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Sample records for acyl binding pocket

  1. Surface-Based Protein Binding Pocket Similarity

    PubMed Central

    Spitzer, Russell; Cleves, Ann E.; Jain, Ajay N.

    2011-01-01

    Protein similarity comparisons may be made on a local or global basis and may consider sequence information or differing levels of structural information. We present a local 3D method that compares protein binding site surfaces in full atomic detail. The approach is based on the morphological similarity method which has been widely applied for global comparison of small molecules. We apply the method to all-by-all comparisons two sets of human protein kinases, a very diverse set of ATP-bound proteins from multiple species, and three heterogeneous benchmark protein binding site data sets. Cases of disagreement between sequence-based similarity and binding site similarity yield informative examples. Where sequence similarity is very low, high pocket similarity can reliably identify important binding motifs. Where sequence similarity is very high, significant differences in pocket similarity are related to ligand binding specificity and similarity. Local protein binding pocket similarity provides qualitatively complementary information to other approaches, and it can yield quantitative information in support of functional annotation. PMID:21769944

  2. Free enthalpies of replacing water molecules in protein binding pockets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riniker, Sereina; Barandun, Luzi J.; Diederich, François; Krämer, Oliver; Steffen, Andreas; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F.

    2012-12-01

    Water molecules in the binding pocket of a protein and their role in ligand binding have increasingly raised interest in recent years. Displacement of such water molecules by ligand atoms can be either favourable or unfavourable for ligand binding depending on the change in free enthalpy. In this study, we investigate the displacement of water molecules by an apolar probe in the binding pocket of two proteins, cyclin-dependent kinase 2 and tRNA-guanine transglycosylase, using the method of enveloping distribution sampling (EDS) to obtain free enthalpy differences. In both cases, a ligand core is placed inside the respective pocket and the remaining water molecules are converted to apolar probes, both individually and in pairs. The free enthalpy difference between a water molecule and a CH3 group at the same location in the pocket in comparison to their presence in bulk solution calculated from EDS molecular dynamics simulations corresponds to the binding free enthalpy of CH3 at this location. From the free enthalpy difference and the enthalpy difference, the entropic contribution of the displacement can be obtained too. The overlay of the resulting occupancy volumes of the water molecules with crystal structures of analogous ligands shows qualitative correlation between experimentally measured inhibition constants and the calculated free enthalpy differences. Thus, such an EDS analysis of the water molecules in the binding pocket may give valuable insight for potency optimization in drug design.

  3. Free enthalpies of replacing water molecules in protein binding pockets.

    PubMed

    Riniker, Sereina; Barandun, Luzi J; Diederich, François; Krämer, Oliver; Steffen, Andreas; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F

    2012-12-01

    Water molecules in the binding pocket of a protein and their role in ligand binding have increasingly raised interest in recent years. Displacement of such water molecules by ligand atoms can be either favourable or unfavourable for ligand binding depending on the change in free enthalpy. In this study, we investigate the displacement of water molecules by an apolar probe in the binding pocket of two proteins, cyclin-dependent kinase 2 and tRNA-guanine transglycosylase, using the method of enveloping distribution sampling (EDS) to obtain free enthalpy differences. In both cases, a ligand core is placed inside the respective pocket and the remaining water molecules are converted to apolar probes, both individually and in pairs. The free enthalpy difference between a water molecule and a CH(3) group at the same location in the pocket in comparison to their presence in bulk solution calculated from EDS molecular dynamics simulations corresponds to the binding free enthalpy of CH(3) at this location. From the free enthalpy difference and the enthalpy difference, the entropic contribution of the displacement can be obtained too. The overlay of the resulting occupancy volumes of the water molecules with crystal structures of analogous ligands shows qualitative correlation between experimentally measured inhibition constants and the calculated free enthalpy differences. Thus, such an EDS analysis of the water molecules in the binding pocket may give valuable insight for potency optimization in drug design.

  4. Acyl-CoA binding proteins: multiplicity and function.

    PubMed

    Gossett, R E; Frolov, A A; Roths, J B; Behnke, W D; Kier, A B; Schroeder, F

    1996-09-01

    The physiological role of long-chain fatty acyl-CoA is thought to be primarily in intermediary metabolism of fatty acids. However, recent data show that nM to microM levels of these lipophilic molecules are potent regulators of cell functions in vitro. Although long-chain fatty acyl-CoA are present at several hundred microM concentration in the cell, very little long-chain fatty acyl-CoA actually exists as free or unbound molecules, but rather is bound with high affinity to membrane lipids and/or proteins. Recently, there is growing awareness that cytosol contains nonenzymatic proteins also capable of binding long-chain fatty acyl-CoA with high affinity. Although the identity of the cytosolic long-chain fatty acyl-CoA binding protein(s) has been the subject of some controversy, there is growing evidence that several diverse nonenzymatic cytosolic proteins will bind long-chain fatty acyl-CoA. Not only does acyl-CoA binding protein specifically bind medium and long-chain fatty acyl-CoA (LCFA-CoA), but ubiquitous proteins with multiple ligand specificities such as the fatty acid binding proteins and sterol carrier protein-2 also bind LCFA-CoA with high affinity. The potential of these acyl-CoA binding proteins to influence the level of free LCFA-CoA and thereby the amount of LCFA-CoA bound to regulatory sites in proteins and enzymes is only now being examined in detail. The purpose of this article is to explore the identity, nature, function, and pathobiology of these fascinating newly discovered long-chain fatty acyl-CoA binding proteins. The relative contributions of these three different protein families to LCFA-CoA utilization and/or regulation of cellular activities are the focus of new directions in this field.

  5. Binding Hydrated Anions with Hydrophobic Pockets.

    PubMed

    Sokkalingam, Punidha; Shraberg, Joshua; Rick, Steven W; Gibb, Bruce C

    2016-01-13

    Using a combination of isothermal titration calorimetry and quantum and molecular dynamics calculations, we demonstrate that relatively soft anions have an affinity for hydrophobic concavity. The results are consistent with the anions remaining partially hydrated upon binding, and suggest a novel strategy for anion recognition.

  6. Modulation of FadR Binding Capacity for Acyl-CoA Fatty Acids Through Structure-Guided Mutagenesis

    DOE PAGES

    Bacik, John-Paul; Yeager, Chris M.; Twary, Scott N.; ...

    2015-09-18

    FadR is a versatile global regulator in Escherichia coli that controls fatty acid metabolism and thereby modulates the ability of this bacterium to grow using fatty acids or acetate as the sole carbon source. FadR regulates fatty acid metabolism in response to intra-cellular concentrations of acyl-CoA lipids. The ability of FadR to bind acyl-CoA fatty acids is hence of significant interest for the engineering of biosynthetic pathways for the production of lipid-based biofuels and commodity chemicals. Based on the available crystal structure of E. coli bound to myristoyl- CoA, we predicted amino acid positions within the effector binding pocket thatmore » would alter the ability of FadR to bind acyl-CoA fatty acids without affecting DNA binding. We utilized fluorescence polarization to characterize the in-vitro binding properties of wild type and mutant FadR. We found that a Leu102Ala mutant enhanced binding of the effector, likely by increasing the size of the binding pocket for the acyl moiety of the molecule. Conversely, the elimination of the guanidine side chain (Arg213Ala and Arg213Met mutants) of the CoA moiety binding site severely diminished the ability of FadR to bind the acyl-CoA effector. These results demonstrate the ability to fine tune FadR binding capacity. The validation of an efficient method to fully characterize all the binding events involved in the specific activity (effector and DNA operator binding) of FadR has allowed us to increase our understanding of the role of specific amino acids in the binding and recognition of acyl-CoA fatty acids and will greatly facilitate efforts aimed at engineering tunable FadR regulators for synthetic biology.« less

  7. Modulation of FadR Binding Capacity for Acyl-CoA Fatty Acids Through Structure-Guided Mutagenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Bacik, John-Paul; Yeager, Chris M.; Twary, Scott N.; Martí-Arbona, Ricardo

    2015-09-18

    FadR is a versatile global regulator in Escherichia coli that controls fatty acid metabolism and thereby modulates the ability of this bacterium to grow using fatty acids or acetate as the sole carbon source. FadR regulates fatty acid metabolism in response to intra-cellular concentrations of acyl-CoA lipids. The ability of FadR to bind acyl-CoA fatty acids is hence of significant interest for the engineering of biosynthetic pathways for the production of lipid-based biofuels and commodity chemicals. Based on the available crystal structure of E. coli bound to myristoyl- CoA, we predicted amino acid positions within the effector binding pocket that would alter the ability of FadR to bind acyl-CoA fatty acids without affecting DNA binding. We utilized fluorescence polarization to characterize the in-vitro binding properties of wild type and mutant FadR. We found that a Leu102Ala mutant enhanced binding of the effector, likely by increasing the size of the binding pocket for the acyl moiety of the molecule. Conversely, the elimination of the guanidine side chain (Arg213Ala and Arg213Met mutants) of the CoA moiety binding site severely diminished the ability of FadR to bind the acyl-CoA effector. These results demonstrate the ability to fine tune FadR binding capacity. The validation of an efficient method to fully characterize all the binding events involved in the specific activity (effector and DNA operator binding) of FadR has allowed us to increase our understanding of the role of specific amino acids in the binding and recognition of acyl-CoA fatty acids and will greatly facilitate efforts aimed at engineering tunable FadR regulators for synthetic biology.

  8. Exploring the inhibitor binding pocket of respiratory complex I.

    PubMed

    Fendel, Uta; Tocilescu, Maja A; Kerscher, Stefan; Brandt, Ulrich

    2008-01-01

    Numerous hydrophobic and amphipathic compounds including several detergents are known to inhibit the ubiquinone reductase reaction of respiratory chain complex I (proton pumping NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase). Guided by the X-ray structure of the peripheral arm of complex I from Thermus thermophilus we have generated a large collection of site-directed mutants in the yeast Yarrowia lipolytica targeting the proposed ubiquinone and inhibitor binding pocket of this huge multiprotein complex at the interface of the 49-kDa and PSST subunits. We could identify a number of residues where mutations changed I(50) values for representatives from all three groups of hydrophobic inhibitors. Many mutations around the domain of the 49-kDa subunit that is homologous to the [NiFe] centre binding region of hydrogenase conferred resistance to DQA (class I/type A) and rotenone (class II/type B) indicating a wider overlap of the binding sites for these two types of inhibitors. In contrast, a region near iron-sulfur cluster N2, where the binding of the n-alkyl-polyoxyethylene-ether detergent C(12)E(8) (type C) was exclusively affected, appeared comparably well separated. Taken together, our data provide structure-based support for the presence of distinct but overlapping binding sites for hydrophobic inhibitors possibly extending into the ubiquinone reduction site of mitochondrial complex I.

  9. Dewetting-Controlled Binding of Ligands to Hydrophobic Pockets

    PubMed Central

    Setny, P.; Wang, Z.; Cheng, L.-T.; Li, B.; McCammon, J. A.; Dzubiella, J.

    2010-01-01

    We report on a combined atomistic molecular dynamics simulation and implicit solvent analysis of a generic hydrophobic pocket-ligand (host-guest) system. The approaching ligand induces complex wetting-dewetting transitions in the weakly solvated pocket. The transitions lead to bimodal solvent fluctuations which govern magnitude and range of the pocket-ligand attraction. A recently developed implicit water model, based on the minimization of a geometric functional, captures the sensitive aqueous interface response to the concave-convex pocket-ligand configuration semiquantitatively. PMID:19905832

  10. Identification of the Binding Position of Amilorides in the Quinone Binding Pocket of Mitochondrial Complex I.

    PubMed

    Ito, Takeshi; Murai, Masatoshi; Morisaka, Hironobu; Miyoshi, Hideto

    2015-06-16

    We previously demonstrated that amilorides bind to the quinone binding pocket of bovine mitochondrial complex I, not to the hitherto suspected Na⁺/H⁺ antiporter-like subunits (ND2, ND4, and ND5) [Murai, M., et al. (2015) Biochemistry 54, 2739-2746]. To characterize the binding position of amilorides within the pocket in more detail, we conducted specific chemical labeling [alkynylation (-C≡CH)] of complex I via ligand-directed tosyl (LDT) chemistry using a newly synthesized amide-type amiloride AAT as a LDT chemistry reagent. The inhibitory potency of AAT, in terms of its IC50 value, was markedly higher (∼1000-fold) than that of prototypical guanidine-type amilorides such as commercially available EIPA and benzamil. Detailed proteomic analyses in combination with click chemistry revealed that the chemical labeling occurred at Asp160 of the 49 kDa subunit (49 kDa Asp160). This labeling was significantly suppressed in the presence of an excess amount of other amilorides or ordinary inhibitors such as quinazoline and acetogenin. Taking into consideration the fact that 49 kDa Asp160 was also specifically labeled by LDT chemistry reagents derived from acetogenin [Masuya, T., et al. (2014) Biochemistry 53, 2307-2317, 7816-7823], we found this aspartic acid to elicit very strong nucleophilicity in the local protein environment. The structural features of the quinone binding pocket in bovine complex I are discussed on the basis of this finding.

  11. Docking studies of nickel-peptide deformylase (PDF) inhibitors: exploring the new binding pockets.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiang; Zhang, Datong; Wang, Jianwu; Cai, Zhengting; Xu, Weiren

    2006-06-20

    The binding modes of a series of known activity inhibitors docking to Peptide deformylase (PDF) have been studied using molecular docking software AutoDock3.0.5. In this study, good correlation (R(2)=0.894) between calculated binding energies and experimental inhibitory activities is obtained. We find that some shallow pockets near the known active pocket are very important which can accommodate the side-chains of the inhibitor. Moreover, a new binding pocket is also explored. All these may provide something useful for designing the potent inhibitors.

  12. Doubling the Size of the Glucocorticoid Receptor Ligand Binding Pocket by Deacylcortivazol

    SciTech Connect

    Suino-Powell, Kelly; Xu, Yong; Zhang, Chenghai; Tao, Yong-guang; Tolbert, W. David; Simons, Jr., S. Stoney; Xu, H. Eric

    2010-03-08

    A common feature of nuclear receptor ligand binding domains (LBD) is a helical sandwich fold that nests a ligand binding pocket within the bottom half of the domain. Here we report that the ligand pocket of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) can be continuously extended into the top half of the LBD by binding to deacylcortivazol (DAC), an extremely potent glucocorticoid. It has been puzzling for decades why DAC, which contains a phenylpyrazole replacement at the conserved 3-ketone of steroid hormones that are normally required for activation of their cognate receptors, is a potent GR activator. The crystal structure of the GR LBD bound to DAC and the fourth LXXLL motif of steroid receptor coactivator 1 reveals that the GR ligand binding pocket is expanded to a size of 1,070 {angstrom}{sup 3}, effectively doubling the size of the GR dexamethasone-binding pocket of 540 {angstrom}{sup 3} and yet leaving the structure of the coactivator binding site intact. DAC occupies only {approx}50% of the space of the pocket but makes intricate interactions with the receptor around the phenylpyrazole group that accounts for the high-affinity binding of DAC. The dramatic expansion of the DAC-binding pocket thus highlights the conformational adaptability of GR to ligand binding. The new structure also allows docking of various nonsteroidal ligands that cannot be fitted into the previous structures, thus providing a new rational template for drug discovery of steroidal and nonsteroidal glucocorticoids that can be specifically designed to reach the unoccupied space of the expanded pocket.

  13. Real-Time Ligand Binding Pocket Database Search Using Local Surface Descriptors

    PubMed Central

    Chikhi, Rayan; Sael, Lee; Kihara, Daisuke

    2010-01-01

    Due to the increasing number of structures of unknown function accumulated by ongoing structural genomics projects, there is an urgent need for computational methods for characterizing protein tertiary structures. As functions of many of these proteins are not easily predicted by conventional sequence database searches, a legitimate strategy is to utilize structure information in function characterization. Of a particular interest is prediction of ligand binding to a protein, as ligand molecule recognition is a major part of molecular function of proteins. Predicting whether a ligand molecule binds a protein is a complex problem due to the physical nature of protein-ligand interactions and the flexibility of both binding sites and ligand molecules. However, geometric and physicochemical complementarity is observed between the ligand and its binding site in many cases. Therefore, ligand molecules which bind to a local surface site in a protein can be predicted by finding similar local pockets of known binding ligands in the structure database. Here, we present two representations of ligand binding pockets and utilize them for ligand binding prediction by pocket shape comparison. These representations are based on mapping of surface properties of binding pockets, which are compactly described either by the two dimensional pseudo-Zernike moments or the 3D Zernike descriptors. These compact representations allow a fast real-time pocket searching against a database. Thorough benchmark study employing two different datasets show that our representations are competitive with the other existing methods. Limitations and potentials of the shape-based methods as well as possible improvements are discussed. PMID:20455259

  14. Competitive binding of a benzimidazole to the histone-binding pocket of the Pygo PHD finger.

    PubMed

    Miller, Thomas C R; Rutherford, Trevor J; Birchall, Kristian; Chugh, Jasveen; Fiedler, Marc; Bienz, Mariann

    2014-12-19

    The Pygo-BCL9 complex is a chromatin reader, facilitating β-catenin-mediated oncogenesis, and is thus emerging as a potential therapeutic target for cancer. Its function relies on two ligand-binding surfaces of Pygo's PHD finger that anchor the histone H3 tail methylated at lysine 4 (H3K4me) with assistance from the BCL9 HD1 domain. Here, we report the first use of fragment-based screening by NMR to identify small molecules that block protein-protein interactions by a PHD finger. This led to the discovery of a set of benzothiazoles that bind to a cleft emanating from the PHD-HD1 interface, as defined by X-ray crystallography. Furthermore, we discovered a benzimidazole that docks into the H3K4me specificity pocket and displaces the native H3K4me peptide from the PHD finger. Our study demonstrates the ligandability of the Pygo-BCL9 complex and uncovers a privileged scaffold as a template for future development of lead inhibitors of oncogenesis.

  15. Molecular Docking Studies to Explore Potential Binding Pockets and Inhibitors for Chikungunya Virus Envelope Glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Phuong T V; Yu, Haibo; Keller, Paul A

    2017-03-11

    The chikungunya virus (CHIKV) envelope glycoproteins are considered important potential targets for anti-CHIKV drug discovery due to their crucial roles in virus attachment and virus entry. In this study, using two available crystal structures of the immature and mature forms of envelope glycoproteins, virtual screenings based on blind dockings and focused dockings were carried out to identify potential binding pockets and hit compounds for the virus. The chemical library database of compounds, NCI Diversity Set II, was used in these docking studies. In addition to reproducing previously reported examples, new binding pockets were identified, e.g., Pocket 2 in the 3N40, and Pocket 2 and Pocket 3 in the 3N42. Convergences in conformational sampling in docking using AutoDock Vina were evaluated. An analysis of docking results was carried out to understand interactions of the envelope glycoproteins complexes. Some key residues for interactions, for example Gly91 and His230, are identified as possessing important roles in the fusion process.

  16. Function of Phe-259 and Thr-314 within the Substrate Binding Pocket of the Juvenile Hormone Esterase of Manduca sexta†

    PubMed Central

    Kamita, Shizuo G.; Wogulis, Mark D.; Law, Christopher S.; Morisseau, Christophe; Tanaka, Hiromasa; Huang, Huazhang; Wilson, David K.; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2013-01-01

    Juvenile hormone (JH) is a key insect developmental hormone that is found at low nanomolar levels in larval insects. The methyl ester of JH is hydrolyzed in many insects by an esterase that shows high specificity for JH. We have previously determined a crystal structure of the JH esterase (JHE) of the tobacco hornworm Manduca sexta (MsJHE) [Wogulis, M., Wheelock, C. E., Kamita, S. G., Hinton, A. C., Whetstone, P. A., Hammock, B. D., and Wilson, D. K. (2006) Biochemistry 45, 4045-4057]. Our molecular modeling indicates that JH fits very tightly within the substrate binding pocket of MsJHE. This tight fit places two non-catalytic amino acid residues, Phe-259 and Thr-314, within the appropriate distance and geometry to potentially interact with the α,β-unsaturated ester and epoxide, respectively, of JH. These residues are highly conserved in numerous biologically active JHEs. Kinetic analyses of mutants of Phe-259 or Thr-314 indicate that these residues contribute to the low KM that MsJHE shows for JH. This low KM, however, comes at the cost of reduced substrate turnover. Neither nucleophilic attack of the resonance stabilized ester by the catalytic serine nor the availability of a water molecule for attack of the acyl-enzyme intermediate appear to be a rate-determining step in the hydrolysis of JH by MsJHE. We hypothesize that the release of the JH acid metabolite from the substrate binding pocket limits the catalytic cycle. Our findings also demonstrate that chemical bond strength does not necessarily correlate with how reactive the bond will be to metabolism. PMID:20307057

  17. Keys to Lipid Selection in Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase Catalysis: Structural Flexibility, Gating Residues and Multiple Binding Pockets

    PubMed Central

    Palermo, Giulia; Bauer, Inga; Campomanes, Pablo; Cavalli, Andrea; Armirotti, Andrea; Girotto, Stefania; Rothlisberger, Ursula; De Vivo, Marco

    2015-01-01

    The fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) regulates the endocannabinoid system cleaving primarily the lipid messenger anandamide. FAAH has been well characterized over the years and, importantly, it represents a promising drug target to treat several diseases, including inflammatory-related diseases and cancer. But its enzymatic mechanism for lipid selection to specifically hydrolyze anandamide, rather than similar bioactive lipids, remains elusive. Here, we clarify this mechanism in FAAH, examining the role of the dynamic paddle, which is formed by the gating residues Phe432 and Trp531 at the boundary between two cavities that form the FAAH catalytic site (the “membrane-access” and the “acyl chain-binding” pockets). We integrate microsecond-long MD simulations of wild type and double mutant model systems (Phe432Ala and Trp531Ala) of FAAH, embedded in a realistic membrane/water environment, with mutagenesis and kinetic experiments. We comparatively analyze three fatty acid substrates with different hydrolysis rates (anandamide > oleamide > palmitoylethanolamide). Our findings identify FAAH’s mechanism to selectively accommodate anandamide into a multi-pocket binding site, and to properly orient the substrate in pre-reactive conformations for efficient hydrolysis that is interceded by the dynamic paddle. Our findings therefore endorse a structural framework for a lipid selection mechanism mediated by structural flexibility and gating residues between multiple binding cavities, as found in FAAH. Based on the available structural data, this exquisite catalytic strategy for substrate specificity seems to be shared by other lipid-degrading enzymes with similar enzymatic architecture. The mechanistic insights for lipid selection might assist de-novo enzyme design or drug discovery efforts. PMID:26111155

  18. Crystal Structure of Human Soluble Adenylate Cyclase Reveals a Distinct, Highly Flexible Allosteric Bicarbonate Binding Pocket

    PubMed Central

    Saalau-Bethell, Susanne M; Berdini, Valerio; Cleasby, Anne; Congreve, Miles; Coyle, Joseph E; Lock, Victoria; Murray, Christopher W; O'Brien, M Alistair; Rich, Sharna J; Sambrook, Tracey; Vinkovic, Mladen; Yon, Jeff R; Jhoti, Harren

    2014-01-01

    Soluble adenylate cyclases catalyse the synthesis of the second messenger cAMP through the cyclisation of ATP and are the only known enzymes to be directly activated by bicarbonate. Here, we report the first crystal structure of the human enzyme that reveals a pseudosymmetrical arrangement of two catalytic domains to produce a single competent active site and a novel discrete bicarbonate binding pocket. Crystal structures of the apo protein, the protein in complex with α,β-methylene adenosine 5′-triphosphate (AMPCPP) and calcium, with the allosteric activator bicarbonate, and also with a number of inhibitors identified using fragment screening, all show a flexible active site that undergoes significant conformational changes on binding of ligands. The resulting nanomolar-potent inhibitors that were developed bind at both the substrate binding pocket and the allosteric site, and can be used as chemical probes to further elucidate the function of this protein. PMID:24616449

  19. Identification of Distant Drug Off-Targets by Direct Superposition of Binding Pocket Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Schumann, Marcel; Armen, Roger S.

    2013-01-01

    Correctly predicting off-targets for a given molecular structure, which would have the ability to bind a large range of ligands, is both particularly difficult and important if they share no significant sequence or fold similarity with the respective molecular target (“distant off-targets”). A novel approach for identification of off-targets by direct superposition of protein binding pocket surfaces is presented and applied to a set of well-studied and highly relevant drug targets, including representative kinases and nuclear hormone receptors. The entire Protein Data Bank is searched for similar binding pockets and convincing distant off-target candidates were identified that share no significant sequence or fold similarity with the respective target structure. These putative target off-target pairs are further supported by the existence of compounds that bind strongly to both with high topological similarity, and in some cases, literature examples of individual compounds that bind to both. Also, our results clearly show that it is possible for binding pockets to exhibit a striking surface similarity, while the respective off-target shares neither significant sequence nor significant fold similarity with the respective molecular target (“distant off-target”). PMID:24391782

  20. RsiteDB: a database of protein binding pockets that interact with RNA nucleotide bases.

    PubMed

    Shulman-Peleg, Alexandra; Nussinov, Ruth; Wolfson, Haim J

    2009-01-01

    We present a new database and an on-line search engine, which store and query the protein binding pockets that interact with single-stranded RNA nucleotide bases. The database consists of a classification of binding sites derived from protein-RNA complexes. Each binding site is assigned to a cluster of similar binding sites in other protein-RNA complexes. Cluster members share similar spatial arrangements of physico-chemical properties, thus can reveal novel similarity between proteins and RNAs with different sequences and folds. The clusters provide 3D consensus binding patterns important for protein-nucleotide recognition. The database search engine allows two types of useful queries: first, given a PDB code of a protein-RNA complex, RsiteDB can detail and classify the properties of the protein binding pockets accommodating extruded RNA nucleotides not involved in local RNA base pairing. Second, given an unbound protein structure, RsiteDB can perform an on-line structural search against the constructed database of 3D consensus binding patterns. Regions similar to known patterns are predicted to serve as binding sites. Alignment of the query to these patterns with their corresponding RNA nucleotides allows making unique predictions of the protein-RNA interactions at the atomic level of detail. This database is accessible at http://bioinfo3d.cs.tau.ac.il/RsiteDB.

  1. The human olfactory receptor 17-40: requisites for fitting into the binding pocket.

    PubMed

    Anselmi, Cecilia; Buonocore, Anna; Centini, Marisanna; Facino, Roberto Maffei; Hatt, Hanns

    2011-06-01

    To gain structural insight on the interactions between odorants and the human olfactory receptor, we did homology modelling of the receptor structure, followed by molecular docking simulation with ligands. Molecular dynamics simulation on the structures resulting from docking served to estimate the binding free energy of the various odorant families. A correlation with the odorous properties of the ligands is proposed. We also investigated which residues were involved in the binding of a set of properly synthesised ligands and which were required for fitting inside the binding pocket. Olfactive stimulation of the olfactory receptor with odorous molecules was also investigated, using calcium imaging or electrophysiological recordings.

  2. Multiscale Monte Carlo Sampling of Protein Sidechains: Application to Binding Pocket Flexibility

    PubMed Central

    Nilmeier, Jerome; Jacobson, Matt

    2008-01-01

    We present a Monte Carlo sidechain sampling procedure and apply it to assessing the flexibility of protein binding pockets. We implemented a multiple “time step” Monte Carlo algorithm to optimize sidechain sampling with a surface generalized Born implicit solvent model. In this approach, certain forces (those due to long-range electrostatics and the implicit solvent model) are updated infrequently, in “outer steps”, while short-range forces (covalent, local nonbonded interactions) are updated at every “inner step”. Two multistep protocols were studied. The first protocol rigorously obeys detailed balance, and the second protocol introduces an approximation to the solvation term that increases the acceptance ratio. The first protocol gives a 10-fold improvement over a protocol that does not use multiple time steps, while the second protocol generates comparable ensembles and gives a 15-fold improvement. A range of 50–200 inner steps per outer step was found to give optimal performance for both protocols. The resultant method is a practical means to assess sidechain flexibility in ligand binding pockets, as we illustrate with proof-of-principle calculations on six proteins: DB3 antibody, thermolysin, estrogen receptor, PPAR-γ, PI3 kinase, and CDK2. The resulting sidechain ensembles of the apo binding sites correlate well with known induced fit conformational changes and provide insights into binding pocket flexibility. PMID:19119325

  3. Development of purely structure-based pharmacophores for the topoisomerase I-DNA-ligand binding pocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drwal, Malgorzata N.; Agama, Keli; Pommier, Yves; Griffith, Renate

    2013-12-01

    Purely structure-based pharmacophores (SBPs) are an alternative method to ligand-based approaches and have the advantage of describing the entire interaction capability of a binding pocket. Here, we present the development of SBPs for topoisomerase I, an anticancer target with an unusual ligand binding pocket consisting of protein and DNA atoms. Different approaches to cluster and select pharmacophore features are investigated, including hierarchical clustering and energy calculations. In addition, the performance of SBPs is evaluated retrospectively and compared to the performance of ligand- and complex-based pharmacophores. SBPs emerge as a valid method in virtual screening and a complementary approach to ligand-focussed methods. The study further reveals that the choice of pharmacophore feature clustering and selection methods has a large impact on the virtual screening hit lists. A prospective application of the SBPs in virtual screening reveals that they can be used successfully to identify novel topoisomerase inhibitors.

  4. Production of a Brassica napus low-molecular mass acyl-coenzyme A-binding protein in Arabidopsis alters the acyl-coenzyme A pool and acyl composition of oil in seeds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Low-molecular mass (10 kD) cytosolic acyl-coenzyme A-binding protein (ACBP) has a substantial influence over fatty acid (FA) composition in oilseeds, possibly via an effect on the partitioning of acyl groups between elongation and desaturation pathways. Previously, we demonstrated that the expressio...

  5. Computational Prediction of acyl-coA Binding Proteins Structure in Brassica napus.

    PubMed

    Raboanatahiry, Nadia Haingotiana; Lu, Guangyuan; Li, Maoteng

    2015-01-01

    Acyl-coA binding proteins could transport acyl-coA esters from plastid to endoplasmic reticulum, prior to fatty acid biosynthesis, leading to the formation of triacylglycerol. The structure and the subcellular localization of acyl-coA binding proteins (ACBP) in Brassica napus were computationally predicted in this study. Earlier, the structure analysis of ACBPs was limited to the small ACBPs, the current study focused on all four classes of ACBPs. Physicochemical parameters including the size and the length, the intron-exon structure, the isoelectric point, the hydrophobicity, and the amino acid composition were studied. Furthermore, identification of conserved residues and conserved domains were carried out. Secondary structure and tertiary structure of ACBPs were also studied. Finally, subcellular localization of ACBPs was predicted. The findings indicated that the physicochemical parameters and subcellular localizations of ACBPs in Brassica napus were identical to Arabidopsis thaliana. Conserved domain analysis indicated that ACBPs contain two or three kelch domains that belong to different families. Identical residues in acyl-coA binding domains corresponded to eight amino acid residues in all ACBPs of B. napus. However, conserved residues of common ACBPs in all species of animal, plant, bacteria and fungi were only inclusive in small ACBPs. Alpha-helixes were displayed and conserved in all the acyl-coA binding domains, representing almost the half of the protein structure. The findings confirm high similarities in ACBPs between A. thaliana and B. napus, they might share the same functions but loss or gain might be possible.

  6. Spontaneous activation of visual pigments in relation to openness/closedness of chromophore-binding pocket

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Wendy Wing Sze; Frederiksen, Rikard; Ren, Xiaozhi; Luo, Dong-Gen; Yamashita, Takahiro; Shichida, Yoshinori; Cornwall, M Carter; Yau, King-Wai

    2017-01-01

    Visual pigments can be spontaneously activated by internal thermal energy, generating noise that interferes with real-light detection. Recently, we developed a physicochemical theory that successfully predicts the rate of spontaneous activity of representative rod and cone pigments from their peak-absorption wavelength (λmax), with pigments having longer λmax being noisier. Interestingly, cone pigments may generally be ~25 fold noisier than rod pigments of the same λmax, possibly ascribed to an ‘open’ chromophore-binding pocket in cone pigments defined by the capability of chromophore-exchange in darkness. Here, we show in mice that the λmax-dependence of pigment noise could be extended even to a mutant pigment, E122Q-rhodopsin. Moreover, although E122Q-rhodopsin shows some cone-pigment-like characteristics, its noise remained quantitatively predictable by the ‘non-open’ nature of its chromophore-binding pocket as in wild-type rhodopsin. The openness/closedness of the chromophore-binding pocket is potentially a useful indicator of whether a pigment is intended for detecting dim or bright light. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18492.001 PMID:28186874

  7. Interactions between Hofmeister anions and the binding pocket of a protein.

    PubMed

    Fox, Jerome M; Kang, Kyungtae; Sherman, Woody; Héroux, Annie; Sastry, G Madhavi; Baghbanzadeh, Mostafa; Lockett, Matthew R; Whitesides, George M

    2015-03-25

    This paper uses the binding pocket of human carbonic anhydrase II (HCAII, EC 4.2.1.1) as a tool to examine the properties of Hofmeister anions that determine (i) where, and how strongly, they associate with concavities on the surfaces of proteins and (ii) how, upon binding, they alter the structure of water within those concavities. Results from X-ray crystallography and isothermal titration calorimetry show that most anions associate with the binding pocket of HCAII by forming inner-sphere ion pairs with the Zn(2+) cofactor. In these ion pairs, the free energy of anion-Zn(2+) association is inversely proportional to the free energetic cost of anion dehydration; this relationship is consistent with the mechanism of ion pair formation suggested by the "law of matching water affinities". Iodide and bromide anions also associate with a hydrophobic declivity in the wall of the binding pocket. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest that anions, upon associating with Zn(2+), trigger rearrangements of water that extend up to 8 Å away from their surfaces. These findings expand the range of interactions previously thought to occur between ions and proteins by suggesting that (i) weakly hydrated anions can bind complementarily shaped hydrophobic declivities, and that (ii) ion-induced rearrangements of water within protein concavities can (in contrast with similar rearrangements in bulk water) extend well beyond the first hydration shells of the ions that trigger them. This study paints a picture of Hofmeister anions as a set of structurally varied ligands that differ in size, shape, and affinity for water and, thus, in their ability to bind to—and to alter the charge and hydration structure of—polar, nonpolar, and topographically complex concavities on the surfaces of proteins.

  8. Characterization of a small acyl-CoA-binding protein (ACBP) from Helianthus annuus L. and its binding affinities.

    PubMed

    Aznar-Moreno, Jose A; Venegas-Calerón, Mónica; Du, Zhi-Yan; Garcés, Rafael; Tanner, Julian A; Chye, Mee-Len; Martínez-Force, Enrique; Salas, Joaquín J

    2016-05-01

    Acyl-CoA-binding proteins (ACBPs) bind to acyl-CoA esters and promote their interaction with other proteins, lipids and cell structures. Small class I ACBPs have been identified in different plants, such as Arabidopsis thaliana (AtACBP6), Brassica napus (BnACBP) and Oryza sativa (OsACBP1, OsACBP2, OsACBP3), and they are capable of binding to different acyl-CoA esters and phospholipids. Here we characterize HaACBP6, a class I ACBP expressed in sunflower (Helianthus annuus) tissues, studying the specificity of its corresponding recombinant HaACBP6 protein towards various acyl-CoA esters and phospholipids in vitro, particularly using isothermal titration calorimetry and protein phospholipid binding assays. This protein binds with high affinity to de novo synthetized derivatives palmitoly-CoA, stearoyl-CoA and oleoyl-CoA (Kd 0.29, 0.14 and 0.15 μM respectively). On the contrary, it showed lower affinity towards linoleoyl-CoA (Kd 5.6 μM). Moreover, rHaACBP6 binds to different phosphatidylcholine species (dipalmitoyl-PC, dioleoyl-PC and dilinoleoyl-PC), yet it displays no affinity towards other phospholipids like lyso-PC, phosphatidic acid and lysophosphatidic acid derivatives. In the light of these results, the possible involvement of this protein in sunflower oil synthesis is considered.

  9. Spatial Decomposition of Translational Water-Water Correlation Entropy in Binding Pockets.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Crystal N; Kurtzman, Tom; Gilson, Michael K

    2016-01-12

    A number of computational tools available today compute the thermodynamic properties of water at surfaces and in binding pockets by using inhomogeneous solvation theory (IST) to analyze explicit-solvent simulations. Such methods enable qualitative spatial mappings of both energy and entropy around a solute of interest and can also be applied quantitatively. However, the entropy estimates of existing methods have, to date, been almost entirely limited to the first-order terms in the IST's entropy expansion. These first-order terms account for localization and orientation of water molecules in the field of the solute but not for the modification of water-water correlations by the solute. Here, we present an extension of the Grid Inhomogeneous Solvation Theory (GIST) approach which accounts for water-water translational correlations. The method involves rewriting the two-point density of water in terms of a conditional density and utilizes the efficient nearest-neighbor entropy estimation approach. Spatial maps of this second order term, for water in and around the synthetic host cucurbit[7]uril and in the binding pocket of the enzyme Factor Xa, reveal mainly negative contributions, indicating solute-induced water-water correlations relative to bulk water; particularly strong signals are obtained for sites at the entrances of cavities or pockets. This second-order term thus enters with the same, negative, sign as the first order translational and orientational terms. Numerical and convergence properties of the methodology are examined.

  10. Spatial Decomposition of Translational Water–Water Correlation Entropy in Binding Pockets

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A number of computational tools available today compute the thermodynamic properties of water at surfaces and in binding pockets by using inhomogeneous solvation theory (IST) to analyze explicit-solvent simulations. Such methods enable qualitative spatial mappings of both energy and entropy around a solute of interest and can also be applied quantitatively. However, the entropy estimates of existing methods have, to date, been almost entirely limited to the first-order terms in the IST’s entropy expansion. These first-order terms account for localization and orientation of water molecules in the field of the solute but not for the modification of water–water correlations by the solute. Here, we present an extension of the Grid Inhomogeneous Solvation Theory (GIST) approach which accounts for water–water translational correlations. The method involves rewriting the two-point density of water in terms of a conditional density and utilizes the efficient nearest-neighbor entropy estimation approach. Spatial maps of this second order term, for water in and around the synthetic host cucurbit[7]uril and in the binding pocket of the enzyme Factor Xa, reveal mainly negative contributions, indicating solute-induced water–water correlations relative to bulk water; particularly strong signals are obtained for sites at the entrances of cavities or pockets. This second-order term thus enters with the same, negative, sign as the first order translational and orientational terms. Numerical and convergence properties of the methodology are examined. PMID:26636620

  11. Computational approaches for identification of conserved/unique binding pockets in the A chain of ricin

    SciTech Connect

    Ecale Zhou, C L; Zemla, A T; Roe, D; Young, M; Lam, M; Schoeniger, J; Balhorn, R

    2005-01-29

    Specific and sensitive ligand-based protein detection assays that employ antibodies or small molecules such as peptides, aptamers, or other small molecules require that the corresponding surface region of the protein be accessible and that there be minimal cross-reactivity with non-target proteins. To reduce the time and cost of laboratory screening efforts for diagnostic reagents, we developed new methods for evaluating and selecting protein surface regions for ligand targeting. We devised combined structure- and sequence-based methods for identifying 3D epitopes and binding pockets on the surface of the A chain of ricin that are conserved with respect to a set of ricin A chains and unique with respect to other proteins. We (1) used structure alignment software to detect structural deviations and extracted from this analysis the residue-residue correspondence, (2) devised a method to compare corresponding residues across sets of ricin structures and structures of closely related proteins, (3) devised a sequence-based approach to determine residue infrequency in local sequence context, and (4) modified a pocket-finding algorithm to identify surface crevices in close proximity to residues determined to be conserved/unique based on our structure- and sequence-based methods. In applying this combined informatics approach to ricin A we identified a conserved/unique pocket in close proximity (but not overlapping) the active site that is suitable for bi-dentate ligand development. These methods are generally applicable to identification of surface epitopes and binding pockets for development of diagnostic reagents, therapeutics, and vaccines.

  12. Comparison of three classes of human liver alcohol dehydrogenase. Emphasis on different substrate binding pockets.

    PubMed

    Eklund, H; Müller-Wille, P; Horjales, E; Futer, O; Holmquist, B; Vallee, B L; Höög, J O; Kaiser, R; Jörnvall, H

    1990-10-24

    Conformational models of the three characterized classes of mammalian liver alcohol dehydrogenase were constructed using computer graphics based on the known three-dimensional structure of the E subunit of the horse enzyme (class I) and the primary structures of the three human enzyme classes. This correlates the substrate-binding pockets of the class I subunits (alpha, beta and gamma in the human enzyme) with those of the class II and III subunits (pi and chi, respectively) for three enzymes that differ in substrate specificity, inhibition pattern and many other properties. The substrate-binding sites exhibit pronounced differences in both shape and properties. Comparing human class I subunits with those of class II and III subunits there are no less than 8 and 10 replacements, respectively, out of 11 residues in the substrate pocket, while in the human class I isozyme variants, only 1-3 of these 11 positions differ. A single residue, Val294, is conserved throughout. The liver alcohol dehydrogenases, with different substrate-specificity pockets, resemble the patterns of other enzyme families such as the pancreatic serine proteases. The inner part of the substrate cleft in the class II and III enzymes is smaller than in the horse class I enzyme, because both Ser48 and Phe93 are replaced by larger residues, Thr and Tyr, respectively. In class II, the residues in the substrate pocket are larger in about half of the positions. It is rich in aromatic residues, four Phe and one Tyr, making the substrate site distinctly smaller than in the class I subunits. In class III, the inner part of the substrate cleft is narrow but the outer part considerably wider and more polar than in the class I and II enzymes. In addition, Ser (or Thr) and Tyr in class II and III instead of His51 may influence proton abstraction/donation at the active site.

  13. Glutamate Water Gates in the Ion Binding Pocket of Na(+) Bound Na(+), K(+)-ATPase.

    PubMed

    Han, Minwoo; Kopec, Wojciech; Solov'yov, Ilia A; Khandelia, Himanshu

    2017-01-13

    The dynamically changing protonation states of the six acidic amino acid residues in the ion binding pocket of the Na(+), K(+) -ATPase (NKA) during the ion transport cycle are proposed to drive ion binding, release and possibly determine Na(+) or K(+) selectivity. We use molecular dynamics (MD) and density functional theory (DFT) simulations to determine the protonation scheme of the Na(+) bound conformation of NKA. MD simulations of all possible protonation schemes show that the bound Na(+) ions are most stably bound when three or four protons reside in the binding sites, and that Glu954 in site III is always protonated. Glutamic acid residues in the three binding sites act as water gates, and their deprotonation triggers water entry to the binding sites. From DFT calculations of Na(+) binding energies, we conclude that three protons in the binding site are needed to effectively bind Na(+) from water and four are needed to release them in the next step. Protonation of Asp926 in site III will induce Na(+) release, and Glu327, Glu954 and Glu779 are all likely to be protonated in the Na(+) bound occluded conformation. Our data provides key insights into the role of protons in the Na(+) binding and release mechanism of NKA.

  14. Glutamate Water Gates in the Ion Binding Pocket of Na+ Bound Na+, K+-ATPase

    PubMed Central

    Han, Minwoo; Kopec, Wojciech; Solov’yov, Ilia A.; Khandelia, Himanshu

    2017-01-01

    The dynamically changing protonation states of the six acidic amino acid residues in the ion binding pocket of the Na+, K+ -ATPase (NKA) during the ion transport cycle are proposed to drive ion binding, release and possibly determine Na+ or K+ selectivity. We use molecular dynamics (MD) and density functional theory (DFT) simulations to determine the protonation scheme of the Na+ bound conformation of NKA. MD simulations of all possible protonation schemes show that the bound Na+ ions are most stably bound when three or four protons reside in the binding sites, and that Glu954 in site III is always protonated. Glutamic acid residues in the three binding sites act as water gates, and their deprotonation triggers water entry to the binding sites. From DFT calculations of Na+ binding energies, we conclude that three protons in the binding site are needed to effectively bind Na+ from water and four are needed to release them in the next step. Protonation of Asp926 in site III will induce Na+ release, and Glu327, Glu954 and Glu779 are all likely to be protonated in the Na+ bound occluded conformation. Our data provides key insights into the role of protons in the Na+ binding and release mechanism of NKA. PMID:28084301

  15. A substrate-induced biotin binding pocket in the carboxyltransferase domain of pyruvate carboxylase.

    PubMed

    Lietzan, Adam D; St Maurice, Martin

    2013-07-05

    Biotin-dependent enzymes catalyze carboxyl transfer reactions by efficiently coordinating multiple reactions between spatially distinct active sites. Pyruvate carboxylase (PC), a multifunctional biotin-dependent enzyme, catalyzes the bicarbonate- and MgATP-dependent carboxylation of pyruvate to oxaloacetate, an important anaplerotic reaction in mammalian tissues. To complete the overall reaction, the tethered biotin prosthetic group must first gain access to the biotin carboxylase domain and become carboxylated and then translocate to the carboxyltransferase domain, where the carboxyl group is transferred from biotin to pyruvate. Here, we report structural and kinetic evidence for the formation of a substrate-induced biotin binding pocket in the carboxyltransferase domain of PC from Rhizobium etli. Structures of the carboxyltransferase domain reveal that R. etli PC occupies a symmetrical conformation in the absence of the biotin carboxylase domain and that the carboxyltransferase domain active site is conformationally rearranged upon pyruvate binding. This conformational change is stabilized by the interaction of the conserved residues Asp(590) and Tyr(628) and results in the formation of the biotin binding pocket. Site-directed mutations at these residues reduce the rate of biotin-dependent reactions but have no effect on the rate of biotin-independent oxaloacetate decarboxylation. Given the conservation with carboxyltransferase domains in oxaloacetate decarboxylase and transcarboxylase, the structure-based mechanism described for PC may be applicable to the larger family of biotin-dependent enzymes.

  16. Distinct pose of discodermolide in taxol binding pocket drives a complementary mode of microtubule stabilization.

    PubMed

    Khrapunovich-Baine, Marina; Menon, Vilas; Verdier-Pinard, Pascal; Smith, Amos B; Angeletti, Ruth Hogue; Fiser, Andras; Horwitz, Susan Band; Xiao, Hui

    2009-12-15

    The microtubule cytoskeleton has proven to be an effective target for cancer therapeutics. One class of drugs, known as microtubule stabilizing agents (MSAs), binds to microtubule polymers and stabilizes them against depolymerization. The prototype of this group of drugs, Taxol, is an effective chemotherapeutic agent used extensively in the treatment of human ovarian, breast, and lung carcinomas. Although electron crystallography and photoaffinity labeling experiments determined that the binding site for Taxol is in a hydrophobic pocket in beta-tubulin, little was known about the effects of this drug on the conformation of the entire microtubule. A recent study from our laboratory utilizing hydrogen-deuterium exchange (HDX) in concert with various mass spectrometry (MS) techniques has provided new information on the structure of microtubules upon Taxol binding. In the current study we apply this technique to determine the binding mode and the conformational effects on chicken erythrocyte tubulin (CET) of another MSA, discodermolide, whose synthetic analogues may have potential use in the clinic. We confirmed that, like Taxol, discodermolide binds to the taxane binding pocket in beta-tubulin. However, as opposed to Taxol, which has major interactions with the M-loop, discodermolide orients itself away from this loop and toward the N-terminal H1-S2 loop. Additionally, discodermolide stabilizes microtubules mainly via its effects on interdimer contacts, specifically on the alpha-tubulin side, and to a lesser extent on interprotofilament contacts between adjacent beta-tubulin subunits. Also, our results indicate complementary stabilizing effects of Taxol and discodermolide on the microtubules, which may explain the synergy observed between the two drugs in vivo.

  17. Progress in antiandrogen design targeting hormone binding pocket to circumvent mutation based resistance

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Xiaohong; He, Yang; Zhou, Jinming

    2015-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) plays a critical role in the development and progression of prostate cancer (PCa). Current clinically used antiandrogens such as flutamide, bicalutamide, and newly approved enzalutamide mainly target the hormone binding pocket (HBP) of AR. However, over time, drug resistance invariably develops and switches these antiandrogens from antagonist to agonist of the AR. Accumulated evidence indicates that AR mutation is an important cause for the drug resistance. This review will give an overview of the mutation based resistance of the current clinically used antiandrogens and the rational drug design to overcome the resistance, provides a promising strategy for the development of the new generation of antiandrogens targeting HBP. PMID:25852559

  18. Fluorescently labelled bovine acyl-CoA-binding protein acting as an acyl-CoA sensor: interaction with CoA and acyl-CoA esters and its use in measuring free acyl-CoA esters and non-esterified fatty acids.

    PubMed Central

    Wadum, Majken C T; Villadsen, Jens K; Feddersen, Søren; Møller, Rikke S; Neergaard, Thomas B F; Kragelund, Birthe B; Højrup, Peter; Faergeman, Nils J; Knudsen, Jens

    2002-01-01

    Long-chain acyl-CoA esters are key metabolites in lipid synthesis and beta-oxidation but, at the same time, are important regulators of intermediate metabolism, insulin secretion, vesicular trafficking and gene expression. Key tools in studying the regulatory functions of acyl-CoA esters are reliable methods for the determination of free acyl-CoA concentrations. No such method is presently available. In the present study, we describe the synthesis of two acyl-CoA sensors for measuring free acyl-CoA concentrations using acyl-CoA-binding protein as a scaffold. Met24 and Ala53 of bovine acyl-CoA-binding protein were replaced by cysteine residues, which were covalently modified with 6-bromoacetyl-2-dimethylaminonaphthalene to make the two fluorescent acyl-CoA indicators (FACIs) FACI-24 and FACI-53. FACI-24 and FACI-53 showed fluorescence emission maximum at 510 and 525 nm respectively, in the absence of ligand (excitation 387 nm). Titration of FACI-24 and FACI-53 with hexadecanoyl-CoA and dodecanoyl-CoA increased the fluorescence yield 5.5-and 4.7-fold at 460 and 495 nm respectively. FACI-24 exhibited a high, and similar increase in, fluorescence yield at 460 nm upon binding of C14-C20 saturated and unsaturated acyl-CoA esters. Both indicators bind long-chain (>C14) acyl-CoA esters with high specificity and affinity (K(d)=0.6-1.7 nM). FACI-53 showed a high fluorescence yield for C8-C12 acyl chains. It is shown that FACI-24 acts as a sensitive acyl-CoA sensor for measuring the concentration of free acyl-CoA, acyl-CoA synthetase activity and the concentrations of free fatty acids after conversion of the fatty acid into their respective acyl-CoA esters. PMID:12071849

  19. Growth suppression by an E2F-binding-defective retinoblastoma protein (RB): contribution from the RB C pocket.

    PubMed

    Whitaker, L L; Su, H; Baskaran, R; Knudsen, E S; Wang, J Y

    1998-07-01

    Growth suppression by the retinoblastoma protein (RB) is dependent on its ability to form complexes with transcription regulators. At least three distinct protein-binding activities have been identified in RB: the large A/B pocket binds E2F, the A/B pocket binds the LXCXE peptide motif, and the C pocket binds the nuclear c-Abl tyrosine kinase. Substitution of Trp for Arg 661 in the B region of RB (mutant 661) inactivates both E2F and LXCXE binding. The tumor suppression function of mutant 661 is not abolished, because this allele predisposes its carriers to retinoblastoma development with a low penetrance. In cell-based assays, 661 is shown to inhibit G1/S progression. This low-penetrance mutant also induces terminal growth arrest with reduced but detectable activity. We have constructed mutations that disrupt C pocket activity. When overproduced, the RB C-terminal fragment did not induce terminal growth arrest but could inhibit G1/S progression, and this activity was abolished by the C-pocket mutations. In full-length RB, the C-pocket mutations reduced but did not abolish RB function. Interestingly, combination of the C-pocket and 661 mutations completely abolished RB's ability to cause an increase in the percentage of cells in G1 and to induce terminal growth arrest. These results suggest that the A/B or C region can induce a prolongation of G1 through mechanisms that are independent of each other. In contrast, long-term growth arrest requires combined activities from both regions of RB. In addition, E2F and LXCXE binding are not the only mechanisms through which RB inhibits cell growth. The C pocket also contributes to RB-mediated growth suppression.

  20. Avibactam and Class C β-Lactamases: Mechanism of Inhibition, Conservation of the Binding Pocket, and Implications for Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Johnstone, M. R.; Ross, P. L.; McLaughlin, R. E.; Olivier, N. B.

    2014-01-01

    Avibactam is a novel non-β-lactam β-lactamase inhibitor that inhibits a wide range of β-lactamases. These include class A, class C, and some class D enzymes, which erode the activity of β-lactam drugs in multidrug-resistant pathogens like Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterobacteriaceae spp. Avibactam is currently in clinical development in combination with the β-lactam antibiotics ceftazidime, ceftaroline fosamil, and aztreonam. Avibactam has the potential to be the first β-lactamase inhibitor that might provide activity against class C-mediated resistance, which represents a growing concern in both hospital- and community-acquired infections. Avibactam has an unusual mechanism of action: it is a covalent inhibitor that acts via ring opening, but in contrast to other currently used β-lactamase inhibitors, this reaction is reversible. Here, we present a high-resolution structure of avibactam bound to a class C β-lactamase, AmpC, from P. aeruginosa that provided insight into the mechanism of both acylation and recyclization in this enzyme class and highlighted the differences observed between class A and class C inhibition. Furthermore, variants resistant to avibactam that identified the residues important for inhibition were isolated. Finally, the structural information was used to predict effective inhibition by sequence analysis and functional studies of class C β-lactamases from a large and diverse set of contemporary clinical isolates (P. aeruginosa and several Enterobacteriaceae spp.) obtained from recent infections to understand any preexisting variability in the binding pocket that might affect inhibition by avibactam. PMID:25022578

  1. Computational Assessment of Potassium and Magnesium Ion Binding to a Buried Pocket in GTPase-Associating Center RNA

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    An experimentally well-studied model of RNA tertiary structures is a 58mer rRNA fragment, known as GTPase-associating center (GAC) RNA, in which a highly negative pocket walled by phosphate oxygen atoms is stabilized by a chelated cation. Although such deep pockets with more than one direct phosphate to ion chelation site normally include magnesium, as shown in one GAC crystal structure, another GAC crystal structure and solution experiments suggest potassium at this site. Both crystal structures also depict two magnesium ions directly bound to the phosphate groups comprising this controversial pocket. Here, we used classical molecular dynamics simulations as well as umbrella sampling to investigate the possibility of binding of potassium versus magnesium inside the pocket and to better characterize the chelation of one of the binding magnesium ions outside the pocket. The results support the preference of the pocket to accommodate potassium rather than magnesium and suggest that one of the closely binding magnesium ions can only bind at high magnesium concentrations, such as might be present during crystallization. This work illustrates the complementary utility of molecular modeling approaches with atomic-level detail in resolving discrepancies between conflicting experimental results. PMID:27983843

  2. Insight into Coenzyme A cofactor binding and the mechanism of acyl-transfer in an acylating aldehyde dehydrogenase from Clostridium phytofermentans

    PubMed Central

    Tuck, Laura R.; Altenbach, Kirsten; Ang, Thiau Fu; Crawshaw, Adam D.; Campopiano, Dominic J.; Clarke, David J.; Marles-Wright, Jon

    2016-01-01

    The breakdown of fucose and rhamnose released from plant cell walls by the cellulolytic soil bacterium Clostridium phytofermentans produces toxic aldehyde intermediates. To enable growth on these carbon sources, the pathway for the breakdown of fucose and rhamnose is encapsulated within a bacterial microcompartment (BMC). These proteinaceous organelles sequester the toxic aldehyde intermediates and allow the efficient action of acylating aldehyde dehydrogenase enzymes to produce an acyl-CoA that is ultimately used in substrate-level phosphorylation to produce ATP. Here we analyse the kinetics of the aldehyde dehydrogenase enzyme from the fucose/rhamnose utilisation BMC with different short-chain fatty aldehydes and show that it has activity against substrates with up to six carbon atoms, with optimal activity against propionaldehyde. We have also determined the X-ray crystal structure of this enzyme in complex with CoA and show that the adenine nucleotide of this cofactor is bound in a distinct pocket to the same group in NAD+. This work is the first report of the structure of CoA bound to an aldehyde dehydrogenase enzyme and our crystallographic model provides important insight into the differences within the active site that distinguish the acylating from non-acylating aldehyde dehydrogenase enzymes. PMID:26899032

  3. WDR5 Intearcts with Mixed Lineage Leukemia (MLL) Protein via the Histone H3-binding Pocket

    SciTech Connect

    Song, J.; Kingston, R

    2008-01-01

    WDR5 is a component of the mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) complex, which methylates lysine 4 of histone H3, and was identified as a methylated Lys-4 histone H3-binding protein. Here, we present a crystal structure of WDR5 bound to an MLL peptide. Surprisingly, we find that WDR5 utilizes the same pocket shown to bind histone H3 for this MLL interaction. Furthermore, the WDR5-MLL interaction is disrupted preferentially by mono- and di-methylated Lys-4 histone H3 over unmodified and tri-methylated Lys-4 histone H3. These data implicate a delicate interplay between the effector, WDR5, the catalytic subunit, MLL, and the substrate, histone H3, of the MLL complex. We suggest that the activity of the MLL complex might be regulated through this interplay.

  4. Mapping protein pockets through their potential small-molecule binding volumes: QSCD applied to biological protein structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Keith; Patel, Nehal M.; Ledel, Aric; Moallemi, Ciamac C.; Wintner, Edward A.

    2004-01-01

    Previously we demonstrated a method, Quantized Surface Complementarity Diversity (QSCD), of defining molecular diversity by measuring shape and functional complementarity of molecules to a basis set of theoretical target surfaces [Wintner E.A. and Moallemi C.C., J. Med. Chem., 43 (2000) 1993]. In this paper we demonstrate a method of mapping actual protein pockets to the same basis set of theoretical target surfaces, thereby allowing categorization of protein pockets by their properties of shape and functionality. The key step in the mapping is a `dissection' algorithm that breaks any protein pocket into a set of potential small molecule binding volumes. It is these binding volumes that are mapped to the basis set of theoretical target surfaces, thus measuring a protein pocket not as a single surface but as a collection of molecular recognition environments.

  5. The same pocket in menin binds both MLL and JUND but has opposite effects on transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Jing; Gurung, Buddha; Wan, Bingbing; Matkar, Smita; Veniaminova, Natalia A.; Wan, Ke; Merchant, Juanita L.; Hua, Xianxin; Lei, Ming

    2013-04-08

    Menin is a tumour suppressor protein whose loss or inactivation causes multiple endocrine neoplasia 1 (MEN1), a hereditary autosomal dominant tumour syndrome that is characterized by tumorigenesis in multiple endocrine organs. Menin interacts with many proteins and is involved in a variety of cellular processes. Menin binds the JUN family transcription factor JUND and inhibits its transcriptional activity. Several MEN1 missense mutations disrupt the menin-JUND interaction, suggesting a correlation between the tumour-suppressor function of menin and its suppression of JUND-activated transcription. Menin also interacts with mixed lineage leukaemia protein 1 (MLL1), a histone H3 lysine 4 methyltransferase, and functions as an oncogenic cofactor to upregulate gene transcription and promote MLL1-fusion-protein-induced leukaemogenesis. A recent report on the tethering of MLL1 to chromatin binding factor lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF) by menin indicates that menin is a molecular adaptor coordinating the functions of multiple proteins. Despite its importance, how menin interacts with many distinct partners and regulates their functions remains poorly understood. Here we present the crystal structures of human menin in its free form and in complexes with MLL1 or with JUND, or with an MLL1-LEDGF heterodimer. These structures show that menin contains a deep pocket that binds short peptides of MLL1 or JUND in the same manner, but that it can have opposite effects on transcription. The menin-JUND interaction blocks JUN N-terminal kinase (JNK)-mediated JUND phosphorylation and suppresses JUND-induced transcription. In contrast, menin promotes gene transcription by binding the transcription activator MLL1 through the peptide pocket while still interacting with the chromatin-anchoring protein LEDGF at a distinct surface formed by both menin and MLL1.

  6. Specificity of anion-binding in the substrate-pocket ofbacteriorhodopsin

    SciTech Connect

    Facciotti, Marc T.; Cheung, Vincent S.; Lunde, Christopher S.; Rouhani, Shahab; Baliga, Nitin S.; Glaeser, Robert M.

    2003-08-30

    The structure of the D85S mutant of bacteriorhodopsin with a nitrate anion bound in the Schiff-base binding site, and the structure of the anion-free protein have been obtained in the same crystal form. Together with the previously solved structures of this anion pump, in both the anion-free state and bromide-bound state, these new structures provide insight into how this mutant of bacteriorhodopsin is able to bind a variety of different anions in the same binding pocket. The structural analysis reveals that the main structural change that accommodates different anions is the repositioning of the polar side-chain of S85. On the basis of these x-ray crystal structures, the prediction is then made that the D85S/D212N double mutant might bind similar anions and do so over a broader pH range than does the single mutant. Experimental comparison of the dissociation constants, K{sub d}, for a variety of anions confirms this prediction and demonstrates, in addition, that the binding affinity is dramatically improved by the D212N substitution.

  7. A comprehensive ligand based mapping of the σ₂ receptor binding pocket.

    PubMed

    Rhoades, Derek J; Kinder, David H; Mahfouz, Tarek M

    2014-01-01

    The sigma (σ) receptor system consists of at least two major receptor subtypes: σ₁ and σ₂. Several potential therapeutic applications would benefit from structural knowledge of the σ₂ receptor but gaining this knowledge has been hampered by the difficulties associated with its isolation and, thus, characterization. Here, a ligand based approach has been adopted using the program PHASE® and a group of 41 potent and structurally diverse σ₂ ligands to develop several pharmacophore models for different families of σ₂ ligands. These pharmacophores were analyzed to identify the different binding modes to the receptor and were combined together to construct a comprehensive pharmacophore that was used to develop a structural model for the σ₂ binding pocket. A total of six binding modes were identified and could be classified as neutral or charged modes. The results presented here also indicate the significance of hydrophobic interactions to σ₂ binding and the requirement of hydrogen bonding interactions to increase the affinity for this receptor subtype. This work adds breadth to our knowledge of this receptor's binding site, and should contribute significantly to the development of novel selective σ₂ ligands.

  8. Broadly neutralizing human antibody that recognizes the receptor-binding pocket of influenza virus hemagglutinin

    SciTech Connect

    Whittle, James R.R.; Zhang, Ruijun; Khurana, Surender; King, Lisa R.; Manischewitz, Jody; Golding, Hana; Dormitzer, Philip R.; Haynes, Barton F.; Walter, Emmanuel B.; Moody, M. Anthony; Kepler, Thomas B.; Liao, Hua-Xin; Harrison, Stephen C.

    2011-09-20

    Seasonal antigenic drift of circulating influenza virus leads to a requirement for frequent changes in vaccine composition, because exposure or vaccination elicits human antibodies with limited cross-neutralization of drifted strains. We describe a human monoclonal antibody, CH65, obtained by isolating rearranged heavy- and light-chain genes from sorted single plasma cells, coming from a subject immunized with the 2007 trivalent influenza vaccine. The crystal structure of a complex of the hemagglutinin (HA) from H1N1 strain A/Solomon Islands/3/2006 with the Fab of CH65 shows that the tip of the CH65 heavy-chain complementarity determining region 3 (CDR3) inserts into the receptor binding pocket on HA1, mimicking in many respects the interaction of the physiological receptor, sialic acid. CH65 neutralizes infectivity of 30 out of 36 H1N1 strains tested. The resistant strains have a single-residue insertion near the rim of the sialic-acid pocket. We conclude that broad neutralization of influenza virus can be achieved by antibodies with contacts that mimic those of the receptor.

  9. An Arabidopsis family of six acyl-CoA-binding proteins has three cytosolic members.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Shi; Chye, Mee-Len

    2009-06-01

    In Arabidopsis thaliana, a gene family of six members encodes acyl-CoA-binding proteins (ACBPs). These Arabidopsis ACBPs (designated ACBP1 to ACBP6) range in size from 10.4kDa to 73.1kDa and display varying affinities for acyl-CoA esters, suggesting that they have different roles in plant lipid metabolism. In contrast, only the 10-kDa ACBPs have been well-characterized from other eukaryote species. Our previous studies have revealed that ACBP1 and ACBP2 are membrane-associated proteins, while ACBP3 is extracellularly-targeted. More recently, we have reported that the remaining three members in this protein family (namely ACBP4, ACBP5 and ACBP6) are subcellularly localized to the cytosol in Arabidopsis. The subcellular localizations of ACBP4, ACBP5 and ACBP6 in the cytosol were demonstrated using a number of different approaches incorporating biochemical fractionation, confocal microscopy of transgenic Arabidopsis expressing autofluorescence-tagged fusions and immunoelectron microscopy using ACBP-specific antibodies. Our results indicate that all three ACBPs in the cytosol are potential candidates for acyl-CoA binding and trafficking in plant cells. In this review, the functional redundancy and differences among the three cytosolic ACBPs are discussed by comparison of their light-regulated expression and substrate affinities to acyl-CoA esters, and from biochemical analyses on their knockout mutants and/or overexpression in transgenic Arabidopsis. The transcriptionally light-induced ACBP4 and ACBP5, which encode the two largest forms of Arabidopsis ACBPs, bind oleoyl-CoA esters and likely transfer oleoyl-CoAs from the plastids (the site of de novo fatty acid biosynthesis) to the endoplasmic reticulum for the biosynthesis of non-plastidial membrane lipids in Arabidopsis.

  10. Mutations in adenine-binding pockets enhance catalytic properties of NAD(P)H-dependent enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Cahn, J.K.B.; Baumschlager, A.; Brinkmann-Chen, S.; Arnold, F.H.

    2016-01-01

    NAD(P)H-dependent enzymes are ubiquitous in metabolism and cellular processes and are also of great interest for pharmaceutical and industrial applications. Here, we present a structure-guided enzyme engineering strategy for improving catalytic properties of NAD(P)H-dependent enzymes toward native or native-like reactions using mutations to the enzyme's adenine-binding pocket, distal to the site of catalysis. Screening single-site saturation mutagenesis libraries identified mutations that increased catalytic efficiency up to 10-fold in 7 out of 10 enzymes. The enzymes improved in this study represent three different cofactor-binding folds (Rossmann, DHQS-like, and FAD/NAD binding) and utilize both NADH and NADPH. Structural and biochemical analyses show that the improved activities are accompanied by minimal changes in other properties (cooperativity, thermostability, pH optimum, uncoupling), and initial tests on two enzymes (ScADH6 and EcFucO) show improved functionality in Escherichia coli. PMID:26512129

  11. Selective JAK3 Inhibitors with a Covalent Reversible Binding Mode Targeting a New Induced Fit Binding Pocket.

    PubMed

    Forster, Michael; Chaikuad, Apirat; Bauer, Silke M; Holstein, Julia; Robers, Matthew B; Corona, Cesear R; Gehringer, Matthias; Pfaffenrot, Ellen; Ghoreschi, Kamran; Knapp, Stefan; Laufer, Stefan A

    2016-11-17

    Janus kinases (JAKs) are a family of cytoplasmatic tyrosine kinases that are attractive targets for the development of anti-inflammatory drugs given their roles in cytokine signaling. One question regarding JAKs and their inhibitors that remains under intensive debate is whether JAK inhibitors should be isoform selective. Since JAK3 functions are restricted to immune cells, an isoform-selective inhibitor for JAK3 could be especially valuable to achieve clinically more useful and precise effects. However, the high degree of structural conservation makes isoform-selective targeting a challenging task. Here, we present picomolar inhibitors with unprecedented kinome-wide selectivity for JAK3. Selectivity was achieved by concurrent covalent reversible targeting of a JAK3-specific cysteine residue and a ligand-induced binding pocket. We confirmed that in vitro activity and selectivity translate well into the cellular environment and suggest that our inhibitors are powerful tools to elucidate JAK3-specific functions.

  12. Cytochrome c Can Form a Well-Defined Binding Pocket for Hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    McClelland, Levi J; Steele, Harmen B B; Whitby, Frank G; Mou, Tung-Chung; Holley, David; Ross, J B Alexander; Sprang, Stephen R; Bowler, Bruce E

    2016-12-28

    Cytochrome c can acquire peroxidase activity when it binds to cardiolipin in mitochondrial membranes. The resulting oxygenation of cardiolipin by cytochrome c provides an early signal for the onset of apoptosis. The structure of this enzyme-substrate complex is a matter of considerable debate. We present three structures at 1.7-2.0 Å resolution of a domain-swapped dimer of yeast iso-1-cytochrome c with the detergents, CYMAL-5, CYMAL-6, and ω-undecylenyl-β-d-maltopyranoside, bound in a channel that places the hydrocarbon moieties of these detergents next to the heme. The heme is poised for peroxidase activity with water bound in place of Met80, which serves as the axial heme ligand when cytochrome c functions as an electron carrier. The hydroxyl group of Tyr67 sits 3.6-4.0 Å from the nearest carbon of the detergents, positioned to act as a relay in radical abstraction during peroxidase activity. Docking studies with linoleic acid, the most common fatty acid component of cardiolipin, show that C11 of linoleic acid can sit adjacent to Tyr67 and the heme, consistent with the oxygenation pattern observed in lipidomics studies. The well-defined hydrocarbon binding pocket provides atomic resolution evidence for the extended lipid anchorage model for cytochrome c/cardiolipin binding. Dimer dissociation/association kinetics for yeast versus equine cytochrome c indicate that formation of mammalian cytochrome c dimers in vivo would require catalysis. However, the dimer structure shows that only a modest deformation of monomeric cytochrome c would suffice to form the hydrocarbon binding site occupied by these detergents.

  13. Evolutionary diversification of retinoic acid receptor ligand-binding pocket structure by molecular tinkering

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez-Mazariegos, Juliana; Nadendla, Eswar Kumar; Studer, Romain A.; Alvarez, Susana; de Lera, Angel R.; Kuraku, Shigehiro; Bourguet, William; Laudet, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Whole genome duplications (WGDs) have been classically associated with the origin of evolutionary novelties and the so-called duplication–degeneration–complementation model describes the possible fates of genes after duplication. However, how sequence divergence effectively allows functional changes between gene duplicates is still unclear. In the vertebrate lineage, two rounds of WGDs took place, giving rise to paralogous gene copies observed for many gene families. For the retinoic acid receptors (RARs), for example, which are members of the nuclear hormone receptor (NR) superfamily, a unique ancestral gene has been duplicated resulting in three vertebrate paralogues: RARα, RARβ and RARγ. It has previously been shown that this single ancestral RAR was neofunctionalized to give rise to a larger substrate specificity range in the RARs of extant jawed vertebrates (also called gnathostomes). To understand RAR diversification, the members of the cyclostomes (lamprey and hagfish), jawless vertebrates representing the extant sister group of gnathostomes, provide an intermediate situation and thus allow the characterization of the evolutionary steps that shaped RAR ligand-binding properties following the WGDs. In this study, we assessed the ligand-binding specificity of cyclostome RARs and found that their ligand-binding pockets resemble those of gnathostome RARα and RARβ. In contrast, none of the cyclostome receptors studied showed any RARγ-like specificity. Together, our results suggest that cyclostome RARs cover only a portion of the specificity repertoire of the ancestral gnathostome RARs and indicate that the establishment of ligand-binding specificity was a stepwise event. This iterative process thus provides a rare example for the diversification of receptor–ligand interactions of NRs following WGDs. PMID:27069642

  14. Identification of the putative binding pocket of valerenic acid on GABAA receptors using docking studies and site‐directed mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Luger, D; Poli, G; Wieder, M; Stadler, M; Ke, S; Ernst, M; Hohaus, A; Linder, T; Seidel, T; Langer, T; Hering, S

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose β2/3‐subunit‐selective modulation of GABAA receptors by valerenic acid (VA) is determined by the presence of transmembrane residue β2/3N265. Currently, it is not known whether β2/3N265 is part of VA's binding pocket or is involved in the transduction pathway of VA's action. The aim of this study was to clarify the localization of VA's binding pocket on GABAA receptors. Experimental Approach Docking and a structure‐based three‐dimensional pharmacophore were employed to identify candidate amino acid residues that are likely to interact with VA. Selected amino acid residues were mutated, and VA‐induced modulation of the resulting GABAA receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes was analysed. Key Results A binding pocket for VA at the β+/α− interface encompassing amino acid β3N265 was predicted. Mutational analysis of suggested amino acid residues revealed a complete loss of VA's activity on β3M286W channels as well as significantly decreased efficacy and potency of VA on β3N265S and β3F289S receptors. In addition, reduced efficacy of VA‐induced I GABA enhancement was also observed for α1M235W, β3R269A and β3M286A constructs. Conclusions and Implications Our data suggest that amino acid residues β3N265, β3F289, β3M286, β3R269 in the β3 subunit, at or near the etomidate/propofol binding site(s), form part of a VA binding pocket. The identification of the binding pocket for VA is essential for elucidating its pharmacological effects and might also help to develop new selective GABAA receptor ligands. PMID:26375408

  15. Angiotensin type 1 receptor resistance to blockade in the opossum proximal tubule cell due to variations in the binding pocket.

    PubMed

    Nistala, Ravi; Andresen, Bradley T; Pulakat, Lakshmi; Meuth, Alex; Sinak, Catherine; Mandavia, Chirag; Thekkumkara, Thomas; Speth, Robert C; Whaley-Connell, Adam; Sowers, James R

    2013-04-15

    Blockade of the angiotensin (ANG) II receptor type 1 (AT(1)R) with angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) is widely used in the treatment of hypertension. However, ARBs are variably effective in reducing blood pressure, likely due, in part, to polymorphisms in the ARB binding pocket of the AT(1)R. Therefore, we need a better understanding of variations/polymorphisms that alter binding of ARBs in heterogeneous patient populations. The opossum proximal tubule cell (OKP) line is commonly used in research to evaluate renal sodium handling and therefore blood pressure. Investigating this issue, we found natural sequence variations in the opossum AT(1)R paralleling those observed in the human AT(1)R. Therefore, we posited that these sequence variations may explain ARB resistance. We demonstrate that OKP cells express AT(1)R mRNA, bind (125)I-labeled ANG II, and exhibit ANG II-induced phosphorylation of Jak2. However, Jak2 phosphorylation is not inhibited by five different ARBs commonly used to treat hypertension. Additionally, nonradioactive ANG II competes (125)I-ANG II efficiently, whereas a 10-fold molar excess of olmesartan and the ANG II receptor type 2 blocker PD-123319 is unable to block (125)I-ANG II binding. In contrast, ANG II binding to OKP cells stably expressing rat AT(1A)Rs, which have a conserved AT(1)R-binding pocket with human AT(1)R, is efficiently inhibited by olmesartan. A novel observation was that resistance to ARB binding to opossum AT(1)Rs correlates with variations from the human receptor at positions 108, 163, 192, and 198 within the ARB-binding pocket. These observations highlight the potential utility of evaluating AT(1)R polymorphisms within the ARB-binding pocket in various hypertensive populations.

  16. Auxin-binding pocket of ABP1 is crucial for its gain-of-function cellular and developmental roles.

    PubMed

    Grones, Peter; Chen, Xu; Simon, Sibu; Kaufmann, Walter A; De Rycke, Riet; Nodzyński, Tomasz; Zažímalová, Eva; Friml, Jiří

    2015-08-01

    The plant hormone auxin is a key regulator of plant growth and development. Auxin levels are sensed and interpreted by distinct receptor systems that activate a broad range of cellular responses. The Auxin-Binding Protein1 (ABP1) that has been identified based on its ability to bind auxin with high affinity is a prime candidate for the extracellular receptor responsible for mediating a range of auxin effects, in particular, the fast non-transcriptional ones. Contradictory genetic studies suggested prominent or no importance of ABP1 in many developmental processes. However, how crucial the role of auxin binding to ABP1 is for its functions has not been addressed. Here, we show that the auxin-binding pocket of ABP1 is essential for its gain-of-function cellular and developmental roles. In total, 16 different abp1 mutants were prepared that possessed substitutions in the metal core or in the hydrophobic amino acids of the auxin-binding pocket as well as neutral mutations. Their analysis revealed that an intact auxin-binding pocket is a prerequisite for ABP1 to activate downstream components of the ABP1 signalling pathway, such as Rho of Plants (ROPs) and to mediate the clathrin association with membranes for endocytosis regulation. In planta analyses demonstrated the importance of the auxin binding pocket for all known ABP1-mediated postembryonic developmental processes, including morphology of leaf epidermal cells, root growth and root meristem activity, and vascular tissue differentiation. Taken together, these findings suggest that auxin binding to ABP1 is central to its function, supporting the role of ABP1 as auxin receptor.

  17. The structure of apo ArnA features an unexpected central binding pocket and provides an explanation for enzymatic cooperativity.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Utz; Hertlein, Simon; Grimm, Clemens

    2015-03-01

    The bacterial protein ArnA is an essential enzyme in the pathway leading to the modification of lipid A with the pentose sugar 4-amino-4-deoxy-L-arabinose. This modification confers resistance to polymyxins, which are antibiotics that are used as a last resort to treat infections with multiple drug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria. ArnA contains two domains with distinct catalytic functions: a dehydrogenase domain and a transformylase domain. The protein forms homohexamers organized as a dimer of trimers. Here, the crystal structure of apo ArnA is presented and compared with its ATP- and UDP-glucuronic acid-bound counterparts. The comparison reveals major structural rearrangements in the dehydrogenase domain that lead to the formation of a previously unobserved binding pocket at the centre of each ArnA trimer in its apo state. In the crystal structure, this pocket is occupied by a DTT molecule. It is shown that formation of the pocket is linked to a cascade of structural rearrangements that emerge from the NAD(+)-binding site. Based on these findings, a small effector molecule is postulated that binds to the central pocket and modulates the catalytic properties of ArnA. Furthermore, the discovered conformational changes provide a mechanistic explanation for the strong cooperative effect recently reported for the ArnA dehydrogenase function.

  18. Structure-guided Development of Specific Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Kinase Inhibitors Targeting the ATP-binding Pocket*

    PubMed Central

    Tso, Shih-Chia; Qi, Xiangbing; Gui, Wen-Jun; Wu, Cheng-Yang; Chuang, Jacinta L.; Wernstedt-Asterholm, Ingrid; Morlock, Lorraine K.; Owens, Kyle R.; Scherer, Philipp E.; Williams, Noelle S.; Tambar, Uttam K.; Wynn, R. Max; Chuang, David T.

    2014-01-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase isoforms (PDKs 1–4) negatively regulate activity of the mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex by reversible phosphorylation. PDK isoforms are up-regulated in obesity, diabetes, heart failure, and cancer and are potential therapeutic targets for these important human diseases. Here, we employed a structure-guided design to convert a known Hsp90 inhibitor to a series of highly specific PDK inhibitors, based on structural conservation in the ATP-binding pocket. The key step involved the substitution of a carbonyl group in the parent compound with a sulfonyl in the PDK inhibitors. The final compound of this series, 2-[(2,4-dihydroxyphenyl)sulfonyl]isoindoline-4,6-diol, designated PS10, inhibits all four PDK isoforms with IC50 = 0.8 μm for PDK2. The administration of PS10 (70 mg/kg) to diet-induced obese mice significantly augments pyruvate dehydrogenase complex activity with reduced phosphorylation in different tissues. Prolonged PS10 treatments result in improved glucose tolerance and notably lessened hepatic steatosis in the mouse model. The results support the pharmacological approach of targeting PDK to control both glucose and fat levels in obesity and type 2 diabetes. PMID:24356970

  19. Structures of BmrR-Drug Complexes Reveal a Rigid Multidrug Binding Pocket And Transcription Activation Through Tyrosine Expulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Newberry, K.J.; Huffman, J.L.; Miller, M.C.; Vazquez-Laslop, N.; Neyfakh, A.A.; Brennan, R.G.

    2009-05-22

    BmrR is a member of the MerR family and a multidrug binding transcription factor that up-regulates the expression of the bmr multidrug efflux transporter gene in response to myriad lipophilic cationic compounds. The structural mechanism by which BmrR binds these chemically and structurally different drugs and subsequently activates transcription is poorly understood. Here, we describe the crystal structures of BmrR bound to rhodamine 6G (R6G) or berberine (Ber) and cognate DNA. These structures reveal each drug stacks against multiple aromatic residues with their positive charges most proximal to the carboxylate group of Glu-253 and that, unlike other multidrug binding pockets, that of BmrR is rigid. Substitution of Glu-253 with either alanine (E253A) or glutamine (E253Q) results in unpredictable binding affinities for R6G, Ber, and tetraphenylphosphonium. Moreover, these drug binding studies reveal that the negative charge of Glu-253 is not important for high affinity binding to Ber and tetraphenylphosphonium but plays a more significant, but unpredictable, role in R6G binding. In vitro transcription data show that E253A and E253Q are constitutively active, and structures of the drug-free E253A-DNA and E253Q-DNA complexes support a transcription activation mechanism requiring the expulsion of Tyr-152 from the multidrug binding pocket. In sum, these data delineate the mechanism by which BmrR binds lipophilic, monovalent cationic compounds and suggest the importance of the redundant negative electrostatic nature of this rigid drug binding pocket that can be used to discriminate against molecules that are not substrates of the Bmr multidrug efflux pump.

  20. Structures of BmrR-drug complexes reveal a rigid multidrug binding pocket and transcription activation through tyrosine expulsion.

    PubMed

    Newberry, Kate J; Huffman, Joy L; Miller, Marshall C; Vazquez-Laslop, Nora; Neyfakh, Alex A; Brennan, Richard G

    2008-09-26

    BmrR is a member of the MerR family and a multidrug binding transcription factor that up-regulates the expression of the bmr multidrug efflux transporter gene in response to myriad lipophilic cationic compounds. The structural mechanism by which BmrR binds these chemically and structurally different drugs and subsequently activates transcription is poorly understood. Here, we describe the crystal structures of BmrR bound to rhodamine 6G (R6G) or berberine (Ber) and cognate DNA. These structures reveal each drug stacks against multiple aromatic residues with their positive charges most proximal to the carboxylate group of Glu-253 and that, unlike other multidrug binding pockets, that of BmrR is rigid. Substitution of Glu-253 with either alanine (E253A) or glutamine (E253Q) results in unpredictable binding affinities for R6G, Ber, and tetraphenylphosphonium. Moreover, these drug binding studies reveal that the negative charge of Glu-253 is not important for high affinity binding to Ber and tetraphenylphosphonium but plays a more significant, but unpredictable, role in R6G binding. In vitro transcription data show that E253A and E253Q are constitutively active, and structures of the drug-free E253A-DNA and E253Q-DNA complexes support a transcription activation mechanism requiring the expulsion of Tyr-152 from the multidrug binding pocket. In sum, these data delineate the mechanism by which BmrR binds lipophilic, monovalent cationic compounds and suggest the importance of the redundant negative electrostatic nature of this rigid drug binding pocket that can be used to discriminate against molecules that are not substrates of the Bmr multidrug efflux pump.

  1. Arabidopsis Acyl-CoA-binding protein ACBP2 interacts with an ethylene-responsive element-binding protein, AtEBP, via its ankyrin repeats.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong-Ye; Chye, Mee-Len

    2004-01-01

    Cytosolic acyl-CoA-binding proteins (ACBP) bind long-chain acyl-CoAs and act as intracellular acyl-CoA transporters and maintain acyl-CoA pools. Arabidopsis thaliana ACBP2 shows conservation at the acyl-CoA-binding domain to cytosolic ACBPs but is distinct by the presence of an N-terminal transmembrane domain and C-terminal ankyrin repeats. The function of the acyl-CoA-binding domain in ACBP2 has been confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis and four conserved residues crucial for palmitoyl-CoA binding have been identified. Results from ACBP2:GFP fusions transiently expressed in onion epidermal cells have demonstrated that the transmembrane domain functions in plasma membrane targeting, suggesting that ACBP2 transfers acyl-CoA esters to this membrane. In this study, we investigated the significance of its ankyrin repeats in mediating protein-protein interactions by yeast two-hybrid analysis and in vitro protein-binding assays; we showed that ACBP2 interacts with the A. thaliana ethylene-responsive element-binding protein AtEBP via its ankyrin repeats. This interaction was lacking in yeast two-hybrid analysis upon removal of the ankyrin repeats. When the subcellular localizations of ACBP2 and AtEBP were further investigated using autofluorescent protein fusions in transient expression by agroinfiltration of tobacco leaves, the DsRed:ACBP2 fusion protein was localized to the plasma membrane while the GFP:AtEBP fusion protein was targeted to the nucleus and plasma membrane. Co-expression of DsRed:ACBP2 and GFP:AtEBP showed a common localization of both proteins at the plasma membrane, suggesting that ACBP2 likely interacts with AtEBP at the plasma membrane.

  2. A Characteristic Back Support Structure in the Bisphenol A-Binding Pocket in the Human Nuclear Receptor ERRγ

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaohui; Matsushima, Ayami; Shimohigashi, Miki; Shimohigashi, Yasuyuki

    2014-01-01

    The endocrine disruptor bisphenol A (BPA) affects various genes and hormones even at merely physiological levels. We recently demonstrated that BPA binds strongly to human nuclear receptor estrogen-related receptor (ERR) γ and that the phenol-A group of BPA is in a receptacle pocket with essential amino acid residues to provide structural support at the backside. This led BPA to bind to ERRγ in an induced-fit-type binding mode, for example, with a rotated motion of Val313 to support the Tyr326-binding site. A similar binding mechanism appears to occur at the binding site of the BPA phenol-B ring. X-ray crystal analysis of the ERRγ-ligand-binding domain/BPA complex suggested that the ERRγ receptor residues Leu342, Leu345, Asn346, and Ile349 function as intrinsic binding sites of the BPA phenol-B, whereas Leu265, Leu268, Ile310, Val313, Leu324, Tyr330, Lys430, Ala431, and His434 work as structural elements to assist these binding sites. In the present study, by evaluating the mutant receptors replaced by a series of amino acids, we demonstrated that a finely assembled structural network indeed exists around the two adjacent Leu342-Asn346 and Leu345-Ile349 ridges on the same α-helix 7 (H7), constructing a part of the binding pocket structure with back support residues for the BPA phenol-B ring. The results reveal that the double-layer binding sites, namely, the ordinary ligand binding sites and their back support residues, substantiate the strong binding of BPA to ERRγ. When ERRγ-Asn346 was replaced by the corresponding Gly and Tyr in ERRα and ERRβ, respectively, the binding affinity of BPA and even 4-hydroxytamxifen (4-OHT) is much reduced. Asn346 was found to be one of the residues that make ERRγ to be exclusive to BPA. PMID:24978476

  3. A characteristic back support structure in the bisphenol A-binding pocket in the human nuclear receptor ERRγ.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaohui; Matsushima, Ayami; Shimohigashi, Miki; Shimohigashi, Yasuyuki

    2014-01-01

    The endocrine disruptor bisphenol A (BPA) affects various genes and hormones even at merely physiological levels. We recently demonstrated that BPA binds strongly to human nuclear receptor estrogen-related receptor (ERR) γ and that the phenol-A group of BPA is in a receptacle pocket with essential amino acid residues to provide structural support at the backside. This led BPA to bind to ERRγ in an induced-fit-type binding mode, for example, with a rotated motion of Val313 to support the Tyr326-binding site. A similar binding mechanism appears to occur at the binding site of the BPA phenol-B ring. X-ray crystal analysis of the ERRγ-ligand-binding domain/BPA complex suggested that the ERRγ receptor residues Leu342, Leu345, Asn346, and Ile349 function as intrinsic binding sites of the BPA phenol-B, whereas Leu265, Leu268, Ile310, Val313, Leu324, Tyr330, Lys430, Ala431, and His434 work as structural elements to assist these binding sites. In the present study, by evaluating the mutant receptors replaced by a series of amino acids, we demonstrated that a finely assembled structural network indeed exists around the two adjacent Leu342-Asn346 and Leu345-Ile349 ridges on the same α-helix 7 (H7), constructing a part of the binding pocket structure with back support residues for the BPA phenol-B ring. The results reveal that the double-layer binding sites, namely, the ordinary ligand binding sites and their back support residues, substantiate the strong binding of BPA to ERRγ. When ERRγ-Asn346 was replaced by the corresponding Gly and Tyr in ERRα and ERRβ, respectively, the binding affinity of BPA and even 4-hydroxytamxifen (4-OHT) is much reduced. Asn346 was found to be one of the residues that make ERRγ to be exclusive to BPA.

  4. Reversal of the Drug Binding Pocket Defects of the AcrB Multidrug Efflux Pump Protein of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Soparkar, Ketaki; Kinana, Alfred D.; Weeks, Jon W.; Morrison, Keith D.; Nikaido, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The AcrB protein of Escherichia coli, together with TolC and AcrA, forms a contiguous envelope conduit for the capture and extrusion of diverse antibiotics and cellular metabolites. In this study, we sought to expand our knowledge of AcrB by conducting genetic and functional analyses. We began with an AcrB mutant bearing an F610A substitution in the drug binding pocket and obtained second-site substitutions that overcame the antibiotic hypersusceptibility phenotype conferred by the F610A mutation. Five of the seven unique single amino acid substitutions—Y49S, V127A, V127G, D153E, and G288C—mapped in the periplasmic porter domain of AcrB, with the D153E and G288C mutations mapping near and at the distal drug binding pocket, respectively. The other two substitutions—F453C and L486W—were mapped to transmembrane (TM) helices 5 and 6, respectively. The nitrocefin efflux kinetics data suggested that all periplasmic suppressors significantly restored nitrocefin binding affinity impaired by the F610A mutation. Surprisingly, despite increasing MICs of tested antibiotics and the efflux of N-phenyl-1-naphthylamine, the TM suppressors did not improve the nitrocefin efflux kinetics. These data suggest that the periplasmic substitutions act by influencing drug binding affinities for the distal binding pocket, whereas the TM substitutions may indirectly affect the conformational dynamics of the drug binding domain. IMPORTANCE The AcrB protein and its homologues confer multidrug resistance in many important human bacterial pathogens. A greater understanding of how these efflux pump proteins function will lead to the development of effective inhibitors against them. The research presented in this paper investigates drug binding pocket mutants of AcrB through the isolation and characterization of intragenic suppressor mutations that overcome the drug susceptibility phenotype of mutations affecting the drug binding pocket. The data reveal a remarkable structure

  5. Access Path to the Ligand Binding Pocket May Play a Role in Xenobiotics Selection by AhR

    PubMed Central

    Szöllősi, Dániel; Erdei, Áron; Gyimesi, Gergely; Magyar, Csaba; Hegedűs, Tamás

    2016-01-01

    Understanding of multidrug binding at the atomic level would facilitate drug design and strategies to modulate drug metabolism, including drug transport, oxidation, and conjugation. Therefore we explored the mechanism of promiscuous binding of small molecules by studying the ligand binding domain, the PAS-B domain of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). Because of the low sequence identities of PAS domains to be used for homology modeling, structural features of the widely employed HIF-2α and a more recent suitable template, CLOCK were compared. These structures were used to build AhR PAS-B homology models. We performed molecular dynamics simulations to characterize dynamic properties of the PAS-B domain and the generated conformational ensembles were employed in in silico docking. In order to understand structural and ligand binding features we compared the stability and dynamics of the promiscuous AhR PAS-B to other PAS domains exhibiting specific interactions or no ligand binding function. Our exhaustive in silico binding studies, in which we dock a wide spectrum of ligand molecules to the conformational ensembles, suggest that ligand specificity and selection may be determined not only by the PAS-B domain itself, but also by other parts of AhR and its protein interacting partners. We propose that ligand binding pocket and access channels leading to the pocket play equally important roles in discrimination of endogenous molecules and xenobiotics. PMID:26727491

  6. Assembly-directed antivirals differentially bind quasiequivalent pockets to modify hepatitis B virus capsid tertiary and quaternary structure.

    PubMed

    Katen, Sarah P; Tan, Zhenning; Chirapu, Srinivas Reddy; Finn, M G; Zlotnick, Adam

    2013-08-06

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a major cause of liver disease. Assembly of the HBV capsid is a critical step in virus production and an attractive target for new antiviral therapies. We determined the structure of HBV capsid in complex with AT-130, a member of the phenylpropenamide family of assembly effectors. AT-130 causes tertiary and quaternary structural changes but does not disrupt capsid structure. AT-130 binds a hydrophobic pocket that also accommodates the previously characterized heteroaryldihydropyrimidine compounds but favors a unique quasiequivalent location on the capsid surface. Thus, this pocket is a promiscuous drug-binding site and a likely target for different assembly effectors with a broad range of mechanisms of activity. That AT-130 successfully decreases virus production by increasing capsid assembly rate without disrupting capsid structure delineates a paradigm in antiviral design, that disrupting reaction timing is a viable strategy for assembly effectors of HBV and other viruses.

  7. Tertiary structure of human alpha1-acid glycoprotein (orosomucoid). Straightforward fluorescence experiments revealing the presence of a binding pocket.

    PubMed

    Albani, Jihad R

    2004-02-25

    Binding of hemin to alpha1-acid glycoprotein has been investigated. Hemin binds to the hydrophobic pocket of hemoproteins. The fluorescent probe 2-(p-toluidino)-6-naphthalenesulfonate (TNS) binds to a hydrophobic domain in alpha1-acid glycoprotein with a dissociation constant equal to 60 microM. Addition of hemin to an alpha1-acid glycoprotein-TNS complex induces the displacement of TNS from its binding site. At saturation (1 hemin for 1 protein) all the TNS has been displaced from its binding site. The dissociation constant of hemin-alpha1-acid glycoprotein was found equal to 2 microM. Thus, TNS and hemin bind to the same hydrophobic site: the pocket of alpha1-acid glycoprotein. Energy-transfer studies performed between the Trp residues of alpha1-acid glycoprotein and hemin indicated that efficiency (E) of Trp fluorescence quenching was equal to 80% and the Förster distance, R0 at which the efficiency of energy transfer is 50% was calculated to be 26 A, revealing a very high energy transfer.

  8. Critical Role of the Secondary Binding Pocket in Modulating the Enzymatic Activity of DUSP5 toward Phosphorylated ERKs.

    PubMed

    Talipov, Marat R; Nayak, Jaladhi; Lepley, Michael; Bongard, Robert D; Sem, Daniel S; Ramchandran, Ramani; Rathore, Rajendra

    2016-11-08

    DUSP5 is an inducible nuclear dual-specificity phosphatase that specifically interacts with and deactivates extracellular signal-regulated kinases ERK1 and ERK2, which are responsible for cell proliferation, differentiation, and survival. The phosphatase domain (PD) of DUSP5 has unique structural features absent from other nuclear DUSPs, such as the presence of a secondary anion-binding site in the proximity of the reaction center and a glutamic acid E264 positioned next to the catalytic cysteine C263, as well as a remote intramolecular disulfide linkage. The overall 400 ns molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the secondary binding site of DUSP5 PD acts as an allosteric regulator of the phosphatase activity of DUSP5. Our studies have identified E264 as a critical constituent of the dual binding pocket, which regulates the catalytic activity of DUSP5 by forming a salt bridge with arginine R269. Molecular dynamics studies showed that initial occupation of the secondary binding pocket leads to the breakage of the salt bridge, which then allows the occupation of the active site. Indeed, biochemical analysis using the pERK assay on mutant E264Q demonstrated that mutation of glutamic acid E264 leads to an increase in the DUSP5 catalytic activity. The role of the secondary binding site in assembling the DUSP5-pERK pre-reactive complex was further demonstrated by molecular dynamics simulations that showed that the remote C197-C219 disulfide linkage controls the structure of the secondary binding pocket based on its redox state (i.e., disulfide/dithiol) and, in turn, the enzymatic activity of DUSP5.

  9. Phosphate-binding pocket in Dicer-2 PAZ domain for high-fidelity siRNA production.

    PubMed

    Kandasamy, Suresh K; Fukunaga, Ryuya

    2016-12-06

    The enzyme Dicer produces small silencing RNAs such as micro-RNAs (miRNAs) and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs). In Drosophila, Dicer-1 produces ∼22-24-nt miRNAs from pre-miRNAs, whereas Dicer-2 makes 21-nt siRNAs from long double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs). How Dicer-2 precisely makes 21-nt siRNAs with a remarkably high fidelity is unknown. Here we report that recognition of the 5'-monophosphate of a long dsRNA substrate by a phosphate-binding pocket in the Dicer-2 PAZ (Piwi, Argonaute, and Zwille/Pinhead) domain is crucial for the length fidelity, but not the efficiency, in 21-nt siRNA production. Loss of the length fidelity, meaning increased length heterogeneity of siRNAs, caused by point mutations in the phosphate-binding pocket of the Dicer-2 PAZ domain decreased RNA silencing activity in vivo, showing the importance of the high fidelity to make 21-nt siRNAs. We propose that the 5'-monophosphate of a long dsRNA substrate is anchored by the phosphate-binding pocket in the Dicer-2 PAZ domain and the distance between the pocket and the RNA cleavage active site in the RNaseIII domain corresponds to the 21-nt pitch in the A-form duplex of a long dsRNA substrate, resulting in high-fidelity 21-nt siRNA production. This study sheds light on the molecular mechanism by which Dicer-2 produces 21-nt siRNAs with a remarkably high fidelity for efficient RNA silencing.

  10. Molecular properties of the class III subfamily of acyl-coenyzme A binding proteins from tung tree (Vernicia fordii)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Acyl-CoA binding proteins (ACBPs) have been identified in most branches of life. A single prototypical ACBP was first discovered in yeast, and was found to play a signficant role in lipid metabolism, among other functions. Plants also contain the prototype small, soluble ACBP, but have also evolve...

  11. Identification of transmembrane domain 6 & 7 residues that contribute to the binding pocket of the urotensin II receptor.

    PubMed

    Holleran, Brian J; Domazet, Ivana; Beaulieu, Marie-Eve; Yan, Li Ping; Guillemette, Gaétan; Lavigne, Pierre; Escher, Emanuel; Leduc, Richard

    2009-04-15

    Urotensin II (U-II), a cyclic undecapeptide, is the natural ligand of the urotensin II (UT) receptor, a G protein-coupled receptor. In the present study, we used the substituted-cysteine accessibility method to identify specific residues in transmembrane domains (TMDs) six and seven of the rat urotensin II receptor (rUT) that contribute to the formation of the binding pocket of the receptor. Each residue in the R256(6.32)-Q283(6.59) fragment of TMD6 and the A295(7.31)-T321(7.57) fragment of TMD7 was mutated, individually, to a cysteine. The resulting mutants were expressed in COS-7 cells, which were subsequently treated with the positively charged methanethiosulfonate-ethylammonium (MTSEA) or the negatively charged methanethiosulfonate-ethylsulfonate (MTSES) sulfhydryl-specific alkylating agents. MTSEA treatment resulted in a significant reduction in the binding of TMD6 mutants F268C(6.44) and W278C(6.54) and TMD7 mutants L298C(7.34), T302C(7.38), and T303C(7.39) to (125)I-U-II. MTSES treatment resulted in a significant reduction in the binding of two additional mutants, namely L282C(6.58) in TMD6 and Y300C(7.36) in TMD7. These results suggest that specific residues orient themselves within the water-accessible binding pocket of the rUT receptor. This approach, which allowed us to identify key determinants in TMD6 and TMD7 that contribute to the UT receptor binding pocket, enabled us to further refine our homology-based model of how U-II interacts with its cognate receptor.

  12. A hydrophobic loop in acyl-CoA binding protein is functionally important for binding to palmitoyl-coenzyme A: a molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Vallejo, Diego F G; Grigera, J Raúl; Costabel, Marcelo D

    2008-04-01

    Acyl-CoA binding protein (ACBP) plays a key role in lipid metabolism, interacting via a partly unknown mechanism with high affinity with long chain fatty acyl-CoAs (LCFA-CoAs). At present there is no study of the microscopic way ligand binding is accomplished. We analyzed this process by molecular dynamics (MDs) simulations. We proposed a computational model of ligand, able to reproduce some evidence from nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) data, quantitative time resolved fluorometry and X-ray crystallography. We found that a hydrophobic loop, not in the active site, is important for function. Besides, multiple sequence alignment shows hydrophobicity (and not the residues itselves) conservation.

  13. Production of a Brassica napus Low-Molecular Mass Acyl-Coenzyme A-Binding Protein in Arabidopsis Alters the Acyl-Coenzyme A Pool and Acyl Composition of Oil in Seeds1[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Yurchenko, Olga; Singer, Stacy D.; Nykiforuk, Cory L.; Gidda, Satinder; Mullen, Robert T.; Moloney, Maurice M.; Weselake, Randall J.

    2014-01-01

    Low-molecular mass (10 kD) cytosolic acyl-coenzyme A-binding protein (ACBP) has a substantial influence over fatty acid (FA) composition in oilseeds, possibly via an effect on the partitioning of acyl groups between elongation and desaturation pathways. Previously, we demonstrated that the expression of a Brassica napus ACBP (BnACBP) complementary DNA in the developing seeds of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) resulted in increased levels of polyunsaturated FAs at the expense of eicosenoic acid (20:1cisΔ11) and saturated FAs in seed oil. In this study, we investigated whether alterations in the FA composition of seed oil at maturity were correlated with changes in the acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) pool in developing seeds of transgenic Arabidopsis expressing BnACBP. Our results indicated that both the acyl-CoA pool and seed oil of transgenic Arabidopsis lines expressing cytosolic BnACBP exhibited relative increases in linoleic acid (18:2cisΔ9,12; 17.9%–44.4% and 7%–13.2%, respectively) and decreases in 20:1cisΔ11 (38.7%–60.7% and 13.8%–16.3%, respectively). However, alterations in the FA composition of the acyl-CoA pool did not always correlate with those seen in the seed oil. In addition, we found that targeting of BnACBP to the endoplasmic reticulum resulted in FA compositional changes that were similar to those seen in lines expressing cytosolic BnACBP, with the most prominent exception being a relative reduction in α-linolenic acid (18:3cisΔ9,12,15) in both the acyl-CoA pool and seed oil of the former (48.4%–48.9% and 5.3%–10.4%, respectively). Overall, these data support the role of ACBP in acyl trafficking in developing seeds and validate its use as a biotechnological tool for modifying the FA composition of seed oil. PMID:24740000

  14. Structure and function of Plasmodium falciparum malate dehydrogenase: role of critical amino acids in co-substrate binding pocket.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Anupam; Tripathi, Abhai K; Desai, Prashant V; Mukherjee, Prasenjit K; Avery, Mitchell A; Walker, Larry A; Tekwani, Babu L

    2009-01-01

    The malaria parasite thrives on anaerobic fermentation of glucose for energy. Earlier studies from our laboratory have demonstrated that a cytosolic malate dehydrogenase (PfMDH) with striking similarity to lactate dehydrogenase (PfLDH) might complement PfLDH function in Plasmodium falciparum. The N-terminal glycine motif, which forms a characteristic Rossman dinucleotide-binding fold in the co-substrate binding pocket, differentiates PfMDH (GlyXGlyXXGly) from other eukaryotic and prokaryotic malate dehydrogenases (GlyXXGlyXXGly). The amino acids lining the co-substrate binding pocket are completely conserved in MDHs from different species of human, primate and rodent malaria parasites. Based on this knowledge and conserved domains among prokaryotic and eukaryotic MDH, the role of critical amino acids lining the co-substrate binding pocket was analyzed in catalytic functions of PfMDH using site-directed mutagenesis. Insertion of Ala at the 9th or 10th position, which converts the N-terminal GlyXGlyXXGly motif (characteristic of malarial MDH and LDH) to GlyXXGlyXXGly (as in bacterial and eukaryotic MDH), uncoupled regulation of the enzyme through substrate inhibition. The dinucleotide fold GlyXGlyXXGly motif seems not to be responsible for the distinct affinity of PfMDH to 3-acetylpyridine-adenine dinucleotide (APAD, a synthetic analog of NAD), since Ala9 and Ala10 insertion mutants still utilized APADH. The Gln11Met mutation, which converts the signature glycine motif in PfMDH to that of PfLDH, did not change the enzyme function. However, the Gln11Gly mutant showed approximately a 5-fold increase in catalytic activity, and higher susceptibility to inhibition with gossypol. Asn119 and His174 participate in binding of both co-substrate and substrate. The Asn119Gly mutant exhibited approximately a 3-fold decrease in catalytic efficiency, while mutation of His174 to Asn or Ala resulted in an inactive enzyme. These studies provide critical insights into the co

  15. A conserved flagellar pocket exposed high mannose moiety is used by African trypanosomes as a host cytokine binding molecule.

    PubMed

    Magez, S; Radwanska, M; Stijlemans, B; Xong, H V; Pays, E; De Baetselier, P

    2001-09-07

    Trypanosomes use antigenic variation of their variant-specific surface glycoprotein (VSG) coat as defense against the host immune system. However, in order to sustain their growth, they need to expose conserved epitopes, allowing host macromolecule binding and receptor-mediated endocytosis. Here we show that Trypanosoma brucei uses the conserved chitobiose-oligomannose (GlcNAc(2)-Man(5-9)) moieties of its VSG as a binding ligand for tumor necrosis factor (TNF), a host cytokine with lectin-like properties. As endocytosis in trypanosomes is restricted to the flagellar pocket, we show that soluble flagellar pocket extracts, and in particular soluble VSG, inhibit the binding of (125)I-TNF to trypanosomes. The interaction between TNF and VSG is confirmed by affinity chromatography, biosensor, and dot-blot affinity measurements, and soluble VSG inhibition of TNF-mediated trypanolysis. In all approaches, removal of N-linked carbohydrates abrogates the TNF-VSG interaction. In addition, synthetic high mannose oligosaccharides can block TNF-VSG interactions, and a VSG glycopeptide carrying the GlcNAc(2)-Man(5-9) moiety is shown to inhibit TNF-mediated trypanosome killing in mixed parasite/macrophage cell cultures. Together, these results support the observation that TNF plays a role in growth control of trypanosomes and, moreover, suggest that, by the use of conserved VSG carbohydrates as lectin-binding epitopes, trypanosomes can limit the necessity to express large numbers of invariant surface exposed receptors.

  16. The structure of the SBP-Tag–streptavidin complex reveals a novel helical scaffold bridging binding pockets on separate subunits

    SciTech Connect

    Barrette-Ng, Isabelle H.; Wu, Sau-Ching; Tjia, Wai-Mui; Wong, Sui-Lam; Ng, Kenneth K. S.

    2013-05-01

    The structure of the SBP-Tag–streptavidin complex reveals a novel mode of peptide recognition in which a single peptide binds simultaneously to biotin-binding pockets from adjacent subunits of streptavidin. The molecular details of peptide recognition suggest how the SBP-Tag can be further modified to become an even more useful tag for a wider range of biotechnological applications. The 38-residue SBP-Tag binds to streptavidin more tightly (K{sub d} ≃ 2.5–4.9 nM) than most if not all other known peptide sequences. Crystallographic analysis at 1.75 Å resolution shows that the SBP-Tag binds to streptavidin in an unprecedented manner by simultaneously interacting with biotin-binding pockets from two separate subunits. An N-terminal HVV peptide sequence (residues 12–14) and a C-terminal HPQ sequence (residues 31–33) form the bulk of the direct interactions between the SBP-Tag and the two biotin-binding pockets. Surprisingly, most of the peptide spanning these two sites (residues 17–28) adopts a regular α-helical structure that projects three leucine side chains into a groove formed at the interface between two streptavidin protomers. The crystal structure shows that residues 1–10 and 35–38 of the original SBP-Tag identified through in vitro selection and deletion analysis do not appear to contact streptavidin and thus may not be important for binding. A 25-residue peptide comprising residues 11–34 (SBP-Tag2) was synthesized and shown using surface plasmon resonance to bind streptavidin with very similar affinity and kinetics when compared with the SBP-Tag. The SBP-Tag2 was also added to the C-terminus of β-lactamase and was shown to be just as effective as the full-length SBP-Tag in affinity purification. These results validate the molecular structure of the SBP-Tag–streptavidin complex and establish a minimal bivalent streptavidin-binding tag from which further rational design and optimization can proceed.

  17. Binding-pocket and lid-region substitutions render human STING sensitive to the species-specific drug DMXAA.

    PubMed

    Gao, Pu; Zillinger, Thomas; Wang, Weiyi; Ascano, Manuel; Dai, Peihong; Hartmann, Gunther; Tuschl, Thomas; Deng, Liang; Barchet, Winfried; Patel, Dinshaw J

    2014-09-25

    The drug DMXAA (5,6-dimethylxanthenone-4-acetic acid) showed therapeutic promise against solid tumors in mouse models but subsequently failed in human clinical trials. DMXAA was later discovered to activate mouse, but not human, STING, an adaptor protein in the cyclic dinucleotide cGAMP-mediated signaling pathway, inducing type I interferon expression. To facilitate the development of compounds that target human STING, we combined structural, biophysical, and cellular assays to study mouse and human chimeric proteins and their interaction with DMXAA. We identified a single substitution (G230I) that enables a DMXAA-induced conformational transition of hSTING from an inactive "open" to an active "closed" state. We also identified a substitution within the binding pocket (Q266I) that cooperates with G230I and the previously identified S162A binding-pocket point substitution, rendering hSTING highly sensitive to DMXAA. These findings should facilitate the reciprocal engineering of DMXAA analogs that bind and stimulate wild-type hSTING and their exploitation for vaccine-adjuvant and anticancer drug development.

  18. Computational fragment-based drug design to explore the hydrophobic sub-pocket of the mitotic kinesin Eg5 allosteric binding site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oguievetskaia, Ksenia; Martin-Chanas, Laetitia; Vorotyntsev, Artem; Doppelt-Azeroual, Olivia; Brotel, Xavier; Adcock, Stewart A.; de Brevern, Alexandre G.; Delfaud, Francois; Moriaud, Fabrice

    2009-08-01

    Eg5, a mitotic kinesin exclusively involved in the formation and function of the mitotic spindle has attracted interest as an anticancer drug target. Eg5 is co-crystallized with several inhibitors bound to its allosteric binding pocket. Each of these occupies a pocket formed by loop 5/helix α2 (L5/α2). Recently designed inhibitors additionally occupy a hydrophobic pocket of this site. The goal of the present study was to explore this hydrophobic pocket with our MED-SuMo fragment-based protocol, and thus discover novel chemical structures that might bind as inhibitors. The MED-SuMo software is able to compare and superimpose similar interaction surfaces upon the whole protein data bank (PDB). In a fragment-based protocol, MED-SuMo retrieves MED-Portions that encode protein-fragment binding sites and are derived from cross-mining protein-ligand structures with libraries of small molecules. Furthermore we have excluded intra-family MED-Portions derived from Eg5 ligands that occupy the hydrophobic pocket and predicted new potential ligands by hybridization that would fill simultaneously both pockets. Some of the latter having original scaffolds and substituents in the hydrophobic pocket are identified in libraries of synthetically accessible molecules by the MED-Search software.

  19. Lipid membranes and acyl-CoA esters promote opposing effects on acyl-CoA binding protein structure and stability.

    PubMed

    Micheletto, Mariana C; Mendes, Luís F S; Basso, Luis G M; Fonseca, Raquel G; Costa-Filho, Antonio J

    2017-04-05

    Acyl-CoA Binding Proteins (ACBP) form a housekeeping family of proteins that is responsible for the buffering of long chain acyl-coenzyme A esters (LCFA-CoA) inside the cell. Even though numerous studies have focused on the characterization of different members of the ACBP family, the knowledge about the impact of both LCFA-CoA and phospholipids on ACBP structure and stability remains scarce. Besides, there are still controversies regarding the possible interaction of ACBP with biological membranes, even though this might be essential for the cargo capture and delivery. In this study, we observed that LCFA-CoA and phospholipids play opposite roles on protein stability and that the interaction with the membrane is dictated by electrostatic interaction. Furthermore, the results support the hypothesis that the LCFA-CoA delivery is driven by the increase of the negative charge on the membrane surface. The combined influence played by the different molecules on ACBP structure is discussed on the light of cargo capture/delivery giving new insights about this important process.

  20. Structure of Liver Receptor Homolog-1 (NR5A2) with PIP3 hormone bound in the ligand binding pocket.

    PubMed

    Sablin, Elena P; Blind, Raymond D; Uthayaruban, Rubatharshini; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Deacon, Ashley M; Das, Debanu; Ingraham, Holly A; Fletterick, Robert J

    2015-12-01

    The nuclear receptor LRH-1 (Liver Receptor Homolog-1, NR5A2) is a transcription factor that regulates gene expression programs critical for many aspects of metabolism and reproduction. Although LRH-1 is able to bind phospholipids, it is still considered an orphan nuclear receptor (NR) with an unknown regulatory hormone. Our prior cellular and structural studies demonstrated that the signaling phosphatidylinositols PI(4,5)P2 (PIP2) and PI(3,4,5)P3 (PIP3) bind and regulate SF-1 (Steroidogenic Factor-1, NR5A1), a close homolog of LRH-1. Here, we describe the crystal structure of human LRH-1 ligand binding domain (LBD) bound by PIP3 - the first phospholipid with a head group endogenous to mammals. We show that the phospholipid hormone binds LRH-1 with high affinity, stabilizing the receptor LBD. While the hydrophobic PIP3 tails (C16/C16) are buried inside the LRH-1 ligand binding pocket, the negatively charged PIP3 head group is presented on the receptor surface, similar to the phosphatidylinositol binding mode observed in the PIP3-SF-1 structure. Thus, data presented in this work reinforce our earlier findings demonstrating that signaling phosphatidylinositols regulate the NR5A receptors LRH-1 and SF-1.

  1. Acyl CoA Binding Proteins are Required for Cuticle Formation and Plant Responses to Microbes.

    PubMed

    Xia, Ye; Yu, Keshun; Gao, Qing-Ming; Wilson, Ella V; Navarre, Duroy; Kachroo, Pradeep; Kachroo, Aardra

    2012-01-01

    Fatty acids (FA) and lipids are well known regulators of plant defense. Our previous studies have shown that components of prokaryotic (plastidal) FA biosynthesis pathway regulate various aspects of plant defense. Here, we investigated the defense related roles of the soluble acyl CoA binding proteins (ACBPs), which are thought to facilitate the intracellular transport of FA/lipids. We show that ACBP3 and 4 are required for maintaining normal lipid levels and that ACBP3 contributes to the lipid flux between the prokaryotic and eukaryotic pathways. We also show that loss of ACBP3, 4, or 6 impair normal development of the cuticle and affect both basal and resistance protein-mediated defense against bacterial and fungal pathogens. Loss of ACBP3, 4, or 6 also inhibits the induction of systemic acquired resistance (SAR) due to the plants inability to generate SAR inducing signal(s). Together, these data show that ACBP3, ACBP4, and ACBP6 are required for cuticle development as well as defense against microbial pathogens.

  2. eMatchSite: Sequence Order-Independent Structure Alignments of Ligand Binding Pockets in Protein Models

    PubMed Central

    Brylinski, Michal

    2014-01-01

    Detecting similarities between ligand binding sites in the absence of global homology between target proteins has been recognized as one of the critical components of modern drug discovery. Local binding site alignments can be constructed using sequence order-independent techniques, however, to achieve a high accuracy, many current algorithms for binding site comparison require high-quality experimental protein structures, preferably in the bound conformational state. This, in turn, complicates proteome scale applications, where only various quality structure models are available for the majority of gene products. To improve the state-of-the-art, we developed eMatchSite, a new method for constructing sequence order-independent alignments of ligand binding sites in protein models. Large-scale benchmarking calculations using adenine-binding pockets in crystal structures demonstrate that eMatchSite generates accurate alignments for almost three times more protein pairs than SOIPPA. More importantly, eMatchSite offers a high tolerance to structural distortions in ligand binding regions in protein models. For example, the percentage of correctly aligned pairs of adenine-binding sites in weakly homologous protein models is only 4–9% lower than those aligned using crystal structures. This represents a significant improvement over other algorithms, e.g. the performance of eMatchSite in recognizing similar binding sites is 6% and 13% higher than that of SiteEngine using high- and moderate-quality protein models, respectively. Constructing biologically correct alignments using predicted ligand binding sites in protein models opens up the possibility to investigate drug-protein interaction networks for complete proteomes with prospective systems-level applications in polypharmacology and rational drug repositioning. eMatchSite is freely available to the academic community as a web-server and a stand-alone software distribution at http://www.brylinski.org/ematchsite. PMID

  3. Light-regulated Arabidopsis ACBP4 and ACBP5 encode cytosolic acyl-CoA-binding proteins that bind phosphatidylcholine and oleoyl-CoA ester.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Shi; Chen, Qin-Fang; Chye, Mee-Len

    2009-10-01

    In Arabidopsis thaliana, six genes encode acyl-CoA-binding proteins (ACBPs) that show conservation of an acyl-CoA-binding domain. These ACBPs display varying affinities for acyl-CoA esters, suggesting of different cellular roles. We have recently reported that three members (ACBP4, ACBP5 and ACBP6) are subcellularly localized to the cytosol by biochemical fractionation, confocal microscopy of transgenic Arabidopsis expressing autofluorescence-tagged fusions and immuno-electron microscopy using ACBP-specific antibodies. In this study, we observed by Northern blot analysis that ACBP4 and ACBP5 mRNAs in rosettes were up-regulated by light and dampened-off in darkness, mimicking FAD7 which encodes omega-3-fatty acid desaturase, an enzyme involved in plastidial lipid metabolism. Results from in vitro binding assays indicate that recombinant ACBP4 and ACBP5 proteins bind [(14)C]oleoyl-CoA esters better than recombinant ACBP6, suggesting that light-regulated ACBP4 and ACBP5 encode cytosolic ACBPs that are potential candidates for the intracellular transport of oleoyl-CoA ester exported from the chloroplast to the endoplasmic reticulum for the biosynthesis of non-plastidial membrane lipids. Nonetheless, His-tagged ACBP4 and ACBP5 resemble ACBP6 in their ability to bind phosphatidylcholine suggesting that all three ACBPs are available for the intracellular transfer of phosphatidylcholine.

  4. A 5′ cytosine binding pocket in Puf3p specifies regulation of mitochondrial mRNAs

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Deyu; Stumpf, Craig R.; Krahn, Joseph M.; Wickens, Marvin; Tanaka Hall, Traci M.

    2010-11-03

    A single regulatory protein can control the fate of many mRNAs with related functions. The Puf3 protein of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is exemplary, as it binds and regulates more than 100 mRNAs that encode proteins with mitochondrial function. Here we elucidate the structural basis of that specificity. To do so, we explore the crystal structures of Puf3p complexes with 2 cognate RNAs. The key determinant of Puf3p specificity is an unusual interaction between a distinctive pocket of the protein with an RNA base outside the 'core' PUF-binding site. That interaction dramatically affects binding affinity in vitro and is required for regulation in vivo. The Puf3p structures, combined with those of Puf4p in the same organism, illuminate the structural basis of natural PUF-RNA networks. Yeast Puf3p binds its own RNAs because they possess a -2C and is excluded from those of Puf4p which contain an additional nucleotide in the core-binding site.

  5. Binding to large enzyme pockets: small-molecule inhibitors of trypanothione reductase.

    PubMed

    Persch, Elke; Bryson, Steve; Todoroff, Nickolay K; Eberle, Christian; Thelemann, Jonas; Dirdjaja, Natalie; Kaiser, Marcel; Weber, Maria; Derbani, Hassan; Brun, Reto; Schneider, Gisbert; Pai, Emil F; Krauth-Siegel, R Luise; Diederich, François

    2014-08-01

    The causative agents of the parasitic disease human African trypanosomiasis belong to the family of trypanosomatids. These parasitic protozoa exhibit a unique thiol redox metabolism that is based on the flavoenzyme trypanothione reductase (TR). TR was identified as a potential drug target and features a large active site that allows a multitude of possible ligand orientations, which renders rational structure-based inhibitor design highly challenging. Herein we describe the synthesis, binding properties, and kinetic analysis of a new series of small-molecule inhibitors of TR. The conjunction of biological activities, mutation studies, and virtual ligand docking simulations led to the prediction of a binding mode that was confirmed by crystal structure analysis. The crystal structures revealed that the ligands bind to the hydrophobic wall of the so-called "mepacrine binding site". The binding conformation and potency of the inhibitors varied for TR from Trypanosoma brucei and T. cruzi.

  6. Arabidopsis membrane-associated acyl-CoA-binding protein ACBP1 is involved in stem cuticle formation

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Yan; Xiao, Shi; Kim, Juyoung; Lung, Shiu-Cheung; Chen, Liang; Tanner, Julian A.; Suh, Mi Chung; Chye, Mee-Len

    2014-01-01

    The membrane-anchored Arabidopsis thaliana ACYL-COA-BINDING PROTEIN1 (AtACBP1) plays important roles in embryogenesis and abiotic stress responses, and interacts with long-chain (LC) acyl-CoA esters. Here, AtACBP1 function in stem cuticle formation was investigated. Transgenic Arabidopsis transformed with an AtACBP1pro::GUS construct revealed β-glucuronidase (GUS) expression on the stem (but not leaf) surface, suggesting a specific role in stem cuticle formation. Isothermal titration calorimetry results revealed that (His)6-tagged recombinant AtACBP1 interacts with LC acyl-CoA esters (18:1-, 18:2-, and 18:3-CoAs) and very-long-chain (VLC) acyl-CoA esters (24:0-, 25:0-, and 26:0-CoAs). VLC fatty acids have been previously demonstrated to act as precursors in wax biosynthesis. Gas chromatography (GC)–flame ionization detector (FID) and GC–mass spectrometry (MS) analyses revealed that an acbp1 mutant showed a reduction in stem and leaf cuticular wax and stem cutin monomer composition in comparison with the wild type (Col-0). Consequently, the acbp1 mutant showed fewer wax crystals on the stem surface in scanning electron microscopy and an irregular stem cuticle layer in transmission electron microscopy in comparison with the wild type. Also, the mutant stems consistently showed a decline in expression of cuticular wax and cutin biosynthetic genes in comparison with the wild type, and the mutant leaves were more susceptible to infection by the necrotrophic pathogen Botrytis cinerea. Taken together, these findings suggest that AtACBP1 participates in Arabidopsis stem cuticle formation by trafficking VLC acyl-CoAs. PMID:25053648

  7. Arabidopsis membrane-associated acyl-CoA-binding protein ACBP1 is involved in stem cuticle formation.

    PubMed

    Xue, Yan; Xiao, Shi; Kim, Juyoung; Lung, Shiu-Cheung; Chen, Liang; Tanner, Julian A; Suh, Mi Chung; Chye, Mee-Len

    2014-10-01

    The membrane-anchored Arabidopsis thaliana ACYL-COA-BINDING PROTEIN1 (AtACBP1) plays important roles in embryogenesis and abiotic stress responses, and interacts with long-chain (LC) acyl-CoA esters. Here, AtACBP1 function in stem cuticle formation was investigated. Transgenic Arabidopsis transformed with an AtACBP1pro::GUS construct revealed β-glucuronidase (GUS) expression on the stem (but not leaf) surface, suggesting a specific role in stem cuticle formation. Isothermal titration calorimetry results revealed that (His)6-tagged recombinant AtACBP1 interacts with LC acyl-CoA esters (18:1-, 18:2-, and 18:3-CoAs) and very-long-chain (VLC) acyl-CoA esters (24:0-, 25:0-, and 26:0-CoAs). VLC fatty acids have been previously demonstrated to act as precursors in wax biosynthesis. Gas chromatography (GC)-flame ionization detector (FID) and GC-mass spectrometry (MS) analyses revealed that an acbp1 mutant showed a reduction in stem and leaf cuticular wax and stem cutin monomer composition in comparison with the wild type (Col-0). Consequently, the acbp1 mutant showed fewer wax crystals on the stem surface in scanning electron microscopy and an irregular stem cuticle layer in transmission electron microscopy in comparison with the wild type. Also, the mutant stems consistently showed a decline in expression of cuticular wax and cutin biosynthetic genes in comparison with the wild type, and the mutant leaves were more susceptible to infection by the necrotrophic pathogen Botrytis cinerea. Taken together, these findings suggest that AtACBP1 participates in Arabidopsis stem cuticle formation by trafficking VLC acyl-CoAs.

  8. Analysis of transient and catalytic desosamine-binding pockets in cytochrome P-450 PikC from Streptomyces venezuelae.

    PubMed

    Li, Shengying; Ouellet, Hugues; Sherman, David H; Podust, Larissa M

    2009-02-27

    The cytochrome P-450 PikC from Streptomyces venezuelae exhibits significant substrate tolerance and performs multiple hydroxylation reactions on structurally variant macrolides bearing the deoxyamino sugar desosamine. In previously determined co-crystal structures (Sherman, D. H., Li, S., Yermalitskaya, L. V., Kim, Y., Smith, J. A., Waterman, M. R., and Podust, L. M. (2006) J. Biol. Chem. 281, 26289-26297), the desosamine moiety of the native substrates YC-17 and narbomycin is bound in two distinct buried and surface-exposed binding pockets, mediated by specific interactions between the protonated dimethylamino group and the acidic amino acid residues Asp(50), Glu(85), and Glu(94). Although the Glu(85) and Glu(94) negative charges are essential for maximal catalytic activity of native enzyme, elimination of the surface-exposed negative charge at Asp(50) results in significantly enhanced catalytic activity. Nevertheless, the D50N substitution could not rescue catalytic activity of PikC(E94Q) based on lack of activity in the corresponding double mutant PikC(D50N/E94Q). To address the specific role for each desosamine-binding pocket, we analyzed the x-ray structures of the PikC(D50N) mutant co-crystallized with narbomycin (1.85A resolution) and YC-17 (3.2A resolution). In PikC(D50N), the desosamine moiety of both YC-17 and narbomycin was bound in a catalytically productive "buried site." This finding suggested a two-step substrate binding mechanism, whereby desosamine is recognized in the two subsites to allow the macrolide substrate to sequentially progress toward a catalytically favorable orientation. Collectively, the binding, mutagenesis, kinetic, and x-ray structural data suggest that enhancement of the catalytic activity of PikC(D50N) is due to the facilitated relocation of substrate to the buried site, which has higher binding affinity, as opposed to dissociation in solution from the transient "surface-exposed site."

  9. ATP-Binding Pocket-Targeted Suppression of Src and Syk by Luteolin Contributes to Its Anti-Inflammatory Action

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeong-Oog; Jeong, Deok; Kim, Mi-Yeon; Cho, Jae Youl

    2015-01-01

    Luteolin is a flavonoid identified as a major anti-inflammatory component of Artemisia asiatica. Numerous reports have demonstrated the ability of luteolin to suppress inflammation in a variety of inflammatory conditions. However, its exact anti-inflammatory mechanism has not been fully elucidated. In the present study, the anti-inflammatory mode of action in activated macrophages of luteolin from Artemisia asiatica was examined by employing immunoblotting analysis, a luciferase reporter gene assay, enzyme assays, and an overexpression strategy. Luteolin dose-dependently inhibited the secretion of nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and diminished the levels of mRNA transcripts of inducible NO synthase (iNOS), tumor necrosis factor- (TNF-) α, and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) and pam3CSK-treated macrophage-like RAW264.7 cells without displaying cytotoxicity. Luteolin displayed potent NO-inhibitory activity and also suppressed the nuclear translocation of NF-κB (p65 and p50) via blockade of Src and Syk, but not other mitogen-activated kinases. Overexpression of wild type Src and point mutants thereof, and molecular modelling studies, suggest that the ATP-binding pocket may be the luteolin-binding site in Src. These results strongly suggest that luteolin may exert its anti-inflammatory action by suppressing the NF-κB signaling cascade via blockade of ATP binding in Src and Syk. PMID:26236111

  10. Remodeling of host phosphatidylcholine by Chlamydia acyltransferase is regulated by acyl-CoA binding protein ACBD6 associated with lipid droplets

    PubMed Central

    Soupene, Eric; Wang, Derek; Kuypers, Frans A

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial human pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis invades cells as an infectious elementary body (EB). The EB is internalized into a vacuole that is hidden from the host defense mechanism, and is modified to sustain the development of the replicative reticulate body (RB). Inside this parasitophorous compartment, called the inclusion, the pathogen survives supported by an active exchange of nutrients and proteins with the host cell. We show that host lipids are scavenged and modified into bacterial-specific lipids by the action of a shared human-bacterial acylation mechanism. The bacterial acylating enzymes for the essential lipids 1-acyl-sn-glycerol 3-phosphate and 1-acyl-sn-phosphatidylcholine were identified as CT453 and CT775, respectively. Bacterial CT775 was found to be associated with lipid droplets (LDs). During the development of C. trachomatis, the human acyl-CoA carrier hACBD6 was recruited to cytosolic LDs and translocated into the inclusion. hACBD6 protein modulated the activity of CT775 in an acyl-CoA dependent fashion and sustained the activity of the bacterial acyltransferase by buffering the concentration of acyl-CoAs. We propose that disruption of the binding activity of the acyl-CoA carrier might represent a new drug-target to prevent growth of C. trachomatis. PMID:25604091

  11. HIV-1 variants with a single-point mutation in the gp41 pocket region exhibiting different susceptibility to HIV fusion inhibitors with pocket- or membrane-binding domain.

    PubMed

    Lu, Lu; Tong, Pei; Yu, Xiaowen; Pan, Chungen; Zou, Peng; Chen, Ying-Hua; Jiang, Shibo

    2012-12-01

    Enfuvirtide (T20), the first FDA-approved peptide HIV fusion/entry inhibitor derived from the HIV-1 gp41 C-terminal heptad-repeat (CHR) domain, is believed to share a target with C34, another well-characterized CHR-peptide, by interacting with the gp41 N-terminal heptad-repeat (NHR) to form six-helix bundle core. However, our previous studies showed that T20 mainly interacts with the N-terminal region of the NHR (N-NHR) and lipid membranes, while C34 mainly binds to the NHR C-terminal pocket region. But so far, no one has shown that C34 can induce drug-resistance mutation in the gp41 pocket region. In this study, we constructed pseudoviruses in which the Ala at the position of 67 in the gp41 pocket region was substituted with Asp, Gly or Ser, respectively, and found that these mutations rendered the viruses highly resistant to C34, but sensitive to T20. The NHR-peptide N36 with mutations of A67 exhibited reduced anti-HIV-1 activity and decreased α-helicity. The stability of six-helix bundle formed by C34 and N36 with A67 mutations was significantly lower than that formed by C34 and N36 with wild-type sequence. The combination of C34 and T20 resulted in potent synergistic anti-HIV-1 effect against the viruses with mutations in either N- or C-terminal region in NHR. These results suggest that C34 with a pocket-binding domain and T20 containing the N-NHR- and membrane-binding domains inhibit HIV-1 fusion by interacting with different target sites and the combinatorial use of C34 and T20 is expected to be effective against HIV-1 variants resistant to HIV fusion inhibitors.

  12. Probing the ATP-Binding Pocket of Protein Kinase DYRK1A with Benzothiazole Fragment Molecules.

    PubMed

    Rothweiler, Ulli; Stensen, Wenche; Brandsdal, Bjørn Olav; Isaksson, Johan; Leeson, Frederick Alan; Engh, Richard Alan; Svendsen, John S Mjøen

    2016-11-10

    DYRK1A has emerged as a potential target for therapies of Alzheimer's disease using small molecules. On the basis of the observation of selective DYRK1A inhibition by firefly d-luciferin, we have explored static and dynamic structural properties of fragment sized variants of the benzothiazole scaffold with respect to DYRK1A using X-ray crystallography and NMR techniques. The compounds have excellent ligand efficiencies and show a remarkable diversity of binding modes in dynamic equilibrium. Binding geometries are determined in part by interactions often considered "weak", including "orthogonal multipolar" types represented by, for example, F-CO, sulfur-aromatic, and halogen-aromatic interactions, together with hydrogen bonds that are modulated by variation of electron withdrawing groups. These studies show how the benzothiazole scaffold is highly promising for the development of therapeutic DYRK1A inhibitors. In addition, the subtleties of the binding interactions, including dynamics, show how full structural studies are required to fully interpret the essential physical determinants of binding.

  13. Fluorescence anisotropy-based measurement of Pseudomonas aeruginosa penicillin-binding protein 2 transpeptidase inhibitor acylation rate constants.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Adam B; Gao, Ning; Gu, Rong-Fang; Thresher, Jason

    2014-10-15

    High-molecular-weight penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) are essential integral membrane proteins of the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane responsible for biosynthesis of peptidoglycan. They are the targets of antibacterial β-lactam drugs, including penicillins, cephalosporins, and carbapenems. β-Lactams covalently acylate the active sites of the PBP transpeptidase domains. Because β-lactams are time-dependent inhibitors, quantitative assessment of the inhibitory activity of these compounds ideally involves measurement of their second-order acylation rate constants. We previously described a fluorescence anisotropy-based assay to measure these rate constants for soluble constructs of PBP3 (Anal. Biochem. 439 (2013) 37-43). Here we report the expression and purification of a soluble construct of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PBP2 as a fusion protein with NusA. This soluble PBP2 was used to measure second-order acylation rate constants with the fluorescence anisotropy assay. Measurements were obtained for mecillinam, which reacts specifically with PBP2, and for several carbapenems. The assay also revealed that PBP2 slowly hydrolyzed mecillinam and was used to measure the rate constant for this deacylation reaction.

  14. Investigation of the free energy profiles of amantadine and rimantadine in the AM2 binding pocket.

    PubMed

    Van Nguyen, Hung; Nguyen, Hieu Thanh; Le, Ly Thi

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to study the mechanism of drug resistance of M2 channel proteins by analyzing the interactions between the drugs amantadine and rimantadine and M2 channel proteins (including the wild type and the three mutants V27A, S31N, and G34A) and the drug binding pathways, by use of a computational approach. Our results showed that multiple drug-binding sites were present in the M2 channel, and the trajectory of the drugs through the M2 channel was determined. A novel method was developed to investigate of free energy profiles of the ligand-protein complexes. Our work provides a new explanation of the large amount of experimental data on drug efficacy.

  15. A conserved NAD(+) binding pocket that regulates protein-protein interactions during aging.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Bonkowski, Michael S; Moniot, Sébastien; Zhang, Dapeng; Hubbard, Basil P; Ling, Alvin J Y; Rajman, Luis A; Qin, Bo; Lou, Zhenkun; Gorbunova, Vera; Aravind, L; Steegborn, Clemens; Sinclair, David A

    2017-03-24

    DNA repair is essential for life, yet its efficiency declines with age for reasons that are unclear. Numerous proteins possess Nudix homology domains (NHDs) that have no known function. We show that NHDs are NAD(+) (oxidized form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide) binding domains that regulate protein-protein interactions. The binding of NAD(+) to the NHD domain of DBC1 (deleted in breast cancer 1) prevents it from inhibiting PARP1 [poly(adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase], a critical DNA repair protein. As mice age and NAD(+) concentrations decline, DBC1 is increasingly bound to PARP1, causing DNA damage to accumulate, a process rapidly reversed by restoring the abundance of NAD(+) Thus, NAD(+) directly regulates protein-protein interactions, the modulation of which may protect against cancer, radiation, and aging.

  16. Biophysical probes reveal a “compromise” nature of the methyllysine binding pocket in L3MBTL1

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Cen; Herold, J. Martin; Kireev, Dmitri; Wigle, Tim; Norris, Jacqueline L.; Frye, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Histone lysine methylation (Kme) encodes essential information modulating many biological processes including gene expression and transcriptional regulation. However, the atomic-level recognition mechanisms of methylated histones by their respective adaptor proteins are still elusive. For instance, it is unclear how L3MBTL1, a methyl-lysine histone code reader, recognizes equally well both mono- and di-methyl marks, but ignores unmodified and trimethylated lysine residues. We made use of Molecular Dynamics (MD) and Free Energy Perturbation (FEP) techniques in order to investigate the energetics and dynamics of the methyllysine recognition. Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC) was employed to experimentally validate the computational findings. Both computational and experimental methods were applied to a set of designed “biophysical” probes that mimic the shape of a single lysine residue and reproduce the binding affinities of cognate histone peptides. Our results suggest that, besides forming favorable interactions, the L3MBTL1 binding pocket energetically penalizes both methylation states and has most probably evolved as a “compromise” that non-optimally fit to both mono- and di-methyl-lysine marks. PMID:21428286

  17. Biophysical probes reveal a "compromise" nature of the methyl-lysine binding pocket in L3MBTL1.

    PubMed

    Gao, Cen; Herold, J Martin; Kireev, Dmitri; Wigle, Tim; Norris, Jacqueline L; Frye, Stephen

    2011-04-13

    Histone lysine methylation (Kme) encodes essential information modulating many biological processes including gene expression and transcriptional regulation. However, the atomic-level recognition mechanisms of methylated histones by their respective adaptor proteins are still elusive. For instance, it is unclear how L3MBTL1, a methyl-lysine histone code reader, recognizes equally well both mono- and dimethyl marks but ignores unmodified and trimethylated lysine residues. We made use of molecular dynamics (MD) and free energy perturbation (FEP) techniques in order to investigate the energetics and dynamics of the methyl-lysine recognition. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) was employed to experimentally validate the computational findings. Both computational and experimental methods were applied to a set of designed "biophysical" probes that mimic the shape of a single lysine residue and reproduce the binding affinities of cognate histone peptides. Our results suggest that, besides forming favorable interactions, the L3MBTL1 binding pocket energetically penalizes both methylation states and has most probably evolved as a "compromise" that nonoptimally fits to both mono- and dimethyl-lysine marks.

  18. Fluorescence energy-transfer measurements between the calcium binding site and the specificity pocket of bovine trypsin using lanthanide probes.

    PubMed

    Darnall, D W; Abbott, F; Gomez, J E; Birnbaum, E R

    1976-11-16

    Using fluorescence energy-transfer experiments we have measured the distance between the specificity pocket and the calcium ion binding site of bovine pancreatic trypsin. Proflavin and thionine were used to block the specificity site, whereas various lanthanide ions were substituted for the calcium. It was then possible to choose various donor-acceptor pairs which exhibit suitable energy transfer. We have calculated the distance between proflavin and Nd(III), Pr(III), and Ho(III) to be 10.9, and 10.3, and 10.3 A, respectively. This agrees very well with the value of approximately 10 A we obtained between the methyl protons of p-toluamidine (a competitive inhibitor) and Gd(III) using nuclear magnetic resonance techniques (Abbott, F., Gomez, J.E., Birnbaum, E.R., and Darnall, D.W. (1975), Biochemistry 14, 4935). This is strong evidence that, in solution, the calcium binding site is composed of the side chains of Ser-190 and Asp-194.

  19. Residues remote from the binding pocket control the antagonist selectivity towards the corticotropin-releasing factor receptor-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xianqiang; Cheng, Jianxin; Wang, Xu; Tang, Yun; Ågren, Hans; Tu, Yaoquan

    2015-01-01

    The corticotropin releasing factors receptor-1 and receptor-2 (CRF1R and CRF2R) are therapeutic targets for treating neurological diseases. Antagonists targeting CRF1R have been developed for the potential treatment of anxiety disorders and alcohol addiction. It has been found that antagonists targeting CRF1R always show high selectivity, although CRF1R and CRF2R share a very high rate of sequence identity. This has inspired us to study the origin of the selectivity of the antagonists. We have therefore built a homology model for CRF2R and carried out unbiased molecular dynamics and well-tempered metadynamics simulations for systems with the antagonist CP-376395 in CRF1R or CRF2R to address this issue. We found that the side chain of Tyr6.63 forms a hydrogen bond with the residue remote from the binding pocket, which allows Tyr6.63 to adopt different conformations in the two receptors and results in the presence or absence of a bottleneck controlling the antagonist binding to or dissociation from the receptors. The rotameric switch of the side chain of Tyr3566.63 allows the breaking down of the bottleneck and is a perquisite for the dissociation of CP-376395 from CRF1R.

  20. Ligand binding pocket of a novel Allatostatin receptor type C of stick insect, Carausius morosus

    PubMed Central

    Duan Sahbaz, Burcin; Sezerman, Osman Ugur; Torun, Hamdi; Birgül Iyison, Necla

    2017-01-01

    Allatostatins (AST) are neuropeptides with variable function ranging from regulation of developmental processes to the feeding behavior in insects. They exert their effects by binding to cognate GPCRs, called Allatostatin receptors (AlstR), which emerge as promising targets for pesticide design. However, AlstRs are rarely studied. This study is the first reported structural study on AlstR-AST interaction. In this work, the first C type AlstR from the stick insect Carausius morosus (CamAlstR-C) was identified and its interaction with type C AST peptide was shown to be physically consistent with the experimental results. The proposed structure of CamAlstR-C revealed a conserved motif within the third extracellular loop, which, together with the N-terminus is essential for ligand binding. In this work, computational studies were combined with molecular and nano-scale approaches in order to introduce an unknown GPCR-ligand system. Consequently, the data obtained provided a reliable target region for future agonist/inverse agonist studies on AlstRs. PMID:28117376

  1. Iterative refinement of a binding pocket model: active computational steering of lead optimization.

    PubMed

    Varela, Rocco; Walters, W Patrick; Goldman, Brian B; Jain, Ajay N

    2012-10-25

    Computational approaches for binding affinity prediction are most frequently demonstrated through cross-validation within a series of molecules or through performance shown on a blinded test set. Here, we show how such a system performs in an iterative, temporal lead optimization exercise. A series of gyrase inhibitors with known synthetic order formed the set of molecules that could be selected for "synthesis." Beginning with a small number of molecules, based only on structures and activities, a model was constructed. Compound selection was done computationally, each time making five selections based on confident predictions of high activity and five selections based on a quantitative measure of three-dimensional structural novelty. Compound selection was followed by model refinement using the new data. Iterative computational candidate selection produced rapid improvements in selected compound activity, and incorporation of explicitly novel compounds uncovered much more diverse active inhibitors than strategies lacking active novelty selection.

  2. Successful prediction of substrate-binding pocket in SLC17 transporter sialin.

    PubMed

    Pietrancosta, Nicolas; Anne, Christine; Prescher, Horst; Ruivo, Raquel; Sagné, Corinne; Debacker, Cécile; Bertrand, Hugues-Olivier; Brossmer, Reinhard; Acher, Francine; Gasnier, Bruno

    2012-03-30

    Secondary active transporters from the SLC17 protein family are required for excitatory and purinergic synaptic transmission, sialic acid metabolism, and renal function, and several members are associated with inherited neurological or metabolic diseases. However, molecular tools to investigate their function or correct their genetic defects are limited or absent. Using structure-activity, homology modeling, molecular docking, and mutagenesis studies, we have located the substrate-binding site of sialin (SLC17A5), a lysosomal sialic acid exporter also recently implicated in exocytotic release of aspartate. Human sialin is defective in two inherited sialic acid storage diseases and is responsible for metabolic incorporation of the dietary nonhuman sialic acid N-glycolylneuraminic acid. We built cytosol-open and lumen-open three-dimensional models of sialin based on weak, but significant, sequence similarity with the glycerol-3-phosphate and fucose permeases from Escherichia coli, respectively. Molecular docking of 31 synthetic sialic acid analogues to both models was consistent with inhibition studies. Narrowing the sialic acid-binding site in the cytosol-open state by two phenylalanine to tyrosine mutations abrogated recognition of the most active analogue without impairing neuraminic acid transport. Moreover, a pilot virtual high-throughput screening of the cytosol-open model could identify a pseudopeptide competitive inhibitor showing >100-fold higher affinity than the natural substrate. This validated model of human sialin and sialin-guided models of other SLC17 transporters should pave the way for the identification of inhibitors, glycoengineering tools, pharmacological chaperones, and fluorescent false neurotransmitters targeted to these proteins.

  3. Investigation of the binding pocket of human hematopoietic prostaglandin (PG) D2 synthase (hH-PGDS): a tale of two waters.

    PubMed

    Trujillo, John I; Kiefer, James R; Huang, Wei; Day, Jacqueline E; Moon, Joseph; Jerome, Gina M; Bono, Christine P; Kornmeier, Christine M; Williams, Melanie L; Kuhn, Cyrille; Rennie, Glen R; Wynn, Thomas A; Carron, Christopher P; Thorarensen, Atli

    2012-06-01

    The inhibition of hH-PGDS has been proposed as a potential target for the development of anti-allergic and anti-inflammatory drugs. Herein we describe our investigation of the binding pocket of this important enzyme and our observation that two water molecules bind to our inhibitors and the enzyme. A series of compounds were prepared to the probe the importance of the water molecules in determining the binding affinity of the inhibitors to the enzyme. The study provides insight into the binding requirements for the design of potent hH-PGDS inhibitors.

  4. Alternative binding proteins: anticalins - harnessing the structural plasticity of the lipocalin ligand pocket to engineer novel binding activities.

    PubMed

    Skerra, Arne

    2008-06-01

    Antibodies are the paradigm for binding proteins, with their hypervariable loop region supported by a structurally rigid framework, thus providing the vast repertoire of antigen-binding sites in the immune system. Lipocalins are another family of proteins that exhibit a binding site with high structural plasticity, which is composed of four peptide loops mounted on a stable beta-barrel scaffold. Using site-directed random mutagenesis and selection via phage display against prescribed molecular targets, it is possible to generate artificial lipocalins with novel ligand specificities, so-called anticalins. Anticalins have been successfully selected both against small hapten-like compounds and against large protein antigens and they usually possess high target affinity and specificity. Their structural analysis has yielded interesting insights into the phenomenon of molecular recognition. Compared with antibodies, they are much smaller, have a simpler molecular architecture (comprising just one polypeptide chain) and they do not require post-translational modification. In addition, anticalins exhibit robust biophysical properties and can easily be produced in microbial expression systems. As their structure-function relationships are well understood, rational engineering of additional features such as site-directed pegylation or fusion with functional effector domains, dimerization modules or even with another anticalin, can be readily achieved. Thus, anticalins offer many applications, not only as reagents for biochemical research but also as a new class of potential drugs for medical therapy.

  5. Aromatic amino acid mutagenesis at the substrate binding pocket of Yarrowia lipolytica lipase Lip2 affects its activity and thermostability.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guilong; Liu, Zimin; Xu, Li; Yan, Yunjun

    2014-01-01

    The lipase2 from Yarrowia lipolytica (YLLip2) is a yeast lipase exhibiting high homologous to filamentous fungal lipase family. Though its crystal structure has been resolved, its structure-function relationship has rarely been reported. By contrast, there are two amino acid residues (V94 and I100) with significant difference in the substrate binding pocket of YLLip2; they were subjected to site-directed mutagenesis (SDM) to introduce aromatic amino acid mutations. Two mutants (V94W and I100F) were created. The enzymatic properties of the mutant lipases were detected and compared with the wild-type. The activities of mutant enzymes dropped to some extent towards p-nitrophenyl palmitate (pNPC16) and their optimum temperature was 35°C, which was 5°C lower than that of the wild-type. However, the thermostability of I100F increased 22.44% after incubation for 1 h at 40°C and its optimum substrate shifted from p-nitrophenyl laurate (pNPC12) to p-nitrophenyl caprate (pNPC10). The above results demonstrated that the two substituted amino acid residuals have close relationship with such enzymatic properties as thermostability and substrate selectivity.

  6. Isocyanide binding kinetics to monomeric hemoproteins. A study on the ligand partition between solvent and heme pocket.

    PubMed Central

    Di Iorio, E E; Winterhalter, K H; Giacometti, G M

    1987-01-01

    The kinetics of methyl-, ethyl-, iso-propyl-, and ter-butyl-isocyanide binding to Aplysia limacina myoglobin (distal His----Lys) and the isolated beta chains from hemoglobin Zurich (distal His----Arg) have been investigated by flash photolysis at various temperatures above 0 degrees C. Sperm whale (Physter catodon) myoglobin and the isolated beta chains from normal adult hemoglobin have been used as references. In most reaction systems investigated the apparent extent of photolysis increases with temperature. For sperm whale myoglobin and the normal beta chains the increase is of the same magnitude and not correlated to the type of ligand used. On the contrary, for the two proteins lacking the distal histidine, the phenomenon is dependent on the size of the alkyl side chain of the ligand. The results, analyzed on the basis of the multibarrier model (Austin, R.H., K.W. Beeson, L. Eisenstein, H. Frauenfelder, and I.C. Gunsalus, 1975, Biochemistry, 16:5355-5373), suggest that the partition of the ligand molecules between the solvent and the heme pocket, occurring during the photolysis process, is primarily determined by interactions between the ligand and residues in the heme cavity rather than by diffusion through the protein matrix. PMID:3567310

  7. Structure-Based Design of a Novel SMYD3 Inhibitor that Bridges the SAM-and MEKK2-Binding Pockets.

    PubMed

    Van Aller, Glenn S; Graves, Alan P; Elkins, Patricia A; Bonnette, William G; McDevitt, Patrick J; Zappacosta, Francesca; Annan, Roland S; Dean, Tony W; Su, Dai-Shi; Carpenter, Christopher L; Mohammad, Helai P; Kruger, Ryan G

    2016-05-03

    SMYD3 is a lysine methyltransferase overexpressed in colorectal, breast, prostate, and hepatocellular tumors, and has been implicated as an oncogene in human malignancies. Methylation of MEKK2 by SMYD3 is important for regulation of the MEK/ERK pathway, suggesting the possibility of selectively targeting SMYD3 in RAS-driven cancers. Structural and kinetic characterization of SMYD3 was undertaken leading to a co-crystal structure of SMYD3 with a MEKK2-peptide substrate bound, and the observation that SMYD3 follows a partially processive mechanism. These insights allowed for the design of GSK2807, a potent and selective, SAM-competitive inhibitor of SMYD3 (Ki = 14 nM). A high-resolution crystal structure reveals that GSK2807 bridges the gap between the SAM-binding pocket and the substrate lysine tunnel of SMYD3. Taken together, our data demonstrate that small-molecule inhibitors of SMYD3 can be designed to prevent methylation of MEKK2 and these could have potential use as anticancer therapeutics.

  8. Acyl-CoA binding protein expression is fiber type- specific and elevated in muscles from the obese insulin-resistant Zucker rat.

    PubMed

    Franch, Jesper; Knudsen, Jens; Ellis, Bronwyn A; Pedersen, Preben K; Cooney, Gregory J; Jensen, Jørgen

    2002-02-01

    Accumulation of acyl-CoA is hypothesized to be involved in development of insulin resistance. Acyl-CoA binds to acyl-CoA binding protein (ACBP) with high affinity, and therefore knowledge about ACBP concentration is important for interpreting acyl-CoA data. In the present study, we used a sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to quantify ACBP concentration in different muscle fiber types. Furthermore, ACBP concentration was compared in muscles from lean and obese Zucker rats. Expression of ACBP was highest in the slow-twitch oxidative soleus muscle and lowest in the fast-twitch glycolytic white gastrocnemius (0.46 +/- 0.02 and 0.16 +/- 0.005 microg/mg protein, respectively). Expression of ACBP was soleus > red gastrocnemius > extensor digitorum longus > white gastrocnemius. Similar fiber type differences were found for carnitine palmitoyl transferase (CPT)-1, and a correlation was observed between ACBP and CPT-1. Muscles from obese Zucker rats had twice the triglyceride content, had approximately twice the long-chain acyl CoA content, and were severely insulin resistant. ACBP concentration was approximately 30% higher in all muscles from obese rats. Activities of CPT-1 and 3-hydroxy-acyl-CoA dehydrogenase were increased in muscles from obese rats, whereas citrate synthase activity was similar. In conclusion, ACBP expression is fiber type-specific with the highest concentration in oxidative muscles and the lowest in glycolytic muscles. The 90% increase in the concentration of acyl-CoA in obese Zucker muscle compared with only a 30% increase in the concentration of ACBP supports the hypothesis that an increased concentration of free acyl-CoA is involved in the development of insulin resistance.

  9. Maturation and Activity of Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Protein 1 Is Inhibited by Acyl-CoA Binding Domain Containing 3

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yong; Patel, Vishala; Bang, Sookhee; Cohen, Natalie; Millar, John; Kim, Sangwon F.

    2012-01-01

    Imbalance of lipid metabolism has been linked with pathogenesis of a variety of human pathological conditions such as diabetes, obesity, cancer and neurodegeneration. Sterol regulatory element binding proteins (SREBPs) are the master transcription factors controlling the homeostasis of fatty acids and cholesterol in the body. Transcription, expression, and activity of SREBPs are regulated by various nutritional, hormonal or stressful stimuli, yet the molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in these adaptative responses remains elusive. In the present study, we found that overexpressed acyl-CoA binding domain containing 3 (ACBD3), a Golgi-associated protein, dramatically inhibited SREBP1-sensitive promoter activity of fatty acid synthase (FASN). Moreover, lipid deprivation-stimulated SREBP1 maturation was significantly attenuated by ACBD3. With cell fractionation, gene knockdown and immunoprecipitation assays, it was showed that ACBD3 blocked intracellular maturation of SREBP1 probably through directly binding with the lipid regulator rather than disrupted SREBP1-SCAP-Insig1 interaction. Further investigation revealed that acyl-CoA domain-containing N-terminal sequence of ACBD3 contributed to its inhibitory effects on the production of nuclear SREBP1. In addition, mRNA and protein levels of FASN and de novo palmitate biosynthesis were remarkably reduced in cells overexpressed with ACBD3. These findings suggest that ACBD3 plays an essential role in maintaining lipid homeostasis via regulating SREBP1's processing pathway and thus impacting cellular lipogenesis. PMID:23166793

  10. Mutational analysis in the glycone binding pocket of Dalbergia cochinchinensis β-glucosidase to increase catalytic efficiency toward mannosides.

    PubMed

    Ratananikom, Khakhanang; Choengpanya, Khuanjarat; Tongtubtim, Nusra; Charoenrat, Theppanya; Withers, Stephen G; Kongsaeree, Prachumporn T

    2013-05-24

    Dalcochinase and Abg are glycoside hydrolase family 1 β-glucosidases from Dalbergia cochinchinensis Pierre and Agrobacterium sp., respectively, with 35% sequence identity. However, Abg shows much higher catalytic efficiencies toward a broad range of glycone substrates than dalcochinase does, possibly due to the difference in amino acid residues around their glycone binding pockets. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to replace the amino acid residues of dalcochinase with the corresponding residues of Abg, generating three single mutants, F196H, S251V, and M369E, as well as the corresponding three double mutants and one triple mutant. Among these, the F196H mutant showed increases in catalytic efficiency toward almost all glycoside substrates tested, with the most improved catalytic efficiency being a 3-fold increase for hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl β-D-mannoside, suggesting a preferred polar residue at this position and consistent with the presence of histidine at this position in two other GH1 glycosidases from barley and rice that prefer β-mannosides. In addition, the M369E mutation resulted in a small increase in catalytic efficiency for cleavage of p-nitrophenyl β-D-galactoside. By contrast, the multiple mutants were up to 8-fold less efficient than the recombinant wild-type dalcochinase, and displayed primarily antagonistic interactions between these residues. Thus, differences in catalytic efficiency between dalcochinase and Abg are therefore not primarily due to differences in the residues that directly contact the substrate, but derive largely from contributions from more remote residues and the overall architecture of the active site.

  11. Characterization of five fatty aldehyde dehydrogenase enzymes from Marinobacter and Acinetobacter: structural insights into the aldehyde binding pocket.

    PubMed

    Bertram, Jonathan H; Mulliner, Kalene M; Shi, Ke; Plunkett, Mary H; Nixon, Peter; Serratore, Nicholas A; Douglas, Christopher J; Aihara, Hideki; Barney, Brett M

    2017-04-07

    Enzymes involved in lipid biosynthesis and metabolism play an important role in energy conversion and storage, and in the function of structural components such as cell membranes. The fatty aldehyde dehydrogenase (FAldDH) plays a central function in the metabolism of lipid intermediates, oxidizing fatty aldehydes to the corresponding fatty acid, and competing with pathways that would further reduce the fatty aldehydes to fatty alcohols or require the fatty aldehydes to produce alkanes. In this report, the genes for four putative FAldDH enzymes from Marinobacter aquaeolei VT8 and an additional enzyme from Acinetobacter baylyi were heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli and shown to display FAldDH activity. Five enzymes (Maqu_0438, Maqu_3316, Maqu_3410, Maqu_3572 and WP_004927398) were found to act on aldehydes ranging from acetaldehyde to hexadecanal, and also acted on the unsaturated long-chain palmitoleyl and oleyl aldehydes. A comparison of the specificity of these enzymes with various aldehydes is presented. Crystallization trials yielded diffraction quality crystals of one particular FAldDH (Maqu_3316) from M. aquaeolei VT8. Crystals were independently treated with both the NAD(+) cofactor and the aldehyde substrate decanal, revealing specific details of the likely substrate binding pocket for this class of enzymes. A likely model for how the catalysis by the enzyme is accomplished is also provided.Importance: This study provides a comparison of multiple enzymes with the ability to oxidize fatty aldehydes to fatty acids, and provides a likely picture of how the fatty aldehyde and NAD(+) is bound to the enzyme to facilitate catalysis. Based on the information obtained from this structural analysis and the comparisons of specificity for the five enzymes that were characterized, correlations may be drawn to the potential roles played by specific residues within the structure.

  12. Identification of transmembrane domain 1 & 2 residues that contribute to the formation of the ligand-binding pocket of the urotensin-II receptor.

    PubMed

    Sainsily, Xavier; Cabana, Jérôme; Holleran, Brian J; Escher, Emanuel; Lavigne, Pierre; Leduc, Richard

    2014-11-15

    The vasoactive urotensin-II (UII), a cyclic undecapeptide widely distributed in cardiovascular, renal and endocrine systems, specifically binds the UII receptor (UT receptor), a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). The involvement of this receptor in numerous pathophysiological conditions including atherosclerosis, heart failure, hypertension, renal impairment and diabetes potentially makes it an interesting therapeutic target. To elucidate how UII binds the UT receptor through the identification of specific residues in transmembrane domains (TM) one (TM1) and two (TM2) that are involved in the formation of the receptor's binding pocket, we used the substituted-cysteine accessibility method (SCAM). Each residue of TM1 (V49((1.30)) to M76((1.57))) and TM2 (V88((2.41)) to H117((2.70))) was mutated, one by one, to a cysteine. The resulting mutants were then expressed in COS-7 cells and subsequently treated with the sulfhydryl-specific alkylating agent methanethiosulfonate-ethylammonium (MTSEA). MTSEA treatment resulted in a significant binding inhibition of (125)I-UII to mutant I54C((1.35)) in TM1 and mutants Y100C((2.53)), S103C((2.56)), F106C((2.59)), I107C((2.60)), T110C((2.63)) and Y111C((2.64)) in TM2. These results identify key structural residues in TM1 and TM2 that participate in the formation of the UT receptor binding pocket. Together with previous SCAM analysis of TM3, TM4, TM5, TM6 and TM7, these results have led us to identify residues within all 7 TMs that participate in UT's binding pocket and have enabled us to propose a model of this receptor's orthosteric binding site.

  13. Solid-phase synthesis and screening of N-acylated polyamine (NAPA) combinatorial libraries for protein binding.

    PubMed

    Iera, Jaclyn A; Jenkins, Lisa M Miller; Kajiyama, Hiroshi; Kopp, Jeffrey B; Appella, Daniel H

    2010-11-15

    Inhibitors for protein-protein interactions are challenging to design, in part due to the unique and complex architectures of each protein's interaction domain. Most approaches to develop inhibitors for these interactions rely on rational design, which requires prior structural knowledge of the target and its ligands. In the absence of structural information, a combinatorial approach may be the best alternative to finding inhibitors of a protein-protein interaction. Current chemical libraries, however, consist mostly of molecules designed to inhibit enzymes. In this manuscript, we report the synthesis and screening of a library based on an N-acylated polyamine (NAPA) scaffold that we designed to have specific molecular features necessary to inhibit protein-protein interactions. Screens of the library identified a member with favorable binding properties to the HIV viral protein R (Vpr), a regulatory protein from HIV, that is involved in numerous interactions with other proteins critical for viral replication.

  14. CORCEMA refinement of the bound ligand conformation within the protein binding pocket in reversibly forming weak complexes using STD-NMR intensities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayalakshmi, V.; Rama Krishna, N.

    2004-05-01

    We describe an intensity-restrained optimization procedure for refining approximate structures of ligands within the protein binding pockets using STD-NMR intensity data on reversibly forming weak complexes. In this approach, the global minimum for the bound-ligand conformation is obtained by a hybrid structure refinement method involving CORCEMA calculation of intensities and simulated annealing optimization of torsion angles of the bound ligand using STD-NMR intensities as experimental constraints and the NOE R-factor as the pseudo-energy function to be minimized. This method is illustrated using simulated STD data sets for typical carbohydrate and peptide ligands. Our procedure also allows for the optimization of side chain torsion angles of protein residues within the binding pocket. This procedure is useful in refining and improving initial models based on crystallography or computer docking or other algorithms to generate models for the bound ligand (e.g., a lead compound) within the protein binding pocket compatible with solution STD-NMR data. This method may facilitate structure-based drug design efforts.

  15. Arabidopsis acyl-CoA-binding protein ACBP6 localizes in the phloem and affects jasmonate composition.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zi-Wei; Lung, Shiu-Cheung; Hu, Tai-Hua; Chen, Qin-Fang; Suen, Yung-Lee; Wang, Mingfu; Hoffmann-Benning, Susanne; Yeung, Edward; Chye, Mee-Len

    2016-12-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana ACYL-COA-BINDING PROTEIN6 (AtACBP6) encodes a cytosolic 10-kDa AtACBP. It confers freezing tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis, possibly by its interaction with lipids as indicated by the binding of acyl-CoA esters and phosphatidylcholine to recombinant AtACBP6. Herein, transgenic Arabidopsis transformed with an AtACBP6 promoter-driven β-glucuronidase (GUS) construct exhibited strong GUS activity in the vascular tissues. Immunoelectron microscopy using anti-AtACBP6 antibodies showed AtACBP6 localization in the phloem especially in the companion cells and sieve elements. Also, the presence of gold grains in the plasmodesmata indicated its potential role in systemic trafficking. The AtACBP6 protein, but not its mRNA, was found in phloem exudate of wild-type Arabidopsis. Fatty acid profiling using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry revealed an increase in the jasmonic acid (JA) precursor, 12-oxo-cis,cis-10,15-phytodienoic acid (cis-OPDA), and a reduction in JA and/or its derivatives in acbp6 phloem exudates in comparison to the wild type. Quantitative real-time PCR showed down-regulation of COMATOSE (CTS) in acbp6 rosettes suggesting that AtACBP6 affects CTS function. AtACBP6 appeared to affect the content of JA and/or its derivatives in the sieve tubes, which is consistent with its role in pathogen-defense and in its wound-inducibility of AtACBP6pro::GUS. Taken together, our results suggest the involvement of AtACBP6 in JA-biosynthesis in Arabidopsis phloem tissues.

  16. Switch control pocket inhibitors of p38-MAP kinase. Durable type II inhibitors that do not require binding into the canonical ATP hinge region

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, Yu Mi; Clare, Michael; Ensinger, Carol L.; Hood, Molly M.; Lord, John W.; Lu, Wei-Ping; Miller, David F.; Patt, William C.; Smith, Bryan D.; Vogeti, Lakshminarayana; Kaufman, Michael D.; Petillo, Peter A.; Wise, Scott C.; Abendroth, Jan; Chun, Lawrence; Clark, Robin; Feese, Michael; Kim, Hidong; Stewart, Lance; Flynn, Daniel L.

    2012-01-20

    Switch control pocket inhibitors of p38-alpha kinase are described. Durable type II inhibitors were designed which bind to arginines (Arg67 or Arg70) that function as key residues for mediating phospho-threonine 180 dependant conformational fluxing of p38-alpha from an inactive type II state to an active type I state. Binding to Arg70 in particular led to potent inhibitors, exemplified by DP-802, which also exhibited high kinase selectivity. Binding to Arg70 obviated the requirement for binding into the ATP Hinge region. X-ray crystallography revealed that DP-802 and analogs induce an enhanced type II conformation upon binding to either the unphosphorylated or the doubly phosphorylated form of p38-alpha kinase.

  17. Apolar distal pocket mutants of yeast cytochrome c peroxidase: hydrogen peroxide reactivity and cyanide binding of the TriAla, TriVal, and TriLeu variants.

    PubMed

    Bidwai, Anil K; Meyen, Cassandra; Kilheeney, Heather; Wroblewski, Damian; Vitello, Lidia B; Erman, James E

    2013-01-01

    Three yeast cytochrome c peroxidase (CcP) variants with apolar distal heme pockets have been constructed. The CcP variants have Arg48, Trp51, and His52 mutated to either all alanines, CcP(triAla), all valines, CcP(triVal), or all leucines, CcP(triLeu). The triple mutants have detectable enzymatic activity at pH 6 but the activity is less than 0.02% that of wild-type CcP. The activity loss is primarily due to the decreased rate of reaction between the triple mutants and H(2)O(2) compared to wild-type CcP. Spectroscopic properties and cyanide binding characteristics of the triple mutants have been investigated over the pH stability region of CcP, pH 4 to 8. The absorption spectra indicate that the CcP triple mutants have hemes that are predominantly five-coordinate, high-spin at pH 5 and six-coordinate, low-spin at pH 8. Cyanide binding to the triple mutants is biphasic indicating that the triple mutants have two slowly-exchanging conformational states with different cyanide affinities. The binding affinity for cyanide is reduced at least two orders of magnitude in the triple mutants compared to wild-type CcP and the rate of cyanide binding is reduced by four to five orders of magnitude. Correlation of the reaction rates of CcP and 12 distal pocket mutants with H(2)O(2) and HCN suggests that both reactions require ionization of the reactants within the distal heme pocket allowing the anion to bind the heme iron. Distal pocket features that promote substrate ionization (basic residues involved in base-catalyzed substrate ionization or polar residues that can stabilize substrate anions) increase the overall rate of reaction with H(2)O(2) and HCN while features that inhibit substrate ionization slow the reactions.

  18. Cross-Neutralising Nanobodies Bind to a Conserved Pocket in the Hemagglutinin Stem Region Identified Using Yeast Display and Deep Mutational Scanning

    PubMed Central

    Gaiotto, Tiziano; Hufton, Simon E.

    2016-01-01

    Cross-neutralising monoclonal antibodies against influenza hemagglutinin (HA) are of considerable interest as both therapeutics and diagnostic tools. We have recently described five different single domain antibodies (nanobodies) which share this cross-neutralising activity and suggest their small size, high stability, and cleft binding properties may present distinct advantages over equivalent conventional antibodies. We have used yeast display in combination with deep mutational scanning to give residue level resolution of positions in the antibody-HA interface which are crucial for binding. In addition, we have mapped positions within HA predicted to have minimal effect on antibody binding when mutated. Our cross-neutralising nanobodies were shown to bind to a highly conserved pocket in the HA2 domain of A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza virus overlapping with the fusion peptide suggesting their mechanism of action is through the inhibition of viral membrane fusion. We also note that the epitope overlaps with that of CR6261 and F10 which are human monoclonal antibodies in clinical development as immunotherapeutics. Although all five nanobodies mapped to the same highly conserved binding pocket we observed differences in the size of the epitope footprint which has implications in comparing the relative genetic barrier each nanobody presents to a rapidly evolving influenza virus. To further refine our epitope map, we have re-created naturally occurring mutations within this HA stem epitope and tested their effect on binding using yeast display. We have shown that a D46N mutation in the HA2 stem domain uniquely interferes with binding of R2b-E8. Further testing of this substitution in the context of full length purified HA from 1918 H1N1 pandemic (Spanish flu), 2009 H1N1 pandemic (swine flu) and highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 demonstrated binding which correlated with D46 whereas binding to seasonal H1N1 strains carrying N46 was absent. In addition, our deep sequence

  19. Acyl-CoA-binding domain containing 3 modulates NAD+ metabolism through activating poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yong; Bang, Sookhee; Park, Soohyun; Shi, Hanyuan; Kim, Sangwon F

    2015-07-15

    NAD(+) plays essential roles in cellular energy homoeostasis and redox state, functioning as a cofactor along the glycolysis and citric acid cycle pathways. Recent discoveries indicated that, through the NAD(+)-consuming enzymes, this molecule may also be involved in many other cellular and biological outcomes such as chromatin remodelling, gene transcription, genomic integrity, cell division, calcium signalling, circadian clock and pluripotency. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) is such an enzyme and dysfunctional PARP1 has been linked with the onset and development of various human diseases, including cancer, aging, traumatic brain injury, atherosclerosis, diabetes and inflammation. In the present study, we showed that overexpressed acyl-CoA-binding domain containing 3 (ACBD3), a Golgi-bound protein, significantly reduced cellular NAD(+) content via enhancing PARP1's polymerase activity and enhancing auto-modification of the enzyme in a DNA damage-independent manner. We identified that extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 as well as de novo fatty acid biosynthesis pathways are involved in ACBD3-mediated activation of PARP1. Importantly, oxidative stress-induced PARP1 activation is greatly attenuated by knocking down the ACBD3 gene. Taken together, these findings suggest that ACBD3 has prominent impacts on cellular NAD(+) metabolism via regulating PARP1 activation-dependent auto-modification and thus cell metabolism and function.

  20. Identification of transmembrane domain 3, 4 & 5 residues that contribute to the formation of the ligand-binding pocket of the urotensin-II receptor.

    PubMed

    Sainsily, Xavier; Cabana, Jérôme; Boulais, Philip E; Holleran, Brian J; Escher, Emanuel; Lavigne, Pierre; Leduc, Richard

    2013-12-01

    Urotensin-II (UII), a cyclic undecapeptide, selectively binds the urotensin-II receptor (UT receptor), a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) involved in cardiovascular effects and associated with numerous pathophysiological conditions including hypertension, atherosclerosis, heart failure, pulmonary hypertension and others. In order to identify specific residues in transmembrane domains (TM) three (TM3), four (TM4) and five (TM5) that are involved in the formation of the UT receptor binding pocket, we used the substituted-cysteine accessibility method (SCAM). Each residue in the F118((3.20)) to S146((3.48)) fragment of TM3, the L168((4.44)) to G194((4.70)) fragment of TM4 and the W203((5.30)) to V232((5.59)) fragment of TM5, was mutated, individually, to a cysteine. The resulting mutants were then expressed in COS-7 cells and subsequently treated with the positively charged sulfhydryl-specific alkylating agent methanethiosulfonate-ethylammonium (MTSEA). MTSEA treatment resulted in a significant reduction in the binding of (125)I-UII to TM3 mutants L126C((3.28)), F127C((3.29)), F131C((3.33)) and M134C((3.36)) and TM4 mutants M184C((4.60)) and I188C((4.64)). No loss of binding was detected following treatment by MTSEA for all TM5 mutants tested. In absence of a crystal structure of UT receptor, these results identify key determinants in TM3, TM4 and TM5 that participate in the formation of the UT receptor binding pocket and has led us to propose a homology model of the UT receptor.

  1. The Role of the β5-α11 Loop in the Active-Site Dynamics of Acylated Penicillin-Binding Protein A from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Fedarovich, Alena; Nicholas, Robert A.; Davies, Christopher

    2013-04-22

    Penicillin-binding protein A (PBPA) is a class B penicillin-binding protein that is important for cell division in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We have determined a second crystal structure of PBPA in apo form and compared it with an earlier structure of apoenzyme. Significant structural differences in the active site region are apparent, including increased ordering of a β-hairpin loop and a shift of the SxN active site motif such that it now occupies a position that appears catalytically competent. Using two assays, including one that uses the intrinsic fluorescence of a tryptophan residue, we have also measured the second-order acylation rate constants for the antibiotics imipenem, penicillin G, and ceftriaxone. Of these, imipenem, which has demonstrable anti-tubercular activity, shows the highest acylation efficiency. Crystal structures of PBPA in complex with the same antibiotics were also determined, and all show conformational differences in the β5–α11 loop near the active site, but these differ for each β-lactam and also for each of the two molecules in the crystallographic asymmetric unit. Overall, these data reveal the β5–α11 loop of PBPA as a flexible region that appears important for acylation and provide further evidence that penicillin-binding proteins in apo form can occupy different conformational states.

  2. Pathogenicity of the BRCA1 Missense Variant M1775K is Determined by the Disruption of the BRCT Phosphopeptide-Binding Pocket: a Multi-Modal Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Tischkowitz,M.; Hamel, N.; Carvalho, M.; Birrane, G.; Soni, A.; van Beers, E.; Joosse, S.; Wong, N.; Novak, D.; et al

    2008-01-01

    A number of germ-line mutations in the BRCA1 gene confer susceptibility to breast and ovarian cancer. However, it remains difficult to determine whether many single amino-acid (missense) changes in the BRCA1 protein that are frequently detected in the clinical setting are pathologic or not. Here, we used a combination of functional, crystallographic, biophysical, molecular and evolutionary techniques, and classical genetic segregation analysis to demonstrate that the BRCA1 missense variant M1775K is pathogenic. Functional assays in yeast and mammalian cells showed that the BRCA1 BRCT domains carrying the amino-acid change M1775K displayed markedly reduced transcriptional activity, indicating that this variant represents a deleterious mutation. Importantly, the M1775K mutation disrupted the phosphopeptide-binding pocket of the BRCA1 BRCT domains, thereby inhibiting the BRCA1 interaction with the proteins BRIP1 and CtIP, which are involved in DNA damage-induced checkpoint control. These results indicate that the integrity of the BRCT phosphopeptide-binding pocket is critical for the tumor suppression function of BRCA1. Moreover, this study demonstrates that multiple lines of evidence obtained from a combination of functional, structural, molecular and evolutionary techniques, and classical genetic segregation analysis are required to confirm the pathogenicity of rare variants of disease-susceptibility genes and obtain important insights into the underlying pathogenetic mechanisms.

  3. Ligand-binding pocket shape differences between S1P1 and S1P3 determine efficiency of chemical probe identification by uHTS

    PubMed Central

    Schürer, Stephan C.; Brown, Steven J.; Cabrera, Pedro Gonzales; Schaeffer, Marie-Therese; Chapman, Jacqueline; Jo, Euijung; Chase, Peter; Spicer, Tim; Hodder, Peter; Rosen, Hugh

    2008-01-01

    We have studied the Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) receptor system to better understand why certain molecular targets within a closely related family are much more tractable when identifying compelling chemical leads. Five medically important G protein-coupled receptors for S1P regulate heart rate, coronary artery caliber, endothelial barrier integrity, and lymphocyte trafficking. Selective S1P receptor agonist probes would be of great utility to study receptor subtype-specific function. Through systematic screening of the same libraries, we identified novel selective agonists chemotypes for each of the S1P1 and S1P3 receptors. uHTS for S1P1 was more effective than for S1P3, with many selective, low nanomolar hits of proven mechanism emerging for. Receptor structure modeling and ligand docking reveal differences between the receptor binding pockets, which are the basis for sub-type selectivity. Novel selective agonists interact primarily in the hydrophobic pocket of the receptor in the absence of head-group interactions. Chemistry-space and shape-based analysis of the screening libraries in combination with the binding models explain the observed differential hit rates and enhanced efficiency for lead discovery for S1P1 vs. S1P3 in this closely related receptor family. PMID:18590333

  4. Mutational Analysis of the Binding Pockets of the Diketo Acid Inhibitor L-742,001 in the Influenza Virus PA Endonuclease

    PubMed Central

    Stevaert, Annelies; Dallocchio, Roberto; Dessì, Alessandro; Pala, Nicolino; Rogolino, Dominga; Sechi, Mario

    2013-01-01

    The influenza virus PA endonuclease, which cleaves capped host pre-mRNAs to initiate synthesis of viral mRNA, is a prime target for antiviral therapy. The diketo acid compound L-742,001 was previously identified as a potent inhibitor of the influenza virus endonuclease reaction, but information on its precise binding mode to PA or potential resistance profile is limited. Computer-assisted docking of L-742,001 into the crystal structure of inhibitor-free N-terminal PA (PA-Nter) indicated a binding orientation distinct from that seen in a recent crystallographic study with L-742,001-bound PA-Nter (R. M. DuBois et al., PLoS Pathog. 8:e1002830, 2012). A comprehensive mutational analysis was performed to determine which amino acid changes within the catalytic center of PA or its surrounding hydrophobic pockets alter the antiviral sensitivity to L-742,001 in cell culture. Marked (up to 20-fold) resistance to L-742,001 was observed for the H41A, I120T, and G81F/V/T mutant forms of PA. Two- to 3-fold resistance was seen for the T20A, L42T, and V122T mutants, and the R124Q and Y130A mutants were 3-fold more sensitive to L-742,001. Several mutations situated at noncatalytic sites in PA had no or only marginal impact on the enzymatic functionality of viral ribonucleoprotein complexes reconstituted in cell culture, consistent with the less conserved nature of these PA residues. Our data provide relevant insights into the binding mode of L-742,001 in the PA endonuclease active site. In addition, we predict some potential resistance sites that should be taken into account during optimization of PA endonuclease inhibitors toward tight binding in any of the hydrophobic pockets surrounding the catalytic center of the enzyme. PMID:23824822

  5. DNA-binding studies and biological activities of new nitrosubstituted acyl thioureas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahir, Shaista; Badshah, Amin; Hussain, Raja Azadar; Tahir, Muhammad Nawaz; Tabassum, Saira; Patujo, Jahangir Ali; Rauf, Muhammad Khawar

    2015-11-01

    Four new nitrosubstituted acylthioureas i.e. 1-acetyl-3-(4-nitrophenyl)thiourea (TU1), 1-acetyl-3-(2-methyl-4-nitrophenyl)thiourea (TU2), 1-acetyl-3-(2-methoxy-4-nitrophenyl)thiourea (TU3) and 1-acetyl-3-(4-chloro-3-nitrophenyl)thiourea (TU4) have been synthesized and characterized (by C13 and H1 nuclear magnetic resonance, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and single crystal X-ray diffraction). As a preliminary investigation of the anti-cancer potencies of the said compounds, DNA interaction studies have been carried out using cyclic voltammetry and UV-vis spectroscopy along with verification from computational studies. The drug-DNA binding constants are found to be in the order, KTU3 9.04 × 106 M-1 > KTU4 8.57 × 106 M-1 > KTU2 6.05 × 106 M-1 > KTU1 1.16 × 106 M-1. Furthermore, the antioxidant, cytotoxic, antibacterial and antifungal activities have been carried out against DPPH (1,1-diphenyl-2-dipicrylhydrazyl), Brine shrimp eggs, gram positive (Micrococcus luteus, Staphylococcus aureus) and gram negative (Bordetella bronchiseptica, Salmonella typhimurium, Enterobacter aerogens) and fungal cultures (Aspergillus fumigatus, Mucor species, Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus flavus) respectively.

  6. Binding water clusters to an aromatic-rich hydrophobic pocket: [2.2.2]paracyclophane-(H2O)n, n = 1-5.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, Evan G; Zwier, Timothy S

    2014-09-18

    [2.2.2]Paracylcophane (tricyclophane, TCP) is a macrocycle with three phenyl substituents linked by ethyl bridges (-CH2CH2-) in the para-position, forming an aromatic-rich pocket capable of binding various substituents, including nature's solvent, water. Building on previous work [Buchanan, E. G.; et al. J. Chem. Phys. 2013, 138, 064308] that reported on the ground state conformational preferences of TCP, the focus of the present study is on the infrared and ultraviolet spectroscopy of TCP-(H2O)n clusters with n = 1-5. Resonant two-photon ionization (R2PI) was used to interrogate the mass selected electronic spectrum of the clusters, reporting on the perturbations imposed on the electronic states of TCP as the size of the water clusters bound to it vary in size from n = 1-5. The TCP-(H2O)n S0-S1 origins are shifted to lower frequency from the monomer, indicating an increased binding energy of the water or water network in the excited state. Ground state resonant ion-dip infrared (RIDIR) spectra of TCP-(H2O)n (n = 1-5) clusters were recorded in the OH stretch region, which probes the H-bonded water networks present and the perturbations imposed on them by TCP. The experimental frequencies are compared with harmonic vibrational frequencies calculated using density functional theory (DFT) with the dispersion-corrected functional ωB97X-D and a 6-311+g(d,p) basis set, providing firm assignments for their H-bonding structures. The H2O molecule in TCP-(H2O)1 sits on top of the binding pocket, donating both of its hydrogen atoms to the aromatic-rich interior of the monomer. The antisymmetric stretch fundamental of H2O in the complex is composed of a closely spaced set of transitions that likely reflect contributions from both para- and ortho-forms of H2O due to internal rotation of the H2O in the binding pocket. TCP-(H2O)2 also exists in a single conformational isomer that retains the same double-donor binding motif for the first water molecule, with the second H2O acting

  7. Molecular cloning and chromosomal localization of a pseudogene related to the human Acyl-CoA binding protein/diazepam binding inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Gersuk, V.H.; Rose, T.M.; Todaro, G.J.

    1995-01-20

    The acyl-CoA binding protein (ACBP) and the diazepam binding inhibitor (DBI) or endozepine are independent isolates of a single 86-amino-acid, 10-kDa protein. ACBP/DBI is highly conserved between species and has been identified in several diverse organisms, including human, cow, rat, frog, duck, insects, plants, and yeast. Although the genomic locus has not yet been cloned in humans, complementary DNA clones with different 5{prime} ends have been isolated and characterized. These cDNA clones appear to be encoded by a single gene. However, Southern blot analyses, in situ hybridizations, and somatic cell hybrid chromosomal mapping all suggest that there are multiple ACBP/DBI-related sequences in the genome. To identify potential members of this gene family, degenerate oligonucleotides corresponding to highly conserved regions of ACBP/DBI were used to screen a human genomic DNA library using the polymerase chain reaction. A novel gene, DBIP1, that is closely related to ACBP/DBI but is clearly distinct was identified. DBIP1 bears extensive sequence homology to ACBP/DBI but lacks the introns predicted by rat and duck genomic sequence studies. A 1-base deletion in the coding region results in a frameshift and, along with the absence of introns and the lack of a detectable transcript, suggests that DBIP1 is a pseudogene. ACBP/DBI has previously been mapped to chromosome 2, although this was recently disputed, and a chromosome 6 location was suggested. We show that ACBP/DBI is correctly placed on chromosome 2 and that the gene identified on chromosome 6 is DBIP1. 33 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  8. The crystal structure of avian CD1 reveals a smaller, more primordial antigen-binding pocket compared to mammalian CD1

    PubMed Central

    Zajonc, Dirk M.; Striegl, Harald; Dascher, Christopher C.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2008-01-01

    The molecular details of glycolipid presentation by CD1 antigen-presenting molecules are well studied in mammalian systems. However, little is known about how these non-classical MHC class I (MHCI) molecules diverged from the MHC locus to create a more complex, hydrophobic binding groove that binds lipids rather than peptides. To address this fundamental question, we have determined the crystal structure of an avian CD1 (chCD1–2) that shares common ancestry with mammalian CD1 from ≈310 million years ago. The chCD1–2 antigen-binding site consists of a compact, narrow, central hydrophobic groove or pore rather than the more open, 2-pocket architecture observed in mammalian CD1s. Potential antigens then would be restricted in size to single-chain lipids or glycolipids. An endogenous ligand, possibly palmitic acid, serves to illuminate the mode and mechanism of ligand interaction with chCD1–2. The palmitate alkyl chain is inserted into the relatively shallow hydrophobic pore; its carboxyl group emerges at the receptor surface and is stabilized by electrostatic and hydrogen bond interactions with an arginine residue that is conserved in all known CD1 proteins. In addition, other novel features, such as an A′ loop that interrupts and segments the normally long, continuous α1 helix, are unique to chCD1–2 and contribute to the unusually narrow binding groove, thereby limiting its size. Because birds and mammals share a common ancestor, but the rate of evolution is slower in birds than in mammals, the chCD1–2-binding groove probably represents a more primordial CD1-binding groove. PMID:19004781

  9. Structural Asymmetry of Phosphodiesterase-9A and a Unique Pocket for Selective Binding of a Potent Enantiomeric Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Manna; Shao, Yongxian; Hou, Jianying; Cui, Wenjun; Liang, Beibei; Huang, Yingchun; Li, Zhe; Wu, Yinuo; Zhu, Xinhai; Liu, Peiqing

    2015-01-01

    Phosphodiesterase-9 (PDE9) inhibitors have been studied as potential therapeutics for treatment of central nervous system diseases and diabetes. Here, we report the discovery of a new category of PDE9 inhibitors by rational design on the basis of the crystal structures. The best compound, (S)-6-((1-(4-chlorophenyl)ethyl)amino)-1-cyclopentyl-1,5,6,7-tetrahydro-4H-pyrazolo[3,4-day]pyrimidin-4-one [(S)-C33], has an IC50 value of 11 nM against PDE9 and the racemic C33 has bioavailability of 56.5% in the rat pharmacokinetic model. The crystal structures of PDE9 in the complex with racemic C33, (R)-C33, and (S)-C33 reveal subtle conformational asymmetry of two M-loops in the PDE9 dimer and different conformations of two C33 enantiomers. The structures also identified a small hydrophobic pocket that interacts with the tyrosyl tail of (S)-C33 but not with (R)-C33, and is thus possibly useful for improvement of selectivity of PDE9 inhibitors. The asymmetry of the M-loop and the different interactions of the C33 enantiomers imply the necessity to consider the whole PDE9 dimer in the design of inhibitors. PMID:26316540

  10. Azurin as a protein scaffold for a low-coordinate non-heme iron site with a small-molecule binding pocket

    PubMed Central

    McLaughlin, Matthew P.; Retegan, Marius; Bill, Eckhard; Payne, Thomas M.; Shafaat, Hannah S.; Peña, Salvador; Sudhamsu, Jawahar; Ensign, Amy A.; Crane, Brian R.; Neese, Frank; Holland, Patrick L.

    2012-01-01

    The apo-protein of Pseudomonas aeruginosa azurin binds iron(II) to give a 1:1 complex, which has been characterized by electronic absorption, Mössbauer, and NMR spectroscopies, as well as X-ray crystallography and quantum-chemical computations. Despite potential competition by water and other coordinating residues, iron(II) binds tightly to the low-coordinate site. The iron(II) complex does not react with chemical redox agents to undergo oxidation or reduction. Spectroscopically-calibrated quantum-chemical computations show that the complex has high-spin iron(II) in a pseudotetrahedral coordination environment, which features interactions with side chains of two histidines and a cysteine, as well as the C=O of Gly45. In the 5A1 ground state, the dz2 orbital is doubly occupied. Mutation of Met121 to Ala leaves the metal site in a similar environment, but creates a pocket for reversible binding of small anions to the iron(II) center. Specifically, azide forms a high-spin iron(II) complex and cyanide forms a low-spin iron(II) complex. PMID:23167247

  11. Cyanide binding to hexacoordinate cyanobacterial hemoglobins: hydrogen-bonding network and heme pocket rearrangement in ferric H117A Synechocystis hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Vu, B Christie; Nothnagel, Henry J; Vuletich, David A; Falzone, Christopher J; Lecomte, Juliette T J

    2004-10-05

    The truncated hemoglobin (Hb) from the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 is a bis-histidyl hexacoordinate complex in the absence of exogenous ligands. This protein can form a covalent cross-link between His117 in the H-helix and the heme 2-vinyl group. Cross-linking, the physiological importance of which has not been established, is avoided with the His117Ala substitution. In the present work, H117A Hb was used to explore exogenous ligand binding to the heme group. NMR and thermal denaturation data showed that the replacement was of little consequence to the structural and thermodynamic properties of ferric Synechocystis Hb. It did, however, decelerate the association of cyanide ions with the heme iron. Full complexation required hours, instead of minutes, of incubation at optical and NMR concentrations. At neutral pH and in the presence of excess cyanide, binding occurred with a first-order dependence on cyanide concentration, eliminating distal histidine decoordination as the rate-limiting step. The cyanide complex of the H117A variant was characterized for the conformational changes occurring as the histidine on the distal side, His46 (E10), was displaced. Extensive rearrangement allowed Tyr22 (B10) to insert in the heme pocket and Gln43 (E7) and Gln47 (E11) to come in contact with it. H-bond formation to the bound cyanide was identified in solution with the use of (1)H(2)O/(2)H(2)O mixtures. Cyanide binding also resulted in a change in the ratio of heme orientational isomers, in a likely manifestation of heme environment reshaping. Similar observations were made with the related Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 H117A Hb, except that cyanide binding was rapid in this protein. In both cases, the (15)N chemical shift of bound cyanide was reminiscent of that in peroxidases and the orientation of the proximal histidine was as in other truncated Hbs. The ensemble of the data provided insight into the structural cooperativity of the heme pocket scaffold and pointed

  12. Ligand-binding pocket bridges DNA-binding and dimerization domains of the urate-responsive MarR homologue MftR from Burkholderia thailandensis.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ashish; Grove, Anne

    2014-07-15

    Members of the multiple antibiotic resistance regulator (MarR) family often regulate gene activity by responding to a specific ligand. In the absence of ligand, most MarR proteins function as repressors, while ligand binding causes attenuated DNA binding and therefore increased gene expression. Previously, we have shown that urate is a ligand for MftR (major facilitator transport regulator), which is encoded by the soil bacterium Burkholderia thailandensis. We show here that both mftR and the divergently oriented gene mftP encoding a major facilitator transport protein are upregulated in the presence of urate. MftR binds two cognate sites in the mftR-mftP intergenic region with equivalent affinity and sensitivity to urate. Mutagenesis of four conserved residues previously reported to be involved in urate binding to Deinococcus radiodurans HucR and Rhizobium radiobacter PecS significantly reduced protein stability and DNA binding affinity but not ligand binding. These data suggest that residues equivalent to those implicated in ligand binding to HucR and PecS serve structural roles and that MftR relies on distinct residues for ligand binding. MftR exhibits a two-step melting transition suggesting independent unfolding of the dimerization and DNA-binding regions; urate binding or mutations in the predicted ligand-binding sites result in one-step unfolding transitions. We suggest that MftR binds the ligand in a cleft between the DNA-binding lobes and the dimer interface but that the mechanism of ligand-mediated attenuation of DNA binding differs from that proposed for other urate-responsive MarR homologues. Since DNA binding by MftR is attenuated at 37 °C, our data also suggest that MftR responds to both ligand and a thermal upshift by attenuated DNA binding and upregulation of the genes under its control.

  13. Arabidopsis acyl-CoA-binding proteins ACBP4 and ACBP5 are subcellularly localized to the cytosol and ACBP4 depletion affects membrane lipid composition.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Shi; Li, Hong-Ye; Zhang, Jiao-Ping; Chan, Suk-Wah; Chye, Mee-Len

    2008-12-01

    In Arabidopsis thaliana, acyl-CoA-binding proteins (ACBPs) are encoded by six genes, and they display varying affinities for acyl-CoA esters. Recombinant ACBP4 and ACBP5 have been shown to bind oleoyl-CoA esters in vitro. In this study, the subcellular localizations of ACBP4 and ACBP5 were determined by biochemical fractionation followed by western blot analyses using anti-ACBP4 and anti-ACBP5 antibodies and immuno-electron microscopy. Confocal microscopy of autofluorescence-tagged ACBP4 and ACBP5, expressed transiently in onion epidermal cells and in transgenic Arabidopsis, confirmed their expression in the cytosol. Taken together, ACBP4 and ACBP5 are available in the cytosol to bind and transfer cytosolic oleoyl-CoA esters. Lipid profile analysis further revealed that an acbp4 knockout mutant showed decreases in membrane lipids (digalactosyldiacylglycerol, monogalactosyldiacylglycerol, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylinositol) while acbp4-complemented lines attained levels similar to wild type, suggesting that ACBP4 plays a role in the biosynthesis of membrane lipids including galactolipids and phospholipids.

  14. Crystal structures of bovine CD1d reveal altered αGalCer presentation and a restricted A' pocket unable to bind long-chain glycolipids.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Guillaume, Joren; Pauwels, Nora; Van Calenbergh, Serge; Van Rhijn, Ildiko; Zajonc, Dirk M

    2012-01-01

    NKT cells play important roles in immune surveillance. They rapidly respond to pathogens by detecting microbial glycolipids when presented by the non-classical MHC I homolog CD1d. Previously, ruminants were considered to lack NKT cells due to the lack of a functional CD1D gene. However, recent data suggest that cattle express CD1d with unknown function. In an attempt to characterize the function of bovine CD1d, we assessed the lipid binding properties of recombinant Bos taurus CD1d (boCD1d) in vitro. BoCD1d is able to bind glycosphingolipids (GSLs) with fatty acid chain lengths of C₁₈, while GSLs with fatty acids of C₂₄ do not bind. Crystal structures of boCD1d bound to a short-chain C₁₂-di-sulfatide antigen, as well as short-chain C₁₆-αGalCer revealed that the Á pocket of boCD1d is restricted in size compared to that of both mouse and human CD1d, explaining the inability of long chain GSL's to bind to boCD1d. Moreover, while di-sulfatide is presented similarly compared to the presentation of sulfatide by mouse CD1d, αGalCer is presented differently at the cell surface, due to an amino acid Asp151Asn substitution that results in loss of intimate contacts between the αGalCer headgroup and CD1d. The altered αGalCer presentation by boCD1d also explains its lack of cross-activation of mouse iNKT cells and raises the interesting question of the nature and function of bovine lipid-reactive T cells.

  15. Crystal Structures of Bovine CD1d Reveal Altered αGalCer Presentation and a Restricted A’ Pocket Unable to Bind Long-Chain Glycolipids

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Guillaume, Joren; Pauwels, Nora; Van Calenbergh, Serge; Van Rhijn, Ildiko; Zajonc, Dirk M.

    2012-01-01

    NKT cells play important roles in immune surveillance. They rapidly respond to pathogens by detecting microbial glycolipids when presented by the non-classical MHC I homolog CD1d. Previously, ruminants were considered to lack NKT cells due to the lack of a functional CD1D gene. However, recent data suggest that cattle express CD1d with unknown function. In an attempt to characterize the function of bovine CD1d, we assessed the lipid binding properties of recombinant Bos taurus CD1d (boCD1d) in vitro. BoCD1d is able to bind glycosphingolipids (GSLs) with fatty acid chain lengths of C18, while GSLs with fatty acids of C24 do not bind. Crystal structures of boCD1d bound to a short-chain C12-di-sulfatide antigen, as well as short-chain C16-αGalCer revealed that the Á pocket of boCD1d is restricted in size compared to that of both mouse and human CD1d, explaining the inability of long chain GSL’s to bind to boCD1d. Moreover, while di-sulfatide is presented similarly compared to the presentation of sulfatide by mouse CD1d, αGalCer is presented differently at the cell surface, due to an amino acid Asp151Asn substitution that results in loss of intimate contacts between the αGalCer headgroup and CD1d. The altered αGalCer presentation by boCD1d also explains its lack of cross-activation of mouse iNKT cells and raises the interesting question of the nature and function of bovine lipid-reactive T cells. PMID:23110152

  16. Two types of antibodies are induced by vaccination with A/California/2009 pdm virus: binding near the sialic acid-binding pocket and neutralizing both H1N1 and H5N1 viruses.

    PubMed

    Ohshima, Nobuko; Kubota-Koketsu, Ritsuko; Iba, Yoshitaka; Okuno, Yoshinobu; Kurosawa, Yoshikazu

    2014-01-01

    Many people have a history of catching the flu several times during childhood but no additional flu in adulthood, even without vaccination. We analyzed the total repertoire of antibodies (Abs) against influenza A group 1 viruses induced in such a flu-resistant person after vaccination with 2009 H1N1 pandemic influenza virus. They were classified into two types, with no exceptions. The first type, the products of B cells newly induced through vaccination, binds near the sialic acid-binding pocket. The second type, the products of long-lived memory B cells established before vaccination, utilizes the 1-69 VH gene, binds to the stem of HA, and neutralizes both H1N1 and H5N1 viruses with few exceptions. These observations indicate that the sialic acid-binding pocket and its surrounding region are immunogenically very potent and majority of the B cells whose growth is newly induced by vaccination produce Abs that recognize these regions. However, they play a role in protection against influenza virus infection for a short period since variant viruses that have acquired resistance to these Abs become dominant. On the other hand, although the stem of HA is immunogenically not potent, the second type of B cells eventually becomes dominant. Thus, a selection system should function in forming the repertoire of long-lived memory B cells and the stability of the epitope would greatly affect the fate of the memory cells. Acquisition of the ability to produce Abs that bind to the stable epitope could be a major factor of flu resistance.

  17. The HIV gp41 pocket binding domain enables C-terminal heptad repeat transition from mediating membrane fusion to immune modulation.

    PubMed

    Klug, Yoel A; Kapach, Gal; Rotem, Etai; Dubreuil, Benjamin; Shai, Yechiel

    2016-04-01

    For successful infection and propagation viruses must overcome many obstacles such as the immune system and entry into their host cells. HIV utilizes its trimeric envelope protein gp160, specifically the gp41 subunit, to enter its host cell. During this process, a gp41-central coiled coil is formed from three N- and three C-terminal heptad repeats, termed the six-helix bundle (SHB), which drives membrane fusion. Recently, T-cell suppression has been reported as an additional function for several regions of gp41 by interfering with the T-cell receptor (TCR) signalling cascade. One of these regions encompasses the conserved pocket binding domain (PBD) that is situated in the C-terminal heptad repeat (CHR) and stabilizes SHB formation. This could indicate that the PBD plays a role in T-cell suppression in addition to its role in membrane fusion. To investigate this dual function, we used two independent cell cultures coupled with biophysical techniques. The data reveal that the PBD mediates T-cell suppression by stabilizing a TCR-binding conformation in the membrane. Moreover, we show that the clinically used HIV fusion inhibitor T-20 did not show suppressive abilities, in contrast with the potent fusion inhibitor C34. In addition, by focusing on SHB conformation after its assembly, we shed light on a mechanism by which gp41's function alternates from membrane fusion facilitation to suppression of TCR activation.

  18. Primary structure of a cerulenin-binding. beta. -ketoacyl-(acyl carrier protein) synthase from barley chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Siggaard-Andersen, M.; Kauppinen, S. ); von Wettstein-Knowles, P. Univ. of Copenhagen )

    1991-05-15

    The radioactively labeled {beta}-ketoacyl thioester synthase inhibitor ({sup 3}H)cerulenin was used to tag three dimeric barley chloroplast proteins ({alpha}{alpha}, {alpha}{beta}, and {beta}{beta}) from the stromal fraction. Oligonucleotides corresponding to amino acid sequences obtained from the purified proteins were used to generate with the polymerase chain reaction a probe for cDNAs encoding the {beta} subunit. cDNA sequencing revealed an open reading frame for 462 residues comprising the mature protein and a 35-amino acid transit peptide. The deduced amino acid sequence of the mature protein is homologous to the {beta}-ketoacyl-(acyl carrier protein) (ACP) synthase I (3-oxoacyl-ACP synthase; acyl-ACP:malonyl-ACP C-acyltransferase (decarboxylating), EC 2.3.1.41) of Escherichia coli. Under analogous experimental conditions ({sup 3}H)cerulenin tagged a single dimeric protein from spinach chloroplasts.

  19. Structural characterization of acyl-CoA oxidases reveals a direct link between pheromone biosynthesis and metabolic state in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinxing; Li, Kunhua; Jones, Rachel A; Bruner, Steven D; Butcher, Rebecca A

    2016-09-06

    Caenorhabditis elegans secretes ascarosides as pheromones to communicate with other worms and to coordinate the development and behavior of the population. Peroxisomal β-oxidation cycles shorten the side chains of ascaroside precursors to produce the short-chain ascaroside pheromones. Acyl-CoA oxidases, which catalyze the first step in these β-oxidation cycles, have different side chain-length specificities and enable C. elegans to regulate the production of specific ascaroside pheromones. Here, we determine the crystal structure of the acyl-CoA oxidase 1 (ACOX-1) homodimer and the ACOX-2 homodimer bound to its substrate. Our results provide a molecular basis for the substrate specificities of the acyl-CoA oxidases and reveal why some of these enzymes have a very broad substrate range, whereas others are quite specific. Our results also enable predictions to be made for the roles of uncharacterized acyl-CoA oxidases in C. elegans and in other nematode species. Remarkably, we show that most of the C. elegans acyl-CoA oxidases that participate in ascaroside biosynthesis contain a conserved ATP-binding pocket that lies at the dimer interface, and we identify key residues in this binding pocket. ATP binding induces a structural change that is associated with tighter binding of the FAD cofactor. Mutations that disrupt ATP binding reduce FAD binding and reduce enzyme activity. Thus, ATP may serve as a regulator of acyl-CoA oxidase activity, thereby directly linking ascaroside biosynthesis to ATP concentration and metabolic state.

  20. Structural characterization of acyl-CoA oxidases reveals a direct link between pheromone biosynthesis and metabolic state in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xinxing; Jones, Rachel A.; Bruner, Steven D.; Butcher, Rebecca A.

    2016-01-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans secretes ascarosides as pheromones to communicate with other worms and to coordinate the development and behavior of the population. Peroxisomal β-oxidation cycles shorten the side chains of ascaroside precursors to produce the short-chain ascaroside pheromones. Acyl-CoA oxidases, which catalyze the first step in these β-oxidation cycles, have different side chain-length specificities and enable C. elegans to regulate the production of specific ascaroside pheromones. Here, we determine the crystal structure of the acyl-CoA oxidase 1 (ACOX-1) homodimer and the ACOX-2 homodimer bound to its substrate. Our results provide a molecular basis for the substrate specificities of the acyl-CoA oxidases and reveal why some of these enzymes have a very broad substrate range, whereas others are quite specific. Our results also enable predictions to be made for the roles of uncharacterized acyl-CoA oxidases in C. elegans and in other nematode species. Remarkably, we show that most of the C. elegans acyl-CoA oxidases that participate in ascaroside biosynthesis contain a conserved ATP-binding pocket that lies at the dimer interface, and we identify key residues in this binding pocket. ATP binding induces a structural change that is associated with tighter binding of the FAD cofactor. Mutations that disrupt ATP binding reduce FAD binding and reduce enzyme activity. Thus, ATP may serve as a regulator of acyl-CoA oxidase activity, thereby directly linking ascaroside biosynthesis to ATP concentration and metabolic state. PMID:27551084

  1. Allosteric remodelling of the histone H3 binding pocket in the Pygo2 PHD finger triggered by its binding to the B9L/BCL9 co-factor.

    PubMed

    Miller, Thomas C R; Rutherford, Trevor J; Johnson, Christopher M; Fiedler, Marc; Bienz, Mariann

    2010-09-03

    The Zn-coordinated PHD fingers of Pygopus (Pygo) proteins are critical for beta-catenin-dependent transcriptional switches in normal and malignant tissues. They bind to methylated histone H3 tails, assisted by their BCL9 co-factors whose homology domain 1 (HD1) binds to the rear PHD surface. Although histone-binding residues are identical between the two human Pygo paralogs, we show here that Pygo2 complexes exhibit slightly higher binding affinities for methylated histone H3 tail peptides than Pygo1 complexes. We solved the crystal structure of the Pygo2 PHD-BCL9-2 HD1 complex, which revealed paralog-specific interactions in its PHD-HD1 interface that could contribute indirectly to its elevated affinity for the methylated histone H3 tail. Interestingly, using NMR spectroscopy, we discovered that HD1 binding to PHD triggers an allosteric communication with a conserved isoleucine residue that lines the binding channel for histone H3 threonine 3 (T3), the link between the two adjacent binding pockets accommodating histone H3 alanine 1 and methylated lysine 4, respectively. This modulates the surface of the T3 channel, providing a plausible explanation as to how BCL9 co-factors binding to Pygo PHD fingers impact indirectly on their histone binding affinity. Intriguingly, this allosteric modulation of the T3 channel is propagated through the PHD structural core by a highly conserved tryptophan, the signature residue defining the PHD subclass of Zn fingers, which suggests that other PHD proteins may also be assisted by co-factors in their decoding of modified histone H3 tails.

  2. Quantum Hall conductance and de Haas-van Alphen oscillation in a tight-binding model with electron and hole pockets for (TMTSF) 2NO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishigi, Keita; Hasegawa, Yasumasa

    2016-08-01

    Quantized Hall conductance and de Haas-van Alphen (dHvA) oscillation are studied theoretically in the tight-binding model for (TMTSF) 2NO3 , in which there are small pockets of electrons and holes due to the periodic potentials of anion ordering in the a direction. The magnetic field is treated by hoppings as complex numbers due to the phase caused by the vector potential, i.e., Peierls substitution. In realistic values of parameters and the magnetic field, the energy as a function of the magnetic field (Hofstadter butterfly diagram) is obtained. It is shown that the energy levels are broadened and the gaps are closed or almost closed periodically as a function of the inverse magnetic field, which is not seen in the semiclassical theory of the magnetic breakdown. The Hall conductance is quantized with an integer obtained by the Diophantine equation when the chemical potential lies in an energy gap. When electrons or holes are doped in this system, the Hall conductance is quantized in some regions of a magnetic field but it is not quantized in other regions of a magnetic field due to the broadening of the Landau levels. The amplitude of the dHvA oscillation at zero temperature decreases as the magnetic field increases, while it is constant in the semiclassical Lifshitz Kosevich formula.

  3. Alteration of the specificity of the cofactor-binding pocket of Corynebacterium 2,5-diketo-D-gluconic acid reductase A.

    PubMed

    Banta, Scott; Swanson, Barbara A; Wu, Shan; Jarnagin, Alisha; Anderson, Stephen

    2002-02-01

    The NADPH-dependent 2,5-diketo-D-gluconic acid (2,5-DKG) reductase enzyme is a required component in some novel biosynthetic vitamin C production processes. This enzyme catalyzes the conversion of 2,5-DKG to 2-keto-L-gulonic acid, which is an immediate precursor to L-ascorbic acid. Forty unique site-directed mutations were made at five residues in the cofactor-binding pocket of 2,5-DKG reductase A in an attempt to improve its ability to use NADH as a cofactor. NADH is more stable, less expensive and more prevalent in the cell than is NADPH. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first focused attempt to alter the cofactor specificity of a member of the aldo-keto reductase superfamily by engineering improved activity with NADH into the enzyme. Activity of the mutants with NADH or NADPH was assayed using activity-stained native polyacrylamide gels. Eight of the mutants at three different sites were identified as having improved activity with NADH. These mutants were purified and subjected to a kinetic characterization with NADH as a cofactor. The best mutant obtained, R238H, produced an almost 7-fold improvement in catalysis with NADH compared with the wild-type enzyme. Surprisingly, most of this catalytic improvement appeared to be due to an improvement in the apparent kcat for the reaction rather than a large improvement in the affinity of the enzyme for NADH.

  4. Strength of hydrogen bond network takes crucial roles in the dissociation process of inhibitors from the HIV-1 protease binding pocket.

    PubMed

    Li, Dechang; Ji, Baohua; Hwang, Keh-Chih; Huang, Yonggang

    2011-04-29

    To understand the underlying mechanisms of significant differences in dissociation rate constant among different inhibitors for HIV-1 protease, we performed steered molecular dynamics (SMD) simulations to analyze the entire dissociation processes of inhibitors from the binding pocket of protease at atomistic details. We found that the strength of hydrogen bond network between inhibitor and the protease takes crucial roles in the dissociation process. We showed that the hydrogen bond network in the cyclic urea inhibitors AHA001/XK263 is less stable than that of the approved inhibitor ABT538 because of their large differences in the structures of the networks. In the cyclic urea inhibitor bound complex, the hydrogen bonds often distribute at the flap tips and the active site. In contrast, there are additional accessorial hydrogen bonds formed at the lateral sides of the flaps and the active site in the ABT538 bound complex, which take crucial roles in stabilizing the hydrogen bond network. In addition, the water molecule W301 also plays important roles in stabilizing the hydrogen bond network through its flexible movement by acting as a collision buffer and helping the rebinding of hydrogen bonds at the flap tips. Because of its high stability, the hydrogen bond network of ABT538 complex can work together with the hydrophobic clusters to resist the dissociation, resulting in much lower dissociation rate constant than those of cyclic urea inhibitor complexes. This study may provide useful guidelines for design of novel potent inhibitors with optimized interactions.

  5. Effects of genetic replacements of charged and H-bonding residues in the retinal pocket on Ca2+ binding to deionized bacteriorhodopsin.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Y N; el-Sayed, M A; Bonet, M L; Lanyi, J K; Chang, M; Ni, B; Needleman, R

    1993-01-01

    Metal cations are known to be required for proton pumping by bacteriorhodopsin (bR). Previous studies found that bR has two high-affinity and four to six low-affinity Ca(2+)-binding sites. In our efforts to find the location of these Ca2+ sites, the effects of replacing charged (Asp-85, Asp-212, and Arg-82) and H-bonding (Tyr-185) residues in the retinal pocket on the color control and binding affinity of Ca2+ ions in Ca(2+)-regenerated bR were examined. The important results are as follows: (i) The removal of Ca2+ from recombinant bR in which charged residues were replaced by neutral ones shifted the retinal absorption to the blue, opposite to that observed in wild-type bR or in recombinant bR in which the H-bonding residue, Tyr-185, was replaced by a non-H-bonding amino acid (Phe). (ii) Similar to the observation in wild-type bR, the binding of Ca2+ to the second site gave the observed color change in the recombinant bR samples in which charged residues were replaced by neutral ones. (iii) The residue replacements had no effect on the affinity constants of the four to six weakly bound Ca2+. (iv) The two high-affinity sites exhibited reduced affinity with substitutions; while the extent of the reduction depended on the specific substitution, each site was reduced by the same factor for each of the charged residue substitutions but by different factors for the mutant where Tyr-185 was replaced with Phe(Y185F). The above results suggest that the two Ca2+ ions in the two high-affinity sites are within interaction distance with one another and with the charged residues in the retinal pocket. The results further suggest that, while the interaction between Tyr-185 and the high-affinity Ca2+ ions is relatively short range and specific (with more coupling to the Ca2+ ion in the second affinity site), between the charged residues and Ca2+ ions it seems to be of the electrostatic (e.g., ion-ion) long range, nonspecific type. Although neither Asp-85, Asp-212, nor Arg-82 is

  6. Isolation and characterization of a cDNA encoding a membrane bound acyl-CoA binding protein from Agave americana L. epidermis.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Consuelo; Martín-Rufián, M; Reina, José J; Heredia, Antonio

    2006-01-01

    A cDNA encoding an acyl-CoA binding protein (ACBP) homologue has been cloned from a cDNA library made from mRNA isolated from epidermis of young leaves of Agave americana L. The derived amino acid sequence reveals a protein corresponding to the membrane-associated form of ACBPs only previously described in Arabidopsis and rice. Northern blot analysis showed that the A. americana ACBP gene is mainly expressed in the epidermis of mature zone of the leaves. The epidermis of A. americana leaves have a well developed cuticle with the highest amounts of the cuticular components waxes, cutin and cutan suggesting a potential role of the protein in cuticle formation.

  7. The putative pocket protein binding site of Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus BV/ODV-C42 is required for virus-induced nuclear actin polymerization.

    PubMed

    Li, Kun; Wang, Yun; Bai, Huimin; Wang, Qian; Song, Jianhua; Zhou, Yuan; Wu, Chunchen; Chen, Xinwen

    2010-08-01

    Nuclear filamentous actin (F-actin) is essential for nucleocapsid morphogenesis of lepidopteran nucleopolyhedroviruses. Previously, we had demonstrated that Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) BV/ODV-C42 (C42) is involved in nuclear actin polymerization by recruiting P78/83, an AcMNPV orf9-encoded N-WASP homology protein that is capable of activating an actin-related-protein 2/3 (Arp2/3) complex to initiate actin polymerization, to the nucleus. To further investigate the role of C42 in virus-induced actin polymerization, the recombinant bacmid vAc(p78/83nls-gfp), with a c42 knockout, p78/83 tagged with a nuclear localization signal coding sequence, and egfp as a reporter gene under the control of the Pp10 promoter, was constructed and transfected to Sf9 cells. In the nuclei of vAc(p78/83nls-gfp)-transfected cells, polymerized F-actin filaments were absent, whereas other actin polymerization elements (i.e., P78/83, G-actin, and Arp2/3 complex) were present. This in vivo evidence indicated that C42 actively participates in the nuclear actin polymerization process as a key element, besides its role in recruiting P78/83 to the nucleus. In order to collect in vitro evidence for the participation of C42 in actin polymerization, an anti-C42 antibody was used to neutralize the viral nucleocapsid, which is capable of initiating actin polymerization in vitro. Both the kinetics of pyrene-actin polymerization and F-actin-specific staining by phalloidin indicated that anti-C42 can significantly attenuate the efficiency of F-actin formation compared to that with control antibodies. Furthermore, we have identified the putative pocket protein binding sequence (PPBS) on C42 that is essential for C42 to exert its function in nuclear actin polymerization.

  8. Crystal structure of tert-butyldimethylsilyl-spiroaminooxathioledioxide-thymine (TSAO-T) in complex with HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) redefines the elastic limits of the non-nucleoside inhibitor-binding pocket

    PubMed Central

    Das, Kalyan; Bauman, Joseph D.; Rim, Angela S.; Dharia, Chhaya; Clark, Arthur D.; Camarasa, María-José; Balzarini, Jan; Arnold, Eddy

    2012-01-01

    Tert-butyldimethylsilyl-spiroaminooxathioledioxide (TSAO) compounds have an embedded thymidine-analog backbone; however, TSAO compounds invoke non-nucleoside RT inhibitor (NNRTI) resistance mutations. Our crystal structure of RT:7 (TSAO-T) complex shows that 7 binds inside the NNRTI-binding pocket assuming a “dragon” shape, and interacts extensively with almost all the pocket residues. The structure also explains the structure-activity relationships and resistance data for TSAO compounds. The binding of 7 causes hyper-expansion of the pocket and significant rearrangement of RT subdomains. This non-optimal complex formation is apparently responsible (1) for the lower stability of a RT (p66/p51) dimer and (2) for the lower potency of 7 despite of its extensive interactions with RT. However, the HIV-1 RT:7 structure reveals novel design features, such as (1) interactions with the conserved Tyr183 from the YMDD-motif and (2) a possible way for an NNRTI to reach the polymerase active site that may be exploited in designing new NNRTIs. PMID:21446702

  9. Arabidopsis acyl-CoA-binding protein ACBP3 participates in plant response to hypoxia by modulating very-long-chain fatty acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Xie, Li-Juan; Yu, Lu-Jun; Chen, Qin-Fang; Wang, Feng-Zhu; Huang, Li; Xia, Fan-Nv; Zhu, Tian-Ren; Wu, Jian-Xin; Yin, Jian; Liao, Bin; Yao, Nan; Shu, Wensheng; Xiao, Shi

    2015-01-01

    In Arabidopsis thaliana, acyl-CoA-binding proteins (ACBPs) are encoded by a family of six genes (ACBP1 to ACBP6), and are essential for diverse cellular activities. Recent investigations suggest that the membrane-anchored ACBPs are involved in oxygen sensing by sequestration of group VII ethylene-responsive factors under normoxia. Here, we demonstrate the involvement of Arabidopsis ACBP3 in hypoxic tolerance. ACBP3 transcription was remarkably induced following submergence under both dark (DS) and light (LS) conditions. ACBP3-overexpressors (ACBP3-OEs) showed hypersensitivity to DS, LS and ethanolic stresses, with reduced transcription of hypoxia-responsive genes as well as accumulation of hydrogen peroxide in the rosettes. In contrast, suppression of ACBP3 in ACBP3-KOs enhanced plant tolerance to DS, LS and ethanol treatments. By analyses of double combinations of OE-1 with npr1-5, coi1-2, ein3-1 as well as ctr1-1 mutants, we observed that the attenuated hypoxic tolerance in ACBP3-OEs was dependent on NPR1- and CTR1-mediated signaling pathways. Lipid profiling revealed that both the total amounts and very-long-chain species of phosphatidylserine (C42:2- and C42:3-PS) and glucosylinositolphosphorylceramides (C22:0-, C22:1-, C24:0-, C24:1-, and C26:1-GIPC) were significantly lower in ACBP3-OEs but increased in ACBP3-KOs upon LS exposure. By microscale thermophoresis analysis, the recombinant ACBP3 protein bound VLC acyl-CoA esters with high affinities in vitro. Further, a knockout mutant of MYB30, a master regulator of very-long-chain fatty acid (VLCFA) biosynthesis, exhibited enhanced sensitivities to LS and ethanolic stresses, phenotypes that were ameliorated by ACBP3-RNAi. Taken together, these findings suggest that Arabidopsis ACBP3 participates in plant response to hypoxia by modulating VLCFA metabolism.

  10. Binding Sites for Acylated Trehalose Analogs of Glycolipid Ligands on an Extended Carbohydrate Recognition Domain of the Macrophage Receptor Mincle*

    PubMed Central

    Feinberg, Hadar; Rambaruth, Neela D. S.; Jégouzo, Sabine A. F.; Jacobsen, Kristian M.; Djurhuus, Rasmus; Poulsen, Thomas B.; Weis, William I.; Taylor, Maureen E.; Drickamer, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    The macrophage receptor mincle binds to trehalose dimycolate on the surface of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Signaling initiated by this interaction leads to cytokine production, which underlies the ability of mycobacteria to evade the immune system and also to function as adjuvants. In previous work the mechanism for binding of the sugar headgroup of trehalose dimycolate to mincle has been elucidated, but the basis for enhanced binding to glycolipid ligands, in which hydrophobic substituents are attached to the 6-hydroxyl groups, has been the subject of speculation. In the work reported here, the interaction of trehalose derivatives with bovine mincle has been probed with a series of synthetic mimics of trehalose dimycolate in binding assays, in structural studies by x-ray crystallography, and by site-directed mutagenesis. Binding studies reveal that, rather than reflecting specific structural preference, the apparent affinity of mincle for ligands with hydrophobic substituents correlates with their overall size. Structural and mutagenesis analysis provides evidence for interaction of the hydrophobic substituents with multiple different portions of the surface of mincle and confirms the presence of three Ca2+-binding sites. The structure of an extended portion of the extracellular domain of mincle, beyond the minimal C-type carbohydrate recognition domain, also constrains the way the binding domains may interact on the surface of macrophages. PMID:27542410

  11. Exploitation of a Novel Binding Pocket in Human Lipoprotein-Associated Phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2) Discovered through X-ray Fragment Screening.

    PubMed

    Woolford, Alison J-A; Pero, Joseph E; Aravapalli, Sridhar; Berdini, Valerio; Coyle, Joseph E; Day, Philip J; Dodson, Andrew M; Grondin, Pascal; Holding, Finn P; Lee, Lydia Y W; Li, Peng; Manas, Eric S; Marino, Joseph; Martin, Agnes C L; McCleland, Brent W; McMenamin, Rachel L; Murray, Christopher W; Neipp, Christopher E; Page, Lee W; Patel, Vipulkumar K; Potvain, Florent; Rich, Sharna; Rivero, Ralph A; Smith, Kirsten; Somers, Donald O; Trottet, Lionel; Velagaleti, Ranganadh; Williams, Glyn; Xie, Ren

    2016-06-09

    Elevated levels of human lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2) are associated with cardiovascular disease and dementia. A fragment screen was conducted against Lp-PLA2 in order to identify novel inhibitors. Multiple fragment hits were observed in different regions of the active site, including some hits that bound in a pocket created by movement of a protein side chain (approximately 13 Å from the catalytic residue Ser273). Using structure guided design, we optimized a fragment that bound in this pocket to generate a novel low nanomolar chemotype, which did not interact with the catalytic residues.

  12. Detection of multiscale pockets on protein surfaces using mathematical morphology.

    PubMed

    Kawabata, Takeshi

    2010-04-01

    Detection of pockets on protein surfaces is an important step toward finding the binding sites of small molecules. In a previous study, we defined a pocket as a space into which a small spherical probe can enter, but a large probe cannot. The radius of the large probes corresponds to the shallowness of pockets. We showed that each type of binding molecule has a characteristic shallowness distribution. In this study, we introduced fundamental changes to our previous algorithm by using a 3D grid representation of proteins and probes, and the theory of mathematical morphology. We invented an efficient algorithm for calculating deep and shallow pockets (multiscale pockets) simultaneously, using several different sizes of spherical probes (multiscale probes). We implemented our algorithm as a new program, ghecom (grid-based HECOMi finder). The statistics of calculated pockets for the structural dataset showed that our program had a higher performance of detecting binding pockets, than four other popular pocket-finding programs proposed previously. The ghecom also calculates the shallowness of binding ligands, R(inaccess) (minimum radius of inaccessible spherical probes) that can be obtained from the multiscale molecular volume. We showed that each part of the binding molecule had a bias toward a specific range of shallowness. These findings will be useful for predicting the types of molecules that will be most likely to bind putative binding pockets, as well as the configurations of binding molecules. The program ghecom is available through the Web server (http://biunit.naist.jp/ghecom).

  13. Efficient Binding of the NOS1AP C-Terminus to the nNOS PDZ Pocket Requires the Concerted Action of the PDZ Ligand Motif, the Internal ExF Site and Structural Integrity of an Independent Element

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li-Li; Cisek, Katryna; Courtney, Michael J.

    2017-01-01

    Neuronal nitric oxide synthase is widely regarded as an important contributor to a number of disorders of excitable tissues. Recently the adaptor protein NOS1AP has emerged as a contributor to several nNOS-linked conditions. As a consequence, the unexpectedly complex mechanisms of interaction between nNOS and its effector NOS1AP have become a particularly interesting topic from the point of view of both basic research and the potential for therapeutic applications. Here we demonstrate that the concerted action of two previously described motif regions contributing to the interaction of nNOS with NOS1AP, the ExF region and the PDZ ligand motif, efficiently excludes an alternate ligand from the nNOS-PDZ ligand-binding pocket. Moreover, we identify an additional element with a denaturable structure that contributes to interaction of NOS1AP with nNOS. Denaturation does not affect the functions of the individual motifs and results in a relatively mild drop, ∼3-fold, of overall binding affinity of the C-terminal region of NOS1AP for nNOS. However, denaturation selectively prevents the concerted action of the two motifs that normally results in efficient occlusion of the PDZ ligand-binding pocket, and results in 30-fold reduction of competition between NOS1AP and an alternate PDZ ligand. PMID:28360833

  14. Solution-state (15)N NMR spectroscopic study of alpha-C-phycocyanin: implications for the structure of the chromophore-binding pocket of the cyanobacterial phytochrome Cph1.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Janina; Kühne, Ronald; Schmieder, Peter

    2007-12-17

    The detailed structure of the chromophore-binding pocket in phytochrome proteins and the structural changes associated with its photocycle are still matters of debate. Insight into the structure and dynamics of the binding pocket has been gained through the comparison of a (15)N NMR spectrum of alpha-C-phycocyanin, which is often used as a model system for the study of phytochromes, with the previously described (15)N NMR spectrum of the cyanobacterial phytochrome Cph1. The former spectrum supports the hypothesis that all four nitrogen atoms of the alpha-C-phycocyanin chromophore are protonated, in analogy with the proposed protonation state for the P(r) and P(fr) forms of Cph1. The spectra show that the chromophores in both proteins exhibit a distinct dynamic behavior, as also indicated by a NOESY spectrum of Cph1. Finally, stereochemical arguments and a Cph1 homology model support the hypothesis that the chromophore in Cph1 is most likely in the ZZZssa conformation in the P(r) form of the protein.

  15. A synthetic peptide targeting the BH4 domain of Bcl-2 induces apoptosis in multiple myeloma and follicular lymphoma cells alone or in combination with agents targeting the BH3-binding pocket of Bcl-2.

    PubMed

    Lavik, Andrew R; Zhong, Fei; Chang, Ming-Jin; Greenberg, Edward; Choudhary, Yuvraj; Smith, Mitchell R; McColl, Karen S; Pink, John; Reu, Frederic J; Matsuyama, Shigemi; Distelhorst, Clark W

    2015-09-29

    Bcl-2 inhibits apoptosis by two distinct mechanisms but only one is targeted to treat Bcl-2-positive malignancies. In this mechanism, the BH1-3 domains of Bcl-2 form a hydrophobic pocket, binding and inhibiting pro-apoptotic proteins, including Bim. In the other mechanism, the BH4 domain mediates interaction of Bcl-2 with inositol 1,4, 5-trisphosphate receptors (IP3Rs), inhibiting pro-apoptotic Ca2+ signals. The current anti-Bcl-2 agents, ABT-263 (Navitoclax) and ABT-199 (Venetoclax), induce apoptosis by displacing pro-apoptotic proteins from the hydrophobic pocket, but do not inhibit Bcl-2-IP3R interaction. Therefore, to target this interaction we developed BIRD-2 (Bcl-2 IP3 Receptor Disruptor-2), a decoy peptide that binds to the BH4 domain, blocking Bcl-2-IP3R interaction and thus inducing Ca2+-mediated apoptosis in chronic lymphocytic leukemia, multiple myeloma, and follicular lymphoma cells, including cells resistant to ABT-263, ABT-199, or the Bruton's tyrosine kinase inhibitor Ibrutinib. Moreover, combining BIRD-2 with ABT-263 or ABT-199 enhances apoptosis induction compared to single agent treatment. Overall, these findings provide strong rationale for developing novel therapeutic agents that mimic the action of BIRD-2 in targeting the BH4 domain of Bcl-2 and disrupting Bcl-2-IP3R interaction.

  16. Acyl-Coenzyme A Binding Protein Regulates Beta Oxidation Required for Growth and Survival of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Fredrick T.; Rahman, S.M. Jamshedur; Hassanein, Mohamed; Qian, Jun; Hoeksema, Megan D.; Chen, Heidi; Eisenberg, Rosana; Chaurand, Pierre; Caprioli, Richard M.; Shiota, Masakazu; Massion, Pierre P.

    2014-01-01

    We identified Acyl-Coenzyme A Binding Protein (ACBP) as part of a proteomic signature predicting the risk of having lung cancer. Because ACBP is known to regulate beta oxidation (β-oxidation), which in turn controls cellular proliferation, we hypothesized that ACBP contributes to regulation of cellular proliferation and survival of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) by modulating β-oxidation. We utilized matrix assisted laser desorption ionization- imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI-IMS) and immunohistochemistry (IHC) to confirm ACBP’s tissue localization in pre-invasive and invasive NSCLCs. We correlated ACBP gene expression levels in NSCLC with clinical outcomes. In loss of function studies, we tested the effect of the downregulation of ACBP on cellular proliferation and apoptosis in normal bronchial and NSCLC cell lines. Using tritiated-palmitate (3H-palmitate), we measured β-oxidation levels and tested the effect of etomoxir, a β-oxidation inhibitor, on proliferation and apoptosis. MALDI-IMS and IHC analysis confirmed that ACBP is overexpressed in preinvasive and invasive lung cancers. High ACBP gene expression levels in NSCLCs correlated with worse survival (HR = 1.73). We observed a 40% decrease in β-oxidation and concordant decreases in proliferation and increases in apoptosis in ACBP depleted NSCLC cells as compared to bronchial airway epithelial cells. Inhibition of β-oxidation by etomoxir in ACBP overexpressing cells produced dose-dependent decrease in proliferation, and increase in apoptosis (p=0.01 and p <0.001 respectively). These data suggest a role for ACBP in controlling lung cancer progression by regulating β-oxidation. PMID:24819876

  17. Conformational landscape of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase non-nucleoside inhibitor binding pocket: lessons for inhibitor design from a cluster analysis of many crystal structures.

    PubMed

    Paris, Kristina A; Haq, Omar; Felts, Anthony K; Das, Kalyan; Arnold, Eddy; Levy, Ronald M

    2009-10-22

    Clustering of 99 available X-ray crystal structures of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) at the flexible non-nucleoside inhibitor binding pocket (NNIBP) provides information about features of the conformational landscape for binding non-nucleoside inhibitors (NNRTIs), including effects of mutation and crystal forms. The ensemble of NNIBP conformations is separated into eight discrete clusters based primarily on the position of the functionally important primer grip, the displacement of which is believed to be one of the mechanisms of inhibition of RT. Two of these clusters are populated by structures in which the primer grip exhibits novel conformations that differ from the predominant cluster by over 4 A and are induced by the unique inhibitors capravirine and rilpivirine/TMC278. This work identifies a new conformation of the NNIBP that may be used to design NNRTIs. It can also be used to guide more complete exploration of the NNIBP free energy landscape using advanced sampling techniques.

  18. Structure of the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase Q151M mutant: insights into the inhibitor resistance of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase and the structure of the nucleotide-binding pocket of Hepatitis B virus polymerase

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Akiyoshi; Tamura, Noriko; Yasutake, Yoshiaki

    2015-10-23

    The structure of the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase Q151M mutant was determined at a resolution of 2.6 Å in space group P321. Hepatitis B virus polymerase (HBV Pol) is an important target for anti-HBV drug development; however, its low solubility and stability in vitro has hindered detailed structural studies. Certain nucleotide reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors (NRTIs) such as tenofovir and lamivudine can inhibit both HBV Pol and Human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) RT, leading to speculation on structural and mechanistic analogies between the deoxynucleotide triphosphate (dNTP)-binding sites of these enzymes. The Q151M mutation in HIV-1 RT, located at the dNTP-binding site, confers resistance to various NRTIs, while maintaining sensitivity to tenofovir and lamivudine. The residue corresponding to Gln151 is strictly conserved as a methionine in HBV Pol. Therefore, the structure of the dNTP-binding pocket of the HIV-1 RT Q151M mutant may reflect that of HBV Pol. Here, the crystal structure of HIV-1 RT Q151M, determined at 2.6 Å resolution, in a new crystal form with space group P321 is presented. Although the structure of HIV-1 RT Q151M superimposes well onto that of HIV-1 RT in a closed conformation, a slight movement of the β-strands (β2–β3) that partially create the dNTP-binding pocket was observed. This movement might be caused by the introduction of the bulky thioether group of Met151. The structure also highlighted the possibility that the hydrogen-bonding network among amino acids and NRTIs is rearranged by the Q151M mutation, leading to a difference in the affinity of NRTIs for HIV-1 RT and HBV Pol.

  19. An Inserted α/β Subdomain Shapes the Catalytic Pocket of Lactobacillus johnsonii Cinnamoyl Esterase

    PubMed Central

    Vu, Clara; Xu, Xiaohui; Cui, Hong; Molloy, Sara; Savchenko, Alexei; Yakunin, Alexander; Gonzalez, Claudio F.

    2011-01-01

    Background Microbial enzymes produced in the gastrointestinal tract are primarily responsible for the release and biochemical transformation of absorbable bioactive monophenols. In the present work we described the crystal structure of LJ0536, a serine cinnamoyl esterase produced by the probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus johnsonii N6.2. Methodology/Principal Findings We crystallized LJ0536 in the apo form and in three substrate-bound complexes. The structure showed a canonical α/β fold characteristic of esterases, and the enzyme is dimeric. Two classical serine esterase motifs (GlyXSerXGly) can be recognized from the amino acid sequence, and the structure revealed that the catalytic triad of the enzyme is formed by Ser106, His225, and Asp197, while the other motif is non-functional. In all substrate-bound complexes, the aromatic acyl group of the ester compound was bound in the deepest part of the catalytic pocket. The binding pocket also contained an unoccupied area that could accommodate larger ligands. The structure revealed a prominent inserted α/β subdomain of 54 amino acids, from which multiple contacts to the aromatic acyl groups of the substrates are made. Inserts of this size are seen in other esterases, but the secondary structure topology of this subdomain of LJ0536 is unique to this enzyme and its closest homolog (Est1E) in the Protein Databank. Conclusions The binding mechanism characterized (involving the inserted α/β subdomain) clearly differentiates LJ0536 from enzymes with similar activity of a fungal origin. The structural features herein described together with the activity profile of LJ0536 suggest that this enzyme should be clustered in a new group of bacterial cinnamoyl esterases. PMID:21876742

  20. Mapping the binding site pocket of the serotonin 5-Hydroxytryptamine2A receptor. Ser3.36(159) provides a second interaction site for the protonated amine of serotonin but not of lysergic acid diethylamide or bufotenin.

    PubMed

    Almaula, N; Ebersole, B J; Zhang, D; Weinstein, H; Sealfon, S C

    1996-06-21

    Like other amine neurotransmitters that activate G-protein-coupled receptors, 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) binds to the 5-HT2A receptor through the interaction of its cationic primary amino group with the conserved Asp3.32(155) in transmembrane helix 3. Computational experiments with a 5-HT2A receptor model suggest that the same functional group of 5-hydroxytryptamine also forms a hydrogen bond with the side chain of Ser3.36(159), which is adjacent in space to Asp3.32(155). However, other 5-HT2A receptor ligands like lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), in which the amine nitrogen is embedded in a heterocycle, or N,N-dimethyl 5-HT, in which the side chain is a tertiary amine, are found in the computational simulations to interact with the aspartate but not with the serine, due mainly to steric hindrance. The predicted difference in the interaction of various ligands in the same receptor binding pocket was tested with site-directed mutagenesis of Ser3.36(159) --> Ala and Ser3.36(159) --> Cys. The alanine substitution led to an 18-fold reduction in 5-HT affinity and the cysteine substitution to an intermediate 5-fold decrease. LSD affinity, in contrast, was unaffected by either mutation. N,N-Dimethyl 5-HT affinity was unaffected by the cysteine mutation and had a comparatively small 3-fold decrease in affinity for the alanine mutant. These findings identify a mode of ligand-receptor complexation that involves two receptor side chains interacting with the same functional group of specific serotonergic ligands. This interaction serves to orient the ligands in the binding pocket and may influence the degree of receptor activation.

  1. Apolar distal pocket mutants of yeast cytochrome c peroxidase: Binding of imidazole, 1-methylimidazole and 4-nitroimidazole to the triAla, triVal, and triLeu variants.

    PubMed

    Bidwai, Anil; Ayala, Caitlan; Vitello, Lidia B; Erman, James E

    2015-08-01

    Imidazole binding to three apolar distal heme pocket mutants of yeast cytochrome c peroxidase (CcP) has been investigated between pH4 and 8. The three CcP variants have Arg-48, Trp-51, and His-52 mutated to either all alanine, CcP(triAla), all valine, CcP(triVal), or all leucine residues, CcP(triLeu). The imidazole binding curves for all three mutants are biphasic indicating that each of the mutants exists in at least two conformational states with different affinities for imidazole. At pH7, the high-affinity conformations of the three CcP mutants bind imidazole between 3.8 and 4.7 orders of magnitude stronger than that of wild-type CcP while the low-affinity conformations have binding affinities about 2.5 orders of magnitude larger than wild-type CcP. Imidazole binding to the three CcP mutants is pH dependent with the strongest binding observed at high pH. Apparent pK(a) values for the transition in binding vary between 5.6 and 7.5 for the high-affinity conformations and between 6.2 and 6.8 for the low-affinity conformations of the CcP triple mutants. The kinetics of imidazole binding are also biphasic. The fast phase of imidazole binding to CcP(triAla) and CcP(triLeu) is linearly dependent on the imidazole concentration while the slow phase is independent of imidazole concentration. Both phases of imidazole binding to CcP(triVal) have a hyperbolic dependence on the imidazole concentration. The apparent association rate constants vary between 30 and 170 M(-1)s(-1) while the apparent dissociation rate constants vary between 0.05 and 0.43 s(-1). The CcP triple mutants have higher binding affinities for 1-methylimidazole and 4-nitroimidazole than does wild-type CcP.

  2. The structure of SSO2064, the first representative of Pfam family PF01796, reveals a novel two-domain zinc-ribbon OB-fold architecture with a potential acyl-CoA-binding role

    PubMed Central

    Krishna, S. Sri; Aravind, L.; Bakolitsa, Constantina; Caruthers, Jonathan; Carlton, Dennis; Miller, Mitchell D.; Abdubek, Polat; Astakhova, Tamara; Axelrod, Herbert L; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Clayton, Thomas; Deller, Marc C.; Duan, Lian; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grant, Joanna C.; Han, Gye Won; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Jin, Kevin K.; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Kumar, Abhinav; Marciano, David; McMullan, Daniel; Morse, Andrew T.; Nigoghossian, Edward; Okach, Linda; Reyes, Ron; Rife, Christopher L.; van den Bedem, Henry; Weekes, Dana; Xu, Qingping; Hodgson, Keith O.; Wooley, John; Elsliger, Marc-André; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2010-01-01

    SSO2064 is the first structural representative of PF01796 (DUF35), a large prokaryotic family with a wide phylogenetic distribution. The structure reveals a novel two-domain architecture comprising an N-terminal, rubredoxin-like, zinc ribbon and a C-terminal, oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide-binding (OB) fold domain. Additional N-terminal helical segments may be involved in protein–protein interactions. Domain architectures, genomic context analysis and functional evidence from certain bacterial representatives of this family suggest that these proteins form a novel fatty-acid-binding component that is involved in the biosynthesis of lipids and polyketide antibiotics and that they possibly function as acyl-CoA-binding proteins. This structure has led to a re-evaluation of the DUF35 family, which has now been split into two entries in the latest Pfam release (v.24.0). PMID:20944206

  3. Synthesis of new (-)-Bestatin-based inhibitor libraries reveals a novel binding mode in the S1 pocket of the essential malaria M1 metalloaminopeptidase

    PubMed Central

    Velmourougane, Geetha; Harbut, Michael B.; Dalal, Seema; McGowan, Sheena; Oellig, Christine A.; Meinhardt, Nataline; Whisstock, James C.; Klemba, Michael; Greenbaum, Doron C.

    2012-01-01

    The malarial PfA-M1 metallo-aminopeptidase is considered a putative drug target. The natural product dipeptide mimetic, bestatin, is a potent inhibitor of PfA-M1. Herein we present a new, efficient and high-yielding protocol for the synthesis of bestatin derivatives from natural and unnatural N-Boc-D-amino acids. A diverse library of bestatin derivatives was synthesized with variants at the sidechain of either the α-hydroxy-β-amino acid (P1) or the adjacent natural α-amino acid (P1’). Surprisingly, we found that extended aromatic sidechains at the P1 position resulted in potent inhibition against PfA-M1. To understand these data, we determined the X-ray co-crystal structures of PfA-M1 with two derivatives having either a Tyr(OMe) 15 or Tyr(OBzl) 16 at the P1 position and observed substantial inhibitor-induced rearrangement of the primary loop within the PfA-M1 pocket that interacts with the P1 sidechain. Our data provide important insights for the rational design of more potent and selective inhibitors of this enzyme that may eventually lead to new therapies for malaria. PMID:21366301

  4. Ghrelin acylation and metabolic control.

    PubMed

    Al Massadi, O; Tschöp, M H; Tong, J

    2011-11-01

    Since its discovery, many physiologic functions have been ascribed to ghrelin, a gut derived hormone. The presence of a median fatty acid side chain on the ghrelin peptide is required for the binding and activation of the classical ghrelin receptor, the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR)-1a. Ghrelin O-acyl transferase (GOAT) was recently discovered as the enzyme responsible for this acylation process. GOAT is expressed in all tissues that have been found to express ghrelin and has demonstrated actions on several complex endocrine organ systems such as the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal, insular and adrenal axis as well as the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, bone and gustatory system. Ghrelin acylation is dependent on the function of GOAT and the availability of substrates such as proghrelin and short- to medium-chain fatty acids (MCFAs). This process is governed by GOAT activity and has been shown to be modified by dietary lipids. In this review, we provided evidence that support an important role of GOAT in the regulation of energy homeostasis and glucose metabolism by modulating acyl ghrelin (AG) production. The relevance of GOAT and AG during periods of starvation remains to be defined. In addition, we summarized the recent literature on the metabolic effects of GOAT specific inhibitors and shared our view on the potential of targeting GOAT for the treatment of metabolic disorders such as obesity and type 2 diabetes.

  5. MHC allele-specific binding of a malaria peptide makes it become promiscuous on fitting a glycine residue into pocket 6.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Luis Eduardo; Parra, Carlos Alberto; Salazar, Luz Mary; Guzmán, Fanny; Pinto, Martha; Patarroyo, Manuel E

    2003-07-18

    Peptide 1585 (EVLYLKPLAGVYRSLKKQLE) has a highly conserved amino-acid sequence located in the Plasmodium falciparum main merozoite surface protein (MSP-1) C-terminal region, required for merozoite entry into human erythrocytes and therefore represents a vaccine candidate for P. falciparum malaria. Original sequence-specific binding to five HLA DRB1* alleles (0101, 0102, 0401, 0701, and 1101) revealed this peptide's specific HLA DRB1*0102 allele binding. This peptide's allele-specific binding to HLA DRB1*0102 took on broader specificity for the DRB1*0101, -0401, and -1101 alleles when lysine was replaced by glycine in position 17 (peptide 5198: EVLYLKPLAGVYRSLKG(17)QLE). Binding of the identified G(10)VYRSLKGQLE(20) C-terminal register to these alleles suggests that peptide promiscuous binding relied on fitting Y(12), L(15), and G(17) into P-1, P-4, and P-6, respectively. The implications of the findings and the future of this synthetic vaccine candidate are discussed.

  6. The 3D Structure of the Binding Pocket of the Human Oxytocin Receptor for Benzoxazine Antagonists, Determined by Molecular Docking, Scoring Functions and 3D-QSAR Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jójárt, Balázs; Martinek, Tamás A.; Márki, Árpád

    2005-05-01

    Molecular docking and 3D-QSAR studies were performed to determine the binding mode for a series of benzoxazine oxytocin antagonists taken from the literature. Structural hypotheses were generated by docking the most active molecule to the rigid receptor by means of AutoDock 3.05. The cluster analysis yielded seven possible binding conformations. These structures were refined by using constrained simulated annealing, and the further ligands were aligned in the refined receptor by molecular docking. A good correlation was found between the estimated Δ G bind and the p K i values for complex F. The Connolly-surface analysis, CoMFA and CoMSIA models q CoMFA 2 = 0.653, q CoMSA 2 = 0.630 and r pred,CoMFA 2 = 0.852 , r pred,CoMSIA 2 = 0.815) confirmed the scoring function results. The structural features of the receptor-ligand complex and the CoMFA and CoMSIA fields are in closely connected. These results suggest that receptor-ligand complex F is the most likely binding hypothesis for the studied benzoxazine analogs.

  7. Binding to retinoblastoma pocket domain does not alter the inter-domain flexibility of the J domain of SV40 large T antigen.

    PubMed

    Williams, Christina K; Vaithiyalingam, Sivaraja; Hammel, Michal; Pipas, James; Chazin, Walter J

    2012-02-15

    Simian Virus 40 uses the large T antigen (Tag) to bind and inactivate retinoblastoma tumor suppressor proteins (Rb), which can result in cellular transformation. Tag is a modular protein with four domains connected by flexible linkers. The N-terminal J domain of Tag is necessary for Rb inactivation. Binding of Rb is mediated by an LXCXE consensus motif immediately C-terminal to the J domain. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) were used to study the structural dynamics and interaction of Rb with the LXCXE motif, the J domain and a construct (N(260)) extending from the J domain through the origin binding domain (OBD). NMR and SAXS data revealed substantial flexibility between the domains in N(260). Binding of pRb to a construct containing the LXCXE motif and the J domain revealed weak interactions between pRb and the J domain. Analysis of the complex of pRb and N(260) indicated that the OBD is not involved and retains its dynamic independence from the remainder of Tag. These results support a 'chaperone' model in which the J domain of Tag changes its orientation as it acts upon different protein complexes.

  8. Modified acyl-ACP desaturase

    DOEpatents

    Cahoon, E.B.; Shanklin, J.; Lindgvist, Y.; Schneider, G.

    1998-01-06

    Disclosed is a method for modifying the chain length and double bond positional specificities of a soluble plant fatty acid desaturase. More specifically, the method involves modifying amino acid contact residues in the substrate binding channel of the soluble fatty acid desaturase which contact the fatty acid. Specifically disclosed is the modification of an acyl-ACP desaturase. Amino acid contact residues which lie within the substrate binding channel are identified, and subsequently replaced with different residues to effect the modification of activity. 1 fig.

  9. Influence of the conserved disulphide bond, exposed to the putative binding pocket, on the structure and function of the immunoglobulin-like molecular chaperone Caf1M of Yersinia pestis.

    PubMed

    Zav'yalov, V P; Chernovskaya, T V; Chapman, D A; Karlyshev, A V; MacIntyre, S; Zavialov, A V; Vasiliev, A M; Denesyuk, A I; Zav'yalova, G A; Dudich, I V; Korpela, T; Abramov, V M

    1997-06-01

    The Yersinia pestis protein Caf1M is a typical representative of a subfamily of periplasmic molecular chaperones with characteristic structural and functional features, one of which is the location of two conserved cysteine residues close to the putative binding pocket. We show that these residues form a disulphide bond, the reduction and alkylation of which significantly increases the dissociation constant of the Caf1M-Caf1 (where Caf 1 is a polypeptide subunit of the capsule) complex [from a Kd of (4.77+/-0.50)x10(-9) M for the intact protein to one of (3.68+/-0.68)x10(-8) M for the modified protein]. The importance of the disulphide bond for the formation of functional Caf1M in vivo was demonstrated using an Escherichia coli dsbA mutant carrying the Y. pestis f1 operon. In accordance with the CD and fluorescence measurements, the disulphide bond is not important for maintenance of the overall structure of the Caf1M molecule, but would appear to affect the fine structural properties of the subunit binding site. A three-dimensional model of the Caf1M-Caf1 complex was designed based on the published crystal structure of PapD (a chaperone required for Pap pili assembly) complexed with a peptide corresponding to the C-terminus of the papG subunit. In the model the disulphide bond is in close proximity to the invariant Caf1M Arg-23 and Lys-142 residues that are assumed to anchor the C-terminal group of the subunit. The importance of this characteristic disulphide bond for the orchestration of the binding site and subunit binding, as well as for the folding of the protein in vivo, is likely to be a common feature of this subfamily of Caf1M-like chaperones. A possible model for the role of the disulphide bond in Caf1 assembly is discussed.

  10. Structure of an Odorant-Vinding Protein form the Mosquito Aedes aegypti Suggests a Binding Pocket Covered by a pH-Sensitive

    SciTech Connect

    N Leite; R Krogh; W Xu; Y Ishida; J Iulek; W Leal; G Oliva

    2011-12-31

    The yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti, is the primary vector for the viruses that cause yellow fever, mostly in tropical regions of Africa and in parts of South America, and human dengue, which infects 100 million people yearly in the tropics and subtropics. A better understanding of the structural biology of olfactory proteins may pave the way for the development of environmentally-friendly mosquito attractants and repellents, which may ultimately contribute to reduction of mosquito biting and disease transmission. Previously, we isolated and cloned a major, female-enriched odorant-binding protein (OBP) from the yellow fever mosquito, AaegOBP1, which was later inadvertently renamed AaegOBP39. We prepared recombinant samples of AaegOBP1 by using an expression system that allows proper formation of disulfide bridges and generates functional OBPs, which are indistinguishable from native OBPs. We crystallized AaegOBP1 and determined its three-dimensional structure at 1.85 {angstrom} resolution by molecular replacement based on the structure of the malaria mosquito OBP, AgamOBP1, the only mosquito OBP structure known to date. The structure of AaegOBP1 (= AaegOBP39) shares the common fold of insect OBPs with six {alpha}-helices knitted by three disulfide bonds. A long molecule of polyethylene glycol (PEG) was built into the electron-density maps identified in a long tunnel formed by a crystallographic dimer of AaegOBP1. Circular dichroism analysis indicated that delipidated AaegOBP1 undergoes a pH-dependent conformational change, which may lead to release of odorant at low pH (as in the environment in the vicinity of odorant receptors). A C-terminal loop covers the binding cavity and this 'lid' may be opened by disruption of an array of acid-labile hydrogen bonds thus explaining reduced or no binding affinity at low pH.

  11. Functions of key residues in the ligand-binding pocket of vitamin D receptor: Fragment molecular orbital interfragment interaction energy analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamagishi, Kenji; Yamamoto, Keiko; Yamada, Sachiko; Tokiwa, Hiroaki

    2006-03-01

    Fragment molecular orbital-interfragment interaction energy calculations of the vitamin D receptor (VDR)/1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D 3 complex were utilized to assign functions of key residues of the VDR. Only one residue forms a significant interaction with the corresponding hydroxy group of the ligand, although two residues are located around each hydroxy group. The degradation of binding affinity for derivatives upon removal of a hydroxy group is closely related to the trend in the strength of the hydrogen bonds. Type II hereditary rickets due to an Arg274 point mutation is caused by the lack of the strongest hydrogen bond.

  12. The ETFDH c.158A>G variation disrupts the balanced interplay of ESE- and ESS-binding proteins thereby causing missplicing and multiple Acyl-CoA dehydrogenation deficiency.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Rikke K J; Brøner, Sabrina; Sabaratnam, Rugivan; Doktor, Thomas K; Andersen, Henriette S; Bruun, Gitte H; Gahrn, Birthe; Stenbroen, Vibeke; Olpin, Simon E; Dobbie, Angus; Gregersen, Niels; Andresen, Brage S

    2014-01-01

    Multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenation deficiency is a disorder of fatty acid and amino acid oxidation caused by defects of electron transfer flavoprotein (ETF) or its dehydrogenase (ETFDH). A clear relationship between genotype and phenotype makes genotyping of patients important not only diagnostically but also for prognosis and for assessment of treatment. In the present study, we show that a predicted benign ETFDH missense variation (c.158A>G/p.Lys53Arg) in exon 2 causes exon skipping and degradation of ETFDH protein in patient samples. Using splicing reporter minigenes and RNA pull-down of nuclear proteins, we show that the c.158A>G variation increases the strength of a preexisting exonic splicing silencer (ESS) motif UAGGGA. This ESS motif binds splice inhibitory hnRNP A1, hnRNP A2/B1, and hnRNP H proteins. Binding of these inhibitory proteins prevents binding of the positive splicing regulatory SRSF1 and SRSF5 proteins to nearby and overlapping exonic splicing enhancer elements and this causes exon skipping. We further suggest that binding of hnRNP proteins to UAGGGA is increased by triggering synergistic hnRNP H binding to GGG triplets located upstream and downsteam of the UAGGGA motif. A number of disease-causing exonic elements that induce exon skipping in other genes have a similar architecture as the one in ETFDH exon 2.

  13. Acyl glucuronides: the good, the bad and the ugly.

    PubMed

    Regan, Sophie L; Maggs, James L; Hammond, Thomas G; Lambert, Craig; Williams, Dominic P; Park, B Kevin

    2010-10-01

    Acyl glucuronidation is the major metabolic conjugation reaction of most carboxylic acid drugs in mammals. The physiological consequences of this biotransformation have been investigated incompletely but include effects on drug metabolism, protein binding, distribution and clearance that impact upon pharmacological and toxicological outcomes. In marked contrast, the exceptional but widely disparate chemical reactivity of acyl glucuronides has attracted far greater attention. Specifically, the complex transacylation and glycation reactions with proteins have provoked much inconclusive debate over the safety of drugs metabolised to acyl glucuronides. It has been hypothesised that these covalent modifications could initiate idiosyncratic adverse drug reactions. However, despite a large body of in vitro data on the reactions of acyl glucuronides with protein, evidence for adduct formation from acyl glucuronides in vivo is limited and potentially ambiguous. The causal connection of protein adduction to adverse drug reactions remains uncertain. This review has assessed the intrinsic reactivity, metabolic stability and pharmacokinetic properties of acyl glucuronides in the context of physiological, pharmacological and toxicological perspectives. Although numerous experiments have characterised the reactions of acyl glucuronides with proteins, these might be attenuated substantially in vivo by rapid clearance of the conjugates. Consequently, to delineate a relationship between acyl glucuronide formation and toxicological phenomena, detailed pharmacokinetic analysis of systemic exposure to the acyl glucuronide should be undertaken adjacent to determining protein adduct concentrations in vivo. Further investigation is required to ascertain whether acyl glucuronide clearance is sufficient to prevent covalent modification of endogenous proteins and consequentially a potential immunological response.

  14. Pocket ECG electrode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lund, Gordon F. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A low-noise electrode suited for sensing electrocardiograms when chronically and subcutaneously implanted in a free-ranging subject. The electrode comprises a pocket-shaped electrically conductive member with a single entrance adapted to receive body fluids. The exterior of the member and the entrance region is coated with electrical insulation so that the only electrolyte/electrode interface is within the member remote from artifact-generating tissue. Cloth straps are bonded to the member to permit the electrode to be sutured to tissue and to provide electrical lead flexure relief.

  15. Pocket ECG electrode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lund, G. F. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A low noise electrode suited for sensing electrocardiograms when chronically and subcutaneously implanted in a free ranging subject is described. The electrode comprises a pocket shaped electrically conductive member with a single entrance adapted to receive body fluids. The exterior of the member and the entrance region is coated with electrical insulation so that the only electrolyte/electrode interface is within the member, remote from artifact-generating tissue. Cloth straps are bonded to the member to permit the electrode to be sutured to tissue and to provide electrical lead flexure relief.

  16. NASA Pocket Statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Pocket Statistics is published for the use of NASA managers and their staff. Included herein is Administrative and Organizational information, summaries of Space Flight Activity including the NASA Major Launch Record, and NASA Procurement, Financial, and Manpower data. The NASA Major Launch Record includes all launches of Scout class and larger vehicles. Vehicle and spacecraft development flights are also included in the Major Launch Record. Shuttle missions are counted as one launch and one payload, where free flying payloads are not involved. Satellites deployed from the cargo bay of the Shuttle and placed in a separate orbit or trajectory are counted as an additional payload.

  17. NASA Pocket Statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    NASA Pocket Statistics is published for the use of NASA managers and their staff. Included herein is Administrative and Organizational information, summaries of Space Flight Activity including the NASA Major Launch Record, and NASA Procurement, Financial, and Manpower data. The NASA Major Launch Record includes all launches of Scout class and larger vehicles. Vehicle and spacecraft development flights are also included in the Major Launch Record. Shuttle missions are counted as one launch and one payload, where free flying payloads are not involved. Satellites deployed from the cargo bay of the Shuttle and placed in a separate orbit or trajectory are counted as an additional payload.

  18. NASA Pocket Statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This booklet of pocket statistics includes the 1996 NASA Major Launch Record, NASA Procurement, Financial, and Workforce data. The NASA Major Launch Record includes all launches of Scout class and larger vehicles. Vehicle and spacecraft development flights are also included in the Major Luanch Record. Shuttle missions are counted as one launch and one payload, where free flying payloads are not involved. Satellites deployed from the cargo bay of the Shuttle and placed in a separate orbit or trajectory are counted as an additional payload.

  19. Oxidative acylation using thioacids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, R.; Orgel, L. E.

    1997-01-01

    Several important prebiotic reactions, including the coupling of amino acids into polypeptides by the formation of amide linkages, involve acylation. Theae reactions present a challenge to the understanding of prebiotic synthesis. Condensation reactions relying on dehydrating agents are either inefficient in aqueous solution or require strongly acidic conditions and high temperatures. Activated amino acids such as thioester derivatives have therefore been suggested as likely substrates for prebiotic peptide synthesis. Here we propose a closely related route to amide bond formation involving oxidative acylation by thioacids. We find that phenylalanine, leucine and phenylphosphate are acylated efficiently in aqueous solution by thioacetic acid and an oxidizing agent. From a prebiotic point of view, oxidative acylation has the advantage of proceeding efficiently in solution and under mild conditions. We anticipate that oxidative acylation should prove to be a general method for activating carboxylic acids, including amino acids.

  20. Total Syntheses and Initial Evaluation of [Ψ[C(=S)NH]Tpg4]vancomycin, [Ψ[C(=NH)NH]Tpg4]vancomycin, [Ψ[CH2NH]Tpg4]vancomycin and their (4-Chlorobiphenyl)methyl Derivatives: Synergistic Binding Pocket and Peripheral Modifications for the Glycopeptide Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Okano, Akinori; Nakayama, Atsushi; Wu, Kejia; Lindsey, Erick A.; Schammel, Alex W.; Feng, Yiqing; Collins, Karen C.

    2015-01-01

    Full details of studies are disclosed on the total synthesis of binding pocket analogues of vancomycin, bearing the peripheral L-vancosaminyl-1,2-D-glucosyl disaccharide, that contain changes to a key single atom in the residue 4 amide (residue 4 carbonyl O → S, NH, H2) designed to directly address the underlying molecular basis of resistance to vancomycin. Also disclosed are studies piloting the late stage transformations conducted on the synthetically more accessible C-terminus hydroxymethyl aglycon derivatives and full details of the peripheral chlorobiphenyl functionalization of all the binding pocket modified vancomycin analogues designed for dual D-Ala-D-Ala/D-Ala-D-Lac binding are reported. Their collective assessment indicate that combined binding pocket and chlorobiphenyl peripherally modified analogues exhibit a remarkable spectrum of antimicrobial activity (VSSA, MRSA, VanA and VanB VRE) and impressive potencies against both vancomycin-sensitive and vancomycin-resistant bacteria (MICs = 0.06–0.005 μg/mL and 0.5–0.06 μg/mL for the amidine and methylene analogues, respectively) and likely benefit from two independent and synergistic mechanisms of action, only one of which is dependent on D-Ala-D-Ala/D-Ala-D-Lac binding. Such analogues are likely to display especially durable antibiotic activity not prone to rapidly acquired clinical resistance. PMID:25750995

  1. Insights into an original pocket-ligand pair classification: a promising tool for ligand profile prediction.

    PubMed

    Pérot, Stéphanie; Regad, Leslie; Reynès, Christelle; Spérandio, Olivier; Miteva, Maria A; Villoutreix, Bruno O; Camproux, Anne-Claude

    2013-01-01

    Pockets are today at the cornerstones of modern drug discovery projects and at the crossroad of several research fields, from structural biology to mathematical modeling. Being able to predict if a small molecule could bind to one or more protein targets or if a protein could bind to some given ligands is very useful for drug discovery endeavors, anticipation of binding to off- and anti-targets. To date, several studies explore such questions from chemogenomic approach to reverse docking methods. Most of these studies have been performed either from the viewpoint of ligands or targets. However it seems valuable to use information from both ligands and target binding pockets. Hence, we present a multivariate approach relating ligand properties with protein pocket properties from the analysis of known ligand-protein interactions. We explored and optimized the pocket-ligand pair space by combining pocket and ligand descriptors using Principal Component Analysis and developed a classification engine on this paired space, revealing five main clusters of pocket-ligand pairs sharing specific and similar structural or physico-chemical properties. These pocket-ligand pair clusters highlight correspondences between pocket and ligand topological and physico-chemical properties and capture relevant information with respect to protein-ligand interactions. Based on these pocket-ligand correspondences, a protocol of prediction of clusters sharing similarity in terms of recognition characteristics is developed for a given pocket-ligand complex and gives high performances. It is then extended to cluster prediction for a given pocket in order to acquire knowledge about its expected ligand profile or to cluster prediction for a given ligand in order to acquire knowledge about its expected pocket profile. This prediction approach shows promising results and could contribute to predict some ligand properties critical for binding to a given pocket, and conversely, some key pocket

  2. Influence of the conserved disulphide bond, exposed to the putative binding pocket, on the structure and function of the immunoglobulin-like molecular chaperone Caf1M of Yersinia pestis.

    PubMed Central

    Zav'yalov, V P; Chernovskaya, T V; Chapman, D A; Karlyshev, A V; MacIntyre, S; Zavialov, A V; Vasiliev, A M; Denesyuk, A I; Zav'yalova, G A; Dudich, I V; Korpela, T; Abramov, V M

    1997-01-01

    The Yersinia pestis protein Caf1M is a typical representative of a subfamily of periplasmic molecular chaperones with characteristic structural and functional features, one of which is the location of two conserved cysteine residues close to the putative binding pocket. We show that these residues form a disulphide bond, the reduction and alkylation of which significantly increases the dissociation constant of the Caf1M-Caf1 (where Caf 1 is a polypeptide subunit of the capsule) complex [from a Kd of (4.77+/-0.50)x10(-9) M for the intact protein to one of (3.68+/-0.68)x10(-8) M for the modified protein]. The importance of the disulphide bond for the formation of functional Caf1M in vivo was demonstrated using an Escherichia coli dsbA mutant carrying the Y. pestis f1 operon. In accordance with the CD and fluorescence measurements, the disulphide bond is not important for maintenance of the overall structure of the Caf1M molecule, but would appear to affect the fine structural properties of the subunit binding site. A three-dimensional model of the Caf1M-Caf1 complex was designed based on the published crystal structure of PapD (a chaperone required for Pap pili assembly) complexed with a peptide corresponding to the C-terminus of the papG subunit. In the model the disulphide bond is in close proximity to the invariant Caf1M Arg-23 and Lys-142 residues that are assumed to anchor the C-terminal group of the subunit. The importance of this characteristic disulphide bond for the orchestration of the binding site and subunit binding, as well as for the folding of the protein in vivo, is likely to be a common feature of this subfamily of Caf1M-like chaperones. A possible model for the role of the disulphide bond in Caf1 assembly is discussed. PMID:9182720

  3. The corneal pocket assay.

    PubMed

    Ziche, Marina; Morbidelli, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    The cornea in most species is physiologically avascular, and thus this assay allows the measurement of newly formed vessels. The continuous monitoring of neovascular growth in the same animal allows the evaluation of drugs acting as suppressors or stimulators of angiogenesis. Under anesthesia a micropocket is produced in the cornea thickness and the angiogenesis stimulus (tumor tissue, cell suspension, growth factor) is placed into the pocket in order to induce vascular outgrowth from the limbal capillaries. Neovascular development and progression can be modified by the presence of locally released or applied inhibitory factors or by systemic treatments. In this chapter the experimental details of the avascular cornea assay, the technical challenges, and advantages and disadvantages in different species are discussed. Protocols for local drug treatment and tissue sampling for histology and pharmacokinetic profile are reported.

  4. Pocket neutron REM meter

    SciTech Connect

    Quam, W.; Del Duca, T.; Plake, W.; Graves, G.; DeVore, T.; Warren, J.

    1982-01-01

    This paper describes a pocket-calculator-sized, neutron-sensitive, REM-responding personnel dosimeter that uses three tissue-equivalent cylindrical proportional counters as neutron-sensitive detectors. These are conventionally called Linear Energy Transfer (LET) counters. Miniaturized hybrid circuits are used for the linear pulse handling electronics, followed by a 256-channel ADC. A CMOS microprocessor is used to calculate REM exposure from the basic rads-tissue data supplied by the LET counters and also to provide timing and display functions. The instrument is used to continuously accumulate time in hours since reset, total counts accumulated, rads-tissue, and REM. At any time the user can display any one of these items or a channel number (an aid in calibration). The instrument provides such data with a precision of +- 3% for a total exposure of 1 mREM over 8 hours.

  5. Pocket neutron REM meter

    SciTech Connect

    Quam, W.; Del Duca, T.; Plake, W.; Graves, G.; DeVore, T.; Warren, J.

    1982-01-01

    This paper describes a pocket-calculator-sized, neutron-sensitive, REM-responding personnel dosimeter that uses three tissue-equivalent cylindrical proportional counters as neutron-sensitive detectors. These are conventionally called Linear Energy Transfer (LET) counters. Miniaturized hybrid circuits are used for the linear pulse handling electronics, followed by a 256-channel ADC. A CMOS microprocessor is used to calculate REM exposure from the basic rads-tissue data supplied by the LET counters and also to provide timing and display functions. The instrument is used to continuously accumulate time in hours since reset, total counts accumulated, rads-tissue, and REM. The user can display any one of these items or a channel number (an aid in calibration) at any time. Such data are provided with a precision of +- 3% for a total exposure of 1 mREM over eight hours.

  6. APoc: large-scale identification of similar protein pockets

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Mu; Skolnick, Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    Motivation: Most proteins interact with small-molecule ligands such as metabolites or drug compounds. Over the past several decades, many of these interactions have been captured in high-resolution atomic structures. From a geometric point of view, most interaction sites for grasping these small-molecule ligands, as revealed in these structures, form concave shapes, or ‘pockets’, on the protein’s surface. An efficient method for comparing these pockets could greatly assist the classification of ligand-binding sites, prediction of protein molecular function and design of novel drug compounds. Results: We introduce a computational method, APoc (Alignment of Pockets), for the large-scale, sequence order-independent, structural comparison of protein pockets. A scoring function, the Pocket Similarity Score (PS-score), is derived to measure the level of similarity between pockets. Statistical models are used to estimate the significance of the PS-score based on millions of comparisons of randomly related pockets. APoc is a general robust method that may be applied to pockets identified by various approaches, such as ligand-binding sites as observed in experimental complex structures, or predicted pockets identified by a pocket-detection method. Finally, we curate large benchmark datasets to evaluate the performance of APoc and present interesting examples to demonstrate the usefulness of the method. We also demonstrate that APoc has better performance than the geometric hashing-based method SiteEngine. Availability and implementation: The APoc software package including the source code is freely available at http://cssb.biology.gatech.edu/APoc. Contact: skolnick@gatech.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:23335017

  7. Acyl peptidic siderophores: structures, biosyntheses and post-assembly modifications.

    PubMed

    Kem, Michelle P; Butler, Alison

    2015-06-01

    Acyl peptidic siderophores are produced by a variety of bacteria and possess unique amphiphilic properties. Amphiphilic siderophores are generally produced in a suite where the iron(III)-binding headgroup remains constant while the fatty acid appendage varies by length and functionality. Acyl peptidic siderophores are commonly synthesized by non-ribosomal peptide synthetases; however, the method of peptide acylation during biosynthesis can vary between siderophores. Following biosynthesis, acyl siderophores can be further modified enzymatically to produce a more hydrophilic compound, which retains its ferric chelating abilities as demonstrated by pyoverdine from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the marinobactins from certain Marinobacter species. Siderophore hydrophobicity can also be altered through photolysis of the ferric complex of certain β-hydroxyaspartic acid-containing acyl peptidic siderophores.

  8. Structure of 3-oxoacyl-(acyl-carrier protein) synthase II from Thermus thermophilus HB8

    SciTech Connect

    Bagautdinov, Bagautdin Ukita, Yoko; Miyano, Masashi; Kunishima, Naoki

    2008-05-01

    The crystal structure of 3-oxoacyl-(acyl-carrier protein) synthase II from T. thermophilus HB8 has been determined at 2.0 Å resolution and compared with the structures of β-keto-ACP synthases from other sources. The β-ketoacyl-(acyl carrier protein) synthases (β-keto-ACP synthases; KAS) catalyse the addition of two-carbon units to the growing acyl chain during the elongation phase of fatty-acid synthesis. As key regulators of bacterial fatty-acid synthesis, they are promising targets for the development of new antibacterial agents. The crystal structure of 3-oxoacyl-ACP synthase II from Thermus thermophilus HB8 (TtKAS II) has been solved by molecular replacement and refined at 2.0 Å resolution. The crystal is orthorhombic, space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = 72.07, b = 185.57, c = 62.52 Å, and contains one homodimer in the asymmetric unit. The subunits adopt the well known α-β-α-β-α thiolase fold that is common to ACP synthases. The structural and sequence similarities of TtKAS II to KAS I and KAS II enzymes of known structure from other sources support the hypothesis of comparable enzymatic activity. The dimeric state of TtKAS II is important to create each fatty-acid-binding pocket. Closer examination of KAS structures reveals that compared with other KAS structures in the apo form, the active site of TtKAS II is more accessible because of the ‘open’ conformation of the Phe396 side chain.

  9. Acylation of the alpha-amino group in neuropeptide Y(12-36) increases binding affinity for the Y2 receptor.

    PubMed

    Murase, S; Yumoto, N; Petukhov, M G; Yoshikawa, S

    1996-01-01

    Competition assays using three series of analogs of neuropeptide Y (NPY) ([Xaa11]NPY(11-36), [Xaa12]NPY(12-36), and [Xaa13]NPY(13-36) revealed that the binding affinity for the Y2 receptor was considerably lowered by truncation of residue 11. Upon acetylation or succinylation of the alpha-amino group, the binding affinity of [Xaa12]NPY(12-36) recovered to a level similar to that of [Xaa11]NPY(11-36). No significant difference was observed between the increases caused by acetylation and those caused by succinylation, suggesting that the increase in binding affinity cannot be explained by the change in the net charge at the N-terminus as a consequence of the modification. The scattered data points on a plot of the alpha-helix content vs. IC50 of all these analogs revealed the absence of any apparent relationship, an indication that prior formation of the alpha-helix is not necessary for binding to the Y2 receptor. It has been widely accepted that fewer than 12 residues from the C-terminus are directly involved in binding of NPY to the Y2 receptor, while the remaining part of NPY only assists in the adoption of a favorable conformation by the C-terminal hexapeptide for recognition by the receptor. However, the present results suggest that the region around residue 12 does not project from the Y2 receptor.

  10. The Length of the Bound Fatty Acid Influences the Dynamics of the Acyl Carrier Protein and the Stability of the Thioester Bond†

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Acyl carrier proteins involved in fatty acid biosynthesis have been shown to exhibit a high degree of conformational flexibility, in that they are able to sequester fatty acid intermediates between 4 and 18 carbons in length. This flexibility has been observed in X-ray and NMR structures of acyl carrier proteins attached to different fatty acids. NMR studies comparing decanoyl-ACP and stearoyl-ACP indicated that ACP exhibits more dynamic motions when bound to longer fatty acids. We have used complementary chemical and NMR methods as an approach to improving our understanding of the effect of fatty acid length on the dynamics of acyl carrier protein. A chemical assay of the accessibility of the acyl thioester to solvent revealed a positive correlation between chain length and rate of hydrolysis. Surprisingly, this linear correlation was biphasic, with accelerated hydrolysis observed for fatty acids longer than 15 carbons. To further understand the motions associated with this acceleration, we collected 15N relaxation dispersion data for 14:0-, 15:0-, and 16:0-ACP. The greatest dispersions were exhibited by residues that form the entrance to the fatty acid binding pocket. In addition, these dispersions were observed to increase with the length of the fatty acid. Because the exchange rates derived from fitting the data to a two-state model varied from residue to residue, a more complex motional model appears to be required to adequately explain the dynamics. Thus, acyl-ACP offers an interesting system for future investigations of complex protein motions on the micro- and millisecond time scales. PMID:20014832

  11. ACBP and cholesterol differentially alter fatty acyl CoA utilization by microsomal ACAT.

    PubMed

    Chao, Hsu; Zhou, Minglong; McIntosh, Avery; Schroeder, Friedhelm; Kier, Ann B

    2003-01-01

    Microsomal acyl CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) is stimulated in vitro and/or in intact cells by proteins that bind and transfer both substrates, cholesterol, and fatty acyl CoA. To resolve the role of fatty acyl CoA binding independent of cholesterol binding/transfer, a protein that exclusively binds fatty acyl CoA (acyl CoA binding protein, ACBP) was compared. ACBP contains an endoplasmic reticulum retention motif and significantly colocalized with acyl-CoA cholesteryl acyltransferase 2 (ACAT2) and endoplasmic reticulum markers in L-cell fibroblasts and hepatoma cells, respectively. In the presence of exogenous cholesterol, ACAT was stimulated in the order: ACBP > sterol carrier protein-2 (SCP-2) > liver fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP). Stimulation was in the same order as the relative affinities of the proteins for fatty acyl CoA. In contrast, in the absence of exogenous cholesterol, these proteins inhibited microsomal ACAT, but in the same order: ACBP > SCP-2 > L-FABP. The extracellular protein BSA stimulated microsomal ACAT regardless of the presence or absence of exogenous cholesterol. Thus, ACBP was the most potent intracellular fatty acyl CoA binding protein in differentially modulating the activity of microsomal ACAT to form cholesteryl esters independent of cholesterol binding/transfer ability.

  12. Use of thermodynamic coupling between antibody-antigen binding and phospholipid acyl chain phase transition energetics to predict immunoliposome targeting affinity.

    PubMed

    Klegerman, Melvin E; Zou, Yuejiao; Golunski, Eva; Peng, Tao; Huang, Shao-Ling; McPherson, David D

    2014-09-01

    Thermodynamic analysis of ligand-target binding has been a useful tool for dissecting the nature of the binding mechanism and, therefore, potentially can provide valuable information regarding the utility of targeted formulations. Based on a consistent coupling of antibody-antigen binding and gel-liquid crystal transition energetics observed for antibody-phosphatidylethanolamine (Ab-PE) conjugates, we hypothesized that the thermodynamic parameters and the affinity for antigen of the Ab-PE conjugates could be effectively predicted once the corresponding information for the unconjugated antibody is determined. This hypothesis has now been tested in nine different antibody-targeted echogenic liposome (ELIP) preparations, where antibody is conjugated to dipalmitoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DPPE) head groups through a thioether linkage. Predictions were satisfactory (affinity not significantly different from the population of values found) in five cases (55.6%), but the affinity of the unconjugated antibody was not significantly different from the population of values found in six cases (66.7%), indicating that the affinities of the conjugated antibody tended not to deviate appreciably from those of the free antibody. While knowledge of the affinities of free antibodies may be sufficient to judge their suitability as targeting agents, thermodynamic analysis may still provide valuable information regarding their usefulness for specific applications.

  13. Acyl-Lipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Li-Beisson, Yonghua; Shorrosh, Basil; Beisson, Fred; Andersson, Mats X.; Arondel, Vincent; Bates, Philip D.; Baud, Sébastien; Bird, David; DeBono, Allan; Durrett, Timothy P.; Franke, Rochus B.; Graham, Ian A.; Katayama, Kenta; Kelly, Amélie A.; Larson, Tony; Markham, Jonathan E.; Miquel, Martine; Molina, Isabel; Nishida, Ikuo; Rowland, Owen; Samuels, Lacey; Schmid, Katherine M.; Wada, Hajime; Welti, Ruth; Xu, Changcheng; Zallot, Rémi; Ohlrogge, John

    2010-01-01

    Acyl lipids in Arabidopsis and all other plants have a myriad of diverse functions. These include providing the core diffusion barrier of the membranes that separates cells and subcellular organelles. This function alone involves more than 10 membrane lipid classes, including the phospholipids, galactolipids, and sphingolipids, and within each class the variations in acyl chain composition expand the number of structures to several hundred possible molecular species. Acyl lipids in the form of triacylglycerol account for 35% of the weight of Arabidopsis seeds and represent their major form of carbon and energy storage. A layer of cutin and cuticular waxes that restricts the loss of water and provides protection from invasions by pathogens and other stresses covers the entire aerial surface of Arabidopsis. Similar functions are provided by suberin and its associated waxes that are localized in roots, seed coats, and abscission zones and are produced in response to wounding. This chapter focuses on the metabolic pathways that are associated with the biosynthesis and degradation of the acyl lipids mentioned above. These pathways, enzymes, and genes are also presented in detail in an associated website (ARALIP: http://aralip.plantbiology.msu.edu/). Protocols and methods used for analysis of Arabidopsis lipids are provided. Finally, a detailed summary of the composition of Arabidopsis lipids is provided in three figures and 15 tables. PMID:22303259

  14. Acyl-Lipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Li-Beisson, Yonghua; Shorrosh, Basil; Beisson, Fred; Andersson, Mats X.; Arondel, Vincent; Bates, Philip D.; Baud, Sébastien; Bird, David; DeBono, Allan; Durrett, Timothy P.; Franke, Rochus B.; Graham, Ian A.; Katayama, Kenta; Kelly, Amélie A.; Larson, Tony; Markham, Jonathan E.; Miquel, Martine; Molina, Isabel; Nishida, Ikuo; Rowland, Owen; Samuels, Lacey; Schmid, Katherine M.; Wada, Hajime; Welti, Ruth; Xu, Changcheng; Zallot, Rémi; Ohlrogge, John

    2013-01-01

    Acyl lipids in Arabidopsis and all other plants have a myriad of diverse functions. These include providing the core diffusion barrier of the membranes that separates cells and subcellular organelles. This function alone involves more than 10 membrane lipid classes, including the phospholipids, galactolipids, and sphingolipids, and within each class the variations in acyl chain composition expand the number of structures to several hundred possible molecular species. Acyl lipids in the form of triacylglycerol account for 35% of the weight of Arabidopsis seeds and represent their major form of carbon and energy storage. A layer of cutin and cuticular waxes that restricts the loss of water and provides protection from invasions by pathogens and other stresses covers the entire aerial surface of Arabidopsis. Similar functions are provided by suberin and its associated waxes that are localized in roots, seed coats, and abscission zones and are produced in response to wounding. This chapter focuses on the metabolic pathways that are associated with the biosynthesis and degradation of the acyl lipids mentioned above. These pathways, enzymes, and genes are also presented in detail in an associated website (ARALIP: http://aralip.plantbiology.msu.edu/). Protocols and methods used for analysis of Arabidopsis lipids are provided. Finally, a detailed summary of the composition of Arabidopsis lipids is provided in three figures and 15 tables. PMID:23505340

  15. Anatomy of the β-branching enzyme of polyketide biosynthesis and its interaction with an acyl-ACP substrate

    PubMed Central

    Maloney, Finn P.; Gerwick, Lena; Gerwick, William H.; Sherman, David H.; Smith, Janet L.

    2016-01-01

    Alkyl branching at the β position of a polyketide intermediate is an important variation on canonical polyketide natural product biosynthesis. The branching enzyme, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl synthase (HMGS), catalyzes the aldol addition of an acyl donor to a β-keto-polyketide intermediate acceptor. HMGS is highly selective for two specialized acyl carrier proteins (ACPs) that deliver the donor and acceptor substrates. The HMGS from the curacin A biosynthetic pathway (CurD) was examined to establish the basis for ACP selectivity. The donor ACP (CurB) had high affinity for the enzyme (Kd = 0.5 μM) and could not be substituted by the acceptor ACP. High-resolution crystal structures of HMGS alone and in complex with its donor ACP reveal a tight interaction that depends on exquisite surface shape and charge complementarity between the proteins. Selectivity is explained by HMGS binding to an unusual surface cleft on the donor ACP, in a manner that would exclude the acceptor ACP. Within the active site, HMGS discriminates between pre- and postreaction states of the donor ACP. The free phosphopantetheine (Ppant) cofactor of ACP occupies a conserved pocket that excludes the acetyl-Ppant substrate. In comparison with HMG-CoA (CoA) synthase, the homologous enzyme from primary metabolism, HMGS has several differences at the active site entrance, including a flexible-loop insertion, which may account for the specificity of one enzyme for substrates delivered by ACP and the other by CoA. PMID:27573844

  16. Purified membrane and soluble folate binding proteins from cultured KB cells have similar amino acid compositions and molecular weights but differ in fatty acid acylation

    SciTech Connect

    Luhrs, C.A.; Pitiranggon, P.; Costa, M.D.; Rothenberg, S.P.; Slomiany, B.L.; Brink, L.; Tous, G.I.; Stein, S.

    1987-09-01

    A membrane-associated folate binding protein (FBP) and a soluble FBP, which is released into the culture medium, have been purified from human KB cells using affinity chromatography. By NaDodSO/sub 4/PAGE, both proteins have an apparent M/sub r/ of approx. 42,000. However, in the presence of Triton X-100, the soluble FBP eluted from a Sephadex G-150 column with an apparent M/sub r/ of approx. 40,000 (similar to NaDodSO/sub 4/PAGE) but the membrane-associated FBP eluted with an apparent M/sub r/ of approx. = 160,000, indicating that this species contains a hydrophobic domain that interacts with the detergent micelles. The amino acid compositions of both forms of FBP were similar, especially with respect to the apolar amino acids. In addition, the 18 amino acids at the amino termini of both proteins were identical. The membrane FBP, following delipidation with chloroformmethanol, contained 7.1 mol of fatty acid per mol of protein, of which 4.7 mol was amide-linked and 2.4 mol was ester-linked. The soluble FBP contained only 0.05 mol of fatty acid per mol of protein. These studies indicate that the membrane FBP of KB cells contains covalently bound fatty acids that may serve to anchor the protein in the cell membrane.

  17. Hydrophobic pocket targeting probes for enteroviruses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martikainen, Mari; Salorinne, Kirsi; Lahtinen, Tanja; Malola, Sami; Permi, Perttu; Häkkinen, Hannu; Marjomäki, Varpu

    2015-10-01

    Visualization and tracking of viruses without compromising their functionality is crucial in order to understand virus targeting to cells and tissues, and to understand the subsequent subcellular steps leading to virus uncoating and replication. Enteroviruses are important human pathogens causing a vast number of acute infections, and are also suggested to contribute to the development of chronic diseases like type I diabetes. Here, we demonstrate a novel method to target site-specifically the hydrophobic pocket of enteroviruses. A probe, a derivative of Pleconaril, was developed and conjugated to various labels that enabled the visualization of enteroviruses under light and electron microscopes. The probe mildly stabilized the virus particle by increasing the melting temperature by 1-3 degrees, and caused a delay in the uncoating of the virus in the cellular endosomes, but could not however inhibit the receptor binding, cellular entry or infectivity of the virus. The hydrophobic pocket binding moiety of the probe was shown to bind to echovirus 1 particle by STD and tr-NOESY NMR methods. Furthermore, binding to echovirus 1 and Coxsackievirus A9, and to a lesser extent to Coxsackie virus B3 was verified by using a gold nanocluster labeled probe by TEM analysis. Molecular modelling suggested that the probe fits the hydrophobic pockets of EV1 and CVA9, but not of CVB3 as expected, correlating well with the variations in the infectivity and stability of the virus particles. EV1 conjugated to the fluorescent dye labeled probe was efficiently internalized into the cells. The virus-fluorescent probe conjugate accumulated in the cytoplasmic endosomes and caused infection starting from 6 hours onwards. Remarkably, before and during the time of replication, the fluorescent probe was seen to leak from the virus-positive endosomes and thus separate from the capsid proteins that were left in the endosomes. These results suggest that, like the physiological hydrophobic content

  18. A pathogenic fungi diphenyl ether phytotoxin targets plant enoyl (acyl carrier protein) reductase.

    PubMed

    Dayan, Franck E; Ferreira, Daneel; Wang, Yan-Hong; Khan, Ikhlas A; McInroy, John A; Pan, Zhiqiang

    2008-07-01

    Cyperin is a natural diphenyl ether phytotoxin produced by several fungal plant pathogens. At high concentrations, this metabolite inhibits protoporphyrinogen oxidase, a key enzyme in porphyrin synthesis. However, unlike its herbicide structural analogs, the mode of action of cyperin is not light dependent, causing loss of membrane integrity in the dark. We report that this natural diphenyl ether inhibits Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) enoyl (acyl carrier protein) reductase (ENR). This enzyme is also sensitive to triclosan, a synthetic antimicrobial diphenyl ether. Whereas cyperin was much less potent than triclosan on this target site, their ability to cause light-independent disruption of membrane integrity and inhibition of ENR is similar at their respective phytotoxic concentrations. The sequence of ENR is highly conserved within higher plants and a homology model of Arabidopsis ENR was derived from the crystal structure of the protein from Brassica napus. Cyperin mimicked the binding of triclosan in the binding pocket of ENR. Both molecules were stabilized by the pi-pi stacking interaction between one of their phenyl rings and the nicotinamide ring of the NAD(+). Furthermore, the side chain of tyrosine is involved in hydrogen bonding with a phenolic hydroxy group of cyperin. Therefore, cyperin may contribute to the virulence of the pathogens by inhibiting ENR and destabilizing the membrane integrity of the cells surrounding the point of infection.

  19. Acylation of Glucagon-Like Peptide-2: Interaction with Lipid Membranes and In Vitro Intestinal Permeability

    PubMed Central

    Trier, Sofie; Linderoth, Lars; Bjerregaard, Simon; Andresen, Thomas Lars; Rahbek, Ulrik Lytt

    2014-01-01

    Background Acylation of peptide drugs with fatty acid chains has proven beneficial for prolonging systemic circulation as well as increasing enzymatic stability without disrupting biological potency. Acylation has furthermore been shown to increase interactions with the lipid membranes of mammalian cells. The extent to which such interactions hinder or benefit delivery of acylated peptide drugs across cellular barriers such as the intestinal epithelia is currently unknown. The present study investigates the effect of acylating peptide drugs from a drug delivery perspective. Purpose We hypothesize that the membrane interaction is an important parameter for intestinal translocation, which may be used to optimize the acylation chain length for intestinal permeation. This work aims to characterize acylated analogues of the intestinotrophic Glucagon-like peptide-2 by systematically increasing acyl chain length, in order to elucidate its influence on membrane interaction and intestinal cell translocation in vitro. Results Peptide self-association and binding to both model lipid and cell membranes was found to increase gradually with acyl chain length, whereas translocation across Caco-2 cells depended non-linearly on chain length. Short and medium acyl chains increased translocation compared to the native peptide, but long chain acylation displayed no improvement in translocation. Co-administration of a paracellular absorption enhancer was found to increase translocation irrespective of acyl chain length, whereas a transcellular enhancer displayed increased synergy with the long chain acylation. Conclusions These results show that membrane interactions play a prominent role during intestinal translocation of an acylated peptide. Acylation benefits permeation for shorter and medium chains due to increased membrane interactions, however, for longer chains insertion in the membrane becomes dominant and hinders translocation, i.e. the peptides get ‘stuck’ in the cell

  20. Role of long-chain fatty acyl-CoA esters in the regulation of metabolism and in cell signalling.

    PubMed Central

    Faergeman, N J; Knudsen, J

    1997-01-01

    The intracellular concentration of free unbound acyl-CoA esters is tightly controlled by feedback inhibition of the acyl-CoA synthetase and is buffered by specific acyl-CoA binding proteins. Excessive increases in the concentration are expected to be prevented by conversion into acylcarnitines or by hydrolysis by acyl-CoA hydrolases. Under normal physiological conditions the free cytosolic concentration of acyl-CoA esters will be in the low nanomolar range, and it is unlikely to exceed 200 nM under the most extreme conditions. The fact that acetyl-CoA carboxylase is active during fatty acid synthesis (Ki for acyl-CoA is 5 nM) indicates strongly that the free cytosolic acyl-CoA concentration is below 5 nM under these conditions. Only a limited number of the reported experiments on the effects of acyl-CoA on cellular functions and enzymes have been carried out at low physiological concentrations in the presence of the appropriate acyl-CoA-buffering binding proteins. Re-evaluation of many of the reported effects is therefore urgently required. However, the observations that the ryanodine-senstitive Ca2+-release channel is regulated by long-chain acyl-CoA esters in the presence of a molar excess of acyl-CoA binding protein and that acetyl-CoA carboxylase, the AMP kinase kinase and the Escherichia coli transcription factor FadR are affected by low nanomolar concentrations of acyl-CoA indicate that long-chain acyl-CoA esters can act as regulatory molecules in vivo. This view is further supported by the observation that fatty acids do not repress expression of acetyl-CoA carboxylase or Delta9-desaturase in yeast deficient in acyl-CoA synthetase. PMID:9173866

  1. GPCR crystal structures: Medicinal chemistry in the pocket.

    PubMed

    Shonberg, Jeremy; Kling, Ralf C; Gmeiner, Peter; Löber, Stefan

    2015-07-15

    Recent breakthroughs in GPCR structural biology have significantly increased our understanding of drug action at these therapeutically relevant receptors, and this will undoubtedly lead to the design of better therapeutics. In recent years, crystal structures of GPCRs from classes A, B, C and F have been solved, unveiling a precise snapshot of ligand-receptor interactions. Furthermore, some receptors have been crystallized in different functional states in complex with antagonists, partial agonists, full agonists, biased agonists and allosteric modulators, providing further insight into the mechanisms of ligand-induced GPCR activation. It is now obvious that there is enormous diversity in the size, shape and position of the ligand binding pockets in GPCRs. In this review, we summarise the current state of solved GPCR structures, with a particular focus on ligand-receptor interactions in the binding pocket, and how this can contribute to the design of GPCR ligands with better affinity, subtype selectivity or efficacy.

  2. NASA Pocket Statistics: 1997 Edition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    POCKET STATISTICS is published by the NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION (NASA). Included in each edition is Administrative and Organizational information, summaries of Space Flight Activity including the NASA Major Launch Record, Aeronautics and Space Transportation and NASA Procurement, Financial and Workforce data. The NASA Major Launch Record includes all launches of Scout class and larger vehicles. Vehicle and spacecraft development flights are also included in the Major Launch Record. Shuttle missions are counted as one launch and one payload, where free flying payloads are not involved. All Satellites deployed from the cargo bay of the Shuttle and placed in a separate orbit or trajectory are counted as an additional payload.

  3. Acylation of Ferrocene: A Greener Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birdwhistell, Kurt R.; Nguyen, Andy; Ramos, Eric J.; Kobelja, Robert

    2008-01-01

    The acylation of ferrocene is a common reaction used in organic laboratories to demonstrate Friedel-Crafts acylation and the purification of compounds using column chromatography. This article describes an acylation of ferrocene experiment that is more eco-friendly than the conventional acylation experiment. The traditional experiment was modified…

  4. Structure-based drug design: exploring the proper filling of apolar pockets at enzyme active sites.

    PubMed

    Zürcher, Martina; Diederich, François

    2008-06-20

    The proper filling of apolar pockets at enzyme active sites is central for increasing binding activity and selectivity of hits and leads in medicinal chemistry. In our structure-based design approach toward the generation of potent enzyme inhibitors, we encountered a variety of challenges in gaining suitable binding affinity from the occupation of such pockets. We summarize them here for the first time. A fluorine scan of tricyclic thrombin inhibitors led to the discovery of favorable orthogonal dipolar C-F...CO interactions. Efficient cation-pi interactions were established in the S4 pocket of factor Xa, another serine protease from the blood coagulation cascade. Changing from mono- to bisubstrate inhibitors of catechol O-methyltransferase, a target in the L-Dopa-based treatment of Parkinson's disease, enabled the full exploitation of a previously unexplored hydrophobic pocket. Conformational preorganization of a pocket at an enzyme active site is crucial for harvesting binding affinity. This is demonstrated for two enzymes from the nonmevalonate pathway of isoprenoid biosynthesis, IspE and IspF, which are pursued as antimalarial targets. Disrupting crystallographically defined water networks on the way into a pocket might cost all of the binding free enthalpy gained from its occupation, as revealed in studies with tRNA-guanine transglycosylase, a target against shigellosis. Investigations of the active site of plasmepsin II, another antimalarial target, showed that principles for proper apolar cavity filling, originally developed for synthetic host-guest systems, are also applicable to enzyme environments.

  5. What induces pocket openings on protein surface patches involved in protein-protein interactions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyrisch, Susanne; Helms, Volkhard

    2009-02-01

    We previously showed for the proteins BCL-XL, IL-2, and MDM2 that transient pockets at their protein-protein binding interfaces can be identified by applying the PASS algorithm to molecular dynamics (MD) snapshots. We now investigated which aspects of the natural conformational dynamics of proteins induce the formation of such pockets. The pocket detection protocol was applied to three different conformational ensembles for the same proteins that were extracted from MD simulations of the inhibitor bound crystal conformation in water and the free crystal/NMR structure in water and in methanol. Additional MD simulations studied the impact of backbone mobility. The more efficient CONCOORD or normal mode analysis (NMA) techniques gave significantly smaller pockets than MD simulations, whereas tCONCOORD generated pockets comparable to those observed in MD simulations for two of the three systems. Our findings emphasize the influence of solvent polarity and backbone rearrangements on the formation of pockets on protein surfaces and should be helpful in future generation of transient pockets as putative ligand binding sites at protein-protein interfaces.

  6. Raf kinase inhibitory protein function is regulated via a flexible pocket and novel phosphorylation-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Granovsky, Alexey E; Clark, Matthew C; McElheny, Dan; Heil, Gary; Hong, Jia; Liu, Xuedong; Kim, Youngchang; Joachimiak, Grazyna; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Koide, Shohei; Rosner, Marsha Rich

    2009-03-01

    Raf kinase inhibitory protein (RKIP/PEBP1), a member of the phosphatidylethanolamine binding protein family that possesses a conserved ligand-binding pocket, negatively regulates the mammalian mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling cascade. Mutation of a conserved site (P74L) within the pocket leads to a loss or switch in the function of yeast or plant RKIP homologues. However, the mechanism by which the pocket influences RKIP function is unknown. Here we show that the pocket integrates two regulatory signals, phosphorylation and ligand binding, to control RKIP inhibition of Raf-1. RKIP association with Raf-1 is prevented by RKIP phosphorylation at S153. The P74L mutation increases kinase interaction and RKIP phosphorylation, enhancing Raf-1/MAPK signaling. Conversely, ligand binding to the RKIP pocket inhibits kinase interaction and RKIP phosphorylation by a noncompetitive mechanism. Additionally, ligand binding blocks RKIP association with Raf-1. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies reveal that the pocket is highly dynamic, rationalizing its capacity to interact with distinct partners and be involved in allosteric regulation. Our results show that RKIP uses a flexible pocket to integrate ligand binding- and phosphorylation-dependent interactions and to modulate the MAPK signaling pathway. This mechanism is an example of an emerging theme involving the regulation of signaling proteins and their interaction with effectors at the level of protein dynamics.

  7. The chemistry of phospholipid binding by the saccharomyces cerevisiae phosphatidylinositol transfer protein sec14p as determined by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    SciTech Connect

    Smirnova, T. I.; Chadwick, T. G.; MacArthur, R.; Poluektov, O.; Song, L.; Ryan, M. M.; Schaaf, G.; Bankaitis, V. A.; Chemistry; North Carolina State Univ.; Florida State Univ.; Univ. of North Carolina

    2006-11-17

    The major yeast phosphatidylinositol/phosphatidylcholine transfer protein Sec14p is the founding member of a large eukaryotic protein superfamily. Functional analyses indicate Sec14p integrates phospholipid metabolism with the membrane trafficking activity of yeast Golgi membranes. In this regard, the ability of Sec14p to rapidly exchange bound phospholipid with phospholipid monomers that reside in stable membrane bilayers is considered to be important for Sec14p function in cells. How Sec14p-like proteins bind phospholipids remains unclear. Herein, we describe the application of EPR spectroscopy to probe the local dynamics and the electrostatic microenvironment of phosphatidylcholine (PtdCho) bound by Sec14p in a soluble protein-PtdCho complex. We demonstrate that PtdCho movement within the Sec14p binding pocket is both anisotropic and highly restricted and that the C5 region of the sn-2 acyl chain of bound PtdCho is highly shielded from solvent, whereas the distal region of that same acyl chain is more accessible. Finally, high field EPR reports on a heterogeneous polarity profile experienced by a phospholipid bound to Sec14p. Taken together, the data suggest a headgroup-out orientation of Sec14p-bound PtdCho. The data further suggest that the Sec14p phospholipid binding pocket provides a polarity gradient that we propose is a primary thermodynamic factor that powers the ability of Sec14p to abstract a phospholipid from a membrane bilayer.

  8. The structural basis of acyl coenzyme A-dependent regulation of the transcription factor FadR

    PubMed Central

    van Aalten, Daan M.F.; DiRusso, Concetta C.; Knudsen, Jens

    2001-01-01

    FadR is an acyl-CoA-responsive transcription factor, regulating fatty acid biosynthetic and degradation genes in Escherichia coli. The apo-protein binds DNA as a homodimer, an interaction that is disrupted by binding of acyl-CoA. The recently described structure of apo-FadR shows a DNA binding domain coupled to an acyl-CoA binding domain with a novel fold, but does not explain how binding of the acyl-CoA effector molecule >30 Å away from the DNA binding site affects transcriptional regulation. Here, we describe the structures of the FadR–operator and FadR– myristoyl-CoA binary complexes. The FadR–DNA complex reveals a novel winged helix–turn–helix protein–DNA interaction, involving sequence-specific contacts from the wing to the minor groove. Binding of acyl-CoA results in dramatic conformational changes throughout the protein, with backbone shifts up to 4.5 Å. The net effect is a rearrangement of the DNA binding domains in the dimer, resulting in a change of 7.2 Å in separation of the DNA recognition helices and the loss of DNA binding, revealing the molecular basis of acyl-CoA-responsive regulation. PMID:11296236

  9. Single-chain antibody-fragment M6P-1 possesses a mannose 6-phosphate monosaccharide-specific binding pocket that distinguishes N-glycan phosphorylation in a branch-specific manner†

    PubMed Central

    Blackler, Ryan J; Evans, Dylan W; Smith, David F; Cummings, Richard D; Brooks, Cory L; Braulke, Thomas; Liu, Xinyu; Evans, Stephen V; Müller-Loennies, Sven

    2016-01-01

    The acquisition of mannose 6-phosphate (Man6P) on N-linked glycans of lysosomal enzymes is a structural requirement for their transport from the Golgi apparatus to lysosomes mediated by the mannose 6-phosphate receptors, 300 kDa cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate receptor (MPR300) and 46 kDa cation-dependent mannose 6-phosphate receptor (MPR46). Here we report that the single-chain variable domain (scFv) M6P-1 is a unique antibody fragment with specificity for Man6P monosaccharide that, through an array-screening approach against a number of phosphorylated N-glycans, is shown to bind mono- and diphosphorylated Man6 and Man7 glycans that contain terminal αMan6P(1 → 2)αMan(1 → 3)αMan. In contrast to MPR300, scFv M6P-1 does not bind phosphodiesters, monophosphorylated Man8 or mono- or diphosphorylated Man9 structures. Single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis to 2.7 Å resolution of Fv M6P-1 in complex with Man6P reveals that specificity and affinity is achieved via multiple hydrogen bonds to the mannose ring and two salt bridges to the phosphate moiety. In common with both MPRs, loss of binding was observed for scFv M6P-1 at pH values below the second pKa of Man6P (pKa = 6.1). The structures of Fv M6P-1 and the MPRs suggest that the change of the ionization state of Man6P is the main driving force for the loss of binding at acidic lysosomal pH (e.g. lysosome pH ∼ 4.6), which provides justification for the evolution of a lysosomal enzyme transport pathway based on Man6P recognition. PMID:26503547

  10. Interactions of acyl-coenzyme A with phosphatidylcholine bilayers and serum albumin

    SciTech Connect

    Boylan, J.G.; Hamilton, J.A. )

    1992-01-21

    Interactions of oleoyl- and octanoyl-coenzyme A (CoA) with phosphatidylcholine (PC) vesicles and bovine serum albumin (BSA) were investigated by NMR spectroscopy. Binding of acyl-CoA to small unilamellar PC vesicles and to BSA was detected by changes in {sup 13}C and {sup 31}P chemical shifts relative to the chemical shifts for aqueous acyl-CoA. PC vesicles remained intact with {le} 15 mol % oleoyl-CoA, while higher oleoyl-CoA proportions produced mixed micelles. In contrast, {sup 13}C spectra revealed rapid exchange (ms) of octanoyl-CoA between the aqueous phase and PC vesicles and a low affinity for the bilayer. Thus, the binding affinity of acyl-CoA for PC bilayers is dependent on the acyl chain length. Addition of ({sup 13}C)carboxyl-enriched oleic acid to oleoyl-CoA/BSA mixtures revealed simultaneous binding of oleic acid and oleoyl-CoA to BSA, with some perturbation of binding interactions. Thus, BSA contains multiple binding sites for oleoyl-CoA and can bind fatty acid and acyl-CoA simultaneously.

  11. Studies of Toxoplasma gondii and Plasmodium falciparum enoyl acyl carrier protein reductase and implications for the development of antiparasitic agents

    SciTech Connect

    Muench, Stephen P.; Prigge, Sean T.; McLeod, Rima; Rafferty, John B.; Kirisits, Michael J.; Roberts, Craig W.; Mui, Ernest J.; Rice, David W.

    2007-03-01

    The crystal structures of T. gondii and P. falciparum ENR in complex with NAD{sup +} and triclosan and of T. gondii ENR in an apo form have been solved to 2.6, 2.2 and 2.8 Å, respectively. Recent studies have demonstrated that submicromolar concentrations of the biocide triclosan arrest the growth of the apicomplexan parasites Plasmodium falciparum and Toxoplasma gondii and inhibit the activity of the apicomplexan enoyl acyl carrier protein reductase (ENR). The crystal structures of T. gondii and P. falciparum ENR in complex with NAD{sup +} and triclosan and of T. gondii ENR in an apo form have been solved to 2.6, 2.2 and 2.8 Å, respectively. The structures of T. gondii ENR have revealed that, as in its bacterial and plant homologues, a loop region which flanks the active site becomes ordered upon inhibitor binding, resulting in the slow tight binding of triclosan. In addition, the T. gondii ENR–triclosan complex reveals the folding of a hydrophilic insert common to the apicomplexan family that flanks the substrate-binding domain and is disordered in all other reported apicomplexan ENR structures. Structural comparison of the apicomplexan ENR structures with their bacterial and plant counterparts has revealed that although the active sites of the parasite enzymes are broadly similar to those of their bacterial counterparts, there are a number of important differences within the drug-binding pocket that reduce the packing interactions formed with several inhibitors in the apicomplexan ENR enzymes. Together with other significant structural differences, this provides a possible explanation of the lower affinity of the parasite ENR enzyme family for aminopyridine-based inhibitors, suggesting that an effective antiparasitic agent may well be distinct from equivalent antimicrobials.

  12. Generating "fragment-based virtual library" using pocket similarity search of ligand-receptor complexes.

    PubMed

    Khashan, Raed S

    2015-01-01

    As the number of available ligand-receptor complexes is increasing, researchers are becoming more dedicated to mine these complexes to aid in the drug design and development process. We present free software which is developed as a tool for performing similarity search across ligand-receptor complexes for identifying binding pockets which are similar to that of a target receptor. The search is based on 3D-geometric and chemical similarity of the atoms forming the binding pocket. For each match identified, the ligand's fragment(s) corresponding to that binding pocket are extracted, thus forming a virtual library of fragments (FragVLib) that is useful for structure-based drug design. The program provides a very useful tool to explore available databases.

  13. Effects of ghrelin and des-acyl ghrelin on neurogenesis of the rat fetal spinal cord

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Miho; Nakahara, Keiko; Goto, Shintaro; Kaiya, Hiroyuki; Miyazato, Mikiya . E-mail: a0d201u@cc.miyazaki-u.ac.jp; Date, Yukari; Nakazato, Masamitsu; Kangawa, Kenji; Murakami, Noboru

    2006-11-24

    Expressions of the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R) mRNA and its protein were confirmed in rat fetal spinal cord tissues by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. In vitro, over 3 nM ghrelin and des-acyl ghrelin induced significant proliferation of primary cultured cells from the fetal spinal cord. The proliferating cells were then double-stained using antibodies against the neuronal precursor marker, nestin, and the cell proliferation marker, 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU), and the nestin-positive cells were also found to be co-stained with antibody against GHS-R. Furthermore, binding studies using [{sup 125}I]des-acyl ghrelin indicated the presence of a specific binding site for des-acyl ghrelin, and confirmed that the binding was displaced with unlabeled des-acyl ghrelin or ghrelin. These results indicate that ghrelin and des-acyl ghrelin induce proliferation of neuronal precursor cells that is both dependent and independent of GHS-R, suggesting that both ghrelin and des-acyl ghrelin are involved in neurogenesis of the fetal spinal cord.

  14. Acylation of salmon calcitonin modulates in vitro intestinal peptide flux through membrane permeability enhancement.

    PubMed

    Trier, Sofie; Linderoth, Lars; Bjerregaard, Simon; Strauss, Holger M; Rahbek, Ulrik L; Andresen, Thomas L

    2015-10-01

    Acylation of peptide drugs with fatty acid chains has proven beneficial for prolonging systemic circulation, as well as increasing enzymatic stability and interactions with lipid cell membranes. Thus, acylation offers several potential benefits for oral delivery of therapeutic peptides, and we hypothesize that tailoring the acylation may be used to optimize intestinal translocation. This work aims to characterize acylated analogues of the therapeutic peptide salmon calcitonin (sCT), which lowers blood calcium, by systematically increasing acyl chain length at two positions, in order to elucidate its influence on intestinal cell translocation and membrane interaction. We find that acylation drastically increases in vitro intestinal peptide flux and confers a transient permeability enhancing effect on the cell layer. The analogues permeabilize model lipid membranes, indicating that the effect is due to a solubilization of the cell membrane, similar to transcellular oral permeation enhancers. The effect is dependent on pH, with larger effect at lower pH, and is impacted by acylation chain length and position. Compared to the unacylated peptide backbone, N-terminal acylation with a short chain provides 6- or 9-fold increase in peptide translocation at pH 7.4 and 5.5, respectively. Prolonging the chain length appears to hamper translocation, possibly due to self-association or aggregation, although the long chain acylated analogues remain superior to the unacylated peptide. For K(18)-acylation a short chain provides a moderate improvement, whereas medium and long chain analogues are highly efficient, with a 12-fold increase in permeability compared to the unacylated peptide backbone, on par with currently employed oral permeation enhancers. For K(18)-acylation the medium chain acylation appears to be optimal, as elongating the chain causes greater binding to the cell membrane but similar permeability, and we speculate that increasing the chain length further may

  15. Structure-based analysis of the molecular interactions between acyltransferase and acyl carrier protein in vicenistatin biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Miyanaga, Akimasa; Iwasawa, Shohei; Shinohara, Yuji; Kudo, Fumitaka; Eguchi, Tadashi

    2016-01-01

    Acyltransferases (ATs) are key determinants of building block specificity in polyketide biosynthesis. Despite the importance of protein–protein interactions between AT and acyl carrier protein (ACP) during the acyltransfer reaction, the mechanism of ACP recognition by AT is not understood in detail. Herein, we report the crystal structure of AT VinK, which transfers a dipeptide group between two ACPs, VinL and VinP1LdACP, in vicenistatin biosynthesis. The isolated VinK structure showed a unique substrate-binding pocket for the dipeptide group linked to ACP. To gain greater insight into the mechanism of ACP recognition, we attempted to crystallize the VinK–ACP complexes. Because transient enzyme–ACP complexes are difficult to crystallize, we developed a covalent cross-linking strategy using a bifunctional maleimide reagent to trap the VinK–ACP complexes, allowing the determination of the crystal structure of the VinK–VinL complex. In the complex structure, Arg-153, Met-206, and Arg-299 of VinK interact with the negatively charged helix II region of VinL. The VinK–VinL complex structure allows, to our knowledge, the first visualization of the interaction between AT and ACP and provides detailed mechanistic insights into ACP recognition by AT. PMID:26831085

  16. Fluorescence characterization of the hydrophobic pocket of cyclophilin B.

    PubMed

    Albani, J R; Carpentier, M; Lansiaux, C

    2008-01-01

    Human cyclophilin B is a monomeric protein that contains two tryptophan residues, Trp104 and 128. Trp128-residue belongs to the binding site of cyclosporin A and is the homologous of Trp 121 in CyPA, while Trp104 residue belongs to the hydrophobic pocket. In the present work, we studied the dynamics of Trp residue(s) of cyclophilin B and of the CyPB(w128A) mutant and of TNS-mutant complex. Our results showed that Trp-104 and TNS show restricted motions within their environments and that energy transfer between the two fluorophores is occurring.

  17. Trapping of the Enoyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Reductase–Acyl Carrier Protein Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Tallorin, Lorillee; Finzel, Kara; Nguyen, Quynh G.; Beld, Joris; La Clair, James J.; Burkart, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    An ideal target for metabolic engineering, fatty acid biosynthesis remains poorly understood on a molecular level. These carrier protein-dependent pathways require fundamental protein–protein interactions to guide reactivity and processivity, and their control has become one of the major hurdles in successfully adapting these biological machines. Our laboratory has developed methods to prepare acyl carrier proteins (ACPs) loaded with substrate mimetics and cross-linkers to visualize and trap interactions with partner enzymes, and we continue to expand the tools for studying these pathways. We now describe application of the slow-onset, tight-binding inhibitor triclosan to explore the interactions between the type II fatty acid ACP from Escherichia coli, AcpP, and its corresponding enoyl-ACP reductase, FabI. We show that the AcpP–triclosan complex demonstrates nM binding, inhibits in vitro activity, and can be used to isolate FabI in complex proteomes. PMID:26938266

  18. Structures of Pseudomonas aeruginosa β-ketoacyl-(acyl-carrier-protein) synthase II (FabF) and a C164Q mutant provide templates for antibacterial drug discovery and identify a buried potassium ion and a ligand-binding site that is an artefact of the crystal form.

    PubMed

    Baum, Bernhard; Lecker, Laura S M; Zoltner, Martin; Jaenicke, Elmar; Schnell, Robert; Hunter, William N; Brenk, Ruth

    2015-08-01

    Bacterial infections remain a serious health concern, in particular causing life-threatening infections of hospitalized and immunocompromised patients. The situation is exacerbated by the rise in antibacterial drug resistance, and new treatments are urgently sought. In this endeavour, accurate structures of molecular targets can support early-stage drug discovery. Here, crystal structures, in three distinct forms, of recombinant Pseudomonas aeruginosa β-ketoacyl-(acyl-carrier-protein) synthase II (FabF) are presented. This enzyme, which is involved in fatty-acid biosynthesis, has been validated by genetic and chemical means as an antibiotic target in Gram-positive bacteria and represents a potential target in Gram-negative bacteria. The structures of apo FabF, of a C164Q mutant in which the binding site is altered to resemble the substrate-bound state and of a complex with 3-(benzoylamino)-2-hydroxybenzoic acid are reported. This compound mimics aspects of a known natural product inhibitor, platensimycin, and surprisingly was observed binding outside the active site, interacting with a symmetry-related molecule. An unusual feature is a completely buried potassium-binding site that was identified in all three structures. Comparisons suggest that this may represent a conserved structural feature of FabF relevant to fold stability. The new structures provide templates for structure-based ligand design and, together with the protocols and reagents, may underpin a target-based drug-discovery project for urgently needed antibacterials.

  19. Chemical Reporters for Exploring Protein Acylation

    PubMed Central

    Thinon, Emmanuelle; Hang, Howard C.

    2015-01-01

    Proteins are acylated by a variety of metabolites that regulates many important cellular pathways in all kingdoms of life. Acyl groups in cells can vary in structure from the smallest unit, acetate, to modified long chain fatty acids, all of which can be activated and covalently attached to diverse amino acid side chains and consequently modulate protein function. For example, acetylation of Lys residues can alter the charge state of proteins and generate new recognition elements for protein–protein interactions. Alternatively, long chain fatty-acylation targets proteins to membranes and enables spatial control of cell signalling. To facilitate the analysis of protein acylation in biology, acyl analogues bearing alkyne or azide tags have been developed that enable fluorescent imaging and proteomic profiling of modified proteins using bioorthogonal ligation methods. Herein, we summarize the currently available acylation chemical reporters and highlight their utility to discover and quantify the roles of protein acylation in biology. PMID:25849926

  20. Unveiling the Pathogenic Molecular Mechanisms of the Most Common Variant (p.K329E) in Medium-Chain Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase Deficiency by in Vitro and in Silico Approaches.

    PubMed

    Bonito, Cátia A; Nunes, Joana; Leandro, João; Louro, Filipa; Leandro, Paula; Ventura, Fátima V; Guedes, Rita C

    2016-12-27

    Medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (MCADD) is the most common genetic disorder affecting the mitochondrial fatty acid β-oxidation pathway. The mature and functional form of human MCAD (hMCAD) is a homotetramer assembled as a dimer of dimers (monomers A/B and C/D). Each monomer binds a FAD cofactor, necessary for the enzyme's activity. The most frequent mutation in MCADD results from the substitution of a lysine with a glutamate in position 304 of mature hMCAD (p.K329E in the precursor protein). Here, we combined in vitro and in silico approaches to assess the impact of the p.K329E mutation on the protein's structure and function. Our in silico results demonstrated for the first time that the p.K329E mutation, despite lying at the dimer-dimer interface and being deeply buried inside the tetrameric core, seems to affect the tetramer surface, especially the β-domain that forms part of the catalytic pocket wall. Additionally, the molecular dynamics data indicate a stronger impact of the mutation on the protein's motions in dimer A/B, while dimer C/D remains similar to the wild type. For dimer A/B, severe disruptions in the architecture of the pockets and in the FAD and octanoyl-CoA binding affinities were also observed. The presence of unaffected pockets (C/D) in the in silico studies may explain the decreased enzymatic activity determined for the variant protein (46% residual activity). Moreover, the in silico structural changes observed for the p.K329E variant protein provide an explanation for the structural instability observed experimentally, namely, the disturbed oligomeric profile, thermal stability, and conformational flexibility, with respect to the wild-type.

  1. The TIP GROWTH DEFECTIVE1 S-acyl transferase regulates plant cell growth in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Hemsley, Piers A; Kemp, Alison C; Grierson, Claire S

    2005-09-01

    TIP GROWTH DEFECTIVE1 (TIP1) of Arabidopsis thaliana affects cell growth throughout the plant and has a particularly strong effect on root hair growth. We have identified TIP1 by map-based cloning and complementation of the mutant phenotype. TIP1 encodes an ankyrin repeat protein with a DHHC Cys-rich domain that is expressed in roots, leaves, inflorescence stems, and floral tissue. Two homologues of TIP1 in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and human (Homo sapiens) have been shown to have S-acyl transferase (also known as palmitoyl transferase) activity. S-acylation is a reversible hydrophobic protein modification that offers swift, flexible control of protein hydrophobicity and affects protein association with membranes, signal transduction, and vesicle trafficking within cells. We show that TIP1 binds the acyl group palmitate, that it can rescue the morphological, temperature sensitivity, and yeast casein kinase2 localization defects of the yeast S-acyl transferase mutant akr1Delta, and that inhibition of acylation in wild-type Arabidopsis roots reproduces the Tip1- mutant phenotype. Our results demonstrate that S-acylation is essential for normal plant cell growth and identify a plant S-acyl transferase, an essential research tool if we are to understand how this important, reversible lipid modification operates in plant cells.

  2. Recombinant C3adesArg/acylation stimulating protein (ASP) is highly bioactive: a critical evaluation of C5L2 binding and 3T3-L1 adipocyte activation.

    PubMed

    Cui, Wei; Lapointe, Marc; Gauvreau, Danny; Kalant, David; Cianflone, Katherine

    2009-10-01

    C5L2 is a recently identified receptor for C5a/C5adesArg, C3a and C3adesArg (ASP). C5a/C5adesArg bind with high affinity, with no identified activation. By contrast, some studies demonstrate C3a/ASP binding/activation to C5L2; others do not. Our aim is to critically evaluate ASP/C3adesArg-C5L2 binding and bioactivity. Cell-associated fluorescent-ASP (Fl-ASP) binding to C5L2 increased from transiently transfectedbinding (NSB, no cells), while albumin increased NSB. Binding to non-transfected HEK was comparable to NSB. Optimal specific binding was obtained at 20 degrees C (vs. 4 degrees C) in PBS or serum-free medium with K(d) 83.7+/-23.7 nM (C5L2-HEK), 66+/-15 nM (C5L2-CHO) and 76+/-14.3 nM (3T3-L1 preadipocytes); (125)I-C5a binding had greater affinity. Fl-ASP-C5L2 binding was comparable and concentration dependent (K(d) 31 nM (direct binding) and IC(50) 35 nM (competition binding) regardless of conditions). Recombinant ASP (rASP) produced in modified Escherichia coli Origami (DE3) (allowing folding and disulphide bridge formation), purified under non-denaturing conditions demonstrated 10x greater bioactivity vs. proteolytically derived plasma ASP for triglyceride synthesis and fatty acid uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocytes and preadipocytes while adipose tissue from C5L2 KO mice was non-responsive. rASP stimulation of adipocyte BODIPY-fatty acid uptake demonstrated EC(50) 115+/-93 nM and maximal stimulation of 413+/-33%, p<0.001. ASP binding has distinct characteristics that lead to C5L2 activation and increased

  3. The Physiology of Protein S-acylation

    PubMed Central

    Chamberlain, Luke H.; Shipston, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Protein S-acylation, the only fully reversible posttranslational lipid modification of proteins, is emerging as a ubiquitous mechanism to control the properties and function of a diverse array of proteins and consequently physiological processes. S-acylation results from the enzymatic addition of long-chain lipids, most typically palmitate, onto intracellular cysteine residues of soluble and transmembrane proteins via a labile thioester linkage. Addition of lipid results in increases in protein hydrophobicity that can impact on protein structure, assembly, maturation, trafficking, and function. The recent explosion in global S-acylation (palmitoyl) proteomic profiling as a result of improved biochemical tools to assay S-acylation, in conjunction with the recent identification of enzymes that control protein S-acylation and de-acylation, has opened a new vista into the physiological function of S-acylation. This review introduces key features of S-acylation and tools to interrogate this process, and highlights the eclectic array of proteins regulated including membrane receptors, ion channels and transporters, enzymes and kinases, signaling adapters and chaperones, cell adhesion, and structural proteins. We highlight recent findings correlating disruption of S-acylation to pathophysiology and disease and discuss some of the major challenges and opportunities in this rapidly expanding field. PMID:25834228

  4. Structures of Pseudomonas aeruginosa β-ketoacyl-(acyl-carrier-protein) synthase II (FabF) and a C164Q mutant provide templates for antibacterial drug discovery and identify a buried potassium ion and a ligand-binding site that is an artefact of the crystal form

    SciTech Connect

    Baum, Bernhard; Lecker, Laura S. M.; Zoltner, Martin; Jaenicke, Elmar; Schnell, Robert; Hunter, William N.; Brenk, Ruth

    2015-07-28

    Three crystal structures of recombinant P. aeruginosa FabF are reported: the apoenzyme, an active-site mutant and a complex with a fragment of a natural product inhibitor. The characterization provides reagents and new information to support antibacterial drug discovery. Bacterial infections remain a serious health concern, in particular causing life-threatening infections of hospitalized and immunocompromised patients. The situation is exacerbated by the rise in antibacterial drug resistance, and new treatments are urgently sought. In this endeavour, accurate structures of molecular targets can support early-stage drug discovery. Here, crystal structures, in three distinct forms, of recombinant Pseudomonas aeruginosa β-ketoacyl-(acyl-carrier-protein) synthase II (FabF) are presented. This enzyme, which is involved in fatty-acid biosynthesis, has been validated by genetic and chemical means as an antibiotic target in Gram-positive bacteria and represents a potential target in Gram-negative bacteria. The structures of apo FabF, of a C164Q mutant in which the binding site is altered to resemble the substrate-bound state and of a complex with 3-(benzoylamino)-2-hydroxybenzoic acid are reported. This compound mimics aspects of a known natural product inhibitor, platensimycin, and surprisingly was observed binding outside the active site, interacting with a symmetry-related molecule. An unusual feature is a completely buried potassium-binding site that was identified in all three structures. Comparisons suggest that this may represent a conserved structural feature of FabF relevant to fold stability. The new structures provide templates for structure-based ligand design and, together with the protocols and reagents, may underpin a target-based drug-discovery project for urgently needed antibacterials.

  5. Structural and Functional Analyses of a Conserved Hydrophobic Pocket of Flavivirus Methyltransferase*

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Hongping; Liu, Lihui; Zou, Gang; Zhao, Yiwei; Li, Zhong; Lim, Siew Pheng; Shi, Pei-Yong; Li, Hongmin

    2010-01-01

    The flavivirus methyltransferase (MTase) sequentially methylates the N7 and 2′-O positions of the viral RNA cap (GpppA-RNA → m7GpppA-RNA → m7GpppAm-RNA), using S-adenosyl-l-methionine (AdoMet) as a methyl donor. We report here that sinefungin (SIN), an AdoMet analog, inhibits several flaviviruses through suppression of viral MTase. The crystal structure of West Nile virus MTase in complex with SIN inhibitor at 2.0-Å resolution revealed a flavivirus-conserved hydrophobic pocket located next to the AdoMet-binding site. The pocket is functionally critical in the viral replication and cap methylations. In addition, the N7 methylation efficiency was found to correlate with the viral replication ability. Thus, SIN analogs with modifications that interact with the hydrophobic pocket are potential specific inhibitors of flavivirus MTase. PMID:20685660

  6. Sticky swinging arm dynamics: studies of an acyl carrier protein domain from the mycolactone polyketide synthase

    PubMed Central

    Vance, Steven; Tkachenko, Olga; Thomas, Ben; Bassuni, Mona; Hong, Hui; Nietlispach, Daniel; Broadhurst, William

    2016-01-01

    Type I modular polyketide synthases (PKSs) produce polyketide natural products by passing a growing acyl substrate chain between a series of enzyme domains housed within a gigantic multifunctional polypeptide assembly. Throughout each round of chain extension and modification reactions, the substrate stays covalently linked to an acyl carrier protein (ACP) domain. In the present study we report on the solution structure and dynamics of an ACP domain excised from MLSA2, module 9 of the PKS system that constructs the macrolactone ring of the toxin mycolactone, cause of the tropical disease Buruli ulcer. After modification of apo ACP with 4′-phosphopantetheine (Ppant) to create the holo form, 15N nuclear spin relaxation and paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) experiments suggest that the prosthetic group swings freely. The minimal chemical shift perturbations displayed by Ppant-attached C3 and C4 acyl chains imply that these substrate-mimics remain exposed to solvent at the end of a flexible Ppant arm. By contrast, hexanoyl and octanoyl chains yield much larger chemical shift perturbations, indicating that they interact with the surface of the domain. The solution structure of octanoyl-ACP shows the Ppant arm bending to allow the acyl chain to nestle into a nonpolar pocket, whereas the prosthetic group itself remains largely solvent exposed. Although the highly reduced octanoyl group is not a natural substrate for the ACP from MLSA2, similar presentation modes would permit partner enzyme domains to recognize an acyl group while it is bound to the surface of its carrier protein, allowing simultaneous interactions with both the substrate and the ACP. PMID:26920023

  7. Evaluation of the turbine pocket spirometer.

    PubMed Central

    Gunawardena, K A; Houston, K; Smith, A P

    1987-01-01

    A compact electronic spirometer, the turbine pocket spirometer, which measures the FEV1, forced vital capacity (FVC), and peak expiratory flow (PEF) in a single expiration, was compared with the Vitalograph and the Wright peak flow meter in 99 subjects (FEV1 range 0.40-5.50 litres; FVC 0.58-6.48 l; PEF 40-650 l min-1). The mean differences between the machines were small--0.05 l for FEV1, 0.05 l for FVC, and 11.6 l min-1 for PEF, with the limits of agreement at +/- 0.25 l, +/- 0.48 l, and +/- 52.2 l min-1 respectively. The wide limits of agreement for the PEF comparison were probably because of the difference in the technique of blowing: a fast, long blow was used for the pocket spirometer and a short, sharp one for the Wright peak flow meter. The FEV1 and FVC showed a proportional bias of around 4-5% in favour of the Vitalograph. The repeatability coefficient for the pocket spirometer FEV1 was 0.18 l, for FVC 0.22 l, and for PEF 31 l min-1. These compared well with the repeatability coefficients of the Vitalograph and the Wright peak flow meter, which gave values of 0.18 l, 0.28 l, and 27 l min-1 respectively. At flow rates of over 600 l min-1 the resistance of the pocket spirometer marginally exceeded the American Thoracic Society recommendations. The machine is easy to operate and portable, and less expensive than the Vitalograph and Wright peak flow meter combined. It can be recommended for general use. Images PMID:3686460

  8. The Apollo 17 pocket mouse experiment (Biocore)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haymaker, W.; Look, B. C.; Benton, E. V.; Simmonds, R. C.

    1975-01-01

    Results are presented of the Biocore experiment which attempted to assess the degree to which exposure to cosmic ray particle radiation might present a risk to astronauts. Pocket mice, with plastic dosimeters implanted beneath the scalp were flown in a sealed canister. The objective was to determine whether microscopically visible lesions attributable to particle radiation, could be found in brain, eye, and other tissues in these animals. The need for further study is demonstrated.

  9. Crystal structure and substrate specificity of the [beta]-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthase III (FabH) from Staphylococcus aureus

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, Xiayang; Choudhry, Anthony E.; Janson, Cheryl A.; Grooms, Michael; Daines, Robert A.; Lonsdale, John T.; Khandekar, Sanjay S.

    2010-07-20

    {beta}-Ketoacyl-ACP synthase III (FabH), an essential enzyme for bacterial viability, catalyzes the initiation of fatty acid elongation by condensing malonyl-ACP with acetyl-CoA. We have determined the crystal structure of FabH from Staphylococcus aureus, a Gram-positive human pathogen, to 2 {angstrom} resolution. Although the overall structure of S. aureus FabH is similar to that of Escherichia coli FabH, the primer binding pocket in S. aureus FabH is significantly larger than that present in E. coli FabH. The structural differences, which agree with kinetic parameters, provide explanation for the observed varying substrate specificity for E. coli and S. aureus FabH. The rank order of activity of S. aureus FabH with various acyl-CoA primers was as follows: isobutyryl- > hexanoyl- > butyryl- > isovaleryl- >> acetyl-CoA. The availability of crystal structure may aid in designing potent, selective inhibitors of S. aureus FabH.

  10. Structural Basis for Substrate Fatty Acyl Chain Specificity: Crystal Structure of Human Very-Long-Chain Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    McAndrew, Ryan P.; Wang, Yudong; Mohsen, Al-Walid; He, Miao; Vockley, Jerry; Kim, Jung-Ja P.

    2008-08-26

    Very-long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD) is a member of the family of acyl-CoA dehydrogenases (ACADs). Unlike the other ACADs, which are soluble homotetramers, VLCAD is a homodimer associated with the mitochondrial membrane. VLCAD also possesses an additional 180 residues in the C terminus that are not present in the other ACADs. We have determined the crystal structure of VLCAD complexed with myristoyl-CoA, obtained by co-crystallization, to 1.91-{angstrom} resolution. The overall fold of the N-terminal {approx}400 residues of VLCAD is similar to that of the soluble ACADs including medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD). The novel C-terminal domain forms an {alpha}-helical bundle that is positioned perpendicular to the two N-terminal helical domains. The fatty acyl moiety of the bound substrate/product is deeply imbedded inside the protein; however, the adenosine pyrophosphate portion of the C14-CoA ligand is disordered because of partial hydrolysis of the thioester bond and high mobility of the CoA moiety. The location of Glu-422 with respect to the C2-C3 of the bound ligand and FAD confirms Glu-422 to be the catalytic base. In MCAD, Gln-95 and Glu-99 form the base of the substrate binding cavity. In VLCAD, these residues are glycines (Gly-175 and Gly-178), allowing the binding channel to extend for an additional 12{angstrom} and permitting substrate acyl chain lengths as long as 24 carbons to bind. VLCAD deficiency is among the more common defects of mitochondrial {beta}-oxidation and, if left undiagnosed, can be fatal. This structure allows us to gain insight into how a variant VLCAD genotype results in a clinical phenotype.

  11. Acyl hydrolases from trans-AT polyketide synthases target acetyl units on acyl carrier proteins.

    PubMed

    Jenner, Matthew; Afonso, Jose P; Kohlhaas, Christoph; Karbaum, Petra; Frank, Sarah; Piel, Jörn; Oldham, Neil J

    2016-04-18

    Acyl hydrolase (AH) domains are a common feature of trans-AT PKSs. They have been hypothesised to perform a proofreading function by removing acyl chains from stalled sites. This study determines the substrate tolerance of the AH PedC for a range of acyl-ACPs. Clear preference towards short, linear acyl-ACPs is shown, with acetyl-ACP the best substrate. These results imply a more targeted housekeeping role for PedC: namely the removal of unwanted acetyl groups from ACP domains caused by erroneous transfer of acetyl-CoA, or possibly by decarboxylation of malonyl-ACP.

  12. Fatty acyl-CoA reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Reiser, Steven E.; Somerville, Chris R.

    1998-12-01

    The present invention relates to bacterial enzymes, in particular to an acyl-CoA reductase and a gene encoding an acyl-CoA reductase, the amino acid and nucleic acid sequences corresponding to the reductase polypeptide and gene, respectively, and to methods of obtaining such enzymes, amino acid sequences and nucleic acid sequences. The invention also relates to the use of such sequences to provide transgenic host cells capable of producing fatty alcohols and fatty aldehydes.

  13. Crystallization and rhenium MAD phasing of the acyl-homoserinelactone synthase EsaI

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, W.T.; Murphy IV, Frank V.; Gould, Ty A.; Jambeck, Per; Val, Dale L.; Cronan, Jr., John E.; Beck von Bodman, Susan; Churchill, Mair E.A.

    2009-04-22

    Acyl-homoserine-L-lactones (AHLs) are diffusible chemical signals that are required for virulence of many Gram-negative bacteria. AHLs are produced by AHL synthases from two substrates, S-adenosyl-L-methionine and acyl-acyl carrier protein. The AHL synthase EsaI, which is homologous to the AHL synthases from other pathogenic bacterial species, has been crystallized in the primitive tetragonal space group P4{sub 3}, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 66.40, c = 47.33 {angstrom}. The structure was solved by multiple-wavelength anomalous diffraction with a novel use of the rhenium anomalous signal. The rhenium-containing structure has been refined to a resolution of 2.5 {angstrom} and the perrhenate ion binding sites and liganding residues have been identified.

  14. Pocket radiation dosimeter--dosimeter charger assembly

    DOEpatents

    Manning, Frank W.

    1984-01-01

    This invention is a novel pocket-type radiation dosimeter comprising an electrometric radiation dosimeter and a charging circuit therefor. The instrument is especially designed to be amenable to mass production, to have a long shelf life, and to be compact, lightweight, and usable by the layman. The dosimeter proper may be of conventional design. The charging circuit includes a shake-type electrostatic generator, a voltage doubler for integrating generator output voltages of one polarity, and a switch operated by an external permanent magnet.

  15. Pocket radiation dosimeter: dosimeter charger assembly

    DOEpatents

    Manning, F.W.

    1982-03-17

    This invention is a novel pocket-type radiation dosimeter comprising an electrometric radiation dosimeter and a charging circuit therefor. The instrument is especially designed to be amenable to mass production, to have a long shelf life, and to be compact, lightweight, and usable by the layman. The dosimeter proper may be of conventional design. The charging circuit includes a shake-type electrostatic generator, a voltage doubler for integrating generator output voltages of one polarity, and a switch operated by an external permanent magnet.

  16. Root Locus Algorithms for Programmable Pocket Calculators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wechsler, E. R.

    1983-01-01

    Two algorithms are described which allow the plotting of individual points on a root locus diagram with or without time delay. The development was performed during the design of a continuous phase shifter used in the Baseband Antenna Combiner for the Deep Space Network (DSN). The algorithms, which are expected to be useful in similar DSN efforts, are simple enough to be implemented on a programmable pocket calculator. The coordinates of the open-loop zeros and poles, the gain constant K, and the time delay T are the data inputs.

  17. Localization of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) and N-acyl phosphatidylethanolamine phospholipase D (NAPE-PLD) in cells expressing the Ca(2+)-binding proteins calbindin, calretinin, and parvalbumin in the adult rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Patricia; Arrabal, Sergio; Vargas, Antonio; Blanco, Eduardo; Serrano, Antonia; Pavón, Francisco J; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Suárez, Juan

    2014-01-01

    The N-acylethanolamines (NAEs), oleoylethanolamide (OEA) and palmithylethanolamide (PEA) are known to be endogenous ligands of PPARα receptors, and their presence requires the activation of a specific phospholipase D (NAPE-PLD) associated with intracellular Ca(2+) fluxes. Thus, the identification of a specific population of NAPE-PLD/PPARα-containing neurons that express selective Ca(2+)-binding proteins (CaBPs) may provide a neuroanatomical basis to better understand the PPARα system in the brain. For this purpose, we used double-label immunofluorescence and confocal laser scanning microscopy for the characterization of the co-existence of NAPE-PLD/PPARα and the CaBPs calbindin D28k, calretinin and parvalbumin in the rat hippocampus. PPARα expression was specifically localized in the cell nucleus and, occasionally, in the cytoplasm of the principal cells (dentate granular and CA pyramidal cells) and some non-principal cells of the hippocampus. PPARα was expressed in the calbindin-containing cells of the granular cell layer of the dentate gyrus (DG) and the SP of CA1. These principal PPARα(+)/calbindin(+) cells were closely surrounded by NAPE-PLD(+) fiber varicosities. No pyramidal PPARα(+)/calbindin(+) cells were detected in CA3. Most cells containing parvalbumin expressed both NAPE-PLD and PPARα in the principal layers of the DG and CA1/3. A small number of cells containing PPARα and calretinin was found along the hippocampus. Scattered NAPE-PLD(+)/calretinin(+) cells were specifically detected in CA3. NAPE-PLD(+) puncta surrounded the calretinin(+) cells localized in the principal cells of the DG and CA1. The identification of the hippocampal subpopulations of NAPE-PLD/PPARα-containing neurons that express selective CaBPs should be considered when analyzing the role of NAEs/PPARα-signaling system in the regulation of hippocampal functions.

  18. Localization of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) and N-acyl phosphatidylethanolamine phospholipase D (NAPE-PLD) in cells expressing the Ca2+-binding proteins calbindin, calretinin, and parvalbumin in the adult rat hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, Patricia; Arrabal, Sergio; Vargas, Antonio; Blanco, Eduardo; Serrano, Antonia; Pavón, Francisco J.; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Suárez, Juan

    2014-01-01

    The N-acylethanolamines (NAEs), oleoylethanolamide (OEA) and palmithylethanolamide (PEA) are known to be endogenous ligands of PPARα receptors, and their presence requires the activation of a specific phospholipase D (NAPE-PLD) associated with intracellular Ca2+ fluxes. Thus, the identification of a specific population of NAPE-PLD/PPARα-containing neurons that express selective Ca2+-binding proteins (CaBPs) may provide a neuroanatomical basis to better understand the PPARα system in the brain. For this purpose, we used double-label immunofluorescence and confocal laser scanning microscopy for the characterization of the co-existence of NAPE-PLD/PPARα and the CaBPs calbindin D28k, calretinin and parvalbumin in the rat hippocampus. PPARα expression was specifically localized in the cell nucleus and, occasionally, in the cytoplasm of the principal cells (dentate granular and CA pyramidal cells) and some non-principal cells of the hippocampus. PPARα was expressed in the calbindin-containing cells of the granular cell layer of the dentate gyrus (DG) and the SP of CA1. These principal PPARα+/calbindin+ cells were closely surrounded by NAPE-PLD+ fiber varicosities. No pyramidal PPARα+/calbindin+ cells were detected in CA3. Most cells containing parvalbumin expressed both NAPE-PLD and PPARα in the principal layers of the DG and CA1/3. A small number of cells containing PPARα and calretinin was found along the hippocampus. Scattered NAPE-PLD+/calretinin+ cells were specifically detected in CA3. NAPE-PLD+ puncta surrounded the calretinin+ cells localized in the principal cells of the DG and CA1. The identification of the hippocampal subpopulations of NAPE-PLD/PPARα-containing neurons that express selective CaBPs should be considered when analyzing the role of NAEs/PPARα-signaling system in the regulation of hippocampal functions. PMID:24672435

  19. Carbohydrate Conformation and Lipid Condensation in Monolayers Containing Glycosphingolipid Gb3: Influence of Acyl Chain Structure

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, Erik B.; Gao, Haifei; Dennison, Andrew J.C.; Chopin, Nathalie; Struth, Bernd; Arnold, Thomas; Florent, Jean-Claude; Johannes, Ludger

    2014-01-01

    Globotriaosylceramide (Gb3), a glycosphingolipid found in the plasma membrane of animal cells, is the endocytic receptor of the bacterial Shiga toxin. Using x-ray reflectivity (XR) and grazing incidence x-ray diffraction (GIXD), lipid monolayers containing Gb3 were investigated at the air-water interface. XR probed Gb3 carbohydrate conformation normal to the interface, whereas GIXD precisely characterized Gb3’s influence on acyl chain in-plane packing and area per molecule (APM). Two phospholipids, 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DSPC) and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DPPE), were used to study Gb3 packing in different lipid environments. Furthermore, the impact on monolayer structure of a naturally extracted Gb3 mixture was compared to synthetic Gb3 species with uniquely defined acyl chain structures. XR results showed that lipid environment and Gb3 acyl chain structure impact carbohydrate conformation with greater solvent accessibility observed for smaller phospholipid headgroups and long Gb3 acyl chains. In general, GIXD showed that Gb3 condensed phospholipid packing resulting in smaller APM than predicted by ideal mixing. Gb3’s capacity to condense APM was larger for DSPC monolayers and exhibited different dependencies on acyl chain structure depending on the lipid environment. The interplay between Gb3-induced changes in lipid packing and the lipid environment’s impact on carbohydrate conformation has broad implications for glycosphingolipid macromolecule recognition and ligand binding. PMID:25185550

  20. Targeting the Central Pocket in Human Transcription Factor TEAD as a Potential Cancer Therapeutic Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Pobbati, Ajaybabu V.; Han, Xiao; Hung, Alvin W.; Weiguang, Seetoh; Huda, Nur; Chen, Guo-Ying; Kang, CongBao; Chia, Cheng San Brian; Luo, Xuelian; Hong, Wanjin; Poulsen, Anders

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The human TEAD family of transcription factors (TEAD1-4) is required for YAP-mediated transcription in the Hippo pathway. Hyperactivation of TEAD’s co-activator YAP contributes to tissue overgrowth and human cancers, suggesting that pharmacological interference of TEAD-YAP activity may be an effective strategy for anticancer therapy. Here we report the discovery of a central pocket in the YAP-binding domain (YBD) of TEAD that is targetable by small molecule inhibitors. Our X-ray crystallography studies reveal that flufenamic acid, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), binds to the central pocket of TEAD2 YBD. Our biochemical and functional analyses further demonstrate that binding of NSAIDs to TEAD inhibits TEAD-YAP-dependent transcription, cell migration and proliferation, indicating that the central pocket is important for TEAD function. Therefore, our studies discover a novel way of targeting TEAD transcription factors and set the stage for therapeutic development of specific TEAD-YAP inhibitors against human cancers. PMID:26592798

  1. Approaches for identification of HIV-1 entry inhibitors targeting gp41 pocket.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fei; Lu, Lu; Du, Lanying; Zhu, Xiaojie; Debnath, Asim K; Jiang, Shibo

    2013-01-11

    The hydrophobic pocket in the HIV-1 gp41 N-terminal heptad repeat (NHR) domain plays an important role in viral fusion and entry into the host cell, and serves as an attractive target for development of HIV-1 fusion/entry inhibitors. The peptide anti-HIV drug targeting gp41 NHR, T-20 (generic name: enfuvirtide; brand name: Fuzeon), was approved by the U.S. FDA in 2003 as the first HIV fusion/entry inhibitor for treatment of HIV/AIDS patients who fail to respond to the current antiretroviral drugs. However, because T20 lacks the pocket-binding domain (PBD), it exhibits low anti-HIV-1 activity and short half-life. Therefore, several next-generation HIV fusion inhibitory peptides with PBD have been developed. They possess longer half-life and more potent antiviral activity against a broad spectrum of HIV-1 strains, including the T-20-resistant variants. Nonetheless, the clinical application of these peptides is still limited by the lack of oral availability and the high cost of production. Thus, development of small molecule compounds targeting the gp41 pocket with oral availability has been promoted. This review describes the main approaches for identification of HIV fusion/entry inhibitors targeting the gp41 pocket and summarizes the latest progress in developing these inhibitors as a new class of anti-HIV drugs.

  2. Biochemical and serological characterization of Bacteroides intermedius strains isolated from the deep periodontal pocket.

    PubMed Central

    Dahlén, G; Wikström, M; Renvert, S; Gmür, R; Guggenheim, B

    1990-01-01

    Fifty-one fluorescence-positive black-pigmented Bacteroides strains obtained from 51 patients with deep periodontal pockets (greater than 6 mm) were identified and characterized. Fifty of these strains were presumptively identified as Bacteroides intermedius according to the indole reaction. This was confirmed by further biochemical characterization. The 50 strains from diseased sites were then compared with 16 B. intermedius strains isolated from periodontally healthy individuals with no signs of destructive periodontal disease. Tests for antimicrobial susceptibility showed similar patterns for all 50 pocket-derived strains, except for one beta-lactamase-positive strain that was resistant to penicillin G and ampicillin. Forty-seven strains were tested for binding of three monoclonal antibodies defining three distinct serogroups of B. intermedius. Thirty-one strains belonged to serogroup I, three to serogroup II and thirteen to serogroup III. In comparison to the strains from the shallow periodontal pockets, serogroup I was significantly overrepresented in the patient group with periodontal disease. We conclude that saccharolytic black-pigmented Bacteroides species from deep periodontal pockets constituted, with very rare exceptions, a biochemically homogeneous but antigenically heterogeneous group of B. intermedius and that serogroup I is predominantly found in deep periodontal lesions. PMID:2229351

  3. Identification of fragments targeting an alternative pocket on HIV-1 gp41 by NMR screening and similarity searching.

    PubMed

    Chu, Shidong; Gochin, Miriam

    2013-09-15

    The HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp41 fusion intermediate is a promising drug target for inhibiting viral entry. However, drug development has been impeded by challenges inherent in mediating the underlying protein-protein interaction. Here we report on the identification of fragments that bind to a C-terminal sub-pocket adjacent to the well-known hydrophobic pocket on the NHR coiled coil. Using a specifically designed assay and ligand-based NMR screening of a fragment library, we identified a thioenylaminopyrazole compound with a dissociation constant of ~500 μM. Interaction with the C-terminal sub-pocket was confirmed by paramagnetic relaxation enhancement NMR experiments, which also yielded the binding mode. Shape-based similarity searching detected additional phenylpyrazole and phenyltriazole fragments within the library, enriching the hit rate over random screening, and revealing molecular features required for activity. Discovery of the novel scaffolds and binding mechanism suggests avenues for extending the interaction surface and improving the potency of a hydrophobic pocket binding inhibitor.

  4. Generation of cell-to-cell signals in quorum sensing: acyl homoserine lactone synthase activity of a purified Vibrio fischeri LuxI protein.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, A L; Val, D L; Hanzelka, B L; Cronan, J E; Greenberg, E P

    1996-09-03

    Many bacteria use acyl homoserine lactone signals to monitor cell density in a type of gene regulation termed quorum sensing and response. Synthesis of these signals is directed by homologs of the luxi gene of Vibrio fischeri. This communication resolves two critical issues concerning the synthesis of the V. fischeri signal. (i) The luxI product is directly involved in signal synthesis-the protein is an acyl homoserine lactone synthase; and (ii) the substrates for acyl homoserine lactone synthesis are not amino acids from biosynthetic pathways or fatty acid degradation products, but rather they are S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) and an acylated acyl carrier protein (ACP) from the fatty acid biosynthesis pathway. We purified a maltose binding protein-LuxI fusion polypeptide and showed that, when provided with the appropriate substrates, it catalyzes the synthesis of an acyl homoserine lactone. In V. fischeri, luxi directs the synthesis of N-(3-oxohexanoyl) homoserine lactone and hexanoyl homoserine lactone. The purified maltose binding protein-LuxI fusion protein catalyzes the synthesis of hexanoyl homoserine lactone from hexanoyl-ACP and SAM. There is a high level of specificity for hexanoyl-ACP over ACPs with differing acyl group lengths, and hexanoyl homoserine lactone was not synthesized when SAM was replaced with other amino acids, such as methionine, S-adenosylhomocysteine, homoserine, or homoserine lactone, or when hexanoyl-SAM was provided as the substrate. This provides direct evidence that the LuxI protein is an auto-inducer synthase that catalyzes the formation of an amide bond between SAM and a fatty acyl-ACP and then catalyzes the formation of the acyl homoserine lactone from the acyl-SAM intermediate.

  5. PoLi: A Virtual Screening Pipeline Based On Template Pocket And Ligand Similarity

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Ambrish; Srinivasan, Bharath; Skolnick, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Often in pharmaceutical research, the goal is to identify small molecules that can interact with and appropriately modify the biological behavior of a new protein target. Unfortunately, most proteins lack both known structures and small molecule binders, prerequisites of many virtual screening, VS, approaches. For such proteins, ligand homology modeling, LHM, that copies ligands from homologous and perhaps evolutionarily distant template proteins, has been shown to be a powerful VS approach to identify possible binding ligands. However, if we want to target a specific pocket for which there is no homologous holo template protein structure, then LHM will not work. To address this issue, in a new pocket based approach, PoLi, we generalize LHM by exploiting the fact that the number of distinct small molecule ligand binding pockets in proteins is small. PoLi identifies similar ligand binding pockets in a holo-template protein library, selectively copies relevant parts of template ligands and uses them for VS. In practice, PoLi is a hybrid structure and ligand based VS algorithm that integrates 2D fingerprint-based and 3D shape-based similarity metrics for improved virtual screening performance. On standard DUD and DUD-E benchmark databases, using modeled receptor structures, PoLi achieves an average enrichment factor of 13.4 and 9.6 respectively, in the top 1% of the screened library. In contrast, traditional docking based VS using AutoDock Vina and homology-based VS using FINDSITEfilt have an average enrichment of 1.6 (3.0) and 9.0 (7.9) on the DUD (DUD-E) sets respectively. Experimental validation of PoLi predictions on dihydrofolate reductase, DHFR, using differential scanning fluorimetry, DSF, identifies multiple ligands with diverse molecular scaffolds, thus demonstrating the advantage of PoLi over current state-of-the-art VS methods. PMID:26225536

  6. ROMPgel beads in IRORI format: acylations revisited.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Richard S

    2005-01-01

    Functionalized "designer" polymers derived from ring-opening metathesis polymerization (ROMPgels) are attractive for their high loading, high purity, and ease of synthesis. Their physical state may vary from liquid to gel to granular solid, making a general method of handling these polymers difficult. By incorporating a suitable norbornene-substituted linker on standard Wang beads, ROMPgels can be easily grafted onto the resin, adding the convenience of a bead format while still maintaining the high loading and excellent site accessibility. This advantage is demonstrated by the use of an N-hydroxysuccinimide ROMPgel (3.3 mmol g(-1), a 3-fold increase from the parent linker resin) in IRORI Kan format. Conditions for the acylation of these IRORI-formatted ROMPgels are reported, along with the scope and limitations of the choice of acylating reagents. Yields are greatly improved by the use of perfluorinated solvents as a nonparticipating cosolvent in the acylation process. A simple titration method for the quantification of the acylated ROMPgels is also reported. Spent Kans are regenerated after each use without apparent loss of activity or purity after several cycles. Due to the high loading and reduced swelling of the ROMPgel resin, up to 0.39 mmol acyl group has successfully been recovered from a single IRORI miniKan, demonstrating the high capacity of the resin and applicability to both lead discovery and optimization programs.

  7. The Potential for Pocket Parks to Increase Physical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Deborah A.; Marsh, Terry; Williamson, Stephanie; Han, Bing; Derose, Kathryn Pitkin; Golinelli, Daniella; McKenzie, Thomas L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To assess the use of new pocket parks in low-income neighborhoods. Setting Los Angeles Subjects Parks users and residents living within ½ mile of 3 pocket parks and 15 neighborhood parks Intervention The creation of pocket parks Design Quasi-experimental post-only comparison Measures We used the System of Observing Play and Recreation in Communities (SOPARC) to measure park use and park-based physical activity and surveyed park users and residents about their park use. Analysis We surveyed 392 and 432 household members within one-half mile of the 3 pocket parks before and after park construction, respectively, as well as 71 pocket park users and compared them to 992 neighborhood park users and 342 residents living within ½ mile of other neighborhood parks. We compared pocket park use to playground area use in the larger neighborhood parks. We used descriptive statistics and Generalized Estimating Equations for the analysis. Results Overall, pocket park use compared favorably in promoting moderate-to-vigorous physical activity with that of existing playground space in nearby parks and they were cost-effective at $0.73/MET hour gained. Pocket park visitors walked an average of 0.25 miles to get there. Conclusions Pocket parks, when perceived as attractive and safe destinations, may increase physical activity by encouraging families with children to walk there. Additional strategies and programs may be needed to encourage more residents to use the parks. PMID:24380461

  8. Kinetics of acyl transfer reactions in organic media catalysed by Candida antarctica lipase B.

    PubMed

    Martinelle, M; Hult, K

    1995-09-06

    The acyl transfer reactions catalysed by Candida antartica lipase B in organic media followed a bi-bi ping-pong mechanism, with competitive substrate inhibition by the alcohols used as acyl acceptors. The effect of organic solvents on Vm and Km was investigated. The Vm values in acetonitrile was 40-50% of those in heptane. High Km values in acetonitrile compared to those in heptane could partly be explained by an increased solvation of the substrates in acetonitrile. Substrate solvation caused a 10-fold change in substrate specificity, defined as (Vm/Km)ethyl octanoate/(Vm/Km)octanoic acid, going from heptane to acetonitrile. Deacylation was the rate determining step for the acyl transfer in heptane with vinyl- and ethyl octanoate as acyl donors and (R)-2-octanol as acyl acceptor. With 1-octanol, a rate determining deacylation step in heptane was indicated using the same acyl donors. Using 1-octanol as acceptor in heptane, S-ethyl thiooctanoate had a 25- to 30-fold lower Vm/Km value and vinyl octanoate a 4-fold higher Vm/Km value than that for ethyl octanoate. The difference showed to be a Km effect for vinyl octanoate and mainly a Km effect for S-ethyl thiooctanoate. The Vm values of the esterification of octanoic acid with different alcohols was 10-30-times lower than those for the corresponding transesterification of ethyl octanoate. The low activity could be explained by a low pH around the enzyme caused by the acid or a withdrawing of active enzyme by nonproductive binding by the acid.

  9. In silico prediction of acyl glucuronide reactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter, Tim; Lewis, Richard; Luker, Tim; Bonnert, Roger; Bernstein, Michael A.; Birkinshaw, Timothy N.; Thom, Stephen; Wenlock, Mark; Paine, Stuart

    2011-11-01

    Drugs and drug candidates containing a carboxylic acid moiety, including many widely used non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are often metabolized to form acyl glucuronides (AGs). NSAIDs such as Ibuprofen are amongst the most widely used drugs on the market, whereas similar carboxylic acid drugs such as Suprofen have been withdrawn due to adverse events. Although the link between these AG metabolites and toxicity is not proven, there is circumstantial literature evidence to suggest that more reactive acyl glucuronides may, in some cases, present a greater risk of exhibiting toxic effects. We wished therefore to rank the reactivity of potential new carboxylate-containing drug candidates, and performed kinetic studies on synthetic acyl glucuronides to benchmark our key compounds. Driven by the desire to quickly rank the reactivity of compounds without the need for lengthy synthesis of the acyl glucuronide, a correlation was established between the degradation half-life of the acyl glucuronide and the half life for the hydrolysis of the more readily available methyl ester derivative. This finding enabled a considerable broadening of chemical property space to be investigated. The need for kinetic measurements was subsequently eliminated altogether by correlating the methyl ester hydrolysis half-life with the predicted 13C NMR chemical shift of the carbonyl carbon together with readily available steric descriptors in a PLS model. This completely in silico prediction of acyl glucuronide reactivity is applicable within the earliest stages of drug design with low cost and acceptable accuracy to guide intelligent molecular design. This reactivity data will be useful alongside the more complex additional pharmacokinetic exposure and distribution data that is generated later in the drug discovery process for assessing the overall toxicological risk of acidic drugs.

  10. Acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ta-Yuan; Li, Bo-Liang; Chang, Catherine C. Y.; Urano, Yasuomi

    2009-01-01

    The enzymes acyl-coenzyme A (CoA):cholesterol acyltransferases (ACATs) are membrane-bound proteins that utilize long-chain fatty acyl-CoA and cholesterol as substrates to form cholesteryl esters. In mammals, two isoenzymes, ACAT1 and ACAT2, encoded by two different genes, exist. ACATs play important roles in cellular cholesterol homeostasis in various tissues. This chapter summarizes the current knowledge on ACAT-related research in two areas: 1) ACAT genes and proteins and 2) ACAT enzymes as drug targets for atherosclerosis and for Alzheimer's disease. PMID:19141679

  11. Acyl silicates and acyl aluminates as activated intermediates in peptide formation on clays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, D. H.; Kennedy, R. M.; Macklin, J.

    1984-01-01

    Glycine reacts with heating on dried clays and other minerals to give peptides in much better yield than in the absence of mineral. This reaction was proposed to occur by way of an activated intermediate such as an acyl silicate or acyl aluminate analogous to acyl phosphates involved in several biochemical reactions including peptide bond synthesis. The proposed mechanism has been confirmed by trapping the intermediate, as well as by direct spectroscopic observation of a related intermediate. The reaction of amino acids on periodically dried mineral surfaces represents a widespead, geologically realistic setting for prebiotic peptide formation via in situ activation.

  12. Crystal structure of the vicilin from Solanum melongena reveals existence of different anionic ligands in structurally similar pockets

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Abha; Kumar, Ashish; Salunke, Dinakar M.

    2016-01-01

    Crystal structure of a vicilin, SM80.1, was determined towards exploring its possible physiological functions. The protein was purified from Solanum melongena by combination of ammonium sulphate fractionation and size exclusion chromatography. Structure was determined ab initio at resolution of 1.5 Å by X-ray crystallography showing the three-dimensional topology of the trimeric protein. Each monomer of SM80.1 consists of two similar domains with hydrophobic binding pocket and each accommodating different ligands, i.e. acetate and pyroglutamate. The relatively high stability of these independent anionic ligands in similar pockets indicated a strict requirement of stabilization by hydrogen bonds with the charged residues, suggesting a degree of plasticity within the binding pocket. Comparison of SM80.1 structure with those of other 7S vicilins indicated conservation of putative binding pocket for anionic ligands. Here we propose the possibility of trapping of these ligands in the protein for their requirement in the metabolic processes. PMID:27004988

  13. Crystal structure of the vicilin from Solanum melongena reveals existence of different anionic ligands in structurally similar pockets.

    PubMed

    Jain, Abha; Kumar, Ashish; Salunke, Dinakar M

    2016-03-23

    Crystal structure of a vicilin, SM80.1, was determined towards exploring its possible physiological functions. The protein was purified from Solanum melongena by combination of ammonium sulphate fractionation and size exclusion chromatography. Structure was determined ab initio at resolution of 1.5 Å by X-ray crystallography showing the three-dimensional topology of the trimeric protein. Each monomer of SM80.1 consists of two similar domains with hydrophobic binding pocket and each accommodating different ligands, i.e. acetate and pyroglutamate. The relatively high stability of these independent anionic ligands in similar pockets indicated a strict requirement of stabilization by hydrogen bonds with the charged residues, suggesting a degree of plasticity within the binding pocket. Comparison of SM80.1 structure with those of other 7S vicilins indicated conservation of putative binding pocket for anionic ligands. Here we propose the possibility of trapping of these ligands in the protein for their requirement in the metabolic processes.

  14. 30 CFR 56.19103 - Dumping facilities and loading pockets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Dumping facilities and loading pockets. 56.19103 Section 56.19103 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... Personnel Hoisting Shafts § 56.19103 Dumping facilities and loading pockets. Dumping facilities and...

  15. 30 CFR 57.19103 - Dumping facilities and loading pockets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Dumping facilities and loading pockets. 57.19103 Section 57.19103 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... MINES Personnel Hoisting Shafts § 57.19103 Dumping facilities and loading pockets. Dumping...

  16. Acyl anion free N-heterocyclic carbene organocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Sarah J; Candish, Lisa; Lupton, David W

    2013-06-21

    Reaction discovery using N-heterocyclic carbene organocatalysis has been dominated by the chemistry of acyl anion equivalents. Recent studies demonstrate that NHCs are far more diverse catalysts, with a variety of reactions discovered that proceed without acyl anion equivalent formation. In this tutorial review selected examples of acyl anion free NHC catalysis using carbonyl compounds are presented.

  17. Structural and Functional Studies of Fatty Acyl Adenylate Ligases from E. coli and L. pneumophila

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z.; Swaminathan, S.; Zhou, R.; Sauder, J. M.; Tonge, P. J.; Burley, S. K.

    2011-02-18

    Fatty acyl-AMP ligase (FAAL) is a new member of a family of adenylate-forming enzymes that were recently discovered in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. They are similar in sequence to fatty acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) ligases (FACLs). However, while FACLs perform a two-step catalytic reaction, AMP ligation followed by CoA ligation using ATP and CoA as cofactors, FAALs produce only the acyl adenylate and are unable to perform the second step. We report X-ray crystal structures of full-length FAAL from Escherichia coli (EcFAAL) and FAAL from Legionella pneumophila (LpFAAL) bound to acyl adenylate, determined at resolution limits of 3.0 and 1.85 {angstrom}, respectively. The structures share a larger N-terminal domain and a smaller C-terminal domain, which together resemble the previously determined structures of FAAL and FACL proteins. Our two structures occur in quite different conformations. EcFAAL adopts the adenylate-forming conformation typical of FACLs, whereas LpFAAL exhibits a unique intermediate conformation. Both EcFAAL and LpFAAL have insertion motifs that distinguish them from the FACLs. Structures of EcFAAL and LpFAAL reveal detailed interactions between this insertion motif and the interdomain hinge region and with the C-terminal domain. We suggest that the insertion motifs support sufficient interdomain motions to allow substrate binding and product release during acyl adenylate formation, but they preclude CoA binding, thereby preventing CoA ligation.

  18. Structural and Functional Studies of Fatty Acyl Adenylate Ligases from E. coli and L. pneumophila

    SciTech Connect

    Z Zhang; R Zhou; J Sauder; P Tonge; S Burley; S Swaminathan

    2011-12-31

    Fatty acyl-AMP ligase (FAAL) is a new member of a family of adenylate-forming enzymes that were recently discovered in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. They are similar in sequence to fatty acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) ligases (FACLs). However, while FACLs perform a two-step catalytic reaction, AMP ligation followed by CoA ligation using ATP and CoA as cofactors, FAALs produce only the acyl adenylate and are unable to perform the second step. We report X-ray crystal structures of full-length FAAL from Escherichia coli (EcFAAL) and FAAL from Legionella pneumophila (LpFAAL) bound to acyl adenylate, determined at resolution limits of 3.0 and 1.85 {angstrom}, respectively. The structures share a larger N-terminal domain and a smaller C-terminal domain, which together resemble the previously determined structures of FAAL and FACL proteins. Our two structures occur in quite different conformations. EcFAAL adopts the adenylate-forming conformation typical of FACLs, whereas LpFAAL exhibits a unique intermediate conformation. Both EcFAAL and LpFAAL have insertion motifs that distinguish them from the FACLs. Structures of EcFAAL and LpFAAL reveal detailed interactions between this insertion motif and the interdomain hinge region and with the C-terminal domain. We suggest that the insertion motifs support sufficient interdomain motions to allow substrate binding and product release during acyl adenylate formation, but they preclude CoA binding, thereby preventing CoA ligation.

  19. Novel Structural Components Contribute to the High Thermal Stability of Acyl Carrier Protein from Enterococcus faecalis*

    PubMed Central

    Park, Young-Guen; Jung, Min-Cheol; Song, Heesang; Jeong, Ki-Woong; Bang, Eunjung; Hwang, Geum-Sook; Kim, Yangmee

    2016-01-01

    Enterococcus faecalis is a Gram-positive, commensal bacterium that lives in the gastrointestinal tracts of humans and other mammals. It causes severe infections because of high antibiotic resistance. E. faecalis can endure extremes of temperature and pH. Acyl carrier protein (ACP) is a key element in the biosynthesis of fatty acids responsible for acyl group shuttling and delivery. In this study, to understand the origin of high thermal stabilities of E. faecalis ACP (Ef-ACP), its solution structure was investigated for the first time. CD experiments showed that the melting temperature of Ef-ACP is 78.8 °C, which is much higher than that of Escherichia coli ACP (67.2 °C). The overall structure of Ef-ACP shows the common ACP folding pattern consisting of four α-helices (helix I (residues 3–17), helix II (residues 39–53), helix III (residues 60–64), and helix IV (residues 68–78)) connected by three loops. Unique Ef-ACP structural features include a hydrophobic interaction between Phe45 in helix II and Phe18 in the α1α2 loop and a hydrogen bonding between Ser15 in helix I and Ile20 in the α1α2 loop, resulting in its high thermal stability. Phe45-mediated hydrophobic packing may block acyl chain binding subpocket II entry. Furthermore, Ser58 in the α2α3 loop in Ef-ACP, which usually constitutes a proline in other ACPs, exhibited slow conformational exchanges, resulting in the movement of the helix III outside the structure to accommodate a longer acyl chain in the acyl binding cavity. These results might provide insights into the development of antibiotics against pathogenic drug-resistant E. faecalis strains. PMID:26631734

  20. Novel Structural Components Contribute to the High Thermal Stability of Acyl Carrier Protein from Enterococcus faecalis.

    PubMed

    Park, Young-Guen; Jung, Min-Cheol; Song, Heesang; Jeong, Ki-Woong; Bang, Eunjung; Hwang, Geum-Sook; Kim, Yangmee

    2016-01-22

    Enterococcus faecalis is a Gram-positive, commensal bacterium that lives in the gastrointestinal tracts of humans and other mammals. It causes severe infections because of high antibiotic resistance. E. faecalis can endure extremes of temperature and pH. Acyl carrier protein (ACP) is a key element in the biosynthesis of fatty acids responsible for acyl group shuttling and delivery. In this study, to understand the origin of high thermal stabilities of E. faecalis ACP (Ef-ACP), its solution structure was investigated for the first time. CD experiments showed that the melting temperature of Ef-ACP is 78.8 °C, which is much higher than that of Escherichia coli ACP (67.2 °C). The overall structure of Ef-ACP shows the common ACP folding pattern consisting of four α-helices (helix I (residues 3-17), helix II (residues 39-53), helix III (residues 60-64), and helix IV (residues 68-78)) connected by three loops. Unique Ef-ACP structural features include a hydrophobic interaction between Phe(45) in helix II and Phe(18) in the α1α2 loop and a hydrogen bonding between Ser(15) in helix I and Ile(20) in the α1α2 loop, resulting in its high thermal stability. Phe(45)-mediated hydrophobic packing may block acyl chain binding subpocket II entry. Furthermore, Ser(58) in the α2α3 loop in Ef-ACP, which usually constitutes a proline in other ACPs, exhibited slow conformational exchanges, resulting in the movement of the helix III outside the structure to accommodate a longer acyl chain in the acyl binding cavity. These results might provide insights into the development of antibiotics against pathogenic drug-resistant E. faecalis strains.

  1. Acyl chain preference and inhibitor identification of Moraxella catarrhalis LpxA: Insight through crystal structure and computational studies.

    PubMed

    Pratap, Shivendra; Kesari, Pooja; Yadav, Ravi; Dev, Aditya; Narwal, Manju; Kumar, Pravindra

    2017-03-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is an important surface component and a potential virulence factor in the pathogenesis of Gram-negative bacteria. UDP-N-acetylglucosamine acyltransferase (LpxA) enzyme catalyzes the first reaction of LPS biosynthesis, reversible transfer of R-3-hydroxy-acyl moiety from donor R-3-hydroxy-acyl-acyl carrier protein to the 3' hydroxyl position of UDP-N-acetyl-glucosamine. LpxA enzyme's essentiality in bacterial survival and absence of any homologous protein in humans makes it a promising target for anti-bacterial drug development. Herein, we present the crystal structure of Moraxella catarrhalis LpxA (McLpxA). We propose that L171 is responsible for limiting the acyl chain length in McLpxA to 10C or 12C. The study reveals the plausible interactions between the highly conserved clusters of basic residues at the C-terminal end of McLpxA and acidic residues of acyl carrier protein (ACP). Furthermore, the crystal structure of McLpxA was used to screen potential inhibitors from NCI open database using various computational approaches viz. pharmacophore mapping, virtual screening and molecular docking. Molecules Mol212032, Mol609399 and Mol152546 showed best binding affinity with McLpxA among all screened molecules. These molecules mimic the substrate-LpxA binding interactions.

  2. Continuous recording of long-chain acyl-coenzyme a synthetase activity using fluorescently labeled bovine serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Demant, E J; Nystrøm, B T

    2001-08-01

    The fluorescence-based long-chain fatty acid probe BSA-HCA (bovine serum albumin labeled with 7-hydroxycoumarin-4-acetic acid) is shown to respond to binding of long-chain acyl-CoA thioesters by quenching of the 450 nm fluorescence emission. As determined by spectrofluorometric titration, binding affinities for palmitoyl-, stearoyl-, and oleoyl-CoA (Kd = 0.2-0.4 microM) are 5-10 times lower than those for the corresponding nonesterified fatty acids. In the presence of detergent (Chaps, Triton X-100, n-octylglucoside) above the critical micelle concentration, acyl-CoA partitions from BSA-HCA and into the detergent micelles. This allows BSA-HCA to be used as a fluorescent probe for continuous recording of fatty acid concentrations in detergent solution with little interference from acyl-CoA. Using a calibration of the fluorescence signal with fatty acids in the C14 to C20 chain-length range, fatty acid consumption by Pseudomonas fragi and rat liver microsomal acyl-CoA synthetase activities are measured down to 0.05 microM/min with a data sampling rate of 10 points per second. This new method provides a very promising spectrofluorometric approach to the study of acyl-CoA synthetase reaction kinetics at physiologically relevant (nM) aqueous phase concentrations of fatty acid substrates and at a time resolution that cannot be obtained in isotopic sampling or enzyme-coupled assays.

  3. Role of pocket flexibility in the modulation of estrogen receptor alpha by key residue arginine 394.

    PubMed

    Mu, Yunsong; Peng, Sufen; Zhang, Aiqian; Wang, Liansheng

    2011-02-01

    Estradiol derivatives, with similar structures as estradiol (E2) or estradiol metabolites, have been recognized to have detrimental health effects on wildlife and humans. However, data at the molecular level about interactions of these compounds with biological targets are still lacking. Herein, a flexible docking approach was used to characterize the molecular interaction of nine estradiol derivatives with estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) in the ligand-binding domain. All ligands were docked in the buried hydrophobic cavity of the steroid hormone pocket. In addition, the plasticity of an active site was also identified by reversing amino acid arginine 394 for better ligand-receptor binding affinity. Finally, bioassays based on genetically modified yeast strains were used to validate the quality of molecular simulation because of their rapidity and high sensitivity. The experimental findings about logarithm values of the median effective concentration (EC50) value had a linear correlation with computational binding affinity from molecular docking, which described a pattern of interaction between estradiol derivatives and ER. The estrogenic activity of all compounds, although more or less lower than E2, was proved to possess high severe environmental risks. Considering the sidechain flexibility in the ligand binding pocket, 17α-ethylestradiol-3-cyclopentylether was reported to correlate highly significantly with known induced fit conformational changes based upon proof-of-principle calculations on human ERα with the preservation of a strong salt bridge between glutamic acid 353 and arginine 394.

  4. High acyl gellan as an emulsion stabilizer.

    PubMed

    Vilela, Joice Aline Pires; da Cunha, Rosiane Lopes

    2016-03-30

    High acyl gellan (0.01-0.2% w/w) was used as stabilizer in oil in water emulsions containing 30% (w/w) of sunflower oil and prepared under different process conditions. Stable emulsions to phase separation could be obtained using high acyl gellan (HA) content above 0.05% (w/w), while low acyl gellan (LA) prepared at the same conditions could not stabilize emulsions. Emulsions properties depended on the process used to mix the oil and gellan dispersion since high pressure homogenization favored stabilization while very high energy density applied by ultrasound led to systems destabilization. Emulsions prepared using high pressure homogenization showed zeta potential values ranging from -50 up to -59 mV, suggesting that electrostatic repulsion could be contributing to the systems stability. Rheological properties of continuous phase were also responsible for emulsions stabilization, since HA gellan dispersions showed high viscosity and gel-like behavior. The high viscosity of the continuous phase could be associated to the presence of high acyl gellan microgels/aggregates. Disentanglement of these aggregates performed by ultrasound strongly decreased the viscosity and consequently affected the emulsions behavior, reducing the stability to phase separation.

  5. Acylated pregnane glycosides from Caralluma russeliana.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Sattar, Essam; Ahmed, Ahmed A; Hegazy, Mohamed-Elamir F; Farag, Mohamed A; Al-Yahya, Mohammad Abdul-Aziz

    2007-05-01

    The chloroform extract of the aerial parts of Caralluma russeliana yielded four acylated pregnane glycosides, namely russeliosides E-H, three were found now. The structures of the compounds were elucidated using MS, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, 1H-1H COSY, HMQC, NOESY and HMBC experiments.

  6. Characteristics of cellular composition of periodontal pockets

    PubMed Central

    Hasiuk, Petro; Hasiuk, Nataliya; Kindiy, Dmytro; Ivanchyshyn, Victoriya; Kalashnikov, Dmytro; Zubchenko, Sergiy

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The development of inflammatory periodontal disease in young people is an urgent problem of today's periodontology, and requires a development of new methods that would give an opportunity not only to diagnose but also for prognosis of periodontitis course in a given patients contingent. Results Cellular structure of periodontal pockets is presented by hematogenous and epithelial cells. Our results are confirmed by previous studies, and show that the penetration of periodontal pathogens leads to formation in periodontal tissue of a highly active complex compounds—cytokines that are able to modify the activity of neutrophils and reduce their specific antibacterial properties. Cytokines not only adversely affect the periodontal tissues, but also cause further activation of cells that synthesized them, and inhibit tissue repair and process of resynthesis of connective tissue by fibroblasts. Conclusion Neutrophilic granulocytes present in each of the types of smear types, but their functional status and quantitative composition is different. The results of our cytological study confirmed the results of immunohistochemical studies, and show that in generalized periodontitis, an inflammatory cellular elements with disorganized epithelial cells and connective tissue of the gums and periodontium, and bacteria form specific types of infiltration in periodontal tissues. PMID:28180007

  7. Crystal structure of human mitochondrial acyl-CoA thioesterase (ACOT2)

    PubMed Central

    Mandel, Corey R.; Tweel, Benjamin; Tong, Liang

    2009-01-01

    Acyl-CoA thioesterases (ACOTs) catalyze the hydrolysis of CoA esters to free CoA and carboxylic acids and have important functions in lipid metabolism and other cellular processes. Type I ACOTs are found only in animals and contain an α/β hydrolase domain, through currently no structural information is available on any of these enzymes. We report here the crystal structure at 2.1 Å resolution of human mitochondrial ACOT2, a type I enzyme. The structure contains two domains, N and C domains. The C domain has the α/β hydrolase fold, with the catalytic triad Ser294-His422-Asp388. The N domain contains a seven-stranded β-sandwich, which has some distant structural homologs in other proteins. The active site is located in a large pocket at the interface between the two domains. The structural information has significant relevance for other type I ACOTs and related enzymes. PMID:19497300

  8. Crystal structure of human mitochondrial acyl-CoA thioesterase (ACOT2).

    PubMed

    Mandel, Corey R; Tweel, Benjamin; Tong, Liang

    2009-08-07

    Acyl-CoA thioesterases (ACOTs) catalyze the hydrolysis of CoA esters to free CoA and carboxylic acids and have important functions in lipid metabolism and other cellular processes. Type I ACOTs are found only in animals and contain an alpha/beta hydrolase domain, through currently no structural information is available on any of these enzymes. We report here the crystal structure at 2.1A resolution of human mitochondrial ACOT2, a type I enzyme. The structure contains two domains, N and C domains. The C domain has the alpha/beta hydrolase fold, with the catalytic triad Ser294-His422-Asp388. The N domain contains a seven-stranded beta-sandwich, which has some distant structural homologs in other proteins. The active site is located in a large pocket at the interface between the two domains. The structural information has significant relevance for other type I ACOTs and related enzymes.

  9. Acylation of the Type 3 Secretion System Translocon Using a Dedicated Acyl Carrier Protein

    PubMed Central

    Agrebi, Rym; Canestrari, Mickaël J.; Mignot, Tâm; Lebrun, Régine; Bouveret, Emmanuelle

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens often deliver effectors into host cells using type 3 secretion systems (T3SS), the extremity of which forms a translocon that perforates the host plasma membrane. The T3SS encoded by Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1) is genetically associated with an acyl carrier protein, IacP, whose role has remained enigmatic. In this study, using tandem affinity purification, we identify a direct protein-protein interaction between IacP and the translocon protein SipB. We show, by mass spectrometry and radiolabelling, that SipB is acylated, which provides evidence for a modification of the translocon that has not been described before. A unique and conserved cysteine residue of SipB is identified as crucial for this modification. Although acylation of SipB was not essential to virulence, we show that this posttranslational modification promoted SipB insertion into host-cell membranes and pore-forming activity linked to the SPI-1 T3SS. Cooccurrence of acyl carrier and translocon proteins in several γ- and β-proteobacteria suggests that acylation of the translocon is conserved in these other pathogenic bacteria. These results also indicate that acyl carrier proteins, known for their involvement in metabolic pathways, have also evolved as cofactors of new bacterial protein lipidation pathways. PMID:28085879

  10. Molar absorptivity and color characteristics of acylated and non-acylated pelargonidin-based anthocyanins.

    PubMed

    Giusti, M M; Rodríguez-Saona, L E; Wrolstad, R E

    1999-11-01

    The effects of glycosylation and acylation on the spectral characteristics, molar absorptivity, and color attributes of purified acylated and non-acylated pelargonidin derivatives were compared. Pigments were obtained from strawberries, radishes, red-fleshed potatoes, and partially hydrolyzed radish pigments. Individual pigments were isolated by using semipreparative HPLC. Spectral and color (CIELch) attributes of purified pigments were measured. Molar absorptivity ranged from 15 600 to 39 590 for pelargonidin-3-glucoside (pg-3-glu) and pg-3-rutinoside-5-glucoside acylated with p-coumaric acid, respectively. The presence of cinnamic acid acylation had a considerable impact on spectral and color characteristics, causing a bathochromic shift of lambda(max). Sugar substitution also played an important role, with a hypsochromic shift caused by the presence of glycosylation. Pg-3, 5-diglu and pg-3,5-triglu possessed a higher hue angle (>40 degrees ) than the other pg derivatives at pH 1.0, corresponding to the yellow-orange region of the color solid. Acylation with malonic acid did not affect lambda(max) and showed little effect on color characteristics. The solvent system had an effect not only on the molar absorptivity, but also on the visual color characteristic of the pigments.

  11. The Role of the Acid Pocket in Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, David R; Derakhshan, Mohammad H; Robertson, Elaine V; McColl, Kenneth E L

    2016-02-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease is one of the commonest chronic conditions in the western world and its prevalence is increasing worldwide. The discovery of the acid pocket explained the paradox of acid reflux occurring more frequently in the postprandial period despite intragastric acidity being low due to the buffering effect of the meal. The acid pocket was first described in 2001 when it was detected as an area of low pH immediately distal to the cardia using dual pH electrode pull-through studies 15 minutes after a meal. It was hypothesized that there was a local pocket of acid close to the gastroesophageal junction that escapes the buffering effect of the meal, and that this is the source of postprandial acidic reflux. The presence of the acid pocket has been confirmed in other studies using different techniques including high-resolution pHmetry, Bravo capsule, magnetic resonance imaging, and scintigraphy. This review aims to describe what we know about the acid pocket including its length, volume, fluid constituents, and its relationship to the lower esophageal sphincter and squamocolumnar junction. We will discuss the possible mechanisms that lead to the formation of the acid pocket and examine what differences exist in patients who suffer from acid reflux. Treatments for reflux disease that affect the acid pocket will also be discussed.

  12. ADS-J1 inhibits HIV-1 infection and membrane fusion by targeting the highly conserved pocket in the gp41 NHR-trimer.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fei; Lu, Lu; Liu, Qi; Yu, Xiaowen; Wang, Lili; He, Elaine; Zou, Peng; Du, Lanying; Sanders, Rogier W; Liu, Shuwen; Jiang, Shibo

    2014-05-01

    We previously identified a potent small-molecule human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) fusion inhibitor, termed ADS-J1, and hypothesized that it mainly targeted the hydrophobic pocket in the gp41 N-terminal heptad repeat (NHR) trimer. However, this hypothesis has been challenged by the fact that ADS-J1 cannot induce drug-resistance mutation in the gp41 pocket region. Therefore, we show herein that HIV-1 mutants resistant to T2635, a peptide derived from the gp41 C-terminal heptad repeat (CHR) region with pocket-binding domain (PBD), were also resistant to ADS-J1. We also show that pseudoviruses with mutations at positions 64 and 67 in the gp41 pocket region were highly resistant to ADS-J1 and C34, another CHR-peptide with PBD, but relatively sensitive to T20, a CHR-peptide without PBD. ADS-J1 could effectively bind to N36Fd, a mimic of the gp41 NHR-trimer with pocket exposed, and block binding of C34 to N36Fd trimer to form six-helix bundle (6-HB). However, ADS-J1 was less effective in binding to N36Fd trimer with mutations in the gp41 pocket region, such as N36(Q64A)Fd, N36(Q64L)Fd, N36(A67G)Fd, N36(A67S)Fd, and N36(Q66R)Fd, as well as less effective in blocking 6-HB formation between C34 and these mutant N36Fd trimers. These results confirm that ADS-J1 mainly targets the pocket region in the HIV-1 gp41 NHR trimer and suggest that it could be used as a lead for developing small-molecule HIV fusion inhibitors and as a molecule probe for studying the mechanisms of gp41-mediated membrane fusion.

  13. Binding and Inactivation Mechanism of a Humanized Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase by [alpha]-Ketoheterocycle Inhibitors Revealed from Cocrystal Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Mileni, Mauro; Garfunkle, Joie; DeMartino, Jessica K.; Cravatt, Benjamin F.; Boger, Dale L.; Stevens, Raymond C.

    2010-08-17

    The cocrystal X-ray structures of two isomeric {alpha}-ketooxazole inhibitors (1 (OL-135) and 2) bound to fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), a key enzymatic regulator of endocannabinoid signaling, are disclosed. The active site catalytic Ser241 is covalently bound to the inhibitors electrophilic carbonyl groups, providing the first structures of FAAH bound to an inhibitor as a deprotonated hemiketal mimicking the enzymatic tetrahedral intermediate. The work also offers a detailed view of the oxyanion hole and an exceptional 'in-action' depiction of the unusual Ser-Ser-Lys catalytic triad. These structures capture the first picture of inhibitors that span the active site into the cytosolic port providing new insights that help to explain FAAH's interaction with substrate leaving groups and their role in modulating inhibitor potency and selectivity. The role for the activating central heterocycle is clearly defined and distinguished from that observed in prior applications with serine proteases, reconciling the large electronic effect of attached substituents found unique to this class of inhibitors with FAAH. Additional striking active site flexibility is seen upon binding of the inhibitors, providing insights into the existence of a now well-defined membrane access channel with the disappearance of a spatially independent portion of the acyl chain-binding pocket. Finally, comparison of the structures of OL-135 (1) and its isomer 2 indicates that they bind identically to FAAH, albeit with reversed orientations of the central activating heterocycle, revealing that the terminal 2-pyridyl substituent and the acyl chain phenyl group provide key anchoring interactions and confirming the distinguishing role of the activating oxazole.

  14. Head-group acylation of monogalactosyldiacylglycerol is a common stress response, and the acyl-galactose acyl composition varies with the plant species and applied stress.

    PubMed

    Vu, Hieu Sy; Roth, Mary R; Tamura, Pamela; Samarakoon, Thilani; Shiva, Sunitha; Honey, Samuel; Lowe, Kaleb; Schmelz, Eric A; Williams, Todd D; Welti, Ruth

    2014-04-01

    Formation of galactose-acylated monogalactosyldiacylglycerols has been shown to be induced by leaf homogenization, mechanical wounding, avirulent bacterial infection and thawing after snap-freezing. Here, lipidomic analysis using mass spectrometry showed that galactose-acylated monogalactosyldiacylglycerols, formed in wheat (Triticum aestivum) and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) leaves upon wounding, have acyl-galactose profiles that differ from those of wounded Arabidopsis thaliana, indicating that different plant species accumulate different acyl-galactose components in response to the same stress. Additionally, the composition of the acyl-galactose component of Arabidopsis acMGDG (galactose-acylated monogalactosyldiacylglycerol) depends on the stress treatment. After sub-lethal freezing treatment, acMGDG contained mainly non-oxidized fatty acids esterified to galactose, whereas mostly oxidized fatty acids accumulated on galactose after wounding or bacterial infection. Compositional data are consistent with acMGDG being formed in vivo by transacylation with fatty acids from digalactosyldiacylglycerols. Oxophytodienoic acid, an oxidized fatty acid, was more concentrated on the galactosyl ring of acylated monogalactosyldiacylglycerols than in galactolipids in general. Also, oxidized fatty acid-containing acylated monogalactosyldiacylglycerols increased cumulatively when wounded Arabidopsis leaves were wounded again. These findings suggest that, in Arabidopsis, the pool of galactose-acylated monogalactosyldiacylglycerols may serve to sequester oxidized fatty acids during stress responses.

  15. Non-hydrolyzable Diubiquitin Probes Reveal Linkage-Specific Reactivity of Deubiquitylating Enzymes Mediated by S2 Pockets

    PubMed Central

    Flierman, Dennis; van der Heden van Noort, Gerbrand J.; Ekkebus, Reggy; Geurink, Paul P.; Mevissen, Tycho E.T.; Hospenthal, Manuela K.; Komander, David; Ovaa, Huib

    2016-01-01

    Summary Ubiquitin chains are important post-translational modifications that control a large number of cellular processes. Chains can be formed via different linkages, which determines the type of signal they convey. Deubiquitylating enzymes (DUBs) regulate ubiquitylation status by trimming or removing chains from attached proteins. DUBs can contain several ubiquitin-binding pockets, which confer specificity toward differently linked chains. Most tools for monitoring DUB specificity target binding pockets on opposing sides of the active site; however, some DUBs contain additional pockets. Therefore, reagents targeting additional pockets are essential to fully understand linkage specificity. We report the development of active site-directed probes and fluorogenic substrates, based on non-hydrolyzable diubiquitin, that are equipped with a C-terminal warhead or a fluorogenic activity reporter moiety. We demonstrate that various DUBs in lysates display differential reactivity toward differently linked diubiquitin probes, as exemplified by the proteasome-associated DUB USP14. In addition, OTUD2 and OTUD3 show remarkable linkage-specific reactivity with our diubiquitin-based reagents. PMID:27066941

  16. NMR second site screening for structure determination of ligands bound in the hydrophobic pocket of HIV-1 gp41.

    PubMed

    Balogh, Edina; Wu, Dong; Zhou, Guangyan; Gochin, Miriam

    2009-03-04

    The development of nonpeptide fusion inhibitors through rational drug design has been hampered by the limited accessibility of the gp41 coiled coil target, which is highly hydrophobic, and the absence of structural data defining details of small molecule interactions. Here we describe a new approach for obtaining structural information on small molecules bound in the hydrophobic pocket of gp41, using a paramagnetic probe peptide which binds adjacent to the pocket along an extended coiled coil. Ligand binding in the pocket leads to paramagnetic relaxation effects or pseudocontact shifts of ligand protons. These effects are distance and/or orientation dependent, permitting determination of ligand pose in the pocket. The method is demonstrated with a fast-exchanging ligand. Multiple measurements at different coiled coil and probe peptide ratios enabled accurate determination of the NMR parameters. Use of a labeled probe peptide stabilizes an otherwise aggregation-prone coiled coil and also enables modulation of the paramagnetic effect to study ligands of various affinities. Ultimately, this technique can provide essential information for structure-based design of nonpeptide fusion inhibitors.

  17. X-ray structures of checkpoint kinase 2 in complex with inhibitors that target its gatekeeper-dependent hydrophobic pocket

    SciTech Connect

    Lountos, George T.; Jobson, Andrew G.; Tropea, Joseph E.; Self, Christopher R.; Zhang, Guangtao; Pommier, Yves; Shoemaker, Robert H.; Waugh, David S.

    2012-09-17

    The serine/threonine checkpoint kinase 2 (Chk2) is an attractive molecular target for the development of small molecule inhibitors to treat cancer. Here, we report the rational design of Chk2 inhibitors that target the gatekeeper-dependent hydrophobic pocket located behind the adenine-binding region of the ATP-binding site. These compounds exhibit IC{sub 50} values in the low nanomolar range and are highly selective for Chk2 over Chk1. X-ray crystallography was used to determine the structures of the inhibitors in complex with the catalytic kinase domain of Chk2 to verify their modes of binding.

  18. Kinetic and Structural Basis for Acyl-Group Selectivity and NAD(+) Dependence in Sirtuin-Catalyzed Deacylation.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Jessica L; Dittenhafer-Reed, Kristin E; Kudo, Norio; Thelen, Julie N; Ito, Akihiro; Yoshida, Minoru; Denu, John M

    2015-05-19

    Acylation of lysine is an important protein modification regulating diverse biological processes. It was recently demonstrated that members of the human Sirtuin family are capable of catalyzing long chain deacylation, in addition to the well-known NAD(+)-dependent deacetylation activity [Feldman, J. L., Baeza, J., and Denu, J. M. (2013) J. Biol. Chem. 288, 31350-31356]. Here we provide a detailed kinetic and structural analysis that describes the interdependence of NAD(+)-binding and acyl-group selectivity for a diverse series of human Sirtuins, SIRT1-SIRT3 and SIRT6. Steady-state and rapid-quench kinetic analyses indicated that differences in NAD(+) saturation and susceptibility to nicotinamide inhibition reflect unique kinetic behavior displayed by each Sirtuin and depend on acyl substrate chain length. Though the rate of nucleophilic attack of the 2'-hydroxyl on the C1'-O-alkylimidate intermediate varies with acyl substrate chain length, this step remains rate-determining for SIRT2 and SIRT3; however, for SIRT6, this step is no longer rate-limiting for long chain substrates. Cocrystallization of SIRT2 with myristoylated peptide and NAD(+) yielded a co-complex structure with reaction product 2'-O-myristoyl-ADP-ribose, revealing a latent hydrophobic cavity to accommodate the long chain acyl group, and suggesting a general mechanism for long chain deacylation. Comparing two separately determined co-complex structures containing either a myristoylated peptide or 2'-O-myristoyl-ADP-ribose indicates there are conformational changes at the myristoyl-ribose linkage with minimal structural differences in the enzyme active site. During the deacylation reaction, the fatty acyl group is held in a relatively fixed position. We describe a kinetic and structural model to explain how various Sirtuins display unique acyl substrate preferences and how different reaction kinetics influence NAD(+) dependence. The biological implications are discussed.

  19. Insights into Medium-chain Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase Structure by Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Bonito, Cátia A; Leandro, Paula; Ventura, Fátima V; Guedes, Rita C

    2016-08-01

    The medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD) is a mitochondrial enzyme that catalyzes the first step of mitochondrial fatty acid β-oxidation (mFAO) pathway. Its deficiency is the most common genetic disorder of mFAO. Many of the MCAD disease-causing variants, including the most common p.K304E variant, show loss of function due to protein misfolding. Herein, we used molecular dynamics simulations to provide insights into the structural stability and dynamic behavior of MCAD wild-type (MCADwt) and validate a structure that would allow reliable new studies on its variants. Our results revealed that in both proteins the flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) has an important structural role on the tetramer stability and also in maintaining the volume of the enzyme catalytic pockets. We confirmed that the presence of substrate changes the dynamics of the catalytic pockets and increases FAD affinity. A comparison between the porcine MCADwt (pMCADwt) and human MCADwt (hMCADwt) structures revealed that both proteins are essentially similar and that the reversion of the double mutant E376G/T255E of hMCAD enzyme does not affect the structure of the protein neither its behavior in simulation. Our validated hMCADwt structure is crucial for complementing and accelerating the experimental studies aiming for the discovery and development of potential stabilizers of MCAD variants as candidates for the treatment of MCAD deficiency (MCADD).

  20. 7. DETAIL VIEW OF ROCKER ARM, SHOWING POCKETS, LUGS, INCLINED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. DETAIL VIEW OF ROCKER ARM, SHOWING POCKETS, LUGS, INCLINED STOPPING BLOCK AT SHOREWARD END OF TRACK GIRDER - Seddon Island Scherzer Rolling Lift Bridge, Spanning Garrison Channel from Tampa to Seddon Island, Tampa, Hillsborough County, FL

  1. 15. MACHINERY DETAILS: LATCH WHEEL BRACKET, LATCH POCKET, LOCK BAR, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. MACHINERY DETAILS: LATCH WHEEL BRACKET, LATCH POCKET, LOCK BAR, LATCH CRADLE, SPLIT COLLAR, ETC. - Niantic River Swing Bridge, Spanning Niantic River between East Lyme & Waterford, Old Lyme, New London County, CT

  2. Investigation on the gas pockets in a rotodynamic multiphase pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J. Y.; Li, Y. J.; Cai, S. J.; Zhu, H. W.; Zhang, Y. X.

    2016-05-01

    The appearance of gas pockets has an obvious impact on the performance of the rotodynamic multiphase pump. In order to study the formation of gas pockets in the pump and its effects on pump's performance, the unsteady numerical simulation and the visualization experiments were done to investigate gas pockets in a three-stage rotodynamic multiphase pump developed by authors. Meanwhile, the mixture of water and air was selected as the medium. According to the distributions of pressure, gas volume fraction and velocity vector in three compression cells in unsteady flow process, the process of the formation of gas pockets in the pump were analysed generally. The visualization experiments were used to verify the validity of the numerical simulation. The results will be benefit for the hydraulic design of the compression cell of rotodynamic multiphase pump.

  3. Behind the Scenes: Astronauts Pockets Deep in Mystery

    NASA Video Gallery

    Host Mike Massimino returns to the pre-launch suit up room at the Kennedy Space Center to reexamine the question: what's inside all those pockets of the astronauts' big orange suits? Find out on "N...

  4. Modification of the substrate specificity of an acyl-acyl carrier protein thioesterase by protein engineering.

    PubMed

    Yuan, L; Voelker, T A; Hawkins, D J

    1995-11-07

    The plant acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) thioesterases (TEs) are of biochemical interest because of their roles in fatty acid synthesis and their utilities in the bioengineering of plant seed oils. When the FatB1 cDNA encoding a 12:0-ACP TE (Uc FatB1) from California bay, Umbellularia californica (Uc) was expressed in Escherichia coli and in developing oilseeds of the plants Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica napus, large amounts of laurate (12:0) and small amounts of myristate (14:0) were accumulated. We have isolated a TE cDNA from camphor (Cinnamomum camphorum) (Cc) seeds that shares 92% amino acid identity with Uc FatB1. This TE, Cc FatB1, mainly hydrolyzes 14:0-ACP as shown by E. coli expression. We have investigated the roles of the N- and C-terminal regions in determining substrate specificity by constructing two chimeric enzymes, in which the N-terminal portion of one protein is fused to the C-terminal portion of the other. Our results show that the C-terminal two-thirds of the protein is critical for the specificity. By site-directed mutagenesis, we have replaced several amino acids in Uc FatB1 by using the Cc FatB1 sequence as a guide. A double mutant, which changes Met-197 to an Arg and Arg-199 to a His (M197R/R199H), turns Uc FatB1 into a 12:0/14:0 TE with equal preference for both substrates. Another mutation, T231K, by itself does not effect the specificity. However, when it is combined with the double mutant to generate a triple mutant (M197R/R199H/T231K), Uc FatB1 is converted to a 14:0-ACP TE. Expression of the double-mutant cDNA in E. coli K27, a strain deficient in fatty acid degradation, results in accumulation of similar amounts of 12:0 and 14:0. Meanwhile the E. coli expressing the triple-mutant cDNA produces predominantly 14:0 with very small amounts of 12:0. Kinetic studies indicate that both wild-type Uc FatB1 and the triple mutant have similar values of Km,app with respect to 14:0-ACP. Inhibitory studies also show that 12:0-ACP is a good

  5. Multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenation deficiency as decreased acyl-carnitine profile in serum.

    PubMed

    Wen, Bing; Li, Duoling; Li, Wei; Zhao, Yuying; Yan, Chuanzhu

    2015-06-01

    We report a case with late onset riboflavin-responsive multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenation deficiency (MADD) characterized by decreased acyl-carnitine profile in serum which is consistent with primary systemic carnitine deficiency (CDSP) while just the contrary to a typical MADD. This patient complained with muscle weakness, muscle pain and intermittent vomiting, and was diagnosed as polymyositis, received prednisone therapy before consulted with us. Muscle biopsy revealed mild lipid storage. The findings of serum acyl-carnitines were consistent with CDSP manifesting as decreased free and total carnitines in serum. But oral L-carnitine supplementation was not very effective to this patient and mutation analysis of the SLC22A5 gene for CDSP was normal. Later, another acyl-carnitine analysis revealed a typical MADD profile in serum, which was characterized by increased multiple acyl-carnitines. Compound heterozygous mutations were identified in electron transferring-flavoprotein dehydrogenase (ETFDH) gene which confirmed the diagnosis of MADD. After administration of riboflavin, he improved dramatically, both clinically and biochemically. Thus, late onset riboflavin-responsive MADD should be included in the differential diagnosis for adult carnitine deficiency.

  6. Fatty Acyl Chains of Mycobacterium marinum Lipooligosaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Rombouts, Yoann; Alibaud, Laeticia; Carrère-Kremer, Séverine; Maes, Emmanuel; Tokarski, Caroline; Elass, Elisabeth; Kremer, Laurent; Guérardel, Yann

    2011-01-01

    We have recently established the fine structure of the glycan backbone of lipooligosaccharides (LOS-I to LOS-IV) isolated from Mycobacterium marinum, a close relative of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. These studies culminated with the description of an unusual terminal N-acylated monosaccharide that confers important biological functions to LOS-IV, such as macrophage activation, that may be relevant to granuloma formation. It was, however, also suggested that the lipid moiety was required for LOSs to exert their immunomodulatory activity. Herein, using highly purified LOSs from M. marinum, we have determined through a combination of mass spectrometric and NMR techniques, the structure and localization of the fatty acids composing the lipid moiety. The occurrence of two distinct polymethyl-branched fatty acids presenting specific localizations is consistent with the presence of two highly related polyketide synthases (Pks5 and Pks5.1) in M. marinum and presumably involved in the synthesis of these fatty acyl chains. In addition, a bioinformatic search permitted us to identify a set of enzymes potentially involved in the biosynthesis or transfer of these lipids to the LOS trehalose unit. These include MMAR_2343, a member of the Pap (polyketide-associated protein) family, that acylates trehalose-based glycolipids in M. marinum. The participation of MMAR_2343 to LOS assembly was demonstrated using a M. marinum mutant carrying a transposon insertion in the MMAR_2343 gene. Disruption of MMAR_2343 resulted in a severe LOS breakdown, indicating that MMAR_2343, hereafter designated PapA4, fulfills the requirements for LOS acylation and assembly. PMID:21803773

  7. In vitro acylation of okadaic acid in the presence of various bivalves' extracts.

    PubMed

    Konoki, Keiichi; Onoda, Tatsuya; Watanabe, Ryuichi; Cho, Yuko; Kaga, Shinnosuke; Suzuki, Toshiyuki; Yotsu-Yamashita, Mari

    2013-01-29

    The dinoflagellate Dinophysis spp. is responsible for diarrhetic shellfish poisoning (DSP). In the bivalves exposed to the toxic bloom of the dinoflagellate, dinophysistoxin 3 (DTX3), the 7-OH acylated form of either okadaic acid (OA) or DTX1, is produced. We demonstrated in vitro acylation of OA with palmitoyl CoA in the presence of protein extract from the digestive gland, but not other tissues of the bivalve Mizuhopecten yessoensis. The yield of 7-O-palmitoyl OA reached its maximum within 2 h, was the highest at 37 °C followed by 28 °C, 16 °C and 4 °C and was the highest at pH 8 in comparison with the yields at pH 6 and pH 4. The transformation also proceeded when the protein extract was prepared from the bivalves Corbicula japonica and Crassostrea gigas. The OA binding protein OABP2 identified in the sponge Halichondria okadai was not detected in the bivalve M. yessoensis, the bivalve Mytilus galloprovincialis and the ascidian Halocynthia roretzi, though they are known to accumulate diarrhetic shellfish poisoning toxins. Since DTX3 does not bind to protein phosphatases 1 and 2A, the physiological target for OA and DTXs in mammalian cells, the acylation of DSP toxins would be related to a detoxification mechanism for the bivalve species.

  8. Detecting Local Ligand-Binding Site Similarity in Non-Homologous Proteins by Surface Patch Comparison

    PubMed Central

    Sael, Lee; Kihara, Daisuke

    2012-01-01

    Functional elucidation of proteins is one of the essential tasks in biology. Function of a protein, specifically, small ligand molecules that bind to a protein, can be predicted by finding similar local surface regions in binding sites of known proteins. Here, we developed an alignment free local surface comparison method for predicting a ligand molecule which binds to a query protein. The algorithm, named Patch-Surfer, represents a binding pocket as a combination of segmented surface patches, each of which is characterized by its geometrical shape, the electrostatic potential, the hydrophobicity, and the concaveness. Representing a pocket by a set of patches is effective to absorb difference of global pocket shape while capturing local similarity of pockets. The shape and the physicochemical properties of surface patches are represented using the 3D Zernike descriptor, which is a series expansion of mathematical 3D function. Two pockets are compared using a modified weighted bipartite matching algorithm, which matches similar patches from the two pockets. Patch-Surfer was benchmarked on three datasets, which consist in total of 390 proteins that bind to one of 21 ligands. Patch-Surfer showed superior performance to existing methods including a global pocket comparison method, Pocket-Surfer, which we have previously introduced. Particularly, as intended, the accuracy showed large improvement for flexible ligand molecules, which bind to pockets in different conformations. PMID:22275074

  9. Physiological Consequences of Compartmentalized Acyl-CoA Metabolism*

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Daniel E.; Young, Pamela A.; Klett, Eric L.; Coleman, Rosalind A.

    2015-01-01

    Meeting the complex physiological demands of mammalian life requires strict control of the metabolism of long-chain fatty acyl-CoAs because of the multiplicity of their cellular functions. Acyl-CoAs are substrates for energy production; stored within lipid droplets as triacylglycerol, cholesterol esters, and retinol esters; esterified to form membrane phospholipids; or used to activate transcriptional and signaling pathways. Indirect evidence suggests that acyl-CoAs do not wander freely within cells, but instead, are channeled into specific pathways. In this review, we will discuss the evidence for acyl-CoA compartmentalization, highlight the key modes of acyl-CoA regulation, and diagram potential mechanisms for controlling acyl-CoA partitioning. PMID:26124277

  10. Probing the Mechanism of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis [beta]-Ketoacyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Synthase III mtFabH: Factors Influencing Catalysis and Substrate Specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Alistair K.; Sridharan, Sudharsan; Kremer, Laurent; Lindenberg, Sandra; Dover, Lynn G.; Sacchettini, James C.; Besra, Gurdyal S.

    2010-11-30

    Mycolic acids are the dominant feature of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis cell wall. These {alpha}-alkyl, {beta}-hydroxy fatty acids are formed by the condensation of two fatty acids, a long meromycolic acid and a shorter C{sub 24}-C{sub 26} fatty acid. The component fatty acids are produced via a combination of type I and II fatty acid synthases (FAS) with FAS-I products being elongated by FAS-II toward meromycolic acids. The {beta}-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) synthase III encoded by mtfabH (mtFabH) links FAS-I and FAS-II, catalyzing the condensation of FAS-I-derived acyl-CoAs with malonyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP). The acyl-CoA chain length specificity of mtFabH was assessed in vitro; the enzyme extended longer, physiologically relevant acyl-CoA primers when paired with AcpM, its natural partner, than with Escherichia coli ACP. The ability of the enzyme to use E. coli ACP suggests that a similar mode of binding is likely with both ACPs, yet it is clear that unique factors inherent to AcpM modulate the substrate specificity of mtFabH. Mutation of proposed key mtFabH residues was used to define their catalytic roles. Substitution of supposed acyl-CoA binding residues reduced transacylation, with double substitutions totally abrogating activity. Mutation of Arg{sup 46} revealed its more critical role in malonyl-AcpM decarboxylation than in the acyl-CoA binding role. Interestingly, this effect was suppressed intragenically by Arg{sup 161} {yields} Ala substitution. Our structural studies suggested that His{sup 258}, previously implicated in malonyl-ACP decarboxylation, also acts as an anchor point for a network of water molecules that we propose promotes deprotonation and transacylation of Cys{sup 122}.

  11. Structure of YciA from Haemophilus influenzae (HI0827), a Hexameric Broad Specificity Acyl-Coenzyme A Thioesterase

    SciTech Connect

    Willis, Mark A.; Zhuang, Zhihao; Song, Feng; Howard, Andrew; Dunaway-Mariano, Debra; Herzberg, Osnat

    2008-04-02

    The crystal structure of HI0827 from Haemophilus influenzae Rd KW20, initially annotated 'hypothetical protein' in sequence databases, exhibits an acyl-coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) thioesterase 'hot dog' fold with a trimer of dimers oligomeric association, a novel assembly for this enzyme family. In studies described in the preceding paper [Zhuang, Z., Song, F., Zhao, H., Li, L., Cao, J., Eisenstein, E., Herzberg, O., and Dunaway-Mariano, D. (2008) Biochemistry 47, 2789-2796], HI0827 is shown to be an acyl-CoA thioesterase that acts on a wide range of acyl-CoA compounds. Two substrate binding sites are located across the dimer interface. The binding sites are occupied by two CoA molecules, one with full occupancy and the second only partially occupied. The CoA molecules, acquired from HI0827-expressing Escherichia coli cells, remained tightly bound to the enzyme through the protein purification steps. The difference in CoA occupancies indicates a different substrate affinity for each of the binding sites, which in turn implies that the enzyme might be subject to allosteric regulation. Mutagenesis studies have shown that the replacement of the putative catalytic carboxylate Asp44 with an alanine residue abolishes activity. The impact of this mutation is seen in the crystal structure of D44A HI0827. Whereas the overall fold and assembly of the mutant protein are the same as those of the wild-type enzyme, the CoA ligands are absent. The dimer interface is perturbed, and the channel that accommodates the thioester acyl chain is more open and wider than that observed in the wild-type enzyme. A model of intact substrate bound to wild-type HI0827 provides a structural rationale for the broad substrate range.

  12. Functional Consequences of the Open Distal Pocket of Dehaloperoxidase-Hemoglobin Observed by Time-Resolved X-ray Crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Junjie; Srajer, Vukica; Franzen, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Using time-resolved X-ray crystallography, we contrast a bifunctional dehaloperoxidase-hemoglobin (DHP) with previously studied examples of myoglobin and hemoglobin in order to understand the functional role of the distal pocket of globins. One key functional difference between the DHP and other globins is the requirement that H2O2 enter the distal pocket of oxyferrous DHP in order to displace O2 from the heme Fe atom and thereby activate the heme for the peroxidase function. The open architecture of DHP permits more than one molecule to simultaneously enter the distal pocket of the protein above the heme in order to facilitate the unique peroxidase cycle starting from the oxyferrous state. The time-resolved X-ray data show that the distal pocket of DHP lacks a protein valve found in the two other globins that have been studied previously. The photolyzed CO ligand trajectory in DHP does not have a docking site. Rather the CO moves immediately to the Xe-binding site. From there CO can escape, but also recombine an order of magnitude more rapidly than in other globins. The contrast with DHP dynamics and function more precisely defines the functional role of the multiple conformational states of myoglobin. Taken together with the high reduction potential of DHP, the open distal site helps to explain how a globin can also function as a peroxidase. PMID:24116924

  13. Characterization of a structurally and functionally diverged acyl-acyl carrier protein desaturase from milkweed seed.

    PubMed

    Cahoon, E B; Coughlan, S J; Shanklin, J

    1997-04-01

    A cDNA for a structurally variant acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) desaturase was isolated from milkweed (Asclepias syriaca) seed, a tissue enriched in palmitoleic (16:1delta9)* and cis-vaccenic (18:1delta11) acids. Extracts of Escherichia coli that express the milkweed cDNA catalyzed delta9 desaturation of acyl-ACP substrates, and the recombinant enzyme exhibited seven- to ten-fold greater specificity for palmitoyl (16:0)-ACP and 30-fold greater specificity for myristoyl (14:0)-ACP than did known delta9-stearoyl (18:0)-ACP desaturases. Like other variant acyl-ACP desaturases reported to date, the milkweed enzyme contains fewer amino acids near its N-terminus compared to previously characterized delta9-18:0-ACP desaturases. Based on the activity of an N-terminal deletion mutant of a delta9-18:0-ACP desaturase, this structural feature likely does not account for differences in substrate specificities.

  14. Acyl-acyl carrier protein as a source of fatty acids for bacterial bioluminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Byers, D.M.; Meighen, E.A.

    1985-09-01

    Pulse-chase experiments with (/sup 3/H)tetradecanoic acid and ATP showed that the bioluminescence-related 32-kDa acyltransferase from Vibrio harveyi can specifically catalyze the deacylation of a /sup 3/H-labeled 18-kDa protein observed in extracts of this bacterium. The 18-kDa protein has been partially purified and its physical and chemical properties strongly indicate that it is fatty acyl-acyl carrier protein (acyl-ACP). Both this V. harveyi (/sup 3/H)acylprotein and (/sup 3/H)palmitoyl-ACP from Escherichia coli were substrates in vitro for either the V. harveyi 32-kDa acyltransferase or the analogous enzyme (34K) from Photobacterium phosphoreum. TLC analysis indicated that the hexane-soluble product of the reaction is fatty acid. No significant cleavage of either E. coli or V. harveyi tetradecanoyl-ACP was observed in extracts of these bacteria unless the 32-kDa or 34K acyltransferase was present. Since these enzymes are believed to be responsible for the supply of fatty acids for reduction to form the aldehyde substrate of luciferase, the above results suggest that long-chain acyl-ACP is the source of fatty acids for bioluminescence.

  15. Acylated flavonol glycoside from Platanus orientalis.

    PubMed

    Tantry, Mudasir A; Akbar, Seema; Dar, Javid A; Irtiza, Syed; Galal, Ahmed; Khuroo, Mohammad A; Ghazanfar, Khalid

    2012-03-01

    The ethylacetate and n-butanol fractions of ethanolic extract of Platanus orientalis leaves led to the isolation of new acylated flavonol glycoside as 3',5,7-trihydroxy-4'-methoxyflavonol 3-[O-2-O-(2,4-Dihydroxy)-E-cinnamoyl-α-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→6)-β-D-glucopyranosyl (1→2)]-β-D-glucopyranoside, along with seven known compounds. All the compounds were characterized by NMR including 2D NMR techniques. The isolates were evaluated for NF-κB, nitric oxide (NO), aromatase and QR2 chemoprevention activities and some of them appeared to be modestly active.

  16. The genetic basis of adaptive melanism in pocket mice.

    PubMed

    Nachman, Michael W; Hoekstra, Hopi E; D'Agostino, Susan L

    2003-04-29

    Identifying the genes underlying adaptation is a major challenge in evolutionary biology. Here, we describe the molecular changes underlying adaptive coat color variation in a natural population of rock pocket mice, Chaetodipus intermedius. Rock pocket mice are generally light-colored and live on light-colored rocks. However, populations of dark (melanic) mice are found on dark lava, and this concealing coloration provides protection from avian and mammalian predators. We conducted association studies by using markers in candidate pigmentation genes and discovered four mutations in the melanocortin-1-receptor gene, Mc1r, that seem to be responsible for adaptive melanism in one population of lava-dwelling pocket mice. Interestingly, another melanic population of these mice on a different lava flow shows no association with Mc1r mutations, indicating that adaptive dark color has evolved independently in this species through changes at different genes.

  17. Ethics pocket cards: an educational tool for busy clinicians.

    PubMed

    Volpe, Rebecca L; Levi, Benjamin H; Blackhall, George F; Green, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    The adage "an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure" is widely used in healthcare settings and can be applied to the work of institutional clinical ethics committees. The model of clinical ethics consultation, however, is inherently reactive: a crisis or question emerges, and ethics experts are called to help. In an effort to employ a proactive component to the model of clinical ethics consultation (as well as to standardize our educational interventions), we developed ethics pocket cards. The purpose of this article is to: (1) describe the rationale for using ethics pocket cards, (2) provide examples of our cards, and (3) begin a dialogue about the potential uses of ethics pocket cards. In doing so, we hope to explore how such portable, economical devices can advance the goals of ethics consultation as well as the educational aims of ethics committees.

  18. Pocket-Sized Echocardiography Devices: One Stop Shop Service?

    PubMed

    Seraphim, Andreas; Paschou, Stavroula A; Grapsa, Julia; Nihoyannopoulos, Petros

    2016-03-01

    The introduction of portable, pocket-sized echocardiography devices in various healthcare systems has raised new questions with regards to their realistic use in clinical practice. Several studies have already attempted to provide information regarding their safety and diagnostic potential, the training required to operate them, as well as their direct comparison with standard echocardiography machines. This manuscript is a review of the literature of the documents or position papers which employ the use of pocket or handheld devices. Following review of the literature, we suggest that these miniaturized devices can provide a valuable diagnostic tool that can complement and improve the diagnostic yield of clinical examination. When operated by appropriately trained professionals, they can provide a limited but very reliable echocardiographic assessment. Pocket-sized echocardiography is a part of physical examination and should not be considered a complete echocardiographic scan. Optimal training is required for the smooth operation of handheld echocardiography.

  19. Pocket-Sized Echocardiography Devices: One Stop Shop Service?

    PubMed Central

    Seraphim, Andreas; Paschou, Stavroula A; Nihoyannopoulos, Petros

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of portable, pocket-sized echocardiography devices in various healthcare systems has raised new questions with regards to their realistic use in clinical practice. Several studies have already attempted to provide information regarding their safety and diagnostic potential, the training required to operate them, as well as their direct comparison with standard echocardiography machines. This manuscript is a review of the literature of the documents or position papers which employ the use of pocket or handheld devices. Following review of the literature, we suggest that these miniaturized devices can provide a valuable diagnostic tool that can complement and improve the diagnostic yield of clinical examination. When operated by appropriately trained professionals, they can provide a limited but very reliable echocardiographic assessment. Pocket-sized echocardiography is a part of physical examination and should not be considered a complete echocardiographic scan. Optimal training is required for the smooth operation of handheld echocardiography. PMID:27081437

  20. Exploration of pH-dependent behavior of the anion receptor pocket of subdomain IIA of HSA: determination of effective pocket charge using the Debye-Hückel limiting law.

    PubMed

    Bolel, Priyanka; Datta, Shubhashis; Mahapatra, Niharendu; Halder, Mintu

    2014-01-09

    Protein-ligand electrostatic interaction can be looked upon as ion receptor-ligand interaction, and the binding cavity of protein can be either an anion or cation receptor depending on the charge of the guest. Here we focus on the exploration of pH-modulated binding of a number of anionic ligands, specific to the subdomain IIA cavity of HSA, such as carmoisine, tartrazine, cochineal red, and warfarin. The logarithm of the binding constant is found to vary linearly with the square-root of ionic strength, indicating applicability of the Debye-Hückel limiting law to protein-ligand electrostatic binding equilibrium, and concludes that the subdomain IIA cavity is an anion receptor. The present approach is very unique that one can calculate the effective charge of the protein-based anion receptor pocket, and the calculated charge has been found to vary between +1 and +3 depending on the pH and ligand itself. The study also indicates that in such cases of specific ligand binding the pocket charge rather than the overall or surface charge of the macromolecule seems to have a paramount role in determining the strength of interaction. For the first time, it is demonstrated that the Debye-Hückel interionic interaction model can be successfully applied to understand the protein-based receptor-ligand electrostatic interaction in general.

  1. Biochemical and Structural Characterization of Germicidin Synthase: Analysis of a Type III Polyketide Synthase That Employs Acyl-ACP as a Starter Unit Donor

    SciTech Connect

    Chemler, Joseph A.; Buchholz, Tonia J.; Geders, Todd W.; Akey, David L.; Rath, Christopher M.; Chlipala, George E.; Smith, Janet L.; Sherman, David H.

    2012-08-10

    Germicidin synthase (Gcs) from Streptomyces coelicolor is a type III polyketide synthase (PKS) with broad substrate flexibility for acyl groups linked through a thioester bond to either coenzyme A (CoA) or acyl carrier protein (ACP). Germicidin synthesis was reconstituted in vitro by coupling Gcs with fatty acid biosynthesis. Since Gcs has broad substrate flexibility, we directly compared the kinetic properties of Gcs with both acyl-ACP and acyl-CoA. The catalytic efficiency of Gcs for acyl-ACP was 10-fold higher than for acyl-CoA, suggesting a strong preference toward carrier protein starter unit transfer. The 2.9 {angstrom} germicidin synthase crystal structure revealed canonical type III PKS architecture along with an unusual helical bundle of unknown function that appears to extend the dimerization interface. A pair of arginine residues adjacent to the active site affect catalytic activity but not ACP binding. This investigation provides new and surprising information about the interactions between type III PKSs and ACPs that will facilitate the construction of engineered systems for production of novel polyketides.

  2. NOTE: Cell-phone interference with pocket dosimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djajaputra, David; Nehru, Ramasamy; Bruch, Philip M.; Ayyangar, Komanduri M.; Raman, Natarajan V.; Enke, Charles A.

    2005-05-01

    Accurate reporting of personal dose is required by regulation for hospital personnel that work with radioactive material. Pocket dosimeters are commonly used for monitoring this personal dose. We show that operating a cell phone in the vicinity of a pocket dosimeter can introduce large and erroneous readings of the dosimeter. This note reports a systematic study of this electromagnetic interference. We found that simple practical measures are enough to mitigate this problem, such as increasing the distance between the cell phone and the dosimeter or shielding the dosimeter, while maintaining its sensitivity to ionizing radiation, by placing it inside a common anti-static bag.

  3. Progress toward Understanding Protein S-acylation: Prospective in Plants.

    PubMed

    Li, Yaxiao; Qi, Baoxiu

    2017-01-01

    S-acylation, also known as S-palmitoylation or palmitoylation, is a reversible post-translational lipid modification in which long chain fatty acid, usually the 16-carbon palmitate, covalently attaches to a cysteine residue(s) throughout the protein via a thioester bond. It is involved in an array of important biological processes during growth and development, reproduction and stress responses in plant. S-acylation is a ubiquitous mechanism in eukaryotes catalyzed by a family of enzymes called Protein S-Acyl Transferases (PATs). Since the discovery of the first PAT in yeast in 2002 research in S-acylation has accelerated in the mammalian system and followed by in plant. However, it is still a difficult field to study due to the large number of PATs and even larger number of putative S-acylated substrate proteins they modify in each genome. This is coupled with drawbacks in the techniques used to study S-acylation, leading to the slower progress in this field compared to protein phosphorylation, for example. In this review we will summarize the discoveries made so far based on knowledge learnt from the characterization of protein S-acyltransferases and the S-acylated proteins, the interaction mechanisms between PAT and its specific substrate protein(s) in yeast and mammals. Research in protein S-acylation and PATs in plants will also be covered although this area is currently less well studied in yeast and mammalian systems.

  4. Progress toward Understanding Protein S-acylation: Prospective in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yaxiao; Qi, Baoxiu

    2017-01-01

    S-acylation, also known as S-palmitoylation or palmitoylation, is a reversible post-translational lipid modification in which long chain fatty acid, usually the 16-carbon palmitate, covalently attaches to a cysteine residue(s) throughout the protein via a thioester bond. It is involved in an array of important biological processes during growth and development, reproduction and stress responses in plant. S-acylation is a ubiquitous mechanism in eukaryotes catalyzed by a family of enzymes called Protein S-Acyl Transferases (PATs). Since the discovery of the first PAT in yeast in 2002 research in S-acylation has accelerated in the mammalian system and followed by in plant. However, it is still a difficult field to study due to the large number of PATs and even larger number of putative S-acylated substrate proteins they modify in each genome. This is coupled with drawbacks in the techniques used to study S-acylation, leading to the slower progress in this field compared to protein phosphorylation, for example. In this review we will summarize the discoveries made so far based on knowledge learnt from the characterization of protein S-acyltransferases and the S-acylated proteins, the interaction mechanisms between PAT and its specific substrate protein(s) in yeast and mammals. Research in protein S-acylation and PATs in plants will also be covered although this area is currently less well studied in yeast and mammalian systems. PMID:28392791

  5. Understanding Acyl Chain and Glycerolipid Metabolism in Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Ohlrogge, John B.

    2013-11-05

    Progress is reported in these areas: acyl-editing in initial eukaryotic lipid assembly in soybean seeds; identification and characterization of two Arabidopsis thaliana lysophosphatidyl acyltransferases with preference for lysophosphatidylethanolamine; and characterization and subcellular distribution of lysolipid acyl transferase activity of pea leaves.

  6. Characterization of the "Escherichia Coli" Acyl Carrier Protein Phosphodiesterase

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    Acyl carrier protein (ACP) is a small essential protein that functions as a carrier of the acyl intermediates of fatty acid synthesis. ACP requires the posttranslational attachment of a 4'phosphopantetheine functional group, derived from CoA, in order to perform its metabolic function. A Mn[superscript 2+] dependent enzymatic activity that removes…

  7. NMR-assisted computational studies of peptidomimetic inhibitors bound in the hydrophobic pocket of HIV-1 glycoprotein 41

    PubMed Central

    Gochin, Miriam; Whitby, Landon R.; Phillips, Aaron H.; Boger, Dale L.

    2013-01-01

    Due to the inherently flexible nature of a protein – protein interaction surface, it is difficult both to inhibit the association with a small molecule, and to predict how it might bind to the surface. In this study, we have examined small molecules that mediate the interaction between a WWI motif on the C-helix of HIV-1 glycoprotein-41 and a deep hydrophobic pocket contained in the interior N-helical trimer. Association between these two components of gp41 leads to virus–cell and cell–cell fusion, which could be abrogated in the presence of an inhibitor that binds tightly in the pocket. We have studied a comprehensive combinatorial library of α-helical peptidomimetics, and found that compounds with strongly hydrophobic side chains had the highest affinity. Computational docking studies produced multiple possible binding modes due to the flexibility of both the binding site and the peptidomimetic compounds. We applied a transferred paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) experiment to two selected members of the library, and showed that addition of a few experimental constraints enabled definitive identification of unique binding poses. Computational docking results were extremely sensitive to side chain conformations, and slight variations could preclude observation of the experimentally validated poses. Different receptor structures were required for docking simulations to sample the correct pose for the two compounds. The study demonstrated the sensitivity of predicted poses to receptor structure and indicated the importance of experimental verification when docking to a malleable protein – protein interaction surface. PMID:23893342

  8. NMR-assisted computational studies of peptidomimetic inhibitors bound in the hydrophobic pocket of HIV-1 glycoprotein 41

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gochin, Miriam; Whitby, Landon R.; Phillips, Aaron H.; Boger, Dale L.

    2013-07-01

    Due to the inherently flexible nature of a protein-protein interaction surface, it is difficult both to inhibit the association with a small molecule, and to predict how it might bind to the surface. In this study, we have examined small molecules that mediate the interaction between a WWI motif on the C-helix of HIV-1 glycoprotein-41 (gp41) and a deep hydrophobic pocket contained in the interior N-helical trimer. Association between these two components of gp41 leads to virus-cell and cell-cell fusion, which could be abrogated in the presence of an inhibitor that binds tightly in the pocket. We have studied a comprehensive combinatorial library of α-helical peptidomimetics, and found that compounds with strongly hydrophobic side chains had the highest affinity. Computational docking studies produced multiple possible binding modes due to the flexibility of both the binding site and the peptidomimetic compounds. We applied a transferred paramagnetic relaxation enhancement experiment to two selected members of the library, and showed that addition of a few experimental constraints enabled definitive identification of unique binding poses. Computational docking results were extremely sensitive to side chain conformations, and slight variations could preclude observation of the experimentally validated poses. Different receptor structures were required for docking simulations to sample the correct pose for the two compounds. The study demonstrated the sensitivity of predicted poses to receptor structure and indicated the importance of experimental verification when docking to a malleable protein-protein interaction surface.

  9. Structure and localisation of drug binding sites on neurotransmitter transporters.

    PubMed

    Ravna, Aina W; Sylte, Ingebrigt; Dahl, Svein G

    2009-10-01

    The dopamine (DAT), serotontin (SERT) and noradrenalin (NET) transporters are molecular targets for different classes of psychotropic drugs. The crystal structure of Aquifex aeolicus LeuT(Aa) was used as a template for molecular modeling of DAT, SERT and NET, and two putative drug binding sites (pocket 1 and 2) in each transporter were identified. Cocaine was docked into binding pocket 1 of DAT, corresponding to the leucine binding site in LeuT(Aa), which involved transmembrane helices (TMHs) 1, 3, 6 and 8. Clomipramine was docked into binding pocket 2 of DAT, involving TMHs 1, 3, 6, 10 and 11, and extracellular loops 4 and 6, corresponding to the clomipramine binding site in a crystal structure of a LeuT(Aa)-clomipramine complex. The structures of the proposed cocaine- and tricyclic antidepressant-binding sites may be of particular interest for the design of novel DAT interacting ligands.

  10. Cysteine-286 as the site of acylation of the Lux-specific fatty acyl-CoA reductase.

    PubMed

    Lee, C Y; Meighen, E A

    1997-04-04

    The channelling of fatty acids into the fatty aldehyde substrate for the bacterial bioluminescence reaction is catalyzed by a fatty acid reductase multienzyme complex, which channels fatty acids through the thioesterase (LuxD), synthetase (LuxE) and reductase (LuxC) components. Although all three components can be readily acylated in extracts of different luminescent bacteria, this complex has been successfully purified only from Photobacterium phosphoreum and the sites of acylation identified on LuxD and LuxE. To identify the acylation site on LuxC, the nucleotide sequence of P. phosphoreum luxC has been determined and the gene expressed in a mutant Escherichia coli strain. Even in crude extracts, the acylated reductase intermediate as well as acyl-CoA reductase activity could be readily detected, providing the basis for analysis of mutant reductases. Comparison of the amino-acid sequences of LuxC from P. phosphoreum, P. leiognathi and other luminescent bacteria, showed that only three cysteine residues (C171, C279, and C286) were conserved. As a cysteine residue on LuxC has been implicated in fatty acyl transfer, each of the conserved cysteine residues of the P. phosphoreum and P. leiognathi reductases was converted to a serine residue, and the properties of the mutant proteins examined. Only mutation of C286-blocked reductase activity and prevented formation of the acylated reductase intermediate, showing that C286 is the site of acylation on LuxC.

  11. First identification of xanthone sulfonamides as potent acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Hu, Honggang; Liao, Hongli; Zhang, Jun; Wu, Weifeng; Yan, Jufang; Yan, Yonghong; Zhao, Qingjie; Zou, Yan; Chai, Xiaoyun; Yu, Shichong; Wu, Qiuye

    2010-05-15

    Inhibitors of acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) would be useful anti-atherogenic agents, since an absence of ACAT affects the absorption and transformation of cholesterol, indirectly resulting in the reduction of cholesteryl ester accumulation in blood vessels. This report discloses xanthone sulfonamides as novel class small molecule inhibitors of ACAT. A series of xanthone sulfonamides were synthesized and evaluated to result in the identification of several potent ACAT inhibitors, among which 2n proved to be more potent than the positive control Sandoz58-35. Moreover, a molecular model for the binding between 2n and the active site of ACAT-2 was provided based computational docking results.

  12. Accumulation of acyl-enzyme in DD-peptidase-catalysed reactions with analogues of peptide substrates.

    PubMed Central

    Jamin, M; Adam, M; Damblon, C; Christiaens, L; Frère, J M

    1991-01-01

    Thioester substrates can be used to study the hydrolysis and transfer reactions catalysed by beta-lactamases and DD-peptidases. With the latter enzymes, accumulation of the acyl-enzyme can be detected directly. The efficiency of various amines as acceptor substrates was in excellent agreement with previous results obtained with peptide substrates of the DD-peptidases. The results indicated the presence of a specific binding site for the acceptor substrates. Although most of the results agreed well with a simple partition model, more elaborate hypotheses will be needed to account for all the data presented. PMID:1747125

  13. Evaluation of Cation Hydrolysis Schemes with a Pocket Calculator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clare, Brian W.

    1979-01-01

    Described is the use of two models of pocket calculators. The Hewlett-Packard HP67 and the Texas Instruments TI59, to solve problems arising in connection with ionic equilibria in solution. A three-parameter regression program is described and listed as a specific example, the hydrolysis of hexavalent uranium, is provided. (BT)

  14. Portable Anthrax Testing with Lab-in-a-Pocket

    SciTech Connect

    Finley, Melissa; Koskelo, Markku; Edwards, Thayne; Kadner, Steve; Beckes-Talcot, Judy; Harper, Jason; Shawwa, Luay

    2014-10-24

    BaDx (Bacillus anthracis Diagnostics) is a lab-in-a-pocket device to sample, sense, and diagnose bacteria that cause anthrax. It accomplishes these tasks in environments with no power, refrigerated storage, or laboratory equipment. BaDx was designed to be used with minimal or no training, and to keep handlers safe.

  15. Portable Anthrax Testing with Lab-in-a-Pocket

    ScienceCinema

    Finley, Melissa; Koskelo, Markku; Edwards, Thayne; Kadner, Steve; Beckes-Talcot, Judy; Harper, Jason; Shawwa, Luay

    2016-07-12

    BaDx (Bacillus anthracis Diagnostics) is a lab-in-a-pocket device to sample, sense, and diagnose bacteria that cause anthrax. It accomplishes these tasks in environments with no power, refrigerated storage, or laboratory equipment. BaDx was designed to be used with minimal or no training, and to keep handlers safe.

  16. Simulation of Population Processes with a Programmable Pocket Calculator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kidd, N. A. C.

    1979-01-01

    Presents a set of simulation models for use in teaching population dynamics. These models are designed specifically for use with a programmable pocket calculator, and can be used to demonstrate growth of populations with discrete or overlapping generations and also to explore effects of density-dependent and -independent mortality. (Author/CS)

  17. Advanced Geometric Optics on a Programmable Pocket Calculator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nussbaum, Allen

    1979-01-01

    Presents a ray-tracing procedure based on some ideas of Herzberger and the matrix approach to geometrical optics. This method, which can be implemented on a programmable pocket calculator, applies to any conic surface, including paraboloids, spheres, and planes. (Author/GA)

  18. Air pocket stability and the imbibition pathway in droplet wetting.

    PubMed

    Chang, Cheng-Chung; Wu, Cyuan-Jhang; Sheng, Yu-Jane; Tsao, Heng-Kwong

    2015-10-07

    The stability of air pockets formed in grooves on a surface is relevant to contact angle hysteresis of droplet wetting and it is investigated by imbibition experiments and surface evolver (SE) simulations. Liquid drops of different wettabilities are placed atop a conical hole on a polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) substrate. The stability of the air pocket depends on surface wettability. Four kinds of imbibition behaviors ranging from wetting to nonwetting are observed. The imbibition pathway for the kinetically unstable air pocket is observed by using the olive oil droplet. It involves an inward flow of a thin liquid film along the wall of the hole. The accumulation of liquid at the bottom leads to the rise of the air bubble. The energy-barrier profile associated with the imbibition pathway acquired by SE simulations is able to interpret the outcome of imbibition. The advancing and receding contact angles of various liquids on a PMMA substrate with drilled holes are also determined. Their wetting behaviors can be categorized into three types. Our experimental results for substrates with or without fluorination are in good agreement with the theory based on the stability of air pockets.

  19. Molecular Orbital Study of the Formation of Intramolecular Hydrogen Bonding of a Ligand Molecule in a Protein Aromatic Hydrophobic Pocket.

    PubMed

    Koseki, Jun; Gouda, Hiroaki; Hirono, Shuichi

    2016-01-01

    The natural product argadin is a cyclopentapeptide chitinase inhibitor that binds to chitinase B (ChiB) from the pathogenic bacteria Serratia marcescens. N(ω)-Acetyl-L-arginine and L-aminoadipic acid of argadin form intramolecular ionic hydrogen bonds in the aromatic hydrophobic pocket of ChiB. We performed ab initio molecular orbital and density functional theory calculations to elucidate the role of this intramolecular hydrogen bonding on intermolecular interactions between argadin and ChiB. We found that argadin accrues large stabilization energies from the van der Waals dispersion interactions, such as CH-π, π-π, and π-lone pair interactions, in the aromatic hydrophobic pocket of ChiB, although intramolecular hydrogen bonding within argadin might result in loss of entropy. The intramolecular ionic hydrogen bonding formation canceled local molecular charges and provided good van der Waals interactions with surrounding aromatic residues.

  20. The Trypanosome Flagellar Pocket Collar and Its Ring Forming Protein—TbBILBO1

    PubMed Central

    Perdomo, Doranda; Bonhivers, Mélanie; Robinson, Derrick R.

    2016-01-01

    Sub-species of Trypanosoma brucei are the causal agents of human African sleeping sickness and Nagana in domesticated livestock. These pathogens have developed an organelle-like compartment called the flagellar pocket (FP). The FP carries out endo- and exocytosis and is the only structure this parasite has evolved to do so. The FP is essential for parasite viability, making it an interesting structure to evaluate as a drug target, especially since it has an indispensible cytoskeleton component called the flagellar pocket collar (FPC). The FPC is located at the neck of the FP where the flagellum exits the cell. The FPC has a complex architecture and division cycle, but little is known concerning its organization. Recent work has focused on understanding how the FP and the FPC are formed and as a result of these studies an important calcium-binding, polymer-forming protein named TbBILBO1 was identified. Cellular biology analysis of TbBILBO1 has demonstrated its uniqueness as a FPC component and until recently, it was unknown what structural role it played in forming the FPC. This review summarizes the recent data on the polymer forming properties of TbBILBO1 and how these are correlated to the FP cytoskeleton. PMID:26950156

  1. Differential turnover of phospholipid acyl groups in mouse peritoneal macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Kuwae, T.; Schmid, P.C.; Johnson, S.B.; Schmid, H.H. )

    1990-03-25

    Phospholipid acyl turnover was assessed in mouse peritoneal exudate cells which consisted primarily of macrophages. The cells were incubated for up to 5 h in media containing 40% H218O, and uptake of 18O into ester carbonyls of phospholipids was determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry of hydrogenated methyl esters. The uptake was highest in choline phospholipids and phosphatidylinositol, less in ethanolamine phospholipids, and much less in phosphatidylserine. Acyl groups at the sn-1 and sn-2 positions of diacyl glycerophospholipids, including arachidonic and other long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, acquired 18O at about the same rate. Acyl groups of alkylacyl glycerophosphocholine exhibited lower rates of 18O uptake, and acyl groups of ethanolamine plasmalogens (alkenylacyl glycerophosphoethanolamines) acquired only minimal amounts of 18O within 5 h, indicating a low average acyl turnover via free fatty acids. Pulse experiments with exogenous 3H-labeled arachidonic acid supported the concept that acylation of alkenyl glycerophosphoethanolamine occurs by acyl transfer from other phospholipids rather than via free fatty acids and acyl-CoA. The 18O content of intracellular free fatty acids increased gradually over a 5-h period, whereas in extracellular free fatty acids it reached maximal 18O levels within the first hour. Arachidonate and other long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids were found to participate readily in deacylation-reacylation reactions but were present only in trace amounts in the free fatty acid pools inside and outside the cells. We conclude that acyl turnover of macrophage phospholipids through hydrolysis and reacylation is rapid but tightly controlled so that appreciable concentrations of free arachidonic acid do not occur.

  2. A Hydrophobic Pocket in the Active Site of Glycolytic Aldolase Mediates Interactions with Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome Protein

    SciTech Connect

    St-Jean,M.; Izard, T.; Sygusch, J.

    2007-01-01

    Aldolase plays essential catalytic roles in glycolysis and gluconeogenesis. However, aldolase is a highly abundant protein that is remarkably promiscuous in its interactions with other cellular proteins. In particular, aldolase binds to highly acidic amino acid sequences, including the C-terminus of the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein, an actin nucleation promoting factor. Here we report the crystal structure of tetrameric rabbit muscle aldolase in complex with a C-terminal peptide of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein. Aldolase recognizes a short, 4-residue DEWD motif (residues 498-501), which adopts a loose hairpin turn that folds about the central aromatic residue, enabling its tryptophan side chain to fit into a hydrophobic pocket in the active site of aldolase. The flanking acidic residues in this binding motif provide further interactions with conserved aldolase active site residues, Arg-42 and Arg-303, aligning their side chains and forming the sides of the hydrophobic pocket. The binding of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein to aldolase precludes intramolecular interactions of its C-terminus with its active site, and is competitive with substrate as well as with binding by actin and cortactin. Finally, based on this structure a novel naphthol phosphate-based inhibitor of aldolase was identified and its structure in complex with aldolase demonstrated mimicry of the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein-aldolase interaction. The data support a model whereby aldolase exists in distinct forms that regulate glycolysis or actin dynamics.

  3. Role of acyl carrier protein isoforms in plant lipid metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    Although acyl carrier protein (ACP) is the best studied protein in plant fatty acid biosynthesis, the in vivo forms of ACPs and their steady state pools have not been examined previously in either seed or leaf. Information about the relative pool sizes of free ACP and its acyl-ACP intermediates is essential for understanding regulation of de novo fatty acid biosynthesis in plants. In this study we utilized antibodies directed against spinach ACP as a sensitive assay to analyze the acyl groups while they were still covalently attached to ACPs. 4 refs., 4 figs.

  4. Synthesis of coenzyme A thioesters using methyl acyl phosphates in an aqueous medium.

    PubMed

    Pal, Mohan; Bearne, Stephen L

    2014-12-28

    Regioselective S-acylation of coenzyme A (CoA) is achieved under aqueous conditions using various aliphatic and aromatic carboxylic acids activated as their methyl acyl phosphate monoesters. Unlike many hydrophobic activating groups, the anionic methyl acyl phosphate mixed anhydride is more compatible with aqueous solvents, making it useful for conducting acylation reactions in an aqueous medium.

  5. Subtilisin-catalyzed resolution of N-acyl arylsulfinamides.

    PubMed

    Savile, Christopher K; Magloire, Vladimir P; Kazlauskas, Romas J

    2005-02-23

    We report the first biocatalytic route to sulfinamides (R-S(O)-NH2), whose sulfur stereocenter makes them important chiral auxiliaries for the asymmetric synthesis of amines. Subtilisin E did not catalyze hydrolysis of N-acetyl or N-butanoyl arylsulfinamides, but did catalyze a highly enantioselective (E > 150 favoring the (R)-enantiomer) hydrolysis of N-chloroacetyl and N-dihydrocinnamoyl arylsulfinamides. Gram-scale resolutions using subtilisin E overexpressed in Bacillus subtilis yielded, after recrystallization, three synthetically useful auxiliaries: (R)-p-toluenesulfinamide (42% yield, 95% ee), (R)-p-chlorobenzenesulfinamide (30% yield, 97% ee), and (R)-2,4,6-trimethylbenzenesulfinamide (30% yield, 99% ee). Molecular modeling suggests that the N-chloroacetyl and N-dihydrocinnamoyl groups mimic a phenylalanine moiety and thus bind the sulfinamide to the active site. Molecular modeling further suggests that enantioselectivity stems from a favorable hydrophobic interaction between the aryl group of the fast-reacting (R)-arylsulfinamide and the S1' leaving group pocket in subtilisin E.

  6. Interactions of acylated methylglucoside derivatives with CO2: simulation and calculations.

    PubMed

    Chang, H H; Cao, R X; Yang, C C; Wei, W L; Pang, X Y; Qiao, Y

    2016-01-01

    Carbohydrates have drawn considerable interest from researchers recently due to their affinity for CO2. However, most of the research in this field has focused on peracetylated derivatives. Compared with acetylated carbohydrates, which have already been studied in depth, methyl D-glucopyranoside derivatives are more stable and could have additional applications. Thus, in the present work, ab initio calculations were performed to elucidate the characteristics of the interactions of methylglucoside derivatives with CO2, and to investigate how the binding energy (ΔE) is affected by isomerization or the introduction of various acyl groups. Four methyl D-glucopyranosides (each with two anomers) bearing acetyl, propionyl, butyryl, and isobutyryl moieties, respectively, were designed as substrates, and the 1:1 complexes of a CO2 molecule with each of these sugar substrates were modeled. The results indicate that ΔE is mainly influenced by interaction distance and the number of negatively charged donors or interacting pairs in the complex; the structure of the acyl group present in the substrate is a secondary influence. Except in the case of methyl 2-O-acetyl-D-glucopyranose, the ΔE values of the α- and β-anomers of each methylglucoside were found to be almost the same. Therefore, we would expect the CO2 affinities of the four derivatives studied here to be as strong as or even stronger than that of peracetylated D-glucopyranose. Graphical Abstract The binding energy between methyl D-glucopyranoside derivatives with various substituted acyl groups and CO2 are evaluated by ab initio calculations. The strong interaction between these methyl dglucopyranoside derivatives and CO2 showed the potential of their application for CO2 capture.

  7. The activity of Rhizomuchor miehei lipase as a biocatalyst in enzymatic acylation of cyclic alcohol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iftitah, Elvina Dhiaul; Srihardyastuti, Arie; Ariefin, Mokhamat

    2017-03-01

    We report the activity of Rhizomuchor miehei lipase (RML) as a biocatalyst, in particular the investigations concerning the effort of substrate-structure reactivity on the enzymatic acylation. The acylation was studied using acetic anhydride as an acyl donor and performed in n-hexane as a solvent. The selectivity of the enzymatic acylation was revealed by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectra. We observed that, RML has shown different behavior when catalyzing the acylation of isopulegol and mixture of isopulegol and citronellal (ratio 1:1). The chemoselectivity for the O-acylation was improved when the acyl acceptor included mixture of isopulegol and citronellal

  8. Structural basis for selective recognition of acyl chains by the membrane-associated acyltransferase PatA

    PubMed Central

    Albesa-Jové, David; Svetlíková, Zuzana; Tersa, Montse; Sancho-Vaello, Enea; Carreras-González, Ana; Bonnet, Pascal; Arrasate, Pedro; Eguskiza, Ander; Angala, Shiva K.; Cifuente, Javier O.; Korduláková, Jana; Jackson, Mary; Mikušová, Katarína; Guerin, Marcelo E.

    2016-01-01

    The biosynthesis of phospholipids and glycolipids are critical pathways for virtually all cell membranes. PatA is an essential membrane associated acyltransferase involved in the biosynthesis of mycobacterial phosphatidyl-myo-inositol mannosides (PIMs). The enzyme transfers a palmitoyl moiety from palmitoyl–CoA to the 6-position of the mannose ring linked to 2-position of inositol in PIM1/PIM2. We report here the crystal structures of PatA from Mycobacterium smegmatis in the presence of its naturally occurring acyl donor palmitate and a nonhydrolyzable palmitoyl–CoA analog. The structures reveal an α/β architecture, with the acyl chain deeply buried into a hydrophobic pocket that runs perpendicular to a long groove where the active site is located. Enzyme catalysis is mediated by an unprecedented charge relay system, which markedly diverges from the canonical HX4D motif. Our studies establish the mechanistic basis of substrate/membrane recognition and catalysis for an important family of acyltransferases, providing exciting possibilities for inhibitor design. PMID:26965057

  9. Structural basis for selective recognition of acyl chains by the membrane-associated acyltransferase PatA.

    PubMed

    Albesa-Jové, David; Svetlíková, Zuzana; Tersa, Montse; Sancho-Vaello, Enea; Carreras-González, Ana; Bonnet, Pascal; Arrasate, Pedro; Eguskiza, Ander; Angala, Shiva K; Cifuente, Javier O; Korduláková, Jana; Jackson, Mary; Mikušová, Katarína; Guerin, Marcelo E

    2016-03-11

    The biosynthesis of phospholipids and glycolipids are critical pathways for virtually all cell membranes. PatA is an essential membrane associated acyltransferase involved in the biosynthesis of mycobacterial phosphatidyl-myo-inositol mannosides (PIMs). The enzyme transfers a palmitoyl moiety from palmitoyl-CoA to the 6-position of the mannose ring linked to 2-position of inositol in PIM1/PIM2. We report here the crystal structures of PatA from Mycobacterium smegmatis in the presence of its naturally occurring acyl donor palmitate and a nonhydrolyzable palmitoyl-CoA analog. The structures reveal an α/β architecture, with the acyl chain deeply buried into a hydrophobic pocket that runs perpendicular to a long groove where the active site is located. Enzyme catalysis is mediated by an unprecedented charge relay system, which markedly diverges from the canonical HX4D motif. Our studies establish the mechanistic basis of substrate/membrane recognition and catalysis for an important family of acyltransferases, providing exciting possibilities for inhibitor design.

  10. 9H-Purine Scaffold Reveals Induced-Fit Pocket Plasticity of the BRD9 Bromodomain

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The 2-amine-9H-purine scaffold was identified as a weak bromodomain template and was developed via iterative structure based design into a potent nanomolar ligand for the bromodomain of human BRD9 with small residual micromolar affinity toward the bromodomain of BRD4. Binding of the lead compound 11 to the bromodomain of BRD9 results in an unprecedented rearrangement of residues forming the acetyllysine recognition site, affecting plasticity of the protein in an induced-fit pocket. The compound does not exhibit any cytotoxic effect in HEK293 cells and displaces the BRD9 bromodomain from chromatin in bioluminescence proximity assays without affecting the BRD4/histone complex. The 2-amine-9H-purine scaffold represents a novel template that can be further modified to yield highly potent and selective tool compounds to interrogate the biological role of BRD9 in diverse cellular systems. PMID:25703523

  11. AmeriFlux US-Cop Corral Pocket

    SciTech Connect

    Bowling, David

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Cop Corral Pocket. Site Description - The Corral Pocket site is located in a semi-arid grassland in southeastern Utah, just east of Canyonlands National park. For the greater part of the year, 38-80% of the ground is essentially bare. Vegetation is primarily native perennial C3/C4 grasses with annual ground converge ranging from 8-35%. Leaving the remaining 0-15% coverage to interspersed annual grasses, the remaining 0-15% coverage is occupied by annual grasses. 6-8 weeks during the late fall or winter, Livestock grazing is responsible for the majority of aboveground vegetation loss and subsequent high variability of ground coverage.

  12. A futuristic vision of pocket ultrasound machines: watch this space

    PubMed Central

    Magotti, Robert; Benzie, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Australian medical ultrasound started in 1959 with the establishment of the Ultrasonics Institute. Since then the technology has advanced tremendously. We are now not only able to obtain clearer images on high specification ultrasound machines but also on pocket‐sized ultrasound machines that are compact, lightweight and affordable. Method: The following descriptive review will examine the indication for use of pocket ultrasound machines in different clinical settings as well as provide evidence of its image clarity and accuracy. Potentially eligible studies were sought primarily through searches of the electronic databases PubMed, Medline (1996–Present), Embase (1996–Present) and Cochrane Library. Conclusion: Pocket ultrasound machines, with appropriate ultrasound knowledge and training, can be incorporated successfully in patient management. The addition of point‐of‐care ultrasound has been shown to improve management recommendations and outcomes. PMID:28191219

  13. Gas pockets in a wastewater rising main: a case study.

    PubMed

    Pozos-Estrada, Oscar; Fuentes-Mariles, Oscar A; Pozos-Estrada, Adrian

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a case study of an existing wastewater rising main (WWRM) in which an extreme transient event produced by simultaneous power failure of the pumps caused the rupture of a 1.2 m (48 in) prestressed concrete cylinder pipe (PCCP), causing an important leakage of sewage. The event and the methodology followed in order to validate the diagnostics of the failure are described. The detail study included in situ observation of the system, experimental investigation in a setup, hydraulic analysis, as well as details of the structural strength of the WWRM. After the extensive investigation and several simulations of fluid transients for different scenarios and flow conditions, it was found that stationary small gas pockets accumulated at high points of the WWRM were identified as the principal contributory factor of the failure. This case study serves as clear warning of the consequences of operating a WWRM with gas pockets at its high points.

  14. Acylated cyanidin 3-sambubioside-5-glucosides in Matthiola incana.

    PubMed

    Saito, N; Tatsuzawa, F; Nishiyama, A; Yokoi, M; Shigihara, A; Honda, T

    1995-03-01

    Four acylated cyanidin 3-sambubioside-5-glucosides were isolated from purple-violet flowers of Matthiola incana and their structures were determined by chemical and spectroscopic methods. Three acylated anthocyanins were cyanidin 3-O-(6-O-acyl-2-O-(2-O-sinapyl-beta-D-xylopyranosyl)-beta-D- glucopyranosides)-5-O-(6-O-malonyl-beta-D-glucopyranosides), in which the acyl group is p-coumaryl, caffeyl or ferulyl, respectively. The remaining pigment is free from malonic acid and was identified as cyanidin 3-O-(6-O-trans-ferulyl-2-O-(2- O-trans-sinapyl-beta-D-xylopyranosyl)-beta-D-glucopyranoside)-5-O- (beta-D-glucopyranoside). Analysis of the anthocyanin constituents in 16 purple-violet cultivars revealed that they contained the above triacylated anthocyanins in variable amounts as main pigments. An aromatic pair of pigments containing sinapic and ferulic acids are considered to produce an important intramolecular effect, making bluish colours in these flowers.

  15. The use of a programmable pocket calculator in clinical dietetics.

    PubMed

    Schlaepfer, L V; Shmerling, D H

    1979-03-09

    The application of programmable pocket calculators to clinical dietetics is described. The development of programs for the HP-67 and 97 for the evaluation of nutritional intakes of patients with obesity, renal disease, etc. and for the calculation and interpretation of food intakes in nutritional surveys is given in detail. The calculators simplify the practical work, shorten the calculation time substantially and allow direct incorporation of newly published data into analysis.

  16. The Toxicity of Sterile Filtrate from Parodontal Pockets

    PubMed Central

    Graham, J. Wallace

    1937-01-01

    The local effect of the absorption of toxic material from pyorrhœa pockets on the hard and soft tissues around the teeth is well known. In this experiment an attempt was made to study the toxic effect on remote structures by injecting the sterile filtrate fresh from pyorrhœa pockets into various animals. The filtrate was obtained from patients with chronic pyorrhœa by removing the contents from parodontal pockets and passing them through a Seitz filter. The sterile filtrate obtained was then injected into cats, guinea-pigs, rabbits, and rats, in varying amounts. In the group of four cats, all showed fatty degeneration of the liver and two showed extreme fatty degeneration of the kidney tubules. Five guinea-pigs receiving one injection of ½ c.c. of filtrate showed no pathological change in the liver or kidney. One out of three guinea-pigs receiving two injections of filtrate showed fatty degeneration of the liver, while five out of six pigs receiving one injection of 1 c.c.,—i.e. double the quantity—showed definite fatty degeneration of the liver. One out of two rabbits showed similar changes and of six rats injected, all died in from five to seven days. The experiment suggests that substances are elaborated in parodontal pockets which are highly toxic and tend to injure the liver and kidney of animals in the process of their elimination. Such toxic material proved fatal in fifteen of the twenty-five animals injected. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3 PMID:19991211

  17. Pocket-sized versus standard ultrasound machines in abdominal imaging.

    PubMed

    Tse, K H; Luk, W H; Lam, M C

    2014-06-01

    The pocket-sized ultrasound machine has emerged as an invaluable tool for quick assessment in emergency and general practice settings. It is suitable for instant and quick assessment in cardiac imaging. However, its applicability in the imaging of other body parts has yet to be established. In this pictorial review, we compared the performance of the pocketsized ultrasound machine against the standard ultrasound machine for its image quality in common abdominal pathology.

  18. Cracking the Hidden Job Market. Pocket Job Series No. 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindgren, Amy

    This book is the third in a series of six pocket-sized books written for career changers and laid-off workers. Each book is written at a 7th- to 10th-grade reading level and contains examples, hands-on self-discovery exercises, and step-by-step advice for a successful job search. This book identifies steps for finding the unadvertised jobs--80-95…

  19. Film cooling air pocket in a closed loop cooled airfoil

    DOEpatents

    Yu, Yufeng Phillip; Itzel, Gary Michael; Osgood, Sarah Jane; Bagepalli, Radhakrishna; Webbon, Waylon Willard; Burdgick, Steven Sebastian

    2002-01-01

    Turbine stator vane segments have radially inner and outer walls with vanes extending between them. The inner and outer walls are compartmentalized and have impingement plates. Steam flowing into the outer wall plenum passes through the impingement plate for impingement cooling of the outer wall upper surface. The spent impingement steam flows into cavities of the vane having inserts for impingement cooling the walls of the vane. The steam passes into the inner wall and through the impingement plate for impingement cooling of the inner wall surface and for return through return cavities having inserts for impingement cooling of the vane surfaces. To provide for air film cooing of select portions of the airfoil outer surface, at least one air pocket is defined on a wall of at least one of the cavities. Each air pocket is substantially closed with respect to the cooling medium in the cavity and cooling air pumped to the air pocket flows through outlet apertures in the wall of the airfoil to cool the same.

  20. Intraperiodontal pocket: An ideal route for local antimicrobial drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Sreeja C.; Anoop, K. R.

    2012-01-01

    Periodontal pockets act as a natural reservoir filled with gingival crevicular fluid for the controlled release delivery of antimicrobials directly. This article reflects the present status of nonsurgical controlled local intrapocket delivery of antimicrobials in the treatment of periodontitis. These sites have specialty in terms of anatomy, permeability, and their ability to retain a delivery system for a desired length of time. A number of antimicrobial products and the composition of the delivery systems, its use, clinical results, and their release are summarized. The goal in using an intrapocket device for the delivery of an antimicrobial agent is the achievement and maintenance of therapeutic drug concentration for the desired period of time. Novel controlled drug delivery system are capable of improving patient compliance as well as therapeutic efficacy with precise control of the rate by which a particular drug dosage is released from a delivery system without the need for frequent administration. These are considered superior drug delivery system because of low cost, greater stability, non-toxicity, biocompatibility, non-immunogenicity, and are biodegradable in nature. This review also focus on the importance and ideal features of periodontal pockets as a drug delivery platform for designing a suitable dosage form along with its potential advantage and limitations. The microbes in the periodontal pocket could destroy periodontal tissues, and a complete knowledge of these as well as an ideal treatment strategy could be helpful in treating this disease. PMID:22470888

  1. Acyl Meldrum's acid derivatives: application in organic synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janikowska, K.; Rachoń, J.; Makowiec, S.

    2014-07-01

    This review is focused on an important class of Meldrum's acid derivatives commonly known as acyl Meldrum's acids. The preparation methods of these compounds are considered including the recently proposed and rather rarely used ones. The chemical properties of acyl Meldrum's acids are described in detail, including thermal stability and reactions with various nucleophiles. The possible mechanisms of these transformations are analyzed. The bibliography includes 134 references.

  2. Oxidative activation of dihydropyridine amides to reactive acyl donors.

    PubMed

    Funder, Erik Daa; Trads, Julie B; Gothelf, Kurt V

    2015-01-07

    Amides of 1,4-dihydropyridine (DHP) are activated by oxidation for acyl transfer to amines, alcohols and thiols. In the reduced form the DHP amide is stable towards reaction with amines at room temperature. However, upon oxidation with DDQ the acyl donor is activated via a proposed pyridinium intermediate. The activated intermediate reacts with various nucleophiles to give amides, esters, and thio-esters in moderate to high yields.

  3. 24 CFR 570.466 - Additional application submission requirements for Pockets of Poverty-employment opportunities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... requirements for Pockets of Poverty-employment opportunities. 570.466 Section 570.466 Housing and Urban... application submission requirements for Pockets of Poverty—employment opportunities. Applicants for Action Grants under the Pockets of Poverty provision must describe the number and, to the extent possible,...

  4. Identification of allosteric PIF-pocket ligands for PDK1 using NMR-based fragment screening and 1H-15N TROSY experiments.

    PubMed

    Stockman, Brian J; Kothe, Michael; Kohls, Darcy; Weibley, Laura; Connolly, Brendan J; Sheils, Alissa L; Cao, Qing; Cheng, Alan C; Yang, Lily; Kamath, Ajith V; Ding, Yuan-Hua; Charlton, Maura E

    2009-02-01

    Aberrant activation of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase pathway because of genetic mutations of essential signalling proteins has been associated with human diseases including cancer and diabetes. The pivotal role of 3-phosphoinositide-dependent kinase-1 in the PI3K signalling cascade has made it an attractive target for therapeutic intervention. The N-terminal lobe of the 3-phosphoinositide-dependent kinase-1 catalytic domain contains a docking site which recognizes the non-catalytic C-terminal hydrophobic motifs of certain substrate kinases. The binding of substrate in this so-called PDK1 Interacting Fragment pocket allows interaction with 3-phosphoinositide-dependent kinase-1 and enhanced phosphorylation of downstream kinases. NMR spectroscopy was used to a screen 3-phosphoinositide-dependent kinase-1 domain construct against a library of chemically diverse fragments in order to identify small, ligand-efficient fragments that might interact at either the ATP site or the allosteric PDK1 Interacting Fragment pocket. While majority of the fragment hits were determined to be ATP-site binders, several fragments appeared to interact with the PDK1 Interacting Fragment pocket. Ligand-induced changes in 1H-15N TROSY spectra acquired using uniformly 15N-enriched PDK1 provided evidence to distinguish ATP-site from PDK1 Interacting Fragment-site binding. Caliper assay data and 19F NMR assay data on the PDK1 Interacting Fragment pocket fragments and structurally related compounds identified them as potential allosteric activators of PDK1 function.

  5. Flexibility and small pockets at protein-protein interfaces: New insights into druggability.

    PubMed

    Jubb, Harry; Blundell, Tom L; Ascher, David B

    2015-10-01

    The transient assembly of multiprotein complexes mediates many aspects of cell regulation and signalling in living organisms. Modulation of the formation of these complexes through targeting protein-protein interfaces can offer greater selectivity than the inhibition of protein kinases, proteases or other post-translational regulatory enzymes using substrate, co-factor or transition state mimetics. However, capitalising on protein-protein interaction interfaces as drug targets has been hindered by the nature of interfaces that tend to offer binding sites lacking the well-defined large cavities of classical drug targets. In this review we posit that interfaces formed by concerted folding and binding (disorder-to-order transitions on binding) of one partner and other examples of interfaces where a protein partner is bound through a continuous epitope from a surface-exposed helix, flexible loop or chain extension may be more tractable for the development of "orthosteric", competitive chemical modulators; these interfaces tend to offer small-volume but deep pockets and/or larger grooves that may be bound tightly by small chemical entities. We discuss examples of such protein-protein interaction interfaces for which successful chemical modulators are being developed.

  6. Flexibility and small pockets at protein–protein interfaces: New insights into druggability

    PubMed Central

    Jubb, Harry; Blundell, Tom L.; Ascher, David B.

    2015-01-01

    The transient assembly of multiprotein complexes mediates many aspects of cell regulation and signalling in living organisms. Modulation of the formation of these complexes through targeting protein–protein interfaces can offer greater selectivity than the inhibition of protein kinases, proteases or other post-translational regulatory enzymes using substrate, co-factor or transition state mimetics. However, capitalising on protein–protein interaction interfaces as drug targets has been hindered by the nature of interfaces that tend to offer binding sites lacking the well-defined large cavities of classical drug targets. In this review we posit that interfaces formed by concerted folding and binding (disorder-to-order transitions on binding) of one partner and other examples of interfaces where a protein partner is bound through a continuous epitope from a surface-exposed helix, flexible loop or chain extension may be more tractable for the development of “orthosteric”, competitive chemical modulators; these interfaces tend to offer small-volume but deep pockets and/or larger grooves that may be bound tightly by small chemical entities. We discuss examples of such protein–protein interaction interfaces for which successful chemical modulators are being developed. PMID:25662442

  7. Biomarker-based diagnosis of pacemaker and implantable cardioverter defibrillator pocket infections: A prospective, multicentre, case-control evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Vrazic, Hrvoje; Haller, Bernhard; Braun, Siegmund; Petzold, Tobias; Ott, Ilka; Lennerz, Agnes; Michel, Jonathan; Blažek, Patrick; Deisenhofer, Isabel; Whittaker, Peter; Kolb, Christof

    2017-01-01

    Background The use of cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIED) has risen steadily, yet the rate of cardiac device infections (CDI) has disproportionately increased. Amongst all cardiac device infections, the pocket infection is the most challenging diagnosis. Therefore, we aimed to improve diagnosis of such pocket infection by identifying relevant biomarkers. Methods We enrolled 25 consecutive patients with invasively and microbiologically confirmed pocket infection. None of the patients had any confounding conditions. Pre-operative levels of 14 biomarkers were compared in infected and control (n = 50) patients. Our selected biomarkers included white blood cell count (WBC), C-reactive protein (CRP), procalcitonin (PCT), lipopolysaccharide binding protein, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (HS-CRP), polymorphonuclear-elastase, presepsin, various interleukins, tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). Results Of the 25 patients with isolated pocket infection (70±13years, 76% male, 40% ICDs), none presented with leukocytosis. In contrast, they had higher serum levels of HS-CRP (p = 0.019) and PCT (p = 0.010) than control patients. Median PCT-level was 0.06 ng/mL (IQR 0.03–0.07 ng/mL) in the study group versus 0.03 ng/mL (IQR 0.02–0.04 ng/mL) in controls. An optimized PCT cut-off value of 0.05 ng/mL suggests pocket infection with a sensitivity of 60% and specificity of 82%. In addition TNF-α- and GM-CSF-levels were lower in the study group. Other biomarkers did not differ between groups. Conclusion Diagnosis of isolated pocket infections requires clinical awareness, physical examination, evaluation of blood cultures and echocardiography assessment. Nevertheless, measurement of PCT- and HS-CRP-levels can aid diagnosis. However, no conclusion can be drawn from normal WBC-values. Clinical trial registration clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01619267 PMID:28264059

  8. Application of oxime-diversification to optimize ligand interactions within a cryptic pocket of the polo-like kinase 1 polo-box domain.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xue Zhi; Hymel, David; Burke, Terrence R

    2016-10-15

    By a process involving initial screening of a set of 87 aldehydes using an oxime ligation-based strategy, we were able to achieve a several-fold affinity enhancement over one of the most potent previously known polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) polo-box domain (PBD) binding inhibitors. This improved binding may result by accessing a newly identified auxiliary region proximal to a key hydrophobic cryptic pocket on the surface of the protein. Our findings could have general applicability to the design of PBD-binding antagonists.

  9. Acylated pregnane glycosides from Caralluma quadrangula.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, Hossam M; Osman, Abdel-Moneim M; Almehdar, Hussein; Abdel-Sattar, Essam

    2013-04-01

    In a previous study, the methanolic extract as well as the chloroform fraction of the aerial parts of Caralluma quadrangula (Forssk.) N.E.Br. indigenous to Saudi Arabia showed significant in vitro cytotoxic activity against breast cancer (MCF7) cell line. In a biologically-guided fractionation approach, four acylated pregnane glycosides were isolated from the chloroform fraction of C. quadrangula. The structures of the isolated compounds were elucidated by the analysis of their MS and NMR data. The compounds were identified as 12,20-di-O-benzoylboucerin 3-O-β-D-digitoxopyranosyl-(1→4)-β-D-canaropyranosyl-(1→4)-β-D-cymaropyranoside (1), 12,20-di-O-benzoylboucerin 3-O-β-D-cymaropyranosyl-(1→4)-β-D-canaropyranosyl-(1→4)-β-D-cymaropyranoside (2), 12,20-di-O-benzoylboucerin 3-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1→4)-β-D-digitoxopyranosyl-(1→4)-β-D-canaropyranosyl-(1→4)-β-D-cymaropyranoside (3) and 12,20-di-O-benzoyl-3β,5α,12β,14β,20-pentahydroxy-(20R)-pregn-6-ene 3-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1→4)-β-D-digitoxopyranosyl-(1→4)-β-D-canaropyranosyl-(1→4)-β-D-cymaropyranoside (4). The isolated compounds were tested for their cytotoxic activity against breast cancer (MCF7) cell line.

  10. A Druggable Pocket at the Nucleocapsid/Phosphoprotein Interaction Site of Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus

    PubMed Central

    Ouizougun-Oubari, Mohamed; Pereira, Nelson; Tarus, Bogdan; Galloux, Marie; Lassoued, Safa; Fix, Jenna; Tortorici, M. Alejandra; Hoos, Sylviane; Baron, Bruno; England, Patrick; Desmaële, Didier; Couvreur, Patrick; Bontems, François; Rey, Félix A.; Eléouët, Jean-François; Slama-Schwok, Anny

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Presently, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), the main cause of severe respiratory infections in infants, cannot be treated efficiently with antivirals. However, its RNA-dependent polymerase complex offers potential targets for RSV-specific drugs. This includes the recognition of its template, the ribonucleoprotein complex (RNP), consisting of genomic RNA encapsidated by the RSV nucleoprotein, N. This recognition proceeds via interaction between the phosphoprotein P, which is the main polymerase cofactor, and N. The determinant role of the C terminus of P, and more particularly of the last residue, F241, in RNP binding and viral RNA synthesis has been assessed previously. Here, we provide detailed structural insight into this crucial interaction for RSV polymerase activity. We solved the crystallographic structures of complexes between the N-terminal domain of N (N-NTD) and C-terminal peptides of P and characterized binding by biophysical approaches. Our results provide a rationale for the pivotal role of F241, which inserts into a well-defined N-NTD pocket. This primary binding site is completed by transient contacts with upstream P residues outside the pocket. Based on the structural information of the N-NTD:P complex, we identified inhibitors of this interaction, selected by in silico screening of small compounds, that efficiently bind to N and compete with P in vitro. One of the compounds displayed inhibitory activity on RSV replication, thereby strengthening the relevance of N-NTD for structure-based design of RSV-specific antivirals. IMPORTANCE Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a widespread pathogen that is a leading cause of acute lower respiratory infections in infants worldwide. RSV cannot be treated efficiently with antivirals, and no vaccine is presently available, with the development of pediatric vaccines being particularly challenging. Therefore, there is a need for new therapeutic strategies that specifically target RSV. The interaction

  11. Water may inhibit oxygen binding in hemoprotein models.

    PubMed

    Collman, James P; Decréau, Richard A; Dey, Abhishek; Yang, Ying

    2009-03-17

    Three distal imidazole pickets in a cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) model form a pocket hosting a cluster of water molecules. The cluster makes the ferrous heme low spin, and consequently the O(2) binding slow. The nature of the rigid proximal imidazole tail favors a high spin/low spin cross-over. The O(2) binding rate is enhanced either by removing the water, increasing the hydrophobicity of the gas binding pocket, or inserting a metal ion that coordinates to the 3 distal imidazole pickets.

  12. Assembly mechanism of Trypanosoma brucei BILBO1 at the flagellar pocket collar.

    PubMed

    Vidilaseris, Keni; Lesigang, Johannes; Morriswood, Brooke; Dong, Gang

    2015-01-01

    The flagellar pocket is a bulb-like invagination of the plasma membrane that encloses the base of the single flagellum in trypanosomes. It is the site of all endo- and exocytic activity in the parasite and has thus been proposed to be a therapeutic target. At the neck of the flagellar pocket is an electron-dense cytoskeletal structure named the flagellar pocket collar. The protein BILBO1 was the first characterized and remains the only known component of the flagellar pocket collar, with essential functions in the biogenesis of both the flagellar pocket and flagellar pocket collar. We recently reported that the filamentous assembly of Trypanosoma brucei BILBO1 (TbBILBO1) is mediated by its central coiled coil domain and C-terminal leucine zipper. Here, we discuss how TbBILBO1 might assemble at the flagellar pocket collar in T. brucei.

  13. Practical Pocket PC Application w/Biometric Security

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Logan, Julian

    2004-01-01

    I work in the Flight Software Engineering Branch, where we provide design and development of embedded real-time software applications for flight and supporting ground systems to support the NASA Aeronautics and Space Programs. In addition, this branch evaluates, develops and implements new technologies for embedded real-time systems, and maintains a laboratory for applications of embedded technology. The majority of microchips that are used in modern society have been programmed using embedded technology. These small chips can be found in microwaves, calculators, home security systems, cell phones and more. My assignment this summer entails working with an iPAQ HP 5500 Pocket PC. This top-of-the-line hand-held device is one of the first mobile PC's to introduce biometric security capabilities. Biometric security, in this case a fingerprint authentication system, is on the edge of technology as far as securing information. The benefits of fingerprint authentication are enormous. The most significant of them are that it is extremely difficult to reproduce someone else's fingerprint, and it is equally difficult to lose or forget your own fingerprint as opposed to a password or pin number. One of my goals for this summer is to integrate this technology with another Pocket PC application. The second task for the summer is to develop a simple application that provides an Astronaut EVA (Extravehicular Activity) Log Book capability. The Astronaut EVA Log Book is what an astronaut would use to report the status of field missions, crew physical health, successes, future plans, etc. My goal is to develop a user interface into which these data fields can be entered and stored. The applications that I am developing are created using eMbedded Visual C++ 4.0 with the Pocket PC 2003 Software Development Kit provided by Microsoft.

  14. Head-group acylation of monogalactosyldiacylglycerol is a common stress response, but the acyl-galactose acyl composition varies with the plant species and applied stress

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Head group acylation of monogalactosyldiacylglycerol is a plant lipid modification occurring during bacterial infection. Little is known about the range of stresses that induce this lipid modification, the molecular species induced, and the function of the modification. Lipidomic analysis using trip...

  15. Pocket atlas of head and neck MRI anatomy

    SciTech Connect

    Lufkin, R.B.; Hanafee, W.N.

    1989-01-01

    This pocket atlas depicts the anatomy of the head and neck as seen in magnetic resonance (MR) images. The collection of 140 high-resolution images covers all major areas - neck, larynx, oropharynx, tongue, nasopharynx, skull base, sinuses, and temporal bone - displayed in sagittal, axial, and coronal MR image planes. The images show maximum fat/muscle contrast for better visualization of fascial planes. In certain areas of the anatomy, such as the neck and temporal bone, surface coils were used to achieve significant advantages in image quality over standard head or body coils.

  16. Spatial Analysis and Quantification of the Thermodynamic Driving Forces in Protein-Ligand Binding: Binding Site Variability

    PubMed Central

    Raman, E. Prabhu; MacKerell, Alexander D.

    2015-01-01

    The thermodynamic driving forces behind small molecule-protein binding are still not well understood, including the variability of those forces associated with different types of ligands in different binding pockets. To better understand these phenomena we calculate spatially resolved thermodynamic contributions of the different molecular degrees of freedom for the binding of propane and methanol to multiple pockets on the proteins Factor Xa and p38 MAP kinase. Binding thermodynamics are computed using a statistical thermodynamics based end-point method applied on a canonical ensemble comprising the protein-ligand complexes and the corresponding free states in an explicit solvent environment. Energetic and entropic contributions of water and ligand degrees of freedom computed from the configurational ensemble provides an unprecedented level of detail into the mechanisms of binding. Direct protein-ligand interaction energies play a significant role in both non-polar and polar binding, which is comparable to water reorganization energy. Loss of interactions with water upon binding strongly compensates these contributions leading to relatively small binding enthalpies. For both solutes, the entropy of water reorganization is found to favor binding in agreement with the classical view of the “hydrophobic effect”. Depending on the specifics of the binding pocket, both energy-entropy compensation and reinforcement mechanisms are observed. Notable is the ability to visualize the spatial distribution of the thermodynamic contributions to binding at atomic resolution showing significant differences in the thermodynamic contributions of water to the binding of propane versus methanol. PMID:25625202

  17. Two fatty acyl reductases involved in moth pheromone biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Antony, Binu; Ding, Bao-Jian; Moto, Ken’Ichi; Aldosari, Saleh A.; Aldawood, Abdulrahman S.

    2016-01-01

    Fatty acyl reductases (FARs) constitute an evolutionarily conserved gene family found in all kingdoms of life. Members of the FAR gene family play diverse roles, including seed oil synthesis, insect pheromone biosynthesis, and mammalian wax biosynthesis. In insects, FAR genes dedicated to sex pheromone biosynthesis (pheromone-gland-specific fatty acyl reductase, pgFAR) form a unique clade that exhibits substantial modifications in gene structure and possesses unique specificity and selectivity for fatty acyl substrates. Highly selective and semi-selective ‘single pgFARs’ produce single and multicomponent pheromone signals in bombycid, pyralid, yponomeutid and noctuid moths. An intriguing question is how a ‘single reductase’ can direct the synthesis of several fatty alcohols of various chain lengths and isomeric forms. Here, we report two active pgFARs in the pheromone gland of Spodoptera, namely a semi-selective, C14:acyl-specific pgFAR and a highly selective, C16:acyl-specific pgFAR, and demonstrate that these pgFARs play a pivotal role in the formation of species-specific signals, a finding that is strongly supported by functional gene expression data. The study envisages a new area of research for disclosing evolutionary changes associated with C14- and C16-specific FARs in moth pheromone biosynthesis. PMID:27427355

  18. Regioselective self-acylating cyclodextrins in organic solvent

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Eunae; Yun, Deokgyu; Jeong, Daham; Im, Jieun; Kim, Hyunki; Dindulkar, Someshwar D.; Choi, Youngjin; Jung, Seunho

    2016-01-01

    Amphiphilic cyclodextrins have been synthesized with self-acylating reaction using vinyl esters in dimethylformamide. In the present study no base, catalyst, or enzyme was used, and the structural analyses using thin layer chromatography, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and mass spectrometry show that the cyclodextrin is substituted preferentially by one acyl moiety at the C2 position of the glucose unit, suggesting that cyclodextrin functions as a regioselective catalytic carbohydrate in organic solvent. In the self-acylation, the most acidic OH group at the 2-position and the inclusion complexing ability of cyclodextrin were considered to be significant. The substrate preference was also observed in favor of the long-chain acyl group, which could be attributed to the inclusion ability of cyclodextrin cavity. Furthermore, using the model amphiphilic building block, 2-O-mono-lauryl β-cyclodextrin, the self-organized supramolecular architecture with nano-vesicular morphology in water was investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy. The cavity-type nano-assembled vesicle and the novel synthetic methods for the preparation of mono-acylated cyclodextrin should be of great interest with regard to drug/gene delivery systems, functional surfactants, and carbohydrate derivatization methods. PMID:27020946

  19. An annotated database of Arabidopsis mutants of acyl lipid metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    McGlew, Kathleen; Shaw, Vincent; Zhang, Meng; Kim, Ryeo Jin; Yang, Weili; Shorrosh, Basil; Suh, Mi Chung; Ohlrogge, John

    2014-12-10

    Mutants have played a fundamental role in gene discovery and in understanding the function of genes involved in plant acyl lipid metabolism. The first mutant in Arabidopsis lipid metabolism (fad4) was described in 1985. Since that time, characterization of mutants in more than 280 genes associated with acyl lipid metabolism has been reported. This review provides a brief background and history on identification of mutants in acyl lipid metabolism, an analysis of the distribution of mutants in different areas of acyl lipid metabolism and presents an annotated database (ARALIPmutantDB) of these mutants. The database provides information on the phenotypes of mutants, pathways and enzymes/proteins associated with the mutants, and allows rapid access via hyperlinks to summaries of information about each mutant and to literature that provides information on the lipid composition of the mutants. Mutants for at least 30 % of the genes in the database have multiple names, which have been compiled here to reduce ambiguities in searches for information. Furthermore, the database should also provide a tool for exploring the relationships between mutants in acyl lipid-related genes and their lipid phenotypes and point to opportunities for further research.

  20. An annotated database of Arabidopsis mutants of acyl lipid metabolism

    DOE PAGES

    McGlew, Kathleen; Shaw, Vincent; Zhang, Meng; ...

    2014-12-10

    Mutants have played a fundamental role in gene discovery and in understanding the function of genes involved in plant acyl lipid metabolism. The first mutant in Arabidopsis lipid metabolism (fad4) was described in 1985. Since that time, characterization of mutants in more than 280 genes associated with acyl lipid metabolism has been reported. This review provides a brief background and history on identification of mutants in acyl lipid metabolism, an analysis of the distribution of mutants in different areas of acyl lipid metabolism and presents an annotated database (ARALIPmutantDB) of these mutants. The database provides information on the phenotypes ofmore » mutants, pathways and enzymes/proteins associated with the mutants, and allows rapid access via hyperlinks to summaries of information about each mutant and to literature that provides information on the lipid composition of the mutants. Mutants for at least 30 % of the genes in the database have multiple names, which have been compiled here to reduce ambiguities in searches for information. Furthermore, the database should also provide a tool for exploring the relationships between mutants in acyl lipid-related genes and their lipid phenotypes and point to opportunities for further research.« less

  1. Regioselective self-acylating cyclodextrins in organic solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Eunae; Yun, Deokgyu; Jeong, Daham; Im, Jieun; Kim, Hyunki; Dindulkar, Someshwar D.; Choi, Youngjin; Jung, Seunho

    2016-03-01

    Amphiphilic cyclodextrins have been synthesized with self-acylating reaction using vinyl esters in dimethylformamide. In the present study no base, catalyst, or enzyme was used, and the structural analyses using thin layer chromatography, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and mass spectrometry show that the cyclodextrin is substituted preferentially by one acyl moiety at the C2 position of the glucose unit, suggesting that cyclodextrin functions as a regioselective catalytic carbohydrate in organic solvent. In the self-acylation, the most acidic OH group at the 2-position and the inclusion complexing ability of cyclodextrin were considered to be significant. The substrate preference was also observed in favor of the long-chain acyl group, which could be attributed to the inclusion ability of cyclodextrin cavity. Furthermore, using the model amphiphilic building block, 2-O-mono-lauryl β-cyclodextrin, the self-organized supramolecular architecture with nano-vesicular morphology in water was investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy. The cavity-type nano-assembled vesicle and the novel synthetic methods for the preparation of mono-acylated cyclodextrin should be of great interest with regard to drug/gene delivery systems, functional surfactants, and carbohydrate derivatization methods.

  2. Leukocyte integrin αLβ2 headpiece structures: The αI domain, the pocket for the internal ligand, and concerted movements of its loops.

    PubMed

    Sen, Mehmet; Springer, Timothy A

    2016-03-15

    High-resolution crystal structures of the headpiece of lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 (integrin αLβ2) reveal how the αI domain interacts with its platform formed by the α-subunit β-propeller and β-subunit βI domains. The αLβ2 structures compared with αXβ2 structures show that the αI domain, tethered through its N-linker and a disulfide to a stable β-ribbon pillar near the center of the platform, can undergo remarkable pivoting and tilting motions that appear buffered by N-glycan decorations that differ between αL and αX subunits. Rerefined β2 integrin structures reveal details including pyroglutamic acid at the β2 N terminus and bending within the EGF1 domain. Allostery is relayed to the αI domain by an internal ligand that binds to a pocket at the interface between the β-propeller and βI domains. Marked differences between the αL and αX subunit β-propeller domains concentrate near the binding pocket and αI domain interfaces. Remarkably, movement in allostery in the βI domain of specificity determining loop 1 (SDL1) causes concerted movement of SDL2 and thereby tightens the binding pocket for the internal ligand.

  3. Leukocyte integrin αLβ2 headpiece structures: The αI domain, the pocket for the internal ligand, and concerted movements of its loops

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Mehmet; Springer, Timothy A.

    2016-01-01

    High-resolution crystal structures of the headpiece of lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 (integrin αLβ2) reveal how the αI domain interacts with its platform formed by the α-subunit β-propeller and β-subunit βI domains. The αLβ2 structures compared with αXβ2 structures show that the αI domain, tethered through its N-linker and a disulfide to a stable β-ribbon pillar near the center of the platform, can undergo remarkable pivoting and tilting motions that appear buffered by N-glycan decorations that differ between αL and αX subunits. Rerefined β2 integrin structures reveal details including pyroglutamic acid at the β2 N terminus and bending within the EGF1 domain. Allostery is relayed to the αI domain by an internal ligand that binds to a pocket at the interface between the β-propeller and βI domains. Marked differences between the αL and αX subunit β-propeller domains concentrate near the binding pocket and αI domain interfaces. Remarkably, movement in allostery in the βI domain of specificity determining loop 1 (SDL1) causes concerted movement of SDL2 and thereby tightens the binding pocket for the internal ligand. PMID:26936951

  4. Improved accuracy in periodontal pocket depth measurement using optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine whether periodontal pocket could be satisfactorily visualized by optical coherence tomography (OCT) and to suggest quantitative methods for measuring periodontal pocket depth. Methods We acquired OCT images of periodontal pockets in a porcine model and determined the actual axial resolution for measuring the exact periodontal pocket depth using a calibration method. Quantitative measurements of periodontal pockets were performed by real axial resolution and compared with the results from manual periodontal probing. Results The average periodontal pocket depth measured by OCT was 3.10±0.15 mm, 4.11±0.17 mm, 5.09±0.17 mm, and 6.05±0.21 mm for each periodontal pocket model, respectively. These values were similar to those obtained by manual periodontal probing. Conclusions OCT was able to visualize periodontal pockets and show attachment loss. By calculating the calibration factor to determine the accurate axial resolution, quantitative standards for measuring periodontal pocket depth can be established regardless of the position of periodontal pocket in the OCT image. PMID:28261520

  5. Contralateral Abdominal Pocketing in Salvation of Replanted Fingertips with Compromised Circulation

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Hyung-Sup; Kim, Dong-Hwi; Kwon, Ho; Jung, Sung-No

    2014-01-01

    Abdominal pocketing is one of the most useful methods in salvation of compromised replanted fingertips. Abdominal pocketing has generally been performed in the ipsilateral lower abdominal quadrant, but we have also performed contralateral pocketing at our institute. To determine which approach is more beneficial, a total of 40 patients underwent an abdominal pocketing procedure in either the ipsilateral or contralateral lower abdominal quadrant after fingertip replantation. Dates of abdominal pocketing after initial replantation, detachment after abdominal pocketing, range of motion (ROM) before abdominal pocketing, and sequential ROM after the detachment operation and date of full ROM recovery and Disabilities of Arm, Shoulder, and Hand questionnaire (DASH) score were recorded through medical chart review. Mean detachment date, mean abduction of shoulder after the detachment operation, and mean days to return to full ROM were not significantly different between the ipsilateral and contralateral pocketing groups. However, the mean DASH score was significantly lower in the contralateral group than the ipsilateral group. There were also fewer postoperative wound complications in the contralateral group than in the ipsilateral group. We, therefore, recommend contralateral abdominal pocketing rather than ipsilateral abdominal pocketing to increase patient comfort and reduce pain and complications. PMID:25379539

  6. Contralateral abdominal pocketing in salvation of replanted fingertips with compromised circulation.

    PubMed

    Shim, Hyung-Sup; Kim, Dong-Hwi; Kwon, Ho; Jung, Sung-No

    2014-01-01

    Abdominal pocketing is one of the most useful methods in salvation of compromised replanted fingertips. Abdominal pocketing has generally been performed in the ipsilateral lower abdominal quadrant, but we have also performed contralateral pocketing at our institute. To determine which approach is more beneficial, a total of 40 patients underwent an abdominal pocketing procedure in either the ipsilateral or contralateral lower abdominal quadrant after fingertip replantation. Dates of abdominal pocketing after initial replantation, detachment after abdominal pocketing, range of motion (ROM) before abdominal pocketing, and sequential ROM after the detachment operation and date of full ROM recovery and Disabilities of Arm, Shoulder, and Hand questionnaire (DASH) score were recorded through medical chart review. Mean detachment date, mean abduction of shoulder after the detachment operation, and mean days to return to full ROM were not significantly different between the ipsilateral and contralateral pocketing groups. However, the mean DASH score was significantly lower in the contralateral group than the ipsilateral group. There were also fewer postoperative wound complications in the contralateral group than in the ipsilateral group. We, therefore, recommend contralateral abdominal pocketing rather than ipsilateral abdominal pocketing to increase patient comfort and reduce pain and complications.

  7. Breakdown of air pockets in downwardly inclined sewerage pressure mains.

    PubMed

    Lubbers, C L; Clemens, F H L R

    2006-01-01

    In the Netherlands, wastewater is collected in municipal areas and transported to centralised WWTPs by an extensive system of pressure mains. Over the last decades these pressure mains did not receive much attention in terms of monitoring of performance or maintenance. A recent inventory showed that half of the pressure mains show an increased pressure loss for no directly obvious reason. One of the many causes that account for the reduction of the flow capacity is the occurrence of free gas in the pipeline. During dry weather periods with low flow velocities, gas may accumulate at high points in the system. Once the velocity increases during storm weather flow, the air pockets may be broken down and transported to the end of the system. A research study is started focussing on the description of the gas-water phenomena in wastewater pressure mains with respect to transportation of gas. An experimental facility is constructed for the study of multi-phase flow. This paper describes the preliminary results of experiments on breakdown rates of gas pockets as a function of inclination angle and water flow rate. The results show an increasing breakdown rate with increasing inclination angle.

  8. Detection of the amoeba Entamoeba gingivalis in periodontal pockets.

    PubMed

    Bonner, Mark; Amard, Véronique; Bar-Pinatel, Charlotte; Charpentier, Frédéric; Chatard, Jean-Michel; Desmuyck, Yvan; Ihler, Serge; Rochet, Jean-Pierre; Roux de La Tribouille, Véronique; Saladin, Luc; Verdy, Marion; Gironès, Núria; Fresno, Manuel; Santi-Rocca, Julien

    2014-01-01

    Periodontitis is a public health issue, being one of the most prevalent diseases worldwide. However, the aetiology of the disease is still unclear: genetics of patients cannot explain the dispersed or isolated localisation of gingival pockets, while bacteria-based models are insufficient to distinguish gingivitis and periodontitis. The possible role of parasites in the establishment of periodontitis has been poorly studied until now. The aim of this project was to study a potential link between colonisation of gingival crevices by the amoeba Entamoeba gingivalis and periodontitis. In eight different dental clinics in France, samples were taken in periodontal pockets (72) or healthy sites (33), and submitted to microscopic observation and molecular identification by PCR with a new set of primers designed to specifically detect E. gingivalis. This blind sample analysis showed the strong sensitivity of PCR compared with clinical diagnosis (58/72 = 81%), and microscopy (51/65 = 78%). The results of this work show that the parasites detected by microscopy mainly - if not exclusively - belong to the species E. gingivalis and that the presence of the parasite is correlated with periodontitis.

  9. Detection of the amoeba Entamoeba gingivalis in periodontal pockets

    PubMed Central

    Bonner, Mark; Amard, Véronique; Bar-Pinatel, Charlotte; Charpentier, Frédéric; Chatard, Jean-Michel; Desmuyck, Yvan; Ihler, Serge; Rochet, Jean-Pierre; Roux de La Tribouille, Véronique; Saladin, Luc; Verdy, Marion; Gironès, Núria; Fresno, Manuel; Santi-Rocca, Julien

    2014-01-01

    Periodontitis is a public health issue, being one of the most prevalent diseases worldwide. However, the aetiology of the disease is still unclear: genetics of patients cannot explain the dispersed or isolated localisation of gingival pockets, while bacteria-based models are insufficient to distinguish gingivitis and periodontitis. The possible role of parasites in the establishment of periodontitis has been poorly studied until now. The aim of this project was to study a potential link between colonisation of gingival crevices by the amoeba Entamoeba gingivalis and periodontitis. In eight different dental clinics in France, samples were taken in periodontal pockets (72) or healthy sites (33), and submitted to microscopic observation and molecular identification by PCR with a new set of primers designed to specifically detect E. gingivalis. This blind sample analysis showed the strong sensitivity of PCR compared with clinical diagnosis (58/72 = 81%), and microscopy (51/65 = 78%). The results of this work show that the parasites detected by microscopy mainly – if not exclusively – belong to the species E. gingivalis and that the presence of the parasite is correlated with periodontitis. PMID:24983705

  10. Structural characterization and comparison of three acyl-carrier-protein synthases from pathogenic bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Halavaty, Andrei S.; Kim, Youngchang; Minasov, George; Shuvalova, Ludmilla; Dubrovska, Ievgeniia; Winsor, James; Zhou, Min; Onopriyenko, Olena; Skarina, Tatiana; Papazisi, Leka; Kwon, Keehwan; Peterson, Scott N.; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Savchenko, Alexei; Anderson, Wayne F.

    2012-10-01

    The structural characterization of acyl-carrier-protein synthase (AcpS) from three different pathogenic microorganisms is reported. One interesting finding of the present work is a crystal artifact related to the activity of the enzyme, which fortuitously represents an opportunity for a strategy to design a potential inhibitor of a pathogenic AcpS. Some bacterial type II fatty-acid synthesis (FAS II) enzymes have been shown to be important candidates for drug discovery. The scientific and medical quest for new FAS II protein targets continues to stimulate research in this field. One of the possible additional candidates is the acyl-carrier-protein synthase (AcpS) enzyme. Its holo form post-translationally modifies the apo form of an acyl carrier protein (ACP), which assures the constant delivery of thioester intermediates to the discrete enzymes of FAS II. At the Center for Structural Genomics of Infectious Diseases (CSGID), AcpSs from Staphylococcus aureus (AcpS{sub SA}), Vibrio cholerae (AcpS{sub VC}) and Bacillus anthracis (AcpS{sub BA}) have been structurally characterized in their apo, holo and product-bound forms, respectively. The structure of AcpS{sub BA} is emphasized because of the two 3′, 5′-adenosine diphosphate (3′, 5′-ADP) product molecules that are found in each of the three coenzyme A (CoA) binding sites of the trimeric protein. One 3′, 5′-ADP is bound as the 3′, 5′-ADP part of CoA in the known structures of the CoA–AcpS and 3′, 5′-ADP–AcpS binary complexes. The position of the second 3′, 5′-ADP has never been described before. It is in close proximity to the first 3′, 5′-ADP and the ACP-binding site. The coordination of two ADPs in AcpS{sub BA} may possibly be exploited for the design of AcpS inhibitors that can block binding of both CoA and ACP.

  11. A Comparative Analysis of Acyl-Homoserine Lactone Synthase Assays.

    PubMed

    Shin, Daniel; Frane, Nicole D; Brecht, Ryan M; Keeler, Jesse; Nagarajan, Rajesh

    2015-12-01

    Quorum sensing is cell-to-cell communication that allows bacteria to coordinate attacks on their hosts by inducing virulent gene expression, biofilm production, and other cellular functions, including antibiotic resistance. AHL synthase enzymes synthesize N-acyl-l-homoserine lactones, commonly referred to as autoinducers, to facilitate quorum sensing in Gram-negative bacteria. Studying the synthases, however, has proven to be a difficult road. Two assays, including a radiolabeled assay and a colorimetric (DCPIP) assay are well-documented in literature to study AHL synthases. In this paper, we describe additional methods that include an HPLC-based, C-S bond cleavage and coupled assays to investigate this class of enzymes. In addition, we compare and contrast each assay for both acyl-CoA- and acyl-ACP-utilizing synthases. The expanded toolkit described in this study should facilitate mechanistic studies on quorum sensing signal synthases and expedite discovery of antivirulent compounds.

  12. Asymmetric Allylboration of Acyl Imines Catalyzed by Chiral Diols

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Sha; Moquist, Philip N.; Schaus, Scott E.

    2008-01-01

    Chiral BINOL-derived diols catalyze the enantioselective asymmetric allylboration of acyl imines. The reaction requires 15 mol% of (S)-3,3′-Ph2-BINOL as the catalyst and allyldiisopropoxyborane as the nucleophile. The reaction products are obtained in good yields (75 – 94%) and high enantiomeric ratios (95:5 – 99.5:0.5) for aromatic and aliphatic imines. High diastereoselectivities (dr > 98:2) and enantioselectivities (er > 98:2) are obtained in the reactions of acyl imines with crotyldiisopropoxyboranes. This asymmetric transformation is directly applied to the synthesis of maraviroc, the selective CCR5 antagonist with potent activity against HIV-1 infection. Mechanistic investigations of the allylboration reaction including IR, NMR, and mass spectrometry study indicate that acyclic boronates are activated by chiral diols via exchange of one of the boronate alkoxy groups with activation of the acyl imine via hydrogen bonding. PMID:18020334

  13. Identification of Unusual Phospholipid Fatty Acyl Compositions of Acanthamoeba castellanii

    PubMed Central

    Palusinska-Szysz, Marta; Kania, Magdalena; Turska-Szewczuk, Anna; Danikiewicz, Witold; Russa, Ryszard; Fuchs, Beate

    2014-01-01

    Acanthamoeba are opportunistic protozoan pathogens that may lead to sight-threatening keratitis and fatal granulomatous encephalitis. The successful prognosis requires early diagnosis and differentiation of pathogenic Acanthamoeba followed by aggressive treatment regimen. The plasma membrane of Acanthamoeba consists of 25% phospholipids (PL). The presence of C20 and, recently reported, 28- and 30-carbon fatty acyl residues is characteristic of amoeba PL. A detailed knowledge about this unusual PL composition could help to differentiate Acanthamoeba from other parasites, e.g. bacteria and develop more efficient treatment strategies. Therefore, the detailed PL composition of Acanthamoeba castellanii was investigated by 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, thin-layer chromatography, gas chromatography, high performance liquid chromatography and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Normal and reversed phase liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometric detection was used for detailed characterization of the fatty acyl composition of each detected PL. The most abundant fatty acyl residues in each PL class were octadecanoyl (18∶0), octadecenoyl (18∶1 Δ9) and hexadecanoyl (16∶0). However, some selected PLs contained also very long fatty acyl chains: the presence of 28- and 30-carbon fatty acyl residues was confirmed in phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylserine, phosphatidic acid and cardiolipin. The majority of these fatty acyl residues were also identified in PE that resulted in the following composition: 28∶1/20∶2, 30∶2/18∶1, 28∶0/20∶2, 30∶2/20∶4 and 30∶3/20∶3. The PL of amoebae are significantly different in comparison to other cells: we describe here for the first time unusual, very long chain fatty acids with Δ5-unsaturation (30∶35,21,24) and 30∶221,24 localized exclusively in specific phospholipid classes of A. castellanii protozoa that could serve as specific biomarkers for the presence of these

  14. Sphingomyelin interfacial behavior: the impact of changing acyl chain composition.

    PubMed Central

    Li, X M; Smaby, J M; Momsen, M M; Brockman, H L; Brown, R E

    2000-01-01

    Sphingomyelins (SMs) containing homogeneous acyl chains with 12, 14, 16, 18, 24, or 26 carbons were synthesized and characterized using an automated Langmuir-type film balance. Surface pressure was monitored as a function of lipid molecular area at constant temperatures between 10 degrees C and 30 degrees C. SM containing lauroyl (12:0) acyl chains displayed only liquid-expanded behavior. Increasing the length of the saturated acyl chain (e.g., 14:0, 16:0, or 18:0) resulted in liquid-expanded to condensed two-dimensional phase transitions at many temperatures in the 10-30 degrees C range. Similar behavior was observed for SMs with lignoceroyl (24:0) or (cerotoyl) 26:0 acyl chains, but isotherms showed only condensed behavior at 10 and 15 degrees C. Insights into the physico-mechanical in-plane interactions occurring within the different SM phases and accompanying changes in SM phase state were provided by analyzing the interfacial area compressibility moduli. At similar surface pressures, SM fluid phases were less compressible than those of phosphatidylcholines with similar chain structures. The area per molecule and compressibility of SM condensed phases depended upon the length of the saturated acyl chain and upon spreading temperature. Spreading of SMs with very long saturated acyl chains at temperatures 30-35 degrees below T(m) resulted in condensed films with lower in-plane compressibilities, but consistently larger cross-sectional molecular areas than the condensed phases achieved by spreading at temperatures only 10-20 degrees below T(m). This behavior is discussed in terms of the enhancement of SM lateral aggregation by temperature reduction, a common approach used during domain isolation from biomembranes. PMID:10733971

  15. Repurposing metformin: an old drug with new tricks in its binding pockets

    PubMed Central

    Pryor, Rosina; Cabreiro, Filipe

    2015-01-01

    Improvements in healthcare and nutrition have generated remarkable increases in life expectancy worldwide. This is one of the greatest achievements of the modern world yet it also presents a grave challenge: as more people survive into later life, more also experience the diseases of old age, including type 2 diabetes (T2D), cardiovascular disease (CVD) and cancer. Developing new ways to improve health in the elderly is therefore a top priority for biomedical research. Although our understanding of the molecular basis of these morbidities has advanced rapidly, effective novel treatments are still lacking. Alternative drug development strategies are now being explored, such as the repurposing of existing drugs used to treat other diseases. This can save a considerable amount of time and money since the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and safety profiles of these drugs are already established, effectively enabling preclinical studies to be bypassed. Metformin is one such drug currently being investigated for novel applications. The present review provides a thorough and detailed account of our current understanding of the molecular pharmacology and signalling mechanisms underlying biguanide–protein interactions. It also focuses on the key role of the microbiota in regulating age-associated morbidities and a potential role for metformin to modulate its function. Research in this area holds the key to solving many of the mysteries of our current understanding of drug action and concerted effects to provide sustained and long-life health. PMID:26475449

  16. Ligand binding pocket function of drosophila USP is necessary for metamorphosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The widely accepted paradigm that epoxidized methyl farnesoates (“juvenile hormones,” JHs) are the principle sesquiterpenoid hormones regulating insect metamorphosis was assessed in Drosophila melanogaster. GC-MS analysis showed that methyl farnesoate, rather than methyl epoxyfarnesoate (= JH III), ...

  17. Quantum chemical study of penicillin: Reactions after acylation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Rui; Feng, Dacheng; Zhu, Feng

    The density functional theory methods were used on the model molecules of penicillin to determine the possible reactions after their acylation on ?-lactamase, and the results were compared with sulbactam we have studied. The results show that, the acylated-enzyme tetrahedral intermediate can evolves with opening of ?-lactam ring as well as the thiazole ring; the thiazole ring-open products may be formed via ?-lactam ring-open product or from tetrahedral intermediate directly. Those products, in imine or enamine form, can tautomerize via hydrogen migration. In virtue of the water-assisted, their energy barriers are obviously reduced.

  18. Does widowhood explain gender differences in out-of-pocket medical spending among the elderly?

    PubMed

    Goda, Gopi Shah; Shoven, John B; Slavov, Sita Nataraj

    2013-05-01

    Despite the presence of Medicare, out-of-pocket medical spending is a large expenditure risk facing the elderly. While women live longer than men, elderly women incur higher out-of-pocket medical spending than men at each age. In this paper, we examine whether differences in marital status and living arrangements can explain this difference. We find that out-of-pocket medical spending is approximately 24 percent higher when an individual becomes widowed, a large portion of which is spending on nursing homes. Our results suggest a substantial role of living arrangements in out-of-pocket medical spending. Our estimates combined with differences in rates of widowhood across gender suggest that marital status can explain about one third of the gender difference in total out-of-pocket medical spending, leaving a large portion unexplained. On the other hand, gender differences in widowhood more than explain the observed gender difference in out-of-pocket spending on nursing homes.

  19. Novel approach in LC-MS/MS using MRM to generate a full profile of acyl-CoAs: discovery of acyl-dephospho-CoAs[S

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qingling; Zhang, Shenghui; Berthiaume, Jessica M.; Simons, Brigitte; Zhang, Guo-Fang

    2014-01-01

    A metabolomic approach to selectively profile all acyl-CoAs was developed using a programmed multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) method in LC-MS/MS and was employed in the analysis of various rat organs. The programmed MRM method possessed 300 mass ion transitions with the mass difference of 507 between precursor ion (Q1) and product ion (Q3), and the precursor ion started from m/z 768 and progressively increased one mass unit at each step. Acyl-dephospho-CoAs resulting from the dephosphorylation of acyl-CoAs were identified by accurate MS and fragmentation. Acyl-dephospho-CoAs were also quantitatively scanned by the MRM method with the mass difference of 427 between Q1 and Q3 mass ions. Acyl-CoAs and dephospho-CoAs were assayed with limits of detection ranging from 2 to 133 nM. The accuracy of the method was demonstrated by assaying a range of concentrations of spiked acyl-CoAs with the results of 80–114%. The distribution of acyl-CoAs reflects the metabolic status of each organ. The physiological role of dephosphorylation of acyl-CoAs remains to be further characterized. The methodology described herein provides a novel strategy in metabolomic studies to quantitatively and qualitatively profile all potential acyl-CoAs and acyl-dephospho-CoAs. PMID:24367045

  20. Copper(II)/amine synergistically catalyzed enantioselective alkylation of cyclic N-acyl hemiaminals with aldehydes.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shutao; Mao, Ying; Lou, Hongxiang; Liu, Lei

    2015-07-07

    The first catalytic asymmetric alkylation of N-acyl quinoliniums with aldehydes has been described. A copper/amine synergistic catalytic system has been developed, allowing the addition of functionalized aldehydes to a wide range of electronically varied N-acyl quinoliniums in good yields with excellent enantiocontrol. The synergistic catalytic system was also effective for N-acyl dihydroisoquinoliniums and β-caboliniums, demonstrating the general applicability of the protocol in the enantioselective alkylation of diverse cyclic N-acyl hemiaminals.

  1. The Level of Circulating Octanoate Does Not Predict Ghrelin O-Acyl Transferase (GOAT)-Mediated Acylation of Ghrelin During Fasting

    PubMed Central

    Nikolayev, Alexander; Liu, Jianhua; Pezzoli, Suzan S.; Farhy, Leon S.; Patrie, James; Gaylinn, Bruce D.; Heiman, Mark; Thorner, Michael O.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acyl-ghrelin is a 28-amino acid peptide released from the stomach. Ghrelin O-acyl transferase (GOAT) attaches an 8-carbon medium-chain fatty acid (MCFA) (octanoate) to serine 3 of ghrelin. This acylation is necessary for the activity of ghrelin. Animal data suggest that MCFAs provide substrate for GOAT and an increase in nutritional octanoate increases acyl-ghrelin. Objectives: To address the question of the source of substrate for acylation, we studied whether the decline in ghrelin acylation during fasting is associated with a decline in circulating MCFAs. Methods: Eight healthy young men (aged 18–28 years, body mass index range, 20.6–26.2 kg/m2) had blood drawn every 10 minutes for acyl- and desacyl-ghrelin and every hour for free fatty acids (FFAs) during the last 24 hours of a 61.5-hour fast and during a fed day. FFAs were measured by a highly sensitive liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy method. Acyl- and desacyl-ghrelin were measured in an in-house assay; the results were published previously. Ghrelin acylation was assessed by the ratio of acyl-ghrelin to total ghrelin. Results: With the exception of MCFAs C8 and C10, all other FFAs, the MCFAs (C6 and C12), and the long-chain fatty acids (C14–C18) significantly increased with fasting (P < .05). There was no significant association between the fold change in ghrelin acylation and circulating FFAs. Conclusions: These results suggest that changes in circulating MCFAs are not linked to the decline in ghrelin acylation during fasting and support the hypothesis that acylation of ghrelin depends at least partially on the availability of gastroluminal MCFAs or the regulation of GOAT activity. PMID:25337923

  2. A salt bridge turns off the foot-pocket in class-II HDACs.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jingwei; Yang, Zuolong; Zhang, Fan; Luo, Hai-Bin; Li, Min; Wu, Ruibo

    2016-08-21

    Histone Deacetylases (HDACs) are promising anticancer targets and several selective inhibitors have been created based on the architectural differences of foot-pockets among HDACs. However, the "gate-keeper" of foot-pockets is still controversial. Herein, it is for the first time revealed that a conserved R-E salt bridge plays a critical role in keeping foot-pockets closed in class-II HDACs by computational simulations. This finding is further substantiated by our mutagenesis experiments.

  3. The structure of haemoglobin bound to the haemoglobin receptor IsdH from Staphylococcus aureus shows disruption of the native α-globin haem pocket.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Claire F; Jacques, David A; Clubb, Robert T; Guss, J Mitchell; Gell, David A

    2015-06-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a common and serious cause of infection in humans. The bacterium expresses a cell-surface receptor that binds to, and strips haem from, human haemoglobin (Hb). The binding interface has previously been identified; however, the structural changes that promote haem release from haemoglobin were unknown. Here, the structure of the receptor-Hb complex is reported at 2.6 Å resolution, which reveals a conformational change in the α-globin F helix that disrupts the haem-pocket structure and alters the Hb quaternary interactions. These features suggest potential mechanisms by which the S. aureus Hb receptor induces haem release from Hb.

  4. Water-Restructuring Mutations Can Reverse the Thermodynamic Signature of Ligand Binding to Human Carbonic Anhydrase.

    PubMed

    Fox, Jerome M; Kang, Kyungtae; Sastry, Madhavi; Sherman, Woody; Sankaran, Banumathi; Zwart, Peter H; Whitesides, George M

    2017-03-27

    This study uses mutants of human carbonic anhydrase (HCAII) to examine how changes in the organization of water within a binding pocket can alter the thermodynamics of protein-ligand association. Results from calorimetric, crystallographic, and theoretical analyses suggest that most mutations strengthen networks of water-mediated hydrogen bonds and reduce binding affinity by increasing the enthalpic cost and, to a lesser extent, the entropic benefit of rearranging those networks during binding. The organization of water within a binding pocket can thus determine whether the hydrophobic interactions in which it engages are enthalpy-driven or entropy-driven. Our findings highlight a possible asymmetry in protein-ligand association by suggesting that, within the confines of the binding pocket of HCAII, binding events associated with enthalpically favorable rearrangements of water are stronger than those associated with entropically favorable ones.

  5. Crystal structure of auxin-binding protein 1 in complex with auxin

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Eui-Jeon; Marshall, Jacqueline; Bauly, James; Chen, Jin-Gui; Venis, Michael; Napier, Richard M.; Pickersgill, Richard W.

    2002-01-01

    The structure of auxin-binding protein 1 (ABP1) from maize has been determined at 1.9 Å resolution, revealing its auxin-binding site. The structure confirms that ABP1 belongs to the ancient and functionally diverse germin/seed storage 7S protein superfamily. The binding pocket of ABP1 is predominantly hydrophobic with a metal ion deep inside the pocket coordinated by three histidines and a glutamate. Auxin binds within this pocket, with its carboxylate binding the zinc and its aromatic ring binding hydrophobic residues including Trp151. There is a single disulfide between Cys2 and Cys155. No conformational rearrangement of ABP1 was observed when auxin bound to the protein in the crystal, but examination of the structure reveals a possible mechanism of signal transduction. PMID:12065401

  6. A Cerulenin Insensitive Short Chain 3-Ketoacyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Synthase in Spinacia oleracea Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Jaworski, Jan G.; Clough, Richard C.; Barnum, Susan R.

    1989-01-01

    A cerulenin insensitive 3-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthase has been assayed in extracts of spinach (Spinacia oleracea) leaf. The enzyme was active in the 40 to 80% ammonium sulfate precipitate of whole leaf homogenates and catalyzed the synthesis of acetoacetyl-acyl carrier protein. This condensation reaction was five-fold faster than acetyl-CoA:acyl carrier protein transacylase, and the initial rates of acyl-acyl carrier protein synthesis were independent of the presence of cerulenin. In the presence of fatty acid synthase cofactors and 100 micromolar cerulenin, the principal fatty acid product of de novo synthesis was butyric and hexanoic acids. Using conformationally sensitive native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis for separation, malonyl-, acetyl-, butyryl-, hexanoyl, and long chain acyl-acyl carrier proteins could be detected by immunoblotting and autoradiography. In the presence of 100 micromolar cerulenin, the accumulation of butyryl- and hexanoyl-acyl carrier protein was observed, with no detectable long chain acyl-acyl carrier proteins or fatty acids being produced. In the absence of cerulenin, the long chain acyl-acyl carrier proteins also accumulated. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:16666765

  7. Functionalized chitosan derivatives as nonviral vectors: physicochemical properties of acylated N,N,N-trimethyl chitosan/oligonucleotide nanopolyplexes.

    PubMed

    Santos, Joyce C C; Moreno, Pedro M D; Mansur, Alexandra A P; Leiro, Victoria; Mansur, Herman S; Pêgo, Ana Paula

    2015-11-07

    Cationic polymers have recently attracted attention due to their proven potential for nonviral gene delivery. In this study, we report novel biocompatible nanocomplexes produced using chemically functionalized N,N,N-trimethyl chitosan (TMC) with different N-acyl chain lengths (C5-C18) associated with single-stranded oligonucleotides. The TMC derivatives were synthesized by covalent coupling reactions of quaternized chitosan with n-pentanoic (C5), n-decanoic (C10), and n-octadecanoic (C18) fatty acids, which were extensively characterized by Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR). These N-acylated TMC derivatives (TMCn) were used as cationic polymeric matrices for encapsulating anionic 18-base single-stranded thiophosphorylated oligonucleotides (ssONs), leading to the formation of polyplexes further characterized by zeta potential (ZP), dynamic light scattering (DLS), binding affinity, transfection efficiency and in vitro cytotoxicity assays. The results demonstrated that the length of the grafted hydrophobic N-acyl chain and the relative amino:phosphate groups ratio (N/P ratio) between the TMC derivatives and ssON played crucial roles in determining the physicochemical properties of the obtained nanocomplexes. While none of the tested derivatives showed appreciable cytotoxicity, the type of acyl chain had a remarkable influence on the cell transfection capacity of TMC-ssON nanocomplexes with the derivatives based on stearic acid showing the best performance based on the results of in vitro assays using a model cell line expressing luciferase (HeLa/Luc705).

  8. Recrystallization of atomically balanced amorphous pockets in Si: A source of point defects

    SciTech Connect

    Marques, Luis A.; Pelaz, Lourdes; Lopez, Pedro; Santos, Ivan; Aboy, Maria

    2007-10-15

    We use classical molecular dynamics simulation techniques to study the regrowth behavior of amorphous pockets in Si. We demonstrate that crystallization depends on the morphology of the pocket-crystal interface. Although our simulated amorphous pockets had not any excess nor deficit of atoms with respect to perfect crystal, after regrowth we found residual defects. Most of them are single Si interstitials and vacancies, but also larger defects have been encountered. We have determined their atomic structures and calculated their formation energies. These complexes are more stable than amorphous pockets, and may trigger the formation of extended defects or favor damage accumulation.

  9. Exploitation of pocket gophers and their food caches by grizzly bears

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mattson, D.J.

    2004-01-01

    I investigated the exploitation of pocket gophers (Thomomys talpoides) by grizzly bears (Ursus arctos horribilis) in the Yellowstone region of the United States with the use of data collected during a study of radiomarked bears in 1977-1992. My analysis focused on the importance of pocket gophers as a source of energy and nutrients, effects of weather and site features, and importance of pocket gophers to grizzly bears in the western contiguous United States prior to historical extirpations. Pocket gophers and their food caches were infrequent in grizzly bear feces, although foraging for pocket gophers accounted for about 20-25% of all grizzly bear feeding activity during April and May. Compared with roots individually excavated by bears, pocket gopher food caches were less digestible but more easily dug out. Exploitation of gopher food caches by grizzly bears was highly sensitive to site and weather conditions and peaked during and shortly after snowmelt. This peak coincided with maximum success by bears in finding pocket gopher food caches. Exploitation was most frequent and extensive on gently sloping nonforested sites with abundant spring beauty (Claytonia lanceolata) and yampah (Perdieridia gairdneri). Pocket gophers are rare in forests, and spring beauty and yampah roots are known to be important foods of both grizzly bears and burrowing rodents. Although grizzly bears commonly exploit pocket gophers only in the Yellowstone region, this behavior was probably widespread in mountainous areas of the western contiguous United States prior to extirpations of grizzly bears within the last 150 years.

  10. Suppression of long chain acyl-CoA synthetase 3 decreases hepatic de novo fatty acid synthesis through decreased transcriptional activity.

    PubMed

    Bu, So Young; Mashek, Mara T; Mashek, Douglas G

    2009-10-30

    Long chain acyl-CoA synthetases (ACSL) and fatty acid transport proteins (FATP) activate fatty acids to acyl-CoAs in the initial step of fatty acid metabolism. Numerous isoforms of ACSL and FATP exist with different tissue distribution patterns, intracellular locations, and substrate preferences, suggesting that each isoform has distinct functions in channeling fatty acids into different metabolic pathways. Because fatty acids, acyl-CoAs, and downstream lipid metabolites regulate various transcription factors that control hepatic energy metabolism, we hypothesized that ACSL or FATP isoforms differentially regulate hepatic gene expression. Using small interference RNA (siRNA), we knocked down each liver-specific ACSL and FATP isoform in rat primary hepatocyte cultures and subsequently analyzed reporter gene activity of numerous transcription factors and performed quantitative mRNA analysis of their target genes. Compared with control cells, which were transfected with control siRNA, knockdown of acyl-CoA synthetase 3 (ACSL3) significantly decreased reporter gene activity of several lipogenic transcription factors such as peroxisome proliferator activation receptor-gamma, carbohydrate-responsive element-binding protein, sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c, and liver X receptor-alpha and the expression of their target genes. These findings were further supported by metabolic labeling studies that showed [1-(14)C]acetate incorporation into lipid extracts was decreased in cells treated with ACSL3 siRNAs and that ACSL3 expression is up-regulated in ob/ob mice and mice fed a high sucrose diet. ACSL3 knockdown decreased total acyl-CoA synthetase activity without substantially altering the expression of other ACSL isoforms. In summary, these results identify a novel role for ACSL3 in mediating transcriptional control of hepatic lipogenesis.

  11. Structure of apo acyl carrier protein and a proposal to engineer protein crystallization through metal ions

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, Xiayang; Janson, Cheryl A.

    2010-11-16

    A topic of current interest is engineering surface mutations in order to improve the success rate of protein crystallization. This report explores the possibility of using metal-ion-mediated crystal-packing interactions to facilitate rational design. Escherichia coli apo acyl carrier protein was chosen as a test case because of its high content of negatively charged carboxylates suitable for metal binding with moderate affinity. The protein was successfully crystallized in the presence of zinc ions. The crystal structure was determined to 1.1 {angstrom} resolution with MAD phasing using anomalous signals from the co-crystallized Zn{sup 2+} ions. The case study suggested an integrated strategy for crystallization and structure solution of proteins via engineering surface Asp and Glu mutants, crystallizing them in the presence of metal ions such as Zn{sup 2+} and solving the structures using anomalous signals.

  12. Airplane stability calculations with a card programmable pocket calculator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherman, W. L.

    1978-01-01

    Programs are presented for calculating airplane stability characteristics with a card programmable pocket calculator. These calculations include eigenvalues of the characteristic equations of lateral and longitudinal motion as well as stability parameters such as the time to damp to one-half amplitude or the damping ratio. The effects of wind shear are included. Background information and the equations programmed are given. The programs are written for the International System of Units, the dimensional form of the stability derivatives, and stability axes. In addition to programs for stability calculations, an unusual and short program is included for the Euler transformation of coordinates used in airplane motions. The programs have been written for a Hewlett Packard HP-67 calculator. However, the use of this calculator does not constitute an endorsement of the product by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  13. Ductal carcinoma of the breast in the pacemaker generator's pocket.

    PubMed

    Zonca, P; Herokova, J; Cambal, M; Jacobi, C A

    2009-01-01

    Authors present a case of a 78-year-old female patient with invasive ductal adenocarcinoma in the pacemaker, s pocket. A decubitus-like tumor had developed in this place, and has been missinterpretated as a benign lesion for 5 months. Diagnosis was done with a time delay. An excisional biopsy revealed annvasive ductal adenocarcinoma. The first step was the implantation of a new pacemaker generator performed on the opposite side. The second step was a modified radical mastectomy, according to Madden, and the removal of the originally implanted pacemaker generator. Radiotherapy and hormonal adjuvant therapy were applied after surgery. The patient was followed-up at an out-patient clinic, and died 25 months after diagnosis because of generalization of the disease (Fig. 2, Ref. 35). Full Text (Free, PDF) www.bmj.sk.

  14. Dynamics of biomolecules, ligand binding & biological functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Myunggi

    Proteins are flexible and dynamic. One static structure alone does not often completely explain biological functions of the protein, and some proteins do not even have high resolution structures. In order to provide better understanding to the biological functions of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, Diphtheria toxin repressor and M2 proton channel, the dynamics of these proteins are investigated using molecular modeling and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. With absence of high resolution structure of alpha7 receptor, the homology models of apo and cobra toxin bound forms have been built. From the MD simulations of these model structures, we observed one subunit of apo simulation moved away from other four subunits. With local movement of flexible loop regions, the whole subunit tilted clockwise. These conformational changes occurred spontaneously, and were strongly correlated with the conformational change when the channel is activated by agonists. Unlike other computational studies, we directly compared our model of open conformation with the experimental data. However, the subunits of toxin bound form were stable, and conformational change is restricted by the bound cobra toxin. These results provide activation and inhibition mechanisms of alpha7 receptors and a possible explanation for intermediate conductance of the channel. Intramolecular complex of SH3-like domain with a proline-rich (Pr) peptide segment in Diphtheria toxin repressor (DtxR) is stabilized in inactive state. Upon activation of DtxR by transition metal binding, this intramolecular complex should be dissociated. The dynamics of this intramolecular complex is investigated using MD simulations and NMR spectroscopy. We observed spontaneous opening and closing motions of the Pr segment binding pockets in both Pr-SH3 and SH3 simulations. The MD simulation results and NMR relaxation data suggest that the Pr segment exhibits a binding ↔ unbinding equilibrium. Despite a wealth of experimental

  15. RND type efflux pump system MexAB-OprM of pseudomonas aeruginosa selects bacterial languages, 3-oxo-acyl-homoserine lactones, for cell-to-cell communication

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Bacteria release a wide variety of small molecules including cell-to-cell signaling compounds. Gram-negative bacteria use a variety of self-produced autoinducers such as acylated homoserine lactones (acyl-HSLs) as signal compounds for quorum sensing (QS) within and between bacterial species. QS plays a significant role in the pathogenesis of infectious diseases and in beneficial symbiosis by responding to acyl-HSLs in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. It is considered that the selection of bacterial languages is necessary to regulate gene expression and thus it leads to the regulation of virulence and provides a growth advantage in several environments. In this study, we hypothesized that RND-type efflux pump system MexAB-OprM of P. aeruginosa might function in the selection of acyl-HSLs, and we provide evidence to support this hypothesis. Results Loss of MexAB-OprM due to deletion of mexB caused increases in QS responses, as shown by the expression of gfp located downstream of the lasB promoter and LasB elastase activity, which is regulated by a LasR-3-oxo-C12-HSL complex. Either complementation with a plasmid containing wild-type mexB or the addition of a LasR-specific inhibitor, patulin, repressed these high responses to 3-oxo-acyl-HSLs. Furthermore, it was shown that the acyl-HSLs-dependent response of P. aeruginosa was affected by the inhibition of MexB transport activity and the mexB mutant. The P. aeruginosa MexAB-OprM deletion mutant showed a strong QS response to 3-oxo-C10-HSL produced by Vibrio anguillarum in a bacterial cross-talk experiment. Conclusion This work demonstrated that MexAB-OprM does not control the binding of LasR to 3-oxo-Cn-HSLs but rather accessibility of non-cognate acyl-HSLs to LasR in P. aeruginosa. MexAB-OprM not only influences multidrug resistance, but also selects acyl-HSLs and regulates QS in P. aeruginosa. The results demonstrate a new QS regulation mechanism via the efflux system MexAB-OprM in P. aeruginosa. PMID:22574700

  16. Acyl migration kinetics of vegetable oil 1,2-diacylglycerols

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The acyl migration kinetics of long-chain 1,2-diacylglycerol (1,2-DAG) to form 1,3-diacylglycerol (1,3-DAG) over the temperature range of 25 to 80 degrees Celsius were examined using proton NMR spectroscopy. The 1,2-DAG mole fraction of 0.32 at equilibrium was found to be insensitive to temperature...

  17. One-Step Conversion of Methyl Ketones to Acyl Chlorides.

    PubMed

    Zaragoza, Florencio

    2015-10-16

    Treatment of aromatic and heteroaromatic methyl ketones with sulfur monochloride and catalytic amounts of pyridine in refluxing chlorobenzene leads to the formation of acyl chlorides. Both electron-rich and electron-poor aryl methyl ketones can be used as starting materials. The resulting C1-byproduct depends on the precise reaction conditions chosen.

  18. Lubricity characteristics of seed oils modified by acylation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chemically modified seed oils via acylation of epoxidized and polyhydroxylated derivatives were investigated for their potential as candidates for lubrication. The native oil was preliminarily epoxidized and ring-opened in a one-pot reaction using formic acid-H2O2 followed by aqueous HCl treatment t...

  19. Mechanistic studies of malonic acid-mediated in situ acylation.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Koushik; Naoum, Johnny N; Roy, Tapta Kanchan; Gilon, Chaim; Gerber, R Benny; Friedler, Assaf

    2015-09-01

    We have previously introduced an easy to perform, cost-effective and highly efficient acetylation technique for solid phase synthesis (SPPS). Malonic acid is used as a precursor and the reaction proceeds via a reactive ketene that acetylates the target amine. Here we present a detailed mechanistic study of the malonic acid-mediated acylation. The influence of reaction conditions, peptide sequence and reagents was systematically studied. Our results show that the methodology can be successfully applied to different types of peptides and nonpeptidic molecules irrespective of their structure, sequence, or conformation. Using alkyl, phenyl, and benzyl malonic acid, we synthesized various acyl peptides with almost quantitative yields. The ketenes obtained from the different malonic acid derived precursors were characterized by in situ (1) H-NMR. The reaction proceeded in short reaction times and resulted in excellent yields when using uronium-based coupling agents, DIPEA as a base, DMF/DMSO/NMP as solvents, Rink amide/Wang/Merrifield resins, temperature of 20°C, pH 8-12 and 5 min preactivation at inert atmosphere. The reaction was unaffected by Lewis acids, transition metal ions, surfactants, or salt. DFT studies support the kinetically favorable concerted mechanism for CO2 and ketene formation that leads to the thermodynamically stable acylated products. We conclude that the malonic acid-mediated acylation is a general method applicable to various target molecules.

  20. Crystal structure of the essential Mycobacterium tuberculosis phosphopantetheinyl transferase PptT, solved as a fusion protein with maltose binding protein.

    PubMed

    Jung, James; Bashiri, Ghader; Johnston, Jodie M; Brown, Alistair S; Ackerley, David F; Baker, Edward N

    2014-12-01

    Phosphopantetheinyl transferases (PPTases) are key enzymes in the assembly-line production of complex molecules such as fatty acids, polyketides and polypeptides, where they activate acyl or peptidyl carrier proteins, transferring a 4'-phosphopantetheinyl moiety from coenzyme A (CoA) to a reactive serine residue on the carrier protein. The human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis encodes two PPTases, both essential and therefore attractive drug targets. We report the structure of the type-II PPTase PptT, obtained from crystals of a fusion protein with maltose binding protein. The structure, at 1.75Å resolution (R=0.156, Rfree=0.191), reveals an α/β fold broadly similar to other type-II PPTases, but with differences in peripheral structural elements. A bound CoA is clearly defined with its pantetheinyl arm tucked into a hydrophobic pocket. Interactions involving the CoA diphosphate, bound Mg(2+) and three active site acidic side chains suggest a plausible pathway for proton transfer during catalysis.

  1. A new role for penicillin acylases: degradation of acyl homoserine lactone quorum sensing signals by Kluyvera citrophila penicillin G acylase.

    PubMed

    Mukherji, Ruchira; Varshney, Nishant Kumar; Panigrahi, Priyabrata; Suresh, C G; Prabhune, Asmita

    2014-03-05

    Use of penicillin acylases for the production of semi-synthetic penicillins is well-known. Escherichia coli penicillin G acylase (EcPGA) has been extensively used for this purpose; however, Kluyvera citrophila penicillin G acylase (KcPGA) is assumed to be a better substitute, owing to its increased resilience to extreme pH conditions and ease of immobilization. In the present article we report a new dimension for the amidase activity of KcPGA by demonstrating its ability to cleave bacterial quorum sensing signal molecules, acyl homoserine lactones (AHL) with acyl chain length of 6-8 with or without oxo-substitution at third carbon position. Initial evidence of AHL degrading capability of KcPGA was obtained using CV026 based bioassay method. Kinetic studies performed at pH 8.0 and 50 °C revealed 3-oxo-C6 HSL to be the best substrate for the enzyme with V(max) and K(m) values of 21.37+0.85 mM/h/mg of protein and 0.1+0.01 mM, respectively. C6 HSL was found to be the second best substrate with V(max) and K(m) value of 10.06+0.27 mM/h/mg of protein and 0.28+0.02 mM, respectively. Molecular modeling and docking studies performed on the active site of the enzyme support these findings by showing the fitting of AHLs perfectly within the hydrophobic pocket of the enzyme active site.

  2. Ethanol Metabolism Modifies Hepatic Protein Acylation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Fritz, Kristofer S.; Green, Michelle F.; Petersen, Dennis R.; Hirschey, Matthew D.

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial protein acetylation increases in response to chronic ethanol ingestion in mice, and is thought to reduce mitochondrial function and contribute to the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease. The mitochondrial deacetylase SIRT3 regulates the acetylation status of several mitochondrial proteins, including those involved in ethanol metabolism. The newly discovered desuccinylase activity of the mitochondrial sirtuin SIRT5 suggests that protein succinylation could be an important post-translational modification regulating mitochondrial metabolism. To assess the possible role of protein succinylation in ethanol metabolism, we surveyed hepatic sub-cellular protein fractions from mice fed a control or ethanol-supplemented diet for succinyl-lysine, as well as acetyl-, propionyl-, and butyryl-lysine post-translational modifications. We found mitochondrial protein propionylation increases, similar to mitochondrial protein acetylation. In contrast, mitochondrial protein succinylation is reduced. These mitochondrial protein modifications appear to be primarily driven by ethanol metabolism, and not by changes in mitochondrial sirtuin levels. Similar trends in acyl modifications were observed in the nucleus. However, comparatively fewer acyl modifications were observed in the cytoplasmic or the microsomal compartments, and were generally unchanged by ethanol metabolism. Using a mass spectrometry proteomics approach, we identified several candidate acetylated, propionylated, and succinylated proteins, which were enriched using antibodies against each modification. Additionally, we identified several acetyl and propionyl lysine residues on the same sites for a number of proteins and supports the idea of the overlapping nature of lysine-specific acylation. Thus, we show that novel post-translational modifications are present in hepatic mitochondrial, nuclear, cytoplasmic, and microsomal compartments and ethanol ingestion, and its associated metabolism, induce specific

  3. Activation of Exogenous Fatty Acids to Acyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Cannot Bypass FabI Inhibition in Neisseria*

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jiangwei; Bruhn, David F.; Frank, Matthew W.; Lee, Richard E.; Rock, Charles O.

    2016-01-01

    Neisseria is a Gram-negative pathogen with phospholipids composed of straight chain saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids, the ability to incorporate exogenous fatty acids, and lipopolysaccharides that are not essential. The FabI inhibitor, AFN-1252, was deployed as a chemical biology tool to determine whether Neisseria can bypass the inhibition of fatty acid synthesis by incorporating exogenous fatty acids. Neisseria encodes a functional FabI that was potently inhibited by AFN-1252. AFN-1252 caused a dose-dependent inhibition of fatty acid synthesis in growing Neisseria, a delayed inhibition of growth phenotype, and minimal inhibition of DNA, RNA, and protein synthesis, showing that its mode of action is through inhibiting fatty acid synthesis. Isotopic fatty acid labeling experiments showed that Neisseria encodes the ability to incorporate exogenous fatty acids into its phospholipids by an acyl-acyl carrier protein-dependent pathway. However, AFN-1252 remained an effective antibacterial when Neisseria were supplemented with exogenous fatty acids. These results demonstrate that extracellular fatty acids are activated by an acyl-acyl carrier protein synthetase (AasN) and validate type II fatty acid synthesis (FabI) as a therapeutic target against Neisseria. PMID:26567338

  4. Rates of thrombin acylation and deacylation upon reaction with low molecular weight acylating agents, carbamylating agents and carbonylating agents.

    PubMed

    Brown, A D; Powers, J C

    1995-08-01

    Acylated derivatives of thrombin have been made using low molecular weight acylating agents, carbamylating agents and carbonylating agents. The compounds used to acylate the active site serine include isatoic anhydrides, benzoxazinones, benzylisocyanate, N-(benzylcarbonyloxy)succinimide and p-(dimethylamino)benzoylimidazolide. The rates of acylation and deacylation were determined. The best overall inhibitors of thrombin are 2-ethoxy-4H-3,1-benzoxazin-4-one, isatoic anhydride and tert-butyl-2,4-dioxo-2H-3,1-benzoxazine-1(4H)-acetate, which have k2/Ki values of 52,700 M-1s-1, 48,900 M-1s-1 and 5400 M-1s-1, respectively. The carbamyl derivative of thrombin formed with benzylisocyanate had the slowest rate of deacylation (2.3 x 10(-7) s-1), while the ester derivative formed with 2-(N,N-dimethylamino)methylimino-4H-3,1-benzoxazin-4-one had the fastest rate of deacylation (1.9 x 10(-4) s-1).

  5. Palmitoyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) thioesterase and the evolutionary origin of plant acyl-ACP thioesterases.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, A; Davies, H M; Voelker, T A

    1995-01-01

    Acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) thioesterases play an essential role in chain termination during de novo fatty acid synthesis and in the channeling of carbon flux between the two lipid biosynthesis pathways in plants. We have discovered that there are two distinct but related thioesterase gene classes in higher plants, termed FatA and FatB, whose evolutionary divergence appears to be ancient. FatA encodes the already described 18:1-ACP thioesterase. In contrast, FatB representatives encode thioesterases preferring acyl-ACPs having saturated acyl groups. We unexpectedly obtained a 16:0-ACP thioesterase cDNA from Cuphea hookeriana seed, which accumulate predominantly 8:0 and 10:0. The 16:0 thioesterase transcripts were found in non-seed tissues, and expression in transgenic Brassica napus led to the production of a 16:0-rich oil. We present evidence that this type of FatB gene is ancient and ubiquitous in plants and that specialized plant medium-chain thioesterases have evolved independently from such enzymes several times during angiosperm evolution. Also, the ubiquitous 18:1-ACP thioesterase appears to be a derivative of a 16:0 thioesterase. PMID:7734968

  6. Transcriptional regulation of Sox2 by the retinoblastoma family of pocket proteins

    PubMed Central

    Carneiro, Carmen; Morey, Lluis; Silva-Álvarez, Sabela Da; Fernandes, Tânia; Abad, María; Croce, Luciano Di; García-Caballero, Tomás; Serrano, Manuel; Rivas, Carmen; Vidal, Anxo; Collado, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Cellular reprogramming to iPSCs has uncovered unsuspected links between tumor suppressors and pluripotency factors. Using this system, it was possible to identify tumor suppressor p27 as a repressor of Sox2 during differentiation. This led to the demonstration that defects in the repression of Sox2 can contribute to tumor development. The members of the retinoblastoma family of pocket proteins, pRb, p107 and p130, are negative regulators of the cell cycle with tumor suppressor activity and with roles in differentiation. In this work we studied the relative contribution of the retinoblastoma family members to the regulation of Sox2 expression. We found that deletion of Rb or p130 leads to impaired repression of Sox2, a deffect amplified by inactivation of p53. We also identified binding of pRb and p130 to an enhancer with crucial regulatory activity on Sox2 expression. Using cellular reprogramming we tested the impact of the defective repression of Sox2 and confirmed that Rb deficiency allows the generation of iPSCs in the absence of exogenous Sox2. Finally, partial depletion of Sox2 positive cells reduced the pituitary tumor development initiated by Rb loss in vivo. In summary, our results show that Sox2 repression by pRb is a relevant mechanism of tumor suppression. PMID:25576924

  7. Effects of protein conformation in docking: improved pose prediction through protein pocket adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Ajay N.

    2009-06-01

    Computational methods for docking ligands have been shown to be remarkably dependent on precise protein conformation, where acceptable results in pose prediction have been generally possible only in the artificial case of re-docking a ligand into a protein binding site whose conformation was determined in the presence of the same ligand (the "cognate" docking problem). In such cases, on well curated protein/ligand complexes, accurate dockings can be returned as top-scoring over 75% of the time using tools such as Surflex-Dock. A critical application of docking in modeling for lead optimization requires accurate pose prediction for novel ligands, ranging from simple synthetic analogs to very different molecular scaffolds. Typical results for widely used programs in the "cross-docking case" (making use of a single fixed protein conformation) have rates closer to 20% success. By making use of protein conformations from multiple complexes, Surflex-Dock yields an average success rate of 61% across eight pharmaceutically relevant targets. Following docking, protein pocket adaptation and rescoring identifies single pose families that are correct an average of 67% of the time. Consideration of the best of two pose families (from alternate scoring regimes) yields a 75% mean success rate.

  8. Effects of protein conformation in docking: improved pose prediction through protein pocket adaptation.

    PubMed

    Jain, Ajay N

    2009-06-01

    Computational methods for docking ligands have been shown to be remarkably dependent on precise protein conformation, where acceptable results in pose prediction have been generally possible only in the artificial case of re-docking a ligand into a protein binding site whose conformation was determined in the presence of the same ligand (the "cognate" docking problem). In such cases, on well curated protein/ligand complexes, accurate dockings can be returned as top-scoring over 75% of the time using tools such as Surflex-Dock. A critical application of docking in modeling for lead optimization requires accurate pose prediction for novel ligands, ranging from simple synthetic analogs to very different molecular scaffolds. Typical results for widely used programs in the "cross-docking case" (making use of a single fixed protein conformation) have rates closer to 20% success. By making use of protein conformations from multiple complexes, Surflex-Dock yields an average success rate of 61% across eight pharmaceutically relevant targets. Following docking, protein pocket adaptation and rescoring identifies single pose families that are correct an average of 67% of the time. Consideration of the best of two pose families (from alternate scoring regimes) yields a 75% mean success rate.

  9. Modeling the met form of human tyrosinase: a refined and hydrated pocket for antagonist design.

    PubMed

    Favre, Elisabeth; Daina, Antoine; Carrupt, Pierre-Alain; Nurisso, Alessandra

    2014-08-01

    Tyrosinases are type 3 copper proteins involved in melanin biosynthesis, responsible for skin and hair color in mammals. To steer tyrosinase inhibitor discovery for therapeutic and cosmetic purposes, structural information about human tyrosinase is necessary. As this protein has never been crystallized so far, we derived a robust homology model built using structural information from Streptomyces castaneoglobisporus and Ipomea batata catecholoxidase enzymes. The active site containing two copper atoms in co-ordination with six histidine residues was refined through an optimization protocol based on molecular mechanics parameters for copper co-ordination and charges calculated by quantum mechanics methods. Five structural water molecules and a hydroxyl ion were found to be essential for optimization. The superimposition of the human homology model on crystallographic structures of tyrosinases from other species revealed similar overall backbone topologies, active site conformations, and conserved water molecules. Phenylthiourea (PTU), the tyrosinase inhibitor of reference, was then docked into the solvated human active pocket. A binding mode consistent with crystallographic information was obtained. Taken together, these findings demonstrated that the human tyrosinase model, deposited in the Protein Model Database, is a reliable structure for future rational inhibitor design projects.

  10. Characteristics and tolerances of the pocket mouse and incidence of disease. [CNS lesions during space flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindberg, R. G.; Kraft, L. M.; Simmonds, R. C.; Bailey, O. T.; Dunlap, W. A.; Haymaker, W.

    1975-01-01

    Studies carried out on the pocket mouse colony on Apollo XVII are reported. They revealed no serological evidence of viral disease, no pathogenic enterobacteria or respiratory Mycoplasma on culture, a 25% incidence of sarcosporidiosis, and a 2% incidence of chronic meningitis or meningoencephalitis. It is concluded that the pocket mouse is a highly adaptive animal and very well-suited to space flight.

  11. The Role of Electronic Pocket Dictionaries as an English Learning Tool among Chinese Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jian, Hua-Li; Sandnes, Frode Eika; Law, Kris M. Y.; Huang, Yo-Ping; Huang, Yueh-Min

    2009-01-01

    This study addressed the role of electronic pocket dictionaries as a language learning tool among university students in Hong Kong and Taiwan. The target groups included engineering and humanities students at both undergraduate and graduate level. Speed of reference was found to be the main motivator for using an electronic pocket dictionary.…

  12. 77 FR 73769 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Listing Four Subspecies of Mazama Pocket Gopher...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-11

    ...We, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, propose to list four subspecies of Mazama pocket gopher (Olympia, Tenino, Yelm, and Roy Prairie) as threatened species under the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended (Act). We additionally propose to designate critical habitat for these subspecies. We have determined that the Tacoma pocket gopher is extinct, and that the listing of three other......

  13. Planview Geometry and morphological characteristics of pocket beaches on the Catalan coast (Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, D.; Guillén, J.; López, L.; Pellegrino, V.

    2009-07-01

    Coastal planform studies are a relevant initial stage before launching detailed dynamic field experiments. The aim of this study is to define the planform characteristics of 72 Catalan pocket beaches, natural and man-made, and to determine their sheltering effect, embaymentization and their status of equilibrium. Planform measurements were performed on SIGPAC, 1:5000 orthophoto sets and wave climate was provided by Puertos del Estado (Wana model). Planform parameters were applied and coastal planview indexes were determined. The study shows that the Catalan pocket beaches display a wide range of indentation, suggesting that no single structural, tectonic or morphological control dominates their planform. The man-made pocket beaches typically display indentations which are smaller than those shown by natural pocket beaches. Headland spacing and beach area are positively correlated. The more indented bays are, the shorter their beaches become. Low-indented pocket beaches are the widest and the longest ones. Deep indentation contributes towards beach protection and energy dissipation which counteracts rip efficiency and inhibits the formation of mega-rips. Pocket beaches often show gradual and moderate alongshore changes in texture and beach morphology. One third of the Catalan pocket beaches are "sediment starved", i.e., 60% and more of their embayed shorelines are deprived of beach sediments. Examination of the status of equilibrium demonstrates that most of the Catalan pocket beaches are in an unstable mode, with indentation ratios that are unrelated to the wave obliquity.

  14. Theory and simulation of diffusion-influenced, stochastically gated ligand binding to buried sites

    PubMed Central

    Barreda, Jorge L.; Zhou, Huan-Xiang

    2011-01-01

    We consider the diffusion-influenced rate coefficient of ligand binding to a site located in a deep pocket on a protein; the binding pocket is flexible and can reorganize in response to ligand entrance. We extend to this flexible protein-ligand system a formalism developed previously [A. M. Berezhkovskii, A, Szabo, and H.-X. Zhou, J. Chem. Phys. 135, 075103 (2011)10.1063/1.3609973] for breaking the ligand-binding problem into an exterior problem and an interior problem. Conformational fluctuations of a bottleneck or a lid and the binding site are modeled as stochastic gating. We present analytical and Brownian dynamics simulation results for the case of a cylindrical pocket containing a binding site at the bottom. Induced switch, whereby the conformation of the protein adapts to the incoming ligand, leads to considerable rate enhancement. PMID:22010732

  15. Circadian periodicity of resistance to ionizing radiation in the pocket mouse.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindberg, R. G.; Hayden, P.; Gambino, J. J.

    1971-01-01

    Investigation of the response of pocket mice to Co 60 irradiation delivered at two times of day - namely, the predicted high and low points of the metabolic rate. The validity of torpor as an assay of the circadian period of body temperature in pocket mice and as a basis for selecting irradiation times is examined. A study is made of the mitotic activity in the pocket mouse intestinal epithelium as an example of a physiological rhythm which might influence radiation sensitivity. The results of tests in which pocket mice were exposed to ionizing radiation at two different times of day are cited. It is found that under the investigated conditions pocket mice irradiated during their metabolically active period (2330 hr) live significantly longer than those irradiated while their metabolic rate is low (0900 hr).

  16. Micro-Pocket Fission Detectors (MPFD) For Fuel Assembly Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Troy Unruh; Michael Reichenberger; Phillip Ugorowski

    2013-09-01

    Neutron sensors capable of real-time measurement of thermal flux, fast flux, and temperature in a single miniaturized probe are needed in irradiation tests required to demonstrate the performance of candidate new fuels, and cladding materials. In-core ceramic-based miniature neutron detectors or “Micro-Pocket Fission Detectors” (MPFDs) have been studied at Kansas State University (KSU). The first MPFD prototypes were tested in various neutron fields at the KSU TRIGA research reactor with successful results. Currently, a United States Department of Energy-sponsored joint KSU/Idaho National Laboratory (INL) effort is underway to develop a high-temperature, high-pressure version of the MPFD using radiation-resistant, high temperature materials, which would be capable of withstanding irradiation test conditions in high performance material and test reactors (MTRs). Ultimately, this more compact, more accurate, and longer lifetime flux sensor for critical mock-ups, existing and advanced reactor designs, high performance MTRs, and transient test reactors has the potential to lead to higher accuracy and resolution data from irradiation testing, more detailed core flux measurements and enhanced fuel assembly processing. Prior evaluations by KSU indicate that these sensors could also be used to monitor burn-up of nuclear fuel. If integrated into nuclear fuel assemblies, MPFDs offer several advantages to current spent fuel management systems.

  17. Temporal patterns in seedling establishment on pocket gopher disturbances.

    PubMed

    Forbis, Tara A; Larmore, Jason; Addis, Elizabeth

    2004-01-01

    Disturbances often facilitate seedling establishment, and can change the species composition of a community by increasing recruitment of disturbance-adapted species. To understand the effects of pocket gopher disturbances on alpine seedling dynamics, we examined the gopher disturbances' effects on seedling emergence and survival on gopher disturbances 0 to 5 years old. In contrast to results from most other ecosystems, these recently created gopher mounds had lower seedling emergence and survival rates than undisturbed areas. A lack of correlation between species' abundances on gopher mounds and undisturbed sites in one of the two communities studied suggested that a suite of disturbance-adapted species recruited onto the mounds. To explain low seedling emergence on recent gopher mounds, we quantified gopher mound seed banks and studied recruitment in a site with mounds that ranged from 0 to >20 years old. Seed numbers in first-year gopher mound soils were extremely low relative to undisturbed soils, and this pattern was mirrored in seedling establishment patterns over the long term. Gopher disturbance depressed seedling emergence density for the first 5 years. Subsequently, emergence density increased until at least 20 years following the disturbance. Emergence on disturbances more than 20 years old was higher than on undisturbed sites. Therefore, gopher disturbances probably facilitate seedling establishment in alpine dry and moist meadow; however, this process takes place over decades.

  18. Inertial Pocket Navigation System: Unaided 3D Positioning

    PubMed Central

    Munoz Diaz, Estefania

    2015-01-01

    Inertial navigation systems use dead-reckoning to estimate the pedestrian's position. There are two types of pedestrian dead-reckoning, the strapdown algorithm and the step-and-heading approach. Unlike the strapdown algorithm, which consists of the double integration of the three orthogonal accelerometer readings, the step-and-heading approach lacks the vertical displacement estimation. We propose the first step-and-heading approach based on unaided inertial data solving 3D positioning. We present a step detector for steps up and down and a novel vertical displacement estimator. Our navigation system uses the sensor introduced in the front pocket of the trousers, a likely location of a smartphone. The proposed algorithms are based on the opening angle of the leg or pitch angle. We analyzed our step detector and compared it with the state-of-the-art, as well as our already proposed step length estimator. Lastly, we assessed our vertical displacement estimator in a real-world scenario. We found that our algorithms outperform the literature step and heading algorithms and solve 3D positioning using unaided inertial data. Additionally, we found that with the pitch angle, five activities are distinguishable: standing, sitting, walking, walking up stairs and walking down stairs. This information complements the pedestrian location and is of interest for applications, such as elderly care. PMID:25897501

  19. Results of ear examination. [in Apollo 17 BIOCORE pocket mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haymaker, W.; Leon, H. A.; Barrows, W. F.; Suri, K.; Kraft, L. M.; Turnbill, C. E.; Webster, D. B.; Ashley, W. W.; Look, B. C.; Simmonds, R. C.

    1975-01-01

    In the five pocket mice flown on Apollo XVII, no evidence was found that the inner ear had been damaged, though poor fixation precluded detailed study. On the other hand, the middle ear cavity was involved in all the mice, hemorrhage having occurred in response to excursions in pressure within the canister that housed the mice during their flight. The same occurred in flight control mice which had been subjected to pressure excursions of much the same magnitude. A greater degree of exudation into air cells and greater leukotaxis were noted in the flight animals than in the control animals. There was no increase in leukocyte population along the paths of the 23 cosmic-ray particles registered in the subscalp dosimeters that traversed the middle ear cavities of the flight mice. The increased exudation and the greater response by leukocytes in the flight mice may have been causally related to the lesions found in their olfactory mucosa but there were no data in support of this possibility.

  20. RBP1 Recruits the mSIN3-Histone Deacetylase Complex to the Pocket of Retinoblastoma Tumor Suppressor Family Proteins Found in Limited Discrete Regions of the Nucleus at Growth Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Albert; Kennedy, Brian K.; Barbie, David A.; Bertos, Nicholas R.; Yang, Xiang Jiao; Theberge, Marie-Christine; Tsai, Shih-Chang; Seto, Edward; Zhang, Yi; Kuzmichev, Andrei; Lane, William S.; Reinberg, Danny; Harlow, Ed; Branton, Philip E.

    2001-01-01

    Retinoblastoma (RB) tumor suppressor family pocket proteins induce cell cycle arrest by repressing transcription of E2F-regulated genes through both histone deacetylase (HDAC)-dependent and -independent mechanisms. In this study we have identified a stable complex that accounts for the recruitment of both repression activities to the pocket. One component of this complex is RBP1, a known pocket-binding protein that exhibits both HDAC-dependent and -independent repression functions. RB family proteins were shown to associate via the pocket with previously identified mSIN3-SAP30-HDAC complexes containing exclusively class I HDACs. Such enzymes do not interact directly with RB family proteins but rather utilize RBP1 to target the pocket. This mechanism was shown to account for the majority of RB-associated HDAC activity. We also show that in quiescent normal human cells this entire RBP1-mSIN3-SAP30-HDAC complex colocalizes with both RB family members and E2F4 in a limited number of discrete regions of the nucleus that in other studies have been shown to represent the initial origins of DNA replication following growth stimulation. These results suggest that RB family members, at least in part, drive exit from the cell cycle by recruitment of this HDAC complex via RBP1 to repress transcription from E2F-dependent promoters and possibly to alter chromatin structure at DNA origins. PMID:11283269

  1. [S-Acyl derivatives of thiosalicylamides having antifungal activity. II].

    PubMed

    Mazza, M; Modena, T; Montanari, L; Pavanetto, F

    1978-07-01

    Some S-acyl derivatives of N-alkylthiosalicylamides [Table I: substances (I leads to XXXI)] were prepared and tested for antifungal activity. The substances, most of which had not been previously reported, were prepared by condensation of 2-mercapto-N-alkylbenzamides with suitable acylating agents. The antifungal activity of the compounds was tested in vitro against Candida albicans and Trichophyton mentagrophytes. For some compounds the was tested activity against the above strains fungicidal, Candida tropicalis and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Many of the compounds proved to have high antifungal activity comparable with that of Clotrimazol. The results extended knowledge on the structure-antifungal activity relationships of this class of compounds. The compounds with the highest antifungal activity were: 2-acetylmercapto-N,n-heptylbenzamide (XXVIII); 2-acetylmercapto-5-Cl-N,n-propylbenzamide (XIV); 2-acetylmercapto-N,n-octylbenzamide (XXXI); 2-acetylmercapto-N,n-pentylbenzamide (XXV); 2-acetylmercapto-N,n-hexylbenzamide (XXVII).

  2. Metabolic Glycoengineering with N-Acyl Side Chain Modified Mannosamines.

    PubMed

    Wratil, Paul R; Horstkorte, Rüdiger; Reutter, Werner

    2016-08-08

    In metabolic glycoengineering (MGE), cells or animals are treated with unnatural derivatives of monosaccharides. After entering the cytosol, these sugar analogues are metabolized and subsequently expressed on newly synthesized glycoconjugates. The feasibility of MGE was first discovered for sialylated glycans, by using N-acyl-modified mannosamines as precursor molecules for unnatural sialic acids. Prerequisite is the promiscuity of the enzymes of the Roseman-Warren biosynthetic pathway. These enzymes were shown to tolerate specific modifications of the N-acyl side chain of mannosamine analogues, for example, elongation by one or more methylene groups (aliphatic modifications) or by insertion of reactive groups (bioorthogonal modifications). Unnatural sialic acids are incorporated into glycoconjugates of cells and organs. MGE has intriguing biological consequences for treated cells (aliphatic MGE) and offers the opportunity to visualize the topography and dynamics of sialylated glycans in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo (bioorthogonal MGE).

  3. Thiourea-Catalyzed Aminolysis of N-acyl Homoserine Lactones

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    of N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs), molecules integral to bacterial quorum sensing . The catalysts afford rate enhancement of up to 10 times the...SUBJECT TERMS quorum sensing Michael A. Bertucci, Stephen J. Lee, Michel R. Gagné University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill Office of Sponsored... quorum sensing . The catalysts afford rate enhancement of up to 10 times the control in CD3CN. Mild catalysis in other polar aprotic solvents is

  4. Antinociceptive property of new 4-acyl-arylhydrazone pyrazole compounds.

    PubMed

    Matheus, M E; Oliveira, L F; Freitas, A C; Carvalho, A M; Barreiro, E J

    1991-01-01

    A series of new 4-acyl-arylhydrazone pyrazole compounds were tested for antinociceptive activity using the inhibition of abdominal contortions induced by acetylcholine (4 mg/kg, ip) in the mouse. Dipyrone was used for comparison of the antinociceptive potency of the compounds being tested. All drugs were administered po in saline (dipyrone) or in propylene glycol (4-acyl-arylhydrazones). The maximum response induced by dipyrone (86% inhibition) was assigned an efficacy index of 1.0. Although none of the compounds had an efficacy index greater than 1.0, all three reached 1.0. The two most potent compounds, W1d and W1g, which also had an efficacy similar to that of dipyrone, contain a p-N(CH3)2 and m-OH,p-OCH3 group in the aromatic ring of the acyl-hydrazone, respectively. W1d presented the lowest antinociceptive ED50 in the series (1.41 mg/kg) and was eleven times more potent than dipyrone (ED50 = 15.80 mg/kg). Other substitutions at the para position had lower potency than W1d. The present results indicate that the introduction of a group at the para position of the acyl-arylhydrazone ring increases the antinociceptive activity of these compounds to provide compounds of the same efficacy but greater potency than dipyrone to which these new compounds are structurally related. Other assays of nociceptive activity are being used to characterize the mechanism of action of the potential new drugs.

  5. Acylation type determines ghrelin's effects on energy homeostasis in rodents.

    PubMed

    Heppner, Kristy M; Chaudhary, Nilika; Müller, Timo D; Kirchner, Henriette; Habegger, Kirk M; Ottaway, Nickki; Smiley, David L; Dimarchi, Richard; Hofmann, Susanna M; Woods, Stephen C; Sivertsen, Bjørn; Holst, Birgitte; Pfluger, Paul T; Perez-Tilve, Diego; Tschöp, Matthias H

    2012-10-01

    Ghrelin is a gastrointestinal polypeptide that acts through the ghrelin receptor (GHSR) to promote food intake and increase adiposity. Activation of GHSR requires the presence of a fatty-acid (FA) side chain on amino acid residue serine 3 of the ghrelin molecule. However, little is known about the role that the type of FA used for acylation plays in the biological action of ghrelin. We therefore evaluated a series of differentially acylated peptides to determine whether alterations in length or stability of the FA side chain have an impact on the ability of ghrelin to activate GHSR in vitro or to differentially alter food intake, body weight, and body composition in vivo. Fatty acids principally available in the diet (such as palmitate C16) and therefore representing potential substrates for the ghrelin-activating enzyme ghrelin O-acyltransferase (GOAT) were used for dose-, time-, and administration/route-dependent effects of ghrelin on food intake, body weight, and body composition in rats and mice. Our data demonstrate that altering the length of the FA side chain of ghrelin results in the differential activation of GHSR. Additionally, we found that acylation of ghrelin with a long-chain FA (C16) delays the acute central stimulation of food intake. Lastly, we found that, depending on acylation length, systemic and central chronic actions of ghrelin on adiposity can be enhanced or reduced. Together our data suggest that modification of the FA side-chain length can be a novel approach to modulate the efficacy of pharmacologically administered ghrelin.

  6. Glycosyltransferases from oat (Avena) implicated in the acylation of avenacins.

    PubMed

    Owatworakit, Amorn; Townsend, Belinda; Louveau, Thomas; Jenner, Helen; Rejzek, Martin; Hughes, Richard K; Saalbach, Gerhard; Qi, Xiaoquan; Bakht, Saleha; Roy, Abhijeet Deb; Mugford, Sam T; Goss, Rebecca J M; Field, Robert A; Osbourn, Anne

    2013-02-08

    Plants produce a huge array of specialized metabolites that have important functions in defense against biotic and abiotic stresses. Many of these compounds are glycosylated by family 1 glycosyltransferases (GTs). Oats (Avena spp.) make root-derived antimicrobial triterpenes (avenacins) that provide protection against soil-borne diseases. The ability to synthesize avenacins has evolved since the divergence of oats from other cereals and grasses. The major avenacin, A-1, is acylated with N-methylanthranilic acid. Previously, we have cloned and characterized three genes for avenacin synthesis (for the triterpene synthase SAD1, a triterpene-modifying cytochrome P450 SAD2, and the serine carboxypeptidase-like acyl transferase SAD7), which form part of a biosynthetic gene cluster. Here, we identify a fourth member of this gene cluster encoding a GT belonging to clade L of family 1 (UGT74H5), and show that this enzyme is an N-methylanthranilic acid O-glucosyltransferase implicated in the synthesis of avenacin A-1. Two other closely related family 1 GTs (UGT74H6 and UGT74H7) are also expressed in oat roots. One of these (UGT74H6) is able to glucosylate both N-methylanthranilic acid and benzoic acid, whereas the function of the other (UGT74H7) remains unknown. Our investigations indicate that UGT74H5 is likely to be key for the generation of the activated acyl donor used by SAD7 in the synthesis of the major avenacin, A-1, whereas UGT74H6 may contribute to the synthesis of other forms of avenacin that are acylated with benzoic acid.

  7. Six new acylated anthocyanins from red radish (Raphanus sativus).

    PubMed

    Tamura, Satoru; Tsuji, Kouji; Yongzhen, Piao; Ohnishi-Kameyama, Mayumi; Murakami, Nobutoshi

    2010-09-01

    Six new acylated anthocyanins (1-6) were isolated along with the three known congeners (7-9) from the fresh roots of red radishes (Raphanus sativus L.) cultivated by our group. Their chemical structures were elucidated by spectroscopic properties. Among the six new anthocyanins, the five constituents (1, 2, 4-6) were shown to contain the malonyl function at 6-OH in the glucopyranosyl residue linked to C-5 in the pelargonidin nucleus.

  8. A new cytotoxic acylated apigenin glucoside from Phyllanthus emblica L.

    PubMed

    El-Desouky, S K; Ryu, Shi Young; Kim, Young-Kyoon

    2008-01-10

    A new acylated apigenin glucoside (apigenin-7-O-(6''-butyryl-beta-glucopyranoside) (1) was isolated from the methanolic extract of the leaves of Phyllanthus emblica L. (Euphorbiaceae) together with the known compounds; gallic acid (2), methyl gallate (3), 1,2,3,4,6-penta-O-galloylglucose (4) and luteolin-4'-O-neohesperiodoside (5). Their chemical structures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic studies ((1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, DEPT, HSQC, HMBC).

  9. Binding Ensemble PROfiling with (F)photoaffinity Labeling (BEProFL) Approach: Mapping the Binding Poses of HDAC8 Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    He, Bai; Velaparthi, Subash; Pieffet, Gilles; Pennington, Chris; Mahesh, Aruna; Holzle, Denise L.; Brunsteiner, Michael; van Breemen, Richard; Blond, Sylvie Y.; Petukhov, Pavel A.

    2009-01-01

    A Binding Ensemble PROfiling with (F)photoaffinity Labeling (BEProFL) approach that utilizes photolabeling of HDAC8 with a probe containing a UV-activated aromatic azide, mapping the covalent modifications by liquid chromatography-tandem mass-spectrometry, and a computational method to characterize the multiple binding poses of the probe is described. Using the BEProFL approach two distinct binding poses of the HDAC8 probe were identified. The data also suggest that an “upside-down” pose with the surface binding group of the probe bound in an alternative pocket near the catalytic site may contribute to the binding. PMID:19886628

  10. Novel B12-dependent Acyl-CoA Mutases and their Biotechnological Potential†

    PubMed Central

    Valentin, Cracan; Banerjee, Ruma

    2012-01-01

    The recent spate of discoveries of novel acyl-CoA mutases has engendered a growing appreciation for the diversity of 5′-deoxyadenosylcobalamin-dependent rearrangement reactions. The prototype of the reaction catalyzed by these enzymes is the 1,2 interchange of a hydrogen atom with a thioester group leading to a change in the degree of carbon skeleton branching. These enzymes are predicted to share common architectural elements: a Rossman fold and a TIM barrel domain for binding cofactor and substrate, respectively. Within this family, methylmalonyl-CoA mutase (MCM) is the best studied and is the only member found in organisms ranging from bacteria to man. MCM interconverts (2R)-methylmalonyl-CoA and succinyl-CoA. The more recently discovered family members include isobutyryl-CoA mutase (ICM), which interconverts isobutyryl-CoA and n-butyryl-CoA; ethylmalonyl-CoA mutase, which interconverts (2R)-ethylmalonyl-CoA and (2S)-methylsuccinyl-CoA, and 2-hydroxyisobutyryl-CoA mutase, which interconverts 2-hydroxyisobutyryl-CoA and (3S)-hydroxybutyryl-CoA. A variant in which the two subunits of ICM are fused to a G-protein chaperone, IcmF, has been described recently. In addition to its ICM activity, IcmF also catalyzes the interconversion of isovaleryl-CoA and pivalyl-CoA. This review focuses on the involvement of acyl-CoA mutases in central carbon and secondary bacterial metabolism and on their biotechnological potential for applications ranging from bioremediation to stereospecific synthesis of C2-C5 carboxylic acids and alcohols, and for production of potential commodity and specialty chemicals. PMID:22803641

  11. Multidrug binding properties of the AcrB efflux pump characterized by molecular dynamics simulations

    PubMed Central

    Vargiu, Attilio V.; Nikaido, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Multidrug resistance in Gram-negative bacteria, to which multidrug efflux pumps such as the AcrB transporter makes a major contribution, is becoming a major public health problem. Unfortunately only a few compounds have been cocrystallized with AcrB, and thus computational approaches are essential in elucidating the interaction between diverse ligands and the pump protein. We used molecular dynamics simulation to examine the binding of nine substrates, two inhibitors, and two nonsubstrates to the distal binding pocket of AcrB, identified earlier by X-ray crystallography. This approach gave us more realistic views of the binding than the previously used docking approach, as the explicit water molecules contributed to the process and the flexible binding site was often seen to undergo large structural changes. We analyzed the interaction in detail in terms of the binding energy, hydrophobic surface-matching, and the residues involved in the process. We found that all substrates tested bound to the pocket, whereas the binding to this site was not preferred for the nonsubstrates. Interestingly, both inhibitors [Phe-Arg-β-naphthylamide and 1-(1-naphtylmethyl)-piperazine] tended to move out of the pocket at least partially, getting into contact with a glycine-rich loop that separates the distal pocket from the more proximal region of the protein and is thought to control the access of substrates to the distal pocket. PMID:23175790

  12. Metabolism of acyl-lipids in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Li-Beisson, Yonghua; Beisson, Fred; Riekhof, Wayne

    2015-05-01

    Microalgae are emerging platforms for production of a suite of compounds targeting several markets, including food, nutraceuticals, green chemicals, and biofuels. Many of these products, such as biodiesel or polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), derive from lipid metabolism. A general picture of lipid metabolism in microalgae has been deduced from well characterized pathways of fungi and land plants, but recent advances in molecular and genetic analyses of microalgae have uncovered unique features, pointing out the necessity to study lipid metabolism in microalgae themselves. In the past 10 years, in addition to its traditional role as a model for photosynthetic and flagellar motility processes, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has emerged as a model organism to study lipid metabolism in green microalgae. Here, after summarizing data on total fatty acid composition, distribution of acyl-lipid classes, and major acyl-lipid molecular species found in C. reinhardtii, we review the current knowledge on the known or putative steps for fatty acid synthesis, glycerolipid desaturation and assembly, membrane lipid turnover, and oil remobilization. A list of characterized or putative enzymes for the major steps of acyl-lipid metabolism in C. reinhardtii is included, and subcellular localizations and phenotypes of associated mutants are discussed. Biogenesis and composition of Chlamydomonas lipid droplets and the potential importance of lipolytic processes in increasing cellular oil content are also highlighted.

  13. Dynamic water behaviour due to one trapped air pocket in a laboratory pipeline apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergant, A.; Karadžić, U.; Tijsseling, A.

    2016-11-01

    Trapped air pockets may cause severe operational problems in hydropower and water supply systems. A locally isolated air pocket creates distinct amplitude, shape and timing of pressure pulses. This paper investigates dynamic behaviour of a single trapped air pocket. The air pocket is incorporated as a boundary condition into the discrete gas cavity model (DGCM). DGCM allows small gas cavities to form at computational sections in the method of characteristics (MOC). The growth of the pocket and gas cavities is described by the water hammer compatibility equation(s), the continuity equation for the cavity volume, and the equation of state of an ideal gas. Isentropic behaviour is assumed for the trapped gas pocket and an isothermal bath for small gas cavities. Experimental investigations have been performed in a laboratory pipeline apparatus. The apparatus consists of an upstream end high-pressure tank, a horizontal steel pipeline (total length 55.37 m, inner diameter 18 mm), four valve units positioned along the pipeline including the end points, and a downstream end tank. A trapped air pocket is captured between two ball valves at the downstream end of the pipeline. The transient event is initiated by rapid opening of the upstream end valve; the downstream end valve stays closed during the event. Predicted and measured results for a few typical cases are compared and discussed.

  14. Chloroperoxidase-Catalyzed Epoxidation of Cis-β-Methylstyrene:Distal Pocket Flexibility Tunes Catalytic Reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Morozov, Alexander N.; Chatfield, David C.

    2012-01-01

    Chloroperoxidase, the most versatile heme protein, has a hybrid active site pocket that shares structural features with peroxidases and cytochrome P450s. The simulation studies presented here show that the enzyme possesses a remarkable ability to efficiently utilize its hybrid structure, assuming structurally different peroxidase-like and P450-like distal pocket faces and thereby enhancing the inherent catalytic capability of the active center. We find that during epoxidation of cis-β-methylstyrene (CBMS), the native peroxidase-like aspect of the distal pocket is diminished as the polar Glu183 side chain is displaced away from the active center and the distal pocket takes on a more hydrophobic, P450-like, aspect. The P450-like distal pocket provides a significant enthalpic stabilization of ~4 kcal/mol of the 14 kcal/mol reaction barrier for gas-phase epoxidation of CMBS by an oxyferryl heme-thiolate species. This stabilization comes from breathing of the distal pocket. As until recently the active site of chloroperoxidase was postulated to be inflexible, these results suggest a new conceptual understanding of the enzyme’s versatility: catalytic reactivity is tuned by flexibility of the distal pocket. PMID:23020548

  15. Efficacy of a physicians' pocket guide about prenatal substance use: a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Midmer, Deana; Kahan, Meldon; Kim, Theresa; Ordean, Alice; Graves, Lisa

    2011-10-01

    A pocket guide on management of substance use during pregnancy was developed by a group of Canadian care providers. One hundred and fifteen family medicine residents in 6 Canadian teaching sites were randomized to receive either the pocket guide or a paper summary on similar clinical topics, based on UpToDate, a comprehensive Web-based resource. At baseline, both groups completed a survey containing questions on beliefs, attitudes, experience, and training on pregnancy and substance use. Participants then answered 28 multiple choice questions about substance use in pregnancy, using either the pocket guide or UpToDate. Finally participants were asked to rate ease of use for the 2 resources. The results showed that the pocket guide group had higher knowledge scores than the UpToDate group overall and at each study site (61.27% vs. 42.86%, P < .001). The residents found the pocket guide easier to use than UpToDate (mean = 2.73 vs. 4.36, P < .001), and were more likely to want to use it again (96% for pocket card, 78% for UpToDate, P = .005). It is concluded that the pocket guide is a practical source of clinical information at point of care, particularly for "orphan" subjects such as substance use in pregnancy.

  16. Phylogenetic and experimental characterization of an acyl-ACP thioesterase family reveals significant diversity in enzymatic specificity and activity

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Acyl-acyl carrier protein thioesterases (acyl-ACP TEs) catalyze the hydrolysis of the thioester bond that links the acyl chain to the sulfhydryl group of the phosphopantetheine prosthetic group of ACP. This reaction terminates acyl chain elongation of fatty acid biosynthesis, and in plant seeds it is the biochemical determinant of the fatty acid compositions of storage lipids. Results To explore acyl-ACP TE diversity and to identify novel acyl ACP-TEs, 31 acyl-ACP TEs from wide-ranging phylogenetic sources were characterized to ascertain their in vivo activities and substrate specificities. These acyl-ACP TEs were chosen by two different approaches: 1) 24 TEs were selected from public databases on the basis of phylogenetic analysis and fatty acid profile knowledge of their source organisms; and 2) seven TEs were molecularly cloned from oil palm (Elaeis guineensis), coconut (Cocos nucifera) and Cuphea viscosissima, organisms that produce medium-chain and short-chain fatty acids in their seeds. The in vivo substrate specificities of the acyl-ACP TEs were determined in E. coli. Based on their specificities, these enzymes were clustered into three classes: 1) Class I acyl-ACP TEs act primarily on 14- and 16-carbon acyl-ACP substrates; 2) Class II acyl-ACP TEs have broad substrate specificities, with major activities toward 8- and 14-carbon acyl-ACP substrates; and 3) Class III acyl-ACP TEs act predominantly on 8-carbon acyl-ACPs. Several novel acyl-ACP TEs act on short-chain and unsaturated acyl-ACP or 3-ketoacyl-ACP substrates, indicating the diversity of enzymatic specificity in this enzyme family. Conclusion These acyl-ACP TEs can potentially be used to diversify the fatty acid biosynthesis pathway to produce novel fatty acids. PMID:21831316

  17. Geometric Measures of Large Biomolecules: Surface, Volume and Pockets

    PubMed Central

    Mach, Paul; Koehl, Patrice

    2011-01-01

    Geometry plays a major role in our attempt to understand the activity of large molecules. For example, surface area and volume are used to quantify the interactions between these molecules and the water surrounding them in implicit solvent models. In addition, the detection of pockets serves as a starting point for predictive studies of biomolecule-ligand interactions. The alpha shape theory provides an exact and robust method for computing these geometric measures. Several implementations of this theory are currently available. We show however that these implementations fail on very large macromolecular systems. We show that these difficulties are not theoretical; rather, they are related to the architecture of current computers that rely on the use of cache memory to speed up calculation. By rewriting the algorithms that implement the different steps of the alpha shape theory such that we enforce locality, we show that we can remediate these cache problems; the corresponding code, UnionBall has an apparent (n) behavior over a large range of values of n (up to tens of millions), where n is the number of atoms. As an example, it takes 136 seconds with UnionBall to compute the contribution of each atom to the surface area and volume of a viral capsid with more than five million atoms on a commodity PC. UnionBall includes functions for computing the surface area and volume of the intersection of two, three and four spheres that are fully detailed in an appendix. UnionBall is available as an OpenSource software. PMID:21823134

  18. MILLISECOND IMAGING OF RADIO TRANSIENTS WITH THE POCKET CORRELATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Law, C. J.; Backer, D. C.; Bower, G. C.; Gutierrez-Kraybill, C.; Williams, P. K. G.; Jones, G.; Barott, W. C.; Werthimer, D. E-mail: jones_gl@caltech.edu

    2011-11-20

    We demonstrate a signal-processing concept for imaging the sky at millisecond rates with radio interferometers. The 'Pocket Correlator' (PoCo) correlates the signals from multiple elements of a radio interferometer fast enough to image brief, dispersed pulses. By the nature of interferometry, a millisecond correlator functions like a large, single-dish telescope, but with improved survey speed, spatial localization, calibration, and interference rejection. To test the concept, we installed PoCo at the Allen Telescope Array (ATA) to search for dispersed pulses from the Crab pulsar, B0329+54, and M31 using total-power, visibility-based, and image-plane techniques. In 1.7 hr of observing, PoCo detected 191 giant pulses from the Crab pulsar brighter than a typical 5{sigma} sensitivity limit of 60 Jy over pulse widths of 3 ms. Roughly 40% of pulses from pulsar B0329+54 were detected by using novel visibility-based techniques. Observations of M31 constrain the rate of pulses brighter than 190 Jy in a three-degree region surrounding the galaxy to <4.3 hr{sup -1}. We calculate the computational demand of various visibility-based pulse search algorithms and demonstrate how compute clusters can help meet this demand. Larger implementations of the fast imaging concept will conduct blind searches for millisecond pulses in our Galaxy and beyond, providing a valuable probe of the interstellar/intergalactic media, discovering new kinds of radio transients, and localizing them to constrain models of their origin.

  19. Deconnable self-reading pocket dosimeter containment with self-contained light

    DOEpatents

    Stevens, Robyn L.; Arnold, Greg N.; McBride, Ryan G.

    1996-01-01

    A container for a self-reading pocket dosimeter includes a transparent tube for receiving the self-reading pocket dosimeter, a light source mounted at one end of the transparent tube, and an eyepiece mounted on an opposite end of the transparent tube for viewing a read-out of the self-reading pocket dosimeter. The container may further include an activation device for selectively supplying power to the light source. The container both protects the dosimeter from being contaminated and provides a light source for viewing the dosimeter.

  20. The effects of cosmic particle radiation on pocket mice aboard Apollo XVII: II. Characteristics and tolerances of the pocket mouse and incidence of disease.

    PubMed

    Linberg, R G; Kraft, L M; Simmonds, R C; Bailey, O T; Dunlap, W A; Haymaker, W

    1975-04-01

    Pocket mice are facultative homoiotherms with the ability to drop their metabolic rate dramatically while at rest or in response to environmental stresses. Under these conditions, they characteristically enter a state of prolonged torpor. These animals require no drinking water and they can live in darkness for many months without apparent ill effect. They tolerate a wide range of ambient temperature, ralative humidity, and oxygen pressure and have survied without food for a mean of 14 d at an ambient temperature of 20 degrees C (68 degrees F). Studies carried out on the pocket mouse colony used for the Apollo XVII flight revealed, in the animals tested, no serological evidence of viral disease, no pathogenic enterobacteria or respiratory Mycoplasma on culture, a 25% incidence of sarcosporidiosis, and a 2% incidence of chronic meningitis or meningoencephalitis. The conclusion reached is that the pocket mouse is a highly adaptive animal and very well suited for space flight.

  1. Plant Microsomal Phospholipid Acyl Hydrolases Have Selectivities for Uncommon Fatty Acids.

    PubMed Central

    Stahl, U.; Banas, A.; Stymne, S.

    1995-01-01

    Developing endosperms and embryos accumulating triacylglycerols rich in caproyl (decanoyl) groups (i.e. developing embryos of Cuphea procumbens and Ulmus glabra) had microsomal acyl hydrolases with high selectivities toward phosphatidylcholine with this acyl group. Similarly, membranes from Euphorbia lagascae and Ricinus communis endosperms, which accumulate triacylglycerols with vernoleate (12-epoxy-octadeca-9-enoate) and ricinoleate (12-hydroxy-octadeca-9-enoate), respectively, had acyl hydrolases that selectively removed their respective oxygenated acyl group from the phospholipids. The activities toward phospholipid substrates with epoxy, hydroxy, and medium-chain acyl groups varied greatly between microsomal preparations from different plant species. Epoxidated and hydroxylated acyl groups in sn-1 and sn-2 positions of phosphatidylcholine and in sn-1-lysophosphatidylcholine were hydrolyzed to a similar extent, whereas the hydrolysis of caproyl groups was highly dependent on the positional localization. PMID:12228415

  2. Direct nonchromatographic assay for 1-acyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Rajasekharan, R.; Ray, T.K.; Cronan, J.E. Jr.

    1988-09-01

    1-Acyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (also called lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferase) which catalyzes the acylation of 1-acyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphate to phosphatidic acid is generally assayed by the use of a radioactive substrate followed by a time-consuming chromatographic separation of substrate and product. We report a direct and highly sensitive nonchromatographic assay for this enzyme based on the ability of Escherichia coli alkaline phosphatase to dephosphorylate 1-acyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphate but not phosphatidic acid. This selective hydrolysis coupled with the use of /sup 32/P-labeled 1-acyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphate as substrate permits measurement of the product, /sup 32/P-labeled phosphatidic acid by solvent extraction or precipitation. We also report a series of enzymatic reactions for the efficient conversion of /sup 32/Pi to /sup 32/P-labeled 1-acyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphate.

  3. Characterization of Lipid A Variants by Energy-Resolved Mass Spectrometry: Impact of Acyl Chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crittenden, Christopher M.; Akin, Lucas D.; Morrison, Lindsay J.; Trent, M. Stephen; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.

    2016-12-01

    Lipid A molecules consist of a diglucosamine sugar core with a number of appended acyl chains that vary in their length and connectivity. Because of the challenging nature of characterizing these molecules and differentiating between isomeric species, an energy-resolved MS/MS strategy was undertaken to track the fragmentation trends and map genealogies of product ions originating from consecutive cleavages of acyl chains. Generalizations were developed based on the number and locations of the primary and secondary acyl chains as well as variations in preferential cleavages arising from the location of the phosphate groups. Secondary acyl chain cleavage occurs most readily for lipid A species at the 3' position, followed by primary acyl chain fragmentation at both the 3' and 3 positions. In the instances of bisphosphorylated lipid A variants, phosphate loss occurs readily in conjunction with the most favorable primary and secondary acyl chain cleavages.

  4. Glycogen phosphorylase as a target for type 2 diabetes: synthetic, biochemical, structural and computational evaluation of novel N-acyl-N´-(β-D-glucopyranosyl) urea inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kantsadi, Anastassia L; Parmenopoulou, Vanessa; Bakalov, Dimitar N; Snelgrove, Laura; Stravodimos, George A; Chatzileontiadou, Demetra S M; Manta, Stella; Panagiotopoulou, Angeliki; Hayes, Joseph M; Komiotis, Dimitri; Leonidas, Demetres D

    2015-01-01

    Glycogen phosphorylase (GP), a validated target for the development of anti-hyperglycaemic agents, has been targeted for the design of novel glycopyranosylamine inhibitors. Exploiting the two most potent inhibitors from our previous study of N-acyl-β-D-glucopyranosylamines (Parmenopoulou et al., Bioorg. Med. Chem. 2014, 22, 4810), we have extended the linking group to -NHCONHCO- between the glucose moiety and the aliphatic/aromatic substituent in the GP catalytic site β-cavity. The N-acyl-N´-(β-D-glucopyranosyl) urea inhibitors were synthesized and their efficiency assessed by biochemical methods, revealing inhibition constant values of 4.95 µM and 2.53 µM. Crystal structures of GP in complex with these inhibitors were determined and analyzed, providing data for further structure based design efforts. A novel Linear Response - Molecular Mechanics Coulomb Surface Area (LR-MM-CBSA) method has been developed which relates predicted and experimental binding free energies for a training set of N-acyl-N´-(β-D-glucopyranosyl) urea ligands with a correlation coefficient R(2) of 0.89 and leave-one-out cross-validation (LOO-cv) Q(2) statistic of 0.79. The method has significant applications to direct future lead optimization studies, where ligand entropy loss on binding is revealed as a key factor to be considered. ADMET property predictions revealed that apart from potential permeability issues, the synthesized N-acyl-N´-(β-D-glucopyranosyl) urea inhibitors have drug-like potential without any toxicity warnings.

  5. ZrCl4-mediated regio- and chemoselective Friedel-Crafts acylation of indole.

    PubMed

    Guchhait, Sankar K; Kashyap, Maneesh; Kamble, Harshad

    2011-06-03

    An efficient method for regio- and chemoselective Friedel-Crafts acylation of indole using acyl chlorides in the presence of ZrCl(4) has been discovered. It minimizes/eliminates common competing reactions that occur due to high and multiatom-nucleophilic character of indole. In this method, a wide range of aroyl, heteroaroyl alkenoyl, and alkanoyl chlorides undergo smooth acylation with various indoles without NH protection and afford 3-acylindoles in good to high yields.

  6. Acute ethanol treatment induces a bimodal response of phospholipid acylation rates in rat red blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Verine, A.; Valette, A.; Richard, D.; Boyer, J. )

    1991-01-01

    A single intraperitoneal injection of ethanol in rats elicited a bimodal response of acylation rates in phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine of intact red blood cells. Within an initial period, ethanol inhibited acylation rates. The inhibition then reversed, leading to increased values which persisted as long as ethanol was present in plasma. Acylation rates were not correlated to ethanol concentrations in plasma. The authors suggest that red cells first desensitize to, then overcompensate for the inhibitory effect of ethanol on acylation reactions. These adaptive changes may be one of the events mediating membrane tolerance to ethanol.

  7. A novel plasmid for detection of N-acyl homoserine lactones.

    PubMed

    Ling, Elizabeth A; Ellison, Matthew L; Pesci, Everett C

    2009-07-01

    Many bacteria utilize acyl-homoserine lactones as cell to cell signals that can regulate the expression of numerous genes. Structural differences in acyl-homoserine lactones produced by different bacteria, such as acyl side chain length and the presence or absence of an oxy group, make many of the commonly used detection bioassays impractical for broad range detection. Here we present a simple, broad range acyl-homoserine lactone detection bioassay that can be used to detect a wide range of these chemical signals. A plasmid (pEAL01) was constructed and transformed into Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain QSC105 to allow for detection of a broad range of acyl-homoserine lactones through induction of a lasB'-lacZ transcriptional fusion. Monitoring beta-galactosidase activity from this bioassay showed that P. aeruginosa strain QSC105 (pEAL01) could detect the presence of eight acyl-homoserine lactones tested at physiological concentrations. This novel strain could also detect acyl-homoserine lactones from the extracts of four different bacteria that produce different acyl-homoserine lactones signals. These data indicate that strain QSC105 (pEAL01) can be used to detect a wide variety of acyl-homoserine lactones by a simple beta-galactosidase assay and this bioassay could be a useful and inexpensive tool to quickly identify the presence of these signal molecules.

  8. 24 CFR 570.466 - Additional application submission requirements for Pockets of Poverty-employment opportunities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... job training programs (such as those related to the CETA program) or job recruiting services for the... persons from the pocket qualified to participate in the CETA program on a continuous basis. HUD...

  9. 24 CFR 570.466 - Additional application submission requirements for Pockets of Poverty-employment opportunities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... job training programs (such as those related to the CETA program) or job recruiting services for the... persons from the pocket qualified to participate in the CETA program on a continuous basis. HUD...

  10. 24 CFR 570.466 - Additional application submission requirements for Pockets of Poverty-employment opportunities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... job training programs (such as those related to the CETA program) or job recruiting services for the... persons from the pocket qualified to participate in the CETA program on a continuous basis. HUD...

  11. EpiPen Out-Of-Pocket Costs More Than Doubled Over Decade

    MedlinePlus

    ... pocket spending for generic EpiPen because of the cost-sharing their insurance plan requires," he explained. The study's senior author, Rena Conti, said current drug pricing practices erode patient and public health. " ...

  12. Out-of-pocket health care expenditures, by insurance status, 2007-10.

    PubMed

    Catlin, Mary K; Poisal, John A; Cowan, Cathy A

    2015-01-01

    Out-of-pocket health care spending in the United States totaled $306.2 billion in 2010 and represented 11.8 percent of total national health expenditures, according to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services' National Health Expenditure Accounts. Spending by people with employer-sponsored health insurance and those covered by Medicare accounted for over 80 percent of total out-of-pocket spending. People without comprehensive medical coverage accounted for less than 8 percent of all out-of-pocket expenditures in 2010. Between 2007 and 2010 per person out-of-pocket spending grew most rapidly for people primarily covered by employer-sponsored insurance and declined for people primarily covered by Medicare and those without coverage.

  13. Compensated electron and hole pockets in an underdoped high- Tc superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebastian, Suchitra E.; Harrison, N.; Goddard, P. A.; Altarawneh, M. M.; Mielke, C. H.; Liang, Ruixing; Bonn, D. A.; Hardy, W. N.; Andersen, O. K.; Lonzarich, G. G.

    2010-06-01

    We report quantum oscillations in the underdoped high-temperature superconductor YBa2Cu3O6+x over a wide range in magnetic field 28≤μ0H≤85T corresponding to ≈12 oscillations, enabling the Fermi surface topology to be mapped to high resolution. As earlier reported by Sebastian [Nature (London) 454, 200 (2008)10.1038/nature07095], we find a Fermi surface comprising multiple pockets, as revealed by the additional distinct quantum oscillation frequencies and harmonics reported in this work. We find the originally reported broad low-frequency Fourier peak at ≈535T to be clearly resolved into three separate peaks at ≈460 , ≈532 , and ≈602T , in reasonable agreement with the reported frequencies of Audouard [Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 157003 (2009)10.1103/PhysRevLett.103.157003]. However, our increased resolution and angle-resolved measurements identify these frequencies to originate from two similarly sized pockets with greatly contrasting degrees of interlayer corrugation. The spectrally dominant frequency originates from a pocket (denoted α ) that is almost ideally two-dimensional in form (exhibiting negligible interlayer corrugation). In contrast, the newly resolved weaker adjacent spectral features originate from a deeply corrugated pocket (denoted γ ). On comparison with band structure, the d -wave symmetry of the interlayer dispersion locates the minimally corrugated α pocket at the “nodal” point knodal=(π/2,π/2) , and the significantly corrugated γ pocket at the “antinodal” point kantinodal=(π,0) within the Brillouin zone. The differently corrugated pockets at different locations indicate creation by translational symmetry breaking—a spin-density wave has been suggested from the suppression of Zeeman splitting for the spectrally dominant pocket. In a broken-translational symmetry scenario, symmetry points to the nodal (α) pocket corresponding to holes, with the weaker antinodal (γ) pocket corresponding to electrons—likely responsible

  14. NEET Micro-Pocket Fission Detector -- FY 2012 Status Report

    SciTech Connect

    Troy Unruh; Joy Rempe; Douglas McGregor; Philip Ugorowski; Michael Reichenberger

    2012-09-01

    A research program has been initiated by the NEET program for developing and testing compact miniature fission chambers capable of simultaneously measuring thermal neutron flux, fast neutron flux and temperature within a single package. When implemented, these sensors will significantly advance flux detection capabilities for irradiation tests in US Materials Test Reactors (MTRs).Ultimately, evaluations may lead to a more compact, more accurate, and longer lifetime flux sensor for critical mock-ups, high performance reactors and commercial nuclear power plants. Deployment of Micro-Pocket Fission Detectors (MPFDs) in US DOE-NE program irradiation tests will address several challenges: Current fission chamber technologies do not offer the ability to measure fast flux, thermal flux and temperature within a single compact probe, MPFDs offer this option. MPFD construction is very different then current fission chamber construction; the use of high temperature materials allow MPFDs to be specifically tailored to survive harsh conditions in typical high performance MTR irradiation tests. New high-fidelity reactor physics codes will need a small, accurate, multipurpose in-core sensor to validate the codes without perturbing the validation experiment; MPFDs fill this requirement. MPFDs can be built with variable sensitivities to survive the lifetime of an experiment or fuel assembly in some MTRs; allowing for more efficient and cost effective power monitoring. The small size of the MPFDs allows multiple sensors to be simultaneously deployed; obtaining data required to visualize the reactor flux and temperature profiles. This report summarizes the research progress for year 1 of this 3 year project. An updated design of the MPFD has been developed, materials and tools to support the new design have been procured, construction methods to support the new design have been initiated at INL’s HTTL and KSU’s SMART Laboratory, plating methods are being updated at KSU, new

  15. NEET Micro-Pocket Fission Detector. Final Project report

    SciTech Connect

    Unruh, T.; Rempe, Joy; McGregor, Douglas; Ugorowski, Philip; Reichenberger, Michael; Ito, Takashi; Villard, J. -F.

    2014-09-01

    A collaboration between the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), the Kansas State University (KSU), and the French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission, Commissariat à l'Énergie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives, (CEA), is funded by the Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) program to develop and test Micro-Pocket Fission Detectors (MPFDs), which are compact fission chambers capable of simultaneously measuring thermal neutron flux, fast neutron flux and temperature within a single package. When deployed, these sensors will significantly advance flux detection capabilities for irradiation tests in US Material Test Reactors (MTRs). Ultimately, evaluations may lead to a more compact, more accurate, and longer lifetime flux sensor for critical mock-ups, and high performance reactors, allowing several Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) programs to obtain higher accuracy/higher resolution data from irradiation tests of candidate new fuels and materials. Specifically, deployment of MPFDs will address several challenges faced in irradiations performed at MTRs: Current fission chamber technologies do not offer the ability to measure fast flux, thermal flux and temperature within a single compact probe; MPFDs offer this option. MPFD construction is very different than current fission chamber construction; the use of high temperature materials allow MPFDs to be specifically tailored to survive harsh conditions encountered in-core of high performance MTRs. The higher accuracy, high fidelity data available from the compact MPFD will significantly enhance efforts to validate new high-fidelity reactor physics codes and new multi-scale, multi-physics codes. MPFDs can be built with variable sensitivities to survive the lifetime of an experiment or fuel assembly in some MTRs, allowing for more efficient and cost effective power monitoring. The small size of the MPFDs allows multiple sensors to be deployed, offering the potential to accurately

  16. Role of a Hydrophobic Pocket in Polyamine Interactions with the Polyspecific Organic Cation Transporter OCT3*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dan C.; Nichols, Colin G.; Sala-Rabanal, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Organic cation transporter 3 (OCT3, SLC22A3) is a polyspecific, facilitative transporter expressed in astrocytes and in placental, intestinal, and blood-brain barrier epithelia, and thus elucidating the molecular mechanisms underlying OCT3 substrate recognition is critical for the rational design of drugs targeting these tissues. The pharmacology of OCT3 is distinct from that of other OCTs, and here we investigated the role of a hydrophobic cavity tucked within the translocation pathway in OCT3 transport properties. Replacement of an absolutely conserved Asp by charge reversal (D478E), neutralization (D478N), or even exchange (D478E) abolished MPP+ uptake, demonstrating this residue to be obligatory for OCT3-mediated transport. Mutations at non-conserved residues lining the putative binding pocket of OCT3 to the corresponding residue in OCT1 (L166F, F450L, and E451Q) reduced the rate of MPP+ transport, but recapitulated the higher sensitivity pharmacological profile of OCT1. Thus, interactions of natural polyamines (putrescine, spermidine, spermine) and polyamine-like potent OCT1 blockers (1,10-diaminodecane, decamethonium, bistriethylaminodecane, and 1,10-bisquinuclidinedecane) with wild-type OCT3 were weak, but were significantly potentiated in the mutant OCT3s. Conversely, a reciprocal mutation in OCT1 (F161L) shifted the polyamine-sensitivity phenotype toward that of OCT3. Further analysis indicated that OCT1 and OCT3 can recognize essentially the same substrates, but the strength of substrate-transporter interactions is weaker in OCT3, as informed by the distinct makeup of the hydrophobic cleft. The residues identified here are key contributors to both the observed differences between OCT3 and OCT1 and to the mechanisms of substrate recognition by OCTs in general. PMID:26405039

  17. Biogenicity of terrestrial oncoids formed in soil pockets, Cayman Brac, British West Indies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Brian

    2011-05-01

    Terrestrial oncoids, up to 85 mm long, are common in some of the soil-filled pockets found in the finely crystalline dolostones of the Cayman Formation on Cayman Brac. Each of these coated grains has a nucleus formed of a white, finely crystalline dolostone lithoclast (derived from the Cayman Formation) that is encased by a light brown to tan cortex that is formed largely of micrite and minimicrite, is vaguely laminated, and lacks obvious biogenic structures. The cortex, typically < 10 mm thick, is variable in thickness around individual grains and from grain to grain. On the surfaces of the oncoids there is a diverse microbiota that includes various reticulate filaments that are typically < 1 μm in diameter, cocci, some large-diameter collapsed and calcified filaments, sporangia-like structures, and locally, exopolysaccharides (EPS). In the subsurface parts of the cortices, however, filaments are very rare and there are only scattered cocci. Evidence derived from the surface microbes indicates that they played an active role in the growth of the cortical laminae by binding material to their surfaces, calcification of the microbes, providing substrates on which calcite was precipitated, and forming cavities in which calcite cement was later precipitated. In stark contrast, it is difficult to ascribe a biotic influence to the formation of the subsurface laminae because of the paucity of preserved microbes. The lack of microbes, however, probably reflects the fact that the formative microbes were destroyed during diagenesis. This example clearly demonstrates that the lack of preserved microbes cannot be taken as an indication that the grains formed as a result of abiogenic processes.

  18. Role of a Hydrophobic Pocket in Polyamine Interactions with the Polyspecific Organic Cation Transporter OCT3.

    PubMed

    Li, Dan C; Nichols, Colin G; Sala-Rabanal, Monica

    2015-11-13

    Organic cation transporter 3 (OCT3, SLC22A3) is a polyspecific, facilitative transporter expressed in astrocytes and in placental, intestinal, and blood-brain barrier epithelia, and thus elucidating the molecular mechanisms underlying OCT3 substrate recognition is critical for the rational design of drugs targeting these tissues. The pharmacology of OCT3 is distinct from that of other OCTs, and here we investigated the role of a hydrophobic cavity tucked within the translocation pathway in OCT3 transport properties. Replacement of an absolutely conserved Asp by charge reversal (D478E), neutralization (D478N), or even exchange (D478E) abolished MPP(+) uptake, demonstrating this residue to be obligatory for OCT3-mediated transport. Mutations at non-conserved residues lining the putative binding pocket of OCT3 to the corresponding residue in OCT1 (L166F, F450L, and E451Q) reduced the rate of MPP(+) transport, but recapitulated the higher sensitivity pharmacological profile of OCT1. Thus, interactions of natural polyamines (putrescine, spermidine, spermine) and polyamine-like potent OCT1 blockers (1,10-diaminodecane, decamethonium, bistriethylaminodecane, and 1,10-bisquinuclidinedecane) with wild-type OCT3 were weak, but were significantly potentiated in the mutant OCT3s. Conversely, a reciprocal mutation in OCT1 (F161L) shifted the polyamine-sensitivity phenotype toward that of OCT3. Further analysis indicated that OCT1 and OCT3 can recognize essentially the same substrates, but the strength of substrate-transporter interactions is weaker in OCT3, as informed by the distinct makeup of the hydrophobic cleft. The residues identified here are key contributors to both the observed differences between OCT3 and OCT1 and to the mechanisms of substrate recognition by OCTs in general.

  19. The impact of air pockets around the vaginal cylinder on vaginal vault brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Guler, O C; Dolek, Y

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the incidence, size and predisposing factors for air pockets around the vaginal cylinder and their dosimetric effect on the vaginal mucosa. Methods: We investigated 174 patients with endometrial carcinoma treated with external radiotherapy (RT) and brachytherapy (BRT) (101 patients, 58%) or BRT alone (73 patients, 42%). The quantity, volume and dosimetric impact of the air pockets surrounding the vaginal cylinder were quantified. The proportions of patients with or without air pockets during application were stratified according to menopausal status, treatment modality and interval between surgery and RT. Results: Air pockets around the vaginal cylinder were seen in 75 patients (43%), while 99 patients (57%) had no air pockets. Only 11 patients (6.3%) received less than the prescribed dose (average 93.9% of prescribed dose; range, 79.0–99.2%). Air pockets were significantly fewer in pre-menopausal patients or in patients treated with the combination of external RT and BRT than in post-menopausal patients or patients treated with BRT alone. A significant correlation existed between the mucosal displacement of the air gap and the ratio of the measured dose at the surface of the air gap and prescribed dose (Pearson r = −0.775; p < 0.001). Conclusion: Air pockets were still a frequent problem during vaginal vault BRT, especially in post-menopausal patients or in patients treated with BRT alone, which may potentially cause dose reductions at the vaginal mucosa. Advances in knowledge: Air pockets around the vaginal cylinder remain a significant problem, which may potentially cause dose reduction in the target volume. PMID:25562767

  20. Achiral pyrazinone-based inhibitors of the hepatitis C virus NS3 protease and drug-resistant variants with elongated substituents directed toward the S2 pocket.

    PubMed

    Gising, Johan; Belfrage, Anna Karin; Alogheli, Hiba; Ehrenberg, Angelica; Åkerblom, Eva; Svensson, Richard; Artursson, Per; Karlén, Anders; Danielson, U Helena; Larhed, Mats; Sandström, Anja

    2014-03-13

    Herein we describe the design, synthesis, inhibitory potency, and pharmacokinetic properties of a novel class of achiral peptidomimetic HCV NS3 protease inhibitors. The compounds are based on a dipeptidomimetic pyrazinone glycine P3P2 building block in combination with an aromatic acyl sulfonamide in the P1P1' position. Structure-activity relationship data and molecular modeling support occupancy of the S2 pocket from elongated R(6) substituents on the 2(1H)-pyrazinone core and several inhibitors with improved inhibitory potency down to Ki = 0.11 μM were identified. A major goal with the design was to produce inhibitors structurally dissimilar to the di- and tripeptide-based HCV protease inhibitors in advanced stages of development for which cross-resistance might be an issue. Therefore, the retained and improved inhibitory potency against the drug-resistant variants A156T, D168V, and R155K further strengthen the potential of this class of inhibitors. A number of the inhibitors were tested in in vitro preclinical profiling assays to evaluate their apparent pharmacokinetic properties. The various R(6) substituents were found to have a major influence on solubility, metabolic stability, and cell permeability.

  1. Interplay between Magnetism, Superconductivity, and Orbital Order in 5-Pocket Model for Iron-Based Superconductors: Parquet Renormalization Group Study.

    PubMed

    Classen, Laura; Xing, Rui-Qi; Khodas, Maxim; Chubukov, Andrey V

    2017-01-20

    We report the results of the parquet renormalization group (RG) analysis of the phase diagram of the most general 5-pocket model for Fe-based superconductors. We use as an input the orbital structure of excitations near the five pockets made out of d_{xz}, d_{yz}, and d_{xy} orbitals and argue that there are 40 different interactions between low-energy fermions in the orbital basis. All interactions flow under the RG, as one progressively integrates out fermions with higher energies. We find that the low-energy behavior is amazingly simple, despite the large number of interactions. Namely, at low energies the full 5-pocket model effectively reduces either to a 3-pocket model made of one d_{xy} hole pocket and two electron pockets or a 4-pocket model made of two d_{xz}/d_{yz} hole pockets and two electron pockets. The leading instability in the effective 4-pocket model is a spontaneous orbital (nematic) order, followed by s^{+-} superconductivity. In the effective 3-pocket model, orbital fluctuations are weaker, and the system develops either s^{+-} superconductivity or a stripe spin-density wave. In the latter case, nematicity is induced by composite spin fluctuations.

  2. Interplay between Magnetism, Superconductivity, and Orbital Order in 5-Pocket Model for Iron-Based Superconductors: Parquet Renormalization Group Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Classen, Laura; Xing, Rui-Qi; Khodas, Maxim; Chubukov, Andrey V.

    2017-01-01

    We report the results of the parquet renormalization group (RG) analysis of the phase diagram of the most general 5-pocket model for Fe-based superconductors. We use as an input the orbital structure of excitations near the five pockets made out of dx z, dy z, and dx y orbitals and argue that there are 40 different interactions between low-energy fermions in the orbital basis. All interactions flow under the RG, as one progressively integrates out fermions with higher energies. We find that the low-energy behavior is amazingly simple, despite the large number of interactions. Namely, at low energies the full 5-pocket model effectively reduces either to a 3-pocket model made of one dx y hole pocket and two electron pockets or a 4-pocket model made of two dx z/dy z hole pockets and two electron pockets. The leading instability in the effective 4-pocket model is a spontaneous orbital (nematic) order, followed by s+- superconductivity. In the effective 3-pocket model, orbital fluctuations are weaker, and the system develops either s+- superconductivity or a stripe spin-density wave. In the latter case, nematicity is induced by composite spin fluctuations.

  3. Retiree out-of-pocket healthcare spending: a study of consumer expectations and policy implications.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Allison K; Jackson, Howell E

    2013-01-01

    Even though most American retirees benefit from Medicare coverage, a mounting body of research predicts that many will face large and increasing out-of-pocket expenditures for healthcare costs in retirement and that many already struggle to finance these costs. It is unclear, however, whether the general population understands the likely magnitude of these out-of-pocket expenditures well enough to plan for them effectively. This study is the first comprehensive examination of Americans' expectations regarding their out-of-pocket spending on healthcare in retirement. We surveyed over 1700 near retirees and retirees to assess their expectations regarding their own spending and then compared their responses to experts' estimates. Our main findings are twofold. First, overall expectations of out-of-pocket spending are mixed. While a significant proportion of respondents estimated out-of-pocket costs in retirement at or above expert estimates of what the typical retiree will spend, a disproportionate number estimated their future spending substantially below what experts view as likely. Estimates by members of some demographic subgroups, including women and younger respondents, deviated relatively further from the experts' estimates. Second, respondents consistently misjudged spending uncertainty. In particular, respondents significantly underestimated how much individual health experience and changes in government policy can affect individual out-of-pocket spending. We discuss possible policy responses, including efforts to improve financial planning and ways to reduce unanticipated financial risk through reform of health insurance regulation.

  4. Mechanism of MenE inhibition by acyl-adenylate analogues and discovery of novel antibacterial agents.

    PubMed

    Matarlo, Joe S; Evans, Christopher E; Sharma, Indrajeet; Lavaud, Lubens J; Ngo, Stephen C; Shek, Roger; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R; French, Jarrod B; Tan, Derek S; Tonge, Peter J

    2015-10-27

    MenE is an o-succinylbenzoyl-CoA (OSB-CoA) synthetase in the bacterial menaquinone biosynthesis pathway and is a promising target for the development of novel antibacterial agents. The enzyme catalyzes CoA ligation via an acyl-adenylate intermediate, and we have previously reported tight-binding inhibitors of MenE based on stable acyl-sulfonyladenosine analogues of this intermediate, including OSB-AMS (1), which has an IC50 value of ≤25 nM for Escherichia coli MenE. Herein, we show that OSB-AMS reduces menaquinone levels in Staphylococcus aureus, consistent with its proposed mechanism of action, despite the observation that the antibacterial activity of OSB-AMS is ∼1000-fold lower than the IC50 for enzyme inhibition. To inform the synthesis of MenE inhibitors with improved antibacterial activity, we have undertaken a structure-activity relationship (SAR) study stimulated by the knowledge that OSB-AMS can adopt two isomeric forms in which the OSB side chain exists either as an open-chain keto acid or a cyclic lactol. These studies revealed that negatively charged analogues of the keto acid form bind, while neutral analogues do not, consistent with the hypothesis that the negatively charged keto acid form of OSB-AMS is the active isomer. X-ray crystallography and site-directed mutagenesis confirm the importance of a conserved arginine for binding the OSB carboxylate. Although most lactol isomers tested were inactive, a novel difluoroindanediol inhibitor (11) with improved antibacterial activity was discovered, providing a pathway toward the development of optimized MenE inhibitors in the future.

  5. Mechanism of MenE Inhibition by Acyl-Adenylate Analogues and Discovery of Novel Antibacterial Agents

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Indrajeet; Lavaud, Lubens J.; Ngo, Stephen C.; Shek, Roger; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; French, Jarrod B.; Tan, Derek S.; Tonge, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    MenE is an o-succinylbenzoyl-CoA (OSB-CoA) synthetase in the bacterial menaquinone biosynthesis pathway and is a promising target for the development of novel antibacterial agents. The enzyme catalyzes CoA ligation via an acyl-adenylate intermediate, and we have previously reported tight-binding inhibitors of MenE based on stable acyl-sulfonyladenosine analogues of this intermediate, including OSB-AMS (1) which has an IC50 value of ≤ 25 nM for the Escherichia coli MenE. Herein, we show that OSB-AMS reduces menaquinone levels in S. aureus, consistent with its proposed mechanism of action, despite the observation that the antibacterial activity of OSB-AMS is ~1000-fold lower than the IC50 for enzyme inhibition. To inform the synthesis of MenE inhibitors with improved antibacterial activity, we have undertaken a structure–activity relationship (SAR) study stimulated by the knowledge that OSB-AMS can adopt two isomeric forms in which the OSB side chain exists either as an open-chain keto acid or a cyclic lactol. These studies revealed that negatively charged analogues of the keto-acid form bind, while neutral analogues do not, consistent with the hypothesis that the negatively-charged keto-acid form of OSB-AMS is the active isomer. X-ray crystallography and site-directed mutagenesis confirm the importance of a conserved arginine for binding the OSB carboxylate. Although most lactol isomers tested were inactive, a novel difluoroindanediol inhibitor (11) with improved antibacterial activity was discovered, providing a pathway toward the development of optimized MenE inhibitors in the future. PMID:26394156

  6. Structural signatures of antibiotic binding sites on the ribosome

    PubMed Central

    David-Eden, Hilda; Mankin, Alexander S.; Mandel-Gutfreund, Yael

    2010-01-01

    The ribosome represents a major target for antibacterial drugs. Being a complex molecular machine, it offers many potential sites for functional interference. The high-resolution structures of ribosome in complex with various antibiotics provide a unique data set for understanding the universal features of drug-binding pockets on the ribosome. In this work, we have analyzed the structural and evolutionary properties of 65 antibiotic binding sites (ABSs) in the ribosome. We compared these sites to similar-size computed pockets extracted from the small and large ribosomal subunits. Based on this analysis, we defined properties of the known drug-binding sites, which constitute the signature of a ‘druggable’ site. The most noticeable properties of the ABSs are prevalence of non-paired bases, a strong bias in favor of unusual syn conformation of the RNA bases and an unusual sugar pucker. We propose that despite the different geometric and chemical properties of diverse antibiotics, their binding sites tend to have common attributes that possibly reflect the potency of the pocket for binding small molecules. Finally, we utilized the ensemble of properties to derive a druggability index, which can be used in conjunction with site functionality information to identify new drug-binding sites on the ribosome. PMID:20494981

  7. Acylated flavonol glycosides from the flower of Elaeagnus angustifolia L.

    PubMed

    Bendaikha, Sarah; Gadaut, Méredith; Harakat, Dominique; Magid, Alabdul

    2014-07-01

    Seven acylated flavonol glycosides named elaeagnosides A-G, in addition to seven known flavonoids were isolated from the flowers of Elaeagnus angustifolia. Their structures were elucidated by different spectroscopic methods including 1D, 2D NMR experiments and HR-ESI-MS analysis. In order to identify natural antioxidant and tyrosinase inhibitor agents, the abilities of these flavonoids to scavenge the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical (DPPH) and to inhibit tyrosinase activity were evaluated. Results revealed that two of these compounds had significant anti-oxidant effect and one compound showed weak tyrosinase-inhibitory activity compared with kojic acid, quercetin, or ascorbic acid, which were used as positive control.

  8. Acyl-CoA synthetase activity links wild-type but not mutant α-synuclein to brain arachidonate metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Golovko, Mikhail Y.; Rosenberger, Thad A.; Faergeman, Nils J.; Feddersen, Søren; Cole, Nelson B.; Pribill, Ingrid; Berger, Johannes; Nussbaum, Robert L.; Murphy, Eric J.

    2008-01-01

    Because α-synuclein (Snca) has a role in brain lipid metabolism, we determined the impact that the loss of α-synuclein had on brain arachidonic acid (20:4n-6) metabolism in vivo using Snca-/- mice. We measured [1-14C]20:4n-6 incorporation and turnover kinetics in brain phospholipids using an established steady-state kinetic model. Liver was used as a negative control and no changes were observed between groups. In Snca-/- brains, there was a marked reduction in 20:4n-6-CoA mass and in microsomal acyl-CoA synthetases (Acsl) activity toward 20:4n-6. Microsomal Acsl activity was completely restored after the addition of exogenous wt mouse or human α-synuclein, but not by A30P, E46K, and A53T forms of α-synuclein. Acsl and acyl-CoA hydrolase expression was not different between groups. The incorporation and turnover of 20:4n-6 into brain phospholipid pools was markedly reduced. The dilution coefficient lambda, which indicates 20:4n-6 recycling between the acyl-CoA pool and brain phospholipids, was increased 3.3-fold, indicating more 20:4n-6 was entering the 20:4n-6-CoA pool from the plasma relative to that being recycled from the phospholipids. This is consistent with the reduction in Acsl activity observed in the Snca-/- mice. Using titration microcalorimetry, we determined that α-synuclein bound free 20:4n-6 (Kd of 3.7 μM), but did not bind 20:4n-6-CoA. These data suggest α-synuclein is involved in substrate presentation to Acsl rather than product removal. In summary, our data demonstrate that α-synuclein has a major role in brain 20:4n-6 metabolism through its modulation of endoplasmic reticulum localized acyl-CoA synthetase activity, although mutants forms of α-synuclein fail to restore this activity. PMID:16734431

  9. Crystal structure of the adenosine A2A receptor bound to an antagonist reveals a potential allosteric pocket

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Bingfa; Bachhawat, Priti; Chu, Matthew Ling-Hon; Wood, Martyn; Ceska, Tom; Sands, Zara A.; Mercier, Joel; Lebon, Florence; Kobilka, Tong Sun; Kobilka, Brian K.

    2017-01-01

    The adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) has long been implicated in cardiovascular disorders. As more selective A2AR ligands are being identified, its roles in other disorders, such as Parkinson’s disease, are starting to emerge, and A2AR antagonists are important drug candidates for nondopaminergic anti-Parkinson treatment. Here we report the crystal structure of A2A receptor bound to compound 1 (Cmpd-1), a novel A2AR/N-methyl d-aspartate receptor subtype 2B (NR2B) dual antagonist and potential anti-Parkinson candidate compound, at 3.5 Å resolution. The A2A receptor with a cytochrome b562-RIL (BRIL) fusion (A2AR–BRIL) in the intracellular loop 3 (ICL3) was crystallized in detergent micelles using vapor-phase diffusion. Whereas A2AR–BRIL bound to the antagonist ZM241385 has previously been crystallized in lipidic cubic phase (LCP), structural differences in the Cmpd-1–bound A2AR–BRIL prevented formation of the lattice observed with the ZM241385–bound receptor. The crystals grew with a type II crystal lattice in contrast to the typical type I packing seen from membrane protein structures crystallized in LCP. Cmpd-1 binds in a position that overlaps with the native ligand adenosine, but its methoxyphenyl group extends to an exosite not previously observed in other A2AR structures. Structural analysis revealed that Cmpd-1 binding results in the unique conformations of two tyrosine residues, Tyr91.35 and Tyr2717.36, which are critical for the formation of the exosite. The structure reveals insights into antagonist binding that are not observed in other A2AR structures, highlighting flexibility in the binding pocket that may facilitate the development of A2AR-selective compounds for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease. PMID:28167788

  10. Directed evolution of the Escherichia coli cAMP receptor protein at the cAMP pocket.

    PubMed

    Gunasekara, Sanjiva M; Hicks, Matt N; Park, Jin; Brooks, Cory L; Serate, Jose; Saunders, Cameron V; Grover, Simranjeet K; Goto, Joy J; Lee, Jin-Won; Youn, Hwan

    2015-10-30

    The Escherichia coli cAMP receptor protein (CRP) requires cAMP binding to undergo a conformational change for DNA binding and transcriptional regulation. Two CRP residues, Thr(127) and Ser(128), are known to play important roles in cAMP binding through hydrogen bonding and in the cAMP-induced conformational change, but the connection between the two is not completely clear. Here, we simultaneously randomized the codons for these two residues and selected CRP mutants displaying high CRP activity in a cAMP-producing E. coli. Many different CRP mutants satisfied the screening condition for high CRP activity, including those that cannot form any hydrogen bonds with the incoming cAMP at the two positions. In vitro DNA-binding analysis confirmed that these selected CRP mutants indeed display high CRP activity in response to cAMP. These results indicate that the hydrogen bonding ability of the Thr(127) and Ser(128) residues is not critical for the cAMP-induced CRP activation. However, the hydrogen bonding ability of Thr(127) and Ser(128) was found to be important in attaining high cAMP affinity. Computational analysis revealed that most natural cAMP-sensing CRP homologs have Thr/Ser, Thr/Thr, or Thr/Asn at positions 127 and 128. All of these pairs are excellent hydrogen bonding partners and they do not elevate CRP activity in the absence of cAMP. Taken together, our analyses suggest that CRP evolved to have hydrogen bonding residues at the cAMP pocket residues 127 and 128 for performing dual functions: preserving high cAMP affinity and keeping CRP inactive in the absence of cAMP.

  11. Characterization of molecular determinants of the conformational stability of macrophage migration inhibitory factor: leucine 46 hydrophobic pocket.

    PubMed

    El-Turk, Farah; Fauvet, Bruno; Ashrafi, Amer; Ouertatani-Sakouhi, Hajer; Cho, Min-Kyu; Neri, Marilisa; Cascella, Michele; Rothlisberger, Ursula; Pojer, Florence; Zweckstetter, Markus; Lashuel, Hilal

    2012-01-01

    Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor (MIF) is a key mediator of inflammatory responses and innate immunity and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of several inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. The oligomerization of MIF, more specifically trimer formation, is essential for its keto-enol tautomerase activity and probably mediates several of its interactions and biological activities, including its binding to its receptor CD74 and activation of certain signaling pathways. Therefore, understanding the molecular factors governing the oligomerization of MIF and the role of quaternary structure in modulating its structural stability and multifunctional properties is crucial for understanding the function of MIF in health and disease. Herein, we describe highly conserved intersubunit interactions involving the hydrophobic packing of the side chain of Leu46 onto the β-strand β3 of one monomer within a hydrophobic pocket from the adjacent monomer constituted by residues Arg11, Val14, Phe18, Leu19, Val39, His40, Val41, Val42, and Pro43. To elucidate the structural significance of these intersubunit interactions and their relative contribution to MIF's trimerization, structural stability and catalytic activity, we generated three point mutations where Leu46 was replaced by glycine (L46G), alanine (L46A) and phenylalanine (L46F), and their structural properties, stability, oligomerization state, and catalytic activity were characterized using a battery of biophysical methods and X-ray crystallography. Our findings provide new insights into the role of the Leu46 hydrophobic pocket in stabilizing the conformational state of MIF in solution. Disrupting the Leu46 hydrophobic interaction perturbs the secondary and tertiary structure of the protein but has no effect on its oligomerization state.

  12. Acylation of Antioxidant of Bamboo Leaves with Fatty Acids by Lipase and the Acylated Derivatives’ Efficiency in the Inhibition of Acrylamide Formation in Fried Potato Crisps

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xiang; Wang, Erpei; Lu, Yuyun; Wang, Yong; Ou, Shiyi; Yan, Rian

    2015-01-01

    This study selectively acylated the primary hydroxyl groups on flavonoids in antioxidant of bamboo leaves (AOB) using lauric acid with Candida antarctica lipase B in tert-amyl-alcohol. The separation and isolation of acylated derivatives were performed using silica gel column chromatography with a mixture of dichloromethane/diethyl ether/methanol as eluents. Both thin layer chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography analyses confirmed the high efficiency of the isolation process with the purified orientin-6″-laurate, isoorientin-6″-laurate, vitexin-6″-laurate, and isovitexin-6″-laurate that were obtained. The addition of AOB and acylated AOB reduced acrylamide formation in fried potato crisps. Results showed that 0.05% AOB and 0.05% and 0.1% acylated AOB groups significantly (p < 0.05) reduced the content of acrylamide in potato crisps by 30.7%, 44.5%, and 46.9%, respectively. PMID:26098744

  13. Acylation of Antioxidant of Bamboo Leaves with Fatty Acids by Lipase and the Acylated Derivatives' Efficiency in the Inhibition of Acrylamide Formation in Fried Potato Crisps.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiang; Wang, Erpei; Lu, Yuyun; Wang, Yong; Ou, Shiyi; Yan, Rian

    2015-01-01

    This study selectively acylated the primary hydroxyl groups on flavonoids in antioxidant of bamboo leaves (AOB) using lauric acid with Candida antarctica lipase B in tert-amyl-alcohol. The separation and isolation of acylated derivatives were performed using silica gel column chromatography with a mixture of dichloromethane/diethyl ether/methanol as eluents. Both thin layer chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography analyses confirmed the high efficiency of the isolation process with the purified orientin-6″-laurate, isoorientin-6″-laurate, vitexin-6″-laurate, and isovitexin-6″-laurate that were obtained. The addition of AOB and acylated AOB reduced acrylamide formation in fried potato crisps. Results showed that 0.05% AOB and 0.05% and 0.1% acylated AOB groups significantly (p < 0.05) reduced the content of acrylamide in potato crisps by 30.7%, 44.5%, and 46.9%, respectively.

  14. Acyl-CoA Synthetase Is Located in the Outer Membrane and Acyl-CoA Thioesterase in the Inner Membrane of Pea Chloroplast Envelopes 1

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Jaen; Keegstra, Kenneth

    1983-01-01

    Both acyl-CoA synthetase and acyl-CoA thioesterase activities are present in chloroplast envelope membranes. The functions of these enzymes in lipid metabolism remains unresolved, although the synthetase has been proposed to be involved in either plastid galactolipid synthesis or the export of plastid-synthesized fatty acids to the cytoplasm. We have examined the locations of both enzymes within the two envelope membranes of pea (Pisum sativum var Laxton's Progress No. 9) chloroplasts. Inner and outer envelope membranes were purified from unfractionated envelope preparations by linear density sucrose gradient centrifugation. Acyl-CoA synthetase was located in the outer envelope membrane while acyl-CoA thioesterase was located in the inner envelope membrane. Thus, it seems unlikely that the synthetase is directly involved in galactolipid assembly. Instead, its localization supports the hypothesis that it functions in the transport of plastid-synthesized fatty acids to the endoplasmic reticulum. PMID:16663076

  15. Stereoelectronic basis for the kinetic resolution of N-heterocycles with chiral acylating reagents.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Sheng-Ying; Wanner, Benedikt; Wheeler, Philip; Beauchemin, André M; Rovis, Tomislav; Bode, Jeffrey W

    2014-06-10

    The kinetic resolution of N-heterocycles with chiral acylating agents reveals a previously unrecognized stereoelectronic effect in amine acylation. Combined with a new achiral hydroxamate, this effect makes possible the resolution of various N-heterocycles by using easily prepared reagents. A transition-state model to rationalize the stereochemical outcome of this kinetic resolution is also proposed.

  16. Structural properties of pepsin-solubilized collagen acylated by lauroyl chloride along with succinic anhydride.

    PubMed

    Li, Conghu; Tian, Zhenhua; Liu, Wentao; Li, Guoying

    2015-10-01

    The structural properties of pepsin-solubilized calf skin collagen acylated by lauroyl chloride along with succinic anhydride were investigated in this paper. Compared with native collagen, acylated collagen retained the unique triple helix conformation, as determined by amino acid analysis, circular dichroism and X-ray diffraction. Meanwhile, the thermostability of acylated collagen using thermogravimetric measurements was enhanced as the residual weight increased by 5%. With the temperature increased from 25 to 115 °C, the secondary structure of native and acylated collagens using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy measurements was destroyed since the intensity of the major amide bands decreased and the positions of the major amide bands shifted to lower wavenumber, respectively. Meanwhile, two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy revealed that the most sensitive bands for acylated and native collagens were amide I and II bands, respectively. Additionally, the corresponding order of the groups between native and acylated collagens was different and the correlation degree for acylated collagen was weaker than that of native collagen, suggesting that temperature played a small influence on the conformation of acylated collagen, which might be concluded that the hydrophobic interaction improved the thermostability of collagen.

  17. Fatty acid acylation of rat brain myelin proteolipid protein in vitro: identification of the lipid donor.

    PubMed

    Bizzozero, O A; Lees, M B

    1986-02-01

    The immediate acyl chain donor for fatty acid esterification of proteolipid protein (PLP) was identified in an in vitro system. Rat brain total membranes, after removal of crude nuclear and mitochondrial fractions, were incubated with radioactive acyl donors, extracted with chloroform/methanol, and analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. In the presence of [3H]palmitic acid, CoA, ATP, and Mg2+, acylation of endogenous PLP occurred at a linear rate for at least 2 h. The radioactivity was associated with the protein via an ester linkage, mainly as palmitic acid. Omission of ATP, CoA, Mg2+, or all three reduced fatty acid incorporation into PLP to 44, 27, 8, and 4%, respectively, of the values in the complete system. Incubation of the membrane fraction with [3H]palmitoyl-CoA in the absence of CoA and ATP led to highly labeled PLP. These data demonstrate that activation of free fatty acid is required for acylation. Phospholipids and glycolipids were not able to acylate the PLP directly. Finally, when isolated myelin was incubated with [3H]palmitoyl-CoA in the absence of cofactors, only PLP was labeled, thus confirming the identity of palmitoyl-CoA as the direct acyl chain donor and suggesting that the acylating activity and the PLP pool available for acylation