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Sample records for acyl binding pocket

  1. A covalent adduct of MbtN, an acyl-ACP dehydrogenase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, reveals an unusual acyl-binding pocket.

    PubMed

    Chai, Ai-Fen; Bulloch, Esther M M; Evans, Genevieve L; Lott, J Shaun; Baker, Edward N; Johnston, Jodie M

    2015-04-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is the causative agent of tuberculosis. Access to iron in host macrophages depends on iron-chelating siderophores called mycobactins and is strongly correlated with Mtb virulence. Here, the crystal structure of an Mtb enzyme involved in mycobactin biosynthesis, MbtN, in complex with its FAD cofactor is presented at 2.30 Å resolution. The polypeptide fold of MbtN conforms to that of the acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (ACAD) family, consistent with its predicted role of introducing a double bond into the acyl chain of mycobactin. Structural comparisons and the presence of an acyl carrier protein, MbtL, in the same gene locus suggest that MbtN acts on an acyl-(acyl carrier protein) rather than an acyl-CoA. A notable feature of the crystal structure is the tubular density projecting from N(5) of FAD. This was interpreted as a covalently bound polyethylene glycol (PEG) fragment and resides in a hydrophobic pocket where the substrate acyl group is likely to bind. The pocket could accommodate an acyl chain of 14-21 C atoms, consistent with the expected length of the mycobactin acyl chain. Supporting this, steady-state kinetics show that MbtN has ACAD activity, preferring acyl chains of at least 16 C atoms. The acyl-binding pocket adopts a different orientation (relative to the FAD) to other structurally characterized ACADs. This difference may be correlated with the apparent ability of MbtN to catalyse the formation of an unusual cis double bond in the mycobactin acyl chain.

  2. Protein Binding Pocket Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Stank, Antonia; Kokh, Daria B; Fuller, Jonathan C; Wade, Rebecca C

    2016-05-17

    The dynamics of protein binding pockets are crucial for their interaction specificity. Structural flexibility allows proteins to adapt to their individual molecular binding partners and facilitates the binding process. This implies the necessity to consider protein internal motion in determining and predicting binding properties and in designing new binders. Although accounting for protein dynamics presents a challenge for computational approaches, it expands the structural and physicochemical space for compound design and thus offers the prospect of improved binding specificity and selectivity. A cavity on the surface or in the interior of a protein that possesses suitable properties for binding a ligand is usually referred to as a binding pocket. The set of amino acid residues around a binding pocket determines its physicochemical characteristics and, together with its shape and location in a protein, defines its functionality. Residues outside the binding site can also have a long-range effect on the properties of the binding pocket. Cavities with similar functionalities are often conserved across protein families. For example, enzyme active sites are usually concave surfaces that present amino acid residues in a suitable configuration for binding low molecular weight compounds. Macromolecular binding pockets, on the other hand, are located on the protein surface and are often shallower. The mobility of proteins allows the opening, closing, and adaptation of binding pockets to regulate binding processes and specific protein functionalities. For example, channels and tunnels can exist permanently or transiently to transport compounds to and from a binding site. The influence of protein flexibility on binding pockets can vary from small changes to an already existent pocket to the formation of a completely new pocket. Here, we review recent developments in computational methods to detect and define binding pockets and to study pocket dynamics. We introduce five

  3. Protein Binding Pocket Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Stank, Antonia; Kokh, Daria B; Fuller, Jonathan C; Wade, Rebecca C

    2016-05-17

    The dynamics of protein binding pockets are crucial for their interaction specificity. Structural flexibility allows proteins to adapt to their individual molecular binding partners and facilitates the binding process. This implies the necessity to consider protein internal motion in determining and predicting binding properties and in designing new binders. Although accounting for protein dynamics presents a challenge for computational approaches, it expands the structural and physicochemical space for compound design and thus offers the prospect of improved binding specificity and selectivity. A cavity on the surface or in the interior of a protein that possesses suitable properties for binding a ligand is usually referred to as a binding pocket. The set of amino acid residues around a binding pocket determines its physicochemical characteristics and, together with its shape and location in a protein, defines its functionality. Residues outside the binding site can also have a long-range effect on the properties of the binding pocket. Cavities with similar functionalities are often conserved across protein families. For example, enzyme active sites are usually concave surfaces that present amino acid residues in a suitable configuration for binding low molecular weight compounds. Macromolecular binding pockets, on the other hand, are located on the protein surface and are often shallower. The mobility of proteins allows the opening, closing, and adaptation of binding pockets to regulate binding processes and specific protein functionalities. For example, channels and tunnels can exist permanently or transiently to transport compounds to and from a binding site. The influence of protein flexibility on binding pockets can vary from small changes to an already existent pocket to the formation of a completely new pocket. Here, we review recent developments in computational methods to detect and define binding pockets and to study pocket dynamics. We introduce five

  4. Architectural repertoire of ligand-binding pockets on protein surfaces.

    PubMed

    Weisel, Martin; Kriegl, Jan M; Schneider, Gisbert

    2010-03-01

    Knowledge of the three-dimensional structure of ligand binding sites in proteins provides valuable information for computer-assisted drug design. We present a method for the automated extraction and classification of ligand binding site topologies, in which protein surface cavities are represented as branched frameworks. The procedure employs a growing neural gas approach for pocket topology assignment and pocket framework generation. We assessed the structural diversity of 623 known ligand binding site topologies based on framework cluster analysis. At a resolution of 5 A only 23 structurally distinct topology groups were formed; this suggests an overall limited structural diversity of ligand-accommodating protein cavities. Higher resolution allowed for identification of protein-family specific pocket features. Pocket frameworks highlight potentially preferred modes of ligand-receptor interactions and will help facilitate the identification of druggable subpockets suitable for ligand affinity and selectivity optimization. PMID:20069621

  5. Modulation of FadR Binding Capacity for Acyl-CoA Fatty Acids Through Structure-Guided Mutagenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Bacik, John-Paul; Yeager, Chris M.; Twary, Scott N.; Martí-Arbona, Ricardo

    2015-09-18

    FadR is a versatile global regulator in Escherichia coli that controls fatty acid metabolism and thereby modulates the ability of this bacterium to grow using fatty acids or acetate as the sole carbon source. FadR regulates fatty acid metabolism in response to intra-cellular concentrations of acyl-CoA lipids. The ability of FadR to bind acyl-CoA fatty acids is hence of significant interest for the engineering of biosynthetic pathways for the production of lipid-based biofuels and commodity chemicals. Based on the available crystal structure of E. coli bound to myristoyl- CoA, we predicted amino acid positions within the effector binding pocket that would alter the ability of FadR to bind acyl-CoA fatty acids without affecting DNA binding. We utilized fluorescence polarization to characterize the in-vitro binding properties of wild type and mutant FadR. We found that a Leu102Ala mutant enhanced binding of the effector, likely by increasing the size of the binding pocket for the acyl moiety of the molecule. Conversely, the elimination of the guanidine side chain (Arg213Ala and Arg213Met mutants) of the CoA moiety binding site severely diminished the ability of FadR to bind the acyl-CoA effector. These results demonstrate the ability to fine tune FadR binding capacity. The validation of an efficient method to fully characterize all the binding events involved in the specific activity (effector and DNA operator binding) of FadR has allowed us to increase our understanding of the role of specific amino acids in the binding and recognition of acyl-CoA fatty acids and will greatly facilitate efforts aimed at engineering tunable FadR regulators for synthetic biology.

  6. Modulation of FadR Binding Capacity for Acyl-CoA Fatty Acids Through Structure-Guided Mutagenesis

    DOE PAGES

    Bacik, John-Paul; Yeager, Chris M.; Twary, Scott N.; Martí-Arbona, Ricardo

    2015-09-18

    FadR is a versatile global regulator in Escherichia coli that controls fatty acid metabolism and thereby modulates the ability of this bacterium to grow using fatty acids or acetate as the sole carbon source. FadR regulates fatty acid metabolism in response to intra-cellular concentrations of acyl-CoA lipids. The ability of FadR to bind acyl-CoA fatty acids is hence of significant interest for the engineering of biosynthetic pathways for the production of lipid-based biofuels and commodity chemicals. Based on the available crystal structure of E. coli bound to myristoyl- CoA, we predicted amino acid positions within the effector binding pocket thatmore » would alter the ability of FadR to bind acyl-CoA fatty acids without affecting DNA binding. We utilized fluorescence polarization to characterize the in-vitro binding properties of wild type and mutant FadR. We found that a Leu102Ala mutant enhanced binding of the effector, likely by increasing the size of the binding pocket for the acyl moiety of the molecule. Conversely, the elimination of the guanidine side chain (Arg213Ala and Arg213Met mutants) of the CoA moiety binding site severely diminished the ability of FadR to bind the acyl-CoA effector. These results demonstrate the ability to fine tune FadR binding capacity. The validation of an efficient method to fully characterize all the binding events involved in the specific activity (effector and DNA operator binding) of FadR has allowed us to increase our understanding of the role of specific amino acids in the binding and recognition of acyl-CoA fatty acids and will greatly facilitate efforts aimed at engineering tunable FadR regulators for synthetic biology.« less

  7. Modulation of FadR binding capacity for acyl-CoA fatty acids through structure-guided mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Bacik, John-Paul; Yeager, Chris M; Twary, Scott N; Martí-Arbona, Ricardo

    2015-10-01

    FadR is a versatile global regulator in Escherichia coli that controls fatty acid metabolism and thereby modulates the ability of this bacterium to grow using fatty acids or acetate as the sole carbon source. FadR regulates fatty acid metabolism in response to intra-cellular concentrations of acyl-CoA lipids. The ability of FadR to bind acyl-CoA fatty acids is thus of significant interest for the engineering of biosynthetic pathways for the production of lipid-based biofuels and commodity chemicals. Based on the available crystal structure of E. coli bound to myristoyl-CoA, we predicted amino acid positions within the effector binding pocket that would alter the ability of FadR to bind acyl-CoA fatty acids without affecting DNA binding. We utilized fluorescence polarization to characterize the in vitro binding properties of wild type and mutant FadR. We found that a Leu102Ala mutant enhanced binding of the effector, likely by increasing the size of the binding pocket for the acyl moiety of the molecule. Conversely, the elimination of the guanidine side chain (Arg213Ala and Arg213Met mutants) of the CoA moiety binding site severely diminished the ability of FadR to bind the acyl-CoA effector. These results demonstrate the ability to fine tune FadR binding capacity. The validation of an efficient method to fully characterize all the binding events involved in the specific activity (effector and DNA operator binding) of FadR has allowed us to increase our understanding of the role of specific amino acids in the binding and recognition of acyl-CoA fatty acids and will greatly facilitate efforts aimed at engineering tunable FadR regulators for synthetic biology. PMID:26385696

  8. Perturbation Approaches for Exploring Protein Binding Site Flexibility to Predict Transient Binding Pockets.

    PubMed

    Kokh, Daria B; Czodrowski, Paul; Rippmann, Friedrich; Wade, Rebecca C

    2016-08-01

    Simulations of the long-time scale motions of a ligand binding pocket in a protein may open up new perspectives for the design of compounds with steric or chemical properties differing from those of known binders. However, slow motions of proteins are difficult to access using standard molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and are thus usually neglected in computational drug design. Here, we introduce two nonequilibrium MD approaches to identify conformational changes of a binding site and detect transient pockets associated with these motions. The methods proposed are based on the rotamerically induced perturbation (RIP) MD approach, which employs perturbation of side-chain torsional motion for initiating large-scale protein movement. The first approach, Langevin-RIP (L-RIP), entails a series of short Langevin MD simulations, each starting with perturbation of one of the side-chains lining the binding site of interest. L-RIP provides extensive sampling of conformational changes of the binding site. In less than 1 ns of MD simulation with L-RIP, we observed distortions of the α-helix in the ATP binding site of HSP90 and flipping of the DFG loop in Src kinase. In the second approach, RIPlig, a perturbation is applied to a pseudoligand placed in different parts of a binding pocket, which enables flexible regions of the binding site to be identified in a small number of 10 ps MD simulations. The methods were evaluated for four test proteins displaying different types and degrees of binding site flexibility. Both methods reveal all transient pocket regions in less than a total of 10 ns of simulations, even though many of these regions remained closed in 100 ns conventional MD. The proposed methods provide computationally efficient tools to explore binding site flexibility and can aid in the functional characterization of protein pockets, and the identification of transient pockets for ligand design. PMID:27399277

  9. Perturbation Approaches for Exploring Protein Binding Site Flexibility to Predict Transient Binding Pockets.

    PubMed

    Kokh, Daria B; Czodrowski, Paul; Rippmann, Friedrich; Wade, Rebecca C

    2016-08-01

    Simulations of the long-time scale motions of a ligand binding pocket in a protein may open up new perspectives for the design of compounds with steric or chemical properties differing from those of known binders. However, slow motions of proteins are difficult to access using standard molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and are thus usually neglected in computational drug design. Here, we introduce two nonequilibrium MD approaches to identify conformational changes of a binding site and detect transient pockets associated with these motions. The methods proposed are based on the rotamerically induced perturbation (RIP) MD approach, which employs perturbation of side-chain torsional motion for initiating large-scale protein movement. The first approach, Langevin-RIP (L-RIP), entails a series of short Langevin MD simulations, each starting with perturbation of one of the side-chains lining the binding site of interest. L-RIP provides extensive sampling of conformational changes of the binding site. In less than 1 ns of MD simulation with L-RIP, we observed distortions of the α-helix in the ATP binding site of HSP90 and flipping of the DFG loop in Src kinase. In the second approach, RIPlig, a perturbation is applied to a pseudoligand placed in different parts of a binding pocket, which enables flexible regions of the binding site to be identified in a small number of 10 ps MD simulations. The methods were evaluated for four test proteins displaying different types and degrees of binding site flexibility. Both methods reveal all transient pocket regions in less than a total of 10 ns of simulations, even though many of these regions remained closed in 100 ns conventional MD. The proposed methods provide computationally efficient tools to explore binding site flexibility and can aid in the functional characterization of protein pockets, and the identification of transient pockets for ligand design.

  10. Profiling Protein Kinases and Other ATP Binding Proteins in Arabidopsis Using Acyl-ATP Probes*

    PubMed Central

    Villamor, Joji Grace; Kaschani, Farnusch; Colby, Tom; Oeljeklaus, Julian; Zhao, David; Kaiser, Markus; Patricelli, Matthew P.; van der Hoorn, Renier A. L.

    2013-01-01

    Many protein activities are driven by ATP binding and hydrolysis. Here, we explore the ATP binding proteome of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana using acyl-ATP (AcATP)1 probes. These probes target ATP binding sites and covalently label lysine residues in the ATP binding pocket. Gel-based profiling using biotinylated AcATP showed that labeling is dependent on pH and divalent ions and can be competed by nucleotides. The vast majority of these AcATP-labeled proteins are known ATP binding proteins. Our search for labeled peptides upon in-gel digest led to the discovery that the biotin moiety of the labeled peptides is oxidized. The in-gel analysis displayed kinase domains of two receptor-like kinases (RLKs) at a lower than expected molecular weight, indicating that these RLKs lost the extracellular domain, possibly as a result of receptor shedding. Analysis of modified peptides using a gel-free platform identified 242 different labeling sites for AcATP in the Arabidopsis proteome. Examination of each individual labeling site revealed a preference of labeling in ATP binding pockets for a broad diversity of ATP binding proteins. Of these, 24 labeled peptides were from a diverse range of protein kinases, including RLKs, mitogen-activated protein kinases, and calcium-dependent kinases. A significant portion of the labeling sites could not be assigned to known nucleotide binding sites. However, the fact that labeling could be competed with ATP indicates that these labeling sites might represent previously uncharacterized nucleotide binding sites. A plot of spectral counts against expression levels illustrates the high specificity of AcATP probes for protein kinases and known ATP binding proteins. This work introduces profiling of ATP binding activities of a large diversity of proteins in plant proteomes. The data have been deposited in ProteomeXchange with the identifier PXD000188. PMID:23722185

  11. Acyl-CoA-Binding Proteins (ACBPs) in Plant Development.

    PubMed

    Lung, Shiu-Cheung; Chye, Mee-Len

    2016-01-01

    Acyl-CoA-binding proteins (ACBPs) play a pivotal role in fatty acid metabolism because they can transport medium- and long-chain acyl-CoA esters. In eukaryotic cells, ACBPs are involved in intracellular trafficking of acyl-CoA esters and formation of a cytosolic acyl-CoA pool. In addition to these ubiquitous functions, more specific non-redundant roles of plant ACBP subclasses are implicated by the existence of multigene families with variable molecular masses, ligand specificities, functional domains (e.g. protein-protein interaction domains), subcellular locations and gene expression patterns. In this chapter, recent progress in the characterization of ACBPs from the model dicot plant, Arabidopsis thaliana, and the model monocot, Oryza sativa, and their emerging roles in plant growth and development are discussed. The functional significance of respective members of the plant ACBP families in various developmental and physiological processes such as seed development and germination, stem cuticle formation, pollen development, leaf senescence, peroxisomal fatty acid β-oxidation and phloem-mediated lipid transport is highlighted.

  12. Acyl-CoA-Binding Proteins (ACBPs) in Plant Development.

    PubMed

    Lung, Shiu-Cheung; Chye, Mee-Len

    2016-01-01

    Acyl-CoA-binding proteins (ACBPs) play a pivotal role in fatty acid metabolism because they can transport medium- and long-chain acyl-CoA esters. In eukaryotic cells, ACBPs are involved in intracellular trafficking of acyl-CoA esters and formation of a cytosolic acyl-CoA pool. In addition to these ubiquitous functions, more specific non-redundant roles of plant ACBP subclasses are implicated by the existence of multigene families with variable molecular masses, ligand specificities, functional domains (e.g. protein-protein interaction domains), subcellular locations and gene expression patterns. In this chapter, recent progress in the characterization of ACBPs from the model dicot plant, Arabidopsis thaliana, and the model monocot, Oryza sativa, and their emerging roles in plant growth and development are discussed. The functional significance of respective members of the plant ACBP families in various developmental and physiological processes such as seed development and germination, stem cuticle formation, pollen development, leaf senescence, peroxisomal fatty acid β-oxidation and phloem-mediated lipid transport is highlighted. PMID:27023243

  13. Dewetting-Controlled Binding of Ligands to Hydrophobic Pockets

    PubMed Central

    Setny, P.; Wang, Z.; Cheng, L.-T.; Li, B.; McCammon, J. A.; Dzubiella, J.

    2010-01-01

    We report on a combined atomistic molecular dynamics simulation and implicit solvent analysis of a generic hydrophobic pocket-ligand (host-guest) system. The approaching ligand induces complex wetting-dewetting transitions in the weakly solvated pocket. The transitions lead to bimodal solvent fluctuations which govern magnitude and range of the pocket-ligand attraction. A recently developed implicit water model, based on the minimization of a geometric functional, captures the sensitive aqueous interface response to the concave-convex pocket-ligand configuration semiquantitatively. PMID:19905832

  14. Anatomy of protein pockets and cavities: measurement of binding site geometry and implications for ligand design.

    PubMed Central

    Liang, J.; Edelsbrunner, H.; Woodward, C.

    1998-01-01

    Identification and size characterization of surface pockets and occluded cavities are initial steps in protein structure-based ligand design. A new program, CAST, for automatically locating and measuring protein pockets and cavities, is based on precise computational geometry methods, including alpha shape and discrete flow theory. CAST identifies and measures pockets and pocket mouth openings, as well as cavities. The program specifies the atoms lining pockets, pocket openings, and buried cavities; the volume and area of pockets and cavities; and the area and circumference of mouth openings. CAST analysis of over 100 proteins has been carried out; proteins examined include a set of 51 monomeric enzyme-ligand structures, several elastase-inhibitor complexes, the FK506 binding protein, 30 HIV-1 protease-inhibitor complexes, and a number of small and large protein inhibitors. Medium-sized globular proteins typically have 10-20 pockets/cavities. Most often, binding sites are pockets with 1-2 mouth openings; much less frequently they are cavities. Ligand binding pockets vary widely in size, most within the range 10(2)-10(3)A3. Statistical analysis reveals that the number of pockets and cavities is correlated with protein size, but there is no correlation between the size of the protein and the size of binding sites. Most frequently, the largest pocket/cavity is the active site, but there are a number of instructive exceptions. Ligand volume and binding site volume are somewhat correlated when binding site volume is < or =700 A3, but the ligand seldom occupies the entire site. Auxiliary pockets near the active site have been suggested as additional binding surface for designed ligands (Mattos C et al., 1994, Nat Struct Biol 1:55-58). Analysis of elastase-inhibitor complexes suggests that CAST can identify ancillary pockets suitable for recruitment in ligand design strategies. Analysis of the FK506 binding protein, and of compounds developed in SAR by NMR (Shuker SB et

  15. Predicting peptide binding to MHC pockets via molecular modeling, implicit solvation, and global optimization.

    PubMed

    Schafroth, Heather D; Floudas, Christodoulos A

    2004-02-15

    Development of a computational prediction method based on molecular modeling, global optimization, and implicit solvation has produced accurate structure and relative binding affinity predictions for peptide amino acids binding to five pockets of the MHC molecule HLA-DRB1*0101. Because peptide binding to MHC molecules is essential to many immune responses, development of such a method for understanding and predicting the forces that drive binding is crucial for pharmaceutical design and disease treatment. Underlying the development of this prediction method are two hypotheses. The first is that pockets formed by the peptide binding groove of MHC molecules are independent, separating the prediction of peptide amino acids that bind within individual pockets from those that bind between pockets. The second hypothesis is that the native state of a system composed of an amino acid bound to a protein pocket corresponds to the system's lowest free energy. The prediction method developed from these hypotheses uses atomistic-level modeling, deterministic global optimization, and three methods of implicit solvation: solvent-accessible area, solvent-accessible volume, and Poisson-Boltzmann electrostatics. The method predicts relative binding affinities of peptide amino acids for pockets of HLA-DRB1*0101 by determining computationally an amino acid's global minimum energy conformation. Prediction results from the method are in agreement with X-ray crystallography data and experimental binding assays.

  16. Small-molecule inhibitor binding to an N-acyl-homoserine lactone synthase.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jiwoung; Goo, Eunhye; Yu, Sangheon; Choi, Okhee; Lee, Jeehyun; Kim, Jinwoo; Kim, Hongsup; Igarashi, Jun; Suga, Hiroaki; Moon, Jae Sun; Hwang, Ingyu; Rhee, Sangkee

    2011-07-19

    Quorum sensing (QS) controls certain behaviors of bacteria in response to population density. In gram-negative bacteria, QS is often mediated by N-acyl-L-homoserine lactones (acyl-HSLs). Because QS influences the virulence of many pathogenic bacteria, synthetic inhibitors of acyl-HSL synthases might be useful therapeutically for controlling pathogens. However, rational design of a potent QS antagonist has been thwarted by the lack of information concerning the binding interactions between acyl-HSL synthases and their ligands. In the gram-negative bacterium Burkholderia glumae, QS controls virulence, motility, and protein secretion and is mediated by the binding of N-octanoyl-L-HSL (C8-HSL) to its cognate receptor, TofR. C8-HSL is synthesized by the acyl-HSL synthase TofI. In this study, we characterized two previously unknown QS inhibitors identified in a focused library of acyl-HSL analogs. Our functional and X-ray crystal structure analyses show that the first inhibitor, J8-C8, binds to TofI, occupying the binding site for the acyl chain of the TofI cognate substrate, acylated acyl-carrier protein. Moreover, the reaction byproduct, 5'-methylthioadenosine, independently binds to the binding site for a second substrate, S-adenosyl-L-methionine. Closer inspection of the mode of J8-C8 binding to TofI provides a likely molecular basis for the various substrate specificities of acyl-HSL synthases. The second inhibitor, E9C-3oxoC6, competitively inhibits C8-HSL binding to TofR. Our analysis of the binding of an inhibitor and a reaction byproduct to an acyl-HSL synthase may facilitate the design of a new class of QS-inhibiting therapeutic agents.

  17. A phosphate-binding pocket within the platform-PAZ-connector helix cassette of human Dicer.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yuan; Simanshu, Dhirendra K; Ma, Jin-Biao; Park, Jong-Eun; Heo, Inha; Kim, V Narry; Patel, Dinshaw J

    2014-02-20

    We have solved two families of crystal structures of the human Dicer "platform-PAZ-connector helix" cassette in complex with small interfering RNAs (siRNAs). The structures possess two adjacently positioned pockets: a 2 nt 3'-overhang-binding pocket within the PAZ domain (3' pocket) and a phosphate-binding pocket within the platform domain (phosphate pocket). One family of complexes contains a knob-like α-helical protrusion, designated "hDicer-specific helix," that separates the two pockets and orients the bound siRNA away from the surface of Dicer, which could be indicative of a product release/transfer state. In the second complex, the helical protrusion is melted/disordered and the bound siRNA is aligned toward the surface of Dicer, suggestive of a cleavage-competent state. These structures allow us to propose that the transition from the cleavage-competent to the postulated product release/transfer state may involve release of the 5'-phosphate from the phosphate pocket while retaining the 3' overhang in the 3' pocket.

  18. Doubling the Size of the Glucocorticoid Receptor Ligand Binding Pocket by Deacylcortivazol

    SciTech Connect

    Suino-Powell, Kelly; Xu, Yong; Zhang, Chenghai; Tao, Yong-guang; Tolbert, W. David; Simons, Jr., S. Stoney; Xu, H. Eric

    2010-03-08

    A common feature of nuclear receptor ligand binding domains (LBD) is a helical sandwich fold that nests a ligand binding pocket within the bottom half of the domain. Here we report that the ligand pocket of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) can be continuously extended into the top half of the LBD by binding to deacylcortivazol (DAC), an extremely potent glucocorticoid. It has been puzzling for decades why DAC, which contains a phenylpyrazole replacement at the conserved 3-ketone of steroid hormones that are normally required for activation of their cognate receptors, is a potent GR activator. The crystal structure of the GR LBD bound to DAC and the fourth LXXLL motif of steroid receptor coactivator 1 reveals that the GR ligand binding pocket is expanded to a size of 1,070 {angstrom}{sup 3}, effectively doubling the size of the GR dexamethasone-binding pocket of 540 {angstrom}{sup 3} and yet leaving the structure of the coactivator binding site intact. DAC occupies only {approx}50% of the space of the pocket but makes intricate interactions with the receptor around the phenylpyrazole group that accounts for the high-affinity binding of DAC. The dramatic expansion of the DAC-binding pocket thus highlights the conformational adaptability of GR to ligand binding. The new structure also allows docking of various nonsteroidal ligands that cannot be fitted into the previous structures, thus providing a new rational template for drug discovery of steroidal and nonsteroidal glucocorticoids that can be specifically designed to reach the unoccupied space of the expanded pocket.

  19. Identification of ligand-binding pockets in proteins using residue preference methods.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Zhijun; Wang, Xicheng

    2009-01-01

    Identification of ligand-binding pockets in proteins is pivotal to protein function definition and drug discovery. In this study, we focus on determining the binding pockets in proteins for potential ligands without any a priori knowledge. Three methods based upon residue preference concept are proposed to predict ligand-binding pockets, where we deal with three types of residue preference (residue based, atom based and atom-contact-pair based preference), respectively. Two test sets were chosen to examine the proposed methods. Two different identification rules (named Top1 and Top2) are used to detect ligand-binding pockets. The results show that the atom-contact-pair method has good accuracy and high efficiency, better than the other two methods. By means of preference analysis for amino acids and atom-contact-pairs, we find that Gly and atom-contact-pairs on aromatic residues appear at ligand-binding pockets more frequently. The former favors pocket flexibility, and the latter shows that aggregate hydrophobic surface may play an important role in complex formation.

  20. Identification of ligand-binding pockets in proteins using residue preference methods.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Zhijun; Wang, Xicheng

    2009-01-01

    Identification of ligand-binding pockets in proteins is pivotal to protein function definition and drug discovery. In this study, we focus on determining the binding pockets in proteins for potential ligands without any a priori knowledge. Three methods based upon residue preference concept are proposed to predict ligand-binding pockets, where we deal with three types of residue preference (residue based, atom based and atom-contact-pair based preference), respectively. Two test sets were chosen to examine the proposed methods. Two different identification rules (named Top1 and Top2) are used to detect ligand-binding pockets. The results show that the atom-contact-pair method has good accuracy and high efficiency, better than the other two methods. By means of preference analysis for amino acids and atom-contact-pairs, we find that Gly and atom-contact-pairs on aromatic residues appear at ligand-binding pockets more frequently. The former favors pocket flexibility, and the latter shows that aggregate hydrophobic surface may play an important role in complex formation. PMID:19689426

  1. Competitive Binding of a Benzimidazole to the Histone-Binding Pocket of the Pygo PHD Finger

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The Pygo-BCL9 complex is a chromatin reader, facilitating β-catenin-mediated oncogenesis, and is thus emerging as a potential therapeutic target for cancer. Its function relies on two ligand-binding surfaces of Pygo’s PHD finger that anchor the histone H3 tail methylated at lysine 4 (H3K4me) with assistance from the BCL9 HD1 domain. Here, we report the first use of fragment-based screening by NMR to identify small molecules that block protein–protein interactions by a PHD finger. This led to the discovery of a set of benzothiazoles that bind to a cleft emanating from the PHD–HD1 interface, as defined by X-ray crystallography. Furthermore, we discovered a benzimidazole that docks into the H3K4me specificity pocket and displaces the native H3K4me peptide from the PHD finger. Our study demonstrates the ligandability of the Pygo–BCL9 complex and uncovers a privileged scaffold as a template for future development of lead inhibitors of oncogenesis. PMID:25323450

  2. The O(2) binding pocket of myohemerythrin: role of a conserved leucine.

    PubMed

    Xiong, J; Phillips, R S; Kurtz, D M; Jin, S; Ai, J; Sanders-Loehr, J

    2000-07-25

    A conserved O(2) binding pocket residue in Phascolopsis gouldii myohemerythrin (myoHr), namely, L104, was mutated to several other residues, and the effects on O(2) association and dissociation rates, O(2) affinity, and autoxidation were examined. The L104V, -F, and -Y myoHrs formed stable O(2) adducts whose UV-vis and resonance Raman spectra closely matched those of wild-type oxymyoHr. The L104V mutation produced only minimal effects on either O(2) association or dissociation, whereas the L104F and -Y mutations resulted in 100-300-fold decreases in both O(2) association and dissociation rates. These decreases are attributed to introduction of steric restrictions into the O(2) binding pocket, which are not present in either wild-type or L104V myoHrs. The failure to observe increased O(2) association or dissociation rates for L104V indicates that the side chain of leucine at position 104 does not sterically "gate" O(2) entry into or exit from the binding pocket in the rate-determining step(s). L104V myoHr autoxidized approximately 3 times faster than did wild type, whereas L104T autoxidized >10(6) times faster than did wild type. The latter large increase is attributed to increased side chain polarity, thereby increasing water occupancy in the oxymyoHr binding pocket. These results indicate that L104 contributes a hydrophobic barrier that restricts water entry into the oxymyoHr binding pocket. Thus, a leucine at position 104 in myoHr appears to have the optimal combination of size and hydrophobicity to facilitate O(2) binding while simultaneously inhibiting autoxidation.

  3. Keys to Lipid Selection in Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase Catalysis: Structural Flexibility, Gating Residues and Multiple Binding Pockets

    PubMed Central

    Palermo, Giulia; Bauer, Inga; Campomanes, Pablo; Cavalli, Andrea; Armirotti, Andrea; Girotto, Stefania; Rothlisberger, Ursula; De Vivo, Marco

    2015-01-01

    The fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) regulates the endocannabinoid system cleaving primarily the lipid messenger anandamide. FAAH has been well characterized over the years and, importantly, it represents a promising drug target to treat several diseases, including inflammatory-related diseases and cancer. But its enzymatic mechanism for lipid selection to specifically hydrolyze anandamide, rather than similar bioactive lipids, remains elusive. Here, we clarify this mechanism in FAAH, examining the role of the dynamic paddle, which is formed by the gating residues Phe432 and Trp531 at the boundary between two cavities that form the FAAH catalytic site (the “membrane-access” and the “acyl chain-binding” pockets). We integrate microsecond-long MD simulations of wild type and double mutant model systems (Phe432Ala and Trp531Ala) of FAAH, embedded in a realistic membrane/water environment, with mutagenesis and kinetic experiments. We comparatively analyze three fatty acid substrates with different hydrolysis rates (anandamide > oleamide > palmitoylethanolamide). Our findings identify FAAH’s mechanism to selectively accommodate anandamide into a multi-pocket binding site, and to properly orient the substrate in pre-reactive conformations for efficient hydrolysis that is interceded by the dynamic paddle. Our findings therefore endorse a structural framework for a lipid selection mechanism mediated by structural flexibility and gating residues between multiple binding cavities, as found in FAAH. Based on the available structural data, this exquisite catalytic strategy for substrate specificity seems to be shared by other lipid-degrading enzymes with similar enzymatic architecture. The mechanistic insights for lipid selection might assist de-novo enzyme design or drug discovery efforts. PMID:26111155

  4. Crystal Structure of Human Soluble Adenylate Cyclase Reveals a Distinct, Highly Flexible Allosteric Bicarbonate Binding Pocket

    PubMed Central

    Saalau-Bethell, Susanne M; Berdini, Valerio; Cleasby, Anne; Congreve, Miles; Coyle, Joseph E; Lock, Victoria; Murray, Christopher W; O'Brien, M Alistair; Rich, Sharna J; Sambrook, Tracey; Vinkovic, Mladen; Yon, Jeff R; Jhoti, Harren

    2014-01-01

    Soluble adenylate cyclases catalyse the synthesis of the second messenger cAMP through the cyclisation of ATP and are the only known enzymes to be directly activated by bicarbonate. Here, we report the first crystal structure of the human enzyme that reveals a pseudosymmetrical arrangement of two catalytic domains to produce a single competent active site and a novel discrete bicarbonate binding pocket. Crystal structures of the apo protein, the protein in complex with α,β-methylene adenosine 5′-triphosphate (AMPCPP) and calcium, with the allosteric activator bicarbonate, and also with a number of inhibitors identified using fragment screening, all show a flexible active site that undergoes significant conformational changes on binding of ligands. The resulting nanomolar-potent inhibitors that were developed bind at both the substrate binding pocket and the allosteric site, and can be used as chemical probes to further elucidate the function of this protein. PMID:24616449

  5. Contribution of the Distal Pocket Residue to the Acyl-Chain-Length Specificity of (R)-Specific Enoyl-Coenzyme A Hydratases from Pseudomonas spp.

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Shun; Hiroe, Ayaka; Ishizuka, Koya; Kanazawa, Hiromi; Shiro, Yoshitsugu

    2015-01-01

    (R)-Specific enoyl-coenzyme A (enoyl-CoA) hydratases (PhaJs) are capable of supplying monomers from fatty acid β-oxidation to polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) biosynthesis. PhaJ1Pp from Pseudomonas putida showed broader substrate specificity than did PhaJ1Pa from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, despite sharing 67% amino acid sequence identity. In this study, the substrate specificity characteristics of two Pseudomonas PhaJ1 enzymes were investigated by site-directed mutagenesis, chimeragenesis, X-ray crystallographic analysis, and homology modeling. In PhaJ1Pp, the replacement of valine with isoleucine at position 72 resulted in an increased preference for enoyl-coenzyme A (CoA) elements with shorter chain lengths. Conversely, at the same position in PhaJ1Pa, the replacement of isoleucine with valine resulted in an increased preference for enoyl-CoAs with longer chain lengths. These changes suggest a narrowing and broadening in the substrate specificity range of the PhaJ1Pp and PhaJ1Pa mutants, respectively. However, the substrate specificity remains broader in PhaJ1Pp than in PhaJ1Pa. Additionally, three chimeric PhaJ1 enzymes, composed from PhaJ1Pp and PhaJ1Pa, all showed significant hydratase activity, and their substrate preferences were within the range exhibited by the parental PhaJ1 enzymes. The crystal structure of PhaJ1Pa was determined at a resolution of 1.7 Å, and subsequent homology modeling of PhaJ1Pp revealed that in the acyl-chain binding pocket, the amino acid at position 72 was the only difference between the two structures. These results indicate that the chain-length specificity of PhaJ1 is determined mainly by the bulkiness of the amino acid residue at position 72, but that other factors, such as structural fluctuations, also affect specificity. PMID:26386053

  6. Production of a Brassica napus low-molecular mass acyl-coenzyme A-binding protein in Arabidopsis alters the acyl-coenzyme A pool and acyl composition of oil in seeds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Low-molecular mass (10 kD) cytosolic acyl-coenzyme A-binding protein (ACBP) has a substantial influence over fatty acid (FA) composition in oilseeds, possibly via an effect on the partitioning of acyl groups between elongation and desaturation pathways. Previously, we demonstrated that the expressio...

  7. HIV-1 Protease Dimerization Dynamics Reveals a Transient Druggable Binding Pocket at the Interface

    PubMed Central

    Pietrucci, Fabio; Vargiu, Attilio Vittorio; Kranjc, Agata

    2015-01-01

    The binding mechanism of HIV-1 protease monomers leading to the catalytically competent dimeric enzyme has been investigated by means of state-of-the-art atomistic simulations. The emerging picture allows a deeper understanding of experimental observations and reveals that water molecules trapped at the interface have an important role in slowing down the kinetics of the association process. Unexpectedly, a cryptic binding pocket is identified at the interface of the complex, corresponding to a partially bound dimer that lacks enzymatic function. The pocket has a transient nature with a lifetime longer than 1 μs, and it displays very favorable druggability features. Docking as well as MM-GBSA free-energy calculations further support the possibility to target the new binding site by means of inhibitors able to prevent the complete dimerization by capturing the inactive conformation. This discovery could open the way to the rational design of a new class of anti-HIV drugs. PMID:26692118

  8. HIV-1 Protease Dimerization Dynamics Reveals a Transient Druggable Binding Pocket at the Interface.

    PubMed

    Pietrucci, Fabio; Vargiu, Attilio Vittorio; Kranjc, Agata

    2015-01-01

    The binding mechanism of HIV-1 protease monomers leading to the catalytically competent dimeric enzyme has been investigated by means of state-of-the-art atomistic simulations. The emerging picture allows a deeper understanding of experimental observations and reveals that water molecules trapped at the interface have an important role in slowing down the kinetics of the association process. Unexpectedly, a cryptic binding pocket is identified at the interface of the complex, corresponding to a partially bound dimer that lacks enzymatic function. The pocket has a transient nature with a lifetime longer than 1 μs, and it displays very favorable druggability features. Docking as well as MM-GBSA free-energy calculations further support the possibility to target the new binding site by means of inhibitors able to prevent the complete dimerization by capturing the inactive conformation. This discovery could open the way to the rational design of a new class of anti-HIV drugs. PMID:26692118

  9. Computational Prediction of acyl-coA Binding Proteins Structure in Brassica napus.

    PubMed

    Raboanatahiry, Nadia Haingotiana; Lu, Guangyuan; Li, Maoteng

    2015-01-01

    Acyl-coA binding proteins could transport acyl-coA esters from plastid to endoplasmic reticulum, prior to fatty acid biosynthesis, leading to the formation of triacylglycerol. The structure and the subcellular localization of acyl-coA binding proteins (ACBP) in Brassica napus were computationally predicted in this study. Earlier, the structure analysis of ACBPs was limited to the small ACBPs, the current study focused on all four classes of ACBPs. Physicochemical parameters including the size and the length, the intron-exon structure, the isoelectric point, the hydrophobicity, and the amino acid composition were studied. Furthermore, identification of conserved residues and conserved domains were carried out. Secondary structure and tertiary structure of ACBPs were also studied. Finally, subcellular localization of ACBPs was predicted. The findings indicated that the physicochemical parameters and subcellular localizations of ACBPs in Brassica napus were identical to Arabidopsis thaliana. Conserved domain analysis indicated that ACBPs contain two or three kelch domains that belong to different families. Identical residues in acyl-coA binding domains corresponded to eight amino acid residues in all ACBPs of B. napus. However, conserved residues of common ACBPs in all species of animal, plant, bacteria and fungi were only inclusive in small ACBPs. Alpha-helixes were displayed and conserved in all the acyl-coA binding domains, representing almost the half of the protein structure. The findings confirm high similarities in ACBPs between A. thaliana and B. napus, they might share the same functions but loss or gain might be possible.

  10. Inversion of axial coordination in myoglobin to create a "proximal" ligand binding pocket.

    PubMed

    Uno, Tadayuki; Sakamoto, Rikiharu; Tomisugi, Yoshikazu; Ishikawa, Yoshinobu; Wilkinson, Anthony J

    2003-09-01

    A ligand binding pocket has been created on the proximal side of the heme in porcine myoglobin by site-directed mutagenesis. Our starting point was the H64V/V68H double mutant which has been shown to have bis-histidine (His68 and His93) heme coordination [Dou, Y., Admiraal, S. J., Ikeda-Saito, M., Krzywda, S., Wilkinson, A. J., Li, T., Olson, J. S., Prince, R. C., Pickering, I. J., George, G. N. (1995) J. Biol. Chem. 270, 15993-16001]. The replacement of the proximal His93 ligand by noncoordinating Ala (H64V/V68H/H93A) or Gly (H64V/V68H/H93G) residues resulted unexpectedly in a six-coordinate low-spin species in both ferric and ferrous states. To test the hypothesis that the sixth coordinating ligand in the triple mutants was the imidazole of His97, this residue was mutated to Phe, in the quadruple mutants, H64V/V68H/H93A/H97F and H64V/V68H/H93G/H97F. The ferric quadruple mutants show a clear water/hydroxide alkaline transition and high cyanide and CO affinities, characteristics similar to those of wild-type myoglobin. The nu(Fe-CO) and nu(C-O) stretching frequencies in the ferrous-CO state of the quadruple mutants indicate that the "proximal" ligand binding heme pocket is less polar than the distal pocket in the wild-type protein. Thus, we conclude that the proximal heme pocket in the quadruple mutants has a similar affinity for exogenous ligands to the distal pocket of wild-type myoglobin but that the two pockets have different polarities. The quadruple mutants open up new approaches for developing heme chemistry on the myoglobin scaffold.

  11. Characterization of a small acyl-CoA-binding protein (ACBP) from Helianthus annuus L. and its binding affinities.

    PubMed

    Aznar-Moreno, Jose A; Venegas-Calerón, Mónica; Du, Zhi-Yan; Garcés, Rafael; Tanner, Julian A; Chye, Mee-Len; Martínez-Force, Enrique; Salas, Joaquín J

    2016-05-01

    Acyl-CoA-binding proteins (ACBPs) bind to acyl-CoA esters and promote their interaction with other proteins, lipids and cell structures. Small class I ACBPs have been identified in different plants, such as Arabidopsis thaliana (AtACBP6), Brassica napus (BnACBP) and Oryza sativa (OsACBP1, OsACBP2, OsACBP3), and they are capable of binding to different acyl-CoA esters and phospholipids. Here we characterize HaACBP6, a class I ACBP expressed in sunflower (Helianthus annuus) tissues, studying the specificity of its corresponding recombinant HaACBP6 protein towards various acyl-CoA esters and phospholipids in vitro, particularly using isothermal titration calorimetry and protein phospholipid binding assays. This protein binds with high affinity to de novo synthetized derivatives palmitoly-CoA, stearoyl-CoA and oleoyl-CoA (Kd 0.29, 0.14 and 0.15 μM respectively). On the contrary, it showed lower affinity towards linoleoyl-CoA (Kd 5.6 μM). Moreover, rHaACBP6 binds to different phosphatidylcholine species (dipalmitoyl-PC, dioleoyl-PC and dilinoleoyl-PC), yet it displays no affinity towards other phospholipids like lyso-PC, phosphatidic acid and lysophosphatidic acid derivatives. In the light of these results, the possible involvement of this protein in sunflower oil synthesis is considered. PMID:26938582

  12. The XRCC1 phosphate-binding pocket binds poly (ADP-ribose) and is required for XRCC1 function

    PubMed Central

    Breslin, Claire; Hornyak, Peter; Ridley, Andrew; Rulten, Stuart L.; Hanzlikova, Hana; Oliver, Antony W.; Caldecott, Keith W.

    2015-01-01

    Poly (ADP-ribose) is synthesized at DNA single-strand breaks and can promote the recruitment of the scaffold protein, XRCC1. However, the mechanism and importance of this process has been challenged. To address this issue, we have characterized the mechanism of poly (ADP-ribose) binding by XRCC1 and examined its importance for XRCC1 function. We show that the phosphate-binding pocket in the central BRCT1 domain of XRCC1 is required for selective binding to poly (ADP-ribose) at low levels of ADP-ribosylation, and promotes interaction with cellular PARP1. We also show that the phosphate-binding pocket is required for EGFP-XRCC1 accumulation at DNA damage induced by UVA laser, H2O2, and at sites of sub-nuclear PCNA foci, suggesting that poly (ADP-ribose) promotes XRCC1 recruitment both at single-strand breaks globally across the genome and at sites of DNA replication stress. Finally, we show that the phosphate-binding pocket is required following DNA damage for XRCC1-dependent acceleration of DNA single-strand break repair, DNA base excision repair, and cell survival. These data support the hypothesis that poly (ADP-ribose) synthesis promotes XRCC1 recruitment at DNA damage sites and is important for XRCC1 function. PMID:26130715

  13. The XRCC1 phosphate-binding pocket binds poly (ADP-ribose) and is required for XRCC1 function.

    PubMed

    Breslin, Claire; Hornyak, Peter; Ridley, Andrew; Rulten, Stuart L; Hanzlikova, Hana; Oliver, Antony W; Caldecott, Keith W

    2015-08-18

    Poly (ADP-ribose) is synthesized at DNA single-strand breaks and can promote the recruitment of the scaffold protein, XRCC1. However, the mechanism and importance of this process has been challenged. To address this issue, we have characterized the mechanism of poly (ADP-ribose) binding by XRCC1 and examined its importance for XRCC1 function. We show that the phosphate-binding pocket in the central BRCT1 domain of XRCC1 is required for selective binding to poly (ADP-ribose) at low levels of ADP-ribosylation, and promotes interaction with cellular PARP1. We also show that the phosphate-binding pocket is required for EGFP-XRCC1 accumulation at DNA damage induced by UVA laser, H2O2, and at sites of sub-nuclear PCNA foci, suggesting that poly (ADP-ribose) promotes XRCC1 recruitment both at single-strand breaks globally across the genome and at sites of DNA replication stress. Finally, we show that the phosphate-binding pocket is required following DNA damage for XRCC1-dependent acceleration of DNA single-strand break repair, DNA base excision repair, and cell survival. These data support the hypothesis that poly (ADP-ribose) synthesis promotes XRCC1 recruitment at DNA damage sites and is important for XRCC1 function. PMID:26130715

  14. Identification of a Cholesterol-Binding Pocket in Inward Rectifier K+ (Kir) Channels

    PubMed Central

    Fürst, Oliver; Nichols, Colin G.; Lamoureux, Guillaume; D’Avanzo, Nazzareno

    2014-01-01

    Cholesterol is the major sterol component of all mammalian plasma membranes. Recent studies have shown that cholesterol inhibits both bacterial (KirBac1.1 and KirBac3.1) and eukaryotic (Kir2.1) inward rectifier K+ (Kir) channels. Lipid-sterol interactions are not enantioselective, and the enantiomer of cholesterol (ent-cholesterol) does not inhibit Kir channel activity, suggesting that inhibition results from direct enantiospecific binding to the channel, and not indirect effects of changes to the bilayer. Furthermore, conservation of the effect of cholesterol among prokaryotic and eukaryotic Kir channels suggests an evolutionary conserved cholesterol-binding pocket, which we aimed to identify. Computational experiments were performed by docking cholesterol to the atomic structures of Kir2.2 (PDB: 3SPI) and KirBac1.1 (PDB: 2WLL) using Autodock 4.2. Poses were assessed to ensure biologically relevant orientation and then clustered according to location and orientation. The stability of cholesterol in each of these poses was then confirmed by molecular dynamics simulations. Finally, mutation of key residues (S95H and I171L) in this putative binding pocket found within the transmembrane domain of Kir2.1 channels were shown to lead to a loss of inhibition by cholesterol. Together, these data provide support for this location as a biologically relevant pocket. PMID:25517146

  15. Polarization effects stabilize bacteriorhodopsin's chromophore binding pocket: a molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Babitzki, G; Denschlag, R; Tavan, P

    2009-07-30

    Hybrid methods, which combine a quantum mechanical description of a chromophore by density functional theory (DFT) with a molecular mechanics (MM) model of the surrounding protein binding pocket, can enable highly accurate computations of the chromophore's in situ vibrational spectra. As a prerequisite, one needs a MM model of the chromophore-protein complex, which allows a correct sampling of its room-temperature equilibrium fluctuations by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. Here, we show for the case of bacteriorhodopsin (BR) that MM-MD descriptions with standard nonpolarizable force fields entail a collapse of the chromophore binding pocket. As demonstrated by us, this collapse can be avoided by employing a polarized MM force field derived by DFT/MM hybrid computations. The corresponding MD simulations, which are complemented by a novel Hamiltonian replica exchange approach, then reveal a structural heterogeneity within the binding pocket of the retinal chromophore, which mainly pertains to the structure of the lysine chain covalently connecting the retinal chromophore with the protein backbone.

  16. Interactions between Hofmeister anions and the binding pocket of a protein.

    PubMed

    Fox, Jerome M; Kang, Kyungtae; Sherman, Woody; Héroux, Annie; Sastry, G Madhavi; Baghbanzadeh, Mostafa; Lockett, Matthew R; Whitesides, George M

    2015-03-25

    This paper uses the binding pocket of human carbonic anhydrase II (HCAII, EC 4.2.1.1) as a tool to examine the properties of Hofmeister anions that determine (i) where, and how strongly, they associate with concavities on the surfaces of proteins and (ii) how, upon binding, they alter the structure of water within those concavities. Results from X-ray crystallography and isothermal titration calorimetry show that most anions associate with the binding pocket of HCAII by forming inner-sphere ion pairs with the Zn(2+) cofactor. In these ion pairs, the free energy of anion-Zn(2+) association is inversely proportional to the free energetic cost of anion dehydration; this relationship is consistent with the mechanism of ion pair formation suggested by the "law of matching water affinities". Iodide and bromide anions also associate with a hydrophobic declivity in the wall of the binding pocket. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest that anions, upon associating with Zn(2+), trigger rearrangements of water that extend up to 8 Å away from their surfaces. These findings expand the range of interactions previously thought to occur between ions and proteins by suggesting that (i) weakly hydrated anions can bind complementarily shaped hydrophobic declivities, and that (ii) ion-induced rearrangements of water within protein concavities can (in contrast with similar rearrangements in bulk water) extend well beyond the first hydration shells of the ions that trigger them. This study paints a picture of Hofmeister anions as a set of structurally varied ligands that differ in size, shape, and affinity for water and, thus, in their ability to bind to—and to alter the charge and hydration structure of—polar, nonpolar, and topographically complex concavities on the surfaces of proteins.

  17. Investigation on the sucrose binding pocket of HIV-1 Integrase by molecular dynamics and synergy experiments.

    PubMed

    Tintori, Cristina; Esposito, Francesca; Morreale, Francesca; Martini, Riccardo; Tramontano, Enzo; Botta, Maurizio

    2015-08-01

    Enzymes whose catalytic activity depends on multimeric assembly are targets for inhibitors that perturb the interactions between the protein subunits such as the HIV-1 Integrase (IN). Sucrose has been recently crystallized in complex with IN revealing an allosteric binding pocket at the monomer-monomer interface. Herein, molecular dynamics were applied to theoretically test the effect of this small ligand on IN. As a result, such a compound increases the mutual free energy of binding between the two interacting monomers. Biological experiments confirmed the computational forecast. PMID:26048795

  18. Spatial Decomposition of Translational Water-Water Correlation Entropy in Binding Pockets.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Crystal N; Kurtzman, Tom; Gilson, Michael K

    2016-01-12

    A number of computational tools available today compute the thermodynamic properties of water at surfaces and in binding pockets by using inhomogeneous solvation theory (IST) to analyze explicit-solvent simulations. Such methods enable qualitative spatial mappings of both energy and entropy around a solute of interest and can also be applied quantitatively. However, the entropy estimates of existing methods have, to date, been almost entirely limited to the first-order terms in the IST's entropy expansion. These first-order terms account for localization and orientation of water molecules in the field of the solute but not for the modification of water-water correlations by the solute. Here, we present an extension of the Grid Inhomogeneous Solvation Theory (GIST) approach which accounts for water-water translational correlations. The method involves rewriting the two-point density of water in terms of a conditional density and utilizes the efficient nearest-neighbor entropy estimation approach. Spatial maps of this second order term, for water in and around the synthetic host cucurbit[7]uril and in the binding pocket of the enzyme Factor Xa, reveal mainly negative contributions, indicating solute-induced water-water correlations relative to bulk water; particularly strong signals are obtained for sites at the entrances of cavities or pockets. This second-order term thus enters with the same, negative, sign as the first order translational and orientational terms. Numerical and convergence properties of the methodology are examined.

  19. Computational approaches for identification of conserved/unique binding pockets in the A chain of ricin

    SciTech Connect

    Ecale Zhou, C L; Zemla, A T; Roe, D; Young, M; Lam, M; Schoeniger, J; Balhorn, R

    2005-01-29

    Specific and sensitive ligand-based protein detection assays that employ antibodies or small molecules such as peptides, aptamers, or other small molecules require that the corresponding surface region of the protein be accessible and that there be minimal cross-reactivity with non-target proteins. To reduce the time and cost of laboratory screening efforts for diagnostic reagents, we developed new methods for evaluating and selecting protein surface regions for ligand targeting. We devised combined structure- and sequence-based methods for identifying 3D epitopes and binding pockets on the surface of the A chain of ricin that are conserved with respect to a set of ricin A chains and unique with respect to other proteins. We (1) used structure alignment software to detect structural deviations and extracted from this analysis the residue-residue correspondence, (2) devised a method to compare corresponding residues across sets of ricin structures and structures of closely related proteins, (3) devised a sequence-based approach to determine residue infrequency in local sequence context, and (4) modified a pocket-finding algorithm to identify surface crevices in close proximity to residues determined to be conserved/unique based on our structure- and sequence-based methods. In applying this combined informatics approach to ricin A we identified a conserved/unique pocket in close proximity (but not overlapping) the active site that is suitable for bi-dentate ligand development. These methods are generally applicable to identification of surface epitopes and binding pockets for development of diagnostic reagents, therapeutics, and vaccines.

  20. Computational Prediction of acyl-coA Binding Proteins Structure in Brassica napus

    PubMed Central

    Raboanatahiry, Nadia Haingotiana; Lu, Guangyuan; Li, Maoteng

    2015-01-01

    Acyl-coA binding proteins could transport acyl-coA esters from plastid to endoplasmic reticulum, prior to fatty acid biosynthesis, leading to the formation of triacylglycerol. The structure and the subcellular localization of acyl-coA binding proteins (ACBP) in Brassica napus were computationally predicted in this study. Earlier, the structure analysis of ACBPs was limited to the small ACBPs, the current study focused on all four classes of ACBPs. Physicochemical parameters including the size and the length, the intron-exon structure, the isoelectric point, the hydrophobicity, and the amino acid composition were studied. Furthermore, identification of conserved residues and conserved domains were carried out. Secondary structure and tertiary structure of ACBPs were also studied. Finally, subcellular localization of ACBPs was predicted. The findings indicated that the physicochemical parameters and subcellular localizations of ACBPs in Brassica napus were identical to Arabidopsis thaliana. Conserved domain analysis indicated that ACBPs contain two or three kelch domains that belong to different families. Identical residues in acyl-coA binding domains corresponded to eight amino acid residues in all ACBPs of B. napus. However, conserved residues of common ACBPs in all species of animal, plant, bacteria and fungi were only inclusive in small ACBPs. Alpha-helixes were displayed and conserved in all the acyl-coA binding domains, representing almost the half of the protein structure. The findings confirm high similarities in ACBPs between A. thaliana and B. napus, they might share the same functions but loss or gain might be possible. PMID:26065422

  1. Insight into Coenzyme A cofactor binding and the mechanism of acyl-transfer in an acylating aldehyde dehydrogenase from Clostridium phytofermentans

    PubMed Central

    Tuck, Laura R.; Altenbach, Kirsten; Ang, Thiau Fu; Crawshaw, Adam D.; Campopiano, Dominic J.; Clarke, David J.; Marles-Wright, Jon

    2016-01-01

    The breakdown of fucose and rhamnose released from plant cell walls by the cellulolytic soil bacterium Clostridium phytofermentans produces toxic aldehyde intermediates. To enable growth on these carbon sources, the pathway for the breakdown of fucose and rhamnose is encapsulated within a bacterial microcompartment (BMC). These proteinaceous organelles sequester the toxic aldehyde intermediates and allow the efficient action of acylating aldehyde dehydrogenase enzymes to produce an acyl-CoA that is ultimately used in substrate-level phosphorylation to produce ATP. Here we analyse the kinetics of the aldehyde dehydrogenase enzyme from the fucose/rhamnose utilisation BMC with different short-chain fatty aldehydes and show that it has activity against substrates with up to six carbon atoms, with optimal activity against propionaldehyde. We have also determined the X-ray crystal structure of this enzyme in complex with CoA and show that the adenine nucleotide of this cofactor is bound in a distinct pocket to the same group in NAD+. This work is the first report of the structure of CoA bound to an aldehyde dehydrogenase enzyme and our crystallographic model provides important insight into the differences within the active site that distinguish the acylating from non-acylating aldehyde dehydrogenase enzymes. PMID:26899032

  2. Ligand binding to the ACBD6 protein regulates the acyl-CoA transferase reactions in membranes[S

    PubMed Central

    Soupene, Eric; Kuypers, Frans A.

    2015-01-01

    The binding determinants of the human acyl-CoA binding domain-containing protein (ACBD) 6 and its function in lipid renewal of membranes were investigated. ACBD6 binds acyl-CoAs of a chain length of 6 to 20 carbons. The stoichiometry of the association could not be fitted to a 1-to-1 model. Saturation of ACBD6 by C16:0-CoA required higher concentration than less abundant acyl-CoAs. In contrast to ACBD1 and ACBD3, ligand binding did not result in the dimerization of ACBD6. The presence of fatty acids affected the binding of C18:1-CoA to ACBD6, dependent on the length, the degree of unsaturation, and the stereoisomeric conformation of their aliphatic chain. ACBD1 and ACBD6 negatively affected the formation of phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylethanolamine in the red blood cell membrane. The acylation rate of lysophosphatidylcholine into PC catalyzed by the red cell lysophosphatidylcholine-acyltransferase 1 protein was limited by the transfer of the acyl-CoA substrate from ACBD6 to the acyltransferase enzyme. These findings provide evidence that the binding properties of ACBD6 are adapted to prevent its constant saturation by the very abundant C16:0-CoA and protect membrane systems from the detergent nature of free acyl-CoAs by controlling their release to acyl-CoA-utilizing enzymes. PMID:26290611

  3. Identification of a Ligand Binding Pocket in LdtR from Liberibacter asiaticus.

    PubMed

    Pagliai, Fernando A; Gonzalez, Claudio F; Lorca, Graciela L

    2015-01-01

    LdtR is a transcriptional activator involved in the regulation of a putative L,D transpeptidase in Liberibacter asiaticus, an unculturable pathogen and one of the causative agents of Huanglongbing disease. Using small molecule screens we identified benzbromarone as an inhibitor of LdtR activity, which was confirmed using in vivo and in vitro assays. Based on these previous results, the objective of this work was to identify the LdtR ligand binding pocket and characterize its interactions with benzbromarone. A structural model of LdtR was constructed and the molecular interactions with the ligand were predicted using the SwissDock interface. Using site-directed mutagenesis, these residues were changed to alanine. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays, thermal denaturation, isothermal titration calorimetry experiments, and in vivo assays were used to identify residues T43, L61, and F64 in the Benz1 pocket of LdtR as the amino acids most likely involved in the binding to benzbromarone. These results provide new information on the binding mechanism of LdtR to a modulatory molecule and provide a blue print for the design of therapeutics for other members of the MarR family of transcriptional regulators involved in pathogenicity. PMID:26635775

  4. Color tuning in binding pocket models of the chlamydomonas-type channelrhodopsins.

    PubMed

    Welke, Kai; Frähmcke, Jan S; Watanabe, Hiroshi C; Hegemann, Peter; Elstner, Marcus

    2011-12-22

    We examined the shift of absorption maxima between the chlamydomonas-type channelrhodopsins (ChRs) and bacteriorhodopsin (BR). Starting from the BR X-ray structure, we modeled the color tuning in the binding pockets of the ChRs by mutating up to 28 amino acids in the vicinity of the chromophore. By applying the efficient self-consistent charge density functional tight binding (SCC-DFTB) method in a quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) framework, including explicit polarization and calculating excitation energies with the semiempirical OM2/MRCI method and the ab initio SORCI method, we have shown that multiple mutations in the binding pocket of BR causes large hypsochromic shifts that are of the same order as the experimentally observed shifts of the absorption maxima between BR and the ChRs. This study further demonstrates that mutations in the proximity of the Schiff base and complex counterion lead to a stronger but more flexible interaction with the retinal, which could serve as a possible explanation for the spectral patterns found in the ChRs. PMID:22077286

  5. Distinct pose of discodermolide in taxol binding pocket drives a complementary mode of microtubule stabilization.

    PubMed

    Khrapunovich-Baine, Marina; Menon, Vilas; Verdier-Pinard, Pascal; Smith, Amos B; Angeletti, Ruth Hogue; Fiser, Andras; Horwitz, Susan Band; Xiao, Hui

    2009-12-15

    The microtubule cytoskeleton has proven to be an effective target for cancer therapeutics. One class of drugs, known as microtubule stabilizing agents (MSAs), binds to microtubule polymers and stabilizes them against depolymerization. The prototype of this group of drugs, Taxol, is an effective chemotherapeutic agent used extensively in the treatment of human ovarian, breast, and lung carcinomas. Although electron crystallography and photoaffinity labeling experiments determined that the binding site for Taxol is in a hydrophobic pocket in beta-tubulin, little was known about the effects of this drug on the conformation of the entire microtubule. A recent study from our laboratory utilizing hydrogen-deuterium exchange (HDX) in concert with various mass spectrometry (MS) techniques has provided new information on the structure of microtubules upon Taxol binding. In the current study we apply this technique to determine the binding mode and the conformational effects on chicken erythrocyte tubulin (CET) of another MSA, discodermolide, whose synthetic analogues may have potential use in the clinic. We confirmed that, like Taxol, discodermolide binds to the taxane binding pocket in beta-tubulin. However, as opposed to Taxol, which has major interactions with the M-loop, discodermolide orients itself away from this loop and toward the N-terminal H1-S2 loop. Additionally, discodermolide stabilizes microtubules mainly via its effects on interdimer contacts, specifically on the alpha-tubulin side, and to a lesser extent on interprotofilament contacts between adjacent beta-tubulin subunits. Also, our results indicate complementary stabilizing effects of Taxol and discodermolide on the microtubules, which may explain the synergy observed between the two drugs in vivo.

  6. Distinct Pose of Discodermolide in Taxol Binding Pocket Drives a Complementary Mode of Microtubule Stabilization

    PubMed Central

    Khrapunovich-Baine, Marina; Menon, Vilas; Verdier-Pinard, Pascal; Smith, Amos B.; Angeletti, Ruth Hogue; Fiser, Andras; Horwitz, Susan Band; Xiao, Hui

    2010-01-01

    The microtubule cytoskeleton has proven to be an effective target for cancer therapeutics. One class of drugs, known as microtubule stabilizing agents (MSAs), binds to microtubule polymers and stabilizes them against depolymerization. The prototype of this group of drugs, Taxol, is an effective chemotherapeutic agent used extensively in the treatment of human ovarian, breast, and lung carcinomas. Although electron crystallography and photoaffinity labeling experiments determined that the binding site for Taxol is in a hydrophobic pocket in β-tubulin, little was known about the effects of this drug on the conformation of the entire microtubule. A recent study from our laboratory utilizing hydrogen-deuterium exchange (HDX) in concert with various mass spectrometry (MS) techniques has provided new information on the structure of microtubules upon Taxol binding. In the current study we apply this technique to determine the binding mode and the conformational effects on chicken erythrocyte tubulin (CET) of another MSA, discodermolide, whose synthetic analogues may have potential use in the clinic. We confirmed that like Taxol, discodermolide binds to the taxane binding pocket in β-tubulin. However, as opposed to Taxol, which has major interactions with the M-loop, discodermolide orients itself away from this loop and towards the N-terminal H1–S2 loop. Additionally, discodermolide stabilizes microtubules mainly via its effects on interdimer contacts, specifically on the α-tubulin side, and to a lesser extent on interprotofilament contacts between adjacent β-tubulin subunits. Also, our results indicate complementary stabilizing effects of Taxol and discodermolide on the microtubules, which may explain the synergy observed between the two drugs in vivo. PMID:19863156

  7. Growth suppression by an E2F-binding-defective retinoblastoma protein (RB): contribution from the RB C pocket.

    PubMed

    Whitaker, L L; Su, H; Baskaran, R; Knudsen, E S; Wang, J Y

    1998-07-01

    Growth suppression by the retinoblastoma protein (RB) is dependent on its ability to form complexes with transcription regulators. At least three distinct protein-binding activities have been identified in RB: the large A/B pocket binds E2F, the A/B pocket binds the LXCXE peptide motif, and the C pocket binds the nuclear c-Abl tyrosine kinase. Substitution of Trp for Arg 661 in the B region of RB (mutant 661) inactivates both E2F and LXCXE binding. The tumor suppression function of mutant 661 is not abolished, because this allele predisposes its carriers to retinoblastoma development with a low penetrance. In cell-based assays, 661 is shown to inhibit G1/S progression. This low-penetrance mutant also induces terminal growth arrest with reduced but detectable activity. We have constructed mutations that disrupt C pocket activity. When overproduced, the RB C-terminal fragment did not induce terminal growth arrest but could inhibit G1/S progression, and this activity was abolished by the C-pocket mutations. In full-length RB, the C-pocket mutations reduced but did not abolish RB function. Interestingly, combination of the C-pocket and 661 mutations completely abolished RB's ability to cause an increase in the percentage of cells in G1 and to induce terminal growth arrest. These results suggest that the A/B or C region can induce a prolongation of G1 through mechanisms that are independent of each other. In contrast, long-term growth arrest requires combined activities from both regions of RB. In addition, E2F and LXCXE binding are not the only mechanisms through which RB inhibits cell growth. The C pocket also contributes to RB-mediated growth suppression. PMID:9632788

  8. Binding of acylated peptides and fatty acids to phospholipid vesicles: pertinence to myristoylated proteins.

    PubMed

    Peitzsch, R M; McLaughlin, S

    1993-10-01

    We studied the binding of fatty acids and acylated peptides to phospholipid vesicles by making electrophoretic mobility and equilibrium dialysis measurements. The binding energies of the anionic form of the fatty acids and the corresponding acylated glycines were identical; the energies increased by 0.8 kcal/mol per number of carbons in the acyl chain (Ncarbon = 10, 12, 14, 16), a value identical to that for the classical entropy-driven hydrophobic effect discussed by Tanford [The Hydrophobic Effect (1980) Wiley, New York]. The unitary Gibbs free binding energy, delta Gou, of myristoylated glycine, 8 kcal/mol, is independent of the nature of the electrically neutral lipids used to form the vesicles. Similar binding energies were obtained with other myristoylated peptides (e.g., Gly-Ala, Gly-Ala-Ala). The 8 kcal/mol, which corresponds to an effective dissociation constant of 10(-4) M for myristoylated peptides with lipids, provides barely enough energy to attach a myristoylated protein in the cytoplasm to the plasma membrane. Thus, other factors that reduce (e.g., hydrophobic interaction of myristate with the covalently attached protein) or enhance (e.g., electrostatic interactions of basic residues with acidic lipids; protein-protein interactions with intrinsic receptor proteins) the interaction of myristoylated proteins with membranes are likely to be important and may cause reversible translocation of these proteins to the membrane.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Ligand binding pocket of the human somatostatin receptor 5: mutational analysis of the extracellular domains.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, M T; Hukovic, N; Kumar, U; Panetta, R; Hjorth, S A; Srikant, C B; Patel, Y C

    1997-11-01

    The ligand binding domain of G protein-coupled receptors for peptide ligands consists of a pocket formed by extracellular and transmembrane domain (TM) residues. In the case of somatostatin (SRIF), however, previous studies have suggested that the binding cavity of the octapeptide analog SMS201-995 (SMS) is lined by residues in TMs III-VII. The additional involvement of the extracellular domains for binding SMS or the natural SRIF ligands (SRIF-14, SRIF-28) has not been clarified. Using a cassette construct cDNA for the human somatostatin 5 receptor (sst5R), we systematically examined the role of exofacial structures in ligand binding by creating a series of mutants in which the extracellular portions have been altered by conservative segment exchange (CSE) mutagenesis for the extracellular loops (ECLs) and by deletion (for the NH2-terminal segment) or truncation analysis (ECL3). CHO-K1 cells were stably transfected with wild type or mutant human sst5R constructs, and agonist binding was assessed using membrane binding assays with 125I-LTT SRIF-28 ligand. Deletion of the NH2 terminus or CSE mutagenesis of ECL1 and ECL3 produced minor 2-8-fold decreases in affinity for SRIF-14, SRIF-28, and SMS ligands. Truncation of ECL3 to mimic the size of this loop in sst1R and sst4R (the two subtypes that do not bind SMS) did not interfere with the binding of SMS, SRIF-14, or SRIF-28. In contrast, both ECL2 mutants failed to bind 125I-LTT SRIF-28. Immunocytochemical analysis of nonpermeabilized cells with a human sst5R antibody revealed that the mutant receptors were targeted to the plasma membrane. Labeled SMS (125I-Tyr3 SMS) also failed to bind to the mutant ECL2 receptors. These results suggest a potential contribution of ECL2 (in addition to the previously identified residues in TMs III-VII) to the SRIF ligand binding pocket.

  10. Ascorbic acid reduction of compound I of mammalian catalases proceeds via specific binding to the NADPH binding pocket.

    PubMed

    Korth, Hans-Gert; Meier, Ann-Cathérine; Auferkamp, Oliver; Sicking, Willi; de Groot, Herbert; Sustmann, Reiner; Kirsch, Michael

    2012-06-12

    Mammalian (Clade 3) catalases utilize NADPH as a protective cofactor to prevent one-electron reduction of the central reactive intermediate Compound I (Cpd I) to the catalytically inactive Compound II (Cpd II) species by re-reduction of Cpd I to the enzyme's resting state (ferricatalase). It has long been known that ascorbate/ascorbic acid is capable of reducing Cpd I of NADPH-binding catalases to Cpd II, but the mode of this one-electron reduction had hitherto not been explored. We here demonstrate that ascorbate-mediated reduction of Cpd I, generated by addition of peroxoacetic acid to NADPH-free bovine liver catalase (BLC), requires specific binding of the ascorbate anion to the NADPH binding pocket. Ascorbate-mediated Cpd II formation was found to be suppressed by added NADPH in a concentration-dependent manner, for the achievement of complete suppression at a stoichiometric 1:1 NADPH:heme concentration ratio. Cpd I → Cpd II reduction by ascorbate was similarly inhibited by addition of NADH, NADP(+), thio-NADP(+), or NAD(+), though with 0.5-, 0.1-, 0.1-, and 0.01-fold reduced efficiencies, respectively, in agreement with the relative binding affinities of these dinucleotides. Unexpected was the observation that although Cpd II formation is not observed in the presence of NADP(+), the decay of Cpd I is slightly accelerated by ascorbate rather than retarded, leading to direct regeneration of ferricatalase. The experimental findings are supported by molecular mechanics docking computations, which show a similar binding of NADPH, NADP(+), and NADH, but not NAD(+), as found in the X-ray structure of NADPH-loaded human erythrocyte catalase. The computations suggest that two ascorbate molecules may occupy the empty NADPH pocket, preferably binding to the adenine binding site. The biological relevance of these findings is discussed. PMID:22616883

  11. Avibactam and Class C β-Lactamases: Mechanism of Inhibition, Conservation of the Binding Pocket, and Implications for Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Johnstone, M. R.; Ross, P. L.; McLaughlin, R. E.; Olivier, N. B.

    2014-01-01

    Avibactam is a novel non-β-lactam β-lactamase inhibitor that inhibits a wide range of β-lactamases. These include class A, class C, and some class D enzymes, which erode the activity of β-lactam drugs in multidrug-resistant pathogens like Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterobacteriaceae spp. Avibactam is currently in clinical development in combination with the β-lactam antibiotics ceftazidime, ceftaroline fosamil, and aztreonam. Avibactam has the potential to be the first β-lactamase inhibitor that might provide activity against class C-mediated resistance, which represents a growing concern in both hospital- and community-acquired infections. Avibactam has an unusual mechanism of action: it is a covalent inhibitor that acts via ring opening, but in contrast to other currently used β-lactamase inhibitors, this reaction is reversible. Here, we present a high-resolution structure of avibactam bound to a class C β-lactamase, AmpC, from P. aeruginosa that provided insight into the mechanism of both acylation and recyclization in this enzyme class and highlighted the differences observed between class A and class C inhibition. Furthermore, variants resistant to avibactam that identified the residues important for inhibition were isolated. Finally, the structural information was used to predict effective inhibition by sequence analysis and functional studies of class C β-lactamases from a large and diverse set of contemporary clinical isolates (P. aeruginosa and several Enterobacteriaceae spp.) obtained from recent infections to understand any preexisting variability in the binding pocket that might affect inhibition by avibactam. PMID:25022578

  12. Gates and binding pockets for nitric oxide with cytochrome c', according to molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Pietra, Francesco

    2013-09-01

    Random-acceleration molecular-dynamics (RAMD) simulations with models of homodimeric 6-ligated distal-NO and 5-ligated proximal-NO cytochrome c' complexes, in TIP3 H2 O, showed two distinct, non-intercommunicating worlds. In the framework of a long cavity formed by four protein helices with heme at one extremity, NO was observed to follow different pathways with the two complexes to reach the solvent. With the 6-ligated complex, NO was observed to progress by exploiting protein internal channels created by thermal fluctuations, and be temporarily trapped into binding pockets before reaching the preferred gate at the heme end of the cavity. In contrast, with the 5-ligated complex, NO was observed to surface the solvent-exposed helix 7, up to a gate at the other extremity of the protein, only occasionally finding an earlier, direct way out toward the solvent. That only bulk NO gets involved in forming the 5-ligated proximal-NO complex is in agreement with previous experimental observations, while the occurrence of binding pockets suggests that also reservoir NO might play a role with the distal-NO complex.

  13. WDR5 Intearcts with Mixed Lineage Leukemia (MLL) Protein via the Histone H3-binding Pocket

    SciTech Connect

    Song, J.; Kingston, R

    2008-01-01

    WDR5 is a component of the mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) complex, which methylates lysine 4 of histone H3, and was identified as a methylated Lys-4 histone H3-binding protein. Here, we present a crystal structure of WDR5 bound to an MLL peptide. Surprisingly, we find that WDR5 utilizes the same pocket shown to bind histone H3 for this MLL interaction. Furthermore, the WDR5-MLL interaction is disrupted preferentially by mono- and di-methylated Lys-4 histone H3 over unmodified and tri-methylated Lys-4 histone H3. These data implicate a delicate interplay between the effector, WDR5, the catalytic subunit, MLL, and the substrate, histone H3, of the MLL complex. We suggest that the activity of the MLL complex might be regulated through this interplay.

  14. Allosteric coupling from G protein to the agonist-binding pocket in GPCRs.

    PubMed

    DeVree, Brian T; Mahoney, Jacob P; Vélez-Ruiz, Gisselle A; Rasmussen, Soren G F; Kuszak, Adam J; Edwald, Elin; Fung, Juan-Jose; Manglik, Aashish; Masureel, Matthieu; Du, Yang; Matt, Rachel A; Pardon, Els; Steyaert, Jan; Kobilka, Brian K; Sunahara, Roger K

    2016-07-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) remain the primary conduit by which cells detect environmental stimuli and communicate with each other. Upon activation by extracellular agonists, these seven-transmembrane-domain-containing receptors interact with heterotrimeric G proteins to regulate downstream second messenger and/or protein kinase cascades. Crystallographic evidence from a prototypic GPCR, the β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR), in complex with its cognate G protein, Gs, has provided a model for how agonist binding promotes conformational changes that propagate through the GPCR and into the nucleotide-binding pocket of the G protein α-subunit to catalyse GDP release, the key step required for GTP binding and activation of G proteins. The structure also offers hints about how G-protein binding may, in turn, allosterically influence ligand binding. Here we provide functional evidence that G-protein coupling to the β2AR stabilizes a ‘closed’ receptor conformation characterized by restricted access to and egress from the hormone-binding site. Surprisingly, the effects of G protein on the hormone-binding site can be observed in the absence of a bound agonist, where G-protein coupling driven by basal receptor activity impedes the association of agonists, partial agonists, antagonists and inverse agonists. The ability of bound ligands to dissociate from the receptor is also hindered, providing a structural explanation for the G-protein-mediated enhancement of agonist affinity, which has been observed for many GPCR–G-protein pairs. Our data also indicate that, in contrast to agonist binding alone, coupling of a G protein in the absence of an agonist stabilizes large structural changes in a GPCR. The effects of nucleotide-free G protein on ligand-binding kinetics are shared by other members of the superfamily of GPCRs, suggesting that a common mechanism may underlie G-protein-mediated enhancement of agonist affinity. PMID:27362234

  15. The same pocket in menin binds both MLL and JUND but has opposite effects on transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Jing; Gurung, Buddha; Wan, Bingbing; Matkar, Smita; Veniaminova, Natalia A.; Wan, Ke; Merchant, Juanita L.; Hua, Xianxin; Lei, Ming

    2013-04-08

    Menin is a tumour suppressor protein whose loss or inactivation causes multiple endocrine neoplasia 1 (MEN1), a hereditary autosomal dominant tumour syndrome that is characterized by tumorigenesis in multiple endocrine organs. Menin interacts with many proteins and is involved in a variety of cellular processes. Menin binds the JUN family transcription factor JUND and inhibits its transcriptional activity. Several MEN1 missense mutations disrupt the menin-JUND interaction, suggesting a correlation between the tumour-suppressor function of menin and its suppression of JUND-activated transcription. Menin also interacts with mixed lineage leukaemia protein 1 (MLL1), a histone H3 lysine 4 methyltransferase, and functions as an oncogenic cofactor to upregulate gene transcription and promote MLL1-fusion-protein-induced leukaemogenesis. A recent report on the tethering of MLL1 to chromatin binding factor lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF) by menin indicates that menin is a molecular adaptor coordinating the functions of multiple proteins. Despite its importance, how menin interacts with many distinct partners and regulates their functions remains poorly understood. Here we present the crystal structures of human menin in its free form and in complexes with MLL1 or with JUND, or with an MLL1-LEDGF heterodimer. These structures show that menin contains a deep pocket that binds short peptides of MLL1 or JUND in the same manner, but that it can have opposite effects on transcription. The menin-JUND interaction blocks JUN N-terminal kinase (JNK)-mediated JUND phosphorylation and suppresses JUND-induced transcription. In contrast, menin promotes gene transcription by binding the transcription activator MLL1 through the peptide pocket while still interacting with the chromatin-anchoring protein LEDGF at a distinct surface formed by both menin and MLL1.

  16. Specificity of anion-binding in the substrate-pocket ofbacteriorhodopsin

    SciTech Connect

    Facciotti, Marc T.; Cheung, Vincent S.; Lunde, Christopher S.; Rouhani, Shahab; Baliga, Nitin S.; Glaeser, Robert M.

    2003-08-30

    The structure of the D85S mutant of bacteriorhodopsin with a nitrate anion bound in the Schiff-base binding site, and the structure of the anion-free protein have been obtained in the same crystal form. Together with the previously solved structures of this anion pump, in both the anion-free state and bromide-bound state, these new structures provide insight into how this mutant of bacteriorhodopsin is able to bind a variety of different anions in the same binding pocket. The structural analysis reveals that the main structural change that accommodates different anions is the repositioning of the polar side-chain of S85. On the basis of these x-ray crystal structures, the prediction is then made that the D85S/D212N double mutant might bind similar anions and do so over a broader pH range than does the single mutant. Experimental comparison of the dissociation constants, K{sub d}, for a variety of anions confirms this prediction and demonstrates, in addition, that the binding affinity is dramatically improved by the D212N substitution.

  17. Broadly neutralizing human antibody that recognizes the receptor-binding pocket of influenza virus hemagglutinin

    SciTech Connect

    Whittle, James R.R.; Zhang, Ruijun; Khurana, Surender; King, Lisa R.; Manischewitz, Jody; Golding, Hana; Dormitzer, Philip R.; Haynes, Barton F.; Walter, Emmanuel B.; Moody, M. Anthony; Kepler, Thomas B.; Liao, Hua-Xin; Harrison, Stephen C.

    2011-09-20

    Seasonal antigenic drift of circulating influenza virus leads to a requirement for frequent changes in vaccine composition, because exposure or vaccination elicits human antibodies with limited cross-neutralization of drifted strains. We describe a human monoclonal antibody, CH65, obtained by isolating rearranged heavy- and light-chain genes from sorted single plasma cells, coming from a subject immunized with the 2007 trivalent influenza vaccine. The crystal structure of a complex of the hemagglutinin (HA) from H1N1 strain A/Solomon Islands/3/2006 with the Fab of CH65 shows that the tip of the CH65 heavy-chain complementarity determining region 3 (CDR3) inserts into the receptor binding pocket on HA1, mimicking in many respects the interaction of the physiological receptor, sialic acid. CH65 neutralizes infectivity of 30 out of 36 H1N1 strains tested. The resistant strains have a single-residue insertion near the rim of the sialic-acid pocket. We conclude that broad neutralization of influenza virus can be achieved by antibodies with contacts that mimic those of the receptor.

  18. Structural consequences of two methyl additions in the E. coli trp repressor L-tryptophan binding pocket

    SciTech Connect

    Lawson, C.L.

    1995-12-01

    The flexibility and specificity of the L-tryptophan corepressor binding pocket of E coli trp repressor are being investigated by high-resolution crystallographic examination of aporepressor/corepressor analog complexes. While addition of a methyl group on the corepressor indole (5-methyl-tryptophan) results in a small but measurable shift in the position of that functional group introduction of a methyl group on a nearby residue in the binding pocket (Val 58 {yields} Ile) leaves the indole position of L-tryptophan essentially unchanged. Careful alignment of these structures with aporepressor/L-tryptophan/operator-DNA complexes reveal why 5-methyltryptophan is a better corepressor than L-tryptophan.

  19. Optimization of a Fragment-Based Screening Hit toward Potent DOT1L Inhibitors Interacting in an Induced Binding Pocket.

    PubMed

    Scheufler, Clemens; Möbitz, Henrik; Gaul, Christoph; Ragot, Christian; Be, Céline; Fernández, César; Beyer, Kim S; Tiedt, Ralph; Stauffer, Frédéric

    2016-08-11

    Mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) gene rearrangement induces leukemic transformation by ectopic recruitment of disruptor of telomeric silencing 1-like protein (DOT1L), a lysine histone methyltransferase, leading to local hypermethylation of H3K79 and misexpression of genes (including HoxA), which drive the leukemic phenotype. A weak fragment-based screening hit identified by SPR was cocrystallized with DOT1L and optimized using structure-based ligand optimization to yield compound 8 (IC50 = 14 nM). This series of inhibitors is structurally not related to cofactor SAM and is not interacting within the SAM binding pocket but induces a pocket adjacent to the SAM binding site.

  20. PA-I lectin from Pseudomonas aeruginosa binds acyl homoserine lactones.

    PubMed

    Boteva, Raina N; Bogoeva, Vanya P; Stoitsova, Stoyanka R

    2005-03-14

    The study analyses the binding affinities of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA-I lectin (PA-IL) to three N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHSL), quorum sensing signal molecules responsible for cell-cell communication in bacteria. It shows that like some plant lectins, PA-IL has a dual function and, besides its carbohydrate-binding capacity, can accommodate AHLS. Formation of complexes between PA-IL and AHSL with acyl side chains composed of 4, 6 or 12 methyl groups is characterized by changes in the emissions of two incorporated fluorescent markers, TNS and IAEDANS, both derivatives of naphthalene sulfonic acid. PA-IL shows increasing affinities to lactones with longer aliphatic side chains. The values of the apparent dissociation constants (K(d)), which are similar to the previously determined K(d) for the adenine high affinity binding, and the similar effects of lactones and adenine on the TNS emission indicate one identical binding site for these ligands, which is suggested to represent the central cavity of the oligomeric molecule formed after the association of the four identical subunits of PA-IL. Intramolecular distances between the fluorescent markers and protein Trp residues are determined by fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET).

  1. Residues in the distal heme pocket of neuroglobin. Implications for the multiple ligand binding steps.

    PubMed

    Uno, Tadayuki; Ryu, Daisuke; Tsutsumi, Hiroko; Tomisugi, Yoshikazu; Ishikawa, Yoshinobu; Wilkinson, Anthony J; Sato, Hideaki; Hayashi, Takashi

    2004-02-13

    Amino acid residues in the ligand binding pocket of human neuroglobin have been identified by site-directed mutagenesis and their properties investigated by resonance Raman and flash photolysis methods. Wild-type neuroglobin has been shown to have six-coordinate heme in both ferric and ferrous states. Substitution of His96 by alanine leads to complete loss of heme, indicating that His96 is the proximal ligand. The resonance Raman spectra of M69L and K67T mutants were similar to those of wild-type (WT) neuroglobin in both ferric and ferrous states. By contrast, H64V was six-coordinate high-spin and five-coordinate high-spin in the ferric and ferrous states, respectively, at acidic pH. The spectra were pH-dependent and six-coordinate with the low-spin component dominating at alkaline pH. In a double mutant H64V/K67T, the high-spin component alone was detected in the both ferric and the ferrous states. This implies that His64 is the endogenous ligand and that Lys67 is situated nearby in the distal pocket. In the ferrous H64V and H64V/K67T mutants, the nu(Fe-His) stretching frequency appears at 221 cm(-1), which is similar to that of deoxymyoglobin. In the ferrous CO-bound state, the nu(Fe-CO) stretching frequency was detected at 521 and 494 cm(-1) in WT, M69L, and K67T, while only the 494 cm(-1) component was detected in the H64V and H64V/K67T mutants. Thus, the 521 cm(-1) component is attributed to the presence of polar His64. The CO binding kinetics were biphasic for WT, H64V, and K67T and monophasic for H64V/K67T. Thus, His64 and Lys67 comprise a unique distal heme pocket in neuroglobin. PMID:14645216

  2. Mutations in adenine-binding pockets enhance catalytic properties of NAD(P)H-dependent enzymes.

    PubMed

    Cahn, J K B; Baumschlager, A; Brinkmann-Chen, S; Arnold, F H

    2016-01-01

    NAD(P)H-dependent enzymes are ubiquitous in metabolism and cellular processes and are also of great interest for pharmaceutical and industrial applications. Here, we present a structure-guided enzyme engineering strategy for improving catalytic properties of NAD(P)H-dependent enzymes toward native or native-like reactions using mutations to the enzyme's adenine-binding pocket, distal to the site of catalysis. Screening single-site saturation mutagenesis libraries identified mutations that increased catalytic efficiency up to 10-fold in 7 out of 10 enzymes. The enzymes improved in this study represent three different cofactor-binding folds (Rossmann, DHQS-like, and FAD/NAD binding) and utilize both NADH and NADPH. Structural and biochemical analyses show that the improved activities are accompanied by minimal changes in other properties (cooperativity, thermostability, pH optimum, uncoupling), and initial tests on two enzymes (ScADH6 and EcFucO) show improved functionality in Escherichia coli. PMID:26512129

  3. Relative positioning of diazepam in the benzodiazepine-binding-pocket of GABA receptors.

    PubMed

    Tan, Kelly R; Baur, Roland; Charon, Sébastien; Goeldner, Maurice; Sigel, Erwin

    2009-12-01

    GABA(A) receptors are the major inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors in the brain. Some of them are targets of benzodiazepines that are widely used in clinical practice for their sedative/hypnotic, anxiolytic, muscle relaxant and anticonvulsant effects. In order to rationally separate these different drug actions, we need to understand the interaction of such compounds with the benzodiazepine-binding pocket. With this aim, we mutated residues located in the benzodiazepine-binding site individually to cysteine. These mutated receptors were combined with benzodiazepine site ligands carrying a cysteine reactive group in a defined position. Proximal apposition of reaction partners will lead to a covalent reaction. We describe here such proximity-accelerated chemical coupling reactions of alpha(1)S205C and alpha(1)T206C with a diazepam derivative modified at the C-3 position with a reactive isothiocyanate group (-NCS). We also provide new data that identify alpha(1)H101C and alpha(1)N102C as exclusive sites of the reaction of a diazepam derivative where the -Cl atom is replaced by a -NCS group. Based on these observations we propose a relative positioning of diazepam within the benzodiazepine-binding site of alpha(1)beta(2)gamma(2) receptors.

  4. Roles of the six peptide-binding pockets of the HLA-A2 molecule in allorecognition by human cytotoxic T-cell clones.

    PubMed

    Matsui, M; Hioe, C E; Frelinger, J A

    1993-01-15

    To evaluate the contribution of the major histocompatibility complex class I pockets to the binding of self-peptides recognized by alloreactive cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) clones, we have constructed an extensive library of HLA-A2 mutants with different amino acid substitutions in each of the six pockets. When these mutants were tested in cytotoxicity assays with a panel of HLA-A2-specific alloreactive CTL clones, each CTL clone showed a unique pattern of reactivity, implying the different contributions of each pocket to binding individual peptides. We noted that the majority of the mutants in pocket B significantly affect recognition by the CTL clones. Unexpectedly, the mutations influencing allorecognition are found in all other pockets as well. Overall, this study demonstrates that each of the six peptide-binding pockets plays an important and distinct role in binding of self-peptides required for recognition of the HLA-A2 molecule by alloreactive CTLs. PMID:7678462

  5. Evolutionary diversification of retinoic acid receptor ligand-binding pocket structure by molecular tinkering

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez-Mazariegos, Juliana; Nadendla, Eswar Kumar; Studer, Romain A.; Alvarez, Susana; de Lera, Angel R.; Kuraku, Shigehiro; Bourguet, William; Laudet, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Whole genome duplications (WGDs) have been classically associated with the origin of evolutionary novelties and the so-called duplication–degeneration–complementation model describes the possible fates of genes after duplication. However, how sequence divergence effectively allows functional changes between gene duplicates is still unclear. In the vertebrate lineage, two rounds of WGDs took place, giving rise to paralogous gene copies observed for many gene families. For the retinoic acid receptors (RARs), for example, which are members of the nuclear hormone receptor (NR) superfamily, a unique ancestral gene has been duplicated resulting in three vertebrate paralogues: RARα, RARβ and RARγ. It has previously been shown that this single ancestral RAR was neofunctionalized to give rise to a larger substrate specificity range in the RARs of extant jawed vertebrates (also called gnathostomes). To understand RAR diversification, the members of the cyclostomes (lamprey and hagfish), jawless vertebrates representing the extant sister group of gnathostomes, provide an intermediate situation and thus allow the characterization of the evolutionary steps that shaped RAR ligand-binding properties following the WGDs. In this study, we assessed the ligand-binding specificity of cyclostome RARs and found that their ligand-binding pockets resemble those of gnathostome RARα and RARβ. In contrast, none of the cyclostome receptors studied showed any RARγ-like specificity. Together, our results suggest that cyclostome RARs cover only a portion of the specificity repertoire of the ancestral gnathostome RARs and indicate that the establishment of ligand-binding specificity was a stepwise event. This iterative process thus provides a rare example for the diversification of receptor–ligand interactions of NRs following WGDs. PMID:27069642

  6. Angiotensin type 1 receptor resistance to blockade in the opossum proximal tubule cell due to variations in the binding pocket.

    PubMed

    Nistala, Ravi; Andresen, Bradley T; Pulakat, Lakshmi; Meuth, Alex; Sinak, Catherine; Mandavia, Chirag; Thekkumkara, Thomas; Speth, Robert C; Whaley-Connell, Adam; Sowers, James R

    2013-04-15

    Blockade of the angiotensin (ANG) II receptor type 1 (AT(1)R) with angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) is widely used in the treatment of hypertension. However, ARBs are variably effective in reducing blood pressure, likely due, in part, to polymorphisms in the ARB binding pocket of the AT(1)R. Therefore, we need a better understanding of variations/polymorphisms that alter binding of ARBs in heterogeneous patient populations. The opossum proximal tubule cell (OKP) line is commonly used in research to evaluate renal sodium handling and therefore blood pressure. Investigating this issue, we found natural sequence variations in the opossum AT(1)R paralleling those observed in the human AT(1)R. Therefore, we posited that these sequence variations may explain ARB resistance. We demonstrate that OKP cells express AT(1)R mRNA, bind (125)I-labeled ANG II, and exhibit ANG II-induced phosphorylation of Jak2. However, Jak2 phosphorylation is not inhibited by five different ARBs commonly used to treat hypertension. Additionally, nonradioactive ANG II competes (125)I-ANG II efficiently, whereas a 10-fold molar excess of olmesartan and the ANG II receptor type 2 blocker PD-123319 is unable to block (125)I-ANG II binding. In contrast, ANG II binding to OKP cells stably expressing rat AT(1A)Rs, which have a conserved AT(1)R-binding pocket with human AT(1)R, is efficiently inhibited by olmesartan. A novel observation was that resistance to ARB binding to opossum AT(1)Rs correlates with variations from the human receptor at positions 108, 163, 192, and 198 within the ARB-binding pocket. These observations highlight the potential utility of evaluating AT(1)R polymorphisms within the ARB-binding pocket in various hypertensive populations.

  7. Angiotensin type 1 receptor resistance to blockade in the opossum proximal tubule cell due to variations in the binding pocket

    PubMed Central

    Nistala, Ravi; Andresen, Bradley T.; Pulakat, Lakshmi; Meuth, Alex; Sinak, Catherine; Mandavia, Chirag; Thekkumkara, Thomas; Speth, Robert C.; Whaley-Connell, Adam

    2013-01-01

    Blockade of the angiotensin (ANG) II receptor type 1 (AT1R) with angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) is widely used in the treatment of hypertension. However, ARBs are variably effective in reducing blood pressure, likely due, in part, to polymorphisms in the ARB binding pocket of the AT1R. Therefore, we need a better understanding of variations/polymorphisms that alter binding of ARBs in heterogeneous patient populations. The opossum proximal tubule cell (OKP) line is commonly used in research to evaluate renal sodium handling and therefore blood pressure. Investigating this issue, we found natural sequence variations in the opossum AT1R paralleling those observed in the human AT1R. Therefore, we posited that these sequence variations may explain ARB resistance. We demonstrate that OKP cells express AT1R mRNA, bind 125I-labeled ANG II, and exhibit ANG II-induced phosphorylation of Jak2. However, Jak2 phosphorylation is not inhibited by five different ARBs commonly used to treat hypertension. Additionally, nonradioactive ANG II competes 125I-ANG II efficiently, whereas a 10-fold molar excess of olmesartan and the ANG II receptor type 2 blocker PD-123319 is unable to block 125I-ANG II binding. In contrast, ANG II binding to OKP cells stably expressing rat AT1ARs, which have a conserved AT1R-binding pocket with human AT1R, is efficiently inhibited by olmesartan. A novel observation was that resistance to ARB binding to opossum AT1Rs correlates with variations from the human receptor at positions 108, 163, 192, and 198 within the ARB-binding pocket. These observations highlight the potential utility of evaluating AT1R polymorphisms within the ARB-binding pocket in various hypertensive populations. PMID:23389452

  8. Auxin-binding pocket of ABP1 is crucial for its gain-of-function cellular and developmental roles.

    PubMed

    Grones, Peter; Chen, Xu; Simon, Sibu; Kaufmann, Walter A; De Rycke, Riet; Nodzyński, Tomasz; Zažímalová, Eva; Friml, Jiří

    2015-08-01

    The plant hormone auxin is a key regulator of plant growth and development. Auxin levels are sensed and interpreted by distinct receptor systems that activate a broad range of cellular responses. The Auxin-Binding Protein1 (ABP1) that has been identified based on its ability to bind auxin with high affinity is a prime candidate for the extracellular receptor responsible for mediating a range of auxin effects, in particular, the fast non-transcriptional ones. Contradictory genetic studies suggested prominent or no importance of ABP1 in many developmental processes. However, how crucial the role of auxin binding to ABP1 is for its functions has not been addressed. Here, we show that the auxin-binding pocket of ABP1 is essential for its gain-of-function cellular and developmental roles. In total, 16 different abp1 mutants were prepared that possessed substitutions in the metal core or in the hydrophobic amino acids of the auxin-binding pocket as well as neutral mutations. Their analysis revealed that an intact auxin-binding pocket is a prerequisite for ABP1 to activate downstream components of the ABP1 signalling pathway, such as Rho of Plants (ROPs) and to mediate the clathrin association with membranes for endocytosis regulation. In planta analyses demonstrated the importance of the auxin binding pocket for all known ABP1-mediated postembryonic developmental processes, including morphology of leaf epidermal cells, root growth and root meristem activity, and vascular tissue differentiation. Taken together, these findings suggest that auxin binding to ABP1 is central to its function, supporting the role of ABP1 as auxin receptor.

  9. Pancreatic Polypeptide Is Recognized by Two Hydrophobic Domains of the Human Y4 Receptor Binding Pocket*

    PubMed Central

    Pedragosa-Badia, Xavier; Sliwoski, Gregory R.; Dong Nguyen, Elizabeth; Lindner, Diana; Stichel, Jan; Kaufmann, Kristian W.; Meiler, Jens; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G.

    2014-01-01

    Structural characterization of the human Y4 receptor (hY4R) interaction with human pancreatic polypeptide (hPP) is crucial, not only for understanding its biological function but also for testing treatment strategies for obesity that target this interaction. Here, the interaction of receptor mutants with pancreatic polypeptide analogs was studied through double-cycle mutagenesis. To guide mutagenesis and interpret results, a three-dimensional comparative model of the hY4R-hPP complex was constructed based on all available class A G protein-coupled receptor crystal structures and refined using experimental data. Our study reveals that residues of the hPP and the hY4R form a complex network consisting of ionic interactions, hydrophobic interactions, and hydrogen binding. Residues Tyr2.64, Asp2.68, Asn6.55, Asn7.32, and Phe7.35 of Y4R are found to be important in receptor activation by hPP. Specifically, Tyr2.64 interacts with Tyr27 of hPP through hydrophobic contacts. Asn7.32 is affected by modifications on position Arg33 of hPP, suggesting a hydrogen bond between these two residues. Likewise, we find that Phe7.35 is affected by modifications of hPP at positions 33 and 36, indicating interactions between these three amino acids. Taken together, we demonstrate that the top of transmembrane helix 2 (TM2) and the top of transmembrane helices 6 and 7 (TM6–TM7) form the core of the peptide binding pocket. These findings will contribute to the rational design of ligands that bind the receptor more effectively to produce an enhanced agonistic or antagonistic effect. PMID:24375409

  10. Protein interactors of acyl-CoA-binding protein ACBP2 mediate cadmium tolerance in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wei; Li, Hong-Ye; Xiao, Shi; Chye, Mee-Len

    2010-08-01

    In our recent paper in the Plant Journal, we reported that Arabidopsis thaliana lysophospholipase 2 (lysoPL2) binds acyl-CoA-binding protein 2 (ACBP2) to mediate cadmium [Cd(II)] tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis. ACBP2 contains ankyrin repeats that have been previously shown to mediate protein-protein interactions with an ethylene-responsive element binding protein (AtEBP) and a farnesylated protein 6 (AtFP6). Transgenic Arabidopsis ACBP2-overexpressors, lysoPL2-overexpressors and AtFP6-overexpressors all display enhanced Cd(II) tolerance, in comparison to wild type, suggesting that ACBP2 and its protein partners work together to mediate Cd(II) tolerance. Given that recombinant ACBP2 and AtFP6 can independently bind Cd(II) in vitro, they may be able to participate in Cd(II) translocation. The binding of recombinant ACBP2 to [(14)C]linoleoyl-CoA and [(14)C]linolenoyl-CoA implies its role in phospholipid repair. In conclusion, ACBP2 can mediate tolerance to Cd(II)-induced oxidative stress by interacting with two protein partners, AtFP6 and lysoPL2. Observations that ACBP2 also binds lysophosphatidylcholine (lysoPC) in vitro and that recombinant lysoPL2 degrades lysoPC, further confirm an interactive role for ACBP2 and lysoPL2 in overcoming Cd(II)-induced stress.

  11. Structures of BmrR-Drug Complexes Reveal a Rigid Multidrug Binding Pocket And Transcription Activation Through Tyrosine Expulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Newberry, K.J.; Huffman, J.L.; Miller, M.C.; Vazquez-Laslop, N.; Neyfakh, A.A.; Brennan, R.G.

    2009-05-22

    BmrR is a member of the MerR family and a multidrug binding transcription factor that up-regulates the expression of the bmr multidrug efflux transporter gene in response to myriad lipophilic cationic compounds. The structural mechanism by which BmrR binds these chemically and structurally different drugs and subsequently activates transcription is poorly understood. Here, we describe the crystal structures of BmrR bound to rhodamine 6G (R6G) or berberine (Ber) and cognate DNA. These structures reveal each drug stacks against multiple aromatic residues with their positive charges most proximal to the carboxylate group of Glu-253 and that, unlike other multidrug binding pockets, that of BmrR is rigid. Substitution of Glu-253 with either alanine (E253A) or glutamine (E253Q) results in unpredictable binding affinities for R6G, Ber, and tetraphenylphosphonium. Moreover, these drug binding studies reveal that the negative charge of Glu-253 is not important for high affinity binding to Ber and tetraphenylphosphonium but plays a more significant, but unpredictable, role in R6G binding. In vitro transcription data show that E253A and E253Q are constitutively active, and structures of the drug-free E253A-DNA and E253Q-DNA complexes support a transcription activation mechanism requiring the expulsion of Tyr-152 from the multidrug binding pocket. In sum, these data delineate the mechanism by which BmrR binds lipophilic, monovalent cationic compounds and suggest the importance of the redundant negative electrostatic nature of this rigid drug binding pocket that can be used to discriminate against molecules that are not substrates of the Bmr multidrug efflux pump.

  12. Probing a Polar Cluster in the Retinal Binding Pocket of Bacteriorhodopsin by a Chemical Design Approach

    PubMed Central

    Simón-Vázquez, Rosana; Domínguez, Marta; Lórenz-Fonfría, Víctor A.; Álvarez, Susana; Bourdelande, José-Luís; de Lera, Ángel R.; Padrós, Esteve; Perálvarez-Marín, Alex

    2012-01-01

    Bacteriorhodopsin has a polar cluster of amino acids surrounding the retinal molecule, which is responsible for light harvesting to fuel proton pumping. From our previous studies, we have shown that threonine 90 is the pivotal amino acid in this polar cluster, both functionally and structurally. In an attempt to perform a phenotype rescue, we have chemically designed a retinal analogue molecule to compensate the drastic effects of the T90A mutation in bacteriorhodopsin. This analogue substitutes the methyl group at position C13 of the retinal hydrocarbon chain by and ethyl group (20-methyl retinal). We have analyzed the effect of reconstituting the wild-type and the T90A mutant apoproteins with all-trans-retinal and its 20-methyl derivative (hereafter, 13-ethyl retinal). Biophysical characterization indicates that recovering the steric interaction between the residue 90 and retinal, eases the accommodation of the chromophore, however it is not enough for a complete phenotype rescue. The characterization of these chemically engineered chromoproteins provides further insight into the role of the hydrogen bond network and the steric interactions involving the retinal binding pocket in bacteriorhodopsin and other microbial sensory rhodopsins. PMID:22879987

  13. Structure-guided development of specific pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase inhibitors targeting the ATP-binding pocket.

    PubMed

    Tso, Shih-Chia; Qi, Xiangbing; Gui, Wen-Jun; Wu, Cheng-Yang; Chuang, Jacinta L; Wernstedt-Asterholm, Ingrid; Morlock, Lorraine K; Owens, Kyle R; Scherer, Philipp E; Williams, Noelle S; Tambar, Uttam K; Wynn, R Max; Chuang, David T

    2014-02-14

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase isoforms (PDKs 1-4) negatively regulate activity of the mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex by reversible phosphorylation. PDK isoforms are up-regulated in obesity, diabetes, heart failure, and cancer and are potential therapeutic targets for these important human diseases. Here, we employed a structure-guided design to convert a known Hsp90 inhibitor to a series of highly specific PDK inhibitors, based on structural conservation in the ATP-binding pocket. The key step involved the substitution of a carbonyl group in the parent compound with a sulfonyl in the PDK inhibitors. The final compound of this series, 2-[(2,4-dihydroxyphenyl)sulfonyl]isoindoline-4,6-diol, designated PS10, inhibits all four PDK isoforms with IC50 = 0.8 μM for PDK2. The administration of PS10 (70 mg/kg) to diet-induced obese mice significantly augments pyruvate dehydrogenase complex activity with reduced phosphorylation in different tissues. Prolonged PS10 treatments result in improved glucose tolerance and notably lessened hepatic steatosis in the mouse model. The results support the pharmacological approach of targeting PDK to control both glucose and fat levels in obesity and type 2 diabetes. PMID:24356970

  14. AcrB drug-binding pocket substitution confers clinically relevant resistance and altered substrate specificity

    PubMed Central

    Blair, Jessica M. A.; Bavro, Vassiliy N.; Ricci, Vito; Modi, Niraj; Cacciotto, Pierpaolo; Kleinekathӧfer, Ulrich; Ruggerone, Paolo; Vargiu, Attilio V.; Baylay, Alison J.; Smith, Helen E.; Brandon, Yvonne; Galloway, David; Piddock, Laura J. V.

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of multidrug-resistant bacterial infections is increasing globally and the need to understand the underlying mechanisms is paramount to discover new therapeutics. The efflux pumps of Gram-negative bacteria have a broad substrate range and transport antibiotics out of the bacterium, conferring intrinsic multidrug resistance (MDR). The genomes of pre- and posttherapy MDR clinical isolates of Salmonella Typhimurium from a patient that failed antibacterial therapy and died were sequenced. In the posttherapy isolate we identified a novel G288D substitution in AcrB, the resistance-nodulation division transporter in the AcrAB-TolC tripartite MDR efflux pump system. Computational structural analysis suggested that G288D in AcrB heavily affects the structure, dynamics, and hydration properties of the distal binding pocket altering specificity for antibacterial drugs. Consistent with this hypothesis, recreation of the mutation in standard Escherichia coli and Salmonella strains showed that G288D AcrB altered substrate specificity, conferring decreased susceptibility to the fluoroquinolone antibiotic ciprofloxacin by increased efflux. At the same time, the substitution increased susceptibility to other drugs by decreased efflux. Information about drug transport is vital for the discovery of new antibacterials; the finding that one amino acid change can cause resistance to some drugs, while conferring increased susceptibility to others, could provide a basis for new drug development and treatment strategies. PMID:25737552

  15. Modulation of NO binding to cytochrome c' by distal and proximal haem pocket residues.

    PubMed

    Barbieri, Sonia; Murphy, Loretta M; Sawers, R Gary; Eady, Robert R; Hasnain, S Samar

    2008-05-01

    We have cloned and expressed the cycP gene encoding cytochrome c' from Alcaligenes xylosoxidans and generated mutations in Arg-124 and Phe-59, residues close to the haem, to probe their involvement in modulating the unusual spin-state equilibrium of the haem Fe and the unique proximal mode of binding of NO to form a stable five-coordinate adduct. Arg-124 is located in the proximal pocket of the haem and forms a hydrogen bond to the stable five-coordinated bound NO. Phe-59 provides steric hindrance at the distal face where NO binds initially to form a six-coordinate adduct. Optical spectroscopy showed altered electronic properties of the oxidised haem centre resulting from the mutations of both residues. The high affinity of the ferrous proteins for NO remained unchanged and all of the mutational variants formed a stable five-coordinate NO species (lambda(Soret) 395 nm) in the presence of stoichiometric concentrations of NO. However, the kinetics of the reactivity towards NO were altered, with mutation of the distal Phe-59 residue resulting in the transient six-coordinate distally bound NO adduct (lambda(Soret) 415 nm) not being detected. Surprisingly, substitution of the proximal residue Arg-124 with Phe, Ala, Gln or Glu also resulted in the six-coordinate adduct not being detected, showing that this proximal residue also modulates reactivity towards NO on the opposite haem face. In contrast, the R124L substitution retained the property of the native protein in the initial formation of a six-coordinate NO adduct, a finding of functional importance since a Lys or an Arg residue is invariant in these proteins.

  16. Deciphering the roles of acyl-CoA-binding proteins in plant cells.

    PubMed

    Lung, Shiu-Cheung; Chye, Mee-Len

    2016-09-01

    Lipid trafficking is vital for metabolite exchange and signal communications between organelles and endomembranes. Acyl-CoA-binding proteins (ACBPs) are involved in the intracellular transport, protection, and pool formation of acyl-CoA esters, which are important intermediates and regulators in lipid metabolism and cellular signaling. In this review, we highlight recent advances in our understanding of plant ACBP families from a cellular and developmental perspective. Plant ACBPs have been extensively studied in Arabidopsis thaliana (a dicot) and to a lesser extent in Oryza sativa (a monocot). Thus far, they have been detected in the plasma membrane, vesicles, endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus, apoplast, cytosol, nuclear periphery, and peroxisomes. In combination with biochemical and molecular genetic tools, the widespread subcellular distribution of respective ACBP members has been explicitly linked to their functions in lipid metabolism during development and in response to stresses. At the cellular level, strong expression of specific ACBP homologs in specialized cells, such as embryos, stem epidermis, guard cells, male gametophytes, and phloem sap, is of relevance to their corresponding distinct roles in organ development and stress responses. Other interesting patterns in their subcellular localization and spatial expression that prompt new directions in future investigations are discussed. PMID:26340904

  17. Conformational Plasticity of the NNRTI-Binding Pocket in HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase: A Fluorine Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Study.

    PubMed

    Sharaf, Naima G; Ishima, Rieko; Gronenborn, Angela M

    2016-07-19

    HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) is a major drug target in the treatment of HIV-1 infection. RT inhibitors currently in use include non-nucleoside, allosteric RT inhibitors (NNRTIs), which bind to a hydrophobic pocket, distinct from the enzyme's active site. We investigated RT-NNRTI interactions by solution (19)F nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), using singly (19)F-labeled RT proteins. Comparison of (19)F chemical shifts of fluorinated RT and drug-resistant variants revealed that the fluorine resonance is a sensitive probe for identifying mutation-induced changes in the enzyme. Our data show that in the unliganded enzyme, the NNRTI-binding pocket is highly plastic and not locked into a single conformation. Upon inhibitor binding, the binding pocket becomes rigidified. In the inhibitor-bound state, the (19)F signal of RT is similar to that of drug-resistant mutant enzymes, distinct from what is observed for the free state. Our results demonstrate the power of (19)F NMR spectroscopy to characterize conformational properties using selectively (19)F-labeled protein. PMID:27163463

  18. Conformational Plasticity of the NNRTI-Binding Pocket in HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase: A Fluorine Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Study.

    PubMed

    Sharaf, Naima G; Ishima, Rieko; Gronenborn, Angela M

    2016-07-19

    HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) is a major drug target in the treatment of HIV-1 infection. RT inhibitors currently in use include non-nucleoside, allosteric RT inhibitors (NNRTIs), which bind to a hydrophobic pocket, distinct from the enzyme's active site. We investigated RT-NNRTI interactions by solution (19)F nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), using singly (19)F-labeled RT proteins. Comparison of (19)F chemical shifts of fluorinated RT and drug-resistant variants revealed that the fluorine resonance is a sensitive probe for identifying mutation-induced changes in the enzyme. Our data show that in the unliganded enzyme, the NNRTI-binding pocket is highly plastic and not locked into a single conformation. Upon inhibitor binding, the binding pocket becomes rigidified. In the inhibitor-bound state, the (19)F signal of RT is similar to that of drug-resistant mutant enzymes, distinct from what is observed for the free state. Our results demonstrate the power of (19)F NMR spectroscopy to characterize conformational properties using selectively (19)F-labeled protein.

  19. G protein-coupled receptor transmembrane binding pockets and their applications in GPCR research and drug discovery: a survey.

    PubMed

    Kratochwil, Nicole A; Gatti-McArthur, Silvia; Hoener, Marius C; Lindemann, Lothar; Christ, Andreas D; Green, Luke G; Guba, Wolfgang; Martin, Rainer E; Malherbe, Pari; Porter, Richard H P; Slack, Jay P; Winnig, Marcel; Dehmlow, Henrietta; Grether, Uwe; Hertel, Cornelia; Narquizian, Robert; Panousis, Constantinos G; Kolczewski, Sabine; Steward, Lucinda

    2011-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) share a common architecture consisting of seven transmembrane (TM) domains. Various lines of evidence suggest that this fold provides a generic binding pocket within the TM region for hosting agonists, antagonists, and allosteric modulators. Hence, an automated method was developed that allows a fast analysis and comparison of these generic ligand binding pockets across the entire GPCR family by providing the relevant information for all GPCRs in the same format. This methodology compiles amino acids lining the TM binding pocket including parts of the ECL2 loop in a so-called 1D ligand binding pocket vector and translates these 1D vectors in a second step into 3D receptor pharmacophore models. It aims to support various aspects of GPCR drug discovery in the pharmaceutical industry. Applications of pharmacophore similarity analysis of these 1D LPVs include definition of receptor subfamilies, prediction of species differences within subfamilies in regard to in vitro pharmacology and identification of nearest neighbors for GPCRs of interest to generate starting points for GPCR lead identification programs. These aspects of GPCR research are exemplified in the field of melanopsins, trace amine-associated receptors and somatostatin receptor subtype 5. In addition, it is demonstrated how 3D pharmacophore models of the LPVs can support the prediction of amino acids involved in ligand recognition, the understanding of mutational data in a 3D context and the elucidation of binding modes for GPCR ligands and their evaluation. Furthermore, guidance through 3D receptor pharmacophore modeling for the synthesis of subtype-specific GPCR ligands will be reported. Illustrative examples are taken from the GPCR family class C, metabotropic glutamate receptors 1 and 5 and sweet taste receptors, and from the GPCR class A, e.g. nicotinic acid and 5-hydroxytryptamine 5A receptor.

  20. Delineating a Ca2+ binding pocket within the venus flytrap module of the human calcium-sensing receptor.

    PubMed

    Silve, Caroline; Petrel, Christophe; Leroy, Christine; Bruel, Henri; Mallet, Eric; Rognan, Didier; Ruat, Martial

    2005-11-11

    The Ca(2+)-sensing receptor (CaSR) belongs to the class III G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), which include receptors for pheromones, amino acids, sweeteners, and the neurotransmitters glutamate and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). These receptors are characterized by a long extracellular amino-terminal domain called a Venus flytrap module (VFTM) containing the ligand binding pocket. To elucidate the molecular determinants implicated in Ca(2+) recognition by the CaSR VFTM, we developed a homology model of the human CaSR VFTM from the x-ray structure of the metabotropic glutamate receptor type 1 (mGluR1), and a phylogenetic analysis of 14 class III GPCR VFTMs. We identified critical amino acids delineating a Ca(2+) binding pocket predicted to be adjacent to, but distinct from, a cavity reminiscent of the binding site described for amino acids in mGluRs, GABA-B receptor, and GPRC6a. Most interestingly, these Ca(2+)-contacting residues are well conserved within class III GPCR VFTMs. Our model was validated by mutational and functional analysis, including the characterization of activating and inactivating mutations affecting a single amino acid, Glu-297, located within the proposed Ca(2+) binding pocket of the CaSR and associated with autosomal dominant hypocalcemia and familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia, respectively, genetic diseases characterized by perturbations in Ca(2+) homeostasis. Altogether, these data define a Ca(2+) binding pocket within the CaSR VFTM that may be conserved in several other class III GPCRs, thereby providing a molecular basis for extracellular Ca(2+) sensing by these receptors. PMID:16147994

  1. Access Path to the Ligand Binding Pocket May Play a Role in Xenobiotics Selection by AhR

    PubMed Central

    Szöllősi, Dániel; Erdei, Áron; Gyimesi, Gergely; Magyar, Csaba; Hegedűs, Tamás

    2016-01-01

    Understanding of multidrug binding at the atomic level would facilitate drug design and strategies to modulate drug metabolism, including drug transport, oxidation, and conjugation. Therefore we explored the mechanism of promiscuous binding of small molecules by studying the ligand binding domain, the PAS-B domain of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). Because of the low sequence identities of PAS domains to be used for homology modeling, structural features of the widely employed HIF-2α and a more recent suitable template, CLOCK were compared. These structures were used to build AhR PAS-B homology models. We performed molecular dynamics simulations to characterize dynamic properties of the PAS-B domain and the generated conformational ensembles were employed in in silico docking. In order to understand structural and ligand binding features we compared the stability and dynamics of the promiscuous AhR PAS-B to other PAS domains exhibiting specific interactions or no ligand binding function. Our exhaustive in silico binding studies, in which we dock a wide spectrum of ligand molecules to the conformational ensembles, suggest that ligand specificity and selection may be determined not only by the PAS-B domain itself, but also by other parts of AhR and its protein interacting partners. We propose that ligand binding pocket and access channels leading to the pocket play equally important roles in discrimination of endogenous molecules and xenobiotics. PMID:26727491

  2. Both major and minor peptide-binding pockets in HLA-A2 influence the presentation of influenza virus matrix peptide to cytotoxic T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Teng, J M; Hogan, K T

    1994-04-01

    Most of the polymorphic residues in class I MHC molecules are concentrated in the alpha 1- and alpha 2-domains with their side chains pointing towards the antigen peptide site. Previous crystal structure analysis revealed six pockets inside the peptide-binding groove and the "extra" electron density in some of the pockets indicated that the pockets are involved in direct peptide binding. In order to investigate the functional role of individual positions from each pocket in antigen presentation, 37 HLA-A2 variants with single amino acid substitution in the peptide-binding groove were generated and used to analyse the specificity of influenza A virus matrix peptide-specific, HLA-A2-restricted CTL. The ability to present peptide by each variant was studied in detail by peptide titration, cold target inhibition, time course and limiting dilution analysis. The direct effect on peptide binding by these substitutions was determined by cell surface class I MHC molecule reconstitution analysis. The results demonstrated that each of the six peptide binding pockets plays a role in T cell recognition. Substitutions introduced into pocket F had less effect on CTL recognition than substitutions introduced in other pockets. With the exception of Tyr substitution for Phe9, single amino acid substitutions in the peptide-binding groove had only minor effects on peptide binding. Therefore, the impact of the substitutions in altering the epitopes recognized by CTL seems to be mediated through an alteration in the conformation of the bound peptide.

  3. Assembly-directed antivirals differentially bind quasi-equivalent pockets to modify HBV capsid tertiary and quaternary structure

    PubMed Central

    Katen, Sarah P.; Tan, Zhenning; Chirapu, Srinivas Reddy; Finn, MG; Zlotnick, Adam

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) is a major cause of liver disease. Assembly of the HBV capsid is a critical step in virus production and an attractive target for new antiviral therapies. We determined the structure of HBV capsid in complex with AT-130, a member of the phenylpropenamide family of assembly effectors. AT-130 causes tertiary and quaternary structural changes, but does not disrupt capsid structure. AT-130 binds a hydrophobic pocket that also accommodates the previously characterized HAP compounds, but favors a unique quasi-equivalent location on the capsid surface. Thus, this pocket is a promiscuous drug binding site and a likely target for different assembly effectors with a broad range of mechanisms of activity. That AT-130 successfully decreases virus production by increasing capsid assembly rate without disrupting capsid structure delineates a new paradigm in antiviral design, that disrupting reaction timing is a viable strategy for assembly effectors of HBV and other viruses. PMID:23871485

  4. Characterization of an acyl-coenzyme A binding protein predominantly expressed in human primitive progenitor cells*s⃞

    PubMed Central

    Soupene, Eric; Serikov, Vladimir; Kuypers, Frans A.

    2008-01-01

    Human acyl-coenzyme A binding domain-containing member 6 (ACBD6) is a modular protein that carries an acyl-CoA binding domain at its N terminus and two ankyrin motifs at its C terminus. ACBD6 binds long-chain acyl-CoAs with a strong preference for unsaturated, C18:1-CoA and C20:4-CoA, over saturated, C16:0-CoA, acyl species. Deletion of the C terminus, which is not conserved among the members of this family, did not affect the binding capacity or the substrate specificity of the protein. ACBD6 is not a ubiquitous protein, and its expression is restricted to tissues and progenitor cells with functions in blood and vessel development. ACBD6 was detected in bone marrow, spleen, placenta, cord blood, circulating CD34+ progenitors, and embryonic-like stem cells derived from placenta. In placenta, the protein was only detected in CD34+ progenitor cells present in blood and in CD31+ endothelial cells surrounding the blood vessels. These cells were also positive for the marker CD133, and they probably constitute hemangiogenic stem cells, precursors of both blood and vessels. We propose that human ACBD6 represents a cellular marker for primitive progenitor cells with functions in hematopoiesis and vascular endothelium development. PMID:18268358

  5. Molecular properties of the class III subfamily of acyl-coenyzme A binding proteins from tung tree (Vernicia fordii)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Acyl-CoA binding proteins (ACBPs) have been identified in most branches of life. A single prototypical ACBP was first discovered in yeast, and was found to play a signficant role in lipid metabolism, among other functions. Plants also contain the prototype small, soluble ACBP, but have also evolve...

  6. A hydrophobic loop in acyl-CoA binding protein is functionally important for binding to palmitoyl-coenzyme A: a molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Vallejo, Diego F G; Grigera, J Raúl; Costabel, Marcelo D

    2008-04-01

    Acyl-CoA binding protein (ACBP) plays a key role in lipid metabolism, interacting via a partly unknown mechanism with high affinity with long chain fatty acyl-CoAs (LCFA-CoAs). At present there is no study of the microscopic way ligand binding is accomplished. We analyzed this process by molecular dynamics (MDs) simulations. We proposed a computational model of ligand, able to reproduce some evidence from nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) data, quantitative time resolved fluorometry and X-ray crystallography. We found that a hydrophobic loop, not in the active site, is important for function. Besides, multiple sequence alignment shows hydrophobicity (and not the residues itselves) conservation.

  7. Production of a Brassica napus Low-Molecular Mass Acyl-Coenzyme A-Binding Protein in Arabidopsis Alters the Acyl-Coenzyme A Pool and Acyl Composition of Oil in Seeds1[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Yurchenko, Olga; Singer, Stacy D.; Nykiforuk, Cory L.; Gidda, Satinder; Mullen, Robert T.; Moloney, Maurice M.; Weselake, Randall J.

    2014-01-01

    Low-molecular mass (10 kD) cytosolic acyl-coenzyme A-binding protein (ACBP) has a substantial influence over fatty acid (FA) composition in oilseeds, possibly via an effect on the partitioning of acyl groups between elongation and desaturation pathways. Previously, we demonstrated that the expression of a Brassica napus ACBP (BnACBP) complementary DNA in the developing seeds of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) resulted in increased levels of polyunsaturated FAs at the expense of eicosenoic acid (20:1cisΔ11) and saturated FAs in seed oil. In this study, we investigated whether alterations in the FA composition of seed oil at maturity were correlated with changes in the acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) pool in developing seeds of transgenic Arabidopsis expressing BnACBP. Our results indicated that both the acyl-CoA pool and seed oil of transgenic Arabidopsis lines expressing cytosolic BnACBP exhibited relative increases in linoleic acid (18:2cisΔ9,12; 17.9%–44.4% and 7%–13.2%, respectively) and decreases in 20:1cisΔ11 (38.7%–60.7% and 13.8%–16.3%, respectively). However, alterations in the FA composition of the acyl-CoA pool did not always correlate with those seen in the seed oil. In addition, we found that targeting of BnACBP to the endoplasmic reticulum resulted in FA compositional changes that were similar to those seen in lines expressing cytosolic BnACBP, with the most prominent exception being a relative reduction in α-linolenic acid (18:3cisΔ9,12,15) in both the acyl-CoA pool and seed oil of the former (48.4%–48.9% and 5.3%–10.4%, respectively). Overall, these data support the role of ACBP in acyl trafficking in developing seeds and validate its use as a biotechnological tool for modifying the FA composition of seed oil. PMID:24740000

  8. The Phosphocholine-binding Pocket on C-reactive Protein Is Necessary for Initial Protection of Mice against Pneumococcal Infection*

    PubMed Central

    Gang, Toh B.; Hammond, David J.; Singh, Sanjay K.; Ferguson, Donald A.; Mishra, Vinod K.; Agrawal, Alok

    2012-01-01

    Human C-reactive protein (CRP) protects mice from lethal Streptococcus pneumoniae infection when injected into mice within the range of 6 h before to 2 h after the administration of pneumococci. Because CRP binds to phosphocholine-containing substances and subsequently activates the complement system, it has been proposed that the antipneumococcal function of CRP requires the binding of CRP to phosphocholine moieties present in pneumococcal cell wall C-polysaccharide. To test this proposal experimentally, in this study, we utilized a new CRP mutant incapable of binding to phosphocholine. Based on the structure of CRP-phosphocholine complexes, which showed that Phe66, Thr76, and Glu81 formed the phosphocholine-binding pocket, we constructed a CRP mutant F66A/T76Y/E81A in which the pocket was blocked by substituting Tyr for Thr76. When compared with wild-type CRP, mutant CRP bound more avidly to phosphoethanolamine and could be purified by affinity chromatography using phosphoethanolamine-conjugated Sepharose. Mutant CRP did not bind to phosphocholine, C-polysaccharide, or pneumococci. Mutant CRP was free in the mouse serum, and its rate of clearance in vivo was not faster than that of wild-type CRP. When either 25 μg or 150 μg of CRP was administered into mice, unlike wild-type CRP, mutant CRP did not protect mice from lethal pneumococcal infection. Mice injected with mutant CRP had higher mortality rates than mice that received wild-type CRP. Decreased survival was due to the increased bacteremia in mice treated with mutant CRP. We conclude that the phosphocholine-binding pocket on CRP is necessary for CRP-mediated initial protection of mice against lethal pneumococcal infection. PMID:23139417

  9. The phosphocholine-binding pocket on C-reactive protein is necessary for initial protection of mice against pneumococcal infection.

    PubMed

    Gang, Toh B; Hammond, David J; Singh, Sanjay K; Ferguson, Donald A; Mishra, Vinod K; Agrawal, Alok

    2012-12-14

    Human C-reactive protein (CRP) protects mice from lethal Streptococcus pneumoniae infection when injected into mice within the range of 6 h before to 2 h after the administration of pneumococci. Because CRP binds to phosphocholine-containing substances and subsequently activates the complement system, it has been proposed that the antipneumococcal function of CRP requires the binding of CRP to phosphocholine moieties present in pneumococcal cell wall C-polysaccharide. To test this proposal experimentally, in this study, we utilized a new CRP mutant incapable of binding to phosphocholine. Based on the structure of CRP-phosphocholine complexes, which showed that Phe(66), Thr(76), and Glu(81) formed the phosphocholine-binding pocket, we constructed a CRP mutant F66A/T76Y/E81A in which the pocket was blocked by substituting Tyr for Thr(76). When compared with wild-type CRP, mutant CRP bound more avidly to phosphoethanolamine and could be purified by affinity chromatography using phosphoethanolamine-conjugated Sepharose. Mutant CRP did not bind to phosphocholine, C-polysaccharide, or pneumococci. Mutant CRP was free in the mouse serum, and its rate of clearance in vivo was not faster than that of wild-type CRP. When either 25 μg or 150 μg of CRP was administered into mice, unlike wild-type CRP, mutant CRP did not protect mice from lethal pneumococcal infection. Mice injected with mutant CRP had higher mortality rates than mice that received wild-type CRP. Decreased survival was due to the increased bacteremia in mice treated with mutant CRP. We conclude that the phosphocholine-binding pocket on CRP is necessary for CRP-mediated initial protection of mice against lethal pneumococcal infection. PMID:23139417

  10. Reversible acyl-homoserine lactone binding to purified Vibrio fischeri LuxR protein.

    PubMed

    Urbanowski, M L; Lostroh, C P; Greenberg, E P

    2004-02-01

    The Vibrio fischeri LuxR protein is the founding member of a family of acyl-homoserine lactone-responsive quorum-sensing transcription factors. Previous genetic evidence indicates that in the presence of its quorum-sensing signal, N-(3-oxohexanoyl) homoserine lactone (3OC6-HSL), LuxR binds to lux box DNA within the promoter region of the luxI gene and activates transcription of the luxICDABEG luminescence operon. We have purified LuxR from recombinant Escherichia coli. Purified LuxR binds specifically and with high affinity to DNA containing a lux box. This binding requires addition of 3OC6-HSL to the assay reactions, presumably forming a LuxR-3OC6-HSL complex. When bound to the lux box at the luxI promoter in vitro, LuxR-3OC6-HSL enables E. coli RNA polymerase to initiate transcription from the luxI promoter. Unlike the well-characterized LuxR homolog TraR in complex with its signal (3-oxo-octanoyl-HSL), the LuxR-30C6-HSL complex can be reversibly inactivated by dilution, suggesting that 3OC6-HSL in the complex is not tightly bound and is in equilibrium with the bulk solvent. Thus, although LuxR and TraR both bind 3-oxoacyl-HSLs, the binding is qualitatively different. The differences have implications for the ways in which these proteins respond to decreases in signal concentrations or rapid drops in population density.

  11. Mutations in FMN Binding Pocket Diminish Chromate Reduction Rates for Gh-ChrR Isolated from Gluconacetobacter hansenii

    SciTech Connect

    Khaleel, Janin A.; Gong, Chunhong; Zhang, Yanfeng; Tan, Ruimin; Squier, Thomas C.; Jin, Hongjun

    2013-06-01

    A putative chromate ion binding site was identified proximal to a rigidly bound FMN from electron densities in the crystal structure of the quinone reductase from Gluconacetobacter hansenii (Gh-ChrR) (3s2y.pdb). To clarify the location of the chromate binding site, and to understand the role of FMN in the NADPH-dependent reduction of chromate, we have expressed and purified four mutant enzymes involving the site-specific substitution of individual side chains within the FMN binding pocket that form non-covalent bonds with the ribityl phosphate (i.e., S15A and R17A in loop 1 between β1 sheet and α1 helix) or the isoalloxanzine ring (E83A or Y84A in loop 4 between the β3 sheet and α4 helix). Mutations that selectively disrupt hydrogen bonds between either the N3 nitrogen on the isoalloxanzine ring (i.e., E83) or the ribitylphos- phoate (i.e., S15) respectively result in 50% or 70% reductions in catalytic rates of chromate reduction. In comparison, mutations that disrupt π-π ring stacking interactions with the isoal-loxanzine ring (i.e., Y84) or a salt bridge with the ribityl phosphate result in 87% and 97% inhibittion. In all cases there are minimal alterations in chromate binding affinities. Collectively, these results support the hypothesis that chromate binds proximal to FMN, and implicate a structural role for FMN positioning for optimal chromate reduction rates. As side chains proximal to the β3/α4 FMN binding loop 4 contribute to both NADH and metal ion binding, we propose a model in which structural changes around the FMN binding pocket couples to both chromate and NADH binding sites.

  12. Discovery of an Allosteric Inhibitor Binding Site in 3-Oxo-acyl-ACP Reductase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    3-Oxo-acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) reductase (FabG) plays a key role in the bacterial fatty acid synthesis II system in pathogenic microorganisms, which has been recognized as a potential drug target. FabG catalyzes reduction of a 3-oxo-acyl-ACP intermediate during the elongation cycle of fatty acid biosynthesis. Here, we report gene deletion experiments that support the essentiality of this gene in P. aeruginosa and the identification of a number of small molecule FabG inhibitors with IC50 values in the nanomolar to low micromolar range and good physicochemical properties. Structural characterization of 16 FabG-inhibitor complexes by X-ray crystallography revealed that the compounds bind at a novel allosteric site located at the FabG subunit–subunit interface. Inhibitor binding relies primarily on hydrophobic interactions, but specific hydrogen bonds are also observed. Importantly, the binding cavity is formed upon complex formation and therefore would not be recognized by virtual screening approaches. The structure analysis further reveals that the inhibitors act by inducing conformational changes that propagate to the active site, resulting in a displacement of the catalytic triad and the inability to bind NADPH. PMID:24015914

  13. Identification of small-molecule binding pockets in the soluble monomeric form of the Aβ42 peptide

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Maximillian; Simone, Alfonso De; Schenk, Dale; Toth, Gergely; Dobson, Christopher M.; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2016-01-01

    The aggregation of intrinsically disordered peptides and proteins is associated with a wide range of highly debilitating neurological and systemic disorders. In this work we explored the potential of a structure-based drug discovery procedure to target one such system, the soluble monomeric form of the Aβ42 peptide. We utilised for this purpose a set of structures of the Aβ42 peptide selected from clusters of conformations within an ensemble generated by molecular dynamics simulations. Using these structures we carried out fragment mapping calculations to identify binding ‘hot spots’ on the monomeric form of the Aβ42 peptide. This procedure provided a set of hot spots with ligand efficiencies comparable to those observed for structured proteins, and that are clustered into binding pockets. We verified that such pockets exhibit a propensity to bind small molecules known to interact with the Aβ42 peptide. Taken together these results provide an initial indication that fragment-based drug discovery may represent a potential therapeutic strategy for diseases associated with the aggregation of intrinsically disordered proteins. PMID:23883055

  14. Identification of the functional binding pocket for compounds targeting small-conductance Ca2+-activated potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Miao; Pascal, John M.; Schumann, Marcel; Armen, Roger S.; Zhang, Ji-fang

    2012-01-01

    Small- and intermediate-conductance Ca2+-activated potassium channels, activated by Ca2+-bound calmodulin, play an important role in regulating membrane excitability. These channels are also linked to clinical abnormalities. A tremendous amount of effort has been devoted to developing small molecule compounds targeting these channels. However, these compounds often suffer from low potency and lack of selectivity, hindering their potentials for clinical use. A key contributing factor is the lack of knowledge of the binding site(s) for these compounds. Here we demonstrate by X-ray crystallography that the binding pocket for the compounds of the 1-EBIO class is located at the calmodulin-channel interface. We show that, based on structure data and molecular docking, mutations of the channel can effectively change the potency of these compounds. Our results provide insight into the molecular nature of the binding pocket and its contribution to the potency and selectivity of the compounds of the 1-EBIO class. PMID:22929778

  15. Allosteric Regulation of Serine Protease HtrA2 through Novel Non-Canonical Substrate Binding Pocket

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Nitu; Gadewal, Nikhil; Chaganti, Lalith K.; Sastry, G. Madhavi; Bose, Kakoli

    2013-01-01

    HtrA2, a trimeric proapoptotic serine protease is involved in several diseases including cancer and neurodegenerative disorders. Its unique ability to mediate apoptosis via multiple pathways makes it an important therapeutic target. In HtrA2, C-terminal PDZ domain upon substrate binding regulates its functions through coordinated conformational changes the mechanism of which is yet to be elucidated. Although allostery has been found in some of its homologs, it has not been characterized in HtrA2 so far. Here, with an in silico and biochemical approach we have shown that allostery does regulate HtrA2 activity. Our studies identified a novel non-canonical selective binding pocket in HtrA2 which initiates signal propagation to the distal active site through a complex allosteric mechanism. This non-classical binding pocket is unique among HtrA family proteins and thus unfolds a novel mechanism of regulation of HtrA2 activity and hence apoptosis. PMID:23457469

  16. Computational fragment-based drug design to explore the hydrophobic sub-pocket of the mitotic kinesin Eg5 allosteric binding site.

    PubMed

    Oguievetskaia, Ksenia; Martin-Chanas, Laetitia; Vorotyntsev, Artem; Doppelt-Azeroual, Olivia; Brotel, Xavier; Adcock, Stewart A; de Brevern, Alexandre G; Delfaud, Francois; Moriaud, Fabrice

    2009-08-01

    Eg5, a mitotic kinesin exclusively involved in the formation and function of the mitotic spindle has attracted interest as an anticancer drug target. Eg5 is co-crystallized with several inhibitors bound to its allosteric binding pocket. Each of these occupies a pocket formed by loop 5/helix alpha2 (L5/alpha2). Recently designed inhibitors additionally occupy a hydrophobic pocket of this site. The goal of the present study was to explore this hydrophobic pocket with our MED-SuMo fragment-based protocol, and thus discover novel chemical structures that might bind as inhibitors. The MED-SuMo software is able to compare and superimpose similar interaction surfaces upon the whole protein data bank (PDB). In a fragment-based protocol, MED-SuMo retrieves MED-Portions that encode protein-fragment binding sites and are derived from cross-mining protein-ligand structures with libraries of small molecules. Furthermore we have excluded intra-family MED-Portions derived from Eg5 ligands that occupy the hydrophobic pocket and predicted new potential ligands by hybridization that would fill simultaneously both pockets. Some of the latter having original scaffolds and substituents in the hydrophobic pocket are identified in libraries of synthetically accessible molecules by the MED-Search software.

  17. Identification and Characterization of Botulinum Neurotoxin A Substrate Binding Pockets and Their Re-Engineering for Human SNAP-23.

    PubMed

    Sikorra, Stefan; Litschko, Christa; Müller, Carina; Thiel, Nadine; Galli, Thierry; Eichner, Timo; Binz, Thomas

    2016-01-29

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are highly potent bacterial proteins that block neurotransmitter release at the neuromuscular junction by cleaving SNAREs (soluble N-ethyl maleimide sensitive factor attachment protein receptors). However, their serotype A (BoNT/A) that cleaves SNAP-25 (synaptosomal-associated protein of 25 kDa) has also been an established pharmaceutical for treatment of medical conditions that rely on hyperactivity of cholinergic nerve terminals for 25 years. The expansion of its use to a variety of further medical conditions associated with hypersecretion components is prevented partly because the involved SNARE isoforms are not cleaved. Therefore, we examined by mutational analyses the reason for the resistance of human SNAP-23, an isoform of SNAP-25. We show that replacement of 10 SNAP-23 residues with their SNAP-25 counterparts effects SNAP-25-like cleavability. Conversely, transfer of each of the replaced SNAP-23 residues to SNAP-25 drastically decreased the cleavability of SNAP-25. By means of the existing SNAP-25-toxin co-crystal structure, molecular dynamics simulations, and corroborative mutagenesis studies, the appropriate binding pockets for these residues in BoNT/A were characterized. Systematic mutagenesis of two major BoNT/A binding pockets was conducted in order to adapt these pockets to corresponding amino acids of human SNAP-23. Human SNAP-23 cleaving mutants were isolated using a newly established yeast-based screening system. This method may be useful for engineering novel BoNT/A pharmaceuticals for the treatment of diseases that rely on SNAP-23-mediated hypersecretion.

  18. Structure of Liver Receptor Homolog-1 (NR5A2) with PIP3 hormone bound in the ligand binding pocket.

    PubMed

    Sablin, Elena P; Blind, Raymond D; Uthayaruban, Rubatharshini; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Deacon, Ashley M; Das, Debanu; Ingraham, Holly A; Fletterick, Robert J

    2015-12-01

    The nuclear receptor LRH-1 (Liver Receptor Homolog-1, NR5A2) is a transcription factor that regulates gene expression programs critical for many aspects of metabolism and reproduction. Although LRH-1 is able to bind phospholipids, it is still considered an orphan nuclear receptor (NR) with an unknown regulatory hormone. Our prior cellular and structural studies demonstrated that the signaling phosphatidylinositols PI(4,5)P2 (PIP2) and PI(3,4,5)P3 (PIP3) bind and regulate SF-1 (Steroidogenic Factor-1, NR5A1), a close homolog of LRH-1. Here, we describe the crystal structure of human LRH-1 ligand binding domain (LBD) bound by PIP3 - the first phospholipid with a head group endogenous to mammals. We show that the phospholipid hormone binds LRH-1 with high affinity, stabilizing the receptor LBD. While the hydrophobic PIP3 tails (C16/C16) are buried inside the LRH-1 ligand binding pocket, the negatively charged PIP3 head group is presented on the receptor surface, similar to the phosphatidylinositol binding mode observed in the PIP3-SF-1 structure. Thus, data presented in this work reinforce our earlier findings demonstrating that signaling phosphatidylinositols regulate the NR5A receptors LRH-1 and SF-1. PMID:26416531

  19. ANCHOR: a web server and database for analysis of protein-protein interaction binding pockets for drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Meireles, Lidio M C; Dömling, Alexander S; Camacho, Carlos J

    2010-07-01

    ANCHOR is a web-based tool whose aim is to facilitate the analysis of protein-protein interfaces with regard to its suitability for small molecule drug design. To this end, ANCHOR exploits the so-called anchor residues, i.e. amino acid side-chains deeply buried at protein-protein interfaces, to indicate possible druggable pockets to be targeted by small molecules. For a given protein-protein complex submitted by the user, ANCHOR calculates the change in solvent accessible surface area (DeltaSASA) upon binding for each side-chain, along with an estimate of its contribution to the binding free energy. A Jmol-based tool allows the user to interactively visualize selected anchor residues in their pockets as well as the stereochemical properties of the surrounding region such as hydrogen bonding. ANCHOR includes a Protein Data Bank (PDB) wide database of pre-computed anchor residues from more than 30,000 PDB entries with at least two protein chains. The user can query according to amino acids, buried area (SASA), energy or keywords related to indication areas, e.g. oncogene or diabetes. This database provides a resource to rapidly assess protein-protein interactions for the suitability of small molecules or fragments with bioisostere anchor analogues as possible compounds for pharmaceutical intervention. ANCHOR web server and database are freely available at http://structure.pitt.edu/anchor.

  20. Niemann-Pick type C disease: a QM/MM study of conformational changes in cholesterol in the NPC1(NTD) and NPC2 binding pockets.

    PubMed

    Elghobashi-Meinhardt, Nadia

    2014-10-21

    Niemann-Pick Type C disease is characterized by disrupted lipid trafficking within the late endosomal (LE)/lysosomal (Lys) cellular compartments. Cholesterol transport within the LE/Lys is believed to take place via a concerted hand-off mechanism in which a small (131aa) soluble cholesterol binding protein, NPC2, transfers cholesterol to the N-terminal domain (NTD) of a larger (1278aa) membrane-bound protein, NPC1(NTD). The transfer is thought to occur through the formation of a stable intermediate complex NPC1(NTD)-NPC2, in which the sterol apertures of the two proteins align to allow passage of the cholesterol molecule. In the working model of the NPC1(NTD)-NPC2 complex, the sterol apertures are aligned, but the binding pockets are bent with respect to one another. In order for cholesterol to slide from one binding pocket to the other, a conformational change must occur in the proteins, in the ligand, or in both. Here, we investigate the possibility that the ligand undergoes a conformational change, or isomerization, to accommodate the bent transfer pathway. To understand what structural factors influence the isomerization rate, we calculate the energy barrier to cholesterol isomerization in both the NPC1(NTD) and NPC2 binding pockets. Here, we use a combined quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) energy function to calculate the isomerization barrier within the native NPC1(NTD) and NPC2 binding pockets before protein-protein docking as well as in the binding pockets of the NPC1(NTD)-NPC2 complex after docking has occurred. The results indicate that cholesterol isomerization in the NPC2 binding pocket is energetically favorable, both before and after formation of the NPC1(NTD)-NPC2 complex. The NPC1(NTD) binding pocket is energetically unfavorable to conformational rearrangement of the hydrophobic ligand because it contains more water molecules near the ligand tail and amino acids with polar side chains. For three NPC1(NTD) mutants investigated, L175Q

  1. eMatchSite: Sequence Order-Independent Structure Alignments of Ligand Binding Pockets in Protein Models

    PubMed Central

    Brylinski, Michal

    2014-01-01

    Detecting similarities between ligand binding sites in the absence of global homology between target proteins has been recognized as one of the critical components of modern drug discovery. Local binding site alignments can be constructed using sequence order-independent techniques, however, to achieve a high accuracy, many current algorithms for binding site comparison require high-quality experimental protein structures, preferably in the bound conformational state. This, in turn, complicates proteome scale applications, where only various quality structure models are available for the majority of gene products. To improve the state-of-the-art, we developed eMatchSite, a new method for constructing sequence order-independent alignments of ligand binding sites in protein models. Large-scale benchmarking calculations using adenine-binding pockets in crystal structures demonstrate that eMatchSite generates accurate alignments for almost three times more protein pairs than SOIPPA. More importantly, eMatchSite offers a high tolerance to structural distortions in ligand binding regions in protein models. For example, the percentage of correctly aligned pairs of adenine-binding sites in weakly homologous protein models is only 4–9% lower than those aligned using crystal structures. This represents a significant improvement over other algorithms, e.g. the performance of eMatchSite in recognizing similar binding sites is 6% and 13% higher than that of SiteEngine using high- and moderate-quality protein models, respectively. Constructing biologically correct alignments using predicted ligand binding sites in protein models opens up the possibility to investigate drug-protein interaction networks for complete proteomes with prospective systems-level applications in polypharmacology and rational drug repositioning. eMatchSite is freely available to the academic community as a web-server and a stand-alone software distribution at http://www.brylinski.org/ematchsite. PMID

  2. Arabidopsis membrane-associated acyl-CoA-binding protein ACBP1 is involved in stem cuticle formation

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Yan; Xiao, Shi; Kim, Juyoung; Lung, Shiu-Cheung; Chen, Liang; Tanner, Julian A.; Suh, Mi Chung; Chye, Mee-Len

    2014-01-01

    The membrane-anchored Arabidopsis thaliana ACYL-COA-BINDING PROTEIN1 (AtACBP1) plays important roles in embryogenesis and abiotic stress responses, and interacts with long-chain (LC) acyl-CoA esters. Here, AtACBP1 function in stem cuticle formation was investigated. Transgenic Arabidopsis transformed with an AtACBP1pro::GUS construct revealed β-glucuronidase (GUS) expression on the stem (but not leaf) surface, suggesting a specific role in stem cuticle formation. Isothermal titration calorimetry results revealed that (His)6-tagged recombinant AtACBP1 interacts with LC acyl-CoA esters (18:1-, 18:2-, and 18:3-CoAs) and very-long-chain (VLC) acyl-CoA esters (24:0-, 25:0-, and 26:0-CoAs). VLC fatty acids have been previously demonstrated to act as precursors in wax biosynthesis. Gas chromatography (GC)–flame ionization detector (FID) and GC–mass spectrometry (MS) analyses revealed that an acbp1 mutant showed a reduction in stem and leaf cuticular wax and stem cutin monomer composition in comparison with the wild type (Col-0). Consequently, the acbp1 mutant showed fewer wax crystals on the stem surface in scanning electron microscopy and an irregular stem cuticle layer in transmission electron microscopy in comparison with the wild type. Also, the mutant stems consistently showed a decline in expression of cuticular wax and cutin biosynthetic genes in comparison with the wild type, and the mutant leaves were more susceptible to infection by the necrotrophic pathogen Botrytis cinerea. Taken together, these findings suggest that AtACBP1 participates in Arabidopsis stem cuticle formation by trafficking VLC acyl-CoAs. PMID:25053648

  3. A 5′ cytosine binding pocket in Puf3p specifies regulation of mitochondrial mRNAs

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Deyu; Stumpf, Craig R.; Krahn, Joseph M.; Wickens, Marvin; Tanaka Hall, Traci M.

    2010-11-03

    A single regulatory protein can control the fate of many mRNAs with related functions. The Puf3 protein of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is exemplary, as it binds and regulates more than 100 mRNAs that encode proteins with mitochondrial function. Here we elucidate the structural basis of that specificity. To do so, we explore the crystal structures of Puf3p complexes with 2 cognate RNAs. The key determinant of Puf3p specificity is an unusual interaction between a distinctive pocket of the protein with an RNA base outside the 'core' PUF-binding site. That interaction dramatically affects binding affinity in vitro and is required for regulation in vivo. The Puf3p structures, combined with those of Puf4p in the same organism, illuminate the structural basis of natural PUF-RNA networks. Yeast Puf3p binds its own RNAs because they possess a -2C and is excluded from those of Puf4p which contain an additional nucleotide in the core-binding site.

  4. Inhibition of the acetyl lysine-binding pocket of bromodomain and extraterminal domain proteins interferes with adipogenesis.

    PubMed

    Goupille, Olivier; Penglong, Tipparat; Kadri, Zahra; Granger-Locatelli, Marine; Fucharoen, Suthat; Maouche-Chrétien, Leila; Prost, Stéphane; Leboulch, Philippe; Chrétien, Stany

    2016-04-15

    The bromodomain and extraterminal (BET) domain family proteins are epigenetic modulators involved in the reading of acetylated lysine residues. The first BET protein inhibitor to be identified, (+)-JQ1, a thienotriazolo-1, 4-diazapine, binds selectively to the acetyl lysine-binding pocket of BET proteins. We evaluated the impact on adipogenesis of this druggable targeting of chromatin epigenetic readers, by investigating the physiological consequences of epigenetic modifications through targeting proteins binding to chromatin. JQ1 significantly inhibited the differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes into white and brown adipocytes by down-regulating the expression of genes involved in adipogenesis, particularly those encoding the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR-γ), the CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBPα) and, STAT5A and B. The expression of a constitutively activated STAT5B mutant did not prevent inhibition by JQ1. Thus, the association of BET/STAT5 is required for adipogenesis but STAT5 transcription activity is not the only target of JQ1. Treatment with JQ1 did not lead to the conversion of white adipose tissue into brown adipose tissue (BAT). BET protein inhibition thus interferes with generation of adipose tissue from progenitors, confirming the importance of the connections between epigenetic mechanisms and specific adipogenic transcription factors. PMID:26972250

  5. Binding to large enzyme pockets: small-molecule inhibitors of trypanothione reductase.

    PubMed

    Persch, Elke; Bryson, Steve; Todoroff, Nickolay K; Eberle, Christian; Thelemann, Jonas; Dirdjaja, Natalie; Kaiser, Marcel; Weber, Maria; Derbani, Hassan; Brun, Reto; Schneider, Gisbert; Pai, Emil F; Krauth-Siegel, R Luise; Diederich, François

    2014-08-01

    The causative agents of the parasitic disease human African trypanosomiasis belong to the family of trypanosomatids. These parasitic protozoa exhibit a unique thiol redox metabolism that is based on the flavoenzyme trypanothione reductase (TR). TR was identified as a potential drug target and features a large active site that allows a multitude of possible ligand orientations, which renders rational structure-based inhibitor design highly challenging. Herein we describe the synthesis, binding properties, and kinetic analysis of a new series of small-molecule inhibitors of TR. The conjunction of biological activities, mutation studies, and virtual ligand docking simulations led to the prediction of a binding mode that was confirmed by crystal structure analysis. The crystal structures revealed that the ligands bind to the hydrophobic wall of the so-called "mepacrine binding site". The binding conformation and potency of the inhibitors varied for TR from Trypanosoma brucei and T. cruzi.

  6. Remodeling of host phosphatidylcholine by Chlamydia acyltransferase is regulated by acyl-CoA binding protein ACBD6 associated with lipid droplets

    PubMed Central

    Soupene, Eric; Wang, Derek; Kuypers, Frans A

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial human pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis invades cells as an infectious elementary body (EB). The EB is internalized into a vacuole that is hidden from the host defense mechanism, and is modified to sustain the development of the replicative reticulate body (RB). Inside this parasitophorous compartment, called the inclusion, the pathogen survives supported by an active exchange of nutrients and proteins with the host cell. We show that host lipids are scavenged and modified into bacterial-specific lipids by the action of a shared human-bacterial acylation mechanism. The bacterial acylating enzymes for the essential lipids 1-acyl-sn-glycerol 3-phosphate and 1-acyl-sn-phosphatidylcholine were identified as CT453 and CT775, respectively. Bacterial CT775 was found to be associated with lipid droplets (LDs). During the development of C. trachomatis, the human acyl-CoA carrier hACBD6 was recruited to cytosolic LDs and translocated into the inclusion. hACBD6 protein modulated the activity of CT775 in an acyl-CoA dependent fashion and sustained the activity of the bacterial acyltransferase by buffering the concentration of acyl-CoAs. We propose that disruption of the binding activity of the acyl-CoA carrier might represent a new drug-target to prevent growth of C. trachomatis. PMID:25604091

  7. Fluorescence anisotropy-based measurement of Pseudomonas aeruginosa penicillin-binding protein 2 transpeptidase inhibitor acylation rate constants.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Adam B; Gao, Ning; Gu, Rong-Fang; Thresher, Jason

    2014-10-15

    High-molecular-weight penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) are essential integral membrane proteins of the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane responsible for biosynthesis of peptidoglycan. They are the targets of antibacterial β-lactam drugs, including penicillins, cephalosporins, and carbapenems. β-Lactams covalently acylate the active sites of the PBP transpeptidase domains. Because β-lactams are time-dependent inhibitors, quantitative assessment of the inhibitory activity of these compounds ideally involves measurement of their second-order acylation rate constants. We previously described a fluorescence anisotropy-based assay to measure these rate constants for soluble constructs of PBP3 (Anal. Biochem. 439 (2013) 37-43). Here we report the expression and purification of a soluble construct of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PBP2 as a fusion protein with NusA. This soluble PBP2 was used to measure second-order acylation rate constants with the fluorescence anisotropy assay. Measurements were obtained for mecillinam, which reacts specifically with PBP2, and for several carbapenems. The assay also revealed that PBP2 slowly hydrolyzed mecillinam and was used to measure the rate constant for this deacylation reaction.

  8. Plant acyl-CoA-binding proteins: An emerging family involved in plant development and stress responses.

    PubMed

    Du, Zhi-Yan; Arias, Tatiana; Meng, Wei; Chye, Mee-Len

    2016-07-01

    Acyl-CoA-binding protein (ACBP) was first identified in mammals as a neuropeptide, and was demonstrated to belong to an important house-keeping protein family that extends across eukaryotes and some prokaryotes. In plants, the Arabidopsis ACBP family consists of six AtACBPs (AtACBP1 to AtACBP6), and has been investigated using gene knock-out mutants and overexpression lines. Herein, recent findings on the AtACBPs are examined to provide an insight on their functions in various plant developmental processes, such as embryo and seed development, seed dormancy and germination, seedling development and cuticle formation, as well as their roles under various environmental stresses. The significance of the AtACBPs in acyl-CoA/lipid metabolism, with focus on their interaction with long to very-long-chain (VLC) acyl-CoA esters and their potential role in the formation of lipid droplets in seeds and vegetative tissues are discussed. In addition, recent findings on the rice ACBP family are presented. The similarities and differences between ACBPs from Arabidopsis and rice, that represent eudicot and monocot model plants, respectively, are analyzed and the evolution of plant ACBPs by phylogenetic analysis reviewed. Finally, we propose potential uses of plant ACBPs in phytoremediation and in agriculture related to the improvement of environmental stress tolerance and seed oil production. PMID:27368137

  9. Structural insights into the ATP binding pocket of the anaplastic lymphoma kinase by site-directed mutagenesis, inhibitor binding analysis, and homology modeling.

    PubMed

    Gunby, Rosalind H; Ahmed, Shaheen; Sottocornola, Roberta; Gasser, Marc; Redaelli, Sara; Mologni, Luca; Tartari, Carmen J; Belloni, Valentina; Gambacorti-Passerini, Carlo; Scapozza, Leonardo

    2006-09-21

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is a valid target for anticancer therapy; however, potent ALK inhibitors suitable for clinical use are lacking. Because the majority of described kinase inhibitors bind in the ATP pocket of the kinase domain, we have characterized this pocket in ALK using site-directed mutagenesis, inhibition studies, and molecular modeling. Mutation of the gatekeeper residue, a key structural determinant influencing inhibitor binding, rendered the fusion protein, NPM/ALK, sensitive to inhibition by SKI-606 in the nanomolar range, while PD173955 inhibited the NPM/ALK mutant at micromolar concentrations. In contrast, both wild type and mutant NPM/ALK were insensitive to imatinib. Computer modeling indicated that docking solutions obtained with a homology model representing the intermediate conformation of the ALK kinase domain reflected closely experimental data. The good agreement between experimental and virtual results indicate that the ALK molecular models described here are useful tools for the rational design of ALK selective inhibitors. In addition, 4-phenylamino-quinoline compounds may have potential as templates for ALK inhibitors. PMID:16970400

  10. Post-docking virtual screening of diverse binding pockets: comparative study using DOCK, AMMOS, X-Score and FRED scoring functions.

    PubMed

    Pencheva, Tania; Soumana, Oumarou Samna; Pajeva, Ilza; Miteva, Maria A

    2010-06-01

    Most of the benchmark studies on docking-scoring methods reported in the last decade conclude that no single scoring function performs well across different protein targets. In this study a comparison of thirteen commonly used force field and empirical scoring functions as implemented in DOCK, AMMOS, X-Score and FRED is carried out on five proteins with diverse binding pockets. The performance is analyzed in relation to the physicochemical properties of the binding sites. The solvation effects are considered via the Generalized Born/Surface Area (GBSA) solvation method for one of the assessed scoring functions. We examined the ability of these scoring functions to discriminate between active and inactive compounds over receptor-based focused libraries. Our results demonstrated that the employed here empirical scoring functions were more appropriate for the pocket of predominant hydrophobic nature while the force field scoring functions performed better on the mixed or polar pockets.

  11. A New Method for Navigating Optimal Direction for Pulling Ligand from Binding Pocket: Application to Ranking Binding Affinity by Steered Molecular Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Vuong, Quan Van; Nguyen, Tin Trung; Li, Mai Suan

    2015-12-28

    In this paper we present a new method for finding the optimal path for pulling a ligand from the binding pocket using steered molecular dynamics (SMD). Scoring function is defined as the steric hindrance caused by a receptor to ligand movement. Then the optimal path corresponds to the minimum of this scoring function. We call the new method MSH (Minimal Steric Hindrance). Contrary to existing navigation methods, our approach takes into account the geometry of the ligand while other methods including CAVER only consider the ligand as a sphere with a given radius. Using three different target + receptor sets, we have shown that the rupture force Fmax and nonequilibrium work Wpull obtained based on the MSH method show a much higher correlation with experimental data on binding free energies compared to CAVER. Furthermore, Wpull was found to be a better indicator for binding affinity than Fmax. Thus, the new MSH method is a reliable tool for obtaining the best direction for ligand exiting from the binding site. Its combination with the standard SMD technique can provide reasonable results for ranking binding affinities using Wpull as a scoring function. PMID:26595261

  12. Arabidopsis cytosolic acyl-CoA-binding proteins ACBP4, ACBP5 and ACBP6 have overlapping but distinct roles in seed development

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, An-Shan; Haslam, Richard P.; Michaelson, Louise V.; Liao, Pan; Chen, Qin-Fang; Sooriyaarachchi, Sanjeewani; Mowbray, Sherry L.; Napier, Johnathan A.; Tanner, Julian A.; Chye, Mee-Len

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotic cytosolic ACBPs (acyl-CoA-binding proteins) bind acyl-CoA esters and maintain a cytosolic acyl-CoA pool, but the thermodynamics of their protein–lipid interactions and physiological relevance in plants are not well understood. Arabidopsis has three cytosolic ACBPs which have been identified as AtACBP4, AtACBP5 and AtACBP6, and microarray data indicated that all of them are expressed in seeds; AtACBP4 is expressed in early embryogenesis, whereas AtACBP5 is expressed later. ITC (isothermal titration calorimetry) in combination with transgenic Arabidopsis lines were used to investigate the roles of these three ACBPs from Arabidopsis thaliana. The dissociation constants, stoichiometry and enthalpy change of AtACBP interactions with various acyl-CoA esters were determined using ITC. Strong binding of recombinant (r) AtACBP6 with long-chain acyl-CoA (C16- to C18-CoA) esters was observed with dissociation constants in the nanomolar range. However, the affinity of rAtACBP4 and rAtACBP5 to these acyl-CoA esters was much weaker (dissociation constants in the micromolar range), suggesting that they interact with acyl-CoA esters differently from rAtACBP6. When transgenic Arabidopsis expressing AtACBP6pro::GUS was generated, strong GUS (β-glucuronidase) expression in cotyledonary-staged embryos and seedlings prompted us to measure the acyl-CoA contents of the acbp6 mutant. This mutant accumulated higher levels of C18:1-CoA and C18:1- and C18:2-CoAs in cotyledonary-staged embryos and seedlings, respectively, in comparison with the wild type. The acbp4acbp5acbp6 mutant showed the lightest seed weight and highest sensitivity to abscisic acid during germination, suggesting their physiological functions in seeds. PMID:25423293

  13. Acyl-homoserine lactone binding to and stability of the orphan Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum-sensing signal receptor QscR.

    PubMed

    Oinuma, Ken-Ichi; Greenberg, E Peter

    2011-01-01

    The Pseudomonas aeruginosa transcription factor QscR responds to a variety of fatty acyl-homoserine lactones (HSLs), including N-3-oxododecanoyl-HSL (3OC12-HSL), which is produced and detected by the P. aeruginosa quorum-sensing circuit LasI and LasR. As is true for LasR and many other acyl-HSL-dependent transcription factors, production of soluble QscR in sufficient amounts for purification requires growth of recombinant bacteria in the presence of an appropriate acyl-HSL. QscR is thought to bind 3OC12-HSL relatively weakly compared to LasR, and unlike LasR, binding of purified QscR to target DNA was shown to strongly depend on exogenously added 3OC12-HSL. We show that purified QscR is dimeric at sufficiently high concentrations and monomeric at lower concentrations. Furthermore, QscR bound 3OC12-HSL more tightly than previously believed. Purified QscR retained 3OC12-HSL, and at sufficiently high concentrations, it bound target DNA in the absence of added 3OC12-HSL. We also obtained soluble QscR from recombinant Escherichia coli grown in the presence of N-3-oxohexanoyl-HSL (3OC6-HSL) instead of 3OC12-HSL, and because 3OC6-HSL bound much more loosely to QscR than other acyl-HSLs tested, we were able to exchange 3OC6-HSL with other acyl-HSLs in vitro and then estimate binding affinities of QscR for different acyl-HSLs and for target DNA. Our data support a model whereby QscR polypeptides fold properly in the absence of an acyl-HSL, but soluble, acyl-HSL-free QscR does not accumulate because it is subject to rapid aggregation or proteolysis.

  14. Host Acyl Coenzyme A Binding Protein Regulates Replication Complex Assembly and Activity of a Positive-Strand RNA Virus

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jiantao; Diaz, Arturo; Mao, Lan; Ahlquist, Paul

    2012-01-01

    All positive-strand RNA viruses reorganize host intracellular membranes to assemble their replication complexes. Similarly, brome mosaic virus (BMV) induces two alternate forms of membrane-bound RNA replication complexes: vesicular spherules and stacks of appressed double-membrane layers. The mechanisms by which these membrane rearrangements are induced, however, remain unclear. We report here that host ACB1-encoded acyl coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) binding protein (ACBP) is required for the assembly and activity of both BMV RNA replication complexes. ACBP is highly conserved among eukaryotes, specifically binds to long-chain fatty acyl-CoA, and promotes general lipid synthesis. Deleting ACB1 inhibited BMV RNA replication up to 30-fold and resulted in formation of spherules that were ∼50% smaller but ∼4-fold more abundant than those in wild-type (wt) cells, consistent with the idea that BMV 1a invaginates and maintains viral spherules by coating the inner spherule membrane. Furthermore, smaller and more frequent spherules were preferentially formed under conditions that induce layer formation in wt cells. Conversely, cellular karmella structures, which are arrays of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes formed upon overexpression of certain cellular ER membrane proteins, were formed normally, indicating a selective inhibition of 1a-induced membrane rearrangements. Restoring altered lipid composition largely complemented the BMV RNA replication defect, suggesting that ACBP was required for maintaining lipid homeostasis. Smaller and more frequent spherules are also induced by 1a mutants with specific substitutions in a membrane-anchoring amphipathic α-helix, implying that the 1a-lipid interactions play critical roles in viral replication complex assembly. PMID:22345450

  15. Host acyl coenzyme A binding protein regulates replication complex assembly and activity of a positive-strand RNA virus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiantao; Diaz, Arturo; Mao, Lan; Ahlquist, Paul; Wang, Xiaofeng

    2012-05-01

    All positive-strand RNA viruses reorganize host intracellular membranes to assemble their replication complexes. Similarly, brome mosaic virus (BMV) induces two alternate forms of membrane-bound RNA replication complexes: vesicular spherules and stacks of appressed double-membrane layers. The mechanisms by which these membrane rearrangements are induced, however, remain unclear. We report here that host ACB1-encoded acyl coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) binding protein (ACBP) is required for the assembly and activity of both BMV RNA replication complexes. ACBP is highly conserved among eukaryotes, specifically binds to long-chain fatty acyl-CoA, and promotes general lipid synthesis. Deleting ACB1 inhibited BMV RNA replication up to 30-fold and resulted in formation of spherules that were ∼50% smaller but ∼4-fold more abundant than those in wild-type (wt) cells, consistent with the idea that BMV 1a invaginates and maintains viral spherules by coating the inner spherule membrane. Furthermore, smaller and more frequent spherules were preferentially formed under conditions that induce layer formation in wt cells. Conversely, cellular karmella structures, which are arrays of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes formed upon overexpression of certain cellular ER membrane proteins, were formed normally, indicating a selective inhibition of 1a-induced membrane rearrangements. Restoring altered lipid composition largely complemented the BMV RNA replication defect, suggesting that ACBP was required for maintaining lipid homeostasis. Smaller and more frequent spherules are also induced by 1a mutants with specific substitutions in a membrane-anchoring amphipathic α-helix, implying that the 1a-lipid interactions play critical roles in viral replication complex assembly.

  16. Evaluation of Different Virtual Screening Programs for Docking in a Charged Binding Pocket

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Wei; Verlinde, Christophe L. M. J.

    2009-01-01

    Virtual screening of small molecules against a protein target often identifies the correct pose, but the ranking in terms of binding energy remains a difficult problem, resulting in unacceptable numbers of false positives and negatives. To investigate this problem, the performance of three docking programs, FRED, QXP/FLO, and GLIDE, along with their five different scoring functions, was evaluated with the engineered cavity in cyctochrome c peroxidase (CCP). This small cavity is negatively charged and completely buried from solvent. A test set of 60 molecules, experimentally identified as 43 “binders” and 17 “non-binders”, were tested with the CCP binding site. The docking methods’ performance is quantified by the ROC curve and their reproduction of crystal poses. The effects from generation of different ligand tautomers and inclusion of water molecule in the cavity are also discussed. PMID:18821750

  17. Theoretical investigation of the interactions in binding pocket of Reverse Transcriptase

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, Kamlesh Kumar; Hatakeyama, Nozomu; Miyamoto, Akira

    2014-01-01

    Interactions in proteins have been studied using several chemical information techniques including quantum chemical methods that are applied to truncated systems composed of the ligand molecule and the surrounding amino acids of the receptor. In this work we adopt an approach to study these interactions accounting for as many as possible explicit solvent molecules and without the need of a fragmented calculation. Furthermore, we embed our quantum chemical calculations within a molecular dynamics framework that enables a fundamentally fast system for quantum molecular dynamic simulations (QCMD). Central to this new system for QCMD is the tight binding QC system, newly developed in our laboratories, and which combined with the MD paradigm results in an ultra accelerated QCMD method for protein–ligand interaction evaluations. We have applied our newly developed method to the Nevirapine (NVP)–Reverse Transcriptase (RT) system. We show how the proposed method leads us to new findings. The advanced QCMD was applied to a system of RT with NVP and it has led to the knowledge of specific groups and atoms that interact with surrounding amino acids of RT and help in drug binding. The information derived from this calculation may be used in designing drugs for NVP resistant virus strains that have binding capability like NVP. PMID:26586999

  18. Mutagenesis of the cyclic AMP receptor protein of Escherichia coli: targeting positions 72 and 82 of the cyclic nucleotide binding pocket.

    PubMed Central

    Belduz, A O; Lee, E J; Harman, J G

    1993-01-01

    The 3', 5' cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) binding pocket of the cAMP receptor protein (CRP) of Escherichia coli was mutagenized to substitute leucine, glutamine, or aspartate for glutamate 72; and lysine, histidine, leucine, isoleucine, or glutamine for arginine 82. Substitutions were made in wild-type CRP and in a CRP*, or cAMP-independent, form of the protein to assess the effects of the amino acid substitutions on CRP structure. Cells containing the binding pocket residue-substituted forms of CRP were characterized through beta-galactosidase activity and by measurement of cAMP binding activity. This study confirms a role for both glutamate 72 and arginine 82 in cAMP binding and activation of CRP. Glutamine or leucine substitution of glutamate 72 produced forms of CRP having low affinity for the cAMP and unresponsive to the nucleotide. Aspartate substituted for glutamate 72 produced a low affinity cAMP-responsive form of CRP. CRP has a stringent requirement for the positioning of the position 72 glutamate carboxyl group within the cyclic nucleotide binding pocket. Results of this study also indicate that there are differences in the binding requirements of cAMP and cGMP, a competitive inhibitor of cAMP binding to CRP. PMID:8388097

  19. An automated system for the analysis of G protein-coupled receptor transmembrane binding pockets: alignment, receptor-based pharmacophores, and their application.

    PubMed

    Kratochwil, Nicole A; Malherbe, Pari; Lindemann, Lothar; Ebeling, Martin; Hoener, Marius C; Mühlemann, Andreas; Porter, Richard H P; Stahl, Martin; Gerber, Paul R

    2005-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) share a common architecture consisting of seven transmembrane (TM) domains. Various lines of evidence suggest that this fold provides a generic binding pocket within the TM region for hosting agonists, antagonists, and allosteric modulators. Here, a comprehensive and automated method allowing fast analysis and comparison of these putative binding pockets across the entire GPCR family is presented. The method relies on a robust alignment algorithm based on conservation indices, focusing on pharmacophore-like relationships between amino acids. Analysis of conservation patterns across the GPCR family and alignment to the rhodopsin X-ray structure allows the extraction of the amino acids lining the TM binding pocket in a so-called ligand binding pocket vector (LPV). In a second step, LPVs are translated to simple 3D receptor pharmacophore models, where each amino acid is represented by a single spherical pharmacophore feature and all atomic detail is omitted. Applications of the method include the assessment of selectivity issues, support of mutagenesis studies, and the derivation of rules for focused screening to identify chemical starting points in early drug discovery projects. Because of the coarseness of this 3D receptor pharmacophore model, however, meaningful scoring and ranking procedures of large sets of molecules are not justified. The LPV analysis of the trace amine-associated receptor family and its experimental validation is discussed as an example. The value of the 3D receptor model is demonstrated for a class C GPCR family, the metabotropic glutamate receptors.

  20. N,C-Capped dipeptides with selectivity for mycobacterial proteasome over human proteasomes: role of S3 and S1 binding pockets.

    PubMed

    Lin, Gang; Chidawanyika, Tamutenda; Tsu, Christopher; Warrier, Thulasi; Vaubourgeix, Julien; Blackburn, Christopher; Gigstad, Kenneth; Sintchak, Michael; Dick, Lawrence; Nathan, Carl

    2013-07-10

    We identified N,C-capped dipeptides that are selective for the Mycobacterium tuberculosis proteasome over human constitutive and immunoproteasomes. Differences in the S3 and S1 binding pockets appeared to account for the species selectivity. The inhibitors can penetrate mycobacteria and kill nonreplicating M. tuberculosis under nitrosative stress.

  1. Residues remote from the binding pocket control the antagonist selectivity towards the corticotropin-releasing factor receptor-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xianqiang; Cheng, Jianxin; Wang, Xu; Tang, Yun; Ågren, Hans; Tu, Yaoquan

    2015-01-01

    The corticotropin releasing factors receptor-1 and receptor-2 (CRF1R and CRF2R) are therapeutic targets for treating neurological diseases. Antagonists targeting CRF1R have been developed for the potential treatment of anxiety disorders and alcohol addiction. It has been found that antagonists targeting CRF1R always show high selectivity, although CRF1R and CRF2R share a very high rate of sequence identity. This has inspired us to study the origin of the selectivity of the antagonists. We have therefore built a homology model for CRF2R and carried out unbiased molecular dynamics and well-tempered metadynamics simulations for systems with the antagonist CP-376395 in CRF1R or CRF2R to address this issue. We found that the side chain of Tyr6.63 forms a hydrogen bond with the residue remote from the binding pocket, which allows Tyr6.63 to adopt different conformations in the two receptors and results in the presence or absence of a bottleneck controlling the antagonist binding to or dissociation from the receptors. The rotameric switch of the side chain of Tyr3566.63 allows the breaking down of the bottleneck and is a perquisite for the dissociation of CP-376395 from CRF1R.

  2. Fluorescence energy-transfer measurements between the calcium binding site and the specificity pocket of bovine trypsin using lanthanide probes.

    PubMed

    Darnall, D W; Abbott, F; Gomez, J E; Birnbaum, E R

    1976-11-16

    Using fluorescence energy-transfer experiments we have measured the distance between the specificity pocket and the calcium ion binding site of bovine pancreatic trypsin. Proflavin and thionine were used to block the specificity site, whereas various lanthanide ions were substituted for the calcium. It was then possible to choose various donor-acceptor pairs which exhibit suitable energy transfer. We have calculated the distance between proflavin and Nd(III), Pr(III), and Ho(III) to be 10.9, and 10.3, and 10.3 A, respectively. This agrees very well with the value of approximately 10 A we obtained between the methyl protons of p-toluamidine (a competitive inhibitor) and Gd(III) using nuclear magnetic resonance techniques (Abbott, F., Gomez, J.E., Birnbaum, E.R., and Darnall, D.W. (1975), Biochemistry 14, 4935). This is strong evidence that, in solution, the calcium binding site is composed of the side chains of Ser-190 and Asp-194.

  3. Structural studies of neuropilin-2 reveal a zinc ion binding site remote from the vascular endothelial growth factor binding pocket.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yi-Chun Isabella; Fotinou, Constantina; Rana, Rohini; Yelland, Tamas; Frankel, Paul; Zachary, Ian; Djordjevic, Snezana

    2016-05-01

    Neuropilin-2 is a transmembrane receptor involved in lymphangiogenesis and neuronal development. In adults, neuropilin-2 and its homologous protein neuropilin-1 have been implicated in cancers and infection. Molecular determinants of the ligand selectivity of neuropilins are poorly understood. We have identified and structurally characterized a zinc ion binding site on human neuropilin-2. The neuropilin-2-specific zinc ion binding site is located near the interface between domains b1 and b2 in the ectopic region of the protein, remote from the neuropilin binding site for its physiological ligand, i.e. vascular endothelial growth factor. We also present an X-ray crystal structure of the neuropilin-2 b1 domain in a complex with the C-terminal sub-domain of VEGF-A. Zn(2+) binding to neuropilin-2 destabilizes the protein structure but this effect was counteracted by heparin, suggesting that modifications by glycans and zinc in the extracellular matrix may affect functional neuropilin-2 ligand binding and signalling activity. PMID:26991001

  4. Electrostatic Modifications of the Human Leukocyte Antigen-DR P9 Peptide-Binding Pocket and Susceptibility to Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis

    PubMed Central

    Hov, Johannes R; Kosmoliaptsis, Vasilis; Traherne, James A; Olsson, Marita; Boberg, Kirsten M; Bergquist, Annika; Schrumpf, Erik; Bradley, J Andrew; Taylor, Craig J; Lie, Benedicte A; Trowsdale, John; Karlsen, Tom H

    2011-01-01

    The strongest genetic risk factors for primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) are found in the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) complex at chromosome 6p21. Genes in the HLA class II region encode molecules that present antigen to T lymphocytes. Polymorphisms in these genes are associated with most autoimmune diseases, most likely because they contribute to the specificity of immune responses. The aim of this study was to analyze the structure and electrostatic properties of the peptide-binding groove of HLA-DR in relation to PSC. Thus, four-digit resolution HLA-DRB1 genotyping was performed in 356 PSC patients and 366 healthy controls. Sequence information was used to assign which amino acids were encoded at all polymorphic positions. In stepwise logistic regressions, variations at residues 37 and 86 were independently associated with PSC (P = 1.2 × 10−32 and P = 1.8 × 10−22 in single-residue models, respectively). Three-dimensional modeling was performed to explore the effect of these key residues on the HLA-DR molecule. This analysis indicated that residue 37 was a major determinant of the electrostatic properties of pocket P9 of the peptide-binding groove. Asparagine at residue 37, which was associated with PSC, induced a positive charge in pocket P9. Tyrosine, which protected against PSC, induced a negative charge in this pocket. Consistent with the statistical observations, variation at residue 86 also indirectly influenced the electrostatic properties of this pocket. DRB1*13:01, which was PSC-associated, had a positive P9 pocket and DRB1*13:02, protective against PSC, had a negative P9 pocket. Conclusion: The results suggest that in patients with PSC, residues 37 and 86 of the HLA-DRβ chain critically influence the electrostatic properties of pocket P9 and thereby the range of peptides presented. (Hepatology 2011;53:1967-1976) PMID:21413052

  5. Fractal binding and dissociation kinetics of lecithin cholesterol acyl transferase (LCAT), a heart-related compound, on biosensor surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doke, Atul M.; Sadana, Ajit

    2006-05-01

    A fractal analysis is presented for the binding and dissociation of different heart-related compounds in solution to receptors immobilized on biosensor surfaces. The data analyzed include LCAT (lecithin cholesterol acyl transferase) concentrations in solution to egg-white apoA-I rHDL immobilized on a biosensor chip surface.1 Single- and dual- fractal models were employed to fit the data. Values of the binding and the dissociation rate coefficient(s), affinity values, and the fractal dimensions were obtained from the regression analysis provided by Corel Quattro Pro 8.0 (Corel Corporation Limited).2 The binding rate coefficients are quite sensitive to the degree of heterogeneity on the sensor chip surface. Predictive equations are developed for the binding rate coefficient as a function of the degree of heterogeneity present on the sensor chip surface and on the LCAT concentration in solution, and for the affinity as a function of the ratio of fractal dimensions present in the binding and the dissociation phases. The analysis presented provided physical insights into these analyte-receptor reactions occurring on different biosensor surfaces.

  6. Phosphatidylinositol-(4,5)-Bisphosphate Acyl Chains Differentiate Membrane Binding of HIV-1 Gag from That of the Phospholipase Cδ1 Pleckstrin Homology Domain

    PubMed Central

    Olety, Balaji; Veatch, Sarah L.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT HIV-1 Gag, which drives virion assembly, interacts with a plasma membrane (PM)-specific phosphoinositide, phosphatidylinositol-(4,5)-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2]. While cellular acidic phospholipid-binding proteins/domains, such as the PI(4,5)P2-specific pleckstrin homology domain of phospholipase Cδ1 (PHPLCδ1), mediate headgroup-specific interactions with corresponding phospholipids, the exact nature of the Gag-PI(4,5)P2 interaction remains undetermined. In this study, we used giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) to examine how PI(4,5)P2 with unsaturated or saturated acyl chains affect membrane binding of PHPLCδ1 and Gag. Both unsaturated dioleoyl-PI(4,5)P2 [DO-PI(4,5)P2] and saturated dipalmitoyl-PI(4,5)P2 [DP-PI(4,5)P2] successfully recruited PHPLCδ1 to membranes of single-phase GUVs. In contrast, DO-PI(4,5)P2 but not DP-PI(4,5)P2 recruited Gag to GUVs, indicating that PI(4,5)P2 acyl chains contribute to stable membrane binding of Gag. GUVs containing PI(4,5)P2, cholesterol, and dipalmitoyl phosphatidylserine separated into two coexisting phases: one was a liquid phase, and the other appeared to be a phosphatidylserine-enriched gel phase. In these vesicles, the liquid phase recruited PHPLCδ1 regardless of PI(4,5)P2 acyl chains. Likewise, Gag bound to the liquid phase when PI(4,5)P2 had DO-acyl chains. DP-PI(4,5)P2-containing GUVs showed no detectable Gag binding to the liquid phase. Unexpectedly, however, DP-PI(4,5)P2 still promoted recruitment of Gag, but not PHPLCδ1, to the dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylserine-enriched gel phase of these GUVs. Altogether, these results revealed different roles for PI(4,5)P2 acyl chains in membrane binding of two PI(4,5)P2-binding proteins, Gag and PHPLCδ1. Notably, we observed that nonmyristylated Gag retains the preference for PI(4,5)P2 containing an unsaturated acyl chain over DP-PI(4,5)P2, suggesting that Gag sensitivity to PI(4,5)P2 acyl chain saturation is determined directly by the matrix-PI(4,5)P2 interaction, rather

  7. An essential serotype recognition pocket on phage P22 tailspike protein forces Salmonella enterica serovar Paratyphi A O-antigen fragments to bind as nonsolution conformers.

    PubMed

    Andres, Dorothee; Gohlke, Ulrich; Broeker, Nina K; Schulze, Stefan; Rabsch, Wolfgang; Heinemann, Udo; Barbirz, Stefanie; Seckler, Robert

    2013-04-01

    Bacteriophage P22 recognizes O-antigen polysaccharides of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica (S.) with its tailspike protein (TSP). In the serovars S. Typhimurium, S. Enteritidis, and S. Paratyphi A, the tetrasaccharide repeat units of the respective O-antigens consist of an identical main chain trisaccharide but different 3,6-dideoxyhexose substituents. Here, the epimers abequose, tyvelose and paratose determine the specific serotype. P22 TSP recognizes O-antigen octasaccharides in an extended binding site with a single 3,6-dideoxyhexose binding pocket. We have isolated S. Paratyphi A octasaccharides which were not available previously and determined the crystal structure of their complex with P22 TSP. We discuss our data together with crystal structures of complexes with S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis octasaccharides determined earlier. Isothermal titration calorimetry showed that S. Paratyphi A octasaccharide binds P22 TSP less tightly, with a difference in binding free energy of ∼7 kJ mol(-1) at 20°C compared with S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis octasaccharides. Individual protein-carbohydrate contacts were probed by amino acid replacements showing that the dideoxyhexose pocket contributes to binding of all three serotypes. However, S. Paratyphi A octasaccharides bind in a conformation with an energetically unfavorable ϕ/ψ glycosidic bond angle combination. In contrast, octasaccharides from the other serotypes bind as solution-like conformers. Two water molecules are conserved in all P22 TSP complexes with octasaccharides of different serotypes. They line the dideoxyhexose binding pocket and force the S. Paratyphi A octasaccharides to bind as nonsolution conformers. This emphasizes the role of solvent as part of carbohydrate binding sites.

  8. A serpin-induced extensive proteolytic susceptibility of urokinase-type plasminogen activator implicates distortion of the proteinase substrate-binding pocket and oxyanion hole in the serpin inhibitory mechanism.

    PubMed

    Egelund, R; Petersen, T E; Andreasen, P A

    2001-02-01

    The formation of stable complexes between serpins and their target serine proteinases indicates formation of an ester bond between the proteinase active-site serine and the serpin P1 residue [Egelund, R., Rodenburg, K.W., Andreasen, P.A., Rasmussen, M.S., Guldberg, R.E. & Petersen, T.E. (1998) Biochemistry 37, 6375-6379]. An important question concerning serpin inhibition is the contrast between the stability of the ester bond in the complex and the rapid hydrolysis of the acyl-enzyme intermediate in general serine proteinase-catalysed peptide bond hydrolysis. To answer this question, we used limited proteolysis to detect conformational differences between free urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and uPA in complex with plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1). Whereas the catalytic domain of free uPA, pro-uPA, uPA in complex with non-serpin inhibitors and anhydro-uPA in a non-covalent complex with PAI-1 was resistant to proteolysis, the catalytic domain of PAI-1-complexed uPA was susceptible to proteolysis. The cleavage sites for four different proteinases were localized in specific areas of the C-terminal beta-barrel of the catalytic domain of uPA, providing evidence that the serpin inhibitory mechanism involves a serpin-induced massive rearrangement of the proteinase active site, including the specificity pocket, the oxyanion hole, and main-chain binding area, rendering the proteinase unable to complete the normal hydrolysis of the acyl-enzyme intermediate. The distorted region includes the so-called activation domain, also known to change conformation on zymogen activation.

  9. Structure-Based Design of a Novel SMYD3 Inhibitor that Bridges the SAM-and MEKK2-Binding Pockets.

    PubMed

    Van Aller, Glenn S; Graves, Alan P; Elkins, Patricia A; Bonnette, William G; McDevitt, Patrick J; Zappacosta, Francesca; Annan, Roland S; Dean, Tony W; Su, Dai-Shi; Carpenter, Christopher L; Mohammad, Helai P; Kruger, Ryan G

    2016-05-01

    SMYD3 is a lysine methyltransferase overexpressed in colorectal, breast, prostate, and hepatocellular tumors, and has been implicated as an oncogene in human malignancies. Methylation of MEKK2 by SMYD3 is important for regulation of the MEK/ERK pathway, suggesting the possibility of selectively targeting SMYD3 in RAS-driven cancers. Structural and kinetic characterization of SMYD3 was undertaken leading to a co-crystal structure of SMYD3 with a MEKK2-peptide substrate bound, and the observation that SMYD3 follows a partially processive mechanism. These insights allowed for the design of GSK2807, a potent and selective, SAM-competitive inhibitor of SMYD3 (Ki = 14 nM). A high-resolution crystal structure reveals that GSK2807 bridges the gap between the SAM-binding pocket and the substrate lysine tunnel of SMYD3. Taken together, our data demonstrate that small-molecule inhibitors of SMYD3 can be designed to prevent methylation of MEKK2 and these could have potential use as anticancer therapeutics.

  10. Kinetic spectroscopy of heme hydration and ligand binding in myoglobin and isolated hemoglobin chains: an optical window into heme pocket water dynamics.

    PubMed

    Esquerra, Raymond M; López-Peña, Ignacio; Tipgunlakant, Pooncharas; Birukou, Ivan; Nguyen, Rosa L; Soman, Jayashree; Olson, John S; Kliger, David S; Goldbeck, Robert A

    2010-09-21

    The entry of a water molecule into the distal heme pocket of pentacoordinate heme proteins such as myoglobin and the alpha,beta chains of hemoglobin can be detected by time-resolved spectroscopy in the heme visible bands after photolysis of the CO complex. Reviewing the evidence from spectrokinetic studies of Mb variants, we find that this optical method measures the occupancy of non(heme)coordinated water in the distal pocket, n(w), with high fidelity. This evidence further suggests that perturbation of the kinetic barrier presented by distal pocket water is often the dominant mechanism by which active site mutations affect the bimolecular rate constant for CO binding. Water entry into the heme pockets of isolated hemoglobin subunits was detected by optical methods. Internal hydration is higher in the native alpha chains than in the beta chains, in agreement with previous crystallographic results for the subunits within Hb tetramers. The kinetic parameters obtained from modeling of the water entry and ligand rebinding in Mb mutants and native Hb chains are consistent with an inverse dependence of the bimolecular association rate constant on the water occupancy factor. This correlation suggests that water and ligand mutually exclude one another from the distal pockets of both types of hemoglobin chains and myoglobin.

  11. A putative acyl-CoA-binding protein is a major phloem sap protein in rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Suzui, Nobuo; Nakamura, Shin-ichi; Fujiwara, Toru; Hayashi, Hiroaki; Yoneyama, Tadakatsu

    2006-01-01

    The N-terminal amino-acid sequence of a major rice phloem-sap protein, named RPP10, was determined. RPP10 is encoded by a single gene in the rice genome. Its complete amino-acid sequence, predicted from the corresponding rice full-length cDNA, showed high similarity to plant acyl-CoA-binding proteins (ACBPs). Western blot analysis using anti-ACBP antiserum revealed that putative ACBP is abundant in the phloem sap of rice plants, and is also present in sieve-tube exudates of winter squash (Cucurbita maxima), oilseed rape (Brassica napus), and coconut palm (Cocos nucifera). These findings give rise to the idea that ACBP may involve lipid metabolism and regulation in the phloem. PMID:16804052

  12. A minimal ligand binding pocket within a network of correlated mutations identified by multiple sequence and structural analysis of G protein coupled receptors

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are seven helical transmembrane proteins that function as signal transducers. They bind ligands in their extracellular and transmembrane regions and activate cognate G proteins at their intracellular surface at the other side of the membrane. The relay of allosteric communication between the ligand binding site and the distant G protein binding site is poorly understood. In this study, GREMLIN [1], a recently developed method that identifies networks of co-evolving residues from multiple sequence alignments, was used to identify those that may be involved in communicating the activation signal across the membrane. The GREMLIN-predicted long-range interactions between amino acids were analyzed with respect to the seven GPCR structures that have been crystallized at the time this study was undertaken. Results GREMLIN significantly enriches the edges containing residues that are part of the ligand binding pocket, when compared to a control distribution of edges drawn from a random graph. An analysis of these edges reveals a minimal GPCR binding pocket containing four residues (T1183.33, M2075.42, Y2686.51 and A2927.39). Additionally, of the ten residues predicted to have the most long-range interactions (A1173.32, A2726.55, E1133.28, H2115.46, S186EC2, A2927.39, E1223.37, G902.57, G1143.29 and M2075.42), nine are part of the ligand binding pocket. Conclusions We demonstrate the use of GREMLIN to reveal a network of statistically correlated and functionally important residues in class A GPCRs. GREMLIN identified that ligand binding pocket residues are extensively correlated with distal residues. An analysis of the GREMLIN edges across multiple structures suggests that there may be a minimal binding pocket common to the seven known GPCRs. Further, the activation of rhodopsin involves these long-range interactions between extracellular and intracellular domain residues mediated by the retinal domain. PMID:22748306

  13. Structural and functional characterization of K339T substitution identified in the PB2 subunit cap-binding pocket of influenza A virus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong; Qin, Kun; Meng, Geng; Zhang, Jinfang; Zhou, Jianfang; Zhao, Guangyu; Luo, Ming; Zheng, Xiaofeng

    2013-04-19

    Influenza virus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase is a heterotrimer composed of PA, PB1, and PB2 subunits. RNA-dependent RNA polymerase is required for both transcription and replication of influenza viral RNA taking place in the nucleus of infected cells. A "cap-snatching" mechanism is used to generate a 5'-capped primer for transcription in which the cap-binding domain of PB2 (PB2cap) captures the 5' cap of the host pre-mRNA. Our statistical analysis of PB2 sequences showed that residue Lys(339) located in the cap-binding pocket of H5N1 PB2cap was gradually replaced by Thr(339) over the past decade. To understand the role of this amino acid polymorphism, we solved the crystal structures of PB2cap with or without a pre-mRNA cap analog, m(7)GTP, in the presence of Lys(339) or Thr(339). The structures showed that Lys(339) contributes to binding the γ-phosphate group of m(7)GTP, and the replacement of Lys(339) by Thr eliminates this interaction. Isothermal titration calorimetry analysis showed that Thr(339) attenuated the PB2cap cap binding activity in vitro compared with Lys(339). Further functional studies confirmed that Thr(339)-PB2-containing ribonucleoprotein complex has a reduced influenza polymerase activity and RNA synthesis activity, and a reconstituted H5N1 virus containing the Thr(339) substitution exhibited a lower virulence to mice but more active replication in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells. The K339T substitution in the cap-binding pocket of PB2 modulates the polymerase activity and virulence by regulating the cap binding activity. It is informative to track variations in the cap-binding pocket of PB2 in surveillance of the evolution and spread of influenza virus.

  14. Switch control pocket inhibitors of p38-MAP kinase. Durable type II inhibitors that do not require binding into the canonical ATP hinge region

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, Yu Mi; Clare, Michael; Ensinger, Carol L.; Hood, Molly M.; Lord, John W.; Lu, Wei-Ping; Miller, David F.; Patt, William C.; Smith, Bryan D.; Vogeti, Lakshminarayana; Kaufman, Michael D.; Petillo, Peter A.; Wise, Scott C.; Abendroth, Jan; Chun, Lawrence; Clark, Robin; Feese, Michael; Kim, Hidong; Stewart, Lance; Flynn, Daniel L.

    2012-01-20

    Switch control pocket inhibitors of p38-alpha kinase are described. Durable type II inhibitors were designed which bind to arginines (Arg67 or Arg70) that function as key residues for mediating phospho-threonine 180 dependant conformational fluxing of p38-alpha from an inactive type II state to an active type I state. Binding to Arg70 in particular led to potent inhibitors, exemplified by DP-802, which also exhibited high kinase selectivity. Binding to Arg70 obviated the requirement for binding into the ATP Hinge region. X-ray crystallography revealed that DP-802 and analogs induce an enhanced type II conformation upon binding to either the unphosphorylated or the doubly phosphorylated form of p38-alpha kinase.

  15. Switch control pocket inhibitors of p38-MAP kinase. Durable type II inhibitors that do not require binding into the canonical ATP hinge region.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Yu Mi; Clare, Michael; Ensinger, Carol L; Hood, Molly M; Lord, John W; Lu, Wei-Ping; Miller, David F; Patt, William C; Smith, Bryan D; Vogeti, Lakshminarayana; Kaufman, Michael D; Petillo, Peter A; Wise, Scott C; Abendroth, Jan; Chun, Lawrence; Clark, Robin; Feese, Michael; Kim, Hidong; Stewart, Lance; Flynn, Daniel L

    2010-10-01

    Switch control pocket inhibitors of p38-alpha kinase are described. Durable type II inhibitors were designed which bind to arginines (Arg67 or Arg70) that function as key residues for mediating phospho-threonine 180 dependant conformational fluxing of p38-alpha from an inactive type II state to an active type I state. Binding to Arg70 in particular led to potent inhibitors, exemplified by DP-802, which also exhibited high kinase selectivity. Binding to Arg70 obviated the requirement for binding into the ATP Hinge region. X-ray crystallography revealed that DP-802 and analogs induce an enhanced type II conformation upon binding to either the unphosphorylated or the doubly phosphorylated form of p38-alpha kinase.

  16. Mutagenesis of the cyclic AMP receptor protein of Escherichia coli: targeting positions 83, 127 and 128 of the cyclic nucleotide binding pocket.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, E J; Glasgow, J; Leu, S F; Belduz, A O; Harman, J G

    1994-01-01

    The cyclic 3', 5' adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) binding pocket of the cAMP receptor protein (CRP) of Escherichia coli was mutagenized to substitute cysteine or glycine for serine 83; cysteine, glycine, isoleucine, or serine for threonine 127; and threonine or alanine for serine 128. Cells that expressed the binding pocket residue-substituted forms of CRP were characterized by measurements of beta-galactosidase activity. Purified wild-type and mutant CRP preparations were characterized by measurement of cAMP binding activity and by their capacity to support lacP activation in vitro. CRP structure was assessed by measurement of sensitivity to protease and DTNB-mediated subunit crosslinking. The results of this study show that cAMP interactions with serine 83, threonine 127 and serine 128 contribute to CRP activation and have little effect on cAMP binding. Amino acid substitutions that introduce hydrophobic amino acid side chain constituents at either position 127 or 128 decrease CRP discrimination of cAMP and cGMP. Finally, cAMP-induced CRP structural change(s) that occur in or near the CRP hinge region result from cAMP interaction with threonine 127; substitution of threonine 127 by cysteine, glycine, isoleucine, or serine produced forms of CRP that contained, independently of cAMP binding, structural changes similar to those of the wild-type CRP:cAMP complex. Images PMID:8065899

  17. Modulation of ligand-heme reactivity by binding pocket residues demonstrated in cytochrome c' over the femtosecond-second temporal range.

    PubMed

    Russell, Henry J; Hardman, Samantha J O; Heyes, Derren J; Hough, Michael A; Greetham, Gregory M; Towrie, Michael; Hay, Sam; Scrutton, Nigel S

    2013-12-01

    The ability of hemoproteins to discriminate between diatomic molecules, and the subsequent affinity for their chosen ligand, is fundamental to the existence of life. These processes are often controlled by precise structural arrangements in proteins, with heme pocket residues driving reactivity and specificity. One such protein is cytochrome c', which has the ability to bind nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO) on opposite faces of the heme, a property that is shared with soluble guanylate cycle. Like soluble guanylate cyclase, cytochrome c' also excludes O2 completely from the binding pocket. Previous studies have shown that the NO binding mechanism is regulated by a proximal arginine residue (R124) and a distal leucine residue (L16). Here, we have investigated the roles of these residues in maintaining the affinity for NO in the heme binding environment by using various time-resolved spectroscopy techniques that span the entire femtosecond-second temporal range in the UV-vis spectrum, and the femtosecond-nanosecond range by IR spectroscopy. Our findings indicate that the tightly regulated NO rebinding events following excitation in wild-type cytochrome c' are affected in the R124A variant. In the R124A variant, vibrational and electronic changes extend continuously across all time scales (from fs-s), in contrast to wild-type cytochrome c' and the L16A variant. Based on these findings, we propose a NO (re)binding mechanism for the R124A variant of cytochrome c' that is distinct from that in wild-type cytochrome c'. In the wider context, these findings emphasize the importance of heme pocket architecture in maintaining the reactivity of hemoproteins towards their chosen ligand, and demonstrate the power of spectroscopic probes spanning a wide temporal range.

  18. Crystal structures of SIRT3 reveal that the α2-α3 loop and α3-helix affect the interaction with long-chain acyl lysine.

    PubMed

    Gai, Wei; Li, He; Jiang, Hualiang; Long, Yaqiu; Liu, Dongxiang

    2016-09-01

    SIRT1-7 play important roles in many biological processes and age-related diseases. In addition to a NAD(+) -dependent deacetylase activity, they can catalyze several other reactions, including the hydrolysis of long-chain fatty acyl lysine. To study the binding modes of sirtuins to long-chain acyl lysines, we solved the crystal structures of SIRT3 bound to either a H3K9-myristoylated- or a H3K9-palmitoylated peptide. Interaction of SIRT3 with the palmitoyl group led to unfolding of the α3-helix. The myristoyl and palmitoyl groups bind to the C-pocket and an allosteric site near the α3-helix, respectively. We found that the residues preceding the α3-helix determine the size of the C-pocket. The flexibility of the α2-α3 loop and the plasticity of the α3-helix affect the interaction with long-chain acyl lysine. PMID:27501476

  19. The Role of the β5-α11 Loop in the Active-Site Dynamics of Acylated Penicillin-Binding Protein A from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Fedarovich, Alena; Nicholas, Robert A.; Davies, Christopher

    2013-04-22

    Penicillin-binding protein A (PBPA) is a class B penicillin-binding protein that is important for cell division in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We have determined a second crystal structure of PBPA in apo form and compared it with an earlier structure of apoenzyme. Significant structural differences in the active site region are apparent, including increased ordering of a β-hairpin loop and a shift of the SxN active site motif such that it now occupies a position that appears catalytically competent. Using two assays, including one that uses the intrinsic fluorescence of a tryptophan residue, we have also measured the second-order acylation rate constants for the antibiotics imipenem, penicillin G, and ceftriaxone. Of these, imipenem, which has demonstrable anti-tubercular activity, shows the highest acylation efficiency. Crystal structures of PBPA in complex with the same antibiotics were also determined, and all show conformational differences in the β5–α11 loop near the active site, but these differ for each β-lactam and also for each of the two molecules in the crystallographic asymmetric unit. Overall, these data reveal the β5–α11 loop of PBPA as a flexible region that appears important for acylation and provide further evidence that penicillin-binding proteins in apo form can occupy different conformational states.

  20. Mechanistic studies of the cationic binding pocket of CYP2C9 in vitro and in silico: metabolism of nonionizable analogs of tienilic acid.

    PubMed

    Tay, Suzanne; Le, Hoa; Ford, Kevin A; Nelson, Sid D; Khojasteh, S Cyrus; Rademacher, Peter M

    2014-11-01

    Tienilic acid (TA) is selectively oxidized at the C-5 position of the thiophene ring by the human liver enzyme cytochrome P450 2C9 (CYP2C9). This oxidation is mediated by the proximal positioning of the thiophene over the heme iron, which is proposed to be coordinated by an interaction of the TA carboxylic acid to a cationic binding pocket in the enzyme active site. In this study, we investigated how chemical modification of TA influences the bioactivation by CYP2C9. For this investigation, nine analogs of TA were chosen with substitutions on either side of the molecule. We tested three parameters, including CYP2C9 inhibition, metabolic profiling, and in silico docking. Of the 10 compounds tested, only two (TA and a noncarboxyl analog) resulted in competitive and time-dependent inhibition of CYP2C9. Metabolic profiling revealed a trend in which substitution of the carboxylate with nonionizable functional groups resulted in metabolic switching from oxidation of the aromatic ring to dealkylation reactions at the opposite side of the structure. The in silico modeling predicted an opposite binding orientation to that of TA for many analogs, including the 3-thenoyl regio-isomer analog, which contradicts previous models. Together these data show that disrupting interactions with the cationic binding pocket of CYP2C9 will impact the sites of metabolism and inhibition of the enzyme.

  1. Probing the Binding Pocket of the Broadly Tuned Human Bitter Taste Receptor TAS2R14 by Chemical Modification of Cognate Agonists.

    PubMed

    Karaman, Rafik; Nowak, Stefanie; Di Pizio, Antonella; Kitaneh, Hothaifa; Abu-Jaish, Alaa; Meyerhof, Wolfgang; Niv, Masha Y; Behrens, Maik

    2016-07-01

    Sensing potentially harmful bitter substances in the oral cavity is achieved by a group of (˜) 25 receptors, named TAS2Rs, which are expressed in specialized sensory cells and recognize individual but overlapping sets of bitter compounds. The receptors differ in their tuning breadths ranging from narrowly to broadly tuned receptors. One of the most broadly tuned human bitter taste receptors is the TAS2R14 recognizing an enormous variety of chemically diverse synthetic and natural bitter compounds, including numerous medicinal drugs. This suggests that this receptor possesses a large readily accessible ligand binding pocket. To allow probing the accessibility and size of the ligand binding pocket, we chemically modified cognate agonists and tested receptor responses in functional assays. The addition of large functional groups to agonists was usually possible without abolishing agonistic activity. The newly synthesized agonist derivatives were modeled in the binding site of the receptor, providing comparison to the mother substances and rationalization of the in vitro activities of this series of compounds. PMID:26825540

  2. A thiolate anion buried within the hydrocarbon ruler perturbs PagP lipid acyl chain selection.

    PubMed

    Khan, M Adil; Moktar, Joel; Mott, Patrick J; Bishop, Russell E

    2010-03-23

    The Escherichia coli outer membrane phospholipid:lipid A palmitoyltransferase PagP exhibits remarkable selectivity because its binding pocket for lipid acyl chains excludes those differing in length from palmitate by a solitary methylene unit. This narrow detergent-binding hydrophobic pocket buried within the eight-strand antiparallel beta-barrel is known as the hydrocarbon ruler. Gly88 lines the acyl chain binding pocket floor, and its substitution can raise the floor to correspondingly shorten the selected acyl chain. An aromatic exciton interaction between Tyr26 and Trp66 provides an intrinsic spectroscopic probe located immediately adjacent to Gly88. The Gly88Cys PagP enzyme was engineered to function as a dedicated myristoyltransferase, but the mutant enzyme instead selected both myristoyl and pentadecanoyl groups, was devoid of the exciton, and displayed a 21 degrees C reduction in thermal stability. We now demonstrate that the structural perturbation results from a buried thiolate anion attributed to suppression of the Cys sulfhydryl group pK(a) from 9.4 in aqueous solvent to 7.5 in the hydrocarbon ruler microenvironment. The Cys thiol is sandwiched at the interface between a nonpolar and a polar beta-barrel interior milieu, suggesting that local electrostatics near the otherwise hydrophobic hydrocarbon ruler pocket serve to perturb the thiol pK(a). Neutralization of the Cys thiolate anion by protonation restores wild-type exciton and thermal stability signatures to Gly88Cys PagP, which then functions as a dedicated myristoyltransferase at pH 7. Gly88Cys PagP assembled in bacterial membranes recapitulates lipid A myristoylation in vivo. Hydrocarbon ruler-exciton coupling in PagP thus reveals a thiol-thiolate ionization mechanism for modulating lipid acyl chain selection.

  3. Cross-Neutralising Nanobodies Bind to a Conserved Pocket in the Hemagglutinin Stem Region Identified Using Yeast Display and Deep Mutational Scanning

    PubMed Central

    Gaiotto, Tiziano; Hufton, Simon E.

    2016-01-01

    Cross-neutralising monoclonal antibodies against influenza hemagglutinin (HA) are of considerable interest as both therapeutics and diagnostic tools. We have recently described five different single domain antibodies (nanobodies) which share this cross-neutralising activity and suggest their small size, high stability, and cleft binding properties may present distinct advantages over equivalent conventional antibodies. We have used yeast display in combination with deep mutational scanning to give residue level resolution of positions in the antibody-HA interface which are crucial for binding. In addition, we have mapped positions within HA predicted to have minimal effect on antibody binding when mutated. Our cross-neutralising nanobodies were shown to bind to a highly conserved pocket in the HA2 domain of A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza virus overlapping with the fusion peptide suggesting their mechanism of action is through the inhibition of viral membrane fusion. We also note that the epitope overlaps with that of CR6261 and F10 which are human monoclonal antibodies in clinical development as immunotherapeutics. Although all five nanobodies mapped to the same highly conserved binding pocket we observed differences in the size of the epitope footprint which has implications in comparing the relative genetic barrier each nanobody presents to a rapidly evolving influenza virus. To further refine our epitope map, we have re-created naturally occurring mutations within this HA stem epitope and tested their effect on binding using yeast display. We have shown that a D46N mutation in the HA2 stem domain uniquely interferes with binding of R2b-E8. Further testing of this substitution in the context of full length purified HA from 1918 H1N1 pandemic (Spanish flu), 2009 H1N1 pandemic (swine flu) and highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 demonstrated binding which correlated with D46 whereas binding to seasonal H1N1 strains carrying N46 was absent. In addition, our deep sequence

  4. DNA-binding studies and biological activities of new nitrosubstituted acyl thioureas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahir, Shaista; Badshah, Amin; Hussain, Raja Azadar; Tahir, Muhammad Nawaz; Tabassum, Saira; Patujo, Jahangir Ali; Rauf, Muhammad Khawar

    2015-11-01

    Four new nitrosubstituted acylthioureas i.e. 1-acetyl-3-(4-nitrophenyl)thiourea (TU1), 1-acetyl-3-(2-methyl-4-nitrophenyl)thiourea (TU2), 1-acetyl-3-(2-methoxy-4-nitrophenyl)thiourea (TU3) and 1-acetyl-3-(4-chloro-3-nitrophenyl)thiourea (TU4) have been synthesized and characterized (by C13 and H1 nuclear magnetic resonance, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and single crystal X-ray diffraction). As a preliminary investigation of the anti-cancer potencies of the said compounds, DNA interaction studies have been carried out using cyclic voltammetry and UV-vis spectroscopy along with verification from computational studies. The drug-DNA binding constants are found to be in the order, KTU3 9.04 × 106 M-1 > KTU4 8.57 × 106 M-1 > KTU2 6.05 × 106 M-1 > KTU1 1.16 × 106 M-1. Furthermore, the antioxidant, cytotoxic, antibacterial and antifungal activities have been carried out against DPPH (1,1-diphenyl-2-dipicrylhydrazyl), Brine shrimp eggs, gram positive (Micrococcus luteus, Staphylococcus aureus) and gram negative (Bordetella bronchiseptica, Salmonella typhimurium, Enterobacter aerogens) and fungal cultures (Aspergillus fumigatus, Mucor species, Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus flavus) respectively.

  5. SIRT3 and SIRT5 regulate the enzyme activity and cardiolipin binding of very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuxun; Bharathi, Sivakama S; Rardin, Matthew J; Uppala, Radha; Verdin, Eric; Gibson, Bradford W; Goetzman, Eric S

    2015-01-01

    SIRT3 and SIRT5 have been shown to regulate mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation but the molecular mechanisms behind the regulation are lacking. Here, we demonstrate that SIRT3 and SIRT5 both target human very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD), a key fatty acid oxidation enzyme. SIRT3 deacetylates and SIRT5 desuccinylates K299 which serves to stabilize the essential FAD cofactor in the active site. Further, we show that VLCAD binds strongly to cardiolipin and isolated mitochondrial membranes via a domain near the C-terminus containing lysines K482, K492, and K507. Acetylation or succinylation of these residues eliminates binding of VLCAD to cardiolipin. SIRT3 deacetylates K507 while SIRT5 desuccinylates K482, K492, and K507. Sirtuin deacylation of recombinant VLCAD rescues membrane binding. Endogenous VLCAD from SIRT3 and SIRT5 knockout mouse liver shows reduced binding to cardiolipin. Thus, SIRT3 and SIRT5 promote fatty acid oxidation by converging upon VLCAD to promote its activity and membrane localization. Regulation of cardiolipin binding by reversible lysine acylation is a novel mechanism that is predicted to extrapolate to other metabolic proteins that localize to the inner mitochondrial membrane. PMID:25811481

  6. Exploring Chromophore-Binding Pocket: High-Resolution Solid-State H-C Interfacial Correlation NMR Spectra with Windowed PMLG Scheme.

    PubMed

    Song, Chen; Lang, Christina; Mailliet, Jo; Hughes, Jon; Gärtner, Wolfgang; Matysik, Jörg

    2012-02-01

    High-resolution two-dimensional (2D) (1)H-(13)C heteronuclear correlation spectra are recorded for selective observation of interfacial 3-5.5 Å contacts of the uniformly (13)C-labeled phycocyanobilin (PCB) chromophore with its unlabeled binding pocket. The experiment is based on a medium- and long-distance heteronuclear correlation (MELODI-HETCOR) method. For improving (1)H spectral resolution, a windowed phase-modulated Lee-Goldburg (wPMLG) decoupling scheme is applied during the t(1) evolution period. Our approach allows for identification of chromophore-protein interactions, in particular for elucidation of the hydrogen-bonding networks and charge distributions within the chromophore-binding pocket. The resulting pulse sequence is tested on the cyanobacterial (Cph1) phytochrome sensory module (residues 1-514, Cph1Δ2) containing uniformly (13)C- and (15)N-labeled PCB chromophore (u-[(13)C,(15)N]-PCB-Cph1Δ2) at 17.6 T. PMID:22303079

  7. Ligand-binding pocket shape differences between S1P1 and S1P3 determine efficiency of chemical probe identification by uHTS

    PubMed Central

    Schürer, Stephan C.; Brown, Steven J.; Cabrera, Pedro Gonzales; Schaeffer, Marie-Therese; Chapman, Jacqueline; Jo, Euijung; Chase, Peter; Spicer, Tim; Hodder, Peter; Rosen, Hugh

    2008-01-01

    We have studied the Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) receptor system to better understand why certain molecular targets within a closely related family are much more tractable when identifying compelling chemical leads. Five medically important G protein-coupled receptors for S1P regulate heart rate, coronary artery caliber, endothelial barrier integrity, and lymphocyte trafficking. Selective S1P receptor agonist probes would be of great utility to study receptor subtype-specific function. Through systematic screening of the same libraries, we identified novel selective agonists chemotypes for each of the S1P1 and S1P3 receptors. uHTS for S1P1 was more effective than for S1P3, with many selective, low nanomolar hits of proven mechanism emerging for. Receptor structure modeling and ligand docking reveal differences between the receptor binding pockets, which are the basis for sub-type selectivity. Novel selective agonists interact primarily in the hydrophobic pocket of the receptor in the absence of head-group interactions. Chemistry-space and shape-based analysis of the screening libraries in combination with the binding models explain the observed differential hit rates and enhanced efficiency for lead discovery for S1P1 vs. S1P3 in this closely related receptor family. PMID:18590333

  8. Pathogenicity of the BRCA1 Missense Variant M1775K is Determined by the Disruption of the BRCT Phosphopeptide-Binding Pocket: a Multi-Modal Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Tischkowitz,M.; Hamel, N.; Carvalho, M.; Birrane, G.; Soni, A.; van Beers, E.; Joosse, S.; Wong, N.; Novak, D.; et al

    2008-01-01

    A number of germ-line mutations in the BRCA1 gene confer susceptibility to breast and ovarian cancer. However, it remains difficult to determine whether many single amino-acid (missense) changes in the BRCA1 protein that are frequently detected in the clinical setting are pathologic or not. Here, we used a combination of functional, crystallographic, biophysical, molecular and evolutionary techniques, and classical genetic segregation analysis to demonstrate that the BRCA1 missense variant M1775K is pathogenic. Functional assays in yeast and mammalian cells showed that the BRCA1 BRCT domains carrying the amino-acid change M1775K displayed markedly reduced transcriptional activity, indicating that this variant represents a deleterious mutation. Importantly, the M1775K mutation disrupted the phosphopeptide-binding pocket of the BRCA1 BRCT domains, thereby inhibiting the BRCA1 interaction with the proteins BRIP1 and CtIP, which are involved in DNA damage-induced checkpoint control. These results indicate that the integrity of the BRCT phosphopeptide-binding pocket is critical for the tumor suppression function of BRCA1. Moreover, this study demonstrates that multiple lines of evidence obtained from a combination of functional, structural, molecular and evolutionary techniques, and classical genetic segregation analysis are required to confirm the pathogenicity of rare variants of disease-susceptibility genes and obtain important insights into the underlying pathogenetic mechanisms.

  9. DR1001 presents ‘altered-self’ peptides derived from joint associated proteins by accepting citrulline in three of its binding pockets

    PubMed Central

    James, Eddie A.; Moustakas, Antonis K.; Bui, John; Papadopoulos, George K.; Bondinas, George; Buckner, Jane H.; Kwok, William W.

    2010-01-01

    Objective HLA-DRB1*1001 (DR1001) is a shared epitope allele associated with rheumatoid arthritis. The objectives of this study were to assess the capacity of DR1001 to accommodate citrulline in its binding pockets and to identify citrullinated T cell epitopes derived from joint associated proteins. Methods The binding of peptide derivatives containing citrulline, arginine, and other amino acid substitutions was measured. A prediction algorithm was then developed to identify arginine containing sequences from joint associated proteins that preferentially bind to DR1001 upon citrullination. Unmodified and citrullinated versions of these sequences were synthesized and utilized to stimulate CD4+ T cells from healthy subjects and rheumatoid arthritis patients. Responses were measured by MHC class II tetramer staining and confirmed by isolating CD4+ T cell clones. Results DR1001 accepted citrulline, but not arginine in three of its anchoring pockets. The prediction algorithm identified sequences that preferentially bound to DR1001 with arginine replaced by citrulline. Three of these sequences elicited CD4+ T cell responses. T cell clones specific for these sequences proliferated only in response to citrullinated peptides. Conclusions Conversion of arginine to citrulline generates ‘altered-self’ peptides that can be bound and presented by DR1001. Responses to these peptides implicate the corresponding proteins (fibrinogen α, fibrinogen β and cartilage intermediate layer protein) as relevant antigens. Preferential responses to citrullinated sequences suggests that altered peptide binding affinity due to this post-translational modification may be an important factor in the initiation or progression of RA. As such, measuring responsiveness to these peptides may be useful for immune monitoring. PMID:20533291

  10. Molecular cloning and chromosomal localization of a pseudogene related to the human Acyl-CoA binding protein/diazepam binding inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Gersuk, V.H.; Rose, T.M.; Todaro, G.J.

    1995-01-20

    The acyl-CoA binding protein (ACBP) and the diazepam binding inhibitor (DBI) or endozepine are independent isolates of a single 86-amino-acid, 10-kDa protein. ACBP/DBI is highly conserved between species and has been identified in several diverse organisms, including human, cow, rat, frog, duck, insects, plants, and yeast. Although the genomic locus has not yet been cloned in humans, complementary DNA clones with different 5{prime} ends have been isolated and characterized. These cDNA clones appear to be encoded by a single gene. However, Southern blot analyses, in situ hybridizations, and somatic cell hybrid chromosomal mapping all suggest that there are multiple ACBP/DBI-related sequences in the genome. To identify potential members of this gene family, degenerate oligonucleotides corresponding to highly conserved regions of ACBP/DBI were used to screen a human genomic DNA library using the polymerase chain reaction. A novel gene, DBIP1, that is closely related to ACBP/DBI but is clearly distinct was identified. DBIP1 bears extensive sequence homology to ACBP/DBI but lacks the introns predicted by rat and duck genomic sequence studies. A 1-base deletion in the coding region results in a frameshift and, along with the absence of introns and the lack of a detectable transcript, suggests that DBIP1 is a pseudogene. ACBP/DBI has previously been mapped to chromosome 2, although this was recently disputed, and a chromosome 6 location was suggested. We show that ACBP/DBI is correctly placed on chromosome 2 and that the gene identified on chromosome 6 is DBIP1. 33 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Binding water clusters to an aromatic-rich hydrophobic pocket: [2.2.2]paracyclophane-(H2O)n, n = 1-5.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, Evan G; Zwier, Timothy S

    2014-09-18

    [2.2.2]Paracylcophane (tricyclophane, TCP) is a macrocycle with three phenyl substituents linked by ethyl bridges (-CH2CH2-) in the para-position, forming an aromatic-rich pocket capable of binding various substituents, including nature's solvent, water. Building on previous work [Buchanan, E. G.; et al. J. Chem. Phys. 2013, 138, 064308] that reported on the ground state conformational preferences of TCP, the focus of the present study is on the infrared and ultraviolet spectroscopy of TCP-(H2O)n clusters with n = 1-5. Resonant two-photon ionization (R2PI) was used to interrogate the mass selected electronic spectrum of the clusters, reporting on the perturbations imposed on the electronic states of TCP as the size of the water clusters bound to it vary in size from n = 1-5. The TCP-(H2O)n S0-S1 origins are shifted to lower frequency from the monomer, indicating an increased binding energy of the water or water network in the excited state. Ground state resonant ion-dip infrared (RIDIR) spectra of TCP-(H2O)n (n = 1-5) clusters were recorded in the OH stretch region, which probes the H-bonded water networks present and the perturbations imposed on them by TCP. The experimental frequencies are compared with harmonic vibrational frequencies calculated using density functional theory (DFT) with the dispersion-corrected functional ωB97X-D and a 6-311+g(d,p) basis set, providing firm assignments for their H-bonding structures. The H2O molecule in TCP-(H2O)1 sits on top of the binding pocket, donating both of its hydrogen atoms to the aromatic-rich interior of the monomer. The antisymmetric stretch fundamental of H2O in the complex is composed of a closely spaced set of transitions that likely reflect contributions from both para- and ortho-forms of H2O due to internal rotation of the H2O in the binding pocket. TCP-(H2O)2 also exists in a single conformational isomer that retains the same double-donor binding motif for the first water molecule, with the second H2O acting

  12. Novel drug design for Chagas disease via targeting Trypanosoma cruzi tubulin: Homology modeling and binding pocket prediction on Trypanosoma cruzi tubulin polymerization inhibition by naphthoquinone derivatives.

    PubMed

    Ogindo, Charles O; Khraiwesh, Mozna H; George, Matthew; Brandy, Yakini; Brandy, Nailah; Gugssa, Ayele; Ashraf, Mohammad; Abbas, Muneer; Southerland, William M; Lee, Clarence M; Bakare, Oladapo; Fang, Yayin

    2016-08-15

    Chagas disease, also called American trypanosomiasis, is a parasitic disease caused by Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi). Recent findings have underscored the abundance of the causative organism, (T. cruzi), especially in the southern tier states of the US and the risk burden for the rural farming communities there. Due to a lack of safe and effective drugs, there is an urgent need for novel therapeutic options for treating Chagas disease. We report here our first scientific effort to pursue a novel drug design for treating Chagas disease via the targeting of T. cruzi tubulin. First, the anti T. cruzi tubulin activities of five naphthoquinone derivatives were determined and correlated to their anti-trypanosomal activities. The correlation between the ligand activities against the T. cruzi organism and their tubulin inhibitory activities was very strong with a Pearson's r value of 0.88 (P value <0.05), indicating that this class of compounds could inhibit the activity of the trypanosome organism via T. cruzi tubulin polymerization inhibition. Subsequent molecular modeling studies were carried out to understand the mechanisms of the anti-tubulin activities, wherein, the homology model of T. cruzi tubulin dimer was generated and the putative binding site of naphthoquinone derivatives was predicted. The correlation coefficient for ligand anti-tubulin activities and their binding energies at the putative pocket was found to be r=0.79, a high correlation efficiency that was not replicated in contiguous candidate pockets. The homology model of T. cruzi tubulin and the identification of its putative binding site lay a solid ground for further structure based drug design, including molecular docking and pharmacophore analysis. This study presents a new opportunity for designing potent and selective drugs for Chagas disease. PMID:27345756

  13. Novel drug design for Chagas disease via targeting Trypanosoma cruzi tubulin: Homology modeling and binding pocket prediction on Trypanosoma cruzi tubulin polymerization inhibition by naphthoquinone derivatives.

    PubMed

    Ogindo, Charles O; Khraiwesh, Mozna H; George, Matthew; Brandy, Yakini; Brandy, Nailah; Gugssa, Ayele; Ashraf, Mohammad; Abbas, Muneer; Southerland, William M; Lee, Clarence M; Bakare, Oladapo; Fang, Yayin

    2016-08-15

    Chagas disease, also called American trypanosomiasis, is a parasitic disease caused by Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi). Recent findings have underscored the abundance of the causative organism, (T. cruzi), especially in the southern tier states of the US and the risk burden for the rural farming communities there. Due to a lack of safe and effective drugs, there is an urgent need for novel therapeutic options for treating Chagas disease. We report here our first scientific effort to pursue a novel drug design for treating Chagas disease via the targeting of T. cruzi tubulin. First, the anti T. cruzi tubulin activities of five naphthoquinone derivatives were determined and correlated to their anti-trypanosomal activities. The correlation between the ligand activities against the T. cruzi organism and their tubulin inhibitory activities was very strong with a Pearson's r value of 0.88 (P value <0.05), indicating that this class of compounds could inhibit the activity of the trypanosome organism via T. cruzi tubulin polymerization inhibition. Subsequent molecular modeling studies were carried out to understand the mechanisms of the anti-tubulin activities, wherein, the homology model of T. cruzi tubulin dimer was generated and the putative binding site of naphthoquinone derivatives was predicted. The correlation coefficient for ligand anti-tubulin activities and their binding energies at the putative pocket was found to be r=0.79, a high correlation efficiency that was not replicated in contiguous candidate pockets. The homology model of T. cruzi tubulin and the identification of its putative binding site lay a solid ground for further structure based drug design, including molecular docking and pharmacophore analysis. This study presents a new opportunity for designing potent and selective drugs for Chagas disease.

  14. Molecular modeling and mutagenesis of the ligand-binding pocket of the mGlu3 subtype of metabotropic glutamate receptor.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yi; Pattabiraman, N; Michne, William F; Huang, Xi-Ping; Hampson, David R

    2003-08-01

    A homology model of the extracellular domain of the mGlu3 subtype of metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptor was generated and tested using site-directed mutagenesis, a radioligand-binding assay using the Group II selective agonist (2S,2'R,3'R)-2-(2',3'-[3H]dicarboxycyclopropyl) glycine ([3H]DCG-IV), and in a fluorescence-based functional assay in live transiently transfected human embryonic kidney cells. Ten of the 12 mGlu3 mutants (R64A, R68A, Y150A, S151A, T174A, D194A, Y222A, R277A, D301A and K389) showed either no binding or a 90% or greater loss of specific [3H]DCG-IV binding. Several analogous mutations in mGlu2 supported the results obtained with mGlu3. These results demonstrate that the binding of [3H]DCG-IV to mGlu3 is exceptionally sensitive to mutagenesis-induced perturbations. In silico docking of DCG-IV into the agonist binding pocket of mGlu3 facilitated the interpretation the mutagenesis results. Tyrosines 150 and 222, and arginine 277 show close contacts with the third carboxylic acid group in DCG-IV, which is not present in glutamate or (2S,1'S,2'S)-2-(carboxycyclopropyl)glycine (L-CCG-I). Mutation of these three amino acids to alanine resulted in a near complete loss of receptor activation by DCG-IV and retention of near wild-type affinity for L-CCG-I. It is proposed that hydrogen bonding between this carboxylate and tyrosines 150 and 222 and arginine 277 provide a partial explanation for the high affinity and Group II selectivity of DCG-IV. These findings define the essential features of the ligand-binding pocket of mGlu3 and, together with other recent studies on mGlu receptors, provide new opportunities for structure-based drug design. PMID:12887692

  15. Arabidopsis acyl-CoA-binding proteins ACBP4 and ACBP5 are subcellularly localized to the cytosol and ACBP4 depletion affects membrane lipid composition.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Shi; Li, Hong-Ye; Zhang, Jiao-Ping; Chan, Suk-Wah; Chye, Mee-Len

    2008-12-01

    In Arabidopsis thaliana, acyl-CoA-binding proteins (ACBPs) are encoded by six genes, and they display varying affinities for acyl-CoA esters. Recombinant ACBP4 and ACBP5 have been shown to bind oleoyl-CoA esters in vitro. In this study, the subcellular localizations of ACBP4 and ACBP5 were determined by biochemical fractionation followed by western blot analyses using anti-ACBP4 and anti-ACBP5 antibodies and immuno-electron microscopy. Confocal microscopy of autofluorescence-tagged ACBP4 and ACBP5, expressed transiently in onion epidermal cells and in transgenic Arabidopsis, confirmed their expression in the cytosol. Taken together, ACBP4 and ACBP5 are available in the cytosol to bind and transfer cytosolic oleoyl-CoA esters. Lipid profile analysis further revealed that an acbp4 knockout mutant showed decreases in membrane lipids (digalactosyldiacylglycerol, monogalactosyldiacylglycerol, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylinositol) while acbp4-complemented lines attained levels similar to wild type, suggesting that ACBP4 plays a role in the biosynthesis of membrane lipids including galactolipids and phospholipids.

  16. Involvement of the Acyl-CoA binding domain containing 7 in the control of food intake and energy expenditure in mice

    PubMed Central

    Lanfray, Damien; Caron, Alexandre; Roy, Marie-Claude; Laplante, Mathieu; Morin, Fabrice; Leprince, Jérôme; Tonon, Marie-Christine; Richard, Denis

    2016-01-01

    Acyl-CoA binding domain-containing 7 (Acbd7) is a paralog gene of the diazepam-binding inhibitor/Acyl-CoA binding protein in which single nucleotide polymorphism has recently been associated with obesity in humans. In this report, we provide converging evidence indicating that a splice variant isoform of the Acbd7 mRNA is expressed and translated by some POMC and GABAergic-neurons in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC). We have demonstrated that the ARC ACBD7 isoform was produced and processed into a bioactive peptide referred to as nonadecaneuropeptide (NDN) in response to catabolic signals. We have characterized NDN as a potent anorexigenic signal acting through an uncharacterized endozepine G protein-coupled receptor and subsequently via the melanocortin system. Our results suggest that ACBD7-producing neurons participate in the hypothalamic leptin signalling pathway. Taken together, these data suggest that ACBD7-producing neurons are involved in the hypothalamic control exerted on food intake and energy expenditure by the leptin-melanocortin pathway. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11742.001 PMID:26880548

  17. Characterization of a protein-generated O₂ binding pocket in PqqC, a cofactorless oxidase catalyzing the final step in PQQ production.

    PubMed

    RoseFigura, Jordan M; Puehringer, Sandra; Schwarzenbacher, Robert; Toyama, Hirohide; Klinman, Judith P

    2011-03-01

    PQQ is an exogenous, tricyclic, quino-cofactor for a number of bacterial dehydrogenases. The final step of PQQ formation is catalyzed by PqqC, a cofactorless oxidase. This study focuses on the activation of molecular oxygen in an enzyme active site without metal or cofactor and has identified a specific oxygen binding and activating pocket in PqqC. The active site variants H154N, Y175F,S, and R179S were studied with the goal of defining the site of O(2) binding and activation. Using apo-glucose dehydrogenase to assay for PQQ production, none of the mutants in this "O(2) core" are capable of PQQ/PQQH(2) formation. Spectrophotometric assays give insight into the incomplete reactions being catalyzed by these mutants. Active site variants Y175F, H154N, and R179S form a quinoid intermediate (Figure 1) anaerobically. Y175S is capable of proceeding further from quinoid to quinol, whereas Y175F, H154N, and R179S require O(2) to produce the quinol species. None of the mutations precludes substrate/product binding or oxygen binding. Assays for the oxidation of PQQH(2) to PQQ show that these O(2) core mutants are incapable of catalyzing a rate increase over the reaction in buffer, whereas H154N can catalyze the oxidation of PQQH(2) to PQQ in the presence of H(2)O(2) as an electron acceptor. Taken together, these data indicate that none of the targeted mutants can react fully to form quinone even in the presence of bound O(2). The data indicate a successful separation of oxidative chemistry from O(2) binding. The residues H154, Y175, and R179 are proposed to form a core O(2) binding structure that is essential for efficient O(2) activation.

  18. Characterization of a Protein Generated O2 Binding Pocket in PqqC, a Cofactorless Oxidase Catalyzing the Final Step in PQQ Production†

    PubMed Central

    RoseFigura, Jordan M.; Puehringer, Sandra; Schwarzenbacher, Robert; Toyama, Hirohide; Klinman, Judith P.

    2012-01-01

    PQQ is an exogenous, tricyclic, quino-cofactor for a number of bacterial dehydrogenases. The final step of PQQ formation is catalyzed by PqqC, a cofactorless oxidase. This study focuses on the activation of molecular oxygen in an enzyme active site without metal or cofactor and has identified a specific oxygen binding and activating pocket in PqqC. The active site variants H154N, Y175F,S and R179S were studied with the goal of defining the site of O2 binding and activation. Using apo-glucose dehydrogenase to assay for PQQ production, none of the mutants in this “O2 core” are capable of PQQ/PQQH2 formation. Spectrophotometric assays give insight into the incomplete reactions being catalyzed by these mutants. Active site variants Y175F, H154N and R179S form a quinoid intermediate (Figure 1) anaerobically. Y175S is capable of proceeding further from quinoid to quinol, whereas Y175F, H154N and R179S require O2 to produce the quinol species. None of the mutations precludes substrate/product binding or oxygen binding. Assays for the oxidation of PQQH2 to PQQ show that these O2 core mutants are incapable of catalyzing a rate increase over the reaction in buffer. Interestingly, H154N can catalyze the oxidation of PQQH2 to PQQ faster than buffer, but only with H2O2 as an electron acceptor, not with O2. Taken together, these data indicate that none of the targeted mutants can react fully to form quinone even in the presence of bound O2. The data indicate a successful separation of oxidative chemistry from O2 binding. The residues H154, Y175, and R179 are proposed to form a core O2 binding structure that is essential for O2 activation. PMID:21155540

  19. Identification of essential residues involved in the glutamate binding pocket of the group II metabotropic glutamate receptor.

    PubMed

    Malherbe, P; Knoflach, F; Broger, C; Ohresser, S; Kratzeisen, C; Adam, G; Stadler, H; Kemp, J A; Mutel, V

    2001-11-01

    Metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors are a family of G-protein-coupled receptors that play central roles as modulators of both glutamatergic and other major neurotransmitter systems in CNS. Using molecular modeling, site-directed mutagenesis, [(3)H]LY354740 binding, [(35)S]GTPgammaS binding, and activation of GIRK current, we have been able to identify residues crucial for the binding of LY354740 and glutamate to rat mGlu2 receptors. Several of the crucial residues located in the binding site (Arg-57, Tyr-144, Tyr-216, Asp-295) have not been identified previously. We propose that the gamma-carboxyl group of LY354740 forms H-bonds to Arg-57, whereas the alpha-carboxyl group forms an H-bond with the hydroxyl group of Ser-145. The alpha-amino group of LY354740 forms H-bonds to Asp-295 and to the side-chain hydroxyl group of Thr-168. In addition, Tyr-144 may establish a hydrophobic (C-H/pi)-interaction with the bicyclo-hexane ring of LY354740. Furthermore, the mutation of residues Ser-148 and Arg-183, which are too remote for a direct interaction, affected the ligand affinity dramatically. These results suggest that Ser-148 and Arg-183 may be important for the 3D structure and/or are involved in closure of the domain. Finally, Asp-146, which is also remote from the binding site, was shown to be involved in the differential binding affinity of [(3)H]LY354740 for mGlu2 versus mGlu3 receptors. All the mGlu receptors except mGlu2 are activated by Ca(2+) and have serine instead of aspartic acid at this position, which suggests a critical role of this aspartic acid residue in the binding properties of this unique receptor. PMID:11641422

  20. Azurin as a protein scaffold for a low-coordinate non-heme iron site with a small-molecule binding pocket

    PubMed Central

    McLaughlin, Matthew P.; Retegan, Marius; Bill, Eckhard; Payne, Thomas M.; Shafaat, Hannah S.; Peña, Salvador; Sudhamsu, Jawahar; Ensign, Amy A.; Crane, Brian R.; Neese, Frank; Holland, Patrick L.

    2012-01-01

    The apo-protein of Pseudomonas aeruginosa azurin binds iron(II) to give a 1:1 complex, which has been characterized by electronic absorption, Mössbauer, and NMR spectroscopies, as well as X-ray crystallography and quantum-chemical computations. Despite potential competition by water and other coordinating residues, iron(II) binds tightly to the low-coordinate site. The iron(II) complex does not react with chemical redox agents to undergo oxidation or reduction. Spectroscopically-calibrated quantum-chemical computations show that the complex has high-spin iron(II) in a pseudotetrahedral coordination environment, which features interactions with side chains of two histidines and a cysteine, as well as the C=O of Gly45. In the 5A1 ground state, the dz2 orbital is doubly occupied. Mutation of Met121 to Ala leaves the metal site in a similar environment, but creates a pocket for reversible binding of small anions to the iron(II) center. Specifically, azide forms a high-spin iron(II) complex and cyanide forms a low-spin iron(II) complex. PMID:23167247

  1. Interactions between 1alpha,25(OH)2D3 and residues in the ligand-binding pocket of the vitamin D receptor: a correlated fragment molecular orbital study.

    PubMed

    Yamagishi, Kenji; Tokiwa, Hiroaki; Makishima, Makoto; Yamada, Sachiko

    2010-07-01

    To provide physicochemical insight into the role of each residue in the ligand-binding pocket (LBP) of the vitamin D receptor (VDR), we evaluated the energies of the interactions between the LBP residues and 1alpha,25(OH)2D3 by using an ab initio fragment molecular orbital (FMO) method at the Møller-Plesset second-order perturbation (MP2) level. This FMO-MP2 method can be used to correctly evaluate both electrostatic and van der Waals dispersion interactions, and it affords these interaction energies separately. We deduced the nature of each interaction and determined the importance of all the LBP residues involved in ligand recognition by the VDR. We previously reported the results of alanine-scanning mutational analysis (ASMA) of all 34 non-alanine residues lining the LBP of the human VDR. The theoretical results in combination with the ASMA results enabled us to assign the role of each LBP residue. We concluded that electrostatic interactions are the major determinant of the ligand-binding activity and ligand recognition specificity and that van der Waals interactions are important for protein folding and, in turn, for cofactor binding.

  2. Ligand-Binding Pocket Bridges DNA-Binding and Dimerization Domains of the Urate-Responsive MarR Homologue MftR from Burkholderia thailandensis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Members of the multiple antibiotic resistance regulator (MarR) family often regulate gene activity by responding to a specific ligand. In the absence of ligand, most MarR proteins function as repressors, while ligand binding causes attenuated DNA binding and therefore increased gene expression. Previously, we have shown that urate is a ligand for MftR (major facilitator transport regulator), which is encoded by the soil bacterium Burkholderia thailandensis. We show here that both mftR and the divergently oriented gene mftP encoding a major facilitator transport protein are upregulated in the presence of urate. MftR binds two cognate sites in the mftR-mftP intergenic region with equivalent affinity and sensitivity to urate. Mutagenesis of four conserved residues previously reported to be involved in urate binding to Deinococcus radiodurans HucR and Rhizobium radiobacter PecS significantly reduced protein stability and DNA binding affinity but not ligand binding. These data suggest that residues equivalent to those implicated in ligand binding to HucR and PecS serve structural roles and that MftR relies on distinct residues for ligand binding. MftR exhibits a two-step melting transition suggesting independent unfolding of the dimerization and DNA-binding regions; urate binding or mutations in the predicted ligand-binding sites result in one-step unfolding transitions. We suggest that MftR binds the ligand in a cleft between the DNA-binding lobes and the dimer interface but that the mechanism of ligand-mediated attenuation of DNA binding differs from that proposed for other urate-responsive MarR homologues. Since DNA binding by MftR is attenuated at 37 °C, our data also suggest that MftR responds to both ligand and a thermal upshift by attenuated DNA binding and upregulation of the genes under its control. PMID:24955985

  3. Primary structure of a cerulenin-binding. beta. -ketoacyl-(acyl carrier protein) synthase from barley chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Siggaard-Andersen, M.; Kauppinen, S. ); von Wettstein-Knowles, P. Univ. of Copenhagen )

    1991-05-15

    The radioactively labeled {beta}-ketoacyl thioester synthase inhibitor ({sup 3}H)cerulenin was used to tag three dimeric barley chloroplast proteins ({alpha}{alpha}, {alpha}{beta}, and {beta}{beta}) from the stromal fraction. Oligonucleotides corresponding to amino acid sequences obtained from the purified proteins were used to generate with the polymerase chain reaction a probe for cDNAs encoding the {beta} subunit. cDNA sequencing revealed an open reading frame for 462 residues comprising the mature protein and a 35-amino acid transit peptide. The deduced amino acid sequence of the mature protein is homologous to the {beta}-ketoacyl-(acyl carrier protein) (ACP) synthase I (3-oxoacyl-ACP synthase; acyl-ACP:malonyl-ACP C-acyltransferase (decarboxylating), EC 2.3.1.41) of Escherichia coli. Under analogous experimental conditions ({sup 3}H)cerulenin tagged a single dimeric protein from spinach chloroplasts.

  4. Structural characterization of acyl-CoA oxidases reveals a direct link between pheromone biosynthesis and metabolic state in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinxing; Li, Kunhua; Jones, Rachel A; Bruner, Steven D; Butcher, Rebecca A

    2016-09-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans secretes ascarosides as pheromones to communicate with other worms and to coordinate the development and behavior of the population. Peroxisomal β-oxidation cycles shorten the side chains of ascaroside precursors to produce the short-chain ascaroside pheromones. Acyl-CoA oxidases, which catalyze the first step in these β-oxidation cycles, have different side chain-length specificities and enable C. elegans to regulate the production of specific ascaroside pheromones. Here, we determine the crystal structure of the acyl-CoA oxidase 1 (ACOX-1) homodimer and the ACOX-2 homodimer bound to its substrate. Our results provide a molecular basis for the substrate specificities of the acyl-CoA oxidases and reveal why some of these enzymes have a very broad substrate range, whereas others are quite specific. Our results also enable predictions to be made for the roles of uncharacterized acyl-CoA oxidases in C. elegans and in other nematode species. Remarkably, we show that most of the C. elegans acyl-CoA oxidases that participate in ascaroside biosynthesis contain a conserved ATP-binding pocket that lies at the dimer interface, and we identify key residues in this binding pocket. ATP binding induces a structural change that is associated with tighter binding of the FAD cofactor. Mutations that disrupt ATP binding reduce FAD binding and reduce enzyme activity. Thus, ATP may serve as a regulator of acyl-CoA oxidase activity, thereby directly linking ascaroside biosynthesis to ATP concentration and metabolic state.

  5. Structural characterization of acyl-CoA oxidases reveals a direct link between pheromone biosynthesis and metabolic state in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinxing; Li, Kunhua; Jones, Rachel A; Bruner, Steven D; Butcher, Rebecca A

    2016-09-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans secretes ascarosides as pheromones to communicate with other worms and to coordinate the development and behavior of the population. Peroxisomal β-oxidation cycles shorten the side chains of ascaroside precursors to produce the short-chain ascaroside pheromones. Acyl-CoA oxidases, which catalyze the first step in these β-oxidation cycles, have different side chain-length specificities and enable C. elegans to regulate the production of specific ascaroside pheromones. Here, we determine the crystal structure of the acyl-CoA oxidase 1 (ACOX-1) homodimer and the ACOX-2 homodimer bound to its substrate. Our results provide a molecular basis for the substrate specificities of the acyl-CoA oxidases and reveal why some of these enzymes have a very broad substrate range, whereas others are quite specific. Our results also enable predictions to be made for the roles of uncharacterized acyl-CoA oxidases in C. elegans and in other nematode species. Remarkably, we show that most of the C. elegans acyl-CoA oxidases that participate in ascaroside biosynthesis contain a conserved ATP-binding pocket that lies at the dimer interface, and we identify key residues in this binding pocket. ATP binding induces a structural change that is associated with tighter binding of the FAD cofactor. Mutations that disrupt ATP binding reduce FAD binding and reduce enzyme activity. Thus, ATP may serve as a regulator of acyl-CoA oxidase activity, thereby directly linking ascaroside biosynthesis to ATP concentration and metabolic state. PMID:27551084

  6. 5'-Substituted Amiloride Derivatives as Allosteric Modulators Binding in the Sodium Ion Pocket of the Adenosine A2A Receptor.

    PubMed

    Massink, Arnault; Louvel, Julien; Adlere, Ilze; van Veen, Corine; Huisman, Berend J H; Dijksteel, Gabrielle S; Guo, Dong; Lenselink, Eelke B; Buckley, Benjamin J; Matthews, Hayden; Ranson, Marie; Kelso, Michael; IJzerman, Adriaan P

    2016-05-26

    The sodium ion site is an allosteric site conserved among many G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Amiloride 1 and 5-(N,N-hexamethylene)amiloride 2 (HMA) supposedly bind in this sodium ion site and can influence orthosteric ligand binding. The availability of a high-resolution X-ray crystal structure of the human adenosine A2A receptor (hA2AAR), in which the allosteric sodium ion site was elucidated, makes it an appropriate model receptor for investigating the allosteric site. In this study, we report the synthesis and evaluation of novel 5'-substituted amiloride derivatives as hA2AAR allosteric antagonists. The potency of the amiloride derivatives was assessed by their ability to displace orthosteric radioligand [(3)H]4-(2-((7-amino-2-(furan-2-yl)-[1,2,4]triazolo[1,5-a]-[1,3,5]triazin-5-yl)amino)ethyl)phenol ([(3)H]ZM-241,385) from both the wild-type and sodium ion site W246A mutant hA2AAR. 4-Ethoxyphenethyl-substituted amiloride 12l was found to be more potent than both amiloride and HMA, and the shift in potency between the wild-type and mutated receptor confirmed its likely binding to the sodium ion site. PMID:27124340

  7. Fine-tuning of the binding and dissociation of CO by the amino acids of the heme pocket of Coprinus cinereus peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Feis, Alessandro; Santoni, Elisa; Neri, Francesca; Ciaccio, Chiara; De Sanctis, Giampiero; Coletta, Massimo; Welinder, Karen G; Smulevich, Giulietta

    2002-11-01

    Resonance Raman and infrared spectra and the CO dissociation rates (k(off)) were measured in Coprinus cinereus peroxidase (CIP) and several mutants in the heme binding pocket. These mutants included the Asp245Asn, Arg51Leu, Arg51Gln, Arg51Asn, Arg51Lys, Phe54Trp, and Phe54Val mutants. Binding of CO to CIP produced different CO adducts at pH 6 and 10. At pH 6, the bound CO is H-bonded to the protonated distal His55 residue, whereas at alkaline pH, the vibrational signatures and the rate of CO dissociation indicate a distal side which is more open or flexible than in other plant peroxidases. The distal Arg51 residue is important in determining the rate of dissociation in the acid form, increasing by 8-17-fold in the Arg51 mutants compared to that for the wild-type protein. Replacement of the distal Phe with Trp created a new acid form characterized by vibrational frequencies and k(off) values very similar to those of cytochrome c peroxidase.

  8. Host-Primed Ebola Virus GP Exposes a Hydrophobic NPC1 Receptor-Binding Pocket, Revealing a Target for Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Bornholdt, Zachary A.; Ndungo, Esther; Fusco, Marnie L.; Bale, Shridhar; Flyak, Andrew I.; Crowe, James E.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The filovirus surface glycoprotein (GP) mediates viral entry into host cells. Following viral internalization into endosomes, GP is cleaved by host cysteine proteases to expose a receptor-binding site (RBS) that is otherwise hidden from immune surveillance. Here, we present the crystal structure of proteolytically cleaved Ebola virus GP to a resolution of 3.3 Å. We use this structure in conjunction with functional analysis of a large panel of pseudotyped viruses bearing mutant GP proteins to map the Ebola virus GP endosomal RBS at molecular resolution. Our studies indicate that binding of GP to its endosomal receptor Niemann-Pick C1 occurs in two distinct stages: the initial electrostatic interactions are followed by specific interactions with a hydrophobic trough that is exposed on the endosomally cleaved GP1 subunit. Finally, we demonstrate that monoclonal antibodies targeting the filovirus RBS neutralize all known filovirus GPs, making this conserved pocket a promising target for the development of panfilovirus therapeutics. PMID:26908579

  9. Nucleotides sequestered at different subsite loci within DNA-binding pockets of two OB-fold single-stranded DNA-binding proteins are unstacked to different extents.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hieu N; Zhao, Liang; Gray, Carla W; Gray, Donald M; Xia, Tianbing

    2013-07-01

    The gene 5 protein (g5p) encoded by the Ff strains of Escherichia coli bacteriophages is a dimeric single-stranded DNA-binding protein (SSB) that consists of two identical OB-fold (oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide-binding) motifs. Ultrafast time-resolved fluorescence measurements were carried out to investigate the effect of g5p binding on the conformation of 2-aminopurine (2AP) labels positioned between adenines or cytosines in the 16-nucleotide antiparallel tails of DNA hairpins. The measurements revealed significant changes in the conformational heterogeneity of the 2AP labels caused by g5p binding. The extent of the changes was dependent on sub-binding-site location, but generally resulted in base unstacking. When bound by g5p, the unstacked 2AP population increased from ∼ 22% to 59-67% in C-2AP-C segments and from 39% to 77% in an A-2AP-A segment. The OB-fold RPA70A domain of the human replication protein A also caused a significant amount of base unstacking at various locations within the DNA binding site as evidenced by steady-state fluorescence titration measurements using 2AP-labeled 5-mer DNAs. These solution studies support the concept that base unstacking at most of a protein's multiple sub-binding-site loci may be a feature that allows non-sequence specific OB-fold proteins to bind to single-stranded DNAs (ssDNAs) with minimal preference for particular sequences.

  10. Allosteric Remodelling of the Histone H3 Binding Pocket in the Pygo2 PHD Finger Triggered by Its Binding to the B9L/BCL9 Co-Factor

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Thomas C.R.; Rutherford, Trevor J.; Johnson, Christopher M.; Fiedler, Marc; Bienz, Mariann

    2010-01-01

    The Zn-coordinated PHD fingers of Pygopus (Pygo) proteins are critical for β-catenin-dependent transcriptional switches in normal and malignant tissues. They bind to methylated histone H3 tails, assisted by their BCL9 co-factors whose homology domain 1 (HD1) binds to the rear PHD surface. Although histone-binding residues are identical between the two human Pygo paralogs, we show here that Pygo2 complexes exhibit slightly higher binding affinities for methylated histone H3 tail peptides than Pygo1 complexes. We solved the crystal structure of the Pygo2 PHD–BCL9-2 HD1 complex, which revealed paralog-specific interactions in its PHD–HD1 interface that could contribute indirectly to its elevated affinity for the methylated histone H3 tail. Interestingly, using NMR spectroscopy, we discovered that HD1 binding to PHD triggers an allosteric communication with a conserved isoleucine residue that lines the binding channel for histone H3 threonine 3 (T3), the link between the two adjacent binding pockets accommodating histone H3 alanine 1 and methylated lysine 4, respectively. This modulates the surface of the T3 channel, providing a plausible explanation as to how BCL9 co-factors binding to Pygo PHD fingers impact indirectly on their histone binding affinity. Intriguingly, this allosteric modulation of the T3 channel is propagated through the PHD structural core by a highly conserved tryptophan, the signature residue defining the PHD subclass of Zn fingers, which suggests that other PHD proteins may also be assisted by co-factors in their decoding of modified histone H3 tails. PMID:20637214

  11. Mutagenesis of Nucleophilic Residues near the Orthosteric Binding Pocket of M1 and M2 Muscarinic receptors: Effect on the Binding of Nitrogen Mustard Analogs of Acetylcholine and McN-A-343

    PubMed Central

    Suga, Hinako; Sawyer, Gregory W.

    2010-01-01

    Investigating how a test drug alters the reaction of a site-directed electrophile with a receptor is a powerful method for determining whether the drug acts competitively or allosterically, provided that the binding site of the electrophile is known. In this study, therefore, we mutated nucleophilic residues near and within the orthosteric pockets of M1 and M2 muscarinic receptors to identify where acetylcholine mustard and 4-[(2-bromoethyl)methyl-amino]-2-butynyl-N-(3-chlorophenyl)carbamate (BR384) bind covalently. BR384 is the nitrogen mustard analog of [4-[[N-(3-chlorophenyl)carbamoyl]oxy]-2-butynyl]trimethylammonium chloride (McN-A-343). Mutation of the highly conserved aspartic acid in M1 (Asp105) and M2 (Asp103) receptors to asparagine largely prevented receptor alkylation by acetylcholine mustard, although modest alkylation still occurred at M2 D103N at high concentrations of the mustard. Receptor alkylation by BR384 was also greatly inhibited in the M1 D105N mutant, but some alkylation still occurred at high concentrations of the compound. In contrast, BR384 rapidly alkylated the M2 D103N mutant. Its affinity was reduced to one tenth, however. The alkylation of M2 D103N by BR384 was competitively inhibited by N-methylscopolamine and allosterically inhibited by gallamine. Mutation of a variety of other nucleophilic residues, some in combination with D103N, had little effect on M2 receptor alkylation by BR384. Our results suggest that BR384 alkylates at least one residue other than the conserved aspartic acid at the ligand-binding site of M1 and M2 receptors. This additional residue seems to be located within or near the orthosteric-binding pocket and is not part of the allosteric site for gallamine. PMID:20643905

  12. Chemical probing of the human sirtuin 5 active site reveals its substrate acyl specificity and peptide-based inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Roessler, Claudia; Nowak, Theresa; Pannek, Martin; Gertz, Melanie; Nguyen, Giang T T; Scharfe, Michael; Born, Ilona; Sippl, Wolfgang; Steegborn, Clemens; Schutkowski, Mike

    2014-09-26

    Sirtuins are NAD(+)-dependent deacetylases acting as sensors in metabolic pathways and stress response. In mammals there are seven isoforms. The mitochondrial sirtuin 5 is a weak deacetylase but a very efficient demalonylase and desuccinylase; however, its substrate acyl specificity has not been systematically analyzed. Herein, we investigated a carbamoyl phosphate synthetase 1 derived peptide substrate and modified the lysine side chain systematically to determine the acyl specificity of Sirt5. From that point we designed six potent peptide-based inhibitors that interact with the NAD(+) binding pocket. To characterize the interaction details causing the different substrate and inhibition properties we report several X-ray crystal structures of Sirt5 complexed with these peptides. Our results reveal the Sirt5 acyl selectivity and its molecular basis and enable the design of inhibitors for Sirt5. PMID:25111069

  13. The Crystal Structure of Escherichia coli Spermidine Synthase SpeE Reveals a Unique Substrate-binding Pocket

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, X.; Chua, T; Tkaczuk, K; Bujnicki, J; Sivaraman, J

    2010-01-01

    Polyamines are essential in all branches of life. Biosynthesis of spermidine, one of the most ubiquitous polyamines, is catalyzed by spermidine synthase (SpeE). Although the function of this enzyme from Escherichia coli has been thoroughly characterized, its structural details remain unknown. Here, we report the crystal structure of E. coli SpeE and study its interaction with the ligands by isothermal titration calorimetry and computational modelling. SpeE consists of two domains - a small N-terminal {beta}-strand domain, and a C-terminal catalytic domain that adopts a canonical methyltransferase (MTase) Rossmann fold. The protein forms a dimer in the crystal and in solution. Structural comparison of E. coli SpeE to its homologs reveals that it has a large and unique substrate-binding cleft that may account for its lower amine substrate specificity.

  14. Modeling the protonation states of β-secretase binding pocket by molecular dynamics simulations and docking studies.

    PubMed

    Sabbah, Dima A; Zhong, Haizhen A

    2016-07-01

    β-secretase (BACE1) is an aspartyl protease that processes the β-amyloid peptide in the human brain in patients with Alzheimer's disease. There are two catalytic aspartates (ASP32 and ASP228) in the active domain of BACE1. Although it is believed that the net charge of the Asp dyad is -1, the exact protonation state still remains a matter of debate. We carried out molecular dynamic (MD) simulations for the four protonation states of BACE1 proteins. We applied Glide docking studies to 21 BACE1 inhibitors against the MD extracted conformations. The dynamic results infer that the protein/ligand complex remains stable during the entire simulation course for HD32D228 model. The results show that the hydrogen bonds between the inhibitor and the Asp dyad are maintained in the 10,000th ps snapshot of HD32D228 model. Our results also reveal the significant loop residues in maintaining the active binding conformation in the HD32D228 model. Molecular docking results show that the HD32D228 model provided the best enrichment factor score, suggesting that this model was able to recognize the most active compounds. Our observations provide an evidence for the preference of the anionic state (HD32D228) in BACE1 binding site and are in accord with reported computational data. The protonation state study would provide significant information to assign the correct protonation state for structure-based drug design and docking studies targeting the BACE1 proteins as a tactic to develop potential AD inhibitors.

  15. Modeling the protonation states of β-secretase binding pocket by molecular dynamics simulations and docking studies.

    PubMed

    Sabbah, Dima A; Zhong, Haizhen A

    2016-07-01

    β-secretase (BACE1) is an aspartyl protease that processes the β-amyloid peptide in the human brain in patients with Alzheimer's disease. There are two catalytic aspartates (ASP32 and ASP228) in the active domain of BACE1. Although it is believed that the net charge of the Asp dyad is -1, the exact protonation state still remains a matter of debate. We carried out molecular dynamic (MD) simulations for the four protonation states of BACE1 proteins. We applied Glide docking studies to 21 BACE1 inhibitors against the MD extracted conformations. The dynamic results infer that the protein/ligand complex remains stable during the entire simulation course for HD32D228 model. The results show that the hydrogen bonds between the inhibitor and the Asp dyad are maintained in the 10,000th ps snapshot of HD32D228 model. Our results also reveal the significant loop residues in maintaining the active binding conformation in the HD32D228 model. Molecular docking results show that the HD32D228 model provided the best enrichment factor score, suggesting that this model was able to recognize the most active compounds. Our observations provide an evidence for the preference of the anionic state (HD32D228) in BACE1 binding site and are in accord with reported computational data. The protonation state study would provide significant information to assign the correct protonation state for structure-based drug design and docking studies targeting the BACE1 proteins as a tactic to develop potential AD inhibitors. PMID:27474865

  16. Navigating into the binding pockets of the HER family protein kinases: discovery of novel EGFR inhibitor as antitumor agent

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Ning, Jin-Feng; Meng, Qing-Wei; Hu, Jing; Zhao, Yan-Bin; Liu, Chao; Cai, Li

    2015-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) family has been validated as a successful antitumor drug target for decades. Known EGFR inhibitors were exposed to distinct drug resistance against the various EGFR mutants within non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), particularly the T790M mutation. Although so far a number of studies have been reported on the development of third-generation EGFR inhibitors for overcoming the resistance issue, the design procedure largely depends on the intuition of medicinal chemists. Here we retrospectively make a detailed analysis of the 42 EGFR family protein crystal complexes deposited in the Protein Data Bank (PDB). Based on the analysis of inhibitor binding modes in the kinase catalytic cleft, we identified a potent EGFR inhibitor (compound A-10) against drug-resistant EGFR through fragment-based drug design. This compound showed at least 30-fold more potency against EGFR T790M than the two control molecules erlotinib and gefitinib in vitro. Moreover, it could exhibit potent HER2 inhibitory activities as well as tumor growth inhibitory activity. Molecular docking studies revealed a structural basis for the increased potency and mutant selectivity of this compound. Compound A-10 may be selected as a promising candidate in further preclinical studies. In addition, our findings could provide a powerful strategy to identify novel selective kinase inhibitors on the basis of detailed kinase–ligand interaction space in the PDB. PMID:26229444

  17. Navigating into the binding pockets of the HER family protein kinases: discovery of novel EGFR inhibitor as antitumor agent.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Ning, Jin-Feng; Meng, Qing-Wei; Hu, Jing; Zhao, Yan-Bin; Liu, Chao; Cai, Li

    2015-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) family has been validated as a successful antitumor drug target for decades. Known EGFR inhibitors were exposed to distinct drug resistance against the various EGFR mutants within non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), particularly the T790M mutation. Although so far a number of studies have been reported on the development of third-generation EGFR inhibitors for overcoming the resistance issue, the design procedure largely depends on the intuition of medicinal chemists. Here we retrospectively make a detailed analysis of the 42 EGFR family protein crystal complexes deposited in the Protein Data Bank (PDB). Based on the analysis of inhibitor binding modes in the kinase catalytic cleft, we identified a potent EGFR inhibitor (compound A-10) against drug-resistant EGFR through fragment-based drug design. This compound showed at least 30-fold more potency against EGFR T790M than the two control molecules erlotinib and gefitinib in vitro. Moreover, it could exhibit potent HER2 inhibitory activities as well as tumor growth inhibitory activity. Molecular docking studies revealed a structural basis for the increased potency and mutant selectivity of this compound. Compound A-10 may be selected as a promising candidate in further preclinical studies. In addition, our findings could provide a powerful strategy to identify novel selective kinase inhibitors on the basis of detailed kinase-ligand interaction space in the PDB. PMID:26229444

  18. Molecular cloning of a cDNA from Brassica napus L. for a homologue of acyl-CoA-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Hills, M J; Dann, R; Lydiate, D; Sharpe, A

    1994-08-01

    A cDNA encoding an acyl-CoA-binding protein (ACBP) homologue has been cloned from a lambda gt11 library made from mRNA isolated from developing seeds of oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.). The derived amino acid sequence reveals a protein 92 amino acids in length which is highly conserved when compared with ACBP sequences from yeast, cow, man and fruit fly. Southern blot analysis of Brassica napus genomic DNA revealed the presence of 6 genes, 3 derived from the Brassica rapa parent and 3 from Brassica oleracea. Northern blot analysis showed that ACBP genes are expressed strongly in developing embryo, flowers and cotyledons of seedlings and to a lesser extent in leaves and roots.

  19. Isolation and characterization of a cDNA encoding a membrane bound acyl-CoA binding protein from Agave americana L. epidermis.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Consuelo; Martín-Rufián, M; Reina, José J; Heredia, Antonio

    2006-01-01

    A cDNA encoding an acyl-CoA binding protein (ACBP) homologue has been cloned from a cDNA library made from mRNA isolated from epidermis of young leaves of Agave americana L. The derived amino acid sequence reveals a protein corresponding to the membrane-associated form of ACBPs only previously described in Arabidopsis and rice. Northern blot analysis showed that the A. americana ACBP gene is mainly expressed in the epidermis of mature zone of the leaves. The epidermis of A. americana leaves have a well developed cuticle with the highest amounts of the cuticular components waxes, cutin and cutan suggesting a potential role of the protein in cuticle formation.

  20. CNDOL: A fast and reliable method for the calculation of electronic properties of very large systems. Applications to retinal binding pocket in rhodopsin and gas phase porphine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montero-Cabrera, Luis Alberto; Röhrig, Ute; Padrón-Garcia, Juan A.; Crespo-Otero, Rachel; Montero-Alejo, Ana L.; Garcia de la Vega, José M.; Chergui, Majed; Rothlisberger, Ursula

    2007-10-01

    Very large molecular systems can be calculated with the so called CNDOL approximate Hamiltonians that have been developed by avoiding oversimplifications and only using a priori parameters and formulas from the simpler NDO methods. A new diagonal monoelectronic term named CNDOL/21 shows great consistency and easier SCF convergence when used together with an appropriate function for charge repulsion energies that is derived from traditional formulas. It is possible to obtain a priori molecular orbitals and electron excitation properties after the configuration interaction of single excited determinants with reliability, maintaining interpretative possibilities even being a simplified Hamiltonian. Tests with some unequivocal gas phase maxima of simple molecules (benzene, furfural, acetaldehyde, hexyl alcohol, methyl amine, 2,5 dimethyl 2,4 hexadiene, and ethyl sulfide) ratify the general quality of this approach in comparison with other methods. The calculation of large systems as porphine in gas phase and a model of the complete retinal binding pocket in rhodopsin with 622 basis functions on 280 atoms at the quantum mechanical level show reliability leading to a resulting first allowed transition in 483nm, very similar to the known experimental value of 500nm of "dark state." In this very important case, our model gives a central role in this excitation to a charge transfer from the neighboring Glu- counterion to the retinaldehyde polyene chain. Tests with gas phase maxima of some important molecules corroborate the reliability of CNDOL/2 Hamiltonians.

  1. Design, synthesis and evaluation of novel HIV-1 NNRTIs with dual structural conformations targeting the entrance channel of the NNRTI binding pocket.

    PubMed

    Meng, Qing; Chen, Xuwang; Kang, Dongwei; Huang, Boshi; Li, Wenxin; Zhan, Peng; Daelemans, Dirk; De Clercq, Erik; Pannecouque, Christophe; Liu, Xinyong

    2016-06-10

    On the basis of structure-based bioisosteric replacement and molecular hybridization strategy, a series of novel dual structural-conformation inhibitors targeting the "entrance channel" of HIV-1 NNRTIs binding pocket (NNIBP) were designed and synthesized. All of the new compounds were evaluated for their anti-HIV activities in MT-4 cells using the MTT method. Five compounds exhibited moderate to excellent potencies inhibiting wild-type (wt) HIV-1 replication with EC50 values ranging from 31.36 μM to 0.11 μM. Among them, compound 15b was identified as the most potent inhibitor with EC50 values of 0.11 μM and 2.18 μM against wt and K103N/Y181C double mutant HIV-1 strain (RES056), respectively. In addition, preliminary structure-activity relationships (SARs) and molecular simulation studies were discussed, which may provide valuable insights for further optimization. PMID:26994843

  2. Strength of hydrogen bond network takes crucial roles in the dissociation process of inhibitors from the HIV-1 protease binding pocket.

    PubMed

    Li, Dechang; Ji, Baohua; Hwang, Keh-Chih; Huang, Yonggang

    2011-01-01

    To understand the underlying mechanisms of significant differences in dissociation rate constant among different inhibitors for HIV-1 protease, we performed steered molecular dynamics (SMD) simulations to analyze the entire dissociation processes of inhibitors from the binding pocket of protease at atomistic details. We found that the strength of hydrogen bond network between inhibitor and the protease takes crucial roles in the dissociation process. We showed that the hydrogen bond network in the cyclic urea inhibitors AHA001/XK263 is less stable than that of the approved inhibitor ABT538 because of their large differences in the structures of the networks. In the cyclic urea inhibitor bound complex, the hydrogen bonds often distribute at the flap tips and the active site. In contrast, there are additional accessorial hydrogen bonds formed at the lateral sides of the flaps and the active site in the ABT538 bound complex, which take crucial roles in stabilizing the hydrogen bond network. In addition, the water molecule W301 also plays important roles in stabilizing the hydrogen bond network through its flexible movement by acting as a collision buffer and helping the rebinding of hydrogen bonds at the flap tips. Because of its high stability, the hydrogen bond network of ABT538 complex can work together with the hydrophobic clusters to resist the dissociation, resulting in much lower dissociation rate constant than those of cyclic urea inhibitor complexes. This study may provide useful guidelines for design of novel potent inhibitors with optimized interactions.

  3. CNDOL: A fast and reliable method for the calculation of electronic properties of very large systems. Applications to retinal binding pocket in rhodopsin and gas phase porphine.

    PubMed

    Montero-Cabrera, Luis Alberto; Röhrig, Ute; Padrón-Garcia, Juan A; Crespo-Otero, Rachel; Montero-Alejo, Ana L; Garcia de la Vega, José M; Chergui, Majed; Rothlisberger, Ursula

    2007-10-14

    Very large molecular systems can be calculated with the so called CNDOL approximate Hamiltonians that have been developed by avoiding oversimplifications and only using a priori parameters and formulas from the simpler NDO methods. A new diagonal monoelectronic term named CNDOL/21 shows great consistency and easier SCF convergence when used together with an appropriate function for charge repulsion energies that is derived from traditional formulas. It is possible to obtain a priori molecular orbitals and electron excitation properties after the configuration interaction of single excited determinants with reliability, maintaining interpretative possibilities even being a simplified Hamiltonian. Tests with some unequivocal gas phase maxima of simple molecules (benzene, furfural, acetaldehyde, hexyl alcohol, methyl amine, 2,5 dimethyl 2,4 hexadiene, and ethyl sulfide) ratify the general quality of this approach in comparison with other methods. The calculation of large systems as porphine in gas phase and a model of the complete retinal binding pocket in rhodopsin with 622 basis functions on 280 atoms at the quantum mechanical level show reliability leading to a resulting first allowed transition in 483 nm, very similar to the known experimental value of 500 nm of "dark state." In this very important case, our model gives a central role in this excitation to a charge transfer from the neighboring Glu(-) counterion to the retinaldehyde polyene chain. Tests with gas phase maxima of some important molecules corroborate the reliability of CNDOL/2 Hamiltonians.

  4. Quantum Hall conductance and de Haas-van Alphen oscillation in a tight-binding model with electron and hole pockets for (TMTSF) 2NO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishigi, Keita; Hasegawa, Yasumasa

    2016-08-01

    Quantized Hall conductance and de Haas-van Alphen (dHvA) oscillation are studied theoretically in the tight-binding model for (TMTSF) 2NO3 , in which there are small pockets of electrons and holes due to the periodic potentials of anion ordering in the a direction. The magnetic field is treated by hoppings as complex numbers due to the phase caused by the vector potential, i.e., Peierls substitution. In realistic values of parameters and the magnetic field, the energy as a function of the magnetic field (Hofstadter butterfly diagram) is obtained. It is shown that the energy levels are broadened and the gaps are closed or almost closed periodically as a function of the inverse magnetic field, which is not seen in the semiclassical theory of the magnetic breakdown. The Hall conductance is quantized with an integer obtained by the Diophantine equation when the chemical potential lies in an energy gap. When electrons or holes are doped in this system, the Hall conductance is quantized in some regions of a magnetic field but it is not quantized in other regions of a magnetic field due to the broadening of the Landau levels. The amplitude of the dHvA oscillation at zero temperature decreases as the magnetic field increases, while it is constant in the semiclassical Lifshitz Kosevich formula.

  5. Identification of the Binding Region of the [2Fe-2S] Ferredoxin in Stearoyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Desaturase

    PubMed Central

    Sobrado, Pablo; Lyle, Karen S.; Kaul, Steven P.; Turco, Michelle M.; Arabshahi, Ida; Marwah, Ashok; Fox, Brian G.

    2008-01-01

    Stearoyl-acyl carrier protein desaturase (Δ9D) catalyzes the O2 and 2e- dependent desaturation of stearoyl-acyl carrier protein (18:0-ACP) to yield oleoyl-ACP (18:1-ACP). The 2e- are provided by essential interactions with reduced plant-type [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin (Fd). We have investigated the protein-protein interface involved in the Fd-Δ9D complex by use of chemical cross-linking, site-directed mutagenesis, steady-state kinetic approaches and molecular docking studies. Treatment of the different proteins with 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide and N-hydroxysuccinimide revealed that carboxylate residues from Fd and lysine residues from Δ9D contribute to the cross-linking. The single substitutions of K60A, K56A, and K230A on Δ9D decreased the kcat/KM for Fd by 4-, 22- and 2,400-fold, respectively, as compared to wt Δ9D and a K41A substitution. The double substitution K56A/K60A decreased the kcat/KM for Fd by 250-fold, while the triple mutation K56A/K60A/K230A decreased the kcat/KM for Fd by at least 700,000-fold. These results strongly implicate the triad of K56, K60 and K230 of Δ9D in the formation of a catalytic complex with Fd. Molecular docking studies indicate that electrostatic interactions between K56 and K60 and carboxylate groups on Fd may situate the [2Fe-2S] cluster of Fd near to W62, a surface residue that is structurally conserved in both ribonucleotide reductase and mycobacterial putative acyl-ACP desaturase DesA2. Owing to the considerably larger effects on catalysis, K230 appears to have other contributions to catalysis arising from its positioning in helix-7 and its close spatial location to the diiron center ligands E229 and H232. These results are considered in the light of the presently available models for Fd-mediated electron transfer in Δ9D and other protein-protein complexes. PMID:16605252

  6. Binding Sites for Acylated Trehalose Analogs of Glycolipid Ligands on an Extended Carbohydrate Recognition Domain of the Macrophage Receptor Mincle*

    PubMed Central

    Feinberg, Hadar; Rambaruth, Neela D. S.; Jégouzo, Sabine A. F.; Jacobsen, Kristian M.; Djurhuus, Rasmus; Poulsen, Thomas B.; Weis, William I.; Taylor, Maureen E.; Drickamer, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    The macrophage receptor mincle binds to trehalose dimycolate on the surface of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Signaling initiated by this interaction leads to cytokine production, which underlies the ability of mycobacteria to evade the immune system and also to function as adjuvants. In previous work the mechanism for binding of the sugar headgroup of trehalose dimycolate to mincle has been elucidated, but the basis for enhanced binding to glycolipid ligands, in which hydrophobic substituents are attached to the 6-hydroxyl groups, has been the subject of speculation. In the work reported here, the interaction of trehalose derivatives with bovine mincle has been probed with a series of synthetic mimics of trehalose dimycolate in binding assays, in structural studies by x-ray crystallography, and by site-directed mutagenesis. Binding studies reveal that, rather than reflecting specific structural preference, the apparent affinity of mincle for ligands with hydrophobic substituents correlates with their overall size. Structural and mutagenesis analysis provides evidence for interaction of the hydrophobic substituents with multiple different portions of the surface of mincle and confirms the presence of three Ca2+-binding sites. The structure of an extended portion of the extracellular domain of mincle, beyond the minimal C-type carbohydrate recognition domain, also constrains the way the binding domains may interact on the surface of macrophages. PMID:27542410

  7. Crystal structure of tert-butyldimethylsilyl-spiroaminooxathioledioxide-thymine (TSAO-T) in complex with HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) redefines the elastic limits of the non-nucleoside inhibitor-binding pocket

    PubMed Central

    Das, Kalyan; Bauman, Joseph D.; Rim, Angela S.; Dharia, Chhaya; Clark, Arthur D.; Camarasa, María-José; Balzarini, Jan; Arnold, Eddy

    2012-01-01

    Tert-butyldimethylsilyl-spiroaminooxathioledioxide (TSAO) compounds have an embedded thymidine-analog backbone; however, TSAO compounds invoke non-nucleoside RT inhibitor (NNRTI) resistance mutations. Our crystal structure of RT:7 (TSAO-T) complex shows that 7 binds inside the NNRTI-binding pocket assuming a “dragon” shape, and interacts extensively with almost all the pocket residues. The structure also explains the structure-activity relationships and resistance data for TSAO compounds. The binding of 7 causes hyper-expansion of the pocket and significant rearrangement of RT subdomains. This non-optimal complex formation is apparently responsible (1) for the lower stability of a RT (p66/p51) dimer and (2) for the lower potency of 7 despite of its extensive interactions with RT. However, the HIV-1 RT:7 structure reveals novel design features, such as (1) interactions with the conserved Tyr183 from the YMDD-motif and (2) a possible way for an NNRTI to reach the polymerase active site that may be exploited in designing new NNRTIs. PMID:21446702

  8. Crystal structure of silkworm Bombyx mori JHBP in complex with 2-methyl-2,4-pentanediol: plasticity of JH-binding pocket and ligand-induced conformational change of the second cavity in JHBP.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Zui; Suzuki, Rintaro; Shiotsuki, Takahiro; Tsuchiya, Wataru; Tase, Akira; Momma, Mitsuru; Yamazaki, Toshimasa

    2013-01-01

    Juvenile hormones (JHs) control a diversity of crucial life events in insects. In Lepidoptera which major agricultural pests belong to, JH signaling is critically controlled by a species-specific high-affinity, low molecular weight JH-binding protein (JHBP) in hemolymph, which transports JH from the site of its synthesis to target tissues. Hence, JHBP is expected to be an excellent target for the development of novel specific insect growth regulators (IGRs) and insecticides. A better understanding of the structural biology of JHBP should pave the way for the structure-based drug design of such compounds. Here, we report the crystal structure of the silkworm Bombyx mori JHBP in complex with two molecules of 2-methyl-2,4-pentanediol (MPD), one molecule (MPD1) bound in the JH-binding pocket while the other (MPD2) in a second cavity. Detailed comparison with the apo-JHBP and JHBP-JH II complex structures previously reported by us led to a number of intriguing findings. First, the JH-binding pocket changes its size in a ligand-dependent manner due to flexibility of the gate α1 helix. Second, MPD1 mimics interactions of the epoxide moiety of JH previously observed in the JHBP-JH complex, and MPD can compete with JH in binding to the JH-binding pocket. We also confirmed that methoprene, which has an MPD-like structure, inhibits the complex formation between JHBP and JH while the unepoxydated JH III (methyl farnesoate) does not. These findings may open the door to the development of novel IGRs targeted against JHBP. Third, binding of MPD to the second cavity of JHBP induces significant conformational changes accompanied with a cavity expansion. This finding, together with MPD2-JHBP interaction mechanism identified in the JHBP-MPD complex, should provide important guidance in the search for the natural ligand of the second cavity. PMID:23437107

  9. Novel anti-Cryptosporidium activity of known drugs identified by high-throughput screening against parasite fatty acyl-CoA binding protein (ACBP)

    PubMed Central

    Fritzler, Jason M.; Zhu, Guan

    2012-01-01

    Background Cryptosporidium parvum causes an opportunistic infection in AIDS patients, and no effective treatments are yet available. This parasite possesses a single fatty acyl-CoA binding protein (CpACBP1) that is localized to the unique parasitophorous vacuole membrane (PVM). The major goal of this study was to identify inhibitors from known drugs against CpACBP1 as potential new anti-Cryptosporidium agents. Methods A fluorescence assay was developed to detect CpACBP1 activity and to identify inhibitors by screening known drugs. Efficacies of top CpACBP1 inhibitors against Cryptosporidium growth in vitro were evaluated using a quantitative RT–PCR assay. Results Nitrobenzoxadiazole-labelled palmitoyl-CoA significantly increased the fluorescent emission upon binding to CpACBP1 (excitation/emission 460/538 nm), which was quantified to determine the CpACBP1 activity and binding kinetics. The fluorescence assay was used to screen a collection of 1040 compounds containing mostly known drugs, and identified the 28 most active compounds that could inhibit CpACBP1 activity with sub-micromolar IC50 values. Among them, four compounds displayed efficacies against parasite growth in vitro with low micromolar IC50 values. The effective compounds were broxyquinoline (IC50 64.9 μM), cloxyquin (IC50 25.1 μM), cloxacillin sodium (IC50 36.2 μM) and sodium dehydrocholate (IC50 53.2 μM). Conclusions The fluorescence ACBP assay can be effectively used to screen known drugs or other compound libraries. Novel anti-Cryptosporidium activity was observed in four top CpACBP1 inhibitors, which may be further investigated for their potential to be repurposed to treat cryptosporidiosis and to serve as leads for drug development. PMID:22167242

  10. Detection of multiscale pockets on protein surfaces using mathematical morphology.

    PubMed

    Kawabata, Takeshi

    2010-04-01

    Detection of pockets on protein surfaces is an important step toward finding the binding sites of small molecules. In a previous study, we defined a pocket as a space into which a small spherical probe can enter, but a large probe cannot. The radius of the large probes corresponds to the shallowness of pockets. We showed that each type of binding molecule has a characteristic shallowness distribution. In this study, we introduced fundamental changes to our previous algorithm by using a 3D grid representation of proteins and probes, and the theory of mathematical morphology. We invented an efficient algorithm for calculating deep and shallow pockets (multiscale pockets) simultaneously, using several different sizes of spherical probes (multiscale probes). We implemented our algorithm as a new program, ghecom (grid-based HECOMi finder). The statistics of calculated pockets for the structural dataset showed that our program had a higher performance of detecting binding pockets, than four other popular pocket-finding programs proposed previously. The ghecom also calculates the shallowness of binding ligands, R(inaccess) (minimum radius of inaccessible spherical probes) that can be obtained from the multiscale molecular volume. We showed that each part of the binding molecule had a bias toward a specific range of shallowness. These findings will be useful for predicting the types of molecules that will be most likely to bind putative binding pockets, as well as the configurations of binding molecules. The program ghecom is available through the Web server (http://biunit.naist.jp/ghecom).

  11. Modified acyl-ACP desaturase

    DOEpatents

    Cahoon, Edgar B.; Shanklin, John; Lindgvist, Ylva; Schneider, Gunter

    1998-01-06

    Disclosed is a methods for modifying the chain length and double bond positional specificities of a soluble plant fatty acid desaturase. More specifically, the method involves modifying amino acid contact residues in the substrate binding channel of the soluble fatty acid desaturase which contact the fatty acid. Specifically disclosed is the modification of an acyl-ACP desaturase. Amino acid contact residues which lie within the substrate binding channel are identified, and subsequently replaced with different residues to effect the modification of activity.

  12. Modified Acyl-ACP desaturase

    DOEpatents

    Cahoon, Edgar B.; Shanklin, John; Lindqvist, Ylva; Schneider, Gunter

    1999-03-30

    Disclosed is a method for modifying the chain length and double bond positional specificities of a soluble plant fatty acid desaturase. More specifically, the method involves modifying amino acid contact residues in the substrate binding channel of the soluble fatty acid desaturase which contact the fatty acid. Specifically disclosed is the modification of an acyl-ACP desaturase. Amino acid contact residues which lie within the substrate binding channel are identified, and subsequently replaced with different residues to effect the modification of activity.

  13. Acyl-coenzyme A-binding protein regulates Beta-oxidation required for growth and survival of non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Harris, Fredrick T; Rahman, S M Jamshedur; Hassanein, Mohamed; Qian, Jun; Hoeksema, Megan D; Chen, Heidi; Eisenberg, Rosana; Chaurand, Pierre; Caprioli, Richard M; Shiota, Masakazu; Massion, Pierre P

    2014-07-01

    We identified acyl-coenzyme A-binding protein (ACBP) as part of a proteomic signature predicting the risk of having lung cancer. Because ACBP is known to regulate β-oxidation, which in turn controls cellular proliferation, we hypothesized that ACBP contributes to regulation of cellular proliferation and survival of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) by modulating β-oxidation. We used matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI-IMS) and immunohistochemistry (IHC) to confirm the tissue localization of ABCP in pre-invasive and invasive NSCLCs. We correlated ACBP gene expression levels in NSCLCs with clinical outcomes. In loss-of-function studies, we tested the effect of the downregulation of ACBP on cellular proliferation and apoptosis in normal bronchial and NSCLC cell lines. Using tritiated-palmitate ((3)H-palmitate), we measured β-oxidation levels and tested the effect of etomoxir, a β-oxidation inhibitor, on proliferation and apoptosis. MALDI-IMS and IHC analysis confirmed that ACBP is overexpressed in pre-invasive and invasive lung cancers. High ACBP gene expression levels in NSCLCs correlated with worse survival (HR = 1.73). We observed a 40% decrease in β-oxidation and concordant decreases in proliferation and increases in apoptosis in ACBP-depleted NSCLC cells as compared with bronchial airway epithelial cells. Inhibition of β-oxidation by etomoxir in ACBP-overexpressing cells produced dose-dependent decrease in proliferation and increase in apoptosis (P = 0.01 and P < 0.001, respectively). These data suggest a role for ACBP in controlling lung cancer progression by regulating β-oxidation.

  14. Verification of a novel NADH-binding motif: combinatorial mutagenesis of three amino acids in the cofactor-binding pocket of Corynebacterium 2,5-diketo-D-gluconic acid reductase.

    PubMed

    Banta, Scott; Anderson, Stephen

    2002-12-01

    A screening method has been developed to support randomized mutagenesis of amino acids in the cofactor-binding pocket of the NADPH-dependent 2,5-diketo-D-gluconic acid (2,5-DKG) reductase. Such an approach could enable the isolation of an enzyme that can better catalyze the reduction of 2,5-DKG to 2-keto-L-gulonic acid (2-KLG) using NADH as a cofactor. 2-KLG is a valuable precursor to ascorbic acid, or vitamin C, and an enzyme with increased activity with NADH may be able to improve two potential vitamin C production processes. Previously we have identified three amino acid residues that can be mutated to improve activity with NADH as a cofactor. As a pilot study to show feasibility, a library was made with these three amino acids randomized, and 300 random colonies were screened for increased NADH activity. The activities of seven mutants with apparent improvements were verified using activity-stained native gels, and sequencing showed that the amino acids obtained were similar to some of those already discovered using rational design. The four most active mutants were purified and kinetically characterized. All of the new mutations resulted in apparent kcat values that were equal to or higher than that of the best mutant obtained through rational design. At saturating levels of cofactor, the best mutant obtained was almost twice as active with NADH as a cofactor as the wild-type enzyme is with NADPH. This screen is a valuable tool for improving 2,5-DKG reductase, and it could easily be modified for improving other aspects of this protein or similar enzymes.

  15. Structure of the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase Q151M mutant: insights into the inhibitor resistance of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase and the structure of the nucleotide-binding pocket of Hepatitis B virus polymerase.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Akiyoshi; Tamura, Noriko; Yasutake, Yoshiaki

    2015-11-01

    Hepatitis B virus polymerase (HBV Pol) is an important target for anti-HBV drug development; however, its low solubility and stability in vitro has hindered detailed structural studies. Certain nucleotide reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors (NRTIs) such as tenofovir and lamivudine can inhibit both HBV Pol and Human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) RT, leading to speculation on structural and mechanistic analogies between the deoxynucleotide triphosphate (dNTP)-binding sites of these enzymes. The Q151M mutation in HIV-1 RT, located at the dNTP-binding site, confers resistance to various NRTIs, while maintaining sensitivity to tenofovir and lamivudine. The residue corresponding to Gln151 is strictly conserved as a methionine in HBV Pol. Therefore, the structure of the dNTP-binding pocket of the HIV-1 RT Q151M mutant may reflect that of HBV Pol. Here, the crystal structure of HIV-1 RT Q151M, determined at 2.6 Å resolution, in a new crystal form with space group P321 is presented. Although the structure of HIV-1 RT Q151M superimposes well onto that of HIV-1 RT in a closed conformation, a slight movement of the β-strands (β2-β3) that partially create the dNTP-binding pocket was observed. This movement might be caused by the introduction of the bulky thioether group of Met151. The structure also highlighted the possibility that the hydrogen-bonding network among amino acids and NRTIs is rearranged by the Q151M mutation, leading to a difference in the affinity of NRTIs for HIV-1 RT and HBV Pol. PMID:26527265

  16. Structure of the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase Q151M mutant: insights into the inhibitor resistance of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase and the structure of the nucleotide-binding pocket of Hepatitis B virus polymerase

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Akiyoshi; Tamura, Noriko; Yasutake, Yoshiaki

    2015-10-23

    The structure of the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase Q151M mutant was determined at a resolution of 2.6 Å in space group P321. Hepatitis B virus polymerase (HBV Pol) is an important target for anti-HBV drug development; however, its low solubility and stability in vitro has hindered detailed structural studies. Certain nucleotide reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors (NRTIs) such as tenofovir and lamivudine can inhibit both HBV Pol and Human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) RT, leading to speculation on structural and mechanistic analogies between the deoxynucleotide triphosphate (dNTP)-binding sites of these enzymes. The Q151M mutation in HIV-1 RT, located at the dNTP-binding site, confers resistance to various NRTIs, while maintaining sensitivity to tenofovir and lamivudine. The residue corresponding to Gln151 is strictly conserved as a methionine in HBV Pol. Therefore, the structure of the dNTP-binding pocket of the HIV-1 RT Q151M mutant may reflect that of HBV Pol. Here, the crystal structure of HIV-1 RT Q151M, determined at 2.6 Å resolution, in a new crystal form with space group P321 is presented. Although the structure of HIV-1 RT Q151M superimposes well onto that of HIV-1 RT in a closed conformation, a slight movement of the β-strands (β2–β3) that partially create the dNTP-binding pocket was observed. This movement might be caused by the introduction of the bulky thioether group of Met151. The structure also highlighted the possibility that the hydrogen-bonding network among amino acids and NRTIs is rearranged by the Q151M mutation, leading to a difference in the affinity of NRTIs for HIV-1 RT and HBV Pol.

  17. Structure of the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase Q151M mutant: insights into the inhibitor resistance of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase and the structure of the nucleotide-binding pocket of Hepatitis B virus polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Akiyoshi; Tamura, Noriko; Yasutake, Yoshiaki

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus polymerase (HBV Pol) is an important target for anti-HBV drug development; however, its low solubility and stability in vitro has hindered detailed structural studies. Certain nucleotide reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors (NRTIs) such as tenofovir and lamivudine can inhibit both HBV Pol and Human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) RT, leading to speculation on structural and mechanistic analogies between the deoxynucleotide triphosphate (dNTP)-binding sites of these enzymes. The Q151M mutation in HIV-1 RT, located at the dNTP-binding site, confers resistance to various NRTIs, while maintaining sensitivity to tenofovir and lamivudine. The residue corresponding to Gln151 is strictly conserved as a methionine in HBV Pol. Therefore, the structure of the dNTP-binding pocket of the HIV-1 RT Q151M mutant may reflect that of HBV Pol. Here, the crystal structure of HIV-1 RT Q151M, determined at 2.6 Å resolution, in a new crystal form with space group P321 is presented. Although the structure of HIV-1 RT Q151M superimposes well onto that of HIV-1 RT in a closed conformation, a slight movement of the β-strands (β2–β3) that partially create the dNTP-binding pocket was observed. This movement might be caused by the introduction of the bulky thioether group of Met151. The structure also highlighted the possibility that the hydrogen-bonding network among amino acids and NRTIs is rearranged by the Q151M mutation, leading to a difference in the affinity of NRTIs for HIV-1 RT and HBV Pol. PMID:26527265

  18. Structure of the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase Q151M mutant: insights into the inhibitor resistance of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase and the structure of the nucleotide-binding pocket of Hepatitis B virus polymerase.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Akiyoshi; Tamura, Noriko; Yasutake, Yoshiaki

    2015-11-01

    Hepatitis B virus polymerase (HBV Pol) is an important target for anti-HBV drug development; however, its low solubility and stability in vitro has hindered detailed structural studies. Certain nucleotide reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors (NRTIs) such as tenofovir and lamivudine can inhibit both HBV Pol and Human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) RT, leading to speculation on structural and mechanistic analogies between the deoxynucleotide triphosphate (dNTP)-binding sites of these enzymes. The Q151M mutation in HIV-1 RT, located at the dNTP-binding site, confers resistance to various NRTIs, while maintaining sensitivity to tenofovir and lamivudine. The residue corresponding to Gln151 is strictly conserved as a methionine in HBV Pol. Therefore, the structure of the dNTP-binding pocket of the HIV-1 RT Q151M mutant may reflect that of HBV Pol. Here, the crystal structure of HIV-1 RT Q151M, determined at 2.6 Å resolution, in a new crystal form with space group P321 is presented. Although the structure of HIV-1 RT Q151M superimposes well onto that of HIV-1 RT in a closed conformation, a slight movement of the β-strands (β2-β3) that partially create the dNTP-binding pocket was observed. This movement might be caused by the introduction of the bulky thioether group of Met151. The structure also highlighted the possibility that the hydrogen-bonding network among amino acids and NRTIs is rearranged by the Q151M mutation, leading to a difference in the affinity of NRTIs for HIV-1 RT and HBV Pol.

  19. Effect of a mutagenized acyl-ACP thioesterase FATA allele from sunflower with improved activity in tobacco leaves and Arabidopsis seeds.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Pérez, Antonio Javier; Venegas-Calerón, Mónica; Vaistij, Fabián E; Salas, Joaquin J; Larson, Tony R; Garcés, Rafael; Graham, Ian A; Martínez-Force, Enrique

    2014-03-01

    The substrate specificity of the acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) thioesterases significantly determines the type of fatty acids that are exported from plastids. Thus, designing acyl-ACP thioesterases with different substrate specificities or kinetic properties would be of interest for plant lipid biotechnology to produce oils enriched in specialty fatty acids. In the present work, the FatA thioesterase from Helianthus annuus was used to test the impact of changes in the amino acids present in the binding pocket on substrate specificity and catalytic efficiency. Amongst all the mutated enzymes studied, Q215W was especially interesting as it had higher specificity towards saturated acyl-ACP substrates and higher catalytic efficiency compared to wild-type H. annuus FatA. Null, wild type and high-efficiency alleles were transiently expressed in tobacco leaves to check their effect on lipid biosynthesis. Expression of active FatA thioesterases altered the composition of leaf triacylglycerols but did not alter total lipid content. However, the expression of the wild type and the high-efficiency alleles in Arabidopsis thaliana transgenic seeds resulted in a strong reduction in oil content and an increase in total saturated fatty acid content. The role and influence of acyl-ACP thioesterases in plant metabolism and their possible applications in lipid biotechnology are discussed.

  20. Overexpression of PGC‑1α enhances cell proliferation and tumorigenesis of HEK293 cells through the upregulation of Sp1 and Acyl-CoA binding protein.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sung-Won; Yun, Seong-Hoon; Park, Eun-Seon; Jeong, Jin-Sook; Kwak, Jong-Young; Park, Joo-In

    2015-03-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC‑1α), a coactivator interacting with multiple transcription factors, regulates several metabolic processes. Although recent studies have focused on the role of PGC‑1α in cancer, the underlying molecular mechanism has not been clarified. Therefore, we evaluated the role of PGC‑1α in cell proliferation and tumorigenesis using human embryonic kidney (HEK)293 cells and colorectal cancer cells. We established stable HEK293 cell lines expressing PGC‑1α and examined cell proliferation, anchorage-independent growth, and oncogenic potential compared to parental HEK293 cells. To identify the molecular PGC‑1α targets for increased cell proliferation and tumorigenesis, the GeneFishing™ DEG (differentially expressed genes) screening system was used. Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence staining were performed for a regulated gene product to confirm the results. Forced expression of PGC‑1α in HEK293 cells promoted cell proliferation and anchorage-independent growth in soft agar. In addition, HEK293 cells that highly expressed PGC‑1α showed enhanced tumor formation when subcutaneously injected into the bilateral flanks of immunodeficient mice. The results of the GeneFishing DEG screening system identified one upregulated gene (Acyl-CoA binding protein; ACBP). Real-time RT-PCR, western blot analysis, and immunofluorescence staining showed that ACBP was markedly increased in HEK293 cells stably overexpressing PGC‑1α (PGC‑1α-HEK293 cells) compared to those expressing an empty vector. In PGC‑1α, ACBP, and specificity protein 1 (Sp1) siRNA knockdown experiments in PGC‑1α-HEK293 and SNU-C4 cells, we also observed inhibition of cell proliferation, reduced expression of antioxidant enzymes, and increased H2O2-induced reactive oxygen species production and apoptosis. These findings suggest that PGC‑1α may promote cell proliferation and tumorigenesis through upregulation of ACBP

  1. Insights into the relationship between the haem-binding pocket and the redox potential of c6 cytochromes: four atomic resolution structures of c6 and c6-like proteins from Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002.

    PubMed

    Bialek, Wojciech; Krzywda, Szymon; Zatwarnicki, Pawel; Jaskolski, Mariusz; Kolesinski, Piotr; Szczepaniak, Andrzej

    2014-11-01

    The structure of cytochrome c6C from the mesophilic cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 has been determined at 1.03 Å resolution. This is the first structural report on the recently discovered cyanobacterial cytochrome c6-like proteins found in marine and nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria. Despite high similarity in the overall three-dimensional fold between cytochromes c6 and c6C, the latter shows saliently different electrostatic properties in terms of surface charge distribution and dipole moments. Its midpoint redox potential is less than half of the value for typical c6 cytochromes and results mainly from the substitution of one residue in the haem pocket. Here, high-resolution crystal structures of mutants of both cytochromes c6 and c6C are presented, and the impact of the mutation of specific residues in the haem-binding pocket on the redox potential is discussed. These findings contribute to the elucidation of the structure-function relationship of c6-like cytochromes.

  2. Apolar distal pocket mutants of yeast cytochrome c peroxidase: Binding of imidazole, 1-methylimidazole and 4-nitroimidazole to the triAla, triVal, and triLeu variants

    PubMed Central

    Bidwai, Anil; Ayala, Caitlan; Vitello, Lidia B.; Erman, James E.

    2015-01-01

    Imidazole binding to three apolar distal heme pocket mutants of yeast cytochrome c peroxidase (CcP) has been investigated between pH 4 and 8. The three CcP variants have Arg-48, Trp-51, and His-52 mutated to either all alanine, CcP(triAla), all valine, CcP(triVal), or all leucine residues, CcP(triLeu). The imidazole binding curves for all three mutants are biphasic indicating that each of the mutants exist in at least two conformational states with different affinities for imidazole. At pH 7, the high-affinity conformations of the three CcP mutants bind imidazole between 3.8 and 4.7 orders of magnitude stronger than that of wild-type CcP while the low-affinity conformations have binding affinities about 2.5 orders of magnitude larger than wild-type CcP. Imidazole binding to the three CcP mutants is pH dependent with the strongest binding observed at high pH. Apparent pKa values for the transition in binding vary between 5.6 and 7.5 for the high-affinity conformations and between 6.2 and 6.8 for the low-affinity conformations of the CcP triple mutants. The kinetics of imidazole binding are also biphasic. The fast phase of imidazole binding to CcP(triAla) and CcP(triLeu) is linearly dependent on the imidazole concentration while the slow phase is independent of imidazole concentration. Both phases of imidazole binding to CcP(triVal) have a hyperbolic dependence on the imidazole concentration. The apparent association rate constants vary between 30 and 170 M−1s−1 while the apparent dissociation rate constants vary between 0.05 and 0.43 s−1. The CcP triple mutants have higher binding affinities for 1-methylimidazole and 4-nitroimidazole than does wild-type CcP. PMID:25900360

  3. Modified Acyl-ACP desaturase

    DOEpatents

    Cahoon, E.B.; Shanklin, J.; Lindqvist, Y.; Schneider, G.

    1999-03-30

    Disclosed is a method for modifying the chain length and double bond positional specificities of a soluble plant fatty acid desaturase. More specifically, the method involves modifying amino acid contact residues in the substrate binding channel of the soluble fatty acid desaturase which contact the fatty acid. Specifically disclosed is the modification of an acyl-ACP desaturase. Amino acid contact residues which lie within the substrate binding channel are identified, and subsequently replaced with different residues to effect the modification of activity. 2 figs.

  4. Modified acyl-ACP desaturase

    DOEpatents

    Cahoon, E.B.; Shanklin, J.; Lindgvist, Y.; Schneider, G.

    1998-01-06

    Disclosed is a method for modifying the chain length and double bond positional specificities of a soluble plant fatty acid desaturase. More specifically, the method involves modifying amino acid contact residues in the substrate binding channel of the soluble fatty acid desaturase which contact the fatty acid. Specifically disclosed is the modification of an acyl-ACP desaturase. Amino acid contact residues which lie within the substrate binding channel are identified, and subsequently replaced with different residues to effect the modification of activity. 1 fig.

  5. Antifibrotic Activity of Acylated and Unacylated Ghrelin

    PubMed Central

    Angelino, Elia; Reano, Simone; Ferrara, Michele; Agosti, Emanuela; Graziani, Andrea; Filigheddu, Nicoletta

    2015-01-01

    Fibrosis can affect almost all tissues and organs, it often represents the terminal stage of chronic diseases, and it is regarded as a major health issue for which efficient therapies are needed. Tissue injury, by inducing necrosis/apoptosis, triggers inflammatory response that, in turn, promotes fibroblast activation and pathological deposition of extracellular matrix. Acylated and unacylated ghrelin are the main products of the ghrelin gene. The acylated form, through its receptor GHSR-1a, stimulates appetite and growth hormone (GH) release. Although unacylated ghrelin does not bind or activate GHSR-1a, it shares with the acylated form several biological activities. Ghrelin peptides exhibit anti-inflammatory, antioxidative, and antiapoptotic activities, suggesting that they might represent an efficient approach to prevent or reduce fibrosis. The aim of this review is to summarize the available evidence regarding the effects of acylated and unacylated ghrelin on different pathologies and experimental models in which fibrosis is a predominant characteristic. PMID:25960743

  6. Histone Deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) Promotes the Pro-survival Activity of 14-3-3ζ via Deacetylation of Lysines within the 14-3-3ζ Binding Pocket*

    PubMed Central

    Mortenson, Jeffrey B.; Heppler, Lisa N.; Banks, Courtney J.; Weerasekara, Vajira K.; Whited, Matthew D.; Piccolo, Stephen R.; Johnson, William E.; Thompson, J. Will; Andersen, Joshua L.

    2015-01-01

    The phospho-binding protein 14-3-3ζ acts as a signaling hub controlling a network of interacting partners and oncogenic pathways. We show here that lysines within the 14-3-3ζ binding pocket and protein-protein interface can be modified by acetylation. The positive charge on two of these lysines, Lys49 and Lys120, is critical for coordinating 14-3-3ζ-phosphoprotein interactions. Through screening, we identified HDAC6 as the Lys49/Lys120 deacetylase. Inhibition of HDAC6 blocks 14-3-3ζ interactions with two well described interacting partners, Bad and AS160, which triggers their dephosphorylation at Ser112 and Thr642, respectively. Expression of an acetylation-refractory K49R/K120R mutant of 14-3-3ζ rescues both the HDAC6 inhibitor-induced loss of interaction and Ser112/Thr642 phosphorylation. Furthermore, expression of the K49R/K120R mutant of 14-3-3ζ inhibits the cytotoxicity of HDAC6 inhibition. These data demonstrate a novel role for HDAC6 in controlling 14-3-3ζ binding activity. PMID:25770209

  7. Acyl-CoA-binding and self-associating properties of a recombinant 13.3 kDa N-terminal fragment of diacylglycerol acyltransferase-1 from oilseed rape

    PubMed Central

    Weselake, Randall J; Madhavji, Milan; Szarka, Steve J; Patterson, Nii A; Wiehler, William B; Nykiforuk, Cory L; Burton, Tracy L; Boora, Parveen S; Mosimann, Steven C; Foroud, Nora A; Thibault, Benjamin J; Moloney, Maurice M; Laroche, André; Furukawa-Stoffer, Tara L

    2006-01-01

    Background Diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT, EC 2.3.1.20) catalyzes the acyl-CoA-dependent acylation of sn-1, 2-diacylglycerol to generate triacylglycerol and CoA. The deduced amino acid sequence of cDNAs encoding DGAT1 from plants and mammals exhibit a hydrophilic N-terminal region followed by a number of potential membrane-spanning segments, which is consistent with the membrane-bound nature of this enzyme family. In order to gain insight into the structure/function properties of DGAT1 from Brassica napus (BnDGAT1), we produced and partially characterized a recombinant polyHis-tagged N-terminal fragment of the enzyme, BnDGAT1(1–116)His6, with calculated molecular mass of 13,278 Da. Results BnDGAT1(1–116)His6 was highly purified from bacterial lysate and plate-like monoclinic crystals were grown using this preparation. Lipidex-1000 binding assays and gel electrophoresis indicated that BnDGAT1(1–116)His6 interacts with long chain acyl-CoA. The enzyme fragment displayed enhanced affinity for erucoyl (22:1cisΔ13)-CoA over oleoyl (18:1cisΔ9)-CoA, and the binding process displayed positive cooperativity. Gel filtration chromatography and cross-linking studies indicated that BnDGAT1(1–116)His6 self-associated to form a tetramer. Polyclonal antibodies raised against a peptide of 15 amino acid residues representing a segment of BnDGAT1(1–116)His6 failed to react with protein in microsomal vesicles following treatment with proteinase K, suggesting that the N-terminal fragment of BnDGAT1 was localized to the cytosolic side of the ER. Conclusion Collectively, these results suggest that BnDGAT1 may be allosterically modulated by acyl-CoA through the N-terminal region and that the enzyme self-associates via interactions on the cytosolic side of the ER. PMID:17192193

  8. Acylated but not des-acyl ghrelin is neuroprotective in an MPTP mouse model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Bayliss, Jacqueline A; Lemus, Moyra; Santos, Vanessa V; Deo, Minh; Elsworth, John D; Andrews, Zane B

    2016-05-01

    The gut hormone ghrelin is widely beneficial in many disease states. However, ghrelin exists in two distinctive isoforms, each with its own metabolic profile. In Parkinson's Disease (PD) acylated ghrelin administration is neuroprotective, however, the role of des-acylated ghrelin remains unknown. In this study, we wanted to identify the relative contribution each isoform plays using the MPTP model of PD. Chronic administration of acylated ghrelin in mice lacking both isoforms of ghrelin (Ghrelin KO) attenuated the MPTP-induced loss on tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) neuronal number and volume and TH protein expression in the nigrostriatal pathway. Moreover, acylated ghrelin reduced the increase in glial fibrillary acidic protein and Ionized calcium binding adaptor molecule 1 microglia in the substantia nigra. However, injection of acylated ghrelin also elevated plasma des-acylated ghrelin, indicating in vivo deacetylation. Next, we chronically administered des-acylated ghrelin to Ghrelin KO mice and observed no neuroprotective effects in terms of TH cell number, TH protein expression, glial fibrillary acidic protein and ionized calcium binding adaptor molecule 1 cell number. The lack of a protective effect was mirrored in ghrelin-O-acyltransferase KO mice, which lack the ability to acylate ghrelin and consequently these mice have chronically increased plasma des-acyl ghrelin. Plasma corticosterone was elevated in ghrelin-O-acyltransferase KO mice and with des-acylated ghrelin administration. Overall, our studies suggest that acylated ghrelin is the isoform responsible for in vivo neuroprotection and that pharmacological approaches preventing plasma conversion from acyl ghrelin to des-acyl ghrelin may have clinical efficacy to help slow or prevent the debilitating effects of PD. Ghrelin exists in the plasma as acyl and des-acyl ghrelin. We determined the form responsible for in vivo neuroprotection in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease. Although exogenous acyl ghrelin

  9. Molecular recognition of CYP26A1 binding pockets and structure-activity relationship studies for design of potent and selective retinoic acid metabolism blocking agents.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bin; Song, Shuai; Hao, Chen-Zhou; Huang, Wan-Xu; Liu, Chun-Chi; Xie, Hong-Lei; Lin, Bin; Cheng, Mao-Sheng; Zhao, Dong-Mei

    2015-03-01

    All-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA), the biologically most active metabolite of vitamin A, plays a major role in the regulation of cellular differentiation and proliferation, and it is also an important pharmacological agent particularly used in the treatment of cancer, skin, neurodegenerative and autoimmune diseases. However, ATRA is very easy to be metabolized into 4-hydroxyl-RA in vivo by CYP26A1, an inducible cytochrome P450 enzyme, eventually into more polar metabolites. Therefore, it is vital to develop specific retinoic acid metabolism blocking agents (RAMBAs) to inhibit the metabolic enzyme CYP26A1 in the treatment of relevant diseases aforementioned. In this study, CYP26A1 and its interactions with retinoic acid-competitive metabolism blocking agents were investigated by a combined ligand- and structure-based approach. First, since the crystal structure of CYP26A1 protein has not been determined, we constructed the 3D structure of CYP26A1 using homology modeling. In order to achieve a deeper insight into the mode of action of RAMBAs in the active site, the molecular superimposition model and the common feature pharmacophore model were constructed, and molecular docking was performed. The molecular superimposition model is composed of three features: the main chain groups, side chain groups, and azole groups. The common feature pharmacophore model consists of five chemical features: four hydrophobic groups and one hydrogen acceptor (HHHHA). The results of molecular docking show that the characteristic groups of RAMBAs were mapped into three different active pockets, respectively. A structure-activity relationship (SAR) was obtained by a combination of the molecular superimposition and docking results with the pharmacophore model. This study gives more insight into the interaction model inside the CYP26A1 active site and provides guidance for the design of more potent and possibly more selective RAMBAs. PMID:25541526

  10. Molecular recognition of CYP26A1 binding pockets and structure-activity relationship studies for design of potent and selective retinoic acid metabolism blocking agents.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bin; Song, Shuai; Hao, Chen-Zhou; Huang, Wan-Xu; Liu, Chun-Chi; Xie, Hong-Lei; Lin, Bin; Cheng, Mao-Sheng; Zhao, Dong-Mei

    2015-03-01

    All-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA), the biologically most active metabolite of vitamin A, plays a major role in the regulation of cellular differentiation and proliferation, and it is also an important pharmacological agent particularly used in the treatment of cancer, skin, neurodegenerative and autoimmune diseases. However, ATRA is very easy to be metabolized into 4-hydroxyl-RA in vivo by CYP26A1, an inducible cytochrome P450 enzyme, eventually into more polar metabolites. Therefore, it is vital to develop specific retinoic acid metabolism blocking agents (RAMBAs) to inhibit the metabolic enzyme CYP26A1 in the treatment of relevant diseases aforementioned. In this study, CYP26A1 and its interactions with retinoic acid-competitive metabolism blocking agents were investigated by a combined ligand- and structure-based approach. First, since the crystal structure of CYP26A1 protein has not been determined, we constructed the 3D structure of CYP26A1 using homology modeling. In order to achieve a deeper insight into the mode of action of RAMBAs in the active site, the molecular superimposition model and the common feature pharmacophore model were constructed, and molecular docking was performed. The molecular superimposition model is composed of three features: the main chain groups, side chain groups, and azole groups. The common feature pharmacophore model consists of five chemical features: four hydrophobic groups and one hydrogen acceptor (HHHHA). The results of molecular docking show that the characteristic groups of RAMBAs were mapped into three different active pockets, respectively. A structure-activity relationship (SAR) was obtained by a combination of the molecular superimposition and docking results with the pharmacophore model. This study gives more insight into the interaction model inside the CYP26A1 active site and provides guidance for the design of more potent and possibly more selective RAMBAs.

  11. fpocket: online tools for protein ensemble pocket detection and tracking.

    PubMed

    Schmidtke, Peter; Le Guilloux, Vincent; Maupetit, Julien; Tufféry, Pierre

    2010-07-01

    Computational small-molecule binding site detection has several important applications in the biomedical field. Notable interests are the identification of cavities for structure-based drug discovery or functional annotation of structures. fpocket is a small-molecule pocket detection program, relying on the geometric alpha-sphere theory. The fpocket web server allows: (i) candidate pocket detection--fpocket; (ii) pocket tracking during molecular dynamics, in order to provide insights into pocket dynamics--mdpocket; and (iii) a transposition of mdpocket to the combined analysis of homologous structures--hpocket. These complementary online tools allow to tackle various questions related to the identification and annotation of functional and allosteric sites, transient pockets and pocket preservation within evolution of structural families. The server and documentation are freely available at http://bioserv.rpbs.univ-paris-diderot.fr/fpocket.

  12. The ETFDH c.158A>G variation disrupts the balanced interplay of ESE- and ESS-binding proteins thereby causing missplicing and multiple Acyl-CoA dehydrogenation deficiency.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Rikke K J; Brøner, Sabrina; Sabaratnam, Rugivan; Doktor, Thomas K; Andersen, Henriette S; Bruun, Gitte H; Gahrn, Birthe; Stenbroen, Vibeke; Olpin, Simon E; Dobbie, Angus; Gregersen, Niels; Andresen, Brage S

    2014-01-01

    Multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenation deficiency is a disorder of fatty acid and amino acid oxidation caused by defects of electron transfer flavoprotein (ETF) or its dehydrogenase (ETFDH). A clear relationship between genotype and phenotype makes genotyping of patients important not only diagnostically but also for prognosis and for assessment of treatment. In the present study, we show that a predicted benign ETFDH missense variation (c.158A>G/p.Lys53Arg) in exon 2 causes exon skipping and degradation of ETFDH protein in patient samples. Using splicing reporter minigenes and RNA pull-down of nuclear proteins, we show that the c.158A>G variation increases the strength of a preexisting exonic splicing silencer (ESS) motif UAGGGA. This ESS motif binds splice inhibitory hnRNP A1, hnRNP A2/B1, and hnRNP H proteins. Binding of these inhibitory proteins prevents binding of the positive splicing regulatory SRSF1 and SRSF5 proteins to nearby and overlapping exonic splicing enhancer elements and this causes exon skipping. We further suggest that binding of hnRNP proteins to UAGGGA is increased by triggering synergistic hnRNP H binding to GGG triplets located upstream and downsteam of the UAGGGA motif. A number of disease-causing exonic elements that induce exon skipping in other genes have a similar architecture as the one in ETFDH exon 2. PMID:24123825

  13. Trapping the dynamic acyl carrier protein in fatty acid biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Chi; Haushalter, Robert W.; Lee, D. John; Markwick, Phineus R. L.; Bruegger, Joel; Caldara-Festin, Grace; Finzel, Kara; Jackson, David R.; Ishikawa, Fumihiro; O’Dowd, Bing; McCammon, J. Andrew; Opella, Stanley J.; Tsai, Shiou-Chuan; Burkart, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    Acyl carrier protein (ACP) transports the growing fatty acid chain between enzyme domains of fatty acid synthase (FAS) during biosynthesis.1 Because FAS enzymes operate upon ACP-bound acyl groups, ACP must stabilize and transport the growing lipid chain.2 The transient nature of ACP-enzyme interactions imposes a major obstacle to gaining high-resolution structural information about fatty acid biosynthesis, and a new strategy is required to properly study protein-protein interactions. In this work, we describe the application of a mechanism-based probe that allows site-selective covalent crosslinking of AcpP to FabA, the E. coli ACP and fatty acid 3-hydroxyacyl-ACP dehydratase. We report the 1.9 Å crystal structure of the crosslinked AcpP=FabA complex as a homo-dimer, in which AcpP exhibits two different conformations likely representing snapshots of ACP in action: the 4′-phosphopantetheine (PPant) group of AcpP first binds an arginine-rich groove of FabA, followed by an AcpP helical conformational change that locks the AcpP and FabA in place. Residues at the interface of AcpP and FabA are identified and validated by solution NMR techniques, including chemical shift perturbations and RDC measurements. These not only support our interpretation of the crystal structures but also provide an animated view of ACP in action during fatty acid dehydration. Combined with molecular dynamics simulations, we show for the first time that FabA extrudes the sequestered acyl chain from the ACP binding pocket before dehydration by repositioning helix III. Extensive sequence conservation among carrier proteins suggests that the mechanistic insights gleaned from our studies will prove general for fatty acid, polyketide and non-ribosomal biosyntheses. Here the foundation is laid for defining the dynamic action of carrier protein activity in primary and secondary metabolism, providing insight into pathways that can play major roles in the treatment of cancer, obesity and infectious

  14. Amino acid substitution at peptide-binding pockets of HLA class I molecules increases risk of severe acute GVHD and mortality

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Haagenson, Michael; Spellman, Stephen R.; Askar, Medhat; Battiwalla, Minoo; Baxter-Lowe, Lee Ann; Bitan, Menachem; Fernandez-Viña, Marcelo; Gandhi, Manish; Jakubowski, Ann A.; Maiers, Martin; Marino, Susana R.; Marsh, Steven G. E.; Oudshoorn, Machteld; Palmer, Jeanne; Prasad, Vinod K.; Reddy, Vijay; Ringden, Olle; Saber, Wael; Santarone, Stella; Schultz, Kirk R.; Setterholm, Michelle; Trachtenberg, Elizabeth; Turner, E. Victoria; Woolfrey, Ann E.; Lee, Stephanie J.; Anasetti, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    HLA disparity has a negative impact on the outcomes of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). We studied the independent impact of amino acid substitution (AAS) at peptide-binding positions 9, 99, 116, and 156, and killer immunoglobulin-like receptor binding position 77 of HLA-A, B, or C, on the risks for grade 3-4 acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), chronic GVHD, treatment-related mortality (TRM), relapse, and overall survival. In multivariate analysis, a mismatch at HLA-C position 116 was associated with increased risk for severe acute GVHD (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.45, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.15-1.82, P = .0016). Mismatch at HLA-C position 99 was associated with increased transplant-related mortality (HR = 1.37, 95% CI = 1.1-1.69, P = .0038). Mismatch at HLA-B position 9 was associated with increased chronic GVHD (HR = 2.28, 95% CI = 1.36-3.82, P = .0018). No AAS were significantly associated with outcome at HLA-A. Specific AAS pair combinations with a frequency >30 were tested for association with HCT outcomes. Cysteine to tyrosine substitution at position 99 of HLA-C was associated with increased TRM (HR = 1.78, 95% = CI 1.27-2.51, P = .0009). These results demonstrate that donor-recipient mismatch for certain peptide-binding residues of the HLA class I molecule is associated with increased risk for acute and chronic GVHD and death. PMID:23982174

  15. Purification of Recombinant Acyl-Coenzyme A:Cholesterol Acyltransferase 1 (ACAT1) from H293 Cells and Binding Studies Between the Enzyme and Substrates Using Difference Intrinsic Fluorescence Spectroscopy†

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Catherine CY; Miyazaki, Akira; Dong, Ruhong; Kheirollah, Alireza; Yu, Chunjiang; Geng, Yong; Higgs, Henry N; Chang, Ta-Yuan

    2010-01-01

    Acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferase 1 (ACAT1) is a membrane bound enzyme utilizing long-chain fatty acyl-coenzyme A and cholesterol to form cholesteryl esters and coenzyme A. Previously, we had expressed tagged human ACAT1 (hACAT1) in CHO cells and purified it to homogeneity; however, only a sparse amount of purified protein could be obtained. Here we report that the hACAT1 expression level in H293 cells is 18-fold higher than that in CHO cells. We have developed a milder purification procedure to purify the enzyme to homogeneity. The abundance of the purified protein enabled us to conduct difference intrinsic fluorescence spectroscopy to study the binding between the enzyme and its substrates in CHAPS/phospholipid mixed micelles. The results show that oleoyl CoA binds to ACAT1 with Kd=1.9 μM, and elicits significant structural changes of the protein as manifested by the significantly positive changes in its fluorescence spectrum; stearoyl CoA elicits a similar spectrum change with much lower in magnitude. Previously, kinetic studies had shown that cholesterol is an efficient substrate and an allosteric activator of ACAT1, while its diastereomer epicholesterol is neither a substrate nor an activator. Here we show that both cholesterol and epicholesterol induce positive changes in the ACAT1 fluorescence spectrum; however, the magnitude of spectrum changes induced by cholesterol is much larger than epicholesterol. These results show that stereospecificity, governed by the 3beta-OH moiety in steroid ring A, plays an important role in the binding of cholesterol to ACAT1. PMID:20964445

  16. Acyl glucuronides: the good, the bad and the ugly.

    PubMed

    Regan, Sophie L; Maggs, James L; Hammond, Thomas G; Lambert, Craig; Williams, Dominic P; Park, B Kevin

    2010-10-01

    Acyl glucuronidation is the major metabolic conjugation reaction of most carboxylic acid drugs in mammals. The physiological consequences of this biotransformation have been investigated incompletely but include effects on drug metabolism, protein binding, distribution and clearance that impact upon pharmacological and toxicological outcomes. In marked contrast, the exceptional but widely disparate chemical reactivity of acyl glucuronides has attracted far greater attention. Specifically, the complex transacylation and glycation reactions with proteins have provoked much inconclusive debate over the safety of drugs metabolised to acyl glucuronides. It has been hypothesised that these covalent modifications could initiate idiosyncratic adverse drug reactions. However, despite a large body of in vitro data on the reactions of acyl glucuronides with protein, evidence for adduct formation from acyl glucuronides in vivo is limited and potentially ambiguous. The causal connection of protein adduction to adverse drug reactions remains uncertain. This review has assessed the intrinsic reactivity, metabolic stability and pharmacokinetic properties of acyl glucuronides in the context of physiological, pharmacological and toxicological perspectives. Although numerous experiments have characterised the reactions of acyl glucuronides with proteins, these might be attenuated substantially in vivo by rapid clearance of the conjugates. Consequently, to delineate a relationship between acyl glucuronide formation and toxicological phenomena, detailed pharmacokinetic analysis of systemic exposure to the acyl glucuronide should be undertaken adjacent to determining protein adduct concentrations in vivo. Further investigation is required to ascertain whether acyl glucuronide clearance is sufficient to prevent covalent modification of endogenous proteins and consequentially a potential immunological response. PMID:20830700

  17. Structure of an Odorant-Vinding Protein form the Mosquito Aedes aegypti Suggests a Binding Pocket Covered by a pH-Sensitive

    SciTech Connect

    N Leite; R Krogh; W Xu; Y Ishida; J Iulek; W Leal; G Oliva

    2011-12-31

    The yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti, is the primary vector for the viruses that cause yellow fever, mostly in tropical regions of Africa and in parts of South America, and human dengue, which infects 100 million people yearly in the tropics and subtropics. A better understanding of the structural biology of olfactory proteins may pave the way for the development of environmentally-friendly mosquito attractants and repellents, which may ultimately contribute to reduction of mosquito biting and disease transmission. Previously, we isolated and cloned a major, female-enriched odorant-binding protein (OBP) from the yellow fever mosquito, AaegOBP1, which was later inadvertently renamed AaegOBP39. We prepared recombinant samples of AaegOBP1 by using an expression system that allows proper formation of disulfide bridges and generates functional OBPs, which are indistinguishable from native OBPs. We crystallized AaegOBP1 and determined its three-dimensional structure at 1.85 {angstrom} resolution by molecular replacement based on the structure of the malaria mosquito OBP, AgamOBP1, the only mosquito OBP structure known to date. The structure of AaegOBP1 (= AaegOBP39) shares the common fold of insect OBPs with six {alpha}-helices knitted by three disulfide bonds. A long molecule of polyethylene glycol (PEG) was built into the electron-density maps identified in a long tunnel formed by a crystallographic dimer of AaegOBP1. Circular dichroism analysis indicated that delipidated AaegOBP1 undergoes a pH-dependent conformational change, which may lead to release of odorant at low pH (as in the environment in the vicinity of odorant receptors). A C-terminal loop covers the binding cavity and this 'lid' may be opened by disruption of an array of acid-labile hydrogen bonds thus explaining reduced or no binding affinity at low pH.

  18. Pyrimidinopyrimidine inhibitors of ketohexokinase: exploring the ring C2 group that interacts with Asp-27B in the ligand binding pocket.

    PubMed

    Maryanoff, Bruce E; O'Neill, John C; McComsey, David F; Yabut, Stephen C; Luci, Diane K; Gibbs, Alan C; Connelly, Margery A

    2012-08-15

    Inhibitors of ketohexokinase (KHK) have potential for the treatment of diabetes and obesity. We have continued studies on a pyrimidinopyrimidine series of potent KHK inhibitors by exploring the 2-position substituent (R(3)) that interacts with Asp-27B in the ATP-binding region of KHK (viz. 1, 2; Table 1). We found that increased spacing between the terminal ammonium group and the heterocyclic scaffold (viz. 16-20), such that interaction with Asp-27B is not possible, still results in potent KHK inhibition (IC(50)=15-50 nM). We propose a new interaction with Asp-194, which serves to expand the pyrimidinopyrimidine pharmacophore.

  19. Functions of key residues in the ligand-binding pocket of vitamin D receptor: Fragment molecular orbital interfragment interaction energy analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamagishi, Kenji; Yamamoto, Keiko; Yamada, Sachiko; Tokiwa, Hiroaki

    2006-03-01

    Fragment molecular orbital-interfragment interaction energy calculations of the vitamin D receptor (VDR)/1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D 3 complex were utilized to assign functions of key residues of the VDR. Only one residue forms a significant interaction with the corresponding hydroxy group of the ligand, although two residues are located around each hydroxy group. The degradation of binding affinity for derivatives upon removal of a hydroxy group is closely related to the trend in the strength of the hydrogen bonds. Type II hereditary rickets due to an Arg274 point mutation is caused by the lack of the strongest hydrogen bond.

  20. Oxidative acylation using thioacids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, R.; Orgel, L. E.

    1997-01-01

    Several important prebiotic reactions, including the coupling of amino acids into polypeptides by the formation of amide linkages, involve acylation. Theae reactions present a challenge to the understanding of prebiotic synthesis. Condensation reactions relying on dehydrating agents are either inefficient in aqueous solution or require strongly acidic conditions and high temperatures. Activated amino acids such as thioester derivatives have therefore been suggested as likely substrates for prebiotic peptide synthesis. Here we propose a closely related route to amide bond formation involving oxidative acylation by thioacids. We find that phenylalanine, leucine and phenylphosphate are acylated efficiently in aqueous solution by thioacetic acid and an oxidizing agent. From a prebiotic point of view, oxidative acylation has the advantage of proceeding efficiently in solution and under mild conditions. We anticipate that oxidative acylation should prove to be a general method for activating carboxylic acids, including amino acids.

  1. Conformation-Specific Infrared and Ultraviolet Spectroscopy of DIBENZO-15-CROWN-5-(H2O)1-CLUSTER: Reshaping a Binding Pocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchanan, Evan G.; Rodrigo, Chirantha P.; Gutberlet, Anna K.; Zwier, Timothy S.

    2010-06-01

    Crown ethers are oxygen containing macrocycles noted for their ability to preferentially bind substrates such as ions and water. Despite the high symmetry inherent to the chemical structure, crown ethers are remarkably flexible, adapting their conformation to the substrate to which they are bound. Here, we present the conformational preferences of the singly hydrated dibenzo-15-crown-5 ether (DB15C) complex formed and cooled in a supersonic jet. The resonance enhanced two-photon ionization, UV-UV Hole-burning, and resonant ion-dip infrared spectra lead to the identification of a single DB15C-(H2O)1 conformer with the water doubly hydrogen bonded to the crown. Single vibronic level dispersed fluorescence identified both electronic origins and the coupling between the two chromophores. Finally, infrared population transfer spectroscopy is used to study the monomer conformer populations formed by infrared photodissocation of the complex via the water OH stretch transitions, providing unique insight to the energy flow between water and crown.

  2. Total Syntheses and Initial Evaluation of [Ψ[C(=S)NH]Tpg4]vancomycin, [Ψ[C(=NH)NH]Tpg4]vancomycin, [Ψ[CH2NH]Tpg4]vancomycin and their (4-Chlorobiphenyl)methyl Derivatives: Synergistic Binding Pocket and Peripheral Modifications for the Glycopeptide Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Okano, Akinori; Nakayama, Atsushi; Wu, Kejia; Lindsey, Erick A.; Schammel, Alex W.; Feng, Yiqing; Collins, Karen C.

    2015-01-01

    Full details of studies are disclosed on the total synthesis of binding pocket analogues of vancomycin, bearing the peripheral L-vancosaminyl-1,2-D-glucosyl disaccharide, that contain changes to a key single atom in the residue 4 amide (residue 4 carbonyl O → S, NH, H2) designed to directly address the underlying molecular basis of resistance to vancomycin. Also disclosed are studies piloting the late stage transformations conducted on the synthetically more accessible C-terminus hydroxymethyl aglycon derivatives and full details of the peripheral chlorobiphenyl functionalization of all the binding pocket modified vancomycin analogues designed for dual D-Ala-D-Ala/D-Ala-D-Lac binding are reported. Their collective assessment indicate that combined binding pocket and chlorobiphenyl peripherally modified analogues exhibit a remarkable spectrum of antimicrobial activity (VSSA, MRSA, VanA and VanB VRE) and impressive potencies against both vancomycin-sensitive and vancomycin-resistant bacteria (MICs = 0.06–0.005 μg/mL and 0.5–0.06 μg/mL for the amidine and methylene analogues, respectively) and likely benefit from two independent and synergistic mechanisms of action, only one of which is dependent on D-Ala-D-Ala/D-Ala-D-Lac binding. Such analogues are likely to display especially durable antibiotic activity not prone to rapidly acquired clinical resistance. PMID:25750995

  3. NASA Pocket Statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    NASA Pocket Statistics is published for the use of NASA managers and their staff. Included herein is Administrative and Organizational information, summaries of Space Flight Activity including the NASA Major Launch Record, and NASA Procurement, Financial, and Manpower data. The NASA Major Launch Record includes all launches of Scout class and larger vehicles. Vehicle and spacecraft development flights are also included in the Major Launch Record. Shuttle missions are counted as one launch and one payload, where free flying payloads are not involved. Satellites deployed from the cargo bay of the Shuttle and placed in a separate orbit or trajectory are counted as an additional payload.

  4. Pocket ECG electrode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lund, Gordon F. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A low-noise electrode suited for sensing electrocardiograms when chronically and subcutaneously implanted in a free-ranging subject. The electrode comprises a pocket-shaped electrically conductive member with a single entrance adapted to receive body fluids. The exterior of the member and the entrance region is coated with electrical insulation so that the only electrolyte/electrode interface is within the member remote from artifact-generating tissue. Cloth straps are bonded to the member to permit the electrode to be sutured to tissue and to provide electrical lead flexure relief.

  5. Pocket ECG electrode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lund, G. F. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A low noise electrode suited for sensing electrocardiograms when chronically and subcutaneously implanted in a free ranging subject is described. The electrode comprises a pocket shaped electrically conductive member with a single entrance adapted to receive body fluids. The exterior of the member and the entrance region is coated with electrical insulation so that the only electrolyte/electrode interface is within the member, remote from artifact-generating tissue. Cloth straps are bonded to the member to permit the electrode to be sutured to tissue and to provide electrical lead flexure relief.

  6. NASA Pocket Statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Pocket Statistics is published for the use of NASA managers and their staff. Included herein is Administrative and Organizational information, summaries of Space Flight Activity including the NASA Major Launch Record, and NASA Procurement, Financial, and Manpower data. The NASA Major Launch Record includes all launches of Scout class and larger vehicles. Vehicle and spacecraft development flights are also included in the Major Launch Record. Shuttle missions are counted as one launch and one payload, where free flying payloads are not involved. Satellites deployed from the cargo bay of the Shuttle and placed in a separate orbit or trajectory are counted as an additional payload.

  7. NASA Pocket Statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This booklet of pocket statistics includes the 1996 NASA Major Launch Record, NASA Procurement, Financial, and Workforce data. The NASA Major Launch Record includes all launches of Scout class and larger vehicles. Vehicle and spacecraft development flights are also included in the Major Luanch Record. Shuttle missions are counted as one launch and one payload, where free flying payloads are not involved. Satellites deployed from the cargo bay of the Shuttle and placed in a separate orbit or trajectory are counted as an additional payload.

  8. Drug discovery targeting human 5-HT2C receptors: Residues S3.36 and Y7.43 impact ligand—binding pocket structure via hydrogen bond formation

    PubMed Central

    Canal, Clinton E.; Cordova-Sintjago, Tania C.; Villa, Nancy Y.; Fang, Li-Juan; Booth, Raymond G.

    2011-01-01

    Specific activation of serotonin (5-HT) 5-HT2C G protein-coupled receptors may be therapeutic for obesity and neuropsychiatric disorders. Mutagenesis coupled with computational and molecular modeling experiments based on the human β2 adrenergic receptor structure were employed to delineate the interactions of different ligands at human 5-HT2C residues D3.32, S3.36 and Y7.43. No binding of the tertiary amine radioligand ([3H]-mesulergine) could be detected when the 5-HT2C D3.32 residue was mutated to alanine (D3.32A). The S3.36A point-mutation greatly reduced affinity of primary amine ligands, modestly reduced affinity of a secondary amine, and except for the 5-HT2C-specific agonist N(CH3)2-PAT, affinity of tertiary amines was unaffected. Molecular modeling results indicated that the primary amines form hydrogen bonds with the S3.36 residue, whereas, with the exception of N(CH3)2-PAT, tertiary amines do not interact considerably with this residue. The Y7.43A point-mutation greatly reduced affinity of 5-HT, yet reduced to a lesser extent the affinity of tryptamine that lacks the 5-hydroxy moiety present in 5-HT; modeling results indicated that the 5-HT 5-hydroxy moiety hydrogen bonds with Y7.43 at the 5-HT2C receptor. Additional modeling results showed that 5-HT induced a hydrogen bond between Y7.43 and D3.32. Finally, modeling results revealed two low-energy binding modes for 5-HT in the 5-HT2C binding pocket, supporting the concept that multiple agonist binding modes may stabilize different receptor active conformations to influence signaling. Ligand potencies for modulating WT and point-mutated 5-HT2C receptor-mediated phospholipase C activity were in accordance with the affinity data. Ligand efficacies, however, were altered considerably by the S3.36A mutation only. PMID:22020288

  9. Microbial Tailoring of Acyl Peptidic Siderophores

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Marine bacteria produce an abundance of suites of acylated siderophores characterized by a unique, species-dependent headgroup that binds iron(III) and one of a series of fatty acid appendages. Marinobacter sp. DS40M6 produces a suite of seven acylated marinobactins, with fatty acids ranging from saturated and unsaturated C12–C18 fatty acids. In the present study, we report that in the late log phase of growth, the fatty acids are hydrolyzed by an amide hydrolase producing the peptidic marinobactin headgroup. Halomonas aquamarina str. DS40M3, another marine bacterium isolated originally from the same sample of open ocean water as Marinobacter sp. DS40M6, produces the acyl aquachelins, also as a suite composed of a peptidic headgroup distinct from that of the marinobactins. In contrast to the acyl marinobactins, hydrolysis of the suite of acyl aquachelins is not detected, even when H. aquamarina str. DS40M3 is grown into the stationary phase. The Marinobacter cell-free extract containing the acyl amide hydrolase is active toward exogenous acyl-peptidic siderophores (e.g., aquachelin C, loihichelin C, as well as octanoyl homoserine lactone used in quorum sensing). Further, when H. aquamarina str. DS40M3 is cultured together with Marinobacter sp. DS40M6, the fatty acids of both suites of siderophores are hydrolyzed, and the aquachelin headgroup is also produced. The present study demonstrates that coculturing bacteria leads to metabolically tailored metabolites compared to growth in a single pure culture, which is interesting given the importance of siderophore-mediated iron acquisition for bacterial growth and that Marinobacter sp. DS40M6 and H. aquamarina str. DS40M3 were isolated from the same sample of seawater. PMID:24735218

  10. A Back-to-Front Fragment-Based Drug Design Search Strategy Targeting the DFG-Out Pocket of Protein Tyrosine Kinases.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Hidehisa; Oki, Hideyuki; Okada, Kengo; Takagi, Terufumi; Tawada, Michiko; Miyazaki, Yasushi; Imamura, Shinichi; Hori, Akira; Lawson, J David; Hixon, Mark S; Kimura, Hiroyuki; Miki, Hiroshi

    2012-04-12

    We present a straightforward process for the discovery of novel back pocket-binding fragment molecules against protein tyrosine kinases. The approach begins by screening against the nonphosphorylated target kinase with subsequent counterscreening of hits against the phosphorylated enzyme. Back pocket-binding fragments are inactive against the phosphorylated kinase. Fragment molecules are of insufficient size to span both regions of the ATP binding pocket; thus, the outcome is binary (back pocket-binding or hinge-binding). Next, fragments with the appropriate binding profile are assayed in combination with a known hinge-binding fragment and subsequently with a known back pocket-binding fragment. Confirmation of back pocket-binding by Yonetani-Theorell plot analysis progresses candidate fragments to crystallization trials. The method is exemplified by a fragment screening campaign against vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2, and a novel back pocket-binding fragment is presented. PMID:24900475

  11. A Back-to-Front Fragment-Based Drug Design Search Strategy Targeting the DFG-Out Pocket of Protein Tyrosine Kinases

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We present a straightforward process for the discovery of novel back pocket-binding fragment molecules against protein tyrosine kinases. The approach begins by screening against the nonphosphorylated target kinase with subsequent counterscreening of hits against the phosphorylated enzyme. Back pocket-binding fragments are inactive against the phosphorylated kinase. Fragment molecules are of insufficient size to span both regions of the ATP binding pocket; thus, the outcome is binary (back pocket-binding or hinge-binding). Next, fragments with the appropriate binding profile are assayed in combination with a known hinge-binding fragment and subsequently with a known back pocket-binding fragment. Confirmation of back pocket-binding by Yonetani–Theorell plot analysis progresses candidate fragments to crystallization trials. The method is exemplified by a fragment screening campaign against vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2, and a novel back pocket-binding fragment is presented. PMID:24900475

  12. Ru(II)-based complexes with N-(acyl)-N',N'-(disubstituted)thiourea ligands: Synthesis, characterization, BSA- and DNA-binding studies of new cytotoxic agents against lung and prostate tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Correa, Rodrigo S; de Oliveira, Katia M; Delolo, Fábio G; Alvarez, Anislay; Mocelo, Raúl; Plutin, Ana M; Cominetti, Marcia R; Castellano, Eduardo E; Batista, Alzir A

    2015-09-01

    Four ruthenium(II)-based complexes with N-(acyl)-N',N'-(disubstituted)thiourea derivatives (Th) were obtained. The compounds, with the general formula trans-[Ru(PPh3)2(Th)(bipy)]PF6, interact with bovine serum albumin (BSA) and DNA. BSA-binding constants, which were in the range of 3.3-6.5×10(4) M(-1), and the thermodynamic parameters (ΔG, ΔH and ΔS), suggest spontaneous interactions with this protein by electrostatic forces due to the positive charge of the complexes. Also, binding constant by spectrophotometric DNA titration (Kb = 0.8-1.8×10(4) M(-1)) and viscosity studies indicate weak interactions between the complexes and DNA. Cytotoxicity assays against DU-145 (prostate cancer) and A549 (lung cancer) tumour cells revealed that the complexes are more active in tumour cells than in normal (L929) cells, and that they present high cytotoxicity (low IC50 values) compared with the reference metallodrug, cisplatin.

  13. Ru(II)-based complexes with N-(acyl)-N',N'-(disubstituted)thiourea ligands: Synthesis, characterization, BSA- and DNA-binding studies of new cytotoxic agents against lung and prostate tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Correa, Rodrigo S; de Oliveira, Katia M; Delolo, Fábio G; Alvarez, Anislay; Mocelo, Raúl; Plutin, Ana M; Cominetti, Marcia R; Castellano, Eduardo E; Batista, Alzir A

    2015-09-01

    Four ruthenium(II)-based complexes with N-(acyl)-N',N'-(disubstituted)thiourea derivatives (Th) were obtained. The compounds, with the general formula trans-[Ru(PPh3)2(Th)(bipy)]PF6, interact with bovine serum albumin (BSA) and DNA. BSA-binding constants, which were in the range of 3.3-6.5×10(4) M(-1), and the thermodynamic parameters (ΔG, ΔH and ΔS), suggest spontaneous interactions with this protein by electrostatic forces due to the positive charge of the complexes. Also, binding constant by spectrophotometric DNA titration (Kb = 0.8-1.8×10(4) M(-1)) and viscosity studies indicate weak interactions between the complexes and DNA. Cytotoxicity assays against DU-145 (prostate cancer) and A549 (lung cancer) tumour cells revealed that the complexes are more active in tumour cells than in normal (L929) cells, and that they present high cytotoxicity (low IC50 values) compared with the reference metallodrug, cisplatin. PMID:26160296

  14. Acyl peptidic siderophores: structures, biosyntheses and post-assembly modifications.

    PubMed

    Kem, Michelle P; Butler, Alison

    2015-06-01

    Acyl peptidic siderophores are produced by a variety of bacteria and possess unique amphiphilic properties. Amphiphilic siderophores are generally produced in a suite where the iron(III)-binding headgroup remains constant while the fatty acid appendage varies by length and functionality. Acyl peptidic siderophores are commonly synthesized by non-ribosomal peptide synthetases; however, the method of peptide acylation during biosynthesis can vary between siderophores. Following biosynthesis, acyl siderophores can be further modified enzymatically to produce a more hydrophilic compound, which retains its ferric chelating abilities as demonstrated by pyoverdine from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the marinobactins from certain Marinobacter species. Siderophore hydrophobicity can also be altered through photolysis of the ferric complex of certain β-hydroxyaspartic acid-containing acyl peptidic siderophores. PMID:25677460

  15. Structure of 3-oxoacyl-(acyl-carrier protein) synthase II from Thermus thermophilus HB8

    SciTech Connect

    Bagautdinov, Bagautdin Ukita, Yoko; Miyano, Masashi; Kunishima, Naoki

    2008-05-01

    The crystal structure of 3-oxoacyl-(acyl-carrier protein) synthase II from T. thermophilus HB8 has been determined at 2.0 Å resolution and compared with the structures of β-keto-ACP synthases from other sources. The β-ketoacyl-(acyl carrier protein) synthases (β-keto-ACP synthases; KAS) catalyse the addition of two-carbon units to the growing acyl chain during the elongation phase of fatty-acid synthesis. As key regulators of bacterial fatty-acid synthesis, they are promising targets for the development of new antibacterial agents. The crystal structure of 3-oxoacyl-ACP synthase II from Thermus thermophilus HB8 (TtKAS II) has been solved by molecular replacement and refined at 2.0 Å resolution. The crystal is orthorhombic, space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = 72.07, b = 185.57, c = 62.52 Å, and contains one homodimer in the asymmetric unit. The subunits adopt the well known α-β-α-β-α thiolase fold that is common to ACP synthases. The structural and sequence similarities of TtKAS II to KAS I and KAS II enzymes of known structure from other sources support the hypothesis of comparable enzymatic activity. The dimeric state of TtKAS II is important to create each fatty-acid-binding pocket. Closer examination of KAS structures reveals that compared with other KAS structures in the apo form, the active site of TtKAS II is more accessible because of the ‘open’ conformation of the Phe396 side chain.

  16. Pocket-based drug design: exploring pocket space.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiliang; Gan, Linfeng; Wang, Erkang; Wang, Jin

    2013-01-01

    The identification and application of druggable pockets of targets play a key role in in silico drug design, which is a fundamental step in structure-based drug design. Herein, some recent progresses and developments of the computational analysis of pockets have been covered. Also, the pockets at the protein-protein interfaces (PPI) have been considered to further explore the pocket space for drug discovery. We have presented two case studies targeting the kinetic pockets generated by normal mode analysis and molecular dynamics method, respectively, in which we focus upon incorporating the pocket flexibility into the two-dimensional virtual screening with both affinity and specificity. We applied the specificity and affinity (SPA) score to quantitatively estimate affinity and evaluate specificity using the intrinsic specificity ratio (ISR) as a quantitative criterion. In one of two cases, we also included some applications of pockets located at the dimer interfaces to emphasize the role of PPI in drug discovery. This review will attempt to summarize the current status of this pocket issue and will present some prospective avenues of further inquiry.

  17. Hydrophobic pocket targeting probes for enteroviruses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martikainen, Mari; Salorinne, Kirsi; Lahtinen, Tanja; Malola, Sami; Permi, Perttu; Häkkinen, Hannu; Marjomäki, Varpu

    2015-10-01

    Visualization and tracking of viruses without compromising their functionality is crucial in order to understand virus targeting to cells and tissues, and to understand the subsequent subcellular steps leading to virus uncoating and replication. Enteroviruses are important human pathogens causing a vast number of acute infections, and are also suggested to contribute to the development of chronic diseases like type I diabetes. Here, we demonstrate a novel method to target site-specifically the hydrophobic pocket of enteroviruses. A probe, a derivative of Pleconaril, was developed and conjugated to various labels that enabled the visualization of enteroviruses under light and electron microscopes. The probe mildly stabilized the virus particle by increasing the melting temperature by 1-3 degrees, and caused a delay in the uncoating of the virus in the cellular endosomes, but could not however inhibit the receptor binding, cellular entry or infectivity of the virus. The hydrophobic pocket binding moiety of the probe was shown to bind to echovirus 1 particle by STD and tr-NOESY NMR methods. Furthermore, binding to echovirus 1 and Coxsackievirus A9, and to a lesser extent to Coxsackie virus B3 was verified by using a gold nanocluster labeled probe by TEM analysis. Molecular modelling suggested that the probe fits the hydrophobic pockets of EV1 and CVA9, but not of CVB3 as expected, correlating well with the variations in the infectivity and stability of the virus particles. EV1 conjugated to the fluorescent dye labeled probe was efficiently internalized into the cells. The virus-fluorescent probe conjugate accumulated in the cytoplasmic endosomes and caused infection starting from 6 hours onwards. Remarkably, before and during the time of replication, the fluorescent probe was seen to leak from the virus-positive endosomes and thus separate from the capsid proteins that were left in the endosomes. These results suggest that, like the physiological hydrophobic content

  18. Side pocket mandrel

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, D.W.; Crawford, M.S.; Crawford, W.B.

    1987-12-29

    A side pocket mandrel is described comprising: a tubular body section having a hollow interior that defines a main bore to one side thereof and another bore to the other side thereof; and a short-length seating section welded to one end of the body section. The seating section has a main bore formed to one side thereof aligned with the main bore in the body section, and a valve seating bore formed on the other side thereof generally aligned with the other bore. The seating bore has a polish section adjacent its outer end. The outer end opening through an exterior end surface of the mandrel. The seating bore has a recessed section adjacent the polish section. That provides an inwardly facing stop shoulder at one end thereof and a latch shoulder at the other end thereof facing the stop shoulder; and a tubular member welded to the seating section in axial alignment with the main bores. The axis of the polish section of the seating bore is inclined toward the axes of the main bores at a small angle.

  19. PockDrug-Server: a new web server for predicting pocket druggability on holo and apo proteins

    PubMed Central

    Hussein, Hiba Abi; Borrel, Alexandre; Geneix, Colette; Petitjean, Michel; Regad, Leslie; Camproux, Anne-Claude

    2015-01-01

    Predicting protein pocket's ability to bind drug-like molecules with high affinity, i.e. druggability, is of major interest in the target identification phase of drug discovery. Therefore, pocket druggability investigations represent a key step of compound clinical progression projects. Currently computational druggability prediction models are attached to one unique pocket estimation method despite pocket estimation uncertainties. In this paper, we propose ‘PockDrug-Server’ to predict pocket druggability, efficient on both (i) estimated pockets guided by the ligand proximity (extracted by proximity to a ligand from a holo protein structure) and (ii) estimated pockets based solely on protein structure information (based on amino atoms that form the surface of potential binding cavities). PockDrug-Server provides consistent druggability results using different pocket estimation methods. It is robust with respect to pocket boundary and estimation uncertainties, thus efficient using apo pockets that are challenging to estimate. It clearly distinguishes druggable from less druggable pockets using different estimation methods and outperformed recent druggability models for apo pockets. It can be carried out from one or a set of apo/holo proteins using different pocket estimation methods proposed by our web server or from any pocket previously estimated by the user. PockDrug-Server is publicly available at: http://pockdrug.rpbs.univ-paris-diderot.fr. PMID:25956651

  20. PockDrug-Server: a new web server for predicting pocket druggability on holo and apo proteins.

    PubMed

    Hussein, Hiba Abi; Borrel, Alexandre; Geneix, Colette; Petitjean, Michel; Regad, Leslie; Camproux, Anne-Claude

    2015-07-01

    Predicting protein pocket's ability to bind drug-like molecules with high affinity, i.e. druggability, is of major interest in the target identification phase of drug discovery. Therefore, pocket druggability investigations represent a key step of compound clinical progression projects. Currently computational druggability prediction models are attached to one unique pocket estimation method despite pocket estimation uncertainties. In this paper, we propose 'PockDrug-Server' to predict pocket druggability, efficient on both (i) estimated pockets guided by the ligand proximity (extracted by proximity to a ligand from a holo protein structure) and (ii) estimated pockets based solely on protein structure information (based on amino atoms that form the surface of potential binding cavities). PockDrug-Server provides consistent druggability results using different pocket estimation methods. It is robust with respect to pocket boundary and estimation uncertainties, thus efficient using apo pockets that are challenging to estimate. It clearly distinguishes druggable from less druggable pockets using different estimation methods and outperformed recent druggability models for apo pockets. It can be carried out from one or a set of apo/holo proteins using different pocket estimation methods proposed by our web server or from any pocket previously estimated by the user. PockDrug-Server is publicly available at: http://pockdrug.rpbs.univ-paris-diderot.fr.

  1. Acyl-Lipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Li-Beisson, Yonghua; Shorrosh, Basil; Beisson, Fred; Andersson, Mats X.; Arondel, Vincent; Bates, Philip D.; Baud, Sébastien; Bird, David; DeBono, Allan; Durrett, Timothy P.; Franke, Rochus B.; Graham, Ian A.; Katayama, Kenta; Kelly, Amélie A.; Larson, Tony; Markham, Jonathan E.; Miquel, Martine; Molina, Isabel; Nishida, Ikuo; Rowland, Owen; Samuels, Lacey; Schmid, Katherine M.; Wada, Hajime; Welti, Ruth; Xu, Changcheng; Zallot, Rémi; Ohlrogge, John

    2013-01-01

    Acyl lipids in Arabidopsis and all other plants have a myriad of diverse functions. These include providing the core diffusion barrier of the membranes that separates cells and subcellular organelles. This function alone involves more than 10 membrane lipid classes, including the phospholipids, galactolipids, and sphingolipids, and within each class the variations in acyl chain composition expand the number of structures to several hundred possible molecular species. Acyl lipids in the form of triacylglycerol account for 35% of the weight of Arabidopsis seeds and represent their major form of carbon and energy storage. A layer of cutin and cuticular waxes that restricts the loss of water and provides protection from invasions by pathogens and other stresses covers the entire aerial surface of Arabidopsis. Similar functions are provided by suberin and its associated waxes that are localized in roots, seed coats, and abscission zones and are produced in response to wounding. This chapter focuses on the metabolic pathways that are associated with the biosynthesis and degradation of the acyl lipids mentioned above. These pathways, enzymes, and genes are also presented in detail in an associated website (ARALIP: http://aralip.plantbiology.msu.edu/). Protocols and methods used for analysis of Arabidopsis lipids are provided. Finally, a detailed summary of the composition of Arabidopsis lipids is provided in three figures and 15 tables. PMID:23505340

  2. Acyl-Lipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Li-Beisson, Yonghua; Shorrosh, Basil; Beisson, Fred; Andersson, Mats X.; Arondel, Vincent; Bates, Philip D.; Baud, Sébastien; Bird, David; DeBono, Allan; Durrett, Timothy P.; Franke, Rochus B.; Graham, Ian A.; Katayama, Kenta; Kelly, Amélie A.; Larson, Tony; Markham, Jonathan E.; Miquel, Martine; Molina, Isabel; Nishida, Ikuo; Rowland, Owen; Samuels, Lacey; Schmid, Katherine M.; Wada, Hajime; Welti, Ruth; Xu, Changcheng; Zallot, Rémi; Ohlrogge, John

    2010-01-01

    Acyl lipids in Arabidopsis and all other plants have a myriad of diverse functions. These include providing the core diffusion barrier of the membranes that separates cells and subcellular organelles. This function alone involves more than 10 membrane lipid classes, including the phospholipids, galactolipids, and sphingolipids, and within each class the variations in acyl chain composition expand the number of structures to several hundred possible molecular species. Acyl lipids in the form of triacylglycerol account for 35% of the weight of Arabidopsis seeds and represent their major form of carbon and energy storage. A layer of cutin and cuticular waxes that restricts the loss of water and provides protection from invasions by pathogens and other stresses covers the entire aerial surface of Arabidopsis. Similar functions are provided by suberin and its associated waxes that are localized in roots, seed coats, and abscission zones and are produced in response to wounding. This chapter focuses on the metabolic pathways that are associated with the biosynthesis and degradation of the acyl lipids mentioned above. These pathways, enzymes, and genes are also presented in detail in an associated website (ARALIP: http://aralip.plantbiology.msu.edu/). Protocols and methods used for analysis of Arabidopsis lipids are provided. Finally, a detailed summary of the composition of Arabidopsis lipids is provided in three figures and 15 tables. PMID:22303259

  3. Acyl-lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Li-Beisson, Yonghua; Shorrosh, Basil; Beisson, Fred; Andersson, Mats X; Arondel, Vincent; Bates, Philip D; Baud, Sébastien; Bird, David; Debono, Allan; Durrett, Timothy P; Franke, Rochus B; Graham, Ian A; Katayama, Kenta; Kelly, Amélie A; Larson, Tony; Markham, Jonathan E; Miquel, Martine; Molina, Isabel; Nishida, Ikuo; Rowland, Owen; Samuels, Lacey; Schmid, Katherine M; Wada, Hajime; Welti, Ruth; Xu, Changcheng; Zallot, Rémi; Ohlrogge, John

    2013-01-01

    Acyl lipids in Arabidopsis and all other plants have a myriad of diverse functions. These include providing the core diffusion barrier of the membranes that separates cells and subcellular organelles. This function alone involves more than 10 membrane lipid classes, including the phospholipids, galactolipids, and sphingolipids, and within each class the variations in acyl chain composition expand the number of structures to several hundred possible molecular species. Acyl lipids in the form of triacylglycerol account for 35% of the weight of Arabidopsis seeds and represent their major form of carbon and energy storage. A layer of cutin and cuticular waxes that restricts the loss of water and provides protection from invasions by pathogens and other stresses covers the entire aerial surface of Arabidopsis. Similar functions are provided by suberin and its associated waxes that are localized in roots, seed coats, and abscission zones and are produced in response to wounding. This chapter focuses on the metabolic pathways that are associated with the biosynthesis and degradation of the acyl lipids mentioned above. These pathways, enzymes, and genes are also presented in detail in an associated website (ARALIP: http://aralip.plantbiology.msu.edu/). Protocols and methods used for analysis of Arabidopsis lipids are provided. Finally, a detailed summary of the composition of Arabidopsis lipids is provided in three figures and 15 tables. PMID:23505340

  4. Anatomy of the β-branching enzyme of polyketide biosynthesis and its interaction with an acyl-ACP substrate.

    PubMed

    Maloney, Finn P; Gerwick, Lena; Gerwick, William H; Sherman, David H; Smith, Janet L

    2016-09-13

    Alkyl branching at the β position of a polyketide intermediate is an important variation on canonical polyketide natural product biosynthesis. The branching enzyme, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl synthase (HMGS), catalyzes the aldol addition of an acyl donor to a β-keto-polyketide intermediate acceptor. HMGS is highly selective for two specialized acyl carrier proteins (ACPs) that deliver the donor and acceptor substrates. The HMGS from the curacin A biosynthetic pathway (CurD) was examined to establish the basis for ACP selectivity. The donor ACP (CurB) had high affinity for the enzyme (Kd = 0.5 μM) and could not be substituted by the acceptor ACP. High-resolution crystal structures of HMGS alone and in complex with its donor ACP reveal a tight interaction that depends on exquisite surface shape and charge complementarity between the proteins. Selectivity is explained by HMGS binding to an unusual surface cleft on the donor ACP, in a manner that would exclude the acceptor ACP. Within the active site, HMGS discriminates between pre- and postreaction states of the donor ACP. The free phosphopantetheine (Ppant) cofactor of ACP occupies a conserved pocket that excludes the acetyl-Ppant substrate. In comparison with HMG-CoA (CoA) synthase, the homologous enzyme from primary metabolism, HMGS has several differences at the active site entrance, including a flexible-loop insertion, which may account for the specificity of one enzyme for substrates delivered by ACP and the other by CoA.

  5. Anatomy of the β-branching enzyme of polyketide biosynthesis and its interaction with an acyl-ACP substrate.

    PubMed

    Maloney, Finn P; Gerwick, Lena; Gerwick, William H; Sherman, David H; Smith, Janet L

    2016-09-13

    Alkyl branching at the β position of a polyketide intermediate is an important variation on canonical polyketide natural product biosynthesis. The branching enzyme, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl synthase (HMGS), catalyzes the aldol addition of an acyl donor to a β-keto-polyketide intermediate acceptor. HMGS is highly selective for two specialized acyl carrier proteins (ACPs) that deliver the donor and acceptor substrates. The HMGS from the curacin A biosynthetic pathway (CurD) was examined to establish the basis for ACP selectivity. The donor ACP (CurB) had high affinity for the enzyme (Kd = 0.5 μM) and could not be substituted by the acceptor ACP. High-resolution crystal structures of HMGS alone and in complex with its donor ACP reveal a tight interaction that depends on exquisite surface shape and charge complementarity between the proteins. Selectivity is explained by HMGS binding to an unusual surface cleft on the donor ACP, in a manner that would exclude the acceptor ACP. Within the active site, HMGS discriminates between pre- and postreaction states of the donor ACP. The free phosphopantetheine (Ppant) cofactor of ACP occupies a conserved pocket that excludes the acetyl-Ppant substrate. In comparison with HMG-CoA (CoA) synthase, the homologous enzyme from primary metabolism, HMGS has several differences at the active site entrance, including a flexible-loop insertion, which may account for the specificity of one enzyme for substrates delivered by ACP and the other by CoA. PMID:27573844

  6. Acyl-acyl carrier protein: Lysomonogalactosyldiacylglycerol acyl transferase in Anabaena variabilis

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H.H.

    1989-01-01

    Monogalactosyldiacylglycerol was produced when membranes isolated from the cyanobacterium, Anabaena variabilis, and washed free of soluble endogenous constituents, were incubated with ({sup 14}C)acyl-acyl carrier protein. This enzymatic synthesis of monogalactosyldiacylglycerol localized in the membranes was not dependent on any added cofactors, such as ATP, coenzyme A, and dithiothreitol. Palmitoyl-, stearoyl-, and oleoyl-acyl carrier proteins were approximately equally active as substrates with Km of 0.37, 0.36, and 0.23 {mu}M, respectively. The ({sup 14}C)acyl group was exclusively transferred to the sn-1 hydroxyl of the glycerol backbone of monogalactosyldiacylglycerol as demonstrated by hydrolysis of all incorporated acyl groups by the lipase from Rhizopus arrhizus delamar. Using a double labelled ({sup 14}C)acyl-({sup 14}C)acyl carrier protein, this enzyme catalyzed the direct transfer of the acyl group from acyl-acyl carrier protein to an endogenous lysomonogalactosyldiacylglycerol to form monogalactosyldiacylglycerol. The transfer reaction mechanism was also confirmed by the increased activity with the addition of the lysomonogalactosyldiacylglycerol suspension. A specific galactolipid acyl hydrolase activity was released into the soluble protein fraction when the membranes of Anabaena variabilis were treated with 2% Triton X-100. The positional specificity of this acyl hydrolase was demonstrated to be similar to that of Rhizopus lipase, i.e. only the acyl group at the sn-1 position was hydrolyzed. The acyl hydrolase which was also localized in the membrane fraction of Anabaena variabilis was presumably responsible for producing endogenous lysomonogalactosyldiacylglycerol used by the acyltransferase.

  7. Purified membrane and soluble folate binding proteins from cultured KB cells have similar amino acid compositions and molecular weights but differ in fatty acid acylation.

    PubMed Central

    Luhrs, C A; Pitiranggon, P; da Costa, M; Rothenberg, S P; Slomiany, B L; Brink, L; Tous, G I; Stein, S

    1987-01-01

    A membrane-associated folate binding protein (FBP) and a soluble FBP, which is released into the culture medium, have been purified from human KB cells using affinity chromatography. By NaDodSO4/PAGE, both proteins have an apparent Mr of approximately 42,000. However, in the presence of Triton X-100, the soluble FBP eluted from a Sephadex G-150 column with an apparent Mr of approximately 40,000 (similar to NaDodSO4/PAGE) but the membrane-associated FBP eluted with an apparent Mr of approximately 160,000, indicating that this species contains a hydrophobic domain that interacts with the detergent micelles. The amino acid compositions of both forms of FBP were similar, especially with respect to the apolar amino acids. In addition, the 18 amino acids at the amino termini of both proteins were identical. The membrane FBP, following delipidation with chloroform/methanol, contained 7.1 mol of fatty acid per mol of protein, of which 4.7 mol was amide-linked and 2.4 mol was ester-linked. The soluble FBP contained only 0.05 mol of fatty acid per mol of protein. These studies indicate that the membrane FBP of KB cells contains covalently bound fatty acids that may serve to anchor the protein in the cell membrane. Images PMID:3476960

  8. Purified membrane and soluble folate binding proteins from cultured KB cells have similar amino acid compositions and molecular weights but differ in fatty acid acylation

    SciTech Connect

    Luhrs, C.A.; Pitiranggon, P.; Costa, M.D.; Rothenberg, S.P.; Slomiany, B.L.; Brink, L.; Tous, G.I.; Stein, S.

    1987-09-01

    A membrane-associated folate binding protein (FBP) and a soluble FBP, which is released into the culture medium, have been purified from human KB cells using affinity chromatography. By NaDodSO/sub 4/PAGE, both proteins have an apparent M/sub r/ of approx. 42,000. However, in the presence of Triton X-100, the soluble FBP eluted from a Sephadex G-150 column with an apparent M/sub r/ of approx. 40,000 (similar to NaDodSO/sub 4/PAGE) but the membrane-associated FBP eluted with an apparent M/sub r/ of approx. = 160,000, indicating that this species contains a hydrophobic domain that interacts with the detergent micelles. The amino acid compositions of both forms of FBP were similar, especially with respect to the apolar amino acids. In addition, the 18 amino acids at the amino termini of both proteins were identical. The membrane FBP, following delipidation with chloroformmethanol, contained 7.1 mol of fatty acid per mol of protein, of which 4.7 mol was amide-linked and 2.4 mol was ester-linked. The soluble FBP contained only 0.05 mol of fatty acid per mol of protein. These studies indicate that the membrane FBP of KB cells contains covalently bound fatty acids that may serve to anchor the protein in the cell membrane.

  9. The functional size of acyl-coenzyme A (CoA):cholesterol acyltransferase and acyl-CoA hydrolase as determined by radiation inactivation

    SciTech Connect

    Billheimer, J.T.; Cromley, D.A.; Kempner, E.S. )

    1990-05-25

    Frozen rat liver microsomes and rough endoplasmic reticulum were irradiated with high energy electrons. The surviving enzymatic activity of acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase and activity for esterification of 25-hydroxycholesterol decreased as a simple exponential function of radiation exposure, leading to a target size of 170-180 kDa. The loss of acyl-CoA hydrolase activity with a radiation dose was complex and resolved as a 45-kDa enzyme associated with a large inhibitor. It is interpreted that acyl-CoA hydrolase is the acyl-CoA-binding component and the inhibitor is the cholesterol-binding component of acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase.

  10. Water properties inside nanoscopic hydrophobic pocket studied by computer simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setny, Piotr; Geller, Maciej

    2006-10-01

    The structure and dynamics of water in the vicinity of the hemispherical hydrophobic pocket of 8Å radius were examined via molecular dynamics simulations in NVT ensemble. Density, hydrogen bonding properties, and residence times of water molecules were projected on two-dimensional planes providing a spatial description of water behavior. We found that the average water density is significantly depleted relative to bulk value. A detailed analysis of pocket occupancy revealed fluctuations between states of completely empty pocket and a pocket filled with a bulklike fluid, which seem to result from collective behavior of water molecules. Free energy differences accompanying these fluctuations are rather small, suggesting that the given pocket radius is close to the critical one for transition between gas and liquid phases in the considered system. We show that the situation is different in the case of a simple Lennard-Jones fluid. These results indicate that changing the surface curvature from flat to concave may lead to qualitative difference in water behavior in its vicinity. We think that our studies may also put some light on binding site desolvation process which is necessary to understand to make correct predictions of binding energies.

  11. Hydrophobic pocket targeting probes for enteroviruses.

    PubMed

    Martikainen, Mari; Salorinne, Kirsi; Lahtinen, Tanja; Malola, Sami; Permi, Perttu; Häkkinen, Hannu; Marjomäki, Varpu

    2015-11-01

    Visualization and tracking of viruses without compromising their functionality is crucial in order to understand virus targeting to cells and tissues, and to understand the subsequent subcellular steps leading to virus uncoating and replication. Enteroviruses are important human pathogens causing a vast number of acute infections, and are also suggested to contribute to the development of chronic diseases like type I diabetes. Here, we demonstrate a novel method to target site-specifically the hydrophobic pocket of enteroviruses. A probe, a derivative of Pleconaril, was developed and conjugated to various labels that enabled the visualization of enteroviruses under light and electron microscopes. The probe mildly stabilized the virus particle by increasing the melting temperature by 1-3 degrees, and caused a delay in the uncoating of the virus in the cellular endosomes, but could not however inhibit the receptor binding, cellular entry or infectivity of the virus. The hydrophobic pocket binding moiety of the probe was shown to bind to echovirus 1 particle by STD and tr-NOESY NMR methods. Furthermore, binding to echovirus 1 and Coxsackievirus A9, and to a lesser extent to Coxsackie virus B3 was verified by using a gold nanocluster labeled probe by TEM analysis. Molecular modelling suggested that the probe fits the hydrophobic pockets of EV1 and CVA9, but not of CVB3 as expected, correlating well with the variations in the infectivity and stability of the virus particles. EV1 conjugated to the fluorescent dye labeled probe was efficiently internalized into the cells. The virus-fluorescent probe conjugate accumulated in the cytoplasmic endosomes and caused infection starting from 6 hours onwards. Remarkably, before and during the time of replication, the fluorescent probe was seen to leak from the virus-positive endosomes and thus separate from the capsid proteins that were left in the endosomes. These results suggest that, like the physiological hydrophobic content

  12. Hydrophobic pocket targeting probes for enteroviruses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martikainen, Mari; Salorinne, Kirsi; Lahtinen, Tanja; Malola, Sami; Permi, Perttu; Häkkinen, Hannu; Marjomäki, Varpu

    2015-10-01

    Visualization and tracking of viruses without compromising their functionality is crucial in order to understand virus targeting to cells and tissues, and to understand the subsequent subcellular steps leading to virus uncoating and replication. Enteroviruses are important human pathogens causing a vast number of acute infections, and are also suggested to contribute to the development of chronic diseases like type I diabetes. Here, we demonstrate a novel method to target site-specifically the hydrophobic pocket of enteroviruses. A probe, a derivative of Pleconaril, was developed and conjugated to various labels that enabled the visualization of enteroviruses under light and electron microscopes. The probe mildly stabilized the virus particle by increasing the melting temperature by 1-3 degrees, and caused a delay in the uncoating of the virus in the cellular endosomes, but could not however inhibit the receptor binding, cellular entry or infectivity of the virus. The hydrophobic pocket binding moiety of the probe was shown to bind to echovirus 1 particle by STD and tr-NOESY NMR methods. Furthermore, binding to echovirus 1 and Coxsackievirus A9, and to a lesser extent to Coxsackie virus B3 was verified by using a gold nanocluster labeled probe by TEM analysis. Molecular modelling suggested that the probe fits the hydrophobic pockets of EV1 and CVA9, but not of CVB3 as expected, correlating well with the variations in the infectivity and stability of the virus particles. EV1 conjugated to the fluorescent dye labeled probe was efficiently internalized into the cells. The virus-fluorescent probe conjugate accumulated in the cytoplasmic endosomes and caused infection starting from 6 hours onwards. Remarkably, before and during the time of replication, the fluorescent probe was seen to leak from the virus-positive endosomes and thus separate from the capsid proteins that were left in the endosomes. These results suggest that, like the physiological hydrophobic content

  13. The Golgi S-acylation machinery comprises zDHHC enzymes with major differences in substrate affinity and S-acylation activity

    PubMed Central

    Lemonidis, Kimon; Gorleku, Oforiwa A.; Sanchez-Perez, Maria C.; Grefen, Christopher; Chamberlain, Luke H.

    2014-01-01

    S-acylation, the attachment of fatty acids onto cysteine residues, regulates protein trafficking and function and is mediated by a family of zDHHC enzymes. The S-acylation of peripheral membrane proteins has been proposed to occur at the Golgi, catalyzed by an S-acylation machinery that displays little substrate specificity. To advance understanding of how S-acylation of peripheral membrane proteins is handled by Golgi zDHHC enzymes, we investigated interactions between a subset of four Golgi zDHHC enzymes and two S-acylated proteins—synaptosomal-associated protein 25 (SNAP25) and cysteine-string protein (CSP). Our results uncover major differences in substrate recognition and S-acylation by these zDHHC enzymes. The ankyrin-repeat domains of zDHHC17 and zDHHC13 mediated strong and selective interactions with SNAP25/CSP, whereas binding of zDHHC3 and zDHHC7 to these proteins was barely detectable. Despite this, zDHHC3/zDHHC7 could S-acylate SNAP25/CSP more efficiently than zDHHC17, whereas zDHHC13 lacked S-acylation activity toward these proteins. Overall the results of this study support a model in which dynamic intracellular localization of peripheral membrane proteins is achieved by highly selective recruitment by a subset of zDHHC enzymes at the Golgi, combined with highly efficient S-acylation by other Golgi zDHHC enzymes. PMID:25253725

  14. Acylation of Ferrocene: A Greener Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birdwhistell, Kurt R.; Nguyen, Andy; Ramos, Eric J.; Kobelja, Robert

    2008-01-01

    The acylation of ferrocene is a common reaction used in organic laboratories to demonstrate Friedel-Crafts acylation and the purification of compounds using column chromatography. This article describes an acylation of ferrocene experiment that is more eco-friendly than the conventional acylation experiment. The traditional experiment was modified…

  15. Acylation of Streptomyces type II polyketide synthase acyl carrier proteins.

    PubMed

    Crosby, J; Byrom, K J; Hitchman, T S; Cox, R J; Crump, M P; Findlow, I S; Bibb, M J; Simpson, T J

    1998-08-14

    Acyl derivatives of type II PKS ACPs are required for in vitro studies of polyketide biosynthesis. The presence of an exposed cysteine residue prevented specific chemical acylation of the phosphopantetheine thiol of the actinorhodin PKS holo ACP. Acylation studies were further complicated by intramolecular disulphide formation between cysteine 17 and the phosphopantetheine. The presence of this intramolecular disulphide was confirmed by tryptic digestion of the ACP followed by ESMS analysis of the fragments. An act Cys17Ser ACP was engineered by site-directed mutagenesis. S-Acyl adducts of act C17S, oxytetracycline and griseusin holo ACPs were rapidly formed by reaction with hexanoyl, 5-ketohexanoyl and protected acetoacetyl imidazolides. Comparisons with type 11 FAS ACPs were made.

  16. Evolution of Acyl-Substrate Recognition by a Family of Acyl-Homoserine Lactone Synthases

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Quin H.; Brecht, Ryan M.; Dudekula, Dastagiri; Greenberg, E. Peter; Nagarajan, Rajesh

    2014-01-01

    Members of the LuxI protein family catalyze synthesis of acyl-homoserine lactone (acyl-HSL) quorum sensing signals from S-adenosyl-L-methionine and an acyl thioester. Some LuxI family members prefer acyl-CoA, and others prefer acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) as the acyl-thioester substrate. We sought to understand the evolutionary history and mechanisms mediating this substrate preference. Our phylogenetic and motif analysis of the LuxI acyl-HSL synthase family indicates that the acyl-CoA-utilizing enzymes evolved from an acyl-ACP-utilizing ancestor. To further understand how acyl-ACPs and acyl-CoAs are recognized by acyl-HSL synthases we studied BmaI1, an octanoyl-ACP-dependent LuxI family member from Burkholderia mallei, and BjaI, an isovaleryl-CoA-dependent LuxI family member from Bradyrhizobium japonicum. We synthesized thioether analogs of their thioester acyl-substrates to probe recognition of the acyl-phosphopantetheine moiety common to both acyl-ACP and acyl-CoA substrates. The kinetics of catalysis and inhibition of these enzymes indicate that they recognize the acyl-phosphopantetheine moiety and they recognize non-preferred substrates with this moiety. We find that CoA substrate utilization arose through exaptation of acyl-phosphopantetheine recognition in this enzyme family. PMID:25401334

  17. NASA Pocket Statistics: 1997 Edition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    POCKET STATISTICS is published by the NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION (NASA). Included in each edition is Administrative and Organizational information, summaries of Space Flight Activity including the NASA Major Launch Record, Aeronautics and Space Transportation and NASA Procurement, Financial and Workforce data. The NASA Major Launch Record includes all launches of Scout class and larger vehicles. Vehicle and spacecraft development flights are also included in the Major Launch Record. Shuttle missions are counted as one launch and one payload, where free flying payloads are not involved. All Satellites deployed from the cargo bay of the Shuttle and placed in a separate orbit or trajectory are counted as an additional payload.

  18. Exploration of electrostatic interaction in the hydrophobic pocket of lysozyme: Importance of ligand-induced perturbation of the secondary structure on the mode of binding of exogenous ligand and possible consequences.

    PubMed

    Panja, Sudipta; Halder, Mintu

    2016-08-01

    Exogenous ligand binding can be adequate to alter the secondary structure of biomolecules besides other external stimuli. In such cases, structural alterations can complicate on the nature of interaction with the exogenous molecules. In order to accommodate the exogenous ligand, the biomolecule has to unfold resulting in a considerable change to its properties. If the bound ligand can be unbound, the biomolecule gets the opportunity to refold back and return to its native state. Keeping this in mind, we have purposely investigated the interaction of tartrazine (TZ), a well abundant azo food colorant, with two homologous lysozymes, namely, human lysozyme (HLZ) and chicken egg white lysozyme (CEWLZ) in physiological pH condition. The binding of TZ with lysozymes has been identified to accompany a ligand-induced secondary structure alteration as indicated by the circular dichroism spectra, and the reduction of α-helical content is more with HLZ than CEWLZ. Interestingly, the binding is identified to occur in the electronic ground state of TZ with lysozyme in its hydrophobic cavity, containing excess of positive charge, predominantly via electrostatic interaction. With increase of salinity of the medium the protein tends to refold back due to wakening of electrostatic forces and consequent reduction of strength of ligand interaction and unbinding. The entropy enthalpy compensation (EEC) has been probed to understand the binding features and it is found that CEWLZ-TZ shows better compensation than HLZ-TZ complex. This is presumably due to the fact that with CEWLZ the binding does not accompany substantial change in the protein secondary structure and hence ineffective to scramble the EEC. The present study initiates the importance of ligand-perturbed structural alteration of biomolecule in controlling the thermodynamics of binding. If there is a considerable alteration of the protein secondary structure due to binding, it is indicative that such changes should bring in

  19. Exploration of electrostatic interaction in the hydrophobic pocket of lysozyme: Importance of ligand-induced perturbation of the secondary structure on the mode of binding of exogenous ligand and possible consequences.

    PubMed

    Panja, Sudipta; Halder, Mintu

    2016-08-01

    Exogenous ligand binding can be adequate to alter the secondary structure of biomolecules besides other external stimuli. In such cases, structural alterations can complicate on the nature of interaction with the exogenous molecules. In order to accommodate the exogenous ligand, the biomolecule has to unfold resulting in a considerable change to its properties. If the bound ligand can be unbound, the biomolecule gets the opportunity to refold back and return to its native state. Keeping this in mind, we have purposely investigated the interaction of tartrazine (TZ), a well abundant azo food colorant, with two homologous lysozymes, namely, human lysozyme (HLZ) and chicken egg white lysozyme (CEWLZ) in physiological pH condition. The binding of TZ with lysozymes has been identified to accompany a ligand-induced secondary structure alteration as indicated by the circular dichroism spectra, and the reduction of α-helical content is more with HLZ than CEWLZ. Interestingly, the binding is identified to occur in the electronic ground state of TZ with lysozyme in its hydrophobic cavity, containing excess of positive charge, predominantly via electrostatic interaction. With increase of salinity of the medium the protein tends to refold back due to wakening of electrostatic forces and consequent reduction of strength of ligand interaction and unbinding. The entropy enthalpy compensation (EEC) has been probed to understand the binding features and it is found that CEWLZ-TZ shows better compensation than HLZ-TZ complex. This is presumably due to the fact that with CEWLZ the binding does not accompany substantial change in the protein secondary structure and hence ineffective to scramble the EEC. The present study initiates the importance of ligand-perturbed structural alteration of biomolecule in controlling the thermodynamics of binding. If there is a considerable alteration of the protein secondary structure due to binding, it is indicative that such changes should bring in

  20. Nucleotide pocket thermodynamics measured by EPR reveal how energy partitioning relates myosin speed to efficiency.

    PubMed

    Purcell, Thomas J; Naber, Nariman; Franks-Skiba, Kathy; Dunn, Alexander R; Eldred, Catherine C; Berger, Christopher L; Málnási-Csizmadia, András; Spudich, James A; Swank, Douglas M; Pate, Edward; Cooke, Roger

    2011-03-18

    We have used spin-labeled ADP to investigate the dynamics of the nucleotide-binding pocket in a series of myosins, which have a range of velocities. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy reveals that the pocket is in equilibrium between open and closed conformations. In the absence of actin, the closed conformation is favored. When myosin binds actin, the open conformation becomes more favored, facilitating nucleotide release. We found that faster myosins favor a more closed pocket in the actomyosin•ADP state, with smaller values of ΔH(0) and ΔS(0), even though these myosins release ADP at a faster rate. A model involving a partitioning of free energy between work-generating steps prior to rate-limiting ADP release explains both the unexpected correlation between velocity and opening of the pocket and the observation that fast myosins are less efficient than slow myosins.

  1. SplitPocket: identification of protein functional surfaces and characterization of their spatial patterns.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Yan Yuan; Dupree, Craig; Chen, Z Jeffrey; Li, Wen-Hsiung

    2009-07-01

    SplitPocket (http://pocket.uchicago.edu/) is a web server to identify functional surfaces of protein from structure coordinates. Using the Alpha Shape Theory, we previously developed an analytical approach to identify protein functional surfaces by the geometric concept of a split pocket, which is a pocket split by a binding ligand. Our geometric approach extracts site-specific spatial information from coordinates of structures. To reduce the search space, probe radii are designed according to the physicochemical textures of molecules. The method uses the weighted Delaunay triangulation and the discrete flow algorithm to obtain geometric measurements and spatial patterns for each predicted pocket. It can also measure the hydrophobicity on a surface patch. Furthermore, we quantify the evolutionary conservation of surface patches by an index derived from the entropy scores in HSSP (homology-derived secondary structure of proteins). We have used the method to examine approximately 1.16 million potential pockets and identified the split pockets in >26,000 structures in the Protein Data Bank. This integrated web server of functional surfaces provides a source of spatial patterns to serve as templates for predicting the functional surfaces of unbound structures involved in binding activities. These spatial patterns should also be useful for protein functional inference, structural evolution and drug design.

  2. Pocket Hematoma: A Call for Definition.

    PubMed

    DE Sensi, Francesco; Miracapillo, Gennaro; Cresti, Alberto; Severi, Silva; Airaksinen, Kari Eino Juhani

    2015-08-01

    Pocket hematoma is a common complication of cardiac implantable electronic device procedures and a potential risk factor for device infections, especially in patients on oral anticoagulation or antiplatelet treatment. There is a wide variability in the incidence of pocket hematoma and bleeding complications in the literature and the major cause for this seems to be the variability of the used definitions for hematomas. The lack of generally accepted definition for pocket hematoma renders the comparisons across the studies difficult. In this article, we briefly review the current literature on this issue and propose a uniform definition for pocket hematoma and criteria for grading the severity of hematoma in clinical practice and research.

  3. Characterization of a Bifunctional Archaeal Acyl Coenzyme A Carboxylase

    PubMed Central

    Chuakrut, Songkran; Arai, Hiroyuki; Ishii, Masaharu; Igarashi, Yasuo

    2003-01-01

    Acyl coenzyme A carboxylase (acyl-CoA carboxylase) was purified from Acidianus brierleyi. The purified enzyme showed a unique subunit structure (three subunits with apparent molecular masses of 62, 59, and 20 kDa) and a molecular mass of approximately 540 kDa, indicating an α4β4γ4 subunit structure. The optimum temperature for the enzyme was 60 to 70°C, and the optimum pH was around 6.4 to 6.9. Interestingly, the purified enzyme also had propionyl-CoA carboxylase activity. The apparent Km for acetyl-CoA was 0.17 ± 0.03 mM, with a Vmax of 43.3 ± 2.8 U mg−1, and the Km for propionyl-CoA was 0.10 ± 0.008 mM, with a Vmax of 40.8 ± 1.0 U mg−1. This result showed that A. brierleyi acyl-CoA carboxylase is a bifunctional enzyme in the modified 3-hydroxypropionate cycle. Both enzymatic activities were inhibited by malonyl-CoA, methymalonyl-CoA, succinyl-CoA, or CoA but not by palmitoyl-CoA. The gene encoding acyl-CoA carboxylase was cloned and characterized. Homology searches of the deduced amino acid sequences of the 62-, 59-, and 20-kDa subunits indicated the presence of functional domains for carboxyltransferase, biotin carboxylase, and biotin carboxyl carrier protein, respectively. Amino acid sequence alignment of acetyl-CoA carboxylases revealed that archaeal acyl-CoA carboxylases are closer to those of Bacteria than to those of Eucarya. The substrate-binding motifs of the enzymes are highly conserved among the three domains. The ATP-binding residues were found in the biotin carboxylase subunit, whereas the conserved biotin-binding site was located on the biotin carboxyl carrier protein. The acyl-CoA-binding site and the carboxybiotin-binding site were found in the carboxyltransferase subunit. PMID:12533469

  4. Studies of Toxoplasma gondii and Plasmodium falciparum enoyl acyl carrier protein reductase and implications for the development of antiparasitic agents

    SciTech Connect

    Muench, Stephen P.; Prigge, Sean T.; McLeod, Rima; Rafferty, John B.; Kirisits, Michael J.; Roberts, Craig W.; Mui, Ernest J.; Rice, David W.

    2007-03-01

    The crystal structures of T. gondii and P. falciparum ENR in complex with NAD{sup +} and triclosan and of T. gondii ENR in an apo form have been solved to 2.6, 2.2 and 2.8 Å, respectively. Recent studies have demonstrated that submicromolar concentrations of the biocide triclosan arrest the growth of the apicomplexan parasites Plasmodium falciparum and Toxoplasma gondii and inhibit the activity of the apicomplexan enoyl acyl carrier protein reductase (ENR). The crystal structures of T. gondii and P. falciparum ENR in complex with NAD{sup +} and triclosan and of T. gondii ENR in an apo form have been solved to 2.6, 2.2 and 2.8 Å, respectively. The structures of T. gondii ENR have revealed that, as in its bacterial and plant homologues, a loop region which flanks the active site becomes ordered upon inhibitor binding, resulting in the slow tight binding of triclosan. In addition, the T. gondii ENR–triclosan complex reveals the folding of a hydrophilic insert common to the apicomplexan family that flanks the substrate-binding domain and is disordered in all other reported apicomplexan ENR structures. Structural comparison of the apicomplexan ENR structures with their bacterial and plant counterparts has revealed that although the active sites of the parasite enzymes are broadly similar to those of their bacterial counterparts, there are a number of important differences within the drug-binding pocket that reduce the packing interactions formed with several inhibitors in the apicomplexan ENR enzymes. Together with other significant structural differences, this provides a possible explanation of the lower affinity of the parasite ENR enzyme family for aminopyridine-based inhibitors, suggesting that an effective antiparasitic agent may well be distinct from equivalent antimicrobials.

  5. Ternary self-assemblies in water: forming a pentanuclear ReLn4 assembly by association of binuclear lanthanide binding pockets with fac-Re(CO)3(dinicotinate)2Cl.

    PubMed

    Hill, Leila R; Blackburn, Octavia A; Jones, Michael W; Tropiano, Manuel; Sørensen, Thomas Just; Faulkner, Stephen

    2013-12-14

    The self-assembly of higher order structures in water is realised by using the association of 1,3-biscarboxylates to binuclear meta-xylyl bridged DO3A complexes. Two dinicotinate binding sites are placed at a right-angle in a rhenium complex, which is shown to form a 1 : 2 complex with α,α'-bis(Eu·DO3A)-5-amino-m-xylene.

  6. Effects of ghrelin and des-acyl ghrelin on neurogenesis of the rat fetal spinal cord

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Miho; Nakahara, Keiko; Goto, Shintaro; Kaiya, Hiroyuki; Miyazato, Mikiya . E-mail: a0d201u@cc.miyazaki-u.ac.jp; Date, Yukari; Nakazato, Masamitsu; Kangawa, Kenji; Murakami, Noboru

    2006-11-24

    Expressions of the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R) mRNA and its protein were confirmed in rat fetal spinal cord tissues by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. In vitro, over 3 nM ghrelin and des-acyl ghrelin induced significant proliferation of primary cultured cells from the fetal spinal cord. The proliferating cells were then double-stained using antibodies against the neuronal precursor marker, nestin, and the cell proliferation marker, 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU), and the nestin-positive cells were also found to be co-stained with antibody against GHS-R. Furthermore, binding studies using [{sup 125}I]des-acyl ghrelin indicated the presence of a specific binding site for des-acyl ghrelin, and confirmed that the binding was displaced with unlabeled des-acyl ghrelin or ghrelin. These results indicate that ghrelin and des-acyl ghrelin induce proliferation of neuronal precursor cells that is both dependent and independent of GHS-R, suggesting that both ghrelin and des-acyl ghrelin are involved in neurogenesis of the fetal spinal cord.

  7. Acylation of salmon calcitonin modulates in vitro intestinal peptide flux through membrane permeability enhancement.

    PubMed

    Trier, Sofie; Linderoth, Lars; Bjerregaard, Simon; Strauss, Holger M; Rahbek, Ulrik L; Andresen, Thomas L

    2015-10-01

    Acylation of peptide drugs with fatty acid chains has proven beneficial for prolonging systemic circulation, as well as increasing enzymatic stability and interactions with lipid cell membranes. Thus, acylation offers several potential benefits for oral delivery of therapeutic peptides, and we hypothesize that tailoring the acylation may be used to optimize intestinal translocation. This work aims to characterize acylated analogues of the therapeutic peptide salmon calcitonin (sCT), which lowers blood calcium, by systematically increasing acyl chain length at two positions, in order to elucidate its influence on intestinal cell translocation and membrane interaction. We find that acylation drastically increases in vitro intestinal peptide flux and confers a transient permeability enhancing effect on the cell layer. The analogues permeabilize model lipid membranes, indicating that the effect is due to a solubilization of the cell membrane, similar to transcellular oral permeation enhancers. The effect is dependent on pH, with larger effect at lower pH, and is impacted by acylation chain length and position. Compared to the unacylated peptide backbone, N-terminal acylation with a short chain provides 6- or 9-fold increase in peptide translocation at pH 7.4 and 5.5, respectively. Prolonging the chain length appears to hamper translocation, possibly due to self-association or aggregation, although the long chain acylated analogues remain superior to the unacylated peptide. For K(18)-acylation a short chain provides a moderate improvement, whereas medium and long chain analogues are highly efficient, with a 12-fold increase in permeability compared to the unacylated peptide backbone, on par with currently employed oral permeation enhancers. For K(18)-acylation the medium chain acylation appears to be optimal, as elongating the chain causes greater binding to the cell membrane but similar permeability, and we speculate that increasing the chain length further may

  8. Random mutagenesis of the nucleotide-binding domain of NRC1 (NB-LRR Required for Hypersensitive Response-Associated Cell Death-1), a downstream signalling nucleotide-binding, leucine-rich repeat (NB-LRR) protein, identifies gain-of-function mutations in the nucleotide-binding pocket.

    PubMed

    Sueldo, Daniela J; Shimels, Mahdere; Spiridon, Laurentiu N; Caldararu, Octav; Petrescu, Andrei-Jose; Joosten, Matthieu H A J; Tameling, Wladimir I L

    2015-10-01

    Plant nucleotide-binding, leucine-rich repeat (NB-LRR) proteins confer immunity to pathogens possessing the corresponding avirulence proteins. Activation of NB-LRR proteins is often associated with induction of the hypersensitive response (HR), a form of programmed cell death. NRC1 (NB-LRR Required for HR-Associated Cell Death-1) is a tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) NB-LRR protein that participates in the signalling cascade leading to resistance to the pathogens Cladosporium fulvum and Verticillium dahliae. To identify mutations in NRC1 that cause increased signalling activity, we generated a random library of NRC1 variants mutated in their nucleotide-binding domain and screened them for the ability to induce an elicitor-independent HR in Nicotiana tabacum. Screening of 1920 clones retrieved 11 gain-of-function mutants, with 10 of them caused by a single amino acid substitution. All substitutions are located in or very close to highly conserved motifs within the nucleotide-binding domain, suggesting modulation of the signalling activity of NRC1. Three-dimensional modelling of the nucleotide-binding domain of NRC1 revealed that the targeted residues are centred around the bound nucleotide. Our mutational approach has generated a wide set of novel gain-of-function mutations in NRC1 and provides insight into how the activity of this NB-LRR is regulated.

  9. Structure-based analysis of the molecular interactions between acyltransferase and acyl carrier protein in vicenistatin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Miyanaga, Akimasa; Iwasawa, Shohei; Shinohara, Yuji; Kudo, Fumitaka; Eguchi, Tadashi

    2016-02-16

    Acyltransferases (ATs) are key determinants of building block specificity in polyketide biosynthesis. Despite the importance of protein-protein interactions between AT and acyl carrier protein (ACP) during the acyltransfer reaction, the mechanism of ACP recognition by AT is not understood in detail. Herein, we report the crystal structure of AT VinK, which transfers a dipeptide group between two ACPs, VinL and VinP1LdACP, in vicenistatin biosynthesis. The isolated VinK structure showed a unique substrate-binding pocket for the dipeptide group linked to ACP. To gain greater insight into the mechanism of ACP recognition, we attempted to crystallize the VinK-ACP complexes. Because transient enzyme-ACP complexes are difficult to crystallize, we developed a covalent cross-linking strategy using a bifunctional maleimide reagent to trap the VinK-ACP complexes, allowing the determination of the crystal structure of the VinK-VinL complex. In the complex structure, Arg-153, Met-206, and Arg-299 of VinK interact with the negatively charged helix II region of VinL. The VinK-VinL complex structure allows, to our knowledge, the first visualization of the interaction between AT and ACP and provides detailed mechanistic insights into ACP recognition by AT. PMID:26831085

  10. Structure-based analysis of the molecular interactions between acyltransferase and acyl carrier protein in vicenistatin biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Miyanaga, Akimasa; Iwasawa, Shohei; Shinohara, Yuji; Kudo, Fumitaka; Eguchi, Tadashi

    2016-01-01

    Acyltransferases (ATs) are key determinants of building block specificity in polyketide biosynthesis. Despite the importance of protein–protein interactions between AT and acyl carrier protein (ACP) during the acyltransfer reaction, the mechanism of ACP recognition by AT is not understood in detail. Herein, we report the crystal structure of AT VinK, which transfers a dipeptide group between two ACPs, VinL and VinP1LdACP, in vicenistatin biosynthesis. The isolated VinK structure showed a unique substrate-binding pocket for the dipeptide group linked to ACP. To gain greater insight into the mechanism of ACP recognition, we attempted to crystallize the VinK–ACP complexes. Because transient enzyme–ACP complexes are difficult to crystallize, we developed a covalent cross-linking strategy using a bifunctional maleimide reagent to trap the VinK–ACP complexes, allowing the determination of the crystal structure of the VinK–VinL complex. In the complex structure, Arg-153, Met-206, and Arg-299 of VinK interact with the negatively charged helix II region of VinL. The VinK–VinL complex structure allows, to our knowledge, the first visualization of the interaction between AT and ACP and provides detailed mechanistic insights into ACP recognition by AT. PMID:26831085

  11. A Conserved Pocket in the Dengue Virus Polymerase Identified through Fragment-based Screening.

    PubMed

    Noble, Christian G; Lim, Siew Pheng; Arora, Rishi; Yokokawa, Fumiaki; Nilar, Shahul; Seh, Cheah Chen; Wright, S Kirk; Benson, Timothy E; Smith, Paul W; Shi, Pei-Yong

    2016-04-15

    We performed a fragment screen on the dengue virus serotype 3 RNA-dependent RNA polymerase using x-ray crystallography. A screen of 1,400 fragments in pools of eight identified a single hit that bound in a novel pocket in the protein. This pocket is located in the polymerase palm subdomain and conserved across the four serotypes of dengue virus. The compound binds to the polymerase in solution as evidenced by surface plasmon resonance and isothermal titration calorimetry analyses. Related compounds where a phenyl is replaced by a thiophene show higher affinity binding, indicating the potential for rational design. Importantly, inhibition of enzyme activity correlated with the binding affinity, showing that the pocket is functionally important for polymerase activity. This fragment is an excellent starting point for optimization through rational structure-based design.

  12. Structures of Pseudomonas aeruginosa β-ketoacyl-(acyl-carrier-protein) synthase II (FabF) and a C164Q mutant provide templates for antibacterial drug discovery and identify a buried potassium ion and a ligand-binding site that is an artefact of the crystal form.

    PubMed

    Baum, Bernhard; Lecker, Laura S M; Zoltner, Martin; Jaenicke, Elmar; Schnell, Robert; Hunter, William N; Brenk, Ruth

    2015-08-01

    Bacterial infections remain a serious health concern, in particular causing life-threatening infections of hospitalized and immunocompromised patients. The situation is exacerbated by the rise in antibacterial drug resistance, and new treatments are urgently sought. In this endeavour, accurate structures of molecular targets can support early-stage drug discovery. Here, crystal structures, in three distinct forms, of recombinant Pseudomonas aeruginosa β-ketoacyl-(acyl-carrier-protein) synthase II (FabF) are presented. This enzyme, which is involved in fatty-acid biosynthesis, has been validated by genetic and chemical means as an antibiotic target in Gram-positive bacteria and represents a potential target in Gram-negative bacteria. The structures of apo FabF, of a C164Q mutant in which the binding site is altered to resemble the substrate-bound state and of a complex with 3-(benzoylamino)-2-hydroxybenzoic acid are reported. This compound mimics aspects of a known natural product inhibitor, platensimycin, and surprisingly was observed binding outside the active site, interacting with a symmetry-related molecule. An unusual feature is a completely buried potassium-binding site that was identified in all three structures. Comparisons suggest that this may represent a conserved structural feature of FabF relevant to fold stability. The new structures provide templates for structure-based ligand design and, together with the protocols and reagents, may underpin a target-based drug-discovery project for urgently needed antibacterials.

  13. Water's Role in Reshaping a Macrocycle's Binding Pocket: Conformation-Specific Infrared and Ultraviolet Spectroscopy of BENZO-15-CROWN-5-(H_{2}O)_{n}-CLUSTERS (n = 1, 2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shubert, V. Alvin; Müller, Christian W.; James, William H. James, III; Zwier, Timothy S.

    2009-06-01

    Crown ethers are well-studied examples of flexible macrocycles with a high binding selectivity for substrates, especially cations. We investigated the conformational preferences of the singly and doubly complexed water clusters of the crown ethers benzo-15-crown-5 (B15C) and its amino-derivative 4'-aminobenzo-15-crown-5 (ABC) cooled in a supersonic jet expansion. The fluorescence excitation, resonance enhanced two-photon ionization (R2PI), UV-UV holeburning (UVHB), fluorescence-dip infrared (FDIR), resonant ion-dip infrared (RIDIR) and novel IR-IR-UV holeburning^{1} spectra allowed for the identification of two B15C-(H_{2}O)_{1} conformers and one ABC-(H_{2}O)_{1} conformer. These conformers are characterized by an all-planar arrangement of the atoms directly bound to the benzene ring in which the crown ether macrocycle opens up to a symmetric structure and accomodates a doubly and triply H-bonded H_{2}O molecule in two distinct ways, respectively. Two B15C-(H_{2}O)_{2} conformers and one ABC-(H_{2}O)_{2} conformer were identified. One of the B15C-(H_{2}O)_{2} conformers contains a macrocycle configuration identical to that found in the monohydrated clusters with an H-bonding topology in which the H_{2}O molecules occupy both available sites simultaneously. The second B15C-(H_{2}O)_{2} conformer is assigned to an H-bond pattern in which the two H_{2}O molecules are concatenated to form an H-bonded bridge involving only three of the four available O-H-bonds (see figure). (1) V. A. Shubert and T. S. Zwier, J. Phys. Chem. A, 2007, 111, 13283.

  14. Stearoyl-Acyl Carrier Protein and Unusual Acyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Desaturase Activities Are Differentially Influenced by Ferredoxin1

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, David J.; Suh, Mi Chung; Ohlrogge, John B.

    2000-01-01

    Acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) desaturases function to position a single double bond into an acyl-ACP substrate and are best represented by the ubiquitous Δ9 18:0-ACP desaturase. Several variant acyl-ACP desaturases have also been identified from species that produce unusual monoenoic fatty acids. All known acyl-ACP desaturase enzymes use ferredoxin as the electron-donating cofactor, and in almost all previous studies the photosynthetic form of ferredoxin rather than the non-photosynthetic form has been used to assess activity. We have examined the influence of different forms of ferredoxin on acyl-ACP desaturases. Using combinations of in vitro acyl-ACP desaturase assays and [14C]malonyl-coenzyme A labeling studies, we have determined that heterotrophic ferredoxin isoforms support up to 20-fold higher unusual acyl-ACP desaturase activity in coriander (Coriandrum sativum), Thunbergia alata, and garden geranium (Pelargonium × hortorum) when compared with photosynthetic ferredoxin isoforms. Heterotrophic ferredoxin also increases activity of the ubiquitous Δ9 18:0-ACP desaturase 1.5- to 3.0-fold in both seed and leaf extracts. These results suggest that ferredoxin isoforms may specifically interact with acyl-ACP desaturases to achieve optimal enzyme activity and that heterotrophic isoforms of ferredoxin may be the in vivo electron donor for this reaction. PMID:11027717

  15. Recombinant C3adesArg/acylation stimulating protein (ASP) is highly bioactive: a critical evaluation of C5L2 binding and 3T3-L1 adipocyte activation.

    PubMed

    Cui, Wei; Lapointe, Marc; Gauvreau, Danny; Kalant, David; Cianflone, Katherine

    2009-10-01

    C5L2 is a recently identified receptor for C5a/C5adesArg, C3a and C3adesArg (ASP). C5a/C5adesArg bind with high affinity, with no identified activation. By contrast, some studies demonstrate C3a/ASP binding/activation to C5L2; others do not. Our aim is to critically evaluate ASP/C3adesArg-C5L2 binding and bioactivity. Cell-associated fluorescent-ASP (Fl-ASP) binding to C5L2 increased from transiently transfectedbinding (NSB, no cells), while albumin increased NSB. Binding to non-transfected HEK was comparable to NSB. Optimal specific binding was obtained at 20 degrees C (vs. 4 degrees C) in PBS or serum-free medium with K(d) 83.7+/-23.7 nM (C5L2-HEK), 66+/-15 nM (C5L2-CHO) and 76+/-14.3 nM (3T3-L1 preadipocytes); (125)I-C5a binding had greater affinity. Fl-ASP-C5L2 binding was comparable and concentration dependent (K(d) 31 nM (direct binding) and IC(50) 35 nM (competition binding) regardless of conditions). Recombinant ASP (rASP) produced in modified Escherichia coli Origami (DE3) (allowing folding and disulphide bridge formation), purified under non-denaturing conditions demonstrated 10x greater bioactivity vs. proteolytically derived plasma ASP for triglyceride synthesis and fatty acid uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocytes and preadipocytes while adipose tissue from C5L2 KO mice was non-responsive. rASP stimulation of adipocyte BODIPY-fatty acid uptake demonstrated EC(50) 115+/-93 nM and maximal stimulation of 413+/-33%, p<0.001. ASP binding has distinct characteristics that lead to C5L2 activation and increased

  16. The Physiology of Protein S-acylation

    PubMed Central

    Chamberlain, Luke H.; Shipston, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Protein S-acylation, the only fully reversible posttranslational lipid modification of proteins, is emerging as a ubiquitous mechanism to control the properties and function of a diverse array of proteins and consequently physiological processes. S-acylation results from the enzymatic addition of long-chain lipids, most typically palmitate, onto intracellular cysteine residues of soluble and transmembrane proteins via a labile thioester linkage. Addition of lipid results in increases in protein hydrophobicity that can impact on protein structure, assembly, maturation, trafficking, and function. The recent explosion in global S-acylation (palmitoyl) proteomic profiling as a result of improved biochemical tools to assay S-acylation, in conjunction with the recent identification of enzymes that control protein S-acylation and de-acylation, has opened a new vista into the physiological function of S-acylation. This review introduces key features of S-acylation and tools to interrogate this process, and highlights the eclectic array of proteins regulated including membrane receptors, ion channels and transporters, enzymes and kinases, signaling adapters and chaperones, cell adhesion, and structural proteins. We highlight recent findings correlating disruption of S-acylation to pathophysiology and disease and discuss some of the major challenges and opportunities in this rapidly expanding field. PMID:25834228

  17. Remote control of regioselectivity in acyl-acyl carrier protein-desaturases

    PubMed Central

    Guy, Jodie E.; Whittle, Edward; Moche, Martin; Lengqvist, Johan; Lindqvist, Ylva; Shanklin, John

    2011-01-01

    Regiospecific desaturation of long-chain saturated fatty acids has been described as approaching the limits of the discriminatory power of enzymes because the substrate entirely lacks distinguishing features close to the site of dehydrogenation. To identify the elusive mechanism underlying regioselectivity, we have determined two crystal structures of the archetypal Δ9 desaturase from castor in complex with acyl carrier protein (ACP), which show the bound ACP ideally situated to position C9 and C10 of the acyl chain adjacent to the diiron active site for Δ9 desaturation. Analysis of the structures and modeling of the complex between the highly homologous ivy Δ4 desaturase and ACP, identified a residue located at the entrance to the binding cavity, Asp280 in the castor desaturase (Lys275 in the ivy desaturase), which is strictly conserved within Δ9 and Δ4 enzymes but differs between them. We hypothesized that interaction between Lys275 and the phosphate of the pantetheine, seen in the ivy model, is key to positioning C4 and C5 adjacent to the diiron center for Δ4 desaturation. Mutating castor Asp280 to Lys resulted in a major shift from Δ9 to Δ4 desaturation. Thus, interaction between desaturase side-chain 280 and phospho-serine 38 of ACP, approximately 27 Å from the site of double-bond formation, predisposes ACP binding that favors either Δ9 or Δ4 desaturation via repulsion (acidic side chain) or attraction (positively charged side chain), respectively. Understanding the mechanism underlying remote control of regioselectivity provides the foundation for reengineering desaturase enzymes to create designer chemical feedstocks that would provide alternatives to those currently obtained from petrochemicals. PMID:21930947

  18. Remote control of regioselectivity in acyl-acyl carrier protein-desaturases.

    PubMed

    Guy, Jodie E; Whittle, Edward; Moche, Martin; Lengqvist, Johan; Lindqvist, Ylva; Shanklin, John

    2011-10-01

    Regiospecific desaturation of long-chain saturated fatty acids has been described as approaching the limits of the discriminatory power of enzymes because the substrate entirely lacks distinguishing features close to the site of dehydrogenation. To identify the elusive mechanism underlying regioselectivity, we have determined two crystal structures of the archetypal Δ9 desaturase from castor in complex with acyl carrier protein (ACP), which show the bound ACP ideally situated to position C9 and C10 of the acyl chain adjacent to the diiron active site for Δ9 desaturation. Analysis of the structures and modeling of the complex between the highly homologous ivy Δ4 desaturase and ACP, identified a residue located at the entrance to the binding cavity, Asp280 in the castor desaturase (Lys275 in the ivy desaturase), which is strictly conserved within Δ9 and Δ4 enzymes but differs between them. We hypothesized that interaction between Lys275 and the phosphate of the pantetheine, seen in the ivy model, is key to positioning C4 and C5 adjacent to the diiron center for Δ4 desaturation. Mutating castor Asp280 to Lys resulted in a major shift from Δ9 to Δ4 desaturation. Thus, interaction between desaturase side-chain 280 and phospho-serine 38 of ACP, approximately 27 Å from the site of double-bond formation, predisposes ACP binding that favors either Δ9 or Δ4 desaturation via repulsion (acidic side chain) or attraction (positively charged side chain), respectively. Understanding the mechanism underlying remote control of regioselectivity provides the foundation for reengineering desaturase enzymes to create designer chemical feedstocks that would provide alternatives to those currently obtained from petrochemicals. PMID:21930947

  19. Topology and acylation of spiralin.

    PubMed Central

    Wróblewski, H; Nyström, S; Blanchard, A; Wieslander, A

    1989-01-01

    Of the 51 polypeptides detected by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the plasma membrane of the helical mollicute Spiroplasma melliferum, 21 are acylated, predominantly with myristic (14:0) and palmitic (16:0) chains. This is notably the case for spiralin, the major membrane protein of this bacterium, which contains an average of 0.7 acyl chains per polypeptide, attached very probably by ester bonds to alcohol amino acids. The amphiphilicity of spiralin was demonstrated by the behavior of the protein in charge-shift electrophoresis, its incorporation into liposomes, and its ability to form in the absence of lipids and detergents, globular protein micelles (diameter, approximately 15 nm). The presence of epitopes on the two faces of the cell membrane, as probed by antibody adsorption and crossed immunoelectrophoresis, and the strong interaction between spiralin and the intracytoplasmic fibrils show that spiralin is a transmembrane protein. The mean hydropathy of the amino acid composition of spiralin (-0.30) is on the hydrophilic side of the scale. Surprisingly, the water-insoluble core of spiralin micelles, which is the putative membrane anchor, has a still more hydrophilic amino acid composition (mean hydropathy, -0.70) and is enriched in glycine and serine residues. Taking into account all these properties, we propose a topological model for spiralin featuring a transbilayer localization with hydrophilic domains protruding on the two faces of the membrane and connected by a small domain embedded within the apolar region of the lipid bilayer. In this model, the membrane anchoring of the protein is strengthened by a covalently bound acyl chain. Images PMID:2768198

  20. Versatility of acyl-acyl carrier protein synthetases.

    PubMed

    Beld, Joris; Finzel, Kara; Burkart, Michael D

    2014-10-23

    The acyl carrier protein (ACP) requires posttranslational modification with a 4'-phosphopantetheine arm for activity, and this thiol-terminated modification carries cargo between enzymes in ACP-dependent metabolic pathways. We show that acyl-ACP synthetases (AasSs) from different organisms are able to load even, odd, and unnatural fatty acids onto E. coli ACP in vitro. Vibrio harveyi AasS not only shows promiscuity for the acid substrate, but also is active upon various alternate carrier proteins. AasS activity also extends to functional activation in living organisms. We show that exogenously supplied carboxylic acids are loaded onto ACP and extended by the E. coli fatty acid synthase, including unnatural fatty acid analogs. These analogs are further integrated into cellular lipids. In vitro characterization of four different adenylate-forming enzymes allowed us to disambiguate CoA-ligases and AasSs, and further in vivo studies show the potential for functional application in other organisms. PMID:25308274

  1. Structures of Pseudomonas aeruginosa β-ketoacyl-(acyl-carrier-protein) synthase II (FabF) and a C164Q mutant provide templates for antibacterial drug discovery and identify a buried potassium ion and a ligand-binding site that is an artefact of the crystal form

    SciTech Connect

    Baum, Bernhard; Lecker, Laura S. M.; Zoltner, Martin; Jaenicke, Elmar; Schnell, Robert; Hunter, William N.; Brenk, Ruth

    2015-07-28

    Three crystal structures of recombinant P. aeruginosa FabF are reported: the apoenzyme, an active-site mutant and a complex with a fragment of a natural product inhibitor. The characterization provides reagents and new information to support antibacterial drug discovery. Bacterial infections remain a serious health concern, in particular causing life-threatening infections of hospitalized and immunocompromised patients. The situation is exacerbated by the rise in antibacterial drug resistance, and new treatments are urgently sought. In this endeavour, accurate structures of molecular targets can support early-stage drug discovery. Here, crystal structures, in three distinct forms, of recombinant Pseudomonas aeruginosa β-ketoacyl-(acyl-carrier-protein) synthase II (FabF) are presented. This enzyme, which is involved in fatty-acid biosynthesis, has been validated by genetic and chemical means as an antibiotic target in Gram-positive bacteria and represents a potential target in Gram-negative bacteria. The structures of apo FabF, of a C164Q mutant in which the binding site is altered to resemble the substrate-bound state and of a complex with 3-(benzoylamino)-2-hydroxybenzoic acid are reported. This compound mimics aspects of a known natural product inhibitor, platensimycin, and surprisingly was observed binding outside the active site, interacting with a symmetry-related molecule. An unusual feature is a completely buried potassium-binding site that was identified in all three structures. Comparisons suggest that this may represent a conserved structural feature of FabF relevant to fold stability. The new structures provide templates for structure-based ligand design and, together with the protocols and reagents, may underpin a target-based drug-discovery project for urgently needed antibacterials.

  2. Lipid Acyl Chain Remodeling in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Renne, Mike F.; Bao, Xue; De Smet, Cedric H.; de Kroon, Anton I. P. M.

    2015-01-01

    Membrane lipid homeostasis is maintained by de novo synthesis, intracellular transport, remodeling, and degradation of lipid molecules. Glycerophospholipids, the most abundant structural component of eukaryotic membranes, are subject to acyl chain remodeling, which is defined as the post-synthetic process in which one or both acyl chains are exchanged. Here, we review studies addressing acyl chain remodeling of membrane glycerophospholipids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a model organism that has been successfully used to investigate lipid synthesis and its regulation. Experimental evidence for the occurrence of phospholipid acyl chain exchange in cardiolipin, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylinositol, and phosphatidylethanolamine is summarized, including methods and tools that have been used for detecting remodeling. Progress in the identification of the enzymes involved is reported, and putative functions of acyl chain remodeling in yeast are discussed. PMID:26819558

  3. Stability-increasing effects of anthocyanin glycosyl acylation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chang-Ling; Yu, Yu-Qi; Chen, Zhong-Jian; Wen, Guo-Song; Wei, Fu-Gang; Zheng, Quan; Wang, Chong-De; Xiao, Xing-Lei

    2017-01-01

    This review comprehensively summarizes the existing knowledge regarding the chemical implications of anthocyanin glycosyl acylation, the effects of acylation on the stability of acylated anthocyanins and the corresponding mechanisms. Anthocyanin glycosyl acylation commonly refers to the phenomenon in which the hydroxyl groups of anthocyanin glycosyls are esterified by aliphatic or aromatic acids, which is synthetically represented by the acylation sites as well as the types and numbers of acyl groups. Generally, glycosyl acylation increases the in vitro and in vivo chemical stability of acylated anthocyanins, and the mechanisms primarily involve physicochemical, stereochemical, photochemical, biochemical or environmental aspects under specific conditions. Additionally, the acylation sites as well as the types and numbers of acyl groups influence the stability of acylated anthocyanins to different degrees. This review could provide insight into the optimization of the stability of anthocyanins as well as the application of suitable anthocyanins in food, pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries. PMID:27507456

  4. Sticky swinging arm dynamics: studies of an acyl carrier protein domain from the mycolactone polyketide synthase

    PubMed Central

    Vance, Steven; Tkachenko, Olga; Thomas, Ben; Bassuni, Mona; Hong, Hui; Nietlispach, Daniel; Broadhurst, William

    2016-01-01

    Type I modular polyketide synthases (PKSs) produce polyketide natural products by passing a growing acyl substrate chain between a series of enzyme domains housed within a gigantic multifunctional polypeptide assembly. Throughout each round of chain extension and modification reactions, the substrate stays covalently linked to an acyl carrier protein (ACP) domain. In the present study we report on the solution structure and dynamics of an ACP domain excised from MLSA2, module 9 of the PKS system that constructs the macrolactone ring of the toxin mycolactone, cause of the tropical disease Buruli ulcer. After modification of apo ACP with 4′-phosphopantetheine (Ppant) to create the holo form, 15N nuclear spin relaxation and paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) experiments suggest that the prosthetic group swings freely. The minimal chemical shift perturbations displayed by Ppant-attached C3 and C4 acyl chains imply that these substrate-mimics remain exposed to solvent at the end of a flexible Ppant arm. By contrast, hexanoyl and octanoyl chains yield much larger chemical shift perturbations, indicating that they interact with the surface of the domain. The solution structure of octanoyl-ACP shows the Ppant arm bending to allow the acyl chain to nestle into a nonpolar pocket, whereas the prosthetic group itself remains largely solvent exposed. Although the highly reduced octanoyl group is not a natural substrate for the ACP from MLSA2, similar presentation modes would permit partner enzyme domains to recognize an acyl group while it is bound to the surface of its carrier protein, allowing simultaneous interactions with both the substrate and the ACP. PMID:26920023

  5. Acyl-acyl-carrier protein: lysomonogalactosyldiacylglycerol acyltransferase from the cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis.

    PubMed

    Chen, H H; Wickrema, A; Jaworski, J G

    1988-12-16

    Membranes isolated from the cyanobacterium, Anabaena variabilis, and washed free of soluble endogenous constituents, were capable of catalyzing the direct transfer of the acyl group from acyl-acyl-carrier protein to an endogenous lysomonogalactosyldiacylglycerol to form monogalactosyldiacylglycerol. Other glycolipids including monoglucosyldiacylglycerol and digalactosyldiacylglycerol were not products of this reaction. The transfer was not dependent on any added cofactors. Palmitoyl-, stearoyl- and oleoyl-acyl-carrier protein were approximately equally active as substrates. Transfer was exclusively to the C-1 of the glycerol, as demonstrated by hydrolysis of all incorporated acyl groups by the lipase from Rhizopus arrhizus delamar. In addition to the single galactolipid, a second minor reaction product was free fatty acid, presumably due to hydrolysis of the acyl-acyl-carrier protein. Using a double-labelled [14C]acyl-[14C]acyl-carrier protein, the reaction was demonstrated to be a transfer reaction, rather than a simple exchange of acyl groups with endogenous monogalactosyldiacylglycerol. The transfer reaction mechanism was also confirmed by increasing activity with the addition of liposomes of lysomonogalactosyldiacylglycerol.

  6. Pocket-size microwave radiation hazard detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolbly, R. B.

    1974-01-01

    Inexpensive lightweight unit is easily carried in coat pocket or attached to belt, detector sounds alarm in presence of dangerous microwave radiation levels. Unit consists of antenna, detector, level sensor, keyed oscillator, and speaker. Antenna may be single equiangular spiral or set of orthogonal slot dipoles. Signal detector is simple diode in small package.

  7. Pocket Guide to Minority Health Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Minority Health (PHS/DHHS), Washington, DC.

    This pocket-size directory lists federal, state, and private agencies; clearinghouses; and organizations that address the general and specific health needs of minority groups. The guide has seven sections. Part 1 describes the Office of Minority Health (OMH), its activities, and the OMH Resource Center. Parts 2 and 3 list Public Health Service…

  8. Crystal structure and substrate specificity of the β-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthase III (FabH) from Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Xiayang; Choudhry, Anthony E.; Janson, Cheryl A.; Grooms, Michael; Daines, Robert A.; Lonsdale, John T.; Khandekar, Sanjay S.

    2005-01-01

    β-Ketoacyl-ACP synthase III (FabH), an essential enzyme for bacterial viability, catalyzes the initiation of fatty acid elongation by condensing malonyl-ACP with acetyl-CoA. We have determined the crystal structure of FabH from Staphylococcus aureus, a Gram-positive human pathogen, to 2 Å resolution. Although the overall structure of S. aureus FabH is similar to that of Escherichia coli FabH, the primer binding pocket in S. aureus FabH is significantly larger than that present in E. coli FabH. The structural differences, which agree with kinetic parameters, provide explanation for the observed varying substrate specificity for E. coli and S. aureus FabH. The rank order of activity of S. aureus FabH with various acyl-CoA primers was as follows: isobutyryl- > hexanoyl- > butyryl- > isovaleryl- >> acetyl-CoA. The availability of crystal structure may aid in designing potent, selective inhibitors of S. aureus FabH. PMID:15987898

  9. Crystal structure and substrate specificity of the [beta]-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthase III (FabH) from Staphylococcus aureus

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, Xiayang; Choudhry, Anthony E.; Janson, Cheryl A.; Grooms, Michael; Daines, Robert A.; Lonsdale, John T.; Khandekar, Sanjay S.

    2010-07-20

    {beta}-Ketoacyl-ACP synthase III (FabH), an essential enzyme for bacterial viability, catalyzes the initiation of fatty acid elongation by condensing malonyl-ACP with acetyl-CoA. We have determined the crystal structure of FabH from Staphylococcus aureus, a Gram-positive human pathogen, to 2 {angstrom} resolution. Although the overall structure of S. aureus FabH is similar to that of Escherichia coli FabH, the primer binding pocket in S. aureus FabH is significantly larger than that present in E. coli FabH. The structural differences, which agree with kinetic parameters, provide explanation for the observed varying substrate specificity for E. coli and S. aureus FabH. The rank order of activity of S. aureus FabH with various acyl-CoA primers was as follows: isobutyryl- > hexanoyl- > butyryl- > isovaleryl- >> acetyl-CoA. The availability of crystal structure may aid in designing potent, selective inhibitors of S. aureus FabH.

  10. Structural and Functional Analyses of a Conserved Hydrophobic Pocket of Flavivirus Methyltransferase*

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Hongping; Liu, Lihui; Zou, Gang; Zhao, Yiwei; Li, Zhong; Lim, Siew Pheng; Shi, Pei-Yong; Li, Hongmin

    2010-01-01

    The flavivirus methyltransferase (MTase) sequentially methylates the N7 and 2′-O positions of the viral RNA cap (GpppA-RNA → m7GpppA-RNA → m7GpppAm-RNA), using S-adenosyl-l-methionine (AdoMet) as a methyl donor. We report here that sinefungin (SIN), an AdoMet analog, inhibits several flaviviruses through suppression of viral MTase. The crystal structure of West Nile virus MTase in complex with SIN inhibitor at 2.0-Å resolution revealed a flavivirus-conserved hydrophobic pocket located next to the AdoMet-binding site. The pocket is functionally critical in the viral replication and cap methylations. In addition, the N7 methylation efficiency was found to correlate with the viral replication ability. Thus, SIN analogs with modifications that interact with the hydrophobic pocket are potential specific inhibitors of flavivirus MTase. PMID:20685660

  11. Structural and Functional Analyses of a Conserved Hydrophobic Pocket of Flavivirus Methyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    H Dong; L Liu; G Zou; Y Zhao; Z Li; S Lim; P Shi; H Li

    2011-12-31

    The flavivirus methyltransferase (MTase) sequentially methylates the N7 and 2'-O positions of the viral RNA cap (GpppA-RNA {yields} m(7)GpppA-RNA {yields} m(7)GpppAm-RNA), using S-adenosyl-l-methionine (AdoMet) as a methyl donor. We report here that sinefungin (SIN), an AdoMet analog, inhibits several flaviviruses through suppression of viral MTase. The crystal structure of West Nile virus MTase in complex with SIN inhibitor at 2.0-{angstrom} resolution revealed a flavivirus-conserved hydrophobic pocket located next to the AdoMet-binding site. The pocket is functionally critical in the viral replication and cap methylations. In addition, the N7 methylation efficiency was found to correlate with the viral replication ability. Thus, SIN analogs with modifications that interact with the hydrophobic pocket are potential specific inhibitors of flavivirus MTase.

  12. ALiBERO: Evolving a team of complementary pocket conformations rather than a single leader

    PubMed Central

    Rueda, Manuel; Totrov, Max; Abagyan, Ruben

    2012-01-01

    Docking and virtual screening (VS) reach maximum potential when the receptor displays the structural changes needed for accurate ligand binding. Unfortunately, these conformational changes are often poorly represented in experimental structures or homology models, debilitating their docking performance. Recently, we have shown that receptors optimized with our LiBERO method (Ligand-guided Backbone Ensemble Receptor Optimization) were able to better discriminate active ligands from inactives in flexible-ligand VS docking experiments. The LiBERO method relies on the use of ligand information for selecting the best performing individual pockets from ensembles derived from normal mode analysis or Monte Carlo. Here we present ALiBERO, a new computational tool that has expanded the pocket selection from single to multiple, allowing for automatic iteration of the sampling-selection procedure. The selection of pockets is performed by a dual method that uses exhaustive combinatorial search plus individual addition of pockets, selecting only those that maximize the discrimination of known actives compounds from decoys. The resulting optimized pockets showed increased VS performance when later used in much larger unrelated test sets consisting of biologically active and inactive ligands. In this paper we will describe the design and implementation of the algorithm, using as a reference the human estrogen receptor alpha. PMID:22947092

  13. Paramagnetic relaxation assisted docking of a small indole compound in the HIV-1 gp41 hydrophobic pocket

    PubMed Central

    Gochin, Miriam; Zhou, Guangyan; Phillips, Aaron

    2010-01-01

    The hydrophobic pocket contained within the gp41 coiled coil is an important target for small molecules designed to inhibit HIV-1 fusion. While various screening experiments have identified molecules purported to bind in this pocket, few have confirmed details of the interaction, instead relying on computational docking to predict the binding mode. This is made more challenging by the fact that residues lining the hydrophobic pocket are highly flexible, as is typical for a protein - protein interaction site, limiting the predictive power of computational tools. In this study, we report on an NMR method to define the binding mode of 1-5i, a compound in a series of newly developed indole inhibitors. We show that paramagnetic relaxation enhancement of ligand protons due to an MTSL group positioned close to the binding pocket could be applied quantitatively to distinguish between more than 30 different computational poses, selecting a single pose that agreed with the NMR data. In this pose, important hydrophobic and polar contacts occur with pocket lysine, tryptophan and glutamine residues, including putative hydrogen bonds between the ligand carboxylate and the lysine ε-amino group. A study of the ligand orientation suggests directions for optimization. PMID:21155611

  14. Efficient mono-acylation of fructose by lipase-catalyzed esterification in ionic liquid co-solvents.

    PubMed

    Li, Lu; Ji, Fangling; Wang, Jingyun; Jiang, Bo; Li, Yachen; Bao, Yongming

    2015-10-30

    Fructose monoesters are eco-friendly nonionic surfactants in various applications. Selective preparation of mono-acylated fructose is challenging due to the multiple hydroxyl sites available for acylation both chemically and enzymatically. Ionic liquids (ILs) have profound impacts not only on the reaction media but also on the catalytic properties of enzymes in the acylation process. In this study, utilizing an IL co-solvent system, selective synthesis of mono-acylated fructose with lauric acid catalyzed by immobilized Candida antarctica lipase B (CALB) was investigated. The imidazolium-based ILs selected as co-solvents with 2-methyl-2-butanol (2M2B) markedly improved the ratios of monolauroyl fructose in the presence of 60% [BMIM][TfO] (v/v) and 20% [BMIM][BF4] (v/v), in which the mono-acylated fructose was 85% and 78% respectively. Based on a Ping-Pong Bi-Bi model, a kinetic equation was fitted, by which the kinetic parameters revealed that the affinity between fructose and acyl-enzyme intermediate was enhanced. The inhibition effect of fructose on free enzyme was weakened in the presence of IL co-solvents. The conformation of CALB binding substrates also changed in the co-solvent system as demonstrated by Fourier transform infrared spectra. These results demonstrated that the variation of CALB kinetic characteristics was a crucial factor for the selectivity of mono-acylation in ILs/2M2B co-solvents.

  15. Efficient mono-acylation of fructose by lipase-catalyzed esterification in ionic liquid co-solvents.

    PubMed

    Li, Lu; Ji, Fangling; Wang, Jingyun; Jiang, Bo; Li, Yachen; Bao, Yongming

    2015-10-30

    Fructose monoesters are eco-friendly nonionic surfactants in various applications. Selective preparation of mono-acylated fructose is challenging due to the multiple hydroxyl sites available for acylation both chemically and enzymatically. Ionic liquids (ILs) have profound impacts not only on the reaction media but also on the catalytic properties of enzymes in the acylation process. In this study, utilizing an IL co-solvent system, selective synthesis of mono-acylated fructose with lauric acid catalyzed by immobilized Candida antarctica lipase B (CALB) was investigated. The imidazolium-based ILs selected as co-solvents with 2-methyl-2-butanol (2M2B) markedly improved the ratios of monolauroyl fructose in the presence of 60% [BMIM][TfO] (v/v) and 20% [BMIM][BF4] (v/v), in which the mono-acylated fructose was 85% and 78% respectively. Based on a Ping-Pong Bi-Bi model, a kinetic equation was fitted, by which the kinetic parameters revealed that the affinity between fructose and acyl-enzyme intermediate was enhanced. The inhibition effect of fructose on free enzyme was weakened in the presence of IL co-solvents. The conformation of CALB binding substrates also changed in the co-solvent system as demonstrated by Fourier transform infrared spectra. These results demonstrated that the variation of CALB kinetic characteristics was a crucial factor for the selectivity of mono-acylation in ILs/2M2B co-solvents. PMID:26343327

  16. Regulation of fatty acid elongation and initiation by acyl-acyl carrier protein in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Heath, R J; Rock, C O

    1996-01-26

    Long chain acyl-acyl carrier protein (acyl-ACP) has been implicated as a physiological inhibitor of fatty acid biosynthesis since acyl-ACP degradation by thioesterase overexpression leads to constitutive, unregulated fatty acid production. The biochemical targets for acyl-ACP inhibition were unknown, and this work identified two biosynthetic enzymes that were sensitive to acyl-ACP feedback inhibition. Palmitoyl-ACP inhibited the incorporation of [14C]malonyl-CoA into long chain fatty acids in cell-free extracts of Escherichia coli. A short chain acyl-ACP species with the electrophoretic properties of beta-hydroxybutyryl-ACP accumulated concomitant with the overall decrease in the amount of [14C]malonyl-CoA incorporation, indicating that the first elongation cycle was targeted by acyl-ACP. All of the proteins required to catalyze the first round of fatty acid synthesis from acetyl-CoA plus malonyl-CoA in vitro were isolated, and the first fatty acid elongation cycle was reconstituted with these purified components. Analysis of the individual enzymes and the pattern of intermediate accumulation in the reconstituted system identified initiation of fatty acid synthesis by beta-ketoacyl-ACP synthase III (fabH) and enoyl-ACP reductase (fabI) in the elongation cycle as two steps attenuated by long chain acyl-ACP.

  17. Crystallization and rhenium MAD phasing of the acyl-homoserinelactone synthase EsaI

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, W.T.; Murphy IV, Frank V.; Gould, Ty A.; Jambeck, Per; Val, Dale L.; Cronan, Jr., John E.; Beck von Bodman, Susan; Churchill, Mair E.A.

    2009-04-22

    Acyl-homoserine-L-lactones (AHLs) are diffusible chemical signals that are required for virulence of many Gram-negative bacteria. AHLs are produced by AHL synthases from two substrates, S-adenosyl-L-methionine and acyl-acyl carrier protein. The AHL synthase EsaI, which is homologous to the AHL synthases from other pathogenic bacterial species, has been crystallized in the primitive tetragonal space group P4{sub 3}, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 66.40, c = 47.33 {angstrom}. The structure was solved by multiple-wavelength anomalous diffraction with a novel use of the rhenium anomalous signal. The rhenium-containing structure has been refined to a resolution of 2.5 {angstrom} and the perrhenate ion binding sites and liganding residues have been identified.

  18. Fatty acyl-CoA reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Reiser, Steven E.; Somerville, Chris R.

    1998-12-01

    The present invention relates to bacterial enzymes, in particular to an acyl-CoA reductase and a gene encoding an acyl-CoA reductase, the amino acid and nucleic acid sequences corresponding to the reductase polypeptide and gene, respectively, and to methods of obtaining such enzymes, amino acid sequences and nucleic acid sequences. The invention also relates to the use of such sequences to provide transgenic host cells capable of producing fatty alcohols and fatty aldehydes.

  19. Epock: rapid analysis of protein pocket dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Laurent, Benoist; Chavent, Matthieu; Cragnolini, Tristan; Dahl, Anna Caroline E.; Pasquali, Samuela; Derreumaux, Philippe; Sansom, Mark S.P.; Baaden, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Summary: The volume of an internal protein pocket is fundamental to ligand accessibility. Few programs that compute such volumes manage dynamic data from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Limited performance often prohibits analysis of large datasets. We present Epock, an efficient command-line tool that calculates pocket volumes from MD trajectories. A plugin for the VMD program provides a graphical user interface to facilitate input creation, run Epock and analyse the results. Availability and implementation: Epock C++ source code, Python analysis scripts, VMD Tcl plugin, documentation and installation instructions are freely available at http://epock.bitbucket.org. Contact: benoist.laurent@gmail.com or baaden@smplinux.de Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25505095

  20. Evaluation of the turbine pocket spirometer.

    PubMed Central

    Gunawardena, K A; Houston, K; Smith, A P

    1987-01-01

    A compact electronic spirometer, the turbine pocket spirometer, which measures the FEV1, forced vital capacity (FVC), and peak expiratory flow (PEF) in a single expiration, was compared with the Vitalograph and the Wright peak flow meter in 99 subjects (FEV1 range 0.40-5.50 litres; FVC 0.58-6.48 l; PEF 40-650 l min-1). The mean differences between the machines were small--0.05 l for FEV1, 0.05 l for FVC, and 11.6 l min-1 for PEF, with the limits of agreement at +/- 0.25 l, +/- 0.48 l, and +/- 52.2 l min-1 respectively. The wide limits of agreement for the PEF comparison were probably because of the difference in the technique of blowing: a fast, long blow was used for the pocket spirometer and a short, sharp one for the Wright peak flow meter. The FEV1 and FVC showed a proportional bias of around 4-5% in favour of the Vitalograph. The repeatability coefficient for the pocket spirometer FEV1 was 0.18 l, for FVC 0.22 l, and for PEF 31 l min-1. These compared well with the repeatability coefficients of the Vitalograph and the Wright peak flow meter, which gave values of 0.18 l, 0.28 l, and 27 l min-1 respectively. At flow rates of over 600 l min-1 the resistance of the pocket spirometer marginally exceeded the American Thoracic Society recommendations. The machine is easy to operate and portable, and less expensive than the Vitalograph and Wright peak flow meter combined. It can be recommended for general use. Images PMID:3686460

  1. Pocketing mechanics of SRM nozzle liner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verderaime, V. S.

    1986-01-01

    A systems approach was adopted to study the pocketing phenomena on a solid rocket nozzle liner. The classical thermoelastic analysis was used to identify marginally strained regions on the composite liner erosion surface and at a depth coincident with the peak value of the across ply coefficient of thermal expansion. A failure criterion was introduced which included a thermal term and permitted failure assessment over the charred liner. The method was verified by satisfactory application to a reported related experiment. Liner pocketing mechanism was attributed to very localized material degradation caused during manufacturing process either by reduction of fiber strength and/or by concentration of resin volume fraction. Pocketing scenario over the degraged material was constructed with supporting formulation to predict size of fissures with respect to degraded material size and location in the liner and with burn time. Sensitivities of liner material parameters were determined to influence test programs designed to update mechanical data base of carbon cloth phenolic over the char temperature range.

  2. Carbohydrate conformation and lipid condensation in monolayers containing glycosphingolipid Gb3: influence of acyl chain structure.

    PubMed

    Watkins, Erik B; Gao, Haifei; Dennison, Andrew J C; Chopin, Nathalie; Struth, Bernd; Arnold, Thomas; Florent, Jean-Claude; Johannes, Ludger

    2014-09-01

    Globotriaosylceramide (Gb3), a glycosphingolipid found in the plasma membrane of animal cells, is the endocytic receptor of the bacterial Shiga toxin. Using x-ray reflectivity (XR) and grazing incidence x-ray diffraction (GIXD), lipid monolayers containing Gb3 were investigated at the air-water interface. XR probed Gb3 carbohydrate conformation normal to the interface, whereas GIXD precisely characterized Gb3's influence on acyl chain in-plane packing and area per molecule (APM). Two phospholipids, 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DSPC) and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DPPE), were used to study Gb3 packing in different lipid environments. Furthermore, the impact on monolayer structure of a naturally extracted Gb3 mixture was compared to synthetic Gb3 species with uniquely defined acyl chain structures. XR results showed that lipid environment and Gb3 acyl chain structure impact carbohydrate conformation with greater solvent accessibility observed for smaller phospholipid headgroups and long Gb3 acyl chains. In general, GIXD showed that Gb3 condensed phospholipid packing resulting in smaller APM than predicted by ideal mixing. Gb3's capacity to condense APM was larger for DSPC monolayers and exhibited different dependencies on acyl chain structure depending on the lipid environment. The interplay between Gb3-induced changes in lipid packing and the lipid environment's impact on carbohydrate conformation has broad implications for glycosphingolipid macromolecule recognition and ligand binding.

  3. Carbohydrate Conformation and Lipid Condensation in Monolayers Containing Glycosphingolipid Gb3: Influence of Acyl Chain Structure

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, Erik B.; Gao, Haifei; Dennison, Andrew J.C.; Chopin, Nathalie; Struth, Bernd; Arnold, Thomas; Florent, Jean-Claude; Johannes, Ludger

    2014-01-01

    Globotriaosylceramide (Gb3), a glycosphingolipid found in the plasma membrane of animal cells, is the endocytic receptor of the bacterial Shiga toxin. Using x-ray reflectivity (XR) and grazing incidence x-ray diffraction (GIXD), lipid monolayers containing Gb3 were investigated at the air-water interface. XR probed Gb3 carbohydrate conformation normal to the interface, whereas GIXD precisely characterized Gb3’s influence on acyl chain in-plane packing and area per molecule (APM). Two phospholipids, 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DSPC) and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DPPE), were used to study Gb3 packing in different lipid environments. Furthermore, the impact on monolayer structure of a naturally extracted Gb3 mixture was compared to synthetic Gb3 species with uniquely defined acyl chain structures. XR results showed that lipid environment and Gb3 acyl chain structure impact carbohydrate conformation with greater solvent accessibility observed for smaller phospholipid headgroups and long Gb3 acyl chains. In general, GIXD showed that Gb3 condensed phospholipid packing resulting in smaller APM than predicted by ideal mixing. Gb3’s capacity to condense APM was larger for DSPC monolayers and exhibited different dependencies on acyl chain structure depending on the lipid environment. The interplay between Gb3-induced changes in lipid packing and the lipid environment’s impact on carbohydrate conformation has broad implications for glycosphingolipid macromolecule recognition and ligand binding. PMID:25185550

  4. Localization of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) and N-acyl phosphatidylethanolamine phospholipase D (NAPE-PLD) in cells expressing the Ca(2+)-binding proteins calbindin, calretinin, and parvalbumin in the adult rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Patricia; Arrabal, Sergio; Vargas, Antonio; Blanco, Eduardo; Serrano, Antonia; Pavón, Francisco J; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Suárez, Juan

    2014-01-01

    The N-acylethanolamines (NAEs), oleoylethanolamide (OEA) and palmithylethanolamide (PEA) are known to be endogenous ligands of PPARα receptors, and their presence requires the activation of a specific phospholipase D (NAPE-PLD) associated with intracellular Ca(2+) fluxes. Thus, the identification of a specific population of NAPE-PLD/PPARα-containing neurons that express selective Ca(2+)-binding proteins (CaBPs) may provide a neuroanatomical basis to better understand the PPARα system in the brain. For this purpose, we used double-label immunofluorescence and confocal laser scanning microscopy for the characterization of the co-existence of NAPE-PLD/PPARα and the CaBPs calbindin D28k, calretinin and parvalbumin in the rat hippocampus. PPARα expression was specifically localized in the cell nucleus and, occasionally, in the cytoplasm of the principal cells (dentate granular and CA pyramidal cells) and some non-principal cells of the hippocampus. PPARα was expressed in the calbindin-containing cells of the granular cell layer of the dentate gyrus (DG) and the SP of CA1. These principal PPARα(+)/calbindin(+) cells were closely surrounded by NAPE-PLD(+) fiber varicosities. No pyramidal PPARα(+)/calbindin(+) cells were detected in CA3. Most cells containing parvalbumin expressed both NAPE-PLD and PPARα in the principal layers of the DG and CA1/3. A small number of cells containing PPARα and calretinin was found along the hippocampus. Scattered NAPE-PLD(+)/calretinin(+) cells were specifically detected in CA3. NAPE-PLD(+) puncta surrounded the calretinin(+) cells localized in the principal cells of the DG and CA1. The identification of the hippocampal subpopulations of NAPE-PLD/PPARα-containing neurons that express selective CaBPs should be considered when analyzing the role of NAEs/PPARα-signaling system in the regulation of hippocampal functions.

  5. Localization of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) and N-acyl phosphatidylethanolamine phospholipase D (NAPE-PLD) in cells expressing the Ca(2+)-binding proteins calbindin, calretinin, and parvalbumin in the adult rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Patricia; Arrabal, Sergio; Vargas, Antonio; Blanco, Eduardo; Serrano, Antonia; Pavón, Francisco J; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Suárez, Juan

    2014-01-01

    The N-acylethanolamines (NAEs), oleoylethanolamide (OEA) and palmithylethanolamide (PEA) are known to be endogenous ligands of PPARα receptors, and their presence requires the activation of a specific phospholipase D (NAPE-PLD) associated with intracellular Ca(2+) fluxes. Thus, the identification of a specific population of NAPE-PLD/PPARα-containing neurons that express selective Ca(2+)-binding proteins (CaBPs) may provide a neuroanatomical basis to better understand the PPARα system in the brain. For this purpose, we used double-label immunofluorescence and confocal laser scanning microscopy for the characterization of the co-existence of NAPE-PLD/PPARα and the CaBPs calbindin D28k, calretinin and parvalbumin in the rat hippocampus. PPARα expression was specifically localized in the cell nucleus and, occasionally, in the cytoplasm of the principal cells (dentate granular and CA pyramidal cells) and some non-principal cells of the hippocampus. PPARα was expressed in the calbindin-containing cells of the granular cell layer of the dentate gyrus (DG) and the SP of CA1. These principal PPARα(+)/calbindin(+) cells were closely surrounded by NAPE-PLD(+) fiber varicosities. No pyramidal PPARα(+)/calbindin(+) cells were detected in CA3. Most cells containing parvalbumin expressed both NAPE-PLD and PPARα in the principal layers of the DG and CA1/3. A small number of cells containing PPARα and calretinin was found along the hippocampus. Scattered NAPE-PLD(+)/calretinin(+) cells were specifically detected in CA3. NAPE-PLD(+) puncta surrounded the calretinin(+) cells localized in the principal cells of the DG and CA1. The identification of the hippocampal subpopulations of NAPE-PLD/PPARα-containing neurons that express selective CaBPs should be considered when analyzing the role of NAEs/PPARα-signaling system in the regulation of hippocampal functions. PMID:24672435

  6. Localization of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) and N-acyl phosphatidylethanolamine phospholipase D (NAPE-PLD) in cells expressing the Ca2+-binding proteins calbindin, calretinin, and parvalbumin in the adult rat hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, Patricia; Arrabal, Sergio; Vargas, Antonio; Blanco, Eduardo; Serrano, Antonia; Pavón, Francisco J.; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Suárez, Juan

    2014-01-01

    The N-acylethanolamines (NAEs), oleoylethanolamide (OEA) and palmithylethanolamide (PEA) are known to be endogenous ligands of PPARα receptors, and their presence requires the activation of a specific phospholipase D (NAPE-PLD) associated with intracellular Ca2+ fluxes. Thus, the identification of a specific population of NAPE-PLD/PPARα-containing neurons that express selective Ca2+-binding proteins (CaBPs) may provide a neuroanatomical basis to better understand the PPARα system in the brain. For this purpose, we used double-label immunofluorescence and confocal laser scanning microscopy for the characterization of the co-existence of NAPE-PLD/PPARα and the CaBPs calbindin D28k, calretinin and parvalbumin in the rat hippocampus. PPARα expression was specifically localized in the cell nucleus and, occasionally, in the cytoplasm of the principal cells (dentate granular and CA pyramidal cells) and some non-principal cells of the hippocampus. PPARα was expressed in the calbindin-containing cells of the granular cell layer of the dentate gyrus (DG) and the SP of CA1. These principal PPARα+/calbindin+ cells were closely surrounded by NAPE-PLD+ fiber varicosities. No pyramidal PPARα+/calbindin+ cells were detected in CA3. Most cells containing parvalbumin expressed both NAPE-PLD and PPARα in the principal layers of the DG and CA1/3. A small number of cells containing PPARα and calretinin was found along the hippocampus. Scattered NAPE-PLD+/calretinin+ cells were specifically detected in CA3. NAPE-PLD+ puncta surrounded the calretinin+ cells localized in the principal cells of the DG and CA1. The identification of the hippocampal subpopulations of NAPE-PLD/PPARα-containing neurons that express selective CaBPs should be considered when analyzing the role of NAEs/PPARα-signaling system in the regulation of hippocampal functions. PMID:24672435

  7. Interaction with membrane lipids and heme ligand binding properties of Escherichia coli flavohemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Bonamore, Alessandra; Farina, Anna; Gattoni, Maurizio; Schininà, M Eugenia; Bellelli, Andrea; Boffi, Alberto

    2003-05-20

    Escherichia coli flavohemoglobin has been shown to be able to bind specifically unsaturated and/or cyclopropanated fatty acids with very high affinity. Unsaturated or cyclopropanated fatty acid binding results in a modification of the visible absorption spectrum of the ferric heme, corresponding to a transition from a pentacoordinated (typical of the ligand free protein) to a hexacoordinated, high spin, heme iron. In contrast, no detectable interaction has been observed with saturated fatty acid, saturated phospholipids, linear, cyclic, and aromatic hydrocarbons pointing out that the protein recognizes specifically double bonds in cis conformation within the hydrocarbon chain of the fatty acid molecule. Accordingly, as demonstrated in gel filtration experiments, flavohemoglobin is able to bind liposomes obtained from lipid extracts of E. coli membranes and eventually abstract phospholipids containing cis double bonds and/or cyclopropane rings along the acyl chains. The presence of a protein bound lipid strongly affects the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of imidazole binding to the ferric protein and brings about significant modifications in the reactivity of the ferrous protein with oxygen and carbon monoxide. The effect of the bound lipid has been accounted for by a reaction scheme that involves the presence of two sites for the lipid/ligand recognition, namely, the heme iron and a non-heme site located in a loop region above the heme pocket. PMID:12741837

  8. Monogalactosyldiacylglycerol biosynthesis by direct acyl transfer in Anabaene variabilis

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H.H.; Wickrema, A.; Jaworski, J.

    1987-04-01

    The authors previously reported the direct acylation of monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG) by an enzyme in the membranes of the cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis. The enzyme requires acyl-acyl carrier protein (acyl-ACP) as substrate, but had no other additional cofactor requirements. Palmitoyl-, stearoyl- and oleoyl-ACP were all effective substrates. The A. variabilis membranes also had a hydrolase activity which metabolized the acyl-ACP to yield free fatty acid and ACP. Possible mechanisms for the acylation reaction include either acyl exchange with existing MGDG or direct acyl transfer to a lyso-MGDG, with concomitant release of free ACP. The mechanism of this reaction has been resolved using a double labelled (/sup 14/C)acyl-(/sup 14/)ACP substrate prepared with E. coli acyl-ACP synthetase. Following incubation with the enzyme, the unreacted (/sup 14/)acyl-(/sup 14/)ACP was isolated and the (/sup 14/)acyl/(/sup 14/)ACP ratio determined. Comparison of this ratio to that of the original substrate indicated no change and eliminated acyl exchange as a possible mechanism. Therefore, the direct acylation of lyso-MGDG is the proposed mechanism for this enzyme.

  9. Aberrant protein acylation is a common observation in inborn errors of acyl-CoA metabolism.

    PubMed

    Pougovkina, Olga; Te Brinke, Heleen; Wanders, Ronald J A; Houten, Sander M; de Boer, Vincent C J

    2014-09-01

    Inherited disorders of acyl-CoA metabolism, such as defects in amino acid metabolism and fatty acid oxidation can present with severe clinical symptoms either neonatally or later in life, but the pathophysiological mechanisms are often incompletely understood. We now report the discovery of a novel biochemical mechanism that could contribute to the pathophysiology of these disorders. We identified increased protein lysine butyrylation in short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (SCAD) deficient mice as a result of the accumulation of butyryl-CoA. Similarly, in SCAD deficient fibroblasts, lysine butyrylation was increased. Furthermore, malonyl-CoA decarboxylase (MCD) deficient patient cells had increased levels of malonylated lysines and propionyl-CoA carboxylase (PCC) deficient patient cells had increased propionylation of lysines. Since lysine acylation can greatly impact protein function, aberrant lysine acylation in inherited disorders associated with acyl-CoA accumulation may well play a role in their disease pathophysiology. PMID:24531926

  10. Slow onset inhibition of bacterial beta-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthases by thiolactomycin.

    PubMed

    Machutta, Carl A; Bommineni, Gopal R; Luckner, Sylvia R; Kapilashrami, Kanishk; Ruzsicska, Bela; Simmerling, Carlos; Kisker, Caroline; Tonge, Peter J

    2010-02-26

    Thiolactomycin (TLM), a natural product thiolactone antibiotic produced by species of Nocardia and Streptomyces, is an inhibitor of the beta-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthase (KAS) enzymes in the bacterial fatty acid synthase pathway. Using enzyme kinetics and direct binding studies, TLM has been shown to bind preferentially to the acyl-enzyme intermediates of the KASI and KASII enzymes from Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Escherichia coli. These studies, which utilized acyl-enzyme mimics in which the active site cysteine was replaced by a glutamine, also revealed that TLM is a slow onset inhibitor of the KASI enzymes KasA and ecFabB but not of the KASII enzymes KasB and ecFabF. The differential affinity of TLM for the acyl-KAS enzymes is proposed to result from structural change involving the movement of helices alpha5 and alpha6 that prepare the enzyme to bind malonyl-AcpM or TLM and that is initiated by formation of hydrogen bonds between the acyl-enzyme thioester and the oxyanion hole. The finding that TLM is a slow onset inhibitor of ecFabB supports the proposal that the long residence time of TLM on the ecFabB homologues in Serratia marcescens and Klebsiella pneumonia is an important factor for the in vivo antibacterial activity of TLM against these two organisms despite the fact that the in vitro MIC values are only 100-200 microg/ml. The mechanistic data on the interaction of TLM with KasA will provide an important foundation for the rational development of high affinity KasA inhibitors based on the thiolactone skeleton.

  11. Slow onset inhibition of bacterial beta-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthases by thiolactomycin.

    PubMed

    Machutta, Carl A; Bommineni, Gopal R; Luckner, Sylvia R; Kapilashrami, Kanishk; Ruzsicska, Bela; Simmerling, Carlos; Kisker, Caroline; Tonge, Peter J

    2010-02-26

    Thiolactomycin (TLM), a natural product thiolactone antibiotic produced by species of Nocardia and Streptomyces, is an inhibitor of the beta-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthase (KAS) enzymes in the bacterial fatty acid synthase pathway. Using enzyme kinetics and direct binding studies, TLM has been shown to bind preferentially to the acyl-enzyme intermediates of the KASI and KASII enzymes from Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Escherichia coli. These studies, which utilized acyl-enzyme mimics in which the active site cysteine was replaced by a glutamine, also revealed that TLM is a slow onset inhibitor of the KASI enzymes KasA and ecFabB but not of the KASII enzymes KasB and ecFabF. The differential affinity of TLM for the acyl-KAS enzymes is proposed to result from structural change involving the movement of helices alpha5 and alpha6 that prepare the enzyme to bind malonyl-AcpM or TLM and that is initiated by formation of hydrogen bonds between the acyl-enzyme thioester and the oxyanion hole. The finding that TLM is a slow onset inhibitor of ecFabB supports the proposal that the long residence time of TLM on the ecFabB homologues in Serratia marcescens and Klebsiella pneumonia is an important factor for the in vivo antibacterial activity of TLM against these two organisms despite the fact that the in vitro MIC values are only 100-200 microg/ml. The mechanistic data on the interaction of TLM with KasA will provide an important foundation for the rational development of high affinity KasA inhibitors based on the thiolactone skeleton. PMID:20018879

  12. [A new pocket-type flicker apparatus].

    PubMed

    Hosokawa, T; Makizuka, T; Nakai, K; Saito, K

    1989-09-01

    A small, light and inexpensive pocket flicker (P.F.) apparatus for measuring fatigue was designed, fabricated and tested. The apparatus, being composed of a light emitting diode and a variable resistor with a scale, is so compact that it can be carried in a shirt pocket. Thus, critical fusion frequency (CFF) values can be easily determined at a working place and the load involved is small when compared to other physical fatigue measurements and earlier CFF apparatuses. Moreover, the apparatus is so inexpensive that it can be widely used. To compare the performance of the P.F. apparatus with earlier apparatuses, the following experiments were performed. CFF values were measured at the same time with the pocket type apparatus, blinking type apparatus and sector type apparatus and the results were compared. The subjects were 13 males and 5 females with their age ranging from 21 to 52 years. The total number of measurements was 132. The CFF values measured with these three apparatuses showed a significant correlation. The correlation coefficient between the CFF values measured with the sector type apparatus and blinking type apparatus was high, but the slope of the regression line was not one. Hence, in comparing the values measured with another apparatus, we should be aware of the differences between these data. The correlation coefficients between the CFF values measured with P.F. apparatus and with sector type apparatus or blinking type apparatus were not higher than those between the CFF values measured with sector type apparatus and blinking type apparatus.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2585810

  13. Pocket radiation dosimeter: dosimeter charger assembly

    DOEpatents

    Manning, F.W.

    1982-03-17

    This invention is a novel pocket-type radiation dosimeter comprising an electrometric radiation dosimeter and a charging circuit therefor. The instrument is especially designed to be amenable to mass production, to have a long shelf life, and to be compact, lightweight, and usable by the layman. The dosimeter proper may be of conventional design. The charging circuit includes a shake-type electrostatic generator, a voltage doubler for integrating generator output voltages of one polarity, and a switch operated by an external permanent magnet.

  14. Pocket radiation dosimeter--dosimeter charger assembly

    DOEpatents

    Manning, Frank W.

    1984-01-01

    This invention is a novel pocket-type radiation dosimeter comprising an electrometric radiation dosimeter and a charging circuit therefor. The instrument is especially designed to be amenable to mass production, to have a long shelf life, and to be compact, lightweight, and usable by the layman. The dosimeter proper may be of conventional design. The charging circuit includes a shake-type electrostatic generator, a voltage doubler for integrating generator output voltages of one polarity, and a switch operated by an external permanent magnet.

  15. Kinetics of acyl transfer reactions in organic media catalysed by Candida antarctica lipase B.

    PubMed

    Martinelle, M; Hult, K

    1995-09-01

    The acyl transfer reactions catalysed by Candida antartica lipase B in organic media followed a bi-bi ping-pong mechanism, with competitive substrate inhibition by the alcohols used as acyl acceptors. The effect of organic solvents on Vm and Km was investigated. The Vm values in acetonitrile was 40-50% of those in heptane. High Km values in acetonitrile compared to those in heptane could partly be explained by an increased solvation of the substrates in acetonitrile. Substrate solvation caused a 10-fold change in substrate specificity, defined as (Vm/Km)ethyl octanoate/(Vm/Km)octanoic acid, going from heptane to acetonitrile. Deacylation was the rate determining step for the acyl transfer in heptane with vinyl- and ethyl octanoate as acyl donors and (R)-2-octanol as acyl acceptor. With 1-octanol, a rate determining deacylation step in heptane was indicated using the same acyl donors. Using 1-octanol as acceptor in heptane, S-ethyl thiooctanoate had a 25- to 30-fold lower Vm/Km value and vinyl octanoate a 4-fold higher Vm/Km value than that for ethyl octanoate. The difference showed to be a Km effect for vinyl octanoate and mainly a Km effect for S-ethyl thiooctanoate. The Vm values of the esterification of octanoic acid with different alcohols was 10-30-times lower than those for the corresponding transesterification of ethyl octanoate. The low activity could be explained by a low pH around the enzyme caused by the acid or a withdrawing of active enzyme by nonproductive binding by the acid. PMID:7669809

  16. Kinetics of acyl transfer reactions in organic media catalysed by Candida antarctica lipase B.

    PubMed

    Martinelle, M; Hult, K

    1995-09-01

    The acyl transfer reactions catalysed by Candida antartica lipase B in organic media followed a bi-bi ping-pong mechanism, with competitive substrate inhibition by the alcohols used as acyl acceptors. The effect of organic solvents on Vm and Km was investigated. The Vm values in acetonitrile was 40-50% of those in heptane. High Km values in acetonitrile compared to those in heptane could partly be explained by an increased solvation of the substrates in acetonitrile. Substrate solvation caused a 10-fold change in substrate specificity, defined as (Vm/Km)ethyl octanoate/(Vm/Km)octanoic acid, going from heptane to acetonitrile. Deacylation was the rate determining step for the acyl transfer in heptane with vinyl- and ethyl octanoate as acyl donors and (R)-2-octanol as acyl acceptor. With 1-octanol, a rate determining deacylation step in heptane was indicated using the same acyl donors. Using 1-octanol as acceptor in heptane, S-ethyl thiooctanoate had a 25- to 30-fold lower Vm/Km value and vinyl octanoate a 4-fold higher Vm/Km value than that for ethyl octanoate. The difference showed to be a Km effect for vinyl octanoate and mainly a Km effect for S-ethyl thiooctanoate. The Vm values of the esterification of octanoic acid with different alcohols was 10-30-times lower than those for the corresponding transesterification of ethyl octanoate. The low activity could be explained by a low pH around the enzyme caused by the acid or a withdrawing of active enzyme by nonproductive binding by the acid.

  17. Fuel tank air pocket removal device

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, C.N. II.

    1991-10-08

    This paper describes a device for the removal of air pockets from filled underground fuel storage tanks. It comprises: a hollow rigid guide column of sufficient length to extend through a fuel inlet opening of the storage tank to the bottom thereof; a rotatable assembly affixed to the lower end of the column and containing guide means for facilitating the passage of a hose from the guide column to the most distant point of the walls of the storage tank; a hose slidably mounted within and extendable from and retractable into the guide column and having means for maintaining the air hose in a plane essentially parallel to the bottom of the storage tank; a first end of a tubular means connected to a first end of the hose, the tubular means comprising flotation means, the flotation means causing a second end of the tubular means to contact the air pocket; and means on a second end of the hose for extending and retracting the hose through the guide column so as to reach any point within the storage tank.

  18. Biochemical and serological characterization of Bacteroides intermedius strains isolated from the deep periodontal pocket.

    PubMed Central

    Dahlén, G; Wikström, M; Renvert, S; Gmür, R; Guggenheim, B

    1990-01-01

    Fifty-one fluorescence-positive black-pigmented Bacteroides strains obtained from 51 patients with deep periodontal pockets (greater than 6 mm) were identified and characterized. Fifty of these strains were presumptively identified as Bacteroides intermedius according to the indole reaction. This was confirmed by further biochemical characterization. The 50 strains from diseased sites were then compared with 16 B. intermedius strains isolated from periodontally healthy individuals with no signs of destructive periodontal disease. Tests for antimicrobial susceptibility showed similar patterns for all 50 pocket-derived strains, except for one beta-lactamase-positive strain that was resistant to penicillin G and ampicillin. Forty-seven strains were tested for binding of three monoclonal antibodies defining three distinct serogroups of B. intermedius. Thirty-one strains belonged to serogroup I, three to serogroup II and thirteen to serogroup III. In comparison to the strains from the shallow periodontal pockets, serogroup I was significantly overrepresented in the patient group with periodontal disease. We conclude that saccharolytic black-pigmented Bacteroides species from deep periodontal pockets constituted, with very rare exceptions, a biochemically homogeneous but antigenically heterogeneous group of B. intermedius and that serogroup I is predominantly found in deep periodontal lesions. PMID:2229351

  19. Acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ta-Yuan; Li, Bo-Liang; Chang, Catherine C. Y.; Urano, Yasuomi

    2009-01-01

    The enzymes acyl-coenzyme A (CoA):cholesterol acyltransferases (ACATs) are membrane-bound proteins that utilize long-chain fatty acyl-CoA and cholesterol as substrates to form cholesteryl esters. In mammals, two isoenzymes, ACAT1 and ACAT2, encoded by two different genes, exist. ACATs play important roles in cellular cholesterol homeostasis in various tissues. This chapter summarizes the current knowledge on ACAT-related research in two areas: 1) ACAT genes and proteins and 2) ACAT enzymes as drug targets for atherosclerosis and for Alzheimer's disease. PMID:19141679

  20. Acyl silicates and acyl aluminates as activated intermediates in peptide formation on clays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, D. H.; Kennedy, R. M.; Macklin, J.

    1984-01-01

    Glycine reacts with heating on dried clays and other minerals to give peptides in much better yield than in the absence of mineral. This reaction was proposed to occur by way of an activated intermediate such as an acyl silicate or acyl aluminate analogous to acyl phosphates involved in several biochemical reactions including peptide bond synthesis. The proposed mechanism has been confirmed by trapping the intermediate, as well as by direct spectroscopic observation of a related intermediate. The reaction of amino acids on periodically dried mineral surfaces represents a widespead, geologically realistic setting for prebiotic peptide formation via in situ activation.

  1. Form and deformity: the trouble with Victorian pockets.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Christopher Todd

    2010-01-01

    This essay explores the Victorian debate about the place of pockets in men's and women's clothing. By studying the representation of men as naturally pocketed creatures and the general denial of useful pockets to middle-class women, the essay demonstrates the tenacious cultural logic by which men's and women's pockets were imagined to correspond to sexual differences and to index access, or lack thereof, to public mobility and financial agency. Interconnected readings of visual art, essays, and novels show how the common sense about gendered pockets was utilized and promulgated in Victorian narratives. The question of who gets pockets is thus positioned as part of the history of gendered bodies in public space.

  2. Identification of N-Acyl Phosphatidylserine Molecules in Eukaryotic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Ziqiang; Li, Shengrong; Smith, Dale C.; Shaw, Walter A.; Raetz, Christian R. H.

    2008-01-01

    While profiling the lipidome of the mouse brain by mass spectrometry, we discovered a novel family of N-acyl phosphatidylserine (N-acyl-PS) molecules. These N-acyl-PS species were enriched by DEAE-cellulose column chromatography, and they were then characterized by accurate mass measurements, tandem mass spectrometry, liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry, and comparison to an authentic standard. Mouse brain N-acyl-PS molecules are heterogeneous and constitute about 0.1 % of the total lipid. In addition to various ester-linked fatty acyl chains on their glycerol backbones, the complexity of the N-acyl-PS series is further increased by the presence of diverse amide-linked N-acyl chains, which include saturated, mono-unsaturated and poly-unsaturated species. N-acyl-PS molecular species were also detected in the lipids of pig brain, mouse RAW264.7 macrophage tumor cells and yeast, but not E. coli. N-acyl-PSs may be biosynthetic precursors of N-acyl serine molecules, such as the recently reported signaling lipid N-arachidonoyl serine from bovine brain. We suggest that a phospholipase D might cleave N-acyl-PS to generate N-acyl serine, in analogy to the biosynthesis of the endocannabinoid N-arachidonoyl ethanolamine (anadamide) from N-arachidonoyl phosphatidylethanolamine. PMID:18031065

  3. Structural and Functional Studies of Fatty Acyl Adenylate Ligases from E. coli and L. pneumophila

    SciTech Connect

    Z Zhang; R Zhou; J Sauder; P Tonge; S Burley; S Swaminathan

    2011-12-31

    Fatty acyl-AMP ligase (FAAL) is a new member of a family of adenylate-forming enzymes that were recently discovered in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. They are similar in sequence to fatty acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) ligases (FACLs). However, while FACLs perform a two-step catalytic reaction, AMP ligation followed by CoA ligation using ATP and CoA as cofactors, FAALs produce only the acyl adenylate and are unable to perform the second step. We report X-ray crystal structures of full-length FAAL from Escherichia coli (EcFAAL) and FAAL from Legionella pneumophila (LpFAAL) bound to acyl adenylate, determined at resolution limits of 3.0 and 1.85 {angstrom}, respectively. The structures share a larger N-terminal domain and a smaller C-terminal domain, which together resemble the previously determined structures of FAAL and FACL proteins. Our two structures occur in quite different conformations. EcFAAL adopts the adenylate-forming conformation typical of FACLs, whereas LpFAAL exhibits a unique intermediate conformation. Both EcFAAL and LpFAAL have insertion motifs that distinguish them from the FACLs. Structures of EcFAAL and LpFAAL reveal detailed interactions between this insertion motif and the interdomain hinge region and with the C-terminal domain. We suggest that the insertion motifs support sufficient interdomain motions to allow substrate binding and product release during acyl adenylate formation, but they preclude CoA binding, thereby preventing CoA ligation.

  4. Structural and Functional Studies of Fatty Acyl Adenylate Ligases from E. coli and L. pneumophila

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z.; Swaminathan, S.; Zhou, R.; Sauder, J. M.; Tonge, P. J.; Burley, S. K.

    2011-02-18

    Fatty acyl-AMP ligase (FAAL) is a new member of a family of adenylate-forming enzymes that were recently discovered in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. They are similar in sequence to fatty acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) ligases (FACLs). However, while FACLs perform a two-step catalytic reaction, AMP ligation followed by CoA ligation using ATP and CoA as cofactors, FAALs produce only the acyl adenylate and are unable to perform the second step. We report X-ray crystal structures of full-length FAAL from Escherichia coli (EcFAAL) and FAAL from Legionella pneumophila (LpFAAL) bound to acyl adenylate, determined at resolution limits of 3.0 and 1.85 {angstrom}, respectively. The structures share a larger N-terminal domain and a smaller C-terminal domain, which together resemble the previously determined structures of FAAL and FACL proteins. Our two structures occur in quite different conformations. EcFAAL adopts the adenylate-forming conformation typical of FACLs, whereas LpFAAL exhibits a unique intermediate conformation. Both EcFAAL and LpFAAL have insertion motifs that distinguish them from the FACLs. Structures of EcFAAL and LpFAAL reveal detailed interactions between this insertion motif and the interdomain hinge region and with the C-terminal domain. We suggest that the insertion motifs support sufficient interdomain motions to allow substrate binding and product release during acyl adenylate formation, but they preclude CoA binding, thereby preventing CoA ligation.

  5. Novel Structural Components Contribute to the High Thermal Stability of Acyl Carrier Protein from Enterococcus faecalis.

    PubMed

    Park, Young-Guen; Jung, Min-Cheol; Song, Heesang; Jeong, Ki-Woong; Bang, Eunjung; Hwang, Geum-Sook; Kim, Yangmee

    2016-01-22

    Enterococcus faecalis is a Gram-positive, commensal bacterium that lives in the gastrointestinal tracts of humans and other mammals. It causes severe infections because of high antibiotic resistance. E. faecalis can endure extremes of temperature and pH. Acyl carrier protein (ACP) is a key element in the biosynthesis of fatty acids responsible for acyl group shuttling and delivery. In this study, to understand the origin of high thermal stabilities of E. faecalis ACP (Ef-ACP), its solution structure was investigated for the first time. CD experiments showed that the melting temperature of Ef-ACP is 78.8 °C, which is much higher than that of Escherichia coli ACP (67.2 °C). The overall structure of Ef-ACP shows the common ACP folding pattern consisting of four α-helices (helix I (residues 3-17), helix II (residues 39-53), helix III (residues 60-64), and helix IV (residues 68-78)) connected by three loops. Unique Ef-ACP structural features include a hydrophobic interaction between Phe(45) in helix II and Phe(18) in the α1α2 loop and a hydrogen bonding between Ser(15) in helix I and Ile(20) in the α1α2 loop, resulting in its high thermal stability. Phe(45)-mediated hydrophobic packing may block acyl chain binding subpocket II entry. Furthermore, Ser(58) in the α2α3 loop in Ef-ACP, which usually constitutes a proline in other ACPs, exhibited slow conformational exchanges, resulting in the movement of the helix III outside the structure to accommodate a longer acyl chain in the acyl binding cavity. These results might provide insights into the development of antibiotics against pathogenic drug-resistant E. faecalis strains.

  6. Interaction of GCAP1 with retinal guanylyl cyclase and calcium: sensitivity to fatty acylation

    PubMed Central

    Peshenko, Igor V.; Olshevskaya, Elena V.; Dizhoor, Alexander M.

    2012-01-01

    Guanylyl cyclase activating proteins (GCAPs) are calcium/magnesium binding proteins within neuronal calcium sensor proteins group (NCS) of the EF-hand proteins superfamily. GCAPs activate retinal guanylyl cyclase (RetGC) in vertebrate photoreceptors in response to light-dependent fall of the intracellular free Ca2+ concentrations. GCAPs consist of four EF-hand domains and contain N-terminal fatty acylated glycine, which in GCAP1 is required for the normal activation of RetGC. We analyzed the effects of a substitution prohibiting N-myristoylation (Gly2 → Ala) on the ability of the recombinant GCAP1 to co-localize with its target enzyme when heterologously expressed in HEK293 cells. We also compared Ca2+ binding and RetGC-activating properties of the purified non-acylated G2A mutant and C14:0 acylated GCAP1 in vitro. The G2A GCAP1 expressed with a C-terminal GFP tag was able to co-localize with the cyclase, albeit less efficiently than the wild type, but much less effectively stimulated cyclase activity in vitro. Ca2+ binding isotherm of the G2A GCAP1 was slightly shifted toward higher free Ca2+ concentrations and so was Ca2+ sensitivity of RetGC reconstituted with the G2A mutant. At the same time, myristoylation had little effect on the high-affinity Ca2+-binding in the EF-hand proximal to the myristoyl residue in three-dimensional GCAP1 structure. These data indicate that the N-terminal fatty acyl group may alter the activity of EF-hands in the distal portion of the GCAP1 molecule via presently unknown intramolecular mechanism. PMID:22371697

  7. The Potential for Pocket Parks to Increase Physical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Deborah A.; Marsh, Terry; Williamson, Stephanie; Han, Bing; Derose, Kathryn Pitkin; Golinelli, Daniella; McKenzie, Thomas L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To assess the use of new pocket parks in low-income neighborhoods. Setting Los Angeles Subjects Parks users and residents living within ½ mile of 3 pocket parks and 15 neighborhood parks Intervention The creation of pocket parks Design Quasi-experimental post-only comparison Measures We used the System of Observing Play and Recreation in Communities (SOPARC) to measure park use and park-based physical activity and surveyed park users and residents about their park use. Analysis We surveyed 392 and 432 household members within one-half mile of the 3 pocket parks before and after park construction, respectively, as well as 71 pocket park users and compared them to 992 neighborhood park users and 342 residents living within ½ mile of other neighborhood parks. We compared pocket park use to playground area use in the larger neighborhood parks. We used descriptive statistics and Generalized Estimating Equations for the analysis. Results Overall, pocket park use compared favorably in promoting moderate-to-vigorous physical activity with that of existing playground space in nearby parks and they were cost-effective at $0.73/MET hour gained. Pocket park visitors walked an average of 0.25 miles to get there. Conclusions Pocket parks, when perceived as attractive and safe destinations, may increase physical activity by encouraging families with children to walk there. Additional strategies and programs may be needed to encourage more residents to use the parks. PMID:24380461

  8. GOAT induced ghrelin acylation regulates hedonic feeding.

    PubMed

    Davis, J F; Perello, M; Choi, D L; Magrisso, I J; Kirchner, H; Pfluger, P T; Tschoep, M; Zigman, J M; Benoit, S C

    2012-11-01

    Ghrelin is an orexigenic hormone that regulates homeostatic and reward-related feeding behavior. Recent evidence indicates that acylation of ghrelin by the gut enzyme ghrelin O-acyl transferase (GOAT) is necessary to render ghrelin maximally active within its target tissues. Here we tested the hypothesis that GOAT activity modulates food motivation and food hedonics using behavioral pharmacology and mutant mice deficient for GOAT and the ghrelin receptor (GHSR). We evaluated operant responding following pharmacological administration of acyl-ghrelin and assessed the necessity of endogenous GOAT activity for operant responding in GOAT and GHSR-null mice. Hedonic-based feeding behavior also was examined in GOAT-KO and GHSR-null mice using a "Dessert Effect" protocol in which the intake of a palatable high fat diet "dessert" was assessed in calorically-sated mice. Pharmacological administration of acyl-ghrelin augmented operant responding; notably, this effect was dependent on intact GHSR signaling. GOAT-KO mice displayed attenuated operant responding and decreased hedonic feeding relative to controls. These behavioral results correlated with decreased expression of the orexin-1 receptor in reward-related brain regions in GOAT-KO mice. In summary, the ability of ghrelin to stimulate food motivation is dependent on intact GHSR signaling and modified by endogenous GOAT activity. Furthermore, GOAT activity is required for hedonic feeding behavior, an effect potentially mediated by forebrain orexin signaling. These data highlight the significance of the GOAT-ghrelin system for the mediation of food motivation and hedonic feeding.

  9. A simple homogeneous scintillation proximity assay for acyl-coenzyme A:diacylglycerol acyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Seethala, Ramakrishna; Peterson, Tara; Dong, Jessica; Chu, Ching-Hsuen; Chen, Luping; Golla, Rajasree; Ma, Zhengping; Panemangalore, Reshma; Lawrence, R Michael; Cheng, Dong

    2008-12-15

    Acyl-coenzyme A:diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT) is a key enzyme in triacylglycerol synthesis, and inhibiting this enzyme is a promising approach for treating obesity, type II diabetes, and dyslipidemia. There are two distinct DGAT enzymes: DGAT1 and DGAT2. The conventional assay for measuring DGAT activity is a thin layer chromatography (TLC) method, which is not amenable to screening a large number of compounds. To increase the throughput, we have developed a novel, homogeneous scintillation proximity assay (SPA) for DGAT. In this assay, when (3)H-labeled acyl-CoA is used as the acyl donor and diacylglycerol is used as the acyl acceptor, the (3)H-labeled triacylglycerol product formed in the reaction binds to polylysine SPA beads, producing a signal that is measured in a TopCount or LEADseeker. The apparent Michaelis-Menten kinetic parameters determined by this DGAT SPA method agreed well with the values determined with the conventional TLC assay. The statistical values also indicate that the DGAT SPA is a robust assay, with a Z' of more than 0.60 and a signal/background ratio of approximately 9. These results suggest that the current assay provides high-throughput capacity for the identification of DGAT inhibitors.

  10. Crystal structure of the vicilin from Solanum melongena reveals existence of different anionic ligands in structurally similar pockets.

    PubMed

    Jain, Abha; Kumar, Ashish; Salunke, Dinakar M

    2016-01-01

    Crystal structure of a vicilin, SM80.1, was determined towards exploring its possible physiological functions. The protein was purified from Solanum melongena by combination of ammonium sulphate fractionation and size exclusion chromatography. Structure was determined ab initio at resolution of 1.5 Å by X-ray crystallography showing the three-dimensional topology of the trimeric protein. Each monomer of SM80.1 consists of two similar domains with hydrophobic binding pocket and each accommodating different ligands, i.e. acetate and pyroglutamate. The relatively high stability of these independent anionic ligands in similar pockets indicated a strict requirement of stabilization by hydrogen bonds with the charged residues, suggesting a degree of plasticity within the binding pocket. Comparison of SM80.1 structure with those of other 7S vicilins indicated conservation of putative binding pocket for anionic ligands. Here we propose the possibility of trapping of these ligands in the protein for their requirement in the metabolic processes. PMID:27004988

  11. Crystal structure of the vicilin from Solanum melongena reveals existence of different anionic ligands in structurally similar pockets.

    PubMed

    Jain, Abha; Kumar, Ashish; Salunke, Dinakar M

    2016-01-01

    Crystal structure of a vicilin, SM80.1, was determined towards exploring its possible physiological functions. The protein was purified from Solanum melongena by combination of ammonium sulphate fractionation and size exclusion chromatography. Structure was determined ab initio at resolution of 1.5 Å by X-ray crystallography showing the three-dimensional topology of the trimeric protein. Each monomer of SM80.1 consists of two similar domains with hydrophobic binding pocket and each accommodating different ligands, i.e. acetate and pyroglutamate. The relatively high stability of these independent anionic ligands in similar pockets indicated a strict requirement of stabilization by hydrogen bonds with the charged residues, suggesting a degree of plasticity within the binding pocket. Comparison of SM80.1 structure with those of other 7S vicilins indicated conservation of putative binding pocket for anionic ligands. Here we propose the possibility of trapping of these ligands in the protein for their requirement in the metabolic processes.

  12. Crystal structure of the vicilin from Solanum melongena reveals existence of different anionic ligands in structurally similar pockets

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Abha; Kumar, Ashish; Salunke, Dinakar M.

    2016-01-01

    Crystal structure of a vicilin, SM80.1, was determined towards exploring its possible physiological functions. The protein was purified from Solanum melongena by combination of ammonium sulphate fractionation and size exclusion chromatography. Structure was determined ab initio at resolution of 1.5 Å by X-ray crystallography showing the three-dimensional topology of the trimeric protein. Each monomer of SM80.1 consists of two similar domains with hydrophobic binding pocket and each accommodating different ligands, i.e. acetate and pyroglutamate. The relatively high stability of these independent anionic ligands in similar pockets indicated a strict requirement of stabilization by hydrogen bonds with the charged residues, suggesting a degree of plasticity within the binding pocket. Comparison of SM80.1 structure with those of other 7S vicilins indicated conservation of putative binding pocket for anionic ligands. Here we propose the possibility of trapping of these ligands in the protein for their requirement in the metabolic processes. PMID:27004988

  13. 30 CFR 57.19103 - Dumping facilities and loading pockets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Dumping facilities and loading pockets. 57.19103 Section 57.19103 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... MINES Personnel Hoisting Shafts § 57.19103 Dumping facilities and loading pockets. Dumping...

  14. 30 CFR 56.19103 - Dumping facilities and loading pockets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Dumping facilities and loading pockets. 56.19103 Section 56.19103 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... Personnel Hoisting Shafts § 56.19103 Dumping facilities and loading pockets. Dumping facilities and...

  15. Depth of penetration in periodontal pockets with oral irrigation.

    PubMed

    Eakle, W S; Ford, C; Boyd, R L

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of the Water Pik oral irrigator as a vehicle for delivering an aqueous solution into periodontal pockets. Plaque-disclosing dye diluted with sterile saline solution was applied with the irrigator toward the gingival margins of teeth at 90 degrees and at 45 degrees prior to their extraction. The mean % penetration measured between a reference notch at the gingival crest and the periodontal ligament at the bottom of the pocket showed no statistical difference between the two angles of application. Penetration ranged from 44% to 71%, the lowest being into pockets 4-7 mm; higher mean penetration was noted in both subgroups 0-3 and greater than 7 mm. No statistical difference was found between proximal and facial or lingual surfaces, maxilla and mandible, existence of tooth contact, and proximal tissue contour or consistency. The mean % penetration was independent of pocket depth (chi 2 analysis). Correlation between pocket depth and mean penetration was low for all but one subgroup (90 degrees application and pockets greater than 7 mm). The results suggest that the oral irrigator will deliver an aqueous solution into periodontal pockets and will penetrate on average to approximately half the depth of the pockets. PMID:3003166

  16. Head-group acylation of monogalactosyldiacylglycerol is a common stress response, and the acyl-galactose acyl composition varies with the plant species and applied stress.

    PubMed

    Vu, Hieu Sy; Roth, Mary R; Tamura, Pamela; Samarakoon, Thilani; Shiva, Sunitha; Honey, Samuel; Lowe, Kaleb; Schmelz, Eric A; Williams, Todd D; Welti, Ruth

    2014-04-01

    Formation of galactose-acylated monogalactosyldiacylglycerols has been shown to be induced by leaf homogenization, mechanical wounding, avirulent bacterial infection and thawing after snap-freezing. Here, lipidomic analysis using mass spectrometry showed that galactose-acylated monogalactosyldiacylglycerols, formed in wheat (Triticum aestivum) and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) leaves upon wounding, have acyl-galactose profiles that differ from those of wounded Arabidopsis thaliana, indicating that different plant species accumulate different acyl-galactose components in response to the same stress. Additionally, the composition of the acyl-galactose component of Arabidopsis acMGDG (galactose-acylated monogalactosyldiacylglycerol) depends on the stress treatment. After sub-lethal freezing treatment, acMGDG contained mainly non-oxidized fatty acids esterified to galactose, whereas mostly oxidized fatty acids accumulated on galactose after wounding or bacterial infection. Compositional data are consistent with acMGDG being formed in vivo by transacylation with fatty acids from digalactosyldiacylglycerols. Oxophytodienoic acid, an oxidized fatty acid, was more concentrated on the galactosyl ring of acylated monogalactosyldiacylglycerols than in galactolipids in general. Also, oxidized fatty acid-containing acylated monogalactosyldiacylglycerols increased cumulatively when wounded Arabidopsis leaves were wounded again. These findings suggest that, in Arabidopsis, the pool of galactose-acylated monogalactosyldiacylglycerols may serve to sequester oxidized fatty acids during stress responses. PMID:24286212

  17. Acylation of Escherichia coli Hemolysin: A Unique Protein Lipidation Mechanism Underlying Toxin Function

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, Peter; Koronakis, Vassilis; Hughes, Colin

    1998-01-01

    The pore-forming hemolysin (HlyA) of Escherichia coli represents a unique class of bacterial toxins that require a posttranslational modification for activity. The inactive protoxin pro-HlyA is activated intracellularly by amide linkage of fatty acids to two internal lysine residues 126 amino acids apart, directed by the cosynthesized HlyC protein with acyl carrier protein as the fatty acid donor. This action distinguishes HlyC from all bacterial acyltransferases such as the lipid A, lux-specific, and nodulation acyltransferases, and from eukaryotic transferases such as N-myristoyl transferases, prenyltransferases, and thioester palmitoyltransferases. Most lipids directly attached to proteins may be classed as N-terminal amide-linked and internal ester-linked acyl groups and C-terminal ether-linked isoprenoid groups. The acylation of HlyA and related toxins does not equate to these but does appear related to a small number of eukaryotic proteins that include inflammatory cytokines and mitogenic and cholinergic receptors. While the location and structure of lipid moieties on proteins vary, there are common effects on membrane affinity and/or protein-protein interactions. Despite being acylated at two residues, HlyA does not possess a “double-anchor” motif and does not have an electrostatic switch, although its dependence on calcium binding for activity suggests that the calcium-myristoyl switch may have relevance. The acyl chains on HlyA may provide anchorage points onto the surface of the host cell lipid bilayer. These could then enhance protein-protein interactions either between HlyA and components of a host signal transduction pathway to influence cytokine production or between HlyA monomers to bring about oligomerization during pore formation. PMID:9618444

  18. Head-group acylation of monogalactosyldiacylglycerol is a common stress response, and the acyl-galactose acyl composition varies with the plant species and applied stress

    PubMed Central

    Vu, Hieu Sy; Roth, Mary R.; Tamura, Pamela; Samarakoon, Thilani; Shiva, Sunitha; Honey, Samuel; Lowe, Kaleb; Schmelz, Eric A.; Williams, Todd D.; Welti, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    Formation of galactose-acylated monogalactosyldiacylglycerols has been shown to be induced by leaf homogenization, mechanical wounding, avirulent bacterial infection, and thawing after snap-freezing. Here, lipidomic analysis using mass spectrometry showed that galactose-acylated monogalactosyldiacylglycerols, formed in wheat (Triticum aestivum) and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) leaves upon wounding, have acyl-galactose profiles that differ from those of wounded Arabidopsis thaliana, indicating that different plant species accumulate different acyl-galactose components in response to the same stress. Additionally, the composition of the acyl-galactose component of Arabidopsis acMGDG depends on the stress treatment. After sub-lethal freezing treatment, acMGDG contained mainly non-oxidized fatty acids esterified to galactose, whereas mostly oxidized fatty acids accumulated on galactose after wounding or bacterial infection. Compositional data are consistent with acMGDG being formed in vivo by transacylation with fatty acids from digalactosyldiacylglycerols. Oxophytodienoic acid, an oxidized fatty acid, was more concentrated on the galactosyl ring of acylated monogalactosyldiacylglycerols than in galactolipids in general. Also, oxidized fatty acid-containing acylated monogalactosyldiacylglycerols increased cumulatively when wounded Arabidopsis leaves were wounded again. These findings suggest that, in Arabidopsis, the pool of galactose-acylated monogalactosyldiacylglycerols may serve to sequester oxidized fatty acids during stress responses. PMID:24286212

  19. Non-hydrolyzable Diubiquitin Probes Reveal Linkage-Specific Reactivity of Deubiquitylating Enzymes Mediated by S2 Pockets

    PubMed Central

    Flierman, Dennis; van der Heden van Noort, Gerbrand J.; Ekkebus, Reggy; Geurink, Paul P.; Mevissen, Tycho E.T.; Hospenthal, Manuela K.; Komander, David; Ovaa, Huib

    2016-01-01

    Summary Ubiquitin chains are important post-translational modifications that control a large number of cellular processes. Chains can be formed via different linkages, which determines the type of signal they convey. Deubiquitylating enzymes (DUBs) regulate ubiquitylation status by trimming or removing chains from attached proteins. DUBs can contain several ubiquitin-binding pockets, which confer specificity toward differently linked chains. Most tools for monitoring DUB specificity target binding pockets on opposing sides of the active site; however, some DUBs contain additional pockets. Therefore, reagents targeting additional pockets are essential to fully understand linkage specificity. We report the development of active site-directed probes and fluorogenic substrates, based on non-hydrolyzable diubiquitin, that are equipped with a C-terminal warhead or a fluorogenic activity reporter moiety. We demonstrate that various DUBs in lysates display differential reactivity toward differently linked diubiquitin probes, as exemplified by the proteasome-associated DUB USP14. In addition, OTUD2 and OTUD3 show remarkable linkage-specific reactivity with our diubiquitin-based reagents. PMID:27066941

  20. Acylated and unacylated ghrelin impair skeletal muscle atrophy in mice.

    PubMed

    Porporato, Paolo E; Filigheddu, Nicoletta; Reano, Simone; Ferrara, Michele; Angelino, Elia; Gnocchi, Viola F; Prodam, Flavia; Ronchi, Giulia; Fagoonee, Sharmila; Fornaro, Michele; Chianale, Federica; Baldanzi, Gianluca; Surico, Nicola; Sinigaglia, Fabiola; Perroteau, Isabelle; Smith, Roy G; Sun, Yuxiang; Geuna, Stefano; Graziani, Andrea

    2013-02-01

    Cachexia is a wasting syndrome associated with cancer, AIDS, multiple sclerosis, and several other disease states. It is characterized by weight loss, fatigue, loss of appetite, and skeletal muscle atrophy and is associated with poor patient prognosis, making it an important treatment target. Ghrelin is a peptide hormone that stimulates growth hormone (GH) release and positive energy balance through binding to the receptor GHSR-1a. Only acylated ghrelin (AG), but not the unacylated form (UnAG), can bind GHSR-1a; however, UnAG and AG share several GHSR-1a-independent biological activities. Here we investigated whether UnAG and AG could protect against skeletal muscle atrophy in a GHSR-1a-independent manner. We found that both AG and UnAG inhibited dexamethasone-induced skeletal muscle atrophy and atrogene expression through PI3Kβ-, mTORC2-, and p38-mediated pathways in myotubes. Upregulation of circulating UnAG in mice impaired skeletal muscle atrophy induced by either fasting or denervation without stimulating muscle hypertrophy and GHSR-1a-mediated activation of the GH/IGF-1 axis. In Ghsr-deficient mice, both AG and UnAG induced phosphorylation of Akt in skeletal muscle and impaired fasting-induced atrophy. These results demonstrate that AG and UnAG act on a common, unidentified receptor to block skeletal muscle atrophy in a GH-independent manner.

  1. The role of acyl-glucose in anthocyanin modifications.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Nobuhiro; Nishizaki, Yuzo; Ozeki, Yoshihiro; Miyahara, Taira

    2014-11-14

    Higher plants can produce a wide variety of anthocyanin molecules through modification of the six common anthocyanin aglycons that they present. Thus, hydrophilic anthocyanin molecules can be formed and stabilized by glycosylation and acylation. Two types of glycosyltransferase (GT) and acyltransferase (AT) have been identified, namely cytoplasmic GT and AT and vacuolar GT and AT. Cytoplasmic GT and AT utilize UDP-sugar and acyl-CoA as donor molecules, respectively, whereas both vacuolar GT and AT use acyl-glucoses as donor molecules. In carnation plants, vacuolar GT uses aromatic acyl-glucoses as the glucose donor in vivo; independently, vacuolar AT uses malylglucose, an aliphatic acyl-glucose, as the acyl-donor. In delphinium and Arabidopsis, p-hydroxybenzoylglucose and sinapoylglucose are used in vivo as bi-functional donor molecules by vacuolar GT and AT, respectively. The evolution of these enzymes has allowed delphinium and Arabidopsis to utilize unique donor molecules for production of highly modified anthocyanins.

  2. Physiological Consequences of Compartmentalized Acyl-CoA Metabolism*

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Daniel E.; Young, Pamela A.; Klett, Eric L.; Coleman, Rosalind A.

    2015-01-01

    Meeting the complex physiological demands of mammalian life requires strict control of the metabolism of long-chain fatty acyl-CoAs because of the multiplicity of their cellular functions. Acyl-CoAs are substrates for energy production; stored within lipid droplets as triacylglycerol, cholesterol esters, and retinol esters; esterified to form membrane phospholipids; or used to activate transcriptional and signaling pathways. Indirect evidence suggests that acyl-CoAs do not wander freely within cells, but instead, are channeled into specific pathways. In this review, we will discuss the evidence for acyl-CoA compartmentalization, highlight the key modes of acyl-CoA regulation, and diagram potential mechanisms for controlling acyl-CoA partitioning. PMID:26124277

  3. Detecting Local Ligand-Binding Site Similarity in Non-Homologous Proteins by Surface Patch Comparison

    PubMed Central

    Sael, Lee; Kihara, Daisuke

    2012-01-01

    Functional elucidation of proteins is one of the essential tasks in biology. Function of a protein, specifically, small ligand molecules that bind to a protein, can be predicted by finding similar local surface regions in binding sites of known proteins. Here, we developed an alignment free local surface comparison method for predicting a ligand molecule which binds to a query protein. The algorithm, named Patch-Surfer, represents a binding pocket as a combination of segmented surface patches, each of which is characterized by its geometrical shape, the electrostatic potential, the hydrophobicity, and the concaveness. Representing a pocket by a set of patches is effective to absorb difference of global pocket shape while capturing local similarity of pockets. The shape and the physicochemical properties of surface patches are represented using the 3D Zernike descriptor, which is a series expansion of mathematical 3D function. Two pockets are compared using a modified weighted bipartite matching algorithm, which matches similar patches from the two pockets. Patch-Surfer was benchmarked on three datasets, which consist in total of 390 proteins that bind to one of 21 ligands. Patch-Surfer showed superior performance to existing methods including a global pocket comparison method, Pocket-Surfer, which we have previously introduced. Particularly, as intended, the accuracy showed large improvement for flexible ligand molecules, which bind to pockets in different conformations. PMID:22275074

  4. Probing the Mechanism of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis [beta]-Ketoacyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Synthase III mtFabH: Factors Influencing Catalysis and Substrate Specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Alistair K.; Sridharan, Sudharsan; Kremer, Laurent; Lindenberg, Sandra; Dover, Lynn G.; Sacchettini, James C.; Besra, Gurdyal S.

    2010-11-30

    Mycolic acids are the dominant feature of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis cell wall. These {alpha}-alkyl, {beta}-hydroxy fatty acids are formed by the condensation of two fatty acids, a long meromycolic acid and a shorter C{sub 24}-C{sub 26} fatty acid. The component fatty acids are produced via a combination of type I and II fatty acid synthases (FAS) with FAS-I products being elongated by FAS-II toward meromycolic acids. The {beta}-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) synthase III encoded by mtfabH (mtFabH) links FAS-I and FAS-II, catalyzing the condensation of FAS-I-derived acyl-CoAs with malonyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP). The acyl-CoA chain length specificity of mtFabH was assessed in vitro; the enzyme extended longer, physiologically relevant acyl-CoA primers when paired with AcpM, its natural partner, than with Escherichia coli ACP. The ability of the enzyme to use E. coli ACP suggests that a similar mode of binding is likely with both ACPs, yet it is clear that unique factors inherent to AcpM modulate the substrate specificity of mtFabH. Mutation of proposed key mtFabH residues was used to define their catalytic roles. Substitution of supposed acyl-CoA binding residues reduced transacylation, with double substitutions totally abrogating activity. Mutation of Arg{sup 46} revealed its more critical role in malonyl-AcpM decarboxylation than in the acyl-CoA binding role. Interestingly, this effect was suppressed intragenically by Arg{sup 161} {yields} Ala substitution. Our structural studies suggested that His{sup 258}, previously implicated in malonyl-ACP decarboxylation, also acts as an anchor point for a network of water molecules that we propose promotes deprotonation and transacylation of Cys{sup 122}.

  5. Investigation on the gas pockets in a rotodynamic multiphase pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J. Y.; Li, Y. J.; Cai, S. J.; Zhu, H. W.; Zhang, Y. X.

    2016-05-01

    The appearance of gas pockets has an obvious impact on the performance of the rotodynamic multiphase pump. In order to study the formation of gas pockets in the pump and its effects on pump's performance, the unsteady numerical simulation and the visualization experiments were done to investigate gas pockets in a three-stage rotodynamic multiphase pump developed by authors. Meanwhile, the mixture of water and air was selected as the medium. According to the distributions of pressure, gas volume fraction and velocity vector in three compression cells in unsteady flow process, the process of the formation of gas pockets in the pump were analysed generally. The visualization experiments were used to verify the validity of the numerical simulation. The results will be benefit for the hydraulic design of the compression cell of rotodynamic multiphase pump.

  6. 15. MACHINERY DETAILS: LATCH WHEEL BRACKET, LATCH POCKET, LOCK BAR, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. MACHINERY DETAILS: LATCH WHEEL BRACKET, LATCH POCKET, LOCK BAR, LATCH CRADLE, SPLIT COLLAR, ETC. - Niantic River Swing Bridge, Spanning Niantic River between East Lyme & Waterford, Old Lyme, New London County, CT

  7. Behind the Scenes: Astronauts Pockets Deep in Mystery

    NASA Video Gallery

    Host Mike Massimino returns to the pre-launch suit up room at the Kennedy Space Center to reexamine the question: what's inside all those pockets of the astronauts' big orange suits? Find out on "N...

  8. Structure of YciA from Haemophilus influenzae (HI0827), a Hexameric Broad Specificity Acyl-Coenzyme A Thioesterase

    SciTech Connect

    Willis, Mark A.; Zhuang, Zhihao; Song, Feng; Howard, Andrew; Dunaway-Mariano, Debra; Herzberg, Osnat

    2008-04-02

    The crystal structure of HI0827 from Haemophilus influenzae Rd KW20, initially annotated 'hypothetical protein' in sequence databases, exhibits an acyl-coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) thioesterase 'hot dog' fold with a trimer of dimers oligomeric association, a novel assembly for this enzyme family. In studies described in the preceding paper [Zhuang, Z., Song, F., Zhao, H., Li, L., Cao, J., Eisenstein, E., Herzberg, O., and Dunaway-Mariano, D. (2008) Biochemistry 47, 2789-2796], HI0827 is shown to be an acyl-CoA thioesterase that acts on a wide range of acyl-CoA compounds. Two substrate binding sites are located across the dimer interface. The binding sites are occupied by two CoA molecules, one with full occupancy and the second only partially occupied. The CoA molecules, acquired from HI0827-expressing Escherichia coli cells, remained tightly bound to the enzyme through the protein purification steps. The difference in CoA occupancies indicates a different substrate affinity for each of the binding sites, which in turn implies that the enzyme might be subject to allosteric regulation. Mutagenesis studies have shown that the replacement of the putative catalytic carboxylate Asp44 with an alanine residue abolishes activity. The impact of this mutation is seen in the crystal structure of D44A HI0827. Whereas the overall fold and assembly of the mutant protein are the same as those of the wild-type enzyme, the CoA ligands are absent. The dimer interface is perturbed, and the channel that accommodates the thioester acyl chain is more open and wider than that observed in the wild-type enzyme. A model of intact substrate bound to wild-type HI0827 provides a structural rationale for the broad substrate range.

  9. Acyl-acyl carrier protein as a source of fatty acids for bacterial bioluminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Byers, D.M.; Meighen, E.A.

    1985-09-01

    Pulse-chase experiments with (/sup 3/H)tetradecanoic acid and ATP showed that the bioluminescence-related 32-kDa acyltransferase from Vibrio harveyi can specifically catalyze the deacylation of a /sup 3/H-labeled 18-kDa protein observed in extracts of this bacterium. The 18-kDa protein has been partially purified and its physical and chemical properties strongly indicate that it is fatty acyl-acyl carrier protein (acyl-ACP). Both this V. harveyi (/sup 3/H)acylprotein and (/sup 3/H)palmitoyl-ACP from Escherichia coli were substrates in vitro for either the V. harveyi 32-kDa acyltransferase or the analogous enzyme (34K) from Photobacterium phosphoreum. TLC analysis indicated that the hexane-soluble product of the reaction is fatty acid. No significant cleavage of either E. coli or V. harveyi tetradecanoyl-ACP was observed in extracts of these bacteria unless the 32-kDa or 34K acyltransferase was present. Since these enzymes are believed to be responsible for the supply of fatty acids for reduction to form the aldehyde substrate of luciferase, the above results suggest that long-chain acyl-ACP is the source of fatty acids for bioluminescence.

  10. BILBO1 Is a Scaffold Protein of the Flagellar Pocket Collar in the Pathogen Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    Florimond, Célia; Sahin, Annelise; Vidilaseris, Keni; Dong, Gang; Landrein, Nicolas; Dacheux, Denis; Albisetti, Anna; Byard, Edward H.; Bonhivers, Mélanie; Robinson, Derrick R.

    2015-01-01

    The flagellar pocket (FP) of the pathogen Trypanosoma brucei is an important single copy structure that is formed by the invagination of the pellicular membrane. It is the unique site of endo- and exocytosis and is required for parasite pathogenicity. The FP consists of distinct structural sub-domains with the least explored being the annulus/horseshoe shaped flagellar pocket collar (FPC). To date the only known component of the FPC is the protein BILBO1, a cytoskeleton protein that has a N-terminus that contains an ubiquitin-like fold, two EF-hand domains, plus a large C-terminal coiled-coil domain. BILBO1 has been shown to bind calcium, but in this work we demonstrate that mutating either or both calcium-binding domains prevents calcium binding. The expression of deletion or mutated forms of BILBO1 in trypanosomes and mammalian cells demonstrate that the coiled-coil domain is necessary and sufficient for the formation of BILBO1 polymers. This is supported by Yeast two-hybrid analysis. Expression of full-length BILBO1 in mammalian cells induces the formation of linear polymers with comma and globular shaped termini, whereas mutation of the canonical calcium-binding domain resulted in the formation of helical polymers and mutation in both EF-hand domains prevented the formation of linear polymers. We also demonstrate that in T. brucei the coiled-coil domain is able to target BILBO1 to the FPC and to form polymers whilst the EF-hand domains influence polymers shape. This data indicates that BILBO1 has intrinsic polymer forming properties and that binding calcium can modulate the form of these polymers. We discuss whether these properties can influence the formation of the FPC. PMID:25822645

  11. Acylated iridoids with cytotoxicity from Valeriana jatamansi.

    PubMed

    Lin, Sheng; Shen, Yun-Heng; Li, Hui-Liang; Yang, Xian-Wen; Chen, Tao; Lu, Long-Hai; Huang, Zheng-Sheng; Liu, Run-Hui; Xu, Xi-Ke; Zhang, Wei-Dong; Wang, Hui

    2009-04-01

    Thirteen new acylated iridoids, jatamanvaltrates A-M (1-13), together with nine known valepotriates (14-22), were isolated from the whole plants of Valeriana jatamansi (syn. Valeriana wallichii). The structures of these new compounds were assigned by detailed interpretation of spectroscopic data. Jatamanvaltrates D (4) and H (9) are the first examples of naturally occurring valepotriates containing an o-hydroxybenzoyloxy moiety at C-10. All isolated compounds were tested for their cytotoxicity against lung adenocarcinoma (A549), metastatic prostate cancer (PC-3M), colon cancer (HCT-8), and hepatoma (Bel7402) cell lines.

  12. Biochemical and Structural Characterization of Germicidin Synthase: Analysis of a Type III Polyketide Synthase That Employs Acyl-ACP as a Starter Unit Donor

    SciTech Connect

    Chemler, Joseph A.; Buchholz, Tonia J.; Geders, Todd W.; Akey, David L.; Rath, Christopher M.; Chlipala, George E.; Smith, Janet L.; Sherman, David H.

    2012-08-10

    Germicidin synthase (Gcs) from Streptomyces coelicolor is a type III polyketide synthase (PKS) with broad substrate flexibility for acyl groups linked through a thioester bond to either coenzyme A (CoA) or acyl carrier protein (ACP). Germicidin synthesis was reconstituted in vitro by coupling Gcs with fatty acid biosynthesis. Since Gcs has broad substrate flexibility, we directly compared the kinetic properties of Gcs with both acyl-ACP and acyl-CoA. The catalytic efficiency of Gcs for acyl-ACP was 10-fold higher than for acyl-CoA, suggesting a strong preference toward carrier protein starter unit transfer. The 2.9 {angstrom} germicidin synthase crystal structure revealed canonical type III PKS architecture along with an unusual helical bundle of unknown function that appears to extend the dimerization interface. A pair of arginine residues adjacent to the active site affect catalytic activity but not ACP binding. This investigation provides new and surprising information about the interactions between type III PKSs and ACPs that will facilitate the construction of engineered systems for production of novel polyketides.

  13. Acyl-ACP Substrate Recognition in Burkholderia mallei BmaI1 Acyl-Homoserine Lactone Synthase

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL) autoinducer mediated quorum sensing regulates virulence in several pathogenic bacteria. The hallmark of an efficient quorum sensing system relies on the tight specificity in the signal generated by each bacterium. Since AHL signal specificity is derived from the acyl-chain of the acyl-ACP (ACP = acyl carrier protein) substrate, AHL synthase enzymes must recognize and react with the native acyl-ACP with high catalytic efficiency while keeping reaction rates with non-native acyl-ACPs low. The mechanism of acyl-ACP substrate recognition in these enzymes, however, remains elusive. In this study, we investigated differences in catalytic efficiencies for shorter and longer chain acyl-ACP substrates reacting with an octanoyl-homoserine lactone synthase Burkholderia mallei BmaI1. With the exception of two-carbon shorter hexanoyl-ACP, the catalytic efficiencies of butyryl-ACP, decanoyl-ACP, and octanoyl-CoA reacting with BmaI1 decreased by greater than 20-fold compared to the native octanoyl-ACP substrate. Furthermore, we also noticed kinetic cooperativity when BmaI1 reacted with non-native acyl-donor substrates. Our kinetic data suggest that non-native acyl-ACP substrates are unable to form a stable and productive BmaI1·acyl-ACP·SAM ternary complex and are thus effectively discriminated by the enzyme. These results offer insights into the molecular basis of substrate recognition for the BmaI1 enzyme. PMID:25215658

  14. Emulsifying properties of acylated rapeseed (Brassica napus L.) peptides.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Vioque, Raúl; Bagger, Christian L; Larré, Colette; Guéguen, Jacques

    2004-03-01

    A peptide fraction having an average size of 5.6 amino acids has been purified from a rapeseed hydrolyzate, acylated using C(10)-C(14) acyl chlorides, and the surface tension values at the air-water interface and emulsifying properties studied. As compared with standard surface-active proteins, such as bovine serum albumin (BSA), and with detergents such as sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), acylated peptides exhibited particular surface characteristics. The surface tension at air-water interface of acylated peptides ranged from 29.1 to 37.8 mN/m at equilibrium; these values were considerably lower than those for BSA and closer those for SDS, suggesting that acylated peptides pack at the air-water interface more like detergents than like proteins. The adsorption of acylated peptides to the oil-water interface was slower than for SDS or BSA, as deduced from the rather large size of oil droplets in emulsions (31-17 microm). Consequently, these emulsions creamed extensively during aging. Nevertheless, emulsions generated from acylated peptides were in general more stable to phase separation than those prepared from SDS. The C(14) acylated peptides were more effective for generating emulsions than the C(10) and C(12) derivatives, especially concerning the stability of emulsions against coalescence and phase separation, which was better than SDS and close to BSA.

  15. Understanding Acyl Chain and Glycerolipid Metabolism in Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Ohlrogge, John B.

    2013-11-05

    Progress is reported in these areas: acyl-editing in initial eukaryotic lipid assembly in soybean seeds; identification and characterization of two Arabidopsis thaliana lysophosphatidyl acyltransferases with preference for lysophosphatidylethanolamine; and characterization and subcellular distribution of lysolipid acyl transferase activity of pea leaves.

  16. Characterization of the "Escherichia Coli" Acyl Carrier Protein Phosphodiesterase

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    Acyl carrier protein (ACP) is a small essential protein that functions as a carrier of the acyl intermediates of fatty acid synthesis. ACP requires the posttranslational attachment of a 4'phosphopantetheine functional group, derived from CoA, in order to perform its metabolic function. A Mn[superscript 2+] dependent enzymatic activity that removes…

  17. Are There Acyl-Homoserine Lactones within Mammalian Intestines?

    PubMed Central

    Swearingen, Matthew C.; Sabag-Daigle, Anice

    2013-01-01

    Many Proteobacteria are capable of quorum sensing using N-acyl-homoserine lactone (acyl-HSL) signaling molecules that are synthesized by LuxI or LuxM homologs and detected by transcription factors of the LuxR family. Most quorum-sensing species have at least one LuxR and one LuxI homolog. However, members of the Escherichia, Salmonella, Klebsiella, and Enterobacter genera possess only a single LuxR homolog, SdiA, and no acyl-HSL synthase. The most obvious hypothesis is that these organisms are eavesdropping on acyl-HSL production within the complex microbial communities of the mammalian intestinal tract. However, there is currently no evidence of acyl-HSLs being produced within normal intestinal communities. A few intestinal pathogens, including Yersinia enterocolitica, do produce acyl-HSLs, and Salmonella can detect them during infection. Therefore, a more refined hypothesis is that SdiA orthologs are used for eavesdropping on other quorum-sensing pathogens in the host. However, the lack of acyl-HSL signaling among the normal intestinal residents is a surprising finding given the complexity of intestinal communities. In this review, we examine the evidence for and against the possibility of acyl-HSL signaling molecules in the mammalian intestine and discuss the possibility that related signaling molecules might be present and awaiting discovery. PMID:23144246

  18. Inhibition of DNA-Topoisomerase I by Acylated Triterpene Saponins from Pittosporum angustifolium Lodd.

    PubMed

    Bäcker, Christian; Drwal, Malgorzata N; Preissner, Robert; Lindequist, Ulrike

    2016-04-01

    Previous phytochemical investigation of the leaves and seeds of Pittosporum angustifolium Lodd. led to the isolation and structural elucidation of polyphenols and triterpene saponins. Evaluation for cytotoxicity of isolated saponins revealed that the predominant structural feature for a cytotoxic activity are acyl substituents at the oleanane aglycon backbone. The present work reports the results of a screening of 10 selected acylated saponins for their potential to inhibit the human DNA-topoisomerase I, giving rise to IC50 values in a range of 2.8-46.5 µM. To clarify the mode of observed cytotoxic action and, moreover, to distinguish from a pure surfactant effect which is commonly accompanied with saponins, these results indicate an involvement of the topoisomerase I and its role as a possible target structure for a cytotoxic activity. In addition, computational predictions of the fitting of saponins to the topoisomerase I-DNA complex, indicate a similar binding mode to that of clinically used topoisomerase I inhibitors. Ten acylated triterpene saponins from Pittosporum angustifolium were investigated for their potential to inhibit the human DNA-topoisomerase I and computational predictions of the fitting of saponins to the topoisomerase I-DNA complex were carried out. PMID:26803837

  19. The role of a novel auxiliary pocket in bacterial phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase druggability.

    PubMed

    Abibi, Ayome; Ferguson, Andrew D; Fleming, Paul R; Gao, Ning; Hajec, Laurel I; Hu, Jun; Laganas, Valerie A; McKinney, David C; McLeod, Sarah M; Prince, D Bryan; Shapiro, Adam B; Buurman, Ed T

    2014-08-01

    The antimicrobial activity of phenyl-thiazolylurea-sulfonamides against Staphylococcus aureus PheRS are dependent upon phenylalanine levels in the extracellular fluids. Inhibitor efficacy in animal models of infection is substantially diminished by dietary phenylalanine intake, thereby reducing the perceived clinical utility of this inhibitor class. The search for novel antibacterial compounds against Gram-negative pathogens led to a re-evaluation of this phenomenon, which is shown here to be unique to S. aureus. Inhibition of macromolecular syntheses and characterization of novel resistance mutations in Escherichia coli demonstrate that antimicrobial activity of phenyl-thiazolylurea-sulfonamides is mediated by PheRS inhibition, validating this enzyme as a viable drug discovery target for Gram-negative pathogens. A search for novel inhibitors of PheRS yielded three novel chemical starting points. NMR studies were used to confirm direct target engagement for phenylalanine-competitive hits. The crystallographic structure of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PheRS defined the binding modes of these hits and revealed an auxiliary hydrophobic pocket that is positioned adjacent to the phenylalanine binding site. Three viable inhibitor-resistant mutants were mapped to this pocket, suggesting that this region is a potential liability for drug discovery. PMID:24936059

  20. The Role of a Novel Auxiliary Pocket in Bacterial Phenylalanyl-tRNA Synthetase Druggability

    PubMed Central

    Abibi, Ayome; Ferguson, Andrew D.; Fleming, Paul R.; Gao, Ning; Hajec, Laurel I.; Hu, Jun; Laganas, Valerie A.; McKinney, David C.; McLeod, Sarah M.; Prince, D. Bryan; Shapiro, Adam B.; Buurman, Ed T.

    2014-01-01

    The antimicrobial activity of phenyl-thiazolylurea-sulfonamides against Staphylococcus aureus PheRS are dependent upon phenylalanine levels in the extracellular fluids. Inhibitor efficacy in animal models of infection is substantially diminished by dietary phenylalanine intake, thereby reducing the perceived clinical utility of this inhibitor class. The search for novel antibacterial compounds against Gram-negative pathogens led to a re-evaluation of this phenomenon, which is shown here to be unique to S. aureus. Inhibition of macromolecular syntheses and characterization of novel resistance mutations in Escherichia coli demonstrate that antimicrobial activity of phenyl-thiazolylurea-sulfonamides is mediated by PheRS inhibition, validating this enzyme as a viable drug discovery target for Gram-negative pathogens. A search for novel inhibitors of PheRS yielded three novel chemical starting points. NMR studies were used to confirm direct target engagement for phenylalanine-competitive hits. The crystallographic structure of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PheRS defined the binding modes of these hits and revealed an auxiliary hydrophobic pocket that is positioned adjacent to the phenylalanine binding site. Three viable inhibitor-resistant mutants were mapped to this pocket, suggesting that this region is a potential liability for drug discovery. PMID:24936059

  1. Lysine fatty acylation promotes lysosomal targeting of TNF-α

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hong; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Lin, Hening

    2016-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) is a proinflammation cytokine secreted by various cells. Understanding its secretive pathway is important to understand the biological functions of TNF-α and diseases associated with TNF-α. TNF-α is one of the first proteins known be modified by lysine fatty acylation (e.g. myristoylation). We previously demonstrated that SIRT6, a member of the mammalian sirtuin family of enzymes, can remove the fatty acyl modification on TNF-α and promote its secretion. However, the mechanistic details about how lysine fatty acylation regulates TNF-α secretion have been unknown. Here we present experimental data supporting that lysine fatty acylation promotes lysosomal targeting of TNF-α. The result is an important first step toward understanding the biological functions of lysine fatty acylation. PMID:27079798

  2. Water and ligand entry in myoglobin: assessing the speed and extent of heme pocket hydration after CO photodissociation.

    PubMed

    Goldbeck, Robert A; Bhaskaran, Shyam; Ortega, Cheri; Mendoza, Juan L; Olson, John S; Soman, Jayashree; Kliger, David S; Esquerra, Raymond M

    2006-01-31

    A previously undescribed spectrokinetic assay for the entry of water into the distal heme pocket of wild-type and mutant myoglobins is presented. Nanosecond photolysis difference spectra were measured in the visible bands of sperm whale myoglobin as a function of distal pocket mutation and temperature. A small blue shift in the 560-nm deoxy absorption peak marked water entry several hundred nanoseconds after CO photodissociation. The observed rate suggests that water entry is rate-limited by the escape of internal dissociated CO. The heme pocket hydration and geminate recombination yields were found to be the primary factors controlling the overall bimolecular association rate constants for CO binding to the mutants studied. The kinetic analysis provides estimates of 84%, 60%, 40%, 0%, and 99% for the steady-state hydrations of wild-type, H64Q, H64A, H64L, and V68F deoxymyoglobin, respectively. The second-order rate constants for CO and H(2)O entry into the empty distal pocket of myoglobin are markedly different, 8 x 10(7) and 2 x 10(5) M(-1).s(-1), respectively, suggesting that hydrophobic partitioning of the apolar gas from the aqueous phase into the relatively apolar protein interior lowers the free energy barrier for CO entry.

  3. Functional Consequences of the Open Distal Pocket of Dehaloperoxidase-Hemoglobin Observed by Time-Resolved X-ray Crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Junjie; Srajer, Vukica; Franzen, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Using time-resolved X-ray crystallography, we contrast a bifunctional dehaloperoxidase-hemoglobin (DHP) with previously studied examples of myoglobin and hemoglobin in order to understand the functional role of the distal pocket of globins. One key functional difference between the DHP and other globins is the requirement that H2O2 enter the distal pocket of oxyferrous DHP in order to displace O2 from the heme Fe atom and thereby activate the heme for the peroxidase function. The open architecture of DHP permits more than one molecule to simultaneously enter the distal pocket of the protein above the heme in order to facilitate the unique peroxidase cycle starting from the oxyferrous state. The time-resolved X-ray data show that the distal pocket of DHP lacks a protein valve found in the two other globins that have been studied previously. The photolyzed CO ligand trajectory in DHP does not have a docking site. Rather the CO moves immediately to the Xe-binding site. From there CO can escape, but also recombine an order of magnitude more rapidly than in other globins. The contrast with DHP dynamics and function more precisely defines the functional role of the multiple conformational states of myoglobin. Taken together with the high reduction potential of DHP, the open distal site helps to explain how a globin can also function as a peroxidase. PMID:24116924

  4. K2CO3-promoted formation of aryl esters from primary aryl amides by the acyl-acyl exchange process.

    PubMed

    Bian, Yongjun; Qu, Xingyu

    2016-04-28

    A new acyl-acyl exchange reaction has been developed for the formation of aryl esters from primary aryl amides. The reaction could occur under mild reaction conditions with catalytic quantities of K2CO3, and could afford moderate to good yields of the desired products. PMID:27035611

  5. Structure of the RNA-Binding Domain of Telomerase: Implications For RNA Recognition and Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Rouda,S.; Skordalakes, E.

    2007-01-01

    Telomerase, a ribonucleoprotein complex, replicates the linear ends of eukaryotic chromosomes, thus taking care of the 'end of replication problem.' TERT contains an essential and universally conserved domain (TRBD) that makes extensive contacts with the RNA (TER) component of the holoenzyme, and this interaction is thought to facilitate TERT/TER assembly and repeat-addition processivity. Here, we present a high-resolution structure of TRBD from Tetrahymena thermophila. The nearly all-helical structure comprises a nucleic acid-binding fold suitable for TER binding. An extended pocket on the surface of the protein, formed by two conserved motifs (CP and T motifs) comprises TRBD's RNA-binding pocket. The width and the chemical nature of this pocket suggest that it binds both single- and double-stranded RNA, possibly stem I, and the template boundary element (TBE). Moreover, the structure provides clues into the role of this domain in TERT/TER stabilization and telomerase repeat-addition processivity.

  6. An in silico algorithm for identifying stabilizing pockets in proteins: test case, the Y220C mutant of the p53 tumor suppressor protein.

    PubMed

    Bromley, Dennis; Bauer, Matthias R; Fersht, Alan R; Daggett, Valerie

    2016-09-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor protein performs a critical role in stimulating apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in response to oncogenic stress. The function of p53 can be compromised by mutation, leading to increased risk of cancer; approximately 50% of cancers are associated with mutations in the p53 gene, the majority of which are in the core DNA-binding domain. The Y220C mutation of p53, for example, destabilizes the core domain by 4 kcal/mol, leading to rapid denaturation and aggregation. The associated loss of tumor suppressor functionality is associated with approximately 75 000 new cancer cases every year. Destabilized p53 mutants can be 'rescued' and their function restored; binding of a small molecule into a pocket on the surface of mutant p53 can stabilize its wild-type structure and restore its function. Here, we describe an in silico algorithm for identifying potential rescue pockets, including the algorithm's integration with the Dynameomics molecular dynamics data warehouse and the DIVE visual analytics engine. We discuss the results of the application of the method to the Y220C p53 mutant, entailing finding a putative rescue pocket through MD simulations followed by an in silico search for stabilizing ligands that dock into the putative rescue pocket. The top three compounds from this search were tested experimentally and one of them bound in the pocket, as shown by nuclear magnetic resonance, and weakly stabilized the mutant. PMID:27503952

  7. An in silico algorithm for identifying stabilizing pockets in proteins: test case, the Y220C mutant of the p53 tumor suppressor protein.

    PubMed

    Bromley, Dennis; Bauer, Matthias R; Fersht, Alan R; Daggett, Valerie

    2016-09-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor protein performs a critical role in stimulating apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in response to oncogenic stress. The function of p53 can be compromised by mutation, leading to increased risk of cancer; approximately 50% of cancers are associated with mutations in the p53 gene, the majority of which are in the core DNA-binding domain. The Y220C mutation of p53, for example, destabilizes the core domain by 4 kcal/mol, leading to rapid denaturation and aggregation. The associated loss of tumor suppressor functionality is associated with approximately 75 000 new cancer cases every year. Destabilized p53 mutants can be 'rescued' and their function restored; binding of a small molecule into a pocket on the surface of mutant p53 can stabilize its wild-type structure and restore its function. Here, we describe an in silico algorithm for identifying potential rescue pockets, including the algorithm's integration with the Dynameomics molecular dynamics data warehouse and the DIVE visual analytics engine. We discuss the results of the application of the method to the Y220C p53 mutant, entailing finding a putative rescue pocket through MD simulations followed by an in silico search for stabilizing ligands that dock into the putative rescue pocket. The top three compounds from this search were tested experimentally and one of them bound in the pocket, as shown by nuclear magnetic resonance, and weakly stabilized the mutant.

  8. Friedel-Craft acylation of ar-himachalene: synthesis of acyl-ar-himachalene and a new acyl-hydroperoxide.

    PubMed

    Hossini, Issam; Harrad, Mohamed Anoir; Ait Ali, Mustapha; El Firdoussi, Larbi; Karim, Abdallah; Valerga, Pedro; Puerta, M Carmen

    2011-01-01

    Friedel-Craft acylation at 100 °C of 2,5,9,9-tetramethyl-6,7,8,9-tetrahydro-5H-benzocycloheptene [ar-himachalene], a sesquiterpenic hydrocarbon obtained by catalytic dehydrogenation of α-, β- and γ-himachalenes, produces a mixture of two compounds: (3,5,5,9-tetramethyl-6,7,8,9-tetrahydro-5H-benzocyclohepten-2-yl)-ethanone (2, in 69% yield), with a conserved reactant backbone, and 3, with a different skeleton, in 21% yield. The crystal structure of 3 reveals it to be 1-(8-ethyl-8-hydroperoxy-3,5,5-trimethyl-5,6,7,8-tetrahydronaphthalen-2-yl)-ethanone. In this compound O-H…O bonds form dimers. These hydrogen-bonds, in conjunction with weaker C-H…O interactions, form a more extended supramolecular arrangement in the crystal. PMID:21760570

  9. Binding kinetics of lock and key colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colón-Meléndez, Laura; Beltran-Villegas, Daniel J.; van Anders, Greg; Liu, Jun; Spellings, Matthew; Sacanna, Stefano; Pine, David J.; Glotzer, Sharon C.; Larson, Ronald G.; Solomon, Michael J.

    2015-05-01

    Using confocal microscopy and first passage time analysis, we measure and predict the rates of formation and breakage of polymer-depletion-induced bonds between lock-and-key colloidal particles and find that an indirect route to bond formation is accessed at a rate comparable to that of the direct formation of these bonds. In the indirect route, the pocket of the lock particle is accessed by nonspecific bonding of the key particle with the lock surface, followed by surface diffusion leading to specific binding in the pocket of the lock. The surprisingly high rate of indirect binding is facilitated by its high entropy relative to that of the pocket. Rate constants for forward and reverse transitions among free, nonspecific, and specific bonds are reported, compared to theoretical values, and used to determine the free energy difference between the nonspecific and specific binding states.

  10. Inhibitors of Foot and Mouth Disease Virus Targeting a Novel Pocket of the RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Cornelison, Ceili A.; Rai, Devendra K.; Matzek, Kayla B.; Leslie, Maxwell D.; Schafer, Elizabeth; Marchand, Bruno; Adedeji, Adeyemi; Michailidis, Eleftherios; Dorst, Christopher A.; Moran, Jennifer; Pautler, Christie; Rodriguez, Luis L.; McIntosh, Mark A.; Rieder, Elizabeth; Sarafianos, Stefan G.

    2010-01-01

    Background Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus (FMDV) is a picornavirus that infects cloven-hoofed animals and leads to severe losses in livestock production. In the case of an FMD outbreak, emergency vaccination requires at least 7 days to trigger an effective immune response. There are currently no approved inhibitors for the treatment or prevention of FMDV infections. Methodology/Principal Findings Using a luciferase-based assay we screened a library of compounds and identified seven novel inhibitors of 3Dpol, the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase of FMDV. The compounds inhibited specifically 3Dpol (IC50s from 2-17 µM) and not other viral or bacterial polymerases. Enzyme kinetic studies on the inhibition mechanism by compounds 5D9 and 7F8 showed that they are non-competitive inhibitors with respect to NTP and nucleic acid substrates. Molecular modeling and docking studies into the 3Dpol structure revealed an inhibitor binding pocket proximal to, but distinct from the 3Dpol catalytic site. Residues surrounding this pocket are conserved among all 60 FMDV subtypes. Site directed mutagenesis of two residues located at either side of the pocket caused distinct resistance to the compounds, demonstrating that they indeed bind at this site. Several compounds inhibited viral replication with 5D9 suppressing virus production in FMDV-infected cells with EC50 = 12 µM and EC90 = 20 µM). Significance We identified several non-competitive inhibitors of FMDV 3Dpol that target a novel binding pocket, which can be used for future structure-based drug design studies. Such studies can lead to the discovery of even more potent antivirals that could provide alternative or supplementary options to contain future outbreaks of FMD. PMID:21203539

  11. Side pockets provide the basis for a new mechanism of Kv channel–specific inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Marzian, Stefanie; Stansfeld, Phillip J; Rapedius, Markus; Rinné, Susanne; Nematian-Ardestani, Ehsan; Abbruzzese, Jennifer L; Steinmeyer, Klaus; Sansom, Mark S P; Sanguinetti, Michael C; Baukrowitz, Thomas; Decher, Niels

    2015-01-01

    Most known small-molecule inhibitors of voltage-gated ion channels have poor subtype specificity because they interact with a highly conserved binding site in the central cavity. Using alanine-scanning mutagenesis, electrophysiological recordings and molecular modeling, we have identified a new drug-binding site in Kv1.x channels. We report that Psora-4 can discriminate between related Kv channel subtypes because, in addition to binding the central pore cavity, it binds a second, less conserved site located in side pockets formed by the backsides of S5 and S6, the S4–S5 linker, part of the voltage sensor and the pore helix. Simultaneous drug occupation of both binding sites results in an extremely stable nonconducting state that confers high affinity, cooperativity, use-dependence and selectivity to Psora-4 inhibition of Kv1.x channels. This new mechanism of inhibition represents a molecular basis for the development of a new class of allosteric and selective voltage-gated channel inhibitors. PMID:23728494

  12. Ethics pocket cards: an educational tool for busy clinicians.

    PubMed

    Volpe, Rebecca L; Levi, Benjamin H; Blackhall, George F; Green, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    The adage "an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure" is widely used in healthcare settings and can be applied to the work of institutional clinical ethics committees. The model of clinical ethics consultation, however, is inherently reactive: a crisis or question emerges, and ethics experts are called to help. In an effort to employ a proactive component to the model of clinical ethics consultation (as well as to standardize our educational interventions), we developed ethics pocket cards. The purpose of this article is to: (1) describe the rationale for using ethics pocket cards, (2) provide examples of our cards, and (3) begin a dialogue about the potential uses of ethics pocket cards. In doing so, we hope to explore how such portable, economical devices can advance the goals of ethics consultation as well as the educational aims of ethics committees.

  13. Optimization of pocket milling operation of rectangular shapes

    SciTech Connect

    Andijani, A.

    1994-12-31

    An optimization model to setup machine parameters (feed, speed, width, and depth of cut) for pocket milling on a vertical mill is developed. We propose an approach to determine the optimal set of operating conditions that minimize the total milling cost. The part to be milled has a square or a rectangular shape. The pocket milling mathematical model in this paper is an explicit, multi-variable, nonlinear objective function, and nonlinear equality and inequality constraints. We provide a study of some optimization algorithms that are suitable for the optimization of the pocket milling operation. We describe the general and the relative features for each algorithm. However, the final choice of the best algorithm depends upon individual preference, experience, and the case being investigated. An illustrative example is presented.

  14. Acyl-acyl carrier protein thioesterase activity from sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) seeds.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Force, E; Cantisán, S; Serrano-Vega, M J; Garcés, R

    2000-10-01

    During sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) seed formation there was an active period of lipid biosynthesis between 12 and 28 days after flowering (DAF). The maximum in-vitro acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) thioesterase activities (EC 3.1.2.14) were found at 15 DAF, preceding the largest accumulation of lipid in the seed. Data from the apparent kinetic parameters, Vmax and Km, from seeds of 15 and 30 DAF, showed that changes in acyl-ACP thioesterase activity are not only quantitative, but also qualitative, since, although the preferred substrate was always oleoyl-ACP, the affinity for palmitoyl-ACP decreased, whereas that for stearoyl-ACP increased with seed maturation. Bisubstrate assays carried out at 30 DAF seemed to indicate that the total activity found in mature seeds is due to a single enzyme with 100/75/15 affinity for oleoyl-ACP/stearoyl-ACP/ palmitoyl-ACP. In contrast, at 15 DAF, enzymatic data together with partial sequences from cDNAs indicated the presence of at least two enzymes with different properties, a FatA-like thioesterase, with a high affinity for oleoyl-ACP, plus a FatB-like enzyme, with preference for long-chain saturated fatty acids, both being expressed during the active lipid biosynthesis period. Competition assays carried out with CAS-5, a mutant with a higher content of palmitic acid in the seed oil, indicated that a modified FatA-type thioesterase is involved in the mutant phenotype.

  15. Palladium-Catalyzed Environmentally Benign Acylation.

    PubMed

    Suchand, Basuli; Satyanarayana, Gedu

    2016-08-01

    Recent trends in research have gained an orientation toward developing efficient strategies using innocuous reagents. The earlier reported transition-metal-catalyzed carbonylations involved either toxic carbon monoxide (CO) gas as carbonylating agent or functional-group-assisted ortho sp(2) C-H activation (i.e., ortho acylation) or carbonylation by activation of the carbonyl group (i.e., via the formation of enamines). Contradicting these methods, here we describe an environmentally benign process, [Pd]-catalyzed direct carbonylation starting from simple and commercially available iodo arenes and aldehydes, for the synthesis of a wide variety of ketones. Moreover, this method comprises direct coupling of iodoarenes with aldehydes without activation of the carbonyl and also without directing group assistance. Significantly, the strategy was successfully applied to the synthesis n-butylphthalide and pitofenone. PMID:27377566

  16. A pocket model for aluminum agglomeration in composite propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, N. S.

    1981-01-01

    This paper presents a model for the purpose of estimating the fraction of aluminum powder that will form agglomerates at the surface of deflagrating composite propellants. The basic idea is that the fraction agglomerated depends upon the amount of aluminum that melts within effective binder pocket volumes framed by oxidizer particles. The effective pocket depends upon the ability of ammonium perchlorate modals to encapsulate the aluminum and provide a local temperature sufficient to ignite the aluminum. Model results are discussed in the light of data showing effects of propellant formulation variables and pressure.

  17. NOTE: Cell-phone interference with pocket dosimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djajaputra, David; Nehru, Ramasamy; Bruch, Philip M.; Ayyangar, Komanduri M.; Raman, Natarajan V.; Enke, Charles A.

    2005-05-01

    Accurate reporting of personal dose is required by regulation for hospital personnel that work with radioactive material. Pocket dosimeters are commonly used for monitoring this personal dose. We show that operating a cell phone in the vicinity of a pocket dosimeter can introduce large and erroneous readings of the dosimeter. This note reports a systematic study of this electromagnetic interference. We found that simple practical measures are enough to mitigate this problem, such as increasing the distance between the cell phone and the dosimeter or shielding the dosimeter, while maintaining its sensitivity to ionizing radiation, by placing it inside a common anti-static bag.

  18. Role of acyl carrier protein isoforms in plant lipid metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    Although acyl carrier protein (ACP) is the best studied protein in plant fatty acid biosynthesis, the in vivo forms of ACPs and their steady state pools have not been examined previously in either seed or leaf. Information about the relative pool sizes of free ACP and its acyl-ACP intermediates is essential for understanding regulation of de novo fatty acid biosynthesis in plants. In this study we utilized antibodies directed against spinach ACP as a sensitive assay to analyze the acyl groups while they were still covalently attached to ACPs. 4 refs., 4 figs.

  19. 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine reactivates gene expression via degradation of pRb pocket proteins.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zhixing; Li, Lian; Liu, Xiangyu; Wang, Donglai; Tu, Bo; Wang, Lina; Wang, Haiying; Zhu, Wei-Guo

    2012-01-01

    Not only does 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-aza-CdR) induce the reexpression of silenced genes through the demethylation of CpG islands, but it increases the expression of unmethylated genes. However, the mechanism by which 5-aza-CdR activates the expression of genes is not completely understood. Here, we report that the pRb pocket proteins pRb, p107, and p130 were degraded in various cancer cell lines in response to 5-aza-CdR treatment, and this effect was dependent on the proteasome pathway. Mouse double minute 2 (MDM2) played a critical role in this 5-aza-CdR-induced degradation of pRb. Furthermore, PP2A phosphatase-induced MDM2 dephosphorylation at S260 was found to be essential for MDM2 binding to pRb in the presence of 5-aza-CdR. pRb degradation resulted in the significant reexpression of several genes, including methylated CDKN2A, RASFF1A, and unmethylated CDKN2D. Finally, knockdown of pRb pocket proteins by either RNAi or 5-aza-CdR treatment induced a significant decrease in the recruitment of SUV39H1 and an increase in the enrichment of KDM3B and KDM4A to histones around the promoter of RASFF1A and thus reduced H3K9 di- and trimethylation, by which RASFF1A expression is activated. Our data reveal a novel mechanism by which 5-aza-CdR induces the expression of both methylated and unmethylated genes by degrading pRb pocket proteins.

  20. Identification of Key Residues and Regions Important for Porcupine-mediated Wnt Acylation*

    PubMed Central

    Rios-Esteves, Jessica; Haugen, Brittany; Resh, Marilyn D.

    2014-01-01

    Wnts comprise a family of lipid-modified, secreted signaling proteins that control embryogenesis, as well as tissue homeostasis in adults. Post-translational attachment of palmitoleate (C16:1) to a conserved Ser in Wnt proteins is catalyzed by Porcupine (Porcn), a member of the membrane bound O-acyltransferase (MBOAT) family, and is required for Wnt secretion and signaling. Moreover, genetic alterations in the PORCN gene lead to focal dermal hypoplasia, an X-linked developmental disorder. Despite its physiological importance, the biochemical mechanism governing Wnt acylation by Porcn is poorly understood. Here, we use a cell-based fatty acylation assay that is a direct readout of Porcn acyltransferase activity to perform structure-function analysis of highly conserved residues in Porcn and Wnt3a. In total, 16-point mutations in Porcn and 13 mutations in Wnt3a were generated and analyzed. We identified key residues within Porcn required for enzymatic activity, stability, and Wnt3a binding and mapped these active site residues to predicted transmembrane domain 9. Analysis of focal dermal hypoplasia-associated mutations in Porcn revealed that loss of enzymatic activity arises from altered stability. A consensus sequence within Wnt3a was identified (CXCHGXSXXCXXKXC) that contains residues that mediate Porcn binding, fatty acid transfer, and Wnt signaling. We also showed that Ser or Thr, but not Cys, can serve as a fatty acylation site in Wnt, establishing Porcn as an O-acyltransferase. This analysis sheds light into the mechanism by which Porcn transfers fatty acids to Wnt proteins and provides insight into the mechanisms of fatty acid transfer by MBOAT family members. PMID:24798332

  1. Molecular Orbital Study of the Formation of Intramolecular Hydrogen Bonding of a Ligand Molecule in a Protein Aromatic Hydrophobic Pocket.

    PubMed

    Koseki, Jun; Gouda, Hiroaki; Hirono, Shuichi

    2016-01-01

    The natural product argadin is a cyclopentapeptide chitinase inhibitor that binds to chitinase B (ChiB) from the pathogenic bacteria Serratia marcescens. N(ω)-Acetyl-L-arginine and L-aminoadipic acid of argadin form intramolecular ionic hydrogen bonds in the aromatic hydrophobic pocket of ChiB. We performed ab initio molecular orbital and density functional theory calculations to elucidate the role of this intramolecular hydrogen bonding on intermolecular interactions between argadin and ChiB. We found that argadin accrues large stabilization energies from the van der Waals dispersion interactions, such as CH-π, π-π, and π-lone pair interactions, in the aromatic hydrophobic pocket of ChiB, although intramolecular hydrogen bonding within argadin might result in loss of entropy. The intramolecular ionic hydrogen bonding formation canceled local molecular charges and provided good van der Waals interactions with surrounding aromatic residues.

  2. A pocket aide-memoire on drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Stockley, I H

    1975-04-01

    A pocket size "slide-rule" type device designed to be used by physicians, pharmacists and nurses as a memory aid on potential drug-drug interactions is described. Color-coded symbols on the device indicate both the type and clinical significance of the potential interactions involving 56 drugs or groups of drugs.

  3. Portable Anthrax Testing with Lab-in-a-Pocket

    SciTech Connect

    Finley, Melissa; Koskelo, Markku; Edwards, Thayne; Kadner, Steve; Beckes-Talcot, Judy; Harper, Jason; Shawwa, Luay

    2014-10-24

    BaDx (Bacillus anthracis Diagnostics) is a lab-in-a-pocket device to sample, sense, and diagnose bacteria that cause anthrax. It accomplishes these tasks in environments with no power, refrigerated storage, or laboratory equipment. BaDx was designed to be used with minimal or no training, and to keep handlers safe.

  4. Advanced Geometric Optics on a Programmable Pocket Calculator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nussbaum, Allen

    1979-01-01

    Presents a ray-tracing procedure based on some ideas of Herzberger and the matrix approach to geometrical optics. This method, which can be implemented on a programmable pocket calculator, applies to any conic surface, including paraboloids, spheres, and planes. (Author/GA)

  5. 6. Julia Steele House, interior view of pocket doors at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Julia Steele House, interior view of pocket doors at front left (south) parlor, looking north. Center hall is behind doors and oak mantle is to left of photograph. - Julia Steele House, 5875 Paris Road (US Highway 27/68); 1 1/5 miles north of Bourbon County line, Paris, Bourbon County, KY

  6. Simulation of Quantum-Mechanical Measurements with Programmable Pocket Calculators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sauer, G.

    1979-01-01

    Described is a method for the illustration of the statistical nature of measurements in quantum physics by means of simulation with pocket calculators. The application to examples like the double-slit experiment, Mott scattering, and the demonstration of the uncertainty relation is discussed. (Author/HM)

  7. Australian Vocational Education and Training Statistics Pocket Guide, Issued 2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER), 2011

    2011-01-01

    This handy, pocket-sized booklet summarises information from the National Centre for Vocational Education Research's (NCVER's) current statistical publications. It presents statistics about: Australia's public vocational education and training (VET) system (which includes activity undertaken at technical and further education [TAFE] institutes,…

  8. Australian Vocational Education and Training Statistics Pocket Guide, Issued 2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER), 2012

    2012-01-01

    This pocket guide presents statistics about: (1) the public vocational education and training (VET) system, which includes activity undertaken at technical and further education (TAFE) institutes, other government providers, community education providers and publicly funded delivery by private providers; (2) apprentices and trainees, who are…

  9. Evaluation of Cation Hydrolysis Schemes with a Pocket Calculator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clare, Brian W.

    1979-01-01

    Described is the use of two models of pocket calculators. The Hewlett-Packard HP67 and the Texas Instruments TI59, to solve problems arising in connection with ionic equilibria in solution. A three-parameter regression program is described and listed as a specific example, the hydrolysis of hexavalent uranium, is provided. (BT)

  10. The pocket epithelium: a light- and electronmicroscopic study.

    PubMed

    Müller-Glauser, W; Schroeder, H E

    1982-03-01

    The POCKET epithelium is important for the pathogenesis of gingivitis and periodontitis. However, this epithelial variant has never been adequately described. The bioptic material with supraalveolar pockets originated from previous studies in which cotton floss ligatures were placed around the crowns of premolars in eight dogs. After periods of 4 to 21 days or up to 5 months, block biopsies comprising dental and gingival tissues were taken on the buccal side. The tissues were processed for light- and electron microscopic examination. The observations revealed that the pocket epithelium (1) does not attach to the tooth, (2) forms irregular ridges and, over connective tissue papillae, thin coverings which occasionally ulcerate, (3) consists of cells only some of which show a tendency to differentiate, (4) presents a basal lamina complex with discontinuities and multiplications, and (5) is infiltrated mainly by lymphocytes, T- and B-blasts and plasma cells, and is transmigrated by neutrophilic granulocytes. It is concluded that the mosaic-like structure of the pocket epithelium reflects the heterogeneity of the adjacent plaque, that this structure together with the absence of membrane coating granules is the basis for an extremely high permeability, and that epithelial ridges may conduct and collect foreign substances which thereby become more easily recognizable for leukocytes.

  11. Elimination of Elyzol 25% Dentalgel matrix from periodontal pockets.

    PubMed

    Stoltze, K

    1995-03-01

    Elyzo 25% Dentalgel (EDG) which is developed for use in the treatment of periodontitis is a suspension of metronidazole benzoate (40%) in a mixture of glyceryl mono-oleate (GMO) and triglyceride (sesame oil). Metronidazole can be detected in the periodontal pockets 24-36 h after application. The aim of the present study was to estimate the period of time that the gel matrix persists on periodontal pockets after 1 application of EDG. 12 patients were included in the study. From each patient, 1 sample was taken before and immediately after, and 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 12 and 24 h after application. Subgingival scaling followed by absorption of gingival crevicular fluid with filter paper was used for sampling. The sampling unit was 1 tooth. Each sample was assayed for the amount of GMO and oleic acid (a degradation product of GMO) by means of high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with UV detection. To allow determination of the GMO dose applied into the pockets and to estimate the recovery rate of the sampling method, 1 tooth in each patient was selected for sampling as soon as the gel had set, i.e., about 10 min after application. Only in 1 patient was a detectable amount of GMO within the pocket revealed 24 h after application. This amount was approximately 0.5% of the mean GMO dose applied around 1 tooth. GMO was found no longer than 12 h in the remaining patients.

  12. Structural basis for selective recognition of acyl chains by the membrane-associated acyltransferase PatA

    PubMed Central

    Albesa-Jové, David; Svetlíková, Zuzana; Tersa, Montse; Sancho-Vaello, Enea; Carreras-González, Ana; Bonnet, Pascal; Arrasate, Pedro; Eguskiza, Ander; Angala, Shiva K.; Cifuente, Javier O.; Korduláková, Jana; Jackson, Mary; Mikušová, Katarína; Guerin, Marcelo E.

    2016-01-01

    The biosynthesis of phospholipids and glycolipids are critical pathways for virtually all cell membranes. PatA is an essential membrane associated acyltransferase involved in the biosynthesis of mycobacterial phosphatidyl-myo-inositol mannosides (PIMs). The enzyme transfers a palmitoyl moiety from palmitoyl–CoA to the 6-position of the mannose ring linked to 2-position of inositol in PIM1/PIM2. We report here the crystal structures of PatA from Mycobacterium smegmatis in the presence of its naturally occurring acyl donor palmitate and a nonhydrolyzable palmitoyl–CoA analog. The structures reveal an α/β architecture, with the acyl chain deeply buried into a hydrophobic pocket that runs perpendicular to a long groove where the active site is located. Enzyme catalysis is mediated by an unprecedented charge relay system, which markedly diverges from the canonical HX4D motif. Our studies establish the mechanistic basis of substrate/membrane recognition and catalysis for an important family of acyltransferases, providing exciting possibilities for inhibitor design. PMID:26965057

  13. Structural basis for selective recognition of acyl chains by the membrane-associated acyltransferase PatA.

    PubMed

    Albesa-Jové, David; Svetlíková, Zuzana; Tersa, Montse; Sancho-Vaello, Enea; Carreras-González, Ana; Bonnet, Pascal; Arrasate, Pedro; Eguskiza, Ander; Angala, Shiva K; Cifuente, Javier O; Korduláková, Jana; Jackson, Mary; Mikušová, Katarína; Guerin, Marcelo E

    2016-01-01

    The biosynthesis of phospholipids and glycolipids are critical pathways for virtually all cell membranes. PatA is an essential membrane associated acyltransferase involved in the biosynthesis of mycobacterial phosphatidyl-myo-inositol mannosides (PIMs). The enzyme transfers a palmitoyl moiety from palmitoyl-CoA to the 6-position of the mannose ring linked to 2-position of inositol in PIM1/PIM2. We report here the crystal structures of PatA from Mycobacterium smegmatis in the presence of its naturally occurring acyl donor palmitate and a nonhydrolyzable palmitoyl-CoA analog. The structures reveal an α/β architecture, with the acyl chain deeply buried into a hydrophobic pocket that runs perpendicular to a long groove where the active site is located. Enzyme catalysis is mediated by an unprecedented charge relay system, which markedly diverges from the canonical HX4D motif. Our studies establish the mechanistic basis of substrate/membrane recognition and catalysis for an important family of acyltransferases, providing exciting possibilities for inhibitor design. PMID:26965057

  14. The Trypanosome Flagellar Pocket Collar and Its Ring Forming Protein-TbBILBO1.

    PubMed

    Perdomo, Doranda; Bonhivers, Mélanie; Robinson, Derrick R

    2016-03-02

    Sub-species of Trypanosoma brucei are the causal agents of human African sleeping sickness and Nagana in domesticated livestock. These pathogens have developed an organelle-like compartment called the flagellar pocket (FP). The FP carries out endo- and exocytosis and is the only structure this parasite has evolved to do so. The FP is essential for parasite viability, making it an interesting structure to evaluate as a drug target, especially since it has an indispensible cytoskeleton component called the flagellar pocket collar (FPC). The FPC is located at the neck of the FP where the flagellum exits the cell. The FPC has a complex architecture and division cycle, but little is known concerning its organization. Recent work has focused on understanding how the FP and the FPC are formed and as a result of these studies an important calcium-binding, polymer-forming protein named TbBILBO1 was identified. Cellular biology analysis of TbBILBO1 has demonstrated its uniqueness as a FPC component and until recently, it was unknown what structural role it played in forming the FPC. This review summarizes the recent data on the polymer forming properties of TbBILBO1 and how these are correlated to the FP cytoskeleton.

  15. The Trypanosome Flagellar Pocket Collar and Its Ring Forming Protein—TbBILBO1

    PubMed Central

    Perdomo, Doranda; Bonhivers, Mélanie; Robinson, Derrick R.

    2016-01-01

    Sub-species of Trypanosoma brucei are the causal agents of human African sleeping sickness and Nagana in domesticated livestock. These pathogens have developed an organelle-like compartment called the flagellar pocket (FP). The FP carries out endo- and exocytosis and is the only structure this parasite has evolved to do so. The FP is essential for parasite viability, making it an interesting structure to evaluate as a drug target, especially since it has an indispensible cytoskeleton component called the flagellar pocket collar (FPC). The FPC is located at the neck of the FP where the flagellum exits the cell. The FPC has a complex architecture and division cycle, but little is known concerning its organization. Recent work has focused on understanding how the FP and the FPC are formed and as a result of these studies an important calcium-binding, polymer-forming protein named TbBILBO1 was identified. Cellular biology analysis of TbBILBO1 has demonstrated its uniqueness as a FPC component and until recently, it was unknown what structural role it played in forming the FPC. This review summarizes the recent data on the polymer forming properties of TbBILBO1 and how these are correlated to the FP cytoskeleton. PMID:26950156

  16. Screening Analogs of β-OG Pocket Binder as Fusion Inhibitor of Dengue Virus 2

    PubMed Central

    Tambunan, Usman SF; Zahroh, Hilyatuz; Parikesit, Arli A; Idrus, Syarifuddin; Kerami, Djati

    2015-01-01

    Dengue is an infectious disease caused by dengue virus (DENV) and transmitted between human hosts by mosquitoes. Recently, Indonesia was listed as a country with the highest cases of dengue by the Association of Southeast Asian Nations. The current treatment for dengue disease is supportive therapy; there is no antiviral drug available in the market against dengue. Therefore, a research on antiviral drug against dengue is very important, especially to prevent outbreak explosion. In this research, the development of dengue antiviral is performed through the inhibition of n-octyl-β-D-glucoside (β-OG) binding pocket on envelope protein of DENV by using analogs of β-OG pocket binder. There are 828 compounds used in this study, and all of them were screened based on the analysis of molecular docking, pharmacological character prediction of the compounds, and molecular dynamics simulation. The result of these analyses revealed that the compound that can be used as an antiviral candidate against DENV is 5-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-N-[2-(p-tolyl) benzotriazol-5-yl]furan-2-carboxamide. PMID:26617459

  17. Structure, stability, and antiplatelet activity of O-acyl derivatives of salicylic acid and lipophilic esters of acetylsalicylate.

    PubMed

    Zavodnik, Ilya B; Lapshina, Elena; Sudnikovich, Elena; Boncler, Magdalena; Luzak, Bogusława; Rózalski, Marcin; Helińska, Magdalena; Watała, Cezary

    2009-01-01

    The anti-thrombotic activity of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) has been shown to be due to specific irreversible acetylation of blood platelet cyclooxygenase. The aim of our study was to investigate the associations between the antiplatelet activities of derivatives of both ASA and salicylic acid (SA), as well as the structure, stability, and molecular properties of these compounds. Homologous series of O-acyl derivatives of salicylic acid (propionyl-, butyrylsalicylic acids, PSA, BSA) and lipophilic dodecyl (C12)-, hexadecyl (C16)-, and cholesteryl acetylsalicylates were synthesized and tested for structure-activity relationships. The molecular properties (heat of formation, molecular surface area, dipole moment) of ASA and SA derivatives obtained by theoretical calculations changed with the increasing length of the acyl or alkyl residue. The inhibition of whole blood platelet aggregation and the reduction in thromboxane (TX) generation by O-acyl derivatives were concentration-dependent and decreased along with increasing the length of acyl hain. These effects correlated with the extent of platelet reactivity and P-selectin expression inhibition in collagen-activated platelets. In contrast to ASA and O-acyl derivatives of SA, none of the lipophilic ASA derivatives had a significant inhibitory effect on platelet aggregation. In conclusion, all SA and ASA derivatives studied under in vitro conditions showed much lower antiplatelet activities than ASA itself, despite their higher affinity to plasma proteins or membrane components and their equivalent ability to acetylate protein free amino groups.We suggest the significance of the carboxylic group, dipole moment, geometry, and size of these pharmaceuticals in their ability to bind to the active site of cyclooxygenase and their antiplatelet efficacy.

  18. A Hydrophobic Pocket in the Active Site of Glycolytic Aldolase Mediates Interactions with Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome Protein

    SciTech Connect

    St-Jean,M.; Izard, T.; Sygusch, J.

    2007-01-01

    Aldolase plays essential catalytic roles in glycolysis and gluconeogenesis. However, aldolase is a highly abundant protein that is remarkably promiscuous in its interactions with other cellular proteins. In particular, aldolase binds to highly acidic amino acid sequences, including the C-terminus of the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein, an actin nucleation promoting factor. Here we report the crystal structure of tetrameric rabbit muscle aldolase in complex with a C-terminal peptide of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein. Aldolase recognizes a short, 4-residue DEWD motif (residues 498-501), which adopts a loose hairpin turn that folds about the central aromatic residue, enabling its tryptophan side chain to fit into a hydrophobic pocket in the active site of aldolase. The flanking acidic residues in this binding motif provide further interactions with conserved aldolase active site residues, Arg-42 and Arg-303, aligning their side chains and forming the sides of the hydrophobic pocket. The binding of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein to aldolase precludes intramolecular interactions of its C-terminus with its active site, and is competitive with substrate as well as with binding by actin and cortactin. Finally, based on this structure a novel naphthol phosphate-based inhibitor of aldolase was identified and its structure in complex with aldolase demonstrated mimicry of the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein-aldolase interaction. The data support a model whereby aldolase exists in distinct forms that regulate glycolysis or actin dynamics.

  19. Amine, Alcohol and Phosphine Catalysts for Acyl Transfer Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spivey, Alan C.; Arseniyadis, Stellios

    An overview of the area of organocatalytic asymmetric acyl transfer processes is presented including O- and N-acylation. The material has been ordered according to the structural class of catalyst employed rather than reaction type with the intention to draw mechanistic parallels between the manner in which the various reactions are accelerated by the catalysts and the concepts employed to control transfer of chiral information from the catalyst to the substrates.

  20. Sirtuin 3 (SIRT3) Protein Regulates Long-chain Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase by Deacetylating Conserved Lysines Near the Active Site

    PubMed Central

    Bharathi, Sivakama S.; Zhang, Yuxun; Mohsen, Al-Walid; Uppala, Radha; Balasubramani, Manimalha; Schreiber, Emanuel; Uechi, Guy; Beck, Megan E.; Rardin, Matthew J.; Vockley, Jerry; Verdin, Eric; Gibson, Bradford W.; Hirschey, Matthew D.; Goetzman, Eric S.

    2013-01-01

    Long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (LCAD) is a key mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation enzyme. We previously demonstrated increased LCAD lysine acetylation in SIRT3 knockout mice concomitant with reduced LCAD activity and reduced fatty acid oxidation. To study the effects of acetylation on LCAD and determine sirtuin 3 (SIRT3) target sites, we chemically acetylated recombinant LCAD. Acetylation impeded substrate binding and reduced catalytic efficiency. Deacetylation with recombinant SIRT3 partially restored activity. Residues Lys-318 and Lys-322 were identified as SIRT3-targeted lysines. Arginine substitutions at Lys-318 and Lys-322 prevented the acetylation-induced activity loss. Lys-318 and Lys-322 flank residues Arg-317 and Phe-320, which are conserved among all acyl-CoA dehydrogenases and coordinate the enzyme-bound FAD cofactor in the active site. We propose that acetylation at Lys-318/Lys-322 causes a conformational change which reduces hydride transfer from substrate to FAD. Medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase and acyl-CoA dehydrogenase 9, two related enzymes with lysines at positions equivalent to Lys-318/Lys-322, were also efficiently deacetylated by SIRT3 following chemical acetylation. These results suggest that acetylation/deacetylation at Lys-318/Lys-322 is a mode of regulating fatty acid oxidation. The same mechanism may regulate other acyl-CoA dehydrogenases. PMID:24121500

  1. Sirtuin 3 (SIRT3) protein regulates long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase by deacetylating conserved lysines near the active site.

    PubMed

    Bharathi, Sivakama S; Zhang, Yuxun; Mohsen, Al-Walid; Uppala, Radha; Balasubramani, Manimalha; Schreiber, Emanuel; Uechi, Guy; Beck, Megan E; Rardin, Matthew J; Vockley, Jerry; Verdin, Eric; Gibson, Bradford W; Hirschey, Matthew D; Goetzman, Eric S

    2013-11-22

    Long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (LCAD) is a key mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation enzyme. We previously demonstrated increased LCAD lysine acetylation in SIRT3 knockout mice concomitant with reduced LCAD activity and reduced fatty acid oxidation. To study the effects of acetylation on LCAD and determine sirtuin 3 (SIRT3) target sites, we chemically acetylated recombinant LCAD. Acetylation impeded substrate binding and reduced catalytic efficiency. Deacetylation with recombinant SIRT3 partially restored activity. Residues Lys-318 and Lys-322 were identified as SIRT3-targeted lysines. Arginine substitutions at Lys-318 and Lys-322 prevented the acetylation-induced activity loss. Lys-318 and Lys-322 flank residues Arg-317 and Phe-320, which are conserved among all acyl-CoA dehydrogenases and coordinate the enzyme-bound FAD cofactor in the active site. We propose that acetylation at Lys-318/Lys-322 causes a conformational change which reduces hydride transfer from substrate to FAD. Medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase and acyl-CoA dehydrogenase 9, two related enzymes with lysines at positions equivalent to Lys-318/Lys-322, were also efficiently deacetylated by SIRT3 following chemical acetylation. These results suggest that acetylation/deacetylation at Lys-318/Lys-322 is a mode of regulating fatty acid oxidation. The same mechanism may regulate other acyl-CoA dehydrogenases. PMID:24121500

  2. Possible Role of Different Yeast and Plant Lysophospholipid:Acyl-CoA Acyltransferases (LPLATs) in Acyl Remodelling of Phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Jasieniecka-Gazarkiewicz, Katarzyna; Demski, Kamil; Lager, Ida; Stymne, Sten; Banaś, Antoni

    2016-01-01

    Recent results have suggested that plant lysophosphatidylcholine:acyl-coenzyme A acyltransferases (LPCATs) can operate in reverse in vivo and thereby catalyse an acyl exchange between the acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) pool and the phosphatidylcholine. We have investigated the abilities of Arabidopsis AtLPCAT2, Arabidopsis lysophosphatidylethanolamine acyltransferase (LPEAT2), S. cerevisiae lysophospholipid acyltransferase (Ale1) and S. cerevisiae lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferase (SLC1) to acylate lysoPtdCho, lysoPtdEtn and lysoPtdOH and act reversibly on the products of the acylation; the PtdCho, PtdEtn and PtdOH. The tested LPLATs were expressed in an S. cervisiae ale1 strain and enzyme activities were assessed in assays using microsomal preparations of the different transformants. The results show that, despite high activity towards lysoPtdCho, lysoPtdEtn and lysoPtdOH by the ALE1, its capacities to operate reversibly on the products of the acylation were very low. Slc1 readily acylated lysoPtdOH, lysoPtdCho and lysoPtdEtn but showed no reversibility towards PtdCho, very little reversibility towards PtdEtn and very high reversibility towards PtdOH. LPEAT2 showed the highest levels of reversibility towards PtdCho and PtdEtn of all LPLATs tested but low ability to operate reversibly on PtdOH. AtLPCAT2 showed good reversible activity towards PtdCho and PtdEtn and very low reversibility towards PtdOH. Thus, it appears that some of the LPLATs have developed properties that, to a much higher degree than other LPLATs, promote the reverse reaction during the same assay conditions and with the same phospholipid. The results also show that the capacity of reversibility can be specific for a particular phospholipid, albeit the lysophospholipid derivatives of other phospholipids serve as good acyl acceptors for the forward reaction of the enzyme. PMID:26643989

  3. Sequestration of carbon dioxide by the hydrophobic pocket of the carbonic anhydrases.

    PubMed

    Domsic, John F; McKenna, Robert

    2010-02-01

    The interaction between carbon dioxide (CO(2)) and the alpha-class carbonic anhydrase, human CA 2 (HCA2) exists for only a short period due to the rapid catalytic turnover by this enzyme. The fleeting nature of this interaction has led to difficulties in its direct analysis, with previous studies placing the CO(2) in the hydrophobic pocket of HCA2's active site. A more precise location was determined via the crystal structure of CO(2) trapped in both wild-type (holo) and zinc-free (apo) HCA2. This provided a detailed description of the means by which CO(2) is held and orientated for optimal catalysis. This information can be extended to the beta and gamma class enzymes to help elucidate the binding mode of CO(2) in these enzymes. PMID:19679198

  4. Kinetic mechanism and order of substrate binding for sn-glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase from squash (Cucurbita moschata).

    PubMed

    Hayman, Matthew W; Fawcett, Tony; Slabas, Antoni R

    2002-03-13

    sn-Glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (G3PAT, EC 2.3.1.15), a component of glycerolipid biosynthesis, is an important enzyme in chilling sensitivity in plants. The three-dimensional structure of the enzyme from squash (Cucurbita moschata), without bound substrate, has been determined [Turnbull et al. (2001) Acta Crystallogr. D 57, 451-453; Turnbull et al. (2001) Structure 9, 347-353]. Here we report the kinetic mechanism of plastidial G3PAT from squash and the order of substrate binding using acyl-acyl carrier protein (acyl-ACP) substrates. The reaction proceeds via a compulsory-ordered ternary complex with acyl-ACP binding before glycerol-3-phosphate. We have also determined that the reaction will proceed with C(4:0)-CoA, C(6:0)-CoA and C(12:0)-ACP substrates, allowing a wider choice of acyl groups for future co-crystallisation studies.

  5. Ligand binding-dependent functions of the lipocalin NLaz: an in vivo study in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Mario; Ganfornina, Maria D; Correnti, Colin; Strong, Roland K; Sanchez, Diego

    2014-04-01

    Lipocalins are small extracellular proteins mostly described as lipid carriers. The Drosophila lipocalin NLaz (neural Lazarillo) modulates the IIS pathway and regulates longevity, stress resistance, and behavior. Here, we test whether a native hydrophobic pocket structure is required for NLaz to perform its functions. We use a point mutation altering the binding pocket (NLaz(L130R)) and control mutations outside NLaz binding pocket. Tryptophan fluorescence titration reveals that NLaz(L130R) loses its ability to bind ergosterol and the pheromone 7(z)-tricosene but retains retinoic acid binding. Using site-directed transgenesis in Drosophila, we test the functionality of the ligand binding-altered lipocalin at the organism level. NLaz-dependent life span reduction, oxidative stress and starvation sensitivity, aging markers accumulation, and deficient courtship are rescued by overexpression of NLaz(WT), but not of NLaz(L130R). Transcriptional responses to aging and oxidative stress show a large set of age-responsive genes dependent on the integrity of NLaz binding pocket. Inhibition of IIS activity and modulation of oxidative stress and infection-responsive genes are binding pocket-dependent processes. Control of energy metabolites on starvation appears to be, however, insensitive to the modification of the NLaz binding pocket. PMID:24361577

  6. Ligand binding-dependent functions of the lipocalin NLaz: an in vivo study in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Mario; Ganfornina, Maria D; Correnti, Colin; Strong, Roland K; Sanchez, Diego

    2014-04-01

    Lipocalins are small extracellular proteins mostly described as lipid carriers. The Drosophila lipocalin NLaz (neural Lazarillo) modulates the IIS pathway and regulates longevity, stress resistance, and behavior. Here, we test whether a native hydrophobic pocket structure is required for NLaz to perform its functions. We use a point mutation altering the binding pocket (NLaz(L130R)) and control mutations outside NLaz binding pocket. Tryptophan fluorescence titration reveals that NLaz(L130R) loses its ability to bind ergosterol and the pheromone 7(z)-tricosene but retains retinoic acid binding. Using site-directed transgenesis in Drosophila, we test the functionality of the ligand binding-altered lipocalin at the organism level. NLaz-dependent life span reduction, oxidative stress and starvation sensitivity, aging markers accumulation, and deficient courtship are rescued by overexpression of NLaz(WT), but not of NLaz(L130R). Transcriptional responses to aging and oxidative stress show a large set of age-responsive genes dependent on the integrity of NLaz binding pocket. Inhibition of IIS activity and modulation of oxidative stress and infection-responsive genes are binding pocket-dependent processes. Control of energy metabolites on starvation appears to be, however, insensitive to the modification of the NLaz binding pocket.

  7. Monogalactosyldiacylglycerol biosynthesis by direct acyl transfer in Anabaena variabilis. [Anabaena variabilis

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H.H.; Wickrema, A.; Jaworski, J.

    1987-05-01

    The authors previously reported the direct acylation of monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG) by an enzyme in the membranes of the cyanobacterium (Anabaena variabilis. The enzyme requires acyl-acyl carrier protein (acyl-ACP) as substrate, but had no other additional cofactor requirements. Palmitoyl-, stearoyl- and oleoyl-ACP were all effective substrates. The A. variabilis membranes also had a hydrolase activity which metabolized the acyl-ACP to yield free fatty acid and ACP. Possible mechanisms for the acylation reaction include either acyl exchange with existing MGDG or direct acyl transfer to a lyso-MGDG, with concomitant release of free ACP. The mechanism of this reaction has been resolved using a double labelled (/sup 14/C)acyl-(/sup 14/C)ACP substrate prepared with E. coli acyl-ACP synthetase. Following incubation with the enzyme, the unreacted (/sup 14/C)acyl-(/sup 14/C)ACP was isolated and the (/sup 14/C)acyl/(/sup 14/C)ACP ratio determined. Comparison of this ratio to that of the original substrate indicated no change and eliminated acyl exchange as a possible mechanism. Therefore, the direct acylation of lyso-MGDG is the proposed mechanism for this enzyme. The reaction is apparently specific for MGDG synthesis, as other glycolipids and phospholipids were not labelled during incubations.

  8. AmeriFlux US-Cop Corral Pocket

    SciTech Connect

    Bowling, David

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Cop Corral Pocket. Site Description - The Corral Pocket site is located in a semi-arid grassland in southeastern Utah, just east of Canyonlands National park. For the greater part of the year, 38-80% of the ground is essentially bare. Vegetation is primarily native perennial C3/C4 grasses with annual ground converge ranging from 8-35%. Leaving the remaining 0-15% coverage to interspersed annual grasses, the remaining 0-15% coverage is occupied by annual grasses. 6-8 weeks during the late fall or winter, Livestock grazing is responsible for the majority of aboveground vegetation loss and subsequent high variability of ground coverage.

  9. Regioselective Acylation of Diols and Triols: The Cyanide Effect.

    PubMed

    Peng, Peng; Linseis, Michael; Winter, Rainer F; Schmidt, Richard R

    2016-05-11

    Central topics of carbohydrate chemistry embrace structural modifications of carbohydrates and oligosaccharide synthesis. Both require regioselectively protected building blocks that are mainly available via indirect multistep procedures. Hence, direct protection methods targeting a specific hydroxy group are demanded. Dual hydrogen bonding will eventually differentiate between differently positioned hydroxy groups. As cyanide is capable of various kinds of hydrogen bonding and as it is a quite strong sterically nondemanding base, regioselective O-acylations should be possible at low temperatures even at sterically congested positions, thus permitting formation and also isolation of the kinetic product. Indeed, 1,2-cis-diols, having an equatorial and an axial hydroxy group, benzoyl cyanide or acetyl cyanide as an acylating agent, and DMAP as a catalyst yield at -78 °C the thermodynamically unfavorable axial O-acylation product; acyl migration is not observed under these conditions. This phenomenon was substantiated with 3,4-O-unproteced galacto- and fucopyranosides and 2,3-O-unprotected mannopyranosides. Even for 3,4,6-O-unprotected galactopyranosides as triols, axial 4-O-acylation is appreciably faster than O-acylation of the primary 6-hydroxy group. The importance of hydrogen bonding for this unusual regioselectivity could be confirmed by NMR studies and DFT calculations, which indicate favorable hydrogen bonding of cyanide to the most acidic axial hydroxy group supported by hydrogen bonding of the equatorial hydroxy group to the axial oxygen. Thus, the "cyanide effect" is due to dual hydrogen bonding of the axial hydroxy group which enhances the nucleophilicity of the respective oxygen atom, permitting an even faster reaction for diols than for mono-ols. In contrast, fluoride as a counterion favors dual hydrogen bonding to both hydroxy groups leading to equatorial O-acylation. PMID:27104625

  10. Site-specific S-Acylation of Influenza Virus Hemagglutinin

    PubMed Central

    Brett, Katharina; Kordyukova, Larisa V.; Serebryakova, Marina V.; Mintaev, Ramil R.; Alexeevski, Andrei V.; Veit, Michael

    2014-01-01

    S-Acylation of hemagglutinin (HA), the main glycoprotein of influenza viruses, is an essential modification required for virus replication. Using mass spectrometry, we have previously demonstrated specific attachment of acyl chains to individual acylation sites. Whereas the two cysteines in the cytoplasmic tail of HA contain only palmitate, stearate is exclusively attached to a cysteine positioned at the end of the transmembrane region (TMR). Here we analyzed recombinant viruses containing HA with exchange of conserved amino acids adjacent to acylation sites or with a TMR cysteine shifted to a cytoplasmic location to identify the molecular signal that determines preferential attachment of stearate. We first developed a new protocol for sample preparation that requires less material and might thus also be suitable to analyze cellular proteins. We observed cell type-specific differences in the fatty acid pattern of HA: more stearate was attached if human viruses were grown in mammalian compared with avian cells. No underacylated peptides were detected in the mass spectra, and even mutations that prevented generation of infectious virus particles did not abolish acylation of expressed HA as demonstrated by metabolic labeling experiments with [3H]palmitate. Exchange of conserved amino acids in the vicinity of an acylation site had a moderate effect on the stearate content. In contrast, shifting the TMR cysteine to a cytoplasmic location virtually eliminated attachment of stearate. Thus, the location of an acylation site relative to the transmembrane span is the main signal for stearate attachment, but the sequence context and the cell type modulate the fatty acid pattern. PMID:25349209

  11. Financial Survival between Jobs. Pocket Job Series No. 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindgren, Amy

    This book is the sixth in a series of six pocket-sized books written for career changers and laid-off workers. Each book is written at a 7th- to 10th-grade reading level and contains examples, hands-on self-discovery exercises, and step-by-step advice for a successful job search. This book provides information on financial survival between…

  12. Unusual metal ion catalysis in an acyl-transferase ribozyme.

    PubMed

    Suga, H; Cowan, J A; Szostak, J W

    1998-07-14

    Most studies of the roles of catalytic metal ions in ribozymes have focused on inner-sphere coordination of the divalent metal ions to the substrate or ribozyme. However, divalent metal ions are strongly hydrated in water, and some proteinenzymes, such as Escherichia coli RNase H and exonuclease III, are known to use metal cofactors in their fully hydrated form [Duffy, T. H., and Nowak, T. (1985) Biochemistry 24, 1152-1160; Jou, R., and Cowan, J. A. (1991) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 113, 6685-6686]. It is therefore important to consider the possibility of outer-sphere coordination of catalytic metal ions in ribozymes. We have used an exchange-inert metal complex, cobalt hexaammine, to show that the catalytic metal ion in an acyl-transferase ribozyme acts through outer-sphere coordination. Our studies provide an example of a fully hydrated Mg2+ ion that plays an essential role in ribozyme catalysis. Kinetic studies of wild-type and mutant ribozymes suggest that a pair of tandem G:U wobble base pairs adjacent to the reactive center constitute the metal-binding site. This result is consistent with recent crystallographic studies [Cate, J. H., and Doudna, J. A. (1996) Structure 4, 1221-1229; Cate, J. H., Gooding, A. R., Podell, E., Zhou, K., Golden, B. L., Kundrot, C. E., Cech, T. R., and Doudna, J. A. (1996) Science 273, 1678-1685; Cate, J. H., Hanna, R. L., and Doudna, J. A. (1997) Nat. Struct. Biol. 4, 553-558] showing that tandem wobble base pairs are good binding sites for metal hexaammines. We propose a model in which the catalytic metal ion is bound in the major groove of the tandem wobble base pairs, is precisely positioned by the ribozyme within the active site, and stabilizes the developing oxyanion in the transition state. Our results may have significant implications for understanding the mechanism of protein synthesis [Noller, H. F., Hoffarth, V., and Zimniak, L. (1992) Science 256, 1416-1419].

  13. 24 CFR 570.466 - Additional application submission requirements for Pockets of Poverty-employment opportunities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... requirements for Pockets of Poverty-employment opportunities. 570.466 Section 570.466 Housing and Urban... application submission requirements for Pockets of Poverty—employment opportunities. Applicants for Action Grants under the Pockets of Poverty provision must describe the number and, to the extent possible,...

  14. 24 CFR 570.466 - Additional application submission requirements for Pockets of Poverty-employment opportunities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... requirements for Pockets of Poverty-employment opportunities. 570.466 Section 570.466 Housing and Urban... application submission requirements for Pockets of Poverty—employment opportunities. Applicants for Action Grants under the Pockets of Poverty provision must describe the number and, to the extent possible,...

  15. 24 CFR 570.466 - Additional application submission requirements for Pockets of Poverty-employment opportunities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... requirements for Pockets of Poverty-employment opportunities. 570.466 Section 570.466 Housing and Urban... application submission requirements for Pockets of Poverty—employment opportunities. Applicants for Action Grants under the Pockets of Poverty provision must describe the number and, to the extent possible,...

  16. 24 CFR 570.466 - Additional application submission requirements for Pockets of Poverty-employment opportunities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... requirements for Pockets of Poverty-employment opportunities. 570.466 Section 570.466 Housing and Urban... application submission requirements for Pockets of Poverty—employment opportunities. Applicants for Action Grants under the Pockets of Poverty provision must describe the number and, to the extent possible,...

  17. Paired electron pockets in the hole-doped cuprates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galitski, Victor; Sachdev, Subir

    2009-04-01

    We propose a theory for the underdoped hole-doped cuprates, focusing on the “nodal-antinodal dichotomy” observed in recent experiments. Our theory begins with an ordered antiferromagnetic Fermi liquid with electron and hole pockets. We argue that it is useful to consider a quantum transition at which the loss of antiferromagnetic order leads to a hypothetical metallic “algebraic charge liquid” (ACL) with pockets of charge -e and +e fermions, and an emergent U(1) gauge field; the instabilities of the ACL lead to the low-temperature phases of the underdoped cuprates. The pairing instability leads to a superconductor with the strongest pairing within the -e Fermi pockets, a d -wave pairing signature for electrons, and very weak nodal-point pairing of the +e fermions near the Brillouin-zone diagonals. The influence of an applied magnetic field is discussed using a proposed phase diagram as a function of field strength and doping. We describe the influence of gauge field and pairing fluctuations on the quantum Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations in the normal states induced by the field. For the finite-temperature pseudogap region, our theory has some similarities to the phenomenological two-fluid model of -2e bosons and +e fermions proposed by Geshkenbein [Phys. Rev. B 55, 3173 (1997)], which describes anomalous aspects of transverse transport in a magnetic field.

  18. Film cooling air pocket in a closed loop cooled airfoil

    DOEpatents

    Yu, Yufeng Phillip; Itzel, Gary Michael; Osgood, Sarah Jane; Bagepalli, Radhakrishna; Webbon, Waylon Willard; Burdgick, Steven Sebastian

    2002-01-01

    Turbine stator vane segments have radially inner and outer walls with vanes extending between them. The inner and outer walls are compartmentalized and have impingement plates. Steam flowing into the outer wall plenum passes through the impingement plate for impingement cooling of the outer wall upper surface. The spent impingement steam flows into cavities of the vane having inserts for impingement cooling the walls of the vane. The steam passes into the inner wall and through the impingement plate for impingement cooling of the inner wall surface and for return through return cavities having inserts for impingement cooling of the vane surfaces. To provide for air film cooing of select portions of the airfoil outer surface, at least one air pocket is defined on a wall of at least one of the cavities. Each air pocket is substantially closed with respect to the cooling medium in the cavity and cooling air pumped to the air pocket flows through outlet apertures in the wall of the airfoil to cool the same.

  19. Rosetta and the Design of Ligand Binding Sites.

    PubMed

    Moretti, Rocco; Bender, Brian J; Allison, Brittany; Meiler, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Proteins that bind small molecules (ligands) can be used as biosensors, signal modulators, and sequestering agents. When naturally occurring proteins for a particular target ligand are not available, artificial proteins can be computationally designed. We present a protocol based on RosettaLigand to redesign an existing protein pocket to bind a target ligand. Starting with a protein structure and the structure of the ligand, Rosetta can optimize both the placement of the ligand in the pocket and the identity and conformation of the surrounding sidechains, yielding proteins that bind the target compound.

  20. Rosetta and the Design of Ligand Binding Sites.

    PubMed

    Moretti, Rocco; Bender, Brian J; Allison, Brittany; Meiler, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Proteins that bind small molecules (ligands) can be used as biosensors, signal modulators, and sequestering agents. When naturally occurring proteins for a particular target ligand are not available, artificial proteins can be computationally designed. We present a protocol based on RosettaLigand to redesign an existing protein pocket to bind a target ligand. Starting with a protein structure and the structure of the ligand, Rosetta can optimize both the placement of the ligand in the pocket and the identity and conformation of the surrounding sidechains, yielding proteins that bind the target compound. PMID:27094285

  1. Water may inhibit oxygen binding in hemoprotein models

    PubMed Central

    Collman, James P.; Decréau, Richard A.; Dey, Abhishek; Yang, Ying

    2009-01-01

    Three distal imidazole pickets in a cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) model form a pocket hosting a cluster of water molecules. The cluster makes the ferrous heme low spin, and consequently the O2 binding slow. The nature of the rigid proximal imidazole tail favors a high spin/low spin cross-over. The O2 binding rate is enhanced either by removing the water, increasing the hydrophobicity of the gas binding pocket, or inserting a metal ion that coordinates to the 3 distal imidazole pickets. PMID:19246375

  2. Head-group acylation of monogalactosyldiacylglycerol is a common stress response, but the acyl-galactose acyl composition varies with the plant species and applied stress

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Head group acylation of monogalactosyldiacylglycerol is a plant lipid modification occurring during bacterial infection. Little is known about the range of stresses that induce this lipid modification, the molecular species induced, and the function of the modification. Lipidomic analysis using trip...

  3. A novel approach for predicting acyl glucuronide reactivity via Schiff base formation: development of rapidly formed peptide adducts for LC/MS/MS measurements.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianyao; Davis, Margaret; Li, Fangbiao; Azam, Farooq; Scatina, JoAnn; Talaat, Rasmy

    2004-09-01

    A novel technique to study the reactivity of acyl glucuronide metabolites to protein has been developed and is described herein. Considered here are acyl glucuronide metabolites, which have undergone the rearrangement of the glucuronic acid moiety at physiological temperature and pH. The investigation of the reactivity of these electrophilic metabolites was carried out by measuring the rate of reaction of rearranged AG metabolites in forming the corresponding acyl glucuronide-peptide adduct in the presence of Lys-Phe. This differs from the parallel technique used in forming AG adducts of proteins that have been previously reported. In the study described here, the Schiff base adduct, diclofenac acyl glucuronide-Lys-Phe product, was generated and structurally elucidated by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) analysis. The product structure was proved to be a Schiff base adduct by chemical derivatization by nucleophilic addition of HCN and chemical reduction with NaCNBH(3), followed by LC/MS/MS analysis. It is proposed here that the degree of reactivity of acyl glucuronides as measured by covalent binding to protein is proportional to the amount of its peptide adduct generated with the peptide technique described. The application of this technique to the assessment of the degree of reactivity of acyl glucuronide metabolites was validated by developing a reactivity rank of seven carboxylic acid-containing drugs. Consistency was achieved between the ranking of reactivity in the peptide technique for these seven compounds and the rankings found in the literature. In addition, a correlation (R(2) = 0.95) was revealed between the formation of a peptide adduct and the rearrangement rate of the primary acyl glucuronide of seven tested compounds. A structure effect on the degree of reactivity has demonstrated the rate order: acetic acid > propionic acid > benzoic acid derivatives. A rational explanation of this order was proposed, based on the inherent

  4. Thermodynamics of peptide inhibitor binding to HIV-1 gp41.

    PubMed

    Cole, J L; Garsky, V M

    2001-05-15

    The gp41 subunit of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelope glycoprotein mediates fusion of the cellular and viral membranes. The gp41 ectodomain is a trimer of alpha-helical hairpins, where N-terminal helices form a parallel three-stranded coiled-coil core and C-terminal helices pack around the core. A deep hydrophobic pocket on the N-terminal core represents an attractive target for antiviral therapeutics. We have employed a soluble derivative of the gp41 core ectodomain and small cyclic disulfide D-peptide inhibitors to define the stoichiometry, affinity, and thermodynamics of ligand binding to this pocket using isothermal titration calorimetry. These inhibitors bind with micromolar affinity to the pocket with the expected stoichiometry of three peptides per gp41 core trimer. There are no cooperative interactions among the three binding sites. Linear eight- or nine-residue D-peptides derived from the pocket-binding domain of the cyclic molecules also bind specifically. A negative heat capacity change is observed and is consistent with burial of hydrophobic surface upon binding. Contrary to expectations for a reaction dominated by the classical hydrophobic effect, peptide binding is enthalpically driven and is opposed by an unfavorable negative entropy change. The calorimetry data support models whereby dominant negative inhibitors bind to a transiently exposed surface on the prefusion intermediate state of gp41 and disrupt subsequent resolution to the fusion-active six-stranded hairpin conformation.

  5. A Druggable Pocket at the Nucleocapsid/Phosphoprotein Interaction Site of Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus

    PubMed Central

    Ouizougun-Oubari, Mohamed; Pereira, Nelson; Tarus, Bogdan; Galloux, Marie; Lassoued, Safa; Fix, Jenna; Tortorici, M. Alejandra; Hoos, Sylviane; Baron, Bruno; England, Patrick; Desmaële, Didier; Couvreur, Patrick; Bontems, François; Rey, Félix A.; Eléouët, Jean-François; Slama-Schwok, Anny

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Presently, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), the main cause of severe respiratory infections in infants, cannot be treated efficiently with antivirals. However, its RNA-dependent polymerase complex offers potential targets for RSV-specific drugs. This includes the recognition of its template, the ribonucleoprotein complex (RNP), consisting of genomic RNA encapsidated by the RSV nucleoprotein, N. This recognition proceeds via interaction between the phosphoprotein P, which is the main polymerase cofactor, and N. The determinant role of the C terminus of P, and more particularly of the last residue, F241, in RNP binding and viral RNA synthesis has been assessed previously. Here, we provide detailed structural insight into this crucial interaction for RSV polymerase activity. We solved the crystallographic structures of complexes between the N-terminal domain of N (N-NTD) and C-terminal peptides of P and characterized binding by biophysical approaches. Our results provide a rationale for the pivotal role of F241, which inserts into a well-defined N-NTD pocket. This primary binding site is completed by transient contacts with upstream P residues outside the pocket. Based on the structural information of the N-NTD:P complex, we identified inhibitors of this interaction, selected by in silico screening of small compounds, that efficiently bind to N and compete with P in vitro. One of the compounds displayed inhibitory activity on RSV replication, thereby strengthening the relevance of N-NTD for structure-based design of RSV-specific antivirals. IMPORTANCE Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a widespread pathogen that is a leading cause of acute lower respiratory infections in infants worldwide. RSV cannot be treated efficiently with antivirals, and no vaccine is presently available, with the development of pediatric vaccines being particularly challenging. Therefore, there is a need for new therapeutic strategies that specifically target RSV. The interaction

  6. Regioselective self-acylating cyclodextrins in organic solvent

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Eunae; Yun, Deokgyu; Jeong, Daham; Im, Jieun; Kim, Hyunki; Dindulkar, Someshwar D.; Choi, Youngjin; Jung, Seunho

    2016-01-01

    Amphiphilic cyclodextrins have been synthesized with self-acylating reaction using vinyl esters in dimethylformamide. In the present study no base, catalyst, or enzyme was used, and the structural analyses using thin layer chromatography, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and mass spectrometry show that the cyclodextrin is substituted preferentially by one acyl moiety at the C2 position of the glucose unit, suggesting that cyclodextrin functions as a regioselective catalytic carbohydrate in organic solvent. In the self-acylation, the most acidic OH group at the 2-position and the inclusion complexing ability of cyclodextrin were considered to be significant. The substrate preference was also observed in favor of the long-chain acyl group, which could be attributed to the inclusion ability of cyclodextrin cavity. Furthermore, using the model amphiphilic building block, 2-O-mono-lauryl β-cyclodextrin, the self-organized supramolecular architecture with nano-vesicular morphology in water was investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy. The cavity-type nano-assembled vesicle and the novel synthetic methods for the preparation of mono-acylated cyclodextrin should be of great interest with regard to drug/gene delivery systems, functional surfactants, and carbohydrate derivatization methods. PMID:27020946

  7. Regioselective self-acylating cyclodextrins in organic solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Eunae; Yun, Deokgyu; Jeong, Daham; Im, Jieun; Kim, Hyunki; Dindulkar, Someshwar D.; Choi, Youngjin; Jung, Seunho

    2016-03-01

    Amphiphilic cyclodextrins have been synthesized with self-acylating reaction using vinyl esters in dimethylformamide. In the present study no base, catalyst, or enzyme was used, and the structural analyses using thin layer chromatography, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and mass spectrometry show that the cyclodextrin is substituted preferentially by one acyl moiety at the C2 position of the glucose unit, suggesting that cyclodextrin functions as a regioselective catalytic carbohydrate in organic solvent. In the self-acylation, the most acidic OH group at the 2-position and the inclusion complexing ability of cyclodextrin were considered to be significant. The substrate preference was also observed in favor of the long-chain acyl group, which could be attributed to the inclusion ability of cyclodextrin cavity. Furthermore, using the model amphiphilic building block, 2-O-mono-lauryl β-cyclodextrin, the self-organized supramolecular architecture with nano-vesicular morphology in water was investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy. The cavity-type nano-assembled vesicle and the novel synthetic methods for the preparation of mono-acylated cyclodextrin should be of great interest with regard to drug/gene delivery systems, functional surfactants, and carbohydrate derivatization methods.

  8. Regioselective self-acylating cyclodextrins in organic solvent.

    PubMed

    Cho, Eunae; Yun, Deokgyu; Jeong, Daham; Im, Jieun; Kim, Hyunki; Dindulkar, Someshwar D; Choi, Youngjin; Jung, Seunho

    2016-01-01

    Amphiphilic cyclodextrins have been synthesized with self-acylating reaction using vinyl esters in dimethylformamide. In the present study no base, catalyst, or enzyme was used, and the structural analyses using thin layer chromatography, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and mass spectrometry show that the cyclodextrin is substituted preferentially by one acyl moiety at the C2 position of the glucose unit, suggesting that cyclodextrin functions as a regioselective catalytic carbohydrate in organic solvent. In the self-acylation, the most acidic OH group at the 2-position and the inclusion complexing ability of cyclodextrin were considered to be significant. The substrate preference was also observed in favor of the long-chain acyl group, which could be attributed to the inclusion ability of cyclodextrin cavity. Furthermore, using the model amphiphilic building block, 2-O-mono-lauryl β-cyclodextrin, the self-organized supramolecular architecture with nano-vesicular morphology in water was investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy. The cavity-type nano-assembled vesicle and the novel synthetic methods for the preparation of mono-acylated cyclodextrin should be of great interest with regard to drug/gene delivery systems, functional surfactants, and carbohydrate derivatization methods. PMID:27020946

  9. Two fatty acyl reductases involved in moth pheromone biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Antony, Binu; Ding, Bao-Jian; Moto, Ken’Ichi; Aldosari, Saleh A.; Aldawood, Abdulrahman S.

    2016-01-01

    Fatty acyl reductases (FARs) constitute an evolutionarily conserved gene family found in all kingdoms of life. Members of the FAR gene family play diverse roles, including seed oil synthesis, insect pheromone biosynthesis, and mammalian wax biosynthesis. In insects, FAR genes dedicated to sex pheromone biosynthesis (pheromone-gland-specific fatty acyl reductase, pgFAR) form a unique clade that exhibits substantial modifications in gene structure and possesses unique specificity and selectivity for fatty acyl substrates. Highly selective and semi-selective ‘single pgFARs’ produce single and multicomponent pheromone signals in bombycid, pyralid, yponomeutid and noctuid moths. An intriguing question is how a ‘single reductase’ can direct the synthesis of several fatty alcohols of various chain lengths and isomeric forms. Here, we report two active pgFARs in the pheromone gland of Spodoptera, namely a semi-selective, C14:acyl-specific pgFAR and a highly selective, C16:acyl-specific pgFAR, and demonstrate that these pgFARs play a pivotal role in the formation of species-specific signals, a finding that is strongly supported by functional gene expression data. The study envisages a new area of research for disclosing evolutionary changes associated with C14- and C16-specific FARs in moth pheromone biosynthesis. PMID:27427355

  10. Two fatty acyl reductases involved in moth pheromone biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Antony, Binu; Ding, Bao-Jian; Moto, Ken'Ichi; Aldosari, Saleh A; Aldawood, Abdulrahman S

    2016-01-01

    Fatty acyl reductases (FARs) constitute an evolutionarily conserved gene family found in all kingdoms of life. Members of the FAR gene family play diverse roles, including seed oil synthesis, insect pheromone biosynthesis, and mammalian wax biosynthesis. In insects, FAR genes dedicated to sex pheromone biosynthesis (pheromone-gland-specific fatty acyl reductase, pgFAR) form a unique clade that exhibits substantial modifications in gene structure and possesses unique specificity and selectivity for fatty acyl substrates. Highly selective and semi-selective 'single pgFARs' produce single and multicomponent pheromone signals in bombycid, pyralid, yponomeutid and noctuid moths. An intriguing question is how a 'single reductase' can direct the synthesis of several fatty alcohols of various chain lengths and isomeric forms. Here, we report two active pgFARs in the pheromone gland of Spodoptera, namely a semi-selective, C14:acyl-specific pgFAR and a highly selective, C16:acyl-specific pgFAR, and demonstrate that these pgFARs play a pivotal role in the formation of species-specific signals, a finding that is strongly supported by functional gene expression data. The study envisages a new area of research for disclosing evolutionary changes associated with C14- and C16-specific FARs in moth pheromone biosynthesis. PMID:27427355

  11. Mammalian acyl-CoA:lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase enzymes.

    PubMed

    Soupene, Eric; Fyrst, Henrik; Kuypers, Frans A

    2008-01-01

    The mammalian RBC lacks de novo lipid synthesis but maintains its membrane composition by rapid turnover of acyl moieties at the sn-2 position of phospholipids. Plasma-derived fatty acids are esterified to acyl-CoA by acyl-CoA synthetases and transferred to lysophospholipids by acyl-CoA:lysophospholipid acyltransferases. We report the characterization of three lysophosphatidylcholine (lysoPC) acyltransferases (LPCATs), products of the AYTL1, -2, and -3 genes. These proteins are three members of a LPCAT family, of which all three genes are expressed in an erythroleukemic cell line. Aytl2 mRNA was detected in mouse reticulocytes, and the presence of the product of the human ortholog was confirmed in adult human RBCs. The three murine Aytl proteins generated phosphatidylcholine from long-chain acyl-CoA and lysoPC when expressed in Escherichia coli membranes. Spliced variants of Aytl1, affecting a conserved catalytic motif, were identified. Calcium and magnesium modulated LPCAT activity of both Aytl1 and -2 proteins that exhibit EF-hand motifs at the C terminus. Characterization of the product of the Aytl2 gene as the phosphatidylcholine reacylating enzyme in RBCs represents the identification of a plasma membrane lysophospholipid acyltransferase and establishes the function of a LPCAT protein.

  12. Biphenyl/diphenyl ether renin inhibitors: filling the S1 pocket of renin via the S3 pocket.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jing; Simpson, Robert D; Zhao, Wei; Tice, Colin M; Xu, Zhenrong; Cacatian, Salvacion; Jia, Lanqi; Flaherty, Patrick T; Guo, Joan; Ishchenko, Alexey; Wu, Zhongren; McKeever, Brian M; Scott, Boyd B; Bukhtiyarov, Yuri; Berbaum, Jennifer; Panemangalore, Reshma; Bentley, Ross; Doe, Christopher P; Harrison, Richard K; McGeehan, Gerard M; Singh, Suresh B; Dillard, Lawrence W; Baldwin, John J; Claremon, David A

    2011-08-15

    Structure-based design led to the discovery of a novel class of renin inhibitors in which an unprecedented phenyl ring filling the S1 site is attached to the phenyl ring filling the S3 pocket. Optimization for several parameters including potency in the presence of human plasma, selectivity against CYP3A4 inhibition and improved rat oral bioavailability led to the identification of 8d which demonstrated antihypertensive efficacy in a transgenic rat model of human hypertension.

  13. Spatial analysis and quantification of the thermodynamic driving forces in protein-ligand binding: binding site variability.

    PubMed

    Raman, E Prabhu; MacKerell, Alexander D

    2015-02-25

    The thermodynamic driving forces behind small molecule-protein binding are still not well-understood, including the variability of those forces associated with different types of ligands in different binding pockets. To better understand these phenomena we calculate spatially resolved thermodynamic contributions of the different molecular degrees of freedom for the binding of propane and methanol to multiple pockets on the proteins Factor Xa and p38 MAP kinase. Binding thermodynamics are computed using a statistical thermodynamics based end-point method applied on a canonical ensemble comprising the protein-ligand complexes and the corresponding free states in an explicit solvent environment. Energetic and entropic contributions of water and ligand degrees of freedom computed from the configurational ensemble provide an unprecedented level of detail into the mechanisms of binding. Direct protein-ligand interaction energies play a significant role in both nonpolar and polar binding, which is comparable to water reorganization energy. Loss of interactions with water upon binding strongly compensates these contributions leading to relatively small binding enthalpies. For both solutes, the entropy of water reorganization is found to favor binding in agreement with the classical view of the "hydrophobic effect". Depending on the specifics of the binding pocket, both energy-entropy compensation and reinforcement mechanisms are observed. It is notable to have the ability to visualize the spatial distribution of the thermodynamic contributions to binding at atomic resolution showing significant differences in the thermodynamic contributions of water to the binding of propane versus methanol. PMID:25625202

  14. Tryptophan fluorescence reveals induced folding of Vibrio harveyi acyl carrier protein upon interaction with partner enzymes.

    PubMed

    Gong, Huansheng; Murphy, Peter W; Langille, Gavin M; Minielly, Sarah J; Murphy, Anne; McMaster, Christopher R; Byers, David M

    2008-11-01

    We have introduced tryptophan as a local fluorescent probe to monitor the conformation of Vibrio harveyi acyl carrier protein (ACP), a small flexible protein that is unfolded at neutral pH but must undergo reversible conformational change during the synthesis and delivery of bacterial fatty acids. Consistent with known 3D structures of ACP, steady-state fluorescence and quenching experiments indicated that Trp at positions 46, 50, and 72 are buried in the hydrophobic core upon Mg(2+)-induced ACP folding, whereas residues 25 and 45 remain in a hydrophilic environment on the protein surface. Attachment of fatty acids to the phosphopantetheine prosthetic group progressively stabilized the folded conformation of all Trp-substituted ACPs, but longer chains (14:0) were less effective than medium chains (8:0) in shielding Trp from acrylamide quenching in the L46W protein. Interaction with ACP-dependent enzymes LpxA and holo-ACP synthase also caused folding of L46W; fluorescence quenching indicated proximity of Trp-45 in helix II of ACP in LpxA binding. Our results suggest that divalent cations and fatty acylation produce differing environments in the ACP core and also reveal enzyme partner-induced folding of ACP, a key feature of "natively unfolded" proteins.

  15. Structural characterization and comparison of three acyl-carrier-protein synthases from pathogenic bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Halavaty, Andrei S.; Kim, Youngchang; Minasov, George; Shuvalova, Ludmilla; Dubrovska, Ievgeniia; Winsor, James; Zhou, Min; Onopriyenko, Olena; Skarina, Tatiana; Papazisi, Leka; Kwon, Keehwan; Peterson, Scott N.; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Savchenko, Alexei; Anderson, Wayne F.

    2012-10-01

    The structural characterization of acyl-carrier-protein synthase (AcpS) from three different pathogenic microorganisms is reported. One interesting finding of the present work is a crystal artifact related to the activity of the enzyme, which fortuitously represents an opportunity for a strategy to design a potential inhibitor of a pathogenic AcpS. Some bacterial type II fatty-acid synthesis (FAS II) enzymes have been shown to be important candidates for drug discovery. The scientific and medical quest for new FAS II protein targets continues to stimulate research in this field. One of the possible additional candidates is the acyl-carrier-protein synthase (AcpS) enzyme. Its holo form post-translationally modifies the apo form of an acyl carrier protein (ACP), which assures the constant delivery of thioester intermediates to the discrete enzymes of FAS II. At the Center for Structural Genomics of Infectious Diseases (CSGID), AcpSs from Staphylococcus aureus (AcpS{sub SA}), Vibrio cholerae (AcpS{sub VC}) and Bacillus anthracis (AcpS{sub BA}) have been structurally characterized in their apo, holo and product-bound forms, respectively. The structure of AcpS{sub BA} is emphasized because of the two 3′, 5′-adenosine diphosphate (3′, 5′-ADP) product molecules that are found in each of the three coenzyme A (CoA) binding sites of the trimeric protein. One 3′, 5′-ADP is bound as the 3′, 5′-ADP part of CoA in the known structures of the CoA–AcpS and 3′, 5′-ADP–AcpS binary complexes. The position of the second 3′, 5′-ADP has never been described before. It is in close proximity to the first 3′, 5′-ADP and the ACP-binding site. The coordination of two ADPs in AcpS{sub BA} may possibly be exploited for the design of AcpS inhibitors that can block binding of both CoA and ACP.

  16. Origin of melt pockets in mantle xenoliths from southern Patagonia, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliani, Paola; Ntaflos, Theodoros; Bjerg, Ernesto

    2009-12-01

    Peridotite mantle xenoliths collected north of Gobernador Gregores, Patagonia, affected by cryptic and modal metasomatism bear melt pockets of unusually large size. Melt pockets consist of second generation olivine (ol2), clinopyroxene (cpx2) and spinel (sp2) ± relict amphibole (amph) immersed in a yellowish vesicular glass matrix. Amphibole breakdown was responsible for melt pocket generation as suggested by textural evidence and proved by consistent mass-balance calculations: amph → cpx2 + ol2 + sp2 + melt. Composition of calculated amphibole in amphibole-free melt pockets is very similar to that measured in amphibole-bearing melt pockets from the same xenolith, i.e. amphibole was consumed in the melt pocket generation process. In melt pockets devoid of relict amphibole, mass-balance calculations show remarkable differences between the calculated amphibole and the measured amphibole compositions in melt pockets from the same xenolith. The participation of minor proportions of a consumed reactant phase could be a reasonable explanation. In some samples the calculated phase proportion of glass is in excess compared to modal estimations based on backscattered electron images, probably because a portion of the generated melt was able to migrate out of the melt pockets. Compositional inhomogeneity of cpx2 and variable Ti Kd in cpx2 vs. glass in the same melt pocket reflect fast nucleation and growth and disequilibrium crystallisation, respectively. This and the difference between forsterite content in calculated equilibrium olivine and second generation olivine, suggest that mineral equilibrium was inhibited by rapid quenching of melt pockets.

  17. Partial deletion of beta9 loop in pancreatic lipase-related protein 2 reduces enzyme activity with a larger effect on long acyl chain substrates.

    PubMed

    Dridi, Kaouthar; Amara, Sawsan; Bezzine, Sofiane; Rodriguez, Jorge A; Carrière, Frédéric; Gaussier, Hélène

    2013-07-01

    Structural studies on pancreatic lipase have revealed a complex architecture of surface loops surrounding the enzyme active site and potentially involved in interactions with lipids. Two of them, the lid and beta loop, expose a large hydrophobic surface and are considered as acyl chain binding sites based on their interaction with an alkyl phosphonate inhibitor. While the role of the lid in substrate recognition and selectivity has been extensively studied, the implication of beta9 loop in acyl chain stabilization remained hypothetical. The characterization of an enzyme with a natural deletion of the lid, guinea pig pancreatic lipase-related protein 2 (GPLRP2), suggests however an essential contribution of the beta9 loop in the stabilization of the acyl enzyme intermediate formed during the lipolysis reaction. A GPLRP2 mutant with a seven-residue deletion of beta9 loop (GPLRP2-deltabeta9) was produced and its enzyme activity was measured using various substrates (triglycerides, monoglycerides, galactolipids, phospholipids, vinyl esters) with short, medium and long acyl chains. Whatever the substrate tested, GPLRP2-deltabeta9 activity is drastically reduced compared to that of wild-type GPLRP2 and this effect is more pronounced as the length of substrate acyl chain increases. Changes in relative substrate selectivity and stereoselectivity remained however weak. The deletion within beta9 loop has also a negative effect on the rate of enzyme inhibition by alkyl phosphonates. All these findings indicate that the reduced enzyme turnover observed with GPLRP2-deltabeta9 results from a weaker stabilization of the acyl enzyme intermediate due to a loss of hydrophobic interactions. PMID:24046870

  18. Identification of Unusual Phospholipid Fatty Acyl Compositions of Acanthamoeba castellanii

    PubMed Central

    Palusinska-Szysz, Marta; Kania, Magdalena; Turska-Szewczuk, Anna; Danikiewicz, Witold; Russa, Ryszard; Fuchs, Beate

    2014-01-01

    Acanthamoeba are opportunistic protozoan pathogens that may lead to sight-threatening keratitis and fatal granulomatous encephalitis. The successful prognosis requires early diagnosis and differentiation of pathogenic Acanthamoeba followed by aggressive treatment regimen. The plasma membrane of Acanthamoeba consists of 25% phospholipids (PL). The presence of C20 and, recently reported, 28- and 30-carbon fatty acyl residues is characteristic of amoeba PL. A detailed knowledge about this unusual PL composition could help to differentiate Acanthamoeba from other parasites, e.g. bacteria and develop more efficient treatment strategies. Therefore, the detailed PL composition of Acanthamoeba castellanii was investigated by 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, thin-layer chromatography, gas chromatography, high performance liquid chromatography and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Normal and reversed phase liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometric detection was used for detailed characterization of the fatty acyl composition of each detected PL. The most abundant fatty acyl residues in each PL class were octadecanoyl (18∶0), octadecenoyl (18∶1 Δ9) and hexadecanoyl (16∶0). However, some selected PLs contained also very long fatty acyl chains: the presence of 28- and 30-carbon fatty acyl residues was confirmed in phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylserine, phosphatidic acid and cardiolipin. The majority of these fatty acyl residues were also identified in PE that resulted in the following composition: 28∶1/20∶2, 30∶2/18∶1, 28∶0/20∶2, 30∶2/20∶4 and 30∶3/20∶3. The PL of amoebae are significantly different in comparison to other cells: we describe here for the first time unusual, very long chain fatty acids with Δ5-unsaturation (30∶35,21,24) and 30∶221,24 localized exclusively in specific phospholipid classes of A. castellanii protozoa that could serve as specific biomarkers for the presence of these

  19. Lysosomal Lipases PLRP2 and LPLA2 Process Mycobacterial Multi-acylated Lipids and Generate T Cell Stimulatory Antigens.

    PubMed

    Gilleron, Martine; Lepore, Marco; Layre, Emilie; Cala-De Paepe, Diane; Mebarek, Naila; Shayman, James A; Canaan, Stéphane; Mori, Lucia; Carrière, Frédéric; Puzo, Germain; De Libero, Gennaro

    2016-09-22

    Complex antigens require processing within antigen-presenting cells (APCs) to form T cell stimulatory complexes with CD1 antigen-presenting molecules. It remains unknown whether lipids with multi-acylated moieties also necessitate digestion by lipases to become capable of binding CD1 molecules and stimulate T cells. Here, we show that the mycobacterial tetra-acylated glycolipid antigens phosphatidyl-myo-inositol mannosides (PIM) are digested to di-acylated forms by pancreatic lipase-related protein 2 (PLRP2) and lysosomal phospholipase A2 (LPLA2) within APCs. Recombinant PLRP2 and LPLA2 removed the sn1- and sn2-bound fatty acids from the PIM glycerol moiety, as revealed by mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance studies. PLRP2 or LPLA2 gene silencing in APCs abolished PIM presentation to T cells, thus revealing an essential role of both lipases in vivo. These findings show that endosomal lipases participate in lipid antigen presentation by processing lipid antigens and have a role in T cell immunity against mycobacteria. PMID:27662254

  20. Quantum chemical study of penicillin: Reactions after acylation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Rui; Feng, Dacheng; Zhu, Feng

    The density functional theory methods were used on the model molecules of penicillin to determine the possible reactions after their acylation on ?-lactamase, and the results were compared with sulbactam we have studied. The results show that, the acylated-enzyme tetrahedral intermediate can evolves with opening of ?-lactam ring as well as the thiazole ring; the thiazole ring-open products may be formed via ?-lactam ring-open product or from tetrahedral intermediate directly. Those products, in imine or enamine form, can tautomerize via hydrogen migration. In virtue of the water-assisted, their energy barriers are obviously reduced.

  1. Diverse Activities of Histone Acylations Connect Metabolism to Chromatin Function.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Arnob; Abmayr, Susan M; Workman, Jerry L

    2016-08-18

    Modifications of histones play important roles in balancing transcriptional output. The discovery of acyl marks, besides histone acetylation, has added to the functional diversity of histone modifications. Since all modifications use metabolic intermediates as substrates for chromatin-modifying enzymes, the prevalent landscape of histone modifications in any cell type is a snapshot of its metabolic status. Here, we review some of the current findings of how differential use of histone acylations regulates gene expression as response to metabolic changes and differentiation programs. PMID:27540855

  2. Novel approach in LC-MS/MS using MRM to generate a full profile of acyl-CoAs: discovery of acyl-dephospho-CoAs[S

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qingling; Zhang, Shenghui; Berthiaume, Jessica M.; Simons, Brigitte; Zhang, Guo-Fang

    2014-01-01

    A metabolomic approach to selectively profile all acyl-CoAs was developed using a programmed multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) method in LC-MS/MS and was employed in the analysis of various rat organs. The programmed MRM method possessed 300 mass ion transitions with the mass difference of 507 between precursor ion (Q1) and product ion (Q3), and the precursor ion started from m/z 768 and progressively increased one mass unit at each step. Acyl-dephospho-CoAs resulting from the dephosphorylation of acyl-CoAs were identified by accurate MS and fragmentation. Acyl-dephospho-CoAs were also quantitatively scanned by the MRM method with the mass difference of 427 between Q1 and Q3 mass ions. Acyl-CoAs and dephospho-CoAs were assayed with limits of detection ranging from 2 to 133 nM. The accuracy of the method was demonstrated by assaying a range of concentrations of spiked acyl-CoAs with the results of 80–114%. The distribution of acyl-CoAs reflects the metabolic status of each organ. The physiological role of dephosphorylation of acyl-CoAs remains to be further characterized. The methodology described herein provides a novel strategy in metabolomic studies to quantitatively and qualitatively profile all potential acyl-CoAs and acyl-dephospho-CoAs. PMID:24367045

  3. Chemoenzymatic Synthesis of Acyl Coenzyme A Substrates Enables in Situ Labeling of Small Molecules and Proteins.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Vinayak; Diethelm, Stefan; Ray, Lauren; Garg, Neha; Awakawa, Takayoshi; Dorrestein, Pieter C; Moore, Bradley S

    2015-09-18

    A chemoenzymatic approach to generate fully functional acyl coenzyme A molecules that are then used as substrates to drive in situ acyl transfer reactions is described. Mass spectrometry based assays to verify the identity of acyl coenzyme A enzymatic products are also illustrated. The approach is responsive to a diverse array of carboxylic acids that can be elaborated to their corresponding coenzyme A thioesters, with potential applications in wide-ranging chemical biology studies that utilize acyl coenzyme A substrates.

  4. Practical Pocket PC Application w/Biometric Security

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Logan, Julian

    2004-01-01

    I work in the Flight Software Engineering Branch, where we provide design and development of embedded real-time software applications for flight and supporting ground systems to support the NASA Aeronautics and Space Programs. In addition, this branch evaluates, develops and implements new technologies for embedded real-time systems, and maintains a laboratory for applications of embedded technology. The majority of microchips that are used in modern society have been programmed using embedded technology. These small chips can be found in microwaves, calculators, home security systems, cell phones and more. My assignment this summer entails working with an iPAQ HP 5500 Pocket PC. This top-of-the-line hand-held device is one of the first mobile PC's to introduce biometric security capabilities. Biometric security, in this case a fingerprint authentication system, is on the edge of technology as far as securing information. The benefits of fingerprint authentication are enormous. The most significant of them are that it is extremely difficult to reproduce someone else's fingerprint, and it is equally difficult to lose or forget your own fingerprint as opposed to a password or pin number. One of my goals for this summer is to integrate this technology with another Pocket PC application. The second task for the summer is to develop a simple application that provides an Astronaut EVA (Extravehicular Activity) Log Book capability. The Astronaut EVA Log Book is what an astronaut would use to report the status of field missions, crew physical health, successes, future plans, etc. My goal is to develop a user interface into which these data fields can be entered and stored. The applications that I am developing are created using eMbedded Visual C++ 4.0 with the Pocket PC 2003 Software Development Kit provided by Microsoft.

  5. Pocket atlas of head and neck MRI anatomy

    SciTech Connect

    Lufkin, R.B.; Hanafee, W.N.

    1989-01-01

    This pocket atlas depicts the anatomy of the head and neck as seen in magnetic resonance (MR) images. The collection of 140 high-resolution images covers all major areas - neck, larynx, oropharynx, tongue, nasopharynx, skull base, sinuses, and temporal bone - displayed in sagittal, axial, and coronal MR image planes. The images show maximum fat/muscle contrast for better visualization of fascial planes. In certain areas of the anatomy, such as the neck and temporal bone, surface coils were used to achieve significant advantages in image quality over standard head or body coils.

  6. The retraction pocket in the treatment of cholesteatoma.

    PubMed

    Austin, D F

    1976-12-01

    Residual and especially recurrent disease was observed in 124 consecutive patients who had operations for cholesteatomas, with the finding of continuing problems in at least 23% of these patients. Surgical therapy based on the goals of extirpation of the "pseudoneoplasm" of cholesteatoma, restoration of health and function, and prevention of recurrence is the ideal. Results of "single-barreled" regimens do not yet meet these goals. A compromise surgical management regimen is offered. Etiologic implications of the retraction pocket phenomenon are explored and a testable hypothesis offered.

  7. Leukocyte integrin αLβ2 headpiece structures: The αI domain, the pocket for the internal ligand, and concerted movements of its loops.

    PubMed

    Sen, Mehmet; Springer, Timothy A

    2016-03-15

    High-resolution crystal structures of the headpiece of lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 (integrin αLβ2) reveal how the αI domain interacts with its platform formed by the α-subunit β-propeller and β-subunit βI domains. The αLβ2 structures compared with αXβ2 structures show that the αI domain, tethered through its N-linker and a disulfide to a stable β-ribbon pillar near the center of the platform, can undergo remarkable pivoting and tilting motions that appear buffered by N-glycan decorations that differ between αL and αX subunits. Rerefined β2 integrin structures reveal details including pyroglutamic acid at the β2 N terminus and bending within the EGF1 domain. Allostery is relayed to the αI domain by an internal ligand that binds to a pocket at the interface between the β-propeller and βI domains. Marked differences between the αL and αX subunit β-propeller domains concentrate near the binding pocket and αI domain interfaces. Remarkably, movement in allostery in the βI domain of specificity determining loop 1 (SDL1) causes concerted movement of SDL2 and thereby tightens the binding pocket for the internal ligand.

  8. Chlamydia trachomatis Scavenges Host Fatty Acids for Phospholipid Synthesis via an Acyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Synthetase*

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jiangwei; Dodson, V. Joshua; Frank, Matthew W.; Rock, Charles O.

    2015-01-01

    The obligate intracellular parasite Chlamydia trachomatis has a reduced genome but relies on de novo fatty acid and phospholipid biosynthesis to produce its membrane phospholipids. Lipidomic analyses showed that 8% of the phospholipid molecular species synthesized by C. trachomatis contained oleic acid, an abundant host fatty acid that cannot be made by the bacterium. Mass tracing experiments showed that isotopically labeled palmitic, myristic, and lauric acids added to the medium were incorporated into C. trachomatis-derived phospholipid molecular species. HeLa cells did not elongate lauric acid, but infected HeLa cell cultures elongated laurate to myristate and palmitate. The elongated fatty acids were incorporated exclusively into C. trachomatis-produced phospholipid molecular species. C. trachomatis has adjacent genes encoding the separate domains of the bifunctional acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) synthetase/2-acylglycerolphosphoethanolamine acyltransferase gene (aas) of Escherichia coli. The CT775 gene encodes an acyltransferase (LpaT) that selectively transfers fatty acids from acyl-ACP to the 1-position of 2-acyl-glycerophospholipids. The CT776 gene encodes an acyl-ACP synthetase (AasC) with a substrate preference for palmitic compared with oleic acid in vitro. Exogenous fatty acids were elongated and incorporated into phospholipids by Escherichia coli-expressing AasC, illustrating its function as an acyl-ACP synthetase in vivo. These data point to an AasC-dependent pathway in C. trachomatis that selectively scavenges host saturated fatty acids to be used for the de novo synthesis of its membrane constituents. PMID:26195634

  9. Chlamydia trachomatis Scavenges Host Fatty Acids for Phospholipid Synthesis via an Acyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Synthetase.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jiangwei; Dodson, V Joshua; Frank, Matthew W; Rock, Charles O

    2015-09-01

    The obligate intracellular parasite Chlamydia trachomatis has a reduced genome but relies on de novo fatty acid and phospholipid biosynthesis to produce its membrane phospholipids. Lipidomic analyses showed that 8% of the phospholipid molecular species synthesized by C. trachomatis contained oleic acid, an abundant host fatty acid that cannot be made by the bacterium. Mass tracing experiments showed that isotopically labeled palmitic, myristic, and lauric acids added to the medium were incorporated into C. trachomatis-derived phospholipid molecular species. HeLa cells did not elongate lauric acid, but infected HeLa cell cultures elongated laurate to myristate and palmitate. The elongated fatty acids were incorporated exclusively into C. trachomatis-produced phospholipid molecular species. C. trachomatis has adjacent genes encoding the separate domains of the bifunctional acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) synthetase/2-acylglycerolphosphoethanolamine acyltransferase gene (aas) of Escherichia coli. The CT775 gene encodes an acyltransferase (LpaT) that selectively transfers fatty acids from acyl-ACP to the 1-position of 2-acyl-glycerophospholipids. The CT776 gene encodes an acyl-ACP synthetase (AasC) with a substrate preference for palmitic compared with oleic acid in vitro. Exogenous fatty acids were elongated and incorporated into phospholipids by Escherichia coli-expressing AasC, illustrating its function as an acyl-ACP synthetase in vivo. These data point to an AasC-dependent pathway in C. trachomatis that selectively scavenges host saturated fatty acids to be used for the de novo synthesis of its membrane constituents. PMID:26195634

  10. Structure of apo acyl carrier protein and a proposal to engineer protein crystallization through metal ions

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, Xiayang; Janson, Cheryl A.

    2010-11-16

    A topic of current interest is engineering surface mutations in order to improve the success rate of protein crystallization. This report explores the possibility of using metal-ion-mediated crystal-packing interactions to facilitate rational design. Escherichia coli apo acyl carrier protein was chosen as a test case because of its high content of negatively charged carboxylates suitable for metal binding with moderate affinity. The protein was successfully crystallized in the presence of zinc ions. The crystal structure was determined to 1.1 {angstrom} resolution with MAD phasing using anomalous signals from the co-crystallized Zn{sup 2+} ions. The case study suggested an integrated strategy for crystallization and structure solution of proteins via engineering surface Asp and Glu mutants, crystallizing them in the presence of metal ions such as Zn{sup 2+} and solving the structures using anomalous signals.

  11. Breakdown of air pockets in downwardly inclined sewerage pressure mains.

    PubMed

    Lubbers, C L; Clemens, F H L R

    2006-01-01

    In the Netherlands, wastewater is collected in municipal areas and transported to centralised WWTPs by an extensive system of pressure mains. Over the last decades these pressure mains did not receive much attention in terms of monitoring of performance or maintenance. A recent inventory showed that half of the pressure mains show an increased pressure loss for no directly obvious reason. One of the many causes that account for the reduction of the flow capacity is the occurrence of free gas in the pipeline. During dry weather periods with low flow velocities, gas may accumulate at high points in the system. Once the velocity increases during storm weather flow, the air pockets may be broken down and transported to the end of the system. A research study is started focussing on the description of the gas-water phenomena in wastewater pressure mains with respect to transportation of gas. An experimental facility is constructed for the study of multi-phase flow. This paper describes the preliminary results of experiments on breakdown rates of gas pockets as a function of inclination angle and water flow rate. The results show an increasing breakdown rate with increasing inclination angle.

  12. Response of ionization chamber based pocket dosimeter to beta radiation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Munish; Gupta, Anil; Pradhan, S M; Bakshi, A K; Chougaonkar, M P; Babu, D A R

    2013-12-01

    Quantitative estimate of the response of ionization chamber based pocket dosimeters (DRDs) to various beta sources was performed. It has been established that the ionization chamber based pocket dosimeters do not respond to beta particles having energy (Emax)<1 MeV and same was verified using (147)Pm, (85)Kr and (204)Tl beta sources. However, for beta particles having energy >1 MeV, the DRDs exhibit measureable response and the values are ~8%, ~14% and ~27% per mSv for natural uranium, (90)Sr/(90)Y and (106)Ru/(106)Rh beta sources respectively. As the energy of the beta particles increases, the response also increases. The response of DRDs to beta particles having energy>1 MeV arises due to the fact that the thickness of the chamber walls is less than the maximum range of beta particles. This may also be one of the reasons for disparity between doses measured with passive/legal dosimeters (TLDs) and DRDs in those situations in which radiation workers are exposed to mixed field of gamma photons and beta particles especially at uranium processing plants, nuclear (power and research) reactors, waste management facilities and fuel reprocessing plants etc. The paper provides the reason (technical) for disparity between the doses recorded by TLDs and DRDs in mixed field of photons and beta particles.

  13. Detection of the amoeba Entamoeba gingivalis in periodontal pockets

    PubMed Central

    Bonner, Mark; Amard, Véronique; Bar-Pinatel, Charlotte; Charpentier, Frédéric; Chatard, Jean-Michel; Desmuyck, Yvan; Ihler, Serge; Rochet, Jean-Pierre; Roux de La Tribouille, Véronique; Saladin, Luc; Verdy, Marion; Gironès, Núria; Fresno, Manuel; Santi-Rocca, Julien

    2014-01-01

    Periodontitis is a public health issue, being one of the most prevalent diseases worldwide. However, the aetiology of the disease is still unclear: genetics of patients cannot explain the dispersed or isolated localisation of gingival pockets, while bacteria-based models are insufficient to distinguish gingivitis and periodontitis. The possible role of parasites in the establishment of periodontitis has been poorly studied until now. The aim of this project was to study a potential link between colonisation of gingival crevices by the amoeba Entamoeba gingivalis and periodontitis. In eight different dental clinics in France, samples were taken in periodontal pockets (72) or healthy sites (33), and submitted to microscopic observation and molecular identification by PCR with a new set of primers designed to specifically detect E. gingivalis. This blind sample analysis showed the strong sensitivity of PCR compared with clinical diagnosis (58/72 = 81%), and microscopy (51/65 = 78%). The results of this work show that the parasites detected by microscopy mainly – if not exclusively – belong to the species E. gingivalis and that the presence of the parasite is correlated with periodontitis. PMID:24983705

  14. Detection of the amoeba Entamoeba gingivalis in periodontal pockets.

    PubMed

    Bonner, Mark; Amard, Véronique; Bar-Pinatel, Charlotte; Charpentier, Frédéric; Chatard, Jean-Michel; Desmuyck, Yvan; Ihler, Serge; Rochet, Jean-Pierre; Roux de La Tribouille, Véronique; Saladin, Luc; Verdy, Marion; Gironès, Núria; Fresno, Manuel; Santi-Rocca, Julien

    2014-01-01

    Periodontitis is a public health issue, being one of the most prevalent diseases worldwide. However, the aetiology of the disease is still unclear: genetics of patients cannot explain the dispersed or isolated localisation of gingival pockets, while bacteria-based models are insufficient to distinguish gingivitis and periodontitis. The possible role of parasites in the establishment of periodontitis has been poorly studied until now. The aim of this project was to study a potential link between colonisation of gingival crevices by the amoeba Entamoeba gingivalis and periodontitis. In eight different dental clinics in France, samples were taken in periodontal pockets (72) or healthy sites (33), and submitted to microscopic observation and molecular identification by PCR with a new set of primers designed to specifically detect E. gingivalis. This blind sample analysis showed the strong sensitivity of PCR compared with clinical diagnosis (58/72 = 81%), and microscopy (51/65 = 78%). The results of this work show that the parasites detected by microscopy mainly - if not exclusively - belong to the species E. gingivalis and that the presence of the parasite is correlated with periodontitis.

  15. Mechanistic studies of malonic acid-mediated in situ acylation.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Koushik; Naoum, Johnny N; Roy, Tapta Kanchan; Gilon, Chaim; Gerber, R Benny; Friedler, Assaf

    2015-09-01

    We have previously introduced an easy to perform, cost-effective and highly efficient acetylation technique for solid phase synthesis (SPPS). Malonic acid is used as a precursor and the reaction proceeds via a reactive ketene that acetylates the target amine. Here we present a detailed mechanistic study of the malonic acid-mediated acylation. The influence of reaction conditions, peptide sequence and reagents was systematically studied. Our results show that the methodology can be successfully applied to different types of peptides and nonpeptidic molecules irrespective of their structure, sequence, or conformation. Using alkyl, phenyl, and benzyl malonic acid, we synthesized various acyl peptides with almost quantitative yields. The ketenes obtained from the different malonic acid derived precursors were characterized by in situ (1) H-NMR. The reaction proceeded in short reaction times and resulted in excellent yields when using uronium-based coupling agents, DIPEA as a base, DMF/DMSO/NMP as solvents, Rink amide/Wang/Merrifield resins, temperature of 20°C, pH 8-12 and 5 min preactivation at inert atmosphere. The reaction was unaffected by Lewis acids, transition metal ions, surfactants, or salt. DFT studies support the kinetically favorable concerted mechanism for CO2 and ketene formation that leads to the thermodynamically stable acylated products. We conclude that the malonic acid-mediated acylation is a general method applicable to various target molecules. PMID:25846609

  16. Preservation of polyunsaturated fatty acyl glycerides via intramolecular antioxidant coupling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ferulic acid and its esters are known to be effective antioxidants. Feruloyl di-gamma-linolenoylglycerol was assessed for its ability to serve as an antioxidant for preventing the oxidation of its gamma-linolenoyl polyunsaturated fatty acyl groups in model membrane phospholipid vesicles. The molec...

  17. Lubricity characteristics of seed oils modified by acylation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chemically modified seed oils via acylation of epoxidized and polyhydroxylated derivatives were investigated for their potential as candidates for lubrication. The native oil was preliminarily epoxidized and ring-opened in a one-pot reaction using formic acid-H2O2 followed by aqueous HCl treatment t...

  18. Repurposing metformin: an old drug with new tricks in its binding pockets.

    PubMed

    Pryor, Rosina; Cabreiro, Filipe

    2015-11-01

    Improvements in healthcare and nutrition have generated remarkable increases in life expectancy worldwide. This is one of the greatest achievements of the modern world yet it also presents a grave challenge: as more people survive into later life, more also experience the diseases of old age, including type 2 diabetes (T2D), cardiovascular disease (CVD) and cancer. Developing new ways to improve health in the elderly is therefore a top priority for biomedical research. Although our understanding of the molecular basis of these morbidities has advanced rapidly, effective novel treatments are still lacking. Alternative drug development strategies are now being explored, such as the repurposing of existing drugs used to treat other diseases. This can save a considerable amount of time and money since the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and safety profiles of these drugs are already established, effectively enabling preclinical studies to be bypassed. Metformin is one such drug currently being investigated for novel applications. The present review provides a thorough and detailed account of our current understanding of the molecular pharmacology and signalling mechanisms underlying biguanide-protein interactions. It also focuses on the key role of the microbiota in regulating age-associated morbidities and a potential role for metformin to modulate its function. Research in this area holds the key to solving many of the mysteries of our current understanding of drug action and concerted effects to provide sustained and long-life health.

  19. Ligand binding pocket function of drosophila USP is necessary for metamorphosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The widely accepted paradigm that epoxidized methyl farnesoates (“juvenile hormones,” JHs) are the principle sesquiterpenoid hormones regulating insect metamorphosis was assessed in Drosophila melanogaster. GC-MS analysis showed that methyl farnesoate, rather than methyl epoxyfarnesoate (= JH III), ...

  20. Repurposing metformin: an old drug with new tricks in its binding pockets

    PubMed Central

    Pryor, Rosina; Cabreiro, Filipe

    2015-01-01

    Improvements in healthcare and nutrition have generated remarkable increases in life expectancy worldwide. This is one of the greatest achievements of the modern world yet it also presents a grave challenge: as more people survive into later life, more also experience the diseases of old age, including type 2 diabetes (T2D), cardiovascular disease (CVD) and cancer. Developing new ways to improve health in the elderly is therefore a top priority for biomedical research. Although our understanding of the molecular basis of these morbidities has advanced rapidly, effective novel treatments are still lacking. Alternative drug development strategies are now being explored, such as the repurposing of existing drugs used to treat other diseases. This can save a considerable amount of time and money since the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and safety profiles of these drugs are already established, effectively enabling preclinical studies to be bypassed. Metformin is one such drug currently being investigated for novel applications. The present review provides a thorough and detailed account of our current understanding of the molecular pharmacology and signalling mechanisms underlying biguanide–protein interactions. It also focuses on the key role of the microbiota in regulating age-associated morbidities and a potential role for metformin to modulate its function. Research in this area holds the key to solving many of the mysteries of our current understanding of drug action and concerted effects to provide sustained and long-life health. PMID:26475449

  1. Separation and quantification of 2-acyl-1-lysophospholipids and 1-acyl-2-lysophospholipids in biological samples by LC-MS/MS

    PubMed Central

    Okudaira, Michiyo; Inoue, Asuka; Shuto, Akira; Nakanaga, Keita; Kano, Kuniyuki; Makide, Kumiko; Saigusa, Daisuke; Tomioka, Yoshihisa; Aoki, Junken

    2014-01-01

    Lysophospholipids (LysoGPs) serve as lipid mediators and precursors for synthesis of diacyl phospholipids (GPs). LysoGPs detected in cells have various acyl chains attached at either the sn-1 or sn-2 position of the glycerol backbone. In general, acyl chains at the sn-2 position of 2-acyl-1-LysoGPs readily move to the sn-1 position, generating 1-acyl-2-lyso isomers by a nonenzymatic reaction called intra-molecular acyl migration, which has hampered the detection of 2-acyl-1-LysoGPs in biological samples. In this study, we developed a simple and versatile method to separate and quantify 2-acyl-1- and 1-acyl-2-LysoGPs. The main point of the method was to extract LysoGPs at pH 4 and 4°C, conditions that were found to completely eliminate the intra-molecular acyl migration. Under the present conditions, the relative amounts of 2-acyl-1-LysoGPs and 1-acyl-2-LysoGPs did not change at least for 1 week. Further, in LysoGPs extracted from cells and tissues under the present conditions, most of the saturated fatty acids (16:0 and 18:0) were found in the sn-1 position of LysoGPs, while most of the PUFAs (18:2, 20:4, 22:6) were found in the sn-2 position. Thus the method can be used to elucidate the in vivo role of 2-acyl-1-LysoGPs. PMID:25114169

  2. OptGraft: A computational procedure for transferring a binding site onto an existing protein scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Fazelinia, Hossein; Cirino, Patrick C; Maranas, Costas D

    2009-01-01

    One of the many challenging tasks of protein design is the introduction of a completely new function into an existing protein scaffold. In this study, we introduce a new computational procedure OptGraft for placing a novel binding pocket onto a protein structure so as its geometry is minimally perturbed. This is accomplished by introducing a two-level procedure where we first identify where are the most appropriate locations to graft the new binding pocket into the protein fold by minimizing the departure from a set of geometric restraints using mixed-integer linear optimization. On identifying the suitable locations that can accommodate the new binding pocket, CHARMM energy calculations are employed to identify what mutations in the neighboring residues, if any, are needed to ensure that the minimum energy conformation of the binding pocket conserves the desired geometry. This computational framework is benchmarked against the results available in the literature for engineering a copper binding site into thioredoxin protein. Subsequently, OptGraft is used to guide the transfer of a calcium-binding pocket from thermitase protein (PDB: 1thm) into the first domain of CD2 protein (PDB:1hng). Experimental characterization of three de novo redesigned proteins with grafted calcium-binding centers demonstrated that they all exhibit high affinities for terbium (Kd ∼ 22, 38, and 55 μM) and can selectively bind calcium over magnesium. PMID:19177362

  3. Irreversible binding of zomepirac to plasma protein in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, P C; McDonagh, A F; Benet, L Z

    1986-01-01

    Zomepirac is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug recently withdrawn from use because of an unexplained high incidence of immunological reactions. It is metabolized in humans to a reactive, unstable acyl glucuronide which accumulates in plasma. Because of the similarity of zomepirac glucuronide to bilirubin glucuronide in structure and stability and the documented irreversible binding of bilirubin to albumin through its acyl glucuronide, we studied the reaction of zomepirac acyl glucuronide with albumin in vitro from pH 5 to 9 and in vivo in six healthy human volunteers who had received a single 100-mg oral dose of zomepirac. Irreversible binding of zomepirac to protein was determined by exhaustive washing of protein, followed by hydrolysis of bound zomepirac-protein adduct with base, extraction of the liberated drug, and chromatographic measurement. Irreversible binding was observed both in vitro and in vivo. The extent of binding in vitro was time- and pH-dependent. In vitro drug binding was also observed for the isomers of zomepirac glucuronide which were formed by intramolecular acyl migration. Irreversible binding in vivo correlated with overall exposure to zomepirac glucuronide when exposure was expressed as the area under the plasma concentration vs. time curve. When probenecid (500 mg, twice daily), which decreases the plasma clearance of zomepirac glucuronide, was administered concurrently with zomepirac, irreversible binding of zomepirac was increased. The nature of the zomepirac protein binding is probably covalent. Formation of irreversibly protein-bound zomepirac occurs via the acyl glucuronide as previously shown for bilirubin glucuronide, and the reaction may be general for other drugs that are metabolized to acyl glucuronides. PMID:3949982

  4. The structure of haemoglobin bound to the haemoglobin receptor IsdH from Staphylococcus aureus shows disruption of the native α-globin haem pocket.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Claire F; Jacques, David A; Clubb, Robert T; Guss, J Mitchell; Gell, David A

    2015-06-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a common and serious cause of infection in humans. The bacterium expresses a cell-surface receptor that binds to, and strips haem from, human haemoglobin (Hb). The binding interface has previously been identified; however, the structural changes that promote haem release from haemoglobin were unknown. Here, the structure of the receptor-Hb complex is reported at 2.6 Å resolution, which reveals a conformational change in the α-globin F helix that disrupts the haem-pocket structure and alters the Hb quaternary interactions. These features suggest potential mechanisms by which the S. aureus Hb receptor induces haem release from Hb.

  5. Ethanol Metabolism Modifies Hepatic Protein Acylation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Fritz, Kristofer S.; Green, Michelle F.; Petersen, Dennis R.; Hirschey, Matthew D.

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial protein acetylation increases in response to chronic ethanol ingestion in mice, and is thought to reduce mitochondrial function and contribute to the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease. The mitochondrial deacetylase SIRT3 regulates the acetylation status of several mitochondrial proteins, including those involved in ethanol metabolism. The newly discovered desuccinylase activity of the mitochondrial sirtuin SIRT5 suggests that protein succinylation could be an important post-translational modification regulating mitochondrial metabolism. To assess the possible role of protein succinylation in ethanol metabolism, we surveyed hepatic sub-cellular protein fractions from mice fed a control or ethanol-supplemented diet for succinyl-lysine, as well as acetyl-, propionyl-, and butyryl-lysine post-translational modifications. We found mitochondrial protein propionylation increases, similar to mitochondrial protein acetylation. In contrast, mitochondrial protein succinylation is reduced. These mitochondrial protein modifications appear to be primarily driven by ethanol metabolism, and not by changes in mitochondrial sirtuin levels. Similar trends in acyl modifications were observed in the nucleus. However, comparatively fewer acyl modifications were observed in the cytoplasmic or the microsomal compartments, and were generally unchanged by ethanol metabolism. Using a mass spectrometry proteomics approach, we identified several candidate acetylated, propionylated, and succinylated proteins, which were enriched using antibodies against each modification. Additionally, we identified several acetyl and propionyl lysine residues on the same sites for a number of proteins and supports the idea of the overlapping nature of lysine-specific acylation. Thus, we show that novel post-translational modifications are present in hepatic mitochondrial, nuclear, cytoplasmic, and microsomal compartments and ethanol ingestion, and its associated metabolism, induce specific

  6. Mammalian long-chain acyl-CoA synthetases.

    PubMed

    Soupene, Eric; Kuypers, Frans A

    2008-05-01

    Acyl-CoA synthetase enzymes are essential for de novo lipid synthesis, fatty acid catabolism, and remodeling of membranes. Activation of fatty acids requires a two-step reaction catalyzed by these enzymes. In the first step, an acyl-AMP intermediate is formed from ATP. AMP is then exchanged with CoA to produce the activated acyl-CoA. The release of AMP in this reaction defines the superfamily of AMP-forming enzymes. The length of the carbon chain of the fatty acid species defines the substrate specificity for the different acyl-CoA synthetases (ACS). On this basis, five sub-families of ACS have been characterized. The purpose of this review is to report on the large family of mammalian long-chain acyl-CoA synthetases (ACSL), which activate fatty acids with chain lengths of 12 to 20 carbon atoms. Five genes and several isoforms generated by alternative splicing have been identified and limited information is available on their localization. The structure of these membrane proteins has not been solved for the mammalian ACSLs but homology to a bacterial form, whose structure has been determined, points at specific structural features that are important for these enzymes across species. The bacterial form acts as a dimer and has a conserved short motif, called the fatty acid Gate domain, that seems to determine substrate specificity. We will discuss the characterization and identification of the different spliced isoforms, draw attention to the inconsistencies and errors in their annotations, and their cellular localizations. These membrane proteins act on membrane-bound substrates probably as homo- and as heterodimer complexes but have often been expressed as single recombinant isoforms, apparently purified as monomers and tested in Triton X-100 micelles. We will argue that such studies have failed to provide an accurate assessment of the activity and of the distinct function of these enzymes in mammalian cells.

  7. A new role for penicillin acylases: degradation of acyl homoserine lactone quorum sensing signals by Kluyvera citrophila penicillin G acylase.

    PubMed

    Mukherji, Ruchira; Varshney, Nishant Kumar; Panigrahi, Priyabrata; Suresh, C G; Prabhune, Asmita

    2014-03-01

    Use of penicillin acylases for the production of semi-synthetic penicillins is well-known. Escherichia coli penicillin G acylase (EcPGA) has been extensively used for this purpose; however, Kluyvera citrophila penicillin G acylase (KcPGA) is assumed to be a better substitute, owing to its increased resilience to extreme pH conditions and ease of immobilization. In the present article we report a new dimension for the amidase activity of KcPGA by demonstrating its ability to cleave bacterial quorum sensing signal molecules, acyl homoserine lactones (AHL) with acyl chain length of 6-8 with or without oxo-substitution at third carbon position. Initial evidence of AHL degrading capability of KcPGA was obtained using CV026 based bioassay method. Kinetic studies performed at pH 8.0 and 50 °C revealed 3-oxo-C6 HSL to be the best substrate for the enzyme with V(max) and K(m) values of 21.37+0.85 mM/h/mg of protein and 0.1+0.01 mM, respectively. C6 HSL was found to be the second best substrate with V(max) and K(m) value of 10.06+0.27 mM/h/mg of protein and 0.28+0.02 mM, respectively. Molecular modeling and docking studies performed on the active site of the enzyme support these findings by showing the fitting of AHLs perfectly within the hydrophobic pocket of the enzyme active site.

  8. Acylated monogalactosyl diacylglycerol: prevalence in the plant kingdom and identification of an enzyme catalyzing galactolipid head group acylation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Anders K; Johansson, Oskar N; Fahlberg, Per; Kommuri, Murali; Töpel, Mats; Bodin, Lovisa J; Sikora, Per; Modarres, Masoomeh; Ekengren, Sophia; Nguyen, Chi T; Farmer, Edward E; Olsson, Olof; Ellerström, Mats; Andersson, Mats X

    2015-12-01

    The lipid phase of the thylakoid membrane is mainly composed of the galactolipids mono- and digalactosyl diacylglycerol (MGDG and DGDG, respectively). It has been known since the late 1960s that MGDG can be acylated with a third fatty acid to the galactose head group (acyl-MGDG) in plant leaf homogenates. In certain brassicaceous plants like Arabidopsis thaliana, the acyl-MGDG frequently incorporates oxidized fatty acids in the form of the jasmonic acid precursor 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid (OPDA). In the present study we further investigated the distribution of acylated and OPDA-containing galactolipids in the plant kingdom. While acyl-MGDG was found to be ubiquitous in green tissue of plants ranging from non-vascular plants to angiosperms, OPDA-containing galactolipids were only present in plants from a few genera. A candidate protein responsible for the acyl transfer was identified in Avena sativa (oat) leaf tissue using biochemical fractionation and proteomics. Knockout of the orthologous gene in A. thaliana resulted in an almost total elimination of the ability to form both non-oxidized and OPDA-containing acyl-MGDG. In addition, heterologous expression of the A. thaliana gene in E. coli demonstrated that the protein catalyzed acylation of MGDG. We thus demonstrate that a phylogenetically conserved enzyme is responsible for the accumulation of acyl-MGDG in A. thaliana. The activity of this enzyme in vivo is strongly enhanced by freezing damage and the hypersensitive response. PMID:26566971

  9. Palmitoyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) thioesterase and the evolutionary origin of plant acyl-ACP thioesterases.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, A; Davies, H M; Voelker, T A

    1995-01-01

    Acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) thioesterases play an essential role in chain termination during de novo fatty acid synthesis and in the channeling of carbon flux between the two lipid biosynthesis pathways in plants. We have discovered that there are two distinct but related thioesterase gene classes in higher plants, termed FatA and FatB, whose evolutionary divergence appears to be ancient. FatA encodes the already described 18:1-ACP thioesterase. In contrast, FatB representatives encode thioesterases preferring acyl-ACPs having saturated acyl groups. We unexpectedly obtained a 16:0-ACP thioesterase cDNA from Cuphea hookeriana seed, which accumulate predominantly 8:0 and 10:0. The 16:0 thioesterase transcripts were found in non-seed tissues, and expression in transgenic Brassica napus led to the production of a 16:0-rich oil. We present evidence that this type of FatB gene is ancient and ubiquitous in plants and that specialized plant medium-chain thioesterases have evolved independently from such enzymes several times during angiosperm evolution. Also, the ubiquitous 18:1-ACP thioesterase appears to be a derivative of a 16:0 thioesterase. PMID:7734968

  10. Palmitoyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) thioesterase and the evolutionary origin of plant acyl-ACP thioesterases.

    PubMed

    Jones, A; Davies, H M; Voelker, T A

    1995-03-01

    Acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) thioesterases play an essential role in chain termination during de novo fatty acid synthesis and in the channeling of carbon flux between the two lipid biosynthesis pathways in plants. We have discovered that there are two distinct but related thioesterase gene classes in higher plants, termed FatA and FatB, whose evolutionary divergence appears to be ancient. FatA encodes the already described 18:1-ACP thioesterase. In contrast, FatB representatives encode thioesterases preferring acyl-ACPs having saturated acyl groups. We unexpectedly obtained a 16:0-ACP thioesterase cDNA from Cuphea hookeriana seed, which accumulate predominantly 8:0 and 10:0. The 16:0 thioesterase transcripts were found in non-seed tissues, and expression in transgenic Brassica napus led to the production of a 16:0-rich oil. We present evidence that this type of FatB gene is ancient and ubiquitous in plants and that specialized plant medium-chain thioesterases have evolved independently from such enzymes several times during angiosperm evolution. Also, the ubiquitous 18:1-ACP thioesterase appears to be a derivative of a 16:0 thioesterase.

  11. Activation of Exogenous Fatty Acids to Acyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Cannot Bypass FabI Inhibition in Neisseria.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jiangwei; Bruhn, David F; Frank, Matthew W; Lee, Richard E; Rock, Charles O

    2016-01-01

    Neisseria is a Gram-negative pathogen with phospholipids composed of straight chain saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids, the ability to incorporate exogenous fatty acids, and lipopolysaccharides that are not essential. The FabI inhibitor, AFN-1252, was deployed as a chemical biology tool to determine whether Neisseria can bypass the inhibition of fatty acid synthesis by incorporating exogenous fatty acids. Neisseria encodes a functional FabI that was potently inhibited by AFN-1252. AFN-1252 caused a dose-dependent inhibition of fatty acid synthesis in growing Neisseria, a delayed inhibition of growth phenotype, and minimal inhibition of DNA, RNA, and protein synthesis, showing that its mode of action is through inhibiting fatty acid synthesis. Isotopic fatty acid labeling experiments showed that Neisseria encodes the ability to incorporate exogenous fatty acids into its phospholipids by an acyl-acyl carrier protein-dependent pathway. However, AFN-1252 remained an effective antibacterial when Neisseria were supplemented with exogenous fatty acids. These results demonstrate that extracellular fatty acids are activated by an acyl-acyl carrier protein synthetase (AasN) and validate type II fatty acid synthesis (FabI) as a therapeutic target against Neisseria.

  12. "Pocket" Deformable Mirror for an Integrated On-Mirror Adaptive System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beresnev, L.; Voronstov, M.; Wangsness, P.

    Existing HEL beam control architectures are extremely complicated because they require installation and alignment of a large number of optical elements, resulting in substantial increase of the entire HEL system size, weight and cost. There is a strong interest in designing new robust beam control capabilities integrated directly to a beam director system. The discussed technical effort is focused on development and demonstration of a new adaptive beam director (ABD) consisting of a beam forming telescope with wavefront compensation integrated solely on its ultra-lightweight primary mirror. This on-mirror AO system will be controlled using a stochastic parallel gradient descent (SPGD) controller specifically designed for target-in-the-loop (TIL) operation. The key component of the on-mirror AO system is its primary mirror. This mirror contains an array of pockets machined on its backside, called a pocket-mirror. A special dielectric layer deposited on the front surface of the pocket-mirror is highly reflective for the HEL wavelength ???HEL, and semi-transparent for the laser illuminator wavelength ?ILL. Thus the wave ?ILL scattered by the target surface enters inside the mirror pockets, while the outgoing HEL beam with wavelength ?HEL is totally reflected. The pockets of the ABD pocket-mirror include opto-electronic components that can provide local (inside pocket-window) wavefront correction and sensing. Wavefront correction at each pocket aperture is performed using electrically sectioned piezo-ceramic annular rings made from thin (~0.3 mm) bimorph discs glued to the pocket bottoms. Control voltages applied to these electrodes result in mechanical deformation of the pocket-window front surface thus providing compensation of low-order aberrations at each pocket-window. Packaging the pockets with a high fill factor allows high resolution control of the beam director primary mirror shape. Preliminary analysis has shown that surface stroke near 3 microns with

  13. Direct N-acylation of azoles via a metal-free catalyzed oxidative cross-coupling strategy.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jingjing; Li, Pan; Xia, Chungu; Li, Fuwei

    2014-05-11

    The KI-catalyzed N-acylation of azoles via direct oxidative coupling of C-H and N-H bonds has been developed. It could be smoothly scaled up to gram synthesis of acyl azoles. The reaction occurred by the coupling of acyl radicals and azoles to form the acyl azole radical anion, followed by its further oxidation.

  14. Recrystallization of atomically balanced amorphous pockets in Si: A source of point defects

    SciTech Connect

    Marques, Luis A.; Pelaz, Lourdes; Lopez, Pedro; Santos, Ivan; Aboy, Maria

    2007-10-15

    We use classical molecular dynamics simulation techniques to study the regrowth behavior of amorphous pockets in Si. We demonstrate that crystallization depends on the morphology of the pocket-crystal interface. Although our simulated amorphous pockets had not any excess nor deficit of atoms with respect to perfect crystal, after regrowth we found residual defects. Most of them are single Si interstitials and vacancies, but also larger defects have been encountered. We have determined their atomic structures and calculated their formation energies. These complexes are more stable than amorphous pockets, and may trigger the formation of extended defects or favor damage accumulation.

  15. Exploitation of pocket gophers and their food caches by grizzly bears

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mattson, D.J.

    2004-01-01

    I investigated the exploitation of pocket gophers (Thomomys talpoides) by grizzly bears (Ursus arctos horribilis) in the Yellowstone region of the United States with the use of data collected during a study of radiomarked bears in 1977-1992. My analysis focused on the importance of pocket gophers as a source of energy and nutrients, effects of weather and site features, and importance of pocket gophers to grizzly bears in the western contiguous United States prior to historical extirpations. Pocket gophers and their food caches were infrequent in grizzly bear feces, although foraging for pocket gophers accounted for about 20-25% of all grizzly bear feeding activity during April and May. Compared with roots individually excavated by bears, pocket gopher food caches were less digestible but more easily dug out. Exploitation of gopher food caches by grizzly bears was highly sensitive to site and weather conditions and peaked during and shortly after snowmelt. This peak coincided with maximum success by bears in finding pocket gopher food caches. Exploitation was most frequent and extensive on gently sloping nonforested sites with abundant spring beauty (Claytonia lanceolata) and yampah (Perdieridia gairdneri). Pocket gophers are rare in forests, and spring beauty and yampah roots are known to be important foods of both grizzly bears and burrowing rodents. Although grizzly bears commonly exploit pocket gophers only in the Yellowstone region, this behavior was probably widespread in mountainous areas of the western contiguous United States prior to extirpations of grizzly bears within the last 150 years.

  16. Psychologist in a pocket: towards depression screening on mobile phones.

    PubMed

    Bitsch, Jó Ágila; Ramos, Roann; Ix, Tim; Ferrer-Cheng, Paula Glenda; Wehrle, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Depression is the most prevalent clinical disorder and one of the main causes of disability. This makes early detection of depressive symptoms critical in its prevention and management. This paper presents and discusses the development of Psychologist in a Pocket (PiaP), a mental mHealth application for Android which screens and monitors for these symptoms, and-given the explicit permission of the user-alerts a trusted contact such as the mental health professional or a close friend, if it detects symptoms. All text inputted electronically-such as short message services, emails, social network posts-is analyzed based on keywords related to depression based on DSM-5 and ICD criteria as well as Beck's Cognitive Theory of Depression and the Self-Focus Model. Data evaluation and collection happen in the background, on-device, without requiring any user involvement. Currently, the application is in an early prototype phase entering initial clinical validation. PMID:25980862

  17. Oriented valve and latch for side pocket mandrel

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, D.W.; Crawford, W.B.; Crawford, M.S.

    1991-10-22

    This patent describes a gas lift valve apparatus for use with a side pocket mandrel having a main bore, a seating bore laterally offset from said main bore, and a longitudinal slot formed in a wall of said mandrel between said man and seating bores. It comprises: a body section having guide means thereon adapted to enter said slot and maintain rotational orientation of said body section in a predetermined position, said body section having gas flow passage; and outlet prot means in said body section communicating with said passage and opening through an outer wall of said guide means, whereby lift gas emanating from said port means is directed only toward main bore of the mandrel.

  18. Airplane stability calculations with a card programmable pocket calculator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherman, W. L.

    1978-01-01

    Programs are presented for calculating airplane stability characteristics with a card programmable pocket calculator. These calculations include eigenvalues of the characteristic equations of lateral and longitudinal motion as well as stability parameters such as the time to damp to one-half amplitude or the damping ratio. The effects of wind shear are included. Background information and the equations programmed are given. The programs are written for the International System of Units, the dimensional form of the stability derivatives, and stability axes. In addition to programs for stability calculations, an unusual and short program is included for the Euler transformation of coordinates used in airplane motions. The programs have been written for a Hewlett Packard HP-67 calculator. However, the use of this calculator does not constitute an endorsement of the product by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.