuronal, astrocytic and nuclear coverage on strips of different lengths, widths and thicknesses. Neuronal and glial growth was characterized 'on', 'adjacent to' and 'away from' the parylene strips. In addition, the article reports how the same material combination can be used to isolate single cells along thin tracks of parylene-C. This is demonstrated with a series of high magnification images of the experimental observations for varying parylene strip widths and thicknesses. Thus, the findings demonstrate the possibility to culture cells on ultra-thin layers of parylene-C and localize single cells on thin strips. Such work is of interest and significance to the Neuroengineering and Multi-Electrode Array (MEA) communities, as it provides an alternative insulating material in the fabrication of embedded micro-electrodes, which can be used to facilitate single cell stimulation and recording in capacitive coupling mode.

  14. Characterization of Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae strains isolated from acute swine erysipelas outbreaks in Eastern China.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yao; Zhu, Xiaoming; Muhammad, Hassan Mushtaq; Jiang, Ping; Li, Yufeng

    2015-06-01

    Recently, a series of acute swine erysipelas outbreaks occurred in Eastern China. Eight strains isolated from cases of septicemia were determined as serotype 1a, and 4 of the isolates were resistant to acriflavine. One isolate strain named HX130709 was attenuated on agar media containing acriflavine dye. The 432-bp hypervariable region in spaA gene of the field and attenuated strains were amplified and sequenced. It was further compared with the vaccine strain G4T10, and thus, the eight field strains can be divided into four spaA-types. The partial spaA gene analysis also showed that no point mutations occurred among different archived passages of HX130709 during the attenuation. Results of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis showed that eight distinct patterns with 22 to 30 DNA fragment bands were produced from field strains, and twelve distinct patterns with 23 to 27 DNA fragment bands were produced from different passages of the attenuated strains. Mouse pathogenicity test showed that the mortality of the mice infected with 10(4) CFU field strains was 100% and the attenuation of strain HX130709 occurred between 46 and 50 passages. All the field and attenuated strains were highly sensitive to β-lactam antibiotics, tetracyclines and macrolides. So, we can make conclusions that the acute swine erysipelas outbreaks in Eastern China were caused by serotype 1a E. rhusiopathiae strains with different biochemical characteristics, and the virulence of serotype 1a E. rhusiopathiae strains is unrelated with some point mutations in 432-bp hypervariable region of the spaA gene.

  15. Characterization of Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae strains isolated from acute swine erysipelas outbreaks in Eastern China

    PubMed Central

    ZOU, Yao; ZHU, Xiaoming; MUHAMMAD, Hassan Mushtaq; JIANG, Ping; LI, Yufeng

    2015-01-01

    Recently, a series of acute swine erysipelas outbreaks occurred in Eastern China. Eight strains isolated from cases of septicemia were determined as serotype 1a, and 4 of the isolates were resistant to acriflavine. One isolate strain named HX130709 was attenuated on agar media containing acriflavine dye. The 432-bp hypervariable region in spaA gene of the field and attenuated strains were amplified and sequenced. It was further compared with the vaccine strain G4T10, and thus, the eight field strains can be divided into four spaA-types. The partial spaA gene analysis also showed that no point mutations occurred among different archived passages of HX130709 during the attenuation. Results of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis showed that eight distinct patterns with 22 to 30 DNA fragment bands were produced from field strains, and twelve distinct patterns with 23 to 27 DNA fragment bands were produced from different passages of the attenuated strains. Mouse pathogenicity test showed that the mortality of the mice infected with 104 CFU field strains was 100% and the attenuation of strain HX130709 occurred between 46 and 50 passages. All the field and attenuated strains were highly sensitive to β-lactam antibiotics, tetracyclines and macrolides. So, we can make conclusions that the acute swine erysipelas outbreaks in Eastern China were caused by serotype 1a E. rhusiopathiae strains with different biochemical characteristics, and the virulence of serotype 1a E. rhusiopathiae strains is unrelated with some point mutations in 432-bp hypervariable region of the spaA gene. PMID:25649849

  16. Isolation and Characterization of a Highly Mutated Chinese Isolate of Enterovirus B84 from a Patient with Acute Flaccid Paralysis

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Huanying; Zhang, Yong; Liu, Leng; Lu, Jing; Guo, Xue; Li, Hui; Zeng, Hanri; Fang, Ling; Xu, Wenbo; Ke, Changwen

    2016-01-01

    Enterovirus B84 (EV-B84) is a newly identified serotype within the species Enterovirus B (EV-B). To date, only ten nucleotide sequences of EV-B84 are published and only one full-length genome sequence (the prototype strain) is available in the GenBank database. Here, a highly mutated EV-B84 (strain AFP452/GD/CHN/2004) was recovered from a patient with acute flaccid paralysis in the Guangdong province of China in 2004 making this the first report of EV-B84 in China. Sequence comparison and phylogenetic dendrogram analysis revealed high variation from the global EV-B84 strains (African and Indian strains) and frequent intertypic recombination in the non-structural protein region, suggesting high genetic diversity in EV-B84. The Chinese EV-B84 strain, apparently evolving independently of the other ten strains, strongly suggests that the EV-B84 strain has been circulating for many years. However, the extremely low isolation rate suggests that it is not a prevalent EV serotype in China or worldwide. This study provides valuable information about the molecular epidemiology of EV-B84 in China, and will be helpful in future studies to understand the association of EV-B84 with neurological disorders; it also helps expand the number of whole virus genome sequences of EV-B84 in the GenBank database. PMID:27499334

  17. The roles of hippocampal microRNAs in response to acute postnatal exposure to di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate in female and male rats.

    PubMed

    Luu, Bryan E; Green, Stuart R; Childers, Christine L; Holahan, Matthew R; Storey, Kenneth B

    2017-02-10

    Previous studies have shown that di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) exposure impairs the normal development of pre- and post-synaptic elements of the male, but not female, rat hippocampus. While males seem to be vulnerable to the neurodevelopmental deficits resulting from DEHP exposure, females appear to show a protective response. The purpose of the present study was to characterize hippocampal microRNAs in female and male rats exposed to DEHP to assess whether any patterns emerged that would be consistent with vulnerability in males and resilience in females. Male and female rats were treated with 0, 1, 10, or 20mg/kg of DEHP by intraperitoneal injections from postnatal day 16 (PND16) - PND22 and brains were removed and flash frozen on PND78. A group of 85 microRNAs which have been previously shown to play a role in the development and maintenance of hippocampal neurons was assessed with RT-qPCR. In response to DEHP exposure, there were 19 microRNAs that increased in females and 52 that decreased in males. The strongest microRNA response in females occurred in conjunction with the 10mg/kg of DEHP dose, whereas suppression of microRNAs in males appeared to be dose-dependent. Select hippocampal microRNAs (such as miR-132-3p and miR-191-5p), previously shown to regulate dendrite morphology, were modulated by DEHP exposure in this study. The results suggest that DEHP exposure has the potential to regulate microRNAs in a sex-specific manner which may interfere with proper hippocampal development in males and preserve hippocampal development in females.

  18. Acute and nongenomic effects of testosterone on isolated and perfused rat heart.

    PubMed

    Ceballos, G; Figueroa, L; Rubio, I; Gallo, G; Garcia, A; Martinez, A; Yañez, R; Perez, J; Morato, T; Chamorro, G

    1999-05-01

    Gonadal steroid hormones influence vascular tone and the development of hypertension. There are sex differences in the incidence of cardiovascular diseases, and great attention has been placed on the study of estrogen cardiovascular effects. However, there are only a few reports on the effects of testosterone on the vasculature. It is commonly accepted that the mechanism of the action of steroid hormones on target tissues is mediated through the binding of hormones to cytoplasmic or nuclear receptors. However, some studies indicate that steroid action can be extremely rapid and therefore unlikely to be through a genomic mechanism. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of intravascularly confined testosterone on an isolated rat heart to demonstrate acute and possibly nongenomic effects of the steroid. Our results show that testosterone blocked the adenosine vasodilator effect and increased vascular resistance, even when its presence was restricted to the coronary vascular lumen. These effects were exerted rapidly and possibly through nongenomic mechanisms.

  19. Complete Genome Sequence of a Novel WU Polyomavirus Isolate from Arkansas, USA, Associated with Acute Respiratory Infection

    PubMed Central

    Denson, J. L.; Schwalm, K. S.; Stoner, A. N.; Kincaid, J. C.; Abramo, T. J.; Thompson, T. M.; Ulloa, E. M.; Burchiel, S. W.; Dinwiddie, D. L.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT We report here the complete genome sequence of a WU polyomavirus (WUPyV) isolate, also known as human polyomavirus 4, collected in 2016 from a patient in Arkansas with an acute respiratory infection. Isolate hPyV4/USA/AR001/2016 has a double-stranded DNA genome of 5,229 bp in length. PMID:28082496

  20. Intracoronary hypothermia for acute myocardial infarction in the isolated beating pig heart

    PubMed Central

    Otterspoor, Luuk C; van Nunen, Lokien X; Rosalina, Tilaï T; Veer, Marcel van’t; Tuijl, Sjoerd Van; Stijnen, Marco; Rutten, Marcel CM; van de Vosse, Frans N; Pijls, Nico HJ

    2017-01-01

    Hypothermia may attenuate reperfusion injury and thereby improve acute myocardial infarction therapy. Systemic cooling trials failed to reduce infarct size, perhaps because the target temperature was not reached fast enough. The use of selective intracoronary hypothermia combined with intracoronary temperature monitoring allows for titrating to target temperature and optimizing the cooling rate. We aimed to the test the feasibility of intracoronary cooling for controlled, selective myocardial hypothermia in an isolated beating pig heart. In five porcine hearts the left anterior descending artery (LAD) was occluded by an over-the-wire balloon (OTWB). After occlusion, saline at 22°C was infused through the OTWB lumen for 5 minutes into the infarct area at a rate of 30 ml/min. Thereafter the balloon was deflated but infusion continued with saline at 4°C for 5 minutes. Distal coronary temperature was continuously monitored by a pressure/temperature guidewire. Myocardial temperature at several locations in the infarct and control areas was recorded using needle thermistors. In the occlusion phase, coronary temperature decreased by 11.4°C (range 9.4-12.5°C). Myocardial temperature throughout the infarct area decreased by 5.1°C (range 1.8-8.1°C) within three minutes. During the reperfusion phase, coronary temperature decreased by 6.2°C (range 4.1-10.3°C) and myocardial temperature decreased by 4.5°C (range 1.5-7.4°C). Myocardial temperature outside the infarct area was not affected. In the isolated beating pig heart with acute occlusion of the LAD, we were able to rapidly “induce, maintain, and control” a stable intracoronary and myocardial target temperature of at least 4°C below body temperature without side effects and using standard PCI equipment, justifying further studies of this technique in humans. PMID:28337283

  1. Angiotensin II has acute effects on TRPC6 channels in podocytes of freshly isolated glomeruli

    PubMed Central

    Ilatovskaya, Daria V.; Palygin, Oleg; Chubinskiy-Nadezhdin, Vladislav; Negulyaev, Yuri A.; Ma, Rong; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Staruschenko, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    A key role for podocytes in the pathogenesis of proteinuric renal diseases has been established. Angiotensin II causes depolarization and increased intracellular calcium concentration in podocytes; members of the cation TRPC channels family, particularly TRPC6, are proposed as proteins responsible for calcium flux. Angiotensin II evokes calcium transient through TRPC channels and mutations in the gene encoding the TRPC6 channel result in the development of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. Here we examined the effects of angiotensin II on intracellular calcium ion levels and endogenous channels in intact podocytes of freshly isolated decapsulated mouse glomeruli. An ion channel with distinct TRPC6 properties was identified in wild type, but was absent in TRPC6 knockout mice. Single channel electrophysiological analysis found that angiotensin II acutely activated native TRPC-like channels in both podocytes of freshly isolated glomeruli and TRPC6 channels transiently overexpressed in CHO cells; the effect was mediated by changes in the channel open probability. Angiotensin II evoked intracellular calcium transients in the wild type podocytes, which was blunted in TRPC6 knockout glomeruli. Pan-TRPC inhibitors gadolinium and SKF 96365 reduced the response in wild type glomerular epithelial cells, whereas the transient in TRPC6 knockout animals was not affected. Thus, angiotensin II-dependent activation of TRPC6 channels in podocytes may have a significant role in the development of kidney diseases. PMID:24646854

  2. Sympathoadrenal Activation is Associated with Acute Traumatic Coagulopathy and Endotheliopathy in Isolated Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Di Battista, Alex P.; Rizoli, Sandro B.; Lejnieks, Brandon; Min, Arimie; Shiu, Maria Y.; Peng, Henry T.; Baker, Andrew J.; Hutchison, Michael G.; Churchill, Nathan; Inaba, Kenji; Nascimento, Bartolomeu B.; de Oliveira Manoel, Airton Leonardo; Beckett, Andrew; Rhind, Shawn G.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Acute coagulopathy after traumatic brain injury (TBI) involves a complex multifactorial hemostatic response that is poorly characterized. Objectives: To examine early posttraumatic alterations in coagulofibrinolytic, endothelial, and inflammatory blood biomarkers in relation to sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activation and 6-month patient outcomes, using multivariate partial least-squares (PLS) analysis. Patients and Methods: A multicenter observational study of 159 adult isolated TBI patients admitted to the emergency department at an urban level I trauma center, was performed. Plasma concentrations of 6 coagulofibrinolytic, 10 vascular endothelial, 19 inflammatory, and 2 catecholamine biomarkers were measured by immunoassay on admission and 24 h postinjury. Neurological outcome at 6 months was assessed using the Extended Glasgow Outcome Scale. PLS-discriminant analysis was used to identify salient biomarker contributions to unfavorable outcome, whereas PLS regression analysis was used to evaluate the covariance between SNS correlates (catecholamines) and biomarkers of coagulopathy, endotheliopathy, and inflammation. Results: Biomarker profiles in patients with an unfavorable outcome displayed procoagulation, hyperfibrinolysis, glycocalyx and endothelial damage, vasculature activation, and inflammation. A strong covariant relationship was evident between catecholamines and biomarkers of coagulopathy, endotheliopathy, and inflammation at both admission and 24 h postinjury. Conclusions: Biomarkers of coagulopathy and endotheliopathy are associated with poor outcome after TBI. Catecholamine levels were highly correlated with endotheliopathy and coagulopathy markers within the first 24 h after injury. Further research is warranted to characterize the pathogenic role of SNS-mediated hemostatic alterations in isolated TBI. PMID:27206278

  3. [Toxigenic effect of Acinetobacter baumannii isolated from children with acute diarrhoea].

    PubMed

    Polanco, Nina; Manzi, Lorna

    2008-03-01

    Diarrheal diseases with diarrhea are the most frequent cause of morbidity and mortality in children; however the causative agent cannot be identified always, which suggests the presence of unknown enteropathogens inducing diarrhea. The isolation of Acinetobacter sp. from feces of children with acute diarrhea, unrelated to known enteropathogens motivated this investigation to detect a possible enterotoxigenic effect on HT-29 cells. The study population comprised 150 children with an age range from 0 to 5 years old; 120 were assisted in the "Hospital Materno Infantil del Este'' with gastrointestinal syndrome and 30 healthy controls who went to the center for routine analysis. In 25% of symptomatic patients were diagnosed parasites and bacteria, identified routinely. From four symptomatic patients were isolated three Acinetobacter baumannii strains and two A. calcoaceticus strains. The strains were cultured in brain-heart infusion for 24 and 48 hrs, at 35 degrees C, and the supernatants were obtained by centrifugation and filtration and their activity tested on HT-29 cell monolayers. The supernatants of the three strains of A. baumannii induced alterations of the cell monolayer, showed by detachments of cell monolayers, cell segregation, cell rounding and swelling. These effects were more intense with the 48 h culture exoproducts of the 016 strain, which were higher than the positive control. This toxigenic effect of A. baumannii, could represent a pathogenic mechanism whose definition requires more studies to determine the possible role in the pathogenicity of this bacillus.

  4. Neonatal isolation alters the estrous cycle interactions on the acute behavioral effects of cocaine.

    PubMed

    Kosten, Therese A; Sanchez, Hayde; Jatlow, Peter I; Kehoe, Priscilla

    2005-09-01

    We demonstrated that neonatal isolation (ISO) increases acquisition of cocaine self-administration and alters psychostimulant-induced ventral striatal dopamine and serotonin levels in female rats. Both dopamine and serotonin modulate the behavioral effects of cocaine and these effects can vary across estrous stages. We now test whether ISO modifies the manner in which estrous stage affects the acute behavioral responses to cocaine. Litters were assigned to ISO (1 h/day isolation; post-natal days 2-9) or non-handled (NH) conditions. In Experiment 1, the ability of cocaine (0.3-30 mg/kg; IP) to disrupt schedule-controlled responding for food was assessed in proestrus, estrus, and diestrus stages. Diestrus and proestrus NH females showed increased response rates at low cocaine doses and decreased rates at higher doses relative to baseline. In contrast, estrus NH females showed decreased responding across all doses. ISO eliminated this estrous stage distinction; only decreased responding to high cocaine doses were seen. Yet, estrous cyclicity during food restriction (Experiment 2) did not differ by group. To confirm this ISO effect, proestrus or estrus rats were administered cocaine (0, 5, 10 mg/kg; IP) and activity monitored in Experiment 3. Locomotor activity differed by estrous stage in NH but not ISO rats. Cocaine plasma levels (Experiment 4) at the time of peak behavioral activity did not differ by group or estrous stage. Results extend prior studies to show estrous stage alters the behavioral effects of cocaine. Neonatal isolation eliminates these effects perhaps reflecting alterations in accumbens monoamine levels or the effects of estrogen on this system.

  5. Neuregulin directly decreases voltage-gated sodium current in hippocampal ErbB4-expressing interneurons.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Megan J; Leiva-Salcedo, Elias; Buonanno, Andres

    2012-10-03

    The Neuregulin 1 (NRG1)/ErbB4 signaling pathway has been genetically and functionally implicated in the etiology underlying schizophrenia, and in the regulation of glutamatergic pyramidal neuron function and plasticity. However, ErbB4 receptors are expressed in subpopulations of GABAergic interneurons, but not in hippocampal or cortical pyramidal neurons, indicating that NRG1 effects on principal neurons are indirect. Consistent with these findings, NRG1 effects on hippocampal long-term potentiation at CA1 pyramidal neuron synapses in slices are mediated indirectly by dopamine. Here we studied whether NRG/ErbB signaling directly regulates interneuron intrinsic excitability by pharmacologically isolating ErbB4-expressing neurons in rat dissociated hippocampal cultures, which lack dopaminergic innervation. We found that NRG1 acutely attenuates ErbB4-expressing interneuron excitability by depolarizing the firing threshold; neurons treated with the pan-ErbB inhibitor PD158780 or negative for ErbB4 were unaffected. These effects of NRG1 are primarily attributable to decreased voltage-gated sodium channel activity, as current density was attenuated by ∼60%. In stark contrast, NRG1 had minor effects on whole-cell potassium currents. Our data reveal the direct actions of NRG1 signaling in ErbB4-expressing interneurons, and offer novel insight into how NRG1/ErbB4 signaling can impact hippocampal activity.

  6. Cannabinoid HU210 protects isolated rat stomach against impairment caused by serum of rats with experimental acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Cao, Ming-hua; Li, Yong-yu; Xu, Jing; Feng, Ya-jing; Lin, Xu-hong; Li, Kun; Han, Tong; Chen, Chang-jie

    2012-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP), especially severe acute pancreatitis often causes extra-pancreatic complications, such as acute gastrointestinal mucosal lesion (AGML) which is accompanied by a considerably high mortality, yet the pathogenesis of AP-induced AGML is still not fully understood. In this report, we investigated the alterations of serum components and gastric endocrine and exocrine functions in rats with experimental acute pancreatitis, and studied the possible contributions of these alterations in the pathogenesis of AGML. In addition, we explored the intervention effects of cannabinoid receptor agonist HU210 and antagonist AM251 on isolated and serum-perfused rat stomach. Our results showed that the AGML occurred after 5 h of AP replication, and the body homeostasis was disturbed in AP rat, with increased levels of pancreatic enzymes, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), proinflammtory cytokines and chemokines in the blood, and an imbalance of the gastric secretion function. Perfusing the isolated rat stomach with the AP rat serum caused morphological changes in the stomach, accompanied with a significant increment of pepsin and [H+] release, and increased gastrin and decreased somatostatin secretion. HU210 reversed the AP-serum-induced rat pathological alterations, including the reversal of transformation of the gastric morphology to certain degree. The results from this study prove that the inflammatory responses and the imbalance of the gastric secretion during the development of AP are responsible for the pathogenesis of AGML, and suggest the therapeutic potential of HU210 for AGML associated with acute pancreatitis.

  7. Urine Albumin Excretion as a Marker of Acute Glycemic Changes in Isolated Postprandial Hyperglycemia

    PubMed Central

    Shilpasree, Alagilawada S; Patil, Vidya S; Patil, Vijayetha P; Ingleshwar, Deepti G

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Postprandial hyperglycemia is a major risk factor for the development of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs), and Most of the times it occurs in patients with normal glycemic control diagnosed by fasting blood glucose (FBG) and glycated hemoglobin levels. Urine albumin excretion (UAE) is an independent predictor of CVD risk. Aim: To estimate UAE in isolated postprandial hyperglycemia (IPPHG) patients and to assess the relationship of UAE with FBG and postprandial blood glucose (PPBG) levels. Settings and Design: A cross-sectional study was carried out in 318 patients with Type II diabetes in the age group 30–60 years for 6 months. Materials and Methods: Patients were divided into five groups based on their FBG and PPBG values. UAE and lipid profile were measured in all the groups. Statistical Analysis: UAE and lipid profile in different groups were compared using ANOVA. Regression analysis was used to predict the variation of UAE with FBG, PPBG, and total cholesterol (TC). Results: Patients with IPPHG had significantly higher albumin excretion compared to normoglycemia (NG) group [P < 0.0001]. In impaired glucose tolerance and isolated fasting hyperglycemia groups, it did not differ significantly from NG group [P = 0.206 and P = 0.173]. Lipid profile did not show any significant difference between the groups. On regression analysis, PPBG but not FBG or TC correlated positively with UAE. Conclusion: UAE is easy, less expensive, and Widely available method done on spot urine samples which predicts the acute glycemic changes and increased risk of developing CVDs in patients with IPPHG. PMID:28042215

  8. BEC, a novel enterotoxin of Clostridium perfringens found in human clinical isolates from acute gastroenteritis outbreaks.

    PubMed

    Yonogi, Shinya; Matsuda, Shigeaki; Kawai, Takao; Yoda, Tomoko; Harada, Tetsuya; Kumeda, Yuko; Gotoh, Kazuyoshi; Hiyoshi, Hirotaka; Nakamura, Shota; Kodama, Toshio; Iida, Tetsuya

    2014-06-01

    Clostridium perfringens is a causative agent of food-borne gastroenteritis for which C. perfringens enterotoxin (CPE) has been considered an essential factor. Recently, we experienced two outbreaks of food-borne gastroenteritis in which non-CPE producers of C. perfringens were strongly suspected to be the cause. Here, we report a novel enterotoxin produced by C. perfringens isolates, BEC (binary enterotoxin of C. perfringens). Culture supernatants of the C. perfringens strains showed fluid-accumulating activity in rabbit ileal loop and suckling mouse assays. Purification of the enterotoxic substance in the supernatants and high-throughput sequencing of genomic DNA of the strains revealed BEC, composed of BECa and BECb. BECa and BECb displayed limited amino acid sequence similarity to other binary toxin family members, such as the C. perfringens iota toxin. The becAB genes were located on 54.5-kb pCP13-like plasmids. Recombinant BECb (rBECb) alone had fluid-accumulating activity in the suckling mouse assay. Although rBECa alone did not show enterotoxic activity, rBECa enhanced the enterotoxicity of rBECb when simultaneously administered in suckling mice. The entertoxicity of the mutant in which the becB gene was disrupted was dramatically decreased compared to that of the parental strain. rBECa showed an ADP-ribosylating activity on purified actin. Although we have not directly evaluated whether BECb delivers BECa into cells, rounding of Vero cells occurred only when cells were treated with both rBECa and rBECb. These results suggest that BEC is a novel enterotoxin of C. perfringens distinct from CPE, and that BEC-producing C. perfringens strains can be causative agents of acute gastroenteritis in humans. Additionally, the presence of becAB on nearly identical plasmids in distinct lineages of C. perfringens isolates suggests the involvement of horizontal gene transfer in the acquisition of the toxin genes.

  9. BEC, a Novel Enterotoxin of Clostridium perfringens Found in Human Clinical Isolates from Acute Gastroenteritis Outbreaks

    PubMed Central

    Yonogi, Shinya; Matsuda, Shigeaki; Kawai, Takao; Yoda, Tomoko; Harada, Tetsuya; Kumeda, Yuko; Gotoh, Kazuyoshi; Hiyoshi, Hirotaka; Nakamura, Shota; Kodama, Toshio

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens is a causative agent of food-borne gastroenteritis for which C. perfringens enterotoxin (CPE) has been considered an essential factor. Recently, we experienced two outbreaks of food-borne gastroenteritis in which non-CPE producers of C. perfringens were strongly suspected to be the cause. Here, we report a novel enterotoxin produced by C. perfringens isolates, BEC (binary enterotoxin of C. perfringens). Culture supernatants of the C. perfringens strains showed fluid-accumulating activity in rabbit ileal loop and suckling mouse assays. Purification of the enterotoxic substance in the supernatants and high-throughput sequencing of genomic DNA of the strains revealed BEC, composed of BECa and BECb. BECa and BECb displayed limited amino acid sequence similarity to other binary toxin family members, such as the C. perfringens iota toxin. The becAB genes were located on 54.5-kb pCP13-like plasmids. Recombinant BECb (rBECb) alone had fluid-accumulating activity in the suckling mouse assay. Although rBECa alone did not show enterotoxic activity, rBECa enhanced the enterotoxicity of rBECb when simultaneously administered in suckling mice. The entertoxicity of the mutant in which the becB gene was disrupted was dramatically decreased compared to that of the parental strain. rBECa showed an ADP-ribosylating activity on purified actin. Although we have not directly evaluated whether BECb delivers BECa into cells, rounding of Vero cells occurred only when cells were treated with both rBECa and rBECb. These results suggest that BEC is a novel enterotoxin of C. perfringens distinct from CPE, and that BEC-producing C. perfringens strains can be causative agents of acute gastroenteritis in humans. Additionally, the presence of becAB on nearly identical plasmids in distinct lineages of C. perfringens isolates suggests the involvement of horizontal gene transfer in the acquisition of the toxin genes. PMID:24664508

  10. Characterization of strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors in acutely isolated adult rat basolateral amygdala neurons.

    PubMed

    McCool, B A; Botting, S K

    2000-03-24

    Large concentrations of the beta-amino acid, taurine, can be found in many forebrain areas such as the basolateral amygdala, a portion of the limbic forebrain intimately associated with the regulation of fear/anxiety-like behaviors. In addition to its cytoprotective and osmoregulatory roles, taurine may also serve as an agonist at GABA(A)- and strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors. In this latter context, the present study demonstrates that application of taurine to acutely isolated neurons from the basolateral amygdala of adult rats causes significant alterations in resting membrane current, as measured by whole-cell patch clamp electrophysiology. Using standard pharmacological approaches, we find that currents gated by concentrations of taurine

  11. 5-HT4-Receptors Modulate Induction of Long-Term Depression but Not Potentiation at Hippocampal Output Synapses in Acute Rat Brain Slices

    PubMed Central

    Wawra, Matthias; Fidzinski, Pawel; Heinemann, Uwe; Mody, Istvan; Behr, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    The subiculum is the principal target of CA1 pyramidal cells and mediates hippocampal output to various cortical and subcortical regions of the brain. The majority of subicular pyramidal cells are burst-spiking neurons. Previous studies indicated that high frequency stimulation in subicular burst-spiking cells causes presynaptic NMDA-receptor dependent long-term potentiation (LTP) whereas low frequency stimulation induces postsynaptic NMDA-receptor-dependent long-term depression (LTD). In the present study, we investigate the effect of 5-hydroxytryptamine type 4 (5-HT4) receptor activation and blockade on both forms of synaptic plasticity in burst-spiking cells. We demonstrate that neither activation nor block of 5-HT4 receptors modulate the induction or expression of LTP. In contrast, activation of 5-HT4 receptors facilitates expression of LTD, and block of the 5-HT4 receptor prevents induction of short-term depression and LTD. As 5-HT4 receptors are positively coupled to adenylate cyclase 1 (AC1), 5-HT4 receptors might modulate PKA activity through AC1. Since LTD is blocked in the presence of 5-HT4 receptor antagonists, our data are consistent with 5-HT4 receptor activation by ambient serotonin or intrinsically active 5-HT4 receptors. Our findings provide new insight into aminergic modulation of hippocampal output. PMID:24505387

  12. Isolation of CD4-independent primary human immunodeficiency virus type 1 isolates that are syncytium inducing and acutely cytopathic for CD8+ lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Zerhouni, Bouchra; Nelson, Julie A E; Saha, Kunal

    2004-02-01

    Previous studies have established the existence of CD4-independent simian immunodeficiency virus, human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2), and laboratory strains of HIV-1. However, whether CD4-independent viruses may also exist in HIV-1-infected patients has remained unclear. We have recently reported the isolation of viruses from an AIDS patient that were able to infect CD8(+) cells independent of CD4, using CD8 as a receptor. Using a similar approach, here we examined viruses from 12 randomly selected patients (obtained from the AIDS Research and Reference Program, National Institutes of Health) for the presence of CD4-independent HIV-1. CD4-independent variants were isolated from infected CD8(+) cells from the viral quasispecies of 7 of 12 patients. The CD4-independent isolates were able to infect primary CD8(+) cells as well as a CD4(-) CD8(+) T-cell line. Soluble CD4 and blocking anti-CD4 or -CD8 antibody had no effect on infection of CD8(+) cells. Remarkably, two of the seven CD4-independent isolates, but not their parental bulk viruses, induced syncytia and caused acute death of infected CD8(+) cells. Some of the CD4-independent variants were also able to infect U87 cells that were negative for CD4, CD8, and common HIV coreceptors, suggesting a novel entry mechanism for these isolates. The CD4-independent isolates were derived from adults and children infected with subtypes A, B, and D. Although no common motif for CD4 independence was found, novel sequence changes were observed in critical areas of the envelopes of the CD4-independent viruses. These results demonstrate that HIV-1-infected patients can frequently harbor viruses that are able to mediate CD4-independent infection of CD8(+) cells. In addition, this study also provides evidence of primary HIV-1 variants that are syncytium inducing and acutely cytopathic for CD8(+) lymphocytes.

  13. [Acute diarrhea outbreak caused by Shigella flexneri at a school in Madrid, Cundinamarca: phenotypic and genotypic characterization of the isolates].

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, Marylin; Realpe, María Elena; Muñoz, Nélida; Sicard, Diego; Silva, Esperanza; Agudelo, Clara Inés; Castañeda, Elizabeth

    2002-09-01

    Shigellosis is an acute diarrhoeal disease that is the main cause of morbidity and mortality in developing countries. In 1997, the Colombian Instituto Nacional de Salud Microbiology Group organized a network surveillance program with the country's Public Health Laboratories (PHLs) to monitor the principal etiological agents responsible for acute diarrhoeal disease. In May, 2001, the PHL of the state of Cundinamarca reported a food poisoning outbreak involving an elementary school community. The main goal of the Microbiology Group involvement was to establish the molecular relationships among the isolates from the outbreak by phenotypic and genotypic methods of characterization. Stool cultures were obtained from 22 of 195 affected individuals. The Microbiology Group confirmed the identification of the isolates by biochemical and serological probes. The antimicrobial susceptibilities were tested against the following battery of antibiotics: chloramphenicol, trimehoprim-sulfamethozazole, cefotaxime, gentamicin, ampicillin and ciprofloxacin. The isolates were subjected to pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) using the following CDC (U.S. Centers for Disease Control) protocols: Xbal restriction enzyme, Shigella sonnei CDC F2353 as the reference standard, and lambda phage as a molecular weight marker. In 15 of 22 (68%) stool cultures Shigella was recovered, all isolates were identified as Shigella flexneri serotype 6 biotype Newcastle with the same antimicrobial susceptibility profile. PFGE showed that 3 (20%) isolates were identical (100% genetic similarity) and the other 12 (80%) were very closely related (genetic similarity between 86-98%). The network system permitted the INS ready access to the isolates and the implementation of the PFGE permitted a quantitative characterization of the clonal relationship among the isolates from the outbreak.

  14. Cellular and molecular characterization of Ca2+ currents in acutely isolated, adult rat neostriatal neurons.

    PubMed

    Bargas, J; Howe, A; Eberwine, J; Cao, Y; Surmeier, D J

    1994-11-01

    Ca2+ currents in acutely isolated, adult rat neostriatal neurons were studied with whole-cell voltage-clamp techniques. In the vast majority of neurons (approximately 90%, n > 250), currents were exclusively of the high-voltage-activated (HVA) type. HVA currents activated near -40 mV and reached their maximum amplitude near 0 mV. Quasi-steady-state inactivation curves in many neurons were well fitted only with a sum of Boltzmann functions, suggesting that the HVA currents were heterogeneous. Although the block of whole-cell current by Cd2+ was well fitted with a single isotherm having an IC50 of near 1 microM, experiments with organic channel antagonists suggested that at least four types of HVA channels were expressed by most cells. On average, the L-channel antagonist nifedipine (5-10 microM) blocked 31 +/- 10% of the whole-cell current (n = 20), the N-channel antagonist omega-conotoxin GVIA (omega-CgTx) (2-5 microM) blocked 27 +/- 11% (n = 20), and the P-channel antagonist omega-agatoxin IVA (100-500 nM) blocked 21 +/- 10% (n = 18). In many neurons, the block by omega-CgTx was partially or completely reversible. In cells tested with a combination of these antagonists, 34 +/- 17% of the peak Ca2+ current remained unblocked (n = 13). Single-cell expression profiling of medium-sized neurons revealed the presence of rbA and rbB Ca2+ channel alpha 1 subunit mRNAs but low or undetectable levels of rbC mRNA (n = 12). These findings suggest that although adult neostriatal projection neurons do not express significant levels of LVA Ca2+ current, they do express a pharmacologically and structurally heterogeneous population of HVA currents.

  15. Compartmental distribution of GABAB receptor-mediated currents along the somatodendritic axis of hippocampal principal cells.

    PubMed

    Degro, Claudius E; Kulik, Akos; Booker, Sam A; Vida, Imre

    2015-01-01

    Activity of cortical principal cells is controlled by the GABAergic system providing inhibition in a compartmentalized manner along their somatodendritic axis. While GABAAR-mediated inhibitory synaptic transmission has been extensively characterized in hippocampal principal cells, little is known about the distribution of postsynaptic effects of GABABRs. In the present study, we have investigated the functional localization of GABABRs and their effector inwardly rectifying potassium (Kir3) channels by combining electrophysiological recordings in acute rat hippocampal slices, high-resolution immunoelectron microscopic analysis and single cell simulations. Pharmacologically isolated slow inhibitory postsynaptic currents were elicited in the three major hippocampal principal cell types by endogenous GABA released by electrical stimulation, photolysis of caged-GABA, as well as the canonical agonist baclofen, with the highest amplitudes observed in the CA3. Spatially restricted currents were assessed along the axis of principal cells by uncaging GABA in the different hippocampal layers. GABABR-mediated currents were present along the entire somatodendritic axis of principal cells, but non-uniformly distributed: largest currents and the highest conductance densities determined in the simulations were consistently found on the distal apical dendrites. Finally, immunocytochemical localization of GABABRs and Kir3 channels showed that distributions overlap but their densities diverge, particularly on the basal dendrites of pyramidal cells. GABABRs current amplitudes and the conductance densities correlated better with Kir3 density, suggesting a bottlenecking effect defined by the effector channel. These data demonstrate a compartmentalized distribution of the GABABR-Kir3 signaling cascade and suggest differential control of synaptic transmission, dendritic integration and synaptic plasticity at afferent pathways onto hippocampal principal cells.

  16. Genetic homogeneity of axenic isolates of Giardia intestinalis derived from acute and chronically infected individuals in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Cedillo-Rivera, Roberto; Darby, Jocelyn M; Enciso-Moreno, J Antonio; Ortega-Pierres, Guadalupe; Ey, Peter L

    2003-06-01

    Twenty-six axenic isolates of Giardia intestinalis, established in Mexico City over an 11-year period from symptomatic and asymptomatic individuals with acute or chronic infections, were typed genetically. A segment of the glutamate dehydrogenase gene was amplified by PCR and examined by restriction analysis using BspH1 and ApaI to determine the major genetic assemblages to which the isolates belonged. This was coupled with the amplification and analysis of segments of variant-specific surface protein genes to determine genetic subgroupings. Despite their heterogeneous clinical backgrounds, the isolates were found to be genetically homogeneous-all belonging to genetic group I of assemblage A. The results show that type A-I G. intestinalis is ubiquitous in Mexico City and that host factors play an important, if not dominant, role in determining the clinical outcome of Giardia infections in humans.

  17. Active Sulforhodamine 101 Uptake into Hippocampal Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Schnell, Christian; Hagos, Yohannes; Hülsmann, Swen

    2012-01-01

    Sulforhodamine 101 (SR101) is widely used as a marker of astrocytes. In this study we investigated labeling of astrocytes by SR101 in acute slices from the ventrolateral medulla and the hippocampus of transgenic mice expressing EGFP under the control of the astrocyte-specific human GFAP promoter. While SR101 efficiently and specifically labeled EGFP-expressing astrocytes in hippocampus, we found that the same staining procedure failed to label astrocytes efficiently in the ventrolateral medulla. Although carbenoxolone is able to decrease the SR101-labeling of astrocytes in the hippocampus, it is unlikely that SR101 is taken up via gap-junction hemichannels because mefloquine, a blocker for pannexin and connexin hemichannels, was unable to prevent SR101-labeling of hippocampal astrocytes. However, SR101-labeling of the hippocampal astrocytes was significantly reduced by substrates of organic anion transport polypeptides, including estron-3-sulfate and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, suggesting that SR101 is actively transported into hippocampal astrocytes. PMID:23189143

  18. Isolation and characterization of acutely toxic fractions in oil sands wastewater

    SciTech Connect

    Verbeek, A.; Mackay, W.; MacKinnon, M.

    1995-12-31

    Extraction of oil from oil sand using the hot water flotation method results in the production of large volumes of wastewater that are acutely toxic to aquatic organisms. At Syncrude Canada Ltd. and Suncor Oil Sands Group Inc., this wastewater is stored in large tailings ponds that must eventually be reclaimed. The acute toxicity of these wastewaters was assessed and the acutely toxic fractions were identified. Samples were collected from the surface and fine tails zones of the Syncrude and Suncor tailings ponds during the summers of 1991 and 1992. The Microtox bioassay was used to assess the acute toxicity before and after various treatments. Where significant reductions in acute toxicity were found, further acute toxicity tests were carried out using Daphnia magna and rainbow trout. The Microtox IC{sub 50} of all centrifuged tailings pond water samples varied between 26.5 and 46%. Daphnia LC{sub 50}s varied between 76 and 98% and a rainbow trout LC{sub 50} was 12.5 %. Organic compounds that have a non-polar component, as removed by solid phase extraction with C{sub 18} sorbent, accounted for all the acute toxicity (100%) of all samples. Organic ``acids``, as removed by precipitation at pH 2.5, also accounted for all the acute toxicity (100%) of all samples except those from pond 1A of Suncor. In pond 1A, organic ``acids`` accounted for approximately 55--60% of the acute toxicity, nonpolar organic volatile compounds accounted for approximately 20--35% and the balance of the acute toxicity was due to non-polar organic compounds that were neither volatile nor organic ``acids``, as removed by precipitation at pH 2.5.

  19. Bacterobilia in acute cholecystitis: Bile cultures' isolates, antibiotic sensitivities and antibiotic usage. A study on a Pakistani population.

    PubMed

    Hadi, Yousaf Bashir; Waqas, Muhammad; Umer, Hafiz Muhammad; Alam, Ammar; Alvi, Abdul Rehman; Khan, Muhammad Rizwan

    2016-10-01

    Acute cholecystitis is one of the most common acute surgical conditions. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy remains the mainstay of treatment. In patients managed non-operatively, antibiotics play an important role in the treatment of cholecystitis. The current retrospective observational study was conducted at a tertiary care hospital in Karachi, and comprised medical records of patients admitted between 2008 and 2014with acute cholecystitis and in whom bile cultures were obtained. Of the 509 patients with a mean age of 51.15 ± 13.4years, early laparoscopic cholecystectomy (within 72hours) was performed on 473(92.9%) cases, while the rest underwent percutaneous cholecystostomy. Bile cultureswere positive in 171(33.6%) patients. Predominantly gram-negative organisms were isolated among a total of 137(27%), with E.coli 63(46%) being the most commonly isolated organism. Of the gram-positive organism, enterococcus 11(8%) was the most common. Antibiotic sensitivities were determined.Based on our findings gram-negative coverage alone should be sufficient in our segment of the population.

  20. The effect of acute swim stress and training in the water maze on hippocampal synaptic activity as well as plasticity in the dentate gyrus of freely moving rats: revisiting swim-induced LTP reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Tabassum, Heena; Frey, Julietta U

    2013-12-01

    Hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) is a cellular model of learning and memory. An early form of LTP (E-LTP) can be reinforced into its late form (L-LTP) by various behavioral interactions within a specific time window ("behavioral LTP-reinforcement"). Depending on the type and procedure used, various studies have shown that stress differentially affects synaptic plasticity. Under low stress, such as novelty detection or mild foot shocks, E-LTP can be transformed into L-LTP in the rat dentate gyrus (DG). A reinforcing effect of a 2-min swim, however, has only been shown in (Korz and Frey (2003) J Neurosci 23:7281-7287; Korz and Frey (2005) J Neurosci 25:7393-7400; Ahmed et al. (2006) J Neurosci 26:3951-3958; Sajikumar et al., (2007) J Physiol 584.2:389-400) so far. We have reinvestigated these studies using the same as well as an improved recording technique which allowed the recording of field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSP) and the population spike amplitude (PSA) at their places of generation in freely moving rats. We show that acute swim stress led to a long-term depression (LTD) in baseline values of PSA and partially fEPSP. In contrast to earlier studies a LTP-reinforcement by swimming could never be reproduced. Our results indicate that 2-min swim stress influenced synaptic potentials as well as E-LTP negatively.

  1. New Hippocampal Neurons Mature Rapidly in Response to Ketamine But Are Not Required for Its Acute Antidepressant Effects on Neophagia in Rats.

    PubMed

    Soumier, Amelie; Carter, Rayna M; Schoenfeld, Timothy J; Cameron, Heather A

    2016-01-01

    Virtually all antidepressant agents increase the birth of granule neurons in the adult dentate gyrus in rodents, providing a key basis for the neurogenesis hypothesis of antidepressant action. The novel antidepressant ketamine, however, shows antidepressant activity in humans within hours, far too rapid for a mechanism involving neuronal birth. Ketamine could potentially act more rapidly by enhancing maturation of new neurons born weeks earlier. To test this possibility, we assessed the effects of S-ketamine (S-(+)-ketamine hydrochloride) injection on maturation, as well as birth and survival, of new dentate gyrus granule neurons in rats, using the immediate-early gene zif268, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, and BrdU, respectively. We show that S-ketamine has rapid effects on new neurons, increasing the proportion of functionally mature young granule neurons within 2 h. A single injection of S-ketamine also increased cell proliferation and functional maturation, and decreased depressive-like behavior, for at least 4 weeks in rats treated with long-term corticosterone administration (a depression model) and controls. However, the behavioral effects of S-ketamine on neophagia were unaffected by elimination of adult neurogenesis. Together, these results indicate that ketamine has surprisingly rapid and long-lasting effects on the recruitment of young neurons into hippocampal networks, but that ketamine has antidepressant-like effects that are independent of adult neurogenesis.

  2. New Hippocampal Neurons Mature Rapidly in Response to Ketamine But Are Not Required for Its Acute Antidepressant Effects on Neophagia in Rats123

    PubMed Central

    Soumier, Amelie; Carter, Rayna M.; Schoenfeld, Timothy J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Virtually all antidepressant agents increase the birth of granule neurons in the adult dentate gyrus in rodents, providing a key basis for the neurogenesis hypothesis of antidepressant action. The novel antidepressant ketamine, however, shows antidepressant activity in humans within hours, far too rapid for a mechanism involving neuronal birth. Ketamine could potentially act more rapidly by enhancing maturation of new neurons born weeks earlier. To test this possibility, we assessed the effects of S-ketamine (S-(+)-ketamine hydrochloride) injection on maturation, as well as birth and survival, of new dentate gyrus granule neurons in rats, using the immediate-early gene zif268, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, and BrdU, respectively. We show that S-ketamine has rapid effects on new neurons, increasing the proportion of functionally mature young granule neurons within 2 h. A single injection of S-ketamine also increased cell proliferation and functional maturation, and decreased depressive-like behavior, for at least 4 weeks in rats treated with long-term corticosterone administration (a depression model) and controls. However, the behavioral effects of S-ketamine on neophagia were unaffected by elimination of adult neurogenesis. Together, these results indicate that ketamine has surprisingly rapid and long-lasting effects on the recruitment of young neurons into hippocampal networks, but that ketamine has antidepressant-like effects that are independent of adult neurogenesis. PMID:27066531

  3. Acute effects of wheel running on adult hippocampal precursor cells in mice are not caused by changes in cell cycle length or S phase length

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Tim J.; Walker, Tara L.; Overall, Rupert W.; Brandt, Moritz D.; Kempermann, Gerd

    2014-01-01

    Exercise stimulates cellular brain plasticity by extending the pool of proliferating neural precursor cells in the adult hippocampus. This effect has been investigated extensively, but the most immediate cellular effect induced by exercise that results in this acute increase in the number of cycling cells remained unclear. In the developing brain as well as adult pathological models, cell cycle alterations have a major influence on the balance between proliferative and neurogenic divisions. In this study we investigated whether this might also apply to the acute physiological pro-neurogenic stimulus of physical exercise in adulthood. Do changes in cell cycle precede the measurable increase in proliferation? After 5 days of voluntary wheel running, however, we measured only a very small, statistically not significant acceleration in cell cycle, which could not quantitatively explain the observed increase in proliferating cells after exercise. Thus, at this acute stage, changes at the level of cell cycle control is not the primary causal mechanism for the expansion of the precursor cell population, although with time after the stimulus changes in cell cycle of the entire population of labeled cells might be the result of the expanded pool of cells that have progressed to the advanced neurogenic stages with shorter cell cycle length. PMID:25339861

  4. Complete genome sequence of Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae strain GXBY-1 isolated from acute swine erysipelas outbreaks in south China.

    PubMed

    Tang, Hai-Bo; Xie, Jiang; Wang, Libo; Liu, Fang; Wu, Jianmin

    2016-06-01

    Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae (E. rhusiopathiae) is an important pathogenic microorganism affecting swine industry. Here, we report the finished annotated genome sequence of E. rhusiopathiae GXBY-1, isolated from acute swine erysipelas in Binyang County, Guangxi, China. The GXBY-1 strain, which exhibits high pathogenicity for swine, contains 1,876,490 bp with G + C content of 36.50%, and contains 1734 protein-coding genes, 57 tRNAs and 27 rRNAs. The nucleotide sequence of this genome was deposited into GenBank under the accession CP014861.

  5. Dynamic proteomics of nucleus accumbens in response to acute psychological stress in environmentally enriched and isolated rats.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xiuzhen; Li, Dingge; Lichti, Cheryl F; Green, Thomas A

    2013-01-01

    Our prior research has shown that environmental enrichment (i.e. rats reared in an environment with novel objects, social contact with conspecifics) produces a protective antidepressant-like phenotype in rats and decreases neurobiological effects of acute psychological stress. Although CREB activity has been identified as a major player, the downstream molecular mechanisms remain largely unexplored. Thus, the current study investigates proteomic differences in the accumbens of rats raised in an enriched condition (EC) versus those raised in an isolated control condition (IC) under basal conditions and after 30 min of acute restraint stress. Results showed that under basal conditions, EC rats generally expressed less mitochondria-related proteins, particularly those involved in TCA cycle and electron transport compared to IC rats. After 30 min of acute stress, EC rats displayed increased expression of energy metabolism enzymes (among others) while IC rats exhibited decreased expression of similar proteins. Further, network and pathway analyses also identified links to AKT signaling proteins, 14-3-3 family proteins, heat-shock proteins, and ubiquitin-interacting proteins. The protein ENO1 showed marked differential expression and regulation; EC rats expressed higher levels under basal conditions that increased subsequent to stress, while the basal IC expression was lower and decreased further still after stress. The results of this study define differential protein expression in a protective rat model for major depression and additionally identify a dynamic and coordinated differential response to acute stress between the two groups. These results provide new avenues for exploration of the molecular determinants of depression and the response to acute stress.

  6. Hippocampal Inactivation Enhances Taste Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Martha E.; Grimes, Brandon S.; Katz, Donald B.

    2005-01-01

    Learning tasks are typically thought to be either hippocampal-dependent (impaired by hippocampal lesions) or hippocampal-independent (indifferent to hippocampal lesions). Here, we show that conditioned taste aversion (CTA) learning fits into neither of these categories. Rats were trained to avoid two taste stimuli, one novel and one familiar.…

  7. Neovestitol, an isoflavonoid isolated from Brazilian red propolis, reduces acute and chronic inflammation: involvement of nitric oxide and IL-6

    PubMed Central

    Franchin, Marcelo; Colón, David F.; da Cunha, Marcos G.; Castanheira, Fernanda V. S.; Saraiva, André L. L.; Bueno-Silva, Bruno; Alencar, Severino M.; Cunha, Thiago M.; Rosalen, Pedro L.

    2016-01-01

    Isoflavonoids have been largely studied due to their distinct biological activities identified thus far. Herein, we evaluated the activity of neovestitol, an isoflavonoid isolated from Brazilian red propolis, in acute and chronic inflammation. As for acute inflammation, we found that neovestitol reduced neutrophil migration, leukocyte rolling and adhesion, as well as expression of ICAM-1 in the mesenteric microcirculation during lipopolysaccharide-induced acute peritonitis. No changes were observed in the levels of TNF-α, CXCL1/KC and CXCL2/MIP-2 upon pretreatment with neovestitol. The administration of an inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) inhibitor abolished the inhibitory effects of neovestitol in neutrophil migration and ICAM-1 expression. Nitrite levels increased upon treatment with neovestitol. No effects of neovestitol were observed on the chemotaxis of neutrophils in vitro. As for chronic inflammation, neovestitol also reduced the clinical score and joint damage in a collagen-induced arthritis model. There was no change in the frequency of IL-17-producing TCD4+ cells. In addition, pretreatment with neovestitol reduced the levels of IL-6. These results demonstrate a potential anti-inflammatory activity of neovestitol, which may be useful for therapeutic purposes and/or as a nutraceutical. PMID:27819273

  8. Complete Genome Sequences of Two Isolates of Human Parvovirus 4 from Patients with Acute Encephalitis Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Shantanu; Seth, Akanksha; Singh, Arvind K.; Jain, Bhawana

    2015-01-01

    Human parvovirus 4 (Parv4) is a relatively new virus. Association of this virus with any human disease is yet to be established. We detected human parvovirus 4 in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of two patients presenting with acute encephalitis syndrome in northern India. This is the first report of the Parv4 genome sequence from northern India. PMID:25635010

  9. Management of acute isolated medial and posteromedial instability of the knee.

    PubMed

    Roth, Jonathan; Taylor, Dean C

    2015-06-01

    Medial-sided knee injuries are very common, the medial collateral ligament being the most commonly injured ligament of the knee. Injuries to the medial side of the knee can occur in isolation or concomitant with other knee ligament injuries. Isolated grade I and II injuries have been typically treated nonoperatively with excellent results. Isolated grade III injuries, however, are less common and more controversial. Although some recent literature has shown acceptable results with nonoperative treatment of isolated grade III injuries, most authors recommend surgical treatment. A variety of operative techniques have been described, including repair, augmentation, and reconstruction, all with favorable outcomes. Choice of treatment method should be based on injury pattern with the goal of regaining valgus and anteromedial rotatory stability of the knee.

  10. Acute electrophysiological effect of pulsed gallium-arsenide low-energy laser irradiation on isolated frog sciatic nerve.

    PubMed

    Cömelekoğlu, U; Bagiş, S; Büyükakilli, B; Sahin, G; Erdoğan, C; Kanik, A

    2002-01-01

    We evaluated the acute electrophysiological effects of low-energy pulsed laser irradiation on isolated frog sciatic nerve measured by extracellular recording technique. A pulsed gallium-arsenide (GaAs) laser (wavelength: 904 nm, pulse duration 220 ns, peak power per pulse: 27W, spot size: 0.28 cm(2), total applied energy density: 0.005-2.5J/cm(2)) was used for the experiment. Sixty isolated nerves were divided into six groups (n=10), each of which received a different laser dose. In each group, action potentials were recorded before laser irradiation which served as the control data. The extracellular action potentials were recorded for each combination of 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, 13 and 15 minutes of irradiation time and 4, 8, 16, 32, 64 and 128 repetition frequency by using a BIOPAC MP 100 Acquisition System Version 3.5.7 (Santa Barbara, USA). Action potential amplitude, area, duration and conduction velocity were measured. Statistical evaluation was performed using repeated measures variance analysis by SPSS 9.0. There were no statistically significant differences for action potential amplitude, area and conduction velocity among the laser groups and control data (p>0.05). The study showed that low-energy GaAs irradiation at 4-128 Hz repetition frequencies administered for irradiation times of 1-15 min generates no effect on action potential amplitude, area, duration and conduction velocity in isolated frog sciatic nerve.

  11. Isolated bladder aspergillosis as the primary presentation of non-oliguric acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Dervisoglu, Erkan; Dikmen, Emre; Filinte, Deniz; Yilmaz, Ahmet

    2008-01-01

    A 70-year-old male patient with diabetes mellitus presented to our hospital with acute obstructive non-oliguric renal failure. Abdominal CT revealed obstructive hydronephrosis and irregular thickening of the bladder wall. Upon cystoscopy, samples of tissue were taken and found to be positive for Aspergillus spp. on histology, indicating infection of the bladder wall. The patient was treated successfully by means of a percutaneous nephrostomy and a 30-day course of caspofungin.

  12. CAMP-reaction among skin isolates obtained from a dog with an acute squamous eczema.

    PubMed

    Brückler, J; Wibawan, I W; Lämmler, C

    1990-12-01

    The primary culture of a clinical specimen obtained from a dog with an acute squamous eczema revealed 3 different bacterial cultures. Two of these cultures, a beta-hemolytic Staphylococcus aureus and a group B streptococcal culture, demonstrated synergistic hemolytic activities on this primary culture plate. The group B streptococcus had the serotype surface antigens Ib/c, protein antigen c in its c beta component.

  13. Hippocampal neurons in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Heckers, S.; Konradi, C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The hippocampus is crucial for normal brain function, especially for the encoding and retrieval of multimodal sensory information. Neuropsychiatric disorders such as temporal lobe epilepsy, amnesia, and the dementias are associated with structural and functional abnormalities of specific hippocampal neurons. More recently we have also found evidence for a role of the hippocampus in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. The most consistent finding is a subtle, yet significant volume difference in schizophrenia. Here we review the cellular and molecular basis of smaller hippocampal volume in schizophrenia. In contrast to neurodegenerative disorders, total hippocampal cell number is not markedly decreased in schizophrenia. However, the intriguing finding of a selective loss of hippocampal inter-neurons deserves further study. Two neurotransmitter receptors, the GABAA and AMPA/kainate glutamate receptors, appear to be abnormal, whereas changes of the NMDA glutamate receptor are less robust. The expression of several genes, including those related to the GABAergic system, neurodevelopment, and synaptic function, is decreased in schizophrenia. Taken together, recent studies of hippocampal cell number, protein expression, and gene regulation point towards an abnormality of hippocampal architecture in schizophrenia. PMID:12111476

  14. Molecular epidemiology of enterovirus B77 isolated from non polio acute flaccid paralytic patients in Pakistan during 2013.

    PubMed

    Angez, Mehar; Shaukat, Shahzad; Zahra, Rabaab; Khurshid, Adnan; Sharif, Salmaan; Alam, Muhammad Masroor; Zaidi, Syed Sohail Zahoor

    2015-01-01

    Human enteroviruses are associated with various clinical syndromes and severe neurological disorders. The aim of this study was to determine the molecular epidemiology of non polio enteroviruses and their correlation with acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) patients living in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (KP) and Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA) of Pakistan. The stool samples collected from these patients were used for isolation of non polio enteroviruses (NPEVs). Out of 38 samples, 29 (76.3%) were successfully typed by microneutralization assay into eleven serotypes including echovirus (E)-3 (5.3%), E-7 (2.6%), E-11 (13.2%), E-12 (7.9%), E-13 (10.5%), E-20 (7.9%), E-27 (5.3%), E-29 (10.5%), E-30 (7.9%), E-33 (2.6%), coxsackievirus (CV) B5 (2.6%) and nine isolates (23.7%) remained untyped which were confirmed as NPEVs by real time RT-PCR. Complete VP1 genetic sequencing data characterized untypeable isolates into enterovirus B77 (EV-B77). Moreover, molecular phylogenetic analysis classified these viruses into two new genotypes having high genetic diversity (at least 17.7%) with prototype. This study provides valuable information on extensive genetic diversity of EV-B77 genotypes. Although, its association with neurological disorder has not yet been known but isolation of nine EV-B77 viruses from AFP cases highlights the fact that they may have a contributing role in the etiology of AFP. In addition, it is needed to establish enterovirus surveillance system and laboratory diagnostic facilities for early detection of NPEVs that may cause poliomyelitis like paralysis especially in the situation when we are at the verge of polio eradication.

  15. Acute Flaccid Paralysis surveillance in Bosnia and Herzegovina: recent isolation of two Sabin like type 2 poliovirus.

    PubMed

    Fontana, Stefano; Buttinelli, Gabriele; Fiore, Stefano; Mulaomerovic, Mirsada; Aćimović, Jela; Amato, Concetta; Delogu, Roberto; Rezza, Giovanni; Stefanelli, Paola

    2017-04-08

    The WHO Regional Commission for the Certification of Poliomyelitis Eradication has recently indicated Bosnia and Herzegovina (B&H) as a high risk country for transmission, following importation, of wild poliovirus (WPV) or circulating vaccine-derived poliovirus (cVDPV). We analyzed data on Acute Flaccid Paralysis (AFP) surveillance between 2007 to 2016, and the trend of polio immunization coverage in B&H. The majority of AFP cases was recorded in 2016 suggesting an enhancement of the AFP surveillance activities. However, the decline in the immunization coverage, around 74%, and the isolation of two Sabin-like poliovirus type 2 strains, one of them close to a VDPV, require a particular attention in the area. Although B&H has successfully maintained its polio-free status since 2002 several challenges need to be addressed. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  16. Treatment of Experimental Acute Radiation Disease in Mice with Probiotics, Quinolones, and General Gnotobiological Isolation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-09-01

    The effect of ciprofloxacin, lomefloxacin, amikacin, and probiotics (Lactobacillus acidophilus 5/4, Bifidobadenum longum 44) on intestinal microflora...methods, increased survival parameters of the mice. The effect of lactobacilli was higher under gnotobiological isolation. Lactobacilli suppressed the...intestinal counts and translocation of gram-negative enterics, but not streptococci. A lomefloxacin/lactobacilli combination showed effects similar to lomefloxacin alone.

  17. Effects of BRL 38227, sodium nitroprusside and verapamil on collateral perfusion following acute arterial occlusion in the rabbit isolated ear.

    PubMed Central

    Randall, M. D.; Griffith, T. M.

    1992-01-01

    1. We have used an isolated, buffer-perfused, rabbit ear model of acute arterial occlusion to investigate the effects of the nitrovasodilator sodium nitroprusside, the potassium channel activator BRL 38227 (the active (-)-enantiomer of cromakalim) and the calcium antagonist, verapamil, on collateral perfusion in the absence of pharmacological tone. 2. Verapamil was the most potent vasodilator (EC50 = 72.6 +/- 32.0 nM) of 5-hydroxytryptamine/histamine-induced tone in the rabbit isolated perfused ear. Sodium nitroprusside and BRL 38227 were less potent with respective EC50 values of 488 +/- 75 nM and 296 +/- 40 nM. Following inhibition of endothelium-derived relaxing factor (EDRF) synthesis, the potency of BRL 38227 was significantly (P less than 0.001) increased with an EC50 of 55.6 +/- 5.0 nM. 3. BRL 38227 at 500 nM and 3 microM induced substantial increases in collateral perfusion following arterial ligation in the absence of pharmacological tone compared to control. Furthermore 3 microM BRL 38227 completely reversed the attenuation of collateral perfusion which followed inhibition of EDRF synthesis with 100 microM NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME). 4. Sodium nitroprusside (500 nM and 3 microM) induced modest improvements in collateral perfusion in the early stages after arterial occlusion. 5. Verapamil did not influence collateral perfusion at either of the concentrations used (50 nM and 3 microM), even though it was a potent vasodilator. 6. The results of this study indicate that BRL 38227, and to a much lesser extent sodium nitroprusside, selectively improve collateral perfusion following arterial occlusion, even in the presence of effects of EDRF on acute collateralization, while verapamil has no effect.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Figure 1 PMID:1393264

  18. Resistance profiles and genetic diversity of Escherichia coli strains isolated from acute bovine mastitis.

    PubMed

    Moser, A; Stephan, R; Corti, S; Lehner, A

    2013-06-01

    Between March 2011 and February 2012 83 E. coli strains were isolated from mastitis milk samples from 83 different animals (67 farms) and tested for their sensitivity to various antibiotics by means of disk diffusion method and genotyped by determination of the phylogenetic groups as well as by pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). The antibiotics were chosen on the basis of their licenses for intramammary application in Switzerland. As many as 16.9 % of the isolates were resistant to one or more antimicrobial agents. Amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, gentamicin and third generation cephalosporins proved effective against the majority of these strains. Nevertheless, one blaCTX-M-14 harbouring extended-spectrum-beta-lactamase producing strain was found. Genetic analysis grouped most of the strains (87 %) into phylogenetic groups A and B1. PFGE genotyping demonstrated that E. coli from cows with mastitis even from the same farm were genotypically very diverse.

  19. Antimicrobial Resistance of Urinary Tract Isolates in Acute Uncomplicated Cystitis among College-Aged Women: Choosing a First-Line Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hames, Leesa; Rice, Craig E.

    2007-01-01

    Objective and Participants: The authors of this retrospective case study focused on antimicrobial susceptibility of urinary tract isolates in cases of acute uncomplicated cystitis in college-aged women, aged 18 to 24 years, diagnosed at a major south-central university student health center. Methods: The authors obtained pertinent data from…

  20. Complete Genome Sequence of Human Adenovirus Type 55 Associated with Acute Respiratory Disease, Isolated from a Military Base in the Republic of Korea

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Se Hun; Song, Dong Hyun; Lee, Daesang; Huh, Kyungmin; Yoo, Hongseok; Oh, Hong Sang; Jung, Jaehun; Woo, Koung In; Kim, Mirang; Seog, Woong; Hwang, Il-Ung

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human adenovirus (HAdV) (genus Mastadenovirus; family Adenoviridae) serotype 55 is a reemerging pathogen associated with acute respiratory disease. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of HAdV-55 strain AFMC 16-0011, isolated from a military recruit, using next-generation sequencing technology. PMID:28280019

  1. Human Enterovirus 109: a Novel Interspecies Recombinant Enterovirus Isolated from a Case of Acute Pediatric Respiratory Illness in Nicaragua▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Yozwiak, Nathan L.; Skewes-Cox, Peter; Gordon, Aubree; Saborio, Saira; Kuan, Guillermina; Balmaseda, Angel; Ganem, Don; Harris, Eva; DeRisi, Joseph L.

    2010-01-01

    Enteroviruses (Picornaviridae family) are a common cause of human illness worldwide and are associated with diverse clinical syndromes, including asymptomatic infection, respiratory illness, gastroenteritis, and meningitis. In this study, we report the identification and complete genome sequence of a novel enterovirus isolated from a case of acute respiratory illness in a Nicaraguan child. Unbiased deep sequencing of nucleic acids from a nose and throat swab sample enabled rapid recovery of the full-genome sequence. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that human enterovirus 109 (EV109) is most closely related to serotypes of human enterovirus species C (HEV-C) in all genomic regions except the 5′ untranslated region (5′ UTR). Bootstrap analysis indicates that the 5′ UTR of EV109 is likely the product of an interspecies recombination event between ancestral members of the HEV-A and HEV-C groups. Overall, the EV109 coding region shares 67 to 72% nucleotide sequence identity with its nearest relatives. EV109 isolates were detected in 5/310 (1.6%) of nose and throat swab samples collected from children in a pediatric cohort study of influenza-like illness in Managua, Nicaragua, between June 2007 and June 2008. Further experimentation is required to more fully characterize the pathogenic role, disease associations, and global distribution of EV109. PMID:20592079

  2. Myocardial Creatine Levels Do Not Influence Response to Acute Oxidative Stress in Isolated Perfused Heart

    PubMed Central

    Aksentijević, Dunja; Zervou, Sevasti; Faller, Kiterie M. E.; McAndrew, Debra J.; Schneider, Jurgen E.; Neubauer, Stefan; Lygate, Craig A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Multiple studies suggest creatine mediates anti-oxidant activity in addition to its established role in cellular energy metabolism. The functional significance for the heart has yet to be established, but antioxidant activity could contribute to the cardioprotective effect of creatine in ischaemia/reperfusion injury. Objectives To determine whether intracellular creatine levels influence responses to acute reactive oxygen species (ROS) exposure in the intact beating heart. We hypothesised that mice with elevated creatine due to over-expression of the creatine transporter (CrT-OE) would be relatively protected, while mice with creatine-deficiency (GAMT KO) would fare worse. Methods and Results CrT-OE mice were pre-selected for creatine levels 20–100% above wild-type using in vivo 1H–MRS. Hearts were perfused in isovolumic Langendorff mode and cardiac function monitored throughout. After 20 min equilibration, hearts were perfused with either H2O2 0.5 µM (30 min), or the anti-neoplastic drug doxorubicin 15 µM (100 min). Protein carbonylation, creatine kinase isoenzyme activities and phospho-PKCδ expression were quantified in perfused hearts as markers of oxidative damage and apoptotic signalling. Wild-type hearts responded to ROS challenge with a profound decline in contractile function that was ameliorated by co-administration of catalase or dexrazoxane as positive controls. In contrast, the functional deterioration in CrT-OE and GAMT KO hearts was indistinguishable from wild-type controls, as was the extent of oxidative damage and apoptosis. Exogenous creatine supplementation also failed to protect hearts from doxorubicin-induced dysfunction. Conclusions Intracellular creatine levels do not influence the response to acute ROS challenge in the intact beating heart, arguing against creatine exerting (patho-)physiologically relevant anti-oxidant activity. PMID:25272153

  3. Pioglitazone Attenuates Acute Cocaine Toxicity in Rat Isolated Heart: Potential Protection by Metabolic Modulation

    PubMed Central

    Weinberg, Guy L.; Ripper, Richard; Bern, Sarah; Lin, Bocheng; Edelman, Lucas; DiGregorio, Guido; Piano, Mariann; Feinstein, Douglas L.

    2013-01-01

    Background The authors test whether cocaine depresses mitochondrial acylcarnitine exchange and if a drug that enhances glucose metabolism could protect against cocaine-induced cardiac dysfunction. Methods Oxygen consumption with and without cocaine was compared in rat cardiac mitochondria using either octanoylcarnitine (lipid) or pyruvate (non-lipid) substrates. Isolated hearts from rats with or without pioglitazone-supplemented diet were exposed to cocaine. Results Cocaine 0.5mM inhibited respiration supported by octanoylcarnitine (82 +/− 10.4 and 45.7 +/− 4.24 ngatomO min −1 mg −1 protein +/− SEM, for control and cocaine treatment, respectively; p < 0.02) but not pyruvate-supported respiration (281 +/− 12.5 and 267 +/− 12.7 ngatomO min −1 mg −1 protein +/− SEM; p = 0.45). Cocaine altered contractility, lusitropy, coronary resistance and lactate production in isolated heart. These effects were each blunted in pioglitazone-treated hearts. Pioglitazone diet attenuated the drop in rate-pressure product (p = 0.002), cocaine-induced diastolic dysfunction (p = 0.04) and myocardial vascular resistance (p = 0.05) compared to controls. Lactate production was higher in pretreated hearts (p = 0.008) and in ventricular myocytes cultured with pioglitazone (p = 0.0001). Conclusions Cocaine inhibited octanoylcarnitine-supported mitochondrial respiration. Pioglitazone diet significantly attenuated the effects of cocaine on isolated heart. The authors postulate that inhibition of acylcarnitine exchange could contribute to cocaine-induced cardiac dysfunction and that metabolic modulation warrants further study a potential treatment for such toxicity. PMID:21487283

  4. Isolated and persistent cognitive dysfunction in a patient with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Adamec, Ivan; Klepac, Nataša; Kolenc, Danijela; Ozretić, David; Habek, Mario

    2013-03-01

    We report a case of pathology-proven acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) in which the patient's symptoms were solely cognitive. Although cognitive dysfunction is a well-recognized symptom in adults with multiple sclerosis, cognitive assessment of adults with ADEM has rarely been reported. A 35-year-old woman was referred to our center for evaluation of cognitive disturbance and demyelinating lesions seen on brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We performed a neurologic examination, full neuropsychological assessment, brain MRI, blood and cerebrospinal fluid analyses, visual evoked potentials, and brain biopsy. The patient's Mini-Mental State Examination score was 26/30. Cognitive assessment revealed multiple severe dysfunctions, mainly in executive and attention tasks. She scored below the normal range on the Digit Span Forward and Backward Test and the Trail Making Test Part B. The Frontal Assessment Battery showed deficits in mental flexibility, motor programming, and inhibitory control. She also scored in the impaired range on tests of verbal fluency and memory. The brain MRI and biopsy confirmed a diagnosis of ADEM. This case report points to the limitations of relying on clinical presentation, neuroimaging, and current controversial diagnostic criteria in diagnosing ADEM in adults, and highlights the essential role of pathologic evaluation.

  5. Acute Reversal of Phospholamban Inhibition Facilitates the Rhythmic Whole-cell Propagating Calcium Waves in Isolated Ventricular Myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Yi-Hsin; Tsai, Wei-Chung; Song, Zhen; Ko, Christopher Y.; Qu, Zhilin; Weiss, James N.; Lin, Shien-Fong; Chen, Peng-Sheng; Jones, Larry R.; Chen, Zhenhui

    2015-01-01

    Phospholamban (PLB) inhibits the activity of cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA2a). Phosphorylation of PLB during sympathetic activation reverses SERCA2a inhibition, increasing SR Ca2+ uptake. However, sympathetic activation also modulates multiple other intracellular targets in ventricular myocytes (VMs), making it impossible to determine the specific effects of reversal of PLB inhibition on the spontaneous SR Ca2+ release. Therefore, it remains unclear how PLB regulates rhythmic activity in VMs. Here we used the Fab fragment of 2D12, a monoclonal anti-PLB antibody, to test how acute reversal of PLB inhibition affects the spontaneous SR Ca2+ release in normal VMs. Ca2+ sparks and spontaneous Ca2+ waves (SCWs) were recorded in the line-scan mode of confocal microscopy using the Ca2+ fluorescent dye Fluo-4 in isolated permeabilized mouse VMs. Fab, which reverses PLB inhibition, significantly increased the frequency, amplitude, and spatial/temporal spread of Ca2+ sparks in VMs exposed to 50 nM free [Ca2+]. At physiological diastolic free [Ca2+] (100–200 nM), Fab facilitated the formation of whole-cell propagating SCWs. At higher free [Ca2+], Fab increased the frequency and velocity, but decreased the decay time of the SCWs. cAMP had little additional effect on the frequency or morphology of Ca2+ sparks or SCWs after Fab addition. These findings were complemented by computer simulations. In conclusion, acute reversal of PLB inhibition alone significantly increased the spontaneous SR Ca2+ release, leading to the facilitation and organization of whole-cell propagating SCWs in normal VMs. PLB thus plays a key role in subcellular Ca2+ dynamics and rhythmic activity of VMs. PMID:25596331

  6. Comparison between acute oral/respiratory and chronic stomatitis/gingivitis isolates of feline calicivirus: pathogenicity, antigenic profile and cross-neutralisation studies.

    PubMed

    Poulet, H; Brunet, S; Soulier, M; Leroy, V; Goutebroze, S; Chappuis, G

    2000-01-01

    Feline calicivirus (FCV) is a major oral and respiratory pathogen of cats, able to induce subclinical infection as well as acute disease. It is also characterized by a high degree of antigenic variation. This work sought to address the question of the existence of distinct biotypes of FCV. Eight French, 6 British and 9 American FCV isolates, responsible for acute oral/respiratory disease or chronic gingivitis/stomatitis, were compared for their pathogenicity, antigenic profiles and serological relationships. Antigenic profiles were assessed by an indirect immunofluorescence assay with a large panel of characterized monoclonal antibodies. Cross-neutralisation assays were performed with specific cat antisera collected at 30 days p.i., then analysed by calculation of antigenic bilateral relatedness and dominance. Whatever their pathogenic origin, all the isolates induced an acute upper-respiratory tract infection in oronasally infected SPF kittens. Their antigenic profiles were different and did not correlate with their geographical or pathological origin. Cross-neutralisation studies and calculation of the mean bilateral relatedness allowed us to distinguish chronic original isolates from acute original ones. This study did not confirm the existence of FCV biotypes but showed that the chronic carrier state is related to the emergence of antigenically distant viruses.

  7. Culturing rat hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Audesirk, G; Audesirk, T; Ferguson, C

    2001-01-01

    Cultured neurons are widely used to investigate the mechanisms of neurotoxicity. Embryonic rat hippocampal neurons may be grown as described under a wide variety of conditions to suit differing experimental procedures, including electrophysiology, morphological analysis of neurite development, and various biochemical and molecular analyses.

  8. Cost of isolation: daily cost of isolation determined and cost avoidance demonstrated from the overuse of personal protective equipment in an acute care facility.

    PubMed

    Verlee, Kerrie; Berriel-Cass, Dorine; Buck, Kristen; Nguyen, Chau

    2014-04-01

    We determined the prevalence and associated cost of isolation precautions. Current census and historic microbiology cultures were assessed for isolation appropriateness following national guidelines. Based on patient assessment and culture data, isolation was discontinued resulting in 4,087 days of isolation and over $141,000 dollars avoided from excess supplies and time.

  9. Aberrant hippocampal neurogenesis contributes to epilepsy and associated cognitive decline

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Kyung-Ok; Lybrand, Zane R.; Ito, Naoki; Brulet, Rebecca; Tafacory, Farrah; Zhang, Ling; Good, Levi; Ure, Kerstin; Kernie, Steven G.; Birnbaum, Shari G.; Scharfman, Helen E.; Eisch, Amelia J.; Hsieh, Jenny

    2015-01-01

    Acute seizures after a severe brain insult can often lead to epilepsy and cognitive impairment. Aberrant hippocampal neurogenesis follows the insult but the role of adult-generated neurons in the development of chronic seizures or associated cognitive deficits remains to be determined. Here we show that the ablation of adult neurogenesis before pilocarpine-induced acute seizures in mice leads to a reduction in chronic seizure frequency. We also show that ablation of neurogenesis normalizes epilepsy-associated cognitive deficits. Remarkably, the effect of ablating adult neurogenesis before acute seizures is long lasting as it suppresses chronic seizure frequency for nearly 1 year. These findings establish a key role of neurogenesis in chronic seizure development and associated memory impairment and suggest that targeting aberrant hippocampal neurogenesis may reduce recurrent seizures and restore cognitive function following a pro-epileptic brain insult. PMID:25808087

  10. Aberrant hippocampal neurogenesis contributes to epilepsy and associated cognitive decline.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kyung-Ok; Lybrand, Zane R; Ito, Naoki; Brulet, Rebecca; Tafacory, Farrah; Zhang, Ling; Good, Levi; Ure, Kerstin; Kernie, Steven G; Birnbaum, Shari G; Scharfman, Helen E; Eisch, Amelia J; Hsieh, Jenny

    2015-03-26

    Acute seizures after a severe brain insult can often lead to epilepsy and cognitive impairment. Aberrant hippocampal neurogenesis follows the insult but the role of adult-generated neurons in the development of chronic seizures or associated cognitive deficits remains to be determined. Here we show that the ablation of adult neurogenesis before pilocarpine-induced acute seizures in mice leads to a reduction in chronic seizure frequency. We also show that ablation of neurogenesis normalizes epilepsy-associated cognitive deficits. Remarkably, the effect of ablating adult neurogenesis before acute seizures is long lasting as it suppresses chronic seizure frequency for nearly 1 year. These findings establish a key role of neurogenesis in chronic seizure development and associated memory impairment and suggest that targeting aberrant hippocampal neurogenesis may reduce recurrent seizures and restore cognitive function following a pro-epileptic brain insult.

  11. A neurodegeneration-specific gene expression signature and immune profile of acutely isolated microglia from an ALS mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Isaac M.; Morimoto, Emiko T.A.; Goodarzi, Hani; Liao, Jennifer T.; O’Keeffe, Sean; Phatnani, Hemali P.; Muratet, Michael; Carroll, Michael C.; Levy, Shawn; Tavazoie, Saeed; Myers, Richard M.; Maniatis, Tom

    2013-01-01

    Microglia are resident immune cells of the CNS that are activated by infection, neuronal injury and inflammation. Here we utilize flow cytometry and deep RNA sequencing of acutely isolated spinal cord microglia to define their activation in vivo. Analysis of resting microglia identified 29 genes that distinguish microglia from other CNS cells and peripheral macrophages/monocytes. We then analyzed molecular changes in microglia during neurodegenerative disease activation using the SOD1G93A mouse model of ALS. We find that SOD1G93A microglia are not derived from infiltrating monocytes, and that both potentially neuroprotective and toxic factors are concurrently up-regulated, including Alzheimer’s disease genes. Mutant microglia differed from SOD1WT, LPS activated microglia, and M1/M2 macrophages, that define an ALS-specific phenotype. Concurrent mRNA/FACS analysis revealed post-transcriptional regulation of microglia surface receptors, and T cell-associated changes in the transcriptome. These results provide insights into microglia biology and establish a resource for future studies of neuroinflammation. PMID:23850290

  12. Antimicrobial susceptibilities and serotypes of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates from elderly patients with pneumonia and acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Trallero, Emilio; Marimón, José M; Larruskain, Julián; Alonso, Marta; Ercibengoa, María

    2011-06-01

    In the elderly, Streptococcus pneumoniae is the most common cause of pneumonia and one of the most frequently isolated pathogens in cases of acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD). This study was conducted to compare the pneumococcal isolates obtained during episodes of AECOPD and pneumonia in patients of ≥65 years old and to analyze whether in patients with AECOPD and pneumonia within a short interval, the same isolate caused both episodes. This laboratory-based study was performed between 2005 and 2008. Pneumococcal isolates from episodes of pneumonia (n = 401) and AECOPD (n = 398), matched one-to-one by date of isolation, were characterized. The serotypes and genotypes of other pneumococcal isolates causing pneumonia and AECOPD in the same patient were compared. In patients with pneumonia, COPD as an underlying disease was not associated with more-drug-resistant pneumococci. In contrast, isolates causing AECOPD showed higher rates of resistance than those causing pneumonia. Serotypes 1, 3, and 7F were more frequent in pneumonia. The same pneumococcus was involved in 25.7% (9/35 patients) of patients with two consecutive AECOPD episodes but in only 6.3% (2/32 patients) of COPD patients with pneumonia and exacerbation (Fisher's exact test; P = 0.047). Less invasive serotypes were isolated more often in AECOPD and were more resistant to antimicrobials. The presence of a specific pneumococcal serotype in AECOPD does not predict the etiology of subsequent pneumonia.

  13. Mild hypothermia, but not propofol, is neuroprotective in organotypic hippocampal cultures.

    PubMed

    Feiner, John R; Bickler, Philip E; Estrada, Sergio; Donohoe, Paul H; Fahlman, Christian S; Schuyler, Jennifer A

    2005-01-01

    The neuroprotective potency of anesthetics such as propofol compared to mild hypothermia remains undefined. Therefore, we determined whether propofol at two clinically relevant concentrations is as effective as mild hypothermia in preventing delayed neuron death in hippocampal slice cultures (HSC). Survival of neurons was assessed 2 and 3 days after 1 h oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) either at 37 degrees C (with or without 10 or 100 microM propofol) or at an average temperature of 35 degrees C during OGD (mild hypothermia). Cell death in CA1, CA3, and dentate neurons in each slice was measured with propidium iodide fluorescence. Mild hypothermia eliminated death in CA1, CA3, and dentate neurons but propofol protected dentate neurons only at a concentration of 10 microM; the more ischemia vulnerable CA1 and CA3 neurons were not protected by either 10 microM or 100 microM propofol. In slice cultures, the toxicity of 100 muM N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), 500 microM glutamate, and 20 microM alpha-amino-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) was not reduced by 100 microM propofol. Because propofol neuroprotection may involve gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-mediated indirect inhibition of glutamate receptors (GluRs), the effects of propofol on GluR activity (calcium influx induced by GluR agonists) were studied in CA1 neurons in HSC, in isolated CA1 neurons, and in cortical brain slices. Propofol (100 and 200 microM, approximate burst suppression concentrations) decreased glutamate-mediated [Ca2+]i increases (Delta[Ca2+]i) responses by 25%-35% in isolated CA1 neurons and reduced glutamate and NMDA Delta[Ca2+]i in acute and cultured hippocampal slices by 35%-50%. In both CA1 neurons and cortical slices, blocking GABAA receptors with picrotoxin reduced the inhibition of GluRs substantially. We conclude that mild hypothermia, but not propofol, protects CA1 and CA3 neurons in hippocampal slice cultures subjected to oxygen and glucose deprivation. Propofol was not

  14. C-reactive protein, haptoglobin and Pig-Major acute phase protein profiles of pigs infected experimentally by different isolates of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus.

    PubMed

    Saco, Y; Martínez-Lobo, F; Cortey, M; Pato, R; Peña, R; Segalés, J; Prieto, C; Bassols, A

    2016-02-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) virus (PRRSV) is the etiologic agent of PRRS, one of the most important diseases in swine worldwide. In the present work, the effects of different PRRSV strains were tested on a piglet experimental model to study the induced acute phase response. For this purpose, pigs (n=15 for each group) were intranasally inoculated with one of five PRRSV strains (isolates EU10, 12, 17, 18 from genotype 1 and isolate JA-142 from genotype 2). The acute phase response was monitored by measuring acute phase proteins (APPs). Specifically, the serum concentration of haptoglobin (Hp), C-reactive protein (CRP) and Pig-Major Acute Protein (Pig-MAP) was determined at 0, 3, 6, 9, 12, 15, 18 and 21 days p.i. Clinical signs and growth performance were also monitored during the experiment. All animals became viremic after inoculation during the study period. The APP response was heterogeneous and dependent on the strain, being strains EU10, EU 18 and JA-142 those that induced the highest response and the strongest clinical signs. In general, Hp was the most sensitive biomarker for PRRSV infection, CRP behaved as moderate and Pig-MAP was the less responsive during the course of PRRSV experimental infection. Hp and CRP were significantly discriminatory between infected and control pigs, but not Pig-MAP.

  15. Modification of glial response in hibernation: a patch-clamp study on glial cells acutely isolated from hibernating land snail.

    PubMed

    Nikolic, Ljiljana; Bataveljic, Danijela; Andjus, Pavle R; Moldovan, Ivana; Nedeljkovic, Miodrag; Petkovic, Branka

    2014-12-01

    Hibernation is a dormant state of some animal species that enables them to survive harsh environmental conditions during the winter seasons. In the hibernating state, preservation of neuronal rhythmic activity at a low level is necessary for maintenance of suspended forms of behavior. As glial cells support rhythmic activity of neurons, preservation of brain function in the hibernating state implies accompanying modification of glial activity. A supportive role of glia in regulating neuronal activity is reflected through the activity of inwardly rectifying K+ channels (Kir). Therefore, we examined electrophysiological response, particularly Kir current response, of glial cells in mixture with neurons acutely isolated from active and hibernating land snail Helix pomatia. Our data show that hibernated glia have significantly lower inward current density, specific membrane conductance, and conductance density compared with active glia. The observed reduction could be attributed to the Kir currents, since the Ba2+-sensitive Kir current density was significantly lower in hibernated glia. Accordingly, a significant positive shift of the current reversal potential indicated a more depolarized state of hibernated glia. Data obtained show that modification of glial current response could be regulated by serotonin (5-HT) through an increase of cGMP as a secondary messenger, since extracellular addition of 5-HT or intracellular administration of cGMP to active glia induced a significant reduction of inward current density and thus mimicked the reduced response of hibernated glia. Lower Kir current density of hibernated glia accompanied the lower electrical activity of hibernated neurons, as revealed by a decrease in neuronal fast inward Na+ current density. Our findings reveal that glial response is reduced in the hibernating state and suggest seasonal modulation of glial activity. Maintenance of low glial activity in hibernation could be important for preservation of brain

  16. Spores of Aspergillus versicolor isolated from indoor air of a moisture-damaged building provoke acute inflammation in mouse lungs.

    PubMed

    Jussila, Juha; Komulainen, Hannu; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Nevalainen, Aino; Pelkonen, Jukka; Hirvonen, Maija-Riitta

    2002-12-01

    Microbial growth in moisture-damaged buildings has been associated with respiratory health effects, and the spores of the mycotoxin producing fungus Aspergillus versicolor are frequently present in the indoor air. To characterize the potential of these spores to cause harmful respiratory effects, mice were exposed via intratracheal instillation to a single dose of the spores of A. versicolor (1 x 10(5), 1 x 10(6), 5 x 10(6), 1 x 10(7), or 1 x 10(8) spores), isolated from the indoor air of a moisture-damaged building. Inflammation and toxicity in lungs were evaluated 24 h later by assessment of biochemical markers and histopathology. The time course of the effects was investigated with the dose of 5 x 10(6) spores for up to 28 days. The exposure to the spores increased transiently proinflammatory cytokine levels (tumor necrosis factor [TNF] alpha and interleukin [IL]-6) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). The cytokine responses were dose and time dependent. The highest cytokine concentrations were measured at 6 h after the dose, and they returned to the control level by 3 days. Moreover, the spores of A. versicolor recruited inflammatory cells into airways: Neutrophils peaked transiently at 24 h, macrophages at 3 days, and lymphocytes at 7 days after the dosing. The inflammatory cell response did not completely disappear during the subsequent 28 days, though no histopathological changes were seen at that time point. The spores did not induce expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase in lavaged cells. Only the highest spore dose (1 x 10(8)) markedly increased serum IL-6, increased vascular leakage, and caused cytotoxicity (i.e., increased levels of albumin, total protein, lactate dehydrogenase [LDH], and hemoglobin in BALF) in the airways. In summary, the spores of A. versicolor caused acute inflammation in mouse lungs. This indicates that they have potential to provoke adverse health effects in the occupants of moisture-damaged buildings.

  17. Correlation between cytotoxicity induced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates from acute infections and IL-1β secretion in a model of human THP-1 monocytes.

    PubMed

    Anantharajah, Ahalieyah; Buyck, Julien M; Faure, Emmanuel; Glupczynski, Youri; Rodriguez-Villalobos, Hector; De Vos, Daniel; Pirnay, Jean-Paul; Bilocq, Florence; Guery, Benoît; Tulkens, Paul M; Mingeot-Leclercq, Marie-Paule; Van Bambeke, Françoise

    2015-10-01

    Type III secretion system (T3SS) in Pseudomonas aeruginosa is associated with poor clinical outcome in acute infections. T3SS allows for injection of bacterial exotoxins (e.g. ExoU or ExoS) into the host cell, causing cytotoxicity. It also activates the cytosolic NLRC4 inflammasome, activating caspase-1, inducing cytotoxicity and release of mature IL-1β, which impairs bacterial clearance. In addition, flagellum-mediated motility has been suggested to also modulate inflammasome response and IL-1β release. Yet the capacity of clinical isolates to induce IL-1β release and its relation with cytotoxicity have never been investigated. Using 20 clinical isolates from acute infections with variable T3SS expression levels and human monocytes, our aim was to correlate IL-1β release with toxin expression, flagellar motility and cytotoxicity. ExoU-producing isolates caused massive cell death but minimal release of IL-1β, while those expressing T3SS but not ExoU (i.e. expressing ExoS or no toxins) induced caspase-1 activation and IL-1β release, the level of which was correlated with cytotoxicity. Both effects were prevented by a specific caspase-1 inhibitor. Flagellar motility was not correlated with cytotoxicity or IL-1β release. No apoptosis was detected. Thus, T3SS cytotoxicity is accompanied by a modification in cytokine balance for P. aeruginosa clinical isolates that do not express ExoU.

  18. Prostaglandin E(2) inhibits calcium current in two sub-populations of acutely isolated mouse trigeminal sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Borgland, Stephanie L; Connor, Mark; Ryan, Renae M; Ball, Helen J; Christie, MacDonald J

    2002-03-01

    Prostaglandins are important mediators of pain and inflammation. We have examined the effects of prostanoids on voltage-activated calcium currents (I(Ca)) in acutely isolated mouse trigeminal sensory neurons, using standard whole cell voltage clamp techniques. Trigeminal neurons were divided into two populations based on the presence (Type 2) or absence (Type 1) of low voltage-activated T-type I(Ca). The absence of T-type I(Ca) is highly correlated with sensitivity to mu-opioid agonists and the VR1 agonist capsaicin. In both populations of cells, high voltage-activated I(Ca) was inhibited by PGE(2) with an EC(50) of about 35 nM, to a maximum of 30 %. T-type I(Ca) was not inhibited by PGE(2). Pertussis toxin pre-treatment abolished the effects of PGE(2) in Type 2 cells, but not in Type 1 cells, whereas treatment with cholera toxin prevented the effects of PGE(2) in Type 1 cells, but not in Type 2 cells. Inhibition of I(Ca) by PGE(2) was associated with slowing of current activation and could be relieved with a large positive pre-pulse, consistent with inhibition of I(Ca) by G protein betagamma subunits. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction of mRNA from trigeminal ganglia indicated that all four EP prostanoid receptors were present. However, in both Type 1 and Type 2 cells the effects of PGE(2) were only mimicked by the selective EP(3) receptor agonist ONO-AE-248, and not by selective agonists for EP(1) (ONO-DI-004), EP(2) (ONO-AE1-259) and EP(4) (ONO-AE1-329) receptors. These data indicate that two populations of neurons in trigeminal ganglia differing in their calcium channel expression, sensitivity to mu-opioids and capsaicin also have divergent mechanisms of PGE(2)-mediated inhibition of calcium channels, with Gi/Go type G proteins involved in one population, and Gs type G proteins in the other.

  19. Isolation of Leptospira from a phocid: acute renal failure and mortality from Leptospirosis in rehabilitated northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris), California, USA.

    PubMed

    Delaney, Martha A; Colegrove, Kathleen M; Spraker, Terry R; Zuerner, Richard L; Galloway, Renee L; Gulland, Frances M D

    2014-07-01

    During rehabilitation, acute renal failure due to leptospirosis occurred in eight male northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris) that stranded along the central California coast in 2011. Characteristic histologic lesions including renal tubular degeneration, necrosis, and mineralization, and mild lymphoplasmacytic interstitial nephritis were noted in the six animals examined. Immunohistochemistry, bacterial culture, and PCR were positive in 2/3, 2/3, and 3/4 seals, respectively, and 6/8 had high serum antibody titers to Leptospira interrogans serovar pomona. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis confirmed one isolate as serovar pomona. Variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) analysis showed both elephant seal isolates were identical to each other but distinct from those isolated from California sea lions (Zalophus californianus). The time from stranding to onset of azotemia was 1 to 38 (median=24) days, suggesting some seals were infected at the rehabilitation facility. Based on temporal and spatial incidence of infection, transmission among elephant seals likely occurred during rehabilitation. Molecular (VNTR) analysis of the two isolates indicates there is a unique L. interrogans serovar pomona genotype in elephant seals, and sea lions were not the source of infection prior to or during rehabilitation. This study confirms the susceptibility of northern elephant seals to leptospirosis, indicates intraspecies transmission during rehabilitation, and reports the first isolation and preliminary characterization of leptospires from elephant seals.

  20. Molecular analysis of group A Streptococcus type emm18 isolates temporally associated with acute rheumatic fever outbreaks in Salt Lake City, Utah.

    PubMed

    Smoot, James C; Korgenski, E Kent; Daly, Judy A; Veasy, L George; Musser, James M

    2002-05-01

    Acute rheumatic fever (ARF) and subsequent rheumatic heart disease are rare but serious sequelae of group A Streptococcus (GAS) infections in most western countries. Salt Lake City (SLC), Utah, and the surrounding intermountain region experienced a resurgence of ARF in 1985 which has persisted. The largest numbers of cases were encountered in 1985-1986 and in 1997-1998. Organisms with a mucoid colony phenotype when grown on blood agar plates were temporally associated with the higher incidence of ARF. To develop an understanding of the molecular population genetic structure of GAS strains associated with ARF in the SLC region, 964 mucoid and nonmucoid pharyngeal isolates recovered in SLC from 1984 to 1999 were studied by sequencing the emm gene. Isolates with an emm18 allele were further characterized by sequencing the spa, covR, and covS genes. Peak periods of ARF were associated with GAS isolates possessing an emm18 allele encoding the protein found in serotype M18 isolates. Among the serotype M18 isolates, the difference in the number of C repeats produced three size variants. Variation was limited in spa, a gene that encodes a streptococcal protective antigen, and covR and covS, genes that encode a two-component regulatory system that, when inactivated, results in a mucoid phenotype and enhanced virulence in mouse infection models. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis showed a single restriction profile for serotype M18 organisms isolated during both peak periods of ARF. In SLC, the incidence of ARF coresurged with the occurrence of GAS serotype M18 isolates that have very restricted genetic variation.

  1. Caribbean and La Réunion Chikungunya Virus Isolates Differ in Their Capacity To Induce Proinflammatory Th1 and NK Cell Responses and Acute Joint Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Teo, Teck-Hui; Her, Zhisheng; Tan, Jeslin J. L.; Lum, Fok-Moon; Lee, Wendy W. L.; Chan, Yi-Hao; Ong, Ruo-Yan; Kam, Yiu-Wing; Leparc-Goffart, Isabelle; Gallian, Pierre; Rénia, Laurent; de Lamballerie, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a mosquito-borne arthralgic alphavirus that has garnered international attention as an important emerging pathogen since 2005. More recently, it invaded the Caribbean islands and the Western Hemisphere. Intriguingly, the current CHIKV outbreak in the Caribbean is caused by the Asian CHIKV genotype, which differs from the La Réunion LR2006 OPY1 isolate belonging to the Indian Ocean lineage. Here, we adopted a systematic and comparative approach against LR2006 OPY1 to characterize the pathogenicity of the Caribbean CNR20235 isolate and consequential host immune responses in mice. Ex vivo infection using primary mouse tail fibroblasts revealed a weaker replication efficiency by CNR20235 isolate. In the CHIKV mouse model, CNR20235 infection induced an enervated joint pathology characterized by moderate edema and swelling, independent of mononuclear cell infiltration. Based on systemic cytokine analysis, localized immunophenotyping, and gene expression profiles in the popliteal lymph node and inflamed joints, two pathogenic phases were defined for CHIKV infection: early acute (2 to 3 days postinfection [dpi]) and late acute (6 to 8 dpi). Reduced joint pathology during early acute phase of CNR20235 infection was associated with a weaker proinflammatory Th1 response and natural killer (NK) cell activity. The pathological role of NK cells was further demonstrated as depletion of NK cells reduced joint pathology in LR2006 OPY1. Taken together, this study provides evidence that the Caribbean CNR20235 isolate has an enfeebled replication and induces a less pathogenic response in the mammalian host. IMPORTANCE The introduction of CHIKV in the Americas has heightened the risk of large-scale outbreaks due to the close proximity between the United States and the Caribbean. The immunopathogenicity of the circulating Caribbean CHIKV isolate was explored, where it was demonstrated to exhibit reduced infectivity resulting in a weakened joint

  2. Properties of two voltage-activated potassium currents in acutely isolated juvenile rat dentate gyrus granule cells.

    PubMed

    Beck, H; Ficker, E; Heinemann, U

    1992-12-01

    1. The properties of outward currents were investigated in acutely isolated dentate gyrus granule cells at postnatal ages of day 5-7, 10-14, 18-24 (P5-7, P10-14, P18-24) and at adulthood (2-3 mo), with the use of the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. 2. Kinetic analysis and pharmacological properties showed that an A-type K+ current (IA) and a delayed rectifier current (IK) were present in these cells. 3. IA in P10-14 cells activated and inactivated rapidly with a decay time constant of 7.5 +/- 2.1 (SD) ms with command pulses to +30 mV. The removal of inactivation was monoexponential with a time constant of 23.1 ms (holding potential, -50 mV; conditioning voltage steps of varying duration to -110 mV). V 1/2 of the Boltzmann function describing steady-state inactivation was -65.1 +/- 1.8 mV with a slope factor of -6.0. IA was sensitive to 5 mM 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) but not to 10 mM tetraethylammonium (TEA). 4. IK in P10-14 cells displayed a voltage-dependent activation time constant (4.3 +/- 0.8 ms for command pulses to +30 mV and 16.2 +/- 2.4 for command pulses to -10 mV) and a double-exponential decay (time constants 194 +/- 21 and 1,625 +/- 254 ms). The rate constant of removal of inactivation was 332.1 ms. IK showed a reduction by 61.4 +/- 5.3% with 10 mM TEA and was partially blocked by 5 mM 4-AP in a subpopulation of cells. 5. Whereas IA remained stable over time, IK showed a substantial reduction of current amplitude by 67% after 30 min of cell perfusion through the patch pipette. The time course of this reduction was monoexponential with a time constant of 6.9 min and was partly due to a shift in V1/2 of the steady-state inactivation from -79.2 to -99.6 mV. 6. IA and IK remained stable with respect to kinetic properties during ontogenesis. However, the relative contribution and pharmacological properties of the investigated K+ currents varied with age. Although IA dominated in P5-7 cells, IK was prominent in most older cells. Five millimolars 4-AP reduced

  3. Hippocampal neurogenesis: Learning to remember.

    PubMed

    Lazarov, Orly; Hollands, Carolyn

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease, the most prevalent form of dementia in the elderly, is characterized by progressive memory loss and cognitive dysfunction. It has become increasingly clear that while neuronal cell loss in the entorhinal cortex and hippocampus occurs in Alzheimer's disease, it is preceded by a long period of deficits in the connectivity of the hippocampal formation that contributes to the vulnerability of these circuits. Hippocampal neurogenesis plays a role in the maintenance and function of the dentate gyrus and hippocampal circuitry. This review will examine the evidence suggesting that hippocampal neurogenesis plays a role in cognitive function that is affected in Alzheimer's disease, will discuss the cognitive assessments used for the detection of Alzheimer's disease in humans and rodent models of familial Alzheimer's disease, and their value for unraveling the mechanism underlying the development of cognitive impairments and dementia.

  4. Common hippocampal structural and functional changes in migraine

    PubMed Central

    Maleki, Nasim; Becerra, Lino; Brawn, Jennifer; McEwen, Bruce; Burstein, Rami; Borsook, David

    2013-01-01

    The hippocampus is classically involved in memory consolidation, spatial navigation and is involved in the stress response. Migraine is an episodic disorder characterized by intermittent attacks with a number of physiological and emotional stressors associated with or provoking each attack. Given that migraine attacks can be viewed as repeated stressors, alterations in hippocampal function and structure may play an important role in migraine pathophysiology. Using high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging, hippocampal morphometric and functional differences (in response to noxious heat stimulation) were compared in age and gender-matched acute episodic migraineurs with high (HF) versus low (LF) frequency of migraine attacks. Morphometric results were compared with age and gender-matched healthy control (HC) cohort. Significant larger bilateral hippocampal volume was found in LF group relative to the HF and HC groups suggestive of an initial adaptive plasticity that may then become dysfunctional with increased frequency. Functional correlates of greater deactivation (LF > HF) in the same hippocampal regions in response to noxious stimulation was also accompanied by overall reduction in functional connectivity of the hippocampus with other brain regions involved in pain processing in the HF group. The results implicate involvement of hippocampus in the pathophysiology of the migraine. PMID:22760159

  5. Adult hippocampal neurogenesis in natural populations of mammals.

    PubMed

    Amrein, Irmgard

    2015-05-01

    This review will discuss adult hippocampal neurogenesis in wild mammals of different taxa and outline similarities with and differences from laboratory animals. It begins with a review of evidence for hippocampal neurogenesis in various mammals, and shows the similar patterns of age-dependent decline in cell proliferation in wild and domesticated mammals. In contrast, the pool of immature neurons that originate from proliferative activity varies between species, implying a selective advantage for mammals that can make use of a large number of these functionally special neurons. Furthermore, rapid adaptation of hippocampal neurogenesis to experimental challenges appears to be a characteristic of laboratory rodents. Wild mammals show species-specific, rather stable hippocampal neurogenesis, which appears related to demands that characterize the niche exploited by a species rather than to acute events in the life of its members. Studies that investigate adult neurogenesis in wild mammals are not numerous, but the findings of neurogenesis under natural conditions can provide new insights, and thereby also address the question to which cognitive demands neurogenesis may respond during selection.

  6. Acute exposure to ergot alkaloids from endophyte-infected tall fescue does not alter absorptive or barrier function of the isolated bovine ruminal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Foote, A P; Penner, G B; Walpole, M E; Klotz, J L; Brown, K R; Bush, L P; Harmon, D L

    2014-07-01

    Ergot alkaloids in endophyte-infected (Neotyphodium coenophialum) tall fescue (Lolium arundinaceum) have been shown to cause a reduction in blood flow to the rumen epithelium as well as a decrease in volatile fatty acids (VFA) absorption from the washed rumen of steers. Previous data also indicates that incubating an extract of endophyte-infected tall fescue seed causes an increase in the amount of VFA absorbed per unit of blood flow, which could result from an alteration in the absorptive or barrier function of the rumen epithelium. An experiment was conducted to determine the acute effects of an endophyte-infected tall fescue seed extract (EXT) on total, passive or facilitated acetate and butyrate flux across the isolated bovine rumen as well as the barrier function measured by inulin flux and tissue conductance (G t ). Flux of ergovaline across the rumen epithelium was also evaluated. Rumen tissue from the caudal dorsal sac of Holstein steers (n=6), fed a common diet, was collected and isolated shortly after slaughter and mounted between two halves of Ussing chambers. In vitro treatments included vehicle control (80% methanol, 0.5% of total volume), Low EXT (50 ng ergovaline/ml) and High EXT (250 ng ergovaline/ml). Results indicate that there is no effect of acute exposure to ergot alkaloids on total, passive or facilitated flux of acetate or butyrate across the isolate bovine rumen epithelium (P>0.51). Inulin flux (P=0.16) and G t (P>0.17) were not affected by EXT treatment, indicating no alteration in barrier function due to acute ergot alkaloid exposure. Ergovaline was detected in the serosal buffer of the High EXT treatment indicating that the flux rate is ~0.25 to 0.44 ng/cm2 per hour. Data indicate that specific pathways for VFA absorption and barrier function of the rumen epithelium are not affected by acute exposure to ergot alkaloids from tall fescue at the concentrations tested. Ergovaline has the potential to be absorbed from the rumen of cattle that

  7. Network hyperexcitability in hippocampal slices from Mecp2 mutant mice revealed by voltage-sensitive dye imaging

    PubMed Central

    Calfa, Gaston; Hablitz, John J.

    2011-01-01

    Dysfunctions of neuronal and network excitability have emerged as common features in disorders associated with intellectual disabilities, autism, and seizure activity, all common clinical manifestations of Rett syndrome (RTT), a neurodevelopmental disorder caused by loss-of-function mutations in the transcriptional regulator methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2). Here, we evaluated the consequences of Mecp2 mutation on hippocampal network excitability, as well as synapse structure and function using a combination of imaging and electrophysiological approaches in acute slices. Imaging the amplitude and spatiotemporal spread of neuronal depolarizations with voltage-sensitive dyes (VSD) revealed that the CA1 and CA3 regions of hippocampal slices from symptomatic male Mecp2 mutant mice are highly hyperexcitable. However, only the density of docked synaptic vesicles and the rate of release from the readily releasable pool are impaired in Mecp2 mutant mice, while synapse density and morphology are unaffected. The differences in network excitability were not observed in surgically isolated CA1 minislices, and blockade of GABAergic inhibition enhanced VSD signals to the same extent in Mecp2 mutant and wild-type mice, suggesting that network excitability originates in area CA3. Indeed, extracellular multiunit recordings revealed a higher level of spontaneous firing of CA3 pyramidal neurons in slices from symptomatic Mecp2 mutant mice. The neuromodulator adenosine reduced the amplitude and spatiotemporal spread of VSD signals evoked in CA1 of Mecp2 mutant slices to wild-type levels, suggesting its potential use as an anticonvulsant in RTT individuals. The present results suggest that hyperactive CA3 pyramidal neurons contribute to hippocampal dysfunction and possibly to limbic seizures observed in Mecp2 mutant mice and RTT individuals. PMID:21307327

  8. Genotypic Characterization of Virulence Factors in Escherichia coli Isolated from Patients with Acute Cystitis, Pyelonephritis and Asymptomatic Bacteriuria

    PubMed Central

    Tabasi, Mohsen; Karam, Mohammad Reza Asadi; Habibi, Mehri; Mostafavi, Ehsan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs) caused by Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) are among the most common infections worldwide. It is well-documented that the pathogenesis of UPEC is mediated by the production of a wide variety of Virulence Factors (VFs). Thus, detection of these VFs and evaluation of their association with different clinical types of UTIs could help to understand the role of these factors in pathogenesis of UPEC isolates. Aim To investigate the genotypic characteristics of UPEC isolates and to examine the relationship between VFs and different clinical symptoms of UTI. Materials and Methods In this cross-sectional study conducted at Pasteur Institute of Iran, a total of 156 UPEC isolated from outpatients and inpatients (symptomatic and asymptomatic UTI patients) visiting general and private hospitals in Tehran, Iran between March 2014 and February 2015 were included. Among them, 49 patients experienced at least one episode of recurrent UTI. A Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) assay was developed to detect the presence of different VFs in the isolates. Moreover, Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE) was used to characterize clonal relationships among UPEC isolates. Results The prevalence of virulence genes ranged from 0% for cdtB to 100% for fimH. The papEF, hlyA and aer genes were found to be significantly more frequent in UPEC isolated from patients with pyelonephritis, while the afa gene, the only indicator of recurrent UTIs, was more prevalent in UPEC isolated from patients with cystitis. In the present study, 34 PFGE clonal groups were found in the UPEC genome. Conclusion Our findings showed that from outpatients and patients with pyelonephritis, isolates were more virulent than those isolated from inpatients and cystitis patients, respectively. PFGE displayed a large diversity in the UPEC isolates that could be considered as an evolutionary strategy in the survival of the bacteria. PMID:28208853

  9. Triheteromeric NMDA Receptors at Hippocampal Synapses

    PubMed Central

    Tovar, Kenneth R.; McGinley, Matthew J.; Westbrook, Gary L.

    2013-01-01

    NMDA receptors are composed of two GluN1 (N1) and two GluN2 (N2) subunits. Constituent N2 subunits control the pharmacological and kinetic characteristics of the receptor. NMDA receptors in hippocampal or cortical neurons are often thought of as diheteromeric, i.e., containing only one type of N2 subunit. However, triheteromeric receptors with more than one type of N2 subunit also have been reported and the relative contribution of di- and triheteromeric NMDA receptors at synapses has been difficult to assess. Because wild-type hippocampal principal neurons express N1, N2A and N2B, we used cultured hippocampal principal neurons from N2A and N2B-knockout mice as templates for diheteromeric synaptic receptors. Summation of N1/N2B and N1/N2A excitatory postsynaptic currents could not account for the deactivation kinetics of wild-type excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) however. To make a quantitative estimate of NMDA receptor subtypes at wild-type synapses, we used the deactivation kinetics, as well as the effects of the competitive antagonist NVP-AAM077. Our results indicate that three types of NMDA receptors contribute to the wild-type EPSC, with at least two-thirds being triheteromeric receptors. Functional isolation of synaptic triheteromeric receptors revealed deactivation kinetics and pharmacology distinct from either diheteromeric receptor subtype. Because of differences in open probability, synaptic triheteromeric receptors outnumbered N1/N2A receptors by 5.8 to 1 and N1/N2B receptors by 3.2 to 1. Our results suggest that triheteromeric NMDA receptors must be either preferentially assembled or preferentially localized at synapses. PMID:23699525

  10. ACUTE INDUCTION OF EPILEPTIFORM DISCHARGES BY PILOCARPINE IN THE IN VITRO ISOLATED GUINEA-PIG BRAIN REQUIRES ENHANCEMENT OF BLOOD–BRAIN BARRIER PERMEABILITY

    PubMed Central

    UVA, L.; LIBRIZZI, L.; MARCHI, N.; NOE, F.; BONGIOVANNI, R.; VEZZANI, A.; JANIGRO, D.; DE CURTIS, M.

    2008-01-01

    Systemic application of the muscarinic agonist, pilocarpine, is commonly utilized to induce an acute status epilepticus that evolves into a chronic epileptic condition characterized by spontaneous seizures. Recent findings suggest that the status epilepticus induced by pilocarpine may be triggered by changes in the blood–brain barrier (BBB) permeability. We tested the role of the BBB in an acute pilocarpine model by using the in vitro model brain preparation and compared our finding with in vivo data. Arterial perfusion of the in vitro isolated guinea-pig brain with <1 mM pilocarpine did not cause epileptiform activity, but rather reduced synaptic transmission and induced steady fast (20–25 Hz) oscillatory activity in limbic cortices. These effects were reversibly blocked by co-perfusion of the muscarinic antagonist atropine sulfate (5 μM). Brain pilocarpine measurements in vivo and in vitro suggested modest BBB penetration. Pilocarpine induced epileptiform discharges only when perfused with compounds that enhance BBB permeability, such as bradykinin (n=2) or histamine (n=10). This pro-epileptic effect was abolished when the BBB-impermeable muscarinic antagonist atropine methyl bromide (5 μM) was co-perfused with histamine and pilocarpine. In the absence of BBB permeability enhancing drugs, pilocarpine induced epileptiform activity only after arterial perfusion at concentrations >10 mM. Ictal discharges correlated with a high intracerebral pilocarpine concentration measured by high pressure liquid chromatography. We propose that acute epileptiform discharges induced by pilocarpine treatment in the in vitro isolated brain preparation are mediated by a dose-dependent, atropine-sensitive muscarinic effect promoted by an increase in BBB permeability. Pilocarpine accumulation secondary to BBB permeability changes may contribute to in vivo ictogenesis in the pilocarpine epilepsy model. PMID:18082973

  11. Sensitivities of major causative organisms isolated from patients with acute uncomplicated cystitis against various antibacterial agents: results of subanalysis based on the presence of menopause.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Tetsuro; Hamasuna, Ryoichi; Ishikawa, Kiyohito; Takahashi, Satoshi; Yasuda, Mitsuru; Hayami, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Kazushi; Muratani, Tetsuro; Monden, Koichi; Arakawa, Soichi; Yamamoto, Shingo

    2012-08-01

    We investigated whether the presence of menopause influenced the species and distribution of causative bacteria isolated from patients with acute uncomplicated cystitis (the most common urinary tract infection), and we also investigated the sensitivity of the isolated species to antibacterial agents. Using multivariate analysis, we also investigated risk factors for infection with quinolone-resistant Escherichia coli, because its frequency has increased and it is now a clinical problem in Japan. Six hundred and thirty-four strains were isolated from 489 premenopausal patients (mean age 32.3 ± 10.1 years). Major causative bacteria detected were Escherichia coli (65.0 %), Enterococcus faecalis (12.0 %), Streptococcus agalactiae (5.5 %), and Klebsiella pneumoniae (1.6 %). From 501 postmenopausal patients (mean age 68.7 ± 10.29 years), 657 strains were isolated, and the major causative bacteria detected were E. coli (61.5 %), E. faecalis (13.7 %), K. pneumoniae (5.2 %), and S. agalactiae (4.0 %). The sensitivities to fluoroquinolones (FQs) and cephems of E. coli isolated from premenopausal patients were both ≥90 %, while the sensitivities to FQs of E. coli isolated from postmenopausal patients were about 5 % lower. In regard to infection with quinolone-resistant E. coli (minimal inhibitory concentration of levofloxacin [LVFX] ≥4 μg/mL), significant risk factors were observed in patients with more than two episodes of cystitis within a year (p = 0.0002), patients to whom antibacterial agents were used previously for this episode of cystitis (p = 0.0175), and patients who had a history of FQ administration within 1 month. Although the species and distribution of causative bacteria of acute uncomplicated cystitis were the same regardless of the presence of menopause, the sensitivities to FQs of E. coli detected in postmenopausal patients were significantly lower than those in the premenopausal women. The major risk factors for infection with quinolone-resistant E

  12. Presynaptic Modulation of the Hippocampal Mossy Fiber Synapse.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-09-14

    decreased by more than 50%. This criterion has been shown to be satisfied by a variety of different K: opioid receptor agonists (Gannon and Terrian...release of both glutamate and dynorphin from isolated hippocampal mossy fiber terminals. Opioid agonists specific for the p, 6 and K opioid receptor...mossy fiber synaptosomes. The K opioid agonists U-62,066E and (-)ethylketocyclazocine, but not the p agonist [D-Ala2,N-Me- Phe4,GlyS-ol]-enkephalin

  13. New cellular markers at diagnosis are associated with isolated central nervous system relapse in paediatric B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    van der Velden, Vincent H J; de Launaij, Daphne; de Vries, Jeltje F; de Haas, Valerie; Sonneveld, Edwin; Voerman, Jane S A; de Bie, Maaike; Revesz, Tamas; Avigad, Smadar; Yeoh, Allen E J; Swagemakers, Sigrid M A; Eckert, Cornelia; Pieters, Rob; van Dongen, Jacques J M

    2016-03-01

    In childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL), central nervous system (CNS) involvement is rare at diagnosis (1-4%), but more frequent at relapse (~30%). Because of the significant late sequelae of CNS treatment, early identification of patients at risk of CNS relapse is crucial. Using microarray-analysis, we discovered multiple differentially expressed genes between B-cell precursor (BCP) ALL cells in bone marrow (BM) and BCP-ALL cells in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) at the time of isolated CNS relapse. After confirmation by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction, selected genes (including SCD and SPP1) were validated at the protein level by flowcytometric analysis of BCP-ALL cells in CSF. Further flowcytometric validation showed that a subpopulation of BCP-ALL cells (>1%) with a 'CNS protein profile' (SCD positivity and increased SPP1 expression) was present in the BM at diagnosis in patients who later developed an isolated CNS relapse, whereas this subpopulation was <1% or absent in all other patients. These data indicate that the presence of a (small) subpopulation of BCP-ALL cells with a 'CNS protein profile' at diagnosis (particularly SCD-positivity) is associated with isolated CNS relapse. Such information can be used to design new diagnostic and treatment strategies that aim at prevention of CNS relapse with reduced toxicity.

  14. Socially isolated mice exhibit a blunted homeostatic sleep response to acute sleep deprivation compared to socially paired mice.

    PubMed

    Kaushal, Navita; Nair, Deepti; Gozal, David; Ramesh, Vijay

    2012-05-15

    Sleep is an important physiological process underlying maintenance of physical, mental and emotional health. Consequently, sleep deprivation (SD) is associated with adverse consequences and increases the risk for anxiety, immune, and cognitive disorders. SD is characterized by increased energy expenditure responses and sleep rebound upon recovery that are regulated by homeostatic processes, which in turn are influenced by stress. Since all previous studies on SD were conducted in a setting of social isolation, the impact of the social contextual setting is unknown. Therefore, we used a relatively stress-free SD paradigm in mice to assess the impact of social isolation on sleep, wakefulness and delta electroencephalogram (EEG) power during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. Paired or isolated C57BL/6J adult chronically-implanted male mice were exposed to SD for 6h and telemetric polygraphic recordings were conducted, including 18 h recovery. Recovery from SD in the paired group showed a significant decrease in wake and significant increase in NREM sleep and rapid eye movement (REM), and a similar, albeit less robust response occurred in the isolated mice. Delta power during NREM sleep was increased in both groups immediately following SD, but paired mice exhibited significantly higher delta power throughout the dark period. The increase in body temperature and gross motor activity observed during the SD procedure was decreased during the dark period. In both open field and elevated plus maze tests, socially isolated mice showed significantly higher anxiety than paired mice. The homeostatic processes altered by SD are differentially affected in paired and isolated mice, suggesting that the social context of isolation stress may adversely affect the quantity and quality of sleep in mice.

  15. Effectiveness of Personal Protective Equipment and Isolation Precautions in Protecting Healthcare Workers from Acquiring Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    SARS outbreak revealed that inapparent infection with SARS was uncommon. 34-37 6 In response to this new disease, SARS infection control guidelines were... pneumonia , 12 March 2003. Available at: http://www.who.int/mediacentre/ news /releases/2003/pr22/en/. Accessed June 15, 2005. 3. World Health Organization...is another area deserving of attention. 2 INTRODUCTION The severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) emerged as a new syndrome due to a novel human

  16. Effects of voluntary running on plasma levels of neurotrophins, hippocampal cell proliferation and learning and memory in stressed rats.

    PubMed

    Yau, S-Y; Lau, B W-M; Zhang, E-D; Lee, J C-D; Li, A; Lee, T M C; Ching, Y-P; Xu, A-M; So, K-F

    2012-10-11

    Previous studies have shown that a 2-week treatment with 40 mg/kg corticosterone (CORT) in rats suppresses hippocampal neurogenesis and decreases hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels and impairs spatial learning, all of which could be counteracted by voluntary wheel running. BDNF and insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1) have been suggested to mediate physical exercise-enhanced hippocampal neurogenesis and cognition. Here we examined whether such running-elicited benefits were accompanied by corresponding changes of peripheral BDNF and IGF-1 levels in a rat model of stress. We examined the effects of acute (5 days) and chronic (4 weeks) treatment with CORT and/or wheel running on (1) hippocampal cell proliferation, (2) spatial learning and memory and (3) plasma levels of BDNF and IGF-1. Acute CORT treatment improved spatial learning without altered cell proliferation compared to vehicle treatment. Acute CORT-treated non-runners showed an increased trend in plasma BDNF levels together with a significant increase in hippocampal BDNF levels. Acute running showed no effect on cognition, cell proliferation and peripheral BDNF and IGF-1 levels. Conversely, chronic CORT treatment in non-runners significantly impaired spatial learning and suppressed cell proliferation in association with a decreased trend in plasma BDNF level and a significant increase in hippocampal BDNF levels. Running counteracted cognitive deficit and restored hippocampal cell proliferation following chronic CORT treatment; but without corresponding changes in plasma BDNF and IGF-1 levels. The results suggest that the beneficial effects of acute stress on cognitive improvement may be mediated by BDNF-enhanced synaptic plasticity that is hippocampal cell proliferation-independent, whereas chronic stress may impair cognition by decreasing hippocampal cell proliferation and BDNF levels. Furthermore, the results indicate a trend in changes of plasma BDNF levels associated with a

  17. Short food deprivation inhibits orexin receptor 1 expression and orexin-A induced intracellular calcium signaling in acutely isolated duodenal enterocytes.

    PubMed

    Bengtsson, Magnus W; Mäkelä, Kari; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Flemström, Gunnar

    2009-03-01

    Close intra-arterial infusion of the appetite regulating peptide orexin-A stimulates bicarbonate secretion from the duodenal mucosa. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the ability of orexin-A to induce intracellular calcium signaling in acutely isolated duodenal enterocytes. Freshly isolated clusters of enterocytes, obtained from rat duodenal mucosa or human duodenal biopsies, were loaded with fura 2-AM and mounted in a perfusion chamber. Cryptlike enterocytes were selected (caged), and changes in intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) were evaluated by fluorescence imaging. Total RNA was extracted from pellets of enterocytes and reverse transcribed to cDNA, and expression of orexin receptors 1 and 2 (OX1R and OX2R) was measured by quantitative real-time PCR. Orexin-A at all concentrations tested (1-100 nM) increased [Ca2+]i in enterocytes isolated from continuously fed rats, and the OX1R-antagonist SB-334867 (10 nM) attenuated the response. The primary [Ca2+]i response was a slow increase to a sustained plateau persisting after orexin-A removal, and a similar response was observed in enterocytes from human biopsies. In contrast to orexin-A, the OX2R agonist (Ala11,D-Leu15)-orexin-B (1-10 nM) did not induce calcium signaling. There were no significant [Ca2+]i responses in enterocytes from animals food deprived overnight, and overnight fasting decreased (P<0.01) enterocyte OX1R as well as OX2R mRNA. Induction of intracellular calcium signaling in isolated duodenal enterocytes is thus mediated primarily by OX1R receptors. Short (overnight) food deprivation markedly depresses receptor expression and inhibits orexin-A induced increases in [Ca2+]i. Studies of enterocyte signaling and intestinal secretion requires particular evaluation regarding feeding status.

  18. Remembering preservation in hippocampal amnesia

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Ian A.; Maguire, Eleanor A.

    2017-01-01

    The lesion-deficit model dominates neuropsychology. This is unsurprising given powerful demonstrations that focal brain lesions can affect specific aspects of cognition. Nowhere is this more evident than in patients with bilateral hippocampal damage. In the last sixty years the amnesia and other impairments exhibited by these patients have helped to delineate the functions of the hippocampus and shape the field of memory. We do not question the value of this approach. However, less prominent are the cognitive processes that remain intact following hippocampal lesions. Here, we collate the piecemeal reports of preservation of function following focal bilateral hippocampal damage, highlighting a wealth of information often veiled by the field’s focus on deficits. We consider how a systematic understanding of what is preserved as well as what is lost could add an important layer of precision to models of memory and the hippocampus. PMID:26361051

  19. Changes in cell death of peripheral blood lymphocytes isolated from children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia upon stimulation with 7 Hz, 30 mT pulsed electromagnetic field.

    PubMed

    Kaszuba-Zwoińska, Jolanta; Ćwiklińska, Magdalena; Balwierz, Walentyna; Chorobik, Paulina; Nowak, Bernadeta; Wójcik-Piotrowicz, Karolina; Ziomber, Agata; Malina-Novak, Kinga; Zaraska, Wiesław; Thor, Piotr J

    2015-03-01

    Pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) influenced the viability of proliferating in vitro peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) isolated from Crohn's disease patients as well as acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML) patients by induction of cell death, but did not cause any vital changes in cells from healthy donors. Experiments with lymphoid U937 and monocytic MonoMac6 cell lines have shown a protective effect of PEMF on the death process in cells treated with death inducers. The aim of the current study was to investigate the influence of PEMF on native proliferating leukocytes originating from newly diagnosed acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients. The effects of exposure to PEMF were studied in PBMCs from 20 children with ALL. PBMCs were stimulated with three doses of PEMF (7 Hz, 30 mT) for 4 h each with 24 h intervals. After the last stimulation, the cells were double stained with annexin V and propidium iodide dye to estimate viability by flow cytometric analysis. The results indicated an increase of annexin V positive as well as double stained annexin V and propidium iodide positive cells after exposure to threefold PEMF stimulation. A low-frequency pulsed electromagnetic field induces cell death in native proliferating cells isolated from ALL patients. The increased vulnerability of proliferating PBMCs to PEMF-induced interactions may be potentially applied in the therapy of ALL. The analysis of expression of apoptosis-related genes revealed changes in mRNA of some genes engaged in the intrinsic apoptotic pathway belonging to the Bcl-2 family and the pathway with apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) abundance upon PEMF stimulation of PBMCs.

  20. Detrimental effects of postnatal exposure to propofol on memory and hippocampal LTP in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuan-Lin; Chen, Xin; Wang, Zhi-Ping

    2015-10-05

    Acute effects of propofol on memory and hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) in adult animals were reported. However, long-term effect of early postnatal application of propofol on memory was not totally disclosed. In this study, experiments were designed to verify the mechanisms underlying the long-term detrimental effects of propofol on memory and hippocampal synaptic plasticity. A consecutive propofol protocol from postnatal day 7 was applied to model anesthesia, long term memory and hippocampal synaptic plasticity were detected 2 months later. Our results showed that repeated propofol exposure in early phase affect the memory in the adult phase. Through recording the field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs) at Schaffer colletaral-CA1 synapses, both of basal synaptic transmission and hippocampal LTP were decreased after propofol application. While LTD induced by low frequency stimulation and 3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (3,5-DHPG) were not affected. Through analyzing the ultrastructure of dendrite in CA1 region, we found that propofol application decreased the spine density, which was consistent with the decrease of PSD-95 expression. In addition, p-AKT level was reduced after first propofol application. Intracerebroventricular injection of Akt inhibitor could mimic the propofol effects on basal synaptic transmission, hippocampal LTP and memory. Taken together, these results suggested that propofol possibly decreased AKT signaling pathway to restrict the spine development, finally leading to hippocampal LTP impairment and memory deficit.

  1. Risk factors for antimicrobial resistance among the Escherichia coli strains isolated from Korean patients with acute uncomplicated cystitis: a prospective and nationwide study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gilho; Cho, Yong-Hyun; Shim, Bong Suk; Lee, Sang Don

    2010-08-01

    We investigated the risk factors for resistance to ciprofloxacin, cefazolin, ampicillin and co-trimoxazole in Escherichia coli isolates from urine of Korean female patients with acute uncomplicated cystitis (AUC). A total of 225 patients and their E. coli isolates were prospectively and nationwidely enrolled between May and October, 2006. All the antimicrobials did not show any differences according to the age group. A higher rate of ciprofloxacin resistance was observed in the south (OR: 3.04, 95% CI: 1.19-7.80 for Chungcheong-do & Jeolla-do; OR: 3.04, 95% CI: 1.22-7.58 for Gyeongsang-do) compared to Gyeonggi-do. Two recurrences of AUC in the past year was an important risk factor for antimicrobial resistance (ciprofloxacin; OR: 6.71, 95% CI: 1.86-24.11 and cefazolin; OR: 5.72, 95% CI: 1.20-27.25). However, the resistance to co-trimoxazole and ampicillin was not associated with any of the risk factors. This study also revealed the pattern of multi-drugs resistance in ciprofloxacin resistant E. coli strains. In conclusion, for Korean patients with two more recurrences of AUC in the past year, it is strongly recommended to perform an antimicrobial sensitivity test with a urine sample before empirical treatment.

  2. Isolation and analysis of the 21q+ chromosome in the acute myelogenous leukemia 8; 21 translocation: evidence that c-mos is not translocated

    SciTech Connect

    Drabkin, H.A.; Diaz, M.; Bradley, C.M.; Le Beau, M.M.; Rowley, J.D.; Patterson, D.

    1985-01-01

    Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), subgroup M2, is associated with a nonrandom chromosomal translocation, t(8;21)(q22,q22). The oncogene c-mos also has been localized to the q22 band on chromosome 8. There is also evidence that genes on chromosome 21 may be important in the development of leukemia. To determine whether the c-mos oncogene has been translocated in AML-M2 with this translocation and to isolate DNA sequences and genes from these two chromosomes that may be important in malignancy, the authors constructed somatic cell hybrids between a Chinese hamster ovary cell (CHO) mutant defective in glycine metabolism and myeloblasts with an 8;21 translocation from a patient with AML. The authors isolated the 21q+ chromosome of this translocation in a somatic cell hybrid and showed that the c-mos oncogene had not been translocated to chromosome 21, ruling out the possibility that translocation of c-mos to chromosome 21 is necessary for development of AML-M2. In addition, there was no detectable rearrangement of the c-mos locus within a 12.4-kilobase region surrounding the gene, indicating that rearrangement of the coding region of the gene itself or alteration of proximal 5' or 3' flanking sequences is not involved. The authors used this hybrid to determine whether specific DNA sequences and biochemical markers from chromosomes 8 and 21 had been translocated in this case.

  3. Genetic diversity of Vibrio parahaemolyticus strains isolated from farmed Pacific white shrimp and ambient pond water affected by acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease outbreak in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Chonsin, Kaknokrat; Matsuda, Shigeaki; Theethakaew, Chonchanok; Kodama, Toshio; Junjhon, Jiraphan; Suzuki, Yasuhiko; Suthienkul, Orasa; Iida, Tetsuya

    2016-01-01

    Acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease (AHPND) is an emerging shrimp disease that causes massive die-offs in farmed shrimps. Recent outbreaks of AHPND in Asia have been causing great losses for shrimp culture and have become a serious socioeconomic problem. The causative agent of AHPND is Vibrio parahaemolyticus, which is typically known to cause food-borne gastroenteritis in humans. However, there have been few reports of the epidemiology of V. parahaemolyticus AHPND strains, and the genetic relationship among AHPND strains is unclear. Here, we report the genetic characterization of V. parahaemolyticus strains isolated from AHPND outbreaks in Thailand. We found eight isolates from AHPND-suspected shrimps and pond water that were positive for AHPND markers AP1 and AP2. PCR analysis confirmed that none of these eight AP-positive AHPND strains possesses the genes for the conventional virulence factors affecting to humans, such as thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH), TDH-related hemolysin (TRH) and type III secretion system 2. Phylogenetic analysis by multilocus sequence typing showed that the AHPND strains are genetically diverse, suggesting that AHPND strains were not derived from a single genetic lineage. Our study represents the first report of molecular epidemiology of AHPND-causing V. parahaemolyticus strains using multilocus sequence typing, and provides an insight into their evolutionary mechanisms.

  4. Isolation and analysis of the 21q+ chromosome in the acute myelogenous leukemia 8;21 translocation: evidence that c-mos is not translocated.

    PubMed

    Drabkin, H A; Diaz, M; Bradley, C M; Le Beau, M M; Rowley, J D; Patterson, D

    1985-01-01

    Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), subgroup M2, is associated with a nonrandom chromosomal translocation, t(8;21)(q22,q22). The oncogene c-mos also has been localized to the q22 band on chromosome 8. There is also evidence that genes on chromosome 21 may be important in the development of leukemia. To determine whether the c-mos oncogene has been translocated in AML-M2 with this translocation and to isolate DNA sequences and genes from these two chromosomes that may be important in malignancy, we constructed somatic cell hybrids between a Chinese hamster ovary cell (CHO) mutant defective in glycine metabolism and myeloblasts with an 8;21 translocation from a patient with AML. We isolated the 21q+ chromosome of this translocation in a somatic cell hybrid and showed that the c-mos oncogene had not been translocated to chromosome 21, ruling out the possibility that translocation of c-mos to chromosome 21 is necessary for development of AML-M2. In addition, there was no detectable rearrangement of the c-mos locus within a 12.4-kilobase region surrounding the gene, indicating that rearrangement of the coding region of the gene itself or alteration of proximal 5' or 3' flanking sequences is not involved. We used this hybrid to determine whether specific DNA sequences and biochemical markers from chromosomes 8 and 21 had been translocated in this case.

  5. The impact of chronic stress burden of 520-d isolation and confinement on the physiological response to subsequent acute stress challenge.

    PubMed

    Yi, Buqing; Matzel, Sandra; Feuerecker, Matthias; Hörl, Marion; Ladinig, Camilla; Abeln, Vera; Choukèr, Alexander; Schneider, Stefan

    2015-03-15

    Collective evidence indicates that previous exposure to stressful condition might be able to induce changes in brain structure, HPA axis activity and related neurotransmission, and accordingly affect physiological responses to subsequent challenges. During long-term spaceflight, space travelers have to live under the condition of isolation and confinement in the spacecraft for a long period. It is still largely unknown if this kind of chronic stress burden can induce any long-lasting changes. To address this question, following 520-d isolation and confinement simulating a flight to Mars, the participants and a matched control group were exposed to an acute stress challenge called parabolic flight. Brain cortical activity, HPA axis activity, and sympathetic adrenal-medullary system response were monitored by EEG signal, cortisol secretion, and catecholamine production, respectively. We observed enhanced EEG signals, elevated cortisol levels and increased adrenaline productions. A group effect on cortisol output was revealed showing higher cortisol peak levels in the Mars520 group as compared to the control group, suggesting that HPA axis was to a certain extent more activated in the subjects who had chronic stress experience.

  6. Serotype distribution of pneumococci isolated from pediatric patients with acute otitis media and invasive infections, and potential coverage of pneumococcal conjugated vaccines.

    PubMed

    Reijtman, Vanesa; Fossati, Sofía; Hernández, Claudia; Sommerfleck, Patricia; Bernáldez, Patricia; Litterio, Mirta; Berberian, Griselda; Regueira, Mabel; Lopardo, Horacio

    2013-01-01

    A 16-month prospective, descriptive study was conducted on pneumococcal serotype distribution isolated from children with acute otitis media (AOM) and invasive infections (INV). Eighty-nine children with pneumococcal INV and 324 with a first episode of AOM were included. Bacterial pathogens (N = 326) were isolated from the middle-ear fluid of 250 patients. A total of 30 pneumococcal serotypes were identified. Prevalent serotypes were 14, 19A, 9V, 3, 19F, 6A, 23F, and 18C in AOM and 14, 1, 19A, 5, 12F, 6B, and 18C in INV. Potential coverage with PCV10 vaccine would be 46.5 % and 60.7 % for pneumococci involved in AOM and INV, respectively; it would be 71.7 % and 73 % with PCV13. PCV10, conjugated with a Haemophilus protein, would have an immunologic coverage of 39.9 % for AOM vs. 18.5 % with PCV13. However, differences in the prevention of INV were crucial for the decision to include the 13-valent vaccine in the national calendar for children less than two years old in Argentina.

  7. Genetic and Behavioral Determinants of Hippocampal Volume Recovery During Abstinence from Alcohol

    PubMed Central

    Hoefer, Michael E.; Pennington, David L.; Durazzo, Timothy C.; Mon, Anderson; Abé, Christoph; Truran, Diana; Hutchison, Kent E.; Meyerhoff, Dieter J.

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol-dependent individuals (ALC) have smaller hippocampi and poorer neurocognition than healthy controls. Results from studies on the association between alcohol consumption and hippocampal volume have been mixed, suggesting that comorbid or premorbid factors (i.e., those present prior to the initiation of alcohol dependence) determine hippocampal volume in ALC. We aimed to characterize the effects of select comorbid (i.e., cigarette smoking) and premorbid factors (brain-derived neurotrophic factor [BDNF] genotype [Val66Met rs6265]) on hippocampal volume in an ALC cohort followed longitudinally into extended abstinence. One hundred twenty-one adult ALC in treatment (76 smokers, 45 non-smokers) and 35 non-smoking light-drinking controls underwent quantitative magnetic resonance imaging, BDNF genotyping, and neurocognitive assessments. Representative subgroups were studied at 1 week, 1 month, and at an average of 7 months of abstinence. ALC had smaller hippocampi than healthy controls at all time points. Hippocampal volume at 1 month of abstinence correlated with lower visuospatial function. Smoking status did not influence hippocampal volume or hippocampal volume recovery during abstinence. However, only BDNF Val homozygotes tended to have hippocampal volume increases over 7 months of abstinence, and Val homozygotes had significantly larger hippocampi than Met carriers at 7 months of abstinence. These findings suggest that BDNF genotype, but not smoking status or measures of drinking severity, regulate functionally relevant hippocampal volume recovery in abstinent ALC. Future studies aimed at exploring genetic determinants of brain morphometry in ALC may need to evaluate individuals during extended abstinence after the acute environmental effects of chronic alcohol consumption have waned. PMID:25262572

  8. Updating stored memory requires adult hippocampal neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Suárez-Pereira, Irene; Carrión, Ángel M

    2015-01-01

    Adult hippocampal neurogenesis appears to influence hippocampal functions, such as memory formation for example. While adult hippocampal neurogenesis is known to be involved in hippocampal-dependent learning and consolidation processes, the role of such immature neurons in memory reconsolidation, a process involved in the modification of stored memories, remains unclear. Here, using a novel fast X-ray ablation protocol to deplete neurogenic cells, we have found that adult hippocampal neurogenesis is required to update object recognition stored memory more than to reinforce it. Indeed, we show that immature neurons were selectively recruited to hippocampal circuits during the updating of stored information. Thus, our data demonstrate a new role for neurogenesis in cognitive processes, adult hippocampal neurogenesis being required for the updating of stored OR memories. These findings suggest that manipulating adult neurogenesis may have a therapeutic application in conditions associated with traumatic stored memory, for example. PMID:26358557

  9. Updating stored memory requires adult hippocampal neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Suárez-Pereira, Irene; Carrión, Ángel M

    2015-09-11

    Adult hippocampal neurogenesis appears to influence hippocampal functions, such as memory formation for example. While adult hippocampal neurogenesis is known to be involved in hippocampal-dependent learning and consolidation processes, the role of such immature neurons in memory reconsolidation, a process involved in the modification of stored memories, remains unclear. Here, using a novel fast X-ray ablation protocol to deplete neurogenic cells, we have found that adult hippocampal neurogenesis is required to update object recognition stored memory more than to reinforce it. Indeed, we show that immature neurons were selectively recruited to hippocampal circuits during the updating of stored information. Thus, our data demonstrate a new role for neurogenesis in cognitive processes, adult hippocampal neurogenesis being required for the updating of stored OR memories. These findings suggest that manipulating adult neurogenesis may have a therapeutic application in conditions associated with traumatic stored memory, for example.

  10. Single-agent lenalidomide induces complete remission of acute myeloid leukemia in patients with isolated trisomy 13

    PubMed Central

    Fehniger, Todd A.; Byrd, John C.; Marcucci, Guido; Abboud, Camille N.; Kefauver, Cheryl; Payton, Jacqueline E.; Vij, Ravi

    2009-01-01

    Patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) frequently fail chemotherapy due to refractory disease, relapse, or toxicity. Among older AML patients (age > 60 years), there are few long-term survivors. Lenalidomide is a candidate for study in AML based on its clinical activity in a related disorder, myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), with the 5q− chromosomal abnormality. We report induction of sustained morphologic and cytogenetic complete remission in 2 older AML patients treated with high-dose, single-agent lenalidomide; each patient had trisomy 13 as the sole cytogenetic abnormality. We show for the first time that lenalidomide has clinical activity in this poor-risk cytogenetic subset of AML. The clinical trials described in this paper have been registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov under identifiers NCT00466895 and NCT00546897. PMID:18824593

  11. Common acute lymphoblastic leukemia antigen: partial characterization by in vivo labeling and isolation of its messenger RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Heinsohn, S.; Kabisch, H.

    1987-01-01

    Common acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) antigen (CALLA)-like proteins were detected by in vivo labeling experiments carried out with human lymphoblastoid cell line KM3 and also in cell-free translation, directed by CALLA-specific mRNA prepared from immunoadsorbed KM3 polysomes. The CALLA-like structure found in both systems shows an Mr of 95kDa. Additional CALLA-like proteins could be identified in the in vivo experiments with calculated Mrs of 40kDa in the cells and 85 and 38kDa in the culture medium. In the cell-free translation system, an additional product of Mr 80kDa could be detected.

  12. Enduring and sex-specific effects of adolescent social isolation in rats on adult stress reactivity.

    PubMed

    Weintraub, Ari; Singaravelu, Janani; Bhatnagar, Seema

    2010-07-09

    In adolescence, gender differences in rates of affective disorders emerge. For both adolescent boys and girls, peer relationships are the primary source of life stressors though adolescent girls are more sensitive to such stressors. Social stressors are also powerful stressors for non-human social species like rodents. In a rat model, we examined how social isolation during adolescence impacts stress reactivity and specific neural substrates in adult male and female rats. Rats were isolated during adolescence by single housing from day 30 to 50 of age and control rats were group housed. On day 50, isolated rats and control rats were re-housed in same-treatment same-sex groups. Adult female rats isolated as adolescents exhibited increased adrenal responses to acute and to repeated stress and exhibited increased hypothalamic vasopressin mRNA and BDNF mRNA in the CA3 hippocampal subfield. In contrast, adult male rats isolated as adolescents exhibited a lower corticosterone response to acute stress, exhibited a reduced state of anxiety as assessed in the elevated plus maze and reduced Orexin mRNA compared to adult males group-housed as adolescents. These data point to a markedly different impact of isolation experienced in adolescence on endocrine and behavioral endpoints in males compared to females and identify specific neural substrates that may mediate the long-lasting effects of stress in adolescence.

  13. Chronic CXCL10 Alters Neuronal Properties in Rat Hippocampal Culture

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jungsook; Nelson, Thomas E.; Bajova, Hilda; Gruol, Donna L.

    2009-01-01

    The chemokine CXCL10 is expressed in the central nervous system (CNS) during neuroinflammatory conditions. Neurons express CXCR3, the receptor for CXCL10, and neuronal function has been shown to be altered by acute exposure to CXCL10. Little is known about the effects of chronic exposure to CXCL10 on neuronal function. Results from our studies show that chronic exposure of cultured rat hippocampal neurons to CXCL10 results in altered levels of protein for GABA and glutamate receptors and altered synaptic network activity. These effects of CXCL10 may contribute to altered CNS function that occurs in some chronic neuroinflammatory conditions. PMID:19167097

  14. Decoding hippocampal signaling deficits after traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Atkins, Coleen M

    2011-12-01

    There are more than 3.17 million people coping with long-term disabilities due to traumatic brain injury (TBI) in the United States. The majority of TBI research is focused on developing acute neuroprotective treatments to prevent or minimize these long-term disabilities. Therefore, chronic TBI survivors represent a large, underserved population that could significantly benefit from a therapy that capitalizes on the endogenous recovery mechanisms occurring during the weeks to months following brain trauma. Previous studies have found that the hippocampus is highly vulnerable to brain injury, in both experimental models of TBI and during human TBI. Although often not directly mechanically injured by the head injury, in the weeks to months following TBI, the hippocampus undergoes atrophy and exhibits deficits in long-term potentiation (LTP), a persistent increase in synaptic strength that is considered to be a model of learning and memory. Decoding the chronic hippocampal LTP and cell signaling deficits after brain trauma will provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms of hippocampal-dependent learning impairments caused by TBI and facilitate the development of effective therapeutic strategies to improve hippocampal-dependent learning for chronic survivors of TBI.

  15. Leptin Counteracts the Hypoxia-Induced Inhibition of Spontaneously Firing Hippocampal Neurons: A Microelectrode Array Study

    PubMed Central

    Gavello, Daniela; Rojo-Ruiz, Jonathan; Marcantoni, Andrea; Franchino, Claudio; Carbone, Emilio; Carabelli, Valentina

    2012-01-01

    Besides regulating energy balance and reducing body-weight, the adipokine leptin has been recently shown to be neuroprotective and antiapoptotic by promoting neuronal survival after excitotoxic and oxidative insults. Here, we investigated the firing properties of mouse hippocampal neurons and the effects of leptin pretreatment on hypoxic damage (2 hours, 3% O2). Experiments were carried out by means of the microelectrode array (MEA) technology, monitoring hippocampal neurons activity from 11 to 18 days in vitro (DIV). Under normoxic conditions, hippocampal neurons were spontaneously firing, either with prevailing isolated and randomly distributed spikes (11 DIV), or with patterns characterized by synchronized bursts (18 DIV). Exposure to hypoxia severely impaired the spontaneous activity of hippocampal neurons, reducing their firing frequency by 54% and 69%, at 11 and 18 DIV respectively, and synchronized their firing activity. Pretreatment with 50 nM leptin reduced the firing frequency of normoxic neurons and contrasted the hypoxia-induced depressive action, either by limiting the firing frequency reduction (at both ages) or by increasing it to 126% (in younger neurons). In order to find out whether leptin exerts its effect by activating large conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels (BK), as shown on rat hippocampal neurons, we applied the BK channel blocker paxilline (1 µM). Our data show that paxilline reversed the effects of leptin, both on normoxic and hypoxic neurons, suggesting that the adipokine counteracts hypoxia through BK channels activation in mouse hippocampal neurons. PMID:22848520

  16. Sex differences in the outcome of juvenile social isolation on HPA axis function in rats.

    PubMed

    Pisu, M G; Garau, A; Boero, G; Biggio, F; Pibiri, V; Dore, R; Locci, V; Paci, E; Porcu, P; Serra, M

    2016-04-21

    Women are more likely than men to suffer from anxiety disorders and major depression. These disorders share hyperresponsiveness to stress as an etiological factor. Thus, sex differences in brain arousal systems and their regulation by chronic stress may account for the increased vulnerability to these disorders in women. Social isolation is a model of early life stress that results in neurobiological alterations leading to increased anxiety-like and depressive-like behaviors. Here we investigated the sex difference in the effects of post-weaning social isolation on acute stress sensitivity and behavior in rats. In both sexes, social isolation at weaning reduced basal levels of the neuroactive steroid allopregnanolone in the brain and of corticosterone in plasma. Moreover, acute stress increased plasma corticosterone levels in both group-housed and socially isolated male and female rats; however this effect was greater in male than female rats subjected to social isolation. Intriguingly, group-housed female rats showed no change in plasma and brain levels of allopregnanolone after acute foot-shock stress. The absence of stress-induced effects on allopregnanolone synthesis might be due to the physiologically higher levels of this hormone in females vs. males. Accordingly, increasing allopregnanolone levels in male rats blunted the response to foot-shock stress in these animals. Socially isolated male, but not female, rats also display depressive-like behavior and increased hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). The ovarian steroids could "buffer" the effect of this adverse experience in females on these parameters. Finally, the dexamethasone (DEX) suppression test indicated that the chronic stress associated with social isolation impairs feedback inhibition in both sexes in which an increase in the abundance of glucocorticoid receptors (GRs) in the hippocampus was found. Altogether, these results demonstrate that social isolation affects neuroendocrine

  17. The ‘single big cryoballoon’ technique for acute pulmonary vein isolation in patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation: a prospective observational single centre study

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Kyoung-Ryul Julian; Schmidt, Boris; Metzner, Andreas; Tilz, Roland; Zerm, Thomas; Köster, Ilka; Fürnkranz, Alexander; Koektuerk, Buelent; Konstantinidou, Melanie; Antz, Matthias; Ouyang, Feifan; Kuck, Karl Heinz

    2009-01-01

    Aims Cryothermal energy (CTE) ablation via a balloon catheter (Arctic Front, Cryocath™) represents a novel technology for pulmonary vein isolation (PVI). However, balloon-based PVI approaches are associated with phrenic nerve palsy (PNP). We investigated whether ‘single big cryoballoon’-deployed CTE lesions can (i) achieve acute electrical PVI without left atrium (LA) imaging and (ii) avoid PNP in patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF). Methods and results After double transseptal punctures, one Lasso catheter and a big 28 mm cryoballoon catheter using a steerable sheath were inserted into the LA. PV angiography and ostial Lasso recordings from all PVs were obtained. Selective PV angiography was used to evaluate balloon to LA–PV junction contact. CTE ablation lasted 300 s, and the PN was paced during freezing at right-sided PVs. Twenty-seven patients (19 males, mean age: 56 ± 9 years, LA size: 42 ± 5 mm) with PAF (mean duration: 6.6 ± 5.7 years) were included. PVI was achieved in 97/99 PVs (98%). Median (Q1; Q3) procedural, balloon, and fluoroscopy times were 220 min (190; 245), 130 min (90; 170), and 50 min (42; 69), respectively. Three transient PNP occurred after distal PV ablations. No PV stenosis occurred. Total median (Q1; Q3) follow-up time was 271 days (147; 356), and 19 of 27 patients (70%) remained in sinus rhythm (3-month blanking period). Conclusion Using the single big cryoballoon technique, almost all PVs (98%) could be electrically isolated without LA imaging and may reduce the incidence of PNP as long as distal ablation inside the septal PVs is avoided. PMID:19109353

  18. Correlation between clinical data and antibiotic resistance in coagulase-negative Staphylococcus species isolated from 68 patients with acute post-cataract endophthalmitis.

    PubMed

    Chiquet, C; Maurin, M; Altayrac, J; Aptel, F; Boisset, S; Vandenesch, F; Cornut, P L; Romanet, J P; Gain, P; Carricajo, A

    2015-06-01

    Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) cause the majority of post-cataract endophthalmitis, which can lead to anatomical and/or functional loss of the eye. This study reports the antibiotic susceptibilities of CNS isolates associated with acute post-cataract endophthalmitis cases and correlates antibiotic resistance with severity and outcome of infection in these patients. Clinical data (initial ocular examination, final prognosis, antibiotic treatment) and the antibiotic susceptibilities of the isolated CNS strains were obtained from 68 patients with post-surgical endophthalmitis recruited during a 7-year period by the FRench Institutional ENDophthalmitis Study (FRIENDS) group. The CNS strains displayed 100% susceptibility to vancomycin, 70% to fluoroquinolones, 83% to fosfomycin, 46% to imipenem and 18% to piperacillin. The most effective antibiotic combinations were fosfomycin plus a fluoroquinolone and imipenem plus a fluoroquinolone, which were considered adequate in 80% and 58% of patients, respectively. Methicillin resistance was significantly associated with older age (p 0.001), diabetes mellitus (p 0.004), absence of fundus visibility (p 0.06), and poor visual prognosis (p 0.03). Resistance to fluoroquinolones was significantly associated with absence of fundus visibility (p 0.05) and diabetes mellitus (p 0.02). This large prospective study demonstrates that methicillin resistance and, to a lesser extent, fluoroquinolone resistance in CNS strains causing postoperative endophthalmitis are both prevalent in France and associated with a poorer visual prognosis. These results emphasize the need for an effective surveillance of this antibiotic resistance and the development of new diagnostic tools for rapid detection for early optimization of antibiotic therapy in endophthalmitis patients.

  19. Medial septum regulates the hippocampal spatial representation

    PubMed Central

    Mamad, Omar; McNamara, Harold M.; Reilly, Richard B.; Tsanov, Marian

    2015-01-01

    The hippocampal circuitry undergoes attentional modulation by the cholinergic medial septum. However, it is unclear how septal activation regulates the spatial properties of hippocampal neurons. We investigated here what is the functional effect of selective-cholinergic and non-selective septal stimulation on septo-hippocampal system. We show for the first time selective activation of cholinergic cells and their differential network effect in medial septum of freely-behaving transgenic rats. Our data show that depolarization of cholinergic septal neurons evokes frequency-dependent response from the non-cholinergic septal neurons and hippocampal interneurons. Our findings provide vital evidence that cholinergic effect on septo-hippocampal axis is behavior-dependent. During the active behavioral state the activation of septal cholinergic projections is insufficient to evoke significant change in the spiking of the hippocampal neurons. The efficiency of septo-hippocampal processing during active exploration relates to the firing patterns of the non-cholinergic theta-bursting cells. Non-selective septal theta-burst stimulation resets the spiking of hippocampal theta cells, increases theta synchronization, entrains the spiking of hippocampal place cells, and tunes the spatial properties in a timing-dependent manner. The spatial properties are augmented only when the stimulation is applied in the periphery of the place field or 400–650 ms before the animals approached the center of the field. In summary, our data show that selective cholinergic activation triggers a robust network effect in the septo-hippocampal system during inactive behavioral state, whereas the non-cholinergic septal activation regulates hippocampal functional properties during explorative behavior. Together, our findings uncover fast septal modulation on hippocampal network and reveal how septal inputs up-regulate and down-regulate the encoding of spatial representation. PMID:26175674

  20. Medial septum regulates the hippocampal spatial representation.

    PubMed

    Mamad, Omar; McNamara, Harold M; Reilly, Richard B; Tsanov, Marian

    2015-01-01

    The hippocampal circuitry undergoes attentional modulation by the cholinergic medial septum. However, it is unclear how septal activation regulates the spatial properties of hippocampal neurons. We investigated here what is the functional effect of selective-cholinergic and non-selective septal stimulation on septo-hippocampal system. We show for the first time selective activation of cholinergic cells and their differential network effect in medial septum of freely-behaving transgenic rats. Our data show that depolarization of cholinergic septal neurons evokes frequency-dependent response from the non-cholinergic septal neurons and hippocampal interneurons. Our findings provide vital evidence that cholinergic effect on septo-hippocampal axis is behavior-dependent. During the active behavioral state the activation of septal cholinergic projections is insufficient to evoke significant change in the spiking of the hippocampal neurons. The efficiency of septo-hippocampal processing during active exploration relates to the firing patterns of the non-cholinergic theta-bursting cells. Non-selective septal theta-burst stimulation resets the spiking of hippocampal theta cells, increases theta synchronization, entrains the spiking of hippocampal place cells, and tunes the spatial properties in a timing-dependent manner. The spatial properties are augmented only when the stimulation is applied in the periphery of the place field or 400-650 ms before the animals approached the center of the field. In summary, our data show that selective cholinergic activation triggers a robust network effect in the septo-hippocampal system during inactive behavioral state, whereas the non-cholinergic septal activation regulates hippocampal functional properties during explorative behavior. Together, our findings uncover fast septal modulation on hippocampal network and reveal how septal inputs up-regulate and down-regulate the encoding of spatial representation.

  1. Sleep benefits subsequent hippocampal functioning.

    PubMed

    Van Der Werf, Ysbrand D; Altena, Ellemarije; Schoonheim, Menno M; Sanz-Arigita, Ernesto J; Vis, José C; De Rijke, Wim; Van Someren, Eus J W

    2009-02-01

    Sleep before learning benefits memory encoding through unknown mechanisms. We found that even a mild sleep disruption that suppressed slow-wave activity and induced shallow sleep, but did not reduce total sleep time, was sufficient to affect subsequent successful encoding-related hippocampal activation and memory performance in healthy human subjects. Implicit learning was not affected. Our results suggest that the hippocampus is particularly sensitive to shallow, but intact, sleep.

  2. Hippocampal amnesia disrupts creative thinking.

    PubMed

    Duff, Melissa C; Kurczek, Jake; Rubin, Rachael; Cohen, Neal J; Tranel, Daniel

    2013-12-01

    Creativity requires the rapid combination and recombination of existing mental representations to create novel ideas and ways of thinking. The hippocampal system, through its interaction with neocortical storage sites, provides a relational database necessary for the creation, updating, maintenance, and juxtaposition of mental representations used in service of declarative memory. Given this functionality, we hypothesized that hippocampus would play a critical role in creative thinking. We examined creative thinking, as measured by verbal and figural forms of the torrance tests of creative thinking (TTCT), in a group of participants with hippocampal damage and severe declarative memory impairment as well as in a group of demographically matched healthy comparison participants. The patients with bilateral hippocampal damage performed significantly worse than comparison participants on both the verbal and figural portions of the TTCT. These findings suggest that hippocampus plays a role critical in creative thinking, adding to a growing body of work pointing to the diverse ways the hallmark processing features of hippocampus serve a variety of behaviors that require flexible cognition.

  3. Cholinergic modulation of hippocampal cells and circuits

    PubMed Central

    Cobb, Stuart R; Davies, Ceri H

    2005-01-01

    Septo-hippocampal cholinergic fibres ramify extensively throughout the hippocampal formation to release acetylcholine upon a diverse range of muscarinic and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors that are differentially expressed by distinct populations of neurones. The resultant modulation of cellular excitability and synaptic transmission within hippocampal circuits underlies the ability of acetylcholine to influence the dynamic properties of the hippocampal network and results in the emergence of a range of stable oscillatory network states. Recent findings suggest a multitude of actions contribute to the oscillogenic properties of acetylcholine which are principally induced by activation of muscarinic receptors but also regulated through activation of nicotinic receptor subtypes. PMID:15528238

  4. Neonatal Hypoxia, Hippocampal Atrophy, and Memory Impairment: Evidence of a Causal Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Janine M.; Gadian, David G.; Jentschke, Sebastian; Goldman, Allan; Munoz, Monica; Pitts, Georgia; Banks, Tina; Chong, W. Kling; Hoskote, Aparna; Deanfield, John; Baldeweg, Torsten; de Haan, Michelle; Mishkin, Mortimer; Vargha-Khadem, Faraneh

    2015-01-01

    Neonates treated for acute respiratory failure experience episodes of hypoxia. The hippocampus, a structure essential for memory, is particularly vulnerable to such insults. Hence, some neonates undergoing treatment for acute respiratory failure might sustain bilateral hippocampal pathology early in life and memory problems later in childhood. We investigated this possibility in a cohort of 40 children who had been treated neonatally for acute respiratory failure but were free of overt neurological impairment. The cohort had mean hippocampal volumes (HVs) significantly below normal control values, memory scores significantly below the standard population means, and memory quotients significantly below those predicted by their full scale IQs. Brain white matter volume also fell below the volume of the controls, but brain gray matter volumes and scores on nonmnemonic neuropsychological tests were within the normal range. Stepwise linear regression models revealed that the cohort's HVs were predictive of degree of memory impairment, and gestational age at treatment was predictive of HVs: the younger the age, the greater the atrophy. We conclude that many neonates treated for acute respiratory failure sustain significant hippocampal atrophy as a result of the associated hypoxia and, consequently, show deficient memory later in life. PMID:24343890

  5. Neonatal hypoxia, hippocampal atrophy, and memory impairment: evidence of a causal sequence.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Janine M; Gadian, David G; Jentschke, Sebastian; Goldman, Allan; Munoz, Monica; Pitts, Georgia; Banks, Tina; Chong, W Kling; Hoskote, Aparna; Deanfield, John; Baldeweg, Torsten; de Haan, Michelle; Mishkin, Mortimer; Vargha-Khadem, Faraneh

    2015-06-01

    Neonates treated for acute respiratory failure experience episodes of hypoxia. The hippocampus, a structure essential for memory, is particularly vulnerable to such insults. Hence, some neonates undergoing treatment for acute respiratory failure might sustain bilateral hippocampal pathology early in life and memory problems later in childhood. We investigated this possibility in a cohort of 40 children who had been treated neonatally for acute respiratory failure but were free of overt neurological impairment. The cohort had mean hippocampal volumes (HVs) significantly below normal control values, memory scores significantly below the standard population means, and memory quotients significantly below those predicted by their full scale IQs. Brain white matter volume also fell below the volume of the controls, but brain gray matter volumes and scores on nonmnemonic neuropsychological tests were within the normal range. Stepwise linear regression models revealed that the cohort's HVs were predictive of degree of memory impairment, and gestational age at treatment was predictive of HVs: the younger the age, the greater the atrophy. We conclude that many neonates treated for acute respiratory failure sustain significant hippocampal atrophy as a result of the associated hypoxia and, consequently, show deficient memory later in life.

  6. ANKS1B Gene Product AIDA-1 Controls Hippocampal Synaptic Transmission by Regulating GluN2B Subunit Localization.

    PubMed

    Tindi, Jaafar O; Chávez, Andrés E; Cvejic, Svetlana; Calvo-Ochoa, Erika; Castillo, Pablo E; Jordan, Bryen A

    2015-06-17

    NMDA receptors (NMDARs) are key mediators of glutamatergic transmission and synaptic plasticity, and their dysregulation has been linked to diverse neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders. While normal NMDAR function requires regulated expression and trafficking of its different subunits, the molecular mechanisms underlying these processes are not fully understood. Here we report that the amyloid precursor protein intracellular domain associated-1 protein (AIDA-1), which associates with NMDARs and is encoded by ANKS1B, a gene recently linked to schizophrenia, regulates synaptic NMDAR subunit composition. Forebrain-specific AIDA-1 conditional knock-out (cKO) mice exhibit reduced GluN2B-mediated and increased GluN2A-mediated synaptic transmission, and biochemical analyses show AIDA-1 cKO mice have low GluN2B and high GluN2A protein levels at isolated hippocampal synaptic junctions compared with controls. These results are corroborated by immunocytochemical and electrophysiological analyses in primary neuronal cultures following acute lentiviral shRNA-mediated knockdown of AIDA-1. Moreover, hippocampal NMDAR-dependent but not metabotropic glutamate receptor-dependent plasticity is impaired in AIDA-1 cKO mice, further supporting a role for AIDA-1 in synaptic NMDAR function. We also demonstrate that AIDA-1 preferentially associates with GluN2B and with the adaptor protein Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent serine protein kinase and kinesin KIF17, which regulate the transport of GluN2B-containing NMDARs from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to synapses. Consistent with this function, GluN2B accumulates in ER-enriched fractions in AIDA-1 cKO mice. These findings suggest that AIDA-1 regulates NMDAR subunit composition at synapses by facilitating transport of GluN2B from the ER to synapses, which is critical for NMDAR plasticity. Our work provides an explanation for how AIDA-1 dysfunction might contribute to neuropsychiatric conditions, such as schizophrenia.

  7. Opposing Actions of Chronic[Deta][superscript 9] Tetrahydrocannabinol and Cannabinoid Antagonists on Hippocampal Long-Term Potentiation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Alexander F.; Oz, Murat; Yang, Ruiqin; Lichtman, Aron H.; Lupica, Carl R.

    2007-01-01

    Memory deficits produced by marijuana arise partly via interaction of the psychoactive component, [Deta][superscript 9]-tetrahydrocannabinol ([Deta][superscript 9]-THC), with cannabinoid receptors in the hippocampus. Although cannabinoids acutely reduce glutamate release and block hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP), a potential substrate for…

  8. Does a physiological concentration of taurine increase acute muscle power output, time to fatigue, and recovery in isolated mouse soleus (slow) muscle with or without the presence of caffeine?

    PubMed

    Tallis, Jason; Higgins, Matthew F; Cox, Val M; Duncan, Michael J; James, Rob S

    2014-01-01

    High concentrations of caffeine and taurine are key constituents of many ergogenic supplements ingested acutely to provide legal enhancements in athlete performance. Despite this, there is little evidence supporting the claims for the performance-enhancing effects of acute taurine supplementation. In-vitro models have demonstrated that a caffeine-induced muscle contracture can be further potentiated when combined with a high concentration of taurine. However, the high concentrations of caffeine used in previous research would be toxic for human consumption. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate whether a physiological dose of caffeine and taurine would directly potentiate skeletal muscle performance. Isolated mouse soleus muscle was used to examine the effects of physiological taurine (TAU), caffeine (CAF), and taurine-caffeine combined (TC) on (i) acute muscle power output; (ii) time to fatigue; and (iii) recovery from fatigue, compared with the untreated controls (CON). Treatment with TAU failed to elicit any significant difference in the measured parameters. Treatment with TC resulted in a significant increase in acute muscle power output and faster time to fatigue. The ergogenic benefit posed by TC was not different from the effects of caffeine alone, suggesting no acute ergogenic benefit of taurine.

  9. Hippocampal atrophy in recurrent major depression.

    PubMed Central

    Sheline, Y I; Wang, P W; Gado, M H; Csernansky, J G; Vannier, M W

    1996-01-01

    Hippocampal volumes of subjects with a history of major depressive episodes but currently in remission and with no known medical comorbidity were compared to matched normal controls by using volumetric magnetic resonance images. Subjects with a history of major depression had significantly smaller left and right hippocampal volumes with no differences in total cerebral volumes. The degree of hippocampal volume reduction correlated with total duration of major depression. In addition, large (diameter > or = 4.5 mm)-hippocampal low signal foci (LSF) were found within the hippocampus, and their number also correlated with the total number of days depressed. These results suggest that depression is associated with hippocampal atrophy, perhaps due to a progressive process mediated by glucocorticoid neurotoxicity. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 4 PMID:8632988

  10. C-type natriuretic peptide activates a non-selective cation current in acutely isolated rat cardiac fibroblasts via natriuretic peptide C receptor-mediated signalling.

    PubMed

    Rose, R A; Hatano, N; Ohya, S; Imaizumi, Y; Giles, W R

    2007-04-01

    In the heart, fibroblasts play an essential role in the deposition of the extracellular matrix and they also secrete a number of hormonal factors. Although natriuretic peptides, including C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) and brain natriuretic peptide, have antifibrotic effects on cardiac fibroblasts, the effects of CNP on fibroblast electrophysiology have not been examined. In this study, acutely isolated ventricular fibroblasts from the adult rat were used to measure the effects of CNP (2 x 10(-8) M) under whole-cell voltage-clamp conditions. CNP, as well as the natriuretic peptide C receptor (NPR-C) agonist cANF (2 x 10(-8) M), significantly increased an outwardly rectifying non-selective cation current (NSCC). This current has a reversal potential near 0 mV. Activation of this NSCC by cANF was abolished by pre-treating fibroblasts with pertussis toxin, indicating the involvement of G(i) proteins. The cANF-activated NSCC was inhibited by the compounds Gd(3+), SKF 96365 and 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis of mRNA from rat ventricular fibroblasts revealed the expression of several transient receptor potential (TRP) channel transcripts. Additional electrophysiological analysis showed that U73122, a phospholipase C antagonist, inhibited the cANF-activated NSCC. Furthermore, the effects of CNP and cANF were mimicked by the diacylglycerol analogue 1-oleoyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycerol (OAG), independently of protein kinase C activity. These are defining characteristics of specific TRPC channels. More detailed molecular analysis confirmed the expression of full-length TRPC2, TRPC3 and TRPC5 transcripts. These data indicate that CNP, acting via the NPR-C receptor, activates a NSCC that is at least partially carried by TRPC channels in cardiac fibroblasts.

  11. Impact of spikelets on hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cell activity during spatial exploration.

    PubMed

    Epsztein, Jérôme; Lee, Albert K; Chorev, Edith; Brecht, Michael

    2010-01-22

    In vivo intracellular recordings of hippocampal neurons reveal the occurrence of fast events of small amplitude called spikelets or fast prepotentials. Because intracellular recordings have been restricted to anesthetized or head-fixed animals, it is not known how spikelet activity contributes to hippocampal spatial representations. We addressed this question in CA1 pyramidal cells by using in vivo whole-cell recording in freely moving rats. We observed a high incidence of spikelets that occurred either in isolation or in bursts and could drive spiking as fast prepotentials of action potentials. Spikelets strongly contributed to spiking activity, driving approximately 30% of all action potentials. CA1 pyramidal cell firing and spikelet activity were comodulated as a function of the animal's location in the environment. We conclude that spikelets have a major impact on hippocampal activity during spatial exploration.

  12. Restraint stress increases hemichannel activity in hippocampal glial cells and neurons.

    PubMed

    Orellana, Juan A; Moraga-Amaro, Rodrigo; Díaz-Galarce, Raúl; Rojas, Sebastián; Maturana, Carola J; Stehberg, Jimmy; Sáez, Juan C

    2015-01-01

    Stress affects brain areas involved in learning and emotional responses, which may contribute in the development of cognitive deficits associated with major depression. These effects have been linked to glial cell activation, glutamate release and changes in neuronal plasticity and survival including atrophy of hippocampal apical dendrites, loss of synapses and neuronal death. Under neuro-inflammatory conditions, we recently unveiled a sequential activation of glial cells that release ATP and glutamate via hemichannels inducing neuronal death due to activation of neuronal NMDA/P2X7 receptors and pannexin1 hemichannels. In the present work, we studied if stress-induced glia activation is associated to changes in hemichannel activity. To this end, we compared hemichannel activity of brain cells after acute or chronic restraint stress in mice. Dye uptake experiments in hippocampal slices revealed that acute stress induces opening of both Cx43 and Panx1 hemichannels in astrocytes, which were further increased by chronic stress; whereas enhanced Panx1 hemichannel activity was detected in microglia and neurons after acute/chronic and chronic stress, respectively. Moreover, inhibition of NMDA/P2X7 receptors reduced the chronic stress-induced hemichannel opening, whereas blockade of Cx43 and Panx1 hemichannels fully reduced ATP and glutamate release in hippocampal slices from stressed mice. Thus, we propose that gliotransmitter release through hemichannels may participate in the pathogenesis of stress-associated psychiatric disorders and possibly depression.

  13. Restraint stress increases hemichannel activity in hippocampal glial cells and neurons

    PubMed Central

    Orellana, Juan A.; Moraga-Amaro, Rodrigo; Díaz-Galarce, Raúl; Rojas, Sebastián; Maturana, Carola J.; Stehberg, Jimmy; Sáez, Juan C.

    2015-01-01

    Stress affects brain areas involved in learning and emotional responses, which may contribute in the development of cognitive deficits associated with major depression. These effects have been linked to glial cell activation, glutamate release and changes in neuronal plasticity and survival including atrophy of hippocampal apical dendrites, loss of synapses and neuronal death. Under neuro-inflammatory conditions, we recently unveiled a sequential activation of glial cells that release ATP and glutamate via hemichannels inducing neuronal death due to activation of neuronal NMDA/P2X7 receptors and pannexin1 hemichannels. In the present work, we studied if stress-induced glia activation is associated to changes in hemichannel activity. To this end, we compared hemichannel activity of brain cells after acute or chronic restraint stress in mice. Dye uptake experiments in hippocampal slices revealed that acute stress induces opening of both Cx43 and Panx1 hemichannels in astrocytes, which were further increased by chronic stress; whereas enhanced Panx1 hemichannel activity was detected in microglia and neurons after acute/chronic and chronic stress, respectively. Moreover, inhibition of NMDA/P2X7 receptors reduced the chronic stress-induced hemichannel opening, whereas blockade of Cx43 and Panx1 hemichannels fully reduced ATP and glutamate release in hippocampal slices from stressed mice. Thus, we propose that gliotransmitter release through hemichannels may participate in the pathogenesis of stress-associated psychiatric disorders and possibly depression. PMID:25883550

  14. Novel transient outward K+ current of mature murine hippocampal neurones.

    PubMed

    Li, X Y; McArdle, J J

    1997-06-01

    Hippocampal neurones were freshly isolated from the brain of adult mice and voltage-dependent K+ currents were recorded with whole-cell patch-clamp technique. Three components of transient K+ current (IA) were isolated when analyzing data with exponential functions or treating neurones with a variety of voltage protocols and pharmacologic agents. Subtraction of the delayed rectifier current (IK) from the K+ currents elicited after prepulses to -120 mV of varying duration revealed fast (IAf) and slow (IAs) components with decay time constants of 45 +/- 8 and 612 +/- 140 ms, respectively; the corresponding time constants for the removal of inactivation were 12.3 and 189.6 ms. both tetraethylammonium and dendrotoxin selectively inhibited IAs. 4-Aminopyridine (4-AP) specifically blocked IAf and 40% of IAs with different affinities. Therefore, the properties of a 4-AP-resistant (IAsR) and 4-AP-sensitive (IAsS) component of IAs were compared. These data suggest that three distinct subtypes of K+ currents contribute to the IA of mature murine hippocampal neurones.

  15. Novel genetic loci associated with hippocampal volume

    PubMed Central

    Hibar, Derrek P.; Adams, Hieab H. H.; Jahanshad, Neda; Chauhan, Ganesh; Stein, Jason L.; Hofer, Edith; Renteria, Miguel E.; Bis, Joshua C.; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Ikram, M. Kamran; Desrivières, Sylvane; Vernooij, Meike W.; Abramovic, Lucija; Alhusaini, Saud; Amin, Najaf; Andersson, Micael; Arfanakis, Konstantinos; Aribisala, Benjamin S.; Armstrong, Nicola J.; Athanasiu, Lavinia; Axelsson, Tomas; Beecham, Ashley H.; Beiser, Alexa; Bernard, Manon; Blanton, Susan H.; Bohlken, Marc M.; Boks, Marco P.; Bralten, Janita; Brickman, Adam M.; Carmichael, Owen; Chakravarty, M. Mallar; Chen, Qiang; Ching, Christopher R. K.; Chouraki, Vincent; Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; Crivello, Fabrice; Den Braber, Anouk; Doan, Nhat Trung; Ehrlich, Stefan; Giddaluru, Sudheer; Goldman, Aaron L.; Gottesman, Rebecca F.; Grimm, Oliver; Griswold, Michael E.; Guadalupe, Tulio; Gutman, Boris A.; Hass, Johanna; Haukvik, Unn K.; Hoehn, David; Holmes, Avram J.; Hoogman, Martine; Janowitz, Deborah; Jia, Tianye; Jørgensen, Kjetil N.; Karbalai, Nazanin; Kasperaviciute, Dalia; Kim, Sungeun; Klein, Marieke; Kraemer, Bernd; Lee, Phil H.; Liewald, David C. M.; Lopez, Lorna M.; Luciano, Michelle; Macare, Christine; Marquand, Andre F.; Matarin, Mar; Mather, Karen A.; Mattheisen, Manuel; McKay, David R.; Milaneschi, Yuri; Muñoz Maniega, Susana; Nho, Kwangsik; Nugent, Allison C.; Nyquist, Paul; Loohuis, Loes M. Olde; Oosterlaan, Jaap; Papmeyer, Martina; Pirpamer, Lukas; Pütz, Benno; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Richards, Jennifer S.; Risacher, Shannon L.; Roiz-Santiañez, Roberto; Rommelse, Nanda; Ropele, Stefan; Rose, Emma J.; Royle, Natalie A.; Rundek, Tatjana; Sämann, Philipp G.; Saremi, Arvin; Satizabal, Claudia L.; Schmaal, Lianne; Schork, Andrew J.; Shen, Li; Shin, Jean; Shumskaya, Elena; Smith, Albert V.; Sprooten, Emma; Strike, Lachlan T.; Teumer, Alexander; Tordesillas-Gutierrez, Diana; Toro, Roberto; Trabzuni, Daniah; Trompet, Stella; Vaidya, Dhananjay; Van der Grond, Jeroen; Van der Lee, Sven J.; Van der Meer, Dennis; Van Donkelaar, Marjolein M. J.; Van Eijk, Kristel R.; Van Erp, Theo G. M.; Van Rooij, Daan; Walton, Esther; Westlye, Lars T.; Whelan, Christopher D.; Windham, Beverly G.; Winkler, Anderson M.; Wittfeld, Katharina; Woldehawariat, Girma; Wolf, Christiane; Wolfers, Thomas; Yanek, Lisa R.; Yang, Jingyun; Zijdenbos, Alex; Zwiers, Marcel P.; Agartz, Ingrid; Almasy, Laura; Ames, David; Amouyel, Philippe; Andreassen, Ole A.; Arepalli, Sampath; Assareh, Amelia A.; Barral, Sandra; Bastin, Mark E.; Becker, Diane M.; Becker, James T.; Bennett, David A.; Blangero, John; van Bokhoven, Hans; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Brodaty, Henry; Brouwer, Rachel M.; Brunner, Han G.; Buckner, Randy L.; Buitelaar, Jan K.; Bulayeva, Kazima B.; Cahn, Wiepke; Calhoun, Vince D.; Cannon, Dara M.; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L.; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Cichon, Sven; Cookson, Mark R.; Corvin, Aiden; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Curran, Joanne E.; Czisch, Michael; Dale, Anders M.; Davies, Gareth E.; De Craen, Anton J. M.; De Geus, Eco J. C.; De Jager, Philip L.; De Zubicaray, Greig I.; Deary, Ian J.; Debette, Stéphanie; DeCarli, Charles; Delanty, Norman; Depondt, Chantal; DeStefano, Anita; Dillman, Allissa; Djurovic, Srdjan; Donohoe, Gary; Drevets, Wayne C.; Duggirala, Ravi; Dyer, Thomas D.; Enzinger, Christian; Erk, Susanne; Espeseth, Thomas; Fedko, Iryna O.; Fernández, Guillén; Ferrucci, Luigi; Fisher, Simon E.; Fleischman, Debra A.; Ford, Ian; Fornage, Myriam; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Fox, Peter T.; Francks, Clyde; Fukunaga, Masaki; Gibbs, J. Raphael; Glahn, David C.; Gollub, Randy L.; Göring, Harald H. H.; Green, Robert C.; Gruber, Oliver; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Guelfi, Sebastian; Håberg, Asta K.; Hansell, Narelle K.; Hardy, John; Hartman, Catharina A.; Hashimoto, Ryota; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Heinz, Andreas; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Hernandez, Dena G.; Heslenfeld, Dirk J.; Ho, Beng-Choon; Hoekstra, Pieter J.; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hofman, Albert; Holsboer, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Hosten, Norbert; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Huentelman, Matthew; Pol, Hilleke E. Hulshoff; Ikeda, Masashi; Jack Jr, Clifford R.; Jenkinson, Mark; Johnson, Robert; Jönsson, Erik G.; Jukema, J. Wouter; Kahn, René S.; Kanai, Ryota; Kloszewska, Iwona; Knopman, David S.; Kochunov, Peter; Kwok, John B.; Lawrie, Stephen M.; Lemaître, Hervé; Liu, Xinmin; Longo, Dan L.; Lopez, Oscar L.; Lovestone, Simon; Martinez, Oliver; Martinot, Jean-Luc; Mattay, Venkata S.; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew M.; McMahon, Francis J.; McMahon, Katie L.; Mecocci, Patrizia; Melle, Ingrid; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Mohnke, Sebastian; Montgomery, Grant W.; Morris, Derek W.; Mosley, Thomas H.; Mühleisen, Thomas W.; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nalls, Michael A.; Nauck, Matthias; Nichols, Thomas E.; Niessen, Wiro J.; Nöthen, Markus M.; Nyberg, Lars; Ohi, Kazutaka; Olvera, Rene L.; Ophoff, Roel A.; Pandolfo, Massimo; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.; Pike, G. Bruce; Potkin, Steven G.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Reppermund, Simone; Rietschel, Marcella; Roffman, Joshua L.; Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina; Rotter, Jerome I.; Ryten, Mina; Sacco, Ralph L.; Sachdev, Perminder S.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Schmidt, Reinhold; Schmidt, Helena; Schofield, Peter R.; Sigursson, Sigurdur; Simmons, Andrew; Singleton, Andrew; Sisodiya, Sanjay M.; Smith, Colin; Smoller, Jordan W.; Soininen, Hilkka; Steen, Vidar M.; Stott, David J.; Sussmann, Jessika E.; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Toga, Arthur W.; Traynor, Bryan J.; Troncoso, Juan; Tsolaki, Magda; Tzourio, Christophe; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Hernández, Maria C. Valdés; Van der Brug, Marcel; van der Lugt, Aad; van der Wee, Nic J. A.; Van Haren, Neeltje E. M.; van 't Ent, Dennis; Van Tol, Marie-Jose; Vardarajan, Badri N.; Vellas, Bruno; Veltman, Dick J.; Völzke, Henry; Walter, Henrik; Wardlaw, Joanna M.; Wassink, Thomas H.; Weale, Michael E.; Weinberger, Daniel R.; Weiner, Michael W.; Wen, Wei; Westman, Eric; White, Tonya; Wong, Tien Y.; Wright, Clinton B.; Zielke, Ronald H.; Zonderman, Alan B.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Wright, Margaret J.; Longstreth, W. T.; Schumann, Gunter; Grabe, Hans J.; Franke, Barbara; Launer, Lenore J.; Medland, Sarah E.; Seshadri, Sudha; Thompson, Paul M.; Ikram, M. Arfan

    2017-01-01

    The hippocampal formation is a brain structure integrally involved in episodic memory, spatial navigation, cognition and stress responsiveness. Structural abnormalities in hippocampal volume and shape are found in several common neuropsychiatric disorders. To identify the genetic underpinnings of hippocampal structure here we perform a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of 33,536 individuals and discover six independent loci significantly associated with hippocampal volume, four of them novel. Of the novel loci, three lie within genes (ASTN2, DPP4 and MAST4) and one is found 200 kb upstream of SHH. A hippocampal subfield analysis shows that a locus within the MSRB3 gene shows evidence of a localized effect along the dentate gyrus, subiculum, CA1 and fissure. Further, we show that genetic variants associated with decreased hippocampal volume are also associated with increased risk for Alzheimer's disease (rg=−0.155). Our findings suggest novel biological pathways through which human genetic variation influences hippocampal volume and risk for neuropsychiatric illness. PMID:28098162

  16. Novel genetic loci associated with hippocampal volume.

    PubMed

    Hibar, Derrek P; Adams, Hieab H H; Jahanshad, Neda; Chauhan, Ganesh; Stein, Jason L; Hofer, Edith; Renteria, Miguel E; Bis, Joshua C; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Ikram, M Kamran; Desrivières, Sylvane; Vernooij, Meike W; Abramovic, Lucija; Alhusaini, Saud; Amin, Najaf; Andersson, Micael; Arfanakis, Konstantinos; Aribisala, Benjamin S; Armstrong, Nicola J; Athanasiu, Lavinia; Axelsson, Tomas; Beecham, Ashley H; Beiser, Alexa; Bernard, Manon; Blanton, Susan H; Bohlken, Marc M; Boks, Marco P; Bralten, Janita; Brickman, Adam M; Carmichael, Owen; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Chen, Qiang; Ching, Christopher R K; Chouraki, Vincent; Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; Crivello, Fabrice; Den Braber, Anouk; Doan, Nhat Trung; Ehrlich, Stefan; Giddaluru, Sudheer; Goldman, Aaron L; Gottesman, Rebecca F; Grimm, Oliver; Griswold, Michael E; Guadalupe, Tulio; Gutman, Boris A; Hass, Johanna; Haukvik, Unn K; Hoehn, David; Holmes, Avram J; Hoogman, Martine; Janowitz, Deborah; Jia, Tianye; Jørgensen, Kjetil N; Karbalai, Nazanin; Kasperaviciute, Dalia; Kim, Sungeun; Klein, Marieke; Kraemer, Bernd; Lee, Phil H; Liewald, David C M; Lopez, Lorna M; Luciano, Michelle; Macare, Christine; Marquand, Andre F; Matarin, Mar; Mather, Karen A; Mattheisen, Manuel; McKay, David R; Milaneschi, Yuri; Muñoz Maniega, Susana; Nho, Kwangsik; Nugent, Allison C; Nyquist, Paul; Loohuis, Loes M Olde; Oosterlaan, Jaap; Papmeyer, Martina; Pirpamer, Lukas; Pütz, Benno; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Richards, Jennifer S; Risacher, Shannon L; Roiz-Santiañez, Roberto; Rommelse, Nanda; Ropele, Stefan; Rose, Emma J; Royle, Natalie A; Rundek, Tatjana; Sämann, Philipp G; Saremi, Arvin; Satizabal, Claudia L; Schmaal, Lianne; Schork, Andrew J; Shen, Li; Shin, Jean; Shumskaya, Elena; Smith, Albert V; Sprooten, Emma; Strike, Lachlan T; Teumer, Alexander; Tordesillas-Gutierrez, Diana; Toro, Roberto; Trabzuni, Daniah; Trompet, Stella; Vaidya, Dhananjay; Van der Grond, Jeroen; Van der Lee, Sven J; Van der Meer, Dennis; Van Donkelaar, Marjolein M J; Van Eijk, Kristel R; Van Erp, Theo G M; Van Rooij, Daan; Walton, Esther; Westlye, Lars T; Whelan, Christopher D; Windham, Beverly G; Winkler, Anderson M; Wittfeld, Katharina; Woldehawariat, Girma; Wolf, Christiane; Wolfers, Thomas; Yanek, Lisa R; Yang, Jingyun; Zijdenbos, Alex; Zwiers, Marcel P; Agartz, Ingrid; Almasy, Laura; Ames, David; Amouyel, Philippe; Andreassen, Ole A; Arepalli, Sampath; Assareh, Amelia A; Barral, Sandra; Bastin, Mark E; Becker, Diane M; Becker, James T; Bennett, David A; Blangero, John; van Bokhoven, Hans; Boomsma, Dorret I; Brodaty, Henry; Brouwer, Rachel M; Brunner, Han G; Buckner, Randy L; Buitelaar, Jan K; Bulayeva, Kazima B; Cahn, Wiepke; Calhoun, Vince D; Cannon, Dara M; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Cichon, Sven; Cookson, Mark R; Corvin, Aiden; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Curran, Joanne E; Czisch, Michael; Dale, Anders M; Davies, Gareth E; De Craen, Anton J M; De Geus, Eco J C; De Jager, Philip L; De Zubicaray, Greig I; Deary, Ian J; Debette, Stéphanie; DeCarli, Charles; Delanty, Norman; Depondt, Chantal; DeStefano, Anita; Dillman, Allissa; Djurovic, Srdjan; Donohoe, Gary; Drevets, Wayne C; Duggirala, Ravi; Dyer, Thomas D; Enzinger, Christian; Erk, Susanne; Espeseth, Thomas; Fedko, Iryna O; Fernández, Guillén; Ferrucci, Luigi; Fisher, Simon E; Fleischman, Debra A; Ford, Ian; Fornage, Myriam; Foroud, Tatiana M; Fox, Peter T; Francks, Clyde; Fukunaga, Masaki; Gibbs, J Raphael; Glahn, David C; Gollub, Randy L; Göring, Harald H H; Green, Robert C; Gruber, Oliver; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Guelfi, Sebastian; Håberg, Asta K; Hansell, Narelle K; Hardy, John; Hartman, Catharina A; Hashimoto, Ryota; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Heinz, Andreas; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Hernandez, Dena G; Heslenfeld, Dirk J; Ho, Beng-Choon; Hoekstra, Pieter J; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hofman, Albert; Holsboer, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Hosten, Norbert; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Huentelman, Matthew; Pol, Hilleke E Hulshoff; Ikeda, Masashi; Jack, Clifford R; Jenkinson, Mark; Johnson, Robert; Jönsson, Erik G; Jukema, J Wouter; Kahn, René S; Kanai, Ryota; Kloszewska, Iwona; Knopman, David S; Kochunov, Peter; Kwok, John B; Lawrie, Stephen M; Lemaître, Hervé; Liu, Xinmin; Longo, Dan L; Lopez, Oscar L; Lovestone, Simon; Martinez, Oliver; Martinot, Jean-Luc; Mattay, Venkata S; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew M; McMahon, Francis J; McMahon, Katie L; Mecocci, Patrizia; Melle, Ingrid; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Mohnke, Sebastian; Montgomery, Grant W; Morris, Derek W; Mosley, Thomas H; Mühleisen, Thomas W; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nalls, Michael A; Nauck, Matthias; Nichols, Thomas E; Niessen, Wiro J; Nöthen, Markus M; Nyberg, Lars; Ohi, Kazutaka; Olvera, Rene L; Ophoff, Roel A; Pandolfo, Massimo; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Penninx, Brenda W J H; Pike, G Bruce; Potkin, Steven G; Psaty, Bruce M; Reppermund, Simone; Rietschel, Marcella; Roffman, Joshua L; Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina; Rotter, Jerome I; Ryten, Mina; Sacco, Ralph L; Sachdev, Perminder S; Saykin, Andrew J; Schmidt, Reinhold; Schmidt, Helena; Schofield, Peter R; Sigursson, Sigurdur; Simmons, Andrew; Singleton, Andrew; Sisodiya, Sanjay M; Smith, Colin; Smoller, Jordan W; Soininen, Hilkka; Steen, Vidar M; Stott, David J; Sussmann, Jessika E; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Toga, Arthur W; Traynor, Bryan J; Troncoso, Juan; Tsolaki, Magda; Tzourio, Christophe; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Hernández, Maria C Valdés; Van der Brug, Marcel; van der Lugt, Aad; van der Wee, Nic J A; Van Haren, Neeltje E M; van 't Ent, Dennis; Van Tol, Marie-Jose; Vardarajan, Badri N; Vellas, Bruno; Veltman, Dick J; Völzke, Henry; Walter, Henrik; Wardlaw, Joanna M; Wassink, Thomas H; Weale, Michael E; Weinberger, Daniel R; Weiner, Michael W; Wen, Wei; Westman, Eric; White, Tonya; Wong, Tien Y; Wright, Clinton B; Zielke, Ronald H; Zonderman, Alan B; Martin, Nicholas G; Van Duijn, Cornelia M; Wright, Margaret J; Longstreth, W T; Schumann, Gunter; Grabe, Hans J; Franke, Barbara; Launer, Lenore J; Medland, Sarah E; Seshadri, Sudha; Thompson, Paul M; Ikram, M Arfan

    2017-01-18

    The hippocampal formation is a brain structure integrally involved in episodic memory, spatial navigation, cognition and stress responsiveness. Structural abnormalities in hippocampal volume and shape are found in several common neuropsychiatric disorders. To identify the genetic underpinnings of hippocampal structure here we perform a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of 33,536 individuals and discover six independent loci significantly associated with hippocampal volume, four of them novel. Of the novel loci, three lie within genes (ASTN2, DPP4 and MAST4) and one is found 200 kb upstream of SHH. A hippocampal subfield analysis shows that a locus within the MSRB3 gene shows evidence of a localized effect along the dentate gyrus, subiculum, CA1 and fissure. Further, we show that genetic variants associated with decreased hippocampal volume are also associated with increased risk for Alzheimer's disease (rg=-0.155). Our findings suggest novel biological pathways through which human genetic variation influences hippocampal volume and risk for neuropsychiatric illness.

  17. A fundamental oscillatory state of isolated rodent hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chiping; Shen, Hui; Luk, Wah Ping; Zhang, Liang

    2002-04-15

    Population neuronal rhythms of various frequencies are observed in the rodent hippocampus during distinct behavioural states. However, the question of whether the hippocampus exhibits properties of spontaneous rhythms and population synchrony in isolation has not been definitively answered. To address this, we developed a novel preparation for studying neuronal rhythms in a relatively large hippocampal tissue in vitro. We isolated the whole hippocampus from mice up to 28 days postnatal age, removing the dentate gyrus while preserving the functional CA3-to-CA1 connections. Placing the hippocampal isolate in a perfusion chamber for electrophysiological assessment extracellular recordings from the CA1 revealed rhythmic field potential of 0.5 to hippocampal axis. We provide convergent evidence, via measurements of extracellular pH and K(+), recordings of synaptic and intracellular activities and morphological assessments, verifying that these rhythms were not the consequence of hypoxia. Data obtained via simultaneous extracellular and patch clamp recordings suggest that the spontaneous rhythms represent a summation of GABAergic IPSPs originating from pyramidal neurons, which result from synchronous discharges of GABAergic inhibitory interneurons. Similar spontaneous field rhythms were also observed in the hippocampal isolate prepared from young gerbils and rats. Based on these data, we postulate that the spontaneous rhythms represent a fundamental oscillatory state of the hippocampal circuitry isolated from extra-hippocampal inputs.

  18. A fundamental oscillatory state of isolated rodent hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chiping; Shen, Hui; Luk, Wah Ping; Zhang, Liang

    2002-01-01

    Population neuronal rhythms of various frequencies are observed in the rodent hippocampus during distinct behavioural states. However, the question of whether the hippocampus exhibits properties of spontaneous rhythms and population synchrony in isolation has not been definitively answered. To address this, we developed a novel preparation for studying neuronal rhythms in a relatively large hippocampal tissue in vitro. We isolated the whole hippocampus from mice up to 28 days postnatal age, removing the dentate gyrus while preserving the functional CA3-to-CA1 connections. Placing the hippocampal isolate in a perfusion chamber for electrophysiological assessment extracellular recordings from the CA1 revealed rhythmic field potential of 0.5 to ≤ 4 Hz that occurred spontaneously and propagated along the ventro-dorsal hippocampal axis. We provide convergent evidence, via measurements of extracellular pH and K+, recordings of synaptic and intracellular activities and morphological assessments, verifying that these rhythms were not the consequence of hypoxia. Data obtained via simultaneous extracellular and patch clamp recordings suggest that the spontaneous rhythms represent a summation of GABAergic IPSPs originating from pyramidal neurons, which result from synchronous discharges of GABAergic inhibitory interneurons. Similar spontaneous field rhythms were also observed in the hippocampal isolate prepared from young gerbils and rats. Based on these data, we postulate that the spontaneous rhythms represent a fundamental oscillatory state of the hippocampal circuitry isolated from extra-hippocampal inputs. PMID:11956340

  19. Abnormalities of hippocampal-cortical connectivity in temporal lobe epilepsy patients with hippocampal sclerosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenjing; He, Huiguang; Lu, Jingjing; Wang, Chunheng; Li, Meng; Lv, Bin; Jin, Zhengyu

    2011-03-01

    Hippocampal sclerosis (HS) is the most common damage seen in the patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). In the present study, the hippocampal-cortical connectivity was defined as the correlation between the hippocampal volume and cortical thickness at each vertex throughout the whole brain. We aimed to investigate the differences of ipsilateral hippocampal-cortical connectivity between the unilateral TLE-HS patients and the normal controls. In our study, the bilateral hippocampal volumes were first measured in each subject, and we found that the ipsilateral hippocampal volume significantly decreased in the left TLE-HS patients. Then, group analysis showed significant thinner average cortical thickness of the whole brain in the left TLE-HS patients compared with the normal controls. We found significantly increased ipsilateral hippocampal-cortical connectivity in the bilateral superior temporal gyrus, the right cingulate gyrus and the left parahippocampal gyrus of the left TLE-HS patients, which indicated structural vulnerability related to the hippocampus atrophy in the patient group. However, for the right TLE-HS patients, no significant differences were found between the patients and the normal controls, regardless of the ipsilateral hippocampal volume, the average cortical thickness or the patterns of hippocampal-cortical connectivity, which might be related to less atrophies observed in the MRI scans. Our study provided more evidence for the structural abnormalities in the unilateral TLE-HS patients.

  20. Androgen Modulation of Hippocampal Structure and Function.

    PubMed

    Atwi, Sarah; McMahon, Dallan; Scharfman, Helen; MacLusky, Neil J

    2016-02-01

    Androgens have profound effects on hippocampal structure and function, including induction of spines and spine synapses on the dendrites of CA1 pyramidal neurons, as well as alterations in long-term synaptic plasticity (LTP) and hippocampally dependent cognitive behaviors. How these effects occur remains largely unknown. Emerging evidence, however, suggests that one of the key elements in the response mechanism may be modulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the mossy fiber (MF) system. In male rats, orchidectomy increases synaptic transmission and excitability in the MF pathway. Testosterone reverses these effects, suggesting that testosterone exerts tonic suppression on MF BDNF levels. These findings suggest that changes in hippocampal function resulting from declining androgen levels may reflect the outcome of responses mediated through normally balanced, but opposing, mechanisms: loss of androgen effects on the hippocampal circuitry may be compensated, at least in part, by an increase in BDNF-dependent MF plasticity.

  1. Androgen Modulation of Hippocampal Structure and Function

    PubMed Central

    Atwi, Sarah; McMahon, Dallan; Scharfman, Helen; MacLusky, Neil J.

    2016-01-01

    Androgens have profound effects on hippocampal structure and function, including induction of spines and spine synapses on the dendrites of CA1 pyramidal neurons, as well as alterations in long-term synaptic plasticity (LTP) and hippocampally dependent cognitive behaviors. How these effects occur remains largely unknown. Emerging evidence, however, suggests that one of the key elements in the response mechanism may be modulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the mossy fiber (MF) system. In male rats, orchidectomy increases synaptic transmission and excitability in the MF pathway. Testosterone reverses these effects, suggesting that testosterone exerts tonic suppression on MF BDNF levels. These findings suggest that changes in hippocampal function resulting from declining androgen levels may reflect the outcome of responses mediated through normally balanced, but opposing, mechanisms: loss of androgen effects on the hippocampal circuitry may be compensated, at least in part, by an increase in BDNF-dependent MF plasticity. PMID:25416742

  2. TONIC INFLUENCE OF NEOCORTEX ON HIPPOCAMPAL SEIZURES.

    PubMed

    Saralidze, E; Khuchua, L; Kobaidze, I

    2016-09-01

    The interaction between different brain structures could be crucial to predicting seizure occurrence, threshold and spread. Moreover, the sleep-wake cycle and electrical activity of brain structures in different phases of sleep could significantly affect the pattern and extent of seizure spread, and therefore the characteristics of epileptic activity. In this animal model using 15 Wistar rats, we show that the duration of hippocampal seizures, induced by electrical stimulation of the hippocampus, is significantly increased during slow sleep. Moreover, decreasing the electrical activity of the neocortex by cooling of the cortical surface or induction of cortical spreading depression also caused an increase in hippocampal seizure duration. Conversely, warming the cortical surface triggered a remission in spreading depression, in turn restoring the duration of epileptic episodes. Our data suggest that the neocortex probably exerts a tonic inhibitory influence on hippocampal seizures. Thus, cortico-hippocampal interaction could be an important component in the manifestation and generalization of limbic seizures.

  3. Dynamic mapping of normal human hippocampal development.

    PubMed

    Gogtay, Nitin; Nugent, Tom F; Herman, David H; Ordonez, Anna; Greenstein, Deanna; Hayashi, Kiralee M; Clasen, Liv; Toga, Arthur W; Giedd, Jay N; Rapoport, Judith L; Thompson, Paul M

    2006-01-01

    The hippocampus, which plays an important role in memory functions and emotional responses, has distinct subregions subserving different functions. Because the volume and shape of the hippocampus are altered in many neuropsychiatric disorders, it is important to understand the trajectory of normal hippocampal development. We present the first dynamic maps to reveal the anatomical sequence of normal human hippocampal development. A novel hippocampal mapping technique was applied to a database of prospectively obtained brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans (100 scans in 31 children and adolescents), scanned every 2 yr for 6-10 yr between ages 4 and 25. Our results establish that the structural development of the human hippocampus is remarkably heterogeneous, with significant differences between posterior (increase over time) and anterior (loss over time) subregions. These distinct developmental trajectories of hippocampal subregions may parallel differences in their functional development.

  4. Increasing Hippocampal Acetylcholine Levels Enhances Behavioral Performance in an Animal Model of Diencephalic Amnesia

    PubMed Central

    Roland, Jessica J.; Mark, Katherine; Vetreno, Ryan P.; Savage, Lisa M.

    2008-01-01

    Pyrithiamine-induced thiamine deficiency (PTD) was used to produce a rodent model of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome that results in acute neurological disturbances, thalamic lesions, and learning and memory impairments. There is also cholinergic septo-hippocampal dysfunction in the PTD model. Systemic (Experiment 1) and intrahippocampal (Experiment 2) injections of the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor physostigmine were administered to determine if increasing acetylcholine levels would eliminate the behavioral impairment produced by PTD. Prior to spontaneous alternation testing, rats received injections of either physostigmine (systemic = 0.075 mg/kg; intrahippocampal = 20, 40 ng/µl) or saline. In Experiment 2, intrahippocampal injections of physostigmine significantly enhanced alternation rates in the PTD-treated rats. In addition, although intrahippocampal infusions of 40 ng of physostigmine increased the available amount of ACh in both Pair-fed (PF) and PTD rats, it did so to a greater extent in PF rats. The increase in ACh levels induced by the direct hippocampal application of physostigmine in the PTD model likely increased activation of the extended limbic system, which was dysfunctional, and therefore led to recovery of function on the spontaneous alternation task. In contrast, the lack of behavioral improvement by intrahippocampal physostigmine infusion in the PF rats, despite a greater rise in hippocampal ACh levels, supports the theory that there is a optimal range of cholinergic tone for optimal behavioral and hippocampal function. PMID:18706897

  5. Postnatal irradiation-induced hippocampal neuropathology, cognitive impairment and aging.

    PubMed

    Tang, Feng Ru; Loke, Weng Keong; Khoo, Boo Cheong

    2017-04-01

    Irradiation of the brain in early human life may set abnormal developmental events into motion that last a lifetime, leading to a poor quality of life for affected individuals. While the effect of irradiation at different early developmental stages on the late human life has not been investigated systematically, animal experimental studies suggest that acute postnatal irradiation with ⩾0.1Gy may significantly reduce neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus and endotheliogenesis in cerebral vessels and induce cognitive impairment and aging. Fractionated irradiation also reduces neurogenesis. Furthermore, irradiation induces hippocampal neuronal loss in CA1 and CA3 areas, neuroinflammation and reduces gliogenesis. The hippocampal neurovascular niche and the total number of microvessels are also changed after radiation exposures. Each or combination of these pathological changes may cause cognitive impairment and aging. Interestingly, acute irradiation of aged brain with a certain amount of radiation has also been reported to induce brain hormesis or neurogenesis. At molecular levels, inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, neural growth factors, neurotransmitters, their receptors and signal transduction systems, reactive oxygen species are involved in radiation-induced adverse effect on brain development and functions. Further study at different omics levels after low dose/dose rate irradiation may not only unravel the mechanisms of radiation-induced adverse brain effect or hormesis, but also provide clues for detection or diagnosis of radiation exposure and for therapeutic approaches to effectively prevent radiation-induced cognitive impairment and aging. Investigation focusing on radiation-induced changes of critical brain development events may reveal many previously unknown adverse effects.

  6. Hippocampal neuroplasticity in major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Malykhin, N V; Coupland, N J

    2015-11-19

    One of the most replicated findings has been that hippocampus volume is decreased in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). Recent volumetric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies suggest that localized differences in hippocampal volume may be more prominent than global differences. Preclinical and post-mortem studies in MDD indicated that different subfields of the hippocampus may respond differently to stress and may also have differential levels of plasticity in response to antidepressant treatment. Advances in high-field MRI allowed researchers to visualize and measure hippocampal subfield volumes in MDD patients in vivo. The results of these studies provide the first in vivo evidence that hippocampal volume reductions in MDD are specific to the cornu ammonis and dentate gyrus hippocampal subfields, findings that appear, on the surface, consistent with preclinical evidence for localized mechanisms of hippocampal neuroplasticity. In this review we discuss how recent advances in neuroimaging allow researchers to further understand hippocampal neuroplasticity in MDD and how it is related to antidepressant treatment, memory function, and disease progression.

  7. Obesity elicits interleukin 1-mediated deficits in hippocampal synaptic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Erion, Joanna R; Wosiski-Kuhn, Marlena; Dey, Aditi; Hao, Shuai; Davis, Catherine L; Pollock, Norman K; Stranahan, Alexis M

    2014-02-12

    Adipose tissue is a known source of proinflammatory cytokines in obese humans and animal models, including the db/db mouse, in which obesity arises as a result of leptin receptor insensitivity. Inflammatory cytokines induce cognitive deficits across numerous conditions, but no studies have determined whether obesity-induced inflammation mediates synaptic dysfunction. To address this question, we used a treadmill training paradigm in which mice were exposed to daily training sessions or an immobile belt, with motivation achieved by delivery of compressed air on noncompliance. Treadmill training prevented hippocampal microgliosis, abolished expression of microglial activation markers, and also blocked the functional sensitization observed in isolated cells after ex vivo exposure to lipopolysaccharide. Reduced microglial reactivity with exercise was associated with reinstatement of hippocampus-dependent memory, reversal of deficits in long-term potentiation, and normalization of hippocampal dendritic spine density. Because treadmill training evokes broad responses not limited to the immune system, we next assessed whether directly manipulating adiposity through lipectomy and fat transplantation influences inflammation, cognition, and synaptic plasticity. Lipectomy prevents and fat transplantation promotes systemic and central inflammation, with associated alterations in cognitive and synaptic function. Levels of interleukin 1β (IL1β) emerged as a correlate of adiposity and cognitive impairment across both the treadmill and lipectomy studies, so we manipulated hippocampal IL1 signaling using intrahippocampal delivery of IL1 receptor antagonist (IL1ra). Intrahippocampal IL1ra prevented synaptic dysfunction, proinflammatory priming, and cognitive impairment. This pattern supports a central role for IL1-mediated neuroinflammation as a mechanism for cognitive deficits in obesity and diabetes.

  8. APP Is a Context-Sensitive Regulator of the Hippocampal Presynaptic Active Zone.

    PubMed

    Laßek, Melanie; Weingarten, Jens; Wegner, Martin; Mueller, Benjamin F; Rohmer, Marion; Baeumlisberger, Dominic; Arrey, Tabiwang N; Hick, Meike; Ackermann, Jörg; Acker-Palmer, Amparo; Koch, Ina; Müller, Ulrike; Karas, Michael; Volknandt, Walter

    2016-04-01

    The hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are characterized by cognitive decline and behavioral changes. The most prominent brain region affected by the progression of AD is the hippocampal formation. The pathogenesis involves a successive loss of hippocampal neurons accompanied by a decline in learning and memory consolidation mainly attributed to an accumulation of senile plaques. The amyloid precursor protein (APP) has been identified as precursor of Aβ-peptides, the main constituents of senile plaques. Until now, little is known about the physiological function of APP within the central nervous system. The allocation of APP to the proteome of the highly dynamic presynaptic active zone (PAZ) highlights APP as a yet unknown player in neuronal communication and signaling. In this study, we analyze the impact of APP deletion on the hippocampal PAZ proteome. The native hippocampal PAZ derived from APP mouse mutants (APP-KOs and NexCreAPP/APLP2-cDKOs) was isolated by subcellular fractionation and immunopurification. Subsequently, an isobaric labeling was performed using TMT6 for protein identification and quantification by high-resolution mass spectrometry. We combine bioinformatics tools and biochemical approaches to address the proteomics dataset and to understand the role of individual proteins. The impact of APP deletion on the hippocampal PAZ proteome was visualized by creating protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks that incorporated APP into the synaptic vesicle cycle, cytoskeletal organization, and calcium-homeostasis. The combination of subcellular fractionation, immunopurification, proteomic analysis, and bioinformatics allowed us to identify APP as structural and functional regulator in a context-sensitive manner within the hippocampal active zone network.

  9. APP Is a Context-Sensitive Regulator of the Hippocampal Presynaptic Active Zone

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Benjamin F.; Rohmer, Marion; Baeumlisberger, Dominic; Arrey, Tabiwang N.; Hick, Meike; Ackermann, Jörg; Acker-Palmer, Amparo; Koch, Ina; Müller, Ulrike; Karas, Michael; Volknandt, Walter

    2016-01-01

    The hallmarks of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) are characterized by cognitive decline and behavioral changes. The most prominent brain region affected by the progression of AD is the hippocampal formation. The pathogenesis involves a successive loss of hippocampal neurons accompanied by a decline in learning and memory consolidation mainly attributed to an accumulation of senile plaques. The amyloid precursor protein (APP) has been identified as precursor of Aβ-peptides, the main constituents of senile plaques. Until now, little is known about the physiological function of APP within the central nervous system. The allocation of APP to the proteome of the highly dynamic presynaptic active zone (PAZ) highlights APP as a yet unknown player in neuronal communication and signaling. In this study, we analyze the impact of APP deletion on the hippocampal PAZ proteome. The native hippocampal PAZ derived from APP mouse mutants (APP-KOs and NexCreAPP/APLP2-cDKOs) was isolated by subcellular fractionation and immunopurification. Subsequently, an isobaric labeling was performed using TMT6 for protein identification and quantification by high-resolution mass spectrometry. We combine bioinformatics tools and biochemical approaches to address the proteomics dataset and to understand the role of individual proteins. The impact of APP deletion on the hippocampal PAZ proteome was visualized by creating protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks that incorporated APP into the synaptic vesicle cycle, cytoskeletal organization, and calcium-homeostasis. The combination of subcellular fractionation, immunopurification, proteomic analysis, and bioinformatics allowed us to identify APP as structural and functional regulator in a context-sensitive manner within the hippocampal active zone network. PMID:27092780

  10. BDNF increases release probability and the size of a rapidly recycling vesicle pool within rat hippocampal excitatory synapses

    PubMed Central

    Tyler, William J; Zhang, Xiao-lei; Hartman, Kenichi; Winterer, Jochen; Muller, Wolfgang; Stanton, Patric K; Pozzo-Miller, Lucas

    2006-01-01

    Exerting its actions pre-, post- and peri-synaptically, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is one of the most potent modulators of hippocampal synaptic function. Here, we examined the effects of BDNF on a rapidly recycling pool (RRP) of vesicles within excitatory synapses. First, we estimated vesicular release in hippocampal cultures by performing FM4-64 imaging in terminals impinging on enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP)-labelled dendritic spines – a hallmark of excitatory synapses. Consistent with a modulation of the RRP, BDNF increased the evoked destaining rate of FM4-64 only during the initial phase of field stimulation. Multiphoton microscopy in acute hippocampal slices confirmed these observations by selectively imaging the RRP, which was loaded with FM1-43 by hyperosmotic shock. Slices exposed to BDNF showed an increase in the evoked and spontaneous rates of FM1-43 destaining from terminals in CA1 stratum radiatum, mostly representing excitatory terminals of Schaffer collaterals. Variance-mean analysis of evoked EPSCs in CA1 pyramidal neurons further confirmed that release probability is increased in BDNF-treated slices, without changes in the number of independent release sites or average postsynaptic quantal amplitude. Because BDNF was absent during dye loading, imaging, destaining and whole-cell recordings, these results demonstrate that BDNF induces a long-lasting enhancement in the probability of transmitter release at hippocampal excitatory synapses by modulating the RRP. Since the endogenous BDNF scavenger TrkB-IgG prevented the enhancement of FM1-43 destaining rate caused by induction of long-term potentiation in acute hippocampal slices, the modulation of a rapidly recycling vesicle pool may underlie the role of BDNF in hippocampal long-term synaptic plasticity. PMID:16709633

  11. MKC-231, a choline uptake enhancer, ameliorates working memory deficits and decreased hippocampal acetylcholine induced by ethylcholine aziridinium ion in mice.

    PubMed

    Murai, S; Saito, H; Abe, E; Masuda, Y; Odashima, J; Itoh, T

    1994-01-01

    The effects of acute and chronic administration of MKC-231, a new choline uptake enhancer, and two other nootropic agents, linopiridine (Dup 996) and tetrahydroaminoacridine (THA) on working memory deficits and decreased hippocampal acetylcholine (ACh) content were studied in a delayed non-matching to sample task, using a T-maze, in ethylcholine aziridinium ion (AF64A)-treated mice. Treatment with AF64A (3.5 nmol, i.c.v.) produced memory deficits and decreased hippocampal ACh content. In acute behavioral experiments, MKC-231 and THA had no significant effect on AF64A-induced memory deficits at any doses tested (0.3, 1.0 and 3.0 mg/kg), whereas Dup 996, at a dose of 1.0 mg/kg, significantly improved memory deficits. In chronic experiments, MKC-231 improved memory deficit at all doses tested (0.3, 1.0, or 3.0 mg/kg p.o., once daily for 11 days) and Dup 996 did so only at a dose of 3.0 mg/kg, whereas THA did not improve memory deficit at any doses tested. In acute neurochemical experiments, MKC-231 and THA did not reverse the AF64A-induced hippocampal ACh depletion. Dup 996, however, further decreased hippocampal ACh content compared to that in the AF64A-treated group. In chronic experiments, MKC-231 significantly reversed hippocampal ACh depletion at doses of 0.3 and 1.0 mg/kg, whereas neither Dup 996 nor THA reversed hippocampal ACh depletion at any doses tested. These results indicate that MKC-231 improved the AF64A-induced working memory deficit and hippocampal ACh depletion, probably by recovering reduced high-affinity choline uptake and ACh release.

  12. Rat hippocampal alterations could underlie behavioral abnormalities induced by exposure to moderate noise levels.

    PubMed

    Uran, S L; Aon-Bertolino, M L; Caceres, L G; Capani, F; Guelman, L R

    2012-08-30

    Noise exposure is known to affect auditory structures in living organisms. However, it should not be ignored that many of the effects of noise are extra-auditory. Previous findings of our laboratory demonstrated that noise was able to induce behavioral alterations that are mainly related to the cerebellum (CE) and the hippocampus (HC). Therefore, the aim of this work was to reveal new data about the vulnerability of developing rat HC to moderate noise levels through the assessment of potential histological changes and hippocampal-related behavioral alterations. Male Wistar rats were exposed to noise (95-97 dB SPL, 2h daily) either for 1 day (acute noise exposure, ANE) or between postnatal days 15 and 30 (sub-acute noise exposure, SANE). Hippocampal histological evaluation as well as short (ST) and long term (LT) habituation and recognition memory assessments were performed. Results showed a mild disruption in the different hippocampal regions after ANE and SANE schemes, along with significant behavioral abnormalities. These data suggest that exposure of developing rats to noise levels of moderate intensity is able to trigger changes in the HC, an extra-auditory structure of the Central Nervous System (CNS), that could underlie the observed behavioral effects.

  13. Hippocampal atrophy rates in Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Henneman, W J.P.; Sluimer, J D.; Barnes, J; van der Flier, W M.; Sluimer, I C.; Fox, N C.; Scheltens, P; Vrenken, H; Barkhof, F

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the added value of hippocampal atrophy rates over whole brain volume measurements on MRI in patients with Alzheimer disease (AD), patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and controls. Methods: We included 64 patients with AD (67 ± 9 years; F/M 38/26), 44 patients with MCI (71 ± 6 years; 21/23), and 34 controls (67 ± 9 years; 16/18). Two MR scans were performed (scan interval: 1.8 ± 0.7 years; 1.0 T), using a coronal three-dimensional T1-weighted gradient echo sequence. At follow-up, 3 controls and 23 patients with MCI had progressed to AD. Hippocampi were manually delineated at baseline. Hippocampal atrophy rates were calculated using regional, nonlinear fluid registration. Whole brain baseline volumes and atrophy rates were determined using automated segmentation and registration tools. Results: All MRI measures differed between groups (p < 0.005). For the distinction of MCI from controls, larger effect sizes of hippocampal measures were found compared to whole brain measures. Between MCI and AD, only whole brain atrophy rate differed significantly. Cox proportional hazards models (variables dichotomized by median) showed that within all patients without dementia, hippocampal baseline volume (hazard ratio [HR]: 5.7 [95% confidence interval: 1.5–22.2]), hippocampal atrophy rate (5.2 [1.9–14.3]), and whole brain atrophy rate (2.8 [1.1–7.2]) independently predicted progression to AD; the combination of low hippocampal volume and high atrophy rate yielded a HR of 61.1 (6.1–606.8). Within patients with MCI, only hippocampal baseline volume and atrophy rate predicted progression. Conclusion: Hippocampal measures, especially hippocampal atrophy rate, best discriminate mild cognitive impairment (MCI) from controls. Whole brain atrophy rate discriminates Alzheimer disease (AD) from MCI. Regional measures of hippocampal atrophy are the strongest predictors of progression to AD. GLOSSARY AD = Alzheimer disease; BET = brain

  14. MRI observation of hippocampal degeneration in Alzheimer’s disease: a forgotten case

    PubMed Central

    D’Angelo, Egidio; Mazzarello, Paolo

    Summary At the beginning of the 1990s, as part of work being done for a master’s degree thesis in physics, an important observation of hippocampal degeneration in Alzheimer’s disease was made in Pavia. However this result was never published in a full scientific paper. This case gives an idea of how an isolated observation can, in the right setting, develop into a real scientific achievement. PMID:24139660

  15. MRI observation of hippocampal degeneration in Alzheimer's disease: a forgotten case.

    PubMed

    D'Angelo, Egidio; Mazzarello, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    At the beginning of the 1990s, as part of work being done for a master's degree thesis in physics, an important observation of hippocampal degeneration in Alzheimer's disease was made in Pavia. However this result was never published in a full scientific paper. This case gives an idea of how an isolated observation can, in the right setting, develop into a real scientific achievement.

  16. Regulating hippocampal hyperexcitability through GABAB Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Min; Moradi‐Chameh, Homeira; Zahid, Tariq; Gane, Jonathan; Wu, Chiping; Valiante, Taufik; Zhang, Liang

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Disturbances of GABAergic inhibition are a major cause of epileptic seizures. GABA exerts its actions via ionotropic GABAA receptors and metabotropic G protein‐coupled GABAB receptors. Malfunction of GABAA inhibition has long been recognized in seizure genesis but the role of GABAB receptors in controlling seizure activity is still not well understood. Here, we examined the anticonvulsive, or inhibitory effects, of GABAB receptors in a mouse model of hippocampal kindling as well as mouse hippocampal slices through the use of GS 39783, a positive allosteric GABAB receptor modulator, and CGP 55845, a selective GABAB receptor antagonist. When administered via intraperitoneal injections in kindled mice, GS 39783 (5 mg/kg) did not attenuate hippocampal EEG discharges, but did reduce aberrant hippocampal spikes, whereas CGP 55845 (10 mg/kg) prolonged hippocampal discharges and increased spike incidences. When examined in hippocampal slices, neither GS 39783 at 5 μmol/L nor the GABAB receptor agonist baclofen at 0.1 μmol/L alone significantly altered repetitive excitatory field potentials, but GS 39783 and baclofen together reversibly abolished these field potentials. In contrast, CGP 55845 at 1 μmol/L facilitated induction and incidence of these field potentials. In addition, CGP 55845 attenuated the paired pulse depression of CA3 population spikes and increased the frequency of EPSCs in individual CA3 pyramidal neurons. Collectively, these data suggest that GABABB receptors regulate hippocampal hyperexcitability by inhibiting CA3 glutamatergic synapses. We postulate that positive allosteric modulation of GABAB receptors may be effective in reducing seizure‐related hyperexcitability. PMID:24771688

  17. Hippocampal place cells, context, and episodic memory.

    PubMed

    Smith, David M; Mizumori, Sheri J Y

    2006-01-01

    Although most observers agree that the hippocampus has a critical role in learning and memory, there remains considerable debate about the precise functional contribution of the hippocampus to these processes. Two of the most influential accounts hold that the primary function of the hippocampus is to generate cognitive maps and to mediate episodic memory processes. The well-documented spatial firing patterns (place fields) of hippocampal neurons in rodents, along with the spatial learning impairments observed with hippocampal damage support the cognitive mapping hypothesis. The amnesia for personally experienced events seen in humans with hippocampal damage and the data of animal models, which show severe memory deficits associated with hippocampal lesions, support the episodic memory account. Although an extensive literature supports each of these hypotheses, a specific contribution of place cells to episodic memory has not been clearly demonstrated. Recent data from our laboratory, together with previous findings, indicate that hippocampal place fields and neuronal responses to task-relevant stimuli are highly sensitive to the context, even when the contexts are defined by abstract task demands rather than the spatial geometry of the environment. On the basis of these findings, it is proposed that place fields reflect a more general context processing function of the hippocampus. Hippocampal context representations could serve to differentiate contexts and prime the relevant memories and behaviors. Since episodic memories, by definition, include information about the time and place where the episode occurred, contextual information is a necessary prerequisite for any episodic memory. Thus, place fields contribute importantly to episodic memory as part of the needed context representations. Additionally, recent findings indicate that hippocampal neurons differentiate contexts at progressively finer levels of detail, suggesting a hierarchical coding scheme which

  18. Characterisation of a collection of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates from patients suffering from acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis: in vitro susceptibility to antibiotics and biofilm formation in relation to antibiotic efflux and serotypes/serogroups.

    PubMed

    Vandevelde, Nathalie M; Tulkens, Paul M; Diaz Iglesias, Yvan; Verhaegen, Jan; Rodriguez-Villalobos, Hector; Philippart, Ivan; Cadrobbi, Julie; Coppens, Nathalie; Boel, An; Van Vaerenbergh, Kristien; Francart, Hugo; Vanhoof, Raymond; Liistro, Giuseppe; Jordens, Paul; d'Odemont, Jean-Paul; Valcke, Yvan; Verschuren, Franck; Van Bambeke, Françoise

    2014-09-01

    The correlation between Streptococcus pneumoniae serotypes, biofilm production, antibiotic susceptibility and drug efflux in isolates from patients suffering from acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis (AECB) remains largely unexplored. Using 101 isolates collected from AECB patients for whom partial (n=51) or full (n=50) medical details were available, we determined serotypes (ST)/serogroups (SG) (Quellung reaction), antibiotic susceptibility patterns [MIC (microdilution) using EUCAST and CLSI criteria] and ability to produce biofilm in vitro (10-day model; crystal violet staining). The majority of patients were 55-75 years old and <5% were vaccinated against S. pneumoniae. Moreover, 54% showed high severity scores (GOLD 3-4), and comorbidities were frequent including hypertension (60%), cancer (24%) and diabetes (20%). Alcohol and/or tobacco dependence was >30%. Isolates of SG6-11-15-23, known for large biofilm production and causing chronic infections, were the most prevalent (>15% each), but other isolates also produced biofilm (SG9-18-22-27 and ST8-20 being most productive), except SG7, SG29 and ST5 (<2% of isolates each). Resistance (EUCAST breakpoints) was 8-13% for amoxicillin and cefuroxime, 35-39% for macrolides, 2-8% for fluoroquinolones and 2% for telithromycin. ST19A isolates showed resistance to all antibiotics, ST14 to all except moxifloxacin, and SG9 and SG19 to all except telithromycin, moxifloxacin and ceftriaxone (SG19 only). Solithromycin and telithromycin MICs were similar. No correlation was observed between biofilm production and MIC or efflux (macrolides, fluoroquinolones). S. pneumoniae serotyping may improve AECB treatment by avoiding antibiotics with predictable low activity, but it is not predictive of biofilm production.

  19. Neuropsychological Assessment of Hippocampal Integrity.

    PubMed

    Saury, Jean-Michel; Emanuelson, Ingrid

    2017-01-01

    Finding methods to describe subcortical processes assisting cognition is an important concern for clinical neuropsychological practice. In this study, we reviewed the literature concerning the relationship between a neuropsychological instrument and the underlying neural substructure. We examined evidence indicating that one of the oldest neuropsychological tests still in use, the Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test (RAVLT), includes reliable indicators of hippocampal integrity. We reviewed studies investigating the neural structures underlying seven tasks generated by the RAVLT, from the perspective of whether the performance of these tasks is dependent on the hippocampus. We found support for our hypothesis in five cases: learning capacity, proactive interference, immediate recall, delayed recall, and delayed recognition. No support for our hypothesis was found with regard to short-term memory and retroactive interference. The RAVLT appears to be a reliable tool for assessing the integrity of the hippocampus and for the early detection of dysfunction. There is a need for such assessments, due to the crucial role of the hippocampus in cognition, for instance, in terms of predicting future outcomes.

  20. Injured Fluoro-Jade-positive hippocampal neurons contain high levels of zinc after traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Hellmich, Helen L; Eidson, Kristine A; Capra, Bridget A; Garcia, Jeanna M; Boone, Deborah R; Hawkins, Bridget E; Uchida, Tatsuo; Dewitt, Douglas S; Prough, Donald S

    2007-01-05

    Hippocampal damage contributes to cognitive dysfunction after traumatic brain injury (TBI). We previously showed that Fluoro-Jade, a fluorescent stain that labels injured, degenerating brain neurons, quantifies the extent of hippocampal injury after experimental fluid percussion TBI in rats. Coincidentally, we observed that injured neurons in the rat hippocampus also stained with Newport Green, a fluorescent dye specific for free ionic zinc. Here, we show that, regardless of injury severity or therapeutic intervention, the post-TBI population of injured neurons in rat hippocampal subfields CA1, CA3 and dentate gyrus is indistinguishable, both in numbers and anatomical distribution, from the population of neurons containing high levels of zinc. Treatment with lamotrigine, which inhibits presynaptic release of glutamate and presumably zinc that is co-localized with glutamate, reduced numbers of Fluoro-Jade-positive and Newport Green-positive neurons equally as did treatment with nicardipine, which blocks voltage-gated calcium channels through which zinc enters neurons. To confirm using molecular techniques that Fluoro-Jade and Newport Green-positive neurons are equivalent populations, we isolated total RNA from 25 Fluoro-Jade-positive and 25 Newport Green-positive pyramidal neurons obtained by laser capture microdissection (LCM) from the CA3 subfield, linearly amplified the mRNA and used quantitative ribonuclease protection analysis to demonstrate similar expression of mRNA for selected TBI-induced genes. Our data suggest that therapeutic interventions aimed at reducing neurotoxic zinc levels after TBI may reduce hippocampal neuronal injury.

  1. Agmatine protects against scopolamine-induced water maze performance impairment and hippocampal ERK and Akt inactivation.

    PubMed

    Moosavi, Maryam; Khales, Golnaz Yadollahi; Abbasi, Leila; Zarifkar, Asadollah; Rastegar, Karim

    2012-04-01

    Cholinergic brain activity plays a significant role in memory. Scopolamine a muscarinic cholinergic antagonist is known to induce impairment in Morris water maze performance, the task which is mainly dependent on the hippocampus. It is suggested that hippocampal ERK and Akt activation play roles in synaptic plasticity and some types of learning and memory. Agmatine, a polyamine derived from l-arginine decarboxylation, is recently shown to exert some neuroprotective effects. This study was aimed to investigate if agmatine could reverse scopolamine-induced memory impairment and possible hippocampal ERK and Akt activity alteration. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 200-250 g were randomly assigned into 5 groups. The animals were trained for 3 days in Morris water maze and in day 4 their memory retention was assessed in probe trial which was consisted of a 60 s trial with no platform. Scopolamine (1 mg/kg/ip) or saline were injected 30 min and agmatine (20 or 40 mg/kg/ip) was administered 60 min before each session. The hippocampi were isolated after behavioral studies and western blotting studies on hippocampal lysates were done to determine the levels of activated ERK and Akt. Scopolamine treatment not only impaired water maze learning and memory, but also decreased the amount of phosphorylated (activated) ERK and Akt. Agmatine pre-treatment prevented both the learning impairment and hippocampal ERK and Akt inactivation induced by scopolamine. It seems that agmatine may act as a candidate substance against amnesia.

  2. Leptin resistance and hippocampal behavioral deficits.

    PubMed

    Van Doorn, Catherine; Macht, Victoria A; Grillo, Claudia A; Reagan, Lawrence P

    2017-03-04

    The adipocyte-derived hormone leptin is an important regulator of body weight and metabolism through activation of brain leptin receptors expressed in regions such as the hypothalamus. Beyond these well described and characterized activities of leptin in the hypothalamus, it is becoming increasingly clear that the central activities of leptin extend to the hippocampus. Indeed, leptin receptors are expressed in the hippocampus where these receptors are proposed to mediate various aspects of hippocampal synaptic plasticity that ultimately impact cognitive function. This concept is supported by studies demonstrating that leptin promotes hippocampal-dependent learning and memory, as well as studies indicating that leptin resistance is associated with deficits in hippocampal-dependent behaviors and in the induction of depressive-like behaviors. The effects of leptin on cognitive/behavioral plasticity in the hippocampus may be regulated by direct activation of leptin receptors expressed in the hippocampus; additionally, leptin-mediated activation of synaptic networks that project to the hippocampus may also impact hippocampal-mediated behaviors. In view of these previous observations, the goal of this review will be to discuss the mechanisms through which leptin facilitates cognition and behavior, as well as to dissect the loci at which leptin resistance leads to impairments in hippocampal synaptic plasticity, including the development of cognitive deficits and increased risk of depressive illness in metabolic disorders such as obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM).

  3. Abnormal hippocampal shape in offenders with psychopathy.

    PubMed

    Boccardi, Marina; Ganzola, Rossana; Rossi, Roberta; Sabattoli, Francesca; Laakso, Mikko P; Repo-Tiihonen, Eila; Vaurio, Olli; Könönen, Mervi; Aronen, Hannu J; Thompson, Paul M; Frisoni, Giovanni B; Tiihonen, Jari

    2010-03-01

    Posterior hippocampal volumes correlate negatively with the severity of psychopathy, but local morphological features are unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate hippocampal morphology in habitually violent offenders having psychopathy. Manual tracings of hippocampi from magnetic resonance images of 26 offenders (age: 32.5 +/- 8.4), with different degrees of psychopathy (12 high, 14 medium psychopathy based on the Psychopathy Checklist Revised), and 25 healthy controls (age: 34.6 +/- 10.8) were used for statistical modelling of local changes with a surface-based radial distance mapping method. Both offenders and controls had similar hippocampal volume and asymmetry ratios. Local analysis showed that the high psychopathy group had a significant depression along the longitudinal hippocampal axis, on both the dorsal and ventral aspects, when compared with the healthy controls and the medium psychopathy group. The opposite comparison revealed abnormal enlargement of the lateral borders in both the right and left hippocampi of both high and medium psychopathy groups versus controls, throughout CA1, CA2-3 and the subicular regions. These enlargement and reduction effects survived statistical correction for multiple comparisons in the main contrast (26 offenders vs. 25 controls) and in most subgroup comparisons. A statistical check excluded a possible confounding effect from amphetamine and polysubstance abuse. These results indicate that habitually violent offenders exhibit a specific abnormal hippocampal morphology, in the absence of total gray matter volume changes, that may relate to different autonomic modulation and abnormal fear-conditioning.

  4. Multisensory control of hippocampal spatiotemporal selectivity.

    PubMed

    Ravassard, Pascal; Kees, Ashley; Willers, Bernard; Ho, David; Aharoni, Daniel; Cushman, Jesse; Aghajan, Zahra M; Mehta, Mayank R

    2013-06-14

    The hippocampal cognitive map is thought to be driven by distal visual cues and self-motion cues. However, other sensory cues also influence place cells. Hence, we measured rat hippocampal activity in virtual reality (VR), where only distal visual and nonvestibular self-motion cues provided spatial information, and in the real world (RW). In VR, place cells showed robust spatial selectivity; however, only 20% were track active, compared with 45% in the RW. This indicates that distal visual and nonvestibular self-motion cues are sufficient to provide selectivity, but vestibular and other sensory cues present in RW are necessary to fully activate the place-cell population. In addition, bidirectional cells preferentially encoded distance along the track in VR, while encoding absolute position in RW. Taken together, these results suggest the differential contributions of these sensory cues in shaping the hippocampal population code. Theta frequency was reduced, and its speed dependence was abolished in VR, but phase precession was unaffected, constraining mechanisms governing both hippocampal theta oscillations and temporal coding. These results reveal cooperative and competitive interactions between sensory cues for control over hippocampal spatiotemporal selectivity and theta rhythm.

  5. Development of hippocampal functional connectivity during childhood.

    PubMed

    Blankenship, Sarah L; Redcay, Elizabeth; Dougherty, Lea R; Riggins, Tracy

    2017-01-01

    The hippocampus is a medial temporal lobe structure involved in memory, spatial navigation, and regulation of stress responses, making it a structure critical to daily functioning. However, little is known about the functional development of the hippocampus during childhood due to methodological challenges of acquiring neuroimaging data in young participants. This is a critical gap given evidence that hippocampally-mediated behaviors (e.g., episodic memory) undergo rapid and important changes during childhood. To address this gap, the present investigation collected resting-state fMRI scans in 97, 4- to 10-year-old children. Whole brain seed-based analyses of anterior, posterior, and whole hippocampal connectivity were performed to identify regions demonstrating stable (i.e., age-controlled) connectivity profiles as well as age-related differences in connectivity. Results reveal that the hippocampus is a highly connected structure of the brain and that most of the major components of the adult network are evident during childhood, including both unique and overlapping connectivity between anterior and posterior regions. Despite widespread age-controlled connectivity, the strength of hippocampal connectivity with regions of lateral temporal lobes and the anterior cingulate increased throughout the studied age range. These findings have implications for future investigations of the development of hippocampally-mediated behaviors and methodological applications for the appropriateness of whole versus segmented hippocampal seeds in connectivity analyses. Hum Brain Mapp 38:182-201, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Neurobiological toxicity of radiation in hippocampal cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joong-Sun; Yang, Miyoung; Kim, Sung-Ho; Shin, Taekyun; Moon, Changjong

    2013-03-01

    Worldwide radiation exposure is increasing due to recent nuclear accidents, space travel, atomic weapons testing and use, and medical treatments. In adult animals, ionizing radiation can significantly impact hippocampal neurogenesis and negatively affect hippocampal functions such as cognition. However, there is considerable uncertainty regarding the mechanisms underlying these effects. This article reviews in vivo and in vitro studies on the effects of irradiation on hippocampal neurogenesis and function in order to gain new mechanistic insights. This information will provide complementary views of our understanding of the normal brain's tolerance to radiation exposure, the potentially serious implications of radiation exposure to cognition, and lead to a discussion of potential strategies for pharmacotherapy and behavioral intervention.

  7. Plasticity of hippocampal memories in humans.

    PubMed

    Horner, Aidan J; Doeller, Christian F

    2017-03-02

    The human hippocampus is a brain region that supports episodic and spatial memory. Recent experiments have drawn on animal research and computational modelling to reveal how the unique computations and representations of the hippocampus support episodic and spatial memory. Invasive electrophysiological recordings and non-invasive functional brain imaging have provided evidence for the rapid formation of hippocampal representations, as well as the ability of the hippocampus to both pattern-separate and pattern-complete input from the neocortex. Further, recent evidence has shown that hippocampal representations are in constant flux, undergoing a continual process of strengthening, weakening and altering. This research offers a glimpse into the highly plastic and flexible nature of the human hippocampal system in relation to episodic memory.

  8. Cholinergic modulation of hippocampal network function

    PubMed Central

    Teles-Grilo Ruivo, Leonor M.; Mellor, Jack R.

    2013-01-01

    Cholinergic septohippocampal projections from the medial septal area to the hippocampus are proposed to have important roles in cognition by modulating properties of the hippocampal network. However, the precise spatial and temporal profile of acetylcholine release in the hippocampus remains unclear making it difficult to define specific roles for cholinergic transmission in hippocampal dependent behaviors. This is partly due to a lack of tools enabling specific intervention in, and recording of, cholinergic transmission. Here, we review the organization of septohippocampal cholinergic projections and hippocampal acetylcholine receptors as well as the role of cholinergic transmission in modulating cellular excitability, synaptic plasticity, and rhythmic network oscillations. We point to a number of open questions that remain unanswered and discuss the potential for recently developed techniques to provide a radical reappraisal of the function of cholinergic inputs to the hippocampus. PMID:23908628

  9. Adult hippocampal neurogenesis and memory interference.

    PubMed

    Winocur, Gordon; Becker, Suzanna; Luu, Paul; Rosenzweig, Shira; Wojtowicz, J Martin

    2012-02-14

    Rats, subjected to low-dose irradiation that suppressed hippocampal neurogenesis, or a sham treatment, were administered a visual discrimination task under conditions of high, or low interference. Half of the rats engaged in running activity and the other half did not. In the non-runners, there was no effect of irradiation on learning, or remembering the discrimination response under low interference, but irradiation treatment increased their susceptibility to interference, resulting in loss of memory for the previously learned discrimination. Irradiated rats that engaged in running activity exhibited increased neuronal growth and protection from memory impairment. The results, which show that hippocampal cells generated in adulthood play a role in differentiating between conflicting, context-dependent memories, provide further evidence of the importance of neurogenesis in hippocampus-sensitive memory tasks. The results are consistent with computational models of hippocampal function that specify a central role for neurogenesis in the modulation of interfering influences during learning and memory.

  10. Cystitis - acute

    MedlinePlus

    Uncomplicated urinary tract infection; UTI - acute cystitis; Acute bladder infection; Acute bacterial cystitis ... cause. Menopause also increases the risk for a urinary tract infection. The following also increase your chances of having ...

  11. Tetramethyl Pyrazine Protects Hippocampal Neurons Against Anoxia/Reoxygenation Injury Through Inhibiting Apoptosis Mediated by JNK/MARK Signal Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Ming; Ma, Wuhua; Zhang, Xiong; Wang, Yong; Gao, Xiaoqiu

    2016-01-01

    Background Tetramethyl pyrazine (TMP) is a typical biologically active alkaloid isolated from the Chinese herb Ligusticum walliichi. It has been reported that TMP shows neuroprotective and stroke injury reductive properties in cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) animal models. In the present study we sought to investigate the effect and potential intervention mechanism of TMP in anoxia/reoxygenation (A/R) rat hippocampal neurons. Material/Methods After being cultured for 7 days, primary hippocampal neurons were randomly assigned into a normal control group (N), a TMP group (C: 0 ug/ml, L: 60 ug/ml, M: 200ug/ml and H: 800 ug/ml), and a JNK inhibitor group (S: SP600125, 10 μmol/L). A hypoxia/reoxygenation model were prepared 1 h after incubation. Hippocampal neurons were incubated in 90% N2 and 10% CO2 for 2 h, and then reoxygenated for 24 h in an incubator with 5%CO2 at the temperature of 37°C. The apoptosis rate, MKK4 and MKK7 mRNA and JNK kinase protein levels (C-fos, c-jun, and P-JNK) of hippocampal neurons were detected. Results The apoptosis rates of hippocampal neurons induced by A/R showed significant reduction after being pre-treated with JNK inhibitor, TMP 60 μg/ml, 200 μg/ml, and 800 μg/ml. The JNK kinase MKK4mRNA and MKK7mRNA levels, as well as the expressions of C-fos, C-jun, and P-JNK protein levels, were also be reduced. Conclusions TMP may produce a protective effect in anoxia/reoxygenation-induced primary hippocampal neuronal injury by inhibiting the apoptosis of the hippocampal neurons; the possible mechanism may be inhibition of the JNK signal pathway. PMID:28009855

  12. Microbats appear to have adult hippocampal neurogenesis, but post-capture stress causes a rapid decline in the number of neurons expressing doublecortin.

    PubMed

    Chawana, R; Alagaili, A; Patzke, N; Spocter, M A; Mohammed, O B; Kaswera, C; Gilissen, E; Bennett, N C; Ihunwo, A O; Manger, P R

    2014-09-26

    A previous study investigating potential adult hippocampal neurogenesis in microchiropteran bats failed to reveal a strong presence of this neural trait. As microchiropterans have a high field metabolic rate and a small body mass, it is possible that capture/handling stress may lead to a decrease in the detectable presence of adult hippocampal neurogenesis. Here we looked for evidence of adult hippocampal neurogenesis using immunohistochemical techniques for the endogenous marker doublecortin (DCX) in 10 species of microchiropterans euthanized and perfusion fixed at specific time points following capture. Our results reveal that when euthanized and perfused within 15 min of capture, abundant putative adult hippocampal neurogenesis could be detected using DCX immunohistochemistry. Between 15 and 30 min post-capture, the detectable levels of DCX dropped dramatically and after 30 min post-capture, immunohistochemistry for DCX could not reveal any significant evidence of putative adult hippocampal neurogenesis. Thus, as with all other mammals studied to date apart from cetaceans, bats, including both microchiropterans and megachiropterans, appear to exhibit substantial levels of adult hippocampal neurogenesis. The present study underscores the concept that, as with laboratory experiments, studies conducted on wild-caught animals need to be cognizant of the fact that acute stress (capture/handling) may induce major changes in the appearance of specific neural traits.

  13. Spontaneous recurrent network activity in organotypic rat hippocampal slices.

    PubMed

    Mohajerani, Majid H; Cherubini, Enrico

    2005-07-01

    Organotypic hippocampal slices were prepared from postnatal day 4 rats and maintained in culture for >6 weeks. Cultured slices exhibited from 12 days in vitro spontaneous events which closely resembled giant depolarizing potentials (GDPs) recorded in neonatal hippocampal slices. GDP-like events occurred over the entire hippocampus with a delay of 30-60 ms between two adjacent regions as demonstrated by pair recordings from CA3-CA3, CA3-CA1 and interneurone-CA3 pyramidal cells. As in acute slices, spontaneous recurrent events were generated by the interplay of GABA and glutamate acting on AMPA receptors as they were reversibly blocked by bicuculline and 6,7-dinitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione but not by dl-2-amino-5-phosphonopentaoic acid. The equilibrium potentials for GABA measured in whole cell and gramicidin-perforated patch from interconnected interneurones-CA3 pyramidal cells were -70 and -56 mV, respectively. The resting membrane potential estimated from the reversal of N-methyl-D-aspartate-induced single-channel currents in cell-attach experiments was -75 mV. In spite of its depolarizing action, in the majority of cases GABA was still inhibitory as it blocked the firing of principal cells. The increased level of glutamatergic connectivity certainly contributed to network synchronization and to the development of interictal discharges after prolonged exposure to bicuculline. In spite of its inhibitory action, in a minority of cells GABA was still depolarizing and excitatory as it was able to bring principal cells to fire, suggesting that a certain degree of immaturity is still present in cultured slices. This was in line with the transient bicuculline-induced block of GDPs and with the isoguvacine-induced increase of GDP frequency.

  14. Recruitment of hippocampal neurons to encode behavioral events in the rat: Alterations in cognitive demand and cannabinoid exposure

    PubMed Central

    Goonawardena, Anushka V; Robinson, Lianne; Riedel, Gernot; Hampson, Robert E

    2009-01-01

    Successful performance by rats of a delayed-nonmatch-to-sample (DNMS) task is hippocampal dependent. We have shown that neurons in hippocampus differentially encode task-relevant events. These responses are critical for correct DNMS performance and are diminished by exogenous cannabinoids. We therefore reasoned that hippocampal neural correlates of behavior are likely shaped during learning; however, to date, no work has examined these correlates during DNMS acquisition training. Consequently, the present study assessed the emergence of hippocampal neural encoding when (i) cognitive task demands were increased through prolongation of delay intervals between sample and nonmatch phase, and (ii) when animals are under cannabinoid treatment and performance is compromised. Adult, male Long-Evans rats were trained to perform the DNMS task without delay and then implanted with multi-electrode recording arrays directed to CA3 and CA1 sub-fields of the hippocampus. Following recovery, single units were isolated and animals divided into two treatment groups: vehicle or WIN 55,212-2 (WIN-2, 0.35 mg/kg). Ensemble firing was monitored during retraining in DNMS task at 0s, and subsequently delay intervals were progressively increased to 1–10s, 11–20s and 21–30s when animals met criterion (80% correct) at each respective interval. Hippocampal CA3 and CA1 principal cells were isolated and recorded throughout treatment. Extention of the delay led to an increase in the number of task-correlated neurons in controls. This recruitment of novel cells was reduced/prevented in the presence of WIN-2 and was paralleled by impairment in acquisition learning at longer delay intervals. Moreover, WIN-2 suppressed hippocampal ensemble firing during the sample (encoding) but not nonmatch phase of the DNMS task across all delays. These cannabinoid induced alterations in hippocampal neuronal activity may explain the observed deficits in DNMS performance. PMID:19771586

  15. Myocardial ischemia/reperfusion impairs neurogenesis and hippocampal-dependent learning and memory.

    PubMed

    Evonuk, Kirsten S; Prabhu, Sumanth D; Young, Martin E; DeSilva, Tara M

    2017-03-01

    The incidence of cognitive impairment in cardiovascular disease (CVD) patients has increased, adversely impacting quality of life and imposing a significant economic burden. Brain imaging of CVD patients has detected changes in the hippocampus, a brain region critical for normal learning and memory. However, it is not clear whether adverse cardiac events or other associated co-morbidities impair cognition. Here, using a murine model of acute myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (I/R), where the coronary artery was occluded for 30min followed by reperfusion, we tested the hypothesis that acute myocardial infarction triggers impairment in cognitive function. Two months following cardiac I/R, behavioral assessments specific for hippocampal cognitive function were performed. Mice subjected to cardiac I/R performed worse in the fear-conditioning paradigm as well as the object location memory behavioral test compared to sham-operated mice. Reactive gliosis was apparent in the hippocampal subregions CA1, CA3, and dentate gyrus 72h post-cardiac I/R as compared with sham, which was sustained two months post-cardiac I/R. Consistent with the inflammatory response, the abundance of doublecortin positive newborn neurons was decreased in the dentate gyrus 72h and 2months post-cardiac I/R as compared with sham. Therefore, we conclude that following acute myocardial infarction, rapid inflammatory responses negatively affect neurogenesis, which may underlie long-term changes in learning and memory.

  16. Traumatic alterations in GABA signaling disrupt hippocampal network activity in the developing brain

    PubMed Central

    Dzhala, Volodymyr; Valeeva, Guzel; Glykys, Joseph; Khazipov, Rustem; Staley, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    Severe head trauma causes widespread neuronal shear injuries and acute seizures. Shearing of neural processes might contribute to seizures by disrupting the transmembrane ion gradients that subserve normal synaptic signaling. To test this possibility, we investigated changes in intracellular chloride concentration ([Cl−]i) associated with the widespread neural shear injury induced during preparation of acute brain slices. In hippocampal slices and intact hippocampal preparations from immature CLM-1 mice, increases in [Cl−]i correlated with disruption of neural processes and biomarkers of cell injury. Traumatized neurons with higher [Cl−]i demonstrated excitatory GABA signaling, remained synaptically active, and facilitated network activity as assayed by the frequency of extracellular action potentials and spontaneous network-driven oscillations. These data support a more inhibitory role for GABA in the unperturbed immature brain, demonstrate the utility of the acute brain slice preparation for the study of the consequences of trauma, and provide potential mechanisms for both GABA-mediated excitatory network events in the slice preparation and early post-traumatic seizures. PMID:22442068

  17. Hippocampal damage and cytoskeletal disruption resulting from impaired energy metabolism. Implications for Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Geddes, J W; Pang, Z; Wiley, D H

    1996-01-01

    To determine if impaired energy metabolism might contribute to some aspects of Alzheimer disease (AD), including the vulnerability of the CA1 region of the hippocampal formation and the altered cytoskeleton evident in neurofibrillary tangles, we examined the effects of metabolic poisons on neuronal damage and cytoskeletal disruption in the hippocampal formation. Intrahippocampal injection of 3-nitropropionic acid (3-NP) and malonic acid resulted in neuronal death, particularly in CA1. Cytoskeletal disruption included loss of dendritic MAP2, but sparing of axonal gamma. MK-801 (a noncompetitive NMDA receptor antagonist) did not atentuate the lesions produced by intrahippocampal injection of malonate. MK-801, however, was effective against intrastriatal malonate. Acute systemic 3-NP resulted in neuronal damage and cytoskeletal disruption in the CA1 region of the hippocampal formation, including an extensive loss of MAP2 immuno-reactivity, but sparing of gamma. The neuronal loss in CA1 was delayed as compared to striatum. Chronic intraventricular infusion of 3-NP produced a different pattern of neuronal damage. Loss of gamma-1 immuno-reactivity was observed in CA3 and CA1 s. orients, whereas MAP2 immunostaining was preserved. These results demonstrate that chronic and acute administration of metabolic inhibitors produce distinct patterns of neuronal damage and cytoskeletal disruption. The results further suggest a differential involvement of the NMDA receptor in malonate-induced neuronal damage in striatum as compared to the hippocampus. The pattern of neuronal damage and cytoskeletal disruption observed following acute metabolic impairment resembled some aspects of neurofibrillary pathology in AD, but did not result in gamma hyperphosphorylation.

  18. Resveratrol: A Potential Hippocampal Plasticity Enhancer

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Gisele Pereira; Cocks, Graham; do Nascimento Bevilaqua, Mário Cesar; Nardi, Antonio Egidio

    2016-01-01

    The search for molecules capable of restoring altered hippocampal plasticity in psychiatric and neurological conditions is one of the most important tasks of modern neuroscience. It is well established that neural plasticity, such as the ability of the postnatal hippocampus to continuously generate newly functional neurons throughout life, a process called adult hippocampal neurogenesis (AHN), can be modulated not only by pharmacological agents, physical exercise, and environmental enrichment, but also by “nutraceutical” agents. In this review we focus on resveratrol, a phenol and phytoalexin found in the skin of grapes and red berries, as well as in nuts. Resveratrol has been reported to have antioxidant and antitumor properties, but its effects as a neural plasticity inducer are still debated. The current review examines recent evidence implicating resveratrol in regulating hippocampal neural plasticity and in mitigating the effects of various disorders and diseases on this important brain structure. Overall, findings show that resveratrol can improve cognition and mood and enhance hippocampal plasticity and AHN; however, some studies report opposite effects, with resveratrol inhibiting aspects of AHN. Therefore, further investigation is needed to resolve these controversies before resveratrol can be established as a safe coadjuvant in preventing and treating neuropsychiatric conditions. PMID:27313836

  19. Food restriction modifies ultrastructure of hippocampal synapses.

    PubMed

    Babits, Réka; Szőke, Balázs; Sótonyi, Péter; Rácz, Bence

    2016-04-01

    Consumption of high-energy diets may compromise health and may also impair cognition; these impairments have been linked to tasks that require hippocampal function. Conversely, food restriction has been shown to improve certain aspects of hippocampal function, including spatial memory and memory persistence. These diet-dependent functional changes raise the possibility that the synaptic structure underlying hippocampal function is also affected. To examine how short-term food restriction (FR) alters the synaptic structure of the hippocampus, we used quantitative electron microscopy to analyze the organization of neuropil in the CA1 stratum radiatum of the hippocampus in young rats, consequent to reduced food. While four weeks of FR did not modify the density, size, or shape of postsynaptic spines, the synapses established by these spines were altered, displaying increased mean length, and more frequent perforations of postsynaptic densities. That the number of perforated synapses (believed to be an indicator of synaptic enhancement) increased, and that the CA1 spine population had on average significantly longer PSDs suggests that synaptic efficacy of axospinous synapses also increased in the CA1. Taken together, our ultrastructural data reveal previously unrecognized structural changes at hippocampal synapses as a function of food restriction, supporting a link between metabolic balance and synaptic plasticity.

  20. Calcium Phosphate Transfection of Primary Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    DiBona, Victoria L.; Wu, Qian; Zhang, Huaye

    2013-01-01

    Calcium phosphate precipitation is a convenient and economical method for transfection of cultured cells. With optimization, it is possible to use this method on hard-to-transfect cells like primary neurons. Here we describe our detailed protocol for calcium phosphate transfection of hippocampal neurons cocultured with astroglial cells. PMID:24300106

  1. Social isolation-induced increase in NMDA receptors in the hippocampus exacerbates emotional dysregulation in mice.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chih-Hua; Hsiao, Ya-Hsin; Chen, Yu-Wen; Yu, Yang-Jung; Gean, Po-Wu

    2015-04-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown that early life adverse events have long-term effects on the susceptibility to subsequent stress exposure in adolescence, but the precise mechanism is unclear. In the present study, mice on postnatal day 21-28 were randomly assigned to either a group or isolated cages for 8 weeks. The socially isolated (SI) mice exhibited a higher level of spontaneous locomotor activity, a longer duration of immobility in the forced swimming test (FST), significantly less prepulse inhibition (PPI) and an increase in aggressive (but not attack) behavior. However, acute stress markedly exacerbated the attack counts of the SI mice but did not affect the group housing (GH) mice. SI mice exhibited higher synaptosomal NR2A and NR2B levels in the hippocampus as compared to the GH mice. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings of CA1 neurons in hippocampal slices showed that the SI mice exhibited a higher input-output relationship of NMDAR-EPSCs as compared to the GH mice. Application of the NR2B -specific antagonist ifenprodil produced a greater attenuating effect on NMDAR-EPSCs in slices from the SI mice. NMDAR EPSCs recorded from the SI mice had a slower deactivation kinetic. MK-801, CPP and ifenprodil, the NMDA antagonists, reversed acute stress-induced exaggeration of aggressive and depressive behaviors. Furthermore, acute stress-induced exacerbation of attack behavior in the SI mice was abolished after the knockdown of NR2B expression. These results suggest that social isolation-induced increased expression of NMDA receptors in the hippocampus involves stress exacerbation of aggressive behaviors. Amelioration of aggressive behaviors by NMDA antagonists may open a new avenue for the treatment of psychopathologies that involve outbursts of emotional aggression in neglected children.

  2. Single fluoxetine treatment before but not after stress prevents stress-induced hippocampal long-term depression and spatial memory retrieval impairment in rats.

    PubMed

    Han, Huili; Dai, Chunfang; Dong, Zhifang

    2015-07-28

    A growing body of evidence has shown that chronic treatment with fluoxetine, a widely prescribed medication for treatment of depression, can affect synaptic plasticity in the adult central nervous system. However, it is not well understood whether acute fluoxetine influences synaptic plasticity, especially on hippocampal CA1 long-term depression (LTD), and if so, whether it subsequently impacts hippocampal-dependent spatial memory. Here, we reported that LTD facilitated by elevated-platform stress in hippocampal slices was completely prevented by fluoxetine administration (10 mg/kg, i.p.) 30 min before stress. The LTD was not, however, significantly inhibited by fluoxetine administration immediately after stress. Similarly, fluoxetine incubation (10 μM) during electrophysiological recordings also displayed no influence on the stress-facilitated LTD. In addition, behavioral results showed that a single fluoxetine treatment 30 min before but not after acute stress fully reversed the impairment of spatial memory retrieval in the Morris water maze paradigm. Taken together, these results suggest that acute fluoxetine treatment only before, but not after stress, can prevent hippocampal CA1 LTD and spatial memory retrieval impairment caused by behavioral stress in adult animals.

  3. Selective Dysregulation of Hippocampal Inhibition in the Mouse Lacking Autism Candidate Gene CNTNAP2.

    PubMed

    Jurgensen, Sofia; Castillo, Pablo E

    2015-10-28

    Mutations in the human gene encoding contactin-associated protein-like 2 (CNTNAP2) have been strongly associated with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Cntnap2(-/-) mice recapitulate major features of ASD, including social impairment, reduced vocalizations, and repetitive behavior. In addition, Cntnap2(-/-) mice show reduced cortical neuronal synchrony and develop spontaneous seizures throughout adulthood. As suggested for other forms of ASDs, this phenotype could reflect some form of synaptic dysregulation. However, the impact of lifelong deletion of CNTNAP2 on synaptic function in the brain remains unknown. To address this issue, we have assessed excitatory and inhibitory synaptic transmission in acute hippocampal slices of Cntnap2(-/-) mice. We found that although excitatory transmission was mostly normal, inhibition onto CA1 pyramidal cells was altered in Cntnap2(-/-) mice. Specifically, putative perisomatic, but not dendritic, evoked IPSCs were significantly reduced in these mice. Whereas both inhibitory short-term plasticity and miniature IPSC frequency and amplitude were normal in Cntnap2(-/-) mice, we found an unexpected increase in the frequency of spontaneous, action potential-driven IPSCs. Altered hippocampal inhibition could account for the behavioral phenotype Cntnap2(-/-) mice present later in life. Overall, our findings that Cntnap2 deletion selectively impairs perisomatic hippocampal inhibition while sparing excitation provide additional support for synaptic dysfunction as a common mechanism underlying ASDs.

  4. IGF-1 Receptor Differentially Regulates Spontaneous and Evoked Transmission via Mitochondria at Hippocampal Synapses

    PubMed Central

    Gazit, Neta; Vertkin, Irena; Shapira, Ilana; Helm, Martin; Slomowitz, Edden; Sheiba, Maayan; Mor, Yael; Rizzoli, Silvio; Slutsky, Inna

    2016-01-01

    Summary The insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) signaling is a key regulator of lifespan, growth, and development. While reduced IGF-1R signaling delays aging and Alzheimer’s disease progression, whether and how it regulates information processing at central synapses remains elusive. Here, we show that presynaptic IGF-1Rs are basally active, regulating synaptic vesicle release and short-term plasticity in excitatory hippocampal neurons. Acute IGF-1R blockade or transient knockdown suppresses spike-evoked synaptic transmission and presynaptic cytosolic Ca2+ transients, while promoting spontaneous transmission and resting Ca2+ level. This dual effect on transmitter release is mediated by mitochondria that attenuate Ca2+ buffering in the absence of spikes and decrease ATP production during spiking activity. We conclude that the mitochondria, activated by IGF-1R signaling, constitute a critical regulator of information processing in hippocampal neurons by maintaining evoked-to-spontaneous transmission ratio, while constraining synaptic facilitation at high frequencies. Excessive IGF-1R tone may contribute to hippocampal hyperactivity associated with Alzheimer’s disease. Video Abstract PMID:26804996

  5. Dysfunctional hippocampal inhibition in the Ts65Dn mouse model of Down syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Best, Tyler K.; Cramer, Nathan P.; Chakrabarti, Lina; Haydar, Tarik F.; Galdzicki, Zygmunt

    2013-01-01

    GABAergic dysfunction is implicated in hippocampal deficits of the Ts65Dn mouse model of Down syndrome (DS). Since Ts65Dn mice overexpress G-protein coupled inward-rectifying potassium (GIRK2) containing channels, we sought to evaluate whether increased GABAergic function disrupts the functioning of hippocampal circuitry. After confirming that GABAB/GIRK current density is significantly elevated in Ts65Dn CA1 pyramidal neurons, we compared monosynaptic inhibitory inputs in CA1 pyramidal neurons in response to proximal (stratum radiatum; SR) and distal (stratum lacunosum moleculare; SLM) stimulation of diploid and Ts65Dn acute hippocampal slices. Synaptic GABAB and GABAA mediated currents evoked by SR stimulation were generally unaffected in Ts65Dn CA1 neurons. However, the GABAB/GABAA ratios evoked by stimulation within the SLM of Ts65Dn hippocampus were significantly larger in magnitude, consistent with increased GABAB/GIRK currents after SLM stimulation. These results indicate that GIRK overexpression in Ts65Dn has functional consequences which affect the balance between GABAB and GABAA inhibition of CA1 pyramidal neurons, most likely in a pathway specific manner, and may contribute to cognitive deficits reported in these mice. PMID:22178330

  6. Hippocampal gene expression changes underlying stress sensitization and recovery.

    PubMed

    Gray, J D; Rubin, T G; Hunter, R G; McEwen, B S

    2014-11-01

    Chronic and acute stressors have been linked to changes in hippocampal function and anxiety-like behaviors. Both produce changes in gene expression, but the extent to which these changes endure beyond the end of stress remains poorly understood. As an essential first step to characterize abnormal patterns of gene expression after stress, this study demonstrates how chronic restraint stress (CRS) modulates gene expression in response to a novel stressor in the hippocampus of wild-type mice and the extent to which these changes last beyond the end of CRS. Male C57/bl6 mice were subjected to (1) a forced swim test (FST), (2) corticosterone (Cort) or vehicle injections, (3) CRS for 21 days and then a FST, or (4) allowed to recover 21 days after CRS and subjected to FST. Hippocampal mRNA was extracted and used to generate cDNA libraries for microarray hybridization. Naive acute stressors (FST and vehicle injection) altered similar sets of genes, but Cort treatment produced a profile that was distinct from both FST and vehicle. Exposure to a novel stress after CRS activated substantially more and different genes than naive exposure. Most genes increased by CRS were decreased after recovery but many remained altered and did not return to baseline. Pathway analysis identified significant clusters of differentially expressed genes across conditions, most notably the nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of B cells (NF-κB) pathway. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) validated changes from the microarrays in known stress-induced genes and confirmed alterations in the NF-κB pathway genes, Nfkbia, RelA and Nfkb1. FST increased anxiety-like behavior in both the naive and recovery from CRS conditions, but not in mice 24h subsequent to their CRS exposure. These findings suggest that the effects of naive stress are distinct from Cort elevation, and that a history of stress exposure can permanently alter gene expression patterns in the hippocampus and the

  7. Hippocampal gene expression changes underlying stress sensitization and recovery

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Jason D.; Rubin, Todd G.; Hunter, Richard G.; McEwen, Bruce S.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic and acute stressors have been linked to changes in hippocampal function and anxiety-like behaviors. Both produce changes in gene expression, but the extent to which these changes endure beyond the end of stress remains poorly understood. As an essential first step to characterize abnormal patterns of gene expression after stress, this study demonstrates how chronic restraint stress (CRS) modulates gene expression in response to a novel stressor in the hippocampus of wild type mice and the extent to which these changes last beyond the end of CRS. Male C57/bl6 mice were subjected to 1) a forced swim test (FST), 2) Corticosterone (Cort) or vehicle injections, 3) CRS for 21 days and then a FST, or 4) allowed to recover 21 days after CRS and subjected to FST. Hippocampal mRNA was extracted and used to generate cDNA libraries for microarray hybridization. Naïve acute stressors (FST and vehicle injection) altered similar sets of genes, but Cort treatment produced a profile that was distinct from both FST and vehicle. Exposure to a novel stress after CRS activated substantially more and different genes than naïve exposure. Most genes increased by CRS were decreased after recovery, but many remained altered and did not return to baseline. Pathway analysis identified significant clusters of differentially expressed genes across conditions, most notably the NfKB pathway. Quantitative RT-PCR validated changes from the microarrays in known stress-induced genes and confirmed alterations in the NfKb pathway genes, Ikbα, RelA and Nfkb1. FST increased anxiety-like behavior in both the naïve and recovery from CRS conditions, but not in mice 24hrs subsequent to their CRS exposure. These findings suggest the effects of naïve stress are distinct from Cort elevation and that a history of stress exposure can permanently alter gene expression patterns in the hippocampus and the behavioral response to a novel stressor. These findings establish a baseline profile of normal

  8. Aerobic fitness, hippocampal viscoelasticity, and relational memory performance.

    PubMed

    Schwarb, Hillary; Johnson, Curtis L; Daugherty, Ana M; Hillman, Charles H; Kramer, Arthur F; Cohen, Neal J; Barbey, Aron K

    2017-03-30

    The positive relationship between hippocampal structure, aerobic fitness, and memory performance is often observed among children and older adults; but evidence of this relationship among young adults, for whom the hippocampus is neither developing nor atrophying, is less consistent. Studies have typically relied on hippocampal volumetry (a gross proxy of tissue composition) to assess individual differences in hippocampal structure. While volume is not specific to microstructural tissue characteristics, microstructural differences in hippocampal integrity may exist even among healthy young adults when volumetric differences are not diagnostic of tissue health or cognitive function. Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) is an emerging noninvasive imaging technique for measuring viscoelastic tissue properties and provides quantitative measures of tissue integrity. We have previously demonstrated that individual differences in hippocampal viscoelasticity are related to performance on a relational memory task; however, little is known about health correlates to this novel measure. In the current study, we investigated the relationship between hippocampal viscoelasticity and cardiovascular health, and their mutual effect on relational memory in a group of healthy young adults (N=51). We replicated our previous finding that hippocampal viscoelasticity correlates with relational memory performance. We extend this work by demonstrating that better aerobic fitness, as measured by VO2max, was associated with hippocampal viscoelasticity that mediated the benefits of fitness on memory function. Hippocampal volume, however, did not account for individual differences in memory. Therefore, these data suggest that hippocampal viscoelasticity may provide a more sensitive measure to microstructural tissue organization and its consequences to cognition among healthy young adults.

  9. Periodic eye opening and upward eye deviation accompanied by burst-suppression, as an isolated clinical manifestation of acute post-hypoxic myoclonus.

    PubMed

    Dericioglu, Nese; Arsava, Ethem Murat; Topcuoglu, Mehmet Akif

    2015-03-01

    Various movement disorders have been described following hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury. Here, we present a 72-year-old female patient who developed periodic opening and upward deviation of the eyes as an isolated clinical finding, within 24 hours after cardio-pulmonary arrest. These movements were accompanied by burst-suppression on EEG, and both clinical and electrophysiological findings were suppressed 18 hours after intravenous levetiracetam infusion. The strictly periodic nature of both EEG discharges and eye opening with vertical deviation suggest a cause due to either activation of a subcortical/brainstem pacemaker reciprocally stimulating the cortex, or, alternatively, post-anoxic burst activity of viable cortical neural networks, somehow stimulating the relevant oculomotor nuclei. Together with previous similar cases, our case expands the spectrum of post-resuscitation myoclonus syndromes with the addition of this rare isolated oculopalpebral subtype. [Published with video sequence].

  10. CaMKII requirement for the persistence of in vivo hippocampal mossy fiber synaptic plasticity and structural reorganization.

    PubMed

    Juárez-Muñoz, Yectivani; Rivera-Olvera, Alejandro; Ramos-Languren, Laura E; Escobar, Martha L

    2017-03-01

    CaMKII has been proposed as a molecular substrate for long-term memory storage due to its capacity to maintain an active autophosporylated state even after the decay of the external stimuli. The hippocampal mossy fiber-CA3 pathway (MF-CA3) is considered as a relevant area for acquisition and storage of different learning tasks. MF-CA3 pathway exhibits a form of LTP characterized by a slow initial increase in the EPSP slope that is independent of NMDA receptors activation. Our previous studies show that application of high frequency stimulation sufficient to elicit MF-CA3 LTP produces structural reorganization, in a manner independent of LTP induction, at the stratum oriens of hippocampal CA3 area 7days after stimulation. However, the molecular mechanisms that underlie the maintenance of MF-CA3 LTP as well as the concomitant structural reorganization in this area remain to be elucidated. Here we show that acute microinfusion of myr-CaMKIINtide, a noncompetitive inhibitor of CaMKII, in the hippocampal CA3 area of adult rats during the late-phase of in vivo MF-CA3 LTP blocked its maintenance and prevented the accompanying morphological reorganization in CA3 area. These findings support the idea that CaMKII is a key molecular substrate for the long-term hippocampal synaptic plasticity maintenance.

  11. Is hippocampal atrophy a future drug target?

    PubMed

    Dhikav, Vikas; Anand, Kuljeet Singh

    2007-01-01

    Hippocampus is the brain structure, vital for episodic and declarative memory. Atrophy of the human hippocampus is seen in a variety of psychiatric and neurological disorders e.g. recurrent depression, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, epilepsy, head injury, and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Importantly, aging hippocampus also undergoes atrophy. In many instances, for example, AD, the atrophy precedes the development of symptoms while in others, there is a temporal relationship between atrophy and symptomatology. The presence of atrophied hippocampus is one of the most consistent features of many common psychiatric disorders. Several factors contribute to this atrophy. Stress is one of the most profound factors implicated and the mechanisms involve glucocorticoids, serotonin, excitatory amino acids etc. Hippocampal formation as a whole can undergo atrophy or its individual structural components e.g. apical dendrities can exhibit atrophy. Several drugs of unrelated classes have been shown to prevent atrophy indicating heterogenous manner in which hippocampal atrophy is produced. These include, tianeptine (affects structural plasticity in hippocampus and is an effective antidepressant); phenytoin (antiseizure and neuroprotective); fluoxetine (downregulates neurodegenerative enzyme and increases neuroprotective hippocampal S100 beta); lithium (neuroprotective and antiapoptotic); tricyclic antidepressants (increase hippocampal neurogenesis); antipsychotics (reduce hippocampal neuronal suppression); sodium valproate (increases neurogenesis) and mifepristone (antioxidant, neuroprotective and anti-glucocorticoid). Now the most important question is: to what extent does the hippocampal atrophy play a role in the genesis of symptoms of diseases or their progression? And if it does, can we achieve the same degree of prevention or reversal seen in experimental animals, in humans also. An even more important question is: whether the prevention of

  12. Development of tolerance to the inhibitory effects of ethanol in the rat isolated vas deferens: effect of acute and chronic ethanol administration in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    DeTurck, K. H.; Pohorecky, L. A.

    1986-01-01

    Contractions of the rat vas deferens elicited by the addition of noradrenaline (NA), K+-depolarizing solutions or by electrical stimulation were recorded before and after incubation with ethanol 181 mM. In tissues from untreated rats, the contractions were inhibited 40-50% by such exposure. Injection of ethanol (2 g kg-1) significantly attenuated ethanol's reduction of peak tension generated by the lowest concentration of NA (10(-4) mM). Chronic administration of ethanol, 18-14 g kg-1 daily for two weeks, resulted in significant tolerance to ethanol. Tissues of treated animals demonstrated ethanol-induced decreases of roughly one-half those of the maltose dextrin (isocaloric) and water (fluid control) groups. This tolerance persisted for at least 48 h after ethanol treatment had been terminated. Overall, the data suggest that ethanol acts both pre- and postsynaptically to produce acute inhibition of smooth muscle contractions or tolerance to these actions upon chronic exposure. PMID:3730699

  13. Mammary Gland Pathology Subsequent to Acute Infection with Strong versus Weak Biofilm Forming Staphylococcus aureus Bovine Mastitis Isolates: A Pilot Study Using Non-Invasive Mouse Mastitis Model

    PubMed Central

    Gogoi-Tiwari, Jully; Williams, Vincent; Waryah, Charlene Babra; Costantino, Paul; Al-Salami, Hani; Mathavan, Sangeetha; Wells, Kelsi; Tiwari, Harish Kumar; Hegde, Nagendra; Isloor, Shrikrishna; Al-Sallami, Hesham; Mukkur, Trilochan

    2017-01-01

    Background Biofilm formation by Staphylococcus aureus is an important virulence attribute because of its potential to induce persistent antibiotic resistance, retard phagocytosis and either attenuate or promote inflammation, depending upon the disease syndrome, in vivo. This study was undertaken to evaluate the potential significance of strength of biofilm formation by clinical bovine mastitis-associated S. aureus in mammary tissue damage by using a mouse mastitis model. Methods Two S. aureus strains of the same capsular phenotype with different biofilm forming strengths were used to non-invasively infect mammary glands of lactating mice. Biofilm forming potential of these strains were determined by tissue culture plate method, ica typing and virulence gene profile per detection by PCR. Delivery of the infectious dose of S. aureus was directly through the teat lactiferous duct without invasive scraping of the teat surface. Both bacteriological and histological methods were used for analysis of mammary gland pathology of mice post-infection. Results Histopathological analysis of the infected mammary glands revealed that mice inoculated with the strong biofilm forming S. aureus strain produced marked acute mastitic lesions, showing profuse infiltration predominantly with neutrophils, with evidence of necrosis in the affected mammary glands. In contrast, the damage was significantly less severe in mammary glands of mice infected with the weak biofilm-forming S. aureus strain. Although both IL-1β and TNF-α inflammatory biomarkers were produced in infected mice, level of TNF-α produced was significantly higher (p<0.05) in mice inoculated with strong biofilm forming S. aureus than the weak biofilm forming strain. Conclusion This finding suggests an important role of TNF-α in mammary gland pathology post-infection with strong biofilm-forming S. aureus in the acute mouse mastitis model, and offers an opportunity for the development of novel strategies for reduction of

  14. Decline in antibiotic resistance and changes in the serotype distribution of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates from children with acute otitis media; a 2001-2011 survey by the French Pneumococcal Network.

    PubMed

    Kempf, M; Varon, E; Lepoutre, A; Gravet, A; Baraduc, R; Brun, M; Chardon, H; Cremniter, J; Croizé, J; Dalmay, F; Demachy, M-C; Fosse, T; Grelaud, C; Hadou, T; Hamdad, F; Koeck, J-L; Luce, S; Mermond, S; Patry, I; Péchinot, A; Raymond, J; Ros, A; Segonds, C; Soullié, B; Tandé, D; Vergnaud, M; Vernet-Garnier, V; Wallet, F; Gutmann, L; Ploy, M-C; Lanotte, P

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is an important cause of acute otitis media (AOM). The aim of this study was to evaluate trends in antibiotic resistance and circulating serotypes of pneumococci isolated from middle ear fluid of French children with AOM during the period 2001-2011, before and after the introduction of the PCV-7 (2003) and PCV-13 (2010) vaccines. Between 2001 and 2011 the French pneumococcal surveillance network analysed the antibiotic susceptibility of 6683 S. pneumoniae isolated from children with AOM, of which 1569 were serotyped. We observed a significant overall increase in antibiotic susceptibility. Respective resistance (I+R) rates in 2001 and 2011 were 76.9% and 57.3% for penicillin, 43.0% and 29.8% for amoxicillin, and 28.6% and 13.0% for cefotaxime. We also found a marked reduction in vaccine serotypes after PCV-7 implementation, from 63.0% in 2001 to 13.2% in 2011, while the incidence of the additional six serotypes included in PCV-13 increased during the same period, with a particularly high proportion of 19A isolates. The proportion of some non-PCV-13 serotypes also increased between 2001 and 2011, especially 15A and 23A. Before PCV-7 implementation, most (70.8%) penicillin non-susceptible pneumococci belonged to PCV-7 serotypes, whereas in 2011, 56.8% of penicillin non-susceptible pneumococci belonged to serotype 19A. Between 2001 and 2011, antibiotic resistance among pneumococci responsible for AOM in France fell markedly, and PCV-7 serotypes were replaced by non-PCV-7 serotypes, especially 19A. We are continuing to assess the impact of PCV-13, introduced in France in 2010, on pneumococcal serotype circulation and antibiotic resistance.

  15. Increased hippocampal blood volume and normal blood flow in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Talati, Pratik; Rane, Swati; Skinner, Jack; Gore, John; Heckers, Stephan

    2015-06-30

    Neuroimaging studies have provided compelling evidence for abnormal hippocampal activity in schizophrenia. Most studies made inferences about baseline hippocampal activity using a single hemodynamic parameter (e.g., blood volume or blood flow). Here we studied several hemodynamic measures in the same cohort to test the hypothesis of increased hippocampal activity in schizophrenia. We used dynamic susceptibility contrast- (DSC-) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to assess blood volume, blood flow, and mean transit time in the hippocampus of 15 patients with chronic schizophrenia and 15 healthy controls. Left and right hippocampal measurements were combined for absolute measures of cerebral blood volume (CBV), cerebral blood flow (CBF), and mean transit time (MTT). We found significantly increased hippocampal CBV, but normal CBF and MTT, in schizophrenia. The uncoupling of CBV and CBF could be due to several factors, including antipsychotic medication, loss of cerebral perfusion pressure, or angiogenesis. Further studies need to incorporate several complementary imaging modalities to better characterize hippocampal dysfunction in schizophrenia.

  16. Hippocampal theta sequences reflect current goals.

    PubMed

    Wikenheiser, Andrew M; Redish, A David

    2015-02-01

    Hippocampal information processing is discretized by oscillations, and the ensemble activity of place cells is organized into temporal sequences bounded by theta cycles. Theta sequences represent time-compressed trajectories through space. Their forward-directed nature makes them an intuitive candidate mechanism for planning future trajectories, but their connection to goal-directed behavior remains unclear. As rats performed a value-guided decision-making task, the extent to which theta sequences projected ahead of the animal's current location varied on a moment-by-moment basis depending on the rat's goals. Look-ahead extended farther on journeys to distant goals than on journeys to more proximal goals and was predictive of the animal's destination. On arrival at goals, however, look-ahead was similar regardless of where the animal began its journey from. Together, these results provide evidence that hippocampal theta sequences contain information related to goals or intentions, pointing toward a potential spatial basis for planning.

  17. Hippocampal Processing of Ambiguity Enhances Fear Memory.

    PubMed

    Amadi, Ugwechi; Lim, Seh Hong; Liu, Elizabeth; Baratta, Michael V; Goosens, Ki A

    2017-02-01

    Despite the ubiquitous use of Pavlovian fear conditioning as a model for fear learning, the highly predictable conditions used in the laboratory do not resemble real-world conditions, in which dangerous situations can lead to unpleasant outcomes in unpredictable ways. In the current experiments, we varied the timing of aversive events after predictive cues in rodents and discovered that temporal ambiguity of aversive events greatly enhances fear. During fear conditioning with unpredictably timed aversive events, pharmacological inactivation of the dorsal hippocampus or optogenetic silencing of cornu ammonis 1 cells during aversive negative prediction errors prevented this enhancement of fear without affecting fear learning for predictable events. Dorsal hippocampal inactivation also prevented ambiguity-related enhancement of fear during auditory fear conditioning under a partial-reinforcement schedule. These results reveal that information about the timing and occurrence of aversive events is rapidly acquired and that unexpectedly timed or omitted aversive events generate hippocampal signals to enhance fear learning.

  18. Sonic Hedgehog Signaling and Hippocampal Neuroplasticity.

    PubMed

    Yao, Pamela J; Petralia, Ronald S; Mattson, Mark P

    2016-12-01

    Sonic hedgehog (Shh) is a secreted protein that controls the patterning of neural progenitor cells, and their neuronal and glial progeny, during development. Emerging findings suggest that Shh also has important roles in the formation and plasticity of neuronal circuits in the hippocampus, a brain region of fundamental importance in learning and memory. Shh mediates activity-dependent and injury-induced hippocampal neurogenesis. Activation of Shh receptors in the dendrites of hippocampal neurons engages a trans-neuronal signaling pathway that accelerates axon outgrowth and enhances glutamate release from presynaptic terminals. Impaired Shh signaling may contribute to the pathogenesis of several developmental and adult-onset neurological disorders that affect the hippocampus, suggesting a potential for therapeutic interventions that target Shh pathways.

  19. Hippocampal culture stimulus with 4-megahertz ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muratore, Robert; LaManna, Justine K.; Lamprecht, Michael R.; Morrison, Barclay, III

    2012-10-01

    Among current modalities, ultrasound uniquely offers both millisecond and millimeter accuracy in noninvasively stimulating brain tissue. In addition, by sweeping the ultrasound beam within the refractory period of the neuronal tissue, ultrasonic neuromodulation can be adapted to target extended or multiply connected regions with quasi-simultaneity. Towards the development of this safe brain stimulus technique, the response of rat hippocampal cultures to ultrasound was investigated. Hippocampal slices, 0.4-mm thick, were obtained from 8-day old Sprague Dawley rats and cultured for 6 days. The in vitro cultures were exposed to multiple 100-ms 4.04-MHz ultrasound pulses from a 42-mm diameter, 90-mm spherical cap transducer. Peak pressure ranged from 0 through about 77 kPa. Responses in the form of electrical potentials from a sixty channel electrode array were digitized and recorded. The DG and CA1 regions of the hippocampus exhibited similar ultrasonically-evoked field potentials.

  20. Cholecystokinin-octapeptide restored morphine-induced hippocampal long-term potentiation impairment in rats.

    PubMed

    Wen, Di; Zang, Guoqing; Sun, DongLei; Yu, Feng; Mei, Dong; Ma, Chunling; Cong, Bin

    2014-01-24

    Cholecystokinin-octapeptide (CCK-8), which is a typical brain-gut peptide, exerts a wide range of biological activities on the central nervous system. We have previously reported that CCK-8 significantly alleviated morphine-induced amnesia and reversed spine density decreases in the CA1 region of the hippocampus in morphine-treated animals. Here, we investigated the effects of CCK-8 on long-term potentiation (LTP) in the lateral perforant path (LPP)-granule cell synapse of rat dentate gyrus (DG) in acute saline or morphine-treated rats. Population spikes (PS), which were evoked by stimulation of the LPP, were recorded in the DG region. Acute morphine (30mg/kg, s.c.) treatment significantly attenuated hippocampal LTP and CCK-8 (1μg, i.c.v.) restored the amplitude of PS that was attenuated by morphine injection. Furthermore, microinjection of CCK-8 (0.1 and 1μg, i.c.v.) also significantly augmented hippocampal LTP in saline-treated (1ml/kg, s.c.) rats. Pre-treatment of the CCK2 receptor antagonist L-365,260 (10μg, i.c.v) reversed the effects of CCK-8, but the CCK1 receptor antagonist L-364,718 (10μg, i.c.v) did not. The present results demonstrate that CCK-8 attenuates the effect of morphine on hippocampal LTP through CCK2 receptors and suggest an ameliorative function of CCK-8 on morphine-induced memory impairment.

  1. Ketogenic diet sensitizes glucose control of hippocampal excitability1

    PubMed Central

    Kawamura, Masahito; Ruskin, David N.; Geiger, Jonathan D.; Boison, Detlev; Masino, Susan A.

    2014-01-01

    A high-fat low-carbohydrate ketogenic diet (KD) is an effective treatment for refractory epilepsy, yet myriad metabolic effects in vivo have not been reconciled clearly with neuronal effects. A KD limits blood glucose and produces ketone bodies from β-oxidation of lipids. Studies have explored changes in ketone bodies and/or glucose in the effects of the KD, and glucose is increasingly implicated in neurological conditions. To examine the interaction between altered glucose and the neural effects of a KD, we fed rats and mice a KD and restricted glucose in vitro while examining the seizure-prone CA3 region of acute hippocampal slices. Slices from KD-fed animals were sensitive to small physiological changes in glucose, and showed reduced excitability and seizure propensity. Similar to clinical observations, reduced excitability depended on maintaining reduced glucose. Enhanced glucose sensitivity and reduced excitability were absent in slices obtained from KD-fed mice lacking adenosine A1 receptors (A1Rs); in slices from normal animals effects of the KD could be reversed with blockers of pannexin-1 channels, A1Rs, or KATP channels. Overall, these studies reveal that a KD sensitizes glucose-based regulation of excitability via purinergic mechanisms in the hippocampus and thus link key metabolic and direct neural effects of the KD. PMID:25170119

  2. Acute sinusitis in children.

    PubMed

    Brook, Itzhak

    2013-04-01

    Acute rhinosinusitis is a common illness in children. Viral upper respiratory tract infection is the most common presentation of rhinosinusitis. Most children resolve the infection spontaneously and only a small proportion develops a secondary bacterial infection. The proper choice of antibiotic therapy depends on the likely infecting pathogens, bacterial antibiotic resistance, and pharmacologic profiles of antibiotics. Amoxicillin-clavulanate is currently recommended as the empiric treatment in those requiring antimicrobial therapy. Isolation of the causative agents should be considered in those who failed the initial treatment. In addition to antibiotics, adjuvant therapies and surgery may be used in the management of acute bacterial rhinosinusitis.

  3. Dreaming is not controlled by hippocampal mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Solms, Mark

    2013-12-01

    Links with the Humanities are to be welcomed, but they cannot be exempted from normal scientific criteria. Any hypothesis regarding the function of dreams that is premised on rapid eye movement (REM)/dream isomorphism is unsupportable on empirical grounds. Llewellyn's hypothesis has the further problem of counter-evidence in respect of its claim that dreaming relies upon hippocampal functions. The hypothesis also lacks face validity.

  4. Chemically Induced Damage to the Hippocampal Formation,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-05-01

    31-42. Siesj0, B K (1981): Cell damage in the brain: A speculative synthe i, J Cereb Blood Flow Metabol 1, 155-85. Stefanis, C (1964): Hippocampal... serotonin effects on central neurons, Advanc Pharmacol 6A, 414-18. Storm-Mathisen, J (1972): Glutamate decarboxylase in the rat hippo- campal region...and chro- nic toluene inhalation on behavior and [ H]- serotonin binding in rat, Life Sciences 30, 1997-2002. Zimmer, L, Woolley, D and Chang, L (1985

  5. Cardioprotective Effects of Total Flavonoids Extracted from Xinjiang Sprig Rosa rugosa against Acute Ischemia/Reperfusion-Induced Myocardial Injury in Isolated Rat Heart.

    PubMed

    Hou, Xuejiao; Han, Jichun; Yuan, Changsheng; Ren, Huanhuan; Zhang, Ya; Zhang, Tao; Xu, Lixia; Zheng, Qiusheng; Chen, Wen

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the antioxidative and cardioprotective effects of total flavonoids extracted from Xinjiang sprig Rosa rugosa on ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury using an isolated Langendorff rat heart model. The possible mechanism of Xinjiang sprig rose total flavonoid (XSRTF) against I/R injury was also studied. XSRTF (5, 10, and 20 µg/mL) dissolved in Krebs-Henseleit buffer was administered to isolated rat heart. The XSRTF showed remarkable scavenging effects against 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl, hydroxyl, and superoxide anion radicals in vitro. XSRTF pretreatment improved the heart rate, increased LVDP, and decreased CK and LDH levels in coronary flow. This pretreatment also increased SOD activity and GSH/GSSG ratio but decreased MDA, TNF-α, and CRP levels and IL-8 and IL-6 activities. The infarct size and cell apoptosis in the hearts from the XSRTF-treated group were lower than those in the hearts from the I/R group. Therefore, the cardioprotective effects of XSRTF may be attributed to its antioxidant, antiapoptotic, and anti-inflammatory activities.

  6. Fornix deep brain stimulation induced long-term spatial memory independent of hippocampal neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hescham, Sarah; Temel, Yasin; Schipper, Sandra; Lagiere, Mélanie; Schönfeld, Lisa-Maria; Blokland, Arjan; Jahanshahi, Ali

    2017-03-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an established symptomatic treatment modality for movement disorders and constitutes an emerging therapeutic approach for the treatment of memory impairment. In line with this, fornix DBS has shown to ameliorate cognitive decline associated with dementia. Nonetheless, mechanisms mediating clinical effects in demented patients or patients with other neurological disorders are largely unknown. There is evidence that DBS is able to modulate neurophysiological activity in targeted brain regions. We therefore hypothesized that DBS might be able to influence cognitive function via activity-dependent regulation of hippocampal neurogenesis. Using stimulation parameters, which were validated to restore memory loss in a previous behavioral study, we here assessed long-term effects of fornix DBS. To do so, we injected the thymidine analog, 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU), after DBS and perfused the animals 6.5 weeks later. A week prior to perfusion, memory performance was assessed in the water maze. We found that acute stimulation of the fornix improved spatial memory performance in the water maze when the probe trial was performed 1 h after the last training session. However, no evidence for stimulation-induced neurogenesis was found in fornix DBS rats when compared to sham. Our results suggest that fornix DBS improves memory functions independent of hippocampal neurogenesis, possibly through other mechanisms such as synaptic plasticity and acute neurotransmitter release.

  7. Gonadal Hormones Rapidly Enhance Spatial Memory and Increase Hippocampal Spine Density in Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Jacome, Luis F.; Barateli, Ketti; Buitrago, Dina; Lema, Franklin; Frankfurt, Maya

    2016-01-01

    17β-estradiol (E2) rapidly, within minutes, activates behaviors and cognition by binding to membrane estrogen receptors, activating cell signaling cascades and increasing dendritic spines. In female rodents, E2 enhances spatial memory within 2–4 hours, and spine density is increased in the CA1 area of the hippocampus within 30–60 minutes. Although chronic gonadal hormone treatments in male rats alter cognition and spines/spine synapses and acute hormone effects occur in hippocampal slices, effects of acute, in vivo hormone administration in males are unknown. Therefore, we assessed rapid effects of E2 (20 μg/kg) and testosterone (T) (750 μg/kg) on spatial memory using the object placement task and on hippocampal spine density using Golgi impregnation. Orchidectomized rats received hormones immediately after the training trial and were tested for retention 2 hours later. Vehicle-injected orchidectomized males spent equal time exploring objects in the old and new locations, but E2- or T-treated subjects spent more time exploring objects at the new location, suggesting enhanced memory. Both hormones also increased spine density in CA1, but not the dentate gyrus, by 20%–40% at 30 minutes and 2 hours after injections. This report is the first, to our knowledge, to show E2 and T enhancements of memory and spine density within such a short time frame in male rats. PMID:26844375

  8. Inhibitory control of intrinsic hippocampal oscillations?

    PubMed

    Fischer, Yacov; Dürr, Roland

    2003-08-22

    An oscillatory mode of activity is a basic operational mode of the hippocampus. Such activity involves the concurrent expression of several rhythmic processes, of which theta (4-15 Hz) and gamma (20-80 Hz) oscillations are prominent and considered to be important for cognitive processing. In an experimental model that preserves the intrinsic network oscillator, exhibiting the dependency on cholinergic inputs and consequent expression of concurrent theta and gamma oscillations, we investigate the intrinsic mechanisms underlying such integrated hippocampal network responses. This experimental framework is used here to examine the currently prevailing dogma, that interneurons control hippocampal oscillations. The spontaneous response of individual pyramidal cells (in areas CA3 and CA1) and interneurons (area CA3), during oscillatory activity, was monitored intracellularly. Particular attention was given to the initiation of interneuron discharge during oscillations, to the impact of the synaptic output of discharging interneurons on the oscillatory activity, and to the time at which interneurons discharge in relation to the oscillatory cycles. Analysis of the spontaneous patterns of activity in individual interneurons and their outcome, during the oscillatory activity, revealed that interneuron activity is incompatible with initiating, pacing or determining the oscillatory frequencies, although contributing to the apparent rhythmic patterns. Moreover, our results show that non-interneuronal members of the network control interneuron activity. We therefore suggest that the activity of the excitatory cells, i.e., principle cells, is critical toward the initiation, pacing and synchronization of intrinsic hippocampal network oscillations.

  9. Updating the lamellar hypothesis of hippocampal organization.

    PubMed

    Sloviter, Robert S; Lømo, Terje

    2012-01-01

    Andersen et al. (1971) proposed that excitatory activity in the entorhinal cortex propagates topographically to the dentate gyrus, and on through a "trisynaptic circuit" lying within transverse hippocampal "slices" or "lamellae." In this way, a relatively simple structure might mediate complex functions in a manner analogous to the way independent piano keys can produce a nearly infinite variety of unique outputs. The lamellar hypothesis derives primary support from the "lamellar" distribution of dentate granule cell axons (the mossy fibers), which innervate dentate hilar neurons and area CA3 pyramidal cells and interneurons within the confines of a thin transverse hippocampal segment. Following the initial formulation of the lamellar hypothesis, anatomical studies revealed that unlike granule cells, hilar mossy cells, CA3 pyramidal cells, and Layer II entorhinal cells all form axonal projections that are more divergent along the longitudinal axis than the clearly "lamellar" mossy fiber pathway. The existence of pathways with "translamellar" distribution patterns has been interpreted, incorrectly in our view, as justifying outright rejection of the lamellar hypothesis (Amaral and Witter, 1989). We suggest that the functional implications of longitudinally projecting axons depend not on whether they exist, but on what they do. The observation that focal granule cell layer discharges normally inhibit, rather than excite, distant granule cells suggests that longitudinal axons in the dentate gyrus may mediate "lateral" inhibition and define lamellar function, rather than undermine it. In this review, we attempt a reconsideration of the evidence that most directly impacts the physiological concept of hippocampal lamellar organization.

  10. Inhibitory control of hippocampal inhibitory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Chamberland, Simon; Topolnik, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    Information processing within neuronal networks is determined by a dynamic partnership between principal neurons and local circuit inhibitory interneurons. The population of GABAergic interneurons is extremely heterogeneous and comprises, in many brain regions, cells with divergent morphological and physiological properties, distinct molecular expression profiles, and highly specialized functions. GABAergic interneurons have been studied extensively during the past two decades, especially in the hippocampus, which is a relatively simple cortical structure. Different types of hippocampal inhibitory interneurons control spike initiation [e.g., axo-axonic and basket cells (BCs)] and synaptic integration (e.g., bistratified and oriens–lacunosum moleculare interneurons) within pyramidal neurons and synchronize local network activity, providing a means for functional segregation of neuronal ensembles and proper routing of hippocampal information. Thus, it is thought that, at least in the hippocampus, GABAergic inhibitory interneurons represent critical regulating elements at all stages of information processing, from synaptic integration and spike generation to large-scale network activity. However, this raises an important question: if inhibitory interneurons are fundamental for network computations, what are the mechanisms that control the activity of the interneurons themselves? Given the essential role of synaptic inhibition in the regulation of neuronal activity, it would be logical to expect that specific inhibitory mechanisms have evolved to control the operation of interneurons. Here, we review the mechanisms of synaptic inhibition of interneurons and discuss their role in the operation of hippocampal inhibitory circuits. PMID:23162426

  11. Acute Bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... can also cause acute bronchitis. To diagnose acute bronchitis, your health care provider will ask about your symptoms and listen to your breathing. You may also have other tests. Treatments include rest, fluids, and aspirin (for adults) or ...

  12. Hippocampal neurogenesis enhancers promote forgetting of remote fear memory after hippocampal reactivation by retrieval.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Rie; Fukushima, Hotaka; Frankland, Paul W; Kida, Satoshi

    2016-09-26

    Forgetting of recent fear memory is promoted by treatment with memantine (MEM), which increases hippocampal neurogenesis. The approaches for treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) using rodent models have focused on the extinction and reconsolidation of recent, but not remote, memories. Here we show that, following prolonged re-exposure to the conditioning context, enhancers of hippocampal neurogenesis, including MEM, promote forgetting of remote contextual fear memory. However, these interventions are ineffective following shorter re-exposures. Importantly, we find that long, but not short re-exposures activate gene expression in the hippocampus and induce hippocampus-dependent reconsolidation of remote contextual fear memory. Furthermore, remote memory retrieval becomes hippocampus-dependent after the long-time recall, suggesting that remote fear memory returns to a hippocampus dependent state after the long-time recall, thereby allowing enhanced forgetting by increased hippocampal neurogenesis. Forgetting of traumatic memory may contribute to the development of PTSD treatment.

  13. A cortico-hippocampal learning rule shapes inhibitory microcircuit activity to enhance hippocampal information flow.

    PubMed

    Basu, Jayeeta; Srinivas, Kalyan V; Cheung, Stephanie K; Taniguchi, Hiroki; Huang, Z Josh; Siegelbaum, Steven A

    2013-09-18

    How does coordinated activity between distinct brain regions implement a set of learning rules to sculpt information processing in a given neural circuit? Using interneuron cell-type-specific optical activation and pharmacogenetic silencing in vitro, we show that temporally precise pairing of direct entorhinal perforant path (PP) and hippocampal Schaffer collateral (SC) inputs to CA1 pyramidal cells selectively suppresses SC-associated perisomatic inhibition from cholecystokinin (CCK)-expressing interneurons. The CCK interneurons provide a surprisingly strong feedforward inhibitory drive to effectively control the coincident excitation of CA1 pyramidal neurons by convergent inputs. Thus, in-phase cortico-hippocampal activity provides a powerful heterosynaptic learning rule for long-term gating of information flow through the hippocampal excitatory macrocircuit by the silencing of the CCK inhibitory microcircuit.

  14. Hippocampal partial kindling decreased hippocampal GABAB receptor efficacy and wet dog shakes in rats.

    PubMed

    Leung, L Stan; Shen, Bixia

    2006-10-16

    To test the hypothesis that GABA(B) receptor efficacy in the behaving rat decreases after partial hippocampal kindling, we measured GABA(B) receptor efficacy by the number of wet dog shakes (WDSs) induced by baclofen (5mM in 0.2muL of saline) infusion into the dorsal hippocampus; these WDSs were blocked by prior infusion of GABA(B) receptor antagonist CGP55845A. Rats were given 15 afterdischarges (ADs) evoked in CA1 over 3 days or control stimulations. The partially kindled rats (after 15 ADs) showed a significant decrease in baclofen-induced WDSs as compared to control rats, on days 1, 4 and 21 after kindling. In contrast, kindled and control rats did not show a significant difference in WDSs induced by hippocampal infusion of GABA(A) receptor antagonist bicuculline. Also, the number of WDSs induced after subcutaneous injection of serotonin-2A/2C agonist+/-1-(2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl)-2-aminopropane was not different between kindled and control rats on 4 and 21 days after kindling. We further tested the hypothesis that the decrease in hippocampal AD-induced WDSs during kindling is caused by a decrease in GABA(B) receptor efficacy. However, we found no convincing evidence to support the latter hypothesis since the AD-induced WDSs were not suppressed by hippocampal infusion of CGP55845A, with the exception that CGP55845A infusion into ventral hippocampus suppressed both hippocampal ADs and WDSs. Together with results derived from previous electrophysiological studies in vitro, it is suggested that a decrease of GABA(B) receptor, possibly GABA(B) autoreceptor, efficacy may explain the decrease of baclofen-induced WDSs after hippocampal kindling.

  15. Casticin, an active compound isolated from Vitex Fructus, ameliorates the cigarette smoke-induced acute lung inflammatory response in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyeonhoon; Jung, Kyung-Hwa; Lee, Hangyul; Park, Soojin; Choi, Woosung; Bae, Hyunsu

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine of the effect of casticin, as an anti-inflammatory agent, on an acute lung inflammation in vivo model established through exposure to cigarette smoke (CS). Casticin is a phytochemical from Vitex species such as Vitex rotundifolia and Vitex agnus-castus that was recently shown to exert an anti-inflammatory effect in vivo. To demonstrate the effects of casticin, C57BL/6 mice were whole-body exposed to mainstream CS or fresh air for two weeks and treated with 1, 2, and 10mg/kg casticin via an i.p. injection. Immune cell infiltrations and cytokine productions were assessed from bronchoalveolar lavage Fluid (BALF), and lung histological analysis was performed. Treatment with casticin was observed to significantly inhibit the numbers of total cells, neutrophils, macrophages, and lymphocytes and reduce the levels of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines in the BALF. In addition, casticin significantly decreased the infiltration of peribronchial and perivascular inflammatory cells and the epithelium thickness. The results of this study indicate that casticin has significant effects on the lung inflammation induced by CS in a mouse model. According to these outcomes, casticin may have therapeutic potential in inflammatory lung diseases, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

  16. WEE1 Inhibitor AZD1775 With or Without Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Advanced Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-12

    Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Isolated Del(5q); Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  17. CD44 Transmembrane Receptor and Hyaluronan Regulate Adult Hippocampal Neural Stem Cell Quiescence and Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Su, Weiping; Foster, Scott C; Xing, Rubing; Feistel, Kerstin; Olsen, Reid H J; Acevedo, Summer F; Raber, Jacob; Sherman, Larry S

    2017-03-17

    Adult neurogenesis in the hippocampal subgranular zone (SGZ) is involved in learning and memory throughout life but declines with aging. Mice lacking the CD44 transmembrane receptor for the glycosaminoglycan hyaluronan (HA) demonstrate a number of neurological disturbances including hippocampal memory deficits, implicating CD44 in the processes underlying hippocampal memory encoding, storage, or retrieval. Here, we found that HA and CD44 play important roles in regulating adult neurogenesis, and we provide evidence that HA contributes to age-related reductions in neural stem cell (NSC) expansion and differentiation in the hippocampus. CD44-expressing NSCs isolated from the mouse SGZ are self-renewing and capable of differentiating into neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes. Mice lacking CD44 demonstrate increases in NSC proliferation in the SGZ. This increased proliferation is also observed in NSCs grown in vitro, suggesting that CD44 functions to regulate NSC proliferation in a cell-autonomous manner. HA is synthesized by NSCs and increases in the SGZ with aging. Treating wild type but not CD44-null NSCs with HA inhibits NSC proliferation. HA digestion in wild type NSC cultures or in the SGZ induces increased NSC proliferation, and CD44-null as well as HA-disrupted wild type NSCs demonstrate delayed neuronal differentiation. HA therefore signals through CD44 to regulate NSC quiescence and differentiation, and HA accumulation in the SGZ may contribute to reductions in neurogenesis that are linked to age-related decline in spatial memory.

  18. Parkia biglobosa Improves Mitochondrial Functioning and Protects against Neurotoxic Agents in Rat Brain Hippocampal Slices

    PubMed Central

    Komolafe, Kayode; Olaleye, Tolulope M.; Seeger, Rodrigo L.; Carvalho, Fabiano B.; Boligon, Aline A.; Athayde, Margareth L.; Klimaczewski, Claudia V.; Akindahunsi, Akintunde A.; Rocha, Joao B. T.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. Methanolic leaf extracts of Parkia biglobosa, PBE, and one of its major polyphenolic constituents, catechin, were investigated for their protective effects against neurotoxicity induced by different agents on rat brain hippocampal slices and isolated mitochondria. Methods. Hippocampal slices were preincubated with PBE (25, 50, 100, or 200 µg/mL) or catechin (1, 5, or 10 µg/mL) for 30 min followed by further incubation with 300 µM H2O2, 300 µM SNP, or 200 µM PbCl2 for 1 h. Effects of PBE and catechin on SNP- or CaCl2-induced brain mitochondrial ROS formation and mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) were also determined. Results. PBE and catechin decreased basal ROS generation in slices and blunted the prooxidant effects of neurotoxicants on membrane lipid peroxidation and nonprotein thiol contents. PBE rescued hippocampal cellular viability from SNP damage and caused a significant boost in hippocampus Na+, K+-ATPase activity but with no effect on the acetylcholinesterase activity. Both PBE and catechin also mitigated SNP- or CaCl2-dependent mitochondrial ROS generation. Measurement by safranine fluorescence however showed that the mild depolarization of the ΔΨm by PBE was independent of catechin. Conclusion. The results suggest that the neuroprotective effect of PBE is dependent on its constituent antioxidants and mild mitochondrial depolarization propensity. PMID:25177688

  19. A Comparison of the Effect of Kettlebell Swings and Isolated Lumbar Extension Training on Acute Torque Production of the Lumbar Extensors.

    PubMed

    Edinborough, Luke; Fisher, James P; Steele, James

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to use a fatigue response test to measure the muscular fatigue (defined as a reduction in torque production) sustained by the lumbar extensors after a single set of kettlebell swings (KBS) in comparison with isolated lumbar extensions (ILEX) and a control condition (CON). The purpose of which is to measure the physiological response of KBS against an already established modality. Subsequent data provide insight of the efficacy of kettlebells swings in strengthening the lumbar muscles and lower back pain treatment. Eight physically active males participated in a repeated measures design where participants completed all conditions. There were statistically significant reductions in maximal torque, reported as strength index (SI), after both KBS and ILEX exercise. A statistically significant difference was found for reductions in maximal torque between CON and both KBS (p = 0.005) and ILEX (p = 0.001) and between KBS and ILEX (p = 0.039). Mean reduction and effect sizes were -1824 ± 1127.12 (SI) and -1.62 for KBS and -4775.6 ± 1593.41 (SI) and -3.00 for ILEX. In addition, a statistically significant difference was found between KBS and ILEX for rate of perceived exertion (p = 0.012). Data suggest that both KBS and ILEX were able to fatigue the lumbar extensors. Isolated lumbar extension was able to generate a greater level of fatigue. However, contrary to previous research, the KBS was able to elicit a physiological response, despite the lack of pelvic restraint supporting the potential to strengthen the lumbar extensors.

  20. Hippocampal synaptic plasticity: effects of neonatal stress in freely moving adult male rats.

    PubMed

    Petrosino, M; Bronzino, J D; Pizzuti, G P

    1999-01-01

    The present study examines the effects of neonatal isolation on hippocampal LTP in adult male rats. Changes in dentate granule cell population measures, i.e., EPSP slope and population spike amplitude (PSA), evoked by tetanization of the medial perforant pathway were used to assess the effects of neonatal isolation on LTP over a period of 96 h. Following tetanization significant group differences were obtained for input/output (I/O) response measures of EPSP slope and PSA, with isolated males showing consistently higher values than in the other two groups. Comparisons made at 1 h post-tetanization (establishment of LTP) indicated that isolated males showed significantly greater enhancement than any other group. At 96 h (maintenance of LTP), however, neonatally isolated males showed significantly greater enhancement than either non-isolated siblings or unhandled controls. Additionally, isolation resulted in prolonging the duration of enhancement obtained from males. Thus, males show different enhancement profiles with respect to both the magnitude and duration of LTP and neonatal isolation alters these profiles in profound manner.

  1. Structural and functional abnormalities of the hippocampal formation in rats with environmentally induced reductions in prepulse inhibition of acoustic startle.

    PubMed

    Greene, J R; Kerkhoff, J E; Guiver, L; Totterdell, S

    2001-01-01

    The effects of social isolation on prepulse inhibition of acoustic startle (PPI), electrophysiology and morphology of subicular pyramidal neurons and the densities of interneuronal sub-types in the hippocampal formation were examined. Wistar rats (male weanlings) were housed socially (socials, n=8) or individually (isolates, n=7). When tested eight weeks later, PPI was lower in isolates. Rats then received terminal anaesthesia before slices of hippocampal formation were made in which the electrophysiological properties of a total of 108 subicular neurons were characterized. There were no differences in neuronal sub-types recorded in socials compared with isolates. Intrinsically burst-firing and regular spiking pyramidal neurons were examined in detail. There were no differences in resting membrane potential or input resistance in isolates compared with socials but action potential height was reduced and action potential threshold raised in isolates. A limited morphological examination of Neurobiotin-filled intrinsically burst-firing neurons did not reveal differences in cell-body area or in number of primary dendrites. Sections from the contralateral hemispheres of the same rats were stained with antibodies to calretinin, parvalbumin and the neuronal isoform of nitric oxide synthase (nNOS). In isolates, the density of calretinin positive neurons was increased in the dentate gyrus but unchanged in areas CA3, CA1 and subiculum. Parvalbumin and nNOS positive neuronal densities were unchanged. Hence in rats with environmentally induced reductions in PPI there are structural and functional abnormalities in the hippocampal formation. If the reduction in PPI stems from these abnormalities, and reduced PPI in rats is relevant to schizophrenia, then drugs that correct the reported electrophysiological changes might have antipsychotic effects.

  2. Effects of ethanol on hippocampal function during adolescence: a look at the past and thoughts on the future.

    PubMed

    Chin, Vivien S; Van Skike, Candice E; Matthews, Douglas B

    2010-02-01

    It has been demonstrated by several laboratories that ethanol, both acute and chronic, produces effects that are age dependent. Specifically, adolescent rats are less sensitive to the hypnotic and motor-impairing effects of ethanol but are more sensitive to the hypothermic effects of the drug. However, the results on hippocampal function are not as clear. For example, there have been mixed findings regarding adolescent sensitivity of hippocampal-dependent (spatial) memory in response to ethanol. The current review explores the present state of the field as it relates to ethanol's effects in the hippocampus, particularly as it relates to spatial memory. In addition, we review potential neurobiological mechanisms that might underlie the age-dependent effects of ethanol in the hippocampus. Finally, future directions are proposed that will advance the state of the field as it relates to ethanol's effect during this developmental period.

  3. The ecological relationship between deprivation, social isolation and rates of hospital admission for acute psychiatric care: a comparison of London and New York City.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Sarah; Copeland, Alison; Fagg, James; Congdon, Peter; Almog, Michael; Fitzpatrick, Justine

    2006-03-01

    We report on comparative analyses of small area variation in rates of acute hospital admissions for psychiatric conditions in Greater London around the year 1998 and in New York City (NYC) in 2000. Based on a theoretical model of the factors likely to influence psychiatric admission rates, and using data from the most recent population censuses and other sources, we examine the association with area indicators designed to measure access to hospital beds, socio-economic deprivation, social fragmentation and ethnic/racial composition. We report results on admissions for men and women aged 15-64 for all psychiatric conditions (excluding self-harm), drug-related substance abuse/addiction, schizophrenia and affective disorders. The units of analysis in NYC were 165 five-digit Zip Code Areas and, in London, 760 electoral wards as defined in 1998. The analysis controls for age and sex composition and, as a proxy for access to care, spatial proximity to hospitals with psychiatric beds. Poisson regression modeling incorporating random effects was used to control for both overdispersion in the counts of admissions and for the effects of spatial autocorrelation. The results for NYC and London showed that local admission rates for all types of condition were positively and significantly associated with deprivation and the association is independent of demographic composition or 'access' to beds. In NYC, social fragmentation showed a significant association with admissions due to affective disorders and schizophrenia, and for drug dependency among females. Racial minority concentration was significantly and positively associated with admissions for schizophrenia. In London, social fragmentation was associated positively with admissions for men and women due to schizophrenia and affective disorders. The variable measuring racial/ethnic minority concentration for London wards showed a negative association with admission rates for drug dependency and for affective disorders. We

  4. Diversity of kindling effects: EEG manifestations in cats during kindling in the hippocampal formation.

    PubMed

    Sobieszek, A

    1989-01-01

    The formation and subsequent development of after-discharges (ADs) and spontaneous interictal spikes was investigated in a group of ten kindled cats. The electrodes used for electrical stimulation and EEG recording were located in various parts of the hippocampal formation: in the hippocampal gyrus, dentate gyrus, subiculum and entorhinal cortex. The animals were stimulated once daily with 1 s trains of 50/s electric pulses. The choice of stimulating electrodes, stimulating currents and, in some cases, monitoring of the stability of stimulating conditions was aided by recording hippocampal field potentials evoked by intrahippocampal electrical stimulation. A subgroup of 5 cats was stimulated at AD threshold or near threshold currents of constant intensity. The following patterns of AD development were observed: (i) a long lasting initial phase of stable, a few second-long ADs with subsequent development, culminating in prolonged ADs and complex partial or secondary generalized tonic clonic seizures, after 80-120 days of kindling; (ii) stable pattern of brief ADs (0.3-1.5 s duration) during 120 days of kindling; (iii) gradual development of initially brief ADs (about 5 s) into longer lasting ADs (about 35 s) associated with complex partial seizures, during 220 days of stimulation. Spontaneous interictal spikes developed in this subgroup after 16-15 days of kindling. The second subgroup of 5 animals was subjected to stimulation with gradually increasing AD subthreshold currents. In two animals of this subgroup spontaneous EEG discharges of isolated spikes and clusters of high frequency spikes appeared in the stimulated hippocampal gyrus after 10 days of kindling. Apart from the diversity of after-discharge development patterns the results indicate relative independence of the processes underlying formation of the spontaneous interictal spikes and after-discharges.

  5. Hippocampal developmental vulnerability to methylmercury extends into prepubescence

    PubMed Central

    Obiorah, Maryann; McCandlish, Elizabeth; Buckley, Brian; DiCicco-Bloom, Emanuel

    2015-01-01

    The developing brain is sensitive to environmental toxicants such as methylmercury (MeHg), to which humans are exposed via contaminated seafood. Prenatal exposure in children is associated with learning, memory and IQ deficits, which can result from hippocampal dysfunction. To explore underlying mechanisms, we have used the postnatal day (P7) rat to model the third trimester of human gestation. We previously showed that a single low exposure (0.6 μg/gbw) that approaches human exposure reduced hippocampal neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus (DG) 24 h later, producing later proliferation and memory deficits in adolescence. Yet, the vulnerable stem cell population and period of developmental vulnerability remain undefined. In this study, we find that P7 exposure of stem cells has long-term consequences for adolescent neurogenesis. It reduced the number of mitotic S-phase cells (BrdU), especially those in the highly proliferative Tbr2+ population, and immature neurons (Doublecortin) in adolescence, suggesting partial depletion of the later stem cell pool. To define developmental vulnerability to MeHg in prepubescent (P14) and adolescent (P21) rats, we examined acute 24 h effects of MeHg exposure on mitosis and apoptosis. We found that low exposure did not adversely impact neurogenesis at either age, but that a higher exposure (5 μg/gbw) at P14 reduced the total number of neural stem cells (Sox2+) by 23% and BrdU+ cells by 26% in the DG hilus, suggesting that vulnerability diminishes with age. To determine whether these effects reflect changes in MeHg transfer across the blood brain barrier (BBB), we assessed Hg content in the hippocampus after peripheral injection and found that similar levels (~800 ng/gm) were obtained at 24 h at both P14 and P21, declining in parallel, suggesting that changes in vulnerability depend more on local tissue and cellular mechanisms. Together, we show that MeHg vulnerability declines with age, and that early exposure impairs later

  6. Classic hippocampal sclerosis and hippocampal-onset epilepsy produced by a single “cryptic” episode of focal hippocampal excitation in awake rats

    PubMed Central

    Norwood, Braxton A.; Bumanglag, Argyle V.; Osculati, Francesco; Sbarbati, Andrea; Marzola, Pasquina; Nicolato, Elena; Fabene, Paolo F.; Sloviter, Robert S.

    2010-01-01

    In refractory temporal lobe epilepsy, seizures often arise from a shrunken hippocampus exhibiting a pattern of selective neuron loss called “classic hippocampal sclerosis.” No single experimental injury has reproduced this specific pathology, suggesting that hippocampal atrophy might be a progressive “endstage” pathology resulting from years of spontaneous seizures. We posed the alternate hypothesis that classic hippocampal sclerosis results from a single excitatory event that has never been successfully modeled experimentally because convulsive status epilepticus, the insult most commonly used to produce epileptogenic brain injury, is too severe and necessarily terminated before the hippocampus receives the needed duration of excitation. We tested this hypothesis by producing prolonged hippocampal excitation in awake rats without causing convulsive status epilepticus. Two daily 30-minute episodes of perforant pathway stimulation in Sprague-Dawley rats increased granule cell paired-pulse inhibition, decreased epileptiform afterdischarge durations during 8 hours of subsequent stimulation, and prevented convulsive status epilepticus. Similarly, one 8-hour episode of reduced-intensity stimulation in Long-Evans rats, which are relatively resistant to developing status epilepticus, produced hippocampal discharges without causing status epilepticus. Both paradigms immediately produced the extensive neuronal injury that defines classic hippocampal sclerosis, without giving any clinical indication during the insult that an injury was being inflicted. Spontaneous hippocampal-onset seizures began 16–25 days post-injury, before hippocampal atrophy developed, as demonstrated by sequential magnetic resonance imaging. These results indicate that classic hippocampal sclerosis is uniquely produced by a single episode of clinically “cryptic” excitation. Epileptogenic insults may often involve prolonged excitation that goes undetected at the time of injury. PMID

  7. ATP induces NO production in hippocampal neurons by P2X(7) receptor activation independent of glutamate signaling.

    PubMed

    Codocedo, Juan Francisco; Godoy, Juan Alejandro; Poblete, Maria Ines; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C; Huidobro-Toro, Juan Pablo

    2013-01-01

    To assess the putative role of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) upon nitric oxide (NO) production in the hippocampus, we used as a model both rat hippocampal slices and isolated hippocampal neurons in culture, lacking glial cells. In hippocampal slices, additions of exogenous ATP or 2'(3')-O-(4-Benzoylbenzoyl) ATP (Bz-ATP) elicited concentration-dependent NO production, which increased linearly within the first 15 min and plateaued thereafter; agonist EC50 values were 50 and 15 µM, respectively. The NO increase evoked by ATP was antagonized in a concentration-dependent manner by Coomassie brilliant blue G (BBG) or by N(ω)-propyl-L-arginine, suggesting the involvement of P2X7Rs and neuronal NOS, respectively. The ATP induced NO production was independent of N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor activity as effects were not alleviated by DL-2-Amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (APV), but antagonized by BBG. In sum, exogenous ATP elicited NO production in hippocampal neurons independently of NMDA receptor activity.

  8. ATP Induces NO Production in Hippocampal Neurons by P2X7 Receptor Activation Independent of Glutamate Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Codocedo, Juan Francisco; Godoy, Juan Alejandro; Poblete, Maria Ines; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C.; Huidobro-Toro, Juan Pablo

    2013-01-01

    To assess the putative role of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) upon nitric oxide (NO) production in the hippocampus, we used as a model both rat hippocampal slices and isolated hippocampal neurons in culture, lacking glial cells. In hippocampal slices, additions of exogenous ATP or 2′(3′)-O-(4-Benzoylbenzoyl) ATP (Bz-ATP) elicited concentration-dependent NO production, which increased linearly within the first 15 min and plateaued thereafter; agonist EC50 values were 50 and 15 µM, respectively. The NO increase evoked by ATP was antagonized in a concentration-dependent manner by Coomassie brilliant blue G (BBG) or by Nω-propyl-L-arginine, suggesting the involvement of P2X7Rs and neuronal NOS, respectively. The ATP induced NO production was independent of N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor activity as effects were not alleviated by DL-2-Amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (APV), but antagonized by BBG. In sum, exogenous ATP elicited NO production in hippocampal neurons independently of NMDA receptor activity. PMID:23472093

  9. Evidence of multiple reassortment events of feline-to-human rotaviruses based on a rare human G3P[9] rotavirus isolated from a patient with acute gastroenteritis.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tinh Huu; Than, Van Thai; Thanh, Hien Dang; Kim, Wonyong

    2016-06-01

    A rare human/feline-like rotavirus G3P[9] strain, CAU14-1-262, from a 2-year-old girl with severe gastroenteritis was isolated and sequenced. The 11 gene segments of the CAU14-1-262 strain possessed a novel genotype constellation, G3-P[9]-I3-R3-C3-M3-A3-N3-T1-E3-H6, which was identified for the first time. Phylogenetic analysis of this strain identified the following genome origins: VP7, VP4, VP6, VP1-VP3, NSP1, NSP2, and NSP4 genes possessed an AU-1-like genotype 3 constellation with high sequence identity to those of the feline and human/feline-like rotaviruses; NSP5 possessed a H6 lineage, with highest sequence identity to the human/feline-like E2541 strain; and the NSP3 gene possessed a Wa-like genotype 1 constellation with high sequence identity to those of the of human rotaviruses. These results provided evidence of multiple reassortment events in G3P[9] rotavirus CAU14-1-262 and possibility of feline-to-human interspecies transmission.

  10. Draft genome sequence of pathogenic bacteria Vibrio parahaemolyticus strain Ba94C2, associated with acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease isolate from South America.

    PubMed

    Restrepo, Leda; Bayot, Bonny; Betancourt, Irma; Pinzón, Andres

    2016-09-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a pathogenic bacteria which has been associated to the early mortality syndrome (EMS) also known as hepatopancreatic necrosis disease (AHPND) causing high mortality in shrimp farms. Pathogenic strains contain two homologous genes related to insecticidal toxin genes, PirA and PirB, these toxin genes are located on a plasmid contained within the bacteria. Genomic sequences have allowed the finding of two strains with a divergent structure related to the geographic region from where they were found. The isolates from the geographic collection of Southeast Asia and Mexico show variable regions on the plasmid genome, indicating that even though they are not alike they still conserve the toxin genes. In this paper, we report for the first time, a pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus strain in shrimp from South America that showed symptoms of AHPND. The genomic analysis revealed that this strain of V. parahaemolyticus found in South America appears to be more related to the Southeast Asia as compared to the Mexican strains. This finding is of major importance for the shrimp industry, especially in regards to the urgent need for disease control strategies to avoid large EMS outbreaks and economic loss, and to determine its dispersion in South America. The whole-genome shotgun project of V. parahaemolyticus strain Ba94C2 have been deposited at DDBJ/EMBL/GenBank under the accession PRJNA335761.

  11. Are isolated wetlands isolated?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Loren M.; Euliss, Ned H.; Haukos, David A.

    2011-01-01

    While federal regulations during the past 10 years have treated isolated wetlands as unconnected to aquatic resources protected by the Clean Water Act, they provide critical ecosystem services to society that extend well beyond their wetland boundaries. The authors offer well-documented examples from the scientific literature on some of the ecosystem services provided by isolated wetlands to society and other ecosystems.

  12. Anterior Thalamic Lesions Alter Both Hippocampal-Dependent Behavior and Hippocampal Acetylcholine Release in the Rat

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savage, Lisa M.; Hall, Joseph M.; Vetreno, Ryan P.

    2011-01-01

    The anterior thalamic nuclei (ATN) are important for learning and memory as damage to this region produces a persistent amnestic syndrome. Dense connections between the ATN and the hippocampus exist, and importantly, damage to the ATN can impair hippocampal functioning. Acetylcholine (ACh) is a key neurotransmitter in the hippocampus, and in vivo…

  13. Preservation of hippocampal neuron numbers and hippocampal subfield volumes in behaviorally characterized aged tree shrews.

    PubMed

    Keuker, Jeanine I H; de Biurrun, Gabriel; Luiten, Paul G M; Fuchs, Eberhard

    2004-01-19

    Aging is associated with a decreased ability to store and retrieve information. The hippocampal formation plays a critical role in such memory processes, and its integrity is affected during normal aging. We used tree shrews (Tupaia belangeri) as an animal model of aging, because in many characteristics, tree shrews are closer to primates than they are to rodents. Young and aged male tree shrews performed a holeboard spatial memory task, which permits assessment of reference and working memory. Upon completion of the behavioral measurements, we carried out modified stereological analyses of neuronal numbers in various subdivisions of the hippocampus and used the Cavalieri method to calculate the volumes of these subfields. Results showed that the working memory of aged tree shrews was significantly impaired compared with that of young animals, whereas the hippocampus-dependent reference memory remained unchanged by aging. Estimation of the number of neurons revealed preserved neuron numbers in the subiculum, in the subregions CA1, CA2, CA3, and in the hilus of the dentate gyrus. Volume measurements showed no aging-related changes in the volume of any of these hippocampal subregions, or in the molecular and granule cell layers of the dentate gyrus of tree shrews. We conclude that the observed changes in memory performance in aging tree shrews are not accompanied by observable reductions of hippocampal neuron numbers or hippocampal volume, rather, the changes in memory performance are more likely the result of modified subcellular mechanisms that are affected by the aging process.

  14. Aberrant hippocampal neurogenesis after limbic kindling: Relationship to BDNF and hippocampal-dependent memory.

    PubMed

    Botterill, J J; Brymer, K J; Caruncho, H J; Kalynchuk, L E

    2015-06-01

    Seizures dramatically increase the number of adult generated neurons in the hippocampus. However, it is not known whether this effect depends on seizures that originate in specific brain regions or whether it is nonspecific to seizure activity regardless of origin. We used kindling of different brain sites to address this question. Rats received 99 kindling stimulations of the basolateral amygdala, dorsal hippocampus, or caudate nucleus over a 6-week period. After kindling, we counted the number of adult generated hippocampal neurons that were birth-dated with the proliferative marker bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) to evaluate cell proliferation and survival under conditions of repeated seizures. Next, we counted the number of doublecortin immunoreactive (DCX-ir) cells and evaluated their dendritic complexity to determine if limbic and nonlimbic seizures have differential effects on neuronal maturation. We also quantified hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophin factor (BDNF) protein levels using an ELISA kit and assessed memory performance using a hippocampal-dependent fear conditioning paradigm. We found that limbic, but not nonlimbic, seizures dramatically increased hippocampal cell proliferation and the number of hilar-CA3 ectopic granule cells. Further, limbic kindling promoted dendritic outgrowth of DCX-ir cells and the number of DCX-ir cells containing basal dendrites. Limbic kindling also enhanced BDNF protein levels throughout the entire hippocampus and impaired the retrieval of fear memories. Collectively, our results suggest a relationship between limbic seizures, neurogenesis, BDNF protein, and cognition.

  15. Sparing of Spatial Mental Imagery in Patients with Hippocampal Lesions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Soyun; Borst, Grégoire; Thompson, William L.; Hopkins, Ramona O.; Kosslyn, Stephen M.; Squire, Larry R.

    2013-01-01

    In four experiments, we explored the capacity for spatial mental imagery in patients with hippocampal lesions, using tasks that minimized the role of learning and memory. On all four tasks, patients with hippocampal lesions performed as well as controls. Nonetheless, in separate tests, the patients were impaired at remembering the materials that…

  16. The Impact of Sleep Loss on Hippocampal Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prince, Toni-Moi; Abel, Ted

    2013-01-01

    Hippocampal cellular and molecular processes critical for memory consolidation are affected by the amount and quality of sleep attained. Questions remain with regard to how sleep enhances memory, what parameters of sleep after learning are optimal for memory consolidation, and what underlying hippocampal molecular players are targeted by sleep…

  17. The extracellular calcium-sensing receptor is required for cholecystokinin secretion in response to L-phenylalanine in acutely isolated intestinal I cells.

    PubMed

    Liou, Alice P; Sei, Yoshitatsu; Zhao, Xilin; Feng, Jianying; Lu, Xinping; Thomas, Craig; Pechhold, Susanne; Raybould, Helen E; Wank, Stephen A

    2011-04-01

    The extracellular calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) has recently been recognized as an L-amino acid sensor and has been implicated in mediating cholecystokinin (CCK) secretion in response to aromatic amino acids. We investigated whether direct detection of L-phenylalanine (L-Phe) by CaSR results in CCK secretion in the native I cell. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting of duodenal I cells from CCK-enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) transgenic mice demonstrated CaSR gene expression. Immunostaining of fixed and fresh duodenal tissue sections confirmed CaSR protein expression. Intracellular calcium fluxes were CaSR dependent, stereoselective for L-Phe over D-Phe, and responsive to type II calcimimetic cinacalcet in CCK-eGFP cells. Additionally, CCK secretion by an isolated I cell population was increased by 30 and 62% in response to L-Phe in the presence of physiological (1.26 mM) and superphysiological (2.5 mM) extracellular calcium concentrations, respectively. While the deletion of CaSR from CCK-eGFP cells did not affect basal CCK secretion, the effect of L-Phe or cinacalcet on intracellular calcium flux was lost. In fact, both secretagogues, as well as superphysiological Ca(2+), evoked an unexpected 20-30% decrease in CCK secretion compared with basal secretion in CaSR(-/-) CCK-eGFP cells. CCK secretion in response to KCl or tryptone was unaffected by the absence of CaSR. The present data suggest that CaSR is required for hormone secretion in the specific response to L-Phe by the native I cell, and that a receptor-mediated mechanism may inhibit hormone secretion in the absence of a fully functional CaSR.

  18. Attenuation of capsaicin-induced acute and visceral nociceptive pain by alpha- and beta-amyrin, a triterpene mixture isolated from Protium heptaphyllum resin in mice.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Francisco A; Costa, Charllynton L S; Chaves, Mariana H; Almeida, Fernanda R C; Cavalcante, Italo J M; Lima, Alana F; Lima, Roberto C P; Silva, Regilane M; Campos, Adriana Rolim; Santos, Flavia A; Rao, Vietla S N

    2005-10-21

    The triterpene mixture, alpha- and beta-amyrin, isolated from Protium heptaphyllum resin was evaluated on capsaicin-evoked nociception in mice. Orally administered alpha- and beta-amyrin (3 to 100 mg/kg) significantly suppressed the nociceptive behaviors--evoked by either subplantar (1.6 microg) or intracolonic (149 microg) application of capsaicin. The antinociception produced by alpha- and beta-amyrin against subplantar capsaicin-induced paw-licking behavior was neither potentiated nor attenuated by ruthenium red (1.5 mg/kg, s.c.), a non-specific antagonist of vanilloid receptor (TRPV1), but was greatly abolished in animals pretreated with naloxone (2 mg/kg, s.c.), suggesting an opioid mechanism. However, participation of alpha2-adrenoceptor involvement was unlikely since yohimbine (2 mg/kg, i.p.) pretreatment failed to block the antinociceptive effect of alpha- and beta-amyrin in the experimental model of visceral nociception evoked by intracolonic capsaicin. The triterpene mixture (3 to 30 mg/kg, p.o.) neither altered significantly the pentobarbital sleeping time, nor impaired the ambulation or motor coordination in open-field and rota-rod tests, respectively, indicating the absence of sedative or motor abnormality that could account for its antinociception. Nevertheless, alpha- and beta-amyrin could significantly block the capsaicin (10 mg/kg, s.c.)-induced hyperthermic response but not the initial hypothermia. These results suggest that the triterpene mixture, alpha- and beta-amyrin has an analgesia inducing effect, possibly involving vanilloid receptor (TRPV1) and an opioid mechanism.

  19. Isolated extramedullary cutaneous relapse despite concomitant severe graft-vs.-host disease and tissue chimerism analysis in a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Kantarcioglu, Bulent; Bekoz, Huseyin Saffet; Ogret, Yeliz Duvarci; Cakir, Asli; Kivanc, Demet; Oguz, Fatma Savran; Sargin, Deniz

    2016-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) is a potentially curative treatment option for patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The curative potential of allo-HSCT for ALL is, in part, due to the graft-vs.-leukemia (GVL) effect, in addition to the intensive conditioning chemo-radiotherapy. However, relapse remains the major cause of treatment failure following allo-HSCT for ALL. In the allo-HSCT setting, testing for genetic markers of hematopoietic chimerism has become a part of the routine diagnostic program. Routine chimerism analysis is usually performed in peripheral blood or bone marrow; in fact, little is known about the value of tissue chimerism in patients with extramedullary relapse (EMR) after the allo-HSCT setting. The present study reports on, a case of a patient with ALL who experienced isolated cutaneous EMR despite ongoing graft-vs.-host disease (GVHD), and the results of peripheral blood and skin tissue chimerism studies using multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of short tandem repeats (STR-PCR). The present case demonstrates that, although complete remission and/or chimerism may be achieved in the bone marrow, chimerism achieved at the tissue level, and the subsequent GVL effect, may be limited, despite concomitant severe GVHD following allo-HSCT. Our tissue chimerism analysis results provide a good example of how skin tissue may be a ‘sanctuary’ site for effector cells of GVL, despite active GVHD and complete hematopoetic chimerism. PMID:28105353

  20. Molecular evolution of VP3, VP1, 3C(pro) and 3D(pol) coding regions in coxsackievirus group A type 24 variant isolates from acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis in 2011 in Okinawa, Japan.

    PubMed

    Nidaira, Minoru; Kuba, Yumani; Saitoh, Mika; Taira, Katsuya; Maeshiro, Noriyuki; Mahoe, Yoko; Kyan, Hisako; Takara, Taketoshi; Okano, Sho; Kudaka, Jun; Yoshida, Hiromu; Oishi, Kazunori; Kimura, Hirokazu

    2014-04-01

    A large acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis (AHC) outbreak occurred in 2011 in Okinawa Prefecture in Japan. Ten strains of coxsackievirus group A type 24 variant (CA24v) were isolated from patients with AHC and full sequence analysis of the VP3, VP1, 3C(pro) and 3D(pol) coding regions performed. To assess time-scale evolution, phylogenetic analysis was performed using the Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo method. In addition, similarity plots were constructed and pairwise distance (p-distance) and positive pressure analyses performed. A phylogenetic tree based on the VP1 coding region showed that the present strains belong to genotype 4 (G4). In addition, the present strains could have divided in about 2010 from the same lineages detected in other countries such as China, India and Australia. The mean rates of molecular evolution of four coding regions were estimated at about 6.15 to 7.86 × 10(-3) substitutions/site/year. Similarity plot analyses suggested that nucleotide similarities between the present strains and a prototype strain (EH24/70 strain) were 0.77-0.94. The p-distance of the present strains was relatively short (<0.01). Only one positive selected site (L25H) was identified in the VP1 protein. These findings suggest that the present CA24v strains causing AHC are genetically related to other AHC strains with rapid evolution and emerged in around 2010.

  1. Direct brain recordings reveal hippocampal rhythm underpinnings of language processing

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Kristopher L.; Lin, Jack J.; Dewar, Callum; Parvizi, Josef; Dronkers, Nina F.; Knight, Robert T.

    2016-01-01

    Language is classically thought to be supported by perisylvian cortical regions. Here we provide intracranial evidence linking the hippocampal complex to linguistic processing. We used direct recordings from the hippocampal structures to investigate whether theta oscillations, pivotal in memory function, track the amount of contextual linguistic information provided in sentences. Twelve participants heard sentences that were either constrained (“She locked the door with the”) or unconstrained (“She walked in here with the”) before presentation of the final word (“key”), shown as a picture that participants had to name. Hippocampal theta power increased for constrained relative to unconstrained contexts during sentence processing, preceding picture presentation. Our study implicates hippocampal theta oscillations in a language task using natural language associations that do not require memorization. These findings reveal that the hippocampal complex contributes to language in an active fashion, relating incoming words to stored semantic knowledge, a necessary process in the generation of sentence meaning. PMID:27647880

  2. Nuclear shrinkage in live mouse hippocampal slices.

    PubMed

    Kasischke, K; Büchner, M; Ludolph, A C; Riepe, M W

    2001-05-01

    Brain slices are used extensively for biochemical, electrophysiological and molecular investigations. However, only the time frame for electrophysiological and biochemical investigations has as yet been defined. The goal of the present study was to investigate the time course of nuclear structure in live brain slices. Hippocampal slices (300 microm) were prepared from male CD1 mice (25-30 g), stained with Hoechst 33342 (10 microM), calcein-AM (2 microM) and ethidium homodimer (4 microM), and imaged with single- and dual-photon microscopy. The volume of CA1 pyramidal cell nuclei decreased from 759+/-229 microm3 in 40-50 microm depth 25 min after preparation to 453+/-169 microm3 (P<0.001) after 60 min, 315+/-112 microm3 (P<0.001) after 120 min and 128+/-71 microm3 (P<0.001) after 8 h. Similar results were obtained on a prolonged time scale in 70-80 microm depth and with an accelerated time scale in 20-30 microm depth. Live-dead staining showed that cell damage is progressing from the surface to deeper layers of the slices in a time-dependent fashion. We conclude that nuclei of CA1 hippocampal pyramidal cells show a time- and depth-dependent shrinkage converging 8 h after slice preparation to a volume of 90-130 microm; in any depth between 20 and 80 microm. The nucleus in the superficial 80 microm of each side appears dysfunctional even at times suitable for electrophysiological and biochemical experimentation in hippocampal slices. Molecular analysis of cell regulation in brain slices may, therefore, be time-dependently distorted by progressing cell death in at least half of the tissue under investigation.

  3. Modeling Impaired Hippocampal Neurogenesis after Radiation Exposure.

    PubMed

    Cacao, Eliedonna; Cucinotta, Francis A

    2016-03-01

    Radiation impairment of neurogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus is one of several factors associated with cognitive detriments after treatment of brain cancers in children and adults with radiation therapy. Mouse models have been used to study radiation-induced changes in neurogenesis, however the models are limited in the number of doses, dose fractions, age and time after exposure conditions that have been studied. The purpose of this study is to develop a novel predictive mathematical model of radiation-induced changes to neurogenesis using a system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations (ODEs) to represent the time, age and dose-dependent changes to several cell populations participating in neurogenesis as reported in mouse experiments exposed to low-LET radiation. We considered four compartments to model hippocampal neurogenesis and, consequently, the effects of radiation treatment in altering neurogenesis: (1) neural stem cells (NSCs), (2) neuronal progenitor cells or neuroblasts (NB), (3) immature neurons (ImN) and (4) glioblasts (GB). Because neurogenesis is decreasing with increasing mouse age, a description of the age-related dynamics of hippocampal neurogenesis is considered in the model, which is shown to be an important factor in comparisons to experimental data. A key feature of the model is the description of negative feedback regulation on early and late neuronal proliferation after radiation exposure. The model is augmented with parametric descriptions of the dose and time after irradiation dependences of activation of microglial cells and a possible shift of NSC proliferation from neurogenesis to gliogenesis reported at higher doses (∼10 Gy). Predictions for dose-fractionation regimes and for different mouse ages, and prospects for future work are then discussed.

  4. Channel shutdown: a response of hippocampal neurons to adverse environments.

    PubMed

    Somjen, G G; Faas, G C; Vreugdenhil, M; Wadman, W J

    1993-12-31

    Stretch-activated ion channels have been discovered in the membrane of many types of cells, but their presence in neurons is uncertain. We used freshly dissociated rat hippocampal neurons to study the effect of hypotonic swelling but, surprisingly, the isolated neurons did not swell. Voltage-dependent whole-cell membrane currents mediated by K+, Na+ and Ca2+ were rapidly and reversibly suppressed during sudden exposure to strongly hypo-osmotic, hyper-osmotic or glucose deficient solutions. The amplitudes of the sustained components of K+ and Ca2+ currents were more depressed than transient currents, but the rate of decay of transient K+ current greatly accelerated. The voltage dependence of activation and of steady state inactivation of residual K+ and Ca2+ currents were not shifted. The current holding membrane potential at -70 mV and therefore the conductance at that voltage were unchanged or somewhat decreased. Capacitive (charging) membrane current was not affected. Changes in tail current suggested moderate loss of cytosolic K+ in some but not in all cells. We conclude that channel shutdown is a uniform response of neuron somata and proximal dendrites to various adverse environments. Hypothetically we propose that swelling was prevented in anisosmotic conditions because membrane water permeability decreased.

  5. Effects of TRPV1 on the hippocampal synaptic plasticity in the epileptic rat brain.

    PubMed

    Saffarzadeh, Fatemeh; Eslamizade, Mohammad J; Ghadiri, Tahereh; Modarres Mousavi, Sayed Mostafa; Hadjighassem, Mahmoudreza; Gorji, Ali

    2015-07-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy is often presented by medically intractable recurrent seizures due to dysfunction of temporal lobe structures, mostly the temporomesial structures. The role of transient receptor potential vaniloid 1 (TRPV1) activity on synaptic plasticity of the epileptic brain tissues was investigated. We studied hippocampal TRPV1 protein content and distribution in the hippocampus of epileptic rats. Furthermore, the effects of pharmacologic modulation of TRPV1 receptors on field excitatory postsynaptic potentials have been analyzed after induction of long term potentiation (LTP) in the hippocampal CA1 and CA3 areas after 1 day (acute phase) and 3 months (chronic phase) of pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus (SE). A higher expression of TRPV1 protein in the hippocampus as well as a higher distribution of this channel in CA1 and CA3 areas in both acute and chronic phases of pilocarpine-induced SE was observed. Activation of TRPV1 using capsaicin (1 µM) enhanced LTP induction in CA1 region in non-epileptic rats. Inhibition of TRPV1 by capsazepine (10 µM) did not affect LTP induction in non-epileptic rats. In acute phase of SE, activation of TRPV1 enhanced LTP in both CA1 and CA3 areas but TRPV1 inhibition did not affect LTP. In chronic phase of SE, application of TRPV1 antagonist enhanced LTP induction in CA1 and CA3 regions but TRPV1 activation had no effect on LTP. These findings indicate that a higher expression of TRPV1 in epileptic conditions is accompanied by a functional impact on the synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus. This suggests TRPV1 as a potential target in treatment of seizure attacks.

  6. Chronic homocysteine exposure causes changes in the intrinsic electrophysiological properties of cultured hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Schaub, Christina; Uebachs, Mischa; Beck, Heinz; Linnebank, Michael

    2013-04-01

    Homocystinuria is an inborn error of metabolism characterized by plasma homocysteine levels up to 500 μM, premature vascular events and mental retardation. Mild elevations of homocysteine plasma levels up to 25 μM, which are common in the general population, are associated with vascular disease, cognitive impairment and neurodegeneration. Several mechanisms of homocysteine neurotoxicity have been investigated. However, information on putative effects of hyperhomocysteinemia on the electrophysiology of neurons is limited. To screen for such effects, we examined primary cultures of mouse hippocampal neurons with the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. Homocysteine was applied intracellularly (100 μM), or cell cultures were incubated with 100 μM homocysteine for 24 h. Membrane voltage was measured in current-clamp mode, and action potential firing was induced with short and prolonged current injections. Single action potentials induced by short current injections (5 ms) were not altered by acute application or incubation of homocysteine. When we elicited trains of action potentials with prolonged current injections (200 ms), a broadening of action potentials during repetitive firing was observed in control neurons. This spike broadening was unaltered by acute application of homocysteine. However, it was significantly diminished when incubation with homocysteine was extended to 24 h prior to recording. Furthermore, the number of action potentials elicited by low current injections was reduced after long-term incubation with homocysteine, but not by the acute application. After 24 h of homocysteine incubation, the input resistance was reduced which might have contributed to the observed alterations in membrane excitability. We conclude that homocysteine exposure causes changes in the intrinsic electrophysiological properties of cultured hippocampal neurons as a mechanism of neurological symptoms of hyperhomocysteinemia.

  7. Acute effect of antidiabetic 1,4-dihydropyridine compound cerebrocrast on cardiac function and glucose metabolism in the isolated, perfused normal rat heart.

    PubMed

    Briede, Janina; Stivrina, Mara; Vigante, Brigita; Stoldere, Dzintra; Duburs, Gunars

    2008-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is an important cardiovascular risk factor and is associated with abnormalities in endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cell function, evoked by chronic hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia. Chronic insulin deficiency or resistance is marked by decreases in the intensity of glucose transport, glucose phosphorylation, and glucose oxidation, plus decreases in ATP levels in cardiac myocytes. It is important to search for new agents that promote glucose consumption in the heart and partially inhibit extensive fatty acid beta-oxidation observed in diabetic, ischemia. When the oxygen supply for myocardium is decreased, the heart accumulates potentially toxic intermediates of fatty acid beta-oxidation, that is, long-chain acylcarnitine and long-chain acyl-CoA metabolites. Exogenous glucose and heart glycogen become an important compensatory source of energy. Therefore we studied the effect of the antidiabetic 1,4-dihydropyridine compound cerebrocrast at concentrations from 10(-10) M to 10(-7) M on isolated rat hearts using the method of Langendorff, on physiological parameters and energy metabolism. Cerebrocrast at concentrations from 10(-10) M to 10(-7) M has a negative inotropic effect on the rat heart. It inhibits L-type Ca(2+)channels thereby diminishing the cellular Ca(2+) supply, reducing contractile activity, and oxygen consumption, that normally favors enhanced glucose uptake, metabolism, and production of high-energy phosphates (ATP content) in myocardium. Cerebrocrast decreases heart rate and left ventricular (LV) systolic pressure; at concentrations of 10(-10) M and 10(-9) M it evokes short-term vasodilatation of coronary arteries. Increase of ATP content in the myocytes induced by cerebrocrast has a ubiquitous role. It can preserve the integrity of the cell plasma membranes, maintain normal cellular function, and inhibit release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) from cells that is associated with diabetes and heart ischemia. Administration of

  8. Intracellular activities related to in vitro hippocampal sharp waves are altered in CA3 pyramidal neurons of aged mice.

    PubMed

    Moradi-Chameh, H; Peng, J; Wu, C; Zhang, L

    2014-09-26

    Pyramidal neurons in the hippocampal CA3 area interconnect intensively via recurrent axonal collaterals, and such CA3-to-CA3 recurrent circuitry plays important roles in the generation of hippocampal network activities. In particular, the CA3 circuitry is able to generate spontaneous sharp waves (SPWs) when examined in vitro. These in vitro SPWs are thought to result from the network activity of GABAergic inhibitory interneurons as SPW-correlating intracellular activities are featured with strong IPSPs in pyramidal neurons and EPSPs or spikes in GABAergic interneurons. In view of accumulating evidence indicating a decrease in subgroups of hippocampal GABAergic interneurons in aged animals, we test the hypothesis that the intracellular activities related to in vitro SPWs are altered in CA3 pyramidal neurons of aged mice. Hippocampal slices were prepared from adult and aged C57 black mice (ages 3-6 and 24-28months respectively). Population and single-cell activities were examined via extracellular and whole-cell patch-clamp recordings. CA3 SPW frequencies were not significantly different between the slices of adult and aged mice but SPW-correlating intracellular activities featured weaker IPSC components in aged CA3 pyramidal neurons compared to adult neurons. It was unlikely that this latter phenomenon was due to general impairments of GABAergic synapses in the aged CA3 circuitry as evoked IPSC responses and pharmacologically isolated IPSCs were observed in aged CA3 pyramidal neurons. In addition, aged CA3 pyramidal neurons displayed more positive resting potentials and had a higher propensity of burst firing than adult neurons. We postulate that alterations of GABAergic network activity may explain the reduced IPCS contributions to in vitro SPWs in aged CA3 pyramidal neurons. Overall, our present observations are supportive of the notion that excitability of hippocampal CA3 circuitry is increased in aged mice.

  9. Voluntary running and environmental enrichment restores impaired hippocampal neurogenesis in a triple transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, J J; Noristani, H N; Olabarria, M; Fletcher, J; Somerville, T D D; Yeh, C Y; Verkhratsky, A

    2011-11-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) affects memory and neurogenesis. Adult neurogenesis plays an important role in memory function and impaired neurogenesis contributes to cognitive deficits associated with AD. Increased physical/ cognitive activity is associated with both reduced risk of dementia and increased neurogenesis. Previous attempts to restore hippocampal neurogenesis in transgenic mice by voluntary running (RUN) and environmental enrichment (ENR) provided controversial results due to lack of non-transgenic (non-Tg) control and inclusion of social isolation as "standard" housing environment. Here, we determine the effect of RUN and ENR upon hippocampal neurogenesis in a triple transgenic (3xTg-AD) mouse model of AD, which mimics AD pathology in humans. We used single and double immunohistochemistry to determine the area density of hippocampal proliferating cells, measured by the presence of phosphorylated Histone H3 (HH3), and their potential neuronal and glial phenotype by co-localizing the proliferating cells with the immature neuronal marker doublecortin (DCX), mature neuronal marker (NeuN) and specific astroglial marker (GFAP). Our results show that 3xTg-AD mice in control environment exhibit impaired hippocampal neurogenesis compared to non-Tg animals at 9 months of age. Exposure to RUN and ENR housing restores hippocampal neurogenesis in 3xTg-AD animals to non-Tg control levels. Differentiation into neurones and glial cells is affected neither by transgenic status nor by housing environment. These results suggest that hippocampus of 3xTg-AD animals maintains the potential for cellular plasticity. Increase in physical activity and/or cognitive experience enhances neurogenesis and provides a potential for stimulation of cognitive function in AD.

  10. Hippocampal and diencephalic pathology in developmental amnesia.

    PubMed

    Dzieciol, Anna M; Bachevalier, Jocelyne; Saleem, Kadharbatcha S; Gadian, David G; Saunders, Richard; Chong, W K Kling; Banks, Tina; Mishkin, Mortimer; Vargha-Khadem, Faraneh

    2017-01-01

    Developmental amnesia (DA) is a selective episodic memory disorder associated with hypoxia-induced bilateral hippocampal atrophy of early onset. Despite the systemic impact of hypoxia-ischaemia, the resulting brain damage was previously reported to be largely limited to the hippocampus. However, the thalamus and the mammillary bodies are parts of the hippocampal-diencephalic network and are therefore also at risk of injury following hypoxic-ischaemic events. Here, we report a neuroimaging investigation of diencephalic damage in a group of 18 patients with DA (age range 11-35 years), and an equal number of controls. Importantly, we uncovered a marked degree of atrophy in the mammillary bodies in two thirds of our patients. In addition, as a group, patients had mildly reduced thalamic volumes. The size of the anterior-mid thalamic (AMT) segment was correlated with patients' visual memory performance. Thus, in addition to the hippocampus, the diencephalic structures also appear to play a role in the patients' memory deficit.

  11. Prediction of Dementia by Hippocampal Shape Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achterberg, Hakim C.; van der Lijn, Fedde; den Heijer, Tom; van der Lugt, Aad; Breteler, Monique M. B.; Niessen, Wiro J.; de Bruijne, Marleen

    This work investigates the possibility of predicting future onset of dementia in subjects who are cognitively normal, using hippocampal shape and volume information extracted from MRI scans. A group of 47 subjects who were non-demented normal at the time of the MRI acquisition, but were diagnosed with dementia during a 9 year follow-up period, was selected from a large population based cohort study. 47 Age and gender matched subjects who stayed cognitively intact were selected from the same cohort study as a control group. The hippocampi were automatically segmented and all segmentations were inspected and, if necessary, manually corrected by a trained observer. From this data a statistical model of hippocampal shape was constructed, using an entropy-based particle system. This shape model provided the input for a Support Vector Machine classifier to predict dementia. Cross validation experiments showed that shape information can predict future onset of dementia in this dataset with an accuracy of 70%. By incorporating both shape and volume information into the classifier, the accuracy increased to 74%.

  12. Hippocampal leptin suppresses methamphetamine-induced hyperlocomotion.

    PubMed

    Nishio, Masahiro; Watanabe, Yasuhiro

    2010-10-01

    Leptin is an anorexigenic peptide which is synthesized in white adipose tissue. The actions of leptin are mediated by the leptin receptor which is abundantly localized in the hypothalamus and is involved in energy regulation and balance. Recently, there has been evidence suggesting that the leptin receptor is also present in the hippocampus and may be involved with hippocampal excitability and long-term depression. To investigate the physiological function of leptin signalling in the hippocampus, we studied the effects of leptin on methamphetamine-induced ambulatory hyperactivity by utilizing intra-hippocampal infusion (i.h.) in mice. Our results show that the infusion of leptin (5 ng each bilaterally i.h.) does not affect the basal ambulatory activity but significantly suppresses methamphetamine-induced ambulatory hyperactivity as compared to saline-infused controls. Interestingly, higher dose of leptin increases the suppression of the methamphetamine-induced ambulatory hyperactivity. The i.h. infusion of leptin did not activate the JAK-STAT pathway, which is the cellular signalling pathway through which leptin acts in the hypothalamus. The infusion of leptin also did not affect activation of p42/44 MAPK which is known to be another leptin-induced signalling pathway in the brain. These results demonstrate that leptin has a novel potential suppressive effect on methamphetamine-induced hyperlocomotion and also suggest that there must be an alternative pathway in the hippocampus through which leptin signalling is being mediated.

  13. Epigenetics, oestradiol and hippocampal memory consolidation.

    PubMed

    Frick, K M

    2013-11-01

    Epigenetic alterations of histone proteins and DNA are essential for hippocampal synaptic plasticity and cognitive function, and contribute to the aetiology of psychiatric disorders and neurodegenerative diseases. Hippocampal memory formation depends on histone alterations and DNA methylation, and increasing evidence suggests that the regulation of these epigenetic processes by modulatory factors, such as environmental enrichment, stress and hormones, substantially influences memory function. Recent work from our laboratory suggests that the ability of the sex-steroid hormone 17β-oestradiol (E2 ) to enhance novel object recognition memory consolidation in young adult female mice is dependent on histone H3 acetylation and DNA methylation in the dorsal hippocampus. Our data also suggest that enzymes mediating DNA methylation and histone acetylation work in concert to regulate the effects of E2 on memory consolidation. These findings shed light on the epigenetic mechanisms that influence hormonal modulation of cognitive function, and may have important implications for understanding how hormones influence cognition in adulthood and ageing. The present review provides a brief overview of the literature on epigenetics and memory, describes in detail our findings demonstrating that epigenetic alterations regulate E2 -induced memory enhancement in female mice, and discusses future directions for research on the epigenetic regulation of E2 -induced memory enhancement.

  14. Glucocorticoid therapy-induced memory deficits: acute versus chronic effects.

    PubMed

    Coluccia, Daniel; Wolf, Oliver T; Kollias, Spyros; Roozendaal, Benno; Forster, Adrian; de Quervain, Dominique J-F

    2008-03-26

    Conditions with chronically elevated glucocorticoid levels are usually associated with declarative memory deficits. Considerable evidence suggests that long-term glucocorticoid exposure may cause cognitive impairment via cumulative and long-lasting influences on hippocampal function and morphology. However, because elevated glucocorticoid levels at the time of retention testing are also known to have direct impairing effects on memory retrieval, it is possible that such acute hormonal influences on retrieval processes contribute to the memory deficits found with chronic glucocorticoid exposure. To investigate this issue, we examined memory functions and hippocampal volume in 24 patients with rheumatoid arthritis who were treated either chronically (5.3 +/- 1.0 years, mean +/- SE) with low to moderate doses of prednisone (7.5 +/- 0.8 mg, mean +/- SE) or without glucocorticoids. In both groups, delayed recall of words learned 24 h earlier was assessed under conditions of either elevated or basal glucocorticoid levels in a double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover design. Although the findings in this patient population did not provide evidence for harmful effects of a history of chronic prednisone treatment on memory performance or hippocampal volume per se, acute prednisone administration 1 h before retention testing to either the steroid or nonsteroid group impaired word recall. Thus, these findings indicate that memory deficits observed under chronically elevated glucocorticoid levels result, at least in part, from acute and reversible glucocorticoid effects on memory retrieval.

  15. Wnt-5a Ligand Modulates Mitochondrial Fission-Fusion in Rat Hippocampal Neurons*

    PubMed Central

    Godoy, Juan A.; Arrázola, Macarena S.; Ordenes, Daniela; Silva-Alvarez, Carmen; Braidy, Nady; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C.

    2014-01-01

    The Wnt signaling pathway plays an important role in developmental processes, including embryonic patterning, cell specification, and cell polarity. Wnt components participate in the development of the central nervous system, and growing evidence indicates that this pathway also regulates the function of the adult nervous system. In this study, we report that Wnt-5a, a noncanonical Wnt ligand, is a potent activator of mitochondrial dynamics and induces acute fission and fusion events in the mitochondria of rat hippocampal neurons. The effect of Wnt-5a was inhibited in the presence of sFRP, a Wnt scavenger. Similarly, the canonical Wnt-3a ligand had no effect on mitochondrial fission-fusion events, suggesting that this effect is specific for Wnt-5a alone. We also show that the Wnt-5a effects on mitochondrial dynamics occur with an increase in both intracellular and mitochondrial calcium (Ca2+), which was correlated with an increased phosphorylation of Drp1(Ser-616) and a decrease of Ser-637 phosphorylation, both indicators of mitochondrial dynamics. Electron microscope analysis of hippocampal tissues in the CA1 region showed an increase in the number of mitochondria present in the postsynaptic region, and this finding correlated with a change in mitochondrial morphology. We conclude that Wnt-5a/Ca2+ signaling regulates the mitochondrial fission-fusion process in hippocampal neurons, a feature that might help to further understand the role of Wnt-related pathologies, including neurodegenerative diseases associated with mitochondrial dysfunction, and represents a potentially important link between impaired metabolic function and degenerative disorders. PMID:25336659

  16. Wnt-5a ligand modulates mitochondrial fission-fusion in rat hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Godoy, Juan A; Arrázola, Macarena S; Ordenes, Daniela; Silva-Alvarez, Carmen; Braidy, Nady; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C

    2014-12-26

    The Wnt signaling pathway plays an important role in developmental processes, including embryonic patterning, cell specification, and cell polarity. Wnt components participate in the development of the central nervous system, and growing evidence indicates that this pathway also regulates the function of the adult nervous system. In this study, we report that Wnt-5a, a noncanonical Wnt ligand, is a potent activator of mitochondrial dynamics and induces acute fission and fusion events in the mitochondria of rat hippocampal neurons. The effect of Wnt-5a was inhibited in the presence of sFRP, a Wnt scavenger. Similarly, the canonical Wnt-3a ligand had no effect on mitochondrial fission-fusion events, suggesting that this effect is specific for Wnt-5a alone. We also show that the Wnt-5a effects on mitochondrial dynamics occur with an increase in both intracellular and mitochondrial calcium (Ca(2+)), which was correlated with an increased phosphorylation of Drp1(Ser-616) and a decrease of Ser-637 phosphorylation, both indicators of mitochondrial dynamics. Electron microscope analysis of hippocampal tissues in the CA1 region showed an increase in the number of mitochondria present in the postsynaptic region, and this finding correlated with a change in mitochondrial morphology. We conclude that Wnt-5a/Ca(2+) signaling regulates the mitochondrial fission-fusion process in hippocampal neurons, a feature that might help to further understand the role of Wnt-related pathologies, including neurodegenerative diseases associated with mitochondrial dysfunction, and represents a potentially important link between impaired metabolic function and degenerative disorders.

  17. CXCR4 and NMDA Receptors Are Functionally Coupled in Rat Hippocampal Noradrenergic and Glutamatergic Nerve Endings.

    PubMed

    Di Prisco, Silvia; Olivero, Guendalina; Merega, Elisa; Bonfiglio, Tommaso; Marchi, Mario; Pittaluga, Anna

    2016-12-01

    Previous studies had shown that the HIV-1 capsidic glycoprotein gp120 (strain IIIB) modulates presynaptic release-regulating NMDA receptors on noradrenergic and glutamatergic terminals. This study aims to assess whether the chemokine CXC4 receptors (CXCR4s) has a role in the gp120-mediated effects. The effect of CXCL12, the endogenous ligand at CXCR4, on the NMDA-mediated releasing activity was therefore investigated. Rat hippocampal synaptosomes were preloaded with [(3)H]noradrenaline ([(3)H]NA) or [(3)H]D-aspartate ([(3)H]D-Asp) and acutely exposed to CXCL12, to NMDA or to both agonists. CXCL12, inactive on its own, facilitated the NMDA-evoked tritium release. The NMDA antagonist MK-801 abolished the NMDA/CXCL12-evoked tritium release of both radiolabelled tracers, while the CXCR4 antagonist AMD 3100 halved it, suggesting that rat hippocampal nerve endings possess presynaptic release-regulating CXCR4 receptors colocalized with NMDA receptors. Accordingly, Western blot analysis confirmed the presence of CXCR4 proteins in synaptosomal plasmamembranes. In both synaptosomal preparations, CXCL12-induced facilitation of NMDA-mediated release was dependent upon PLC-mediated src-induced events leading to mobilization of Ca(2+) from intraterminal IP3-sensitive stores Finally, the gp120-induced facilitation of NMDA-mediated release of [(3)H]NA and [(3)H]D-Asp was prevented by AMD 3100. We propose that CXCR4s are functionally coupled to NMDA receptors in rat hippocampal noradrenergic and glutamatergic terminals and account for the gp120-induced modulation of the NMDA-mediated central effects. The NMDA/CXCR4 cross-talk could have a role in the neuropsychiatric symptoms often observed in HIV-1 positive patients.

  18. Corticosterone enhances the potency of ethanol against hippocampal long-term potentiation via local neurosteroid synthesis.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Yukitoshi; O'Dell, Kazuko A; Zorumski, Charles F

    2015-01-01

    Corticosterone is known to accumulate in brain after various stressors including alcohol intoxication. Just as severe alcohol intoxication is typically required to impair memory formation only high concentrations of ethanol (60 mM) acutely inhibit long-term potentiation (LTP), a cellular memory mechanism, in naïve hippocampal slices. This LTP inhibition involves synthesis of neurosteroids, including allopregnanolone, and appears to involve a form of cellular stress. In the CA1 region of rat hippocampal slices, we examined whether a lower concentration of ethanol (20 mM) inhibits LTP in the presence of corticosterone, a stress-related modulator, and whether corticosterone stimulates local neurosteroid synthesis. Although low micromolar corticosterone alone did not inhibit LTP induction, we found that 20 mM ethanol inhibited LTP in the presence of corticosterone. At 20 mM, ethanol alone did not stimulate neurosteroid synthesis or inhibit LTP. LTP inhibition by corticosterone plus ethanol was blocked by finasteride, an inhibitor of 5α-reductase, suggesting a role for neurosteroid synthesis. We also found that corticosterone alone enhanced neurosteroid immunostaining in CA1 pyramidal neurons and that this immunostaining was further augmented by 20 mM ethanol. The enhanced neurosteroid staining was blocked by finasteride and the N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonist, 2-amino-5-phosphonovalerate (APV). These results indicate that corticosterone promotes neurosteroid synthesis in hippocampal pyramidal neurons and can participate in ethanol-mediated synaptic dysfunction even at moderate ethanol levels. These effects may contribute to the influence of stress on alcohol-induced cognitive impairment.

  19. Corticosterone enhances the potency of ethanol against hippocampal long-term potentiation via local neurosteroid synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Izumi, Yukitoshi; O’Dell, Kazuko A.; Zorumski, Charles F.

    2015-01-01

    Corticosterone is known to accumulate in brain after various stressors including alcohol intoxication. Just as severe alcohol intoxication is typically required to impair memory formation only high concentrations of ethanol (60 mM) acutely inhibit long-term potentiation (LTP), a cellular memory mechanism, in naïve hippocampal slices. This LTP inhibition involves synthesis of neurosteroids, including allopregnanolone, and appears to involve a form of cellular stress. In the CA1 region of rat hippocampal slices, we examined whether a lower concentration of ethanol (20 mM) inhibits LTP in the presence of corticosterone, a stress-related modulator, and whether corticosterone stimulates local neurosteroid synthesis. Although low micromolar corticosterone alone did not inhibit LTP induction, we found that 20 mM ethanol inhibited LTP in the presence of corticosterone. At 20 mM, ethanol alone did not stimulate neurosteroid synthesis or inhibit LTP. LTP inhibition by corticosterone plus ethanol was blocked by finasteride, an inhibitor of 5α-reductase, suggesting a role for neurosteroid synthesis. We also found that corticosterone alone enhanced neurosteroid immunostaining in CA1 pyramidal neurons and that this immunostaining was further augmented by 20 mM ethanol. The enhanced neurosteroid staining was blocked by finasteride and the N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonist, 2-amino-5-phosphonovalerate (APV). These results indicate that corticosterone promotes neurosteroid synthesis in hippocampal pyramidal neurons and can participate in ethanol-mediated synaptic dysfunction even at moderate ethanol levels. These effects may contribute to the influence of stress on alcohol-induced cognitive impairment. PMID:26190975

  20. Holographic Photolysis for Multiple Cell Stimulation in Mouse Hippocampal Slices

    PubMed Central

    Papagiakoumou, Eirini; Ventalon, Cathie; Angulo, María Cecilia; Emiliani, Valentina

    2010-01-01

    Background Advanced light microscopy offers sensitive and non-invasive means to image neural activity and to control signaling with photolysable molecules and, recently, light-gated channels. These approaches require precise and yet flexible light excitation patterns. For synchronous stimulation of subsets of cells, they also require large excitation areas with millisecond and micrometric resolution. We have recently developed a new method for such optical control using a phase holographic modulation of optical wave-fronts, which minimizes power loss, enables rapid switching between excitation patterns, and allows a true 3D sculpting of the excitation volumes. In previous studies we have used holographic photololysis to control glutamate uncaging on single neuronal cells. Here, we extend the use of holographic photolysis for the excitation of multiple neurons and of glial cells. Methods/Principal Findings The system combines a liquid crystal device for holographic patterned photostimulation, high-resolution optical imaging, the HiLo microscopy, to define the stimulated regions and a conventional Ca2+ imaging system to detect neural activity. By means of electrophysiological recordings and calcium imaging in acute hippocampal slices, we show that the use of excitation patterns precisely tailored to the shape of multiple neuronal somata represents a very efficient way for the simultaneous excitation of a group of neurons. In addition, we demonstrate that fast shaped illumination patterns also induce reliable responses in single glial cells. Conclusions/Significance We show that the main advantage of holographic illumination is that it allows for an efficient excitation of multiple cells with a spatiotemporal resolution unachievable with other existing approaches. Although this paper focuses on the photoactivation of caged molecules, our approach will surely prove very efficient for other probes, such as light-gated channels, genetically encoded photoactivatable

  1. Serotonin dependent masking of hippocampal sharp wave ripples.

    PubMed

    ul Haq, Rizwan; Anderson, Marlene L; Hollnagel, Jan-Oliver; Worschech, Franziska; Sherkheli, Muhammad Azahr; Behrens, Christoph J; Heinemann, Uwe

    2016-02-01

    Sharp wave ripples (SPW-Rs) are thought to play an important role in memory consolidation. By rapid replay of previously stored information during slow wave sleep and consummatory behavior, they result from the formation of neural ensembles during a learning period. Serotonin (5-HT), suggested to be able to modify SPW-Rs, can affect many neurons simultaneously by volume transmission and alter network functions in an orchestrated fashion. In acute slices from dorsal hippocampus, SPW-Rs can be induced by repeated high frequency stimulation that induces long-lasting LTP. We used this model to study SPW-R appearance and modulation by 5-HT. Although stimulation in presence of 5-HT permitted LTP induction, SPW-Rs were "masked"--but appeared after 5-HT wash-out. This SPW-R masking was dose dependent with 100 nM 5-HT being sufficient--if the 5-HT re-uptake inhibitor citalopram was present. Fenfluramine, a serotonin releaser, could also mask SPW-Rs. Masking was due to 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A/C receptor activation. Neither membrane potential nor membrane conductance changes in pyramidal cells caused SPW-R blockade since both remained unaffected by combining 5-HT and citalopram. Moreover, 10 and 30 μM 5-HT mediated SPW-R masking preceded neuronal hyperpolarization and involved reduced presynaptic transmitter release. 5-HT, as well as a 5-HT1A agonist, augmented paired pulse facilitation and affected the coefficient of variance. Spontaneous SPW-Rs in mice hippocampal slices were also masked by 5-HT and fenfluramine. While neuronal ensembles can acquire long lasting LTP during higher 5-HT levels, lower 5-HT levels enable neural ensembles to replay previously stored information and thereby permit memory consolidation memory.

  2. Fetal Hippocampal Development: Analysis by Magnetic Resonance Imaging Volumetry

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Francois Dominique; Habas, Piotr; Kim, Kio; Corbett-Detig, James; Xu, Duan; Studholme, Colin; Glenn, Orit A.

    2011-01-01

    The hippocampal formation plays an important role in learning and memory, however data on its development in utero in humans is limited. This study was performed to evaluate hippocampal development in healthy fetuses using 3D reconstructed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A cohort of 20 healthy pregnant women underwent prenatal MRI at a median gestational age of 24.9 weeks (range 21.3-31.9 weeks); 6 of the women also had a second fetal MRI performed at a 6 week interval. Routine 2D ultrafast T2-weighted images were used to reconstruct a 3D volume image, which was then used to manually segment the right and left hippocampi. Total hippocampal volume was calculated for each subject and compared against gestational age. There was a linear increase in total hippocampal volume with increasing gestational age (P<0.001). For subjects scanned twice, there was an increase in hippocampal size on the second fetal MRI (P=0.0004). This represents the first volumetric study of fetal hippocampal development in vivo. This normative volumetric data will be helpful for future comparison studies of suspected developmental abnormalities of hippocampal structure and function. PMID:21270675

  3. White matter hyperintensities are associated with disproportionate progressive hippocampal atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Manning, Emily N.; Bartlett, Jonathan W.; Cash, David M.; Malone, Ian B.; Ridgway, Gerard R.; Lehmann, Manja; Leung, Kelvin K.; Sudre, Carole H.; Ourselin, Sebastien; Biessels, Geert Jan; Carmichael, Owen T.; Fox, Nick C.; Cardoso, M. Jorge; Barnes, Josephine

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT This study investigates relationships between white matter hyperintensity (WMH) volume, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology markers, and brain and hippocampal volume loss. Subjects included 198 controls, 345 mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and 154 AD subjects with serial volumetric 1.5‐T MRI. CSF Aβ42 and total tau were measured (n = 353). Brain and hippocampal loss were quantified from serial MRI using the boundary shift integral (BSI). Multiple linear regression models assessed the relationships between WMHs and hippocampal and brain atrophy rates. Models were refitted adjusting for (a) concurrent brain/hippocampal atrophy rates and (b) CSF Aβ42 and tau in subjects with CSF data. WMH burden was positively associated with hippocampal atrophy rate in controls (P = 0.002) and MCI subjects (P = 0.03), and with brain atrophy rate in controls (P = 0.03). The associations with hippocampal atrophy rate remained following adjustment for concurrent brain atrophy rate in controls and MCIs, and for CSF biomarkers in controls (P = 0.007). These novel results suggest that vascular damage alongside AD pathology is associated with disproportionately greater hippocampal atrophy in nondemented older adults. © 2016 The Authors Hippocampus Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27933676

  4. White matter hyperintensities are associated with disproportionate progressive hippocampal atrophy.

    PubMed

    Fiford, Cassidy M; Manning, Emily N; Bartlett, Jonathan W; Cash, David M; Malone, Ian B; Ridgway, Gerard R; Lehmann, Manja; Leung, Kelvin K; Sudre, Carole H; Ourselin, Sebastien; Biessels, Geert Jan; Carmichael, Owen T; Fox, Nick C; Cardoso, M Jorge; Barnes, Josephine

    2017-03-01

    This study investigates relationships between white matter hyperintensity (WMH) volume, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology markers, and brain and hippocampal volume loss. Subjects included 198 controls, 345 mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and 154 AD subjects with serial volumetric 1.5-T MRI. CSF Aβ42 and total tau were measured (n = 353). Brain and hippocampal loss were quantified from serial MRI using the boundary shift integral (BSI). Multiple linear regression models assessed the relationships between WMHs and hippocampal and brain atrophy rates. Models were refitted adjusting for (a) concurrent brain/hippocampal atrophy rates and (b) CSF Aβ42 and tau in subjects with CSF data. WMH burden was positively associated with hippocampal atrophy rate in controls (P = 0.002) and MCI subjects (P = 0.03), and with brain atrophy rate in controls (P = 0.03). The associations with hippocampal atrophy rate remained following adjustment for concurrent brain atrophy rate in controls and MCIs, and for CSF biomarkers in controls (P = 0.007). These novel results suggest that vascular damage alongside AD pathology is associated with disproportionately greater hippocampal atrophy in nondemented older adults. © 2016 The Authors Hippocampus Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Long-term recovery from hippocampal-related behavioral and biochemical abnormalities induced by noise exposure during brain development. Evaluation of auditory pathway integrity.

    PubMed

    Uran, S L; Gómez-Casati, M E; Guelman, L R

    2014-10-01

    Sound is an important part of man's contact with the environment and has served as critical means for survival throughout his evolution. As a result of exposure to noise, physiological functions such as those involving structures of the auditory and non-auditory systems might be damaged. We have previously reported that noise-exposed developing rats elicited hippocampal-related histological, biochemical and behavioral changes. However, no data about the time lapse of these changes were reported. Moreover, measurements of auditory pathway function were not performed in exposed animals. Therefore, with the present work, we aim to test the onset and the persistence of the different extra-auditory abnormalities observed in noise-exposed rats and to evaluate auditory pathway integrity. Male Wistar rats of 15 days were exposed to moderate noise levels (95-97 dB SPL, 2 h a day) during one day (acute noise exposure, ANE) or during 15 days (sub-acute noise exposure, SANE). Hippocampal biochemical determinations as well as short (ST) and long term (LT) behavioral assessments were performed. In addition, histological and functional evaluations of the auditory pathway were carried out in exposed animals. Our results show that hippocampal-related behavioral and biochemical changes (impairments in habituation, recognition and associative memories as well as distortion of anxiety-related behavior, decreases in reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and increases in antioxidant enzymes activities) induced by noise exposure were almost completely restored by PND 90. In addition, auditory evaluation shows that increased cochlear thresholds observed in exposed rats were re-established at PND 90, although with a remarkable supra-threshold amplitude reduction. These data suggest that noise-induced hippocampal and auditory-related alterations are mostly transient and that the effects of noise on the hippocampus might be, at least in part, mediated by the damage on the auditory pathway

  6. Neuronal zinc stores are modulated by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs: an optical analysis in cultured hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Love, Rachal; Salazar, Gloria; Faundez, Victor

    2005-11-02

    Zinc chelation and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been explored as potential neuroprotective agents. However, it remains unknown whether NSAIDs and zinc chelation may converge on a similar cellular process. Using two-photon microscopy to observe hippocampal neurons labeled with a zinc-sensitive dye, we provide evidence that three chemically unrelated NSAIDs, niflumic acid, ibuprofen, and naproxen, acutely increase intracellular zinc stores from extracellular metal pools. Phospholipase A2 inhibitors triggered similar responses, suggesting that NSAIDs likely control zinc stores by their activity as cyclooxygenase inhibitors. These results provide evidence for a new link between cyclooxygenase metabolites and the mechanisms controlling neuronal zinc pools.

  7. The role of microglia in adult hippocampal neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gemma, Carmelina; Bachstetter, Adam D

    2013-11-22

    Our view of microglia has dramatically changed in the last decade. From cells being "silent" in the healthy brain, microglia have emerged to be actively involved in several brain physiological functions including adult hippocampal neurogenesis, and cognitive and behavioral function. In light of recent discoveries revealing a role of microglia as important effectors of neuronal circuit reorganization, considerable attention has been focused on how microglia and hippocampal neurogenesis could be an interdependent phenomenon. In this review the role of microglia in the adult hippocampal neurogenesis under physiological condition is discussed.

  8. In vitro detection of oxygen and glucose deprivation-induced neurodegeneration and pharmacological neuroprotection based on hippocampal stratum pyramidale width.

    PubMed

    Öz, Pınar; Saybaşılı, Hale

    2017-01-01

    Ischemia is one of the most prominent risk factors of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. The effects of oxygen and glucose depletion in hippocampal tissue due to ischemia can be mimicked in vitro using the oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) model. In this study, we applied OGD on acute rat hippocampal slices in order to design an elementary yet quantitative histological technique that compares the neuroprotective effects of (l)-carnitine to known neuroprotectors, such as the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist memantine and the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-B receptor agonist baclofen. The level of neurodegeneration and the efficiency of pharmacological applications were estimated via stratum pyramidale width measurements in CA1 and CA3 regions of Nissl-stained 200-μm thick hippocampal slices. We demonstrated that (l)-carnitine is an effective pharmacological target against the neurodegeneration induced by in vitro ischemia in a narrow range of concentrations. Even though the effect of chemical neuroprotection was significant, full recovery was not achieved in the dose interval of 5-100μM. In addition to chemical applications, hypothermia was used as a physical neuroprotection against ischemia-related neurodegeneration. Our results showed that incubation of slices for 60min at 4°C provided the same level of neuroprotection as the most effective doses of memantine, baclofen, and (l)-carnitine.

  9. Effects of secreted oligomers of amyloid β-protein on hippocampal synaptic plasticity: a potent role for trimers

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, Matthew; Shankar, Ganesh M; Mehta, Tapan; Walsh, Dominic M; Selkoe, Dennis J

    2006-01-01

    The accumulation of amyloid β-protein (Aβ) in brain regions serving memory and cognition is a central pathogenic feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We have shown that small soluble oligomers of human Aβ that are naturally secreted by cultured cells inhibit hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) in vitro and in vivo and transiently impair the recall of a complex learned behaviour in rats. These results support the hypothesis that diffusible oligomers of Aβ initiate a synaptic dysfunction that may be an early event in AD. We now report detailed electrophysiological analyses that define conditions under which acute application of soluble Aβ inhibits hippocampal synaptic plasticity in wild-type mice. To ascertain which Aβ assemblies contribute to the impairment of LTP, we fractionated oligomers by size-exclusion chromatography and found that Aβ trimers fully inhibit LTP, whereas dimers and tetramers have an intermediate potency. Natural Aβ oligomers are sensitive to heat denaturation, primarily inhibit the induction phase of LTP, and cause a sustained impairment of LTP even after extensive washout. We observed no effects of Aβ oligomers on presynaptic vesicle release. LTP in juvenile mice is resistant to the effects of Aβ oligomers, as is brain-derived-neurotrophic-factor-induced LTP in adult hippocampus. We conclude that specific assemblies, particularly timers, of naturally secreted Aβ oligomers are potent and selective inhibitors of certain forms of hippocampal LTP. PMID:16469784

  10. Hippocampal memory processes are modulated by insulin and high-fat-induced insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    McNay, Ewan C.; Ong, Cecilia T.; McCrimmon, Rory J.; Cresswell, James; Bogan, Jonathan S.; Sherwin, Robert S

    2010-01-01

    Insulin regulates glucose uptake and storage in peripheral tissues, and has been shown to act within the hypothalamus to acutely regulate food intake and metabolism. The machinery for transduction of insulin signaling is also present in other brain areas, particularly in the hippocampus, but a physiological role for brain insulin outside the hypothalamus has not been established. Recent studies suggest that insulin may be able to modulate cognitive functions including memory. Here we report that local delivery of insulin to the rat hippocampus enhances spatial memory, in a PI-3-kinase dependent manner, and that intrahippocampal insulin also increases local glycolytic metabolism. Selective blockade of endogenous intrahippocampal insulin signaling impairs memory performance. Further, a rodent model of type 2 diabetes mellitus produced by a high-fat diet impairs basal cognitive function and attenuates both cognitive and metabolic responses to hippocampal insulin administration. Our data demonstrate that insulin is required for optimal hippocampal memory processing. Insulin resistance within the telencephalon may underlie the cognitive deficits commonly reported to accompany type 2 diabetes. PMID:20176121

  11. Mouse δ opioid receptors are located on presynaptic afferents to hippocampal pyramidal cells.

    PubMed

    Rezaï, Xavier; Faget, Lauren; Bednarek, Ewa; Schwab, Yannick; Kieffer, Brigitte L; Massotte, Dominique

    2012-05-01

    Delta opioid receptors participate in the control of chronic pain and emotional responses. Recent data have also identified their implication in drug-context associations pointing to a modulatory role on hippocampal activity. We used fluorescent knock-in mice that express a functional delta opioid receptor fused at its carboxy terminus with the green fluorescent protein in place of the native receptor to investigate the receptor neuroanatomical distribution in this structure. Fine mapping of the pyramidal layer was performed in hippocampal acute brain slices and organotypic cultures using fluorescence confocal imaging, co-localization with pre- and postsynaptic markers and correlative light-electron microscopy. The different approaches concurred to identify delta opioid receptors on presynaptic afferents to glutamatergic principal cells. In the latter, only scarce receptors were detected that were confined within the Golgi or vesicular intracellular compartments with no receptor present at the cell surface. In the mouse hippocampus, expression of functional delta opioid receptors is therefore mostly associated with interneurons emphasizing a presynaptic modulatory effect on the pyramidal cell firing rate.

  12. Antidepressant behavior in thyroidectomized Wistar rats is induced by hippocampal hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    da Conceição, Rodrigo Rodrigues; Laureano-Melo, Roberto; Oliveira, Kelen Carneiro; de Carvalho Melo, Maria Clara; Kasamatsu, Tereza Sayoko; de Barros Maciel, Rui Monteiro; de Souza, Janaina Sena; Giannocco, Gisele

    2016-04-01

    Thyroidectomy is a surgical procedure indicated in cases of several maligned or benign thyroid diseases, thus, the aim of our study was to verify how the hypothyroidism induced by thyroidectomy influences behavioral parameters and its relation to thyroid hormones metabolism and neurogenesis at hippocampus. For this purpose, Adult male Wistar rats underwent to thyroidectomy to induce hypothyroidism. Behavioral tests, the thyroid profile and hippocampal gene expression were evaluated in control and in thyroidectomized animals. It was observed that thyroidectomized group had a significant increasing in serum thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) and a decreasing in thyroxine (T4) levels as well as in triiodothyronine (T3) serum level. It was also observed reduction of the monocarboxylate transporter 8 (Mct8), thyroid hormone receptor alfa (Trα1), deiodinase type 2 (Dio2), ectonucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase 2 (Enpp2) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (Bdnf) mRNA expression in hippocampus of thyroidectomized animals. In the forced swimming test, it was verified that thyroidectomy promotes a decrease in time of immobility and climbing when compared with the control group. In summary, we demonstrated that antidepressant behavior in thyroidectomized Wistar rats is induced by hippocampal hypothyroidism. This effect could be associated to an impaired neuronal activity in acute stress response as it is observed in forced swimming paradigm.

  13. Ventromedial prefrontal cortex stimulation enhances memory and hippocampal neurogenesis in the middle-aged rats

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Albert; Jain, Neeraj; Vyas, Ajai; Lim, Lee Wei

    2015-01-01

    Memory dysfunction is a key symptom of age-related dementia. Although recent studies have suggested positive effects of electrical stimulation for memory enhancement, its potential targets remain largely unknown. In this study, we hypothesized that spatially targeted deep brain stimulation of ventromedial prefrontal cortex enhanced memory functions in a middle-aged rat model. Our results show that acute stimulation enhanced the short-, but not the long-term memory in the novel-object recognition task. Interestingly, after chronic high-frequency stimulation, both the short- and long-term memories were robustly improved in the novel-object recognition test and Morris water-maze spatial task compared to sham. Our results also demonstrated that chronic ventromedial prefrontal cortex high-frequency stimulation upregulated neurogenesis-associated genes along with enhanced hippocampal cell proliferation. Importantly, these memory behaviors were strongly correlated with the hippocampal neurogenesis. Overall, these findings suggest that chronic ventromedial prefrontal cortex high-frequency stimulation may serve as a novel effective therapeutic target for dementia-related disorders. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04803.001 PMID:25768425

  14. Chronic treatment with agomelatine or venlafaxine reduces depolarization-evoked glutamate release from hippocampal synaptosomes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Growing compelling evidence from clinical and preclinical studies has demonstrated the primary role of alterations of glutamatergic transmission in cortical and limbic areas in the pathophysiology of mood disorders. Chronic antidepressants have been shown to dampen endogenous glutamate release from rat hippocampal synaptic terminals and to prevent the marked increase of glutamate overflow induced by acute behavioral stress in frontal/prefrontal cortex. Agomelatine, a new antidepressant endowed with MT1/MT2 agonist and 5-HT2C serotonergic antagonist properties, has shown efficacy at both preclinical and clinical levels. Results Chronic treatment with agomelatine, or with the reference drug venlafaxine, induced a marked decrease of depolarization-evoked endogenous glutamate release from purified hippocampal synaptic terminals in superfusion. No changes were observed in GABA release. This effect was accompanied by reduced accumulation of SNARE protein complexes, the key molecular effector of vesicle docking, priming and fusion at presynaptic membranes. Conclusions Our data suggest that the novel antidepressant agomelatine share with other classes of antidepressants the ability to modulate glutamatergic transmission in hippocampus. Its action seems to be mediated by molecular mechanisms located on the presynaptic membrane and related with the size of the vesicle pool ready for release. PMID:23895555

  15. The TNFα-Transgenic Rat: Hippocampal Synaptic Integrity, Cognition, Function, and Post-Ischemic Cell Loss

    PubMed Central

    Pettigrew, L. Creed; Kryscio, Richard J.; Norris, Christopher M.

    2016-01-01

    The cytokine, tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), is a key regulator of neuroinflammation linked to numerous neurodegenerative conditions and diseases. The present study used transgenic rats that overexpress a murine TNFα gene, under the control of its own promoter, to investigate the impact of chronically elevated TNFα on hippocampal synaptic function. Neuronal viability and cognitive recovery in TNFα Tg rats were also determined following an ischemic insult arising from reversible middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Basal CA3-CA1 synaptic strength, recorded in acute brain slices, was not significantly different between eight-week-old TNFα Tg rats and non-Tg rats. In contrast, slices from TNFα Tg rats showed significantly greater levels of long-term potentiation (LTP) in response to 100 Hz stimulation, suggesting that synaptic networks may be hyperexcitable in the context of elevated TNFα. Cognitive and motor deficits (assessed on the Morris Water Maze and Rotarod task, respectively) were present in TNFα Tg rats in the absence of significant differences in the loss of cortical and hippocampal neurons. TNF overexpression exacerbated MCAO-dependent deficits on the rotarod, but ameliorated cortical neuron loss in response to MCAO. PMID:27144978

  16. In vivo BDNF modulation of hippocampal mossy fiber plasticity induced by high frequency stimulation.

    PubMed

    Schjetnan, Andrea Gómez-Palacio; Escobar, Martha L

    2012-01-01

    Changes in synaptic efficacy and morphology have been proposed as mechanisms underlying learning and memory processes. In our previous studies, high frequency stimulation (HFS) sufficient to induce LTP at the hippocampal mossy fiber (MF) pathway, leads to MF synaptogenesis, in a prominent contralateral form, at the stratum oriens of hippocampal CA3 area. Recently we reported that acute intrahippocampal microinfusion of BDNF induces a lasting potentiation of synaptic efficacy at the MF projection accompanied by a structural reorganization at the CA3 area within the stratum oriens region in a prominent ipsilateral form. It is considered that the capacity of synapses to express plastic changes is itself subject to variation dependent on previous experience. Here we used intrahippocampal microinfusion of BDNF to analyze its effects on functional and structural synaptic plasticity induced by subsequent mossy fiber HFS sufficient to induce LTP in adult rats, in vivo. Our results show that BDNF modifies the ability of the MF pathway to present LTP by HFS. Moreover BDNF modified the structural reorganization pattern produced by HFS, presenting a balanced bilateral appearance. Microinfusion of K252a blocks the functional and morphological effects produced by BDNF, revealing that the BDNF modulation is dependent on its TrkB receptor activation. These findings support the idea that BDNF actions modify subsequent synaptic plasticity; a homeostatic mechanism thought to be essential for synaptic integration among prolonged temporal domains in the adult mammalian brain.

  17. Amyloid-Beta Induced Changes in Vesicular Transport of BDNF in Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Seifert, Bianca; Eckenstaler, Robert; Rönicke, Raik; Leschik, Julia; Lutz, Beat; Reymann, Klaus; Lessmann, Volkmar; Brigadski, Tanja

    2016-01-01

    The neurotrophin brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is an important growth factor in the CNS. Deficits in transport of this secretory protein could underlie neurodegenerative diseases. Investigation of disease-related changes in BDNF transport might provide insights into the cellular mechanism underlying, for example, Alzheimer's disease (AD). To analyze the role of BDNF transport in AD, live cell imaging of fluorescently labeled BDNF was performed in hippocampal neurons of different AD model systems. BDNF and APP colocalized with low incidence in vesicular structures. Anterograde as well as retrograde transport of BDNF vesicles was reduced and these effects were mediated by factors released from hippocampal neurons into the extracellular medium. Transport of BDNF was altered at a very early time point after onset of human APP expression or after acute amyloid-beta(1-42) treatment, while the activity-dependent release of BDNF remained unaffected. Taken together, extracellular cleavage products of APP induced rapid changes in anterograde and retrograde transport of BDNF-containing vesicles while release of BDNF was unaffected by transgenic expression of mutated APP. These early transport deficits might lead to permanently impaired brain functions in the adult brain. PMID:26881108

  18. Reassessing the effects of histone deacetylase inhibitors on hippocampal memory and cognitive aging.

    PubMed

    Castellano, James F; Fletcher, Bonnie R; Patzke, Holger; Long, Jeffrey M; Sewal, Angila; Kim, David H; Kelley-Bell, Bennett; Rapp, Peter R

    2014-08-01

    Converging results link histone acetylation dynamics to hippocampus-dependent memory, including evidence that histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) administration enhances long-term memory. Previously, we demonstrated that aging disrupts the coordinated epigenetic response to recent experience observed in the young adult hippocampus. Here, we extended that work to test the cognitive effects of a novel, brain-penetrant HDACi (EVX001688; EVX) that we confirmed yields robust, relatively long lasting dose-dependent increases in histone acetylation in the hippocampus. In young rats, acute systemic EVX administration, scheduled to yield elevated histone acetylation levels during training in a contextual fear conditioning (CFC) task, had no effect on memory retention at 24 h at any dose examined (10, 30, or 60 mg/kg). Pretraining injection of another HDACi, sodium butyrate, also failed to affect fear memory, and CFC training itself had no influence on hippocampal histone acetylation at 1 hour in mice or two strains of rats. EVX administration before water maze training in young rats yielded a modest effect such that the middle dose produced marginally better 24-h retention than either the low or high dose, but only a small numerical benefit relative to vehicle. Guided by those findings, a final experiment tested the influence of pretraining EVX treatment on age-related spatial memory impairment. The results, revealing no effect on performance, are consistent with the idea that effective procognitive HDACi treatments in aging may require intervention aimed at restoring coordinated epigenetic regulation rather than bulk increases in hippocampal histone acetylation.

  19. Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pancreatitis Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy Timothy Gardner, MD Acute pancreatitis is defined as ... pancreatitis in pregnancy. Reasons for Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy While acute pancreatitis is responsible for almost 1 ...

  20. Extrasynaptic vesicle recycling in mature hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Ratnayaka, Arjuna; Marra, Vincenzo; Branco, Tiago; Staras, Kevin

    2011-11-08

    Fast neuronal signalling relies on highly regulated vesicle fusion and recycling at specialized presynaptic terminals. Recently, examples of non-classical neurotransmission have also been reported, where fusion of vesicles can occur at sites remote from conventional synapses. This has potentially broad biological implications, but the underlying mechanisms are not well established. Here we show that a complete vesicle recycling pathway can occur at discrete axonal sites in mature hippocampal neurons and that extrasynaptic fusion is a robust feature of native tissue. We demonstrate that laterally mobile vesicle clusters trafficking between synaptic terminals become transiently stabilized by evoked action potentials and undergo complete but delayed Ca(2+)-dependent fusion along axons. This fusion is associated with dynamic actin accumulation and, subsequently, vesicles can be locally recycled, re-acidified and re-used. Immunofluorescence and ultrastructural work demonstrates that extrasynaptic fusion sites can have apposed postsynaptic specializations, suggesting that mobile vesicle recycling may underlie highly dynamic neuron-neuron communication.

  1. Spatial Relational Memory Requires Hippocampal Adult Neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Koehl, Muriel; Ichas, François; De Giorgi, Francesca; Costet, Pierre; Abrous, Djoher Nora; Piazza, Pier Vincenzo

    2008-01-01

    The dentate gyrus of the hippocampus is one of the few regions of the mammalian brain where new neurons are generated throughout adulthood. This adult neurogenesis has been proposed as a novel mechanism that mediates spatial memory. However, data showing a causal relationship between neurogenesis and spatial memory are controversial. Here, we developed an inducible transgenic strategy allowing specific ablation of adult-born hippocampal neurons. This resulted in an impairment of spatial relational memory, which supports a capacity for flexible, inferential memory expression. In contrast, less complex forms of spatial knowledge were unaltered. These findings demonstrate that adult-born neurons are necessary for complex forms of hippocampus-mediated learning. PMID:18509506

  2. TAM receptor deficiency affects adult hippocampal neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Rui; Meng, Lingbin; Li, Qiutang; Lu, Qingxian

    2014-01-01

    The Tyro3, Axl and Mertk (TAM) subfamily of receptor protein tyrosine kinases functions in cell growth, differentiation, survival, and most recently found, in the regulation of immune responses and phagocytosis. All three receptors and their ligands, Gas6 (growth arrest-specific gene 6) and protein S, are expressed in the central nervous system (CNS). TAM receptors play pivotal roles in adult hippocampal neurogenesis. Loss of these receptors causes a comprised neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus of adult hippocampus. TAM receptors have a negative regulatory effect on microglia and peripheral antigen-presenting cells, and play a critical role in preventing overproduction of pro-inflammatory cytokines detrimental to the proliferation, differentiation, and survival of adult neuronal stem cells (NSCs). Besides, these receptors also play an intrinsic trophic function in supporting NSC survival, proliferation, and differentiation into immature neurons. All these events collectively ensure a sustained neurogenesis in adult hippocampus. PMID:25487541

  3. Hippocampal-cortical interaction in decision making.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jai Y; Frank, Loren M

    2015-01-01

    When making a decision it is often necessary to consider the available alternatives in order to choose the most appropriate option. This deliberative process, where the pros and cons of each option are considered, relies on memories of past actions and outcomes. The hippocampus and prefrontal cortex are required for memory encoding, memory retrieval and decision making, but it is unclear how these areas support deliberation. Here we examine the potential neural substrates of these processes in the rat. The rat is a powerful model to investigate the network mechanisms underlying deliberation in the mammalian brain given the anatomical and functional conservation of its hippocampus and prefrontal cortex to other mammalian systems. Importantly, it is amenable to large scale neural recording while performing laboratory tasks that exploit its natural decision-making behavior. Focusing on findings in the rat, we discuss how hippocampal-cortical interactions could provide a neural substrate for deliberative decision making.

  4. Tau Protein and Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Fuster-Matanzo, Almudena; Llorens-Martín, María; Jurado-Arjona, Jerónimo; Avila, Jesús; Hernández, Félix

    2012-01-01

    Tau protein is a microtubule-associated protein found in the axonal compartment that stabilizes neuronal microtubules under normal physiological conditions. Tau metabolism has attracted much attention because of its role in neurodegenerative disorders called tauopathies, mainly Alzheimer disease. Here, we review recent findings suggesting that axonal outgrowth in subgranular zone during adult hippocampal neurogenesis requires a dynamic microtubule network and tau protein facilitates to maintain that dynamic cytoskeleton. Those functions are carried out in part by tau isoform with only three microtubule-binding domains (without exon 10) and by presence of hyperphosphorylated tau forms. Thus, tau is a good marker and a valuable tool to study new axons in adult neurogenesis. PMID:22787440

  5. Hippocampal awake replay in fear memory retrieval.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chun-Ting; Haggerty, Daniel; Kemere, Caleb; Ji, Daoyun

    2017-04-01

    Hippocampal place cells are key to episodic memories. How these cells participate in memory retrieval remains unclear. After rats acquired a fear memory by receiving mild footshocks in a shock zone on a track, we analyzed place cells when the animals were placed on the track again and displayed an apparent memory retrieval behavior: avoidance of the shock zone. We found that place cells representing the shock zone were reactivated, despite the fact that the animals did not enter the shock zone. This reactivation occurred in ripple-associated awake replay of place cell sequences encoding the paths from the animal's current positions to the shock zone but not in place cell sequences within individual cycles of theta oscillation. The result reveals a specific place-cell pattern underlying inhibitory avoidance behavior and provides strong evidence for the involvement of awake replay in fear memory retrieval.

  6. GABAA Receptors at Hippocampal Mossy Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, Arnaud; Fabian-Fine, Ruth; Scott, Ricardo; Walker, Matthew C.; Rusakov, Dmitri A.; Kullmann, Dimitri M.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Presynaptic GABAA receptors modulate synaptic transmission in several areas of the CNS but are not known to have this action in the cerebral cortex. We report that GABAA receptor activation reduces hippocampal mossy fibers excitability but has the opposite effect when intracellular Cl− is experimentally elevated. Synaptically released GABA mimics the effect of exogenous agonists. GABAA receptors modulating axonal excitability are tonically active in the absence of evoked GABA release or exogenous agonist application. Presynaptic action potential-dependent Ca2+ transients in individual mossy fiber varicosities exhibit a biphasic dependence on membrane potential and are altered by GABAA receptors. Antibodies against the α2 subunit of GABAA receptors stain mossy fibers. Axonal GABAA receptors thus play a potentially important role in tonic and activity-dependent heterosynaptic modulation of information flow to the hippocampus. PMID:12971896

  7. Hippocampal Neurogenesis and Antidepressive Therapy: Shocking Relations

    PubMed Central

    Rotheneichner, Peter; Lange, Simona; O'Sullivan, Anna; Marschallinger, Julia; Zaunmair, Pia; Geretsegger, Christian; Aigner, Ludwig

    2014-01-01

    Speculations on the involvement of hippocampal neurogenesis, a form of neuronal plasticity, in the aetiology of depression and the mode of action of antidepressive therapies, started to arise more than a decade ago. But still, conclusive evidence that adult neurogenesis contributes to antidepressive effects of pharmacological and physical therapies has not been generated yet. This review revisits recent findings on the close relation between the mode(s) of action of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), a powerful intervention used as second-line treatment of major depression disorders, and the neurogenic response to ECT. Following application of electroconvulsive shocks, intricate interactions between neurogenesis, angiogenesis, and microglia activation, the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and the secretion of neurotrophic factors have been documented. Furthermore, considering the fact that neurogenesis strongly diminishes along aging, we investigated the response to electroconvulsive shocks in young as well as in aged cohorts of mice. PMID:24967107

  8. Hummingbirds have a greatly enlarged hippocampal formation.

    PubMed

    Ward, Brian J; Day, Lainy B; Wilkening, Steven R; Wylie, Douglas R; Saucier, Deborah M; Iwaniuk, Andrew N

    2012-08-23

    Both field and laboratory studies demonstrate that hummingbirds (Apodiformes, Trochilidae) have exceptional spatial memory. The complexity of spatial-temporal information that hummingbirds must retain and use daily is probably subserved by the hippocampal formation (HF), and therefore, hummingbirds should have a greatly expanded HF. Here, we compare the relative size of the HF in several hummingbird species with that of other birds. Our analyses reveal that the HF in hummingbirds is significantly larger, relative to telencephalic volume, than any bird examined to date. When expressed as a percentage of telencephalic volume, the hummingbird HF is two to five times larger than that of caching and non-caching songbirds, seabirds and woodpeckers. This HF expansion in hummingbirds probably underlies their ability to remember the location, distribution and nectar content of flowers, but more detailed analyses are required to determine the extent to which this arises from an expansion of HF or a decrease in size of other brain regions.

  9. Acute Diagnosis and Management of Stroke Presenting Dizziness or Vertigo.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Han; Kim, Ji-Soo

    2015-08-01

    Stroke involving the brainstem and cerebellum frequently presents acute vestibular syndrome. Although vascular vertigo is known to usually accompany other neurologic symptoms and signs, isolated vertigo from small infarcts involving the cerebellum or brainstem has been increasingly recognized. Bedside neuro-otologic examination can reliably differentiate acute vestibular syndrome due to stroke from more benign inner ear disease. Sometimes acute isolated audiovestibular loss may herald impending infarction in the territory of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery. Accurate identification of isolated vascular vertigo is very important because misdiagnosis of acute stroke may result in significant morbidity and mortality.

  10. In vivo BDNF modulation of adult functional and morphological synaptic plasticity at hippocampal mossy fibers.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Palacio-Schjetnan, Andrea; Escobar, Martha L

    2008-11-07

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been proposed as a key regulator and mediator of long-term synaptic modifications related to learning and memory maintenance. Our previous studies show that application of high-frequency stimulation (HFS) sufficient to elicit LTP at the dentate gyrus (DG)-CA3 pathway produces mossy fiber structural modifications 7 days after tetanic stimulation. In the present study, we show that acute intrahippocampal microinfusion of BDNF induces a lasting potentiation of synaptic efficacy in the DG-CA3 projection of anesthetized adult rats. Furthermore, we show that BDNF functional modifications in synaptic efficacy are accompanied by a presynaptic structural long-lasting reorganization at the hippocampal mossy fiber pathway. These findings support the idea that BDNF plays an important role as synaptic messenger of activity-dependent synaptic plasticity in the adult mammalian brain, in vivo.

  11. Acute septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Shirtliff, Mark E; Mader, Jon T

    2002-10-01

    Acute septic arthritis may develop as a result of hematogenous seeding, direct introduction, or extension from a contiguous focus of infection. The pathogenesis of acute septic arthritis is multifactorial and depends on the interaction of the host immune response and the adherence factors, toxins, and immunoavoidance strategies of the invading pathogen. Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Staphylococcus aureus are used in discussing the host-pathogen interaction in the pathogenesis of acute septic arthritis. While diagnosis rests on isolation of the bacterial species from synovial fluid samples, patient history, clinical presentation, laboratory findings, and imaging studies are also important. Acute nongonococcal septic arthritis is a medical emergency that can lead to significant morbidity and mortality. Therefore, prompt recognition, rapid and aggressive antimicrobial therapy, and surgical treatment are critical to ensuring a good prognosis. Even with prompt diagnosis and treatment, high mortality and morbidity rates still occur. In contrast, gonococcal arthritis is often successfully treated with antimicrobial therapy alone and demonstrates a very low rate of complications and an excellent prognosis for full return of normal joint function. In the case of prosthetic joint infections, the hardware must be eventually removed by a two-stage revision in order to cure the infection.

  12. Mechanism of Highly Synchronized Bilateral Hippocampal Activity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Y.; Toprani, S.; Tang, Y.; Vrabec, T.; Durand, D.M.

    2014-01-01

    In vivo studies of epileptiform discharges in the hippocampi of rodents have shown that bilateral seizure activity can sometimes be synchronized with very small delays (< 2 ms). This observed small time delay of epileptiform activity between the left and right CA3 regions is unexpected given the physiological propagation time across the hemispheres (> 6 ms). The goal of this study is to determine the mechanisms of this tight synchronization with in-vitro electrophysiology techniques and computer simulations. The hypothesis of a common source was first eliminated by using an in-vitro preparation containing both hippocampi with a functional ventral hippocampal commissure (VHC) and no other tissue. Next, the hypothesis that a noisy baseline could mask the underlying synchronous activity between the two hemispheres was ruled out by low noise in-vivo recordings and computer simulation of the noisy environment. Then we built a novel bilateral CA3 model to test the hypothesis that the phenomenon of very small left-to-right propagation delay of seizure activity is a product of epileptic cell network dynamics. We found that the commissural tract connectivity could decrease the delay between seizure events recorded from two sides while the activity propagated longitudinally along the CA3 layer thereby yielding delays much smaller than the propagation time between the two sides. The modeling results indicate that both recurrent and feedforward inhibition were required for shortening the bilateral propagation delay and depended critically on the length of the commissural fiber tract as well as the number of cells involved in seizure generation. These combined modeling/experimental studies indicate that it is possible to explain near perfect synchronization between the two hemispheres by taking into account the structure of the hippocampal network. PMID:24262205

  13. Movement Enhances the Nonlinearity of Hippocampal Theta

    PubMed Central

    Sheremet, Alex; Burke, Sara N.

    2016-01-01

    The nonlinear, metastable dynamics of the brain are essential for large-scale integration of smaller components and for the rapid organization of neurons in support of behavior. Therefore, understanding the nonlinearity of the brain is paramount for understanding the relationship between brain dynamics and behavior. Explicit quantitative descriptions of the properties and consequences of nonlinear neural networks, however, are rare. Because the local field potential (LFP) reflects the total activity across a population of neurons, nonlinearites of the nervous system should be quantifiable by examining oscillatory structure. We used high-order spectral analysis of LFP recorded from the dorsal and intermediate regions of the rat hippocampus to show that the nonlinear character of the hippocampal theta rhythm is directly related to movement speed of the animal. In the time domain, nonlinearity is expressed as the development of skewness and asymmetry in the theta shape. In the spectral domain, nonlinear dynamics manifest as the development of a chain of harmonics statistically phase coupled to the theta oscillation. This evolution was modulated across hippocampal regions, being stronger in the dorsal CA1 relative to more intermediate areas. The intensity and timing of the spiking activity of pyramidal cells and interneurons was strongly correlated to theta nonlinearity. Because theta is known to propagate from dorsal to ventral regions of the hippocampus, these data suggest that the nonlinear character of theta decreases as it travels and supports a hypothesis that activity dissipates along the longitudinal axis of the hippocampus. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT We describe the first explicit quantification regarding how behavior enhances the nonlinearity of the nervous system. Our findings demonstrate uniquely how theta changes with increasing speed due to the altered underlying neuronal dynamics and open new directions of research on the relationship between single

  14. Hippocampal sharp waves: their origin and significance.

    PubMed

    Buzsáki, G

    1986-11-29

    This study investigated the spatial distribution and cellular-synaptic generation of hippocampal sharp waves (SPW) in the dorsal hippocampus of the awake rat. Depth analyses of SPWs were performed by stepping the recording electrode in 82.5 microns increments. SPWs were present during slow wave sleep, awake immobility, drinking, grooming and eating (0.01-2/s). The largest negative SPWs were recorded from the middle part of the stratum radiatum of CA1, the stratum lucidum of CA3, the inner molecular layer of the dentate gyrus and from layer I of the subiculum, in that order. The polarity of the SPWs was positive in layers II-IV of the subiculum, in stratum oriens and stratum pyramidale of CA1 and CA3, and in the hilus of the dentate gyrus. The electrical gradients across the null zones of the field SPWs were as large as 8-14 mV/mm. SPWs were associated with population bursts of pyramidal cells and increased discharges of interneurons and granule cells. During the SPW the excitability of granule cells and pyramidal cells to afferent volleys increased considerably. Picrotoxin and atropine and aspiration lesion of the fimbria-fornix increased either the amplitude or the frequency of SPWs. Diazepam and Nembutal could completely abolish SPWs. It is suggested that: hippocampal SPWs are triggered by a population burst of CA3 pyramidal cells as a result of temporary disinhibition from afferent control; and field SPWs represent summed extracellular PSPs of CA1 and subicular pyramidal cells, and dentate granular cells induced by the Schaffer collaterals and the associational fibers of hilar cells, respectively. The relevance of the physiological SPWs to epileptic interictal spikes and long-term potentiation is discussed.

  15. Psychobiological models of hippocampal function in learning and memory.

    PubMed

    Gluck, M A; Myers, C E

    1997-01-01

    We review current computational models of hippocampal function in learning and memory, concentrating on those that make strongest contact with psychological issues and behavioral data. Some models build upon Marr's early theories for modeling hippocampal field CA3's putative role in the fast, temporary storage of episodic memories. Other models focus on hippocampal involvement in incrementally learned associations, such as classical conditioning. More recent efforts have attempted to bring functional interpretations of the hippocampal region in closer contact with underlying anatomy and physiology. In reviewing these psychobiological models, three major themes emerge. First, computational models provide the conceptual glue to bind together data from multiple levels of analysis. Second, models serve as important tools to integrate data from both animal and human studies. Third, previous psychological models that capture important behavioral principles of memory provide an important top-down constraint for developing computational models of the neural bases of these behaviors.

  16. Extent of hippocampal atrophy predicts degree of deficit in recall

    PubMed Central

    Patai, Eva Zita; Gadian, David G.; Cooper, Janine M.; Dzieciol, Anna M.; Mishkin, Mortimer; Vargha-Khadem, Faraneh

    2015-01-01

    Which specific memory functions are dependent on the hippocampus is still debated. The availability of a large cohort of patients who had sustained relatively selective hippocampal damage early in life enabled us to determine which type of mnemonic deficit showed a correlation with extent of hippocampal injury. We assessed our patient cohort on a test that provides measures of recognition and recall that are equated for difficulty and found that the patients' performance on the recall tests correlated significantly with their hippocampal volumes, whereas their performance on the equally difficult recognition tests did not and, indeed, was largely unaffected regardless of extent of hippocampal atrophy. The results provide new evidence in favor of the view that the hippocampus is essential for recall but not for recognition. PMID:26417089

  17. Extent of hippocampal atrophy predicts degree of deficit in recall.

    PubMed

    Patai, Eva Zita; Gadian, David G; Cooper, Janine M; Dzieciol, Anna M; Mishkin, Mortimer; Vargha-Khadem, Faraneh

    2015-10-13

    Which specific memory functions are dependent on the hippocampus is still debated. The availability of a large cohort of patients who had sustained relatively selective hippocampal damage early in life enabled us to determine which type of mnemonic deficit showed a correlation with extent of hippocampal injury. We assessed our patient cohort on a test that provides measures of recognition and recall that are equated for difficulty and found that the patients' performance on the recall tests correlated significantly with their hippocampal volumes, whereas their performance on the equally difficult recognition tests did not and, indeed, was largely unaffected regardless of extent of hippocampal atrophy. The results provide new evidence in favor of the view that the hippocampus is essential for recall but not for recognition.

  18. Hippocampal damage and memory impairment in congenital cyanotic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-López, Mónica; Hoskote, Aparna; Chadwick, Martin J; Dzieciol, Anna M; Gadian, David G; Chong, Kling; Banks, Tina; de Haan, Michelle; Baldeweg, Torsten; Mishkin, Mortimer; Vargha-Khadem, Faraneh

    2017-04-01

    Neonatal hypoxia can lead to hippocampal atrophy, which can lead, in turn, to memory impairment. To test the generalizability of this causal sequence, we examined a cohort of 41 children aged 8-16, who, having received the arterial switch operation to correct for transposition of the great arteries, had sustained significant neonatal cyanosis but were otherwise neurodevelopmentally normal. As predicted, the cohort had significant bilateral reduction of hippocampal volumes relative to the volumes of 64 normal controls. They also had significant, yet selective, impairment of episodic memory as measured by standard tests of memory, despite relatively normal levels of intelligence, academic attainment, and verbal fluency. Across the cohort, degree of memory impairment was correlated with degree of hippocampal atrophy suggesting that even as early as neonatal life no other structure can fully compensate for hippocampal injury and its special role in serving episodic long term memory. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. DEVELOPMENTAL LEAD (PB) CHANGES AND IN HIPPOCAMPAL FUNCTION.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Childhood lead (Pb) exposure has long been associated with reduced IQ, impaired cognitive function, and more recently increases in violence and aggression. We have studied the disruptive effects of developmental Pb exposure on an electrophysiological model of memory, hippocampal...

  20. Segmentation of the mouse hippocampal formation in magnetic resonance images.

    PubMed

    Richards, Kay; Watson, Charles; Buckley, Rachel F; Kurniawan, Nyoman D; Yang, Zhengyi; Keller, Marianne D; Beare, Richard; Bartlett, Perry F; Egan, Gary F; Galloway, Graham J; Paxinos, George; Petrou, Steven; Reutens, David C

    2011-10-01

    The hippocampal formation plays an important role in cognition, spatial navigation, learning, and memory. High resolution magnetic resonance (MR) imaging makes it possible to study in vivo changes in the hippocampus over time and is useful for comparing hippocampal volume and structure in wild type and mutant mice. Such comparisons demand a reliable way to segment the hippocampal formation. We have developed a method for the systematic segmentation of the hippocampal formation using the perfusion-fixed C57BL/6 mouse brain for application in longitudinal and comparative studies. Our aim was to develop a guide for segmenting over 40 structures in an adult mouse brain using 30 μm isotropic resolution images acquired with a 16.4 T MR imaging system and combined using super-resolution reconstruction.

  1. DEVELOPMENTAL HYPOTHYROIDISM IMPAIRS HIPPOCAMPAL LEARNING AND SYNAPTIC TRANSMISSION IN VIVO.

    EPA Science Inventory

    A number of environmental chemicals have been reported to alter thyroid hormone (TH) function. It is well established that severe hypothyroidism during critical periods of brain development leads to alterations in hippocampal structure and learning deficits, yet evaluation of ...

  2. Hippocampal damage and memory impairment in congenital cyanotic heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Hoskote, Aparna; Chadwick, Martin J.; Dzieciol, Anna M.; Gadian, David G.; Chong, Kling; Banks, Tina; de Haan, Michelle; Baldeweg, Torsten; Mishkin, Mortimer; Vargha‐Khadem, Faraneh

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Neonatal hypoxia can lead to hippocampal atrophy, which can lead, in turn, to memory impairment. To test the generalizability of this causal sequence, we examined a cohort of 41 children aged 8‐16, who, having received the arterial switch operation to correct for transposition of the great arteries, had sustained significant neonatal cyanosis but were otherwise neurodevelopmentally normal. As predicted, the cohort had significant bilateral reduction of hippocampal volumes relative to the volumes of 64 normal controls. They also had significant, yet selective, impairment of episodic memory as measured by standard tests of memory, despite relatively normal levels of intelligence, academic attainment, and verbal fluency. Across the cohort, degree of memory impairment was correlated with degree of hippocampal atrophy suggesting that even as early as neonatal life no other structure can fully compensate for hippocampal injury and its special role in serving episodic long term memory. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:28032672

  3. Hippocampal asymmetry in exploratory behavior to vasoactive intestinal polypeptide.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, Margarita; Ternianov, Alexandar; Belcheva, Stiliana; Tashev, Roman; Negrev, Negrin; Belcheva, Iren

    2008-06-01

    The effects of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) microinjected uni- or bilaterally into the CA1 hippocampal area of male Wistar rats at a dose of 10, 50 and 100 ng on exploratory behavior were examined. VIP microinjected bilaterally at a high dose (100 ng) significantly decreased the horizontal movements, while at low doses (10 and 50 ng) had no effect on the exploratory activity. Microinjections of VIP into the left hippocampal CA1 area at doses 50 and 100 ng suppressed the exploratory activity, while right-side VIP administration at a dose 100 ng significantly increased horizontal movements compared to the respective controls. Vertical activity was stimulated only by VIP administered into the right hippocampal CA1 area at the three doses used. Neither bilateral nor left injections of VIP induced changes in the vertical movements. The main finding was the presence of hippocampal asymmetry in exploratory behavior to unilateral microinjections of VIP depending on the dose and the microinjected hemisphere.

  4. Alcohol and adult hippocampal neurogenesis: promiscuous drug, wanton effects.

    PubMed

    Geil, Chelsea R; Hayes, Dayna M; McClain, Justin A; Liput, Daniel J; Marshall, S Alex; Chen, Kevin Y; Nixon, Kimberly

    2014-10-03

    Adult neurogenesis is now widely accepted as an important contributor to hippocampal integrity and function but also dysfunction when adult neurogenesis is affected in neuropsychiatric diseases such as alcohol use disorders. Excessive alcohol consumption, the defining characteristic of alcohol use disorders, results in a variety of cognitive and behavioral impairments related wholly or in part to hippocampal structure and function. Recent preclinical work has shown that adult neurogenesis may be one route by which alcohol produces hippocampal neuropathology. Alcohol is a pharmacologically promiscuous drug capable of interfering with adult neurogenesis through multiple mechanisms. This review will discuss the primary mechanisms underlying alcohol-induced changes in adult hippocampal neurogenesis including alcohol's effects on neurotransmitters, CREB and its downstream effectors, and the neurogenic niche.

  5. Existence of nitric oxide synthase in rat hippocampal pyramidal cells.

    PubMed Central

    Wendland, B; Schweizer, F E; Ryan, T A; Nakane, M; Murad, F; Scheller, R H; Tsien, R W

    1994-01-01

    It has been proposed that nitric oxide (NO) serves as a key retrograde messenger during long-term potentiation at hippocampal synapses, linking induction of long-term potentiation in postsynaptic CA1 pyramidal cells to expression of long-term potentiation in presynaptic nerve terminals. However, nitric oxide synthase (NOS), the proposed NO-generating enzyme, has not yet been detected in the appropriate postsynaptic cells. We here demonstrate specific NOS immunoreactivity in the CA1 region of hippocampal sections by using an antibody specific for NOS type I and relatively gentle methods of fixation. NOS immunoreactivity was found in dendrites and cell bodies of CA1 pyramidal neurons. Cultured hippocampal pyramidal cells also displayed specific immunostaining. Control experiments showed no staining with preimmune serum or immune serum that was blocked with purified NOS. These results demonstrate that CA1 pyramidal cells contain NOS, as required were NO involved in retrograde signaling during hippocampal synaptic plasticity. Images PMID:7510887

  6. Restoration of Akt activity by the bisperoxovanadium compound bpV(pic) attenuates hippocampal apoptosis in experimental neonatal pneumococcal meningitis.

    PubMed

    Sury, Matthias D; Vorlet-Fawer, Lorianne; Agarinis, Claudia; Yousefi, Shida; Grandgirard, Denis; Leib, Stephen L; Christen, Stephan

    2011-01-01

    Pneumococcal meningitis causes apoptosis of developing neurons in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. The death of these cells is accompanied with long-term learning and memory deficits in meningitis survivors. Here, we studied the role of the PI3K/Akt (protein kinase B) survival pathway in hippocampal apoptosis in a well-characterized infant rat model of pneumococcal meningitis. Meningitis was accompanied by a significant decrease of the PI3K product phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate (PIP(3)) and of phosphorylated (i.e., activated) Akt in the hippocampus. At the cellular level, phosphorylated Akt was decreased in both the granular layer and the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus, the region where the developing neurons undergo apoptosis. Protein levels and activity of PTEN, the major antagonist of PI3K, were unaltered by infection, suggesting that the observed decrease in PIP(3) and Akt phosphorylation is a result of decreased PI3K signaling. Treatment with the PTEN inhibitor bpV(pic) restored Akt activity and significantly attenuated hippocampal apoptosis. Co-treatment with the specific PI3K inhibitor LY294002 reversed the restoration of Akt activity and attenuation of hippocampal apoptosis, while it had no significant effect on these parameters on its own. These results indicate that the inhibitory effect of bpV(pic) on apoptosis was mediated by PI3K-dependent activation of Akt, strongly suggesting that bpV(pic) acted on PTEN. Treatment with bpV(pic) also partially inhibited the concentration of bacteria and cytokines in the CSF, but this effect was not reversed by LY294002, indicating that the effect of bpV(pic) on apoptosis was independent of its effect on CSF bacterial burden and cytokine levels. These results indicate that the PI3K/Akt pathway plays an important role in the death and survival of developing hippocampal neurons during the acute phase of pneumococcal meningitis.

  7. Increased Hippocampal Neurogenesis and Accelerated Response to Antidepressants in Mice with Specific Deletion of CREB in the Hippocampus: Role of cAMP Response-Element Modulator τ

    PubMed Central

    Gundersen, Brigitta B.; Briand, Lisa A.; Onksen, Jennifer L.; LeLay, John; Kaestner, Klaus H.

    2013-01-01

    The transcription factor cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) has been implicated in the pathophysiology of depression as well as in the efficacy of antidepressant treatment. However, altering CREB levels appears to have differing effects on anxiety- and depression-related behaviors, depending on which brain region is examined. Furthermore, many manipulations of CREB lead to corresponding changes in other CREB family proteins, and the impact of these changes has been largely ignored. To further investigate the region-specific importance of CREB in depression-related behavior and antidepressant response, we used CrebloxP/loxP mice to localize CREB deletion to the hippocampus. In an assay sensitive to chronic antidepressant response, the novelty-induced hypophagia procedure, hippocampal CREB deletion, did not alter the response to chronic antidepressant treatment. In contrast, mice with hippocampal CREB deletion responded to acute antidepressant treatment in this task, and this accelerated response was accompanied by an increase in hippocampal neurogenesis. Upregulation of the CREB-family protein cAMP response-element modulator (CREM) was observed after CREB deletion. Viral overexpression of the activator isoform of CREM, CREMτ, in the hippocampus also resulted in an accelerated response to antidepressants as well as increased hippocampal neurogenesis. This is the first demonstration of CREMτ within the brain playing a role in behavior and specifically in behavioral outcomes following antidepressant treatment. The current results suggest that activation of CREMτ may provide a means to accelerate the therapeutic efficacy of current antidepressant treatment. PMID:23966689

  8. Sub-toxic Ethanol Exposure Modulates Gene Expression and Enzyme Activity of Antioxidant Systems to Provide Neuroprotection in Hippocampal HT22 Cells.

    PubMed

    Casañas-Sánchez, Verónica; Pérez, José A; Quinto-Alemany, David; Díaz, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Ethanol is known to cause severe systemic damage often explained as secondary to oxidative stress. Brain is particularly vulnerable to ethanol-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) because the high amounts of lipids, and because nerve cell membranes contain high amounts of peroxidable fatty acids. Usually these effects of ethanol are associated to high and/or chronic exposure to ethanol. However, as we show in this manuscript, a low and acute dose of ethanol trigger a completely different response in hippocampal cells. Thus, we have observed that 0.1% ethanol exposure to HT22 cells, a murine hippocampal-derived cell line, increases the transcriptional expression of different genes belonging to the classical, glutathione/glutaredoxin and thioredoxin/peroxiredoxin antioxidant systems, these including Sod1, Sod2, Gpx1, Gclc, and Txnrd1. Paralleling these changes, enzyme activities of total superoxide dismutase (tSOD), catalase, total glutathione peroxidase (tGPx), glutathione-S-reductase (GSR), and total thioredoxin reductase (tTXNRD), were all increased, while the generation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), as indicators of lipid peroxidation, and glutathione levels remained unaltered. Ethanol exposure did not affect cell viability or cell growing as assessed by real-time cell culture monitoring, indicating that low ethanol doses are not deleterious for hippocampal cells, but rather prevented glutamate-induced excitotoxicity. In summary, we conclude that sub-toxic exposure to ethanol may well be neuroprotective against oxidative insults in hippocampal cells.

  9. Sub-toxic Ethanol Exposure Modulates Gene Expression and Enzyme Activity of Antioxidant Systems to Provide Neuroprotection in Hippocampal HT22 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Casañas-Sánchez, Verónica; Pérez, José A.; Quinto-Alemany, David; Díaz, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Ethanol is known to cause severe systemic damage often explained as secondary to oxidative stress. Brain is particularly vulnerable to ethanol-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) because the high amounts of lipids, and because nerve cell membranes contain high amounts of peroxidable fatty acids. Usually these effects of ethanol are associated to high and/or chronic exposure to ethanol. However, as we show in this manuscript, a low and acute dose of ethanol trigger a completely different response in hippocampal cells. Thus, we have observed that 0.1% ethanol exposure to HT22 cells, a murine hippocampal-derived cell line, increases the transcriptional expression of different genes belonging to the classical, glutathione/glutaredoxin and thioredoxin/peroxiredoxin antioxidant systems, these including Sod1, Sod2, Gpx1, Gclc, and Txnrd1. Paralleling these changes, enzyme activities of total superoxide dismutase (tSOD), catalase, total glutathione peroxidase (tGPx), glutathione-S-reductase (GSR), and total thioredoxin reductase (tTXNRD), were all increased, while the generation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), as indicators of lipid peroxidation, and glutathione levels remained unaltered. Ethanol exposure did not affect cell viability or cell growing as assessed by real-time cell culture monitoring, indicating that low ethanol doses are not deleterious for hippocampal cells, but rather prevented glutamate-induced excitotoxicity. In summary, we conclude that sub-toxic exposure to ethanol may well be neuroprotective against oxidative insults in hippocampal cells. PMID:27512374

  10. Chelation of hippocampal zinc enhances long-term potentiation and synaptic tagging/capture in CA1 pyramidal neurons of aged rats: implications to aging and memory.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Mahesh Shivarama; Sharma, Mahima; Sajikumar, Sreedharan

    2017-02-01

    Aging is associated with decline in cognitive functions, prominently in the memory consolidation and association capabilities. Hippocampus plays a crucial role in the formation and maintenance of long-term associative memories, and a significant body of evidence shows that impairments in hippocampal function correlate with aging-related memory loss. A number of studies have implicated alterations in hippocampal synaptic plasticity, such as long-term potentiation (LTP), in age-related cognitive decline although exact mechanisms underlying are not completely clear. Zinc deficiency and the resultant adverse effects on cognition have been well studied. However, the role of excess of zinc in synaptic plasticity, especially in aging, is not addressed well. Here, we have investigated the hippocampal zinc levels and the impairments in synaptic plasticity, such as LTP and synaptic tagging and capture (STC), in the CA1 region of acute hippocampal slices from 82- to 84-week-old male Wistar rats. We report increased zinc levels in the hippocampus of aged rats and also deficits in the tetani-induced and dopaminergic agonist-induced late-LTP and STC. The observed deficits in synaptic plasticity were restored upon chelation of zinc using a cell-permeable chelator. These data suggest that functional plasticity and associativity can be successfully established in aged neural networks by chelating zinc with cell-permeable chelating agents.

  11. Increasing adult hippocampal neurogenesis is sufficient to improve pattern separation.

    PubMed

    Sahay, Amar; Scobie, Kimberly N; Hill, Alexis S; O'Carroll, Colin M; Kheirbek, Mazen A; Burghardt, Nesha S; Fenton, André A; Dranovsky, Alex; Hen, René

    2011-04-28

    Adult hippocampal neurogenesis is a unique form of neural circuit plasticity that results in the generation of new neurons in the dentate gyrus throughout life. Neurons that arise in adults (adult-born neurons) show heightened synaptic plasticity during their maturation and can account for up to ten per cent of the entire granule cell population. Moreover, levels of adult hippocampal neurogenesis are increased by interventions that are associated with beneficial effects on cognition and mood, such as learning, environmental enrichment, exercise and chronic treatment with antidepressants. Together, these properties of adult neurogenesis indicate that this process could be harnessed to improve hippocampal functions. However, despite a substantial number of studies demonstrating that adult-born neurons are necessary for mediating specific cognitive functions, as well as some of the behavioural effects of antidepressants, it is unknown whether an increase in adult hippocampal neurogenesis is sufficient to improve cognition and mood. Here we show that inducible genetic expansion of the population of adult-born neurons through enhancing their survival improves performance in a specific cognitive task in which two similar contexts need to be distinguished. Mice with increased adult hippocampal neurogenesis show normal object recognition, spatial learning, contextual fear conditioning and extinction learning but are more efficient in differentiating between overlapping contextual representations, which is indicative of enhanced pattern separation. Furthermore, stimulation of adult hippocampal neurogenesis, when combined with an intervention such as voluntary exercise, produces a robust increase in exploratory behaviour. However, increasing adult hippocampal neurogenesis alone does not produce a behavioural response like that induced by anxiolytic agents or antidepressants. Together, our findings suggest that strategies that are designed to increase adult hippocampal

  12. An organotypic hippocampal slice culture model of excitotoxic injury induced spontaneous recurrent epileptiform discharges

    PubMed Central

    Ziobro, Julie M.; Deshpande, Laxmikant S.; DeLorenzo, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    Stroke is the major cause of acquired epilepsy in the adult population. The mechanisms of ischemia-induced epileptogenesis are not completely understood, but glutamate is associated with both ischemia-induced injury and epileptogenesis. The objective of this study was to develop an in vitro model of epileptogenesis induced by glutamate injury in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHSCs), as observed in stroke-induced acquired epilepsy. OHSCs were prepared from 1-week old Sprague-Dawley rat pups. They were exposed to 3.5 mM glutamate for 35 minutes at 21 days in vitro. Field potential recordings and whole-cell current clamp electrophysiology were used to monitor the development of in vitro seizure events up to 19 days after injury. Propidium iodide uptake assays were used to examine acute cell death following injury. Glutamate exposure produced a subset of hippocampal neurons that died acutely and a larger population of injured but surviving neurons. These surviving neurons manifested spontaneous, recurrent epileptiform discharges in neural networks, characterized by paroxysmal depolarizing shifts and high frequency spiking in both field potential and intracellular recordings. This model also exhibited anticonvulsant sensitivity similar to in vivo models. Our study is the first demonstration of a chronic model of acquired epilepsy in OHSCs following a glutamate injury. This in vitro model of glutamate injury–induced epileptogenesis may help develop therapeutic strategies to prevent epileptogenesis after stroke and elucidate some of the mechanisms that underlie stroke-induced epilepsy in a more anatomically in-tact system. PMID:21111720

  13. Positive modulation of AMPA receptors increases neurotrophin expression by hippocampal and cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Lauterborn, J C; Lynch, G; Vanderklish, P; Arai, A; Gall, C M

    2000-01-01

    This study investigated whether positive modulators of AMPA-type glutamate receptors influence neurotrophin expression by forebrain neurons. Treatments with the ampakine CX614 markedly and reversibly increased brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA and protein levels in cultured rat entorhinal/hippocampal slices. Acute effects of CX614 were dose dependent over the range in which the drug increased synchronous neuronal discharges; threshold concentrations for acute responses had large effects on mRNA content when applied for 3 d. Comparable results were obtained with a second, structurally distinct ampakine CX546. Ampakine-induced upregulation was broadly suppressed by AMPA, but not NMDA, receptor antagonists and by reducing transmitter release. Antagonism of L-type voltage-sensitive calcium channels blocked induction in entorhinal cortex but not hippocampus. Prolonged infusions of suprathreshold ampakine concentrations produced peak BDNF mRNA levels at 12 hr and a return to baseline levels by 48 hr. In contrast, BDNF protein remained elevated throughout a 48 hr incubation with the drug. Nerve growth factor mRNA levels also were increased by ampakines but with a much more rapid return to control levels during chronic administration. Finally, intraperitoneal injections of CX546 increased hippocampal BDNF mRNA levels in aged rats and middle-aged mice. The present results provide evidence of regional differences in mechanisms via which activity regulates neurotrophin expression. Moreover, these data establish that changes in synaptic potency produce sufficient network level physiological effects for inducing neurotrophin genes, indicate that the response becomes refractory during prolonged ampakine exposure, and raise the possibility of using positive AMPA modulators to regulate neurotrophin levels in aged brain.

  14. Synaptic Function of Rab11Fip5: Selective Requirement for Hippocampal Long-Term Depression

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Mohiuddin; Jurado, Sandra; Malenka, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    Postsynaptic AMPA-type glutamate receptors (AMPARs) are among the major determinants of synaptic strength and can be trafficked into and out of synapses. Neuronal activity regulates AMPAR trafficking during synaptic plasticity to induce long-term changes in synaptic strength, including long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD). Rab family GTPases regulate most membrane trafficking in eukaryotic cells; particularly, Rab11 and its effectors are implicated in mediating postsynaptic AMPAR insertion during LTP. To explore the synaptic function of Rab11Fip5, a neuronal Rab11 effector and a candidate autism-spectrum disorder gene, we performed shRNA-mediated knock-down and genetic knock-out (KO) studies. Surprisingly, we observed robust shRNA-induced synaptic phenotypes that were rescued by a Rab11Fip5 cDNA but that were nevertheless not observed in conditional KO neurons. Both in cultured neurons and acute slices, KO of Rab11Fip5 had no significant effect on basic parameters of synaptic transmission, indicating that Rab11Fip5 is not required for fundamental synaptic operations, such as neurotransmitter release or postsynaptic AMPAR insertion. KO of Rab11Fip5 did, however, abolish hippocampal LTD as measured both in acute slices or using a chemical LTD protocol in cultured neurons but did not affect hippocampal LTP. The Rab11Fip5 KO mice performed normally in several behavioral tasks, including fear conditioning, but showed enhanced contextual fear extinction. These are the first findings to suggest a requirement for Rab11Fip5, and presumably Rab11, during LTD. PMID:25972173

  15. [Acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Hecker, M; Mayer, K; Askevold, I; Collet, P; Weigand, M A; Krombach, G A; Padberg, W; Hecker, A

    2014-03-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a potentially fatal disease with individually differing expression of systemic involvement. For this reason early diagnosis with subsequent risk stratification is essential in the clinical management of this frequent gastroenterological disorder. Severe forms of acute pancreatitis occur in approximately 20 % of cases often requiring intensive care monitoring and interdisciplinary therapeutic approaches. In the acute phase adequate fluid replacement and sufficient analgesic therapy is of major therapeutic importance. Concerning the administration of antibiotics and the nutritional support of patients with acute pancreatitis a change in paradigms could be observed in recent years. Furthermore, endoscopic, radiological or surgical interventions can be necessary depending on the severity of the disease and potential complications.

  16. Bronchitis - acute

    MedlinePlus

    ... to breathe. Other symptoms of bronchitis are a cough and coughing up mucus. Acute means the symptoms ... diagnosed with chronic bronchitis, you must have a cough with mucus on most days for at least ...

  17. Acute Bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... bronchitis? Acute bronchitis is inflammation of your bronchial tree. The bronchial tree consists of tubes that carry air into your ... weeks or months. This happens because the bronchial tree takes a while to heal. A lasting cough ...

  18. Kv2 channel regulation of action potential repolarization and firing patterns in superior cervical ganglion neurons and hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pin W; Bean, Bruce P

    2014-04-02

    Kv2 family "delayed-rectifier" potassium channels are widely expressed in mammalian neurons. Kv2 channels activate relatively slowly and their contribution to action potential repolarization under physiological conditions has been unclear. We explored the function of Kv2 channels using a Kv2-selective blocker, Guangxitoxin-1E (GxTX-1E). Using acutely isolated neurons, mixed voltage-clamp and current-clamp experiments were done at 37°C to study the physiological kinetics of channel gating and action potentials. In both rat superior cervical ganglion (SCG) neurons and mouse hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons, 100 nm GxTX-1E produced near-saturating block of a component of current typically constituting ∼60-80% of the total delayed-rectifier current. GxTX-1E also reduced A-type potassium current (IA), but much more weakly. In SCG neurons, 100 nm GxTX-1E broadened spikes and voltage clamp experiments using action potential waveforms showed that Kv2 channels carry ∼55% of the total outward current during action potential repolarization despite activating relatively late in the spike. In CA1 neurons, 100 nm GxTX-1E broadened spikes evoked from -70 mV, but not -80 mV, likely reflecting a greater role of Kv2 when other potassium channels were partially inactivated at -70 mV. In both CA1 and SCG neurons, inhibition of Kv2 channels produced dramatic depolarization of interspike voltages during repetitive firing. In CA1 neurons and some SCG neurons, this was associated with increased initial firing frequency. In all neurons, inhibition of Kv2 channels depressed maintained firing because neurons entered depolarization block more readily. Therefore, Kv2 channels can either decrease or increase neuronal excitability depending on the time scale of excitation.

  19. Kv2 Channel Regulation of Action Potential Repolarization and Firing Patterns in Superior Cervical Ganglion Neurons and Hippocampal CA1 Pyramidal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Pin W.

    2014-01-01

    Kv2 family “delayed-rectifier” potassium channels are widely expressed in mammalian neurons. Kv2 channels activate relatively slowly and their contribution to action potential repolarization under physiological conditions has been unclear. We explored the function of Kv2 channels using a Kv2-selective blocker, Guangxitoxin-1E (GxTX-1E). Using acutely isolated neurons, mixed voltage-clamp and current-clamp experiments were done at 37°C to study the physiological kinetics of channel gating and action potentials. In both rat superior cervical ganglion (SCG) neurons and mouse hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons, 100 nm GxTX-1E produced near-saturating block of a component of current typically constituting ∼60–80% of the total delayed-rectifier current. GxTX-1E also reduced A-type potassium current (IA), but much more weakly. In SCG neurons, 100 nm GxTX-1E broadened spikes and voltage clamp experiments using action potential waveforms showed that Kv2 channels carry ∼55% of the total outward current during action potential repolarization despite activating relatively late in the spike. In CA1 neurons, 100 nm GxTX-1E broadened spikes evoked from −70 mV, but not −80 mV, likely reflecting a greater role of Kv2 when other potassium channels were partially inactivated at −70 mV. In both CA1 and SCG neurons, inhibition of Kv2 channels produced dramatic depolarization of interspike voltages during repetitive firing. In CA1 neurons and some SCG neurons, this was associated with increased initial firing frequency. In all neurons, inhibition of Kv2 channels depressed maintained firing because neurons entered depolarization block more readily. Therefore, Kv2 channels can either decrease or increase neuronal excitability depending on the time scale of excitation. PMID:24695716

  20. Sleep-Stage Correlates of Hippocampal Electroencephalogram in Primates

    PubMed Central

    Eifuku, Satoshi; Fushiki, Hiroaki; Watanabe, Yukio; Uchiyama, Kumiko

    2013-01-01

    It has been demonstrated in the rodent hippocampus that rhythmic slow activity (theta) predominantly occurs during rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, while sharp waves and associated ripples occur mainly during non-REM sleep. However, evidence is lacking for correlates of sleep stages with electroencephalogram (EEG) in the hippocampus of monkeys. In the present study, we recorded hippocampal EEG from the dentate gyrus in monkeys overnight under conditions of polysomnographical monitoring. As result, the hippocampal EEG changed in a manner similar to that of the surface EEG: during wakefulness, the hippocampal EEG showed fast, desynchronized waves, which were partly replaced with slower waves of intermediate amplitudes during the shallow stages of non-REM sleep. During the deep stages of non-REM sleep, continuous, slower oscillations (0.5–8 Hz) with high amplitudes were predominant. During REM sleep, the hippocampal EEG again showed fast, desynchronized waves similar to those found during wakefulness. These results indicate that in the monkey, hippocampal rhythmic slow activity rarely occurs during REM sleep, which is in clear contrast to that of rodents. In addition, the increase in the slower oscillations of hippocampal EEG during non-REM sleep, which resembled that of the surface EEG, may at least partly reflect cortical inputs to the dentate gyrus during this behavioral state. PMID:24386134

  1. Constructing, Perceiving, and Maintaining Scenes: Hippocampal Activity and Connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Zeidman, Peter; Mullally, Sinéad L.; Maguire, Eleanor A.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, evidence has accumulated to suggest the hippocampus plays a role beyond memory. A strong hippocampal response to scenes has been noted, and patients with bilateral hippocampal damage cannot vividly recall scenes from their past or construct scenes in their imagination. There is debate about whether the hippocampus is involved in the online processing of scenes independent of memory. Here, we investigated the hippocampal response to visually perceiving scenes, constructing scenes in the imagination, and maintaining scenes in working memory. We found extensive hippocampal activation for perceiving scenes, and a circumscribed area of anterior medial hippocampus common to perception and construction. There was significantly less hippocampal activity for maintaining scenes in working memory. We also explored the functional connectivity of the anterior medial hippocampus and found significantly stronger connectivity with a distributed set of brain areas during scene construction compared with scene perception. These results increase our knowledge of the hippocampus by identifying a subregion commonly engaged by scenes, whether perceived or constructed, by separating scene construction from working memory, and by revealing the functional network underlying scene construction, offering new insights into why patients with hippocampal lesions cannot construct scenes. PMID:25405941

  2. Optogenetic Activation of Septal Glutamatergic Neurons Drive Hippocampal Theta Rhythms.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Jennifer; Manseau, Frédéric; Ducharme, Guillaume; Amilhon, Bénédicte; Vigneault, Erika; El Mestikawy, Salah; Williams, Sylvain

    2016-03-09

    The medial septum and diagonal band of Broca (MS-DBB) has an essential role for theta rhythm generation in the hippocampus and is critical for learning and memory. The MS-DBB contains cholinergic, GABAergic, and recently described glutamatergic neurons, but their specific contribution to theta generation is poorly understood. Here, we examined the role of MS-DBB glutamatergic neurons in theta rhythm using optogenetic activation and electrophysiological recordings performed in in vitro preparations and in freely behaving mice. The experiments in slices suggest that MS-DBB glutamatergic neurons provide prominent excitatory inputs to a majority of local GABAergic and a minority of septal cholinergic neurons. In contrast, activation of MS-DBB glutamatergic fiber terminals in hippocampal slices elicited weak postsynaptic responses in hippocampal neurons. In the in vitro septo-hippocampal preparation, activation of MS-DBB glutamatergic neurons did increase the rhythmicity of hippocampal theta oscillations, whereas stimulation of septo-hippocampal glutamatergic fibers in the fornix did not have an effect. In freely behaving mice, activation of these neurons in the MS-DBB strongly synchronized hippocampal theta rhythms over a wide range of frequencies, whereas activation of their projections to the hippocampus through fornix stimulations had no effect on theta rhythms, suggesting that MS-DBB glutamatergic neurons played a role in theta generation through local modulation of septal neurons. Together, these results provide the first evidence that MS-DBB glutamatergic neurons modulate local septal circuits, which in turn contribute to theta rhythms in the hippocampus.

  3. Rit GTPase Signaling Promotes Immature Hippocampal Neuronal Survival

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Weikang; Carlson, Shaun W.; Brelsfoard, Jennifer M.; Mannon, Catherine E.; Moncman, Carole L.; Saatman, Kathryn E.; Andres, Douglas A.

    2012-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms governing the spontaneous recovery seen following brain injury remain elusive, but recent studies indicate that injury-induced stimulation of hippocampal neurogenesis contributes to the repair process. The therapeutic potential of endogenous neurogenesis is tempered by the demonstration that traumatic brain injury (TBI) results in the selective death of adult-born immature neurons, compromising the cell population poised to compensate for trauma-induced neuronal loss. Here, we identify the Ras-related GTPase, Rit, as a critical player in the survival of immature hippocampal neurons following brain injury. While Rit knockout (Rit−/−) did not alter hippocampal development, hippocampal neural cultures derived from Rit−/− mice display increased cell death and blunted MAPK cascade activation in response to oxidative stress, without affecting BDNF-dependent signaling. When compared to wild-type hippocampal cultures, Rit loss rendered immature (Dcx+) neurons susceptible to oxidative damage, without altering the survival of neural progenitor (Nestin+) cells. Oxidative stress is a major contributor to neuronal cell death following brain injury. Consistent with the enhanced vulnerability of cultured Rit−/− immature neurons, Rit−/− mice exhibited a significantly greater loss of adult-born immature neurons within the dentate gyrus after TBI. In addition, post-TBI neuronal remodeling was blunted. Taken together, these data identify a new and unexpected role for Rit in injury-induced neurogenesis, functioning as a selective survival mechanism for immature hippocampal neurons within the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus following TBI. PMID:22815504

  4. Signatures of hippocampal oxidative stress in aged spatial learning-impaired rodents.

    PubMed

    Nicolle, M M; Gonzalez, J; Sugaya, K; Baskerville, K A; Bryan, D; Lund, K; Gallagher, M; McKinney, M

    2001-01-01

    Neurons and glia within the hippocampus of aged, spatial learning-impaired Long-Evans rats exhibit uniquely altered gene expression profiles, and we have postulated oxidative stress as the basis for this. To test this hypothesis we quantitated the extent of protein and nucleic acid oxidative damage, evaluated the status of mitochondrial DNA integrity, and examined several signaling entities and molecular indicators frequently associated with oxidative stress and gliosis. Immunoblotting demonstrated elevated heme oxygenase-1 in the aged-impaired hippocampus and immunocytochemistry suggested that heme oxygenase-1 is largely cytosolic and at least partly neuronal in nature. In the aged-impaired group, immunoreactivity to 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine, an oxidative nucleic acid adduct, was found to be elevated in the dentate gyrus and in area CA1 of the hippocampal formation. Isolated mitochondrial DNA was found to be significantly damaged in the aged-impaired group. In the aged learning-impaired rats only, proteins in a 65-kDa band were found to contain excessive levels of carbonyl residues. Glial activation was examined by in situ hybridization histochemistry to tumor necrosis factor alpha and by immunocytochemistry with OX-6, which detects activated microglia. White matter in aged brains exhibited a modest up-regulation of tumor necrosis factor alpha mRNA and OX-6 immunoreactivity, but the hippocampal formation expressed tumor necrosis factor alpha mRNA equivalent to young animals and few OX-6-positive microglia. The mRNA for manganese-dependent superoxide dismutase, which is elevated in the aged hippocampus, was found preferentially expressed in neurons. We conclude that aged hippocampal neurons appear to be under oxidative stress and this is more severe in the learning-impaired subjects, suggesting a possible basis for age-induced cognitive decline.

  5. Epigenetic modulation of adult hippocampal neurogenesis by extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Leone, Lucia; Fusco, Salvatore; Mastrodonato, Alessia; Piacentini, Roberto; Barbati, Saviana Antonella; Zaffina, Salvatore; Pani, Giovambattista; Podda, Maria Vittoria; Grassi, Claudio

    2014-06-01

    Throughout life, adult neurogenesis generates new neurons in the dentate gyrus of hippocampus that have a critical role in memory formation. Strategies able to stimulate this endogenous process have raised considerable interest because of their potential use to treat neurological disorders entailing cognitive impairment. We previously reported that mice exposed to extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields (ELFEFs) showed increased hippocampal neurogenesis. Here, we demonstrate that the ELFEF-dependent enhancement of hippocampal neurogenesis improves spatial learning and memory. To gain insights on the molecular mechanisms underlying ELFEFs' effects, we extended our studies to an in vitro model of neural stem cells (NSCs) isolated from the hippocampi of newborn mice. We found that ELFEFs enhanced proliferation and neuronal differentiation of hippocampal NSCs by regulation of epigenetic mechanisms leading to pro-neuronal gene expression. Upon ELFEF stimulation of NSCs, we observed a significant enhancement of expression of the pro-proliferative gene hairy enhancer of split 1 and the neuronal determination genes NeuroD1 and Neurogenin1. These events were preceded by increased acetylation of H3K9 and binding of the phosphorylated transcription factor cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) on the regulatory sequence of these genes. Such ELFEF-dependent epigenetic modifications were prevented by the Cav1-channel blocker nifedipine, and were associated with increased occupancy of CREB-binding protein (CBP) to the same loci within the analyzed promoters. Our results unravel the molecular mechanisms underlying the ELFEFs' ability to improve endogenous neurogenesis, pointing to histone acetylation-related chromatin remodeling as a critical determinant. These findings could pave the way to the development of novel therapeutic approaches in regenerative medicine.

  6. Cortical and Hippocampal Correlates of Deliberation during Model-Based Decisions for Rewards in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Bornstein, Aaron M.; Daw, Nathaniel D.

    2013-01-01

    How do we use our memories of the past to guide decisions we've never had to make before? Although extensive work describes how the brain learns to repeat rewarded actions, decisions can also be influenced by associations between stimuli or events not directly involving reward — such as when planning routes using a cognitive map or chess moves using predicted countermoves — and these sorts of associations are critical when deciding among novel options. This process is known as model-based decision making. While the learning of environmental relations that might support model-based decisions is well studied, and separately this sort of information has been inferred to impact decisions, there is little evidence concerning the full cycle by which such associations are acquired and drive choices. Of particular interest is whether decisions are directly supported by the same mnemonic systems characterized for relational learning more generally, or instead rely on other, specialized representations. Here, building on our previous work, which isolated dual representations underlying sequential predictive learning, we directly demonstrate that one such representation, encoded by the hippocampal memory system and adjacent cortical structures, supports goal-directed decisions. Using interleaved learning and decision tasks, we monitor predictive learning directly and also trace its influence on decisions for reward. We quantitatively compare the learning processes underlying multiple behavioral and fMRI observables using computational model fits. Across both tasks, a quantitatively consistent learning process explains reaction times, choices, and both expectation- and surprise-related neural activity. The same hippocampal and ventral stream regions engaged in anticipating stimuli during learning are also engaged in proportion to the difficulty of decisions. These results support a role for predictive associations learned by the hippocampal memory system to be recalled

  7. Hippocampal lesions do not impair the geomagnetic orientation of migratory savannah sparrows.

    PubMed

    Bingman, V P; Able, K P; Siegel, J J

    1999-12-01

    The avian hippocampal formation is known to participate in naturally occurring spatial behavior such as homing in pigeons and cache recovery in food storing passerines, but its participation in the often spectacular migrations of birds remains uncertain. As a first investigation into the possible role of hippocampal formation in migration, the effect of hippocampal formation lesions on the geomagnetic migratory orientation of Savannah sparrows was examined. When tested indoors, hippocampal formation-lesioned sparrows were able to orient in an appropriate migratory direction indicating no necessary role for hippocampal formation in geomagnetic migratory orientation. However, hippocampal formation-lesioned birds displayed significantly less migratory (nocturnal) activity, a result that inspires further study.

  8. Ethanol inhibits long-term potentiation in hippocampal CA1 neurons, irrespective of lamina and stimulus strength, through neurosteroidogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Binu; Ahmed, Saheeb; Zafar, Noman; Dean, Camin

    2015-01-01

    Ethanol inhibits memory encoding and the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) in CA1 neurons of the hippocampus. Hippocampal LTP at Schaffer collateral synapses onto CA1 pyramidal neurons has been widely studied as a cellular model of learning and memory, but there is striking heterogeneity in the underlying molecular mechanisms in distinct regions and in response to distinct stimuli. Basal and apical dendrites differ in terms of innervation, input specificity, and molecular mechanisms of LTP induction and maintenance, and different stimuli determine distinct molecular pathways of potentiation. However, lamina or stimulus-dependent effects of ethanol on LTP have not been investigated. Here, we tested the effect of acute application of 60 mM ethanol on LTP induction in distinct dendritic compartments (apical versus basal) of CA1 neurons, and in response to distinct stimulation paradigms (single versus repeated, spaced high frequency stimulation). We found that ethanol completely blocks LTP in apical dendrites, whereas it reduces the magnitude of LTP in basal dendrites. Acute ethanol treatment for just 15 min altered pre- and post-synaptic protein expression. Interestingly, ethanol increases the neurosteroid allopregnanolone, which causes ethanol-dependent inhibition of LTP, more prominently in apical dendrites, where ethanol has greater effects on LTP. This suggests that ethanol has general effects on fundamental properties of synaptic plasticity, but the magnitude of its effect on LTP differs depending on hippocampal sub-region and stimulus strength.

  9. Ozone modulates the effects of imipramine on immobility in the forced swim test, and nonspecific parameters of hippocampal oxidative stress in the rat.

    PubMed

    Mokoena, Mmalebuso L; Harvey, Brian H; Oliver, Douglas W; Brink, Christiaan B

    2010-06-01

    Depression has been associated with oxidative stress. There is increased awareness of the role of environmental toxins in the development of mood disorders. Ozone, a pro-oxidant and environmental pollutant, has been noted to have central nervous system effects. We investigated the effects of acute and chronic ozone inhalation on the response of imipramine in the forced-swim test (FST) and on biomarkers of oxidative stress in rat hippocampus. Sprague Dawley rats were exposed to 0, 0.25 or 0.7 ppm ozone per inhalation 4 h daily for either 30 days (chronic) or once (acute). Animals were then injected intraperitoneally with imipramine (10 mg/kg) or saline 24, 5 and 1 h before the forced-swim test. Hippocampal superoxide accumulation and lipid peroxidation were measured. Imipramine evoked an antidepressant-like effect independent of acute or chronic ozone exposure. However, 0.7 ppm acute ozone and 0.25 ppm chronic ozone attenuated the antidepressant-like effects of imipramine. The ozone exposures also elevated hippocampal superoxide accumulation and lipid peroxidation. Importantly, imipramine reversed the lipid peroxidation induced by chronic ozone, thereby preventing cellular damage induced by oxidative stress. Ozone exposure presents a feasible model with etiological validity to investigate oxidative stress in depression and antidepressant action.

  10. Hippocampal fields in the hedgehog tenrec. Their architecture and major intrinsic connections.

    PubMed

    Künzle, H; Radtke-Schuller, S

    2001-11-01

    The Madagascan lesser hedgehog tenrec was investigated to get insight into the areal evolution of the hippocampal formation in mammals with poorly differentiated brains. The hippocampal subdivisions were analyzed using cyto- and chemoarchitectural criteria; long associational and commissural connections were demonstrated with tracer techniques. The hedgehog tenrec shows a well differentiated dentate gyrus, CA3 and CA1. Their major intrinsic connections lie within the band of variations known from other species. The dentate hilar region shows calretinin-positive mossy cells with extensive projections to the molecular layer. The calbindin- and enkephalin-positive granule mossy fibers form a distinct endbulb and do not invade the CA1 as reported in the erinaceous hedgehog. Isolated granule cells with basal dendrites were also noted. A CA2 region is hard to identify architecturally; its presence is suggested due to its contralateral connections. Subicular and perisubicular regions are clearly present along the dorsal aspects of the hemisphere, but we failed to identify them unequivocally along the caudal and ventral tip of the hippocampus. A temporal portion of the subiculum, if present, differs in its chemoarchitecture from its dorsal counterpart. The perisubicular region, located medially adjacent to the dorsal subiculum may be equivalent to the rat's presubiculum; evidence for the presence of a parasubiculum was rather weak.

  11. Hippocampal cAMP/PKA/CREB is required for neuroprotective effect of acupuncture.

    PubMed

    Li, Qian-Qian; Shi, Guang-Xia; Yang, Jing-Wen; Li, Zhao-Xin; Zhang, Zhen-Hua; He, Tian; Wang, Jing; Liu, Li-Ying; Liu, Cun-Zhi

    2015-02-01

    Acupuncture has beneficial effects in vascular dementia (VaD) patients. The underlying mechanism, however, remains unknown. The present study was designed to investigate whether the cAMP/PKA/CREB cascade is involved in the mechanism of acupuncture in cerebral multi-infarction rats. In this study, cerebral multi-infarction was modeled in adult Wistar rats by homologous blood clot emboli. After a two-week acupuncture treatment at Zusanli (ST36), hippocampal-dependent memory was tested by employing a radial arm maze test. The hippocampus was isolated for analyses of cAMP concentration, phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity and CREB/pCREB and ERK/pERK expressions. The Morris water maze (MWM) task and CREB phosphorylation were evaluated in the presence of PKA-selective peptide inhibitor (H89). The radial arm maze test results demonstrated that acupuncture treatment at ST36 reversed hippocampal-dependent memory in impaired animals. Compared to those of the impaired group, cAMP concentration, PKA activity and pCREB and pERK expressions were increased following acupuncture therapy. Finally, the blockade of PKA reversed the increase in CREB phosphorylation and the improvement in recognitive function induced by acupuncture treatment. These results suggest that acupuncture could improve hippocampus function by modulating the cAMP/PKA/CREB signaling pathway, which represents a molecular mechanism of acupuncture for recognitive function in cerebral multi-infarction rats.

  12. Pretreatment with apoaequorin protects hippocampal CA1 neurons from oxygen-glucose deprivation.

    PubMed

    Detert, Julia A; Adams, Erin L; Lescher, Jacob D; Lyons, Jeri-Anne; Moyer, James R

    2013-01-01

    Ischemic stroke affects ∼795,000 people each year in the U.S., which results in an estimated annual cost of $73.7 billion. Calcium is pivotal in a variety of neuronal signaling cascades, however, during ischemia, excess calcium influx can trigger excitotoxic cell death. Calcium binding proteins help neurons regulate/buffer intracellular calcium levels during ischemia. Aequorin is a calcium binding protein isolated from the jellyfish Aequorea victoria, and has been used for years as a calcium indicator, but little is known about its neuroprotective properties. The present study used an in vitro rat brain slice preparation to test the hypothesis that an intra-hippocampal infusion of apoaequorin (the calcium binding component of aequorin) protects neurons from ischemic cell death. Bilaterally cannulated rats received an apoaequorin infusion in one hemisphere and vehicle control in the other. Hippocampal slices were then prepared and subjected to 5 minutes of oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD), and cell death was assayed by trypan blue exclusion. Apoaequorin dose-dependently protected neurons from OGD--doses of 1% and 4% (but not 0.4%) significantly decreased the number of trypan blue-labeled neurons. This effect was also time dependent, lasting up to 48 hours. This time dependent effect was paralleled by changes in cytokine and chemokine expression, indicating that apoaequorin may protect neurons via a neuroimmunomodulatory mechanism. These data support the hypothesis that pretreatment with apoaequorin protects neurons against ischemic cell death, and may be an effective neurotherapeutic.

  13. Role of adult hippocampal neurogenesis in stress resilience

    PubMed Central

    Levone, Brunno R.; Cryan, John F.; O'Leary, Olivia F.

    2014-01-01

    There is a growing appreciation that adult hippocampal neurogenesis plays a role in emotional and cognitive processes related to psychiatric disorders. Although many studies have investigated the effects of stress on adult hippocampal neurogenesis, most have not focused on whether stress-induced changes in neurogenesis occur specifically in animals that are more resilient or more susceptible to the behavioural and neuroendocrine effects of stress. Thus, in the present review we explore whether there is a clear relationship between stress-induced changes in adult hippocampal neurogenesis, stress resilience and antidepressant-induced recovery from stress-induced changes in behaviour. Exposure to different stressors is known to reduce adult hippocampal neurogenesis, but some stressors have also been shown to exert opposite effects. Ablation of neurogenesis does not lead to a depressive phenotype, but it can enhance responsiveness to stress and affect stress susceptibility. Monoaminergic-targeted antidepressants, environmental enrichment and adrenalectomy are beneficial for reversing stress-induced changes in behaviour and have been shown to do so in a neurogenesis-dependant manner. In addition, stress and antidepressants can affect hippocampal neurogenesis, preferentially in the ventral hippocampus. Together, these data show that adult hippocampal neurogenesis may play a role in the neuroendocrine and behavioural responses to stress, although it is not yet fully clear under which circumstances neurogenesis promotes resilience or susceptibility to stress. It will be important that future studies carefully examine how adult hippocampal neurogenesis can contribute to stress resilience/susceptibility so that it may be appropriately exploited for the development of new and more effective treatments for stress-related psychiatric disorders. PMID:27589664

  14. Manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI) of rat brain after systemic administration of MnCl₂: hippocampal signal enhancement without disruption of hippocampus-dependent behavior.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Stewart J; Hussey, Rosalind; Jansen, Maurits A; Merrifield, Gavin D; Marshall, Ian; MacLullich, Alasdair; Yau, Joyce L W; Bast, Tobias

    2011-01-01

    Manganese (Mn(2+))-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (MEMRI) in rodents offers unique opportunities for the longitudinal study of hippocampal structure and function in parallel with cognitive testing. However, Mn(2+) is a potent toxin and there is evidence that it can interfere with neuronal function. Thus, apart from causing adverse peripheral side effects, Mn(2+) may disrupt the function of brain areas where it accumulates to produce signal enhancement and, thereby, Mn(2+) administration may confound cognitive testing. Here, we examined in male adult Lister hooded rats if a moderate systemic dose of MnCl₂ (200 μmol/kg; two intraperitoneal injections of 100 μmol/kg separated by 1 h) that produces hippocampal MR signal enhancement would disrupt hippocampal function. To this end, we used a delayed-matching-to-place (DMP) watermaze task, which requires rapid allocentric place learning and is highly sensitive to interference with hippocampal function. Tested on the DMP task 1 h and 24 h after MnCl₂ injection, rats did not show any impairment in indices of memory performance (latencies, search preference) or any sensorimotor effects. However, MnCl₂ injection caused acute peripheral effects (severe ataxia and erythema, i.e. redness of paws, ears, and nose) which subsided over 30 min. Additionally, rats injected with MnCl₂ showed reduced weight 1 day after injection and failed to reach the normal weight-growth curve of control rats within the 16 days monitored. Our results indicate that 200 μmol/kg MnCl₂ produces hippocampal MR signal enhancement without disrupting hippocampus-dependent behavior on a rapid place learning task, even though attention must be paid to peripheral side effects.

  15. Hippocampal CA1 Ripples as Inhibitory Transients

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Giri P; Fellous, Jean-Marc; Bazhenov, Maxim

    2016-01-01

    Memories are stored and consolidated as a result of a dialogue between the hippocampus and cortex during sleep. Neurons active during behavior reactivate in both structures during sleep, in conjunction with characteristic brain oscillations that may form the neural substrate of memory consolidation. In the hippocampus, replay occurs within sharp wave-ripples: short bouts of high-frequency activity in area CA1 caused by excitatory activation from area CA3. In this work, we develop a computational model of ripple generation, motivated by in vivo rat data showing that ripples have a broad frequency distribution, exponential inter-arrival times and yet highly non-variable durations. Our study predicts that ripples are not persistent oscillations but result from a transient network behavior, induced by input from CA3, in which the high frequency synchronous firing of perisomatic interneurons does not depend on the time scale of synaptic inhibition. We found that noise-induced loss of synchrony among CA1 interneurons dynamically constrains individual ripple duration. Our study proposes a novel mechanism of hippocampal ripple generation consistent with a broad range of experimental data, and highlights the role of noise in regulating the duration of input-driven oscillatory spiking in an inhibitory network. PMID:27093059

  16. Dendritic potassium channels in hippocampal pyramidal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Daniel; Hoffman, Dax A; Magee, Jeffrey C; Poolos, Nicholas P; Watanabe, Shigeo; Colbert, Costa M; Migliore, Michele

    2000-01-01

    Potassium channels located in the dendrites of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons control the shape and amplitude of back-propagating action potentials, the amplitude of excitatory postsynaptic potentials and dendritic excitability. Non-uniform gradients in the distribution of potassium channels in the dendrites make the dendritic electrical properties markedly different from those found in the soma. For example, the influence of a fast, calcium-dependent potassium current on action potential repolarization is progressively reduced in the first 150 μm of the apical dendrites, so that action potentials recorded farther than 200 μm from the soma have no fast after-hyperpolarization and are wider than those in the soma. The peak amplitude of back-propagating action potentials is also progressively reduced in the dendrites because of the increasing density of a transient potassium channel with distance from the soma. The activation of this channel can be reduced by the activity of a number of protein kinases as well as by prior depolarization. The depolarization from excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) can inactivate these A-type K+ channels and thus lead to an increase in the amplitude of dendritic action potentials, provided the EPSP and the action potentials occur within the appropriate time window. This time window could be in the order of 15 ms and may play a role in long-term potentiation induced by pairing EPSPs and back-propagating action potentials. PMID:10811726

  17. Millisecond Timescale Synchrony among Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Amarasingham, Asohan; Mizuseki, Kenji; Buzsáki, György

    2014-01-01

    Inhibitory neurons in cortical circuits play critical roles in composing spike timing and oscillatory patterns in neuronal activity. These roles in turn require coherent activation of interneurons at different timescales. To investigate how the local circuitry provides for these activities, we applied resampled cross-correlation analyses to large-scale recordings of neuronal populations in the cornu ammonis 1 (CA1) and CA3 regions of the hippocampus of freely moving rats. Significant counts in the cross-correlation of cell pairs, relative to jittered surrogate spike-trains, allowed us to identify the effective couplings between neurons in CA1 and CA3 hippocampal regions on the timescale of milliseconds. In addition to putative excitatory and inhibitory monosynaptic connections, we uncovered prominent millisecond timescale synchrony between cell pairs, observed as peaks in the central 0 ms bin of cross-correlograms. This millisecond timescale synchrony appeared to be independent of network state, excitatory input, and γ oscillations. Moreover, it was frequently observed between cells of differing putative interneuronal type, arguing against gap junctions as the sole underlying source. Our observations corroborate recent in vitro findings suggesting that inhibition alone is sufficient to synchronize interneurons at such fast timescales. Moreover, we show that this synchronous spiking may cause stronger inhibition and rebound spiking in target neurons, pointing toward a potential function for millisecond synchrony of interneurons in shaping and affecting timing in pyramidal populations within and downstream from the circuit. PMID:25378164

  18. Hippocampal CA1 Ripples as Inhibitory Transients.

    PubMed

    Malerba, Paola; Krishnan, Giri P; Fellous, Jean-Marc; Bazhenov, Maxim

    2016-04-01

    Memories are stored and consolidated as a result of a dialogue between the hippocampus and cortex during sleep. Neurons active during behavior reactivate in both structures during sleep, in conjunction with characteristic brain oscillations that may form the neural substrate of memory consolidation. In the hippocampus, replay occurs within sharp wave-ripples: short bouts of high-frequency activity in area CA1 caused by excitatory activation from area CA3. In this work, we develop a computational model of ripple generation, motivated by in vivo rat data showing that ripples have a broad frequency distribution, exponential inter-arrival times and yet highly non-variable durations. Our study predicts that ripples are not persistent oscillations but result from a transient network behavior, induced by input from CA3, in which the high frequency synchronous firing of perisomatic interneurons does not depend on the time scale of synaptic inhibition. We found that noise-induced loss of synchrony among CA1 interneurons dynamically constrains individual ripple duration. Our study proposes a novel mechanism of hippocampal ripple generation consistent with a broad range of experimental data, and highlights the role of noise in regulating the duration of input-driven oscillatory spiking in an inhibitory network.

  19. Dendritic potassium channels in hippocampal pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Johnston, D; Hoffman, D A; Magee, J C; Poolos, N P; Watanabe, S; Colbert, C M; Migliore, M

    2000-05-15

    Potassium channels located in the dendrites of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons control the shape and amplitude of back-propagating action potentials, the amplitude of excitatory postsynaptic potentials and dendritic excitability. Non-uniform gradients in the distribution of potassium channels in the dendrites make the dendritic electrical properties markedly different from those found in the soma. For example, the influence of a fast, calcium-dependent potassium current on action potential repolarization is progressively reduced in the first 150 micrometer of the apical dendrites, so that action potentials recorded farther than 200 micrometer from the soma have no fast after-hyperpolarization and are wider than those in the soma. The peak amplitude of back-propagating action potentials is also progressively reduced in the dendrites because of the increasing density of a transient potassium channel with distance from the soma. The activation of this channel can be reduced by the activity of a number of protein kinases as well as by prior depolarization. The depolarization from excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) can inactivate these A-type K+ channels and thus lead to an increase in the amplitude of dendritic action potentials, provided the EPSP and the action potentials occur within the appropriate time window. This time window could be in the order of 15 ms and may play a role in long-term potentiation induced by pairing EPSPs and back-propagating action potentials.

  20. A Nonlinear Model for Hippocampal Cognitive Prosthesis: Memory Facilitation by Hippocampal Ensemble Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Hampson, Robert E.; Song, Dong; Chan, Rosa H.M.; Sweatt, Andrew J.; Riley, Mitchell R.; Gerhardt, Gregory A.; Shin, Dae C.; Marmarelis, Vasilis Z.; Berger, Theodore W.; Deadwyler, Samuel A.

    2012-01-01

    Collaborative investigations have characterized how multineuron hippocampal ensembles encode memory necessary for subsequent successful performance by rodents in a delayed nonmatch to sample (DNMS) task and utilized that information to provide the basis for a memory prosthesis to enhance performance. By employing a unique nonlinear dynamic multi-input/multi-output (MIMO) model, developed and adapted to hippocampal neural ensemble firing patterns derived from simultaneous recorded CA1 and CA3 activity, it was possible to extract information encoded in the sample phase necessary for successful performance in the nonmatch phase of the task. The extension of this MIMO model to online delivery of electrical stimulation delivered to the same recording loci that mimicked successful CA1 firing patterns, provided the means to increase levels of performance on a trial-by-trial basis. Inclusion of several control procedures provides evidence for the specificity of effective MIMO model generated patterns of electrical stimulation. Increased utility of the MIMO model as a prosthesis device was exhibited by the demonstration of cumulative increases in DNMS task performance with repeated MIMO stimulation over many sessions on both stimulation and nonstimulation trials, suggesting overall system modification with continued exposure. Results reported here are compatible with and extend prior demonstrations and further support the candidacy of the MIMO model as an effective cortical prosthesis. PMID:22438334

  1. Hippocampal-Prefrontal Interactions in Cognition, Behavior and Psychiatric Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sigurdsson, Torfi; Duvarci, Sevil

    2016-01-01

    The hippocampus and prefrontal cortex (PFC) have long been known to play a central role in various behavioral and cognitive functions. More recently, electrophysiological and functional imaging studies have begun to examine how interactions between the two structures contribute to behavior during various tasks. At the same time, it has become clear that hippocampal-prefrontal interactions are disrupted in psychiatric disease and may contribute to their pathophysiology. These impairments have most frequently been observed in schizophrenia, a disease that has long been associated with hippocampal and prefrontal dysfunction. Studies in animal models of the illness have also begun to relate disruptions in hippocampal-prefrontal interactions to the various risk factors and pathophysiological mechanisms of the illness. The goal of this review is to summarize what is known about the role of hippocampal-prefrontal interactions in normal brain function and compare how these interactions are disrupted in schizophrenia patients and animal models of the disease. Outstanding questions for future research on the role of hippocampal-prefrontal interactions in both healthy brain function and disease states are also discussed. PMID:26858612

  2. The Form and Function of Hippocampal Context Representations

    PubMed Central

    Smith, David M.; Bulkin, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Context is an essential component of learning and memory processes, and the hippocampus is critical for encoding contextual information. However, connecting hippocampal physiology with its role in context and memory has only recently become possible. It is now clear that contexts are represented by coherent ensembles of hippocampal neurons and new optogenetic stimulation studies indicate that activity in these ensembles can trigger the retrieval of context appropriate memories. We interpret these findings in light of recent evidence that the hippocampus is critically involved in using contextual information to prevent interference, and propose a theoretical framework for understanding contextual influence of memory retrieval. When a new context is encountered, a unique hippocampal ensemble is recruited to represent it. Memories for events that occur in the context become associated with the hippocampal representation. Revisiting the context causes the hippocampal context code to be re-expressed and the relevant memories are primed. As a result, retrieval of appropriate memories is enhanced and interference from memories belonging to other contexts is minimized. PMID:24462752

  3. Acceleration of hippocampal atrophy rates in asymptomatic amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Andrews, K Abigail; Frost, Chris; Modat, Marc; Cardoso, M Jorge; Rowe, Chris C; Villemagne, Victor; Fox, Nick C; Ourselin, Sebastien; Schott, Jonathan M

    2016-03-01

    Increased rates of brain atrophy measured from serial magnetic resonance imaging precede symptom onset in Alzheimer's disease and may be useful outcome measures for prodromal clinical trials. Appropriate trial design requires a detailed understanding of the relationships between β-amyloid load and accumulation, and rate of brain change at this stage of the disease. Fifty-two healthy individuals (72.3 ± 6.9 years) from Australian Imaging, Biomarkers and Lifestyle Study of Aging had serial (0, 18 m, 36 m) magnetic resonance imaging, (0, 18 m) Pittsburgh compound B positron emission tomography, and clinical assessments. We calculated rates of whole brain and hippocampal atrophy, ventricular enlargement, amyloid accumulation, and cognitive decline. Over 3 years, rates of whole brain atrophy (p < 0.001), left and right hippocampal atrophy (p = 0.001, p = 0.023), and ventricular expansion (p < 0.001) were associated with baseline β-amyloid load. Whole brain atrophy rates were also independently associated with β-amyloid accumulation over the first 18 months (p = 0.003). Acceleration of left hippocampal atrophy rate was associated with baseline β-amyloid load across the cohort (p < 0.02). We provide evidence that rates of atrophy are associated with both baseline β-amyloid load and accumulation, and that there is presymptomatic, amyloid-mediated acceleration of hippocampal atrophy. Clinical trials using rate of hippocampal atrophy as an outcome measure should not assume linear decline in the presymptomatic phase.

  4. Maternal anxiety and infants' hippocampal development: timing matters.

    PubMed

    Qiu, A; Rifkin-Graboi, A; Chen, H; Chong, Y-S; Kwek, K; Gluckman, P D; Fortier, M V; Meaney, M J

    2013-09-24

    Exposure to maternal anxiety predicts offspring brain development. However, because children's brains are commonly assessed years after birth, the timing of such maternal influences in humans is unclear. This study aimed to examine the consequences of antenatal and postnatal exposure to maternal anxiety upon early infant development of the hippocampus, a key structure for stress regulation. A total of 175 neonates underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at birth and among them 35 had repeated scans at 6 months of age. Maternal anxiety was assessed using the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) at week 26 of pregnancy and 3 months after delivery. Regression analyses showed that antenatal maternal anxiety did not influence bilateral hippocampal volume at birth. However, children of mothers reporting increased anxiety during pregnancy showed slower growth of both the left and right hippocampus over the first 6 months of life. This effect of antenatal maternal anxiety upon right hippocampal growth became statistically stronger when controlling for postnatal maternal anxiety. Furthermore, a strong positive association between postnatal maternal anxiety and right hippocampal growth was detected, whereas a strong negative association between postnatal maternal anxiety and the left hippocampal volume at 6 months of life was found. Hence, the postnatal growth of bilateral hippocampi shows distinct responses to postnatal maternal anxiety. The size of the left hippocampus during early development is likely to reflect the influence of the exposure to perinatal maternal anxiety, whereas right hippocampal growth is constrained by antenatal maternal anxiety, but enhanced in response to increased postnatal maternal anxiety.

  5. Hippocampal neurochemical and electrophysiological measures from freely moving rats.

    PubMed

    Bronzino, J D; Kehoe, P; Hendriks, R; Vita, L; Golas, B; Vivona, C; Morgane, P J

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes surgical and recording procedures that have been developed which permit the simultaneous monitoring of levels of select neurochemicals (via microdialysis) and measures of dentate-evoked field potentials within the hippocampal formation of freely moving adult rats. To test and evaluate these procedures, they were employed to examine changes in hippocampal neurochemistry and neuronal excitability associated with the establishment and maintenance of hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP). Measures of hippocampal norepinephrine (NE) and glutamate levels along with measures of the dentate granule cell population spike amplitude (PSA) were obtained before, during, and after tetanization of the medial perforant path using two separate tetanization paradigms. Results obtained using these new procedures in several animals indicated that changes in NE and glutamate levels were strongly correlated with increases in the dentate granule cell PSA measure obtained following tetanization. The results indicate that this newly developed procedure can be effectively used to directly examine the relationship between neurochemical and neurophysiological changes associated with hippocampal neuroplasticity.

  6. Hippocampal Insulin Resistance Impairs Spatial Learning and Synaptic Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Piroli, Gerardo G.; Lawrence, Robert C.; Wrighten, Shayna A.; Green, Adrienne J.; Wilson, Steven P.; Sakai, Randall R.; Kelly, Sandra J.; Wilson, Marlene A.; Mott, David D.; Reagan, Lawrence P.

    2015-01-01

    Insulin receptors (IRs) are expressed in discrete neuronal populations in the central nervous system, including the hippocampus. To elucidate the functional role of hippocampal IRs independent of metabolic function, we generated a model of hippocampal-specific insulin resistance using a lentiviral vector expressing an IR antisense sequence (LV-IRAS). LV-IRAS effectively downregulates IR expression in the rat hippocampus without affecting body weight, adiposity, or peripheral glucose homeostasis. Nevertheless, hippocampal neuroplasticity was impaired in LV-IRAS–treated rats. High-frequency stimulation, which evoked robust long-term potentiation (LTP) in brain slices from LV control rats, failed to evoke LTP in LV-IRAS–treated rats. GluN2B subunit levels, as well as the basal level of phosphorylation of GluA1, were reduced in the hippocampus of LV-IRAS rats. Moreover, these deficits in synaptic transmission were associated with impairments in spatial learning. We suggest that alterations in the expression and phosphorylation of glutamate receptor subunits underlie the alterations in LTP and that these changes are responsible for the impairment in hippocampal-dependent learning. Importantly, these learning deficits are strikingly similar to the impairments in complex task performance observed in patients with diabetes, which strengthens the hypothesis that hippocampal insulin resistance is a key mediator of cognitive deficits independent of glycemic control. PMID:26216852

  7. Encoding of head direction by hippocampal place cells in bats.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Alon; Yartsev, Michael M; Ulanovsky, Nachum

    2014-01-15

    Most theories of navigation rely on the concept of a mental map and compass. Hippocampal place cells are neurons thought to be important for representing the mental map; these neurons become active when the animal traverses a specific location in the environment (the "place field"). Head-direction cells are found outside the hippocampus, and encode the animal's head orientation, thus implementing a neural compass. The prevailing view is that the activity of head-direction cells is not tuned to a single place, while place cells do not encode head direction. However, little work has been done to investigate in detail the possible head-directional tuning of hippocampal place cells across species. Here we addressed this by recording the activity of single neurons in the hippocampus of two evolutionarily distant bat species, Egyptian fruit bat and big brown bat, which crawled randomly in three different open-field arenas. We found that a large fraction of hippocampal neurons, in both bat species, showed conjunctive sensitivity to the animal's spatial position (place field) and to its head direction. We introduced analytical methods to demonstrate that the head-direction tuning was significant even after controlling for the behavioral coupling between position and head direction. Surprisingly, some hippocampal neurons preserved their head direction tuning even outside the neuron's place field, suggesting that "spontaneous" extra-field spikes are not noise, but in fact carry head-direction information. Overall, these findings suggest that bat hippocampal neurons can convey both map information and compass information.

  8. Remote semantic memory is impoverished in hippocampal amnesia.

    PubMed

    Klooster, Nathaniel B; Duff, Melissa C

    2015-12-01

    The necessity of the hippocampus for acquiring new semantic concepts is a topic of considerable debate. However, it is generally accepted that any role the hippocampus plays in semantic memory is time limited and that previously acquired information becomes independent of the hippocampus over time. This view, along with intact naming and word-definition matching performance in amnesia, has led to the notion that remote semantic memory is intact in patients with hippocampal amnesia. Motivated by perspectives of word learning as a protracted process where additional features and senses of a word are added over time, and by recent discoveries about the time course of hippocampal contributions to on-line relational processing, reconsolidation, and the flexible integration of information, we revisit the notion that remote semantic memory is intact in amnesia. Using measures of semantic richness and vocabulary depth from psycholinguistics and first and second language-learning studies, we examined how much information is associated with previously acquired, highly familiar words in a group of patients with bilateral hippocampal damage and amnesia. Relative to healthy demographically matched comparison participants and a group of brain-damaged comparison participants, the patients with hippocampal amnesia performed significantly worse on both productive and receptive measures of vocabulary depth and semantic richness. These findings suggest that remote semantic memory is impoverished in patients with hippocampal amnesia and that the hippocampus may play a role in the maintenance and updating of semantic memory beyond its initial acquisition.

  9. Dynamics of hippocampal spatial representation in echolocating bats.

    PubMed

    Ulanovsky, Nachum; Moss, Cynthia F

    2011-02-01

    The "place fields" of hippocampal pyramidal neurons are not static. For example, upon a contextual change in the environment, place fields may "remap" within typical timescales of ~ 1 min. A few studies have shown more rapid dynamics in hippocampal activity, linked to internal processes, such as switches between spatial reference frames or changes within the theta cycle. However, little is known about rapid hippocampal place field dynamics in response to external, sensory stimuli. Here, we studied this question in big brown bats, echolocating mammals in which we can readily measure rapid changes in sensory dynamics (sonar signals), as well as rapid behavioral switches between distal and proximal exploratory modes. First, we show that place field size was modulated by the availability of sensory information, on a timescale of ~ 300 ms: Bat hippocampal place fields were smallest immediately after an echolocation call, but place fields "diffused" with the passage of time after the call, when echo information was no longer arriving. Second, we show rapid modulation of hippocampal place fields as the animal switched between two exploratory modes. Third, we compared place fields and spatial view fields of individual neurons and found that place tuning was much more pronounced than spatial view tuning. In addition, dynamic fluctuations in spatial view tuning were stronger than fluctuations in place tuning. Taken together, these results suggest that spatial representation in mammalian hippocampus can be very rapidly modulated by external sensory and behavioral events.

  10. Hippocampal-neocortical functional reorganization underlies children's cognitive development.

    PubMed

    Qin, Shaozheng; Cho, Soohyun; Chen, Tianwen; Rosenberg-Lee, Miriam; Geary, David C; Menon, Vinod

    2014-09-01

    The importance of the hippocampal system for rapid learning and memory is well recognized, but its contributions to a cardinal feature of children's cognitive development-the transition from procedure-based to memory-based problem-solving strategies-are unknown. Here we show that the hippocampal system is pivotal to this strategic transition. Longitudinal functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in 7-9-year-old children revealed that the transition from use of counting to memory-based retrieval parallels increased hippocampal and decreased prefrontal-parietal engagement during arithmetic problem solving. Longitudinal improvements in retrieval-strategy use were predicted by increased hippocampal-neocortical functional connectivity. Beyond childhood, retrieval-strategy use continued to improve through adolescence into adulthood and was associated with decreased activation but more stable interproblem representations in the hippocampus. Our findings provide insights into the dynamic role of the hippocampus in the maturation of memory-based problem solving and establish a critical link between hippocampal-neocortical reorganization and children's cognitive development.

  11. Reducing central serotonin in adulthood promotes hippocampal neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Song, Ning-Ning; Jia, Yun-Fang; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Qiong; Huang, Ying; Liu, Xiao-Zhen; Hu, Ling; Lan, Wei; Chen, Ling; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Chen, Xiaoyan; Xu, Lin; Ding, Yu-Qiang

    2016-02-03

    Chronic administration of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), which up-regulates central serotonin (5-HT) system function, enhances adult hippocampal neurogenesis. However, the relationship between central 5-HT system and adult neurogenesis has not fully been understood. Here, we report that lowering 5-HT level in adulthood is also able to enhance adult hippocampal neurogenesis. We used tamoxifen (TM)-induced Cre in Pet1-CreER(T2) mice to either deplete central serotonergic (5-HTergic) neurons or inactivate 5-HT synthesis in adulthood and explore the role of central 5-HT in adult hippocampal neurogenesis. A dramatic increase in hippocampal neurogenesis is present in these two central 5-HT-deficient mice and it is largely prevented by administration of agonist for 5-HTR2c receptor. In addition, the survival of new-born neurons in the hippocampus is enhanced. Furthermore, the adult 5-HT-deficient mice showed reduced depression-like behaviors but enhanced contextual fear memory. These findings demonstrate that lowering central 5-HT function in adulthood can also enhance adult hippocampal neurogenesis, thus revealing a new aspect of central 5-HT in regulating adult neurogenesis.

  12. Maternal anxiety and infants' hippocampal development: timing matters

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, A; Rifkin-Graboi, A; Chen, H; Chong, Y-S; Kwek, K; Gluckman, P D; Fortier, M V; Meaney, M J

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to maternal anxiety predicts offspring brain development. However, because children's brains are commonly assessed years after birth, the timing of such maternal influences in humans is unclear. This study aimed to examine the consequences of antenatal and postnatal exposure to maternal anxiety upon early infant development of the hippocampus, a key structure for stress regulation. A total of 175 neonates underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at birth and among them 35 had repeated scans at 6 months of age. Maternal anxiety was assessed using the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) at week 26 of pregnancy and 3 months after delivery. Regression analyses showed that antenatal maternal anxiety did not influence bilateral hippocampal volume at birth. However, children of mothers reporting increased anxiety during pregnancy showed slower growth of both the left and right hippocampus over the first 6 months of life. This effect of antenatal maternal anxiety upon right hippocampal growth became statistically stronger when controlling for postnatal maternal anxiety. Furthermore, a strong positive association between postnatal maternal anxiety and right hippocampal growth was detected, whereas a strong negative association between postnatal maternal anxiety and the left hippocampal volume at 6 months of life was found. Hence, the postnatal growth of bilateral hippocampi shows distinct responses to postnatal maternal anxiety. The size of the left hippocampus during early development is likely to reflect the influence of the exposure to perinatal maternal anxiety, whereas right hippocampal growth is constrained by antenatal maternal anxiety, but enhanced in response to increased postnatal maternal anxiety. PMID:24064710

  13. N-Docosahexaenoylethanolamide promotes development of hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hee-Yong; Moon, Hyun-Seuk; Cao, Dehua; Lee, Jeongrim; Kevala, Karl; Jun, Sang Beom; Lovinger, David M.; Akbar, Mohammed; Huang, Bill X.

    2011-01-01

    DHA (docosahexaenoic acid, C22:6,n−3) has been shown to promote neurite growth and synaptogenesis in embryonic hippocampal neurons, supporting the importance of DHA known for hippocampus-related learning and memory function. In the present study, we demonstrate that DHA metabolism to DEA (N-docosahexaenoylethanolamide) is a significant mechanism for hippocampal neuronal development, contributing to synaptic function. We found that a fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibitor URB597 potentiates DHA-induced neurite growth, synaptogenesis and synaptic protein expression. Active metabolism of DHA to DEA was observed in embryonic day 18 hippocampal neuronal cultures, which was increased further by URB597. Synthetic DEA promoted hippocampal neurite growth and synaptogenesis at substantially lower concentrations in comparison with DHA. DEA-treated neurons increased the expression of synapsins and glutamate receptor subunits and exhibited enhanced glutamatergic synaptic activity, as was the case for DHA. The DEA level in mouse fetal hippocampi was altered according to the maternal dietary supply of n−3 fatty acids, suggesting that DEA formation is a relevant in vivo process responding to the DHA status. In conclusion, DHA metabolism to DEA is a significant biochemical mechanism for neurite growth, synaptogenesis and synaptic protein expression, leading to enhanced glutamatergic synaptic function. The novel DEA-dependent mechanism offers a new molecular insight into hippocampal neurodevelopment and function. PMID:21281269

  14. Lamina-specific synaptic connections of hippocampal neurons in vitro.

    PubMed

    Frotscher, M; Heimrich, B

    1995-03-01

    By using slice cultures as a model, we demonstrate here that different target selectivities exist among the various afferent fibers to the hippocampus. As in intact animals, septohippocampal cholinergic fibers, provided by a slice culture of septum, innervate a co-cultured slice of hippocampus diffusely, that is, without forming distinct layers of termination. As in vivo, the septal cholinergic fibers establish synapses with a variety of target cells. Conversely, fibers from an entorhinal slice co-cultured to a hippocampal slice display their normal laminar specificity. They preferentially terminate in the outer molecular layer of the fascia dentata, thereby selectively contacting peripheral dendrites of the granule cells. This preferential termination on peripheral dendritic segments is remarkable, since these fibers do not have to compete with commissural fibers, hypothalamic fibers, and septal afferents for dendritic space under these culture conditions. Moreover, in triplet cultures in which first two hippocampal slices were co-cultured and then, with a delay of 5 days, an entorhinal slice was added, the fibers from the entorhinal slice and those from the hippocampal culture terminated in their appropriate layers in the hippocampal target culture. However, in this approach the normal sequence of ingrowth of these two afferents was reversed. In normal ontogenetic development, entorhinal afferents arrive in the hippocampus before the commissural fibers. The results show that there are different degrees of target selectivity of hippocampal afferents and that the characteristic lamination of certain afferent fibers in the hippocampus is not determined by their sequential ingrowth during development.

  15. Neurotrophic effects of tianeptine on hippocampal neurons: a proteomic approach.

    PubMed

    Chu, Chin-Chen; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Chen, Kuan-Ting; Shieh, Ja-Ping; Wang, Li-Kai; Shui, Hao-Ai; Ho, Shung-Tai

    2010-02-05

    Tianeptine, an atypical tricyclic antidepressant with unique characteristics, can improve memory and prevent stress-induced hippocampal damage. It has neuroplastic and neurotrophic effects on hippocampal neurons and can prevent dendritic atrophy of the hippocampus in certain pathological conditions. To obtain a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms, we performed a proteomic analysis on tianeptine-treated hippocampal neurons. Primary hippocampal neurons were prepared from fetal Sprague-Dawley rats, eliminating glia cells by addition of cytosine beta-D-arabinofuranoside at day 2 in vitro (DIV2). The neurons were treated with tianeptine (10 microg/mL) or vehicle at DIV3, then harvested at DIV4 or DIV9 for immunocytochemical analysis of, respectively, neurite outgrowth or synapse formation. A proteomics analysis was performed on DIV4 neurons and the data were confirmed by Western blot analysis. Using specific markers, we demonstrated that tianeptine can augment neurite growth and promote synaptic contacts in cultured hippocampal neurons. The proteomics analysis identified 11 differentially expressed proteins, with roles in neurite growth, metabolism of neurotrophic substances, synaptogenesis, and synaptic activity homeostasis. The data shed light on the mechanisms underlying the neurotrophic effect of tianeptine observed in both animal studies and the clinic.

  16. Qualitative and Quantitative Hippocampal MRI Assessments in Intractable Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Paramdeep; Kaur, Rupinderjeet; Saggar, Kavita; Singh, Gagandeep; Kaur, Amarpreet

    2013-01-01

    Aims. To acquire normative data of hippocampal volumes and T2 relaxation times, to evaluate and compare qualitative and quantitative assessments in evaluating hippocampi in patients with different durations of intractable epilepsy, and to propose an imaging protocol based on performance of these techniques. Methods. MRI analysis was done in 50 nonepileptic controls and 30 patients with intractable epilepsy on 1.5T scanner. Visual assessment and hippocampal volumetry were done on oblique coronal IR/T2W and T1W MP-RAGE images, respectively. T2 relaxation times were measured using 16-echo Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill sequence. Volumetric data was normalized for variation in head size between individuals. Patients were divided into temporal (n = 20) and extratemporal (n = 10) groups based on clinical and EEG localization. Results. In controls, right hippocampal volume was slightly more than the left with no effect of age or gender. In TLE patients, hippocampal volumetry provided maximum concordance with EEG. Visual assessment of unilateral pathology concurred well with measured quantitative values but poorly in cases with bilateral pathologies. There were no significant differences of mean values between extratemporal group and controls group. Quantitative techniques detected mild abnormalities, undetected on visual assessment. Conclusions. Quantitative techniques are more sensitive to diagnose bilateral and mild unilateral hippocampal abnormalities. PMID:23984369

  17. Remote semantic memory is impoverished in hippocampal amnesia

    PubMed Central

    Klooster, Nathaniel B.; Duff, Melissa C.

    2015-01-01

    The necessity of the hippocampus for acquiring new semantic concepts is a topic of considerable debate. However, it is generally accepted that any role the hippocampus plays in semantic memory is time limited and that previously acquired information becomes independent of the hippocampus over time. This view, along with intact naming and word-definition matching performance in amnesia, has led to the notion that remote semantic memory is intact in patients with hippocampal amnesia. Motivated by perspectives of word learning as a protracted process where additional features and senses of a word are added over time, and by recent discoveries about the time course of hippocampal contributions to on-line relational processing, reconsolidation, and the flexible integration of information, we revisit the notion that remote semantic memory is intact in amnesia. Using measures of semantic richness and vocabulary depth from psycholinguistics and first and second language-learning studies, we examined how much information is associated with previously acquired, highly familiar words in a group of patients with bilateral hippocampal damage and amnesia. Relative to healthy demographically matched comparison participants and a group of brain-damaged comparison participants, the patients with hippocampal amnesia performed significantly worse on both productive and receptive measures of vocabulary depth and semantic richness. These findings suggest that remote semantic memory is impoverished in patients with hippocampal amnesia and that the hippocampus may play a role in the maintenance and updating of semantic memory beyond its initial acquisition. PMID:26474741

  18. Acute melatonin treatment alters dendritic morphology and circadian clock gene expression in the hippocampus of Siberian hamsters.

    PubMed

    Ikeno, Tomoko; Nelson, Randy J

    2015-02-01

    In the hippocampus of Siberian hamsters, dendritic length and dendritic complexity increase in the CA1 region whereas dendritic spine density decreases in the dentate gyrus region at night. However, the underlying mechanism of the diurnal rhythmicity in hippocampal neuronal remodeling is unknown. In mammals, most daily rhythms in physiology and behaviors are regulated by a network of circadian clocks. The central clock, located in the hypothalamus, controls melatonin secretion at night and melatonin modifies peripheral clocks by altering expression of circadian clock genes. In this study, we examined the effects of acute melatonin treatment on the circadian clock system as well as on morphological changes of hippocampal neurons. Male Siberian hamsters were injected with melatonin in the afternoon; 4 h later, mRNA levels of hypothalamic and hippocampal circadian clock genes and hippocampal neuron dendritic morphology were assessed. In the hypothalamus, melatonin treatment did not alter Period1 and Bmal1 expression. However, melatonin treatment increased both Period1 and Bmal1 expression in the hippocampus, suggesting that melatonin affected molecular oscillations in the hippocampus. Melatonin treatment also induced rapid remodeling of hippocampal neurons; melatonin increased apical dendritic length and dendritic complexity in the CA1 region and reduced the dendritic spine density in the dentate gyrus region. These data suggest that structural changes in hippocampal neurons are regulated by a circadian clock and that melatonin functions as a nighttime signal to coordinate the diurnal rhythm in neuronal remodeling.

  19. Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Geokas, Michael C.

    1972-01-01

    For many decades two types of acute pancreatitis have been recognized: the edematous or interstitial and the hemorrhagic or necrotic. In most cases acute pancreatitis is associated with alcoholism or biliary tract disease. Elevated serum or urinary α-amylase is the most important finding in diagnosis. The presence of methemalbumin in serum and in peritoneal or pleural fluid supports the diagnosis of the hemorrhagic form of the disease in patients with a history and enzyme studies suggestive of pancreatitis. There is no characteristic clinical picture in acute pancreatitis, and its complications are legion. Pancreatic pseudocyst is probably the most common and pancreatic abscess is the most serious complication. The pathogenetic principle is autodigestion, but the precise sequence of biochemical events is unclear, especially the mode of trypsinogen activation and the role of lysosomal hydrolases. A host of metabolic derangements have been identified in acute pancreatitis, involving lipid, glucose, calcium and magnesium metabolism and changes of the blood clotting mechanism, to name but a few. Medical treatment includes intestinal decompression, analgesics, correction of hypovolemia and other supportive and protective measures. Surgical exploration is advisable in selected cases, when the diagnosis is in doubt, and is considered imperative in the presence of certain complications, especially pancreatic abscess. PMID:4559467

  20. Hippocampal and Extrahippocampal Systems Compete for Control of Contextual Fear: Role of Ventral Subiculum and Amygdala

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biedenkapp, Joseph C.; Rudy, Jerry W.

    2009-01-01

    Two neural systems, a hippocampal system and an extrahippocampal system compete for control over contextual fear, and the hippocampal system normally dominates. Our experiments reveal that output provided by the ventral subiculum is critical for the hippocampal system to win this competition. Bilateral electrolytic lesions of the ventral subiculum…

  1. MR-determined hippocampal asymmetry in full-term and preterm neonates.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Deanne K; Wood, Stephen J; Doyle, Lex W; Warfield, Simon K; Egan, Gary F; Inder, Terrie E

    2009-02-01

    Hippocampi are asymmetrical in children and adults, where the right hippocampus is larger. To date, no literature has confirmed that hippocampal asymmetry is evident at birth. Furthermore, gender differences have been observed in normal hippocampal asymmetry, but this has not been examined in neonates. Stress, injury, and lower IQ have been associated with alterations to hippocampal asymmetry. These same factors often accompany preterm birth. Therefore, prematurity is possibly associated with altered hippocampal asymmetry. There were three aims of this study: First, we assessed whether hippocampi were asymmetrical at birth, second whether there was a gender effect on hippocampal asymmetry, and third whether the stress of preterm birth altered hippocampal asymmetry. This study utilized volumetric magnetic resonance imaging to compare left and right hippocampal volumes in 32 full-term and 184 preterm infants at term. Full-term infants demonstrated rightward hippocampal asymmetry, as did preterm infants. In the case of preterm infants, hippocampal asymmetry was proportional to total hemispheric asymmetry. This study is the first to demonstrate that the normal pattern of hippocampal asymmetry is present this early in development. We did not find gender differences in hippocampal asymmetry at term. Preterm infants tended to have less asymmetrical hippocampi than full-term infants, a difference which became significant after correcting for hemispheric brain tissue volumes. This study may suggest that hippocampal asymmetry develops in utero and is maintained into adulthood in infants with a normal neurological course.

  2. Chronic Mild Stress Modulates Activity-Dependent Transcription of BDNF in Rat Hippocampal Slices.

    PubMed

    Molteni, Raffaella; Rossetti, Andrea C; Savino, Elisa; Racagni, Giorgio; Calabrese, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    Although activity-dependent transcription represents a crucial mechanism for long-lasting experience-dependent changes in the hippocampus, limited data exist on its contribution to pathological conditions. We aim to investigate the influence of chronic stress on the activity-dependent transcription of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). The ex vivo methodology of acute stimulation of hippocampal slices obtained from rats exposed to chronic mild stress (CMS) was used to evaluate whether the adverse experience may alter activity-dependent BDNF gene expression. CMS reduces BDNF expression and that acute depolarization significantly upregulates total BDNF mRNA levels only in control animals, showing that CMS exposure may alter BDNF transcription under basal conditions and during neuronal activation. Moreover, while the basal effect of CMS on total BDNF reflects parallel modulations of all the transcripts examined, isoform-specific changes were found after depolarization. This different effect was also observed in the activation of intracellular signaling pathways related to the neurotrophin. In conclusion, our study discloses a functional alteration of BDNF transcription as a consequence of stress. Being the activity-regulated transcription a critical process in synaptic and neuronal plasticity, the different regulation of individual BDNF promoters may contribute to long-lasting changes, which are fundamental for the vulnerability of the hippocampus to stress-related diseases.

  3. Chronic lamotrigine treatment increases rat hippocampal GABA shunt activity and elevates cerebral taurine levels.

    PubMed

    Hassel, B; Taubøll, E; Gjerstad, L

    2001-02-01

    The mechanism of action of the antiepileptic drug lamotrigine has previously been investigated only in acute experiments and is thought to involve inhibition of voltage-dependent sodium channels. However, lamotrigine is effective against more forms of epilepsies than other antiepileptic drugs that also inhibit sodium channels. We investigated whether chronic lamotrigine treatment may affect cerebral amino acid levels. Rats received lamotrigine, 10 mg/kg/day, for 90 days. The hippocampal level of GABA increased 25%, and the activities of glutamate decarboxylase and succinic semialdehyde/GABA transaminase increased 12 and 21% (p< 0.05), respectively, indicating increased GABA turnover. The uptake of GABA and glutamate into proteoliposomes remained unaltered. The level of taurine increased 27% in the hippocampus and 16% in the frontal and parietal cortices. The activities of hexokinase and alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase, remained at control values. Serum lamotrigine was 41.7+/-1.5 microM (mean+/-S.E.M.), which is within the range seen in epileptic patients. Acute experiments with 5, 20 or 100 mg lamotrigine/kg, caused no changes in brain amino acid levels. The results suggest that chronic lamotrigine treatment increases GABAergic activity in the hippocampus. The cerebral increase in taurine, which has neuromodulatory properties, may contribute to the antiepileptic effect of lamotrigine.

  4. Retrieval induces hippocampal-dependent reconsolidation of spatial memory

    PubMed Central

    Rossato, Janine I.; Bevilaqua, Lia R.M.; Medina, Jorge H.; Izquierdo, Iván; Cammarota, Martín

    2006-01-01

    Nonreinforced retrieval can cause extinction and/or reconsolidation, two processes that affect subsequent retrieval in opposite ways. Using the Morris water maze task we show that, in the rat, repeated nonreinforced expression of spatial memory causes extinction, which is unaffected by inhibition of protein synthesis within the CA1 region of the dorsal hippocampus. However, if the number of nonreinforced retrieval trials is insufficient to induce long-lasting extinction, then a hippocampal protein synthesis-dependent reconsolidation process recovers the original memory. Inhibition of hippocampal protein synthesis after reversal learning sessions impairs retention of the reversed preference and blocks persistence of the original one, suggesting that reversal learning involves reconsolidation rather than extinction of the original memory. Our results suggest the existence of a hippocampal protein synthesis-dependent reconsolidation process that operates to recover or update retrieval-weakened memories from incomplete extinction. PMID:16882860

  5. VTA neurons coordinate with the hippocampal reactivation of spatial experience

    PubMed Central

    Gomperts, Stephen N; Kloosterman, Fabian; Wilson, Matthew A

    2015-01-01

    Spatial learning requires the hippocampus, and the replay of spatial sequences during hippocampal sharp wave-ripple (SPW-R) events of quiet wakefulness and sleep is believed to play a crucial role. To test whether the coordination of VTA reward prediction error signals with these replayed spatial sequences could contribute to this process, we recorded from neuronal ensembles of the hippocampus and VTA as rats performed appetitive spatial tasks and subsequently slept. We found that many reward responsive (RR) VTA neurons coordinated with quiet wakefulness-associated hippocampal SPW-R events that replayed recent experience. In contrast, coordination between RR neurons and SPW-R events in subsequent slow wave sleep was diminished. Together, these results indicate distinct contributions of VTA reinforcement activity associated with hippocampal spatial replay to the processing of wake and SWS-associated spatial memory. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05360.001 PMID:26465113

  6. Unstable periodic orbits in human epileptic hippocampal slices.

    PubMed

    Pen-Ning Yu; Min-Chi Hsiao; Dong Song; Liu, Charles Y; Heck, Christi N; Millett, David; Berger, Theodore W

    2014-01-01

    Inter-ictal activity is studied in hippocampal slices resected from patients with epilepsy using local field potential recording. Inter-ictal activity in the dentate gyrus (DG) is induced by high-potassium (8 mM), low-magnesium (0.25 mM) aCSF with additional 100 μM 4-aminopyridine(4-AP). The dynamics of the inter-ictal activity is investigated by developing the first return map with inter-pulse intervals. Unstable periodic orbits (UPOs) are detected in the hippocampal slice at the DG area according to both the topological recurrence method and the periodic orbit transform method. Surrogate analysis suggests the presence of UPOs in hippocampal slices from patients with epilepsy. This finding also suggests that inter-ictal activity is a chaotic system and will allow us to apply chaos control techniques to manipulate inter-ictal activity.

  7. Smaller hippocampal volume predicts pathologic vulnerability to psychological trauma

    PubMed Central

    Gilbertson, Mark W.; Shenton, Martha E.; Ciszewski, Aleksandra; Kasai, Kiyoto; Lasko, Natasha B.; Orr, Scott P.; Pitman, Roger K.

    2010-01-01

    In animals, exposure to severe stress can damage the hippocampus. Recent human studies show smaller hippocampal volume in individuals with the stress-related psychiatric condition posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Does this represent the neurotoxic effect of trauma, or is smaller hippocampal volume a pre-existing condition that renders the brain more vulnerable to the development of pathological stress responses? In monozygotic twins discordant for trauma exposure, we found evidence that smaller hippocampi indeed constitute a risk factor for the development of stress-related psychopathology. Disorder severity in PTSD patients who were exposed to trauma was negatively correlated with the hippocampal volume of both the patients and the patients’ trauma-unexposed identical co-twin. Furthermore, severe PTSD twin pairs—both the trauma-exposed and unexposed members—had significantly smaller hipp