Science.gov

Sample records for acyl chain methylene

  1. Lipid Acyl Chain Remodeling in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Renne, Mike F.; Bao, Xue; De Smet, Cedric H.; de Kroon, Anton I. P. M.

    2015-01-01

    Membrane lipid homeostasis is maintained by de novo synthesis, intracellular transport, remodeling, and degradation of lipid molecules. Glycerophospholipids, the most abundant structural component of eukaryotic membranes, are subject to acyl chain remodeling, which is defined as the post-synthetic process in which one or both acyl chains are exchanged. Here, we review studies addressing acyl chain remodeling of membrane glycerophospholipids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a model organism that has been successfully used to investigate lipid synthesis and its regulation. Experimental evidence for the occurrence of phospholipid acyl chain exchange in cardiolipin, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylinositol, and phosphatidylethanolamine is summarized, including methods and tools that have been used for detecting remodeling. Progress in the identification of the enzymes involved is reported, and putative functions of acyl chain remodeling in yeast are discussed. PMID:26819558

  2. Metabolic Glycoengineering with N-Acyl Side Chain Modified Mannosamines.

    PubMed

    Wratil, Paul R; Horstkorte, Rüdiger; Reutter, Werner

    2016-08-01

    In metabolic glycoengineering (MGE), cells or animals are treated with unnatural derivatives of monosaccharides. After entering the cytosol, these sugar analogues are metabolized and subsequently expressed on newly synthesized glycoconjugates. The feasibility of MGE was first discovered for sialylated glycans, by using N-acyl-modified mannosamines as precursor molecules for unnatural sialic acids. Prerequisite is the promiscuity of the enzymes of the Roseman-Warren biosynthetic pathway. These enzymes were shown to tolerate specific modifications of the N-acyl side chain of mannosamine analogues, for example, elongation by one or more methylene groups (aliphatic modifications) or by insertion of reactive groups (bioorthogonal modifications). Unnatural sialic acids are incorporated into glycoconjugates of cells and organs. MGE has intriguing biological consequences for treated cells (aliphatic MGE) and offers the opportunity to visualize the topography and dynamics of sialylated glycans in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo (bioorthogonal MGE). PMID:27435524

  3. Regioselective enzymatic acylation of methyl shikimate. Influence of acyl chain length and solvent polarity on enzyme specificity.

    PubMed

    Armesto, Nuria; Ferrero, Miguel; Fernández, Susana; Gotor, Vicente

    2002-07-12

    Candida antarctica lipase A (CAL-A) selectively catalyzes the acylation at the secondary C-4 hydroxyl group of methyl shikimate (2), which possesses three secondary hydroxyl groups, the C-3 allylic one being chemically more reactive. The effect both of the acyl group of the acylating agents and of the solvent polarity has been studied. The selectivity of CAL-A is almost complete with acyl donors that possess short chains. However, when acyl donors have longer chains, better results are obtained by C. antarctica lipase B (CAL-B). PMID:12098318

  4. Naphthalene Derivatives Induce Acyl Chain Interdigitation in Dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine Bilayers.

    PubMed

    Kamal, Md Arif; Raghunathan, V A

    2016-01-14

    The interdigitated phase of the lipid bilayer results when acyl chains from opposing monolayers fully interpenetrate such that the terminal methyl groups of the respective lipid chains are located at the interfacial region on the opposite sides of the bilayer. Usually, chain interdigitation is not encountered in a symmetric chain phosphatidylcholine (PC) membrane but can be induced under certain special conditions. In this article, we elucidate the contribution of small amphiphatic molecules in altering the physical properties of a symmetric chain PC bilayer membrane, which results in acyl chain interdigitation. Using small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), we have carried out a systematic investigation of the physical interactions of three naphthalene derivatives containing hydroxyl groups: β-naphthol, 2,3-dihydroxynaphthalene, and 2,7-dihydroxynaphthalene, with dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayers. On the basis of the diffraction patterns, we have determined the temperature-composition phase diagrams of these binary mixtures. The present study not only enables us to gain insight into the role played by small molecules in altering the packing arrangement of the acyl chains of the constituting PC lipids of the bilayer but also brings to light some important features that have not yet been reported hitherto. One such feature is the stabilization of the enigmatic asymmetric ripple phase over a wide temperature and concentration range. The results presented here strongly point toward a clear correlation between chain interdigitation and the stability of the ripple phase. PMID:26687052

  5. A Thiolate Anion Buried within the Hydrocarbon Ruler Perturbs PagP Lipid Acyl Chain Selection†

    PubMed Central

    Khan, M. Adil; Moktar, Joel; Mott, Patrick J.; Bishop, Russell E.

    2016-01-01

    The Escherichia coli outer membrane phospholipid:lipid A palmitoyltransferase PagP exhibits remarkable selectivity because its binding pocket for lipid acyl chains excludes those differing in length from palmitate by a solitary methylene unit. This narrow detergent-binding hydrophobic pocket buried within the eight-strand antiparallel β-barrel is known as the hydrocarbon ruler. Gly88 lines the acyl chain binding pocket floor, and its substitution can raise the floor to correspondingly shorten the selected acyl chain. An aromatic exciton interaction between Tyr26 and Trp66 provides an intrinsic spectroscopic probe located immediately adjacent to Gly88. The Gly88Cys PagP enzyme was engineered to function as a dedicated myristoyltransferase, but the mutant enzyme instead selected both myristoyl and pentadecanoyl groups, was devoid of the exciton, and displayed a 21 °C reduction in thermal stability. We now demonstrate that the structural perturbation results from a buried thiolate anion attributed to suppression of the Cys sulfhydryl group pKa from 9.4 in aqueous solvent to 7.5 in the hydrocarbon ruler microenvironment. The Cys thiol is sandwiched at the interface between a nonpolar and a polar β-barrel interior milieu, suggesting that local electrostatics near the otherwise hydrophobic hydrocarbon ruler pocket serve to perturb the thiol pKa. Neutralization of the Cys thiolate anion by protonation restores wild-type exciton and thermal stability signatures to Gly88Cys PagP, which then functions as a dedicated myristoyltransferase at pH 7. Gly88Cys PagP assembled in bacterial membranes recapitulates lipid A myristoylation in vivo. Hydrocarbon ruler–exciton coupling in PagP thus reveals a thiol–thiolate ionization mechanism for modulating lipid acyl chain selection. PMID:20175558

  6. Interactions of the acyl chain with the Saccharomyces cerevisiae acyl carrier protein.

    PubMed

    Perez, Daniel R; Leibundgut, Marc; Wider, Gerhard

    2015-04-01

    Acyl carrier protein (ACP) domains are critical integral components of multifunctional type I fatty acid synthases (FAS I) and polyketide synthases (PKSs), where they shuttle the growing adducts of the synthesis between the catalytic domains. In contrast to ACP of mammalian FAS I, PKSs, and the dissociated fatty acid synthase type II systems (FAS II) of bacteria, fungal FAS I ACP consists of two subdomains, one comprising the canonical ACP fold observed in all FAS systems and the other representing an extra structural subdomain. While ACPs of dissociated FAS II are able to sequester the reaction intermediates during substrate shuttling, such a transport mechanism has not been observed in ACP domains of multifunctional FAS I and PKS systems. For a better understanding of the interaction between the canonical subdomain of fungal ACP with the growing acyl chain and the role of the structural subdomain, we determined the structure of the isolated Saccharomyces cerevisiae acyl carrier protein (ScACP) domain by NMR spectroscopy and investigated the interactions between ScACP and covalently attached substrate acyl chains of varying length by monitoring chemical shift perturbations. The interactions were mapped to the hydrophobic core of the canonical subdomain, while no perturbations were detected in the structural subdomain. A population analysis revealed that only approximately 15% of covalently attached decanoyl chains are sequestered by the ACP core, comparable to the mammalian FAS I and multifunctional PKS systems, which do not sequester their substrates. Finally, denaturation experiments show that both ScACP subdomains unfold cooperatively and that the weak interaction of the acyl chain with the hydrophobic core does not significantly affect the ACP stability. PMID:25774789

  7. Mutations in p53 change phosphatidylinositol acyl chain composition

    PubMed Central

    Naguib, Adam; Bencze, Gyula; Engle, Dannielle; Chio, Iok I. C.; Herzka, Tali; Watrud, Kaitlin; Bencze, Szilvia; Tuveson, David A.; Pappin, Darryl J; Trotman, Lloyd C.

    2014-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol phosphate (PIP) second messengers relay extracellular growth cues through the phosphorylation status of the inositol sugar, a signal transduction system that is deregulated in cancer. In stark contrast to PIP inositol head group phosphorylation, changes in phosphatidylinositol (PI) lipid acyl chains in cancer have remained ill-defined. Here, we apply a mass spectrometry-based method capable of unbiased high-throughput identification and quantification of cellular PI acyl chain composition. Using this approach we find that PI lipid chains represent a cell-specific fingerprint and are unperturbed by serum-mediated signaling in contrast to the inositol head group. We find that mutation of Trp53 results in PIs containing reduced-length fatty acid moieties. Our results suggest that the anchoring tails of lipid second messengers form an additional layer of PIP signaling in cancer that operates independently of PTEN/PI3-Kinase activity, but is instead linked somehow to p53. PMID:25543136

  8. Acyl Chain Length of Phosphatidylserine Is Correlated with Plant Lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Xuejun; Li, Weiqi

    2014-01-01

    Plant lifespan is affected by factors with genetic and environmental bases. The laws governing these two factors and how they affect plant lifespan are unclear. Here we show that the acyl chain length (ACL) of phosphatidylserine (PS) is correlated with plant lifespan. Among the detected eight head-group classes of membrane lipids with lipidomics based on triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry, the ACL of PS showed high diversity, in contrast to the ACLs of the other seven classes, which were highly conserved over all stages of development in all plant species and organs and under all conditions that we studied. Further investigation found that acyl chains of PS lengthened during development, senescence, and under environmental stresses and that increasing length was accelerated by promoted- senescence. The acyl chains of PS were limited to a certain carbon number and ceased to increase in length when plants were close to death. These findings suggest that the ACL of PS can count plant lifespan and could be a molecular scale ruler for measuring plant development and senescence. PMID:25058060

  9. Characterization of an Archaeal Medium-Chain Acyl Coenzyme A Synthetase from Methanosarcina acetivorans▿

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Yu; Ingram-Smith, Cheryl; Cooper, Leroy L.; Smith, Kerry S.

    2010-01-01

    Short- and medium-chain acyl coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) synthetases catalyze the formation of acyl-CoA from an acyl substrate, ATP, and CoA. These enzymes catalyze mechanistically similar two-step reactions that proceed through an enzyme-bound acyl-AMP intermediate. Here we describe the characterization of a member of this enzyme family from the methane-producing archaeon Methanosarcina acetivorans. This enzyme, a medium-chain acyl-CoA synthetase designated MacsMa, utilizes 2-methylbutyrate as its preferred substrate for acyl-CoA synthesis but cannot utilize acetate and thus cannot catalyze the first step of acetoclastic methanogenesis in M. acetivorans. When propionate or other less favorable acyl substrates, such as butyrate, 2-methylpropionate, or 2-methylvalerate, were utilized, the acyl-CoA was not produced or was produced at reduced levels. Instead, acyl-AMP and PPi were released in the absence of CoA, whereas in the presence of CoA, the intermediate was broken down into AMP and the acyl substrate, which were released along with PPi. These results suggest that although acyl-CoA synthetases may have the ability to utilize a broad range of substrates for the acyl-adenylate-forming first step of the reaction, the intermediate may not be suitable for the thioester-forming second step. The MacsMa structure has revealed the putative acyl substrate- and CoA-binding pockets. Six residues proposed to form the acyl substrate-binding pocket, Lys256, Cys298, Gly351, Trp259, Trp237, and Trp254, were targeted for alteration. Characterization of the enzyme variants indicates that these six residues are critical in acyl substrate binding and catalysis, and even conservative alterations significantly reduced the catalytic ability of the enzyme. PMID:20851904

  10. Cardiolipin molecular species with shorter acyl chains accumulate in Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants lacking the acyl coenzyme A-binding protein Acb1p: new insights into acyl chain remodeling of cardiolipin.

    PubMed

    Rijken, Pieter J; Houtkooper, Riekelt H; Akbari, Hana; Brouwers, Jos F; Koorengevel, Martijn C; de Kruijff, Ben; Frentzen, Margrit; Vaz, Frédéric M; de Kroon, Anton I P M

    2009-10-01

    The function of the mitochondrial phospholipid cardiolipin (CL) is thought to depend on its acyl chain composition. The present study aims at a better understanding of the way the CL species profile is established in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by using depletion of the acyl-CoA-binding protein Acb1p as a tool to modulate the cellular acyl chain content. Despite the presence of an intact CL remodeling system, acyl chains shorter than 16 carbon atoms (C16) were found to accumulate in CL in cells lacking Acb1p. Further experiments revealed that Taz1p, a key CL remodeling enzyme, was not responsible for the shortening of CL in the absence of Acb1p. This left de novo CL synthesis as the only possible source of acyl chains shorter than C16 in CL. Experiments in which the substrate specificity of the yeast cardiolipin synthase Crd1p and the acyl chain composition of individual short CL species were investigated, indicated that both CL precursors (i.e. phosphatidylglycerol and CDP-diacylglycerol) contribute to comparable extents to the shorter acyl chains in CL in acb1 mutants. Based on the findings, we conclude that the fatty acid composition of mature CL in yeast is governed by the substrate specificity of the CL-specific lipase Cld1p and the fatty acid composition of the Taz1p substrates. PMID:19656950

  11. Understanding Acyl Chain and Glycerolipid Metabolism in Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Ohlrogge, John B.

    2013-11-05

    Progress is reported in these areas: acyl-editing in initial eukaryotic lipid assembly in soybean seeds; identification and characterization of two Arabidopsis thaliana lysophosphatidyl acyltransferases with preference for lysophosphatidylethanolamine; and characterization and subcellular distribution of lysolipid acyl transferase activity of pea leaves.

  12. Synthesis of Long-Chain Acyl-CoA in Chloroplast Envelope Membranes 1

    PubMed Central

    Joyard, Jacques; Stumpf, Paul K.

    1981-01-01

    The chloroplast envelope is the site of a very active long-chain acylcoenzyme A (CoA) synthetase. Furthermore, we have recently shown that an acyl CoA thioesterase is also associated with envelope membrane (Joyard J, PK Stumpf 1980 Plant Physiol 65: 1039-1043). To clarify the interacting roles of both the acyl-CoA thioesterase and the acyl-CoA synthetase, the formation of acyl-CoA in envelope membranes was examined with different techniques which permitted the measurement of the actual rates of acyl-CoA formation. Using [14C]ATP or [14C]oleic acid as labeled substrates, it can be shown that the envelope acyl-CoA synthetase required both Mg2+ and dithiothreitol. Triton X-100 slightly stimulated the activity. The specificity of the acyl-CoA synthetase was determined either with [14C]ATP or with [3H]CoA as substrates. The results obtained in both cases were similar, that is, as substrates, the unsaturated fatty acids were more effective than saturated fatty acids, the velocity of the reaction increased from lauric acid to palmitic acid, and the maximum velocity was obtained with unsaturated C18 fatty acids. The results obtained suggest that the acyl-CoA thioesterase associated with envelope membranes could be an ultimate control to prevent the transport (outside of the chloroplast) or the insertion (into chloroplast lipids) of fatty acids with chains shorter than C16. PMID:16661656

  13. The chain-flipping mechanism of ACP (acyl carrier protein)-dependent enzymes appears universal.

    PubMed

    Cronan, John E

    2014-06-01

    ACPs (acyl carrier proteins) play essential roles in the synthesis of fatty acids, polyketides and non-ribosomal polypeptides. ACP function requires the modification of the protein by attachment of 4'-phosphopantetheine to a conserved serine residue. The phosphopantetheine thiol acts to tether the starting materials and intermediates as their thioesters. ACPs are small highly soluble proteins composed of four α-helices. The helices form a bundle that acts as a hydrophobic sleeve that sequesters the acyl chains and activated thioesters from solvent. However, in the synthesis of fatty acids and complex lipids the enzymes of the pathway must access the thioester and the proximal carbon atoms in order to perform the needed chemistry. How such access is provided without exposure of the acyl chains to solvent has been a longstanding question due to the lack of acyl-ACP-enzyme complexes, a situation generally attributed to the brevity of the interactions of acyl-ACPs with their cognate enzymes. As discussed in the present review the access question has now been answered by four recent crystal structures, each of which shows that the entire acyl chain plus the 4'-phosphopantetheine prosthetic group partitions from the ACP hydrophobic sleeve into a hydrophobic pocket or groove of the enzyme protein, a process termed chain flipping. PMID:24825445

  14. Phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate 5-Kinase Isoforms Exhibit Acyl Chain Selectivity for Both Substrate and Lipid Activator*

    PubMed Central

    Shulga, Yulia V.; Anderson, Richard A.; Topham, Matthew K.; Epand, Richard M.

    2012-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate is mostly produced in the cell by phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate 5-kinases (PIP5K) and has a crucial role in numerous signaling events. Here we demonstrate that in vitro all three isoforms of PIP5K, α, β, and γ, discriminate among substrates with different acyl chains for both the substrates phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PtdIns4P) and phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns) although to different extents, with isoform γ being the most selective. Fully saturated dipalmitoyl-PtdIns4P was a poor substrate for all three isoforms, but both the 1-stearoyl-2-arachidonoyl and the 1-stearoyl-2-oleoyl forms of PtdIns4P were good substrates. Vmax was greater for the 1-stearoyl-2-arachidonoyl form compared with the 1-stearoyl-2-oleoyl form, although for PIP5Kβ the difference was small. For the α and γ isoforms, Km was much lower for 1-stearoyl-2-oleoyl PtdIns4P, making this lipid the better substrate of the two under most conditions. Activation of PIP5K by phosphatidic acid is also acyl chain-dependent. Species of phosphatidic acid with two unsaturated acyl chains are much better activators of PIP5K than those containing one saturated and one unsaturated acyl chain. PtdIns is a poor substrate for PIP5K, but it also shows acyl chain selectivity. Curiously, there is no acyl chain discrimination among species of phosphatidic acid in the activation of the phosphorylation of PtdIns. Together, our findings indicate that PIP5K isoforms α, β, and γ act selectively on substrates and activators with different acyl chains. This could be a tightly regulated mechanism of producing physiologically active unsaturated phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate species in the cell. PMID:22942276

  15. Long-chain acyl-homoserine lactones from Methylobacterium mesophilicum: synthesis and absolute configuration.

    PubMed

    Pomini, Armando M; Cruz, Pedro L R; Gai, Cláudia; Araújo, Welington L; Marsaioli, Anita J

    2009-12-01

    The acyl-homoserine lactones (acyl-HSLs) produced by Methylobacterium mesophilicum isolated from orange trees infected with the citrus variegated chlorosis (CVC) disease have been studied, revealing the occurrence of six long-chain acyl-HSLs, i.e., the saturated homologues (S)-N-dodecanoyl (1) and (S)-N-tetradecanoyl-HSL (5), the uncommon odd-chain N-tridecanoyl-HSL (3), the new natural product (S)-N-(2E)-dodecenoyl-HSL (2), and the rare unsaturated homologues (S)-N-(7Z)-tetradecenoyl (4) and (S)-N-(2E,7Z)-tetradecadienyl-HSL (6). The absolute configurations of all HSLs were determined as 3S. Compounds 2 and 6 were synthesized for the first time. Antimicrobial assays with synthetic acyl-HSLs against Gram-positive bacterial endophytes co-isolated with M. mesophilicum from CVC-infected trees revealed low or no antibacterial activity. PMID:19919062

  16. Cardiolipin Molecular Species with Shorter Acyl Chains Accumulate in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mutants Lacking the Acyl Coenzyme A-binding Protein Acb1p

    PubMed Central

    Rijken, Pieter J.; Houtkooper, Riekelt H.; Akbari, Hana; Brouwers, Jos F.; Koorengevel, Martijn C.; de Kruijff, Ben; Frentzen, Margrit; Vaz, Frédéric M.; de Kroon, Anton I. P. M.

    2009-01-01

    The function of the mitochondrial phospholipid cardiolipin (CL) is thought to depend on its acyl chain composition. The present study aims at a better understanding of the way the CL species profile is established in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by using depletion of the acyl-CoA-binding protein Acb1p as a tool to modulate the cellular acyl chain content. Despite the presence of an intact CL remodeling system, acyl chains shorter than 16 carbon atoms (C16) were found to accumulate in CL in cells lacking Acb1p. Further experiments revealed that Taz1p, a key CL remodeling enzyme, was not responsible for the shortening of CL in the absence of Acb1p. This left de novo CL synthesis as the only possible source of acyl chains shorter than C16 in CL. Experiments in which the substrate specificity of the yeast cardiolipin synthase Crd1p and the acyl chain composition of individual short CL species were investigated, indicated that both CL precursors (i.e. phosphatidylglycerol and CDP-diacylglycerol) contribute to comparable extents to the shorter acyl chains in CL in acb1 mutants. Based on the findings, we conclude that the fatty acid composition of mature CL in yeast is governed by the substrate specificity of the CL-specific lipase Cld1p and the fatty acid composition of the Taz1p substrates. PMID:19656950

  17. Retrobiosynthetic Approach Delineates the Biosynthetic Pathway and the Structure of the Acyl Chain of Mycobacterial Glycopeptidolipids*

    PubMed Central

    Vats, Archana; Singh, Anil Kumar; Mukherjee, Raju; Chopra, Tarun; Ravindran, Madhu Sudhan; Mohanty, Debasisa; Chatterji, Dipankar; Reyrat, Jean-Marc; Gokhale, Rajesh S.

    2012-01-01

    Glycopeptidolipids (GPLs) are dominant cell surface molecules present in several non-tuberculous and opportunistic mycobacterial species. GPLs from Mycobacterium smegmatis are composed of a lipopeptide core unit consisting of a modified C26-C34 fatty acyl chain that is linked to a tetrapeptide (Phe-Thr-Ala-alaninol). The hydroxyl groups of threonine and terminal alaninol are further modified by glycosylations. Although chemical structures have been reported for 16 GPLs from diverse mycobacteria, there is still ambiguity in identifying the exact position of the hydroxyl group on the fatty acyl chain. Moreover, the enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of the fatty acyl component are unknown. In this study we show that a bimodular polyketide synthase in conjunction with a fatty acyl-AMP ligase dictates the synthesis of fatty acyl chain of GPL. Based on genetic, biochemical, and structural investigations, we determine that the hydroxyl group is present at the C-5 position of the fatty acyl component. Our retrobiosynthetic approach has provided a means to understand the biosynthesis of GPLs and also resolve the long-standing debate on the accurate structure of mycobacterial GPLs. PMID:22798073

  18. Carbohydrate Conformation and Lipid Condensation in Monolayers Containing Glycosphingolipid Gb3: Influence of Acyl Chain Structure

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, Erik B.; Gao, Haifei; Dennison, Andrew J.C.; Chopin, Nathalie; Struth, Bernd; Arnold, Thomas; Florent, Jean-Claude; Johannes, Ludger

    2014-01-01

    Globotriaosylceramide (Gb3), a glycosphingolipid found in the plasma membrane of animal cells, is the endocytic receptor of the bacterial Shiga toxin. Using x-ray reflectivity (XR) and grazing incidence x-ray diffraction (GIXD), lipid monolayers containing Gb3 were investigated at the air-water interface. XR probed Gb3 carbohydrate conformation normal to the interface, whereas GIXD precisely characterized Gb3’s influence on acyl chain in-plane packing and area per molecule (APM). Two phospholipids, 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DSPC) and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DPPE), were used to study Gb3 packing in different lipid environments. Furthermore, the impact on monolayer structure of a naturally extracted Gb3 mixture was compared to synthetic Gb3 species with uniquely defined acyl chain structures. XR results showed that lipid environment and Gb3 acyl chain structure impact carbohydrate conformation with greater solvent accessibility observed for smaller phospholipid headgroups and long Gb3 acyl chains. In general, GIXD showed that Gb3 condensed phospholipid packing resulting in smaller APM than predicted by ideal mixing. Gb3’s capacity to condense APM was larger for DSPC monolayers and exhibited different dependencies on acyl chain structure depending on the lipid environment. The interplay between Gb3-induced changes in lipid packing and the lipid environment’s impact on carbohydrate conformation has broad implications for glycosphingolipid macromolecule recognition and ligand binding. PMID:25185550

  19. Structural Basis for Substrate Fatty Acyl Chain Specificity: Crystal Structure of Human Very-Long-Chain Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    McAndrew, Ryan P.; Wang, Yudong; Mohsen, Al-Walid; He, Miao; Vockley, Jerry; Kim, Jung-Ja P.

    2008-08-26

    Very-long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD) is a member of the family of acyl-CoA dehydrogenases (ACADs). Unlike the other ACADs, which are soluble homotetramers, VLCAD is a homodimer associated with the mitochondrial membrane. VLCAD also possesses an additional 180 residues in the C terminus that are not present in the other ACADs. We have determined the crystal structure of VLCAD complexed with myristoyl-CoA, obtained by co-crystallization, to 1.91-{angstrom} resolution. The overall fold of the N-terminal {approx}400 residues of VLCAD is similar to that of the soluble ACADs including medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD). The novel C-terminal domain forms an {alpha}-helical bundle that is positioned perpendicular to the two N-terminal helical domains. The fatty acyl moiety of the bound substrate/product is deeply imbedded inside the protein; however, the adenosine pyrophosphate portion of the C14-CoA ligand is disordered because of partial hydrolysis of the thioester bond and high mobility of the CoA moiety. The location of Glu-422 with respect to the C2-C3 of the bound ligand and FAD confirms Glu-422 to be the catalytic base. In MCAD, Gln-95 and Glu-99 form the base of the substrate binding cavity. In VLCAD, these residues are glycines (Gly-175 and Gly-178), allowing the binding channel to extend for an additional 12{angstrom} and permitting substrate acyl chain lengths as long as 24 carbons to bind. VLCAD deficiency is among the more common defects of mitochondrial {beta}-oxidation and, if left undiagnosed, can be fatal. This structure allows us to gain insight into how a variant VLCAD genotype results in a clinical phenotype.

  20. Measurement of Long-Chain Fatty Acyl-CoA Synthetase Activity.

    PubMed

    Füllekrug, Joachim; Poppelreuther, Margarete

    2016-01-01

    Long-chain fatty acyl-CoA synthetases (ACS) are a family of essential enzymes of lipid metabolism, activating fatty acids by thioesterification with coenzyme A. Fatty acyl-CoA molecules are then readily utilized for the biosynthesis of storage and membrane lipids, or for the generation of energy by ß-oxidation. Acyl-CoAs also function as transcriptional activators, allosteric inhibitors, or precursors for inflammatory mediators. Recent work suggests that ACS enzymes may drive cellular fatty acid uptake by metabolic trapping, and may also regulate the channeling of fatty acids towards specific metabolic pathways. The implication of ACS enzymes in widespread lipid associated diseases like type 2 diabetes has rekindled interest in this protein family. Here, we describe in detail how to measure long-chain fatty acyl-CoA synthetase activity by a straightforward radiometric assay. Cell lysates are incubated with ATP, coenzyme A, Mg(2+), and radiolabeled fatty acid bound to BSA. Differential phase partitioning of fatty acids and acyl-CoAs is exploited to quantify the amount of generated acyl-CoA by scintillation counting. The high sensitivity of this assay also allows the analysis of small samples like patient biopsies. PMID:26552674

  1. Effect of carbon chain length in acyl coenzyme A on the efficiency of enzymatic transformation of okadaic acid to 7-O-acyl okadaic acid.

    PubMed

    Furumochi, Sachie; Onoda, Tatsuya; Cho, Yuko; Fuwa, Haruhiko; Sasaki, Makoto; Yotsu-Yamashita, Mari; Konoki, Keiichi

    2016-07-01

    Okadaic acid (OA), a product of dinoflagellate Prorocentrum spp., is transformed into 7-O-acyl OA in various bivalve species. The structural transformation proceeds enzymatically in vitro in the presence of the microsomal fraction from the digestive gland of bivalves. We have been using LC-MS/MS to identify OA-transforming enzymes by detecting 7-O-acyl OA, also known as dinophysistoxin 3 (DTX3). However, an alternative assay for DTX3 is required because the OA-transforming enzyme is a membrane protein, and surfactants for solubilizing membrane proteins decrease the sensitivity of LC-MS/MS. The present study examined saturated fatty acyl CoAs with a carbon chain length of 10 (decanoyl), 12 (dodecanoyl), 14 (tetradecanoyl), 16 (hexadecanoyl) and 18 (octadecanoyl) as the substrate for the in vitro acylation reaction. Saturated fatty acyl CoAs with a carbon chain length of 14, 16 and 18 exhibited higher yields than those with a carbon chain length of 10 or 12. Acyl CoAs with carbon chain lengths from 14 to 18 and containing either a diene unit, an alkyne unit, or an azide unit in the carbon chain were synthesized and shown to provide the corresponding DTX3 with a yield comparable to that of hexadecanoyl CoA. The three functional units can be conjugated with fluorescent reagents and are applicable to the development of a novel assay for DTX3. PMID:27231127

  2. Long Chain N-acyl Homoserine Lactone Production by Enterobacter sp. Isolated from Human Tongue Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Wai-Fong; Purmal, Kathiravan; Chin, Shenyang; Chan, Xin-Yue; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2012-01-01

    We report the isolation of N-acyl homoserine lactone-producing Enterobacter sp. isolate T1-1 from the posterior dorsal surfaces of the tongue of a healthy individual. Spent supernatants extract from Enterobacter sp. isolate T1-1 activated the biosensor Agrobacterium tumefaciens NTL4(pZLR4), suggesting production of long chain AHLs by these isolates. High resolution mass spectrometry analysis of these extracts confirmed that Enterobacter sp. isolate T1-1 produced a long chain N-acyl homoserine lactone, namely N-dodecanoyl-homoserine lactone (C12-HSL). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first isolation of Enterobacter sp., strain T1-1 from the posterior dorsal surface of the human tongue and N-acyl homoserine lactones production by this bacterium. PMID:23202161

  3. Measurement of tissue acyl-CoAs using flow-injection tandem mass spectrometry: acyl-CoA profiles in short-chain fatty acid oxidation defects

    PubMed Central

    Palladino, Andrew A.; Chen, Jie; Kallish, Staci; Stanley, Charles A.; Bennett, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    The primary accumulating metabolites in fatty acid oxidation defects are intramitochondrial acyl-CoAs. Typically, secondary metabolites such as acylcarnitines, acylglycines and dicarboxylic acids are measured to study these disorders. Methods have not been adapted for tissue acyl-CoA measurement in defects with primarily acyl-CoA accumulation. Our objective was to develop a method to measure fatty acyl-CoA species that are present in tissues of mice with fatty acid oxidation defects using flow-injection tandem mass spectrometry. Following the addition of internal standards of [13C2] acetyl-CoA, [13C8] octanoyl-CoA, and [C17] heptadecanoic CoA, acyl-CoA’s are extracted from tissue samples and are injected directly into the mass spectrometer. Data is acquired using a 506.9 neutral loss scan and multiple reaction-monitoring (MRM). This method can identify all long, medium and short-chain acyl-CoA species in wild type mouse liver including predicted 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA species. We validated the method using liver of the short-chain-acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (SCAD) knock-out mice. As expected, there is a significant increase in [C4] butyryl-CoA species in the SCAD −/− mouse liver compared to wild type. We then tested the assay in liver from the short-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase (SCHAD) deficient mice to determine the profile of acyl-CoA accumulation in this less predictable model. There was more modest accumulation of medium chain species including 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA’s consistent with the known chain-length specificity of the SCHAD enzyme. PMID:23117082

  4. Genetics Home Reference: short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Download PDF Open All Close All Description Short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (SCAD) deficiency is a condition that prevents the body from converting certain fats into energy, especially during periods without food (fasting). Signs and symptoms of SCAD deficiency may ...

  5. Acyl Chain Disorder and Azelaoyl Orientation in Lipid Membranes Containing Oxidized Lipids.

    PubMed

    Mendes Ferreira, Tiago; Sood, Rohit; Bärenwald, Ruth; Carlström, Göran; Topgaard, Daniel; Saalwächter, Kay; Kinnunen, Paavo K J; Ollila, O H Samuli

    2016-06-28

    Oxidized phospholipids occur naturally in conditions of oxidative stress and have been suggested to play an important role in a number of pathological conditions due to their effects on a lipid membrane acyl chain orientation, ordering, and permeability. Here we investigate the effect of the oxidized phospholipid 1-palmitoyl-2-azelaoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (PazePC) on a model membrane of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) using a combination of (13)C-(1)H dipolar-recoupling nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments and united-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The obtained experimental order parameter SCH profiles show that the presence of 30 mol % PazePC in the bilayer significantly increases the gauche content of the POPC acyl chains, therefore decreasing the thickness of the bilayer, although with no stable bilayer pore formation. The MD simulations reproduce the disordering effect and indicate that the orientation of the azelaoyl chain is highly dependent on its protonation state with acyl chain reversal for fully deprotonated states and a parallel orientation along the interfacial plane for fully protonated states, deprotonated and protonated azelaoyl chains having negative and positive SCH profiles, respectively. Only fully or nearly fully protonated azelaoyl chain are observed in the (13)C-(1)H dipolar-recoupling NMR experiments. The experiments show positive SCH values for the azelaoyl segments confirming for the first time that oxidized chains with polar termini adopt a parallel orientation to the bilayer plane as predicted in MD simulations. PMID:27260273

  6. Lipid Gymnastics: Evidence of Complete Acyl Chain Reversal in Oxidized Phospholipids from Molecular Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Khandelia, Himanshu; Mouritsen, Ole G.

    2009-01-01

    In oxidative environments, biomembranes contain oxidized lipids with short, polar acyl chains. Two stable lipid oxidation products are PoxnoPC and PazePC. PoxnoPC has a carbonyl group, and PazePC has an anionic carboxyl group pendant at the end of the short, oxidized acyl chain. We have used MD simulations to explore the possibility of complete chain reversal in OXPLs in POPC-OXPL mixtures. The polar AZ chain of PazePC undergoes chain reversal without compromising the lipid bilayer integrity at concentrations up to 25% OXPL, and the carboxyl group points into the aqueous phase. Counterintuitively, the perturbation of overall membrane structural and dynamic properties is stronger for PoxnoPC than for PazePC. This is because of the overall condensing and ordering effect of sodium ions bound strongly to the lipids in the PazePC simulations. The reorientation of AZ chain is similar for two different lipid force fields. This work provides the first molecular evidence of the “extended lipid conformation” in phospholipid membranes. The chain reversal of PazePC lipids decorates the membrane interface with reactive, negatively charged functional groups. Such chain reversal is likely to exert a profound influence on the structure and dynamics of biological membranes, and on membrane-associated biological processes. PMID:19348756

  7. Trans-unsaturated lipid dynamics: modulation of dielaidoylphosphatidylcholine acyl chain motion by ethanol.

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, L A; Miller, K W

    1993-01-01

    Acyl chain dynamics of the trans-unsaturated lipid, dielaidoylphosphatidylcholine (DEPC), were studied by conventional and saturation transfer electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy of aqueous dispersions of DEPC spin labeled with lecithins having doxyl groups at positions 5, 10, and 14 on the sn-2 chain. The gel to liquid crystalline transition is concerted with simultaneous increases in rotational motion about the long axis of the acyl chain (libration) and in gauche-trans conformational interconversions (wobble). Relative to saturated lecithins at similar reduced temperatures the double bond (a) slowed libration by an order of magnitude in both phases, while wobble motions were several times slower, and (b)-produced a pronounced stiffness of the acyl chain near the double bond. Ethanol (0-1.6 M), in addition to its well-known colligative effect on the phase transition, was found to decrease the bilayer order in a concentration-dependent manner. This effect was smaller in the gel than in the liquid crystalline phase, most pronounced next to the double bond, and weakest deep in the bilayer. Ethanol affected slow motions little in the gel phase but wobble and libration correlation times were markedly decreased in the liquid crystalline phase. PMID:8274650

  8. Effects of Nanoparticle Morphology and Acyl Chain Length on Spontaneous Lipid Transfer Rates

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Xia, Yan; Li, Ming; Charubin, Kamil; Liu, Ying; Heberle, Frederick A.; Katsaras, John; Jing, Benxin; Zhu, Yingxi; Nieh, Mu-Ping

    2015-11-05

    In this paper, we report on studies of lipid transfer rates between different morphology nanoparticles and lipids with different length acyl chains. The lipid transfer rate of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (di-C14, DMPC) in discoidal “bicelles” (0.156 h–1) is 2 orders of magnitude greater than that of DMPC vesicles (ULVs) (1.1 × 10–3 h–1). For both bicellar and ULV morphologies, increasing the acyl chain length by two carbons [going from di-C14 DMPC to di-C16, dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC)] causes lipid transfer rates to decrease by more than 2 orders of magnitude. Results from small angle neutron scattering (SANS), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and fluorescence correlationmore » spectroscopy (FCS) are in good agreement. Finally, the present studies highlight the importance of lipid dynamic processes taking place in different morphology biomimetic membranes.« less

  9. Effects of Nanoparticle Morphology and Acyl Chain Length on Spontaneous Lipid Transfer Rates

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Yan; Li, Ming; Charubin, Kamil; Liu, Ying; Heberle, Frederick A.; Katsaras, John; Jing, Benxin; Zhu, Yingxi; Nieh, Mu-Ping

    2015-11-05

    In this paper, we report on studies of lipid transfer rates between different morphology nanoparticles and lipids with different length acyl chains. The lipid transfer rate of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (di-C14, DMPC) in discoidal “bicelles” (0.156 h–1) is 2 orders of magnitude greater than that of DMPC vesicles (ULVs) (1.1 × 10–3 h–1). For both bicellar and ULV morphologies, increasing the acyl chain length by two carbons [going from di-C14 DMPC to di-C16, dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC)] causes lipid transfer rates to decrease by more than 2 orders of magnitude. Results from small angle neutron scattering (SANS), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) are in good agreement. Finally, the present studies highlight the importance of lipid dynamic processes taking place in different morphology biomimetic membranes.

  10. Hepatic fatty acid uptake is regulated by the sphingolipid acyl chain length.

    PubMed

    Park, Woo-Jae; Park, Joo-Won; Merrill, Alfred H; Storch, Judith; Pewzner-Jung, Yael; Futerman, Anthony H

    2014-12-01

    Ceramide synthase 2 (CerS2) null mice cannot synthesize very-long acyl chain (C22-C24) ceramides resulting in significant alterations in the acyl chain composition of sphingolipids. We now demonstrate that hepatic triacylglycerol (TG) levels are reduced in the liver but not in the adipose tissue or skeletal muscle of the CerS2 null mouse, both before and after feeding with a high fat diet (HFD), where no weight gain was observed and large hepatic nodules appeared. Uptake of both BODIPY-palmitate and [VH]-palmitate was also abrogated in the hepa- tocytes and liver. The role of a number of key proteins involved in fatty acid uptake was examined, including FATP5, CD36/FAT, FABPpm and cytoplasmic FABP1. Levels of FATP5 and FABP1 were decreased in the CerS2 null mouse liver, whereas CD36/FAT levels were significantly elevated and CD36/FAT was also mislocalized upon insulin treatment. Moreover, treatment of hepatocytes with C22-C24-ceramides down-regulated CD36/FAT levels. Infection of CerS2 null mice with recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV)-CerS2 restored normal TG levels and corrected the mislocalization of CD36/FAT, but had no effect on the intracellular localization or levels of FATP5 or FABP1. Together, these results demonstrate that hepatic fatty acid uptake via CD36/FAT can be regulated by altering the acyl chain composition of sphingolipids. PMID:25241943

  11. Cardiac Hypertrophy in Mice with Long-Chain Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase (LCAD) or Very Long-Chain Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase (VLCAD) Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Keith B.; Liu, Jian; Tian, Liqun; Barnes, Stephen; Yang, Qinglin; Wood, Philip A.

    2009-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is a common finding in human patients with inborn errors of long-chain fatty acid oxidation. Mice with either very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (VLCAD−/−) or long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (LCAD−/−) develop cardiac hypertrophy. Cardiac hypertrophy, initially measured using heart/body weight ratios, was manifested most severely in LCAD−/− male mice. VLCAD−/− mice, as a group, showed a mild increase in normalized cardiac mass (8.8% hypertrophy compared to all wild-type [WT] mice). In contrast, LCAD−/− mice as a group showed more severe cardiac hypertrophy (32.2% increase compared to all WT mice). Based on a clear male predilection, we investigated the role of dietary plant estrogenic compounds commonly found in mouse diets due to soy or alfalfa components providing natural phytoestrogens or isoflavones in cardioprotection of LCAD−/− mice. Male LCAD−/− mice fed an isoflavone-free test diet had more severe cardiac hypertrophy (58.1% hypertrophy compared to WT mice fed the same diet. There were no significant differences in the female groups fed any of the diets. Echocardiography measurement performed on male LCAD deficient mice fed a standard diet at ~3 months of age confirmed the substantial cardiac hypertrophy in these mice compared with WT controls. Left ventricular wall thickness of interventricular septum and posterior wall was remarkably increased in LCAD−/− mice compared with that of WT controls. Accordingly, the calculated LV mass after normalization to body weight was increased about 40% in the LCAD−/− mice compared with WT mice. In summary, we found that metabolic cardiomyopathy, expressed as hypertrophy, developed in mice due to either VLCAD deficiency or LCAD deficiency; however, LCAD deficiency was the most profound and appeared to be attenuated either by endogenous estrogen in females or phytoestrogens in the diet as isoflavones in males. PMID:19736549

  12. Inhibitory effect of quinolone antimicrobial and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on a medium chain acyl-CoA synthetase.

    PubMed

    Kasuya, F; Hiasa, M; Kawai, Y; Igarashi, K; Fukui, M

    2001-08-01

    The inhibitory effects of quinolone antimicrobial agents and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on purified mouse liver mitochondrial medium chain acyl-CoA synthetase catalyzing the first reaction of glycine conjugation were examined, using hexanoic acid as a substrate. Enoxacin, ofloxacin, nalidixic acid, diflunisal, salicylic acid, 2-hydroxynaphthoic acid, and 2-hydroxydodecanoic acid, which do not act as substrates, were potent inhibitors. Diflunisal, nalidixic acid, salicylic acid, 2-hydroxynaphthoic acid, and 2-hydroxydodecanoic acid inhibited competitively this medium chain acyl-CoA synthetase with K(i) values of 0.6, 12.4, 19.6, 13.4, and 15.0 microM, respectively. Enoxacin and ofloxacin inhibited this medium chain acyl-CoA synthetase in a mixed-type manner with K(i) values of 23.7 and 38.2 microM, respectively. Felbinac, which is a substrate, inhibited the activity of this medium chain acyl-CoA synthetase for hexanoic acid (IC50 = 25 microM). The concomitant presence of enoxacin and felbinac strongly inhibited this medium chain acyl-CoA synthetase. These findings indicate that medium chain acyl-CoA synthetases may be influenced by quinolone antimicrobial and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. PMID:11434910

  13. Actinobacterial Acyl Coenzyme A Synthetases Involved in Steroid Side-Chain Catabolism

    PubMed Central

    Casabon, Israël; Swain, Kendra; Crowe, Adam M.

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial steroid catabolism is an important component of the global carbon cycle and has applications in drug synthesis. Pathways for this catabolism involve multiple acyl coenzyme A (CoA) synthetases, which activate alkanoate substituents for β-oxidation. The functions of these synthetases are poorly understood. We enzymatically characterized four distinct acyl-CoA synthetases from the cholate catabolic pathway of Rhodococcus jostii RHA1 and the cholesterol catabolic pathway of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Phylogenetic analysis of 70 acyl-CoA synthetases predicted to be involved in steroid metabolism revealed that the characterized synthetases each represent an orthologous class with a distinct function in steroid side-chain degradation. The synthetases were specific for the length of alkanoate substituent. FadD19 from M. tuberculosis H37Rv (FadD19Mtb) transformed 3-oxo-4-cholesten-26-oate (kcat/Km = 0.33 × 105 ± 0.03 × 105 M−1 s−1) and represents orthologs that activate the C8 side chain of cholesterol. Both CasGRHA1 and FadD17Mtb are steroid-24-oyl-CoA synthetases. CasG and its orthologs activate the C5 side chain of cholate, while FadD17 and its orthologs appear to activate the C5 side chain of one or more cholesterol metabolites. CasIRHA1 is a steroid-22-oyl-CoA synthetase, representing orthologs that activate metabolites with a C3 side chain, which accumulate during cholate catabolism. CasI had similar apparent specificities for substrates with intact or extensively degraded steroid nuclei, exemplified by 3-oxo-23,24-bisnorchol-4-en-22-oate and 1β(2′-propanoate)-3aα-H-4α(3″-propanoate)-7aβ-methylhexahydro-5-indanone (kcat/Km = 2.4 × 105 ± 0.1 × 105 M−1 s−1 and 3.2 × 105 ± 0.3 × 105 M−1 s−1, respectively). Acyl-CoA synthetase classes involved in cholate catabolism were found in both Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria. Overall, this study provides insight into the physiological roles of acyl-CoA synthetases in steroid catabolism and

  14. Plasmodium falciparum Sir2A preferentially hydrolyzes medium and long chain fatty acyl lysine

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Anita Y.; Zhou, Yeyun; Khan, Saba; Deitsch, Kirk W.; Hao, Quan; Lin, Hening

    2011-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum Sir2A (PfSir2A), a member of the sirtuin family of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-dependent deacetylases, has been shown to regulate the expression of surface antigens to evade the detection by host immune surveillance. It is thought that PfSir2A achieves this by deacetylating histones. However, the deacetylase activity of PfSir2A is weak. Here we present enzymology and structural evidences supporting that PfSir2A catalyzes the hydrolysis of medium and long chain fatty acyl groups from lysine residues more efficiently. Furthermore, P. falciparum proteins are found to contain such fatty acyl lysine modifications that can be removed by purified PfSir2A in vitro. Together, the data suggest that the physiological function of PfSir2A in antigen variation may be achieved by removing medium and long chain fatty acyl groups from protein lysine residues. The robust activity of PfSir2A would also facilitate the development of PfSir2A inhibitors, which may have therapeutic value in malaria treatment. PMID:21992006

  15. Pulmonary lung surfactant synthetic peptide concentration-dependent modulation of DPPC and POPG acyl chain order in a DPPC:POPG:palmitic acid lipid mixture.

    PubMed

    Krill, S L; Gupta, S L; Smith, T

    1994-05-01

    Lung surfactant-associated protein interaction with lipid matrices and the effects on lipid thermotropic phase behavior are areas of active research. Many studies limit the lipids to a single or two-component system. The current investigation utilizes a three-lipid component matrix (DPPC:POPG:palmitic acid) to investigate the impact of a synthetic surfactant protein B fragment (SP-B 53-78 DiACM) on the dynamic surface activity of the lipid admixture as measured by a Wilhelmy surface balance. Also, the modulation of the individual lipid acyl chain order by the peptide within the lipid matrix is studied through the use of thermal perturbation FTIR spectroscopy. The data clearly demonstrate a concentration-dependent effect of the peptide on the surface activity with an improvement in the dynamic surface tension diagram characteristics (decreased surface tension and increased collapse plateau) especially at low, 0.36 M%, peptide concentrations. These effects are diminished upon further addition of the peptide. FTIR spectral data demonstrate that the peptide addition results in a significant increase in the acyl chain order of the DPPC and POPG components as measured by the position of the methylene stretching vibrational bands. DPPC is most sensitive to the peptide presence, while the palmitic acid is least affected. The transition temperatures of the individual lipids are also increased with the addition of the peptide. The presence of POPG in the matrix achieves the surface activity similarly seen with natural lung surfactant relative to a DPPC/palmitic acid lipid matrix alone. Its presence increases the sensitivity of the DPPC acyl chains to the presence of the peptide. These effects on the chain order are most probably related to the increased acyl chain fluidity which POPG imparts to the lipid matrix because of the presence of the cis double bond. The phosphatidylglycerol headgroup also adds a negative charge to the lipid matrix which enhances the peptide

  16. BROWN ADIPOSE TISSUE FUNCTION IN SHORT-CHAIN ACYL-COA DEHYDROGENASE DEFICIENT MICE

    PubMed Central

    Skilling, Helen; Coen, Paul M.; Fairfull, Liane; Ferrell, Robert E.; Goodpaster, Bret H.; Vockley, Jerry; Goetzman, Eric S.

    2010-01-01

    Brown adipose tissue is a highly specialized organ that uses mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation to fuel nonshivering thermogenesis. In mice, mutations in the acyl-CoA dehydrogenase family of fatty acid oxidation genes are associated with sensitivity to cold. Brown adipose tissue function has not previously been characterized in these knockout strains. Short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (SCAD) deficient mice were found to have increased brown adipose tissue mass as well as modest cardiac hypertrophy. Uncoupling protein-1 was reduced by 70% in brown adipose tissue and this was not due to a change in mitochondrial number, nor was it due to decreased signal transduction through protein kinase A which is known to be a major regulator of uncoupling protein-1 expression. PKA activity and in vitro lipolysis were normal in brown adipose tissue, although in white adipose tissue a modest increase in basal lipolysis was seen in SCAD−/ − mice. Finally, an in vivo norepinephrine challenge of brown adipose tissue thermogenesis revealed normal heat production in SCAD−/− mice. These results suggest that reduced brown adipose tissue function is not the major factor causing cold sensitivity in acyl-CoA dehydrogenase knockout strains. We speculate that other mechanisms such as shivering capacity, cardiac function, and reduced hepatic glycogen stores are involved. PMID:20727852

  17. Acyl chain length and charge effect on Tamoxifen-lipid model membrane interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilge, Duygu; Kazanci, Nadide; Severcan, Feride

    2013-05-01

    Tamoxifen (TAM), which is an antiestrogenic agent, is widely used during chemotherapy of breast, pancreas, brain and liver cancers. In this study, TAM and model membrane interactions in the form of multilamellar vesicles (MLVs) were studied for lipids containing different acyl chain length and different charge status as a function of different TAM (1, 6, 9 and 15 mol%) concentrations. Zwitterionic lipids namely dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC), and dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) lipids were used to see the acyl chain length effect and anionic dipalmitoyl phosphtidylglycerol (DPPG) lipid was used to see the charge effect. For this purpose Fourier transform-infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic and differential scanning calorimetric (DSC) techniques have been conducted. For zwitterionic lipid, concentration dependent different action of TAM was observed both in the gel and liquid crystalline phases by significantly increasing the lipid order and decreasing the dynamics for 1 mol% TAM, while decreasing the lipid order and increasing the dynamics of the lipids for higher concentrations (6, 9 and 15 mol%). However, different than neutral lipids, the dynamics and disorder of DPPG liposome increased for all TAM concentrations. The interactions between TAM and head group of multilamellar liposomes was monitored by analyzing the Cdbnd O stretching and PO2- antisymmetric double bond stretching bands. Increasing Tamoxifen concentrations led to a dehydration around these functional groups in the polar part of the lipids. DSC studies showed that for all types of lipids, TAM eliminates the pre-transition, shifts the main phase transition to lower temperatures and broadened the phase transition curve. The results indicate that not the acyl chain length but the charge status of the polar head group induces different effects on lipid membranes order and dynamics.

  18. Acyl-Chain Mismatch Driven Superlattice Arrangements in DPPC/DLPC/Cholesterol Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Cannon, Brian; Lewis, Anthony; Somerharju, Pentti; Virtanen, Jorma; Huang, Juyang; Cheng, Kwan Hon

    2010-01-01

    Fluorescence and infrared spectroscopy and cholesterol oxidase activity were employed to investigate the effect of phosphatidylcholine (PC) acyl chain length mismatch on the lateral organizations of lipids in liquid-ordered dipalmitoyl-PC/dilauroyl-PC/cholesterol (DPPC/DLPC/CHOL) bilayers. Plots of steady-state fluorescence emission anisotropy of diphenylhexatriene (DPH) labeled PC (DPH-PC) embedded in the DPPC/DLPC/CHOL bilayers revealed significant peaks at several DPPC mole fractions (YDPPC) when the cholesterol mole fraction (XCHOL) was fixed to particular values. Analogously, the DPH-PC anisotropy peaked at several critical XCHOL’s when YDPPC was fixed. Acyl chain C–H and C=O vibrational peak frequencies of native PC as well as the activity of cholesterol oxidase also revealed dips and peaks at similar YDPPC’s. Importantly, most of the observed peaks/dips coincide with the critical mole fractions predicted by the Superlattice (SL) model. A three-dimensional map of DPH-PC anisotropy versus composition in the range 0.32 ≤ XCHOL ≤ 0.50; 0.54 ≤ YDPPC ≤ 0.72 revealed a prominent peak at (XCHOL, YDPPC) ≈ (0.42, 0.64). This suggests a simultaneous presence of two different types of superlattices, one where cholesterol is the quest molecule in a PC host lattice and another where DPPC is the guest in the DLPC host lattice. Time-resolved measurements of DPH-PC fluorescence indicated the existence of an ordered, rotationally hindered environment of acyl chains at that “critical” composition consistent with the existence of SL arrangements. We propose that beside CHOL/PC superlattices, DPPC, and DLPC as well tend to adopt regular SL-like lateral distributions relative to each other, presumably because the less hydrophobic DLPC molecule is slightly displaced toward the aqueous phase, thus allowing more room and mobility for the head groups of both DPPC and DLPC as well as for the acyl chain tails of DPPC. The parallel presence of two kinds of

  19. DISTINCT TRANSCRIPTIONAL REGULATION OF LONG-CHAIN ACYL-COA SYNTHETASE ISOFORMS AND CYTOSOLIC THIOESTERASE 1 IN THE RODENT HEART BY FATTY ACIDS AND INSULIN

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The molecular mechanism(s) responsible for channeling long-chain fatty acids (LCFAs) into oxidative versus nonoxidative pathways is (are) poorly understood in the heart. Intracellular LCFAs are converted to long-chain fatty acyl-CoAs (LCFA-CoAs) by a family of long-chain acyl-CoA synthetases (ACSLs)...

  20. Modified branched-chain amino acid pathways give rise to acyl acids of sucrose esters exuded from tobacco leaf trichomes.

    PubMed

    Kandra, G; Severson, R; Wagner, G J

    1990-03-10

    A major diversion of carbon from branched-chain amino acid biosynthesis/catabolism to form acyl moieties of sucrose esters (6-O-acetyl-2,3,4-tri-O-acyl-alpha-D-glucopyranosyl-beta-D- fructofuranosides) was observed to be associated with specialized trichome head cells which secrete large amounts of sucrose esters. Surface chemistry and acetyl and acyl substituent groups of tobacco (T.I. 1068) sucrose esters were identified and quantified by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Sucrose esters were prominent surface constituents and 3-methylvaleric acid, 2- and 3-methylbutyric acid, and methylpropionic acid accounted for 60%, 25% and 9%, respectively, of total C3--C7 acyl substituents. Radiolabeled Thr, Ile, Val, Leu, pyruvate and Asp, metabolites of branched-chain amino acid pathways, were compared with radioactively labeled acetate and sucrose as donors of carbon to sucrose, acetyl and acyl components of sucrose esters using epidermal peels with undisturbed trichomes. Preparations of biosynthetically competent trichome heads (site of sucrose ester formation) were also examined. Results indicate that 3-methylvaleryl and 2-methylbutyryl groups are derived from the Thr pathway of branched-chain amino acid metabolism, 3-methylbutyryl and methylpropionyl groups are formed via the pyruvate pathway, and that acetyl groups are principally formed directly via acetyl-CoA. Arguments are presented which rule out participation of fatty acid synthase in the formation of prominent acyl acids. Results suggest that the shunting of carbon away from the biosynthesis of Val, Leu and Ile may be due to a low level of amino acid utilization in protein synthesis in specialized glandular head cells of trichomes. This would result in the availability of corresponding oxo acids for CoA activation and esterification to form sucrose esters. Preliminary evidence was found for the involvement of cycling reactions in oxo-acid-chain lengthening and for utilization of pyruvate-derived 2

  1. Acyl-chain remodeling of dioctanoyl-phosphatidylcholine in Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant defective in de novo and salvage phosphatidylcholine synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Kishino, Hideyuki; Eguchi, Hiroki; Takagi, Keiko; Horiuchi, Hiroyuki; Fukuda, Ryouichi; Ohta, Akinori

    2014-03-07

    Highlights: • Dioctanoyl-PC (diC8PC) supported growth of a yeast mutant defective in PC synthesis. • diC8PC was converted to PC species containing longer acyl residues in the mutant. • Both acyl residues of diC8PC were replaced by longer fatty acids in vitro. • This system will contribute to the elucidation of the acyl chain remodeling of PC. - Abstract: A yeast strain, in which endogenous phosphatidylcholine (PC) synthesis is controllable, was constructed by the replacement of the promoter of PCT1, encoding CTP:phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase, with GAL1 promoter in a double deletion mutant of PEM1 and PEM2, encoding phosphatidylethanolamine methyltransferase and phospholipid methyltransferase, respectively. This mutant did not grow in the glucose-containing medium, but the addition of dioctanoyl-phosphatidylcholine (diC8PC) supported its growth. Analyses of the metabolism of {sup 13}C-labeled diC8PC ((methyl-{sup 13}C){sub 3}-diC8PC) in this strain using electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry revealed that it was converted to PC species containing acyl residues of 16 or 18 carbons at both sn-1 and sn-2 positions. In addition, both acyl residues of (methyl-{sup 13}C){sub 3}-diC8PC were replaced with 16:1 acyl chains in the in vitro reaction using the yeast cell extract in the presence of palmitoleoyl-CoA. These results indicate that PC containing short acyl residues was remodeled to those with acyl chains of physiological length in yeast.

  2. Probing the Lipid-Protein Interface Using Model Transmembrane Peptides with a Covalently Linked Acyl Chain

    PubMed Central

    Nyholm, Thomas K.M.; van Duyl, Bianca; Rijkers, Dirk T.S.; Liskamp, Rob M.J.; Killian, J. Antoinette

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to gain insight into how interactions between proteins and lipids in membranes are sensed at the protein-lipid interface. As a probe to analyze this interface, we used deuterium-labeled acyl chains that were covalently linked to a model transmembrane peptide. First, a perdeuterated palmitoyl chain was coupled to the Trp-flanked peptide WALP23 (Ac-CGWW(LA)8LWWA-NH2), and the deuterium NMR spectrum was analyzed in di-C18:1-phosphatidylcholine (PC) bilayers. We found that the chain order of this peptide-linked chain is rather similar to that of a noncovalently coupled perdeuterated palmitoyl chain, except that it exhibits a slightly lower order. Similar results were obtained when site-specific deuterium labels were used and when the palmitoyl chain was attached to the more-hydrophobic model peptide WLP23 (Ac-CGWWL17WWA-NH2) or to the Lys-flanked peptide KALP23 (Ac-CGKK(LA)8LKKA-NH2). The experiments showed that the order of both the peptide-linked chains and the noncovalently coupled palmitoyl chains in the phospholipid bilayer increases in the order KALP23 < WALP23 < WLP23. Furthermore, changes in the bulk lipid bilayer thickness caused by varying the lipid composition from di-C14:1-PC to di-C18:1-PC or by including cholesterol were sensed rather similarly by the covalently coupled chain and the noncovalently coupled palmitoyl chains. The results indicate that the properties of lipids adjacent to transmembrane peptides mostly reflect the properties of the surrounding lipid bilayer, and hence that (at least for the single-span model peptides used in this study) annular lipids do not play a highly specific role in protein-lipid interactions. PMID:22004750

  3. Sequential Collision- and Ozone-Induced Dissociation Enables Assignment of Relative Acyl Chain Position in Triacylglycerols.

    PubMed

    Marshall, David L; Pham, Huong T; Bhujel, Mahendra; Chin, Jacqueline S R; Yew, Joanne Y; Mori, Kenji; Mitchell, Todd W; Blanksby, Stephen J

    2016-03-01

    Unambiguous identification of isomeric lipids by mass spectrometry represents a significant analytical challenge in contemporary lipidomics. Herein, the combination of collision-induced dissociation (CID) with ozone-induced dissociation (OzID) on an ion-trap mass spectrometer is applied to the identification of triacylglycerol (TG) isomers that vary only by the substitution pattern of fatty acyl (FA) chains esterified to the glycerol backbone. Isolated product ions attributed to loss of a single FA arising from CID of [TG + Na](+) ions react rapidly with ozone within the ion trap. The resulting CID/OzID spectra exhibit abundant ions that unequivocally reveal the relative position of FAs along the backbone. Isomeric TGs containing two or three different FA substituents are readily differentiated by diagnostic ions present in their CID/OzID spectra. Compatibility of this method with chromatographic separations enables the characterization of unusual TGs containing multiple short-chain FAs present in Drosophila. PMID:26799085

  4. Inhibition of Long Chain Fatty Acyl-CoA Synthetase (ACSL) and Ischemia Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Prior, Allan M.; Zhang, Man; Blakeman, Nina; Datta, Palika; Pham, Hung; Young, Lindon H.; Weis, Margaret T.; Hua, Duy H.

    2014-01-01

    Various triacsin C analogs, containing different alkenyl chains and carboxylic acid bioisoteres including 4-aminobenzoic acid, isothiazolidine dioxide, hydroxylamine, hydroxytriazene, and oxadiazolidine dione, were synthesized and their inhibitions of long chain fatty acyl-CoA synthetase (ACSL) were examined. Two methods, a cell-based assay of ACSL activity and an in situ [14C]-palmitate incorporation into extractable lipids were used to study the inhibition. Using an in vivo leukocyte recruitment inhibition protocol, the translocation of one or more cell adhesion molecules from the cytoplasm to the plasma membrane on either the endothelium or leukocyte or both was inhibited by inhibitors 1, 9, and triacsin C. The results suggest that inhibition of ACSL may attenuate the vascular inflammatory component associated with ischemia reperfusion injury and lead to a decrease of infarct expansion. PMID:24480468

  5. 2H nuclear magnetic resonance order parameter profiles suggest a change of molecular shape for phosphatidylcholines containing a polyunsaturated acyl chain.

    PubMed Central

    Holte, L. L.; Peter, S. A.; Sinnwell, T. M.; Gawrisch, K.

    1995-01-01

    Solid-state 2H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to determine the orientational order parameter profiles for a series of phosphatidylcholines with perdeuterated stearic acid, 18:0d35, in position sn-1 and 18:1 omega 9, 18:2 omega 6, 18:3 omega 3, 20:4 omega 6, 20:5 omega 3, or 22:6 omega 3 in position sn-2. The main phase transition temperatures were derived from a first moment analysis, and order parameter profiles of sn-1 chains were calculated from dePaked nuclear magnetic resonance powder patterns. Comparison of the profiles at 37 degrees C showed that unsaturation causes an inhomogenous disordering along the sn-1 chain. Increasing sn-2 chain unsaturation from one to six double bonds resulted in a 1.6-kHz decrease in quadrupolar splittings of the sn-1 chain in the upper half of the chain (or plateau region) and maximum splitting difference of 4.4 kHz at methylene carbon 14. The change in chain order corresponds to a decrease in the 18:0 chain length of 0.4 +/- 0.2 A with 18:2 omega 6 versus 18:1 omega 9 in position sn-2. Fatty acids containing three or more double bonds in sn-2 showed a decrease in sn-1 chain length of 0.7 +/- 0.2 A compared with 18:1 omega 9. The chain length of all lipids decreased with increasing temperature. Highly unsaturated phosphatidylcholines (three or more double bonds in sn-2) had shorter sn-1 chains, but the chain length was somewhat less sensitive to temperature. The profiles reveal that the sn-1 chain exhibits a selective increase in motional freedom in a region located toward the bottom half of the chain as sn-2 unsaturation is increased. This corresponds to an area increase around carbon atom number 14 that is three to four times greater than the increase for the top part of the chain. A similar asymmetric decrease in order, largest toward the methyl end of the chain, was observed when 1 -palmitoyl-2-oleoylphosphatidylethanolamine goes from a lamellar to an inverse hexagonal (H,,) phase. This is consistent with a

  6. [Medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency. Apropos of a case with demonstration of this enzyme deficiency].

    PubMed

    Collet, J P; Divry, P; Blanc, J F; Guibaud, P; David, M; Macabeo, V; Vibert, J; Hermier, M

    1984-12-01

    The medium chain acyl-CoA deshydrogenase defect: a new inherited metabolic disorder. This enzymatic defect blocks the catabolism of non esterified fatty acids during fasting. Thus, this disease is revealed by a coma due to hypoglycemia in a young child; the presence of dicarboxylic aciduria in such a situation is the main evidence for this diagnosis. Finally, the enzymatic studies performed on skin fibroblasts show a defect in medium chain acyl-CoA deshydrogenase. When a child is investigated away from a coma episode, the ketotic diet induces dicarboxylic aciduria but must be performed in an intensive care unit for its dangers. PMID:6535973

  7. Prolonged QTc interval in association with medium-chain acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Wiles, Jason R; Leslie, Nancy; Knilans, Timothy K; Akinbi, Henry

    2014-06-01

    Medium-chain acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase (MCAD) deficiency is the most common disorder of mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation. We report a term male infant who presented at 3 days of age with hypoglycemia, compensated metabolic acidosis, hypocalcemia, and prolonged QTc interval. Pregnancy was complicated by maternal premature atrial contractions and premature ventricular contractions. Prolongation of the QTc interval resolved after correction of metabolic derangements. The newborn screen was suggestive for MCAD deficiency, a diagnosis that was confirmed on genetic analysis that showed homozygosity for the disease-associated missense A985G mutation in the ACADM gene. This is the first report of acquired prolonged QTc in a neonate with MCAD deficiency, and it suggests that MCAD deficiency should be considered in the differential diagnoses of acute neonatal illnesses associated with electrocardiographic abnormality. We review the clinical presentation and diagnosis of MCAD deficiency in neonates. PMID:24799540

  8. Density fluctuations in saturated phospholipid bilayers increase as the acyl-chain length decreases.

    PubMed Central

    Ipsen, J H; Jørgensen, K; Mouritsen, O G

    1990-01-01

    A systematic computer simulation study is conducted for a model of the main phase transition of fully hydrated saturated diacyl phosphatidylcholine bilayers (DMPC, DPPC, and DSPC). With particular focus on the fluctuation effects on the thermal properties in the transition region, the study yields data for the specific heat, the lateral compressibility, and the lipid-domain size distribution. Via a simple model assumption the transmembrane passive ion permeability is derived from the lipid-domain interfacial measure. A comparative analysis of the various data shows, in agreement with a number of experiments, that the lateral density fluctuations and hence the response functions increase as the acyl-chain length is decreased. Images FIGURE 2 PMID:2291936

  9. An investigation into a cardiolipin acyl chain insertion site in cytochrome c.

    PubMed

    Rajagopal, Badri S; Silkstone, Gary G; Nicholls, Peter; Wilson, Michael T; Worrall, Jonathan A R

    2012-05-01

    Mitochondrial cytochrome c associates with the phosphoplipid cardiolipin (CL) through a combination of electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions. The latter occurs by insertion into cytochrome c of an acyl chain, resulting in the dissociation of the axial Met-80 heme-iron ligand. The resulting five coordinate cytochrome c/CL complex has peroxidatic properties leading to peroxidation of CL and dissociation of the complex. These events are considered to be pre-apoptotic and culminate with release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria into the cytoplasm. Two distinct surface regions on cytochrome c have been suggested to mediate CL acyl chain insertion and this study has probed one of these regions. We have constructed a series of alanine mutants aimed at disrupting a surface cleft formed between residues 67-71 and 82-85. The physicochemical properties, peroxidase activity, CL binding, and kinetics of carbon monoxide (CO) binding to the ferrous cytochrome c/CL complex have been assessed for the individual mutants. Our findings reveal that the majority of mutants are capable of binding CL in the same apparent stoichiometry as the wild-type protein, with the extent to which the Met-80 ligand is bound in the ferrous cytochrome c/CL complex being mutant specific at neutral pH. Mutation of the species conserved Arg-91 residue, that anchors the cleft, results in the greatest changes to physicochemical properties of the protein leading to a change in the CL binding ratio required to effect structural changes and to the ligand-exchange properties of the ferrous cytochrome c/CL complex. PMID:22365930

  10. Evidence for involvement of medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase in the metabolism of phenylbutyrate

    PubMed Central

    Kormanik, Kaitlyn; Kang, Heejung; Cuebas, Dean; Vockley, Jerry; Mohsen, Al-Walid

    2012-01-01

    Sodium phenylbutyrate is used for treating urea cycle disorders, providing an alternative for ammonia excretion. Following conversion to its CoA ester, phenylbutyryl-CoA is postulated to undergo one round of β-oxidation to phenylacetyl-CoA, the active metabolite. Molecular modeling suggests that medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD; EC 1.3.99.3), a key enzyme in straight chain fatty acid β-oxidation, could utilize phenylbutyryl-CoA as substrate. Moreover, phenylpropionyl-CoA has been shown to be a substrate for MCAD and its intermediates accumulate in patients with MCAD deficiency. We have examined the involvement of MCAD and other acyl-CoA dehydrogenases (ACADs) in the metabolism of phenylbutyryl-CoA. Anaerobic titration of purified recombinant human MCAD with phenylbutyryl-CoA caused changes in the MCAD spectrum that are similar to those induced by octanoyl-CoA, its bona fide substrate, and unique to the development of the charge transfer ternary complex. The calculated apparent dissociation constant (KD app) for these substrates was 2.16 μM and 0.12 μM, respectively. The MCAD reductive and oxidative half reactions were monitored using the electron transfer flavoprotein (ETF) fluorescence reduction assay. The catalytic efficiency and the Km for phenylbutyryl-CoA were 0.2 mM−1· sec−1 and 5.3 μM compared to 4.0 mM−1· sec−1 and 2.8 μM for octanoyl-CoA. Extracts of wild type and MCAD-deficient lymphoblast cells were tested for the ability to reduce ETF using phenylbutyryl-CoA as substrate. While ETF reduction activity was detected in extracts of wild type cells, it was undetectable in extracts of cells deficient in MCAD. The results are consistent with MCAD playing a key role in phenylbutyrate metabolism. PMID:23141465

  11. Identification of a Long-Chain Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Acyl-Coenzyme A Synthetase from the Diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana1

    PubMed Central

    Tonon, Thierry; Qing, Renwei; Harvey, David; Li, Yi; Larson, Tony Robert; Graham, Ian Alexander

    2005-01-01

    The draft genome of the diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana was searched for DNA sequences showing homology with long-chain acyl-coenzyme A synthetases (LACSs), since the corresponding enzyme may play a key role in the accumulation of health-beneficial polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) in triacylglycerol. Among the candidate genes identified, an open reading frame named TplacsA was found to be full length and constitutively expressed during cell cultivation. The predicted amino acid sequence of the corresponding protein, TpLACSA, exhibited typical features of acyl-coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) synthetases involved in the activation of long-chain fatty acids. Feeding experiments carried out in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) transformed with the algal gene showed that TpLACSA was able to activate a number of PUFAs, including eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Determination of acyl-CoA synthetase activities by direct measurement of acyl-CoAs produced in the presence of different PUFA substrates showed that TpLACSA was most active toward DHA. Heterologous expression also revealed that TplacsA transformants were able to incorporate more DHA in triacylglycerols than the control yeast. PMID:15821149

  12. Crystallization of the C-terminal domain of the mouse brain cytosolic long-chain acyl-CoA thioesterase

    SciTech Connect

    Serek, Robert; Forwood, Jade K.; Hume, David A.; Martin, Jennifer L.; Kobe, Bostjan

    2006-02-01

    The C-terminal domain of the mouse long-chain acyl-CoA thioesterase has been expressed in bacteria and crystallized by vapour diffusion. The crystals diffract to 2.4 Å resolution. The mammalian long-chain acyl-CoA thioesterase, the enzyme that catalyses the hydrolysis of acyl-CoAs to free fatty acids, contains two fused 4HBT (4-hydroxybenzoyl-CoA thioesterase) motifs. The C-terminal domain of the mouse long-chain acyl-CoA thioesterase (Acot7) has been expressed in bacteria and crystallized. The crystals were obtained by vapour diffusion using PEG 2000 MME as precipitant at pH 7.0 and 290 K. The crystals have the symmetry of space group R32 (unit-cell parameters a = b = 136.83, c = 99.82 Å, γ = 120°). Two molecules are expected in the asymmetric unit. The crystals diffract to 2.4 Å resolution using the laboratory X-ray source and are suitable for crystal structure determination.

  13. Mouse very long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Heinzer, Ann K; Kemp, Stephan; Lu, Jyh-Feng; Watkins, Paul A; Smith, Kirby D

    2002-08-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by accumulation of very long-chain fatty acids (VLCFA). This accumulation has been attributed to decreased VLCFA beta-oxidation and peroxisomal very long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase (VLCS) activity. The X-ALD gene, ABCD1, encodes a peroxisomal membrane ATP binding cassette transporter, ALDP, that is hypothesized to affect VLCS activity in peroxisomes by direct interaction with the VLCS enzyme. Recently, a VLCS gene that encodes a protein with significant sequence identity to known rat and human peroxisomal VLCS protein has been identified in mice. We find that the mouse VLCS gene (Vlcs) encodes an enzyme (Vlcs) with VLCS activity that localizes to peroxisomes and is expressed in X-ALD target tissues. We show that the expression of Vlcs in the peroxisomes of X-ALD mouse fibroblasts improves VLCFA beta-oxidation in these cells, implying a role for this enzyme in the biochemical abnormality of X-ALD. X-ALD mice, which accumulate VLCFA in tissues, show no change in the expression of Vlcs, the subcellular localization of Vlcs, or general peroxisomal VLCS activity. These observations imply that ALDP is not necessary for the proper expression or localization of Vlcs protein, and the control of VLCFA levels does not depend on the direct interaction of Vlcs and ALDP. PMID:12048192

  14. Comparative studies of Acyl-CoA dehydrogenases for monomethyl branched chain substrates in amino acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaojun; Wu, Long; Deng, Guisheng; Chen, Gong; Li, Nan; Chu, Xiusheng; Li, Ding

    2013-04-01

    Short/branched chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (SBCAD), isovaleryl-CoA dehydrogenase (IVD), and isobutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase (IBD) are involved in metabolism of isoleucine, leucine, and valine, respectively. These three enzymes all belong to acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (ACD) family, and catalyze the dehydrogenation of monomethyl branched-chain fatty acid (mmBCFA) thioester derivatives. In the present work, the catalytic properties of rat SBCAD, IVD, and IBD, including their substrate specificity, isomerase activity, and enzyme inhibition, were comparatively studied. Our results indicated that SBCAD has its catalytic properties relatively similar to those of straight-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenases in terms of their isomerase activity and enzyme inhibition, while IVD and IBD are different. IVD has relatively broader substrate specificity than those of the other two enzymes in accommodating various substrate analogs. The present study increased our understanding for the metabolism of monomethyl branched-chain fatty acids (mmBCFAs) and branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs), which should also be useful for selective control of a particular reaction through the design of specific inhibitors. PMID:23474214

  15. Binding of the Cationic Peptide (KL)4K to Lipid Monolayers at the Air-Water Interface: Effect of Lipid Headgroup Charge, Acyl Chain Length, and Acyl Chain Saturation.

    PubMed

    Hädicke, André; Blume, Alfred

    2016-04-28

    The binding of the cationic peptide (KL)4K to monolayers of different anionic lipids was determined by adsorption experiments. The chemical structure of the anionic phospholipids was changed in different ways. First, the hydrophobic region of phosphatidylglycerols was altered by elongation of the acyl chain length. Second, an unsaturated chain was introduced. Third, lipids with negatively charged headgroups of different chemical structure were compared. (KL)4K itself shows no surface activity and does not bind to monolayers of zwitterionic lipids. Analysis of (KL)4K binding to anionic lipid monolayers reveals a competition between two binding processes: (i) incorporation of the peptide into the acyl chain region (surface pressure increase) and (ii) electrostatic interaction screening the negative charges with reduction of charge repulsion (surface pressure decrease due to monolayer condensation). The lipid acyl chain length and the chemical structure of the headgroup have minor effects on the binding properties. However, a strong dependence on the phase state of the monolayer was observed. In the liquid-expanded (LE) phase, the fluid monolayer provides enough space, so that peptide insertion due to hydrophobic interactions dominates. For monolayers in the liquid-condensed (LC) phase, peptide binding followed by monolayer condensation is the main effect. PMID:27049846

  16. Dual mesomorphic assemblage of chitin normal acylates and rapid enthalpy relaxation of their side chains.

    PubMed

    Teramoto, Yoshikuni; Miyata, Tomoya; Nishio, Yoshiyuki

    2006-01-01

    Chitin derivatives having normalacyl groups (C(n)H(2n-1)O-; n = 4-20) were synthesized with pyridine, p-toluenesulfonyl chloride, and normal alkanoic acid in an N,N-dimethylacetamide-lithium chloride homogeneous system. The products (C(n)-ACs; degree of acyl substitution, DS = 1.7-1.9) showed an n-dependent thermal transition behavior: no evident transition (n = 4-10), a glass transition (n = 12 and 14), and a pseudo-first-order phase transition (n = 16-20), the latter two occurring usually below room temperature when examined by differential scanning calorimetry. Wide-angle X-ray diffractometry (WAXD) at 20 degrees C displayed a sharp diffraction peak (2theta = 2 degrees -7 degrees ) and a diffuse halo (2theta approximately 20 degrees ) for the respective C(n)-ACs. The former d-spacing (1.5-3.6 nm) increased with an increase in n to yield two stages of mutually different increasing rates, which reflects a systematic n-dependence of the period of a layered structure of the main chains. The molecular assembly of C(n)-ACs exhibited "dual mesomorphy"; nematic ordering for the semirigid carbohydrate trunk and smectic one for the flexible side chains. On the other hand, WAXD profiles of C(n)-ACs (n = 14-18) indicated almost no temperature dependence from -150 to +220 degrees C. Therefore, it was reasonably assumed that the pseudo-first-order transition observed in thermograms of C(n)-ACs (n = 16-20) was due to the enthalpy relaxation of the side-chain assemblage. An insight was provided into the kinetics of the characteristic aging behavior as a liquid-crystalline glass, in comparison with the corresponding data for other noncrystalline macromolecules. PMID:16398515

  17. Effects of short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase on cardiomyocyte apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Zhenhua; Huang, Qiuju; Shu, Zhaohui; Liu, Peiqing; Chen, Shaorui; Pan, Xuediao; Zang, Linquan; Zhou, Sigui

    2016-07-01

    Short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (SCAD), a key enzyme of fatty acid β-oxidation, plays an important role in cardiac hypertrophy. However, its effect on the cardiomyocyte apoptosis remains unknown. We aimed to determine the role of SCAD in tert-butyl hydroperoxide (tBHP)-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis. The mRNA and protein expression of SCAD were significantly down-regulated in the cardiomyocyte apoptosis model. Inhibition of SCAD with siRNA-1186 significantly decreased SCAD expression, enzyme activity and ATP content, but obviously increased the content of free fatty acids. Meanwhile, SCAD siRNA treatment triggered the same apoptosis as cardiomyocytes treated with tBHP, such as the increase in cell apoptotic rate, the activation of caspase3 and the decrease in the Bcl-2/Bax ratio, which showed that SCAD may play an important role in primary cardiomyocyte apoptosis. The changes of phosphonate AMP-activated protein kinase α (p-AMPKα) and Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) in cardiomyocyte apoptosis were consistent with that of SCAD. Furthermore, PPARα activator fenofibrate and AMPKα activator AICAR treatment significantly increased the expression of SCAD and inhibited cardiomyocyte apoptosis. In conclusion, for the first time our findings directly demonstrated that SCAD may be as a new target to prevent cardiomyocyte apoptosis through the AMPK/PPARα/SCAD signal pathways. PMID:26989860

  18. Biophysical Characterization of a New Phospholipid Analogue with a Spin-Labeled Unsaturated Fatty Acyl Chain

    PubMed Central

    Bunge, Andreas; Windeck, Anne-Katrin; Pomorski, Thomas; Schiller, Jürgen; Herrmann, Andreas; Huster, Daniel; Müller, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Spin-labeled analogs of phospholipids have been used widely to characterize the biophysical properties of membranes. We describe synthesis and application of a new spin-labeled phospholipid analog, SL-POPC. The advantage of this molecule is that the EPR active doxyl group is linked to an unsaturated fatty acyl chain different to saturated phospholipid analogs used so far. The need for those analogs arises from the fact that biological membranes contain unsaturated phospholipids to a large extent. The biophysical properties of SL-POPC in membranes were characterized using EPR and NMR spectroscopy and compared with those of the saturated spin-labeled phospholipid, SL-PSPC. To this end, POPC membranes were labeled with either analog to assess whether the spin-labeled counterpart SL-POPC mimics the membrane properties better than the often used SL-PSPC. The results show that SL-POPC and SL-PSPC explore different molecular environments of the bilayer, and that the type and degree of perturbation of bilayer caused by the label moiety also differs between both analogs. We found that SL-POPC is more appropriate to assess the versatile dynamics of POPC membranes than SL-PSPC. PMID:19186138

  19. Insights into Medium-chain Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase Structure by Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Bonito, Cátia A; Leandro, Paula; Ventura, Fátima V; Guedes, Rita C

    2016-08-01

    The medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD) is a mitochondrial enzyme that catalyzes the first step of mitochondrial fatty acid β-oxidation (mFAO) pathway. Its deficiency is the most common genetic disorder of mFAO. Many of the MCAD disease-causing variants, including the most common p.K304E variant, show loss of function due to protein misfolding. Herein, we used molecular dynamics simulations to provide insights into the structural stability and dynamic behavior of MCAD wild-type (MCADwt) and validate a structure that would allow reliable new studies on its variants. Our results revealed that in both proteins the flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) has an important structural role on the tetramer stability and also in maintaining the volume of the enzyme catalytic pockets. We confirmed that the presence of substrate changes the dynamics of the catalytic pockets and increases FAD affinity. A comparison between the porcine MCADwt (pMCADwt) and human MCADwt (hMCADwt) structures revealed that both proteins are essentially similar and that the reversion of the double mutant E376G/T255E of hMCAD enzyme does not affect the structure of the protein neither its behavior in simulation. Our validated hMCADwt structure is crucial for complementing and accelerating the experimental studies aiming for the discovery and development of potential stabilizers of MCAD variants as candidates for the treatment of MCAD deficiency (MCADD). PMID:26992026

  20. Insights into Sphingolipid Miscibility: Separate Observation of Sphingomyelin and Ceramide N-Acyl Chain Melting

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Sherry S.W.; Busto, Jon V.; Keyvanloo, Amir; Goñi, Félix M.; Thewalt, Jenifer

    2012-01-01

    Ceramide produced from sphingomyelin in the plasma membrane is purported to affect signaling through changes in the membrane’s physical properties. Thermal behavior of N-palmitoyl sphingomyelin (PSM) and N-palmitoyl ceramide (PCer) mixtures in excess water has been monitored by 2H NMR spectroscopy and compared to differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) data. The alternate use of either perdeuterated or proton-based N-acyl chain PSM and PCer in our 2H NMR studies has allowed the separate observation of gel-fluid transitions in each lipid in the presence of the other one, and this in turn has provided direct information on the lipids’ miscibility over a wide temperature range. The results provide further evidence of the stabilization of the PSM gel state by PCer. Moreover, overlapping NMR and DSC data reveal that the DSC-signals parallel the melting of the major component (PSM) except at intermediate (20 and 30 mol %) fractions of PCer. In such cases, the DSC endotherm reports on the presumably highly cooperative melting of PCer. Up to at least 50 mol % PCer, PSM and PCer mix ideally in the liquid crystalline phase; in the gel phase, PCer becomes incorporated into PSM:PCer membranes with no evidence of pure solid PCer. PMID:23260048

  1. Electron spin resonance studies of acyl chain motion in reconstituted nicotinic acetylcholine receptor membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Raines, D E; Wu, G; Dalton, L A; Miller, K W

    1995-01-01

    The electron spin resonance spectra of spin-label positional isomers of stearic acid (n-SASL) incorporated into nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAcChoR) reconstituted into dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC) were deconvoluted into bilayer- and protein-associated components by subtraction under conditions of slow exchange. The selectivity of n-SASL (n = 6, 9, 12, and 14) for the lipid-protein interface of the nAcChoR was threefold greater than that of DOPC and independent of the spin label position. The temperature at which exchange became apparent as judged from lineshape broadening of the mobile lipid component spectrum was dependent upon the position of the spin-label moiety; near the bilayer center, exchange broadening occurred at lower temperatures than it did closer to the lipid headgroup. This suggests that the lipid headgroup region of boundary lipids is relatively fixed, whereas its acyl chain whips on and off the protein with increasing frequency near the bilayer center. Motions on the microsecond time scale were examined by microwave power saturation. Each n-SASL saturated more readily when incorporated into vesicles containing the nAcChoR than when in pure DOPC liposomes. Therefore, lipid mobility is perturbed by the nAcChoR on the microsecond time scale with an apparent magnitude that is relatively modest, probably due to exchange on this time scale. PMID:8527664

  2. Altering the sphingolipid acyl chain composition prevents LPS/GLN-mediated hepatic failure in mice by disrupting TNFR1 internalization

    PubMed Central

    Ali, M; Fritsch, J; Zigdon, H; Pewzner-Jung, Y; Schütze, S; Futerman, A H

    2013-01-01

    The involvement of ceramide in death receptor-mediated apoptosis has been widely examined with most studies focusing on the role of ceramide generated from sphingomyelin hydrolysis. We now analyze the effect of the ceramide acyl chain length by studying tumor necrosis factor α receptor-1 (TNFR1)-mediated apoptosis in a ceramide synthase 2 (CerS2) null mouse, which cannot synthesize very-long acyl chain ceramides. CerS2 null mice were resistant to lipopolysaccharide/galactosamine-mediated fulminant hepatic failure even though TNFα secretion from macrophages was unaffected. Cultured hepatocytes were also insensitive to TNFα-mediated apoptosis. In addition, in both liver and in hepatocytes, caspase activities were not elevated, consistent with inhibition of TNFR1 pro-apoptotic signaling. In contrast, Fas receptor activation resulted in the death of CerS2 null mice. Caspase activation was blocked because of the inability of CerS2 null mice to internalize the TNFR1; whereas Fc-TNFα was internalized to a perinuclear region in hepatocytes from wild-type mice, no internalization was detected in CerS2 null mice. Our results indicate that altering the acyl chain composition of sphingolipids inhibits TNFR1 internalization and inhibits selective pro-apoptotic downstream signaling for apoptosis. PMID:24263103

  3. Concentrations of long-chain acyl-acyl carrier proteins during fatty acid synthesis by chloroplasts isolated from pea (Pisum sativum), safflower (Carthamus tinctoris), and amaranthus (Amaranthus lividus) leaves

    SciTech Connect

    Roughan, G.; Nishida, I. )

    1990-01-01

    Fatty acid synthesis from (1-14C)acetate by chloroplasts isolated from peas and amaranthus was linear for at least 15 min, whereas incorporation of the tracer into long-chain acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) did not increase after 2-3 min. When reactions were transferred to the dark after 3-5 min, long-chain acyl-ACPs lost about 90% of their radioactivity and total fatty acids retained all of theirs. Half-lives of the long-chain acyl-ACPs were estimated to be 10-15 s. Concentrations of palmitoyl-, stearoyl-, and oleoyl-ACP as indicated by equilibrium labeling during steady-state fatty acid synthesis, ranged from 0.6-1.1, 0.2-0.7, and 0.4-1.6 microM, respectively, for peas and from 1.6-1.9, 1.3-2.6, and 0.6-1.4 microM, respectively, for amaranthus. These values are based on a chloroplast volume of 47 microliters/mg chlorophyll and varied according to the mode of the incubation. A slow increase in activity of the fatty acid synthetase in safflower chloroplasts resulted in long-chain acyl-ACPs continuing to incorporate labeled acetate for 10 min. Upon re-illumination following a dark break, however, both fatty acid synthetase activity and acyl-ACP concentrations increased very rapidly. Palmitoyl-ACP was present at concentrations up to 2.5 microM in safflower chloroplasts, whereas those of stearoyl- and oleoyl-ACPs were in the lower ranges measured for peas. Acyl-ACPs were routinely separated from extracts of chloroplasts that had been synthesising long-chain fatty acids from labeled acetate by a minor modification of the method of Mancha et al. The results compared favorably with those obtained using alternative analytical methods such as adsorption to filter paper and partition chromatography on silicic acid columns.

  4. Medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency human genome epidemiology review.

    PubMed

    Wang, S S; Fernhoff, P M; Hannon, W H; Khoury, M J

    1999-01-01

    Medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD) is a tetrameric flavoprotein essential for the beta-oxidation of medium chain fatty acids. MCAD deficiency (MCADD) is an inherited error of fatty acid metabolism. The gene for MCAD is located on chromosome one (1p31). One variant of the MCAD gene, G985A, a point mutation causing a change from lysine to glutamate at position 304 (K304E) in the mature MCAD protein, has been found in 90% of the alleles in MCADD patients identified retrospectively. There is a high frequency of MCADD among people of Northern European descent, which is believed to be due to a founder effect. MCADD is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. Of patients clinically diagnosed with MCADD, 81% who have been identified retrospectively are homozygous for K304E, and 18% are compound heterozygotes for K304E. Clinical data on the probability of clinical disease indicates that MCADD patients are at risk for the following outcomes: hypoglycemia, vomiting, lethargy, encephalopathy, respiratory arrest, hepatomegaly, seizures, apnea, cardiac arrest, coma, and sudden and unexpected death. Long-term outcomes include developmental and behavioral disability, chronic muscle weakness, failure to thrive, cerebral palsy, and attention deficit disorder (ADD). Differences in clinical disease specific to allelic variants have not been documented. Factors that may increase risk for disease onset or modify disease severity are age when the first episode occurred, fasting, and presence of infection. Acute attacks must be treated immediately with appropriate intravenous doses of glucose. For those diagnosed, long-term management of the disease includes preventing stress caused by fasting and maintaining a high-carbohydrate, reduced-fat diet, and carnitine supplementation. Hospitalization costs attributable to morbidity and mortality from MCADD are unknown; MCADD is not a diagnosis in the International Classification of Disease, 10th Revision (ICD-10) codebook. Furthermore

  5. Biosynthesis of triacylglycerols containing very long chain monounsaturated acyl moieties in developing seeds. [Lunaria annua L. ; Sinapis alba L

    SciTech Connect

    Fehling, E.; Murphy, D.J.; Mukherjee, K.D. )

    1990-10-01

    Particulate (15,000g) fractions from developing seeds of honesty (Lunaria annua L.) and mustard (Sinapis alba L.) synthesize radioactive very long chain monounsaturated fatty acids (gadoleic, erucic, and nervonic) from (1-{sup 14}C)oleoyl-CoA and malonyl-CoA or from oleoyl-CoA and (2-{sup 14}C)malonyl-CoA. The very long chain monounsaturated fatty acids are rapidly channeled to triacylglycerols and other acyl lipids without intermediate accumulation of their CoA thioesters. When (1-{sup 14}C)oleoyl-CoA is used as the radioactive substrate, phosphatidylcholines and other phospholipids are most extensively radiolabeled by oleoyl moieties rather than by very long chain monounsaturated acyl moieties. When (2-{sup 14}C)malonyl-CoA is used as the radioactive substrate, no radioactive oleic acid is formed and the newly synthesized very long chain monounsaturated fatty acids are extensively incorporated into phosphatidylcholines and other phospholipids as well as triacylglycerols. The pattern of labeling of the key intermediates of the Kennedy pathway, e.g. lysophosphatidic acids, phosphatidic acids, and diacylglycerols by the newly synthesized very long chain monounsaturated fatty acids is consistent with the operation of this pathway in the biosynthesis of triacylglycerols.

  6. Clinical aspects of short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Wanders, Ronald J. A.; Wijburg, Frits A.

    2010-01-01

    Short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (SCADD) is an autosomal recessive inborn error of mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation. SCADD is biochemically characterized by increased C4-carnitine in plasma and ethylmalonic acid in urine. The diagnosis of SCADD is confirmed by DNA analysis showing SCAD gene mutations and/or variants. SCAD gene variants are present in homozygous form in approximately 6% of the general population and considered to confer susceptibility to development of clinical disease. Clinically, SCADD generally appears to present early in life and to be most frequently associated with developmental delay, hypotonia, epilepsy, behavioral disorders, and hypoglycemia. However, these symptoms often ameliorate and even disappear spontaneously during follow-up and were found to be unrelated to the SCAD genotype. In addition, in some cases, symptoms initially attributed to SCADD could later be explained by other causes. Finally, SCADD relatives of SCADD patients as well as almost all SCADD individuals diagnosed by neonatal screening remained asymptomatic during follow-up. This potential lack of clinical consequences of SCADD has several implications. First, the diagnosis of SCADD should never preclude extension of the diagnostic workup for other potential causes of the observed symptoms. Second, patients and parents should be clearly informed about the potential lack of relevance of the disorder to avoid unfounded anxiety. Furthermore, to date, SCADD is not an optimal candidate for inclusion in newborn screening programs. More studies are needed to fully establish the relevance of SCADD and solve the question as to whether SCADD is involved in a multifactorial disease or represents a nondisease. PMID:20429031

  7. Acyl chain-dependent effect of lysophosphatidylcholine on endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation.

    PubMed

    Rao, Shailaja P; Riederer, Monika; Lechleitner, Margarete; Hermansson, Martin; Desoye, Gernot; Hallström, Seth; Graier, Wolfgang F; Frank, Saša

    2013-01-01

    Previously we identified palmitoyl-, oleoyl-, linoleoyl-, and arachidonoyl-lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC 16:0, 18:1, 18:2 and 20:4) as the most prominent LPC species generated by endothelial lipase (EL). In the present study, we examined the impact of those LPC on acetylcholine (ACh)- induced vascular relaxation. All tested LPC attenuated ACh-induced relaxation, measured ex vivo, using mouse aortic rings and wire myography. The rank order of potency was as follows: 18:2>20:4>16:0>18:1. The attenuating effect of LPC 16:0 on relaxation was augmented by indomethacin-mediated cyclooxygenase (COX)-inhibition and CAY10441, a prostacyclin (PGI2)- receptor (IP) antagonist. Relaxation attenuated by LPC 20:4 and 18:2 was improved by indomethacin and SQ29548, a thromboxane A2 (TXA2)- receptor antagonist. The effect of LPC 20:4 could also be improved by TXA2- and PGI2-synthase inhibitors. As determined by EIA assays, the tested LPC promoted secretion of PGI2, TXA2, PGF2α, and PGE2, however, with markedly different potencies. LPC 16:0 was the most potent inducer of superoxide anion production by mouse aortic rings, followed by LPC 18:2, 20:4 and 18:1, respectively. The strong antioxidant tempol recovered relaxation impairment caused by LPC 18:2, 18:1 and 20:4, but not by LPC 16:0. The tested LPC attenuate ACh-induced relaxation through induction of proconstricting prostanoids and superoxide anions. The potency of attenuating relaxation and the relative contribution of underlying mechanisms are strongly related to LPC acyl-chain length and degree of saturation. PMID:23741477

  8. Changes in short-chain acyl-coA dehydrogenase during rat cardiac development and stress

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jinxian; Xu, Lipeng; Huang, Qiuju; Luo, Jiani; Liu, Peiqing; Chen, Shaorui; Yuan, Xi; Lu, Yao; Wang, Ping; Zhou, Sigui

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the expression of short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (SCAD), a key enzyme of fatty acid β-oxidation, during rat heart development and the difference of SCAD between pathological and physiological cardiac hypertrophy. The expression of SCAD was lowest in the foetal and neonatal heart, which had time-dependent increase during normal heart development. In contrast, a significant decrease in SCAD expression was observed in different ages of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). On the other hand, swim-trained rats developed physiological cardiac hypertrophy, whereas SHR developed pathological cardiac hypertrophy. The two kinds of cardiac hypertrophy exhibited divergent SCAD changes in myocardial fatty acids utilization. In addition, the expression of SCAD was significantly decreased in pathological cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, however, increased in physiological cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. SCAD siRNA treatment triggered the pathological cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, which showed that the down-regulation of SCAD expression may play an important role in pathological cardiac hypertrophy. The changes in peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) was accordant with that of SCAD. Moreover, the specific PPARα ligand fenofibrate treatment increased the expression of SCAD and inhibited pathological cardiac hypertrophy. Therefore, we speculate that the down-regulated expression of SCAD in pathological cardiac hypertrophy may be responsible for ‘the recapitulation of foetal energy metabolism’. The deactivation of PPARα may result in the decrease in SCAD expression in pathological cardiac hypertrophy. Changes in SCAD are different in pathological and physiological cardiac hypertrophy, which may be used as the molecular markers of pathological and physiological cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:25753319

  9. Regulation of gene expression through a transcriptional repressor that senses acyl-chain length in membrane phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Hofbauer, Harald F; Schopf, Florian H; Schleifer, Hannes; Knittelfelder, Oskar L; Pieber, Bartholomäus; Rechberger, Gerald N; Wolinski, Heimo; Gaspar, Maria L; Kappe, C Oliver; Stadlmann, Johannes; Mechtler, Karl; Zenz, Alexandra; Lohner, Karl; Tehlivets, Oksana; Henry, Susan A; Kohlwein, Sepp D

    2014-06-23

    Membrane phospholipids typically contain fatty acids (FAs) of 16 and 18 carbon atoms. This particular chain length is evolutionarily highly conserved and presumably provides maximum stability and dynamic properties to biological membranes in response to nutritional or environmental cues. Here, we show that the relative proportion of C16 versus C18 FAs is regulated by the activity of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (Acc1), the first and rate-limiting enzyme of FA de novo synthesis. Acc1 activity is attenuated by AMPK/Snf1-dependent phosphorylation, which is required to maintain an appropriate acyl-chain length distribution. Moreover, we find that the transcriptional repressor Opi1 preferentially binds to C16 over C18 phosphatidic acid (PA) species: thus, C16-chain containing PA sequesters Opi1 more effectively to the ER, enabling AMPK/Snf1 control of PA acyl-chain length to determine the degree of derepression of Opi1 target genes. These findings reveal an unexpected regulatory link between the major energy-sensing kinase, membrane lipid composition, and transcription. PMID:24960695

  10. Interactions of the C-terminus of lung surfactant protein B with lipid bilayers are modulated by acyl chain saturation.

    PubMed

    Antharam, Vijay C; Farver, R Suzanne; Kuznetsova, Anna; Sippel, Katherine H; Mills, Frank D; Elliott, Douglas W; Sternin, Edward; Long, Joanna R

    2008-11-01

    Lung surfactant protein B (SP-B) is critical to minimizing surface tension in the alveoli. The C-terminus of SP-B, residues 59-80, has much of the surface activity of the full protein and serves as a template for the development of synthetic surfactant replacements. The molecular mechanisms responsible for its ability to restore lung compliance were investigated with circular dichroism, differential scanning calorimetry, and (31)P and (2)H solid-state NMR spectroscopy. SP-B(59-80) forms an amphipathic helix which alters lipid organization and acyl chain dynamics in fluid lamellar phase 4:1 DPPC:POPG and 3:1 POPC:POPG MLVs. At higher levels of SP-B(59-80) in the POPC:POPG lipid system a transition to a nonlamellar phase is observed while DPPC:POPG mixtures remain in a lamellar phase. Deuterium NMR shows an increase in acyl chain order in DPPC:POPG MLVs on addition of SP-B(59-80); in POPC:POPG MLVs, acyl chain order parameters decrease. Our results indicate SP-B(59-80) penetrates deeply into DPPC:POPG bilayers and binds more peripherally to POPC:POPG bilayers. Similar behavior has been observed for KL(4), a peptide mimetic of SP-B which was originally designed using SP-B(59-80) as a template and has been clinically demonstrated to be successful in treating respiratory distress syndrome. The ability of these helical peptides to differentially partition into lipid lamellae based on their degree of monounsaturation and subsequent changes in lipid dynamics suggest a mechanism for lipid organization and trafficking within the dynamic lung environment. PMID:18694722

  11. Interactions of the C-terminus of pulmonary surfactant B with lipid bilayers are modulated by acyl chain saturation

    PubMed Central

    Antharam, Vijay C.; Farver, R. Suzanne; Kuznetsova, Anna; Sippel, Katherine H.; Mills, Frank D.; Elliott, Douglas W.; Sternin, Edward; Long, Joanna R.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Lung surfactant protein B (SP-B) is critical to minimizing surface tension in the alveoli. The C-terminus of SP-B, residues 59-80, has much of the surface activity of the full protein and serves as a template for the development of synthetic surfactant replacements. The molecular mechanisms responsible for its ability to restore lung compliance were investigated with circular dichroism, differential scanning calorimetry, and 31P and 2H solid-state NMR spectroscopy. SP-B59-80 forms an amphipathic helix which alters lipid organization and acyl chain dynamics in fluid lamellar phase 4:1 DPPC:POPG and 3:1 POPC:POPG MLVs. At higher levels of SP-B59-80 in the POPC:POPG lipid system a transition to a nonlamellar phase is observed while DPPC:POPG mixtures remain in a lamellar phase. Deuterium NMR shows an increase in acyl chain order in DPPC:POPG MLVs on addition of SP-B59-80; in POPC:POPG MLVs, acyl chain order parameters decrease. Our results indicate SP-B59-80 penetrates deeply into DPPC:POPG bilayers and binds more peripherally to POPC:POPG bilayers. Similar behavior has been observed for KL4, a peptide mimetic of SP-B which was originally designed using SP-B59-80 as a template and has been clinically demonstrated to be successful in treating respiratory distress syndrome. The ability of these helical peptides to differentially partition into lipid lamellae containing varying levels of monounsaturation and subsequent changes in lipid dynamics suggest a mechanism for lipid organization and trafficking within the dynamic lung environment. PMID:18694722

  12. Identification of Regiospecific Isomers of Diricinoleoyl-acyl-glycerols containing one non-ricinoleoyl chain in Castor Oil by ESI-MS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    HPLC fractions of diricinoleoyl-acyl-glycerols containing one non-ricinoleoyl chain from castor oil were used to identify the regiospecific location of this non-ricinoleoyl chain on the glycerol backbone using electrospray ionization-MS3 of lithium adducts. The regiospecific ions used were from...

  13. Two Predicted Transmembrane Domains Exclude Very Long Chain Fatty acyl-CoAs from the Active Site of Mouse Wax Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Kawelke, Steffen; Feussner, Ivo

    2015-01-01

    Wax esters are used as coatings or storage lipids in all kingdoms of life. They are synthesized from a fatty alcohol and an acyl-CoA by wax synthases. In order to get insights into the structure-function relationships of a wax synthase from Mus musculus, a domain swap experiment between the mouse acyl-CoA:wax alcohol acyltransferase (AWAT2) and the homologous mouse acyl-CoA:diacylglycerol O-acyltransferase 2 (DGAT2) was performed. This showed that the substrate specificity of AWAT2 is partially determined by two predicted transmembrane domains near the amino terminus of AWAT2. Upon exchange of the two domains for the respective part of DGAT2, the resulting chimeric enzyme was capable of incorporating up to 20% of very long acyl chains in the wax esters upon expression in S. cerevisiae strain H1246. The amount of very long acyl chains in wax esters synthesized by wild type AWAT2 was negligible. The effect was narrowed down to a single amino acid position within one of the predicted membrane domains, the AWAT2 N36R variant. Taken together, we provide first evidence that two predicted transmembrane domains in AWAT2 are involved in determining its acyl chain length specificity. PMID:26714272

  14. Phospholipid profiling identifies acyl chain elongation as a ubiquitous trait and potential target for the treatment of lung squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Marien, Eyra; Meister, Michael; Muley, Thomas; del Pulgar, Teresa Gomez; Derua, Rita; Spraggins, Jeffrey M.; Van de Plas, Raf; Vanderhoydonc, Frank; Machiels, Jelle; Binda, Maria Mercedes; Dehairs, Jonas; Willette-Brown, Jami; Hu, Yinling; Dienemann, Hendrik; Thomas, Michael; Schnabel, Philipp A.; Caprioli, Richard M.; Lacal, Juan Carlos; Waelkens, Etienne; Swinnen, Johannes V.

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death. Beyond first line treatment, few therapeutic options are available, particularly for squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Here, we have explored the phospholipidomes of 30 human SCCs and found that they almost invariably (in 96.7% of cases) contain phospholipids with longer acyl chains compared to matched normal tissues. This trait was confirmed using in situ 2D-imaging MS on tissue sections and by phospholipidomics of tumor and normal lung tissue of the L-IkkαKA/KA mouse model of lung SCC. In both human and mouse, the increase in acyl chain length in cancer tissue was accompanied by significant changes in the expression of acyl chain elongases (ELOVLs). Functional screening of differentially expressed ELOVLs by selective gene knockdown in SCC cell lines followed by phospholipidomics revealed ELOVL6 as the main elongation enzyme responsible for acyl chain elongation in cancer cells. Interestingly, inhibition of ELOVL6 drastically reduced colony formation of multiple SCC cell lines in vitro and significantly attenuated their growth as xenografts in vivo in mouse models. These findings identify acyl chain elongation as one of the most common traits of lung SCC discovered so far and pinpoint ELOVL6 as a novel potential target for cancer intervention. PMID:26862848

  15. Regulation of Membrane Proteins by Dietary Lipids: Effects of Cholesterol and Docosahexaenoic Acid Acyl Chain-Containing Phospholipids on Rhodopsin Stability and Function

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Michael P.; Mitchell, Drake C.

    2008-01-01

    Purified bovine rhodopsin was reconstituted into vesicles consisting of 1-stearoyl-2-oleoyl phosphatidylcholine or 1-stearoyl-2-docosahexaenoyl phosphatidylcholine with and without 30 mol % cholesterol. Rhodopsin stability was examined using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The thermal unfolding transition temperature (Tm) of rhodopsin was scan rate-dependent, demonstrating the presence of a rate-limited component of denaturation. The activation energy of this kinetically controlled process (Ea) was determined from DSC thermograms by four separate methods. Both Tm and Ea varied with bilayer composition. Cholesterol increased the Tm both the presence and absence of docosahexaenoic acid acyl chains (DHA). In contrast, cholesterol lowered Ea in the absence of DHA, but raised Ea in the presence of 20 mol % DHA-containing phospholipid. The relative acyl chain packing order was determined from measurements of diphenylhexatriene fluorescence anisotropy decay. The Tm for thermal unfolding was inversely related to acyl chain packing order. Rhodopsin kinetic stability (Ea) was reduced in highly ordered or disordered membranes. Maximal kinetic stability was found within the range of acyl chain order found in native bovine rod outer segment disk membranes. The results demonstrate that membrane composition has distinct effects on the thermal versus kinetic stabilities of membrane proteins, and suggests that a balance between membrane constituents with opposite effects on acyl chain packing, such as DHA and cholesterol, may be required for maximum protein stability. PMID:18424497

  16. Chlamydia trachomatis growth and development requires the activity of host Long-chain Acyl-CoA Synthetases (ACSLs)

    PubMed Central

    Recuero-Checa, Maria A.; Sharma, Manu; Lau, Constance; Watkins, Paul A.; Gaydos, Charlotte A.; Dean, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    The obligate-intracellular pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis (Ct) has undergone considerable genome reduction with consequent dependence on host biosynthetic pathways, metabolites and enzymes. Long-chain acyl-CoA synthetases (ACSLs) are key host-cell enzymes that convert fatty acids (FA) into acyl-CoA for use in metabolic pathways. Here, we show that the complete host ACSL family [ACSL1 and ACSL3–6] translocates into the Ct membrane-bound vacuole, termed inclusion, and remains associated with membranes of metabolically active forms of Ct throughout development. We discovered that three different pharmacologic inhibitors of ACSL activity independently impede Ct growth in a dose-dependent fashion. Using an FA competition assay, host ACSLs were found to activate Ct branched-chain FAs, suggesting that one function of the ACSLs is to activate Ct FAs and host FAs (recruited from the cytoplasm) within the inclusion. Because the ACSL inhibitors can deplete lipid droplets (LD), we used a cell line where LD synthesis was switched off to evaluate whether LD deficiency affects Ct growth. In these cells, we found no effect on growth or on translocation of ACSLs into the inclusion. Our findings support an essential role for ACSL activation of host-cell and bacterial FAs within the inclusion to promote Ct growth and development, independent of LDs. PMID:26988341

  17. Long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase 4 modulates prostaglandin E2 release from human arterial smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Golej, Deidre L.; Askari, Bardia; Kramer, Farah; Barnhart, Shelley; Vivekanandan-Giri, Anuradha; Pennathur, Subramaniam; Bornfeldt, Karin E.

    2011-01-01

    Long-chain acyl-CoA synthetases (ACSLs) catalyze the thioesterification of long-chain FAs into their acyl-CoA derivatives. Purified ACSL4 is an arachidonic acid (20:4)-preferring ACSL isoform, and ACSL4 is therefore a probable regulator of lipid mediator production in intact cells. Eicosanoids play important roles in vascular homeostasis and disease, yet the role of ACSL4 in vascular cells is largely unknown. In the present study, the ACSL4 splice variant expressed in human arterial smooth muscle cells (SMCs) was identified as variant 1. To investigate the function of ACSL4 in SMCs, ACSL4 variant 1 was overexpressed, knocked-down by small interfering RNA, or its enzymatic activity acutely inhibited in these cells. Overexpression of ACSL4 resulted in a markedly increased synthesis of arachidonoyl-CoA, increased 20:4 incorporation into phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylinositol, and triacylglycerol, and reduced cellular levels of unesterified 20:4. Accordingly, secretion of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) was blunted in ACSL4-overexpressing SMCs compared with controls. Conversely, acute pharmacological inhibition of ACSL4 activity resulted in increased release of PGE2. However, long-term downregulation of ACSL4 resulted in markedly reduced PGE2 secretion. Thus, ACSL4 modulates PGE2 release from human SMCs. ACSL4 may regulate a number of processes dependent on the release of arachidonic acid-derived lipid mediators in the arterial wall. PMID:21242590

  18. Long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase in fatty acid metabolism involved in liver and other diseases: An update

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Sheng; Yang, Xue-Feng; Liu, Hao-Lei; Fu, Nian; Ouyang, Yan; Qing, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase (ACSL) family members include five different ACSL isoforms, each encoded by a separate gene and have multiple spliced variants. ACSLs on endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondrial outer membrance catalyze fatty acids with chain lengths from 12 to 20 carbon atoms to form acyl-CoAs, which are lipid metabolic intermediates and involved in fatty acid metabolism, membrane modifications and various physiological processes. Gain- or loss-of-function studies have shown that the expression of individual ACSL isoforms can alter the distribution and amount of intracellular fatty acids. Changes in the types and amounts of fatty acids, in turn, can alter the expression of intracellular ACSLs. ACSL family members affect not only the proliferation of normal cells, but the proliferation of malignant tumor cells. They also regulate cell apoptosis through different signaling pathways and molecular mechanisms. ACSL members have individual functions in fatty acid metabolism in different types of cells depending on substrate preferences, subcellular location and tissue specificity, thus contributing to liver diseases and metabolic diseases, such as fatty liver disease, obesity, atherosclerosis and diabetes. They are also linked to neurological disorders and other diseases. However, the mechanisms are unclear. This review addresses new findings in the classification and properties of ACSLs and the fatty acid metabolism-associated effects of ACSLs in diseases. PMID:25834313

  19. Crystal structures of SIRT3 reveal that the α2-α3 loop and α3-helix affect the interaction with long-chain acyl lysine.

    PubMed

    Gai, Wei; Li, He; Jiang, Hualiang; Long, Yaqiu; Liu, Dongxiang

    2016-09-01

    SIRT1-7 play important roles in many biological processes and age-related diseases. In addition to a NAD(+) -dependent deacetylase activity, they can catalyze several other reactions, including the hydrolysis of long-chain fatty acyl lysine. To study the binding modes of sirtuins to long-chain acyl lysines, we solved the crystal structures of SIRT3 bound to either a H3K9-myristoylated- or a H3K9-palmitoylated peptide. Interaction of SIRT3 with the palmitoyl group led to unfolding of the α3-helix. The myristoyl and palmitoyl groups bind to the C-pocket and an allosteric site near the α3-helix, respectively. We found that the residues preceding the α3-helix determine the size of the C-pocket. The flexibility of the α2-α3 loop and the plasticity of the α3-helix affect the interaction with long-chain acyl lysine. PMID:27501476

  20. Steady-state concentrations of coenzyme A, acetyl-coenzyme A and long-chain fatty acyl-coenzyme A in rat-liver mitochondria oxidizing palmitate

    PubMed Central

    Garland, P. B.; Shepherd, D.; Yates, D. W.

    1965-01-01

    1. Fluorimetric assays are described for CoASH, acetyl-CoA and long-chain fatty acyl-CoA, and are sensitive to at least 50μμmoles of each. 2. Application of these assays to rat-liver mitochondria oxidizing palmitate in the absence and presence of carnitine indicated two pools of intramitochondrial CoA. One pool could be acylated by palmitate and ATP, and the other pool acylated by palmitate with ATP and carnitine, or by palmitoylcarnitine alone. 3. The intramitochondrial content of acetyl-CoA is increased by the oxidation of palmitate both in the absence and presence of l-malate. 4. The conversion of palmitoyl-CoA into acetyl-CoA by β-oxidation takes place without detectable accumulation of acyl-CoA intermediates. PMID:16749169

  1. The role of Δ6-desaturase acyl-carrier specificity in the efficient synthesis of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids in transgenic plants.

    PubMed

    Sayanova, Olga; Ruiz-Lopez, Noemi; Haslam, Richard P; Napier, Johnathan A

    2012-02-01

    The role of acyl-CoA-dependent Δ6-desaturation in the heterologous synthesis of omega-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids was systematically evaluated in transgenic yeast and Arabidopsis thaliana. The acyl-CoA Δ6-desaturase from the picoalga Ostreococcus tauri and orthologous activities from mouse (Mus musculus) and salmon (Salmo salar) were shown to generate substantial levels of Δ6-desaturated acyl-CoAs, in contrast to the phospholipid-dependent Δ6-desaturases from higher plants that failed to modify this metabolic pool. Transgenic plants expressing the acyl-CoA Δ6-desaturases from either O. tauri or salmon, in conjunction with the two additional activities required for the synthesis of C20 polyunsaturated fatty acids, contained higher levels of eicosapentaenoic acid compared with plants expressing the borage phospholipid-dependent Δ6-desaturase. The use of acyl-CoA-dependent Δ6-desaturases almost completely abolished the accumulation of unwanted biosynthetic intermediates such as γ-linolenic acid in total seed lipids. Expression of acyl-CoA Δ6-desaturases resulted in increased distribution of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids in the polar lipids of transgenic plants, reflecting the larger substrate pool available for acylation by enzymes of the Kennedy pathway. Expression of the O. tauriΔ6-desaturase in transgenic Camelina sativa plants also resulted in the accumulation of high levels of Δ6-desaturated fatty acids. This study provides evidence for the efficacy of using acyl-CoA-dependent Δ6-desaturases in the efficient metabolic engineering of transgenic plants with high value traits such as the synthesis of omega-3 LC-PUFAs. PMID:21902798

  2. Phosphatidylinositol-(4,5)-Bisphosphate Acyl Chains Differentiate Membrane Binding of HIV-1 Gag from That of the Phospholipase Cδ1 Pleckstrin Homology Domain

    PubMed Central

    Olety, Balaji; Veatch, Sarah L.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT HIV-1 Gag, which drives virion assembly, interacts with a plasma membrane (PM)-specific phosphoinositide, phosphatidylinositol-(4,5)-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2]. While cellular acidic phospholipid-binding proteins/domains, such as the PI(4,5)P2-specific pleckstrin homology domain of phospholipase Cδ1 (PHPLCδ1), mediate headgroup-specific interactions with corresponding phospholipids, the exact nature of the Gag-PI(4,5)P2 interaction remains undetermined. In this study, we used giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) to examine how PI(4,5)P2 with unsaturated or saturated acyl chains affect membrane binding of PHPLCδ1 and Gag. Both unsaturated dioleoyl-PI(4,5)P2 [DO-PI(4,5)P2] and saturated dipalmitoyl-PI(4,5)P2 [DP-PI(4,5)P2] successfully recruited PHPLCδ1 to membranes of single-phase GUVs. In contrast, DO-PI(4,5)P2 but not DP-PI(4,5)P2 recruited Gag to GUVs, indicating that PI(4,5)P2 acyl chains contribute to stable membrane binding of Gag. GUVs containing PI(4,5)P2, cholesterol, and dipalmitoyl phosphatidylserine separated into two coexisting phases: one was a liquid phase, and the other appeared to be a phosphatidylserine-enriched gel phase. In these vesicles, the liquid phase recruited PHPLCδ1 regardless of PI(4,5)P2 acyl chains. Likewise, Gag bound to the liquid phase when PI(4,5)P2 had DO-acyl chains. DP-PI(4,5)P2-containing GUVs showed no detectable Gag binding to the liquid phase. Unexpectedly, however, DP-PI(4,5)P2 still promoted recruitment of Gag, but not PHPLCδ1, to the dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylserine-enriched gel phase of these GUVs. Altogether, these results revealed different roles for PI(4,5)P2 acyl chains in membrane binding of two PI(4,5)P2-binding proteins, Gag and PHPLCδ1. Notably, we observed that nonmyristylated Gag retains the preference for PI(4,5)P2 containing an unsaturated acyl chain over DP-PI(4,5)P2, suggesting that Gag sensitivity to PI(4,5)P2 acyl chain saturation is determined directly by the matrix-PI(4,5)P2 interaction, rather

  3. Fatty Acid Oxidation Mediated by Acyl-CoA Synthetase Long Chain 3 Is Required for Mutant KRAS Lung Tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Padanad, Mahesh S; Konstantinidou, Georgia; Venkateswaran, Niranjan; Melegari, Margherita; Rindhe, Smita; Mitsche, Matthew; Yang, Chendong; Batten, Kimberly; Huffman, Kenneth E; Liu, Jingwen; Tang, Ximing; Rodriguez-Canales, Jaime; Kalhor, Neda; Shay, Jerry W; Minna, John D; McDonald, Jeffrey; Wistuba, Ignacio I; DeBerardinis, Ralph J; Scaglioni, Pier Paolo

    2016-08-01

    KRAS is one of the most commonly mutated oncogenes in human cancer. Mutant KRAS aberrantly regulates metabolic networks. However, the contribution of cellular metabolism to mutant KRAS tumorigenesis is not completely understood. We report that mutant KRAS regulates intracellular fatty acid metabolism through Acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) synthetase long-chain family member 3 (ACSL3), which converts fatty acids into fatty Acyl-CoA esters, the substrates for lipid synthesis and β-oxidation. ACSL3 suppression is associated with depletion of cellular ATP and causes the death of lung cancer cells. Furthermore, mutant KRAS promotes the cellular uptake, retention, accumulation, and β-oxidation of fatty acids in lung cancer cells in an ACSL3-dependent manner. Finally, ACSL3 is essential for mutant KRAS lung cancer tumorigenesis in vivo and is highly expressed in human lung cancer. Our data demonstrate that mutant KRAS reprograms lipid homeostasis, establishing a metabolic requirement that could be exploited for therapeutic gain. PMID:27477280

  4. Structural basis for selective recognition of acyl chains by the membrane-associated acyltransferase PatA

    PubMed Central

    Albesa-Jové, David; Svetlíková, Zuzana; Tersa, Montse; Sancho-Vaello, Enea; Carreras-González, Ana; Bonnet, Pascal; Arrasate, Pedro; Eguskiza, Ander; Angala, Shiva K.; Cifuente, Javier O.; Korduláková, Jana; Jackson, Mary; Mikušová, Katarína; Guerin, Marcelo E.

    2016-01-01

    The biosynthesis of phospholipids and glycolipids are critical pathways for virtually all cell membranes. PatA is an essential membrane associated acyltransferase involved in the biosynthesis of mycobacterial phosphatidyl-myo-inositol mannosides (PIMs). The enzyme transfers a palmitoyl moiety from palmitoyl–CoA to the 6-position of the mannose ring linked to 2-position of inositol in PIM1/PIM2. We report here the crystal structures of PatA from Mycobacterium smegmatis in the presence of its naturally occurring acyl donor palmitate and a nonhydrolyzable palmitoyl–CoA analog. The structures reveal an α/β architecture, with the acyl chain deeply buried into a hydrophobic pocket that runs perpendicular to a long groove where the active site is located. Enzyme catalysis is mediated by an unprecedented charge relay system, which markedly diverges from the canonical HX4D motif. Our studies establish the mechanistic basis of substrate/membrane recognition and catalysis for an important family of acyltransferases, providing exciting possibilities for inhibitor design. PMID:26965057

  5. Structural basis for selective recognition of acyl chains by the membrane-associated acyltransferase PatA.

    PubMed

    Albesa-Jové, David; Svetlíková, Zuzana; Tersa, Montse; Sancho-Vaello, Enea; Carreras-González, Ana; Bonnet, Pascal; Arrasate, Pedro; Eguskiza, Ander; Angala, Shiva K; Cifuente, Javier O; Korduláková, Jana; Jackson, Mary; Mikušová, Katarína; Guerin, Marcelo E

    2016-01-01

    The biosynthesis of phospholipids and glycolipids are critical pathways for virtually all cell membranes. PatA is an essential membrane associated acyltransferase involved in the biosynthesis of mycobacterial phosphatidyl-myo-inositol mannosides (PIMs). The enzyme transfers a palmitoyl moiety from palmitoyl-CoA to the 6-position of the mannose ring linked to 2-position of inositol in PIM1/PIM2. We report here the crystal structures of PatA from Mycobacterium smegmatis in the presence of its naturally occurring acyl donor palmitate and a nonhydrolyzable palmitoyl-CoA analog. The structures reveal an α/β architecture, with the acyl chain deeply buried into a hydrophobic pocket that runs perpendicular to a long groove where the active site is located. Enzyme catalysis is mediated by an unprecedented charge relay system, which markedly diverges from the canonical HX4D motif. Our studies establish the mechanistic basis of substrate/membrane recognition and catalysis for an important family of acyltransferases, providing exciting possibilities for inhibitor design. PMID:26965057

  6. Hepatic long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase 5 mediates fatty acid channeling between anabolic and catabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Bu, So Young; Mashek, Douglas G

    2010-11-01

    Long-chain acyl-CoA synthetases (ACSLs) and fatty acid transport proteins (FATPs) activate fatty acids (FAs) to acyl-CoAs prior to their downstream metabolism. Of numerous ACSL and FATP isoforms, ACSL5 is expressed predominantly in tissues with high rates of triacylglycerol (TAG) synthesis, suggesting it may have an anabolic role in lipid metabolism. To characterize the role of ACSL5 in hepatic energy metabolism, we used small interference RNA (siRNA) to knock down ACSL5 in rat primary hepatocytes. Compared with cells transfected with control siRNA, suppression of ACSL5 expression significantly decreased FA-induced lipid droplet formation. These findings were further extended with metabolic labeling studies showing that ACSL5 knockdown resulted in decreased [1-(14)C]oleic acid or acetic acid incorporation into intracellular TAG, phospholipids, and cholesterol esters without altering FA uptake or lipogenic gene expression. ACSL5 knockdown also decreased hepatic TAG secretion proportionate to the observed decrease in neutral lipid synthesis. ACSL5 knockdown did not alter lipid turnover or mediate the effects of insulin on lipid metabolism. Hepatocytes treated with ACSL5 siRNA had increased rates of FA oxidation without changing PPAR-α activity and target gene expression. These results suggest that ACSL5 activates and channels FAs toward anabolic pathways and, therefore, is an important branch point in hepatic FA metabolism. PMID:20798351

  7. Dynamics of the Heat Stress Response of Ceramides with Different Fatty-Acyl Chain Lengths in Baker's Yeast.

    PubMed

    Chen, Po-Wei; Fonseca, Luis L; Hannun, Yusuf A; Voit, Eberhard O

    2015-08-01

    The article demonstrates that computational modeling has the capacity to convert metabolic snapshots, taken sequentially over time, into a description of cellular, dynamic strategies. The specific application is a detailed analysis of a set of actions with which Saccharomyces cerevisiae responds to heat stress. Using time dependent metabolic concentration data, we use a combination of mathematical modeling, reverse engineering, and optimization to infer dynamic changes in enzyme activities within the sphingolipid pathway. The details of the sphingolipid responses to heat stress are important, because they guide some of the longer-term alterations in gene expression, with which the cells adapt to the increased temperature. The analysis indicates that all enzyme activities in the system are affected and that the shapes of the time trends in activities depend on the fatty-acyl CoA chain lengths of the different ceramide species in the system. PMID:26241868

  8. Medium-Chain Acyl-CoA Deficiency: Outlines from Newborn Screening, In Silico Predictions, and Molecular Studies

    PubMed Central

    Catarzi, Serena; Caciotti, Anna; Thusberg, Janita; Tonin, Rodolfo; Malvagia, Sabrina; la Marca, Giancarlo; Pasquini, Elisabetta; Cavicchi, Catia; Ferri, Lorenzo; Donati, Maria A.; Baronio, Federico; Guerrini, Renzo; Mooney, Sean D.; Morrone, Amelia

    2013-01-01

    Medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (MCADD) is a disorder of fatty acid oxidation characterized by hypoglycemic crisis under fasting or during stress conditions, leading to lethargy, seizures, brain damage, or even death. Biochemical acylcarnitines data obtained through newborn screening by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) were confirmed by molecular analysis of the medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (ACADM) gene. Out of 324.000 newborns screened, we identified 14 MCADD patients, in whom, by molecular analysis, we found a new nonsense c.823G>T (p.Gly275∗) and two new missense mutations: c.253G>C (p.Gly85Arg) and c.356T>A (p.Val119Asp). Bioinformatics predictions based on both phylogenetic conservation and functional/structural software were used to characterize the new identified variants. Our findings confirm the rising incidence of MCADD whose existence is increasingly recognized due to the efficacy of an expanded newborn screening panel by LC-MS/MS making possible early specific therapies that can prevent possible crises in at-risk infants. We noticed that the “common” p.Lys329Glu mutation only accounted for 32% of the defective alleles, while, in clinically diagnosed patients, this mutation accounted for 90% of defective alleles. Unclassified variants (UVs or VUSs) are especially critical when considering screening programs. The functional and pathogenic characterization of genetic variants presented here is required to predict their medical consequences in newborns. PMID:24294134

  9. Medium-chain acyl-CoA deficiency: outlines from newborn screening, in silico predictions, and molecular studies.

    PubMed

    Catarzi, Serena; Caciotti, Anna; Thusberg, Janita; Tonin, Rodolfo; Malvagia, Sabrina; la Marca, Giancarlo; Pasquini, Elisabetta; Cavicchi, Catia; Ferri, Lorenzo; Donati, Maria A; Baronio, Federico; Guerrini, Renzo; Mooney, Sean D; Morrone, Amelia

    2013-01-01

    Medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (MCADD) is a disorder of fatty acid oxidation characterized by hypoglycemic crisis under fasting or during stress conditions, leading to lethargy, seizures, brain damage, or even death. Biochemical acylcarnitines data obtained through newborn screening by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) were confirmed by molecular analysis of the medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (ACADM) gene. Out of 324.000 newborns screened, we identified 14 MCADD patients, in whom, by molecular analysis, we found a new nonsense c.823G>T (p.Gly275∗) and two new missense mutations: c.253G>C (p.Gly85Arg) and c.356T>A (p.Val119Asp). Bioinformatics predictions based on both phylogenetic conservation and functional/structural software were used to characterize the new identified variants. Our findings confirm the rising incidence of MCADD whose existence is increasingly recognized due to the efficacy of an expanded newborn screening panel by LC-MS/MS making possible early specific therapies that can prevent possible crises in at-risk infants. We noticed that the "common" p.Lys329Glu mutation only accounted for 32% of the defective alleles, while, in clinically diagnosed patients, this mutation accounted for 90% of defective alleles. Unclassified variants (UVs or VUSs) are especially critical when considering screening programs. The functional and pathogenic characterization of genetic variants presented here is required to predict their medical consequences in newborns. PMID:24294134

  10. Depletion of Phosphatidylcholine in Yeast Induces Shortening and Increased Saturation of the Lipid Acyl Chains: Evidence for Regulation of Intrinsic Membrane Curvature in a Eukaryote

    PubMed Central

    Boumann, Henry A.; Gubbens, Jacob; Koorengevel, Martijn C.; Oh, Chan-Seok; Martin, Charles E.; Heck, Albert J.R.; Patton-Vogt, Jana; Henry, Susan A.; de Kruijff, Ben; de Kroon, Anton I.P.M.

    2006-01-01

    To study the consequences of depleting the major membrane phospholipid phosphatidylcholine (PC), exponentially growing cells of a yeast cho2opi3 double deletion mutant were transferred from medium containing choline to choline-free medium. Cell growth did not cease until the PC level had dropped below 2% of total phospholipids after four to five generations. Increasing contents of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and phosphatidylinositol made up for the loss of PC. During PC depletion, the remaining PC was subject to acyl chain remodeling with monounsaturated species replacing diunsaturated species, as shown by mass spectrometry. The remodeling of PC did not require turnover by the SPO14-encoded phospholipase D. The changes in the PC species profile were found to reflect an overall shift in the cellular acyl chain composition that exhibited a 40% increase in the ratio of C16 over C18 acyl chains, and a 10% increase in the degree of saturation. The shift was stronger in the phospholipid than in the neutral lipid fraction and strongest in the species profile of PE. The shortening and increased saturation of the PE acyl chains were shown to decrease the nonbilayer propensity of PE. The results point to a regulatory mechanism in yeast that maintains intrinsic membrane curvature in an optimal range. PMID:16339082

  11. Depletion of phosphatidylcholine in yeast induces shortening and increased saturation of the lipid acyl chains: evidence for regulation of intrinsic membrane curvature in a eukaryote.

    PubMed

    Boumann, Henry A; Gubbens, Jacob; Koorengevel, Martijn C; Oh, Chan-Seok; Martin, Charles E; Heck, Albert J R; Patton-Vogt, Jana; Henry, Susan A; de Kruijff, Ben; de Kroon, Anton I P M

    2006-02-01

    To study the consequences of depleting the major membrane phospholipid phosphatidylcholine (PC), exponentially growing cells of a yeast cho2opi3 double deletion mutant were transferred from medium containing choline to choline-free medium. Cell growth did not cease until the PC level had dropped below 2% of total phospholipids after four to five generations. Increasing contents of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and phosphatidylinositol made up for the loss of PC. During PC depletion, the remaining PC was subject to acyl chain remodeling with monounsaturated species replacing diunsaturated species, as shown by mass spectrometry. The remodeling of PC did not require turnover by the SPO14-encoded phospholipase D. The changes in the PC species profile were found to reflect an overall shift in the cellular acyl chain composition that exhibited a 40% increase in the ratio of C16 over C18 acyl chains, and a 10% increase in the degree of saturation. The shift was stronger in the phospholipid than in the neutral lipid fraction and strongest in the species profile of PE. The shortening and increased saturation of the PE acyl chains were shown to decrease the nonbilayer propensity of PE. The results point to a regulatory mechanism in yeast that maintains intrinsic membrane curvature in an optimal range. PMID:16339082

  12. Sirtuin 3 (SIRT3) protein regulates long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase by deacetylating conserved lysines near the active site.

    PubMed

    Bharathi, Sivakama S; Zhang, Yuxun; Mohsen, Al-Walid; Uppala, Radha; Balasubramani, Manimalha; Schreiber, Emanuel; Uechi, Guy; Beck, Megan E; Rardin, Matthew J; Vockley, Jerry; Verdin, Eric; Gibson, Bradford W; Hirschey, Matthew D; Goetzman, Eric S

    2013-11-22

    Long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (LCAD) is a key mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation enzyme. We previously demonstrated increased LCAD lysine acetylation in SIRT3 knockout mice concomitant with reduced LCAD activity and reduced fatty acid oxidation. To study the effects of acetylation on LCAD and determine sirtuin 3 (SIRT3) target sites, we chemically acetylated recombinant LCAD. Acetylation impeded substrate binding and reduced catalytic efficiency. Deacetylation with recombinant SIRT3 partially restored activity. Residues Lys-318 and Lys-322 were identified as SIRT3-targeted lysines. Arginine substitutions at Lys-318 and Lys-322 prevented the acetylation-induced activity loss. Lys-318 and Lys-322 flank residues Arg-317 and Phe-320, which are conserved among all acyl-CoA dehydrogenases and coordinate the enzyme-bound FAD cofactor in the active site. We propose that acetylation at Lys-318/Lys-322 causes a conformational change which reduces hydride transfer from substrate to FAD. Medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase and acyl-CoA dehydrogenase 9, two related enzymes with lysines at positions equivalent to Lys-318/Lys-322, were also efficiently deacetylated by SIRT3 following chemical acetylation. These results suggest that acetylation/deacetylation at Lys-318/Lys-322 is a mode of regulating fatty acid oxidation. The same mechanism may regulate other acyl-CoA dehydrogenases. PMID:24121500

  13. Sirtuin 3 (SIRT3) Protein Regulates Long-chain Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase by Deacetylating Conserved Lysines Near the Active Site

    PubMed Central

    Bharathi, Sivakama S.; Zhang, Yuxun; Mohsen, Al-Walid; Uppala, Radha; Balasubramani, Manimalha; Schreiber, Emanuel; Uechi, Guy; Beck, Megan E.; Rardin, Matthew J.; Vockley, Jerry; Verdin, Eric; Gibson, Bradford W.; Hirschey, Matthew D.; Goetzman, Eric S.

    2013-01-01

    Long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (LCAD) is a key mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation enzyme. We previously demonstrated increased LCAD lysine acetylation in SIRT3 knockout mice concomitant with reduced LCAD activity and reduced fatty acid oxidation. To study the effects of acetylation on LCAD and determine sirtuin 3 (SIRT3) target sites, we chemically acetylated recombinant LCAD. Acetylation impeded substrate binding and reduced catalytic efficiency. Deacetylation with recombinant SIRT3 partially restored activity. Residues Lys-318 and Lys-322 were identified as SIRT3-targeted lysines. Arginine substitutions at Lys-318 and Lys-322 prevented the acetylation-induced activity loss. Lys-318 and Lys-322 flank residues Arg-317 and Phe-320, which are conserved among all acyl-CoA dehydrogenases and coordinate the enzyme-bound FAD cofactor in the active site. We propose that acetylation at Lys-318/Lys-322 causes a conformational change which reduces hydride transfer from substrate to FAD. Medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase and acyl-CoA dehydrogenase 9, two related enzymes with lysines at positions equivalent to Lys-318/Lys-322, were also efficiently deacetylated by SIRT3 following chemical acetylation. These results suggest that acetylation/deacetylation at Lys-318/Lys-322 is a mode of regulating fatty acid oxidation. The same mechanism may regulate other acyl-CoA dehydrogenases. PMID:24121500

  14. A multisubstrate assay for lipases/esterases: assessing acyl chain length selectivity by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Divakar, K; Gautam, Pennathur

    2014-03-01

    Lipases and esterases are hydrolytic enzymes and are known to hydrolyze esters with unique substrate specificity and acyl chain length selectivity. We have developed a simple competitive multiple substrate assay for determination of acyl chain length selectivity of lipases/esterases using RP-HPLC with UV detection. A method for separation and quantification of 4-nitrophenyl fatty acid esters (C4-C18) was developed and validated. The chain length selectivity of five lipases and two esterases was determined in a multisubstrate reaction system containing equimolar concentrations of 4-nitrophenyl esters (C4-C18). This assay is simple, reproducible, and a useful tool for determining chain length selectivity of lipases/esterases. PMID:24316114

  15. Strategies for Correcting Very Long Chain Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase Deficiency*

    PubMed Central

    Tenopoulou, Margarita; Chen, Jie; Bastin, Jean; Bennett, Michael J.; Ischiropoulos, Harry; Doulias, Paschalis-Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Very long acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD) deficiency is a genetic pediatric disorder presenting with a spectrum of phenotypes that remains for the most part untreatable. Here, we present a novel strategy for the correction of VLCAD deficiency by increasing mutant VLCAD enzymatic activity. Treatment of VLCAD-deficient fibroblasts, which express distinct mutant VLCAD protein and exhibit deficient fatty acid β-oxidation, with S-nitroso-N-acetylcysteine induced site-specific S-nitrosylation of VLCAD mutants at cysteine residue 237. Cysteine 237 S-nitrosylation was associated with an 8–17-fold increase in VLCAD-specific activity and concomitant correction of acylcarnitine profile and β-oxidation capacity, two hallmarks of the disorder. Overall, this study provides biochemical evidence for a potential therapeutic modality to correct β-oxidation deficiencies. PMID:25737446

  16. Genetics Home Reference: medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... down (metabolize) a group of fats called medium-chain fatty acids. These fatty acids are found in foods and the body's fat tissues. Fatty acids are a major source of energy for the heart and muscles. During periods of fasting, ... of this enzyme, medium-chain fatty acids are not metabolized properly. As a ...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... metabolize) a group of fats called very long-chain fatty acids. These fatty acids are found in foods and the body's fat tissues. Fatty acids are a major source of energy for the heart and muscles. During periods of fasting, ... of this enzyme, very long-chain fatty acids are not metabolized properly. As a ...

  18. A Peroxisomal Long-Chain Acyl-CoA Synthetase from Glycine max Involved in Lipid Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Bingjun; Sun, Xuegang; Gu, Shoulai; Han, Tianfu; Hou, Wensheng

    2014-01-01

    Seed storage oil, in the form of triacylglycerol (TAG), is degraded to provide carbon and energy during germination and early seedling growth by the fatty acid β-oxidation in the peroxisome. Although the pathways for lipid degradation have been uncovered, understanding of the exact involved enzymes in soybean is still limited. Long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase (ACSL) is a critical enzyme that activates free fatty acid released from TAG to form the fatty acyl-CoA. Recent studies have shown the importance of ACSL in lipid degradation and synthesis, but few studies were focused on soybean. In this work, we cloned a ACSL gene from soybean and designated it as GmACSL2. Sequence analysis revealed that GmACSL2 encodes a protein of 733 amino acid residues, which is highly homologous to the ones in other higher plants. Complementation test showed that GmACSL2 could restore the growth of an ACS-deficient yeast strain (YB525). Co-expression assay in Nicotiana benthamiana indicated that GmACSL2 is located at peroxisome. Expression pattern analysis showed that GmACSL2 is highly expressed in germinating seedling and strongly induced 1 day after imbibition, which indicate that GmACSL2 may take part in the seed germination. GmACSL2 overexpression in yeast and soybean hairy root severely reduces the contents of the lipids and fatty acids, compared with controls in both cells, and enhances the β-oxidation efficiency in yeast. All these results suggest that GmACSL2 may take part in fatty acid and lipid degradation. In conclusion, peroxisomal GmACSL2 from Glycine max probably be involved in the lipid degradation during seed germination. PMID:24992019

  19. Long-chain bases of sphingolipids are transported into cells via the acyl-CoA synthetases.

    PubMed

    Narita, Tomomi; Naganuma, Tatsuro; Sase, Yurie; Kihara, Akio

    2016-01-01

    Transport of dietary lipids into small-intestinal epithelial cells is pathologically and nutritionally important. However, lipid uptake remains an almost unexplored research area. Although we know that long-chain bases (LCBs), constituents of sphingolipids, can enter into cells efficiently, the molecular mechanism of LCB uptake is completely unclear. Here, we found that the yeast acyl-CoA synthetases (ACSs) Faa1 and Faa4 are redundantly involved in LCB uptake. In addition to fatty acid-activating activity, transporter activity toward long-chain fatty acids (LCFAs) has been suggested for ACSs. Both LCB and LCFA transports were largely impaired in faa1Δ faa4Δ cells. Furthermore, LCB and LCFA uptakes were mutually competitive. However, the energy dependency was different for their transports. Sodium azide/2-deoxy-D-glucose treatment inhibited import of LCFA but not that of LCB. Furthermore, the ATP-AMP motif mutation FAA1 S271A largely impaired the metabolic activity and LCFA uptake, while leaving LCB import unaffected. These results indicate that only LCFA transport requires ATP. Since ACSs do not metabolize LCBs as substrates, Faa1 and Faa4 are likely directly involved in LCB transport. Furthermore, we revealed that ACSs are also involved in LCB transport in mammalian cells. Thus, our findings provide strong support for the hypothesis that ACSs directly transport LCFAs. PMID:27136724

  20. Surface active molecules: preparation and properties of long chain n-acyl-l-alpha-amino-omega-guanidine alkyl acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Infante, R; Dominguez, J G; Erra, P; Julia, R; Prats, M

    1984-12-01

    Synopsis A new route for the synthesis of long chain N(alpha)-acyl-l-alpha-amino-omega-guamdine alkyl acid derivatives, with cationic or amphoteric character has been established. The general formula of these compounds is shown below. A physico-chemical and antimicrobial study of these products as a function of the alkyl ester or sodium salt (R), the straight chain length of the fatty acid residue (x) and the number of carbons between the omega-guanidine and omega-carboxyl group (n) has been investigated. The water solubility, surface tension, critical micelle concentration (c.m.c.) and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria (including Pseudomonas) has been determined. Dicyclohexylcarbodiimide has been used to condense fatty acids and alpha-amino-omega-guanidine alkyl acids. In these conditions protection of the omega-guanidine group is not necessary. The main characteristic of this synthetic procedure is the use of very mild experimental conditions (temperature, pH) to form the amide linkage which leads to pure optical compounds in high yield in the absence of electrolytes. The results show that some structural modifications, particularly the protection of the carboxyl group, promote variations of the surfactant and antimicrobial properties. Only those molecules with the blocked carboxyl group (cationic molecules, where R = Me, Et or Pr) showed a good surfactant and antimicrobial activity. When the carboxyl group was unprotected (amphoteric molecules, where R = Na(+)) the resulting compounds were inactive. PMID:19467126

  1. The adjuvant activity of fatty acid esters. The role of acyl chain length and degree of saturation.

    PubMed Central

    Bomford, R

    1981-01-01

    Water-in-oil emulsions of metabolizable fatty acid esters, with the non-toxic surfactant Pluronic L122 as emulsifying agent, potentiated the humoral response to bovine serum albumin and staphylococcal toxoid in the mouse. Adjuvant activity was increased by changing the chemical nature of the esters as follows: (i) using a series of ethyl esters, adjuvant activity appeared when the acyl chain length of the fatty acid component was 16 or greater; (ii) isobutyl and isopropyl esters of palmitic acid (C16:0) were superior to ethyl; (iii) the ethyl esters of oleic (C18:1) and linoleic (C18:2) acids were better than stearic (C18:0). Since emulsions prepared with longer chain saturated esters are very viscous or solid at room temperature, and unsaturated esters are chemically reactive, emulsions were prepared with differing proportions of ethyl caprate (C10:0) and butyl stearate. At a ratio of 9:1 the emulsions possessed the low viscosity of ethyl caprate, but gained the adjuvant activity of butyl stearate. 125I-labelled BSA was retained in the footpad to a significantly greater extent than with a caprate emulsion, but reasons are given for believing that slow release of antigen is not the only mechanism of adjuvant activity. The ester emulsions caused more acute but less chronic local inflammation (footpad swelling) than Freund's incomplete adjuvant. PMID:7275184

  2. Long-chain bases of sphingolipids are transported into cells via the acyl-CoA synthetases

    PubMed Central

    Narita, Tomomi; Naganuma, Tatsuro; Sase, Yurie; Kihara, Akio

    2016-01-01

    Transport of dietary lipids into small-intestinal epithelial cells is pathologically and nutritionally important. However, lipid uptake remains an almost unexplored research area. Although we know that long-chain bases (LCBs), constituents of sphingolipids, can enter into cells efficiently, the molecular mechanism of LCB uptake is completely unclear. Here, we found that the yeast acyl-CoA synthetases (ACSs) Faa1 and Faa4 are redundantly involved in LCB uptake. In addition to fatty acid-activating activity, transporter activity toward long-chain fatty acids (LCFAs) has been suggested for ACSs. Both LCB and LCFA transports were largely impaired in faa1Δ faa4Δ cells. Furthermore, LCB and LCFA uptakes were mutually competitive. However, the energy dependency was different for their transports. Sodium azide/2-deoxy-D-glucose treatment inhibited import of LCFA but not that of LCB. Furthermore, the ATP-AMP motif mutation FAA1 S271A largely impaired the metabolic activity and LCFA uptake, while leaving LCB import unaffected. These results indicate that only LCFA transport requires ATP. Since ACSs do not metabolize LCBs as substrates, Faa1 and Faa4 are likely directly involved in LCB transport. Furthermore, we revealed that ACSs are also involved in LCB transport in mammalian cells. Thus, our findings provide strong support for the hypothesis that ACSs directly transport LCFAs. PMID:27136724

  3. Biochemical Correction of Very Long–chain Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase Deficiency Following Adeno-associated Virus Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Merritt, J. Lawrence; Nguyen, Tien; Daniels, Jan; Matern, Dietrich; Schowalter, David B.

    2009-01-01

    We report the development of a gene replacement strategy for very long–chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD) deficiency. VLCAD is a mitochondrial enzyme involved in fatty acid β-oxidation, a key step in energy production during times of fasting or stress. Deficiency of VLCAD classically presents as hepatic dysfunction, hypoglycemia, cardiomyopathy, rhabdomyolysis, and/or sudden death. While dietary therapy for VLCAD deficiency has proven beneficial in preventing some symptoms, a risk of metabolic catastrophic decompensation remains throughout life during times of increased energy demand. We designed a recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) expressing the human VLCAD gene (AAV8-hVLCAD). To demonstrate its in vivo activity, AAV8-hVLCAD was administered via the tail vein to VLCAD-knockout mice. A reduction in accumulated serum long-chain acylcarnitines and increased fasting tolerance judged on blood glucose concentrations were observed as of 11 days postinjections through >100 days. Western analysis of liver, skeletal muscle, and heart extracts using PEP1 anti-hVLCAD antibody revealed short-term hVLCAD expression in the liver and muscle and longer-term expression in heart. This demonstrates the ability of human VLCAD to correct the biochemical phenotype of VLCAD-deficient mice. PMID:19156135

  4. Long-Chain Acyl CoA Synthetase 4A regulates Smad activity and dorsoventral patterning in the zebrafish embryo

    PubMed Central

    Miyares, Rosa Linda; Stein, Cornelia; Renisch, Björn; Anderson, Jennifer Lynn; Hammerschmidt, Matthias; Farber, Steven Arthur

    2013-01-01

    Summary Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFA) and their metabolites are critical players in cell biology and embryonic development. Here we show that long-chain acyl CoA synthetase 4a (Acsl4a), an LC-PUFA activating enzyme, is essential for proper patterning of the zebrafish dorsoventral axis. Loss of Acsl4a results in dorsalized embryos due to attenuated Bmp signaling. We demonstrate that Acsl4a modulates the activity of Smad transcription factors, the downstream mediators of Bmp signaling. Acsl4a promotes the inhibition of p38 MAPK and the Akt-mediated inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3), critical inhibitors of Smad activity. Consequently, introduction of a constitutively active Akt can rescue the dorsalized phenotype of Acsl4a deficient embryos. Our results reveal a critical role for Acsl4a in modulating Bmp-Smad activity and provide a potential avenue for LC-PUFAs to influence a variety of developmental processes. PMID:24332754

  5. Deciphering the role of individual acyl chains in the interaction network between phosphatidylserines and a single-spanning membrane protein.

    PubMed

    Mousson, Florence; Coïc, Yves-Marie; Baleux, Françoise; Beswick, Veronica; Sanson, Alain; Neumann, Jean-Michel

    2002-11-19

    PMP1 is a small single-spanning membrane protein functioning as a regulatory subunit of the yeast plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase. This protein forms a unique helix and exhibits a positively charged cytoplasmic domain that is able to specifically segregate phosphatidylserines (PSs). A marked groove formed at the helix surface is thought to play a major role in the related lipid-protein interaction network. Mutational analysis and (1)H NMR experiments were therefore performed on a synthetic PMP1 fragment using DPC-d(38) micelles as a membrane-like environment, in the presence of small amounts of POPS. A mutation designed for altering the helix groove was shown to disfavor the POPS binding specificity as much as that affecting the electrostatic interaction network. From POPS titration experiments monitored by a full set of one- and two-dimensional NOESY spectra, the association between the phospholipids and the PMP1 peptide has been followed. Our data reveal that the clustering of POPS molecules is promoted from a stabilized framework obtained by coupling the PMP1 helix groove to a POPS sn-2 chain. To our knowledge, the NOE-based titration plots displayed in this report constitute the first NMR data that directly distinguish the role of the sn-1 and sn-2 acyl chains in a lipid-protein interaction. The results are discussed while taking into account our accurate knowledge of the yeast plasma membrane composition and its ability to form functional lipid rafts. PMID:12427022

  6. Intestinal acyl-CoA synthetase 5: activation of long chain fatty acids and behind.

    PubMed

    Klaus, Christina; Jeon, Min Kyung; Kaemmerer, Elke; Gassler, Nikolaus

    2013-11-14

    The intestinal mucosa is characterized by a high complexity in terms of structure and functions and allows for a controlled demarcation towards the gut lumen. On the one hand it is responsible for pulping and selective absorption of alimentary substances ensuring the immunological tolerance, on the other hand it prevents the penetration of micro-organisms as well as bacterial outgrowth. The continuous regeneration of surface epithelia along the crypt-villus-axis in the small intestine is crucial to assuring these various functions. The core phenomena of intestinal epithelia regeneration comprise cell proliferation, migration, differentiation, and apoptosis. These partly contrarily oriented processes are molecularly balanced through numerous interacting signaling pathways like Wnt/β-catenin, Notch and Hedgehog, and regulated by various modifying factors. One of these modifiers is acyl-CoA synthetase 5 (ACSL5). It plays a key role in de novo lipid synthesis, fatty acid degradation and membrane modifications, and regulates several intestinal processes, primarily through different variants of protein lipidation, e.g., palmitoylation. ACSL5 was shown to interact with proapoptotic molecules, and besides seems to inhibit proliferation along the crypt-villus-axis. Because of its proapoptotic and antiproliferative characteristics it could be of significant relevance for intestinal homeostasis, cellular disorder and tumor development. PMID:24259967

  7. Membrane lateral compressibility determined by NMR and x-ray diffraction: effect of acyl chain polyunsaturation.

    PubMed Central

    Koenig, B W; Strey, H H; Gawrisch, K

    1997-01-01

    The elastic area compressibility modulus, Ka, of lamellar liquid crystalline bilayers was determined by a new experimental approach using 2H-NMR order parameters of lipid hydrocarbon chains together with lamellar repeat spacings measured by x-ray diffraction. The combination of NMR and x-ray techniques yields accurate determination of lateral area per lipid molecule. Samples of saturated, monounsaturated, and polyunsaturated phospholipids were equilibrated with polyethylene glycol (PEG) 20,000 solutions in water at concentrations from 0 to 55 wt % PEG at 30 degrees C. This procedure is equivalent to applying 0 to 8 dyn/cm lateral pressure to the bilayers. The resulting reductions in area per lipid were measured with a resolution of +/-0.2 A2 and the fractional area decrease was proportional to applied lateral pressure. For 1,2-dimyristoyl(d54)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, 1-stearoyl(d35)-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (SOPC-d35), and 1-stearoyl(d35)-2-docosahexaenoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (SDPC-d35) cross-sectional areas per molecule in excess water of 59.5, 61.4, and 69.2 A2 and bilayer elastic area compressibility moduli of 141, 221, and 121 dyn/cm were determined, respectively. Combining NMR and x-ray results enables the determination of compressibility differences between saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbon chains. In mixed-chain SOPC-d35 both chains have similar compressibility moduli; however, in mixed-chain polyunsaturated SDPC-d35, the saturated stearic acid chain appears to be far less compressible than the polyunsaturated docosahexaenoic acid chain. Images FIGURE 3 FIGURE 5 PMID:9336191

  8. Influence of the degree of unsaturation of the acyl side chain upon the interaction of analogues of 1-arachidonoylglycerol with monoacylglycerol lipase and fatty acid amide hydrolase

    SciTech Connect

    Vandevoorde, Severine; Saha, Bijali; Mahadevan, Anu; Razdan, Raj K.; Pertwee, Roger G.; Martin, Billy R.; Fowler, Christopher J. . E-mail: cf@pharm.umu.se

    2005-11-11

    Little is known as to the structural requirements of the acyl side chain for interaction of acylglycerols with monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL), the enzyme chiefly responsible for the metabolism of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) in the brain. In the present study, a series of twelve analogues of 1-AG (the more stable regioisomer of 2-AG) were investigated with respect to their ability to inhibit the metabolism of 2-oleoylglycerol by cytosolic and membrane-bound MAGL. In addition, the ability of the compounds to inhibit the hydrolysis of anandamide by fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) was investigated. For cytosolic MAGL, compounds with 20 carbon atoms in the acyl chain and 2-5 unsaturated bonds inhibited the hydrolysis of 2-oleoylglycerol with similar potencies (IC{sub 50} values in the range 5.1-8.2 {mu}M), whereas the two compounds with a single unsaturated bond were less potent (IC{sub 50} values 19 and 21 {mu}M). The fully saturated analogue 1-monoarachidin did not inhibit the enzyme, whereas the lower side chain analogues 1-monopalmitin and 1-monomyristin inhibited the enzyme with IC{sub 50} values of 12 and 32 {mu}M, respectively. The 22-carbon chain analogue of 1-AG was also potent (IC{sub 50} value 4.5 {mu}M). Introduction of an {alpha}-methyl group for the C20:4, C20:3, and C22:4 compounds did not affect potency in a consistent manner. For the FAAH and the membrane-bound MAGL, there was no obvious relationship between the degree of unsaturation of the acyl side chain and the ability to inhibit the enzymes. It is concluded that increasing the number of unsaturated bonds on the acyl side chain of 1-AG from 1 to 5 has little effect on the affinity of acylglycerols for cytosolic MAGL.

  9. Fatty acid transport by vectorial acylation in mammals: roles played by different isoforms of rat long-chain acyl-CoA synthetases.

    PubMed

    Tong, Fumin; Black, Paul N; Coleman, Rosalind A; DiRusso, Concetta C

    2006-03-01

    Mammals express multiple isoforms of acyl-CoA synthetase (ACSL1 and ACSL3-6) in various tissues. These enzymes are essential for fatty acid metabolism providing activated intermediates for complex lipid synthesis, protein modification, and beta-oxidation. Yeast in contrast express four major ACSLs, which have well-defined functions. Two, Faa1p and Faa4p, are specifically required for fatty acid transport by vectorial acylation. Four ACSLs from the rat were expressed in a yeast faa1delta faa4delta strain and their roles in fatty acid transport and trafficking characterized. All four restored ACS activity yet varied in substrate preference. ACSL1, 4, and 6 were able to rescue fatty acid transport activity and triglyceride synthesis. ACSL5, however, was unable to facilitate fatty acid transport despite conferring robust oleoyl-CoA synthetase activity. This is the first study evaluating the role of the mammalian ACSLs in fatty acid transport and supports a role for ACSL1, 4, and 6 in transport by vectorial acylation. PMID:16466685

  10. Development and pathomechanisms of cardiomyopathy in very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficient (VLCAD(-/-)) mice.

    PubMed

    Tucci, Sara; Flögel, Ulrich; Hermann, Sven; Sturm, Marga; Schäfers, Michael; Spiekerkoetter, Ute

    2014-05-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a typical manifestation of very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (VLCADD), the most common long-chain β-oxidation defects in humans; however in some patients cardiac function is fully compensated. Cardiomyopathy may also be reversed by supplementation of medium-chain triglycerides (MCT). We here characterize cardiac function of VLCAD-deficient (VLCAD(-/-)) mice over one year. Furthermore, we investigate the long-term effect of a continuous MCT diet on the cardiac phenotype. We assessed cardiac morphology and function in VLCAD(-/-) mice by in vivo MRI. Cardiac energetics were measured by (31)P-MRS and myocardial glucose uptake was quantified by positron-emission-tomography (PET). Metabolic adaptations were identified by the expression of genes regulating glucose and lipid metabolism using real-time-PCR. VLCAD(-/-) mice showed a progressive decrease in heart function over 12 months accompanied by a reduced phosphocreatine-to-ATP-ratio indicative of chronic energy deficiency. Long-term MCT supplementation aggravated the cardiac phenotype into dilated cardiomyopathy with features similar to diabetic heart disease. Cardiac energy production and function in mice with a β-oxidation defect cannot be maintained with age. Compensatory mechanisms are insufficient to preserve the cardiac energy state over time. However, energy deficiency by impaired β-oxidation and long-term MCT induce cardiomyopathy by different mechanisms. Cardiac MRI and MRS may be excellent tools to assess minor changes in cardiac function and energetics in patients with β-oxidation defects for preventive therapy. PMID:24530811

  11. Very Long-Chain Acyl-CoA Synthetase 3: Overexpression and Growth Dependence in Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Zhengtong; Fraisl, Peter; Shi, Xiaohai; Gabrielson, Edward; Forss-Petter, Sonja; Berger, Johannes; Watkins, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. In the United States, only one in six lung cancer patients survives five years after diagnosis. These statistics may improve if new therapeutic targets are identified. We previously reported that an enzyme of fatty acid metabolism, very long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase 3 (ACSVL3), is overexpressed in malignant glioma, and that depleting glioblastoma cells of ACSVL3 diminishes their malignant properties. To determine whether ACSVL3 expression was also increased in lung cancer, we studied tumor histologic sections and lung cancer cell lines. Immunohistochemical analysis of normal human lung showed moderate ACSVL3 expression only in bronchial epithelial cells. In contrast, all of 69 different lung tumors tested, including adeno-, squamous cell, large cell, and small cell carcinomas, had robustly elevated ACSVL3 levels. Western blot analysis of lung cancer cell lines derived from these tumor types also had significantly increased ACSVL3 protein compared to normal bronchial epithelial cells. Decreasing the growth rate of lung cancer cell lines did not change ACSVL3 expression. However, knocking down ACSVL3 expression by RNA interference reduced cell growth rates in culture by 65–76%, and the ability of tumor cells to form colonies in soft agar suspension by 65–80%. We also conducted studies to gain a better understanding of the biochemical properties of human ACSVL3. ACSVL3 mRNA was detected in many human tissues, but the expression pattern differed somewhat from that of the mouse. The enzyme activated long- and very long-chain saturated fatty acid substrates, as well as long-chain mono- and polyunsaturated fatty acids to their respective coenzyme A derivatives. Endogenous human ACSVL3 protein was found in a punctate subcellular compartment that partially colocalized with mitochondria as determined by immunofluorescence microscopy and subcellular fractionation. From these studies, we conclude that ACSVL3 is

  12. Influence of acid chain length on the properties of TiO2 prepared by sol-gel method and LC-MS studies of methylene blue photodegradation.

    PubMed

    Bakre, Pratibha V; Volvoikar, Prajesh S; Vernekar, Amit A; Tilve, S G

    2016-07-15

    Nano-sized titanium dioxide photocatalysts were synthesized by hybrid hydrolytic nonhydrolytic sol-gel method using aliphatic organic acid templates to study the effect of chain length on their properties. X-ray diffraction pattern indicated crystalline anatase phase. The Barrett-Joyner-Halenda surface area measurement gave surface area ranging from 98.4 to 205.5m(2)/g and was found to be dependent on the chain length of the aliphatic acid. The longer chain acids rendered the material with high surface area. The organic acids acted as bidentate ligand and a surfactant in controlling the size and the mesoporosity. The size of the TiO2 nanoparticulate was found to be in the range of 10-18nm. The catalyst prepared by employing long chain acids octanoic acid and palmitic acid had smaller size, narrow pore radius, higher surface area and showed better photocatalytic activity than the commercially available Degussa P25 catalyst for the degradation of methylene blue dye. A new intermediate was identified by tandem liquid chromatography mass spectrometry studies during the degradation of methylene blue solution. PMID:27100905

  13. Bilirubin conjugates of human bile. The excretion of bilirubin as the acyl glycosides of aldobiouronic acid, pseudoaldobiouronic acid and hexuronosylhexuronic acid, with a branched-chain hexuronic acid as one of the components of hexuronosylhexuronide

    PubMed Central

    Kuenzle, Clive C.

    1970-01-01

    Structure elucidations have been performed on the bilirubin conjugates isolated from human hepatic bile as the phenylazo derivatives. The major bilirubin conjugates are excreted, not as was formerly thought in the form of glucuronides, but as the acyl glycosides of aldobiouronic acid, pseudoaldobiouronic acid and hexuronosylhexuronic acid. The isolated aldobiouronides are proposed to have the structures of an acyl 6-O-hexopyranosyluronic acid-hexopyranoside, an acyl 4-O-hexofuranosyluronic acid-d-glucopyranoside, and an acyl 4-O-β-d-glucofuranosyluronic acid-d-glucopyranoside respectively, with the acyl radicals being those of the phenylazo derivative of bilirubin. The pseudoaldobiouronide is suggested to be the acyl 4-O-α-d-glucofuranosyl-β-d -glucopyranosiduronic acid, with the acyl radical being that of the phenylazo derivative of vinylneoxanthobilirubinic acid. The hexuronosylhexuronide presumably is the acyl 4-O-(3-C-hydroxymethylribofuranosyluronic acid)-β-d-glucopyranosiduronic acid, with the acyl radical being that of the phenylazo derivative of bilirubin. The 3-C-hydroxymethylriburonic acid, isolated as one of the components of the hexuronosylhexuronide, is the first natural branched-chain hexuronic acid to be detected, and the first branched-chain sugar ever detected in humans. PMID:5500303

  14. Altered Energetics of Exercise Explain Risk of Rhabdomyolysis in Very Long-Chain Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Diekman, E F; Visser, G; Schmitz, J P J; Nievelstein, R A J; de Sain-van der Velden, M; Wardrop, M; Van der Pol, W L; Houten, S M; van Riel, N A W; Takken, T; Jeneson, J A L

    2016-01-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is common in very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (VLCADD) and other metabolic myopathies, but its pathogenic basis is poorly understood. Here, we show that prolonged bicycling exercise against a standardized moderate workload in VLCADD patients is associated with threefold bigger changes in phosphocreatine (PCr) and inorganic phosphate (Pi) concentrations in quadriceps muscle and twofold lower changes in plasma acetyl-carnitine levels than in healthy subjects. This result is consistent with the hypothesis that muscle ATP homeostasis during exercise is compromised in VLCADD. However, the measured rates of PCr and Pi recovery post-exercise showed that the mitochondrial capacity for ATP synthesis in VLCADD muscle was normal. Mathematical modeling of oxidative ATP metabolism in muscle composed of three different fiber types indicated that the observed altered energy balance during submaximal exercise in VLCADD patients may be explained by a slow-to-fast shift in quadriceps fiber-type composition corresponding to 30% of the slow-twitch fiber-type pool in healthy quadriceps muscle. This study demonstrates for the first time that quadriceps energy balance during exercise in VLCADD patients is altered but not because of failing mitochondrial function. Our findings provide new clues to understanding the risk of rhabdomyolysis following exercise in human VLCADD. PMID:26881790

  15. Tumor-suppressive functions of long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase 4 in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Ye, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Xiao; Li, Yandong; Gao, Yong

    2016-04-01

    Long chain acyl CoA synthetase 4 (ACSL4) is a key enzyme in fatty acid metabolism with marked preference for arachidonic acid (AA). Recent reports have implicated its crucial roles in tumorigenesis. However in gastric cancer (GC), the expression and function of ACSL4 remain unclear. In the present study, we identified ACSL4 as a potential tumor suppressor in GC. The ACSL4 expression in GC samples was evaluated by real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry. The results indicated that the mRNA and protein levels of ACSL4 were frequently downregulated in cancer tissues compared with the adjacent non-cancerous mucosa control tissues. Cell-based functional assays exhibited that ectopic expression of ACSL4 inhibits cell growth, colony formation and cell migration, whereas ACSL4 knockdown enhanced these effects. In a nude mice model, ACSL4 knockdown also promoted subcutaneous xenografts' growth in vivo. Moreover, western blot analysis revealed that ACSL4 expression had a significant effect on FAK and P21 protein level. These findings suggest that ACSL4 plays a tumor-suppressive role and could be a potential therapeutic target in GC. PMID:26949059

  16. Altered Energetics of Exercise Explain Risk of Rhabdomyolysis in Very Long-Chain Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Diekman, E. F.; Visser, G.; Schmitz, J. P. J.; Nievelstein, R. A. J.; de Sain-van der Velden, M.; Wardrop, M.; Van der Pol, W. L.; Houten, S. M.; van Riel, N. A. W.; Takken, T.; Jeneson, J. A. L.

    2016-01-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is common in very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (VLCADD) and other metabolic myopathies, but its pathogenic basis is poorly understood. Here, we show that prolonged bicycling exercise against a standardized moderate workload in VLCADD patients is associated with threefold bigger changes in phosphocreatine (PCr) and inorganic phosphate (Pi) concentrations in quadriceps muscle and twofold lower changes in plasma acetyl-carnitine levels than in healthy subjects. This result is consistent with the hypothesis that muscle ATP homeostasis during exercise is compromised in VLCADD. However, the measured rates of PCr and Pi recovery post-exercise showed that the mitochondrial capacity for ATP synthesis in VLCADD muscle was normal. Mathematical modeling of oxidative ATP metabolism in muscle composed of three different fiber types indicated that the observed altered energy balance during submaximal exercise in VLCADD patients may be explained by a slow-to-fast shift in quadriceps fiber-type composition corresponding to 30% of the slow-twitch fiber-type pool in healthy quadriceps muscle. This study demonstrates for the first time that quadriceps energy balance during exercise in VLCADD patients is altered but not because of failing mitochondrial function. Our findings provide new clues to understanding the risk of rhabdomyolysis following exercise in human VLCADD. PMID:26881790

  17. Oxidized phosphatidylcholines suggest oxidative stress in patients with medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Najdekr, Lukáš; Gardlo, Alžběta; Mádrová, Lucie; Friedecký, David; Janečková, Hana; Correa, Elon S; Goodacre, Royston; Adam, Tomáš

    2015-07-01

    Inborn errors of metabolism encompass a large group of diseases caused by enzyme deficiencies and are therefore amenable to metabolomics investigations. Medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (MCADD) is a defect in β-oxidation of fatty acids, and is one of the most well understood disorders. We report here the use of liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) based untargeted metabolomics and targeted flow injection analysis-tandem mass spectrometry (FIA-TMS) that lead to discovery of novel compounds of oxidative stress. Dry blood spots of controls (n=25) and patient samples (n=25) were extracted by methanol/water (1/1, v/v) and these supernatants were analyzed by LC-MS method with detection by an Orbitrap Elite MS. Data were processed by XCMS and CAMERA followed by dimension reduction methods. Patients were clearly distinguished from controls in PCA. S-plot derived from OPLS-DA indicated that medium-chain acylcarnitines (octanoyl, decenoyl and decanoyl carnitines) as well as three phosphatidylcholines (PC(16:0,9:0(COOH))), PC(18:0,5:0(COOH)) and PC(16:0,8:0(COOH)) were important metabolites for differentiation between patients and healthy controls. In order to biologically validate these discriminatory molecules as indicators for oxidative stress, a second cohort of individuals were analyzed, including MCADD (n=25) and control (n=250) samples. These were measured by a modified newborn screening method using FIA-TMS (API 4000) in MRM mode. Calculated p-values for PC(16:0,9:0(COOH)), PC(18:0,5:0(COOH)) and PC(16:0,8:0(COOH)) were 1.927×10(-14), 2.391×10(-15) and 3.354×10(-15) respectively. These elevated oxidized phospholipids indeed show an increased presence of oxidative stress in MCADD patients as one of the pathophysiological mechanisms of the disease. PMID:25882409

  18. Separation of isomeric short-chain acyl-CoAs in plant matrices using ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Purves, Randy W; Ambrose, Stephen J; Clark, Shawn M; Stout, Jake M; Page, Jonathan E

    2015-02-01

    Acyl coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) thioesters are important intermediates in cellular metabolism and being able to distinguish among them is critical to fully understanding metabolic pathways in plants. Although significant advances have been made in the identification and quantification of acyl-CoAs using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), separation of isomeric species such as isobutyryl- and n-butyrl-CoA has remained elusive. Here we report an ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC)-MS/MS method for quantifying short-chain acyl-CoAs including isomeric species n-butyryl-CoA and isobutyryl-CoA as well as n-valeryl-CoA and isovaleryl-CoA. The method was applied to the analysis of extracts of hop (Humulus lupulus) and provided strong evidence for the existence of an additional structural isomer of valeryl-CoA, 2-methylbutyryl-CoA, as well as an unexpected isomer of hexanoyl-CoA. The results showed differences in the acyl-CoA composition among varieties of Humulus lupulus, both in glandular trichomes and cone tissues. When compared with the analysis of hemp (Cannabis sativa) extracts, the contribution of isobutyryl-CoAs in hop was greater as would be expected based on the downstream polyketide products. Surprisingly, branched chain valeryl-CoAs (isovaleryl-CoA and 2-methylbutyryl-CoA) were the dominant form of valeryl-CoAs in both hop and hemp. The capability to separate these isomeric forms will help to understand biochemical pathways leading to specialized metabolites in plants. PMID:25553535

  19. Sexual dimorphism of lipid metabolism in very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficient (VLCAD-/-) mice in response to medium-chain triglycerides (MCT).

    PubMed

    Tucci, Sara; Flögel, Ulrich; Spiekerkoetter, Ute

    2015-07-01

    Medium-chain triglycerides (MCT) are widely applied in the treatment of long-chain fatty acid oxidation disorders. Previously it was shown that long-term MCT supplementation strongly affects lipid metabolism in mice. We here investigate sex-specific effects in mice with very-long-chain-acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD) deficiency in response to a long-term MCT modified diet. We quantified blood lipids, acylcarnitines, glucose, insulin and free fatty acids, as well as tissue triglycerides in the liver and skeletal muscle under a control and an MCT diet over 1 year. In addition, visceral and hepatic fat content and muscular intramyocellular lipids (IMCL) were assessed by in vivo(1)H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) techniques. The long-term application of an MCT diet induced a marked alteration of glucose homeostasis. However, only VLCAD-/- female mice developed a severe metabolic syndrome characterized by marked insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, severe hepatic and visceral steatosis, whereas VLCAD-/- males seemed to be protected and only presented with milder insulin resistance. Moreover, the highly saturated MCT diet is associated with a decreased hepatic stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1 (SCD1) activity in females aggravating the harmful effects of a saturated MCT diet. Long-term MCT supplementation deeply affects lipid metabolism in a sexual dimorphic manner resulting in a severe metabolic syndrome only in female mice. These findings are striking since the first signs of insulin resistance already occur in female VLCAD-/- mice during their reproductive period. How these metabolic adaptations are finally regulated needs to be determined. More important, the relevance of these findings for humans under these dietary modifications needs to be investigated. PMID:25887160

  20. Effect of a bovine lung surfactant protein isolate (SP-B/C) on egg phosphatidylglycerol acyl chain order in a lipid mixture with dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine and palmitic acid.

    PubMed

    Krill, S L; Gupta, S L

    1994-04-01

    Dynamic surface tension measurements of films of a d62 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine:L-alpha-phosphatidyl-DL - glycerol:d31 palmitic acid (d62-DPPC:EggPG:d31-PA) lipid matrix in the presence of a bovine pulmonary surfactant protein isolate (SP-B/C) demonstrate the improved surface activity over that of the lipids alone. Thus, significant interaction of the proteins with the lipid matrix is demonstrated. The effect of SP-B/C on the acyl chain order of the negatively charged EggPG within a d62-DPPC:EggPG:d31-PA lipid matrix in D2O saline was investigated in thermal perturbation Fourier transform IR spectroscopic studies. The EggPG thermotropic phase behavior was determined independently of the other lipid components with perdeuterated lipids and D2O. The data demonstrate the high degree of EggPG acyl chain disorder in the absence of the protein isolate. A broad transition occurs between 30 and 40 degrees C. The addition of the protein isolate did not alter the acyl chain order at 0.281 and 1.46 mg/mL of protein. However, alterations in the lipid carbonyl vibrational mode were observed. PMID:8046609

  1. Measurement of stable isotopic enrichment and concentration of long-chain fatty acyl-carnitines in tissue by HPLC-MS.

    PubMed

    Sun, Dayong; Cree, Melanie G; Zhang, Xiao-Jun; Bøersheim, Elisabet; Wolfe, Robert R

    2006-02-01

    We have developed a new method for the simultaneous measurements of stable isotopic tracer enrichments and concentrations of individual long-chain fatty acyl-carnitines in muscle tissue using ion-pairing high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization quadrupole mass spectrometry in the selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode. Long-chain fatty acyl-carnitines were extracted from frozen muscle tissue samples by acetonitrile/methanol. Baseline separation was achieved by reverse-phase HPLC in the presence of the volatile ion-pairing reagent heptafluorobutyric acid. The SIM capability of a single quadrupole mass analyzer allows further separation of the ions of interest from the sample matrixes, providing very clean total and selected ion chromatograms that can be used to calculate the stable isotopic tracer enrichment and concentration of long-chain fatty acyl-carnitines in a single analysis. The combination of these two separation techniques greatly simplifies the sample preparation procedure and increases the detection sensitivity. Applying this protocol to biological muscle samples proves it to be a very sensitive, accurate, and precise analytical tool. PMID:16301738

  2. Gating of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore by long chain fatty acyl analogs in vivo.

    PubMed

    Samovski, Dmitri; Kalderon, Bella; Yehuda-Shnaidman, Einav; Bar-Tana, Jacob

    2010-03-01

    The role played by long chain fatty acids (LCFA) in promoting energy expenditure is confounded by their dual function as substrates for oxidation and as putative classic uncouplers of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. LCFA analogs of the MEDICA (MEthyl-substituted DICarboxylic Acids) series are neither esterified into lipids nor beta-oxidized and may thus simulate the uncoupling activity of natural LCFA in vivo, independently of their substrate role. Treatment of rats or cell lines with MEDICA analogs results in low conductance gating of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (PTP), with 10-40% decrease in the inner mitochondrial membrane potential. PTP gating by MEDICA analogs is accounted for by inhibition of Raf1 expression and kinase activity, resulting in suppression of the MAPK/RSK1 and the adenylate cyclase/PKA transduction pathways. Suppression of RSK1 and PKA results in a decrease in phosphorylation of their respective downstream targets, Bad(Ser-112) and Bad(Ser-155). Decrease in Bad(Ser-112, Ser-155) phosphorylation results in increased binding of Bad to mitochondrial Bcl2 with concomitant displacement of Bax, followed by PTP gating induced by free mitochondrial Bax. Low conductance PTP gating by LCFA/MEDICA may account for their thyromimetic calorigenic activity in vivo. PMID:20037159

  3. Diacylglycerol-containing docosahexaenoic acid in acyl chain modulates airway smooth muscle tone.

    PubMed

    Hichami, Aziz; Morin, Caroline; Rousseau, Eric; Khan, Naim A

    2005-10-01

    We synthesized and assessed the role of a diacylglycerol (DAG)-containing docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), that is, 1-stearoyl-2-docosahexaenoyl-sn-glycerol (SDHG), in the contraction of guinea pig airway smooth muscle (ASM). We compared its action with 1-stearoyl-2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycerol (SAG) and 1,2-dioctanoyl-sn-glycerol (1,2-DiC8), a stable DAG analog. The three DAGs (SAG, SDHG, and 1,2-DiC8) induced reversible concentration-dependent contraction of ASM. SDHG induced higher guinea pig ASM contraction than did SAG and 1,2-DiC8. The effects of SDHG were blocked, to different extents, by nifedipine (L-type Ca2+ channel blocker). By employing GF-109203X (protein kinase C [PKC] inhibitor) and lanthanum (La3+), a nonselective cation channel blocker, we observed that SDHG evoked ASM contractile response via PKC-dependent and PKC-independent (but Ca2+-dependent) pathways. Interestingly, SAG exerted its action only by increasing [Ca2+]i and did not require PKC activation. To probe the implication of calcium mobilization, we employed thapsigargin (TG), which also induced ASM contraction in a calcium-dependent manner. SDHG and 1,2-DiC8, in a PKC-dependent manner, induced the phosphorylation of CPI-17 (myosin light chain phosphatase inhibitor of 17 kD). Furthermore, SAG and TG failed to phosphorylate CPI-17 in ASM cells. Our results suggest that different DAG species, produced during a dietary supplementation with fatty acids, could modulate the reactivity of airway smooth muscles in a PKC-dependent and -independent manner, and hence, may play a critical role in health and disease. PMID:15961724

  4. Insertion of apoLp-III into a lipid monolayer is more favorable for saturated, more ordered, acyl-chains

    SciTech Connect

    Rathnayake, Sewwandi S.; Mirheydari, Mona; Schulte, Adam; Gillahan, James E.; Gentit, Taylor; Phillips, Ashley N.; Okonkwo, Rose K.; Burger, Koert N.J.; Mann, Elizabeth K.; Vaknin, David; Bu, Wei; Agra-Kooijman, Dena Mae; Kooijman, Edgar E.

    2013-10-04

    Neutral lipid transport in mammals is complicated involving many types of apolipoprotein. The exchangeable apolipoproteins mediate the transfer of hydrophobic lipids between tissues and particles, and bind to cell surface receptors. Amphipathic a-helices form a common structural motif that facilitates their lipid binding and exchangeability. ApoLp-III, the only exchangeable apolipoprotein found in insects, is a model amphipathic a:helix bundle protein and its three dimensional structure and function mimics that of the mammalian proteins apoE and apoAI. Even the intracellular exchangeable lipid droplet protein TIP47/perilipin 3 contains an a-helix bundle domain with high structural similarity to that of apoE and apoLp-III. Here, we investigated the interaction of apoLp-III from Locusta migratoria with lipid monolayers. Consistent with earlier work we find that insertion of apoLp-III into fluid lipid monolayers is highest for diacylglycerol. We observe a preference for saturated and more highly ordered lipids, suggesting a new mode of interaction for amphipathic a-helix bundles. X-ray reflectivity shows that apoLp-III unfolds at a hydrophobic interface and flexible loops connecting the amphipathic cc-helices stay in solution. X-ray diffraction indicates that apoLp-III insertion into diacylglycerol monolayers induces additional ordering of saturated acyl-chains. These results thus shed important new insight into the protein-lipid interactions of a model exchangeable apolipoprotein with significant implications for its mammalian counterparts. (C) 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Effects of hypo- and hyperthyroidism on rat liver microsomal long-chain fatty acyl-CoA synthetase and hydrolase

    SciTech Connect

    Dang, A.Q.; Faas, F.H.; Carter, W.J.

    1986-05-01

    The effects of hyperthyroidism (hyperT/sub 3/), (tri-iodothryonine (T/sub 3/) injected rats), and hypothyroidism (hypoT/sub 3/) (thyroidectomized rats) on the activation of fatty acids by a microsomal long-chain fatty acyl-CoA (LCA-CoA) synthetase and the degradation of LCA-CoA by a microsomal LCA-CoA hydrolase was determined. MAS was assayed by measuring the (1-/sup 14/C)-palmitate or -1-/sup 14/C) oleate incorporated into its water soluble CoA ester. MAH was assayed spectrophotomerically by following the reduction of 5',5'-dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid) by the CoA released from palmitoyl-CoA or oleoyl-CoA. Enzyme activities are given as mean (nmoles/mg/min) +/- SEM. MAS activities were decreased 36-44% (p < 0.01) in both hypoT/sub 3/ and hyperT/sub 3/ (controls = 101 +/- 4 (n = 11, (1-/sup 14/C)-palmitate) of 72 +/- 2 (n = 5,(1-/sup 14/C)oleate)). These decreases may contribute to the decreased triacelyglycerol (TG) and phospholipid contents in the hyperT/sub 3/ liver and the decreased clearance rate of plasma TG in the hypoT/sub 3/. MAH was decreased 27-42% (p<0.01) only in hypoT/sub 3/ (controls = 77 +/- 3 (n = 11, palmitoyl-CoA) or 45 +/- 1 (n = 5, oleoyl-CoA)). This decrease was corrected by T/sub 3/ treatment. Since the decreased MAH would increase the availability of LCA-CoA, it may contribute to the increased TG synthesis in hypoT/sub 3/.

  6. Diet-Sensitive Sources of Reactive Oxygen Species in Liver Mitochondria: Role of Very Long Chain Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenases

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, Ariel R.; Kakimoto, Pâmela A. H. B.; Kowaltowski, Alicia J.

    2013-01-01

    High fat diets and accompanying hepatic steatosis are highly prevalent conditions. Previous work has shown that steatosis is accompanied by enhanced generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which may mediate further liver damage. Here we investigated mechanisms leading to enhanced ROS generation following high fat diets (HFD). We found that mitochondria from HFD livers present no differences in maximal respiratory rates and coupling, but generate more ROS specifically when fatty acids are used as substrates. Indeed, many acyl-CoA dehydrogenase isoforms were found to be more highly expressed in HFD livers, although only the very long chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD) was more functionally active. Studies conducted with permeabilized mitochondria and different chain length acyl-CoA derivatives suggest that VLCAD is also a source of ROS production in mitochondria of HFD animals. This production is stimulated by the lack of NAD+. Overall, our studies uncover VLCAD as a novel, diet-sensitive, source of mitochondrial ROS. PMID:24116206

  7. Structure-activity relationship studies on acremomannolipin A, the potent calcium signal modulator with a novel glycolipid structure 4: Role of acyl side chains on d-mannose.

    PubMed

    Tsutsui, Nozomi; Tanabe, Genzoh; Ikeda, Nami; Okamura, Saika; Ogawa, Marika; Miyazaki, Kuniko; Kita, Ayako; Sugiura, Reiko; Muraoka, Osamu

    2016-10-01

    As part of an ongoing study on the structure-activity relationship of acremomannolipin A (1)-the novel glycolipid isolated from Acremonium strictum possessing potent calcium signal-modulating activity-the role of acyl substituents on the d-mannose moiety was examined. Three partially deacylated homologs (2a-2c) and 20 homologs (2d-2w) bearing different acyloxy side chains were synthesized via the stereoselective β-mannosylation of appropriately protected mannosyl sulfoxides (3) with d-mannitol derivatives (4), and their calcium signal-modulating activities were examined. The activities of 2a-2c were completely lost. Homologs bearing relatively short acyloxy groups at C-3, C-4, and C-6 positions (2t-2v) exhibited less activity than 1, whereas a heptanoyl homolog (2w: C7) maintained activity nearly equal to that of 1. When the acyl groups at these three positions were substituted by an octanoyl group (2i: C8), the activity was completely lost. On the other hand, of the 10 homologs in which the octanoyl at C-2 was substituted by other acyloxy moieties (2j-2s), three (2m: C7, 2n: C9, 2o: C10) maintained potent activity. These results suggested that peracylated mannose structure is critical for calcium signal-modulating activity, and this activity is precisely dependent on the length of four acyl side chains on d-mannose. PMID:27243802

  8. Rhizobial homologs of the fatty acid transporter FadL facilitate perception of long-chain acyl-homoserine lactone signals

    PubMed Central

    Krol, Elizaveta; Becker, Anke

    2014-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) using N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs) as signal molecules is a common strategy used by diverse Gram-negative bacteria. A widespread mechanism of AHL sensing involves binding of these molecules by cytosolic LuxR-type transcriptional regulators, which requires uptake of external AHLs. The outer membrane is supposed to be an efficient barrier for diffusion of long-chain AHLs. Here we report evidence that in Sinorhizobium meliloti, sensing of AHLs with acyl chains composed of 14 or more carbons is facilitated by the outer membrane protein FadLSm, a homolog of the Escherichia coli FadLEc long-chain fatty acid transporter. The effect of fadLSm on AHL sensing was more prominent for longer and more hydrophobic signal molecules. Using reporter gene fusions to QS target genes, we found that fadLSm increased AHL sensitivity and accelerated the course of QS. In contrast to FadLEc, FadLSm did not support uptake of oleic acid, but did contribute to growth on palmitoleic acid. FadLSm homologs from related symbiotic α-rhizobia and the plant pathogen Agrobacterium tumefaciens differed in their ability to facilitate long-chain AHL sensing or to support growth on oleic acid. FadLAt was found to be ineffective toward long-chain AHLs. We obtained evidence that the predicted extracellular loop 5 of FadLSm and further α-rhizobial FadL proteins contains determinants of specificity to long-chain AHLs. Replacement of a part of loop 5 by the corresponding region from α-rhizobial FadL proteins transferred sensitivity for long-chain AHLs to FadLAt. PMID:25002473

  9. The membrane interaction of amphiphilic model peptides affects phosphatidylserine headgroup and acyl chain order and dynamics. Application of the phospholipid headgroup electrometer concept to phosphatidylserine

    SciTech Connect

    de Kroon, A.I.P.M.; Killian, J.A.; de Gier, J.; de Kruijff, B. )

    1991-01-29

    Deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance ({sup 2}H NMR) was used to study the interaction of amphiphilic model peptides with model membranes consisting of 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-L-serine deuterated either at the {beta}-position of the serine moiety ((2-{sup 2}H)DOPS) or at the 11-position of the acyl chains ((11,11-{sup 2}H{sub 2})DOPS). The peptides are derived from the sequences H-Ala-Met-Leu-Trp-Ala-OH and H-Arg-Met-Leu-Trp-Ala-OH and contain a positive charge of +1 or +2 at the amino terminus or one positive charge at each end of the molecule. Upon titration of dispersions of DOPS with the peptides, the divalent peptides show a similar extent of binding to the DOPS bilyers, which is larger than that of the single charged peptide. Under these conditions the values of the quadrupolar splitting of both (2-{sup 2}H)DOPS and (11,11-{sup 2}H{sub 2})DOPS are decreased, indicating that the peptides reduce the order of both the DOPS headgroup and the acyl chains. The extent of the decrease depends on the amount of peptide bound and on the position of the charged moieties in the peptide molecule. Titrations of DOPS with poly(L-lysine){sub 100}, which were included for reasons of comparison, reveal increased {Delta}v{sub q} values. When the peptide-lipid titrations are carried out without applying a freeze-thaw procedure to achieve full equilibration, two-component {sup 2}H NMR spectra occur. The apparently limited accessibility of the lipid to the peptides under these circumstances is discussed in relation to the ability of the peptides to exhibit transbilayer movement. {sup 2}H spin-lattice relaxation time T1 measurements demonstrate a decrease of the rates of motion of both headgroup and acyl chains of DOPS in the presence of the peptides.

  10. Mouse Siglec-1 Mediates trans-Infection of Surface-bound Murine Leukemia Virus in a Sialic Acid N-Acyl Side Chain-dependent Manner.

    PubMed

    Erikson, Elina; Wratil, Paul R; Frank, Martin; Ambiel, Ina; Pahnke, Katharina; Pino, Maria; Azadi, Parastoo; Izquierdo-Useros, Nuria; Martinez-Picado, Javier; Meier, Chris; Schnaar, Ronald L; Crocker, Paul R; Reutter, Werner; Keppler, Oliver T

    2015-11-01

    Siglec-1 (sialoadhesin, CD169) is a surface receptor on human cells that mediates trans-enhancement of HIV-1 infection through recognition of sialic acid moieties in virus membrane gangliosides. Here, we demonstrate that mouse Siglec-1, expressed on the surface of primary macrophages in an interferon-α-responsive manner, captures murine leukemia virus (MLV) particles and mediates their transfer to proliferating lymphocytes. The MLV infection of primary B-cells was markedly more efficient than that of primary T-cells. The major structural protein of MLV particles, Gag, frequently co-localized with Siglec-1, and trans-infection, primarily of surface-bound MLV particles, efficiently occurred. To explore the role of sialic acid for MLV trans-infection at a submolecular level, we analyzed the potential of six sialic acid precursor analogs to modulate the sialylated ganglioside-dependent interaction of MLV particles with Siglec-1. Biosynthetically engineered sialic acids were detected in both the glycolipid and glycoprotein fractions of MLV producer cells. MLV released from cells carrying N-acyl-modified sialic acids displayed strikingly different capacities for Siglec-1-mediated capture and trans-infection; N-butanoyl, N-isobutanoyl, N-glycolyl, or N-pentanoyl side chain modifications resulted in up to 92 and 80% reduction of virus particle capture and trans-infection, respectively, whereas N-propanoyl or N-cyclopropylcarbamyl side chains had no effect. In agreement with these functional analyses, molecular modeling indicated reduced binding affinities for non-functional N-acyl modifications. Thus, Siglec-1 is a key receptor for macrophage/lymphocyte trans-infection of surface-bound virions, and the N-acyl side chain of sialic acid is a critical determinant for the Siglec-1/MLV interaction. PMID:26370074

  11. Synthesis and Th1-immunostimulatory activity of α-galactosylceramide analogues bearing a halogen-containing or selenium-containing acyl chain.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Md Imran; Hanashima, Shinya; Nomura, Takuto; Lethu, Sébastien; Tsuchikawa, Hiroshi; Murata, Michio; Kusaka, Hiroki; Kita, Shunsuke; Maenaka, Katsumi

    2016-08-15

    A novel series of CD1d ligand α-galactosylceramides (α-GalCers) were synthesized by incorporation of the heavy atoms Br and Se in the acyl chain backbone of α-galactosyl-N-cerotoylphytosphingosine. The synthetic analogues are potent CD1d ligands and stimulate mouse invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells to selectively enhance Th1 cytokine production. These synthetic analogues would be efficient X-ray crystallographic probes to disclose precise atomic positions of alkyl carbons and lipid-protein interactions in KRN7000/CD1d complexes. PMID:27325450

  12. A Methylated Phosphate Group and Four Amide-linked Acyl Chains in Leptospira interrogans Lipid A. The Membrane Anchor of an Unusual Lipopolysaccharide that Activates TLR2*

    PubMed Central

    Que-Gewirth, Nanette L. S.; Ribeiro, Anthony A.; Kalb, Suzanne R.; Cotter, Robert J.; Bulach, Dieter M.; Adler, Ben; Girons, Isabelle Saint; Werts, Catherine; Raetz, Christian R. H.

    2008-01-01

    Leptospira interrogans differs from other spirochetes in that it contains homologs of all the Escherichia coli lpx genes required for the biosynthesis of the lipid A anchor of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). LPS from L. interrogans cells is unusual in that it activates TLR2 rather than TLR4. The structure of L. interrogans lipid A has now been determined by a combination of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry, NMR spectroscopy, and biochemical studies. Lipid A was released from LPS of L. interrogans serovar Pomona by 100 °C hydrolysis at pH 4.5 in the presence of SDS. Following purification by anion exchange and thin layer chromatography, the major component was shown to have a molecular weight of 1727. Mild hydrolysis with dilute NaOH reduced this to 1338, consistent with the presence of four N-linked and two O-linked acyl chains. The lipid A molecules of both the virulent and nonvirulent forms of L. interrogans serovar Icterohaemorrhagiae (strain Verdun) were identical to those of L. interrogans Pomona by the above criteria. Given the selectivity of L. interrogans LpxA for 3-hydroxylaurate, we propose that L. interrogans lipid A is acylated with R-3-hydroxylaurate at positions 3 and 3′ and with R-3-hydroxypalmitate at positions 2 and 2′. The hydroxyacyl chain composition was validated by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry of fatty acid methyl esters. Intact hexa-acylated lipid A of L. interrogans Pomona was also analyzed by NMR, confirming the presence a β-1′,6-linked disaccharide of 2,3-diamino-2,3-dideoxy-D-glucopyranose units. Two secondary unsaturated acyl chains are attached to the distal residue. The 1-position of the disaccharide is derivatized with an axial phosphate moiety, but the 4′-OH is unsubstituted. 1H and 31P NMR analyses revealed that the 1-phosphate group is methylated. Purified L. interrogans lipid A is inactive against human THP-1 cells but does stimulate tumor necrosis factor production by

  13. Long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase 2 knockdown leads to decreased fatty acid oxidation in fat body and reduced reproductive capacity in the insect Rhodnius prolixus.

    PubMed

    Alves-Bezerra, Michele; Klett, Eric L; De Paula, Iron F; Ramos, Isabela B; Coleman, Rosalind A; Gondim, Katia C

    2016-07-01

    Long-chain acyl-CoA esters are important intermediates in lipid metabolism and are synthesized from fatty acids by long-chain acyl-CoA synthetases (ACSL). The hematophagous insect Rhodnius prolixus, a vector of Chagas' disease, produces glycerolipids in the midgut after a blood meal, which are stored as triacylglycerol in the fat body and eggs. We identified twenty acyl-CoA synthetase genes in R. prolixus, two encoding ACSL isoforms (RhoprAcsl1 and RhoprAcsl2). RhoprAcsl1 transcripts increased in posterior midgut on the second day after feeding, and RhoprAcsl2 was highly transcribed on the tenth day. Both enzymes were expressed in Escherichia coli. Recombinant RhoprACSL1 and RhoprACSL2 had broad pH optima (7.5-9.5 and 6.5-9.5, respectively), were inhibited by triacsin C, and were rosiglitazone-insensitive. Both showed similar apparent Km for palmitic and oleic acid (2-6 μM), but different Km for arachidonic acid (0.5 and 6 μM for RhoprACSL1-Flag and RhoprACSL2-Flag, respectively). The knockdown of RhoprAcsl1 did not result in noticeable phenotypes. However, RhoprACSL2 deficient insects exhibited a 2.5-fold increase in triacylglycerol content in the fat body, and 90% decrease in fatty acid β-oxidation. RhoprAcsl2 knockdown also resulted in 20% increase in lifespan, delayed digestion, 30% reduced oviposition, and 50% reduction in egg hatching. Laid eggs and hatched nymphs showed remarkable alterations in morphology. In summary, R. prolixus ACSL isoforms have distinct roles on lipid metabolism. Although RhoprACSL1 functions remain unclear, we propose that RhoprACSL2 is the main contributor for the formation of the intracellular acyl-CoA pool channeled for β-oxidation in the fat body, and is also required for normal reproduction. PMID:27091636

  14. Synthesis, calorimetric studies, and crystal structures of N, O-diacylethanolamines with matched chains[S

    PubMed Central

    Kamlekar, Ravi Kanth; Tarafdar, Pradip K.; Swamy, Musti J.

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies show that N-, O-diacylethanolamines (DAEs) can be derived by the O-acylation of N-acylethanolamines (NAEs) under physiological conditions. Because the content of NAEs in a variety of organisms increases in response to stress, it is likely that DAEs may also be present in biomembranes. In view of this, a homologous series of DAEs with matched acyl chains (n = 10–20) have been synthesized and characterized. Transition enthalpies and entropies obtained from differential scanning calorimetry show that dry DAEs with even and odd acyl chains independently exhibit linear dependence on the chainlength. Linear least-squares analyses yielded incremental values contributed by each methylene group to the transition enthalpy and entropy and the corresponding end contributions. N-, O-Didecanoylethanolamine (DDEA), N-, O-dilauroylethanolamine (DLEA), and N-, O-dimyristoylethanolamine (DMEA) crystallized in the orthorhombic space group Pbc21 with four symmetry-related molecules in the unit cell. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies show that DDEA, DLEA, and DMEA are isostructural and adopt an L-shaped structure with the N-acyl chain and the central ethanolamine moiety being essentially identical to the structure of N-acylethanolamines, whereas the O-acyl chain is linear with all-trans conformation. In all three DAEs, the lipid molecules are organized in a bilayer fashion wherein the N-acyl and O-acyl chains from adjacent layers oppose each other. PMID:19597189

  15. Increased Long Chain acyl-Coa Synthetase Activity and Fatty Acid Import Is Linked to Membrane Synthesis for Development of Picornavirus Replication Organelles

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Alison J.; Ford, Lauren A.; Pei, Zhengtong; Watkins, Paul A.; Ernst, Robert K.; Belov, George A.

    2013-01-01

    All positive strand (+RNA) viruses of eukaryotes replicate their genomes in association with membranes. The mechanisms of membrane remodeling in infected cells represent attractive targets for designing future therapeutics, but our understanding of this process is very limited. Elements of autophagy and/or the secretory pathway were proposed to be hijacked for building of picornavirus replication organelles. However, even closely related viruses differ significantly in their requirements for components of these pathways. We demonstrate here that infection with diverse picornaviruses rapidly activates import of long chain fatty acids. While in non-infected cells the imported fatty acids are channeled to lipid droplets, in infected cells the synthesis of neutral lipids is shut down and the fatty acids are utilized in highly up-regulated phosphatidylcholine synthesis. Thus the replication organelles are likely built from de novo synthesized membrane material, rather than from the remodeled pre-existing membranes. We show that activation of fatty acid import is linked to the up-regulation of cellular long chain acyl-CoA synthetase activity and identify the long chain acyl-CoA syntheatse3 (Acsl3) as a novel host factor required for polio replication. Poliovirus protein 2A is required to trigger the activation of import of fatty acids independent of its protease activity. Shift in fatty acid import preferences by infected cells results in synthesis of phosphatidylcholines different from those in uninfected cells, arguing that the viral replication organelles possess unique properties compared to the pre-existing membranes. Our data show how poliovirus can change the overall cellular membrane homeostasis by targeting one critical process. They explain earlier observations of increased phospholipid synthesis in infected cells and suggest a simple model of the structural development of the membranous scaffold of replication complexes of picorna-like viruses, that may be

  16. SIRT3 and SIRT5 Regulate the Enzyme Activity and Cardiolipin Binding of Very Long-Chain Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuxun; Bharathi, Sivakama S.; Rardin, Matthew J.; Uppala, Radha; Verdin, Eric; Gibson, Bradford W.; Goetzman, Eric S.

    2015-01-01

    SIRT3 and SIRT5 have been shown to regulate mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation but the molecular mechanisms behind the regulation are lacking. Here, we demonstrate that SIRT3 and SIRT5 both target human very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD), a key fatty acid oxidation enzyme. SIRT3 deacetylates and SIRT5 desuccinylates K299 which serves to stabilize the essential FAD cofactor in the active site. Further, we show that VLCAD binds strongly to cardiolipin and isolated mitochondrial membranes via a domain near the C-terminus containing lysines K482, K492, and K507. Acetylation or succinylation of these residues eliminates binding of VLCAD to cardiolipin. SIRT3 deacetylates K507 while SIRT5 desuccinylates K482, K492, and K507. Sirtuin deacylation of recombinant VLCAD rescues membrane binding. Endogenous VLCAD from SIRT3 and SIRT5 knockout mouse liver shows reduced binding to cardiolipin. Thus, SIRT3 and SIRT5 promote fatty acid oxidation by converging upon VLCAD to promote its activity and membrane localization. Regulation of cardiolipin binding by reversible lysine acylation is a novel mechanism that is predicted to extrapolate to other metabolic proteins that localize to the inner mitochondrial membrane. PMID:25811481

  17. Antiproliferative activity of long chain acylated esters of quercetin-3-O-glucoside in hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Sudan, Sudhanshu; Rupasinghe, Hp Vasantha

    2015-11-01

    Despite their strong role in human health, poor bioavailability of flavonoids limits their biological effects in vivo. Enzymatically catalyzed acylation of fatty acids to flavonoids is one of the approaches of increasing cellular permeability and hence, biological activities. In this study, six long chain fatty acid esters of quercetin-3-O-glucoside (Q3G) acylated enzymatically and were used for determining their antiproliferative action in hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HepG2) in comparison to precursor compounds and two chemotherapy drugs (Sorafenib and Cisplatin). Fatty acid esters of Q3G showed significant inhibition of HepG2 cell proliferation by 85 to 90% after 6 h and 24 h of treatment, respectively. The cell death due to these novel compounds was associated with cell-cycle arrest in S-phase and apoptosis observed by DNA fragmentation, fluorescent microscopy and elevated caspase-3 activity and strong DNA topoisomerase II inhibition. Interestingly, Q3G esters showed significantly low toxicity to normal liver cells than Sorafenib (P < 0.05), a chemotherapy drug for hepatocellular carcinoma. Among all, oleic acid ester of Q3G displayed the greatest antiproliferation action and a high potential as an anti-cancer therapeutic. Overall, the results of the study suggest strong antiproliferative action of these novel food-derived compounds in treatment of cancer. PMID:25681471

  18. SIRT3 and SIRT5 regulate the enzyme activity and cardiolipin binding of very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuxun; Bharathi, Sivakama S; Rardin, Matthew J; Uppala, Radha; Verdin, Eric; Gibson, Bradford W; Goetzman, Eric S

    2015-01-01

    SIRT3 and SIRT5 have been shown to regulate mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation but the molecular mechanisms behind the regulation are lacking. Here, we demonstrate that SIRT3 and SIRT5 both target human very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD), a key fatty acid oxidation enzyme. SIRT3 deacetylates and SIRT5 desuccinylates K299 which serves to stabilize the essential FAD cofactor in the active site. Further, we show that VLCAD binds strongly to cardiolipin and isolated mitochondrial membranes via a domain near the C-terminus containing lysines K482, K492, and K507. Acetylation or succinylation of these residues eliminates binding of VLCAD to cardiolipin. SIRT3 deacetylates K507 while SIRT5 desuccinylates K482, K492, and K507. Sirtuin deacylation of recombinant VLCAD rescues membrane binding. Endogenous VLCAD from SIRT3 and SIRT5 knockout mouse liver shows reduced binding to cardiolipin. Thus, SIRT3 and SIRT5 promote fatty acid oxidation by converging upon VLCAD to promote its activity and membrane localization. Regulation of cardiolipin binding by reversible lysine acylation is a novel mechanism that is predicted to extrapolate to other metabolic proteins that localize to the inner mitochondrial membrane. PMID:25811481

  19. Unusual Methyl-Branched α,β-Unsaturated Acyl Chain Substitutions in the Nod Factors of an Arctic Rhizobium, Mesorhizobium sp. Strain N33 (Oxytropis arctobia)

    PubMed Central

    Poinsot, Véréna; Bélanger, Elaine; Laberge, Serge; Yang, Guo-Ping; Antoun, Hani; Cloutier, Jean; Treilhou, Michel; Dénarié, Jean; Promé, Jean-Claude; Debellé, Frédéric

    2001-01-01

    Mesorhizobium sp. strain N33 (Oxytropis arctobia), a rhizobial strain isolated in arctic Canada, is able to fix nitrogen at very low temperatures in association with a few arctic legume species belonging to the genera Astragalus, Onobrychis, and Oxytropis. Using mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, we have determined the structure of N33 Nod factors, which are major determinants of nodulation. They are pentameric lipochito-oligosaccharides 6-O sulfated at the reducing end and exhibit other original substitutions: 6-O acetylation of the glucosamine residue next to the nonreducing terminal glucosamine and N acylation of the nonreducing terminal glucosamine by methyl-branched acyl chains of the iso series, some of which are α,β unsaturated. These unusual substitutions may contribute to the peculiar host range of N33. Analysis of N33 whole-cell fatty acids indicated that synthesis of the methyl-branched fatty acids depended on the induction of bacteria by plant flavonoids, suggesting a specific role for these fatty acids in the signaling process between the plant and the bacteria. Synthesis of the methyl-branched α,β-unsaturated fatty acids required a functional nodE gene. PMID:11371536

  20. Cloning of a coconut endosperm cDNA encoding a 1-acyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase that accepts medium-chain-length substrates.

    PubMed Central

    Knutzon, D S; Lardizabal, K D; Nelsen, J S; Bleibaum, J L; Davies, H M; Metz, J G

    1995-01-01

    Immature coconut (Cocos nucifera) endosperm contains a 1-acyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (LPAAT) activity that shows a preference for medium-chain-length fatty acyl-coenzyme A substrates (H.M. Davies, D.J. Hawkins, J.S. Nelsen [1995] Phytochemistry 39:989-996). Beginning with solubilized membrane preparations, we have used chromatographic separations to identify a polypeptide with an apparent molecular mass of 29 kD, whose presence in various column fractions correlates with the acyltransferase activity detected in those same fractions. Amino acid sequence data obtained from several peptides generated from this protein were used to isolate a full-length clone from a coconut endosperm cDNA library. Clone pCGN5503 contains a 1325-bp cDNA insert with an open reading frame encoding a 308-amino acid protein with a calculated molecular mass of 34.8 kD. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequence of pCGN5503 to sequences in the data banks revealed significant homology to other putative LPAAT sequences. Expression of the coconut cDNA in Escherichia coli conferred upon those cells a novel LPAAT activity whose substrate activity profile matched that of the coconut enzyme. PMID:8552723

  1. Imaging Mass Spectrometry Reveals Acyl-Chain- and Region-Specific Sphingolipid Metabolism in the Kidneys of Sphingomyelin Synthase 2-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sugimoto, Masayuki; Wakabayashi, Masato; Shimizu, Yoichi; Yoshioka, Takeshi; Higashino, Kenichi; Numata, Yoshito; Okuda, Tomohiko; Zhao, Songji; Sakai, Shota; Igarashi, Yasuyuki; Kuge, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    Obesity was reported to cause kidney injury by excessive accumulation of sphingolipids such as sphingomyelin and ceramide. Sphingomyelin synthase 2 (SMS2) is an important enzyme for hepatic sphingolipid homeostasis and its dysfunction is considered to result in fatty liver disease. The expression of SMS2 is also high in the kidneys. However, the contribution of SMS2 on renal sphingolipid metabolism remains unclear. Imaging mass spectrometry is a powerful tool to visualize the distribution and provide quantitative data on lipids in tissue sections. Thus, in this study, we analyzed the effects of SMS2 deficiency on the distribution and concentration of sphingomyelins in the liver and kidneys of mice fed with a normal-diet or a high-fat-diet using imaging mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry. Our study revealed that high-fat-diet increased C18–C22 sphingomyelins, but decreased C24-sphingomyelins, in the liver and kidneys of wild-type mice. By contrast, SMS2 deficiency decreased C18–C24 sphingomyelins in the liver. Although a similar trend was observed in the whole-kidneys, the effects were minor. Interestingly, imaging mass spectrometry revealed that sphingomyelin localization was specific to each acyl-chain length in the kidneys. Further, SMS2 deficiency mainly decreased C22-sphingomyelin in the renal medulla and C24-sphingomyelins in the renal cortex. Thus, imaging mass spectrometry can provide visual assessment of the contribution of SMS2 on acyl-chain- and region-specific sphingomyelin metabolism in the kidneys. PMID:27010944

  2. Determination of membrane cholesterol partition coefficient using a lipid vesicle-cyclodextrin binary system: effect of phospholipid acyl chain unsaturation and headgroup composition.

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Shui-Lin; Litman, Burton J

    2002-01-01

    Lateral domain or raft formation in biological membranes is often discussed in terms of cholesterol-lipid interactions. Preferential interactions of cholesterol with lipids, varying in headgroup and acyl chain unsaturation, were studied by measuring the partition coefficient for cholesterol in unilamellar vesicles. A novel vesicle-cyclodextrin system was used, which precludes the possibility of cross-contamination between donor-acceptor vesicles or the need to modify one of the vesicle populations. Variation in phospholipid headgroup resulted in cholesterol partitioning in the order of sphingomyelin (SM) > phosphatidylserine > phosphatidylcholine (PC) > phosphatidylenthanolamine (PE), spanning a range of partition DeltaG of -1181 cal/mol to +683 cal/mol for SM and PE, respectively. Among the acyl chains examined, the order of cholesterol partitioning was 18:0(stearic acid),18:1n-9(oleic acid) PC > di18:1n-9PC > di18:1n-12(petroselenic acid) PC > di18:2n-6(linoleic acid) PC > 16:0(palmitic acid),22:6n-3(DHA) PC > di18:3n-3(alpha-linolenic acid) PC > di22:6n-3PC with a range in partition DeltaG of 913 cal/mol. Our results suggest that the large differences observed in cholesterol-lipid interactions contribute to the forces responsible for lateral domain formation in plasma membranes. These differences may also be responsible for the heterogeneous cholesterol distribution in cellular membranes, where cholesterol is highly enriched in plasma membranes and relatively depleted in intracellular membranes. PMID:12496107

  3. Rat long chain acyl-CoA synthetase 5 increases fatty acid uptake and partitioning to cellular triacylglycerol in McArdle-RH7777 cells.

    PubMed

    Mashek, Douglas G; McKenzie, Michelle A; Van Horn, Cynthia G; Coleman, Rosalind A

    2006-01-13

    Long chain acyl-CoA synthetase (ACSL) catalyzes the initial step in long chain fatty acid metabolism. Of the five mammalian ACSL isoforms cloned and characterized, ACSL5 is the only isoform found to be located, in part, on mitochondria and thus was hypothesized to be involved in fatty acid oxidation. To elucidate the specific roles of ACSL5 in fatty acid metabolism, we used adenoviral-mediated overexpression of ACSL5 (Ad-ACSL5) in rat hepatoma McArdle-RH7777 cells. Confocal microscopy revealed that Ad-ACSL5 colocalized to both mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum. When compared with cells infected with Ad-GFP, Ad-ACSL5-infected cells at 24 h after infection had 2-fold higher acyl-CoA synthetase activities and 30% higher rates of fatty acid uptake when incubated with 500 microM [1-(14)C]oleic acid. Metabolism of [1-(14)C]oleic acid to cellular triacylglycerol (TAG) increased 42% in Ad-ACSL5-infected cells, but when compared with control cells, metabolism to acid-soluble metabolites, phospholipids, and medium TAG did not differ substantially. The incorporation of [1-(14)C]oleate and [1,2,3-(3)H]glycerol into TAG was similar in Ad-ACSL5-infected cells, thus indicating that Ad-ACSL5 increased TAG synthesis through both de novo and reacylation pathways. However, [1-(14)C]acetic acid incorporation into cellular lipids showed that, when compared with control cells, Ad-ACSL5-infected cells did not increase the metabolism of fatty acids that were derived from de novo synthesis. These results suggest that uptake of fatty acids into cells is regulated by metabolism and that overexpressed ACSL5 partitions exogenously derived fatty acids toward TAG synthesis and storage. PMID:16263710

  4. Modulation of cellulase activity by charged lipid bilayers with different acyl chain properties for efficient hydrolysis of ionic liquid-pretreated cellulose.

    PubMed

    Mihono, Kai; Ohtsu, Takeshi; Ohtani, Mai; Yoshimoto, Makoto; Kamimura, Akio

    2016-10-01

    The stability of cellulase activity in the presence of ionic liquids (ILs) is critical for the enzymatic hydrolysis of insoluble cellulose pretreated with ILs. In this work, cellulase was incorporated in the liposomes composed of negatively charged 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoglycerol (POPG) and zwitterionic phosphatidylcholines (PCs) with different length and degree of unsaturation of the acyl chains. The liposomal cellulase-catalyzed reaction was performed at 45°C in the acetate buffer solution (pH 4.8) with 2.0g/L CC31 as cellulosic substrate. The crystallinity of CC31 was reduced by treating with 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([Bmim]Cl) at 120°C for 30min. The liposomal cellulase continuously catalyzed hydrolysis of the pretreated CC31 for 48h producing glucose in the presence of 15wt% [Bmim]Cl. The charged lipid membranes were interactive with [Bmim](+), as elucidated by the [Bmim]Cl-induced alterations in fluorescence polarization of the membrane-embedded 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH) molecules. The charged membranes offered the microenvironment where inhibitory effects of [Bmim]Cl on the cellulase activity was relieved. The maximum glucose productivity GP of 10.8 mmol-glucose/(hmol-lipid) was obtained at the reaction time of 48h with the cellulase incorporated in the liposomes ([lipid]=5.0mM) composed of 50mol% POPG and 1,2-dilauroyl-sn-glycero-3-phosohocholine (DLPC) with relatively short and saturated acyl chains. PMID:27318965

  5. A comparative study of diffusive and osmotic water permeation across bilayers composed of phospholipids with different head groups and fatty acyl chains.

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, M; Blume, A

    1995-01-01

    Osmotic and diffusive water permeability coefficients Pf and Pd were measured for lipid vesicles of 100-250 nm diameter composed of a variety of phospholipids with different head groups and fatty acyl chains. Two different methods were applied: the H2O/D2O exchange technique for diffusive water flow, and the osmotic technique for water flux driven by an osmotic gradient. For phosphatidylcholines in the liquid-crystalline state at 70 degrees C, permeability constants Pd between 3.0 and 5.2.10(-4) cm/s and ratios Pf/Pd 7 and 23 were observed. The observation of a permeability maximum in the phase transition region and the fact that osmotically driven water flux is higher than diffusive water exchange suggest that water is diffusing through small transient pores arising from density fluctuations in the bilayers. The Pd values depend on the nature of the head group, on the chemical structure of the chains, and on the type of chain linkage. In the case of charged lipids, the ionic strength of the solution has a strong influence. For phosphatidylethanolamines, phosphatidic acids, and ether phosphatidylcholines, permeability constants Pd were considerably lower (2-4.10(-6) cm/s at 70 degrees C). For liquid-crystalline phosphatidylcholines, a strong reduction of Pd after addition of ethanol was observed (2-4.10(-6) cm/s at 70 degrees C). The experimental values are discussed in connection with different permeation models. PMID:7756562

  6. Transcriptional Regulation by the Short-Chain Fatty Acyl Coenzyme A Regulator (ScfR) PccR Controls Propionyl Coenzyme A Assimilation by Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Propionyl coenzyme A (propionyl-CoA) assimilation by Rhodobacter sphaeroides proceeds via the methylmalonyl-CoA pathway. The activity of the key enzyme of the pathway, propionyl-CoA carboxylase (PCC), was upregulated 20-fold during growth with propionate compared to growth with succinate. Because propionyl-CoA is an intermediate in acetyl-CoA assimilation via the ethylmalonyl-CoA pathway, acetate growth also requires the methylmalonyl-CoA pathway. PCC activities were upregulated 8-fold in extracts of acetate-grown cells compared to extracts of succinate-grown cells. The upregulation of PCC activities during growth with propionate or acetate corresponded to increased expression of the pccB gene, which encodes a subunit of PCC. PccR (RSP_2186) was identified to be a transcriptional regulator required for the upregulation of pccB transcript levels and, consequently, PCC activity: growth substrate-dependent regulation was lost when pccR was inactivated by an in-frame deletion. In the pccR mutant, lacZ expression from a 215-bp plasmid-borne pccB upstream fragment including 27 bp of the pccB coding region was also deregulated. A loss of regulation as a result of mutations in the conserved motifs TTTGCAAA-X4-TTTGCAAA in the presence of PccR allowed the prediction of a possible operator site. PccR, together with homologs from other organisms, formed a distinct clade within the family of short-chain fatty acyl coenzyme A regulators (ScfRs) defined here. Some members from other clades within the ScfR family have previously been shown to be involved in regulating acetyl-CoA assimilation by the glyoxylate bypass (RamB) or propionyl-CoA assimilation by the methylcitrate cycle (MccR). IMPORTANCE Short-chain acyl-CoAs are intermediates in essential biosynthetic and degradative pathways. The regulation of their accumulation is crucial for appropriate cellular function. This work identifies a regulator (PccR) that prevents the accumulation of propionyl-CoA by controlling

  7. Distinct transcriptional regulation of long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase isoforms and cytosolic thioesterase 1 in the rodent heart by fatty acids and insulin.

    PubMed

    Durgan, David J; Smith, Justin K; Hotze, Margaret A; Egbejimi, Oluwaseun; Cuthbert, Karalyn D; Zaha, Vlad G; Dyck, Jason R B; Abel, E Dale; Young, Martin E

    2006-06-01

    The molecular mechanism(s) responsible for channeling long-chain fatty acids (LCFAs) into oxidative versus nonoxidative pathways is (are) poorly understood in the heart. Intracellular LCFAs are converted to long-chain fatty acyl-CoAs (LCFA-CoAs) by a family of long-chain acyl-CoA synthetases (ACSLs). Cytosolic thioesterase 1 (CTE1) hydrolyzes cytosolic LCFA-CoAs to LCFAs, generating a potential futile cycle at the expense of ATP utilization. We hypothesized that ACSL isoforms and CTE1 are differentially regulated in the heart during physiological and pathophysiological conditions. Using quantitative RT-PCR, we report that the five known acsl isoforms (acsl1, acsl3, acsl4, acsl5, and acsl6) and cte1 are expressed in whole rat and mouse hearts, as well as adult rat cardiomyocytes (ARCs). Streptozotocin-induced insulin-dependent diabetes (4 wk) and fasting (

  8. The Effect of Temperature, Cations, and Number of Acyl Chains on the Lamellar to Non-Lamellar Transition in Lipid-A Membranes: A Microscopic View

    SciTech Connect

    Pontes, Frederico J.; Rusu, Victor H.; Soares, Thereza A.; Lins, Roberto D.

    2012-05-24

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) are the main constituent of the outer bacterial membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. Lipid-A is the structural region of LPS that interacts with the innate immune system and induces inflammatory responses. It is formed by a phosphorylated β-d-glucosaminyl-(1→6)-α-N-glucosamine disaccharide backbone containing ester-linked and amide-linked long-chain fatty acids, which may vary in length and number depending on the bacterial strains and the environment. Phenotypical variation (i.e., number of acyl chains), cation type, and temperature influence the phase transition, aggregate structure, and endotoxic activity of Lipid-A. We have applied an extension of the GROMOS force field 45a4 carbohydrate parameter set to investigate the behavior of hexa- and pentaacylated Lipid-A of Pseudomonas aeruginosa at two temperatures (300 and 328 K) and in the presence of mono- and divalent cations (represented by Ca2+ and Na+, respectively) through molecular dynamics simulations. The distinct phase of Lipid-A aggregates was characterized by structural properties, deuterium order parameters, the molecular shape of the lipid units (conical versus cylindrical), and molecular packing. Our results show that Na+ ions induce a transition from the lamellar to nonlamellar phase. In contrast, the bilayer integrity is maintained in the presence of Ca2+ ions. Through these findings, we present microscopic insights on the influence of different cations on the molecular behavior of Lipid-A associated with the lamellar to nonlamellar transition.

  9. A Single Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase Is Required For Catabolism Of Isoleucine, Valine And Short-Chain Fatty Acids In Aspergillus nidulans

    PubMed Central

    Maggio-Hall, Lori A.; Lyne, Paul; Wolff, Jon A.; Keller, Nancy P.

    2010-01-01

    An acyl-CoA dehydrogenase has been identified as part of the mitochondrial β-oxidation pathway in the ascomycete fungus Aspergillus nidulans. Disruption of the scdA gene prevented use of butyric acid (C4) and hexanoic acid (C6) as carbon sources and reduced cellular butyryl-CoA dehydrogenase activity by 7.5-fold. While the mutant strain exhibited wild-type levels of growth on erucic acid (C22:1) and oleic acid (C18:1), some reduction in growth was observed with myristic acid (C14). The ΔscdA mutation was found to be epistatic to a mutation downstream in the β-oxidation pathway (disruption of enoyl-CoA hydratase). The ΔscdA mutant was also unable to use isoleucine or valine as a carbon source. Transcription of scdA was observed in the presence of either fatty acids or amino acids. When the mutant was grown in medium containing either isoleucine or valine, organic acid analysis of culture supernatants showed accumulation of 2-oxo acid intermediates of branched chain amino acid catabolism, suggesting feedback inhibition of the upstream branched-chain α-keto acid dehydrogenase. PMID:17656140

  10. The Effect of Temperature, Cations, and Number of Acyl Chains on the Lamellar to Non-Lamellar Transition in Lipid-A Membranes: A Microscopic View.

    PubMed

    Pontes, Frederico J S; Rusu, Victor H; Soares, Thereza A; Lins, Roberto D

    2012-10-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) are the main constituent of the outer bacterial membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. Lipid-A is the structural region of LPS that interacts with the innate immune system and induces inflammatory responses. It is formed by a phosphorylated β-d-glucosaminyl-(1→6)-α-N-glucosamine disaccharide backbone containing ester-linked and amide-linked long-chain fatty acids, which may vary in length and number depending on the bacterial strains and the environment. Phenotypical variation (i.e., number of acyl chains), cation type, and temperature influence the phase transition, aggregate structure, and endotoxic activity of Lipid-A. We have applied an extension of the GROMOS force field 45a4 carbohydrate parameter set to investigate the behavior of hexa- and pentaacylated Lipid-A of Pseudomonas aeruginosa at two temperatures (300 and 328 K) and in the presence of mono- and divalent cations (represented by Ca(2+) and Na(+), respectively) through molecular dynamics simulations. The distinct phase of Lipid-A aggregates was characterized by structural properties, deuterium order parameters, the molecular shape of the lipid units (conical versus cylindrical), and molecular packing. Our results show that Na(+) ions induce a transition from the lamellar to nonlamellar phase. In contrast, the bilayer integrity is maintained in the presence of Ca(2+) ions. Through these findings, we present microscopic insights on the influence of different cations on the molecular behavior of Lipid-A associated with the lamellar to nonlamellar transition. PMID:26593024

  11. Acyl-lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Li-Beisson, Yonghua; Shorrosh, Basil; Beisson, Fred; Andersson, Mats X; Arondel, Vincent; Bates, Philip D; Baud, Sébastien; Bird, David; Debono, Allan; Durrett, Timothy P; Franke, Rochus B; Graham, Ian A; Katayama, Kenta; Kelly, Amélie A; Larson, Tony; Markham, Jonathan E; Miquel, Martine; Molina, Isabel; Nishida, Ikuo; Rowland, Owen; Samuels, Lacey; Schmid, Katherine M; Wada, Hajime; Welti, Ruth; Xu, Changcheng; Zallot, Rémi; Ohlrogge, John

    2013-01-01

    Acyl lipids in Arabidopsis and all other plants have a myriad of diverse functions. These include providing the core diffusion barrier of the membranes that separates cells and subcellular organelles. This function alone involves more than 10 membrane lipid classes, including the phospholipids, galactolipids, and sphingolipids, and within each class the variations in acyl chain composition expand the number of structures to several hundred possible molecular species. Acyl lipids in the form of triacylglycerol account for 35% of the weight of Arabidopsis seeds and represent their major form of carbon and energy storage. A layer of cutin and cuticular waxes that restricts the loss of water and provides protection from invasions by pathogens and other stresses covers the entire aerial surface of Arabidopsis. Similar functions are provided by suberin and its associated waxes that are localized in roots, seed coats, and abscission zones and are produced in response to wounding. This chapter focuses on the metabolic pathways that are associated with the biosynthesis and degradation of the acyl lipids mentioned above. These pathways, enzymes, and genes are also presented in detail in an associated website (ARALIP: http://aralip.plantbiology.msu.edu/). Protocols and methods used for analysis of Arabidopsis lipids are provided. Finally, a detailed summary of the composition of Arabidopsis lipids is provided in three figures and 15 tables. PMID:23505340

  12. Acyl-lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Li-Beisson, Yonghua; Shorrosh, Basil; Beisson, Fred; Andersson, Mats X; Arondel, Vincent; Bates, Philip D; Baud, Sébastien; Bird, David; Debono, Allan; Durrett, Timothy P; Franke, Rochus B; Graham, Ian A; Katayama, Kenta; Kelly, Amélie A; Larson, Tony; Markham, Jonathan E; Miquel, Martine; Molina, Isabel; Nishida, Ikuo; Rowland, Owen; Samuels, Lacey; Schmid, Katherine M; Wada, Hajime; Welti, Ruth; Xu, Changcheng; Zallot, Rémi; Ohlrogge, John

    2010-01-01

    Acyl lipids in Arabidopsis and all other plants have a myriad of diverse functions. These include providing the core diffusion barrier of the membranes that separates cells and subcellular organelles. This function alone involves more than 10 membrane lipid classes, including the phospholipids, galactolipids, and sphingolipids, and within each class the variations in acyl chain composition expand the number of structures to several hundred possible molecular species. Acyl lipids in the form of triacylglycerol account for 35% of the weight of Arabidopsis seeds and represent their major form of carbon and energy storage. A layer of cutin and cuticular waxes that restricts the loss of water and provides protection from invasions by pathogens and other stresses covers the entire aerial surface of Arabidopsis. Similar functions are provided by suberin and its associated waxes that are localized in roots, seed coats, and abscission zones and are produced in response to wounding. This chapter focuses on the metabolic pathways that are associated with the biosynthesis and degradation of the acyl lipids mentioned above. These pathways, enzymes, and genes are also presented in detail in an associated website (ARALIP: http://aralip.plantbiology.msu.edu/). Protocols and methods used for analysis of Arabidopsis lipids are provided. Finally, a detailed summary of the composition of Arabidopsis lipids is provided in three figures and 15 tables. PMID:22303259

  13. Acyl-Lipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Li-Beisson, Yonghua; Shorrosh, Basil; Beisson, Fred; Andersson, Mats X.; Arondel, Vincent; Bates, Philip D.; Baud, Sébastien; Bird, David; DeBono, Allan; Durrett, Timothy P.; Franke, Rochus B.; Graham, Ian A.; Katayama, Kenta; Kelly, Amélie A.; Larson, Tony; Markham, Jonathan E.; Miquel, Martine; Molina, Isabel; Nishida, Ikuo; Rowland, Owen; Samuels, Lacey; Schmid, Katherine M.; Wada, Hajime; Welti, Ruth; Xu, Changcheng; Zallot, Rémi; Ohlrogge, John

    2010-01-01

    Acyl lipids in Arabidopsis and all other plants have a myriad of diverse functions. These include providing the core diffusion barrier of the membranes that separates cells and subcellular organelles. This function alone involves more than 10 membrane lipid classes, including the phospholipids, galactolipids, and sphingolipids, and within each class the variations in acyl chain composition expand the number of structures to several hundred possible molecular species. Acyl lipids in the form of triacylglycerol account for 35% of the weight of Arabidopsis seeds and represent their major form of carbon and energy storage. A layer of cutin and cuticular waxes that restricts the loss of water and provides protection from invasions by pathogens and other stresses covers the entire aerial surface of Arabidopsis. Similar functions are provided by suberin and its associated waxes that are localized in roots, seed coats, and abscission zones and are produced in response to wounding. This chapter focuses on the metabolic pathways that are associated with the biosynthesis and degradation of the acyl lipids mentioned above. These pathways, enzymes, and genes are also presented in detail in an associated website (ARALIP: http://aralip.plantbiology.msu.edu/). Protocols and methods used for analysis of Arabidopsis lipids are provided. Finally, a detailed summary of the composition of Arabidopsis lipids is provided in three figures and 15 tables. PMID:22303259

  14. Acyl-Lipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Li-Beisson, Yonghua; Shorrosh, Basil; Beisson, Fred; Andersson, Mats X.; Arondel, Vincent; Bates, Philip D.; Baud, Sébastien; Bird, David; DeBono, Allan; Durrett, Timothy P.; Franke, Rochus B.; Graham, Ian A.; Katayama, Kenta; Kelly, Amélie A.; Larson, Tony; Markham, Jonathan E.; Miquel, Martine; Molina, Isabel; Nishida, Ikuo; Rowland, Owen; Samuels, Lacey; Schmid, Katherine M.; Wada, Hajime; Welti, Ruth; Xu, Changcheng; Zallot, Rémi; Ohlrogge, John

    2013-01-01

    Acyl lipids in Arabidopsis and all other plants have a myriad of diverse functions. These include providing the core diffusion barrier of the membranes that separates cells and subcellular organelles. This function alone involves more than 10 membrane lipid classes, including the phospholipids, galactolipids, and sphingolipids, and within each class the variations in acyl chain composition expand the number of structures to several hundred possible molecular species. Acyl lipids in the form of triacylglycerol account for 35% of the weight of Arabidopsis seeds and represent their major form of carbon and energy storage. A layer of cutin and cuticular waxes that restricts the loss of water and provides protection from invasions by pathogens and other stresses covers the entire aerial surface of Arabidopsis. Similar functions are provided by suberin and its associated waxes that are localized in roots, seed coats, and abscission zones and are produced in response to wounding. This chapter focuses on the metabolic pathways that are associated with the biosynthesis and degradation of the acyl lipids mentioned above. These pathways, enzymes, and genes are also presented in detail in an associated website (ARALIP: http://aralip.plantbiology.msu.edu/). Protocols and methods used for analysis of Arabidopsis lipids are provided. Finally, a detailed summary of the composition of Arabidopsis lipids is provided in three figures and 15 tables. PMID:23505340

  15. De novo fatty acid biosynthesis and elongation in very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase-deficient mice supplemented with odd or even medium-chain fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Tucci, Sara; Behringer, Sidney; Spiekerkoetter, Ute

    2015-11-01

    An even medium-chain triglyceride (MCT)-based diet is the mainstay of treatment in very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD) deficiency (VLCADD). Previous studies with magnetic resonance spectroscopy have shown an impact of MCT on the average fatty acid chain length in abdominal fat. We therefore assume that medium-chain fatty acids (MCFAs) are elongated and accumulate in tissue as long-chain fatty acids. In this study, we explored the hepatic effects of long-term supplementation with MCT or triheptanoin, an odd-chain C7-based triglyceride, in wild-type and VLCAD-deficient (VLCAD(-/-) ) mice after 1 year of supplementation as compared with a control diet. The de novo biosynthesis and elongation of fatty acids, and peroxisomal β-oxidation, were quantified by RT-PCR. This was followed by a comprehensive analysis of hepatic and cardiac fatty acid profiles by GC-MS. Long-term application of even and odd MCFAs strongly induced de novo biosynthesis and elongation of fatty acids in both wild-type and VLCAD(-/-) mice, leading to an alteration of the hepatic fatty acid profiles. We detected de novo-synthesized and elongated fatty acids, such as heptadecenoic acid (C17:1n9), eicosanoic acid (C20:1n9), erucic acid (C22:1n9), and mead acid (C20:3n9), that were otherwise completely absent in mice under control conditions. In parallel, the content of monounsaturated fatty acids was massively increased. Furthermore, we observed strong upregulation of peroxisomal β-oxidation in VLCAD(-/-) mice, especially when they were fed an MCT diet. Our data raise the question of whether long-term MCFA supplementation represents the most efficient treatment in the long term. Studies on the hepatic toxicity of triheptanoin are still ongoing. PMID:26284828

  16. Structure of a Specialized Acyl Carrier Protein Essential for Lipid A Biosynthesis with Very Long-chain Fatty Acids in Open and Closed Conformations

    SciTech Connect

    Ramelot, Theresa A.; Rossi, Paolo M.; Forouhar, Farhad; Lee, Hsiau-Wei; Yang, Yunhuang; Ni, Shuisong; Unser, Sarah; Lew, Scott; Seetharaman, Jayaraman; Xiao, Rong; Acton, Thomas; Everett, John K.; Prestegard, James H.; Hunt, John F.; Montelione, Gaetano; Kennedy, Michael A.

    2012-09-18

    The solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structures and backbone (15)N dynamics of the specialized acyl carrier protein (ACP), RpAcpXL, from Rhodopseudomonas palustris, in both the apo form and holo form modified by covalent attachment of 4'-phosphopantetheine at S37, are virtually identical, monomeric, and correspond to the closed conformation. The structures have an extra α-helix compared to the archetypical ACP from Escherichia coli, which has four helices, resulting in a larger opening to the hydrophobic cavity. Chemical shift differences between apo- and holo-RpAcpXL indicated some differences in the hinge region between α2 and α3 and in the hydrophobic cavity environment, but corresponding changes in nuclear Overhauser effect cross-peak patterns were not detected. In contrast to the NMR structures, apo-RpAcpXL was observed in an open conformation in crystals that diffracted to 2.0 Å resolution, which resulted from movement of α3. On the basis of the crystal structure, the predicted biological assembly is a homodimer. Although the possible biological significance of dimerization is unknown, there is potential that the resulting large shared hydrophobic cavity could accommodate the very long-chain fatty acid (28-30 carbons) that this specialized ACP is known to synthesize and transfer to lipid A. These structures are the first representatives of the AcpXL family and the first to indicate that dimerization may be important for the function of these specialized ACPs.

  17. Myopathy in very-long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency: clinical and biochemical differences with the fatal cardiac phenotype.

    PubMed

    Scholte, H R; Van Coster, R N; de Jonge, P C; Poorthuis, B J; Jeneson, J A; Andresen, B S; Gregersen, N; de Klerk, J B; Busch, H F

    1999-07-01

    A 30-year-old man suffered since the age of 13 years from exercise induced episodes of intense generalised muscle pain, weakness and myoglobinuria. Fasting ketogenesis was low, while blood glucose remained normal. Muscle mitochondria failed to oxidise palmitoylcarnitine. Palmitoyl-CoA dehydrogenase was deficient in muscle and fibroblasts, consistent with deficiency of very-long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD). The gene of this enzyme had a homozygous deletion of three base pairs in exon 9, skipping lysine residue 238. Fibroblasts oxidised myristate, palmitate and oleate at a rate of 129, 62 and 38% of controls. In contrast to patients with cardiac VLCAD deficiency, our patient had no lipid storage, a normal heart function, a higher rate of oleate oxidation in fibroblasts and normal free carnitine in plasma and fibroblasts. 31P-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of muscle showed a normal oxidative phosphorylation as assessed by phosphocreatine recovery, but a significant increase in pH and in Pi/ATP ratio. PMID:10407852

  18. Rat long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase mRNA, protein, and activity vary in tissue distribution and in response to diet.

    PubMed

    Mashek, Douglas G; Li, Lei O; Coleman, Rosalind A

    2006-09-01

    Distinct isoforms of long-chain acyl-CoA synthetases (ACSLs) may partition fatty acids toward specific metabolic cellular pathways. For each of the five members of the rat ACSL family, we analyzed tissue mRNA distributions, and we correlated the mRNA, protein, and activity of ACSL1 and ACSL4 after fasting and refeeding a 69% sucrose diet. Not only did quantitative real-time PCR analyses reveal unique tissue expression patterns for each ACSL isoform, but expression varied markedly in different adipose depots. Fasting increased ACSL4 mRNA abundance in liver, muscle, and gonadal and inguinal adipose tissues, and refeeding decreased ACSL4 mRNA. A similar pattern was observed for ACSL1, but both fasting and refeeding decreased ACSL1 mRNA in gonadal adipose. Fasting also decreased ACSL3 and ACSL5 mRNAs in liver and ACSL6 mRNA in muscle. Surprisingly, in nearly every tissue measured, the effects of fasting and refeeding on the mRNA abundance of ACSL1 and ACSL4 were discordant with changes in protein abundance. These data suggest that the individual ACSL isoforms are distinctly regulated across tissues and show that mRNA expression may not provide useful information about isoform function. They further suggest that translational or posttranslational modifications are likely to contribute to the regulation of ACSL isoforms. PMID:16772660

  19. Short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (SCAD) deficiency: An examination of the medical and neurodevelopmental characteristics of 14 cases identified through newborn screening or clinical symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Waisbren, S.E.; Levy, H.L.; Noble, M.; Matern, D.; Gregersen, N.; Pasley, K.; Marsden, D.

    2014-01-01

    The medical and neurodevelopmental characteristics of 14 children with short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (SCADD) are described. Eight were detected as neonates by newborn screening. Three children diagnosed on the basis of clinical symptoms had normal newborn screening results while 3 were born in states that did not screen for SCADD. Treatment included frequent feedings and a low fat diet. All children identified by newborn screening demonstrated medical and neuropsychological development within the normative range on follow-up, although one child had a relative weakness in the motor area and another child exhibited mild speech delay. Of the 3 clinically identified children with newborn screening results below the cut-off value, 2 were healthy and performed within the normal range on cognitive and motor tests at follow-up. Four clinically identified children with SCADD experienced persistent symptoms and/or developmental delay. However, in each of these cases, there were supplementary or alternative explanations for medical and neuropsychological deficits. Results indicated no genotype-phenotype correlations. These findings suggest that SCADD might be benign and the clinical symptoms ascribed to SCADD reflective of ascertainment bias or that early identification and treatment prevented complications that may have occurred due to interaction between genetic susceptibility and other genetic factors or environmental stressors. PMID:18676165

  20. Complete amino acid sequence of the medium-chain S-acyl fatty acid synthetase thio ester hydrolase from rat mammary gland

    SciTech Connect

    Randhawa, Z.I.; Smith, S.

    1987-03-10

    The complete amino acid sequence of the medium-chain S-acyl fatty acid synthetase thio ester hydrolase (thioesterase II) from rat mammary gland is presented. Most of the sequence was derived by analysis of (/sup 14/C)-labelled peptide fragments produced by cleavage at methionyl, glutamyl, lysyl, arginyl, and tryptophanyl residues. A small section of the sequence was deduced from a previously analyzed cDNA clone. The protein consists of 260 residues and has a blocked amino-terminal methionine and calculated M/sub r/ of 29,212. The carboxy-terminal sequence, verified by Edman degradation of the carboxy-terminal cyanogen bromide fragment and carboxypeptidase Y digestion of the intact thioesterase II, terminates with a serine residue and lacks three additional residues predicted by the cDNA sequence. The native enzyme contains three cysteine residues but no disulfide bridges. The active site serine residue is located at position 101. The rat mammary gland thioesterase II exhibits approximately 40% homology with a thioesterase from mallard uropygial gland, the sequence of which was recently determined by cDNA analysis. Thus the two enzymes may share similar structural features and a common evolutionary origin. The location of the active site in these thioesterases differs from that of other serine active site esterases; indeed, the enzymes do not exhibit any significant homology with other serine esterases, suggesting that they may constitute a separate new family of serine active site enzymes.

  1. Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid biosynthesis in the euryhaline herbivorous teleost Scatophagus argus: Functional characterization, tissue expression and nutritional regulation of two fatty acyl elongases.

    PubMed

    Xie, Dizhi; Chen, Fang; Lin, Siyuan; You, Cuihong; Wang, Shuqi; Zhang, Qinghao; Monroig, Óscar; Tocher, Douglas R; Li, Yuanyou

    2016-08-01

    Both the spotted scat Scatophagus argus and rabbitfish Siganus canaliculatus belong to the few cultured herbivorous marine teleost, however, their fatty acyl desaturase (Fad) system involved in long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (LC-PUFA) biosynthesis is different. The S. argus has a △6 Fad, while the rabbitfish has △4 and △6/△5 Fads, which were the first report in vertebrate and marine teleost, respectively. In order to compare the characteristics of elongases of very long-chain fatty acids (Elovl) between them, two Elovl cDNAs were cloned from S. argus in the present study. One has 885bp of open read fragment (ORF) encoding a protein with 294 amino acid (aa) showing Elovl5 activity functionally characterized by heterologous expression in yeast, which was primarily active for the elongation of C18 and C20 PUFAs. The other has 915bp of ORF coding for a 305 aa protein showing Elovl4 activity, which was more efficient in the elongation of C20 and C22 PUFAs. Tissue distribution analyses by RT-PCR showed that elovl5 was highly expressed in the liver compared to other tissues determined, whereas elovl4 transcripts were only detected in the eye. The expression of elovl5 and elovl4 were significantly affected by dietary fatty acid composition, with highest expression of mRNA in the liver and eye of fish fed a diet with an 18:3n-3/18:2n-6 ratio of 1.7:1. These results indicated that the S. argus has a similar Elovl system in the LC-PUFA biosynthetic pathway to that of rabbitfish although their Fad system was different, suggesting that the diversification of fish LC-PUFA biosynthesis specificities is more associated with its Fad system. These new insights expand our knowledge and understanding of the molecular basis and regulation of LC-PUFA biosynthesis in fish. PMID:27050407

  2. Riboflavin-Responsive and -Non-responsive Mutations in FAD Synthase Cause Multiple Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase and Combined Respiratory-Chain Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Rikke K J; Koňaříková, Eliška; Giancaspero, Teresa A; Mosegaard, Signe; Boczonadi, Veronika; Mataković, Lavinija; Veauville-Merllié, Alice; Terrile, Caterina; Schwarzmayr, Thomas; Haack, Tobias B; Auranen, Mari; Leone, Piero; Galluccio, Michele; Imbard, Apolline; Gutierrez-Rios, Purificacion; Palmfeldt, Johan; Graf, Elisabeth; Vianey-Saban, Christine; Oppenheim, Marcus; Schiff, Manuel; Pichard, Samia; Rigal, Odile; Pyle, Angela; Chinnery, Patrick F; Konstantopoulou, Vassiliki; Möslinger, Dorothea; Feichtinger, René G; Talim, Beril; Topaloglu, Haluk; Coskun, Turgay; Gucer, Safak; Botta, Annalisa; Pegoraro, Elena; Malena, Adriana; Vergani, Lodovica; Mazzà, Daniela; Zollino, Marcella; Ghezzi, Daniele; Acquaviva, Cecile; Tyni, Tiina; Boneh, Avihu; Meitinger, Thomas; Strom, Tim M; Gregersen, Niels; Mayr, Johannes A; Horvath, Rita; Barile, Maria; Prokisch, Holger

    2016-06-01

    Multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiencies (MADDs) are a heterogeneous group of metabolic disorders with combined respiratory-chain deficiency and a neuromuscular phenotype. Despite recent advances in understanding the genetic basis of MADD, a number of cases remain unexplained. Here, we report clinically relevant variants in FLAD1, which encodes FAD synthase (FADS), as the cause of MADD and respiratory-chain dysfunction in nine individuals recruited from metabolic centers in six countries. In most individuals, we identified biallelic frameshift variants in the molybdopterin binding (MPTb) domain, located upstream of the FADS domain. Inasmuch as FADS is essential for cellular supply of FAD cofactors, the finding of biallelic frameshift variants was unexpected. Using RNA sequencing analysis combined with protein mass spectrometry, we discovered FLAD1 isoforms, which only encode the FADS domain. The existence of these isoforms might explain why affected individuals with biallelic FLAD1 frameshift variants still harbor substantial FADS activity. Another group of individuals with a milder phenotype responsive to riboflavin were shown to have single amino acid changes in the FADS domain. When produced in E. coli, these mutant FADS proteins resulted in impaired but detectable FADS activity; for one of the variant proteins, the addition of FAD significantly improved protein stability, arguing for a chaperone-like action similar to what has been reported in other riboflavin-responsive inborn errors of metabolism. In conclusion, our studies identify FLAD1 variants as a cause of potentially treatable inborn errors of metabolism manifesting with MADD and shed light on the mechanisms by which FADS ensures cellular FAD homeostasis. PMID:27259049

  3. Acyl chain length effects related to glycosphingolipid crypticity in phospholipid membranes: probed by 2H-NMR.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, K S; Briere, K; Jarrell, H C; Grant, C W

    1994-03-23

    Wideline 2H-NMR was used to consider the relationships amongst glycosphingolipid and phospholipid fatty acid chain length and glycosphingolipid receptor function, in a system classically associated with crypticity. Galactosyl ceramide (GalCer), having 18- or 24-carbon fatty acid, was deuterium labelled at the conformationally-restricted fatty acid alpha-carbon (C-2). 2H-NMR spectra of N-[2,2-2H2]stearoyl and N-[2,2-2H2]lignoceroyl GalCer (GalCer with 18-vs. 24-carbon selectively deuterated fatty acid) were then compared over a range of temperatures in phosphatidylcholine/cholesterol membranes in which the host phospholipid had dimyristoyl, dipalmitoyl, or distearoyl fatty acid composition. Findings were evaluated in the light of known sensitivity of antibody interaction with GalCer to temperature and to both glycolipid fatty acid chain length and host matrix fatty acid chain length. Under the conditions of experimentation, spectra were not obtainable for glycolipids having rigid body motions that were slow on the NMR timescale (10(-4)-10(-5) s)-i.e.. motions typical of non-fluid (gel phase) membranes. The systems, DPPC/cholesterol and DSPC/cholesterol, in which the original observation was made of increased antibody binding to GalCer with long fatty acid, proved to be characterised by receptor motions that were in this slow timescale for both 18:0 and 24:0 GalCer at 22-24 degrees C. Under conditions for which spectra could be obtained, those for GalCer with [2,2-2H2]lignoceroyl (24-carbon alpha-deuterated) fatty acid were qualitatively similar to those of its 18-carbon analogue in all (fluid) membranes examined. However, spectral splittings differed quantitatively between deuterated 18:0 and 24:0 GalCer at a given temperature, dependent upon host matrix. These differences were most marked at lower temperatures and in the longer chain (more ordered) matrices, DPPC/cholesterol and DSPC/cholesterol. This suggests that maximum effects of glycolipid chain length on

  4. Contribution of the Distal Pocket Residue to the Acyl-Chain-Length Specificity of (R)-Specific Enoyl-Coenzyme A Hydratases from Pseudomonas spp.

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Shun; Hiroe, Ayaka; Ishizuka, Koya; Kanazawa, Hiromi; Shiro, Yoshitsugu

    2015-01-01

    (R)-Specific enoyl-coenzyme A (enoyl-CoA) hydratases (PhaJs) are capable of supplying monomers from fatty acid β-oxidation to polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) biosynthesis. PhaJ1Pp from Pseudomonas putida showed broader substrate specificity than did PhaJ1Pa from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, despite sharing 67% amino acid sequence identity. In this study, the substrate specificity characteristics of two Pseudomonas PhaJ1 enzymes were investigated by site-directed mutagenesis, chimeragenesis, X-ray crystallographic analysis, and homology modeling. In PhaJ1Pp, the replacement of valine with isoleucine at position 72 resulted in an increased preference for enoyl-coenzyme A (CoA) elements with shorter chain lengths. Conversely, at the same position in PhaJ1Pa, the replacement of isoleucine with valine resulted in an increased preference for enoyl-CoAs with longer chain lengths. These changes suggest a narrowing and broadening in the substrate specificity range of the PhaJ1Pp and PhaJ1Pa mutants, respectively. However, the substrate specificity remains broader in PhaJ1Pp than in PhaJ1Pa. Additionally, three chimeric PhaJ1 enzymes, composed from PhaJ1Pp and PhaJ1Pa, all showed significant hydratase activity, and their substrate preferences were within the range exhibited by the parental PhaJ1 enzymes. The crystal structure of PhaJ1Pa was determined at a resolution of 1.7 Å, and subsequent homology modeling of PhaJ1Pp revealed that in the acyl-chain binding pocket, the amino acid at position 72 was the only difference between the two structures. These results indicate that the chain-length specificity of PhaJ1 is determined mainly by the bulkiness of the amino acid residue at position 72, but that other factors, such as structural fluctuations, also affect specificity. PMID:26386053

  5. Long Chain Fatty Acid Acylated Derivatives of Quercetin-3-O-Glucoside as Antioxidants to Prevent Lipid Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Warnakulasuriya, Sumudu N.; Ziaullah; Rupasinghe, H.P. Vasantha

    2014-01-01

    Flavonoids have shown promise as natural plant-based antioxidants for protecting lipids from oxidation. It was hypothesized that their applications in lipophilic food systems can be further enhanced by esterification of flavonoids with fatty acids. Quercetin-3-O-glucoside (Q3G) was esterified individually with six selected long chain fatty acids: stearic acid (STA), oleic acid (OLA), linoleic acid (LNA), α-linolenic acid (ALA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and decosahexaenoic acid (DHA), using Candida antarctica B lipase as the biocatalyst. The antioxidant activity of esterified flavonoids was evaluated using lipid oxidation model systems of poly-unsaturated fatty acids-rich fish oil and human low density lipoprotein (LDL), in vitro. In the oil-in-water emulsion, Q3G esters exhibited 50% to 100% inhibition in primary oxidation and 30% to 75% inhibition in secondary oxidation. In bulk oil, Q3G esters did not provide considerable protection from lipid oxidation; however, Q3G demonstrated more than 50% inhibition in primary oxidation. EPA, DHA and ALA esters of Q3G showed significantly higher inhibition in Cu2+- and peroxyl radical-induced LDL oxidation in comparison to Q3G. PMID:25384198

  6. Three RFLPs defining a haplotype associated with the common mutation in a human medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD) deficiency occur in Alu repeats

    SciTech Connect

    Zhifang Zhang; Yeqing Zhou; Kelly, D.P.; Strauss, A.W. St. Louis Children's Hospital, MO ); Kolvraa, S.; Gregersen, N. )

    1993-06-01

    Medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD) deficiency is a common inborn error of fatty-acid oxidation and may cause sudden infant death. Previous studies revealed that (i) homozygosity for an A-to-G mutation at nucleotide 985 of the mRNA coding region (A985G) is an extremely common cause of MCAD deficiency and (ii) MCAD deficiency is strongly associated with a particular haplotype for RFLPs for BanII, PstI, and TaqI. TaqI allele 2 is always associated with the A985G mutation in human MCAD deficiency. In this study, the authors have delineated the molecular basis of the RFLPs for PstI, BamHI, and TaqI in the human MCAD gene. Their results prove that the three RFLPs are caused by point mutations in the 8 kb of DNA encompassing exons 8--10 of the human MCAD gene. The TaqI polymorphism is caused by a C-to-A substitution 392 bp upstream of the exon 8, and the PstI and BamHI polymorphisms are due to T-to-C and G-to-A substitutions, respectively, which are 727 and 931 bp downstream of exon 10, respectively. All three RFLPs lie within Alu repetitive sequences. Comparison of intronic sequences immediately following exon 10 from two normal individuals with different haplotypes showed that this region contains densely packed Alu repeats and is highly polymorphic. The results are consistent both with a founder effect as the cause of the high prevalence of a single (A985G) mutation in MCAD deficiency and with its association with a particular haplotype for these intragenic RFLPs. 27 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  7. The Physiology of Protein S-acylation

    PubMed Central

    Chamberlain, Luke H.; Shipston, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Protein S-acylation, the only fully reversible posttranslational lipid modification of proteins, is emerging as a ubiquitous mechanism to control the properties and function of a diverse array of proteins and consequently physiological processes. S-acylation results from the enzymatic addition of long-chain lipids, most typically palmitate, onto intracellular cysteine residues of soluble and transmembrane proteins via a labile thioester linkage. Addition of lipid results in increases in protein hydrophobicity that can impact on protein structure, assembly, maturation, trafficking, and function. The recent explosion in global S-acylation (palmitoyl) proteomic profiling as a result of improved biochemical tools to assay S-acylation, in conjunction with the recent identification of enzymes that control protein S-acylation and de-acylation, has opened a new vista into the physiological function of S-acylation. This review introduces key features of S-acylation and tools to interrogate this process, and highlights the eclectic array of proteins regulated including membrane receptors, ion channels and transporters, enzymes and kinases, signaling adapters and chaperones, cell adhesion, and structural proteins. We highlight recent findings correlating disruption of S-acylation to pathophysiology and disease and discuss some of the major challenges and opportunities in this rapidly expanding field. PMID:25834228

  8. Temperature-Dependence of Lipid A Acyl Structure in Psychrobacter cryohalolentis and Arctic Isolates of Colwellia hornerae and Colwellia piezophila.

    PubMed

    Sweet, Charles R; Watson, Rebecca E; Landis, Corinne A; Smith, Joseph P

    2015-08-01

    Lipid A is a fundamental Gram-negative outer membrane component and the essential element of lipopolysaccharide (endotoxin), a potent immunostimulatory molecule. This work describes the metabolic adaptation of the lipid A acyl structure by Psychrobacter cryohalolentis at various temperatures in its facultative psychrophilic growth range, as characterized by MALDI-TOF MS and FAME GC-MS. It also presents the first elucidation of lipid A structure from the Colwellia genus, describing lipid A from strains of Colwellia hornerae and Colwellia piezophila, which were isolated as primary cultures from Arctic fast sea ice and identified by 16S rDNA sequencing. The Colwellia strains are obligate psychrophiles, with a growth range restricted to 15 °C or less. As such, these organisms have less need for fluidity adaptation in the acyl moiety of the outer membrane, and they do not display alterations in lipid A based on growth temperature. Both Psychrobacter and Colwellia make use of extensive single-methylene variation in the size of their lipid A molecules. Such single-carbon variations in acyl size were thought to be restricted to psychrotolerant (facultative) species, but its presence in these Colwellia species shows that odd-chain acyl units and a single-carbon variation in lipid A structure are present in obligate psychrophiles, as well. PMID:26264000

  9. Temperature-Dependence of Lipid A Acyl Structure in Psychrobacter cryohalolentis and Arctic Isolates of Colwellia hornerae and Colwellia piezophila

    PubMed Central

    Sweet, Charles R.; Watson, Rebecca E.; Landis, Corinne A.; Smith, Joseph P.

    2015-01-01

    Lipid A is a fundamental Gram-negative outer membrane component and the essential element of lipopolysaccharide (endotoxin), a potent immunostimulatory molecule. This work describes the metabolic adaptation of the lipid A acyl structure by Psychrobacter cryohalolentis at various temperatures in its facultative psychrophilic growth range, as characterized by MALDI-TOF MS and FAME GC-MS. It also presents the first elucidation of lipid A structure from the Colwellia genus, describing lipid A from strains of Colwellia hornerae and Colwellia piezophila, which were isolated as primary cultures from Arctic fast sea ice and identified by 16S rDNA sequencing. The Colwellia strains are obligate psychrophiles, with a growth range restricted to 15 °C or less. As such, these organisms have less need for fluidity adaptation in the acyl moiety of the outer membrane, and they do not display alterations in lipid A based on growth temperature. Both Psychrobacter and Colwellia make use of extensive single-methylene variation in the size of their lipid A molecules. Such single-carbon variations in acyl size were thought to be restricted to psychrotolerant (facultative) species, but its presence in these Colwellia species shows that odd-chain acyl units and a single-carbon variation in lipid A structure are present in obligate psychrophiles, as well. PMID:26264000

  10. Systematic Analysis of Gene Expression Alterations and Clinical Outcomes for Long-Chain Acyl-Coenzyme A Synthetase Family in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei-Ching; Wang, Chih-Yang; Hung, Yu-Hsuan; Weng, Tzu-Yang; Yen, Meng-Chi; Lai, Ming-Derg

    2016-01-01

    Dysregulated lipid metabolism contributes to cancer progression. Our previous study indicates that long-chain fatty acyl-Co A synthetase (ACSL) 3 is essential for lipid upregulation induced by endoplasmic reticulum stress. In this report, we aimed to identify the role of ACSL family in cancer with systematic analysis and in vitro experiment. We explored the ACSL expression using Oncomine database to determine the gene alteration during carcinogenesis and identified the association between ACSL expression and the survival of cancer patient using PrognoScan database. ACSL1 may play a potential oncogenic role in colorectal and breast cancer and play a potential tumor suppressor role in lung cancer. Co-expression analysis revealed that ACSL1 was coexpressed with MYBPH, PTPRE, PFKFB3, SOCS3 in colon cancer and with LRRFIP1, TSC22D1 in lung cancer. In accordance with PrognoScan analysis, downregulation of ACSL1 in colon and breast cancer cell line inhibited proliferation, migration, and anchorage-independent growth. In contrast, increase of oncogenic property was observed in lung cancer cell line by attenuating ACSL1. High ACSL3 expression predicted a better prognosis in ovarian cancer; in contrast, high ACSL3 predicted a worse prognosis in melanoma. ACSL3 was coexpressed with SNUPN, TRIP13, and SEMA5A in melanoma. High expression of ACSL4 predicted a worse prognosis in colorectal cancer, but predicted better prognosis in breast, brain and lung cancer. ACSL4 was coexpressed with SERPIN2, HNRNPCL1, ITIH2, PROCR, LRRFIP1. High expression of ACSL5 predicted good prognosis in breast, ovarian, and lung cancers. ACSL5 was coexpressed with TMEM140, TAPBPL, BIRC3, PTPRE, and SERPINB1. Low ACSL6 predicted a worse prognosis in acute myeloid leukemia. ACSL6 was coexpressed with SOX6 and DARC. Altogether, different members of ACSLs are implicated in diverse types of cancer development. ACSL-coexpressed molecules may be used to further investigate the role of ACSL family in

  11. Systematic Analysis of Gene Expression Alterations and Clinical Outcomes for Long-Chain Acyl-Coenzyme A Synthetase Family in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Ching; Wang, Chih-Yang; Hung, Yu-Hsuan; Weng, Tzu-Yang; Yen, Meng-Chi; Lai, Ming-Derg

    2016-01-01

    Dysregulated lipid metabolism contributes to cancer progression. Our previous study indicates that long-chain fatty acyl-Co A synthetase (ACSL) 3 is essential for lipid upregulation induced by endoplasmic reticulum stress. In this report, we aimed to identify the role of ACSL family in cancer with systematic analysis and in vitro experiment. We explored the ACSL expression using Oncomine database to determine the gene alteration during carcinogenesis and identified the association between ACSL expression and the survival of cancer patient using PrognoScan database. ACSL1 may play a potential oncogenic role in colorectal and breast cancer and play a potential tumor suppressor role in lung cancer. Co-expression analysis revealed that ACSL1 was coexpressed with MYBPH, PTPRE, PFKFB3, SOCS3 in colon cancer and with LRRFIP1, TSC22D1 in lung cancer. In accordance with PrognoScan analysis, downregulation of ACSL1 in colon and breast cancer cell line inhibited proliferation, migration, and anchorage-independent growth. In contrast, increase of oncogenic property was observed in lung cancer cell line by attenuating ACSL1. High ACSL3 expression predicted a better prognosis in ovarian cancer; in contrast, high ACSL3 predicted a worse prognosis in melanoma. ACSL3 was coexpressed with SNUPN, TRIP13, and SEMA5A in melanoma. High expression of ACSL4 predicted a worse prognosis in colorectal cancer, but predicted better prognosis in breast, brain and lung cancer. ACSL4 was coexpressed with SERPIN2, HNRNPCL1, ITIH2, PROCR, LRRFIP1. High expression of ACSL5 predicted good prognosis in breast, ovarian, and lung cancers. ACSL5 was coexpressed with TMEM140, TAPBPL, BIRC3, PTPRE, and SERPINB1. Low ACSL6 predicted a worse prognosis in acute myeloid leukemia. ACSL6 was coexpressed with SOX6 and DARC. Altogether, different members of ACSLs are implicated in diverse types of cancer development. ACSL-coexpressed molecules may be used to further investigate the role of ACSL family in

  12. Identification of N-Acyl Phosphatidylserine Molecules in Eukaryotic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Ziqiang; Li, Shengrong; Smith, Dale C.; Shaw, Walter A.; Raetz, Christian R. H.

    2008-01-01

    While profiling the lipidome of the mouse brain by mass spectrometry, we discovered a novel family of N-acyl phosphatidylserine (N-acyl-PS) molecules. These N-acyl-PS species were enriched by DEAE-cellulose column chromatography, and they were then characterized by accurate mass measurements, tandem mass spectrometry, liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry, and comparison to an authentic standard. Mouse brain N-acyl-PS molecules are heterogeneous and constitute about 0.1 % of the total lipid. In addition to various ester-linked fatty acyl chains on their glycerol backbones, the complexity of the N-acyl-PS series is further increased by the presence of diverse amide-linked N-acyl chains, which include saturated, mono-unsaturated and poly-unsaturated species. N-acyl-PS molecular species were also detected in the lipids of pig brain, mouse RAW264.7 macrophage tumor cells and yeast, but not E. coli. N-acyl-PSs may be biosynthetic precursors of N-acyl serine molecules, such as the recently reported signaling lipid N-arachidonoyl serine from bovine brain. We suggest that a phospholipase D might cleave N-acyl-PS to generate N-acyl serine, in analogy to the biosynthesis of the endocannabinoid N-arachidonoyl ethanolamine (anadamide) from N-arachidonoyl phosphatidylethanolamine. PMID:18031065

  13. Preparation of fatty-acylated derivatives of acyl carrier protein using Vibrio harveyi acyl-ACP synthetase.

    PubMed

    Shen, Z; Fice, D; Byers, D M

    1992-07-01

    A simple two-step purification of Vibrio harveyi fatty acyl-acyl carrier protein (acyl-ACP) synthetase, which is useful for the quantitative preparation and analysis of fatty-acylated derivatives of ACP, is described. Acyl-ACP synthetase can be partially purified from extracts of this bioluminescent bacterium by Cibacron blue chromatography and Sephacryl S-300 gel filtration and is stable for months at -20 degrees C in the presence of glycerol. Incubation of ACP from Escherichia coli with ATP and radiolabeled fatty acids (6 to 16 carbons in length) in the presence of the enzyme resulted in quantitative conversion to biologically active acylated derivatives. The enzyme reaction can be monitored by a filter disk assay to quantitate levels of ACP or by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and fluorography to detect ACP in cell extracts. With its broad fatty acid chain length specificity and optimal activity in mild nondenaturing buffers, the soluble V. harveyi acyl-ACP synthetase provides an attractive alternative to current chemical and enzymatic methods of acyl-ACP preparation and analysis. PMID:1514693

  14. Production of long chain alcohols and alkanes upon coexpression of an acyl-ACP reductase and aldehyde-deformylating oxgenase with a bacterial type-I fatty acid synthase in E. coli

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Coursolle, Dan; Shanklin, John; Lian, Jiazhang; Zhao, Huimin

    2015-06-23

    Microbial long chain alcohols and alkanes are renewable biofuels that could one day replace petroleum-derived fuels. Here we report a novel pathway for high efficiency production of these products in Escherichia coli strain BL21(DE3). We first identified the acyl-ACP reductase/aldehyde deformylase combinations with the highest activity in this strain. Next, we used catalase coexpression to remove toxic byproducts and increase the overall titer. Finally, by introducing the type-I fatty acid synthase from Corynebacterium ammoniagenes, we were able to bypass host regulatory mechanisms of fatty acid synthesis that have thus far hampered efforts to optimize the yield of acyl-ACP-derived products inmore » BL21(DE3). When all these engineering strategies were combined with subsequent optimization of fermentation conditions, we were able to achieve a final titer around 100 mg/L long chain alcohol/alkane products including a 57 mg/L titer of pentadecane, the highest titer reported in E. coli BL21(DE3) to date. The expression of prokaryotic type-I fatty acid synthases offer a unique strategy to produce fatty acid-derived products in E. coli that does not rely exclusively on the endogenous type-II fatty acid synthase system.« less

  15. Production of long chain alcohols and alkanes upon coexpression of an acyl-ACP reductase and aldehyde-deformylating oxgenase with a bacterial type-I fatty acid synthase in E. coli

    SciTech Connect

    Coursolle, Dan; Shanklin, John; Lian, Jiazhang; Zhao, Huimin

    2015-06-23

    Microbial long chain alcohols and alkanes are renewable biofuels that could one day replace petroleum-derived fuels. Here we report a novel pathway for high efficiency production of these products in Escherichia coli strain BL21(DE3). We first identified the acyl-ACP reductase/aldehyde deformylase combinations with the highest activity in this strain. Next, we used catalase coexpression to remove toxic byproducts and increase the overall titer. Finally, by introducing the type-I fatty acid synthase from Corynebacterium ammoniagenes, we were able to bypass host regulatory mechanisms of fatty acid synthesis that have thus far hampered efforts to optimize the yield of acyl-ACP-derived products in BL21(DE3). When all these engineering strategies were combined with subsequent optimization of fermentation conditions, we were able to achieve a final titer around 100 mg/L long chain alcohol/alkane products including a 57 mg/L titer of pentadecane, the highest titer reported in E. coli BL21(DE3) to date. The expression of prokaryotic type-I fatty acid synthases offer a unique strategy to produce fatty acid-derived products in E. coli that does not rely exclusively on the endogenous type-II fatty acid synthase system.

  16. Production of long chain alcohols and alkanes upon coexpression of an acyl-ACP reductase and aldehyde-deformylating oxygenase with a bacterial type-I fatty acid synthase in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Coursolle, Dan; Lian, Jiazhang; Shanklin, John; Zhao, Huimin

    2015-09-01

    Microbial long chain alcohols and alkanes are renewable biofuels that could one day replace petroleum-derived fuels. Here we report a novel pathway for high efficiency production of these products in Escherichia coli strain BL21(DE3). We first identified the acyl-ACP reductase/aldehyde deformylase combinations with the highest activity in this strain. Next, we used catalase coexpression to remove toxic byproducts and increase the overall titer. Finally, by introducing the type-I fatty acid synthase from Corynebacterium ammoniagenes, we were able to bypass host regulatory mechanisms of fatty acid synthesis that have thus far hampered efforts to optimize the yield of acyl-ACP-derived products in BL21(DE3). When all these engineering strategies were combined with subsequent optimization of fermentation conditions, we were able to achieve a final titer around 100 mg L(-1) long chain alcohol/alkane products including a 57 mg L(-1) titer of pentadecane, the highest titer reported in E. coli BL21(DE3) to date. The expression of prokaryotic type-I fatty acid synthases offer a unique strategy to produce fatty acid-derived products in E. coli that does not rely exclusively on the endogenous type-II fatty acid synthase system. PMID:26135500

  17. Prevalence and mutation analysis of short/branched chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (SBCADD) detected on newborn screening in Wisconsin

    PubMed Central

    Van Calcar, Sandra C.; Baker, Mei W.; Williams, Phillip; Jones, Susan A.; Xiong, Blia; Thao, Mai Choua; Lee, Sheng; Yang, Mai Khou; Rice, Greg M.; Rhead, William; Vockley, Jerry; Hoffman, Gary; Durkin, Maureen S.

    2015-01-01

    Short/branched chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (SBCADD), also called 2-methylbutyryl CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (2-MBCDD), is a disorder of L-isoleucine metabolism of uncertain clinical significance. SBCADD is inadvertently detected on expanded newborn screening by elevated 2-methylbutyrylcarnitine (C5), which has the same mass to charge (m/s) on tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) as isovalerylcarnitine (C5), an analyte that is elevated in isovaleric acidemia (IVA), a disorder in leucine metabolism. SBCADD cases identified in the Hmong-American population have been found in association with the c.1165 A>G mutation in the ACADSB gene. The purposes of this study were to: (a) estimate the prevalence of SBCADD and carrier frequency of the c.1165 A>G mutation in the Hmong ethnic group; (b) determine whether the c.1 165 A>G mutation is common to all Hmong newborns screening positive for SBCADD; and (c) evaluate C5 acylcarnitine cut-off values to detect and distinguish between SBCADD and IVA diagnoses. During the first 10 years of expanded newborn screening using MS/MS in Wisconsin (2001–2011), 97 infants had elevated C5 values (≥0.44 μmol/L), of whom five were Caucasian infants confirmed to have IVA Of the remaining 92 confirmed SBCADD cases, 90 were of Hmong descent. Mutation analysis was completed on an anonymous, random sample of newborn screening cards (n = 1139) from Hmong infants. Fifteen infants, including nine who had screened positive for SBCADD based on a C5 acylcarnitine concentrations ≥0.44 μmol/L, were homozygous for the c.1165 A>G mutation. This corresponds to a prevalence in this ethnic group of being homozygous for the mutation of 1.3% (95% confidence interval 0.8–2.2%) and of being heterozygous for the mutation of 21.8% (95% confidence interval 19.4–24.3%), which is consistent with the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Detection of homozygous individuals who were not identified on newborn screening suggests that the C5 screening cut

  18. Modified acyl-ACP desaturase

    DOEpatents

    Cahoon, Edgar B.; Shanklin, John; Lindgvist, Ylva; Schneider, Gunter

    1998-01-06

    Disclosed is a methods for modifying the chain length and double bond positional specificities of a soluble plant fatty acid desaturase. More specifically, the method involves modifying amino acid contact residues in the substrate binding channel of the soluble fatty acid desaturase which contact the fatty acid. Specifically disclosed is the modification of an acyl-ACP desaturase. Amino acid contact residues which lie within the substrate binding channel are identified, and subsequently replaced with different residues to effect the modification of activity.

  19. Modified Acyl-ACP desaturase

    DOEpatents

    Cahoon, Edgar B.; Shanklin, John; Lindqvist, Ylva; Schneider, Gunter

    1999-03-30

    Disclosed is a method for modifying the chain length and double bond positional specificities of a soluble plant fatty acid desaturase. More specifically, the method involves modifying amino acid contact residues in the substrate binding channel of the soluble fatty acid desaturase which contact the fatty acid. Specifically disclosed is the modification of an acyl-ACP desaturase. Amino acid contact residues which lie within the substrate binding channel are identified, and subsequently replaced with different residues to effect the modification of activity.

  20. SREBP2 Activation Induces Hepatic Long-chain Acyl-CoA Synthetase 1 (ACSL1) Expression in Vivo and in Vitro through a Sterol Regulatory Element (SRE) Motif of the ACSL1 C-promoter.

    PubMed

    Singh, Amar Bahadur; Kan, Chin Fung Kelvin; Dong, Bin; Liu, Jingwen

    2016-03-01

    Long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase 1 (ACSL1) plays a key role in fatty acid metabolism. To identify novel transcriptional modulators of ACSL1, we examined ACSL1 expression in liver tissues of hamsters fed a normal diet, a high fat diet, or a high cholesterol and high fat diet (HCHFD). Feeding hamsters HCHFD markedly reduced hepatic Acsl1 mRNA and protein levels as well as acyl-CoA synthetase activity. Decreases in Acsl1 expression strongly correlated with reductions in hepatic Srebp2 mRNA level and mature Srebp2 protein abundance. Conversely, administration of rosuvastatin (RSV) to hamsters increased hepatic Acsl1 expression. These new findings were reproduced in mice treated with RSV or fed the HCHFD. Furthermore, the RSV induction of acyl-CoA activity in mouse liver resulted in increases in plasma and hepatic cholesterol ester concentrations and reductions in free cholesterol amounts. Investigations on different ACSL1 transcript variants in HepG2 cells revealed that the mRNA expression of C-ACSL1 was specifically regulated by the sterol regulatory element (SRE)-binding protein (SREBP) pathway, and RSV treatment increased the C-ACSL1 abundance from a minor mRNA species to an abundant transcript. We analyzed 5'-flanking sequence of exon 1C of the human ACSL1 gene and identified one putative SRE site. By performing a promoter activity assay and DNA binding assays, we firmly demonstrated the key role of this SRE motif in SREBP2-mediated activation of C-ACSL1 gene transcription. Finally, we demonstrated that knockdown of endogenous SREBP2 in HepG2 cells lowered ACSL1 mRNA and protein levels. Altogether, this work discovered an unprecedented link between ACSL1 and SREBP2 via the specific regulation of the C-ACSL1 transcript. PMID:26728456

  1. Site-specific analysis of protein S-acylation by resin-assisted capture[S

    PubMed Central

    Forrester, Michael T.; Hess, Douglas T.; Thompson, J. Will; Hultman, Rainbo; Moseley, M. Arthur; Stamler, Jonathan S.; Casey, Patrick J.

    2011-01-01

    Protein S-acylation is a major posttranslational modification whereby a cysteine thiol is converted to a thioester. A prototype is S-palmitoylation (fatty acylation), in which a protein undergoes acylation with a hydrophobic 16 carbon lipid chain. Although this modification is a well-recognized determinant of protein function and localization, current techniques to study cellular S-acylation are cumbersome and/or technically demanding. We recently described a simple and robust methodology to rapidly identify S-nitrosylation sites in proteins via resin-assisted capture (RAC) and provided an initial description of the applicability of the technique to S-acylated proteins (acyl-RAC). Here we expand on the acyl-RAC assay, coupled with mass spectrometry-based proteomics, to characterize both previously reported and novel sites of endogenous S-acylation. Acyl-RAC should therefore find general applicability in studies of both global and individual protein S-acylation in mammalian cells. PMID:21044946

  2. Aberrant protein acylation is a common observation in inborn errors of acyl-CoA metabolism.

    PubMed

    Pougovkina, Olga; Te Brinke, Heleen; Wanders, Ronald J A; Houten, Sander M; de Boer, Vincent C J

    2014-09-01

    Inherited disorders of acyl-CoA metabolism, such as defects in amino acid metabolism and fatty acid oxidation can present with severe clinical symptoms either neonatally or later in life, but the pathophysiological mechanisms are often incompletely understood. We now report the discovery of a novel biochemical mechanism that could contribute to the pathophysiology of these disorders. We identified increased protein lysine butyrylation in short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (SCAD) deficient mice as a result of the accumulation of butyryl-CoA. Similarly, in SCAD deficient fibroblasts, lysine butyrylation was increased. Furthermore, malonyl-CoA decarboxylase (MCD) deficient patient cells had increased levels of malonylated lysines and propionyl-CoA carboxylase (PCC) deficient patient cells had increased propionylation of lysines. Since lysine acylation can greatly impact protein function, aberrant lysine acylation in inherited disorders associated with acyl-CoA accumulation may well play a role in their disease pathophysiology. PMID:24531926

  3. Dependence of Mesomorphic Behaviour of Methylene-Linked Dimers and the Stability of the NTB /NX Phase upon Choice of Mesogenic Units and Terminal Chain Length.

    PubMed

    Mandle, Richard J; Goodby, John W

    2016-06-27

    Twelve symmetrical dimeric materials consisting of a nonamethylene (C9) spacer and either phenyl 4-(4'-alkylphenyl)benzoate, phenyl 4-(4'-alkylcyclohexyl)benzoate or phenyl 4-(4'-alkylbicyclohexyl)carboxylate mesogenic units were prepared and their mesogenic behaviour characterised by POM, DSC and XRD. All of the materials exhibited nematic phases with clearing points in excess of 200 °C. Four compounds were found to exhibit the twist-bend nematic phase, with one material exhibiting a transition from the NTB phase into an anticlinic smectic 'X' phase. Across all three series of compounds the length of terminal chain is seen to dictate, to some degree, the type of mesophase formed: shorter terminal chains favour nematic and NTB mesophases, whereas longer terminal aliphatic chains were found to promote smectic phases. PMID:27244550

  4. Overexpression of human fatty acid transport protein 2/very long chain acyl-CoA synthetase 1 (FATP2/Acsvl1) reveals distinct patterns of trafficking of exogenous fatty acids

    SciTech Connect

    Melton, Elaina M.; Cerny, Ronald L.; DiRusso, Concetta C.; Black, Paul N.

    2013-11-01

    Highlights: •Roles of FATP2 in fatty acid transport/activation contribute to lipid homeostasis. •Use of 13C- and D-labeled fatty acids provide novel insights into FATP2 function. •FATP2-dependent trafficking of FA into phospholipids results in distinctive profiles. •FATP2 functions in the transport and activation pathways for exogenous fatty acids. -- Abstract: In mammals, the fatty acid transport proteins (FATP1 through FATP6) are members of a highly conserved family of proteins, which function in fatty acid transport proceeding through vectorial acylation and in the activation of very long chain fatty acids, branched chain fatty acids and secondary bile acids. FATP1, 2 and 4, for example directly function in fatty acid transport and very long chain fatty acids activation while FATP5 does not function in fatty acid transport but activates secondary bile acids. In the present work, we have used stable isotopically labeled fatty acids differing in carbon length and saturation in cells expressing FATP2 to gain further insights into how this protein functions in fatty acid transport and intracellular fatty acid trafficking. Our previous studies showed the expression of FATP2 modestly increased C16:0-CoA and C20:4-CoA and significantly increased C18:3-CoA and C22:6-CoA after 4 h. The increases in C16:0-CoA and C18:3-CoA suggest FATP2 must necessarily partner with a long chain acyl CoA synthetase (Acsl) to generate C16:0-CoA and C18:3-CoA through vectorial acylation. The very long chain acyl CoA synthetase activity of FATP2 is consistent in the generation of C20:4-CoA and C22:6-CoA coincident with transport from their respective exogenous fatty acids. The trafficking of exogenous fatty acids into phosphatidic acid (PA) and into the major classes of phospholipids (phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylinositol (PI), and phosphatidyserine (PS)) resulted in distinctive profiles, which changed with the expression of FATP2. The

  5. Methylene blue unresponsive methemoglobinemia

    PubMed Central

    Patnaik, Sibabratta; Natarajan, Manivachagan Muthappa; James, Ebor Jacob; Ebenezer, Kala

    2014-01-01

    Acquired methemoglobinemia is an uncommon blood disorder induced by exposure to certain oxidizing agents and drugs. Although parents may not give any history of toxin ingestion; with the aid of pulse-oximetry and blood gas analysis, we can diagnose methemoglobinemia. Prompt recognition of this condition is required in emergency situations to institute early methylene blue therapy. We report an unusual case of severe toxic methemoglobinemia, which did not respond to methylene blue, but was successfully managed with exchange transfusion. PMID:24872659

  6. Cloning and characterization of cDNAs encoding for long-chain saturated acyl-ACP thioesterases from the developing seeds of Brassica juncea.

    PubMed

    Jha, Saheli Sinha; Jha, Jyoti K; Chattopadhyaya, Banani; Basu, Asitava; Sen, Soumitra K; Maiti, Mrinal K

    2010-06-01

    Four types of cDNAs corresponding to the fatty acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) thioesterase (Fat) enzyme were isolated from the developing seeds of Brassica juncea, a widely cultivated species amongst the oil-seed crops. The mature polypeptides deduced from the cDNAs showed sequence identity with the FatB class of plant thioesterases. Southern hybridization revealed the presence of at least four copies of BjFatB gene in the genome of this amphidiploid species. Western blot and RT-PCR analyses showed that the BjFatB class thioesterase is expressed poorly in flowers and leaves, but significantly in seeds at the mid-maturation stage. The enzymatic activities of different BjFatB isoforms were established upon heterologous expression of the four BjFatB CDSs in Escherichia coli K27fadD88, a mutant strain of fatty acid beta-oxidation pathway. The substrate specificity of each BjFatB isoform was determined in vivo by fatty acid profile analyses of the culture supernatant and membrane lipid of the recombinant K27fadD88 and E. coli DH10B (fadD(+)) clones, respectively. The BjFatB1 and BjFatB3 were predominantly active on C18:0-ACP substrate, whereas BjFatB2 and BjFatB4 were specific towards C18:0-ACP as well as C16:0-ACP. These novel FatB genes may find potential application in metabolic engineering of crop plants through their over-expression in seed tissues to generate stearate-rich vegetable fats/oils of commercial importance. PMID:20356753

  7. Different effects of fibrates on the microsomal fatty acid chain elongation and the acyl composition of phospholipids in guinea-pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Vázquez, M.; Alegret, M.; López, M.; Rodríguez, C.; Adzet, T.; Merlos, M.; Laguna, J. C.

    1995-01-01

    1. The effects in vitro and in vivo of three fibric acid derivatives, clofibrate (CFB), bezafibrate (BFB) and gemfibrozil (GFB) on some enzyme activities related to fatty acid biosynthesis, namely palmitoyl-CoA synthetase and hydrolases (microsomal and cytosolic), NADH and NADPH cytochrome c reductases and acyl-CoA elongases were investigated in guinea-pigs. 2. The three fibrates inhibited acyl-CoA elongation in vitro, irrespective of the substrate of elongation used (saturated, monounsaturated, polyunsaturated) and with an order of potency GFB > BFB > CFB. In the case of GFB, inhibition occurred at concentrations that can be reached in vivo. 3. Microsomal palmitoyl-CoA hydrolase and synthetase were also inhibited in vitro (GFB > or = BFB > CFB), whereas NADH cytochrome c reductase activity was increased by GFB. Nevertheless, the magnitude of changes were lower than those observed in elongation activities. 4. Treatment with fibrates did not produce peroxisomal proliferation in guinea-pigs, as measured by peroxisomal beta-oxidation activity and liver weight/body weight ratio. Nevertheless, fibrates provoked a reduction in plasma cholesterol and triglycerides, at least in GFB- and BFB-treated animals. 5. Fatty acid elongation was significantly modified by GFB treatment in vivo. The remaining enzyme activities studied were only slightly changed by fibrate treatment. 6. Treatment with BFB and to a lesser extent with CFB, increased the relative proportion of MUFA (palmitoleic and oleic acids) in microsomal phospholipids, whereas PUFA (mainly linoleic acid) decreased. GFB behaved differently, increasing palmitic and linoleic acids and decreasing stearic and oleic acids. The latter changes are attributable to an inhibition of elongation activity by GFB. 7. The changes observed after fibrate treatment in both rats and guinea-pigs, as they are not directly related to peroxisome proliferation, could be more reliably extrapolated to man than those observed only in rats. PMID

  8. Phylogenetic and experimental characterization of an acyl-ACP thioesterase family reveals significant diversity in enzymatic specificity and activity

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Acyl-acyl carrier protein thioesterases (acyl-ACP TEs) catalyze the hydrolysis of the thioester bond that links the acyl chain to the sulfhydryl group of the phosphopantetheine prosthetic group of ACP. This reaction terminates acyl chain elongation of fatty acid biosynthesis, and in plant seeds it is the biochemical determinant of the fatty acid compositions of storage lipids. Results To explore acyl-ACP TE diversity and to identify novel acyl ACP-TEs, 31 acyl-ACP TEs from wide-ranging phylogenetic sources were characterized to ascertain their in vivo activities and substrate specificities. These acyl-ACP TEs were chosen by two different approaches: 1) 24 TEs were selected from public databases on the basis of phylogenetic analysis and fatty acid profile knowledge of their source organisms; and 2) seven TEs were molecularly cloned from oil palm (Elaeis guineensis), coconut (Cocos nucifera) and Cuphea viscosissima, organisms that produce medium-chain and short-chain fatty acids in their seeds. The in vivo substrate specificities of the acyl-ACP TEs were determined in E. coli. Based on their specificities, these enzymes were clustered into three classes: 1) Class I acyl-ACP TEs act primarily on 14- and 16-carbon acyl-ACP substrates; 2) Class II acyl-ACP TEs have broad substrate specificities, with major activities toward 8- and 14-carbon acyl-ACP substrates; and 3) Class III acyl-ACP TEs act predominantly on 8-carbon acyl-ACPs. Several novel acyl-ACP TEs act on short-chain and unsaturated acyl-ACP or 3-ketoacyl-ACP substrates, indicating the diversity of enzymatic specificity in this enzyme family. Conclusion These acyl-ACP TEs can potentially be used to diversify the fatty acid biosynthesis pathway to produce novel fatty acids. PMID:21831316

  9. Modified Acyl-ACP desaturase

    DOEpatents

    Cahoon, E.B.; Shanklin, J.; Lindqvist, Y.; Schneider, G.

    1999-03-30

    Disclosed is a method for modifying the chain length and double bond positional specificities of a soluble plant fatty acid desaturase. More specifically, the method involves modifying amino acid contact residues in the substrate binding channel of the soluble fatty acid desaturase which contact the fatty acid. Specifically disclosed is the modification of an acyl-ACP desaturase. Amino acid contact residues which lie within the substrate binding channel are identified, and subsequently replaced with different residues to effect the modification of activity. 2 figs.

  10. Modified acyl-ACP desaturase

    DOEpatents

    Cahoon, E.B.; Shanklin, J.; Lindgvist, Y.; Schneider, G.

    1998-01-06

    Disclosed is a method for modifying the chain length and double bond positional specificities of a soluble plant fatty acid desaturase. More specifically, the method involves modifying amino acid contact residues in the substrate binding channel of the soluble fatty acid desaturase which contact the fatty acid. Specifically disclosed is the modification of an acyl-ACP desaturase. Amino acid contact residues which lie within the substrate binding channel are identified, and subsequently replaced with different residues to effect the modification of activity. 1 fig.

  11. Characterization of the molecular species of glycerophospholipids from rabbit kidney: an alternative approach to the determination of the fatty acyl chain position by negative ion fast atom bombardment combined with mass-analysed ion kinetic energy analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, S; Curcuruto, O; Catinella, S; Traldi, P; Menon, G

    1992-12-01

    An alternative approach to identifying fatty acid chain position in the molecular species of glycerophospholipids has been studied and developed. The fatty acyl groups esterified to the glycerol backbone in isomeric glycerophosphatidyl-choline, -serine and -ethanolamine as well as glycerophosphatidic acid can be detected by the presence of a pair of anions derived from phosphatidic acid parent ions (M minus the polar head groups in glycerophospholipids), designed to be [M--polar head--R2COOH]- and [M--polar head--R2CO--H]-, produced by negative ion fast atom bombardment combined with mass-analysed ion kinetic energy analysis. Because of the significant abundance of [M--polar head--R2COOH]- anion, fatty acid chains differing by 2 Da can be distinguished by accurate measurements of the electrostatic voltage related to this ion. Three-volt differences can be evidenced. Using this approach, the molecular species of glycerophosphatidyl-choline, -serine, -ethanolamine and -inositol from rabbit kidney were characterized after the separation of both class and species by normal and reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography, respectively. We identified 11 arachidonoyl-containing molecular species of glycerophospholipids and the other 17 lipid molecules in this biological material. A couple of 1- alkenyl-2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphoethanolamine species, identified as plasmalogen GPE 16:0-20:4 and plasmalogen GPE 18:0-20:4, were found for the first time in rabbit kidney. PMID:1477110

  12. LIGNIN ACYLATION IN GRASSES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Acylation of lignin during growth and development is a commonly found among some plant species. Grasses form unique acylated lignins involving p-coumarate (pCA). In corn rind tissue, it is exclusively attached to the gamma-carbon of lignin monomers, with a strong preference (over 90%) for attachment...

  13. Pseudo-enzymatic S-acylation of a myristoylated yes protein tyrosine kinase peptide in vitro may reflect non-enzymatic S-acylation in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Bañó, M C; Jackson, C S; Magee, A I

    1998-01-01

    Covalent attachment of a variety of lipid groups to proteins is now recognized as a major group of post-translational modifications. S-acylation of proteins at cysteine residues is the only modification considered dynamic and thus has the potential for regulating protein function and/or localization. The activities that catalyse reversible S-acylation have not been well characterized and it is not clear whether both the acylation and the deacylation steps are regulated, since in principle it would be sufficient to control only one of them. Both apparently enzymatic and non-enzymatic S-acylation of proteins have previously been reported. Here we show that a synthetic myristoylated c-Yes protein tyrosine kinase undecapeptide undergoes spontaneous S-acylation in vitro when using a long chain acyl-CoA as acyl donor in the absence of any protein. The S-acylation was dependent on myristoylation of the substrate, the length of the incubation period, temperature and substrate concentration. When COS cell fractions were added to the S-acylation reaction no additional peptide:S-acyltransferase activity was detected. These results are consistent with the possibility that membrane-associated proteins may undergo S-acylation in vivo by non-enzymatic transfer of acyl groups from acyl-CoA. In this case, the S-acylation-deacylation process could be controlled by a regulated depalmitoylation mechanism. PMID:9480882

  14. Oxidative acylation using thioacids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, R.; Orgel, L. E.

    1997-01-01

    Several important prebiotic reactions, including the coupling of amino acids into polypeptides by the formation of amide linkages, involve acylation. Theae reactions present a challenge to the understanding of prebiotic synthesis. Condensation reactions relying on dehydrating agents are either inefficient in aqueous solution or require strongly acidic conditions and high temperatures. Activated amino acids such as thioester derivatives have therefore been suggested as likely substrates for prebiotic peptide synthesis. Here we propose a closely related route to amide bond formation involving oxidative acylation by thioacids. We find that phenylalanine, leucine and phenylphosphate are acylated efficiently in aqueous solution by thioacetic acid and an oxidizing agent. From a prebiotic point of view, oxidative acylation has the advantage of proceeding efficiently in solution and under mild conditions. We anticipate that oxidative acylation should prove to be a general method for activating carboxylic acids, including amino acids.

  15. Acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ta-Yuan; Li, Bo-Liang; Chang, Catherine C. Y.; Urano, Yasuomi

    2009-01-01

    The enzymes acyl-coenzyme A (CoA):cholesterol acyltransferases (ACATs) are membrane-bound proteins that utilize long-chain fatty acyl-CoA and cholesterol as substrates to form cholesteryl esters. In mammals, two isoenzymes, ACAT1 and ACAT2, encoded by two different genes, exist. ACATs play important roles in cellular cholesterol homeostasis in various tissues. This chapter summarizes the current knowledge on ACAT-related research in two areas: 1) ACAT genes and proteins and 2) ACAT enzymes as drug targets for atherosclerosis and for Alzheimer's disease. PMID:19141679

  16. Acyl-ACP Substrate Recognition in Burkholderia mallei BmaI1 Acyl-Homoserine Lactone Synthase

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL) autoinducer mediated quorum sensing regulates virulence in several pathogenic bacteria. The hallmark of an efficient quorum sensing system relies on the tight specificity in the signal generated by each bacterium. Since AHL signal specificity is derived from the acyl-chain of the acyl-ACP (ACP = acyl carrier protein) substrate, AHL synthase enzymes must recognize and react with the native acyl-ACP with high catalytic efficiency while keeping reaction rates with non-native acyl-ACPs low. The mechanism of acyl-ACP substrate recognition in these enzymes, however, remains elusive. In this study, we investigated differences in catalytic efficiencies for shorter and longer chain acyl-ACP substrates reacting with an octanoyl-homoserine lactone synthase Burkholderia mallei BmaI1. With the exception of two-carbon shorter hexanoyl-ACP, the catalytic efficiencies of butyryl-ACP, decanoyl-ACP, and octanoyl-CoA reacting with BmaI1 decreased by greater than 20-fold compared to the native octanoyl-ACP substrate. Furthermore, we also noticed kinetic cooperativity when BmaI1 reacted with non-native acyl-donor substrates. Our kinetic data suggest that non-native acyl-ACP substrates are unable to form a stable and productive BmaI1·acyl-ACP·SAM ternary complex and are thus effectively discriminated by the enzyme. These results offer insights into the molecular basis of substrate recognition for the BmaI1 enzyme. PMID:25215658

  17. The mitogenic activities of phosphatidate are acyl-chain-length dependent and calcium independent in C3H/10T1/2 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Krabak, M J; Hui, S W

    1991-01-01

    Phosphatidates (PA or phosphatidic acid) were shown to have mitogenic properties, including the stimulation of DNA synthesis and calcium mobilization in C3H/10T1/2 cells. Their continuous presence for a minimum of 7 h induced DNA synthesis with kinetics similar to that observed when 10% fetal bovine serum was used as a mitogen. PAs with long chain saturated fatty acid moieties were more mitogenic, in a dose-dependent fashion, than PAs with short saturated or unsaturated fatty acid moieties. When compared with lysostearoyl-PA (LSPA), distearoyl-PA (DSPA) was as potent with respect to the induction of DNA synthesis. Lysooleoyl-PA (LOPA) was slightly more potent than dioleoyl-PA (DOPA), but much weaker than DSPA and LSPA. Preincubation with dilauroyl-PA (DLPA) reduces the mitogenic effect of DSPA by 85%. The pattern of mitogenic inhibition suggests that a chain-length-independent, yet PA-specific, mechanism is involved. Both DSPA and DLPA are equally taken up by the cells after 30 min. LOPA, but not LSPA, produced a large calcium transient (1.3 microM), which we found to be derived from intracellular sources. DSPA, the most mitogenic PA tested, produced a weaker transient (0.6 microM). Interestingly, LSPA did not produce any detectable calcium transient. These results suggest that the chain-length-specific step in the signaling mechanism of PA occurs after the initial chain-length-independent partitioning and/or binding to the membrane and that the induction of DNA synthesis is not related to the observed calcium transients. PMID:2007185

  18. Clinical relevance of short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (SCAD) deficiency: Exploring the role of new variants including the first SCAD-disease-causing allele carrying a synonymous mutation

    PubMed Central

    Tonin, Rodolfo; Caciotti, Anna; Funghini, Silvia; Pasquini, Elisabetta; Mooney, Sean D.; Cai, Binghuang; Proncopio, Elena; Donati, Maria Alice; Baronio, Federico; Bettocchi, Ilaria; Cassio, Alessandra; Biasucci, Giacomo; Bordugo, Andrea; la Marca, Giancarlo; Guerrini, Renzo; Morrone, Amelia

    2016-01-01

    Short-chain acyl-coA dehydrogenase deficiency (SCADD) is an autosomal recessive inborn error of mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation caused by ACADS gene alterations. SCADD is a heterogeneous condition, sometimes considered to be solely a biochemical condition given that it has been associated with variable clinical phenotypes ranging from no symptoms or signs to metabolic decompensation occurring early in life. A reason for this variability is due to SCAD alterations, such as the common p.Gly209Ser, that confer a disease susceptibility state but require a complex multifactorial/polygenic condition to manifest clinically. Our study focuses on 12 SCADD patients carrying 11 new ACADS variants, with the purpose of defining genotype–phenotype correlations based on clinical data, metabolite evaluation, molecular analyses, and in silico functional analyses. Interestingly, we identified a synonymous variant, c.765G > T (p.Gly255Gly) that influences ACADS mRNA splicing accuracy. mRNA characterisation demonstrated that this variant leads to an aberrant splicing product, harbouring a premature stop codon. Molecular analysis and in silico tools are able to characterise ACADS variants, identifying the severe mutations and consequently indicating which patients could benefit from a long term follow- up. We also emphasise that synonymous mutations can be relevant features and potentially associated with SCADD. PMID:27051597

  19. Characterization of the promoter region of the bovine long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase 1 gene: Roles of E2F1, Sp1, KLF15, and E2F4

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhi-Dong; Zan, Lin-Sen; Li, An-Ning; Cheng, Gong; Li, Shi-Jun; Zhang, Ya-Ran; Wang, Xiao-Yu; Zhang, Ying-Ying

    2016-01-01

    The nutritional value and eating qualities of beef are enhanced when the unsaturated fatty acid content of fat is increased. Long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase 1 (ACSL1) plays key roles in fatty acid transport and degradation, as well as lipid synthesis. It has been identified as a plausible functional and positional candidate gene for manipulations of fatty acid composition in bovine skeletal muscle. In the present study, we determined that bovine ACSL1was highly expressed in subcutaneous adipose tissue and longissimus thoracis. To elucidate the molecular mechanisms involved in bovine ACSL1 regulation, we cloned and characterized the promoter region of ACSL1. Applying 5′-rapid amplification of cDNA end analysis (RACE), we identified multiple transcriptional start sites (TSSs) in its promoter region. Using a series of 5′ deletion promoter plasmids in luciferase reporter assays, we found that the proximal minimal promoter of ACSL1 was located within the region −325/−141 relative to the TSS and it was also located in the predicted CpG island. Mutational analysis and electrophoretic mobility shift assays demonstrated that E2F1, Sp1, KLF15 and E2F4 binding to the promoter region drives ACSL1 transcription. Together these interactions integrate and frame a key functional role for ACSL1 in mediating the lipid composition of beef. PMID:26782942

  20. Clinical relevance of short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (SCAD) deficiency: Exploring the role of new variants including the first SCAD-disease-causing allele carrying a synonymous mutation.

    PubMed

    Tonin, Rodolfo; Caciotti, Anna; Funghini, Silvia; Pasquini, Elisabetta; Mooney, Sean D; Cai, Binghuang; Proncopio, Elena; Donati, Maria Alice; Baronio, Federico; Bettocchi, Ilaria; Cassio, Alessandra; Biasucci, Giacomo; Bordugo, Andrea; la Marca, Giancarlo; Guerrini, Renzo; Morrone, Amelia

    2016-06-01

    Short-chain acyl-coA dehydrogenase deficiency (SCADD) is an autosomal recessive inborn error of mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation caused by ACADS gene alterations. SCADD is a heterogeneous condition, sometimes considered to be solely a biochemical condition given that it has been associated with variable clinical phenotypes ranging from no symptoms or signs to metabolic decompensation occurring early in life. A reason for this variability is due to SCAD alterations, such as the common p.Gly209Ser, that confer a disease susceptibility state but require a complex multifactorial/polygenic condition to manifest clinically. Our study focuses on 12 SCADD patients carrying 11 new ACADS variants, with the purpose of defining genotype-phenotype correlations based on clinical data, metabolite evaluation, molecular analyses, and in silico functional analyses. Interestingly, we identified a synonymous variant, c.765G > T (p.Gly255Gly) that influences ACADS mRNA splicing accuracy. mRNA characterisation demonstrated that this variant leads to an aberrant splicing product, harbouring a premature stop codon. Molecular analysis and in silico tools are able to characterise ACADS variants, identifying the severe mutations and consequently indicating which patients could benefit from a long term follow- up. We also emphasise that synonymous mutations can be relevant features and potentially associated with SCADD. PMID:27051597

  1. A Genetically Amenable Platensimycin- and Platencin- Overproducer as a Platform for Biosynthetic Explorations: a Showcase of PtmO4, a Long-Chain Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Rudolf, Jeffrey D.; Dong, Liao-Bin; Huang, Tingting; Shen, Ben

    2015-01-01

    Platensimycin (PTM) and platencin (PTN) are members of a new class of promising drug leads that target bacterial and mammalian fatty acid synthases. We previously cloned and sequenced the PTM and PTN gene clusters, discovered six additional PTM-PTN dual producing strains, and demonstrated the dramatic overproduction of PTM and PTN by inactivating the pathway-specific regulators ptmR1 or ptnR1 in four different strains. Our ability to utilize these PTM-PTN dual overproducing strains was limited by their lack of genetic amenability. Here we report the construction of Streptomyces platensis SB12029, a genetically amenable, in-frame ΔptmR1 dual PTM-PTN overproducing strain. To highlight the potential of this strain for future PTM and PTN biosynthetic studies, we created the ΔptmR1 ΔptmO4 double mutant S. platensis SB12030. Fourteen PTM and PTN congeners, ten of which were new, were isolated from SB12030, shedding new insights into PTM and PTN biosynthesis. PtmO4, a long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, is strongly implicated to catalyze β-oxidation of the diterpenoid intermediates in to the PTM and PTN scaffolds. SB12029 sets the stage for future biosynthetic and bioengineering studies of the PTM and PTN family of natural products. PMID:26055255

  2. Fluorescently labelled bovine acyl-CoA-binding protein acting as an acyl-CoA sensor: interaction with CoA and acyl-CoA esters and its use in measuring free acyl-CoA esters and non-esterified fatty acids.

    PubMed Central

    Wadum, Majken C T; Villadsen, Jens K; Feddersen, Søren; Møller, Rikke S; Neergaard, Thomas B F; Kragelund, Birthe B; Højrup, Peter; Faergeman, Nils J; Knudsen, Jens

    2002-01-01

    Long-chain acyl-CoA esters are key metabolites in lipid synthesis and beta-oxidation but, at the same time, are important regulators of intermediate metabolism, insulin secretion, vesicular trafficking and gene expression. Key tools in studying the regulatory functions of acyl-CoA esters are reliable methods for the determination of free acyl-CoA concentrations. No such method is presently available. In the present study, we describe the synthesis of two acyl-CoA sensors for measuring free acyl-CoA concentrations using acyl-CoA-binding protein as a scaffold. Met24 and Ala53 of bovine acyl-CoA-binding protein were replaced by cysteine residues, which were covalently modified with 6-bromoacetyl-2-dimethylaminonaphthalene to make the two fluorescent acyl-CoA indicators (FACIs) FACI-24 and FACI-53. FACI-24 and FACI-53 showed fluorescence emission maximum at 510 and 525 nm respectively, in the absence of ligand (excitation 387 nm). Titration of FACI-24 and FACI-53 with hexadecanoyl-CoA and dodecanoyl-CoA increased the fluorescence yield 5.5-and 4.7-fold at 460 and 495 nm respectively. FACI-24 exhibited a high, and similar increase in, fluorescence yield at 460 nm upon binding of C14-C20 saturated and unsaturated acyl-CoA esters. Both indicators bind long-chain (>C14) acyl-CoA esters with high specificity and affinity (K(d)=0.6-1.7 nM). FACI-53 showed a high fluorescence yield for C8-C12 acyl chains. It is shown that FACI-24 acts as a sensitive acyl-CoA sensor for measuring the concentration of free acyl-CoA, acyl-CoA synthetase activity and the concentrations of free fatty acids after conversion of the fatty acid into their respective acyl-CoA esters. PMID:12071849

  3. Simulation of the gel-fluid transition in a membrane composed of lipids with two connected acyl chains: application of a dimer-move step.

    PubMed Central

    Jerala, R; Almeida, P F; Biltonen, R L

    1996-01-01

    Phospholipids have been treated as dimers on a hexagonal lattice, and a move has been introduced that allows the dimers to move and change their orientation on the lattice. Simulations have been performed in which phospholipid chains have been treated as being either independent or infinitely coupled thermodynamically with regard to their conformational state. Both types of simulation have reproduced well experimental heat-capacity curves of dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine small unilamellar vesicles. Apart from a different gel-fluid interaction parameter and a different number of unlike nearest-neighbor contacts, most of the averages and thermodynamic quantities were essentially the same in the two types of simulation. These results indicate that the transition is not first order and validate those of previous Monte Carlo simulations that have neglected the dimeric nature of phospholipids in the sense that they show that for the thermotropic transition the approximation of phospholipids as monomers is valid. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 5 PMID:8842200

  4. Effect of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on the acyl-CoA synthetase activity toward medium-chain, long-chain and polyunsaturated fatty acids in mitochondria of mouse liver and brain.

    PubMed

    Kasuya, Fumiyo; Kazuhiro, Misumi; Tatsuya, Hasegawa; Nakamoto, Kazuo; Tokuyama, Shogo; Masuyama, Teiichi

    2013-02-01

    Effect of eleven non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on the acyl-CoA synthetase activities toward octanoic, palmitic, arachidonic and docosahexaenoic acids was evaluated in mouse liver and brain mitochondria. The drugs tested were aspirin, salicylic acid, diflunisal, mefenamic acid, indomethacin, etodolac, ibuprofen, ketoprofen, naproxen, loxoprofen, flurbiprofen. In mouse liver mitochondria, diflunisal and mefenamic acid exhibited the inhibitory activities not only for octanoic acid (IC(50) = 78.7 and 64.7 µM) and but also for palmitic acid (IC(50) = 236.5 and 284.4 µM), respectively. Aspirin was an inhibitor for the activation of octanoic acid only (IC(50) = 411.0 µM). In the brain, mefenamic acid and diflunisal inhibited strongly palmitoyl-CoA formation (IC(50) = 57.3 and 114.0 µM), respectively. The activation of docosahexaenoic acid in brain was sensitive to inhibition by diflunisal and mefenamic acid compared with liver. PMID:22299587

  5. Essential role of the donor acyl carrier protein in stereoselective chain translocation to a fully reducing module of the nanchangmycin polyketide synthase.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xun; Liu, Tiangang; Deng, Zixin; Cane, David E

    2012-01-31

    Incubation of recombinant module 2 of the polyether nanchangmycin synthase (NANS), carrying an appended thioesterase domain, with the ACP-bound substrate (2RS)-2-methyl-3-ketobutyryl-NANS_ACP1 (2-ACP1) and methylmalonyl-CoA in the presence of NADPH gave diastereomerically pure (2S,4R)-2,4-dimethyl-5-ketohexanoic acid (4a). These results contrast with the previously reported weak discrimination by NANS module 2+TE between the enantiomers of the corresponding N-acetylcysteamine-conjugated substrate analogue (±)-2-methyl-3-ketobutyryl-SNAC (2-SNAC), which resulted in formation of a 5:3 mixture of 4a and its (2S,4S)-diastereomer 4b. Incubation of NANS module 2+TE with 2-ACP1 in the absence of NADPH gave unreduced 3,5,6-trimethyl-4-hydroxypyrone (3) with a k(cat) of 4.4 ± 0.9 min⁻¹ and a k(cat)/K(m) of 67 min⁻¹ mM⁻¹, corresponding to a ∼2300-fold increase compared to the k(cat)/K(m) for the diffusive substrate 2-SNAC. Covalent tethering of the 2-methyl-3-ketobutyryl thioester substrate to the NANS ACP1 domain derived from the natural upstream PKS module of the nanchangmycin synthase significantly enhanced both the stereospecificity and the kinetic efficiency of the sequential polyketide chain translocation and condensation reactions catalyzed by the ketosynthase domain of NANS module 2. PMID:22229794

  6. Characterization of the Mycobacterial Acyl-CoA Carboxylase Holo Complexes Reveals Their Functional Expansion into Amino Acid Catabolism

    PubMed Central

    Ehebauer, Matthias T.; Zimmermann, Michael; Jakobi, Arjen J.; Noens, Elke E.; Laubitz, Daniel; Cichocki, Bogdan; Marrakchi, Hedia; Lanéelle, Marie-Antoinette; Daffé, Mamadou; Sachse, Carsten; Dziembowski, Andrzej; Sauer, Uwe; Wilmanns, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Biotin-mediated carboxylation of short-chain fatty acid coenzyme A esters is a key step in lipid biosynthesis that is carried out by multienzyme complexes to extend fatty acids by one methylene group. Pathogenic mycobacteria have an unusually high redundancy of carboxyltransferase genes and biotin carboxylase genes, creating multiple combinations of protein/protein complexes of unknown overall composition and functional readout. By combining pull-down assays with mass spectrometry, we identified nine binary protein/protein interactions and four validated holo acyl-coenzyme A carboxylase complexes. We investigated one of these - the AccD1-AccA1 complex from Mycobacterium tuberculosis with hitherto unknown physiological function. Using genetics, metabolomics and biochemistry we found that this complex is involved in branched amino-acid catabolism with methylcrotonyl coenzyme A as the substrate. We then determined its overall architecture by electron microscopy and found it to be a four-layered dodecameric arrangement that matches the overall dimensions of a distantly related methylcrotonyl coenzyme A holo complex. Our data argue in favor of distinct structural requirements for biotin-mediated γ-carboxylation of α−β unsaturated acid esters and will advance the categorization of acyl-coenzyme A carboxylase complexes. Knowledge about the underlying structural/functional relationships will be crucial to make the target category amenable for future biomedical applications. PMID:25695631

  7. Engineering a Disulfide Bond in the Lid Hinge Region of Rhizopus chinensis Lipase: Increased Thermostability and Altered Acyl Chain Length Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiao-Wei; Tan, Nian-Jiang; Xiao, Rong; Xu, Yan

    2012-01-01

    The key to enzyme function is the maintenance of an appropriate balance between molecular stability and structural flexibility. The lid domain which is very important for “interfacial activation” is the most flexible part in the lipase structure. In this work, rational design was applied to explore the relationship between lid rigidity and lipase activity by introducing a disulfide bond in the hinge region of the lid, in the hope of improving the thermostability of R. chinensis lipase through stabilization of the lid domain without interfering with its catalytic performance. A disulfide bridge between F95C and F214C was introduced into the lipase from R. chinensis in the hinge region of the lid according to the prediction of the “Disulfide by Design” algorithm. The disulfide variant showed substantially improved thermostability with an eleven-fold increase in the t1/2 value at 60°C and a 7°C increase of Tm compared with the parent enzyme, probably contributed by the stabilization of the geometric structure of the lid region. The additional disulfide bond did not interfere with the catalytic rate (kcat) and the catalytic efficiency towards the short-chain fatty acid substrate, however, the catalytic efficiency of the disulfide variant towards pNPP decreased by 1.5-fold probably due to the block of the hydrophobic substrate channel by the disulfide bond. Furthermore, in the synthesis of fatty acid methyl esters, the maximum conversion rate by RCLCYS reached 95% which was 9% higher than that by RCL. This is the first report on improving the thermostability of the lipase from R. chinensis by introduction of a disulfide bond in the lid hinge region without compromising the catalytic rate. PMID:23056295

  8. Enzymatic acylation of starch.

    PubMed

    Alissandratos, Apostolos; Halling, Peter J

    2012-07-01

    Starch a cheap, abundant and renewable natural material has been chemically modified for many years. The popular modification acylation has been used to adjust rheological properties as well as deliver polymers with internal plasticizers and other potential uses. However the harsh reaction conditions required to produce these esters may limit their use, especially in sensitive applications (foods, pharmaceuticals, etc.). The use of enzymes to catalyse acylation may provide a suitable alternative due to high selectivities and mild reaction conditions. Traditional hydrolase-catalysed synthesis in non-aqueous apolar media is hard due to lack of polysaccharide solubility. However, acylated starch derivatives have recently been successfully produced in other non-conventional systems: (a) surfactant-solubilised subtilisin and suspended amylose in organic media; (b) starch nanoparticles dispersed in organic medium with immobilised lipase; (c) aqueous starch gels with lipase and dispersed fatty acids. We attempt a systematic review that draws parallels between the seemingly unrelated approaches described. PMID:22138593

  9. Nonideal mixing and phase separation in phosphatidylcholine-phosphatidic acid mixtures as a function of acyl chain length and pH.

    PubMed Central

    Garidel, P; Johann, C; Blume, A

    1997-01-01

    The miscibilities of phosphatidic acids (PAs) and phosphatidylcholines (PCs) with different chain lengths (n = 14, 16) at pH 4, pH 7, and pH 12 were examined by differential scanning calorimetry. Simulation of heat capacity curves was performed using a new approach that incorporates changes of cooperativity of the transition in addition to nonideal mixing in the gel and the liquid-crystalline phase as a function of composition. From the simulations of the heat capacity curves, first estimates for the nonideality parameters for nonideal mixing as a function of composition were obtained, and phase diagrams were constructed using temperatures for onset and end of melting, which were corrected for the broadening effect caused by a decrease in cooperativity. In all cases the composition dependence of the nonideality parameters indicated nonsymmetrical mixing behavior. The phase diagrams were therefore further refined by simulations of the coexistence curves using a four-parameter approximation to account for nonideal and nonsymmetrical mixing in the gel and the liquid-crystalline phase. The mixing behavior was studied at three different pH values to investigate how changes in headgroup charge of the PA influences the miscibility. The experiments showed that at pH 7, where the PA component is negatively charged, the nonideality parameters are in most cases negative, indicating that electrostatic effects favor a mixing of the two components. Partial protonation of the PA component at pH 4 leads to strong changes in miscibility; the nonideality parameters for the liquid-crystalline phase are now in most cases positive, indicating clustering of like molecules. The phase diagram for 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidic acid:1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphorylcholine mixtures at pH 4 indicates that a fluid-fluid immiscibility is likely. The results show that a decrease in ionization of PAs can induce large changes in mixing behavior. This occurs because of a

  10. A pleiotropic element in the medium-chain acyl coenzyme A dehydrogenase gene promoter mediates transcriptional regulation by multiple nuclear receptor transcription factors and defines novel receptor-DNA binding motifs.

    PubMed Central

    Carter, M E; Gulick, T; Moore, D D; Kelly, D P

    1994-01-01

    We previously identified a complex regulatory element in the medium-chain acyl coenzyme A dehydrogenase gene promoter that confers transcriptional regulation by the retinoid receptors RAR and RXR and the orphan nuclear receptor HNF-4. In this study we demonstrate a trans-repressing regulatory function for the orphan receptor COUP-TF at this same nuclear receptor response element (NRRE-1). The transcriptional regulatory properties and receptor binding sequences of each nuclear receptor response element within NRRE-1 are also characterized. NRRE-1 consists of four potential nuclear hormone receptor hexamer binding sites, arranged as [<--1-(n)s-2-->-3-->(n)4<--4], three of which are used in alternative pairwise binding by COUP-TF and HNF-4 homodimers and by RAR-RXR heterodimers, as demonstrated by mobility shift assays and methylation interference analysis. Binding and transactivation studies with mutant NRRE-1 elements confirmed the existence of distinct retinoid, COUP-TF, and HNF-4 response elements that define novel receptor binding motifs: COUP-TF homodimers bound sites 1 and 3 (two hexamer repeat sequences arranged as an everted imperfect repeat separated by 14 bp or ER14), RAR-RXR heterodimers bound sites 1 and 2 (ER8), and HNF-4 homodimers bound sites 2 and 3 (imperfect DR0). Mixing cotransfection experiments demonstrated that the nuclear receptor dimers compete at NRRE-1 to modulate constitutive and ligand-mediated transcriptional activity. These data suggest a mechanism for the transcriptional modulation of genes encoding enzymes involved in cellular metabolism. Images PMID:8007945

  11. The capacity for long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid synthesis in a carnivorous vertebrate: Functional characterisation and nutritional regulation of a Fads2 fatty acyl desaturase with Δ4 activity and an Elovl5 elongase in striped snakehead (Channa striata).

    PubMed

    Kuah, Meng-Kiat; Jaya-Ram, Annette; Shu-Chien, Alexander Chong

    2015-03-01

    The endogenous production of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFA) in carnivorous teleost species inhabiting freshwater environments is poorly understood. Although a predatory lifestyle could potentially supply sufficient LC-PUFA to satisfy the requirements of these species, the nutrient-poor characteristics of the freshwater food web could impede this advantage. In this study, we report the cloning and functional characterisation of an elongase enzyme in the LC-PUFA biosynthesis pathway from striped snakehead (Channa striata), which is a strict freshwater piscivore that shows high deposition of LC-PUFA in its flesh. We also functionally characterised a previously isolated fatty acyl desaturase cDNA from this species. Results showed that the striped snakehead desaturase is capable of Δ4 and Δ5 desaturation activities, while the elongase showed the characteristics of Elovl5 elongases. Collectively, these findings reveal that striped snakehead exhibits the genetic resources to synthesise docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 22:6n-3) from eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA; 20:5n-3). Both genes are expressed at considerable levels in the brain and the liver. In liver, both genes were up-regulated by dietary C18 PUFA, although this increase did not correspond to a significant rise in the deposition of muscle LC-PUFA. Brain tissue of fish fed with plant oil diets showed higher expression of fads2 gene compared to fish fed with fish oil-based diet, which could ensure DHA levels remain constant under limited dietary DHA intake. This suggests the importance of DHA production from EPA via the ∆4 desaturation step in order to maintain an optimal reserve of DHA in the neuronal tissues of carnivores. PMID:25542509

  12. Structural Effects on Arthrobacter Methylene Hydroxylase Activity1

    PubMed Central

    Hayasaka, Steven; Klein, D. A.

    1971-01-01

    Arthrobacter 4-44-2 (ATCC 25581), capable of subterminal oxidation of n-hexadecane to 2-, 3-, and 4-alcoholic and ketonic products, was examined for the ability of this methylene hydroxylase capability to be induced and repressed and for structural relationships influencing methylene function oxidation. Induction was best carried out by use of n-alkanes from 10 to 16 carbons in length and was especially strong with methylcyclohexane among cyclic compounds tested. Induction was not observed with several related alcohols, 1-unsaturated compounds, or methoxy and ethoxy compounds tested. After induction, n-alkanes 14 and 16 carbons in length were transformed to the corresponding internal oxidation products; however, no activity was observed with even-carbon alkanes of shorter chain length. Hexadecene-1 and all alcohols tested, including cyclododecanol, were transformed to corresponding ketonic or aldehydic products. Cyclic compounds tested, including cyclododecane, were not oxidized by induced cells, suggesting that a methyl group plays a role in orientation of the substrate for the methylene hydroxylation but that the methyl function was not as critical after completion of the hydroxylation step regardless of structural configuration. Acetate strongly repressed induction of n-hexadecane methylene hydroxylase activity. Inducibility of methylene hydroxylase activity was confirmed by use of cell-free systems with methylcyclohexane as an inducer. A stimulation of methylene hydroxylase activity by addition of reduced pyridine nucleotides and ferrous ion was indicated. PMID:5139534

  13. Neurometabolic mechanisms for memory enhancement and neuroprotection of methylene blue

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Julio C.; Bruchey, Aleksandra K.; Gonzalez-Lima, F.

    2011-01-01

    This paper provides the first review of the memory-enhancing and neuroprotective metabolic mechanisms of action of methylene blue in vivo. These mechanisms have important implications as a new neurobiological approach to improve normal memory and to treat memory impairment and neurodegeneration associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. Methylene blue’s action is unique because its neurobiological effects are not determined by regular drug-receptor interactions or drug-response paradigms. Methylene blue shows a hormetic dose-response, with opposite effects at low and high doses. At low doses, methylene blue is an electron cycler in the mitochondrial electron transport chain, with unparalleled antioxidant and cell respiration-enhancing properties that affect the function of the nervous system in a versatile manner. A major role of the respiratory enzyme cytochrome oxidase on the memory-enhancing effects of methylene blue is supported by available data. The memory-enhancing effects have been associated with improvement of memory consolidation in a network-specific and use-dependent fashion. In addition, low doses of methylene blue have also been used for neuroprotection against mitochondrial dysfunction in humans and experimental models of disease. The unique auto-oxidizing property of methylene blue and its pleiotropic effects on a number of tissue oxidases explain its potent neuroprotective effects at low doses. The evidence reviewed supports a mechanistic role of low-dose methylene blue as a promising and safe intervention for improving memory and for the treatment of acute and chronic conditions characterized by increased oxidative stress, neurodegeneration and memory impairment. PMID:22067440

  14. Separation and quantification of 2-acyl-1-lysophospholipids and 1-acyl-2-lysophospholipids in biological samples by LC-MS/MS

    PubMed Central

    Okudaira, Michiyo; Inoue, Asuka; Shuto, Akira; Nakanaga, Keita; Kano, Kuniyuki; Makide, Kumiko; Saigusa, Daisuke; Tomioka, Yoshihisa; Aoki, Junken

    2014-01-01

    Lysophospholipids (LysoGPs) serve as lipid mediators and precursors for synthesis of diacyl phospholipids (GPs). LysoGPs detected in cells have various acyl chains attached at either the sn-1 or sn-2 position of the glycerol backbone. In general, acyl chains at the sn-2 position of 2-acyl-1-LysoGPs readily move to the sn-1 position, generating 1-acyl-2-lyso isomers by a nonenzymatic reaction called intra-molecular acyl migration, which has hampered the detection of 2-acyl-1-LysoGPs in biological samples. In this study, we developed a simple and versatile method to separate and quantify 2-acyl-1- and 1-acyl-2-LysoGPs. The main point of the method was to extract LysoGPs at pH 4 and 4°C, conditions that were found to completely eliminate the intra-molecular acyl migration. Under the present conditions, the relative amounts of 2-acyl-1-LysoGPs and 1-acyl-2-LysoGPs did not change at least for 1 week. Further, in LysoGPs extracted from cells and tissues under the present conditions, most of the saturated fatty acids (16:0 and 18:0) were found in the sn-1 position of LysoGPs, while most of the PUFAs (18:2, 20:4, 22:6) were found in the sn-2 position. Thus the method can be used to elucidate the in vivo role of 2-acyl-1-LysoGPs. PMID:25114169

  15. The natural history of elevated tetradecenoyl-L-carnitine detected by newborn screening in New Zealand: implications for very long chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency screening and treatment.

    PubMed

    Ryder, Bryony; Knoll, Detlef; Love, Donald R; Shepherd, Phillip; Love, Jennifer M; Reed, Peter W; de Hora, Mark; Webster, Dianne; Glamuzina, Emma; Wilson, Callum

    2016-05-01

    Very long chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (VLCADD, OMIM #201475) has been increasingly diagnosed since the advent of expanded newborn screening (NBS). Elevated levels of tetradecenoyl-L-carnitine (C14:1) in newborn screening blood spot samples are particularly common in New Zealand, however this has not translated into increased VLCADD clinical presentations. A high proportion of screen-positive cases in NZ are of Maori or Pacific ethnicity and positive for the c.1226C > T (p.Thr409Met) ACADVL gene variant. We performed a retrospective, blinded, case-control study of 255 cases, born between 2006 and 2013, with elevated NBS C14:1 levels between 0.9 and 2.4 μmol/L, below the NZ C14:1 notification cut-off of 2.5 μmol/L. Coded healthcare records were audited for cases and age- and ethnicity- matched controls. The clinical records of those with possible VLCADD-related symptoms were reviewed. The follow-up period was 6 months to 7 years. Two of 247 cases (0.8 %) had possible VLCADD-like symptoms while four of 247 controls (2 %) had VLCADD-like symptoms (p = 0.81). Maori were overrepresented (68 % of the cohort vs 15 % of population). Targeted analysis of the c.1226 locus revealed the local increase in screening C14:1 levels is associated with the c.1226C > T variant (97/152 alleles tested), found predominantly in Maori and Pacific people. There was no increase in clinically significant childhood disease, irrespective of ethnicity. The study suggests that children with elevated C14:1, between 0.9-2.4 μmol/L, on NBS are at very low risk of clinically significant childhood disease. A minimally interventional approach to managing these patients is indicated, at least in the New Zealand population. PMID:26743058

  16. Acyl-acyl carrier protein: Lysomonogalactosyldiacylglycerol acyl transferase in Anabaena variabilis

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H.H.

    1989-01-01

    Monogalactosyldiacylglycerol was produced when membranes isolated from the cyanobacterium, Anabaena variabilis, and washed free of soluble endogenous constituents, were incubated with ({sup 14}C)acyl-acyl carrier protein. This enzymatic synthesis of monogalactosyldiacylglycerol localized in the membranes was not dependent on any added cofactors, such as ATP, coenzyme A, and dithiothreitol. Palmitoyl-, stearoyl-, and oleoyl-acyl carrier proteins were approximately equally active as substrates with Km of 0.37, 0.36, and 0.23 {mu}M, respectively. The ({sup 14}C)acyl group was exclusively transferred to the sn-1 hydroxyl of the glycerol backbone of monogalactosyldiacylglycerol as demonstrated by hydrolysis of all incorporated acyl groups by the lipase from Rhizopus arrhizus delamar. Using a double labelled ({sup 14}C)acyl-({sup 14}C)acyl carrier protein, this enzyme catalyzed the direct transfer of the acyl group from acyl-acyl carrier protein to an endogenous lysomonogalactosyldiacylglycerol to form monogalactosyldiacylglycerol. The transfer reaction mechanism was also confirmed by the increased activity with the addition of the lysomonogalactosyldiacylglycerol suspension. A specific galactolipid acyl hydrolase activity was released into the soluble protein fraction when the membranes of Anabaena variabilis were treated with 2% Triton X-100. The positional specificity of this acyl hydrolase was demonstrated to be similar to that of Rhizopus lipase, i.e. only the acyl group at the sn-1 position was hydrolyzed. The acyl hydrolase which was also localized in the membrane fraction of Anabaena variabilis was presumably responsible for producing endogenous lysomonogalactosyldiacylglycerol used by the acyltransferase.

  17. Plant Microsomal Phospholipid Acyl Hydrolases Have Selectivities for Uncommon Fatty Acids.

    PubMed Central

    Stahl, U.; Banas, A.; Stymne, S.

    1995-01-01

    Developing endosperms and embryos accumulating triacylglycerols rich in caproyl (decanoyl) groups (i.e. developing embryos of Cuphea procumbens and Ulmus glabra) had microsomal acyl hydrolases with high selectivities toward phosphatidylcholine with this acyl group. Similarly, membranes from Euphorbia lagascae and Ricinus communis endosperms, which accumulate triacylglycerols with vernoleate (12-epoxy-octadeca-9-enoate) and ricinoleate (12-hydroxy-octadeca-9-enoate), respectively, had acyl hydrolases that selectively removed their respective oxygenated acyl group from the phospholipids. The activities toward phospholipid substrates with epoxy, hydroxy, and medium-chain acyl groups varied greatly between microsomal preparations from different plant species. Epoxidated and hydroxylated acyl groups in sn-1 and sn-2 positions of phosphatidylcholine and in sn-1-lysophosphatidylcholine were hydrolyzed to a similar extent, whereas the hydrolysis of caproyl groups was highly dependent on the positional localization. PMID:12228415

  18. Acyl-acyl carrier protein as a source of fatty acids for bacterial bioluminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Byers, D.M.; Meighen, E.A.

    1985-09-01

    Pulse-chase experiments with (/sup 3/H)tetradecanoic acid and ATP showed that the bioluminescence-related 32-kDa acyltransferase from Vibrio harveyi can specifically catalyze the deacylation of a /sup 3/H-labeled 18-kDa protein observed in extracts of this bacterium. The 18-kDa protein has been partially purified and its physical and chemical properties strongly indicate that it is fatty acyl-acyl carrier protein (acyl-ACP). Both this V. harveyi (/sup 3/H)acylprotein and (/sup 3/H)palmitoyl-ACP from Escherichia coli were substrates in vitro for either the V. harveyi 32-kDa acyltransferase or the analogous enzyme (34K) from Photobacterium phosphoreum. TLC analysis indicated that the hexane-soluble product of the reaction is fatty acid. No significant cleavage of either E. coli or V. harveyi tetradecanoyl-ACP was observed in extracts of these bacteria unless the 32-kDa or 34K acyltransferase was present. Since these enzymes are believed to be responsible for the supply of fatty acids for reduction to form the aldehyde substrate of luciferase, the above results suggest that long-chain acyl-ACP is the source of fatty acids for bioluminescence.

  19. Long-Chain Fatty Acid Oxidation Disorders (LC-FAOD) Extension Study for Subjects Previously Enrolled in Triheptanoin Studies.

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-26

    Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase (CPT I or CPT II) Deficiency; Very Long Chain Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase (VLCAD) Deficiency; Long-chain 3-hydroxy-acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase (LCHAD) Deficiency; Trifunctional Protein (TFP) Deficiency; Carnitine-acylcarnitine Translocase (CACT) Deficiency

  20. Methylene blue related sterile endophthalmitis.

    PubMed

    Lim, A K E; Ulagantheran V, V; Siow, Y C; Lim, K S

    2008-08-01

    To report a case of methylene blue related endophthalmitis. Observational case report. Review of clinical record, photographs. A 60 year old man developed endophthalmitis after methylene blue was accidentally used to stain the anterior capsule during phacoemulsification of cataract. His left visual acuity deteriorated from 6/12 to 6/36 two weeks after the operation. Despite intensive treatment with topical and intravitreal antibiotics, his condition deteriorated. A vitrectomy and silicone oil injection eventually managed to control the progression of the disease and salvage the eye. However the visual outcome remained poor due to corneal decompensation and retinal ischemia. Both vitreous tap and vitreous biopsy were negative for any organism. Methylene blue is extremely toxic to ocular structures and should not be used intraocularly. PMID:19248701

  1. Acyl migration kinetics of vegetable oil 1,2-diacylglycerols

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The acyl migration kinetics of long-chain 1,2-diacylglycerol (1,2-DAG) to form 1,3-diacylglycerol (1,3-DAG) over the temperature range of 25 to 80 degrees Celsius were examined using proton NMR spectroscopy. The 1,2-DAG mole fraction of 0.32 at equilibrium was found to be insensitive to temperature...

  2. The 2.1Å Crystal Structure of an Acyl-CoA Synthetase from Methanosarcina acetivorans reveals an alternate acyl binding pocket for small branched acyl substrates†,‡

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Manish B.; Ingram-Smith, Cheryl; Cooper, Leroy L.; Qu, Jun; Meng, Yu; Smith, Kerry S.; Gulick, Andrew M.

    2009-01-01

    The acyl-AMP forming family of adenylating enzymes catalyze two-step reactions to activate a carboxylate with the chemical energy derived from ATP hydrolysis. X-ray crystal structures have been determined for multiple members of this family and, together with biochemical studies, provide insights into the active site and catalytic mechanisms used by these enzymes. These studies have shown that the enzymes use a domain rotation of 140° to reconfigure a single active site to catalyze the two partial reactions. We present here the crystal structure of a new medium chain acyl-CoA synthetase from Methanosarcina acetivorans. The binding pocket for the three substrates is analyzed, with many conserved residues present in the AMP binding pocket. The CoA binding pocket is compared to the pockets of both acetyl-CoA synthetase and 4-chlorobenzoate:CoA ligase. Most interestingly, the acyl binding pocket of the new structure is compared with other acyl- and aryl-CoA synthetases. A comparison of the acyl-binding pocket of the acyl-CoA synthetase from M. acetivorans with other structures identifies a shallow pocket that is used to bind the medium chain carboxylates. These insights emphasize the high sequence and structural diversity among this family in the area of the acyl binding pocket. PMID:19544569

  3. Efficient free fatty acid production in Escherichia coli using plant acyl-ACP thioesterases.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiujun; Li, Mai; Agrawal, Arpita; San, Ka-Yiu

    2011-11-01

    Microbial biosynthesis of fatty acid-like chemicals from renewable carbon sources has attracted significant attention in recent years. Free fatty acids can be used as precursors for the production of fuels or chemicals. Free fatty acids can be produced by introducing an acyl-acyl carrier protein thioesterase gene into Escherichia coli. The presence of the acyl-ACP thioesterase will break the fatty acid elongation cycle and release free fatty acid. Depending on their sequence similarity and substrate specificity, class FatA thioesterase is active on unsaturated acyl-ACPs and class FatB prefers saturated acyl group. Different acyl-ACP thioesterases have different degrees of chain length specificity. Although some of these enzymes have been characterized from a number of sources, information on their ability to produce free fatty acid in microbial cells has not been extensively examined until recently. In this study, we examined the effect of the overexpression of acyl-ACP thioesterase genes from Diploknema butyracea, Gossypium hirsutum, Ricinus communis and Jatropha curcas on free fatty acid production. In particular, we are interested in studying the effect of different acyl-ACP thioesterase on the quantities and compositions of free fatty acid produced by an E. coli strain ML103 carrying these constructs. It is shown that the accumulation of free fatty acid depends on the acyl-ACP thioesterase used. The strain carrying the acyl-ACP thioesterase gene from D. butyracea produced approximately 0.2g/L of free fatty acid while the strains carrying the acyl-ACP thioesterase genes from R. communis and J. curcas produced the most free fatty acid at a high level of more than 2.0 g/L at 48 h. These two strains accumulated three major straight chain free fatty acids, C14, C16:1 and C16 at levels about 40%, 35% and 20%, respectively. PMID:22001432

  4. Acylation of Ferrocene: A Greener Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birdwhistell, Kurt R.; Nguyen, Andy; Ramos, Eric J.; Kobelja, Robert

    2008-01-01

    The acylation of ferrocene is a common reaction used in organic laboratories to demonstrate Friedel-Crafts acylation and the purification of compounds using column chromatography. This article describes an acylation of ferrocene experiment that is more eco-friendly than the conventional acylation experiment. The traditional experiment was modified…

  5. Exogenous myristic acid can be partially degraded prior to activation to form acyl-acyl carrier protein intermediates and lipid A in Vibrio harveyi.

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Z; Byers, D M

    1994-01-01

    To study the involvement of acyl carrier protein (ACP) in the metabolism of exogenous fatty acids in Vibrio harveyi, cultures were incubated in minimal medium with [9,10-3H]myristic acid, and labeled proteins were analyzed by gel electrophoresis. Labeled acyl-ACP was positively identified by immunoprecipitation with anti-V. harveyi ACP serum and comigration with acyl-ACP standards and [3H]beta-alanine-labeled bands on both sodium dodecyl sulfate- and urea-polyacrylamide gels. Surprisingly, most of the acyl-ACP label corresponded to fatty acid chain lengths of less than 14 carbons: C14, C12, C10, and C8 represented 33, 40, 14, and 8% of total [3H]14:0-derived acyl-ACPs, respectively, in a dark mutant (M17) of V. harveyi which lacks myristoyl-ACP esterase activity; however, labeled 14:0-ACP was absent in the wild-type strain. 14:0- and 12:0-ACP were also the predominant species labeled in complex medium. In contrast, short-chain acyl-ACPs (< or = C6) were the major labeled derivatives when V. harveyi was incubated with [3H]acetate, indicating that acyl-ACP labeling with [3H]14:0 in vivo is not due to the total degradation of [3H]14:0 to [3H]acetyl coenzyme A followed by resynthesis. Cerulenin increased the mass of medium- to long-chain acyl-ACPs (> or = C8) labeled with [3H]beta-alanine fivefold, while total incorporation of [3H]14:0 was not affected, although a shift to shorter chain lengths was noted. Additional bands which comigrated with acyl-ACP on sodium dodecyl sulfate gels were identified as lipopolysaccharide by acid hydrolysis and thin-layer chromatography. The levels of incorporation of [3H] 14:0 into acyl-ACP and lipopolysaccharide were 2 and 15%, respectively, of that into phospholipid by 10 min. Our results indicate that in contrast to the situation in Escherichia coli, exogenous fatty acids can be activated to acyl-ACP intermediates after partial degradation in V. harveyi and can effectively label products (i.e., lipid A) that require ACP as an acyl

  6. The mechanism of acyl specific phospholipid remodeling by tafazzin

    PubMed Central

    Schlame, Michael; Acehan, Devrim; Berno, Bob; Xu, Yang; Valvo, Salvatore; Ren, Mindong; Stokes, David L.; Epand, Richard M.

    2013-01-01

    Cardiolipin is a mitochondrial phospholipid with a characteristic acyl chain composition that depends on the function of tafazzin, a phospholipid-lysophospholipid transacylase, although the enzyme itself lacks acyl specificity. We incubated isolated tafazzin with various mixtures of phospholipids and lysophospholipids, characterized the lipid phase by 31P-NMR, and measured newly formed molecular species by mass spectrometry. Significant transacylation was observed only in non-bilayer lipid aggregates and the substrate specificity was highly sensitive to the lipid phase. In particular, tetralinoleoyl-cardiolipin, a prototype molecular species, formed only under conditions that favor the inverted hexagonal phase. In isolated mitochondria, <1 percent of lipids participated in transacylations, suggesting that the action of tafazzin is limited to privileged lipid domains. We propose that tafazzin reacts with non-bilayer type lipid domains that occur in curved or hemifused membrane zones, and that acyl specificity is driven by the packing properties of these domains. PMID:22941046

  7. N-Acylation During Glidobactin Biosynthesis by the Tridomain Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase Module GlbF

    PubMed Central

    Imker, Heidi J.; Krahn, Daniel; Clerc, Jérôme; Kaiser, Markus; Walsh, Christopher T.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Glidobactins are hybrid NRPS-PKS natural products that function as irreversible proteasome inhibitors. A variety of medium chain 2(E),4(E)-diene fatty acids N-acylate the peptidolactam core and contribute significantly to the potency of proteasome inhibition. We have expressed the initiation NRPS module GlbF (C-A-T) in Escherichia coli and observe soluble active protein only on co-expression with the 8 kDa MbtH-like protein, GlbE. Following adenylation and installation of Thr as a T-domain thioester, the starter condensation domain utilizes fatty acyl-CoA donors to acylate the Thr1 amino group and generate the fatty acyl-Thr1-S-pantetheinyl-GlbF intermediate to be used in subsequent chain elongation. Previously proposed to be mediated via acyl carrier protein fatty acid donors, direct utilization of fatty acyl-CoA donors for N-acylation of T-domain tethered amino acids is likely a common strategy for chain initiation in NRPS-mediated lipopeptide biosynthesis. PMID:21035730

  8. An Open-label Phase 2 Study of UX007 (Triheptanoin) in Subjects With Long-Chain Fatty Acid Oxidation Disorders (LC-FAOD)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-15

    Long-chain Fatty Acid Oxidation Disorders (LC-FAOD); Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase (CPT II) Deficiency; Very Long Chain Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase (VLCAD) Deficiency; Longchain 3-hydroxy-acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase (LCHAD) Deficiency; Trifunctional Protein (TFP) Deficiency

  9. Two fatty acyl reductases involved in moth pheromone biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Antony, Binu; Ding, Bao-Jian; Moto, Ken'Ichi; Aldosari, Saleh A; Aldawood, Abdulrahman S

    2016-01-01

    Fatty acyl reductases (FARs) constitute an evolutionarily conserved gene family found in all kingdoms of life. Members of the FAR gene family play diverse roles, including seed oil synthesis, insect pheromone biosynthesis, and mammalian wax biosynthesis. In insects, FAR genes dedicated to sex pheromone biosynthesis (pheromone-gland-specific fatty acyl reductase, pgFAR) form a unique clade that exhibits substantial modifications in gene structure and possesses unique specificity and selectivity for fatty acyl substrates. Highly selective and semi-selective 'single pgFARs' produce single and multicomponent pheromone signals in bombycid, pyralid, yponomeutid and noctuid moths. An intriguing question is how a 'single reductase' can direct the synthesis of several fatty alcohols of various chain lengths and isomeric forms. Here, we report two active pgFARs in the pheromone gland of Spodoptera, namely a semi-selective, C14:acyl-specific pgFAR and a highly selective, C16:acyl-specific pgFAR, and demonstrate that these pgFARs play a pivotal role in the formation of species-specific signals, a finding that is strongly supported by functional gene expression data. The study envisages a new area of research for disclosing evolutionary changes associated with C14- and C16-specific FARs in moth pheromone biosynthesis. PMID:27427355

  10. Two fatty acyl reductases involved in moth pheromone biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Antony, Binu; Ding, Bao-Jian; Moto, Ken’Ichi; Aldosari, Saleh A.; Aldawood, Abdulrahman S.

    2016-01-01

    Fatty acyl reductases (FARs) constitute an evolutionarily conserved gene family found in all kingdoms of life. Members of the FAR gene family play diverse roles, including seed oil synthesis, insect pheromone biosynthesis, and mammalian wax biosynthesis. In insects, FAR genes dedicated to sex pheromone biosynthesis (pheromone-gland-specific fatty acyl reductase, pgFAR) form a unique clade that exhibits substantial modifications in gene structure and possesses unique specificity and selectivity for fatty acyl substrates. Highly selective and semi-selective ‘single pgFARs’ produce single and multicomponent pheromone signals in bombycid, pyralid, yponomeutid and noctuid moths. An intriguing question is how a ‘single reductase’ can direct the synthesis of several fatty alcohols of various chain lengths and isomeric forms. Here, we report two active pgFARs in the pheromone gland of Spodoptera, namely a semi-selective, C14:acyl-specific pgFAR and a highly selective, C16:acyl-specific pgFAR, and demonstrate that these pgFARs play a pivotal role in the formation of species-specific signals, a finding that is strongly supported by functional gene expression data. The study envisages a new area of research for disclosing evolutionary changes associated with C14- and C16-specific FARs in moth pheromone biosynthesis. PMID:27427355

  11. Regioselective self-acylating cyclodextrins in organic solvent

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Eunae; Yun, Deokgyu; Jeong, Daham; Im, Jieun; Kim, Hyunki; Dindulkar, Someshwar D.; Choi, Youngjin; Jung, Seunho

    2016-01-01

    Amphiphilic cyclodextrins have been synthesized with self-acylating reaction using vinyl esters in dimethylformamide. In the present study no base, catalyst, or enzyme was used, and the structural analyses using thin layer chromatography, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and mass spectrometry show that the cyclodextrin is substituted preferentially by one acyl moiety at the C2 position of the glucose unit, suggesting that cyclodextrin functions as a regioselective catalytic carbohydrate in organic solvent. In the self-acylation, the most acidic OH group at the 2-position and the inclusion complexing ability of cyclodextrin were considered to be significant. The substrate preference was also observed in favor of the long-chain acyl group, which could be attributed to the inclusion ability of cyclodextrin cavity. Furthermore, using the model amphiphilic building block, 2-O-mono-lauryl β-cyclodextrin, the self-organized supramolecular architecture with nano-vesicular morphology in water was investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy. The cavity-type nano-assembled vesicle and the novel synthetic methods for the preparation of mono-acylated cyclodextrin should be of great interest with regard to drug/gene delivery systems, functional surfactants, and carbohydrate derivatization methods. PMID:27020946

  12. Regioselective self-acylating cyclodextrins in organic solvent.

    PubMed

    Cho, Eunae; Yun, Deokgyu; Jeong, Daham; Im, Jieun; Kim, Hyunki; Dindulkar, Someshwar D; Choi, Youngjin; Jung, Seunho

    2016-01-01

    Amphiphilic cyclodextrins have been synthesized with self-acylating reaction using vinyl esters in dimethylformamide. In the present study no base, catalyst, or enzyme was used, and the structural analyses using thin layer chromatography, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and mass spectrometry show that the cyclodextrin is substituted preferentially by one acyl moiety at the C2 position of the glucose unit, suggesting that cyclodextrin functions as a regioselective catalytic carbohydrate in organic solvent. In the self-acylation, the most acidic OH group at the 2-position and the inclusion complexing ability of cyclodextrin were considered to be significant. The substrate preference was also observed in favor of the long-chain acyl group, which could be attributed to the inclusion ability of cyclodextrin cavity. Furthermore, using the model amphiphilic building block, 2-O-mono-lauryl β-cyclodextrin, the self-organized supramolecular architecture with nano-vesicular morphology in water was investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy. The cavity-type nano-assembled vesicle and the novel synthetic methods for the preparation of mono-acylated cyclodextrin should be of great interest with regard to drug/gene delivery systems, functional surfactants, and carbohydrate derivatization methods. PMID:27020946

  13. Regioselective self-acylating cyclodextrins in organic solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Eunae; Yun, Deokgyu; Jeong, Daham; Im, Jieun; Kim, Hyunki; Dindulkar, Someshwar D.; Choi, Youngjin; Jung, Seunho

    2016-03-01

    Amphiphilic cyclodextrins have been synthesized with self-acylating reaction using vinyl esters in dimethylformamide. In the present study no base, catalyst, or enzyme was used, and the structural analyses using thin layer chromatography, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and mass spectrometry show that the cyclodextrin is substituted preferentially by one acyl moiety at the C2 position of the glucose unit, suggesting that cyclodextrin functions as a regioselective catalytic carbohydrate in organic solvent. In the self-acylation, the most acidic OH group at the 2-position and the inclusion complexing ability of cyclodextrin were considered to be significant. The substrate preference was also observed in favor of the long-chain acyl group, which could be attributed to the inclusion ability of cyclodextrin cavity. Furthermore, using the model amphiphilic building block, 2-O-mono-lauryl β-cyclodextrin, the self-organized supramolecular architecture with nano-vesicular morphology in water was investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy. The cavity-type nano-assembled vesicle and the novel synthetic methods for the preparation of mono-acylated cyclodextrin should be of great interest with regard to drug/gene delivery systems, functional surfactants, and carbohydrate derivatization methods.

  14. Anti-proliferative effects of O-acyl-low-molecular-weight heparin derivatives on bovine pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Hari G.; Mrabat, Hicham; Yu, Lunyin; Hales, Charles A.; Li, Boyangzi; Moore, Casey N.; Zhang, Fuming; Linhardt, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    Heparin (HP) inhibits the growth of several cell types in vitro including bovine pulmonary artery (BPA) smooth muscle cells (SMCs). In initial studies we discovered that an O-hexanoylated low-molecular-weight (LMW) HP derivative having acyl groups with 6-carbon chain length was more potent inhibitor of BPA-SMCs than the starting HP. We prepared several O-acylated LMWHP derivatives having 4-, 6-, 8-, 10-, 12-, and 18- carbon acyl chain lengths to determine the optimal acyl chain length for maximum anti-proliferative properties of BPA-SMCs. The starting LMWHP was prepared from unfractionated HP by sodium periodate treatment followed by sodium borohydride reduction. The tri-n-butylammonium salt of this LMWHP was O-acylated with butanoic, hexanoic, octanoic, decanoic, dodecanoic, and stearyl anhydrides separately to give respective O-acylated LMWHP derivatives. Gradient polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) was used to examine the average molecular weights of those O-acylated LMWHP derivatives. NMR analysis indicated the presence of one O-acyl group per disaccharide residue. Measurement of the inhibition of BPA-SMCS as a function of O-acyl chain length shows two optima, at a carbon chain length of 6 (O-hexanoylated LMWHP) and at a carbon chain length 12–18 (O-dodecanoyl and O-stearyl LMWHPs). A solution competition SPR study was performed to test the ability of different O-acylated LMWHP derivatives to inhibit fibroblast growth factor (FGF) 1 and FGF2 binding to surface-immobilized heparin. All the LMWHP derivatives bound to FGF1 and FGF2 but each exhibited slightly different binding affinity. PMID:21773727

  15. Acylation Type Determines Ghrelin's Effects on Energy Homeostasis in Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Heppner, Kristy M.; Chaudhary, Nilika; Müller, Timo D.; Kirchner, Henriette; Habegger, Kirk M.; Ottaway, Nickki; Smiley, David L.; DiMarchi, Richard; Hofmann, Susanna M.; Woods, Stephen C.; Sivertsen, Bjørn; Holst, Birgitte; Pfluger, Paul T.; Perez-Tilve, Diego

    2012-01-01

    Ghrelin is a gastrointestinal polypeptide that acts through the ghrelin receptor (GHSR) to promote food intake and increase adiposity. Activation of GHSR requires the presence of a fatty-acid (FA) side chain on amino acid residue serine 3 of the ghrelin molecule. However, little is known about the role that the type of FA used for acylation plays in the biological action of ghrelin. We therefore evaluated a series of differentially acylated peptides to determine whether alterations in length or stability of the FA side chain have an impact on the ability of ghrelin to activate GHSR in vitro or to differentially alter food intake, body weight, and body composition in vivo. Fatty acids principally available in the diet (such as palmitate C16) and therefore representing potential substrates for the ghrelin-activating enzyme ghrelin O-acyltransferase (GOAT) were used for dose-, time-, and administration/route-dependent effects of ghrelin on food intake, body weight, and body composition in rats and mice. Our data demonstrate that altering the length of the FA side chain of ghrelin results in the differential activation of GHSR. Additionally, we found that acylation of ghrelin with a long-chain FA (C16) delays the acute central stimulation of food intake. Lastly, we found that, depending on acylation length, systemic and central chronic actions of ghrelin on adiposity can be enhanced or reduced. Together our data suggest that modification of the FA side-chain length can be a novel approach to modulate the efficacy of pharmacologically administered ghrelin. PMID:22865372

  16. Palmitoyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) thioesterase and the evolutionary origin of plant acyl-ACP thioesterases.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, A; Davies, H M; Voelker, T A

    1995-01-01

    Acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) thioesterases play an essential role in chain termination during de novo fatty acid synthesis and in the channeling of carbon flux between the two lipid biosynthesis pathways in plants. We have discovered that there are two distinct but related thioesterase gene classes in higher plants, termed FatA and FatB, whose evolutionary divergence appears to be ancient. FatA encodes the already described 18:1-ACP thioesterase. In contrast, FatB representatives encode thioesterases preferring acyl-ACPs having saturated acyl groups. We unexpectedly obtained a 16:0-ACP thioesterase cDNA from Cuphea hookeriana seed, which accumulate predominantly 8:0 and 10:0. The 16:0 thioesterase transcripts were found in non-seed tissues, and expression in transgenic Brassica napus led to the production of a 16:0-rich oil. We present evidence that this type of FatB gene is ancient and ubiquitous in plants and that specialized plant medium-chain thioesterases have evolved independently from such enzymes several times during angiosperm evolution. Also, the ubiquitous 18:1-ACP thioesterase appears to be a derivative of a 16:0 thioesterase. PMID:7734968

  17. Metabolic alkene labeling and in vitro detection of histone acylation via the aqueous oxidative Heck reaction

    PubMed Central

    Ourailidou, Maria E.; Dockerty, Paul; Witte, Martin; Poelarends, Gerrit J.; Dekker, Frank J.

    2016-01-01

    The detection of protein lysine acylations remains a challenge due to a lack of specific antibodies for acylations with various chain lengths. This problem can be addressed by metabolic labeling techniques using carboxylates with reactive functionalities. Subsequent chemoselective reactions with a complementary moiety connected to a detection tag enable the visualization and quantification of the protein lysine acylome. In this study, we present EDTA-Pd(II) as a novel catalyst for the oxidative Heck reaction on protein-bound alkenes, which allows employment of fully aqueous reaction conditions. We used this reaction to monitor histone lysine acylation in vitro after metabolic incorporation of olefinic carboxylates as chemical reporters. PMID:25672493

  18. Remote control of regioselectivity in acyl-acyl carrier protein-desaturases

    PubMed Central

    Guy, Jodie E.; Whittle, Edward; Moche, Martin; Lengqvist, Johan; Lindqvist, Ylva; Shanklin, John

    2011-01-01

    Regiospecific desaturation of long-chain saturated fatty acids has been described as approaching the limits of the discriminatory power of enzymes because the substrate entirely lacks distinguishing features close to the site of dehydrogenation. To identify the elusive mechanism underlying regioselectivity, we have determined two crystal structures of the archetypal Δ9 desaturase from castor in complex with acyl carrier protein (ACP), which show the bound ACP ideally situated to position C9 and C10 of the acyl chain adjacent to the diiron active site for Δ9 desaturation. Analysis of the structures and modeling of the complex between the highly homologous ivy Δ4 desaturase and ACP, identified a residue located at the entrance to the binding cavity, Asp280 in the castor desaturase (Lys275 in the ivy desaturase), which is strictly conserved within Δ9 and Δ4 enzymes but differs between them. We hypothesized that interaction between Lys275 and the phosphate of the pantetheine, seen in the ivy model, is key to positioning C4 and C5 adjacent to the diiron center for Δ4 desaturation. Mutating castor Asp280 to Lys resulted in a major shift from Δ9 to Δ4 desaturation. Thus, interaction between desaturase side-chain 280 and phospho-serine 38 of ACP, approximately 27 Å from the site of double-bond formation, predisposes ACP binding that favors either Δ9 or Δ4 desaturation via repulsion (acidic side chain) or attraction (positively charged side chain), respectively. Understanding the mechanism underlying remote control of regioselectivity provides the foundation for reengineering desaturase enzymes to create designer chemical feedstocks that would provide alternatives to those currently obtained from petrochemicals. PMID:21930947

  19. Remote control of regioselectivity in acyl-acyl carrier protein-desaturases.

    PubMed

    Guy, Jodie E; Whittle, Edward; Moche, Martin; Lengqvist, Johan; Lindqvist, Ylva; Shanklin, John

    2011-10-01

    Regiospecific desaturation of long-chain saturated fatty acids has been described as approaching the limits of the discriminatory power of enzymes because the substrate entirely lacks distinguishing features close to the site of dehydrogenation. To identify the elusive mechanism underlying regioselectivity, we have determined two crystal structures of the archetypal Δ9 desaturase from castor in complex with acyl carrier protein (ACP), which show the bound ACP ideally situated to position C9 and C10 of the acyl chain adjacent to the diiron active site for Δ9 desaturation. Analysis of the structures and modeling of the complex between the highly homologous ivy Δ4 desaturase and ACP, identified a residue located at the entrance to the binding cavity, Asp280 in the castor desaturase (Lys275 in the ivy desaturase), which is strictly conserved within Δ9 and Δ4 enzymes but differs between them. We hypothesized that interaction between Lys275 and the phosphate of the pantetheine, seen in the ivy model, is key to positioning C4 and C5 adjacent to the diiron center for Δ4 desaturation. Mutating castor Asp280 to Lys resulted in a major shift from Δ9 to Δ4 desaturation. Thus, interaction between desaturase side-chain 280 and phospho-serine 38 of ACP, approximately 27 Å from the site of double-bond formation, predisposes ACP binding that favors either Δ9 or Δ4 desaturation via repulsion (acidic side chain) or attraction (positively charged side chain), respectively. Understanding the mechanism underlying remote control of regioselectivity provides the foundation for reengineering desaturase enzymes to create designer chemical feedstocks that would provide alternatives to those currently obtained from petrochemicals. PMID:21930947

  20. Structural basis for acyl-group discrimination by human Gcn5L2

    PubMed Central

    Ringel, Alison E.; Wolberger, Cynthia

    2016-01-01

    Gcn5 is a conserved acetyltransferase that regulates transcription by acetylating the N-terminal tails of histones. Motivated by recent studies identifying a chemically diverse array of lysine acyl modifications in vivo, the acyl-chain specificity of the acetyltransferase human Gcn5 (Gcn5L2) was examined. Whereas Gcn5L2 robustly catalyzes lysine acetylation, the acyltransferase activity of Gcn5L2 becomes progressively weaker with increasing acyl-chain length. To understand how Gcn5 discriminates between different acyl-CoA molecules, structures of the catalytic domain of human Gcn5L2 bound to propionyl-CoA and butyryl-CoA were determined. Although the active site of Gcn5L2 can accommodate propionyl-CoA and butyryl-CoA without major structural rearrangements, butyryl-CoA adopts a conformation incompatible with catalysis that obstructs the path of the incoming lysine residue and acts as a competitive inhibitor of Gcn5L2 versus acetyl-CoA. These structures demonstrate how Gcn5L2 discriminates between acyl-chain donors and explain why Gcn5L2 has weak activity for acyl moieties that are larger than an acetyl group. PMID:27377381

  1. 29 CFR 1910.1052 - Methylene Chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Methylene Chloride. 1910.1052 Section 1910.1052 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS (CONTINUED) Toxic and Hazardous Substances § 1910.1052 Methylene Chloride. This...

  2. Acyl-CoA-Binding Proteins (ACBPs) in Plant Development.

    PubMed

    Lung, Shiu-Cheung; Chye, Mee-Len

    2016-01-01

    Acyl-CoA-binding proteins (ACBPs) play a pivotal role in fatty acid metabolism because they can transport medium- and long-chain acyl-CoA esters. In eukaryotic cells, ACBPs are involved in intracellular trafficking of acyl-CoA esters and formation of a cytosolic acyl-CoA pool. In addition to these ubiquitous functions, more specific non-redundant roles of plant ACBP subclasses are implicated by the existence of multigene families with variable molecular masses, ligand specificities, functional domains (e.g. protein-protein interaction domains), subcellular locations and gene expression patterns. In this chapter, recent progress in the characterization of ACBPs from the model dicot plant, Arabidopsis thaliana, and the model monocot, Oryza sativa, and their emerging roles in plant growth and development are discussed. The functional significance of respective members of the plant ACBP families in various developmental and physiological processes such as seed development and germination, stem cuticle formation, pollen development, leaf senescence, peroxisomal fatty acid β-oxidation and phloem-mediated lipid transport is highlighted. PMID:27023243

  3. Fatty acylation of proteins: The long and the short of it.

    PubMed

    Resh, Marilyn D

    2016-07-01

    Long, short and medium chain fatty acids are covalently attached to hundreds of proteins. Each fatty acid confers distinct biochemical properties, enabling fatty acylation to regulate intracellular trafficking, subcellular localization, protein-protein and protein-lipid interactions. Myristate and palmitate represent the most common fatty acid modifying groups. New insights into how fatty acylation reactions are catalyzed, and how fatty acylation regulates protein structure and function continue to emerge. Myristate is typically linked to an N-terminal glycine, but recent studies reveal that lysines can also be myristoylated. Enzymes that remove N-terminal myristoyl-glycine or myristate from lysines have now been identified. DHHC proteins catalyze S-palmitoylation, but the mechanisms that regulate substrate recognition by individual DHHC family members remain to be determined. New studies continue to reveal thioesterases that remove palmitate from S-acylated proteins. Another area of rapid expansion is fatty acylation of the secreted proteins hedgehog, Wnt and Ghrelin, by Hhat, Porcupine and GOAT, respectively. Understanding how these membrane bound O-acyl transferases recognize their protein and fatty acyl CoA substrates is an active area of investigation, and is punctuated by the finding that these enzymes are potential drug targets in human diseases. PMID:27233110

  4. RNA SHAPE chemistry with aromatic acylating reagents.

    PubMed

    Nodin, Laura; Noël, Olivier; Chaminade, Françoise; Maskri, Ouerdia; Barbier, Vincent; David, Olivier; Fossé, Philippe; Xie, Juan

    2015-02-01

    As chemical methods for RNA secondary structure determination, SHAPE chemistry (selective 2'-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension) has been developed to specifically target flexible nucleotides (often unpaired nucleotides) independently to their purine or pyrimidine nature. In order to improve the specificity of acylating reagents towards unpaired nucleotides, we have explored the reactivity of symmetric anhydrides, acyl fluorides, active esters like succinimidyl ester and cyanomethyl esters for 2'-O-acylation reaction. Among the tested compounds, only the acyl fluoride 4 showed a low reactivity (compared to NMIA). However, this study is the first to show that nucleophilic catalysts like DMAP greatly improved the selective 2'-hydroxyl acylation by symmetric anhydrides, acyl fluorides and succinimidyl ester, with the 2-fluorobenzoic anhydride 5 being the most reactive. PMID:25557357

  5. DHHC Protein S-Acyltransferases Use Similar Ping-Pong Kinetic Mechanisms but Display Different Acyl-CoA Specificities*

    PubMed Central

    Jennings, Benjamin C.; Linder, Maurine E.

    2012-01-01

    DHHC proteins catalyze the reversible S-acylation of proteins at cysteine residues, a modification important for regulating protein localization, stability, and activity. However, little is known about the kinetic mechanism of DHHC proteins. A high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), fluorescent peptide-based assay for protein S-acylation activity was developed to characterize mammalian DHHC2 and DHHC3. Time courses and substrate saturation curves allowed the determination of Vmax and Km values for both the peptide N-myristoylated-GCG and palmitoyl-coenzyme A. DHHC proteins acylate themselves upon incubation with palmitoyl-CoA, which is hypothesized to reflect a transient acyl enzyme transfer intermediate. Single turnover assays with DHHC2 and DHHC3 demonstrated that a radiolabeled acyl group on the enzyme transferred to the protein substrate, consistent with a two-step ping-pong mechanism. Enzyme autoacylation and acyltransfer to substrate displayed the same acyl-CoA specificities, further supporting a two-step mechanism. Interestingly, DHHC2 efficiently transferred acyl chains 14 carbons and longer, whereas DHHC3 activity was greatly reduced by acyl-CoAs with chain lengths longer than 16 carbons. The rate and extent of autoacylation of DHHC3, as well as the rate of acyl chain transfer to protein substrate, were reduced with stearoyl-CoA when compared with palmitoyl-CoA. This is the first observation of lipid substrate specificity among DHHC proteins and may account for the differential S-acylation of proteins observed in cells. PMID:22247542

  6. Plant fatty acyl reductases: enzymes generating fatty alcohols for protective layers with potential for industrial applications.

    PubMed

    Rowland, Owen; Domergue, Frédéric

    2012-09-01

    Primary fatty alcohols are found throughout the biological world, either in free form or in a combined state. They are common components of plant surface lipids (i.e. cutin, suberin, sporopollenin, and associated waxes) and their absence can significantly perturb these essential barriers. Fatty alcohols and/or derived compounds are also likely to have direct functions in plant biotic and abiotic interactions. An evolutionarily related set of alcohol-forming fatty acyl reductases (FARs) is present in all kingdoms of life. Plant microsomal and plastid-associated FAR enzymes have been characterized, acting on acyl-coenzymeA (acyl-CoA) or acyl-acyl carrier protein (acyl-ACP) substrates, respectively. FARs have distinct substrate specificities both with regard to chain length and chain saturation. Fatty alcohols and wax esters, which are a combination of fatty alcohol and fatty acid, have a variety of commercial applications. The expression of FARs with desired specificities in transgenic microbes or oilseed crops would provide a novel means of obtaining these valuable compounds. In the present review, we report on recent progress in characterizing plant FAR enzymes and in understanding the biological roles of primary fatty alcohols, as well as describe the biotechnological production and industrial uses of fatty alcohols. PMID:22794916

  7. Metabolic and Tissue-Specific Regulation of Acyl-CoA Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Jessica M.; Bowman, Caitlyn E.; Wolfgang, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Acyl-CoA formation initiates cellular fatty acid metabolism. Acyl-CoAs are generated by the ligation of a fatty acid to Coenzyme A mediated by a large family of acyl-CoA synthetases (ACS). Conversely, acyl-CoAs can be hydrolyzed by a family of acyl-CoA thioesterases (ACOT). Here, we have determined the transcriptional regulation of all ACS and ACOT enzymes across tissues and in response to metabolic perturbations. We find patterns of coordinated regulation within and between these gene families as well as distinct regulation occurring in a tissue- and physiologically-dependent manner. Due to observed changes in long-chain ACOT mRNA and protein abundance in liver and adipose tissue, we determined the consequence of increasing cytosolic long-chain thioesterase activity on fatty acid metabolism in these tissues by generating transgenic mice overexpressing a hyperactive mutant of Acot7 in the liver or adipose tissue. Doubling cytosolic acyl-CoA thioesterase activity failed to protect mice from diet-induced obesity, fatty liver or insulin resistance, however, overexpression of Acot7 in adipocytes rendered mice cold intolerant. Together, these data suggest distinct modes of regulation of the ACS and ACOT enzymes and that these enzymes act in a coordinated fashion to control fatty acid metabolism in a tissue-dependent manner. PMID:25760036

  8. Methylene chloride poisoning in a cabinet worker.

    PubMed Central

    Mahmud, M; Kales, S N

    1999-01-01

    More than a million workers are at risk for methylene chloride exposure. Aerosol sprays and paint stripping may also cause significant nonoccupational exposures. After methylene chloride inhalation, significant amounts of carbon monoxide are formed in vivo as a metabolic by-product. Poisoning predominantly affects the central nervous system and results from both carboxyhemoglobin formation and direct solvent-related narcosis. In this report, we describe a case of methylene chloride intoxication probably complicated by exogenous carbon monoxide exposure. The worker's presentation of intermittent headaches was consistent with both methylene chloride intoxication and carbon monoxide poisoning. The exposures and symptoms were corroborated by elevated carboxyhemoglobin saturations and a workplace inspection that documented significant exposures to both methylene chloride and carbon monoxide. When both carbon monoxide and methylene chloride are inhaled, additional carboxyhemoglobin formation is expected. Preventive efforts should include education, air monitoring, and periodic carboxyhemoglobin determinations. Methylene chloride should never be used in enclosed or poorly ventilated areas because of the well-documented dangers of loss of consciousness and death. Images Figure 1 PMID:10464079

  9. Fatty acyl-CoA reductases of birds

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Birds clean and lubricate their feathers with waxes that are produced in the uropygial gland, a holocrine gland located on their back above the tail. The type and the composition of the secreted wax esters are dependent on the bird species, for instance the wax ester secretion of goose contains branched-chain fatty acids and unbranched fatty alcohols, whereas that of barn owl contains fatty acids and alcohols both of which are branched. Alcohol-forming fatty acyl-CoA reductases (FAR) catalyze the reduction of activated acyl groups to fatty alcohols that can be esterified with acyl-CoA thioesters forming wax esters. Results cDNA sequences encoding fatty acyl-CoA reductases were cloned from the uropygial glands of barn owl (Tyto alba), domestic chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus) and domestic goose (Anser anser domesticus). Heterologous expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae showed that they encode membrane associated enzymes which catalyze a NADPH dependent reduction of acyl-CoA thioesters to fatty alcohols. By feeding studies of transgenic yeast cultures and in vitro enzyme assays with membrane fractions of transgenic yeast cells two groups of isozymes with different properties were identified, termed FAR1 and FAR2. The FAR1 group mainly synthesized 1-hexadecanol and accepted substrates in the range between 14 and 18 carbon atoms, whereas the FAR2 group preferred stearoyl-CoA and accepted substrates between 16 and 20 carbon atoms. Expression studies with tissues of domestic chicken indicated that FAR transcripts were not restricted to the uropygial gland. Conclusion The data of our study suggest that the identified and characterized avian FAR isozymes, FAR1 and FAR2, can be involved in wax ester biosynthesis and in other pathways like ether lipid synthesis. PMID:22151413

  10. Endotoxin Structures in the Psychrophiles Psychromonas marina and Psychrobacter cryohalolentis Contain Distinctive Acyl Features

    PubMed Central

    Sweet, Charles R.; Alpuche, Giancarlo M.; Landis, Corinne A.; Sandman, Benjamin C.

    2014-01-01

    Lipid A is the essential component of endotoxin (Gram-negative lipopolysaccharide), a potent immunostimulatory compound. As the outer surface of the outer membrane, the details of lipid A structure are crucial not only to bacterial pathogenesis but also to membrane integrity. This work characterizes the structure of lipid A in two psychrophiles, Psychromonas marina and Psychrobacter cryohalolentis, and also two mesophiles to which they are related using MALDI-TOF MS and fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) GC-MS. P. marina lipid A is strikingly similar to that of Escherichia coli in organization and total acyl size, but incorporates an unusual doubly unsaturated tetradecadienoyl acyl residue. P. cryohalolentis also shows structural organization similar to a closely related mesophile, Acinetobacter baumannii, however it has generally shorter acyl constituents and shows many acyl variants differing by single methylene (-CH2-) units, a characteristic it shares with the one previously reported psychrotolerant lipid A structure. This work is the first detailed structural characterization of lipid A from an obligate psychrophile and the second from a psychrotolerant species. It reveals distinctive structural features of psychrophilic lipid A in comparison to that of related mesophiles which suggest constitutive adaptations to maintain outer membrane fluidity in cold environments. PMID:25010385

  11. Specificity of acyl-homoserine lactone synthases examined by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gould, Ty A; Herman, Jake; Krank, Jessica; Murphy, Robert C; Churchill, Mair E A

    2006-01-01

    Many gram-negative bacteria produce a specific set of N-acyl-L-homoserine-lactone (AHL) signaling molecules for the purpose of quorum sensing, which is a means of regulating coordinated gene expression in a cell-density-dependent manner. AHLs are produced from acylated acyl-carrier protein (acyl-ACP) and S-adenosyl-L-methionine by the AHL synthase enzyme. The appearance of specific AHLs is due in large part to the intrinsic specificity of the enzyme for subsets of acyl-ACP substrates. Structural studies of the Pantoea stewartii enzyme EsaI and AHL-sensitive bioassays revealed that threonine 140 in the acyl chain binding pocket directs the enzyme toward production of 3-oxo-homoserine lactones. Mass spectrometry was used to examine the range of AHL molecular species produced by AHL synthases under a variety of conditions. An AHL selective normal-phase chromatographic purification with addition of a deuterated AHL internal standard was followed by reverse-phase liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry in order to obtain estimates of the relative amounts of different AHLs from biological samples. The AHLs produced by wild-type and engineered EsaI and LasI AHL synthases show that intrinsic specificity and different cellular conditions influence the production of AHLs. The threonine at position 140 in EsaI is important for the preference for 3-oxo-acyl-ACPs, but the role of the equivalent threonine in LasI is less clear. In addition, LasI expressed in Escherichia coli produces a high proportion of unusual AHLs with acyl chains consisting of an odd number of carbons. Furthermore, these studies offer additional methods that will be useful for surveying and quantitating AHLs from different sources. PMID:16385066

  12. Acyl CoA synthetase 5 (ACSL5) ablation in mice increases energy expenditure and insulin sensitivity and delays fat absorption

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: The family of acyl-CoA synthetase enzymes (ACSL) activates fatty acids within cells to generate long chain fatty acyl CoA (FACoA). The differing metabolic fates of FACoAs such as incorporation into neutral lipids, phospholipids, and oxidation pathways are differentially regulated by the ...

  13. Expression of poly-3-(R)-hydroxyalkanoate (PHA) polymerase and acyl-CoA-transacylase in plastids of transgenic potato leads to the synthesis of a hydrophobic polymer, presumably medium-chain-length PHAs.

    PubMed

    Romano, Andrea; van der Plas, Linus H W; Witholt, Bernard; Eggink, Gerrit; Mooibroek, Hans

    2005-01-01

    Medium-chain-length poly-3-(R)-hydroxyalkanoates (mcl-PHAs) belong to the group of microbial polyesters. The minimum gene-set for the accumulation of mcl-PHAs from de novo fatty acid biosynthesis has been identified in prokaryotes as consisting of the Pha-C1 polymerase and the ACP-CoA-transacylase. In this paper, the synthesis of mcl-PHAs has been attempted in transgenic potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) using the same set of genes that were introduced into potato by particle bombardment. Polymer contents of transgenic lines were analysed by gas chromatography and by a new simple method employing a size-exclusion filter column. The expression of the Pha-C1 polymerase and the ACP-CoA-transacylase in the plastids of transgenic potato led to the synthesis of a hydrophobic polymer composed of mcl-hydroxy-fatty acids with carbon chain lengths ranging from C-6 to C-12 in leaves of the selected transgenic lines. We strongly suggest that the polymer observed consists of mcl-PHAs and that this report establishes for the first time a possible route for the production of mcl-PHAs from de novo fatty acid biosynthesis in plants. PMID:15351883

  14. The mitochondrial acyl carrier protein (ACP) coordinates mitochondrial fatty acid synthesis with iron sulfur cluster biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Van Vranken, Jonathan G; Jeong, Mi-Young; Wei, Peng; Chen, Yu-Chan; Gygi, Steven P; Winge, Dennis R; Rutter, Jared

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial fatty acid synthesis (FASII) and iron sulfur cluster (FeS) biogenesis are both vital biosynthetic processes within mitochondria. In this study, we demonstrate that the mitochondrial acyl carrier protein (ACP), which has a well-known role in FASII, plays an unexpected and evolutionarily conserved role in FeS biogenesis. ACP is a stable and essential subunit of the eukaryotic FeS biogenesis complex. In the absence of ACP, the complex is destabilized resulting in a profound depletion of FeS throughout the cell. This role of ACP depends upon its covalently bound 4’-phosphopantetheine (4-PP)-conjugated acyl chain to support maximal cysteine desulfurase activity. Thus, it is likely that ACP is not simply an obligate subunit but also exploits the 4-PP-conjugated acyl chain to coordinate mitochondrial fatty acid and FeS biogenesis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17828.001 PMID:27540631

  15. The mitochondrial acyl carrier protein (ACP) coordinates mitochondrial fatty acid synthesis with iron sulfur cluster biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Van Vranken, Jonathan G; Jeong, Mi-Young; Wei, Peng; Chen, Yu-Chan; Gygi, Steven P; Winge, Dennis R; Rutter, Jared

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial fatty acid synthesis (FASII) and iron sulfur cluster (FeS) biogenesis are both vital biosynthetic processes within mitochondria. In this study, we demonstrate that the mitochondrial acyl carrier protein (ACP), which has a well-known role in FASII, plays an unexpected and evolutionarily conserved role in FeS biogenesis. ACP is a stable and essential subunit of the eukaryotic FeS biogenesis complex. In the absence of ACP, the complex is destabilized resulting in a profound depletion of FeS throughout the cell. This role of ACP depends upon its covalently bound 4'-phosphopantetheine (4-PP)-conjugated acyl chain to support maximal cysteine desulfurase activity. Thus, it is likely that ACP is not simply an obligate subunit but also exploits the 4-PP-conjugated acyl chain to coordinate mitochondrial fatty acid and FeS biogenesis. PMID:27540631

  16. Ligand binding to the ACBD6 protein regulates the acyl-CoA transferase reactions in membranes.

    PubMed

    Soupene, Eric; Kuypers, Frans A

    2015-10-01

    The binding determinants of the human acyl-CoA binding domain-containing protein (ACBD) 6 and its function in lipid renewal of membranes were investigated. ACBD6 binds acyl-CoAs of a chain length of 6 to 20 carbons. The stoichiometry of the association could not be fitted to a 1-to-1 model. Saturation of ACBD6 by C16:0-CoA required higher concentration than less abundant acyl-CoAs. In contrast to ACBD1 and ACBD3, ligand binding did not result in the dimerization of ACBD6. The presence of fatty acids affected the binding of C18:1-CoA to ACBD6, dependent on the length, the degree of unsaturation, and the stereoisomeric conformation of their aliphatic chain. ACBD1 and ACBD6 negatively affected the formation of phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylethanolamine in the red blood cell membrane. The acylation rate of lysophosphatidylcholine into PC catalyzed by the red cell lysophosphatidylcholine-acyltransferase 1 protein was limited by the transfer of the acyl-CoA substrate from ACBD6 to the acyltransferase enzyme. These findings provide evidence that the binding properties of ACBD6 are adapted to prevent its constant saturation by the very abundant C16:0-CoA and protect membrane systems from the detergent nature of free acyl-CoAs by controlling their release to acyl-CoA-utilizing enzymes. PMID:26290611

  17. Natural variability in acyl moieties of sugar esters produced by certain tobacco and other Solanaceae species.

    PubMed

    Kroumova, Antoaneta B M; Zaitlin, Dave; Wagner, George J

    2016-10-01

    A unique feature of glandular trichomes of plants in the botanical family Solanaceae is that they produce sugar esters (SE), chemicals that have been shown to possess insecticidal, antifungal, and antibacterial properties. Sugar esters of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) provide pest resistance, and are important flavor precursors in oriental tobacco cultivars. Acyl moieties of SEs in Nicotiana spp., petunia, and tomato are shown to vary with respect to carbon length and isomer structure (2-12 carbon chain length; anteiso-, iso-, and straight-chain). Sugar esters and their acyl groups could serve as a model to explore the basis of phenotypic diversity and adaptation to natural and agricultural environments. However, information on the diversity of acyl composition among species, cultivars, and accessions is lacking. Herein, described is the analysis of SE acyl groups found in 21 accessions of Nicotiana obtusifolia (desert tobacco), six of Nicotiana occidentalis subsp. hesperis, three of Nicotiana alata, two of N. occidentalis, four modern tobacco cultivars, five petunia hybrids, and one accession each of a primitive potato (Solanum berthaultii) and tomato (Solanum pennellii). A total of 20 different acyl groups was observed that were represented differently among cultivars, species, and accessions. In Nicotiana species, acetate and iso- and anteiso-branched acids prevailed. Straight-chain groups (2-8 carbons) were prominent in petunias, while octanoic acid was prominent in N. alata and N. × sanderae. Two unexpected acyl groups, 8-methyl nonanoate and decanoate were found in N. occidentalis subsp. hesperis. Longer chain groups were found in the petunia, tomato, and potato species studied. PMID:27262877

  18. Kinetic and Structural Basis for Acyl-Group Selectivity and NAD(+) Dependence in Sirtuin-Catalyzed Deacylation.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Jessica L; Dittenhafer-Reed, Kristin E; Kudo, Norio; Thelen, Julie N; Ito, Akihiro; Yoshida, Minoru; Denu, John M

    2015-05-19

    Acylation of lysine is an important protein modification regulating diverse biological processes. It was recently demonstrated that members of the human Sirtuin family are capable of catalyzing long chain deacylation, in addition to the well-known NAD(+)-dependent deacetylation activity [Feldman, J. L., Baeza, J., and Denu, J. M. (2013) J. Biol. Chem. 288, 31350-31356]. Here we provide a detailed kinetic and structural analysis that describes the interdependence of NAD(+)-binding and acyl-group selectivity for a diverse series of human Sirtuins, SIRT1-SIRT3 and SIRT6. Steady-state and rapid-quench kinetic analyses indicated that differences in NAD(+) saturation and susceptibility to nicotinamide inhibition reflect unique kinetic behavior displayed by each Sirtuin and depend on acyl substrate chain length. Though the rate of nucleophilic attack of the 2'-hydroxyl on the C1'-O-alkylimidate intermediate varies with acyl substrate chain length, this step remains rate-determining for SIRT2 and SIRT3; however, for SIRT6, this step is no longer rate-limiting for long chain substrates. Cocrystallization of SIRT2 with myristoylated peptide and NAD(+) yielded a co-complex structure with reaction product 2'-O-myristoyl-ADP-ribose, revealing a latent hydrophobic cavity to accommodate the long chain acyl group, and suggesting a general mechanism for long chain deacylation. Comparing two separately determined co-complex structures containing either a myristoylated peptide or 2'-O-myristoyl-ADP-ribose indicates there are conformational changes at the myristoyl-ribose linkage with minimal structural differences in the enzyme active site. During the deacylation reaction, the fatty acyl group is held in a relatively fixed position. We describe a kinetic and structural model to explain how various Sirtuins display unique acyl substrate preferences and how different reaction kinetics influence NAD(+) dependence. The biological implications are discussed. PMID:25897714

  19. Echium oil increased the expression of a Δ4 Fads2 fatty acyl desaturase and the deposition of n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid in comparison with linseed oil in striped snakehead (Channa striata) muscle.

    PubMed

    Jaya-Ram, Annette; Shu-Chien, Alexander Chong; Kuah, Meng-Kiat

    2016-08-01

    Despite the potential of vegetable oils as aquafeed ingredients, a major drawback associated with their utilization is the inferior level of beneficial n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFA). Echium oil (EO), which is rich in stearidonic acid (SDA, 18:4n-3), could potentially improve the deposition of n-3 LC-PUFA as the biosynthesis of LC-PUFA is enhanced through bypassing the rate-limiting ∆6 desaturation step. We report for the first time an attempt to investigate whether the presence of a desaturase (Fads2) capable of ∆4 desaturation activities and an elongase (Elovl5) will leverage the provision of dietary SDA to produce a higher rate of LC-PUFA bioconversion. Experimental diets were designed containing fish oil (FO), EO or linseed oil (LO) (100FO, 100EO, 100LO), and diets which comprised equal mixtures of the designated oils (50EOFO and 50EOLO) were evaluated in a 12-week feeding trial involving striped snakeheads (Channa striata). There was no significant difference in growth and feed conversion efficiency. The hepatic fatty acid composition and higher expression of fads2 and elovl5 genes in fish fed EO-based diets indicate the utilization of dietary SDA for LC-PUFA biosynthesis. Collectively, this resulted in a higher deposition of muscle eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5n-3) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3) compared to LO-based diets. Dietary EO improved the ratio of n-3 LC-PUFA to n-6 LC-PUFA in fish muscle, which is desirable for human populations with excessive consumption of n-6 PUFA. This study validates the contribution of SDA in improving the content of n-3 LC-PUFA and the ratio of EPA to arachidonic acid (ARA, 20:4n-6) in a freshwater carnivorous species. PMID:26842427

  20. Stability-increasing effects of anthocyanin glycosyl acylation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chang-Ling; Yu, Yu-Qi; Chen, Zhong-Jian; Wen, Guo-Song; Wei, Fu-Gang; Zheng, Quan; Wang, Chong-De; Xiao, Xing-Lei

    2017-01-01

    This review comprehensively summarizes the existing knowledge regarding the chemical implications of anthocyanin glycosyl acylation, the effects of acylation on the stability of acylated anthocyanins and the corresponding mechanisms. Anthocyanin glycosyl acylation commonly refers to the phenomenon in which the hydroxyl groups of anthocyanin glycosyls are esterified by aliphatic or aromatic acids, which is synthetically represented by the acylation sites as well as the types and numbers of acyl groups. Generally, glycosyl acylation increases the in vitro and in vivo chemical stability of acylated anthocyanins, and the mechanisms primarily involve physicochemical, stereochemical, photochemical, biochemical or environmental aspects under specific conditions. Additionally, the acylation sites as well as the types and numbers of acyl groups influence the stability of acylated anthocyanins to different degrees. This review could provide insight into the optimization of the stability of anthocyanins as well as the application of suitable anthocyanins in food, pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries. PMID:27507456

  1. Acyl lipidation of a peptide: effects on activity and epidermal permeability in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Rocco, Daniel; Ross, James; Murray, Paul E; Caccetta, Rima

    2016-01-01

    Short-chain lipid conjugates can increase permeability of a small peptide across human epidermis; however, the emerging lipoaminoacid (LAA) conjugation technique is costly and can deliver mixed synthetic products of varied biological potential. LAA conjugation using a racemic mixture produces a mixture of D- and L-stereoisomers. Individual enantiomers can be produced at an extra cost. We investigated an affordable technique that produces only one synthetic product: short-chain (C7–C8) acyl lipidation. Acyl lipidation of Ala-Ala-Pro-Val, an inhibitor of human neutrophil elastase (HNE; believed to lead to abnormal tissue destruction and disease development), was investigated as an alternative to LAA conjugation. The current study aimed to assess the effects of acyl lipidation (either at the N-terminal or at the C-terminal) on neutrophil elastase activity in vitro and on transdermal delivery ex vivo. The inhibitory capacity of the acyl conjugates was compared to LAA conjugates (conjugated at the N-terminal) of the same peptide. The L-stereoisomer appears to rapidly degrade, but it represents a significantly (P<0.05) better inhibitor of HNE than the parent peptide (Ala-Ala-Pro-Val). Although the D-stereoisomer appears to permeate human epidermal skin sections in a better fashion than the L-stereoisomer, it is not a significantly better inhibitor of HNE than the parent peptide. Acyl lipidation (with a C7 lipid chain) at either end of the peptide substantially enhances the permeability of the peptide across human skin epidermis as well as significantly (P<0.005) increases its elastase inhibitory potential. Therefore, our current study indicates that acyl lipidation of a peptide is a more economical and effective alternative to LAA conjugation. PMID:27468224

  2. Sticky swinging arm dynamics: studies of an acyl carrier protein domain from the mycolactone polyketide synthase

    PubMed Central

    Vance, Steven; Tkachenko, Olga; Thomas, Ben; Bassuni, Mona; Hong, Hui; Nietlispach, Daniel; Broadhurst, William

    2016-01-01

    Type I modular polyketide synthases (PKSs) produce polyketide natural products by passing a growing acyl substrate chain between a series of enzyme domains housed within a gigantic multifunctional polypeptide assembly. Throughout each round of chain extension and modification reactions, the substrate stays covalently linked to an acyl carrier protein (ACP) domain. In the present study we report on the solution structure and dynamics of an ACP domain excised from MLSA2, module 9 of the PKS system that constructs the macrolactone ring of the toxin mycolactone, cause of the tropical disease Buruli ulcer. After modification of apo ACP with 4′-phosphopantetheine (Ppant) to create the holo form, 15N nuclear spin relaxation and paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) experiments suggest that the prosthetic group swings freely. The minimal chemical shift perturbations displayed by Ppant-attached C3 and C4 acyl chains imply that these substrate-mimics remain exposed to solvent at the end of a flexible Ppant arm. By contrast, hexanoyl and octanoyl chains yield much larger chemical shift perturbations, indicating that they interact with the surface of the domain. The solution structure of octanoyl-ACP shows the Ppant arm bending to allow the acyl chain to nestle into a nonpolar pocket, whereas the prosthetic group itself remains largely solvent exposed. Although the highly reduced octanoyl group is not a natural substrate for the ACP from MLSA2, similar presentation modes would permit partner enzyme domains to recognize an acyl group while it is bound to the surface of its carrier protein, allowing simultaneous interactions with both the substrate and the ACP. PMID:26920023

  3. Alkylation and acylation of cyclotriphosphazenes.

    PubMed

    Benson, Mark A; Zacchini, Stefano; Boomishankar, Ramamoorthy; Chan, Yuri; Steiner, Alexander

    2007-08-20

    Phosphazenes (RNH)6P3N3 (R = n-propyl, isobutyl, isopropyl, cyclohexyl, tert-butyl, benzyl) are readily alkylated at ring N sites by alkyl halides forming N-alkyl phosphazenium cations. Alkylation of two ring N sites occurred after prolonged heating in the presence of methyl iodide or immediately at room temperature with methyl triflate yielding N,N'-dimethyl phosphazenium dications. Geminal dichloro derivatives Cl2(RNH)4P3N3 are methylated by methyl iodide at the ring N site adjacent to both P centers carrying four RNH groups. X-ray crystal structures showed that the alkylation of ring N sites leads to substantial elongation of the associated P-N bonds. Both N-alkyl and N,N'-dialkyl phosphazenium salts form complex supramolecular networks in the solid state via NH...X interactions. Systems carrying less-bulky RNH groups show additional NH...N bonds between N-alkyl phosphazenium ions. N-Alkyl phosphazenium halides form complexes with silver ions upon treatment with silver nitrate. Depending on the steric demand of RNH substituents, either one or both of the vacant ring N sites engage in coordination to silver ions. Treatment of (RNH)6P3N3 (R = isopropyl) with acetyl chloride and benzoyl chloride, respectively, yielded N-acyl phosphazenium ions. X-ray crystal structures revealed that elongation of P-N bonds adjacent to the acylated ring N site is more pronounced than it is in the case of N-alkylated species. Salts containing N-alkyl phosphazenium ions are stable toward water and other mild nucleophiles, while N,N'-dialkyl and N-acyl phosphazenium salts are readily hydrolyzed. The reaction of (RNH)6P3N3 with bromoacetic acid led to N-alkylation at one ring N site in addition to formation of an amide via condensation of an adjacent RNH substituent with the carboxylic acid group. The resulting bromide salt contains mono cations of composition (RNH)5P3N3CH2CONR in which a CH2-C(O) unit is embedded between a ring N and an exocyclic N site of the phosphazene. PMID

  4. Study of Triheptanoin for Treatment of Long-Chain Fatty Acid Oxidation Disorder

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-20

    Very Long-chain acylCoA Dehydrogenase (VLCAD) Deficiency; Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase 2 (CPT2) Deficiency; Mitochondrial Trifunctional Protein (TFP) Deficiency; Long-chain 3 hydroxyacylCoA Dehydrogenase (LCHAD) Deficiency

  5. Safe thyroidectomy with intraoperative methylene blue spraying

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background We aimed to minimalize operative complications by spraying of methylene blue stain on thyroid glands and the perithyroidal area. Material and methods The intra-operative methylene blue spraying technique was used prospectively on a total of 56 patients who had undergone primary (not recurrent) thyroid surgery for a variety of thyroid diseases. Bilateral total thyroidectomy was performed in all cases. After superior but before inferior pole ligation, 0.5ml of methylene blue was sprayed over the thyroid lobe and perilober area. Tissues, especially parathyroides, the recurrent laryngeal nerve, and the inferior thyroid artery, were identified and evaluated. Results Recurrent laryngeal nerve and arteries were not stained and thus they remained white in all cases while all other tissues were stained blue. Within three minutes parathyroid glands washed out the blue stain and the original yellow color was regained. Thyroid tissue wash-out time was not less than 15 minutes; perithyroideal muscles, tendinous and lipoid structures took no less than 25 minutes. Conclusion The safety of intravascular methylene blue guidance on thyroid surgery is known. This research demonstrates the effectiveness of the spraying technique, a new technique which ensures not only identification of parathyroid glands within three minutes, but also identification of recurrent laryngeal nerves and inferior thyroid arteries. PMID:23148801

  6. Methylene Salicylicacidyl Hexamer (MSH) Has DNAse Activity.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Ankit; Gade, Chandrasekhar Reddy; Dixit, Manjusha; Sharma, Nagendra K

    2015-07-01

    Salicylic acid and formaldehyde form heterogenous methyl/methylene salicylicacidyl oligomers and polymers in presence of sulfuric acid (H2SO4) and sodium nitrite (NaNO2). One of the oligomers as aurintricarboxylic acid (ATA), methelene bridged salicylic acid trimer, has been identified and explored in biochemical research, which is a potent inhibitor of many biological processes. A very few reports are also available on dimer, trimer, and tetramer of methelene bridged salicylic acids from same reaction mixture. Herein, we report the isolation and biochemical screening of partial purified low-molecular component as methylene salicylicacidyl hexamer (MSH) from the above reaction mixture. The interaction of methylene salicylicacidyl oligomer with DNA was studied by agarose and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, which suggest that methylene salicylicacidyl oligomer has DNAse activity. So far, no such significant reports are available on low-molecular oligomer of methelene bridged salicylic acids. In further, we also attempted to investigate the nature of nuclease activity, which clearly indicates DNA exonuclease type of activity. Further studies are needed to establish the mechanism of actions. PMID:26077682

  7. 21 CFR 173.255 - Methylene chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Methylene chloride. 173.255 Section 173.255 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SECONDARY DIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Solvents, Lubricants, Release Agents and...

  8. 21 CFR 173.255 - Methylene chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Methylene chloride. 173.255 Section 173.255 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SECONDARY DIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Solvents, Lubricants, Release Agents and...

  9. Allene Functionalization via Bicyclic Methylene Aziridines

    PubMed Central

    Boralsky, Luke A.; Marston, Dagmara; Grigg, R. David; Hershberger, John C.; Schomaker, Jennifer M.

    2011-01-01

    The oxidative functionalization of olefins is a common method for the formation of vicinal carbon-heteroatom bonds. However, oxidative methods to transform allenes into synthetic motifs containing three contiguous carbon-heteroatom bonds are much less developed. This paper describes the use of bicyclic methylene aziridines (MAs), prepared via intramolecular allene aziridination, as scaffolds for functionalization of all three allene carbons. PMID:21438516

  10. Long chain acyl-CoA synthetases and other acyl activating enzymes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proper synthesis and breakdown of molecules containing carboxylic acids is a vital part of metabolism in all living organisms. Given the relatively inert chemical nature of many carboxylic acids, activation is a necessary step prior to use in the various anabolic and catabolic pathways that utilize...

  11. Friedel-Crafts Acylation with Amides

    PubMed Central

    Raja, Erum K.; DeSchepper, Daniel J.; Nilsson Lill, Sten O.; Klumpp, Douglas A.

    2012-01-01

    Friedel-Crafts acylation has been known since the 1870s and it is an important organic synthetic reaction leading to aromatic ketone products. Friedel-Crafts acylation is usually done with carboxylic acid chlorides or anhydrides while amides are generally not useful substrates in these reactions. Despite being the least reactive carboxylic acid derivative, we have found a series of amides capable of providing aromatic ketones in good yields (55–96%, 17 examples). We propose a mechanism involving diminished C-N resonance through superelectrophilic activation and subsequent cleavage to acyl cations. PMID:22690740

  12. Fatty acyl-CoA reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Reiser, Steven E.; Somerville, Chris R.

    1998-12-01

    The present invention relates to bacterial enzymes, in particular to an acyl-CoA reductase and a gene encoding an acyl-CoA reductase, the amino acid and nucleic acid sequences corresponding to the reductase polypeptide and gene, respectively, and to methods of obtaining such enzymes, amino acid sequences and nucleic acid sequences. The invention also relates to the use of such sequences to provide transgenic host cells capable of producing fatty alcohols and fatty aldehydes.

  13. Acyl chain composition and coexisting fluid phases in lipid bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Yongwen; Bradley, Miranda; Mitchell, Drake

    2011-10-01

    At room temperature phospholipid bilayers enriched in sphingolipids and cholesterol may form a solid phase as well as two coexisting fluid phases. These are the standard fluid phase, or the liquid-disordered phase, ld, and the liquid-ordered phase, lo, which is commonly associated with lipid rafts. Ternary mixtures of palmitoyl-oleoyl-phosphocholine (POPC; 16:0,18:1 PC), sphingomyelin (SPM), and cholesterol (Chol) form coexisting lo, ld and solid phases over a wide range of molar ratios. We are examining the ability of two fluorescent probes to detect these 2 phases: NBD linked to di-16:0 PE which partitions strongly into the lo phase and NBD linked to di-18:1 PE which partitions strongly into the ld phase. We are also examining the effect of the highly polyunsaturated phospholipid stearoyl-docosahexanoyl-phosphocholine (SDPC; 18:0, 22:6 PC) on the ternary phase diagram of POPC/SPM/Chol with particular focus on the functionally important lo/ld coexistence region. We report on the fluorescence lifetime and anisotropy decay dynamics of these two fluorescent probes.

  14. Unique acyl-carnitine profiles are potential biomarkers for acquired mitochondrial disease in autism spectrum disorder

    PubMed Central

    Frye, R E; Melnyk, S; MacFabe, D F

    2013-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) has been associated with mitochondrial disease (MD). Interestingly, most individuals with ASD and MD do not have a specific genetic mutation to explain the MD, raising the possibility of that MD may be acquired, at least in a subgroup of children with ASD. Acquired MD has been demonstrated in a rodent ASD model in which propionic acid (PPA), an enteric bacterial fermentation product of ASD-associated gut bacteria, is infused intracerebroventricularly. This animal model shows validity as it demonstrates many behavioral, metabolic, neuropathologic and neurophysiologic abnormalities associated with ASD. This animal model also demonstrates a unique pattern of elevations in short-chain and long-chain acyl-carnitines suggesting abnormalities in fatty-acid metabolism. To determine if the same pattern of biomarkers of abnormal fatty-acid metabolism are present in children with ASD, the laboratory results from a large cohort of children with ASD (n=213) who underwent screening for metabolic disorders, including mitochondrial and fatty-acid oxidation disorders, in a medically based autism clinic were reviewed. Acyl-carnitine panels were determined to be abnormal if three or more individual acyl-carnitine species were abnormal in the panel and these abnormalities were verified by repeated testing. Overall, 17% of individuals with ASD demonstrated consistently abnormal acyl-carnitine panels. Next, it was determined if specific acyl-carnitine species were consistently elevated across the individuals with consistently abnormal acyl-carnitine panels. Significant elevations in short-chain and long-chain, but not medium-chain, acyl-carnitines were found in the ASD individuals with consistently abnormal acyl-carnitine panels—a pattern consistent with the PPA rodent ASD model. Examination of electron transport chain function in muscle and fibroblast culture, histological and electron microscopy examination of muscle and other biomarkers of

  15. Origin of membrane dipole potential: contribution of the phospholipid fatty acid chains.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Uwe; Mannock, David A; Lewis, Ruthven N A H; Pohl, Peter; McElhaney, Ronald N; Pohl, Elena E

    2002-08-01

    The large intrinsic membrane dipole potential, phi(d), is important for protein insertion and functioning as well as for ion transport across natural and model membranes. However, the origin of phi(d) is controversial. From experiments carried out with lipid monolayers, a significant dependence on the fatty acid chain length is suggested, whereas in experiments with lipid bilayers, the contribution of additional -CH(2)-groups seems negligibly small compared with that of the phospholipid carbonyl groups and lipid-bound water molecules. To compare the impact of the -CH(2)-groups of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) near and far from the glycerol backbone, we have varied the structure of DPPC by incorporation of sulfur atoms in place of methylene groups in different positions of the fatty acid chain. The phi(d) of symmetric lipid bilayers containing one heteroatom was obtained from the charge relaxation of oppositely charged hydrophobic ions. We have found that the substitution for a S-atom of a -CH(2)-group decreases phi(d). The effect (deltaphi(d) = -22.6 mV) is most pronounced for S-atoms near the lipid head group while a S-atom substitution in the C(13)- or C(14)-position of the hydrocarbon chain does not effect the bilayer dipole potential. Most probably deltaphi(d) does not originate from an altered dipole potential of the acyl chain containing an heteroatom but is mediated by the disruption of chain packing, leading to a decreased density of lipid dipoles in the membrane. PMID:12191841

  16. Featured Molecules: Ascorbic Acid and Methylene Blue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, William F.; Wildman, Randall J.

    2003-05-01

    The WebWare molecules of the month for May are featured in several articles in this issue. "Arsenic: Not So Evil After All?" discusses the pharmaceutical uses of methylene blue and its development as the first synthetic drug used against a specific disease. The JCE Classroom Activity "Out of the Blue" and the article "Greening the Blue Bottle" feature methylene blue and ascorbic acid as two key ingredients in the formulation of the blue bottle. You can also see a colorful example of these two molecules in action on the cover. "Sailing on the 'C': A Vitamin Titration with a Twist" describes an experiment to determine the vitamin C (ascorbic acid) content of citrus fruits and challenges students, as eighteenth-century sea captains, to decide the best fruit to take on a long voyage. Fully manipulable (Chime) versions of these and other molecules are available at Only@JCE Online.

  17. Insight into Coenzyme A cofactor binding and the mechanism of acyl-transfer in an acylating aldehyde dehydrogenase from Clostridium phytofermentans

    PubMed Central

    Tuck, Laura R.; Altenbach, Kirsten; Ang, Thiau Fu; Crawshaw, Adam D.; Campopiano, Dominic J.; Clarke, David J.; Marles-Wright, Jon

    2016-01-01

    The breakdown of fucose and rhamnose released from plant cell walls by the cellulolytic soil bacterium Clostridium phytofermentans produces toxic aldehyde intermediates. To enable growth on these carbon sources, the pathway for the breakdown of fucose and rhamnose is encapsulated within a bacterial microcompartment (BMC). These proteinaceous organelles sequester the toxic aldehyde intermediates and allow the efficient action of acylating aldehyde dehydrogenase enzymes to produce an acyl-CoA that is ultimately used in substrate-level phosphorylation to produce ATP. Here we analyse the kinetics of the aldehyde dehydrogenase enzyme from the fucose/rhamnose utilisation BMC with different short-chain fatty aldehydes and show that it has activity against substrates with up to six carbon atoms, with optimal activity against propionaldehyde. We have also determined the X-ray crystal structure of this enzyme in complex with CoA and show that the adenine nucleotide of this cofactor is bound in a distinct pocket to the same group in NAD+. This work is the first report of the structure of CoA bound to an aldehyde dehydrogenase enzyme and our crystallographic model provides important insight into the differences within the active site that distinguish the acylating from non-acylating aldehyde dehydrogenase enzymes. PMID:26899032

  18. Insight into Coenzyme A cofactor binding and the mechanism of acyl-transfer in an acylating aldehyde dehydrogenase from Clostridium phytofermentans.

    PubMed

    Tuck, Laura R; Altenbach, Kirsten; Ang, Thiau Fu; Crawshaw, Adam D; Campopiano, Dominic J; Clarke, David J; Marles-Wright, Jon

    2016-01-01

    The breakdown of fucose and rhamnose released from plant cell walls by the cellulolytic soil bacterium Clostridium phytofermentans produces toxic aldehyde intermediates. To enable growth on these carbon sources, the pathway for the breakdown of fucose and rhamnose is encapsulated within a bacterial microcompartment (BMC). These proteinaceous organelles sequester the toxic aldehyde intermediates and allow the efficient action of acylating aldehyde dehydrogenase enzymes to produce an acyl-CoA that is ultimately used in substrate-level phosphorylation to produce ATP. Here we analyse the kinetics of the aldehyde dehydrogenase enzyme from the fucose/rhamnose utilisation BMC with different short-chain fatty aldehydes and show that it has activity against substrates with up to six carbon atoms, with optimal activity against propionaldehyde. We have also determined the X-ray crystal structure of this enzyme in complex with CoA and show that the adenine nucleotide of this cofactor is bound in a distinct pocket to the same group in NAD(+). This work is the first report of the structure of CoA bound to an aldehyde dehydrogenase enzyme and our crystallographic model provides important insight into the differences within the active site that distinguish the acylating from non-acylating aldehyde dehydrogenase enzymes. PMID:26899032

  19. Plant Cytosolic Acyl-CoA-Binding Proteins.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zi-Wei; Chye, Mee-Len

    2016-01-01

    A gene family encoding six members of acyl-CoA-binding proteins (ACBP) exists in Arabidopsis and they are designated as AtACBP1-AtACBP6. They have been observed to play pivotal roles in plant lipid metabolism, consistent to the abilities of recombinant AtACBP in binding different medium- and long-chain acyl-CoA esters in vitro. While AtACBP1 and AtACBP2 are membrane-associated proteins with ankyrin repeats and AtACBP3 contains a signaling peptide for targeting to the apoplast, AtACBP4, AtACBP5 and AtACBP6 represent the cytosolic forms in the AtACBP family. They were verified to be subcellularly localized in the cytosol using diverse experimental methods, including cell fractionation followed by western blot analysis, immunoelectron microscopy and confocal laser-scanning microscopy using autofluorescence-tagged fusions. AtACBP4 (73.2 kDa) and AtACBP5 (70.1 kDa) are the largest, while AtACBP6 (10.4 kDa) is the smallest. Their binding affinities to oleoyl-CoA esters suggested that they can potentially transfer oleoyl-CoA esters from the plastids to the endoplasmic reticulum, facilitating the subsequent biosynthesis of non-plastidial membrane lipids in Arabidopsis. Recent studies on ACBP, extended from a dicot (Arabidopsis) to a monocot, revealed that six ACBP are also encoded in rice (Oryza sativa). Interestingly, three small rice ACBP (OsACBP1, OsACBP2 and OsACBP3) are present in the cytosol in comparison to one (AtACBP6) in Arabidopsis. In this review, the combinatory and distinct roles of the cytosolic AtACBP are discussed, including their functions in pollen and seed development, light-dependent regulation and substrate affinities to acyl-CoA esters. PMID:26662549

  20. Monogalactosyldiacylglycerol biosynthesis by direct acyl transfer in Anabaene variabilis

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H.H.; Wickrema, A.; Jaworski, J.

    1987-04-01

    The authors previously reported the direct acylation of monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG) by an enzyme in the membranes of the cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis. The enzyme requires acyl-acyl carrier protein (acyl-ACP) as substrate, but had no other additional cofactor requirements. Palmitoyl-, stearoyl- and oleoyl-ACP were all effective substrates. The A. variabilis membranes also had a hydrolase activity which metabolized the acyl-ACP to yield free fatty acid and ACP. Possible mechanisms for the acylation reaction include either acyl exchange with existing MGDG or direct acyl transfer to a lyso-MGDG, with concomitant release of free ACP. The mechanism of this reaction has been resolved using a double labelled (/sup 14/C)acyl-(/sup 14/)ACP substrate prepared with E. coli acyl-ACP synthetase. Following incubation with the enzyme, the unreacted (/sup 14/)acyl-(/sup 14/)ACP was isolated and the (/sup 14/)acyl/(/sup 14/)ACP ratio determined. Comparison of this ratio to that of the original substrate indicated no change and eliminated acyl exchange as a possible mechanism. Therefore, the direct acylation of lyso-MGDG is the proposed mechanism for this enzyme.

  1. Anatomy of a simple acyl intermediate in enzyme catalysis: combined biophysical and modeling studies on ornithine acetyl transferase.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Aman; Clifton, Ian J; Bagonis, Maria; Kershaw, Nadia J; Domene, Carmen; Claridge, Timothy D W; Wharton, Christopher W; Schofield, Christopher J

    2009-01-21

    Acyl-enzyme complexes are intermediates in reactions catalyzed by many hydrolases and related enzymes which employ nucleophilic catalysis. However, most of the reported structural data on acyl-enzyme complexes has been acquired under noncatalytic conditions. Recent IR analyses have indicated that some acyl-enzyme complexes may be more flexible than most crystallographic analyses have implied. OAT2 is a member of the N-terminal nucleophile (Ntn) hydrolase enzyme superfamily and catalyzes the reversible transfer of an acetyl group between the alpha-amino groups of ornithine and glutamate in a mechanism proposed to involve an acyl-enzyme complex. We have carried out biophysical analyses on ornithine acetyl transferase (OAT2), both in solution and in the crystalline state. Mass spectrometric studies identified Thr-181 as the residue acetylated during OAT2 catalysis; (13)C NMR analyses implied the presence of an acyl-enzyme complex in solution. Crystallization of OAT2 in the presence of N-alpha-acetyl-L-glutamate led to a structure in which Thr-181 was acetylated; the carbonyl oxygen of the acyl-enzyme complex was located in an oxyanion hole and positioned to hydrogen bond with the backbone amide NH of Gly-112 and the alcohol of Thr-111. While the crystallographic analyses revealed only one structure, IR spectroscopy demonstrated the presence of two distinct acyl-enzyme complex structures with carbonyl stretching frequencies at 1691 and 1701 cm(-1). Modeling studies implied two possible acyl-enzyme complex structures, one of which correlates with that observed in the crystal structure and with the 1691 cm(-1) IR absorption. The second acyl-enzyme complex structure, which has only a single oxyanion hole hydrogen bond, is proposed to give rise to the 1701 cm(-1) IR absorption. The two acyl-enzyme complex structures can interconvert by movement of the Thr-111 side-chain alcohol hydrogen away from the oxyanion hole to hydrogen bond with the backbone carbonyl of the acylated

  2. Microbial Tailoring of Acyl Peptidic Siderophores

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Marine bacteria produce an abundance of suites of acylated siderophores characterized by a unique, species-dependent headgroup that binds iron(III) and one of a series of fatty acid appendages. Marinobacter sp. DS40M6 produces a suite of seven acylated marinobactins, with fatty acids ranging from saturated and unsaturated C12–C18 fatty acids. In the present study, we report that in the late log phase of growth, the fatty acids are hydrolyzed by an amide hydrolase producing the peptidic marinobactin headgroup. Halomonas aquamarina str. DS40M3, another marine bacterium isolated originally from the same sample of open ocean water as Marinobacter sp. DS40M6, produces the acyl aquachelins, also as a suite composed of a peptidic headgroup distinct from that of the marinobactins. In contrast to the acyl marinobactins, hydrolysis of the suite of acyl aquachelins is not detected, even when H. aquamarina str. DS40M3 is grown into the stationary phase. The Marinobacter cell-free extract containing the acyl amide hydrolase is active toward exogenous acyl-peptidic siderophores (e.g., aquachelin C, loihichelin C, as well as octanoyl homoserine lactone used in quorum sensing). Further, when H. aquamarina str. DS40M3 is cultured together with Marinobacter sp. DS40M6, the fatty acids of both suites of siderophores are hydrolyzed, and the aquachelin headgroup is also produced. The present study demonstrates that coculturing bacteria leads to metabolically tailored metabolites compared to growth in a single pure culture, which is interesting given the importance of siderophore-mediated iron acquisition for bacterial growth and that Marinobacter sp. DS40M6 and H. aquamarina str. DS40M3 were isolated from the same sample of seawater. PMID:24735218

  3. Microbial tailoring of acyl peptidic siderophores.

    PubMed

    Gauglitz, Julia M; Iinishi, Akira; Ito, Yusai; Butler, Alison

    2014-04-29

    Marine bacteria produce an abundance of suites of acylated siderophores characterized by a unique, species-dependent headgroup that binds iron(III) and one of a series of fatty acid appendages. Marinobacter sp. DS40M6 produces a suite of seven acylated marinobactins, with fatty acids ranging from saturated and unsaturated C12-C18 fatty acids. In the present study, we report that in the late log phase of growth, the fatty acids are hydrolyzed by an amide hydrolase producing the peptidic marinobactin headgroup. Halomonas aquamarina str. DS40M3, another marine bacterium isolated originally from the same sample of open ocean water as Marinobacter sp. DS40M6, produces the acyl aquachelins, also as a suite composed of a peptidic headgroup distinct from that of the marinobactins. In contrast to the acyl marinobactins, hydrolysis of the suite of acyl aquachelins is not detected, even when H. aquamarina str. DS40M3 is grown into the stationary phase. The Marinobacter cell-free extract containing the acyl amide hydrolase is active toward exogenous acyl-peptidic siderophores (e.g., aquachelin C, loihichelin C, as well as octanoyl homoserine lactone used in quorum sensing). Further, when H. aquamarina str. DS40M3 is cultured together with Marinobacter sp. DS40M6, the fatty acids of both suites of siderophores are hydrolyzed, and the aquachelin headgroup is also produced. The present study demonstrates that coculturing bacteria leads to metabolically tailored metabolites compared to growth in a single pure culture, which is interesting given the importance of siderophore-mediated iron acquisition for bacterial growth and that Marinobacter sp. DS40M6 and H. aquamarina str. DS40M3 were isolated from the same sample of seawater. PMID:24735218

  4. Solvent mimicry with methylene carbene to probe protein topography.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Gabriela Elena; Monti, José Luis E; Mundo, Mariana Rocío; Delfino, José María

    2015-10-01

    The solvent accessible surface area (SASA) of the polypeptide chain plays a key role in protein folding, conformational change, and interaction. This fundamental biophysical parameter is elusive in experimental measurement. Our approach to this problem relies on the reaction of the minimal photochemical reagent diazirine (DZN) with polypeptides. This reagent (i) exerts solvent mimicry because its size is comparable to water and (ii) shows scant chemical selectivity because it generates extremely reactive methylene carbene. Methylation gives rise to the EM (extent of modification) signal, which is useful for scrutinizing the conformational change triggered by Ca(2+) binding to calmodulin (CaM). The increased EM observed for the full protein is dominated by the enhanced exposure of hydrophobic area in Ca(2+)-CaM. Fragmentation allowed us to quantify the methylene incorporation at specific sites. Peptide 91-106 reveals a major reorganization around the calcium 151 binding site, resulting in local ordering and a greater exposure of the hydrophobic surface. Additionally, this technique shows a high sensitivity to probe recognition between CaM and melittin (Mel). The large decrease in EM indicates the occlusion of a significant hydrophobic area upon complexation. Protection from labeling reveals a larger involvement of the N-terminal and central regions of CaM in this interaction. Despite its smaller size, Mel's differential exposure can also be quantified. Moreover, MS/MS fragmentation realizes the goal of extending the resolution of labeled sites at the amino acid level. Overall, DZN labeling emerges as a useful footprinting method capable of shedding light on physiological conformational changes and interactions. PMID:26348271

  5. Use of acyl phosphonates for the synthesis of inulin esters and their use as emulsion stabilizing agents.

    PubMed

    Rogge, Tina M; Stevens, Christian V; Colpaert, Anton; Levecke, Bart; Booten, Karl

    2007-02-01

    Inulin, the polydisperse polyfructose, extracted from chicory, was modified via esterification with acyl phosphonates. The grafting of an acyl chain onto the inulin backbone under different conditions led to a highly efficient synthesis of a series of inulin esters, with interesting tensioactive properties. The derivatives were evaluated in oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions with isoparaffinic oil, Isopar M. Therefore, a 2% (w/v) aqueous solution of inulin-based surfactant was used in 50/50 O/W emulsions, in nonelectrolyte, and in electrolyte media, using 1 M MgSO4. Longer acyl chains, e.g., dodecanoyl (C12), hexadecanoyl (C16), and octadecanoyl (C18), with degrees of substitution lower than 0.5, gave rise to the highest emulsion stabilities against coalescence. PMID:17291072

  6. Membrane Topology and Transient Acylation of Toxoplasma gondii Glycosylphosphatidylinositols

    PubMed Central

    Kimmel, Jürgen; Smith, Terry K.; Azzouz, Nahid; Gerold, Peter; Seeber, Frank; Lingelbach, Klaus; Dubremetz, Jean-François; Schwarz, Ralph T.

    2006-01-01

    Using hypotonically permeabilized Toxoplasma gondii tachyzoites, we investigated the topology of the free glycosylphosphatidylinositols (GPIs) within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane. The morphology and permeability of parasites were checked by electron microscopy and release of a cytosolic protein. The membrane integrity of organelles (ER and rhoptries) was checked by protease protection assays. In initial experiments, GPI biosynthetic intermediates were labeled with UDP-[6-3H]GlcNAc in permeabilized parasites, and the transmembrane distribution of the radiolabeled lipids was probed with phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC). A new early intermediate with an acyl modification on the inositol was identified, indicating that inositol acylation also occurs in T. gondii. A significant portion of the early GPI intermediates (GlcN-PI and GlcNAc-PI) could be hydrolyzed following PI-PLC treatment, indicating that these glycolipids are predominantly present in the cytoplasmic leaflet of the ER. Permeabilized T. gondii parasites labeled with either GDP-[2-3H]mannose or UDP-[6-3H]glucose showed that the more mannosylated and side chain (Glc-GalNAc)-modified GPI intermediates are also preferentially localized in the cytoplasmic leaflet of the ER. PMID:16896225

  7. Acylation of lysolecithin in the intestinal mucosa of rats

    PubMed Central

    Subbaiah, P. V.; Sastry, P. S.; Ganguly, J.

    1970-01-01

    1. The presence of an active acyl-CoA–lysolecithin (1-acylglycerophosphorylcholine) acyltransferase was demonstrated in rat intestinal mucosa. 2. ATP and CoA were necessary for the incorporation of free [1-14C]oleic acid into lecithin (phosphatidylcholine). 3. The reaction was about 20 times as fast with [1-14C]oleoyl-CoA as with free oleic acid, CoA and ATP. 4. With 1-acylglycerophosphorylcholine as the acceptor, both oleic acid and palmitic acid were incorporated into the β-position of lecithin; the incorporation of palmitic acid was 60% of that of oleic acid. 5. Of the various analogues of lysolecithin tested as acyl acceptors from [1-14C]oleoyl CoA, a lysolecithin with a long-chain fatty acid at the 1-position was most efficient. 6. The enzyme was mostly present in the brush-border-free particulate fraction of the intestinal mucosa. 7. Of the various tissues of rats tested for the activity, intestinal mucosa was found to be the most active, with testes, liver, kidneys and spleen following it in decreasing order. PMID:5484668

  8. The Liganding of Glycolipid Transfer Protein Is Controlled by Glycolipid Acyl Structure

    PubMed Central

    Kanack, Alex T; Lu, Min; Abagyan, Ruben; Brown, Rhoderick E; Patel, Dinshaw J

    2006-01-01

    Glycosphingolipids (GSLs) play major roles in cellular growth and development. Mammalian glycolipid transfer proteins (GLTPs) are potential regulators of cell processes mediated by GSLs and display a unique architecture among lipid binding/transfer proteins. The GLTP fold represents a novel membrane targeting/interaction domain among peripheral proteins. Here we report crystal structures of human GLTP bound to GSLs of diverse acyl chain length, unsaturation, and sugar composition. Structural comparisons show a highly conserved anchoring of galactosyl- and lactosyl-amide headgroups by the GLTP recognition center. By contrast, acyl chain chemical structure and occupancy of the hydrophobic tunnel dictate partitioning between sphingosine-in and newly-observed sphingosine-out ligand-binding modes. The structural insights, combined with computed interaction propensity distributions, suggest a concerted sequence of events mediated by GLTP conformational changes during GSL transfer to and/or from membranes, as well as during GSL presentation and/or transfer to other proteins. PMID:17105344

  9. Cloning, characterization, and expression analysis of acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP)-thioesterase B from seeds of Chinese Spicehush (Lindera communis).

    PubMed

    Dong, Shubin; Huang, Jiacong; Li, Yannan; Zhang, Jing; Lin, Shanzhi; Zhang, Zhixiang

    2014-05-25

    Acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) thioesterases (TE EC 3.1.2.14) are fatty acid biosynthesis key enzymes that determine fatty acid carbon chain length in most plant tissues. A full-length cDNA corresponding to one of the fatty acyl-ACP thioesterase (Fat) genes, designated LcFatB, was isolated from developing Lindera communis seeds using PCR and RACE with degenerate primers based on conserved sequences of multiple TE gene sequences obtained from GenBank. The 1788 bp cDNA had an open reading frame (ORF) of 1260 bp encoding a protein of 419 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence showed 61-73% identity to proteins in the FatB class of plant thioesterases. Real-time quantitative PCR analysis revealed that LcFatB was expressed in all tissues of L. communis, with the highest expression in the developing seeds 75days after flowering. Recombinant pET-MLcFatB was constructed using the pET-30 a vector and transformed into Escherichia coli BL21(DE3)△FadE, a strain that deleted the acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (FadE). SDS-PAGE analysis of proteins isolated from pET-MLcFatB E. coli cells after induction with IPTG revealed a protein band at ~40.5kDa, corresponding to the predicted size of LcFatB mature protein. The decanoic acid and lauric acid contents of the pET-MLcFatB transformant were increased significantly. These findings suggest that an LcFatB gene from a non-traditional oil-seed tree could be used to function as a saturated acyl-ACP thioesterase and could potentially be used to modify the fatty acid composition of seed oil from L. communis or other species through transgenic approaches. PMID:24631366

  10. Downregulation of Carnitine Acyl-Carnitine Translocase by miRNAs 132 and 212 Amplifies Glucose-Stimulated Insulin Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Soni, Mufaddal S.; Rabaglia, Mary E.; Bhatnagar, Sushant; Shang, Jin; Ilkayeva, Olga; Mynatt, Randall; Zhou, Yun-Ping; Schadt, Eric E.; Thornberry, Nancy A.; Muoio, Deborah M.; Keller, Mark P.

    2014-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that micro-RNAs (miRNAs) 132 and 212 are differentially upregulated in response to obesity in two mouse strains that differ in their susceptibility to obesity-induced diabetes. Here we show the overexpression of miRNAs 132 and 212 enhances insulin secretion (IS) in response to glucose and other secretagogues including nonfuel stimuli. We determined that carnitine acyl-carnitine translocase (CACT; Slc25a20) is a direct target of these miRNAs. CACT is responsible for transporting long-chain acyl-carnitines into the mitochondria for β-oxidation. Small interfering RNA–mediated knockdown of CACT in β-cells led to the accumulation of fatty acyl-carnitines and enhanced IS. The addition of long-chain fatty acyl-carnitines promoted IS from rat insulinoma β-cells (INS-1) as well as primary mouse islets. The effect on INS-1 cells was augmented in response to suppression of CACT. A nonhydrolyzable ether analog of palmitoyl-carnitine stimulated IS, showing that β-oxidation of palmitoyl-carnitine is not required for its stimulation of IS. These studies establish a link between miRNA-dependent regulation of CACT and fatty acyl-carnitine–mediated regulation of IS. PMID:24969106

  11. The monounsaturated acyl- and alkyl- moieties of wax esters and their distribution in commercial orange roughy (Hoplostethus atlanticus) oil.

    PubMed

    Body, D R; Johnson, C B; Shaw, G J

    1985-10-01

    Wax esters were isolated from commercial orange roughy (Hoplostethus atlanticus) oil by column chromatography and fractionated by argentation thin layer chromatography. Following transesterification, the resultant fatty acid methyl esters and fatty alcohols were analyzed by gas chromatography. Both acyl- and alkyl-moieties were mainly of the monoene structure within the 16:1-22:1 range. After derivatization, the positions of the double bonds of even numbered fatty acid and fatty alcohol isomers were located by chromatography-mass spectrometry and compared. Results of these positional analyses indicate that the primary desaturation reactions takes place in the delta 9 position of pre-existing (C14 to C24) acyl chains. It is proposed that acyl components from 18:1 are subjected to chain elongation to form a mixture of 24:1 isomers as the final product. Apart from the 24:1 acyl moiety of the wax esters, in which the double bond was almost exclusively in the delta 15 position, de novo biosynthetic reactions on acids and alcohols appear to yield related acyl- and alkyl-moieties of resynthesized wax esters. PMID:4058265

  12. Discovery of acyl guanidine tryptophan hydroxylase-1 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Daniel R; De Lombaert, Stéphane; Aiello, Robert; Bourassa, Patricia; Barucci, Nicole; Zhang, Qing; Paralkar, Vishwas; Stein, Adam J; Valentine, Jim; Zavadoski, William

    2016-06-15

    An increasing number of diseases have been linked to a dysfunctional peripheral serotonin system. Given that tryptophan hydroxylase 1 (TPH1) is the rate limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis off serotonin, it represents an attractive target to regulate peripheral serotonin. Following up to our first disclosure, we report a new chemotype of TPH1 inhibitors where-by the more common central planar heterocycle has been replaced with an open-chain, acyl guanidine surrogate. Through our work, we found that compounds of this nature provide highly potent TPH1 inhibitors with favorable physicochemical properties that were effective in reducing murine intestinal 5-HT in vivo. Furthermore, we obtained a high resolution (1.90Å) X-ray structure crystal structure of one of these inhibitors (compound 51) that elucidated the active conformation along with revealing a dimeric form of TPH1 for the first time. PMID:27146606

  13. Acyl silicates and acyl aluminates as activated intermediates in peptide formation on clays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, D. H.; Kennedy, R. M.; Macklin, J.

    1984-01-01

    Glycine reacts with heating on dried clays and other minerals to give peptides in much better yield than in the absence of mineral. This reaction was proposed to occur by way of an activated intermediate such as an acyl silicate or acyl aluminate analogous to acyl phosphates involved in several biochemical reactions including peptide bond synthesis. The proposed mechanism has been confirmed by trapping the intermediate, as well as by direct spectroscopic observation of a related intermediate. The reaction of amino acids on periodically dried mineral surfaces represents a widespead, geologically realistic setting for prebiotic peptide formation via in situ activation.

  14. Compartmentalized Acyl-CoA Metabolism in Skeletal Muscle Regulates Systemic Glucose Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lei O.; Grevengoed, Trisha J.; Paul, David S.; Ilkayeva, Olga; Koves, Timothy R.; Pascual, Florencia; Newgard, Christopher B.; Muoio, Deborah M.

    2015-01-01

    The impaired capacity of skeletal muscle to switch between the oxidation of fatty acid (FA) and glucose is linked to disordered metabolic homeostasis. To understand how muscle FA oxidation affects systemic glucose, we studied mice with a skeletal muscle–specific deficiency of long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase (ACSL)1. ACSL1 deficiency caused a 91% loss of ACSL-specific activity and a 60–85% decrease in muscle FA oxidation. Acsl1M−/− mice were more insulin sensitive, and, during an overnight fast, their respiratory exchange ratio was higher, indicating greater glucose use. During endurance exercise, Acsl1M−/− mice ran only 48% as far as controls. At the time that Acsl1M−/− mice were exhausted but control mice continued to run, liver and muscle glycogen and triacylglycerol stores were similar in both genotypes; however, plasma glucose concentrations in Acsl1M−/− mice were ∼40 mg/dL, whereas glucose concentrations in controls were ∼90 mg/dL. Excess use of glucose and the likely use of amino acids for fuel within muscle depleted glucose reserves and diminished substrate availability for hepatic gluconeogenesis. Surprisingly, the content of muscle acyl-CoA at exhaustion was markedly elevated, indicating that acyl-CoAs synthesized by other ACSL isoforms were not available for β-oxidation. This compartmentalization of acyl-CoAs resulted in both an excessive glucose requirement and severely compromised systemic glucose homeostasis. PMID:25071025

  15. High acyl gellan as an emulsion stabilizer.

    PubMed

    Vilela, Joice Aline Pires; da Cunha, Rosiane Lopes

    2016-03-30

    High acyl gellan (0.01-0.2% w/w) was used as stabilizer in oil in water emulsions containing 30% (w/w) of sunflower oil and prepared under different process conditions. Stable emulsions to phase separation could be obtained using high acyl gellan (HA) content above 0.05% (w/w), while low acyl gellan (LA) prepared at the same conditions could not stabilize emulsions. Emulsions properties depended on the process used to mix the oil and gellan dispersion since high pressure homogenization favored stabilization while very high energy density applied by ultrasound led to systems destabilization. Emulsions prepared using high pressure homogenization showed zeta potential values ranging from -50 up to -59 mV, suggesting that electrostatic repulsion could be contributing to the systems stability. Rheological properties of continuous phase were also responsible for emulsions stabilization, since HA gellan dispersions showed high viscosity and gel-like behavior. The high viscosity of the continuous phase could be associated to the presence of high acyl gellan microgels/aggregates. Disentanglement of these aggregates performed by ultrasound strongly decreased the viscosity and consequently affected the emulsions behavior, reducing the stability to phase separation. PMID:26794954

  16. A shotgun lipidomics study of a putative lysophosphatidic acid acyl transferase (PlsC) in Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed

    Basconcillo, Libia Saborido; Zaheer, Rahat; Finan, Turlough M; McCarry, Brian E

    2009-09-15

    A shotgun lipidomics approach was used to study the knockout mutant of a putative lysophosphatidic acyl acid transferase (PlsC) in order to delineate the function of this enzyme in Sinorhizobium meliloti. In plsC knockout mutant lipids that contained 16:0 and 16:1 fatty acids and their biosynthetically related cyclopropane fatty acid (cis-9,10-methylene hexadecanoic acid) decreased up to 93%. Tandem mass spectrometry experiments in the presence of added Li(+) showed that the putative PlsC (SMc00714) functioned as a lysophosphatidic acid acyl transferase specific for the transfer of C16 fatty acids to the sn-2 position of lipids. The levels of lipids containing C18 fatty acids were unaffected in plsC mutant, suggesting the presence of one or more fatty acyl transferases in the genome of S. meliloti with selectivity towards C18 fatty acids. Two non-phosphorus containing lipid classes, sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol and 1,2-diacylglyceryl-trimethylhomoserine lipids, showed similar decreases in C16 fatty acid content as phospholipids in plsC knockout mutant; these non-phosphorus containing lipids share a common biosynthetic origin with phospholipids, most likely involving phosphatidic acid. Ornithine lipids containing C16 fatty acids also showed decreased levels in PlsC knockout mutant, suggesting that PlsC is also involved in their biosynthesis. PMID:19525157

  17. An investigation of nonchlorinated substitute cleaning agents for methylene chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Salerno, R.F.; Dichiaro, J.V.; Egleston, E.E.; Koons, J.W.

    1990-01-29

    Four nonchlorinated solvents, N-methylpyrrolidinone (NMP), arco solv DPM, Bio Act EC-7, and ethyl lactate, were evaluated as substitutes for the methylene chloride used as a cleaning solvent in a ceramic component production process. NMP showed a cleaning efficiency that was superior to the other nonchlorinated solvents and to methylene chloride. 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Structural Basis for Substrate Specificity in Adenosylcobalamin-dependent Isobutyryl-CoA Mutase and Related Acyl-CoA Mutases.

    PubMed

    Jost, Marco; Born, David A; Cracan, Valentin; Banerjee, Ruma; Drennan, Catherine L

    2015-11-01

    Acyl-CoA mutases are a growing class of adenosylcobalamin-dependent radical enzymes that perform challenging carbon skeleton rearrangements in primary and secondary metabolism. Members of this class of enzymes must precisely control substrate positioning to prevent oxidative interception of radical intermediates during catalysis. Our understanding of substrate specificity and catalysis in acyl-CoA mutases, however, is incomplete. Here, we present crystal structures of IcmF, a natural fusion protein variant of isobutyryl-CoA mutase, in complex with the adenosylcobalamin cofactor and four different acyl-CoA substrates. These structures demonstrate how the active site is designed to accommodate the aliphatic acyl chains of each substrate. The structures suggest that a conformational change of the 5'-deoxyadenosyl group from C2'-endo to C3'-endo could contribute to initiation of catalysis. Furthermore, detailed bioinformatic analyses guided by our structural findings identify critical determinants of acyl-CoA mutase substrate specificity and predict new acyl-CoA mutase-catalyzed reactions. These results expand our understanding of the substrate specificity and the catalytic scope of acyl-CoA mutases and could benefit engineering efforts for biotechnological applications ranging from production of biofuels and commercial products to hydrocarbon remediation. PMID:26318610

  19. Synthesis of symmetrical methylene-bridged imidazoheterocycles using DMSO as methylene source under metal-free conditions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ping; Shen, Ziyan; Yuan, Yao; Sun, Peipei

    2016-07-01

    A facile H3PO4-promoted bridging methylenation of imidazopyridines or similar heterocycles has been described for the synthesis of symmetrical methylene-bridged imidazoheterocycles, in which DMSO was used as the carbon source. The reaction obtained good yields for most substrates with high C3-regioselectivity. This method also features metal-free, practicability and low cost. PMID:27298191

  20. Reinforcing Lipid A Acylation on the Cell Surface of Acinetobacter baumannii Promotes Cationic Antimicrobial Peptide Resistance and Desiccation Survival

    PubMed Central

    Boll, Joseph M.; Tucker, Ashley T.; Klein, Dustin R.; Beltran, Alexander M.; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.; Davies, Bryan W.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Acinetobacter baumannii is an emerging Gram-negative pathogen found in hospitals and intensive care units. In order to persist in hospital environments, A. baumannii withstands desiccative conditions and can rapidly develop multidrug resistance to conventional antibiotics. Cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMPs) have served as therapeutic alternatives because they target the conserved lipid A component of the Gram-negative outer membrane to lyse the bacterial cell. However, many Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria, including A. baumannii, fortify their outer membrane with hepta-acylated lipid A to protect the cell from CAMP-dependent cell lysis. Whereas in Escherichia coli and Salmonella, increased production of the outer membrane acyltransferase PagP results in formation of protective hepta-acylated lipid A, which reinforces the lipopolysaccharide portion of the outer membrane barrier, A. baumannii does not carry a gene that encodes a PagP homolog. Instead, A. baumannii has evolved a PagP-independent mechanism to synthesize protective hepta-acylated lipid A. Taking advantage of a recently adapted A. baumannii genetic recombineering system, we characterized two putative acyltransferases in A. baumannii designated LpxLAb (A. baumannii LpxL) and LpxMAb (A. baumannii LpxM), which transfer one and two lauroyl (C12:0) acyl chains, respectively, during lipid A biosynthesis. Hepta-acylation of A. baumannii lipid A promoted resistance to vertebrate and polymyxin CAMPs, which are prescribed as last-resort treatment options. Intriguingly, our analysis also showed that LpxMAb-dependent acylation of lipid A is essential for A. baumannii desiccation survival, a key resistance mechanism for survival in hospital environments. Compounds that inhibit LpxMAb-dependent hepta-acylation of lipid A could act synergistically with CAMPs to provide innovative transmission prevention strategies and treat multidrug-resistant infections. PMID:25991684

  1. Levels of acyl-coenzyme A synthetase 5 in urothelial cells and corresponding neoplasias reflect cellular differentiation.

    PubMed

    Gaisa, Nadine T; Reinartz, Andrea; Schneider, Ursula; Klaus, Christina; Heidenreich, Axel; Jakse, Gerhard; Kaemmerer, Elke; Klinkhammer, Barbara Mara; Knuechel, Ruth; Gassler, Nikolaus

    2013-03-01

    Metabolic components like fatty acids and acyl-Coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) thioesters have been implicated in the pathogenesis of various tumours. The activation of fatty acids to acyl-CoAs is catalysed by long chain acyl-CoA synthetases (ACSLs), and impairment of ACSL expression levels has been associated with tumourigenesis and progression. Since ACSLs have never been investigated in bladder tissues, the study aims to characterize ACSL expression and acyl-CoA synthesis in normal and neoplastic bladder tissues, as well as cell lines. ACSL isoforms 1, 3, 4 and 5 and synthesis of acyl-CoAs were analysed using qRT-PCR, western blot analysis, immunohistochemistry and lipid mass spectrometry. In normal urothelium, expression of ACSL1, 3, 4 and 5, with highest levels of ACSL isoform 5 was found. However, ACSL5 expression was reduced in corresponding neoplastic tissues and urothelial cell lines depending on the grade of cellular differentiation. Anti-ACSL5 immunostainings showed expression in normal urothelium and a gradual loss of ACSL5 protein via pre-invasive lesions to invasive carcinomas. High expression of ACSL5 correlated with increased α-galactosidase activity and positive Uroplakin III staining in tumours. In contrast, synthesis of acyl-CoAs was enhanced in neoplastic bladder tissues compared to normal urothelium, and reflected an increase with respect to cellular differentiation. These results confirm an expression of ACSLs, especially isoform 5, in human urothelium, prove enzymatic/lipidomic changes in bladder cancer tissues, and suggest an involvement of ACSL5 in cellular maturation and/or senescence with possible effects onto induction of tumour formation or progression. Further work may identify responsible pathway alterations, and attempting to re-balance the metabolic equilibrium of the urothelium may offer a further opportunity for tumour treatment and prevention. PMID:23348389

  2. Characterization of soluble acyl-ACP desaturases from Camelina sativa, Macadamia tetraphylla and Dolichandra unguis-cati.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Manuel Fernando Rodríguez; Sánchez-García, Alicia; Salas, Joaquín J; Garcés, Rafael; Martínez-Force, Enrique

    2015-04-15

    Acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) desaturases (EC 1.14.19.2) are soluble enzymes that catalyse the insertion of a double bond into saturated fatty acid bound in saturated acyl chains bound to ACP in higher plants, producing cis-monounsaturated fatty acids. Three types of soluble acyl-ACP desaturases have been described: Δ(9)-acyl-ACP, Δ(6)-acyl-ACP and Δ(4)-acyl-ACP desaturases, which differ in the substrate specificity and the position in which the double bond is introduced. In the present work, Camelina sativa (CsSAD), Macadamia tetraphylla (MtSAD) and Dolichandra unguis-cati (DuSAD) desaturases were cloned, sequenced and characterized. Single copies of CsSAD, MtSAD and DuSAD with three, one and two different alleles, respectively, were found. The corresponding mature proteins were heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli for biochemical characterization in protein extracts. The recombinant CsSAD enzyme showed 300-fold higher specificity towards 18:0-ACP than 16:0-ACP. Similar profile exhibited MtSAD although the differences in the specificity were lower, around 170-fold higher for 18:0-ACP than 16:0-ACP. Furthermore, DuSAD presented a profile showing preference towards 16:0-ACP against 18:0-ACP, around twice more, being so a Δ(9) palmitoyl-ACP desaturase. Also, we reported the expression profile of CsSAD, which showed the highest levels of expression in expanding tissues that typically are very active in lipid biosynthesis such as developing seed endosperm. Moreover, the possibility to express a new desaturase in C. sativa (oilseed crop that store high levels of oil and is easy to transform) to create a new line rich in short monounsaturated fatty acid is discussed. PMID:25765361

  3. Adiabatic state preparation study of methylene

    SciTech Connect

    Veis, Libor Pittner, Jiří

    2014-06-07

    Quantum computers attract much attention as they promise to outperform their classical counterparts in solving certain type of problems. One of them with practical applications in quantum chemistry is simulation of complex quantum systems. An essential ingredient of efficient quantum simulation algorithms are initial guesses of the exact wave functions with high enough fidelity. As was proposed in Aspuru-Guzik et al. [Science 309, 1704 (2005)], the exact ground states can in principle be prepared by the adiabatic state preparation method. Here, we apply this approach to preparation of the lowest lying multireference singlet electronic state of methylene and numerically investigate preparation of this state at different molecular geometries. We then propose modifications that lead to speeding up the preparation process. Finally, we decompose the minimal adiabatic state preparation employing the direct mapping in terms of two-qubit interactions.

  4. Enzymatic Acylation of Anthocyanin Isolated from Black Rice with Methyl Aromatic Acid Ester as Donor: Stability of the Acylated Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zheng; Li, Chunyang; Zhang, Lixia; Liu, Qin; Ou, Shiyi; Zeng, Xiaoxiong

    2016-02-10

    The enzymatic acylation of anthocyanin from black rice with aromatic acid methyl esters as acyl donors and Candida antarctica lipase B was carried out under reduced pressure. The highest conversion of 91% was obtained with benzoic acid methyl ester as acyl donor; cyanidin 3-(6″-benzoyl)-glucoside, cyanidin 3-(6″-salicyloyl)-glucoside, and cyanidin 3-(6″-cinnamoyl)-glucoside were successfully synthesized. This is the first report on the enzymatic acylation of anthocyanin from black rice with methyl aromatic esters as acyl donors and lipase as biocatalyst. Furthermore, the acylation with aromatic carboxylic acids enhanced both the thermostability and light resistivity of anthocyanin. In particular, cyanidin 3-(6″-cinnamoyl)-glucoside was the most stable among the three acylated anthocyanins synthesized. PMID:26766135

  5. Structure of armadillo ACBP: a new member of the acyl-CoA-binding protein family

    SciTech Connect

    Costabel, Marcelo D.; Ermácora, Mario R.; Santomé, José A.; Alzari, Pedro M.; Guérin, Diego M. A.

    2006-10-01

    The X-ray structure of the tetragonal form of apo acyl-CoA-binding protein (ACBP) from the Harderian gland of the South American armadillo Chaetophractus villosus has been solved. The X-ray structure of the tetragonal form of apo acyl-CoA-binding protein (ACBP) from the Harderian gland of the South American armadillo Chaetophractus villosus has been solved. ACBP is a carrier for activated long-chain fatty acids and has been associated with many aspects of lipid metabolism. Its secondary structure is highly similar to that of the corresponding form of bovine ACBP and exhibits the unique flattened α-helical bundle (up–down–down–up) motif reported for animal, yeast and insect ACBPs. Conformational differences are located in loops and turns, although these structural differences do not suffice to account for features that could be related to the unusual biochemistry and lipid metabolism of the Harderian gland.

  6. [Antibacterial Activity of Alkylated and Acylated Derivatives of Low-Molecular Weight Chitosan].

    PubMed

    Shagdarova, B Ts; Il'ina, A V; Varlamov, V P

    2016-01-01

    A number of alkylated (quaternized) and acylated derivatives of low-molecular weight chitosan were obtained. The structure and composition of the compounds were confirmed by the results of IR and PMR spectroscopy, as well as conductometric titration. The effect of the acyl substituent and the degree of substitution of N-(2-hydroxy-3-trimethylammonium) with the propyl fragment appended to amino groups of the C2 atom of polymer chains on antibacterial activity against typical representatives of gram-positive and gram-negative microorganisms (Staphylococcus epidermidis and Escherichia coli) was studied. The highest activity was in the case of N-[(2-hydroxy-3-trimethylammonium)propyl]chitosan chloride with the maximal substitution (98%). The minimal inhibitory concentration of the derivative was 0.48 µg/mL and 3.90 µg/mL for S. epidermis and E. coli, respectively. PMID:27266254

  7. Ab initio study on the transition state of acylation step of trypsin catalysis.

    PubMed

    Kubodera, H; Nakagawa, S; Umeyama, H

    1990-03-01

    The transition state of acylation step of trypsin catalysis was determined by molecular orbital calculations. The calculations were carried out at the RHF-LCAO-SCF approximation level with double zeta basis set (plus polarization functions). The role of His57 residue in the acylation step of the catalytic reaction of trypsin was analysed from a quantum mechanical point of view. The influences of surrounding residues, such as oxyanion hole and Asp102-, and the electrostatic effect of the other regions of the enzyme were also studied. His57 was proved to capture the proton from Ser195 side chain terminus with its lone pair and to transfer it to substrate with electrostatic assistance of Asp102- and oxyanion hole. PMID:2165153

  8. Endogenous N-acyl taurines regulate skin wound healing.

    PubMed

    Sasso, Oscar; Pontis, Silvia; Armirotti, Andrea; Cardinali, Giorgia; Kovacs, Daniela; Migliore, Marco; Summa, Maria; Moreno-Sanz, Guillermo; Picardo, Mauro; Piomelli, Daniele

    2016-07-26

    The intracellular serine amidase, fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), degrades a heterogeneous family of lipid-derived bioactive molecules that include amides of long-chain fatty acids with taurine [N-acyl-taurines (NATs)]. The physiological functions of the NATs are unknown. Here we show that genetic or pharmacological disruption of FAAH activity accelerates skin wound healing in mice and stimulates motogenesis of human keratinocytes and differentiation of human fibroblasts in primary cultures. Using untargeted and targeted lipidomics strategies, we identify two long-chain saturated NATs-N-tetracosanoyl-taurine [NAT(24:0)] and N-eicosanoyl-taurine [NAT(20:0)]-as primary substrates for FAAH in mouse skin, and show that the levels of these substances sharply decrease at the margins of a freshly inflicted wound to increase again as healing begins. Additionally, we demonstrate that local administration of synthetic NATs accelerates wound closure in mice and stimulates repair-associated responses in primary cultures of human keratinocytes and fibroblasts, through a mechanism that involves tyrosine phosphorylation of the epidermal growth factor receptor and an increase in intracellular calcium levels, under the permissive control of transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 receptors. The results point to FAAH-regulated NAT signaling as an unprecedented lipid-based mechanism of wound-healing control in mammalian skin, which might be targeted for chronic wound therapy. PMID:27412859

  9. Methylene Blue Inhibits Caspases by Oxidation of the Catalytic Cysteine.

    PubMed

    Pakavathkumar, Prateep; Sharma, Gyanesh; Kaushal, Vikas; Foveau, Bénédicte; LeBlanc, Andrea C

    2015-01-01

    Methylene blue, currently in phase 3 clinical trials against Alzheimer Disease, disaggregates the Tau protein of neurofibrillary tangles by oxidizing specific cysteine residues. Here, we investigated if methylene blue can inhibit caspases via the oxidation of their active site cysteine. Methylene blue, and derivatives, azure A and azure B competitively inhibited recombinant Caspase-6 (Casp6), and inhibited Casp6 activity in transfected human colon carcinoma cells and in serum-deprived primary human neuron cultures. Methylene blue also inhibited recombinant Casp1 and Casp3. Furthermore, methylene blue inhibited Casp3 activity in an acute mouse model of liver toxicity. Mass spectrometry confirmed methylene blue and azure B oxidation of the catalytic Cys163 cysteine of Casp6. Together, these results show a novel inhibitory mechanism of caspases via sulfenation of the active site cysteine. These results indicate that methylene blue or its derivatives could (1) have an additional effect against Alzheimer Disease by inhibiting brain caspase activity, (2) be used as a drug to prevent caspase activation in other conditions, and (3) predispose chronically treated individuals to cancer via the inhibition of caspases. PMID:26400108

  10. Methylene Blue Inhibits Caspases by Oxidation of the Catalytic Cysteine

    PubMed Central

    Pakavathkumar, Prateep; Sharma, Gyanesh; Kaushal, Vikas; Foveau, Bénédicte; LeBlanc, Andrea C.

    2015-01-01

    Methylene blue, currently in phase 3 clinical trials against Alzheimer Disease, disaggregates the Tau protein of neurofibrillary tangles by oxidizing specific cysteine residues. Here, we investigated if methylene blue can inhibit caspases via the oxidation of their active site cysteine. Methylene blue, and derivatives, azure A and azure B competitively inhibited recombinant Caspase-6 (Casp6), and inhibited Casp6 activity in transfected human colon carcinoma cells and in serum-deprived primary human neuron cultures. Methylene blue also inhibited recombinant Casp1 and Casp3. Furthermore, methylene blue inhibited Casp3 activity in an acute mouse model of liver toxicity. Mass spectrometry confirmed methylene blue and azure B oxidation of the catalytic Cys163 cysteine of Casp6. Together, these results show a novel inhibitory mechanism of caspases via sulfenation of the active site cysteine. These results indicate that methylene blue or its derivatives could (1) have an additional effect against Alzheimer Disease by inhibiting brain caspase activity, (2) be used as a drug to prevent caspase activation in other conditions, and (3) predispose chronically treated individuals to cancer via the inhibition of caspases. PMID:26400108

  11. Purification and characterization of fatty acyl-acyl carrier protein synthetase from Vibrio harveyi.

    PubMed Central

    Fice, D; Shen, Z; Byers, D M

    1993-01-01

    A Vibrio harveyi enzyme which catalyzes the ATP-dependent ligation of fatty acids to acyl carrier protein (ACP) has been purified 6,000-fold to apparent homogeneity by anion-exchange, gel filtration, and ACP-Sepharose affinity chromatography. Purified acyl-ACP synthetase migrated as a single 62-kDa band on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and as an 80-kDa protein by gel filtration under reducing conditions. Activity of the purified enzyme was lost within hours in the absence of glycerol and low concentrations of Triton X-100. Acyl-ACP synthetase exhibited Kms for myristic acid, ACP, and ATP of 7 microM, 18 microM, and 0.3 mM, respectively. The enzyme was specific for adenine-containing nucleotides, and AMP was the product of the reaction. No covalent acyl-enzyme intermediate was observed. Enzyme activity was stimulated up to 50% by iodoacetamide but inhibited > 80% by N-ethylmaleimide: inhibition by the latter was prevented by ATP and ACP but not myristic acid. Dithiothreitol and sulfhydryl-directed reagents also influenced enzyme size, activity, and elution pattern on anion-exchange resins. The function of acyl-ACP synthetase has not been established, but it may be related to the capacity of V. harveyi to elongate exogenous fatty acids by an ACP-dependent mechanism. Images PMID:8384617

  12. Phase Behavior and Nanoscale Structure of Phospholipid Membranes Incorporated with Acylated C14-Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Tina B.; Kaasgaard, Thomas; Jensen, Morten Ø.; Frokjaer, Sven; Mouritsen, Ole G.; Jørgensen, Kent

    2005-01-01

    The thermotropic phase behavior and lateral structure of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) lipid bilayers containing an acylated peptide has been characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) on vesicles and atomic force microscopy (AFM) on mica-supported bilayers. The acylated peptide, which is a synthetic decapeptide N-terminally linked to a C14 acyl chain (C14-peptide), is incorporated into DPPC bilayers in amounts ranging from 0–20 mol %. The calorimetric scans of the two-component system demonstrate a distinct influence of the C14-peptide on the lipid bilayer thermodynamics. This is manifested as a concentration-dependent downshift of both the main phase transition and the pretransition. In addition, the main phase transition peak is significantly broadened, indicating phase coexistence. In the AFM imaging scans we found that the C14-peptide, when added to supported gel phase DPPC bilayers, inserts preferentially into preexisting defect regions and has a noticeable influence on the organization of the surrounding lipids. The presence of the C14-peptide gives rise to a laterally heterogeneous bilayer structure with coexisting lipid domains characterized by a 10 Å height difference. The AFM images also show that the appearance of the ripple phase of the DPPC lipid bilayers is unaffected by the C14-peptide. The experimental results are supported by molecular dynamics simulations, which show that the C14-peptide has a disordering effect on the lipid acyl chains and causes a lateral expansion of the lipid bilayer. These effects are most pronounced for gel-like bilayer structures and support the observed downshift in the phase-transition temperature. Moreover, the molecular dynamics data indicate a tendency of a tryptophan residue in the peptide sequence to position itself in the bilayer headgroup region. PMID:16100273

  13. Head-group acylation of monogalactosyldiacylglycerol is a common stress response, and the acyl-galactose acyl composition varies with the plant species and applied stress

    PubMed Central

    Vu, Hieu Sy; Roth, Mary R.; Tamura, Pamela; Samarakoon, Thilani; Shiva, Sunitha; Honey, Samuel; Lowe, Kaleb; Schmelz, Eric A.; Williams, Todd D.; Welti, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    Formation of galactose-acylated monogalactosyldiacylglycerols has been shown to be induced by leaf homogenization, mechanical wounding, avirulent bacterial infection, and thawing after snap-freezing. Here, lipidomic analysis using mass spectrometry showed that galactose-acylated monogalactosyldiacylglycerols, formed in wheat (Triticum aestivum) and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) leaves upon wounding, have acyl-galactose profiles that differ from those of wounded Arabidopsis thaliana, indicating that different plant species accumulate different acyl-galactose components in response to the same stress. Additionally, the composition of the acyl-galactose component of Arabidopsis acMGDG depends on the stress treatment. After sub-lethal freezing treatment, acMGDG contained mainly non-oxidized fatty acids esterified to galactose, whereas mostly oxidized fatty acids accumulated on galactose after wounding or bacterial infection. Compositional data are consistent with acMGDG being formed in vivo by transacylation with fatty acids from digalactosyldiacylglycerols. Oxophytodienoic acid, an oxidized fatty acid, was more concentrated on the galactosyl ring of acylated monogalactosyldiacylglycerols than in galactolipids in general. Also, oxidized fatty acid-containing acylated monogalactosyldiacylglycerols increased cumulatively when wounded Arabidopsis leaves were wounded again. These findings suggest that, in Arabidopsis, the pool of galactose-acylated monogalactosyldiacylglycerols may serve to sequester oxidized fatty acids during stress responses. PMID:24286212

  14. Acyl Silicates and Acyl Aluminates as Activated Intermediates in Peptide Formation on Clays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, David H.; Kennedy, Robert M.; Macklin, John

    1984-12-01

    Glycine reacts with heating on dried clays and other minerals to give peptides in much better yield than in the absence of mineral. This reaction was proposed to occur by way of an activated intermediate such as an acyl silicate or acyl aluminate (i.e., the anhydride of a carboxylic acid with Si-OH or Al-OH), analogous to acyl phosphates involved in several biochemical reactions including peptide bond synthesis. We confirmed the proposed mechanism by trapping the intermediate, as well as by direct spectroscopic observation of a related intermediate. The reaction of amino acids on periodically dried mineral surfaces represents a widespread, geologically realistic setting for prebiotic peptide formation via in situ activation.

  15. Fatty Acid Export from the Chloroplast. Molecular Characterization of a Major Plastidial Acyl-Coenzyme A Synthetase from Arabidopsis1

    PubMed Central

    Schnurr, Judy A.; Shockey, Jay M.; de Boer, Gert-Jan; Browse, John A.

    2002-01-01

    Acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) synthetases (ACSs, EC 6.2.1.3) catalyze the formation of fatty acyl-CoAs from free fatty acid, ATP, and CoA. Essentially all de novo fatty acid synthesis occurs in the plastid. Fatty acids destined for membrane glycerolipid and triacylglycerol synthesis in the endoplasmic reticulum must be first activated to acyl-CoAs via an ACS. Within a family of nine ACS genes from Arabidopsis, we identified a chloroplast isoform, LACS9. LACS9 is highly expressed in developing seeds and young rosette leaves. Both in vitro chloroplast import assays and transient expression of a green fluorescent protein fusion indicated that the LACS9 protein is localized in the plastid envelope. A T-DNA knockout mutant (lacs9-1) was identified by reverse genetics and these mutant plants were indistinguishable from wild type in growth and appearance. Analysis of leaf lipids provided no evidence for compromised export of acyl groups from chloroplasts. However, direct assays demonstrated that lacs9-1 plants contained only 10% of the chloroplast long-chain ACS activity found for wild type. The residual long-chain ACS activity in mutant chloroplasts was comparable with calculated rates of fatty acid synthesis. Although another isozyme contributes to the activation of fatty acids during their export from the chloroplast, LACS9 is a major chloroplast ACS. PMID:12177483

  16. The fruit ripening-related gene FaAAT2 encodes an acyl transferase involved in strawberry aroma biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Cumplido-Laso, Guadalupe; Medina-Puche, Laura; Moyano, Enriqueta; Hoffmann, Thomas; Sinz, Quirin; Ring, Ludwig; Studart-Wittkowski, Claudia; Caballero, José Luis; Schwab, Wilfried; Muñoz-Blanco, Juan; Blanco-Portales, Rosario

    2012-06-01

    Short-chain esters contribute to the blend of volatiles that define the strawberry aroma. The last step in their biosynthesis involves an alcohol acyltransferase that catalyses the esterification of an acyl moiety of acyl-CoA with an alcohol. This study identified a novel strawberry alcohol acyltransferase gene (FaAAT2) whose expression pattern during fruit receptacle growth and ripening is in accordance with the production of esters throughout strawberry fruit ripening. The full-length FaAAT2 cDNA was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli and its activity was analysed with acyl-CoA and alcohol substrates. The semi-purified FaAAT2 enzyme had activity with C1-C8 straight-chain alcohols and aromatic alcohols in the presence of acetyl-CoA. Cinnamyl alcohol was the most efficient acyl acceptor. When FaAAT2 expression was transiently downregulated in the fruit receptacle by agroinfiltration, the volatile ester production was significantly reduced in strawberry fruit. The results suggest that FaAAT2 plays a significant role in the production of esters that contribute to the final strawberry fruit flavour. PMID:22563120

  17. Spectroscopy of Methylene Blue-Smectite Suspensions.

    PubMed

    Jacobs; Schoonheydt

    1999-12-01

    Aqueoussuspensions of different Na-smectite type clay minerals were exchanged with methylene blue (Mb) and analyzed by visible spectroscopy. The spectra show bands of two types of monomers, protonated Mb, Mb-dimers, and higher aggregates. Their relative importance and the bandwidth was found to depend on parameters such as the particle morphology, the degree of dispersion, and the extent and location of the layer charge of the smectite. This can be qualitatively explained by the relative importance of three types of interactions, Mb-surface, H(2)O-surface, and Mb-Mb interactions. For hectorite and laponite at small loadings, H(2)O-surface interactions are dominant. Mb-islands are formed with a characteristic monomer absorption at 653 nm. Monomers at the surface absorb at 670 nm as found in barasym and saponite. Wyoming bentonite takes an intermediate position. As the loading increases Mb-Mb and Mb-surface interactions become dominant, giving rise to monomers absorbing at 670 nm, dimers, and higher aggregates. The bandwidths of the absorption bands reflect the structure of the clay particle associates. Copyright 1999 Academic Press. PMID:10550246

  18. Methylene blue treatment in experimental ischemic stroke: a mini review

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zhao; Duong, Timothy Q

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of death and long-term disability. Methylene blue, a drug grandfathered by the Food and Drug Administration with a long history of safe usage in humans for treating methemoglobinemia and cyanide poisoning, has recently been shown to be neuroprotective in neurodegenerative diseases and brain injuries. The goal of this paper is to review studies on methylene blue in experimental stroke models. PMID:27042692

  19. Unique plasma metabolomic signatures of individuals with inherited disorders of long-chain fatty acid oxidation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Blood and urine acylcarnitine profiles are commonly used to diagnose long-chain fatty acid oxidation disorders (FAOD: i.e., long-chain hydroxy-acyl-CoA dehydrogenase [LCHAD] and carnitine palmitoyltransferase 2 [CPT2] deficiency), but the global metabolic impact of long-chain FAOD has not been repor...

  20. Engineering Yarrowia lipolytica for production of medium-chain fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Rutter, Charles D; Zhang, Shuyan; Rao, Christopher V

    2015-09-01

    Lipids are naturally derived products that offer an attractive, renewable alternative to petroleum-based hydrocarbons. While naturally produced long-chain fatty acids can replace some petroleum analogs, medium-chain fatty acid would more closely match the desired physical and chemical properties of currently employed petroleum products. In this study, we engineered Yarrowia lipolytica, an oleaginous yeast that naturally produces lipids at high titers, to produce medium-chain fatty acids. Five different acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) thioesterases with specificity for medium-chain acyl-ACP molecules were expressed in Y. lipolytica, resulting in formation of either decanoic or octanoic acid. These novel fatty acid products were found to comprise up to 40 % of the total cell lipids. Furthermore, the reduction in chain length resulted in a twofold increase in specific lipid productivity in these engineered strains. The medium-chain fatty acids were found to be incorporated into all lipid classes. PMID:26129951

  1. Fate and effects of methylene chloride in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Klecka, G M

    1982-09-01

    Activated sludge obtained from a municipal wastewater treatment plant was acclimated to methylene chloride at concentrations between 1 and 100 mg/liter by continuous exposure to the compound for 9 to 11 days. Acclimated cultures were shown to mineralize methylene chloride to carbon dioxide and chloride. Rates of methylene chloride degradation were 0.14, 2.3, and 7.4 mg of CH2Cl2 consumed per h per g of mixed-liquor suspended solids for cultures incubated in the presence of 1, 10, and 100 mg/liter, respectively. Concentrations of methylene chloride between 10 and 1,000 mg/liter had no significant effect on O2 consumption or glucose metabolism by activated sludge. A hypothetical model was developed to examine the significance of volatilization and biodegradation for the removal of methylene chloride from an activated sludge reactor. Application of the model indicated that the rate of biodegradation was approximately 12 times greater than the rate of volatilization. Thus, biodegradation may be the predominant process determining the fate of methylene chloride in activated sludge systems continuously exposed to the compound. PMID:7138008

  2. Fate and effects of methylene chloride in activated sludge.

    PubMed Central

    Klecka, G M

    1982-01-01

    Activated sludge obtained from a municipal wastewater treatment plant was acclimated to methylene chloride at concentrations between 1 and 100 mg/liter by continuous exposure to the compound for 9 to 11 days. Acclimated cultures were shown to mineralize methylene chloride to carbon dioxide and chloride. Rates of methylene chloride degradation were 0.14, 2.3, and 7.4 mg of CH2Cl2 consumed per h per g of mixed-liquor suspended solids for cultures incubated in the presence of 1, 10, and 100 mg/liter, respectively. Concentrations of methylene chloride between 10 and 1,000 mg/liter had no significant effect on O2 consumption or glucose metabolism by activated sludge. A hypothetical model was developed to examine the significance of volatilization and biodegradation for the removal of methylene chloride from an activated sludge reactor. Application of the model indicated that the rate of biodegradation was approximately 12 times greater than the rate of volatilization. Thus, biodegradation may be the predominant process determining the fate of methylene chloride in activated sludge systems continuously exposed to the compound. PMID:7138008

  3. Modulation of FadR binding capacity for acyl-CoA fatty acids through structure-guided mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Bacik, John-Paul; Yeager, Chris M; Twary, Scott N; Martí-Arbona, Ricardo

    2015-10-01

    FadR is a versatile global regulator in Escherichia coli that controls fatty acid metabolism and thereby modulates the ability of this bacterium to grow using fatty acids or acetate as the sole carbon source. FadR regulates fatty acid metabolism in response to intra-cellular concentrations of acyl-CoA lipids. The ability of FadR to bind acyl-CoA fatty acids is thus of significant interest for the engineering of biosynthetic pathways for the production of lipid-based biofuels and commodity chemicals. Based on the available crystal structure of E. coli bound to myristoyl-CoA, we predicted amino acid positions within the effector binding pocket that would alter the ability of FadR to bind acyl-CoA fatty acids without affecting DNA binding. We utilized fluorescence polarization to characterize the in vitro binding properties of wild type and mutant FadR. We found that a Leu102Ala mutant enhanced binding of the effector, likely by increasing the size of the binding pocket for the acyl moiety of the molecule. Conversely, the elimination of the guanidine side chain (Arg213Ala and Arg213Met mutants) of the CoA moiety binding site severely diminished the ability of FadR to bind the acyl-CoA effector. These results demonstrate the ability to fine tune FadR binding capacity. The validation of an efficient method to fully characterize all the binding events involved in the specific activity (effector and DNA operator binding) of FadR has allowed us to increase our understanding of the role of specific amino acids in the binding and recognition of acyl-CoA fatty acids and will greatly facilitate efforts aimed at engineering tunable FadR regulators for synthetic biology. PMID:26385696

  4. Modulation of FadR Binding Capacity for Acyl-CoA Fatty Acids Through Structure-Guided Mutagenesis

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bacik, John-Paul; Yeager, Chris M.; Twary, Scott N.; Martí-Arbona, Ricardo

    2015-09-18

    FadR is a versatile global regulator in Escherichia coli that controls fatty acid metabolism and thereby modulates the ability of this bacterium to grow using fatty acids or acetate as the sole carbon source. FadR regulates fatty acid metabolism in response to intra-cellular concentrations of acyl-CoA lipids. The ability of FadR to bind acyl-CoA fatty acids is hence of significant interest for the engineering of biosynthetic pathways for the production of lipid-based biofuels and commodity chemicals. Based on the available crystal structure of E. coli bound to myristoyl- CoA, we predicted amino acid positions within the effector binding pocket thatmore » would alter the ability of FadR to bind acyl-CoA fatty acids without affecting DNA binding. We utilized fluorescence polarization to characterize the in-vitro binding properties of wild type and mutant FadR. We found that a Leu102Ala mutant enhanced binding of the effector, likely by increasing the size of the binding pocket for the acyl moiety of the molecule. Conversely, the elimination of the guanidine side chain (Arg213Ala and Arg213Met mutants) of the CoA moiety binding site severely diminished the ability of FadR to bind the acyl-CoA effector. These results demonstrate the ability to fine tune FadR binding capacity. The validation of an efficient method to fully characterize all the binding events involved in the specific activity (effector and DNA operator binding) of FadR has allowed us to increase our understanding of the role of specific amino acids in the binding and recognition of acyl-CoA fatty acids and will greatly facilitate efforts aimed at engineering tunable FadR regulators for synthetic biology.« less

  5. Modulation of FadR Binding Capacity for Acyl-CoA Fatty Acids Through Structure-Guided Mutagenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Bacik, John-Paul; Yeager, Chris M.; Twary, Scott N.; Martí-Arbona, Ricardo

    2015-09-18

    FadR is a versatile global regulator in Escherichia coli that controls fatty acid metabolism and thereby modulates the ability of this bacterium to grow using fatty acids or acetate as the sole carbon source. FadR regulates fatty acid metabolism in response to intra-cellular concentrations of acyl-CoA lipids. The ability of FadR to bind acyl-CoA fatty acids is hence of significant interest for the engineering of biosynthetic pathways for the production of lipid-based biofuels and commodity chemicals. Based on the available crystal structure of E. coli bound to myristoyl- CoA, we predicted amino acid positions within the effector binding pocket that would alter the ability of FadR to bind acyl-CoA fatty acids without affecting DNA binding. We utilized fluorescence polarization to characterize the in-vitro binding properties of wild type and mutant FadR. We found that a Leu102Ala mutant enhanced binding of the effector, likely by increasing the size of the binding pocket for the acyl moiety of the molecule. Conversely, the elimination of the guanidine side chain (Arg213Ala and Arg213Met mutants) of the CoA moiety binding site severely diminished the ability of FadR to bind the acyl-CoA effector. These results demonstrate the ability to fine tune FadR binding capacity. The validation of an efficient method to fully characterize all the binding events involved in the specific activity (effector and DNA operator binding) of FadR has allowed us to increase our understanding of the role of specific amino acids in the binding and recognition of acyl-CoA fatty acids and will greatly facilitate efforts aimed at engineering tunable FadR regulators for synthetic biology.

  6. Ion channel regulation by protein S-acylation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Protein S-acylation, the reversible covalent fatty-acid modification of cysteine residues, has emerged as a dynamic posttranslational modification (PTM) that controls the diversity, life cycle, and physiological function of numerous ligand- and voltage-gated ion channels. S-acylation is enzymatically mediated by a diverse family of acyltransferases (zDHHCs) and is reversed by acylthioesterases. However, for most ion channels, the dynamics and subcellular localization at which S-acylation and deacylation cycles occur are not known. S-acylation can control the two fundamental determinants of ion channel function: (1) the number of channels resident in a membrane and (2) the activity of the channel at the membrane. It controls the former by regulating channel trafficking and the latter by controlling channel kinetics and modulation by other PTMs. Ion channel function may be modulated by S-acylation of both pore-forming and regulatory subunits as well as through control of adapter, signaling, and scaffolding proteins in ion channel complexes. Importantly, cross-talk of S-acylation with other PTMs of both cysteine residues by themselves and neighboring sites of phosphorylation is an emerging concept in the control of ion channel physiology. In this review, I discuss the fundamentals of protein S-acylation and the tools available to investigate ion channel S-acylation. The mechanisms and role of S-acylation in controlling diverse stages of the ion channel life cycle and its effect on ion channel function are highlighted. Finally, I discuss future goals and challenges for the field to understand both the mechanistic basis for S-acylation control of ion channels and the functional consequence and implications for understanding the physiological function of ion channel S-acylation in health and disease. PMID:24821965

  7. Synthesis, Surface Active Properties and Cytotoxicity of Sodium N-Acyl Prolines.

    PubMed

    Sreenu, Madhumanchi; Narayana Prasad, Rachapudi Badari; Sujitha, Pombala; Kumar, Chityal Ganesh

    2015-01-01

    Sodium N-acyl prolines (NaNAPro) were synthesized using mixture of fatty acids obtained from coconut, palm, karanja, Sterculia foetida and high oleic sunflower oils via Schotten-Baumann reaction in 58-75% yields to study the synergetic effect of mixture of hydrophobic fatty acyl functionalities like saturation, unsaturation and cyclopropene fatty acids with different chain lengths and aliphatic hetero cyclic proline head group on their surface and cytotoxicity activities. The products were characterized by chromatographic and spectral techniques. The synthesized products were evaluated for their surface active properties such as surface tension, wetting power, foaming characteristics, emulsion stability, calcium tolerance, critical micelle concentration (CMC) and thermodynamic properties. The results revealed that all the products exhibited superior surface active properties like CMC, calcium tolerance and emulsion stability as compared to the standard surfactant, sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS). In addition, palm, Sterculia foetida and high oleic sunflower fatty N-acyl prolines exhibited promising cytotoxicity against different tumor cell lines. PMID:26521810

  8. Endophytic Actinomycetes: A Novel Source of Potential Acyl Homoserine Lactone Degrading Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Chankhamhaengdecha, Surang; Hongvijit, Suphatra; Srichaisupakit, Akkaraphol; Charnchai, Pattra; Panbangred, Watanalai

    2013-01-01

    Several Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria employ N-acyl-L-homoserine lactone (HSL) quorum sensing (QS) system to control their virulence traits. Degradation of acyl-HSL signal molecules by quorum quenching enzyme (QQE) results in a loss of pathogenicity in QS-dependent organisms. The QQE activity of actinomycetes in rhizospheric soil and inside plant tissue was explored in order to obtain novel strains with high HSL-degrading activity. Among 344 rhizospheric and 132 endophytic isolates, 127 (36.9%) and 68 (51.5%) of them, respectively, possessed the QQE activity. The highest HSL-degrading activity was at 151.30 ± 3.1 nmole/h/mL from an endophytic actinomycetes isolate, LPC029. The isolate was identified as Streptomyces based on 16S  rRNA gene sequence similarity. The QQE from LPC029 revealed HSL-acylase activity that was able to cleave an amide bond of acyl-side chain in HSL substrate as determined by HPLC. LPC029 HSL-acylase showed broad substrate specificity from C6- to C12-HSL in which C10HSL is the most favorable substrate for this enzyme. In an in vitro pathogenicity assay, the partially purified HSL-acylase efficiently suppressed soft rot of potato caused by Pectobacterium carotovorum ssp. carotovorum as demonstrated. To our knowledge, this is the first report of HSL-acylase activity derived from an endophytic Streptomyces. PMID:23484156

  9. Cloning of a palmitoyl-acyl carrier protein thioesterase from oil palm.

    PubMed

    Othman, A; Lazarus, C; Fraser, T; Stobart, K

    2000-12-01

    A palmitoyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) thioesterase cDNA clone was isolated from an oil palm cDNA library. The cDNA was expressed in Escherichia coli as a glutathione S-transferase fusion protein and a crude bacterial extract was assayed for acyl-CoA-hydrolysing activity. The recombinant enzyme was able to hydrolyse medium- and long-chain acyl-CoAs. Northern-blot analysis showed a high level of gene expression in leaf, flower and 15-, 17- and 18-week mesocarp tissues. Low-level gene expression was detected in germinated seedlings and 8- and 12-week mesocarp tissues, but no transcript was detected in any kernel tissues. Southern-blot analysis indicated the presence of a single gene and we have also isolated a genomic clone using the cDNA as a probe. Two genomic fragments were subcloned and a 7 kb contiguous stretch of the oil palm genome was sequenced. Comparison of this sequence with the cDNA sequence identified a putative 93 amino acid transit peptide, most of which is missing from the cDNA. The coding region of the gene consisted of seven exons and six introns. PMID:11171146

  10. Arabidopsis cytosolic acyl-CoA-binding proteins ACBP4, ACBP5 and ACBP6 have overlapping but distinct roles in seed development

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, An-Shan; Haslam, Richard P.; Michaelson, Louise V.; Liao, Pan; Chen, Qin-Fang; Sooriyaarachchi, Sanjeewani; Mowbray, Sherry L.; Napier, Johnathan A.; Tanner, Julian A.; Chye, Mee-Len

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotic cytosolic ACBPs (acyl-CoA-binding proteins) bind acyl-CoA esters and maintain a cytosolic acyl-CoA pool, but the thermodynamics of their protein–lipid interactions and physiological relevance in plants are not well understood. Arabidopsis has three cytosolic ACBPs which have been identified as AtACBP4, AtACBP5 and AtACBP6, and microarray data indicated that all of them are expressed in seeds; AtACBP4 is expressed in early embryogenesis, whereas AtACBP5 is expressed later. ITC (isothermal titration calorimetry) in combination with transgenic Arabidopsis lines were used to investigate the roles of these three ACBPs from Arabidopsis thaliana. The dissociation constants, stoichiometry and enthalpy change of AtACBP interactions with various acyl-CoA esters were determined using ITC. Strong binding of recombinant (r) AtACBP6 with long-chain acyl-CoA (C16- to C18-CoA) esters was observed with dissociation constants in the nanomolar range. However, the affinity of rAtACBP4 and rAtACBP5 to these acyl-CoA esters was much weaker (dissociation constants in the micromolar range), suggesting that they interact with acyl-CoA esters differently from rAtACBP6. When transgenic Arabidopsis expressing AtACBP6pro::GUS was generated, strong GUS (β-glucuronidase) expression in cotyledonary-staged embryos and seedlings prompted us to measure the acyl-CoA contents of the acbp6 mutant. This mutant accumulated higher levels of C18:1-CoA and C18:1- and C18:2-CoAs in cotyledonary-staged embryos and seedlings, respectively, in comparison with the wild type. The acbp4acbp5acbp6 mutant showed the lightest seed weight and highest sensitivity to abscisic acid during germination, suggesting their physiological functions in seeds. PMID:25423293

  11. Chlorsulfuron modifies biosynthesis of acyl Acid substituents of sucrose esters secreted by tobacco trichomes.

    PubMed

    Kandra, L; Wagner, G J

    1990-11-01

    Sucrose esters and duvatrienediol diterpenes are principal constituents formed in and secreted outside head cells of trichomes occurring on surfaces of Nicotiana tabacum. Using trichome-bearing epidermal peels prepared from midveins of N. tabacum cv T.I. 1068 leaves, we found that chlorsulfuron reduced and modified radiolabeling of sucrose ester acyl acids derived from branched-chain amino acid metabolism. The herbicide did not effect formation and exudation of diterpenes which are products of isoprenoid metabolism. Treatment with 1.0 micromolar chlorsulfuron affected 8.5- and 6.3-fold reductions in radiolabeling of methylvaleryl and methylbutyryl groups of sucrose esters, respectively, and concomitant increases of 9- and 9.8-fold in radiolabeling of straight chain valeryl and butyryl groups, respectively. These results and others indicate that inhibition of acetolactate synthase causes an accumulation of 2-oxo-butyric acid that is utilized by enzymes common to Leu biosynthesis to form 2-oxo-valeric acid. Coenzyme A (CoA) activation of this keto acid gives rise to butyryl CoA, which is utilized to form butyryl containing sucrose esters. Alternatively, reutilization of 2-oxo-valeric acid by the same enzymes followed by CoA activation leads to valeryl containing sucrose esters. We propose that in trichome secretory cells synthase, isomerase and dehydrogenase enzymes which catalyze Leu synthesis/degredation in most tissues, convert iso-branched, anteiso-branched and straight-chain keto acids in the formation of sucrose ester acyl groups. PMID:16667871

  12. Chlorsulfuron Modifies Biosynthesis of Acyl Acid Substituents of Sucrose Esters Secreted by Tobacco Trichomes

    PubMed Central

    Kandra, Lili; Wagner, George J.

    1990-01-01

    Sucrose esters and duvatrienediol diterpenes are principal constituents formed in and secreted outside head cells of trichomes occurring on surfaces of Nicotiana tabacum. Using trichome-bearing epidermal peels prepared from midveins of N. tabacum cv T.I. 1068 leaves, we found that chlorsulfuron reduced and modified radiolabeling of sucrose ester acyl acids derived from branched-chain amino acid metabolism. The herbicide did not effect formation and exudation of diterpenes which are products of isoprenoid metabolism. Treatment with 1.0 micromolar chlorsulfuron affected 8.5- and 6.3-fold reductions in radiolabeling of methylvaleryl and methylbutyryl groups of sucrose esters, respectively, and concomitant increases of 9- and 9.8-fold in radiolabeling of straight chain valeryl and butyryl groups, respectively. These results and others indicate that inhibition of acetolactate synthase causes an accumulation of 2-oxo-butyric acid that is utilized by enzymes common to Leu biosynthesis to form 2-oxo-valeric acid. Coenzyme A (CoA) activation of this keto acid gives rise to butyryl CoA, which is utilized to form butyryl containing sucrose esters. Alternatively, reutilization of 2-oxo-valeric acid by the same enzymes followed by CoA activation leads to valeryl containing sucrose esters. We propose that in trichome secretory cells synthase, isomerase and dehydrogenase enzymes which catalyze Leu synthesis/degredation in most tissues, convert iso-branched, anteiso-branched and straight-chain keto acids in the formation of sucrose ester acyl groups. PMID:16667871

  13. Characterization of Novel Acyl Coenzyme A Dehydrogenases Involved in Bacterial Steroid Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Ruprecht, Amanda; Maddox, Jaymie; Stirling, Alexander J.; Visaggio, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The acyl coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) dehydrogenases (ACADs) FadE34 and CasC, encoded by the cholesterol and cholate gene clusters of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Rhodococcus jostii RHA1, respectively, were successfully purified. Both enzymes differ from previously characterized ACADs in that they contain two fused acyl-CoA dehydrogenase domains in a single polypeptide. Site-specific mutagenesis showed that only the C-terminal ACAD domain contains the catalytic glutamate base required for enzyme activity, while the N-terminal ACAD domain contains an arginine required for ionic interactions with the pyrophosphate of the flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) cofactor. Therefore, the two ACAD domains must associate to form a single active site. FadE34 and CasC were not active toward the 3-carbon side chain steroid metabolite 3-oxo-23,24-bisnorchol-4-en-22-oyl-CoA (4BNC-CoA) but were active toward steroid CoA esters containing 5-carbon side chains. CasC has similar specificity constants for cholyl-CoA, deoxycholyl-CoA, and 3β-hydroxy-5-cholen-24-oyl-CoA, while FadE34 has a preference for the last compound, which has a ring structure similar to that of cholesterol metabolites. Knockout of the casC gene in R. jostii RHA1 resulted in a reduced growth on cholate as a sole carbon source and accumulation of a 5-carbon side chain cholate metabolite. FadE34 and CasC represent unique members of ACADs with primary structures and substrate specificities that are distinct from those of previously characterized ACADs. IMPORTANCE We report here the identification and characterization of acyl-CoA dehydrogenases (ACADs) involved in the metabolism of 5-carbon side chains of cholesterol and cholate. The two homologous enzymes FadE34 and CasC, from M. tuberculosis and Rhodococcus jostii RHA1, respectively, contain two ACAD domains per polypeptide, and we show that these two domains interact to form a single active site. FadE34 and CasC are therefore representatives of a new class of

  14. Synthesis and characterization of some acyl thiourea derivatives of chitosan and their biocidal activities.

    PubMed

    Elkholy, Said S; Salem, Hend A; Eweis, Mohamed; Elsabee, Maher Z

    2014-09-01

    Three acyl derivatives of chitosan (CS) with different side chains were synthesized and their structures were characterized. Their swelling behavior was investigated. The antifungal behavior of these chitosan derivatives was investigated in vitro on the mycelial growth, sporulation and germination of conidia or sclerotia of the sugar-beet pathogens, Rhizoctonia solani K"uhn (AG2-2) and Sclerotium rolfsii Sacc. All the prepared derivatives had a significant inhibiting effect on the different stages of development on the germination of conidia or sclerotia of all the investigated fungi. In the absence of chitosan and its derivative, R. solani exhibited the fastest growth of the fungi studied. PMID:25002014

  15. Arabidopsis membrane-associated acyl-CoA-binding protein ACBP1 is involved in stem cuticle formation

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Yan; Xiao, Shi; Kim, Juyoung; Lung, Shiu-Cheung; Chen, Liang; Tanner, Julian A.; Suh, Mi Chung; Chye, Mee-Len

    2014-01-01

    The membrane-anchored Arabidopsis thaliana ACYL-COA-BINDING PROTEIN1 (AtACBP1) plays important roles in embryogenesis and abiotic stress responses, and interacts with long-chain (LC) acyl-CoA esters. Here, AtACBP1 function in stem cuticle formation was investigated. Transgenic Arabidopsis transformed with an AtACBP1pro::GUS construct revealed β-glucuronidase (GUS) expression on the stem (but not leaf) surface, suggesting a specific role in stem cuticle formation. Isothermal titration calorimetry results revealed that (His)6-tagged recombinant AtACBP1 interacts with LC acyl-CoA esters (18:1-, 18:2-, and 18:3-CoAs) and very-long-chain (VLC) acyl-CoA esters (24:0-, 25:0-, and 26:0-CoAs). VLC fatty acids have been previously demonstrated to act as precursors in wax biosynthesis. Gas chromatography (GC)–flame ionization detector (FID) and GC–mass spectrometry (MS) analyses revealed that an acbp1 mutant showed a reduction in stem and leaf cuticular wax and stem cutin monomer composition in comparison with the wild type (Col-0). Consequently, the acbp1 mutant showed fewer wax crystals on the stem surface in scanning electron microscopy and an irregular stem cuticle layer in transmission electron microscopy in comparison with the wild type. Also, the mutant stems consistently showed a decline in expression of cuticular wax and cutin biosynthetic genes in comparison with the wild type, and the mutant leaves were more susceptible to infection by the necrotrophic pathogen Botrytis cinerea. Taken together, these findings suggest that AtACBP1 participates in Arabidopsis stem cuticle formation by trafficking VLC acyl-CoAs. PMID:25053648

  16. Characterization of the "Escherichia Coli" Acyl Carrier Protein Phosphodiesterase

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    Acyl carrier protein (ACP) is a small essential protein that functions as a carrier of the acyl intermediates of fatty acid synthesis. ACP requires the posttranslational attachment of a 4'phosphopantetheine functional group, derived from CoA, in order to perform its metabolic function. A Mn[superscript 2+] dependent enzymatic activity that removes…

  17. Characterization of the acyl substrate binding pocket of acetyl-CoA synthetase.

    PubMed

    Ingram-Smith, Cheryl; Woods, Barrett I; Smith, Kerry S

    2006-09-26

    AMP-forming acetyl-CoA synthetase [ACS; acetate:CoA ligase (AMP-forming), EC 6.2.1.1] catalyzes the activation of acetate to acetyl-CoA in a two-step reaction. This enzyme is a member of the adenylate-forming enzyme superfamily that includes firefly luciferase, nonribosomal peptide synthetases, and acyl- and aryl-CoA synthetases/ligases. Although the structures of several superfamily members demonstrate that these enzymes have a similar fold and domain structure, the low sequence conservation and diversity of the substrates utilized have limited the utility of these structures in understanding substrate binding in more distantly related enzymes in this superfamily. The crystal structures of the Salmonella enterica ACS and Saccharomyces cerevisiae ACS1 have allowed a directed approach to investigating substrate binding and catalysis in ACS. In the S. enterica ACS structure, the propyl group of adenosine 5'-propylphosphate, which mimics the acyl-adenylate intermediate, lies in a hydrophobic pocket. Modeling of the Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus Z245 ACS (MT-ACS1) on the S. cerevisiae ACS structure showed similar active site architecture, and alignment of the amino acid sequences of proven ACSs indicates that the four residues that compose the putative acetate binding pocket are well conserved. These four residues, Ile312, Thr313, Val388, and Trp416 of MT-ACS1, were targeted for alteration, and our results support that they do indeed form the acetate binding pocket and that alterations at these positions significantly alter the enzyme's affinity for acetate as well as the range of acyl substrates that can be utilized. In particular, Trp416 appears to be the primary determinant for acyl chain length that can be accommodated in the binding site. PMID:16981708

  18. Modification of seed oil content and acyl composition in the brassicaceae by expression of a yeast sn-2 acyltransferase gene.

    PubMed Central

    Zou, J; Katavic, V; Giblin, E M; Barton, D L; MacKenzie, S L; Keller, W A; Hu, X; Taylor, D C

    1997-01-01

    A putative yeast sn-2 acyltransferase gene (SLC1-1), reportedly a variant acyltransferase that suppresses a genetic defect in sphingolipid long-chain base biosynthesis, has been expressed in a yeast SLC deletion strain. The SLC1-1 gene product was shown in vitro to encode an sn-2 acyltransferase capable of acylating sn-1 oleoyl-lysophosphatidic acid, using a range of acyl-CoA thioesters, including 18:1-, 22:1-, and 24:0-CoAs. The SLC1-1 gene was introduced into Arabidopsis and a high erucic acid-containing Brassica napus cv Hero under the control of a constitutive (tandem cauliflower mosaic virus 35S) promoter. The resulting transgenic plants showed substantial increases of 8 to 48% in seed oil content (expressed on the basis of seed dry weight) and increases in both overall proportions and amounts of very-long-chain fatty acids in seed triacylglycerols (TAGs). Furthermore, the proportion of very-long-chain fatty acids found at the sn-2 position of TAGs was increased, and homogenates prepared from developing seeds of transformed plants exhibited elevated lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferase (EC 2.3.1.51) activity. Thus, the yeast sn-2 acyltransferase has been shown to encode a protein that can exhibit lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferase activity and that can be used to change total fatty acid content and composition as well as to alter the stereospecific acyl distribution of fatty acids in seed TAGs. PMID:9212466

  19. Acyl peptidic siderophores: structures, biosyntheses and post-assembly modifications.

    PubMed

    Kem, Michelle P; Butler, Alison

    2015-06-01

    Acyl peptidic siderophores are produced by a variety of bacteria and possess unique amphiphilic properties. Amphiphilic siderophores are generally produced in a suite where the iron(III)-binding headgroup remains constant while the fatty acid appendage varies by length and functionality. Acyl peptidic siderophores are commonly synthesized by non-ribosomal peptide synthetases; however, the method of peptide acylation during biosynthesis can vary between siderophores. Following biosynthesis, acyl siderophores can be further modified enzymatically to produce a more hydrophilic compound, which retains its ferric chelating abilities as demonstrated by pyoverdine from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the marinobactins from certain Marinobacter species. Siderophore hydrophobicity can also be altered through photolysis of the ferric complex of certain β-hydroxyaspartic acid-containing acyl peptidic siderophores. PMID:25677460

  20. Lysine fatty acylation promotes lysosomal targeting of TNF-α

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hong; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Lin, Hening

    2016-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) is a proinflammation cytokine secreted by various cells. Understanding its secretive pathway is important to understand the biological functions of TNF-α and diseases associated with TNF-α. TNF-α is one of the first proteins known be modified by lysine fatty acylation (e.g. myristoylation). We previously demonstrated that SIRT6, a member of the mammalian sirtuin family of enzymes, can remove the fatty acyl modification on TNF-α and promote its secretion. However, the mechanistic details about how lysine fatty acylation regulates TNF-α secretion have been unknown. Here we present experimental data supporting that lysine fatty acylation promotes lysosomal targeting of TNF-α. The result is an important first step toward understanding the biological functions of lysine fatty acylation. PMID:27079798

  1. Vertebrate fatty acyl desaturase with Δ4 activity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuanyou; Monroig, Oscar; Zhang, Liang; Wang, Shuqi; Zheng, Xiaozhong; Dick, James R.; You, Cuihong; Tocher, Douglas R.

    2010-01-01

    Biosynthesis of the highly biologically active long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, arachidonic (ARA), eicosapentaenoic (EPA), and docosahexaenoic (DHA) acids, in vertebrates requires the introduction of up to three double bonds catalyzed by fatty acyl desaturases (Fad). Synthesis of ARA is achieved by Δ6 desaturation of 18∶2n - 6 to produce 18∶3n - 6 that is elongated to 20∶3n - 6 followed by Δ5 desaturation. Synthesis of EPA from 18∶3n - 3 requires the same enzymes and pathway as for ARA, but DHA synthesis reportedly requires two further elongations, a second Δ6 desaturation and a peroxisomal chain shortening step. This paper describes cDNAs, fad1 and fad2, isolated from the herbivorous, marine teleost fish (Siganus canaliculatus) with high similarity to mammalian Fad proteins. Functional characterization of the cDNAs by heterologous expression in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae showed that Fad1 was a bifunctional Δ6/Δ5 Fad. Previously, functional dual specificity in vertebrates had been demonstrated for a zebrafish Danio rerio Fad and baboon Fad, so the present report suggests bifunctionality may be more widespread in vertebrates. However, Fad2 conferred on the yeast the ability to convert 22∶5n - 3 to DHA indicating that this S. canaliculatus gene encoded an enzyme having Δ4 Fad activity. This is a unique report of a Fad with Δ4 activity in any vertebrate species and indicates that there are two possible mechanisms for DHA biosynthesis, a direct route involving elongation of EPA to 22∶5n - 3 followed by Δ4 desaturation, as well as the more complicated pathway as described above. PMID:20826444

  2. Structural characterization of acyl-CoA oxidases reveals a direct link between pheromone biosynthesis and metabolic state in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinxing; Li, Kunhua; Jones, Rachel A; Bruner, Steven D; Butcher, Rebecca A

    2016-09-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans secretes ascarosides as pheromones to communicate with other worms and to coordinate the development and behavior of the population. Peroxisomal β-oxidation cycles shorten the side chains of ascaroside precursors to produce the short-chain ascaroside pheromones. Acyl-CoA oxidases, which catalyze the first step in these β-oxidation cycles, have different side chain-length specificities and enable C. elegans to regulate the production of specific ascaroside pheromones. Here, we determine the crystal structure of the acyl-CoA oxidase 1 (ACOX-1) homodimer and the ACOX-2 homodimer bound to its substrate. Our results provide a molecular basis for the substrate specificities of the acyl-CoA oxidases and reveal why some of these enzymes have a very broad substrate range, whereas others are quite specific. Our results also enable predictions to be made for the roles of uncharacterized acyl-CoA oxidases in C. elegans and in other nematode species. Remarkably, we show that most of the C. elegans acyl-CoA oxidases that participate in ascaroside biosynthesis contain a conserved ATP-binding pocket that lies at the dimer interface, and we identify key residues in this binding pocket. ATP binding induces a structural change that is associated with tighter binding of the FAD cofactor. Mutations that disrupt ATP binding reduce FAD binding and reduce enzyme activity. Thus, ATP may serve as a regulator of acyl-CoA oxidase activity, thereby directly linking ascaroside biosynthesis to ATP concentration and metabolic state. PMID:27551084

  3. Friedel-Craft acylation of ar-himachalene: synthesis of acyl-ar-himachalene and a new acyl-hydroperoxide.

    PubMed

    Hossini, Issam; Harrad, Mohamed Anoir; Ait Ali, Mustapha; El Firdoussi, Larbi; Karim, Abdallah; Valerga, Pedro; Puerta, M Carmen

    2011-01-01

    Friedel-Craft acylation at 100 °C of 2,5,9,9-tetramethyl-6,7,8,9-tetrahydro-5H-benzocycloheptene [ar-himachalene], a sesquiterpenic hydrocarbon obtained by catalytic dehydrogenation of α-, β- and γ-himachalenes, produces a mixture of two compounds: (3,5,5,9-tetramethyl-6,7,8,9-tetrahydro-5H-benzocyclohepten-2-yl)-ethanone (2, in 69% yield), with a conserved reactant backbone, and 3, with a different skeleton, in 21% yield. The crystal structure of 3 reveals it to be 1-(8-ethyl-8-hydroperoxy-3,5,5-trimethyl-5,6,7,8-tetrahydronaphthalen-2-yl)-ethanone. In this compound O-H…O bonds form dimers. These hydrogen-bonds, in conjunction with weaker C-H…O interactions, form a more extended supramolecular arrangement in the crystal. PMID:21760570

  4. A fraction of methylene chloride from Geum japonicum Thunberg inhibits tumor metastatic and angiogenic potential.

    PubMed

    Heo, Jin-Chul; Son, Minsik; Woo, Sang-Uk; Kweon, Mi-Ae; Yoon, Eun Kyung; Lee, Hee Kyung; Choi, Won-Sik; Cho, Kang-Jin; Lee, Sang-Han

    2008-06-01

    The plant Geum japonicum Thunberg (GjT) has been used as a diuretic in traditional medicine. Herein, we report that the GjT extract blocks both the spread of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) on matrigel and the migration of B16 cells. We used various assays to test for cell attachment, spreading, wound healing and angiogenesis. A reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) assay were also carried out for the mechanistic study of GjT. Our results showed that a fraction of methylene chloride fraction from GjT inhibited B16 cells during cell attachment and migration and suppressed tube formation in a dose-dependent manner. An RT-PCR analysis showed that the methylene chloride extract decreased the mRNA expression of CD44 and TIMP-2. A Western blot analysis of the phosphorylation of MAPK kinases (ERK, JNK and p38) showed that the GjT fraction increased the expression of phospho-JNK, suggesting that GjT has the potential to alleviate metastatic and angiogenic activity, via a phospho-JNK signaling pathway. PMID:18497943

  5. Enhanced cellular uptake of short polyarginine peptides through fatty acylation and cyclization.

    PubMed

    Oh, Donghoon; Nasrolahi Shirazi, Amir; Northup, Kevin; Sullivan, Brian; Tiwari, Rakesh Kumar; Bisoffi, Marco; Parang, Keykavous

    2014-08-01

    Many of the reported arginine-rich cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) for the enhanced delivery of drugs are linear peptides composed of more than seven arginine residues to retain the cell penetration properties. Herein, we synthesized a class of nine polyarginine peptides containing 5 and 6 arginines, namely, R5 and R6. We further explored the effect of acylation with long chain fatty acids (i.e., octanoic acid, dodecanoic acid, and hexadecanoic acid) and cyclization on the cell penetrating properties of the peptides. The fluorescence-labeled acylated cyclic peptide dodecanoyl-[R5] and linear peptide dodecanoyl-(R5) showed approximately 13.7- and 10.2-fold higher cellular uptake than that of control 5,6-carboxyfluorescein, respectively. The mechanism of the peptide internalization into cells was found to be energy-dependent endocytosis. Dodecanoyl-[R5] and dodecanoyl-[R6] enhanced the intracellular uptake of a fluorescence-labeled cell-impermeable negatively charged phosphopeptide (F'-GpYEEI) in human ovarian cancer cells (SK-OV-3) by 3.4-fold and 5.5-fold, respectively, as shown by flow cytometry. The cellular uptake of F'-GpYEEI in the presence of hexadecanoyl-[R5] was 9.3- and 6.0-fold higher than that in the presence of octanoyl-[R5] and dodecanoyl-[R5], respectively. Dodecanoyl-[R5] enhanced the cellular uptake of the phosphopeptide by 1.4-2.5-fold higher than the corresponding linear peptide dodecanoyl-(R5) and those of representative CPPs, such as hepta-arginine (CR7) and TAT peptide. These results showed that a combination of acylation by long chain fatty acids and cyclization on short arginine-containing peptides can improve their cell-penetrating property, possibly through efficient interaction of rigid positively charged R and hydrophobic dodecanoyl moiety with the corresponding residues in the cell membrane phospholipids. PMID:24978295

  6. Structure of 3-oxoacyl-(acyl-carrier protein) synthase II from Thermus thermophilus HB8

    SciTech Connect

    Bagautdinov, Bagautdin Ukita, Yoko; Miyano, Masashi; Kunishima, Naoki

    2008-05-01

    The crystal structure of 3-oxoacyl-(acyl-carrier protein) synthase II from T. thermophilus HB8 has been determined at 2.0 Å resolution and compared with the structures of β-keto-ACP synthases from other sources. The β-ketoacyl-(acyl carrier protein) synthases (β-keto-ACP synthases; KAS) catalyse the addition of two-carbon units to the growing acyl chain during the elongation phase of fatty-acid synthesis. As key regulators of bacterial fatty-acid synthesis, they are promising targets for the development of new antibacterial agents. The crystal structure of 3-oxoacyl-ACP synthase II from Thermus thermophilus HB8 (TtKAS II) has been solved by molecular replacement and refined at 2.0 Å resolution. The crystal is orthorhombic, space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = 72.07, b = 185.57, c = 62.52 Å, and contains one homodimer in the asymmetric unit. The subunits adopt the well known α-β-α-β-α thiolase fold that is common to ACP synthases. The structural and sequence similarities of TtKAS II to KAS I and KAS II enzymes of known structure from other sources support the hypothesis of comparable enzymatic activity. The dimeric state of TtKAS II is important to create each fatty-acid-binding pocket. Closer examination of KAS structures reveals that compared with other KAS structures in the apo form, the active site of TtKAS II is more accessible because of the ‘open’ conformation of the Phe396 side chain.

  7. Palladium-Catalyzed Environmentally Benign Acylation.

    PubMed

    Suchand, Basuli; Satyanarayana, Gedu

    2016-08-01

    Recent trends in research have gained an orientation toward developing efficient strategies using innocuous reagents. The earlier reported transition-metal-catalyzed carbonylations involved either toxic carbon monoxide (CO) gas as carbonylating agent or functional-group-assisted ortho sp(2) C-H activation (i.e., ortho acylation) or carbonylation by activation of the carbonyl group (i.e., via the formation of enamines). Contradicting these methods, here we describe an environmentally benign process, [Pd]-catalyzed direct carbonylation starting from simple and commercially available iodo arenes and aldehydes, for the synthesis of a wide variety of ketones. Moreover, this method comprises direct coupling of iodoarenes with aldehydes without activation of the carbonyl and also without directing group assistance. Significantly, the strategy was successfully applied to the synthesis n-butylphthalide and pitofenone. PMID:27377566

  8. Methylene blue-related corneal edema and iris discoloration.

    PubMed

    Timucin, Ozgur Bulent; Karadag, Mehmet Fatih; Aslanci, Mehmet Emin; Baykara, Mehmet

    2016-04-01

    We report the case of a 70-year-old female patient who developed corneal edema and iris discoloration following the inadvertent use of 1% methylene blue instead of 0.025% trypan blue to stain the anterior capsule during cataract phacoemulsification surgery. Copious irrigation was performed upon realization of incorrect dye use. Corneal edema and iris discoloration developed during the early postoperative period and persisted at 24-months follow-up. However, keratoplasty was not required. The intracameral use of 1% methylene blue has a cytotoxic effect on the corneal endothelium and iris epithelium. Copious irrigation for at least 30 min using an anterior chamber maintainer may improve outcomes. PMID:27224079

  9. Recognition of acyl carrier proteins by ketoreductases in assembly line polyketide synthases.

    PubMed

    Ostrowski, Matthew P; Cane, David E; Khosla, Chaitan

    2016-07-01

    Ketoreductases (KRs) are the most widespread tailoring domains found in individual modules of assembly line polyketide synthases (PKSs), and are responsible for controlling the configurations of both the α-methyl and β-hydroxyl stereogenic centers in the growing polyketide chain. Because they recognize substrates that are covalently bound to acyl carrier proteins (ACPs) within the same PKS module, we sought to quantify the extent to which protein-protein recognition contributes to the turnover of these oxidoreductive enzymes using stand-alone domains from the 6-deoxyerythronolide B synthase (DEBS). Reduced 2-methyl-3-hydroxyacyl-ACP substrates derived from two enantiomeric acyl chains and four distinct ACP domains were synthesized and presented to four distinct KR domains. Two KRs, from DEBS modules 2 and 5, displayed little preference for oxidation of substrates tethered to their cognate ACP domains over those attached to the other ACP domains tested. In contrast, the KR from DEBS module 1 showed an ~10-50-fold preference for substrate attached to its native ACP domain, whereas the KR from DEBS module 6 actually displayed an ~10-fold preference for the ACP from DEBS module 5. Our findings suggest that recognition of the ACP by a KR domain is unlikely to affect the rate of native assembly line polyketide biosynthesis. In some cases, however, unfavorable KR-ACP interactions may suppress the rate of substrate processing when KR domains are swapped to construct hybrid PKS modules. PMID:27118242

  10. Structure of 3-oxoacyl-(acyl-carrier protein) synthase II from Thermus thermophilus HB8

    PubMed Central

    Bagautdinov, Bagautdin; Ukita, Yoko; Miyano, Masashi; Kunishima, Naoki

    2008-01-01

    The β-ketoacyl-(acyl carrier protein) synthases (β-keto-ACP synthases; KAS) catalyse the addition of two-carbon units to the growing acyl chain during the elongation phase of fatty-acid synthesis. As key regulators of bacterial fatty-acid synthesis, they are promising targets for the development of new antibacterial agents. The crystal structure of 3-oxoacyl-ACP synthase II from Thermus thermophilus HB8 (TtKAS II) has been solved by molecular replacement and refined at 2.0 Å resolution. The crystal is orthorhombic, space group P21212, with unit-cell parameters a = 72.07, b = 185.57, c = 62.52 Å, and contains one homodimer in the asymmetric unit. The subunits adopt the well known α-β-α-β-α thiolase fold that is common to ACP synthases. The structural and sequence similarities of TtKAS II to KAS I and KAS II enzymes of known structure from other sources support the hypothesis of comparable enzymatic activity. The dimeric state of TtKAS II is important to create each fatty-acid-binding pocket. Closer examination of KAS structures reveals that compared with other KAS structures in the apo form, the active site of TtKAS II is more accessible because of the ‘open’ conformation of the Phe396 side chain. PMID:18453702

  11. Structure of 3-oxoacyl-(acyl-carrier protein) synthase II from Thermus thermophilus HB8.

    PubMed

    Bagautdinov, Bagautdin; Ukita, Yoko; Miyano, Masashi; Kunishima, Naoki

    2008-05-01

    The beta-ketoacyl-(acyl carrier protein) synthases (beta-keto-ACP synthases; KAS) catalyse the addition of two-carbon units to the growing acyl chain during the elongation phase of fatty-acid synthesis. As key regulators of bacterial fatty-acid synthesis, they are promising targets for the development of new antibacterial agents. The crystal structure of 3-oxoacyl-ACP synthase II from Thermus thermophilus HB8 (TtKAS II) has been solved by molecular replacement and refined at 2.0 A resolution. The crystal is orthorhombic, space group P2(1)2(1)2, with unit-cell parameters a = 72.07, b = 185.57, c = 62.52 A, and contains one homodimer in the asymmetric unit. The subunits adopt the well known alpha-beta-alpha-beta-alpha thiolase fold that is common to ACP synthases. The structural and sequence similarities of TtKAS II to KAS I and KAS II enzymes of known structure from other sources support the hypothesis of comparable enzymatic activity. The dimeric state of TtKAS II is important to create each fatty-acid-binding pocket. Closer examination of KAS structures reveals that compared with other KAS structures in the apo form, the active site of TtKAS II is more accessible because of the ;open' conformation of the Phe396 side chain. PMID:18453702

  12. Direct Acylation of Carrier Proteins with Functionalized β-Lactones

    PubMed Central

    Amoroso, Jon W.; Borketey, Lawrence S.; Prasad, Gitanjeli

    2014-01-01

    As the key component of many biosynthetic assemblies, acyl-carrier proteins offer a robust entry point for introduction of small molecule probes and pathway intermediates. Current labeling strategies primarily rely on modifications to the phosphopantetheine cofactor or its biosynthetic precursors followed by attachment to the apo form of a given carrier protein. As a greatly simplified alternative, direct and selective acylation of holo-acyl-carrier proteins using readily accessible β-lactones as electrophilic partners for the phosphopantetheine-thiol has been demonstrated. PMID:20433156

  13. Role of acyl carrier protein isoforms in plant lipid metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    Although acyl carrier protein (ACP) is the best studied protein in plant fatty acid biosynthesis, the in vivo forms of ACPs and their steady state pools have not been examined previously in either seed or leaf. Information about the relative pool sizes of free ACP and its acyl-ACP intermediates is essential for understanding regulation of de novo fatty acid biosynthesis in plants. In this study we utilized antibodies directed against spinach ACP as a sensitive assay to analyze the acyl groups while they were still covalently attached to ACPs. 4 refs., 4 figs.

  14. Biochemical analysis of the substrate specificity of the beta-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthase domain of module 2 of the erythromycin polyketide synthase.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jiaquan; Kinoshita, Kenji; Khosla, Chaitan; Cane, David E

    2004-12-28

    The beta-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthase (KS) domain of the modular 6-deoxyerythronolide B synthase (DEBS) catalyzes the fundamental chain building reaction of polyketide biosynthesis. The KS-catalyzed reaction involves two discrete steps consisting of formation of an acyl-enzyme intermediate generated from the incoming acylthioester substrate and an active site cysteine residue, and the conversion of this intermediate to the beta-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein product by a decarboxylative condensation with a paired methylmalonyl-SACP. We have determined the rate constants for the individual biochemical steps by a combination of protein acylation and transthioesterification experiments. The first-order rate constant (k(2)) for formation of the acyl-enzyme intermediate from [1-(14)C]-(2S,3R)-2-methyl-3-hydroxypentanoyl-SNAC (2) and recombinant DEBS module 2 is 5.8 +/- 2.6 min(-)(1), with a dissociation constant (K(S)) of 3.5 +/- 2.8 mM. The acyl-enzyme adduct was formed at a near-stoichiometric ratio of approximately 0.8:1. Transthioesterification between unlabeled diketide-SNAC 2 and N-[1-(14)C-acetyl]cysteamine gave a k(exch) of 0.15 +/- 0.06 min(-)(1), with a K(m) for HSNAC of 5.7 +/- 4.9 mM and a K(m) for 2 of 5.3 +/- 0.9 mM. Under the conditions that were used, k(exch) was equal to k(-)(2), the first-order rate constant for reversal of the acyl-enzyme-forming reaction. Since the rate of the decarboxylative condensation is much greater that the rate of reversion to the starting material (k(3) > k(-)(2)), formation of the acyl-enzyme adduct is effectively irreversible, thereby establishing that the observed value of the specificity constant (k(cat)/K(m)) is solely a reflection of the intrinsic substrate specificity of the KS-catalyzed acyl-enzyme-forming reaction. These findings were also extended to a panel of diketide- and triketide-SNAC analogues, revealing that some substrate analogues that are not converted to product by DEBS module 2 form dead

  15. Probing the Mechanism of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis [beta]-Ketoacyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Synthase III mtFabH: Factors Influencing Catalysis and Substrate Specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Alistair K.; Sridharan, Sudharsan; Kremer, Laurent; Lindenberg, Sandra; Dover, Lynn G.; Sacchettini, James C.; Besra, Gurdyal S.

    2010-11-30

    Mycolic acids are the dominant feature of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis cell wall. These {alpha}-alkyl, {beta}-hydroxy fatty acids are formed by the condensation of two fatty acids, a long meromycolic acid and a shorter C{sub 24}-C{sub 26} fatty acid. The component fatty acids are produced via a combination of type I and II fatty acid synthases (FAS) with FAS-I products being elongated by FAS-II toward meromycolic acids. The {beta}-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) synthase III encoded by mtfabH (mtFabH) links FAS-I and FAS-II, catalyzing the condensation of FAS-I-derived acyl-CoAs with malonyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP). The acyl-CoA chain length specificity of mtFabH was assessed in vitro; the enzyme extended longer, physiologically relevant acyl-CoA primers when paired with AcpM, its natural partner, than with Escherichia coli ACP. The ability of the enzyme to use E. coli ACP suggests that a similar mode of binding is likely with both ACPs, yet it is clear that unique factors inherent to AcpM modulate the substrate specificity of mtFabH. Mutation of proposed key mtFabH residues was used to define their catalytic roles. Substitution of supposed acyl-CoA binding residues reduced transacylation, with double substitutions totally abrogating activity. Mutation of Arg{sup 46} revealed its more critical role in malonyl-AcpM decarboxylation than in the acyl-CoA binding role. Interestingly, this effect was suppressed intragenically by Arg{sup 161} {yields} Ala substitution. Our structural studies suggested that His{sup 258}, previously implicated in malonyl-ACP decarboxylation, also acts as an anchor point for a network of water molecules that we propose promotes deprotonation and transacylation of Cys{sup 122}.

  16. Anti-Tumor Effects of Novel 5-O-Acyl Plumbagins Based on the Inhibition of Mammalian DNA Replicative Polymerase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Kawamura, Moe; Kuriyama, Isoko; Maruo, Sayako; Kuramochi, Kouji; Tsubaki, Kazunori; Yoshida, Hiromi; Mizushina, Yoshiyuki

    2014-01-01

    We previously found that vitamin K3 (menadione, 2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone) inhibits the activity of human mitochondrial DNA polymerase γ (pol γ). In this study, we focused on plumbagin (5-hydroxy-2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone), and chemically synthesized novel plumbagins conjugated with C2:0 to C22:6 fatty acids (5-O-acyl plumbagins). These chemically modified plumbagins enhanced mammalian pol inhibition and their cytotoxic activity. Plumbagin conjugated with chains consisting of more than C18-unsaturated fatty acids strongly inhibited the activities of calf pol α and human pol γ. Plumbagin conjugated with oleic acid (C18:1-acyl plumbagin) showed the strongest suppression of human colon carcinoma (HCT116) cell proliferation among the ten synthesized 5-O-acyl plumbagins. The inhibitory activity on pol α, a DNA replicative pol, by these compounds showed high correlation with their cancer cell proliferation suppressive activity. C18:1-Acyl plumbagin selectively inhibited the activities of mammalian pol species, but did not influence the activities of other pols and DNA metabolic enzymes tested. This compound inhibited the proliferation of various human cancer cell lines, and was the cytotoxic inhibitor showing strongest inhibition towards HT-29 colon cancer cells (LD50 = 2.9 µM) among the nine cell lines tested. In an in vivo anti-tumor assay conducted on nude mice bearing solid tumors of HT-29 cells, C18:1-acyl plumbagin was shown to be a promising tumor suppressor. These data indicate that novel 5-O-acyl plumbagins act as anti-cancer agents based on mammalian DNA replicative pol α inhibition. Moreover, the results suggest that acylation of plumbagin is an effective chemical modification to improve the anti-cancer activity of vitamin K3 derivatives, such as plumbagin. PMID:24520419

  17. Synthesis, Characterization, and Evaluation of Cytotoxicity of Poly(3-methylene-2-pyrrolidone).

    PubMed

    Heyns, Ingrid M; Pfukwa, Rueben; Klumperman, Bert

    2016-05-01

    The homo- and copolymerization of 3-methylene-2-pyrrolidone (3M2P) is introduced. 3M2P is readily polymerized via conventional free radical polymerization, and two reversible deactivation radical polymerization methods including reversible addition-fragmentation (chain) transfer and single-electron-transfer living radical polymerization. Poly(3M2P) has a high thermal stability and a very high glass transition temperature. Poly(3M2P) does not dissolve in most common organic solvents, but it has a high aqueous solubility. Cytotoxicity tests reveal that it is nontoxic to cells, even up to concentrations of 1 mg/mL. This adds poly(3M2P) to the family of water-soluble and biocompatible pyrrolidone-based vinyl polymers. PMID:27087262

  18. Infrared and Fluorescence Spectroscopic Investigations of the Acyl Surface Modification of Hydrogel Beads for the Deposition of a Phospholipid Coating.

    PubMed

    Grossutti, Michael; Seenath, Ryan; Lipkowski, Jacek

    2015-10-27

    The scaffolded vesicle has been employed as an alternative means of developing natural model membranes and envisioned as a potential nutraceutical transporter. Furthering the research of the scaffolded vesicle system, a nucleophilic substitution reaction was implemented to form an ester linkage between palmitate and terminal hydroxyl groups of dextran in order to hydrophobically modify the hydrogel scaffold. An average tilt angle of 38° of the hydrophobic palmitate modifying layer on the surface of the hydrogel was determined from dichroic ratios obtained from infrared spectra collected in the attenuated total reflection (ATR) configuration. ATR-IR studies of the DMPC-coated acylated hydrogel demonstrated that the hydrocarbon chains of the DMPC coating was similar to those of the DMPC bilayers and that the underlying palmitate layer had a negligible effect on the average tilt angle (26°) of the DMPC coating. The permeability of this acylated hydrogel was investigated with fluorescence spectroscopy and the terbium/dipicolinic acid assay. The hydrophobic modification on the surface of the hydrogel bead allowed for an efficient deposition of a DMPC layer that served as an impermeable barrier to terbium efflux. About 72% of DMPC-coated acylated hydrogel beads showed ideal barrier properties. The remaining 28% were leaking, but the half-life of terbium efflux of the DMPC-coated acylated hydrogel was increasing, and the total amount of leaked terbium was decreasing with the incubation time. The half-life time and the retention were considered a marked improvement relative to past scaffolded vesicle preparations. The process of acylating hydrogel beads for efficient DMPC deposition has been identified as another viable method for controlling the permeability of the scaffolded vesicle. PMID:26429738

  19. Structure of YciA from Haemophilus influenzae (HI0827), a Hexameric Broad Specificity Acyl-Coenzyme A Thioesterase

    SciTech Connect

    Willis, Mark A.; Zhuang, Zhihao; Song, Feng; Howard, Andrew; Dunaway-Mariano, Debra; Herzberg, Osnat

    2008-04-02

    The crystal structure of HI0827 from Haemophilus influenzae Rd KW20, initially annotated 'hypothetical protein' in sequence databases, exhibits an acyl-coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) thioesterase 'hot dog' fold with a trimer of dimers oligomeric association, a novel assembly for this enzyme family. In studies described in the preceding paper [Zhuang, Z., Song, F., Zhao, H., Li, L., Cao, J., Eisenstein, E., Herzberg, O., and Dunaway-Mariano, D. (2008) Biochemistry 47, 2789-2796], HI0827 is shown to be an acyl-CoA thioesterase that acts on a wide range of acyl-CoA compounds. Two substrate binding sites are located across the dimer interface. The binding sites are occupied by two CoA molecules, one with full occupancy and the second only partially occupied. The CoA molecules, acquired from HI0827-expressing Escherichia coli cells, remained tightly bound to the enzyme through the protein purification steps. The difference in CoA occupancies indicates a different substrate affinity for each of the binding sites, which in turn implies that the enzyme might be subject to allosteric regulation. Mutagenesis studies have shown that the replacement of the putative catalytic carboxylate Asp44 with an alanine residue abolishes activity. The impact of this mutation is seen in the crystal structure of D44A HI0827. Whereas the overall fold and assembly of the mutant protein are the same as those of the wild-type enzyme, the CoA ligands are absent. The dimer interface is perturbed, and the channel that accommodates the thioester acyl chain is more open and wider than that observed in the wild-type enzyme. A model of intact substrate bound to wild-type HI0827 provides a structural rationale for the broad substrate range.

  20. Immunomodulatory N-acyl Dopamine Glycosides from the Icelandic Marine Sponge Myxilla incrustans Collected at a Hydrothermal Vent Site.

    PubMed

    Einarsdottir, Eydis; Liu, Hong-Bing; Freysdottir, Jona; Gotfredsen, Charlotte Held; Omarsdottir, Sesselja

    2016-06-01

    A chemical investigation of the sponge (Porifera) Myxilla incrustans collected from the unique submarine hydrothermal vent site Strytan, North of Iceland, revealed a novel family of closely related N-acyl dopamine glycosides. Three new compounds, myxillin A (1), B (2) and C (3), were isolated and structurally elucidated using several analytical techniques, such as HR-MS, 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy. Myxillin A (1) and B (2)were shown to be structurally similar, composed of a dopamine moiety, but differ in the acyl chain length and saturation. The myxillin C (3) has a dehydrotyrosine moiety composing the same acyl chain and glycosylation as myxillin B (2). Myxillins A (1) and C (3) were tested for immunomodulating activity in an in vitro dendritic cell model. Dendritic cells matured and stimulated in the presence of myxillin A (1) secreted lower levels of IL-12p40, whilst dendritic cells matured and stimulated in the presence of myxillin C (3) secreted lower levels of IL-10 compared with dendritic cells matured and stimulated in the presence of the solvent alone. These opposing results indicate that the structural differences in the aromatic ring part of the molecules could have an impact on the immunological effects of dendritic cells. These molecules could, therefore, prove to be important in preventing inflammatory diseases on the one hand, and inducing a response to fight tumors and/or pathogens on the other hand. Further studies will be needed to confirm these potential uses. PMID:27135626

  1. The halo-substituent effect on Pseudomonas cepacia lipase-mediated regioselective acylation of nucleosides: A comparative investigation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhao-Yu; Bi, Yan-Hong; Yang, Rong-Ling; Duan, Zhang-Qun; Nie, Ling-Hong; Li, Xiang-Qian; Zong, Min-Hua; Wu, Jie

    2015-10-20

    In this work, comparative experiments were explored to investigate the substrate specificity of Pseudomonas cepacia lipase in regioselective acylation of nucleosides carrying various substituents (such as the H, F, Cl, Br, I) at 2'- and 5-positions. Experimental data indicated that the catalytic performance of the enzyme depended very much on the halo-substituents in nucleosides. The increased bulk of 2'-substituents in ribose moiety of the nucleoside might contribute to the improved 3'-regioselectivity (90-98%, nucleosides a-d) in enzymatic decanoylation, while the enhancement of regioselectivity (93-99%) in 3'-O-acylated nucleosides e-h could be attributable to the increasing hydrophobicity of the halogen atoms at 5-positions. With regard to the chain-length selectivity, P. cepacia lipase displayed the highest 3'-regioselectivity toward the longer chain (C14) as compared to shorter (C6 and C10) ones. The position, orientation and property of the substituent, specific structure of the lipase's active site, and acyl structure could account for the diverse results. PMID:26325198

  2. 4,4\\'-Methylene bis(N,N\\'-dimethyl)aniline

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    4,4 ' - Methylene bis ( N , N ' - dimethyl ) aniline ; CASRN 101 - 61 - 1 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Haz

  3. Methylene Diphenyl Diisocyanate (monomeric MDI) and polymeric MDI (PMDI)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Methylene Diphenyl Diisocyanate ( monomeric MDI ) and polymeric MDI ( PMDI ) ; CASRN 101 - 68 - 8 , 9016 - 87 - 9 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment devel

  4. Extinction Memory Improvement by the Metabolic Enhancer Methylene Blue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez-Lima, F.; Bruchey, Aleksandra K.

    2004-01-01

    We investigated whether postextinction administration of methylene blue (MB) could enhance retention of an extinguished conditioned response. MB is a redox compound that at low doses elevates cytochrome oxidase activity, thereby improving brain energy production. Saline or MB (4 mg/kg intraperitoneally) were administered to rats for 5 d following…

  5. Enhanced free fatty acid production by codon-optimized Lactococcus lactis acyl-ACP thioesterase gene expression in Escherichia coli using crude glycerol.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sunhee; Park, Soohyun; Park, Chulhwan; Pack, Seung Pil; Lee, Jinwon

    2014-12-01

    Fatty acid production and composition are determined by the type of acyl-acyl carrier protein thioesterases (acyl-ACP TEs) expressed in Escherichia coli. Bacterial acyl-ACP TEs from Lactococcus lactis (SGJS47), Enterococcus faecalis (SGJS49), and Burkholderia cepacia (SGJS50) were codon-optimized and expressed in E. coli for enhanced fatty acid production. Samples were extracted at the lag, log, and stationary phases of cell growth, and gene expression levels of the codon optimized acy-ACP TEs as well as fatty acid production were monitored. At 24h after initiation of gene expression, the OPLlTE expression level and fatty acid production in SGJS47 increased up to 15.8-fold and 3.2-fold compared to the control and other recombinant strains, respectively. Additionally, in SGJS47, improvement in free fatty acid (FFA) composition, high-specificity production of short-chain fatty acids (C8, C10) and unsaturated fatty acids (C16:1) was achieved in crude glycerol medium condition. Compared with control strain, the percentage of FFAs (C8 and C10) was enhanced by approximately 16- to 21-fold, C16:1 FFA ratio increased approximately 18-fold. Observation of codon-optimized acyl-ACP TE genes expression level in E. coli may be useful for understanding mechanisms towards improving fatty acid production. Engineered strains have the potential to overproduce specific FFAs and thereby reduce the cost of fatty acid production by using industrially inexpensive carbon sources. PMID:25442943

  6. Chemoselective O-acylation of hydroxyamino acids and amino alcohols under acidic reaction conditions: History, scope and applications.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, Tor E

    2015-01-01

    Amino acids, whether natural, semisynthetic or synthetic, are among the most important and useful chiral building blocks available for organic chemical synthesis. In principle, they can function as inexpensive, chiral and densely functionalized starting materials. On the other hand, the use of amino acid starting materials routinely necessitates protective group chemistry, and in reality, large-scale preparations of even the simplest side-chain derivatives of many amino acids often become annoyingly strenuous due to the necessity of employing protecting groups, on one or more of the amino acid functionalities, during the synthetic sequence. However, in the case of hydroxyamino acids such as hydroxyproline, serine, threonine, tyrosine and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA), many O-acyl side-chain derivatives are directly accessible via a particularly expedient and scalable method not commonly applied until recently. Direct acylation of unprotected hydroxyamino acids with acyl halides or carboxylic anhydrides under appropriately acidic reaction conditions renders possible chemoselective O-acylation, furnishing the corresponding side-chain esters directly, on multigram-scale, in a single step, and without chromatographic purification. Assuming a certain degree of stability under acidic reaction conditions, the method is also applicable for a number of related compounds, such as various amino alcohols and the thiol-functional amino acid cysteine. While the basic methodology underlying this approach has been known for decades, it has evolved through recent developments connected to amino acid-derived chiral organocatalysts to become a more widely recognized procedure for large-scale preparation of many useful side-chain derivatives of hydroxyamino acids and related compounds. Such derivatives are useful in peptide chemistry and drug development, as amino acid amphiphiles for asymmetric catalysis, and as amino acid acrylic precursors for preparation of catalytically

  7. Chemoselective O-acylation of hydroxyamino acids and amino alcohols under acidic reaction conditions: History, scope and applications

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Summary Amino acids, whether natural, semisynthetic or synthetic, are among the most important and useful chiral building blocks available for organic chemical synthesis. In principle, they can function as inexpensive, chiral and densely functionalized starting materials. On the other hand, the use of amino acid starting materials routinely necessitates protective group chemistry, and in reality, large-scale preparations of even the simplest side-chain derivatives of many amino acids often become annoyingly strenuous due to the necessity of employing protecting groups, on one or more of the amino acid functionalities, during the synthetic sequence. However, in the case of hydroxyamino acids such as hydroxyproline, serine, threonine, tyrosine and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA), many O-acyl side-chain derivatives are directly accessible via a particularly expedient and scalable method not commonly applied until recently. Direct acylation of unprotected hydroxyamino acids with acyl halides or carboxylic anhydrides under appropriately acidic reaction conditions renders possible chemoselective O-acylation, furnishing the corresponding side-chain esters directly, on multigram-scale, in a single step, and without chromatographic purification. Assuming a certain degree of stability under acidic reaction conditions, the method is also applicable for a number of related compounds, such as various amino alcohols and the thiol-functional amino acid cysteine. While the basic methodology underlying this approach has been known for decades, it has evolved through recent developments connected to amino acid-derived chiral organocatalysts to become a more widely recognized procedure for large-scale preparation of many useful side-chain derivatives of hydroxyamino acids and related compounds. Such derivatives are useful in peptide chemistry and drug development, as amino acid amphiphiles for asymmetric catalysis, and as amino acid acrylic precursors for preparation of

  8. Carbapenems and SHV-1 β-Lactamase Form Different Acyl-Enzyme Populations in Crystals and Solution

    PubMed Central

    Kalp, Matthew; Carey, Paul R.

    2009-01-01

    The reactions between single crystals of the SHV-1 β-lactamase enzyme and the carbapenems, meropenem, imipenem and ertapenem, have been studied by Raman microscopy. Aided by quantum mechanical calculations, major populations of two acyl-enzyme species, a labile Δ2-pyrroline and a more tightly bound Δ1-pyrroline, have been identified for all three compounds. These isomers differ only in the position of the double bond about the carbapenem nucleus. This discovery is consonant with X-ray crystallographic findings that also identified two populations for meropenem bound in SHV-1: one with the acyl C=O group in the oxyanion hole and the second with the acyl group rotated 180 degrees compared to its expected position [Nukaga, M., Bethel, C. R., Thomson, J. M., Hujer, A. M., Distler, A. M., Anderson, V. E., Knox, J. R., and Bonomo, R. A. (2008) Journal of the American Chemical Society]. When crystals of the Δ1 and Δ2 containing acyl-enzymes were exposed to solutions with no carbapenem, rapid deacylation of the Δ2 species was observed by kinetic Raman experiments. However, no change in the Δ1 population was observed over 1 hour, the effective lifetime of the crystal. These observations lead to the hypothesis that the stable Δ1 species is due to the form seen by X-ray with the acyl carbonyl outside the oxyanion hole, while the Δ2 species corresponds to the form with the carbonyl inside the oxyanion hole. Soak-in and soak-out Raman experiments also demonstrated that tautomeric exchange between the Δ1 and Δ2 forms does not occur on the crystalline enzyme. When meropenem or ertapenem were reacted with SHV-1 in solution, the Raman difference spectra demonstrated that only a major population corresponding to the Δ1 acyl-enzyme could be detected. The 1003 cm-1 mode of the phenyl ring positioned on the C3 side chain of ertapenem acts as an effective internal Raman intensity standard and the ratio of its intensity to that of the 1600 cm-1 feature of Δ1 provides an

  9. LC-quadrupole/Orbitrap high-resolution mass spectrometry enables stable isotope-resolved simultaneous quantification and ¹³C-isotopic labeling of acyl-coenzyme A thioesters.

    PubMed

    Frey, Alexander J; Feldman, Daniel R; Trefely, Sophie; Worth, Andrew J; Basu, Sankha S; Snyder, Nathaniel W

    2016-05-01

    Acyl-coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) thioesters are evolutionarily conserved, compartmentalized, and energetically activated substrates for biochemical reactions. The ubiquitous involvement of acyl-CoA thioesters in metabolism, including the tricarboxylic acid cycle, fatty acid metabolism, amino acid degradation, and cholesterol metabolism highlights the broad applicability of applied measurements of acyl-CoA thioesters. However, quantitation of acyl-CoA levels provides only one dimension of metabolic information and a more complete description of metabolism requires the relative contribution of different precursors to individual substrates and pathways. Using two distinct stable isotope labeling approaches, acyl-CoA thioesters can be labeled with either a fixed [(13)C3(15)N1] label derived from pantothenate into the CoA moiety or via variable [(13)C] labeling into the acyl chain from metabolic precursors. Liquid chromatography-hybrid quadrupole/Orbitrap high-resolution mass spectrometry using parallel reaction monitoring, but not single ion monitoring, allowed the simultaneous quantitation of acyl-CoA thioesters by stable isotope dilution using the [(13)C3(15)N1] label and measurement of the incorporation of labeled carbon atoms derived from [(13)C6]-glucose, [(13)C5(15)N2]-glutamine, and [(13)C3]-propionate. As a proof of principle, we applied this method to human B cell lymphoma (WSU-DLCL2) cells in culture to precisely describe the relative pool size and enrichment of isotopic tracers into acetyl-, succinyl-, and propionyl-CoA. This method will allow highly precise, multiplexed, and stable isotope-resolved determination of metabolism to refine metabolic models, characterize novel metabolism, and test modulators of metabolic pathways involving acyl-CoA thioesters. PMID:26968563

  10. Nitroreductase-triggered activation of a novel caged fluorescent probe obtained from methylene blue.

    PubMed

    Bae, Jungeun; McNamara, Louis E; Nael, Manal A; Mahdi, Fakhri; Doerksen, Robert J; Bidwell, Gene L; Hammer, Nathan I; Jo, Seongbong

    2015-08-18

    A near-infrared fluorescent probe based on methylene blue (p-NBMB) was developed for the detection of nitroreductase. Conjugating methylene blue with a p-nitrobenzyl moiety enables it to be activated by nitroreductase-catalyzed 1,6-elimination, resulting in the release of an active methylene blue fluorophore. PMID:26165999

  11. Sonochemical enzyme-catalyzed regioselective acylation of flavonoid glycosides.

    PubMed

    Ziaullah; Rupasinghe, H P Vasantha

    2016-04-01

    This work compares a highly efficient and alternative method of sonication-assisted lipase catalyzed acylation of quercetin-3-O-glucoside and phloretin-2'-glucoside, using Candida antarctica lipase B (Novozyme 435(®)), with a range of fatty acids. In this study, sonication-assisted irradiation coupled with stirring has been found to be more efficient and economical than conventional reaction conditions. Sonication-assisted acylation accelerated the reactions and reduced the time required by 4-5 folds. PMID:26829593

  12. Trichome-derived O-acyl sugars are a first meal for caterpillars that tags them for predation

    PubMed Central

    Weinhold, Alexander; Baldwin, Ian Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Plant glandular trichomes exude secondary metabolites with defensive functions, but these epidermal protuberances are surprisingly the first meal of Lepidopteran herbivores on Nicotiana attenuata. O-acyl sugars, the most abundant metabolite of glandular trichomes, impart a distinct volatile profile to the body and frass of larvae that feed on them. The headspace composition of Manduca sexta larvae is dominated by the branched chain aliphatic acids hydrolyzed from ingested O-acyl sugars, which waxes and wanes rapidly with trichome ingestion. In native habitats a ground-hunting predator, the omnivorous ant Pogonomyrmex rugosus, but not the big-eyed bug Geocoris spp., use these volatile aliphatic acids to locate their prey. PMID:21518882

  13. Primary structure of a cerulenin-binding. beta. -ketoacyl-(acyl carrier protein) synthase from barley chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Siggaard-Andersen, M.; Kauppinen, S. ); von Wettstein-Knowles, P. Univ. of Copenhagen )

    1991-05-15

    The radioactively labeled {beta}-ketoacyl thioester synthase inhibitor ({sup 3}H)cerulenin was used to tag three dimeric barley chloroplast proteins ({alpha}{alpha}, {alpha}{beta}, and {beta}{beta}) from the stromal fraction. Oligonucleotides corresponding to amino acid sequences obtained from the purified proteins were used to generate with the polymerase chain reaction a probe for cDNAs encoding the {beta} subunit. cDNA sequencing revealed an open reading frame for 462 residues comprising the mature protein and a 35-amino acid transit peptide. The deduced amino acid sequence of the mature protein is homologous to the {beta}-ketoacyl-(acyl carrier protein) (ACP) synthase I (3-oxoacyl-ACP synthase; acyl-ACP:malonyl-ACP C-acyltransferase (decarboxylating), EC 2.3.1.41) of Escherichia coli. Under analogous experimental conditions ({sup 3}H)cerulenin tagged a single dimeric protein from spinach chloroplasts.

  14. Trichome-derived O-acyl sugars are a first meal for caterpillars that tags them for predation.

    PubMed

    Weinhold, Alexander; Baldwin, Ian Thomas

    2011-05-10

    Plant glandular trichomes exude secondary metabolites with defensive functions, but these epidermal protuberances are surprisingly the first meal of Lepidopteran herbivores on Nicotiana attenuata. O-acyl sugars, the most abundant metabolite of glandular trichomes, impart a distinct volatile profile to the body and frass of larvae that feed on them. The headspace composition of Manduca sexta larvae is dominated by the branched chain aliphatic acids hydrolyzed from ingested O-acyl sugars, which waxes and wanes rapidly with trichome ingestion. In native habitats a ground-hunting predator, the omnivorous ant Pogonomyrmex rugosus, but not the big-eyed bug Geocoris spp., use these volatile aliphatic acids to locate their prey. PMID:21518882

  15. Branched Chain Amino Acid Metabolism in the Biosynthesis of Lycopersicon pennellii Glucose Esters 1

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Donald S.; Steffens, John C.

    1990-01-01

    Lycopersicon pennellii Corr. (D'Arcy) an insect-resistant, wild tomato possesses high densities of glandular trichomes which exude a mixture of 2,3,4-tri-O-acylated glucose esters that function as a physical impediment and feeding deterrent to small arthropod pests. The acyl moieties are branched C4 and C5 acids, and branched and straight chain C10, C11, and C12 acids. The structure of the branched acyl constituents suggests that the branched chain amino acid biosynthetic pathway participates in their biosynthesis. [14C]Valine and deuterated branched chain amino acids (and their oxo-acid derivatives) were incorporated into branched C4 and C5 acid groups of glucose esters by a process of transamination, oxidative decarboxylation and subsequent acylation. C4 and C5 branched acids were elongated by two carbon units to produce the branched C10-C12 groups. Norvaline, norleucine, allylglycine, and methionine also were processed into acyl moieties and secreted from the trichomes as glucose esters. Changes in the acyl composition of the glucose esters following sulfonylurea herbicide administration support the participation of acetohydroxyacid synthetase and the other enzymes of branched amino acid biosynthesis in the production of glucose esters. PMID:16667654

  16. "One-Pot" Approach to 8-Acylated 2-Quinolinones via Palladium-Catalyzed Regioselective Acylation of Quinoline N-Oxides.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaopei; Cui, Xiuling; Wu, Yangjie

    2016-05-20

    A "one-pot" facile and efficient protocol for 8-acylated 2-quinolinones has been developed through palladium-catalyzed acylation of quinoline N-oxides, which proceeds with high selectivity at the C8-position. The desired products were isolated in up to 95% yield and good functional group tolerance. A palladacycle was isolated from the catalytic process and proposed as a key intermediate. PMID:27153298

  17. Possible Role of Different Yeast and Plant Lysophospholipid:Acyl-CoA Acyltransferases (LPLATs) in Acyl Remodelling of Phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Jasieniecka-Gazarkiewicz, Katarzyna; Demski, Kamil; Lager, Ida; Stymne, Sten; Banaś, Antoni

    2016-01-01

    Recent results have suggested that plant lysophosphatidylcholine:acyl-coenzyme A acyltransferases (LPCATs) can operate in reverse in vivo and thereby catalyse an acyl exchange between the acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) pool and the phosphatidylcholine. We have investigated the abilities of Arabidopsis AtLPCAT2, Arabidopsis lysophosphatidylethanolamine acyltransferase (LPEAT2), S. cerevisiae lysophospholipid acyltransferase (Ale1) and S. cerevisiae lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferase (SLC1) to acylate lysoPtdCho, lysoPtdEtn and lysoPtdOH and act reversibly on the products of the acylation; the PtdCho, PtdEtn and PtdOH. The tested LPLATs were expressed in an S. cervisiae ale1 strain and enzyme activities were assessed in assays using microsomal preparations of the different transformants. The results show that, despite high activity towards lysoPtdCho, lysoPtdEtn and lysoPtdOH by the ALE1, its capacities to operate reversibly on the products of the acylation were very low. Slc1 readily acylated lysoPtdOH, lysoPtdCho and lysoPtdEtn but showed no reversibility towards PtdCho, very little reversibility towards PtdEtn and very high reversibility towards PtdOH. LPEAT2 showed the highest levels of reversibility towards PtdCho and PtdEtn of all LPLATs tested but low ability to operate reversibly on PtdOH. AtLPCAT2 showed good reversible activity towards PtdCho and PtdEtn and very low reversibility towards PtdOH. Thus, it appears that some of the LPLATs have developed properties that, to a much higher degree than other LPLATs, promote the reverse reaction during the same assay conditions and with the same phospholipid. The results also show that the capacity of reversibility can be specific for a particular phospholipid, albeit the lysophospholipid derivatives of other phospholipids serve as good acyl acceptors for the forward reaction of the enzyme. PMID:26643989

  18. Long-chain polyacetals from plant oils.

    PubMed

    Chikkali, Samir; Stempfle, Florian; Mecking, Stefan

    2012-07-13

    Plant oil-derived α,ω-diacetals are polycondensated to the novel polyacetals [OCH(2) O(CH(2))(y)](n) (y = 19 and 23) with molecular weight of ca. M(n) = 2 × 10(4) g mol(-1). The long methylene sequences provide substantial melt and crystallization temperatures (T(m) = 88 °C and T(c) = 68 °C for y = 23), and rates of hydrolytic degradation are dramatically lower for the long-chain polyacetals versus a shorter chain analogue (y = 12) studied for comparison. PMID:22648983

  19. Purification and biochemical characterization of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis beta-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthases KasA and KasB.

    PubMed

    Schaeffer, M L; Agnihotri, G; Volker, C; Kallender, H; Brennan, P J; Lonsdale, J T

    2001-12-14

    Mycolic acids are vital components of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis cell wall, and enzymes involved in their formation represent attractive targets for the discovery of novel anti-tuberculosis agents. Biosynthesis of the fatty acyl chains of mycolic acids involves two fatty acid synthetic systems, the multifunctional polypeptide fatty acid synthase I (FASI), which performs de novo fatty acid synthesis, and the dissociated FASII system, which consists of monofunctional enzymes, and acyl carrier protein (ACP) and elongates FASI products to long chain mycolic acid precursors. In this study, we present the initial characterization of purified KasA and KasB, two beta-ketoacyl-ACP synthase (KAS) enzymes of the M. tuberculosis FASII system. KasA and KasB were expressed in E. coli and purified by affinity chromatography. Both enzymes showed activity typical of bacterial KASs, condensing an acyl-ACP with malonyl-ACP. Consistent with the proposed role of FASII in mycolic acid synthesis, analysis of various acyl-ACP substrates indicated KasA and KasB had higher specificity for long chain acyl-ACPs containing at least 16 carbons. Activity of KasA and KasB increased with use of M. tuberculosis AcpM, suggesting that structural differences between AcpM and E. coli ACP may affect their recognition by the enzymes. Both enzymes were sensitive to KAS inhibitors cerulenin and thiolactomycin. These results represent important steps in characterizing KasA and KasB as targets for antimycobacterial drug discovery. PMID:11600501

  20. Chemically Modified N-Acylated Hyaluronan Fragments Modulate Proinflammatory Cytokine Production by Stimulated Human Macrophages*

    PubMed Central

    Babasola, Oladunni; Rees-Milton, Karen J.; Bebe, Siziwe; Wang, Jiaxi; Anastassiades, Tassos P.

    2014-01-01

    Low molecular mass hyaluronans are known to induce inflammation. To determine the role of the acetyl groups of low molecular mass hyaluronan in stimulating the production of proinflammatory cytokines, partial N-deacetylation was carried out by hydrazinolysis. This resulted in 19.7 ± 3.5% free NH2 functional groups, which were then acylated by reacting with an acyl anhydride, including acetic anhydride. Hydrazinolysis resulted in bond cleavage of the hyaluronan chain causing a reduction of the molecular mass to 30–214 kDa. The total NH2 and N-acetyl moieties in the reacetylated hyaluronan were 0% and 98.7 ± 1.5% respectively, whereas for butyrylated hyaluronan, the total NH2, N-acetyl, and N-butyryl moieties were 0, 82.2 ± 4.6, and 22.7 ± 3.8%, respectively, based on 1H NMR. We studied the effect of these polymers on cytokine production by cultured human macrophages (THP-1 cells). The reacetylated hyaluronan stimulated proinflammatory cytokine production to levels similar to LPS, whereas partially deacetylated hyaluronan had no stimulatory effect, indicating the critical role of the N-acetyl groups in the stimulation of proinflammatory cytokine production. Butyrylated hyaluronan significantly reduced the stimulatory effect on cytokine production by the reacetylated hyaluronan or LPS but had no stimulatory effect of its own. The other partially N-acylated hyaluronan derivatives tested showed smaller stimulatory effects than reacetylated hyaluronan. Antibody and antagonist experiments suggest that the acetylated and partially butyrylated lower molecular mass hyaluronans exert their effects through the TLR-4 receptor system. Selectively N-butyrylated lower molecular mass hyaluronan shows promise as an example of a novel semisynthetic anti-inflammatory molecule. PMID:25053413

  1. Monogalactosyldiacylglycerol biosynthesis by direct acyl transfer in Anabaena variabilis. [Anabaena variabilis

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H.H.; Wickrema, A.; Jaworski, J.

    1987-05-01

    The authors previously reported the direct acylation of monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG) by an enzyme in the membranes of the cyanobacterium (Anabaena variabilis. The enzyme requires acyl-acyl carrier protein (acyl-ACP) as substrate, but had no other additional cofactor requirements. Palmitoyl-, stearoyl- and oleoyl-ACP were all effective substrates. The A. variabilis membranes also had a hydrolase activity which metabolized the acyl-ACP to yield free fatty acid and ACP. Possible mechanisms for the acylation reaction include either acyl exchange with existing MGDG or direct acyl transfer to a lyso-MGDG, with concomitant release of free ACP. The mechanism of this reaction has been resolved using a double labelled (/sup 14/C)acyl-(/sup 14/C)ACP substrate prepared with E. coli acyl-ACP synthetase. Following incubation with the enzyme, the unreacted (/sup 14/C)acyl-(/sup 14/C)ACP was isolated and the (/sup 14/C)acyl/(/sup 14/C)ACP ratio determined. Comparison of this ratio to that of the original substrate indicated no change and eliminated acyl exchange as a possible mechanism. Therefore, the direct acylation of lyso-MGDG is the proposed mechanism for this enzyme. The reaction is apparently specific for MGDG synthesis, as other glycolipids and phospholipids were not labelled during incubations.

  2. Regioselective Acylation of Diols and Triols: The Cyanide Effect.

    PubMed

    Peng, Peng; Linseis, Michael; Winter, Rainer F; Schmidt, Richard R

    2016-05-11

    Central topics of carbohydrate chemistry embrace structural modifications of carbohydrates and oligosaccharide synthesis. Both require regioselectively protected building blocks that are mainly available via indirect multistep procedures. Hence, direct protection methods targeting a specific hydroxy group are demanded. Dual hydrogen bonding will eventually differentiate between differently positioned hydroxy groups. As cyanide is capable of various kinds of hydrogen bonding and as it is a quite strong sterically nondemanding base, regioselective O-acylations should be possible at low temperatures even at sterically congested positions, thus permitting formation and also isolation of the kinetic product. Indeed, 1,2-cis-diols, having an equatorial and an axial hydroxy group, benzoyl cyanide or acetyl cyanide as an acylating agent, and DMAP as a catalyst yield at -78 °C the thermodynamically unfavorable axial O-acylation product; acyl migration is not observed under these conditions. This phenomenon was substantiated with 3,4-O-unproteced galacto- and fucopyranosides and 2,3-O-unprotected mannopyranosides. Even for 3,4,6-O-unprotected galactopyranosides as triols, axial 4-O-acylation is appreciably faster than O-acylation of the primary 6-hydroxy group. The importance of hydrogen bonding for this unusual regioselectivity could be confirmed by NMR studies and DFT calculations, which indicate favorable hydrogen bonding of cyanide to the most acidic axial hydroxy group supported by hydrogen bonding of the equatorial hydroxy group to the axial oxygen. Thus, the "cyanide effect" is due to dual hydrogen bonding of the axial hydroxy group which enhances the nucleophilicity of the respective oxygen atom, permitting an even faster reaction for diols than for mono-ols. In contrast, fluoride as a counterion favors dual hydrogen bonding to both hydroxy groups leading to equatorial O-acylation. PMID:27104625

  3. Head-group acylation of monogalactosyldiacylglycerol is a common stress response, but the acyl-galactose acyl composition varies with the plant species and applied stress

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Head group acylation of monogalactosyldiacylglycerol is a plant lipid modification occurring during bacterial infection. Little is known about the range of stresses that induce this lipid modification, the molecular species induced, and the function of the modification. Lipidomic analysis using trip...

  4. Investigation of some characteristics of polyhydroxy milkweed triglycerides and their acylated derivatives in relation to lubricity.

    PubMed

    Harry-O'kuru, Rogers E; Biresaw, Girma; Cermak, Steven C; Gordon, Sherald H; Vermillion, Karl

    2011-05-11

    Most industrial lubricants are derived from nonrenewable petroleum-based sources. As useful as these lubricants are, their unintended consequences are the pollution of the Earth's environment as a result of the slow degradation of the spent materials. Native seed oils, on the other hand, are renewable and are also biodegradable in the environment, but these oils often suffer a drawback in having lower thermal stability and a shorter shelf life because of the intrinsic -C═C- unsaturation in their structures. This drawback can be overcome, yet the inherent biodegradative property retained, by appropriate derivatization of the oil. Pursuant to this, this study investigated derivatized polyhydroxy milkweed oil to assess its suitability as lubricant. The milkweed plant is a member of the Asclepiadaceae, a family with many genera including the common milkweeds, Asclepias syriaca L., Asclepias speciosa L., Asclepias tuberosa L., etc. The seeds of these species contain mainly C-18 triglycerides that are highly unsaturated, 92%. The olefinic character of this oil has been chemically modified by generating polyhydroxy triglycerides (HMWO) that show high viscosity and excellent moisturizing characteristics. In this work, HMWO have been chemically modified by esterifying their hydroxyl groups with acyl groups of various chain lengths (C2-C5). The results of investigation into the effect of the acyl derivatives' chemical structure on kinematic and dynamic viscosity, oxidation stability, cold-flow (pour point, cloud point) properties, coefficient of friction, wear, and elastohydrodynamic film thickness are discussed. PMID:21428293

  5. Proton conductance and fatty acyl composition of liver mitochondria correlates with body mass in birds.

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Martin D; Turner, Nigel; Ocloo, Augustine; Else, Paul L; Hulbert, A J

    2003-01-01

    The proton conductance of isolated liver mitochondria correlates significantly with body mass in mammals, but not in ectotherms. To establish whether the correlation in mammals is general for endotherms or mammal-specific, we measured proton conductance in mitochondria from birds, the other main group of endotherms, using birds varying in mass over a wide range (nearly 3000-fold), from 13 g zebra finches to 35 kg emus. Respiratory control ratios were higher in mitochondria from larger birds. Mitochondrial proton conductance in liver mitochondria from birds correlated strongly with body mass [respiration rate per mg of protein driving proton leak at 170 mV being 44.7 times (body mass in g)(-0.19)], thus suggesting a general relationship between body mass and proton conductance in endotherms. Mitochondria from larger birds had the same or perhaps greater surface area per mg of protein than mitochondria from smaller birds. Hence, the lower proton conductance was caused not by surface area changes but by some change in the properties of the inner membrane. Liver mitochondria from larger birds had phospholipid fatty acyl chains that were less polyunsaturated and more monounsaturated when compared with those from smaller birds. Phospholipid fatty acyl polyunsaturation correlated positively and monounsaturation correlated negatively with proton conductance. These correlations echo those seen in mammalian liver mitochondria, suggesting that they too are general for endotherms. PMID:12943530

  6. Identification of a Mycoloyl Transferase Selectively Involved in O-Acylation of Polypeptides in Corynebacteriales

    PubMed Central

    Huc, Emilie; de Sousa-D'Auria, Célia; de la Sierra-Gallay, Inès Li; Salmeron, Christophe; van Tilbeurgh, Herman; Bayan, Nicolas; Houssin, Christine

    2013-01-01

    We have previously described the posttranslational modification of pore-forming small proteins of Corynebacterium by mycolic acid, a very-long-chain α-alkyl and β-hydroxy fatty acid. Using a combination of chemical analyses and mass spectrometry, we identified the mycoloyl transferase (Myt) that catalyzes the transfer of the fatty acid residue to yield O-acylated polypeptides. Inactivation of corynomycoloyl transferase C (cg0413 [Corynebacterium glutamicum mytC {CgmytC}]), one of the six Cgmyt genes of C. glutamicum, specifically abolished the O-modification of the pore-forming proteins PorA and PorH, which is critical for their biological activity. Expectedly, complementation of the cg0413 mutant with either the wild-type gene or its orthologues from Corynebacterium diphtheriae and Rhodococcus, but not Nocardia, fully restored the O-acylation of the porins. Consistently, the three-dimensional structure of CgMytC showed the presence of a unique loop that is absent from enzymes that transfer mycoloyl residues onto both trehalose and the cell wall arabinogalactan. These data suggest the implication of this structure in the enzyme specificity for protein instead of carbohydrate. PMID:23852866

  7. Expression of acyl-CoA synthetase 5 in human epidermis.

    PubMed

    Gaisa, N T; Köster, J; Reinartz, A; Ertmer, K; Ehling, J; Raupach, K; Perez-Bouza, A; Knüchel, R; Gassler, N

    2008-04-01

    The human epidermis is characterized by a constant renewal of keratinocytes embedded in a matrix enriched with lipids. Numerous proteins involved in lipid metabolism are found in human epidermis, especially in keratinocytes. Long-chain acyl-CoA derivatives, which are catalyzed by human ACSL5, are important metabolites in several biochemical pathways, including ceramide de novo synthesis. The aim of the present study was to investigate expression of acyl-CoA synthetase isoform 5 (ACSL5) in human epidermis by an in situ, as well as a molecular approach. We show that ACSL5 mRNA and protein are found in human epidermis, as well as in non-differentiated and differentiated HaCaT cells. Keratinocytes of stratum spinosum are the main source for ACSL5 expression in both meshed facial or abdominal skin and ridged skin of upper or lower extremities including TUNEL-positive cells in upper cellular layers. Single keratinocytes of chronic solar-exposed meshed facial epidermis occasionally display a stronger ACSL5 immunostaining. In conclusion, our study indicates that epidermal ACSL5 expression might be involved in differentiation and the stress response of keratinocytes. PMID:18228202

  8. Methylene blue doped polymers: efficient media for optical recording

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ushamani, M.; Sreekumar, K.; Sudha Kartha, C.; Joseph, R.

    2004-05-01

    Polymer materials find application in optical storage technology, namely in the development of high information density and fast access type memories. A new polymer blend of methylene blue sensitized polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and polyacrylic acid (PAA) in methanol is prepared and characterized and its comparison with methylene blue sensitized PVA in methanol and complexed methylene blue sensitized polyvinyl chloride (CMBPVC) is presented. The optical absorption spectra of the thin films of these polymers showed a strong and broad absorption region at 670-650 nm, matching the wavelength of the laser used. A very slow recovery of the dye on irradiation was observed when a 7:3 blend of polyvinyl alcohol/polyacrylic acid at a pH of 3.8 and a sensitizer concentration of 4.67 · 10-5 g/ml were used. A diffraction efficiency of up to 20% was observed for the MBPVA/alcohol system and an energetic sensitivity of 2000 mJ/cm2 was obtained in the photosensitive films with a spatial frequency of 588 lines/mm.

  9. Acylated flavonol glycosides from the forage legume, Onobrychis viciifolia (sainfoin).

    PubMed

    Veitch, Nigel C; Regos, Ionela; Kite, Geoffrey C; Treutter, Dieter

    2011-04-01

    Ten acylated flavonol glycosides were isolated from aqueous acetone extracts of the aerial parts of the forage legume, Onobrychis viciifolia, and their structures determined using spectroscopic methods. Among these were eight previously unreported examples which comprised either feruloylated or sinapoylated derivatives of 3-O-di- and 3-O-triglycosides of kaempferol (3,5,7,4'-tetrahydroxyflavone) or quercetin (3,5,7,3',4'-pentahydroxyflavone). The diglycosides were acylated at the primary Glc residue of O-α-Rhap(1→6)-β-Glcp (rutinose), whereas the triglycosides were acylated at the terminal Rha residues of the branched trisaccharides, O-α-Rhap(1→2)[α-Rhap(1→6)]-β-Galp or O-α-Rhap(1→2)[α-Rhap(1→6)]-β-Glcp. Identification of the primary 3-O-linked hexose residues as either Gal or Glc was carried out by negative ion electrospray and serial MS, and cryoprobe NMR spectroscopy. Analysis of UV and MS spectra of the acylated flavonol glycosides provided additional diagnostic features relevant to direct characterisation of these compounds in hyphenated analyses. Quantitative analysis of the acylated flavonol glycosides present in different aerial parts of sainfoin revealed that the highest concentrations were in mature leaflets. PMID:21292287

  10. Inhibition of Octreotide Acylation Inside PLGA Microspheres by Derivatization of the Amines of the Peptide with a Self-Immolative Protecting Group.

    PubMed

    Shirangi, Mehrnoosh; Najafi, Marzieh; Rijkers, Dirk T S; Kok, Robbert Jan; Hennink, Wim E; van Nostrum, Cornelus F

    2016-03-16

    Acylation of biopharmaceuticals such as peptides has been identified as a major obstacle for the successful development of PLGA controlled release formulations. The purpose of this study was to develop a method to inhibit peptide acylation in poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) formulations by reversibly and temporarily blocking the amine groups of a model peptide (octreotide) with a self-immolative protecting group (SIP), O-4-nitrophenyl-O'-4-acetoxybenzyl carbonate. The octreotide with two self-immolative protecting groups (OctdiSIP) on the N-terminus and lysine side chain was synthesized by reaction of the peptide with O-4-nitrophenyl-O'-4-acetoxybenzyl carbonate, purified by preparative RP-HPLC and characterized by mass spectrometry. Degradation studies of OctdiSIP in aqueous solutions of different pH values showed that protected octreotide was stable at low pH (pH 5) whereas the protecting group was eliminated at physiological pH, especially in the presence of an esterase, to generate native octreotide. OctdiSIP encapsulated in PLGA microspheres, prepared using a double emulsion solvent evaporation method, showed substantial inhibition of acylation as compared to the unprotected octreotide: 52.5% of unprotected octreotide was acylated after 50 days incubation of microspheres in PBS pH 7.4 at 37 °C, whereas OctdiSIP showed only 5.0% acylation in the same time frame. In conclusion, the incorporation of self-immolative protection groups provides a viable approach for inhibition of acylation of peptides in PLGA delivery systems. PMID:26726953

  11. Comparison of metabolic fluxes of cis-5-enoyl-CoA and saturated acyl-CoA through the beta-oxidation pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Tserng, K Y; Chen, L S; Jin, S J

    1995-01-01

    The metabolic fluxes of cis-5-enoyl-CoAs through the beta-oxidation cycle were studied in solubilized rat liver mitochondrial samples and compared with saturated acyl-CoAs of equal chain length. These studies were accomplished using either spectrophotometric assay of enzyme activities and/or the analysis of metabolites and precursors using a gas chromatographic method after conversion of CoA esters into their free acids. Cis-5-enoyl-CoAs were dehydrogenated by acyl-CoA oxidase or acyl-CoA dehydrogenases at significantly lower rates (10-44%) than saturated acyl-CoAs. However, enoyl-CoA hydratase hydrated trans-2-cis-5-enoyl-CoA at a faster rate (at least 1.5-fold) than trans-2-enoyl-CoA. The combined activities of 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase and 3-ketoacyl-CoA thiolase for 3-hydroxy-cis-5-enoyl-CoAs derived from cis-5-enoyl-CoAs were less than 40% of the activity for the corresponding 3-hydroxyacyl-CoAs prepared from saturated acyl-CoAs. Rat liver mitochondrial beta-oxidation enzymes were capable of metabolizing cis-5-enoyl-CoA via one cycle of beta-oxidation to cis-3-enoyl-CoA with two less carbons. However, the overall rates of one cycle of beta-oxidation, as determined with stable-isotope-labelled tracer, was only 15-25%, for cis-5-enoyl-CoA, of that for saturated acyl-CoA. In the presence of NADPH, the metabolism of cis-5-enoyl-CoAs was switched to the reduction pathway.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7717980

  12. α-Amidoalkylating agents from N-acyl-α-amino acids: 1-(N-acylamino)alkyltriphenylphosphonium salts.

    PubMed

    Mazurkiewicz, Roman; Adamek, Jakub; Październiok-Holewa, Agnieszka; Zielińska, Katarzyna; Simka, Wojciech; Gajos, Anna; Szymura, Karol

    2012-02-17

    N-Acyl-α-amino acids were efficiently transformed in a two-step procedure into 1-N-(acylamino)alkyltriphenylphosphonium salts, new powerful α-amidoalkylating agents. The effect of the α-amino acid structure, the base used [MeONa or a silica gel-supported piperidine (SiO(2)-Pip)], and the main electrolysis parameters (current density, charge consumption) on the yield and selectivity of the electrochemical decarboxylative α-methoxylation of N-acyl-α-amino acids (Hofer-Moest reaction) was investigated. For most proteinogenic and all studied unproteinogenic α-amino acids, very good results were obtained using a substoichiometric amount of SiO(2)-Pip as the base. Only in the cases of N-acylated cysteine, methionine, and tryptophan, attempts to carry out the Hofer-Moest reaction in the applied conditions failed, probably because of the susceptibility of these α-amino acids to an electrochemical oxidation on the side chain. The methoxy group of N-(1-methoxyalkyl)amides was effectively displaced with the triphenylphosphonium group by dissolving an equimolar amount of N-(1-methoxyalkyl)amide and triphenylphosphonium tetrafluoroborate in CH(2)Cl(2) at room temperature for 30 min, followed by the precipitation of 1-N-(acylamino)alkyltriphenylphosphonium salt with Et(2)O. PMID:22250978

  13. Evolution of acyl-ACP-thioesterases and β-ketoacyl-ACP-synthases revealed by protein-protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    Beld, Joris; Blatti, Jillian L.; Behnke, Craig; Mendez, Michael; Burkart, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    The fatty acid synthase (FAS) is a conserved primary metabolic enzyme complex capable of tolerating cross-species engineering of domains for the development of modified and overproduced fatty acids. In eukaryotes, acyl-acyl carrier protein thioesterases (TEs) off-load mature cargo from the acyl carrier protein (ACP), and plants have developed TEs for short/medium-chain fatty acids. We showed that engineering plant TEs into the green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii does not result in the predicted shift in fatty acid profile. Since fatty acid biosynthesis relies on substrate recognition and protein-protein interactions between the ACP and its partner enzymes, we hypothesized that plant TEs and algal ACP do not functionally interact. Phylogenetic analysis revealed major evolutionary differences between FAS enzymes, including TEs and ketoacyl synthases (KSs), in which the former is present only in some species, whereas the latter is present in all, and has a common ancestor. In line with these results, TEs appeared to be selective towards their ACP partners whereas KSs showed promiscuous behavior across bacterial, plant and algal species. Based on phylogenetic analyses, in silico docking, in vitro mechanistic crosslinking and in vivo algal engineering, we propose that phylogeny can predict effective interactions between ACPs and partner enzymes. PMID:25110394

  14. Acylation of Biomolecules in Prokaryotes: a Widespread Strategy for the Control of Biological Function and Metabolic Stress.

    PubMed

    Hentchel, Kristy L; Escalante-Semerena, Jorge C

    2015-09-01

    Acylation of biomolecules (e.g., proteins and small molecules) is a process that occurs in cells of all domains of life and has emerged as a critical mechanism for the control of many aspects of cellular physiology, including chromatin maintenance, transcriptional regulation, primary metabolism, cell structure, and likely other cellular processes. Although this review focuses on the use of acetyl moieties to modify a protein or small molecule, it is clear that cells can use many weak organic acids (e.g., short-, medium-, and long-chain mono- and dicarboxylic aliphatics and aromatics) to modify a large suite of targets. Acetylation of biomolecules has been studied for decades within the context of histone-dependent regulation of gene expression and antibiotic resistance. It was not until the early 2000s that the connection between metabolism, physiology, and protein acetylation was reported. This was the first instance of a metabolic enzyme (acetyl coenzyme A [acetyl-CoA] synthetase) whose activity was controlled by acetylation via a regulatory system responsive to physiological cues. The above-mentioned system was comprised of an acyltransferase and a partner deacylase. Given the reversibility of the acylation process, this system is also referred to as reversible lysine acylation (RLA). A wealth of information has been obtained since the discovery of RLA in prokaryotes, and we are just beginning to visualize the extent of the impact that this regulatory system has on cell function. PMID:26179745

  15. [Adsorption of methylene blue from water by the biochars generated from crop residues].

    PubMed

    Xu, Ren-Kou; Zhao, An-Zhen; Xiao, Shuang-Cheng; Yuan, Jin-Hua

    2012-01-01

    Biochars were prepared from straws of rice, peanut and soybean and rice hull using a low temperature pyrolysis method and adsorption of methylene blue by these biochars were investigated with batch and leaching experiments. Results indicated that biochars have high adsorption capacity for methylene blue and followed the order: rice straw char > soybean straw char > peanut straw char > rice hull char. This order is generally consistent with the amount of negative charge and specific surface area of these biochars. While methylene blue was mainly adsorbed specifically by the biochars, because the adsorption of methylene blue increased with the increase of ionic strength and the adsorption led to the shift of zeta potential of biochar particles to positive value direction. Langmuir equation fitted the adsorption isotherms well and can be used to describe the adsorption behaviors of methylene blue by the biochars. The maximum adsorption capacity of methylene blue predicted by langmuir equation was 196.1, 169.5, 129.9 and 89.3 mmol x kg(-1) for rice straw char, soybean straw char, peanut straw char and rice hull char, respectively. Leaching experiments show that rice hull char of 156 g can remove methylene blue from 30 L water containing 0.3 mmol x L(-1) of methylene blue completely and the cumulative amount of methylene blue absorbed by the biochar reaches 57.7 mmol x kg(-1). The biochars can be used as efficient adsorbents to remove methylene blue from waste water of dye. PMID:22452202

  16. Acylated sucroses and acylated quinic acids analogs from the flower buds of Prunus mume and their inhibitory effect on melanogenesis.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Seikou; Fujimoto, Katsuyoshi; Matsumoto, Takahiro; Nakashima, Souichi; Ohta, Tomoe; Ogawa, Keiko; Matsuda, Hisashi; Yoshikawa, Masayuki

    2013-08-01

    The methanolic extract from the flower buds of Prunus mume, cultivated in Zhejiang Province, China, showed an inhibitory effect on melanogenesis in theophylline-stimulated B16 melanoma 4A5 cells. From the methanolic extract, five acylated sucroses, mumeoses A-E, and three acylated quinic acid analogs, 5-O-(E)-p-coumaroylquinic acid ethyl ester, and mumeic acid-A and its methyl ester, were isolated together with 13 known compounds. The chemical structures of the compounds were elucidated on the basis of chemical and physicochemical evidence. Inhibitory effects of the isolated compounds on melanogenesis in theophylline-stimulated B16 melanoma 4A5 cells were also investigated. Acylated quinic acid analogs substantially inhibited melanogenesis. In particular, 5-O-(E)-feruloylquinic acid methyl ester exhibited a potent inhibitory effect [inhibition (%): 21.5±1.0 (P<0.01) at 0.1 μM]. Moreover, its biological effect was much stronger than that of the reference compound, arbutin [inhibition (%): 10.6±0.6 (P<0.01) at 10 μM]. Interestingly, the obtained acylated quinic acid analogs displaying melanogenesis inhibitory activity showed no cytotoxicity [cell viability >97% at 10 μM]. It is concluded that acylated quinic acid analogs are promising therapeutic agents for the treatment of skin disorders. PMID:23693120

  17. Trapping of the Enoyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Reductase–Acyl Carrier Protein Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Tallorin, Lorillee; Finzel, Kara; Nguyen, Quynh G.; Beld, Joris; La Clair, James J.; Burkart, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    An ideal target for metabolic engineering, fatty acid biosynthesis remains poorly understood on a molecular level. These carrier protein-dependent pathways require fundamental protein–protein interactions to guide reactivity and processivity, and their control has become one of the major hurdles in successfully adapting these biological machines. Our laboratory has developed methods to prepare acyl carrier proteins (ACPs) loaded with substrate mimetics and cross-linkers to visualize and trap interactions with partner enzymes, and we continue to expand the tools for studying these pathways. We now describe application of the slow-onset, tight-binding inhibitor triclosan to explore the interactions between the type II fatty acid ACP from Escherichia coli, AcpP, and its corresponding enoyl-ACP reductase, FabI. We show that the AcpP–triclosan complex demonstrates nM binding, inhibits in vitro activity, and can be used to isolate FabI in complex proteomes. PMID:26938266

  18. Asymmetric Allylboration of Acyl Imines Catalyzed by Chiral Diols

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Sha; Moquist, Philip N.; Schaus, Scott E.

    2008-01-01

    Chiral BINOL-derived diols catalyze the enantioselective asymmetric allylboration of acyl imines. The reaction requires 15 mol% of (S)-3,3′-Ph2-BINOL as the catalyst and allyldiisopropoxyborane as the nucleophile. The reaction products are obtained in good yields (75 – 94%) and high enantiomeric ratios (95:5 – 99.5:0.5) for aromatic and aliphatic imines. High diastereoselectivities (dr > 98:2) and enantioselectivities (er > 98:2) are obtained in the reactions of acyl imines with crotyldiisopropoxyboranes. This asymmetric transformation is directly applied to the synthesis of maraviroc, the selective CCR5 antagonist with potent activity against HIV-1 infection. Mechanistic investigations of the allylboration reaction including IR, NMR, and mass spectrometry study indicate that acyclic boronates are activated by chiral diols via exchange of one of the boronate alkoxy groups with activation of the acyl imine via hydrogen bonding. PMID:18020334

  19. Identification of N-acyl homoserine lactones produced by Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus PAL5 cultured in complex and synthetic media.

    PubMed

    Nieto-Peñalver, Carlos G; Bertini, Elisa V; de Figueroa, Lucía I C

    2012-07-01

    The endophytic diazotrophic Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus PAL5 was originally isolated from sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum). The biological nitrogen fixation, phytohormones secretion, solubilization of mineral nutrients and phytopathogen antagonism allow its classification as a plant growth-promoting bacterium. The recent genomic sequence of PAL5 unveiled the presence of a quorum sensing (QS) system. QS are regulatory mechanisms that, through the production of signal molecules or autoinducers, permit a microbial population the regulation of the physiology in a coordinated manner. The most studied autoinducers in gram-negative bacteria are the N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs). The usage of biosensor strains evidenced the presence of AHL-like molecules in cultures of G. diazotrophicus PAL5 grown in complex and synthetic media. Analysis of AHLs performed by LC-APCI-MS permitted the identification of eight different signal molecules, including C6-, C8-, C10-, C12- and C14-HSL. Mass spectra confirmed that this diazotrophic strain also synthesizes autoinducers with carbonyl substitutions in the acyl chain. No differences in the profile of AHLs could be determined under both culture conditions. However, although the level of short-chain AHLs was not affected, a decrease of 30% in the production of long-chain AHLs could be measured in synthetic medium. PMID:22350020

  20. X-Ray Crystal Structure of Mycobacterium Tuberculosis β-Ketoacyl Acyl Carrier Protein Synthase II (mtKasB)

    PubMed Central

    Sridharan, Sudharsan; Wang, Lei; Brown, Alistair K.; Dover, Lynn G.; Kremer, Laurent; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Sacchettini, James C.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Mycolic acids are long chain α-alkyl branched, β-hydroxy fatty acids that represent a characteristic component of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis cell wall. Through their covalent attachment to peptidoglycan via an arabinogalactan polysaccharide, they provide the basis for an essential outer envelope membrane. Mycobacteria possess two fatty acid synthases (FAS); FAS-I carries out de novo synthesis of fatty acids while FAS-II is considered to elongate medium chain length fatty acyl primers to provide long chain (C56) precursors of mycolic acids. Here we report the crystal structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis β-ketoacyl acyl carrier protein synthase (ACP) II mtKasB, a mycobacterial elongation condensing enzyme involved in FAS-II. This enzyme, along with the M. tuberculosis β-ketoacyl ACP synthase I mtKasA, catalyzes the Claisen-type condensation reaction responsible for fatty acyl elongation in FAS-II and are potential targets for development of novel anti-tubercular drugs. The crystal structure refined to 2.4 Å resolution revealed that, like other KAS-II enzymes, mtKasB adopts a thiolase fold but contains unique structural features in the capping region that may be crucial to its preference for longer fatty acyl chains than its counterparts from other bacteria. Modeling of mtKasA using the mtKasB structure as a template predicts the overall structures to be almost identical, but a larger entrance to the active site tunnel is envisaged that might contribute to the greater sensitivity of mtKasA to the inhibitor thiolactomycin (TLM). Modeling of TLM binding in mtKasB shows that the drug fits the active site poorly and results of enzyme inhibition assays using TLM analogues are wholly consistent with our structural observations. Consequently, the structure described here further highlights the potential of TLM as an anti-tubercular lead compound and will aid further exploration of the TLM scaffold towards the design of novel compounds which inhibit

  1. Potential O-acyl-substituted (-)-Epicatechin gallate prodrugs as inhibitors of DMBA/TPA-induced squamous cell carcinoma of skin in Swiss albino mice.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Sandeep; Manon, Benu; Vir Singh, Tej; Dev Sharma, Pritam; Sharma, Manu

    2011-04-01

    (-)-Epicatechin-3-gallate (1) is one of the principal catechins of green tea and exhibits cancer-preventive activities in various animal models. However, this compound is unstable in neutral or alkaline medium and, therefore, has a poor bioavailability. To improve its stability, O-acyl derivatives of 1 were prepared by isolating the partially purified tea catechin fraction from green tea extract and treating it with a variety of acylating agents. The resulting derivatives, compounds 2-6, were screened for their antitumor potential against 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA)/12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced squamous cell carcinogenesis of skin in mice. The results showed that the antitumor activity decreased with the increase in size of the chain length of the acyl groups, i.e., from compound 2, derivative with an Ac group, to compound 6, possessing a valeryl group. Moreover, the C(4) derivative with a branched acyl chain, 5, had a lower activity than the linear C(4) derivative 4. This reduction in the inhibitory activity may be due to the steric hindrance by the two Me groups. Moreover, significant increases in the protein levels analyzed by ELISA of c-Jun, p65, and p53 were observed in the skin of DMBA/TPA treated mice, whereas mice treated with 2 and DMBA/TPA had a similar expression of these transcription factors than the control mice. The prodrug potential of the O-acyl derivatives 2-6 showed that they were adequately stable to be absorbed intact from the intestine, more stable at gastric pH, and suitable for oral administration. PMID:21480506

  2. Chemical and Biochemical Transfer of Acyl Groups: A New Look at an Old Mechanism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douglas, Kenneth T.; Williams, Andrew

    1976-01-01

    Examines recent studies of the elimination-addition mechanism of acyl group transfer, in which an acid function moves from one acceptor to another. Presents diagnostic evidence for this mechanism and discusses acyl group transfers in metabolism. (MLH)

  3. Direct N-acylation of lactams, oxazolidinones, and imidazolidinones with aldehydes by Shvo's catalyst.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Hong, Soon Hyeok

    2012-09-01

    Direct N-acylation of lactams, oxazolidinones, and imidazolidinones was achieved with aldehydes by Shvo's catalyst without using any other stoichiometric reagent. The N-acylations with α,β-unsaturated aldehydes were achieved with excellent yields. PMID:22913512

  4. ACYL-ACYL CARRIER PROTEIN DESATURASE2 and 3 Are Responsible for Making Omega-7 Fatty Acids in the Arabidopsis Aleurone.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Fiona M; Munoz-Azcarate, Olaya; Kelly, Amélie A; Beaudoin, Frédéric; Kurup, Smita; Eastmond, Peter J

    2016-09-01

    Omega-7 monounsaturated fatty acids (ω-7s) are specifically enriched in the aleurone of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seeds. We found significant natural variation in seed ω-7 content and used a Multiparent Advanced Generation Inter-Cross population to fine-map a major quantitative trait loci to a region containing ACYL-ACYL CARRIER PROTEIN DESATURASE1 (AAD1) and AAD3 We found that AAD3 expression is localized to the aleurone where mutants show an approximately 50% reduction in ω-7 content. By contrast, AAD1 is localized to the embryo where mutants show a small reduction in ω-9 content. Enzymatic analysis has previously shown that AAD family members possess both stearoyl- and palmitoyl-ACP Δ(9) desaturase activity, including the predominant isoform SUPPRESSOR OF SALICYLIC ACID INSENSITIVE2. However, aad3 ssi2 aleurone contained the same amount of ω-7s as aad3 Within the AAD family, AAD3 shares the highest degree of sequence similarity with AAD2 and AAD4. Mutant analysis showed that AAD2 also contributes to ω-7 production in the aleurone, and aad3 aad2 exhibits an approximately 85% reduction in ω-7s Mutant analysis also showed that FATTY ACID ELONGASE1 is required for the production of very long chain ω-7s in the aleurone. Together, these data provide genetic evidence that the ω-7 pathway proceeds via Δ(9) desaturation of palmitoyl-ACP followed by elongation of the product. Interestingly, significant variation was also identified in the ω-7 content of Brassica napus aleurone, with the highest level detected being approximately 47% of total fatty acids. PMID:27462083

  5. Four Trypanosoma brucei fatty acyl-CoA synthetases: fatty acid specificity of the recombinant proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, D W; Englund, P T

    2001-01-01

    As part of our investigation of fatty acid metabolism in Trypanosoma brucei, we have expressed four acyl-CoA synthetase (TbACS) genes in Esherichia coli. The recombinant proteins, with His-tags on their C-termini, were purified to near homogeneity using nickel-chelate affinity chromatography. Although these enzymes are highly homologous, they have distinct specificities for fatty acid chain length. TbACS1 prefers saturated fatty acids in the range C(11:0) to C(14:0) and TbACS2 prefers shorter fatty acids, mainly C(10:0). TbACS3 and 4, which have 95% sequence identity, have similar specificities, favouring fatty acids between C(14:0) and C(17:0). In addition, TbACS1, 3 and 4 function well with a variety of unsaturated fatty acids. PMID:11535136

  6. Biofilm activity and sludge characteristics affected by exogenous N-acyl homoserine lactones in biofilm reactors.

    PubMed

    Hu, Huizhi; He, Junguo; Liu, Jian; Yu, Huarong; Zhang, Jie

    2016-07-01

    This study verified the effect of N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) concentrations on mature biofilm systems. Three concentrations of an AHL mixture were used in the batch test. Introducing of 5nM AHLs significantly increased biofilm activity and increased sludge characteristics, which resulted in better pollutant removal performance, whereas exogenous 50nM and 500nM AHLs limited pollutant removal, especially COD and nitrogen removal. To further identify how exogenous signal molecular affects biofilm system nitrogen removal, analyzing of nitrifying bacteria through real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) revealed that these additional signal molecules affect nitrifying to total bacteria ratio. In addition, the running state of the system was stable during 15days of operation without an AHL dose, which suggests that the changes in the system due to AHL are irreversible. PMID:27030953

  7. Measuring the bioactivity and molecular conformation of typically globular proteins with phenothiazine-derived methylene blue in solid and in solution: A comparative study using photochemistry and computational chemistry.

    PubMed

    Ding, Fei; Xie, Yong; Peng, Wei; Peng, Yu-Kui

    2016-05-01

    Methylene blue is a phenothiazine agent, that possesses a diversity of biomedical and biological therapeutic purpose, and it has also become the lead compound for the exploitation of other pharmaceuticals such as chlorpromazine and the tricyclic antidepressants. However, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has acquired cases of detrimental effects of methylene blue toxicities such as hemolytic anemia, methemoglobinemia and phototoxicity. In this work, the molecular recognition of methylene blue by two globular proteins, hemoglobin and lysozyme was characterized by employing fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD) along with molecular modeling at the molecular scale. The recognition of methylene blue with proteins appears fluorescence quenching via static type, this phenomenon does cohere with time-resolved fluorescence lifetime decay that nonfluorescent protein-drug conjugate formation has a strength of 10(4)M(-1), and the primary noncovalent bonds, that is hydrogen bonds, π-conjugated effects and hydrophobic interactions were operated and remained adduct stable. Meantime, the results of far-UV CD and synchronous fluorescence suggest that the α-helix of hemoglobin/lysozyme decreases from 78.2%/34.7% (free) to 58.7%/23.8% (complex), this elucidation agrees well with the elaborate description of three-dimensional fluorescence showing the polypeptide chain of proteins partially destabilized upon conjugation with methylene blue. Furthermore, both extrinsic fluorescent indicator and molecular modeling clearly exhibit methylene blue is situated within the cavity constituted by α1, β2 and α2 subunits of hemoglobin, while it was located at the deep fissure on the lysozyme surface and Trp-62 and Trp-63 residues are nearby. With the aid of computational analyses and combining the wet experiments, it can evidently be found that the recognition ability of proteins for methylene blue is patterned upon the following sequence: lysozyme

  8. Diverse Activities of Histone Acylations Connect Metabolism to Chromatin Function.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Arnob; Abmayr, Susan M; Workman, Jerry L

    2016-08-18

    Modifications of histones play important roles in balancing transcriptional output. The discovery of acyl marks, besides histone acetylation, has added to the functional diversity of histone modifications. Since all modifications use metabolic intermediates as substrates for chromatin-modifying enzymes, the prevalent landscape of histone modifications in any cell type is a snapshot of its metabolic status. Here, we review some of the current findings of how differential use of histone acylations regulates gene expression as response to metabolic changes and differentiation programs. PMID:27540855

  9. Quantum chemical study of penicillin: Reactions after acylation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Rui; Feng, Dacheng; Zhu, Feng

    The density functional theory methods were used on the model molecules of penicillin to determine the possible reactions after their acylation on ?-lactamase, and the results were compared with sulbactam we have studied. The results show that, the acylated-enzyme tetrahedral intermediate can evolves with opening of ?-lactam ring as well as the thiazole ring; the thiazole ring-open products may be formed via ?-lactam ring-open product or from tetrahedral intermediate directly. Those products, in imine or enamine form, can tautomerize via hydrogen migration. In virtue of the water-assisted, their energy barriers are obviously reduced.

  10. Identification of a potential bottleneck in branched chain fatty acid incorporation into triacylglycerol for lipid biosynthesis in agronomic plants.

    PubMed

    Nlandu Mputu, M; Rhazi, L; Vasseur, G; Vu, T-D; Gontier, E; Thomasset, B

    2009-06-01

    In plant, unusual fatty acids are produced by a limited number of species. The industrial benefits of these unusual structures have led several groups to study their production in transgenic plants. Their research results led to very modest accumulation in seeds which was largely due to a limited knowledge of the lipid metabolism and fatty acid transfer in plants. More specifically we need to better understand the substrate specificity and selectivity of acyltransferases which are required for the incorporation of these unusual fatty acids into storage triacylglycerols. In our studies we have compared the incorporation of [(14)C] Oleoyl-CoA and Branched Chain Acyls-CoA into [(3)H] LPA-C18:1 by the Lysophosphatidic acid Acyltransferase (LPAAT) from developing seeds of agronomic plants (flax (Linum usitatissimum) and rape (Brassica napus)) and from a plant capable of producing high amounts of hydroxy fatty acids (castor bean (Ricinus communis)). Our assays demonstrate that LPAATs of the three studied species (1) incorporated preferentially oleyl-CoA, (2) could incorporate cyclopropane acyl-CoA when added alone as a substrate, however very weakly for rapeseed and castor bean seeds, (3) presented a low capacity to incorporate methyl branched acyl-CoA when added alone as a substrate (4) weakly incorporated cyclopropane acyl-CoA and was unable to incorporate methyl branched acyl-CoA when presented with an equimolar mix of oleyl-CoA and branched chain acyl-CoA. In all cases, the LPAAT had a low affinity for branched chain acyl-CoAs. The results show that LPAAT activity from agronomic plants constitutes a bottleneck for the incorporation of branched Chain acyl-CoA into PA. PMID:19327383

  11. Novel approach in LC-MS/MS using MRM to generate a full profile of acyl-CoAs: discovery of acyl-dephospho-CoAs[S

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qingling; Zhang, Shenghui; Berthiaume, Jessica M.; Simons, Brigitte; Zhang, Guo-Fang

    2014-01-01

    A metabolomic approach to selectively profile all acyl-CoAs was developed using a programmed multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) method in LC-MS/MS and was employed in the analysis of various rat organs. The programmed MRM method possessed 300 mass ion transitions with the mass difference of 507 between precursor ion (Q1) and product ion (Q3), and the precursor ion started from m/z 768 and progressively increased one mass unit at each step. Acyl-dephospho-CoAs resulting from the dephosphorylation of acyl-CoAs were identified by accurate MS and fragmentation. Acyl-dephospho-CoAs were also quantitatively scanned by the MRM method with the mass difference of 427 between Q1 and Q3 mass ions. Acyl-CoAs and dephospho-CoAs were assayed with limits of detection ranging from 2 to 133 nM. The accuracy of the method was demonstrated by assaying a range of concentrations of spiked acyl-CoAs with the results of 80–114%. The distribution of acyl-CoAs reflects the metabolic status of each organ. The physiological role of dephosphorylation of acyl-CoAs remains to be further characterized. The methodology described herein provides a novel strategy in metabolomic studies to quantitatively and qualitatively profile all potential acyl-CoAs and acyl-dephospho-CoAs. PMID:24367045

  12. A Methylene Group on C-2 of 24,24-Difluoro-19-nor-1α,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 Markedly Increases Bone Calcium Mobilization in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Agnieszka; Massarelli, Ilaria; Thoden, James B.; Plum, Lori A.; DeLuca, Hector F.

    2015-01-01

    Four side chain fluorinated analogues of 1α,25-dihydroxy-19-norvitamin D have been prepared in convergent syntheses using the Wittig-Horner reaction as a key step. Structures and absolute configurations of analogues 3 and 5 were confirmed by X-ray crystallography. All analogues showed high potency in HL-60 cell differentiation and vitamin D-24-hydroxylase (24-OHase) transcription as compared to 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1). Most important is that all of the 20S-configured derivatives (4 and 6) had high bone mobilizing activity in vivo. However, in the 20R series, a 2-methylene group was required for high bone mobilizing activity. A change in positioning of the 20R molecule in the vitamin D receptor when the 2-methylene group is present may provide new insight into the molecular basis of bone calcium mobilization induced by vitamin D. PMID:26630444

  13. Chlamydia trachomatis Scavenges Host Fatty Acids for Phospholipid Synthesis via an Acyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Synthetase.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jiangwei; Dodson, V Joshua; Frank, Matthew W; Rock, Charles O

    2015-09-01

    The obligate intracellular parasite Chlamydia trachomatis has a reduced genome but relies on de novo fatty acid and phospholipid biosynthesis to produce its membrane phospholipids. Lipidomic analyses showed that 8% of the phospholipid molecular species synthesized by C. trachomatis contained oleic acid, an abundant host fatty acid that cannot be made by the bacterium. Mass tracing experiments showed that isotopically labeled palmitic, myristic, and lauric acids added to the medium were incorporated into C. trachomatis-derived phospholipid molecular species. HeLa cells did not elongate lauric acid, but infected HeLa cell cultures elongated laurate to myristate and palmitate. The elongated fatty acids were incorporated exclusively into C. trachomatis-produced phospholipid molecular species. C. trachomatis has adjacent genes encoding the separate domains of the bifunctional acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) synthetase/2-acylglycerolphosphoethanolamine acyltransferase gene (aas) of Escherichia coli. The CT775 gene encodes an acyltransferase (LpaT) that selectively transfers fatty acids from acyl-ACP to the 1-position of 2-acyl-glycerophospholipids. The CT776 gene encodes an acyl-ACP synthetase (AasC) with a substrate preference for palmitic compared with oleic acid in vitro. Exogenous fatty acids were elongated and incorporated into phospholipids by Escherichia coli-expressing AasC, illustrating its function as an acyl-ACP synthetase in vivo. These data point to an AasC-dependent pathway in C. trachomatis that selectively scavenges host saturated fatty acids to be used for the de novo synthesis of its membrane constituents. PMID:26195634

  14. Synthesis and antihyperglycemic activity of novel N-acyl-2-arylethylamines and N-acyl-3-coumarylamines.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Atma P; Kumar, Shailesh; Varshney, Vandana; Singh, Amar B; Srivastava, Arvind K; Sahu, Devi P

    2008-04-01

    A series of novel N-acyl-2-arylethylamines and N-acyl-3-coumarylamines were synthesized and evaluated for their antihyperglycemic activity. Compounds 3g and 6d exhibited lowering of postprandial plasma glucose by 30.7%, 23.3% in SLM and 25.6%, 25.4% in STZ models respectively which is significant compared to metformin and glybenclamide. Other compounds exhibited moderate to good activity ranging from 19.5% to 32.8% in SLM and 3.26% to 25.4% in STZ models. PMID:18353644

  15. Highly regioselective para-methylthiolation/bridging methylenation of arylamines promoted by NH4I.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yinfeng; Cong, Tiantian; Liu, Ping; Sun, Peipei

    2015-10-14

    Aryl methyl thioethers and methylene-bridged arylamines were synthesized via highly regioselective para-methylthiolation/bridging methylenation of arylamines using DMSO as the methylthio or methylene source in the presence of NH4I under metal-free conditions. For the substrates with both electron-donating and electron-withdrawing substituents, the reaction proceeded smoothly and gave moderate to good yields. PMID:26337143

  16. Removal of methylene blue from dye effluent using ageratum conyzoide leaf powder (ACLP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezechi, Ezerie Henry; Kutty, Shamsul Rahman bin Mohamed; Malakahmad, Amirhossein; Isa, Mohamed Hasnain; Aminu, Nasiru; Salihi, Ibrahim Umar

    2015-07-01

    Methylene blue (MB), a common environmental pollutant discharged from dye effluents were removed from synthetic effluents in this study using ageratum conyzoide leaf powder. Effects of operating parameters such as pH, initial Methylene blue concentration, adsorbent weight and contact time were examined on methylene blue removal whereas stirring speed was constant at 100 rpm. Results show that low pH (3-4) had more Methylene blue removal than high pH. Methylene blue removal decreased when initial concentration was increased but increased when adsorbent weight was increased. Removal of Methylene blue by Ageratum conyzoide leaf powder was rapid and significantly above 80% in all initial concentrations examined. At optimum conditions of pH 3, 20 minutes contact time and adsorbent weight of 60 mg for Methylene blue initial concentration of 20 mg/L, 40 mg/L and 60 mg/L, Methylene blue removal of 84.7%, 83.9% and 81.2% were obtained respectively. Results suggest that Ageratum conyzoide leaf powder could be potential adsorbents for Methylene blue removal from dye effluents.

  17. Toxicology and metabolism of methylene chloride. (Latest citations from the Life Sciences Collection database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning methylene chloride, its effects on biological systems, and its metabolic fate. Both animal and human studies, and case reports are examined for methylene chloride toxicity. Exposure to the chemical through inhalation, ingestion, and contact is examined. Occupational exposure to methylene chloride is included, and risk factors are discussed. Long term carcinogenicity of methylene chloride is also considered. Toxicity of other chlorinated organic compounds is referenced in related bibliographies. (Contains a minimum of 78 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  18. A Reminder of Methylene Blue's Effectiveness in Treating Vasoplegic Syndrome after On-Pump Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Lisa; Tadros, Hany B.; Munfakh, Nabil A.

    2015-01-01

    The inflammatory response induced by cardiopulmonary bypass decreases vascular tone, which in turn can lead to vasoplegic syndrome. Indeed the hypotension consequent to on-pump cardiac surgery often necessitates vasopressor and intravenous fluid support. Methylene blue counteracts vasoplegic syndrome by inhibiting the formation of nitric oxide. We report the use of methylene blue in a 75-year-old man who developed vasoplegic syndrome after cardiac surgery. After the administration of methylene blue, his hypotension improved to the extent that he could be weaned from vasopressors. The use of methylene blue should be considered in patients who develop hypotension refractory to standard treatment after cardiac surgery. PMID:26504450

  19. On methylene-bridged cysteine and lysine residues in proteins.

    PubMed

    Ruszkowski, Milosz; Dauter, Zbigniew

    2016-09-01

    Cysteine residues ubiquitously stabilize tertiary and quaternary protein structure by formation of disulfide bridges. Here we investigate another linking interaction that involves sulfhydryl groups of cysteines, namely intra- and intermolecular methylene-bridges between cysteine and lysine residues. A number of crystal structures possessing such a linkage were identified in the Protein Data Bank. Inspection of the electron density maps and re-refinement of the nominated structures unequivocally confirmed the presence of Lys-CH2 -Cys bonds in several cases. PMID:27261771

  20. Mechanistic studies of malonic acid-mediated in situ acylation.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Koushik; Naoum, Johnny N; Roy, Tapta Kanchan; Gilon, Chaim; Gerber, R Benny; Friedler, Assaf

    2015-09-01

    We have previously introduced an easy to perform, cost-effective and highly efficient acetylation technique for solid phase synthesis (SPPS). Malonic acid is used as a precursor and the reaction proceeds via a reactive ketene that acetylates the target amine. Here we present a detailed mechanistic study of the malonic acid-mediated acylation. The influence of reaction conditions, peptide sequence and reagents was systematically studied. Our results show that the methodology can be successfully applied to different types of peptides and nonpeptidic molecules irrespective of their structure, sequence, or conformation. Using alkyl, phenyl, and benzyl malonic acid, we synthesized various acyl peptides with almost quantitative yields. The ketenes obtained from the different malonic acid derived precursors were characterized by in situ (1) H-NMR. The reaction proceeded in short reaction times and resulted in excellent yields when using uronium-based coupling agents, DIPEA as a base, DMF/DMSO/NMP as solvents, Rink amide/Wang/Merrifield resins, temperature of 20°C, pH 8-12 and 5 min preactivation at inert atmosphere. The reaction was unaffected by Lewis acids, transition metal ions, surfactants, or salt. DFT studies support the kinetically favorable concerted mechanism for CO2 and ketene formation that leads to the thermodynamically stable acylated products. We conclude that the malonic acid-mediated acylation is a general method applicable to various target molecules. PMID:25846609

  1. A new acylated isoflavone glucoside from Pterocarpus santalinus.

    PubMed

    Krishnaveni, K S; Srinivasa Rao, J V

    2000-09-01

    Phytochemical investigation on the constituents of heartwood of Pterocarpus santalinus resulted in the isolation of a new acylated isoflavone glucoside. The structure of the new compound was elucidated on the basis of spectral studies as 4',5-dihydroxy-7-O-methyl isoflavone 3'-O-D-(3''-E-cinnamoyl)glucoside. PMID:10993243

  2. Novel triterpenoid acyl esters and alkaloids from Anoectochilus roxburghii.

    PubMed

    Han, Mei-Hua; Yang, Xiu-Wei; Jin, Yan-Ping

    2008-01-01

    Two novel sorghumol acyl esters, sorghumol 3-O-Z-p-coumarate and sorghumol 3-O-E-p-coumarate, and a novel alkaloid, anoectochine, were isolated from the whole plants of Anoectochilus roxburghii along with one known triterpenoid, sorghumol. Their structures were established by their detailed spectral studies, including two-dimensional NMR ((1)H-(1)H COSY, HSQC and HMBC). PMID:18435530

  3. Lubricity characteristics of seed oils modified by acylation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chemically modified seed oils via acylation of epoxidized and polyhydroxylated derivatives were investigated for their potential as candidates for lubrication. The native oil was preliminarily epoxidized and ring-opened in a one-pot reaction using formic acid-H2O2 followed by aqueous HCl treatment t...

  4. Preservation of polyunsaturated fatty acyl glycerides via intramolecular antioxidant coupling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ferulic acid and its esters are known to be effective antioxidants. Feruloyl di-gamma-linolenoylglycerol was assessed for its ability to serve as an antioxidant for preventing the oxidation of its gamma-linolenoyl polyunsaturated fatty acyl groups in model membrane phospholipid vesicles. The molec...

  5. Acylation of N-p-Toluenesulfonylpyrrole Under Friedel-Crafts Conditions. Evidence for Organoaluminum Intermediates

    PubMed Central

    Huffman, John W.; Smith, Valerie J.; Padgett, Lea W.

    2008-01-01

    The Friedel-Crafts acylation of N-p-toluenesulfonylpyrrole under Friedel-Crafts conditions has been reinvestigated. Evidence is presented in support of the hypothesis that when AlCl3 is used as the Lewis acid, acylation proceeds via reaction of an organoaluminum intermediate with the acyl halide. This leads to the production of the 3-acyl derivative as the major product. With weaker Lewis acids (EtAlCl2, Et2AlCl) or less than one equivalent of AlCl3 the relative amount of 2-acyl product is increased. A mechanistic rationalization is presented to explain these data. PMID:19247425

  6. Evolution of the acyl-CoA binding protein (ACBP)

    PubMed Central

    Burton, Mark; Rose, Timothy M.; Færgeman, Nils J.; Knudsen, Jens

    2005-01-01

    Acyl-CoA-binding protein (ACBP) is a 10 kDa protein that binds C12–C22 acyl-CoA esters with high affinity. In vitro and in vivo experiments suggest that it is involved in multiple cellular tasks including modulation of fatty acid biosynthesis, enzyme regulation, regulation of the intracellular acyl-CoA pool size, donation of acyl-CoA esters for β-oxidation, vesicular trafficking, complex lipid synthesis and gene regulation. In the present study, we delineate the evolutionary history of ACBP to get a complete picture of its evolution and distribution among species. ACBP homologues were identified in all four eukaryotic kingdoms, Animalia, Plantae, Fungi and Protista, and eleven eubacterial species. ACBP homologues were not detected in any other known bacterial species, or in archaea. Nearly all of the ACBP-containing bacteria are pathogenic to plants or animals, suggesting that an ACBP gene could have been acquired from a eukaryotic host by horizontal gene transfer. Many bacterial, fungal and higher eukaryotic species only harbour a single ACBP homologue. However, a number of species, ranging from protozoa to vertebrates, have evolved two to six lineage-specific paralogues through gene duplication and/or retrotransposition events. The ACBP protein is highly conserved across phylums, and the majority of ACBP genes are subjected to strong purifying selection. Experimental evidence indicates that the function of ACBP has been conserved from yeast to humans and that the multiple lineage-specific paralogues have evolved altered functions. The appearance of ACBP very early on in evolution points towards a fundamental role of ACBP in acyl-CoA metabolism, including ceramide synthesis and in signalling. PMID:16018771

  7. Acylated monogalactosyl diacylglycerol: prevalence in the plant kingdom and identification of an enzyme catalyzing galactolipid head group acylation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Anders K; Johansson, Oskar N; Fahlberg, Per; Kommuri, Murali; Töpel, Mats; Bodin, Lovisa J; Sikora, Per; Modarres, Masoomeh; Ekengren, Sophia; Nguyen, Chi T; Farmer, Edward E; Olsson, Olof; Ellerström, Mats; Andersson, Mats X

    2015-12-01

    The lipid phase of the thylakoid membrane is mainly composed of the galactolipids mono- and digalactosyl diacylglycerol (MGDG and DGDG, respectively). It has been known since the late 1960s that MGDG can be acylated with a third fatty acid to the galactose head group (acyl-MGDG) in plant leaf homogenates. In certain brassicaceous plants like Arabidopsis thaliana, the acyl-MGDG frequently incorporates oxidized fatty acids in the form of the jasmonic acid precursor 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid (OPDA). In the present study we further investigated the distribution of acylated and OPDA-containing galactolipids in the plant kingdom. While acyl-MGDG was found to be ubiquitous in green tissue of plants ranging from non-vascular plants to angiosperms, OPDA-containing galactolipids were only present in plants from a few genera. A candidate protein responsible for the acyl transfer was identified in Avena sativa (oat) leaf tissue using biochemical fractionation and proteomics. Knockout of the orthologous gene in A. thaliana resulted in an almost total elimination of the ability to form both non-oxidized and OPDA-containing acyl-MGDG. In addition, heterologous expression of the A. thaliana gene in E. coli demonstrated that the protein catalyzed acylation of MGDG. We thus demonstrate that a phylogenetically conserved enzyme is responsible for the accumulation of acyl-MGDG in A. thaliana. The activity of this enzyme in vivo is strongly enhanced by freezing damage and the hypersensitive response. PMID:26566971

  8. Methylene blue-enhanced arthroscopic resection of dorsal wrist ganglions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byung Joo; Sawyer, Gregory A; Dasilva, Manuel F

    2011-12-01

    The ganglion is the most common soft tissue mass of the hand and wrist. Over the past 10 to 15 years, there has been a growing interest in arthroscopic treatment of dorsal wrist ganglions. Proposed advantages of arthroscopy include greater motion (particularly wrist flexion), improved cosmesis, and potential to identify/treat other intra-articular pathology. Despite the documented clinical success of arthroscopic ganglion excision, limitations include inconsistent identification of the ganglion stalk. Our described technique offers a means by which to improve visualization of the ganglion stalk intra-articularly to produce a more effective and efficient arthroscopic ganglion excision. During the procedure, a small volume of methylene blue solution is injected into the cyst. Its communication with the joint is apparent arthroscopically, thus identifying the location of the stalk. With the ability to precisely identify the ganglion stalk using an injection of methylene blue, the surgeon can direct the arthroscopic debridement toward the appropriate pathologic tissue. Unnecessary debridement of uninvolved tissue can be avoided with the technique. This also allows for optimal portal placement and, in particular, indicates whether a midcarpal portal should be employed. This should result in fewer recurrences, decreased operative time, and less iatrogenic injury. PMID:22105637

  9. Reprogramming acyl carrier protein interactions of an acyl-CoA promiscuous trans-acyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Zhixia; Musiol, Ewa M; Weber, Tilmann; Williams, Gavin J

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Protein interactions between acyl carrier proteins (ACP’s) and trans-acting acyltransferase domains (trans-AT’s) are critical for regioselective extender unit installation by many polyketide synthases. Yet, little is known regarding the specificity of these interactions, particularly for trans-AT’s with unusual extender unit specificities. Currently, the best-studied trans-AT with non-malonyl specificity is KirCII from kirromycin biosynthesis. Here, we developed a new assay to probe ACP interactions based on leveraging the extender unit promiscuity of KirCII. The assay allows us to identify residues on the ACP surface that contribute to specific recognition by KirCII. This information proved sufficient to modify a non-cognate ACP from a different biosynthetic system to be a substrate for KirCII. The findings form a foundation for further understanding the specificity of trans-AT:ACP protein interactions, and for engineering modular polyketide synthases to produce analogues. PMID:24726832

  10. Production of a Brassica napus low-molecular mass acyl-coenzyme A-binding protein in Arabidopsis alters the acyl-coenzyme A pool and acyl composition of oil in seeds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Low-molecular mass (10 kD) cytosolic acyl-coenzyme A-binding protein (ACBP) has a substantial influence over fatty acid (FA) composition in oilseeds, possibly via an effect on the partitioning of acyl groups between elongation and desaturation pathways. Previously, we demonstrated that the expressio...

  11. Stratum corneum lipid matrix: Location of acyl ceramide and cholesterol in the unit cell of the long periodicity phase.

    PubMed

    Mojumdar, E H; Gooris, G S; Groen, D; Barlow, D J; Lawrence, M J; Demé, B; Bouwstra, J A

    2016-08-01

    The extracellular lipid matrix in the skin's outermost layer, the stratum corneum, is crucial for the skin barrier. The matrix is composed of ceramides (CERs), cholesterol (CHOL) and free fatty acids (FFAs) and involves two lamellar phases: the short periodicity phase (SPP) and the long periodicity phase (LPP). To understand the skin barrier thoroughly, information about the molecular arrangement in the unit cell of these lamellar phases is paramount. Previously we examined the molecular arrangement in the unit cell of the SPP. Furthermore X-ray and neutron diffraction revealed a trilayer arrangement of lipids within the unit cell of the LPP [D. Groen et al., Biophysical Journal, 97, 2242-2249, 2009]. In the present study, we used neutron diffraction to obtain more details about the location of lipid (sub)classes in the unit cell of the LPP. The diffraction pattern revealed at least 8 diffraction orders of the LPP with a repeating unit of 129.6±0.5Å. To determine the location of lipid sub(classes) in the unit cell, samples were examined with either only protiated lipids or selectively deuterated lipids. The diffraction data obtained by means of D2O/H2O contrast variation together with a gradual replacement of one particular CER, the acyl CER, by its partly deuterated counterpart, were used to construct the scattering length density profiles. The acyl chain of the acyl CER subclass is located at a position of ~21.4±0.2Å from the unit cell centre of the LPP. The position and orientation of CHOL in the LPP unit cell were determined using tail and head-group deuterated forms of the sterol. CHOL is located with its head-group positioned ~26±0.2Å from the unit cell centre. This allows the formation of a hydrogen bond with the ester group of the acyl CER located in close proximity. Based on the positions of the deuterated moieties of the acyl CER, CHOL and the previously determined location of two other lipid subclasses [E.H. Mojumdar et al., Biophysical Journal

  12. Evaluation of methylene diphenyl diisocyanate as an indoor air pollutant and biological assessment of methylene dianiline in the polyurethane factories.

    PubMed

    Mirmohammadi, Mirtaghi; Ibrahim, M Hakimi; Ahmad, Anees; Kadir, Mohd Omar Abdul; Mohammadyan, M; Mirashrafi, S B

    2009-04-01

    Today many raw materials used in factories may have a dangerous effect on the physiological system of workers. One of them, which is widely used in the polyurethane factories, is diisocyanates. These compounds are widely used in surface coatings, polyurethane foams, adhesives, resins, elastomers, binders, and sealants. Exposure to diisocyanates causes irritation to the skin, mucous membranes, eyes, and respiratory tract. Methylene dianiline (MDA) is a metabolite of methylene diphenyle diisocyanate (MDI), an excretory material of worker's urine who are exposed to MDI. Around 100 air samples were collected among five factories by the Midget Impinger, which contained DMSO absorbent as a solvent and Tryptamine as a reagent. Samples were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography with an EC\\UV detector using the NIOSH 5522 method of sampling and analysis. Also, fifty urine samples were collected from workers by using William's biological analysis method. The concentration of MDI in all air samples was more than 88 mug/m(3), showing a high concentration of the pollutant in the workplaces in comparison with the NIOSH standard, and all the worker's urine was contaminated by MDA. The correlation and regression tests were used to obtain statistical model for MDI and MDA that is useful for prediction of diisocyanates pollution situation in the polyurethane factories. PMID:20165612

  13. Evaluation of methylene diphenyl diisocyanate as an indoor air pollutant and biological assessment of methylene dianiline in the polyurethane factories

    PubMed Central

    Mirmohammadi, Mirtaghi; Ibrahim, M. Hakimi; Ahmad, Anees; Kadir, Mohd Omar Abdul; Mohammadyan, M.; Mirashrafi, S. B.

    2009-01-01

    Today many raw materials used in factories may have a dangerous effect on the physiological system of workers. One of them, which is widely used in the polyurethane factories, is diisocyanates. These compounds are widely used in surface coatings, polyurethane foams, adhesives, resins, elastomers, binders, and sealants. Exposure to diisocyanates causes irritation to the skin, mucous membranes, eyes, and respiratory tract. Methylene dianiline (MDA) is a metabolite of methylene diphenyle diisocyanate (MDI), an excretory material of worker's urine who are exposed to MDI. Around 100 air samples were collected among five factories by the Midget Impinger, which contained DMSO absorbent as a solvent and Tryptamine as a reagent. Samples were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography with an EC\\UV detector using the NIOSH 5522 method of sampling and analysis. Also, fifty urine samples were collected from workers by using William's biological analysis method. The concentration of MDI in all air samples was more than 88 μg/m3, showing a high concentration of the pollutant in the workplaces in comparison with the NIOSH standard, and all the worker's urine was contaminated by MDA. The correlation and regression tests were used to obtain statistical model for MDI and MDA that is useful for prediction of diisocyanates pollution situation in the polyurethane factories. PMID:20165612

  14. Synthesis of N-acyl homoserine lactone analogues reveals strong activators of SdiA, the Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium LuxR homologue.

    PubMed

    Janssens, Joost C A; Metzger, Kristine; Daniels, Ruth; Ptacek, Dave; Verhoeven, Tine; Habel, Lothar W; Vanderleyden, Jos; De Vos, Dirk E; De Keersmaecker, Sigrid C J

    2007-01-01

    N-Acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs) are molecules that are synthesized and detected by many gram-negative bacteria to monitor the population density, a phenomenon known as quorum sensing. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is an exceptional species since it does not synthesize its own AHLs, while it does encode a LuxR homologue, SdiA, which enables this bacterium to detect AHLs that are produced by other species. To obtain more information about the specificity of the ligand binding by SdiA, we synthesized and screened a limited library of AHL analogues. We identified two classes of analogues that are strong activators of SdiA: the N-(3-oxo-acyl)-homocysteine thiolactones (3O-AHTLs) and the N-(3-oxo-acyl)-trans-2-aminocyclohexanols. To our knowledge, this is the first report of compounds (the 3O-AHTLs) that are able to activate a LuxR homologue at concentrations that are lower than the concentrations of the most active AHLs. SdiA responds with greatest sensitivity to AHTLs that have a keto modification at the third carbon atom and an acyl chain that is seven or eight carbon atoms long. The N-(3-oxo-acyl)-trans-2-aminocyclohexanols were found to be less sensitive to deactivation by lactonase and alkaline pH than the 3O-AHTLs and the AHLs are. We also examined the activity of our library with LuxR of Vibrio fischeri and identified three new inhibitors of LuxR. Finally, we performed preliminary binding experiments which suggested that SdiA binds its activators reversibly. These results increase our understanding of the specificity of the SdiA-ligand interaction, which could have uses in the development of anti-quorum-sensing-based antimicrobials. PMID:17085703

  15. The Wax Ester Synthase/Acyl Coenzyme A:Diacylglycerol Acyltransferase from Acinetobacter sp. Strain ADP1: Characterization of a Novel Type of Acyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Stöveken, Tim; Kalscheuer, Rainer; Malkus, Ursula; Reichelt, Rudolf; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2005-01-01

    The wax ester synthase/acyl coenzyme A (acyl-CoA):diacylglycerol acyltransferase (WS/DGAT) catalyzes the final steps in triacylglycerol (TAG) and wax ester (WE) biosynthesis in the gram-negative bacterium Acinetobacter sp. strain ADP1. It constitutes a novel class of acyltransferases which is fundamentally different from acyltransferases involved in TAG and WE synthesis in eukaryotes. The enzyme was purified by a three-step purification protocol to apparent homogeneity from the soluble fraction of recombinant Escherichia coli Rosetta (DE3)pLysS (pET23a::atfA). Purified WS/DGAT revealed a remarkably low substrate specificity, accepting a broad range of various substances as alternative acceptor molecules. Besides having DGAT and WS activity, the enzyme possesses acyl-CoA:monoacylglycerol acyltransferase (MGAT) activity. The sn-1 and sn-3 positions of acylglycerols are accepted with higher specificity than the sn-2 position. Linear alcohols ranging from ethanol to triacontanol are efficiently acylated by the enzyme, which exhibits highest specificities towards medium-chain-length alcohols. The acylation of cyclic and aromatic alcohols, such as cyclohexanol or phenylethanol, further underlines the unspecific character of this enzyme. The broad range of possible substrates may lead to biotechnological production of interesting wax ester derivatives. Determination of the native molecular weight revealed organization as a homodimer. The large number of WS/DGAT-homologous genes identified in pathogenic mycobacteria and their possible importance for the pathogenesis and latency of these bacteria makes the purified WS/DGAT from Acinetobacter sp. strain ADP1 a valuable model for studying this group of proteins in pathogenic mycobacteria. PMID:15687201

  16. 21 CFR 500.27 - Methylene blue-containing drugs for use in animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...-antispasmodic preparations that contained methylene blue cause Heinz body hemolytic anemia in cats when used... Heinz body hemolytic anemia reaction to methylene blue has also been demonstrated in dogs under... inclusion bodies (Heinz bodies) and associated hemolytic anemia is unclear. (2) The effectiveness of...

  17. 21 CFR 520.154b - Bacitracin methylene disalicylate and streptomycin sulfate powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... sulfate powder. 520.154b Section 520.154b Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.154b Bacitracin methylene disalicylate and streptomycin sulfate powder. (a) Specifications. Each gram of powder contains 200 units bacitracin methylene disalicylate and streptomycin...

  18. 21 CFR 520.154b - Bacitracin methylene disalicylate and streptomycin sulfate powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... sulfate powder. 520.154b Section 520.154b Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.154b Bacitracin methylene disalicylate and streptomycin sulfate powder. (a) Specifications. Each gram of powder contains 200 units bacitracin methylene disalicylate and streptomycin...

  19. Purification of a Jojoba Embryo Fatty Acyl-Coenzyme A Reductase and Expression of Its cDNA in High Erucic Acid Rapeseed

    PubMed Central

    Metz, James G.; Pollard, Michael R.; Anderson, Lana; Hayes, Thomas R.; Lassner, Michael W.

    2000-01-01

    The jojoba (Simmondsia chinensis) plant produces esters of long-chain alcohols and fatty acids (waxes) as a seed lipid energy reserve. This is in contrast to the triglycerides found in seeds of other plants. We purified an alcohol-forming fatty acyl-coenzyme A reductase (FAR) from developing embryos and cloned the cDNA encoding the enzyme. Expression of a cDNA in Escherichia coli confers FAR activity upon those cells and results in the accumulation of fatty alcohols. The FAR sequence shows significant homology to an Arabidopsis protein of unknown function that is essential for pollen development. When the jojoba FAR cDNA is expressed in embryos of Brassica napus, long-chain alcohols can be detected in transmethylated seed oils. Resynthesis of the gene to reduce its A plus T content resulted in increased levels of alcohol production. In addition to free alcohols, novel wax esters were detected in the transgenic seed oils. In vitro assays revealed that B. napus embryos have an endogenous fatty acyl-coenzyme A: fatty alcohol acyl-transferase activity that could account for this wax synthesis. Thus, introduction of a single cDNA into B. napus results in a redirection of a portion of seed oil synthesis from triglycerides to waxes. PMID:10712526

  20. Crystal structure of FAS thioesterase domain with polyunsaturated fatty acyl adduct and inhibition by dihomo-[gamma]-linolenic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wei; Chakravarty, Bornali; Zheng, Fei; Gu, Ziwei; Wu, Hongmei; Mao, Jianqiang; Wakil, Salih J.; Quiocho, Florante A.

    2012-05-29

    Human fatty acid synthase (hFAS) is a homodimeric multidomain enzyme that catalyzes a series of reactions leading to the de novo biosynthesis of long-chain fatty acids, mainly palmitate. The carboxy-terminal thioesterase (TE) domain determines the length of the fatty acyl chain and its ultimate release by hydrolysis. Because of the upregulation of hFAS in a variety of cancers, it is a target for antiproliferative agent development. Dietary long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) have been known to confer beneficial effects on many diseases and health conditions, including cancers, inflammations, diabetes, and heart diseases, but the precise molecular mechanisms involved have not been elucidated. We report the crystal structure of the hFAS TE domain covalently modified and inactivated by methyl {gamma}-linolenylfluorophosphonate. Whereas the structure confirmed the phosphorylation by the phosphonate head group of the active site serine, it also unexpectedly revealed the binding of the 18-carbon polyunsaturated {gamma}-linolenyl tail in a long groove-tunnel site, which itself is formed mainly by the emergence of an {alpha} helix (the 'helix flap'). We then found inhibition of the TE domain activity by the PUFA dihomo-{gamma}-linolenic acid; {gamma}- and {alpha}-linolenic acids, two popular dietary PUFAs, were less effective. Dihomo-{gamma}-linolenic acid also inhibited fatty acid biosynthesis in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes and selective human breast cancer cell lines, including SKBR3 and MDAMB231. In addition to revealing a novel mechanism for the molecular recognition of a polyunsaturated fatty acyl chain, our results offer a new framework for developing potent FAS inhibitors as therapeutics against cancers and other diseases.

  1. Biosynthesis of odd-chain fatty alcohols in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Cao, Ying-Xiu; Xiao, Wen-Hai; Liu, Duo; Zhang, Jin-Lai; Ding, Ming-Zhu; Yuan, Ying-Jin

    2015-05-01

    Engineered microbes offer the opportunity to design and implement artificial molecular pathways for renewable production of tailored chemical commodities. Targeted biosynthesis of odd-chain fatty alcohols is very challenging in microbe, due to the specificity of fatty acids synthase for two-carbon unit elongation. Here, we developed a novel strategy to directly tailor carbon number in fatty aldehydes formation step by incorporating α-dioxygenase (αDOX) from Oryza sativa (rice) into Escherichia coli αDOX oxidizes Cn fatty acids (even-chain) to form Cn-1 fatty aldehydes (odd-chain). Through combining αDOX with fatty acyl-acyl carrier protein (-ACP) thioesterase (TE) and aldehyde reductase (AHR), the medium odd-chain fatty alcohols profile (C11, C13, C15) was firstly established in E. coli. Also, medium even-chain alkanes (C12, C14) were obtained by substitution of AHR to aldehyde decarbonylase (AD). The titer of odd-chain fatty alcohols was improved from 7.4mg/L to 101.5mg/L in tube cultivation by means of fine-tuning endogenous fatty acyl-ACP TE (TesA'), αDOX, AHRs and the genes involved in fatty acids metabolism pathway. Through high cell density fed-batch fermentation, a titer of 1.95g/L odd-chain fatty alcohols was achieved, which was the highest reported titer in E. coli. Our system has greatly expanded the current microbial fatty alcohols profile that provides a new brand solution for producing complex and desired molecules in microbes. PMID:25773521

  2. Terahertz Spectroscopy of Deuterated Methylene Bi-Radical CD_2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozeki, Hiroyuki; Bailleux, Stephane

    2015-06-01

    Methylene, the parent of the carbene compounds, plays a crucial role in many chemical reactions. This bi-radical is a known interstellar molecule that has been detected towards hot cores in dense interstellar clouds. CH_2 is also thought to be present in cometary atmospheres. In the gas phase chemical models of both dense and diffuse molecular clouds, CH_2 is a key intermediate in interstellar carbon chemistry which is produced primarily by dissociative recombination of the methyl ion, CH^+_3. Recently tentative detection of the mono-deuterated methyl ion, CH_2D^+ has been reported toward an infrared source in the vicinity of Orion. Deuterated methylene CHD and CD_2 can be produced from this ion or its counterpart CHD^+_2 by dissociative recombination with an electron: CH2D+ + e- → CHD+ H or {CH2 + D}, CHD2+ ~+ e- → CHD+ D or CD2 + H. Thus, both CHD and CD_2 can be observed in warm interstellar clouds, where the deuterium fractionation process is important. Precise laboratory reference data are desirable for radioastronomical observation of these molecules. Here we report on our high-resolution spectroscopic investigation on the deuterated methylene radical, CD_2 (X ^3B_1) up to 1.45 THz. At present time, eleven out of the twelve fine-structure components of four pure rotational transitions have been newly recorded, and these measurements double the number of previously observed transitions. CD_2 was generated in a discharge in CD_2CO which was obtained from the flash pyrolysis of acetic anhydride-d6 ((CD_3CO)_2O). Effort is currently made to measure the astronomically important 111 - 000 transition whose fine-structure components are predicted to occur at 1.224,1.228 and 1.234 THz. D. C. Lis, P. F. Goldsmith, E. A. Bergin et al. 2009, in Submillimeter Astrophysics and Technology, ASP Conf. Ser., 417, 23. H. Ozeki and S. Saito J. Chem. Phys. 1996, 104, 2167.

  3. Dietary acylated starch improves performance and gut health in necrotic enteritis challenged broilers.

    PubMed

    M'Sadeq, Shawkat A; Wu, Shu-Biao; Swick, Robert A; Choct, Mingan

    2015-10-01

    Resistant starch has been reported to act as a protective agent against pathogenic organisms in the gut and to encourage the proliferation of beneficial organisms. This study examined the efficacy of acetylated high amylose maize starch (SA) and butyralated high-amylose maize starch (SB) in reducing the severity of necrotic enteritis (NE) in broilers under experimental challenge. A total of 720 one-day-old male Ross 308 chicks were assigned to 48 floor pens with a 2 × 4 factorial arrangement of treatments. Factors were a) challenge: no or yes; and b) feed additive: control, antibiotics (AB), SA, or SB. Birds were challenged with Eimeria and C. perfringens according to a previously reported protocol. On d 24 and 35, challenged birds had lower (P < 0.001) livability (LV), weight gain (WG), and feed intake (FI) compared to unchallenged birds. Challenged birds fed SA and SB had higher FI and WG at d 24 and 35 (P < 0.05) compared to birds fed the control diet, while being significantly lower than those fed AB. Unchallenged birds fed SA or SB had higher FI at d 24 and 35 compared to those fed the control diet (P < 0.05). Birds fed SB had increased (P < 0.001) jejunal villus height/crypt depth (VH:CD) ratios at d 15, increased ileal (P < 0.001) and caecal (P < 0.001) butyrate levels at d 15 and 24, and decreased (P < 0.01) caecal pH at d 15. Birds fed SA had increased (P < 0.001) ileal acetate content at d 24 and decreased (P < 0.01) caecal pH at d 15. These results demonstrated that dietary acylated starch improved WG in birds challenged with necrotic enteritis. Depending on the acid used, starch acylation also offers a degree of specificity in short chain fatty acid (SCFA) delivery to the lower intestinal tract which improves gut health. PMID:26287000

  4. NMR Solution Structure and Biophysical Characterization of Vibrio harveyi Acyl Carrier Protein A75H

    PubMed Central

    Chan, David I.; Chu, Byron C. H.; Lau, Cheryl K. Y.; Hunter, Howard N.; Byers, David M.; Vogel, Hans J.

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial acyl carrier protein (ACP) is a highly anionic, 9 kDa protein that functions as a cofactor protein in fatty acid biosynthesis. Escherichia coli ACP is folded at neutral pH and in the absence of divalent cations, while Vibrio harveyi ACP, which is very similar at 86% sequence identity, is unfolded under the same conditions. V. harveyi ACP adopts a folded conformation upon the addition of divalent cations such as Ca2+ and Mg2+ and a mutant, A75H, was previously identified that restores the folded conformation at pH 7 in the absence of divalent cations. In this study we sought to understand the unique folding behavior of V. harveyi ACP using NMR spectroscopy and biophysical methods. The NMR solution structure of V. harveyi ACP A75H displays the canonical ACP structure with four helices surrounding a hydrophobic core, with a narrow pocket closed off from the solvent to house the acyl chain. His-75, which is charged at neutral pH, participates in a stacking interaction with Tyr-71 in the far C-terminal end of helix IV. pH titrations and the electrostatic profile of ACP suggest that V. harveyi ACP is destabilized by anionic charge repulsion around helix II that can be partially neutralized by His-75 and is further reduced by divalent cation binding. This is supported by differential scanning calorimetry data which indicate that calcium binding further increases the melting temperature of V. harveyi ACP A75H by ∼20 °C. Divalent cation binding does not alter ACP dynamics on the ps-ns timescale as determined by 15N NMR relaxation experiments, however, it clearly stabilizes the protein fold as observed by hydrogen-deuterium exchange studies. Finally, we demonstrate that the E. coli ACP H75A mutant is similarly unfolded as wild-type V. harveyi ACP, further stressing the importance of this particular residue for proper protein folding. PMID:20659901

  5. Modification of the substrate specificity of an acyl-acyl carrier protein thioesterase by protein engineering.

    PubMed

    Yuan, L; Voelker, T A; Hawkins, D J

    1995-11-01

    The plant acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) thioesterases (TEs) are of biochemical interest because of their roles in fatty acid synthesis and their utilities in the bioengineering of plant seed oils. When the FatB1 cDNA encoding a 12:0-ACP TE (Uc FatB1) from California bay, Umbellularia californica (Uc) was expressed in Escherichia coli and in developing oilseeds of the plants Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica napus, large amounts of laurate (12:0) and small amounts of myristate (14:0) were accumulated. We have isolated a TE cDNA from camphor (Cinnamomum camphorum) (Cc) seeds that shares 92% amino acid identity with Uc FatB1. This TE, Cc FatB1, mainly hydrolyzes 14:0-ACP as shown by E. coli expression. We have investigated the roles of the N- and C-terminal regions in determining substrate specificity by constructing two chimeric enzymes, in which the N-terminal portion of one protein is fused to the C-terminal portion of the other. Our results show that the C-terminal two-thirds of the protein is critical for the specificity. By site-directed mutagenesis, we have replaced several amino acids in Uc FatB1 by using the Cc FatB1 sequence as a guide. A double mutant, which changes Met-197 to an Arg and Arg-199 to a His (M197R/R199H), turns Uc FatB1 into a 12:0/14:0 TE with equal preference for both substrates. Another mutation, T231K, by itself does not effect the specificity. However, when it is combined with the double mutant to generate a triple mutant (M197R/R199H/T231K), Uc FatB1 is converted to a 14:0-ACP TE. Expression of the double-mutant cDNA in E. coli K27, a strain deficient in fatty acid degradation, results in accumulation of similar amounts of 12:0 and 14:0. Meanwhile the E. coli expressing the triple-mutant cDNA produces predominantly 14:0 with very small amounts of 12:0. Kinetic studies indicate that both wild-type Uc FatB1 and the triple mutant have similar values of Km,app with respect to 14:0-ACP. Inhibitory studies also show that 12:0-ACP is a good

  6. The effects of down-regulating expression of Arabidopsis thaliana membrane-associated acyl-CoA binding protein 2 on acyl-lipid composition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Multiple classes of acyl-CoA binding proteins are encoded by plant genomes, including a plant-unique class of predicted integral membrane-proteins. Transcript analysis revealed that both of the integral membrane-acyl-CoA binding proteins of Arabidopsis thaliana, ACBP1 and ACBP2, are expressed in al...

  7. 40 CFR 180.1207 - N-acyl sarcosines and sodium N-acyl sarcosinates; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false N-acyl sarcosines and sodium N-acyl sarcosinates; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 180.1207 Section 180.1207 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD...

  8. New acylated anthocyanins from purple yam and their antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Moriya, Chiemi; Hosoya, Takahiro; Agawa, Sayuri; Sugiyama, Yasumasa; Kozone, Ikuko; Shin-Ya, Kazuo; Terahara, Norihiko; Kumazawa, Shigenori

    2015-01-01

    Purple yam (Dioscorea alata L.), which is widely distributed in tropical and subtropical regions, is characterized by its color and viscosity. Previous studies have shown that purple yams contain a variety of acylated anthocyanins that exhibit higher levels of antioxidant activity than the corresponding nonacylated compounds. In this study, the pigments found in purple yams from the Philippines (D. alata) were isolated and evaluated in terms of antioxidant activity. Four new acylated anthocyanins, alanins (1-4) were isolated from the MeOH extracts of purple yam, which were subsequently determined to be cyanidin (1, 2, and 4) and peonidin (3) type compounds, along with four known anthocyanins (5-8). The structures of 1-4 were determined by spectroscopic methods, including NMR and MS analyses. The antioxidant activities of anthocyanins 1-8 were investigated using oxygen radical absorbing capacity and ferric reducing antioxidant power assays. PMID:25848974

  9. Site-Selective Acylations with Tailor-Made Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Huber, Florian; Kirsch, Stefan F

    2016-04-18

    The acylation of alcohols catalyzed by N,N-dimethylamino pyridine (DMAP) is, despite its widespread use, sometimes confronted with substrate-specific problems: For example, target compounds with multiple hydroxy groups may show insufficient selectivity for one hydroxyl, and the resulting product mixtures are hardly separable. Here we describe a concept that aims at tailor-made catalysts for the site-specific acylation. To this end, we introduce a catalyst library where each entry is constructed by connecting a variable and readily tuned peptide scaffold with a catalytically active unit based on DMAP. For selected examples, we demonstrate how library screening leads to the identification of optimized catalysts, and the substrates of interest can be converted with a markedly enhanced site-selectivity compared with only DMAP. Furthermore, substrate-optimized catalysts of this type can be used to selectively convert "their" substrate in the presence of structurally similar compounds, an important requisite for reactions with mixtures of substances. PMID:26970553

  10. Methylene blue adsorption on a DMPA lipid langmuir monolayer.

    PubMed

    Giner Casares, Juan José; Camacho, Luis; Martín-Romero, Maria Teresa; López Cascales, José Javier

    2010-07-12

    Adsorption of methylene blue (MB) onto a dimyristoylphosphatidic acid (DMPA) Langmuir air/water monolayer is studied by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, UV reflection spectroscopy and surface potential measurements. The free-energy profile associated with MB transfer from water to the lipid monolayer shows two minima of -66 and -60 kJ mol(-1) for its solid and gas phase, respectively, corresponding to a spontaneous thermodynamic process. From the position of the free-energy minima, it is possible to predict the precise location of MB in the interior of the DMPA monolayer. Thus, MB is accommodated in the phosphoryl or carbonyl region of the DMPA Langmuir air/water interface, depending on the isomorphic state (solid or gas phase, respectively). Reorientation of MB, measured from the bulk solution to the interior of the lipid monolayer, passes from a random orientation in bulk solution to an orientation parallel to the surface of the lipid monolayer when MB is absorbed. PMID:20544777

  11. Preparation of photocrosslinkable polystyrene methylene cinnamate nanofibers via electrospinning.

    PubMed

    Yi, Chuan; Nirmala, R; Navamathavan, R; Li, Xiang-Dan; Kim, Hak-Yong

    2011-10-01

    Nanoscaled photocrosslinkable polystyrene methylene cinnamate (PSMC) nanofibers were fabricated by electrospinning. The PSMC was prepared by the modification of polystyrene as a starting material via a two-step reaction process, chloromethylation and esterification. The chemical structure of PSMC was confirmed by 1H NMR and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The photosensitivity of the PSMC was investigated using ultraviolet (UV) spectroscopic methods. Electrospun PSMC nanofiber mat showed excellent solubility in many organic solvents. UV irradiation of the electrospun mats led to photodimerization to resist dissolving in organic solvents. The morphology of the nanofiber was observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and the result indicated that the average diameter of nanofibers is 350 nm and the crosslinked nanofibers were not collapsed after dipping into organic solvent showing good solvent-stability. This photocrosslinked nanofibers has the potential application in filtration, catalyst carrier and protective coating. PMID:22400211

  12. Adsorption studies of methylene blue dye on tunisian activated lignin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriaa, A.; Hamdi, N.; Srasra, E.

    2011-02-01

    Activated carbon prepared from natural lignin, providing from a geological deposit, was used as the adsorbent for the removal of methylene blue (MB) dye from aqueous solutions. Batch adsorption studies were conducted to evaluate various experimental parameters like pH and contact time for the removal of this dye. Effective pH for MB removal was 11. Kinetic study showed that the adsorption of dye was gradual process. Quasi equilibrium reached in 4 h. Pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order were used to fit the experimental data. Pseudo-second-order rate equation was able to provide realistic description of adsorption kinetics. The experimental isotherms data were also modelled by the Langmuir and Freundlich equation of adsorption. Equilibrium data fitted well with the Langmuir model with maximum monolayer adsorption capacity of 147 mg/g. Activated lignin was shown to be a promising material for adsorption of MB from aqueous solutions.

  13. Sequestration of Methylene Blue into Polyelectrolyte Complex Coacervates.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Mengmeng; Zacharia, Nicole S

    2016-08-01

    Polyelectrolyte complex coacervation is a process that has been proposed as a model for protocell formation due to its ability to compartmentalize chemicals in solution without a membrane. During the liquid-liquid phase separation that results in water rich and polyelectrolyte rich phases, small molecules present in solution selectively partition to one phase over the other. This sequestration is based on relative affinities. Here, a study of the sequestration of methylene blue (MB) into the complex coacervate phase of three pairs of synthetic polyelectrolytes is presented; branched polyethylene imine with polyacrylic acid, polyvinyl sulfonate, or poly(4-styrenesulfonic acid). These materials are characterized with UV-vis, zeta potential measurements, and dynamic light scattering. The branched polyethylene imine/poly(4-styrenesulfonic acid) system is shown to have a significantly higher sequestration capacity for the MB as compared to either of the other two systems, based on π-π interactions which are not possible in the other systems. PMID:27336461

  14. Assess health effects associated with dichloromethane (methylene chloride). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-03-09

    On August 13-14, 1987 the Halogenated Organics Subcommittee of the Science Advisory Board's Environmental Health Committee met in Washington, D.C. to review two documents prepared by EPA's Office of Research and Development that assess health effects associated with dichloromethane (methylene chloride). The documents included: a June 1987 Draft Technical Analysis of New Methods and Data Regarding Dichloromethane: Pharmacokinetics, Mechanism of Action and Epidemiology, a July 1987 Draft Addendum to the Health Assessment Document for Dichloromethane: Pharmacokinetics, Mechanism of Action and Epidemiology. The Subcommittees concluded that the Addendum was one of the best documents it has received in terms of its clarity, coverage of the data and analysis of scientific issues. The document clearly demonstrates the potential utility of pharmacokinetics data in risk assessment.

  15. Methylene blue mediated laser therapy of maxillary sinusitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genina, E. A.; Bashkatov, A. N.; Chikina, E. E.; Knyazev, A. B.; Mareev, O. V.; Tuchin, V. V.

    2006-07-01

    The purpose of the present work is a clinical study of photodynamic therapy of maxillary sinusitis. 0.1%-Methylene Blue aqueous solution in combination with He-Ne laser irradiation (632.8 nm) have been used for treatment of maxillary sinus mucous of patients with acute and chronic maxillary sinusitis. The differences between the results of the treatment with dye and light versus treatment with a drug for every group of patients were statistically analyzed by Student’s t test. The efficacy of the photodynamic therapy was estimated with the use of the following criteria: the state of respiration, olfaction, duration of purulent discharge, reconstruction of transport function of ciliary epithelium, etc. The obtained results have shown that the photodynamic therapy is effective in comparison with conservative methods of treatment of the disease.

  16. Nanosized ZSM-5 will improve photodynamic therapy using Methylene blue.

    PubMed

    Kariminezhad, H; Habibi, M; Mirzababayi, N

    2015-07-01

    Nowadays, nanotechnology is growing to improve Photodynamic Therapy and reduce its side effects. In this research, the synthesized co-polymeric Zeolite Secony Mobile-5 (ZSM-5) was employed to modify Methylene Blue (MB) for these reasons. UV-Visible, FTIR, XRD analysis and SEM images were used to investigate obtained nanostructure. The crystal size for these nanostructures were determined 75 nm and maximum adsorption capacity of MB in the nanostructure was estimated 111 (mg g(-1)). Also, the role of Polyethylene Glycol (PEG) was studied as a capable non-toxic polymeric coating to overcome biological barriers. Moreover, potential of singlet oxygen production of the synthesized nanostructure was compared with MB and ZSM-5 nanoparticles control samples. Synthesized nanodrugs show impressive light induced singlet oxygen production efficiency. PMID:25900556

  17. Excited states of methylene from quantum Monte Carlo.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Paul M; Toulouse, Julien; Zhang, Zhiyong; Musgrave, Charles B; Umrigar, C J

    2009-09-28

    The ground and lowest three adiabatic excited states of methylene are computed using the variational Monte Carlo and diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC) methods using progressively larger Jastrow-Slater multideterminant complete active space (CAS) wave functions. The highest of these states has the same symmetry, (1)A(1), as the first excited state. The DMC excitation energies obtained using any of the CAS wave functions are in excellent agreement with experiment, but single-determinant wave functions do not yield accurate DMC energies of the states of (1)A(1) symmetry, indicating that it is important to include in the wave function Slater determinants that describe static (strong) correlation. Excitation energies obtained using recently proposed pseudopotentials [Burkatzki et al., J. Chem. Phys. 126, 234105 (2007)] differ from the all-electron excitation energies by at most 0.04 eV. PMID:19791848

  18. Organometallic macromolecules with piano stool coordination repeating units: chain configuration and stimulated solution behaviour.

    PubMed

    Cao, Kai; Ward, Jonathan; Amos, Ryan C; Jeong, Moon Gon; Kim, Kyoung Taek; Gauthier, Mario; Foucher, Daniel; Wang, Xiaosong

    2014-09-11

    Theoretical calculations illustrate that organometallic macromolecules with piano stool coordination repeating units (Fe-acyl complex) adopt linear chain configuration with a P-Fe-C backbone surrounded by aromatic groups. The macromolecules show molecular weight-dependent and temperature stimulated solution behaviour in DMSO. PMID:25036387

  19. Glycosyltransferases from Oat (Avena) Implicated in the Acylation of Avenacins*

    PubMed Central

    Owatworakit, Amorn; Townsend, Belinda; Louveau, Thomas; Jenner, Helen; Rejzek, Martin; Hughes, Richard K.; Saalbach, Gerhard; Qi, Xiaoquan; Bakht, Saleha; Roy, Abhijeet Deb; Mugford, Sam T.; Goss, Rebecca J. M.; Field, Robert A.; Osbourn, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Plants produce a huge array of specialized metabolites that have important functions in defense against biotic and abiotic stresses. Many of these compounds are glycosylated by family 1 glycosyltransferases (GTs). Oats (Avena spp.) make root-derived antimicrobial triterpenes (avenacins) that provide protection against soil-borne diseases. The ability to synthesize avenacins has evolved since the divergence of oats from other cereals and grasses. The major avenacin, A-1, is acylated with N-methylanthranilic acid. Previously, we have cloned and characterized three genes for avenacin synthesis (for the triterpene synthase SAD1, a triterpene-modifying cytochrome P450 SAD2, and the serine carboxypeptidase-like acyl transferase SAD7), which form part of a biosynthetic gene cluster. Here, we identify a fourth member of this gene cluster encoding a GT belonging to clade L of family 1 (UGT74H5), and show that this enzyme is an N-methylanthranilic acid O-glucosyltransferase implicated in the synthesis of avenacin A-1. Two other closely related family 1 GTs (UGT74H6 and UGT74H7) are also expressed in oat roots. One of these (UGT74H6) is able to glucosylate both N-methylanthranilic acid and benzoic acid, whereas the function of the other (UGT74H7) remains unknown. Our investigations indicate that UGT74H5 is likely to be key for the generation of the activated acyl donor used by SAD7 in the synthesis of the major avenacin, A-1, whereas UGT74H6 may contribute to the synthesis of other forms of avenacin that are acylated with benzoic acid. PMID:23258535

  20. Glycosyltransferases from oat (Avena) implicated in the acylation of avenacins.

    PubMed

    Owatworakit, Amorn; Townsend, Belinda; Louveau, Thomas; Jenner, Helen; Rejzek, Martin; Hughes, Richard K; Saalbach, Gerhard; Qi, Xiaoquan; Bakht, Saleha; Roy, Abhijeet Deb; Mugford, Sam T; Goss, Rebecca J M; Field, Robert A; Osbourn, Anne

    2013-02-01

    Plants produce a huge array of specialized metabolites that have important functions in defense against biotic and abiotic stresses. Many of these compounds are glycosylated by family 1 glycosyltransferases (GTs). Oats (Avena spp.) make root-derived antimicrobial triterpenes (avenacins) that provide protection against soil-borne diseases. The ability to synthesize avenacins has evolved since the divergence of oats from other cereals and grasses. The major avenacin, A-1, is acylated with N-methylanthranilic acid. Previously, we have cloned and characterized three genes for avenacin synthesis (for the triterpene synthase SAD1, a triterpene-modifying cytochrome P450 SAD2, and the serine carboxypeptidase-like acyl transferase SAD7), which form part of a biosynthetic gene cluster. Here, we identify a fourth member of this gene cluster encoding a GT belonging to clade L of family 1 (UGT74H5), and show that this enzyme is an N-methylanthranilic acid O-glucosyltransferase implicated in the synthesis of avenacin A-1. Two other closely related family 1 GTs (UGT74H6 and UGT74H7) are also expressed in oat roots. One of these (UGT74H6) is able to glucosylate both N-methylanthranilic acid and benzoic acid, whereas the function of the other (UGT74H7) remains unknown. Our investigations indicate that UGT74H5 is likely to be key for the generation of the activated acyl donor used by SAD7 in the synthesis of the major avenacin, A-1, whereas UGT74H6 may contribute to the synthesis of other forms of avenacin that are acylated with benzoic acid. PMID:23258535

  1. The ɛ-Amino Group of Protein Lysine Residues Is Highly Susceptible to Nonenzymatic Acylation by Several Physiological Acyl-CoA Thioesters.

    PubMed

    Simic, Zeljko; Weiwad, Matthias; Schierhorn, Angelika; Steegborn, Clemens; Schutkowski, Mike

    2015-11-01

    Mitochondrial enzymes implicated in the pathophysiology of diabetes, cancer, and metabolic syndrome are highly regulated by acetylation. However, mitochondrial acetyltransferases have not been identified. Here, we show that acetylation and also other acylations are spontaneous processes that depend on pH value, acyl-CoA concentration and the chemical nature of the acyl residue. In the case of a peptide derived from carbamoyl phosphate synthetase 1, the rates of succinylation and glutarylation were up to 150 times than for acetylation. These results were confirmed by using the protein substrate cyclophilin A (CypA). Deacylation experiments revealed that SIRT3 exhibits deacetylase activity but is not able to remove any of the succinyl groups from CypA, whereas SIRT5 is an effective protein desuccinylase. Thus, the acylation landscape on lysine residues might largely depend on the enzymatic activity of specific sirtuins, and the availability and reactivity of acyl-CoA compounds. PMID:26382620

  2. Gastrointestinal uptake of nasunin, acylated anthocyanin in eggplant.

    PubMed

    Ichiyanagi, Takashi; Terahara, Norihiko; Rahman, M Mamunur; Konishi, Tetsuya

    2006-07-26

    We previously showed that nasunin, acylated anthocyanins in eggplant peel, comprises two isomers, cis-nasunin and trans-nasunin. In this study, gastrointestinal absorption of cis- and trans-nasunins was studied in rats. Orally administered nasunins were quickly absorbed in their original acylated forms and maximally appeared in blood plasma after 15 min. When the maximum plasma concentration and area under the plasma concentration curve were normalized by orally administered dose (micromoles per kilogram), there was no significant difference in the uptake efficiency between two isomers and both exhibited a plasma level almost identical to that of delphinidin 3-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside. However, metabolites such as 4'-O-methyl analogues and extended glucuronides which were observed for delphinidin 3-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside and cyanidin 3-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside metabolisms were not detected in urine or blood plasma. Moreover, deacylated and glycolytic products of nasunins such as delphinidin 3-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside or delphinidin (aglycone) were also not detected in blood plasma even after oral administration for 8 h. These results indicated that nasunins were absorbed in their original acylated forms and exhibit a bioavailability almost identical to that of nonacylated anthocyanins. PMID:16848510

  3. Acylation of 1,3-butadiene with acetylfluorosulfonate

    SciTech Connect

    Gavrishova, T.N.; Shastin, A.V.; Balenkova, E.S.; Novikov, N.A.

    1987-11-20

    1-Acetylbutadiene (I) is widely used in diene syntheses, and is also a valuable starting material for the preparation of otherwise difficulty accessible 1-substituted butadienes, which are then used in the synthesis of natural products. At the present time, however, there is no convenient one-step method for the preparation of acetylbutadiene (I). Acylation of butadiene (II) in the presence of Lewis acids is accompanied by extensive polymerization, and the maximum yield of acylated product in these reactions is only 10%. The authors have now successfully carried out the acylation of butadiene (II) with acetyfluorosulfonate. Workup of the reaction mixture with triethylamine gave acetylbutadiene (I) in 33% yield. The E-configuration of compound (I) was established based on the values of the spin-spin coupling constants for interaction of the olefinic protons, /sup 3/J(H/sup a/-H/sup b/) 15.4 Hz, which was determined by NMR spectroscopy. The presence of a characteristic absorption band at 965 cm/sup -1/ in the IR spectrum also confirms the E-configuration of compound (I).

  4. Metabolism of acyl-lipids in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Li-Beisson, Yonghua; Beisson, Fred; Riekhof, Wayne

    2015-05-01

    Microalgae are emerging platforms for production of a suite of compounds targeting several markets, including food, nutraceuticals, green chemicals, and biofuels. Many of these products, such as biodiesel or polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), derive from lipid metabolism. A general picture of lipid metabolism in microalgae has been deduced from well characterized pathways of fungi and land plants, but recent advances in molecular and genetic analyses of microalgae have uncovered unique features, pointing out the necessity to study lipid metabolism in microalgae themselves. In the past 10 years, in addition to its traditional role as a model for photosynthetic and flagellar motility processes, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has emerged as a model organism to study lipid metabolism in green microalgae. Here, after summarizing data on total fatty acid composition, distribution of acyl-lipid classes, and major acyl-lipid molecular species found in C. reinhardtii, we review the current knowledge on the known or putative steps for fatty acid synthesis, glycerolipid desaturation and assembly, membrane lipid turnover, and oil remobilization. A list of characterized or putative enzymes for the major steps of acyl-lipid metabolism in C. reinhardtii is included, and subcellular localizations and phenotypes of associated mutants are discussed. Biogenesis and composition of Chlamydomonas lipid droplets and the potential importance of lipolytic processes in increasing cellular oil content are also highlighted. PMID:25660108

  5. Serum lipids and acyl group composition of alcoholic patients.

    PubMed

    Sun, G Y; Rush, A; Chin, P C; Gorka, C; Lahiri, S; Wood, W G

    1988-01-01

    The lipid content and acyl group composition of serum from a group of alcoholic patients at a VA Medical Center were compared to control subjects sampled either from University of Missouri personnel or from subjects who were undergoing a preemployment physical examination at the same VA Medical Center. Plasma of alcoholic patients indicated an elevated triacylglycerol level (24-35%) as compared to both control groups. In addition, the acyl groups of triacylglycerols of alcoholic patients showed a markedly lower proportion of 18:2 and a higher proportion of 18:0 and 18:1 as compared to the control groups. The level of phosphatidylcholines in the plasma of alcoholic patients was not different from controls. However, acyl group composition of phosphatidylcholines from alcoholics indicated a lower proportion of 22:6 (n-3) as compared to controls. Although the cholesteryl ester level in serum was higher in alcoholics than in controls, the difference did not reach a level of significance. There was a similar decrease in 18:2 and an increase in 18:0 in cholesteryl esters of alcoholics as compared to controls. Results indicate that alcoholics in the United States show a similar change in certain serum lipids as reported for the Swedish alcoholics. This study also shows the complexities involved in selecting appropriate control groups to be compared with alcoholic patients. PMID:3395462

  6. New players in the fatty acyl ethanolamide metabolism.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Iffat Ara Sonia; Tsuboi, Kazuhito; Uyama, Toru; Ueda, Natsuo

    2014-08-01

    Fatty acyl ethanolamides represent a class of endogenous bioactive lipid molecules and are generally referred to as N-acylethanolamines (NAEs). NAEs include palmitoylethanolamide (anti-inflammatory and analgesic substance), oleoylethanolamide (anorexic substance), and anandamide (endocannabinoid). The endogenous levels of NAEs are mainly regulated by enzymes responsible for their biosynthesis and degradation. In mammalian tissues, the major biosynthetic pathway starts from glycerophospholipids and is composed of two enzyme reactions. The first step is N-acylation of ethanolamine phospholipids catalyzed by Ca(2+)-dependent N-acyltransferase and the second step is the release of NAEs from N-acylated ethanolamine phospholipids by N-acylphosphatidylethanolamine (NAPE)-hydrolyzing phospholipase D (NAPE-PLD). As for the degradation of NAEs, fatty acid amide hydrolase plays the central role. However, recent studies strongly suggest the involvement of other enzymes in the NAE metabolism. These enzymes include members of the HRAS-like suppressor family (also called phospholipase A/acyltransferase family), which were originally discovered as tumor suppressors but can function as Ca(2+)-independent NAPE-forming N-acyltransferases; multiple enzymes involved in the NAPE-PLD-independent multi-step pathways to generate NAE from NAPE, which came to light by the analysis of NAPE-PLD-deficient mice; and a lysosomal NAE-hydrolyzing acid amidase as a second NAE hydrolase. These newly recognized enzymes may become the targets for the development of new therapeutic drugs. Here, we focus on recent enzymological findings in this area. PMID:24747663

  7. Directed Evolution of a Pyruvate Aldolase to Recognize A Long Chain Acyl Substrate

    PubMed Central

    Cheriyan, Manoj; Walters, Matthew J.; Kang, Brian D.; Anzaldi, Laura L.; Toone, Eric J.; Fierke, Carol A.

    2011-01-01

    The use of biological catalysts for industrial scale synthetic chemistry is highly attractive, given their cost effectiveness, high specificity that obviates the need for protecting group chemistry, and the environmentally benign nature of enzymatic procedures. Here we evolve the naturally occurring 2-keto-3-deoxy-6-phosphogluconate (KDPG) aldolases from Thermatoga maritima and Escherichia coli, into enzymes that recognize a non-functionalized electrophilic substrate, 2-keto-4-hydroxyoctonoate (KHO). Using an in vivo selection based on pyruvate auxotrophy, mutations were identified that lower the KM value up to 100-fold in E. coli KDPG aldolase, and that enhance the efficiency of retro-aldol cleavage of KHO by increasing the value of kcat/KM up to 25-fold in T. maritima KDPG aldolase. These data indicate that numerous mutations distal from the active site contribute to enhanced “uniform binding” of the substrates, which is the first step in the evolution of novel catalytic activity. PMID:21944547

  8. Acyl Carrier Protein Synthases from Gram-Negative, Gram-Positive, and Atypical Bacterial Species: Biochemical and Structural Properties and Physiological Implications

    PubMed Central

    McAllister, Kelly A.; Peery, Robert B.; Zhao, Genshi

    2006-01-01

    Acyl carrier protein (ACP) synthase (AcpS) catalyzes the transfer of the 4′-phosphopantetheine moiety from coenzyme A (CoA) onto a serine residue of apo-ACP, resulting in the conversion of apo-ACP to the functional holo-ACP. The holo form of bacterial ACP plays an essential role in mediating the transfer of acyl fatty acid intermediates during the biosynthesis of fatty acids and phospholipids. AcpS is therefore an attractive target for therapeutic intervention. In this study, we have purified and characterized the AcpS enzymes from Escherichia coli, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Mycoplasma pneumoniae, which exemplify gram-negative, gram-positive, and atypical bacteria, respectively. Our gel filtration column chromatography and cross-linking studies demonstrate that the AcpS enzyme from M. pneumoniae, like E. coli enzyme, exhibits a homodimeric structure, but the enzyme from S. pneumoniae exhibits a trimeric structure. Our biochemical studies show that the AcpS enzymes from M. pneumoniae and S. pneumoniae can utilize both short- and long-chain acyl CoA derivatives but prefer long-chain CoA derivatives as substrates. On the other hand, the AcpS enzyme from E. coli can utilize short-chain CoA derivatives but not the long-chain CoA derivatives tested. Finally, our biochemical studies show that M. pneumoniae AcpS is kinetically a very sluggish enzyme compared with those from E. coli and S. pneumoniae. Together, the results of these studies show that the AcpS enzymes from different bacterial species exhibit different native structures and substrate specificities with regard to the utilization of CoA and its derivatives. These findings suggest that AcpS from different microorganisms plays a different role in cellular physiology. PMID:16788183

  9. Characterization of new glycolipid biosurfactants, tri-acylated mannosylerythritol lipids, produced by Pseudozyma yeasts.

    PubMed

    Fukuoka, Tokuma; Morita, Tomotake; Konishi, Masaaki; Imura, Tomohiro; Kitamoto, Dai

    2007-07-01

    Mannosylerythritol lipids (MELs) are glycolipid biosurfactants produced by Pseudozyma yeasts. They show not only the excellent interfacial properties but also versatile biochemical actions. In the course of MEL production from soybean oil by P. antarctica and P. rugulosa, some new extracellular glycolipids (more hydrophobic than the previously reported di-acylated MELs) were found in the culture medium. The most hydrophobic one was identified as 1-O-alka(e)noyl-4-O-[(4',6'-di-O-acetyl-2',3'-di-O-alka(e)noyl)-beta-D-mannopyranosyl]-D-erythritol, namely tri-acylated MEL. Others were tri-acylated MELs bearing only one acetyl group. The tri-acylated MEL could be prepared by the lipase-catalyzed esterification of a di-acylated MEL with oleic acid implying that the new glycolipids are synthesized from di-acylated MELs in the culture medium containing the residual fatty acids. PMID:17417694

  10. Thioesterase superfamily member 2/Acyl-CoA thioesterase 13 (Them2/Acot13) regulates adaptive thermogenesis in mice.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hye Won; Ozdemir, Cafer; Kawano, Yuki; LeClair, Katherine B; Vernochet, Cecile; Kahn, C Ronald; Hagen, Susan J; Cohen, David E

    2013-11-15

    Members of the acyl-CoA thioesterase (Acot) gene family hydrolyze fatty acyl-CoAs, but their biological functions remain incompletely understood. Thioesterase superfamily member 2 (Them2; synonym Acot13) is enriched in oxidative tissues, associated with mitochondria, and relatively specific for long chain fatty acyl-CoA substrates. Using Them2(-/-) mice, we have demonstrated key roles for Them2 in regulating hepatic glucose and lipid metabolism. However, reduced body weights and decreased adiposity in Them2(-/-) mice observed despite increased food consumption were not well explained. To explore a role in thermogenesis, mice were exposed to ambient temperatures ranging from thermoneutrality (30 °C) to cold (4 °C). In response to short term (24-h) exposures to decreasing ambient temperatures, Them2(-/-) mice exhibited increased adaptive responses in physical activity, food consumption, and energy expenditure when compared with Them2(+/+) mice. By contrast, genotype-dependent differences were not observed in mice that were equilibrated (96 h) at each ambient temperature. In brown adipose tissue, the absence of Them2 was associated with reduced lipid droplets, alterations in the ultrastructure of mitochondria, and increased expression of thermogenic genes. Indicative of a direct regulatory role for Them2 in heat production, cultured primary brown adipocytes from Them2(-/-) mice exhibited increased norepinephrine-mediated triglyceride hydrolysis and increased rates of O2 consumption, together with elevated expression of thermogenic genes. At least in part by regulating intracellular fatty acid channeling, Them2 functions in brown adipose tissue to suppress adaptive increases in energy expenditure. PMID:24072708

  11. Host Acyl Coenzyme A Binding Protein Regulates Replication Complex Assembly and Activity of a Positive-Strand RNA Virus

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jiantao; Diaz, Arturo; Mao, Lan; Ahlquist, Paul

    2012-01-01

    All positive-strand RNA viruses reorganize host intracellular membranes to assemble their replication complexes. Similarly, brome mosaic virus (BMV) induces two alternate forms of membrane-bound RNA replication complexes: vesicular spherules and stacks of appressed double-membrane layers. The mechanisms by which these membrane rearrangements are induced, however, remain unclear. We report here that host ACB1-encoded acyl coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) binding protein (ACBP) is required for the assembly and activity of both BMV RNA replication complexes. ACBP is highly conserved among eukaryotes, specifically binds to long-chain fatty acyl-CoA, and promotes general lipid synthesis. Deleting ACB1 inhibited BMV RNA replication up to 30-fold and resulted in formation of spherules that were ∼50% smaller but ∼4-fold more abundant than those in wild-type (wt) cells, consistent with the idea that BMV 1a invaginates and maintains viral spherules by coating the inner spherule membrane. Furthermore, smaller and more frequent spherules were preferentially formed under conditions that induce layer formation in wt cells. Conversely, cellular karmella structures, which are arrays of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes formed upon overexpression of certain cellular ER membrane proteins, were formed normally, indicating a selective inhibition of 1a-induced membrane rearrangements. Restoring altered lipid composition largely complemented the BMV RNA replication defect, suggesting that ACBP was required for maintaining lipid homeostasis. Smaller and more frequent spherules are also induced by 1a mutants with specific substitutions in a membrane-anchoring amphipathic α-helix, implying that the 1a-lipid interactions play critical roles in viral replication complex assembly. PMID:22345450

  12. Acylation Enhances, but Is Not Required for, the Cytotoxic Activity of Mannheimia haemolytica Leukotoxin in Bighorn Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Batra, Sai A.; Shanthalingam, Sudarvili; Munske, Gerhard R.; Raghavan, Bindu; Kugadas, Abirami; Bavanthasivam, Jegarubee; Highlander, Sarah K.

    2015-01-01

    Mannheimia haemolytica causes pneumonia in domestic and wild ruminants. Leukotoxin (Lkt) is the most important virulence factor of the bacterium. It is encoded within the four-gene lktCABD operon: lktA encodes the structural protoxin, and lktC encodes a trans-acylase that adds fatty acid chains to internal lysine residues in the protoxin, which is then secreted from the cell by a type 1 secretion system apparatus encoded by lktB and lktD. It has been reported that LktC-mediated acylation is necessary for the biological effects of the toxin. However, an LktC mutant that we developed previously was only partially attenuated in its virulence for cattle. The objective of this study was to elucidate the role of LktC-mediated acylation in Lkt-induced cytotoxicity. We performed this study in bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) (BHS), since they are highly susceptible to M. haemolytica infection. The LktC mutant caused fatal pneumonia in 40% of inoculated BHS. On necropsy, a large number of necrotic polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) were observed in the lungs. Lkt from the mutant was cytotoxic to BHS PMNs in an in vitro cytotoxicity assay. Flow cytometric analysis of mutant Lkt-treated PMNs revealed the induction of necrosis. Scanning electron microscopic analysis revealed the presence of pores and blebs on mutant-Lkt-treated PMNs. Mass spectrometric analysis confirmed that the mutant secreted an unacylated Lkt. Taken together, these results suggest that acylation is not necessary for the cytotoxic activity of M. haemolytica Lkt but that it enhances the potency of the toxin. PMID:26216418

  13. Fatal exposure to methylene chloride among bathtub refinishers - United States, 2000-2011.

    PubMed

    2012-02-24

    In 2010, the Michigan Fatality Assessment and Control Evaluation program conducted an investigation into the death of a bathtub refinisher who used a methylene chloride-based paint stripping product marketed for use in aircraft maintenance. The program identified two earlier, similar deaths in Michigan. Program staff members notified CDC's National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), which in turn notified the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). In addition to the three deaths, OSHA identified 10 other bathtub refinisher fatalities associated with methylene chloride stripping agents that had been investigated in nine states during 2000-2011. Each death occurred in a residential bathroom with inadequate ventilation. Protective equipment, including a respirator, either was not used or was inadequate to protect against methylene chloride vapor, which has been recognized as potentially fatal to furniture strippers and factory workers but has not been reported previously as a cause of death among bathtub refinishers. Worker safety agencies, public health agencies, methylene chloride-based stripper manufacturers, and trade organizations should communicate the extreme hazards of using methylene chloride-based stripping products in bathtub refinishing to employers, workers, and consumers. Employers should strongly consider alternative methods of bathtub stripping and always ensure worker safety protections that reduce the risk for health hazards to acceptable levels. Employers choosing to use methylene chloride-based stripping products must comply with OSHA's standard to limit methylene chloride exposures to safe levels. PMID:22357403

  14. Methylene blue prevents retinal damage in an experimental model of ischemic proliferative retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Rey-Funes, Manuel; Larrayoz, Ignacio M; Fernández, Juan C; Contartese, Daniela S; Rolón, Federico; Inserra, Pablo I F; Martínez-Murillo, Ricardo; López-Costa, Juan J; Dorfman, Verónica B; Martínez, Alfredo; Loidl, César F

    2016-06-01

    Perinatal asphyxia induces retinal lesions, generating ischemic proliferative retinopathy, which may result in blindness. Previously, we showed that the nitrergic system was involved in the physiopathology of perinatal asphyxia. Here we analyze the application of methylene blue, a well-known soluble guanylate cyclase inhibitor, as a therapeutic strategy to prevent retinopathy. Male rats (n = 28 per group) were treated in different ways: 1) control group comprised born-to-term animals; 2) methylene blue group comprised animals born from pregnant rats treated with methylene blue (2 mg/kg) 30 and 5 min before delivery; 3) perinatal asphyxia (PA) group comprised rats exposed to perinatal asphyxia (20 min at 37°C); and 4) methylene blue-PA group comprised animals born from pregnant rats treated with methylene blue (2 mg/kg) 30 and 5 min before delivery, and then the pups were subjected to PA as above. For molecular studies, mRNA was obtained at different times after asphyxia, and tissue was collected at 30 days for morphological and biochemical analysis. Perinatal asphyxia produced significant gliosis, angiogenesis, and thickening of the inner retina. Methylene blue treatment reduced these parameters. Perinatal asphyxia resulted in a significant elevation of the nitrergic system as shown by NO synthase (NOS) activity assays, Western blotting, and (immuno)histochemistry for the neuronal isoform of NOS and NADPH-diaphorase activity. All these parameters were also normalized by the treatment. In addition, methylene blue induced the upregulation of the anti-angiogenic peptide, pigment epithelium-derived factor. Application of methylene blue reduced morphological and biochemical parameters of retinopathy. This finding suggests the use of methylene blue as a new treatment to prevent or decrease retinal damage in the context of ischemic proliferative retinopathy. PMID:26984891

  15. Metachromasy as an indicator of photostabilization of methylene blue adsorbed to clays and minerals.

    PubMed

    Samuels, Maya; Mor, Omer; Rytwo, Giora

    2013-04-01

    The influence of methylene blue adsorption to different clays on its photodegradation was studied. Methylene blue in solution was decomposed by sunlight in a zero-order process. Adsorption to some clay minerals (sepiolite and vermiculite) and a zeolite (clinoptilolite) accelerated the degradation process, and converted it to a first-order reaction. On the other hand, adsorption to other clay minerals (palygorskite and montmorillonite) stabilized the dye and prevented its degradation. Interestingly, in the clay-dye complexes that exhibited stability, clear metachromasy of the adsorbed methylene blue occurred, whereas the effect was not observed in the clay-dye complexes that underwent photodegradation. PMID:23474529

  16. The antimicrobial properties of light-activated polymers containing methylene blue and gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Perni, Stefano; Piccirillo, Clara; Pratten, Jonathan; Prokopovich, Polina; Chrzanowski, Wojciech; Parkin, Ivan P; Wilson, Michael

    2009-01-01

    We report the formation of polysiloxane polymers containing embedded methylene blue and gold nanoparticles incorporated by a swell-encapsulation-shrink method. These polymers show significant antimicrobial activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli with up to a 3.5 log(10) reduction in the viable count when exposed for 5 min to light from a low power 660 nm laser. The bacterial kill is due to the light-induced production of singlet oxygen and other reactive oxygen species by the methylene blue. Interestingly, the presence of 2 nm gold nanoparticles significantly enhanced the ability of the methylene blue to kill bacteria. PMID:18838166

  17. Use of methylene blue for catecholamine-refractory vasoplegia from protamine and aprotinin.

    PubMed

    Del Duca, Danny; Sheth, Shashank S; Clarke, Ann E; Lachapelle, Kevin J; Ergina, Patrick L

    2009-02-01

    We present two cases of catecholamine-refractory and vasopressin-refractory vasoplegic syndrome associated with intraoperative anaphylaxis during cardiac surgery. One case was related to the administration of protamine and the other case to the administration of aprotinin. Both cases were successfully managed using intravenous methylene blue. The use of methylene blue blocks accumulation of cyclic guanosine monophosphate by competitively inhibiting the enzyme guanylate cyclase. This results in reduced responsiveness of the vasculature to cyclic guanosine monophosphate-mediated vasodilators, such as nitric oxide. This report provides a description of severe anaphylaxis induced by different agents, in which the use of methylene blue was associated with a significant clinical response. PMID:19161806

  18. Degradation of methylene blue by radio frequency plasmas in water under ultraviolet irradiation.

    PubMed

    Maehara, Tsunehiro; Nishiyama, Kyohei; Onishi, Shingo; Mukasa, Shinobu; Toyota, Hiromichi; Kuramoto, Makoto; Nomura, Shinfuku; Kawashima, Ayato

    2010-02-15

    The degradation of methylene blue by radio frequency (RF) plasmas in water under ultraviolet (UV) irradiation was studied experimentally. When the methylene blue solution was exposed to RF plasma, UV irradiation from a mercury vapor lamp enhanced degradation significantly. A lamp without power supply also enhanced degradation since weak UV light was emitted weakly from the lamp due to the excitation of mercury vapor by stray RF power. Such an enhancement is explained by the fact that after hydrogen peroxide is produced via the recombination process of OH radicals around the plasma, OH radicals reproduced from hydrogen peroxide via the photolysis process degrade methylene blue. PMID:19819072

  19. Radiolytic crosslinking and chain scission in aliphatic and alkyl-aromatic polyamides—II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyons, Bernard J.; Glover, Leon C.

    Regression analysis of the radiation parameters of nine aliphatic polyamides exposed to ionizing radiation leads to the conclusion that the decline in the ratio of chain scission to crosslinking in higher aliphatic polyamides is best related to the linear increase in the methylene content of, or the number of methylene groups in, the polyamide repeat unit. G(crosslink) [ G(X)] and G(chain scission) [ G(CS)] values, however, do not correlate well with either of these parameters. Rather it is found that the major determinant of yields [about 80-85% of the variation for G(X), 70% for G(CS)] is the number of hydrogen atoms or methylene groups in the amine residue. A minor determinant [15% of the variation for G(X) and 30% for G(CS)] is the number of hydrogen atoms or methylene groups in the acid residue of the repeat unit. Significantly, although there was little sign of a decrease in G(CS) in the higher aliphatic homologues (up to 11 methylene residues per amide group), G(CS) is found to be positively related to the number of methylene groups in the amine residue but negatively related to the number of methylene groups in the acid residue. Thus although the amine residue dominates the radiolytic response, the acid residue plays a critical if lesser role in determining chain scission yields in polyamides. Thus a polyamide with the repeat unit —(CH 2) 3 nCONH(CH 2) nNHCO— would be predicted to have a very low or zero G(CS) and, if n is 10 or more, a G(X) comparable to that of polyethylene. Although, logically, the yields of crosslinks and chain scissions in polyamides would be expected to tend to that of polyethylene as the number of methylene groups in the repeat unit increases, use of two models assuming an exponential trend to the G(X) value characteristic of polyethylene in the analysis did not provide better fits to the data than the simple linear model referred to above. Indeed, the assumption of a significant exponential trend factor led to a marked drop in

  20. Structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis mtFabD, a malonyl-CoA:acyl carrier protein transacylase (MCAT)

    SciTech Connect

    Ghadbane, Hemza; Brown, Alistair K.; Kremer, Laurent; Besra, Gurdyal S. Fütterer, Klaus

    2007-10-01

    Binding of Ni{sup 2+} ions to the uncleaved affinity tag facilitated de novo phasing of the crystal structure of M. tuberculosis mtFabD to 3.0 Å resolution. Mycobacteria display a unique and unusual cell-wall architecture, central to which is the membrane-proximal mycolyl-arabinogalactan-peptidoglycan core (mAGP). The biosynthesis of mycolic acids, which form the outermost layer of the mAGP core, involves malonyl-CoA:acyl carrier protein transacylase (MCAT). This essential enzyme catalyses the transfer of malonyl from coenzyme A to acyl carrier protein AcpM, thus feeding these two-carbon units into the chain-elongation cycle of the type II fatty-acid synthase. The crystal structure of M. tuberculosis mtFabD, the mycobacterial MCAT, has been determined to 3.0 Å resolution by multi-wavelength anomalous dispersion. Phasing was facilitated by Ni{sup 2+} ions bound to the 20-residue N-terminal affinity tag, which packed between the two independent copies of mtFabD.

  1. Acyl-CoA synthetase as a cancer survival factor: its inhibition enhances the efficacy of etoposide.

    PubMed

    Mashima, Tetsuo; Sato, Shigeo; Okabe, Sachiko; Miyata, Satoshi; Matsuura, Masaaki; Sugimoto, Yoshikazu; Tsuruo, Takashi; Seimiya, Hiroyuki

    2009-08-01

    Lipid metabolism is often elevated in cancer cells and plays an important role in their growth and malignancy. Acyl-CoA synthetase (ACS), which converts long-chain fatty acids to acyl-CoA, is overexpressed in various types of cancer. However, the role of ACS in cancer remains unknown. Here, we found that ACS enzyme activity is required for cancer cell survival. Namely, the ACS inhibitor Triacsin c induced massive apoptosis in glioma cells while this cell death was completely suppressed by overexpression of ACSL5, the Triacsin c-resistant ACS isozyme, but not by overexpression of a catalytically inactive ACSL5 mutant. ACS inhibition by Triacsin c markedly potentiated the Bax-induced intrinsic apoptotic pathway by promoting cytochrome c release and subsequent caspase activation. These effects were abrogated by ACSL5 overexpression. Correspondingly, ACS inhibition synergistically potentiated the glioma cell death induced by etoposide, a well-known activator of apoptosis. Furthermore, in a nude mouse xenograft model, Triacsin c at a non-toxic dose enhanced the antitumor efficacy of a low-dose chemotherapy with etoposide. These results indicate that ACS is an apoptosis suppressor and that ACS inhibition could be a rational strategy to amplify the antitumor effect of etoposide. PMID:19459852

  2. Amended safety assessment of formaldehyde and methylene glycol as used in cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Boyer, Ivan J; Heldreth, Bart; Bergfeld, Wilma F; Belsito, Donald V; Hill, Ronald A; Klaassen, Curtis D; Liebler, Daniel C; Marks, James G; Shank, Ronald C; Slaga, Thomas J; Snyder, Paul W; Andersen, F Alan

    2013-01-01

    Formaldehyde and methylene glycol may be used safely in cosmetics if established limits are not exceeded and are safe for use in nail hardeners in the present practices of use and concentration, which include instructions to avoid skin contact. In hair-smoothing products, however, in the present practices of use and concentration, formaldehyde and methylene glycol are unsafe. Methylene glycol is continuously converted to formaldehyde, and vice versa, even at equilibrium, which can be easily shifted by heating, drying, and other conditions to increase the amount of formaldehyde. This rapid, reversible formaldehyde/methylene glycol equilibrium is distinguished from the slow, irreversible release of formaldehyde resulting from the so-called formaldehyde releaser preservatives, which are not addressed in this safety assessment (formaldehyde releasers may continue to be safely used in cosmetics at the levels established in their individual Cosmetic Ingredient Review safety assessments). PMID:24335968

  3. Methylene chloride exposure and birthweight in Monroe County, New York

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, B.P.; Frank