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Sample records for acyl coa synthetase

  1. Acyl CoA synthetase 5 (ACSL5) ablation in mice increases energy expenditure and insulin sensitivity and delays fat absorption

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: The family of acyl-CoA synthetase enzymes (ACSL) activates fatty acids within cells to generate long chain fatty acyl CoA (FACoA). The differing metabolic fates of FACoAs such as incorporation into neutral lipids, phospholipids, and oxidation pathways are differentially regulated by the ...

  2. Ricinus communis contains and acyl-CoA synthetase that preferentially activates ricinoleate to its CoA thioester

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As part of our effort to identify enzymes that are critical for producing large amounts of ricinoleate in castor oil, we have isolated three cDNAs encoding acyl-CoA synthetase (ACS) in the castor plant. Analysis of the cDNA sequences reveals that two of them, designated RcACS 2 and RcACS 4, contain...

  3. Acyl CoA synthetase 5 (ACSL5) ablation in mice increases energy expenditure and insulin sensitivity and delays fat absorption

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, Thomas A.; O'Keeffe, Kayleigh R.; D'Aquila, Theresa; Yan, Qing Wu; Griffin, John D.; Killion, Elizabeth A.; Salter, Deanna M.; Mashek, Douglas G.; Buhman, Kimberly K.; Greenberg, Andrew S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The family of acyl-CoA synthetase enzymes (ACSL) activates fatty acids within cells to generate long chain fatty acyl CoA (FACoA). The differing metabolic fates of FACoAs such as incorporation into neutral lipids, phospholipids, and oxidation pathways are differentially regulated by the ACSL isoforms. In vitro studies have suggested a role for ACSL5 in triglyceride synthesis; however, we have limited understanding of the in vivo actions of this ACSL isoform. Methods To elucidate the in vivo actions of ACSL5 we generated a line of mice in which ACSL5 expression was ablated in all tissues (ACSL5−/−). Results Ablation of ACSL5 reduced ACSL activity by ∼80% in jejunal mucosa, ∼50% in liver, and ∼37% in brown adipose tissue lysates. Body composition studies revealed that ACSL5−/−, as compared to control ACSL5loxP/loxP, mice had significantly reduced fat mass and adipose fat pad weights. Indirect calorimetry studies demonstrated that ACSL5−/− had increased metabolic rates, and in the dark phase, increased respiratory quotient. In ACSL5−/− mice, fasting glucose and serum triglyceride were reduced; and insulin sensitivity was improved during an insulin tolerance test. Both hepatic mRNA (∼16-fold) and serum levels of fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) (∼13-fold) were increased in ACSL5−/− as compared to ACSL5loxP/loxP. Consistent with increased FGF21 serum levels, uncoupling protein-1 gene (Ucp1) and PPAR-gamma coactivator 1-alpha gene (Pgc1α) transcript levels were increased in gonadal adipose tissue. To further evaluate ACSL5 function in intestine, mice were gavaged with an olive oil bolus; and the rate of triglyceride appearance in serum was found to be delayed in ACSL5−/− mice as compared to control mice. Conclusions In summary, ACSL5−/− mice have increased hepatic and serum FGF21 levels, reduced adiposity, improved insulin sensitivity, increased energy expenditure and delayed triglyceride absorption. These studies

  4. Arabidopsis CER8 encodes LONG-CHAIN ACYL-COA SYNTHETASE 1 (LACS1) that has overlapping functions with LACS2 in plant wax and cutin synthesis.

    PubMed

    Lü, Shiyou; Song, Tao; Kosma, Dylan K; Parsons, Eugene P; Rowland, Owen; Jenks, Matthew A

    2009-08-01

    Plant cuticle is an extracellular lipid-based matrix of cutin and waxes, which covers aerial organs and protects them from many forms of environmental stress. We report here the characterization of CER8/LACS1, one of nine Arabidopsis long-chain acyl-CoA synthetases thought to activate acyl chains. Mutations in LACS1 reduced the amount of wax in all chemical classes on the stem and leaf, except in the very long-chain fatty acid (VLCFA) class wherein acids longer than 24 carbons (C(24)) were elevated more than 155%. The C(16) cutin monomers on lacs1 were reduced by 37% and 22%, whereas the C(18) monomers were increased by 28% and 20% on stem and leaf, respectively. Amounts of wax and cutin on a lacs1-1 lacs2-3 double mutant were much lower than on either parent, and lacs1-1 lacs2-3 had much higher cuticular permeability than either parent. These additive effects indicate that LACS1 and LACS2 have overlapping functions in both wax and cutin synthesis. We demonstrated that LACS1 has synthetase activity for VLCFAs C(20)-C(30), with highest activity for C(30) acids. LACS1 thus appears to function as a very long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase in wax metabolism. Since C(16) but not C(18) cutin monomers are reduced in lacs1, and C(16) acids are the next most preferred acid (behind C(30)) by LACS1 in our assays, LACS1 also appears to be important for the incorporation of C(16) monomers into cutin polyester. As such, LACS1 defines a functionally novel acyl-CoA synthetase that preferentially modifies both VLCFAs for wax synthesis and long-chain (C(16)) fatty acids for cutin synthesis.

  5. Increased long chain acyl-Coa synthetase activity and fatty acid import is linked to membrane synthesis for development of picornavirus replication organelles.

    PubMed

    Nchoutmboube, Jules A; Viktorova, Ekaterina G; Scott, Alison J; Ford, Lauren A; Pei, Zhengtong; Watkins, Paul A; Ernst, Robert K; Belov, George A

    2013-01-01

    All positive strand (+RNA) viruses of eukaryotes replicate their genomes in association with membranes. The mechanisms of membrane remodeling in infected cells represent attractive targets for designing future therapeutics, but our understanding of this process is very limited. Elements of autophagy and/or the secretory pathway were proposed to be hijacked for building of picornavirus replication organelles. However, even closely related viruses differ significantly in their requirements for components of these pathways. We demonstrate here that infection with diverse picornaviruses rapidly activates import of long chain fatty acids. While in non-infected cells the imported fatty acids are channeled to lipid droplets, in infected cells the synthesis of neutral lipids is shut down and the fatty acids are utilized in highly up-regulated phosphatidylcholine synthesis. Thus the replication organelles are likely built from de novo synthesized membrane material, rather than from the remodeled pre-existing membranes. We show that activation of fatty acid import is linked to the up-regulation of cellular long chain acyl-CoA synthetase activity and identify the long chain acyl-CoA syntheatse3 (Acsl3) as a novel host factor required for polio replication. Poliovirus protein 2A is required to trigger the activation of import of fatty acids independent of its protease activity. Shift in fatty acid import preferences by infected cells results in synthesis of phosphatidylcholines different from those in uninfected cells, arguing that the viral replication organelles possess unique properties compared to the pre-existing membranes. Our data show how poliovirus can change the overall cellular membrane homeostasis by targeting one critical process. They explain earlier observations of increased phospholipid synthesis in infected cells and suggest a simple model of the structural development of the membranous scaffold of replication complexes of picorna-like viruses, that may be

  6. Spectrophotometric studies of acyl-coenzyme A synthetases of rat liver mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Garland, P. B.; Yates, D. W.; Haddock, B. A.

    1970-01-01

    1. Deca-2,4,6,8-tetraenoic acid is a substrate for both ATP-specific (EC 6.2.1.2 or 3) and GTP-specific (EC 6.2.1.–) acyl-CoA synthetases of rat liver mitochondria. The enzymic synthesis of decatetraenoyl-CoA results in new spectral characteristics. The difference spectrum for the acyl-CoA minus free acid has a maximum at 376nm with εmM 34. Isosbestic points are at 345nm and 440nm. 2. The acylation of CoA by decatetraenoate in mitochondrial suspensions can be continuously measured with a dual-wavelength spectrophotometer. 3. By using this technique, three distinct types of acyl-CoA synthetase activity were demonstrated in rat liver mitochondria. One of these utilized added CoA and ATP, required added Mg2+ and corresponded to a previously described `external' acyl-CoA synthetase. The other two acyl-CoA synthetase activities utilized intramitochondrial CoA and did not require added Mg2+. Of these two `internal' acyl-CoA synthetases, one was insensitive to uncoupling agents, was inhibited by phosphate or arsenate, and corresponded to the GTP-specific enzyme. The other corresponded to the ATP-specific enzyme. 4. Atractylate inhibited the activity of the two internal acyl-CoA synthetases only when the energy source was added ATP. 5. The amount of intramitochondrial CoA acylated by decatetraenoate was independent of whether the internal ATP-specific or GTP-specific acyl-CoA synthetase was active. It is concluded that these two internal acyl-CoA synthetases have access to the same intramitochondrial pool of CoA. 6. The amount of intramitochondrial CoA that could be acylated with decatetraenoate was decreased by the addition of palmitoyl-dl-carnitine, 2-oxoglutarate, or pyruvate. These observations indicated that pyruvate dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.4.1), oxoglutarate dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.4.2), carnitine palmitoyltransferase (EC 2.3.1.–), citrate synthase (EC 4.1.3.7), and succinyl-CoA synthetase (EC 6.2.1.4) all have access to the same intramitochondrial pool of CoA as do

  7. ACBP and cholesterol differentially alter fatty acyl CoA utilization by microsomal ACAT.

    PubMed

    Chao, Hsu; Zhou, Minglong; McIntosh, Avery; Schroeder, Friedhelm; Kier, Ann B

    2003-01-01

    Microsomal acyl CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) is stimulated in vitro and/or in intact cells by proteins that bind and transfer both substrates, cholesterol, and fatty acyl CoA. To resolve the role of fatty acyl CoA binding independent of cholesterol binding/transfer, a protein that exclusively binds fatty acyl CoA (acyl CoA binding protein, ACBP) was compared. ACBP contains an endoplasmic reticulum retention motif and significantly colocalized with acyl-CoA cholesteryl acyltransferase 2 (ACAT2) and endoplasmic reticulum markers in L-cell fibroblasts and hepatoma cells, respectively. In the presence of exogenous cholesterol, ACAT was stimulated in the order: ACBP > sterol carrier protein-2 (SCP-2) > liver fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP). Stimulation was in the same order as the relative affinities of the proteins for fatty acyl CoA. In contrast, in the absence of exogenous cholesterol, these proteins inhibited microsomal ACAT, but in the same order: ACBP > SCP-2 > L-FABP. The extracellular protein BSA stimulated microsomal ACAT regardless of the presence or absence of exogenous cholesterol. Thus, ACBP was the most potent intracellular fatty acyl CoA binding protein in differentially modulating the activity of microsomal ACAT to form cholesteryl esters independent of cholesterol binding/transfer ability.

  8. Actinobacterial Acyl Coenzyme A Synthetases Involved in Steroid Side-Chain Catabolism

    PubMed Central

    Casabon, Israël; Swain, Kendra; Crowe, Adam M.

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial steroid catabolism is an important component of the global carbon cycle and has applications in drug synthesis. Pathways for this catabolism involve multiple acyl coenzyme A (CoA) synthetases, which activate alkanoate substituents for β-oxidation. The functions of these synthetases are poorly understood. We enzymatically characterized four distinct acyl-CoA synthetases from the cholate catabolic pathway of Rhodococcus jostii RHA1 and the cholesterol catabolic pathway of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Phylogenetic analysis of 70 acyl-CoA synthetases predicted to be involved in steroid metabolism revealed that the characterized synthetases each represent an orthologous class with a distinct function in steroid side-chain degradation. The synthetases were specific for the length of alkanoate substituent. FadD19 from M. tuberculosis H37Rv (FadD19Mtb) transformed 3-oxo-4-cholesten-26-oate (kcat/Km = 0.33 × 105 ± 0.03 × 105 M−1 s−1) and represents orthologs that activate the C8 side chain of cholesterol. Both CasGRHA1 and FadD17Mtb are steroid-24-oyl-CoA synthetases. CasG and its orthologs activate the C5 side chain of cholate, while FadD17 and its orthologs appear to activate the C5 side chain of one or more cholesterol metabolites. CasIRHA1 is a steroid-22-oyl-CoA synthetase, representing orthologs that activate metabolites with a C3 side chain, which accumulate during cholate catabolism. CasI had similar apparent specificities for substrates with intact or extensively degraded steroid nuclei, exemplified by 3-oxo-23,24-bisnorchol-4-en-22-oate and 1β(2′-propanoate)-3aα-H-4α(3″-propanoate)-7aβ-methylhexahydro-5-indanone (kcat/Km = 2.4 × 105 ± 0.1 × 105 M−1 s−1 and 3.2 × 105 ± 0.3 × 105 M−1 s−1, respectively). Acyl-CoA synthetase classes involved in cholate catabolism were found in both Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria. Overall, this study provides insight into the physiological roles of acyl-CoA synthetases in steroid catabolism and

  9. Role of intramitochondrial arachidonic acid and acyl-CoA synthetase 4 in angiotensin II-regulated aldosterone synthesis in NCI-H295R adrenocortical cell line.

    PubMed

    Mele, Pablo G; Duarte, Alejandra; Paz, Cristina; Capponi, Alessandro; Podestá, Ernesto J

    2012-07-01

    Although the role of arachidonic acid (AA) in angiotensin II (ANG II)- and potassium-stimulated steroid production in zona glomerulosa cells is well documented, the mechanism responsible for AA release is not fully described. In this study we evaluated the mechanism involved in the release of intramitochondrial AA and its role in the regulation of aldosterone synthesis by ANG II in glomerulosa cells. We show that ANG II and potassium induce the expression of acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) thioesterase 2 and acyl-CoA synthetase 4, two enzymes involved in intramitochondrial AA generation/export system well characterized in other steroidogenic systems. We demonstrate that mitochondrial ATP is required for AA generation/export system, steroid production, and steroidogenic acute regulatory protein induction. We also demonstrate the role of protein tyrosine phosphatases regulating acyl-CoA synthetase 4 and steroidogenic acute regulatory protein induction, and hence ANG II-stimulated aldosterone synthesis.

  10. Revised nomenclature for the mammalian long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase gene family.

    PubMed

    Mashek, Douglas G; Bornfeldt, Karin E; Coleman, Rosalind A; Berger, Johannes; Bernlohr, David A; Black, Paul; DiRusso, Concetta C; Farber, Steven A; Guo, Wen; Hashimoto, Naohiro; Khodiyar, Varsha; Kuypers, Frans A; Maltais, Lois J; Nebert, Daniel W; Renieri, Alessandra; Schaffer, Jean E; Stahl, Andreas; Watkins, Paul A; Vasiliou, Vasilis; Yamamoto, Tokuo T

    2004-10-01

    By consensus, the acyl-CoA synthetase (ACS) community, with the advice of the human and mouse genome nomenclature committees, has revised the nomenclature for the mammalian long-chain acyl-CoA synthetases. ACS is the family root name, and the human and mouse genes for the long-chain ACSs are termed ACSL1,3-6 and Acsl1,3-6, respectively. Splice variants of ACSL3, -4, -5, and -6 are cataloged. Suggestions for naming other family members and for the nonmammalian acyl-CoA synthetases are made.

  11. Antitumor/Antifungal Celecoxib Derivative AR-12 is a Non-Nucleoside Inhibitor of the ANL-Family Adenylating Enzyme Acetyl CoA Synthetase

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    AR-12/OSU-03012 is an antitumor celecoxib-derivative that has progressed to Phase I clinical trial as an anticancer agent and has activity against a number of infectious agents including fungi, bacteria and viruses. However, the mechanism of these activities has remained unclear. Based on a chemical-genetic profiling approach in yeast, we have found that AR-12 is an ATP-competitive, time-dependent inhibitor of yeast acetyl coenzyme A synthetase. AR-12-treated fungal cells show phenotypes consistent with the genetic reduction of acetyl CoA synthetase activity, including induction of autophagy, decreased histone acetylation, and loss of cellular integrity. In addition, AR-12 is a weak inhibitor of human acetyl CoA synthetase ACCS2. Acetyl CoA synthetase activity is essential in many fungi and parasites. In contrast, acetyl CoA is primarily synthesized by an alternate enzyme, ATP-citrate lyase, in mammalian cells. Taken together, our results indicate that AR-12 is a non-nucleoside acetyl CoA synthetase inhibitor and that acetyl CoA synthetase may be a feasible antifungal drug target. PMID:27088128

  12. Acyl-CoA synthetase activity links wild-type but not mutant α-synuclein to brain arachidonate metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Golovko, Mikhail Y.; Rosenberger, Thad A.; Faergeman, Nils J.; Feddersen, Søren; Cole, Nelson B.; Pribill, Ingrid; Berger, Johannes; Nussbaum, Robert L.; Murphy, Eric J.

    2008-01-01

    Because α-synuclein (Snca) has a role in brain lipid metabolism, we determined the impact that the loss of α-synuclein had on brain arachidonic acid (20:4n-6) metabolism in vivo using Snca-/- mice. We measured [1-14C]20:4n-6 incorporation and turnover kinetics in brain phospholipids using an established steady-state kinetic model. Liver was used as a negative control and no changes were observed between groups. In Snca-/- brains, there was a marked reduction in 20:4n-6-CoA mass and in microsomal acyl-CoA synthetases (Acsl) activity toward 20:4n-6. Microsomal Acsl activity was completely restored after the addition of exogenous wt mouse or human α-synuclein, but not by A30P, E46K, and A53T forms of α-synuclein. Acsl and acyl-CoA hydrolase expression was not different between groups. The incorporation and turnover of 20:4n-6 into brain phospholipid pools was markedly reduced. The dilution coefficient lambda, which indicates 20:4n-6 recycling between the acyl-CoA pool and brain phospholipids, was increased 3.3-fold, indicating more 20:4n-6 was entering the 20:4n-6-CoA pool from the plasma relative to that being recycled from the phospholipids. This is consistent with the reduction in Acsl activity observed in the Snca-/- mice. Using titration microcalorimetry, we determined that α-synuclein bound free 20:4n-6 (Kd of 3.7 μM), but did not bind 20:4n-6-CoA. These data suggest α-synuclein is involved in substrate presentation to Acsl rather than product removal. In summary, our data demonstrate that α-synuclein has a major role in brain 20:4n-6 metabolism through its modulation of endoplasmic reticulum localized acyl-CoA synthetase activity, although mutants forms of α-synuclein fail to restore this activity. PMID:16734431

  13. Dihydrofolate synthetase and folylpolyglutamate synthetase: direct evidence for intervention of acyl phosphate intermediates

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, R.V.; Shane, B.; McGuire, J.J.; Coward, J.K.

    1988-12-13

    The transfer of /sup 17/O and/or /sup 18/O from (COOH-/sup 17/O or -/sup 18/O) enriched substrates to inorganic phosphate (P/sub i/) has been demonstrated for two enzyme-catalyzed reactions involved in folate biosynthesis and glutamylation. COOH-/sup 18/O-labeled folate, methotrexate, and dihydropteroate, in addition to (/sup 17/O)-glutamate, were synthesized and used as substrates for folylpolyglutamate synthetase (FPGS) isolated from Escherichia coli, hog liver, and rat liver and for dihydrofolate synthetase (DHFS) isolated from E. coli. P/sub i/ was purified from the reaction mixtures and converted to trimethyl phosphate (TMP), which was then analyzed for /sup 17/O and /sup 18/O enrichment by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and/or mass spectroscopy. In the reactions catalyzed by the E. coli enzymes, both NMR and quantitative mass spectral analyses established that transfer of the oxygen isotope from the substrate /sup 18/O-enriched carboxyl group to P/sub i/ occurred, thereby providing strong evidence for an acyl phosphate intermediate in both the FPGS- and DHFS-catalyzed reactions. Similar oxygen-transfer experiments were carried out by use of two mammalian enzymes. The small amounts of P/sub i/ obtained from reactions catalyzed by these less abundant FPGS proteins precluded the use of NMR techniques. However, mass spectral analysis of the TMP derived from the mammalian FPGS-catalyzed reactions showed clearly that /sup 18/O transfer had occurred.

  14. Acyl CoA Binding Proteins are Required for Cuticle Formation and Plant Responses to Microbes.

    PubMed

    Xia, Ye; Yu, Keshun; Gao, Qing-Ming; Wilson, Ella V; Navarre, Duroy; Kachroo, Pradeep; Kachroo, Aardra

    2012-01-01

    Fatty acids (FA) and lipids are well known regulators of plant defense. Our previous studies have shown that components of prokaryotic (plastidal) FA biosynthesis pathway regulate various aspects of plant defense. Here, we investigated the defense related roles of the soluble acyl CoA binding proteins (ACBPs), which are thought to facilitate the intracellular transport of FA/lipids. We show that ACBP3 and 4 are required for maintaining normal lipid levels and that ACBP3 contributes to the lipid flux between the prokaryotic and eukaryotic pathways. We also show that loss of ACBP3, 4, or 6 impair normal development of the cuticle and affect both basal and resistance protein-mediated defense against bacterial and fungal pathogens. Loss of ACBP3, 4, or 6 also inhibits the induction of systemic acquired resistance (SAR) due to the plants inability to generate SAR inducing signal(s). Together, these data show that ACBP3, ACBP4, and ACBP6 are required for cuticle development as well as defense against microbial pathogens.

  15. Fatty Acid Oxidation Mediated by Acyl-CoA Synthetase Long Chain 3 Is Required for Mutant KRAS Lung Tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Padanad, Mahesh S; Konstantinidou, Georgia; Venkateswaran, Niranjan; Melegari, Margherita; Rindhe, Smita; Mitsche, Matthew; Yang, Chendong; Batten, Kimberly; Huffman, Kenneth E; Liu, Jingwen; Tang, Ximing; Rodriguez-Canales, Jaime; Kalhor, Neda; Shay, Jerry W; Minna, John D; McDonald, Jeffrey; Wistuba, Ignacio I; DeBerardinis, Ralph J; Scaglioni, Pier Paolo

    2016-08-09

    KRAS is one of the most commonly mutated oncogenes in human cancer. Mutant KRAS aberrantly regulates metabolic networks. However, the contribution of cellular metabolism to mutant KRAS tumorigenesis is not completely understood. We report that mutant KRAS regulates intracellular fatty acid metabolism through Acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) synthetase long-chain family member 3 (ACSL3), which converts fatty acids into fatty Acyl-CoA esters, the substrates for lipid synthesis and β-oxidation. ACSL3 suppression is associated with depletion of cellular ATP and causes the death of lung cancer cells. Furthermore, mutant KRAS promotes the cellular uptake, retention, accumulation, and β-oxidation of fatty acids in lung cancer cells in an ACSL3-dependent manner. Finally, ACSL3 is essential for mutant KRAS lung cancer tumorigenesis in vivo and is highly expressed in human lung cancer. Our data demonstrate that mutant KRAS reprograms lipid homeostasis, establishing a metabolic requirement that could be exploited for therapeutic gain.

  16. Characterization of Ten Heterotetrameric NDP-Dependent Acyl-CoA Synthetases of the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus

    DOE PAGES

    Scott, Joseph W.; Poole, Farris L.; Adams, Michael W. W.

    2014-01-01

    Tmore » he hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus grows by fermenting peptides and carbohydrates to organic acids. In the terminal step, acyl-CoA synthetase (ACS) isoenzymes convert acyl-CoA derivatives to the corresponding acid and conserve energy in the form of ATP. ACS1 and ACS2 were previously purified from P. furiosus and have α 2 β 2 structures but the genome contains genes encoding three additional α -subunits.he ten possible combinations of α and β genes were expressed in E. coli and each resulted in stable and active α 2 β 2 isoenzymes.he α -subunit of each isoenzyme determined CoA-based substrate specificity and between them they accounted for the CoA derivatives of fourteen amino acids.he β -subunit determined preference for adenine or guanine nucleotides.he GTP-generating isoenzymes are proposed to play a role in gluconeogenesis by producing GTP for GTP-dependent phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and for other GTP-dependent processes.ranscriptional and proteomic data showed that all ten isoenzymes are constitutively expressed indicating that both ATP and GTP are generated from the metabolism of most of the amino acids. A phylogenetic analysis showed that the ACSs of P. furiosus and other members of thehermococcales are evolutionarily distinct from those found throughout the rest of biology, including those of other hyperthermophilic archaea.« less

  17. Acyl-CoA Synthetase Is Located in the Outer Membrane and Acyl-CoA Thioesterase in the Inner Membrane of Pea Chloroplast Envelopes 1

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Jaen; Keegstra, Kenneth

    1983-01-01

    Both acyl-CoA synthetase and acyl-CoA thioesterase activities are present in chloroplast envelope membranes. The functions of these enzymes in lipid metabolism remains unresolved, although the synthetase has been proposed to be involved in either plastid galactolipid synthesis or the export of plastid-synthesized fatty acids to the cytoplasm. We have examined the locations of both enzymes within the two envelope membranes of pea (Pisum sativum var Laxton's Progress No. 9) chloroplasts. Inner and outer envelope membranes were purified from unfractionated envelope preparations by linear density sucrose gradient centrifugation. Acyl-CoA synthetase was located in the outer envelope membrane while acyl-CoA thioesterase was located in the inner envelope membrane. Thus, it seems unlikely that the synthetase is directly involved in galactolipid assembly. Instead, its localization supports the hypothesis that it functions in the transport of plastid-synthesized fatty acids to the endoplasmic reticulum. PMID:16663076

  18. Activation of AMP-activated protein kinase signaling pathway by adiponectin and insulin in mouse adipocytes: requirement of acyl-CoA synthetases FATP1 and Acsl1 and association with an elevation in AMP/ATP ratio.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qingqing; Gauthier, Marie-Soleil; Sun, Lei; Ruderman, Neil; Lodish, Harvey

    2010-11-01

    Adiponectin activates AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in adipocytes, but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Here we tested the hypothesis that AMP, generated in activating fatty acids to their CoA derivatives, catalyzed by acyl-CoA synthetases, is involved in AMPK activation by adiponectin. Moreover, in adipocytes, insulin affects the subcellular localization of acyl-CoA synthetase FATP1. Thus, we also tested whether insulin activates AMPK in these cells and, if so, whether it activates through a similar mechanism. We examined these hypotheses by measuring the AMP/ATP ratio and AMPK activation on adiponectin and insulin stimulation and after knocking down acyl-CoA synthetases in adipocytes. We show that adiponectin activation of AMPK is accompanied by an ∼2-fold increase in the cellular AMP/ATP ratio. Moreover, FATP1 and Acsl1, the 2 major acyl-CoA synthetase isoforms in adipocytes, are essential for AMPK activation by adiponectin. We also show that after 40 min. insulin activated AMPK in adipocytes, which was coupled with a 5-fold increase in the cellular AMP/ATP ratio. Knockdown studies show that FATP1 and Acsl1 are required for these processes, as well as for stimulation of long-chain fatty acid uptake by adiponection and insulin. These studies demonstrate that a change in cellular energy state is associated with AMPK activation by both adiponectin and insulin, which requires the activity of FATP1 and Acsl1.

  19. Effects of hypo- and hyperthyroidism on rat liver microsomal long-chain fatty acyl-CoA synthetase and hydrolase

    SciTech Connect

    Dang, A.Q.; Faas, F.H.; Carter, W.J.

    1986-05-01

    The effects of hyperthyroidism (hyperT/sub 3/), (tri-iodothryonine (T/sub 3/) injected rats), and hypothyroidism (hypoT/sub 3/) (thyroidectomized rats) on the activation of fatty acids by a microsomal long-chain fatty acyl-CoA (LCA-CoA) synthetase and the degradation of LCA-CoA by a microsomal LCA-CoA hydrolase was determined. MAS was assayed by measuring the (1-/sup 14/C)-palmitate or -1-/sup 14/C) oleate incorporated into its water soluble CoA ester. MAH was assayed spectrophotomerically by following the reduction of 5',5'-dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid) by the CoA released from palmitoyl-CoA or oleoyl-CoA. Enzyme activities are given as mean (nmoles/mg/min) +/- SEM. MAS activities were decreased 36-44% (p < 0.01) in both hypoT/sub 3/ and hyperT/sub 3/ (controls = 101 +/- 4 (n = 11, (1-/sup 14/C)-palmitate) of 72 +/- 2 (n = 5,(1-/sup 14/C)oleate)). These decreases may contribute to the decreased triacelyglycerol (TG) and phospholipid contents in the hyperT/sub 3/ liver and the decreased clearance rate of plasma TG in the hypoT/sub 3/. MAH was decreased 27-42% (p<0.01) only in hypoT/sub 3/ (controls = 77 +/- 3 (n = 11, palmitoyl-CoA) or 45 +/- 1 (n = 5, oleoyl-CoA)). This decrease was corrected by T/sub 3/ treatment. Since the decreased MAH would increase the availability of LCA-CoA, it may contribute to the increased TG synthesis in hypoT/sub 3/.

  20. The N-terminal region of acyl-CoA synthetase 3 is essential for both the localization on lipid droplets and the function in fatty acid uptake.

    PubMed

    Poppelreuther, Margarete; Rudolph, Berenice; Du, Chen; Großmann, Regina; Becker, Melanie; Thiele, Christoph; Ehehalt, Robert; Füllekrug, Joachim

    2012-05-01

    Cytosolic lipid droplets (LDs) are storage organelles for neutral lipids derived from endogenous metabolism. Acyl-CoA synthetase family proteins are essential enzymes in this biosynthetic pathway, contributing activated fatty acids. Fluorescence microscopy showed that ACSL3 is localized to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and LDs, with the distribution dependent on the cell type and the supply of fatty acids. The N-terminus of ACSL3 was necessary and sufficient for targeting reporter proteins correctly, as demonstrated by subcellular fractionation and confocal microscopy. The N-terminal region of ACSL3 was also found to be functionally required for the enzyme activity. Selective permeabilization and in silico analysis suggest that ACSL3 assumes a hairpin membrane topology, with the N-terminal hydrophobic amino acids forming an amphipathic helix restricted to the cytosolic leaflet of the ER membrane. ACSL3 was effectively translocated from the ER to nascent LDs when neutral lipid synthesis was stimulated by the external addition of fatty acids. Cellular fatty acid uptake was increased by overexpression and reduced by RNA interference of ACSL3. In conclusion, the structural organization of ACSL3 allows the fast and efficient movement from the ER to emerging LDs. ACSL3 not only esterifies fatty acids with CoA but is also involved in the cellular uptake of fatty acids, presumably indirectly by metabolic trapping. The unique localization of the acyl-CoA synthetase ACSL3 on LDs suggests a function in the local synthesis of lipids.

  1. Acyl Coenzyme A Synthetase from Pseudomonas fragi Catalyzes the Synthesis of Adenosine 5′-Polyphosphates and Dinucleoside Polyphosphates†

    PubMed Central

    Fontes, Rui; Günther Sillero, Maria A.; Sillero, Antonio

    1998-01-01

    Acyl coenzyme A (CoA) synthetase (EC 6.2.1.8) from Pseudomonas fragi catalyzes the synthesis of adenosine 5′-tetraphosphate (p4A) and adenosine 5′-pentaphosphate (p5A) from ATP and tri- or tetrapolyphosphate, respectively. dATP, adenosine-5′-O-[γ-thiotriphosphate] (ATPγS), adenosine(5′)tetraphospho(5′)adenosine (Ap4A), and adenosine(5′)pentaphospho(5′)adenosine (Ap5A) are also substrates of the reaction yielding p4(d)A in the presence of tripolyphosphate (P3). UTP, CTP, and AMP are not substrates of the reaction. The Km values for ATP and P3 are 0.015 and 1.3 mM, respectively. Maximum velocity was obtained in the presence of MgCl2 or CoCl2 equimolecular with the sum of ATP and P3. The relative rates of synthesis of p4A with divalent cations were Mg = Co > Mn = Zn >> Ca. In the pH range used, maximum and minimum activities were measured at pH values of 5.5 and 8.2, respectively; the opposite was observed for the synthesis of palmitoyl-CoA, with maximum activity in the alkaline range. The relative rates of synthesis of palmitoyl-CoA and p4A are around 10 (at pH 5.5) and around 200 (at pH 8.2). The synthesis of p4A is inhibited by CoA, and the inhibitory effect of CoA can be counteracted by fatty acids. To a lesser extent, the enzyme catalyzes the synthesis also of Ap4A (from ATP), Ap5A (from p4A), and adenosine(5′)tetraphospho(5′)nucleoside (Ap4N) from adequate adenylyl donors (ATP, ATPγS, or octanoyl-AMP) and adequate adenylyl acceptors (nucleoside triphosphates). PMID:9620965

  2. Overexpression of human fatty acid transport protein 2/very long chain acyl-CoA synthetase 1 (FATP2/Acsvl1) reveals distinct patterns of trafficking of exogenous fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Melton, Elaina M; Cerny, Ronald L; DiRusso, Concetta C; Black, Paul N

    2013-11-01

    In mammals, the fatty acid transport proteins (FATP1 through FATP6) are members of a highly conserved family of proteins, which function in fatty acid transport proceeding through vectorial acylation and in the activation of very long chain fatty acids, branched chain fatty acids and secondary bile acids. FATP1, 2 and 4, for example directly function in fatty acid transport and very long chain fatty acids activation while FATP5 does not function in fatty acid transport but activates secondary bile acids. In the present work, we have used stable isotopically labeled fatty acids differing in carbon length and saturation in cells expressing FATP2 to gain further insights into how this protein functions in fatty acid transport and intracellular fatty acid trafficking. Our previous studies showed the expression of FATP2 modestly increased C16:0-CoA and C20:4-CoA and significantly increased C18:3-CoA and C22:6-CoA after 4h. The increases in C16:0-CoA and C18:3-CoA suggest FATP2 must necessarily partner with a long chain acyl CoA synthetase (Acsl) to generate C16:0-CoA and C18:3-CoA through vectorial acylation. The very long chain acyl CoA synthetase activity of FATP2 is consistent in the generation of C20:4-CoA and C22:6-CoA coincident with transport from their respective exogenous fatty acids. The trafficking of exogenous fatty acids into phosphatidic acid (PA) and into the major classes of phospholipids (phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylinositol (PI), and phosphatidyserine (PS)) resulted in distinctive profiles, which changed with the expression of FATP2. The trafficking of exogenous C16:0 and C22:6 into PA was significant where there was 6.9- and 5.3-fold increased incorporation, respectively, over the control; C18:3 and C20:4 also trended to increase in the PA pool while there were no changes for C18:1 and C18:2. The trafficking of C18:3 into PC and PI trended higher and approached significance. In the case of C20:4, expression of

  3. Overexpression of Human Fatty Acid Transport Protein 2/Very Long Chain Acyl-CoA Synthetase 1 (FATP2/Acsvl1) Reveals Distinct Patterns of Trafficking of Exogenous Fatty Acids

    PubMed Central

    Melton, Elaina M.; Cerny, Ronald L.; DiRusso, Concetta C.; Black, Paul N.

    2014-01-01

    In mammals, the fatty acid transport proteins (FATP1 through FATP6) are members of a highly conserved family of proteins, which function in fatty acid transport proceeding through vectorial acylation and in the activation of very long chain fatty acids, branched chain fatty acids and secondary bile acids. FATP1, 2 and 4, for example directly function in fatty acid transport and very long chain fatty acids activation while FATP5 does not function in fatty acid transport but activates secondary bile acids. In the present work, we have used stable isotopically labeled fatty acids differing in carbon length and saturation in cells expressing FATP2 to gain further insights into how this protein functions in fatty acid transport and intracellular fatty acid trafficking. Our previous studies showed the expression of FATP2 modestly increased C16:0-CoA and C20:4-CoA and significantly increased C18:3-CoA and C22:6-CoA after 4hr. The increases in C16:0-CoA and C18:3-CoA suggest FATP2 must necessarily partner with a long chain acyl CoA synthetase (Acsl) to generate C16:0-CoA and C18:3-CoA through vectorial acylation. The very long chain acyl CoA synthetase activity of FATP2 is consistent in the generation of C20:4-CoA and C22:6-CoA coincident with transport from their respective exogenous fatty acids. The trafficking of exogenous fatty acids into phosphatidic acid (PA) and into the major classes of phospholipids (phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylinositol (PI), and phosphatidyserine (PS)) resulted in distinctive profiles, which changed with the expression of FATP2. The trafficking of exogenous C16:0 and C22:6 into PA was significant where there was 6.9- and 5.3-fold increased incorporation, respectively, over the control; C18:3 and C20:4 also trended to increase in the PA pool while there were no changes for C18:1 and C18:2. The trafficking of C18:3 into PC and PI trended higher and approached significance. In the case of C20:4, expression of

  4. Overexpression of human fatty acid transport protein 2/very long chain acyl-CoA synthetase 1 (FATP2/Acsvl1) reveals distinct patterns of trafficking of exogenous fatty acids

    SciTech Connect

    Melton, Elaina M.; Cerny, Ronald L.; DiRusso, Concetta C.; Black, Paul N.

    2013-11-01

    Highlights: •Roles of FATP2 in fatty acid transport/activation contribute to lipid homeostasis. •Use of 13C- and D-labeled fatty acids provide novel insights into FATP2 function. •FATP2-dependent trafficking of FA into phospholipids results in distinctive profiles. •FATP2 functions in the transport and activation pathways for exogenous fatty acids. -- Abstract: In mammals, the fatty acid transport proteins (FATP1 through FATP6) are members of a highly conserved family of proteins, which function in fatty acid transport proceeding through vectorial acylation and in the activation of very long chain fatty acids, branched chain fatty acids and secondary bile acids. FATP1, 2 and 4, for example directly function in fatty acid transport and very long chain fatty acids activation while FATP5 does not function in fatty acid transport but activates secondary bile acids. In the present work, we have used stable isotopically labeled fatty acids differing in carbon length and saturation in cells expressing FATP2 to gain further insights into how this protein functions in fatty acid transport and intracellular fatty acid trafficking. Our previous studies showed the expression of FATP2 modestly increased C16:0-CoA and C20:4-CoA and significantly increased C18:3-CoA and C22:6-CoA after 4 h. The increases in C16:0-CoA and C18:3-CoA suggest FATP2 must necessarily partner with a long chain acyl CoA synthetase (Acsl) to generate C16:0-CoA and C18:3-CoA through vectorial acylation. The very long chain acyl CoA synthetase activity of FATP2 is consistent in the generation of C20:4-CoA and C22:6-CoA coincident with transport from their respective exogenous fatty acids. The trafficking of exogenous fatty acids into phosphatidic acid (PA) and into the major classes of phospholipids (phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylinositol (PI), and phosphatidyserine (PS)) resulted in distinctive profiles, which changed with the expression of FATP2. The

  5. Poly specific trans-acyltransferase machinery revealed via engineered acyl-CoA synthetases.

    PubMed

    Koryakina, Irina; McArthur, John; Randall, Shan; Draelos, Matthew M; Musiol, Ewa M; Muddiman, David C; Weber, Tilmann; Williams, Gavin J

    2013-01-18

    Polyketide synthases construct polyketides with diverse structures and biological activities via the condensation of extender units and acyl thioesters. Although a growing body of evidence suggests that polyketide synthases might be tolerant to non-natural extender units, in vitro and in vivo studies aimed at probing and utilizing polyketide synthase specificity are severely limited to only a small number of extender units, owing to the lack of synthetic routes to a broad variety of acyl-CoA extender units. Here, we report the construction of promiscuous malonyl-CoA synthetase variants that can be used to synthesize a broad range of malonyl-CoA extender units substituted at the C2-position, several of which contain handles for chemoselective ligation and are not found in natural biosynthetic systems. We highlighted utility of these enzymes by probing the acyl-CoA specificity of several trans-acyltransferases, leading to the unprecedented discovery of poly specificity toward non-natural extender units, several of which are not found in naturally occurring biosynthetic pathways. These results reveal that polyketide biosynthetic machinery might be more tolerant to non-natural substrates than previously established, and that mutant synthetases are valuable tools for probing the specificity of biosynthetic machinery. Our data suggest new synthetic biology strategies for harnessing this promiscuity and enabling the regioselective modification of polyketides.

  6. A simple method for isolation and construction of markerless cyanobacterial mutants defective in acyl-acyl carrier protein synthetase.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Kouji; Keta, Sumie; Uesaka, Kazuma; Kato, Akihiro; Takatani, Nobuyuki; Ihara, Kunio; Omata, Tatsuo; Aichi, Makiko

    2016-12-01

    Cyanobacterial mutants defective in acyl-acyl carrier protein synthetase (Aas) secrete free fatty acids (FFAs) into the external medium and hence have been used for the studies aimed at photosynthetic production of biofuels. While the wild-type strain of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 is highly sensitive to exogenously added linolenic acid, mutants defective in the aas gene are known to be resistant to the externally provided fatty acid. In this study, the wild-type Synechocystis cells were shown to be sensitive to lauric, oleic, and linoleic acids as well, and the resistance to these fatty acids was shown to be enhanced by inactivation of the aas gene. On the basis of these observations, we developed an efficient method to isolate aas-deficient mutants from cultures of Synechocystis cells by counter selection using linoleic acid or linolenic acid as the selective agent. A variety of aas mutations were found in about 70 % of the FFA-resistant mutants thus selected. Various aas mutants were isolated also from Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002, using lauric acid as a selective agent. Selection using FFAs was useful also for construction of markerless aas knockout mutants from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002. Thus, genetic engineering of FFA-producing cyanobacterial strains would be greatly facilitated by the use of the FFAs for counter selection.

  7. Fluorescently labelled bovine acyl-CoA-binding protein acting as an acyl-CoA sensor: interaction with CoA and acyl-CoA esters and its use in measuring free acyl-CoA esters and non-esterified fatty acids.

    PubMed Central

    Wadum, Majken C T; Villadsen, Jens K; Feddersen, Søren; Møller, Rikke S; Neergaard, Thomas B F; Kragelund, Birthe B; Højrup, Peter; Faergeman, Nils J; Knudsen, Jens

    2002-01-01

    Long-chain acyl-CoA esters are key metabolites in lipid synthesis and beta-oxidation but, at the same time, are important regulators of intermediate metabolism, insulin secretion, vesicular trafficking and gene expression. Key tools in studying the regulatory functions of acyl-CoA esters are reliable methods for the determination of free acyl-CoA concentrations. No such method is presently available. In the present study, we describe the synthesis of two acyl-CoA sensors for measuring free acyl-CoA concentrations using acyl-CoA-binding protein as a scaffold. Met24 and Ala53 of bovine acyl-CoA-binding protein were replaced by cysteine residues, which were covalently modified with 6-bromoacetyl-2-dimethylaminonaphthalene to make the two fluorescent acyl-CoA indicators (FACIs) FACI-24 and FACI-53. FACI-24 and FACI-53 showed fluorescence emission maximum at 510 and 525 nm respectively, in the absence of ligand (excitation 387 nm). Titration of FACI-24 and FACI-53 with hexadecanoyl-CoA and dodecanoyl-CoA increased the fluorescence yield 5.5-and 4.7-fold at 460 and 495 nm respectively. FACI-24 exhibited a high, and similar increase in, fluorescence yield at 460 nm upon binding of C14-C20 saturated and unsaturated acyl-CoA esters. Both indicators bind long-chain (>C14) acyl-CoA esters with high specificity and affinity (K(d)=0.6-1.7 nM). FACI-53 showed a high fluorescence yield for C8-C12 acyl chains. It is shown that FACI-24 acts as a sensitive acyl-CoA sensor for measuring the concentration of free acyl-CoA, acyl-CoA synthetase activity and the concentrations of free fatty acids after conversion of the fatty acid into their respective acyl-CoA esters. PMID:12071849

  8. Characterization of Two Members among the Five ADP-Forming Acyl Coenzyme A (Acyl-CoA) Synthetases Reveals the Presence of a 2-(Imidazol-4-yl)Acetyl-CoA Synthetase in Thermococcus kodakarensis

    PubMed Central

    Awano, Tomotsugu; Wilming, Anja; Tomita, Hiroya; Yokooji, Yuusuke; Fukui, Toshiaki; Imanaka, Tadayuki

    2014-01-01

    The genome of Thermococcus kodakarensis, along with those of most Thermococcus and Pyrococcus species, harbors five paralogous genes encoding putative α subunits of nucleoside diphosphate (NDP)-forming acyl coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) synthetases. The substrate specificities of the protein products for three of these paralogs have been clarified through studies on the individual enzymes from Pyrococcus furiosus and T. kodakarensis. Here we have examined the biochemical properties of the remaining two acyl-CoA synthetase proteins from T. kodakarensis. The TK0944 and TK2127 genes encoding the two α subunits were each coexpressed with the β subunit-encoding TK0943 gene. In both cases, soluble proteins with an α2β2 structure were obtained and their activities toward various acids in the ADP-forming reaction were examined. The purified TK0944/TK0943 protein (ACS IIITk) accommodated a broad range of acids that corresponded to those generated in the oxidative metabolism of Ala, Val, Leu, Ile, Met, Phe, and Cys. In contrast, the TK2127/TK0943 protein exhibited relevant levels of activity only toward 2-(imidazol-4-yl)acetate, a metabolite of His degradation, and was thus designated 2-(imidazol-4-yl)acetyl-CoA synthetase (ICSTk), a novel enzyme. Kinetic analyses were performed on both proteins with their respective substrates. In T. kodakarensis, we found that the addition of histidine to the medium led to increases in intracellular ADP-forming 2-(imidazol-4-yl)acetyl-CoA synthetase activity, and 2-(imidazol-4-yl)acetate was detected in the culture medium, suggesting that ICSTk participates in histidine catabolism. The results presented here, together with those of previous studies, have clarified the substrate specificities of all five known NDP-forming acyl-CoA synthetase proteins in the Thermococcales. PMID:24163338

  9. Mycobacteria Encode Active and Inactive Classes of TesB Fatty-Acyl CoA Thioesterases Revealed through Structural and Functional Analysis.

    PubMed

    Swarbrick, Crystall M D; Bythrow, Glennon V; Aragao, David; Germain, Gabrielle A; Quadri, Luis E N; Forwood, Jade K

    2017-03-14

    Mycobacteria contain a large number of highly divergent species and exhibit unusual lipid metabolism profiles, believed to play important roles in immune invasion. Thioesterases modulate lipid metabolism through the hydrolysis of activated fatty-acyl CoAs; multiple copies are present in mycobacteria, yet many remain uncharacterized. Here, we undertake a comprehensive structural and functional analysis of a TesB thioesterase from Mycobacterium avium (MaTesB). Structural superposition with other TesB thioesterases reveals that the Asp active site residue, highly conserved across a wide range of TesB thioesterases, is mutated to Ala. Consistent with these structural data, the wild-type enzyme failed to hydrolyze an extensive range of acyl-CoA substrates. Mutation of this residue to an active Asp residue restored activity against a range of medium-chain length fatty-acyl CoA substrates. Interestingly, this Ala mutation is highly conserved across a wide range of Mycobacterium species but not found in any other bacteria or organism. Our structural homology analysis revealed that at least one other TesB acyl-CoA thioesterase also contains an Ala residue at the active site, while two other Mycobacterium TesB thioesterases harbor an Asp residue at the active site. The inactive TesBs display a common quaternary structure that is distinct from that of the active TesB thioesterases. Investigation of the effect of expression of either the catalytically active or inactive MaTesB in Mycobacterium smegmatis exposed, to the best of our knowledge, the first genotype-phenotype association implicating a mycobacterial tesB gene. This is the first report that mycobacteria encode active and inactive forms of thioesterases, the latter of which appear to be unique to mycobacteria.

  10. Continuous recording of long-chain acyl-coenzyme a synthetase activity using fluorescently labeled bovine serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Demant, E J; Nystrøm, B T

    2001-08-01

    The fluorescence-based long-chain fatty acid probe BSA-HCA (bovine serum albumin labeled with 7-hydroxycoumarin-4-acetic acid) is shown to respond to binding of long-chain acyl-CoA thioesters by quenching of the 450 nm fluorescence emission. As determined by spectrofluorometric titration, binding affinities for palmitoyl-, stearoyl-, and oleoyl-CoA (Kd = 0.2-0.4 microM) are 5-10 times lower than those for the corresponding nonesterified fatty acids. In the presence of detergent (Chaps, Triton X-100, n-octylglucoside) above the critical micelle concentration, acyl-CoA partitions from BSA-HCA and into the detergent micelles. This allows BSA-HCA to be used as a fluorescent probe for continuous recording of fatty acid concentrations in detergent solution with little interference from acyl-CoA. Using a calibration of the fluorescence signal with fatty acids in the C14 to C20 chain-length range, fatty acid consumption by Pseudomonas fragi and rat liver microsomal acyl-CoA synthetase activities are measured down to 0.05 microM/min with a data sampling rate of 10 points per second. This new method provides a very promising spectrofluorometric approach to the study of acyl-CoA synthetase reaction kinetics at physiologically relevant (nM) aqueous phase concentrations of fatty acid substrates and at a time resolution that cannot be obtained in isotopic sampling or enzyme-coupled assays.

  11. Fatty acid transport by vectorial acylation in mammals: roles played by different isoforms of rat long-chain acyl-CoA synthetases.

    PubMed

    Tong, Fumin; Black, Paul N; Coleman, Rosalind A; DiRusso, Concetta C

    2006-03-01

    Mammals express multiple isoforms of acyl-CoA synthetase (ACSL1 and ACSL3-6) in various tissues. These enzymes are essential for fatty acid metabolism providing activated intermediates for complex lipid synthesis, protein modification, and beta-oxidation. Yeast in contrast express four major ACSLs, which have well-defined functions. Two, Faa1p and Faa4p, are specifically required for fatty acid transport by vectorial acylation. Four ACSLs from the rat were expressed in a yeast faa1delta faa4delta strain and their roles in fatty acid transport and trafficking characterized. All four restored ACS activity yet varied in substrate preference. ACSL1, 4, and 6 were able to rescue fatty acid transport activity and triglyceride synthesis. ACSL5, however, was unable to facilitate fatty acid transport despite conferring robust oleoyl-CoA synthetase activity. This is the first study evaluating the role of the mammalian ACSLs in fatty acid transport and supports a role for ACSL1, 4, and 6 in transport by vectorial acylation.

  12. Identification of acyl-CoA synthetases involved in the mammalian sphingosine 1-phosphate metabolic pathway.

    PubMed

    Ohkuni, Aya; Ohno, Yusuke; Kihara, Akio

    2013-12-13

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) plays important roles both as a bioactive lipid molecule and an intermediate of the sphingolipid-to-glycerophospholipid metabolic pathway. To identify human acyl-CoA synthetases (ACSs) involved in S1P metabolism, we cloned all 26 human ACS genes and examined their abilities to restore deficient sphingolipid-to-glycerophospholipid metabolism in a yeast mutant lacking two ACS genes, FAA1 and FAA4. Here, in addition to the previously identified ACSL family members (ACSL1, 3, 4, 5, and 6), we found that ACSVL1, ACSVL4, and ACSBG1 also restored metabolism. All 8 ACSs were localized either exclusively or partly to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), where S1P metabolism takes place. We previously proposed the entire S1P metabolic pathway from results obtained using yeast cells, i.e., S1P is metabolized to glycerophospholipids via trans-2-hexadecenal, trans-2-hexadecenoic acid, trans-2-hexadecenoyl-CoA, and palmitoyl-CoA. However, as S1P is not a naturally occurring long-chain base 1-phosphate in yeast, the validity of this pathway required further verification using mammalian cells. In the present study, we treated HeLa cells with the ACS inhibitor triacsin C and found that inhibition of ACSs resulted in accumulation of trans-2-hexadecenoic acid as in ACS mutant yeast. From these results, we conclude that S1P is metabolized by a common pathway in eukaryotes.

  13. Giardia fatty acyl-CoA synthetases as potential drug targets

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Fengguang; Ortega-Pierres, Guadalupe; Argüello-García, Raúl; Zhang, Haili; Zhu, Guan

    2015-01-01

    Giardiasis caused by Giardia intestinalis (syn. G. lamblia, G. duodenalis) is one of the leading causes of diarrheal parasitic diseases worldwide. Although limited drugs to treat giardiasis are available, there are concerns regarding toxicity in some patients and the emerging drug resistance. By data-mining genome sequences, we observed that G. intestinalis is incapable of synthesizing fatty acids (FA) de novo. However, this parasite has five long-chain fatty acyl-CoA synthetases (GiACS1 to GiACS5) to activate FA scavenged from the host. ACS is an essential enzyme because FA need to be activated to form acyl-CoA thioesters before they can enter subsequent metabolism. In the present study, we performed experiments to explore whether some GiACS enzymes could serve as drug targets in Giardia. Based on the high-throughput datasets and protein modeling analyses, we initially studied the GiACS1 and GiACS2, because genes encoding these two enzymes were found to be more consistently expressed in varied parasite life cycle stages and when interacting with host cells based on previously reported transcriptome data. These two proteins were cloned and expressed as recombinant proteins. Biochemical analysis revealed that both had apparent substrate preference toward palmitic acid (C16:0) and myristic acid (C14:0), and allosteric or Michaelis–Menten kinetics on palmitic acid or ATP. The ACS inhibitor triacsin C inhibited the activity of both enzymes (IC50 = 1.56 μM, Ki = 0.18 μM for GiACS1, and IC50 = 2.28 μM, Ki = 0.23 μM for GiACS2, respectively) and the growth of G. intestinalis in vitro (IC50 = 0.8 μM). As expected from giardial evolutionary characteristics, both GiACSs displayed differences in overall folding structure as compared with their human counterparts. These observations support the notion that some of the GiACS enzymes may be explored as drug targets in this parasite. PMID:26257723

  14. Identification of 3-Sulfinopropionyl Coenzyme A (CoA) Desulfinases within the Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase Superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Schürmann, Marc; Demming, Rebecca Michaela; Krewing, Marco; Rose, Judith; Wübbeler, Jan Hendrik

    2014-01-01

    In a previous study, the essential role of 3-sulfinopropionyl coenzyme A (3SP-CoA) desulfinase acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (Acd) in Advenella mimigardefordensis strain DPN7T (AcdDPN7) during degradation of 3,3′-dithiodipropionic acid (DTDP) was elucidated. DTDP is a sulfur-containing precursor substrate for biosynthesis of polythioesters (PTEs). AcdDPN7 showed high amino acid sequence similarity to acyl-CoA dehydrogenases but was unable to catalyze a dehydrogenation reaction. Hence, it was investigated in the present study whether 3SP-CoA desulfinase activity is an uncommon or a widespread property within the acyl-CoA dehydrogenase superfamily. Therefore, proteins of the acyl-CoA dehydrogenase superfamily from Advenella kashmirensis WT001, Bacillus cereus DSM31, Cupriavidus necator N-1, Escherichia coli BL21, Pseudomonas putida KT2440, Burkholderia xenovorans LB400, Ralstonia eutropha H16, Variovorax paradoxus B4, Variovorax paradoxus S110, and Variovorax paradoxus TBEA6 were expressed in E. coli strains. All purified acyl-CoA dehydrogenases appeared as homotetramers, as revealed by size exclusion chromatography. AcdS110, AcdB4, AcdH16, and AcdKT2440 were able to dehydrogenate isobutyryl-CoA. AcdKT2440 additionally dehydrogenated butyryl-CoA and valeryl-CoA, whereas AcdDSM31 dehydrogenated only butyryl-CoA and valeryl-CoA. No dehydrogenation reactions were observed with propionyl-CoA, isovaleryl-CoA, succinyl-CoA, and glutaryl-CoA for any of the investigated acyl-CoA dehydrogenases. Only AcdTBEA6, AcdN-1, and AcdLB400 desulfinated 3SP-CoA and were thus identified as 3SP-CoA desulfinases within the acyl-CoA dehydrogenase family, although none of these three Acds dehydrogenated any of the tested acyl-CoA thioesters. No appropriate substrates were identified for AcdBL21 and AcdWT001. Spectrophotometric assays provided apparent Km and Vmax values for active substrates and indicated the applicability of phylogenetic analyses to predict the substrate range of

  15. Identification of 3-sulfinopropionyl coenzyme A (CoA) desulfinases within the Acyl-CoA dehydrogenase superfamily.

    PubMed

    Schürmann, Marc; Demming, Rebecca Michaela; Krewing, Marco; Rose, Judith; Wübbeler, Jan Hendrik; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2014-02-01

    In a previous study, the essential role of 3-sulfinopropionyl coenzyme A (3SP-CoA) desulfinase acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (Acd) in Advenella mimigardefordensis strain DPN7(T) (AcdDPN7) during degradation of 3,3'-dithiodipropionic acid (DTDP) was elucidated. DTDP is a sulfur-containing precursor substrate for biosynthesis of polythioesters (PTEs). AcdDPN7 showed high amino acid sequence similarity to acyl-CoA dehydrogenases but was unable to catalyze a dehydrogenation reaction. Hence, it was investigated in the present study whether 3SP-CoA desulfinase activity is an uncommon or a widespread property within the acyl-CoA dehydrogenase superfamily. Therefore, proteins of the acyl-CoA dehydrogenase superfamily from Advenella kashmirensis WT001, Bacillus cereus DSM31, Cupriavidus necator N-1, Escherichia coli BL21, Pseudomonas putida KT2440, Burkholderia xenovorans LB400, Ralstonia eutropha H16, Variovorax paradoxus B4, Variovorax paradoxus S110, and Variovorax paradoxus TBEA6 were expressed in E. coli strains. All purified acyl-CoA dehydrogenases appeared as homotetramers, as revealed by size exclusion chromatography. AcdS110, AcdB4, AcdH16, and AcdKT2440 were able to dehydrogenate isobutyryl-CoA. AcdKT2440 additionally dehydrogenated butyryl-CoA and valeryl-CoA, whereas AcdDSM31 dehydrogenated only butyryl-CoA and valeryl-CoA. No dehydrogenation reactions were observed with propionyl-CoA, isovaleryl-CoA, succinyl-CoA, and glutaryl-CoA for any of the investigated acyl-CoA dehydrogenases. Only AcdTBEA6, AcdN-1, and AcdLB400 desulfinated 3SP-CoA and were thus identified as 3SP-CoA desulfinases within the acyl-CoA dehydrogenase family, although none of these three Acds dehydrogenated any of the tested acyl-CoA thioesters. No appropriate substrates were identified for AcdBL21 and AcdWT001. Spectrophotometric assays provided apparent Km and Vmax values for active substrates and indicated the applicability of phylogenetic analyses to predict the substrate range of

  16. The Acyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Synthetase from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 Mediates Fatty Acid Import1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    von Berlepsch, Simon; Kunz, Hans-Henning; Brodesser, Susanne; Fink, Patrick; Marin, Kay; Flügge, Ulf-Ingo; Gierth, Markus

    2012-01-01

    The transfer of fatty acids across biological membranes is a largely uncharacterized process, although it is essential at membranes of several higher plant organelles like chloroplasts, peroxisomes, or the endoplasmic reticulum. Here, we analyzed loss-of-function mutants of the unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 as a model system to circumvent redundancy problems encountered in eukaryotic organisms. Cells deficient in the only cytoplasmic Synechocystis acyl-acyl carrier protein synthetase (SynAas) were highly resistant to externally provided α-linolenic acid, whereas wild-type cells bleached upon this treatment. Bleaching of wild-type cells was accompanied by a continuous increase of α-linolenic acid in total lipids, whereas no such accumulation could be observed in SynAas-deficient cells (Δsynaas). When SynAas was disrupted in the tocopherol-deficient, α-linolenic acid-hypersensitive Synechocystis mutant Δslr1736, double mutant cells displayed the same resistance phenotype as Δsynaas. Moreover, heterologous expression of SynAas in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) mutants lacking the major yeast fatty acid import protein Fat1p (Δfat1) led to the restoration of wild-type sensitivity against exogenous α-linolenic acid of the otherwise resistant Δfat1 mutant, indicating that SynAas is functionally equivalent to Fat1p. In addition, liposome assays provided direct evidence for the ability of purified SynAas protein to mediate α-[14C]linolenic acid retrieval from preloaded liposome membranes via the synthesis of [14C]linolenoyl-acyl carrier protein. Taken together, our data show that an acyl-activating enzyme like SynAas is necessary and sufficient to mediate the transfer of fatty acids across a biological membrane. PMID:22535424

  17. Silencing the expression of mitochondrial acyl-CoA thioesterase I and acyl-CoA synthetase 4 inhibits hormone-induced steroidogenesis.

    PubMed

    Maloberti, Paula; Castilla, Rocío; Castillo, Fernanda; Cornejo Maciel, Fabiana; Mendez, Carlos F; Paz, Cristina; Podestá, Ernesto J

    2005-04-01

    Arachidonic acid and its lypoxygenated metabolites play a fundamental role in the hormonal regulation of steroidogenesis. Reduction in the expression of the mitochondrial acyl-CoA thioesterase (MTE-I) by antisense or small interfering RNA (siRNA) and of the arachidonic acid-preferring acyl-CoA synthetase (ACS4) by siRNA produced a marked reduction in steroid output of cAMP-stimulated Leydig cells. This effect was blunted by a permeable analog of cholesterol that bypasses the rate-limiting step in steroidogenesis, the transport of cholesterol from the outer to the inner mitochondrial membrane. The inhibition of steroidogenesis was overcome by addition of exogenous arachidonic acid, indicating that the enzymes are part of the mechanism responsible for arachidonic acid release involved in steroidogenesis. Knocking down the expression of MTE-I leads to a significant reduction in the expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein. This protein is induced by arachidonic acid and controls the rate-limiting step. Overexpression of MTE-I resulted in an increase in cAMP-induced steroidogenesis. In summary, our results demonstrate a critical role for ACS4 and MTE-I in the hormonal regulation of steroidogenesis as a new pathway of arachidonic acid release different from the classical phospholipase A2 cascade.

  18. Effect of various eicosanoid products of arachidonic acid on the acyl CoA: Cholesterol acyl transferase activity in three different mammalian cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Malo, P.El.

    1988-01-01

    Acylcoenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) catalyzes cholesterol ester synthesis intracellularly and has been implicated in the development of atherosclerosis. An in vitro assay has been adapted for determining ACAT activity from rat FU5AH hepatoma, Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) and rat thoracic aortic smooth muscle (RSM) cells. Formation of {sup 14}C-labelled cholesteryl oleate at 0 to 60 min {plus minus} cholesterol was determined; in the presence of exogenous cholesterol, ACAT activity was approximately linear and surpassed the plateau observed in ACAT activity without cholesterol. Increasing exogenous cholesterol concentration, the amount of oleoyl CoA or the amount of microsomal protein produced a corresponding increase in ACAT activity, while ester formation was slightly increased by decreasing the ratio of Triton WR-1339 to cholesterol. Both the thromboxane A{sub 2} (TxA{sub 2}) mimic, U-44069, and the inflammatory lipoxygenase product, LTB{sub 4}, decreased optimal in vitro microsomal ACAT activity from RSM, but not form FU5AH, while CHO ACAT activity was suppressed by LTB{sub r} only. PGI{sub 2}, PGE{sub 2} and PGF{sub 2{alpha}} had minimal effects for each cell type.

  19. N-Acylation During Glidobactin Biosynthesis by the Tridomain Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase Module GlbF

    PubMed Central

    Imker, Heidi J.; Krahn, Daniel; Clerc, Jérôme; Kaiser, Markus; Walsh, Christopher T.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Glidobactins are hybrid NRPS-PKS natural products that function as irreversible proteasome inhibitors. A variety of medium chain 2(E),4(E)-diene fatty acids N-acylate the peptidolactam core and contribute significantly to the potency of proteasome inhibition. We have expressed the initiation NRPS module GlbF (C-A-T) in Escherichia coli and observe soluble active protein only on co-expression with the 8 kDa MbtH-like protein, GlbE. Following adenylation and installation of Thr as a T-domain thioester, the starter condensation domain utilizes fatty acyl-CoA donors to acylate the Thr1 amino group and generate the fatty acyl-Thr1-S-pantetheinyl-GlbF intermediate to be used in subsequent chain elongation. Previously proposed to be mediated via acyl carrier protein fatty acid donors, direct utilization of fatty acyl-CoA donors for N-acylation of T-domain tethered amino acids is likely a common strategy for chain initiation in NRPS-mediated lipopeptide biosynthesis. PMID:21035730

  20. Sudden unexpected infant death (SUDI) in a newborn due to medium chain acyl CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD) deficiency with an unusual severe genotype

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Medium chain acyl CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (MCAD) is the most common inborn error of fatty acid oxidation. This condition may lead to cellular energy shortage and cause severe clinical events such as hypoketotic hypoglycemia, Reye syndrome and sudden death. MCAD deficiency usually presents around three to six months of life, following catabolic stress as intercurrent infections or prolonged fasting, whilst neonatal-onset of the disease is quite rare. We report the case of an apparently healthy newborn who suddenly died at the third day of life, in which the diagnosis of MCAD deficiency was possible through peri-mortem blood-spot acylcarnitine analysis that showed very high concentrations of octanoylcarnitine. Genetic analysis at the ACADM locus confirmed the biochemical findings by demonstrating the presence in homozygosity of the frame-shift c.244dup1 (p.Trp82LeufsX23) mutation, a severe genotype that may explain the unusual and very early fatal outcome in this newborn. This report confirms that inborn errors of fatty acid oxidation represent one of the genetic causes of sudden unexpected deaths in infancy (SUDI) and underlines the importance to include systematically specific metabolic screening in any neonatal unexpected death. PMID:23095120

  1. Modulating effects of acyl-CoA synthetase 5-derived mitochondrial Wnt2B palmitoylation on intestinal Wnt activity

    PubMed Central

    Klaus, Christina; Schneider, Ursula; Hedberg, Christian; Schütz, Anke K; Bernhagen, Jürgen; Waldmann, Herbert; Gassler, Nikolaus; Kaemmerer, Elke

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of acyl-CoA synthetase 5 (ACSL5) activity in Wnt signaling in intestinal surface epithelia. METHODS: Several cell lines were used to investigate the ACSL5-dependent expression and synthesis of Wnt2B, a mitochondrially expressed protein of the Wnt signaling family. Wnt activity was functionally assessed with a luciferase reporter assay. ACSL5-related biochemical Wnt2B modifications were investigated with a modified acyl-exchange assay. The findings from the cell culture models were verified using an Apcmin/+ mouse model as well as normal and neoplastic diseased human intestinal tissues. RESULTS: In the presence of ACSL5, Wnt2B was unable to translocate into the nucleus and was enriched in mitochondria, which was paralleled by a significant decrease in Wnt activity. ACSL5-dependent S-palmitoylation of Wnt2B was identified as a molecular reason for mitochondrial Wnt2B accumulation. In cell culture systems, a strong relation of ACSL5 expression, Wnt2B palmitoylation, and degree of malignancy were found. Using normal mucosa, the association of ACSL5 and Wnt2B was seen, but in intestinal neoplasias the mechanism was only rudimentarily observed. CONCLUSION: ACSL5 mediates antiproliferative activities via Wnt2B palmitoylation with diminished Wnt activity. The molecular pathway is probably relevant for intestinal homeostasis, overwhelmed by other pathways in carcinogenesis. PMID:25356045

  2. Chlamydia trachomatis growth and development requires the activity of host Long-chain Acyl-CoA Synthetases (ACSLs)

    PubMed Central

    Recuero-Checa, Maria A.; Sharma, Manu; Lau, Constance; Watkins, Paul A.; Gaydos, Charlotte A.; Dean, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    The obligate-intracellular pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis (Ct) has undergone considerable genome reduction with consequent dependence on host biosynthetic pathways, metabolites and enzymes. Long-chain acyl-CoA synthetases (ACSLs) are key host-cell enzymes that convert fatty acids (FA) into acyl-CoA for use in metabolic pathways. Here, we show that the complete host ACSL family [ACSL1 and ACSL3–6] translocates into the Ct membrane-bound vacuole, termed inclusion, and remains associated with membranes of metabolically active forms of Ct throughout development. We discovered that three different pharmacologic inhibitors of ACSL activity independently impede Ct growth in a dose-dependent fashion. Using an FA competition assay, host ACSLs were found to activate Ct branched-chain FAs, suggesting that one function of the ACSLs is to activate Ct FAs and host FAs (recruited from the cytoplasm) within the inclusion. Because the ACSL inhibitors can deplete lipid droplets (LD), we used a cell line where LD synthesis was switched off to evaluate whether LD deficiency affects Ct growth. In these cells, we found no effect on growth or on translocation of ACSLs into the inclusion. Our findings support an essential role for ACSL activation of host-cell and bacterial FAs within the inclusion to promote Ct growth and development, independent of LDs. PMID:26988341

  3. Chlamydia trachomatis growth and development requires the activity of host Long-chain Acyl-CoA Synthetases (ACSLs).

    PubMed

    Recuero-Checa, Maria A; Sharma, Manu; Lau, Constance; Watkins, Paul A; Gaydos, Charlotte A; Dean, Deborah

    2016-03-18

    The obligate-intracellular pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis (Ct) has undergone considerable genome reduction with consequent dependence on host biosynthetic pathways, metabolites and enzymes. Long-chain acyl-CoA synthetases (ACSLs) are key host-cell enzymes that convert fatty acids (FA) into acyl-CoA for use in metabolic pathways. Here, we show that the complete host ACSL family [ACSL1 and ACSL3-6] translocates into the Ct membrane-bound vacuole, termed inclusion, and remains associated with membranes of metabolically active forms of Ct throughout development. We discovered that three different pharmacologic inhibitors of ACSL activity independently impede Ct growth in a dose-dependent fashion. Using an FA competition assay, host ACSLs were found to activate Ct branched-chain FAs, suggesting that one function of the ACSLs is to activate Ct FAs and host FAs (recruited from the cytoplasm) within the inclusion. Because the ACSL inhibitors can deplete lipid droplets (LD), we used a cell line where LD synthesis was switched off to evaluate whether LD deficiency affects Ct growth. In these cells, we found no effect on growth or on translocation of ACSLs into the inclusion. Our findings support an essential role for ACSL activation of host-cell and bacterial FAs within the inclusion to promote Ct growth and development, independent of LDs.

  4. Isolation of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae long chain fatty acyl:CoA synthetase gene (FAA1) and assessment of its role in protein N- myristoylation

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Regulation of myristoylCoA pools in Saccharomyces cerevisiae plays an important role in modulating the activity of myristoylCoA:protein N- myristoyltransferase (NMT), an essential enzyme with an ordered Bi Bi reaction that catalyzes the transfer of myristate from myristoylCoA to greater than or equal to 12 cellular proteins. At least two pathways are available for generating myristoylCoA: de novo synthesis by the multifunctional, multisubunit fatty acid synthetase complex (FAS) and activation of exogenous myristate by acylCoA synthetase. The FAA1 (fatty acid activation) gene has been isolated by genetic complementation of a faal mutant. This single copy gene, which maps to the right arm of chromosome XV, specifies a long chain acylCoA synthetase of 700 amino acids. Analyses of strains containing NMT1 and a faal null mutation indicated that FAA1 is not essential for vegetative growth when an active de novo pathway for fatty acid synthesis is present. The role of FAA1 in cellular lipid metabolism and protein N-myristoylation was therefore assessed in strains subjected to biochemical or genetic blockade of FAS. At 36 degrees C, FAA1 is required for the utilization of exogenous myristate by NMT and for the synthesis of several phospholipid species. This requirement is not apparent at 24 or 30 degrees C, suggesting that S. cerevisiae contains another acylCoA synthetase activity whose chain length and/or temperature optima may differ from Faalp. PMID:1572893

  5. Characterization of recombinant long-chain rat acyl-CoA synthetase isoforms 3 and 6: identification of a novel variant of isoform 6.

    PubMed

    Van Horn, Cynthia G; Caviglia, Jorge M; Li, Lei O; Wang, Shuli; Granger, Deborah A; Coleman, Rosalind A

    2005-02-08

    The metabolism of long-chain fatty acids in brain and their incorporation into signaling molecules such as diacylglycerol and LPA and into structural components of membranes, including myelin, requires activation by long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase (ACSL). Because ACSL3 and ACSL6 are the predominant ACSL isoforms in brain, we cloned and characterized these isoforms from rat brain and identified a novel ACSL6 clone (ACSL6_v2). ACSL6_v2 and the previously reported ACSL6_v1 represent splice variants that include exon 13 or 14, respectively. Homologue sequences of both of these variants are present in the human and mouse databases. ACSL3, ACSL6_v1, and ACSL6_v2 with Flag-epitopes at the C-termini were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified on Flag-affinity columns. The three recombinant proteins were characterized. Compared to ACSL4, another brain isoform, ACSL3, ACSL6_v1, and ACSL6_v2 showed similarities in kinetic values for CoA, palmitate, and arachidonate, but their apparent Km values for oleate were 4- to 6-fold lower than for ACSL4. In a direct competition assay with palmitate, all the polyunsaturated fatty acids tested were strong competitors only for ACSL4 with IC50 values of 0.5 to 5 microM. DHA was also strongly preferred by ACSL6_v2. The apparent Km value for ATP of ACSL6_v1 was 8-fold higher than that of ACSL6_v2. ACSL3 and the two variants of ACSL6 were more resistant than ACSL4 to heat inactivation. Despite the high amino acid identity between ACSL3 and ACSL4, rosiglitazone inhibited only ACSL4. Triacsin C, an inhibitor of ACSL1 and ACSL4, also inhibited ACSL3, but did not inhibit the ACSL6 variants. These data further document important differences in the closely related ACSL isoforms and show that amino acid changes near the consensus nucleotide binding site alter function in the two splice variants of ACSL6.

  6. Nucleotide sequence and functional analysis of the luxE gene encoding acyl-protein synthetase of the lux operon from Photobacterium leiognathi.

    PubMed

    Lin, J W; Chao, Y F; Weng, S F

    1996-11-21

    Nucleotide sequence of the luxE gene GenBank Accession No. U66407 from Photobacterium leiognathi PL741 has been determined, and the amino acid sequence of acyl-protein synthetase encoded by the luxE gene is deduced. Nucleotide sequence reveals that the luxE gene encodes acyl-protein synthetase, which is a component of the fatty acid reductase complex that is responsible for converting fatty acid to aldehyde as substrate in the luciferase-catalyzed bioluminescence reaction. The acyl-protein synthetase encoded by the luxE gene has a calculated M, 43,128 and comprises 373 amino acid residues. Alignment and comparison of acyl-protein synthetases from P. leiognathi, P. phosphoreum, Vibrio fischeri, V. harveyi and Xenorhabdus luminescens shows that they are homologous; there is 75.5% homologous (44.2% identity and 31.3% similarity) among these species. Functional analysis illustrates that the specific segment sequence lying before or in the luxE gene might from potential loops omega o omega e1, omega e2 as mRNA stability loop and/or for sub-regulation by alternative modulation in the lux operon. The gene order of the luxE gene in the lux and the lum operons is<--ter-lumQ-lumP-R&R-luxC-luxD-luxA-luxB -luxN-luxE-->(R&R: regulatory region; ter; transcriptional terminator), whereas the R&R is the regulatory region for the lum and the lux operons, and ter is the transcriptional terminator for the lum operon.

  7. PPARδ activation induces hepatic long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase 4 expression in vivo and in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Kan, Chin Fung Kelvin; Singh, Amar Bahadur; Dong, Bin; Shende, Vikram Ravindra; Liu, Jingwen

    2017-01-01

    The arachidonic acid preferred long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase 4 (ACSL4) is a key enzyme for fatty acid metabolism in various metabolic tissues. In this study, we utilized hamsters fed a normal chow diet, a high-fat diet or a high cholesterol and high fat diet (HCHFD) as animal models to explore novel transcriptional regulatory mechanisms for ACSL4 expression under hyperlipidemic conditions. Through cloning hamster ACSL4 homolog and tissue profiling ACSL4 mRNA and protein expressions we observed a selective upregulation of ACSL4 in testis and liver of HCHFD fed animals. Examination of transcriptional activators of the ACSL family revealed an increased hepatic expression of PPARδ but not PPARα in HCHFD fed hamsters. To explore a role of PPARδ in dietary cholesterol-mediated upregulation of ACSL4, we administered a PPARδ specific agonist L165041 to normolipidemic and dyslipidemic hamsters. We observed significant increases of hepatic ACSL4 mRNA and protein levels in all L165041-treated hamsters as compared to control animals. The induction of ACSL4 expression by L165041 in liver tissue in vivo was recapitulated in human primary hepatocytes and hepatocytes isolated from hamster and mouse. Moreover, employing the approach of adenovirus-mediated gene knockdown, we showed that depletion of PPARδ in hamster hepatocytes specifically reduced ACSL4 expression. Finally, utilizing HepG2 as a model system, we demonstrate that PPARδ activation leads to increased ACSL4 promoter activity, mRNA and protein expression, and consequently higher arachidonoyl-CoA synthetase activity. Taken together, we have discovered a novel PPARδ-mediated regulatory mechanism for ACSL4 expression in liver tissue and cultured hepatic cells. PMID:25645621

  8. PPARδ activation induces hepatic long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase 4 expression in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kan, Chin Fung Kelvin; Singh, Amar Bahadur; Dong, Bin; Shende, Vikram Ravindra; Liu, Jingwen

    2015-05-01

    The arachidonic acid preferred long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase 4 (ACSL4) is a key enzyme for fatty acid metabolism in various metabolic tissues. In this study, we utilized hamsters fed a normal chow diet, a high-fat diet or a high cholesterol and high fat diet (HCHFD) as animal models to explore novel transcriptional regulatory mechanisms for ACSL4 expression under hyperlipidemic conditions. Through cloning hamster ACSL4 homolog and tissue profiling ACSL4 mRNA and protein expressions we observed a selective upregulation of ACSL4 in testis and liver of HCHFD fed animals. Examination of transcriptional activators of the ACSL family revealed an increased hepatic expression of PPARδ but not PPARα in HCHFD fed hamsters. To explore a role of PPARδ in dietary cholesterol-mediated upregulation of ACSL4, we administered a PPARδ specific agonist L165041 to normolipidemic and dyslipidemic hamsters. We observed significant increases of hepatic ACSL4 mRNA and protein levels in all L165041-treated hamsters as compared to control animals. The induction of ACSL4 expression by L165041 in liver tissue in vivo was recapitulated in human primary hepatocytes and hepatocytes isolated from hamster and mouse. Moreover, employing the approach of adenovirus-mediated gene knockdown, we showed that depletion of PPARδ in hamster hepatocytes specifically reduced ACSL4 expression. Finally, utilizing HepG2 as a model system, we demonstrate that PPARδ activation leads to increased ACSL4 promoter activity, mRNA and protein expression, and consequently higher arachidonoyl-CoA synthetase activity. Taken together, we have discovered a novel PPARδ-mediated regulatory mechanism for ACSL4 expression in liver tissue and cultured hepatic cells.

  9. Activation of LXR increases acyl-CoA synthetase activity through direct regulation of ACSL3 in human placental trophoblast cells.

    PubMed

    Weedon-Fekjaer, M Susanne; Dalen, Knut Tomas; Solaas, Karianne; Staff, Anne Cathrine; Duttaroy, Asim K; Nebb, Hilde Irene

    2010-07-01

    Placental fatty acid transport and metabolism are important for proper growth and development of the feto-placental unit. The nuclear receptors, liver X receptors alpha and beta (LXRalpha and LXRbeta), are key regulators of lipid metabolism in many tissues, but little is known about their role in fatty acid transport and metabolism in placenta. The current study investigates the LXR-mediated regulation of long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase 3 (ACSL3) and its functions in human placental trophoblast cells. We demonstrate that activation of LXR increases ACSL3 expression, acyl-CoA synthetase activity, and fatty acid uptake in human tropholast cells. Silencing of ACSL3 in these cells attenuates the LXR-mediated increase in acyl-CoA synthetase activity. Furthermore, we show that ACSL3 is directly regulated by LXR through a conserved LXR responsive element in the ACSL3 promoter. Our results suggest that LXR plays a regulatory role in fatty acid metabolism by direct regulation of ACSL3 in human placental trophoblast cells.

  10. Suppression of long chain acyl-CoA synthetase 3 decreases hepatic de novo fatty acid synthesis through decreased transcriptional activity.

    PubMed

    Bu, So Young; Mashek, Mara T; Mashek, Douglas G

    2009-10-30

    Long chain acyl-CoA synthetases (ACSL) and fatty acid transport proteins (FATP) activate fatty acids to acyl-CoAs in the initial step of fatty acid metabolism. Numerous isoforms of ACSL and FATP exist with different tissue distribution patterns, intracellular locations, and substrate preferences, suggesting that each isoform has distinct functions in channeling fatty acids into different metabolic pathways. Because fatty acids, acyl-CoAs, and downstream lipid metabolites regulate various transcription factors that control hepatic energy metabolism, we hypothesized that ACSL or FATP isoforms differentially regulate hepatic gene expression. Using small interference RNA (siRNA), we knocked down each liver-specific ACSL and FATP isoform in rat primary hepatocyte cultures and subsequently analyzed reporter gene activity of numerous transcription factors and performed quantitative mRNA analysis of their target genes. Compared with control cells, which were transfected with control siRNA, knockdown of acyl-CoA synthetase 3 (ACSL3) significantly decreased reporter gene activity of several lipogenic transcription factors such as peroxisome proliferator activation receptor-gamma, carbohydrate-responsive element-binding protein, sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c, and liver X receptor-alpha and the expression of their target genes. These findings were further supported by metabolic labeling studies that showed [1-(14)C]acetate incorporation into lipid extracts was decreased in cells treated with ACSL3 siRNAs and that ACSL3 expression is up-regulated in ob/ob mice and mice fed a high sucrose diet. ACSL3 knockdown decreased total acyl-CoA synthetase activity without substantially altering the expression of other ACSL isoforms. In summary, these results identify a novel role for ACSL3 in mediating transcriptional control of hepatic lipogenesis.

  11. Long-chain bases of sphingolipids are transported into cells via the acyl-CoA synthetases

    PubMed Central

    Narita, Tomomi; Naganuma, Tatsuro; Sase, Yurie; Kihara, Akio

    2016-01-01

    Transport of dietary lipids into small-intestinal epithelial cells is pathologically and nutritionally important. However, lipid uptake remains an almost unexplored research area. Although we know that long-chain bases (LCBs), constituents of sphingolipids, can enter into cells efficiently, the molecular mechanism of LCB uptake is completely unclear. Here, we found that the yeast acyl-CoA synthetases (ACSs) Faa1 and Faa4 are redundantly involved in LCB uptake. In addition to fatty acid-activating activity, transporter activity toward long-chain fatty acids (LCFAs) has been suggested for ACSs. Both LCB and LCFA transports were largely impaired in faa1Δ faa4Δ cells. Furthermore, LCB and LCFA uptakes were mutually competitive. However, the energy dependency was different for their transports. Sodium azide/2-deoxy-D-glucose treatment inhibited import of LCFA but not that of LCB. Furthermore, the ATP-AMP motif mutation FAA1 S271A largely impaired the metabolic activity and LCFA uptake, while leaving LCB import unaffected. These results indicate that only LCFA transport requires ATP. Since ACSs do not metabolize LCBs as substrates, Faa1 and Faa4 are likely directly involved in LCB transport. Furthermore, we revealed that ACSs are also involved in LCB transport in mammalian cells. Thus, our findings provide strong support for the hypothesis that ACSs directly transport LCFAs. PMID:27136724

  12. Hepatic expression of long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase 3 is upregulated in hyperlipidemic hamsters.

    PubMed

    Wu, Minhao; Liu, Haiyan; Chen, Wei; Fujimoto, Yasuyuki; Liu, Jingwen

    2009-11-01

    Members of the mammalian long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase (ACSL) family are key enzymes for cellular fatty acid metabolism that catalyze the initial step in activation of long-chain fatty acids. However, the specificity of individual isoforms of ACSL to the lipid metabolic process is not well studied. In addition, the regulation of expression of individual ACSL isoforms under hyperlipidemic conditions is largely unknown. We cloned the hamster ACSL3 cDNA coding region and generated specific antibodies recognizing the ACSL3 protein. We next observed the changes in ACSL3 mRNA and protein expression in hamsters fed a standard chow diet or a high fat and high cholesterol (HFHC) diet. HFHC feeding significantly increased ACSL3 mRNA and protein expression in liver and to a lesser extent in muscle but not in adipose, brain, heart, or testis. Additionally, ACSL3 mRNA abundance was differentially regulated by the nutritional status in different tissues with liver, muscle, and adipose being the most sensitive tissues. Importantly, the hepatic ACSL3 mRNA expression pattern in response to fasting and refeeding in hyperlipidemic hamsters differed from that observed in normal chow-fed hamsters. Together, these results provide the first in vivo evidence of altered regulation of hepatic ACSL3 expression under hyperlipidemic conditions and suggest important regulatory roles for this enzyme in lipid metabolism.

  13. Sunflower (Helianthus annuus) long-chain acyl-coenzyme A synthetases expressed at high levels in developing seeds.

    PubMed

    Aznar-Moreno, Jose A; Venegas Calerón, Mónica; Martínez-Force, Enrique; Garcés, Rafael; Mullen, Robert; Gidda, Satinder K; Salas, Joaquín J

    2014-03-01

    Long chain fatty acid synthetases (LACSs) activate the fatty acid chains produced by plastidial de novo biosynthesis to generate acyl-CoA derivatives, important intermediates in lipid metabolism. Oilseeds, like sunflower, accumulate high levels of triacylglycerols (TAGs) in their seeds to nourish the embryo during germination. This requires that sunflower seed endosperm supports very active glycerolipid synthesis during development. Sunflower seed plastids produce large amounts of fatty acids, which must be activated through the action of LACSs, in order to be incorporated into TAGs. We cloned two different LACS genes from developing sunflower endosperm, HaLACS1 and HaLACS2, which displayed sequence homology with Arabidopsis LACS9 and LACS8 genes, respectively. These genes were expressed at high levels in developing seeds and exhibited distinct subcellular distributions. We generated constructs in which these proteins were fused to green fluorescent protein and performed transient expression experiments in tobacco cells. The HaLACS1 protein associated with the external envelope of tobacco chloroplasts, whereas HaLACS2 was strongly bound to the endoplasmic reticulum. Finally, both proteins were overexpressed in Escherichia coli and recovered as active enzymes in the bacterial membranes. Both enzymes displayed similar substrate specificities, with a very high preference for oleic acid and weaker activity toward stearic acid. On the basis of our findings, we discuss the role of these enzymes in sunflower oil synthesis.

  14. Multiple erythroid isoforms of human long-chain acyl-CoA synthetases are produced by switch of the fatty acid gate domains

    PubMed Central

    Soupene, Eric; Kuypers, Frans A

    2006-01-01

    Background The formation of acyl-CoA by the action of acyl-CoA synthetases plays a crucial role in membrane lipid turnover, including the plasma membrane of erythrocytes. In human, five Acyl-CoA Synthetase Long-chain (ACSL) genes have been identified with as many as 3 different transcript variants for each. Results Acyl-CoA Synthetase Long-chain member 6 (ACSL6) is responsible for activation of long-chain fatty acids in erythrocytes. Two additional transcript variants were also isolated from brain and testis. We report the expression in reticulocytes of two new variants and of the one isolated from brain. All three represented different spliced variants of a mutually exclusive exon pair. They encode a slightly different short motif which contains a conserved structural domain, the fatty acid Gate domain. The motifs differ in the presence of either the aromatic residue phenylalanine (Phe) or tyrosine (Tyr). Based on homology, two new isoforms for the closely related ACSL1 were predicted and characterized. One represented a switch of the Phe- to the Tyr-Gate domain motif, the other resulted from the exclusion of both. Swapping of this motif also appears to be common in all mammalian ACSL member 1 and 6 homologs. Conclusion We propose that a Phe to Tyr substitution or deletion of the Gate domain, is the structural reason for the conserved alternative splicing that affects these motifs. Our findings support our hypothesis that this region is structurally important to define the activity of these enzymes. PMID:16834775

  15. Neurodegeneration in a Drosophila model of adrenoleukodystrophy: the roles of the Bubblegum and Double bubble acyl-CoA synthetases

    PubMed Central

    Sivachenko, Anna; Gordon, Hannah B.; Kimball, Suzanne S.; Gavin, Erin J.; Bonkowsky, Joshua L.; Letsou, Anthea

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Debilitating neurodegenerative conditions with metabolic origins affect millions of individuals worldwide. Still, for most of these neurometabolic disorders there are neither cures nor disease-modifying therapies, and novel animal models are needed for elucidation of disease pathology and identification of potential therapeutic agents. To date, metabolic neurodegenerative disease has been modeled in animals with only limited success, in part because existing models constitute analyses of single mutants and have thus overlooked potential redundancy within metabolic gene pathways associated with disease. Here, we present the first analysis of a very-long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase (ACS) double mutant. We show that the Drosophila bubblegum (bgm) and double bubble (dbb) genes have overlapping functions, and that the consequences of double knockout of both bubblegum and double bubble in the fly brain are profound, affecting behavior and brain morphology, and providing the best paradigm to date for an animal model of adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD), a fatal childhood neurodegenerative disease associated with the accumulation of very-long-chain fatty acids. Using this more fully penetrant model of disease to interrogate brain morphology at the level of electron microscopy, we show that dysregulation of fatty acid metabolism via disruption of ACS function in vivo is causal of neurodegenerative pathologies that are evident in both neuronal cells and their supporting cell populations, and leads ultimately to lytic cell death in affected areas of the brain. Finally, in an extension of our model system to the study of human disease, we describe our identification of an individual with leukodystrophy who harbors a rare mutation in SLC27a6 (encoding a very-long-chain ACS), a human homolog of bgm and dbb. PMID:26893370

  16. Deficiency of cardiac Acyl-CoA synthetase-1 induces diastolic dysfunction, but pathologic hypertrophy is reversed by rapamycin.

    PubMed

    Paul, David S; Grevengoed, Trisha J; Pascual, Florencia; Ellis, Jessica M; Willis, Monte S; Coleman, Rosalind A

    2014-06-01

    In mice with temporally-induced cardiac-specific deficiency of acyl-CoA synthetase-1 (Acsl1(H-/-)), the heart is unable to oxidize long-chain fatty acids and relies primarily on glucose for energy. These metabolic changes result in the development of both a spontaneous cardiac hypertrophy and increased phosphorylated S6 kinase (S6K), a substrate of the mechanistic target of rapamycin, mTOR. Doppler echocardiography revealed evidence of significant diastolic dysfunction, indicated by a reduced E/A ratio and increased mean performance index, although the deceleration time and the expression of sarco/endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase and phospholamban showed no difference between genotypes. To determine the role of mTOR in the development of cardiac hypertrophy, we treated Acsl1(H-/-) mice with rapamycin. Six to eight week old Acsl1(H-/-) mice and their littermate controls were given i.p. tamoxifen to eliminate cardiac Acsl1, then concomitantly treated for 10weeks with i.p. rapamycin or vehicle alone. Rapamycin completely blocked the enhanced ventricular S6K phosphorylation and cardiac hypertrophy and attenuated the expression of hypertrophy-associated fetal genes, including α-skeletal actin and B-type natriuretic peptide. mTOR activation of the related Acsl3 gene, usually associated with pathologic hypertrophy, was also attenuated in the Acsl1(H-/-) hearts, indicating that alternative pathways of fatty acid activation did not compensate for the loss of Acsl1. Compared to controls, Acsl1(H-/-) hearts exhibited an 8-fold higher uptake of 2-deoxy[1-(14)C]glucose and a 35% lower uptake of the fatty acid analog 2-bromo[1-(14)C]palmitate. These data indicate that Acsl1-deficiency causes diastolic dysfunction and that mTOR activation is linked to the development of cardiac hypertrophy in Acsl1(H-/-) mice.

  17. Loss of long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase isoform 1 impairs cardiac autophagy and mitochondrial structure through mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 activation

    PubMed Central

    Grevengoed, Trisha J.; Cooper, Daniel E.; Young, Pamela A.; Ellis, Jessica M.; Coleman, Rosalind A.

    2015-01-01

    Because hearts with a temporally induced knockout of acyl-CoA synthetase 1 (Acsl1T−/−) are virtually unable to oxidize fatty acids, glucose use increases 8-fold to compensate. This metabolic switch activates mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), which initiates growth by increasing protein and RNA synthesis and fatty acid metabolism, while decreasing autophagy. Compared with controls, Acsl1T−/− hearts contained 3 times more mitochondria with abnormal structure and displayed a 35–43% lower respiratory function. To study the effects of mTORC1 activation on mitochondrial structure and function, mTORC1 was inhibited by treating Acsl1T−/− and littermate control mice with rapamycin or vehicle alone for 2 wk. Rapamycin treatment normalized mitochondrial structure, number, and the maximal respiration rate in Acsl1T−/− hearts, but did not improve ADP-stimulated oxygen consumption, which was likely caused by the 33–51% lower ATP synthase activity present in both vehicle- and rapamycin-treated Acsl1T−/− hearts. The turnover of microtubule associated protein light chain 3b in Acsl1T−/− hearts was 88% lower than controls, indicating a diminished rate of autophagy. Rapamycin treatment increased autophagy to a rate that was 3.1-fold higher than in controls, allowing the formation of autophagolysosomes and the clearance of damaged mitochondria. Thus, long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase isoform 1 (ACSL1) deficiency in the heart activated mTORC1, thereby inhibiting autophagy and increasing the number of damaged mitochondria.—Grevengoed, T. J., Cooper, D. E., Young, P. A., Ellis, J. M., Coleman, R. A. Loss of long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase isoform 1 impairs cardiac autophagy and mitochondrial structure through mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 activation. PMID:26220174

  18. Long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase 2 knockdown leads to decreased fatty acid oxidation in fat body and reduced reproductive capacity in the insect Rhodnius prolixus.

    PubMed

    Alves-Bezerra, Michele; Klett, Eric L; De Paula, Iron F; Ramos, Isabela B; Coleman, Rosalind A; Gondim, Katia C

    2016-07-01

    Long-chain acyl-CoA esters are important intermediates in lipid metabolism and are synthesized from fatty acids by long-chain acyl-CoA synthetases (ACSL). The hematophagous insect Rhodnius prolixus, a vector of Chagas' disease, produces glycerolipids in the midgut after a blood meal, which are stored as triacylglycerol in the fat body and eggs. We identified twenty acyl-CoA synthetase genes in R. prolixus, two encoding ACSL isoforms (RhoprAcsl1 and RhoprAcsl2). RhoprAcsl1 transcripts increased in posterior midgut on the second day after feeding, and RhoprAcsl2 was highly transcribed on the tenth day. Both enzymes were expressed in Escherichia coli. Recombinant RhoprACSL1 and RhoprACSL2 had broad pH optima (7.5-9.5 and 6.5-9.5, respectively), were inhibited by triacsin C, and were rosiglitazone-insensitive. Both showed similar apparent Km for palmitic and oleic acid (2-6 μM), but different Km for arachidonic acid (0.5 and 6 μM for RhoprACSL1-Flag and RhoprACSL2-Flag, respectively). The knockdown of RhoprAcsl1 did not result in noticeable phenotypes. However, RhoprACSL2 deficient insects exhibited a 2.5-fold increase in triacylglycerol content in the fat body, and 90% decrease in fatty acid β-oxidation. RhoprAcsl2 knockdown also resulted in 20% increase in lifespan, delayed digestion, 30% reduced oviposition, and 50% reduction in egg hatching. Laid eggs and hatched nymphs showed remarkable alterations in morphology. In summary, R. prolixus ACSL isoforms have distinct roles on lipid metabolism. Although RhoprACSL1 functions remain unclear, we propose that RhoprACSL2 is the main contributor for the formation of the intracellular acyl-CoA pool channeled for β-oxidation in the fat body, and is also required for normal reproduction.

  19. Genetic association of long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase 1 variants with fasting glucose, diabetes, and subclinical atherosclerosis[S

    PubMed Central

    Manichaikul, Ani; Wang, Xin-Qun; Zhao, Wei; Wojczynski, Mary K.; Siebenthall, Kyle; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A.; Saleheen, Danish; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Reilly, Muredach P.; Rich, Stephen S.; Bornfeldt, Karin E.

    2016-01-01

    Long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase 1 (ACSL1) converts free fatty acids into acyl-CoAs. Mouse studies have revealed that ACSL1 channels acyl-CoAs to β-oxidation, thereby reducing glucose utilization, and is required for diabetes-accelerated atherosclerosis. The role of ACSL1 in humans is unknown. We therefore examined common variants in the human ACSL1 locus by genetic association studies for fasting glucose, diabetes status, and preclinical atherosclerosis by using the MAGIC and DIAGRAM consortia; followed by analyses in participants from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis, the Penn-T2D consortium, and a meta-analysis of subclinical atherosclerosis in African Americans; and finally, expression quantitative trait locus analysis and identification of DNase I hypersensitive sites (DHS). The results show that three SNPs in ACSL1 (rs7681334, rs735949, and rs4862423) are associated with fasting glucose or diabetes status in these large (>200,000 subjects) data sets. Furthermore, rs4862423 is associated with subclinical atherosclerosis and coincides with a DHS highly accessible in human heart. SNP rs735949 is in strong linkage disequilibrium with rs745805, significantly associated with ACSL1 levels in skin, suggesting tissue-specific regulatory mechanisms. This study provides evidence in humans of ACSL1 SNPs associated with fasting glucose, diabetes, and subclinical atherosclerosis and suggests links among these traits and acyl-CoA synthesis. PMID:26711138

  20. Long chain acyl-CoA synthetase 3-mediated phosphatidylcholine synthesis is required for assembly of very low density lipoproteins in human hepatoma Huh7 cells.

    PubMed

    Yao, Hongbing; Ye, Jin

    2008-01-11

    Hepatocytes play a crucial role in regulating lipid metabolism by exporting cholesterol and triglyceride into plasma through secretion of very low density lipoproteins (VLDL). VLDL production is also required for release of hepatitis C virus (HCV) from infected hepatocytes. Here, we show that long chain acyl-CoA synthetase 3 (ACSL3) plays a crucial role in secretion of VLDL and HCV from hepatocytes. In cultured human hepatoma Huh7 cells, ACSL3 is specifically required for incorporation of fatty acids into phosphatidylcholine. In cells receiving small interfering RNA targeting ACSL3, secretion of apolipoprotein B, the major protein component of VLDL, was inhibited and the lipoprotein was rapidly degraded. This inhibition in secretion was completely eliminated when these cells were treated with phosphatidylcholine. Treatment of cells with small interfering RNA targeting ACSL3 also inhibited secretion of HCV from Huh7-derived cells. These results identify ACSL3 as a new enzymatic target to limit VLDL secretion and HCV infection.

  1. The structure of S . lividans acetoacetyl-CoA synthetase shows a novel interaction between the C-terminal extension and the N-terminal domain

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Carter A.; Tucker, Alex C.; Escalante-Semerena, Jorge C.; Gulick, Andrew M.

    2014-12-09

    The adenosine monoposphate-forming acyl-CoA synthetase enzymes catalyze a two-step reaction that involves the initial formation of an acyl adenylate that reacts in a second partial reaction to form a thioester between the acyl substrate and CoA. These enzymes utilize a Domain Alternation catalytic mechanism, whereby a ~110 residue C-terminal domain rotates by 140° to form distinct catalytic conformations for the two partial reactions. In this paper, the structure of an acetoacetyl-CoA synthetase (AacS) is presented that illustrates a novel aspect of this C-terminal domain. Specifically, several acetyl- and acetoacetyl-CoA synthetases contain a 30-residue extension on the C-terminus compared to other members of this family. Finally, whereas residues from this extension are disordered in prior structures, the AacS structure shows that residues from this extension may interact with key catalytic residues from the N-terminal domain.

  2. Unraveling Cholesterol Catabolism in Mycobacterium tuberculosis: ChsE4-ChsE5 α2β2 Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase Initiates β-Oxidation of 3-Oxo-cholest-4-en-26-oyl CoA

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The metabolism of host cholesterol by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is an important factor for both its virulence and pathogenesis, although how and why cholesterol metabolism is required is not fully understood. Mtb uses a unique set of catabolic enzymes that are homologous to those required for classical β-oxidation of fatty acids but are specific for steroid-derived substrates. Here, we identify and assign the substrate specificities of two of these enzymes, ChsE4-ChsE5 (Rv3504-Rv3505) and ChsE3 (Rv3573c), that carry out cholesterol side chain oxidation in Mtb. Steady-state assays demonstrate that ChsE4-ChsE5 preferentially catalyzes the oxidation of 3-oxo-cholest-4-en-26-oyl CoA in the first cycle of cholesterol side chain β-oxidation that ultimately yields propionyl-CoA, whereas ChsE3 specifically catalyzes the oxidation of 3-oxo-chol-4-en-24-oyl CoA in the second cycle of β-oxidation that generates acetyl-CoA. However, ChsE4-ChsE5 can catalyze the oxidation of 3-oxo-chol-4-en-24-oyl CoA as well as 3-oxo-4-pregnene-20-carboxyl-CoA. The functional redundancy of ChsE4-ChsE5 explains the in vivo phenotype of the igr knockout strain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis; the loss of ChsE1-ChsE2 can be compensated for by ChsE4-ChsE5 during the chronic phase of infection. The X-ray crystallographic structure of ChsE4-ChsE5 was determined to a resolution of 2.0 Å and represents the first high-resolution structure of a heterotetrameric acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (ACAD). Unlike typical homotetrameric ACADs that bind four flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) cofactors, ChsE4-ChsE5 binds one FAD at each dimer interface, resulting in only two substrate-binding sites rather than the classical four active sites. A comparison of the ChsE4-ChsE5 substrate-binding site to those of known mammalian ACADs reveals an enlarged binding cavity that accommodates steroid substrates and highlights novel prospects for designing inhibitors against the committed β-oxidation step in the first

  3. The microsomal dicarboxylyl-CoA synthetase.

    PubMed Central

    Vamecq, J; de Hoffmann, E; Van Hoof, F

    1985-01-01

    Dicarboxylic acids are products of the omega-oxidation of monocarboxylic acids. We demonstrate that in rat liver dicarboxylic acids (C5-C16) can be converted into their CoA esters by a dicarboxylyl-CoA synthetase. During this activation ATP, which cannot be replaced by GTP, is converted into AMP and PPi, both acting as feedback inhibitors of the reaction. Thermolabile at 37 degrees C, and optimally active at pH 6.5, dicarboxylyl-CoA synthetase displays the highest activity on dodecanedioic acid (2 micromol/min per g of liver). Cell-fractionation studies indicate that this enzyme belongs to the hepatic microsomal fraction. Investigations about the fate of dicarboxylyl-CoA esters disclosed the existence of an oxidase, which could be measured by monitoring the production of H2O2. In our assay conditions this H2O2 production is dependent on and closely follows the CoA consumption. It appears that the chain-length specificity of the handling of dicarboxylic acids by this catabolic pathway (activation to acyl-CoA and oxidation with H2O2 production) parallels the pattern of the degradation of exogenous dicarboxylic acids in vivo. PMID:4062873

  4. Characterization of Acyl-CoA synthetase isoforms in pancreatic beta cells: Gene silencing shows participation of ACSL3 and ACSL4 in insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Israr-Ul H; Longacre, Melissa J; Stoker, Scott W; Kendrick, Mindy A; O'Neill, Lucas M; Zitur, Laura J; Fernandez, Luis A; Ntambi, James M; MacDonald, Michael J

    2017-03-15

    Long-chain acyl-CoA synthetases (ACSLs) convert fatty acids to fatty acyl-CoAs to regulate various physiologic processes. We characterized the ACSL isoforms in a cell line of homogeneous rat beta cells (INS-1 832/13 cells) and human pancreatic islets. ACSL4 and ACSL3 proteins were present in the beta cells and human and rat pancreatic islets and concentrated in insulin secretory granules and less in mitochondria and negligible in other intracellular organelles. ACSL1 and ACSL6 proteins were not seen in INS-1 832/13 cells or pancreatic islets. ACSL5 protein was seen only in INS-1 832/13 cells. With shRNA-mediated gene silencing we developed stable ACSL knockdown cell lines from INS-1 832/13 cells. Glucose-stimulated insulin release was inhibited ∼50% with ACSL4 and ACSL3 knockdown and unaffected in cell lines with knockdown of ACSL5, ACLS6 and ACSL1. Lentivirus shRNA-mediated gene silencing of ACSL4 and ACSL3 in human pancreatic islets inhibited glucose-stimulated insulin release. ACSL4 and ACSL3 knockdown cells showed inhibition of ACSL enzyme activity more with arachidonate than with palmitate as a substrate, consistent with their preference for unsaturated fatty acids as substrates. ACSL4 knockdown changed the patterns of fatty acids in phosphatidylserines and phosphatidylethanolamines. The results show the involvement of ACLS4 and ACLS3 in insulin secretion.

  5. Molecular cloning and nutrient regulation analysis of long chain acyl-CoA synthetase 1 gene in grass carp, Ctenopharyngodon idella L.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Han-Liang; Chen, Shuai; Xu, Jian-He; Yi, Le-Fei; Peng, Yong-Xing; Pan, Qian; Shen, Xin; Dong, Zhi-Guo; Zhang, Xia-Qing; Wang, Wen-Xiang

    2017-02-01

    Long chain acyl-CoA synthetase 1 (ACSL1), a key regulatory enzyme of fatty acid metabolism, catalyzes the conversion of long-chain fatty acids to acyl-coenzyme A. The full-length cDNAs of ACSL1a and ACSL1b were cloned from the liver of a grass carp. Both cDNAs contained a 2094bp open reading frame encoding 697 amino acids. Amino acid sequence alignment showed that ACSL1a shared 73.5% sequence identity with ACSL1b. Each of the two ACSL1s proteins had a transmembrane domain, a P-loop domain, and L-, A-, and G-motifs, which were relatively conserved in comparison to other vertebrates. Relative expression profile of ACSL1 mRNAs in different tissues indicated that ACSL1a is highly expressed in heart, mesenteric adipose, and brain tissues, whereas ACSL1b is highly expressed in heart, white muscle, foregut, and liver tissues. Nutrient regulation research showed that the expression levels of ACSL1a and ACSL1b were significantly down-regulated when 3, 6, and 9% fish oil were added in diet of grass carp as compared to the control group. However, no significant difference in the levels of ACSL1 mRNA was observed between the experimental groups. This study demonstrated the relationship between ACSL1a and ACSL1b genes in grass carp and laid a foundation for further research on ACSL family members in other species.

  6. Short-term exposures of fish to perfluorooctane sulfonate: acute effects on fatty acyl-coa oxidase activity, oxidative stress, and circulating sex steroids.

    PubMed

    Oakes, Ken D; Sibley, Paul K; Martin, Jon W; MacLean, Dan D; Solomon, Keith R; Mabury, Scott A; Van Der Kraak, Glen J

    2005-05-01

    This study investigated the effects of exposure to waterborne perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) on oxidative stress and reproductive endpoints in fish. Exposures utilized species commonly used in toxicological testing, including the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), as well as relatively insensitive taxa such as creek chub (Semotilus atromaculatus), spottail shiner (Notropis hudsonius), and white sucker (Catostomus commersoni). In all fish species, short-term (14-28 d) exposure to PFOS produced only modest mortality at concentrations consistent with environmental spill scenarios. However, PFOS consistently increased hepatic fatty acyl-CoA oxidase activity and increased oxidative damage, as quantified using the 2-thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances assay. Plasma testosterone, 11-ketotestosterone, and 17beta-estradiol titers were often elevated with PFOS exposure. Vitellogenin, the egg yolk precursor protein, was occasionally altered in the plasma with PFOS exposure, but responses varied with maturity. Oviposition frequency and egg deposition in fathead minnow were not significantly impaired with PFOS exposure, despite a trend toward progressive impairment with increasing exposure concentrations. Although short-term PFOS exposure produced significant impacts on biochemical and reproductive endpoints in fish at concentrations consistent with environmental spills, the impact of long-term exposure to environmentally relevant concentrations of PFOS is unclear.

  7. A Rare Case of Short-Chain Acyl-COA Dehydrogenase Deficiency: The Apparent Rarity of the Disorder Results in Under Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Reddy, G Shilpa; Sujatha, M

    2011-07-01

    Short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (ACAD) deficiency is an extremely rare inherited mitochondrial disorder of fat metabolism. This belongs to a group of diseases known as fatty acid oxidation disorders. Screening programmes have provided evidence that all the fatty acid oxidation disorders combined are among the most common inborn errors of metabolism. Mitochondrial beta oxidation of fatty acids is an essential energy producing pathway. It is a particularly important pathway during prolonged periods of starvation and during periods of reduced caloric intake due to gastrointestinal illness or increased energy expenditure during febrile illness. The most common presentation is an acute episode of life threatening coma and hypoglycemia induced by a period of fasting due to defective hepatic ketogenesis. Here, the case of a 4 month old female patient who had seizures since the third day of her birth and persistent hypoglycemia is described. She was born to parents of second degree consanguinity after 10 years of infertility treatment. There was history of delayed cry after birth. Metabolic screening for TSH, galactosemia, 17-OHP, G6PD, cystic fibrosis, biotinidase were normal. Tandem mass spectrometric (TMS) screening for blood amino acids, organic acids, fatty acids showed elevated butyryl carnitine (C4) as 3.40 μmol/L (normal <2.00 μmol/L), hexanoyl carnitine (C6) as 0.92 μmol/L (normal <0.72 μmol/L), C4/C3 as 2.93 μmol/L (normal <1.18 μmol/L). The child was started immediately on carnitor syrup (carnitine) 1/2 ml twice daily. Limitation of fasting stress and dietary fat was advised. Baby responded well by gaining weight and seizures were controlled. Until now, less than 25 patients have been reported worldwide. The limited number of patients diagnosed until now is due to the rarity of the disorder resulting in under diagnosis.

  8. Fungal ammonia fermentation, a novel metabolic mechanism that couples the dissimilatory and assimilatory pathways of both nitrate and ethanol. Role of acetyl CoA synthetase in anaerobic ATP synthesis.

    PubMed

    Takasaki, Kazuto; Shoun, Hirofumi; Yamaguchi, Masashi; Takeo, Kanji; Nakamura, Akira; Hoshino, Takayuki; Takaya, Naoki

    2004-03-26

    Fungal ammonia fermentation is a novel dissimilatory metabolic mechanism that supplies energy under anoxic conditions. The fungus Fusarium oxysporum reduces nitrate to ammonium and simultaneously oxidizes ethanol to acetate to generate ATP (Zhou, Z., Takaya, N., Nakamura, A., Yamaguchi, M., Takeo, K., and Shoun, H. (2002) J. Biol. Chem. 277, 1892-1896). We identified the Aspergillus nidulans genes involved in ammonia fermentation by analyzing fungal mutants. The results showed that assimilatory nitrate and nitrite reductases (the gene products of niaD and niiA) were essential for reducing nitrate and for anaerobic cell growth during ammonia fermentation. We also found that ethanol oxidation is coupled with nitrate reduction and catalyzed by alcohol dehydrogenase, coenzyme A (CoA)-acylating aldehyde dehydrogenase, and acetyl-CoA synthetase (Acs). This is similar to the mechanism suggested in F. oxysporum except A. nidulans uses Acs to produce ATP instead of the ADP-dependent acetate kinase of F. oxysporum. The production of Acs requires a functional facA gene that encodes Acs and that is involved in ethanol assimilation and other metabolic processes. We purified the gene product of facA (FacA) from the fungus to show that the fungus acetylates FacA on its lysine residue(s) specifically under conditions of ammonia fermentation to regulate its substrate affinity. Acetylated FacA had higher affinity for acetyl-CoA than for acetate, whereas non-acetylated FacA had more affinity for acetate. Thus, the acetylated variant of the FacA protein is responsible for ATP synthesis during fungal ammonia fermentation. These results showed that the fungus ferments ammonium via coupled dissimilatory and assimilatory mechanisms.

  9. Bitter gourd (Momordica charantia) extract activates peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors and upregulates the expression of the acyl CoA oxidase gene in H4IIEC3 hepatoma cells.

    PubMed

    Chao, Che-Yi; Huang, Ching-jang

    2003-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha) is a ligand-dependent transcription factor that regulates the expression of genes involved in lipid metabolism and transport. Ligands/activators of PPARalpha, like fibrate-type drugs, may have hypolipidemic effects. To identify food that contains activators of PPARalpha, a transactivation assay employing a clone of CHO-K1 cells stably transfected with a (UAS)(4)-tk-alkaline phosphatase reporter and a chimeric receptor of Gal4-rPPARalpha LBD was used to screen ethyl acetate (EA) extracts of a large variety of food materials. It was found that the EA extract of bitter gourd (Momordica charantia), a common oriental vegetable, activated PPARalpha to an extent that was equivalent to or even higher than 10 microM Wy-14643, a known ligand of PPARalpha. This extract also activated PPARgamma to a significant extent which was comparable to 0.5 microM BRL-49653. The activity toward PPARalpha was mainly in the soluble fraction of the organic solvent. The EA extract prepared from the whole fruit showed significantly higher activity than that from seeds or flesh alone. The bitter gourd EA extract was then incorporated into the medium for treatment of a peroxisome proliferator-responsive murine hepatoma cell line, H4IIEC3, for 72 h. Treated cells showed significantly higher activity of acyl CoA oxidase and higher expressions of mRNA of this enzyme and fatty acid-binding protein, indicating that the bitter gourd EA extract was able to act on a natural PPARalpha signaling pathway in this cell line. It is thus worth further investigating the PPAR-associated health benefits of bitter gourd.

  10. Ontogeny of mRNA expression and activity of long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase (ACSL) isoforms in Mus musculus heart.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Hendrik; Neal, Andrea C; Coleman, Rosalind A; Lewin, Tal M

    2007-01-01

    Long-chain acyl-CoA synthetases (ACSL) activate fatty acids (FA) and provide substrates for virtually every metabolic pathway that catabolizes FA or synthesizes complex lipids. We have hypothesized that each of the five cloned ACSL isoforms partitions FA towards specific downstream pathways. Adult heart expresses all five cloned ACSL isoforms, but their independent functional roles have not been elucidated. Studies implicate ACSL1 in both oxidative and lipid synthetic pathways. To clarify the functional role of ACSL1 and the other ACSL isoforms (3-6), we examined ACS specific activity and Acsl mRNA expression in the developing mouse heart which increases FA oxidative pathways for energy production after birth. Compared to the embryonic heart, ACS specific activity was 14-fold higher on post-natal day 1 (P1). On P1, as compared to the fetus, only Acsl1 mRNA increased, whereas transcripts for the other Acsl isoforms remained the same, suggesting that ACSL1 is the major isoform responsible for activating long-chain FA for myocardial oxidation after birth. In contrast, the mRNA abundance of Acsl3 was highest on E16, and decreased dramatically by P7, suggesting that ACSL3 may play a critical role during the development of the fetal heart. Our data support the hypothesis that each ACSL has a specific role in the channeling of FA towards distinct metabolic fates.

  11. Rat long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase mRNA, protein, and activity vary in tissue distribution and in response to diet.

    PubMed

    Mashek, Douglas G; Li, Lei O; Coleman, Rosalind A

    2006-09-01

    Distinct isoforms of long-chain acyl-CoA synthetases (ACSLs) may partition fatty acids toward specific metabolic cellular pathways. For each of the five members of the rat ACSL family, we analyzed tissue mRNA distributions, and we correlated the mRNA, protein, and activity of ACSL1 and ACSL4 after fasting and refeeding a 69% sucrose diet. Not only did quantitative real-time PCR analyses reveal unique tissue expression patterns for each ACSL isoform, but expression varied markedly in different adipose depots. Fasting increased ACSL4 mRNA abundance in liver, muscle, and gonadal and inguinal adipose tissues, and refeeding decreased ACSL4 mRNA. A similar pattern was observed for ACSL1, but both fasting and refeeding decreased ACSL1 mRNA in gonadal adipose. Fasting also decreased ACSL3 and ACSL5 mRNAs in liver and ACSL6 mRNA in muscle. Surprisingly, in nearly every tissue measured, the effects of fasting and refeeding on the mRNA abundance of ACSL1 and ACSL4 were discordant with changes in protein abundance. These data suggest that the individual ACSL isoforms are distinctly regulated across tissues and show that mRNA expression may not provide useful information about isoform function. They further suggest that translational or posttranslational modifications are likely to contribute to the regulation of ACSL isoforms.

  12. A Novel Fatty Acyl-CoA Synthetase Is Required for Pollen Development and Sporopollenin Biosynthesis in Arabidopsis[C][W

    PubMed Central

    de Azevedo Souza, Clarice; Kim, Sung Soo; Koch, Stefanie; Kienow, Lucie; Schneider, Katja; McKim, Sarah M.; Haughn, George W.; Kombrink, Erich; Douglas, Carl J.

    2009-01-01

    Acyl-CoA Synthetase (ACOS) genes are related to 4-coumarate:CoA ligase (4CL) but have distinct functions. The Arabidopsis thaliana ACOS5 protein is in clade A of Arabidopsis ACOS proteins, the clade most closely related to 4CL proteins. This clade contains putative nonperoxisomal ACOS enzymes conserved in several angiosperm lineages and in the moss Physcomitrella patens. Although its function is unknown, ACOS5 is preferentially expressed in the flowers of all angiosperms examined. Here, we show that an acos5 mutant produced no pollen in mature anthers and no seeds by self-fertilization and was severely compromised in pollen wall formation apparently lacking sporopollenin or exine. The phenotype was first evident at stage 8 of anther development and correlated with maximum ACOS5 mRNA accumulation in tapetal cells at stages 7 to 8. Green fluorescent protein–ACOS5 fusions showed that ACOS5 is located in the cytoplasm. Recombinant ACOS5 enzyme was active against oleic acid, allowing kinetic constants for ACOS5 substrates to be established. Substrate competition assays indicated broad in vitro preference of the enzyme for medium-chain fatty acids. We propose that ACOS5 encodes an enzyme that participates in a conserved and ancient biochemical pathway required for sporopollenin monomer biosynthesis that may also include the Arabidopsis CYP703A2 and MS2 enzymes. PMID:19218397

  13. Involvement of acyl-CoA synthetase genes in n-alkane assimilation and fatty acid utilization in yeast Yarrowia lipolytica.

    PubMed

    Tenagy; Park, Jun Seok; Iwama, Ryo; Kobayashi, Satoshi; Ohta, Akinori; Horiuchi, Hiroyuki; Fukuda, Ryouichi

    2015-06-01

    Here, we investigated the roles of YAL1 (FAA1) and FAT1 encoding acyl-CoA synthetases (ACSs) and three additional orthologs of ACS genes FAT2-FAT4 of the yeast Yarrowia lipolytica in the assimilation or utilization of n-alkanes and fatty acids. ACS deletion mutants were generated to characterize their function. The FAT1 deletion mutant exhibited decreased growth on n-alkanes of 10-18 carbons, whereas the FAA1 mutant showed growth reduction on n-alkane of 16 carbons. However, FAT2-FAT4 deletion mutants did not show any growth defects, suggesting that FAT1 and FAA1 are involved in the activation of fatty acids produced during the metabolism of n-alkanes. In contrast, deletions of FAA1 and FAT1-FAT4 conferred no defect in growth on fatty acids. The wild-type strain grew in the presence of cerulenin, an inhibitor of fatty acid synthesis, by utilizing exogenously added fatty acid or fatty acid derived from n-alkane when oleic acid or n-alkane of 18 carbons was supplemented. However, the FAA1 deletion mutant did not grow, indicating a critical role for FAA1 in the utilization of fatty acids. Fluorescent microscopic observation and biochemical analyses suggested that Fat1p is present in the peroxisome and Faa1p is localized in the cytosol and to membranes.

  14. Protein tyrosine phosphatases regulate arachidonic acid release, StAR induction and steroidogenesis acting on a hormone-dependent arachidonic acid-preferring acyl-CoA synthetase.

    PubMed

    Cano, Florencia; Poderoso, Cecilia; Cornejo Maciel, Fabiana; Castilla, Rocío; Maloberti, Paula; Castillo, Fernanda; Neuman, Isabel; Paz, Cristina; Podestá, Ernesto J

    2006-06-01

    The activation of the rate-limiting step in steroid biosynthesis, that is the transport of cholesterol into the mitochondria, is dependent on PKA-mediated events triggered by hormones like ACTH and LH. Two of such events are the protein tyrosine dephosphorylation mediated by protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) and the release of arachidonic acid (AA) mediated by two enzymes, ACS4 (acyl-CoA synthetase 4) and Acot2 (mitochondrial thioesterase). ACTH and LH regulate the activity of PTPs and Acot2 and promote the induction of ACS4. Here we analyzed the involvement of PTPs on the expression of ACS4. We found that two PTP inhibitors, acting through different mechanisms, are both able to abrogate the hormonal effect on ACS4 induction. PTP inhibitors also reduce the effect of cAMP on steroidogenesis and on the level of StAR protein, which facilitates the access of cholesterol into the mitochondria. Moreover, our results indicate that exogenous AA is able to overcome the inhibition produced by PTP inhibitors on StAR protein level and steroidogenesis. Then, here we describe a link between PTP activity and AA release, since ACS4 induction is under the control of PTP activity, being a key event for AA release, StAR induction and steroidogenesis.

  15. COAs: Behind the Masks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birke, Szifra

    1993-01-01

    Provides information on alcoholism and codependency to help teachers identify and respond to children of alcoholics (COAs). Discusses characteristics of alcoholic homes and problems encountered by children and adult COAs. Examines survival "masks" of COAs, including hero, rebel, adjustor, clown, and caretaker. Lists organizational,…

  16. Distinct transcriptional regulation of long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase isoforms and cytosolic thioesterase 1 in the rodent heart by fatty acids and insulin.

    PubMed

    Durgan, David J; Smith, Justin K; Hotze, Margaret A; Egbejimi, Oluwaseun; Cuthbert, Karalyn D; Zaha, Vlad G; Dyck, Jason R B; Abel, E Dale; Young, Martin E

    2006-06-01

    The molecular mechanism(s) responsible for channeling long-chain fatty acids (LCFAs) into oxidative versus nonoxidative pathways is (are) poorly understood in the heart. Intracellular LCFAs are converted to long-chain fatty acyl-CoAs (LCFA-CoAs) by a family of long-chain acyl-CoA synthetases (ACSLs). Cytosolic thioesterase 1 (CTE1) hydrolyzes cytosolic LCFA-CoAs to LCFAs, generating a potential futile cycle at the expense of ATP utilization. We hypothesized that ACSL isoforms and CTE1 are differentially regulated in the heart during physiological and pathophysiological conditions. Using quantitative RT-PCR, we report that the five known acsl isoforms (acsl1, acsl3, acsl4, acsl5, and acsl6) and cte1 are expressed in whole rat and mouse hearts, as well as adult rat cardiomyocytes (ARCs). Streptozotocin-induced insulin-dependent diabetes (4 wk) and fasting (

  17. The functional interaction between Acyl-CoA synthetase 4, 5-lipooxygenase and cyclooxygenase-2 controls tumor growth: a novel therapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Orlando, Ulises D; Garona, Juan; Ripoll, Giselle V; Maloberti, Paula M; Solano, Ángela R; Avagnina, Alejandra; Gomez, Daniel E; Alonso, Daniel F; Podestá, Ernesto J

    2012-01-01

    The acyl-CoA synthetase 4 (ACSL4), which esterify mainly arachidonic acid (AA) into acyl-CoA, is increased in breast, colon and hepatocellular carcinoma. The transfection of MCF-7 cells with ACSL4 cDNA transforms the cells into a highly aggressive phenotype and controls both lipooxygenase-5 (LOX-5) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) metabolism of AA, suggesting a causal role of ACSL4 in tumorigenesis. We hypothesized that ACSL4, LOX-5 and COX-2 may constitute potential therapeutic targets for the control of tumor growth. Therefore, the aim of this study was to use a tetracycline Tet-Off system of MCF-7 xenograft model of breast cancer to confirm the effect of ACSL4 overexpression on tumor growth in vivo. We also aim to determine whether a combinatorial inhibition of the ACSL4-LOX-COX-2 pathway affects tumor growth in vivo using a xenograft model based on MDA-MB-231 cells, a highly aggressive breast cancer cell line naturally overexpressing ACSL4. The first novel finding is that stable transfection of MCF-7 cells with ACSL4 using the tetracycline Tet-Off system of MCF-7 cells resulted in development of growing tumors when injected into nude mice. Tumor xenograft development measured in animals that received doxycycline resulted in tumor growth inhibition. The tumors presented marked nuclear polymorphism, high mitotic index and low expression of estrogen and progesterone receptor. These results demonstrate the transformational capacity of ACSL4 overexpression. We examined the effect of a combination of inhibitors of ACSL4, LOX-5 and COX-2 on MDA-MB-231 tumor xenografts. This treatment markedly reduced tumor growth in doses of these inhibitors that were otherwise ineffective when used alone, indicating a synergistic effect of the compounds. Our results suggest that these enzymes interact functionally and form an integrated system that operates in a concerted manner to regulate tumor growth and consequently may be potential therapeutic targets for the control of

  18. An arachidonic acid-preferring acyl-CoA synthetase is a hormone-dependent and obligatory protein in the signal transduction pathway of steroidogenic hormones.

    PubMed

    Cornejo Maciel, Fabiana; Maloberti, Paula; Neuman, Isabel; Cano, Florencia; Castilla, Rocío; Castillo, Fernanda; Paz, Cristina; Podestá, Ernesto J

    2005-06-01

    We have described that, in adrenal and Leydig cells, the hormonal regulation of free arachidonic acid (AA) concentration is mediated by the concerted action of two enzymes: an acyl-CoA thioesterase (MTE-I or ARTISt) and an acyl-CoA synthetase (ACS4). In this study we analyzed the potential regulation of these proteins by hormonal action in steroidogenic cells. We demonstrated that ACS4 is rapidly induced by adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) and cAMP in Y1 adrenocortical cells. The hormone and its second messenger increased ACS4 protein levels in a time and concentration dependent way. Maximal concentration of ACTH (10 mIU/ml) produced a significant effect after 15 min of treatment and exerted the highest increase (3-fold) after 30 min. Moreover, (35)S-methionine incorporation showed that the increase in ACS4 protein levels is due to an increase in the de novo synthesis of the protein. On the contrary MTE-I protein levels in Y1 and MA-10 cells did not change after steroidogenic stimuli. In contrast with the effect observed on protein levels, stimulation of both cell lines did not change ACS4 RNA levels during the first hour of treatment, indicating that the effect of both stimuli is exerted at the level of ACS4 protein synthesis.StAR protein induction has a key role on the activation of steroidogenesis since this protein increases the rate of the limiting step of the whole process. In agreement with the fact that the inhibition of ACS4 activity by triacsin C blocks cAMP-stimulated progesterone production by MA-10 Leydig cells, here we demonstrated that ACS4 inhibition also reduces StAR protein levels. Moreover, exogenous AA was able to overcome the effect of triacsin C on both events, StAR induction and steroidogenesis. These results were confirmed by experiments using ACS4-targeted siRNA which result in a reduction in both ACS4 and StAR protein levels. The concomitant decrease in steroid production was overcome by the addition of AA to the knocked-out cells. In summary

  19. FAT/CD36 is located on the outer mitochondrial membrane, upstream of long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase, and regulates palmitate oxidation.

    PubMed

    Smith, Brennan K; Jain, Swati S; Rimbaud, Stéphanie; Dam, Aaron; Quadrilatero, Joe; Ventura-Clapier, Renée; Bonen, Arend; Holloway, Graham P

    2011-07-01

    FAT/CD36 (fatty acid translocase/Cluster of Differentiation 36), a plasma membrane fatty-acid transport protein, has been found on mitochondrial membranes; however, it remains unclear where FAT/CD36 resides on this organelle or its functional role within mitochondria. In the present study, we demonstrate, using several different approaches, that in skeletal muscle FAT/CD36 resides on the OMM (outer mitochondrial membrane). To determine the functional role of mitochondrial FAT/CD36 in this tissue, we determined oxygen consumption rates in permeabilized muscle fibres in WT (wild-type) and FAT/CD36-KO (knockout) mice using a variety of substrates. Despite comparable muscle mitochondrial content, as assessed by unaltered mtDNA (mitochondrial DNA), citrate synthase, β-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase, cytochrome c oxidase complex IV and respiratory capacities [maximal OXPHOS (oxidative phosphorylation) respiration] in WT and KO mice, palmitate-supported respiration was 34% lower in KO animals. In contrast, palmitoyl-CoA-supported respiration was unchanged. These results indicate that FAT/CD36 is key for palmitate-supported respiration. Therefore we propose a working model of mitochondrial fatty-acid transport, in which FAT/CD36 is positioned on the OMM, upstream of long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase, thereby contributing to the regulation of mitochondrial fatty-acid transport. We further support this model by providing evidence that FAT/CD36 is not located in mitochondrial contact sites, and therefore does not directly interact with carnitine palmitoyltransferase-I as original proposed.

  20. Long chain acyl-CoA synthetase-3 is a molecular target for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta in HepG2 hepatoma cells.

    PubMed

    Cao, Aiqin; Li, Hai; Zhou, Yue; Wu, Minhao; Liu, Jingwen

    2010-05-28

    ACSL3 is a member of the long chain acyl-CoA synthetase (ACSL) family that plays key roles in fatty acid metabolism in various tissues in an isozyme-specific manner. Our previous studies showed that ACSL3 was transcriptionally up-regulated by the cytokine oncostatin M (OSM) in HepG2 cells, accompanied by reduced cellular triglyceride content and enhanced beta-oxidation. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanism underlying the OSM-induced activation of ACSL3 gene transcription in HepG2 cells. We showed that OSM treatment resulted in a coordinated elevation of mRNA levels of ACSL3 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta (PPARdelta). The effect of OSM on ACSL3 mRNA expression was inhibited by cellular depletion of PPARdelta. By utilizing a PPARdelta agonist, L165041, we demonstrated that activation of PPARdelta led to increases in ACSL3 promoter activity, mRNA level, and protein level in HepG2 cells. Analysis of the ACSL3 promoter sequence identified two imperfect PPAR-responsive elements (PPRE) located in the ACSL3 promoter region -944 to -915, relative to the transcription start site. The up-regulation of ACSL3 promoter activity by PPARdelta was abolished by deletion of this PPRE-containing region or mutation to disrupt the binding sites. Direct interactions of PPARdelta with ACSL3-PPRE sequences were demonstrated by gel mobility shift and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. Finally, we provided in vivo evidence showing that activation of PPARdelta by L165041 in hamsters increased ACSL3 mRNA and protein levels in the liver. These new findings define ACSL3 as a novel molecular target of PPARdelta in HepG2 cells and provide a regulatory mechanism for ACSL3 transcription in liver tissue.

  1. Reduction of serum free fatty acids and triglycerides by liver-targeted expression of long chain acyl-CoA synthetase 3.

    PubMed

    Wu, Minhao; Cao, Aiqin; Dong, Bin; Liu, Jingwen

    2011-05-01

    ACSL3 is a member of the long chain acyl-CoA synthetase (ACSL) family that consists of 5 isozymes responsible for cellular fatty acid metabolism in various tissues in an isozyme-specific manner. Our previous studies have demonstrated that expression of ACSL3 mRNA and protein in liver was specifically increased after feeding hamsters with a fat- and cholesterol-enriched diet, providing the first in vivo evidence for the regulated expression of ACSL3 in liver tissue. The aim of the current study was to further investigate the role of ACSL3 in regulating hepatic lipid metabolism in vitro and in vivo. We utilized an adenoviral-mediated gene delivery approach to exogenously express hamster ACSL3 in hamster liver as well as in HepG2 cells. Transduction of HepG2 cells with Ad-hamACSL3 adenovirus elevated total cellular ACSL enzyme activity, which was accompanied by a significant reduction of cellular contents of triglycerides and total phospholipids. Immunostaining and confocal microscopy studies revealed that ACSL3 was localized to endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria. In vivo, infection of hamsters with Ad-hamACSL3 led to sustained expression of ACSL3 mRNA and protein in liver two weeks after infection. Importantly, compared with Ad-GFP control virus infected hamsters, we observed significantly lower free fatty acids and triglycerides plus modest reduction of phospholipids in the serum of Ad-hamACSL3 infected animals. Furthermore, triglyceride levels were significantly reduced in Ad-hamACSL3 infected hamster liver. Altogether, these results provide important and physiologically relevant evidence that strengthens the link between ACSL3 expression and hepatic reduction of triglycerides and fatty acids.

  2. High-fructose diet downregulates long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase 3 expression in liver of hamsters via impairing LXR/RXR signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Dong, Bin; Kan, Chin Fung Kelvin; Singh, Amar B; Liu, Jingwen

    2013-05-01

    Long-chain acyl-CoA synthetases (ACSL) play key roles in fatty acid metabolism in liver and other metabolic tissues in an isozyme-specific manner. In this study, we examined the effects of a fructose-enriched diet on expressions of ACSL isoforms in the liver of hamsters. We showed that the fructose diet markedly reduced the mRNA and protein expressions of ACSL3 in hamster liver without significant effects on other ACSLs. The decrease in ACSL3 abundance was accompanied by a reduction in ACSL-catalyzed synthesis of arachidonyl-CoA and oleoyl-CoA in liver homogenates of hamsters fed the fructose diet as opposed to normal diet. We further showed that fructose diet specifically reduced expressions of three key components of the LXR signaling pathway, namely, liver X receptor (LXR)α, LXRβ, and retinoid X receptor (RXR)β. Exogenous expression and activation of LXRα/β increased hamster ACSL3 promoter activities in a LXR-responsive element (LXRE)-dependent fashion. Finally, we showed that treating hamsters with LXR agonist GW3965 increased hepatic ACSL3 expression without affecting other ACSL isoforms. Furthermore, the ligand-induced increases of ACSL3 expression were accompanied with the reduction of hepatic triglyceride levels in GW3965-treated hamster liver. Altogether, our studies demonstrate that fructose diet has a negative impact on LXR signaling pathway in liver tissue and reduction of ACSL3 expression/activity could be a causal factor for fructose-induced hepatic steatosis.

  3. Functional interaction between acyl-CoA synthetase 4, lipooxygenases and cyclooxygenase-2 in the aggressive phenotype of breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Maloberti, Paula M; Duarte, Alejandra B; Orlando, Ulises D; Pasqualini, María E; Solano, Angela R; López-Otín, Carlos; Podestá, Ernesto J

    2010-11-11

    The acyl-CoA synthetase 4 (ACSL4) is increased in breast cancer, colon and hepatocellular carcinoma. ACSL4 mainly esterifies arachidonic acid (AA) into arachidonoyl-CoA, reducing free AA intracellular levels, which is in contradiction with the need for AA metabolites in tumorigenesis. Therefore, the causal role of ACSL4 is still not established. This study was undertaken to determine the role of ACSL4 in AA metabolic pathway in breast cancer cells. The first novel finding is that ACSL4 regulates the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and the production of prostaglandin in MDA-MB-231 cells. We also found that ACSL4 is significantly up-regulated in the highly aggressive MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. In terms of its overexpression and inhibition, ACSL4 plays a causal role in the control of the aggressive phenotype. These results were confirmed by the increase in the aggressive behaviour of MCF-7 cells stably transfected with a Tet-off ACSL4 vector. Concomitantly, another significant finding was that intramitochondrial AA levels are significantly higher in the aggressive cells. Thus, the esterification of AA by ACSL4 compartmentalizes the release of AA in mitochondria, a mechanism that serves to drive the specific lipooxygenase metabolization of the fatty acid. To our knowledge, this is the first report that ACSL4 expression controls both lipooxygenase and cyclooxygenase metabolism of AA. Thus, this functional interaction represents an integrated system that regulates the proliferating and metastatic potential of cancer cells. Therefore, the development of combinatory therapies that profit from the ACSL4, lipooxygenase and COX-2 synergistic action may allow for lower medication doses and avoidance of side effects.

  4. Insulin Signaling Regulates Fatty Acid Catabolism at the Level of CoA Activation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaojun; Gopalacharyulu, Peddinti; Seppänen-Laakso, Tuulikki; Ruskeepää, Anna-Liisa; Aye, Cho Cho; Carson, Brian P.; Mora, Silvia; Orešič, Matej; Teleman, Aurelio A.

    2012-01-01

    The insulin/IGF signaling pathway is a highly conserved regulator of metabolism in flies and mammals, regulating multiple physiological functions including lipid metabolism. Although insulin signaling is known to regulate the activity of a number of enzymes in metabolic pathways, a comprehensive understanding of how the insulin signaling pathway regulates metabolic pathways is still lacking. Accepted knowledge suggests the key regulated step in triglyceride (TAG) catabolism is the release of fatty acids from TAG via the action of lipases. We show here that an additional, important regulated step is the activation of fatty acids for beta-oxidation via Acyl Co-A synthetases (ACS). We identify pudgy as an ACS that is transcriptionally regulated by direct FOXO action in Drosophila. Increasing or reducing pudgy expression in vivo causes a decrease or increase in organismal TAG levels respectively, indicating that pudgy expression levels are important for proper lipid homeostasis. We show that multiple ACSs are also transcriptionally regulated by insulin signaling in mammalian cells. In sum, we identify fatty acid activation onto CoA as an important, regulated step in triglyceride catabolism, and we identify a mechanistic link through which insulin regulates lipid homeostasis. PMID:22275878

  5. Systematic Analysis of Gene Expression Alterations and Clinical Outcomes for Long-Chain Acyl-Coenzyme A Synthetase Family in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei-Ching; Wang, Chih-Yang; Hung, Yu-Hsuan; Weng, Tzu-Yang; Yen, Meng-Chi; Lai, Ming-Derg

    2016-01-01

    Dysregulated lipid metabolism contributes to cancer progression. Our previous study indicates that long-chain fatty acyl-Co A synthetase (ACSL) 3 is essential for lipid upregulation induced by endoplasmic reticulum stress. In this report, we aimed to identify the role of ACSL family in cancer with systematic analysis and in vitro experiment. We explored the ACSL expression using Oncomine database to determine the gene alteration during carcinogenesis and identified the association between ACSL expression and the survival of cancer patient using PrognoScan database. ACSL1 may play a potential oncogenic role in colorectal and breast cancer and play a potential tumor suppressor role in lung cancer. Co-expression analysis revealed that ACSL1 was coexpressed with MYBPH, PTPRE, PFKFB3, SOCS3 in colon cancer and with LRRFIP1, TSC22D1 in lung cancer. In accordance with PrognoScan analysis, downregulation of ACSL1 in colon and breast cancer cell line inhibited proliferation, migration, and anchorage-independent growth. In contrast, increase of oncogenic property was observed in lung cancer cell line by attenuating ACSL1. High ACSL3 expression predicted a better prognosis in ovarian cancer; in contrast, high ACSL3 predicted a worse prognosis in melanoma. ACSL3 was coexpressed with SNUPN, TRIP13, and SEMA5A in melanoma. High expression of ACSL4 predicted a worse prognosis in colorectal cancer, but predicted better prognosis in breast, brain and lung cancer. ACSL4 was coexpressed with SERPIN2, HNRNPCL1, ITIH2, PROCR, LRRFIP1. High expression of ACSL5 predicted good prognosis in breast, ovarian, and lung cancers. ACSL5 was coexpressed with TMEM140, TAPBPL, BIRC3, PTPRE, and SERPINB1. Low ACSL6 predicted a worse prognosis in acute myeloid leukemia. ACSL6 was coexpressed with SOX6 and DARC. Altogether, different members of ACSLs are implicated in diverse types of cancer development. ACSL-coexpressed molecules may be used to further investigate the role of ACSL family in

  6. Systematic Analysis of Gene Expression Alterations and Clinical Outcomes for Long-Chain Acyl-Coenzyme A Synthetase Family in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Ching; Wang, Chih-Yang; Hung, Yu-Hsuan; Weng, Tzu-Yang; Yen, Meng-Chi; Lai, Ming-Derg

    2016-01-01

    Dysregulated lipid metabolism contributes to cancer progression. Our previous study indicates that long-chain fatty acyl-Co A synthetase (ACSL) 3 is essential for lipid upregulation induced by endoplasmic reticulum stress. In this report, we aimed to identify the role of ACSL family in cancer with systematic analysis and in vitro experiment. We explored the ACSL expression using Oncomine database to determine the gene alteration during carcinogenesis and identified the association between ACSL expression and the survival of cancer patient using PrognoScan database. ACSL1 may play a potential oncogenic role in colorectal and breast cancer and play a potential tumor suppressor role in lung cancer. Co-expression analysis revealed that ACSL1 was coexpressed with MYBPH, PTPRE, PFKFB3, SOCS3 in colon cancer and with LRRFIP1, TSC22D1 in lung cancer. In accordance with PrognoScan analysis, downregulation of ACSL1 in colon and breast cancer cell line inhibited proliferation, migration, and anchorage-independent growth. In contrast, increase of oncogenic property was observed in lung cancer cell line by attenuating ACSL1. High ACSL3 expression predicted a better prognosis in ovarian cancer; in contrast, high ACSL3 predicted a worse prognosis in melanoma. ACSL3 was coexpressed with SNUPN, TRIP13, and SEMA5A in melanoma. High expression of ACSL4 predicted a worse prognosis in colorectal cancer, but predicted better prognosis in breast, brain and lung cancer. ACSL4 was coexpressed with SERPIN2, HNRNPCL1, ITIH2, PROCR, LRRFIP1. High expression of ACSL5 predicted good prognosis in breast, ovarian, and lung cancers. ACSL5 was coexpressed with TMEM140, TAPBPL, BIRC3, PTPRE, and SERPINB1. Low ACSL6 predicted a worse prognosis in acute myeloid leukemia. ACSL6 was coexpressed with SOX6 and DARC. Altogether, different members of ACSLs are implicated in diverse types of cancer development. ACSL-coexpressed molecules may be used to further investigate the role of ACSL family in

  7. A Hybrid Non-Ribosomal Peptide/Polyketide Synthetase Containing Fatty-Acyl Ligase (FAAL) Synthesizes the β-Amino Fatty Acid Lipopeptides Puwainaphycins in the Cyanobacterium Cylindrospermum alatosporum

    PubMed Central

    Mareš, Jan; Hájek, Jan; Urajová, Petra; Kopecký, Jiří; Hrouzek, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    A putative operon encoding the biosynthetic pathway for the cytotoxic cyanobacterial lipopeptides puwainphycins was identified in Cylindrospermum alatosporum. Bioinformatics analysis enabled sequential prediction of puwainaphycin biosynthesis; this process is initiated by the activation of a fatty acid residue via fatty acyl-AMP ligase and continued by a multidomain non-ribosomal peptide synthetase/polyketide synthetase. High-resolution mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy measurements proved the production of puwainaphycin F/G congeners differing in FA chain length formed by either 3-amino-2-hydroxy-4-methyl dodecanoic acid (4-methyl-Ahdoa) or 3-amino-2-hydroxy-4-methyl tetradecanoic acid (4-methyl-Ahtea). Because only one puwainaphycin operon was recovered in the genome, we suggest that the fatty acyl-AMP ligase and one of the amino acid adenylation domains (Asn/Gln) show extended substrate specificity. Our results provide the first insight into the biosynthesis of frequently occurring β-amino fatty acid lipopeptides in cyanobacteria, which may facilitate analytical assessment and development of monitoring tools for cytotoxic cyanobacterial lipopeptides. PMID:25369527

  8. SREBP2 Activation Induces Hepatic Long-chain Acyl-CoA Synthetase 1 (ACSL1) Expression in Vivo and in Vitro through a Sterol Regulatory Element (SRE) Motif of the ACSL1 C-promoter.

    PubMed

    Singh, Amar Bahadur; Kan, Chin Fung Kelvin; Dong, Bin; Liu, Jingwen

    2016-03-04

    Long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase 1 (ACSL1) plays a key role in fatty acid metabolism. To identify novel transcriptional modulators of ACSL1, we examined ACSL1 expression in liver tissues of hamsters fed a normal diet, a high fat diet, or a high cholesterol and high fat diet (HCHFD). Feeding hamsters HCHFD markedly reduced hepatic Acsl1 mRNA and protein levels as well as acyl-CoA synthetase activity. Decreases in Acsl1 expression strongly correlated with reductions in hepatic Srebp2 mRNA level and mature Srebp2 protein abundance. Conversely, administration of rosuvastatin (RSV) to hamsters increased hepatic Acsl1 expression. These new findings were reproduced in mice treated with RSV or fed the HCHFD. Furthermore, the RSV induction of acyl-CoA activity in mouse liver resulted in increases in plasma and hepatic cholesterol ester concentrations and reductions in free cholesterol amounts. Investigations on different ACSL1 transcript variants in HepG2 cells revealed that the mRNA expression of C-ACSL1 was specifically regulated by the sterol regulatory element (SRE)-binding protein (SREBP) pathway, and RSV treatment increased the C-ACSL1 abundance from a minor mRNA species to an abundant transcript. We analyzed 5'-flanking sequence of exon 1C of the human ACSL1 gene and identified one putative SRE site. By performing a promoter activity assay and DNA binding assays, we firmly demonstrated the key role of this SRE motif in SREBP2-mediated activation of C-ACSL1 gene transcription. Finally, we demonstrated that knockdown of endogenous SREBP2 in HepG2 cells lowered ACSL1 mRNA and protein levels. Altogether, this work discovered an unprecedented link between ACSL1 and SREBP2 via the specific regulation of the C-ACSL1 transcript.

  9. SREBP2 Activation Induces Hepatic Long-chain Acyl-CoA Synthetase 1 (ACSL1) Expression in Vivo and in Vitro through a Sterol Regulatory Element (SRE) Motif of the ACSL1 C-promoter*

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Amar Bahadur; Kan, Chin Fung Kelvin; Dong, Bin; Liu, Jingwen

    2016-01-01

    Long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase 1 (ACSL1) plays a key role in fatty acid metabolism. To identify novel transcriptional modulators of ACSL1, we examined ACSL1 expression in liver tissues of hamsters fed a normal diet, a high fat diet, or a high cholesterol and high fat diet (HCHFD). Feeding hamsters HCHFD markedly reduced hepatic Acsl1 mRNA and protein levels as well as acyl-CoA synthetase activity. Decreases in Acsl1 expression strongly correlated with reductions in hepatic Srebp2 mRNA level and mature Srebp2 protein abundance. Conversely, administration of rosuvastatin (RSV) to hamsters increased hepatic Acsl1 expression. These new findings were reproduced in mice treated with RSV or fed the HCHFD. Furthermore, the RSV induction of acyl-CoA activity in mouse liver resulted in increases in plasma and hepatic cholesterol ester concentrations and reductions in free cholesterol amounts. Investigations on different ACSL1 transcript variants in HepG2 cells revealed that the mRNA expression of C-ACSL1 was specifically regulated by the sterol regulatory element (SRE)-binding protein (SREBP) pathway, and RSV treatment increased the C-ACSL1 abundance from a minor mRNA species to an abundant transcript. We analyzed 5′-flanking sequence of exon 1C of the human ACSL1 gene and identified one putative SRE site. By performing a promoter activity assay and DNA binding assays, we firmly demonstrated the key role of this SRE motif in SREBP2-mediated activation of C-ACSL1 gene transcription. Finally, we demonstrated that knockdown of endogenous SREBP2 in HepG2 cells lowered ACSL1 mRNA and protein levels. Altogether, this work discovered an unprecedented link between ACSL1 and SREBP2 via the specific regulation of the C-ACSL1 transcript. PMID:26728456

  10. The structure of S . lividans acetoacetyl-CoA synthetase shows a novel interaction between the C-terminal extension and the N-terminal domain

    DOE PAGES

    Mitchell, Carter A.; Tucker, Alex C.; Escalante-Semerena, Jorge C.; ...

    2014-12-09

    The adenosine monoposphate-forming acyl-CoA synthetase enzymes catalyze a two-step reaction that involves the initial formation of an acyl adenylate that reacts in a second partial reaction to form a thioester between the acyl substrate and CoA. These enzymes utilize a Domain Alternation catalytic mechanism, whereby a ~110 residue C-terminal domain rotates by 140° to form distinct catalytic conformations for the two partial reactions. In this paper, the structure of an acetoacetyl-CoA synthetase (AacS) is presented that illustrates a novel aspect of this C-terminal domain. Specifically, several acetyl- and acetoacetyl-CoA synthetases contain a 30-residue extension on the C-terminus compared to othermore » members of this family. Finally, whereas residues from this extension are disordered in prior structures, the AacS structure shows that residues from this extension may interact with key catalytic residues from the N-terminal domain.« less

  11. Role of 4-Hydroxybutyrate-CoA Synthetase in the CO2 Fixation Cycle in Thermoacidophilic Archaea

    SciTech Connect

    Hawkins, AS; Han, YJ; Bennett, RK; Adams, MWW; Kelly, RM

    2013-02-08

    Metallosphaera sedula is an extremely thermoacidophilic archaeon that grows heterotrophically on peptides and chemolithoautotrophically on hydrogen, sulfur, or reduced metals as energy sources. During autotrophic growth, carbon dioxide is incorporated into cellular carbon via the 3-hydroxypropionate/4-hydroxybutyrate cycle (3HP/4HB). To date, all of the steps in the pathway have been connected to enzymes encoded in specific genes, except for the one responsible for ligation of coenzyme A (CoA) to 4HB. Although several candidates for this step have been identified through bioinformatic analysis of the M. sedula genome, none have been shown to catalyze this biotransformation. In this report, transcriptomic analysis of cells grown under strict H-2-CO2 autotrophy was consistent with the involvement of Msed_0406 and Msed_0394. Recombinant versions of these enzymes catalyzed the ligation of CoA to 4HB, with similar affinities for 4HB (K-m values of 1.9 and 1.5 mM for Msed_0406 and Msed_0394, respectively) but with different rates (1.69 and 0.22 mu mol x min(-1) x mg(-1) for Msed_0406 and Msed_0394, respectively). Neither Msed_0406 nor Msed_0394 have close homologs in other Sulfolobales, although low sequence similarity is not unusual for acyl-adenylate-forming enzymes. The capacity of these two enzymes to use 4HB as a substrate may have arisen from simple modifications to acyl-adenylate-forming enzymes. For example, a single amino acid substitution (W424G) in the active site of the acetate/propionate synthetase (Msed_1353), an enzyme that is highly conserved among the Sulfolobales, changed its substrate specificity to include 4HB. The identification of the 4-HB CoA synthetase now completes the set of enzymes comprising the 3HP/4HB cycle.

  12. Purification of Pseudomonas putida acyl coenzyme A ligase active with a range of aliphatic and aromatic substrates.

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Valverde, M; Reglero, A; Martinez-Blanco, H; Luengo, J M

    1993-01-01

    Acyl coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) ligase (acyl-CoA synthetase [ACoAS]) from Pseudomonas putida U was purified to homogeneity (252-fold) after this bacterium was grown in a chemically defined medium containing octanoic acid as the sole carbon source. The enzyme, which has a mass of 67 kDa, showed maximal activity at 40 degrees C in 10 mM K2PO4H-NaPO4H2 buffer (pH 7.0) containing 20% (wt/vol) glycerol. Under these conditions, ACoAS showed hyperbolic behavior against acetate, CoA, and ATP; the Kms calculated for these substrates were 4.0, 0.7, and 5.2 mM, respectively. Acyl-CoA ligase recognizes several aliphatic molecules (acetic, propionic, butyric, valeric, hexanoic, heptanoic, and octanoic acids) as substrates, as well as some aromatic compounds (phenylacetic and phenoxyacetic acids). The broad substrate specificity of ACoAS from P. putida was confirmed by coupling it with acyl-CoA:6-aminopenicillanic acid acyltransferase from Penicillium chrysogenum to study the formation of several penicillins. Images PMID:8476289

  13. Reversible Nε-Lysine Acetylation Regulates the Activity of Acyl-CoA Synthetases Involved in Anaerobic Benzoate Catabolism in Rhodopseudomonas palustris

    PubMed Central

    Crosby, Heidi A.; Heiniger, Erin K.; Harwood, Caroline S.; Escalante-Semerena, Jorge C.

    2010-01-01

    Rhodopseudomonas palustris grows photoheterotrophically on aromatic compounds available in aquatic environments rich in plant-derived lignin. Benzoate degradation is regulated at the transcriptional level in R. palustris in response to anoxia and the presence of benzoate and/or benzoyl-CoA (Bz-CoA). Here, we report evidence that anaerobic benzoate catabolism in this bacterium is also regulated at the posttranslational level. In this pathway, benzoate is activated to Bz-CoA by the AMP-forming Bz-CoA synthetase (BadA) enzyme. Mass spectrometry and mutational analysis data indicate that residue Lys512 is critical to BadA activity. Acetylation of Lys512 inactivated BadA; deacetylation reactivated BadA. Likewise, 4-hydroxybenzoyl-CoA (HbaA) and cyclohexanecarboxyl-CoA (AliA) synthetases were also reversibly acetylated. We identified one acetyltransferase that modified BadA, Hba, and AliA in vitro. The acetyltransferase enzyme is homologous to the protein acetyltransferase (Pat) enzyme of Salmonella enterica sv Typhimurium LT2, thus we refer to it as RpPat. RpPat also modified acetyl-CoA (Ac-CoA) synthetase (Acs) from R. palustris. In vivo data indicate that at least two deacetylases reactivate BadAAc. One is SrtN (encoded by srtN, formerly rpa2524), a sirtuin-type NAD+-dependent deacetylase (O-acetyl-ADP-ribose-forming); the other deacetylase is LdaA (encoded by ldaA, for lysine deacetylase A; formerly rpa0954), an acetate-forming protein deacetylase. LdaA reactivated HbaAc and AliAAc in vitro. PMID:20345662

  14. Synthesis of coenzyme A thioesters using methyl acyl phosphates in an aqueous medium.

    PubMed

    Pal, Mohan; Bearne, Stephen L

    2014-12-28

    Regioselective S-acylation of coenzyme A (CoA) is achieved under aqueous conditions using various aliphatic and aromatic carboxylic acids activated as their methyl acyl phosphate monoesters. Unlike many hydrophobic activating groups, the anionic methyl acyl phosphate mixed anhydride is more compatible with aqueous solvents, making it useful for conducting acylation reactions in an aqueous medium.

  15. dAcsl, the Drosophila ortholog of acyl-CoA synthetase long-chain family member 3 and 4, inhibits synapse growth by attenuating bone morphogenetic protein signaling via endocytic recycling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhihua; Huang, Yan; Hu, Wen; Huang, Sheng; Wang, Qifu; Han, Junhai; Zhang, Yong Q

    2014-02-19

    Fatty acid metabolism plays an important role in brain development and function. Mutations in acyl-CoA synthetase long-chain family member 4 (ACSL4), which converts long-chain fatty acids to acyl-CoAs, result in nonsyndromic X-linked mental retardation. ACSL4 is highly expressed in the hippocampus, a structure critical for learning and memory. However, the underlying mechanism by which mutations of ACSL4 lead to mental retardation remains poorly understood. We report here that dAcsl, the Drosophila ortholog of ACSL4 and ACSL3, inhibits synaptic growth by attenuating BMP signaling, a major growth-promoting pathway at neuromuscular junction (NMJ) synapses. Specifically, dAcsl mutants exhibited NMJ overgrowth that was suppressed by reducing the doses of the BMP pathway components, accompanied by increased levels of activated BMP receptor Thickveins (Tkv) and phosphorylated mothers against decapentaplegic (Mad), the effector of the BMP signaling at NMJ terminals. In addition, Rab11, a small GTPase involved in endosomal recycling, was mislocalized in dAcsl mutant NMJs, and the membrane association of Rab11 was reduced in dAcsl mutant brains. Consistently, the BMP receptor Tkv accumulated in early endosomes but reduced in recycling endosomes in dAcsl mutant NMJs. dAcsl was also required for the recycling of photoreceptor rhodopsin in the eyes, implying a general role for dAcsl in regulating endocytic recycling of membrane receptors. Importantly, expression of human ACSL4 rescued the endocytic trafficking and NMJ phenotypes of dAcsl mutants. Together, our results reveal a novel mechanism whereby dAcsl facilitates Rab11-dependent receptor recycling and provide insights into the pathogenesis of ACSL4-related mental retardation.

  16. Rosiglitazone Inhibits Acyl-CoA Synthetase Activity and Fatty Acid Partitioning to Diacylglycerol and Triacylglycerol via a Peroxisome Proliferator–Activated Receptor-γ–Independent Mechanism in Human Arterial Smooth Muscle Cells and Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Askari, Bardia; Kanter, Jenny E.; Sherrid, Ashley M.; Golej, Deidre L.; Bender, Andrew T.; Liu, Joey; Hsueh, Willa A.; Beavo, Joseph A.; Coleman, Rosalind A.; Bornfeldt, Karin E.

    2010-01-01

    Rosiglitazone is an insulin-sensitizing agent that has recently been shown to exert beneficial effects on atherosclerosis. In addition to peroxisome proliferator–activated receptor (PPAR)-γ, rosiglitazone can affect other targets, such as directly inhibiting recombinant long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase (ACSL)-4 activity. Because it is unknown if ACSL4 is expressed in vascular cells involved in atherosclerosis, we investigated the ability of rosiglitazone to inhibit ACSL activity and fatty acid partitioning in human and murine arterial smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and macrophages. Human and murine SMCs and human macrophages expressed Acsl4, and rosiglitazone inhibited Acsl activity in these cells. Furthermore, rosiglitazone acutely inhibited partitioning of fatty acids into phospholipids in human SMCs and inhibited fatty acid partitioning into diacylglycerol and triacylglycerol in human SMCs and macrophages through a PPAR-γ–independent mechanism. Conversely, murine macrophages did not express ACSL4, and rosiglitazone did not inhibit ACSL activity in these cells, nor did it affect acute fatty acid partitioning into cellular lipids. Thus, rosiglitazone inhibits ACSL activity and fatty acid partitioning in human and murine SMCs and in human macrophages through a PPAR-γ–independent mechanism likely to be mediated by ACSL4 inhibition. Therefore, rosiglitazone might alter the biological effects of fatty acids in these cells and in atherosclerosis. PMID:17259370

  17. Biochemical and Crystallographic Analysis of Substrate Binding and Conformational Changes in Acetyl-CoA Synthetase

    SciTech Connect

    Reger,A.; Carney, J.; Gulick, A.

    2007-01-01

    The adenylate-forming enzymes, including acyl-CoA synthetases, the adenylation domains of non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS), and firefly luciferase, perform two half-reactions in a ping-pong mechanism. We have proposed a domain alternation mechanism for these enzymes whereby, upon completion of the initial adenylation reaction, the C-terminal domain of these enzymes undergoes a 140{sup o} rotation to perform the second thioester-forming half-reaction. Structural and kinetic data of mutant enzymes support this hypothesis. We present here mutations to Salmonella enterica acetyl-CoA synthetase (Acs) and test the ability of the enzymes to catalyze the complete reaction and the adenylation half-reaction. Substitution of Lys609 with alanine results in an enzyme that is unable to catalyze the adenylate reaction, while the Gly524 to leucine substitution is unable to catalyze the complete reaction yet catalyzes the adenylation half-reaction with activity comparable to the wild-type enzyme. The positions of these two residues, which are located on the mobile C-terminal domain, strongly support the domain alternation hypothesis. We also present steady-state kinetic data of putative substrate-binding residues and demonstrate that no single residue plays a dominant role in dictating CoA binding. We have also created two mutations in the active site to alter the acyl substrate specificity. Finally, the crystallographic structures of wild-type Acs and mutants R194A, R584A, R584E, K609A, and V386A are presented to support the biochemical analysis.

  18. Biosynthesis of amphi-enterobactin siderophores by Vibrio harveyi BAA-1116: identification of a bifunctional nonribosomal peptide synthetase condensation domain.

    PubMed

    Zane, Hannah K; Naka, Hiroaki; Rosconi, Federico; Sandy, Moriah; Haygood, Margo G; Butler, Alison

    2014-04-16

    The genome of Vibrio harveyi BAA-1116 contains a nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) gene cluster (aebA-F) resembling that for enterobactin, yet enterobactin is not produced. A gene predicted to encode a long-chain fatty acid CoA ligase (FACL), similar to enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of acyl peptides, resides 15 kb away from the putative enterobactin-like biosynthetic gene cluster (aebG). The proximity of this FACL gene to the enterobactin-like synthetase suggested that V. harveyi may produce amphiphilic enterobactin-like siderophores. Extraction of the bacterial cell pellet of V. harveyi led to the isolation and structure determination of a suite of eight amphi-enterobactin siderophores composed of the cyclic lactone of tris-2,3-dihydroxybenzoyl-L-serine and acyl-L-serine. The FACL knockout mutant, ΔaebG V. harveyi, and the NRPS knockout mutant, ΔaebF V. harveyi, do not produce amphi-enterobactins. The amphi-enterobactin biosynthetic machinery was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli and reconstituted in vitro, demonstrating the condensation domain of AebF has unique activity, catalyzing two distinct condensation reactions.

  19. Acyl substrate preferences of an IAA-amido synthetase account for variations in grape (Vitis vinifera L.) berry ripening caused by different auxinic compounds indicating the importance of auxin conjugation in plant development.

    PubMed

    Böttcher, Christine; Boss, Paul K; Davies, Christopher

    2011-08-01

    Nine Gretchen Hagen (GH3) genes were identified in grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.) and six of these were predicted on the basis of protein sequence similarity to act as indole-3-acetic acid (IAA)-amido synthetases. The activity of these enzymes is thought to be important in controlling free IAA levels and one auxin-inducible grapevine GH3 protein, GH3-1, has previously been implicated in the berry ripening process. Ex planta assays showed that the expression of only one other GH3 gene, GH3-2, increased following the treatment of grape berries with auxinic compounds. One of these was the naturally occurring IAA and the other two were synthetic, α-naphthalene acetic acid (NAA) and benzothiazole-2-oxyacetic acid (BTOA). The determination of steady-state kinetic parameters for the recombinant GH3-1 and GH3-2 proteins revealed that both enzymes efficiently conjugated aspartic acid (Asp) to IAA and less well to NAA, while BTOA was a poor substrate. GH3-2 gene expression was induced by IAA treatment of pre-ripening berries with an associated increase in levels of IAA-Asp and a decrease in free IAA levels. This indicates that GH3-2 responded to excess auxin to maintain low levels of free IAA. Grape berry ripening was not affected by IAA application prior to veraison (ripening onset) but was considerably delayed by NAA and even more so by BTOA. The differential effects of the three auxinic compounds on berry ripening can therefore be explained by the induction and acyl substrate specificity of GH3-2. These results further indicate an important role for GH3 proteins in controlling auxin-related plant developmental processes.

  20. Acyl-CoA synthetase-4, a new regulator of mTOR and a potential therapeutic target for enhanced estrogen receptor function in receptor-positive and -negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dattilo, Melina A.; Solano, Angela R.; Maloberti, Paula M.; Podesta, Ernesto J.

    2015-01-01

    Although the role of acyl-CoA synthetase 4 (ACSL4) in mediating an aggressive phenotype is well accepted, there is little evidence as to the early steps through which ACSL4 increases tumor growth and progression. In this study, and by means of the stable transfection of MCF-7 cells with ACSL4 using the tetracycline Tet-Off system (MCF-7 Tet-Off/ACSL4), we identify the mTOR pathway as one of the main specific signatures of ACSL4 expression and demonstrate the partial involvement of the lipoxygenase pathway in the activation of mTOR. The specificity of ACSL4 action on mTOR signaling is also determined by doxycycline inhibition of ACSL4 expression in MCF-7 Tet-Off/ACSL4 cells, by the expression of ACSL4 in the non-aggressive T47D breast cancer cell line and by knocking down this enzyme expression in the MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells, which constitutively express ACSL4. ACSL4 regulates components of the two complexes of the mTOR pathway (mTORC1/2), along with upstream regulators and substrates. We show that mTOR inhibitor rapamycin and ACSL4 inhibitor rosiglitazone can act in combination to inhibit cell growth. In addition, we demonstrate a synergistic effect on cell growth inhibition by the combination of rosiglitazone and tamoxifen, an estrogen receptor α (ERα) inhibitor. Remarkably, this synergistic effect is also evident in the triple negative MDA-MB-231 cells in vitro and in vivo. These results suggest that ACSL4 could be a target to restore tumor hormone dependence in tumors with poor prognosis for disease-free and overall survival, in which no effective specifically targeted therapy is readily available. PMID:26536660

  1. Acyl-CoA synthetase-4, a new regulator of mTOR and a potential therapeutic target for enhanced estrogen receptor function in receptor-positive and -negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Orlando, Ulises D; Castillo, Ana F; Dattilo, Melina A; Solano, Angela R; Maloberti, Paula M; Podesta, Ernesto J

    2015-12-15

    Although the role of acyl-CoA synthetase 4 (ACSL4) in mediating an aggressive phenotype is well accepted, there is little evidence as to the early steps through which ACSL4 increases tumor growth and progression. In this study, and by means of the stable transfection of MCF-7 cells with ACSL4 using the tetracycline Tet-Off system (MCF-7 Tet-Off/ACSL4), we identify the mTOR pathway as one of the main specific signatures of ACSL4 expression and demonstrate the partial involvement of the lipoxygenase pathway in the activation of mTOR. The specificity of ACSL4 action on mTOR signaling is also determined by doxycycline inhibition of ACSL4 expression in MCF-7 Tet-Off/ACSL4 cells, by the expression of ACSL4 in the non-aggressive T47D breast cancer cell line and by knocking down this enzyme expression in the MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells, which constitutively express ACSL4. ACSL4 regulates components of the two complexes of the mTOR pathway (mTORC1/2), along with upstream regulators and substrates.We show that mTOR inhibitor rapamycin and ACSL4 inhibitor rosiglitazone can act in combination to inhibit cell growth. In addition, we demonstrate a synergistic effect on cell growth inhibition by the combination of rosiglitazone and tamoxifen, an estrogen receptor α (ERα) inhibitor. Remarkably, this synergistic effect is also evident in the triple negative MDA-MB-231 cells in vitro and in vivo.These results suggest that ACSL4 could be a target to restore tumor hormone dependence in tumors with poor prognosis for disease-free and overall survival, in which no effective specifically targeted therapy is readily available.

  2. Acyl substrate preferences of an IAA-amido synthetase account for variations in grape (Vitis vinifera L.) berry ripening caused by different auxinic compounds indicating the importance of auxin conjugation in plant development

    PubMed Central

    Böttcher, Christine; Boss, Paul K.; Davies, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    Nine Gretchen Hagen (GH3) genes were identified in grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.) and six of these were predicted on the basis of protein sequence similarity to act as indole-3-acetic acid (IAA)-amido synthetases. The activity of these enzymes is thought to be important in controlling free IAA levels and one auxin-inducible grapevine GH3 protein, GH3-1, has previously been implicated in the berry ripening process. Ex planta assays showed that the expression of only one other GH3 gene, GH3-2, increased following the treatment of grape berries with auxinic compounds. One of these was the naturally occurring IAA and the other two were synthetic, α-naphthalene acetic acid (NAA) and benzothiazole-2-oxyacetic acid (BTOA). The determination of steady-state kinetic parameters for the recombinant GH3-1 and GH3-2 proteins revealed that both enzymes efficiently conjugated aspartic acid (Asp) to IAA and less well to NAA, while BTOA was a poor substrate. GH3-2 gene expression was induced by IAA treatment of pre-ripening berries with an associated increase in levels of IAA-Asp and a decrease in free IAA levels. This indicates that GH3-2 responded to excess auxin to maintain low levels of free IAA. Grape berry ripening was not affected by IAA application prior to veraison (ripening onset) but was considerably delayed by NAA and even more so by BTOA. The differential effects of the three auxinic compounds on berry ripening can therefore be explained by the induction and acyl substrate specificity of GH3-2. These results further indicate an important role for GH3 proteins in controlling auxin-related plant developmental processes. PMID:21543520

  3. Identification of a novel CoA synthase isoform, which is primarily expressed in Brain

    SciTech Connect

    Nemazanyy, Ivan . E-mail: nemazanyy@imbg.org.ua; Panasyuk, Ganna; Breus, Oksana; Zhyvoloup, Alexander; Filonenko, Valeriy; Gout, Ivan T. . E-mail: i.gout@ucl.ac.uk

    2006-03-24

    CoA and its derivatives Acetyl-CoA and Acyl-CoA are important players in cellular metabolism and signal transduction. CoA synthase is a bifunctional enzyme which mediates the final stages of CoA biosynthesis. In previous studies, we have reported molecular cloning, biochemical characterization, and subcellular localization of CoA synthase (CoASy). Here, we describe the existence of a novel CoA synthase isoform, which is the product of alternative splicing and possesses a 29aa extension at the N-terminus. We termed it CoASy {beta} and originally identified CoA synthase, CoASy {alpha}. The transcript specific for CoASy {beta} was identified by electronic screening and by RT-PCR analysis of various rat tissues. The existence of this novel isoform was further confirmed by immunoblot analysis with antibodies directed to the N-terminal peptide of CoASy {beta}. In contrast to CoASy {alpha}, which shows ubiquitous expression, CoASy {beta} is primarily expressed in Brain. Using confocal microscopy, we demonstrated that both isoforms are localized on mitochondria. The N-terminal extension does not affect the activity of CoA synthase, but possesses a proline-rich sequence which can bring the enzyme into complexes with signalling proteins containing SH3 or WW domains. The role of this novel isoform in CoA biosynthesis, especially in Brain, requires further elucidation.

  4. Characterization of the "Escherichia Coli" Acyl Carrier Protein Phosphodiesterase

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    Acyl carrier protein (ACP) is a small essential protein that functions as a carrier of the acyl intermediates of fatty acid synthesis. ACP requires the posttranslational attachment of a 4'phosphopantetheine functional group, derived from CoA, in order to perform its metabolic function. A Mn[superscript 2+] dependent enzymatic activity that removes…

  5. Subcellular relocalization of a long-chain fatty acid CoA ligase by a suppressor mutation alleviates a respiration deficiency in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Harington, A; Schwarz, E; Slonimski, P P; Herbert, C J

    1994-01-01

    We have isolated an extragenic suppressor, FAM1-1, which is able to restore respiratory growth to a deletion of the CEM1 gene (mitochondrial beta-keto-acyl synthase). The sequence of the suppressor strongly suggests that it encodes a long-chain fatty acid CoA ligase (fatty-acyl-CoA synthetase). We have also cloned and sequenced the wild-type FAM1 gene, which is devoid of suppressor activity. The comparison of the two sequences shows that the suppressor mutation is an A-->T transversion, which creates a new initiation codon and adds 18 amino acids to the N-terminus of the protein. This extension has all the characteristics of a mitochondrial targeting sequence, whilst the N-terminus of the wild-type protein has none of these characteristics. In vitro mitochondrial import experiments show that the N-terminal half of the suppressor protein, but not of the wild-type, is transported into mitochondria. Thus, we hypothesize that the suppressor acts by changing the subcellular localization of the protein and relocating at least some of the enzyme from the cytosol to the mitochondria. These results support the hypothesis that some form of fatty acid synthesis, specific for the mitochondria, is essential for the function of the organelle. Images PMID:7988550

  6. The Acyl Desaturase CER17 Is Involved in Producing Wax Unsaturated Primary Alcohols and Cutin Monomers.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xianpeng; Zhao, Huayan; Kosma, Dylan K; Tomasi, Pernell; Dyer, John M; Li, Rongjun; Liu, Xiulin; Wang, Zhouya; Parsons, Eugene P; Jenks, Matthew A; Lü, Shiyou

    2017-02-01

    We report n-6 monounsaturated primary alcohols (C26:1, C28:1, and C30:1 homologs) in the cuticular waxes of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) inflorescence stem, a class of wax not previously reported in Arabidopsis. The Arabidopsis cer17 mutant was completely deficient in these monounsaturated alcohols, and CER17 was found to encode a predicted ACYL-COENZYME A DESATURASE LIKE4 (ADS4). Studies of the Arabidopsis cer4 mutant and yeast variously expressing CER4 (a predicted fatty acyl-CoA reductase) with CER17/ADS4, demonstrated CER4's principal role in synthesis of these monounsaturated alcohols. Besides unsaturated alcohol deficiency, cer17 mutants exhibited a thickened and irregular cuticle ultrastructure and increased amounts of cutin monomers. Although unsaturated alcohols were absent throughout the cer17 stem, the mutation's effects on cutin monomers and cuticle ultrastructure were much more severe in distal than basal stems, consistent with observations that the CER17/ADS4 transcript was much more abundant in distal than basal stems. Furthermore, distal but not basal stems of a double mutant deficient for both CER17/ADS4 and LONG-CHAIN ACYL-COA SYNTHETASE1 produced even more cutin monomers and a thicker and more disorganized cuticle ultrastructure and higher cuticle permeability than observed for wild type or either mutant parent, indicating a dramatic genetic interaction on conversion of very long chain acyl-CoA precursors. These results provide evidence that CER17/ADS4 performs n-6 desaturation of very long chain acyl-CoAs in both distal and basal stems and has a major function associated with governing cutin monomer amounts primarily in the distal segments of the inflorescence stem.

  7. Crystallographic trapping of the glutamyl-CoA thioester intermediate of family I CoA transferases

    SciTech Connect

    Rangarajan,E.; Li, Y.; Ajamian, E.; Iannuzzi, P.; Kernaghan, S.; Fraser, M.; Cygler, M.; Matte, A.

    2005-01-01

    Coenzyme A transferases are involved in a broad range of biochemical processes in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, and exhibit a diverse range of substrate specificities. The YdiF protein from Escherichia coli O157:H7 is an acyl-CoA transferase of unknown physiological function, and belongs to a large sequence family of CoA transferases, present in bacteria to humans, which utilize oxoacids as acceptors. In vitro measurements showed that YdiF displays enzymatic activity with short-chain acyl-CoAs. The crystal structures of YdiF and its complex with CoA, the first co-crystal structure for any Family I CoA transferase, have been determined and refined at 1.9 and 2.0 Angstrom resolution, respectively. YdiF is organized into tetramers, with each monomer having an open {alpha}/{beta} structure characteristic of Family I CoA transferases. Co-crystallization of YdiF with a variety of CoA thioesters in the absence of acceptor carboxylic acid resulted in trapping a covalent {gamma}-glutamyl-CoA thioester intermediate. The CoA binds within a well defined pocket at the N- and C-terminal domain interface, but makes contact only with the C-terminal domain. The structure of the YdiF complex provides a basis for understanding the different catalytic steps in the reaction of Family I CoA transferases.

  8. The Acyl Desaturase CER17 Is Involved in Producing Wax Unsaturated Primary Alcohols and Cutin Monomers1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xianpeng; Zhao, Huayan; Kosma, Dylan K.; Dyer, John M.; Li, Rongjun; Liu, Xiulin; Wang, Zhouya; Jenks, Matthew A.

    2017-01-01

    We report n-6 monounsaturated primary alcohols (C26:1, C28:1, and C30:1 homologs) in the cuticular waxes of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) inflorescence stem, a class of wax not previously reported in Arabidopsis. The Arabidopsis cer17 mutant was completely deficient in these monounsaturated alcohols, and CER17 was found to encode a predicted ACYL-COENZYME A DESATURASE LIKE4 (ADS4). Studies of the Arabidopsis cer4 mutant and yeast variously expressing CER4 (a predicted fatty acyl-CoA reductase) with CER17/ADS4, demonstrated CER4’s principal role in synthesis of these monounsaturated alcohols. Besides unsaturated alcohol deficiency, cer17 mutants exhibited a thickened and irregular cuticle ultrastructure and increased amounts of cutin monomers. Although unsaturated alcohols were absent throughout the cer17 stem, the mutation’s effects on cutin monomers and cuticle ultrastructure were much more severe in distal than basal stems, consistent with observations that the CER17/ADS4 transcript was much more abundant in distal than basal stems. Furthermore, distal but not basal stems of a double mutant deficient for both CER17/ADS4 and LONG-CHAIN ACYL-COA SYNTHETASE1 produced even more cutin monomers and a thicker and more disorganized cuticle ultrastructure and higher cuticle permeability than observed for wild type or either mutant parent, indicating a dramatic genetic interaction on conversion of very long chain acyl-CoA precursors. These results provide evidence that CER17/ADS4 performs n-6 desaturation of very long chain acyl-CoAs in both distal and basal stems and has a major function associated with governing cutin monomer amounts primarily in the distal segments of the inflorescence stem. PMID:28069670

  9. A fluorescent assay to quantitatively measure in vitro acyl CoA:diacylglycerol acyltransferase activity.

    PubMed

    McFie, Pamela J; Stone, Scot J

    2011-09-01

    Triacylglycerols (TG) are the major storage form of energy in eukaryotic organisms and are synthesized primarily by acyl CoA:1,2-diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT) enzymes. In vitro DGAT activity has previously been quantified by measuring the incorporation of either radiolabeled fatty acyl CoA or diacylglycerol (DG) into TG. We developed a modified acyltransferase assay using a fluorescent fatty acyl CoA substrate to accurately quantify in vitro DGAT activity. In the modified assay, radioactive fatty acyl CoA is replaced with fluorescent NBD-palmitoyl CoA, which is used as a substrate by DGAT with DG to produce NBD-TG. After extraction with organic solvents and separation by thin layer chromatography, NBD-TG formation can be detected and accurately quantified using a fluorescent imaging system. We demonstrate that this method can be adapted to detect other acyltransferase activities. Because NBD-palmitoyl CoA is commercially available at a much lower cost compared with radioactive acyl CoA substrates, it is a more economical alternative to radioactive tracers. In addition, the exposure of laboratory personnel to radioactivity is greatly reduced.

  10. Mechanistic insight with HBCH2CoA as a probe to polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) synthases.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Shrestha, Ruben; Buckley, Rachael M; Jewell, Jamie; Bossmann, Stefan H; Stubbe, JoAnne; Li, Ping

    2014-08-15

    Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) synthases catalyze the polymerization of 3-(R)-hydroxybutyrate coenzyme A (HBCoA) to produce polyoxoesters of 1-2 MDa. A substrate analogue HBCH2CoA, in which the S in HBCoA is replaced with a CH2 group, was synthesized in 13 steps using a chemoenzymatic approach in a 7.5% overall yield. Kinetic studies reveal it is a competitive inhibitor of a class I and a class III PHB synthases, with Kis of 40 and 14 μM, respectively. To probe the elongation steps of the polymerization, HBCH2CoA was incubated with a synthase acylated with a [(3)H]-saturated trimer-CoA ([(3)H]-sTCoA). The products of the reaction were shown to be the methylene analogue of [(3)H]-sTCoA ([(3)H]-sT-CH2-CoA), saturated dimer-([(3)H]-sD-CO2H), and trimer-acid ([(3)H]-sT-CO2H), distinct from the expected methylene analogue of [(3)H]-saturated tetramer-CoA ([(3)H]-sTet-CH2-CoA). Detection of [(3)H]-sT-CH2-CoA and its slow rate of formation suggest that HBCH2CoA may be reporting on the termination and repriming process of the synthases, rather than elongation.

  11. A Chemo-Enzymatic Road Map to the Synthesis of CoA Esters.

    PubMed

    Peter, Dominik M; Vögeli, Bastian; Cortina, Niña Socorro; Erb, Tobias J

    2016-04-20

    Coenzyme A (CoA) is a ubiquitous cofactor present in every known organism. The thioesters of CoA are core intermediates in many metabolic processes, such as the citric acid cycle, fatty acid biosynthesis and secondary metabolism, including polyketide biosynthesis. Synthesis of CoA-thioesters is vital for the study of CoA-dependent enzymes and pathways, but also as standards for metabolomics studies. In this work we systematically tested five chemo-enzymatic methods for the synthesis of the three most abundant acyl-CoA thioester classes in biology; saturated acyl-CoAs, α,β-unsaturated acyl-CoAs (i.e., enoyl-CoA derivatives), and α-carboxylated acyl-CoAs (i.e., malonyl-CoA derivatives). Additionally we report on the substrate promiscuity of three newly described acyl-CoA dehydrogenases that allow the simple conversion of acyl-CoAs into enoyl-CoAs. With these five methods, we synthesized 26 different CoA-thioesters with a yield of 40% or higher. The CoA esters produced range from short- to long-chain, include branched and α,β-unsaturated representatives as well as other functional groups. Based on our results we provide a general guideline to the optimal synthesis method of a given CoA-thioester in respect to its functional group(s) and the commercial availability of the precursor molecule. The proposed synthetic routes can be performed in small scale and do not require special chemical equipment, making them convenient also for biological laboratories.

  12. Fatty acid acylation of rat brain myelin proteolipid protein in vitro: identification of the lipid donor.

    PubMed

    Bizzozero, O A; Lees, M B

    1986-02-01

    The immediate acyl chain donor for fatty acid esterification of proteolipid protein (PLP) was identified in an in vitro system. Rat brain total membranes, after removal of crude nuclear and mitochondrial fractions, were incubated with radioactive acyl donors, extracted with chloroform/methanol, and analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. In the presence of [3H]palmitic acid, CoA, ATP, and Mg2+, acylation of endogenous PLP occurred at a linear rate for at least 2 h. The radioactivity was associated with the protein via an ester linkage, mainly as palmitic acid. Omission of ATP, CoA, Mg2+, or all three reduced fatty acid incorporation into PLP to 44, 27, 8, and 4%, respectively, of the values in the complete system. Incubation of the membrane fraction with [3H]palmitoyl-CoA in the absence of CoA and ATP led to highly labeled PLP. These data demonstrate that activation of free fatty acid is required for acylation. Phospholipids and glycolipids were not able to acylate the PLP directly. Finally, when isolated myelin was incubated with [3H]palmitoyl-CoA in the absence of cofactors, only PLP was labeled, thus confirming the identity of palmitoyl-CoA as the direct acyl chain donor and suggesting that the acylating activity and the PLP pool available for acylation are both in the myelin.

  13. Xanthomonas campestris RpfB is a fatty Acyl-CoA ligase required to counteract the thioesterase activity of the RpfF diffusible signal factor (DSF) synthase.

    PubMed

    Bi, Hongkai; Yu, Yonghong; Dong, Huijuan; Wang, Haihong; Cronan, John E

    2014-07-01

    In Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc), the proteins encoded by the rpf (regulator of pathogenicity factor) gene cluster produce and sense a fatty acid signal molecule called diffusible signalling factor (DSF, 2(Z)-11-methyldodecenoic acid). RpfB was reported to be involved in DSF processing and was predicted to encode an acyl-CoA ligase. We report that RpfB activates a wide range of fatty acids to their CoA esters in vitro. Moreover, RpfB can functionally replace the paradigm bacterial acyl-CoA ligase, Escherichia coli FadD, in the E. coli ß-oxidation pathway and deletion of RpfB from the Xcc genome results in a strain unable to utilize fatty acids as carbon sources. An essential RpfB function in the pathogenicity factor pathway was demonstrated by the properties of a strain deleted for both the rpfB and rpfC genes. The ΔrpfB ΔrpfC strain grew poorly and lysed upon entering stationary phase. Deletion of rpfF, the gene encoding the DSF synthetic enzyme, restored normal growth to this strain. RpfF is a dual function enzyme that synthesizes DSF by dehydration of a 3-hydroxyacyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) fatty acid synthetic intermediate and also cleaves the thioester bond linking DSF to ACP. However, the RpfF thioesterase activity is of broad specificity and upon elimination of its RpfC inhibitor RpfF attains maximal activity and its thioesterase activity proceeds to block membrane lipid synthesis by cleavage of acyl-ACP intermediates. This resulted in release of the nascent acyl chains to the medium as free fatty acids. This lack of acyl chains for phospholipid synthesis results in cell lysis unless RpfB is present to counteract the RpfF thioesterase activity by catalysing uptake and activation of the free fatty acids to give acyl-CoAs that can be utilized to restore membrane lipid synthesis. Heterologous expression of a different fatty acid activating enzyme, the Vibrio harveyi acyl-ACP synthetase, replaced RpfB in counteracting the effects of high

  14. Acyl peptidic siderophores: structures, biosyntheses and post-assembly modifications.

    PubMed

    Kem, Michelle P; Butler, Alison

    2015-06-01

    Acyl peptidic siderophores are produced by a variety of bacteria and possess unique amphiphilic properties. Amphiphilic siderophores are generally produced in a suite where the iron(III)-binding headgroup remains constant while the fatty acid appendage varies by length and functionality. Acyl peptidic siderophores are commonly synthesized by non-ribosomal peptide synthetases; however, the method of peptide acylation during biosynthesis can vary between siderophores. Following biosynthesis, acyl siderophores can be further modified enzymatically to produce a more hydrophilic compound, which retains its ferric chelating abilities as demonstrated by pyoverdine from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the marinobactins from certain Marinobacter species. Siderophore hydrophobicity can also be altered through photolysis of the ferric complex of certain β-hydroxyaspartic acid-containing acyl peptidic siderophores.

  15. Mechanism of MenE inhibition by acyl-adenylate analogues and discovery of novel antibacterial agents.

    PubMed

    Matarlo, Joe S; Evans, Christopher E; Sharma, Indrajeet; Lavaud, Lubens J; Ngo, Stephen C; Shek, Roger; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R; French, Jarrod B; Tan, Derek S; Tonge, Peter J

    2015-10-27

    MenE is an o-succinylbenzoyl-CoA (OSB-CoA) synthetase in the bacterial menaquinone biosynthesis pathway and is a promising target for the development of novel antibacterial agents. The enzyme catalyzes CoA ligation via an acyl-adenylate intermediate, and we have previously reported tight-binding inhibitors of MenE based on stable acyl-sulfonyladenosine analogues of this intermediate, including OSB-AMS (1), which has an IC50 value of ≤25 nM for Escherichia coli MenE. Herein, we show that OSB-AMS reduces menaquinone levels in Staphylococcus aureus, consistent with its proposed mechanism of action, despite the observation that the antibacterial activity of OSB-AMS is ∼1000-fold lower than the IC50 for enzyme inhibition. To inform the synthesis of MenE inhibitors with improved antibacterial activity, we have undertaken a structure-activity relationship (SAR) study stimulated by the knowledge that OSB-AMS can adopt two isomeric forms in which the OSB side chain exists either as an open-chain keto acid or a cyclic lactol. These studies revealed that negatively charged analogues of the keto acid form bind, while neutral analogues do not, consistent with the hypothesis that the negatively charged keto acid form of OSB-AMS is the active isomer. X-ray crystallography and site-directed mutagenesis confirm the importance of a conserved arginine for binding the OSB carboxylate. Although most lactol isomers tested were inactive, a novel difluoroindanediol inhibitor (11) with improved antibacterial activity was discovered, providing a pathway toward the development of optimized MenE inhibitors in the future.

  16. Mechanism of MenE Inhibition by Acyl-Adenylate Analogues and Discovery of Novel Antibacterial Agents

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Indrajeet; Lavaud, Lubens J.; Ngo, Stephen C.; Shek, Roger; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; French, Jarrod B.; Tan, Derek S.; Tonge, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    MenE is an o-succinylbenzoyl-CoA (OSB-CoA) synthetase in the bacterial menaquinone biosynthesis pathway and is a promising target for the development of novel antibacterial agents. The enzyme catalyzes CoA ligation via an acyl-adenylate intermediate, and we have previously reported tight-binding inhibitors of MenE based on stable acyl-sulfonyladenosine analogues of this intermediate, including OSB-AMS (1) which has an IC50 value of ≤ 25 nM for the Escherichia coli MenE. Herein, we show that OSB-AMS reduces menaquinone levels in S. aureus, consistent with its proposed mechanism of action, despite the observation that the antibacterial activity of OSB-AMS is ~1000-fold lower than the IC50 for enzyme inhibition. To inform the synthesis of MenE inhibitors with improved antibacterial activity, we have undertaken a structure–activity relationship (SAR) study stimulated by the knowledge that OSB-AMS can adopt two isomeric forms in which the OSB side chain exists either as an open-chain keto acid or a cyclic lactol. These studies revealed that negatively charged analogues of the keto-acid form bind, while neutral analogues do not, consistent with the hypothesis that the negatively-charged keto-acid form of OSB-AMS is the active isomer. X-ray crystallography and site-directed mutagenesis confirm the importance of a conserved arginine for binding the OSB carboxylate. Although most lactol isomers tested were inactive, a novel difluoroindanediol inhibitor (11) with improved antibacterial activity was discovered, providing a pathway toward the development of optimized MenE inhibitors in the future. PMID:26394156

  17. Cysteine-286 as the site of acylation of the Lux-specific fatty acyl-CoA reductase.

    PubMed

    Lee, C Y; Meighen, E A

    1997-04-04

    The channelling of fatty acids into the fatty aldehyde substrate for the bacterial bioluminescence reaction is catalyzed by a fatty acid reductase multienzyme complex, which channels fatty acids through the thioesterase (LuxD), synthetase (LuxE) and reductase (LuxC) components. Although all three components can be readily acylated in extracts of different luminescent bacteria, this complex has been successfully purified only from Photobacterium phosphoreum and the sites of acylation identified on LuxD and LuxE. To identify the acylation site on LuxC, the nucleotide sequence of P. phosphoreum luxC has been determined and the gene expressed in a mutant Escherichia coli strain. Even in crude extracts, the acylated reductase intermediate as well as acyl-CoA reductase activity could be readily detected, providing the basis for analysis of mutant reductases. Comparison of the amino-acid sequences of LuxC from P. phosphoreum, P. leiognathi and other luminescent bacteria, showed that only three cysteine residues (C171, C279, and C286) were conserved. As a cysteine residue on LuxC has been implicated in fatty acyl transfer, each of the conserved cysteine residues of the P. phosphoreum and P. leiognathi reductases was converted to a serine residue, and the properties of the mutant proteins examined. Only mutation of C286-blocked reductase activity and prevented formation of the acylated reductase intermediate, showing that C286 is the site of acylation on LuxC.

  18. Structural and Functional Studies of Fatty Acyl Adenylate Ligases from E. coli and L. pneumophila

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z.; Swaminathan, S.; Zhou, R.; Sauder, J. M.; Tonge, P. J.; Burley, S. K.

    2011-02-18

    Fatty acyl-AMP ligase (FAAL) is a new member of a family of adenylate-forming enzymes that were recently discovered in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. They are similar in sequence to fatty acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) ligases (FACLs). However, while FACLs perform a two-step catalytic reaction, AMP ligation followed by CoA ligation using ATP and CoA as cofactors, FAALs produce only the acyl adenylate and are unable to perform the second step. We report X-ray crystal structures of full-length FAAL from Escherichia coli (EcFAAL) and FAAL from Legionella pneumophila (LpFAAL) bound to acyl adenylate, determined at resolution limits of 3.0 and 1.85 {angstrom}, respectively. The structures share a larger N-terminal domain and a smaller C-terminal domain, which together resemble the previously determined structures of FAAL and FACL proteins. Our two structures occur in quite different conformations. EcFAAL adopts the adenylate-forming conformation typical of FACLs, whereas LpFAAL exhibits a unique intermediate conformation. Both EcFAAL and LpFAAL have insertion motifs that distinguish them from the FACLs. Structures of EcFAAL and LpFAAL reveal detailed interactions between this insertion motif and the interdomain hinge region and with the C-terminal domain. We suggest that the insertion motifs support sufficient interdomain motions to allow substrate binding and product release during acyl adenylate formation, but they preclude CoA binding, thereby preventing CoA ligation.

  19. Structural and Functional Studies of Fatty Acyl Adenylate Ligases from E. coli and L. pneumophila

    SciTech Connect

    Z Zhang; R Zhou; J Sauder; P Tonge; S Burley; S Swaminathan

    2011-12-31

    Fatty acyl-AMP ligase (FAAL) is a new member of a family of adenylate-forming enzymes that were recently discovered in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. They are similar in sequence to fatty acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) ligases (FACLs). However, while FACLs perform a two-step catalytic reaction, AMP ligation followed by CoA ligation using ATP and CoA as cofactors, FAALs produce only the acyl adenylate and are unable to perform the second step. We report X-ray crystal structures of full-length FAAL from Escherichia coli (EcFAAL) and FAAL from Legionella pneumophila (LpFAAL) bound to acyl adenylate, determined at resolution limits of 3.0 and 1.85 {angstrom}, respectively. The structures share a larger N-terminal domain and a smaller C-terminal domain, which together resemble the previously determined structures of FAAL and FACL proteins. Our two structures occur in quite different conformations. EcFAAL adopts the adenylate-forming conformation typical of FACLs, whereas LpFAAL exhibits a unique intermediate conformation. Both EcFAAL and LpFAAL have insertion motifs that distinguish them from the FACLs. Structures of EcFAAL and LpFAAL reveal detailed interactions between this insertion motif and the interdomain hinge region and with the C-terminal domain. We suggest that the insertion motifs support sufficient interdomain motions to allow substrate binding and product release during acyl adenylate formation, but they preclude CoA binding, thereby preventing CoA ligation.

  20. Materials and methods for the alteration of enzyme and acetyl CoA levels in plants

    DOEpatents

    Nikolau, Basil J.; Wurtele, Eve S.; Oliver, David J.; Schnable, Patrick S.; Wen, Tsui-Jung

    2009-04-28

    The present invention provides nucleic acid and amino acid sequences of acetyl CoA synthetase (ACS), plastidic pyruvate dehydrogenase (pPDH), ATP citrate lyase (ACL), Arabidopsis pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC), and Arabidopsis aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), specifically ALDH-2 and ALDH-4. The present invention also provides a recombinant vector comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding one of the aforementioned enzymes, an antisense sequence thereto or a ribozyme therefor, a cell transformed with such a vector, antibodies to the enzymes, a plant cell, a plant tissue, a plant organ or a plant in which the level of an enzyme has been altered, and a method of producing such a plant cell, plant tissue, plant organ or plant. Desirably, alteration of the level of enzyme results in an alteration of the level of acetyl CoA in the plant cell, plant tissue, plant organ or plant. In addition, the present invention provides a recombinant vector comprising an antisense sequence of a nucleic acid sequence encoding pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC), the E1.alpha. subunit of pPDH, the E1.beta. subunit of pPDH, the E2 subunit of pPDH, mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase (mtPDH) or aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) or a ribozyme that can cleave an RNA molecule encoding PDC, E1.alpha. pPDH, E1.beta. pPDH, E2 pPDH, mtPDH or ALDH.

  1. Materials and methods for the alteration of enzyme and acetyl CoA levels in plants

    DOEpatents

    Nikolau, Basil J.; Wurtele, Eve S.; Oliver, David J.; Behal, Robert; Schnable, Patrick S.; Ke, Jinshan; Johnson, Jerry L.; Allred, Carolyn C.; Fatland, Beth; Lutziger, Isabelle; Wen, Tsui-Jung

    2005-09-13

    The present invention provides nucleic acid and amino acid sequences of acetyl CoA synthetase (ACS), plastidic pyruvate dehydrogenase (pPDH), ATP citrate lyase (ACL), Arabidopsis pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC), and Arabidopsis aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), specifically ALDH-2 and ALDH-4. The present invention also provides a recombinant vector comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding one of the aforementioned enzymes, an antisense sequence thereto or a ribozyme therefor, a cell transformed with such a vector, antibodies to the enzymes, a plant cell, a plant tissue, a plant organ or a plant in which the level of an enzyme has been altered, and a method of producing such a plant cell, plant tissue, plant organ or plant. Desirably, alteration of the level of enzyme results in an alteration of the level of acetyl CoA in the plant cell, plant tissue, plant organ or plant. In addition, the present invention provides a recombinant vector comprising an antisense sequence of a nucleic acid sequence encoding pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC), the E1.alpha. subunit of pPDH, the E1.beta. subunit of pPDH, the E2 subunit of pPDH, mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase (mtPDH) or aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) or a ribozyme that can cleave an RNA molecule encoding PDC, E1.alpha. pPDH, E1.beta. pPDH, E2 pPDH, mtPDH or ALDH.

  2. Materials and methods for the alteration of enzyme and acetyl CoA levels in plants

    DOEpatents

    Nikolau, Basil J.; Wurtele, Eve S.; Oliver, David J.; Behal, Robert; Schnable, Patrick S.; Ke, Jinshan; Johnson, Jerry L.; Allred, Carolyn C.; Fatland, Beth; Lutziger, Isabelle; Wen, Tsui-Jung

    2004-07-20

    The present invention provides nucleic acid and amino acid sequences of acetyl CoA synthetase (ACS), plastidic pyruvate dehydrogenase (pPDH), ATP citrate lyase (ACL), Arabidopsis pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC), and Arabidopsis aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), specifically ALDH-2 and ALDH-4. The present invention also provides a recombinant vector comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding one of the aforementioned enzymes, an antisense sequence thereto or a ribozyme therefor, a cell transformed with such a vector, antibodies to the enzymes, a plant cell, a plant tissue, a plant organ or a plant in which the level of an enzyme has been altered, and a method of producing such a plant cell, plant tissue, plant organ or plant. Desirably, alteration of the level of enzyme results in an alteration of the level of acetyl CoA in the plant cell, plant tissue, plant organ or plant. In addition, the present invention provides a recombinant vector comprising an antisense sequence of a nucleic acid sequence encoding pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC), the E1.sub..alpha. subunit of pPDH, the E1.sub..beta. subunit of pPDH, the E2 subunit of pPDH, mitochondrial pyurvate dehydrogenase (mtPDH) or aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) or a ribozyme that can cleave an RNA molecule encoding PDC, E1.sub..alpha. pPDH, E1.sub..beta. pPDH, E2 pPDH, mtPDH or ALDH.

  3. Fatty acyl-CoA elongation in Blatella germanica integumental microsomes.

    PubMed

    Juárez, M Patricia

    2004-08-01

    Insect cuticular hydrocarbons are synthesized de novo in integumental tissue through the concerted action of fatty acid synthases (FASs), fatty acyl-CoA elongases, a reductase, and a decarboxylase to produce hydrocarbons and CO2. Elongation of fatty acyl-CoAs to very long chain fatty acids was studied in the integumental microsomes of the German cockroach, Blatella germanica. Incubation of [1-14C]palmitoyl-CoA, malonyl-CoA, and NADPH resulted in the production of 18-CoA with minor amounts of C20, C22, C24, C30, and C32 labeled acyl-CoA moieties. Similar experiments with [1-14C]stearoyl-CoA rendered C20-CoA as the major product, and lesser amounts of C22 and C24-CoAs were also detected. After solubilization of the microsomal FAS, kinetic parameters were determined radiochemically or by measuring NADPH consumption. The reaction velocity was linear for up to 3 min incubation time, and with a protein concentration up to 0.025 microg/microl. The effect of the chain length on the reaction velocity was compared for palmitoyl-CoA, stearoyl-CoA, and eicosanoyl-CoA. The optimal substrate concentration was 10 microM for C16-CoA, between 8 and 12 microM for C18-CoA, and close to 3 microM for C20-CoA. In vivo hydrocarbon biosynthesis was inhibited from 55.5 to 72.5% in the presence of 1 mM trichloroacetic acid, a known inhibitor of elongation reactions.

  4. The hexanoyl-CoA precursor for cannabinoid biosynthesis is formed by an acyl-activating enzyme in Cannabis sativa trichomes.

    PubMed

    Stout, Jake M; Boubakir, Zakia; Ambrose, Stephen J; Purves, Randy W; Page, Jonathan E

    2012-08-01

    The psychoactive and analgesic cannabinoids (e.g. Δ(9) -tetrahydrocannabinol (THC)) in Cannabis sativa are formed from the short-chain fatty acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) precursor hexanoyl-CoA. Cannabinoids are synthesized in glandular trichomes present mainly on female flowers. We quantified hexanoyl-CoA using LC-MS/MS and found levels of 15.5 pmol g(-1) fresh weight in female hemp flowers with lower amounts in leaves, stems and roots. This pattern parallels the accumulation of the end-product cannabinoid, cannabidiolic acid (CBDA). To search for the acyl-activating enzyme (AAE) that synthesizes hexanoyl-CoA from hexanoate, we analyzed the transcriptome of isolated glandular trichomes. We identified 11 unigenes that encoded putative AAEs including CsAAE1, which shows high transcript abundance in glandular trichomes. In vitro assays showed that recombinant CsAAE1 activates hexanoate and other short- and medium-chained fatty acids. This activity and the trichome-specific expression of CsAAE1 suggest that it is the hexanoyl-CoA synthetase that supplies the cannabinoid pathway. CsAAE3 encodes a peroxisomal enzyme that activates a variety of fatty acid substrates including hexanoate. Although phylogenetic analysis showed that CsAAE1 groups with peroxisomal AAEs, it lacked a peroxisome targeting sequence 1 (PTS1) and localized to the cytoplasm. We suggest that CsAAE1 may have been recruited to the cannabinoid pathway through the loss of its PTS1, thereby redirecting it to the cytoplasm. To probe the origin of hexanoate, we analyzed the trichome expressed sequence tag (EST) dataset for enzymes of fatty acid metabolism. The high abundance of transcripts that encode desaturases and a lipoxygenase suggests that hexanoate may be formed through a pathway that involves the oxygenation and breakdown of unsaturated fatty acids.

  5. Nature of the Fatty Acid Synthetase Systems in Parenchymal and Epidermal Cells of Allium porrum L. Leaves 1

    PubMed Central

    Lessire, Rene; Stumpe, Paul K.

    1983-01-01

    Fatty acid synthesis was compared in cell-free extracts of epidermis and parenchyma of Allium porrum L. leaves. Parenchyma extracts had the major fatty acid synthetase (FAS) activity (70-90%) of the whole leaf; palmitic acid was also the major fatty acid synthesized when acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA) was the primer, but when acetyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) was employed, C18:0 and C16:0 were synthesized in equal proportion. With the epidermal FAS system when either acetyl-CoA or acetyl-ACP was tested in the presence of labeled malonyl-CoA, palmitic acid was the only product synthesized. Specific activities of the FAS enzyme activities were determined in both tissue extracts. The properties of malonyl-CoA:ACP transacylase were examined from the two different tissues. The molecular weights estimated by Sephadex G-200 chromatography were 38,000 for the epidermal enzyme and 45,000 for parenchymal enzyme. The optimal pH was for both enzymes 7.8 to 8.0 and the maximal velocity 0.4 to 0.5 micromoles per milligram protein per minute. These enzymes had different affinities for malonyl-CoA and ACP. For the malonyl-CoA:ACP transacylase of epidermis, the Km values were 5.6 and 13.7 micromolar for malonyl-CoA and ACP, respectively, and 4.2 and 21.7 micromolar for the parenchymal enzyme. These results suggest that the FAS system in both tissues are nonassociated, that the malonyl-CoA:ACP transacylases are isozymes, and that both in epidermis and in parenchyma tissue two independent FAS system occur. Evidence would suggest that β-ketoacyl-ACP synthase II is present in the parenchymal cells but missing in the epidermal cell. PMID:16663268

  6. Identification of pantoate kinase and phosphopantothenate synthetase from Methanospirillum hungatei.

    PubMed

    Katoh, Hiroki; Tamaki, Hideyuki; Tokutake, Yuka; Hanada, Satoshi; Chohnan, Shigeru

    2013-04-01

    Pantothenate synthetase (PanC) and pantothenate kinase which function in the canonical coenzyme A (CoA) biosynthetic pathway cannot be found in most archaea. COG1829 and COG1701 intrinsic to archaea were proposed as the candidate proteins for producing 4'-phosphopantothenate instead, and the COG1701 protein from Methanosarcina mazei was assigned as PanC. Meanwhile, the Thermococcus kodakarensis COG1829 and COG1701 proteins were biochemically identified as novel enzymes, i.e., pantoate kinase (PoK) and phosphopantothenate synthetase (PPS). In this study, the functions of Mhun_0831 (COG1829) and Mhun_0832 (COG1701) from Methanospirillum hungatei were identified, and the recombinant enzymes were partially characterized. Plasmids simultaneously possessing the two genes encoding Mhun_0831 and Mhun_0832 complemented the poor growth of the temperature-sensitive Escherichia coli pantothenate kinase mutant ts9. The recombinant Mhun_0831 and Mhun_0832 expressed in E. coli cells exhibited PoK and PPS activities, respectively, being in accord with the functions of T. kodakarensis proteins. The PoK activity was most active at pH 8.5 and 40°C, and accepted ATP and UTP as a phosphate donor. Although CoA did not affect the PoK activity, the end product considerably accelerated the PPS activity. The homologs of both proteins are widely conserved in most archaeal genomes. Taken together, our findings indicate that archaea can synthesize CoA through the unique pathway involving PoK and PPS, in addition to the canonical one that the order Thermoplasmatales employs.

  7. Role of long-chain fatty acyl-CoA esters in the regulation of metabolism and in cell signalling.

    PubMed Central

    Faergeman, N J; Knudsen, J

    1997-01-01

    The intracellular concentration of free unbound acyl-CoA esters is tightly controlled by feedback inhibition of the acyl-CoA synthetase and is buffered by specific acyl-CoA binding proteins. Excessive increases in the concentration are expected to be prevented by conversion into acylcarnitines or by hydrolysis by acyl-CoA hydrolases. Under normal physiological conditions the free cytosolic concentration of acyl-CoA esters will be in the low nanomolar range, and it is unlikely to exceed 200 nM under the most extreme conditions. The fact that acetyl-CoA carboxylase is active during fatty acid synthesis (Ki for acyl-CoA is 5 nM) indicates strongly that the free cytosolic acyl-CoA concentration is below 5 nM under these conditions. Only a limited number of the reported experiments on the effects of acyl-CoA on cellular functions and enzymes have been carried out at low physiological concentrations in the presence of the appropriate acyl-CoA-buffering binding proteins. Re-evaluation of many of the reported effects is therefore urgently required. However, the observations that the ryanodine-senstitive Ca2+-release channel is regulated by long-chain acyl-CoA esters in the presence of a molar excess of acyl-CoA binding protein and that acetyl-CoA carboxylase, the AMP kinase kinase and the Escherichia coli transcription factor FadR are affected by low nanomolar concentrations of acyl-CoA indicate that long-chain acyl-CoA esters can act as regulatory molecules in vivo. This view is further supported by the observation that fatty acids do not repress expression of acetyl-CoA carboxylase or Delta9-desaturase in yeast deficient in acyl-CoA synthetase. PMID:9173866

  8. High fat fed heart failure animals have enhanced mitochondrial function and acyl-coa dehydrogenase activities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have previously shown that administration of high fat in heart failure (HF) increased mitochondrial respiration and did not alter left ventricular (LV) function. PPARalpha is a nuclear transcription factor that activates expression of genes involved in fatty acid uptake and utilization. We hypoth...

  9. Oxidative acylation using thioacids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, R.; Orgel, L. E.

    1997-01-01

    Several important prebiotic reactions, including the coupling of amino acids into polypeptides by the formation of amide linkages, involve acylation. Theae reactions present a challenge to the understanding of prebiotic synthesis. Condensation reactions relying on dehydrating agents are either inefficient in aqueous solution or require strongly acidic conditions and high temperatures. Activated amino acids such as thioester derivatives have therefore been suggested as likely substrates for prebiotic peptide synthesis. Here we propose a closely related route to amide bond formation involving oxidative acylation by thioacids. We find that phenylalanine, leucine and phenylphosphate are acylated efficiently in aqueous solution by thioacetic acid and an oxidizing agent. From a prebiotic point of view, oxidative acylation has the advantage of proceeding efficiently in solution and under mild conditions. We anticipate that oxidative acylation should prove to be a general method for activating carboxylic acids, including amino acids.

  10. Polyspecific pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetases from directed evolution

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Li-Tao; Wang, Yane-Shih; Nakamura, Akiyoshi; Eiler, Daniel; Kavran, Jennifer M.; Wong, Margaret; Kiessling, Laura L.; Steitz, Thomas A.; O’Donoghue, Patrick; Söll, Dieter

    2014-01-01

    Pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetase (PylRS) and its cognate tRNAPyl have emerged as ideal translation components for genetic code innovation. Variants of the enzyme facilitate the incorporation >100 noncanonical amino acids (ncAAs) into proteins. PylRS variants were previously selected to acylate Nε-acetyl-Lys (AcK) onto tRNAPyl. Here, we examine an Nε-acetyl-lysyl-tRNA synthetase (AcKRS), which is polyspecific (i.e., active with a broad range of ncAAs) and 30-fold more efficient with Phe derivatives than it is with AcK. Structural and biochemical data reveal the molecular basis of polyspecificity in AcKRS and in a PylRS variant [iodo-phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase (IFRS)] that displays both enhanced activity and substrate promiscuity over a chemical library of 313 ncAAs. IFRS, a product of directed evolution, has distinct binding modes for different ncAAs. These data indicate that in vivo selections do not produce optimally specific tRNA synthetases and suggest that translation fidelity will become an increasingly dominant factor in expanding the genetic code far beyond 20 amino acids. PMID:25385624

  11. Polyspecific pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetases from directed evolution.

    PubMed

    Guo, Li-Tao; Wang, Yane-Shih; Nakamura, Akiyoshi; Eiler, Daniel; Kavran, Jennifer M; Wong, Margaret; Kiessling, Laura L; Steitz, Thomas A; O'Donoghue, Patrick; Söll, Dieter

    2014-11-25

    Pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetase (PylRS) and its cognate tRNA(Pyl) have emerged as ideal translation components for genetic code innovation. Variants of the enzyme facilitate the incorporation >100 noncanonical amino acids (ncAAs) into proteins. PylRS variants were previously selected to acylate N(ε)-acetyl-Lys (AcK) onto tRNA(Pyl). Here, we examine an N(ε)-acetyl-lysyl-tRNA synthetase (AcKRS), which is polyspecific (i.e., active with a broad range of ncAAs) and 30-fold more efficient with Phe derivatives than it is with AcK. Structural and biochemical data reveal the molecular basis of polyspecificity in AcKRS and in a PylRS variant [iodo-phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase (IFRS)] that displays both enhanced activity and substrate promiscuity over a chemical library of 313 ncAAs. IFRS, a product of directed evolution, has distinct binding modes for different ncAAs. These data indicate that in vivo selections do not produce optimally specific tRNA synthetases and suggest that translation fidelity will become an increasingly dominant factor in expanding the genetic code far beyond 20 amino acids.

  12. Measuring long-chain acyl-coenzyme A concentrations and enrichment using liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry with selected reaction monitoring.

    PubMed

    Blachnio-Zabielska, Agnieszka U; Koutsari, Christina; Jensen, Michael D

    2011-08-15

    Long-chain acyl-coenzymes A (acyl-CoAs) (LCACoA) are the activated forms of long-chain fatty acids and serve as key lipid metabolites. Excess accumulation of intracellular LCACoA, diacylglycerols (DAGs) and ceramides may create insulin resistance with respect to glucose metabolism. We present a new method to measure LCACoA concentrations and isotopic enrichment of palmitoyl-CoA ([U-(13) C]16-CoA) and oleoyl-CoA ([U-(13) C]18:1-CoA) using ultra-performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC/MS/MS) to quantitate seven different LCACoA (C14-CoA, C16-CoA, C16:1-CoA, C18-CoA, C18:1-CoA, C18:2-CoA, C20-CoA). The molecules are separated on a reversed-phase UPLC column using a binary gradient with ammonium hydroxide (NH(4) OH) in water and NH(4) OH in acetonitrile (ACN). The LCACoA are quantified using selected reaction monitoring (SRM) on a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer in positive electrospray ionization (ESI) mode. All LCACoA ions except enriched palmitate enrichment of palmitoyl-CoA ([U(-13)C]16-CoA) and oleoyl-CoA ([U(-13)C]18:1-CoA) using ultra-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (UPLC/MS/MS) to quantitate seven different LCACoA (C14-CoA, C16-CoA, C16:1-CoA, C18-CoA, C18:1-CoA, C18:2-CoA, C20-CoA). The molecules are separated on a reversed-phase UPLC column using a binary gradient with ammonium hydroxide (NH(4) OH) in water and NH(4) OH in acetonitrile. The LCACoA are quantified using selected reaction monitoring (SRM) on a triple quadrupolemass spectrometer in positive electrospray ionization (ESI) mode. All LCACoA ions except enriched palmitate and oleate were monitored as [M+2+H](+) and [U(13)C]16-CoA and [U(13)C]18:1-CoA were monitored as [M+16+H](+) and [M+18+H](+), respectively. The method is simple, sensitive and efficient (run time as short as 5 min) and allowed us to measure the concentration and detect enrichment in intramyocellular [U(13) C]16-CoA and [U(13) C]18:1-CoA during a low dose intravenous infusion of [U(13

  13. [Anti-synthetase syndrome].

    PubMed

    Novak, Srdan

    2012-01-01

    Antysynthetase syndrome is considered as a group ofidiopathic inflammatory myositis with charcteristic serologic hallmark--antibodies which recognise the aminoacyl-tRNA synthetasses (ARS). Clinical picture of those patients contains myositis and/or intersticial lung disease (ILD) and/or arthritis and/or fever and/or Raynaud phenomenon and sometimes characteristic look of mechanic's hands. Myositis can be overt, sometimes even absent, while IBP is major cause of morbidity and determines the outcome of the disease. Untill now eight different any-synthetase autoantibodies are recognised, and most frequent are findings of anti-histidyl-tRNa synthetase antibodies. Patients with other ARS autoantibodies usually have severe ILD. Drug of choice are steroids in dosage of 1 mg/kg with immunosupresive agent (azatioprin or methotrexate) while in severe IBP cyclophosphamide is needed. Recently succsesful treatment with rituximab in combination with cyclophosphamide is reported.

  14. Long chain acyl-CoA synthetases and other acyl activating enzymes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proper synthesis and breakdown of molecules containing carboxylic acids is a vital part of metabolism in all living organisms. Given the relatively inert chemical nature of many carboxylic acids, activation is a necessary step prior to use in the various anabolic and catabolic pathways that utilize...

  15. Insight into Coenzyme A cofactor binding and the mechanism of acyl-transfer in an acylating aldehyde dehydrogenase from Clostridium phytofermentans

    PubMed Central

    Tuck, Laura R.; Altenbach, Kirsten; Ang, Thiau Fu; Crawshaw, Adam D.; Campopiano, Dominic J.; Clarke, David J.; Marles-Wright, Jon

    2016-01-01

    The breakdown of fucose and rhamnose released from plant cell walls by the cellulolytic soil bacterium Clostridium phytofermentans produces toxic aldehyde intermediates. To enable growth on these carbon sources, the pathway for the breakdown of fucose and rhamnose is encapsulated within a bacterial microcompartment (BMC). These proteinaceous organelles sequester the toxic aldehyde intermediates and allow the efficient action of acylating aldehyde dehydrogenase enzymes to produce an acyl-CoA that is ultimately used in substrate-level phosphorylation to produce ATP. Here we analyse the kinetics of the aldehyde dehydrogenase enzyme from the fucose/rhamnose utilisation BMC with different short-chain fatty aldehydes and show that it has activity against substrates with up to six carbon atoms, with optimal activity against propionaldehyde. We have also determined the X-ray crystal structure of this enzyme in complex with CoA and show that the adenine nucleotide of this cofactor is bound in a distinct pocket to the same group in NAD+. This work is the first report of the structure of CoA bound to an aldehyde dehydrogenase enzyme and our crystallographic model provides important insight into the differences within the active site that distinguish the acylating from non-acylating aldehyde dehydrogenase enzymes. PMID:26899032

  16. Structure of YciA from Haemophilus influenzae (HI0827), a Hexameric Broad Specificity Acyl-Coenzyme A Thioesterase

    SciTech Connect

    Willis, Mark A.; Zhuang, Zhihao; Song, Feng; Howard, Andrew; Dunaway-Mariano, Debra; Herzberg, Osnat

    2008-04-02

    The crystal structure of HI0827 from Haemophilus influenzae Rd KW20, initially annotated 'hypothetical protein' in sequence databases, exhibits an acyl-coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) thioesterase 'hot dog' fold with a trimer of dimers oligomeric association, a novel assembly for this enzyme family. In studies described in the preceding paper [Zhuang, Z., Song, F., Zhao, H., Li, L., Cao, J., Eisenstein, E., Herzberg, O., and Dunaway-Mariano, D. (2008) Biochemistry 47, 2789-2796], HI0827 is shown to be an acyl-CoA thioesterase that acts on a wide range of acyl-CoA compounds. Two substrate binding sites are located across the dimer interface. The binding sites are occupied by two CoA molecules, one with full occupancy and the second only partially occupied. The CoA molecules, acquired from HI0827-expressing Escherichia coli cells, remained tightly bound to the enzyme through the protein purification steps. The difference in CoA occupancies indicates a different substrate affinity for each of the binding sites, which in turn implies that the enzyme might be subject to allosteric regulation. Mutagenesis studies have shown that the replacement of the putative catalytic carboxylate Asp44 with an alanine residue abolishes activity. The impact of this mutation is seen in the crystal structure of D44A HI0827. Whereas the overall fold and assembly of the mutant protein are the same as those of the wild-type enzyme, the CoA ligands are absent. The dimer interface is perturbed, and the channel that accommodates the thioester acyl chain is more open and wider than that observed in the wild-type enzyme. A model of intact substrate bound to wild-type HI0827 provides a structural rationale for the broad substrate range.

  17. Purification and Characterization of a Novel Pumpkin Short-Chain Acyl-Coenzyme A Oxidase with Structural Similarity to Acyl-Coenzyme A Dehydrogenases

    PubMed Central

    De Bellis, Luigi; Gonzali, Silvia; Alpi, Amedeo; Hayashi, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Makoto; Nishimura, Mikio

    2000-01-01

    A novel pumpkin (Cucurbita pepo) short-chain acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) oxidase (ACOX) was purified to homogeneity by hydrophobic-interaction, hydroxyapatite, affinity, and anion-exchange chromatography. The purified enzyme is a tetrameric protein, consisting of apparently identical 47-kD subunits. The protein structure of this oxidase differs from other plant and mammalian ACOXs, but is similar to the protein structure of mammalian mitochondrial acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (ACDH) and the recently identified plant mitochondrial ACDH. Subcellular organelle separation by sucrose density gradient centrifugation revealed that the enzyme is localized in glyoxysomes, whereas no immunoreactive bands of similar molecular weight were detected in mitochondrial fractions. The enzyme selectively catalyzes the oxidation of CoA esters of fatty acids with 4 to 10 carbon atoms, and exhibits the highest activity on C-6 fatty acids. Apparently, the enzyme has no activity on CoA esters of branched-chain or dicarboxylic fatty acids. The enzyme is slightly inhibited by high concentrations of substrate and it is not inhibited by Triton X-100 at concentrations up to 0.5% (v/v). The characteristics of this novel ACOX enzyme are discussed in relation to other ACOXs and ACDHs. PMID:10806249

  18. Fatty acyl-CoA inhibition of beta-hydroxy-beta-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase activity.

    PubMed

    Faas, F H; Carter, W J; Wynn, J O

    1978-11-22

    The influence of the fatty acyl-CoA thioesters on rat liver microsomal hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA reductase activity was tested in vitro to determine if the previously demonstrated inhibition of [14C]acetate incorporation into cholesterol is due to inhibition of this rate limiting step in cholesterol synthesis. The polyunsaturated fatty acyl-CoA thioesters caused the greatest inhibition of enzyme activity, 50 micron arachidonoyl-CoA inhibiting 67% and 5 micron inhibiting 22%. 50 micron linoleoyl-CoA inhibited 56% with the more saturated thioesters causing less inhibition. 50--100 micron free fatty acids, free CoA, cholesterol esters, phospholipids, carnitine derivatives, prostaglandins and non-specific detergents caused little or no inhibition of enzyme activity. Kinetic studies revealed the inhibition to be noncompetitive with respect to hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA with a Ki for arachidonoyl CoA of 3.10 micron. Fatty acyl-CoA inhibition of in vitro cholesterol synthesis is due to inhibition of hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA reductase activity. Variation in intracellular concentrations of fatty acyl-CoA thioesters may signficantly alter cholesterol synthesis.

  19. Ralstonia solanacearum RSp0194 Encodes a Novel 3-Keto-Acyl Carrier Protein Synthase III.

    PubMed

    Mao, Ya-Hui; Ma, Jin-Cheng; Li, Feng; Hu, Zhe; Wang, Hai-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Fatty acid synthesis (FAS), a primary metabolic pathway, is essential for survival of bacteria. Ralstonia solanacearum, a β-proteobacteria member, causes a bacterial wilt affecting more than 200 plant species, including many economically important plants. However, thus far, the fatty acid biosynthesis pathway of R. solanacearum has not been well studied. In this study, we characterized two forms of 3-keto-ACP synthase III, RsFabH and RsFabW, in R. solanacearum. RsFabH, the homologue of Escherichia coli FabH, encoded by the chromosomal RSc1050 gene, catalyzes the condensation of acetyl-CoA with malonyl-ACP in the initiation steps of fatty acid biosynthesis in vitro. The RsfabH mutant lost de novo fatty acid synthetic ability, and grows in medium containing free fatty acids. RsFabW, a homologue of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA3286, encoded by a megaplasmid gene, RSp0194, condenses acyl-CoA (C2-CoA to C10-CoA) with malonyl-ACP to produce 3-keto-acyl-ACP in vitro. Although the RsfabW mutant was viable, RsfabW was responsible for RsfabH mutant growth on medium containing free fatty acids. Our results also showed that RsFabW could condense acyl-ACP (C4-ACP to C8-ACP) with malonyl-ACP, to produce 3-keto-acyl-ACP in vitro, which implies that RsFabW plays a special role in fatty acid synthesis of R. solanacearum. All of these data confirm that R. solanacearum not only utilizes acetyl-CoA, but also, utilizes medium-chain acyl-CoAs or acyl-ACPs as primers to initiate fatty acid synthesis.

  20. Global Hawk Pacific (GloPac) COA and Mission Coordination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dillon, Mark; Hall, Philip

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the science objectives of the Global Hawk unmanned aircraft system (UAS) in the Pacific region, shows examp le flight tracks, the satellite under-flight requirement, the flight planning, and the agencies coordination of the airspace required for the Certificate of Authorization (COA).

  1. Structural Basis for Substrate Fatty Acyl Chain Specificity: Crystal Structure of Human Very-Long-Chain Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    McAndrew, Ryan P.; Wang, Yudong; Mohsen, Al-Walid; He, Miao; Vockley, Jerry; Kim, Jung-Ja P.

    2008-08-26

    Very-long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD) is a member of the family of acyl-CoA dehydrogenases (ACADs). Unlike the other ACADs, which are soluble homotetramers, VLCAD is a homodimer associated with the mitochondrial membrane. VLCAD also possesses an additional 180 residues in the C terminus that are not present in the other ACADs. We have determined the crystal structure of VLCAD complexed with myristoyl-CoA, obtained by co-crystallization, to 1.91-{angstrom} resolution. The overall fold of the N-terminal {approx}400 residues of VLCAD is similar to that of the soluble ACADs including medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD). The novel C-terminal domain forms an {alpha}-helical bundle that is positioned perpendicular to the two N-terminal helical domains. The fatty acyl moiety of the bound substrate/product is deeply imbedded inside the protein; however, the adenosine pyrophosphate portion of the C14-CoA ligand is disordered because of partial hydrolysis of the thioester bond and high mobility of the CoA moiety. The location of Glu-422 with respect to the C2-C3 of the bound ligand and FAD confirms Glu-422 to be the catalytic base. In MCAD, Gln-95 and Glu-99 form the base of the substrate binding cavity. In VLCAD, these residues are glycines (Gly-175 and Gly-178), allowing the binding channel to extend for an additional 12{angstrom} and permitting substrate acyl chain lengths as long as 24 carbons to bind. VLCAD deficiency is among the more common defects of mitochondrial {beta}-oxidation and, if left undiagnosed, can be fatal. This structure allows us to gain insight into how a variant VLCAD genotype results in a clinical phenotype.

  2. Acyl-Lipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Li-Beisson, Yonghua; Shorrosh, Basil; Beisson, Fred; Andersson, Mats X.; Arondel, Vincent; Bates, Philip D.; Baud, Sébastien; Bird, David; DeBono, Allan; Durrett, Timothy P.; Franke, Rochus B.; Graham, Ian A.; Katayama, Kenta; Kelly, Amélie A.; Larson, Tony; Markham, Jonathan E.; Miquel, Martine; Molina, Isabel; Nishida, Ikuo; Rowland, Owen; Samuels, Lacey; Schmid, Katherine M.; Wada, Hajime; Welti, Ruth; Xu, Changcheng; Zallot, Rémi; Ohlrogge, John

    2010-01-01

    Acyl lipids in Arabidopsis and all other plants have a myriad of diverse functions. These include providing the core diffusion barrier of the membranes that separates cells and subcellular organelles. This function alone involves more than 10 membrane lipid classes, including the phospholipids, galactolipids, and sphingolipids, and within each class the variations in acyl chain composition expand the number of structures to several hundred possible molecular species. Acyl lipids in the form of triacylglycerol account for 35% of the weight of Arabidopsis seeds and represent their major form of carbon and energy storage. A layer of cutin and cuticular waxes that restricts the loss of water and provides protection from invasions by pathogens and other stresses covers the entire aerial surface of Arabidopsis. Similar functions are provided by suberin and its associated waxes that are localized in roots, seed coats, and abscission zones and are produced in response to wounding. This chapter focuses on the metabolic pathways that are associated with the biosynthesis and degradation of the acyl lipids mentioned above. These pathways, enzymes, and genes are also presented in detail in an associated website (ARALIP: http://aralip.plantbiology.msu.edu/). Protocols and methods used for analysis of Arabidopsis lipids are provided. Finally, a detailed summary of the composition of Arabidopsis lipids is provided in three figures and 15 tables. PMID:22303259

  3. Acyl-Lipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Li-Beisson, Yonghua; Shorrosh, Basil; Beisson, Fred; Andersson, Mats X.; Arondel, Vincent; Bates, Philip D.; Baud, Sébastien; Bird, David; DeBono, Allan; Durrett, Timothy P.; Franke, Rochus B.; Graham, Ian A.; Katayama, Kenta; Kelly, Amélie A.; Larson, Tony; Markham, Jonathan E.; Miquel, Martine; Molina, Isabel; Nishida, Ikuo; Rowland, Owen; Samuels, Lacey; Schmid, Katherine M.; Wada, Hajime; Welti, Ruth; Xu, Changcheng; Zallot, Rémi; Ohlrogge, John

    2013-01-01

    Acyl lipids in Arabidopsis and all other plants have a myriad of diverse functions. These include providing the core diffusion barrier of the membranes that separates cells and subcellular organelles. This function alone involves more than 10 membrane lipid classes, including the phospholipids, galactolipids, and sphingolipids, and within each class the variations in acyl chain composition expand the number of structures to several hundred possible molecular species. Acyl lipids in the form of triacylglycerol account for 35% of the weight of Arabidopsis seeds and represent their major form of carbon and energy storage. A layer of cutin and cuticular waxes that restricts the loss of water and provides protection from invasions by pathogens and other stresses covers the entire aerial surface of Arabidopsis. Similar functions are provided by suberin and its associated waxes that are localized in roots, seed coats, and abscission zones and are produced in response to wounding. This chapter focuses on the metabolic pathways that are associated with the biosynthesis and degradation of the acyl lipids mentioned above. These pathways, enzymes, and genes are also presented in detail in an associated website (ARALIP: http://aralip.plantbiology.msu.edu/). Protocols and methods used for analysis of Arabidopsis lipids are provided. Finally, a detailed summary of the composition of Arabidopsis lipids is provided in three figures and 15 tables. PMID:23505340

  4. Activation of Exogenous Fatty Acids to Acyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Cannot Bypass FabI Inhibition in Neisseria*

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jiangwei; Bruhn, David F.; Frank, Matthew W.; Lee, Richard E.; Rock, Charles O.

    2016-01-01

    Neisseria is a Gram-negative pathogen with phospholipids composed of straight chain saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids, the ability to incorporate exogenous fatty acids, and lipopolysaccharides that are not essential. The FabI inhibitor, AFN-1252, was deployed as a chemical biology tool to determine whether Neisseria can bypass the inhibition of fatty acid synthesis by incorporating exogenous fatty acids. Neisseria encodes a functional FabI that was potently inhibited by AFN-1252. AFN-1252 caused a dose-dependent inhibition of fatty acid synthesis in growing Neisseria, a delayed inhibition of growth phenotype, and minimal inhibition of DNA, RNA, and protein synthesis, showing that its mode of action is through inhibiting fatty acid synthesis. Isotopic fatty acid labeling experiments showed that Neisseria encodes the ability to incorporate exogenous fatty acids into its phospholipids by an acyl-acyl carrier protein-dependent pathway. However, AFN-1252 remained an effective antibacterial when Neisseria were supplemented with exogenous fatty acids. These results demonstrate that extracellular fatty acids are activated by an acyl-acyl carrier protein synthetase (AasN) and validate type II fatty acid synthesis (FabI) as a therapeutic target against Neisseria. PMID:26567338

  5. Activities of acyl-CoA:diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT) and phospholipid:diacylglycerol acyltransferase (PDAT) in microsomal preparations of developing sunflower and safflower seeds.

    PubMed

    Banaś, Walentyna; Sanchez Garcia, Alicia; Banaś, Antoni; Stymne, Sten

    2013-06-01

    The last step in triacylglycerols (TAG) biosynthesis in oil seeds, the acylation of diacylglycerols (DAG), is catalysed by two types of enzymes: the acyl-CoA:diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT) and phospholipid:diacylglycerol acyltransferase (PDAT). The relative contribution of these enzymes in the synthesis of TAG has not yet been defined in any plant tissue. In the presented work, microsomal preparations were obtained from sunflower and safflower seeds at different stages of development and used in DGAT and PDAT enzyme assays. The ratio between PDAT and DGAT activity differed dramatically between the two different species. DGAT activities were measured with two different acyl acceptors and assay methods using two different acyl-CoAs, and in all cases the ratio of PDAT to DGAT activity was significantly higher in safflower than sunflower. The sunflower DGAT, measured by both methods, showed significant higher activity with 18:2-CoA than with 18:1-CoA, whereas the opposite specificity was seen with the safflower enzyme. The specificities of PDAT on the other hand, were similar in both species with 18:2-phosphatidylcholine being a better acyl donor than 18:1-PC and with acyl groups at the sn-2 position utilised about fourfold the rate of the sn-1 position. No DAG:DAG transacylase activity could be detected in the microsomal preparations.

  6. Arabidopsis membrane-associated acyl-CoA-binding protein ACBP1 is involved in stem cuticle formation

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Yan; Xiao, Shi; Kim, Juyoung; Lung, Shiu-Cheung; Chen, Liang; Tanner, Julian A.; Suh, Mi Chung; Chye, Mee-Len

    2014-01-01

    The membrane-anchored Arabidopsis thaliana ACYL-COA-BINDING PROTEIN1 (AtACBP1) plays important roles in embryogenesis and abiotic stress responses, and interacts with long-chain (LC) acyl-CoA esters. Here, AtACBP1 function in stem cuticle formation was investigated. Transgenic Arabidopsis transformed with an AtACBP1pro::GUS construct revealed β-glucuronidase (GUS) expression on the stem (but not leaf) surface, suggesting a specific role in stem cuticle formation. Isothermal titration calorimetry results revealed that (His)6-tagged recombinant AtACBP1 interacts with LC acyl-CoA esters (18:1-, 18:2-, and 18:3-CoAs) and very-long-chain (VLC) acyl-CoA esters (24:0-, 25:0-, and 26:0-CoAs). VLC fatty acids have been previously demonstrated to act as precursors in wax biosynthesis. Gas chromatography (GC)–flame ionization detector (FID) and GC–mass spectrometry (MS) analyses revealed that an acbp1 mutant showed a reduction in stem and leaf cuticular wax and stem cutin monomer composition in comparison with the wild type (Col-0). Consequently, the acbp1 mutant showed fewer wax crystals on the stem surface in scanning electron microscopy and an irregular stem cuticle layer in transmission electron microscopy in comparison with the wild type. Also, the mutant stems consistently showed a decline in expression of cuticular wax and cutin biosynthetic genes in comparison with the wild type, and the mutant leaves were more susceptible to infection by the necrotrophic pathogen Botrytis cinerea. Taken together, these findings suggest that AtACBP1 participates in Arabidopsis stem cuticle formation by trafficking VLC acyl-CoAs. PMID:25053648

  7. Arabidopsis membrane-associated acyl-CoA-binding protein ACBP1 is involved in stem cuticle formation.

    PubMed

    Xue, Yan; Xiao, Shi; Kim, Juyoung; Lung, Shiu-Cheung; Chen, Liang; Tanner, Julian A; Suh, Mi Chung; Chye, Mee-Len

    2014-10-01

    The membrane-anchored Arabidopsis thaliana ACYL-COA-BINDING PROTEIN1 (AtACBP1) plays important roles in embryogenesis and abiotic stress responses, and interacts with long-chain (LC) acyl-CoA esters. Here, AtACBP1 function in stem cuticle formation was investigated. Transgenic Arabidopsis transformed with an AtACBP1pro::GUS construct revealed β-glucuronidase (GUS) expression on the stem (but not leaf) surface, suggesting a specific role in stem cuticle formation. Isothermal titration calorimetry results revealed that (His)6-tagged recombinant AtACBP1 interacts with LC acyl-CoA esters (18:1-, 18:2-, and 18:3-CoAs) and very-long-chain (VLC) acyl-CoA esters (24:0-, 25:0-, and 26:0-CoAs). VLC fatty acids have been previously demonstrated to act as precursors in wax biosynthesis. Gas chromatography (GC)-flame ionization detector (FID) and GC-mass spectrometry (MS) analyses revealed that an acbp1 mutant showed a reduction in stem and leaf cuticular wax and stem cutin monomer composition in comparison with the wild type (Col-0). Consequently, the acbp1 mutant showed fewer wax crystals on the stem surface in scanning electron microscopy and an irregular stem cuticle layer in transmission electron microscopy in comparison with the wild type. Also, the mutant stems consistently showed a decline in expression of cuticular wax and cutin biosynthetic genes in comparison with the wild type, and the mutant leaves were more susceptible to infection by the necrotrophic pathogen Botrytis cinerea. Taken together, these findings suggest that AtACBP1 participates in Arabidopsis stem cuticle formation by trafficking VLC acyl-CoAs.

  8. Genetics Home Reference: glutathione synthetase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Facebook Share on Twitter Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Search MENU Toggle navigation Home Page Search ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions glutathione synthetase deficiency glutathione synthetase ...

  9. Synthesis and magnetic properties of superparamagnetic CoAs nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, P.; Ashokaan, N.; Masud, J.; Pariti, A.; Nath, M.

    2015-03-01

    This article provides a comprehensive guide on the synthesis and characterization of superparamagnetic CoAs nanoparticles and elongated nanostructures with high blocking temperature, (TB), via hot-injection precipitation and solvothermal methods. Cobalt arsenides constitute an important family of magnetically active solids that find a variety of applications ranging from magnetic semiconductors to biomedical imaging. While the higher temperature hot-injection precipitation technique (300 °C) yields pure CoAs nanostructures, the lower temperature solvothermal method (200 °C) yields a mixture of CoAs nanoparticles along with other Co-based impurity phases. The synthesis in all these cases involved usage of triphenylarsine ((C6H5)3As) as the As precursor which reacts with solid Co2(CO)8 by ligand displacement to yield a single source precursor. The surfactant, hexadecylamine (HDA) further assists in controlling the morphology of the nanostructures. HDA also provides a basic medium and molten flux-like conditions for the redox chemistry to occur between Co and As at elevated temperatures. The influence of the length of reaction time was investigated by studying the evolution of product morphology over time. It was observed that while spontaneous nucleation at higher temperature followed by controlled growth led to the predominant formation of short nanorods, with longer reaction time, the nanorods were further converted to nanoparticles. The size of the nanoparticles obtained, was mostly in the range of 10-15 nm. The key finding of this work is exceptionally high coercivity in CoAs nanostructures for the first time. Coercivity observed was as high as 0.1 T (1000 Oe) at 2 K. These kinds of magnetic nanostructures find multiple applications in spintronics, whereas the superparamagnetic nanoparticles are viable for use in magnetic storage, ferrofluids and as contrast enhancing agents in MRI.

  10. Crystal structure of human mitochondrial acyl-CoA thioesterase (ACOT2)

    PubMed Central

    Mandel, Corey R.; Tweel, Benjamin; Tong, Liang

    2009-01-01

    Acyl-CoA thioesterases (ACOTs) catalyze the hydrolysis of CoA esters to free CoA and carboxylic acids and have important functions in lipid metabolism and other cellular processes. Type I ACOTs are found only in animals and contain an α/β hydrolase domain, through currently no structural information is available on any of these enzymes. We report here the crystal structure at 2.1 Å resolution of human mitochondrial ACOT2, a type I enzyme. The structure contains two domains, N and C domains. The C domain has the α/β hydrolase fold, with the catalytic triad Ser294-His422-Asp388. The N domain contains a seven-stranded β-sandwich, which has some distant structural homologs in other proteins. The active site is located in a large pocket at the interface between the two domains. The structural information has significant relevance for other type I ACOTs and related enzymes. PMID:19497300

  11. Crystal structure of human mitochondrial acyl-CoA thioesterase (ACOT2).

    PubMed

    Mandel, Corey R; Tweel, Benjamin; Tong, Liang

    2009-08-07

    Acyl-CoA thioesterases (ACOTs) catalyze the hydrolysis of CoA esters to free CoA and carboxylic acids and have important functions in lipid metabolism and other cellular processes. Type I ACOTs are found only in animals and contain an alpha/beta hydrolase domain, through currently no structural information is available on any of these enzymes. We report here the crystal structure at 2.1A resolution of human mitochondrial ACOT2, a type I enzyme. The structure contains two domains, N and C domains. The C domain has the alpha/beta hydrolase fold, with the catalytic triad Ser294-His422-Asp388. The N domain contains a seven-stranded beta-sandwich, which has some distant structural homologs in other proteins. The active site is located in a large pocket at the interface between the two domains. The structural information has significant relevance for other type I ACOTs and related enzymes.

  12. Studies of Human 2,4-Dienoyl CoA Reductase Shed New Light on Peroxisomal β-Oxidation of Unsaturated Fatty Acids

    SciTech Connect

    Hua, Tian; Wu, Dong; Ding, Wei; Wang, Jiangyun; Shaw, Neil; Liu, Zhi-Jie

    2012-10-15

    Peroxisomes play an essential role in maintaining fatty acid homeostasis. Although mitochondria are also known to participate in the catabolism of fatty acids via β-oxidation, differences exist between the peroxisomal and mitochondrial β-oxidation. Only peroxisomes, but not mitochondrion, can shorten very long chain fatty acids. Here, we describe the crystal structure of a ternary complex of peroxisomal 2,4-dienoyl CoA reductases (pDCR) with hexadienoyl CoA and NADP, as a prototype for comparison with the mitochondrial 2,4-dienoyl CoA reductase (mDCR) to shed light on the differences between the enzymes from the two organelles at the molecular level. Unexpectedly, the structure of pDCR refined to 1.84 Å resolution reveals the absence of the tyrosine-serine pair seen in the active site of mDCR, which together with a lysine and an asparagine have been deemed a hallmark of the SDR family of enzymes. Instead, aspartate hydrogen-bonded to the Cα hydroxyl via a water molecule seems to perturb the water molecule for protonation of the substrate. Our studies provide the first structural evidence for participation of water in the DCR-catalyzed reactions. Biochemical studies and structural analysis suggest that pDCRs can catalyze the shortening of six-carbon-long substrates in vitro. However, the Km values of pDCR for short chain acyl CoAs are at least 6-fold higher than those for substrates with 10 or more aliphatic carbons. Unlike mDCR, hinge movements permit pDCR to process very long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids.

  13. Interactions of acyl-coenzyme A with phosphatidylcholine bilayers and serum albumin

    SciTech Connect

    Boylan, J.G.; Hamilton, J.A. )

    1992-01-21

    Interactions of oleoyl- and octanoyl-coenzyme A (CoA) with phosphatidylcholine (PC) vesicles and bovine serum albumin (BSA) were investigated by NMR spectroscopy. Binding of acyl-CoA to small unilamellar PC vesicles and to BSA was detected by changes in {sup 13}C and {sup 31}P chemical shifts relative to the chemical shifts for aqueous acyl-CoA. PC vesicles remained intact with {le} 15 mol % oleoyl-CoA, while higher oleoyl-CoA proportions produced mixed micelles. In contrast, {sup 13}C spectra revealed rapid exchange (ms) of octanoyl-CoA between the aqueous phase and PC vesicles and a low affinity for the bilayer. Thus, the binding affinity of acyl-CoA for PC bilayers is dependent on the acyl chain length. Addition of ({sup 13}C)carboxyl-enriched oleic acid to oleoyl-CoA/BSA mixtures revealed simultaneous binding of oleic acid and oleoyl-CoA to BSA, with some perturbation of binding interactions. Thus, BSA contains multiple binding sites for oleoyl-CoA and can bind fatty acid and acyl-CoA simultaneously.

  14. Effect of salicylic acid and diclofenac on the medium-chain and long-chain acyl-CoA formation in the liver and brain of mouse.

    PubMed

    Kasuya, Fumiyo; Kazumi, Maya; Tatsuki, Takao; Suzuki, Risa

    2009-07-01

    Medium-chain and long-chain acyl-CoA esters are key metabolites in fatty acid metabolism. Effects of salicylic acid on the in vivo formation of acyl-CoAs in mouse liver and brain were investigated. Further, inhibition of the medium-chain and long-chain acyl-CoA synthetases by salicylic acid and diclofenac was determined in mouse liver and brain mitochondria. Acyl-CoA esters were analyzed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The amounts of medium-chain acyl-CoAs (C(6), C(8) and C(10)) were less than long-chain acyl-CoAs (C(16:0), C(18:0), C(18:1) and C(20:4)) in both liver and brain. The administration of salicylic acid decreased the levels of both the medium-chain (C(6), C(8) and C(10)) and long-chain acyl-CoAs (C(16:0), C(18:0), C(18:1) and C(20:4)) in liver. In brain, however, only long-chain acyl-CoAs were decreased. The level of salicylyl-CoA detected in brain was about 12% of that in liver. Salicylic acid had a strong inhibitory activity (IC(50) = 0.1 mm) for the liver mitochondrial formation of hexanoyl-CoA from hexanoic acid, whereas diclofenac was weak (IC(50) = 4.4 mm). In contrast, diclofenac (IC(50) = 1.4 mm) inhibited the liver mitochondrial long-chain acyl-CoA synthetases more potently than salicylic acid (IC(50) = 25.5 mm). Similar inhibitory activities for the acyl-CoA synthetases were obtained in the case of the brain and liver mitochondria, except for the weak inhibition of brain medium-chain acyl-CoA synthetases by salicylic acid (IC(50) = 1.8 mm). These findings suggest that salicylic acid and diclofenac exhibit different mechanisms of inhibition of fatty acid metabolism depending on the length of the acyl chain and tissues, and they may contribute to the further understanding of the toxic effects associated with these drugs.

  15. Molecular cloning and sequencing of a cDNA encoding the thioesterase domain of the rat fatty acid synthetase.

    PubMed

    Naggert, J; Witkowski, A; Mikkelsen, J; Smith, S

    1988-01-25

    A cloned cDNA containing the entire coding sequence for the long-chain S-acyl fatty acid synthetase thioester hydrolase (thioesterase I) component as well as the 3'-noncoding region of the fatty acid synthetase has been isolated using an expression vector and domain-specific antibodies. The coding region was assigned to the thioesterase I domain by identification of sequences coding for characterized peptide fragments, amino-terminal analysis of the isolated thioesterase I domain and the presence of the serine esterase active-site sequence motif. The thioesterase I domain is 306 amino acids long with a calculated molecular mass of 33,476 daltons; its DNA is flanked at the 5'-end by a region coding for the acyl carrier protein domain and at the 3'-end by a 1,537-base pairs-long noncoding sequence with a poly(A) tail. The thioesterase I domain exhibits a low, albeit discernible, homology with the discrete medium-chain S-acyl fatty acid synthetase thioester hydrolases (thioesterase II) from rat mammary gland and duck uropygial gland, suggesting a distant but common evolutionary ancestry for these proteins.

  16. Modulation of FadR Binding Capacity for Acyl-CoA Fatty Acids Through Structure-Guided Mutagenesis

    DOE PAGES

    Bacik, John-Paul; Yeager, Chris M.; Twary, Scott N.; ...

    2015-09-18

    FadR is a versatile global regulator in Escherichia coli that controls fatty acid metabolism and thereby modulates the ability of this bacterium to grow using fatty acids or acetate as the sole carbon source. FadR regulates fatty acid metabolism in response to intra-cellular concentrations of acyl-CoA lipids. The ability of FadR to bind acyl-CoA fatty acids is hence of significant interest for the engineering of biosynthetic pathways for the production of lipid-based biofuels and commodity chemicals. Based on the available crystal structure of E. coli bound to myristoyl- CoA, we predicted amino acid positions within the effector binding pocket thatmore » would alter the ability of FadR to bind acyl-CoA fatty acids without affecting DNA binding. We utilized fluorescence polarization to characterize the in-vitro binding properties of wild type and mutant FadR. We found that a Leu102Ala mutant enhanced binding of the effector, likely by increasing the size of the binding pocket for the acyl moiety of the molecule. Conversely, the elimination of the guanidine side chain (Arg213Ala and Arg213Met mutants) of the CoA moiety binding site severely diminished the ability of FadR to bind the acyl-CoA effector. These results demonstrate the ability to fine tune FadR binding capacity. The validation of an efficient method to fully characterize all the binding events involved in the specific activity (effector and DNA operator binding) of FadR has allowed us to increase our understanding of the role of specific amino acids in the binding and recognition of acyl-CoA fatty acids and will greatly facilitate efforts aimed at engineering tunable FadR regulators for synthetic biology.« less

  17. Modulation of FadR Binding Capacity for Acyl-CoA Fatty Acids Through Structure-Guided Mutagenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Bacik, John-Paul; Yeager, Chris M.; Twary, Scott N.; Martí-Arbona, Ricardo

    2015-09-18

    FadR is a versatile global regulator in Escherichia coli that controls fatty acid metabolism and thereby modulates the ability of this bacterium to grow using fatty acids or acetate as the sole carbon source. FadR regulates fatty acid metabolism in response to intra-cellular concentrations of acyl-CoA lipids. The ability of FadR to bind acyl-CoA fatty acids is hence of significant interest for the engineering of biosynthetic pathways for the production of lipid-based biofuels and commodity chemicals. Based on the available crystal structure of E. coli bound to myristoyl- CoA, we predicted amino acid positions within the effector binding pocket that would alter the ability of FadR to bind acyl-CoA fatty acids without affecting DNA binding. We utilized fluorescence polarization to characterize the in-vitro binding properties of wild type and mutant FadR. We found that a Leu102Ala mutant enhanced binding of the effector, likely by increasing the size of the binding pocket for the acyl moiety of the molecule. Conversely, the elimination of the guanidine side chain (Arg213Ala and Arg213Met mutants) of the CoA moiety binding site severely diminished the ability of FadR to bind the acyl-CoA effector. These results demonstrate the ability to fine tune FadR binding capacity. The validation of an efficient method to fully characterize all the binding events involved in the specific activity (effector and DNA operator binding) of FadR has allowed us to increase our understanding of the role of specific amino acids in the binding and recognition of acyl-CoA fatty acids and will greatly facilitate efforts aimed at engineering tunable FadR regulators for synthetic biology.

  18. Acylation of Ferrocene: A Greener Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birdwhistell, Kurt R.; Nguyen, Andy; Ramos, Eric J.; Kobelja, Robert

    2008-01-01

    The acylation of ferrocene is a common reaction used in organic laboratories to demonstrate Friedel-Crafts acylation and the purification of compounds using column chromatography. This article describes an acylation of ferrocene experiment that is more eco-friendly than the conventional acylation experiment. The traditional experiment was modified…

  19. Concentrations of long-chain acyl-acyl carrier proteins during fatty acid synthesis by chloroplasts isolated from pea (Pisum sativum), safflower (Carthamus tinctoris), and amaranthus (Amaranthus lividus) leaves

    SciTech Connect

    Roughan, G.; Nishida, I. )

    1990-01-01

    Fatty acid synthesis from (1-14C)acetate by chloroplasts isolated from peas and amaranthus was linear for at least 15 min, whereas incorporation of the tracer into long-chain acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) did not increase after 2-3 min. When reactions were transferred to the dark after 3-5 min, long-chain acyl-ACPs lost about 90% of their radioactivity and total fatty acids retained all of theirs. Half-lives of the long-chain acyl-ACPs were estimated to be 10-15 s. Concentrations of palmitoyl-, stearoyl-, and oleoyl-ACP as indicated by equilibrium labeling during steady-state fatty acid synthesis, ranged from 0.6-1.1, 0.2-0.7, and 0.4-1.6 microM, respectively, for peas and from 1.6-1.9, 1.3-2.6, and 0.6-1.4 microM, respectively, for amaranthus. These values are based on a chloroplast volume of 47 microliters/mg chlorophyll and varied according to the mode of the incubation. A slow increase in activity of the fatty acid synthetase in safflower chloroplasts resulted in long-chain acyl-ACPs continuing to incorporate labeled acetate for 10 min. Upon re-illumination following a dark break, however, both fatty acid synthetase activity and acyl-ACP concentrations increased very rapidly. Palmitoyl-ACP was present at concentrations up to 2.5 microM in safflower chloroplasts, whereas those of stearoyl- and oleoyl-ACPs were in the lower ranges measured for peas. Acyl-ACPs were routinely separated from extracts of chloroplasts that had been synthesising long-chain fatty acids from labeled acetate by a minor modification of the method of Mancha et al. The results compared favorably with those obtained using alternative analytical methods such as adsorption to filter paper and partition chromatography on silicic acid columns.

  20. Generation of fatty acids by an acyl esterase in the bioluminescent system of Photobacterium phosphoreum

    SciTech Connect

    Carey, L.M.; Rodriguez, A.; Meighen, E.

    1984-08-25

    The fatty acid reductase complex from Photobacterium phosphoreum has been discovered to have a long chain ester hydrolase activity associated with the 34K protein component of the complex. This protein has been resolved from the other components (50K and 58K) of the fatty acid reductase complex with a purity of > 95% and found to catalyze the transfer of acyl groups from acyl-CoA primarily to thiol acceptors with a low level of transfer to glycerol and water. Addition of the 50K protein of the complex caused a dramatic change in specificity increasing the transfer to oxygen acceptors. The acyl-CoA hydrolase activity increased almost 10-fold, and hence free fatty acids can be generated by the 34K protein when it is present in the fatty acid reductase complex. Hydrolysis of acyl-S-mercaptoethanol and acyl-1-glycerol and the ATP-dependent reduction of the released fatty acids to aldehyde for the luminescent reaction were also demonstrated for the reconstituted fatty acid reductase complex, raising the possibility that the immediate source of fatty acids for this reaction in vivo could be the membrane lipids and/or the fatty acid synthetase system.

  1. Hepatocytes explanted in the spleen preferentially express carbamoylphosphate synthetase rather than glutamine synthetase.

    PubMed

    Lamers, W H; Been, W; Charles, R; Moorman, A F

    1990-10-01

    Urea cycle enzymes and glutamine synthetase are essential for NH3 detoxification and systemic pH homeostasis in mammals. Carbamoylphosphate synthetase, the first and flux-determining enzyme of the cycle, is found only in a large periportal compartment, and glutamine synthetase is found only in a small, complementary pericentral compartment. Because it is not possible to manipulate experimentally the intrahepatic distribution of carbamoylphosphate synthetase and glutamine synthetase, we looked for conditions in which explanted hepatocytes would exhibit either the carbamoylphosphate synthetase phenotype or glutamine synthetase phenotype. In the spleen hepatocytes either settle as individual cells or in small agglomerates. The dispersed cells only express the carbamoylphosphate synthetase phenotype. Within the agglomerates, sinusoids that drain on venules develop. Hepatocytes surrounding the venules stain only weakly for carbamoylphosphate synthetase but are strongly positive for glutamine synthetase. These observations were made for explanted embryonic hepatocytes (no prior expression of either carbamoylphosphate synthetase or glutamine synthetase), neonatal hepatocytes (compartments of gene expression not yet established) and adult periportal and pericentral hepatocytes.

  2. Mycobacterium tuberculosis beta-ketoacyl acyl carrier protein synthase III (mtFabH) assay: principles and method.

    PubMed

    Sachdeva, Sarbjot; Reynolds, Kevin A

    2008-01-01

    Fatty acid biosynthesis is one of the relatively newer targets in antibacterial drug discovery. The presence of distinct fatty acid synthases (FAS) in mammals and bacteria and the fact that most bacterial FAS enzymes are essential for viability make this a very attractive antimicrobial drug target. The enzyme beta-ketoacyl ACP synthase (KASIII or FabH) is the key enzyme that initiates fatty acid biosynthesis in a type II dissociated FAS. This enzyme catalyzes the condensation of acyl CoA and malonyl ACP (acyl carrier protein) to form a beta-ketoacyl ACP product, which is further processed to form mature fatty acids that are involved in various essential cellular processes and structures like phospholipid biosynthesis, cell wall formation, etc. Herein we describe a new assay for the Mycobacterium tuberculosis FabH (mtFabH) enzyme involved in a key initiation step in the synthesis of mycolic acids, which are an integral component of the cell wall. The assay eliminates the need for the cumbersome washing steps or specialty scintillation proximity assay beads and the preparation of acyl carrier proteins required in other assay formats. This discontinuous assay involves the reduction of radiolabled long-chain beta-ketoacyl CoA product to its dihydroxy derivative, which partitions into a nonpolar phase for quantitation, while the reduced radiolabeled substrate derivative remains in the aqueous phase.

  3. Adenosine 5'-tetraphosphate and adenosine 5'-pentaphosphate are synthesized by yeast acetyl coenzyme A synthetase.

    PubMed Central

    Guranowski, A; Günther Sillero, M A; Sillero, A

    1994-01-01

    Yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) acetyl coenzyme A (CoA) synthetase (EC 6.2.1.1) catalyzes the synthesis of adenosine 5'-tetraphosphate (P4A) and adenosine 5'-pentaphosphate (p5A) from ATP and tri- or tetrapolyphosphate (P3 or P4), with relative velocities of 7:1, respectively. Of 12 nucleotides tested as potential donors of nucleotidyl moiety, only ATP, adenosine-5'-O-[3-thiotriphosphate], and acetyl-AMP were substrates, with relative velocities of 100, 62, and 80, respectively. The Km values for ATP, P3, and acetyl-AMP were 0.16, 4.7, and 1.8 mM, respectively. The synthesis of p4A could proceed in the absence of exogenous acetate but was stimulated twofold by acetate, with an apparent Km value of 0.065 mM. CoA did not participate in the synthesis of p4A (p5A) and inhibited the reaction (50% inhibitory concentration of 0.015 mM). At pH 6.3, which was optimum for formation of p4A (p5A), the rate of acetyl-CoA synthesis (1.84 mumol mg-1 min-1) was 245 times faster than the rate of synthesis of p4A measured in the presence of acetate. The known formation of p4A (p5A) in yeast sporulation and the role of acetate may therefore be related to acetyl-CoA synthetase. Images PMID:7910605

  4. Use of sustainable chemistry to produce an acyl amino acid surfactant.

    PubMed

    Reznik, Gabriel O; Vishwanath, Prashanth; Pynn, Michelle A; Sitnik, Joy M; Todd, Jeffrey J; Wu, Jun; Jiang, Yan; Keenan, Brendan G; Castle, Andrew B; Haskell, Richard F; Smith, Temple F; Somasundaran, Ponisseril; Jarrell, Kevin A

    2010-05-01

    Surfactants find wide commercial use as foaming agents, emulsifiers, and dispersants. Currently, surfactants are produced from petroleum, or from seed oils such as palm or coconut oil. Due to concerns with CO(2) emissions and the need to protect rainforests, there is a growing necessity to manufacture these chemicals using sustainable resources In this report, we describe the engineering of a native nonribosomal peptide synthetase pathway (i.e., surfactin synthetase), to generate a Bacillus strain that synthesizes a highly water-soluble acyl amino acid surfactant, rather than the water insoluble lipopeptide surfactin. This novel product has a lower CMC and higher water solubility than myristoyl glutamate, a commercial surfactant. This surfactant is produced by fermentation of cellulosic carbohydrate as feedstock. This method of surfactant production provides an approach to sustainable manufacturing of new surfactants.

  5. Production of a Brassica napus Low-Molecular Mass Acyl-Coenzyme A-Binding Protein in Arabidopsis Alters the Acyl-Coenzyme A Pool and Acyl Composition of Oil in Seeds1[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Yurchenko, Olga; Singer, Stacy D.; Nykiforuk, Cory L.; Gidda, Satinder; Mullen, Robert T.; Moloney, Maurice M.; Weselake, Randall J.

    2014-01-01

    Low-molecular mass (10 kD) cytosolic acyl-coenzyme A-binding protein (ACBP) has a substantial influence over fatty acid (FA) composition in oilseeds, possibly via an effect on the partitioning of acyl groups between elongation and desaturation pathways. Previously, we demonstrated that the expression of a Brassica napus ACBP (BnACBP) complementary DNA in the developing seeds of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) resulted in increased levels of polyunsaturated FAs at the expense of eicosenoic acid (20:1cisΔ11) and saturated FAs in seed oil. In this study, we investigated whether alterations in the FA composition of seed oil at maturity were correlated with changes in the acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) pool in developing seeds of transgenic Arabidopsis expressing BnACBP. Our results indicated that both the acyl-CoA pool and seed oil of transgenic Arabidopsis lines expressing cytosolic BnACBP exhibited relative increases in linoleic acid (18:2cisΔ9,12; 17.9%–44.4% and 7%–13.2%, respectively) and decreases in 20:1cisΔ11 (38.7%–60.7% and 13.8%–16.3%, respectively). However, alterations in the FA composition of the acyl-CoA pool did not always correlate with those seen in the seed oil. In addition, we found that targeting of BnACBP to the endoplasmic reticulum resulted in FA compositional changes that were similar to those seen in lines expressing cytosolic BnACBP, with the most prominent exception being a relative reduction in α-linolenic acid (18:3cisΔ9,12,15) in both the acyl-CoA pool and seed oil of the former (48.4%–48.9% and 5.3%–10.4%, respectively). Overall, these data support the role of ACBP in acyl trafficking in developing seeds and validate its use as a biotechnological tool for modifying the FA composition of seed oil. PMID:24740000

  6. Mitochondrial storage form of acetyl CoA carboxylase in fasted and alloxan diabetic rats

    SciTech Connect

    Roman-Lopez, C.R.; Allred, J.B.

    1986-05-01

    Sodium dodecyl sulfate-denatured biotinyl proteins will bind (/sup 14/C)methyl avidin which remains bound through polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The method has been used to demonstrate the presence of two high molecular weight subunit forms of acetyl CoA carboxylase in rat liver cytoplasm, both of which are precipitated by antibody to purifed rat liver acetyl CoA carboxylase prepared from sheep serum. Rat liver mitochondria contained five distinct biotinyl protein subunits, the two largest of which have been identified as acetyl CoA carboxylase subunits on the basis of precipitation by anti-acetyl CoA carboxylase antibody. The small quantity of acetyl CoA carboxylase associated with rat liver microsomes could be attributed to cytoplasmic contamination. The binding of radioactive avidin is sufficiently tight to use as a measure of the quantity of acetyl CoA carboxylase. The quantity and activity of the cytoplasmic enzyme was reduced in fasted and in alloxan diabetic rats compared to that in fed controls but the quantity of the enzyme associated with isolated mitochondria was not reduced. The results indicate that there is a mitochondrial storage form of acetyl CoA carboxylase.

  7. Investigations into the post-translational modification and mechanism of isopenicillin N:acyl-CoA acyltransferase using electrospray mass spectrometry.

    PubMed Central

    Aplin, R T; Baldwin, J E; Roach, P L; Robinson, C V; Schofield, C J

    1993-01-01

    Electrospray mass spectrometry (e.s.m.s.) was used to confirm the position of the post-translational cleavage of the isopenicillin N:acyl-CoA acyltransferase preprotein to give the alpha- and beta-subunits. The e.s.m.s. studies suggested partial modification of the alpha-subunit in vivo by exogenously added substituted acetic acids. E.s.m.s. has also allowed the observation in vitro of the transfer of the acyl group from several acyl-CoAs to the beta-subunit. N.m.r. data for the CoA species have been deposited as Supplementary Publication SUP 500173 (2 pages) at the British Library Document Supply Centre (DSC), Boston Spa, Wetherby, West Yorkshire LS23 7BQ, from whom copies can be obtained on the terms indicated in Biochem. J. (1993) 289, 9. Images Figure 1 PMID:8396910

  8. Radioimmune assay of human platelet prostaglandin synthetase

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, G.J.; Machuga, E.T.

    1982-02-01

    Normal platelet function depends, in part, on platelet PG synthesis. PG synthetase (cyclo-oxygenase) catalyzes the first step in PG synthesis, the formation of PGH/sub 2/ from arachidonic acid. Inhibition of the enzyme by ASA results in an abnormality in the platelet release reaction. Patients with pparent congenital abnormalities in the enzyme have been described, and the effects have been referred to as ''aspirin-like'' defects of the platelet function. These patients lack platelet PG synthetase activity, but the actual content of PG synthetase protein in these individuals' platelets is unknown. Therefore an RIA for human platelet PG synthetase would provide new information, useful in assessing the aspirin-like defects of platelet function. An RIA for human platelet PG synthetase is described. The assay utilizes a rabbit antibody directed against the enzyme and (/sup 125/I)-labelled sheep PG synthetase as antigen. The human platelet enzyme is assayed by its ability to inhibit precipitation of the (/sup 125/I)antigen. The assay is sensitive to 1 ng of enzyme. By the immune assay, human platelets contain approximately 1200 ng of PG synethetase protein per 1.5 mg of platelet protein (approximately 10/sup 9/ platelets). This content corresponds to 10,000 enzyme molecules per platelet. The assay provides a rapid and convenient assay for the human platelet enzyme, and it can be applied to the assessment of patients with apparent platelet PG synthetase (cyclo-oxygenase) deficiency.

  9. Gene encoding plant asparagine synthetase

    DOEpatents

    Coruzzi, Gloria M.; Tsai, Fong-Ying

    1993-10-26

    The identification and cloning of the gene(s) for plant asparagine synthetase (AS), an important enzyme involved in the formation of asparagine, a major nitrogen transport compound of higher plants is described. Expression vectors constructed with the AS coding sequence may be utilized to produce plant AS; to engineer herbicide resistant plants, salt/drought tolerant plants or pathogen resistant plants; as a dominant selectable marker; or to select for novel herbicides or compounds useful as agents that synchronize plant cells in culture. The promoter for plant AS, which directs high levels of gene expression and is induced in an organ specific manner and by darkness, is also described. The AS promoter may be used to direct the expression of heterologous coding sequences in appropriate hosts.

  10. Functional reconstitution of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis long-chain acyl-CoA carboxylase from multiple acyl-CoA subunits.

    PubMed

    Bazet Lyonnet, Bernardo; Diacovich, Lautaro; Gago, Gabriela; Spina, Lucie; Bardou, Fabienne; Lemassu, Anne; Quémard, Annaïk; Gramajo, Hugo

    2017-02-21

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis produces a large number of structurally diverse lipids that have been implicated in the pathogenicity, persistence and antibiotic resistance of this organism. Most building blocks involved in the biosynthesis of all these lipids are generated by acyl-CoA carboxylases (ACCase) whose subunit composition and physiological roles have not yet been clearly established. A rather controversial data in the literature refers to the exact protein composition and substrate specificity of the enzyme complex that produces the long-chain α-carboxy-acyl-CoAs; one of the substrates involved in the last step of condensation mediated by the polyketide synthase Pks13 to synthesize mature mycolic acids. Here we have successfully reconstituted the so called long-chain acyl-CoA carboxylase complex (LCC) from its purified components: the α-subunit AccA3, the ε-subunit AccE5 and the two β-subunits AccD4 and AccD5, and demonstrated that the four subunits are essential for its LCC activity. Furthermore, we also showed by substrate competition experiments and the use of a specific inhibitor of the AccD5 subunit, that its role in the carboxylation of the long acyl-CoAs, as part of the LCC complex, was structural rather than catalytic. Moreover, AccD5 was also able to carboxylate its natural substrates, acetyl-CoA and propionyl-CoA, in the context of the LCC enzyme complex. Thus, the supercomplex formed by these four subunits has the potential to generate the main substrates, malonyl-CoA, methylmalonyl-CoA and α-carboxy-C24-26 -CoA, used as condensing units for the biosynthesis of all the lipids present in this pathogen. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  11. Biochemical and Structural Characterization of Germicidin Synthase: Analysis of a Type III Polyketide Synthase That Employs Acyl-ACP as a Starter Unit Donor

    SciTech Connect

    Chemler, Joseph A.; Buchholz, Tonia J.; Geders, Todd W.; Akey, David L.; Rath, Christopher M.; Chlipala, George E.; Smith, Janet L.; Sherman, David H.

    2012-08-10

    Germicidin synthase (Gcs) from Streptomyces coelicolor is a type III polyketide synthase (PKS) with broad substrate flexibility for acyl groups linked through a thioester bond to either coenzyme A (CoA) or acyl carrier protein (ACP). Germicidin synthesis was reconstituted in vitro by coupling Gcs with fatty acid biosynthesis. Since Gcs has broad substrate flexibility, we directly compared the kinetic properties of Gcs with both acyl-ACP and acyl-CoA. The catalytic efficiency of Gcs for acyl-ACP was 10-fold higher than for acyl-CoA, suggesting a strong preference toward carrier protein starter unit transfer. The 2.9 {angstrom} germicidin synthase crystal structure revealed canonical type III PKS architecture along with an unusual helical bundle of unknown function that appears to extend the dimerization interface. A pair of arginine residues adjacent to the active site affect catalytic activity but not ACP binding. This investigation provides new and surprising information about the interactions between type III PKSs and ACPs that will facilitate the construction of engineered systems for production of novel polyketides.

  12. Mitochondrial disease genes COA6, COX6B and SCO2 have overlapping roles in COX2 biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Alok; Pratt, Anthony T.; Soma, Shivatheja; Theriault, Sarah G.; Griffin, Aaron T.; Trivedi, Prachi P.; Gohil, Vishal M.

    2016-01-01

    Biogenesis of cytochrome c oxidase (CcO), the terminal enzyme of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, is a complex process facilitated by several assembly factors. Pathogenic mutations were recently reported in one such assembly factor, COA6, and our previous work linked Coa6 function to mitochondrial copper metabolism and expression of Cox2, a copper-containing subunit of CcO. However, the precise role of Coa6 in Cox2 biogenesis remained unknown. Here we show that yeast Coa6 is an orthologue of human COA6, and like Cox2, is regulated by copper availability, further implicating it in copper delivery to Cox2. In order to place Coa6 in the Cox2 copper delivery pathway, we performed a comprehensive genetic epistasis analysis in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and found that simultaneous deletion of Coa6 and Sco2, a mitochondrial copper metallochaperone, or Coa6 and Cox12/COX6B, a structural subunit of CcO, completely abrogates Cox2 biogenesis. Unlike Coa6 deficient cells, copper supplementation fails to rescue Cox2 levels of these double mutants. Overexpression of Cox12 or Sco proteins partially rescues the coa6Δ phenotype, suggesting their overlapping but non-redundant roles in copper delivery to Cox2. These genetic data are strongly corroborated by biochemical studies demonstrating physical interactions between Coa6, Cox2, Cox12 and Sco proteins. Furthermore, we show that patient mutations in Coa6 disrupt Coa6–Cox2 interaction, providing the biochemical basis for disease pathogenesis. Taken together, these results place COA6 in the copper delivery pathway to CcO and, surprisingly, link it to a previously unidentified function of CcO subunit Cox12 in Cox2 biogenesis. PMID:26669719

  13. Ghrelin acylation and metabolic control.

    PubMed

    Al Massadi, O; Tschöp, M H; Tong, J

    2011-11-01

    Since its discovery, many physiologic functions have been ascribed to ghrelin, a gut derived hormone. The presence of a median fatty acid side chain on the ghrelin peptide is required for the binding and activation of the classical ghrelin receptor, the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR)-1a. Ghrelin O-acyl transferase (GOAT) was recently discovered as the enzyme responsible for this acylation process. GOAT is expressed in all tissues that have been found to express ghrelin and has demonstrated actions on several complex endocrine organ systems such as the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal, insular and adrenal axis as well as the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, bone and gustatory system. Ghrelin acylation is dependent on the function of GOAT and the availability of substrates such as proghrelin and short- to medium-chain fatty acids (MCFAs). This process is governed by GOAT activity and has been shown to be modified by dietary lipids. In this review, we provided evidence that support an important role of GOAT in the regulation of energy homeostasis and glucose metabolism by modulating acyl ghrelin (AG) production. The relevance of GOAT and AG during periods of starvation remains to be defined. In addition, we summarized the recent literature on the metabolic effects of GOAT specific inhibitors and shared our view on the potential of targeting GOAT for the treatment of metabolic disorders such as obesity and type 2 diabetes.

  14. In vitro acylation of okadaic acid in the presence of various bivalves' extracts.

    PubMed

    Konoki, Keiichi; Onoda, Tatsuya; Watanabe, Ryuichi; Cho, Yuko; Kaga, Shinnosuke; Suzuki, Toshiyuki; Yotsu-Yamashita, Mari

    2013-01-29

    The dinoflagellate Dinophysis spp. is responsible for diarrhetic shellfish poisoning (DSP). In the bivalves exposed to the toxic bloom of the dinoflagellate, dinophysistoxin 3 (DTX3), the 7-OH acylated form of either okadaic acid (OA) or DTX1, is produced. We demonstrated in vitro acylation of OA with palmitoyl CoA in the presence of protein extract from the digestive gland, but not other tissues of the bivalve Mizuhopecten yessoensis. The yield of 7-O-palmitoyl OA reached its maximum within 2 h, was the highest at 37 °C followed by 28 °C, 16 °C and 4 °C and was the highest at pH 8 in comparison with the yields at pH 6 and pH 4. The transformation also proceeded when the protein extract was prepared from the bivalves Corbicula japonica and Crassostrea gigas. The OA binding protein OABP2 identified in the sponge Halichondria okadai was not detected in the bivalve M. yessoensis, the bivalve Mytilus galloprovincialis and the ascidian Halocynthia roretzi, though they are known to accumulate diarrhetic shellfish poisoning toxins. Since DTX3 does not bind to protein phosphatases 1 and 2A, the physiological target for OA and DTXs in mammalian cells, the acylation of DSP toxins would be related to a detoxification mechanism for the bivalve species.

  15. Genetics Home Reference: holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... use of biotin, a B vitamin found in foods such as liver, egg yolks, and milk. Holocarboxylase synthetase attaches biotin to certain enzymes that are essential for the normal production and breakdown of proteins, fats, and carbohydrates in ...

  16. Mutations in COA6 cause cytochrome c oxidase deficiency and neonatal hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Baertling, Fabian; A M van den Brand, Mariel; Hertecant, Jozef L; Al-Shamsi, Aisha; P van den Heuvel, Lambert; Distelmaier, Felix; Mayatepek, Ertan; Smeitink, Jan A; Nijtmans, Leo G J; Rodenburg, Richard J T

    2015-01-01

    COA6/C1ORF31 is involved in cytochrome c oxidase (complex IV) biogenesis. We present a new pathogenic COA6 variant detected in a patient with neonatal hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and isolated complex IV deficiency. For the first time, clinical details about a COA6-deficient patient are given and patient fibroblasts are functionally characterized: COA6 protein is undetectable and steady-state levels of complex IV and several of its subunits are reduced. The monomeric COX1 assembly intermediate accumulates. Using pulse-chase experiments, we demonstrate an increased turnover of mitochondrial encoded complex IV subunits. Although monomeric complex IV is decreased in patient fibroblasts, the CI/CIII2 /CIVn -supercomplexes remain unaffected. Copper supplementation shows a partial rescue of complex IV deficiency in patient fibroblasts. We conclude that COA6 is required for complex IV subunit stability. Furthermore, the proposed role in the copper delivery pathway to complex IV subunits is substantiated and a therapeutic lead for COA6-deficient patients is provided.

  17. Structural characterization and comparison of three acyl-carrier-protein synthases from pathogenic bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Halavaty, Andrei S.; Kim, Youngchang; Minasov, George; Shuvalova, Ludmilla; Dubrovska, Ievgeniia; Winsor, James; Zhou, Min; Onopriyenko, Olena; Skarina, Tatiana; Papazisi, Leka; Kwon, Keehwan; Peterson, Scott N.; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Savchenko, Alexei; Anderson, Wayne F.

    2012-10-01

    The structural characterization of acyl-carrier-protein synthase (AcpS) from three different pathogenic microorganisms is reported. One interesting finding of the present work is a crystal artifact related to the activity of the enzyme, which fortuitously represents an opportunity for a strategy to design a potential inhibitor of a pathogenic AcpS. Some bacterial type II fatty-acid synthesis (FAS II) enzymes have been shown to be important candidates for drug discovery. The scientific and medical quest for new FAS II protein targets continues to stimulate research in this field. One of the possible additional candidates is the acyl-carrier-protein synthase (AcpS) enzyme. Its holo form post-translationally modifies the apo form of an acyl carrier protein (ACP), which assures the constant delivery of thioester intermediates to the discrete enzymes of FAS II. At the Center for Structural Genomics of Infectious Diseases (CSGID), AcpSs from Staphylococcus aureus (AcpS{sub SA}), Vibrio cholerae (AcpS{sub VC}) and Bacillus anthracis (AcpS{sub BA}) have been structurally characterized in their apo, holo and product-bound forms, respectively. The structure of AcpS{sub BA} is emphasized because of the two 3′, 5′-adenosine diphosphate (3′, 5′-ADP) product molecules that are found in each of the three coenzyme A (CoA) binding sites of the trimeric protein. One 3′, 5′-ADP is bound as the 3′, 5′-ADP part of CoA in the known structures of the CoA–AcpS and 3′, 5′-ADP–AcpS binary complexes. The position of the second 3′, 5′-ADP has never been described before. It is in close proximity to the first 3′, 5′-ADP and the ACP-binding site. The coordination of two ADPs in AcpS{sub BA} may possibly be exploited for the design of AcpS inhibitors that can block binding of both CoA and ACP.

  18. Molecular cloning of rat acss3 and characterization of mammalian propionyl-CoA synthetase in the liver mitochondrial matrix.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Yukihiro; Araki, Aya; Maruta, Hitomi; Takahashi, Yoshitaka; Yamashita, Hiromi

    2016-12-21

    Among the three acyl-CoA synthetase short-chain family members (ACSS), ACSS3 is poorly characterized. To characterize ACSS3, we performed molecular cloning and protein expression of rat acss3 and determined its intracellular localization, tissue distribution, and substrate specificity. Transient expression of rat ACSS3 in HeLa cells resulted in a 10-fold increase of acetyl-CoA synthetase activity compared with that in control cells. The acss3 transcripts are expressed in a wide range of tissues, with the highest levels observed in liver tissue followed by kidney tissue. Subcellular fractionation using liver tissue showed that ACSS3 is localized into the mitochondrial matrix. Among the short-chain fatty acids examined, recombinant ACSS3, purified from Escherichia coli cells transformed with the plasmid containing rat acss3, preferentially utilized propionate with a KM value of 0.19 mM. Knockdown of acss3 in HepG2 cells resulted in a significant decrease of ACSS3 expression level and propionyl-CoA synthetase activity in cell lysates. Levels of ACSS3 in the liver and the activity of propionyl-CoA synthetase in the mitochondria were significantly increased by fasting. These results suggested that ACSS3 is a liver mitochondrial matrix enzyme with high affinity to propionic acid, and its expression level is upregulated under ketogenic conditions.

  19. Chemical Reporters for Exploring Protein Acylation

    PubMed Central

    Thinon, Emmanuelle; Hang, Howard C.

    2015-01-01

    Proteins are acylated by a variety of metabolites that regulates many important cellular pathways in all kingdoms of life. Acyl groups in cells can vary in structure from the smallest unit, acetate, to modified long chain fatty acids, all of which can be activated and covalently attached to diverse amino acid side chains and consequently modulate protein function. For example, acetylation of Lys residues can alter the charge state of proteins and generate new recognition elements for protein–protein interactions. Alternatively, long chain fatty-acylation targets proteins to membranes and enables spatial control of cell signalling. To facilitate the analysis of protein acylation in biology, acyl analogues bearing alkyne or azide tags have been developed that enable fluorescent imaging and proteomic profiling of modified proteins using bioorthogonal ligation methods. Herein, we summarize the currently available acylation chemical reporters and highlight their utility to discover and quantify the roles of protein acylation in biology. PMID:25849926

  20. Cloning of nitroalkane oxidase from Fusarium oxysporum identifies a new member of the acyl-CoA dehydrogenase superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Daubner, S. Colette; Gadda, Giovanni; Valley, Michael P.; Fitzpatrick, Paul F.

    2002-01-01

    The flavoprotein nitroalkane oxidase (NAO) from Fusarium oxysporum catalyzes the oxidation of nitroalkanes to the respective aldehydes with production of nitrite and hydrogen peroxide. The sequences of several peptides from the fungal enzyme were used to design oligonucleotides for the isolation of a portion of the NAO gene from an F. oxysporum genomic DNA preparation. This sequence was used to clone the cDNA for NAO from an F. oxysporum cDNA library. The sequence of the cloned cDNA showed that NOA is a member of the acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (ACAD) superfamily. The members of this family share with NAO a mechanism that is initiated by proton removal from carbon, suggesting a common chemical reaction for this superfamily. NAO was expressed in Escherichia coli and the recombinant enzyme was characterized. Recombinant NAO has identical kinetic parameters to enzyme isolated from F. oxysporum but is isolated with oxidized FAD rather than the nitrobutyl-FAD found in the fungal enzyme. NAO purified from E. coli or from F. oxysporum has no detectable ACAD activity on short- or medium-chain acyl CoAs, and medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase and short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase are unable to catalyze oxidation of nitroalkanes. PMID:11867731

  1. Determination of individual long-chain fatty acyl-CoA esters in heart and skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Molaparast-Saless, F; Shrago, E; Spennetta, T L; Donatello, S; Kneeland, L M; Nellis, S H; Liedtke, A J

    1988-05-01

    A method has been developed for determination of individual long-chain fatty acyl-CoA esters from heart and skeletal muscle using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The esters were extracted from freeze-clamped tissue of pig and rat hearts and rat skeletal muscle for analysis on a radially compressed C18 5mu reverse-phase column. Nine peaks in the extract with carbon chain lengths from C12 to C20 that subsequently disappeared on alkaline hydrolysis were identified. The major acyl-CoA peaks were 14:1, 18:2, 16:0 and 18:1 and additionally in rat heart 18:0. Total long-chain acyl-CoA esters obtained by summation of the individual molecular species was 11.34 +/- 1.48 nmol/g wet wt. pig heart; 14.51 +/- 2.11 nmol/g wet wt. in rat heart, and 4.35 +/- 0.71 nmol/g wet wt. in rat skeletal muscle. These values were approximately 132% of those obtained using a separate procedure that measured total CoA by HPLC after alkaline hydrolysis of the esters. The described method demonstrates the quantitation of individual acyl-CoA species in muscle tissue. Therefore, it has a number of advantages in that it permits information to be obtained on the individual molecular species under various nutritional and metabolic conditions.

  2. Anatomy of the β-branching enzyme of polyketide biosynthesis and its interaction with an acyl-ACP substrate

    PubMed Central

    Maloney, Finn P.; Gerwick, Lena; Gerwick, William H.; Sherman, David H.; Smith, Janet L.

    2016-01-01

    Alkyl branching at the β position of a polyketide intermediate is an important variation on canonical polyketide natural product biosynthesis. The branching enzyme, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl synthase (HMGS), catalyzes the aldol addition of an acyl donor to a β-keto-polyketide intermediate acceptor. HMGS is highly selective for two specialized acyl carrier proteins (ACPs) that deliver the donor and acceptor substrates. The HMGS from the curacin A biosynthetic pathway (CurD) was examined to establish the basis for ACP selectivity. The donor ACP (CurB) had high affinity for the enzyme (Kd = 0.5 μM) and could not be substituted by the acceptor ACP. High-resolution crystal structures of HMGS alone and in complex with its donor ACP reveal a tight interaction that depends on exquisite surface shape and charge complementarity between the proteins. Selectivity is explained by HMGS binding to an unusual surface cleft on the donor ACP, in a manner that would exclude the acceptor ACP. Within the active site, HMGS discriminates between pre- and postreaction states of the donor ACP. The free phosphopantetheine (Ppant) cofactor of ACP occupies a conserved pocket that excludes the acetyl-Ppant substrate. In comparison with HMG-CoA (CoA) synthase, the homologous enzyme from primary metabolism, HMGS has several differences at the active site entrance, including a flexible-loop insertion, which may account for the specificity of one enzyme for substrates delivered by ACP and the other by CoA. PMID:27573844

  3. Acetyl CoA carboxylase inactivation and meiotic maturation in mouse oocytes.

    PubMed

    Valsangkar, Deepa S; Downs, Stephen M

    2015-09-01

    In mouse oocytes, meiotic induction by pharmacological activation of PRKA (adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase; formerly known as AMPK) or by hormones depends on stimulation of fatty acid oxidation (FAO). PRKA stimulates FAO by phosphorylating and inactivating acetyl CoA carboxylase (ACAC; formerly ACC), leading to decreased malonyl CoA levels and augmenting fatty-acid transport into mitochondria. We investigated a role for ACAC inactivation in meiotic resumption by testing the effect of two ACAC inhibitors, CP-640186 and Soraphen A, on mouse oocytes maintained in meiotic arrest in vitro. These inhibitors significantly stimulated the resumption of meiosis in arrested cumulus cell-enclosed oocytes, denuded oocytes, and follicle-enclosed oocytes. This stimulation was accompanied by an increase in FAO. Etomoxir, a malonyl CoA analogue, prevented meiotic resumption as well as the increase in FAO induced by ACAC inhibition. Citrate, an ACAC activator, and CBM-301106, an inhibitor of malonyl CoA decarboxylase, which converts malonyl CoA to acetyl CoA, suppressed both meiotic induction and FAO induced by follicle-stimulating hormone, presumably by maintaining elevated malonyl CoA levels. Mouse oocyte-cumulus cell complexes contain both isoforms of ACAC (ACACA and ACACB); when wild-type and Acacb(-/-) oocytes characteristics were compared, we found that these single-knockout oocytes showed a significantly higher FAO level and a reduced ability to maintain meiotic arrest, resulting in higher rates of germinal vesicle breakdown. Collectively, these data support the model that ACAC inactivation contributes to the maturation-promoting activity of PRKA through stimulation of FAO.

  4. Acyl-CoA binding protein expression is fiber type- specific and elevated in muscles from the obese insulin-resistant Zucker rat.

    PubMed

    Franch, Jesper; Knudsen, Jens; Ellis, Bronwyn A; Pedersen, Preben K; Cooney, Gregory J; Jensen, Jørgen

    2002-02-01

    Accumulation of acyl-CoA is hypothesized to be involved in development of insulin resistance. Acyl-CoA binds to acyl-CoA binding protein (ACBP) with high affinity, and therefore knowledge about ACBP concentration is important for interpreting acyl-CoA data. In the present study, we used a sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to quantify ACBP concentration in different muscle fiber types. Furthermore, ACBP concentration was compared in muscles from lean and obese Zucker rats. Expression of ACBP was highest in the slow-twitch oxidative soleus muscle and lowest in the fast-twitch glycolytic white gastrocnemius (0.46 +/- 0.02 and 0.16 +/- 0.005 microg/mg protein, respectively). Expression of ACBP was soleus > red gastrocnemius > extensor digitorum longus > white gastrocnemius. Similar fiber type differences were found for carnitine palmitoyl transferase (CPT)-1, and a correlation was observed between ACBP and CPT-1. Muscles from obese Zucker rats had twice the triglyceride content, had approximately twice the long-chain acyl CoA content, and were severely insulin resistant. ACBP concentration was approximately 30% higher in all muscles from obese rats. Activities of CPT-1 and 3-hydroxy-acyl-CoA dehydrogenase were increased in muscles from obese rats, whereas citrate synthase activity was similar. In conclusion, ACBP expression is fiber type-specific with the highest concentration in oxidative muscles and the lowest in glycolytic muscles. The 90% increase in the concentration of acyl-CoA in obese Zucker muscle compared with only a 30% increase in the concentration of ACBP supports the hypothesis that an increased concentration of free acyl-CoA is involved in the development of insulin resistance.

  5. Structural and docking studies of Leucaena leucocephala Cinnamoyl CoA reductase.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Nirmal K; Vindal, Vaibhav; Kumar, Vikash; Kabra, Ashish; Phogat, Navneet; Kumar, Manoj

    2011-03-01

    Lignin, a major constituent of plant call wall, is a phenolic heteropolymer. It plays a major role in the development of plants and their defense mechanism against pathogens. Therefore Lignin biosynthesis is one of the critical metabolic pathways. In lignin biosynthesis, the Cinnamoyl CoA reductase is a key enzyme which catalyzes the first step in the pathway. Cinnamoyl CoA reductase provides the substrates which represent the main transitional molecules of lignin biosynthesis pathway, exhibits a high in vitro kinetic preference for feruloyl CoA. In present study, the three-dimensional model of cinnamoyl CoA reductase was constructed based on the crystal structure of Grape Dihydroflavonol 4-Reductase. Furthermore, the docking studies were performed to understand the substrate interactions to the active site of CCR. It showed that residues ARG51, ASN52, ASP54 and ASN58 were involved in substrate binding. We also suggest that residue ARG51 in CCR is the determinant residue in competitive inhibition of other substrates. This structural and docking information have prospective implications to understand the mechanism of CCR enzymatic reaction with feruloyl CoA, however the approach will be applicable in prediction of substrates and engineering 3D structures of other enzymes as well.

  6. The Physiology of Protein S-acylation

    PubMed Central

    Chamberlain, Luke H.; Shipston, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Protein S-acylation, the only fully reversible posttranslational lipid modification of proteins, is emerging as a ubiquitous mechanism to control the properties and function of a diverse array of proteins and consequently physiological processes. S-acylation results from the enzymatic addition of long-chain lipids, most typically palmitate, onto intracellular cysteine residues of soluble and transmembrane proteins via a labile thioester linkage. Addition of lipid results in increases in protein hydrophobicity that can impact on protein structure, assembly, maturation, trafficking, and function. The recent explosion in global S-acylation (palmitoyl) proteomic profiling as a result of improved biochemical tools to assay S-acylation, in conjunction with the recent identification of enzymes that control protein S-acylation and de-acylation, has opened a new vista into the physiological function of S-acylation. This review introduces key features of S-acylation and tools to interrogate this process, and highlights the eclectic array of proteins regulated including membrane receptors, ion channels and transporters, enzymes and kinases, signaling adapters and chaperones, cell adhesion, and structural proteins. We highlight recent findings correlating disruption of S-acylation to pathophysiology and disease and discuss some of the major challenges and opportunities in this rapidly expanding field. PMID:25834228

  7. Fatty Acid Synthetase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Harold P.; Volkmann, Carol M.; Chao, Fu-Chuan

    1967-01-01

    A light particle fraction of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, obtained from the crude ribosomal material, and containing the fatty acid synthetase, consisted primarily of 27S and 47S components. This fraction has a protein-ribonucleic acid ratio of about 13. Electron micrographs showed particles ranging in diameter between 100 and 300 A in this material. By use of density gradient analysis, the fatty acid synthetase was found in the 47S component. This component contained particles which were predominantly 300 A in diameter and which were considerably flatter than ribosomes, and it consisted almost entirely of protein. Images PMID:6025308

  8. Role of acyl carrier protein isoforms in plant lipid metabolism: Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Ohlrogge, J.B.

    1989-01-01

    Previous research from my lab has revealed that several higher plant species have multiple isoforms of acyl carrier protein (ACP) and therefore this trait appears highly conserved among higher plants. This level of conservation suggests that the existence of ACP isoforms is not merely the results of neutral gene duplications. We have developed techniques to examine a wider range of species. Acyl carrier proteins can be labelled very specifically and to high specific activity using H-palmitate and the E. coli enzyme acyl-ACP synthetase. Isoforms were then resolved by western blotting and native PAGE of H-palmitate labelled ACP's. Multiple isoforms of ACP were observed the leaf tissue of the monocots Avena sativa and Hordeum vulgare and dicots including Arabidopsis thallina, Cuphea wrightii, and Brassica napus. Lower vascular plants including the cycad, Dioon edule, Ginkgo biloba, the gymnosperm Pinus, the fern Anernia phyllitidis and Psilotum nudum, the most primitive known extant vascular plant, were also found to have multiple ACP isoforms as were the nonvascular liverwort, Marchantia and moss, Polytrichum. Therefore, the development of ACP isoforms occurred early in evolution. However, the uniellular alge Chlamydomonas and Dunaliella and the photosynthetic cyanobacteria Synechocystis and Agmnellum have only a single elecrophotetic form of ACP. Thus, multiple forms of ACP do not occur in all photosynthetic organisms but may be associated with multicellular plants.

  9. Modified acyl-ACP desaturase

    DOEpatents

    Cahoon, E.B.; Shanklin, J.; Lindgvist, Y.; Schneider, G.

    1998-01-06

    Disclosed is a method for modifying the chain length and double bond positional specificities of a soluble plant fatty acid desaturase. More specifically, the method involves modifying amino acid contact residues in the substrate binding channel of the soluble fatty acid desaturase which contact the fatty acid. Specifically disclosed is the modification of an acyl-ACP desaturase. Amino acid contact residues which lie within the substrate binding channel are identified, and subsequently replaced with different residues to effect the modification of activity. 1 fig.

  10. Promiscuous methionyl-tRNA synthetase mediates adaptive mistranslation to protect cells against oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin Young; Kim, Dae Gyu; Kim, Byung-Gyu; Yang, Won Suk; Hong, Jeena; Kang, Taehee; Oh, Young Sun; Kim, Kyung Rok; Han, Byung Woo; Hwang, Byung Joon; Kang, Beom Sik; Kang, Mi-Sun; Kim, Myung-Hee; Kwon, Nam Hoon; Kim, Sunghoon

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (ARSs) acylate transfer (t)RNAs with amino acids. Charging tRNAs with the right amino acids is the first step in translation; therefore, the accurate and error-free functioning of ARSs is an essential prerequisite for translational fidelity. A recent study found that methionine (Met) can be incorporated into non-Met residues of proteins through methionylation of non-cognate tRNAs under conditions of oxidative stress. However, it was not understood how this mis-methionylation is achieved. Here, we report that methionyl-tRNA synthetase (MRS) is phosphorylated at Ser209 and Ser825 by extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK1/2) under conditions of stress caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS), and that this phosphorylated MRS shows increased affinity for non-cognate tRNAs with lower affinity for tRNAMet, leading to an increase in Met residues in cellular proteins. The expression of a mutant MRS containing the substitutions S209D and S825D, mimicking dual phosphorylation, reduced ROS levels and cell death. This controlled inaccuracy of MRS seems to serve as a defense mechanism against ROS-mediated damage at the cost of translational fidelity. PMID:25097229

  11. Spectroscopic Classification of SN 2017coa as a Type Ia Supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Danfeng; Rui, Liming; Wang, Xiaofeng; Tan, Hanjie; Li, Wenxiong; Zhang, Tianmeng; Xu, Zhijian; Yang, Zesheng; Song, Hao; Mo, Jun; Wang, Yuanhao; Zhou, Ziheng; Meng, Xianmin; Qian, Shenban; Jia, Junjun; Zhou, Xu; Zhang, Jujia

    2017-04-01

    We obtained an optical spectrum (range 360-840 nm) of SN 2017coa,discovered by Tsinghua-NAOC Transient Survey (TNTS), on UT Mar.31.49 2017 with the 2.16-m telescope (+BFOSC) at Xinglong Station of National Astronomical Observatories of China (NAOC).

  12. Application of a Propionyl Coenzyme A Synthetase for Poly(3-Hydroxypropionate-co-3-Hydroxybutyrate) Accumulation in Recombinant Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Valentin, Henry E.; Mitsky, Timothy A.; Mahadeo, Debbie A.; Tran, Minhtien; Gruys, Kenneth J.

    2000-01-01

    The genetic operon for propionic acid degradation in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium contains an open reading frame designated prpE which encodes a propionyl coenzyme A (propionyl-CoA) synthetase (A. R. Horswill and J. C. Escalante-Semerena, Microbiology 145:1381–1388, 1999). In this paper we report the cloning of prpE by PCR, its overexpression in Escherichia coli, and the substrate specificity of the enzyme. When propionate was utilized as the substrate for PrpE, a Km of 50 μM and a specific activity of 120 μmol · min−1 · mg−1 were found at the saturating substrate concentration. PrpE also activated acetate, 3-hydroxypropionate (3HP), and butyrate to their corresponding coenzyme A esters but did so much less efficiently than propionate. When prpE was coexpressed with the polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) biosynthetic genes from Ralstonia eutropha in recombinant E. coli, a PHA copolymer containing 3HP units accumulated when 3HP was supplied with the growth medium. To compare the utility of acyl-CoA synthetases to that of an acyl-CoA transferase for PHA production, PHA-producing recombinant strains were constructed to coexpress the PHA biosynthetic genes with prpE, with acoE (an acetyl-CoA synthetase gene from R. eutropha [H. Priefert and A. Steinbüchel, J. Bacteriol. 174:6590–6599, 1992]), or with orfZ (an acetyl-CoA:4-hydroxybutyrate-CoA transferase gene from Clostridium propionicum [H. E. Valentin, S. Reiser, and K. J. Gruys, Biotechnol. Bioeng. 67:291–299, 2000]). Of the three enzymes, PrpE and OrfZ enabled similar levels of 3HP incorporation into PHA, whereas AcoE was significantly less effective in this capacity. PMID:11097899

  13. Modification of seed oil content and acyl composition in the brassicaceae by expression of a yeast sn-2 acyltransferase gene.

    PubMed Central

    Zou, J; Katavic, V; Giblin, E M; Barton, D L; MacKenzie, S L; Keller, W A; Hu, X; Taylor, D C

    1997-01-01

    A putative yeast sn-2 acyltransferase gene (SLC1-1), reportedly a variant acyltransferase that suppresses a genetic defect in sphingolipid long-chain base biosynthesis, has been expressed in a yeast SLC deletion strain. The SLC1-1 gene product was shown in vitro to encode an sn-2 acyltransferase capable of acylating sn-1 oleoyl-lysophosphatidic acid, using a range of acyl-CoA thioesters, including 18:1-, 22:1-, and 24:0-CoAs. The SLC1-1 gene was introduced into Arabidopsis and a high erucic acid-containing Brassica napus cv Hero under the control of a constitutive (tandem cauliflower mosaic virus 35S) promoter. The resulting transgenic plants showed substantial increases of 8 to 48% in seed oil content (expressed on the basis of seed dry weight) and increases in both overall proportions and amounts of very-long-chain fatty acids in seed triacylglycerols (TAGs). Furthermore, the proportion of very-long-chain fatty acids found at the sn-2 position of TAGs was increased, and homogenates prepared from developing seeds of transformed plants exhibited elevated lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferase (EC 2.3.1.51) activity. Thus, the yeast sn-2 acyltransferase has been shown to encode a protein that can exhibit lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferase activity and that can be used to change total fatty acid content and composition as well as to alter the stereospecific acyl distribution of fatty acids in seed TAGs. PMID:9212466

  14. The utilization of the acyl-CoA and the involvement PDAT and DGAT in the biosynthesis of erucic acid-rich triacylglycerols in Crambe seed oil.

    PubMed

    Furmanek, Tomasz; Demski, Kamil; Banaś, Walentyna; Haslam, Richard; Napier, Jonathan; Stymne, Sten; Banaś, Antoni

    2014-04-01

    The triacylglycerol of Crambe abyssinica seeds consist of 95% very long chain (>18 carbon) fatty acids (86% erucic acid; 22:1∆13) in the sn-1 and sn-3 positions. This would suggest that C. abyssinica triacylglycerols are not formed by the action of the phospholipid:diacylglycerol acyltransferase (PDAT), but are rather the results of acyl-CoA:diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT) activity. However, measurements of PDAT and DGAT activities in microsomal membranes showed that C. abyssinica has significant PDAT activity, corresponding to about 10% of the DGAT activity during periods of rapid seed oil accumulation. The specific activity of DGAT for erucoyl-CoA had doubled at 19 days after flowering compared to earlier developmental stages, and was, at that stage, the preferred acyl donor, whereas the activities for 16:0-CoA and 18:1-CoA remained constant. This indicates that an expression of an isoform of DGAT with high specificity for erucoyl-CoA is induced at the onset of rapid erucic acid and oil accumulation in the C. abyssinica seeds. Analysis of the composition of the acyl-CoA pool during different stages of seed development showed that the percentage of erucoyl groups in acyl-CoA was much higher than in complex lipids at all stages of seed development except in the desiccation phase. These results are in accordance with published results showing that the rate limiting step in erucic acid accumulation in C. abyssinica oil is the utilization of erucoyl-CoA by the acyltransferases in the glycerol-3-phosphate pathway.

  15. Enhancement of free fatty acid production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by control of fatty acyl-CoA metabolism.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liwei; Zhang, Jianhua; Lee, Jaslyn; Chen, Wei Ning

    2014-08-01

    Production of biofuels derived from microbial fatty acids has attracted great attention in recent years owing to their potential to replace petroleum-derived fuels. To be cost competitive with current petroleum fuel, flux toward the direct precursor fatty acids needs to be enhanced to approach high yields. Herein, fatty acyl-CoA metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae was engineered to accumulate more free fatty acids (FFA). For this purpose, firstly, haploid S. cerevisiae double deletion strain △faa1△faa4 was constructed, in which the genes FAA1 and FAA4 encoding two acyl-CoA synthetases were deleted. Then the truncated version of acyl-CoA thioesterase ACOT5 (Acot5s) encoding Mus musculus peroxisomal acyl-CoA thioesterase 5 was expressed in the cytoplasm of the strain △faa1△faa4. The resulting strain △faa1△faa4 [Acot5s] accumulated more extracellular FFA with higher unsaturated fatty acid (UFA) ratio as compared to the wild-type strain and double deletion strain △faa1△faa4. The extracellular total fatty acids (TFA) in the strain △faa1△faa4 [Acot5s] increased to 6.43-fold as compared to the wild-type strain during the stationary phase. UFA accounted for 42 % of TFA in the strain △faa1△faa4 [Acot5s], while no UFA was detected in the wild-type strain. In addition, the expression of Acot5s in △faa1△faa4 restored the growth, which indicates that FFA may not be the reason for growth inhibition in the strain △faa1△faa4. RT-PCR results demonstrated that the de-repression of fatty acid synthesis genes led to the increase of extracellular fatty acids. The study presented here showed that through control of the acyl-CoA metabolism by deleting acyl-CoA synthetase and expressing thioesterase, more FFA could be produced in S. cerevisiae, demonstrating great potential for exploitation in the platform of microbial fatty acid-derived biofuels.

  16. L-delta-(alpha-Aminoadipoyl)-L-cysteine-D-valine synthetase: production of dipeptides containing valine residue at its C-terminus.

    PubMed

    Shiau, Chia-Yang; Liu, Yu-Tien

    2002-04-12

    L-delta-(alpha-Aminoadipoyl)-L-cysteine-D-valine synthetase (ACVS) has been recently studied as a model enzyme for peptide synthetases. It was found that in the absence of alpha-aminoadipic acid but in the presence of several cysteine analogues it was incorporated into several analogue dipeptides upon incubation of the potential cysteine analogues with ACVS. [(14)C]Cysteine was incorporated into the[(14)C]cysteinyl-valine analogue dipeptides. Notably, [(14)C]valine incorporation in the presence of N-acylated cysteine analogues was observed. The alpha-aminoadipic acid activation site is influential, inhibitory or promotive, on the production of these putative dipeptide products. The production of dipeptide analogues, containing valine or analogues at the C-terminus, leads to the speculation that the biosynthetic direction of ACV could be from the C-terminus to the N-terminus.

  17. Acyl hydrolases from trans-AT polyketide synthases target acetyl units on acyl carrier proteins.

    PubMed

    Jenner, Matthew; Afonso, Jose P; Kohlhaas, Christoph; Karbaum, Petra; Frank, Sarah; Piel, Jörn; Oldham, Neil J

    2016-04-18

    Acyl hydrolase (AH) domains are a common feature of trans-AT PKSs. They have been hypothesised to perform a proofreading function by removing acyl chains from stalled sites. This study determines the substrate tolerance of the AH PedC for a range of acyl-ACPs. Clear preference towards short, linear acyl-ACPs is shown, with acetyl-ACP the best substrate. These results imply a more targeted housekeeping role for PedC: namely the removal of unwanted acetyl groups from ACP domains caused by erroneous transfer of acetyl-CoA, or possibly by decarboxylation of malonyl-ACP.

  18. Key enzymes for biosynthesis of neutral lipid storage compounds in prokaryotes: properties, function and occurrence of wax ester synthases/acyl-CoA: diacylglycerol acyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Wältermann, Marc; Stöveken, Tim; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2007-02-01

    Triacylglycerols (TAGs) and wax esters (WEs) are beside polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) important storage lipids in some groups of prokaryotes. Accumulation of these lipids occurs in cells when they are cultivated under conditions of unbalanced growth in the presence of high concentrations of a suitable carbon source, which can be used for fatty acid and storage lipid biosyntheses. The key enzymes, which mediate both WE and TAG formations from long-chain acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) as acyl donor and long-chain fatty alcohols or diacylglycerols as respective acyl acceptors in bacteria, are WE synthases/acyl-CoA:diacylglycerol acyltransferases (WS/DGATs). The WS/DGATs identified so far represent rather unspecific enzymes with broad spectra of possible substrates; this makes them interesting for many biotechnological applications. This review traces the molecular structure and biochemical properties including the probable regions responsible for acyltransferase properties, enzymatic activity and substrate specifities. The phylogenetic relationships based on amino acid sequence similarities of this unique class of enzymes were revealed. Furthermore, recent advances in understanding the physiological functions of WS/DGATs in their natural hosts including pathogenic Mycobacterium tuberculosis were discussed.

  19. The Endoplasmic Reticulum-Associated Maize GL8 Protein Is a Component of the Acyl-Coenzyme A Elongase Involved in the Production of Cuticular Waxes1

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaojie; Dietrich, Charles R.; Lessire, Rene; Nikolau, Basil J.; Schnable, Patrick S.

    2002-01-01

    The gl8 gene is required for the normal accumulation of cuticular waxes on maize (Zea mays) seedling leaves. The predicted GL8 protein exhibits significant sequence similarity to a class of enzymes that catalyze the reduction of a ketone group to a hydroxyl group. Polyclonal antibodies raised against the recombinant Escherichia coli-expressed GL8 protein were used to investigate the function of this protein in planta. Subcellular fractionation experiments indicate that the GL8 protein is associated with the endoplasmic reticulum membranes. Furthermore, polyclonal antibodies raised against the partially purified leek (Allium porrum) microsomal acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) elongase can react with the E. coli-expressed GL8 protein. In addition, anti-GL8 immunoglobulin G inhibited the in vitro elongation of stearoyl-CoA by leek and maize microsomal acyl-CoA elongase. In combination, these findings indicate that the GL8 protein is a component of the acyl-CoA elongase. In addition, the finding that anti-GL8 immunoglobulin G did not significantly inhibit the 3-ketoacyl-CoA synthase, 3-ketoacyl-CoA dehydrase, and (E) 2,3-enoyl-CoA reductase partial reactions of leek or maize acyl-CoA elongase lends further support to our previous hypothesis that the GL8 protein functions as a β-ketoacyl reductase during the elongation of very long-chain fatty acids required for the production of cuticular waxes. PMID:11891248

  20. A Previously Unknown Oxalyl-CoA Synthetase Is Important for Oxalate Catabolism in Arabidopsis[W

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Justin; Kim, Hyun Uk; Nakata, Paul A.; Browse, John

    2012-01-01

    Oxalate is produced by several catabolic pathways in plants. The best characterized pathway for subsequent oxalate degradation is via oxalate oxidase, but some species, such as Arabidopsis thaliana, have no oxalate oxidase activity. Previously, an alternative pathway was proposed in which oxalyl-CoA synthetase (EC 6.2.1.8) catalyzes the first step, but no gene encoding this function has been found. Here, we identify ACYL-ACTIVATING ENZYME3 (AAE3; At3g48990) from Arabidopsis as a gene encoding oxalyl-CoA synthetase. Recombinant AAE3 protein has high activity against oxalate, with Km = 149.0 ± 12.7 μM and Vmax = 11.4 ± 1.0 μmol/min/mg protein, but no detectable activity against other organic acids tested. Allelic aae3 mutants lacked oxalyl-CoA synthetase activity and were unable to degrade oxalate into CO2. Seeds of mutants accumulated oxalate to levels threefold higher than the wild type, resulting in the formation of oxalate crystals. Crystal formation was associated with seed coat defects and substantially reduced germination of mutant seeds. Leaves of mutants were damaged by exogenous oxalate and more susceptible than the wild type to infection by the fungus Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, which produces oxalate as a phytotoxin to aid infection. Our results demonstrate that, in Arabidopsis, oxalyl-CoA synthetase encoded by AAE3 is required for oxalate degradation, for normal seed development, and for defense against an oxalate-producing fungal pathogen. PMID:22447686

  1. Fatty acyl-CoA reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Reiser, Steven E.; Somerville, Chris R.

    1998-12-01

    The present invention relates to bacterial enzymes, in particular to an acyl-CoA reductase and a gene encoding an acyl-CoA reductase, the amino acid and nucleic acid sequences corresponding to the reductase polypeptide and gene, respectively, and to methods of obtaining such enzymes, amino acid sequences and nucleic acid sequences. The invention also relates to the use of such sequences to provide transgenic host cells capable of producing fatty alcohols and fatty aldehydes.

  2. Quantitative target analysis and kinetic profiling of acyl-CoAs reveal the rate-limiting step in cyanobacterial 1-butanol production.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Shingo; Putri, Sastia P; Lan, Ethan I; Laviña, Walter A; Dempo, Yudai; Bamba, Takeshi; Liao, James C; Fukusaki, Eiichiro

    Cyanobacterial 1-butanol production is an important model system for direct conversion of CO2 to fuels and chemicals. Metabolically-engineered cyanobacteria introduced with a heterologous Coenzyme A (CoA)-dependent pathway modified from Clostridium species can convert atmospheric CO2 into 1-butanol. Efforts to optimize the 1-butanol pathway in Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 have focused on the improvement of the CoA-dependent pathway thus, probing the in vivo metabolic state of the CoA-dependent pathway is essential for identifying its limiting steps. In this study, we performed quantitative target analysis and kinetic profiling of acyl-CoAs in the CoA-dependent pathway by reversed phase ion-pair liquid chromatography-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry. Using (13)C-labelled cyanobacterial cell extract as internal standard, measurement of the intracellular concentration of acyl-CoAs revealed that the reductive reaction of butanoyl-CoA to butanal is a possible rate-limiting step. In addition, improvement of the butanoyl-CoA to butanal reaction resulted in an increased rate of acetyl-CoA synthesis by possibly compensating for the limitation of free CoA species. We inferred that the efficient recycling of free CoA played a key role in enhancing the conversion of pyruvate to acetyl-CoA.

  3. Dexamethasone regulates glutamine synthetase expression in rat skeletal muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Max, Stephen R.; Konagaya, Masaaki; Konagaya, Yoko; Thomas, John W.; Banner, Carl; Vitkovic, Ljubisa

    1986-01-01

    The regulation of glutamine synthetase by glucocorticoids in rat skeletal muscles was studied. Administration of dexamethasone strikingly enhanced glutamine synthetase activity in plantaris and soleus muscles. The dexamethasone-mediated induction of glutamine synthetase activity was blocked to a significant extent by orally administered RU38486, a glucocorticoid antagonist, indicating the involvement of intracellular glucocorticoid receptors in the induction. Northern blot analysis revealed that dexamethasone-mediated enhancement of glutamine synthetase activity involves dramatically increased levels of glutamine synthetase mRNA. The induction of glutamine synthetase was selective in that glutaminase activity of soleus and plantaris muscles was not increased by dexamethasone. Furthermore, dexamethasone treatment resulted in only a small increase in glutamine synthetase activity in the heart. Accordingly, there was only a slight change in glutamine synthetase mRNA level in this tissue. Thus, glucocorticoids regulate glutamine synthetase gene expression in rat muscles at the transcriptional level via interaction with intracellular glutamine production by muscle and to mechanisms underlying glucocorticoid-induced muscle atrophy.

  4. Aminoacyl-coenzyme A synthesis catalyzed by a CoA ligase from Penicillium chrysogenum.

    PubMed

    Koetsier, Martijn J; Jekel, Peter A; Wijma, Hein J; Bovenberg, Roel A L; Janssen, Dick B

    2011-03-23

    Coenzyme A ligases play an important role in metabolism by catalyzing the activation of carboxylic acids. In this study we describe the synthesis of aminoacyl-coenzyme As (CoAs) catalyzed by a CoA ligase from Penicillium chrysogenum. The enzyme accepted medium-chain length fatty acids as the best substrates, but the proteinogenic amino acids L-phenylalanine and L-tyrosine, as well as the non-proteinogenic amino acids D-phenylalanine, D-tyrosine and (R)- and (S)-β-phenylalanine were also accepted. Of these amino acids, the highest activity was found for (R)-β-phenylalanine, forming (R)-β-phenylalanyl-CoA. Homology modeling suggested that alanine 312 is part of the active site cavity, and mutagenesis (A312G) yielded a variant that has an enhanced catalytic efficiency with β-phenylalanines and D-α-phenylalanine.

  5. Mosaic Conservation Opportunity Areas - Liberal Model (ECO_RES.COA_MOSAIC33)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The COA_Mosaic33 layer designates areas with potential for forest/grassland mosaic conservation. These are areas of natural or semi-natural forest/grassland mosaic land cover patches that are at least 75 meters away from roads and away from patch edges. OAs were modeled by creating distance grids using the National Land Cover Database and the Census Bureau's TIGER roads files

  6. Mosaic Conservation Opportunity Areas - Conservativel Model (ECO_RES.COA_MOSAIC66)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The COA_Mosaic66 layer designates areas with potential for forest/grassland mosaic conservation. These are areas of natural or semi-natural forest/grassland land cover patches that area at least 395 meters away from roads and away from patch edges. OAs were modeled by creating distance grids using the National Land Cover Database and the Census Bureau's TIGER road files.

  7. Regulation of schistosome egg production by HMG CoA reductase

    SciTech Connect

    VandeWaa, E.A.; Bennett, J.L.

    1986-03-05

    Hydroxymethylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMG CoA reductase) catalyzes the conversion of HMG CoA to mevalonate in the synthesis of steroids, isoprenoids and terpenes. Mevinolin, an inhibitor of this enzyme, decreased egg production in Schistosoma mansoni during in vitro incubations. This was associated with a reduction in the incorporation of /sup 14/C-acetate into polyisoprenoids and a reduction in the formation of a lipid-linked oligosaccharide. In vivo, mevinolin in daily doses of 50 mg/kg (p.o., from days 30-48 post-infection) caused no change in gross liver pathology in S. mansoni infected mice. However, when parasites exposed to mevinolin or its vehicle in vivo were cultured in vitro, worms from mevinolin-treated mice produced six times more eggs than control parasites. When infected mice were dosed with 250 mg/kg mevinolin daily (p.o., from days 35-45 post-infection), liver pathology was reduced in comparison to control mice. Thus, during in vivo exposure to a high dose of the drug egg production is decreased, while at a lower dose it appears unaffected until the parasites are cultured in a drug-free in vitro system wherein egg production is stimulated to extraordinarily high levels. It may be that at low doses mevinolin, by inhibiting the enzyme, is blocking the formation of a product (such as an isoprenoid) which normally acts to down-regulate enzyme synthesis, resulting in enzyme induction. Induction of HMG CoA reductase is then expressed as increased egg production when the worms are removed from the drug. These data suggest that HMG CoA reductase plays a role in schistosome egg production.

  8. Domain analysis of 3 Keto Acyl-CoA synthase for structural variations in Vitis vinifera and Oryza brachyantha using comparative modelling.

    PubMed

    Sagar, Mamta; Pandey, Neetesh; Qamar, Naseha; Singh, Brijendra; Shukla, Akanksha

    2015-03-01

    The long chain fatty acids incorporated into plant lipids are derived from the iterative addition of C2 units which is provided by malonyl-CoA to an acyl-CoA after interactions with 3-ketoacyl-CoA synthase (KCS), found in several plants. This study provides functional characterization of three 3 ketoacyl CoA synthase like proteins in Vitis vinifera (one) and Oryza brachyantha (two proteins). Sequence analysis reveals that protein of Oryza brachyantha shows 96% similarity to a hypothetical protein in Sorghum bicolor; total 11 homologs were predicted in Sorghum bicolor. Conserved domain prediction confirm the presence of FAE1/Type III polyketide synthase-like protein, Thiolase-like, subgroup; Thiolase-like and 3-Oxoacyl-ACP synthase III, C-terminal and chalcone synthase like domain but very long chain 3-keto acyl CoA domain is absent. All three proteins were found to have Chalcone and stilbene synthases C terminal domain which is similar to domain of thiolase and β keto acyl synthase. Its N terminal domain is absent in J3M9Z7 protein of Oryza brachyantha and F6HH63 protein of Vitis vinifera. Differences in N-terminal domain is responsible for distinguish activity. The J3MF16 protein of Oryza brachyantha contains N terminal domain and C terminal domain and characterized using annotation of these domains. Domains Gcs (streptomyces coelicolor) and Chalcone-stilbene synthases (KAS) in 2-pyrone synthase (Gerbera hybrid) and chalcone synthase 2 (Medicago sativa) were found to be present in three proteins. This similarity points toward anthocyanin biosynthetic process. Similarity to chalcone synthase 2 reveals its possible role in Naringenine and Chalcone synthase like activity. In 3 keto acyl CoA synthase of Oryza brachyantha. Active site residues C-240, H-407, N-447 are present in J3MF16 protein that are common in these three protein at different positions. Structural variations among dimer interface, product binding site, malonyl-CoA binding sites, were predicted in

  9. Germline deletion of pantothenate kinases 1 and 2 reveals the key roles for CoA in postnatal metabolism.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Matthew; Leonardi, Roberta; Zhang, Yong-Mei; Rehg, Jerold E; Jackowski, Suzanne

    2012-01-01

    Pantothenate kinase (PanK) phosphorylates pantothenic acid (vitamin B(5)) and controls the overall rate of coenzyme A (CoA) biosynthesis. Pank1 gene deletion in mice results in a metabolic phenotype where fatty acid oxidation and gluconeogenesis are impaired in the fasted state, leading to mild hypoglycemia. Inactivating mutations in the human PANK2 gene lead to childhood neurodegeneration, but Pank2 gene inactivation in mice does not elicit a phenotype indicative of the neuromuscular symptoms or brain iron accumulation that accompany the human disease. Pank1/Pank2 double knockout (dKO) mice were derived to determine if the mild phenotypes of the single knockout mice are due to the ability of the two isoforms to compensate for each other in CoA biosynthesis. Postnatal development was severely affected in the dKO mice. The dKO pups developed progressively severe hypoglycemia and hyperketonemia by postnatal day 10 leading to death by day 17. Hyperketonemia arose from impaired whole-body ketone utilization illustrating the requirement for CoA in energy generation from ketones. dKO pups had reduced CoA and decreased fatty acid oxidation coupled with triglyceride accumulation in liver. dKO hepatocytes could not maintain the NADH levels compared to wild-type hepatocytes. These results revealed an important link between CoA and NADH levels, which was reflected by deficiencies in hepatic oleate synthesis and gluconeogenesis. The data indicate that PanK1 and PanK2 can compensate for each other to supply tissue CoA, but PanK1 is more important to CoA levels in liver whereas PanK2 contributes more to CoA synthesis in the brain.

  10. Copper supplementation restores cytochrome c oxidase assembly defect in a mitochondrial disease model of COA6 deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Alok; Trivedi, Prachi P.; Timbalia, Shrishiv A.; Griffin, Aaron T.; Rahn, Jennifer J.; Chan, Sherine S. L.; Gohil, Vishal M.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial respiratory chain biogenesis is orchestrated by hundreds of assembly factors, many of which are yet to be discovered. Using an integrative approach based on clues from evolutionary history, protein localization and human genetics, we have identified a conserved mitochondrial protein, C1orf31/COA6, and shown its requirement for respiratory complex IV biogenesis in yeast, zebrafish and human cells. A recent next-generation sequencing study reported potential pathogenic mutations within the evolutionarily conserved Cx9CxnCx10C motif of COA6, implicating it in mitochondrial disease biology. Using yeast coa6Δ cells, we show that conserved residues in the motif, including the residue mutated in a patient with mitochondrial disease, are essential for COA6 function, thus confirming the pathogenicity of the patient mutation. Furthermore, we show that zebrafish embryos with zfcoa6 knockdown display reduced heart rate and cardiac developmental defects, recapitulating the observed pathology in the human mitochondrial disease patient who died of neonatal hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. The specific requirement of Coa6 for respiratory complex IV biogenesis, its intramitochondrial localization and the presence of the Cx9CxnCx10C motif suggested a role in mitochondrial copper metabolism. In support of this, we show that exogenous copper supplementation completely rescues respiratory and complex IV assembly defects in yeast coa6Δ cells. Taken together, our results establish an evolutionarily conserved role of Coa6 in complex IV assembly and support a causal role of the COA6 mutation in the human mitochondrial disease patient. PMID:24549041

  11. Cooperation between COA6 and SCO2 in COX2 maturation during cytochrome c oxidase assembly links two mitochondrial cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Pacheu-Grau, David; Bareth, Bettina; Dudek, Jan; Juris, Lisa; Vögtle, F-Nora; Wissel, Mirjam; Leary, Scot C; Dennerlein, Sven; Rehling, Peter; Deckers, Markus

    2015-06-02

    Three mitochondria-encoded subunits form the catalytic core of cytochrome c oxidase, the terminal enzyme of the respiratory chain. COX1 and COX2 contain heme and copper redox centers, which are integrated during assembly of the enzyme. Defects in this process lead to an enzyme deficiency and manifest as mitochondrial disorders in humans. Here we demonstrate that COA6 is specifically required for COX2 biogenesis. Absence of COA6 leads to fast turnover of newly synthesized COX2 and a concomitant reduction in cytochrome c oxidase levels. COA6 interacts transiently with the copper-containing catalytic domain of newly synthesized COX2. Interestingly, similar to the copper metallochaperone SCO2, loss of COA6 causes cardiomyopathy in humans. We show that COA6 and SCO2 interact and that corresponding pathogenic mutations in each protein affect complex formation. Our analyses define COA6 as a constituent of the mitochondrial copper relay system, linking defects in COX2 metallation to cardiac cytochrome c oxidase deficiency.

  12. Validation of CoaBC as a Bactericidal Target in the Coenzyme A Pathway of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis relies on its own ability to biosynthesize coenzyme A to meet the needs of the myriad enzymatic reactions that depend on this cofactor for activity. As such, the essential pantothenate and coenzyme A biosynthesis pathways have attracted attention as targets for tuberculosis drug development. To identify the optimal step for coenzyme A pathway disruption in M. tuberculosis, we constructed and characterized a panel of conditional knockdown mutants in coenzyme A pathway genes. Here, we report that silencing of coaBC was bactericidal in vitro, whereas silencing of panB, panC, or coaE was bacteriostatic over the same time course. Silencing of coaBC was likewise bactericidal in vivo, whether initiated at infection or during either the acute or chronic stages of infection, confirming that CoaBC is required for M. tuberculosis to grow and persist in mice and arguing against significant CoaBC bypass via transport and assimilation of host-derived pantetheine in this animal model. These results provide convincing genetic validation of CoaBC as a new bactericidal drug target. PMID:27676316

  13. SIRT4 coordinates the balance between lipid synthesis and catabolism by repressing malonyl CoA decarboxylase

    PubMed Central

    Laurent, Gaëlle; German, Natalie J.; Saha, Asish K.; de Boer, Vincent C. J.; Davies, Michael; Koves, Timothy R.; Dephoure, Noah; Fischer, Frank; Boanca, Gina; Vaitheesvaran, Bhavapriya; Lovitch, Scott B.; Sharpe, Arlene H.; Kurland, Irwin J.; Steegborn, Clemens; Gygi, Steven P.; Muoio, Deborah M.; Ruderman, Neil B.; Haigis, Marcia C.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Lipid metabolism is tightly controlled by the nutritional state of the organism. Nutrient-rich conditions increase lipogenesis whereas nutrient deprivation promotes fat oxidation. In this study, we identify the mitochondrial sirtuin, SIRT4, as a novel regulator of lipid homeostasis. SIRT4 is active in nutrient-replete conditions to repress fatty acid oxidation while promoting lipid anabolism. SIRT4 deacetylates and inhibits malonyl CoA decarboxylase (MCD), an enzyme that produces acetyl CoA from malonyl CoA. Malonyl CoA provides the carbon skeleton for lipogenesis and also inhibits fat oxidation. Mice lacking SIRT4 display elevated MCD activity and decreased malonyl CoA in skeletal muscle and white adipose tissue. Consequently, SIRT4 KO mice display deregulated lipid metabolism leading to increased exercise tolerance and protection against diet-induced obesity. In sum, this work elucidates SIRT4 as an important regulator of lipid homeostasis, identifies MCD as a novel SIRT4 target, and deepens our understanding of the malonyl CoA regulatory axis. PMID:23746352

  14. Site Directed Mutagenesis of Schizosaccharomyces pombe Glutathione Synthetase Produces an Enzyme with Homoglutathione Synthetase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Dworeck, Tamara; Zimmermann, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Three different His-tagged, mutant forms of the fission yeast glutathione synthetase (GSH2) were derived by site-directed mutagenesis. The mutant and wild-type enzymes were expressed in E. coli DH5α and affinity purified in a two-step procedure. Analysis of enzyme activity showed that it was possible to shift the substrate specificity of GSH2 from Gly (km 0,19; wild-type) to β-Ala or Ser. One mutation (substitution of Ile471, Cy472 to Met and Val and Ala 485 and Thr486 to Leu and Pro) increased the affinity of GSH2 for β-Ala (km 0,07) and lowered the affinity for Gly (km 0,83), which is a characteristic of the enzyme homoglutathione synthetase found in plants. Substitution of Ala485 and Thr486 to Leu and Pro only, increased instead the affinity of GSH2 for Ser (km 0,23) as a substrate, while affinity to Gly was preserved (km 0,12). This provides a new biosynthetic pathway for hydroxymethyl glutathione, which is known to be synthesized from glutathione and Ser in a reaction catalysed by carboxypeptidase Y. The reported findings provide further insight into how specific amino acids positioned in the GSH2 active site facilitate the recognition of different amino acid substrates, furthermore they support the evolutionary theory that homoglutathione synthetase evolved from glutathione synthetase by a single gene duplication event. PMID:23091597

  15. ROMPgel beads in IRORI format: acylations revisited.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Richard S

    2005-01-01

    Functionalized "designer" polymers derived from ring-opening metathesis polymerization (ROMPgels) are attractive for their high loading, high purity, and ease of synthesis. Their physical state may vary from liquid to gel to granular solid, making a general method of handling these polymers difficult. By incorporating a suitable norbornene-substituted linker on standard Wang beads, ROMPgels can be easily grafted onto the resin, adding the convenience of a bead format while still maintaining the high loading and excellent site accessibility. This advantage is demonstrated by the use of an N-hydroxysuccinimide ROMPgel (3.3 mmol g(-1), a 3-fold increase from the parent linker resin) in IRORI Kan format. Conditions for the acylation of these IRORI-formatted ROMPgels are reported, along with the scope and limitations of the choice of acylating reagents. Yields are greatly improved by the use of perfluorinated solvents as a nonparticipating cosolvent in the acylation process. A simple titration method for the quantification of the acylated ROMPgels is also reported. Spent Kans are regenerated after each use without apparent loss of activity or purity after several cycles. Due to the high loading and reduced swelling of the ROMPgel resin, up to 0.39 mmol acyl group has successfully been recovered from a single IRORI miniKan, demonstrating the high capacity of the resin and applicability to both lead discovery and optimization programs.

  16. Retinal Vasculitis in Anti-Synthetase Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Christopher P; Pecen, Paula E; Baynes, Kimberly; Ehlers, Justis P; Srivastava, Sunil K

    2016-09-01

    A 31-year-old woman with a history of anti-synthetase syndrome-related myositis and interstitial lung disease presented with acute-onset blurry vision and rash on her hands and feet. Visual acuity was hand motion in her right eye and 20/40 in her left eye. Dilated fundus exam showed extensive retinal vasculitis, diffuse intraretinal hemorrhages, and subretinal fluid. Optical coherence tomography revealed significant macular thickening, and fluorescein angiography revealed vascular leakage with peripheral nonperfusion. Aggressive systemic immunosuppression was initiated, with gradual resolution of her disease during 8 months of follow-up. [Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging Retina. 2016;47:874-879.].

  17. Characterization of Cereulide Synthetase, a Toxin-Producing Macromolecular Machine

    PubMed Central

    Alonzo, Diego A.; Magarvey, Nathan A.; Schmeing, T. Martin

    2015-01-01

    Cereulide synthetase is a two-protein nonribosomal peptide synthetase system that produces a potent emetic toxin in virulent strains of Bacillus cereus. The toxin cereulide is a depsipeptide, as it consists of alternating aminoacyl and hydroxyacyl residues. The hydroxyacyl residues are derived from keto acid substrates, which cereulide synthetase selects and stereospecifically reduces with imbedded ketoreductase domains before incorporating them into the growing depsipeptide chain. We present an in vitro biochemical characterization of cereulide synthetase. We investigate the kinetics and side chain specificity of α-keto acid selection, evaluate the requirement of an MbtH-like protein for adenylation domain activity, assay the effectiveness of vinylsulfonamide inhibitors on ester-adding modules, perform NADPH turnover experiments and evaluate in vitro depsipeptide biosynthesis. This work also provides biochemical insight into depsipeptide-synthesizing nonribosomal peptide synthetases responsible for other bioactive molecules such as valinomycin, antimycin and kutzneride. PMID:26042597

  18. In silico prediction of acyl glucuronide reactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter, Tim; Lewis, Richard; Luker, Tim; Bonnert, Roger; Bernstein, Michael A.; Birkinshaw, Timothy N.; Thom, Stephen; Wenlock, Mark; Paine, Stuart

    2011-11-01

    Drugs and drug candidates containing a carboxylic acid moiety, including many widely used non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are often metabolized to form acyl glucuronides (AGs). NSAIDs such as Ibuprofen are amongst the most widely used drugs on the market, whereas similar carboxylic acid drugs such as Suprofen have been withdrawn due to adverse events. Although the link between these AG metabolites and toxicity is not proven, there is circumstantial literature evidence to suggest that more reactive acyl glucuronides may, in some cases, present a greater risk of exhibiting toxic effects. We wished therefore to rank the reactivity of potential new carboxylate-containing drug candidates, and performed kinetic studies on synthetic acyl glucuronides to benchmark our key compounds. Driven by the desire to quickly rank the reactivity of compounds without the need for lengthy synthesis of the acyl glucuronide, a correlation was established between the degradation half-life of the acyl glucuronide and the half life for the hydrolysis of the more readily available methyl ester derivative. This finding enabled a considerable broadening of chemical property space to be investigated. The need for kinetic measurements was subsequently eliminated altogether by correlating the methyl ester hydrolysis half-life with the predicted 13C NMR chemical shift of the carbonyl carbon together with readily available steric descriptors in a PLS model. This completely in silico prediction of acyl glucuronide reactivity is applicable within the earliest stages of drug design with low cost and acceptable accuracy to guide intelligent molecular design. This reactivity data will be useful alongside the more complex additional pharmacokinetic exposure and distribution data that is generated later in the drug discovery process for assessing the overall toxicological risk of acidic drugs.

  19. Biochemical and kinetic characterization of the recombinant ADP-forming acetyl coenzyme A synthetase from the amitochondriate protozoan Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Jones, Cheryl P; Ingram-Smith, Cheryl

    2014-12-01

    Entamoeba histolytica, an amitochondriate protozoan parasite that relies on glycolysis as a key pathway for ATP generation, has developed a unique extended PPi-dependent glycolytic pathway in which ADP-forming acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA) synthetase (ACD; acetate:CoA ligase [ADP-forming]; EC 6.2.1.13) converts acetyl-CoA to acetate to produce additional ATP and recycle CoA. We characterized the recombinant E. histolytica ACD and found that the enzyme is bidirectional, allowing it to potentially play a role in ATP production or in utilization of acetate. In the acetate-forming direction, acetyl-CoA was the preferred substrate and propionyl-CoA was used with lower efficiency. In the acetyl-CoA-forming direction, acetate was the preferred substrate, with a lower efficiency observed with propionate. The enzyme can utilize both ADP/ATP and GDP/GTP in the respective directions of the reaction. ATP and PPi were found to inhibit the acetate-forming direction of the reaction, with 50% inhibitory concentrations of 0.81 ± 0.17 mM (mean ± standard deviation) and 0.75 ± 0.20 mM, respectively, which are both in the range of their physiological concentrations. ATP and PPi displayed mixed inhibition versus each of the three substrates, acetyl-CoA, ADP, and phosphate. This is the first example of regulation of ACD enzymatic activity, and possible roles for this regulation are discussed.

  20. Acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ta-Yuan; Li, Bo-Liang; Chang, Catherine C. Y.; Urano, Yasuomi

    2009-01-01

    The enzymes acyl-coenzyme A (CoA):cholesterol acyltransferases (ACATs) are membrane-bound proteins that utilize long-chain fatty acyl-CoA and cholesterol as substrates to form cholesteryl esters. In mammals, two isoenzymes, ACAT1 and ACAT2, encoded by two different genes, exist. ACATs play important roles in cellular cholesterol homeostasis in various tissues. This chapter summarizes the current knowledge on ACAT-related research in two areas: 1) ACAT genes and proteins and 2) ACAT enzymes as drug targets for atherosclerosis and for Alzheimer's disease. PMID:19141679

  1. Cloning and sequencing of an acetyl-CoA synthetase (ADP-forming) gene from the amitochondriate protist, Giardia lamblia.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, L B; Morrison, H G; Sogin, M L; Müller, M

    1999-06-11

    A Giardia lamblia gene, Glacs, was cloned, sequenced and expressed in Escheria Coli. This gene codes for a 726 residue long acetyl-CoA synthetase (ADP-forming). This enzyme is responsible for the formation of acetate, a metabolic endproduct of G. lamblia. It is known from only two Type I amitochondriate eukaryotes, G. lamblia and Entamoeba histolytica and from the archaebacterium, Pyrococcus furiosus. With Glacs as query, homologous unidentified open reading frames were detected in the complete genomes of only a few archaebacteria and eubacteria. These form a new protein family present in all three domains of life, which probably plays a central role in the acyl-CoA metabolism but is of restricted taxonomic distribution.

  2. Acyl silicates and acyl aluminates as activated intermediates in peptide formation on clays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, D. H.; Kennedy, R. M.; Macklin, J.

    1984-01-01

    Glycine reacts with heating on dried clays and other minerals to give peptides in much better yield than in the absence of mineral. This reaction was proposed to occur by way of an activated intermediate such as an acyl silicate or acyl aluminate analogous to acyl phosphates involved in several biochemical reactions including peptide bond synthesis. The proposed mechanism has been confirmed by trapping the intermediate, as well as by direct spectroscopic observation of a related intermediate. The reaction of amino acids on periodically dried mineral surfaces represents a widespead, geologically realistic setting for prebiotic peptide formation via in situ activation.

  3. COA7 (C1orf163/RESA1) mutations associated with mitochondrial leukoencephalopathy and cytochrome c oxidase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Martinez Lyons, Anabel; Ardissone, Anna; Reyes, Aurelio; Robinson, Alan J; Moroni, Isabella; Fernandez-Vizarra, Erika; Zeviani, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Background Assembly of cytochrome c oxidase (COX, complex IV, cIV), the terminal component of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, is assisted by several factors, most of which are conserved from yeast to humans. However, some of them, including COA7, are found in humans but not in yeast. COA7 is a 231aa-long mitochondrial protein present in animals, containing five Sel1-like tetratricopeptide repeat sequences, which are likely to interact with partner proteins. Methods Whole exome sequencing was carried out on a 19 year old woman, affected by early onset, progressive severe ataxia and peripheral neuropathy, mild cognitive impairment and a cavitating leukodystrophy of the brain with spinal cord hypotrophy. Biochemical analysis of the mitochondrial respiratory chain revealed the presence of isolated deficiency of cytochrome c oxidase (COX) activity in skin fibroblasts and skeletal muscle. Mitochondrial localization studies were carried out in isolated mitochondria and mitoplasts from immortalized control human fibroblasts. Results We found compound heterozygous mutations in COA7: a paternal c.410A>G, p.Y137C, and a maternal c.287+1G>T variants. Lentiviral-mediated expression of recombinant wild-type COA7 cDNA in the patient fibroblasts led to the recovery of the defect in COX activity and restoration of normal COX amount. In mitochondrial localization experiments, COA7 behaved as the soluble matrix protein Citrate Synthase. Conclusions We report here the first patient carrying pathogenic mutations of COA7, causative of isolated COX deficiency and progressive neurological impairment. We also show that COA7 is a soluble protein localized to the matrix, rather than in the intermembrane space as previously suggested. PMID:27683825

  4. The multiple acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenation disorders, glutaric aciduria type II and ethylmalonic-adipic aciduria. Mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation, acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase, and electron transfer flavoprotein activities in fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Amendt, B A; Rhead, W J

    1986-01-01

    The multiple acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) dehydrogenation disorders (MAD) include severe (S) and mild (M) variants, glutaric aciduria type II (MAD:S) and ethylmalonic-adipic aciduria (MAD:M). Intact MAD:M mitochondria oxidized [1-14C]octanoate, [1-14C]palmityl-CoA, and [1,5-14C]glutarate at 20-46% of control levels; MAD:S mitochondria oxidized these three substrates at 0.4-18% of control levels. In MAD:M mitochondria, acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (ADH) activities were similar to control, whereas MAD:S ADH activities ranged from 38% to 73% of control. Electron transfer flavoprotein (ETF) activities in five MAD:M cell lines ranged from 29 to 51% of control (P less than 0.01); ETF deficiency was the primary enzymatic defect in two MAD:M lines. In four MAD:S patients, ETF activities ranged from 3% to 6% of control (P less than 0.001); flavin adenine dinucleotide addition increased residual ETF activity from 4% to 21% of control in a single MAD:S line (P less than 0.01). Three MAD:S patients had ETF activities ranging from 33 to 53% of control; other investigators found deficient ETF-dehydrogenase activity in these MAD:S and three of our MAD:M cell lines. PMID:3722376

  5. Acyl anion free N-heterocyclic carbene organocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Sarah J; Candish, Lisa; Lupton, David W

    2013-06-21

    Reaction discovery using N-heterocyclic carbene organocatalysis has been dominated by the chemistry of acyl anion equivalents. Recent studies demonstrate that NHCs are far more diverse catalysts, with a variety of reactions discovered that proceed without acyl anion equivalent formation. In this tutorial review selected examples of acyl anion free NHC catalysis using carbonyl compounds are presented.

  6. High acyl gellan as an emulsion stabilizer.

    PubMed

    Vilela, Joice Aline Pires; da Cunha, Rosiane Lopes

    2016-03-30

    High acyl gellan (0.01-0.2% w/w) was used as stabilizer in oil in water emulsions containing 30% (w/w) of sunflower oil and prepared under different process conditions. Stable emulsions to phase separation could be obtained using high acyl gellan (HA) content above 0.05% (w/w), while low acyl gellan (LA) prepared at the same conditions could not stabilize emulsions. Emulsions properties depended on the process used to mix the oil and gellan dispersion since high pressure homogenization favored stabilization while very high energy density applied by ultrasound led to systems destabilization. Emulsions prepared using high pressure homogenization showed zeta potential values ranging from -50 up to -59 mV, suggesting that electrostatic repulsion could be contributing to the systems stability. Rheological properties of continuous phase were also responsible for emulsions stabilization, since HA gellan dispersions showed high viscosity and gel-like behavior. The high viscosity of the continuous phase could be associated to the presence of high acyl gellan microgels/aggregates. Disentanglement of these aggregates performed by ultrasound strongly decreased the viscosity and consequently affected the emulsions behavior, reducing the stability to phase separation.

  7. Acylated pregnane glycosides from Caralluma russeliana.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Sattar, Essam; Ahmed, Ahmed A; Hegazy, Mohamed-Elamir F; Farag, Mohamed A; Al-Yahya, Mohammad Abdul-Aziz

    2007-05-01

    The chloroform extract of the aerial parts of Caralluma russeliana yielded four acylated pregnane glycosides, namely russeliosides E-H, three were found now. The structures of the compounds were elucidated using MS, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, 1H-1H COSY, HMQC, NOESY and HMBC experiments.

  8. The Role of Coa2 in Hemylation of Yeast Cox1 Revealed by Its Genetic Interaction with Cox10 ▿

    PubMed Central

    Bestwick, Megan; Khalimonchuk, Oleh; Pierrel, Fabien; Winge, Dennis R.

    2010-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells lacking the cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) assembly factor Coa2 are impaired in Cox1 maturation and exhibit a rapid degradation of newly synthesized Cox1. The respiratory deficiency of coa2Δ cells is suppressed either by the presence of a mutant allele of the Cox10 farnesyl transferase involved in heme a biosynthesis or through impaired proteolysis by the disruption of the mitochondrial Oma1 protease. Cox10 with an N196K substitution functions as a robust gain-of-function suppressor of the respiratory deficiency of coa2Δ cells but lacks suppressor activity for two other CcO assembly mutant strains, the coa1Δ and shy1Δ mutants. The suppressor activity of N196K mutant Cox10 is dependent on its catalytic function and the presence of Cox15, the second enzyme involved in heme a biosynthesis. Varying the substitution at Asn196 reveals a correlation between the suppressor activity and the stabilization of the high-mass homo-oligomeric Cox10 complex. We postulate that the mutant Cox10 complex has enhanced efficiency in the addition of heme a to Cox1. Coa2 appears to impart stability to the oligomeric wild-type Cox10 complex involved in Cox1 hemylation. PMID:19841065

  9. Stimulation of Ribonucleic Acid Synthesis by Chloramphenicol in a rel+ Aminoacyl-Transfer Ribonucleic Acid Synthetase Mutant of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Yegian, Charles D.; Vanderslice, Rebecca W.

    1971-01-01

    Escherichia coli strain 9D3 possesses a highly temperature-sensitive valyl-transfer ribonucleic acid (tRNA) synthetase (EC 6.1.1.9). Since 9D3 is a rel+ strain, it cannot carry out net RNA synthesis at high temperature. A 100-μg amount of chloramphenicol (CAP) per ml added in the absence of valine cannot stimulate RNA synthesis. Either 300 μg of CAP or 100 μg of CAP plus 50 μg of valine per ml, however, promotes nearly maximal RNA synthesis. These results can be understood as follows. (i) Valyl-tRNA is required for net RNA synthesis, (ii) the synthetase lesion is incomplete, (iii) the rate of mutant acylation of tRNAval at high temperature is valine-dependent, and (iv) the CAP concentration determines the rate of residual protein synthesis. Data are also presented which demonstrate that the rate of net RNA synthesis can greatly increase long after the addition of CAP, if the amount of valyl-tRNA increases. PMID:4942766

  10. Acylation of the Type 3 Secretion System Translocon Using a Dedicated Acyl Carrier Protein

    PubMed Central

    Agrebi, Rym; Canestrari, Mickaël J.; Mignot, Tâm; Lebrun, Régine; Bouveret, Emmanuelle

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens often deliver effectors into host cells using type 3 secretion systems (T3SS), the extremity of which forms a translocon that perforates the host plasma membrane. The T3SS encoded by Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1) is genetically associated with an acyl carrier protein, IacP, whose role has remained enigmatic. In this study, using tandem affinity purification, we identify a direct protein-protein interaction between IacP and the translocon protein SipB. We show, by mass spectrometry and radiolabelling, that SipB is acylated, which provides evidence for a modification of the translocon that has not been described before. A unique and conserved cysteine residue of SipB is identified as crucial for this modification. Although acylation of SipB was not essential to virulence, we show that this posttranslational modification promoted SipB insertion into host-cell membranes and pore-forming activity linked to the SPI-1 T3SS. Cooccurrence of acyl carrier and translocon proteins in several γ- and β-proteobacteria suggests that acylation of the translocon is conserved in these other pathogenic bacteria. These results also indicate that acyl carrier proteins, known for their involvement in metabolic pathways, have also evolved as cofactors of new bacterial protein lipidation pathways. PMID:28085879

  11. Molar absorptivity and color characteristics of acylated and non-acylated pelargonidin-based anthocyanins.

    PubMed

    Giusti, M M; Rodríguez-Saona, L E; Wrolstad, R E

    1999-11-01

    The effects of glycosylation and acylation on the spectral characteristics, molar absorptivity, and color attributes of purified acylated and non-acylated pelargonidin derivatives were compared. Pigments were obtained from strawberries, radishes, red-fleshed potatoes, and partially hydrolyzed radish pigments. Individual pigments were isolated by using semipreparative HPLC. Spectral and color (CIELch) attributes of purified pigments were measured. Molar absorptivity ranged from 15 600 to 39 590 for pelargonidin-3-glucoside (pg-3-glu) and pg-3-rutinoside-5-glucoside acylated with p-coumaric acid, respectively. The presence of cinnamic acid acylation had a considerable impact on spectral and color characteristics, causing a bathochromic shift of lambda(max). Sugar substitution also played an important role, with a hypsochromic shift caused by the presence of glycosylation. Pg-3, 5-diglu and pg-3,5-triglu possessed a higher hue angle (>40 degrees ) than the other pg derivatives at pH 1.0, corresponding to the yellow-orange region of the color solid. Acylation with malonic acid did not affect lambda(max) and showed little effect on color characteristics. The solvent system had an effect not only on the molar absorptivity, but also on the visual color characteristic of the pigments.

  12. Mechanistic issues in asparagine synthetase catalysis.

    PubMed

    Richards, N G; Schuster, S M

    1998-01-01

    The enzymatic synthesis of asparagine is an ATP-dependent process that utilizes the nitrogen atom derived from either glutamine or ammonia. Despite a long history of kinetic and mechanistic investigation, there is no universally accepted catalytic mechanism for this seemingly straightforward carboxyl group activating enzyme, especially as regards those steps immediately preceding amide bond formation. This chapter considers four issues dealing with the mechanism: (a) the structural organization of the active site(s) partaking in glutamine utilization and aspartate activation; (b) the relationship of asparagine synthetase to other amidotransferases; (c) the way in which ATP is used to activate the beta-carboxyl group; and (d) the detailed mechanism by which nitrogen is transferred.

  13. Glutamine Synthetase: Role in Neurological Disorders.

    PubMed

    Jayakumar, Arumugam R; Norenberg, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) is an ATP-dependent enzyme found in most species that synthesizes glutamine from glutamate and ammonia. In brain, GS is exclusively located in astrocytes where it serves to maintain the glutamate-glutamine cycle, as well as nitrogen metabolism. Changes in the activity of GS, as well as its gene expression, along with excitotoxicity, have been identified in a number of neurological conditions. The literature describing alterations in the activation and gene expression of GS, as well as its involvement in different neurological disorders, however, is incomplete. This review summarizes changes in GS gene expression/activity and its potential contribution to the pathogenesis of several neurological disorders, including hepatic encephalopathy, ischemia, epilepsy, Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, traumatic brain injury, Parkinson's disease, and astroglial neoplasms. This review also explores the possibility of targeting GS in the therapy of these conditions.

  14. {alpha}-Lipoic acid prevents lipotoxic cardiomyopathy in acyl CoA-synthase transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Young; Naseem, R. Haris; Park, Byung-Hyun; Garry, Daniel J.; Richardson, James A.; Schaffer, Jean E.; Unger, Roger H. . E-mail: roger.unger@utsouthwestern.edu

    2006-05-26

    {alpha}-Lipoic acid ({alpha}-LA) mimics the hypothalamic actions of leptin on food intake, energy expenditure, and activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). To determine if, like leptin, {alpha}-LA protects against cardiac lipotoxicity, {alpha}-LA was fed to transgenic mice with cardiomyocyte-specific overexpression of the acyl CoA synthase (ACS) gene. Untreated ACS-transgenic mice died prematurely with increased triacylglycerol content and dilated cardiomyopathy, impaired systolic function and myofiber disorganization, apoptosis, and interstitial fibrosis on microscopy. In {alpha}-LA-treated ACS-transgenic mice heart size, echocardiogram and TG content were normal. Plasma TG fell 50%, hepatic-activated phospho-AMPK rose 6-fold, sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c declined 50%, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma} cofactor-1{alpha} mRNA rose 4-fold. Since food restriction did not prevent lipotoxicity, we conclude that {alpha}-LA treatment, like hyperleptinemia, protects the heart of ACS-transgenic mice from lipotoxicity.

  15. Adaptive changes in individual acyl-CoA esters from hamster BAT during cold acclimation.

    PubMed

    Donatello, S; Spennetta, T; Strieleman, P; Woldegiorgis, G; Shrago, E

    1988-02-01

    Long-chain fatty acyl-CoA esters (LCFACoAE) were extracted from freeze-clamped powdered brown adipose tissue (BAT) obtained from thermoneutral control and cold-acclimated hamsters and the CoA esters individually separated by high-performance liquid chromatography. LCFACoAE of carbon chain length C12 to C20 were identified by increasing column retention time in the following order: C12:0, C14:1, C14:0, C16:1, C18:2, C16:0, C18:1, C18:0, and C20:4. The mean total LCFACoAE concentrations were 235 +/- 40 nmol/g protein for the control hamsters and 648 +/- 105 nmol/g protein for the 22-day cold-acclimated hamsters. A rapid fourfold increase in the levels of C16:0, C18:0, and C18:1 occurred within hours after initiation of the cold temperature, whereas the concentrations of the other six LCFACoAE either increased only slightly or remained unchanged. Almost 50% of the total LCFACoAE in the BAT of cold-acclimated hamsters was made up of C16:0, C18:0, and C18:1. These results, which demonstrate some dynamic changes in adipose tissue LCFACoAE, are consistent with their proposed role in the initiation and maintenance of BAT thermogenesis.

  16. The role of peroxisomal fatty acyl-CoA beta-oxidation in bile acid biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, H.; Miwa, A. )

    1989-11-01

    The physiological role of the peroxisomal fatty acyl-CoA beta-oxidizing system (FAOS) is not yet established. We speculated that there might be a relationship between peroxisomal degradation of long-chain fatty acids in the liver and the biosynthesis of bile acids. This was investigated using (1-{sup 14}C)butyric acid and (1-{sup 14}C)lignoceric acid as substrates of FAOS in mitochondria and peroxisomes, respectively. The incorporation of ({sup 14}C)lignoceric acid into primary bile acids was approximately four times higher than that of ({sup 14}C)butyric acid (in terms of C-2 units). The pools of these two fatty acids in the liver were exceedingly small. The incorporations of radioactivity into the primary bile acids were strongly inhibited by administration of aminotriazole, which is a specific inhibitor of peroxisomal FAOS in vivo. Aminotriazole inhibited preferentially the formation of cholate, the major primary bile acid, from both ({sup 14}C)lignoceric acid and ({sup 14}C)butyric acid, rather than the formation of chenodeoxycholate. The former inhibition was about 70% and the latter was approximately 40-50%. In view of reports that cholate is biosynthesized from endogenous cholesterol, the above results indicate that peroxisomal FAOS may have an anabolic function, supplying acetyl CoA for bile acid biosynthesis.

  17. Structural basis for recruitment of tandem hotdog domains in acyl-CoA thioesterase 7 and its role in inflammation.

    PubMed

    Forwood, Jade K; Thakur, Anil S; Guncar, Gregor; Marfori, Mary; Mouradov, Dmitri; Meng, Weining; Robinson, Jodie; Huber, Thomas; Kellie, Stuart; Martin, Jennifer L; Hume, David A; Kobe, Bostjan

    2007-06-19

    Acyl-CoA thioesterases (Acots) catalyze the hydrolysis of fatty acyl-CoA to free fatty acid and CoA and thereby regulate lipid metabolism and cellular signaling. We present a comprehensive structural and functional characterization of mouse acyl-CoA thioesterase 7 (Acot7). Whereas prokaryotic homologues possess a single thioesterase domain, mammalian Acot7 contains a pair of domains in tandem. We determined the crystal structures of both the N- and C-terminal domains of the mouse enzyme, and inferred the structure of the full-length enzyme using a combination of chemical cross-linking, mass spectrometry, and molecular modeling. The quaternary arrangement in Acot7 features a trimer of hotdog fold dimers. Both domains of Acot7 are required for activity, but only one of two possible active sites in the dimer is functional. Asn-24 and Asp-213 (from N- and C-domains, respectively) were identified as the catalytic residues through site-directed mutagenesis. An enzyme with higher activity than wild-type Acot7 was obtained by mutating the residues in the nonfunctional active site. Recombinant Acot7 was shown to have the highest activity toward arachidonoyl-CoA, suggesting a function in eicosanoid metabolism. In line with the proposal, Acot7 was shown to be highly expressed in macrophages and up-regulated by lipopolysaccharide. Overexpression of Acot7 in a macrophage cell line modified the production of prostaglandins D2 and E2. Together, the results link the molecular and cellular functions of Acot7 and identify the enzyme as a candidate drug target in inflammatory disease.

  18. Structural basis for recruitment of tandem hotdog domains in acyl-CoA thioesterase 7 and its role in inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Forwood, Jade K.; Thakur, Anil S.; Guncar, Gregor; Marfori, Mary; Mouradov, Dmitri; Meng, Weining; Robinson, Jodie; Huber, Thomas; Kellie, Stuart; Martin, Jennifer L.; Hume, David A.; Kobe, Bostjan

    2007-01-01

    Acyl-CoA thioesterases (Acots) catalyze the hydrolysis of fatty acyl-CoA to free fatty acid and CoA and thereby regulate lipid metabolism and cellular signaling. We present a comprehensive structural and functional characterization of mouse acyl-CoA thioesterase 7 (Acot7). Whereas prokaryotic homologues possess a single thioesterase domain, mammalian Acot7 contains a pair of domains in tandem. We determined the crystal structures of both the N- and C-terminal domains of the mouse enzyme, and inferred the structure of the full-length enzyme using a combination of chemical cross-linking, mass spectrometry, and molecular modeling. The quaternary arrangement in Acot7 features a trimer of hotdog fold dimers. Both domains of Acot7 are required for activity, but only one of two possible active sites in the dimer is functional. Asn-24 and Asp-213 (from N- and C-domains, respectively) were identified as the catalytic residues through site-directed mutagenesis. An enzyme with higher activity than wild-type Acot7 was obtained by mutating the residues in the nonfunctional active site. Recombinant Acot7 was shown to have the highest activity toward arachidonoyl-CoA, suggesting a function in eicosanoid metabolism. In line with the proposal, Acot7 was shown to be highly expressed in macrophages and up-regulated by lipopolysaccharide. Overexpression of Acot7 in a macrophage cell line modified the production of prostaglandins D2 and E2. Together, the results link the molecular and cellular functions of Acot7 and identify the enzyme as a candidate drug target in inflammatory disease. PMID:17563367

  19. Head-group acylation of monogalactosyldiacylglycerol is a common stress response, and the acyl-galactose acyl composition varies with the plant species and applied stress.

    PubMed

    Vu, Hieu Sy; Roth, Mary R; Tamura, Pamela; Samarakoon, Thilani; Shiva, Sunitha; Honey, Samuel; Lowe, Kaleb; Schmelz, Eric A; Williams, Todd D; Welti, Ruth

    2014-04-01

    Formation of galactose-acylated monogalactosyldiacylglycerols has been shown to be induced by leaf homogenization, mechanical wounding, avirulent bacterial infection and thawing after snap-freezing. Here, lipidomic analysis using mass spectrometry showed that galactose-acylated monogalactosyldiacylglycerols, formed in wheat (Triticum aestivum) and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) leaves upon wounding, have acyl-galactose profiles that differ from those of wounded Arabidopsis thaliana, indicating that different plant species accumulate different acyl-galactose components in response to the same stress. Additionally, the composition of the acyl-galactose component of Arabidopsis acMGDG (galactose-acylated monogalactosyldiacylglycerol) depends on the stress treatment. After sub-lethal freezing treatment, acMGDG contained mainly non-oxidized fatty acids esterified to galactose, whereas mostly oxidized fatty acids accumulated on galactose after wounding or bacterial infection. Compositional data are consistent with acMGDG being formed in vivo by transacylation with fatty acids from digalactosyldiacylglycerols. Oxophytodienoic acid, an oxidized fatty acid, was more concentrated on the galactosyl ring of acylated monogalactosyldiacylglycerols than in galactolipids in general. Also, oxidized fatty acid-containing acylated monogalactosyldiacylglycerols increased cumulatively when wounded Arabidopsis leaves were wounded again. These findings suggest that, in Arabidopsis, the pool of galactose-acylated monogalactosyldiacylglycerols may serve to sequester oxidized fatty acids during stress responses.

  20. Three CoA Transferases Involved in the Production of Short Chain Fatty Acids in Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Mitsunari; Yoshida, Yasuo; Nagano, Keiji; Hasegawa, Yoshiaki; Takebe, Jun; Yoshimura, Fuminobu

    2016-01-01

    Butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA transferase, which produces butyrate and acetyl-CoA from butyryl-CoA and acetate, is responsible for the final step of butyrate production in bacteria. This study demonstrates that in the periodontopathogenic bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis this reaction is not catalyzed by PGN_1171, previously annotated as butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA transferase, but by three distinct CoA transferases, PGN_0725, PGN_1341, and PGN_1888. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and spectrophotometric analyses were performed using crude enzyme extracts from deletion mutant strains and purified recombinant proteins. The experiments revealed that, in the presence of acetate, PGN_0725 preferentially utilized butyryl-CoA rather than propionyl-CoA. By contrast, this preference was reversed in PGN_1888. The only butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA transferase activity was observed in PGN_1341. Double reciprocal plots revealed that all the reactions catalyzed by these enzymes follow a ternary-complex mechanism, in contrast to previously characterized CoA transferases. GC-MS analysis to determine the concentrations of short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) in culture supernatants of P. gingivalis wild type and mutant strains revealed that PGN_0725 and PGN_1888 play a major role in the production of butyrate and propionate, respectively. Interestingly, a triple deletion mutant lacking PGN_0725, PGN_1341, and PGN_1888 produced low levels of SCFAs, suggesting that the microorganism contains CoA transferase(s) in addition to these three enzymes. Growth rates of the mutant strains were mostly slower than that of the wild type, indicating that many carbon compounds produced in the SCFA synthesis appear to be important for the biological activity of this microorganism. PMID:27486457

  1. TRYPTOPHANASE-TRYPTOPHAN SYNTHETASE SYSTEMS IN ESCHERICHIA COLI III.

    PubMed Central

    Freundlich, Martin; Lichstein, Herman C.

    1962-01-01

    Freundlich, Martin (University of Minnesota, Minneapolis) and Herman C. Lichstein. Tryptophanase-tryptophan synthetase systems in Escherichia coli. III. Requirements for enzyme synthesis. J. Bacteriol. 84:996–1006. 1962.—The requirements for the formation of tryptophanase and tryptophan synthetase in Escherichia coli during repression release were studied. The kinetics of the formation of tryptophan synthetase differed in the two strains examined; this was attributed to differences in the endogenous level of tryptophan in the bacterial cells. The formation of both enzymes was inhibited by chloramphenicol, and by the absence of arginine in an arginine-requiring mutant. These results are indicative of a requirement for protein synthesis for enzyme formation. Requirements for nucleic acid synthesis were examined by use of a uracil- and thymine-requiring mutant, and with purine and pyrimidine analogues. The results obtained suggest that some type of ribonucleic acid synthesis was necessary for the formation of tryptophanase and tryptophan synthetase. PMID:13959620

  2. A key role of PGC-1α transcriptional coactivator in production of VEGF by a novel angiogenic agent COA-Cl in cultured human fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Igarashi, Junsuke; Okamoto, Ryuji; Yamashita, Tetsuo; Hashimoto, Takeshi; Karita, Sakiko; Nakai, Kozo; Kubota, Yasuo; Takata, Maki; Yamaguchi, Fuminori; Tokuda, Masaaki; Sakakibara, Norikazu; Tsukamoto, Ikuko; Konishi, Ryoji; Hirano, Katsuya

    2016-03-01

    We previously demonstrated a potent angiogenic effect of a newly developed adenosine-like agent namedCOA-Cl.COA-Cl exerted tube forming activity in human umbilical vein endothelial cells in the presence of normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDF). We therefore explored whether and howCOA-Cl modulates gene expression and protein secretion ofVEGF, a master regulator of angiogenesis, inNHDFRT-PCRandELISArevealed thatCOA-Cl upregulatedVEGF mRNAexpression and protein secretion inNHDFHIF1α(hypoxia-inducible factor 1α), a transcription factor, andPGC-1α(peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γcoactivator-1α), a transcriptional coactivator, are known to positively regulate theVEGFgene. Immunoblot andRT-PCRanalyses revealed thatCOA-Cl markedly upregulated the expression ofPGC-1αprotein andmRNACOA-Cl had no effect on the expression ofHIF1αprotein andmRNAin both hypoxia and normoxia. SilencingPGC-1αgene, but notHIF1αgene, by small interferingRNAattenuated the ability ofCOA-Cl to promoteVEGFsecretion. When an N-terminal fragment ofPGC-1αwas cotransfected with its partner transcription factorERRα(estrogen-related receptor-α) inCOS-7 cells,COA-Cl upregulated the expression of the endogenousVEGF mRNA However,COA-Cl had no effect on the expression ofVEGF, whenHIF1αwas transfected.COA-Cl inducesVEGFgene expression and protein secretion in fibroblasts. The transcriptional coactivatorPGC-1α, in concert withERRα, plays a key role in theCOA-Cl-inducedVEGFproduction.COA-Cl-induced activation ofPGC-1α-ERRα-VEGFpathway has a potential as a novel means for therapeutic angiogenesis.

  3. Genome mining unearths a hybrid nonribosomal peptide synthetase-like-pteridine synthase biosynthetic gene cluster

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyun Bong; Perez, Corey E; Barber, Karl W; Rinehart, Jesse; Crawford, Jason M

    2017-01-01

    Nonribosomal peptides represent a large class of metabolites with pharmaceutical relevance. Pteridines, such as pterins, folates, and flavins, are heterocyclic metabolites that often serve as redox-active cofactors. The biosynthetic machineries for construction of these distinct classes of small molecules operate independently in the cell. Here, we discovered an unprecedented nonribosomal peptide synthetase-like-pteridine synthase hybrid biosynthetic gene cluster in Photorhabdus luminescens using genome synteny analysis. P. luminescens is a Gammaproteobacterium that undergoes phenotypic variation and can have both pathogenic and mutualistic roles. Through extensive gene deletion, pathway-targeted molecular networking, quantitative proteomic analysis, and NMR, we show that the genetic locus affects the regulation of quorum sensing and secondary metabolic enzymes and encodes new pteridine metabolites functionalized with cis-amide acyl-side chains, termed pepteridine A (1) and B (2). The pepteridines are produced in the pathogenic phenotypic variant and represent the first reported metabolites to be synthesized by a hybrid NRPS-pteridine pathway. These studies expand our view of the combinatorial biosynthetic potential available in bacteria. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.25229.001

  4. Phylogenetic Study of Polyketide Synthases and Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetases Involved in the Biosynthesis of Mycotoxins

    PubMed Central

    Gallo, Antonia; Ferrara, Massimo; Perrone, Giancarlo

    2013-01-01

    Polyketide synthase (PKSs) and nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPSs) are large multimodular enzymes involved in biosynthesis of polyketide and peptide toxins produced by fungi. Furthermore, hybrid enzymes, in which a reducing PKS region is fused to a single NRPS module, are also responsible of the synthesis of peptide-polyketide metabolites in fungi. The genes encoding for PKSs and NRPSs have been exposed to complex evolutionary mechanisms, which have determined the great number and diversity of metabolites. In this study, we considered the most important polyketide and peptide mycotoxins and, for the first time, a phylogenetic analysis of both PKSs and NRPSs involved in their biosynthesis was assessed using two domains for each enzyme: β-ketosynthase (KS) and acyl-transferase (AT) for PKSs; adenylation (A) and condensation (C) for NRPSs. The analysis of both KS and AT domains confirmed the differentiation of the three classes of highly, partially and non-reducing PKSs. Hybrid PKS-NRPSs involved in mycotoxins biosynthesis grouped together in the phylogenetic trees of all the domains analyzed. For most mycotoxins, the corresponding biosynthetic enzymes from distinct fungal species grouped together, except for PKS and NRPS involved in ochratoxin A biosynthesis, for which an unlike process of evolution could be hypothesized in different species. PMID:23604065

  5. TRYPTOPHANASE-TRYPTOPHAN SYNTHETASE SYSTEMS IN ESCHERICHIA COLI I.

    PubMed Central

    Freundlich, Martin; Lichstein, Herman C.

    1962-01-01

    Freundlich, Martin (University of Minnesota, Minneapolis) and Herman C. Lichstein. Tryptophanase-tryptophan synthetase systems in Escherichia coli. I. Effect of tryptophan and related compounds. J. Bacteriol. 84:979–987. 1962.—The effect of tryptophan and related compounds on tryptophanase and tryptophan synthetase formation in Escherichia coli was determined. Several of these compounds stimulated the formation of tryptophanase while concomitantly decreasing the production of synthetase. A number of tryptophan analogues were found to inhibit growth. The possible mode of action of these substances was examined further. 5-Hydroxytryptophan greatly inhibited the formation of synthetase and also reduced growth. Its inhibitory action on growth was attributed, at least partially, to the false feedback inhibition of anthranilic acid formation. Tryptamine was found to be a potent inhibitor of the activity of synthetase, as well as of the enzyme(s) involved in the synthesis of anthranilic acid from shikimic acid. However, growth reduction was only partially reversed by tryptophan. Indole-3-acetic acid and indole-3-propionic acid decreased growth and increased the formation of synthetase six- to eightfold. The action of these compounds was ascribed to their ability to block the endogenous formation of tryptophan. PMID:13959621

  6. Evolution of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase quaternary structure and activity: Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondrial phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase.

    PubMed Central

    Sanni, A; Walter, P; Boulanger, Y; Ebel, J P; Fasiolo, F

    1991-01-01

    Phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetases [L-phenylalanine:tRNAPhe ligase (AMP-forming), EC 6.1.1.20] from Escherichia coli, yeast cytoplasm, and mammalian cytoplasm have an unusual conserved alpha 2 beta 2 quaternary structure that is shared by only one other aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase. Both subunits are required for activity. We show here that a single mitochondrial polypeptide from Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an active phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase. This protein (the MSF1 gene product) is active as a monomer. It has all three characteristic sequence motifs of the class II aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and its activity may result from the recruitment of additional sequences into an alpha-subunit-like structure. Images PMID:1924298

  7. Acyl glucuronides: the good, the bad and the ugly.

    PubMed

    Regan, Sophie L; Maggs, James L; Hammond, Thomas G; Lambert, Craig; Williams, Dominic P; Park, B Kevin

    2010-10-01

    Acyl glucuronidation is the major metabolic conjugation reaction of most carboxylic acid drugs in mammals. The physiological consequences of this biotransformation have been investigated incompletely but include effects on drug metabolism, protein binding, distribution and clearance that impact upon pharmacological and toxicological outcomes. In marked contrast, the exceptional but widely disparate chemical reactivity of acyl glucuronides has attracted far greater attention. Specifically, the complex transacylation and glycation reactions with proteins have provoked much inconclusive debate over the safety of drugs metabolised to acyl glucuronides. It has been hypothesised that these covalent modifications could initiate idiosyncratic adverse drug reactions. However, despite a large body of in vitro data on the reactions of acyl glucuronides with protein, evidence for adduct formation from acyl glucuronides in vivo is limited and potentially ambiguous. The causal connection of protein adduction to adverse drug reactions remains uncertain. This review has assessed the intrinsic reactivity, metabolic stability and pharmacokinetic properties of acyl glucuronides in the context of physiological, pharmacological and toxicological perspectives. Although numerous experiments have characterised the reactions of acyl glucuronides with proteins, these might be attenuated substantially in vivo by rapid clearance of the conjugates. Consequently, to delineate a relationship between acyl glucuronide formation and toxicological phenomena, detailed pharmacokinetic analysis of systemic exposure to the acyl glucuronide should be undertaken adjacent to determining protein adduct concentrations in vivo. Further investigation is required to ascertain whether acyl glucuronide clearance is sufficient to prevent covalent modification of endogenous proteins and consequentially a potential immunological response.

  8. Multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenation deficiency as decreased acyl-carnitine profile in serum.

    PubMed

    Wen, Bing; Li, Duoling; Li, Wei; Zhao, Yuying; Yan, Chuanzhu

    2015-06-01

    We report a case with late onset riboflavin-responsive multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenation deficiency (MADD) characterized by decreased acyl-carnitine profile in serum which is consistent with primary systemic carnitine deficiency (CDSP) while just the contrary to a typical MADD. This patient complained with muscle weakness, muscle pain and intermittent vomiting, and was diagnosed as polymyositis, received prednisone therapy before consulted with us. Muscle biopsy revealed mild lipid storage. The findings of serum acyl-carnitines were consistent with CDSP manifesting as decreased free and total carnitines in serum. But oral L-carnitine supplementation was not very effective to this patient and mutation analysis of the SLC22A5 gene for CDSP was normal. Later, another acyl-carnitine analysis revealed a typical MADD profile in serum, which was characterized by increased multiple acyl-carnitines. Compound heterozygous mutations were identified in electron transferring-flavoprotein dehydrogenase (ETFDH) gene which confirmed the diagnosis of MADD. After administration of riboflavin, he improved dramatically, both clinically and biochemically. Thus, late onset riboflavin-responsive MADD should be included in the differential diagnosis for adult carnitine deficiency.

  9. Fatty Acyl Chains of Mycobacterium marinum Lipooligosaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Rombouts, Yoann; Alibaud, Laeticia; Carrère-Kremer, Séverine; Maes, Emmanuel; Tokarski, Caroline; Elass, Elisabeth; Kremer, Laurent; Guérardel, Yann

    2011-01-01

    We have recently established the fine structure of the glycan backbone of lipooligosaccharides (LOS-I to LOS-IV) isolated from Mycobacterium marinum, a close relative of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. These studies culminated with the description of an unusual terminal N-acylated monosaccharide that confers important biological functions to LOS-IV, such as macrophage activation, that may be relevant to granuloma formation. It was, however, also suggested that the lipid moiety was required for LOSs to exert their immunomodulatory activity. Herein, using highly purified LOSs from M. marinum, we have determined through a combination of mass spectrometric and NMR techniques, the structure and localization of the fatty acids composing the lipid moiety. The occurrence of two distinct polymethyl-branched fatty acids presenting specific localizations is consistent with the presence of two highly related polyketide synthases (Pks5 and Pks5.1) in M. marinum and presumably involved in the synthesis of these fatty acyl chains. In addition, a bioinformatic search permitted us to identify a set of enzymes potentially involved in the biosynthesis or transfer of these lipids to the LOS trehalose unit. These include MMAR_2343, a member of the Pap (polyketide-associated protein) family, that acylates trehalose-based glycolipids in M. marinum. The participation of MMAR_2343 to LOS assembly was demonstrated using a M. marinum mutant carrying a transposon insertion in the MMAR_2343 gene. Disruption of MMAR_2343 resulted in a severe LOS breakdown, indicating that MMAR_2343, hereafter designated PapA4, fulfills the requirements for LOS acylation and assembly. PMID:21803773

  10. Succinyl CoA: 3-oxoacid CoA transferase (SCOT): human cDNA cloning, human chromosomal mapping to 5p13, and mutation detection in a SCOT-deficient patient.

    PubMed Central

    Kassovska-Bratinova, S.; Fukao, T.; Song, X. Q.; Duncan, A. M.; Chen, H. S.; Robert, M. F.; Pérez-Cerdá, C.; Ugarte, M.; Chartrand, C.; Vobecky, S.; Kondo, N.; Mitchell, G. A.

    1996-01-01

    Succinyl CoA: 3-oxoacid CoA transferase (SCOT; E.C.2.8.3.5) mediates the rate-determining step of ketolysis in extrahepatic tissues, the esterification of acetoacetate to CoA for use in energy production. Hereditary SCOT deficiency in humans causes episodes of severe ketoacidosis. We obtained human-heart SCOT cDNA clones spanning the entire 1,560-nt coding sequence. Sequence alignment of the human SCOT peptides with other known CoA transferases revealed several conserved regions of potential functional importance. A single approximately 3.2-kb SCOT mRNA is present in human tissues (heart > leukocytes >> fibroblasts), but no signal is detectable in the human hepatoma cell line HepG2. We mapped the human SCOT locus (OXCT) to the cytogenetic band 5p13 by in situ hybridization. From fibroblasts of a patient with hereditary SCOT deficiency, we amplified and cloned cDNA fragments containing the entire SCOT coding sequence. We found a homozygous C-to-G transversion at nt 848, which changes the Ser 283 codon to a stop codon. This mutation (S283X) is incompatible with normal enzyme function and represents the first documentation of a pathogenic mutation in SCOT deficiency. Images Figure 2 Figure 6 PMID:8751852

  11. Discovery of Tumor-Specific Irreversible Inhibitors of Stearoyl CoA Desaturase

    PubMed Central

    Theodoropoulos, Panayotis C.; Gonzales, Stephen S.; Winterton, Sarah E.; Rodriguez-Navas, Carlos; McKnight, John S.; Morlock, Lorraine K.; Hanson, Jordan M.; Cross, Bethany; Owen, Amy E.; Duan, Yingli; Moreno, Jose R.; Lemoff, Andrew; Mirzaei, Hamid; Posner, Bruce A.; Williams, Noelle S.

    2016-01-01

    A hallmark of targeted cancer therapies is selective toxicity among cancer cell lines. We evaluated results from a viability screen of over 200,000 small molecules to identify two chemical series, oxalamides and benzothiazoles, that were selectively toxic to the same four of 12 human lung cancer cell lines at low nanomolar concentrations. Sensitive cell lines expressed cytochrome P450 (CYP) 4F11, which metabolized the compounds into irreversible stearoyl CoA desaturase (SCD) inhibitors. SCD is recognized as a promising biological target in cancer and metabolic disease. However, SCD is essential to sebocytes, and accordingly SCD inhibitors cause skin toxicity. Mouse sebocytes were unable to activate the benzothiazoles or oxalamides into SCD inhibitors, providing a therapeutic window for inhibiting SCD in vivo. We thus offer a strategy to target SCD in cancer by taking advantage of high CYP expression in a subset of tumors. PMID:26829472

  12. Structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis phosphopantetheine adenylyltransferase in complex with the feedback inhibitor CoA reveals only one active-site conformation

    SciTech Connect

    Wubben, T.; Mesecar, A.D.

    2014-10-02

    Phosphopantetheine adenylyltransferase (PPAT) catalyzes the penultimate step in the coenzyme A (CoA) biosynthetic pathway, reversibly transferring an adenylyl group from ATP to 4'-phosphopantetheine to form dephosphocoenzyme A (dPCoA). To complement recent biochemical and structural studies on Mycobacterium tuberculosis PPAT (MtPPAT) and to provide further insight into the feedback regulation of MtPPAT by CoA, the X-ray crystal structure of the MtPPAT enzyme in complex with CoA was determined to 2.11 {angstrom} resolution. Unlike previous X-ray crystal structures of PPAT-CoA complexes from other bacteria, which showed two distinct CoA conformations bound to the active site, only one conformation of CoA is observed in the MtPPAT-CoA complex.

  13. Glucocorticoid receptor-mediated induction of glutamine synthetase in skeletal muscle cells in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Max, Stephen R.; Thomas, John W.; Banner, Carl; Vitkovic, Ljubisa; Konagaya, Masaaki

    1987-01-01

    The regulation by glucocorticoids of glutamine synthetase in L6 muscle cells in culture is studied. Glutamine synthetase activity was strikingly enhanced by dexamethasone. The dexamethasone-mediated induction of glutamine synthetase activity was blocked by RU38486, a glucocorticoid antagonist, indicating the involvement of intracellular glucocorticoid receptors in the induction process. RU38486 alone was without effect. Northern blot analysis revealed that dexamethasone-mediated enhancement of glutamine synthetase activity involves increased levels of glutamine synthetase mRNA. Glucocorticoids regulate the expression of glutamine synthetase mRNA in cultured muscle cells via interaction with intracellular receptors. Such regulation may be relevant to control of glutamine production by muscle.

  14. Metabolism of ricinoleic acid into gamma-decalactone: beta-oxidation and long chain acyl intermediates of ricinoleic acid in the genus Sporidiobolus sp.

    PubMed

    Blin-Perrin, C; Molle, D; Dufosse, L; Le-Quere, J L; Viel, C; Mauvais, G; Feron, G

    2000-07-01

    In order to study differences in gamma-decalactone production in yeast, four species of Sporidiobolus were cultivated with 5% of methyl ricinoleate as the lactone substrate. In vivo studies showed different time courses of intermediates of ricinoleic acid breakdown between the four species. In vitro studies of the beta-oxidation system were conducted with crude cell extracts of Sporidiobolus spp. and with ricinoleyl-CoA (RCoA) as substrate. The beta-oxidation was detected by measuring acyl-CoA oxidase, 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase activities, and acetyl-CoA production. The time courses of the CoA esters resulting from RCoA breakdown by crude extract of Sporidiobolus spp. permit the proposal of different metabolic models in the yeast. These models explained the differences observed during in vivo studies.

  15. Spectroscopic Classification of ASASSN-16fn/AT2016coa and MASTER J202606.27-200732.6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falco, E.; Calkins, M.; Challis, P.; Kirshner, R.; Prieto, J. L.; Stanek, K. Z.

    2016-06-01

    Optical spectra (range 350-760nm) of the supernova candidates ASASSN-16fn/AT2016coa (ATel #9081) and MASTER J202606.27-200732.6 (ATel #9056) were obtained on UT 2016 June 3 with the F. L. Whipple Observatory 1.5-m telescope (+ FAST).

  16. Geranylgeraniol suppresses the viability of human DU145 prostate carcinoma cells and the level of HMG CoA reductase

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Nicolle V.; Yeganehjoo, Hoda; Katuru, Rajasekhar; DeBose-Boyd, Russell A.; Morris, Lindsey L.; Michon, Renee; Yu, Zhi-Ling; Mo, Huanbiao

    2014-01-01

    The rate-limiting enzyme of the mevalonate pathway, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG CoA) reductase, provides essential intermediates for the prenylation of nuclear lamins and Ras and dolichol-mediated glycosylation of growth factor receptors. The diterpene geranylgeraniol downregulates the level of HMG CoA reductase and suppresses the growth of human liver, lung, ovary, pancreas, colon, stomach, and blood tumors. We evaluated the growth-suppressive activity of geranylgeraniol in human prostate carcinoma cells. Geranylgeraniol induced dose-dependent suppression of the viability of human DU145 prostate carcinoma cells (IC50 = 80 ±18 μmol/L, n =5) following 72-h incubations in 96-well plates. Cell cycle was arrested at the G1 phase with a concomitant decrease in cyclin D1 protein. Geranylgeraniol-induced apoptosis was detected by flow cytometric analysis, fluorescence microscopy following acridine orange and ethidium bromide dual staining, and caspase-3 activation. Geranylgeraniol-induced viability suppression was accompanied by concentration-dependent decrease in the level of HMG CoA reductase protein. As a nonsterol molecule that downregulates HMG CoA reductase in the presence of sterols, geranylgeraniol may have potential in the chemoprevention and/or therapy of human prostate cancer. PMID:24006306

  17. Carnitine palmitoyl transferase activity in Morris Hepatoma 7777 mitochondria and its sensitivity to malonyl CoA inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Woldegiorgis, G.; Shrago, E.

    1986-05-01

    Earlier reports in the literature have indicated no detectable Carnitine Palymitoyl Transferase (CPT) activity in homogenates prepared from Morris Hepatoma 7777. In its study CPT activity in isolated mitochondria (mito) was measured by butanol extraction of the (/sup 3/H)palmitoyl carnitine formed as outlined by Bremer et al. Contrary to the earlier work where no appreciable activity of CPT was observed the authors find significant levels of CPT (2.6 nMol/min/mg protein) in isolated mito from Morris Hepatoma 7777 (MH 7777). The level of CPT activity observed in MH 7777 mito was, however, 36% lower compared to the host liver CPT activity (4.1 nMol/min/mg protein). The enzyme in MH 7777 mito showed 83% inhibition in the presence of 10 ..mu..M malonyl CoA, in agreement with the degree of sensitivity observed with the host liver isolated mito. On freeze thawing host mito, total CPT activity increased and the sensitivity of the enzyme to malonyl CoA decreased. Frozen thawed MH 7777 mito showed a similar response to malonyl CoA but no change in the total CPT level was observed. The authors results establish for the first time the presence of a malonyl CoA sensitive CPT in MH 7777 mito, which may have slightly different properties from normal due to the membrane environment of the enzyme.

  18. Human acyl-CoA dehydrogenase-9 plays a novel role in the mitochondrial beta-oxidation of unsaturated fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Ensenauer, Regina; He, Miao; Willard, Jan-Marie; Goetzman, Eric S; Corydon, Thomas J; Vandahl, Brian B; Mohsen, Al-Walid; Isaya, Grazia; Vockley, Jerry

    2005-09-16

    Unsaturated fatty acids play an important role in the prevention of human diseases such as diabetes, obesity, cancer, and neurodegeneration. However, their oxidation in vivo by acyl-CoA dehydrogenases (ACADs) that catalyze the first step of each cycle of mitochondrial fatty acid beta-oxidation is not entirely understood. Recently, a novel ACAD (ACAD-9) of unknown function that is highly homologous to human very-long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase was identified by large-scale random sequencing. To characterize its enzymatic role, we have expressed ACAD-9 in Escherichia coli, purified it, and determined its pattern of substrate utilization. The N terminus of the mature form of the enzyme was identified by in vitro mitochondrial import studies of precursor protein. A 37-amino acid leader peptide was cleaved sequentially by two mitochondrial peptidases to yield a predicted molecular mass of 65 kDa for the mature subunit. Submitochondrial fractionation studies found native ACAD-9 to be associated with the mitochondrial membrane. Gel filtration analysis indicated that, like very-long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, ACAD-9 is a dimer, in contrast to the other known ACADs, which are tetramers. Purified mature ACAD-9 had maximal activity with long-chain unsaturated acyl-CoAs as substrates (C16:1-, C18:1-, C18:2-, C22:6-CoA). These results suggest a previously unrecognized role for ACAD-9 in the mitochondrial beta-oxidation of long-chain unsaturated fatty acids. Because of the substrate specificity and abundance of ACAD-9 in brain, we speculate that it may play a role in the turnover of lipid membrane unsaturated fatty acids that are essential for membrane integrity and structure.

  19. Physiological Consequences of Compartmentalized Acyl-CoA Metabolism*

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Daniel E.; Young, Pamela A.; Klett, Eric L.; Coleman, Rosalind A.

    2015-01-01

    Meeting the complex physiological demands of mammalian life requires strict control of the metabolism of long-chain fatty acyl-CoAs because of the multiplicity of their cellular functions. Acyl-CoAs are substrates for energy production; stored within lipid droplets as triacylglycerol, cholesterol esters, and retinol esters; esterified to form membrane phospholipids; or used to activate transcriptional and signaling pathways. Indirect evidence suggests that acyl-CoAs do not wander freely within cells, but instead, are channeled into specific pathways. In this review, we will discuss the evidence for acyl-CoA compartmentalization, highlight the key modes of acyl-CoA regulation, and diagram potential mechanisms for controlling acyl-CoA partitioning. PMID:26124277

  20. OUTCROP-BASED HIGH RESOLUTION GAMMA-RAY CHARACTERIZATION OF ARSENIC-BEARING LITHOFACIES IN THE PERMIAN GARBER SANDSTONE AND WELLINGTON FORMATION, CENTRAL OKLAHOMA AQUIFER (COA). CLEVELAND COUNTY, OKLAHOMA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The COA supplies drinking water to a number of municipalities in central Oklahoma. Two major stratigraphic units in the COA, the Garber Sandstone and Wellington Formation, contain naturally occurring arsenic that exceeds government mandated drinking-water standards (EPA, 2001). ...

  1. Pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetase, an aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase for genetic code expansion

    PubMed Central

    Crnković, Ana; Suzuki, Tateki; Söll, Dieter; Reynolds, Noah M.

    2016-01-01

    Genetic code expansion (GCE) has become a central topic of synthetic biology. GCE relies on engineered aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) and a cognate tRNA species to allow codon reassignment by co-translational insertion of non-canonical amino acids (ncAAs) into proteins. Introduction of such amino acids increases the chemical diversity of recombinant proteins endowing them with novel properties. Such proteins serve in sophisticated biochemical and biophysical studies both in vitro and in vivo, they may become unique biomaterials or therapeutic agents, and they afford metabolic dependence of genetically modified organisms for biocontainment purposes. In the Methanosarcinaceae the incorporation of the 22nd genetically encoded amino acid, pyrrolysine (Pyl), is facilitated by pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetase (PylRS) and the cognate UAG-recognizing tRNAPyl. This unique aaRS•tRNA pair functions as an orthogonal translation system (OTS) in most model organisms. The facile directed evolution of the large PylRS active site to accommodate many ncAAs, and the enzyme’s anticodon-blind specific recognition of the cognate tRNAPyl make this system highly amenable for GCE purposes. The remarkable polyspecificity of PylRS has been exploited to incorporate >100 different ncAAs into proteins. Here we review the Pyl-OT system and selected GCE applications to examine the properties of an effective OTS. PMID:28239189

  2. Aminoacyl tRNA synthetases and their connections to disease.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang Gyu; Schimmel, Paul; Kim, Sunghoon

    2008-08-12

    Aminoacylation of transfer RNAs establishes the rules of the genetic code. The reactions are catalyzed by an ancient group of 20 enzymes (one for each amino acid) known as aminoacyl tRNA synthetases (AARSs). Surprisingly, the etiology of specific diseases-including cancer, neuronal pathologies, autoimmune disorders, and disrupted metabolic conditions-is connected to specific aminoacyl tRNA synthetases. These connections include heritable mutations in the genes for tRNA synthetases that are causally linked to disease, with both dominant and recessive disease-causing mutations being annotated. Because some disease-causing mutations do not affect aminoacylation activity or apparent enzyme stability, the mutations are believed to affect functions that are distinct from aminoacylation. Examples include enzymes that are secreted as procytokines that, after activation, operate in pathways connected to the immune system or angiogenesis. In addition, within cells, synthetases form multiprotein complexes with each other or with other regulatory factors and in that way control diverse signaling pathways. Although much has been uncovered in recent years, many novel functions, disease connections, and interpathway connections of tRNA synthetases have yet to be worked out.

  3. Functional linkage between the glutaminase and synthetase domains of carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase. Role of serine 44 in carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase-aspartate carbamoyltransferase-dihydroorotase (cad).

    PubMed

    Hewagama, A; Guy, H I; Vickrey, J F; Evans, D R

    1999-10-01

    Mammalian carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase is part of carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase-aspartate carbamoyltransferase-dihydroorotase (CAD), a multifunctional protein that also catalyzes the second and third steps of pyrimidine biosynthesis. Carbamoyl phosphate synthesis requires the concerted action of the glutaminase (GLN) and carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase domains of CAD. There is a functional linkage between these domains such that glutamine hydrolysis on the GLN domain does not occur at a significant rate unless ATP and HCO(3)(-), the other substrates needed for carbamoyl phosphate synthesis, bind to the synthetase domain. The GLN domain consists of catalytic and attenuation subdomains. In the separately cloned GLN domain, the catalytic subdomain is down-regulated by interactions with the attenuation domain, a process thought to be part of the functional linkage. Replacement of Ser(44) in the GLN attenuation domain with alanine increases the k(cat)/K(m) for glutamine hydrolysis 680-fold. The formation of a functional hybrid between the mammalian Ser(44) GLN domain and the Escherichia coli carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase large subunit had little effect on glutamine hydrolysis. In contrast, ATP and HCO(3)(-) did not stimulate the glutaminase activity, indicating that the interdomain linkage had been disrupted. In accord with this interpretation, the rate of glutamine hydrolysis and carbamoyl phosphate synthesis were no longer coordinated. Approximately 3 times more glutamine was hydrolyzed by the Ser(44) --> Ala mutant than that needed for carbamoyl phosphate synthesis. Ser(44), the only attenuation subdomain residue that extends into the GLN active site, appears to be an integral component of the regulatory circuit that phases glutamine hydrolysis and carbamoyl phosphate synthesis.

  4. Characterization of a structurally and functionally diverged acyl-acyl carrier protein desaturase from milkweed seed.

    PubMed

    Cahoon, E B; Coughlan, S J; Shanklin, J

    1997-04-01

    A cDNA for a structurally variant acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) desaturase was isolated from milkweed (Asclepias syriaca) seed, a tissue enriched in palmitoleic (16:1delta9)* and cis-vaccenic (18:1delta11) acids. Extracts of Escherichia coli that express the milkweed cDNA catalyzed delta9 desaturation of acyl-ACP substrates, and the recombinant enzyme exhibited seven- to ten-fold greater specificity for palmitoyl (16:0)-ACP and 30-fold greater specificity for myristoyl (14:0)-ACP than did known delta9-stearoyl (18:0)-ACP desaturases. Like other variant acyl-ACP desaturases reported to date, the milkweed enzyme contains fewer amino acids near its N-terminus compared to previously characterized delta9-18:0-ACP desaturases. Based on the activity of an N-terminal deletion mutant of a delta9-18:0-ACP desaturase, this structural feature likely does not account for differences in substrate specificities.

  5. Acyl-acyl carrier protein as a source of fatty acids for bacterial bioluminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Byers, D.M.; Meighen, E.A.

    1985-09-01

    Pulse-chase experiments with (/sup 3/H)tetradecanoic acid and ATP showed that the bioluminescence-related 32-kDa acyltransferase from Vibrio harveyi can specifically catalyze the deacylation of a /sup 3/H-labeled 18-kDa protein observed in extracts of this bacterium. The 18-kDa protein has been partially purified and its physical and chemical properties strongly indicate that it is fatty acyl-acyl carrier protein (acyl-ACP). Both this V. harveyi (/sup 3/H)acylprotein and (/sup 3/H)palmitoyl-ACP from Escherichia coli were substrates in vitro for either the V. harveyi 32-kDa acyltransferase or the analogous enzyme (34K) from Photobacterium phosphoreum. TLC analysis indicated that the hexane-soluble product of the reaction is fatty acid. No significant cleavage of either E. coli or V. harveyi tetradecanoyl-ACP was observed in extracts of these bacteria unless the 32-kDa or 34K acyltransferase was present. Since these enzymes are believed to be responsible for the supply of fatty acids for reduction to form the aldehyde substrate of luciferase, the above results suggest that long-chain acyl-ACP is the source of fatty acids for bioluminescence.

  6. The glutamine synthetase gene family in Populus

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Glutamine synthetase (GS; EC: 6.3.1.2, L-glutamate: ammonia ligase ADP-forming) is a key enzyme in ammonium assimilation and metabolism of higher plants. The current work was undertaken to develop a more comprehensive understanding of molecular and biochemical features of GS gene family in poplar, and to characterize the developmental regulation of GS expression in various tissues and at various times during the poplar perennial growth. Results The GS gene family consists of 8 different genes exhibiting all structural and regulatory elements consistent with their roles as functional genes. Our results indicate that the family members are organized in 4 groups of duplicated genes, 3 of which code for cytosolic GS isoforms (GS1) and 1 which codes for the choroplastic GS isoform (GS2). Our analysis shows that Populus trichocarpa is the first plant species in which it was observed the complete GS family duplicated. Detailed expression analyses have revealed specific spatial and seasonal patterns of GS expression in poplar. These data provide insights into the metabolic function of GS isoforms in poplar and pave the way for future functional studies. Conclusions Our data suggest that GS duplicates could have been retained in order to increase the amount of enzyme in a particular cell type. This possibility could contribute to the homeostasis of nitrogen metabolism in functions associated to changes in glutamine-derived metabolic products. The presence of duplicated GS genes in poplar could also contribute to diversification of the enzymatic properties for a particular GS isoform through the assembly of GS polypeptides into homo oligomeric and/or hetero oligomeric holoenzymes in specific cell types. PMID:21867507

  7. Model simulations of cooking organic aerosol (COA) over the UK using estimates of emissions based on measurements at two sites in London

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ots, Riinu; Vieno, Massimo; Allan, James D.; Reis, Stefan; Nemitz, Eiko; Young, Dominique E.; Coe, Hugh; Di Marco, Chiara; Detournay, Anais; Mackenzie, Ian A.; Green, David C.; Heal, Mathew R.

    2016-11-01

    Cooking organic aerosol (COA) is currently not included in European emission inventories. However, recent positive matrix factorization (PMF) analyses of aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) measurements have suggested important contributions of COA in several European cities. In this study, emissions of COA were estimated for the UK, based on hourly AMS measurements of COA made at two sites in London (a kerbside site in central London and an urban background site in a residential area close to central London) for the full calendar year of 2012 during the Clean Air for London (ClearfLo) campaign. Iteration of COA emissions estimates and subsequent evaluation and sensitivity experiments were conducted with the EMEP4UK atmospheric chemistry transport modelling system with a horizontal resolution of 5 km × 5 km. The spatial distribution of these emissions was based on workday population density derived from the 2011 census data. The estimated UK annual COA emission was 7.4 Gg per year, which is an almost 10 % addition to the officially reported UK national total anthropogenic emissions of PM2.5 (82 Gg in 2012), corresponding to 320 mg person-1 day-1 on average. Weekday and weekend diurnal variation in COA emissions were also based on the AMS measurements. Modelled concentrations of COA were then independently evaluated against AMS-derived COA measurements from another city and time period (Manchester, January-February 2007), as well as with COA estimated by a chemical mass balance model of measurements for a 2-week period at the Harwell rural site (˜ 80 km west of central London). The modelled annual average contribution of COA to ambient particulate matter (PM) in central London was between 1 and 2 µg m-3 (˜ 20 % of total measured OA1) and between 0.5 and 0.7 µg m-3 in other major cities in England (Manchester, Birmingham, Leeds). It was also shown that cities smaller than London can have a central hotspot of population density of smaller

  8. Acylated flavonol glycoside from Platanus orientalis.

    PubMed

    Tantry, Mudasir A; Akbar, Seema; Dar, Javid A; Irtiza, Syed; Galal, Ahmed; Khuroo, Mohammad A; Ghazanfar, Khalid

    2012-03-01

    The ethylacetate and n-butanol fractions of ethanolic extract of Platanus orientalis leaves led to the isolation of new acylated flavonol glycoside as 3',5,7-trihydroxy-4'-methoxyflavonol 3-[O-2-O-(2,4-Dihydroxy)-E-cinnamoyl-α-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→6)-β-D-glucopyranosyl (1→2)]-β-D-glucopyranoside, along with seven known compounds. All the compounds were characterized by NMR including 2D NMR techniques. The isolates were evaluated for NF-κB, nitric oxide (NO), aromatase and QR2 chemoprevention activities and some of them appeared to be modestly active.

  9. Changes in the activity levels of glutamine synthetase, glutaminase and glycogen synthetase in rats subjected to hypoxic stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vats, P.; Mukherjee, A. K.; Kumria, M. M. L.; Singh, S. N.; Patil, S. K. B.; Rangnathan, S.; Sridharan, K.

    Exposure to high altitude causes loss of body mass and alterations in metabolic processes, especially carbohydrate and protein metabolism. The present study was conducted to elucidate the role of glutamine synthetase, glutaminase and glycogen synthetase under conditions of chronic intermittent hypoxia. Four groups, each consisting of 12 male albino rats (Wistar strain), were exposed to a simulated altitude of 7620 m in a hypobaric chamber for 6 h per day for 1, 7, 14 and 21 days, respectively. Blood haemoglobin, blood glucose, protein levels in the liver, muscle and plasma, glycogen content, and glutaminase, glutamine synthetase and glycogen synthetase activities in liver and muscle were determined in all groups of exposed and in a group of unexposed animals. Food intake and changes in body mass were also monitored. There was a significant reduction in body mass (28-30%) in hypoxia-exposed groups as compared to controls, with a corresponding decrease in food intake. There was rise in blood haemoglobin and plasma protein in response to acclimatisation. Over a three-fold increase in liver glycogen content was observed following 1 day of hypoxic exposure (4.76+/-0.78 mg.g-1 wet tissue in normal unexposed rats; 15.82+/-2.30 mg.g-1 wet tissue in rats exposed to hypoxia for 1 day). This returned to normal in later stages of exposure. However, there was no change in glycogen synthetase activity except for a decrease in the 21-days hypoxia-exposed group. There was a slight increase in muscle glycogen content in the 1-day exposed group which declined significantly by 56.5, 50.6 and 42% following 7, 14, and 21 days of exposure, respectively. Muscle glycogen synthetase activity was also decreased following 21 days of exposure. There was an increase in glutaminase activity in the liver and muscle in the 7-, 14- and 21-day exposed groups. Glutamine synthetase activity was higher in the liver in 7- and 14-day exposed groups; this returned to normal following 21 days of exposure

  10. Structural and biochemical characterisation of Archaeoglobus fulgidus esterase reveals a bound CoA molecule in the vicinity of the active site

    PubMed Central

    Sayer, Christopher; Finnigan, William; Isupov, Michail N.; Levisson, Mark; Kengen, Servé W. M.; van der Oost, John; Harmer, Nicholas J.; Littlechild, Jennifer A.

    2016-01-01

    A new carboxyl esterase, AF-Est2, from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Archaeoglobus fulgidus has been cloned, over-expressed in Escherichia coli and biochemically and structurally characterized. The enzyme has high activity towards short- to medium-chain p-nitrophenyl carboxylic esters with optimal activity towards the valerate ester. The AF-Est2 has good solvent and pH stability and is very thermostable, showing no loss of activity after incubation for 30 min at 80 °C. The 1.4 Å resolution crystal structure of AF-Est2 reveals Coenzyme A (CoA) bound in the vicinity of the active site. Despite the presence of CoA bound to the AF-Est2 this enzyme has no CoA thioesterase activity. The pantetheine group of CoA partially obstructs the active site alcohol pocket suggesting that this ligand has a role in regulation of the enzyme activity. A comparison with closely related α/β hydrolase fold enzyme structures shows that the AF-Est2 has unique structural features that allow CoA binding. A comparison of the structure of AF-Est2 with the human carboxyl esterase 1, which has CoA thioesterase activity, reveals that CoA is bound to different parts of the core domain in these two enzymes and approaches the active site from opposite directions. PMID:27160974

  11. Heterogeneity of Glutamine Synthetase Polypeptides in Phaseolus vulgaris L. 1

    PubMed Central

    Lara, Miguel; Porta, Helena; Padilla, Jaime; Folch, Jorge; Sánchez, Federico

    1984-01-01

    Glutamine synthetases from roots, nodules, and leaves of Phaseolus vulgaris L. have been purified to homogeneity and their polypeptide composition determined. The leaf enzyme is composed of six polypeptides. The cytosolic fraction contains two 43,000 dalton polypeptides and the chloroplastic enzyme is formed by four 45,000 dalton polypeptides. Root glutamine synthetase consists only of the same two polypeptides of 43,000 dalton that are present in the leaf enzyme. The nodule enzyme is formed by two polypeptides of 43,000 dalton, one is common to the leaf and root enzyme but the other is specific for N2-fixing nodule tissue. The two glutamine synthetase forms of the nodule contain a different proportion of the 43,000 dalton polypeptides. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 PMID:16663942

  12. Progress toward Understanding Protein S-acylation: Prospective in Plants.

    PubMed

    Li, Yaxiao; Qi, Baoxiu

    2017-01-01

    S-acylation, also known as S-palmitoylation or palmitoylation, is a reversible post-translational lipid modification in which long chain fatty acid, usually the 16-carbon palmitate, covalently attaches to a cysteine residue(s) throughout the protein via a thioester bond. It is involved in an array of important biological processes during growth and development, reproduction and stress responses in plant. S-acylation is a ubiquitous mechanism in eukaryotes catalyzed by a family of enzymes called Protein S-Acyl Transferases (PATs). Since the discovery of the first PAT in yeast in 2002 research in S-acylation has accelerated in the mammalian system and followed by in plant. However, it is still a difficult field to study due to the large number of PATs and even larger number of putative S-acylated substrate proteins they modify in each genome. This is coupled with drawbacks in the techniques used to study S-acylation, leading to the slower progress in this field compared to protein phosphorylation, for example. In this review we will summarize the discoveries made so far based on knowledge learnt from the characterization of protein S-acyltransferases and the S-acylated proteins, the interaction mechanisms between PAT and its specific substrate protein(s) in yeast and mammals. Research in protein S-acylation and PATs in plants will also be covered although this area is currently less well studied in yeast and mammalian systems.

  13. Progress toward Understanding Protein S-acylation: Prospective in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yaxiao; Qi, Baoxiu

    2017-01-01

    S-acylation, also known as S-palmitoylation or palmitoylation, is a reversible post-translational lipid modification in which long chain fatty acid, usually the 16-carbon palmitate, covalently attaches to a cysteine residue(s) throughout the protein via a thioester bond. It is involved in an array of important biological processes during growth and development, reproduction and stress responses in plant. S-acylation is a ubiquitous mechanism in eukaryotes catalyzed by a family of enzymes called Protein S-Acyl Transferases (PATs). Since the discovery of the first PAT in yeast in 2002 research in S-acylation has accelerated in the mammalian system and followed by in plant. However, it is still a difficult field to study due to the large number of PATs and even larger number of putative S-acylated substrate proteins they modify in each genome. This is coupled with drawbacks in the techniques used to study S-acylation, leading to the slower progress in this field compared to protein phosphorylation, for example. In this review we will summarize the discoveries made so far based on knowledge learnt from the characterization of protein S-acyltransferases and the S-acylated proteins, the interaction mechanisms between PAT and its specific substrate protein(s) in yeast and mammals. Research in protein S-acylation and PATs in plants will also be covered although this area is currently less well studied in yeast and mammalian systems. PMID:28392791

  14. Understanding Acyl Chain and Glycerolipid Metabolism in Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Ohlrogge, John B.

    2013-11-05

    Progress is reported in these areas: acyl-editing in initial eukaryotic lipid assembly in soybean seeds; identification and characterization of two Arabidopsis thaliana lysophosphatidyl acyltransferases with preference for lysophosphatidylethanolamine; and characterization and subcellular distribution of lysolipid acyl transferase activity of pea leaves.

  15. Conformational transitions of cinnamoyl CoA reductase 1 from Leucaena leucocephala.

    PubMed

    Sonawane, Prashant D; Khan, Bashir M; Gaikwad, Sushama M

    2014-03-01

    Conformational transitions of cinnamoyl CoA reductase, a key regulatory enzyme in lignin biosynthesis, from Leucaena leucocephala (Ll-CCRH1) were studied using fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopy. The native protein possesses four trp residues exposed on the surface and 66% of helical structure, undergoes rapid structural transitions at and above 45 °C and starts forming aggregates at 55 °C. Ll-CCRH1 was transformed into acid induced (pH 2.0) molten globule like structure, exhibiting altered secondary structure, diminished tertiary structure and exposed hydrophobic residues. The molten globule like structure was examined for the thermal and chemical stability. The altered secondary structure of L1-CCRH1 at pH 2.0 was stable up to 90 °C. Also, in presence of 0.25 M guanidine hydrochloride (GdnHCl), it got transformed into different structure which was stable in the vicinity of 2M GdnHCl (as compared to drastic loss of native structure in 2M GdnHCl) as seen in far UV-CD spectra. The structural transition of Ll-CCRH1 at pH 2.0 followed another transition after readjusting the pH to 8.0, forming a structure with hardly any similarity to that of native protein.

  16. Acyl-CoA binding proteins: multiplicity and function.

    PubMed

    Gossett, R E; Frolov, A A; Roths, J B; Behnke, W D; Kier, A B; Schroeder, F

    1996-09-01

    The physiological role of long-chain fatty acyl-CoA is thought to be primarily in intermediary metabolism of fatty acids. However, recent data show that nM to microM levels of these lipophilic molecules are potent regulators of cell functions in vitro. Although long-chain fatty acyl-CoA are present at several hundred microM concentration in the cell, very little long-chain fatty acyl-CoA actually exists as free or unbound molecules, but rather is bound with high affinity to membrane lipids and/or proteins. Recently, there is growing awareness that cytosol contains nonenzymatic proteins also capable of binding long-chain fatty acyl-CoA with high affinity. Although the identity of the cytosolic long-chain fatty acyl-CoA binding protein(s) has been the subject of some controversy, there is growing evidence that several diverse nonenzymatic cytosolic proteins will bind long-chain fatty acyl-CoA. Not only does acyl-CoA binding protein specifically bind medium and long-chain fatty acyl-CoA (LCFA-CoA), but ubiquitous proteins with multiple ligand specificities such as the fatty acid binding proteins and sterol carrier protein-2 also bind LCFA-CoA with high affinity. The potential of these acyl-CoA binding proteins to influence the level of free LCFA-CoA and thereby the amount of LCFA-CoA bound to regulatory sites in proteins and enzymes is only now being examined in detail. The purpose of this article is to explore the identity, nature, function, and pathobiology of these fascinating newly discovered long-chain fatty acyl-CoA binding proteins. The relative contributions of these three different protein families to LCFA-CoA utilization and/or regulation of cellular activities are the focus of new directions in this field.

  17. Arabidopsis acyl-CoA-binding protein ACBP6 localizes in the phloem and affects jasmonate composition.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zi-Wei; Lung, Shiu-Cheung; Hu, Tai-Hua; Chen, Qin-Fang; Suen, Yung-Lee; Wang, Mingfu; Hoffmann-Benning, Susanne; Yeung, Edward; Chye, Mee-Len

    2016-12-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana ACYL-COA-BINDING PROTEIN6 (AtACBP6) encodes a cytosolic 10-kDa AtACBP. It confers freezing tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis, possibly by its interaction with lipids as indicated by the binding of acyl-CoA esters and phosphatidylcholine to recombinant AtACBP6. Herein, transgenic Arabidopsis transformed with an AtACBP6 promoter-driven β-glucuronidase (GUS) construct exhibited strong GUS activity in the vascular tissues. Immunoelectron microscopy using anti-AtACBP6 antibodies showed AtACBP6 localization in the phloem especially in the companion cells and sieve elements. Also, the presence of gold grains in the plasmodesmata indicated its potential role in systemic trafficking. The AtACBP6 protein, but not its mRNA, was found in phloem exudate of wild-type Arabidopsis. Fatty acid profiling using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry revealed an increase in the jasmonic acid (JA) precursor, 12-oxo-cis,cis-10,15-phytodienoic acid (cis-OPDA), and a reduction in JA and/or its derivatives in acbp6 phloem exudates in comparison to the wild type. Quantitative real-time PCR showed down-regulation of COMATOSE (CTS) in acbp6 rosettes suggesting that AtACBP6 affects CTS function. AtACBP6 appeared to affect the content of JA and/or its derivatives in the sieve tubes, which is consistent with its role in pathogen-defense and in its wound-inducibility of AtACBP6pro::GUS. Taken together, our results suggest the involvement of AtACBP6 in JA-biosynthesis in Arabidopsis phloem tissues.

  18. Real-Time Decision Support for Course of Action/Enemy Course of Action (COA/ECOA) Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-01

    used. 3. A domain ontology must be given. Based on these assumptions, we propose the CAFSIN solution, standing for COA Analysis based on Fuzzified...the Pentagon” and “DoD” are wired together as the same word and are represented as a single node). 2. Polysemy : words with different meanings in the...Given an ontology with these requirements satisfied, a standard hashing function may be used to directly identify a specific node in the ontology

  19. Biochemical characterization of recombinant cinnamoyl CoA reductase 1 (Ll-CCRH1) from Leucaena leucocephala.

    PubMed

    Sonawane, Prashant; Vishwakarma, Rishi Kishore; Khan, Bashir M

    2013-07-01

    Recombinant cinnamoyl CoA reductase 1 (Ll-CCRH1) protein from Leucaena leucocephala was overexpressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) strain and purified to apparent homogeneity. Optimum pH for forward and reverse reaction was found to be 6.5 and 7.8 respectively. The enzyme was most stable around pH 6.5 at 25°C for 90 min. The enzyme showed Kcat/Km for feruloyl, caffeoyl, sinapoyl, coumaroyl CoA, coniferaldehyde and sinapaldehyde as 4.6, 2.4, 2.3, 1.7, 1.9 and 1.2 (×10(6) M(-1) s(-1)), respectively, indicating affinity of enzyme for feruloyl CoA over other substrates and preference of reduction reaction over oxidation. Activation energy, Ea for various substrates was found to be in the range of 20-50 kJ/mol. Involvement of probable carboxylate ion, histidine, lysine or tyrosine at the active site of enzyme was predicted by pH activity profile. SAXS studies of protein showed radius 3.04 nm and volume 49.25 nm(3) with oblate ellipsoid shape. Finally, metal ion inhibition studies revealed that Ll-CCRH1 is a metal independent enzyme.

  20. Correlation of ATP citrate lyase and acetyl CoA levels with trichothecene production in Fusarium graminearum.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Naoko; Tsuyuki, Rie; Yoshinari, Tomoya; Usuma, Jermnak; Furukawa, Tomohiro; Nagasawa, Hiromichi; Sakuda, Shohei

    2013-11-21

    The correlation of ATP citrate lyase (ACL) and acetyl CoA levels with trichothecene production in Fusarium graminearum was investigated using an inhibitor (precocene II) and an enhancer (cobalt chloride) of trichothecene production by changing carbon sources in liquid medium. When precocene II (30 µM) was added to inhibit trichothecene production in a trichothecene high-production medium containing sucrose, ACL expression was reduced and ACL mRNA level as well as acetyl CoA amount in the fungal cells were reduced to the levels observed in a trichothecene trace-production medium containing glucose or fructose. The ACL mRNA level was greatly increased by addition of cobalt chloride in the trichothecene high-production medium, but not in the trichothecene trace-production medium. Levels were reduced to those level in the trichothecene trace-production medium by addition of precocene II (300 µM) together with cobalt chloride. These results suggest that ACL expression is activated in the presence of sucrose and that acetyl CoA produced by the increased ALC level may be used for trichothecene production in the fungus. These findings also suggest that sucrose is important for the action of cobalt chloride in activating trichothecene production and that precocene II may affect a step down-stream of the target of cobalt chloride.

  1. SUBSURFACE WELL-LOG CORRELATION OF ARSENIC-BEARING LITHOFACIES IN THE PERMIAN GARBER SANDSTONE AND WELLINGTON FORMATION, CENTRAL OKLAHOMA AQUIFER (COA), CLEVELAND COUNTY, OKLAHOMA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The fluvial Garber Sandstone and the underlying Wellington Formation are important sources of drinking water in central Oklahoma. These formations, which make up much of the COA, consist of amalgamated sandstones with some interbedded mudstones, siltstones, and local mudstone- a...

  2. The importance of cytosolic glutamine synthetase in nitrogen assimilation and recycling.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Stéphanie M; Habash, Dimah Z

    2009-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase assimilates ammonium into amino acids, thus it is a key enzyme for nitrogen metabolism. The cytosolic isoenzymes of glutamine synthetase assimilate ammonium derived from primary nitrogen uptake and from various internal nitrogen recycling pathways. In this way, cytosolic glutamine synthetase is crucial for the remobilization of protein-derived nitrogen. Cytosolic glutamine synthetase is encoded by a small family of genes that are well conserved across plant species. Members of the cytosolic glutamine synthetase gene family are regulated in response to plant nitrogen status, as well as to environmental cues, such as nitrogen availability and biotic/abiotic stresses. The complex regulation of cytosolic glutamine synthetase at the transcriptional to post-translational levels is key to the establishment of a specific physiological role for each isoenzyme. The diverse physiological roles of cytosolic glutamine synthetase isoenzymes are important in relation to current agricultural and ecological issues.

  3. The importance of cytosolic glutamine synthetase in nitrogen assimilation and recycling

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, S.M.; Habash, D.Z.

    2009-07-02

    Glutamine synthetase assimilates ammonium into amino acids, thus it is a key enzyme for nitrogen metabolism. The cytosolic isoenzymes of glutamine synthetase assimilate ammonium derived from primary nitrogen uptake and from various internal nitrogen recycling pathways. In this way, cytosolic glutamine synthetase is crucial for the remobilization of protein-derived nitrogen. Cytosolic glutamine synthetase is encoded by a small family of genes that are well conserved across plant species. Members of the cytosolic glutamine synthetase gene family are regulated in response to plant nitrogen status, as well as to environmental cues, such as nitrogen availability and biotic/abiotic stresses. The complex regulation of cytosolic glutamine synthetase at the transcriptional to post-translational levels is key to the establishment of a specific physiological role for each isoenzyme. The diverse physiological roles of cytosolic glutamine synthetase isoenzymes are important in relation to current agricultural and ecological issues.

  4. An Oxalyl-CoA Synthetase Is Involved in Oxalate Degradation and Aluminum Tolerance1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Wei; Xu, Jia Meng; Gong, Yu Long; Jin, Jian Feng; Chen, Wei Wei; Liu, Ling Yu; Hai, Mei Rong

    2016-01-01

    Acyl Activating Enzyme3 (AAE3) was identified to be involved in the catabolism of oxalate, which is critical for seed development and defense against fungal pathogens. However, the role of AAE3 protein in abiotic stress responses is unknown. Here, we investigated the role of rice bean (Vigna umbellata) VuAAE3 in Al tolerance. Recombinant VuAAE3 protein has specific activity against oxalate, with Km = 121 ± 8.2 µm and Vmax of 7.7 ± 0.88 µmol min−1 mg−1 protein, indicating it functions as an oxalyl-CoA synthetase. VuAAE3-GFP localization suggested that this enzyme is a soluble protein with no specific subcellular localization. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR and VuAAE3 promoter-GUS reporter analysis showed that the expression induction of VuAAE3 is mainly confined to rice bean root tips. Accumulation of oxalate was induced rapidly by Al stress in rice bean root tips, and exogenous application of oxalate resulted in the inhibition of root elongation and VuAAE3 expression induction, suggesting that oxalate accumulation is involved in Al-induced root growth inhibition. Furthermore, overexpression of VuAAE3 in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) resulted in the increase of Al tolerance, which was associated with the decrease of oxalate accumulation. In addition, NtMATE and NtALS3 expression showed no difference between transgenic lines and wild-type plants. Taken together, our results suggest that VuAAE3-dependent turnover of oxalate plays a critical role in Al tolerance mechanisms. PMID:27650448

  5. An Oxalyl-CoA Synthetase Is Involved in Oxalate Degradation and Aluminum Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Lou, He Qiang; Fan, Wei; Xu, Jia Meng; Gong, Yu Long; Jin, Jian Feng; Chen, Wei Wei; Liu, Ling Yu; Hai, Mei Rong; Yang, Jian Li; Zheng, Shao Jian

    2016-11-01

    Acyl Activating Enzyme3 (AAE3) was identified to be involved in the catabolism of oxalate, which is critical for seed development and defense against fungal pathogens. However, the role of AAE3 protein in abiotic stress responses is unknown. Here, we investigated the role of rice bean (Vigna umbellata) VuAAE3 in Al tolerance. Recombinant VuAAE3 protein has specific activity against oxalate, with Km = 121 ± 8.2 µm and Vmax of 7.7 ± 0.88 µmol min(-1) mg(-1) protein, indicating it functions as an oxalyl-CoA synthetase. VuAAE3-GFP localization suggested that this enzyme is a soluble protein with no specific subcellular localization. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR and VuAAE3 promoter-GUS reporter analysis showed that the expression induction of VuAAE3 is mainly confined to rice bean root tips. Accumulation of oxalate was induced rapidly by Al stress in rice bean root tips, and exogenous application of oxalate resulted in the inhibition of root elongation and VuAAE3 expression induction, suggesting that oxalate accumulation is involved in Al-induced root growth inhibition. Furthermore, overexpression of VuAAE3 in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) resulted in the increase of Al tolerance, which was associated with the decrease of oxalate accumulation. In addition, NtMATE and NtALS3 expression showed no difference between transgenic lines and wild-type plants. Taken together, our results suggest that VuAAE3-dependent turnover of oxalate plays a critical role in Al tolerance mechanisms.

  6. Peroxisomal Delta(3),Delta(2)-enoyl CoA isomerases and evolution of cytosolic paralogues in embryophytes.

    PubMed

    Goepfert, Simon; Vidoudez, Charles; Tellgren-Roth, Christian; Delessert, Syndie; Hiltunen, J Kalervo; Poirier, Yves

    2008-12-01

    Delta(3),Delta(2)-enoyl CoA isomerase (ECI) is an enzyme that participates in the degradation of unsaturated fatty acids through the beta-oxidation cycle. Three genes encoding Delta(3),Delta(2)-enoyl CoA isomerases and named AtECI1, AtECI2 and AtECI3 have been identified in Arabidopsis thaliana. When expressed heterologously in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, all three ECI proteins were targeted to the peroxisomes and enabled the yeast Deltaeci1 mutant to degrade 10Z-heptadecenoic acid, demonstrating Delta(3),Delta(2)-enoyl CoA isomerase activity in vivo. Fusion proteins between yellow fluorescent protein and AtECI1 or AtECI2 were targeted to the peroxisomes in onion epidermal cells and Arabidopsis root cells, but a similar fusion protein with AtECI3 remained in the cytosol for both tissues. AtECI3 targeting to peroxisomes in S. cerevisiae was dependent on yeast PEX5, while expression of Arabidopsis PEX5 in yeast failed to target AtECI3 to peroxisomes. AtECI2 and AtECI3 are tandem duplicated genes and show a high level of amino acid conservation, except at the C-terminus; AtECI2 ends with the well conserved peroxisome targeting signal 1 (PTS1) terminal tripeptide PKL, while AtECI3 possesses a divergent HNL terminal tripeptide. Evolutionary analysis of ECI genes in plants revealed several independent duplication events, with duplications occurring in rice and Medicago truncatula, generating homologues with divergent C-termini and no recognizable PTS1. All plant ECI genes analyzed, including AtECI3, are under negative purifying selection, implying functionality of the cytosolic AtECI3. Analysis of the mammalian and fungal genomes failed to identify cytosolic variants of the Delta(3),Delta(2)-enoyl CoA isomerase, indicating that evolution of cytosolic Delta(3),Delta(2)-enoyl CoA isomerases is restricted to the plant kingdom.

  7. Failure of the Normal Ureagenic Response to Amino Acids in Organic Acid-loaded Rats

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Peter M.; Walser, Mackenzie

    1980-01-01

    Propionic and methylmalonic acidemia are both known to be associated with hyperammonemia. Rats injected with 10 or 20 mmol/kg of propionate or 20 mmol/kg of methylmalonate, along with 1.5 g/kg of a mixture of amino acids, developed severe hyperammonemia, whereas rats administered the same dosages of acetate did not. In vitro, neither propionyl nor methylmalonyl CoA affected the activity of carbamyl phosphate synthetase I, ornithine transcarbamylase, nor the activation constant (KA) of carbamyl phosphate synthetase I for N-acetyl glutamate. Furthermore, rats injected with propionate showed no alteration of liver amino acid concentrations, which could explain impaired ureagenesis. Animals injected with methylmalonate showed an increase in both citrulline and aspartate, suggesting that argininosuccinic acid synthetase may also have been inhibited. Liver ATP levels were unchanged. Citrullinogenesis, measured in intact mitochondria from livers of injected animals, was reduced 20-25% by 20 mmol/kg of propionate or methylmalonate (compared with acetate). This effect was attributable to an impairment in the normal rise of liver N-acetyl glutamate content after amino acid injection. Thus, carbamyl phosphate synthetase I activation was reduced. Liver levels of acetyl CoA and free CoA were reduced. Levels of unidentified acyl CoA derivatives rose, presumably reflecting the accumulation of propionyl and methylmalonyl CoA. Thus, the principal mechanism for hyperammonemia induced by these acids is depletion of liver N-acetyl glutamate, which is in turn attributable to depletion of acetyl CoA and/or competitive inhibition by propionyl and methylmalonyl CoA of N-acetyl glutamate synthetase. Injection of methylmalonate may also have an additional inhibitory effect on argininosuccinic acid synthetase. PMID:7400325

  8. Differential turnover of phospholipid acyl groups in mouse peritoneal macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Kuwae, T.; Schmid, P.C.; Johnson, S.B.; Schmid, H.H. )

    1990-03-25

    Phospholipid acyl turnover was assessed in mouse peritoneal exudate cells which consisted primarily of macrophages. The cells were incubated for up to 5 h in media containing 40% H218O, and uptake of 18O into ester carbonyls of phospholipids was determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry of hydrogenated methyl esters. The uptake was highest in choline phospholipids and phosphatidylinositol, less in ethanolamine phospholipids, and much less in phosphatidylserine. Acyl groups at the sn-1 and sn-2 positions of diacyl glycerophospholipids, including arachidonic and other long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, acquired 18O at about the same rate. Acyl groups of alkylacyl glycerophosphocholine exhibited lower rates of 18O uptake, and acyl groups of ethanolamine plasmalogens (alkenylacyl glycerophosphoethanolamines) acquired only minimal amounts of 18O within 5 h, indicating a low average acyl turnover via free fatty acids. Pulse experiments with exogenous 3H-labeled arachidonic acid supported the concept that acylation of alkenyl glycerophosphoethanolamine occurs by acyl transfer from other phospholipids rather than via free fatty acids and acyl-CoA. The 18O content of intracellular free fatty acids increased gradually over a 5-h period, whereas in extracellular free fatty acids it reached maximal 18O levels within the first hour. Arachidonate and other long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids were found to participate readily in deacylation-reacylation reactions but were present only in trace amounts in the free fatty acid pools inside and outside the cells. We conclude that acyl turnover of macrophage phospholipids through hydrolysis and reacylation is rapid but tightly controlled so that appreciable concentrations of free arachidonic acid do not occur.

  9. Phosphatidylglycerol of rat lung. Intracellular sites of formation de novo and acyl species pattern in mitochondria, microsomes and surfactant.

    PubMed Central

    Schlame, M; Rüstow, B; Kunze, D; Rabe, H; Reichmann, G

    1986-01-01

    The subcellular site of phosphatidylglycerol (PG) formation for lung surfactant has not been convincingly clarified. To approach this problem we analysed the acyl species pattern of lung PG in mitochondria, microsomes and surfactant by h.p.l.c. separation of its 1,2-diacyl-3-naphthylurethane derivatives. Both mitochondrial and microsomal PG proved identical with surfactant PG, containing the major species 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-PG and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-PG. The fatty acid composition of mitochondrial PG differs markedly from that of diphosphatidylglycerol. This may be taken as an indication that mitochondrial PG is synthesized on purpose to form surfactant, rather than being only the precursor of diphosphatidylglycerol. In vitro, sn-[U-14C]glycerol 3-phosphate incorporation into PG of mitochondria or microsomes occurs in the presence of CTP, ATP and CoA but independently of the supply of exogenous lipoidic precursors. Although the rate in vitro of autonomous PG synthesis, and the endogenous PG content, are higher in mitochondria than in microsomes, it is assumed that both subcellular fractions are involved in PG formation for surfactant. PMID:3827844

  10. Defective Pollen Wall is Required for Anther and Microspore Development in Rice and Encodes a Fatty Acyl Carrier Protein Reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, J.; Shanklin, J.; Tan, H.; Yu, X.-H.; Liu, Y.; Liang, W.; Ranathunge, K.; Franke, R. B.; Schreiber, L.; Wang, Y.; Kai, G.; Ma, H.; Zhang, D.

    2011-06-01

    Aliphatic alcohols naturally exist in many organisms as important cellular components; however, their roles in extracellular polymer biosynthesis are poorly defined. We report here the isolation and characterization of a rice (Oryza sativa) male-sterile mutant, defective pollen wall (dpw), which displays defective anther development and degenerated pollen grains with an irregular exine. Chemical analysis revealed that dpw anthers had a dramatic reduction in cutin monomers and an altered composition of cuticular wax, as well as soluble fatty acids and alcohols. Using map-based cloning, we identified the DPW gene, which is expressed in both tapetal cells and microspores during anther development. Biochemical analysis of the recombinant DPW enzyme shows that it is a novel fatty acid reductase that produces 1-hexadecanol and exhibits >270-fold higher specificity for palmiltoyl-acyl carrier protein than for C16:0 CoA substrates. DPW was predominantly targeted to plastids mediated by its N-terminal transit peptide. Moreover, we demonstrate that the monocot DPW from rice complements the dicot Arabidopsis thaliana male sterile2 (ms2) mutant and is the probable ortholog of MS2. These data suggest that DPWs participate in a conserved step in primary fatty alcohol synthesis for anther cuticle and pollen sporopollenin biosynthesis in monocots and dicots.

  11. Defective pollen wall is required for anther and microspore development in rice and encodes a fatty acyl carrier protein reductase.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jing; Tan, Hexin; Yu, Xiao-Hong; Liu, Yuanyun; Liang, Wanqi; Ranathunge, Kosala; Franke, Rochus Benni; Schreiber, Lukas; Wang, Yujiong; Kai, Guoying; Shanklin, John; Ma, Hong; Zhang, Dabing

    2011-06-01

    Aliphatic alcohols naturally exist in many organisms as important cellular components; however, their roles in extracellular polymer biosynthesis are poorly defined. We report here the isolation and characterization of a rice (Oryza sativa) male-sterile mutant, defective pollen wall (dpw), which displays defective anther development and degenerated pollen grains with an irregular exine. Chemical analysis revealed that dpw anthers had a dramatic reduction in cutin monomers and an altered composition of cuticular wax, as well as soluble fatty acids and alcohols. Using map-based cloning, we identified the DPW gene, which is expressed in both tapetal cells and microspores during anther development. Biochemical analysis of the recombinant DPW enzyme shows that it is a novel fatty acid reductase that produces 1-hexadecanol and exhibits >270-fold higher specificity for palmiltoyl-acyl carrier protein than for C16:0 CoA substrates. DPW was predominantly targeted to plastids mediated by its N-terminal transit peptide. Moreover, we demonstrate that the monocot DPW from rice complements the dicot Arabidopsis thaliana male sterile2 (ms2) mutant and is the probable ortholog of MS2. These data suggest that DPWs participate in a conserved step in primary fatty alcohol synthesis for anther cuticle and pollen sporopollenin biosynthesis in monocots and dicots.

  12. 4-coumarate: CoA ligase partitions metabolites for eugenol biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Shubhra; Kumar, Ritesh; Chanotiya, Chandan S; Shanker, Karuna; Gupta, Madan M; Nagegowda, Dinesh A; Shasany, Ajit K

    2013-08-01

    Biosynthesis of eugenol shares its initial steps with that of lignin, involving conversion of hydroxycinnamic acids to their corresponding coenzyme A (CoA) esters by 4-coumarate:CoA ligases (4CLs). In this investigation, a 4CL (OS4CL) was identified from glandular trichome-rich tissue of Ocimum sanctum with high sequence similarity to an isoform (OB4CL_ctg4) from Ocimum basilicum. The levels of OS4CL and OB4CL_ctg4-like transcripts were highest in O. sanctum trichome, followed by leaf, stem and root. The eugenol content in leaf essential oil was positively correlated with the expression of OS4CL in the leaf at different developmental stages. Recombinant OS4CL showed the highest activity with p-coumaric acid, followed by ferulic, caffeic and trans-cinnamic acids. Transient RNA interference (RNAi) suppression of OS4CL in O. sanctum leaves caused a reduction in leaf eugenol content and trichome transcript level, with a considerable increase in endogenous p-coumaric, ferulic, trans-cinnamic and caffeic acids. A significant reduction in the expression levels was observed for OB4CL_ctg4-related transcripts in suppressed trichome compared with transcripts similar to the other four isoforms (OB4CL_ctg1, 2, 3 and 5). Sinapic acid and lignin content were also unaffected in RNAi suppressed leaf samples. Transient expression of OS4CL-green fluorescent protein fusion protein in Arabidopsis protoplasts was associated with the cytosol. These results indicate metabolite channeling of intermediates towards eugenol by a specific 4CL and is the first report demonstrating the involvement of 4CL in creation of virtual compartments through substrate utilization and committing metabolites for eugenol biosynthesis at an early stage of the pathway.

  13. Role of acyl carrier protein isoforms in plant lipid metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    Although acyl carrier protein (ACP) is the best studied protein in plant fatty acid biosynthesis, the in vivo forms of ACPs and their steady state pools have not been examined previously in either seed or leaf. Information about the relative pool sizes of free ACP and its acyl-ACP intermediates is essential for understanding regulation of de novo fatty acid biosynthesis in plants. In this study we utilized antibodies directed against spinach ACP as a sensitive assay to analyze the acyl groups while they were still covalently attached to ACPs. 4 refs., 4 figs.

  14. Clone and functional analysis of Seryl-tRNA synthetase and Tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase from silkworm, Bombyx mori

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jingsheng; Tian, Jianghai; Li, Fanchi; Xue, Bin; Hu, Jiahuan; Cheng, Xiaoyu; Li, Jinxin; Shen, Weide; Li, Bing

    2017-01-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases are the key enzymes for protein synthesis. Glycine, alanine, serine and tyrosine are the major amino acids composing fibroin of silkworm. Among them, the genes of alanyl-tRNA synthetase (AlaRS) and glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GlyRS) have been cloned. In this study, the seryl-tRNA synthetase (SerRS) and tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase (TyrRS) genes from silkworm were cloned. Their full length are 1709 bp and 1868 bp and contain open reading frame (ORF) of 1485 bp and 1575 bp, respectively. RT-PCR examination showed that the transcription levels of SerRS, TyrRS, AlaRS and GlyRS are significantly higher in silk gland than in other tissues. In addition, their transcription levels are much higher in middle and posterior silk gland than in anterior silk gland. Moreover, treatment of silkworms with phoxim, an inhibitor of silk protein synthesis, but not TiO2 NP, an enhancer of silk protein synthesis, significantly reduced the transcription levels of aaRS and content of free amino acids in posterior silk gland, therefore affecting silk protein synthesis, which may be the mechanism of phoxim-silking disorders. Furthermore, low concentration of TiO2 NPs showed no effect on the transcription of aaRS and content of free amino acids, suggesting that TiO2 NPs promotes silk protein synthesis possibly by increasing the activity of fibroin synthase in silkworm. PMID:28134300

  15. The activity of Rhizomuchor miehei lipase as a biocatalyst in enzymatic acylation of cyclic alcohol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iftitah, Elvina Dhiaul; Srihardyastuti, Arie; Ariefin, Mokhamat

    2017-03-01

    We report the activity of Rhizomuchor miehei lipase (RML) as a biocatalyst, in particular the investigations concerning the effort of substrate-structure reactivity on the enzymatic acylation. The acylation was studied using acetic anhydride as an acyl donor and performed in n-hexane as a solvent. The selectivity of the enzymatic acylation was revealed by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectra. We observed that, RML has shown different behavior when catalyzing the acylation of isopulegol and mixture of isopulegol and citronellal (ratio 1:1). The chemoselectivity for the O-acylation was improved when the acyl acceptor included mixture of isopulegol and citronellal

  16. Development of a new transformant selection system for Penicillium chrysogenum: isolation and characterization of the P. chrysogenum acetyl-coenzyme A synthetase gene (facA) and its use as a homologous selection marker.

    PubMed

    Gouka, R J; van Hartingsveldt, W; Bovenberg, R A; van Zeijl, C M; van den Hondel, C A; van Gorcom, R F

    1993-01-01

    A new transformation system for the filamentous fungus Penicillium chrysogenum is described, based on the use of the homologous acetyl-coenzyme A synthetase (facA) gene as a selection marker. Acetate-non-utilizing (Fac-) strains of P. chrysogenum were obtained by positive selection for spontaneous resistance to fluoroacetate. Among these fac mutants putative facA strains were selected for a loss of acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA) synthetase activity. The facA gene, coding for the enzyme acetyl-CoA synthetase, was isolated from a P. chrysogenum genomic library using synthetic oligonucleotides derived from conserved regions from the corresponding genes of Aspergillus nidulans and Neurospora crassa. Vector pPC2-3, comprising a genomic 6.5 kb PstI fragment, was able to complement P. chrysogenum facA strains with frequencies up to 27 transformants.micrograms-1 DNA. Direct selection of transformants was accomplished using acetate and low amounts (0.001%) of glucose as carbon sources. About 50% of the transformants arose by integration of pPC2-3 DNA at the homologous facA locus and 50% by integration elsewhere in the genome. Determination of the nucleotide sequence of part of the cloned fragment showed the presence of an open reading frame of 2007 nucleotides, interrupted by five putative introns. Comparison of the nucleotide and the amino acid sequence of the facA gene of P. chrysogenum with the facA gene of A. nidulans reveals similarities of 80% and 89%, respectively. The putative introns present in the P. chrysogenum facA gene appear at identical positions as those in the A. nidulans facA gene, but show no significant sequence similarity.

  17. Acylated cyanidin 3-sambubioside-5-glucosides in Matthiola incana.

    PubMed

    Saito, N; Tatsuzawa, F; Nishiyama, A; Yokoi, M; Shigihara, A; Honda, T

    1995-03-01

    Four acylated cyanidin 3-sambubioside-5-glucosides were isolated from purple-violet flowers of Matthiola incana and their structures were determined by chemical and spectroscopic methods. Three acylated anthocyanins were cyanidin 3-O-(6-O-acyl-2-O-(2-O-sinapyl-beta-D-xylopyranosyl)-beta-D- glucopyranosides)-5-O-(6-O-malonyl-beta-D-glucopyranosides), in which the acyl group is p-coumaryl, caffeyl or ferulyl, respectively. The remaining pigment is free from malonic acid and was identified as cyanidin 3-O-(6-O-trans-ferulyl-2-O-(2- O-trans-sinapyl-beta-D-xylopyranosyl)-beta-D-glucopyranoside)-5-O- (beta-D-glucopyranoside). Analysis of the anthocyanin constituents in 16 purple-violet cultivars revealed that they contained the above triacylated anthocyanins in variable amounts as main pigments. An aromatic pair of pigments containing sinapic and ferulic acids are considered to produce an important intramolecular effect, making bluish colours in these flowers.

  18. Acyl Meldrum's acid derivatives: application in organic synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janikowska, K.; Rachoń, J.; Makowiec, S.

    2014-07-01

    This review is focused on an important class of Meldrum's acid derivatives commonly known as acyl Meldrum's acids. The preparation methods of these compounds are considered including the recently proposed and rather rarely used ones. The chemical properties of acyl Meldrum's acids are described in detail, including thermal stability and reactions with various nucleophiles. The possible mechanisms of these transformations are analyzed. The bibliography includes 134 references.

  19. Oxidative activation of dihydropyridine amides to reactive acyl donors.

    PubMed

    Funder, Erik Daa; Trads, Julie B; Gothelf, Kurt V

    2015-01-07

    Amides of 1,4-dihydropyridine (DHP) are activated by oxidation for acyl transfer to amines, alcohols and thiols. In the reduced form the DHP amide is stable towards reaction with amines at room temperature. However, upon oxidation with DDQ the acyl donor is activated via a proposed pyridinium intermediate. The activated intermediate reacts with various nucleophiles to give amides, esters, and thio-esters in moderate to high yields.

  20. Different effects of fibrates on the microsomal fatty acid chain elongation and the acyl composition of phospholipids in guinea-pigs.

    PubMed

    Vázquez, M; Alegret, M; López, M; Rodríguez, C; Adzet, T; Merlos, M; Laguna, J C

    1995-12-01

    1. The effects in vitro and in vivo of three fibric acid derivatives, clofibrate (CFB), bezafibrate (BFB) and gemfibrozil (GFB) on some enzyme activities related to fatty acid biosynthesis, namely palmitoyl-CoA synthetase and hydrolases (microsomal and cytosolic), NADH and NADPH cytochrome c reductases and acyl-CoA elongases were investigated in guinea-pigs. 2. The three fibrates inhibited acyl-CoA elongation in vitro, irrespective of the substrate of elongation used (saturated, monounsaturated, polyunsaturated) and with an order of potency GFB > BFB > CFB. In the case of GFB, inhibition occurred at concentrations that can be reached in vivo. 3. Microsomal palmitoyl-CoA hydrolase and synthetase were also inhibited in vitro (GFB > or = BFB > CFB), whereas NADH cytochrome c reductase activity was increased by GFB. Nevertheless, the magnitude of changes were lower than those observed in elongation activities. 4. Treatment with fibrates did not produce peroxisomal proliferation in guinea-pigs, as measured by peroxisomal beta-oxidation activity and liver weight/body weight ratio. Nevertheless, fibrates provoked a reduction in plasma cholesterol and triglycerides, at least in GFB- and BFB-treated animals. 5. Fatty acid elongation was significantly modified by GFB treatment in vivo. The remaining enzyme activities studied were only slightly changed by fibrate treatment. 6. Treatment with BFB and to a lesser extent with CFB, increased the relative proportion of MUFA (palmitoleic and oleic acids) in microsomal phospholipids, whereas PUFA (mainly linoleic acid) decreased. GFB behaved differently, increasing palmitic and linoleic acids and decreasing stearic and oleic acids. The latter changes are attributable to an inhibition of elongation activity by GFB. 7. The changes observed after fibrate treatment in both rats and guinea-pigs, as they are not directly related to peroxisome proliferation, could be more reliably extrapolated to man than those observed only in rats.

  1. Different effects of fibrates on the microsomal fatty acid chain elongation and the acyl composition of phospholipids in guinea-pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Vázquez, M.; Alegret, M.; López, M.; Rodríguez, C.; Adzet, T.; Merlos, M.; Laguna, J. C.

    1995-01-01

    1. The effects in vitro and in vivo of three fibric acid derivatives, clofibrate (CFB), bezafibrate (BFB) and gemfibrozil (GFB) on some enzyme activities related to fatty acid biosynthesis, namely palmitoyl-CoA synthetase and hydrolases (microsomal and cytosolic), NADH and NADPH cytochrome c reductases and acyl-CoA elongases were investigated in guinea-pigs. 2. The three fibrates inhibited acyl-CoA elongation in vitro, irrespective of the substrate of elongation used (saturated, monounsaturated, polyunsaturated) and with an order of potency GFB > BFB > CFB. In the case of GFB, inhibition occurred at concentrations that can be reached in vivo. 3. Microsomal palmitoyl-CoA hydrolase and synthetase were also inhibited in vitro (GFB > or = BFB > CFB), whereas NADH cytochrome c reductase activity was increased by GFB. Nevertheless, the magnitude of changes were lower than those observed in elongation activities. 4. Treatment with fibrates did not produce peroxisomal proliferation in guinea-pigs, as measured by peroxisomal beta-oxidation activity and liver weight/body weight ratio. Nevertheless, fibrates provoked a reduction in plasma cholesterol and triglycerides, at least in GFB- and BFB-treated animals. 5. Fatty acid elongation was significantly modified by GFB treatment in vivo. The remaining enzyme activities studied were only slightly changed by fibrate treatment. 6. Treatment with BFB and to a lesser extent with CFB, increased the relative proportion of MUFA (palmitoleic and oleic acids) in microsomal phospholipids, whereas PUFA (mainly linoleic acid) decreased. GFB behaved differently, increasing palmitic and linoleic acids and decreasing stearic and oleic acids. The latter changes are attributable to an inhibition of elongation activity by GFB. 7. The changes observed after fibrate treatment in both rats and guinea-pigs, as they are not directly related to peroxisome proliferation, could be more reliably extrapolated to man than those observed only in rats. PMID

  2. Study of the Binding Energies between Unnatural Amino Acids and Engineered Orthogonal Tyrosyl-tRNA Synthetases

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Wei; Truong, Tan M.; Ai, Hui-wang

    2015-01-01

    We utilized several computational approaches to evaluate the binding energies of tyrosine (Tyr) and several unnatural Tyr analogs, to several orthogonal aaRSes derived from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii and Escherichia coli tyrosyl-tRNA synthetases. The present study reveals the following: (1) AutoDock Vina and ROSETTA were able to distinguish binding energy differences for individual pairs of favorable and unfavorable aaRS-amino acid complexes, but were unable to cluster together all experimentally verified favorable complexes from unfavorable aaRS-Tyr complexes; (2) MD-MM/PBSA provided the best prediction accuracy in terms of clustering favorable and unfavorable enzyme-substrate complexes, but also required the highest computational cost; and (3) MM/PBSA based on single energy-minimized structures has a significantly lower computational cost compared to MD-MM/PBSA, but still produced sufficiently accurate predictions to cluster aaRS-amino acid interactions. Although amino acid-aaRS binding is just the first step in a complex series of processes to acylate a tRNA with its corresponding amino acid, the difference in binding energy, as shown by MD-MM/PBSA, is important for a mutant orthogonal aaRS to distinguish between a favorable unnatural amino acid (unAA) substrate from unfavorable natural amino acid substrates. Our computational study should assist further designing and engineering of orthogonal aaRSes for the genetic encoding of novel unAAs. PMID:26220470

  3. Study of the Binding Energies between Unnatural Amino Acids and Engineered Orthogonal Tyrosyl-tRNA Synthetases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Wei; Truong, Tan M.; Ai, Hui-Wang

    2015-07-01

    We utilized several computational approaches to evaluate the binding energies of tyrosine (Tyr) and several unnatural Tyr analogs, to several orthogonal aaRSes derived from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii and Escherichia coli tyrosyl-tRNA synthetases. The present study reveals the following: (1) AutoDock Vina and ROSETTA were able to distinguish binding energy differences for individual pairs of favorable and unfavorable aaRS-amino acid complexes, but were unable to cluster together all experimentally verified favorable complexes from unfavorable aaRS-Tyr complexes; (2) MD-MM/PBSA provided the best prediction accuracy in terms of clustering favorable and unfavorable enzyme-substrate complexes, but also required the highest computational cost; and (3) MM/PBSA based on single energy-minimized structures has a significantly lower computational cost compared to MD-MM/PBSA, but still produced sufficiently accurate predictions to cluster aaRS-amino acid interactions. Although amino acid-aaRS binding is just the first step in a complex series of processes to acylate a tRNA with its corresponding amino acid, the difference in binding energy, as shown by MD-MM/PBSA, is important for a mutant orthogonal aaRS to distinguish between a favorable unnatural amino acid (unAA) substrate from unfavorable natural amino acid substrates. Our computational study should assist further designing and engineering of orthogonal aaRSes for the genetic encoding of novel unAAs.

  4. Inhibition of recombinant Pneumocystis carinii dihydropteroate synthetase by sulfa drugs.

    PubMed

    Hong, Y L; Hossler, P A; Calhoun, D H; Meshnick, S R

    1995-08-01

    Forty-four sulfa drugs were screened against crude preparations of recombinant Pneumocystis carinii dihydropteroate synthetase. The apparent Michaelis-Menten constants (Km) for p-aminobenzoic acid and 7,8-dihydro-6-hydroxymethylpterin pyrophosphate were 0.34 +/- 0.02 and 2.50 +/- 0.71 microM, respectively. Several sulfa drugs, including sulfathiazole, sulfachlorpyridazine, sulfamethoxypyridazine, and sulfathiourea, inhibited dihydropteroate synthetase approximately as well as sulfamethoxazole, as determined by the concentrations which cause 50% inhibition and/or by Ki. For all sulfones and sulfonamides tested, unsubstituted p-amino groups were necessary for activity, and sulfonamides containing an N1-heterocyclic substituent were found to be the most effective inhibitors. Folate biosynthesis in isolated intact P. carinii was approximately equally sensitive to inhibition by sulfamethoxazole, sulfachlorpyridazine, sulfamethoxypyridazine, sulfisoxazole, and sulfathiazole. Two of these drugs, sulfamethoxypyridazine and sulfisoxazole, are known to be less toxic than sulfamethoxazole and should be further evaluated for the treatment of P. carinii pneumonia.

  5. Aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetase Complexes in Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Havrylenko, Svitlana; Mirande, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases are essential enzymes for interpreting the genetic code. They are responsible for the proper pairing of codons on mRNA with amino acids. In addition to this canonical, translational function, they are also involved in the control of many cellular pathways essential for the maintenance of cellular homeostasis. Association of several of these enzymes within supramolecular assemblies is a key feature of organization of the translation apparatus in eukaryotes. It could be a means to control their oscillation between translational functions, when associated within a multi-aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase complex (MARS), and nontranslational functions, after dissociation from the MARS and association with other partners. In this review, we summarize the composition of the different MARS described from archaea to mammals, the mode of assembly of these complexes, and their roles in maintenance of cellular homeostasis. PMID:25807264

  6. Biochemical and inhibition studies of glutamine synthetase from Leishmania donovani.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vinay; Yadav, Shailendra; Soumya, Neelagiri; Kumar, Rohit; Babu, Neerupudi Kishore; Singh, Sushma

    2017-03-25

    Leishmaniasis is a group of tropical diseases caused by protozoan parasites of the genus Leishmania. Leishmania donovani is a protozoan parasite that causes visceral leishmaniasis, a fatal disease if left untreated. Chemotherapy for leishmaniasis is problematic as the available drugs are toxic, costly and shows drug resistance, hence, there is a necessity to look out for the novel drug targets, chemical entities and vaccine. Glutamine synthetase (GS) catalyzes the synthesis of glutamine from glutamate and ammonia. In the present study, we have identified and characterized GS from L. donovani. The nucleotide sequence encoding putative glutamine synthetase like sequence from L. donovani (LdGS, LDBPK_060370) was cloned. A 43.5 kDa protein with 6X-His tag at the C-terminal end was obtained by overexpression of LdGS in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) strain. Expression of native LdGS in promastigotes and recombinant L. donovani glutamine synthetase (rLdGS) was confirmed by western blot analysis. An increase in expression of GS was observed at different phases of growth of the parasite. Expression of LdGS in promastigote and amastigote was confirmed by western blot analysis. Immunofluorescence studies of both the promastigote and amastigote stages of the parasite revealed the presence of LdGS in cytoplasm. GS exists as a single copy gene in parasite genome. Kinetic analysis of GS enzyme revealed Km value of 26.3 ± 0.4 mM for l- glutamate and Vmax value of 2.15 ± 0.07 U mg(-1). Present study confirms the presence of glutamine synthetase in L. donovani and provides comprehensive overview of LdGS for further validating it as a potential drug target.

  7. Acylated pregnane glycosides from Caralluma quadrangula.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, Hossam M; Osman, Abdel-Moneim M; Almehdar, Hussein; Abdel-Sattar, Essam

    2013-04-01

    In a previous study, the methanolic extract as well as the chloroform fraction of the aerial parts of Caralluma quadrangula (Forssk.) N.E.Br. indigenous to Saudi Arabia showed significant in vitro cytotoxic activity against breast cancer (MCF7) cell line. In a biologically-guided fractionation approach, four acylated pregnane glycosides were isolated from the chloroform fraction of C. quadrangula. The structures of the isolated compounds were elucidated by the analysis of their MS and NMR data. The compounds were identified as 12,20-di-O-benzoylboucerin 3-O-β-D-digitoxopyranosyl-(1→4)-β-D-canaropyranosyl-(1→4)-β-D-cymaropyranoside (1), 12,20-di-O-benzoylboucerin 3-O-β-D-cymaropyranosyl-(1→4)-β-D-canaropyranosyl-(1→4)-β-D-cymaropyranoside (2), 12,20-di-O-benzoylboucerin 3-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1→4)-β-D-digitoxopyranosyl-(1→4)-β-D-canaropyranosyl-(1→4)-β-D-cymaropyranoside (3) and 12,20-di-O-benzoyl-3β,5α,12β,14β,20-pentahydroxy-(20R)-pregn-6-ene 3-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1→4)-β-D-digitoxopyranosyl-(1→4)-β-D-canaropyranosyl-(1→4)-β-D-cymaropyranoside (4). The isolated compounds were tested for their cytotoxic activity against breast cancer (MCF7) cell line.

  8. Discovery of tumor-specific irreversible inhibitors of stearoyl CoA desaturase | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    A hallmark of targeted cancer therapies is selective toxicity among cancer cell lines. We evaluated results from a viability screen of over 200,000 small molecules to identify two chemical series, oxalamides and benzothiazoles, that were selectively toxic at low nanomolar concentrations to the same 4 of 12 human lung cancer cell lines. Sensitive cell lines expressed cytochrome P450 (CYP) 4F11, which metabolized the compounds into irreversible inhibitors of stearoyl CoA desaturase (SCD). SCD is recognized as a promising biological target in cancer and metabolic disease.

  9. Identification of the glutamine synthetase adenylyltransferase of Azospirillum brasilense.

    PubMed

    Van Dommelen, Anne; Spaepen, Stijn; Vanderleyden, Jozef

    2009-04-01

    Glutamine synthetase, a key enzyme in nitrogen metabolism of both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, is strictly regulated. One means of regulation is the modulation of activity through adenylylation catalyzed by adenylyltransferases. Using PCR primers based on conserved sequences in glutamine synthetase adenylyltransferases, we amplified part of the glnE gene of Azospirillum brasilense Sp7. The complete glnE sequence of A. brasilense Sp245 was retrieved from the draft genome sequence of this organism (http://genomics.ornl.gov/research/azo/). Adenylyltransferase is a bifunctional enzyme consisting of an N-terminal domain responsible for deadenylylation activity and a C-terminal domain responsible for adenylylation activity. Both domains are partially homologous to each other. Residues important for catalytic activity were present in the deduced amino acid sequence of the A. brasilense Sp245 glnE sequence. A glnE mutant was constructed in A. brasilense Sp7 by inserting a kanamycin resistance cassette between the two active domains of the enzyme. The resulting mutant was unable to adenylylate the glutamine synthetase enzyme and was impaired in growth when shifted from nitrogen-poor to nitrogen-rich medium.

  10. Mitochondrial aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases in human disease.

    PubMed

    Konovalova, Svetlana; Tyynismaa, Henna

    2013-04-01

    Mitochondrial aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (mtARSs) are essential in the process of transferring genetic information from mitochondrial DNA to the complexes of the oxidative phosphorylation system. These synthetases perform an integral step in the initiation of mitochondrial protein synthesis by charging tRNAs with their cognate amino acids. All mtARSs are encoded by nuclear genes, nine of which have recently been described as disease genes for mitochondrial disorders. Unexpectedly, the clinical presentations of these diseases are highly specific to the affected synthetase. Encephalopathy is the most common manifestation but again with gene-specific outcomes. Other clinical presentations include myopathy with anemia, cardiomyopathy, tubulopathy and hearing loss with female ovarian dysgenesis. Here we review the described mutation types and the associated patient phenotypes. The identified mutation spectrum suggests that only mutation types that allow some residual tRNA-charging activity can result in the described mtARS diseases but the molecular mechanisms behind the selective tissue involvement are not currently understood.

  11. Expression of glutamine synthetase in balloon cells: a basis of their antiepileptic role?

    PubMed

    Buccoliero, Anna Maria; Barba, Carmen; Giordano, Flavio; Baroni, Gianna; Genitori, Lorenzo; Guerrini, Renzo; Taddei, Gian Luigi

    2015-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase is an enzyme involved in the clearance of glutamate, the most potent excitatory neurotransmitter. We studied the immunohistochemical expression of glutamine synthetase in neocortical samples from 5 children who underwent surgery for pharmacoresistant epilepsy and a histological diagnosis of focal cortical dysplasia IIb. In all cases, balloon cells, but not dysmorphic neurons, were immunopositive for glutamine synthetase. This finding suggests that balloon cells can be involved in the neutralization of glutamate and play a protective anti-seizure role.

  12. Tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase: the first crystallization of a human mitochondrial aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnefond, Luc; Frugier, Magali; Touzé, Elodie; Lorber, Bernard; Florentz, Catherine; Giegé, Richard Rudinger-Thirion, Joëlle; Sauter, Claude

    2007-04-01

    Crystals of human mitochondrial tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase lacking the C-terminal S4-like domain diffract to 2.7 Å resolution and are suitable for structure determination. Human mitochondrial tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase and a truncated version with its C-terminal S4-like domain deleted were purified and crystallized. Only the truncated version, which is active in tyrosine activation and Escherichia coli tRNA{sup Tyr} charging, yielded crystals suitable for structure determination. These tetragonal crystals, belonging to space group P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2, were obtained in the presence of PEG 4000 as a crystallizing agent and diffracted X-rays to 2.7 Å resolution. Complete data sets could be collected and led to structure solution by molecular replacement.

  13. 3-Sulfinopropionyl-coenzyme A (3SP-CoA) desulfinase from Advenella mimigardefordensis DPN7T: crystal structure and function of a desulfinase with an acyl-CoA dehydrogenase fold

    PubMed Central

    Schürmann, Marc; Meijers, Rob; Schneider, Thomas R.; Steinbüchel, Alexander; Cianci, Michele

    2015-01-01

    3-Sulfinopropionyl-coenzyme A (3SP-CoA) desulfinase (AcdDPN7; EC 3.13.1.4) was identified during investigation of the 3,3′-dithiodipropionic acid (DTDP) catabolic pathway in the betaproteobacterium Advenella mimigardefordensis strain DPN7T. DTDP is an organic disulfide and a precursor for the synthesis of polythioesters (PTEs) in bacteria, and is of interest for biotechnological PTE production. AcdDPN7 catalyzes sulfur abstraction from 3SP-CoA, a key step during the catabolism of DTDP. Here, the crystal structures of apo AcdDPN7 at 1.89 Å resolution and of its complex with the CoA moiety from the substrate analogue succinyl-CoA at 2.30 Å resolution are presented. The apo structure shows that AcdDPN7 belongs to the acyl-CoA dehydrogenase superfamily fold and that it is a tetramer, with each subunit containing one flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) molecule. The enzyme does not show any dehydrogenase activity. Dehydrogenase activity would require a catalytic base (Glu or Asp residue) at either position 246 or position 366, where a glutamine and a glycine are instead found, respectively, in this desulfinase. The positioning of CoA in the crystal complex enabled the modelling of a substrate complex containing 3SP-CoA. This indicates that Arg84 is a key residue in the desulfination reaction. An Arg84Lys mutant showed a complete loss of enzymatic activity, suggesting that the guanidinium group of the arginine is essential for desulfination. AcdDPN7 is the first desulfinase with an acyl-CoA dehydrogenase fold to be reported, which underlines the versatility of this enzyme scaffold. PMID:26057676

  14. Screening, identification, and characterization of mechanistically diverse inhibitors of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis enzyme, pantothenate kinase (CoaA).

    PubMed

    Venkatraman, Janani; Bhat, Jyothi; Solapure, Suresh M; Sandesh, Jatheendranath; Sarkar, Debasmita; Aishwarya, Sundaram; Mukherjee, Kakoli; Datta, Santanu; Malolanarasimhan, Krishnan; Bandodkar, Balachandra; Das, Kaveri S

    2012-03-01

    The authors describe the discovery of anti-mycobacterial compounds through identifying mechanistically diverse inhibitors of the essential Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) enzyme, pantothenate kinase (CoaA). Target-driven drug discovery technologies often work with purified enzymes, and inhibitors thus discovered may not optimally inhibit the form of the target enzyme predominant in the bacterial cell or may not be available at the desired concentration. Therefore, in addition to addressing entry or efflux issues, inhibitors with diverse mechanisms of inhibition (MoI) could be prioritized before hit-to-lead optimization. The authors describe a high-throughput assay based on protein thermal melting to screen large numbers of compounds for hits with diverse MoI. Following high-throughput screening for Mtb CoaA enzyme inhibitors, a concentration-dependent increase in protein thermal stability was used to identify true binders, and the degree of enhancement or reduction in thermal stability in the presence of substrate was used to classify inhibitors as competitive or non/uncompetitive. The thermal shift-based MoI assay could be adapted to screen hundreds of compounds in a single experiment as compared to traditional biochemical approaches for MoI determination. This MoI was confirmed through mechanistic studies that estimated K(ie) and K(ies) for representative compounds and through nuclear magnetic resonance-based ligand displacement assays.

  15. Head-group acylation of monogalactosyldiacylglycerol is a common stress response, but the acyl-galactose acyl composition varies with the plant species and applied stress

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Head group acylation of monogalactosyldiacylglycerol is a plant lipid modification occurring during bacterial infection. Little is known about the range of stresses that induce this lipid modification, the molecular species induced, and the function of the modification. Lipidomic analysis using trip...

  16. C75 is converted to C75-CoA in the hypothalamus, where it inhibits carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 and decreases food intake and body weight.

    PubMed

    Mera, Paula; Bentebibel, Assia; López-Viñas, Eduardo; Cordente, Antonio G; Gurunathan, Chandrashekaran; Sebastián, David; Vázquez, Irene; Herrero, Laura; Ariza, Xavier; Gómez-Puertas, Paulino; Asins, Guillermina; Serra, Dolors; García, Jordi; Hegardt, Fausto G

    2009-03-15

    Central nervous system administration of C75 produces hypophagia and weight loss in rodents identifying C75 as a potential drug against obesity and type 2 diabetes. However, the mechanism underlying this effect is unknown. Here we show that C75-CoA is generated chemically, in vitro and in vivo from C75 and that it is a potent inhibitor of carnitine palmitoyltranferase 1 (CPT1), the rate-limiting step of fatty-acid oxidation. Three-D docking and kinetic analysis support the inhibitory effect of C75-CoA on CPT1. Central nervous system administration of C75 in rats led to C75-CoA production, inhibition of CPT1 and lower body weight and food intake. Our results suggest that inhibition of CPT1, and thus increased availability of fatty acids in the hypothalamus, contribute to the pharmacological mechanism of C75 to decrease food intake.

  17. Two fatty acyl reductases involved in moth pheromone biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Antony, Binu; Ding, Bao-Jian; Moto, Ken’Ichi; Aldosari, Saleh A.; Aldawood, Abdulrahman S.

    2016-01-01

    Fatty acyl reductases (FARs) constitute an evolutionarily conserved gene family found in all kingdoms of life. Members of the FAR gene family play diverse roles, including seed oil synthesis, insect pheromone biosynthesis, and mammalian wax biosynthesis. In insects, FAR genes dedicated to sex pheromone biosynthesis (pheromone-gland-specific fatty acyl reductase, pgFAR) form a unique clade that exhibits substantial modifications in gene structure and possesses unique specificity and selectivity for fatty acyl substrates. Highly selective and semi-selective ‘single pgFARs’ produce single and multicomponent pheromone signals in bombycid, pyralid, yponomeutid and noctuid moths. An intriguing question is how a ‘single reductase’ can direct the synthesis of several fatty alcohols of various chain lengths and isomeric forms. Here, we report two active pgFARs in the pheromone gland of Spodoptera, namely a semi-selective, C14:acyl-specific pgFAR and a highly selective, C16:acyl-specific pgFAR, and demonstrate that these pgFARs play a pivotal role in the formation of species-specific signals, a finding that is strongly supported by functional gene expression data. The study envisages a new area of research for disclosing evolutionary changes associated with C14- and C16-specific FARs in moth pheromone biosynthesis. PMID:27427355

  18. Regioselective self-acylating cyclodextrins in organic solvent

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Eunae; Yun, Deokgyu; Jeong, Daham; Im, Jieun; Kim, Hyunki; Dindulkar, Someshwar D.; Choi, Youngjin; Jung, Seunho

    2016-01-01

    Amphiphilic cyclodextrins have been synthesized with self-acylating reaction using vinyl esters in dimethylformamide. In the present study no base, catalyst, or enzyme was used, and the structural analyses using thin layer chromatography, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and mass spectrometry show that the cyclodextrin is substituted preferentially by one acyl moiety at the C2 position of the glucose unit, suggesting that cyclodextrin functions as a regioselective catalytic carbohydrate in organic solvent. In the self-acylation, the most acidic OH group at the 2-position and the inclusion complexing ability of cyclodextrin were considered to be significant. The substrate preference was also observed in favor of the long-chain acyl group, which could be attributed to the inclusion ability of cyclodextrin cavity. Furthermore, using the model amphiphilic building block, 2-O-mono-lauryl β-cyclodextrin, the self-organized supramolecular architecture with nano-vesicular morphology in water was investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy. The cavity-type nano-assembled vesicle and the novel synthetic methods for the preparation of mono-acylated cyclodextrin should be of great interest with regard to drug/gene delivery systems, functional surfactants, and carbohydrate derivatization methods. PMID:27020946

  19. An annotated database of Arabidopsis mutants of acyl lipid metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    McGlew, Kathleen; Shaw, Vincent; Zhang, Meng; Kim, Ryeo Jin; Yang, Weili; Shorrosh, Basil; Suh, Mi Chung; Ohlrogge, John

    2014-12-10

    Mutants have played a fundamental role in gene discovery and in understanding the function of genes involved in plant acyl lipid metabolism. The first mutant in Arabidopsis lipid metabolism (fad4) was described in 1985. Since that time, characterization of mutants in more than 280 genes associated with acyl lipid metabolism has been reported. This review provides a brief background and history on identification of mutants in acyl lipid metabolism, an analysis of the distribution of mutants in different areas of acyl lipid metabolism and presents an annotated database (ARALIPmutantDB) of these mutants. The database provides information on the phenotypes of mutants, pathways and enzymes/proteins associated with the mutants, and allows rapid access via hyperlinks to summaries of information about each mutant and to literature that provides information on the lipid composition of the mutants. Mutants for at least 30 % of the genes in the database have multiple names, which have been compiled here to reduce ambiguities in searches for information. Furthermore, the database should also provide a tool for exploring the relationships between mutants in acyl lipid-related genes and their lipid phenotypes and point to opportunities for further research.

  20. An annotated database of Arabidopsis mutants of acyl lipid metabolism

    DOE PAGES

    McGlew, Kathleen; Shaw, Vincent; Zhang, Meng; ...

    2014-12-10

    Mutants have played a fundamental role in gene discovery and in understanding the function of genes involved in plant acyl lipid metabolism. The first mutant in Arabidopsis lipid metabolism (fad4) was described in 1985. Since that time, characterization of mutants in more than 280 genes associated with acyl lipid metabolism has been reported. This review provides a brief background and history on identification of mutants in acyl lipid metabolism, an analysis of the distribution of mutants in different areas of acyl lipid metabolism and presents an annotated database (ARALIPmutantDB) of these mutants. The database provides information on the phenotypes ofmore » mutants, pathways and enzymes/proteins associated with the mutants, and allows rapid access via hyperlinks to summaries of information about each mutant and to literature that provides information on the lipid composition of the mutants. Mutants for at least 30 % of the genes in the database have multiple names, which have been compiled here to reduce ambiguities in searches for information. Furthermore, the database should also provide a tool for exploring the relationships between mutants in acyl lipid-related genes and their lipid phenotypes and point to opportunities for further research.« less

  1. Regioselective self-acylating cyclodextrins in organic solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Eunae; Yun, Deokgyu; Jeong, Daham; Im, Jieun; Kim, Hyunki; Dindulkar, Someshwar D.; Choi, Youngjin; Jung, Seunho

    2016-03-01

    Amphiphilic cyclodextrins have been synthesized with self-acylating reaction using vinyl esters in dimethylformamide. In the present study no base, catalyst, or enzyme was used, and the structural analyses using thin layer chromatography, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and mass spectrometry show that the cyclodextrin is substituted preferentially by one acyl moiety at the C2 position of the glucose unit, suggesting that cyclodextrin functions as a regioselective catalytic carbohydrate in organic solvent. In the self-acylation, the most acidic OH group at the 2-position and the inclusion complexing ability of cyclodextrin were considered to be significant. The substrate preference was also observed in favor of the long-chain acyl group, which could be attributed to the inclusion ability of cyclodextrin cavity. Furthermore, using the model amphiphilic building block, 2-O-mono-lauryl β-cyclodextrin, the self-organized supramolecular architecture with nano-vesicular morphology in water was investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy. The cavity-type nano-assembled vesicle and the novel synthetic methods for the preparation of mono-acylated cyclodextrin should be of great interest with regard to drug/gene delivery systems, functional surfactants, and carbohydrate derivatization methods.

  2. CoaTx-II, a new dimeric Lys49 phospholipase A2 from Crotalus oreganus abyssus snake venom with bactericidal potential: Insights into its structure and biological roles.

    PubMed

    Almeida, J R; Lancellotti, M; Soares, A M; Calderon, L A; Ramírez, D; González, W; Marangoni, S; Da Silva, S L

    2016-09-15

    Snake venoms are rich and intriguing sources of biologically-active molecules that act on target cells, modulating a diversity of physiological functions and presenting promising pharmacological applications. Lys49 phospholipase A2 is one of the multifunctional proteins present in these complex secretions and, although catalytically inactive, has a variety of biological activities, including cytotoxic, antibacterial, inflammatory, antifungal activities. Herein, a Lys49 phospholipase A2, denominated CoaTx-II from Crotalus oreganus abyssus, was purified and structurally and pharmacologically characterized. CoaTx-II was isolated with a high degree of purity by a combination of two chromatographic steps; molecular exclusion and reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography. This toxin is dimeric with a mass of 13868.2 Da (monomeric form), as determined by mass spectrometry. CoaTx-II is rich in Arg and Lys residues and displays high identity with other Lys49 PLA2 homologues, which have high isoelectric points. The structural model of dimeric CoaTx-II shows that the toxin is non-covalently stabilized. Despite its enzymatic inactivity, in vivo CoaTx-II caused local muscular damage, characterized by increased plasma creatine kinase and confirmed by histological alterations, in addition to an inflammatory activity, as demonstrated by mice paw edema induction and pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-6 elevation. CoaTx-II also presents antibacterial activity against gram negative (Pseudomonas aeruginosa 31NM, Escherichia coli ATCC 25922) and positive (Staphyloccocus aureus BEC9393 and Rib1) bacteria. Therefore, data show that this newly purified toxin plays a central role in mediating the degenerative events associated with envenomation, in addition to demonstrating antibacterial properties, with potential for use in the development of strategies for antivenom therapy and combating antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

  3. Neutralization of acidic residues in helix II stabilizes the folded conformation of acyl carrier protein and variably alters its function with different enzymes.

    PubMed

    Gong, Huansheng; Murphy, Anne; McMaster, Christopher R; Byers, David M

    2007-02-16

    Acyl carrier protein (ACP), a small protein essential for bacterial growth and pathogenesis, interacts with diverse enzymes during the biosynthesis of fatty acids, phospholipids, and other specialized products such as lipid A. NMR and hydrodynamic studies have previously shown that divalent cations stabilize native helical ACP conformation by binding to conserved acidic residues at two sites (A and B) at either end of the "recognition" helix II. To examine the roles of these amino acids in ACP structure and function, site-directed mutagenesis was used to replace individual site A (Asp-30, Asp-35, Asp-38) and site B (Glu-47, Glu-53, Asp-56) residues in recombinant Vibrio harveyi ACP with the corresponding amides, along with combined mutations at each site (SA, SB) or both sites (SA/SB). Like native V. harveyi ACP, all individual mutants were unfolded at neutral pH but adopted a helical conformation in the presence of millimolar Mg(2+) or upon fatty acylation. Mg(2+) binding to sites A or B independently stabilized native ACP conformation, whereas mutant SA/SB was folded in the absence of Mg(2+), suggesting that charge neutralization is largely responsible for ACP stabilization by divalent cations. Asp-35 in site A was critical for holo-ACP synthase activity, while acyl-ACP synthetase and UDP-N-acetylglucosamine acyltransferase (LpxA) activities were more affected by mutations in site B. Both sites were required for fatty acid synthase activity. Overall, our results indicate that divalent cation binding site mutations have predicted effects on ACP conformation but unpredicted and variable consequences on ACP function with different enzymes.

  4. Cross sections for production of the CO(A 1 Pi)-(X 1 Sigma) fourth positive band system and O(3 S) by photodissociation of CO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gentieu, E. P.; Mentall, J. E.

    1972-01-01

    The CO(A 1 Pi) cross sections reported here, along with previously determined electron impact results, establish the basis for calculating CO fourth positive system volume emission rates in the Martian dayglow. Calculated volume emission rates in turn determine relative distribution of photon vs. electron impact as mechanisms for producing CO(A 1 Pi) in the Mars atmosphere. The smallness of the O(1304) cross section confirms previous indirect evidence that photodissociative excitation of CO2 is not an important source of O(3 S) in the upper atmosphere of Mars.

  5. Trapping of the Enoyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Reductase–Acyl Carrier Protein Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Tallorin, Lorillee; Finzel, Kara; Nguyen, Quynh G.; Beld, Joris; La Clair, James J.; Burkart, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    An ideal target for metabolic engineering, fatty acid biosynthesis remains poorly understood on a molecular level. These carrier protein-dependent pathways require fundamental protein–protein interactions to guide reactivity and processivity, and their control has become one of the major hurdles in successfully adapting these biological machines. Our laboratory has developed methods to prepare acyl carrier proteins (ACPs) loaded with substrate mimetics and cross-linkers to visualize and trap interactions with partner enzymes, and we continue to expand the tools for studying these pathways. We now describe application of the slow-onset, tight-binding inhibitor triclosan to explore the interactions between the type II fatty acid ACP from Escherichia coli, AcpP, and its corresponding enoyl-ACP reductase, FabI. We show that the AcpP–triclosan complex demonstrates nM binding, inhibits in vitro activity, and can be used to isolate FabI in complex proteomes. PMID:26938266

  6. A Comparative Analysis of Acyl-Homoserine Lactone Synthase Assays.

    PubMed

    Shin, Daniel; Frane, Nicole D; Brecht, Ryan M; Keeler, Jesse; Nagarajan, Rajesh

    2015-12-01

    Quorum sensing is cell-to-cell communication that allows bacteria to coordinate attacks on their hosts by inducing virulent gene expression, biofilm production, and other cellular functions, including antibiotic resistance. AHL synthase enzymes synthesize N-acyl-l-homoserine lactones, commonly referred to as autoinducers, to facilitate quorum sensing in Gram-negative bacteria. Studying the synthases, however, has proven to be a difficult road. Two assays, including a radiolabeled assay and a colorimetric (DCPIP) assay are well-documented in literature to study AHL synthases. In this paper, we describe additional methods that include an HPLC-based, C-S bond cleavage and coupled assays to investigate this class of enzymes. In addition, we compare and contrast each assay for both acyl-CoA- and acyl-ACP-utilizing synthases. The expanded toolkit described in this study should facilitate mechanistic studies on quorum sensing signal synthases and expedite discovery of antivirulent compounds.

  7. Asymmetric Allylboration of Acyl Imines Catalyzed by Chiral Diols

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Sha; Moquist, Philip N.; Schaus, Scott E.

    2008-01-01

    Chiral BINOL-derived diols catalyze the enantioselective asymmetric allylboration of acyl imines. The reaction requires 15 mol% of (S)-3,3′-Ph2-BINOL as the catalyst and allyldiisopropoxyborane as the nucleophile. The reaction products are obtained in good yields (75 – 94%) and high enantiomeric ratios (95:5 – 99.5:0.5) for aromatic and aliphatic imines. High diastereoselectivities (dr > 98:2) and enantioselectivities (er > 98:2) are obtained in the reactions of acyl imines with crotyldiisopropoxyboranes. This asymmetric transformation is directly applied to the synthesis of maraviroc, the selective CCR5 antagonist with potent activity against HIV-1 infection. Mechanistic investigations of the allylboration reaction including IR, NMR, and mass spectrometry study indicate that acyclic boronates are activated by chiral diols via exchange of one of the boronate alkoxy groups with activation of the acyl imine via hydrogen bonding. PMID:18020334

  8. Structural analysis of FAD synthetase from Corynebacterium ammoniagenes

    PubMed Central

    Frago, Susana; Martínez-Júlvez, Marta; Serrano, Ana; Medina, Milagros

    2008-01-01

    Background The prokaryotic FAD synthetase family – a group of bifunctional enzymes that catalyse riboflavin phosphorylation and FMN adenylylation within a single polypeptide chain- was analysed in terms of sequence and structure. Results Sequences of nearly 800 prokaryotic species were aligned. Those related with bifunctional FAD synthetase activities showed conservation of several consensus regions and highly conserved residues. A 3D model for the FAD synthetase from Corynebacterium ammoniagenes (CaFADS) was generated. This model confirms that the N-terminal and C-terminal domains are related to nucleotydyltransferases and riboflavin kinases, respectively. Models for the interaction of CaFADS with its substrates were also produced, allowing location of all the protein substrates in their putative binding pockets. These include two independent flavin binding sites for each CaFADS activity. Conclusion For the first time, the putative presence of a flavin binding site for the adenylylation activity, independent from that related with the phosphorylation activity, is shown. Additionally, these models suggest the functional relevance of some residues putatively involved in the catalytic processes. Their relevant roles were analysed by site-directed mutagenesis. A role was confirmed for H28, H31, S164 and T165 in the stabilisation of the P groups and the adenine moiety of ATP and, the P of FMN for the adenylylation. Similarly, T208, N210 and E268 appear critical for accommodation of the P groups of ATP and the ribityl end of RF in the active site for the phosphorylation process. Finally, the C-terminal domain was shown to catalyse the phosphorylation process on its own, but no reaction at all was observed with the individually expressed N-terminal domain. PMID:18811972

  9. Inactivation and covalent modification of CTP synthetase by thiourea dioxide.

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, J. G.; Sparvero, L. J.; Villafranca, J. J.

    1992-01-01

    Thiourea dioxide was used in chemical modification studies to identify functionally important amino acids in Escherichia coli CTP synthetase. Incubation at pH 8.0 in the absence of substrates led to rapid, time dependent, and irreversible inactivation of the enzyme. The second-order rate constant for inactivation was 0.18 M-1 s-1. Inactivation also occurred in the absence of oxygen and in the presence of catalase, thereby ruling out mixed-function oxidation/reduction as the mode of amino acid modification. Saturating concentrations of the substrates ATP and UTP, and the allosteric activator GTP prevented inactivation by thiourea dioxide, whereas saturating concentrations of glutamine (a substrate) did not. The concentration dependence of nucleotide protection revealed cooperative behavior with respect to individual nucleotides and with respect to various combinations of nucleotides. Mixtures of nucleotides afforded greater protection against inactivation than single nucleotides alone, and a combination of the substrates ATP and UTP provided the most protection. The Hill coefficient for nucleotide protection was approximately 2 for ATP, UTP, and GTP. In the presence of 1:1 ratios of ATP:UTP, ATP:GTP, and UTP:GTP, the Hill coefficient was approximately 4 in each case. Fluorescence and circular dichroism measurements indicated that modification by thiourea dioxide causes detectable changes in the structure of the protein. Modification with [14C]thiourea dioxide demonstrated that complete inactivation correlates with incorporation of 3 mol of [14C]thiourea dioxide per mole of CTP synthetase monomer. The specificity of thiourea dioxide for lysine residues indicates that one or more lysines are most likely involved in CTP synthetase activity. The data further indicate that nucleotide binding prevents access to these functionally important residues. PMID:1303749

  10. Identification of Unusual Phospholipid Fatty Acyl Compositions of Acanthamoeba castellanii

    PubMed Central

    Palusinska-Szysz, Marta; Kania, Magdalena; Turska-Szewczuk, Anna; Danikiewicz, Witold; Russa, Ryszard; Fuchs, Beate

    2014-01-01

    Acanthamoeba are opportunistic protozoan pathogens that may lead to sight-threatening keratitis and fatal granulomatous encephalitis. The successful prognosis requires early diagnosis and differentiation of pathogenic Acanthamoeba followed by aggressive treatment regimen. The plasma membrane of Acanthamoeba consists of 25% phospholipids (PL). The presence of C20 and, recently reported, 28- and 30-carbon fatty acyl residues is characteristic of amoeba PL. A detailed knowledge about this unusual PL composition could help to differentiate Acanthamoeba from other parasites, e.g. bacteria and develop more efficient treatment strategies. Therefore, the detailed PL composition of Acanthamoeba castellanii was investigated by 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, thin-layer chromatography, gas chromatography, high performance liquid chromatography and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Normal and reversed phase liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometric detection was used for detailed characterization of the fatty acyl composition of each detected PL. The most abundant fatty acyl residues in each PL class were octadecanoyl (18∶0), octadecenoyl (18∶1 Δ9) and hexadecanoyl (16∶0). However, some selected PLs contained also very long fatty acyl chains: the presence of 28- and 30-carbon fatty acyl residues was confirmed in phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylserine, phosphatidic acid and cardiolipin. The majority of these fatty acyl residues were also identified in PE that resulted in the following composition: 28∶1/20∶2, 30∶2/18∶1, 28∶0/20∶2, 30∶2/20∶4 and 30∶3/20∶3. The PL of amoebae are significantly different in comparison to other cells: we describe here for the first time unusual, very long chain fatty acids with Δ5-unsaturation (30∶35,21,24) and 30∶221,24 localized exclusively in specific phospholipid classes of A. castellanii protozoa that could serve as specific biomarkers for the presence of these

  11. Sphingomyelin interfacial behavior: the impact of changing acyl chain composition.

    PubMed Central

    Li, X M; Smaby, J M; Momsen, M M; Brockman, H L; Brown, R E

    2000-01-01

    Sphingomyelins (SMs) containing homogeneous acyl chains with 12, 14, 16, 18, 24, or 26 carbons were synthesized and characterized using an automated Langmuir-type film balance. Surface pressure was monitored as a function of lipid molecular area at constant temperatures between 10 degrees C and 30 degrees C. SM containing lauroyl (12:0) acyl chains displayed only liquid-expanded behavior. Increasing the length of the saturated acyl chain (e.g., 14:0, 16:0, or 18:0) resulted in liquid-expanded to condensed two-dimensional phase transitions at many temperatures in the 10-30 degrees C range. Similar behavior was observed for SMs with lignoceroyl (24:0) or (cerotoyl) 26:0 acyl chains, but isotherms showed only condensed behavior at 10 and 15 degrees C. Insights into the physico-mechanical in-plane interactions occurring within the different SM phases and accompanying changes in SM phase state were provided by analyzing the interfacial area compressibility moduli. At similar surface pressures, SM fluid phases were less compressible than those of phosphatidylcholines with similar chain structures. The area per molecule and compressibility of SM condensed phases depended upon the length of the saturated acyl chain and upon spreading temperature. Spreading of SMs with very long saturated acyl chains at temperatures 30-35 degrees below T(m) resulted in condensed films with lower in-plane compressibilities, but consistently larger cross-sectional molecular areas than the condensed phases achieved by spreading at temperatures only 10-20 degrees below T(m). This behavior is discussed in terms of the enhancement of SM lateral aggregation by temperature reduction, a common approach used during domain isolation from biomembranes. PMID:10733971

  12. Stability of Rat Brain Glutamine Synthetase to Oxygen Toxicity (Oxygen at High Pressure).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-07-01

    Enzyme assays using the gamma-glutamyl transferase method provided estimates of glutamine synthetase activity in rat brain homogenates subjected to a...supports the lack of any connection between convulsions caused by in vivo inhibition of glutamine synthetase and convulsions caused by oxygen toxicity (oxygen at high pressure). (Author)

  13. Quantum chemical study of penicillin: Reactions after acylation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Rui; Feng, Dacheng; Zhu, Feng

    The density functional theory methods were used on the model molecules of penicillin to determine the possible reactions after their acylation on ?-lactamase, and the results were compared with sulbactam we have studied. The results show that, the acylated-enzyme tetrahedral intermediate can evolves with opening of ?-lactam ring as well as the thiazole ring; the thiazole ring-open products may be formed via ?-lactam ring-open product or from tetrahedral intermediate directly. Those products, in imine or enamine form, can tautomerize via hydrogen migration. In virtue of the water-assisted, their energy barriers are obviously reduced.

  14. Peptide Mapping of Aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetases: Evidence for Internal Sequence Homology in Escherichia coli Leucyl-tRNA Synthetase

    PubMed Central

    Waterson, Robert M.; Konigsberg, William H.

    1974-01-01

    Most aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases contain polypeptide chains of about either 50,000 or 100,000 daltons. Peptide mapping of tryptic, chymotryptic, or Staphylococcus aureus acid protease digests of seryl-tRNA synthetase (100,000, dimer) and leucyl-tRNA synthetase (100,000, monomer) from E. coli was done after selective modification of lysine residues with [14C]succinic anhydride or of methionine residues with [14C]iodoacetate. By use of thin-layer electrophoresis and chromatography on silicagel or cellulose plates followed by radioautography it was possible, depending upon the specific activity of the reagent used, to detect radioactive peptides obtained from as little as l μg of protein. Seryl-tRNA synthetase gave the correct number of tryptic peptides expected for a dimer of identical subunits. Leucyl-tRNA synthetase, on the other hand, gave roughly half the number of radioactive tryptic, chymotryptic, and acid protease peptides expected from the lysine, arginine, and methionine content of the 100,000 monomer. We have interpreted these results as indicating that extensive internal homology exists among lysine- and methionine-containing peptides within the leucyl-tRNA synthetase. The simplest conclusion that can be drawn from these observations is that the NH2- and COOH-terminal halves of leucyl-tRNA synthetase and perhaps other synthetases of 100,000 molecular weight may have evolved through a process of gene duplication and fusion, followed by limited diversification by way of amino-acid substitutions accumulating during evolution. Images PMID:4592690

  15. Novel approach in LC-MS/MS using MRM to generate a full profile of acyl-CoAs: discovery of acyl-dephospho-CoAs[S

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qingling; Zhang, Shenghui; Berthiaume, Jessica M.; Simons, Brigitte; Zhang, Guo-Fang

    2014-01-01

    A metabolomic approach to selectively profile all acyl-CoAs was developed using a programmed multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) method in LC-MS/MS and was employed in the analysis of various rat organs. The programmed MRM method possessed 300 mass ion transitions with the mass difference of 507 between precursor ion (Q1) and product ion (Q3), and the precursor ion started from m/z 768 and progressively increased one mass unit at each step. Acyl-dephospho-CoAs resulting from the dephosphorylation of acyl-CoAs were identified by accurate MS and fragmentation. Acyl-dephospho-CoAs were also quantitatively scanned by the MRM method with the mass difference of 427 between Q1 and Q3 mass ions. Acyl-CoAs and dephospho-CoAs were assayed with limits of detection ranging from 2 to 133 nM. The accuracy of the method was demonstrated by assaying a range of concentrations of spiked acyl-CoAs with the results of 80–114%. The distribution of acyl-CoAs reflects the metabolic status of each organ. The physiological role of dephosphorylation of acyl-CoAs remains to be further characterized. The methodology described herein provides a novel strategy in metabolomic studies to quantitatively and qualitatively profile all potential acyl-CoAs and acyl-dephospho-CoAs. PMID:24367045

  16. Inhibition of rabbit gastric glucosamine synthetase activity by Cu2+, Zn2+ and Se4+.

    PubMed

    Fujita, T; Sakuma, S; Takahashi, K; Bohtani, Y; Nishida, H; Fujimoto, Y

    1997-05-01

    The effects of Fe2+, Cu2+, Zn2+ and Se4+ on the activity of glucosamine synthetase, the rate-limiting enzyme of mucus synthesis, in rabbit gastric corporal mucosa were examined. Cu2+, Zn2+ and Se4+ inhibited the glucosamine synthetase activity at concentrations ranging from 1 to 10 microM (Cu2+, 8-98% inhibition; Zn2+, 10-99% inhibition; Se4+, 32-89% inhibition). The inhibitory effects of these three ions were much stronger than that of UDP-N-acetylglúcosamine known as a representative inhibitor of the glucosamine synthetase activity (10 microM, 52% inhibition). Fe2+ had no significant effect on the glucosamine synthetase activity up to 100 microM. These results suggest that Cu2+, Zn2+ and Se4+ can be potent inhibitors of gastric glucosamine synthetase activity.

  17. Circumstantial evidence for a role of glutamine-synthetase in suicide.

    PubMed

    Kalkman, Hans O

    2011-06-01

    Suicide occurs during depression, schizophrenia, diabetes and epilepsy. A common denominator of these disorders is the presence of inflammation. Inflammatory cytokines affect function and expression of the glial enzyme glutamine synthetase and post mortem studies indicate that brain glutamine synthetase function is suppressed in mood disorders and epilepsy. In a study of schizophrenia brains, the expression of glutamine synthetase was reduced in those cases where the cause of death was suicide. The glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) inhibitor, lithium, which has a proven efficacy against suicide, increased in an animal experiment the expression of glutamine synthetase. Based on these data one could reason that suicide may be prevented by centrally acting GSK3 inhibitors. However, since inhibition of glutamine synthetase may lead to a deficit in glutamine and as consequence a GABA and glutamate deficit, even simple food supplementation with glutamine might help to reduce suicide.

  18. Copper(II)/amine synergistically catalyzed enantioselective alkylation of cyclic N-acyl hemiaminals with aldehydes.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shutao; Mao, Ying; Lou, Hongxiang; Liu, Lei

    2015-07-07

    The first catalytic asymmetric alkylation of N-acyl quinoliniums with aldehydes has been described. A copper/amine synergistic catalytic system has been developed, allowing the addition of functionalized aldehydes to a wide range of electronically varied N-acyl quinoliniums in good yields with excellent enantiocontrol. The synergistic catalytic system was also effective for N-acyl dihydroisoquinoliniums and β-caboliniums, demonstrating the general applicability of the protocol in the enantioselective alkylation of diverse cyclic N-acyl hemiaminals.

  19. The Level of Circulating Octanoate Does Not Predict Ghrelin O-Acyl Transferase (GOAT)-Mediated Acylation of Ghrelin During Fasting

    PubMed Central

    Nikolayev, Alexander; Liu, Jianhua; Pezzoli, Suzan S.; Farhy, Leon S.; Patrie, James; Gaylinn, Bruce D.; Heiman, Mark; Thorner, Michael O.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acyl-ghrelin is a 28-amino acid peptide released from the stomach. Ghrelin O-acyl transferase (GOAT) attaches an 8-carbon medium-chain fatty acid (MCFA) (octanoate) to serine 3 of ghrelin. This acylation is necessary for the activity of ghrelin. Animal data suggest that MCFAs provide substrate for GOAT and an increase in nutritional octanoate increases acyl-ghrelin. Objectives: To address the question of the source of substrate for acylation, we studied whether the decline in ghrelin acylation during fasting is associated with a decline in circulating MCFAs. Methods: Eight healthy young men (aged 18–28 years, body mass index range, 20.6–26.2 kg/m2) had blood drawn every 10 minutes for acyl- and desacyl-ghrelin and every hour for free fatty acids (FFAs) during the last 24 hours of a 61.5-hour fast and during a fed day. FFAs were measured by a highly sensitive liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy method. Acyl- and desacyl-ghrelin were measured in an in-house assay; the results were published previously. Ghrelin acylation was assessed by the ratio of acyl-ghrelin to total ghrelin. Results: With the exception of MCFAs C8 and C10, all other FFAs, the MCFAs (C6 and C12), and the long-chain fatty acids (C14–C18) significantly increased with fasting (P < .05). There was no significant association between the fold change in ghrelin acylation and circulating FFAs. Conclusions: These results suggest that changes in circulating MCFAs are not linked to the decline in ghrelin acylation during fasting and support the hypothesis that acylation of ghrelin depends at least partially on the availability of gastroluminal MCFAs or the regulation of GOAT activity. PMID:25337923

  20. Replacement of the folC gene, encoding folylpolyglutamate synthetase-dihydrofolate synthetase in Escherichia coli, with genes mutagenized in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Pyne, C; Bognar, A L

    1992-01-01

    The folylpolyglutamate synthetase-dihydrofolate synthetase gene (folC) in Escherichia coli was deleted from the bacterial chromosome and replaced by a selectable Kmr marker. The deletion strain required a complementing gene expressing folylpolyglutamate synthetase encoded on a plasmid for viability, indicating that folC is an essential gene in E. coli. The complementing folC gene was cloned into the vector pPM103 (pSC101, temperature sensitive for replication), which segregated spontaneously at 42 degrees C in the absence of selection. This complementing plasmid was replaced in the folC deletion strain by compatible pUC plasmids containing folC genes with mutations generated in vitro, producing strains which express only mutant folylpolyglutamate synthetase. Mutant folC genes expressing insufficient enzyme activity could not complement the chromosomal deletion, resulting in retention of the pPM103 plasmid. Some mutant genes expressing low levels of enzyme activity replaced the complementing plasmid, but the strains produced were auxotrophic for products of folate-dependent pathways. The folylpolyglutamate synthetase gene from Lactobacillus casei, which may lack dihydrofolate synthetase activity, replaced the complementing plasmid, but the strain was auxotrophic for all folate end products. Images PMID:1548226

  1. Purification and comparison of two forms of S-adenosyl-L-methionine synthetase from rat liver.

    PubMed

    Cabrero, C; Puerta, J; Alemany, S

    1987-12-30

    Only two S-adenosyl-L-methionine synthetase forms exist in rat liver: high-Mr S-adenosyl-L-methionine synthetase and low-Mr S-adenosyl-L-methionine synthetase, which have been purified to apparent homogeneity as judged by sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. High-Mr S-adenosyl-L-methionine synthetase had an apparent molecular mass, determined by gel filtration, of 210 kDa and was a tetramer constituted by 48.5-kDa subunits, estimated by sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The apparent molecular mass of low-Mr S-adenosyl-L-methionine synthetase, as estimated by gel filtration, was 110 kDa and was constituted by two subunits of 47 kDa. An antiserum against low-Mr S-adenosyl-L-methionine synthetase cross-reacted with the two forms. Reverse-phase HPLC runs of tryptic digestions of high-Mr and low-Mr S-adenosyl-L-methionine synthetase showed that the peptide maps of the two forms were very similar, if not identical. High-Mr S-adenosyl-L-methionine synthetase activity was inhibited by S-adenosyl-L-methionine and pyrophosphate. Depending on the dose used, S-adenosyl-L-methionine activated or inhibited low-Mr S-adenosyl-L-methionine synthetase and pyrophosphate had no effect on this form. The two synthetases showed a different specific activity at the physiological concentration of methionine. This report shows that even though the two forms are constructed of the same polypeptide chains, they are regulated in a different manner by methionine and by the products of the reaction.

  2. A Cerulenin Insensitive Short Chain 3-Ketoacyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Synthase in Spinacia oleracea Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Jaworski, Jan G.; Clough, Richard C.; Barnum, Susan R.

    1989-01-01

    A cerulenin insensitive 3-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthase has been assayed in extracts of spinach (Spinacia oleracea) leaf. The enzyme was active in the 40 to 80% ammonium sulfate precipitate of whole leaf homogenates and catalyzed the synthesis of acetoacetyl-acyl carrier protein. This condensation reaction was five-fold faster than acetyl-CoA:acyl carrier protein transacylase, and the initial rates of acyl-acyl carrier protein synthesis were independent of the presence of cerulenin. In the presence of fatty acid synthase cofactors and 100 micromolar cerulenin, the principal fatty acid product of de novo synthesis was butyric and hexanoic acids. Using conformationally sensitive native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis for separation, malonyl-, acetyl-, butyryl-, hexanoyl, and long chain acyl-acyl carrier proteins could be detected by immunoblotting and autoradiography. In the presence of 100 micromolar cerulenin, the accumulation of butyryl- and hexanoyl-acyl carrier protein was observed, with no detectable long chain acyl-acyl carrier proteins or fatty acids being produced. In the absence of cerulenin, the long chain acyl-acyl carrier proteins also accumulated. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:16666765

  3. Characterization of the JWST Pathfinder mirror dynamics using the center of curvature optical assembly (CoCOA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Conrad; Hadaway, James B.; Olczak, Gene; Cosentino, Joseph; Johnston, John D.; Whitman, Tony; Connolly, Mark; Chaney, David; Knight, J. Scott; Telfer, Randal

    2016-07-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Optical Telescope Element (OTE) consists of a 6.6 m clear aperture, 18 segment primary mirror, all-reflective, three-mirror anastigmat operating at cryogenic temperatures. To verify performance of the primary mirror, a full aperture center of curvature optical null test is performed under cryogenic conditions in Chamber A at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Johnson Space Center (JSC) using an instantaneous phase measuring interferometer. After phasing the mirrors during the JWST Pathfinder testing, the interferometer is utilized to characterize the mirror relative piston and tilt dynamics under different facility configurations. The correlation between the motions seen on detectors at the focal plane and the interferometer validates the use of the interferometer for dynamic investigations. The success of planned test hardware improvements will be characterized by the multi-wavelength interferometer (MWIF) at the Center of Curvature Optical Assembly (CoCOA).

  4. Characterization of the JWST Pathfinder Mirror Dynamics Using the Center of Curvature Optical Assembly (CoCOA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, Conrad; Hadaway, James B.; Olczak, Gene; Cosentino, Joseph; Johnston, John D.; Whitman, Tony; Connolly, Mark; Chaney, David; Knight, J. Scott; Telfer, Randal

    2016-01-01

    The JWST (James Webb Space Telescope) Optical Telescope Element (OTE) consists of a 6.6 meter clear aperture, 18-segment primary mirror, all-reflective, three-mirror anastigmat operating at cryogenic temperatures. To verify performance of the primary mirror, a full aperture center of curvature optical null test is performed under cryogenic conditions in Chamber A at NASA Johnson Space Center using an instantaneous phase measuring interferometer. After phasing the mirrors during the JWST Pathfinder testing, the interferometer is utilized to characterize the mirror relative piston and tilt dynamics under different facility configurations. The correlation between the motions seen on detectors at the focal plane and the interferometer validates the use of the interferometer for dynamic investigations. The success of planned test hardware improvements will be characterized by the multi-wavelength interferometer (MWIF) at the Center of Curvature Optical Assembly (CoCOA).

  5. Substrate specificity, substrate channeling, and allostery in BphJ: an acylating aldehyde dehydrogenase associated with the pyruvate aldolase BphI.

    PubMed

    Baker, Perrin; Carere, Jason; Seah, Stephen Y K

    2012-06-05

    BphJ, a nonphosphorylating acylating aldehyde dehydrogenase, catalyzes the conversion of aldehydes to form acyl-coenzyme A in the presence of NAD(+) and coenzyme A (CoA). The enzyme is structurally related to the nonacylating aldehyde dehydrogenases, aspartate-β-semialdehyde dehydrogenase and phosphorylating glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. Cys-131 was identified as the catalytic thiol in BphJ, and pH profiles together with site-specific mutagenesis data demonstrated that the catalytic thiol is not activated by an aspartate residue, as previously proposed. In contrast to the wild-type enzyme that had similar specificities for two- or three-carbon aldehydes, an I195A variant was observed to have a 20-fold higher catalytic efficiency for butyraldehyde and pentaldehyde compared to the catalytic efficiency of the wild type toward its natural substrate, acetaldehyde. BphJ forms a heterotetrameric complex with the class II aldolase BphI that channels aldehydes produced in the aldol cleavage reaction to the dehydrogenase via a molecular tunnel. Replacement of Ile-171 and Ile-195 with bulkier amino acid residues resulted in no more than a 35% reduction in acetaldehyde channeling efficiency, showing that these residues are not critical in gating the exit of the channel. Likewise, the replacement of Asn-170 in BphJ with alanine and aspartate did not substantially alter aldehyde channeling efficiencies. Levels of activation of BphI by BphJ N170A, N170D, and I171A were reduced by ≥3-fold in the presence of NADH and ≥4.5-fold when BphJ was undergoing turnover, indicating that allosteric activation of the aldolase has been compromised in these variants. The results demonstrate that the dehydrogenase coordinates the catalytic activity of BphI through allostery rather than through aldehyde channeling.

  6. Escherichia coli Enoyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Reductase (FabI) Supports Efficient Operation of a Functional Reversal of the β-Oxidation Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Vick, Jacob E.; Clomburg, James M.; Blankschien, Matthew D.; Chou, Alexander; Kim, Seohyoung

    2014-01-01

    We recently used a synthetic/bottom-up approach to establish the identity of the four enzymes composing an engineered functional reversal of the β-oxidation cycle for fuel and chemical production in Escherichia coli (J. M. Clomburg, J. E. Vick, M. D. Blankschien, M. Rodriguez-Moya, and R. Gonzalez, ACS Synth Biol 1:541–554, 2012, http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/sb3000782). While native enzymes that catalyze the first three steps of the pathway were identified, the identity of the native enzyme(s) acting as the trans-enoyl coenzyme A (CoA) reductase(s) remained unknown, limiting the amount of product that could be synthesized (e.g., 0.34 g/liter butyrate) and requiring the overexpression of a foreign enzyme (the Euglena gracilis trans-enoyl-CoA reductase [EgTER]) to achieve high titers (e.g., 3.4 g/liter butyrate). Here, we examine several native E. coli enzymes hypothesized to catalyze the reduction of enoyl-CoAs to acyl-CoAs. Our results indicate that FabI, the native enoyl-acyl carrier protein (enoyl-ACP) reductase (ENR) from type II fatty acid biosynthesis, possesses sufficient NADH-dependent TER activity to support the efficient operation of a β-oxidation reversal. Overexpression of FabI proved as effective as EgTER for the production of butyrate and longer-chain carboxylic acids. Given the essential nature of fabI, we investigated whether bacterial ENRs from other families were able to complement a fabI deletion without promiscuous reduction of crotonyl-CoA. These characteristics from Bacillus subtilis FabL enabled ΔfabI complementation experiments that conclusively established that FabI encodes a native enoyl-CoA reductase activity that supports the β-oxidation reversal in E. coli. PMID:25527535

  7. Pre-exercise medium-chain triglyceride application prevents acylcarnitine accumulation in skeletal muscle from very-long-chain acyl-CoA-dehydrogenase-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Primassin, Sonja; Tucci, Sara; Herebian, Diran; Seibt, Annette; Hoffmann, Lars; ter Veld, Frank; Spiekerkoetter, Ute

    2010-06-01

    Dietary modification with medium-chain triglyceride (MCT) supplementation is one crucial way of treating children with long-chain fatty acid oxidation disorders. Recently, supplementation prior to exercise has been reported to prevent muscular pain and rhabdomyolysis. Systematic studies to determine when MCT supplementation is most beneficial have not yet been undertaken. We studied the effects of an MCT-based diet compared with MCT administration only prior to exercise in very-long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD) knockout (KO) mice. VLCAD KO mice were fed an MCT-based diet in same amounts as normal mouse diet containing long-chain triglycerides (LCT) and were exercised on a treadmill. Mice fed a normal LCT diet received MCT only prior to exercise. Acylcarnitine concentration, free carnitine concentration, and acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) oxidation capacity in skeletal muscle as well as hepatic lipid accumulation were determined. Long-chain acylcarnitines significantly increased in VLCAD-deficient skeletal muscle with an MCT diet compared with an LCT diet with MCT bolus prior to exercise, whereas an MCT bolus treatment significantly decreased long-chain acylcarnitines after exercise compared with an LCT diet. C8-carnitine was significantly increased in skeletal muscle after MCT bolus treatment and exercise compared with LCT and long-term MCT treatment. Increased hepatic lipid accumulation was observed in long-term MCT-treated KO mice. MCT seems most beneficial when given in a single dose directly prior to exercise to prevent acylcarnitine accumulation. In contrast, continuous MCT treatment produces a higher skeletal muscle content of long-chain acylcarnitines after exercise and increases hepatic lipid storage in VLCAD KO mice.

  8. Novel Insights into Regulation of Asparagine Synthetase in Conifers

    PubMed Central

    Canales, Javier; Rueda-López, Marina; Craven-Bartle, Blanca; Avila, Concepción; Cánovas, Francisco M.

    2012-01-01

    Asparagine, a key amino acid for nitrogen storage and transport in plants, is synthesized via the ATP-dependent reaction catalyzed by the enzyme asparagine synthetase (AS; EC 6.3.5.4). In this work, we present the molecular analysis of two full-length cDNAs that encode asparagine synthetase in maritime pine (Pinus pinaster Ait.), PpAS1, and PpAS2. Phylogenetic analyses of the deduced amino acid sequences revealed that both genes are class II AS, suggesting an ancient origin of these genes in plants. A comparative study of PpAS1 and PpAS2 gene expression profiles showed that PpAS1 gene is highly regulated by developmental and environmental factors, while PpAS2 is expressed constitutively. To determine the molecular mechanisms underpinning the differential expression of PpAS1, the promoter region of the gene was isolated and putative binding sites for MYB transcription factors were identified. Gel mobility shift assays showed that a MYB protein from Pinus taeda (PtMYB1) was able to interact with the promoter region of PpAS1. Furthermore, transient expression analyses in pine cells revealed a negative effect of PtMYB1 on PpAS1 expression. The potential role of MYB factors in the transcriptional regulation of PpAS1 in vascular cells is discussed. PMID:22654888

  9. Biochemical characterization of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate synthetase

    PubMed Central

    Alderwick, Luke J; Lloyd, Georgina S; Lloyd, Adrian J; Lovering, Andrew L; Eggeling, Lothar; Besra, Gurdyal S

    2011-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis arabinogalactan (AG) is an essential cell wall component. It provides a molecular framework serving to connect peptidoglycan to the outer mycolic acid layer. The biosynthesis of the arabinan domains of AG and lipoarabinomannan (LAM) occurs via a combination of membrane bound arabinofuranosyltransferases, all of which utilize decaprenol-1-monophosphorabinose as a substrate. The source of arabinose ultimately destined for deposition into cell wall AG or LAM originates exclusively from phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate (pRpp), a central metabolite which is also required for other essential metabolic processes, such as de novo purine and pyrimidine biosyntheses. In M. tuberculosis, a single pRpp synthetase enzyme (Mt-PrsA) is solely responsible for the generation of pRpp, by catalyzing the transfer of pyrophosphate from ATP to the C1 hydroxyl position of ribose-5-phosphate. Here, we report a detailed biochemical and biophysical study of Mt-PrsA, which exhibits the most rapid enzyme kinetics reported for a pRpp synthetase. PMID:21045009

  10. Mammalian folylpoly-. gamma. -glutamate synthetase. 3. Specificity for folate analogues

    SciTech Connect

    George, S.; Cichowicz, D.J.; Shane, B.

    1987-01-27

    A variety of folate analogues were synthesized to explore the specificity of the folate binding site of hog liver folypolyglutamate synthetase and the requirements for catalysis. Modifications of the internal and terminal glutamate moieties of folate cause large drops in on rates and/or affinity for the protein. The only exceptions are glutamine, homocysteate, and ornithine analogues, indicating a less stringent specificity around the delta-carbon of glutamate. It is proposed that initial folate binding to the enzyme involves low-affinity interactions at a pterin and a glutamate site and that the first glutamate bound is the internal residue adjacent to the benzoyl group. Processive movement of the polyglutamate chain through the glutamate site and a possible conformational change in the protein when the terminal residue is bound would result in tight binding and would position the ..gamma..-carboxyl of the terminal glutamate in the correct position for catalysis. The 4-amino substitution of folate increases the on rate for monoglutamate derivatives but severely impairs catalysis with diglutamate derivatives. Pteroylornithine derivatives are the first potent and specific inhibitors of folylpolyglutamate synthetase to be identified and may act as analogues of reaction intermediates. Other folate derivatives with tetrahedral chemistry replacing the peptide bond, such as pteroyl-..gamma..-glutamyl-(psi,CH/sub 2/-NH)-glutamate, retain affinity for the protein but are considerably less effective inhibitors than the ornithine derivatives. Enzyme activity was assayed using (/sup 14/C)glutamate.

  11. Novel insights into regulation of asparagine synthetase in conifers.

    PubMed

    Canales, Javier; Rueda-López, Marina; Craven-Bartle, Blanca; Avila, Concepción; Cánovas, Francisco M

    2012-01-01

    Asparagine, a key amino acid for nitrogen storage and transport in plants, is synthesized via the ATP-dependent reaction catalyzed by the enzyme asparagine synthetase (AS; EC 6.3.5.4). In this work, we present the molecular analysis of two full-length cDNAs that encode asparagine synthetase in maritime pine (Pinus pinaster Ait.), PpAS1, and PpAS2. Phylogenetic analyses of the deduced amino acid sequences revealed that both genes are class II AS, suggesting an ancient origin of these genes in plants. A comparative study of PpAS1 and PpAS2 gene expression profiles showed that PpAS1 gene is highly regulated by developmental and environmental factors, while PpAS2 is expressed constitutively. To determine the molecular mechanisms underpinning the differential expression of PpAS1, the promoter region of the gene was isolated and putative binding sites for MYB transcription factors were identified. Gel mobility shift assays showed that a MYB protein from Pinus taeda (PtMYB1) was able to interact with the promoter region of PpAS1. Furthermore, transient expression analyses in pine cells revealed a negative effect of PtMYB1 on PpAS1 expression. The potential role of MYB factors in the transcriptional regulation of PpAS1 in vascular cells is discussed.

  12. Linear magnetoelectric effect as a signature of long-range collinear antiferromagnetic ordering in the frustrated spinel CoA l2O4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghara, Somnath; Ter-Oganessian, N. V.; Sundaresan, A.

    2017-03-01

    The ground state of the frustrated A -site magnetic spinel CoA l2O4 has been a controversial issue whether it is a collinear antiferromagnetic ordering or a spiral spin-liquid state, as the ratio of the two competing interactions J2/J1 lies close to the boundary between these two ground states. Here we address the magnetic ground state in CoA l2O4 with different amounts of C o2 +/A l3 + site disorder from the study of magnetoelectric effect and Monte Carlo simulations. CoA l2O4 with low site disorder exhibits a linear magnetoelectric effect below the magnetic ordering temperature. With increasing disorder, the magnetoelectric effect is suppressed and the sample with 14 % disorder exhibits a spin glass behavior without the magnetoelectric effect. Monte Carlo simulations support the experimental findings and suggest that the site disorder suppresses long-range antiferromagnetic order and induces a spin glass state. Since the linear magnetoelectric effect requires a long-range magnetic ordering, we suggest that the ground state of CoA l2O4 with low site disorder is a collinear antiferromagnet.

  13. Acyl migration kinetics of vegetable oil 1,2-diacylglycerols

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The acyl migration kinetics of long-chain 1,2-diacylglycerol (1,2-DAG) to form 1,3-diacylglycerol (1,3-DAG) over the temperature range of 25 to 80 degrees Celsius were examined using proton NMR spectroscopy. The 1,2-DAG mole fraction of 0.32 at equilibrium was found to be insensitive to temperature...

  14. One-Step Conversion of Methyl Ketones to Acyl Chlorides.

    PubMed

    Zaragoza, Florencio

    2015-10-16

    Treatment of aromatic and heteroaromatic methyl ketones with sulfur monochloride and catalytic amounts of pyridine in refluxing chlorobenzene leads to the formation of acyl chlorides. Both electron-rich and electron-poor aryl methyl ketones can be used as starting materials. The resulting C1-byproduct depends on the precise reaction conditions chosen.

  15. Lubricity characteristics of seed oils modified by acylation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chemically modified seed oils via acylation of epoxidized and polyhydroxylated derivatives were investigated for their potential as candidates for lubrication. The native oil was preliminarily epoxidized and ring-opened in a one-pot reaction using formic acid-H2O2 followed by aqueous HCl treatment t...

  16. Mechanistic studies of malonic acid-mediated in situ acylation.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Koushik; Naoum, Johnny N; Roy, Tapta Kanchan; Gilon, Chaim; Gerber, R Benny; Friedler, Assaf

    2015-09-01

    We have previously introduced an easy to perform, cost-effective and highly efficient acetylation technique for solid phase synthesis (SPPS). Malonic acid is used as a precursor and the reaction proceeds via a reactive ketene that acetylates the target amine. Here we present a detailed mechanistic study of the malonic acid-mediated acylation. The influence of reaction conditions, peptide sequence and reagents was systematically studied. Our results show that the methodology can be successfully applied to different types of peptides and nonpeptidic molecules irrespective of their structure, sequence, or conformation. Using alkyl, phenyl, and benzyl malonic acid, we synthesized various acyl peptides with almost quantitative yields. The ketenes obtained from the different malonic acid derived precursors were characterized by in situ (1) H-NMR. The reaction proceeded in short reaction times and resulted in excellent yields when using uronium-based coupling agents, DIPEA as a base, DMF/DMSO/NMP as solvents, Rink amide/Wang/Merrifield resins, temperature of 20°C, pH 8-12 and 5 min preactivation at inert atmosphere. The reaction was unaffected by Lewis acids, transition metal ions, surfactants, or salt. DFT studies support the kinetically favorable concerted mechanism for CO2 and ketene formation that leads to the thermodynamically stable acylated products. We conclude that the malonic acid-mediated acylation is a general method applicable to various target molecules.

  17. Localization of two human autoantigen genes by PCR screening and in situ hybridization-glycyl-tRNA synthetase locates to 7p15 and Alanyl-tRNA synthetase locates to 16q22

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, R.C.; Pai, S.I.; Liu, P.; Ge, Q.; Targoff, I.N.

    1995-11-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aminoacyl-RS) catalyze the attachment of an amino acid to its cognate tRNA. Five of 20 human aminoacyl-RS (histidyl-RS, threonyl-RS, isoleucyl-RS, glycyl-RS, and alanyl-RS) have been identified as targets of autoantibodies in the autoimmune disease polymyositis/dermatomyositis (PM/DM; 9). A sixth autoantigenic amino-acyl-RS, lysyl-RS, was recently reported. The genes for histidyl-RS and threonyl-RS have been assigned to chromosome 5, as have the genes for leucyl-RS and arginyl-RS. Six other aminoacyl-RS (glutamyl-prolyl-RS, valyl-RS, cysteinyl-RS, methionyl-RS, tryptophanyl-RS, and asparaginyl-RS) were assigned to chromosomes 1, 6, 11, 12, 14, and 18, respectively. The reason for a preponderance of aminoacyl-RS genes on chromosome 5 is unknown, but it has been suggested that regulatory relatedness might be a factor. Recently the entire or partial cDNA sequences for two autoantigenic aminoacyl-RS genes, glycyl-RS (gene symbol GARS; 4) and alanyl-RS (gene symbol AARS; 1), were reported. To understand further the genesis of autoimmune responses to aminoacyl-RS and to determine whether genes for autoantigenic aminoacyl-RS colocalize to chromosome 5, we have determined the chromosomal site of the GARS and AARS genes by PCR-based screening of somatic cell hybrid panels and by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis. 10 refs., 1 fig.

  18. Ethanol Metabolism Modifies Hepatic Protein Acylation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Fritz, Kristofer S.; Green, Michelle F.; Petersen, Dennis R.; Hirschey, Matthew D.

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial protein acetylation increases in response to chronic ethanol ingestion in mice, and is thought to reduce mitochondrial function and contribute to the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease. The mitochondrial deacetylase SIRT3 regulates the acetylation status of several mitochondrial proteins, including those involved in ethanol metabolism. The newly discovered desuccinylase activity of the mitochondrial sirtuin SIRT5 suggests that protein succinylation could be an important post-translational modification regulating mitochondrial metabolism. To assess the possible role of protein succinylation in ethanol metabolism, we surveyed hepatic sub-cellular protein fractions from mice fed a control or ethanol-supplemented diet for succinyl-lysine, as well as acetyl-, propionyl-, and butyryl-lysine post-translational modifications. We found mitochondrial protein propionylation increases, similar to mitochondrial protein acetylation. In contrast, mitochondrial protein succinylation is reduced. These mitochondrial protein modifications appear to be primarily driven by ethanol metabolism, and not by changes in mitochondrial sirtuin levels. Similar trends in acyl modifications were observed in the nucleus. However, comparatively fewer acyl modifications were observed in the cytoplasmic or the microsomal compartments, and were generally unchanged by ethanol metabolism. Using a mass spectrometry proteomics approach, we identified several candidate acetylated, propionylated, and succinylated proteins, which were enriched using antibodies against each modification. Additionally, we identified several acetyl and propionyl lysine residues on the same sites for a number of proteins and supports the idea of the overlapping nature of lysine-specific acylation. Thus, we show that novel post-translational modifications are present in hepatic mitochondrial, nuclear, cytoplasmic, and microsomal compartments and ethanol ingestion, and its associated metabolism, induce specific

  19. Effect of Liver Damage and Hyperbaric Oxygenation on Glutamine Synthetase of Hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Savilov, P N; Yakovlev, V N

    2016-01-01

    Activity of glutamine synthetase in the hepatocytes of healthy animals and animals with chronic CCl4-induced hepatitis was studied on white mature female rats after liver resection (15-20% of organ weight) and hyperbaric oxygenation (3 atm, 50 min, 3 times). Surgically operated left and non-operated middle lobes of the liver were analyzed on day 3 after liver resection and exposure to hyperbaric oxygenation. On day 65 of CCl4 poisoning, activity of glutamine synthetase decreased in both lobes and did not recover on day 3 after toxin cessation. Liver resection under conditions of CCl4-induced hepatitis restored reduced activity of glutamine synthetase in both liver lobes to the normal level. In healthy rats, the increase in glutamine synthetase activity after liver resection was found only in the middle lobe of the liver. Hyperbaric oxygenation enhanced the stimulatory effect of liver resection on glutamine synthetase activity in hepatocytes during chronic CCl4-induced hepatitis. In healthy animals with liver resection, activity of glutamine synthetase did not change after hyperbaric oxygenation, while normally oxygenation inhibited glutamine synthetase activity.

  20. Encapsulation of glutamine synthetase in mouse erythrocytes: a new procedure for ammonia detoxification.

    PubMed

    Kosenko, Elena A; Venediktova, Natalia I; Kudryavtsev, Andrey A; Ataullakhanov, Fazoil I; Kaminsky, Yury G; Felipo, Vicente; Montoliu, Carmina

    2008-12-01

    There are a number of pathological situations in which ammonia levels increase leading to hyperammonemia, which may cause neurological alterations and can lead to coma and death. Currently, there are no efficient treatments allowing rapid and sustained decrease of ammonia levels in these situations. A way to increase ammonia detoxification would be to increase its incorporation in glutamine by glutamine synthetase. The aim of this work was to develop a procedure to encapsulate glutamine synthetase in mouse erythrocytes and to assess whether administration of these erythrocytes containing glutamine synthetase (GS) reduce ammonia levels in hyperammonemic mice. The procedure developed allowed the encapsulation of 3 +/- 0.25 IU of GS / mL of erythrocytes with a 70% cell recovery. Most metabolites, including ATP, remained unaltered in glutamine synthetase-loaded erythrocytes (named ammocytes by us) compared with native erythrocytes. The glutamine synthetase-loaded ammocytes injected in mice survived and retained essentially all of their glutamine synthetase activity for at least 48 h in vivo. Injection of these ammocytes into hyperammonemic mice reduced ammonia levels in the blood by about 50%. The results reported indicate that ammocytes are able to keep their integrity, normal energy metabolism, the inserted glutamine synthetase activity, and can be useful to reduce ammonia levels in hyperammonemic situations.

  1. Molecular structure of the human argininosuccinate synthetase gene: Occurrence of alternative mRNA splicing

    SciTech Connect

    Freytag, S.O.; Beaudet, A.L.; Bock, H.G.O.; O'Brien, W.E.

    1984-10-01

    The human genome contains one expressed argininosuccinate synthetase gene and ca. 14 pseudogenes that are dispersed to at least 11 human chromosomes. Eleven clones isolated from a human genomic DNA library were characterized extensively by restriction mapping, Southern blotting, and nucleotide sequencing. These 11 clones represent the entire expressed argininosuccinate synthetase gene that spans 63 kilobases and contains at least 13 exons. The expressed gene codes for two mRNAs that differ in their 5' untranslated sequences and arise by alternative splicing involving the inclusion or deletion of an entire exon. In normal human liver and cultured fibroblasts, the predominant mature argininosuccinate synthetase mRNA lacks sequences encoded by exon 2 in the expressed gene. In contrast, the predominant argininosuccinate synthetase mRNA in baboon liver contains exon 2 sequences. A transformed canavanine-resistant human cell line in which argininosuccinate synthetase activity is 180-fold higher than that in wild-type cells contains abundant amounts of both forms of the argininosuccinate synthetase mRNA. The mRNA lacking exon 2 sequences is the more abundant mRNA species in the canavanine-resistant cells. These observations show that splicing of the argininosuccinate synthetase mRNA is species specific in primates and varies among different human cell types.

  2. Rates of thrombin acylation and deacylation upon reaction with low molecular weight acylating agents, carbamylating agents and carbonylating agents.

    PubMed

    Brown, A D; Powers, J C

    1995-08-01

    Acylated derivatives of thrombin have been made using low molecular weight acylating agents, carbamylating agents and carbonylating agents. The compounds used to acylate the active site serine include isatoic anhydrides, benzoxazinones, benzylisocyanate, N-(benzylcarbonyloxy)succinimide and p-(dimethylamino)benzoylimidazolide. The rates of acylation and deacylation were determined. The best overall inhibitors of thrombin are 2-ethoxy-4H-3,1-benzoxazin-4-one, isatoic anhydride and tert-butyl-2,4-dioxo-2H-3,1-benzoxazine-1(4H)-acetate, which have k2/Ki values of 52,700 M-1s-1, 48,900 M-1s-1 and 5400 M-1s-1, respectively. The carbamyl derivative of thrombin formed with benzylisocyanate had the slowest rate of deacylation (2.3 x 10(-7) s-1), while the ester derivative formed with 2-(N,N-dimethylamino)methylimino-4H-3,1-benzoxazin-4-one had the fastest rate of deacylation (1.9 x 10(-4) s-1).

  3. Palmitoyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) thioesterase and the evolutionary origin of plant acyl-ACP thioesterases.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, A; Davies, H M; Voelker, T A

    1995-01-01

    Acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) thioesterases play an essential role in chain termination during de novo fatty acid synthesis and in the channeling of carbon flux between the two lipid biosynthesis pathways in plants. We have discovered that there are two distinct but related thioesterase gene classes in higher plants, termed FatA and FatB, whose evolutionary divergence appears to be ancient. FatA encodes the already described 18:1-ACP thioesterase. In contrast, FatB representatives encode thioesterases preferring acyl-ACPs having saturated acyl groups. We unexpectedly obtained a 16:0-ACP thioesterase cDNA from Cuphea hookeriana seed, which accumulate predominantly 8:0 and 10:0. The 16:0 thioesterase transcripts were found in non-seed tissues, and expression in transgenic Brassica napus led to the production of a 16:0-rich oil. We present evidence that this type of FatB gene is ancient and ubiquitous in plants and that specialized plant medium-chain thioesterases have evolved independently from such enzymes several times during angiosperm evolution. Also, the ubiquitous 18:1-ACP thioesterase appears to be a derivative of a 16:0 thioesterase. PMID:7734968

  4. The crystal structure of BlmI as a model for nonribosomal peptide synthetase peptidyl carrier proteins.

    PubMed

    Lohman, Jeremy R; Ma, Ming; Cuff, Marianne E; Bigelow, Lance; Bearden, Jessica; Babnigg, Gyorgy; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Phillips, George N; Shen, Ben

    2014-07-01

    Carrier proteins (CPs) play a critical role in the biosynthesis of various natural products, especially in nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) and polyketide synthase (PKS) enzymology, where the CPs are referred to as peptidyl-carrier proteins (PCPs) or acyl-carrier proteins (ACPs), respectively. CPs can either be a domain in large multifunctional polypeptides or standalone proteins, termed Type I and Type II, respectively. There have been many biochemical studies of the Type I PKS and NRPS CPs, and of Type II ACPs. However, recently a number of Type II PCPs have been found and biochemically characterized. In order to understand the possible interaction surfaces for combinatorial biosynthetic efforts we crystallized the first characterized and representative Type II PCP member, BlmI, from the bleomycin biosynthetic pathway from Streptomyces verticillus ATCC 15003. The structure is similar to CPs in general but most closely resembles PCPs. Comparisons with previously determined PCP structures in complex with catalytic domains reveals a common interaction surface. This surface is highly variable in charge and shape, which likely confers specificity for interactions. Previous nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis of a prototypical Type I PCP excised from the multimodular context revealed three conformational states. Comparison of the states with the structure of BlmI and other PCPs reveals that only one of the NMR states is found in other studies, suggesting the other two states may not be relevant. The state represented by the BlmI crystal structure can therefore serve as a model for both Type I and Type II PCPs.

  5. Parenteral and enteral metabolism of anaplerotic triheptanoin in normal rats. II. Effects on lipolysis, glucose production, and liver acyl-CoA profile

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Lei; Zhang, Guo-Fang; Kombu, Rajan S.; Allen, Frederick; Kutz, Gerd; Brewer, Wolf-Ulrich; Roe, Charles R.

    2010-01-01

    The anaplerotic odd-medium-chain triglyceride triheptanoin is used in clinical trials for the chronic dietary treatment of patients with long-chain fatty acid oxidation disorders. We previously showed (Kinman RP, Kasumov T, Jobbins KA, Thomas KR, Adams JE, Brunengraber LN, Kutz G, Brewer WU, Roe CR, Brunengraber H. Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab 291: E860–E866, 2006) that the intravenous infusion of triheptanoin increases lipolysis traced by the turnover of glycerol. In this study, we tested whether lipolysis induced by triheptanoin infusion is accompanied by the potentially harmful release of long-chain fatty acids. Rats were infused with heptanoate ± glycerol or triheptanoin. Intravenous infusion of triheptanoin at 40% of caloric requirement markedly increased glycerol endogenous Ra but not oleate endogenous Ra. Thus, the activation of lipolysis was balanced by fatty acid reesterification in the same cells. The liver acyl-CoA profile showed the accumulation of intermediates of heptanoate β-oxidation and C5-ketogenesis and a decrease in free CoA but no evidence of metabolic perturbation of liver metabolism such as propionyl overload. Our data suggest that triheptanoin, administered either intravenously or intraduodenally, could be used for intensive care and nutritional support of metabolically decompensated long-chain fatty acid oxidation disorders. PMID:19903863

  6. Defective peroxisomal catabolism of branched fatty acyl coenzyme A in mice lacking the sterol carrier protein-2/sterol carrier protein-x gene function

    PubMed Central

    Seedorf, Udo; Raabe, Martin; Ellinghaus, Peter; Kannenberg, Frank; Fobker, Manfred; Engel, Thomas; Denis, Simone; Wouters, Fred; Wirtz, Karel W.A.; Wanders, Ronald J.A.; Maeda, Nobuyo; Assmann, Gerd

    1998-01-01

    Gene targeting in mice was used to investigate the unknown function of Scp2, encoding sterol carrier protein-2 (SCP2; a peroxisomal lipid carrier) and sterol carrier protein-x (SCPx; a fusion protein between SCP2 and a peroxisomal thiolase). Complete deficiency of SCP2 and SCPx was associated with marked alterations in gene expression, peroxisome proliferation, hypolipidemia, impaired body weight control, and neuropathy. Along with these abnormalities, catabolism of methyl-branched fatty acyl CoAs was impaired. The defect became evident from up to 10-fold accumulation of the tetramethyl-branched fatty acid phytanic acid in Scp2(−/−) mice. Further characterization supported that the gene disruption led to inefficient import of phytanoyl-CoA into peroxisomes and to defective thiolytic cleavage of 3-ketopristanoyl-CoA. These results corresponded to high-affinity binding of phytanoyl-CoA to the recombinant rat SCP2 protein, as well as high 3-ketopristanoyl-CoA thiolase activity of the recombinant rat SCPx protein. PMID:9553048

  7. Biochemical characteristics of AtFAR2, a fatty acid reductase from Arabidopsis thaliana that reduces fatty acyl-CoA and -ACP substrates into fatty alcohols.

    PubMed

    Doan, Thuy T P; Carlsson, Anders S; Stymne, Sten; Hofvander, Per

    2016-01-01

    Fatty alcohols and derivatives are important for proper deposition of a functional pollen wall. Mutations in specific genes encoding fatty acid reductases (FAR) responsible for fatty alcohol production cause abnormal development of pollen. A disrupted AtFAR2 (MS2) gene in Arabidopsis thaliana results in pollen developing an abnormal exine layer and a reduced fertility phenotype. AtFAR2 has been shown to be targeted to chloroplasts and in a purified form to be specific for acyl-ACP substrates. Here, we present data on the in vitro and in planta characterizations of AtFAR2 from A. thaliana and show that this enzyme has the ability to use both, C16:0-ACP and C16:0-CoA, as substrates to produce C16:0-alcohol. Our results further show that AtFAR2 is highly similar in properties and substrate specificity to AtFAR6 for which in vitro data has been published, and which is also a chloroplast localized enzyme. This suggests that although AtFAR2 is the major enzyme responsible for exine layer functionality, AtFAR6 might provide functional redundancy to AtFAR2.

  8. Defective Pollen Wall Is Required for Anther and Microspore Development in Rice and Encodes a Fatty Acyl Carrier Protein Reductase[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jing; Tan, Hexin; Yu, Xiao-Hong; Liu, Yuanyun; Liang, Wanqi; Ranathunge, Kosala; Franke, Rochus Benni; Schreiber, Lukas; Wang, Yujiong; Kai, Guoying; Shanklin, John; Ma, Hong; Zhang, Dabing

    2011-01-01

    Aliphatic alcohols naturally exist in many organisms as important cellular components; however, their roles in extracellular polymer biosynthesis are poorly defined. We report here the isolation and characterization of a rice (Oryza sativa) male-sterile mutant, defective pollen wall (dpw), which displays defective anther development and degenerated pollen grains with an irregular exine. Chemical analysis revealed that dpw anthers had a dramatic reduction in cutin monomers and an altered composition of cuticular wax, as well as soluble fatty acids and alcohols. Using map-based cloning, we identified the DPW gene, which is expressed in both tapetal cells and microspores during anther development. Biochemical analysis of the recombinant DPW enzyme shows that it is a novel fatty acid reductase that produces 1-hexadecanol and exhibits >270-fold higher specificity for palmiltoyl-acyl carrier protein than for C16:0 CoA substrates. DPW was predominantly targeted to plastids mediated by its N-terminal transit peptide. Moreover, we demonstrate that the monocot DPW from rice complements the dicot Arabidopsis thaliana male sterile2 (ms2) mutant and is the probable ortholog of MS2. These data suggest that DPWs participate in a conserved step in primary fatty alcohol synthesis for anther cuticle and pollen sporopollenin biosynthesis in monocots and dicots. PMID:21705642

  9. Production of a Brassica napus low-molecular mass acyl-coenzyme A-binding protein in Arabidopsis alters the acyl-coenzyme A pool and acyl composition of oil in seeds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Low-molecular mass (10 kD) cytosolic acyl-coenzyme A-binding protein (ACBP) has a substantial influence over fatty acid (FA) composition in oilseeds, possibly via an effect on the partitioning of acyl groups between elongation and desaturation pathways. Previously, we demonstrated that the expressio...

  10. The MTCY428.08 Gene of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Codes for NAD+ Synthetase

    PubMed Central

    Cantoni, Rita; Branzoni, Manuela; Labò, Monica; Rizzi, Menico; Riccardi, Giovanna

    1998-01-01

    The product of the MTCY428.08 gene of Mycobacterium tuberculosis shows sequence homology with several NAD+ synthetases. The MTCY428.08 gene was cloned into the expression vectors pGEX-4T-1 and pET-15b. Expression in Escherichia coli led to overproduction of glutathione S-transferase fused and His6-tagged gene products, which were enzymatically assayed for NAD synthetase activity. Our results demonstrate that the MTCY428.08 gene of M. tuberculosis is the structural gene for NAD+ synthetase. PMID:9620974

  11. Critical Evaluation of the Changes in Glutamine Synthetase Activity in Models of Cerebral Stroke.

    PubMed

    Jeitner, Thomas M; Battaile, Kevin; Cooper, Arthur J L

    2015-12-01

    The following article addresses some seemingly paradoxical observations concerning cerebral glutamine synthetase in ischemia-reperfusion injury. In the brain, this enzyme is predominantly found in astrocytes and catalyzes part of the glutamine-glutamate cycle. Glutamine synthetase is also thought to be especially sensitive to inactivation by the oxygen- and nitrogen-centered radicals generated during strokes. Despite this apparent sensitivity, glutamine synthetase specific activity is elevated in the affected tissues during reperfusion. Given the central role of the glutamine-glutamate cycle in the brain, we sought to resolve these conflicting observations with the view of providing an alternative perspective for therapeutic intervention in stroke.

  12. Acylation of Glucagon-Like Peptide-2: Interaction with Lipid Membranes and In Vitro Intestinal Permeability

    PubMed Central

    Trier, Sofie; Linderoth, Lars; Bjerregaard, Simon; Andresen, Thomas Lars; Rahbek, Ulrik Lytt

    2014-01-01

    Background Acylation of peptide drugs with fatty acid chains has proven beneficial for prolonging systemic circulation as well as increasing enzymatic stability without disrupting biological potency. Acylation has furthermore been shown to increase interactions with the lipid membranes of mammalian cells. The extent to which such interactions hinder or benefit delivery of acylated peptide drugs across cellular barriers such as the intestinal epithelia is currently unknown. The present study investigates the effect of acylating peptide drugs from a drug delivery perspective. Purpose We hypothesize that the membrane interaction is an important parameter for intestinal translocation, which may be used to optimize the acylation chain length for intestinal permeation. This work aims to characterize acylated analogues of the intestinotrophic Glucagon-like peptide-2 by systematically increasing acyl chain length, in order to elucidate its influence on membrane interaction and intestinal cell translocation in vitro. Results Peptide self-association and binding to both model lipid and cell membranes was found to increase gradually with acyl chain length, whereas translocation across Caco-2 cells depended non-linearly on chain length. Short and medium acyl chains increased translocation compared to the native peptide, but long chain acylation displayed no improvement in translocation. Co-administration of a paracellular absorption enhancer was found to increase translocation irrespective of acyl chain length, whereas a transcellular enhancer displayed increased synergy with the long chain acylation. Conclusions These results show that membrane interactions play a prominent role during intestinal translocation of an acylated peptide. Acylation benefits permeation for shorter and medium chains due to increased membrane interactions, however, for longer chains insertion in the membrane becomes dominant and hinders translocation, i.e. the peptides get ‘stuck’ in the cell

  13. Regulation of Angiogenesis by Aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetases

    PubMed Central

    Mirando, Adam C.; Francklyn, Christopher S.; Lounsbury, Karen M.

    2014-01-01

    In addition to their canonical roles in translation the aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (ARSs) have developed secondary functions over the course of evolution. Many of these activities are associated with cellular survival and nutritional stress responses essential for homeostatic processes in higher eukaryotes. In particular, six ARSs and one associated factor have documented functions in angiogenesis. However, despite their connection to this process, the ARSs are mechanistically distinct and exhibit a range of positive or negative effects on aspects of endothelial cell migration, proliferation, and survival. This variability is achieved through the appearance of appended domains and interplay with inflammatory pathways not found in prokaryotic systems. Complete knowledge of the non-canonical functions of ARSs is necessary to understand the mechanisms underlying the physiological regulation of angiogenesis. PMID:25535072

  14. Activity of formylphosphate in the reaction catalyzed by formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase

    SciTech Connect

    Jahansouz, H.; Kofron, J.L.; Smithers, G.W.; Himes, R.H.; Reed, G.H.

    1986-05-01

    Formylphosphate (FP), a putative enzyme-bound intermediate in the reaction catalyzed by N/sup 10/-formylH/sub 4/folate synthetase, was synthesized from formylfluoride and Pi. Measurement of hydrolysis rates by /sup 31/P NMR showed that FP is very unstable with a half-life of 48 min at 20/sup 0/C and pH 7. At pH 7 hydrolysis occurs with O-P bond cleavage as shown by /sup 18/O incorporation from /sup 18/O-H/sub 2/O into Pi. The substrate activity of FP was tested in the reaction catalyzed by N/sup 10/-formylH/sub 4/folate synthetase isolated from Clostridium cylindrosporum. MgATP + H/sub 4/folate + HCOO/sup -/ in equilibrium MgADP + Pi +N/sup 10/-formylH/sub 4/folate FP supports the reaction in both the forward and reverse directions. Thus, N/sup 10/-formylH/sub 4/folate is produced from H/sub 4/-folate and FP but only if ADP is present, and ATP is produced from FP and ADP but only if H/sub 4/folate is present. The requirements for H/sub 4/folate in the synthesis of ATP from ADP and FP and for ADP in the synthesis of N/sup 10/-formylH/sub 4/folate from FP and H/sub 4/folate, are consistent with past kinetic and isotope exchange studies which showed that the reaction proceeds by a sequential mechanism and that all three substrates must be present for any reaction to occur.

  15. Transformation of Bacillus Subtilis with cloned thymidylate synthetases

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, Edward M.

    1980-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis carries two genes, thyA and thyB, each encoding different protein products, with thymidylate synthetase (TSase) activity. Either of these genes alone is sufficient for thymidine independence in B. subtilis. In addition there exist two B. subtilis temperate bacteriophages which upon infection of thymine requiring auxotrophs results in conversion of the organism to thymine independence. Chimeric plasmids selected for Thy/sup +/ transforming activity in E. coli were constructed and then used as a source of defined highly enriched DNA with which to transform competent B. subtilis. These plasmids were studied for their: (1) abiility to transform B. subtilis to thymine independence; (2) site of integration within the B. subtilis chromosome upon transformation; (3) phenotype of Thy/sup +/ plasmid generated transformants; and (4) nucleotide sequence homology among the cloned DNA fragments conferring thymine independence. Plasmids containing the two bacteriophage thy genes displayed the phenotype associated with thyA, whereas the plasmids containing the cloned B. subtilis chromosomal genes displayed the phenotype associated with thyB. Utilizing similar technology, the ability of an entirely foreign hybred bacterial plasmiid to transform B. subtilis was examined. In this case the gene from E. coli encoding thymidylate synthetase was cloned in the plasmid pBR322. The resulting chimeric plasmid was effective in transforming both E. coli and B. subtilis to thymine prototrophy. Uncloned linear E. coli chromosomal DNA was unable to transform thymine requiring strains of B. subtilis to thymine independence. Although the Thy/sup +/ transformants of E. coli contained plasmid DNA, the Thy/sup +/ transformants derived from the transformation of B. subtilis did not contain detectable extrachromosomal DNA. Instead the DNA from the chimeric plasmid was integrated into the chromosome of B. subtilis. (ERB)

  16. Identification and functional characterization of a novel bacterial type asparagine synthetase A: a tRNA synthetase paralog from Leishmania donovani.

    PubMed

    Manhas, Reetika; Tripathi, Pankaj; Khan, Sameena; Sethu Lakshmi, Bhavana; Lal, Shambhu Krishan; Gowri, Venkatraman Subramanian; Sharma, Amit; Madhubala, Rentala

    2014-04-25

    Asparagine is formed by two structurally distinct asparagine synthetases in prokaryotes. One is the ammonia-utilizing asparagine synthetase A (AsnA), and the other is asparagine synthetase B (AsnB) that uses glutamine or ammonia as a nitrogen source. In a previous investigation using sequence-based analysis, we had shown that Leishmania spp. possess asparagine-tRNA synthetase paralog asparagine synthetase A (LdASNA) that is ammonia-dependent. Here, we report the cloning, expression, and kinetic analysis of ASNA from Leishmania donovani. Interestingly, LdASNA was both ammonia- and glutamine-dependent. To study the physiological role of ASNA in Leishmania, gene deletion mutations were attempted via targeted gene replacement. Gene deletion of LdASNA showed a growth delay in mutants. However, chromosomal null mutants of LdASNA could not be obtained as the double transfectant mutants showed aneuploidy. These data suggest that LdASNA is essential for survival of the Leishmania parasite. LdASNA enzyme was recalcitrant toward crystallization so we instead crystallized and solved the atomic structure of its close homolog from Trypanosoma brucei (TbASNA) at 2.2 Å. A very significant conservation in active site residues is observed between TbASNA and Escherichia coli AsnA. It is evident that the absence of an LdASNA homolog from humans and its essentiality for the parasites make LdASNA a novel drug target.

  17. The oxalyl-CoA synthetase-regulated oxalate and its distinct effects on resistance to bacterial blight and aluminium toxicity in rice.

    PubMed

    Peng, C; Liang, X; Liu, E-E; Zhang, J-J; Peng, X-X

    2016-12-31

    Oxalic acid is widely distributed in biological systems and known to play functional roles in plants. The gene AAE3 was recently identified to encode an oxalyl-CoA synthetase (OCS) in Arabidopsis that catalyses the conversion of oxalate and CoA into oxalyl-CoA. It will be particularly important to characterise the homologous gene in rice since rice is not only a monocotyledonous model plant, but also a staple food crop. Various enzymatic and biological methods have been used to characterise the homologous gene. We first defined that AAE3 in the rice genome (OsAAE3) also encodes an OCS enzyme. Its Km for oxalate is 1.73 ± 0.12 mm, and Vm is 6824.9 ± 410.29 U·min(-1) ·mg protein(-1) . Chemical modification and site-directed mutagenesis analyses identified thiols as the active site residues for rice OCS catalysis, suggesting that the enzyme might be regulated by redox state. Subcellular localisation assay showed that the enzyme is located in the cytosol and predominantly distributed in leaf epidermal cells. As expected, oxalate levels increased when OCS was suppressed in RNAi transgenic plants. More interestingly, OCS-suppressed plants were more susceptible to bacterial blight but more resistant to Al toxicity. The results demonstrate that the OsAAE3-encoded protein also acts as an OCS in rice, and may play different roles in coping with stresses. These molecular, enzymatic and functional data provide first-hand information to further clarify the function and mechanism of OCS in rice plants.

  18. Modification of the substrate specificity of an acyl-acyl carrier protein thioesterase by protein engineering.

    PubMed

    Yuan, L; Voelker, T A; Hawkins, D J

    1995-11-07

    The plant acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) thioesterases (TEs) are of biochemical interest because of their roles in fatty acid synthesis and their utilities in the bioengineering of plant seed oils. When the FatB1 cDNA encoding a 12:0-ACP TE (Uc FatB1) from California bay, Umbellularia californica (Uc) was expressed in Escherichia coli and in developing oilseeds of the plants Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica napus, large amounts of laurate (12:0) and small amounts of myristate (14:0) were accumulated. We have isolated a TE cDNA from camphor (Cinnamomum camphorum) (Cc) seeds that shares 92% amino acid identity with Uc FatB1. This TE, Cc FatB1, mainly hydrolyzes 14:0-ACP as shown by E. coli expression. We have investigated the roles of the N- and C-terminal regions in determining substrate specificity by constructing two chimeric enzymes, in which the N-terminal portion of one protein is fused to the C-terminal portion of the other. Our results show that the C-terminal two-thirds of the protein is critical for the specificity. By site-directed mutagenesis, we have replaced several amino acids in Uc FatB1 by using the Cc FatB1 sequence as a guide. A double mutant, which changes Met-197 to an Arg and Arg-199 to a His (M197R/R199H), turns Uc FatB1 into a 12:0/14:0 TE with equal preference for both substrates. Another mutation, T231K, by itself does not effect the specificity. However, when it is combined with the double mutant to generate a triple mutant (M197R/R199H/T231K), Uc FatB1 is converted to a 14:0-ACP TE. Expression of the double-mutant cDNA in E. coli K27, a strain deficient in fatty acid degradation, results in accumulation of similar amounts of 12:0 and 14:0. Meanwhile the E. coli expressing the triple-mutant cDNA produces predominantly 14:0 with very small amounts of 12:0. Kinetic studies indicate that both wild-type Uc FatB1 and the triple mutant have similar values of Km,app with respect to 14:0-ACP. Inhibitory studies also show that 12:0-ACP is a good

  19. [S-Acyl derivatives of thiosalicylamides having antifungal activity. II].

    PubMed

    Mazza, M; Modena, T; Montanari, L; Pavanetto, F

    1978-07-01

    Some S-acyl derivatives of N-alkylthiosalicylamides [Table I: substances (I leads to XXXI)] were prepared and tested for antifungal activity. The substances, most of which had not been previously reported, were prepared by condensation of 2-mercapto-N-alkylbenzamides with suitable acylating agents. The antifungal activity of the compounds was tested in vitro against Candida albicans and Trichophyton mentagrophytes. For some compounds the was tested activity against the above strains fungicidal, Candida tropicalis and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Many of the compounds proved to have high antifungal activity comparable with that of Clotrimazol. The results extended knowledge on the structure-antifungal activity relationships of this class of compounds. The compounds with the highest antifungal activity were: 2-acetylmercapto-N,n-heptylbenzamide (XXVIII); 2-acetylmercapto-5-Cl-N,n-propylbenzamide (XIV); 2-acetylmercapto-N,n-octylbenzamide (XXXI); 2-acetylmercapto-N,n-pentylbenzamide (XXV); 2-acetylmercapto-N,n-hexylbenzamide (XXVII).

  20. Metabolic Glycoengineering with N-Acyl Side Chain Modified Mannosamines.

    PubMed

    Wratil, Paul R; Horstkorte, Rüdiger; Reutter, Werner

    2016-08-08

    In metabolic glycoengineering (MGE), cells or animals are treated with unnatural derivatives of monosaccharides. After entering the cytosol, these sugar analogues are metabolized and subsequently expressed on newly synthesized glycoconjugates. The feasibility of MGE was first discovered for sialylated glycans, by using N-acyl-modified mannosamines as precursor molecules for unnatural sialic acids. Prerequisite is the promiscuity of the enzymes of the Roseman-Warren biosynthetic pathway. These enzymes were shown to tolerate specific modifications of the N-acyl side chain of mannosamine analogues, for example, elongation by one or more methylene groups (aliphatic modifications) or by insertion of reactive groups (bioorthogonal modifications). Unnatural sialic acids are incorporated into glycoconjugates of cells and organs. MGE has intriguing biological consequences for treated cells (aliphatic MGE) and offers the opportunity to visualize the topography and dynamics of sialylated glycans in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo (bioorthogonal MGE).

  1. Evidence for two immunologically distinct acetyl-coenzyme A synthetases in yeast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Satyanarayana, T.; Mandel, A. D.; Klein, H. P.

    1974-01-01

    Evidence is presented that clearly establishes the presence of two acetyl-CoA synthetases in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, one elaborated under 'aerobic' conditions, the other under 'nonaerobic' conditions. The antibody produced by each enzyme is immunologically specific.

  2. Alternative pathways for editing non-cognate amino acids by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases.

    PubMed Central

    Jakubowski, H; Fersht, A R

    1981-01-01

    Evidence is presented that the editing mechanisms of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase operate by two alternative pathways: pre-transfer, by hydrolysis of the non-cognate aminoacyl adenylate; post-transfer, by hydrolysis of the mischarged tRNA. The methionyl-tRNA synthetases from Escherichia coli and Bacillus stearothermophilus and isoleucyl-tRNA synthetase from E. coli, for example, are shown to reject misactivated homocysteine rapidly by the pre-transfer route. A novel feature of this reaction is that homocysteine thiolactone is formed by the facile cyclisation of the homocysteinyl adenylate. Valyl-tRNA synthetases, on the other hand, reject the more readily activated non-cognate amino acids by primarily the post-transfer route. The features governing the choice of pathway are discussed. PMID:7024910

  3. Regulation of active site coupling in glutamine-dependent NAD[superscript +] synthetase

    SciTech Connect

    LaRonde-LeBlanc, Nicole; Resto, Melissa; Gerratana, Barbara

    2009-05-21

    NAD{sup +} is an essential metabolite both as a cofactor in energy metabolism and redox homeostasis and as a regulator of cellular processes. In contrast to humans, Mycobacterium tuberculosis NAD{sup +} biosynthesis is absolutely dependent on the activity of a multifunctional glutamine-dependent NAD{sup +} synthetase, which catalyzes the ATP-dependent formation of NAD{sup +} at the synthetase domain using ammonia derived from L-glutamine in the glutaminase domain. Here we report the kinetics and structural characterization of M. tuberculosis NAD{sup +} synthetase. The kinetics data strongly suggest tightly coupled regulation of the catalytic activities. The structure, the first of a glutamine-dependent NAD{sup +} synthetase, reveals a homooctameric subunit organization suggesting a tight dependence of catalysis on the quaternary structure, a 40-{angstrom} intersubunit ammonia tunnel and structural elements that may be involved in the transfer of information between catalytic sites.

  4. Preparation and cross-reactivity of anti-avian glutamine synthetase antibody.

    PubMed

    Smith, D D; Vorhaben, J E; Campbell, J W

    1983-04-01

    Rabbit antibody to chicken liver mitochondrial glutamine synthetase was purified by immunoaffinity chromatography for analysis of the immunological relatedness of vertebrate glutamine synthetases. The antibody cross-reacted with enzymes from representatives of all five vertebrate classes, indicating a high degree of evolutionary conservatism in the structure of the enzymes. A unique aspect of the immunological similarity of these enzymes is that it exists between cytosolic and mitochondrial enzymes which are, in general, immunologically distinct. The antibody did not cross-react with two insect glutamine synthetases. Compositional difference indices, calculated from the amino acid compositions of glutamine synthetases from several species, gave a mean estimate of over 80% sequence homology for the vertebrate enzymes. The avian mitochondrial enzyme gave a mean 78% homology with the mammalian cytosolic enzyme.

  5. Diffuse glutamine synthetase overexpression restricted to areas of peliosis in a β-catenin-activated hepatocellular adenoma: a potential pitfall in glutamine synthetase interpretation.

    PubMed

    Berry, Ryan S; Gullapalli, Rama R; Wu, Jin; Morris, Katherine; Hanson, Joshua A

    2014-08-01

    Hepatocellular adenomas have recently been classified into four subtypes based on molecular findings: hepatocyte nuclear factor 1α (HNF1α) inactivated, inflammatory/telangiectatic, β-catenin activated, and unclassifiable. β-catenin-activated adenomas have the potential for malignant transformation and are thus important to recognize. Diffuse glutamine synthetase immunohistochemical positivity has been shown to be a reliable surrogate marker for β-catenin activation, though variations in staining patterns may be difficult to interpret. We report a case of a peliotic adenoma that was morphologically consistent with a β-catenin wild-type hepatocellular adenoma but harbored a β-catenin mutation by molecular analysis. The tumor lacked nuclear β-catenin positivity and demonstrated a hitherto undescribed pattern of glutamine synthetase overexpression restricted to areas of peliosis with mostly negative staining in non-peliotic areas. This pattern was initially interpreted as physiologic and may represent a potential pitfall in glutamine synthetase interpretation.

  6. Thiourea-Catalyzed Aminolysis of N-acyl Homoserine Lactones

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    of N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs), molecules integral to bacterial quorum sensing . The catalysts afford rate enhancement of up to 10 times the...SUBJECT TERMS quorum sensing Michael A. Bertucci, Stephen J. Lee, Michel R. Gagné University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill Office of Sponsored... quorum sensing . The catalysts afford rate enhancement of up to 10 times the control in CD3CN. Mild catalysis in other polar aprotic solvents is

  7. Antinociceptive property of new 4-acyl-arylhydrazone pyrazole compounds.

    PubMed

    Matheus, M E; Oliveira, L F; Freitas, A C; Carvalho, A M; Barreiro, E J

    1991-01-01

    A series of new 4-acyl-arylhydrazone pyrazole compounds were tested for antinociceptive activity using the inhibition of abdominal contortions induced by acetylcholine (4 mg/kg, ip) in the mouse. Dipyrone was used for comparison of the antinociceptive potency of the compounds being tested. All drugs were administered po in saline (dipyrone) or in propylene glycol (4-acyl-arylhydrazones). The maximum response induced by dipyrone (86% inhibition) was assigned an efficacy index of 1.0. Although none of the compounds had an efficacy index greater than 1.0, all three reached 1.0. The two most potent compounds, W1d and W1g, which also had an efficacy similar to that of dipyrone, contain a p-N(CH3)2 and m-OH,p-OCH3 group in the aromatic ring of the acyl-hydrazone, respectively. W1d presented the lowest antinociceptive ED50 in the series (1.41 mg/kg) and was eleven times more potent than dipyrone (ED50 = 15.80 mg/kg). Other substitutions at the para position had lower potency than W1d. The present results indicate that the introduction of a group at the para position of the acyl-arylhydrazone ring increases the antinociceptive activity of these compounds to provide compounds of the same efficacy but greater potency than dipyrone to which these new compounds are structurally related. Other assays of nociceptive activity are being used to characterize the mechanism of action of the potential new drugs.

  8. Acylation type determines ghrelin's effects on energy homeostasis in rodents.

    PubMed

    Heppner, Kristy M; Chaudhary, Nilika; Müller, Timo D; Kirchner, Henriette; Habegger, Kirk M; Ottaway, Nickki; Smiley, David L; Dimarchi, Richard; Hofmann, Susanna M; Woods, Stephen C; Sivertsen, Bjørn; Holst, Birgitte; Pfluger, Paul T; Perez-Tilve, Diego; Tschöp, Matthias H

    2012-10-01

    Ghrelin is a gastrointestinal polypeptide that acts through the ghrelin receptor (GHSR) to promote food intake and increase adiposity. Activation of GHSR requires the presence of a fatty-acid (FA) side chain on amino acid residue serine 3 of the ghrelin molecule. However, little is known about the role that the type of FA used for acylation plays in the biological action of ghrelin. We therefore evaluated a series of differentially acylated peptides to determine whether alterations in length or stability of the FA side chain have an impact on the ability of ghrelin to activate GHSR in vitro or to differentially alter food intake, body weight, and body composition in vivo. Fatty acids principally available in the diet (such as palmitate C16) and therefore representing potential substrates for the ghrelin-activating enzyme ghrelin O-acyltransferase (GOAT) were used for dose-, time-, and administration/route-dependent effects of ghrelin on food intake, body weight, and body composition in rats and mice. Our data demonstrate that altering the length of the FA side chain of ghrelin results in the differential activation of GHSR. Additionally, we found that acylation of ghrelin with a long-chain FA (C16) delays the acute central stimulation of food intake. Lastly, we found that, depending on acylation length, systemic and central chronic actions of ghrelin on adiposity can be enhanced or reduced. Together our data suggest that modification of the FA side-chain length can be a novel approach to modulate the efficacy of pharmacologically administered ghrelin.

  9. Glycosyltransferases from oat (Avena) implicated in the acylation of avenacins.

    PubMed

    Owatworakit, Amorn; Townsend, Belinda; Louveau, Thomas; Jenner, Helen; Rejzek, Martin; Hughes, Richard K; Saalbach, Gerhard; Qi, Xiaoquan; Bakht, Saleha; Roy, Abhijeet Deb; Mugford, Sam T; Goss, Rebecca J M; Field, Robert A; Osbourn, Anne

    2013-02-08

    Plants produce a huge array of specialized metabolites that have important functions in defense against biotic and abiotic stresses. Many of these compounds are glycosylated by family 1 glycosyltransferases (GTs). Oats (Avena spp.) make root-derived antimicrobial triterpenes (avenacins) that provide protection against soil-borne diseases. The ability to synthesize avenacins has evolved since the divergence of oats from other cereals and grasses. The major avenacin, A-1, is acylated with N-methylanthranilic acid. Previously, we have cloned and characterized three genes for avenacin synthesis (for the triterpene synthase SAD1, a triterpene-modifying cytochrome P450 SAD2, and the serine carboxypeptidase-like acyl transferase SAD7), which form part of a biosynthetic gene cluster. Here, we identify a fourth member of this gene cluster encoding a GT belonging to clade L of family 1 (UGT74H5), and show that this enzyme is an N-methylanthranilic acid O-glucosyltransferase implicated in the synthesis of avenacin A-1. Two other closely related family 1 GTs (UGT74H6 and UGT74H7) are also expressed in oat roots. One of these (UGT74H6) is able to glucosylate both N-methylanthranilic acid and benzoic acid, whereas the function of the other (UGT74H7) remains unknown. Our investigations indicate that UGT74H5 is likely to be key for the generation of the activated acyl donor used by SAD7 in the synthesis of the major avenacin, A-1, whereas UGT74H6 may contribute to the synthesis of other forms of avenacin that are acylated with benzoic acid.

  10. Six new acylated anthocyanins from red radish (Raphanus sativus).

    PubMed

    Tamura, Satoru; Tsuji, Kouji; Yongzhen, Piao; Ohnishi-Kameyama, Mayumi; Murakami, Nobutoshi

    2010-09-01

    Six new acylated anthocyanins (1-6) were isolated along with the three known congeners (7-9) from the fresh roots of red radishes (Raphanus sativus L.) cultivated by our group. Their chemical structures were elucidated by spectroscopic properties. Among the six new anthocyanins, the five constituents (1, 2, 4-6) were shown to contain the malonyl function at 6-OH in the glucopyranosyl residue linked to C-5 in the pelargonidin nucleus.

  11. A new cytotoxic acylated apigenin glucoside from Phyllanthus emblica L.

    PubMed

    El-Desouky, S K; Ryu, Shi Young; Kim, Young-Kyoon

    2008-01-10

    A new acylated apigenin glucoside (apigenin-7-O-(6''-butyryl-beta-glucopyranoside) (1) was isolated from the methanolic extract of the leaves of Phyllanthus emblica L. (Euphorbiaceae) together with the known compounds; gallic acid (2), methyl gallate (3), 1,2,3,4,6-penta-O-galloylglucose (4) and luteolin-4'-O-neohesperiodoside (5). Their chemical structures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic studies ((1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, DEPT, HSQC, HMBC).

  12. Metabolism of acyl-lipids in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Li-Beisson, Yonghua; Beisson, Fred; Riekhof, Wayne

    2015-05-01

    Microalgae are emerging platforms for production of a suite of compounds targeting several markets, including food, nutraceuticals, green chemicals, and biofuels. Many of these products, such as biodiesel or polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), derive from lipid metabolism. A general picture of lipid metabolism in microalgae has been deduced from well characterized pathways of fungi and land plants, but recent advances in molecular and genetic analyses of microalgae have uncovered unique features, pointing out the necessity to study lipid metabolism in microalgae themselves. In the past 10 years, in addition to its traditional role as a model for photosynthetic and flagellar motility processes, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has emerged as a model organism to study lipid metabolism in green microalgae. Here, after summarizing data on total fatty acid composition, distribution of acyl-lipid classes, and major acyl-lipid molecular species found in C. reinhardtii, we review the current knowledge on the known or putative steps for fatty acid synthesis, glycerolipid desaturation and assembly, membrane lipid turnover, and oil remobilization. A list of characterized or putative enzymes for the major steps of acyl-lipid metabolism in C. reinhardtii is included, and subcellular localizations and phenotypes of associated mutants are discussed. Biogenesis and composition of Chlamydomonas lipid droplets and the potential importance of lipolytic processes in increasing cellular oil content are also highlighted.

  13. The identification of new cytosolic glutamine synthetase and asparagine synthetase genes in barley (Hordeum vulgare L.), and their expression during leaf senescence.

    PubMed

    Avila-Ospina, Liliana; Marmagne, Anne; Talbotec, Joël; Krupinska, Karin; Masclaux-Daubresse, Céline

    2015-04-01

    Glutamine synthetase and asparagine synthetase are two master enzymes involved in ammonium assimilation in plants. Their roles in nitrogen remobilization and nitrogen use efficiency have been proposed. In this report, the genes coding for the cytosolic glutamine synthetases (HvGS1) and asparagine synthetases (HvASN) in barley were identified. In addition to the three HvGS1 and two HvASN sequences previously reported, two prokaryotic-like HvGS1 and three HvASN cDNA sequences were identified. Gene structures were then characterized, obtaining full genomic sequences. The response of the five HvGS1 and five HvASN genes to leaf senescence was then studied. Developmental senescence was studied using primary and flag leaves. Dark-exposure or low-nitrate conditions were also used to trigger stress-induced senescence. Well-known senescence markers such as the chlorophyll and Rubisco contents were monitored in order to characterize senescence levels in the different leaves. The three eukaryotic-like HvGS1_1, HvGS1_2, and HvGS1_3 sequences showed the typical senescence-induced reduction in gene expression described in many plant species. By contrast, the two prokaryotic-like HvGS1_4 and HvGS1_5 sequences were repressed by leaf senescence, similar to the HvGS2 gene, which encodes the chloroplast glutamine synthetase isoenzyme. There was a greater contrast in the responses of the five HvASN and this suggested that these genes are needed for N remobilization in senescing leaves only when plants are well fertilized with nitrate. Responses of the HvASN sequences to dark-induced senescence showed that there are two categories of asparagine synthetases, one induced in the dark and the other repressed by the same conditions.

  14. Probing the active site of cinnamoyl CoA reductase 1 (Ll-CCRH1) from Leucaena leucocephala.

    PubMed

    Sonawane, Prashant; Patel, Krunal; Vishwakarma, Rishi Kishore; Srivastava, Sameer; Singh, Somesh; Gaikwad, Sushama; Khan, Bashir M

    2013-09-01

    Lack of three dimensional crystal structure of cinnamoyl CoA reductase (CCR) limits its detailed active site characterization studies. Putative active site residues involved in the substrate/NADPH binding and catalysis for Leucaena leucocephala CCR (Ll-CCRH1; GenBank: DQ986907) were identified by amino acid sequence alignment and homology modeling. Putative active site residues and proximal H215 were subjected for site directed mutagenesis, and mutated enzymes were expressed, purified and assayed to confirm their functional roles. Mutagenesis of S136, Y170 and K174 showed complete loss of activity, indicating their pivotal roles in catalysis. Mutant S212G exhibited the catalytic efficiencies less than 10% of wild type, showing its indirect involvement in substrate binding or catalysis. R51G, D77G, F30V and I31N double mutants showed significant changes in Km values, specifying their roles in substrate binding. Finally, chemical modification and substrate protection studies corroborated the presence Ser, Tyr, Lys, Arg and carboxylate group at the active site of Ll-CCRH1.

  15. Downregulation of Caffeic Acid 3-O-Methyltransferase and Caffeoyl CoA 3-O-Methyltransferase in Transgenic Alfalfa

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Dianjing; Chen, Fang; Inoue, Kentaro; Blount, Jack W.; Dixon, Richard A.

    2001-01-01

    Transgenic alfalfa plants were generated harboring caffeic acid 3-O-methyltransferase (COMT) and caffeoyl CoA 3-O-methyltransferase (CCOMT) cDNA sequences under control of the bean phenylalanine ammonia-lyase PAL2 promoter. Strong downregulation of COMT resulted in decreased lignin content, a reduction in total guaiacyl (G) lignin units, a near total loss of syringyl (S) units in monomeric and dimeric lignin degradation products, and appearance of low levels of 5-hydroxy guaiacyl units and a novel dimer. No soluble monolignol precursors accumulated. In contrast, strong downregulation of CCOMT led to reduced lignin levels, a reduction in G units without reduction in S units, and increases in β-5 linked dimers of G units. Accumulation of soluble caffeic acid β-d-glucoside occurred only in CCOMT downregulated plants. The results suggest that CCOMT does not significantly contribute to the 3-O-methylation step in S lignin biosynthesis in alfalfa and that there is redundancy with respect to the 3-O-methylation reaction of G lignin biosynthesis. COMT is unlikely to catalyze the in vivo methylation of caffeic acid during lignin biosynthesis. PMID:11158530

  16. Impact of single-dose nandrolone decanoate on gonadotropins, blood lipids and HMG CoA reductase in healthy men.

    PubMed

    Gårevik, N; Börjesson, A; Choong, E; Ekström, L; Lehtihet, M

    2016-06-01

    The aim was to study the effect and time profile of a single dose of nandrolone decanoate (ND) on gonadotropins, blood lipids and HMG CoA reductase [3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGCR)] in healthy men. Eleven healthy male participants aged 29-46 years were given a single dose of 150 mg ND as an intramuscular dose of Deca Durabol®, Organon. Blood samples for sex hormones, lipids and HMGCR mRNA analysis were collected prior to ND administration day 0, 4 and 14. A significant suppression of luteinising hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) was seen after 4 days. Total testosterone and bioavailable testosterone level decreased significantly throughout the observed study period. A small but significant decrease in sexual hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) was seen after 4 days but not after 14 days. Total serum (S)-cholesterol and plasma (P)-apolipoprotein B (ApoB) increased significantly after 14 days. In 80% of the individuals, the HMGCR mRNA level was increased 4 days after the ND administration. Our results show that a single dose of 150 mg ND increases (1) HMGCR mRNA expression, (2) total S-cholesterol and (3) P-ApoB level. The long-term consequences on cardiovascular risk that may appear in users remain to be elucidated.

  17. Gain-Of-Function Mutational Activation of Human TRNA Synthetase Procytokine

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, X.L.; Kapoor, M.; Otero, F.J.; Slike, B.M.; Tsuruta, H.; Frausto, R.; Bates, A.; Ewalt, K.L.; Cheresh, D.A.; Schimmel, P.; /Scripps Res. Inst. /SLAC, SSRL

    2009-04-30

    Disease-causing mutations occur in genes for aminoacyl tRNA synthetases. That some mutations are dominant suggests a gain of function. Native tRNA synthetases, such as tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase (TyrRS) and tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase, catalyze aminoacylation and are also procytokines that are activated by natural fragmentation. In principle, however, gain-of-function phenotypes could arise from mutational activation of synthetase procytokines. From crystal structure analysis, we hypothesized that a steric block of a critical Glu-Leu-Arg (ELR) motif in full-length TyrRS suppresses the cytokine activity of a natural fragment. To test this hypothesis, we attempted to uncover ELR in the procytokine by mutating a conserved tyrosine (Y341) that tethers ELR. Site-specific proteolytic cleavage and small-angle X-ray scattering established subtle opening of the structure by the mutation. Strikingly, four different assays demonstrated mutational activation of cytokine functions. The results prove the possibilities for constitutive gain-of-function mutations in tRNA synthetases.

  18. Recurrent seizures and brain pathology after inhibition of glutamine synthetase in the hippocampus in rats.

    PubMed

    Eid, Tore; Ghosh, Arko; Wang, Yue; Beckström, Henning; Zaveri, Hitten P; Lee, Tih-Shih W; Lai, James C K; Malthankar-Phatak, Gauri H; de Lanerolle, Nihal C

    2008-08-01

    An excess of extracellular glutamate in the hippocampus has been linked to the generation of recurrent seizures and brain pathology in patients with medically intractable mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE). However, the mechanism which results in glutamate excess in MTLE remains unknown. We recently reported that the glutamate-metabolizing enzyme glutamine synthetase is deficient in the hippocampus in patients with MTLE, and we postulated that this deficiency is critically involved in the pathophysiology of the disease. To further explore the role of glutamine synthetase in MTLE we created a novel animal model of hippocampal glutamine synthetase deficiency by continuous (approximately 28 days) microinfusion of methionine sulfoximine (MSO: 0.625 to 2.5 microg/h) unilaterally into the hippocampus in rats. This treatment led to a deficiency in hippocampal glutamine synthetase activity by 82-97% versus saline. The majority (>95%) of the MSO-treated animals exhibited recurrent seizures that continued for several weeks. Some of the MSO-treated animals exhibited neuropathological features that were similar to mesial temporal sclerosis, such as hippocampal atrophy and patterned loss of hippocampal neurons. However, many MSO-treated animals displayed only minimal injury to the hippocampus, with no clear evidence of mesial temporal sclerosis. These findings support the hypothesis that a deficiency in hippocampal glutamine synthetase causes recurrent seizures, even in the absence of classical mesial temporal sclerosis, and that restoration of glutamine synthetase may represent a novel approach to therapeutic intervention in this disease.

  19. Phylogenetic and experimental characterization of an acyl-ACP thioesterase family reveals significant diversity in enzymatic specificity and activity

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Acyl-acyl carrier protein thioesterases (acyl-ACP TEs) catalyze the hydrolysis of the thioester bond that links the acyl chain to the sulfhydryl group of the phosphopantetheine prosthetic group of ACP. This reaction terminates acyl chain elongation of fatty acid biosynthesis, and in plant seeds it is the biochemical determinant of the fatty acid compositions of storage lipids. Results To explore acyl-ACP TE diversity and to identify novel acyl ACP-TEs, 31 acyl-ACP TEs from wide-ranging phylogenetic sources were characterized to ascertain their in vivo activities and substrate specificities. These acyl-ACP TEs were chosen by two different approaches: 1) 24 TEs were selected from public databases on the basis of phylogenetic analysis and fatty acid profile knowledge of their source organisms; and 2) seven TEs were molecularly cloned from oil palm (Elaeis guineensis), coconut (Cocos nucifera) and Cuphea viscosissima, organisms that produce medium-chain and short-chain fatty acids in their seeds. The in vivo substrate specificities of the acyl-ACP TEs were determined in E. coli. Based on their specificities, these enzymes were clustered into three classes: 1) Class I acyl-ACP TEs act primarily on 14- and 16-carbon acyl-ACP substrates; 2) Class II acyl-ACP TEs have broad substrate specificities, with major activities toward 8- and 14-carbon acyl-ACP substrates; and 3) Class III acyl-ACP TEs act predominantly on 8-carbon acyl-ACPs. Several novel acyl-ACP TEs act on short-chain and unsaturated acyl-ACP or 3-ketoacyl-ACP substrates, indicating the diversity of enzymatic specificity in this enzyme family. Conclusion These acyl-ACP TEs can potentially be used to diversify the fatty acid biosynthesis pathway to produce novel fatty acids. PMID:21831316

  20. Testing Models of Fatty Acid Transfer and Lipid Synthesis in Spinach Leaf Using in Vivo Oxygen-18 Labeling1

    PubMed Central

    Pollard, Mike; Ohlrogge, John

    1999-01-01

    Oxygen-18 labeling has been applied to the study of plant lipid biosynthesis for the first time. [13C218O2]Acetate was incubated with spinach (Spinacia oleracea) leaves and the 18O content in fatty acid methyl esters isolated from different lipid classes measured by gas chromatography-mass spectometry. Fatty acids isolated from lipids synthesized within the plastid, such as monogalactosyldiacylglycerol, show an 18O content consistent with the exogenous acetate undergoing a single activation step and with the direct utilization of acyl-acyl carrier protein by the acyl transferases of the chloroplast. In contrast, fatty acids isolated from lipids assembled in the cytosol, such as phosphatidylcholine, show a 50% reduction in the 18O content. This is indicative of export of the fatty acyl groups from the plastid via a free carboxylate anion, and is consistent with the acyl-acyl carrier protein thioesterase:acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) synthetase mediated export mechanism. If this were not the case and the acyl group was transferred directly from acyl-acyl carrier protein to an acyl acceptor on the cytosolic side, there would be either complete retention of 18O or, less likely, complete loss of 18O, but not a 50% loss of 18O. Thus, existing models for fatty acid transfer from the plastid and for spatially separate synthesis of “prokaryotic” and “eukaryotic” lipids have both been confirmed. PMID:10594108

  1. Testing models of fatty acid transfer and lipid synthesis in spinach leaf using in vivo oxygen-18 labeling

    SciTech Connect

    Pollard, M.; Ohlrogge, J.

    1999-12-01

    Oxygen-18 labeling has been applied to the study of plant lipid biosynthesis for the first time. [{sup 13}C{sub 2}{sup 18}O{sub 2}]Acetate was incubated with spinach (Spinacia oleracea) leaves and the {sup 18}O content in fatty acid methyl esters isolated from different lipid classes measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Fatty acids isolated from lipids synthesized within the plastid, such as monogalactosyldiacylglycerol, show an {sup 18}O content consistent with the exogenous acetate undergoing a single activation step and with the direct utilization of acyl-acyl carrier protein by the acyl transferases of the chloroplast. In contrast, fatty acids isolated from lipids assembled in the cytosol, such as phosphatidylcholine, show a 50% reduction in the {sup 18}O content. This is indicative of export of the fatty acyl groups from the plastid via a free carboxylate anion, and is consistent with the acyl-acyl carrier protein thioesterase:acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) synthetase mediated export mechanism. If this were not the case and the acyl group was transferred directly from acyl-acyl carrier protein to an acyl acceptor on the cytosolic side, there would be either complete retention of {sup 18}O or, less likely, complete loss of {sup 18}O, but not a 50% loss of {sup 18}O. Thus, existing models for fatty acid transfer from the plastid and for spatially separate synthesis of prokaryotic and eukaryotic lipids have both been confirmed.

  2. Reverse genetic characterization of two paralogous acetoacetyl CoA thiolase genes in Arabidopsis reveals their importance in plant growth and development.

    PubMed

    Jin, Huanan; Song, Zhihong; Nikolau, Basil J

    2012-06-01

    Acetoacetyl CoA thiolase (AACT, EC 2.3.1.9) catalyzes the condensation of two acetyl CoA molecules to form acetoacetyl CoA. Two AACT-encoding genes, At5g47720 (AACT1) and At5g48230 (AACT2), were functionally identified in the Arabidopsis genome by direct enzymological assays and functional expression in yeast. Promoter::GUS fusion experiments indicated that AACT1 is primarily expressed in the vascular system and AACT2 is highly expressed in root tips, young leaves, top stems and anthers. Characterization of T-DNA insertion mutant alleles at each AACT locus established that AACT2 function is required for embryogenesis and for normal male gamete transmission. In contrast, plants lacking AACT1 function are completely viable and show no apparent growth phenotypes, indicating that AACT1 is functionally redundant with respect to AACT2 function. RNAi lines that express reduced levels of AACT2 show pleiotropic phenotypes, including reduced apical dominance, elongated life span and flowering duration, sterility, dwarfing, reduced seed yield and shorter root length. Microscopic analysis reveals that the reduced stature is caused by a reduction in cell size and fewer cells, and male sterility is caused by loss of the pollen coat and premature degeneration of the tapetal cells. Biochemical analyses established that the roots of AACT2 RNAi plants show quantitative and qualitative alterations in phytosterol profiles. These phenotypes and biochemical alterations are reversed when AACT2 RNAi plants are grown in the presence of mevalonate, which is consistent with the role of AACT2 in generating the bulk of the acetoacetyl CoA precursor required for the cytosol-localized, mevalonate-derived isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway.

  3. Modulating the synthetase activity of penicillin G acylase in organic media by addition of N-methylimidazole: using vinyl acetate as activated acyl donor.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bokai; Wu, Qi; Lv, Deshui; Lin, Xianfu

    2011-05-20

    This paper reported the modulation of enzyme activity by organic small molecule. The esterification activity of Penicillin G acylase (PGA) was improved more than 70-fold by the addition of 10% N-methylimidazole. Some control experiments have been designed to demonstrate the catalytic specificity of PGA. The structure and the amount of additive were optimized to improve the product yield. The influence of N-methylimidazole on the PGA conformation was investigated by FTIR and autodock simulation. Seven substrates were used to evaluate the effect of structure on the PGA-catalyzed transesterification. A series of products were successfully synthesized with the yield ranged from 56% to 84% and PGA showed specific recognition on the substrate with phenyl group in the presence of 10% N-methylimidazole.

  4. Either fadD1 or fadD2, Which Encode acyl-CoA Synthetase, Is Essential for the Survival of Haemophilus parasuis SC096

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Saixiang; Xu, Chenggang; Yang, Kaijie; Wang, Haihong; Fan, Huiying; Liao, Ming

    2017-01-01

    In Haemophilus parasuis, the genes HAPS_0217 and HAPS_1695 are predicted to encode long-chain fatty acid-CoA ligases (FACSs). These proteins contain ATP/AMP signature motifs and FACS conserved motifs that are homologous to those in Escherichia coli FadD (EcFadD). In this study, we demonstrate that HAPS_0217 and HAPS_1695 can functionally replace EcFadD in the E. coli fadD mutant JW1794, and were thus designated fadD1 and fadD2, respectively. An evaluation of kinetic parameters indicated that FadD1 and FadD2 have a substrate preference for long-chain fatty acids. Moreover, FadD2 exhibited substrate inhibition in the presence of high concentrations of oleic acid. Single mutants of each of the fadD genes were easily constructed, whereas double mutants were not. These results were further confirmed using genomic site-directed mutagenesis, which supported the idea that H. parasuis requires either fadD1 or fadD2 for survival. The fadD1 mutant exhibited slower growth than the wild-type strain SC096, and its complementation resulted in a restored phenotype. The wild-type strain did not grow on chemically defined medium without the addition of oleic acid, indicating that lipids are a vital nutrient for this bacterium. Additionally, strains with a disrupted fadD1 gene also exhibited increased sensitivity to quinolone antibiotics, including levofloxacin, enrofloxacin, ciprofloxacin and nalidixic acid. PMID:28361037

  5. Plant Microsomal Phospholipid Acyl Hydrolases Have Selectivities for Uncommon Fatty Acids.

    PubMed Central

    Stahl, U.; Banas, A.; Stymne, S.

    1995-01-01

    Developing endosperms and embryos accumulating triacylglycerols rich in caproyl (decanoyl) groups (i.e. developing embryos of Cuphea procumbens and Ulmus glabra) had microsomal acyl hydrolases with high selectivities toward phosphatidylcholine with this acyl group. Similarly, membranes from Euphorbia lagascae and Ricinus communis endosperms, which accumulate triacylglycerols with vernoleate (12-epoxy-octadeca-9-enoate) and ricinoleate (12-hydroxy-octadeca-9-enoate), respectively, had acyl hydrolases that selectively removed their respective oxygenated acyl group from the phospholipids. The activities toward phospholipid substrates with epoxy, hydroxy, and medium-chain acyl groups varied greatly between microsomal preparations from different plant species. Epoxidated and hydroxylated acyl groups in sn-1 and sn-2 positions of phosphatidylcholine and in sn-1-lysophosphatidylcholine were hydrolyzed to a similar extent, whereas the hydrolysis of caproyl groups was highly dependent on the positional localization. PMID:12228415

  6. Direct nonchromatographic assay for 1-acyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Rajasekharan, R.; Ray, T.K.; Cronan, J.E. Jr.

    1988-09-01

    1-Acyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (also called lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferase) which catalyzes the acylation of 1-acyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphate to phosphatidic acid is generally assayed by the use of a radioactive substrate followed by a time-consuming chromatographic separation of substrate and product. We report a direct and highly sensitive nonchromatographic assay for this enzyme based on the ability of Escherichia coli alkaline phosphatase to dephosphorylate 1-acyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphate but not phosphatidic acid. This selective hydrolysis coupled with the use of /sup 32/P-labeled 1-acyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphate as substrate permits measurement of the product, /sup 32/P-labeled phosphatidic acid by solvent extraction or precipitation. We also report a series of enzymatic reactions for the efficient conversion of /sup 32/Pi to /sup 32/P-labeled 1-acyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphate.

  7. Characterization of Lipid A Variants by Energy-Resolved Mass Spectrometry: Impact of Acyl Chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crittenden, Christopher M.; Akin, Lucas D.; Morrison, Lindsay J.; Trent, M. Stephen; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.

    2016-12-01

    Lipid A molecules consist of a diglucosamine sugar core with a number of appended acyl chains that vary in their length and connectivity. Because of the challenging nature of characterizing these molecules and differentiating between isomeric species, an energy-resolved MS/MS strategy was undertaken to track the fragmentation trends and map genealogies of product ions originating from consecutive cleavages of acyl chains. Generalizations were developed based on the number and locations of the primary and secondary acyl chains as well as variations in preferential cleavages arising from the location of the phosphate groups. Secondary acyl chain cleavage occurs most readily for lipid A species at the 3' position, followed by primary acyl chain fragmentation at both the 3' and 3 positions. In the instances of bisphosphorylated lipid A variants, phosphate loss occurs readily in conjunction with the most favorable primary and secondary acyl chain cleavages.

  8. ZrCl4-mediated regio- and chemoselective Friedel-Crafts acylation of indole.

    PubMed

    Guchhait, Sankar K; Kashyap, Maneesh; Kamble, Harshad

    2011-06-03

    An efficient method for regio- and chemoselective Friedel-Crafts acylation of indole using acyl chlorides in the presence of ZrCl(4) has been discovered. It minimizes/eliminates common competing reactions that occur due to high and multiatom-nucleophilic character of indole. In this method, a wide range of aroyl, heteroaroyl alkenoyl, and alkanoyl chlorides undergo smooth acylation with various indoles without NH protection and afford 3-acylindoles in good to high yields.

  9. Acute ethanol treatment induces a bimodal response of phospholipid acylation rates in rat red blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Verine, A.; Valette, A.; Richard, D.; Boyer, J. )

    1991-01-01

    A single intraperitoneal injection of ethanol in rats elicited a bimodal response of acylation rates in phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine of intact red blood cells. Within an initial period, ethanol inhibited acylation rates. The inhibition then reversed, leading to increased values which persisted as long as ethanol was present in plasma. Acylation rates were not correlated to ethanol concentrations in plasma. The authors suggest that red cells first desensitize to, then overcompensate for the inhibitory effect of ethanol on acylation reactions. These adaptive changes may be one of the events mediating membrane tolerance to ethanol.

  10. A novel plasmid for detection of N-acyl homoserine lactones.

    PubMed

    Ling, Elizabeth A; Ellison, Matthew L; Pesci, Everett C

    2009-07-01

    Many bacteria utilize acyl-homoserine lactones as cell to cell signals that can regulate the expression of numerous genes. Structural differences in acyl-homoserine lactones produced by different bacteria, such as acyl side chain length and the presence or absence of an oxy group, make many of the commonly used detection bioassays impractical for broad range detection. Here we present a simple, broad range acyl-homoserine lactone detection bioassay that can be used to detect a wide range of these chemical signals. A plasmid (pEAL01) was constructed and transformed into Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain QSC105 to allow for detection of a broad range of acyl-homoserine lactones through induction of a lasB'-lacZ transcriptional fusion. Monitoring beta-galactosidase activity from this bioassay showed that P. aeruginosa strain QSC105 (pEAL01) could detect the presence of eight acyl-homoserine lactones tested at physiological concentrations. This novel strain could also detect acyl-homoserine lactones from the extracts of four different bacteria that produce different acyl-homoserine lactones signals. These data indicate that strain QSC105 (pEAL01) can be used to detect a wide variety of acyl-homoserine lactones by a simple beta-galactosidase assay and this bioassay could be a useful and inexpensive tool to quickly identify the presence of these signal molecules.

  11. The gene encoding human glutathione synthetase (GSS) maps to the long arm of chromosome 20 at band 11.2

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, G.C.; Vaska, V.L.; Ford, J.H.

    1995-12-10

    Two forms of glutathione synthetase deficiency have been described. While one form is mild, causing hemolytic anemia, the other more severe form causes 5-oxoprolinuria with secondary neurological involvement. Despite the existence of two deficiency phenotypes, Southern blots hybridized with a glutathione synthetase cDNA suggest that there is a single glutathione synthetase gene in the human genome. Analysis of somatic cell hybrids showed the human glutathione synthetase gene (GSS) to be located on chromosome 20, and this assignment has been refined to subband 20q11.2 using in situ hybridization. 16 refs., 2 figs.

  12. Expression of glutamine synthetase in the mouse kidney: localization in multiple epithelial cell types and differential regulation by hypokalemia.

    PubMed

    Verlander, Jill W; Chu, Diana; Lee, Hyun-Wook; Handlogten, Mary E; Weiner, I David

    2013-09-01

    Renal glutamine synthetase catalyzes the reaction of NH4+ with glutamate, forming glutamine and decreasing the ammonia available for net acid excretion. The purpose of the present study was to determine glutamine synthetase's specific cellular expression in the mouse kidney and its regulation by hypokalemia, a common cause of altered renal ammonia metabolism. Glutamine synthetase mRNA and protein were present in the renal cortex and in both the outer and inner stripes of the outer medulla. Immunohistochemistry showed glutamine synthetase expression throughout the entire proximal tubule and in nonproximal tubule cells. Double immunolabel with cell-specific markers demonstrated glutamine synthetase expression in type A intercalated cells, non-A, non-B intercalated cells, and distal convoluted tubule cells, but not in principal cells, type B intercalated cells, or connecting segment cells. Hypokalemia induced by feeding a nominally K+ -free diet for 12 days decreased glutamine synthetase expression throughout the entire proximal tubule and in the distal convoluted tubule and simultaneously increased glutamine synthetase expression in type A intercalated cells in both the cortical and outer medullary collecting duct. We conclude that glutamine synthetase is widely and specifically expressed in renal epithelial cells and that the regulation of expression differs in specific cell populations. Glutamine synthetase is likely to mediate an important role in renal ammonia metabolism.

  13. Substrate specificity of THCA-CoA oxidases from rat liver light mitochondrial fractions on dehydrogenation of 3 alpha,7 alpha,12 alpha-trihydroxy-5 beta-cholestanoic acid CoA thioester.

    PubMed

    Ikegawa, S; Goto, T; Mano, N; Goto, J

    1998-11-01

    The substrate specificity of rat liver peroxisomal 3 alpha,7 alpha,12 alpha-trihydroxy-5 beta-cholestanoyl-CoA (THCA-CoA) oxidases, which catalyze the dehydrogenation of 3 alpha,7 alpha,12 alpha-trihydroxy-5 beta-cholestanoic acid (THCA) CoA thioester, having an asymmetric center at C-25, to form (24E)-3 alpha,7 alpha,12 alpha-trihydroxy-5 beta-cholest-24-enoic acid (delta 24-THCA) CoA thioester, was studied. The stable isotope labeled substrates, [3,7,12-18O3]-(25R)- and (25S)-THCA CoA thioesters were synthesized by an exchange reaction of carbonyl oxygens on a steroid nucleus of 3,7,12-trioxo-5 beta-cholestanoic acid, followed by metal hydride reduction and condensation reaction with CoA. After incubation of a mixture of unlabeled (25R)- and 18O-labeled (25S)-THCA CoA thioester, or vice versa, with hepatic peroxisomal THCA-CoA oxidases, biotransformed delta 24-THCA was determined by liquid chromatography/atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry. The delta 24-THCA was derived only from (25S)-THCA CoA thioester, indicating that the 25S epimer of THCA is a preferential substrate on dehydrogenation by THCA-CoA oxidases.

  14. Biochemical parameters of glutamine synthetase from Klebsiella aerogenes.

    PubMed Central

    Bender, R A; Janssen, K A; Resnick, A D; Blumenberg, M; Foor, F; Magasanik, B

    1977-01-01

    The glutamine synthetase (GS) from Klebsiella aerogenes is similar to that from Escherichia coli in several respects: (i) it is repressed by high levels of ammonia in the growth medium; (ii) its biosynthetic activity is greatly reduced by adenylylation; and (iii) adenylylation lowers the pH optimum and alters the response of the enzymes to various inhibitors in the gamma-glutamyl transferase (gammaGT) assay. There are, however, several important differences: (i) the isoactivity point for the adenylylated and non-adenylylated forms in the gammaGT assay occurs at pH 7.55 in K. aerogenes and at pH 7.15 in E. coli; (ii) the non-adenylylated form of the GS from K. aerogenes is stimulated by 60 mM MgCl2 in the gammaGT assay at pH 7.15. A biosynthetic reaction assay that correlates well with number of non-adenylylated enzyme subunits, as determined by the method of Mg2+ inhibition of the gammaGT assay, is described. Finally, we have found that it is necessary to use special methods to harvest growing cells to prevent changes in the adenylylation state of GS from occurring during harvesting. PMID:14104

  15. Chitin synthetase in encysting Giardia lamblia and Entamoeba invadens

    SciTech Connect

    Das, S.; Gillin, F.D.

    1987-05-01

    Giardia lamblia (Gl) and Entamoeba invadens (Ei) are protozoan parasites with two morphologic stages in their life cycles. Motile trophozoites colonize the intestine of humans and reptiles respectively. Water resistant cysts, which can survive outside the host, transmit infection. In vitro cyst formation of Ei from trophozoites has been reported, and the authors have recently induced in vitro encystation of Gl. Although the cyst walls of both parasites contain chitin, it synthesis by encysting trophozoites has not been reported. The authors now show that encystation conditions greatly increase chitin synthetase (CS) specific activity (incorporation of /sup 3/H GlcNAc from UDP-GlcNAc into TCA-or alcohol-precipitable material). Extracts of encysting Gl incorporated 3.6 nmol/mg protein in 5 hr compared to < 0.005 in controls. Extracts of encysting Fi incorporated 4.8 n mol/mg protein, compared to 1.7 in the control. CS activity of both parasites requires preformed chitin. The Gl enzyme requires a reducing agent, is inhibited by digitonin and the CS inhibitors, polyoxin D and Nikkomycin, but not by tunicamycin. The product is digested by chitinase. Ei enzyme does not require a reducing agent and is stimulated by 1 mg/ml digitonin, but inhibited by higher concentrations. These studies demonstrate CS enzymes which may play important roles in encystation of Gl and Ei.

  16. Cloning, expression, and purification of glutamine synthetase from Clostridum acetobutylicum

    SciTech Connect

    Usdin, K.P.; Zappe, H.; Jones, D.T.; Woods, D.R.

    1986-09-01

    A glutamine synthetase (GS) gene, glnA, from the gram-positive obligate anaerobe Clostridium acetobutylicum was cloned on recombinant plasmid pHZ200 and enabled Escherichia coli glnA deletion mutants to utilize (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/ as a sole source of nitrogen. The cloned C. acetobutylicum gene was expressed from a regulatory region contained within the cloned DNA fragment. glnA expression was subject to nitrogen regulation in E. coli. This cloned glnA DNA did not enable an E. coli glnA ntrB ntrC deletion mutant to utilize arginine or low levels of glutamine as sole nitrogen sources, and failed to activate histidase activity in this strain which contained the Klebsiella aerogenes hut operon. The GS produced by pHZ200 was purified and had an apparent subunit molecular weight of approximately 59,000. There was no DNA or protein homology between the cloned C. acetobutylicum glnA gene and GS and the corresponding gene and GS from E. coli. The C. acetobutylicum GS was inhibited by Mg/sup 2 +/ in the ..gamma..-glutamyl transferase assay, but there was no evidence that the GS was adenylylated.

  17. The prokaryotic FAD synthetase family: a potential drug target.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Ana; Ferreira, Patricia; Martínez-Júlvez, Marta; Medina, Milagros

    2013-01-01

    Disruption of cellular production of the flavin cofactors, flavin adenine mononucleotide (FMN) and flavin adenine dinucleotide(FAD) will prevent the assembly of a large number of flavoproteins and flavoenzymes involved in key metabolic processes in all types of organisms. The enzymes responsible for FMN and FAD production in prokaryotes and eukaryotes exhibit various structural characteristics to catalyze the same chemistry, a fact that converts the prokaryotic FAD synthetase (FADS) in a potential drug target for the development of inhibitors endowed with anti-pathogenic activity. The first step before searching for selective inhibitors of FADS is to understand the structural and functional mechanisms for the riboflavin kinase and FMN adenylyltransferase activities of the prokaryotic enzyme, and particularly to identify their differential functional characteristics with regard to the enzymes performing similar functions in other organisms, particularly humans. In this paper, an overview of the current knowledge of the structure-function relationships in prokaryotic FADS has been presented, as well as of the state of the art in the use of these enzymes as drug targets.

  18. Insights into an Unusual Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Binz, Tina M.; Maffioli, Sonia I.; Sosio, Margherita; Donadio, Stefano; Müller, Rolf

    2010-01-01

    The GE81112 tetrapeptides (1–3) represent a structurally unique class of antibiotics, acting as specific inhibitors of prokaryotic protein synthesis. Here we report the cloning and sequencing of the GE81112 biosynthetic gene cluster from Streptomyces sp. L-49973 and the development of a genetic manipulation system for Streptomyces sp. L-49973. The biosynthetic gene cluster for the tetrapeptide antibiotic GE81112 (getA-N) was identified within a 61.7-kb region comprising 29 open reading frames (open reading frames), 14 of which were assigned to the biosynthetic gene cluster. Sequence analysis revealed the GE81112 cluster to consist of six nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) genes encoding incomplete di-domain NRPS modules and a single free standing NRPS domain as well as genes encoding other biosynthetic and modifying proteins. The involvement of the cloned gene cluster in GE81112 biosynthesis was confirmed by inactivating the NRPS gene getE resulting in a GE81112 production abolished mutant. In addition, we characterized the NRPS A-domains from the pathway by expression in Escherichia coli and in vitro enzymatic assays. The previously unknown stereochemistry of most chiral centers in GE81112 was established from a combined chemical and biosynthetic approach. Taken together, these findings have allowed us to propose a rational model for GE81112 biosynthesis. The results further open the door to developing new derivatives of these promising antibiotic compounds by genetic engineering. PMID:20710026

  19. Structural Biology of Non-Ribosomal Peptide Synthetases

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Bradley R.; Gulick, Andrew M.

    2016-01-01

    Summary The non-ribosomal peptide synthetases are modular enzymes that catalyze synthesis of important peptide products from a variety of standard and non-proteinogenic amino acid substrates. Within a single module are multiple catalytic domains that are responsible for incorporation of a single residue. After the amino acid is activated and covalently attached to an integrated carrier protein domain, the substrates and intermediates are delivered to neighboring catalytic domains for peptide bond formation or, in some modules, chemical modification. In the final module, the peptide is delivered to a terminal thioesterase domain that catalyzes release of the peptide product. This multi-domain modular architecture raises questions about the structural features that enable this assembly line synthesis in an efficient manner. The structures of the core component domains have been determined and demonstrate insights into the catalytic activity. More recently, multi-domain structures have been determined and are providing clues to the features of these enzyme systems that govern the functional interaction between multiple domains. This chapter describes the structures of NRPS proteins and the strategies that are being used to assist structural studies of these dynamic proteins, including careful consideration of domain boundaries for generation of truncated proteins and the use of mechanism-based inhibitors that trap interactions between the catalytic and carrier protein domains. PMID:26831698

  20. In situ autoradiographic detection of folylpolyglutamate synthetase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Sussman, D.J.; Milman, G.; Osborne, C.; Shane, B.

    1986-11-01

    The enzyme folylpolyglutamate synthetase (FPGS) catalyzes the conversion of folate (pteroylmonoglutamate) to the polyglutamate forms (pteroylpolyglutamates) that are required for folate retention by mammalian cells. A rapid in situ autoradiographic assay for FPGS was developed which is based on the folate cofactor requirement of thymidylate synthase. Chinese hamster AUX B1 mutant cells lack FPGS activity and are unable to accumulate folate. As a result, the conversion of (6-/sup 3/H)deoxyuridine to thymidine via the thymidylate synthase reaction is impaired in AUX B1 cells and no detectable label is incorporated into DNA. In contrast, FPGS in wild-type Chinese hamster CHO cells causes folate retention and enables the incorporation of (6-/sup 3/H)deoxyuridine into DNA. Incorporation may be detected by autoradiography of monolayer cultures or of colonies replica plated onto polyester discs. Introduction of Escherichia coli FPGS into AUX B1 cells restores the activity of the thymidylate synthase pathway and demonstrates that the E. coli FPGS enzyme can provide pteroylpolyglutamates which functions in mammalian cells.

  1. The aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jiongming; Marygold, Steven J; Gharib, Walid H; Suter, Beat

    2015-01-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) ligate amino acids to their cognate tRNAs, allowing them to decode the triplet code during translation. Through different mechanisms aaRSs also perform several non-canonical functions in transcription, translation, apoptosis, angiogenesis and inflammation. Drosophila has become a preferred system to model human diseases caused by mutations in aaRS genes, to dissect effects of reduced translation or non-canonical activities, and to study aminoacylation and translational fidelity. However, the lack of a systematic annotation of this gene family has hampered such studies. Here, we report the identification of the entire set of aaRS genes in the fly genome and we predict their roles based on experimental evidence and/or orthology. Further, we propose a new, systematic and logical nomenclature for aaRSs. We also review the research conducted on Drosophila aaRSs to date. Together, our work provides the foundation for further research in the fly aaRS field. PMID:26761199

  2. Secondary NAD+ deficiency in the inherited defect of glutamine synthetase.

    PubMed

    Hu, Liyan; Ibrahim, Khalid; Stucki, Martin; Frapolli, Michele; Shahbeck, Noora; Chaudhry, Farrukh A; Görg, Boris; Häussinger, Dieter; Penberthy, W Todd; Ben-Omran, Tawfeg; Häberle, Johannes

    2015-11-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) deficiency is an ultra-rare inborn error of amino acid metabolism that has been described in only three patients so far. The disease is characterized by neonatal onset of severe encephalopathy, low levels of glutamine in blood and cerebrospinal fluid, chronic moderate hyperammonemia, and an overall poor prognosis in the absence of an effective treatment. Recently, enteral glutamine supplementation was shown to be a safe and effective therapy for this disease but there are no data available on the long-term effects of this intervention. The amino acid glutamine, severely lacking in this disorder, is central to many metabolic pathways in the human organism and is involved in the synthesis of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) starting from tryptophan or niacin as nicotinate, but not nicotinamide. Using fibroblasts, leukocytes, and immortalized peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) from a patient carrying a GLUL gene point mutation associated with impaired GS activity, we tested whether glutamine deficiency in this patient results in NAD(+) depletion and whether it can be rescued by supplementation with glutamine, nicotinamide or nicotinate. The present study shows that congenital GS deficiency is associated with NAD(+) depletion in fibroblasts, leukocytes and PBSC, which may contribute to the severe clinical phenotype of the disease. Furthermore, it shows that NAD(+) depletion can be rescued by nicotinamide supplementation in fibroblasts and leukocytes, which may open up potential therapeutic options for the treatment of this disorder.

  3. The enterococcal cytolysin synthetase has an unanticipated lipid kinase fold.

    PubMed

    Dong, Shi-Hui; Tang, Weixin; Lukk, Tiit; Yu, Yi; Nair, Satish K; van der Donk, Wilfred A

    2015-07-30

    The enterococcal cytolysin is a virulence factor consisting of two post-translationally modified peptides that synergistically kill human immune cells. Both peptides are made by CylM, a member of the LanM lanthipeptide synthetases. CylM catalyzes seven dehydrations of Ser and Thr residues and three cyclization reactions during the biosynthesis of the cytolysin large subunit. We present here the 2.2 Å resolution structure of CylM, the first structural information on a LanM. Unexpectedly, the structure reveals that the dehydratase domain of CylM resembles the catalytic core of eukaryotic lipid kinases, despite the absence of clear sequence homology. The kinase and phosphate elimination active sites that affect net dehydration are immediately adjacent to each other. Characterization of mutants provided insights into the mechanism of the dehydration process. The structure is also of interest because of the interactions of human homologs of lanthipeptide cyclases with kinases such as mammalian target of rapamycin.

  4. The plastidial folylpolyglutamate synthetase and root apical meristem maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Avinash C; Tang, Yuhong; Díaz de la Garza, Rocío I

    2011-01-01

    Folylpolyglutamate synthetase (FPGS) catalyzes the attachment of glutamate residues to the folate molecule in plants. Three isoforms of FPGS have been identified in Arabidopsis and these are localized in the plastid (AtDFB), mitochondria (AtDFC) and cytosol (AtDFD). We recently determined that mutants in the AtDFB (At5G05980) gene disrupt primary root development in Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings. Transient expression of AtDFB-green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion under the control of the native AtDFB promoter in Nicotiana tabacum leaf epidermal cells verified the plastid localization of AtDFB. Furthermore, low concentrations of methotrexate (MTX), a compound commonly used as a folate antagonist in plant and mammalian cells induced primary root defects in wild type seedlings that were similar to atdfb. In addition, atdfb seedlings were more sensitive to MTX when compared to wild type. Quantitative (q) RT-PCR showed lower transcript levels of the mitochondrial and cytosolic FPGS in roots of 7-day-old atdfb seedling suggesting feedback regulation of AtDFB on the expression of other FPGS isoforms during early seedling development. The primary root defects of atdfb, which can be traced in part to altered quiescent center (QC) identity, pave the way for future studies that could link cell type specific folate and FPGS isoform requirements to whole organ development. PMID:21502816

  5. Unequal synthesis and differential degradation of propionyl CoA carboxylase subunits in cells from normal and propionic acidemia patients.

    PubMed Central

    Ohura, T; Kraus, J P; Rosenberg, L E

    1989-01-01

    We have characterized further the molecular basis of human inherited propionyl CoA carboxylase deficiency by measuring steady state levels of the mRNAs coding for the enzyme's two protein subunits (alpha and beta) and by estimating initial synthesis and steady state levels of the protein subunits in skin fibroblasts from controls and affected patients. We studied cell lines from both major complementation groups (pccA and pccBC) corresponding, respectively, to defects in the carboxylase's alpha and beta subunits. Analysis of pccA lines revealed the absence of alpha chain mRNA in three and an abnormally small alpha-mRNA in a fourth. Despite the presence of normal beta-mRNA in each of these pccA lines, there was complete absence of both alpha and beta protein subunits under steady state conditions, even though new synthesis and mitochondrial import of beta precursors was normal. Results in nine pccBC lines revealed normal alpha mRNA in each, while the amounts of beta-mRNA were distinctly reduced in every case. Correspondingly, alpha protein subunits were present in normal amounts at steady-state, but beta subunits were uniformly decreased. In addition, in six of the nine beta deficient cell lines, partially degraded beta-subunits were observed. To help interpret these results, synthesis and stability of carboxylase subunits were studied in intact HeLa cells using a pulse-chase protocol. Whereas alpha chains were stable over the four hour interval studied, beta chains--initially synthesized in large excess over alpha chains--were degraded rapidly reaching equivalence with alpha chains after two hours.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:2741949

  6. Acylated flavonol glycosides from the flower of Elaeagnus angustifolia L.

    PubMed

    Bendaikha, Sarah; Gadaut, Méredith; Harakat, Dominique; Magid, Alabdul

    2014-07-01

    Seven acylated flavonol glycosides named elaeagnosides A-G, in addition to seven known flavonoids were isolated from the flowers of Elaeagnus angustifolia. Their structures were elucidated by different spectroscopic methods including 1D, 2D NMR experiments and HR-ESI-MS analysis. In order to identify natural antioxidant and tyrosinase inhibitor agents, the abilities of these flavonoids to scavenge the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical (DPPH) and to inhibit tyrosinase activity were evaluated. Results revealed that two of these compounds had significant anti-oxidant effect and one compound showed weak tyrosinase-inhibitory activity compared with kojic acid, quercetin, or ascorbic acid, which were used as positive control.

  7. Involvement of S1P1 receptor pathway in angiogenic effects of a novel adenosine-like nucleic acid analog COA-Cl in cultured human vascular endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Igarashi, Junsuke; Hashimoto, Takeshi; Kubota, Yasuo; Shoji, Kazuyo; Maruyama, Tokumi; Sakakibara, Norikazu; Takuwa, Yoh; Ujihara, Yoshihiro; Katanosaka, Yuki; Mohri, Satoshi; Naruse, Keiji; Yamashita, Tetsuo; Okamoto, Ryuji; Hirano, Katsuya; Kosaka, Hiroaki; Takata, Maki; Konishi, Ryoji; Tsukamoto, Ikuko

    2014-01-01

    COA-Cl (2Cl-C.OXT-A) is a recently developed adenosine-like nucleic acid analog that promotes angiogenesis via the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases ERK1/2. Endothelial S1P1 receptor plays indispensable roles in developmental angiogenesis. In this study, we examined the functions of S1P1 in COA-Cl-induced angiogenic responses. Antagonists for S1P1, W146, and VPC23019, substantially but still partly inhibited the effects of COA-Cl with regard to ERK1/2 activation and tube formation in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). Antagonists for adenosine A1 receptor and purinergic P2Y1 receptor were without effect. Genetic knockdown of S1P1 with siRNA, but not that of S1P3, attenuated COA-Cl-elicited ERK1/2 responses. The signaling properties of COA-Cl showed significant similarities to those of sphingosine 1-phosphate, an endogenous S1P1 ligand, in that both induced responses sensitive to pertussis toxin (Gα i/o inhibitor), 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid tetrakis (acetoxymethyl ester) (BAPTA-AM), (calcium chelator), and PP2 (c-Src tyrosine kinase inhibitor). COA-Cl elevated intracellular Ca2+ concentration and induced tyrosine phosphorylation of p130Cas, a substrate of c-Src, in HUVEC. COA-Cl displaced [3H]S1P in a radioligand-binding competition assay in chem-1 cells overexpressing S1P1. However, COA-Cl activated ERK1/2 in CHO-K1 cells that lack functional S1P1 receptor, suggesting the presence of additional yet-to-be-defined COA-Cl target in these cells. The results thus suggest the major contribution of S1P1 in the angiogenic effects of COA-Cl. However, other mechanism such as that seen in CHO-K1 cells may also be partly involved. Collectively, these findings may lead to refinement of the design of this nucleic acid analog and ultimately to development of small molecule-based therapeutic angiogenesis. PMID:25505610

  8. Structure of the prolyl-tRNA synthetase from the eukaryotic pathogen Giardia lamblia

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, Eric T.; Kim, Jessica E.; Napuli, Alberto J.; Verlinde, Christophe L. M. J.; Fan, Erkang; Zucker, Frank H.; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Buckner, Frederick S.; Hol, Wim G. J.; Merritt, Ethan A.

    2012-09-01

    The structure of Giardia prolyl-tRNA synthetase cocrystallized with proline and ATP shows evidence for half-of-the-sites activity, leading to a corresponding mixture of reaction substrates and product (prolyl-AMP) in the two active sites of the dimer. The genome of the human intestinal parasite Giardia lamblia contains only a single aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase gene for each amino acid. The Giardia prolyl-tRNA synthetase gene product was originally misidentified as a dual-specificity Pro/Cys enzyme, in part owing to its unexpectedly high off-target activation of cysteine, but is now believed to be a normal representative of the class of archaeal/eukaryotic prolyl-tRNA synthetases. The 2.2 Å resolution crystal structure of the G. lamblia enzyme presented here is thus the first structure determination of a prolyl-tRNA synthetase from a eukaryote. The relative occupancies of substrate (proline) and product (prolyl-AMP) in the active site are consistent with half-of-the-sites reactivity, as is the observed biphasic thermal denaturation curve for the protein in the presence of proline and MgATP. However, no corresponding induced asymmetry is evident in the structure of the protein. No thermal stabilization is observed in the presence of cysteine and ATP. The implied low affinity for the off-target activation product cysteinyl-AMP suggests that translational fidelity in Giardia is aided by the rapid release of misactivated cysteine.

  9. Glutamine Synthetase Sensitivity to Oxidative Modification during Nutrient Starvation in Prochlorococcus marinus PCC 9511.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Baena, Guadalupe; Domínguez-Martín, María Agustina; Donaldson, Robert P; García-Fernández, José Manuel; Diez, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase plays a key role in nitrogen metabolism, thus the fine regulation of this enzyme in Prochlorococcus, which is especially important in the oligotrophic oceans where this marine cyanobacterium thrives. In this work, we studied the metal-catalyzed oxidation of glutamine synthetase in cultures of Prochlorococcus marinus strain PCC 9511 subjected to nutrient limitation. Nitrogen deprivation caused glutamine synthetase to be more sensitive to metal-catalyzed oxidation (a 36% increase compared to control, non starved samples). Nutrient starvation induced also a clear increase (three-fold in the case of nitrogen) in the concentration of carbonyl derivatives in cell extracts, which was also higher (22%) upon addition of the inhibitor of electron transport, DCMU, to cultures. Our results indicate that nutrient limitations, representative of the natural conditions in the Prochlorococcus habitat, affect the response of glutamine synthetase to oxidative inactivating systems. Implications of these results on the regulation of glutamine synthetase by oxidative alteration prior to degradation of the enzyme in Prochlorococcus are discussed.

  10. Interdomain and Intermodule Organization in Epimerization Domain Containing Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetases.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Hung; Li, Kunhua; Guntaka, Naga Sandhya; Bruner, Steven D

    2016-08-19

    Nonribosomal peptide synthetases are large, complex multidomain enzymes responsible for the biosynthesis of a wide range of peptidic natural products. Inherent to synthetase chemistry is the thioester templated mechanism that relies on protein/protein interactions and interdomain dynamics. Several questions related to structure and mechanism remain to be addressed, including the incorporation of accessory domains and intermodule interactions. The inclusion of nonproteinogenic d-amino acids into peptide frameworks is a common and important modification for bioactive nonribosomal peptides. Epimerization domains, embedded in nonribosomal peptide synthetases assembly lines, catalyze the l- to d-amino acid conversion. Here we report the structure of the epimerization domain/peptidyl carrier protein didomain construct from the first module of the cyclic peptide antibiotic gramicidin synthetase. Both holo (phosphopantethiene post-translationally modified) and apo structures were determined, each representing catalytically relevant conformations of the two domains. The structures provide insight into domain-domain recognition, substrate delivery during the assembly line process, in addition to the structural organization of homologous condensation domains, canonical players in all synthetase modules.

  11. The yeast VAS1 gene encodes both mitochondrial and cytoplasmic valyl-tRNA synthetases.

    PubMed

    Chatton, B; Walter, P; Ebel, J P; Lacroute, F; Fasiolo, F

    1988-01-05

    S1 mapping on the VAS1 structural gene indicates the existence of two classes of transcripts initiating at distinct in-frame translation start codons. The longer class of VAS1 transcripts initiates upstream of both ATG codons located 138 base pairs away and the shorter class downstream of the first ATG. A mutation that destroys the first AUG on the long message results in respiratory deficiency but does not affect viability. Mutation of the ATG at position 139 leads to lethality because the initiating methionine codon of the essential cytoplasmic valyl-tRNA synthetase has been destroyed. N-terminal protein sequence data further confirm translation initiation at ATG-139 for the cytoplasmic valyl-tRNA synthetase. From these results, we conclude that the VAS1 single gene encodes both mitochondrial and cytoplasmic valyl-tRNA synthetases. The presequence of the mitochondrial valyl-tRNA synthetase shows amino acid composition but not the amphiphilic character of imported mitochondrial proteins. From mutagenesis of the ATG-139 we conclude that the presequence specifically targets the cytoplasmically synthesized mitochondrial valyl-tRNA synthetase to the mitochondrial outer membrane and prevents binding of the enzyme core to cytoplasmic tRNAVal.

  12. Enzymatic Processing of Fumiquinazoline F: A Tandem Oxidative-Acylation Strategy for the Generation of Multicyclic Scaffolds in Fungal Indole Alkaloid Biosynthesis†

    PubMed Central

    Ames, Brian D.; Liu, Xinyu; Walsh, Christopher T.

    2010-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus Af293 is a known producer of quinazoline natural products including the antitumor fumiquinazolines, of which the simplest member is fumiquinazoline F (FQF) with a 6-6-6 tricyclic core derived from anthranilic acid, tryptophan, and alanine. FQF is the proposed biological precursor to fumiquinazoline A (FQA) where the pendant indole side chain has been modified via oxidative coupling of an additional molecule of alanine, yielding a fused 6-5-5 imidazoindolone. We recently identified fungal anthranilate-activating non-ribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) domains through bioinformatics approaches. One domain previously identified is part of the trimodular NRPS Af12080, which we predict is responsible for FQF formation. We now show that two adjacent A. fumigatus ORFs, a monomodular NRPS Af12050 and a flavoprotein Af12060, are necessary and sufficient to convert FQF to FQA. Af12060 oxidizes the 2',3'-double bond of the indole side chain of FQF, and the three-domain NRPS Af12050 activates L-Ala as the adenylate, installs it as the pantetheinyl thioester on its carrier protein domain and acylates the oxidized indole for subsequent intramolecular cyclization to create the 6-5-5 imidazolindolone of FQA. This work provides experimental validation of the fumiquinazoline biosynthetic cluster of A. fumigatus A293, and describes an oxidative annulation biosynthetic strategy likely shared among several classes of polycyclic fungal alkaloids. PMID:20804163

  13. Acylation of Antioxidant of Bamboo Leaves with Fatty Acids by Lipase and the Acylated Derivatives’ Efficiency in the Inhibition of Acrylamide Formation in Fried Potato Crisps

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xiang; Wang, Erpei; Lu, Yuyun; Wang, Yong; Ou, Shiyi; Yan, Rian

    2015-01-01

    This study selectively acylated the primary hydroxyl groups on flavonoids in antioxidant of bamboo leaves (AOB) using lauric acid with Candida antarctica lipase B in tert-amyl-alcohol. The separation and isolation of acylated derivatives were performed using silica gel column chromatography with a mixture of dichloromethane/diethyl ether/methanol as eluents. Both thin layer chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography analyses confirmed the high efficiency of the isolation process with the purified orientin-6″-laurate, isoorientin-6″-laurate, vitexin-6″-laurate, and isovitexin-6″-laurate that were obtained. The addition of AOB and acylated AOB reduced acrylamide formation in fried potato crisps. Results showed that 0.05% AOB and 0.05% and 0.1% acylated AOB groups significantly (p < 0.05) reduced the content of acrylamide in potato crisps by 30.7%, 44.5%, and 46.9%, respectively. PMID:26098744

  14. Acylation of Antioxidant of Bamboo Leaves with Fatty Acids by Lipase and the Acylated Derivatives' Efficiency in the Inhibition of Acrylamide Formation in Fried Potato Crisps.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiang; Wang, Erpei; Lu, Yuyun; Wang, Yong; Ou, Shiyi; Yan, Rian

    2015-01-01

    This study selectively acylated the primary hydroxyl groups on flavonoids in antioxidant of bamboo leaves (AOB) using lauric acid with Candida antarctica lipase B in tert-amyl-alcohol. The separation and isolation of acylated derivatives were performed using silica gel column chromatography with a mixture of dichloromethane/diethyl ether/methanol as eluents. Both thin layer chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography analyses confirmed the high efficiency of the isolation process with the purified orientin-6″-laurate, isoorientin-6″-laurate, vitexin-6″-laurate, and isovitexin-6″-laurate that were obtained. The addition of AOB and acylated AOB reduced acrylamide formation in fried potato crisps. Results showed that 0.05% AOB and 0.05% and 0.1% acylated AOB groups significantly (p < 0.05) reduced the content of acrylamide in potato crisps by 30.7%, 44.5%, and 46.9%, respectively.

  15. [2'-5' olygoadenylate synthetase activity in peripheral facial paralysis].

    PubMed

    Nakazato, H; Ikeda, M

    1995-03-01

    Interferons are produced in response to viral infection and play an important part in defense by their antiviral effects. An interferon-induced enzyme, 2'-5' oligoadenylate synthetase (2-5AS) also takes an important part of the system of defense against viral infections, and its activity elevates in nonspecific viral infections. This study was designed to evaluate the usefulness of examining serum 2-5AS activity and peripheral blood WBC 2-5AS (WBC 2-5AS) as diagnostic aids of viral infections that cause facial paralysis. Samples were obtained from 83 patients with Bell's palsy, 20 with Ramsay Hunt syndrome, 74 healthy individuals, and a total of 177 subjects. In 177, we measured serum 2-5AS level in 123 subjects, WBC 2-5AS level in 57, and both in 25. Serum 2-5AS levels in Bell's palsy (60 cases) ranged from 20 to 146 pmol/dl (average: 38.5). The range in Ramsay Hunt syndrome (13) was 20-333 (average: 59.0), and in healthy controls (50), it was 20-128 (average: 41.4). WBC 2-5AS level ranged from 20 to 5900 pmol/dl (average: 733.2) in Bell's palsy (23 cases), from 20-4540 (average: 1371.4) in Ramsay Hunt syndrome (7), and from 20-903 (average: 294.5) in healthy individuals (24). There were no statistically significant differences in serum 2-5AS activities. Otherwise, there was significant difference (p < 0.01) between healthy individuals and Patients with Ramsay Hunt syndrome in WBC 2-5AS activity. In Bell's palsy, 3 cases (13.0%) with markedly high WBC 2-5AS levels existed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Antimalarial Benzoxaboroles Target Plasmodium falciparum Leucyl-tRNA Synthetase

    PubMed Central

    Sonoiki, Ebere; Palencia, Andres; Guo, Denghui; Ahyong, Vida; Dong, Chen; Li, Xianfeng; Hernandez, Vincent S.; Zhang, Yong-Kang; Choi, Wai; Gut, Jiri; Legac, Jennifer; Cooper, Roland; Alley, M. R. K.; Freund, Yvonne R.; DeRisi, Joseph; Cusack, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    There is a need for new antimalarials, ideally with novel mechanisms of action. Benzoxaboroles have been shown to be active against bacteria, fungi, and trypanosomes. Therefore, we investigated the antimalarial activity and mechanism of action of 3-aminomethyl benzoxaboroles against Plasmodium falciparum. Two 3-aminomethyl compounds, AN6426 and AN8432, demonstrated good potency against cultured multidrug-resistant (W2 strain) P. falciparum (50% inhibitory concentration [IC50] of 310 nM and 490 nM, respectively) and efficacy against murine Plasmodium berghei infection when administered orally once daily for 4 days (90% effective dose [ED90], 7.4 and 16.2 mg/kg of body weight, respectively). To characterize mechanisms of action, we selected parasites with decreased drug sensitivity by culturing with stepwise increases in concentration of AN6426. Resistant clones were characterized by whole-genome sequencing. Three generations of resistant parasites had polymorphisms in the predicted editing domain of the gene encoding a P. falciparum leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LeuRS; PF3D7_0622800) and in another gene (PF3D7_1218100), which encodes a protein of unknown function. Solution of the structure of the P. falciparum LeuRS editing domain suggested key roles for mutated residues in LeuRS editing. Short incubations with AN6426 and AN8432, unlike artemisinin, caused dose-dependent inhibition of [14C]leucine incorporation by cultured wild-type, but not resistant, parasites. The growth of resistant, but not wild-type, parasites was impaired in the presence of the unnatural amino acid norvaline, consistent with a loss of LeuRS editing activity in resistant parasites. In summary, the benzoxaboroles AN6426 and AN8432 offer effective antimalarial activity and act, at least in part, against a novel target, the editing domain of P. falciparum LeuRS. PMID:27270277

  17. Functional interactions between a glutamine synthetase promoter and MYB proteins.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Maldonado, Josefa; Avila, Concepción; Torre, Fernando; Cañas, Rafael; Cánovas, Francisco M; Campbell, Malcolm M

    2004-08-01

    In Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris), ammonium assimilation is catalysed by glutamine synthetase (GS) [EC 6.3.1.2], which is encoded by two genes, PsGS1a and PsGS1b. PsGS1b is expressed in the vascular tissue throughout the plant body, where it is believed to play a role in recycling ammonium released by various facets of metabolism. The mechanisms that may underpin the transcriptional regulation of PsGS1b were explored. The PsGS1b promoter contains a region that is enriched in previously characterized cis-acting elements, known as AC elements. Pine nuclear proteins bound these AC element-rich regions in a tissue-specific manner. As previous experiments had shown that R2R3-MYB transcription factors could interact with AC elements, the capacity of the AC elements in the PsGS1b promoter to interact with MYB proteins was examined. Two MYB proteins from loblolly pine (Pinus taeda), PtMYB1 and PtMYB4, bound to the PsGS1b promoter were able to activate transcription from this promoter in yeast, arabidopsis and pine cells. Immunolocalization experiments revealed that the two MYB proteins were most abundant in cells previously shown to accumulate PsGS1b transcripts. Immunoprecipitation analysis and supershift electrophoretic mobility shift assays implicated these same two proteins in the formation of complexes between pine nuclear extracts and the PsGS1b promoter. Given that these MYB proteins were previously shown to have the capacity to activate gene expression related to lignin biosynthesis, we hypothesize that they may function to co-regulate lignification, a process that places significant demands on nitrogen recycling, and GS, the major enzyme involved in the nitrogen recycling pathway.

  18. Blockade of Glutamine Synthetase Enhances Inflammatory Response in Microglial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Palmieri, Erika M.; Menga, Alessio; Lebrun, Aurore; Hooper, Douglas C.; Butterfield, D. Allan

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Microglial cells are brain-resident macrophages engaged in surveillance and maintained in a constant state of relative inactivity. However, their involvement in autoimmune diseases indicates that in pathological conditions microglia gain an inflammatory phenotype. The mechanisms underlying this change in the microglial phenotype are still unclear. Since metabolism is an important modulator of immune cell function, we focused our attention on glutamine synthetase (GS), a modulator of the response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) activation in other cell types, which is expressed by microglia. Results: GS inhibition enhances release of inflammatory mediators of LPS-activated microglia in vitro, leading to perturbation of the redox balance and decreased viability of cocultured neurons. GS inhibition also decreases insulin-mediated glucose uptake in microglia. In vivo, microglia-specific GS ablation enhances expression of inflammatory markers upon LPS treatment. In the spinal cords from experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), GS expression levels and glutamine/glutamate ratios are reduced. Innovation: Recently, metabolism has been highlighted as mediator of immune cell function through the discovery of mechanisms that (behind these metabolic changes) modulate the inflammatory response. The present study shows for the first time a metabolic mechanism mediating microglial response to a proinflammatory stimulus, pointing to GS activity as a master modulator of immune cell function and thus unraveling a potential therapeutic target. Conclusions: Our study highlights a new role of GS in modulating immune response in microglia, providing insights into the pathogenic mechanisms associated with inflammation and new strategies of therapeutic intervention. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 26, 351–363. PMID:27758118

  19. Functional Analysis of Leishmania Cyclopropane Fatty Acid Synthetase

    PubMed Central

    Oyola, Samuel O.; Evans, Krystal J.; Smith, Terry K.; Smith, Barbara A.; Hilley, James D.; Mottram, Jeremy C.; Kaye, Paul M.; Smith, Deborah F.

    2012-01-01

    The single gene encoding cyclopropane fatty acid synthetase (CFAS) is present in Leishmania infantum, L. mexicana and L. braziliensis but absent from L. major, a causative agent of cutaneous leishmaniasis. In L. infantum, usually causative agent of visceral leishmaniasis, the CFAS gene is transcribed in both insect (extracellular) and host (intracellular) stages of the parasite life cycle. Tagged CFAS protein is stably detected in intracellular L. infantum but only during the early log phase of extracellular growth, when it shows partial localisation to the endoplasmic reticulum. Lipid analyses of L. infantum wild type, CFAS null and complemented parasites detect a low abundance CFAS-dependent C19Δ fatty acid, characteristic of a cyclopropanated species, in wild type and add-back cells. Sub-cellular fractionation studies locate the C19Δ fatty acid to both ER and plasma membrane-enriched fractions. This fatty acid is not detectable in wild type L. major, although expression of the L. infantum CFAS gene in L. major generates cyclopropanated fatty acids, indicating that the substrate for this modification is present in L. major, despite the absence of the modifying enzyme. Loss of the L. infantum CFAS gene does not affect extracellular parasite growth, phagocytosis or early survival in macrophages. However, while endocytosis is also unaffected in the extracellular CFAS nulls, membrane transporter activity is defective and the null parasites are more resistant to oxidative stress. Following infection in vivo, L. infantum CFAS nulls exhibit lower parasite burdens in both the liver and spleen of susceptible hosts but it has not been possible to complement this phenotype, suggesting that loss of C19Δ fatty acid may lead to irreversible changes in cell physiology that cannot be rescued by re-expression. Aberrant cyclopropanation in L. major decreases parasite virulence but does not influence parasite tissue tropism. PMID:23251490

  20. Stereoelectronic basis for the kinetic resolution of N-heterocycles with chiral acylating reagents.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Sheng-Ying; Wanner, Benedikt; Wheeler, Philip; Beauchemin, André M; Rovis, Tomislav; Bode, Jeffrey W

    2014-06-10

    The kinetic resolution of N-heterocycles with chiral acylating agents reveals a previously unrecognized stereoelectronic effect in amine acylation. Combined with a new achiral hydroxamate, this effect makes possible the resolution of various N-heterocycles by using easily prepared reagents. A transition-state model to rationalize the stereochemical outcome of this kinetic resolution is also proposed.

  1. Structural properties of pepsin-solubilized collagen acylated by lauroyl chloride along with succinic anhydride.

    PubMed

    Li, Conghu; Tian, Zhenhua; Liu, Wentao; Li, Guoying

    2015-10-01

    The structural properties of pepsin-solubilized calf skin collagen acylated by lauroyl chloride along with succinic anhydride were investigated in this paper. Compared with native collagen, acylated collagen retained the unique triple helix conformation, as determined by amino acid analysis, circular dichroism and X-ray diffraction. Meanwhile, the thermostability of acylated collagen using thermogravimetric measurements was enhanced as the residual weight increased by 5%. With the temperature increased from 25 to 115 °C, the secondary structure of native and acylated collagens using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy measurements was destroyed since the intensity of the major amide bands decreased and the positions of the major amide bands shifted to lower wavenumber, respectively. Meanwhile, two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy revealed that the most sensitive bands for acylated and native collagens were amide I and II bands, respectively. Additionally, the corresponding order of the groups between native and acylated collagens was different and the correlation degree for acylated collagen was weaker than that of native collagen, suggesting that temperature played a small influence on the conformation of acylated collagen, which might be concluded that the hydrophobic interaction improved the thermostability of collagen.

  2. Ortho C-H Acylation of Aryl Iodides by Palladium/Norbornene Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Dong, Zhe; Wang, Jianchun; Ren, Zhi; Dong, Guangbin

    2015-10-19

    Reported herein is a palladium/norbornene-catalyzed ortho-arene acylation of aryl iodides by a Catellani-type C-H functionalization. This transformation is enabled by isopropyl carbonate anhydrides, which serve as both an acyl cation equivalent and a hydride source.

  3. The Role of Mitochondrial Non-Enzymatic Protein Acylation in Ageing

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Shin Yee; Ng, Li Theng; Ng, Li Fang; Inoue, Takao; Tolwinski, Nicholas S.; Hagen, Thilo; Gruber, Jan

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, various large-scale proteomic studies have demonstrated that mitochondrial proteins are highly acylated, most commonly by addition of acetyl and succinyl groups. These acyl modifications may be enzyme catalysed but can also be driven non-enzymatically. The latter mechanism is promoted in mitochondria due to the nature of the mitochondrial microenvironment, which is alkaline and contains high concentrations of acyl-CoA species. Protein acylation may modify enzyme activity, typically inhibiting it. We posited that organismal ageing might be accompanied by an accumulation of acylated proteins, especially in mitochondria, and that this might compromise mitochondrial function and contribute to ageing. In this study, we used R. norvegicus, C. elegans and D. melanogaster to compare the acylation status of mitochondrial proteins between young and old animals. We observed a specific age-dependent increase in protein succinylation in worms and flies but not in rat. Rats have two substrate-specific mitochondrial deacylases, SIRT3 and SIRT5 while both flies and worms lack these enzymes. We propose that accumulation of mitochondrial protein acylation contributes to age-dependent mitochondrial functional decline and that SIRT3 and SIRT5 enzymes may promote longevity through regulation of mitochondrial protein acylation during ageing. PMID:28033361

  4. Selective acylation of plasma membrane proteins of Mycoplasma agalactiae: the causal agent of agalactia.

    PubMed

    Le Hénaff, M; Guéguen, M M; Fontenelle, C

    2000-01-01

    Revealed by in vivo labeling with (14)C-palmitic acid, about 15 acylated proteins were identified in the plasma membrane of Mycoplasma agalactiae (type strain PG2), including the major component p40. Triton X-114 phase partitioning and Western blotting demonstrated the amphiphilic properties of the acyl proteins and showed that they were also antigenic components. Chemical analyses of fatty acids bound to proteins revealed the following selectivity order within acylation: stearic acid (18:0) > linoleic acid (18:2c) approximately palmitic acid (16:0) > oleic acid (18:1c) > myristic acid (14:0), with 16:0 and 18:1c preferred for the O-acylation and 18:0 for the N-acylation. The ratio [O-ester- + amide-bound acyl chains]/O-ester-linked chains being close to 1.4 as well as the presence of S-glycerylcysteine suggest that acyl proteins in M. agalactiae are true lipoproteins containing N-acyl diacyl glycerylcysteine, probably processed by a mechanism analogous to that described for Gram-negative eubacteria.

  5. COA User's Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, B.; Pautz, J.; Sellers, C.

    1999-01-28

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has one of the largest and most complete collections of information on crude oil composition that is available to the public. The computer program that manages this database of crude oil analyses has recently been rewritten to allow easier access to this information. This report describes how the new system can be accessed and how the information contained in the Crude Oil Analysis Data Bank can be obtained.

  6. Impact of intracerebroventricular obestatin on plasma acyl ghrelin, des-acyl ghrelin and nesfatin-1 levels, and on gastric emptying in rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chih-Yen; Lee, Wei-Jei; Chong, Keong; Lee, Shou-Dong; Liao, You-Di

    2012-07-01

    Obestatin, which is a putative 23-amino-acid peptide, is derived from the C-terminal part of the mammalian preproghrelin gene. Nesfatin-1 mRNA is co-expressed with ghrelin in gastric endocrine X/A-like cells; therefore, nesfatin-1 may also interact with preproghrelin gene products in the stomach. In this study, we investigated the impact of obestatin on the plasma levels of acyl ghrelin, des-acyl ghrelin and nesfatin-1, and on the gastric emptying of a solid nutrient meal 2 h after an intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection in conscious, fasted rats. The rats were implanted with ICV catheters. Plasma levels of acyl ghrelin, des-acyl ghrelin and nesfatin-1, expected to be co-expressed with obestatin, were measured, whereas the human/rat corticotropin-releasing factor (h/rCRF) was applied as an inhibitor of gastric emptying. The ICV administration of obestatin (0.1, 0.3 and 1.0 nmol/rat) did not modify the plasma acyl ghrelin and des-acyl ghrelin levels, the acyl ghrelin/des-acyl ghrelin ratio and nesfatin-1 concentrations. The ICV acute administration of obestatin had no influence on the 2-h rate of gastric emptying of a solid nutrient meal, but the ICV h/rCRF injection delayed it. The weight of food ingested 1 h before ICV injection significantly, but negatively correlated with the gastric emptying of a solid nutrient meal. Our study indicates that the ICV injection of obestatin does not change the 2-h rate of gastric emptying of a solid nutrient meal and the relatively weak interrelationships between ghrelin gene products and nesfatin-1. However, the weight of the ingested food negatively affects the gastric emptying of a solid nutrient meal in conscious, fasted rats.

  7. Acylation of salmon calcitonin modulates in vitro intestinal peptide flux through membrane permeability enhancement.

    PubMed

    Trier, Sofie; Linderoth, Lars; Bjerregaard, Simon; Strauss, Holger M; Rahbek, Ulrik L; Andresen, Thomas L

    2015-10-01

    Acylation of peptide drugs with fatty acid chains has proven beneficial for prolonging systemic circulation, as well as increasing enzymatic stability and interactions with lipid cell membranes. Thus, acylation offers several potential benefits for oral delivery of therapeutic peptides, and we hypothesize that tailoring the acylation may be used to optimize intestinal translocation. This work aims to characterize acylated analogues of the therapeutic peptide salmon calcitonin (sCT), which lowers blood calcium, by systematically increasing acyl chain length at two positions, in order to elucidate its influence on intestinal cell translocation and membrane interaction. We find that acylation drastically increases in vitro intestinal peptide flux and confers a transient permeability enhancing effect on the cell layer. The analogues permeabilize model lipid membranes, indicating that the effect is due to a solubilization of the cell membrane, similar to transcellular oral permeation enhancers. The effect is dependent on pH, with larger effect at lower pH, and is impacted by acylation chain length and position. Compared to the unacylated peptide backbone, N-terminal acylation with a short chain provides 6- or 9-fold increase in peptide translocation at pH 7.4 and 5.5, respectively. Prolonging the chain length appears to hamper translocation, possibly due to self-association or aggregation, although the long chain acylated analogues remain superior to the unacylated peptide. For K(18)-acylation a short chain provides a moderate improvement, whereas medium and long chain analogues are highly efficient, with a 12-fold increase in permeability compared to the unacylated peptide backbone, on par with currently employed oral permeation enhancers. For K(18)-acylation the medium chain acylation appears to be optimal, as elongating the chain causes greater binding to the cell membrane but similar permeability, and we speculate that increasing the chain length further may

  8. Non-enzymatic protein acylation as a carbon stress regulated by sirtuin deacylases

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Gregory R.; Hirschey, Matthew D.

    2014-01-01

    Cellular proteins are decorated with a wide range of acetyl and other acyl modifications. Many studies have demonstrated regulation of site-specific acetylation by acetyltransferases and deacetylases. Acylation is emerging as a new type of lysine modification, but less is known about its overall regulatory role. Furthermore, the mechanisms of lysine acylation, its overlap with protein acetylation, and how it influences cellular function are major unanswered questions in the field. In this review, we discuss the known roles of acetyltransferases and deacetylases, and the sirtuins as a conserved family of NAD+-dependent protein deacylases that are important for response to cellular stress and homeostasis. We also consider the evidence for an emerging idea of non-enzymatic protein acylation. Finally, we put forward the hypothesis that protein acylation is a form of protein “carbon stress”, that the deacylases evolved to remove as a part of a global protein quality control network. PMID:24725594

  9. Methods and compositions for the production of orthogonal tRNA-aminoacyl tRNA synthetase pairs

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei; Anderson, John Christopher; Chin, Jason W.; Liu, David R.; Magliery, Thomas J.; Meggers, Eric L.; Mehl, Ryan Aaron; Pastrnak, Miro; Santoro, Stephen William; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2015-10-20

    This invention provides compositions and methods for generating components of protein biosynthetic machinery including orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases. Methods for identifying orthogonal pairs are also provided. These components can be used to incorporate unnatural amino acids into proteins in vivo.

  10. Methods and compositions for the production of orthogonal tRNA-aminoacyl tRNA synthetase pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, Peter; Wang, Lei; Anderson, John Christopher; Chin, Jason; Liu, David R.; Magliery, Thomas J.; Meggers, Eric L.; Mehl, Ryan Aaron; Pastrnak, Miro; Santoro, Stephen William; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2006-08-01

    This invention provides compositions and methods for generating components of protein biosynthetic machinery including orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases. Methods for identifying orthogonal pairs are also provided. These components can be used to incorporate unnatural amino acids into proteins in vivo.

  11. Transcription factor TnrA inhibits the biosynthetic activity of glutamine synthetase in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Fedorova, Ksenia; Kayumov, Airat; Woyda, Kathrin; Ilinskaja, Olga; Forchhammer, Karl

    2013-05-02

    The Bacillus subtilis glutamine synthetase (GS) plays a dual role in cell metabolism by functioning as catalyst and regulator. GS catalyses the ATP-dependent synthesis of glutamine from glutamate and ammonium. Under nitrogen-rich conditions, GS becomes feedback-inhibited by high intracellular glutamine levels and then binds transcription factors GlnR and TnrA, which control the genes of nitrogen assimilation. While GS-bound TnrA is no longer able to interact with DNA, GlnR-DNA binding is shown to be stimulated by GS complex formation. In this paper we show a new physiological feature of the interaction between glutamine synthetase and TnrA. The transcription factor TnrA inhibits the biosynthetic activity of glutamine synthetase in vivo and in vitro, while the GlnR protein does not affect the activity of the enzyme.

  12. Cloning and characterization of the C. elegans histidyl-tRNA synthetase gene.

    PubMed Central

    Amaar, Y G; Baillie, D L

    1993-01-01

    In this paper, we report the cloning and sequencing of the C. elegans histidyl-tRNA synthetase gene. The complete genomic sequence, and most of the cDNA sequence, of this gene is now determined. The gene size including flanking and coding regions is 2230 nucleotides long. Three small introns (45-50 bp long) are found to interrupt the open reading frame. The open reading frame translates to 523 amino acids. This putative protein sequence shows extensive homology with the human and yeast histidyl-tRNA the histidyl-tRNA synthetase gene is a single copy gene. Hence, it is very likely that it encodes both the cytoplasmic and the mitochondrial histidyl-tRNA synthetases. It is likely to be trans-spliced since it contains a trans-splice site in its 5' untranslated region. PMID:8414990

  13. Structure of a tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase containing an iron–sulfur cluster

    PubMed Central

    Han, Gye Won; Yang, Xiang-Lei; McMullan, Daniel; Chong, Yeeting E.; Krishna, S. Sri; Rife, Christopher L.; Weekes, Dana; Brittain, Scott M.; Abdubek, Polat; Ambing, Eileen; Astakhova, Tamara; Axelrod, Herbert L.; Carlton, Dennis; Caruthers, Jonathan; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Clayton, Thomas; Duan, Lian; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grant, Joanna C.; Grzechnik, Slawomir K.; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Jin, Kevin K.; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Kumar, Abhinav; Marciano, David; Miller, Mitchell D.; Morse, Andrew T.; Nigoghossian, Edward; Okach, Linda; Paulsen, Jessica; Reyes, Ron; van den Bedem, Henry; White, Aprilfawn; Wolf, Guenter; Xu, Qingping; Hodgson, Keith O.; Wooley, John; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Elsliger, Marc-André; Schimmel, Paul; Wilson, Ian A.

    2010-01-01

    A novel aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase that contains an iron–sulfur cluster in the tRNA anticodon-binding region and efficiently charges tRNA with tryptophan has been found in Thermotoga maritima. The crystal structure of TmTrpRS (tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase; TrpRS; EC 6.1.1.2) reveals an iron–sulfur [4Fe–­4S] cluster bound to the tRNA anticodon-binding (TAB) domain and an l-­tryptophan ligand in the active site. None of the other T. maritima aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (AARSs) contain this [4Fe–4S] cluster-binding motif (C-x 22-C-x 6-C-x 2-C). It is speculated that the iron–sulfur cluster contributes to the stability of TmTrpRS and could play a role in the recognition of the anticodon. PMID:20944229

  14. Steady state fluorescence studies of wild type recombinant cinnamoyl CoA reductase (Ll-CCRH1) and its active site mutants.

    PubMed

    Sonawane, Prashant; Vishwakarma, Rishi Kishore; Singh, Somesh; Gaikwad, Sushama; Khan, Bashir M

    2014-05-01

    Fluorescence quenching and time resolved fluorescence studies of wild type recombinant cinnamoyl CoA reductase (Ll-CCRH1), a multitryptophan protein from Leucaena leucocephala and 10 different active site mutants were carried out to investigate tryptophan environment. The enzyme showed highest affinity for feruloyl CoA (K(a)  = 3.72 × 10(5) M(-1)) over other CoA esters and cinnamaldehydes, as determined by fluorescence spectroscopy. Quenching of the fluorescence by acrylamide for wild type and active site mutants was collisional with almost 100% of the tryptophan fluorescence accessible under native condition and remained same after denaturation of protein with 6 M GdnHCl. In wild type Ll-CCRH1, the extent of quenching achieved with iodide (f(a) = 1.0) was significantly higher than cesium ions (f(a) = 0.33) suggesting more density of positive charge around surface of trp conformers under native conditions. Denaturation of wild type protein with 6 M GdnHCl led to significant increase in the quenching with cesium (f(a) = 0.54), whereas quenching with iodide ion was decreased (f(a) = 0.78), indicating reorientation of charge density around trp from positive to negative and heterogeneity in trp environment. The Stern-Volmer plots for wild type and mutants Ll-CCRH1 under native and denatured conditions, with cesium ion yielded biphasic quenching profiles. The extent of quenching for cesium and iodide ions under native and denatured conditions observed in active site mutants was significantly different from wild type Ll-CCRH1 under the same conditions. Thus, single substitution type mutations of active site residues showed heterogeneity in tryptophan microenvironment and differential degree of conformation of protein under native or denatured conditions.

  15. Effect of Genistein and L-Carnitine and Their Combination on Gene Expression of Hepatocyte HMG-COA Reductase and LDL Receptor in Experimental Nephrotic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    YOUSEFINEJAD, Abbas; SIASSI, Fereydoon; MIRSHAFIEY, Abbas; ESHRAGHIAN, Mohammad-Reza; KOOHDANI, Fariba; JAVANBAKHT, Mohammad Hassan; SEDAGHAT, Reza; RAMEZANI, Atena; ZAREI, Mahnaz; DJALALI, Mahmoud

    2015-01-01

    Background: Nephrotic syndrome is a disorder that leads to hyperlipidemia. L-carnitine and genistein can effect on lipid metabolism and the syndrome. In the present study, we have delved into the separate and the twin-effects of L-carnitine and genistein on the gene expressions of HMG-COA reductase and LDL receptor in experimental nephrotic syndrome. Methods: In this controlled experimental study, 50 male Sprague–Dawley rats were randomly divided into five groups: NC (normal-control), PC (patient-control), LC (L-carnitine), G (genistein), LCG (L-carnitine-genistein). Adriamycin was used for inducing nephrotic syndrome and the spot urine samples and urine protein-to-creatinine ratio were measured. Hepatocytic RNA was extracted and real-time PCR was used for HMG-COA Reductase and LDL receptor gene Expression measurement. Results: The final weight of the patients groups were lower than the NC group (P=0.001), and weight gain of the NC group was higher than the other groups (P<0.001). The proteinuria and urine protein-to-creatinine ratio showed significant differences between PC group and LC, G and LCG groups at week 7 (P<0.001). The expression of HMGCOA Reductase mRNA down regulated in LC, G and LCG groups in comparison with PC group (P<0.001). ΔCT of LDLr mRNA showed significant differences between the PC group and the other patient groups (P<0.001). Conclusion: This study shows a significant decreasing (P<0.001) and non-significant increasing trend in HMG-COA Reductase and LDLr gene expression, respectively, and synergistic effect of L-carnitine and genistein on these genes in experimental nephrotic syndrome. PMID:26576346

  16. RNAi inhibition of feruloyl CoA 6'-hydroxylase reduces scopoletin biosynthesis and post-harvest physiological deterioration in cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) storage roots.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shi; Zainuddin, Ima M; Vanderschuren, Herve; Doughty, James; Beeching, John R

    2017-03-18

    Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) is a major world crop, whose storage roots provide food for over 800 million throughout the humid tropics. Despite many advantages as a crop, the development of cassava is seriously constrained by the rapid post-harvest physiological deterioration (PPD) of its roots that occurs within 24-72 h of harvest, rendering the roots unpalatable and unmarketable. PPD limits cassava's marketing possibilities in countries that are undergoing increased development and urbanisation due to growing distances between farms and consumers. The inevitable wounding of the roots caused by harvesting triggers an oxidative burst that spreads throughout the cassava root, together with the accumulation of secondary metabolites including phenolic compounds, of which the coumarin scopoletin (7-hydroxy-6-methoxy-2H-1-benzopyran-2-one) is the most abundant. Scopoletin oxidation yields a blue-black colour, which suggests its involvement in the discoloration observed during PPD. Feruloyl CoA 6'-hydroxylase is a controlling enzyme in the biosynthesis of scopoletin. The cassava genome contains a seven membered family of feruloyl CoA 6'-hydroxylase genes, four of which are expressed in the storage root and, of these, three were capable of functionally complementing Arabidopsis T-DNA insertion mutants in this gene. A RNA interference construct, designed to a highly conserved region of these genes, was used to transform cassava, where it significantly reduced feruloyl CoA 6'-hydroxylase gene expression, scopoletin accumulation and PPD symptom development. Collectively, our results provide evidence that scopoletin plays a major functional role in the development of PPD symptoms, rather than merely paralleling symptom development in the cassava storage root.

  17. 40 CFR 721.7270 - 1-propanaminium, 3-amino-, N,N,N-trimethyl-N-soya acyl derivs., chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-trimethyl-N-soya acyl derivs., chloride. 721.7270 Section 721.7270 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...-soya acyl derivs., chloride. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as 1-propanaminium, 3-amino-, N,N,N-trimethyl-N-soya acyl...

  18. 40 CFR 721.7270 - 1-propanaminium, 3-amino-, N,N,N-trimethyl-N-soya acyl derivs., chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...-trimethyl-N-soya acyl derivs., chloride. 721.7270 Section 721.7270 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...-soya acyl derivs., chloride. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as 1-propanaminium, 3-amino-, N,N,N-trimethyl-N-soya acyl...

  19. 40 CFR 721.10056 - Benzenemethanaminium, N-(3-aminopropyl)-N,N-dimethyl-, N-soya acyl derivs., chlorides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...)-N,N-dimethyl-, N-soya acyl derivs., chlorides. 721.10056 Section 721.10056 Protection of Environment...-aminopropyl)-N,N-dimethyl-, N-soya acyl derivs., chlorides. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses...-dimethyl-, N-soya acyl derivs., chlorides (PMN P-03-47; CAS No. 90194-13-1) is subject to reporting...

  20. 40 CFR 721.10056 - Benzenemethanaminium, N-(3-aminopropyl)-N,N-dimethyl-, N-soya acyl derivs., chlorides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...)-N,N-dimethyl-, N-soya acyl derivs., chlorides. 721.10056 Section 721.10056 Protection of Environment...-aminopropyl)-N,N-dimethyl-, N-soya acyl derivs., chlorides. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses...-dimethyl-, N-soya acyl derivs., chlorides (PMN P-03-47; CAS No. 90194-13-1) is subject to reporting...

  1. 40 CFR 721.10056 - Benzenemethanaminium, N-(3-aminopropyl)-N,N-dimethyl-, N-soya acyl derivs., chlorides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...)-N,N-dimethyl-, N-soya acyl derivs., chlorides. 721.10056 Section 721.10056 Protection of Environment...-aminopropyl)-N,N-dimethyl-, N-soya acyl derivs., chlorides. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses...-dimethyl-, N-soya acyl derivs., chlorides (PMN P-03-47; CAS No. 90194-13-1) is subject to reporting...

  2. 40 CFR 721.10056 - Benzenemethanaminium, N-(3-aminopropyl)-N,N-dimethyl-, N-soya acyl derivs., chlorides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...)-N,N-dimethyl-, N-soya acyl derivs., chlorides. 721.10056 Section 721.10056 Protection of Environment...-aminopropyl)-N,N-dimethyl-, N-soya acyl derivs., chlorides. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses...-dimethyl-, N-soya acyl derivs., chlorides (PMN P-03-47; CAS No. 90194-13-1) is subject to reporting...

  3. 40 CFR 721.10056 - Benzenemethanaminium, N-(3-aminopropyl)-N,N-dimethyl-, N-soya acyl derivs., chlorides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...)-N,N-dimethyl-, N-soya acyl derivs., chlorides. 721.10056 Section 721.10056 Protection of Environment...-aminopropyl)-N,N-dimethyl-, N-soya acyl derivs., chlorides. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses...-dimethyl-, N-soya acyl derivs., chlorides (PMN P-03-47; CAS No. 90194-13-1) is subject to reporting...

  4. Is hydrogen peroxide involved in the benzyl viologen-mediated in-vivo inactivation of rat liver glutamine synthetase?

    PubMed Central

    Muriana, F. J.; Ruiz-Gutierrez, V.; Relimpio, A. M.

    1993-01-01

    After benzyl viologen administration to rats, a decrease in the rat liver glutamine synthetase activity was observed. An increase in the rat liver catalase activity was found concomitantly. In combination with the catalase inhibitor aminotriazole, benzyl viologen again diminished, but markedly, the rat liver glutamine synthetase activity. Moreover, partially purified glutamine synthetase from rat liver underwent rapid inactivation upon aerobic incubation with NAD(P)H and benzyl viologen. This inactivation was prevented by catalase, which suggests that the NAD(P)H/BV2+/O2-dependent system has a role in H2O2 production. Our results suggest that H2O2 is involved in the benzyl viologen-mediated in-vivo inactivation of the rat liver glutamine synthetase. In contrast, benzyl viologen alone or in combination with aminotriazole produced a significant increase of brain glutamine synthetase. PMID:8098954

  5. 248-nm laser photolysis of CHBr3/O-atom mixtures: kinetic evidence for UV CO(A) chemiluminescence in the reaction of methylidyne radicals with atomic oxygen.

    PubMed

    Vaghjiani, Ghanshyam L

    2005-03-17

    The 4th positive and Cameron band emissions from electronically excited CO have been observed for the first time in 248-nm pulsed laser photolysis of a trace amount of CHBr(3) vapor in an excess of O atoms. O atoms were produced by dissociation of N(2)O (or O(2)) in a cw-microwave discharge cavity in 2.0 Torr of He at 298 K. The CO emission intensity in these bands showed a quadratic dependence on the laser fluence employed. Temporal profiles of the CO(A) and other excited-state products that formed in the photoproduced precursor + O-atom reactions were measured by recording their time-resolved chemiluminescence in discrete vibronic bands. The CO 4th positive transition (A(1)Pi, v' = 0 --> X(1)Sigma(+), v' ' = 2) near 165.7 nm was monitored in this work to deduce the pseudo-first-order decay kinetics of the CO(A) chemiluminescence in the presence of various added substrates (CH(4), NO, N(2)O, H(2), and O(2)). From this, the second-order rate coefficient values were determined for reactions of these substrates with the photoproduced precursors. The measured reactivity trends suggest that the prominent precursors responsible for the CO(A) chemiluminescence are the methylidyne radicals, CH(X(2)Pi) and CH(a(4)Sigma(-)), whose production requires the absorption of at least 2 laser photons by the photolysis mixture. The O-atom reactions with brominated precursors (CBr, CHBr, and CBr(2)), which also form in the photolysis, are shown to play a minor role in the production of the CO(A or a) chemiluminescence. However, the CBr(2) + O-atom reaction was identified as a significant source for the 289.9-nm Br(2) chemiluminescence that was also observed in this work. The 282.2-nm OH and the 336.2-nm NH chemiluminescences were also monitored to deduce the kinetics of CH(X(2)Pi) and CH(a(4)Sigma(-)) reactions when excess O(2) and NO were present.

  6. Time course of the uridylylation and adenylylation states in the glutamine synthetase bicyclic cascade.

    PubMed Central

    Varón-Castellanos, R; Havsteen, B H; García-Moreno, M; Valero-Ruiz, E; Molina-Alarcón, M; García-Cánovas, F

    1993-01-01

    A kinetic analysis of the glutamine synthetase bicyclic cascade is presented. It includes the dependence on time from the onset of the reaction of both the uridylylation of Shapiro's regulatory protein and the adenylylation of the glutamine synthetase. The transient phase equations obtained allow an estimation of the time elapsed until the states of uridylylation and adenylylation reach their steady-states, and therefore an evaluation of the effective sensitivity of the system. The contribution of the uridylylation cycle to the adenylylation cycle has been studied, and an equation relating the state of adenylylation at any time to the state of uridylylation at the same instant has been derived. PMID:8104399

  7. The binding of tyrosinyl-5'-AMP to tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase (E.coli).

    PubMed Central

    Grosse, F; Krauss, G; Kownatzki, R; Maass, G

    1979-01-01

    The binding between tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase (E.coli) and the alkylanalogue of the aminoacyladenylate, tyrosinyl-5'-AMP, has been investigated by fluorescence titrations and rapid mixing experiments. Tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase has two equivalent and independent binding sites for tyrosinyl-5'-AMP. The intrinsic binding constant is 4 x 10(7)M-1. The binding sites for tRNATyr and tyrosinyl-5'-AMP are independent of each other, the anticooperative mode of tRNA binding being preserved in the presence of tyrosinyl-5-AMP. PMID:377229

  8. Reduced activity of glutamine synthetase in Rhodospirillum rubrum mutants lacking the adenylyltransferase GlnE.

    PubMed

    Jonsson, Anders; Nordlund, Stefan; Teixeira, Pedro Filipe

    2009-10-01

    In the nitrogen-fixing bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum, the GlnE adenylyltransferase (encoded by glnE) catalyzes reversible adenylylation of glutamine synthetase, thereby regulating nitrogen assimilation. We have generated glnE mutant strains that are unable to adenylylate glutamine synthetase (GS). Surprisingly, the activity of GS was lower in the mutants than in the wild type, even when grown in nitrogen-fixing conditions. Our results support the proposal that R. rubrum can only cope with the absence of an adenylylation system in the presence of lowered GS expression or activity. In general terms, this report also provides further support for the central role of GS in bacterial metabolism.

  9. Correlation of Exon 3 β-catenin Mutations with Glutamine Synthetase Staining Patterns in Hepatocellular Adenoma and Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hale, Gillian; Liu, Xinxin; Hu, Junjie; Xu, Zhong; Che, Li; Solomon, David; Tsokos, Christos; Shafizadeh, Nafis; Chen, Xin; Gill, Ryan; Kakar, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    The current clinical practice is based on the assumption of strong correlation between diffuse glutamine synthetase expression and β-catenin activation in hepatocellular adenoma and hepatocellular carcinoma. This high correlation is based on limited data, and may represent an oversimplification as glutamine synthetase staining patterns show wide variability in clinical practice. Standardized criteria for interpreting diverse glutamine synthetase patterns, and the association between each pattern and β-catenin mutations is not clearly established. This study examines the correlation between glutamine synthetase staining patterns and β-catenin mutations in 15 typical hepatocellular adenomas, 5 atypical hepatocellular neoplasms and 60 hepatocellular carcinomas. Glutamine synthetase staining was classified into one of three patterns: (a) diffuse homogeneous: moderate to strong cytoplasmic staining in more than 90% of lesional cells, without a map-like pattern, (b) diffuse heterogeneous: moderate to strong staining in 50–90% of lesional cells, without a map-like pattern, and (c) patchy: moderate to strong staining in <50% of lesional cells (often perivascular), or weak staining irrespective of extent, and all other staining patterns (including negative cases). Sanger sequencing of CTNNB1 exon 3 was performed in all cases. Of hepatocellular tumors with diffuse glutamine synthetase staining (homogeneous or heterogeneous), an exon 3 β-catenin mutation was detected in 33% (2/6) of typical hepatocellular adenoma, 75% (3/4) of atypical hepatocellular neoplasm and 17% (8/47) of hepatocellular carcinomas. An exon 3 mutation was also observed in 15% (2/13) of hepatocellular carcinomas with patchy glutamine synthetase staining. The results show a modest correlation between diffuse glutamine synthetase immunostaining and exon 3 β-catenin mutations in hepatocellular adenoma and hepatocellular carcinoma with discrepancy rates exceeding 50% in both hepatocellular adenoma and

  10. Correlation of exon 3 β-catenin mutations with glutamine synthetase staining patterns in hepatocellular adenoma and hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hale, Gillian; Liu, Xinxin; Hu, Junjie; Xu, Zhong; Che, Li; Solomon, David; Tsokos, Christos; Shafizadeh, Nafis; Chen, Xin; Gill, Ryan; Kakar, Sanjay

    2016-11-01

    The current clinical practice is based on the assumption of strong correlation between diffuse glutamine synthetase expression and β-catenin activation in hepatocellular adenoma and hepatocellular carcinoma. This high correlation is based on limited data and may represent an oversimplification as glutamine synthetase staining patterns show wide variability in clinical practice. Standardized criteria for interpreting diverse glutamine synthetase patterns, and the association between each pattern and β-catenin mutations is not clearly established. This study examines the correlation between glutamine synthetase staining patterns and β-catenin mutations in 15 typical hepatocellular adenomas, 5 atypical hepatocellular neoplasms and 60 hepatocellular carcinomas. Glutamine synthetase staining was classified into one of the three patterns: (a) diffuse homogeneous: moderate-to-strong cytoplasmic staining in >90% of lesional cells, without a map-like pattern, (b) diffuse heterogeneous: moderate-to-strong staining in 50-90% of lesional cells, without a map-like pattern, and (c) patchy: moderate-to-strong staining in <50% of lesional cells (often perivascular), or weak staining irrespective of the extent, and all other staining patterns (including negative cases). Sanger sequencing of CTNNB1 exon 3 was performed in all cases. Of hepatocellular tumors with diffuse glutamine synthetase staining (homogeneous or heterogeneous), an exon 3 β-catenin mutation was detected in 33% (2/6) of typical hepatocellular adenoma, 75% (3/4) of atypical hepatocellular neoplasm and 17% (8/47) of hepatocellular carcinomas. An exon 3 mutation was also observed in 15% (2/13) of hepatocellular carcinomas with patchy glutamine synthetase staining. The results show a modest correlation between diffuse glutamine synthetase immunostaining and exon 3 β-catenin mutations in hepatocellular adenoma and hepatocellular carcinoma with discrepancy rates >50% in both hepatocellular adenoma and hepatocellular

  11. Isolated poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) granules are complex bacterial organelles catalyzing formation of PHB from acetyl coenzyme A (CoA) and degradation of PHB to acetyl-CoA.

    PubMed

    Uchino, Keiichi; Saito, Terumi; Gebauer, Birgit; Jendrossek, Dieter

    2007-11-01

    Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) granules isolated in native form (nPHB granules) from Ralstonia eutropha catalyzed formation of PHB from (14)C-labeled acetyl coenzyme A (CoA) in the presence of NADPH and concomitantly released CoA, revealing that PHB biosynthetic proteins (acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase, acetoacetyl-CoA reductase, and PHB synthase) are present and active in isolated nPHB granules in vitro. nPHB granules also catalyzed thiolytic cleavage of PHB in the presence of added CoA, resulting in synthesis of 3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA (3HB-CoA) from PHB. Synthesis of 3HB-CoA was also shown by incubation of artificial (protein-free) PHB with CoA and PhaZa1, confirming that PhaZa1 is a PHB depolymerase catalyzing the thiolysis reaction. Acetyl-CoA was the major product detectable after incubation of nPHB granules in the presence of NAD(+), indicating that downstream mobilizing enzyme activities were also present and active in isolated nPHB granules. We propose that intracellular concentrations of key metabolites (CoA, acetyl-CoA, 3HB-CoA, NAD(+)/NADH) determine whether a cell accumulates or degrades PHB. Since the degradation product of PHB is 3HB-CoA, the cells do not waste energy by synthesis and degradation of PHB. Thus, our results explain the frequent finding of simultaneous synthesis and breakdown of PHB.

  12. A new mechanism of post-transfer editing by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases: catalysis of hydrolytic reaction by bacterial-type prolyl-tRNA synthetase.

    PubMed

    Boyarshin, Konstantin S; Priss, Anastasia E; Rayevskiy, Alexsey V; Ilchenko, Mykola M; Dubey, Igor Ya; Kriklivyi, Ivan A; Yaremchuk, Anna D; Tukalo, Michael A

    2017-02-01

    Aminoacyl tRNA synthetases are enzymes that specifically attach amino acids to cognate tRNAs for use in the ribosomal stage of translation. For many aminoacyl tRNA synthetases, the required level of amino acid specificity is achieved either by specific hydrolysis of misactivated aminoacyl-adenylate intermediate (pre-transfer editing) or by hydrolysis of the mischarged aminoacyl-tRNA (post-transfer editing). To investigate the mechanism of post-transfer editing of alanine by prolyl-tRNA synthetase from the pathogenic bacteria Enterococcus faecalis, we used molecular modeling, molecular dynamic simulations, quantum mechanical (QM) calculations, site-directed mutagenesis of the enzyme, and tRNA modification. The results support a new tRNA-assisted mechanism of hydrolysis of misacylated Ala-tRNA(Pro). The most important functional element of this catalytic mechanism is the 2'-OH group of the terminal adenosine 76 of Ala-tRNA(Pro), which forms an intramolecular hydrogen bond with the carbonyl group of the alanine residue, strongly facilitating hydrolysis. Hydrolysis was shown by QM methods to proceed via a general acid-base catalysis mechanism involving two functionally distinct water molecules. The transition state of the reaction was identified. Amino acid residues of the editing active site participate in the coordination of substrate and both attacking and assisting water molecules, performing the proton transfer to the 3'-O atom of A76.

  13. Acyl-homoserine lactone quorum sensing: from evolution to application.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Martin; Sexton, D Joseph; Diggle, Stephen P; Greenberg, E Peter

    2013-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a widespread process in bacteria that employs autoinducing chemical signals to coordinate diverse, often cooperative activities such as bioluminescence, biofilm formation, and exoenzyme secretion. Signaling via acyl-homoserine lactones is the paradigm for QS in Proteobacteria and is particularly well understood in the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Despite thirty years of mechanistic research, empirical studies have only recently addressed the benefits of QS and provided support for the traditional assumptions regarding its social nature and its role in optimizing cell-density-dependent group behaviors. QS-controlle