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Sample records for acyl-coa dehydrogenase superfamily

  1. BROWN ADIPOSE TISSUE FUNCTION IN SHORT-CHAIN ACYL-COA DEHYDROGENASE DEFICIENT MICE

    PubMed Central

    Skilling, Helen; Coen, Paul M.; Fairfull, Liane; Ferrell, Robert E.; Goodpaster, Bret H.; Vockley, Jerry; Goetzman, Eric S.

    2010-01-01

    Brown adipose tissue is a highly specialized organ that uses mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation to fuel nonshivering thermogenesis. In mice, mutations in the acyl-CoA dehydrogenase family of fatty acid oxidation genes are associated with sensitivity to cold. Brown adipose tissue function has not previously been characterized in these knockout strains. Short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (SCAD) deficient mice were found to have increased brown adipose tissue mass as well as modest cardiac hypertrophy. Uncoupling protein-1 was reduced by 70% in brown adipose tissue and this was not due to a change in mitochondrial number, nor was it due to decreased signal transduction through protein kinase A which is known to be a major regulator of uncoupling protein-1 expression. PKA activity and in vitro lipolysis were normal in brown adipose tissue, although in white adipose tissue a modest increase in basal lipolysis was seen in SCAD−/ − mice. Finally, an in vivo norepinephrine challenge of brown adipose tissue thermogenesis revealed normal heat production in SCAD−/− mice. These results suggest that reduced brown adipose tissue function is not the major factor causing cold sensitivity in acyl-CoA dehydrogenase knockout strains. We speculate that other mechanisms such as shivering capacity, cardiac function, and reduced hepatic glycogen stores are involved. PMID:20727852

  2. Aldehyde dehydrogenase protein superfamily in maize.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Mei-Liang; Zhang, Qian; Zhou, Ming; Qi, Lei-Peng; Yang, Xiong-Bang; Zhang, Kai-Xuan; Pang, Jun-Feng; Zhu, Xue-Mei; Shao, Ji-Rong; Tang, Yi-Xiong; Wu, Yan-Min

    2012-11-01

    Maize (Zea mays ssp. mays L.) is an important model organism for fundamental research in the agro-biotechnology field. Aldehydes were generated in response to a suite of environmental stresses that perturb metabolism including salinity, dehydration, desiccation, and cold and heat shock. Many biologically important aldehydes are metabolized by the superfamily of NAD(P)(+)-dependent aldehyde dehydrogenases. Here, starting from the database of Z. mays, we identified 28 aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) genes and 48 transcripts by the in silico cloning method using the ALDH-conserved domain amino acid sequence of Arabidopsis and rice as a probe. Phylogenetic analysis shows that all 28 members of the ALDH gene families were classified to ten distinct subfamilies. Microarray data and quantitative real-time PCR analysis reveal that ZmALDH9, ZmALDH13, and ZmALDH17 genes involve the function of drought stress, acid tolerance, and pathogens infection. These results suggested that these three ZmALDH genes might be potentially useful in maize genetic improvement. PMID:22983498

  3. High fat fed heart failure animals have enhanced mitochondrial function and acyl-coa dehydrogenase activities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have previously shown that administration of high fat in heart failure (HF) increased mitochondrial respiration and did not alter left ventricular (LV) function. PPARalpha is a nuclear transcription factor that activates expression of genes involved in fatty acid uptake and utilization. We hypoth...

  4. Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Gene Superfamily in Populus: Organization and Expression Divergence between Paralogous Gene Pairs

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Feng-Xia; Zang, Jian-Lei; Wang, Tan; Xie, Yu-Li; Zhang, Jin; Hu, Jian-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) constitute a superfamily of NAD(P)+-dependent enzymes that catalyze the irreversible oxidation of a wide range of reactive aldehydes to their corresponding nontoxic carboxylic acids. ALDHs have been studied in many organisms from bacteria to mammals; however, no systematic analyses incorporating genome organization, gene structure, expression profiles, and cis-acting elements have been conducted in the model tree species Populus trichocarpa thus far. In this study, a comprehensive analysis of the Populus ALDH gene superfamily was performed. A total of 26 Populus ALDH genes were found to be distributed across 12 chromosomes. Genomic organization analysis indicated that purifying selection may have played a pivotal role in the retention and maintenance of PtALDH gene families. The exon-intron organizations of PtALDHs were highly conserved within the same family, suggesting that the members of the same family also may have conserved functionalities. Microarray data and qRT-PCR analysis indicated that most PtALDHs had distinct tissue-specific expression patterns. The specificity of cis-acting elements in the promoter regions of the PtALDHs and the divergence of expression patterns between nine paralogous PtALDH gene pairs suggested that gene duplications may have freed the duplicate genes from the functional constraints. The expression levels of some ALDHs were up- or down-regulated by various abiotic stresses, implying that the products of these genes may be involved in the adaptation of Populus to abiotic stresses. Overall, the data obtained from our investigation contribute to a better understanding of the complexity of the Populus ALDH gene superfamily and provide insights into the function and evolution of ALDH gene families in vascular plants. PMID:25909656

  5. Non-P450 aldehyde oxidizing enzymes: the aldehyde dehydrogenase superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Marchitti, Satori A; Brocker, Chad; Stagos, Dimitrios; Vasiliou, Vasilis

    2009-01-01

    Background Aldehydes are highly reactive molecules. While several non-P450 enzyme systems participate in their metabolism, one of the most important is the aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) superfamily, composed of NAD(P)+-dependent enzymes that catalyze aldehyde oxidation. Objective This article presents a review of what is currently known about each member of the human ALDH superfamily including the pathophysiological significance of these enzymes. Methods Relevant literature involving all members of the human ALDH family was extensively reviewed, with the primary focus on recent and novel findings. Conclusion To date, 19 ALDH genes have been identified in the human genome and mutations in these genes and subsequent inborn errors in aldehyde metabolism are the molecular basis of several diseases, including Sjögren-Larsson syndrome, type II hyperprolinemia, γ-hydroxybutyric aciduria and pyridoxine-dependent seizures. ALDH enzymes also play important roles in embryogenesis and development, neurotransmission, oxidative stress and cancer. Finally, ALDH enzymes display multiple catalytic and non-catalytic functions including ester hydrolysis, antioxidant properties, xenobiotic bioactivation and UV light absorption. PMID:18611112

  6. Classification and nomenclature of the superfamily of short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases (SDRs).

    PubMed

    Persson, Bengt; Kallberg, Yvonne

    2013-02-25

    The short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases (SDRs) constitute one of the largest protein superfamilies known today. The members are distantly related with typically 20-30% residue identity in pair-wise comparisons. Still, all hitherto structurally known SDRs present a common three-dimensional structure consisting of a Rossmann fold with a parallel beta sheet flanked by three helices on each side. Using hidden Markov models (HMMs), we have developed a semi-automated subclassification system for this huge family. Currently, 75% of all SDR forms have been assigned to one of the 464 families totalling 122,940 proteins. There are 47 human SDR families, corresponding to 75 genes. Most human SDR families (35 families) have only one gene, while 12 have between 2 and 8 genes. For more than half of the human SDR families, the three-dimensional fold is known. The number of SDR members increases considerably every year, but the number of SDR families now starts to converge. The classification method has paved the ground for a sustainable and expandable nomenclature system. Information on the SDR superfamily is continuously updated at http://sdr-enzymes.org/. PMID:23200746

  7. Stereoselective carveol dehydrogenase from Rhodococcus erythropolis DCL14. A novel nicotinoprotein belonging to the short chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily.

    PubMed

    van der Werf, M J; van der Ven, C; Barbirato, F; Eppink, M H; de Bont, J A; van Berkel, W J

    1999-09-10

    A novel nicotinoprotein, catalyzing the dichlorophenolindophenol-dependent oxidation of carveol to carvone, was purified to homogeneity from Rhodococcus erythropolis DCL14. The enzyme is specifically induced after growth on limonene and carveol. Dichlorophenolindophenol-dependent carveol dehydrogenase (CDH) is a homotetramer of 120 kDa with each subunit containing a tightly bound NAD(H) molecule. The enzyme is optimally active at pH 5.5 and 50 degrees C and displays a broad substrate specificity with a preference for substituted cyclohexanols. When incubated with a diastereomeric mixture of (4R)- or (4S)-carveol, CDH stereoselectively catalyzes the conversion of the (6S)-carveol stereoisomers only. Kinetic studies with pure stereoisomers showed that this is due to large differences in V(max)/K(m) values and simultaneous product inhibition by (R)- or (S)-carvone. The R. erythropolis CDH gene (limC) was identified in an operon encoding the enzymes involved in limonene degradation. The CDH nucleotide sequence revealed an open reading frame of 831 base pairs encoding a 277-amino acid protein with a deduced mass of 29,531 Da. The CDH primary structure shares 10-30% sequence identity with members of the short chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily. Structure homology modeling with trihydroxynaphthalene reductase from Magnaporthe grisea suggests that CDH from R. erythropolis DCL14 is an alpha/beta one-domain protein with an extra loop insertion involved in NAD binding and a flexible C-terminal part involved in monoterpene binding. PMID:10473585

  8. Active site dynamics in the zinc-dependent medium chain alcohol dehydrogenase superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Patrick J.; Britton, K. Linda; Fisher, Martin; Esclapez, Julia; Pire, Carmen; Bonete, Maria Jose; Ferrer, Juan; Rice, David W.

    2009-01-01

    Despite being the subject of intensive investigations, many aspects of the mechanism of the zinc-dependent medium chain alcohol dehydrogenase (MDR) superfamily remain contentious. We have determined the high-resolution structures of a series of binary and ternary complexes of glucose dehydrogenase, an MDR enzyme from Haloferax mediterranei. In stark contrast to the textbook MDR mechanism in which the zinc ion is proposed to remain stationary and attached to a common set of protein ligands, analysis of these structures reveals that in each complex, there are dramatic differences in the nature of the zinc ligation. These changes arise as a direct consequence of linked movements of the zinc ion, a zinc-bound bound water molecule, and the substrate during progression through the reaction. These results provide evidence for the molecular basis of proton traffic during catalysis, a structural explanation for pentacoordinate zinc ion intermediates, a unifying view for the observed patterns of metal ligation in the MDR family, and highlight the importance of dynamic fluctuations at the metal center in changing the electrostatic potential in the active site, thereby influencing the proton traffic and hydride transfer events. PMID:19131516

  9. Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) superfamily in plants: gene nomenclature and comparative genomics.

    PubMed

    Brocker, Chad; Vasiliou, Melpomene; Carpenter, Sarah; Carpenter, Christopher; Zhang, Yucheng; Wang, Xiping; Kotchoni, Simeon O; Wood, Andrew J; Kirch, Hans-Hubert; Kopečný, David; Nebert, Daniel W; Vasiliou, Vasilis

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a significant increase in the number of completely sequenced plant genomes. The comparison of fully sequenced genomes allows for identification of new gene family members, as well as comprehensive analysis of gene family evolution. The aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) gene superfamily comprises a group of enzymes involved in the NAD(+)- or NADP(+)-dependent conversion of various aldehydes to their corresponding carboxylic acids. ALDH enzymes are involved in processing many aldehydes that serve as biogenic intermediates in a wide range of metabolic pathways. In addition, many of these enzymes function as 'aldehyde scavengers' by removing reactive aldehydes generated during the oxidative degradation of lipid membranes, also known as lipid peroxidation. Plants and animals share many ALDH families, and many genes are highly conserved between these two evolutionarily distinct groups. Conversely, both plants and animals also contain unique ALDH genes and families. Herein we carried out genome-wide identification of ALDH genes in a number of plant species-including Arabidopsis thaliana (thale crest), Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (unicellular algae), Oryza sativa (rice), Physcomitrella patens (moss), Vitis vinifera (grapevine) and Zea mays (maize). These data were then combined with previous analysis of Populus trichocarpa (poplar tree), Selaginella moellindorffii (gemmiferous spikemoss), Sorghum bicolor (sorghum) and Volvox carteri (colonial algae) for a comprehensive evolutionary comparison of the plant ALDH superfamily. As a result, newly identified genes can be more easily analyzed and gene names can be assigned according to current nomenclature guidelines; our goal is to clarify previously confusing and conflicting names and classifications that might confound results and prevent accurate comparisons between studies. PMID:23007552

  10. The Plant Short-Chain Dehydrogenase (SDR) superfamily: genome-wide inventory and diversification patterns

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases (SDRs) form one of the largest and oldest NAD(P)(H) dependent oxidoreductase families. Despite a conserved ‘Rossmann-fold’ structure, members of the SDR superfamily exhibit low sequence similarities, which constituted a bottleneck in terms of identification. Recent classification methods, relying on hidden-Markov models (HMMs), improved identification and enabled the construction of a nomenclature. However, functional annotations of plant SDRs remain scarce. Results Wide-scale analyses were performed on ten plant genomes. The combination of hidden Markov model (HMM) based analyses and similarity searches led to the construction of an exhaustive inventory of plant SDR. With 68 to 315 members found in each analysed genome, the inventory confirmed the over-representation of SDRs in plants compared to animals, fungi and prokaryotes. The plant SDRs were first classified into three major types — ‘classical’, ‘extended’ and ‘divergent’ — but a minority (10% of the predicted SDRs) could not be classified into these general types (‘unknown’ or ‘atypical’ types). In a second step, we could categorize the vast majority of land plant SDRs into a set of 49 families. Out of these 49 families, 35 appeared early during evolution since they are commonly found through all the Green Lineage. Yet, some SDR families — tropinone reductase-like proteins (SDR65C), ‘ABA2-like’-NAD dehydrogenase (SDR110C), ‘salutaridine/menthone-reductase-like’ proteins (SDR114C), ‘dihydroflavonol 4-reductase’-like proteins (SDR108E) and ‘isoflavone-reductase-like’ (SDR460A) proteins — have undergone significant functional diversification within vascular plants since they diverged from Bryophytes. Interestingly, these diversified families are either involved in the secondary metabolism routes (terpenoids, alkaloids, phenolics) or participate in developmental processes (hormone biosynthesis or catabolism, flower

  11. Modeling-Dependent Protein Characterization of the Rice Aldehyde Dehydrogenase (ALDH) Superfamily Reveals Distinct Functional and Structural Features

    PubMed Central

    Kotchoni, Simeon O.; Jimenez-Lopez, Jose C.; Gao, Dongying; Edwards, Vincent; Gachomo, Emma W.; Margam, Venu M.; Seufferheld, Manfredo J.

    2010-01-01

    The completion of the rice genome sequence has made it possible to identify and characterize new genes and to perform comparative genomics studies across taxa. The aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) gene superfamily encoding for NAD(P)+-dependent enzymes is found in all major plant and animal taxa. However, the characterization of plant ALDHs has lagged behind their animal- and prokaryotic-ALDH homologs. In plants, ALDHs are involved in abiotic stress tolerance, male sterility restoration, embryo development and seed viability and maturation. However, there is still no structural property-dependent functional characterization of ALDH protein superfamily in plants. In this paper, we identify members of the rice ALDH gene superfamily and use the evolutionary nesting events of retrotransposons and protein-modeling–based structural reconstitution to report the genetic and molecular and structural features of each member of the rice ALDH superfamily in abiotic/biotic stress responses and developmental processes. Our results indicate that rice-ALDHs are the most expanded plant ALDHs ever characterized. This work represents the first report of specific structural features mediating functionality of the whole families of ALDHs in an organism ever characterized. PMID:20634950

  12. Identification of 3-sulfinopropionyl coenzyme A (CoA) desulfinases within the Acyl-CoA dehydrogenase superfamily.

    PubMed

    Schürmann, Marc; Demming, Rebecca Michaela; Krewing, Marco; Rose, Judith; Wübbeler, Jan Hendrik; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2014-02-01

    In a previous study, the essential role of 3-sulfinopropionyl coenzyme A (3SP-CoA) desulfinase acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (Acd) in Advenella mimigardefordensis strain DPN7(T) (AcdDPN7) during degradation of 3,3'-dithiodipropionic acid (DTDP) was elucidated. DTDP is a sulfur-containing precursor substrate for biosynthesis of polythioesters (PTEs). AcdDPN7 showed high amino acid sequence similarity to acyl-CoA dehydrogenases but was unable to catalyze a dehydrogenation reaction. Hence, it was investigated in the present study whether 3SP-CoA desulfinase activity is an uncommon or a widespread property within the acyl-CoA dehydrogenase superfamily. Therefore, proteins of the acyl-CoA dehydrogenase superfamily from Advenella kashmirensis WT001, Bacillus cereus DSM31, Cupriavidus necator N-1, Escherichia coli BL21, Pseudomonas putida KT2440, Burkholderia xenovorans LB400, Ralstonia eutropha H16, Variovorax paradoxus B4, Variovorax paradoxus S110, and Variovorax paradoxus TBEA6 were expressed in E. coli strains. All purified acyl-CoA dehydrogenases appeared as homotetramers, as revealed by size exclusion chromatography. AcdS110, AcdB4, AcdH16, and AcdKT2440 were able to dehydrogenate isobutyryl-CoA. AcdKT2440 additionally dehydrogenated butyryl-CoA and valeryl-CoA, whereas AcdDSM31 dehydrogenated only butyryl-CoA and valeryl-CoA. No dehydrogenation reactions were observed with propionyl-CoA, isovaleryl-CoA, succinyl-CoA, and glutaryl-CoA for any of the investigated acyl-CoA dehydrogenases. Only AcdTBEA6, AcdN-1, and AcdLB400 desulfinated 3SP-CoA and were thus identified as 3SP-CoA desulfinases within the acyl-CoA dehydrogenase family, although none of these three Acds dehydrogenated any of the tested acyl-CoA thioesters. No appropriate substrates were identified for AcdBL21 and AcdWT001. Spectrophotometric assays provided apparent Km and Vmax values for active substrates and indicated the applicability of phylogenetic analyses to predict the substrate range of

  13. At5g50600 encodes a member of the short-chain dehydrogenase reductase superfamily with 11beta- and 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activities associated with Arabidopsis thaliana seed oil bodies.

    PubMed

    d'Andréa, S; Canonge, M; Beopoulos, A; Jolivet, P; Hartmann, M A; Miquel, M; Lepiniec, L; Chardot, T

    2007-02-01

    In a previous work, we presented evidence for the presence of a protein encoded by At5g50600 in oil bodies (OBs) from Arabidopsis thaliana [P. Jolivet, E. Roux, S. D'Andrea, M. Davanture, L. Negroni, M. Zivy, T. Chardot, Protein composition of oil bodies in Arabidopsis thaliana ecotype WS, Plant Physiol. Biochem. 42 (2004) 501-509]. Using specific antibodies and proteomic techniques, we presently confirm the existence of this protein, which is a member of the short-chain steroid dehydrogenase reductase superfamily. We have measured its activity toward various steroids (cholesterol, dehydroepiandrosterone, cortisol, corticosterone, estradiol, estrone) and NAD(P)(H), either within purified OBs or as a purified bacterially expressed chimera. Both enzymatic systems (OBs purified from A. thaliana seeds as well as the chimeric enzyme) exhibited hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (HSD) activity toward estradiol (17beta-hydroxysteroid) with NAD+ or NADP+, NADP+ being the preferred cofactor. Low levels of activity were observed with cortisol or corticosterone (11beta-hydroxysteroids), but neither cholesterol nor DHEA (3beta-hydroxysteroids) were substrates, whatever the cofactor used. Similar activity profiles were found for both enzyme sources. Purified OBs were found to be also able to catalyze estrone reduction (17beta-ketosteroid reductase activity) with NADPH. The enzyme occurring in A. thaliana OBs can be classified as a NADP+-dependent 11beta-,17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase/17beta-ketosteroid reductase. This enzyme probably corresponds to AtHSD1, which is encoded by At5g50600. However, its physiological role and substrates still remain to be determined. PMID:17074428

  14. Comparative anatomy of the aldo-keto reductase superfamily.

    PubMed Central

    Jez, J M; Bennett, M J; Schlegel, B P; Lewis, M; Penning, T M

    1997-01-01

    The aldo-keto reductases metabolize a wide range of substrates and are potential drug targets. This protein superfamily includes aldose reductases, aldehyde reductases, hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases and dihydrodiol dehydrogenases. By combining multiple sequence alignments with known three-dimensional structures and the results of site-directed mutagenesis studies, we have developed a structure/function analysis of this superfamily. Our studies suggest that the (alpha/beta)8-barrel fold provides a common scaffold for an NAD(P)(H)-dependent catalytic activity, with substrate specificity determined by variation of loops on the C-terminal side of the barrel. All the aldo-keto reductases are dependent on nicotinamide cofactors for catalysis and retain a similar cofactor binding site, even among proteins with less than 30% amino acid sequence identity. Likewise, the aldo-keto reductase active site is highly conserved. However, our alignments indicate that variation ofa single residue in the active site may alter the reaction mechanism from carbonyl oxidoreduction to carbon-carbon double-bond reduction, as in the 3-oxo-5beta-steroid 4-dehydrogenases (Delta4-3-ketosteroid 5beta-reductases) of the superfamily. Comparison of the proposed substrate binding pocket suggests residues 54 and 118, near the active site, as possible discriminators between sugar and steroid substrates. In addition, sequence alignment and subsequent homology modelling of mouse liver 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase and rat ovary 20alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase indicate that three loops on the C-terminal side of the barrel play potential roles in determining the positional and stereo-specificity of the hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases. Finally, we propose that the aldo-keto reductase superfamily may represent an example of divergent evolution from an ancestral multifunctional oxidoreductase and an example of convergent evolution to the same active-site constellation as the short

  15. Conotoxin Gene Superfamilies

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Samuel D.; Norton, Raymond S.

    2014-01-01

    Conotoxins are the peptidic components of the venoms of marine cone snails (genus Conus). They are remarkably diverse in terms of structure and function. Unique potency and selectivity profiles for a range of neuronal targets have made several conotoxins valuable as research tools, drug leads and even therapeutics, and has resulted in a concerted and increasing drive to identify and characterise new conotoxins. Conotoxins are translated from mRNA as peptide precursors, and cDNA sequencing is now the primary method for identification of new conotoxin sequences. As a result, gene superfamily, a classification based on precursor signal peptide identity, has become the most convenient method of conotoxin classification. Here we review each of the described conotoxin gene superfamilies, with a focus on the structural and functional diversity present in each. This review is intended to serve as a practical guide to conotoxin superfamilies and to facilitate interpretation of the increasing number of conotoxin precursor sequences being identified by targeted-cDNA sequencing and more recently high-throughput transcriptome sequencing. PMID:25522317

  16. [The regulation of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and glycogen synthase activities by insulin superfamily peptides in myometrium of pregnant women and its impairments under different types of diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Kuznetsova, L A; Chistiakova, O V

    2009-01-01

    The regulatory effects of insulin, insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), and relaxin on glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) and glycogen synthase (GS) activities have been studied in myometrium of pregnant women of control group and with diabetes mellitus of different etiology. In patients with type 1 diabetes G6PDH activity did not differ from the control group, but the enzyme activity was sharply decreased in pregnant women with type 2 diabetes and gestational diabetes. In the control group maximal stimulation of G6PDH activity was observed at 10(-9) M of peptides and their stimulating effect decreased in the following order: insulin > relaxin > IGF-1. In pregnant women with types 1 diabetes insulin effect on the enzyme activity was lower than in the control, and the effects of IGF-1 and relaxin were absent. In the group of pregnant women with type 2 diabetes and gestational diabetes the effects of insulin and IGF-1 were decreased, but the effect of relaxin was somewhat higher thus giving the following order in their efficiency relaxin > IGF-1 = insulin. At 10(-9) M peptides exhibited similar stimulating effects on the active form of GS-I, but had no influence on the total enzyme activity in the control group of pregnant women. In patients with type 1 diabetes GS activity remained unchanged (versus control), and peptides did not stimulate the enzyme activity. In patients with type 2 diabetes a significant decrease in GS activity was accompanied by the decrease in the effect of peptides, giving the following order of their efficiency: insulin = IGF-1 > relaxin. In myometrium of pregnant women with gestational (treated and untreated) diabetes GS activity decreased, the effect of insulin was weaker, whereas the effects of relaxin and IGF-1 increased thus giving the following order of their efficiency: relaxin > IGF-1 > insulin. Insulin therapy of type 1 diabetes incompletely restored sensitivity of the enzymes to the peptide actions. At the same time, in women

  17. EXPRESSION OF TURKEY TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS AND ACYL COA OXIDASE IN DIFFERENT TISSUES AND GENETIC POPULATIONS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several transcription factors are involved in regulating lipid metabolism in various animal tissues. Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR) gamma and PPAR alpha regulate both lipogenesis and fatty acid oxidation. Gene fragments for PPAR gamma, PPAR alpha, and acyl CoA oxidase (ACO) have b...

  18. Alteration of substrate specificity of alanine dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Puja; Aldeborgh, Hannah; Carlucci, Lauren; Walsh, Lauren; Wasserman, Jordan; Zhou, Edward; Lefurgy, Scott T.; Mundorff, Emily C.

    2015-01-01

    The l-alanine dehydrogenase (AlaDH) has a natural history that suggests it would not be a promising candidate for expansion of substrate specificity by protein engineering: it is the only amino acid dehydrogenase in its fold family, it has no sequence or structural similarity to any known amino acid dehydrogenase, and it has a strong preference for l-alanine over all other substrates. By contrast, engineering of the amino acid dehydrogenase superfamily members has produced catalysts with expanded substrate specificity; yet, this enzyme family already contains members that accept a broad range of substrates. To test whether the natural history of an enzyme is a predictor of its innate evolvability, directed evolution was carried out on AlaDH. A single mutation identified through molecular modeling, F94S, introduced into the AlaDH from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtAlaDH) completely alters its substrate specificity pattern, enabling activity toward a range of larger amino acids. Saturation mutagenesis libraries in this mutant background additionally identified a double mutant (F94S/Y117L) showing improved activity toward hydrophobic amino acids. The catalytic efficiencies achieved in AlaDH are comparable with those that resulted from similar efforts in the amino acid dehydrogenase superfamily and demonstrate the evolvability of MtAlaDH specificity toward other amino acid substrates. PMID:25538307

  19. The AAA+ superfamily of functionally diverse proteins

    PubMed Central

    Snider, Jamie; Thibault, Guillaume; Houry, Walid A

    2008-01-01

    The AAA+ superfamily is a large and functionally diverse superfamily of NTPases that are characterized by a conserved nucleotide-binding and catalytic module, the AAA+ module. Members are involved in an astonishing range of different cellular processes, attaining this functional diversity through additions of structural motifs and modifications to the core AAA+ module. PMID:18466635

  20. Superfamilies of Evolved and Designed Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milo, Ron; Itzkovitz, Shalev; Kashtan, Nadav; Levitt, Reuven; Shen-Orr, Shai; Ayzenshtat, Inbal; Sheffer, Michal; Alon, Uri

    2004-03-01

    Complex biological, technological, and sociological networks can be of very different sizes and connectivities, making it difficult to compare their structures. Here we present an approach to systematically study similarity in the local structure of networks, based on the significance profile (SP) of small subgraphs in the network compared to randomized networks. We find several superfamilies of previously unrelated networks with very similar SPs. One superfamily, including transcription networks of microorganisms, represents ``rate-limited'' information-processing networks strongly constrained by the response time of their components. A distinct superfamily includes protein signaling, developmental genetic networks, and neuronal wiring. Additional superfamilies include power grids, protein-structure networks and geometric networks, World Wide Web links and social networks, and word-adjacency networks from different languages.

  1. MOLECULAR VIEW OF THE SUPERFAMILY DIOCTOPHYMATOIDEA (NEMATODA)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Monophyly of the superfamily Dioctophymatoidea using 3 constituent genera was tested using a multilocus analysis of DNA sequence variation. Phylogenetic reconstruction involved maximum parsimony, maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference of 18s nuclear DNA (786 bp segment) and mitochondrial cytochro...

  2. Intrinsic Disorder in the Kinesin Superfamily.

    PubMed

    Seeger, Mark A; Rice, Sarah E

    2013-09-01

    Kinesin molecular motors perform a myriad of intracellular transport functions. While their mechanochemical mechanisms are well understood and well-conserved throughout the superfamily, the cargo-binding and regulatory mechanisms governing the activity of kinesins are highly diverse and in general, are incompletely characterized. Here we present evidence from bioinformatic predictions indicating that most kinesin superfamily members contain significant regions of intrinsically disordered (ID) residues. ID regions can bind to multiple partners with high specificity, and are highly labile to post-translational modification and degradation signals. In kinesins, the predicted ID regions are primarily found in areas outside the motor domains, where primary sequences diverge by family, suggesting that ID may be a critical structural element for determining the functional specificity of individual kinesins. To support this idea, we present a systematic analysis of the kinesin superfamily, family by family, for predicted regions of ID. We combine this analysis with a comprehensive review of kinesin binding partners and post-translational modifications. We find two key trends across the entire kinesin superfamily. First, ID residues tend to be in the tail regions of kinesins, opposite the superfamily-conserved motor domains. Second, predicted ID regions correlate to regions that are known to bind to cargoes and/or undergo post-translational modifications. We therefore propose that ID is a structural element utilized by the kinesin superfamily in order to impart functional specificity to individual kinesins. PMID:24244223

  3. Intrinsic Disorder in the Kinesin Superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Seeger, Mark A.; Rice, Sarah E.

    2012-01-01

    Kinesin molecular motors perform a myriad of intracellular transport functions. While their mechanochemical mechanisms are well understood and well-conserved throughout the superfamily, the cargo-binding and regulatory mechanisms governing the activity of kinesins are highly diverse and in general, are incompletely characterized. Here we present evidence from bioinformatic predictions indicating that most kinesin superfamily members contain significant regions of intrinsically disordered (ID) residues. ID regions can bind to multiple partners with high specificity, and are highly labile to post-translational modification and degradation signals. In kinesins, the predicted ID regions are primarily found in areas outside the motor domains, where primary sequences diverge by family, suggesting that ID may be a critical structural element for determining the functional specificity of individual kinesins. To support this idea, we present a systematic analysis of the kinesin superfamily, family by family, for predicted regions of ID. We combine this analysis with a comprehensive review of kinesin binding partners and post-translational modifications. We find two key trends across the entire kinesin superfamily. First, ID residues tend to be in the tail regions of kinesins, opposite the superfamily-conserved motor domains. Second, predicted ID regions correlate to regions that are known to bind to cargoes and/or undergo post-translational modifications. We therefore propose that ID is a structural element utilized by the kinesin superfamily in order to impart functional specificity to individual kinesins. PMID:24244223

  4. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003671.htm Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) is a type of ...

  5. Independent evolution of four heme peroxidase superfamilies.

    PubMed

    Zámocký, Marcel; Hofbauer, Stefan; Schaffner, Irene; Gasselhuber, Bernhard; Nicolussi, Andrea; Soudi, Monika; Pirker, Katharina F; Furtmüller, Paul G; Obinger, Christian

    2015-05-15

    Four heme peroxidase superfamilies (peroxidase-catalase, peroxidase-cyclooxygenase, peroxidase-chlorite dismutase and peroxidase-peroxygenase superfamily) arose independently during evolution, which differ in overall fold, active site architecture and enzymatic activities. The redox cofactor is heme b or posttranslationally modified heme that is ligated by either histidine or cysteine. Heme peroxidases are found in all kingdoms of life and typically catalyze the one- and two-electron oxidation of a myriad of organic and inorganic substrates. In addition to this peroxidatic activity distinct (sub)families show pronounced catalase, cyclooxygenase, chlorite dismutase or peroxygenase activities. Here we describe the phylogeny of these four superfamilies and present the most important sequence signatures and active site architectures. The classification of families is described as well as important turning points in evolution. We show that at least three heme peroxidase superfamilies have ancient prokaryotic roots with several alternative ways of divergent evolution. In later evolutionary steps, they almost always produced highly evolved and specialized clades of peroxidases in eukaryotic kingdoms with a significant portion of such genes involved in coding various fusion proteins with novel physiological functions. PMID:25575902

  6. Precambrian origins of the TNFR superfamily.

    PubMed

    Quistad, S D; Traylor-Knowles, N

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of the tumor necrosis factor/tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily (TNF/TNFR) is complicated and not well understood. To date, most TNFR studies have focused on vertebrate models leaving the role of TNFRs in invertebrates largely unexplored. The evolution of important cellular processes including stress response, apoptosis, development, and inflammation will be better understood by examining the TNF/TNFR superfamily in ancient invertebrate phyla. How widespread is this gene family within the evolutionary tree of life and is there evidence for similar function in invertebrates? A first step is to identify the presence or absence of these genes within basal metazoan taxa using the signature cysteine-rich domain (CRD) of the TNFR superfamily. In this perspective, we will start by examining what is currently known about the function of TNFRs in invertebrates. Then, we will assess the role of TNFRs in apoptosis and explore the origins of the domains found in TNFRs including the death domain (DD) and CRD. Finally, we will examine the phylogenetic relationship between TNFRs containing DDs identified to date. From these data, we propose a model for a Precambrian origin of TNFRs and their functional role in apoptosis. PMID:27551546

  7. Precambrian origins of the TNFR superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Quistad, S D; Traylor-Knowles, N

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of the tumor necrosis factor/tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily (TNF/TNFR) is complicated and not well understood. To date, most TNFR studies have focused on vertebrate models leaving the role of TNFRs in invertebrates largely unexplored. The evolution of important cellular processes including stress response, apoptosis, development, and inflammation will be better understood by examining the TNF/TNFR superfamily in ancient invertebrate phyla. How widespread is this gene family within the evolutionary tree of life and is there evidence for similar function in invertebrates? A first step is to identify the presence or absence of these genes within basal metazoan taxa using the signature cysteine-rich domain (CRD) of the TNFR superfamily. In this perspective, we will start by examining what is currently known about the function of TNFRs in invertebrates. Then, we will assess the role of TNFRs in apoptosis and explore the origins of the domains found in TNFRs including the death domain (DD) and CRD. Finally, we will examine the phylogenetic relationship between TNFRs containing DDs identified to date. From these data, we propose a model for a Precambrian origin of TNFRs and their functional role in apoptosis. PMID:27551546

  8. Comparative genomic analysis of mitochondrial protein-coding genes in Veneroida clams: Analysis of superfamily-specific genomic and evolutionary features.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jae Yeon; Lee, Chang-Kyu; Kim, Heebal; Nam, Bo-Hye; An, Cheul Min; Park, Jung Youn; Park, Kyu-Hyun; Huh, Chul-Sung; Kim, Eun Bae

    2015-12-01

    Veneroida is the largest order of bivalves, and these clams are commercially important in Asian countries. Although numerous studies have focused on the genomic characters of individual species or genera in Veneroida, superfamily-specific genomic characters have not been determined. In this study, we performed a comparative genomic analysis of 12 mitochondrial protein coding genes (PCGs) from 25 clams in six Veneroida superfamilies to determine genomic and evolutionary features of each superfamily. Length and distribution of nucleotides encoding the PCGs were too variable to define superfamily-specific genomic characters. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that PCGs are suitable for classification of species in three superfamilies: Cardioidea, Mactroidea, and Veneroidea. However, one species classified in Tellinoidea, Sinonovacula constricta, was evolutionarily closer to Solenoidea clams than Tellinoidea clams. dN/dS analysis showed that positively selected sites in NADH dehydrogenase subunit, nd4 and subunit of ATP synthase, atp6 were present in Mactroidea. Differences in selected sites in the nd4 and atp6 could be caused by superfamily-level differences in sodium transport or ATP synthesis functions, respectively. These differences in selected sites in NADH may have conferred these animals, which have low motility and do not generally move, with increased flexibility to maintain homeostasis in the face of osmotic pressure. Our study provides insight into evolutionary traits as well as facilitates identification of veneroids. PMID:26343338

  9. Assessing strategies for improved superfamily recognition

    PubMed Central

    Sillitoe, Ian; Dibley, Mark; Bray, James; Addou, Sarah; Orengo, Christine

    2005-01-01

    There are more than 200 completed genomes and over 1 million nonredundant sequences in public repositories. Although the structural data are more sparse (~13,000 nonredundant structures solved to date), several powerful sequence-based methodologies now allow these structures to be mapped onto related regions in a significant proportion of genome sequences. We review a number of publicly available strategies for providing structural annotations for genome sequences, and we describe the protocol adopted to provide CATH structural annotations for completed genomes. In particular, we assess the performance of several sequence-based protocols employing Hidden Markov model (HMM) technologies for superfamily recognition, including a new approach (SAMOSA [sequence augmented models of structure alignments]) that exploits multiple structural alignments from the CATH domain structure database when building the models. Using a data set of remote homologs detected by structure comparison and manually validated in CATH, a single-seed HMM library was able to recognize 76% of the data set. Including the SAMOSA models in the HMM library showed little gain in homolog recognition, although a slight improvement in alignment quality was observed for very remote homologs. However, using an expanded 1D-HMM library, CATH-ISL increased the coverage to 86%. The single-seed HMM library has been used to annotate the protein sequences of 120 genomes from all three major kingdoms, allowing up to 70% of the genes or partial genes to be assigned to CATH superfamilies. It has also been used to recruit sequences from Swiss-Prot and TrEMBL into CATH domain superfamilies, expanding the CATH database eightfold. PMID:15937274

  10. The P450 gene superfamily: recommended nomenclature.

    PubMed

    Nebert, D W; Adesnik, M; Coon, M J; Estabrook, R W; Gonzalez, F J; Guengerich, F P; Gunsalus, I C; Johnson, E F; Kemper, B; Levin, W

    1987-02-01

    A nomenclature for the P450 gene superfamily is proposed based on evolution. Recommendations include Roman numerals for distinct gene families, capital letters for subfamilies, and Arabic numerals for individual genes. An updating of this list, which presently includes 65 entries, will be required every 1-2 years. Assignment of orthologous genes is presently uncertain in some cases--between widely diverged species and especially in the P450II family due to the large number of genes. As more is known, it might become necessary to change some gene assignments that are based on our present knowledge. PMID:3829886

  11. Kinesin superfamily motor proteins and intracellular transport.

    PubMed

    Hirokawa, Nobutaka; Noda, Yasuko; Tanaka, Yosuke; Niwa, Shinsuke

    2009-10-01

    Intracellular transport is fundamental for cellular function, survival and morphogenesis. Kinesin superfamily proteins (also known as KIFs) are important molecular motors that directionally transport various cargos, including membranous organelles, protein complexes and mRNAs. The mechanisms by which different kinesins recognize and bind to specific cargos, as well as how kinesins unload cargo and determine the direction of transport, have now been identified. Furthermore, recent molecular genetic experiments have uncovered important and unexpected roles for kinesins in the regulation of such physiological processes as higher brain function, tumour suppression and developmental patterning. These findings open exciting new areas of kinesin research. PMID:19773780

  12. Neuronal polarity and the kinesin superfamily proteins.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Takao; Hirokawa, Nobutaka

    2007-02-01

    Neurons are highly polarized cells, typically with a long axon and relatively short dendrites. A wealth of recent data has identified a number of signaling molecules that are involved in neuronal polarization. Kinesin superfamily proteins (KIFs) contribute to the establishment and maintenance of neuronal polarity by selectively transporting various proteins and vesicles to either the axon or dendrites. Now evidence is emerging that KIFs also play an important role in axonal formation, the initial event of neuronal polarization. In particular, KIF13B transports phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-trisphosphate, which, based on current hypotheses, is one of the most upstream molecules in the intracellular signaling cascades involved in axonal formation. PMID:17284724

  13. Plant Formate Dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    John Markwell

    2005-01-10

    The research in this study identified formate dehydrogenase, an enzyme that plays a metabolic role on the periphery of one-carbon metabolism, has an unusual localization in Arabidopsis thaliana and that the enzyme has an unusual kinetic plasticity. These properties make it possible that this enzyme could be engineered to attempt to engineer plants with an improved photosynthetic efficiency. We have produced transgenic Arabidopsis and tobacco plants with increased expression of the formate dehydrogenase enzyme to initiate further studies.

  14. Retinol dehydrogenase 10 but not retinol/sterol dehydrogenase(s) regulates the expression of retinoic acid-responsive genes in human transgenic skin raft culture.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Ah; Belyaeva, Olga V; Wu, Lizhi; Kedishvili, Natalia Y

    2011-04-15

    Retinoic acid is essential for skin growth and differentiation, and its concentration in skin is controlled tightly. In humans, four different members of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) superfamily of proteins were proposed to catalyze the rate-limiting step in the biosynthesis of retinoic acid (the oxidation of retinol to retinaldehyde). Epidermis contains at least three of these enzymes, but their relative importance for retinoic acid biosynthesis and regulation of gene expression during growth and differentiation of epidermis is not known. Here, we investigated the effect of the four human SDRs on retinoic acid biosynthesis, and their impact on growth and differentiation of keratinocytes using organotypic skin raft culture model of human epidermis. The results of this study demonstrate that ectopic expression of retinol dehydrogenase 10 (RDH10, SDR16C4) in skin rafts dramatically increases proliferation and inhibits differentiation of keratinocytes, consistent with the increased steady-state levels of retinoic acid and activation of retinoic acid-inducible genes in RDH10 rafts. In contrast, SDRs with dual retinol/sterol substrate specificity, namely retinol dehydrogenase 4 (RoDH4, SDR9C8), RoDH-like 3α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (RL-HSD, SDR9C6), and RDH-like SDR (RDHL, SDR9C4) do not affect the expression of retinoic acid-inducible genes but alter the expression levels of several components of extracellular matrix. These results reveal essential differences in the metabolic contribution of RDH10 versus retinol/sterol dehydrogenases to retinoic acid biosynthesis and provide the first evidence that non-retinoid metabolic products of retinol/sterol dehydrogenases affect gene expression in human epidermis. PMID:21345790

  15. Retinol Dehydrogenase 10 but Not Retinol/Sterol Dehydrogenase(s) Regulates the Expression of Retinoic Acid-responsive Genes in Human Transgenic Skin Raft Culture*

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung-Ah; Belyaeva, Olga V.; Wu, Lizhi; Kedishvili, Natalia Y.

    2011-01-01

    Retinoic acid is essential for skin growth and differentiation, and its concentration in skin is controlled tightly. In humans, four different members of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) superfamily of proteins were proposed to catalyze the rate-limiting step in the biosynthesis of retinoic acid (the oxidation of retinol to retinaldehyde). Epidermis contains at least three of these enzymes, but their relative importance for retinoic acid biosynthesis and regulation of gene expression during growth and differentiation of epidermis is not known. Here, we investigated the effect of the four human SDRs on retinoic acid biosynthesis, and their impact on growth and differentiation of keratinocytes using organotypic skin raft culture model of human epidermis. The results of this study demonstrate that ectopic expression of retinol dehydrogenase 10 (RDH10, SDR16C4) in skin rafts dramatically increases proliferation and inhibits differentiation of keratinocytes, consistent with the increased steady-state levels of retinoic acid and activation of retinoic acid-inducible genes in RDH10 rafts. In contrast, SDRs with dual retinol/sterol substrate specificity, namely retinol dehydrogenase 4 (RoDH4, SDR9C8), RoDH-like 3α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (RL-HSD, SDR9C6), and RDH-like SDR (RDHL, SDR9C4) do not affect the expression of retinoic acid-inducible genes but alter the expression levels of several components of extracellular matrix. These results reveal essential differences in the metabolic contribution of RDH10 versus retinol/sterol dehydrogenases to retinoic acid biosynthesis and provide the first evidence that non-retinoid metabolic products of retinol/sterol dehydrogenases affect gene expression in human epidermis. PMID:21345790

  16. Immunoglobulin superfamily proteins in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Teichmann, S A; Chothia, C

    2000-03-10

    The predicted proteins of the genome of Caenorhabditis elegans were analysed by various sequence comparison methods to identify the repertoire of proteins that are members of the immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF). The IgSF is one of the largest families of protein domain in this genome and likely to be one of the major families in other multicellular eukaryotes too. This is because members of the superfamily are involved in a variety of functions including cell-cell recognition, cell-surface receptors, muscle structure and, in higher organisms, the immune system. Sixty-four proteins with 488 I set IgSF domains were identified largely by using Hidden Markov models. The domain architectures of the protein products of these 64 genes are described. Twenty-one of these had been characterised previously. We show that another 25 are related to proteins of known function. The C. elegans IgSF proteins can be classified into five broad categories: muscle proteins, protein kinases and phosphatases, three categories of proteins involved in the development of the nervous system, leucine-rich repeat containing proteins and proteins without homologues of known function, of which there are 18. The 19 proteins involved in nervous system development that are not kinases or phosphatases are homologues of neuroglian, axonin, NCAM, wrapper, klingon, ICCR and nephrin or belong to the recently identified zig gene family. Out of the set of 64 genes, 22 are on the X chromosome. This study should be seen as an initial description of the IgSF repertoire in C. elegans, because the current gene definitions may contain a number of errors, especially in the case of long sequences, and there may be IgSF genes that have not yet been detected. However, the proteins described here do provide an overview of the bulk of the repertoire of immunoglobulin superfamily members in C. elegans, a framework for refinement and extension of the repertoire as gene and protein definitions improve, and the basis

  17. Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (HSDs) in bacteria: a bioinformatic perspective.

    PubMed

    Kisiela, Michael; Skarka, Adam; Ebert, Bettina; Maser, Edmund

    2012-03-01

    Steroidal compounds including cholesterol, bile acids and steroid hormones play a central role in various physiological processes such as cell signaling, growth, reproduction, and energy homeostasis. Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (HSDs), which belong to the superfamily of short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases (SDR) or aldo-keto reductases (AKR), are important enzymes involved in the steroid hormone metabolism. HSDs function as an enzymatic switch that controls the access of receptor-active steroids to nuclear hormone receptors and thereby mediate a fine-tuning of the steroid response. The aim of this study was the identification of classified functional HSDs and the bioinformatic annotation of these proteins in all complete sequenced bacterial genomes followed by a phylogenetic analysis. For the bioinformatic annotation we constructed specific hidden Markov models in an iterative approach to provide a reliable identification for the specific catalytic groups of HSDs. Here, we show a detailed phylogenetic analysis of 3α-, 7α-, 12α-HSDs and two further functional related enzymes (3-ketosteroid-Δ(1)-dehydrogenase, 3-ketosteroid-Δ(4)(5α)-dehydrogenase) from the superfamily of SDRs. For some bacteria that have been previously reported to posses a specific HSD activity, we could annotate the corresponding HSD protein. The dominating phyla that were identified to express HSDs were that of Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria, and Firmicutes. Moreover, some evolutionarily more ancient microorganisms (e.g., Cyanobacteria and Euryachaeota) were found as well. A large number of HSD-expressing bacteria constitute the normal human gastro-intestinal flora. Another group of bacteria were originally isolated from natural habitats like seawater, soil, marine and permafrost sediments. These bacteria include polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons-degrading species such as Pseudomonas, Burkholderia and Rhodococcus. In conclusion, HSDs are found in a wide variety of microorganisms including

  18. The extended protein kinase C superfamily.

    PubMed Central

    Mellor, H; Parker, P J

    1998-01-01

    Members of the mammalian protein kinase C (PKC) superfamily play key regulatory roles in a multitude of cellular processes, ranging from control of fundamental cell autonomous activities, such as proliferation, to more organismal functions, such as memory. However, understanding of mammalian PKC signalling systems is complicated by the large number of family members. Significant progress has been made through studies based on comparative analysis, which have defined a number of regulatory elements in PKCs which confer specific location and activation signals to each isotype. Further studies on simple organisms have shown that PKC signalling paradigms are conserved through evolution from yeast to humans, underscoring the importance of this family in cellular signalling and giving novel insights into PKC function in complex mammalian systems. PMID:9601053

  19. Comparative Analysis of Cystatin Superfamily in Platyhelminths

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Aijiang

    2015-01-01

    The cystatin superfamily is comprised of cysteine proteinase inhibitors and encompasses at least 3 subfamilies: stefins, cystatins and kininogens. In this study, the platyhelminth cystatin superfamily was identified and grouped into stefin and cystatin subfamilies. The conserved domain of stefins (G, QxVxG) was observed in all members of platyhelminth stefins. The three characteristics of cystatins, the cystatin-like domain (G, QxVxG, PW), a signal peptide, and one or two conserved disulfide bonds, were observed in platyhelminths, with the exception of cestodes, which lacked the conserved disulfide bond. However, it is noteworthy that cestode cystatins had two tandem repeated domains, although the second tandem repeated domain did not contain a cystatin-like domain, which has not been previously reported. Tertiary structure analysis of Taenia solium cystatin, one of the cestode cystatins, demonstrated that the N-terminus of T. solium cystatin formed a five turn α-helix, a five stranded β-pleated sheet and a hydrophobic edge, similar to the structure of chicken cystatin. Although no conserved disulfide bond was found in T. solium cystatin, the models of T. solium cystatin and chicken cystatin corresponded at the site of the first disulfide bridge of the chicken cystatin. However, the two models were not similar regarding the location of the second disulfide bridge of chicken cystatin. These results showed that T. solium cystatin and chicken cystatin had similarities and differences, suggesting that the biochemistry of T. solium cystatin could be similar to chicken cystatin in its inhibitory function and that it may have further functional roles. The same results were obtained for other cestode cystatins. Phylogenetic analysis showed that cestode cystatins constituted an independent clade and implied that cestode cystatins should be considered to have formed a new clade during evolution. PMID:25853513

  20. Origin and evolution of TNF and TNF receptor superfamilies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The tumor necrosis factor superfamily (TNFSF) and the TNF receptor superfamily (TNFRSF) have an ancient evolutionary origin that can be traced back to single copy genes within Arthropods. In humans, 18 TNFSF and 29 TNFRSF genes have been identified. Evolutionary models account for the increase in g...

  1. Aldehyde dehydrogenases: From eye crystallins to metabolic disease and cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Vasiliou, Vasilis; Thompson, David C.; Smith, Clay; Fujita, Mayumi; Chen, Ying

    2014-01-01

    The aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) superfamily is composed of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate) (NAD(P)+)-dependent enzymes that catalyze the oxidation of aldehydes to their corresponding carboxylic acids. To date, 24 ALDH gene families have been identified in the eukaryotic genome. In addition to aldehyde metabolizing capacity, ALDHs have additional catalytic (e.g. esterase and reductase) and non-catalytic activities. The latter include functioning as structural elements in the eye (crystallins) and as binding molecules to endobiotics and xenobiotics. Mutations in human ALDH genes and subsequent inborn errors in aldehyde metabolism are the molecular basis of several diseases. Most recently ALDH polymorphisms have been associated with gout and osteoporosis. Aldehyde dehydrogenase enzymes also play important roles in embryogenesis and development, neurotransmission, oxidative stress and cancer. This article serves as a comprehensive review of the current state of knowledge regarding the ALDH superfamily and the contribution of ALDHs to various physiological and pathophysiological processes. PMID:23159885

  2. Analysis of the kinesin superfamily: insights into structure and function.

    PubMed

    Miki, Harukata; Okada, Yasushi; Hirokawa, Nobutaka

    2005-09-01

    Kinesin superfamily proteins (KIFs) are key players or 'hub' proteins in the intracellular transport system, which is essential for cellular function and morphology. The KIF superfamily is also the first large protein family in mammals whose constituents have been completely identified and confirmed both in silico and in vivo. Numerous studies have revealed the structures and functions of individual family members; however, the relationships between members or a perspective of the whole superfamily structure until recently remained elusive. Here, we present a comprehensive summary based on a large, systematic phylogenetic analysis of the kinesin superfamily. All available sequences in public databases, including genomic information from all model organisms, were analyzed to yield the most complete phylogenetic kinesin tree thus far, comprising 14 families. This comprehensive classification builds on the recently proposed standardized nomenclature for kinesins and allows systematic analysis of the structural and functional relationships within the kinesin superfamily. PMID:16084724

  3. Evolution of the Ferric Reductase Domain (FRD) Superfamily: Modularity, Functional Diversification, and Signature Motifs

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuezhi; Krause, Karl-Heinz; Xenarios, Ioannis; Soldati, Thierry; Boeckmann, Brigitte

    2013-01-01

    A heme-containing transmembrane ferric reductase domain (FRD) is found in bacterial and eukaryotic protein families, including ferric reductases (FRE), and NADPH oxidases (NOX). The aim of this study was to understand the phylogeny of the FRD superfamily. Bacteria contain FRD proteins consisting only of the ferric reductase domain, such as YedZ and short bFRE proteins. Full length FRE and NOX enzymes are mostly found in eukaryotic cells and all possess a dehydrogenase domain, allowing them to catalyze electron transfer from cytosolic NADPH to extracellular metal ions (FRE) or oxygen (NOX). Metazoa possess YedZ-related STEAP proteins, possibly derived from bacteria through horizontal gene transfer. Phylogenetic analyses suggests that FRE enzymes appeared early in evolution, followed by a transition towards EF-hand containing NOX enzymes (NOX5- and DUOX-like). An ancestral gene of the NOX(1-4) family probably lost the EF-hands and new regulatory mechanisms of increasing complexity evolved in this clade. Two signature motifs were identified: NOX enzymes are distinguished from FRE enzymes through a four amino acid motif spanning from transmembrane domain 3 (TM3) to TM4, and YedZ/STEAP proteins are identified by the replacement of the first canonical heme-spanning histidine by a highly conserved arginine. The FRD superfamily most likely originated in bacteria. PMID:23505460

  4. Separation of dehydrogenases on polyaminomethylstyrene.

    PubMed

    Schöpp, W; Meinert, S; Thyfronitou, J; Aurich, H

    1975-01-29

    The binding of dehydrogenases, especially alcohol dehydrogenase, and other proteins to several ion exchangers and hydrophobic polymers was investigated. Quantitative parameters for the stability of the polymer-protein complexes (obtained form double reciprocal plots) indicate a high but different affinity of many proteins for polyaminomethylstyrene. The chromatography of a mixture of five dehydrogenases and human serum albumin on polyaminomethylstyrene is described. PMID:237012

  5. Human microsomal carbonyl reducing enzymes in the metabolism of xenobiotics: well-known and promising members of the SDR superfamily.

    PubMed

    Skarydová, Lucie; Wsól, Vladimír

    2012-05-01

    The best known, most widely studied enzyme system in phase I biotransformation is cytochrome P450 (CYP), which participates in the metabolism of roughly 9 of 10 drugs in use today. The main biotransformation isoforms of CYP are associated with the membrane of the endoplasmatic reticulum (ER). Other enzymes that are also active in phase I biotransformation are carbonyl reducing enzymes. Much is known about the role of cytosolic forms of carbonyl reducing enzymes in the metabolism of xenobiotics, but their microsomal forms have been mostly poorly studied. The only well-known microsomal carbonyl reducing enzyme taking part in the biotransformation of xenobiotics is 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1, a member of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily. Physiological roles of microsomal carbonyl reducing enzymes are better known than their participation in the metabolism of xenobiotics. This review is a summary of the fragmentary information known about the roles of the microsomal forms. Besides 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1, it has been reported, so far, that retinol dehydrogenase 12 participates only in the detoxification of unsaturated aldehydes formed upon oxidative stress. Another promising group of microsomal biotransformation carbonyl reducing enzymes are some members of 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases. Generally, it is clear that this area is, overall, quite unexplored, but carbonyl reducing enzymes located in the ER have proven very interesting. The study of these enzymes could shed new light on the metabolism of several clinically used drugs or they could become an important target in connection with some diseases. PMID:22181347

  6. SAXS fingerprints of aldehyde dehydrogenase oligomers.

    PubMed

    Tanner, John J

    2015-12-01

    Enzymes of the aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) superfamily catalyze the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-dependent oxidation of aldehydes to carboxylic acids. ALDHs are important in detoxification of aldehydes, amino acid metabolism, embryogenesis and development, neurotransmission, oxidative stress, and cancer. Mutations in genes encoding ALDHs cause metabolic disorders, including alcohol flush reaction (ALDH2), Sjögren-Larsson syndrome (ALDH3A2), hyperprolinemia type II (ALDH4A1), γ-hydroxybutyric aciduria (ALDH5A1), methylmalonic aciduria (ALDH6A1), pyridoxine dependent epilepsy (ALDH7A1), and hyperammonemia (ALDH18A1). We previously reported crystal structures and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) analyses of ALDHs exhibiting dimeric, tetrameric, and hexameric oligomeric states (Luo et al., Biochemistry 54 (2015) 5513-5522; Luo et al., J. Mol. Biol. 425 (2013) 3106-3120). Herein I provide the SAXS curves, radii of gyration, and distance distribution functions for the three types of ALDH oligomer. The SAXS curves and associated analysis provide diagnostic fingerprints that allow rapid identification of the type of ALDH oligomer that is present in solution. The data sets provided here serve as a benchmark for characterizing oligomerization of ALDHs. PMID:26693506

  7. Cloning, purification and crystallization of Thermus thermophilus proline dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    White, Tommi A.; Tanner, John J.

    2005-08-01

    Cloning, purification and crystallization of T. thermophilus proline dehydrogenase is reported. The detergent n-octyl β-d-glucopyranoside was used to reduce polydispersity, which enabled crystallization. Nature recycles l-proline by converting it to l-glutamate. This four-electron oxidation process is catalyzed by the two enzymes: proline dehydrogenase (PRODH) and Δ{sup 1}-pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase. This note reports the cloning, purification and crystallization of Thermus thermophilus PRODH, which is the prototype of a newly discovered superfamily of bacterial monofunctional PRODHs. The results presented here include production of a monodisperse protein solution through use of the detergent n-octyl β-d-glucopyranoside and the growth of native crystals that diffracted to 2.3 Å resolution at Advanced Light Source beamline 4.2.2. The space group is P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 82.2, b = 89.6, c = 94.3 Å. The asymmetric unit is predicted to contain two protein molecules and 46% solvent. Molecular-replacement trials using a fragment of the PRODH domain of the multifunctional Escherichia coli PutA protein as the search model (24% amino-acid sequence identity) did not produce a satisfactory solution. Therefore, the structure of T. thermophilus PRODH will be determined by multiwavelength anomalous dispersion phasing using a selenomethionyl derivative.

  8. Phylogenomic analysis of the cystatin superfamily in eukaryotes and prokaryotes

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The cystatin superfamily comprises cysteine protease inhibitors that play key regulatory roles in protein degradation processes. Although they have been the subject of many studies, little is known about their genesis, evolution and functional diversification. Our aim has been to obtain a comprehensive insight into their origin, distribution, diversity, evolution and classification in Eukaryota, Bacteria and Archaea. Results We have identified in silico the full complement of the cystatin superfamily in more than 2100 prokaryotic and eukaryotic genomes. The analysis of numerous eukaryotic genomes has provided strong evidence for the emergence of this superfamily in the ancestor of eukaryotes. The progenitor of this superfamily was most probably intracellular and lacked a signal peptide and disulfide bridges, much like the extant Giardia cystatin. A primordial gene duplication produced two ancestral eukaryotic lineages, cystatins and stefins. While stefins remain encoded by a single or a small number of genes throughout the eukaryotes, the cystatins have undergone a more complex and dynamic evolution through numerous gene and domain duplications. In the cystatin superfamily we discovered twenty vertebrate-specific and three angiosperm-specific orthologous families, indicating that functional diversification has occurred only in multicellular eukaryotes. In vertebrate orthologous families, the prevailing trends were loss of the ancestral inhibitory activity and acquisition of novel functions in innate immunity. Bacterial cystatins and stefins may be emergency inhibitors that enable survival of bacteria in the host, defending them from the host's proteolytic activity. Conclusion This study challenges the current view on the classification, origin and evolution of the cystatin superfamily and provides valuable insights into their functional diversification. The findings of this comprehensive study provide guides for future structural and evolutionary studies

  9. Human dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR family) member 11 is a novel type of 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Endo, Satoshi; Miyagi, Namiki; Matsunaga, Toshiyuki; Hara, Akira; Ikari, Akira

    2016-03-25

    We report characterization of a member of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily encoded in a human gene, DHRS11. The recombinant protein (DHRS11) efficiently catalyzed the conversion of the 17-keto group of estrone, 4- and 5-androstenes and 5α-androstanes into their 17β-hydroxyl metabolites with NADPH as a coenzyme. In contrast, it exhibited reductive 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity toward 5β-androstanes, 5β-pregnanes, 4-pregnenes and bile acids. Additionally, DHRS11 reduced α-dicarbonyls (such as diacetyl and methylglyoxal) and alicyclic ketones (such as 1-indanone and loxoprofen). The enzyme activity was inhibited in a mixed-type manner by flavonoids, and competitively by carbenoxolone, glycyrrhetinic acid, zearalenone, curcumin and flufenamic acid. The expression of DHRS11 mRNA was observed widely in human tissues, most abundantly in testis, small intestine, colon, kidney and cancer cell lines. Thus, DHRS11 represents a novel type of 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase with unique catalytic properties and tissue distribution. PMID:26920053

  10. Phylogenomic analysis of the GIY-YIG nuclease superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Dunin-Horkawicz, Stanislaw; Feder, Marcin; Bujnicki, Janusz M

    2006-01-01

    Background The GIY-YIG domain was initially identified in homing endonucleases and later in other selfish mobile genetic elements (including restriction enzymes and non-LTR retrotransposons) and in enzymes involved in DNA repair and recombination. However, to date no systematic search for novel members of the GIY-YIG superfamily or comparative analysis of these enzymes has been reported. Results We carried out database searches to identify all members of known GIY-YIG nuclease families. Multiple sequence alignments together with predicted secondary structures of identified families were represented as Hidden Markov Models (HMM) and compared by the HHsearch method to the uncharacterized protein families gathered in the COG, KOG, and PFAM databases. This analysis allowed for extending the GIY-YIG superfamily to include members of COG3680 and a number of proteins not classified in COGs and to predict that these proteins may function as nucleases, potentially involved in DNA recombination and/or repair. Finally, all old and new members of the GIY-YIG superfamily were compared and analyzed to infer the phylogenetic tree. Conclusion An evolutionary classification of the GIY-YIG superfamily is presented for the very first time, along with the structural annotation of all (sub)families. It provides a comprehensive picture of sequence-structure-function relationships in this superfamily of nucleases, which will help to design experiments to study the mechanism of action of known members (especially the uncharacterized ones) and will facilitate the prediction of function for the newly discovered ones. PMID:16646971

  11. Cyanobacterial NADPH dehydrogenase complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Teruo; Mi, Hualing

    2007-07-01

    Cyanobacteria possess functionally distinct multiple NADPH dehydrogenase (NDH-1) complexes that are essential to CO2 uptake, photosystem-1 cyclic electron transport and respiration. The unique nature of cyanobacterial NDH-1 complexes is the presence of subunits involved in CO2 uptake. Other than CO2 uptake, chloroplastic NDH-1 complex has similar role as cyanobacterial NDH-1 complexes in photosystem-1 cyclic electron transport and respiration (chlororespiration). In this mini-review we focus on the structure and function of cyanobacterial NDH-1 complexes and their phylogeny. The function of chloroplastic NDH-1 complex and characteristics of plants defective in NDH-1 are also described forcomparison.

  12. Genetics Home Reference: pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... control the activity of the complex: pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphatase turns on (activates) the complex, while pyruvate dehydrogenase ... binding protein (the PDHX gene), and pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphatase (the PDP1 gene) have been identified in people ...

  13. Markers of Fitness in a Successful Enzyme Superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Karen N.; Dunaway-Mariano, Debra

    2009-01-01

    Summary Haloalkanoic acid dehalogenase (HAD) superfamily members serve as the predominant catalysts of metabolic phosphate ester hydrolysis in all three kingdoms of life. Collectively, the known structural, bioinformatic, and mechanistic data offer a glimpse of the variety of HAD enzymes that have evolved in the service of metabolic expansion. Factors that have contributed to superfamily dominance include a chemically versatile nucleophile, stability of the core superfold, structural modularity of the chemistry and specificity domains, conformational coupling conferred by the topology of the inserted specificity elements, and retention of a conserved mold for stabilization of the trigonal bipyramidal transition state. PMID:19889535

  14. Studying TGF-beta superfamily signaling by knockouts and knockins.

    PubMed

    Chang, H; Lau, A L; Matzuk, M M

    2001-06-30

    The transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) superfamily has profound effects on many aspects of animal development. In the last decade, our laboratory and others have performed in vivo functional studies on multiple components of the TGF-beta superfamily signal transduction pathway, including upstream ligands, transmembrane receptors, receptor-associated proteins and downstream Smad proteins. We have taken gene knockout approaches to generate null alleles of the genes of interest, as well as a gene knockin approach to replace the mature region of one TGF-beta superfamily ligand with another. We found that activin betaB, expressed in the spatiotemporal pattern of activin betaA, can function as a hypomorphic allele of activin betaA and rescue the craniofacial defects and neonatal lethal phenotype of activin betaA-deficient mice. With the knockout approach, we have shown that the expression pattern of a component in the TGF-beta superfamily signal transduction cascade does not necessarily predict its in vivo function. Two liver-specific activins, activin betaC and activin betaE are dispensable for liver development, regeneration and function, whereas ubiquitously expressed Smad5 has specific roles in the development of multiple embryonic and extraembryonic tissues. PMID:11451570

  15. The Insect Chemoreceptor Superfamily Is Ancient in Animals.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Hugh M

    2015-11-01

    The insect chemoreceptor superfamily consists of 2 gene families, the highly diverse gustatory receptors (GRs) found in all arthropods with sequenced genomes and the odorant receptors that evolved from a GR lineage and have been found only in insects to date. Here, I describe relatives of the insect chemoreceptor superfamily, specifically the basal GR family, in diverse other animals, showing that the superfamily dates back at least to early animal evolution. GR-Like (GRL) genes are present in the genomes of the placozoan Trichoplax adhaerens, an anemone Nematostella vectensis, a coral Acropora digitifera, a polychaete Capitella teleta, a leech Helobdella robusta, the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans (and many other nematodes), 3 molluscs (a limpet Lottia gigantea, an oyster Crassostrea gigas, and the sea hare Aplysia californica), the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, and the sea acorn Saccoglossus kowalevskii. While some of these animals contain multiple divergent GRL lineages, GRLs have been lost entirely from other animal lineages such as vertebrates. GRLs are absent from the ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi, the demosponge Amphimedon queenslandica, and 2 available chaonoflagellate genomes, so it remains unclear whether this superfamily originated before or during animal evolution. PMID:26354932

  16. Functional Diversity of Haloacid Dehalogenase Superfamily Phosphatases from Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Nocek, Boguslaw; Brown, Greg; Makarova, Kira S.; Flick, Robert; Wolf, Yuri I.; Khusnutdinova, Anna; Evdokimova, Elena; Jin, Ke; Tan, Kemin; Hanson, Andrew D.; Hasnain, Ghulam; Zallot, Rémi; de Crécy-Lagard, Valérie; Babu, Mohan; Savchenko, Alexei; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Edwards, Aled M.; Koonin, Eugene V.; Yakunin, Alexander F.

    2015-01-01

    The haloacid dehalogenase (HAD)-like enzymes comprise a large superfamily of phosphohydrolases present in all organisms. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome encodes at least 19 soluble HADs, including 10 uncharacterized proteins. Here, we biochemically characterized 13 yeast phosphatases from the HAD superfamily, which includes both specific and promiscuous enzymes active against various phosphorylated metabolites and peptides with several HADs implicated in detoxification of phosphorylated compounds and pseudouridine. The crystal structures of four yeast HADs provided insight into their active sites, whereas the structure of the YKR070W dimer in complex with substrate revealed a composite substrate-binding site. Although the S. cerevisiae and Escherichia coli HADs share low sequence similarities, the comparison of their substrate profiles revealed seven phosphatases with common preferred substrates. The cluster of secondary substrates supporting significant activity of both S. cerevisiae and E. coli HADs includes 28 common metabolites that appear to represent the pool of potential activities for the evolution of novel HAD phosphatases. Evolution of novel substrate specificities of HAD phosphatases shows no strict correlation with sequence divergence. Thus, evolution of the HAD superfamily combines the conservation of the overall substrate pool and the substrate profiles of some enzymes with remarkable biochemical and structural flexibility of other superfamily members. PMID:26071590

  17. Ancestry and diversity of the HMG box superfamily.

    PubMed Central

    Laudet, V; Stehelin, D; Clevers, H

    1993-01-01

    The HMG box is a novel type of DNA-binding domain found in a diverse group of proteins. The HMG box superfamily comprises a.o. the High Mobility Group proteins HMG1 and HMG2, the nucleolar transcription factor UBF, the lymphoid transcription factors TCF-1 and LEF-1, the fungal mating-type genes mat-Mc and MATA1, and the mammalian sex-determining gene SRY. The superfamily dates back to at least 1,000 million years ago, as its members appear in animals, plants and yeast. Alignment of all known HMG boxes defined an unusually loose consensus sequence. We constructed phylogenetic trees connecting the members of the HMG box superfamily in order to understand their evolution. This analysis led us to distinguish two subfamilies: one comprising proteins with a single sequence-specific HMG box, the other encompassing relatively non sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins with multiple HMG boxes. By studying the extent of diversification of the superfamily, we found that the speed of evolution was very different within the various groups of HMG-box containing factors. Comparison of the evolution of the two boxes of ABF2 and of mtTF1 implied different diversification models for these two proteins. Finally, we provide a tree for the highly complex group of SRY-like ('Sox' genes), clustering at least 40 different loci that rapidly diverged in various animal lineages. PMID:8506143

  18. Dissection of the Dimerization Modes in the DJ-1 Superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Hoi Jong; Kim, Sangok; Kim, Yun Jae; Kim, Min-Kyu; Kang, Sung Gyun; Lee, Jung-Hyun; Kim, Wankyu; Cha, Sun-Shin

    2012-01-01

    The DJ-1 superfamily (DJ-1/ThiJ/PfpI superfamily) is distributed across all three kingdoms of life. These proteins are involved in a highly diverse range of cellular functions, including chaperone and protease activity. DJ-1 proteins usually form dimers or hexamers in vivo and show at least four different binding orientations via distinct interface patches. Abnormal oligomerization of human DJ-1 is related to neurodegenerative disorders including Parkinson’s disease, suggesting important functional roles of quaternary structures. However, the quaternary structures of the DJ-1 superfamily have not been extensively studied. Here, we focus on the diverse oligomerization modes among the DJ-1 superfamily proteins and investigate the functional roles of quaternary structures both computationally and experimentally. The oligomerization modes are classified into 4 types (DJ-1, YhbO, Hsp, and YDR types) depending on the distinct interface patches (I–IV) upon dimerization. A unique, rotated interface via patch I is reported, which may potentially be related to higher order oligomerization. In general, the groups based on sequence similarity are consistent with the quaternary structural classes, but their biochemical functions cannot be directly inferred using sequence information alone. The observed phyletic pattern suggests the dynamic nature of quaternary structures in the course of evolution. The amino acid residues at the interfaces tend to show lower mutation rates than those of non-interfacial surfaces. PMID:22228183

  19. CREST - a large and diverse superfamily of putative transmembrane hydrolases

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background A number of membrane-spanning proteins possess enzymatic activity and catalyze important reactions involving proteins, lipids or other substrates located within or near lipid bilayers. Alkaline ceramidases are seven-transmembrane proteins that hydrolyze the amide bond in ceramide to form sphingosine. Recently, a group of putative transmembrane receptors called progestin and adipoQ receptors (PAQRs) were found to be distantly related to alkaline ceramidases, raising the possibility that they may also function as membrane enzymes. Results Using sensitive similarity search methods, we identified statistically significant sequence similarities among several transmembrane protein families including alkaline ceramidases and PAQRs. They were unified into a large and diverse superfamily of putative membrane-bound hydrolases called CREST (alkaline ceramidase, PAQR receptor, Per1, SID-1 and TMEM8). The CREST superfamily embraces a plethora of cellular functions and biochemical activities, including putative lipid-modifying enzymes such as ceramidases and the Per1 family of putative phospholipases involved in lipid remodeling of GPI-anchored proteins, putative hormone receptors, bacterial hemolysins, the TMEM8 family of putative tumor suppressors, and the SID-1 family of putative double-stranded RNA transporters involved in RNA interference. Extensive similarity searches and clustering analysis also revealed several groups of proteins with unknown function in the CREST superfamily. Members of the CREST superfamily share seven predicted core transmembrane segments with several conserved sequence motifs. Conclusions Universal conservation of a set of histidine and aspartate residues across all groups in the CREST superfamily, coupled with independent discoveries of hydrolase activities in alkaline ceramidases and the Per1 family as well as results from previous mutational studies of Per1, suggests that the majority of CREST members are metal-dependent hydrolases

  20. Increased Long Chain acyl-Coa Synthetase Activity and Fatty Acid Import Is Linked to Membrane Synthesis for Development of Picornavirus Replication Organelles

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Alison J.; Ford, Lauren A.; Pei, Zhengtong; Watkins, Paul A.; Ernst, Robert K.; Belov, George A.

    2013-01-01

    All positive strand (+RNA) viruses of eukaryotes replicate their genomes in association with membranes. The mechanisms of membrane remodeling in infected cells represent attractive targets for designing future therapeutics, but our understanding of this process is very limited. Elements of autophagy and/or the secretory pathway were proposed to be hijacked for building of picornavirus replication organelles. However, even closely related viruses differ significantly in their requirements for components of these pathways. We demonstrate here that infection with diverse picornaviruses rapidly activates import of long chain fatty acids. While in non-infected cells the imported fatty acids are channeled to lipid droplets, in infected cells the synthesis of neutral lipids is shut down and the fatty acids are utilized in highly up-regulated phosphatidylcholine synthesis. Thus the replication organelles are likely built from de novo synthesized membrane material, rather than from the remodeled pre-existing membranes. We show that activation of fatty acid import is linked to the up-regulation of cellular long chain acyl-CoA synthetase activity and identify the long chain acyl-CoA syntheatse3 (Acsl3) as a novel host factor required for polio replication. Poliovirus protein 2A is required to trigger the activation of import of fatty acids independent of its protease activity. Shift in fatty acid import preferences by infected cells results in synthesis of phosphatidylcholines different from those in uninfected cells, arguing that the viral replication organelles possess unique properties compared to the pre-existing membranes. Our data show how poliovirus can change the overall cellular membrane homeostasis by targeting one critical process. They explain earlier observations of increased phospholipid synthesis in infected cells and suggest a simple model of the structural development of the membranous scaffold of replication complexes of picorna-like viruses, that may be relevant for other (+)RNA viruses as well. PMID:23762027

  1. DISTINCT TRANSCRIPTIONAL REGULATION OF LONG-CHAIN ACYL-COA SYNTHETASE ISOFORMS AND CYTOSOLIC THIOESTERASE 1 IN THE RODENT HEART BY FATTY ACIDS AND INSULIN

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The molecular mechanism(s) responsible for channeling long-chain fatty acids (LCFAs) into oxidative versus nonoxidative pathways is (are) poorly understood in the heart. Intracellular LCFAs are converted to long-chain fatty acyl-CoAs (LCFA-CoAs) by a family of long-chain acyl-CoA synthetases (ACSLs)...

  2. A NOVEL 78-KDA FATTY ACYL-COA SYNTHETASE (ACS1) OF BABESIA BOVIS STIMULATES MEMORY CD4+ T LYMPHOCYTE RESPONSES IN B. BOVIS-IMMUNE CATTLE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Antigen-specific CD4+ T lymphocyte responses contribute to protective immunity against Babesia bovis, however the antigens that induce these responses remain largely unknown. A proteomic approach was used to identify novel B. bovis antigens recognized by memory CD4+ T cells from immune cattle. Fract...

  3. Lactate dehydrogenase-elevating virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This book chapter describes the taxonomic classification of Lactate dehydrogenase-elevating virus (LDV). Included are: host, genome, classification, morphology, physicochemical and physical properties, nucleic acid, proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, geographic range, phylogenetic properties, biologic...

  4. Alcohol Dehydrogenase from Methylobacterium organophilum

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, H. J.; Hanson, R. S.

    1978-01-01

    The alcohol dehydrogenase from Methylobacterium organophilum, a facultative methane-oxidizing bacterium, has been purified to homogeneity as indicated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-gel electrophoresis. It has several properties in common with the alcohol dehydrogenases from other methylotrophic bacteria. The active enzyme is a dimeric protein, both subunits having molecular weights of about 62,000. The enzyme exhibits broad substrate specificity for primary alcohols and catalyzes the two-step oxidation of methanol to formate. The apparent Michaelis constants of the enzyme are 2.9 × 10−5 M for methanol and 8.2 × 10−5 M for formaldehyde. Activity of the purified enzyme is dependent on phenazine methosulfate. Certain characteristics of this enzyme distinguish it from the other alcohol dehydrogenases of other methylotrophic bacteria. Ammonia is not required for, but stimulates the activity of newly purified enzyme. An absolute dependence on ammonia develops after storage of the purified enzyme. Activity is not inhibited by phosphate. The fluorescence spectrum of the enzyme indicates that it and the cofactor associated with it may be chemically different from the alcohol dehydrogenases from other methylotrophic bacteria. The alcohol dehydrogenases of Hyphomicrobium WC-65, Pseudomonas methanica, Methylosinus trichosporium, and several facultative methylotrophs are serologically related to the enzyme purified in this study. The enzymes of Rhodopseudomonas acidophila and of organisms of the Methylococcus group did not cross-react with the antiserum prepared against the alcohol dehydrogenase of M. organophilum. Images PMID:80974

  5. Cross-regulation between herpesviruses and the TNF superfamily members

    PubMed Central

    Šedý, John R.; Spear, Patricia G.

    2008-01-01

    Herpesviruses have evolved numerous strategies to subvert host immune responses so they can coexist with their host species. These viruses ‘co-opt’ host genes for entry into host cells and then express immunomodulatory genes, including mimics of members of the tumour-necrosis factor (TNF) superfamily, that initiate and alter host-cell signalling pathways. TNF superfamily members have crucial roles in controlling herpesvirus infection by mediating the direct killing of infected cells and by enhancing immune responses. Despite these strong immune responses, herpesviruses persist in a latent form, which suggests a dynamic relationship between the host immune system and the virus that results in a balance between host survival and viral control. PMID:18949019

  6. Thermal stability of the polyheme cytochrome c3 superfamily.

    PubMed

    Florens, L; Bianco, P; Haladjian, J; Bruschi, M; Protasevich, I; Makarov, A

    1995-10-16

    The cytochrome c3 superfamily includes Desulfovibrio polyheme cytochromes c. We report the characteristic thermal stability parameters of the Desulfovibrio desulfuricans Norway (D.d.N.) cytochromes c3 (M(r) 13,000 and M(r) 26,000) and the Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough (D.v.H.) cytochrome c3 (M(r) 13,000) and high molecular mass cytochrome c (Hmc), as obtained with the help of electronic spectroscopy, voltammetric techniques and differential scanning calorimetry. The polyheme cytochromes are denatured over a wide range of temperatures: the D.v.H. cytochrome c3 is highly thermostable (Td = 121 degrees C) contrary to the D.d.N. protein (Td = 73 degrees C). The thermostability of the polyheme cytochromes is redox state dependent. The results are discussed in the light of the structural and functional relationships within the cytochrome c3 superfamily. PMID:7589483

  7. Panoramic view of a superfamily of phosphatases through substrate profiling.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hua; Pandya, Chetanya; Liu, Chunliang; Al-Obaidi, Nawar F; Wang, Min; Zheng, Li; Toews Keating, Sarah; Aono, Miyuki; Love, James D; Evans, Brandon; Seidel, Ronald D; Hillerich, Brandan S; Garforth, Scott J; Almo, Steven C; Mariano, Patrick S; Dunaway-Mariano, Debra; Allen, Karen N; Farelli, Jeremiah D

    2015-04-21

    Large-scale activity profiling of enzyme superfamilies provides information about cellular functions as well as the intrinsic binding capabilities of conserved folds. Herein, the functional space of the ubiquitous haloalkanoate dehalogenase superfamily (HADSF) was revealed by screening a customized substrate library against >200 enzymes from representative prokaryotic species, enabling inferred annotation of ∼35% of the HADSF. An extremely high level of substrate ambiguity was revealed, with the majority of HADSF enzymes using more than five substrates. Substrate profiling allowed assignment of function to previously unannotated enzymes with known structure, uncovered potential new pathways, and identified iso-functional orthologs from evolutionarily distant taxonomic groups. Intriguingly, the HADSF subfamily having the least structural elaboration of the Rossmann fold catalytic domain was the most specific, consistent with the concept that domain insertions drive the evolution of new functions and that the broad specificity observed in HADSF may be a relic of this process. PMID:25848029

  8. Panoramic view of a superfamily of phosphatases through substrate profiling

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hua; Pandya, Chetanya; Liu, Chunliang; Al-Obaidi, Nawar F.; Wang, Min; Zheng, Li; Toews Keating, Sarah; Aono, Miyuki; Love, James D.; Evans, Brandon; Seidel, Ronald D.; Hillerich, Brandan S.; Garforth, Scott J.; Almo, Steven C.; Mariano, Patrick S.; Dunaway-Mariano, Debra; Allen, Karen N.; Farelli, Jeremiah D.

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale activity profiling of enzyme superfamilies provides information about cellular functions as well as the intrinsic binding capabilities of conserved folds. Herein, the functional space of the ubiquitous haloalkanoate dehalogenase superfamily (HADSF) was revealed by screening a customized substrate library against >200 enzymes from representative prokaryotic species, enabling inferred annotation of ∼35% of the HADSF. An extremely high level of substrate ambiguity was revealed, with the majority of HADSF enzymes using more than five substrates. Substrate profiling allowed assignment of function to previously unannotated enzymes with known structure, uncovered potential new pathways, and identified iso-functional orthologs from evolutionarily distant taxonomic groups. Intriguingly, the HADSF subfamily having the least structural elaboration of the Rossmann fold catalytic domain was the most specific, consistent with the concept that domain insertions drive the evolution of new functions and that the broad specificity observed in HADSF may be a relic of this process. PMID:25848029

  9. Role of Tumor Necrosis Factor Superfamily in Neuroinflammation and Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Sonar, Sandip; Lal, Girdhari

    2015-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor superfamily (TNFSF) molecules play an important role in the activation, proliferation, differentiation, and migration of immune cells into the central nervous system (CNS). Several TNF superfamily molecules are known to control alloimmunity, autoimmunity, and immunity. Development of transgenic and gene knockout animals, and monoclonal antibodies against TNFSF molecules have increased our understanding of individual receptor–ligand interactions, and their intracellular signaling during homeostasis and neuroinflammation. A strong clinical association has been observed between TNFSF members and CNS autoimmunity such as multiple sclerosis and also in its animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Therefore, they are promising targets for alternative therapeutic options to control autoimmunity. Although, TNFSF ligands are widely distributed and have diverse functions, we have restricted the discussions in this review to TNFSF receptor–ligand interactions and their role in the pathogenesis of neuroinflammation and CNS autoimmunity. PMID:26257732

  10. Clinical targeting of the TNF and TNFR superfamilies

    PubMed Central

    Croft, Michael; Benedict, Chris A.; Ware, Carl F.

    2013-01-01

    Inhibitors of tumour necrosis factor (TNF) are among the most successful protein-based drugs (biologics) and have proven to be clinically efficacious at reducing inflammation associated with several autoimmune diseases. As a result, attention is focusing on the therapeutic potential of additional members of the TNF superfamily of structurally related cytokines. Many of these TNF-related cytokines or their cognate receptors are now in preclinical or clinical development as possible targets for modulating inflammatory diseases and cancer as well as other indications. This Review focuses on the biologics that are currently in clinical trials for immune-related diseases and other syndromes, discusses the successes and failures to date as well as the expanding therapeutic potential of modulating the activity of this superfamily of molecules. PMID:23334208

  11. The evolution of the actin binding NET superfamily.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Timothy J; Deeks, Michael J; Wang, Pengwei; Hussey, Patrick J

    2014-01-01

    The Arabidopsis Networked (NET) superfamily are plant-specific actin binding proteins which specifically label different membrane compartments and identify specialized sites of interaction between actin and membranes unique to plants. There are 13 members of the superfamily in Arabidopsis, which group into four distinct clades or families. NET homologs are absent from the genomes of metazoa and fungi; furthermore, in plantae, NET sequences are also absent from the genome of mosses and more ancient extant plant clades. A single family of the NET proteins is found encoded in the club moss genome, an extant species of the earliest vascular plants. Gymnosperms have examples from families 4 and 3, with a hybrid form of NET1 and 2 which shows characteristics of both NET1 and NET2. In addition to NET3 and 4 families, the NET1 and pollen-expressed NET2 families are found only as independent sequences in Angiosperms. This is consistent with the divergence of reproductive actin. The four families are conserved across Monocots and Eudicots, with the numbers of members of each clade expanding at this point, due, in part, to regions of genome duplication. Since the emergence of the NET superfamily at the dawn of vascular plants, they have continued to develop and diversify in a manner which has mirrored the divergence and increasing complexity of land-plant species. PMID:24926301

  12. Evolutionary History of the Photolyase/Cryptochrome Superfamily in Eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Qiming; Dvornyk, Volodymyr

    2015-01-01

    Background Photolyases and cryptochromes are evolutionarily related flavoproteins, which however perform distinct physiological functions. Photolyases (PHR) are evolutionarily ancient enzymes. They are activated by light and repair DNA damage caused by UV radiation. Although cryptochromes share structural similarity with DNA photolyases, they lack DNA repair activity. Cryptochrome (CRY) is one of the key elements of the circadian system in animals. In plants, CRY acts as a blue light receptor to entrain circadian rhythms, and mediates a variety of light responses, such as the regulation of flowering and seedling growth. Results We performed a comprehensive evolutionary analysis of the CRY/PHR superfamily. The superfamily consists of 7 major subfamilies: CPD class I and CPD class II photolyases, (6–4) photolyases, CRY-DASH, plant PHR2, plant CRY and animal CRY. Although the whole superfamily evolved primarily under strong purifying selection (average ω = 0.0168), some subfamilies did experience strong episodic positive selection during their evolution. Photolyases were lost in higher animals that suggests natural selection apparently became weaker in the late stage of evolutionary history. The evolutionary time estimates suggested that plant and animal CRYs evolved in the Neoproterozoic Era (~1000–541 Mya), which might be a result of adaptation to the major climate and global light regime changes occurred in that period of the Earth’s geological history. PMID:26352435

  13. The Ferritin Superfamily: Supramolecular Templates for Materials Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Uchida, Masaki; Kang, Sebyung; Reichhardt, Courtney; Harlen, Kevin; Douglas, Trevor

    2013-01-01

    Members of the ferritin superfamily are multi-subunit cage-like proteins with a hollow interior cavity. These proteins possess three distinct surfaces, i.e. interior and exterior surfaces of the cages and interface between subunits. The interior cavity provides a unique reaction environment in which the interior reaction is separated from the external environment. In biology the cavity is utilized for sequestration of irons and biomineralization as a mechanism to render Fe inert and sequester it from the external environment. Material scientists have been inspired by this system and exploited a range of ferritin superfamily proteins as supramolecular templates to encapsulate nanoparticles and/or as well-defined building blocks for fabrication of higher order assembly. Besides the interior cavity, the exterior surface of the protein cages can be modified without altering the interior characteristics. This allows us to deliver the protein cages to a targeted tissue in vivo or to achieve controlled assembly on a solid substrate to fabricate higher order structures. Furthermore, the interface between subunits is utilized for manipulating chimeric self-assembly of the protein cages and in the generation of symmetry-broken Janus particles. Utilizing these ideas, the ferritin superfamily has been exploited for development of a broad range of materials with applications from biomedicine to electronics. PMID:20026386

  14. The evolution of the actin binding NET superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, Timothy J.; Deeks, Michael J.; Wang, Pengwei; Hussey, Patrick J.

    2014-01-01

    The Arabidopsis Networked (NET) superfamily are plant-specific actin binding proteins which specifically label different membrane compartments and identify specialized sites of interaction between actin and membranes unique to plants. There are 13 members of the superfamily in Arabidopsis, which group into four distinct clades or families. NET homologs are absent from the genomes of metazoa and fungi; furthermore, in plantae, NET sequences are also absent from the genome of mosses and more ancient extant plant clades. A single family of the NET proteins is found encoded in the club moss genome, an extant species of the earliest vascular plants. Gymnosperms have examples from families 4 and 3, with a hybrid form of NET1 and 2 which shows characteristics of both NET1 and NET2. In addition to NET3 and 4 families, the NET1 and pollen-expressed NET2 families are found only as independent sequences in Angiosperms. This is consistent with the divergence of reproductive actin. The four families are conserved across Monocots and Eudicots, with the numbers of members of each clade expanding at this point, due, in part, to regions of genome duplication. Since the emergence of the NET superfamily at the dawn of vascular plants, they have continued to develop and diversify in a manner which has mirrored the divergence and increasing complexity of land-plant species. PMID:24926301

  15. SCOPmap: Automated assignment of protein structures to evolutionary superfamilies

    PubMed Central

    Cheek, Sara; Qi, Yuan; Krishna, S Sri; Kinch, Lisa N; Grishin, Nick V

    2004-01-01

    Background Inference of remote homology between proteins is very challenging and remains a prerogative of an expert. Thus a significant drawback to the use of evolutionary-based protein structure classifications is the difficulty in assigning new proteins to unique positions in the classification scheme with automatic methods. To address this issue, we have developed an algorithm to map protein domains to an existing structural classification scheme and have applied it to the SCOP database. Results The general strategy employed by this algorithm is to combine the results of several existing sequence and structure comparison tools applied to a query protein of known structure in order to find the homologs already classified in SCOP database and thus determine classification assignments. The algorithm is able to map domains within newly solved structures to the appropriate SCOP superfamily level with ~95% accuracy. Examples of correctly mapped remote homologs are discussed. The algorithm is also capable of identifying potential evolutionary relationships not specified in the SCOP database, thus helping to make it better. The strategy of the mapping algorithm is not limited to SCOP and can be applied to any other evolutionary-based classification scheme as well. SCOPmap is available for download. Conclusion The SCOPmap program is useful for assigning domains in newly solved structures to appropriate superfamilies and for identifying evolutionary links between different superfamilies. PMID:15598351

  16. Monoterpene metabolism. Cloning, expression, and characterization of (-)-isopiperitenol/(-)-carveol dehydrogenase of peppermint and spearmint.

    PubMed

    Ringer, Kerry L; Davis, Edward M; Croteau, Rodney

    2005-03-01

    The essential oils of peppermint (Mentha x piperita) and spearmint (Mentha spicata) are distinguished by the oxygenation position on the p-menthane ring of the constitutive monoterpenes that is conferred by two regiospecific cytochrome P450 limonene-3- and limonene-6-hydroxylases. Following hydroxylation of limonene, an apparently similar dehydrogenase oxidizes (-)-trans-isopiperitenol to (-)-isopiperitenone in peppermint and (-)-trans-carveol to (-)-carvone in spearmint. Random sequencing of a peppermint oil gland secretory cell cDNA library revealed a large number of clones that specified redox-type enzymes, including dehydrogenases. Full-length dehydrogenase clones were screened by functional expression in Escherichia coli using a recently developed in situ assay. A single full-length acquisition encoding (-)-trans-isopiperitenol dehydrogenase (ISPD) was isolated. The (-)-ISPD cDNA has an open reading frame of 795 bp that encodes a 265-residue enzyme with a calculated molecular mass of 27,191. Nondegenerate primers were designed based on the (-)-trans-ISPD cDNA sequence and employed to screen a spearmint oil gland secretory cell cDNA library from which a 5'-truncated cDNA encoding the spearmint homolog, (-)-trans-carveol-dehydrogenase, was isolated. Reverse transcription-PCR amplification and RACE were used to acquire the remaining 5'-sequence from RNA isolated from oil gland secretory cells of spearmint leaf. The full-length spearmint dehydrogenase shares >99% amino acid identity with its peppermint homolog and both dehydrogenases are capable of utilizing (-)-trans-isopiperitenol and (-)-trans-carveol. These isopiperitenol/carveol dehydrogenases are members of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily and are related to other plant short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases involved in secondary metabolism (lignan biosynthesis), stress responses, and phytosteroid biosynthesis, but they are quite dissimilar (approximately 13% identity) to the monoterpene

  17. Michael hydratase alcohol dehydrogenase or just alcohol dehydrogenase?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The Michael hydratase – alcohol dehydrogenase (MhyADH) from Alicycliphilus denitrificans was previously identified as a bi-functional enzyme performing a hydration of α,β-unsaturated ketones and subsequent oxidation of the formed alcohols. The investigations of the bi-functionality were based on a spectrophotometric assay and an activity staining in a native gel of the dehydrogenase. New insights in the recently discovered organocatalytic Michael addition of water led to the conclusion that the previously performed experiments to identify MhyADH as a bi-functional enzyme and their results need to be reconsidered and the reliability of the methodology used needs to be critically evaluated. PMID:24949265

  18. Genetics Home Reference: lactate dehydrogenase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... dehydrogenase-B pieces (subunits) of the lactate dehydrogenase enzyme. This enzyme is found throughout the body and is important ... cells. There are five different forms of this enzyme, each made up of four protein subunits. Various ...

  19. A new protein superfamily: TPPP-like proteins.

    PubMed

    Orosz, Ferenc

    2012-01-01

    The introduction of the term 'Tubulin Polymerization Promoting Protein (TPPP)-like proteins' is suggested. They constitute a eukaryotic protein superfamily, characterized by the presence of the p25alpha domain (Pfam05517, IPR008907), and named after the first identified member, TPPP/p25, exhibiting microtubule stabilizing function. TPPP-like proteins can be grouped on the basis of two characteristics: the length of their p25alpha domain, which can be long, short, truncated or partial, and the presence or absence of additional domain(s). TPPPs, in the strict sense, contain no other domains but one long or short p25alpha one (long- and short-type TPPPs, respectively). Proteins possessing truncated p25alpha domain are first described in this paper. They evolved from the long-type TPPPs and can be considered as arthropod-specific paralogs of long-type TPPPs. Phylogenetic analysis shows that the two groups (long-type and truncated TPPPs) split in the common ancestor of arthropods. Incomplete p25alpha domains can be found in multidomain TPPP-like proteins as well. The various subfamilies occur with a characteristic phyletic distribution: e. g., animal genomes/proteomes contain almost without exception long-type TPPPs; the multidomain apicortins occur almost exclusively in apicomplexan parasites. There are no data about the physiological function of these proteins except two human long-type TPPP paralogs which are involved in developmental processes of the brain and the musculoskeletal system, respectively. I predict that the superfamily members containing long or partial p25alpha domain are often intrinsically disordered proteins, while those with short or truncated domain(s) are structurally ordered. Interestingly, members of this superfamily connected or maybe connected to diseases are intrinsically disordered proteins. PMID:23166627

  20. A New Protein Superfamily: TPPP-Like Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Orosz, Ferenc

    2012-01-01

    The introduction of the term ‘Tubulin Polymerization Promoting Protein (TPPP)-like proteins’ is suggested. They constitute a eukaryotic protein superfamily, characterized by the presence of the p25alpha domain (Pfam05517, IPR008907), and named after the first identified member, TPPP/p25, exhibiting microtubule stabilizing function. TPPP-like proteins can be grouped on the basis of two characteristics: the length of their p25alpha domain, which can be long, short, truncated or partial, and the presence or absence of additional domain(s). TPPPs, in the strict sense, contain no other domains but one long or short p25alpha one (long- and short-type TPPPs, respectively). Proteins possessing truncated p25alpha domain are first described in this paper. They evolved from the long-type TPPPs and can be considered as arthropod-specific paralogs of long-type TPPPs. Phylogenetic analysis shows that the two groups (long-type and truncated TPPPs) split in the common ancestor of arthropods. Incomplete p25alpha domains can be found in multidomain TPPP-like proteins as well. The various subfamilies occur with a characteristic phyletic distribution: e. g., animal genomes/proteomes contain almost without exception long-type TPPPs; the multidomain apicortins occur almost exclusively in apicomplexan parasites. There are no data about the physiological function of these proteins except two human long-type TPPP paralogs which are involved in developmental processes of the brain and the musculoskeletal system, respectively. I predict that the superfamily members containing long or partial p25alpha domain are often intrinsically disordered proteins, while those with short or truncated domain(s) are structurally ordered. Interestingly, members of this superfamily connected or maybe connected to diseases are intrinsically disordered proteins. PMID:23166627

  1. Origin and evolution of medium chain alcohol dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Jörnvall, Hans; Hedlund, Joel; Bergman, Tomas; Kallberg, Yvonne; Cederlund, Ella; Persson, Bengt

    2013-02-25

    Different lines of alcohol dehydrogenases (ADHs) have separate superfamily origins, already recognized but now extended and re-evaluated by re-screening of the latest databank update. The short-chain form (SDR) is still the superfamily with most abundant occurrence, most multiple divergence, most prokaryotic emphasis, and most non-complicated architecture. This pattern is compatible with an early appearance at the time of the emergence of prokaryotic cellular life. The medium-chain form (MDR) is also old but second in terms of all the parameters above, and therefore compatible with a second emergence. However, this step appears seemingly earlier than previously considered, and may indicate sub-stages of early emergences at the increased resolution available from the now greater number of data entries. The Zn-MDR origin constitutes a third stage, possibly compatible with the transition to oxidative conditions on earth. Within all these three lines, repeated enzymogeneses gave the present divergence. MDR-ADH origin(s), at a fourth stage, may also be further resolved in multiple or extended modes, but the classical liver MDR-ADH of the liver type can still be traced to a gene duplication ~550 MYA (million years ago), at the early vertebrate radiation, compatible with the post-eon-shift, "Cambrian explosion". Classes and isozymes correspond to subsequent and recent duplicatory events, respectively. They illustrate a peculiar pattern with functional and emerging evolutionary distinctions between parent and emerging lines, suggesting a parallelism between duplicatory and mutational events, now also visible at separate sub-stages. Combined, all forms show distinctive patterns at different levels and illustrate correlations with global events. They further show that simple molecular observations on patterns, multiplicities and occurrence give much information, suggesting common divergence rules not much disturbed by horizontal gene transfers after the initial origins. PMID

  2. TNF Superfamily: A Growing Saga of Kidney Injury Modulators

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Niño, Maria D.; Benito-Martin, Alberto; Gonçalves, Sara; Sanz, Ana B.; Ucero, Alvaro C.; Izquierdo, Maria C.; Ramos, Adrian M.; Berzal, Sergio; Selgas, Rafael; Ruiz-Ortega, Marta; Egido, Jesus; Ortiz, Alberto

    2010-01-01

    Members of the TNF superfamily participate in kidney disease. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and Fas ligand regulate renal cell survival and inflammation, and therapeutic targeting improves the outcome of experimental renal injury. TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL and its potential decoy receptor osteoprotegerin are the two most upregulated death-related genes in human diabetic nephropathy. TRAIL activates NF-kappaB in tubular cells and promotes apoptosis in tubular cells and podocytes, especially in a high-glucose environment. By contrast, osteoprotegerin plays a protective role against TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Another family member, TNF-like weak inducer of apoptosis (TWEAK induces inflammation and tubular cell death or proliferation, depending on the microenvironment. While TNF only activates canonical NF-kappaB signaling, TWEAK promotes both canonical and noncanonical NF-kappaB activation in tubular cells, regulating different inflammatory responses. TWEAK promotes the secretion of MCP-1 and RANTES through NF-kappaB RelA-containing complexes and upregulates CCl21 and CCL19 expression through NF-kappaB inducing kinase (NIK-) dependent RelB/NF-kappaB2 complexes. In vivo TWEAK promotes postnephrectomy compensatory renal cell proliferation in a noninflammatory milieu. However, in the inflammatory milieu of acute kidney injury, TWEAK promotes tubular cell death and inflammation. Therapeutic targeting of TNF superfamily cytokines, including multipronged approaches targeting several cytokines should be further explored. PMID:20953353

  3. Structure-Based Phylogenetic Analysis of the Lipocalin Superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Lakshmi, Balasubramanian; Mishra, Madhulika; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy; Archunan, Govindaraju

    2015-01-01

    Lipocalins constitute a superfamily of extracellular proteins that are found in all three kingdoms of life. Although very divergent in their sequences and functions, they show remarkable similarity in 3-D structures. Lipocalins bind and transport small hydrophobic molecules. Earlier sequence-based phylogenetic studies of lipocalins highlighted that they have a long evolutionary history. However the molecular and structural basis of their functional diversity is not completely understood. The main objective of the present study is to understand functional diversity of the lipocalins using a structure-based phylogenetic approach. The present study with 39 protein domains from the lipocalin superfamily suggests that the clusters of lipocalins obtained by structure-based phylogeny correspond well with the functional diversity. The detailed analysis on each of the clusters and sub-clusters reveals that the 39 lipocalin domains cluster based on their mode of ligand binding though the clustering was performed on the basis of gross domain structure. The outliers in the phylogenetic tree are often from single member families. Also structure-based phylogenetic approach has provided pointers to assign putative function for the domains of unknown function in lipocalin family. The approach employed in the present study can be used in the future for the functional identification of new lipocalin proteins and may be extended to other protein families where members show poor sequence similarity but high structural similarity. PMID:26263546

  4. Membrane and Protein Interactions of the Pleckstrin Homology Domain Superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Lenoir, Marc; Kufareva, Irina; Abagyan, Ruben; Overduin, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The human genome encodes about 285 proteins that contain at least one annotated pleckstrin homology (PH) domain. As the first phosphoinositide binding module domain to be discovered, the PH domain recruits diverse protein architectures to cellular membranes. PH domains constitute one of the largest protein superfamilies, and have diverged to regulate many different signaling proteins and modules such as Dbl homology (DH) and Tec homology (TH) domains. The ligands of approximately 70 PH domains have been validated by binding assays and complexed structures, allowing meaningful extrapolation across the entire superfamily. Here the Membrane Optimal Docking Area (MODA) program is used at a genome-wide level to identify all membrane docking PH structures and map their lipid-binding determinants. In addition to the linear sequence motifs which are employed for phosphoinositide recognition, the three dimensional structural features that allow peripheral membrane domains to approach and insert into the bilayer are pinpointed and can be predicted ab initio. The analysis shows that conserved structural surfaces distinguish which PH domains associate with membrane from those that do not. Moreover, the results indicate that lipid-binding PH domains can be classified into different functional subgroups based on the type of membrane insertion elements they project towards the bilayer. PMID:26512702

  5. Membrane and Protein Interactions of the Pleckstrin Homology Domain Superfamily.

    PubMed

    Lenoir, Marc; Kufareva, Irina; Abagyan, Ruben; Overduin, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The human genome encodes about 285 proteins that contain at least one annotated pleckstrin homology (PH) domain. As the first phosphoinositide binding module domain to be discovered, the PH domain recruits diverse protein architectures to cellular membranes. PH domains constitute one of the largest protein superfamilies, and have diverged to regulate many different signaling proteins and modules such as Dbl homology (DH) and Tec homology (TH) domains. The ligands of approximately 70 PH domains have been validated by binding assays and complexed structures, allowing meaningful extrapolation across the entire superfamily. Here the Membrane Optimal Docking Area (MODA) program is used at a genome-wide level to identify all membrane docking PH structures and map their lipid-binding determinants. In addition to the linear sequence motifs which are employed for phosphoinositide recognition, the three dimensional structural features that allow peripheral membrane domains to approach and insert into the bilayer are pinpointed and can be predicted ab initio. The analysis shows that conserved structural surfaces distinguish which PH domains associate with membrane from those that do not. Moreover, the results indicate that lipid-binding PH domains can be classified into different functional subgroups based on the type of membrane insertion elements they project towards the bilayer. PMID:26512702

  6. Tumor Necrosis Factor Superfamily in Innate Immunity and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Šedý, John; Bekiaris, Vasileios; Ware, Carl F.

    2015-01-01

    The tumor necrosis factor superfamily (TNFSF) and its corresponding receptor superfamily (TNFRSF) form communication pathways required for developmental, homeostatic, and stimulus-responsive processes in vivo. Although this receptor–ligand system operates between many different cell types and organ systems, many of these proteins play specific roles in immune system function. The TNFSF and TNFRSF proteins lymphotoxins, LIGHT (homologous to lymphotoxins, exhibits inducible expression, and competes with HSV glycoprotein D for herpes virus entry mediator [HVEM], a receptor expressed by T lymphocytes), lymphotoxin-β receptor (LT-βR), and HVEM are used by embryonic and adult innate lymphocytes to promote the development and homeostasis of lymphoid organs. Lymphotoxin-expressing innate-acting B cells construct microenvironments in lymphoid organs that restrict pathogen spread and initiate interferon defenses. Recent results illustrate how the communication networks formed among these cytokines and the coreceptors B and T lymphocyte attenuator (BTLA) and CD160 both inhibit and activate innate lymphoid cells (ILCs), innate γδ T cells, and natural killer (NK) cells. Understanding the role of TNFSF/TNFRSF and interacting proteins in innate cells will likely reveal avenues for future therapeutics for human disease. PMID:25524549

  7. Tumor necrosis factor superfamily in innate immunity and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Šedý, John; Bekiaris, Vasileios; Ware, Carl F

    2015-04-01

    The tumor necrosis factor superfamily (TNFSF) and its corresponding receptor superfamily (TNFRSF) form communication pathways required for developmental, homeostatic, and stimulus-responsive processes in vivo. Although this receptor-ligand system operates between many different cell types and organ systems, many of these proteins play specific roles in immune system function. The TNFSF and TNFRSF proteins lymphotoxins, LIGHT (homologous to lymphotoxins, exhibits inducible expression, and competes with HSV glycoprotein D for herpes virus entry mediator [HVEM], a receptor expressed by T lymphocytes), lymphotoxin-β receptor (LT-βR), and HVEM are used by embryonic and adult innate lymphocytes to promote the development and homeostasis of lymphoid organs. Lymphotoxin-expressing innate-acting B cells construct microenvironments in lymphoid organs that restrict pathogen spread and initiate interferon defenses. Recent results illustrate how the communication networks formed among these cytokines and the coreceptors B and T lymphocyte attenuator (BTLA) and CD160 both inhibit and activate innate lymphoid cells (ILCs), innate γδ T cells, and natural killer (NK) cells. Understanding the role of TNFSF/TNFRSF and interacting proteins in innate cells will likely reveal avenues for future therapeutics for human disease. PMID:25524549

  8. Diversity, classification and function of the plant protein kinase superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Lehti-Shiu, Melissa D.; Shiu, Shin-Han

    2012-01-01

    Eukaryotic protein kinases belong to a large superfamily with hundreds to thousands of copies and are components of essentially all cellular functions. The goals of this study are to classify protein kinases from 25 plant species and to assess their evolutionary history in conjunction with consideration of their molecular functions. The protein kinase superfamily has expanded in the flowering plant lineage, in part through recent duplications. As a result, the flowering plant protein kinase repertoire, or kinome, is in general significantly larger than other eukaryotes, ranging in size from 600 to 2500 members. This large variation in kinome size is mainly due to the expansion and contraction of a few families, particularly the receptor-like kinase/Pelle family. A number of protein kinases reside in highly conserved, low copy number families and often play broadly conserved regulatory roles in metabolism and cell division, although functions of plant homologues have often diverged from their metazoan counterparts. Members of expanded plant kinase families often have roles in plant-specific processes and some may have contributed to adaptive evolution. Nonetheless, non-adaptive explanations, such as kinase duplicate subfunctionalization and insufficient time for pseudogenization, may also contribute to the large number of seemingly functional protein kinases in plants. PMID:22889912

  9. Topological and Phylogenetic Analyses of Bacterial Holin Families and Superfamilies

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Bhaskara L.; Saier, Milton H.

    2013-01-01

    Holins are small “hole-forming” transmembrane proteins that mediate bacterial cell lysis during programmed cell death or following phage infection. We have identified fifty two families of established or putative holins and have included representative members of these proteins in the Transporter Classification Database (TCDB; www.tcdb.org). We have identified the organismal sources of members of these families, calculated their average protein sizes, estimated their topologies and determined their relative family sizes. Topological analyses suggest that these proteins can have 1, 2, 3 or 4 transmembrane α-helical segments (TMSs), and members of a single family are frequently, but not always, of a single topology. In one case, proteins of a family proved to have either 2 or 4 TMSs, and the latter arose by intragenic duplication of a primordial 2 TMS protein-encoding gene resembling the former. Using established statistical approaches, some of these families have been shown to be related by common descent. Seven superfamilies, including 21 of the 52 recognized families were identified. Conserved motif and Pfam analyses confirmed most superfamily assignments. These results serve to expand upon the scope of channel-forming bacterial holins. PMID:23856191

  10. Phylogenetic Diversification of the Globin Gene Superfamily in Chordates

    PubMed Central

    Storz, Jay F.; Opazo, Juan C.; Hoffmann, Federico G.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Phylogenetic reconstructions provide a means of inferring the branching relationships among members of multigene families that have diversified via successive rounds of gene duplication and divergence. Such reconstructions can illuminate the pathways by which particular expression patterns and protein functions evolved. For example, phylogenetic analyses can reveal cases in which similar expression patterns or functional properties evolved independently in different lineages, either through convergence, parallelism, or evolutionary reversals. The purpose of this paper is to provide a robust phylogenetic framework for interpreting experimental data and for generating hypotheses about the functional evolution of globin proteins in chordate animals. To do this we present a consensus phylogeny of the chordate globin gene superfamily. We document the relative roles of gene duplication and whole-genome duplication in fueling the functional diversification of vertebrate globins, and we unravel patterns of shared ancestry among globin genes from representatives of the three chordate subphyla (Craniata, Urochordata, and Cephalochordata). Our results demonstrate the value of integrating phylogenetic analyses with genomic analyses of conserved synteny to infer the duplicative origins and evolutionary histories of globin genes. We also discuss a number of case studies that illustrate the importance of phylogenetic information when making inferences about the evolution of globin gene expression and protein function. Finally, we discuss why the globin gene superfamily presents special challenges for phylogenetic analysis, and we describe methodological approaches that can be used to meet those challenges. PMID:21557448

  11. The Defensins Consist of Two Independent, Convergent Protein Superfamilies.

    PubMed

    Shafee, Thomas M A; Lay, Fung T; Hulett, Mark D; Anderson, Marilyn A

    2016-09-01

    The defensin and defensin-like proteins are an extensive group of small, cationic, disulfide-rich proteins found in animals, plants, and fungi and mostly perform roles in host defense. The term defensin was originally used for small mammalian proteins found in neutrophils and was subsequently applied to insect proteins and plant γ-thionins based on their perceived sequence and structural similarity. Defensins are often described as ancient innate immunity molecules and classified as a single superfamily and both sequence alignments and phylogenies have been constructed. Here, we present evidence that the defensins have not all evolved from a single ancestor. Instead, they consist of two analogous superfamilies, and extensive convergent evolution is the source of their similarities. Evidence of common origin necessarily gets weaker for distantly related genes, as is the case for defensins, which are both divergent and small. We show that similarities that have been used as evidence for common origin are all expected by chance in short, constrained, disulfide-rich proteins. Differences in tertiary structure, secondary structure order, and disulfide bond connectivity indicate convergence as the likely source of the similarity. We refer to the two evolutionarily independent groups as the cis-defensins and trans-defensins based on the orientation of the most conserved pair of disulfides. PMID:27297472

  12. Kinesin superfamily proteins (KIFs) in the mouse transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Miki, Harukata; Setou, Mitsutoshi; Hirokawa, Nobutaka

    2003-06-01

    In the post genomic era where virtually all the genes and the proteins are known, an important task is to provide a comprehensive analysis of the expression of important classes of genes, such as those that are required for intracellular transport. We report the comprehensive analysis of the Kinesin Superfamily, which is the first and only large protein family whose constituents have been completely identified and confirmed in silico and at the cDNA, mRNA level. In FANTOM2, we have found 90 clones from 33 Kinesin Superfamily Protein (KIF) gene loci. The clones were analyzed in reference to sequence state, library of origin, detection methods, and alternative splicing. More than half of the representative transcriptional units (TU) were full length. The FANTOM2 library also contains novel splice variants previously unreported. We have compared and evaluated various protein classification tools and protein search methods using this data set. This report provides a foundation for future research of the intracellular transport along microtubules and proves the significance of intracellular transport protein transcripts as part of the transcriptome. PMID:12819144

  13. Ancient Origin of the New Developmental Superfamily DANGER

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, D. Neil; Barrow, Roxanne K.; Snyder, Solomon H.; van Rossum, Damian B.; Patterson, Randen L.

    2007-01-01

    Developmental proteins play a pivotal role in the origin of animal complexity and diversity. We report here the identification of a highly divergent developmental protein superfamily (DANGER), which originated before the emergence of animals (∼850 million years ago) and experienced major expansion-contraction events during metazoan evolution. Sequence analysis demonstrates that DANGER proteins diverged via multiple mechanisms, including amino acid substitution, intron gain and/or loss, and recombination. Divergence for DANGER proteins is substantially greater than for the prototypic member of the superfamily (Mab-21 family) and other developmental protein families (e.g., WNT proteins). DANGER proteins are widely expressed and display species-dependent tissue expression patterns, with many members having roles in development. DANGER1A, which regulates the inositol trisphosphate receptor, promotes the differentiation and outgrowth of neuronal processes. Regulation of development may be a universal function of DANGER family members. This family provides a model system to investigate how rapid protein divergence contributes to morphological complexity. PMID:17301879

  14. Comparative analysis of cation/proton antiporter superfamily in plants

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Chuyu; Yang, Xiaohan; Xia, Xinli; Yin, Weilun

    2013-01-01

    The cation/proton antiporter superfamily is associated with the transport of monovalent cations across membranes. This superfamily was annotated in the Arabidopsis genome and some members were functionally characterized. In the present study, a systematic analysis of the cation/proton antiporter genes in diverse plant specieswas reported.We identified 240 cation/proton antiporters in alga, moss, and angiosperm. A phylogenetic tree was constructed showing these 240members are separated into three families, i.e., Na+/H+ exchangers, K+ efflux antiporters, and cation/H+ exchangers. Our analysis revealed that tandem and/or segmental duplications contribute to the expansion of cation/H+ exchangers in the examined angiospermspecies. Sliding windowanalysis of the nonsynonymous/synonymous substitution ratios showed some differences in the evolutionary fate of cation/proton antiporter paralogs. Furthermore, we identified over-represented motifs among these 240 proteins and foundmostmotifs are family specific, demonstrating diverse evolution of the cation/proton antiporters among three families. In addition, we investigated the co-expressed genes of the cation/proton antiporters in Arabidopsis thaliana. The results showed some biological processes are enriched in the co-expressed genes, suggesting the cation/proton antiporters may be involved in these biological processes. Taken together, this study furthers our knowledge on cation/proton antiporters in plants.

  15. Short interspersed elements (SINEs) of the Geomyoidea superfamily rodents.

    PubMed

    Gogolevsky, Konstantin P; Kramerov, Dmitri A

    2006-05-24

    A new short interspersed element (SINE) was isolated from the genome of desert kangaroo rat (Dipodomys deserti) using single-primer PCR. This SINE consists of two monomers: the left monomer (IDL) resembles rodent ID element and other tRNAAla(CGC)-derived SINEs, whereas the right one (Geo) shows no similarity with known SINE sequences. PCR and hybridization analyses demonstrated that IDL-Geo SINE is restricted to the rodent superfamily Geomyoidea (families Geomyidea and Heteromyidea). Isolation and analysis of IDL-Geo from California pocket mouse (Chaetodipus californicus) and Botta's pocket gopher (Thomomys bottae) revealed some species-specific features of this SINE family. The structure and evolution of known dimeric SINEs are discussed. PMID:16517098

  16. Promiscuity and electrostatic flexibility in the alkaline phosphatase superfamily.

    PubMed

    Pabis, Anna; Kamerlin, Shina Caroline Lynn

    2016-04-01

    Catalytic promiscuity, that is, the ability of single enzymes to facilitate the turnover of multiple, chemically distinct substrates, is a widespread phenomenon that plays an important role in the evolution of enzyme function. Additionally, such pre-existing multifunctionality can be harnessed in artificial enzyme design. The members of the alkaline phosphatase superfamily have served extensively as both experimental and computational model systems for enhancing our understanding of catalytic promiscuity. In this Opinion, we present key recent computational studies into the catalytic activity of these highly promiscuous enzymes, highlighting the valuable insight they have provided into both the molecular basis for catalytic promiscuity in general, and its implications for the evolution of phosphatase activity. PMID:26716576

  17. TGF-β superfamily: how does it regulate testis development.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yun-Shu; Hu, Yan-Jun; Yang, Wan-Xi

    2012-04-01

    Testis development is a highly regulated sequence of developmental process that spans from the establishment of germ cell lineage during embryonic development to the periodic wave of spermatogenesis in adulthood. The normal development of testes and the fertility of male animals require specific cell types to respond correctly at a specific time point, the process of which is precisely regulated by various factors. Several members of the transforming growth factor-β superfamily are shown to be the key mediators. They act as the extracellular ligand of signaling transduction that regulates the proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis and other cell behaviors to help coordinate the physiology of the cells to the overall development of the testis and the organism. This paper reviews the current understanding of some of TGF-βs' major regulatory roles in the overall process of testis development, analyzes the current studies and their limitations and points out the research areas that need further investigation. PMID:21947950

  18. Covalent Docking Predicts Substrates for Haloalkanoate Dehalogenase Superfamily Phosphatases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Enzyme function prediction remains an important open problem. Though structure-based modeling, such as metabolite docking, can identify substrates of some enzymes, it is ill-suited to reactions that progress through a covalent intermediate. Here we investigated the ability of covalent docking to identify substrates that pass through such a covalent intermediate, focusing particularly on the haloalkanoate dehalogenase superfamily. In retrospective assessments, covalent docking recapitulated substrate binding modes of known cocrystal structures and identified experimental substrates from a set of putative phosphorylated metabolites. In comparison, noncovalent docking of high-energy intermediates yielded nonproductive poses. In prospective predictions against seven enzymes, a substrate was identified for five. For one of those cases, a covalent docking prediction, confirmed by empirical screening, and combined with genomic context analysis, suggested the identity of the enzyme that catalyzes the orphan phosphatase reaction in the riboflavin biosynthetic pathway of Bacteroides. PMID:25513739

  19. Intracellular Transport and Kinesin Superfamily Proteins: Structure, Function and Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirokawa, N.; Takemura, R.

    Using various molecular cell biological and molecular genetic approaches, we identified kinesin superfamily proteins (KIFs) and characterized their significant functions in intracellular transport, which is fundamental for cellular morphogenesis, functioning, and survival. We showed that KIFs not only transport various membranous organelles, proteins complexes and mRNAs fundamental for cellular functions but also play significant roles in higher brain functions such as memory and learning, determination of important developmental processes such as left-right asymmetry formation and brain wiring. We also elucidated that KIFs recognize and bind to their specific cargoes using scaffolding or adaptor protein complexes. Concerning the mechanism of motility, we discovered the simplest unique monomeric motor KIF1A and determined by molecular biophysics, cryoelectron microscopy and X-ray crystallography that KIF1A can move on a microtubule processively as a monomer by biased Brownian motion and by hydolyzing ATP.

  20. Subtilases: the superfamily of subtilisin-like serine proteases.

    PubMed Central

    Siezen, R. J.; Leunissen, J. A.

    1997-01-01

    Subtilases are members of the clan (or superfamily) of subtilisin-like serine proteases. Over 200 subtilases are presently known, more than 170 of which with their complete amino acid sequence. In this update of our previous overview (Siezen RJ, de Vos WM, Leunissen JAM, Dijkstra BW, 1991, Protein Eng 4:719-731), details of more than 100 new subtilases discovered in the past five years are summarized, and amino acid sequences of their catalytic domains are compared in a multiple sequence alignment. Based on sequence homology, a subdivision into six families is proposed. Highly conserved residues of the catalytic domain are identified, as are large or unusual deletions and insertions. Predictions have been updated for Ca(2+)-binding sites, disulfide bonds, and substrate specificity, based on both sequence alignment and three-dimensional homology modeling. PMID:9070434

  1. Insight into the stereospecificity of short-chain thermus thermophilus alcohol dehydrogenase showing pro-S hydride transfer and prelog enantioselectivity.

    PubMed

    Pennacchio, Angela; Giordano, Assunta; Esposito, Luciana; Langella, Emma; Rossi, Mosè; Raia, Carlo A

    2010-04-01

    The stereochemistry of the hydride transfer in reactions catalyzed by NAD(H)-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase from Thermus thermophilus HB27 was determined by means of (1)H-NMR spectroscopy. The enzyme transfers the pro-S hydrogen of [4R-(2)H]NADH and exhibits Prelog specificity. Enzyme-substrate docking calculations provided structural details about the enantioselectivity of this thermophilic enzyme. These results give additional insights into the diverse active site architectures of the largely versatile short-chain dehydrogenase superfamily enzymes. A feasible protocol for the synthesis of [4R-(2)H]NADH with high yield was also set up by enzymatic oxidation of 2-propanol-d(8) catalyzed by Bacillus stearothermophilus alcohol dehydrogenase. PMID:19807673

  2. Modeling catalytic promiscuity in the alkaline phosphatase superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Duarte, Fernanda; Amrein, Beat Anton

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, it has become increasingly clear that promiscuity plays a key role in the evolution of new enzyme function. This finding has helped to elucidate fundamental aspects of molecular evolution. While there has been extensive experimental work on enzyme promiscuity, computational modeling of the chemical details of such promiscuity has traditionally fallen behind the advances in experimental studies, not least due to the nearly prohibitive computational cost involved in examining multiple substrates with multiple potential mechanisms and binding modes in atomic detail with a reasonable degree of accuracy. However, recent advances in both computational methodologies and power have allowed us to reach a stage in the field where we can start to overcome this problem, and molecular simulations can now provide accurate and efficient descriptions of complex biological systems with substantially less computational cost. This has led to significant advances in our understanding of enzyme function and evolution in a broader sense. Here, we will discuss currently available computational approaches that can allow us to probe the underlying molecular basis for enzyme specificity and selectivity, discussing the inherent strengths and weaknesses of each approach. As a case study, we will discuss recent computational work on different members of the alkaline phosphatase superfamily (AP) using a range of different approaches, showing the complementary insights they have provided. We have selected this particular superfamily, as it poses a number of significant challenges for theory, ranging from the complexity of the actual reaction mechanisms involved to the reliable modeling of the catalytic metal centers, as well as the very large system sizes. We will demonstrate that, through current advances in methodologies, computational tools can provide significant insight into the molecular basis for catalytic promiscuity, and, therefore, in turn, the mechanisms of protein

  3. Genome-level and biochemical diversity of the acyl-activating enzyme superfamily in plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In higher plants, the superfamily of carboxyl-CoA ligases and related proteins, collectively called acyl activating enzymes (AAEs), has evolved to provide enzymes for many pathways of primary and secondary metabolism and for the conjugation of hormones to amino acids. Across the superfamily there is...

  4. The DJ-1 superfamily members YhbO and YajL from Escherichia coli repair proteins from glycation by methylglyoxal and glyoxal.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, Jad; Mihoub, Mouadh; Gautier, Valérie; Richarme, Gilbert

    2016-02-01

    YhbO and YajL belong to the PfpI/Hsp31/DJ-1 superfamily. Both proteins are involved in protection against environmental stresses. Here, we show that, like DJ-1 and Hsp31, they repair glyoxal- and methylglyoxal-glycated proteins. YhbO and YajL repair glycated serum albumin, collagen, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, and fructose biphosphate aldolase. Bacterial extracts from deglycase mutants display increased glycation levels, whereas deglycase overexpression decreases protein glycation. Moreover, yhbO and yajL mutants display decreased viability in methylglyoxal- or glucose-containing media. Finally, the apparent glyoxalase activities of YhbO and YajL reflect their deglycase activities. PMID:26774339

  5. Function, kinetic properties, crystallization, and regulation of microbial malate dehydrogenase*

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi-Íñiguez, Tóshiko; Aburto-Rodríguez, Nelly; Vilchis-González, Ana Laura; Flores, María Elena

    2016-01-01

    Malate dehydrogenase (MDH) is an enzyme widely distributed among living organisms and is a key protein in the central oxidative pathway. It catalyzes the interconversion between malate and oxaloacetate using NAD+ or NADP+ as a cofactor. Surprisingly, this enzyme has been extensively studied in eukaryotes but there are few reports about this enzyme in prokaryotes. It is necessary to review the relevant information to gain a better understanding of the function of this enzyme. Our review of the data generated from studies in bacteria shows much diversity in their molecular properties, including weight, oligomeric states, cofactor and substrate binding affinities, as well as differences in the direction of the enzymatic reaction. Furthermore, due to the importance of its function, the transcription and activity of this enzyme are rigorously regulated. Crystal structures of MDH from different bacterial sources led to the identification of the regions involved in substrate and cofactor binding and the residues important for the dimer-dimer interface. This structural information allows one to make direct modifications to improve the enzyme catalysis by increasing its activity, cofactor binding capacity, substrate specificity, and thermostability. A comparative analysis of the phylogenetic reconstruction of MDH reveals interesting facts about its evolutionary history, dividing this superfamily of proteins into two principle clades and establishing relationships between MDHs from different cellular compartments from archaea, bacteria, and eukaryotes.

  6. Escherichia coli d-Malate Dehydrogenase, a Generalist Enzyme Active in the Leucine Biosynthesis Pathway*

    PubMed Central

    Vorobieva, Anastassia A.; Khan, Mohammad Shahneawz; Soumillion, Patrice

    2014-01-01

    The enzymes of the β-decarboxylating dehydrogenase superfamily catalyze the oxidative decarboxylation of d-malate-based substrates with various specificities. Here, we show that, in addition to its natural function affording bacterial growth on d-malate as a carbon source, the d-malate dehydrogenase of Escherichia coli (EcDmlA) naturally expressed from its chromosomal gene is capable of complementing leucine auxotrophy in a leuB− strain lacking the paralogous isopropylmalate dehydrogenase enzyme. To our knowledge, this is the first example of an enzyme that contributes with a physiologically relevant level of activity to two distinct pathways of the core metabolism while expressed from its chromosomal locus. EcDmlA features relatively high catalytic activity on at least three different substrates (l(+)-tartrate, d-malate, and 3-isopropylmalate). Because of these properties both in vivo and in vitro, EcDmlA may be defined as a generalist enzyme. Phylogenetic analysis highlights an ancient origin of DmlA, indicating that the enzyme has maintained its generalist character throughout evolution. We discuss the implication of these findings for protein evolution. PMID:25160617

  7. Formaldehyde dehydrogenase preparations from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) comprise methanol dehydrogenase and methylene tetrahydromethanopterin dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Adeosun, Ekundayo K; Smith, Thomas J; Hoberg, Anne-Mette; Velarde, Giles; Ford, Robert; Dalton, Howard

    2004-03-01

    In methylotrophic bacteria, formaldehyde is an important but potentially toxic metabolic intermediate that can be assimilated into biomass or oxidized to yield energy. Previously reported was the purification of an NAD(P)(+)-dependent formaldehyde dehydrogenase (FDH) from the obligate methane-oxidizing methylotroph Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath), presumably important in formaldehyde oxidation, which required a heat-stable factor (known as the modifin) for FDH activity. Here, the major protein component of this FDH preparation was shown by biophysical techniques to comprise subunits of 64 and 8 kDa in an alpha(2)beta(2) arrangement. N-terminal sequencing of the subunits of FDH, together with enzymological characterization, showed that the alpha(2)beta(2) tetramer was a quinoprotein methanol dehydrogenase of the type found in other methylotrophs. The FDH preparations were shown to contain a highly active NAD(P)(+)-dependent methylene tetrahydromethanopterin dehydrogenase that was the probable source of the NAD(P)(+)-dependent formaldehyde oxidation activity. These results support previous findings that methylotrophs possess multiple pathways for formaldehyde dissimilation. PMID:14993320

  8. Monoterpene Metabolism. Cloning, Expression, and Characterization of (−)-Isopiperitenol/(−)-Carveol Dehydrogenase of Peppermint and Spearmint1

    PubMed Central

    Ringer, Kerry L.; Davis, Edward M.; Croteau, Rodney

    2005-01-01

    The essential oils of peppermint (Mentha x piperita) and spearmint (Mentha spicata) are distinguished by the oxygenation position on the p-menthane ring of the constitutive monoterpenes that is conferred by two regiospecific cytochrome P450 limonene-3- and limonene-6-hydroxylases. Following hydroxylation of limonene, an apparently similar dehydrogenase oxidizes (−)-trans-isopiperitenol to (−)-isopiperitenone in peppermint and (−)-trans-carveol to (−)-carvone in spearmint. Random sequencing of a peppermint oil gland secretory cell cDNA library revealed a large number of clones that specified redox-type enzymes, including dehydrogenases. Full-length dehydrogenase clones were screened by functional expression in Escherichia coli using a recently developed in situ assay. A single full-length acquisition encoding (−)-trans-isopiperitenol dehydrogenase (ISPD) was isolated. The (−)-ISPD cDNA has an open reading frame of 795 bp that encodes a 265-residue enzyme with a calculated molecular mass of 27,191. Nondegenerate primers were designed based on the (−)-trans-ISPD cDNA sequence and employed to screen a spearmint oil gland secretory cell cDNA library from which a 5′-truncated cDNA encoding the spearmint homolog, (−)-trans-carveol-dehydrogenase, was isolated. Reverse transcription-PCR amplification and RACE were used to acquire the remaining 5′-sequence from RNA isolated from oil gland secretory cells of spearmint leaf. The full-length spearmint dehydrogenase shares >99% amino acid identity with its peppermint homolog and both dehydrogenases are capable of utilizing (−)-trans-isopiperitenol and (−)-trans-carveol. These isopiperitenol/carveol dehydrogenases are members of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily and are related to other plant short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases involved in secondary metabolism (lignan biosynthesis), stress responses, and phytosteroid biosynthesis, but they are quite dissimilar (approximately 13

  9. Cellobiose dehydrogenase in cellulose degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Eriksson, L.; Igarashi, Kiyohiko; Samejima, Masahiro

    1996-10-01

    Cellobiose dehydrogenase is produced by a variety of fungi. Although it was already discovered during the 70`s, it`s role in cellulose and lignin degradation is yet ambiguous. The enzyme contains both heme and FAD as prosthetic groups, and seems to have a domain specifically designed to bind the enzyme to cellulose. It`s affinity to amorphous cellulose is higher than to crystalline cellulose. We will report on the binding behavior of the enzyme, its usefulness in elucidation of cellulose structures and also, possibilities for applications such as its use in measuring individual and synergistic mechanisms for cellulose degradation by endo- and exo-glucanases.

  10. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of binary and ternary complexes of Haloferax mediterranei glucose dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Esclapez, Julia; Britton, K. Linda; Baker, Patrick J.; Fisher, Martin; Pire, Carmen; Ferrer, Juan; Bonete, María José; Rice, David W.

    2005-08-01

    Single crystals of binary and ternary complexes of wild-type and D38C mutant H. mediterranei glucose dehydrogenase have been obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Haloferax mediterranei glucose dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.47) belongs to the medium-chain alcohol dehydrogenase superfamily and requires zinc for catalysis. In the majority of these family members, the catalytic zinc is tetrahedrally coordinated by the side chains of a cysteine, a histidine, a cysteine or glutamate and a water molecule. In H. mediterranei glucose dehydrogenase, sequence analysis indicates that the zinc coordination is different, with the invariant cysteine replaced by an aspartate residue. In order to analyse the significance of this replacement and to contribute to an understanding of the role of the metal ion in catalysis, a range of binary and ternary complexes of the wild-type and a D38C mutant protein have been crystallized. For most of the complexes, crystals belonging to space group I222 were obtained using sodium/potassium citrate as a precipitant. However, for the binary and non-productive ternary complexes with NADPH/Zn, it was necessary to replace the citrate with 2-methyl-2,4-pentanediol. Despite the radical change in conditions, the crystals thus formed were isomorphous.

  11. Crystallization, X-ray diffraction analysis and phasing of 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase from the fungus Cochliobolus lunatus

    SciTech Connect

    Cassetta, Alberto; Büdefeld, Tomaž; Lanišnik Rižner, Tea; Kristan, Katja; Stojan, Jure; Lamba, Doriano

    2005-12-01

    The expression, purification and crystallization of 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase from the filamentous fungus C. lunatus and its Y167F mutant, both in the apo form, are described. X-ray diffraction analysis and phasing by Patterson-search techniques are reported. 17β-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase from the filamentous fungus Cochliobolus lunatus (17β-HSDcl) is an NADP(H)-dependent enzyme that preferentially catalyses the oxidoreduction of oestrogens and androgens. The enzyme belongs to the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily and is the only fungal hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase known to date. 17β-HSDcl has recently been characterized and cloned and has been the subject of several functional studies. Although several hypotheses on the physiological role of 17β-HSDcl in fungal metabolism have been formulated, its function is still unclear. An X-ray crystallographic study has been undertaken and the optimal conditions for crystallization of 17β-HSDcl (apo form) were established, resulting in well shaped crystals that diffracted to 1.7 Å resolution. The space group was identified as I4{sub 1}22, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 67.14, c = 266.77 Å. Phasing was successfully performed by Patterson search techniques. A catalytic inactive mutant Tyr167Phe was also engineered, expressed, purified and crystallized for functional and structural studies.

  12. Target Selection and Annotation for the Structural Genomics of the Amidohydrolase and Enolase Superfamilies

    SciTech Connect

    Pieper, U.; Chiang, R; Seffernick, J; Brown, S; Glasner, M; Kelly, L; Eswar, N; Sauder, M; Bonanno, J; et al,

    2009-01-01

    To study the substrate specificity of enzymes, we use the amidohydrolase and enolase superfamilies as model systems; members of these superfamilies share a common TIM barrel fold and catalyze a wide range of chemical reactions. Here, we describe a collaboration between the Enzyme Specificity Consortium (ENSPEC) and the New York SGX Research Center for Structural Genomics (NYSGXRC) that aims to maximize the structural coverage of the amidohydrolase and enolase superfamilies. Using sequence- and structure-based protein comparisons, we first selected 535 target proteins from a variety of genomes for high-throughput structure determination by X-ray crystallography; 63 of these targets were not previously annotated as superfamily members. To date, 20 unique amidohydrolase and 41 unique enolase structures have been determined, increasing the fraction of sequences in the two superfamilies that can be modeled based on at least 30% sequence identity from 45% to 73%. We present case studies of proteins related to uronate isomerase (an amidohydrolase superfamily member) and mandelate racemase (an enolase superfamily member), to illustrate how this structure-focused approach can be used to generate hypotheses about sequence-structure-function relationships.

  13. The RNase H-like superfamily: new members, comparative structural analysis and evolutionary classification

    PubMed Central

    Majorek, Karolina A.; Dunin-Horkawicz, Stanislaw; Steczkiewicz, Kamil; Muszewska, Anna; Nowotny, Marcin; Ginalski, Krzysztof; Bujnicki, Janusz M.

    2014-01-01

    Ribonuclease H-like (RNHL) superfamily, also called the retroviral integrase superfamily, groups together numerous enzymes involved in nucleic acid metabolism and implicated in many biological processes, including replication, homologous recombination, DNA repair, transposition and RNA interference. The RNHL superfamily proteins show extensive divergence of sequences and structures. We conducted database searches to identify members of the RNHL superfamily (including those previously unknown), yielding >60 000 unique domain sequences. Our analysis led to the identification of new RNHL superfamily members, such as RRXRR (PF14239), DUF460 (PF04312, COG2433), DUF3010 (PF11215), DUF429 (PF04250 and COG2410, COG4328, COG4923), DUF1092 (PF06485), COG5558, OrfB_IS605 (PF01385, COG0675) and Peptidase_A17 (PF05380). Based on the clustering analysis we grouped all identified RNHL domain sequences into 152 families. Phylogenetic studies revealed relationships between these families, and suggested a possible history of the evolution of RNHL fold and its active site. Our results revealed clear division of the RNHL superfamily into exonucleases and endonucleases. Structural analyses of features characteristic for particular groups revealed a correlation between the orientation of the C-terminal helix with the exonuclease/endonuclease function and the architecture of the active site. Our analysis provides a comprehensive picture of sequence-structure-function relationships in the RNHL superfamily that may guide functional studies of the previously uncharacterized protein families. PMID:24464998

  14. A comprehensive manually curated protein–protein interaction database for the Death Domain superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Dongseop; Yoon, Jong Hwan; Shin, Soo-Yong; Jang, Tae-Ho; Kim, Hong-Gee; So, Insuk; Jeon, Ju-Hong; Park, Hyun Ho

    2012-01-01

    The Death Domain (DD) superfamily, which is one of the largest classes of protein interaction modules, plays a pivotal role in apoptosis, inflammation, necrosis and immune cell signaling pathways. Because aberrant or inappropriate DD superfamily-mediated signaling events are associated with various human diseases, such as cancers, neurodegenerative diseases and immunological disorders, the studies in these fields are of great biological and clinical importance. To facilitate the understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which the DD superfamily is associated with biological and disease processes, we have developed the DD database (http://www.deathdomain.org), a manually curated database that aims to offer comprehensive information on protein–protein interactions (PPIs) of the DD superfamily. The DD database was created by manually curating 295 peer-reviewed studies that were published in the literature; the current version documents 175 PPI pairs among the 99 DD superfamily proteins. The DD database provides a detailed summary of the DD superfamily proteins and their PPI data. Users can find in-depth information that is specified in the literature on relevant analytical methods, experimental resources and domain structures. Our database provides a definitive and valuable tool that assists researchers in understanding the signaling network that is mediated by the DD superfamily. PMID:22135292

  15. Large-Scale Analysis Exploring Evolution of Catalytic Machineries and Mechanisms in Enzyme Superfamilies

    PubMed Central

    Furnham, Nicholas; Dawson, Natalie L.; Rahman, Syed A.; Thornton, Janet M.; Orengo, Christine A.

    2016-01-01

    Enzymes, as biological catalysts, form the basis of all forms of life. How these proteins have evolved their functions remains a fundamental question in biology. Over 100 years of detailed biochemistry studies, combined with the large volumes of sequence and protein structural data now available, means that we are able to perform large-scale analyses to address this question. Using a range of computational tools and resources, we have compiled information on all experimentally annotated changes in enzyme function within 379 structurally defined protein domain superfamilies, linking the changes observed in functions during evolution to changes in reaction chemistry. Many superfamilies show changes in function at some level, although one function often dominates one superfamily. We use quantitative measures of changes in reaction chemistry to reveal the various types of chemical changes occurring during evolution and to exemplify these by detailed examples. Additionally, we use structural information of the enzymes active site to examine how different superfamilies have changed their catalytic machinery during evolution. Some superfamilies have changed the reactions they perform without changing catalytic machinery. In others, large changes of enzyme function, in terms of both overall chemistry and substrate specificity, have been brought about by significant changes in catalytic machinery. Interestingly, in some superfamilies, relatives perform similar functions but with different catalytic machineries. This analysis highlights characteristics of functional evolution across a wide range of superfamilies, providing insights that will be useful in predicting the function of uncharacterised sequences and the design of new synthetic enzymes. PMID:26585402

  16. Large-Scale Analysis Exploring Evolution of Catalytic Machineries and Mechanisms in Enzyme Superfamilies.

    PubMed

    Furnham, Nicholas; Dawson, Natalie L; Rahman, Syed A; Thornton, Janet M; Orengo, Christine A

    2016-01-29

    Enzymes, as biological catalysts, form the basis of all forms of life. How these proteins have evolved their functions remains a fundamental question in biology. Over 100 years of detailed biochemistry studies, combined with the large volumes of sequence and protein structural data now available, means that we are able to perform large-scale analyses to address this question. Using a range of computational tools and resources, we have compiled information on all experimentally annotated changes in enzyme function within 379 structurally defined protein domain superfamilies, linking the changes observed in functions during evolution to changes in reaction chemistry. Many superfamilies show changes in function at some level, although one function often dominates one superfamily. We use quantitative measures of changes in reaction chemistry to reveal the various types of chemical changes occurring during evolution and to exemplify these by detailed examples. Additionally, we use structural information of the enzymes active site to examine how different superfamilies have changed their catalytic machinery during evolution. Some superfamilies have changed the reactions they perform without changing catalytic machinery. In others, large changes of enzyme function, in terms of both overall chemistry and substrate specificity, have been brought about by significant changes in catalytic machinery. Interestingly, in some superfamilies, relatives perform similar functions but with different catalytic machineries. This analysis highlights characteristics of functional evolution across a wide range of superfamilies, providing insights that will be useful in predicting the function of uncharacterised sequences and the design of new synthetic enzymes. PMID:26585402

  17. Betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase in sorghum.

    PubMed Central

    Wood, A J; Saneoka, H; Rhodes, D; Joly, R J; Goldsbrough, P B

    1996-01-01

    The ability to synthesize and accumulate glycine betaine is wide-spread among angiosperms and is thought to contribute to salt and drought tolerance. In plants glycine betaine is synthesized by the two-step oxidation of choline via the intermediate betaine aldehyde, catalyzed by choline monooxygenase and betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase (BADH). Two sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) cDNA clones, BADH1 and BADH15, putatively encoding betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase were isolated and characterized. BADH1 is a truncated cDNA of 1391 bp. BADH15 is a full-length cDNA clone, 1812 bp in length, predicted to encode a protein of 53.6 kD. The predicted amino acid sequences of BADH1 and BADH15 share significant homology with other plant BADHs. The effects of water deficit on BADH mRNA expression, leaf water relations, and glycine betaine accumulation were investigated in leaves of preflowering sorghum plants. BADH1 and BADH15 mRNA were both induced by water deficit and their expression coincided with the observed glycine betaine accumulation. During the course of 17 d, the leaf water potential in stressed sorghum plants reached -2.3 MPa. In response to water deficit, glycine betaine levels increased 26-fold and proline levels increased 108-fold. In severely stressed plants, proline accounted for > 60% of the total free amino acid pool. Accumulation of these compatible solutes significantly contributed to osmotic potential and allowed a maximal osmotic adjustment of 0.405 MPa. PMID:8934627

  18. Kinesin and dynein superfamily proteins in organelle transport and cell division.

    PubMed

    Hirokawa, N; Noda, Y; Okada, Y

    1998-02-01

    Microtubule-associated motor proteins of the kinesin and dynein superfamilies play important roles in cellular mechanisms such as organelle transport and mitosis. Identification and characterization of new family members (in particular KIFC2, 16 new KIFs, XKlp2 and XKCM1 of the kinesin superfamily, and DHC2 and DHC3 of the dynein superfamily) and further characterization of known family members have improved our understanding of these cellular mechanisms. Sophisticated biophysical and structural analyses of monomeric and dimeric motor proteins have contributed to elucidating the mechanisms behind motor protein motility and polarity. PMID:9484596

  19. THE SLCO (FORMER SLC21) SUPERFAMILY OF TRANSPORTERS

    PubMed Central

    Hagenbuch, Bruno; Stieger, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    The members of the organic anion transporting polypeptide superfamily (OATPs) are classified within the SLCO solute carrier family. All functionally well characterized members are predicted to have 12 transmembrane domains and are sodium-independent transport systems that mediate the transport of a broad range of endo- as well as xenobiotics. Substrates are mainly amphipathic organic anions with a molecular weight of more than 300 Da, but some of the known transported substrates are also neutral or even positively charged. Among the well characterized substrates are numerous drugs including statins, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, antibiotics, antihistaminics, antihypertensives and anticancer drugs. Based on their amino acid sequence identities, the different OATPs cluster into families (in general with more than 40% amino acid sequence identity) and subfamilies (more than 60% amino acid identity). With the sequencing of genomes from different species and the computerized prediction of encoded proteins more than 300 OATPs can be found in the databases, however only a fraction of them have been identified in humans, rodents, and some additional species important for pharmaceutical research like the rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta), the dog (Canis lupus familiaris) and the pig (Sus scrofa). These OATPs form 6 families (OATP1–OATP6) and 13 subfamilies. In this review we try to summarize what is currently known about OATPs with respect to endogenous substrates, tissue distribution, transport mechanisms, regulation of expression, structure-function relationship and mutations and polymorphisms. PMID:23506880

  20. Unusual properties of the cytochrome P450 superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Lamb, David C.; Waterman, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    During the early years of cytochrome P450 research, a picture of conserved properties arose from studies of mammalian forms of these monooxygenases. They included the protohaem prosthetic group, the cysteine residue that coordinates to the haem iron and the reduced CO difference spectrum. Alternatively, the most variable feature of P450s was the enzymatic activities, which led to the conclusion that there are a large number of these enzymes, most of which have yet to be discovered. More recently, studies of these enzymes in other eukaryotes and in prokaryotes have led to the discovery of unexpected P450 properties. Many are variations of the original properties, whereas others are difficult to explain because of their unique nature relative to the rest of the known members of the superfamily. These novel properties expand our appreciation of the broad view of P450 structure and function, and generate curiosity concerning the evolution of P450s. In some cases, structural properties, previously not found in P450s, can lead to enzymatic activities impacting the biological function of organisms containing these enzymes; whereas, in other cases, the biological reason for the variations are not easily understood. Herein, we present particularly interesting examples in detail rather than cataloguing them all. PMID:23297356

  1. Sequence and structural analyses of interleukin-8-like chemokine superfamily.

    PubMed

    Kanagarajadurai, Karuppiah; Sowdhamini, Ramanathan

    2008-01-01

    Interleukin-8 and related chemokines are small proteins that bind to receptors belonging to the large family of G-protein-coupled receptors. They can cause migration of cells like neutrophils and eosinophils and some of them are implicated in angiogenic diseases. More than 40 subfamilies of these ligands are known that share poor sequence similarity and display receptor specificity. There is very little structural information about the mode of binding between ligands and the receptors. We have employed multi-fold sensitive sequence search methods to provide a repertoire of 252 putative interleukin-8 proteins and homologues, which are shared across humans, aves and fish. The sequences can be organized into five major known clusters. The propensity of occurrence of certain amino acid alphabets is found to be specific in different locations of the polypeptide fold. The sequence dispersion is also observed to be cluster-specific when examined by Evolutionary Trace procedure. Amino acid alphabet analysis and Evolutionary Trace procedure reveal cluster-specific amino acid distribution that provide clues about how the small fold of the ligand could display remarkable receptor specificity. We notice regions, like the beta1-beta2 loop of the fold, that are potentially involved in receptor recognition and specificity that could be potential sites for residue mutations. Systematic studies of the distribution patterns enable better understanding of the evolution and molecular recognition of this important and diverse protein superfamily. PMID:19032164

  2. A complex gene superfamily encodes actin in petunia.

    PubMed Central

    Baird, W V; Meagher, R B

    1987-01-01

    We have shown by several independent criteria that actin is encoded by a very large and complex superfamily of genes in Petunia. Several cDNA and genomic probes encoding actins from diverse organisms (Dictyostelium, Drosophila, chicken and soybean) hybridize to hundreds of restriction fragments in the petunia genome. Actin-hybridizing sequences were isolated from a petunia genomic library at a rate of at least 200 per genome equivalent. Twenty randomly selected actin-hybridizing clones were characterized in more detail. DNA sequence data from four representative and highly divergent clones, PAc2, PAc3, PAc4 and PAc7, demonstrate that these actin-like sequences are related to functional actin genes. Intron positions typical of other known plant actin genes are conserved in these clones. Four of six clones analyzed (PAc1, PAc2, PAc3, PAc4) hybridize to leaf mRNA of the same size (1.7 kb) as that reported for other plant actin mRNAs and to a slightly smaller mRNA species (1.5 kb). Five distinct subfamilies of actin-related genes were characterized which varied in size from a few members to several dozen members. It is clear from our data that other actin gene subfamilies must also exist within the genome. Possible mechanisms of actin gene amplification and genome turnover are discussed. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:3428258

  3. Examining k-nearest neighbour networks: Superfamily phenomena and inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khor, Alexander; Small, Michael

    2016-04-01

    We examine the use of recurrence networks in studying non-linear deterministic dynamical systems. Specifically, we focus on the case of k-nearest neighbour networks, which have already been shown to contain meaningful (and more importantly, easily accessible) information about dynamics. Superfamily phenomena have previously been identified, although a complete explanation for its appearance was not provided. Local dimension of the attractor is presented as one possible determinant, discussing the ability of specific motifs to be embedded in various dimensions. In turn, the Lyapunov spectrum provides the link between attractor dimension and dynamics required. We also prove invertibility of k-nearest neighbour networks. A new metric is provided, under which the k-nearest neighbour and ɛ-recurrence construction methods produce identical networks. Hence, the already established ɛ-recurrence inversion algorithm applies equally to the k-nearest neighbour case, and inversion is proved. The change in metric necessarily distorts the shape of the reconstructed attractor, although topology is conserved.

  4. Study of Functional and Allosteric Sites in Protein Superfamilies

    PubMed Central

    Suplatov, D.; Švedas, V.

    2015-01-01

    The interaction of proteins (enzymes) with a variety of low-molecular-weight compounds, as well as protein-protein interactions, is the most important factor in the regulation of their functional properties. To date, research effort has routinely focused on studying ligand binding to the functional sites of proteins (active sites of enzymes), whereas the molecular mechanisms of allosteric regulation, as well as binding to other pockets and cavities in protein structures, remained poorly understood. Recent studies have shown that allostery may be an intrinsic property of virtually all proteins. Novel approaches are needed to systematically analyze the architecture and role of various binding sites and establish the relationship between structure, function, and regulation. Computational biology, bioinformatics, and molecular modeling can be used to search for new regulatory centers, characterize their structural peculiarities, as well as compare different pockets in homologous proteins, study the molecular mechanisms of allostery, and understand the communication between topologically independent binding sites in protein structures. The establishment of an evolutionary relationship between different binding centers within protein superfamilies and the discovery of new functional and allosteric (regulatory) sites using computational approaches can improve our understanding of the structure-function relationship in proteins and provide new opportunities for drug design and enzyme engineering. PMID:26798490

  5. Chemical synthesis of peptides within the insulin superfamily.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fa; Zaykov, Alexander N; Levy, Jay J; DiMarchi, Richard D; Mayer, John P

    2016-05-01

    The synthesis of insulin has inspired fundamental advances in the art of peptide science while simultaneously revealing the structure-function relationship of this centrally important metabolic hormone. This review highlights milestones in the chemical synthesis of insulin that can be divided into two separate approaches: (i) disulfide bond formation driven by protein folding and (ii) chemical reactivity-directed sequential disulfide bond formation. Common to the two approaches are the persistent challenges presented by the hydrophobic nature of the individual A-chain and B-chain and the need for selective disulfide formation under mildly oxidative conditions. The extension and elaboration of these synthetic approaches have been ongoing within the broader insulin superfamily. These structurally similar peptides include the insulin-like growth factors and also the related peptides such as relaxin that signal through G-protein-coupled receptors. After a half-century of advances in insulin chemistry, we have reached a point where synthesis is no longer limiting structural and biological investigation within this family of peptide hormones. The future will increasingly focus on the refinement of structure to meet medicinal purposes that have long been pursued, such as the development of a glucose-sensitive insulin. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26910514

  6. Phylogenetic relationships among superfamilies of Neritimorpha (Mollusca: Gastropoda).

    PubMed

    Uribe, Juan E; Colgan, Don; Castro, Lyda R; Kano, Yasunori; Zardoya, Rafael

    2016-11-01

    Despite the extraordinary morphological and ecological diversity of Neritimorpha, few studies have focused on the phylogenetic relationships of this lineage of gastropods, which includes four extant superfamilies: Neritopsoidea, Hydrocenoidea, Helicinoidea, and Neritoidea. Here, the nucleotide sequences of the complete mitochondrial genomes of Georissa bangueyensis (Hydrocenoidea), Neritina usnea (Neritoidea), and Pleuropoma jana (Helicinoidea) and the nearly complete mt genomes of Titiscania sp. (Neritopsoidea) and Theodoxus fluviatilis (Neritoidea) were determined. Phylogenetic reconstructions using probabilistic methods were based on mitochondrial (13 protein coding genes and two ribosomal rRNA genes), nuclear (partial 28S rRNA, 18S rRNA, actin, and histone H3 genes) and combined sequence data sets. All phylogenetic analyses except one converged on a single, highly supported tree in which Neritopsoidea was recovered as the sister group of a clade including Helicinoidea as the sister group of Hydrocenoidea and Neritoidea. This topology agrees with the fossil record and supports at least three independent invasions of land by neritimorph snails. The mitochondrial genomes of Titiscania sp., G. bangueyensis, N. usnea, and T. fluviatilis share the same gene organization previously described for Nerita mt genomes whereas that of P. jana has undergone major rearrangements. We sequenced about half of the mitochondrial genome of another species of Helicinoidea, Viana regina, and confirmed that this species shares the highly derived gene order of P. jana. PMID:27456746

  7. All kinesin superfamily protein, KIF, genes in mouse and human.

    PubMed

    Miki, H; Setou, M; Kaneshiro, K; Hirokawa, N

    2001-06-19

    Intracellular transport is essential for morphogenesis and functioning of the cell. The kinesin superfamily proteins (KIFs) have been shown to transport membranous organelles and protein complexes in a microtubule- and ATP-dependent manner. More than 30 KIFs have been reported in mice. However, the nomenclature of KIFs has not been clearly established, resulting in various designations and redundant names for a single KIF. Here, we report the identification and classification of all KIFs in mouse and human genome transcripts. Previously unidentified murine KIFs were found by a PCR-based search. The identification of all KIFs was confirmed by a database search of the total human genome. As a result, there are a total of 45 KIFs. The nomenclature of all KIFs is presented. To understand the function of KIFs in intracellular transport in a single tissue, we focused on the brain. The expression of 38 KIFs was detected in brain tissue by Northern blotting or PCR using cDNA. The brain, mainly composed of highly differentiated and polarized cells such as neurons and glia, requires a highly complex intracellular transport system as indicated by the increased number of KIFs for their sophisticated functions. It is becoming increasingly clear that the cell uses a number of KIFs and tightly controls the direction, destination, and velocity of transportation of various important functional molecules, including mRNA. This report will set the foundation of KIF and intracellular transport research. PMID:11416179

  8. Kinesin superfamily proteins and their various functions and dynamics.

    PubMed

    Hirokawa, Nobutaka; Takemura, Reiko

    2004-11-15

    Kinesin superfamily proteins (KIFs) are motor proteins that transport membranous organelles and macromolecules fundamental for cellular functions along microtubules. Their roles in transport in axons and dendrites have been studied extensively, but KIFs are also used in intracellular transport in general. Recent findings have revealed that in many cases, the specific interaction of cargoes and motors is mediated via adaptor/scaffolding proteins. Cargoes are sorted to precise destinations, such as axons or dendrites. KIFs also participate in polarized transport in epithelial cells as shown in the apical transport of annexin XIIIb-containing vesicles by KIFC3. KIFs play important roles in higher order neuronal activity; transgenic mice overexpressing KIF17, which transports N-methyl-d-asp (NMDA) receptors to dendrites, show enhanced memory and learning. KIFs also play significant roles in neuronal development and brain wiring: KIF2A suppresses elongation of axon collaterals by its unique microtubule-depolymerizing activity. X-ray crystallography has revealed the structural uniqueness of KIF2 underlying the microtubule-depolymerizing activity. In addition, single molecule biophysics and optical trapping have shown that the motility of monomeric KIF1A is caused by biased Brownian movement, and X-ray crystallography has shown how the conformational changes occur for KIF1A to move during ATP hydrolysis. These multiple approaches in analyzing KIF functions will illuminate many basic mechanisms underlying intracellular events and will be a very promising and fruitful area for future studies. PMID:15501445

  9. Functions of kinesin superfamily proteins in neuroreceptor trafficking.

    PubMed

    Wang, Na; Xu, Junyu

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic plasticity is widely regarded as the cellular basis of learning and memory. Understanding the molecular mechanism of synaptic plasticity has been one of center pieces of neuroscience research for more than three decades. It has been well known that the trafficking of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazoloe-4-propionic acid- (AMPA-) type, N-methyl-D-aspartate- (NMDA-) type glutamate receptors to and from synapses is a key molecular event underlying many forms of synaptic plasticity. Kainate receptors are another type of glutamate receptors playing important roles in synaptic transmission. In addition, GABA receptors also play important roles in modulating the synaptic plasticity. Kinesin superfamily proteins (also known as KIFs) transport various cargos in both anterograde and retrograde directions through the interaction with different adaptor proteins. Recent studies indicate that KIFs regulate the trafficking of NMDA receptors, AMPA receptors, kainate receptors, and GABA receptors and thus play important roles in neuronal activity. Here we review the essential functions of KIFs in the trafficking of neuroreceptor and synaptic plasticity. PMID:26075252

  10. Functions of Kinesin Superfamily Proteins in Neuroreceptor Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Na

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic plasticity is widely regarded as the cellular basis of learning and memory. Understanding the molecular mechanism of synaptic plasticity has been one of center pieces of neuroscience research for more than three decades. It has been well known that the trafficking of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazoloe-4-propionic acid- (AMPA-) type, N-methyl-D-aspartate- (NMDA-) type glutamate receptors to and from synapses is a key molecular event underlying many forms of synaptic plasticity. Kainate receptors are another type of glutamate receptors playing important roles in synaptic transmission. In addition, GABA receptors also play important roles in modulating the synaptic plasticity. Kinesin superfamily proteins (also known as KIFs) transport various cargos in both anterograde and retrograde directions through the interaction with different adaptor proteins. Recent studies indicate that KIFs regulate the trafficking of NMDA receptors, AMPA receptors, kainate receptors, and GABA receptors and thus play important roles in neuronal activity. Here we review the essential functions of KIFs in the trafficking of neuroreceptor and synaptic plasticity. PMID:26075252

  11. Single motoneuron succinate dehydrogenase activity.

    PubMed

    Chalmers, G R; Edgerton, V R

    1989-07-01

    We have developed a quantitative histochemical assay for measurement of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) activity in single motoneurons. A computer image processing system was used to quantify the histochemical enzyme reaction product and to follow the time course of the reaction. The optimal concentration for each of the ingredients of the incubation medium for the SDH reaction was determined and the importance of using histochemical "blanks" in the determination of enzymatic activity was demonstrated. The enzymatic activity was linear with respect to reaction time and tissue thickness. The procedure described meets the criteria generally considered essential for establishment of a quantitative histochemical assay. The assay was then used to examine the SDH activity of cat and rat motoneurons. It was found that motoneurons with a small soma size had a wide range of SDH activity, whereas those with a large soma size were restricted to low SDH activity. PMID:2732457

  12. Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Luzzatto, Lucio; Nannelli, Caterina; Notaro, Rosario

    2016-04-01

    G6PD is a housekeeping gene expressed in all cells. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) is part of the pentose phosphate pathway, and its main physiologic role is to provide NADPH. G6PD deficiency, one of the commonest inherited enzyme abnormalities in humans, arises through one of many possible mutations, most of which reduce the stability of the enzyme and its level as red cells age. G6PD-deficient persons are mostly asymptomatic, but they can develop severe jaundice during the neonatal period and acute hemolytic anemia when they ingest fava beans or when they are exposed to certain infections or drugs. G6PD deficiency is a global health issue. PMID:27040960

  13. EARLY DIVERSIFICATION OF THE TUMOR NECROSIS SUPERFAMILY IN TELEOSTS: GENOMIC CHARACTERIZATION AND EXPRESSION ANALYSIS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Members of the tumor necrosis factor superfamily (TNFSF) are cytokines involved in diverse immunological and developmental pathways. Little is known about their evolution or expression in lower vertebrate species. Bioinformatic searches of available teleost databases including Zebrafish, Tetroadon...

  14. Bringing Bioactive Compounds into Membranes: The UbiA Superfamily of Intramembrane Aromatic Prenyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Li, Weikai

    2016-04-01

    The UbiA superfamily of intramembrane prenyltransferases catalyzes a key biosynthetic step in the production of ubiquinones, menaquinones, plastoquinones, hemes, chlorophylls, vitamin E, and structural lipids. These lipophilic compounds serve as electron and proton carriers for cellular respiration and photosynthesis, as antioxidants to reduce cell damage, and as structural components of microbial cell walls and membranes. This article reviews the biological functions and enzymatic activities of representative members of the superfamily, focusing on the remarkable recent research progress revealing that the UbiA superfamily is centrally implicated in several important physiological processes and human diseases. Because prenyltransferases in this superfamily have distinctive substrate preferences, two recent crystal structures are compared to illuminate the general mechanism for substrate recognition. PMID:26922674

  15. Checklist of the Diptera superfamilies Tephritoidea and Sciomyzoidea of Finland (Insecta)

    PubMed Central

    Kahanpää, Jere; Winqvist, Kaj

    2014-01-01

    Abstract A revised checklist of the flies of superfamilies Tephritoidea and Sciomyzoidea of Finland is provided. The following families are covered: Eurygnathomyiidae, Lonchaeidae, Neottiophilidae, Pallopteridae, Piophilidae, Platystomatidae, Tephritidae, Ulidiidae (Tephritoidea); Coelopidae, Dryomyzidae, Heterocheilidae, Phaeomyiidae, Sciomyzidae, Sepsidae (Sciomyzoidea). PMID:25337022

  16. Checklist of the superfamilies Oestroidea and Hippoboscoidea of Finland (Insecta, Diptera)

    PubMed Central

    Pohjoismäki, Jaakko; Kahanpää, Jere

    2014-01-01

    Abstract An updated checklist of the superfamilies Oestroidea and Hippoboscoidea recorded from Finland is presented. The checklist covers the following families: Calliphoridae, Rhiniidae, Sarcophagidae, Rhinophoridae, Tachinidae, Oestridae and Hippoboscidae. PMID:25337034

  17. MetaSINEs: Broad Distribution of a Novel SINE Superfamily in Animals

    PubMed Central

    Nishihara, Hidenori; Plazzi, Federico; Passamonti, Marco; Okada, Norihiro

    2016-01-01

    SINEs (short interspersed elements) are transposable elements that typically originate independently in each taxonomic clade (order/family). However, some SINE families share a highly similar central sequence and are thus categorized as a SINE superfamily. Although only four SINE superfamilies (CORE-SINEs, V-SINEs, DeuSINEs, and Ceph-SINEs) have been reported so far, it is expected that new SINE superfamilies would be discovered by deep exploration of new SINEs in metazoan genomes. Here we describe 15 SINEs, among which 13 are novel, that have a similar 66-bp central region and therefore constitute a new SINE superfamily, MetaSINEs. MetaSINEs are distributed from fish to cnidarians, suggesting their common evolutionary origin at least 640 Ma. Because the 3′ tails of MetaSINEs are variable, these SINEs most likely survived by changing their partner long interspersed elements for retrotransposition during evolution. Furthermore, we examined the presence of members of other SINE superfamilies in bivalve genomes and characterized eight new SINEs belonging to the CORE-SINEs, V-SINEs, and DeuSINEs, in addition to the MetaSINEs. The broad distribution of bivalve SINEs suggests that at least three SINEs originated in the common ancestor of Bivalvia. Our comparative analysis of the central domains of the SINEs revealed that, in each superfamily, only a restricted region is shared among all of its members. Because the functions of the central domains of the SINE superfamilies remain unknown, such structural information of SINE superfamilies will be useful for future experimental and comparative analyses to reveal why they have been retained in metazoan genomes during evolution. PMID:26872770

  18. MetaSINEs: Broad Distribution of a Novel SINE Superfamily in Animals.

    PubMed

    Nishihara, Hidenori; Plazzi, Federico; Passamonti, Marco; Okada, Norihiro

    2016-03-01

    SINEs (short interspersed elements) are transposable elements that typically originate independently in each taxonomic clade (order/family). However, some SINE families share a highly similar central sequence and are thus categorized as a SINE superfamily. Although only four SINE superfamilies (CORE-SINEs, V-SINEs, DeuSINEs, and Ceph-SINEs) have been reported so far, it is expected that new SINE superfamilies would be discovered by deep exploration of new SINEs in metazoan genomes. Here we describe 15 SINEs, among which 13 are novel, that have a similar 66-bp central region and therefore constitute a new SINE superfamily, MetaSINEs. MetaSINEs are distributed from fish to cnidarians, suggesting their common evolutionary origin at least 640 Ma. Because the 3' tails of MetaSINEs are variable, these SINEs most likely survived by changing their partner long interspersed elements for retrotransposition during evolution. Furthermore, we examined the presence of members of other SINE superfamilies in bivalve genomes and characterized eight new SINEs belonging to the CORE-SINEs, V-SINEs, and DeuSINEs, in addition to the MetaSINEs. The broad distribution of bivalve SINEs suggests that at least three SINEs originated in the common ancestor of Bivalvia. Our comparative analysis of the central domains of the SINEs revealed that, in each superfamily, only a restricted region is shared among all of its members. Because the functions of the central domains of the SINE superfamilies remain unknown, such structural information of SINE superfamilies will be useful for future experimental and comparative analyses to reveal why they have been retained in metazoan genomes during evolution. PMID:26872770

  19. Defining and predicting structurally conserved regions in protein superfamilies

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ivan K.; Grishin, Nick V.

    2013-01-01

    Motivation: The structures of homologous proteins are generally better conserved than their sequences. This phenomenon is demonstrated by the prevalence of structurally conserved regions (SCRs) even in highly divergent protein families. Defining SCRs requires the comparison of two or more homologous structures and is affected by their availability and divergence, and our ability to deduce structurally equivalent positions among them. In the absence of multiple homologous structures, it is necessary to predict SCRs of a protein using information from only a set of homologous sequences and (if available) a single structure. Accurate SCR predictions can benefit homology modelling and sequence alignment. Results: Using pairwise DaliLite alignments among a set of homologous structures, we devised a simple measure of structural conservation, termed structural conservation index (SCI). SCI was used to distinguish SCRs from non-SCRs. A database of SCRs was compiled from 386 SCOP superfamilies containing 6489 protein domains. Artificial neural networks were then trained to predict SCRs with various features deduced from a single structure and homologous sequences. Assessment of the predictions via a 5-fold cross-validation method revealed that predictions based on features derived from a single structure perform similarly to ones based on homologous sequences, while combining sequence and structural features was optimal in terms of accuracy (0.755) and Matthews correlation coefficient (0.476). These results suggest that even without information from multiple structures, it is still possible to effectively predict SCRs for a protein. Finally, inspection of the structures with the worst predictions pinpoints difficulties in SCR definitions. Availability: The SCR database and the prediction server can be found at http://prodata.swmed.edu/SCR. Contact: 91huangi@gmail.com or grishin@chop.swmed.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics

  20. Cadherins: The Superfamily Critically Involved in Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ashaie, Maeirah Afzal; Chowdhury, Ezharul Hoque

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer, one of the leading causes of mortality and morbidity among females, is regulated in part by diverse classes of adhesion molecules one of which is known as cadherins. Located at adherens junctions, the members of this superfamily are responsible for upholding proper cell-cell adhesion. Cadherins possess diverse structures and functions and any alteration in their structures or functions causes impeding of normal mammary cells development and maintenance, thus leading to breast malignancy. E-, N-, P-, VE-, Proto-, desmosomal and FAT cadherins have been found to regulate breast cancer in positive as well as negative fashion, whereby both Ecadherin (CDH1) and N-cadherin (CDH2) contribute significantly towards transitioning from epithelial state to mesenchymal state (EMT) and enacting the abnormal cells to invade and metastasize nearby and distant tissues. Aberration in gene expression of cadherins can be either due to somatic or epigenetic silencing or via transcriptional factors. Besides other cadherins, E-cadherin which serves as hallmark of EMT is associated with several regulatory factors such as Snail, Slug, Twist, Zeb, KLF4, NFI, TBX2, SIX, b-Myb, COX-2, Arf6, FOXA2, GATA3 and SMAR1, which modulate E-cadherin gene transcription to promote or represses tumor invasion and colonization. Signaling molecules such as Notch, TGF-β, estrogen receptors, EGF and Wnt initiate numerous signaling cascades via these vital factors of cell programming, controlling expression of E-cadherin at transcriptional (mRNA) and protein level. Thus, interactions of cadherins with their roles in tumor suppression and oncogenic transformation can be beneficial in providing valuable insights for breast cancer diagnosis and therapeutics development. PMID:26825466

  1. Evolutionary Dynamics of the Cellulose Synthase Gene Superfamily in Grasses.

    PubMed

    Schwerdt, Julian G; MacKenzie, Katrin; Wright, Frank; Oehme, Daniel; Wagner, John M; Harvey, Andrew J; Shirley, Neil J; Burton, Rachel A; Schreiber, Miriam; Halpin, Claire; Zimmer, Jochen; Marshall, David F; Waugh, Robbie; Fincher, Geoffrey B

    2015-07-01

    Phylogenetic analyses of cellulose synthase (CesA) and cellulose synthase-like (Csl) families from the cellulose synthase gene superfamily were used to reconstruct their evolutionary origins and selection histories. Counterintuitively, genes encoding primary cell wall CesAs have undergone extensive expansion and diversification following an ancestral duplication from a secondary cell wall-associated CesA. Selection pressure across entire CesA and Csl clades appears to be low, but this conceals considerable variation within individual clades. Genes in the CslF clade are of particular interest because some mediate the synthesis of (1,3;1,4)-β-glucan, a polysaccharide characteristic of the evolutionarily successful grasses that is not widely distributed elsewhere in the plant kingdom. The phylogeny suggests that duplication of either CslF6 and/or CslF7 produced the ancestor of a highly conserved cluster of CslF genes that remain located in syntenic regions of all the grass genomes examined. A CslF6-specific insert encoding approximately 55 amino acid residues has subsequently been incorporated into the gene, or possibly lost from other CslFs, and the CslF7 clade has undergone a significant long-term shift in selection pressure. Homology modeling and molecular dynamics of the CslF6 protein were used to define the three-dimensional dispositions of individual amino acids that are subject to strong ongoing selection, together with the position of the conserved 55-amino acid insert that is known to influence the amounts and fine structures of (1,3;1,4)-β-glucans synthesized. These wall polysaccharides are attracting renewed interest because of their central roles as sources of dietary fiber in human health and for the generation of renewable liquid biofuels. PMID:25999407

  2. Aldo-keto reductase (AKR) superfamily: genomics and annotation.

    PubMed

    Mindnich, Rebekka D; Penning, Trevor M

    2009-07-01

    Aldo-keto reductases (AKRs) are phase I metabolising enzymes that catalyse the reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate) (NAD(P)H)-dependent reduction of carbonyl groups to yield primary and secondary alcohols on a wide range of substrates, including aliphatic and aromatic aldehydes and ketones, ketoprostaglandins, ketosteroids and xenobiotics. In so doing they functionalise the carbonyl group for conjugation (phase II enzyme reactions). Although functionally diverse, AKRs form a protein superfamily based on their high sequence identity and common protein fold, the (alpha/beta) 8 -barrel structure. Well over 150 AKR enzymes, from diverse organisms, have been annotated so far and given systematic names according to a nomenclature that is based on multiple protein sequence alignment and degree of identity. Annotation of non-vertebrate AKRs at the National Center for Biotechnology Information or Vertebrate Genome Annotation (vega) database does not often include the systematic nomenclature name, so the most comprehensive overview of all annotated AKRs is found on the AKR website (http://www.med.upenn.edu/akr/). This site also hosts links to more detailed and specialised information (eg on crystal structures, gene expression and single nucleotide polymorphisms [SNPs]). The protein-based AKR nomenclature allows unambiguous identification of a given enzyme but does not reflect the wealth of genomic and transcriptomic variation that exists in the various databases. In this context, identification of putative new AKRs and their distinction from pseudogenes are challenging. This review provides a short summary of the characteristic features of AKR biochemistry and structure that have been reviewed in great detail elsewhere, and focuses mainly on nomenclature and database entries of human AKRs that so far have not been subject to systematic annotation. Recent developments in the annotation of SNP and transcript variance in AKRs are also summarised. PMID:19706366

  3. Aldehyde dehydrogenases in cellular responses to oxidative/electrophilic stress.

    PubMed

    Singh, Surendra; Brocker, Chad; Koppaka, Vindhya; Chen, Ying; Jackson, Brian C; Matsumoto, Akiko; Thompson, David C; Vasiliou, Vasilis

    2013-03-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are continuously generated within living systems and the inability to manage ROS load leads to elevated oxidative stress and cell damage. Oxidative stress is coupled to the oxidative degradation of lipid membranes, also known as lipid peroxidation. This process generates over 200 types of aldehydes, many of which are highly reactive and toxic. Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) metabolize endogenous and exogenous aldehydes and thereby mitigate oxidative/electrophilic stress in prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. ALDHs are found throughout the evolutionary gamut, from single-celled organisms to complex multicellular species. Not surprisingly, many ALDHs in evolutionarily distant, and seemingly unrelated, species perform similar functions, including protection against a variety of environmental stressors such as dehydration and ultraviolet radiation. The ability to act as an "aldehyde scavenger" during lipid peroxidation is another ostensibly universal ALDH function found across species. Upregulation of ALDHs is a stress response in bacteria (environmental and chemical stress), plants (dehydration, salinity, and oxidative stress), yeast (ethanol exposure and oxidative stress), Caenorhabditis elegans (lipid peroxidation), and mammals (oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation). Recent studies have also identified ALDH activity as an important feature of cancer stem cells. In these cells, ALDH expression helps abrogate oxidative stress and imparts resistance against chemotherapeutic agents such as oxazaphosphorine, taxane, and platinum drugs. The ALDH superfamily represents a fundamentally important class of enzymes that contributes significantly to the management of electrophilic/oxidative stress within living systems. Mutations in various ALDHs are associated with a variety of pathological conditions in humans, highlighting the fundamental importance of these enzymes in physiological and pathological processes. PMID:23195683

  4. Short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases in cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Kramm, Anneke; Kisiela, Michael; Schulz, Rüdiger; Maser, Edmund

    2012-03-01

    The short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases (SDRs) represent a large superfamily of enzymes, most of which are NAD(H)-dependent or NADP(H)-dependent oxidoreductases. They display a wide substrate spectrum, including steroids, alcohols, sugars, aromatic compounds, and xenobiotics. On the basis of characteristic sequence motifs, the SDRs are subdivided into two main (classical and extended) and three smaller (divergent, intermediate, and complex) families. Despite low residue identities in pairwise comparisons, the three-dimensional structure among the SDRs is conserved and shows a typical Rossmann fold. Here, we used a bioinformatics approach to determine whether and which SDRs are present in cyanobacteria, microorganisms that played an important role in our ecosystem as the first oxygen producers. Cyanobacterial SDRs could indeed be identified, and were clustered according to the SDR classification system. Furthermore, because of the early availability of its genome sequence and the easy application of transformation methods, Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, one of the most important cyanobacterial strains, was chosen as the model organism for this phylum. Synechocystis sp. SDRs were further analysed with bioinformatics tools, such as hidden Markov models (HMMs). It became evident that several cyanobacterial SDRs show remarkable sequence identities with SDRs in other organisms. These so-called 'homologous' proteins exist in plants, model organisms such as Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis  elegans, and even in humans. As sequence identities of up to 60% were found between Synechocystis and humans, it was concluded that SDRs seemed to have been well conserved during evolution, even after dramatic terrestrial changes such as the conversion of the early reducing atmosphere to an oxidizing one by cyanobacteria. PMID:22251568

  5. Genetics Home Reference: succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... a chemical that transmits signals in the brain (neurotransmitter) called gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA). The primary ... Diseases National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD) Pediatric Neurotransmitter Disease Association GeneReviews (1 link) Succinic Semialdehyde Dehydrogenase ...

  6. Novel dehydrogenase catalyzes oxidative hydrolysis of carbon-nitrogen double bonds for hydrazone degradation.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Hideomi; Suzuta, Tetsuya; Hoshino, Takayuki; Takaya, Naoki

    2008-02-29

    Hydrazines and their derivatives are versatile artificial and natural compounds that are metabolized by elusive biological systems. Here we identified microorganisms that assimilate hydrazones and isolated the yeast, Candida palmioleophila MK883. When cultured with adipic acid bis(ethylidene hydrazide) as the sole source of carbon, C. palmioleophila MK883 degraded hydrazones and accumulated adipic acid dihydrazide. Cytosolic NAD+- or NADP+-dependent hydrazone dehydrogenase (Hdh) activity was detectable under these conditions. The production of Hdh was inducible by adipic acid bis(ethylidene hydrazide) and the hydrazone, varelic acid ethylidene hydrazide, under the control of carbon catabolite repression. Purified Hdh oxidized and hydrated the C=N double bond of acetaldehyde hydrazones by reducing NAD+ or NADP+ to produce relevant hydrazides and acetate, the latter of which the yeast assimilated. The deduced amino acid sequence revealed that Hdh belongs to the aldehyde dehydrogenase (Aldh) superfamily. Kinetic and mutagenesis studies showed that Hdh formed a ternary complex with the substrates and that conserved Cys is essential for the activity. The mechanism of Hdh is similar to that of Aldh, except that it catalyzed oxidative hydrolysis of hydrazones that requires adding a water molecule to the reaction catalyzed by conventional Aldh. Surprisingly, both Hdh and Aldh from baker's yeast (Ald4p) catalyzed the Hdh reaction as well as aldehyde oxidation. Our findings are unique in that we discovered a biological mechanism for hydrazone utilization and a novel function of proteins in the Aldh family that act on C=N compounds. PMID:18096698

  7. Structural and kinetic characterization of recombinant 2-hydroxymuconate semialdehyde dehydrogenase from Pseudomonas putida G7.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Simara Semíramis de; Neves, Cíntia Mara Leal; Guimarães, Samuel Leite; Whitman, Christian P; Johnson, William H; Aparicio, Ricardo; Nagem, Ronaldo Alves Pinto

    2015-08-01

    The first enzyme in the oxalocrotonate branch of the naphthalene-degradation lower pathway in Pseudomonas putida G7 is NahI, a 2-hydroxymuconate semialdehyde dehydrogenase which converts 2-hydroxymuconate semialdehyde to 2-hydroxymuconate in the presence of NAD(+). NahI is in family 8 (ALDH8) of the NAD(P)(+)-dependent aldehyde dehydrogenase superfamily. In this work, we report the cloning, expression, purification and preliminary structural and kinetic characterization of the recombinant NahI. The nahI gene was subcloned into a T7 expression vector and the enzyme was overexpressed in Escherichia coli ArcticExpress as a hexa-histidine-tagged fusion protein. After purification by affinity and size-exclusion chromatography, dynamic light scattering and small-angle X-ray scattering experiments were conducted to analyze the oligomeric state and the overall shape of the enzyme in solution. The protein is a tetramer in solution and has nearly perfect 222 point group symmetry. Protein stability and secondary structure content were evaluated by a circular dichroism spectroscopy assay under different thermal conditions. Furthermore, kinetic assays were conducted and, for the first time, KM (1.3±0.3μM) and kcat (0.9s(-1)) values were determined at presumed NAD(+) saturation. NahI is highly specific for its biological substrate and has no activity with salicylaldehyde, another intermediate in the naphthalene-degradation pathway. PMID:26032336

  8. Ocular Aldehyde Dehydrogenases: Protection against Ultraviolet Damage and Maintenance of Transparency for Vision

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying; Thompson, David C.; Koppaka, Vindhya; Jester, James V.; Vasiliou, Vasilis

    2012-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) enzymes catalyze the NAD(P)+-dependent oxidation of a wide variety of endogenous and exogenous aldehydes to their corresponding acids. Some members of the ALDH superfamily of enzymes are abundantly expressed in the mammalian cornea and lens in a taxon-specific manner. Considered to be corneal and lens crystallins, they confer protective and transparent properties upon these ocular tissues. ALDH3A1 is highly expressed in the cornea of most mammals, with the exception of rabbit that expresses exclusively ALDH1A1 in the cornea. ALDH1A1 is present in both the cornea and lens of several animal species. As a result of their catalytic and non-catalytic functions, ALDH3A1 and ALDH1A1 proteins protect inner ocular tissues from ultraviolet radiation and reactive oxygen-induced damage. In addition, these corneal crystallins contribute to cellular transparency in corneal stromal keratocytes, supporting a structural role of these ALDH proteins. A putative regulatory function of ALDH3A1 on corneal cell proliferation has also been proposed. Finally, the three retinaldehye dehydrogenases cooperatively mediate retinoic acid signaling during the eye development. PMID:23098688

  9. Utility of the Amborella trichopoda expansin superfamily in elucidating the history of angiosperm expansins.

    PubMed

    Seader, Victoria H; Thornsberry, Jennifer M; Carey, Robert E

    2016-03-01

    Expansins form a superfamily of plant proteins that assist in cell wall loosening during growth and development. The superfamily is divided into four families: EXPA, EXPB, EXLA, and EXLB (Sampedro and Cosgrove in Genome Biol 6:242, 2005. doi: 10.1186/gb-2005-6-12-242 ). Previous studies on Arabidopsis, rice, and Populus trichocarpa have clarified the evolutionary history of expansins in angiosperms (Sampedro et al. in Plant J 44:409-419, 2005. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-313X.2005.02540.x ). Amborella trichopoda is a flowering plant that diverged very early. Thus, it is a sister lineage to all other extant angiosperms (Amborella Genome Project in 342:1241089, 2013. doi: 10.1126/science.1241089 ). Because of this relationship, comparing the A. trichopoda expansin superfamily with those of other flowering plants may indicate which expansin genes were present in the last common ancestor of all angiosperms. The A. trichopoda expansin superfamily was assembled using BLAST searches with angiosperm expansin queries. The search results were analyzed and annotated to isolate the complete A. trichopoda expansin superfamily. This superfamily is similar to other angiosperm expansin superfamilies, but is somewhat smaller. This is likely because of a lack of genome duplication events (Amborella Genome Project 2013). Phylogenetic and syntenic analyses of A. trichopoda expansins have improved our understanding of the evolutionary history of expansins in angiosperms. Nearly all of the A. trichopoda expansins were placed into an existing Arabidopsis-rice expansin clade. Based on the results of phylogenetic and syntenic analyses, we estimate there were 12-13 EXPA genes, 2 EXPB genes, 1 EXLA gene, and 2 EXLB genes in the last common ancestor of all angiosperms. PMID:26646380

  10. The DinB Superfamily Includes Novel Mycothiol, Bacillithiol and Glutathione S-transferases

    PubMed Central

    Newton, Gerald L.; Leung, Stephan S.; Wakabayashi, Judy I.; Rawat, Mamta; Fahey, Robert C.

    2011-01-01

    The superfamily of glutathione S-transferases has been the subject of extensive study but Actinobacteria produce mycothiol (MSH) in place of glutathione and no mycothiol S-transferase (MST) has been identified. Using mycothiol and monochlorobimane as substrates a MST activity was detected in extracts of Mycobacterium smegmatis and purified sufficiently to allow identification of MSMEG_0887, a member the DUF664 family of the DinB superfamily, as the MST. The identity of the M. smegmatis and homologous Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Rv0443) enzymes was confirmed by cloning and the expressed proteins were found to be active with MSH but not bacillithiol (BSH) or glutathione (GSH). Bacillus subtilis YfiT is another member of the DinB superfamily but this bacterium produces BSH. The YfiT protein was shown to have S-transferase activity with monochlorobimane when assayed with BSH but not with MSH or GSH. Enterococcus faecalis EF_3021 shares some homology with MSMEG_0887 but this organism produces GSH but not MSH or BSH. Cloned and expressed EF_0321 was active with monochlorobimane and GSH but not with MSH or BSH. MDMPI_2 is another member of the DinB superfamily and has been previously shown to have mycothiol-dependent maleylpyruvate isomerase activity. Three of the eight families of the DinB superfamily include proteins shown to catalyze thiol-dependent metabolic or detoxification activities. Since more than two-thirds of the sequences assigned to the DinB superfamily are members of these families it seems likely that such activity is dominant in the DinB superfamily. PMID:22059487

  11. Phosphorylation site on yeast pyruvate dehydrogenase complex

    SciTech Connect

    Uhlinger, D.J.

    1986-01-01

    The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex was purified to homogeneity from baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). Yeast cells were disrupted in a Manton-Gaulin laboratory homogenizer. The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex was purified by fractionation with polyethylene glycol, isoelectric precipitation, ultracentrifugation and chromatography on hydroxylapatite. Final purification of the yeast pyruvate dehydrogenase complex was achieved by cation-exchange high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). No endogenous pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase activity was detected during the purification. However, the yeast pyruvate dehydrogenase complex was phosphorylated and inactivated with purified pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase from bovine kidney. Tryptic digestion of the /sup 32/P-labeled complex yielded a single phosphopeptide which was purified to homogeniety. The tryptic digest was subjected to chromatography on a C-18 reverse phase HPLC column with a linear gradient of acetonitrile. Radioactive fractions were pooled, concentrated, and subjected to anion-exchange HPLC. The column was developed with a linear gradient of ammonium acetate. Final purification of the phosphopeptide was achieved by chromatography on a C-18 reverse phase HPLC column developed with a linear gradient of acetonitrile. The amino acid sequence of the homogeneous peptide was determined by manual modified Edman degradation.

  12. Cloning of the Arabidopsis and Rice Formaldehyde Dehydrogenase Genes: Implications for the Origin of Plant Adh Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Dolferus, R.; Osterman, J. C.; Peacock, W. J.; Dennis, E. S.

    1997-01-01

    This article reports the cloning of the genes encoding the Arabidopsis and rice class III ADH enzymes, members of the alcohol dehydrogenase or medium chain reductase/dehydrogenase superfamily of proteins with glutathione-dependent formaldehyde dehydrogenase activity (GSH-FDH). Both genes contain eight introns in exactly the same positions, and these positions are conserved in plant ethanol-active Adh genes (class P). These data provide further evidence that plant class P genes have evolved from class III genes by gene duplication and acquisition of new substrate specificities. The position of introns and similarities in the nucleic acid and amino acid sequences of the different classes of ADH enzymes in plants and humans suggest that plant and animal class III enzymes diverged before they duplicated to give rise to plant and animal ethanol-active ADH enzymes. Plant class P ADH enzymes have gained substrate specificities and evolved promoters with different expression properties, in keeping with their metabolic function as part of the alcohol fermentation pathway. PMID:9215914

  13. The Transporter-Opsin-G protein-coupled receptor (TOG) Superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Yee, Daniel C.; Shlykov, Maksim A.; Västermark, Åke; Reddy, Vamsee S.; Arora, Sumit; Sun, Eric I.; Saier, Milton H.

    2013-01-01

    Visual Rhodopsins (VR) are recognized members of the large and diverse family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), but their evolutionary origin and relationships to other proteins, are not known. In an earlier publication (Shlykov et al., 2012), we characterized the 4-Toulene Sulfonate Uptake Permease (TSUP) family of transmembrane proteins, showing that these 7 or 8 TMS proteins arose by intragenic duplication of a 4 TMS-encoding gene, sometimes followed by loss of a terminal TMS. In this study, we show that the TSUP, GPCR and Microbial Rhodopsin (MR) families are related to each other and to six other currently recognized transport protein families. We designate this superfamily the Transporter-Opsin-G protein-coupled receptor (TOG) Superfamily. Despite their 8 TMS origins, members of most constituent families exhibit 7 TMS topologies that are well conserved, and these arose by loss of either the N-terminal (more frequent) or the C-terminal (less frequent) TMS, depending on the family. Phylogenetic analyses revealed familial relationships within the superfamily and protein relationships within each of the nine families. The statistical analyses leading to the conclusion of homology were confirmed using HMMs, Pfam, and 3D superimpositions. Proteins functioning by dissimilar mechanisms (channels, primary active transporters, secondary active transporters, group translocators and receptors) are interspersed on a phylogenetic tree of the TOG superfamily, suggesting that changes in the transport and energy-coupling mechanisms occurred multiple times during the evolution of this superfamily. PMID:23981446

  14. An artificial intelligence approach to motif discovery in protein sequences: application to steriod dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Bailey, T L; Baker, M E; Elkan, C P

    1997-05-01

    MEME (Multiple Expectation-maximization for Motif Elicitation) is a unique new software tool that uses artificial intelligence techniques to discover motifs shared by a set of protein sequences in a fully automated manner. This paper is the first detailed study of the use of MEME to analyse a large, biologically relevant set of sequences, and to evaluate the sensitivity and accuracy of MEME in identifying structurally important motifs. For this purpose, we chose the short-chain alcohol dehydrogenase superfamily because it is large and phylogenetically diverse, providing a test of how well MEME can work on sequences with low amino acid similarity. Moreover, this dataset contains enzymes of biological importance, and because several enzymes have known X-ray crystallographic structures, we can test the usefulness of MEME for structural analysis. The first six motifs from MEME map onto structurally important alpha-helices and beta-strands on Streptomyces hydrogenans 20beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase. We also describe MAST (Motif Alignment Search Tool), which conveniently uses output from MEME for searching databases such as SWISS-PROT and Genpept. MAST provides statistical measures that permit a rigorous evaluation of the significance of database searches with individual motifs or groups of motifs. A database search of Genpept90 by MAST with the log-odds matrix of the first six motifs obtained from MEME yields a bimodal output, demonstrating the selectivity of MAST. We show for the first time, using primary sequence analysis, that bacterial sugar epimerases are homologs of short-chain dehydrogenases. MEME and MAST will be increasingly useful as genome sequencing provides large datasets of phylogenetically divergent sequences of biomedical interest. PMID:9366496

  15. Enantioselective Synthesis of Vicinal (R,R)-Diols by Saccharomyces cerevisiae Butanediol Dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Calam, Eduard; González-Roca, Eva; Fernández, M Rosario; Dequin, Sylvie; Parés, Xavier; Virgili, Albert; Biosca, Josep A

    2016-01-01

    Butanediol dehydrogenase (Bdh1p) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae belongs to the superfamily of the medium-chain dehydrogenases and reductases and converts reversibly R-acetoin and S-acetoin to (2R,3R)-2,3-butanediol and meso-2,3-butanediol, respectively. It is specific for NAD(H) as a coenzyme, and it is the main enzyme involved in the last metabolic step leading to (2R,3R)-2,3-butanediol in yeast. In this study, we have used the activity of Bdh1p in different forms-purified enzyme, yeast extracts, permeabilized yeast cells, and as a fusion protein (with yeast formate dehydrogenase, Fdh1p)-to transform several vicinal diketones to the corresponding diols. We have also developed a new variant of the delitto perfetto methodology to place BDH1 under the control of the GAL1 promoter, resulting in a yeast strain that overexpresses butanediol dehydrogenase and formate dehydrogenase activities in the presence of galactose and regenerates NADH in the presence of formate. While the use of purified Bdh1p allows the synthesis of enantiopure (2R,3R)-2,3-butanediol, (2R,3R)-2,3-pentanediol, (2R,3R)-2,3-hexanediol, and (3R,4R)-3,4-hexanediol, the use of the engineered strain (as an extract or as permeabilized cells) yields mixtures of the diols. The production of pure diol stereoisomers has also been achieved by means of a chimeric fusion protein combining Fdh1p and Bdh1p. Finally, we have determined the selectivity of Bdh1p toward the oxidation/reduction of the hydroxyl/ketone groups from (2R,3R)-2,3-pentanediol/2,3-pentanedione and (2R,3R)-2,3-hexanediol/2,3-hexanedione. In conclusion, Bdh1p is an enzyme with biotechnological interest that can be used to synthesize chiral building blocks. A scheme of the favored pathway with the corresponding intermediates is proposed for the Bdh1p reaction. PMID:26729717

  16. Enantioselective Synthesis of Vicinal (R,R)-Diols by Saccharomyces cerevisiae Butanediol Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Calam, Eduard; González-Roca, Eva; Fernández, M. Rosario; Dequin, Sylvie; Parés, Xavier; Virgili, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Butanediol dehydrogenase (Bdh1p) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae belongs to the superfamily of the medium-chain dehydrogenases and reductases and converts reversibly R-acetoin and S-acetoin to (2R,3R)-2,3-butanediol and meso-2,3-butanediol, respectively. It is specific for NAD(H) as a coenzyme, and it is the main enzyme involved in the last metabolic step leading to (2R,3R)-2,3-butanediol in yeast. In this study, we have used the activity of Bdh1p in different forms—purified enzyme, yeast extracts, permeabilized yeast cells, and as a fusion protein (with yeast formate dehydrogenase, Fdh1p)—to transform several vicinal diketones to the corresponding diols. We have also developed a new variant of the delitto perfetto methodology to place BDH1 under the control of the GAL1 promoter, resulting in a yeast strain that overexpresses butanediol dehydrogenase and formate dehydrogenase activities in the presence of galactose and regenerates NADH in the presence of formate. While the use of purified Bdh1p allows the synthesis of enantiopure (2R,3R)-2,3-butanediol, (2R,3R)-2,3-pentanediol, (2R,3R)-2,3-hexanediol, and (3R,4R)-3,4-hexanediol, the use of the engineered strain (as an extract or as permeabilized cells) yields mixtures of the diols. The production of pure diol stereoisomers has also been achieved by means of a chimeric fusion protein combining Fdh1p and Bdh1p. Finally, we have determined the selectivity of Bdh1p toward the oxidation/reduction of the hydroxyl/ketone groups from (2R,3R)-2,3-pentanediol/2,3-pentanedione and (2R,3R)-2,3-hexanediol/2,3-hexanedione. In conclusion, Bdh1p is an enzyme with biotechnological interest that can be used to synthesize chiral building blocks. A scheme of the favored pathway with the corresponding intermediates is proposed for the Bdh1p reaction. PMID:26729717

  17. Proline dehydrogenase (oxidase) in cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Phang, James M

    2012-01-01

    Proline dehydrogenase (oxidase, PRODH/POX), the first enzyme in the proline degradative pathway, plays a special role in tumorigenesis and tumor development. Proline metabolism catalyzed by PRODH/POX is closely linked with the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and urea cycle. The proline cycle formed by the interconversion of proline and Δ(1) -pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C) between mitochondria and cytosol interlocks with pentose phosphate pathway. Importantly, by catalyzing proline to P5C, PRODH/POX donates electrons into the electron transport chain to generate ROS or ATP. In earlier studies, we found that PRODH/POX functions as a tumor suppressor to initiate apoptosis, inhibit tumor growth, and block the cell cycle, all by ROS signaling. It also suppresses hypoxia inducible factor signaling by increasing α-ketoglutarate. During tumor progression, PRODH/POX is under the control of various tumor-associated factors, such as tumor suppressor p53, inflammatory factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ), onco-miRNA miR-23b*, and oncogenic transcription factor c-MYC. Recent studies revealed the two-sided features of PRODH/POX-mediated regulation. Under metabolic stress such as oxygen and glucose deprivation, PRODH/POX can be induced to serve as a tumor survival factor through ATP production or ROS-induced autophagy. The paradoxical roles of PRODH/POX can be understood considering the temporal and spatial context of the tumor. Further studies will provide additional insights into this protein and on its metabolic effects in tumors, which may lead to new therapeutic strategies. PMID:22886911

  18. An autosomal glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (hexose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase) polymorphism in human saliva.

    PubMed

    Tan, S G; Ashton, G C

    1976-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (hexose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase) from human saliva has been demonstrated by the zymogram technique. Three phenotypes were found. Family and population studies suggested that these phenotypes are the products of an autosomal locus with two alleles Sgd-1 and Sgd-2. PMID:950237

  19. Mechanistic similarity and diversity among the guanidine-modifying members of the pentein superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Linsky, Thomas; Fast, Walter

    2014-01-01

    The pentein superfamily is a mechanistically diverse superfamily encompassing both noncatalytic proteins and enzymes that catalyze hydrolase, dihydrolase and amidinotransfer reactions on guanidine substrates. Despite generally low sequence identity, they possess a conserved structural fold and display common mechanistic themes in catalysis. The structurally characterized catalytic penteins possess a conserved core of residues that include a Cys, His and two polar, guanidine-binding residues. All known catalytic penteins use the core Cys to attack the substrate’s guanidine moiety to form a covalent thiouronium adduct and all cleave one or more of the guanidine C–N bonds. The mechanistic information compiled to date supports the hypothesis that this superfamily may have evolved divergently from a catalytically promiscuous ancestor. PMID:20654741

  20. The LysE Superfamily of Transport Proteins Involved in Cell Physiology and Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Tsu, Brian V.; Saier, Milton H.

    2015-01-01

    The LysE superfamily consists of transmembrane transport proteins that catalyze export of amino acids, lipids and heavy metal ions. Statistical means were used to show that it includes newly identified families including transporters specific for (1) tellurium, (2) iron/lead, (3) manganese, (4) calcium, (5) nickel/cobalt, (6) amino acids, and (7) peptidoglycolipids as well as (8) one family of transmembrane electron carriers. Internal repeats and conserved motifs were identified, and multiple alignments, phylogenetic trees and average hydropathy, amphipathicity and similarity plots provided evidence that all members of the superfamily derived from a single common 3-TMS precursor peptide via intragenic duplication. Their common origin implies that they share common structural, mechanistic and functional attributes. The transporters of this superfamily play important roles in ionic homeostasis, cell envelope assembly, and protection from excessive cytoplasmic heavy metal/metabolite concentrations. They thus influence the physiology and pathogenesis of numerous microbes, being potential targets of drug action. PMID:26474485

  1. Benzene toxicity: emphasis on cytosolic dihydrodiol dehydrogenases

    SciTech Connect

    Bolcsak, L.E.

    1982-01-01

    Blood dyscrasias such as leukopenia and anemia have been clearly identified as consequences of chronic benzene exposure. The metabolites, phenol, catechol, and hydroquinone produced inhibition of /sup 59/Fe uptake in mice which followed the same time course as that produced by benzene. The inhibitor of benzene oxidation, 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole, mitigated the inhibitory effects of benzene and phenol only. These data support the contention that benzene toxicity is mediated by a metabolite and suggest that the toxicity of phenol is a consequence of its metabolism to hydroquinone and that the route of metabolism to catechol may also contribute to the production of toxic metabolite(s). The properties of mouse liver cytosolic dihydrodiol dehydrogenases were examined. These enzymes catalyze the NADP/sup +/-dependent oxidation of trans-1,2-dihydro-1,2-dihydroxybenzene (BDD) to catechol, a possible toxic metabolite of benzene produced via this metabolic route. Four distinct dihydrodiol dehydrogenases (DD1, DD2, DD3, and DD4) were purified to apparent homogeneity as judged by SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and isoelectric focusing. DD1 appeared to be identical to the major ketone reductase and 17..beta..-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity in the liver. DD2 exhibited aldehyde reductase activity. DD3 and DD4 oxidized 17..beta..-hydroxysteroids, but no carbonyl reductase activity was detected. These relationships between BDD dehydrogenases and carbonyl reductase and/or 17..beta..-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activities were supported by several lines of evidence.

  2. Catalytic mechanism of Zn2+-dependent polyol dehydrogenases: kinetic comparison of sheep liver sorbitol dehydrogenase with wild-type and Glu154→Cys forms of yeast xylitol dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Klimacek, Mario; Hellmer, Heidemarie; Nidetzky, Bernd

    2007-01-01

    Co-ordination of catalytic Zn2+ in sorbitol/xylitol dehydrogenases of the medium-chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily involves direct or water-mediated interactions from a glutamic acid residue, which substitutes a homologous cysteine ligand in alcohol dehydrogenases of the yeast and liver type. Glu154 of xylitol dehydrogenase from the yeast Galactocandida mastotermitis (termed GmXDH) was mutated to a cysteine residue (E154C) to revert this replacement. In spite of their variable Zn2+ content (0.10–0.40 atom/subunit), purified preparations of E154C exhibited a constant catalytic Zn2+ centre activity (kcat) of 1.19±0.03 s−1 and did not require exogenous Zn2+ for activity or stability. E154C retained 0.019±0.003% and 0.74±0.03% of wild-type catalytic efficiency (kcat/Ksorbitol=7800±700 M−1· s−1) and kcat (=161±4 s−1) for NAD+-dependent oxidation of sorbitol at 25 °C respectively. The pH profile of kcat/Ksorbitol for E154C decreased below an apparent pK of 9.1±0.3, reflecting a shift in pK by about +1.7–1.9 pH units compared with the corresponding pH profiles for GmXDH and sheep liver sorbitol dehydrogenase (termed slSDH). The difference in pK for profiles determined in 1H2O and 2H2O solvent was similar and unusually small for all three enzymes (≈+0.2 log units), suggesting that the observed pK in the binary enzyme–NAD+ complexes could be due to Zn2+-bound water. Under conditions eliminating their different pH-dependences, wild-type and mutant GmXDH displayed similar primary and solvent deuterium kinetic isotope effects of 1.7±0.2 (E154C, 1.7±0.1) and 1.9±0.3 (E154C, 2.4±0.2) on kcat/Ksorbitol respectively. Transient kinetic studies of NAD+ reduction and proton release during sorbitol oxidation by slSDH at pH 8.2 show that two protons are lost with a rate constant of 687±12 s−1 in the pre-steady state, which features a turnover of 0.9±0.1 enzyme equivalents as NADH was produced with a rate constant of 409±3 s−1. The

  3. Established and emerging fluorescence-based assays for G-protein function: Ras-superfamily GTPases.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Rafael J; Kimple, Randall J; Rossman, Kent L; Siderovski, David P; Sondek, John

    2003-06-01

    Ras and Rho GTPases are signaling proteins that regulate a variety of physiological events and are intimately linked to the progression of cancer. Recently, a variety of fluorescence-based assays have been refined to monitor activation of these GTPases. This review summarizes current fluorescence-based techniques for studying Ras superfamily GTPases with an emphasis on practical examples and high-throughput applications. These techniques are not only useful for biochemical characterization of Ras superfamily members, but will also facilitate the discovery of small molecule therapeutics designed to inhibit signal transduction mediated by GTPases. PMID:12769685

  4. NAD + -dependent Formate Dehydrogenase from Plants

    PubMed Central

    Alekseeva, A.A.; Savin, S.S.; Tishkov, V.I.

    2011-01-01

    NAD+-dependent formate dehydrogenase (FDH, EC 1.2.1.2) widely occurs in nature. FDH consists of two identical subunits and contains neither prosthetic groups nor metal ions. This type of FDH was found in different microorganisms (including pathogenic ones), such as bacteria, yeasts, fungi, and plants. As opposed to microbiological FDHs functioning in cytoplasm, plant FDHs localize in mitochondria. Formate dehydrogenase activity was first discovered as early as in 1921 in plant; however, until the past decade FDHs from plants had been considerably less studied than the enzymes from microorganisms. This review summarizes the recent results on studying the physiological role, properties, structure, and protein engineering of plant formate dehydrogenases. PMID:22649703

  5. Two different dihydroorotate dehydrogenases in Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, P S; Jansen, P J; Hammer, K

    1994-01-01

    The pyrimidine de novo biosynthesis pathway has been characterized for a number of organisms. The general pathway consists of six enzymatic steps. In the characterization of the pyrimidine pathway of Lactococcus lactis, two different pyrD genes encoding dihydroorotate dehydrogenase were isolated. The nucleotide sequences of the two genes, pyrDa and pyrDb, have been determined. One of the deduced amino acid sequences has a high degree of homology to the Saccharomyces cerevisiae dihydroorotate dehydrogenase, and the other resembles the dihydroorotate dehydrogenase from Bacillus subtilis. It is possible to distinguish between the two enzymes in crude extracts by using different electron acceptors. We constructed mutants containing a mutated form of either one or the other or both of the pyrD genes. Only the double mutant is pyrimidine auxotrophic. Images PMID:8021180

  6. Fundamental molecular differences between alcohol dehydrogenase classes.

    PubMed Central

    Danielsson, O; Atrian, S; Luque, T; Hjelmqvist, L; Gonzàlez-Duarte, R; Jörnvall, H

    1994-01-01

    Two types of alcohol dehydrogenase in separate protein families are the "medium-chain" zinc enzymes (including the classical liver and yeast forms) and the "short-chain" enzymes (including the insect form). Although the medium-chain family has been characterized in prokaryotes and many eukaryotes (fungi, plants, cephalopods, and vertebrates), insects have seemed to possess only the short-chain enzyme. We have now also characterized a medium-chain alcohol dehydrogenase in Drosophila. The enzyme is identical to insect octanol dehydrogenase. It is a typical class III alcohol dehydrogenase, similar to the corresponding human form (70% residue identity), with mostly the same residues involved in substrate and coenzyme interactions. Changes that do occur are conservative, but Phe-51 is of functional interest in relation to decreased coenzyme binding and increased overall activity. Extra residues versus the human enzyme near position 250 affect the coenzyme-binding domain. Enzymatic properties are similar--i.e., very low activity toward ethanol (Km beyond measurement) and high selectivity for formaldehyde/glutathione (S-hydroxymethylglutathione; kcat/Km = 160,000 min-1.mM-1). Between the present class III and the ethanol-active class I enzymes, however, patterns of variability differ greatly, highlighting fundamentally separate molecular properties of these two alcohol dehydrogenases, with class III resembling enzymes in general and class I showing high variation. The gene coding for the Drosophila class III enzyme produces an mRNA of about 1.36 kb that is present at all developmental stages of the fly, compatible with the constitutive nature of the vertebrate enzyme. Taken together, the results bridge a previously apparent gap in the distribution of medium-chain alcohol dehydrogenases and establish a strictly conserved class III enzyme, consistent with an important role for this enzyme in cellular metabolism. Images PMID:8197167

  7. Recent advances in the study of enzyme promiscuity in the tautomerase superfamily.

    PubMed

    Baas, Bert-Jan; Zandvoort, Ellen; Geertsema, Edzard M; Poelarends, Gerrit J

    2013-05-27

    Catalytic promiscuity and evolution: Many enzymes exhibit catalytic promiscuity--the ability to catalyze reactions other than their biologically relevant one. These reactions can serve as starting points for both natural and laboratory evolution of new enzymatic functions. Recent advances in the study of enzyme promiscuity in the tautomerase superfamily are discussed. PMID:23649962

  8. Molecular evolution of miraculin-like proteins in soybean Kunitz super-family.

    PubMed

    Selvakumar, Purushotham; Gahloth, Deepankar; Tomar, Prabhat Pratap Singh; Sharma, Nidhi; Sharma, Ashwani Kumar

    2011-12-01

    Miraculin-like proteins (MLPs) belong to soybean Kunitz super-family and have been characterized from many plant families like Rutaceae, Solanaceae, Rubiaceae, etc. Many of them possess trypsin inhibitory activity and are involved in plant defense. MLPs exhibit significant sequence identity (~30-95%) to native miraculin protein, also belonging to Kunitz super-family compared with a typical Kunitz family member (~30%). The sequence and structure-function comparison of MLPs with that of a classical Kunitz inhibitor have demonstrated that MLPs have evolved to form a distinct group within Kunitz super-family. Sequence analysis of new genes along with available MLP sequences in the literature revealed three major groups for these proteins. A significant feature of Rutaceae MLP type 2 sequences is the presence of phosphorylation motif. Subtle changes are seen in putative reactive loop residues among different MLPs suggesting altered specificities to specific proteases. In phylogenetic analysis, Rutaceae MLP type 1 and type 2 proteins clustered together on separate branches, whereas native miraculin along with other MLPs formed distinct clusters. Site-specific positive Darwinian selection was observed at many sites in both the groups of Rutaceae MLP sequences with most of the residues undergoing positive selection located in loop regions. The results demonstrate the sequence and thereby the structure-function divergence of MLPs as a distinct group within soybean Kunitz super-family due to biotic and abiotic stresses of local environment. PMID:22274614

  9. Functional Diversity of Haloacid Dehalogenase Superfamily Phosphatases from Saccharomyces cerevisiae: BIOCHEMICAL, STRUCTURAL, AND EVOLUTIONARY INSIGHTS.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Nocek, Boguslaw; Brown, Greg; Makarova, Kira S; Flick, Robert; Wolf, Yuri I; Khusnutdinova, Anna; Evdokimova, Elena; Jin, Ke; Tan, Kemin; Hanson, Andrew D; Hasnain, Ghulam; Zallot, Rémi; de Crécy-Lagard, Valérie; Babu, Mohan; Savchenko, Alexei; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Edwards, Aled M; Koonin, Eugene V; Yakunin, Alexander F

    2015-07-24

    The haloacid dehalogenase (HAD)-like enzymes comprise a large superfamily of phosphohydrolases present in all organisms. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome encodes at least 19 soluble HADs, including 10 uncharacterized proteins. Here, we biochemically characterized 13 yeast phosphatases from the HAD superfamily, which includes both specific and promiscuous enzymes active against various phosphorylated metabolites and peptides with several HADs implicated in detoxification of phosphorylated compounds and pseudouridine. The crystal structures of four yeast HADs provided insight into their active sites, whereas the structure of the YKR070W dimer in complex with substrate revealed a composite substrate-binding site. Although the S. cerevisiae and Escherichia coli HADs share low sequence similarities, the comparison of their substrate profiles revealed seven phosphatases with common preferred substrates. The cluster of secondary substrates supporting significant activity of both S. cerevisiae and E. coli HADs includes 28 common metabolites that appear to represent the pool of potential activities for the evolution of novel HAD phosphatases. Evolution of novel substrate specificities of HAD phosphatases shows no strict correlation with sequence divergence. Thus, evolution of the HAD superfamily combines the conservation of the overall substrate pool and the substrate profiles of some enzymes with remarkable biochemical and structural flexibility of other superfamily members. PMID:26071590

  10. Building a Phylogenetic Tree of the Human and Ape Superfamily Using DNA-DNA Hybridization Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maier, Caroline Alexander

    2004-01-01

    The study describes the process of DNA-DNA hybridization and the history of its use by Sibley and Alquist in simple, straightforward, and interesting language that students easily understand to create their own phylogenetic tree of the hominoid superfamily. They calibrate the DNA clock and use it to estimate the divergence dates of the various…

  11. Functional Characterization of Tumor Necrosis Factor Superfamily 15(TNFSF15) Induced by Lipopolysaccharides and Eimeria Infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A full-length cDNA encoding chicken tumor necrosis factor superfamily 15 (TNFSF15) was isolated and its functional role was investigated. TNFSF15 transcripts were primarily expressed in spleen, liver, intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes (IEL), peripheral blood lymphocytes and bursa. In vitro inf...

  12. Identification and Characterization of New Family Members in the Tautomerase Superfamily: Analysis and Implications

    PubMed Central

    Huddleston, Jamison P.; Burks, Elizabeth A.; Whitman, Christian P.

    2014-01-01

    Tautomerase superfamily members are characterized by a β–α–β building block and a catalytic amino terminal proline. 4-oxalocrotonate tautomerase (4-OT) and malonate semialdehyde decarboxylase (MSAD) are the title enzymes of two of the five known families in the superfamily. Two recent developments in these families indicate that there might be more metabolic diversity in the tautomerase superfamily than previously thought. 4-OT homologues have been identified in three biosynthetic pathways, whereas all previously characterized 4-OTs are found in catabolic pathways. In the MSAD family, homologues have been characterized that lack decarboxylase activity, but have a modest hydratase activity using 2-oxo-3-pentynoate. This observation stands in contrast to the first characterized MSAD, which is a proficient decarboxylase and a less efficient hydratase. The hydratase activity was thought to be a vestigial and promiscuous activity. However, this recent discovery suggests that the hydratase activity might reflect a new activity in the MSAD family for an unknown substrate. These discoveries open up new avenues of research in the tautomerase superfamily. PMID:25219626

  13. fastSCOP: a fast web server for recognizing protein structural domains and SCOP superfamilies.

    PubMed

    Tung, Chi-Hua; Yang, Jinn-Moon

    2007-07-01

    The fastSCOP is a web server that rapidly identifies the structural domains and determines the evolutionary superfamilies of a query protein structure. This server uses 3D-BLAST to scan quickly a large structural classification database (SCOP1.71 with <95% identity with each other) and the top 10 hit domains, which have different superfamily classifications, are obtained from the hit lists. MAMMOTH, a detailed structural alignment tool, is adopted to align these top 10 structures to refine domain boundaries and to identify evolutionary superfamilies. Our previous works demonstrated that 3D-BLAST is as fast as BLAST, and has the characteristics of BLAST (e.g. a robust statistical basis, effective search and reliable database search capabilities) in large structural database searches based on a structural alphabet database and a structural alphabet substitution matrix. The classification accuracy of this server is approximately 98% for 586 query structures and the average execution time is approximately 5. This server was also evaluated on 8700 structures, which have no annotations in the SCOP; the server can automatically assign 7311 (84%) proteins (9420 domains) to the SCOP superfamilies in 9.6 h. These results suggest that the fastSCOP is robust and can be a useful server for recognizing the evolutionary classifications and the protein functions of novel structures. The server is accessible at http://fastSCOP.life.nctu.edu.tw. PMID:17485476

  14. Human Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Genes: Alternatively-Spliced Transcriptional Variants and Their Suggested Nomenclature

    PubMed Central

    Black, William J.; Stagos, Dimitrios; Marchitti, Satori A.; Nebert, Daniel W.; Tipton, Keith F.; Bairoch, Amos; Vasiliou, Vasilis

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The human aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) gene superfamily consists of 19 genes encoding enzymes critical for NAD(P)+-dependent oxidation of endogenous and exogenous aldehydes, including drugs and environmental toxicants. Mutations in ALDH genes are the molecular basis of several disease states (e.g. Sjögren-Larsson syndrome, pyridoxine-dependent seizures, and type II hyperprolinemia) and may contribute to the etiology of complex diseases such as cancer and Alzheimer’s disease. The aim of this nomenclature update was to identify splice transcriptional variants principally for the human ALDH genes. METHODS Data-mining methods were used to retrieve all human ALDH sequences. Alternatively-spliced transcriptional variants were determined based upon: a) criteria for sequence integrity and genomic alignment; b) evidence of multiple independent cDNA sequences corresponding to a variant sequence; and c) if available, empirical evidence of variants from the literature. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION Alternatively-spliced transcriptional variants and their encoded proteins exist for most of the human ALDH genes; however, their function and significance remain to be established. When compared with the human genome, rat and mouse include an additional gene, Aldh1a7, in the ALDH1A subfamily. In order to avoid confusion when identifying splice variants in various genomes, nomenclature guidelines for the naming of such alternative transcriptional variants and proteins are recommended herein. In addition, a web database (www.aldh.org) has been developed to provide up-to-date information and nomenclature guidelines for the ALDH superfamily. PMID:19823103

  15. Human dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR family) member 8 (DHRS8): a description and evaluation of its biochemical properties.

    PubMed

    Lundová, Tereza; Štambergová, Hana; Zemanová, Lucie; Svobodová, Markéta; Havránková, Jana; Šafr, Miroslav; Wsól, Vladimír

    2016-01-01

    Dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR family) member 8 (DHRS8, SDR16C2) belongs to the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) superfamily, one of the largest enzyme groups. In addition to the well-known members which participate in the metabolism of important eobiotics and xenobiotics, this superfamily contains many poorly characterized proteins. DHRS8 is a member of the Multisubstrate NADP(H)-dependent SDR16C family, which generally contains insufficiently described enzymes. Despite the limited knowledge about DHRS8, preliminary indicators have emerged regarding its significant function in the modulation of steroidal activity, at least in the case of 3α-adiol, lipid metabolism and detoxification. The aim of this study was to describe additional biochemical properties of DHRS8 and to unify knowledge about this enzyme. The DHRS8 was prepared in recombinant form and its membrane topology in the endoplasmic reticulum as an integral protein with cytosolic orientation was demonstrated. The enzyme participates in the NAD(+)-dependent oxidation of steroid hormones as β-estradiol and testosterone in vitro; apparent K m and V max values were 39.86 µM and 0.80 nmol × mg(-1) × min(-1) for β-estradiol and 1207.29 µM and 3.45 nmol × mg(-1) × min(-1) for testosterone. Moreover, synthetic steroids (methyltestosterone and nandrolone) used as anabolics as well as all-trans-retinol were for the first time identified as substrates of DHRS8. This knowledge of its in vitro activity together with a newly described expression pattern at the protein level in tissues involved in steroidogenesis (adrenal gland and testis) and detoxification (liver, lung, kidney and small intestine) could suggest a potential role of DHRS8 in vivo. PMID:26472732

  16. Comparison of molecular dynamics and superfamily spaces of protein domain deformation

    PubMed Central

    Velázquez-Muriel, Javier A; Rueda, Manuel; Cuesta, Isabel; Pascual-Montano, Alberto; Orozco, Modesto; Carazo, José-María

    2009-01-01

    Background It is well known the strong relationship between protein structure and flexibility, on one hand, and biological protein function, on the other hand. Technically, protein flexibility exploration is an essential task in many applications, such as protein structure prediction and modeling. In this contribution we have compared two different approaches to explore the flexibility space of protein domains: i) molecular dynamics (MD-space), and ii) the study of the structural changes within superfamily (SF-space). Results Our analysis indicates that the MD-space and the SF-space display a significant overlap, but are still different enough to be considered as complementary. The SF-space space is wider but less complex than the MD-space, irrespective of the number of members in the superfamily. Also, the SF-space does not sample all possibilities offered by the MD-space, but often introduces very large changes along just a few deformation modes, whose number tend to a plateau as the number of related folds in the superfamily increases. Conclusion Theoretically, we obtained two conclusions. First, that function restricts the access to some flexibility patterns to evolution, as we observe that when a superfamily member changes to become another, the path does not completely overlap with the physical deformability. Second, that conformational changes from variation in a superfamily are larger and much simpler than those allowed by physical deformability. Methodologically, the conclusion is that both spaces studied are complementary, and have different size and complexity. We expect this fact to have application in fields as 3D-EM/X-ray hybrid models or ab initio protein folding. PMID:19220918

  17. Psoriatic therapeutics and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Cotton, D W; van Rossum, E

    1975-01-01

    The inhibitory effects of various agents on the enzyme glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase have been studied in vitro. Stress is laid on the calculation of kinetic parameters such as true K-I values. The most active inhibitor was methotrexate, closely followed by cGMP. The increase in inhibitory activity after incubation of methotrexate with liver slices is discussed. PMID:167665

  18. Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Inhibitors: a Comprehensive Review of the Pharmacology, Mechanism of Action, Substrate Specificity, and Clinical Application

    PubMed Central

    Koppaka, Vindhya; Thompson, David C.; Chen, Ying; Ellermann, Manuel; Nicolaou, Kyriacos C.; Juvonen, Risto O.; Petersen, Dennis; Deitrich, Richard A.; Hurley, Thomas D.

    2012-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) belong to a superfamily of enzymes that play a key role in the metabolism of aldehydes of both endogenous and exogenous derivation. The human ALDH superfamily comprises 19 isozymes that possess important physiological and toxicological functions. The ALDH1A subfamily plays a pivotal role in embryogenesis and development by mediating retinoic acid signaling. ALDH2, as a key enzyme that oxidizes acetaldehyde, is crucial for alcohol metabolism. ALDH1A1 and ALDH3A1 are lens and corneal crystallins, which are essential elements of the cellular defense mechanism against ultraviolet radiation-induced damage in ocular tissues. Many ALDH isozymes are important in oxidizing reactive aldehydes derived from lipid peroxidation and thereby help maintain cellular homeostasis. Increased expression and activity of ALDH isozymes have been reported in various human cancers and are associated with cancer relapse. As a direct consequence of their significant physiological and toxicological roles, inhibitors of the ALDH enzymes have been developed to treat human diseases. This review summarizes known ALDH inhibitors, their mechanisms of action, isozyme selectivity, potency, and clinical uses. The purpose of this review is to 1) establish the current status of pharmacological inhibition of the ALDHs, 2) provide a rationale for the continued development of ALDH isozyme-selective inhibitors, and 3) identify the challenges and potential therapeutic rewards associated with the creation of such agents. PMID:22544865

  19. Multiple retinoid dehydrogenases in testes cytosol from alcohol dehydrogenase negative or positive deermice.

    PubMed

    Posch, K C; Napoli, J L

    1992-05-28

    Retinoic acid syntheses from retinol by cytosol from testes of alcohol dehydrogenase negative or positive deermice were similar in specific activity and in their insensitivity to 1 M ethanol or 100 mM 4-methylpyrazole. Anion-exchange followed by size-exclusion chromatography revealed multiple and similarly migrating peaks in each cytosol that had both retinol and retinal dehydrogenase activities. Thus, the effects of ethanol on testes cannot be caused by direct inhibition of cytosolic retinoic acid synthesis because retinoid dehydrogenases distinct from mouse class A2 alcohol dehydrogenases, which corresponds to human class I, occurred in testes and they were not inhibited by ethanol. These data also demonstrate the occurrence of multiple cytosolic retinoic acid synthesis activities and indicate that the two reactions of cytosolic retinoic acid synthesis, retinol and retinal dehydrogenation, may be catalyzed by enzymes that occur as complexes. PMID:1599517

  20. Characterization of xylitol dehydrogenase from Debaryomyces hansenii

    SciTech Connect

    Girio, F.M.; Amaral-Collaco, M.T.; Pelica, F.

    1996-01-01

    The xylitol dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.9) from xylose-grown cells of Debaryomyces hansenii was partially purified in two chromatographic steps, and characterization studies were carried out in order to investigate the role of the xylitol dehydrogenase-catalyzed step in the regulation of D-xylose metabolism. The enzyme was most active at pH 9.0-9.5, and exhibited a broad polyol specificity. The Michaelis constants for xylitol and NAD{sup +} were 16.5 and 0.55 mM, respectively. Ca{sup 2+}, Mg{sup 2+}, and Mn{sup 2+} did not affect the enzyme activity. Conversely, Zn{sup 2+}, Cd{sup 2+}, and Co{sup 2+} strongly inhibited the enzyme activity. It was concluded that NAD{sup +}-xylitol dehydrogenase from D. hansenii has similarities with other xylose-fermenting yeasts in respect to optimal pH, substrate specificity, and K{sub m} value for xylitol, and therefore should be named L-iditol:NAD{sup +}-5-oxidoreductase (EC 1.1.1.14). The reason D. hansenii is a good xylitol producer is not because of its value of K for xylitol, which is low enough to assure its fast oxidation by NAD{sup +}-xylitol dehydrogenase. However, a higher K{sub m} value of xylitol dehydrogenase for NAD{sup +} compared to the K{sub m} values of other xylose-fermenting yeasts may be responsible for the higher xylitol yields. 22 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. YZGD from Paenibacillus thiaminolyticus, a pyridoxal phosphatase of the HAD (haloacid dehalogenase) superfamily and a versatile member of the Nudix (nucleoside diphosphate x) hydrolase superfamily.

    PubMed

    Tirrell, Isaac M; Wall, Jennifer L; Daley, Christopher J; Denial, Sarah J; Tennis, Frances G; Galens, Kevin G; O'Handley, Suzanne F

    2006-03-15

    YZGD from Paenibacillus thiaminolyticus is a novel bifunctional enzyme with both PLPase (pyridoxal phosphatase) and Nudix (nucleoside diphosphate x) hydrolase activities. The PLPase activity is catalysed by the HAD (haloacid dehalogenase) superfamily motif of the enzyme, and the Nudix hydrolase activity is catalysed by the conserved Nudix signature sequence within a separate portion of the enzyme, as confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis. YZGD's phosphatase activity is very specific, with pyridoxal phosphate being the only natural substrate, while YZGD's Nudix activity is just the opposite, with YZGD being the most versatile Nudix hydrolase characterized to date. YZGD's Nudix substrates include the CDP-alcohols (CDP-ethanol, CDP-choline and CDP-glycerol), the ADP-coenzymes (NADH, NAD and FAD), ADP-sugars, TDP-glucose and, to a lesser extent, UDP- and GDP-sugars. Regardless of the Nudix substrate, one of the products is always a nucleoside monophosphate, suggesting a role in nucleotide salvage. Both the PLPase and Nudix hydrolase activities require a bivalent metal cation, but while PLPase activity is supported by Co2+, Mg2+, Zn2+ and Mn2+, the Nudix hydrolase activity is Mn2+-specific. YZGD's phosphatase activity is optimal at an acidic pH (pH 5), while YZGD's Nudix activities are optimal at an alkaline pH (pH 8.5). YZGD is the first enzyme reported to be a member of both the HAD and Nudix hydrolase superfamilies, the first PLPase to be recognized as a member of the HAD superfamily and the first Nudix hydrolase capable of hydrolysing ADP-x, CDP-x and TDP-x substrates with comparable substrate specificity. PMID:16336194

  2. YZGD from Paenibacillus thiaminolyticus, a pyridoxal phosphatase of the HAD (haloacid dehalogenase) superfamily and a versatile member of the Nudix (nucleoside diphosphate x) hydrolase superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Tirrell, Isaac M.; Wall, Jennifer L.; Daley, Christopher J.; Denial, Sarah J.; Tennis, Frances G.; Galens, Kevin G.; O'Handley, Suzanne F.

    2005-01-01

    YZGD from Paenibacillus thiaminolyticus is a novel bifunctional enzyme with both PLPase (pyridoxal phosphatase) and Nudix (nucleoside diphosphate x) hydrolase activities. The PLPase activity is catalysed by the HAD (haloacid dehalogenase) superfamily motif of the enzyme, and the Nudix hydrolase activity is catalysed by the conserved Nudix signature sequence within a separate portion of the enzyme, as confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis. YZGD's phosphatase activity is very specific, with pyridoxal phosphate being the only natural substrate, while YZGD's Nudix activity is just the opposite, with YZGD being the most versatile Nudix hydrolase characterized to date. YZGD's Nudix substrates include the CDP-alcohols (CDP-ethanol, CDP-choline and CDP-glycerol), the ADP-coenzymes (NADH, NAD and FAD), ADP-sugars, TDP-glucose and, to a lesser extent, UDP- and GDP-sugars. Regardless of the Nudix substrate, one of the products is always a nucleoside monophosphate, suggesting a role in nucleotide salvage. Both the PLPase and Nudix hydrolase activities require a bivalent metal cation, but while PLPase activity is supported by Co2+, Mg2+, Zn2+ and Mn2+, the Nudix hydrolase activity is Mn2+-specific. YZGD's phosphatase activity is optimal at an acidic pH (pH 5), while YZGD's Nudix activities are optimal at an alkaline pH (pH 8.5). YZGD is the first enzyme reported to be a member of both the HAD and Nudix hydrolase superfamilies, the first PLPase to be recognized as a member of the HAD superfamily and the first Nudix hydrolase capable of hydrolysing ADP-x, CDP-x and TDP-x substrates with comparable substrate specificity. PMID:16336194

  3. Structure of a bacterial enzyme regulated by phosphorylation, isocitrate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Hurley, J H; Thorsness, P E; Ramalingam, V; Helmers, N H; Koshland, D E; Stroud, R M

    1989-11-01

    The structure of isocitrate dehydrogenase [threo-DS-isocitrate: NADP+ oxidoreductase (decarboxylating), EC 1.1.1.42] from Escherichia coli has been solved and refined at 2.5 A resolution and is topologically different from that of any other dehydrogenase. This enzyme, a dimer of identical 416-residue subunits, is inactivated by phosphorylation at Ser-113, which lies at the edge of an interdomain pocket that also contains many residues conserved between isocitrate dehydrogenase and isopropylmalate dehydrogenase. Isocitrate dehydrogenase contains an unusual clasp-like domain in which both polypeptide chains in the dimer interlock. Based on the structure of isocitrate dehydrogenase and conservation with isopropylmalate dehydrogenase, we suggest that the active site lies in an interdomain pocket close to the phosphorylation site. PMID:2682654

  4. Characterization of homogeneous recombinant rat ovarian 20alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase: fluorescent properties and inhibition profile.

    PubMed Central

    Ma, H; Penning, T M

    1999-01-01

    In rat ovary, 20alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (20alpha-HSD), a member of the aldo-keto reductase (AKR) superfamily, converts progesterone into the inactive progestin 20alpha-hydroxyprogesterone and has been implicated in the termination of pregnancy. Here we report a convenient overexpression system that permits the purification of milligram quantities of homogeneous recombinant 20alpha-HSD with wild-type enzyme activity. The availability of this enzyme has permitted detailed kinetic, inhibition and fluorescence analyses. The enzyme exhibited narrow steroid specificity, catalysing reactions only at C-20; it reduced progesterone and 17alpha-hydroxyprogesterone and oxidized 20alpha-hydroxypregnanes. It also turned over common AKR substrates, such as 9, 10-phenanthrenequinone and 4-nitrobenzaldehyde. The intrinsic fluorescence spectrum of 20alpha-HSD was characterized and was quenched on the binding of NADP(H), yielding a KNADPd of 0.36 microM and a KNADPHd of 0.64 microM. NADP(H) binding generated an energy transfer band that could not be quenched by steroids. Inhibition studies conducted with non-steroidal and steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and synthetic oestrogens indicated that even though rat ovarian 20alpha-HSD and rat liver 3alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3alpha-HSD) share more than 67% amino acid identity, their inhibition profiles are markedly different. Unlike 3alpha-HSD, most of these compounds did not inhibit 20alpha-HSD. Only meclofenamic acid and hexoestrol were potent competitive inhibitors for 20alpha-HSD, yielding K(i) values of 18.9 and 14.3 microM respectively. These studies suggest that selective non-steroidal AKR inhibitors could be developed for 20alpha-HSD that might be useful in maintaining pregnancy and that specific inhibitors might be developed from either N-phenylanthranilates or biphenols. PMID:10417353

  5. Characterization of homogeneous recombinant rat ovarian 20alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase: fluorescent properties and inhibition profile.

    PubMed

    Ma, H; Penning, T M

    1999-08-01

    In rat ovary, 20alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (20alpha-HSD), a member of the aldo-keto reductase (AKR) superfamily, converts progesterone into the inactive progestin 20alpha-hydroxyprogesterone and has been implicated in the termination of pregnancy. Here we report a convenient overexpression system that permits the purification of milligram quantities of homogeneous recombinant 20alpha-HSD with wild-type enzyme activity. The availability of this enzyme has permitted detailed kinetic, inhibition and fluorescence analyses. The enzyme exhibited narrow steroid specificity, catalysing reactions only at C-20; it reduced progesterone and 17alpha-hydroxyprogesterone and oxidized 20alpha-hydroxypregnanes. It also turned over common AKR substrates, such as 9, 10-phenanthrenequinone and 4-nitrobenzaldehyde. The intrinsic fluorescence spectrum of 20alpha-HSD was characterized and was quenched on the binding of NADP(H), yielding a KNADPd of 0.36 microM and a KNADPHd of 0.64 microM. NADP(H) binding generated an energy transfer band that could not be quenched by steroids. Inhibition studies conducted with non-steroidal and steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and synthetic oestrogens indicated that even though rat ovarian 20alpha-HSD and rat liver 3alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3alpha-HSD) share more than 67% amino acid identity, their inhibition profiles are markedly different. Unlike 3alpha-HSD, most of these compounds did not inhibit 20alpha-HSD. Only meclofenamic acid and hexoestrol were potent competitive inhibitors for 20alpha-HSD, yielding K(i) values of 18.9 and 14.3 microM respectively. These studies suggest that selective non-steroidal AKR inhibitors could be developed for 20alpha-HSD that might be useful in maintaining pregnancy and that specific inhibitors might be developed from either N-phenylanthranilates or biphenols. PMID:10417353

  6. Structural and kinetic characterization of recombinant 2-hydroxymuconate semialdehyde dehydrogenase from Pseudomonas putida G7

    PubMed Central

    de Araújo, Simara Semíramis; Neves, Cíntia Mara Leal; Guimarães, Samuel Leite; Whitman, Christian P.; Johnson, William H.; Aparicio, Ricardo; Nagem, Ronaldo Alves Pinto

    2016-01-01

    The first enzyme in the oxalocrotonate branch of the naphthalene-degradation lower pathway in Pseudomonas putida G7 is NahI, a 2-hydroxymuconate semialdehyde dehydrogenase required for conversion of 2-hydroxymuconate semialdehyde to 2-hydroxymuconate in the presence of NAD+. NahI is in one family of the NAD(P)+-dependent aldehyde dehydrogenase superfamily (ALDH8). In this work, we report the cloning, expression, purification and preliminary structural and kinetic characterization of the recombinant NahI. The nahI gene was subcloned into a T7 expression vector and the enzyme was overexpressed in Escherichia coli ArcticExpress at 12 ºC as an N-terminal hexa-histidine-tagged fusion protein (6xHis-NahI). After the soluble protein was purified by affinity and size-exclusion chromatography, dynamic light scattering and small-angle X-ray scattering experiments were conducted to analyze the oligomeric state and the overall shape of the enzyme in solution. The protein is a tetramer in solution and has nearly perfect 222 point group symmetry. Protein stability and secondary structure content were also evaluated by a circular dichroism spectroscopy assay under different thermal conditions. Furthermore, kinetic assays were conducted for the recombinant enzyme and, for the first time, KM (1.3 ± 0.3 μM) and kcat (0.9 s−1) values were determined for this enzyme (at presumed NAD+ saturation). NahI is highly specific for its biological substrate (2-hydroxymuconate semialdehyde) and has no activity with salicylaldehyde, another intermediate in the naphthalene-degradation pathway. PMID:26032336

  7. Structural Determinants of Oligomerization of !1-Pyrroline-5-Carboxylate Dehydrogenase: Identification of a Hexamerization Hot Spot

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Min; Singh, Ranjan K.; Tanner, John J.

    2013-01-01

    The aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) superfamily member !1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase (P5CDH) catalyzes the NAD+-dependent oxidation of glutamate semialdehyde to glutamate, which is the final step of proline catabolism. Defects in P5CDH activity lead to the metabolic disorder type II hyperprolinemia, P5CDH is essential for virulence of the fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans, and bacterial P5CDHs have been targeted for vaccine development. Although the enzyme oligomeric state is known to be important for ALDH function, the oligomerization of P5CDH has remained relatively unstudied. Here we determine the oligomeric states and quaternary structures of four bacterial P5CDHs using a combination of small-angle X-ray scattering, X-ray crystallography, and dynamic light scattering. The P5CDHs from Thermus thermophilus and Deinococcus radiodurans form trimer-of-dimers hexamers in solution, which is the first observation of a hexameric ALDH in solution. In contrast, two Bacillus P5CDHs form dimers in solution but do not assemble into a higher order oligomer. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to identify a hexamerization hot spot that is centered on an arginine residue in the NAD+-binding domain. Mutation of this critical Arg residue to Ala in either of the hexameric enzymes prevents hexamer formation in solution. Paradoxically, the dimeric Arg-to-Ala T. thermophilus mutant enzyme packs as a hexamer in the crystal state, which illustrates the challenges associated with predicting the biological assembly in solution from crystal structures. The observation of different oligomeric states among P5CDHs suggests potential differences in cooperativity and protein-protein interactions. PMID:23747974

  8. Isolation and Manipulation of Adipogenic Cells to Assess TGF-β Superfamily Functions.

    PubMed

    Namwanje, Maria; Bournat, Juan C; Brown, Chester W

    2016-01-01

    A variety of TGF-β superfamily members affect adipocyte differentiation and function with consequential effects on energy metabolism. There has been a growing interest in this area because of the apparent influence of the BMP subgroup on brown adipose characteristics and potential application to the treatment of human obesity. In this chapter we describe methods that are useful in allowing one to assess the roles of specific members of the superfamily on adipocyte differentiation and mature adipocyte function, including the isolation and differentiation of mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) to examine cell autonomous effects and the efficient transfection of two commonly used (but difficult to transfect) adipogenic cell lines, C3H/10T1/2 and 3T3-L1. PMID:26520126

  9. The Ribonuclease A Superfamily in Humans: Canonical RNases as the Buttress of Innate Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Koczera, Patrick; Martin, Lukas; Marx, Gernot; Schuerholz, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    In humans, the ribonuclease A (RNase A) superfamily contains eight different members that have RNase activities, and all of these members are encoded on chromosome 14. The proteins are secreted by a large variety of different tissues and cells; however, a comprehensive understanding of these proteins’ physiological roles is lacking. Different biological effects can be attributed to each protein, including antiviral, antibacterial and antifungal activities as well as cytotoxic effects against host cells and parasites. Different immunomodulatory effects have also been demonstrated. This review summarizes the available data on the human RNase A superfamily and illustrates the significant role of the eight canonical RNases in inflammation and the host defence system against infections. PMID:27527162

  10. Cloning of a new member of the insulin gene superfamily (INSL4) expressed in human placenta

    SciTech Connect

    Chassin, D.; Laurent, A.; Janneau, J.L.

    1995-09-20

    A new member of the insulin gene superfamily was identified by screening a subtracted cDNA library of first-trimester human placenta and, hence, was tentatively named early placenta insulin-like peptide (EPIL). In this paper, we report the cloning and sequencing of the EPIL cDNA and the EPIL gene (INSL4). Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequence of the early placenta insulin-like peptide revealed significant overall and structural homologies with members of the insulin-like hormone superfamily. Moreover, the organization of the early placenta insulin-like gene, which is composed of two exons and one intron, is similiar to that of insulin and relaxin. By in situ hybridization, the INSL4 gene was assigned to band p24 of the short arm of chromosome 9. RT-PCR analysis of EPIL tissue distribution revealed that its transcripts are expressed in the placenta and uterus. 22 refs., 3 figs.

  11. The Ribonuclease A Superfamily in Humans: Canonical RNases as the Buttress of Innate Immunity.

    PubMed

    Koczera, Patrick; Martin, Lukas; Marx, Gernot; Schuerholz, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    In humans, the ribonuclease A (RNase A) superfamily contains eight different members that have RNase activities, and all of these members are encoded on chromosome 14. The proteins are secreted by a large variety of different tissues and cells; however, a comprehensive understanding of these proteins' physiological roles is lacking. Different biological effects can be attributed to each protein, including antiviral, antibacterial and antifungal activities as well as cytotoxic effects against host cells and parasites. Different immunomodulatory effects have also been demonstrated. This review summarizes the available data on the human RNase A superfamily and illustrates the significant role of the eight canonical RNases in inflammation and the host defence system against infections. PMID:27527162

  12. Molecular motor proteins of the kinesin superfamily proteins (KIFs): structure, cargo and disease.

    PubMed

    Seog, Dae-Hyun; Lee, Dae-Ho; Lee, Sang-Kyoung

    2004-02-01

    Intracellular organelle transport is essential for morphogenesis and functioning of the cell. Kinesins and kinesin-related proteins make up a large superfamily of molecular motors that transport cargoes such as vesicles, organelles (e.g. mitochondria, peroxisomes, lysosomes), protein complexes (e.g. elements of the cytoskeleton, virus particles), and mRNAs in a microtubule- and ATP-dependent manner in neuronal and non-neuronal cells. Until now, more than 45 kinesin superfamily proteins (KIFs) have been identified in the mouse and human genomes. Elucidating the transport pathways mediated by kinesins, the identities of the cargoes moved, and the nature of the proteins that link kinesin motors to cargoes are areas of intense investigation. This review focuses on the structure, the binding partners of kinesins and kinesin-based human diseases. PMID:14966333

  13. Peafowl lactate dehydrogenase: problem of isoenzyme identification.

    PubMed

    Rose, R G; Wilson, A C

    1966-09-16

    Peafowl, like other vertebrates, contain multiple forms of lactate dehydrogenase. The electrophoretic properties of the peafowl isoenzymes are unusual in that the isoenzyme from heart tissue can be either more or less anodic than that of muscle, depending on the pH. This finding focuses attention on the problem of isoenzyme identification. It is suggested that isoenzymes be identified on the basis of properties that are chemically and biologically more significant than electrophoretic mobility. PMID:5917779

  14. TGF-β superfamily signaling in muscle and tendon adaptation to resistance exercise

    PubMed Central

    Gumucio, Jonathan P; Sugg, Kristoffer B; Mendias, Christopher L

    2015-01-01

    Numerous studies in muscle and tendon have identified a central role of the TGF-β superfamily of cytokines in the regulation of extracellular matrix growth and remodeling, protein degradation, and cell proliferation and differentiation. Here we provide a novel framework for TGF-β and myostatin signaling in controlling the coordinated adaptation of both skeletal muscle and tendon tissue to resistance training. PMID:25607281

  15. Sequence, structure and functional diversity of PD-(D/E)XK phosphodiesterase superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Steczkiewicz, Kamil; Muszewska, Anna; Knizewski, Lukasz; Rychlewski, Leszek; Ginalski, Krzysztof

    2012-01-01

    Proteins belonging to PD-(D/E)XK phosphodiesterases constitute a functionally diverse superfamily with representatives involved in replication, restriction, DNA repair and tRNA–intron splicing. Their malfunction in humans triggers severe diseases, such as Fanconi anemia and Xeroderma pigmentosum. To date there have been several attempts to identify and classify new PD-(D/E)KK phosphodiesterases using remote homology detection methods. Such efforts are complicated, because the superfamily exhibits extreme sequence and structural divergence. Using advanced homology detection methods supported with superfamily-wide domain architecture and horizontal gene transfer analyses, we provide a comprehensive reclassification of proteins containing a PD-(D/E)XK domain. The PD-(D/E)XK phosphodiesterases span over 21 900 proteins, which can be classified into 121 groups of various families. Eleven of them, including DUF4420, DUF3883, DUF4263, COG5482, COG1395, Tsp45I, HaeII, Eco47II, ScaI, HpaII and Replic_Relax, are newly assigned to the PD-(D/E)XK superfamily. Some groups of PD-(D/E)XK proteins are present in all domains of life, whereas others occur within small numbers of organisms. We observed multiple horizontal gene transfers even between human pathogenic bacteria or from Prokaryota to Eukaryota. Uncommon domain arrangements greatly elaborate the PD-(D/E)XK world. These include domain architectures suggesting regulatory roles in Eukaryotes, like stress sensing and cell-cycle regulation. Our results may inspire further experimental studies aimed at identification of exact biological functions, specific substrates and molecular mechanisms of reactions performed by these highly diverse proteins. PMID:22638584

  16. A Tale from TGF-β Superfamily for Thymus Ontogeny and Function

    PubMed Central

    Jurberg, Arnon Dias; Vasconcelos-Fontes, Larissa; Cotta-de-Almeida, Vinícius

    2015-01-01

    Multiple signaling pathways control every aspect of cell behavior, organ formation, and tissue homeostasis throughout the lifespan of any individual. This review takes an ontogenetic view focused on the large superfamily of TGF-β/bone morphogenetic protein ligands to address thymus morphogenesis and function in T cell differentiation. Recent findings on a role of GDF11 for reversing aging-related phenotypes are also discussed. PMID:26441956

  17. Neuropathology in Succinic Semialdehyde Dehydrogenase Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Knerr, Ina; Gibson, K. Michael; Murdoch, Geoffrey; Salomons, Gajja S.; Jakobs, Cornelis; Combs, Susan; Pearl, Phillip L.

    2010-01-01

    Reported here is the novel finding of neuropathology in a patient with succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase deficiency, an inherited disorder of γ-aminobutyric acid metabolism characterized by intellectual deficiency, hypotonia, and epilepsy, with 4-hydroxybutyric aciduria and abnormalities of the globus pallidus on neuroimaging. A 19-year-old woman of European origin with a neurodevelopmental disorder and epilepsy died unexpectedly in 1998. A postmortem examination was performed, with a final diagnosis of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy patients. Eight years later, her sister with a neurodevelopmental disorder presented at 13 years of age with seizures and was diagnosed with succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase deficiency. In the decedent, succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase deficiency was established at the molecular level, 10 years after her death, using genomic DNA from brain tissue specimens. The neuropathologic findings revealed striking discoloration of the globi pallidi, leptomeningeal congestion, and a scar in the frontal cortex. After detection of the pathogenic homozygous mutation c.1226G>A, p.Gly409Asp in the living sister, it was confirmed in the decedent. An underlying metabolic disease may be an additional risk factor for sudden unexpected death in epilepsy patients. PMID:20304328

  18. Succinate dehydrogenase-deficient gastrointestinal stromal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ya-Mei; Gu, Meng-Li; Ji, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Most gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are characterized by KIT or platelet-derived growth factor alpha (PDGFRA) activating mutations. However, there are still 10%-15% of GISTs lacking KIT and PDGFRA mutations, called wild-type GISTs (WT GISTs). Among these so-called WT GISTs, a small subset is associated with succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) deficiency, known as SDH-deficient GISTs. In addition, GISTs that occur in Carney triad and Carney-Stratakis syndrome represent specific examples of SDH-deficient GISTs. SDH-deficient GISTs locate exclusively in the stomach, showing predilection for children and young adults with female preponderance. The tumor generally pursues an indolent course and exhibits primary resistance to imatinib therapy in most cases. Loss of succinate dehydrogenase subunit B expression and overexpression of insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R) are common features of SDH-deficient GISTs. In WT GISTs without succinate dehydrogenase activity, upregulation of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α may lead to increased growth signaling through IGF1R and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR). As a result, IGF1R and VEGFR are promising to be the novel therapeutic targets of GISTs. This review will update the current knowledge on characteristics of SDH-deficient GISTs and further discuss the possible mechanisms of tumorigenesis and clinical management of SDH-deficient GISTs. PMID:25741136

  19. Dihydrodiol dehydrogenase and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Smithgall, T.E.

    1986-01-01

    Carcinogenic activation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by microsomal monoxygenases proceeds through trans-dihydrodiol metabolites to diol-epoxide ultimate carcinogens. This thesis directly investigated the role of dihydrodiol dehydrogenase, a cytosolic NAD(P)-linked oxidoreductase, in the detoxification of polycyclic aromatic trans-dihydrodiols. A wide variety of non-K-region trans-dihydrodiols were synthesized and shown to be substrates for the homogeneous rat liver dehydrogenase, including several potent proximate carcinogens derived from 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene, 5-methylchrysene, and benzo(a)pyrene. Since microsomal activation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons is highly stereospecific, the stereochemical course of enzymatic trans-dihydrodiol oxidation was monitored using circular dichroism spectropolarimetry. The major product formed from the dehydrogenase-catalyzed oxidation of the trans-1,2-dihydrodiol of naphthalene was characterized using UV, IR, NMR, and mass spectroscopy, and appears to be 4-hydroxy-1,2-naphthoquinone. Mass spectral analysis suggests that an analogous hydroxylated o-quinone is formed as the major product of benzo(a)pyrene-7,8-dihydrodiol oxidation. Enzymatic oxidation of trans-dihydrodiols was shown to be potently inhibited by all of the major classes of the nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs. Enhancement of trans-dihydrodiol proximate carcinogen oxidation may protect against possible adverse effects of the aspirin-like drugs, and help maintain the balance between activation and detoxification of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

  20. Functional classification of CATH superfamilies: a domain-based approach for protein function annotation

    PubMed Central

    Das, Sayoni; Lee, David; Sillitoe, Ian; Dawson, Natalie L.; Lees, Jonathan G.; Orengo, Christine A.

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: Computational approaches that can predict protein functions are essential to bridge the widening function annotation gap especially since <1.0% of all proteins in UniProtKB have been experimentally characterized. We present a domain-based method for protein function classification and prediction of functional sites that exploits functional sub-classification of CATH superfamilies. The superfamilies are sub-classified into functional families (FunFams) using a hierarchical clustering algorithm supervised by a new classification method, FunFHMMer. Results: FunFHMMer generates more functionally coherent groupings of protein sequences than other domain-based protein classifications. This has been validated using known functional information. The conserved positions predicted by the FunFams are also found to be enriched in known functional residues. Moreover, the functional annotations provided by the FunFams are found to be more precise than other domain-based resources. FunFHMMer currently identifies 110 439 FunFams in 2735 superfamilies which can be used to functionally annotate > 16 million domain sequences. Availability and implementation: All FunFam annotation data are made available through the CATH webpages (http://www.cathdb.info). The FunFHMMer webserver (http://www.cathdb.info/search/by_funfhmmer) allows users to submit query sequences for assignment to a CATH FunFam. Contact: sayoni.das.12@ucl.ac.uk Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:26139634

  1. Origination, Expansion, Evolutionary Trajectory, and Expression Bias of AP2/ERF Superfamily in Brassica napus.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiaoming; Wang, Jinpeng; Ma, Xiao; Li, Yuxian; Lei, Tianyu; Wang, Li; Ge, Weina; Guo, Di; Wang, Zhenyi; Li, Chunjin; Zhao, Jianjun; Wang, Xiyin

    2016-01-01

    The AP2/ERF superfamily, one of the most important transcription factor families, plays crucial roles in response to biotic and abiotic stresses. So far, a comprehensive evolutionary inference of its origination and expansion has not been available. Here, we identified 515 AP2/ERF genes in B. napus, a neo-tetraploid forming ~7500 years ago, and found that 82.14% of them were duplicated in the tetraploidization. A prominent subgenome bias was revealed in gene expression, tissue-specific, and gene conversion. Moreover, a large-scale analysis across plants and alga suggested that this superfamily could have been originated from AP2 family, expanding to form other families (ERF, and RAV). This process was accompanied by duplicating and/or alternative deleting AP2 domain, intragenic domain sequence conversion, and/or by acquiring other domains, resulting in copy number variations, alternatively contributing to functional innovation. We found that significant positive selection occurred at certain critical nodes during the evolution of land plants, possibly responding to changing environment. In conclusion, the present research revealed origination, functional innovation, and evolutionary trajectory of the AP2/ERF superfamily, contributing to understanding their roles in plant stress tolerance. PMID:27570529

  2. Origination, Expansion, Evolutionary Trajectory, and Expression Bias of AP2/ERF Superfamily in Brassica napus

    PubMed Central

    Song, Xiaoming; Wang, Jinpeng; Ma, Xiao; Li, Yuxian; Lei, Tianyu; Wang, Li; Ge, Weina; Guo, Di; Wang, Zhenyi; Li, Chunjin; Zhao, Jianjun; Wang, Xiyin

    2016-01-01

    The AP2/ERF superfamily, one of the most important transcription factor families, plays crucial roles in response to biotic and abiotic stresses. So far, a comprehensive evolutionary inference of its origination and expansion has not been available. Here, we identified 515 AP2/ERF genes in B. napus, a neo-tetraploid forming ~7500 years ago, and found that 82.14% of them were duplicated in the tetraploidization. A prominent subgenome bias was revealed in gene expression, tissue-specific, and gene conversion. Moreover, a large-scale analysis across plants and alga suggested that this superfamily could have been originated from AP2 family, expanding to form other families (ERF, and RAV). This process was accompanied by duplicating and/or alternative deleting AP2 domain, intragenic domain sequence conversion, and/or by acquiring other domains, resulting in copy number variations, alternatively contributing to functional innovation. We found that significant positive selection occurred at certain critical nodes during the evolution of land plants, possibly responding to changing environment. In conclusion, the present research revealed origination, functional innovation, and evolutionary trajectory of the AP2/ERF superfamily, contributing to understanding their roles in plant stress tolerance. PMID:27570529

  3. The First Mitochondrial Genome for the Superfamily Hagloidea and Implications for Its Systematic Status in Ensifera

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhijun; Shi, Fuming; Zhao, Ling

    2014-01-01

    Hagloidea Handlirsch, 1906 was an ancient group of Ensifera, that was much more diverse in the past extending at least into the Triassic, apparently diminishing in diversity through the Cretaceous, and now only represented by a few extant species. In this paper, we report the complete mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) of Tarragoilus diuturnus Gorochov, 2001, representing the first mitogenome of the superfamily Hagloidea. The size of the entire mitogenome of T. diuturnus is 16144 bp, containing 13 protein-coding genes (PCGs), 2 ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes, 22 transfer RNA (tRNA) genes and one control region. The order and orientation of the gene arrangement pattern is identical to that of D. yakuba and most ensiferans species. A phylogenomic analysis was carried out based on the concatenated dataset of 13 PCGs and 2 rRNA genes from mitogenome sequences of 15 ensiferan species, comprising four superfamilies Grylloidea, Tettigonioidae, Rhaphidophoroidea and Hagloidea. Both maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference analyses strongly support Hagloidea T. diuturnus and Rhaphidophoroidea Troglophilus neglectus as forming a monophyletic group, sister to the Tettigonioidea. The relationships among four superfamilies of Ensifera were (Grylloidea, (Tettigonioidea, (Hagloidea, Rhaphidophoroidea))). PMID:24465850

  4. A Comparative Analysis of Synonymous Codon Usage Bias Pattern in Human Albumin Superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Mirsafian, Hoda; Mat Ripen, Adiratna; Singh, Aarti; Teo, Phaik Hwan; Merican, Amir Feisal; Mohamad, Saharuddin Bin

    2014-01-01

    Synonymous codon usage bias is an inevitable phenomenon in organismic taxa across the three domains of life. Though the frequency of codon usage is not equal across species and within genome in the same species, the phenomenon is non random and is tissue-specific. Several factors such as GC content, nucleotide distribution, protein hydropathy, protein secondary structure, and translational selection are reported to contribute to codon usage preference. The synonymous codon usage patterns can be helpful in revealing the expression pattern of genes as well as the evolutionary relationship between the sequences. In this study, synonymous codon usage bias patterns were determined for the evolutionarily close proteins of albumin superfamily, namely, albumin, α-fetoprotein, afamin, and vitamin D-binding protein. Our study demonstrated that the genes of the four albumin superfamily members have low GC content and high values of effective number of codons (ENC) suggesting high expressivity of these genes and less bias in codon usage preferences. This study also provided evidence that the albumin superfamily members are not subjected to mutational selection pressure. PMID:24707212

  5. Exploring and Expanding the Fatty-Acid-Binding Protein Superfamily in Fasciola Species.

    PubMed

    Morphew, Russell M; Wilkinson, Toby J; Mackintosh, Neil; Jahndel, Veronika; Paterson, Steve; McVeigh, Paul; Abbas Abidi, Syed M; Saifullah, Khalid; Raman, Muthusamy; Ravikumar, Gopalakrishnan; LaCourse, James; Maule, Aaron; Brophy, Peter M

    2016-09-01

    The liver flukes Fasciola hepatica and F. gigantica infect livestock worldwide and threaten food security with climate change and problematic control measures spreading disease. Fascioliasis is also a foodborne disease with up to 17 million humans infected. In the absence of vaccines, treatment depends on triclabendazole (TCBZ), and overuse has led to widespread resistance, compromising future TCBZ control. Reductionist biology from many laboratories has predicted new therapeutic targets. To this end, the fatty-acid-binding protein (FABP) superfamily has proposed multifunctional roles, including functions intersecting vaccine and drug therapy, such as immune modulation and anthelmintic sequestration. Research is hindered by a lack of understanding of the full FABP superfamily complement. Although discovery studies predicted FABPs as promising vaccine candidates, it is unclear if uncharacterized FABPs are more relevant for vaccine formulations. We have coupled genome, transcriptome, and EST data mining with proteomics and phylogenetics to reveal a liver fluke FABP superfamily of seven clades: previously identified clades I-III and newly identified clades IV-VII. All new clade FABPs were analyzed using bioinformatics and cloned from both liver flukes. The extended FABP data set will provide new study tools to research the role of FABPs in parasite biology and as therapy targets. PMID:27495901

  6. Cooperative behavior of the nuclear receptor superfamily and its deregulation in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Long, Mark D.; Thorne, James L.; Campbell, Moray J.

    2014-01-01

    The current study aimed to assess the topology of the nuclear receptor (NR) superfamily in normal prostate epithelial cells and its distortion in prostate cancer. Both in vitro and in silico approaches were utilized to profile NRs expressed in non-malignant RWPE-1 cells, which were subsequently investigated by treating cells with 132 binary NR ligand combinations. Nine significant cooperative interactions emerged including both superadditive [22(R)-hydroxycholesterol and eicosatetraenoic acid] and subadditive [1α,25(OH)2D3 and chenodeoxycholic acid] cellular responses, which could be explained in part by cooperative control of cell-cycle progression and candidate gene expression. In addition, publicly available data were employed to assess NR expression in human prostate tissue. Common and significant loss of NR superfamily expression was established in publicly available data from prostate tumors, in part predicting parallel distortion of targeting microRNA. These findings suggest that the NR superfamily in the prostate cooperatively integrates signals from dietary, hormonal and metabolic cues, and is significantly distorted in prostate cancer. PMID:24104552

  7. Diversity of Conotoxin Gene Superfamilies in the Venomous Snail, Conus victoriae

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Samuel D.; Safavi-Hemami, Helena; McIntosh, Lachlan D.; Purcell, Anthony W.; Norton, Raymond S.; Papenfuss, Anthony T.

    2014-01-01

    Animal venoms represent a vast library of bioactive peptides and proteins with proven potential, not only as research tools but also as drug leads and therapeutics. This is illustrated clearly by marine cone snails (genus Conus), whose venoms consist of mixtures of hundreds of peptides (conotoxins) with a diverse array of molecular targets, including voltage- and ligand-gated ion channels, G-protein coupled receptors and neurotransmitter transporters. Several conotoxins have found applications as research tools, with some being used or developed as therapeutics. The primary objective of this study was the large-scale discovery of conotoxin sequences from the venom gland of an Australian cone snail species, Conus victoriae. Using cDNA library normalization, high-throughput 454 sequencing, de novo transcriptome assembly and annotation with BLASTX and profile hidden Markov models, we discovered over 100 unique conotoxin sequences from 20 gene superfamilies, the highest diversity of conotoxins so far reported in a single study. Many of the sequences identified are new members of known conotoxin superfamilies, some help to redefine these superfamilies and others represent altogether new classes of conotoxins. In addition, we have demonstrated an efficient combination of methods to mine an animal venom gland and generate a library of sequences encoding bioactive peptides. PMID:24505301

  8. The cation/Ca(2+) exchanger superfamily: phylogenetic analysis and structural implications.

    PubMed

    Cai, Xinjiang; Lytton, Jonathan

    2004-09-01

    Cation/Ca(2+) exchangers are an essential component of Ca(2+) signaling pathways and function to transport cytosolic Ca(2+) across membranes against its electrochemical gradient by utilizing the downhill gradients of other cation species such as H(+), Na(+), or K(+). The cation/Ca(2+) exchanger superfamily is composed of H(+)/Ca(2+) exchangers and Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchangers, which have been investigated extensively in both plant cells and animal cells. Recently, information from completely sequenced genomes of bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes has revealed the presence of genes that encode homologues of cation/Ca(2+) exchangers in many organisms in which the role of these exchangers has not been clearly demonstrated. In this study, we report a comprehensive sequence alignment and the first phylogenetic analysis of the cation/Ca(2+) exchanger superfamily of 147 sequences. The results present a framework for structure-function relationships of cation/Ca(2+) exchangers, suggesting unique signature motifs of conserved residues that may underlie divergent functional properties. Construction of a phylogenetic tree with inclusion of cation/Ca(2+) exchangers with known functional properties defines five protein families and the evolutionary relationships between the members. Based on this analysis, the cation/Ca(2+) exchanger superfamily is classified into the YRBG, CAX, NCX, and NCKX families and a newly recognized family, designated CCX. These findings will provide guides for future studies concerning structures, functions, and evolutionary origins of the cation/Ca(2+) exchangers. PMID:15163769

  9. Isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 mutations in cholangiocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kipp, Benjamin R; Voss, Jesse S; Kerr, Sarah E; Barr Fritcher, Emily G; Graham, Rondell P; Zhang, Lizhi; Highsmith, W Edward; Zhang, Jun; Roberts, Lewis R; Gores, Gregory J; Halling, Kevin C

    2012-10-01

    Somatic mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 genes are common in gliomas and help stratify patients with brain cancer into histologic and molecular subtypes. However, these mutations are considered rare in other solid tumors. The aims of this study were to determine the frequency of isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 mutations in cholangiocarcinoma and to assess histopathologic differences between specimens with and without an isocitrate dehydrogenase mutation. We sequenced 94 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded cholangiocarcinoma (67 intrahepatic and 27 extrahepatic) assessing for isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (codon 132) and isocitrate dehydrogenase 2 (codons 140 and 172) mutations. Multiple histopathologic characteristics were also evaluated and compared with isocitrate dehydrogenase 1/2 mutation status. Of the 94 evaluated specimens, 21 (22%) had a mutation including 14 isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 7 isocitrate dehydrogenase 2 mutations. Isocitrate dehydrogenase mutations were more frequently observed in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma than in extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (28% versus 7%, respectively; P = .030). The 14 isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 mutations were R132C (n = 9), R132S (n = 2), R132G (n = 2), and R132L (n = 1). The 7 isocitrate dehydrogenase 2 mutations were R172K (n = 5), R172M (n = 1), and R172G (n = 1). Isocitrate dehydrogenase mutations were more frequently observed in tumors with clear cell change (P < .001) and poorly differentiated histology (P = .012). The results of this study show for the first time that isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 genes are mutated in cholangiocarcinoma. The results of this study are encouraging because it identifies a new potential target for genotype-directed therapeutic trials and may represent a potential biomarker for earlier detection of cholangiocarcinoma in a subset of cases. PMID:22503487

  10. Molecular cloning and expression analysis of the gene encoding proline dehydrogenase from Jatropha curcas L.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haibo; Ao, Pingxing; Yang, Shuanglong; Zou, Zhurong; Wang, Shasha; Gong, Ming

    2015-03-01

    Proline dehydrogenase (ProDH) (EC 1.5.99.8) is a key enzyme in the catabolism of proline. The enzyme JcProDH and its complementary DNA (cDNA) were isolated from Jatropha curcas L., an important woody oil plant used as a raw material for biodiesels. It has been classified as a member of the Pro_dh superfamily based on multiple sequence alignment, phylogenetic characterization, and its role in proline catabolism. Its cDNA is 1674 bp in length with a complete open reading frame of 1485 bp, which encodes a polypeptide chain of 494 amino acids with a predicted molecular mass of 54 kD and a pI of 8.27. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that JcProDH showed high similarity with ProDH from other plants. Reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) analysis revealed that JcProDH was especially abundant in the seeds and flowers but scarcely present in the stems, roots, and leaves. In addition, the expression of JcProDH increased in leaves experiencing environmental stress such as cold (5 °C), heat (42 °C), salt (300 mM), and drought (30 % PEG6000). The JcProDH protein was successfully expressed in the yeast strain INVSc1 and showed high enzyme activity in proline catabolism. This result confirmed that the JcProDH gene negatively participated in the stress response. PMID:25502926

  11. Evolution of Enzymatic Activities in the Enolase Superfamily: D-Mannonate Dhydratase from Novosphingobium aromaticivorans

    SciTech Connect

    Rakus,J.; Fedorov, A.; Fedorov, E.; Glasner, M.; Vick, J.; Babbitt, P.; Almo, S.; Gerlt, J.

    2007-01-01

    The d-mannonate dehydratase (ManD) function was assigned to a group of orthologous proteins in the mechanistically diverse enolase superfamily by screening a library of acid sugars. Structures of the wild type ManD from Novosphingobium aromaticivorans were determined at pH 7.5 in the presence of Mg2+ and also in the presence of Mg2+ and the 2-keto-3-keto-d-gluconate dehydration product; the structure of the catalytically active K271E mutant was determined at pH 5.5 in the presence of the d-mannonate substrate. As previously observed in the structures of other members of the enolase superfamily, ManD contains two domains, an N-terminal a+{beta} capping domain and a ({beta}/a)7{beta}-barrel domain. The barrel domain contains the ligands for the essential Mg2+, Asp 210, Glu 236, and Glu 262, at the ends of the third, fourth, and fifth {beta}-strands of the barrel domain, respectively. However, the barrel domain lacks both the Lys acid/base catalyst at the end of the second {beta}-strand and the His-Asp dyad acid/base catalyst at the ends of the seventh and sixth {beta}-strands, respectively, that are found in many members of the superfamily. Instead, a hydrogen-bonded dyad of Tyr 159 in a loop following the second {beta}-strand and Arg 147 at the end of the second {beta}-strand are positioned to initiate the reaction by abstraction of the 2-proton. Both Tyr 159 and His 212, at the end of the third {beta}-strand, are positioned to facilitate both syn-dehydration and ketonization of the resulting enol intermediate to yield the 2-keto-3-keto-d-gluconate product with the observed retention of configuration. The identities and locations of these acid/base catalysts as well as of cationic amino acid residues that stabilize the enolate anion intermediate define a new structural strategy for catalysis (subgroup) in the mechanistically diverse enolase superfamily. With these differences, we provide additional evidence that the ligands for the essential Mg2+ are the only

  12. Molecular Genetic and Crystal Structural Analysis of 1-(4-Hydroxyphenyl)-Ethanol Dehydrogenase from 'Aromatoleum aromaticum' EbN1.

    PubMed

    Büsing, Imke; Höffken, H Wolfgang; Breuer, Michael; Wöhlbrand, Lars; Hauer, Bernhard; Rabus, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    The dehydrogenation of 1-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-ethanol to 4-hydroxyacetophenone represents the second reaction step during anaerobic degradation of p-ethylphenol in the denitrifying bacterium 'Aromatoleum aromaticum' EbN1. Previous proteogenomic studies identified two different proteins (ChnA and EbA309) as possible candidates for catalyzing this reaction [Wöhlbrand et al: J Bacteriol 2008;190:5699-5709]. Physiological-molecular characterization of newly generated unmarked in-frame deletion and complementation mutants allowed defining ChnA (renamed here as Hped) as the enzyme responsible for 1-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-ethanol oxidation. Hped [1-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-ethanol dehydrogenase] belongs to the 'classical' family within the short-chain alcohol dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) superfamily. Hped was overproduced in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized. The X-ray structures of the apo- and NAD(+)-soaked form were resolved at 1.5 and 1.1 Å, respectively, and revealed Hped as a typical homotetrameric SDR. Modeling of the substrate 4-hydroxyacetophenone (reductive direction of Hped) into the active site revealed the structural determinants of the strict (R)-specificity of Hped (Phe(187)), contrasting the (S)-specificity of previously reported 1-phenylethanol dehydrogenase (Ped; Tyr(93)) from strain EbN1 [Höffken et al: Biochemistry 2006;45:82-93]. PMID:26488297

  13. Transcriptional regulation of human and murine short-chain dehydrogenase/reductases (SDRs) - an in silico approach.

    PubMed

    Ebert, Bettina; Kisiela, Michael; Maser, Edmund

    2016-05-01

    Numerous physiological functions of the body are controlled by endogenous (e.g. steroids, retinoids, lipid mediators) or exogenous molecules (e.g. drugs, xenobiotics) that bind to transcription factors (TF). The biosynthesis and catabolism of these signaling molecules depend, apart from CYPs, on enzymes belonging to the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) superfamily. Moreover, the contribution of SDRs to the metabolism of therapeutic drugs and xenobiotics is increasingly recognized. However, only scarce information exists regarding the transcriptional regulation of most SDR proteins. This work aims to illustrate the role of nuclear receptors (NR) and TF related to oxidative stress, inflammation, hypoxia, and xenobiotics in the regulation of selected human and murine SDRs that play crucial roles in steroid, retinoid, eicosanoid, fatty acid, and xenobiotic metabolism. These include, for example, 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases, retinol dehydrogenases, and carbonyl reductases. Because existing experimental data are limited, an in silico analysis (TRANSFAC(®) Professional database) of the 5'-upstream sequences for putative response elements was performed. Experimental and in silico data suggest that pharmaceutical, environmental, or dietary NR ligands may alter SDR-mediated retinoid, steroid, and xenobiotic metabolism, likely affecting basic cellular events like energy expenditure, cell proliferation/differentiation, or aging processes. Also, some SDRs are possibly induced by their own substrates. Further experimental work is urgently needed to fully understand the NR-mediated transcriptional regulation of SDRs. This is essential for deducing their possible involvement in drug side effects and will help to identify new substrates and further physiological functions of these SDRs. PMID:27362327

  14. Lactate dehydrogenase X, malate dehydrogenase and total protein in rat spermatozoa during epididymal transit.

    PubMed

    Vermouth, N T; Carriazo, C S; Ponce, R H; Blanco, A

    1986-01-01

    Lactate dehydrogenase isozyme X (LDH X), malate dehydrogenase (MDH) and total soluble protein have been determined in lysates of spermatozoa isolated from caput, corpus and cauda of rat epididymis. Transit of spermatozoa through epididymis is accompanied by a reduction of LDH X, MDH and total protein per cell in sexually rested animals. The profiles of reduction along epididymal segments are different for the three variables studied. Mating with receptive females during the 5 days prior to determinations increases significantly the levels of MDH in spermatozoa from all sections of epididymis and produces increase of total soluble protein in the cells contained in cauda. PMID:3956158

  15. 21 CFR 862.1500 - Malic dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... plasma. Malic dehydrogenase measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of muscle and liver diseases, myocardial infarctions, cancer, and blood disorders such as myelogenous (produced in the...

  16. 21 CFR 866.5560 - Lactic dehydrogenase immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... blood cells), myocardial infarction (heart disease), and some forms of leukemia (cancer of the blood... conditions known to cause increased lactic dehydrogenase levels. (b) Classification. Class I...

  17. 21 CFR 866.5560 - Lactic dehydrogenase immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... blood cells), myocardial infarction (heart disease), and some forms of leukemia (cancer of the blood... conditions known to cause increased lactic dehydrogenase levels. (b) Classification. Class I...

  18. 21 CFR 866.5560 - Lactic dehydrogenase immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... blood cells), myocardial infarction (heart disease), and some forms of leukemia (cancer of the blood... conditions known to cause increased lactic dehydrogenase levels. (b) Classification. Class I...

  19. 21 CFR 866.5560 - Lactic dehydrogenase immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... blood cells), myocardial infarction (heart disease), and some forms of leukemia (cancer of the blood... conditions known to cause increased lactic dehydrogenase levels. (b) Classification. Class I...

  20. 21 CFR 862.1420 - Isocitric dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... and plasma. Isocitric dehydrogenase measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of liver disease such as viral hepatitis, cirrhosis, or acute inflammation of the biliary tract; pulmonary...

  1. 21 CFR 862.1420 - Isocitric dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... and plasma. Isocitric dehydrogenase measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of liver disease such as viral hepatitis, cirrhosis, or acute inflammation of the biliary tract; pulmonary...

  2. 21 CFR 862.1420 - Isocitric dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... and plasma. Isocitric dehydrogenase measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of liver disease such as viral hepatitis, cirrhosis, or acute inflammation of the biliary tract; pulmonary...

  3. 21 CFR 862.1420 - Isocitric dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... and plasma. Isocitric dehydrogenase measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of liver disease such as viral hepatitis, cirrhosis, or acute inflammation of the biliary tract; pulmonary...

  4. 21 CFR 862.1420 - Isocitric dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... and plasma. Isocitric dehydrogenase measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of liver disease such as viral hepatitis, cirrhosis, or acute inflammation of the biliary tract; pulmonary...

  5. Lactate dehydrogenase in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Stankovic Stojanovic, Katia; Lionnet, François

    2016-07-01

    Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity is elevated in many pathological states. Interest in LDH activity in sickle cell disease (SCD) has developed out of an increased comprehension of the pathophysiological process and the clinical course of the disease. Elevated LDH activity in SCD comes from various mechanisms, especially intravascular hemolysis, as well as ischemia-reperfusion damage and tissular necrosis. Intravascular hemolysis is associated with vasoconstriction, platelet activation, endothelial damage, and vascular complications. LDH has been used as a diagnostic and prognostic factor of acute and chronic complications. In this review we have evaluated the literature where LDH activity was examined during steady-state or acute conditions in SCD. PMID:27138446

  6. Substrate specificity of sheep liver sorbitol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed Central

    Lindstad, R I; Köll, P; McKinley-McKee, J S

    1998-01-01

    The substrate specificity of sheep liver sorbitol dehydrogenase has been studied by steady-state kinetics over the range pH 7-10. Sorbitol dehydrogenase stereo-selectively catalyses the reversible NAD-linked oxidation of various polyols and other secondary alcohols into their corresponding ketones. The kinetic constants are given for various novel polyol substrates, including L-glucitol, L-mannitol, L-altritol, D-altritol, D-iditol and eight heptitols, as well as for many aliphatic and aromatic alcohols. The maximum velocities (kcat) and the substrate specificity-constants (kcat/Km) are positively correlated with increasing pH. The enzyme-catalysed reactions occur by a compulsory ordered kinetic mechanism with the coenzyme as the first, or leading, substrate. With many substrates, the rate-limiting step for the overall reaction is the enzyme-NADH product dissociation. However, with several substrates there is a transition to a mechanism with partial rate-limitation at the ternary complex level, especially at low pH. The kinetic data enable the elucidation of new empirical rules for the substrate specificity of sorbitol dehydrogenase. The specificity-constants for polyol oxidation vary as a function of substrate configuration with D-xylo> D-ribo > L-xylo > D-lyxo approximately L-arabino > D-arabino > L-lyxo. Catalytic activity with a polyol or an aromatic substrate and various 1-deoxy derivatives thereof varies with -CH2OH > -CH2NH2 > -CH2OCH3 approximately -CH3. The presence of a hydroxyl group at each of the remaining chiral centres of a polyol, apart from the reactive C2, is also nonessential for productive ternary complex formation and catalysis. A predominantly nonpolar enzymic epitope appears to constitute an important structural determinant for the substrate specificity of sorbitol dehydrogenase. The existence of two distinct substrate binding regions in the enzyme active site, along with that of the catalytic zinc, is suggested to account for the lack of

  7. Methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase from Clostridium formicoaceticum and methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase, methenyltetrahydrofolate cyclohydrolase (combined) from Clostridium thermoaceticum

    SciTech Connect

    Ljungdahl, L.G.; O'Brien, W.E.; Moore, M.R.; Liu, M.T.

    1980-01-01

    Methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase is widely distributed and has been found in every cell type investigated. The NAD-specific enzyme has been purified to homogeneity from Clostridium formicoaceticum and the NADP-specific enzyme has been obtained from Clostridium thermoaceticum. Other sources of the NADP-specific enzyme are Streptococcus species, Escherichia coli, Clostridium cylindrosporum, Salmonella typhimurium, yeast, liver from various animals, calf thymus, and plants. The NAD-specific enzyme has been demonstrated in Acetobacterium woodii, some methane bacteria, and in Ehrlich ascites tumor cells. Of considerable interest are the observations that in porcine and ovine livers, as well as in yeast, methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase purified to homogeneity also contains methylenetetrahydrofolate cyclohydrolase and formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase activities. Now it appears that the purified methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase from C. thermoaceticum also has cyclohydrolase but not synthetase activity. Methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase has been discussed previously in this series, as has methenyltetrahydrofolate cyclohydrolase. In C. formicoaceticum and C. thermoaceticum these tetrahydrofolate-dependent enzymes participate in a sequence of metabolic reactions by which carbon dioxide is reduced to the methyl group of 5-methyltetrahydrofolate which in turn is utilized for the synthesis of acetate. This pathway provides the mechanism for disposing of reducing equivalents generated in glycolysis.

  8. Crystal structure of Pseudomonas fluorescens mannitol 2-dehydrogenase: evidence for a very divergent long-chain dehydrogenase family.

    PubMed

    Kavanagh, Kathryn L; Klimacek, Mario; Nidetzky, Bernd; Wilson, David K

    2003-02-01

    Mannitol 2-dehydrogenase from Pseudomonas fluorescens (pfMDH) is a secondary alcohol dehydrogenase that catalyzes the reversible NAD(P)-dependent oxidation of D-mannitol to D-fructose, D-arabinitol to D-xylulose, and D-sorbitol to L-sorbose. It is a member of the mostly prokaryotic family of long-chain mannitol dehydrogenases that so far includes 66 members. Unlike other alcohol and polyol dehydrogenases that utilize metal cofactors or a conserved active-site tyrosine for catalysis, an invariant lysine is the general base. The crystal structure of pfMDH in a binary complex with NAD(H) and a ternary complex with NAD(H) and D-mannitol have been determined to 1.7 and 1.8 A resolution respectively. Comparison of secondary structure assignment to sequence alignments suggest the shortest members of this family, mannitol-1-phosphate 5-dehydrogenases, retain core elements but lack secondary structural components found on the surface of pfMDH. The elements predicted to be absent are distributed throughout the primary sequence, implying that a simple truncation or fusion did not occur. The closest structural neighbors are 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase, UDP-glucose dehydrogenase, N-(1-D-carboxyethyl)-L-norvaline dehydrogenase, and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. Although sequence identity is only a barely recognizable 7-10%, conservation of secondary structural elements as well as homologous residues that are contributed to the active site indicates they may be related by divergent evolution. PMID:12604241

  9. Phylogenetic analysis of the phytochrome superfamily reveals distinct microbial subfamilies of photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Karniol, Baruch; Wagner, Jeremiah R.; Walker, Joseph M.; Vierstra, Richard D.

    2005-01-01

    Phys (phytochromes) are a superfamily of photochromic photoreceptors that employ a bilin-type chromophore to sense red and far-red light. Although originally thought to be restricted to plants, accumulating genetic and genomic analyses now indicate that they are also prevalent among micro-organisms. By a combination of phylogenetic and biochemical studies, we have expanded the Phy superfamily and organized its members into distinct functional clades which include the phys (plant Phys), BphPs (bacteriophytochromes), Cphs (cyanobacterial Phys), Fphs (fungal Phys) and a collection of Phy-like sequences. All contain a signature GAF (cGMP phosphodiesterase/adenylate cyclase/FhlA) domain, which houses the bilin lyase activity. A PHY domain (uppercase letters are used to denote the PHY domain specifically), which helps stabilize the Pfr form (far-red-light-absorbing form of Phy), is downstream of the GAF region in all but the Phy-like sequences. The phy, Cph, BphP and Fph families also include a PLD [N-terminal PAS (Per/Arnt/Sim)-like domain] upstream of the GAF domain. Site-directed mutagenesis of conserved residues within the GAF and PLD motifs supports their importance in chromophore binding and/or spectral activity. In agreement with Lamparter, Carrascal, Michael, Martinez, Rottwinkel and Abian [(2004) Biochemistry 43, 3659–3669], a conserved cysteine within the PLD of several BphPs was found to be necessary for binding the chromophore via the C-3 vinyl side chain on the bilin A ring. Phy-type sequences were also discovered in the actinobacterium Kineococcus radiotolerans and collections of microorganisms obtained from marine and extremely acidic environments, thus expanding further the range of these photoreceptors. Based on their organization and distribution, the evolution of the Phy superfamily into distinct photoreceptor types is proposed. PMID:16004604

  10. Historical perspectives on tumor necrosis factor and its superfamily: 25 years later, a golden journey

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Subash C.; Kim, Ji Hye

    2012-01-01

    Although activity that induced tumor regression was observed and termed tumor necrosis factor (TNF) as early as the 1960s, the true identity of TNF was not clear until 1984, when Aggarwal and coworkers reported, for the first time, the isolation of 2 cytotoxic factors: one, derived from macrophages (molecular mass 17 kDa), was named TNF, and the second, derived from lymphocytes (20 kDa), was named lymphotoxin. Because the 2 cytotoxic factors exhibited 50% amino acid sequence homology and bound to the same receptor, they came to be called TNF-α and TNF-β. Identification of the protein sequences led to cloning of their cDNA. Based on sequence homology to TNF-α, now a total of 19 members of the TNF superfamily have been identified, along with 29 interacting receptors, and several molecules that interact with the cytoplasmic domain of these receptors. The roles of the TNF superfamily in inflammation, apoptosis, proliferation, invasion, angiogenesis, metastasis, and morphogenesis have been documented. Their roles in immunologic, cardiovascular, neurologic, pulmonary, and metabolic diseases are becoming apparent. TNF superfamily members are active targets for drug development, as indicated by the recent approval and expanding market of TNF blockers used to treat rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, Crohns disease, and osteoporosis, with a total market of more than US $20 billion. As we learn more about this family, more therapeutics will probably emerge. In this review, we summarize the initial discovery of TNF-α, and the insights gained regarding the roles of this molecule and its related family members in normal physiology and disease. PMID:22053109

  11. Cooperative Electrostatic Interactions Drive Functional Evolution in the Alkaline Phosphatase Superfamily

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    It is becoming widely accepted that catalytic promiscuity, i.e., the ability of a single enzyme to catalyze the turnover of multiple, chemically distinct substrates, plays a key role in the evolution of new enzyme functions. In this context, the members of the alkaline phosphatase superfamily have been extensively studied as model systems in order to understand the phenomenon of enzyme multifunctionality. In the present work, we model the selectivity of two multiply promiscuous members of this superfamily, namely the phosphonate monoester hydrolases from Burkholderia caryophylli and Rhizobium leguminosarum. We have performed extensive simulations of the enzymatic reaction of both wild-type enzymes and several experimentally characterized mutants. Our computational models are in agreement with key experimental observables, such as the observed activities of the wild-type enzymes, qualitative interpretations of experimental pH-rate profiles, and activity trends among several active site mutants. In all cases the substrates of interest bind to the enzyme in similar conformations, with largely unperturbed transition states from their corresponding analogues in aqueous solution. Examination of transition-state geometries and the contribution of individual residues to the calculated activation barriers suggest that the broad promiscuity of these enzymes arises from cooperative electrostatic interactions in the active site, allowing each enzyme to adapt to the electrostatic needs of different substrates. By comparing the structural and electrostatic features of several alkaline phosphatases, we suggest that this phenomenon is a generalized feature driving selectivity and promiscuity within this superfamily and can be in turn used for artificial enzyme design. PMID:26091851

  12. A new multigene superfamily of Kunitz-type protease inhibitors from sea anemone Heteractis crispa.

    PubMed

    Isaeva, Marina P; Chausova, Victoriya E; Zelepuga, Elena A; Guzev, Konstantin V; Tabakmakher, Valentin M; Monastyrnaya, Margarita M; Kozlovskaya, Emma P

    2012-03-01

    Despite a considerable number of publications devoted to isolation and physicochemical properties of protease inhibitors from sea anemones, virtually nothing is known about the structure of the genes, and the nature of their isoforms diversity. Using the PCR-based cloning approach we discovered the Kunitz-type multigene superfamily composed of distinct gene families (GS-, RG-, GG-, and GN-gene families). It has been identified only three full-length GS-transcripts indicating a much greater variety of Kunitz homologs in Heteractis crispa. We have examined an exon-intron structure of GS-genes; an open reading frame is interrupted by a single intron located at the middle of the signal peptide. 33 deduced mature GS-polypeptides have been categorized into three groups according to the nature of a P1 residue. Some of them corresponded to native Kunitz-type protease inhibitors earlier isolated from H. crispa. The deduced GS-polypeptide sequences demonstrated diverse charge distribution ranging from the local point charges forms to the overall positive ones. We have suggested that the GS-gene family has evolved through gene tandem duplication followed by adaptive divergence of the P1 residue in the reactive site selected for divergent functions in paralogs. The expansion of this Kunitz-type multigene superfamily during evolution is lineage-specific, providing the tropical sea anemone H. crispa with the ability to interact an increasing diversity of the preys and predators. Our results show that the Kunitz-type polypeptides are encoded by a multigene superfamily and realized via a combinatory Kunitz-type library in the H. crispa tentacles venom. PMID:22001835

  13. Expanding the nitrogen regulatory protein superfamily: Homology detection at below random sequence identity.

    PubMed

    Kinch, Lisa N; Grishin, Nick V

    2002-07-01

    Nitrogen regulatory (PII) proteins are signal transduction molecules involved in controlling nitrogen metabolism in prokaryots. PII proteins integrate the signals of intracellular nitrogen and carbon status into the control of enzymes involved in nitrogen assimilation. Using elaborate sequence similarity detection schemes, we show that five clusters of orthologs (COGs) and several small divergent protein groups belong to the PII superfamily and predict their structure to be a (betaalphabeta)(2) ferredoxin-like fold. Proteins from the newly emerged PII superfamily are present in all major phylogenetic lineages. The PII homologs are quite diverse, with below random (as low as 1%) pairwise sequence identities between some members of distant groups. Despite this sequence diversity, evidence suggests that the different subfamilies retain the PII trimeric structure important for ligand-binding site formation and maintain a conservation of conservations at residue positions important for PII function. Because most of the orthologous groups within the PII superfamily are composed entirely of hypothetical proteins, our remote homology-based structure prediction provides the only information about them. Analogous to structural genomics efforts, such prediction gives clues to the biological roles of these proteins and allows us to hypothesize about locations of functional sites on model structures or rationalize about available experimental information. For instance, conserved residues in one of the families map in close proximity to each other on PII structure, allowing for a possible metal-binding site in the proteins coded by the locus known to affect sensitivity to divalent metal ions. Presented analysis pushes the limits of sequence similarity searches and exemplifies one of the extreme cases of reliable sequence-based structure prediction. In conjunction with structural genomics efforts to shed light on protein function, our strategies make it possible to detect

  14. The glycosidation of xenobiotics and endogenous compounds: versatility and redundancy in the UDP glycosyltransferase superfamily.

    PubMed

    Meech, Robyn; Miners, John O; Lewis, Benjamin C; Mackenzie, Peter I

    2012-05-01

    The covalent addition of sugars to small organic molecules is mediated by a superfamily of UDP glycosyltransferases (UGTs) found in animals, plants and bacteria. This superfamily evolved by gene duplication and divergence to manage exposure to a changing environment of lipophilic chemicals. The recent characterization of the UGT3A family provides further insights into the origin and evolution of this superfamily in mammals and the role of individual UGTs in the formation of the various chemical glycosides found in body tissues and fluids. Furthermore, the unique UDP-sugar specificities of the two enzymes in this family inform our knowledge of UGT structure relating to catalysis and UDP-sugar specificity. In addition to the UGT3 gene family, three other gene families, UGTs1, 2, and 8, are found in mammalian genomes. The 19 members of the UGT1 and 2 families have a major role in processing lipophilic chemicals due to their capacity to glucuronidate a broad range of structurally-dissimilar substrates. In contrast, the UGT3 enzymes only have a minor role, as their activities are very low in the major drug-metabolic organs, and their N-acetylglucosaminide and glucoside products are only a minor component of circulating and excreted drug metabolites. Although the endogenous role of the UGT3 family is still unknown, participation in the processing of lipophilic chemicals in specific cell types or at specific times during ontogeny cannot be excluded. In contrast to the UGT 1, 2 and 3 families, the single member of the UGT8 family appears to have no role in drug metabolism. PMID:22322248

  15. How can we understand an entire (super)family of proteins?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoff, Wouter

    2015-03-01

    Understanding how the functional properties of a protein are encoded in its amino acid sequence remains a formidable challenge. We use photoactive yellow protein (PYP) to determine how structure-function relationships can be obtained for an entire (super)family of proteins. PYP is a model system to study fundamental processes in proteins and a prototype for the PAS domain superfamily. It consists of a 100-residue PAS domain with an additional 25-residue N-terminal extension. PYP exhibits a photocycle that is initiated by pCA photoisomerization, followed by proton transfer from Glu46 to the pCA and a subsequent protein quake during formation of the pB intermediate. These structural changes are driven by the electrostatic epicenter formed by the buried ionized Glu46 side chain and involve partial protein unfolding, including the release of the N-terminal region. Deletion of the N-terminal region slows down pB decay 1,000-fold. We report results on family-wide structure function relationships in PYP. (i) Transplanting mutations that alter the properties of a highly studied PYP to a different PYP homolog are only partially successful, implying sequence context dependence of functional properties. (ii) We find a direct correlation between the strength of the hydrogen bonding between the pCA and Glu46 and functional properties of PYPs. The role of Glu46 as the epicenter for driving large conformational changes during pB formation is conserved. (iii) Across the PYP family the N-terminal region is negatively charged while the PAS core is positively charged. The resulting charge-charge interactions are critical for the function the N-terminal region. (iv) We find that residues conserved in the PAS domain superfamily exert their effects through conserved patterns of side chain interactions.

  16. Catecholamine regulation of lactate dehydrogenase in rat brain cell culture

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, S.; McGinnis, J.F.; de Vellis, J.

    1980-03-25

    The mechanism of catecholamine induction of the soluble cytoplasmic enzyme lactate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.27) was studied in the rat glial tumor cell line, C6. Lactate dehydrogenase was partially purified from extracts of (/sup 3/H)leucine-labeled cells by affinity gel chromatography and quantitatively immunoprecipitated with anti-lactate dehydrogenase-5 IgG and with antilactate dehydrogenase-1 IgG. The immunoprecipitates were dissociated and electrophoresed on sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gels. Using this methodology, the increased enzyme activity of lactate dehydrogenase in norepinephrine-treated C6 cells was observed to be concomitant with the increased synthesis of enzyme molecules. Despite the continued presence of norepinephrine, the specific increase in the rate of synthesis of lactate dehydrogenase was transient. It was first detected at 4 h, was maximum at 9 h, and returned to basal levels by 24 h. The half-life of lactate dehydrogenase enzyme activity was 36 h during the induction and 40 h during deinduction. The half-life for decay of /sup 3/H-labeled lactate dehydrogenase was 41 h. These observations suggest that the increase in lactate dehydrogenase activity in norepinephrine-treated cells does not involve any change in the rate of degradation. Norepinephrine increased the specific rate of synthesis of both lactate dehydrogenase-5 (a tetramer of four M subunits) and lactate dehydrogenase-1 (a tetramer of four H subunits), although to different extents. Since these subunits are coded for by two separate genes on separate chromosomes, it suggests that the regulatory mechanism involves at least two separate sites of action.

  17. Giant mini-clusters as possible origin of halo phenomena observed in super-families

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Among 91 mini-clusters from 30 high energy Chiron-type families in Chacaltaya emulsion chambers, there were observed several extremely large multiplicity clusters in the highest energy range, far beyond the average of ordinary type clusters. Some details of microscopic observation of those giant mini-clusters in nuclear emulsion plates and some phenomenological regularity found in common among them are described. Such giant mini-clusters are possible candidates for the origin of narrow symmetric single halo phenomena in X-ray films which are frequently observed in super-families of visible energy greater than 1,000 TeV.

  18. Modulation of Bacterial Multidrug Resistance Efflux Pumps of the Major Facilitator Superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sanath; Mukherjee, Mun Mun; Varela, Manuel F.

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial infections pose a serious public health concern, especially when an infectious disease has a multidrug resistant causative agent. Such multidrug resistant bacteria can compromise the clinical utility of major chemotherapeutic antimicrobial agents. Drug and multidrug resistant bacteria harbor several distinct molecular mechanisms for resistance. Bacterial antimicrobial agent efflux pumps represent a major mechanism of clinical resistance. The major facilitator superfamily (MFS) is one of the largest groups of solute transporters to date and includes a significant number of bacterial drug and multidrug efflux pumps. We review recent work on the modulation of multidrug efflux pumps, paying special attention to those transporters belonging primarily to the MFS. PMID:25750934

  19. LmrS is a multidrug efflux pump of the major facilitator superfamily from Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Floyd, Jody L; Smith, Kenneth P; Kumar, Sanath H; Floyd, Jared T; Varela, Manuel F

    2010-12-01

    A multidrug efflux pump designated LmrS (lincomycin resistance protein of Staphylococcus aureus), belonging to the major facilitator superfamily (MFS) of transporters, was cloned, and the role of LmrS in antimicrobial efflux was evaluated. The highest relative increase in MIC, 16-fold, was observed for linezolid and tetraphenylphosphonium chloride (TPCL), followed by an 8-fold increase for sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), trimethoprim, and chloramphenicol. LmrS has 14 predicted membrane-spanning domains and is homologous to putative lincomycin resistance proteins of Bacillus spp., Lactobacillus spp., and Listeria spp. PMID:20855745

  20. General survey of hAT transposon superfamily with highlight on hobo element in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Ladevèze, Véronique; Chaminade, Nicole; Lemeunier, Françoise; Periquet, Georges; Aulard, Sylvie

    2012-09-01

    The hAT transposons, very abundant in all kingdoms, have a common evolutionary origin probably predating the plant-fungi-animal divergence. In this paper we present their general characteristics. Members of this superfamily belong to Class II transposable elements. hAT elements share transposase, short terminal inverted repeats and eight base-pairs duplication of genomic target. We focus on hAT elements in Drosophila, especially hobo. Its distribution, dynamics and impact on genome restructuring in laboratory strains as well as in natural populations are reported. Finally, the evolutionary history of hAT elements, their domestication and use as transgenic tools are discussed. PMID:23111927

  1. Kinesin superfamily proteins (KIFs): Various functions and their relevance for important phenomena in life and diseases.

    PubMed

    Hirokawa, Nobutaka; Tanaka, Yosuke

    2015-05-15

    Kinesin superfamily proteins (KIFs) largely serve as molecular motors on the microtubule system and transport various cellular proteins, macromolecules, and organelles. These transports are fundamental to cellular logistics, and at times, they directly modulate signal transduction by altering the semantics of informational molecules. In this review, we will summarize recent approaches to the regulation of the transport destinations and to the physiological relevance of the role of these proteins in neuroscience, ciliary functions, and metabolic diseases. Understanding these burning questions will be essential in establishing a new paradigm of cellular functions and disease pathogenesis. PMID:25724902

  2. [Scarabaeoidea superfamily (Insecta: Coleoptera) as a bioindicator element of anthropogenic disturbance in an amazon national park].

    PubMed

    Otavo, Samuel Eduardo; Parrado-Rosselli, Angela; Noriega, Jorge Ari

    2013-06-01

    Abstract: Scarabaeoidea superfamily (Insecta: Coleoptera) as a bioindicator element of anthropogenic disturbance in an amazon national park. Insects have been recognized to be important indicators of the quality elements of ecosystems, among others, because of their rapid response to environmental variability and ease cost-effective capture. In this work we evaluated whether beetles of the Scarabaeoidea superfamily may be used as bioindicators of anthropogenic disturbance of Amazonian terra firme rain forests, in order to provide guidelines for monitoring strategies of the Amacayacu National Park. We considered three different levels of anthropogenic disturbance (i.e. low, medium, high) in 12 transects (four in each intervention level), and caught all beetle species of this superfamily. Three interception traps, two light traps, three pitfalls and four bottle fruit traps were used per transect, as well as manual catch. In total, 593 individuals belonging to 92 species, 44 genera and seven families were collected. Scarabaeidae (n = 232, 27 spp.) and Dynastidae (n = 161, 26 spp.) were the families with the highest number of individuals and species, while Aphodiidae, Cetoniidae and Geotrupidae exhibited the lowest. The most abundant species per family were Ateuchus sp. (33.2%) from Scarabaeidae, Cyclocephala verticalis (55.9%) from Dynastidae, Astaena sp. (75.8%) from Melolonthidae, Ceratocanthus amazonicus (66.7%) from Ceratocanthidae y Chaetodus asuai (96.8%) from Hybosoridae. Results showed that the number of species and individuals increased with the anthropogenic disturbance. The Margalef and Shannon indexes also revealed that the highest richness and equity occurred in the high-disturbed site, respectively. Dynastidae exhibited the highest number of exclusive species per gradient, while Scarabaeidae shared most of its species. Ten species were recorded in the three disturbance levels, 26 species in two and 56 species were exclusive to one level. The most

  3. The Aldo-Keto Reductase Superfamily and its Role in Drug Metabolism and Detoxification

    PubMed Central

    Barski, Oleg A.; Tipparaju, Srinivas M.; Bhatnagar, Aruni

    2008-01-01

    The Aldo-Keto Reductase (AKR) superfamily comprises of several enzymes that catalyze redox transformations involved in biosynthesis, intermediary metabolism and detoxification. Substrates of the family include glucose, steroids, glycosylation end products, lipid peroxidation products, and environmental pollutants. These proteins adopt a (β/α)8 barrel structural motif interrupted by a number of extraneous loops and helixes that vary between proteins and bring structural identity to individual families. The human AKR family differs from the rodent families. Due to their broad substrate specificity, AKRs play an important role in the Phase II detoxification of a large number of pharmaceuticals, drugs, and xenobiotics. PMID:18949601

  4. Substrate, product, and cofactor: The extraordinarily flexible relationship between the CDE superfamily and heme.

    PubMed

    Celis, Arianna I; DuBois, Jennifer L

    2015-05-15

    PFam Clan 0032, also known as the CDE superfamily, is a diverse group of at least 20 protein families sharing a common α,β-barrel domain. Of these, six different groups bind heme inside the barrel's interior, using it alternately as a cofactor, substrate, or product. Focusing on these six, an integrated picture of structure, sequence, taxonomy, and mechanism is presented here, detailing how a single structural motif might be able to mediate such an array of functions with one of nature's most important small molecules. PMID:25778630

  5. Characterization of two bacterial hydroxynitrile lyases with high similarity to cupin superfamily proteins.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Zahid; Wiedner, Romana; Steiner, Kerstin; Hajek, Tanja; Avi, Manuela; Hecher, Bianca; Sessitsch, Angela; Schwab, Helmut

    2012-03-01

    Hydroxynitrile lyases (HNLs) catalyze the cleavage of cyanohydrins. In the reverse reaction, they catalyze the formation of carbon-carbon bonds by enantioselective condensation of hydrocyanic acid with carbonyls. In this study, we describe two proteins from endophytic bacteria that display activity in the cleavage and the synthesis reaction of (R)-mandelonitrile with up to 74% conversion of benzaldehyde (enantiopreference ee 89%). Both showed high similarity to proteins of the cupin superfamily which so far were not known to exhibit HNL activity. PMID:22226952

  6. Characterization of Two Bacterial Hydroxynitrile Lyases with High Similarity to Cupin Superfamily Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Zahid; Wiedner, Romana; Steiner, Kerstin; Hajek, Tanja; Avi, Manuela; Hecher, Bianca; Sessitsch, Angela

    2012-01-01

    Hydroxynitrile lyases (HNLs) catalyze the cleavage of cyanohydrins. In the reverse reaction, they catalyze the formation of carbon-carbon bonds by enantioselective condensation of hydrocyanic acid with carbonyls. In this study, we describe two proteins from endophytic bacteria that display activity in the cleavage and the synthesis reaction of (R)-mandelonitrile with up to 74% conversion of benzaldehyde (enantiopreference ee 89%). Both showed high similarity to proteins of the cupin superfamily which so far were not known to exhibit HNL activity. PMID:22226952

  7. Alcohol dehydrogenases from olive (Olea europaea) fruit.

    PubMed

    Salas, J J; Sánchez, J

    1998-05-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenase activity was detected in extracts from the pericarp tissues of developing olive fruits using hexanal as the substrate. Total activity in the crude extract was 20-fold higher with NADPH than with NADH. Three discrete enzymes were resolved by means of a purification protocol involving ammonium sulfate fractionation followed by ion-exchange and affinity chromatography. One of the enzymes was NAD-dependent and displayed a high K(m) for hexanal (K(m) = 2.1 mM). Two NADP-dependent alcohol dehydrogenases were resolved, one showing a high K(m) for hexanal (K(m) = 1.9 mM) and the second with a lower K(m) for the same substrate (K(m) = 0.04 mM). The three enzymes have been partially purified and their kinetic parameters and specificities for various aldehydes determined. The involvement of these enzymes in the biogenesis of six carbon alcohols constituent of the aroma of olive oil is discussed. PMID:9621451

  8. Phosphorylation-dephosphorylation of yeast pyruvate dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Uhlinger, D.J.; Reed, L.J.

    1986-05-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) was purified to homogeneity from baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). No pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) kinase activity was detected at any stage of the purification. However, the purified PDC was phosphorylated and inactivated by purified PDH kinase from bovine kidney mitochondria, Mg/sup 2 +/, and (..gamma..-/sup 32/P)ATP. The protein-bound radioactivity was localized in the PDH ..cap alpha.. subunit. The phosphorylated, inactivated PDC was dephosphorylated and reactivated with purified bovine PDH phosphatase, Mg/sup 2 +/, and Ca/sup 2 +/. From a tryptic digest of phosphorylated yeast PDC a radioactive peptide was isolated by anion and reverse phase HPLC. The sequence of this tetradecapeptide is Tyr-Gly-Gly-His-Ser(P)-Met-Ser-Asp-Pro-Gly-Thr-Thr-Tyr-Arg. This sequence is very similar to the sequence of a tryptic phosphopeptide derived from the ..cap alpha.. subunit of bovine kidney and heart PDH: Tyr-His-Gly-His-Ser(P)-Met-Ser-Asp-Pro-Gly-Val-Ser-Tyr-Arg.

  9. Characterization of hamster NAD+-dependent 3(17)β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase belonging to the aldo-keto reductase 1C subfamily.

    PubMed

    Endo, Satoshi; Noda, Misato; Ikari, Akira; Tatematsu, Kenjiro; El-Kabbani, Ossama; Hara, Akira; Kitade, Yukio; Matsunaga, Toshiyuki

    2015-11-01

    The cDNAs for morphine 6-dehydrogenase (AKR1C34) and its homologous aldo-keto reductase (AKR1C35) were cloned from golden hamster liver, and their enzymatic properties and tissue distribution were compared. AKR1C34 and AKR1C35 similarly oxidized various xenobiotic alicyclic alcohols using NAD(+), but differed in their substrate specificity for hydroxysteroids and inhibitor sensitivity. While AKR1C34 showed 3α/17β/20α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activities, AKR1C35 efficiently oxidized various 3β- and 17β-hydroxysteroids, including biologically active 3β-hydroxy-5α/β-dihydro-C19/C21-steroids, dehydroepiandrosterone and 17β-estradiol. AKR1C35 also differed from AKR1C34 in its high sensitivity to flavonoids, which inhibited competitively with respect to 17β-estradiol (Ki 0.11-0.69 μM). The mRNA for AKR1C35 was expressed liver-specific in male hamsters and ubiquitously in female hamsters, whereas the expression of the mRNA for AKR1C34 displayed opposite sexual dimorphism. Because AKR1C35 is the first 317Β-HYDROXYSTEROID DEHYDROGENASE IN THE AKR SUPERFAMILY: , we also investigated the molecular determinants for the 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity by replacement of Val54 and Cys310 in AKR1C35 with the corresponding residues in AKR1C34, Ala and Phe, respectively. The mutation of Val54Ala, but not Cys310Phe, significantly impaired this activity, suggesting that Val54 plays a critical role in recognition of the steroidal substrate. PMID:26002966

  10. 21 CFR 862.1500 - Malic dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Malic dehydrogenase test system. 862.1500 Section 862.1500 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1500 Malic dehydrogenase test system....

  11. 21 CFR 862.1440 - Lactate dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Lactate dehydrogenase test system. 862.1440 Section 862.1440 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1440 Lactate dehydrogenase...

  12. 21 CFR 866.5560 - Lactic dehydrogenase immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Lactic dehydrogenase immunological test system. 866.5560 Section 866.5560 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems § 866.5560 Lactic dehydrogenase immunological...

  13. BACTERIAL EXPRESSION, PURIFICATION, AND CHARACTERIZATION OF ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA PYRUVATE DEHYDROGENASE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) is a very large multi-component structure that catalyzes decarboxylation of pyruvate, yielding CO2, NADH, and acetyl-CoA as products. The decarboxylation reaction is catalyzed by pyruvate dehydrogenase (E1). The PDC occupies a key position in intermediary met...

  14. Isolation of a novel LPS-induced component of the ML superfamily in Ciona intestinalis.

    PubMed

    Vizzini, Aiti; Bonura, Angela; Longo, Valeria; Sanfratello, Maria Antonietta; Parrinello, Daniela; Cammarata, Matteo; Colombo, Paolo

    2015-11-01

    ML superfamily represents a group of proteins playing important roles in lipid metabolism and innate immune response. In this study, we report the identification of the first component of the ML superfamily in the invertebrate Ciona intestinalis by means of a subtractive hybridization strategy. Sequence homology and phylogenetic analysis showed that this protein forms a specific clade with vertebrate components of the Niemann-Pick type C2 protein and, for this reason, it has been named Ci-NPC2. The putative Ci-NPC2 is a 150 amino acids long protein with a short signal peptide, seven cysteine residues, three putative lipid binding site and a three-dimensional model showing a characteristic β-strand structure. Gene expression analysis demonstrated that the Ci-NPC2 protein is positively upregulated after LPS inoculum with a peak of expression 1 h after challenge. Finally, in-situ hybridization demonstrated that the Ci-NPC2 protein is preferentially expressed in hemocytes inside the vessel lumen. PMID:26159403

  15. Prokaryotic origins of the non-animal peroxidase superfamily and organelle-mediated transmission to eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Passardi, Filippo; Bakalovic, Nenad; Teixeira, Felipe Karam; Margis-Pinheiro, Marcia; Penel, Claude; Dunand, Christophe

    2007-05-01

    Members of the superfamily of plant, fungal, and bacterial peroxidases are known to be present in a wide variety of living organisms. Extensive searching within sequencing projects identified organisms containing sequences of this superfamily. Class I peroxidases, cytochrome c peroxidase (CcP), ascorbate peroxidase (APx), and catalase peroxidase (CP), are known to be present in bacteria, fungi, and plants, but have now been found in various protists. CcP sequences were detected in most mitochondria-possessing organisms except for green plants, which possess only ascorbate peroxidases. APx sequences had previously been observed only in green plants but were also found in chloroplastic protists, which acquired chloroplasts by secondary endosymbiosis. CP sequences that are known to be present in prokaryotes and in Ascomycetes were also detected in some Basidiomycetes and occasionally in some protists. Class II peroxidases are involved in lignin biodegradation and are found only in the Homobasidiomycetes. In fact class II peroxidases were identified in only three orders, although degenerate forms were found in different Pezizomycota orders. Class III peroxidases are specific for higher plants, and their evolution is thought to be related to the emergence of the land plants. We have found, however, that class III peroxidases are present in some green algae, which predate land colonization. The presence of peroxidases in all major phyla (except vertebrates) makes them powerful marker genes for understanding the early evolutionary events that led to the appearance of the ancestors of each eukaryotic group. PMID:17355904

  16. The Hotdog fold: wrapping up a superfamily of thioesterases and dehydratases

    PubMed Central

    Dillon, Shane C; Bateman, Alex

    2004-01-01

    Background The Hotdog fold was initially identified in the structure of Escherichia coli FabA and subsequently in 4-hydroxybenzoyl-CoA thioesterase from Pseudomonas sp. strain CBS. Since that time structural determinations have shown a number of other apparently unrelated proteins also share the Hotdog fold. Results Using sequence analysis we unify a large superfamily of HotDog domains. Membership includes numerous prokaryotic, archaeal and eukaryotic proteins involved in several related, but distinct, catalytic activities, from metabolic roles such as thioester hydrolysis in fatty acid metabolism, to degradation of phenylacetic acid and the environmental pollutant 4-chlorobenzoate. The superfamily also includes FapR, a non-catalytic bacterial homologue that is involved in transcriptional regulation of fatty acid biosynthesis. We have defined 17 subfamilies, with some characterisation. Operon analysis has revealed numerous HotDog domain-containing proteins to be fusion proteins, where two genes, once separate but adjacent open-reading frames, have been fused into one open-reading frame to give a protein with two functional domains. Finally we have generated a Hidden Markov Model library from our analysis, which can be used as a tool for predicting the occurrence of HotDog domains in any protein sequence. Conclusions The HotDog domain is both an ancient and ubiquitous motif, with members found in the three branches of life. PMID:15307895

  17. The Anabaena sensory rhodopsin transducer defines a novel superfamily of prokaryotic small-molecule binding domains

    PubMed Central

    De Souza, Robson F; Iyer, Lakshminarayan M; Aravind, L

    2009-01-01

    The Anabaena sensory rhodopsin transducer (ASRT) is a small protein that has been claimed to function as a signaling molecule downstream of the cyanobacterial sensory rhodopsin. However, orthologs of ASRT have been detected in several bacteria that lack rhodopsin, raising questions about the generality of this function. Using sequence profile searches we show that ASRT defines a novel superfamily of β-sandwich fold domains. Through contextual inference based on domain architectures and predicted operons and structural analysis we present strong evidence that these domains bind small molecules, most probably sugars. We propose that the intracellular versions like ASRT probably participate as sensors that regulate a diverse range of sugar metabolism operons or even the light sensory behavior in Anabaena by binding sugars or related metabolites. We also show that one of the extracellular versions define a predicted sugar-binding structure in a novel cell-surface lipoprotein found across actinobacteria, including several pathogens such as Tropheryma, Actinomyces and Thermobifida. The analysis of this superfamily also provides new data to investigate the evolution of carbohydrate binding modes in β-sandwich domains with very different topologies. Reviewers: This article was reviewed by M. Madan Babu and Mark A. Ragan. PMID:19682383

  18. The history of the Drosophila TRP channel: The birth of a new channel superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Minke, Baruch

    2011-01-01

    Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) channels are polymodal cellular sensors involved in a wide variety of cellular processes, mainly by changing membrane voltage and increasing cellular Ca2+. This review outlines in detail the history of the founding member of the TRP family, the Drosophila TRP channel. The field began with a spontaneous mutation in the trp gene that led to a blind mutant during prolonged intense light. It was this mutant that allowed for the discovery of the first TRP channels. A combination of electrophysiological, biochemical, Ca2+ measurements, and genetic studies in flies and in other invertebrates pointed to TRP as a novel phosphoinositide-regulated, and Ca2+ permeable channel. The cloning and sequencing of the trp gene provided its molecular identity. These seminal findings led to the isolation of the first mammalian homologues of the Drosophila TRP channels. We now know that TRP channel proteins are conserved through evolution and are found in most organisms, tissues, and cell-types. The TRP channel superfamily is classified into seven related subfamilies: TRPC, TRPM, TRPV, TRPA, TRPP, TRPML and TRPN. A great deal is known today about participation of TRP channels in many biological processes including initiation of pain, thermoregulation, salivary fluid secretion, inflammation, cardiovascular regulation, smooth muscle tone, pressure regulation, Ca2+ and Mg2+ homeostasis and lysosomal function. The native Drosophila photoreceptor cells, where the founding member of the TRP channels superfamily was found is still a useful preparation to study basic features of this remarkable channel. PMID:21067449

  19. Novel triphosphate phosphohydrolase activity of Clostridium thermocellum TTM, a member of the triphosphate tunnel metalloenzyme superfamily.

    PubMed

    Keppetipola, Niroshika; Jain, Ruchi; Shuman, Stewart

    2007-04-20

    Triphosphate tunnel metalloenzymes (TTMs) are a newly recognized superfamily of phosphotransferases defined by a unique active site residing within an eight-stranded beta barrel. The prototypical members are the eukaryal metal-dependent RNA triphosphatases, which catalyze the initial step in mRNA capping. Little is known about the activities and substrate specificities of the scores of TTM homologs present in bacterial and archaeal proteomes, nearly all of which are annotated as adenylate cyclases. Here we have conducted a biochemical and structure-function analysis of a TTM protein (CthTTM) from the bacterium Clostridium thermocellum. CthTTM is a metal-dependent tripolyphosphatase and nucleoside triphosphatase; it is not an adenylate cyclase. We have identified 11 conserved amino acids in the tunnel that are critical for tripolyphosphatase and ATPase activity. The most salient findings are that (i) CthTTM is 150-fold more active in cleaving tripolyphosphate than ATP and (ii) the substrate specificity of CthTTM can be transformed by a single mutation (K8A) that abolishes tripolyphosphatase activity while strongly stimulating ATP hydrolysis. Our results underscore the plasticity of CthTTM substrate choice and suggest how novel specificities within the TTM superfamily might evolve through changes in the residues that line the tunnel walls. PMID:17303560

  20. Invited review: Mechanisms of GTP hydrolysis and conformational transitions in the dynamin superfamily.

    PubMed

    Daumke, Oliver; Praefcke, Gerrit J K

    2016-08-01

    Dynamin superfamily proteins are multidomain mechano-chemical GTPases which are implicated in nucleotide-dependent membrane remodeling events. A prominent feature of these proteins is their assembly- stimulated mechanism of GTP hydrolysis. The molecular basis for this reaction has been initially clarified for the dynamin-related guanylate binding protein 1 (GBP1) and involves the transient dimerization of the GTPase domains in a parallel head-to-head fashion. A catalytic arginine finger from the phosphate binding (P-) loop is repositioned toward the nucleotide of the same molecule to stabilize the transition state of GTP hydrolysis. Dynamin uses a related dimerization-dependent mechanism, but instead of the catalytic arginine, a monovalent cation is involved in catalysis. Still another variation of the GTP hydrolysis mechanism has been revealed for the dynamin-like Irga6 which bears a glycine at the corresponding position in the P-loop. Here, we highlight conserved and divergent features of GTP hydrolysis in dynamin superfamily proteins and show how nucleotide binding and hydrolysis are converted into mechano-chemical movements. We also describe models how the energy of GTP hydrolysis can be harnessed for diverse membrane remodeling events, such as membrane fission or fusion. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 105: 580-593, 2016. PMID:27062152

  1. Reconstitution of ThiC in thiamine pyrimidine biosynthesis expands the radical SAM superfamily

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, Abhishek; Li, Yue; Zhang, Yang; Grove, Tyler L.; Lee, Michael; Krebs, Carsten; Booker, Squire J.; Begley, Tadhg P.; Ealick, Steven E.

    2009-01-15

    4-Amino-5-hydroxymethyl-2-methylpyrimidine phosphate (HMP-P) synthase catalyzes a complex rearrangement of 5-aminoimidazole ribonucleotide (AIR) to form HMP-P, the pyrimidine moiety of thiamine phosphate. We determined the three-dimensional structures of HMP-P synthase and its complexes with the product HMP-P and a substrate analog imidazole ribotide. The structure of HMP-P synthase reveals a homodimer in which each protomer comprises three domains: an N-terminal domain with a novel fold, a central ({beta}{alpha}){sub 8} barrel and a disordered C-terminal domain that contains a conserved CX{sub 2}CX{sub 4}C motif, which is suggestive of a [4Fe-4S] cluster. Biochemical studies have confirmed that HMP-P synthase is iron sulfur cluster-dependent, that it is a new member of the radical SAM superfamily and that HMP-P and 5{prime}-deoxyadenosine are products of the reaction. Moessbauer and EPR spectroscopy confirm the presence of one [4Fe-4S] cluster. Structural comparisons reveal that HMP-P synthase is homologous to a group of adenosylcobalamin radical enzymes. This similarity supports an evolutionary relationship between these two superfamilies.

  2. A unique cis-3-hydroxy-l-proline dehydratase in the enolase superfamily.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinshuai; Kumar, Ritesh; Vetting, Matthew W; Zhao, Suwen; Jacobson, Matthew P; Almo, Steven C; Gerlt, John A

    2015-02-01

    The genome of Labrenzia aggregata IAM 12614 encodes an uncharacterized member of the muconate lactonizing enzyme (MLE) subgroup of the enolase superfamily (UniProt ID A0NXQ8 ). The gene encoding A0NXQ8 is located between genes that encode members of the proline racemase superfamily, 4R-hydroxyproline 2-epimerase (UniProt ID A0NXQ7 ; 4HypE) and trans-3-hydroxy-l-proline dehydratase (UniProt ID A0NXQ9 ; t3LHypD). A0NXQ8 was screened with a library of proline analogues; two reactions were observed with cis-3-hydroxy-l-proline (c3LHyp), competing 2-epimerization to trans-3-hydroxy-d-proline (1,1-proton transfer) and dehydration to Δ(1)-pyrroline-2-carboxylate (β-elimination; c3LHyp dehydratase), with eventual total dehydration. The genome context encoding A0NXQ8 both (1) confirms its novel c3LHyp dehydratase function and (2) provides evidence for metabolic pathways that allow L. aggregata to utilize several isomeric 3- and 4-hydroxyprolines as sole carbon sources. PMID:25608448

  3. Marine medaka ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily and new insight into teleost Abch nomenclature

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Chang-Bum; Kim, Bo-Mi; Kang, Hye-Min; Choi, Ik-Young; Rhee, Jae-Sung; Lee, Jae-Seong

    2015-01-01

    The ABC gene family is recognized as one of the largest gene families in all kingdoms of life. Although many genes involved in the ABC superfamily have been annotated from several fish species, information on large sets of the ABC superfamily and their evolutionary characterization are still unclear. In the marine medaka Oryzias melastigma, 50 ABC transporters were identified with bioinformatics-aided in silico analyses, and their full-length cDNA sequences were characterized. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that they could be classified into the eight subfamilies (A–H) that include all members of all ABC subfamilies. Interestingly, several teleosts’ Abcg members were closely clustered with Abch members in a distinctive clade. The abch gene was also observed in the coelacanth and the spotted gar, suggesting that this gene was retained from a bilaterian ancestor and that a gene loss event recently occurred in the tetrapod lineage. In teleosts, the nomenclature of previously annotated abcg genes should be considered carefully, as they form a distinctive clade with the marine medaka abch subfamily and other teleost abch genes, but not with the members of the Abcg subfamily. PMID:26472499

  4. Nitrilase superfamily aryl acylamidase from the halotolerant mangrove Streptomyces sp. 211726.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yanling; Xu, Wei; Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Sihong; Hong, Kui; Deng, Zixin; Sun, Yuhui

    2014-10-01

    A novel nitrilase superfamily amidase gene, designated azl13, was cloned from Streptomyces sp. 211726. Bioinformatic and biochemical analysis indicated that Azl13 belongs to a new subfamily in branch 13 of the nitrilase superfamily. His6-Azl13 was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) and had the expected molecular mass of 31 kDa, and the enzymatic activity was best at 40 °C, pH 8.0. His6-Azl13 had amidase, aryl acylamidase, and acyl transferase activities, and it displayed an unusually wide substrate spectrum. His6-Azl13 was most active on 4-guanidinobutyramide, which is probably its natural substrate, moderately active on short-chain aliphatic amides and weakly active hydrolyzing aromatic and heterocyclic amides. His6-Azl13 also catalyzed acyl transfer to hydroxylamine from acetamide or the herbicide propanil. The substrate spectrum differs from that of the Pseudomonas amidase RamA, probably reflecting high salinity adaptation. The broad substrate spectrum of Azl13 is potentially useful for chemical synthesis and biodegradation. PMID:24752846

  5. A diverse superfamily of enzymes with ATP-dependent carboxylate-amine/thiol ligase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Galperin, M. Y.; Koonin, E. V.

    1997-01-01

    The recently developed PSI-BLAST method for sequence database search and methods for motif analysis were used to define and expand a superfamily of enzymes with an unusual nucleotide-binding fold, referred to as palmate, or ATP-grasp fold. In addition to D-alanine-D-alanine ligase, glutathione synthetase, biotin carboxylase, and carbamoyl phosphate synthetase, enzymes with known three-dimensional structures, the ATP-grasp domain is predicted in the ribosomal protein S6 modification enzyme (RimK), urea amidolyase, tubulin-tyrosine ligase, and three enzymes of purine biosynthesis. All these enzymes possess ATP-dependent carboxylate-amine ligase activity, and their catalytic mechanisms are likely to include acylphosphate intermediates. The ATP-grasp superfamily also includes succinate-CoA ligase (both ADP-forming and GDP-forming variants), malate-CoA ligase, and ATP-citrate lyase, enzymes with a carboxylate-thiol ligase activity, and several uncharacterized proteins. These findings significantly extend the variety of the substrates of ATP-grasp enzymes and the range of biochemical pathways in which they are involved, and demonstrate the complementarity between structural comparison and powerful methods for sequence analysis. PMID:9416615

  6. Crystal Structure and Promiscuous Partitioning of a Covalent Intermediate Common in the Pentein Superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Linsky, Thomas W.; Monzingo, Arthur F.; Stone, Everett M.; Robertus, Jon D.; Fast, Walter

    2008-01-01

    Summary Many enzymes in the pentein superfamily use a transient covalent intermediate in their catalytic mechanisms. Here, we use a mutant (H162G) dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and an alternative substrate, S-methyl-L-thiocitrulline, to trap, crystallize and determine the 2.8 Å resolution structure of a stable covalent adduct which mimics this reaction intermediate. Observed interactions between the trapped adduct and active site residues along with comparison to a previously known product-bound structure provide insight into the normal catalytic mechanism. The plane of the trapped thiouronium intermediate is angled away from that seen in the product and substrate complexes, allowing for an altered angle of attack between the nucleophiles of the first and second half reactions. The stable covalent adduct is also capable of further reaction. Addition of exogenous imidazole can rescue the original hydrolytic activity. Notably, addition of other exogenous amines can instead yield substituted arginine products. These alternative products arise from partitioning of the trapped intermediate into the evolutionarily related amidinotransferase reaction pathway. The enzyme scaffold provides both selectivity and catalysis for the amidinotransferase reaction, underscoring commonalities between different reaction pathways found in this mechanistically diverse enzyme superfamily. The promiscuous partitioning of this covalent intermediate may also help to illuminate the evolutionary history of these enzymes. PMID:18482699

  7. Identification and classification of 16 new kinesin superfamily (KIF) proteins in mouse genome.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, T; Tanaka, Y; Matsuoka, E; Kondo, S; Okada, Y; Noda, Y; Kanai, Y; Hirokawa, N

    1997-09-01

    KIF (kinesin superfamily) proteins are microtubule-dependent molecular motors that play important roles in intracellular transport and cell division. The extent to which KIFs are involved in various transporting phenomena, as well as their regulation mechanism, are unknown. The identification of 16 new KIFs in this report doubles the existing number of KIFs known in the mouse. Conserved nucleotide sequences in the motor domain were amplified by PCR using cDNAs of mouse nervous tissue, kidney, and small intestine as templates. The new KIFs were studied with respect to their expression patterns in different tissues, chromosomal location, and molecular evolution. Our results suggest that (i) there is no apparent tendency among related subclasses of KIFs of cosegregation in chromosomal mapping, and (ii) according to their tissue distribution patterns, KIFs can be divided into two classes-i.e., ubiquitous and specific tissue-dominant. Further characterization of KIFs may elucidate unknown fundamental phenomena underlying intracellular transport. Finally, we propose a straightforward nomenclature system for the members of the mouse kinesin superfamily. PMID:9275178

  8. Structural basis for amino acid export by DMT superfamily transporter YddG.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Hirotoshi; Doki, Shintaro; Takemoto, Mizuki; Ikuta, Tatsuya; Higuchi, Takashi; Fukui, Keita; Usuda, Yoshihiro; Tabuchi, Eri; Nagatoishi, Satoru; Tsumoto, Kouhei; Nishizawa, Tomohiro; Ito, Koichi; Dohmae, Naoshi; Ishitani, Ryuichiro; Nureki, Osamu

    2016-06-16

    The drug/metabolite transporter (DMT) superfamily is a large group of membrane transporters ubiquitously found in eukaryotes, bacteria and archaea, and includes exporters for a remarkably wide range of substrates, such as toxic compounds and metabolites. YddG is a bacterial DMT protein that expels aromatic amino acids and exogenous toxic compounds, thereby contributing to cellular homeostasis. Here we present structural and functional analyses of YddG. Using liposome-based analyses, we show that Escherichia coli and Starkeya novella YddG export various amino acids. The crystal structure of S. novella YddG at 2.4 Å resolution reveals a new membrane transporter topology, with ten transmembrane segments in an outward-facing state. The overall structure is basket-shaped, with a large substrate-binding cavity at the centre of the molecule, and is composed of inverted structural repeats related by two-fold pseudo-symmetry. On the basis of this intramolecular symmetry, we propose a structural model for the inward-facing state and a mechanism of the conformational change for substrate transport, which we confirmed by biochemical analyses. These findings provide a structural basis for the mechanism of transport of DMT superfamily proteins. PMID:27281193

  9. GLYCERALDEHYDE 3-PHOSPHATE DEHYDROGENASE-S, A SPERM-SPECIFIC GLYCOLYTIC ENZYME, IS REQUIRED FOR SPERM MOTILITY AND MALE FERTILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    While glycolysis is highly conserved, it is remarkable that several novel isozymes in this central metabolic pathway are found in mammalian sperm. Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase-S (GAPDS) is the product of a mouse gene expressed only during spermatogenesis and, like it...

  10. Crystal structures and kinetics of monofunctional proline dehydrogenase provide insight into substrate recognition and conformational changes associated with flavin reduction and product release.

    PubMed

    Luo, Min; Arentson, Benjamin W; Srivastava, Dhiraj; Becker, Donald F; Tanner, John J

    2012-12-18

    Proline dehydrogenase (PRODH) catalyzes the FAD-dependent oxidation of proline to Δ(1)-pyrroline-5-carboxylate, which is the first step of proline catabolism. Here, we report the structures of proline dehydrogenase from Deinococcus radiodurans in the oxidized state complexed with the proline analogue L-tetrahydrofuroic acid and in the reduced state with the proline site vacant. The analogue binds against the si face of the FAD isoalloxazine and is protected from bulk solvent by helix α8 and the β1-α1 loop. The FAD ribityl chain adopts two conformations in the E-S complex, which is unprecedented for flavoenzymes. One of the conformations is novel for the PRODH superfamily and may contribute to the low substrate affinity of Deinococcus PRODH. Reduction of the crystalline enzyme-inhibitor complex causes profound structural changes, including 20° butterfly bending of the isoalloxazine, crankshaft rotation of the ribityl, shifting of α8 by 1.7 Å, reconfiguration of the β1-α1 loop, and rupture of the Arg291-Glu64 ion pair. These changes dramatically open the active site to facilitate product release and allow electron acceptors access to the reduced flavin. The structures suggest that the ion pair, which is conserved in the PRODH superfamily, functions as the active site gate. Mutagenesis of Glu64 to Ala decreases the catalytic efficiency 27-fold, which demonstrates the importance of the gate. Mutation of Gly63 decreases the efficiency 140-fold, which suggests that flexibility of the β1-α1 loop is essential for optimal catalysis. The large conformational changes that are required to form the E-S complex suggest that conformational selection plays a role in substrate recognition. PMID:23151026

  11. Crystal Structures and Kinetics of Monofunctional Proline Dehydrogenase Provide Insight into Substrate Recognition and Conformational Changes Associated With Flavin Reduction and Product Release

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Min; Arentson, Benjamin W.; Srivastava, Dhiraj; Becker, Donald F.; Tanner, John J.

    2012-01-01

    Proline dehydrogenase catalyzes the FAD-dependent oxidation of proline to Δ1- pyrroline-5-carboxylate, which is the first step of proline catabolism. Here, we report the structures of proline dehydrogenase from Deinococcus radiodurans in the oxidized state complexed with the proline analog L-tetrahydrofuroic acid and in the reduced state with the proline site vacant. The analog binds against the si face of the FAD isoalloxazine and is protected from bulk solvent by the α8 helix and the β1-α1 loop. The FAD ribityl chain adopts two conformations in the E-S complex, which is unprecedented for flavoenzymes. One of the conformations is novel for the PRODH superfamily and may contribute to the low substrate affinity of Deinococcus PRODH. Reduction of the crystalline enzyme-inhibitor complex causes profound structural changes, including 20° butterfly bending of the isoalloxazine, crankshaft rotation of the ribityl, shifting of α8 by 1.7 Å, reconfiguration of the β1-α1 loop, and rupture of the Arg291-Glu64 ion pair. These changes dramatically open the active site to facilitate product release and allow electron acceptors access to the reduced flavin. The structures suggest that the ion pair, which is conserved in the PRODH superfamily, functions as the active site gate. Mutagenesis of Glu64 to Ala decreases catalytic efficiency 27-fold, which demonstrates the importance of the gate. Mutation of Gly63 decreases efficiency 140-fold, which suggests that flexibility of the β1-α1 loop is essential for optimal catalysis. The large conformational changes that are required to form the E-S complex suggest that conformational selection plays a role in substrate recognition. PMID:23151026

  12. Enantiocomplementary Yarrowia lipolytica Oxidoreductases: Alcohol Dehydrogenase 2 and Short Chain Dehydrogenase/Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Napora-Wijata, Kamila; Strohmeier, Gernot A.; Sonavane, Manoj N.; Avi, Manuela; Robins, Karen; Winkler, Margit

    2013-01-01

    Enzymes of the non-conventional yeast Yarrowia lipolytica seem to be tailor-made for the conversion of lipophilic substrates. Herein, we cloned and overexpressed the Zn-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase ADH2 from Yarrowia lipolytica in Escherichia coli. The purified enzyme was characterized in vitro. The substrate scope for YlADH2 mediated oxidation and reduction was investigated spectrophotometrically and the enzyme showed a broader substrate range than its homolog from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A preference for secondary compared to primary alcohols in oxidation direction was observed for YlADH2. 2-Octanone was investigated in reduction mode in detail. Remarkably, YlADH2 displays perfect (S)-selectivity and together with a highly (R)-selective short chain dehydrogenase/ reductase from Yarrowia lipolytica it is possible to access both enantiomers of 2-octanol in >99% ee with Yarrowia lipolytica oxidoreductases. PMID:24970175

  13. Antimicrobial Cellobiose Dehydrogenase-Chitosan Particles.

    PubMed

    Tegl, Gregor; Thallinger, Barbara; Beer, Bianca; Sygmund, Christoph; Ludwig, Roland; Rollett, Alexandra; Nyanhongo, Gibson S; Guebitz, Georg M

    2016-01-13

    Increasing prevalence of chronic wounds and microbial infection constitute a severe health challenge. The situation is further complicated by emerging multidrug resistance making the treatment of infections increasingly difficult. Here, a novel antimicrobial system based on in situ release of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) by cellobiose dehydrogenase (CDH) immobilized on chitosan (CTS) particles is described. Covalent immobilization using carbodiimide coupling lead to a higher amount of protein immobilized on CTS (104 μg CDH/mg CTS) when compared to noncovalent immobilization, which, however, showed highest recovery of CDH activity (0.01 U/mg CTS). The CDH-CTS in situ generated H2O2 completely inhibited growth of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus over a period of 24 h. This resilient antimicrobial system represents a novel strategy for preventing infection with potential application in counteracting microbial colonization of chronic wounds. PMID:26672396

  14. Crystal structure of Arabidopsis thaliana cytokinin dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, Euiyoung; Bingman, Craig A.; Bitto, Eduard; Aceti, David J.; Phillips, Jr., George N.

    2008-08-13

    Since first discovered in Zea mays, cytokinin dehydrogenase (CKX) genes have been identified in many plants including rice and Arabidopsis thaliana, which possesses CKX homologues (AtCKX1-AtCKX7). So far, the three-dimensional structure of only Z. mays CKX (ZmCKX1) has been determined. The crystal structures of ZmCKX1 have been solved in the native state and in complex with reaction products and a slowly reacting substrate. The structures revealed four glycosylated asparagine residues and a histidine residue covalently linked to FAD. Combined with the structural information, recent biochemical analyses of ZmCKX1 concluded that the final products of the reaction, adenine and a side chain aldehyde, are formed by nonenzymatic hydrolytic cleavage of cytokinin imine products resulting directly from CKX catalysis. Here, we report the crystal structure of AtCKX7 (gene locus At5g21482.1, UniProt code Q9FUJ1).

  15. Fast internal dynamics in alcohol dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Monkenbusch, M.; Stadler, A. Biehl, R.; Richter, D.; Ollivier, J.; Zamponi, M.

    2015-08-21

    Large-scale domain motions in alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) have been observed previously by neutron spin-echo spectroscopy (NSE). We have extended the investigation on the dynamics of ADH in solution by using high-resolution neutron time-of-flight (TOF) and neutron backscattering (BS) spectroscopy in the incoherent scattering range. The observed hydrogen dynamics were interpreted in terms of three mobility classes, which allowed a simultaneous description of the measured TOF and BS spectra. In addition to the slow global protein diffusion and domain motions observed by NSE, a fast internal process could be identified. Around one third of the protons in ADH participate in the fast localized diffusive motion. The diffusion coefficient of the fast internal motions is around two third of the value of the surrounding D{sub 2}O solvent. It is tempting to associate the fast internal process with solvent exposed amino acid residues with dangling side chains.

  16. Stability of immobilized yeast alcohol dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Ooshima, H.; Genko, Y.; Harano, Y.

    1981-12-01

    The effects of substrate on stabilities of native (NA) and three kinds of immobilized yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (IMA), namely PGA (the carrier; porous glass), SEA (agarose gel) prepared covalently, and AMA (anion-exchange resin) prepared ionically, were studied. The following results were obtained. 1) The deactivations of NA and IMA free from the substrate or in the presence of ethanol obey the first-order kinetics, whereas, in the presence of butyraldehyde, their deactivation behaviors are explained on the basis of coexistence of two components of YADHs, namely the labile E1 and the comparatively stable E2, with different first-order deactivation constants. (2) A few attempts for stabilization of IMA were carried out from the viewpoint of the effects of crosslinkages among the subunits of YADH for PGA and the multibonding between the carrier and enzyme for SEA. The former is effective for the stabilization, whereas the latter is not. (Refs. 19).

  17. Betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase isozymes of spinach

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, A.D.; Weretilnyk, E.A.; Weigel, P.

    1986-04-01

    Betaine is synthesized in spinach chloroplasts via the pathway Choline ..-->.. Betaine Aldehyde ..-->.. Betaine; the second step is catalyzed by betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase (BADH). The subcellular distribution of BADH was determined in leaf protoplast lysates; BADH isozymes were separated by 6-9% native PAGE. The chloroplast stromal fraction contains a single BADH isozyme (number1) that accounts for > 80% of the total protoplast activity; the extrachloroplastic fraction has a minor isozyme (number2) which migrates more slowly than number1. Both isozymes appear specific for betaine aldehyde, are more active with NAD than NADP, and show a ca. 3-fold activity increase in salinized leaves. The phenotype of a natural variant of isozyme number1 suggests that the enzyme is a dimer.

  18. Fast internal dynamics in alcohol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Monkenbusch, M; Stadler, A; Biehl, R; Ollivier, J; Zamponi, M; Richter, D

    2015-08-21

    Large-scale domain motions in alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) have been observed previously by neutron spin-echo spectroscopy (NSE). We have extended the investigation on the dynamics of ADH in solution by using high-resolution neutron time-of-flight (TOF) and neutron backscattering (BS) spectroscopy in the incoherent scattering range. The observed hydrogen dynamics were interpreted in terms of three mobility classes, which allowed a simultaneous description of the measured TOF and BS spectra. In addition to the slow global protein diffusion and domain motions observed by NSE, a fast internal process could be identified. Around one third of the protons in ADH participate in the fast localized diffusive motion. The diffusion coefficient of the fast internal motions is around two third of the value of the surrounding D2O solvent. It is tempting to associate the fast internal process with solvent exposed amino acid residues with dangling side chains. PMID:26298156

  19. Purification and properties of L-mandelate dehydrogenase and comparison with other membrane-bound dehydrogenases from Acinetobacter calcoaceticus.

    PubMed

    Hoey, M E; Allison, N; Scott, A J; Fewson, C A

    1987-12-15

    L-Mandelate dehydrogenase was purified from Acinetobacter calcoaceticus by Triton X-100 extraction from a 'wall + membrane' fraction, ion-exchange chromatography on DEAE-Sephacel, (NH4)2SO4 fractionation and gel filtration followed by further ion-exchange chromatography. The purified enzyme was partially characterized with respect to its subunit Mr (44,000), pH optimum (7.5), pI value (4.2), substrate specificity and susceptibility to various potential inhibitors including thiol-blocking reagents. FMN was identified as the non-covalently bound cofactor. The properties of L-mandelate dehydrogenase are compared with those of D-mandelate dehydrogenase, D-lactate dehydrogenase and L-lactate dehydrogenase from A. calcoaceticus. PMID:3325042

  20. Purification and properties of L-mandelate dehydrogenase and comparison with other membrane-bound dehydrogenases from Acinetobacter calcoaceticus.

    PubMed Central

    Hoey, M E; Allison, N; Scott, A J; Fewson, C A

    1987-01-01

    L-Mandelate dehydrogenase was purified from Acinetobacter calcoaceticus by Triton X-100 extraction from a 'wall + membrane' fraction, ion-exchange chromatography on DEAE-Sephacel, (NH4)2SO4 fractionation and gel filtration followed by further ion-exchange chromatography. The purified enzyme was partially characterized with respect to its subunit Mr (44,000), pH optimum (7.5), pI value (4.2), substrate specificity and susceptibility to various potential inhibitors including thiol-blocking reagents. FMN was identified as the non-covalently bound cofactor. The properties of L-mandelate dehydrogenase are compared with those of D-mandelate dehydrogenase, D-lactate dehydrogenase and L-lactate dehydrogenase from A. calcoaceticus. PMID:3325042

  1. Multiple alcohol dehydrogenases but no functional acetaldehyde dehydrogenase causing excessive acetaldehyde production from ethanol by oral streptococci

    PubMed Central

    Pavlova, Sylvia I.; Jin, Ling; Gasparovich, Stephen R.

    2013-01-01

    Ethanol consumption and poor oral hygiene are risk factors for oral and oesophageal cancers. Although oral streptococci have been found to produce excessive acetaldehyde from ethanol, little is known about the mechanism by which this carcinogen is produced. By screening 52 strains of diverse oral streptococcal species, we identified Streptococcus gordonii V2016 that produced the most acetaldehyde from ethanol. We then constructed gene deletion mutants in this strain and analysed them for alcohol and acetaldehyde dehydrogenases by zymograms. The results showed that S. gordonii V2016 expressed three primary alcohol dehydrogenases, AdhA, AdhB and AdhE, which all oxidize ethanol to acetaldehyde, but their preferred substrates were 1-propanol, 1-butanol and ethanol, respectively. Two additional dehydrogenases, S-AdhA and TdhA, were identified with specificities to the secondary alcohol 2-propanol and threonine, respectively, but not to ethanol. S. gordonii V2016 did not show a detectable acetaldehyde dehydrogenase even though its adhE gene encodes a putative bifunctional acetaldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase. Mutants with adhE deletion showed greater tolerance to ethanol in comparison with the wild-type and mutant with adhA or adhB deletion, indicating that AdhE is the major alcohol dehydrogenase in S. gordonii. Analysis of 19 additional strains of S. gordonii, S. mitis, S. oralis, S. salivarius and S. sanguinis showed expressions of up to three alcohol dehydrogenases, but none showed detectable acetaldehyde dehydrogenase, except one strain that showed a novel ALDH. Therefore, expression of multiple alcohol dehydrogenases but no functional acetaldehyde dehydrogenase may contribute to excessive production of acetaldehyde from ethanol by certain oral streptococci. PMID:23637459

  2. Human thioesterase superfamily member 2 (hTHEM2) is co-localized with {beta}-tubulin onto the microtubule

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng Zhongjun; Bao Shilai; Shan Xiaoyue; Xu Hang . E-mail: hxu@moon.ibp.ac.cn; Gong Weimin . E-mail: wgong@ibp.ac.cn

    2006-12-01

    Human thioesterase superfamily member 2 (hTHEM2) belongs to the hotdog-fold enzyme superfamily but its biological function remains unknown. Tissue specific expression in mouse showed that the encoding gene is highly expressed in the kidney, and moderately expressed in the liver, brain, large intestine, and small intestine. Small interference RNA silencing in cell line HCT116 shows that the hthem2 gene is essential for the cell sustained proliferation. Immunostaining and GFP-Tag experiments show that hTHEM2 is co-localized with microtubules.

  3. Biochemical and structural characterization of Cryptosporidium parvum Lactate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Cook, William J; Senkovich, Olga; Hernandez, Agustin; Speed, Haley; Chattopadhyay, Debasish

    2015-03-01

    The protozoan parasite Cryptosporidium parvum causes waterborne diseases worldwide. There is no effective therapy for C. parvum infection. The parasite depends mainly on glycolysis for energy production. Lactate dehydrogenase is a major regulator of glycolysis. This paper describes the biochemical characterization of C. parvum lactate dehydrogenase and high resolution crystal structures of the apo-enzyme and four ternary complexes. The ternary complexes capture the enzyme bound to NAD/NADH or its 3-acetylpyridine analog in the cofactor binding pocket, while the substrate binding site is occupied by one of the following ligands: lactate, pyruvate or oxamate. The results reveal distinctive features of the parasitic enzyme. For example, C. parvum lactate dehydrogenase prefers the acetylpyridine analog of NADH as a cofactor. Moreover, it is slightly less sensitive to gossypol inhibition compared with mammalian lactate dehydrogenases and not inhibited by excess pyruvate. The active site loop and the antigenic loop in C. parvum lactate dehydrogenase are considerably different from those in the human counterpart. Structural features and enzymatic properties of C. parvum lactate dehydrogenase are similar to enzymes from related parasites. Structural comparison with malate dehydrogenase supports a common ancestry for the two genes. PMID:25542170

  4. Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex from Chloroplasts of Pisum sativum L 1

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Michael; Randall, Douglas D.

    1979-01-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase complex is associated with intact chloroplasts and mitochondria of 9-day-old Pisum sativum L. seedlings. The ratio of the mitochondrial complex to the chloroplast complex activities is about 3 to 1. Maximal rates observed for chloroplast pyruvate dehydrogenase complex activity ranged from 6 to 9 micromoles of NADH produced per milligram of chlorophyll per hour. Osmotic rupture of pea chloroplasts released 88% of the complex activity, indicating that chloroplast pyruvate dehydrogenase complex is a stromal complex. The pH optimum for chloroplast pyruvate dehydrogenase complex was between 7.8 and 8.2, whereas the mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex had a pH optimum between 7.3 and 7.7. Chloroplast pyruvate dehydrogenase complex activity was specific for pyruvate, dependent upon coenzyme A and NAD and partially dependent upon Mg2+ and thiamine pyrophosphate. Chloroplast-associated pyruvate dehydrogenase complex provides a direct link between pyruvate metabolism and chloroplast fatty acid biosynthesis by providing the substrate, acetyl-CoA, necessary for membrane development in young plants. Images PMID:16661100

  5. Evolution of Enzymatic Activities in the Enolase Superfamily: L-Fuconate Dehydratase from Xanthomonas campestris

    SciTech Connect

    Yew,W.; Fedorov, A.; Fedorov, E.; Rakus, J.; Pierce, R.; Almo, S.; Gerlt, J.

    2006-01-01

    Many members of the mechanistically diverse enolase superfamily have unknown functions. In this report the authors use both genome (operon) context and screening of a library of acid sugars to assign the L-fuconate dehydratase (FucD) function to a member of the mandelate racemase (MR) subgroup of the superfamily encoded by the Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris str. ATCC 33913 genome (GI: 21233491). Orthologues of FucD are found in both bacteria and eukaryotes, the latter including the rTS beta protein in Homo sapiens that has been implicated in regulating thymidylate synthase activity. As suggested by sequence alignments and confirmed by high-resolution structures in the presence of active site ligands, FucD and MR share the same active site motif of functional groups: three carboxylate ligands for the essential Mg2+ located at the ends of th third, fourth, and fifth-strands in the (/)7-barrel domain (Asp 248, Glu 274, and Glu 301, respectively), a Lys-x-Lys motif at the end of the second-strand (Lys 218 and Lys 220), a His-Asp dyad at the end of the seventh and sixth-strands (His 351 and Asp 324, respectively), and a Glue at the end of the eighth-strand (Glu 382). The mechanism of the FucD reaction involves initial abstraction of the 2-proton by Lys 220, acid catalysis of the vinylogous-elimination of the 3-OH group by His 351, and stereospecific ketonization of the resulting 2-keto-3-deoxy-L-fuconate product. Screening of the library of acid sugars revealed substrate and functional promiscuity: In addition to L-fuconate, FucD also catalyzes the dehydration of L-galactonate, D-arabinonate, D-altronate, L-talonate, and D-ribonate. The dehydrations of L-fuconate, L-galactonate, and D-arabinonate are initiated by abstraction of the 2-protons by Lys 220. The dehydrations of L-talonate and D-ribonate are initiated by abstraction of the 2-protons by His 351; however, protonation of the enediolate intermediates by the conjugate acid of Lys 220 yields L

  6. Follicle-restricted compartmentalization of transforming growth factor beta superfamily ligands in the feline ovary.

    PubMed

    Bristol, Sarah K; Woodruff, Teresa K

    2004-03-01

    Ovarian follicular development, follicle selection, and the process of ovulation remain poorly understood in most species. Throughout reproductive life, follicle fate is balanced between growth and apoptosis. These opposing forces are controlled by numerous endocrine, paracrine, and autocrine factors, including the ligands represented by the transforming growth factor beta (TGFbeta) superfamily. TGFbeta, activin, inhibin, bone morphometric protein (BMP), and growth differentiation factor 9 (GDF-9) are present in the ovary of many animals; however, no comprehensive analysis of the localization of each ligand or its receptors and intracellular signaling molecules during folliculogenesis has been done. The domestic cat is an ideal model for studying ovarian follicle dynamics due to an abundance of all follicle populations, including primordial stage, and the amount of readily available tissue following routine animal spaying. Additionally, knowledge of the factors involved in feline follicular development could make an important impact on in vitro maturation/in vitro fertilization (IVM/IVF) success for endangered feline species. Thus, the presence and position of TGFbeta superfamily members within the feline ovary have been evaluated in all stages of follicular development by immunolocalization. The cat inhibin alpha subunit protein is present in all follicle stages but increases in intensity within the mural granulosa cells in large antral follicles. The inhibin betaA and betaB subunit proteins, in addition to the activin type I (ActRIB) and activin type II receptor (ActRIIB), are produced in primordial and primary follicle granulosa cells. Additionally, inhibin betaA subunit is detected in the theca cells from secondary through large antral follicle size classes. GDF-9 is restricted to the oocyte of preantral and antral follicles, whereas the type II BMP receptor (BMP-RII) protein is predominantly localized to primordial- and primary-stage follicles. TGFbeta1, 2

  7. Evolution of Enzymatic Activities in the Enolase Superfamily: L-Rhamnonate Dehydratase

    SciTech Connect

    Rakus,J.; Fedorov, A.; Fedorov, E.; Glaner, M.; Hubbard, B.; Delli, J.; Babbitt, P.; Almo, S.; Gerlt, J.

    2008-01-01

    The l-rhamnonate dehydratase (RhamD) function was assigned to a previously uncharacterized family in the mechanistically diverse enolase superfamily that is encoded by the genome of Escherichia coli K-12. We screened a library of acid sugars to discover that the enzyme displays a promiscuous substrate specificity: l-rhamnonate (6-deoxy-l-mannonate) has the 'best' kinetic constants, with l-mannonate, l-lyxonate, and d-gulonate dehydrated less efficiently. Crystal structures of the RhamDs from both E. coli K-12 and Salmonella typhimurium LT2 (95% sequence identity) were obtained in the presence of Mg2+; the structure of the RhamD from S. typhimurium was also obtained in the presence of 3-deoxy-l-rhamnonate (obtained by reduction of the product with NaBH4). Like other members of the enolase superfamily, RhamD contains an N-terminal a + {beta} capping domain and a C-terminal ({beta}/a)7{beta}-barrel (modified TIM-barrel) catalytic domain with the active site located at the interface between the two domains. In contrast to other members, the specificity-determining '20s loop' in the capping domain is extended in length and the '50s loop' is truncated. The ligands for the Mg2+ are Asp 226, Glu 252 and Glu 280 located at the ends of the third, fourth and fifth {beta}-strands, respectively. The active site of RhamD contains a His 329-Asp 302 dyad at the ends of the seventh and sixth {beta}-strands, respectively, with His 329 positioned to function as the general base responsible for abstraction of the C2 proton of l-rhamnonate to form a Mg2+-stabilized enediolate intermediate. However, the active site does not contain other acid/base catalysts that have been implicated in the reactions catalyzed by other members of the MR subgroup of the enolase superfamily. Based on the structure of the liganded complex, His 329 also is expected to function as the general acid that both facilitates departure of the 3-OH group in a syn-dehydration reaction and delivers a proton to carbon-3

  8. Ensembler: Enabling High-Throughput Molecular Simulations at the Superfamily Scale.

    PubMed

    Parton, Daniel L; Grinaway, Patrick B; Hanson, Sonya M; Beauchamp, Kyle A; Chodera, John D

    2016-06-01

    The rapidly expanding body of available genomic and protein structural data provides a rich resource for understanding protein dynamics with biomolecular simulation. While computational infrastructure has grown rapidly, simulations on an omics scale are not yet widespread, primarily because software infrastructure to enable simulations at this scale has not kept pace. It should now be possible to study protein dynamics across entire (super)families, exploiting both available structural biology data and conformational similarities across homologous proteins. Here, we present a new tool for enabling high-throughput simulation in the genomics era. Ensembler takes any set of sequences-from a single sequence to an entire superfamily-and shepherds them through various stages of modeling and refinement to produce simulation-ready structures. This includes comparative modeling to all relevant PDB structures (which may span multiple conformational states of interest), reconstruction of missing loops, addition of missing atoms, culling of nearly identical structures, assignment of appropriate protonation states, solvation in explicit solvent, and refinement and filtering with molecular simulation to ensure stable simulation. The output of this pipeline is an ensemble of structures ready for subsequent molecular simulations using computer clusters, supercomputers, or distributed computing projects like Folding@home. Ensembler thus automates much of the time-consuming process of preparing protein models suitable for simulation, while allowing scalability up to entire superfamilies. A particular advantage of this approach can be found in the construction of kinetic models of conformational dynamics-such as Markov state models (MSMs)-which benefit from a diverse array of initial configurations that span the accessible conformational states to aid sampling. We demonstrate the power of this approach by constructing models for all catalytic domains in the human tyrosine kinase

  9. The role of cysteine in the alteration of bovine liver dihydrodiol dehydrogenase 3 activity.

    PubMed Central

    Nanjo, H; Adachi, H; Aketa, M; Mizoguchi, T; Nishihara, T; Terada, T

    1995-01-01

    Bovine liver NADP(+)-dependent dihydrodiol dehydrogenase (DD3) is extremely sensitive to SH reagents such as N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) and 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid). NEM produced time- and concentration-dependent inactivation of DD3 in a pseudo-first-order reaction manner. This inactivation was prevented by NADP+, 3-acetylpyridine-adenine dinucleotide phosphate, 2',5'-ADP and 2'-AMP but not by substrates, NAD+, nicotinamide mononucleotide or 5'-ADP.DD3 was absorbed by an affinity column of thiopropyl-Sepharose 6B, but enzyme incubated with both NEM and NADP+ was not. Moreover, one [14C]NEM molecule was incorporated into a cysteine of DD3 in the presence, and two cysteines of DD3 in the absence, of NADP+. These results suggested that two cysteine residues were modified per enzyme molecule by NEM, one was protected by NADP+ and the other had no significant function for the enzyme activity. Two radiolabelled peptides (P1 and P2) produced by the digestion with lysyl endopeptidase of [14C]NEM-modified DD3 could be separated by reverse-phase HPLC. P1, which was radiolabelled by [14C]NEM only in the absence of NADP+, showed the following sequence; H2N-Tyr-Lys-Pro-Val-Xaa-Asn-Gln-Val-Glu- NEM.Cys-His-Pro-Tyr-Phe-Asn-Gln-Ser-Lys-COOH (Xaa indicates a possible cysteine residue). This sequence was very similar to that of rat liver 3 alpha-hydroxysteroid/dihydrodiol dehydrogenase (3 alpha-HSD/DD) (residues 184 to 201) and was also highly conserved in the aldo-keto reductase superfamily. The sequence of P2, which had radioactivity in both the absence and presence of NADP+, also contained an NEM-modified cysteine and was similar in sequence to the regions located in loop A of rat 3 alpha-HSD/DD. The present study suggests that P1, which may have a cysteine residue corresponding to Cys-193 of rat 3 alpha-HSD/DD, functions in the alteration of DD3 activity depending on the modulation of NADP(+)-binding ability through a thiol/disulphide exchange reaction similar to that of

  10. Structure of the periplasmic adaptor protein from a major facilitator superfamily (MFS) multidrug efflux pump

    PubMed Central

    Hinchliffe, Philip; Greene, Nicholas P.; Paterson, Neil G.; Crow, Allister; Hughes, Colin; Koronakis, Vassilis

    2014-01-01

    Periplasmic adaptor proteins are key components of bacterial tripartite efflux pumps. The 2.85 Å resolution structure of an MFS (major facilitator superfamily) pump adaptor, Aquifex aeolicus EmrA, shows linearly arranged α-helical coiled-coil, lipoyl, and β-barrel domains, but lacks the fourth membrane-proximal domain shown in other pumps to interact with the inner membrane transporter. The adaptor α-hairpin, which binds outer membrane TolC, is exceptionally long at 127 Å, and the β-barrel contains a conserved disordered loop. The structure extends the view of adaptors as flexible, modular components that mediate diverse pump assembly, and suggests that in MFS tripartite pumps a hexamer of adaptors could provide a periplasmic seal. PMID:24996185

  11. Phi Class of Glutathione S-transferase Gene Superfamily Widely Exists in Nonplant Taxonomic Groups

    PubMed Central

    Munyampundu, Jean-Pierre; Xu, You-Ping; Cai, Xin-Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) constitute a superfamily of enzymes involved in detoxification of noxious compounds and protection against oxidative damage. GST class Phi (GSTF), one of the important classes of plant GSTs, has long been considered as plant specific but was recently found in basidiomycete fungi. However, the range of nonplant taxonomic groups containing GSTFs remains unknown. In this study, the distribution and phylogenetic relationships of nonplant GSTFs were investigated. We identified GSTFs in ascomycete fungi, myxobacteria, and protists Naegleria gruberi and Aureococcus anophagefferens. GSTF occurrence in these bacteria and protists correlated with their genome sizes and habitats. While this link was missing across ascomycetes, the distribution and abundance of GSTFs among ascomycete genomes could be associated with their lifestyles to some extent. Sequence comparison, gene structure, and phylogenetic analyses indicated divergence among nonplant GSTFs, suggesting polyphyletic origins during evolution. Furthermore, in silico prediction of functional partners suggested functional diversification among nonplant GSTFs. PMID:26884677

  12. The eukaryotic protein kinase superfamily of the necrotrophic fungal plant pathogen, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum.

    PubMed

    Hegedus, Dwayne D; Gerbrandt, Kelsey; Coutu, Cathy

    2016-05-01

    Protein kinases have been implicated in the regulation of many processes that guide pathogen development throughout the course of infection. A survey of the Sclerotinia sclerotiorum genome for genes encoding proteins containing the highly conserved eukaryotic protein kinase (ePK) domain, the largest protein kinase superfamily, revealed 92 S. sclerotiorum ePKs. This review examines the composition of the S. sclerotiorum ePKs based on conserved motifs within the ePK domain family, and relates this to orthologues found in other filamentous fungi and yeasts. The ePKs are also discussed in terms of their proposed role(s) in aspects of host pathogenesis, including the coordination of mycelial growth/development and deployment of pathogenicity determinants in response to environmental stimuli, nutrients and stress. PMID:26395470

  13. Proton-coupled sugar transport in the prototypical major facilitator superfamily protein XylE

    PubMed Central

    Wisedchaisri, Goragot; Park, Min-Sun; Iadanza, Matthew G.; Zheng, Hongjin; Gonen, Tamir

    2014-01-01

    The major facilitator superfamily (MFS) is the largest collection of structurally related membrane proteins that transport a wide array of substrates. The proton-coupled sugar transporter XylE is the first member of the MFS that has been structurally characterized in multiple transporting conformations, including both the outward and inward-facing states. Here we report the crystal structure of XylE in a new inward-facing open conformation, allowing us to visualize the rocker-switch movement of the N-domain against the C-domain during the transport cycle. Using molecular dynamics simulation, and functional transport assays, we describe the movement of XylE that facilitates sugar translocation across a lipid membrane and identify the likely candidate proton-coupling residues as the conserved Asp27 and Arg133. This study addresses the structural basis for proton-coupled substrate transport and release mechanism for the sugar porter family of proteins. PMID:25088546

  14. The membrane attack complex, perforin and cholesterol-dependent cytolysin superfamily of pore-forming proteins.

    PubMed

    Lukoyanova, Natalya; Hoogenboom, Bart W; Saibil, Helen R

    2016-06-01

    The membrane attack complex and perforin proteins (MACPFs) and bacterial cholesterol-dependent cytolysins (CDCs) are two branches of a large and diverse superfamily of pore-forming proteins that function in immunity and pathogenesis. During pore formation, soluble monomers assemble into large transmembrane pores through conformational transitions that involve extrusion and refolding of two α-helical regions into transmembrane β-hairpins. These transitions entail a dramatic refolding of the protein structure, and the resulting assemblies create large holes in cellular membranes, but they do not use any external source of energy. Structures of the membrane-bound assemblies are required to mechanistically understand and modulate these processes. In this Commentary, we discuss recent advances in the understanding of assembly mechanisms and molecular details of the conformational changes that occur during MACPF and CDC pore formation. PMID:27179071

  15. Genomic structure of SAS, a member of the transmembrane 4 superfamily amplified in human sarcomas

    SciTech Connect

    Jankowski, S.A.; De Jong, P.; Meltzer, P.S.

    1995-01-20

    SAS is a recently identified member of the transmembrane 4 superfamily (TM4SF) that is frequently amplified in human sarcomas. To further its characterization and to confirm its classification, the genomic structure of the SAS gene was determined. The SAS gene covers approximately 3.2 kb of DNA. It contains six exons within its translated region, three of which are highly conserved in the TM4SF. 5{prime} to the translation start site are two putative transcription start sites, two CCAAT consensus sequences, and potential binding sites for both Sp1 and ATF transcription factors. Comparison of SAS organization to human ME491, CD9, and CD53 and murine CD53 and TAPA-1 confirms that SAS is a member of this family of genes and is consistent with the theory that these genes arose through duplication and divergent evolution. 44 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Identification of novel CAP superfamily protein members of Echinococcus granulosus protoscoleces.

    PubMed

    Silvarrey, María Cecilia; Echeverría, Soledad; Costábile, Alicia; Castillo, Estela; Paulino, Margot; Esteves, Adriana

    2016-06-01

    Echinoccocus granulosus is the causative agent of Cyst Echinococcosis, a zoonotic infection affecting humans and livestock representing a public health and an economic burden for several countries. Despite decades of investigation an effective vaccine still remains to be found. Parasitic cysteine-rich secretory proteins, antigen 5 and pathogenesis-related 1 proteins (CAPs) have been proposed as vaccine candidates against helmith's infection. In this work we have identified two novel proteins of this superfamily expressed at the protoescoleces larval stage named EgVAL1 and EgVAL2. The open reading frame sequences were deduced. The aminoacidic sequence was analyzed and confronted against already known vertebrate' and helminth's proteins sequences in order to infer putative functions. Immunolocalization studies were also performed. The obtained data supported by immunolocalization studies and homology models suggest that these proteins could be involved in protease activity inhibition. PMID:26899679

  17. TNF superfamily members play distinct roles in shaping the thymic stromal microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Bichele, Rudolf; Kisand, Kai; Peterson, Pärt; Laan, Martti

    2016-04-01

    The differentiation and proper function of thymic epithelial cells (TECs) depend on various tumor necrosis factor superfamily (TNFSF) signals that are needed to maintain the thymic stromal microenvironment. Nevertheless, the direct transcriptional effects of these signals on TECs remain unclear. To address this issue, we stimulated murine embryonic thymus tissue with selected TNFSF ligands and performed a gene expression profiling study. We show that Aire expression is a direct and specific effect of RANKL stimulation, whereas LTβ and TNFα are major inducers of chemokines in the thymic stroma and we propose differential NF-κB binding as one possible cause of these gene expression patterns. Our work provides further insight into the complex molecular pathways that shape the thymic microenvironment and maintain central tolerance. PMID:27011037

  18. Structure of the periplasmic adaptor protein from a major facilitator superfamily (MFS) multidrug efflux pump.

    PubMed

    Hinchliffe, Philip; Greene, Nicholas P; Paterson, Neil G; Crow, Allister; Hughes, Colin; Koronakis, Vassilis

    2014-08-25

    Periplasmic adaptor proteins are key components of bacterial tripartite efflux pumps. The 2.85 Å resolution structure of an MFS (major facilitator superfamily) pump adaptor, Aquifex aeolicus EmrA, shows linearly arranged α-helical coiled-coil, lipoyl, and β-barrel domains, but lacks the fourth membrane-proximal domain shown in other pumps to interact with the inner membrane transporter. The adaptor α-hairpin, which binds outer membrane TolC, is exceptionally long at 127 Å, and the β-barrel contains a conserved disordered loop. The structure extends the view of adaptors as flexible, modular components that mediate diverse pump assembly, and suggests that in MFS tripartite pumps a hexamer of adaptors could provide a periplasmic seal. PMID:24996185

  19. The multidrug transporters belonging to major facilitator superfamily in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    De Rossi, Edda; Arrigo, Patrizio; Bellinzoni, Marco; Silva, Pedro A. E.; Martín, Carlos; Aínsa, José A.; Guglierame, Paola; Riccardi, Giovanna

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Both intrinsic and acquired multidrug resistance play an important role in the insurgence of tuberculosis. Detailed knowledge of the molecular basis of drug recognition and transport by multidrug transport systems is required for the development of new antibiotics that are not extruded or of inhibitors that block the multidrug transporter and allow traditional antibiotics to be effective. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We have undertaken the inventory of the drug transporters subfamily, included in the major facilitator superfamily (MFS), encoded by the complete genome of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB). These proteins were identified on the basis of their characteristic stretches of amino acids and transmembrane segments (TMS) number. CONCLUSIONS: Genome analysis and searches of homology between the identified transporters and proteins characterized in other organisms revealed 16 open reading frames encoding putative drug efflux pumps belonging to MFS. In the case of two of them, we also have demonstrated that they function as drug efflux proteins. PMID:12520088

  20. Association of intestinal peptide transport with a protein related to the cadherin superfamily.

    PubMed

    Dantzig, A H; Hoskins, J A; Tabas, L B; Bright, S; Shepard, R L; Jenkins, I L; Duckworth, D C; Sportsman, J R; Mackensen, D; Rosteck, P R

    1994-04-15

    The first step in oral absorption of many medically important peptide-based drugs is mediated by an intestinal proton-dependent peptide transporter. This transporter facilitates the oral absorption of beta-lactam antibiotics and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors from the intestine into enterocytes lining the luminal wall. A monoclonal antibody that blocked uptake of cephalexin was used to identify and clone a gene that encodes an approximately 92-kilodalton membrane protein that was associated with the acquisition of peptide transport activity by transport-deficient cells. The amino acid sequence deduced from the complementary DNA sequence of the cloned gene indicated that this transport-associated protein shares several conserved structural elements with the cadherin superfamily of calcium-dependent, cell-cell adhesion proteins. PMID:8153632

  1. Tumour Necrosis Factor Superfamily Members in the Pathogenesis of Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ślebioda, Tomasz J.; Kmieć, Zbigniew

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a group of inflammatory conditions of the gastrointestinal tract of unclear aetiology of which two major forms are Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). CD and UC are immunologically distinct, although they both result from hyperactivation of proinflammatory pathways in intestines and disruption of intestinal epithelial barrier. Members of the tumour necrosis factor superfamily (TNFSF) are molecules of broad spectrum of activity, including direct disruption of intestinal epithelial barrier integrity and costimulation of proinflammatory functions of lymphocytes. Tumour necrosis factor (TNF) has a well-established pathological role in IBD which also serves as a target in IBD treatment. In this review we discuss the role of TNF and other TNFSF members, notably, TL1A, FasL, LIGHT, TRAIL, and TWEAK, in the pathogenesis of IBD. PMID:25045210

  2. COUP-TF gene: a structure unique for the steroid/thyroid receptor superfamily.

    PubMed Central

    Ritchie, H H; Wang, L H; Tsai, S; O'Malley, B W; Tsai, M J

    1990-01-01

    Two different genomic genes for the COUP-transcription factor, COUP-TF I and COUP-TF II, have been isolated from a human cosmid genomic library using a [32P]-labeled cDNA probe. Data obtained from Southern blot analysis of these cosmid clones indicated that two closely related genes exist in the human genome and have a similar genomic organization. The genes are similar in the hormone and DNA binding domains but diverge from one another in the N-terminal region. Using DNA sequencing and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) techniques we have determined that the structure of COUP-TF I consists only of three exons and two introns. Surprisingly, both zinc fingers (i.e., F1 and F2) are located in the first exon. Therefore, COUP-TF I is unique among the members of the steroid/thyroid hormone receptor superfamily which have been described to date. Images PMID:2263450

  3. Kinesin superfamily protein 2A (KIF2A) functions in suppression of collateral branch extension.

    PubMed

    Homma, Noriko; Takei, Yosuke; Tanaka, Yosuke; Nakata, Takao; Terada, Sumio; Kikkawa, Masahide; Noda, Yasuko; Hirokawa, Nobutaka

    2003-07-25

    Through interactions with microtubules, the kinesin superfamily of proteins (KIFs) could have multiple roles in neuronal function and development. During neuronal development, postmitotic neurons develop primary axons extending toward targets, while other collateral branches remain short. Although the process of collateral branching is important for correct wiring of the brain, the mechanisms involved are not well understood. In this study, we analyzed kif2a(-/-) mice, whose brains showed multiple phenotypes, including aberrant axonal branching due to overextension of collateral branches. In kif2a(-/-) growth cones, microtubule-depolymerizing activity decreased. Moreover, many individual microtubules showed abnormal behavior at the kif2a(-/-) cell edge. Based on these results, we propose that KIF2A regulates microtubule dynamics at the growth cone edge by depolymerizing microtubules and that it plays an important role in the suppression of collateral branch extension. PMID:12887924

  4. Kinesin superfamily proteins and the regulation of microtubule dynamics in morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Niwa, Shinsuke

    2015-01-01

    Kinesin superfamily proteins (KIFs) are microtubule-dependent molecular motors that serve as sources of force for intracellular transport and cell division. Recent studies have revealed new roles of KIFs as microtubule stabilizers and depolymerizers, and these activities are fundamental to cellular morphogenesis and mammalian development. KIF2A and KIF19A have microtubule-depolymerizing activities and regulate the neuronal morphology and cilia length, respectively. KIF21A and KIF26A work as microtubule stabilizers that regulate axonal morphology. Morphological defects that are similar to human diseases are observed in mice in which these KIF genes have been deleted. Actually, KIF2A and KIF21A have been identified as causes of human neuronal diseases. In this review, the functions of these atypical KIFs that regulate microtubule dynamics are discussed. Moreover, some interesting unanswered questions and hypothetical answers to them are discussed. PMID:25347970

  5. Structure of Bacterial LigD -phosphoesterase Unveils a DNA Repair Superfamily

    SciTech Connect

    Nair, P.; Smith, P; Shuman, S

    2010-01-01

    The DNA ligase D (LigD) 3{prime}-phosphoesterase (PE) module is a conserved component of the bacterial nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) apparatus that performs 3{prime} end-healing reactions at DNA double-strand breaks. Here we report the 1.9 {angstrom} crystal structure of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PE, which reveals that PE exemplifies a unique class of DNA repair enzyme. PE has a distinctive fold in which an eight stranded {beta} barrel with a hydrophobic interior supports a crescent-shaped hydrophilic active site on its outer surface. Six essential side chains coordinate manganese and a sulfate mimetic of the scissile phosphate. The PE active site and mechanism are unique vis a vis other end-healing enzymes. We find PE homologs in archaeal and eukaryal proteomes, signifying that PEs comprise a DNA repair superfamily.

  6. Targeting of the Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor Superfamily for Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The tumor necrosis factor (TNF) ligand and cognate TNF receptor superfamilies constitute an important regulatory axis that is pivotal for immune homeostasis and correct execution of immune responses. TNF ligands and receptors are involved in diverse biological processes ranging from the selective induction of cell death in potentially dangerous and superfluous cells to providing costimulatory signals that help mount an effective immune response. This diverse and important regulatory role in immunity has sparked great interest in the development of TNFL/TNFR-targeted cancer immunotherapeutics. In this review, I will discuss the biology of the most prominent proapoptotic and co-stimulatory TNF ligands and review their current status in cancer immunotherapy. PMID:23840967

  7. Structure-function of human 3 alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases: genes and proteins.

    PubMed

    Penning, T M; Jin, Y; Steckelbroeck, S; Lanisnik Rizner, T; Lewis, M

    2004-02-27

    Four soluble human 3 alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (HSD) isoforms exist which are aldo-keto reductase (AKR) superfamily members. They share 86% sequence identity and correspond to: AKR1C1 (20 alpha(3 alpha)-HSD); AKR1C2 (type 3 3 alpha-HSD and bile-acid binding protein); AKR1C3 (type 2 3 alpha-HSD and type 5 17 beta-HSD); and AKR1C4 (type 1 3 alpha-HSD). Each of the homogeneous recombinant enzymes are plastic and display 3-, 17- and 20-ketosteroid reductase and 3 alpha- 17 beta- and 20 alpha-hydroxysteroid oxidase activities with different k(cat)/K(m) ratios in vitro. The crystal structure of the AKR1C2.NADP(+).ursodeoxycholate complex provides an explanation for this functional plasticity. Ursodeoxycholate is bound backwards (D-ring in the A-ring position) and upside down (beta-face of steroid inverted) relative to the position of 3-ketosteroids in the related rat liver 3 alpha-HSD (AKR1C9) structure. Transient transfection indicates that in COS-1 cells, AKR1C enzymes function as ketosteroid reductases due to potent inhibition of their oxidase activity by NADPH. By acting as ketosteroid reductases they may regulate the occupancy of the androgen, estrogen and progesterone receptors. RT-PCR showed that AKRs are discretely localized. AKR1C4 is virtually liver specific, while AKR1C2 and AKR1C3 are dominantly expressed in prostate and mammary gland. AKR1C genes are highly conserved in structure and may be transcriptionally regulated by steroid hormones and stress. PMID:15026176

  8. Integrated analysis of cytochrome P450 gene superfamily in the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The functional and evolutionary diversification of insect cytochrome P450s (CYPs) shaped the success of insects. CYPs constitute one of the largest and oldest gene superfamilies that are found in virtually all aerobic organisms. Because of the availability of whole genome sequence and well functioning RNA interference (RNAi), the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum serves as an ideal insect model for conducting functional genomics studies. Although several T. castaneum CYPs had been functionally investigated in our previous studies, the roles of the majority of CYPs remain largely unknown. Here, we comprehensively analyzed the phylogenetic relationship of all T. castaneum CYPs with genes in other insect species, investigated the CYP6BQ gene cluster organization, function and evolution, as well as examined the mitochondrial CYPs gene expression patterns and intron-exon organization. Results A total 143 CYPs were identified and classified into 26 families and 59 subfamilies. The phylogenetic trees of CYPs among insects across taxa provided evolutionary insight for the genetic distance and function. The percentage of singleton (33.3%) in T. castaneum CYPs is much less than those in Drosophila melanogaster (52.5%) and Bombyx mori (51.2%). Most members in the largest CYP6BQ gene cluster may make contribution to deltamethrin resistance in QTC279 strain. T. castaneum genome encodes nine mitochondrial CYPs, among them CYP12H1 is only expressed in the final instar larval stage. The intron-exon organizations of these mitochondrial CYPs are highly diverse. Conclusion Our studies provide a platform to understand the evolution and functions of T. castaneum CYP gene superfamily which will help reveal the strategies employed by insects to cope with their environment. PMID:23497158

  9. Homology between O-linked GlcNAc transferases and proteins of the glycogen phosphorylase superfamily.

    PubMed

    Wrabl, J O; Grishin, N V

    2001-11-30

    The O-linked GlcNAc transferases (OGTs) are a recently characterized group of largely eukaryotic enzymes that add a single beta-N-acetylglucosamine moiety to specific serine or threonine hydroxyls. In humans, this process may be part of a sugar regulation mechanism or cellular signaling pathway that is involved in many important diseases, such as diabetes, cancer, and neurodegeneration. However, no structural information about the human OGT exists, except for the identification of tetratricopeptide repeats (TPR) at the N terminus. The locations of substrate binding sites are unknown and the structural basis for this enzyme's function is not clear. Here, remote homology is reported between the OGTs and a large group of diverse sugar processing enzymes, including proteins with known structure such as glycogen phosphorylase, UDP-GlcNAc 2-epimerase, and the glycosyl transferase MurG. This relationship, in conjunction with amino acid similarity spanning the entire length of the sequence, implies that the fold of the human OGT consists of two Rossmann-like domains C-terminal to the TPR region. A conserved motif in the second Rossmann domain points to the UDP-GlcNAc donor binding site. This conclusion is supported by a combination of statistically significant PSI-BLAST hits, consensus secondary structure predictions, and a fold recognition hit to MurG. Additionally, iterative PSI-BLAST database searches reveal that proteins homologous to the OGTs form a large and diverse superfamily that is termed GPGTF (glycogen phosphorylase/glycosyl transferase). Up to one-third of the 51 functional families in the CAZY database, a glycosyl transferase classification scheme based on catalytic residue and sequence homology considerations, can be unified through this common predicted fold. GPGTF homologs constitute a substantial fraction of known proteins: 0.4% of all non-redundant sequences and about 1% of proteins in the Escherichia coli genome are found to belong to the GPGTF

  10. Prediction of function for the polyprenyl transferase subgroup in the isoprenoid synthase superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Wallrapp, Frank H.; Pan, Jian-Jung; Ramamoorthy, Gurusankar; Almonacid, Daniel E.; Hillerich, Brandan S.; Seidel, Ronald; Patskovsky, Yury; Babbitt, Patricia C.; Almo, Steven C.; Jacobson, Matthew P.; Poulter, C. Dale

    2013-01-01

    The number of available protein sequences has increased exponentially with the advent of high-throughput genomic sequencing, creating a significant challenge for functional annotation. Here, we describe a large-scale study on assigning function to unknown members of the trans-polyprenyl transferase (E-PTS) subgroup in the isoprenoid synthase superfamily, which provides substrates for the biosynthesis of the more than 55,000 isoprenoid metabolites. Although the mechanism for determining the product chain length for these enzymes is known, there is no simple relationship between function and primary sequence, so that assigning function is challenging. We addressed this challenge through large-scale bioinformatics analysis of >5,000 putative polyprenyl transferases; experimental characterization of the chain-length specificity of 79 diverse members of this group; determination of 27 structures of 19 of these enzymes, including seven cocrystallized with substrate analogs or products; and the development and successful application of a computational approach to predict function that leverages available structural data through homology modeling and docking of possible products into the active site. The crystallographic structures and computational structural models of the enzyme–ligand complexes elucidate the structural basis of specificity. As a result of this study, the percentage of E-PTS sequences similar to functionally annotated ones (BLAST e-value ≤ 1e−70) increased from 40.6 to 68.8%, and the percentage of sequences similar to available crystal structures increased from 28.9 to 47.4%. The high accuracy of our blind prediction of newly characterized enzymes indicates the potential to predict function to the complete polyprenyl transferase subgroup of the isoprenoid synthase superfamily computationally. PMID:23493556

  11. The structure of hookworm platelet inhibitor (HPI), a CAP superfamily member from Ancylostoma caninum

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Dongying; Francischetti, Ivo M. B.; Ribeiro, Jose M. C.; Andersen, John F.

    2015-01-01

    Secreted protein components of hookworm species include a number of representatives of the cysteine-rich/antigen 5/pathogenesis-related 1 (CAP) protein family known as Ancylostoma-secreted proteins (ASPs). Some of these have been considered as candidate antigens for the development of vaccines against hookworms. The functions of most CAP superfamily members are poorly understood, but one form, the hookworm platelet inhibitor (HPI), has been isolated as a putative antagonist of the platelet integrins αIIbβ3 and α2β1. Here, the crystal structure of HPI is described and its structural features are examined in relation to its possible function. The HPI structure is similar to those of other ASPs and shows incomplete conservation of the sequence motifs CAP1 and CAP2 that are considered to be diagnostic of CAP superfamily members. The asymmetric unit of the HPI crystal contains a dimer with an extensive interaction interface, but chromatographic measurements indicate that it is primarily monomeric in solution. In the dimeric structure, the putative active-site cleft areas from both monomers are united into a single negatively charged depression. A potential Lys-Gly-Asp disintegrin-like motif was identified in the sequence of HPI, but is not positioned at the apex of a tight turn, making it unlikely that it interacts with the integrin. Recombinant HPI produced in Escherichia coli was found not to inhibit the adhesion of human platelets to collagen or fibrinogen, despite having a native structure as shown by X-ray diffraction. This result corroborates previous analyses of recombinant HPI and suggests that it might require post-translational modification or have a different biological function. PMID:26057788

  12. The structure of hookworm platelet inhibitor (HPI), a CAP superfamily member from Ancylostoma caninum.

    PubMed

    Ma, Dongying; Francischetti, Ivo M B; Ribeiro, Jose M C; Andersen, John F

    2015-06-01

    Secreted protein components of hookworm species include a number of representatives of the cysteine-rich/antigen 5/pathogenesis-related 1 (CAP) protein family known as Ancylostoma-secreted proteins (ASPs). Some of these have been considered as candidate antigens for the development of vaccines against hookworms. The functions of most CAP superfamily members are poorly understood, but one form, the hookworm platelet inhibitor (HPI), has been isolated as a putative antagonist of the platelet integrins αIIbβ3 and α2β1. Here, the crystal structure of HPI is described and its structural features are examined in relation to its possible function. The HPI structure is similar to those of other ASPs and shows incomplete conservation of the sequence motifs CAP1 and CAP2 that are considered to be diagnostic of CAP superfamily members. The asymmetric unit of the HPI crystal contains a dimer with an extensive interaction interface, but chromatographic measurements indicate that it is primarily monomeric in solution. In the dimeric structure, the putative active-site cleft areas from both monomers are united into a single negatively charged depression. A potential Lys-Gly-Asp disintegrin-like motif was identified in the sequence of HPI, but is not positioned at the apex of a tight turn, making it unlikely that it interacts with the integrin. Recombinant HPI produced in Escherichia coli was found not to inhibit the adhesion of human platelets to collagen or fibrinogen, despite having a native structure as shown by X-ray diffraction. This result corroborates previous analyses of recombinant HPI and suggests that it might require post-translational modification or have a different biological function. PMID:26057788

  13. The barber's pole worm CAP protein superfamily--A basis for fundamental discovery and biotechnology advances.

    PubMed

    Mohandas, Namitha; Young, Neil D; Jabbar, Abdul; Korhonen, Pasi K; Koehler, Anson V; Amani, Parisa; Hall, Ross S; Sternberg, Paul W; Jex, Aaron R; Hofmann, Andreas; Gasser, Robin B

    2015-12-01

    Parasitic worm proteins that belong to the cysteine-rich secretory proteins, antigen 5 and pathogenesis-related 1 (CAP) superfamily are proposed to play key roles in the infection process and the modulation of immune responses in host animals. However, there is limited information on these proteins for most socio-economically important worms. Here, we review the CAP protein superfamily of Haemonchus contortus (barber's pole worm), a highly significant parasitic roundworm (order Strongylida) of small ruminants. To do this, we mined genome and transcriptomic datasets, predicted and curated full-length amino acid sequences (n=45), undertook systematic phylogenetic analyses of these data and investigated transcription throughout the life cycle of H. contortus. We inferred functions for selected Caenorhabditis elegans orthologs (including vap-1, vap-2, scl-5 and lon-1) based on genetic networking and by integrating data and published information, and were able to infer that a subset of orthologs and their interaction partners play pivotal roles in growth and development via the insulin-like and/or the TGF-beta signalling pathways. The identification of the important and conserved growth regulator LON-1 led us to appraise the three-dimensional structure of this CAP protein by comparative modelling. This model revealed the presence of different topological moieties on the canonical fold of the CAP domain, which coincide with an overall charge separation as indicated by the electrostatic surface potential map. These observations suggest the existence of separate sites for effector binding and receptor interactions, and thus support the proposal that these worm molecules act in similar ways as venoms act as ligands for chemokine receptors or G protein-coupled receptor effectors. In conclusion, this review should guide future molecular studies of these molecules, and could support the development of novel interventions against haemonchosis. PMID:26239368

  14. Localization of kinesin superfamily proteins to the connecting cilium of fish photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Beech, P L; Pagh-Roehl, K; Noda, Y; Hirokawa, N; Burnside, B; Rosenbaum, J L

    1996-04-01

    Kinesin superfamily proteins (KIFs) are probable motors in vesicular and non-vesicular transport along microtubular tracks. Since a variety of KIFs have been recently identified in the motile flagella of Chlamydomonas, we sought to ascertain whether KIFs are also associated with the connecting cilia of vertebrate rod photoreceptors. As the only structural link between the rod inner segment and the photosensitive rod outer segment, the connecting cilium is thought to be the channel through which all material passes into and out of the outer segment from the rod cell body. We have performed immunological tests on isolated sunfish rod inner-outer segments (RIS-ROS) using two antibodies that recognize the conserved motor domain of numerous KIFs (anti-LAGSE, a peptide antibody, and anti-Klp1 head, generated against the N terminus of Chlamydomonas Klp1) as well as an antibody specific to a neuronal KIF, KIF3A. On immunoblots of RIS-ROS, LAGSE antibody detected a prominent band at approximately 117 kDa, which is likely to be kinesin heavy chain, and Klp1 head antibody detected a single band at approximately 170 kDa; KIF3A antibody detected a polypeptide at approximately 85 kDa which co-migrated with mammalian KIF3A and displayed ATP-dependent release from rod cytoskeletons. Immunofluorescence localizations with anti-LAGSE and anti-Klp1 head antibodies detected epitopes in the axoneme and ellipsoid, and immunoelectron microscopy with the LAGSE antibody showed that the connecting cilium region was particularly antigenic. Immunofluorescence with anti-KIF3A showed prominent labelling of the connecting cilium and the area surrounding its basal body; the outer segment axoneme and parts of the inner segment coincident with microtubules were also labelled. We propose that these putative kinesin superfamily proteins may be involved in the translocation of material between the rod inner and outer segments. PMID:8718680

  15. An orphan viral TNF receptor superfamily member identified in lymphocystis disease virus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Lymphocystis disease virus (LCDV) is a large icosahedral dsDNA-containing virus of the Lymphocystivirus genus within the Iridoviridae family that can cause disease in more than 140 marine and freshwater fish species. While several isolates have been charcaterized and classified into distinct genotypes the complete genomic sequence is currently only available from two species, the LCDV-1, isolated from flounder (Platichtys flesus) in Europe and the LCDV-C, isolated from Japanese cultured flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) in China. Analysis of the genome of LCDV-C showed it to encode a protein named LDVICp016 with similarities to the Tumour necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) superfamily with immunomodulatory potential. Findings We have expressed and purified the recombinant protein LDVICp016 and screened for potential interaction partners using surface plasmon resonance. Commercially available human and mouse members of the TNF superfamily (TNFSF), along with a representative set of fish-derived TNFSF were tested. We have found the LDVICp016 protein to be secreted and we have identified a second viral TNFR encoded by ORF 095 of the same virus. None of the 42 tested proteins were found to interact with LDVICp016. Conclusions We show that LDVICp016 is a secreted protein belonging to the TNF receptor family that may be part of a larger gene family in Lymphocystiviruses. While the ligand of this protein remains unknown, possibly due to the species specific nature of this interaction, further investigations into the potential role of this protein in the blockade of immune responses in its fish host are required. PMID:23758704

  16. Experiment Pamir-2. Fianit: A giant super-family with halo (Epsilon sub 0 at approximately 10(17) eV)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zatsepin, G. T.

    1985-01-01

    A superfamily with halo of extremely high energy named Fianit was recorded in X-ray emulsion chamber (XEC) at the Pamirs (atmospheric depth 600 g/sq.cm.). Detailed description of the superfamily and results of its analysis are presented.

  17. Mechanistic and Bioinformatic Investigation of a Conserved Active Site Helix in α-Isopropylmalate Synthase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, a Member of the DRE-TIM Metallolyase Superfamily

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The characterization of functionally diverse enzyme superfamilies provides the opportunity to identify evolutionarily conserved catalytic strategies, as well as amino acid substitutions responsible for the evolution of new functions or specificities. Isopropylmalate synthase (IPMS) belongs to the DRE-TIM metallolyase superfamily. Members of this superfamily share common active site elements, including a conserved active site helix and an HXH divalent metal binding motif, associated with stabilization of a common enolate anion intermediate. These common elements are overlaid by variations in active site architecture resulting in the evolution of a diverse set of reactions that include condensation, lyase/aldolase, and carboxyl transfer activities. Here, using IPMS, an integrated biochemical and bioinformatics approach has been utilized to investigate the catalytic role of residues on an active site helix that is conserved across the superfamily. The construction of a sequence similarity network for the DRE-TIM metallolyase superfamily allows for the biochemical results obtained with IPMS variants to be compared across superfamily members and within other condensation-catalyzing enzymes related to IPMS. A comparison of our results with previous biochemical data indicates an active site arginine residue (R80 in IPMS) is strictly required for activity across the superfamily, suggesting that it plays a key role in catalysis, most likely through enolate stabilization. In contrast, differential results obtained from substitution of the C-terminal residue of the helix (Q84 in IPMS) suggest that this residue plays a role in reaction specificity within the superfamily. PMID:24720347

  18. Purification of NADPH-dependent dehydroascorbate reductase from rat liver and its identification with 3 alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase.

    PubMed Central

    Del Bello, B; Maellaro, E; Sugherini, L; Santucci, A; Comporti, M; Casini, A F

    1994-01-01

    Rat liver cytosol has been found to reduce dehydroascorbic acid (DHAA) to ascorbic acid in the presence of NADPH. The enzyme responsible for such activity has been purified by ammonium sulphate fractionation, DEAE-Sepharose, Sephadex G-100 SF and Reactive Red column chromatography, with an overall recovery of 27%. SDS/PAGE of the purified enzyme showed one single protein band with an M(r) of 37,500. A similar value (36,800) was found by gel filtration on a Sephadex G-100 SF column. The results indicate that the enzyme is a homogeneous monomer. The Km for DHAA was 4.6 mM and the Vmax. was 1.55 units/mg of protein; for NADPH Km and Vmax. were 4.3 microM and 1.10 units/mg of protein respectively. The optimum pH was around 6.2. Several typical substrates and inhibitors of the aldo-keto reductase superfamily have been tested. The strong inhibition of DHAA reductase effected by steroidal and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, together with the ability to reduce 5 alpha-androstane-3,17-dione strongly, suggest the possibility that DHAA reductase corresponds to 3 alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase. Microsequence analysis performed on the electro-transferred enzyme band shows that the N-terminus is blocked. Internal primary structure data were obtained from CNBr-derived fragments and definitely proved the identity of NADPH-dependent DHAA reductase with 3 alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase. Images Figure 2 Figure 4 PMID:7998972

  19. Cloning, crystallization and preliminary X-ray study of XC1258, a CN-hydrolase superfamily protein from Xanthomonas campestris

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Ying-Der; Chin, Ko-Hsin; Shr, Hui-Lin; Gao, Fei Philip; Lyu, Ping-Chiang; Wang, Andrew H.-J.; Chou, Shan-Ho

    2006-10-01

    A CN-hydrolase superfamily protein from the plant pathogen X. campestris has been overexpressed in E. coli, purified and crystallized. CN-hydrolase superfamily proteins are involved in a wide variety of non-peptide carbon–nitrogen hydrolysis reactions, producing some important natural products such as auxin, biotin, precursors of antibiotics etc. These reactions all involve attack on a cyano or carbonyl carbon by a conserved novel catalytic triad Glu-Lys-Cys through a thiol acylenzyme intermediate. However, classification into the CN-hydrolase superfamily based on sequence similarity alone is not straightforward and further structural data are necessary to improve this categorization. Here, the cloning, expression, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of XC1258, a CN-hydrolase superfamily protein from the plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris (Xcc), are reported. The SeMet-substituted XC1258 crystals diffracted to a resolution of 1.73 Å. They are orthorhombic and belong to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = 143.8, b = 154.63, c = 51.3 Å, respectively.

  20. The Glutathione-S-Transferase, Cytochrome P450 and Carboxyl/Cholinesterase Gene Superfamilies in Predatory Mite Metaseiulus occidentalis

    PubMed Central

    Hoy, Marjorie A.

    2016-01-01

    Pesticide-resistant populations of the predatory mite Metaseiulus (= Typhlodromus or Galendromus) occidentalis (Arthropoda: Chelicerata: Acari: Phytoseiidae) have been used in the biological control of pest mites such as phytophagous Tetranychus urticae. However, the pesticide resistance mechanisms in M. occidentalis remain largely unknown. In other arthropods, members of the glutathione-S-transferase (GST), cytochrome P450 (CYP) and carboxyl/cholinesterase (CCE) gene superfamilies are involved in the diverse biological pathways such as the metabolism of xenobiotics (e.g. pesticides) in addition to hormonal and chemosensory processes. In the current study, we report the identification and initial characterization of 123 genes in the GST, CYP and CCE superfamilies in the recently sequenced M. occidentalis genome. The gene count represents a reduction of 35% compared to T. urticae. The distribution of genes in the GST and CCE superfamilies in M. occidentalis differs significantly from those of insects and resembles that of T. urticae. Specifically, we report the presence of the Mu class GSTs, and the J’ and J” clade CCEs that, within the Arthropoda, appear unique to Acari. Interestingly, the majority of CCEs in the J’ and J” clades contain a catalytic triad, suggesting that they are catalytically active. They likely represent two Acari-specific CCE clades that may participate in detoxification of xenobiotics. The current study of genes in these superfamilies provides preliminary insights into the potential molecular components that may be involved in pesticide metabolism as well as hormonal/chemosensory processes in the agriculturally important M. occidentalis. PMID:27467523

  1. DIVERSITY OF DcMaster-LIKE ELEMENTS OF THE PIF/Harbinger SUPERFAMILY IN THE CARROT GENOME

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transposable elements constitute a significant fraction of plant genomes. Both autonomous and non-autonomous elements of the DcMaster family, residing in the carrot genome, were described previously. DcMaster elements were classified as members of the PIF/Harbinger superfamily. In the present paper ...

  2. Structural and functional characterization of α-isopropylmalate synthase and citramalate synthase, members of the LeuA dimer superfamily.

    PubMed

    Frantom, Patrick A

    2012-03-15

    The manipulation of modular regulatory domains from allosteric enzymes represents a possible mechanism to engineer allostery into non-allosteric systems. Currently, there is insufficient understanding of the structure/function relationships in modular regulatory domains to rationally implement this methodology. The LeuA dimer regulatory domain represents a well-conserved, novel fold responsible for the regulation of two enzymes involved in branched chain amino acid biosynthesis, α-isopropylmalate synthase and citramalate synthase. The LeuA dimer regulatory domain is responsible for the feedback inhibition of these enzymes by their respective downstream products. Both enzymes display multidomain architecture with a conserved N-terminal TIM barrel catalytic domain and a C-terminal (βββα)2 LeuA dimer domain joined by a flexible linker region. Due to the similarity of three-dimensional structure and catalytic mechanism combined with low sequence similarity, we propose these enzymes can be classified as members of the LeuA dimer superfamily. Despite their similarity, members of the LeuA dimer superfamily display diversity in their allosteric mechanisms. In this review, structural aspects of the LeuA dimer superfamily are discussed followed by three examples highlighting the diversity of allosteric mechanisms in the LeuA dimer superfamily. PMID:22033339

  3. Biological function of a DUF95 superfamily protein involved in the biosynthesis of a circular bacteriocin, leucocyclicin Q.

    PubMed

    Mu, Fuqin; Masuda, Yoshimitsu; Zendo, Takeshi; Ono, Hiroshi; Kitagawa, Hiroshi; Ito, Haruo; Nakayama, Jiro; Sonomoto, Kenji

    2014-02-01

    Biological functions of a DUF95 superfamily protein in the biosynthesis gene cluster of a novel circular bacteriocin, leucocyclicin Q (LcyQ), were characterized in this paper. Sequence analysis and database search of the regions flanking the LcyQ structural gene lcyQ revealed four open reading frames (lcyR, lcyB, lcyC, and lcyD) related to bacteriocin biosynthesis. LcyD shares some similarity to the DUF95 superfamily proteins, often found in the biosynthetic gene clusters of circular bacteriocins. Mass spectrometry analysis showed accumulation of active mature LcyQ inside lcyD knockout cells. Heterologous expression of lcyD demonstrated that it confers robust immunity against LcyQ. Peptide release/binding assay revealed that the immunity could be attributed to the secretion of LcyQ to the cell exterior. Thus, the DUF95 superfamily protein has a dual function in the biosynthesis of LcyQ, as an immunity-associated transporter and as a secretion-aiding agent. Accumulation of mature LcyQ inside the cell in lcyD knockout strains, further implied that cyclization occurs within the cell. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on LcyQ cyclization inside the cell and the dual role of a DUF95 superfamily protein in circular bacteriocin biosynthesis. PMID:23906710

  4. The Glutathione-S-Transferase, Cytochrome P450 and Carboxyl/Cholinesterase Gene Superfamilies in Predatory Mite Metaseiulus occidentalis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ke; Hoy, Marjorie A

    2016-01-01

    Pesticide-resistant populations of the predatory mite Metaseiulus (= Typhlodromus or Galendromus) occidentalis (Arthropoda: Chelicerata: Acari: Phytoseiidae) have been used in the biological control of pest mites such as phytophagous Tetranychus urticae. However, the pesticide resistance mechanisms in M. occidentalis remain largely unknown. In other arthropods, members of the glutathione-S-transferase (GST), cytochrome P450 (CYP) and carboxyl/cholinesterase (CCE) gene superfamilies are involved in the diverse biological pathways such as the metabolism of xenobiotics (e.g. pesticides) in addition to hormonal and chemosensory processes. In the current study, we report the identification and initial characterization of 123 genes in the GST, CYP and CCE superfamilies in the recently sequenced M. occidentalis genome. The gene count represents a reduction of 35% compared to T. urticae. The distribution of genes in the GST and CCE superfamilies in M. occidentalis differs significantly from those of insects and resembles that of T. urticae. Specifically, we report the presence of the Mu class GSTs, and the J' and J" clade CCEs that, within the Arthropoda, appear unique to Acari. Interestingly, the majority of CCEs in the J' and J" clades contain a catalytic triad, suggesting that they are catalytically active. They likely represent two Acari-specific CCE clades that may participate in detoxification of xenobiotics. The current study of genes in these superfamilies provides preliminary insights into the potential molecular components that may be involved in pesticide metabolism as well as hormonal/chemosensory processes in the agriculturally important M. occidentalis. PMID:27467523

  5. ALDEHYDE DEHYDROGENASES EXPRESSION DURING POSTNATAL DEVELOPMENT: LIVER VS. LUNG

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aldehydes are highly reactive molecules present in the environment, and can be produced during biotransformation of xenobiotics. Although the lung can be a major target for aldehyde toxicity, development of aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs), which detoxify aldehydes, in lung has be...

  6. Genetics Home Reference: 3-beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... not by hormone test. Clin Endocrinol (Oxf). 2003 Mar;58(3):323-31. Citation on PubMed Pang S, ... dehydrogenase deficiency. Endocrinol Metab Clin North Am. 2001 Mar;30(1):81-99, vi-vii. Review. Citation ...

  7. Quinoprotein alcohol dehydrogenase from ethanol-grown Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Groen, B; Frank, J; Duine, J A

    1984-01-01

    Cell-free extracts of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains, grown on ethanol, showed dye-linked alcohol dehydrogenase activities. The enzyme responsible for this activity was purified to homogeneity. It appeared to contain two molecules of pyrroloquinoline quinone per enzyme molecule. In many respects, it resembled other quinoprotein alcohol dehydrogenases (EC 1.1.99.8), having a substrate specificity intermediate between that of methanol dehydrogenases and ethanol dehydrogenases in this group. On the other hand, it also showed dissimilarities: the enzyme was found to be a monomer (Mr 101 000), to need only one molecule of the suicide substrate cyclopropanol to become fully inactivated, and to have a different aromatic amino acid composition. PMID:6439190

  8. 21 CFR 862.1380 - Hydroxybutyric dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... dehydrogenase (HBD) in plasma or serum. HBD measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of myocardial infarction, renal damage (such as rejection of transplants), certain hematological diseases (such as...

  9. 21 CFR 862.1380 - Hydroxybutyric dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... dehydrogenase (HBD) in plasma or serum. HBD measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of myocardial infarction, renal damage (such as rejection of transplants), certain hematological diseases (such as...

  10. 21 CFR 862.1380 - Hydroxybutyric dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... dehydrogenase (HBD) in plasma or serum. HBD measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of myocardial infarction, renal damage (such as rejection of transplants), certain hematological diseases (such as...

  11. 21 CFR 862.1380 - Hydroxybutyric dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... dehydrogenase (HBD) in plasma or serum. HBD measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of myocardial infarction, renal damage (such as rejection of transplants), certain hematological diseases (such as...

  12. N-acylethanolamines as novel alcohol dehydrogenase 3 substrates.

    PubMed

    Ivkovic, Milena; Dempsey, Daniel R; Handa, Sumit; Hilton, Joshua H; Lowe, Edward W; Merkler, David J

    2011-02-15

    N-acylethanolamines (NAEs) are members of the fatty acid amide family. The NAEs have been proposed to serve as metabolic precursors to N-acylglycines (NAGs). The sequential oxidation of the NAEs by an alcohol dehydrogenase and an aldehyde dehydrogenase would yield the N-acylglycinals and/or the NAGs. Alcohol dehydrogenase 3 (ADH3) is one enzyme that might catalyze this reaction. To define a potential role for ADH3 in NAE catabolism, we synthesized a set of NAEs and evaluated these as ADH3 substrates. NAEs were oxidized by ADH3, yielding the N-acylglycinals as the product. The (V/K)(app) values for the NAEs included here were low relative to cinnamyl alcohol. Our data show that the NAEs can serve as alcohol dehydrogenase substrates. PMID:21144815

  13. Aldehyde dehydrogenase inhibitors from the mushroom Clitocybe clavipes.

    PubMed

    Kawagishi, Hirokazu; Miyazawa, Toshiyuki; Kume, Hiroko; Arimoto, Yasushi; Inakuma, Takahiro

    2002-11-01

    Five fatty acid derivatives including three novel compounds were isolated from the mushroom Clitocybe clavipe. Their structures were elucidated by spectral analyses. These compounds inhibited aldehyde dehydrogenase in vitro. PMID:12444711

  14. Purification and properties of carbon monoxide dehydrogenase from Methanococcus vannielii.

    PubMed Central

    DeMoll, E; Grahame, D A; Harnly, J M; Tsai, L; Stadtman, T C

    1987-01-01

    Carbon monoxide dehydrogenase was purified to homogeneity from Methanococcus vannielii grown with formate as the sole carbon source. The enzyme is composed of subunits with molecular weights of 89,000 and 21,000 in an alpha 2 beta 2 oligomeric structure. The native molecular weight of carbon monoxide dehydrogenase, determined by gel electrophoresis, is 220,000. The enzyme from M. vannielii contains 2 g-atoms of nickel per mol of enzyme. Except for its relatively high pH optimum of 10.5 and its slightly greater net positive charge, the enzyme from M. vannielii closely resembles carbon monoxide dehydrogenase isolated previously from acetate-grown Methanosarcina barkeri. Carbon monoxide dehydrogenase from M. vannielii constitutes 0.2% of the soluble protein of the cell. By comparison the enzyme comprises 5% of the soluble protein in acetate-grown cells of M. barkeri and approximately 1% in methanol-grown cells. Images PMID:3624199

  15. 21 CFR 862.1440 - Lactate dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... dehydrogenase measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of liver diseases such as acute viral hepatitis, cirrhosis, and metastatic carcinoma of the liver, cardiac diseases such as myocardial...

  16. 21 CFR 862.1440 - Lactate dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... dehydrogenase measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of liver diseases such as acute viral hepatitis, cirrhosis, and metastatic carcinoma of the liver, cardiac diseases such as myocardial...

  17. 21 CFR 862.1440 - Lactate dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... dehydrogenase measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of liver diseases such as acute viral hepatitis, cirrhosis, and metastatic carcinoma of the liver, cardiac diseases such as myocardial...

  18. 21 CFR 862.1440 - Lactate dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... dehydrogenase measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of liver diseases such as acute viral hepatitis, cirrhosis, and metastatic carcinoma of the liver, cardiac diseases such as myocardial...

  19. Mammalian class IV alcohol dehydrogenase (stomach alcohol dehydrogenase): structure, origin, and correlation with enzymology.

    PubMed Central

    Parés, X; Cederlund, E; Moreno, A; Hjelmqvist, L; Farrés, J; Jörnvall, H

    1994-01-01

    The structure of a mammalian class IV alcohol dehydrogenase has been determined by peptide analysis of the protein isolated from rat stomach. The structure indicates that the enzyme constitutes a separate alcohol dehydrogenase class, in agreement with the distinct enzymatic properties; the class IV enzyme is somewhat closer to class I (the "classical" liver alcohol dehydrogenase; approximately 68% residue identities) than to the other classes (II, III, and V; approximately 60% residue identities), suggesting that class IV might have originated through duplication of an early vertebrate class I gene. The activity of the class IV protein toward ethanol is even higher than that of the classical liver enzyme. Both Km and kcat values are high, the latter being the highest of any class characterized so far. Structurally, these properties are correlated with replacements at the active site, affecting both substrate and coenzyme binding. In particular, Ala-294 (instead of valine) results in increased space in the middle section of the substrate cleft, Gly-47 (instead of a basic residue) results in decreased charge interactions with the coenzyme pyrophosphate, and Tyr-363 (instead of a basic residue) may also affect coenzyme binding. In combination, these exchanges are compatible with a promotion of the off dissociation and an increased turnover rate. In contrast, residues at the inner part of the substrate cleft are bulky, accounting for low activity toward secondary alcohols and cyclohexanol. Exchanges at positions 259-261 involve minor shifts in glycine residues at a reverse turn in the coenzyme-binding fold. Clearly, class IV is distinct in structure, ethanol turnover, stomach expression, and possible emergence from class I. PMID:8127901

  20. Enzymic and structural studies on Drosophila alcohol dehydrogenase and other short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases.

    PubMed

    Smilda, T; Kamminga, A H; Reinders, P; Baron, W; van Hylckama Vlieg, J E; Beintema, J J

    2001-05-01

    Enzymic and structural studies on Drosophila alcohol dehydrogenases and other short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases (SDRs) are presented. Like alcohol dehydrogenases from other Drosophila species, the enzyme from D. simulans is more active on secondary than on primary alcohols, although ethanol is its only known physiological substrate. Several secondary alcohols were used to determine the kinetic parameters kcat and Km. The results of these experiments indicate that the substrate-binding region of the enzyme allows optimal binding of a short ethyl side-chain in a small binding pocket, and of a propyl or butyl side-chain in large binding pocket, with stereospecificity for R(-) alcohols. At a high concentration of R(-) alcohols substrate activation occurs. The kcat and Km values determined under these conditions are about two-fold, and two orders of magnitude, respectively, higher than those at low substrate concentrations. Sequence alignment of several SDRs of known, and unknown three-dimensional structures, indicate the presence of several conserved residues in addition to those involved in the catalyzed reactions. Structural roles of these conserved residues could be derived from observations made on superpositioned structures of several SDRs with known structures. Several residues are conserved in tetrameric SDRs, but not in dimeric ones. Two halohydrin-halide-lyases show significant homology with SDRs in the catalytic domains of these enzymes, but they do not have the structural features required for binding NAD+. Probably these lyases descend from an SDR, which has lost the capability to bind NAD+, but the enzyme reaction mechanisms may still be similar. PMID:11443349

  1. Structural Studies of Cinnamoyl-CoA Reductase and Cinnamyl-Alcohol Dehydrogenase, Key Enzymes of Monolignol Biosynthesis[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Haiyun; Zhou, Rui; Louie, Gordon V.; Mühlemann, Joëlle K.; Bomati, Erin K.; Bowman, Marianne E.; Dudareva, Natalia; Dixon, Richard A.; Noel, Joseph P.; Wang, Xiaoqiang

    2014-01-01

    The enzymes cinnamoyl-CoA reductase (CCR) and cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD) catalyze the two key reduction reactions in the conversion of cinnamic acid derivatives into monolignol building blocks for lignin polymers in plant cell walls. Here, we describe detailed functional and structural analyses of CCRs from Medicago truncatula and Petunia hybrida and of an atypical CAD (CAD2) from M. truncatula. These enzymes are closely related members of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) superfamily. Our structural studies support a reaction mechanism involving a canonical SDR catalytic triad in both CCR and CAD2 and an important role for an auxiliary cysteine unique to CCR. Site-directed mutants of CAD2 (Phe226Ala and Tyr136Phe) that enlarge the phenolic binding site result in a 4- to 10-fold increase in activity with sinapaldehyde, which in comparison to the smaller coumaraldehyde and coniferaldehyde substrates is disfavored by wild-type CAD2. This finding demonstrates the potential exploitation of rationally engineered forms of CCR and CAD2 for the targeted modification of monolignol composition in transgenic plants. Thermal denaturation measurements and structural comparisons of various liganded and unliganded forms of CCR and CAD2 highlight substantial conformational flexibility of these SDR enzymes, which plays an important role in the establishment of catalytically productive complexes of the enzymes with their NADPH and phenolic substrates. PMID:25217505

  2. Structure of a short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) within a genomic island from a clinical strain of Acinetobacter baumannii

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, Bhumika S. Tetu, Sasha G.; Harrop, Stephen J.; Paulsen, Ian T.; Mabbutt, Bridget C.

    2014-09-25

    The structure of a short-chain dehydrogenase encoded within genomic islands of A. baumannii strains has been solved to 2.4 Å resolution. This classical SDR incorporates a flexible helical subdomain. The NADP-binding site and catalytic side chains are identified. Over 15% of the genome of an Australian clinical isolate of Acinetobacter baumannii occurs within genomic islands. An uncharacterized protein encoded within one island feature common to this and other International Clone II strains has been studied by X-ray crystallography. The 2.4 Å resolution structure of SDR-WM99c reveals it to be a new member of the classical short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) superfamily. The enzyme contains a nucleotide-binding domain and, like many other SDRs, is tetrameric in form. The active site contains a catalytic tetrad (Asn117, Ser146, Tyr159 and Lys163) and water molecules occupying the presumed NADP cofactor-binding pocket. An adjacent cleft is capped by a relatively mobile helical subdomain, which is well positioned to control substrate access.

  3. Human liver aldehyde dehydrogenase: coenzyme binding

    SciTech Connect

    Kosley, L.L.; Pietruszko, R.

    1987-05-01

    The binding of (U-/sup 14/C) NAD to mitochondrial (E2) and cytoplasmin(E1) aldehyde dehydrogenase was measured by gel filtration and sedimentation techniques. The binding data for NAD and (E1) yielded linear Scatchard plots giving a dissociation constant of 25 (+/- 8) uM and the stoichiometry of 2 mol of NAD bound per mol of E1. The binding data for NAD and (E2) gave nonlinear Scatchard plots. The binding of NADH to E2 was measured via fluorescence enhancement; this could not be done with E1 because there was no signal. The dissociation constant for E2 by this technique was 0.7 (+/- 0.4) uM and stoichiometry of 1.0 was obtained. The binding of (U-/sup 14/C) NADH to (E1) and (E2) was also measured by the sedimentation technique. The binding data for (E1) and NADH gave linear Scatchard plots giving a dissociation constant of 13 (+/- 6) uM and the stoichiometry of 2.0. The binding data for NADH to (E2) gave nonlinear Scatchard plots. With (E1), the dissociation constants for both NAD and NADH are similar to those determined kinetically, but the stoichiometry is only half of that found by stopped flow technique. With (E2) the dissociation constant by fluorometric procedure was 2 orders of magnitude less than that from catalytic reaction.

  4. Targeting isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) in cancer.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Takeo; Khawaja, Muhammad Rizwan; DiNardo, Courtney D; Atkins, Johnique T; Janku, Filip

    2016-05-01

    Isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) is an essential enzyme for cellular respiration in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. Recurrent mutations in IDH1 or IDH2 are prevalent in several cancers including glioma, acute myeloid leukemia (AML), cholangiocarcinoma and chondrosarcoma. The mutated IDH1 and IDH2 proteins have a gain-of-function, neomorphic activity, catalyzing the reduction of α-ketoglutarate (α-KG) to 2-hydroxyglutarate (2-HG) by NADPH. Cancer-associated IDH mutations block normal cellular differentiation and promote tumorigenesis via the abnormal production of the oncometabolite 2-HG. High levels of 2-HG have been shown to inhibit α-KG dependent dioxygenases, including histone and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) demethylases, which play a key role in regulating the epigenetic state of cells. Current targeted inhibitors of IDH1 (AG120, IDH305), IDH2 (AG221), and pan-IDH1/2 (AG881) selectively inhibit mutant IDH protein and induce cell differentiation in in vitro and in vivo models. Preliminary results from phase I clinical trials with IDH inhibitors in patients with advanced hematologic malignancies have demonstrated an objective response rate ranging from 31% to 40% with durable responses (>1 year) observed. Furthermore, the IDH inhibitors have demonstrated early signals of activity in solid tumors with IDH mutations, including cholangiocarcinomas and low grade gliomas. PMID:27355333

  5. Eucalypt NADP-Dependent Isocitrate Dehydrogenase1

    PubMed Central

    Boiffin, Vincent; Hodges, Michael; Gálvez, Susana; Balestrini, Raffaella; Bonfante, Paola; Gadal, Pierre; Martin, Francis

    1998-01-01

    NADP-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase (NADP-ICDH) activity is increased in roots of Eucalyptus globulus subsp. bicostata ex Maiden Kirkp. during colonization by the ectomycorrhizal fungus Pisolithus tinctorius Coker and Couch. To investigate the regulation of the enzyme expression, a cDNA (EgIcdh) encoding the NADP-ICDH was isolated from a cDNA library of E. globulus-P. tinctorius ectomycorrhizae. The putative polypeptide sequence of EgIcdh showed a high amino acid similarity with plant NADP-ICDHs. Because the deduced EgICDH protein lacks an amino-terminal targeting sequence and shows highest similarity to plant cytosolic ICDHs, it probably represents a cytoplasmic isoform. RNA analysis showed that the steady-state level of EgIcdh transcripts was enhanced nearly 2-fold in ectomycorrhizal roots compared with nonmycorrhizal roots. Increased accumulation of NADP-ICDH transcripts occurred as early as 2 d after contact and likely led to the observed increased enzyme activity. Indirect immunofluorescence microscopy indicated that NADP-ICDH was preferentially accumulated in the epidermis and stele parenchyma of nonmycorrhizal and ectomycorrhizal lateral roots. The putative role of cytosolic NADP-ICDH in ectomycorrhizae is discussed. PMID:9662536

  6. Aggregation states of mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, S. A.; Hazlett, T. L.; Brunet, J. E.; Jameson, D. M.

    1998-01-01

    The oligomeric state of fluorescein-labeled mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase (L-malate NAD+ oxidoreductase; mMDH; EC 1.1.1.37), as a function of protein concentration, has been examined using steady-state and dynamic polarization methodologies. A "global" rotational relaxation time of 103 +/- 7 ns was found for micromolar concentrations of mMDH-fluorescein, which is consistent with the reported size and shape of mMDH. Dilution of the mMDH-fluorescein conjugates, prepared using a phosphate buffer protocol, to nanomolar concentrations had no significant effect on the rotational relaxation time of the adduct, indicating that the dimer-monomer dissociation constant for mMDH is below 10(-9) M. In contrast to reports in the literature suggesting a pH-dependent dissociation of mMDH, the oligomeric state of this mMDH-fluorescein preparation remained unchanged between pH 5.0 and 8.0. Application of hydrostatic pressure up to 2.5 kilobars was ineffective in dissociating the mMDH dimer. However, the mMDH dimer was completely dissociated in 1.5 M guanidinium hydrochloride. Dilution of a mMDH-fluorescein conjugate, prepared using a Tris buffer protocol, did show dissociation, which can be attributed to aggregates present in these preparations. These results are considered in light of the disparities in the literature concerning the properties of the mMDH dimer-monomer equilibrium. PMID:9792106

  7. Targeting Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 2: New Therapeutic Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Che-Hong; Ferreira, Julio Cesar Batista; Gross, Eric R.; Mochly-Rosen, Daria

    2014-01-01

    A family of detoxifying enzymes called aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) has been a subject of recent interest, as its role in detoxifying aldehydes that accumulate through metabolism and to which we are exposed from the environment has been elucidated. Although the human genome has 19 ALDH genes, one ALDH emerges as a particularly important enzyme in a variety of human pathologies. This ALDH, ALDH2, is located in the mitochondrial matrix with much known about its role in ethanol metabolism. Less known is a new body of research to be discussed in this review, suggesting that ALDH2 dysfunction may contribute to a variety of human diseases including cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, neurodegenerative diseases, stroke, and cancer. Recent studies suggest that ALDH2 dysfunction is also associated with Fanconi anemia, pain, osteoporosis, and the process of aging. Furthermore, an ALDH2 inactivating mutation (termed ALDH2*2) is the most common single point mutation in humans, and epidemiological studies suggest a correlation between this inactivating mutation and increased propensity for common human pathologies. These data together with studies in animal models and the use of new pharmacological tools that activate ALDH2 depict a new picture related to ALDH2 as a critical health-promoting enzyme. PMID:24382882

  8. Postischemic hyperoxia reduces hippocampal pyruvate dehydrogenase activity

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Erica M.; Rosenthal, Robert E.; Kristian, Tibor; Fiskum, Gary

    2008-01-01

    The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHC) is a mitochondrial matrix enzyme that catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate and represents the sole bridge between anaerobic and aerobic cerebral energy metabolism. Previous studies demonstrating loss of PDHC enzyme activity and immunoreactivity during reperfusion after cerebral ischemia suggest that oxidative modifications are involved. This study tested the hypothesis that hyperoxic reperfusion exacerbates loss of PDHC enzyme activity, possibly due to tyrosine nitration or S-nitrosation. We used a clinically relevant canine ventricular fibrillation cardiac arrest model in which, after resuscitation and ventilation on either 100% O2 (hyperoxic) or 21–30% O2 (normoxic), animals were sacrificed at 2 h reperfusion and the brains removed for enzyme activity and immunoreactivity measurements. Animals resuscitated under hyperoxic conditions exhibited decreased PDHC activity and elevated 3-nitrotyrosine immunoreactivity in the hippocampus but not the cortex, compared to nonischemic controls. These measures were unchanged in normoxic animals. In vitro exposure of purified PDHC to peroxynitrite resulted in a dose-dependent loss of activity and increased nitrotyrosine immunoreactivity. These results support the hypothesis that oxidative stress contributes to loss of hippocampal PDHC activity during cerebral ischemia and reperfusion and suggest that PDHC is a target of peroxynitrite. PMID:16716897

  9. Iodination of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Jean O.; Harris, J. Ieuan

    1970-01-01

    1. A high degree of homology in the positions of tyrosine residues in glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase from lobster and pig muscle, and from yeast, prompted an examination of the reactivity of tyrosine residues in the enzyme. 2. Iodination of the enzyme from lobster muscle with low concentrations of potassium tri-[125I]-iodide led to the identification of tyrosine residues of differing reactivity. Tyrosine-46 appeared to be the most reactive in the native enzyme. 3. When the monocarboxymethylated enzyme was briefly treated with small amounts of iodine, iodination could be confined almost entirely to tyrosine-46 in the lobster enzyme; tyrosine-39 or tyrosine-42, or both, were also beginning to react. 4. These three tyrosine residues were also those that reacted most readily in the carboxymethylated pig and yeast enzymes. 5. The difficulties in attaining specific reaction of the native enzyme are considered. 6. The differences between our results and those of other workers are discussed. ImagesPLATE 1PLATE 2 PMID:5530750

  10. [Pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency and cerebral malformations].

    PubMed

    Eirís, J; Alvarez-Moreno, A; Briones, P; Alonso-Alonso, C; Castro-Gago, M

    1996-10-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) deficiency is a major cause of primary lactic acidosis and severe global developmental delay. A deficiency of PDH E1 alpha, a subunit of the PDH complex is a prominent cause of congenital lactic acidosis. The E1 alpha cDNA and corresponding genomic DNA have been located in the short arm of the X-chromosome (Xp22-1). A isolated 'cerebral' lactic acidosis with cerebral dysgenesis is a recognized pattern of presentation of PDH deficiency. Here, we report clinical features, magnetic resonance, and biochemical studies of two females aged 6 months (case 1) and 26 months (case 2). Both had severe development delay, minor dysmorphic features, microcephaly, severe hypoplasia of the corpus callosum, cerebral atrophy, ventricular dilatation and increase in serum lactate levels without systemic acidosis. Urinary organic acid profile was compatible with PDH deficiency. Increased CSF lactate and pyruvate levels and reduced total PDH and PDH E1 activities in muscle and fibroblasts were observed in case 1. Otherwise, decreased total PDH activity in muscle but not in fibroblasts was seen in case 2. The PDH E1á gene was sequenced in the case 1 and a deletion in exon 7 was demonstrated. Dysmorphism with severe cerebral malformations in female patients merits a metabolic evaluation, including determination of lactate and pyruvate levels in CSF. PMID:8983728

  11. Inhibitors of 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1.

    PubMed

    Brozic, P; Lanisnik Risner, T; Gobec, S

    2008-01-01

    Carcinogenesis of hormone-related cancers involves hormone-stimulated cell proliferation, which increases the number of cell divisions and the opportunity for random genetic errors. In target tissues, steroid hormones are interconverted between their potent, high affinity forms for their respective receptors and their inactive, low affinity forms. One group of enzymes responsible for these interconversions are the hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases, which regulate ligand access to steroid receptors and thus act at a pre-receptor level. As part of this group, the 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases catalyze either oxidation of hydroxyl groups or reduction of keto groups at steroid position C17. The thoroughly characterized 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 activates the less active estrone to estradiol, a potent ligand for estrogen receptors. This isoform is expressed in gonads, where it affects circulating levels of estradiol, and in peripheral tissue, where it regulates ligand occupancy of estrogen receptors. Inhibitors of 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 are thus highly interesting potential therapeutic agents for the control of estrogen-dependent diseases such as endometriosis, as well as breast and ovarian cancers. Here, we present the review on the recent development of inhibitors of 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 published and patented since the previous review of 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase inhibitors of Poirier (Curr. Med. Chem., 2003, 10, 453). These inhibitors are divided into two separate groups according to their chemical structures: steroidal and non-steroidal 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 inhibitors. Their estrogenic/ proliferative activities and selectivities over other 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases that are involved in local regulation of estrogen action (types 2, 7 and 12) are also presented. PMID:18220769

  12. Succinate Dehydrogenase Loss in Familial Paraganglioma: Biochemistry, Genetics, and Epigenetics

    PubMed Central

    Her, Yeng F.; Maher, L. James

    2015-01-01

    It is counterintuitive that metabolic defects reducing ATP production can cause, rather than protect from, cancer. Yet this is precisely the case for familial paraganglioma, a form of neuroendocrine malignancy caused by loss of succinate dehydrogenase in the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Here we review biochemical, genetic, and epigenetic considerations in succinate dehydrogenase loss and present leading models and mysteries associated with this fascinating and important tumor. PMID:26294907

  13. Role of threonine dehydrogenase in Escherichia coli threonine degradation.

    PubMed Central

    Potter, R; Kapoor, V; Newman, E B

    1977-01-01

    Threonine was used as nitrogen source by Escherichia coli K-12 through a pathway beginning with the enzyme threonine dehydrogenase. The 2-amino-3-ketobutyrate formed was converted to glycine, and the glycine was converted to serine, which acted as the actual nitrogen donor. The enzyme formed under anaerobic conditions and known as threonine deaminase (biodegradative) is less widespread than threonine dehydrogenase and may be involved in energy metabolism rather than in threonine degradation per se. PMID:334738

  14. Light modulation of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase by photosynthetic electron flow in pea chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Akamba, L.M.; Anderson, L.E.

    1981-02-01

    Light activation of NADP-linked glyceraldehyde-3-P dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.1.13) and light inactivation of glucose-6-P dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.49) appear to be modulated within pea leaf chloroplasts by mediators which are reduced by photosynthetic electron flow from the photosystem I reaction center. Dichlorophenyl-1,1-dimethylurea inhibition of this modulation can be completely reversed by ascorbate plus 2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol in broken chloroplasts, but not in intact chloroplasts. Intact chloroplasts are impermeable to 2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol at pH 7.5. Studies on the effect of light in reconstituted chloroplasts with photosystem I-enriched particles in the place of whole thylakoids revealed that photosystem I participants in the light modulation of NADP-linked glyceraldehyde-3-P dehydrogenase and of glucose-6-P dehydrogenase.

  15. Synergistic interaction of glyceraldehydes-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and ArsJ, a novel organoarsenical efflux permease, confers arsenate resistance.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian; Yoshinaga, Masafumi; Garbinski, Luis D; Rosen, Barry P

    2016-06-01

    Microbial biotransformations are major contributors to the arsenic biogeocycle. In parallel with transformations of inorganic arsenic, organoarsenicals pathways have recently been recognized as important components of global cycling of arsenic. The well-characterized pathway of resistance to arsenate is reduction coupled to arsenite efflux. Here, we describe a new pathway of arsenate resistance involving biosynthesis and extrusion of an unusual pentavalent organoarsenical. A number of arsenic resistance (ars) operons have two genes of unknown function that are linked in these operons. One, gapdh, encodes the glycolytic enzyme glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. The other, arsJ, encodes a major facilitator superfamily (MFS) protein. The two genes were cloned from the chromosome of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. When expressed together, but not alone, in Escherichia coli, gapdh and arsJ specifically conferred resistance to arsenate and decreased accumulation of As(V). Everted membrane vesicles from cells expressing arsJ accumulated As(V) in the presence of purified GAPDH, D-glceraldehylde 3-phosphate (G3P) and NAD(+) . GAPDH forms the unstable organoarsenical 1-arseno-3-phosphoglycerate (1As3PGA). We propose that ArsJ is an efflux permease that extrudes 1As3PGA from cells, where it rapidly dissociates into As(V) and 3-phosphoglycerate (3PGA), creating a novel pathway of arsenate resistance. PMID:26991003

  16. Cloning and overexpression of an NADH-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase gene from Candida maris involved in (R)-selective reduction of 5-acetylfuro[2,3-c]pyridine.

    PubMed

    Kawano, Shigeru; Yano, Miho; Hasegawa, Junzo; Yasohara, Yoshihiko

    2011-01-01

    5-((R)-1-Hydroxyethyl)-furo[2,3-c]pyridine ((R)-FPH) is a useful chiral building block in the synthesis of pharmaceuticals. An NADH-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase (AFPDH) isolated from Candida maris catalyzed the reduction of 5-acetylfuro[2,3-c]pyridine (AFP) to (R)-FPH with 100% enantiomeric excess. The gene encoding AFPDH was cloned and sequenced. The AFPDH gene comprises 762 bp and encodes a polypeptide of 27,230 Da. The deduced amino acid sequence showed a high degree of similarity to those of other members of the short-chain alcohol dehydrogenase superfamily. The AFPDH gene was overexpressed in Escherichia coli under the control of the lac promoter. One L of the cultured broth of an E. coli transformant coexpressing AFPDH and the glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) gene reduced 250 g of AFP to (R)-FPH in an organic solvent two-phase system. Under coupling with NADH regeneration using 2-propanol, 1 L of the cultured broth of an E. coli transformant expressing the AFPDH gene reduced 150 g of AFP to (R)-FPH. The optical purity of the (R)-FPH formed was 100% enantiomeric excess under both reaction conditions. PMID:22056439

  17. Stringency of substrate specificity of Escherichia coli malate dehydrogenase.

    SciTech Connect

    Boernke, W. E.; Millard, C. S.; Stevens, P. W.; Kakar, S. N.; Stevens, F. J.; Donnelly, M. I.; Nebraska Wesleyan Univ.

    1995-09-10

    Malate dehydrogenase and lactate dehydrogenase are members of the structurally and functionally homologous family of 2-ketoacid dehydrogenases. Both enzymes display high specificity for their respective keto substrates, oxaloacetate and pyruvate. Closer analysis of their specificity, however, reveals that the specificity of malate dehydrogenase is much stricter and less malleable than that of lactate dehydrogenase. Site-specific mutagenesis of the two enzymes in an attempt to reverse their specificity has met with contrary results. Conversion of a specific active-site glutamine to arginine in lactate dehydrogenase from Bacillus stearothermophilus generated an enzyme that displayed activity toward oxaloacetate equal to that of the native enzyme toward pyruvate (H. M. Wilks et al. (1988) Science 242, 1541-1544). We have constructed a series of mutants in the mobile, active site loop of the Escherichia coli malate dehydrogenase that incorporate the complementary change, conversion of arginine 81 to glutamine, to evaluate the role of charge distribution and conformational flexibility within this loop in defining the substrate specificity of these enzymes. Mutants incorporating the change R81Q all had reversed specificity, displaying much higher activity toward pyruvate than to the natural substrate, oxaloacetate. In contrast to the mutated lactate dehydrogenase, these reversed-specificity mutants were much less active than the native enzyme. Secondary mutations within the loop of the E. coli enzyme (A80N, A80P, A80P/M85E/D86T) had either no or only moderately beneficial effects on the activity of the mutant enzyme toward pyruvate. The mutation A80P, which can be expected to reduce the overall flexibility of the loop, modestly improved activity toward pyruvate. The possible physiological relevance of the stringent specificity of malate dehydrogenase was investigated. In normal strains of E. coli, fermentative metabolism was not affected by expression of the mutant

  18. Structural Studies of Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciszak, Ewa; Korotchkina, Lioubov G.; Dominiak, Paulina; Sidhu, Sukhdeep; Patel, Mulchand S.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Human pyruvate dehydrogenase (E1) catalyzes the irreversible decarboxylation of pyruvate in the presence of Mg(2+) and thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP) followed by the rate-limiting reductive acetylation of the lipoyl moiety linked to dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase. The three-dimensional structure of human E1 is elucidated using the methods of macromolecular X-ray crystallography. The structure is an alpha, alpha', beta and beta' tetramer with the protein units being in the tetrahedral arrangement. Each 361-residue alpha-subunit and 329-residue beta-subunit is composed of a beta-sheet core surrounded by alpha-helical domains. Each subunit is in extensive contact with all the three subunits involving TPP and magnesium cofactors, and potassium ions. The two binding sites for TPP are at the alpha-beta' and alpha'-beta interfaces, each involving a magnesium ion and Phe6l, His63, Tyr89, and Met200 from the alpha-subunit (or alpha'-subunit), and Met81 Phe85, His128 from the beta-subunit (or beta'-subunit). K+ ions are nestled between two beta-sheets and the end of an alpha-helix in each beta-subunit, where they are coordinated by four carbonyl oxygen groups from Ile12, Ala160, Asp163, and Asnl65, and a water molecule. The catalytic C2 carbon of thiazolium ring in this structure forms a 3.2 A contact with a water molecule involved in a series of H-bonds with other water molecules, and indirectly with amino acids including those involved in the catalysis and regulation of the enzyme.

  19. Succinate dehydrogenase gene mutations in cardiac paragangliomas.

    PubMed

    Martucci, Victoria L; Emaminia, Abbas; del Rivero, Jaydira; Lechan, Ronald M; Magoon, Bindiya T; Galia, Analyza; Fojo, Tito; Leung, Steve; Lorusso, Roberto; Jimenez, Camilo; Shulkin, Barry L; Audibert, Jennifer L; Adams, Karen T; Rosing, Douglas R; Vaidya, Anand; Dluhy, Robert G; Horvath, Keith A; Pacak, Karel

    2015-06-15

    Pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas are chromaffin cell tumors arising from neuroendocrine cells. At least 1/3 of paragangliomas are related to germline mutations in 1 of 17 genes. Although these tumors can occur throughout the body, cardiac paragangliomas are very rare, accounting for <0.3% of mediastinal tumors. The purpose of this study was to determine the clinical characteristics of patients with cardiac paragangliomas, particularly focusing on their genetic backgrounds. A retrospective chart analysis of 15 patients with cardiac paragangliomas was performed to determine clinical presentation, genetic background, diagnostic workup, and outcomes. The average age at diagnosis was 41.9 years. Typical symptoms of paraganglioma (e.g., hypertension, sweating, palpitations, headache) were reported at initial presentation in 13 patients (86.7%); the remaining 2, as well as 4 symptomatic patients, initially presented with cardiac-specific symptoms (e.g., chest pain, dyspnea). Genetic testing was done in 13 patients (86.7%); 10 (76.9%) were positive for mutations in succinate dehydrogenase (SDHx) subunits B, C, or D. Thirteen patients (86.7%) underwent surgery to remove the paraganglioma with no intraoperative morbidity or mortality; 1 additional patient underwent surgical resection but experienced intraoperative complications after removal of the tumor due to co-morbidities and did not survive. SDHx mutations are known to be associated with mediastinal locations and malignant behavior of paragangliomas. In this report, the investigators extend the locations of predominantly SDHx-related paragangliomas to cardiac tumors. In conclusion, cardiac paragangliomas are frequently associated with underlying SDHx germline mutations, suggesting a need for genetic testing of all patients with this rare tumor. PMID:25896150

  20. The Carbon Monoxide Dehydrogenase from Desulfovibrio vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Hadj-Saïd, Jessica; Pandelia, Maria-Eirini; Léger, Christophe; Fourmond, Vincent; Dementin, Sébastien

    2015-12-01

    Ni-containing Carbon Monoxide Dehydrogenases (CODHs) catalyze the reversible conversion between CO and CO₂and are involved in energy conservation and carbon fixation. These homodimeric enzymes house two NiFeS active sites (C-clusters) and three accessory [4Fe-4S] clusters. The Desulfovibrio vulgaris (Dv) genome contains a two-gene CODH operon coding for a CODH (cooS) and a maturation protein (cooC) involved in nickel insertion in the active site. According to the literature, the question of the precise function of CooC as a chaperone folding the C-cluster in a form which accommodates free nickel or as a mere nickel donor is not resolved. Here, we report the biochemical and spectroscopic characterization of two recombinant forms of the CODH, produced in the absence and in the presence of CooC, designated CooS and CooS(C), respectively. CooS contains no nickel and cannot be activated, supporting the idea that the role of CooC is to fold the C-cluster so that it can bind nickel. As expected, CooS(C) is Ni-loaded, reversibly converts CO and CO₂, displays the typical Cred1 and Cred2 EPR signatures of the C-cluster and activates in the presence of methyl viologen and CO in an autocatalytic process. However, Ni-loaded CooS(C) reaches maximum activity only upon reductive treatment in the presence of exogenous nickel, a phenomenon that had not been observed before. Surprisingly, the enzyme displays the Cred1 and Cred2 signatures whether it has been activated or not, showing that this activation process of the Ni-loaded Dv CODH is not associated with structural changes at the active site. PMID:26255854

  1. p53 Superfamily proteins in marine bivalve cancer and stress biology.

    PubMed

    Walker, Charles W; Van Beneden, Rebecca J; Muttray, Annette F; Böttger, S Anne; Kelley, Melissa L; Tucker, Abraham E; Thomas, W Kelley

    2011-01-01

    The human p53 tumour suppressor protein is inactivated in many cancers and is also a major player in apoptotic responses to cellular stress. The p53 protein and the two other members of this protein family (p63, p73) are encoded by distinct genes and their functions have been extensively documented for humans and some other vertebrates. The structure and relative expression levels for members of the p53 superfamily have also been reported for most major invertebrate taxa. The functions of homologous proteins have been investigated for only a few invertebrates (specifically, p53 in flies, nematodes and recently a sea anemone). These studies of classical model organisms all suggest that the gene family originally evolved to mediate apoptosis of damaged germ cells or to protect germ cells from genotoxic stress. Here, we have correlated data from a number of molluscan and other invertebrate sequencing projects to provide a framework for understanding p53 signalling pathways in marine bivalve cancer and stress biology. These data suggest that (a) the two identified p53 and p63/73-like proteins in soft shell clam (Mya arenaria), blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) and Northern European squid (Loligo forbesi) have identical core sequences and may be splice variants of a single gene, while some molluscs and most other invertebrates have two or more distinct genes expressing different p53 family members; (b) transcriptional activation domains (TADs) in bivalve p53 and p63/73-like protein sequences are 67-69% conserved with human p53, while those in ecdysozoan, cnidarian, placozoan and choanozoan eukaryotes are ≤33% conserved; (c) the Mdm2 binding site in the transcriptional activation domain is 100% conserved in all sequenced bivalve p53 proteins (e.g. Mya, Mytilus, Crassostrea and Spisula) but is not present in other non-deuterostome invertebrates; (d) an Mdm2 homologue has been cloned for Mytilus trossulus; (e) homologues for both human p53 upstream regulatory and

  2. Functional Annotation of Two New Carboxypeptidases from the Amidohydrolase Superfamily of Enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, D.; Xu, C; Kumaran, D; Brown, A; Sauder, M; Burley, S; Swaminathan, S; Raushel, F

    2009-01-01

    Two proteins from the amidohydrolase superfamily of enzymes were cloned, expressed, and purified to homogeneity. The first protein, Cc0300, was from Caulobacter crescentus CB-15 (Cc0300), while the second one (Sgx9355e) was derived from an environmental DNA sequence originally isolated from the Sargasso Sea (gi|44371129). The catalytic functions and the substrate profiles for the two enzymes were determined with the aid of combinatorial dipeptide libraries. Both enzymes were shown to catalyze the hydrolysis of l-Xaa-l-Xaa dipeptides in which the amino acid at the N-terminus was relatively unimportant. These enzymes were specific for hydrophobic amino acids at the C-terminus. With Cc0300, substrates terminating in isoleucine, leucine, phenylalanine, tyrosine, valine, methionine, and tryptophan were hydrolyzed. The same specificity was observed with Sgx9355e, but this protein was also able to hydrolyze peptides terminating in threonine. Both enzymes were able to hydrolyze N-acetyl and N-formyl derivatives of the hydrophobic amino acids and tripeptides. The best substrates identified for Cc0300 were l-Ala-l-Leu with kcat and kcat/Km values of 37 s-1 and 1.1 x 105 M-1 s-1, respectively, and N-formyl-l-Tyr with kcat and kcat/Km values of 33 s-1 and 3.9 x 105 M-1 s-1, respectively. The best substrate identified for Sgx9355e was l-Ala-l-Phe with kcat and kcat/Km values of 0.41 s-1 and 5.8 x 103 M-1 s-1. The three-dimensional structure of Sgx9355e was determined to a resolution of 2.33 Angstroms with l-methionine bound in the active site. The a-carboxylate of the methionine is ion-paired to His-237 and also hydrogen bonded to the backbone amide groups of Val-201 and Leu-202. The a-amino group of the bound methionine interacts with Asp-328. The structural determinants for substrate recognition were identified and compared with other enzymes in this superfamily that hydrolyze dipeptides with different specificities.

  3. Evolution of Enzymatic Activities in the Enolase Superfamily: Galactarate Dehydratase III from Agrobacterium tumefaciens C58

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The genome of Agrobacterium tumefaciens C58 encodes 12 members of the enolase superfamily (ENS), eight of which are members of the mandelate racemase (MR) subgroup and, therefore, likely to be acid sugar dehydratases. Using a library of 77 acid sugars for high-throughput screening, one protein (UniProt entry A9CG74; locus tag Atu4196) showed activity with both m-galactarate and d-galacturonate. Two families of galactarate dehydratases had been discovered previously in the ENS, GalrD/TalrD [Yew, W. S., et al. (2007) Biochemistry46, 9564–9577] and GalrD-II [Rakus, J. F., et al. (2009) Biochemistry48, 11546–11558]; these have different active site acid/base catalysis and have no activity with d-galacturonate. A9CG74 dehydrates m-galactarate to form 2-keto-3-deoxy-galactarate but does not dehydrate d-galacturonate as expected. Instead, when A9CG74 is incubated with d-galacturonate, 3-deoxy-d-xylo-hexarate or 3-deoxy-d-lyxo-hexarate is formed. In this reaction, instead of abstracting the C5 proton α to the carboxylate group, the expected reaction for a member of the ENS, the enzyme apparently abstracts the proton α to the aldehyde group to form 3-deoxy-d-threo-hexulosuronate that undergoes a 1,2-hydride shift similar to the benzylic acid rearrangement to form the observed product. A. tumefaciens C58 does not utilize m-galactarate as a carbon source under the conditions tested in this study, although it does utilize d-galacturonate, which is a likely precursor to m-galactarate. The gene encoding A9CG74 and several genome proximal genes were upregulated with d-galacturonate as the carbon source. One of these, a member of the dihydrodipicolinate synthase superfamily, catalyzes the dehydration and subsequent decarboxylation of 2-keto-3-deoxy-d-galactarate to α-ketoglutarate semialdehyde, thereby providing a pathway for the conversion of m-galactarate to α-ketoglutarate semialdehyde. PMID:24926996

  4. Genome-wide analysis of the MYB transcription factor superfamily in soybean

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The MYB superfamily constitutes one of the most abundant groups of transcription factors described in plants. Nevertheless, their functions appear to be highly diverse and remain rather unclear. To date, no genome-wide characterization of this gene family has been conducted in a legume species. Here we report the first genome-wide analysis of the whole MYB superfamily in a legume species, soybean (Glycine max), including the gene structures, phylogeny, chromosome locations, conserved motifs, and expression patterns, as well as a comparative genomic analysis with Arabidopsis. Results A total of 244 R2R3-MYB genes were identified and further classified into 48 subfamilies based on a phylogenetic comparative analysis with their putative orthologs, showed both gene loss and duplication events. The phylogenetic analysis showed that most characterized MYB genes with similar functions are clustered in the same subfamily, together with the identification of orthologs by synteny analysis, functional conservation among subgroups of MYB genes was strongly indicated. The phylogenetic relationships of each subgroup of MYB genes were well supported by the highly conserved intron/exon structures and motifs outside the MYB domain. Synonymous nucleotide substitution (dN/dS) analysis showed that the soybean MYB DNA-binding domain is under strong negative selection. The chromosome distribution pattern strongly indicated that genome-wide segmental and tandem duplication contribute to the expansion of soybean MYB genes. In addition, we found that ~ 4% of soybean R2R3-MYB genes had undergone alternative splicing events, producing a variety of transcripts from a single gene, which illustrated the extremely high complexity of transcriptome regulation. Comparative expression profile analysis of R2R3-MYB genes in soybean and Arabidopsis revealed that MYB genes play conserved and various roles in plants, which is indicative of a divergence in function. Conclusions In this

  5. In Vitro Mutational and Bioinformatics Analysis of the M71 Odorant Receptor and Its Superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Tomoiaga, Delia; D’Hulst, Charlotte; Krampis, Konstantinos; Feinstein, Paul

    2015-01-01

    We performed an extensive mutational analysis of the canonical mouse odorant receptor (OR) M71 to determine the properties of ORs that inhibit plasma membrane trafficking in heterologous expression systems. We employed the use of the M71::GFP fusion protein to directly assess plasma membrane localization and functionality of M71 in heterologous cells in vitro or in olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) in vivo. OSN expression of M71::GFP show only small differences in activity compared to untagged M71. However, M71::GFP could not traffic to the plasma membrane even in the presence of proposed accessory proteins RTP1S or mβ2AR. To ask if ORs contain an internal “kill sequence”, we mutated ~15 of the most highly conserved OR specific amino acids not found amongst the trafficking non-OR GPCR superfamily; none of these mutants rescued trafficking. Addition of various amino terminal signal sequences or different glycosylation motifs all failed to produce trafficking. The addition of the amino and carboxy terminal domains of mβ2AR or the mutation Y289A in the highly conserved GPCR motif NPxxY does not rescue plasma membrane trafficking. The failure of targeted mutagenesis on rescuing plasma membrane localization in heterologous cells suggests that OR trafficking deficits may not be attributable to conserved collinear motifs, but rather the overall amino acid composition of the OR family. Thus, we performed an in silico analysis comparing the OR and other amine receptor superfamilies. We find that ORs contain fewer charged residues and more hydrophobic residues distributed throughout the protein and a conserved overall amino acid composition. From our analysis, we surmise that it may be difficult to traffic ORs at high levels to the cell surface in vitro, without making significant amino acid modifications. Finally, we observed specific increases in methionine and histidine residues as well as a marked decrease in tryptophan residues, suggesting that these changes

  6. Evolution of enzymatic activities in the enolase superfamily: galactarate dehydratase III from Agrobacterium tumefaciens C58.

    PubMed

    Groninger-Poe, Fiona P; Bouvier, Jason T; Vetting, Matthew W; Kalyanaraman, Chakrapani; Kumar, Ritesh; Almo, Steven C; Jacobson, Matthew P; Gerlt, John A

    2014-07-01

    The genome of Agrobacterium tumefaciens C58 encodes 12 members of the enolase superfamily (ENS), eight of which are members of the mandelate racemase (MR) subgroup and, therefore, likely to be acid sugar dehydratases. Using a library of 77 acid sugars for high-throughput screening, one protein (UniProt entry A9CG74; locus tag Atu4196) showed activity with both m-galactarate and d-galacturonate. Two families of galactarate dehydratases had been discovered previously in the ENS, GalrD/TalrD [Yew, W. S., et al. (2007) Biochemistry 46, 9564-9577] and GalrD-II [Rakus, J. F., et al. (2009) Biochemistry 48, 11546-11558]; these have different active site acid/base catalysis and have no activity with d-galacturonate. A9CG74 dehydrates m-galactarate to form 2-keto-3-deoxy-galactarate but does not dehydrate d-galacturonate as expected. Instead, when A9CG74 is incubated with d-galacturonate, 3-deoxy-d-xylo-hexarate or 3-deoxy-d-lyxo-hexarate is formed. In this reaction, instead of abstracting the C5 proton α to the carboxylate group, the expected reaction for a member of the ENS, the enzyme apparently abstracts the proton α to the aldehyde group to form 3-deoxy-d-threo-hexulosuronate that undergoes a 1,2-hydride shift similar to the benzylic acid rearrangement to form the observed product. A. tumefaciens C58 does not utilize m-galactarate as a carbon source under the conditions tested in this study, although it does utilize d-galacturonate, which is a likely precursor to m-galactarate. The gene encoding A9CG74 and several genome proximal genes were upregulated with d-galacturonate as the carbon source. One of these, a member of the dihydrodipicolinate synthase superfamily, catalyzes the dehydration and subsequent decarboxylation of 2-keto-3-deoxy-d-galactarate to α-ketoglutarate semialdehyde, thereby providing a pathway for the conversion of m-galactarate to α-ketoglutarate semialdehyde. PMID:24926996

  7. Ensembler: Enabling High-Throughput Molecular Simulations at the Superfamily Scale

    PubMed Central

    Parton, Daniel L.; Grinaway, Patrick B.; Hanson, Sonya M.; Beauchamp, Kyle A.; Chodera, John D.

    2016-01-01

    The rapidly expanding body of available genomic and protein structural data provides a rich resource for understanding protein dynamics with biomolecular simulation. While computational infrastructure has grown rapidly, simulations on an omics scale are not yet widespread, primarily because software infrastructure to enable simulations at this scale has not kept pace. It should now be possible to study protein dynamics across entire (super)families, exploiting both available structural biology data and conformational similarities across homologous proteins. Here, we present a new tool for enabling high-throughput simulation in the genomics era. Ensembler takes any set of sequences—from a single sequence to an entire superfamily—and shepherds them through various stages of modeling and refinement to produce simulation-ready structures. This includes comparative modeling to all relevant PDB structures (which may span multiple conformational states of interest), reconstruction of missing loops, addition of missing atoms, culling of nearly identical structures, assignment of appropriate protonation states, solvation in explicit solvent, and refinement and filtering with molecular simulation to ensure stable simulation. The output of this pipeline is an ensemble of structures ready for subsequent molecular simulations using computer clusters, supercomputers, or distributed computing projects like Folding@home. Ensembler thus automates much of the time-consuming process of preparing protein models suitable for simulation, while allowing scalability up to entire superfamilies. A particular advantage of this approach can be found in the construction of kinetic models of conformational dynamics—such as Markov state models (MSMs)—which benefit from a diverse array of initial configurations that span the accessible conformational states to aid sampling. We demonstrate the power of this approach by constructing models for all catalytic domains in the human tyrosine

  8. Functional annotation of two new carboxypeptidases from the amidohydrolase superfamily of enzymes.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Dao Feng; Xu, Chengfu; Kumaran, Desigan; Brown, Ann C; Sauder, J Michael; Burley, Stephen K; Swaminathan, Subramanyam; Raushel, Frank M

    2009-06-01

    Two proteins from the amidohydrolase superfamily of enzymes were cloned, expressed, and purified to homogeneity. The first protein, Cc0300, was from Caulobacter crescentus CB-15 (Cc0300), while the second one (Sgx9355e) was derived from an environmental DNA sequence originally isolated from the Sargasso Sea ( gi|44371129 ). The catalytic functions and the substrate profiles for the two enzymes were determined with the aid of combinatorial dipeptide libraries. Both enzymes were shown to catalyze the hydrolysis of l-Xaa-l-Xaa dipeptides in which the amino acid at the N-terminus was relatively unimportant. These enzymes were specific for hydrophobic amino acids at the C-terminus. With Cc0300, substrates terminating in isoleucine, leucine, phenylalanine, tyrosine, valine, methionine, and tryptophan were hydrolyzed. The same specificity was observed with Sgx9355e, but this protein was also able to hydrolyze peptides terminating in threonine. Both enzymes were able to hydrolyze N-acetyl and N-formyl derivatives of the hydrophobic amino acids and tripeptides. The best substrates identified for Cc0300 were l-Ala-l-Leu with k(cat) and k(cat)/K(m) values of 37 s(-1) and 1.1 x 10(5) M(-1) s(-1), respectively, and N-formyl-l-Tyr with k(cat) and k(cat)/K(m) values of 33 s(-1) and 3.9 x 10(5) M(-1) s(-1), respectively. The best substrate identified for Sgx9355e was l-Ala-l-Phe with k(cat) and k(cat)/K(m) values of 0.41 s(-1) and 5.8 x 10(3) M(-1) s(-1). The three-dimensional structure of Sgx9355e was determined to a resolution of 2.33 A with l-methionine bound in the active site. The alpha-carboxylate of the methionine is ion-paired to His-237 and also hydrogen bonded to the backbone amide groups of Val-201 and Leu-202. The alpha-amino group of the bound methionine interacts with Asp-328. The structural determinants for substrate recognition were identified and compared with other enzymes in this superfamily that hydrolyze dipeptides with different specificities. PMID:19358546

  9. Radical SAM, A Novel Protein Superfamily Linking Unresolved Steps in Familiar Biosynthetic Pathways with Radical Mechanisms: Functional Characterization Using New Analysis and Information Visualization Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Sofia, Heidi J.; Chen, Guang; Hetzler, Elizabeth G.; Reyes Spindola, Jorge F.; Miller, Nancy E.

    2001-03-01

    A large protein superfamily with over 500 members has been discovered and analyzed using powerful new bioinformatics and information visualization methods. Evidence exists that these proteins generate a 5?-deoxyadenosyl radical by reductive cleavage of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) through an unusual Fe-S center. Radical SAM superfamily proteins function in DNA precursor, vitamin, cofactor, antibiotic, and herbicide biosynthesis in a collection of basic and familiar pathways. One of the members is interferon-inducible and is considered a candidate drug target for osteoporosis. The identification of this superfamily suggests that radical-based catalysis is important in a number of previously well-studied but unresolved biochemical pathways.

  10. Differing roles for members of the phospholipase A2 superfamily in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Kalyvas, Athena; Baskakis, Constantinos; Magrioti, Victoria; Constantinou-Kokotou, Violetta; Stephens, Daren; López-Vales, Rubèn; Lu, Jian-Qiang; Yong, V. Wee; Dennis, Edward A.; Kokotos, George

    2009-01-01

    The phospholipase A2 (PLA2) superfamily hydrolyzes phospholipids to release free fatty acids and lysophospholipids, some of which can mediate inflammation and demyelination, hallmarks of the CNS autoimmune disease multiple sclerosis. The expression of two of the intracellular PLA2s (cPLA2 GIVA and iPLA2 GVIA) and two of the secreted PLA2s (sPLA2 GIIA and sPLA2 GV) are increased in different stages of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of multiple sclerosis. We show using small molecule inhibitors, that cPLA2 GIVA plays a role in the onset, and iPLA2 GVIA in the onset and progression of EAE. We also show a potential role for sPLA2 in the later remission phase. These studies demonstrate that selective inhibition of iPLA2 can ameliorate disease progression when treatment is started before or after the onset of symptoms. The effects of these inhibitors on lesion burden, chemokine and cytokine expression as well as on the lipid profile provide insights into their potential modes of action. iPLA2 is also expressed by macrophages and other immune cells in multiple sclerosis lesions. Our results therefore suggest that iPLA2 might be an excellent target to block for the treatment of CNS autoimmune diseases, such as multiple sclerosis. PMID:19218359

  11. Primase-polymerases are a functionally diverse superfamily of replication and repair enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Guilliam, Thomas A.; Keen, Benjamin A.; Brissett, Nigel C.; Doherty, Aidan J.

    2015-01-01

    Until relatively recently, DNA primases were viewed simply as a class of proteins that synthesize short RNA primers requisite for the initiation of DNA replication. However, recent studies have shown that this perception of the limited activities associated with these diverse enzymes can no longer be justified. Numerous examples can now be cited demonstrating how the term ‘DNA primase’ only describes a very narrow subset of these nucleotidyltransferases, with the vast majority fulfilling multifunctional roles from DNA replication to damage tolerance and repair. This article focuses on the archaeo-eukaryotic primase (AEP) superfamily, drawing on recently characterized examples from all domains of life to highlight the functionally diverse pathways in which these enzymes are employed. The broad origins, functionalities and enzymatic capabilities of AEPs emphasizes their previous functional misannotation and supports the necessity for a reclassification of these enzymes under a category called primase-polymerases within the wider functional grouping of polymerases. Importantly, the repositioning of AEPs in this way better recognizes their broader roles in DNA metabolism and encourages the discovery of additional functions for these enzymes, aside from those highlighted here. PMID:26109351

  12. Stonefish toxin defines an ancient branch of the perforin-like superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Ellisdon, Andrew M.; Reboul, Cyril F.; Huynh, Kitmun; Oellig, Christine A.; Winter, Kelly L.; Hodgson, Wayne C.; Seymour, Jamie; Dearden, Peter K.; Tweten, Rodney K.; Whisstock, James C.; McGowan, Sheena

    2015-01-01

    The lethal factor in stonefish venom is stonustoxin (SNTX), a heterodimeric cytolytic protein that induces cardiovascular collapse in humans and native predators. Here, using X-ray crystallography, we make the unexpected finding that SNTX is a pore-forming member of an ancient branch of the Membrane Attack Complex-Perforin/Cholesterol-Dependent Cytolysin (MACPF/CDC) superfamily. SNTX comprises two homologous subunits (α and β), each of which comprises an N-terminal pore-forming MACPF/CDC domain, a central focal adhesion-targeting domain, a thioredoxin domain, and a C-terminal tripartite motif family-like PRY SPla and the RYanodine Receptor immune recognition domain. Crucially, the structure reveals that the two MACPF domains are in complex with one another and arranged into a stable early prepore-like assembly. These data provide long sought after near-atomic resolution insights into how MACPF/CDC proteins assemble into prepores on the surface of membranes. Furthermore, our analyses reveal that SNTX-like MACPF/CDCs are distributed throughout eukaryotic life and play a broader, possibly immune-related function outside venom. PMID:26627714

  13. Evolution of the SOUL Heme-Binding Protein Superfamily Across Eukarya.

    PubMed

    Fortunato, Antonio Emidio; Sordino, Paolo; Andreakis, Nikos

    2016-06-01

    SOUL homologs constitute a heme-binding protein superfamily putatively involved in heme and tetrapyrrole metabolisms associated with a number of physiological processes. Despite their omnipresence across the tree of life and the biochemical characterization of many SOUL members, their functional role and the evolutionary events leading to such remarkable protein repertoire still remain cryptic. To explore SOUL evolution, we apply a computational phylogenetic approach, including a relevant number of SOUL homologs, to identify paralog forms and reconstruct their genealogy across the tree of life and within species. In animal lineages, multiple gene duplication or loss events and paralog functional specializations underlie SOUL evolution from the dawn of ancestral echinoderm and mollusc SOUL forms. In photosynthetic organisms, SOUL evolution is linked to the endosymbiosis events leading to plastid acquisition in eukaryotes. Derivative features, such as the F2L peptide and BH3 domain, evolved in vertebrates and provided innovative functionality to support immune response and apoptosis. The evolution of elements such as the N-terminal protein domain DUF2358, the His42 residue, or the tetrapyrrole heme-binding site is modern, and their functional implications still unresolved. This study represents the first in-depth analysis of SOUL protein evolution and provides novel insights in the understanding of their obscure physiological role. PMID:27209522

  14. Superfamily-wide portrait of serine hydrolase inhibition achieved by library-versus-library screening.

    PubMed

    Bachovchin, Daniel A; Ji, Tianyang; Li, Weiwei; Simon, Gabriel M; Blankman, Jacqueline L; Adibekian, Alexander; Hoover, Heather; Niessen, Sherry; Cravatt, Benjamin F

    2010-12-01

    Serine hydrolases (SHs) are one of the largest and most diverse enzyme classes in mammals. They play fundamental roles in virtually all physiological processes and are targeted by drugs to treat diseases such as diabetes, obesity, and neurodegenerative disorders. Despite this, we lack biological understanding for most of the 110+ predicted mammalian metabolic SHs, in large part because of a dearth of assays to assess their biochemical activities and a lack of selective inhibitors to probe their function in living systems. We show here that the vast majority (> 80%) of mammalian metabolic SHs can be labeled in proteomes by a single, active site-directed fluorophosphonate probe. We exploit this universal activity-based assay in a library-versus-library format to screen 70+ SHs against 140+ structurally diverse carbamates. Lead inhibitors were discovered for ∼40% of the screened enzymes, including many poorly characterized SHs. Global profiles identified carbamate inhibitors that discriminate among highly sequence-related SHs and, conversely, enzymes that share inhibitor sensitivity profiles despite lacking sequence homology. These findings indicate that sequence relatedness is not a strong predictor of shared pharmacology within the SH superfamily. Finally, we show that lead carbamate inhibitors can be optimized into pharmacological probes that inactivate individual SHs with high specificity in vivo. PMID:21084632

  15. Superfamily-wide portrait of serine hydrolase inhibition achieved by library-versus-library screening

    PubMed Central

    Bachovchin, Daniel A.; Ji, Tianyang; Li, Weiwei; Simon, Gabriel M.; Blankman, Jacqueline L.; Adibekian, Alexander; Hoover, Heather; Niessen, Sherry; Cravatt, Benjamin F.

    2010-01-01

    Serine hydrolases (SHs) are one of the largest and most diverse enzyme classes in mammals. They play fundamental roles in virtually all physiological processes and are targeted by drugs to treat diseases such as diabetes, obesity, and neurodegenerative disorders. Despite this, we lack biological understanding for most of the 110+ predicted mammalian metabolic SHs, in large part because of a dearth of assays to assess their biochemical activities and a lack of selective inhibitors to probe their function in living systems. We show here that the vast majority (> 80%) of mammalian metabolic SHs can be labeled in proteomes by a single, active site-directed fluorophosphonate probe. We exploit this universal activity-based assay in a library-versus-library format to screen 70+ SHs against 140+ structurally diverse carbamates. Lead inhibitors were discovered for ∼40% of the screened enzymes, including many poorly characterized SHs. Global profiles identified carbamate inhibitors that discriminate among highly sequence-related SHs and, conversely, enzymes that share inhibitor sensitivity profiles despite lacking sequence homology. These findings indicate that sequence relatedness is not a strong predictor of shared pharmacology within the SH superfamily. Finally, we show that lead carbamate inhibitors can be optimized into pharmacological probes that inactivate individual SHs with high specificity in vivo. PMID:21084632

  16. A high-throughput, multiplexed assay for superfamily-wide profiling of enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Bachovchin, Daniel A; Koblan, Luke W; Wu, Wengen; Liu, Yuxin; Li, Youhua; Zhao, Peng; Woznica, Iwona; Shu, Ying; Lai, Jack H; Poplawski, Sarah E; Kiritsy, Christopher P; Healey, Sarah E; DiMare, Matthew; Sanford, David G; Munford, Robert S; Bachovchin, William W; Golub, Todd R

    2014-08-01

    The selectivity of an enzyme inhibitor is a key determinant of its usefulness as a tool compound or its safety as a drug. Yet selectivity is never assessed comprehensively in the early stages of the drug discovery process, and only rarely in the later stages, because technical limitations prohibit doing otherwise. Here, we report EnPlex, an efficient, high-throughput method for simultaneously assessing inhibitor potency and specificity, and pilot its application to 96 serine hydrolases. EnPlex analysis of widely used serine hydrolase inhibitors revealed numerous previously unrecognized off-target interactions, some of which may help to explain previously confounding adverse effects. In addition, EnPlex screening of a hydrolase-directed library of boronic acid- and nitrile-containing compounds provided structure-activity relationships in both potency and selectivity dimensions from which lead candidates could be more effectively prioritized. Follow-up of a series of dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitors showed that EnPlex indeed predicted efficacy and safety in animal models. These results demonstrate the feasibility and value of high-throughput, superfamily-wide selectivity profiling and suggest that such profiling can be incorporated into the earliest stages of drug discovery. PMID:24997602

  17. Can SINEs: a family of tRNA-derived retroposons specific to the superfamily Canoidea.

    PubMed Central

    Coltman, D W; Wright, J M

    1994-01-01

    A repetitive element of approximately 200 bp was cloned from harbour seal (Phoca vitulina concolour) genomic DNA. The sequence of the element revealed putative RNA polymerase III control boxes, a poly A tail and direct terminal repeats characteristic of SINEs. Sequence and secondary structural similarities suggest that the SINE is derived from a tRNA, possibly tRNA-alanine. Southern blot analysis indicated that the element is predominately dispersed in unique regions of the seal genome, but may also be present in other repetitive sequences, such as tandemly arrayed satellite DNA. Based on slot-blot hybridization analysis, we estimate that 1.3 x 10(6) copies of the SINE are present in the harbour seal genome; SINE copy number based on the number of clones isolated from a size-selected library, however, is an order of magnitude lower (1-3 x 10(5) copies), an estimate consistent with the abundance of SINEs in other mammalian genomes. Database searches found similar sequences have been isolated from dog (Canis familiaris) and mink (Mustela vison). These, and the seal SINE sequences are characterized by an internal CT dinucleotide microsatellite in the tRNA-unrelated region. Hybridization of genomic DNA from representative species of a wide range of mammalian orders to an oligonucleotide (30mer) probe complementary to a conserved region of the SINE confirmed that the element is unique to carnivores of the superfamily Canoidea. Images PMID:8052527

  18. New species and records of mites of the superfamily Sarcoptoidea (Acariformes: Psoroptidia) from mammals in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Bochkov, Andre V; Valim, Michel P

    2016-01-01

    Sixteen species of the superfamily Sarcoptoidea (Acariformes: Psoroptidia) belonging to 10 genera of the families Atopomelidae, Listrophoridae, Chirodiscidae, and Listropsoralgidae are recorded in Brazil. Among them, three species, Prolistrophorus hylaeamys sp. nov. from Hylaeamys laticeps (Lund, 1840) (Cricetidae: Sigmodontinae) from Minas Gerais, Lynxacarus serrafreirei sp. nov. from Galictis cuja (Molina, 1782) (Carnivora: Mustelidae) from Rio de Janeiro (Listrophoridae), and Didelphoecius micoureus sp. nov. (Atopomelidae) from Micoureus paraguayanus (Tate, 1931) (Didelphimorphia: Didelphidae) from Minas Gerais are described as new for science. Three species of the family Listrophoridae, Prolistrophorus bidentatus Fain et Lukoschus, 1984 from Akodon cursor (Winge, 1887) (Rodentia: Cricetidae) (new host), Prolistrophorus ctenomys Fain, 1970 from Ctenomys torquatus Lichtenstein, 1830 (Rodentia: Ctenomyidae) (new host), and Leporacarus sylvilagi Fain, Whitaker et Lukoschus, 1981 from Sylvilagus brasiliensis (Linnaeus, 1758) (Lagomorpha: Leporidae) (new host) -from Minas Gerais and Rio Grande do Sul, and one species of the family Chirodiscidae, Parakosa tadarida McDaniel and Lawrence, 1962 from Molossus molossus (Pallas, 1766) (Chiroptera: Molossidae) are recorded for the first time in Brazil. The previously unknown female of Didelphoecius validus Fain, Zanatta-Coutinho et Fonseca, 1996 (Atopomelidae) from Metachirus nudicaudatus (Geoffroy, 1803) (Didelphimorphia: Didelphidae) from Minas Gerais is described. All data on host-parasite associations of sarcoptoids in Brazil are summarized. Totally, 61 sarcoptoid species of 8 families are recorded in Brazil. PMID:26751869

  19. DUF538 protein superfamily is predicted to be chlorophyll hydrolyzing enzymes in plants.

    PubMed

    Gholizadeh, Ashraf

    2016-01-01

    The possible hydrolytic activity towards chlorophyll molecules was predicted for DUF538 protein superfamily in plants. It was examined by using computational as well as experimental tools including in vitro chlorophyll degradation, antioxidant compounds production and in vivo real-time gene expression tests. Comparison of the computational data with the experimental results indicated that DUF538 proteins might be chlorophyll hydrolyzing enzyme (most probably carboxyesterase) which degrade chlorophyll molecules (66 % per 12 hrs) to produce new compounds (1.8 fold per 12 hrs) with antioxidant properties. The relevance of DUF538 gene expression level with the chlorophyll contents (2.8 fold increase per chlorophyll content of 50 %) of the drought-stressed leaves showed that chlorophyll degradation by DUF538 is most probably induced in response to stress stimuli. Despite membranous chlorophyll catabolic pathways, DUF538-dependent reactions is predicted to be occurred in the cytosol of the under stressed plants. We addressed as to whether chlorophyll breakdown to antioxidant compounds by DUF538 is a defense mechanism of plants against stress stimuli, in vivo? This question is going to be investigated in our next research project. PMID:27186021

  20. The P450 superfamily: update on new sequences, gene mapping, and recommended nomenclature.

    PubMed

    Nebert, D W; Nelson, D R; Coon, M J; Estabrook, R W; Feyereisen, R; Fujii-Kuriyama, Y; Gonzalez, F J; Guengerich, F P; Gunsalus, I C; Johnson, E F

    1991-01-01

    We provide here a list of 154 P450 genes and seven putative pseudogenes that have been characterized as of October 20, 1990. These genes have been described in a total of 23 eukaryotes (including nine mammalian and one plant species) and six prokaryotes. Of 27 gene families so far described, 10 exist in all mammals. These 10 families comprise 18 subfamilies, of which 16 and 14 have been mapped in the human and mouse genomes, respectively; to date, each subfamily appears to represent a cluster of tightly linked genes. We propose here a modest revision of the initially proposed (Nebert et al., DNA 6, 1-11, 1987) and updated (Nebert et al., DNA 8, 1-13, 1989) nomenclature system based on evolution of the superfamily. For the gene we recommend that the italicized root symbol CYP for human (Cyp for mouse), representing cytochrome P450, be followed by an Arabic number denoting the family, a letter designating the subfamily (when two or more exist), and an Arabic numeral representing the individual gene within the subfamily. A hyphen should precede the final number in mouse genes. We suggest that the human nomenclature system be used for other species. This system is consistent with our earlier proposed nomenclature for P450 of all eukaryotes and prokaryotes, except that we are discouraging the future use of cumbersome Roman numerals. PMID:1991046

  1. TNF Superfamily Protein–Protein Interactions: Feasibility of Small-Molecule Modulation

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yun; Buchwald, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The tumor necrosis factor (TNF) superfamily (TNFSF) contains about thirty structurally related receptors (TNFSFRs) and about twenty protein ligands that bind to one or more of these receptors. Almost all of these cell surface protein-protein interactions (PPIs) represent high-value therapeutic targets for inflammatory or immune modulation in autoimmune diseases, transplant recipients, or cancers, and there are several biologics including antibodies and fusion proteins targeting them that are in various phases of clinical development. Small-molecule inhibitors or activators could represent possible alternatives if the difficulties related to the targeting of protein-protein interactions by small molecules can be addressed. Compounds proving the feasibility of such approaches have been identified through different drug discovery approaches for a number of these TNFSFR-TNFSF type PPIs including CD40-CD40L, BAFFR-BAFF, TRAIL-DR5, and OX40-OX40L. Corresponding structural, signaling, and medicinal chemistry aspects are briefly reviewed here. While none of these small-molecule modulators identified so far seems promising enough to be pursued for clinical development, they provide proof-of-principle evidence that these interactions are susceptible to small-molecule modulation and can serve as starting points toward the identification of more potent and selective candidates. PMID:25706111

  2. Characterization of a Novel Conus bandanus Conopeptide Belonging to the M-Superfamily Containing Bromotryptophan

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Bao; Le Caer, Jean-Pierre; Mourier, Gilles; Thai, Robert; Lamthanh, Hung; Servent, Denis; Benoit, Evelyne; Molgó, Jordi

    2014-01-01

    A novel conotoxin (conopeptide) was biochemically characterized from the crude venom of the molluscivorous marine snail, Conus bandanus (Hwass in Bruguière, 1792), collected in the south-central coast of Vietnam. The peptide was identified by screening bromotryptophan from chromatographic fractions of the crude venom. Tandem mass spectrometry techniques were used to detect and localize different post-translational modifications (PTMs) present in the BnIIID conopeptide. The sequence was confirmed by Edman’s degradation and mass spectrometry revealing that the purified BnIIID conopeptide had 15 amino acid residues, with six cysteines at positions 1, 2, 7, 11, 13, and 14, and three PTMs: bromotryptophan, γ-carboxy glutamate, and amidated aspartic acid, at positions “4”, “5”, and “15”, respectively. The BnIIID peptide was synthesized for comparison with the native peptide. Homology comparison with conopeptides having the III-cysteine framework (–CCx1x2x3x4Cx1x2x3Cx1CC–) revealed that BnIIID belongs to the M-1 family of conotoxins. This is the first report of a member of the M-superfamily containing bromotryptophan as PTM. PMID:24905483

  3. Plum, an immunoglobulin superfamily protein, regulates axon pruning by facilitating TGF-β signaling

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiaomeng M.; Gutman, Itai; Mosca, Timothy J.; Iram, Tal; Özkan, Engin; Garcia, K. Christopher; Luo, Liqun; Schuldiner, Oren

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Axon pruning during development is essential for the proper wiring of the mature nervous system, but its regulation remains poorly understood. We have identified an immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF) transmembrane protein, Plum, that is cell-autonomously required for axon pruning of mushroom body (MB) γ neurons and for ectopic synapse refinement at the developing neuromuscular junction in Drosophila. Plum promotes MB γ neuron axon pruning by regulating the expression of Ecdysone Receptor-B1, a key initiator of axon pruning. Genetic analyses indicate that Plum acts to facilitate signaling of Myoglianin, a glial-derived TGF-β, on MB γ neurons upstream of the type-I TGF-β receptor Baboon. Myoglianin, Baboon, and Ecdysone Receptor-B1 are also required for neuromuscular junction ectopic synapse refinement. Our study highlights both IgSF proteins and TGF-β facilitation as key promoters of developmental axon elimination and demonstrates a mechanistic conservation between MB axon pruning during metamorphosis and the refinement of ectopic larval neuromuscular connections. PMID:23664613

  4. Phylogenetic relationships among hadal amphipods of the Superfamily Lysianassoidea: Implications for taxonomy and biogeography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritchie, H.; Jamieson, A. J.; Piertney, S. B.

    2015-11-01

    Amphipods of the superfamily Lysianassoidea are ubiquitous at hadal depths (>6000 m) and therefore are an ideal model group for investigating levels of endemism and the drivers of speciation in deep ocean trenches. The taxonomic classification of hadal amphipods is typically based on conventional morphological traits but it has been suggested that convergent evolution, phenotypic plasticity, intra-specific variability and ontogenetic variation may obscure the ability to robustly diagnose taxa and define species. Here we use phylogenetic analysis of DNA sequence variation at two mitochondrial (COI and 16S rDNA) and one nuclear (18S rDNA) regions at to examine the evolutionary relationships among 25 putative amphipod species representing 14 genera and 11 families that were sampled from across seven hadal trenches. We identify several instances where species, genera and families do not resolve monophyletic clades, highlighting incongruence between the current taxonomic classification and the molecular phylogeny for this group. Our data also help extend and resolve the known biogeographic distributions for the different species, such as identifying the co-occurrence of Hirondellea dubia and Hirondellea gigas in the Mariana trench.

  5. Prevertebrate Local Gene Duplication Facilitated Expansion of the Neuropeptide GPCR Superfamily.

    PubMed

    Yun, Seongsik; Furlong, Michael; Sim, Mikang; Cho, Minah; Park, Sumi; Cho, Eun Bee; Reyes-Alcaraz, Arfaxad; Hwang, Jong-Ik; Kim, Jaebum; Seong, Jae Young

    2015-11-01

    In humans, numerous genes encode neuropeptides that comprise a superfamily of more than 70 genes in approximately 30 families and act mainly through rhodopsin-like G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Two rounds of whole-genome duplication (2R WGD) during early vertebrate evolution greatly contributed to proliferation within gene families; however, the mechanisms underlying the initial emergence and diversification of these gene families before 2R WGD are largely unknown. In this study, we analyzed 25 vertebrate rhodopsin-like neuropeptide GPCR families and their cognate peptides using phylogeny, synteny, and localization of these genes on reconstructed vertebrate ancestral chromosomes (VACs). Based on phylogeny, these GPCR families can be divided into five distinct clades, and members of each clade tend to be located on the same VACs. Similarly, their neuropeptide gene families also tend to reside on distinct VACs. Comparison of these GPCR genes with those of invertebrates including Drosophila melanogaster, Caenorhabditis elegans, Branchiostoma floridae, and Ciona intestinalis indicates that these GPCR families emerged through tandem local duplication during metazoan evolution prior to 2R WGD. Our study describes a presumptive evolutionary mechanism and development pathway of the vertebrate rhodopsin-like GPCR and cognate neuropeptide families from the urbilaterian ancestor to modern vertebrates. PMID:26337547

  6. Evolutionary affiliations within the superfamily of ketosynthases reflect complex pathway associations.

    PubMed

    Moffitt, Michelle C; Neilan, Brett A

    2003-04-01

    Type I polyketide synthases are known to produce a wide range of medically and industrially important polyketides. The ketosynthase (KS) domain is required for the condensation of an extender unit onto the growing polyketide chain during polyketide biosynthesis. KSs represent a superfamily of complex biosynthetic pathway-associated enzymes found in prokaryotes, fungi, and plants. Although themselves functionally conserved, KSs are involved in the production of a structurally diverse range of metabolites. Degenerate oligonucleotide primers, designed for the amplification of KS domains, amplified KS domains from a range of organisms including cyanobacterial and dinoflagellates. KS domains detected in dinoflagellate cultures appear to have been amplified from the less than 3- micro m filtrate of the nonaxenic culture. Phylogenetic analysis of sequences obtained during this study enabled the specific identification of KS domains of hybrid or mixed polyketide synthase/peptide synthetase complexes, required for the condensation of an extender unit onto an amino acid starter unit. The primer sets described in this study were also used for the detection of novel KS domains directly from environmental samples. The ability to predict function based on primary molecular structure will be critical for future discovery and rational engineering of polyketides. PMID:12664164

  7. Expression Divergence of Duplicate Genes in the Protein Kinase Superfamily in Pacific Oyster.

    PubMed

    Gao, Dahai; Ko, Dennis C; Tian, Xinmin; Yang, Guang; Wang, Liuyang

    2015-01-01

    Gene duplication has been proposed to serve as the engine of evolutionary innovation. It is well recognized that eukaryotic genomes contain a large number of duplicated genes that evolve new functions or expression patterns. However, in mollusks, the evolutionary mechanisms underlying the divergence and the functional maintenance of duplicate genes remain little understood. In the present study, we performed a comprehensive analysis of duplicate genes in the protein kinase superfamily using whole genome and transcriptome data for the Pacific oyster. A total of 64 duplicated gene pairs were identified based on a phylogenetic approach and the reciprocal best BLAST method. By analyzing gene expression from RNA-seq data from 69 different developmental and stimuli-induced conditions (nine tissues, 38 developmental stages, eight dry treatments, seven heat treatments, and seven salty treatments), we found that expression patterns were significantly correlated for a number of duplicate gene pairs, suggesting the conservation of regulatory mechanisms following divergence. Our analysis also identified a subset of duplicate gene pairs with very high expression divergence, indicating that these gene pairs may have been subjected to transcriptional subfunctionalization or neofunctionalization after the initial duplication events. Further analysis revealed a significant correlation between expression and sequence divergence (as revealed by synonymous or nonsynonymous substitution rates) under certain conditions. Taken together, these results provide evidence for duplicate gene sequence and expression divergence in the Pacific oyster, accompanying its adaptation to harsh environments. Our results provide new insights into the evolution of duplicate genes and their expression levels in the Pacific oyster. PMID:26417197

  8. Tracing the structural evolution of eukaryotic ATP binding cassette transporter superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Jie; Feng, Jinmei; Yuan, Dongxia; Zhou, Jun; Miao, Wei

    2015-01-01

    The ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters superfamily is one of the largest classes of membrane proteins. The core of the ABC transporter protein is composed of transmembrane domains (TMDs) and nucleotide binding domains (NBD). Eukaryotes ABC transporters are classified into seven main families (ABCA to ABCG) based on sequence similarity and domain organizations. With different domain number and domain organizations, eukaryote ABC transporters show diverse structures: the single structure (NBD or TMD), the ABC2 structure (NBD-NBD), the half structure (TMD-NBD or NBD-TMD) and the full structure (TMD-NBD-TMD-NBD or NBD-TMD-NBD-TMD). However, studies on how various ABC transporter gene structures evolved is still absent. Therefore, in this study, we comprehensively investigated the structural evolution of eukaryotic ABC transporters. The seven eukaryote ABC transporter families (A to G) fell into three groups: A&G group, B,C&D group and E&F group. There were at least four times the number of NBD and TMD fusion events in the origin of the half structure transporter. Two fusion modes were found in the full and ABC2 structure origination. Based on these findings, we present a putative structural evolutionary path of eukaryote ABC transporters that will increase our understanding on their origin, divergence and function. PMID:26577702

  9. Evolution of the cytochrome P450 superfamily: sequence alignments and pharmacogenetics.

    PubMed

    Lewis, D F; Watson, E; Lake, B G

    1998-06-01

    The evolution of the cytochrome P450 (CYP) superfamily is described, with particular reference to major events in the development of biological forms during geological time. It is noted that the currently accepted timescale for the elaboration of the P450 phylogenetic tree exhibits close parallels with the evolution of terrestrial biota. Indeed, the present human P450 complement of xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes may have originated from coevolutionary 'warfare' between plants and animals during the Devonian period about 400 million years ago. A number of key correspondences between the evolution of P450 system and the course of biological development over time, point to a mechanistic molecular biology of evolution which is consistent with a steady increase in atmospheric oxygenation beginning over 2000 million years ago, whereas dietary changes during more recent geological time may provide one possible explanation for certain species differences in metabolism. Alignment between P450 protein sequences within the same family or subfamily, together with across-family comparisons, aid the rationalization of drug metabolism specificities for different P450 isoforms, and can assist in an understanding of genetic polymorphisms in P450-mediated oxidations at the molecular level. Moreover, the variation in P450 regulatory mechanisms and inducibilities between different mammalian species are likely to have important implications for current procedures of chemical safety evaluation, which rely on pure genetic strains of laboratory bred rodents for the testing of compounds destined for human exposure. PMID:9630657

  10. Glutathione Transferases Superfamily: Cold-Inducible Expression of Distinct GST Genes in Brassica oleracea.

    PubMed

    Vijayakumar, Harshavardhanan; Thamilarasan, Senthil Kumar; Shanmugam, Ashokraj; Natarajan, Sathishkumar; Jung, Hee-Jeong; Park, Jong-In; Kim, HyeRan; Chung, Mi-Young; Nou, Ill-Sup

    2016-01-01

    Plants, as sessile organisms, can suffer serious growth and developmental consequences under cold stress conditions. Glutathione transferases (GSTs, EC 2.5.1.18) are ubiquitous and multifunctional conjugating proteins, which play a major role in stress responses by preventing oxidative damage by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Currently, understanding of their function(s) during different biochemical and signaling pathways under cold stress condition remain unclear. In this study, using combined computational strategy, we identified 65 Brassica oleracea glutathione transferases (BoGST) and characterized them based on evolutionary analysis into 11 classes. Inter-species and intra-species duplication was evident between BoGSTs and Arabidopsis GSTs. Based on localization analyses, we propose possible pathways in which GST genes are involved during cold stress. Further, expression analysis of the predicted putative functions for GST genes were investigated in two cold contrasting genotypes (cold tolerance and susceptible) under cold condition, most of these genes were highly expressed at 6 h and 1 h in the cold tolerant (CT) and cold susceptible (CS) lines, respectively. Overall, BoGSTU19, BoGSTU24, BoGSTF10 are candidate genes highly expressed in B. oleracea. Further investigation of GST superfamily in B. oleracea will aid in understanding complex mechanism underlying cold tolerance in plants. PMID:27472324

  11. S-nitrosylation in TNF superfamily signaling pathway: Implication in cancer☆

    PubMed Central

    Plenchette, Stéphanie; Romagny, Sabrina; Laurens, Véronique; Bettaieb, Ali

    2015-01-01

    One of the key features of tumor cells is the acquisition of resistance to apoptosis. Thus, novel therapeutic strategies that circumvent apoptotic resistance and result in tumor elimination are needed. One strategy to induce apoptosis is to activate death receptor signaling pathways. In the tumor microenvironment, stimulation of Fas, Death receptor 4 (DR4) and tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (TNFR1) can initiate multiple signaling pathways driving either tumor promotion or elimination. Nitric oxide (NO) is an important signaling molecule now understood to play a dual role in cancer biology. More and more attention is directed toward the role displayed by S-nitrosylation, the incorporation of an NO moiety to a cysteine thiol group, in promoting cell death in tumor cells. Protein post-translation modification by S-nitrosylation has decisive roles in regulating signal-transduction pathways. In this review, we summarize several examples of protein modification by S-nitrosylation that regulate signaling pathways engaged by members of the TNF superfamily (Fas ligand (FasL), Tumor-necrosis-factor-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL) and TNFalpha (TNFα)) and the way it influences cell fate decisions. PMID:26448396

  12. Glutathione Transferases Superfamily: Cold-Inducible Expression of Distinct GST Genes in Brassica oleracea

    PubMed Central

    Vijayakumar, Harshavardhanan; Thamilarasan, Senthil Kumar; Shanmugam, Ashokraj; Natarajan, Sathishkumar; Jung, Hee-Jeong; Park, Jong-In; Kim, HyeRan; Chung, Mi-Young; Nou, Ill-Sup

    2016-01-01

    Plants, as sessile organisms, can suffer serious growth and developmental consequences under cold stress conditions. Glutathione transferases (GSTs, EC 2.5.1.18) are ubiquitous and multifunctional conjugating proteins, which play a major role in stress responses by preventing oxidative damage by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Currently, understanding of their function(s) during different biochemical and signaling pathways under cold stress condition remain unclear. In this study, using combined computational strategy, we identified 65 Brassica oleracea glutathione transferases (BoGST) and characterized them based on evolutionary analysis into 11 classes. Inter-species and intra-species duplication was evident between BoGSTs and Arabidopsis GSTs. Based on localization analyses, we propose possible pathways in which GST genes are involved during cold stress. Further, expression analysis of the predicted putative functions for GST genes were investigated in two cold contrasting genotypes (cold tolerance and susceptible) under cold condition, most of these genes were highly expressed at 6 h and 1 h in the cold tolerant (CT) and cold susceptible (CS) lines, respectively. Overall, BoGSTU19, BoGSTU24, BoGSTF10 are candidate genes highly expressed in B. oleracea. Further investigation of GST superfamily in B. oleracea will aid in understanding complex mechanism underlying cold tolerance in plants. PMID:27472324

  13. Active transporters as enzymes: an energetic framework applied to major facilitator superfamily and ABC importer systems.

    PubMed

    Shilton, Brian H

    2015-04-15

    Active membrane transporters are dynamic molecular machines that catalyse transport across a membrane by coupling solute movement to a source of energy such as ATP or a secondary ion gradient. A central question for many active transporters concerns the mechanism by which transport is coupled to a source of energy. The transport process and associated energetic coupling involve conformational changes in the transporter. For efficient transport, the conformational changes must be tightly regulated and they must link energy use to movement of the substrate across the membrane. The present review discusses active transport using the well-established energetic framework for enzyme-mediated catalysis. In particular, membrane transport systems can be viewed as ensembles consisting of low-energy and high-energy conformations. The transport process involves binding interactions that selectively stabilize the higher energy conformations, and in this way promote conformational changes in the system that are coupled to decreases in free energy and substrate translocation. The major facilitator superfamily of secondary active transporters is used to illustrate these ideas, which are then be expanded to primary active transport mediated by ABC (ATP-binding cassette) import systems, with a focus on the well-studied maltose transporter. PMID:25837849

  14. The Cadherin Superfamily in Anopheles gambiae: a Comparative Study With Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Simões, Sérgio; Moita, Luís F.; Jacinto, António; Fernandes, Pedro

    2005-01-01

    The cadherin superfamily is a diverse and multifunctional group of proteins with extensive representation across genomes of phylogenetically distant species that is involved in cell–cell communication and adhesion. The mosquito Anopheles gambiae is an emerging model organism for the study of innate immunity and host–pathogen interactions, where the malaria parasite induces a profound rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton at critical stages of infection. We have used bioinformatics tools to retrieve present sequence knowledge about the complete repertoire of cadherins in A. gambiae and compared it to that of the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. In A. gambiae, we have identified 43 genes coding for cadherin extracellular domains that were re-annotated to 38 genes and represent an expansion of this gene family in comparison to other invertebrate organisms. The majority of Drosophila cadherins show a 1 : 1 Anopheles orthologue, but we have observed a remarkable expansion in some groups in A. gambiae, such as N-cadherins, that were recently shown to have a role in the olfactory system of the fruit fly. In vivo dsRNA silencing of overrepresented genes in A. gambiae and other genes showing expression at critical tissues for parasite infection will likely advance our understanding of the problems of host preference and host–pathogen interactions in this mosquito species. PMID:18629193

  15. Stonefish toxin defines an ancient branch of the perforin-like superfamily.

    PubMed

    Ellisdon, Andrew M; Reboul, Cyril F; Panjikar, Santosh; Huynh, Kitmun; Oellig, Christine A; Winter, Kelly L; Dunstone, Michelle A; Hodgson, Wayne C; Seymour, Jamie; Dearden, Peter K; Tweten, Rodney K; Whisstock, James C; McGowan, Sheena

    2015-12-15

    The lethal factor in stonefish venom is stonustoxin (SNTX), a heterodimeric cytolytic protein that induces cardiovascular collapse in humans and native predators. Here, using X-ray crystallography, we make the unexpected finding that SNTX is a pore-forming member of an ancient branch of the Membrane Attack Complex-Perforin/Cholesterol-Dependent Cytolysin (MACPF/CDC) superfamily. SNTX comprises two homologous subunits (α and β), each of which comprises an N-terminal pore-forming MACPF/CDC domain, a central focal adhesion-targeting domain, a thioredoxin domain, and a C-terminal tripartite motif family-like PRY SPla and the RYanodine Receptor immune recognition domain. Crucially, the structure reveals that the two MACPF domains are in complex with one another and arranged into a stable early prepore-like assembly. These data provide long sought after near-atomic resolution insights into how MACPF/CDC proteins assemble into prepores on the surface of membranes. Furthermore, our analyses reveal that SNTX-like MACPF/CDCs are distributed throughout eukaryotic life and play a broader, possibly immune-related function outside venom. PMID:26627714

  16. Sequence-Structure-Function Classification of a Catalytically Diverse Oxidoreductase Superfamily in Mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, F Hafna; Carr, Paul D; Lee, Brendon M; Afriat-Jurnou, Livnat; Mohamed, A Elaaf; Hong, Nan-Sook; Flanagan, Jack; Taylor, Matthew C; Greening, Chris; Jackson, Colin J

    2015-11-01

    The deazaflavin cofactor F420 enhances the persistence of mycobacteria during hypoxia, oxidative stress, and antibiotic treatment. However, the identities and functions of the mycobacterial enzymes that utilize F420 under these conditions have yet to be resolved. In this work, we used sequence similarity networks to analyze the distribution of the largest F420-dependent protein family in mycobacteria. We show that these enzymes are part of a larger split β-barrel enzyme superfamily (flavin/deazaflavin oxidoreductases, FDORs) that include previously characterized pyridoxamine/pyridoxine-5'-phosphate oxidases and heme oxygenases. We show that these proteins variously utilize F420, flavin mononucleotide, flavin adenine dinucleotide, and heme cofactors. Functional annotation using phylogenetic, structural, and spectroscopic methods revealed their involvement in heme degradation, biliverdin reduction, fatty acid modification, and quinone reduction. Four novel crystal structures show that plasticity in substrate binding pockets and modifications to cofactor binding motifs enabled FDORs to carry out a variety of functions. This systematic classification and analysis provides a framework for further functional analysis of the roles of FDORs in mycobacterial pathogenesis and persistence. PMID:26434506

  17. Intracellular transport and kinesin superfamily proteins, KIFs: structure, function, and dynamics.

    PubMed

    Hirokawa, Nobutaka; Noda, Yasuko

    2008-07-01

    Various molecular cell biology and molecular genetic approaches have indicated significant roles for kinesin superfamily proteins (KIFs) in intracellular transport and have shown that they are critical for cellular morphogenesis, functioning, and survival. KIFs not only transport various membrane organelles, protein complexes, and mRNAs for the maintenance of basic cellular activity, but also play significant roles for various mechanisms fundamental for life, such as brain wiring, higher brain functions such as memory and learning and activity-dependent neuronal survival during brain development, and for the determination of important developmental processes such as left-right asymmetry formation and suppression of tumorigenesis. Accumulating data have revealed a molecular mechanism of cargo recognition involving scaffolding or adaptor protein complexes. Intramolecular folding and phosphorylation also regulate the binding activity of motor proteins. New techniques using molecular biophysics, cryoelectron microscopy, and X-ray crystallography have detected structural changes in motor proteins, synchronized with ATP hydrolysis cycles, leading to the development of independent models of monomer and dimer motors for processive movement along microtubules. PMID:18626067

  18. Sorting Nexin 17 Interacts Directly with Kinesin Superfamily KIF1Bbeta Protein.

    PubMed

    Seog, Dae-Hyun; Han, Jin

    2008-08-01

    KIF1Bbeta is a member of the Kinesin superfamily proteins (KIFs), which are microtubule-dependent molecular motors that are involved in various intracellular organellar transport processes. KIF1Bbeta is not restricted to neuronal systems, however, is widely expressed in other tissues, even though the function of KIF1Bbeta is still unclear. To elucidate the KIF1Bbeta-binding proteins in non-neuronal cells, we used the yeast two-hybrid system, and found a specific interaction of KIF1Bbeta and the sorting nexin (SNX) 17. The C-terminal region of SNX17 is required for the binding with KIF1Bbeta. SNX17 protein bound to the specific region of KIF1Bbeta (813-916. aa), but not to other kinesin family members. In addition, this specific interaction was also observed in the Glutathione S-transferase pull-down assay. An antibody to SNX17 specifically co-immunoprecipitated KIF1Bbeta associated with SNX17 from mouse brain extracts. These results suggest that SNX17 might be involved in the KIF1Bbeta-mediated transport as a KIF1Bbeta adaptor protein. PMID:19967056

  19. Kinesin superfamily protein 3 (KIF3) motor transports fodrin-associating vesicles important for neurite building.

    PubMed

    Takeda, S; Yamazaki, H; Seog, D H; Kanai, Y; Terada, S; Hirokawa, N

    2000-03-20

    Kinesin superfamily proteins (KIFs) comprise several dozen molecular motor proteins. The KIF3 heterotrimer complex is one of the most abundantly and ubiquitously expressed KIFs in mammalian cells. To unveil the functions of KIF3, microinjection of function-blocking monovalent antibodies against KIF3 into cultured superior cervical ganglion (SCG) neurons was carried out. They significantly blocked fast axonal transport and brought about inhibition of neurite extension. A yeast two-hybrid binding assay revealed the association of fodrin with the KIF3 motor through KAP3. This was further confirmed by using vesicles collected from large bundles of axons (cauda equina), from which membranous vesicles could be prepared in pure preparations. Both immunoprecipitation and immunoelectron microscopy indicated the colocalization of fodrin and KIF3 on the same vesicles, the results reinforcing the evidence that the cargo of the KIF3 motor consists of fodrin-associating vesicles. In addition, pulse-labeling study implied partial comigration of both molecules as fast flow components. Taken together, the KIF3 motor is engaged in fast axonal transport that conveys membranous components important for neurite extension. PMID:10725338

  20. The Tumor Necrosis Factor Superfamily Molecule LIGHT Promotes Keratinocyte Activity and Skin Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Herro, Rana; Da Silva Antunes, Ricardo; Aguilera, Amelia Roman; Tamada, Koji; Croft, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Several inflammatory diseases including scleroderma and atopic dermatitis display dermal thickening, epidermal hypertrophy, or excessive accumulation of collagen. Factors that might promote these features are of interest for clinical therapy. We previously reported that LIGHT, a TNF superfamily molecule, mediated collagen deposition in the lungs in response to allergen. We therefore tested whether LIGHT might similarly promote collagen accumulation and features of skin fibrosis. Strikingly, injection of recombinant soluble LIGHT into naïve mice, either subcutaneously or systemically, promoted collagen deposition in the skin, and dermal and epidermal thickening. This replicated the activity of bleomycin, an antibiotic that has been previously used in models of scleroderma in mice. Moreover skin fibrosis induced by bleomycin was dependent on endogenous LIGHT activity. The action of LIGHT in vivo was mediated via both of its receptors, HVEM and LTβR, and was dependent on the innate cytokine TSLP and TGF-β. Furthermore, we found that HVEM and LTβR were expressed on human epidermal keratinocytes, and that LIGHT could directly promote TSLP expression in these cells. We reveal an unappreciated activity of LIGHT on keratinocytes and suggest that LIGHT may be an important mediator of skin inflammation and fibrosis in diseases such as scleroderma or atopic dermatitis. PMID:25789702

  1. A unique uracil-DNA binding protein of the uracil DNA glycosylase superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Sang, Pau Biak; Srinath, Thiruneelakantan; Patil, Aravind Goud; Woo, Eui-Jeon; Varshney, Umesh

    2015-01-01

    Uracil DNA glycosylases (UDGs) are an important group of DNA repair enzymes, which pioneer the base excision repair pathway by recognizing and excising uracil from DNA. Based on two short conserved sequences (motifs A and B), UDGs have been classified into six families. Here we report a novel UDG, UdgX, from Mycobacterium smegmatis and other organisms. UdgX specifically recognizes uracil in DNA, forms a tight complex stable to sodium dodecyl sulphate, 2-mercaptoethanol, urea and heat treatment, and shows no detectable uracil excision. UdgX shares highest homology to family 4 UDGs possessing Fe-S cluster. UdgX possesses a conserved sequence, KRRIH, which forms a flexible loop playing an important role in its activity. Mutations of H in the KRRIH sequence to S, G, A or Q lead to gain of uracil excision activity in MsmUdgX, establishing it as a novel member of the UDG superfamily. Our observations suggest that UdgX marks the uracil-DNA for its repair by a RecA dependent process. Finally, we observed that the tight binding activity of UdgX is useful in detecting uracils in the genomes. PMID:26304551

  2. Reciprocal Interactions between Cell Adhesion Molecules of the Immunoglobulin Superfamily and the Cytoskeleton in Neurons.

    PubMed

    Leshchyns'ka, Iryna; Sytnyk, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    Cell adhesion molecules of the immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF) including the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) and members of the L1 family of neuronal cell adhesion molecules play important functions in the developing nervous system by regulating formation, growth and branching of neurites, and establishment of the synaptic contacts between neurons. In the mature brain, members of IgSF regulate synapse composition, function, and plasticity required for learning and memory. The intracellular domains of IgSF cell adhesion molecules interact with the components of the cytoskeleton including the submembrane actin-spectrin meshwork, actin microfilaments, and microtubules. In this review, we summarize current data indicating that interactions between IgSF cell adhesion molecules and the cytoskeleton are reciprocal, and that while IgSF cell adhesion molecules regulate the assembly of the cytoskeleton, the cytoskeleton plays an important role in regulation of the functions of IgSF cell adhesion molecules. Reciprocal interactions between NCAM and L1 family members and the cytoskeleton and their role in neuronal differentiation and synapse formation are discussed in detail. PMID:26909348

  3. Hypervariability within the Rifin, Stevor and Pfmc-2TM superfamilies in Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Lavazec, Catherine; Sanyal, Sohini; Templeton, Thomas J.

    2006-01-01

    The human malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, possesses a broad repertoire of proteins that are proposed to be trafficked to the erythrocyte cytoplasm or surface, based upon the presence within these proteins of a Pexel/VTS erythrocyte-trafficking motif. This catalog includes large families of predicted 2 transmembrane (2TM) proteins, including the Rifin, Stevor and Pfmc-2TM superfamilies, of which each possesses a region of extensive sequence diversity across paralogs and between isolates that is confined to a proposed surface-exposed loop on the infected erythrocyte. Here we express epitope-tagged versions of the 2TM proteins in transgenic NF54 parasites and present evidence that the Stevor and Pfmc-2TM families are exported to the erythrocyte membrane, thus supporting the hypothesis that host immune pressure drives antigenic diversity within the loop. An examination of multiple P.falciparum isolates demonstrates that the hypervariable loop within Stevor and Pfmc-2TM proteins possesses sequence diversity across isolate boundaries. The Pfmc-2TM genes are encoded within large amplified loci that share profound nucleotide identity, which in turn highlight the divergences observed within the hypervariable loop. The majority of Pexel/VTS proteins are organized together within sub-telomeric genome neighborhoods, and a mechanism must therefore exist to differentially generate sequence diversity within select genes, as well as within highly defined regions within these genes. PMID:17148488

  4. Assessment of toxicity using dehydrogenases activity and mathematical modeling.

    PubMed

    Matyja, Konrad; Małachowska-Jutsz, Anna; Mazur, Anna K; Grabas, Kazimierz

    2016-07-01

    Dehydrogenase activity is frequently used to assess the general condition of microorganisms in soil and activated sludge. Many studies have investigated the inhibition of dehydrogenase activity by various compounds, including heavy metal ions. However, the time after which the measurements are carried out is often chosen arbitrarily. Thus, it can be difficult to estimate how the toxic effects of compounds vary during the reaction and when the maximum of the effect would be reached. Hence, the aim of this study was to create simple and useful mathematical model describing changes in dehydrogenase activity during exposure to substances that inactivate enzymes. Our model is based on the Lagergrens pseudo-first-order equation, the rate of chemical reactions, enzyme activity, and inactivation and was created to describe short-term changes in dehydrogenase activity. The main assumption of our model is that toxic substances cause irreversible inactivation of enzyme units. The model is able to predict the maximum direct toxic effect (MDTE) and the time to reach this maximum (TMDTE). In order to validate our model, we present two examples: inactivation of dehydrogenase in microorganisms in soil and activated sludge. The model was applied successfully for cadmium and copper ions. Our results indicate that the predicted MDTE and TMDTE are more appropriate than EC50 and IC50 for toxicity assessments, except for long exposure times. PMID:27021434

  5. Characterization and purification of carbon monoxide dehydrogenase from Methanosarcina barkeri.

    PubMed Central

    Krzycki, J A; Zeikus, J G

    1984-01-01

    Carbon monoxide-dependent production of H2, CO2, and CH4 was detected in crude cell extracts of acetate-grown Methanosarcina barkeri. This metabolic transformation was associated with an active methyl viologen-linked CO dehydrogenase activity (5 to 10 U/mg of protein). Carbon monoxide dehydrogenase activity was inhibited 85% by 10 microM KCN and was rapidly inactivated by O2. The enzyme was nearly homogeneous after 20-fold purification, indicating that a significant proportion of soluble cell protein was CO dehydrogenase (ca. 5%). The native purified enzyme displayed a molecular weight of 232,000 and a two-subunit composition of 92,000 and 18,000 daltons. The enzyme was shown to contain nickel by isolation of radioactive CO dehydrogenase from cells grown in 63Ni. Analysis of enzyme kinetic properties revealed an apparent Km of 5 mM for CO and a Vmax of 1,300 U/mg of protein. The spectral properties of the enzyme were similar to those published for CO dehydrogenase from acetogenic anaerobes. The physiological functions of the enzyme are discussed. Images PMID:6425262

  6. Dehydrogenase activity of forest soils depends on the assay used

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Januszek, Kazimierz; Długa, Joanna; Socha, Jarosław

    2015-01-01

    Dehydrogenases are exclusively intracellular enzymes, which play an important role in the initial stages of oxidation of soil organic matter. One of the most frequently used methods to estimate dehydrogenase activity in soil is based on the use of triphenyltetrazolium chloride as an artificial electron acceptor. The purpose of this study was to compare the activity of dehydrogenases of forest soils with varied physicochemical properties using different triphenyltetrazolium chloride assays. The determination was carried out using the original procedure by Casida et al., a modification of the procedure which involves the use of Ca(OH)2 instead of CaCO3, the Thalmann method, and the assay by Casida et al. without addition of buffer or any salt. Soil dehydrogenase activity depended on the assay used. Dehydrogenase determined by the Casida et al. method without addition of buffer or any salt correlated with the pH values of soils. The autoclaved strongly acidic samples of control soils showed high concentrations of triphenylformazan, probably due to chemical reduction of triphenyltetrazolium chloride. There is, therefore, a need for a sterilization method other than autoclaving, ie a process that results in significant changes in soil properties, thus helping to increase the chemical reduction of triphenyltetrazolium chloride.

  7. Characterization of interactions of dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase with its binding protein in the human pyruvate dehydrogenase complex

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Yun-Hee; Patel, Mulchand S.

    2010-05-07

    Unlike pyruvate dehydrogenase complexes (PDCs) from prokaryotes, PDCs from higher eukaryotes have an additional structural component, E3-binding protein (BP), for binding of dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (E3) in the complex. Based on the 3D structure of the subcomplex of human (h) E3 with the di-domain (L3S1) of hBP, the amino acid residues (H348, D413, Y438, and R447) of hE3 for binding to hBP were substituted singly by alanine or other residues. These substitutions did not have large effects on hE3 activity when measured in its free form. However, when these hE3 mutants were reconstituted in the complex, the PDC activity was significantly reduced to 9% for Y438A, 20% for Y438H, and 18% for D413A. The binding of hE3 mutants with L3S1 determined by isothermal titration calorimetry revealed that the binding affinities of the Y438A, Y438H, and D413A mutants to L3S1 were severely reduced (1019-, 607-, and 402-fold, respectively). Unlike wild-type hE3 the binding of the Y438A mutant to L3S1 was accompanied by an unfavorable enthalpy change and a large positive entropy change. These results indicate that hE3-Y438 and hE3-D413 play important roles in binding of hE3 to hBP.

  8. Cache Domains That are Homologous to, but Different from PAS Domains Comprise the Largest Superfamily of Extracellular Sensors in Prokaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyay, Amit A.; Fleetwood, Aaron D.; Adebali, Ogun; Finn, Robert D.; Zhulin, Igor B.

    2016-01-01

    Cellular receptors usually contain a designated sensory domain that recognizes the signal. Per/Arnt/Sim (PAS) domains are ubiquitous sensors in thousands of species ranging from bacteria to humans. Although PAS domains were described as intracellular sensors, recent structural studies revealed PAS-like domains in extracytoplasmic regions in several transmembrane receptors. However, these structurally defined extracellular PAS-like domains do not match sequence-derived PAS domain models, and thus their distribution across the genomic landscape remains largely unknown. Here we show that structurally defined extracellular PAS-like domains belong to the Cache superfamily, which is homologous to, but distinct from the PAS superfamily. Our newly built computational models enabled identification of Cache domains in tens of thousands of signal transduction proteins including those from important pathogens and model organisms. Furthermore, we show that Cache domains comprise the dominant mode of extracellular sensing in prokaryotes. PMID:27049771

  9. A superfamily of metalloenzymes unifies phosphopentomutase and cofactor-independent phosphoglycerate mutase with alkaline phosphatases and sulfatases.

    PubMed Central

    Galperin, M. Y.; Bairoch, A.; Koonin, E. V.

    1998-01-01

    Sequence analysis of the probable archaeal phosphoglycerate mutase resulted in the identification of a superfamily of metalloenzymes with similar metal-binding sites and predicted conserved structural fold. This superfamily unites alkaline phosphatase, N-acetylgalactosamine-4-sulfatase, and cerebroside sulfatase, enzymes with known three-dimensional structures, with phosphopentomutase, 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate-independent phosphoglycerate mutase, phosphoglycerol transferase, phosphonate monoesterase, streptomycin-6-phosphate phosphatase, alkaline phosphodiesterase/nucleotide pyrophosphatase PC-1, and several closely related sulfatases. In addition to the metal-binding motifs, all these enzymes contain a set of conserved amino acid residues that are likely to be required for the enzymatic activity. Mutational changes in the vicinity of these residues in several sulfatases cause mucopolysaccharidosis (Hunter, Maroteaux-Lamy, Morquio, and Sanfilippo syndromes) and metachromatic leucodystrophy. PMID:10082381

  10. Evaluation of NAD(P)-Dependent Dehydrogenase Activities in Neutrophilic Granulocytes by the Bioluminescent Method.

    PubMed

    Savchenko, A A

    2015-09-01

    Bioluminescent method for measurements of the neutrophilic NAD(P)-dependent dehydrogenases (lactate dehydrogenase, NAD-dependent malate dehydrogenase, NADP-dependent decarboxylating malate dehydrogenase, NAD-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase, and glucose- 6-phosphate dehydrogenase) is developed. The sensitivity of the method allows minimization of the volume of biological material for measurements to 104 neutrophils per analysis. The method is tried in patients with diffuse purulent peritonitis. Low levels of NADPH synthesis enzymes and high levels of enzymes determining the substrate flow by the Krebs cycle found in these patients can lead to attenuation of functional activity of cells. PMID:26468025

  11. Diversification of a single ancestral gene into a successful toxin superfamily in highly venomous Australian funnel-web spiders

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Spiders have evolved pharmacologically complex venoms that serve to rapidly subdue prey and deter predators. The major toxic factors in most spider venoms are small, disulfide-rich peptides. While there is abundant evidence that snake venoms evolved by recruitment of genes encoding normal body proteins followed by extensive gene duplication accompanied by explosive structural and functional diversification, the evolutionary trajectory of spider-venom peptides is less clear. Results Here we present evidence of a spider-toxin superfamily encoding a high degree of sequence and functional diversity that has evolved via accelerated duplication and diversification of a single ancestral gene. The peptides within this toxin superfamily are translated as prepropeptides that are posttranslationally processed to yield the mature toxin. The N-terminal signal sequence, as well as the protease recognition site at the junction of the propeptide and mature toxin are conserved, whereas the remainder of the propeptide and mature toxin sequences are variable. All toxin transcripts within this superfamily exhibit a striking cysteine codon bias. We show that different pharmacological classes of toxins within this peptide superfamily evolved under different evolutionary selection pressures. Conclusions Overall, this study reinforces the hypothesis that spiders use a combinatorial peptide library strategy to evolve a complex cocktail of peptide toxins that target neuronal receptors and ion channels in prey and predators. We show that the ω-hexatoxins that target insect voltage-gated calcium channels evolved under the influence of positive Darwinian selection in an episodic fashion, whereas the κ-hexatoxins that target insect calcium-activated potassium channels appear to be under negative selection. A majority of the diversifying sites in the ω-hexatoxins are concentrated on the molecular surface of the toxins, thereby facilitating neofunctionalisation leading to new toxin

  12. Gelsolin-Like Domain 3 Plays Vital Roles in Regulating the Activities of the Lily Villin/Gelsolin/Fragmin Superfamily.

    PubMed

    Qian, Dong; Nan, Qiong; Yang, Yueming; Li, Hui; Zhou, Yuelong; Zhu, Jingen; Bai, Qifeng; Zhang, Pan; An, Lizhe; Xiang, Yun

    2015-01-01

    The villin/gelsolin/fragmin superfamily is a major group of Ca2+-dependent actin-binding proteins (ABPs) involved in various cellular processes. Members of this superfamily typically possess three or six tandem gelsolin-like (G) domains, and each domain plays a distinct role in actin filament dynamics. Although the activities of most G domains have been characterized, the biochemical function of the G3 domain remains poorly understood. In this study, we carefully compared the detailed biochemical activities of ABP29 (a new member of this family that contains the G1-G2 domains of lily ABP135) and ABP135G1-G3 (which contains the G1-G3 domains of lily ABP135). In the presence of high Ca2+ levels in vitro (200 and 10 μM), ABP135G1-G3 exhibited greater actin severing and/or depolymerization and nucleating activities than ABP29, and these proteins had similar actin capping activities. However, in the presence of low levels of Ca2+ (41 nM), ABP135G1-G3 had a weaker capping activity than ABP29. In addition, ABP29 inhibited F-actin depolymerization, as shown by dilution-mediated depolymerization assay, differing from the typical superfamily proteins. In contrast, ABP135G1-G3 accelerated F-actin depolymerization. All of these results demonstrate that the G3 domain plays specific roles in regulating the activities of the lily villin/gelsolin/fragmin superfamily proteins. PMID:26587673

  13. Gelsolin-Like Domain 3 Plays Vital Roles in Regulating the Activities of the Lily Villin/Gelsolin/Fragmin Superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yueming; Li, Hui; Zhou, Yuelong; Zhu, Jingen; Bai, Qifeng; Zhang, Pan; An, Lizhe; Xiang, Yun

    2015-01-01

    The villin/gelsolin/fragmin superfamily is a major group of Ca2+-dependent actin-binding proteins (ABPs) involved in various cellular processes. Members of this superfamily typically possess three or six tandem gelsolin-like (G) domains, and each domain plays a distinct role in actin filament dynamics. Although the activities of most G domains have been characterized, the biochemical function of the G3 domain remains poorly understood. In this study, we carefully compared the detailed biochemical activities of ABP29 (a new member of this family that contains the G1-G2 domains of lily ABP135) and ABP135G1-G3 (which contains the G1-G3 domains of lily ABP135). In the presence of high Ca2+ levels in vitro (200 and 10 μM), ABP135G1-G3 exhibited greater actin severing and/or depolymerization and nucleating activities than ABP29, and these proteins had similar actin capping activities. However, in the presence of low levels of Ca2+ (41 nM), ABP135G1-G3 had a weaker capping activity than ABP29. In addition, ABP29 inhibited F-actin depolymerization, as shown by dilution-mediated depolymerization assay, differing from the typical superfamily proteins. In contrast, ABP135G1-G3 accelerated F-actin depolymerization. All of these results demonstrate that the G3 domain plays specific roles in regulating the activities of the lily villin/gelsolin/fragmin superfamily proteins. PMID:26587673

  14. Aminotransferase and glutamate dehydrogenase activities in lactobacilli and streptococci.

    PubMed

    Peralta, Guillermo Hugo; Bergamini, Carina Viviana; Hynes, Erica Rut

    2016-01-01

    Aminotransferases and glutamate dehydrogenase are two main types of enzymes involved in the initial steps of amino acid catabolism, which plays a key role in the cheese flavor development. In the present work, glutamate dehydrogenase and aminotransferase activities were screened in twenty one strains of lactic acid bacteria of dairy interest, either cheese-isolated or commercial starters, including fifteen mesophilic lactobacilli, four thermophilic lactobacilli, and two streptococci. The strains of Streptococcus thermophilus showed the highest glutamate dehydrogenase activity, which was significantly elevated compared with the lactobacilli. Aspartate aminotransferase prevailed in most strains tested, while the levels and specificity of other aminotransferases were highly strain- and species-dependent. The knowledge of enzymatic profiles of these starter and cheese-isolated cultures is helpful in proposing appropriate combinations of strains for improved or increased cheese flavor. PMID:27266631

  15. The Structure of a Sugar Transporter of the Glucose EIIC Superfamily Provides Insight into the Elevator Mechanism of Membrane Transport.

    PubMed

    McCoy, Jason G; Ren, Zhenning; Stanevich, Vitali; Lee, Jumin; Mitra, Sharmistha; Levin, Elena J; Poget, Sebastien; Quick, Matthias; Im, Wonpil; Zhou, Ming

    2016-06-01

    The phosphoenolpyruvate:carbohydrate phosphotransferase systems are found in bacteria, where they play central roles in sugar uptake and regulation of cellular uptake processes. Little is known about how the membrane-embedded components (EIICs) selectively mediate the passage of carbohydrates across the membrane. Here we report the functional characterization and 2.55-Å resolution structure of a maltose transporter, bcMalT, belonging to the glucose superfamily of EIIC transporters. bcMalT crystallized in an outward-facing occluded conformation, in contrast to the structure of another glucose superfamily EIIC, bcChbC, which crystallized in an inward-facing occluded conformation. The structures differ in the position of a structurally conserved substrate-binding domain that is suggested to play a central role in sugar transport. In addition, molecular dynamics simulations suggest a potential pathway for substrate entry from the periplasm into the bcMalT substrate-binding site. These results provide a mechanistic framework for understanding substrate recognition and translocation for the glucose superfamily EIIC transporters. PMID:27161976

  16. The Association between Gene-Environment Interactions and Diseases Involving the Human GST Superfamily with SNP Variants

    PubMed Central

    Hollman, Antoinesha L.; Tchounwou, Paul B.; Huang, Hung-Chung

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to environmental hazards has been associated with diseases in humans. The identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in human populations exposed to different environmental hazards, is vital for detecting the genetic risks of some important human diseases. Several studies in this field have been conducted on glutathione S-transferases (GSTs), a phase II detoxification superfamily, to investigate its role in the occurrence of diseases. Human GSTs consist of cytosolic and microsomal superfamilies that are further divided into subfamilies. Based on scientific search engines and a review of the literature, we have found a large amount of published articles on human GST super- and subfamilies that have greatly assisted in our efforts to examine their role in health and disease. Because of its polymorphic variations in relation to environmental hazards such as air pollutants, cigarette smoke, pesticides, heavy metals, carcinogens, pharmaceutical drugs, and xenobiotics, GST is considered as a significant biomarker. This review examines the studies on gene-environment interactions related to various diseases with respect to single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) found in the GST superfamily. Overall, it can be concluded that interactions between GST genes and environmental factors play an important role in human diseases. PMID:27043589

  17. The Association between Gene-Environment Interactions and Diseases Involving the Human GST Superfamily with SNP Variants.

    PubMed

    Hollman, Antoinesha L; Tchounwou, Paul B; Huang, Hung-Chung

    2016-04-01

    Exposure to environmental hazards has been associated with diseases in humans. The identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in human populations exposed to different environmental hazards, is vital for detecting the genetic risks of some important human diseases. Several studies in this field have been conducted on glutathione S-transferases (GSTs), a phase II detoxification superfamily, to investigate its role in the occurrence of diseases. Human GSTs consist of cytosolic and microsomal superfamilies that are further divided into subfamilies. Based on scientific search engines and a review of the literature, we have found a large amount of published articles on human GST super- and subfamilies that have greatly assisted in our efforts to examine their role in health and disease. Because of its polymorphic variations in relation to environmental hazards such as air pollutants, cigarette smoke, pesticides, heavy metals, carcinogens, pharmaceutical drugs, and xenobiotics, GST is considered as a significant biomarker. This review examines the studies on gene-environment interactions related to various diseases with respect to single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) found in the GST superfamily. Overall, it can be concluded that interactions between GST genes and environmental factors play an important role in human diseases. PMID:27043589

  18. Elevated plasma citrulline: look for dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Haviv, Ruby; Zeharia, Avraham; Belaiche, Corinne; Haimi Cohen, Yishai; Saada, Ann

    2014-02-01

    The E3 subunit of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase/dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase/DLD/lipoamide dehydrogenase/LAD), is a mitochondrial matrix enzyme and also a part of the branched-chain ketoacid dehydrogenase and alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complexes. DLD deficiency (MIM #246900), is relatively frequent in the Ashkenazi Jewish population but occurs in other populations as well. Early diagnosis is important to prevent episodes of metabolic decompensation, liver failure, and encephalopathy. The clinical presentations are varied and may include Reye-like syndrome, hepatic failure, myopathy, and myoglobinuria. Laboratory markers, such as elevated urinary alpha-ketoglutarate, blood pyruvate, lactate, and ammonia, are mostly nonspecific and not always present, making the diagnosis difficult. Since we observed elevated plasma citrulline levels in a number of confirmed cases, we retrospectively examined the value of citrulline as a biochemical marker for DLD deficiency. Data was gathered from the files of 17 pediatric patients with DLD deficiency, confirmed by enzymatic and genetic analysis. The control group included 19 patients in whom urea cycle defects were ruled out but DLD deficiency was suspected. Seven of the DLD-deficient patients presented with elevated plasma citrulline levels (median value 205 μM, range 59-282 μM) (normal range 1-45 μM) while none in the control patient group. In five patients, elevated citrulline was associated with elevated plasma glutamine and metabolic acidosis. Interestingly, elevated plasma citrulline was associated with the common G229C mutation. In conclusion, we suggest that elevated plasma citrulline in the absence of urea cycle defects warrants an investigation for DLD deficiency. PMID:23995961

  19. Crystal structure of homoisocitrate dehydrogenase from Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    SciTech Connect

    Bulfer, Stacie L.; Hendershot, Jenna M.; Trievel, Raymond C.

    2013-09-18

    Lysine biosynthesis in fungi, euglena, and certain archaebacteria occurs through the {alpha}-aminoadipate pathway. Enzymes in the first steps of this pathway have been proposed as potential targets for the development of antifungal therapies, as they are absent in animals but are conserved in several pathogenic fungi species, including Candida, Cryptococcus, and Aspergillus. One potential antifungal target in the {alpha}-aminoadipate pathway is the third enzyme in the pathway, homoisocitrate dehydrogenase (HICDH), which catalyzes the divalent metal-dependent conversion of homoisocitrate to 2-oxoadipate (2-OA) using nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD{sup +}) as a cofactor. HICDH belogns to a family of {beta}-hydroxyacid oxidative decarboxylases that includes malate dehydrogenase, tartrate dehydrogenase, 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase, isocitrate dehydrogenase (ICDH), and 3-isopropylmalte dehydrogenase (IPMDH). ICDH and IPMDH are well-characterized enzymes that catalyze the decarboxylation of isocitrate to yield 2-oxoglutarate (2-OG) in the citric acid cycle and the conversion of 3-isopropylmalate to 2-oxoisovalerate in the leucine biosynthetic pathway, respectively. Recent structural and biochemical studies of HICDH reveal that this enzyme shares sequence, structural, and mechanistic homology with ICDH and IPMDH. To date, the only published structures of HICDH are from the archaebacteria Thermus thermophilus (TtHICDH). Fungal HICDHs diverge from TtHICDH in several aspects, including their thermal stability, oligomerization state, and substrate specificity, thus warranting further characterization. To gain insights into these differences, they determined crystal structures of a fungal Schizosaccharomyces pombe HICDH (SpHICDH) as an apoenzyme and as a binary complex with additive tripeptide glycyl-glycyl-glycine (GGG) to 1.55 {angstrom} and 1.85 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. Finally, a comparison of the SpHICDH and TtHICDH structures reveal differences in

  20. Reversible inactivation of CO dehydrogenase with thiol compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Kreß, Oliver; Gnida, Manuel; Pelzmann, Astrid M.; Marx, Christian; Meyer-Klaucke, Wolfram; Meyer, Ortwin

    2014-05-09

    Highlights: • Rather large thiols (e.g. coenzyme A) can reach the active site of CO dehydrogenase. • CO- and H{sub 2}-oxidizing activity of CO dehydrogenase is inhibited by thiols. • Inhibition by thiols was reversed by CO or upon lowering the thiol concentration. • Thiols coordinate the Cu ion in the [CuSMo(=O)OH] active site as a third ligand. - Abstract: Carbon monoxide dehydrogenase (CO dehydrogenase) from Oligotropha carboxidovorans is a structurally characterized member of the molybdenum hydroxylase enzyme family. It catalyzes the oxidation of CO (CO + H{sub 2}O → CO{sub 2} + 2e{sup −} + 2H{sup +}) which proceeds at a unique [CuSMo(=O)OH] metal cluster. Because of changing activities of CO dehydrogenase, particularly in subcellular fractions, we speculated whether the enzyme would be subject to regulation by thiols (RSH). Here we establish inhibition of CO dehydrogenase by thiols and report the corresponding K{sub i}-values (mM): L-cysteine (5.2), D-cysteine (9.7), N-acetyl-L-cysteine (8.2), D,L-homocysteine (25.8), L-cysteine–glycine (2.0), dithiothreitol (4.1), coenzyme A (8.3), and 2-mercaptoethanol (9.3). Inhibition of the enzyme was reversed by CO or upon lowering the thiol concentration. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) of thiol-inhibited CO dehydrogenase revealed a bimetallic site in which the RSH coordinates to the Cu-ion as a third ligand ([Mo{sup VI}(=O)OH{sub (2)}SCu{sup I}(SR)S-Cys]) leaving the redox state of the Cu(I) and the Mo(VI) unchanged. Collectively, our findings establish a regulation of CO dehydrogenase activity by thiols in vitro. They also corroborate the hypothesis that CO interacts with the Cu-ion first. The result that thiol compounds much larger than CO can freely travel through the substrate channel leading to the bimetallic cluster challenges previous concepts involving chaperone function and is of importance for an understanding how the sulfuration step in

  1. Isolation of human lactate dehydrogenase isoenzyme X by affinity chromatography.

    PubMed Central

    Kolk, A H; van Kuyk, L; Boettcher, B

    1978-01-01

    Human isoenzyme LDH-X (lactate dehydrogenase isoenzyme X) was isolated from seminal fluid of frozen semen samples by affinity chromatography by using oxamate-Sepharose and AMP-Sepharose. In the presence of 1.6 mM-NAD+, isoenzyme LDH-X does not bind to AMP-Sepharose, whereas the other lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes do. This is the crucial point in the isolation of isoenzyme LDH-X from the other isoenzymes. The purified human isoenzyme LDH-X had a specific activity of 146 units/mg of protein. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:213050

  2. Prostaglandin dehydrogenase and the initiation of labor.

    PubMed

    Challis, J R; Patel, F A; Pomini, F

    1999-01-01

    In summary, these studies have suggested that prostaglandin dehydrogenase may have a central role to play in the mechanisms which determine biologically active prostaglandin concentrations within human fetal membranes and placenta at the time of labor, at term or preterm. Moreover, our studies indicate that the regulation of PGDH may by multifactorial (figure 3). In certain regions of the membranes, we suggest that PGDH expression may be influenced by levels of anti-inflammatory and pro-inflammatory cytokines. In other regions of the membranes, we suggest that PGDH may be regulated at a transcriptional level by competing activities of progesterone and cortisol. The action of progesterone could be effected through systemically-derived steroid, or by locally synthesized steroid, acting in a paracrine and/or autocrine fashion. The effects of cortisol in placenta must be due to glucocorticoid derived from the maternal or fetal compartment, since the placenta lacks the hydroxylases required for endogenous cortisol production. However, metabolism of cortisol by 11 beta-HSD-2 reduces the potency of this glucocorticoid in placental tissue. In chorion however, cortisol may be formed locally, from cortisone, in addition to its being derived from the maternal circulation and/or from the amniotic fluid. Our current studies do not allow us to delineate whether the effects of progesterone and cortisol on PGDH are exerted through the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) or progesterone receptor (PR) or both. It is possible that through pregnancy, PGDH activity is maintained by progesterone acting either through low levels of PR in membranes, or, more likely, acting through GR. At term, elevated levels of cortisol compete with and displace progesterone from GR, resulting in inhibition of PGDH transcription and activity. In this way, local withdrawal of progesterone action would be effected within human intrauterine tissues, without requiring changes in systemic, circulating progesterone

  3. 3-Sulfinopropionyl-coenzyme A (3SP-CoA) desulfinase from Advenella mimigardefordensis DPN7T: crystal structure and function of a desulfinase with an acyl-CoA dehydrogenase fold

    PubMed Central

    Schürmann, Marc; Meijers, Rob; Schneider, Thomas R.; Steinbüchel, Alexander; Cianci, Michele

    2015-01-01

    3-Sulfinopropionyl-coenzyme A (3SP-CoA) desulfinase (AcdDPN7; EC 3.13.1.4) was identified during investigation of the 3,3′-dithiodipropionic acid (DTDP) catabolic pathway in the betaproteobacterium Advenella mimigardefordensis strain DPN7T. DTDP is an organic disulfide and a precursor for the synthesis of polythioesters (PTEs) in bacteria, and is of interest for biotechnological PTE production. AcdDPN7 catalyzes sulfur abstraction from 3SP-CoA, a key step during the catabolism of DTDP. Here, the crystal structures of apo AcdDPN7 at 1.89 Å resolution and of its complex with the CoA moiety from the substrate analogue succinyl-CoA at 2.30 Å resolution are presented. The apo structure shows that AcdDPN7 belongs to the acyl-CoA dehydrogenase superfamily fold and that it is a tetramer, with each subunit containing one flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) molecule. The enzyme does not show any dehydrogenase activity. Dehydrogenase activity would require a catalytic base (Glu or Asp residue) at either position 246 or position 366, where a glutamine and a glycine are instead found, respectively, in this desulfinase. The positioning of CoA in the crystal complex enabled the modelling of a substrate complex containing 3SP-CoA. This indicates that Arg84 is a key residue in the desulfination reaction. An Arg84Lys mutant showed a complete loss of enzymatic activity, suggesting that the guanidinium group of the arginine is essential for desulfination. AcdDPN7 is the first desulfinase with an acyl-CoA dehydrogenase fold to be reported, which underlines the versatility of this enzyme scaffold. PMID:26057676

  4. Major intrinsic protein superfamily: channels with unique structural features and diverse selectivity filters.

    PubMed

    Verma, Ravi Kumar; Gupta, Anjali Bansal; Sankararamakrishnan, Ramasubbu

    2015-01-01

    Members of the superfamily of major intrinsic proteins (MIPs) facilitate water and solute permeability across cell membranes and are found in sources ranging from bacteria to humans. Aquaporin and aquaglyceroporin channels are the prominent members of the MIP superfamily. Experimental studies show that MIPs are involved in important physiological processes in mammals and plants. They are implicated in several human diseases and are considered to be attractive drug targets for a wide range of diseases such as cancer, brain edema, epilepsy, glaucoma, and congestive heart failure. Three-dimensional structures of MIP channels from diverse sources reveal that MIPs adopt a unique conserved hourglass helical fold consisting of six transmembrane helices (TM1-TM6) and two half-helices (LB and LE). Conserved NPA motifs near the center and the aromatic/arginine selectivity filter (Ar/R SF) toward the extracellular side constitute two narrow constriction regions within the channel. Structural knowledge combined with simulation studies have helped to investigate the role of these two constriction regions in the transport and selectivity of the solutes. With the availability of many genome sequences from diverse species, a large number of MIP genes have been identified. Homology models of 1500 MIP channels have been used to derive structure-based sequence alignment of TM1-TM6 helices and the two half-helices LB and LE. Thirteen residues are highly conserved in different transmembrane helices and half-helices. High group conservation of small and weakly polar residues is observed in 27 positions at the interface of two interacting helices. Thus, although the MIP sequences are diverse, the hourglass helical fold is maintained during evolution with the conservation of these 40 positions within the transmembrane region. We have proposed a generic structure-based numbering scheme for the MIP channels that will facilitate easier comparison of the MIP sequences. Analysis of Ar/R SF in

  5. Mechanistic Diversity in the RuBisCO Superfamily: The Enolase in the Methionine

    SciTech Connect

    Imker,H.; Fedorov, A.; Fedorov, E.; Almo, S.; Gerlt, J.

    2007-01-01

    D-Ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO), the most abundant enzyme, is the paradigm member of the recently recognized mechanistically diverse RuBisCO superfamily. The RuBisCO reaction is initiated by abstraction of the proton from C3 of the D-ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate substrate by a carbamate oxygen of carboxylated Lys 201 (spinach enzyme). Heterofunctional homologues of RuBisCO found in species of Bacilli catalyze the tautomerization ('enolization') of 2,3-diketo-5-methylthiopentane 1-phosphate (DK-MTP 1-P) in the methionine salvage pathway in which 5-methylthio-D-ribose (MTR) derived from 5'-methylthioadenosine is converted to methionine [Ashida, H., Saito, Y., Kojima, C., Kobayashi, K., Ogasawara, N., and Yokota, A. (2003) A functional link between RuBisCO-like protein of Bacillus and photosynthetic RuBisCO, Science 302, 286-290]. The reaction catalyzed by this 'enolase' is accomplished by abstraction of a proton from C1 of the DK-MTP 1-P substrate to form the tautomerized product, a conjugated enol. Because the RuBisCO- and 'enolase'-catalyzed reactions differ in the regiochemistry of proton abstraction but are expected to share stabilization of an enolate anion intermediate by coordination to an active site Mg{sup 2+}, we sought to establish structure-function relationships for the 'enolase' reaction so that the structural basis for the functional diversity could be established. We determined the stereochemical course of the reaction catalyzed by the 'enolases' from Bacillus subtilis and Geobacillus kaustophilus. Using stereospecifically deuterated samples of an alternate substrate derived from D-ribose (5-OH group instead of the 5-methylthio group in MTR) as well as of the natural DK-MTP 1-P substrate, we determined that the 'enolase'-catalyzed reaction involves abstraction of the 1-proS proton. We also determined the structure of the activated 'enolase' from G. kaustophilus (carboxylated on Lys 173) liganded with Mg{sup 2+} and 2

  6. Fauna Europaea: Coleoptera 2 (excl. series Elateriformia, Scarabaeiformia, Staphyliniformia and superfamily Curculionoidea).

    PubMed

    Audisio, Paolo; Alonso Zarazaga, Miguel-Angel; Slipinski, Adam; Nilsson, Anders; Jelínek, Josef; Taglianti, Augusto Vigna; Turco, Federica; Otero, Carlos; Canepari, Claudio; Kral, David; Liberti, Gianfranco; Sama, Gianfranco; Nardi, Gianluca; Löbl, Ivan; Horak, Jan; Kolibac, Jiri; Háva, Jirí; Sapiejewski, Maciej; Jäch, Manfred; Bologna, Marco Alberto; Biondi, Maurizio; Nikitsky, Nikolai B; Mazzoldi, Paolo; Zahradnik, Petr; Wegrzynowicz, Piotr; Constantin, Robert; Gerstmeier, Roland; Zhantiev, Rustem; Fattorini, Simone; Tomaszewska, Wioletta; Rücker, Wolfgang H; Vazquez-Albalate, Xavier; Cassola, Fabio; Angelini, Fernando; Johnson, Colin; Schawaller, Wolfgang; Regalin, Renato; Baviera, Cosimo; Rocchi, Saverio; Cianferoni, Fabio; Beenen, Ron; Schmitt, Michael; Sassi, David; Kippenberg, Horst; Zampetti, Marcello Franco; Trizzino, Marco; Chiari, Stefano; Carpaneto, Giuseppe Maria; Sabatelli, Simone; de Jong, Yde

    2015-01-01

    Fauna Europaea provides a public web-service with an index of scientific names (including synonyms) of all living European land and freshwater animals, their geographical distribution at country level (up to the Urals, excluding the Caucasus region), and some additional information. The Fauna Europaea project covers about 230,000 taxonomic names, including 130,000 accepted species and 14,000 accepted subspecies, which is much more than the originally projected number of 100,000 species. This represents a huge effort by more than 400 contributing specialists throughout Europe and is a unique (standard) reference suitable for many users in science, government, industry, nature conservation and education. Coleoptera represent a huge assemblage of holometabolous insects, including as a whole more than 200 recognized families and some 400,000 described species worldwide. Basic information is summarized on their biology, ecology, economic relevance, and estimated number of undescribed species worldwide. Little less than 30,000 species are listed from Europe. The Coleoptera 2 section of the Fauna Europaea database (Archostemata, Myxophaga, Adephaga and Polyphaga excl. the series Elateriformia, Scarabaeiformia, Staphyliniformia and the superfamily Curculionoidea) encompasses 80 families (according to the previously accepted family-level systematic framework) and approximately 13,000 species. Tabulations included a complete list of the families dealt with, the number of species in each, the names of all involved specialists, and, when possible, an estimate of the gaps in terms of total number of species at an European level. A list of some recent useful references is appended. Most families included in the Coleoptera 2 Section have been updated in the most recent release of the Fauna Europaea index, or are ready to be updated as soon as the FaEu data management environment completes its migration from Zoological Museum Amsterdam to Berlin Museum für Naturkunde. PMID

  7. Functional Identification of Incorrectly Annotated Prolidases from the Amidohydrolase Superfamily of Enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, D.; Patskovsky, Y; Xu, C; Meyer, A; Sauder, J; Burley, S; Almo, S; Raushel, F

    2009-01-01

    The substrate profiles for two proteins from Caulobacter crescentus CB15 (Cc2672 and Cc3125) and one protein (Sgx9359b) derived from a DNA sequence (gi|44368820) isolated from the Sargasso Sea were determined using combinatorial libraries of dipeptides and N-acyl derivatives of amino acids. These proteins are members of the amidohydrolase superfamily and are currently misannotated in NCBI as catalyzing the hydrolysis of l-Xaa-l-Pro dipeptides. Cc2672 was shown to catalyze the hydrolysis of l-Xaa-l-Arg/Lys dipeptides and the N-acetyl and N-formyl derivatives of lysine and arginine. This enzyme will also hydrolyze longer peptides that terminate in either lysine or arginine. The N-methyl phosphonate derivative of l-lysine was a potent competitive inhibitor of Cc2672 with a Ki value of 120 nM. Cc3125 was shown to catalyze the hydrolysis of l-Xaa-l-Arg/Lys dipeptides but will not hydrolyze tripeptides or the N-formyl and N-acetyl derivatives of lysine or arginine. The substrate profile for Sgx9359b is similar to that of Cc2672 except that compounds with a C-terminal lysine are not recognized as substrates. The X-ray structure of Sgx9359b was determined to a resolution of 2.3 Angstroms. The protein folds as a (e/a)8-barrel and self-associates to form a homooctamer. The active site is composed of a binuclear metal center similar to that found in phosphotriesterase and dihydroorotase. In one crystal form, arginine was bound adventitiously to the eight active sites within the octamer. The orientation of the arginine in the active site identified the structural determinants for recognition of the a-carboxylate and the positively charged side chains of arginine-containing substrates. This information was used to identify 18 other bacterial sequences that possess identical or similar substrate profiles.

  8. New mini- zincin structures provide a minimal scaffold for members of this metallopeptidase superfamily

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The Acel_2062 protein from Acidothermus cellulolyticus is a protein of unknown function. Initial sequence analysis predicted that it was a metallopeptidase from the presence of a motif conserved amongst the Asp-zincins, which are peptidases that contain a single, catalytic zinc ion ligated by the histidines and aspartic acid within the motif (HEXXHXXGXXD). The Acel_2062 protein was chosen by the Joint Center for Structural Genomics for crystal structure determination to explore novel protein sequence space and structure-based function annotation. Results The crystal structure confirmed that the Acel_2062 protein consisted of a single, zincin-like metallopeptidase-like domain. The Met-turn, a structural feature thought to be important for a Met-zincin because it stabilizes the active site, is absent, and its stabilizing role may have been conferred to the C-terminal Tyr113. In our crystallographic model there are two molecules in the asymmetric unit and from size-exclusion chromatography, the protein dimerizes in solution. A water molecule is present in the putative zinc-binding site in one monomer, which is replaced by one of two observed conformations of His95 in the other. Conclusions The Acel_2062 protein is structurally related to the zincins. It contains the minimum structural features of a member of this protein superfamily, and can be described as a “mini- zincin”. There is a striking parallel with the structure of a mini-Glu-zincin, which represents the minimum structure of a Glu-zincin (a metallopeptidase in which the third zinc ligand is a glutamic acid). Rather than being an ancestral state, phylogenetic analysis suggests that the mini-zincins are derived from larger proteins. PMID:24383880

  9. Pathogenic Leptospira species express surface-exposed proteins belonging to the bacterial immunoglobulin superfamily.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, James; Barocchi, Michele A; Croda, Julio; Young, Tracy A; Sanchez, Yolanda; Siqueira, Isadora; Bolin, Carole A; Reis, Mitermayer G; Riley, Lee W; Haake, David A; Ko, Albert I

    2003-08-01

    Proteins with bacterial immunoglobulin-like (Big) domains, such as the Yersinia pseudotuberculosis invasin and Escherichia coli intimin, are surface-expressed proteins that mediate host mammalian cell invasion or attachment. Here, we report the identification and characterization of a new family of Big domain proteins, referred to as Lig (leptospiral Ig-like) proteins, in pathogenic Leptospira. Screening of L. interrogans and L. kirschneri expression libraries with sera from leptospirosis patients identified 13 lambda phage clones that encode tandem repeats of the 90 amino acid Big domain. Two lig genes, designated ligA and ligB, and one pseudogene, ligC, were identified. The ligA and ligB genes encode amino-terminal lipoprotein signal peptides followed by 10 or 11 Big domain repeats and, in the case of ligB, a unique carboxy-terminal non-repeat domain. The organization of ligC is similar to that of ligB but contains mutations that disrupt the reading frame. The lig sequences are present in pathogenic but not saprophytic Leptospira species. LigA and LigB are expressed by a variety of virulent leptospiral strains. Loss of Lig protein and RNA transcript expression is correlated with the observed loss of virulence during culture attenuation of pathogenic strains. High-pressure freeze substitution followed by immunocytochemical electron microscopy confirmed that the Lig proteins were localized to the bacterial surface. Immunoblot studies with patient sera found that the Lig proteins are a major antigen recognized during the acute host infection. These observations demonstrate that the Lig proteins are a newly identified surface protein of pathogenic Leptospira, which by analogy to other bacterial immunoglobulin superfamily virulence factors, may play a role in host cell attachment and invasion during leptospiral pathogenesis. PMID:12890019

  10. Unprecedented acetoacetyl-coenzyme A synthesizing enzyme of the thiolase superfamily involved in the mevalonate pathway.

    PubMed

    Okamura, Eiji; Tomita, Takeo; Sawa, Ryuichi; Nishiyama, Makoto; Kuzuyama, Tomohisa

    2010-06-22

    Acetoacetyl-CoA is the precursor of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl (HMG)-CoA in the mevalonate pathway, which is essential for terpenoid backbone biosynthesis. Acetoacetyl-CoA is also the precursor of poly-beta-hydroxybutyrate, a polymer belonging to the polyester class produced by microorganisms. The de novo synthesis of acetoacetyl-CoA is usually catalyzed by acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase via a thioester-dependent Claisen condensation reaction between two molecules of acetyl-CoA. Here, we report that nphT7, found in the mevalonate pathway gene cluster from a soil-isolated Streptomyces sp. strain, encodes an unusual acetoacetyl-CoA synthesizing enzyme. The recombinant enzyme overexpressed in Escherichia coli catalyzes a single condensation of acetyl-CoA and malonyl-CoA to give acetoacetyl-CoA and CoA. Replacement of malonyl-CoA with malonyl-(acyl carrier protein) resulted in loss of the condensation activity. No acetoacetyl-CoA synthesizing activity was detected through the condensation of two molecules of acetyl-CoA. Based on these properties of NphT7, we propose to name this unusual enzyme of the thiolase superfamily acetoacetyl-CoA synthase. Coexpression of nphT7 with the HMG-CoA synthase gene and the HMG-CoA reductase gene in a heterologous host allowed 3.5-fold higher production of mevalonate than when only the HMG-CoA synthase and HMG-CoA reductase genes were expressed. This result suggests that nphT7 can be used to significantly increase the concentration of acetoacetyl-CoA in cells, eventually leading to the production of useful terpenoids and poly-beta-hydroxybutyrate. PMID:20534558

  11. Improving Functional Annotation in the DRE-TIM Metallolyase Superfamily through Identification of Active Site Fingerprints.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Garima; Johnson, Jordyn L; Frantom, Patrick A

    2016-03-29

    Within the DRE-TIM metallolyase superfamily, members of the Claisen-like condensation (CC-like) subgroup catalyze C-C bond-forming reactions between various α-ketoacids and acetyl-coenzyme A. These reactions are important in the metabolic pathways of many bacterial pathogens and serve as engineering scaffolds for the production of long-chain alcohol biofuels. To improve functional annotation and identify sequences that might use novel substrates in the CC-like subgroup, a combination of structural modeling and multiple-sequence alignments identified active site residues on the third, fourth, and fifth β-strands of the TIM-barrel catalytic domain that are differentially conserved within the substrate-diverse enzyme families. Using α-isopropylmalate synthase and citramalate synthase from Methanococcus jannaschii (MjIPMS and MjCMS), site-directed mutagenesis was used to test the role of each identified position in substrate selectivity. Kinetic data suggest that residues at the β3-5 and β4-7 positions play a significant role in the selection of α-ketoisovalerate over pyruvate in MjIPMS. However, complementary substitutions in MjCMS fail to alter substrate specificity, suggesting residues in these positions do not contribute to substrate selectivity in this enzyme. Analysis of the kinetic data with respect to a protein similarity network for the CC-like subgroup suggests that evolutionarily distinct forms of IPMS utilize residues at the β3-5 and β4-7 positions to affect substrate selectivity while the different versions of CMS use unique architectures. Importantly, mapping the identities of residues at the β3-5 and β4-7 positions onto the protein similarity network allows for rapid annotation of probable IPMS enzymes as well as several outlier sequences that may represent novel functions in the subgroup. PMID:26935545

  12. Fauna Europaea: Coleoptera 2 (excl. series Elateriformia, Scarabaeiformia, Staphyliniformia and superfamily Curculionoidea)

    PubMed Central

    Alonso Zarazaga, Miguel-Angel; Slipinski, Adam; Nilsson, Anders; Jelínek, Josef; Taglianti, Augusto Vigna; Turco, Federica; Otero, Carlos; Canepari, Claudio; Kral, David; Liberti, Gianfranco; Sama, Gianfranco; Nardi, Gianluca; Löbl, Ivan; Horak, Jan; Kolibac, Jiri; Háva, Jirí; Sapiejewski, Maciej; Jäch, Manfred; Bologna, Marco Alberto; Biondi, Maurizio; Nikitsky, Nikolai B.; Mazzoldi, Paolo; Zahradnik, Petr; Wegrzynowicz, Piotr; Constantin, Robert; Gerstmeier, Roland; Zhantiev, Rustem; Fattorini, Simone; Tomaszewska, Wioletta; Rücker, Wolfgang H.; Vazquez-Albalate, Xavier; Cassola, Fabio; Angelini, Fernando; Johnson, Colin; Schawaller, Wolfgang; Regalin, Renato; Baviera, Cosimo; Rocchi, Saverio; Cianferoni, Fabio; Beenen, Ron; Schmitt, Michael; Sassi, David; Kippenberg, Horst; Zampetti, Marcello Franco; Trizzino, Marco; Chiari, Stefano; Carpaneto, Giuseppe Maria; Sabatelli, Simone

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Fauna Europaea provides a public web-service with an index of scientific names (including synonyms) of all living European land and freshwater animals, their geographical distribution at country level (up to the Urals, excluding the Caucasus region), and some additional information. The Fauna Europaea project covers about 230,000 taxonomic names, including 130,000 accepted species and 14,000 accepted subspecies, which is much more than the originally projected number of 100,000 species. This represents a huge effort by more than 400 contributing specialists throughout Europe and is a unique (standard) reference suitable for many users in science, government, industry, nature conservation and education. Coleoptera represent a huge assemblage of holometabolous insects, including as a whole more than 200 recognized families and some 400,000 described species worldwide. Basic information is summarized on their biology, ecology, economic relevance, and estimated number of undescribed species worldwide. Little less than 30,000 species are listed from Europe. The Coleoptera 2 section of the Fauna Europaea database (Archostemata, Myxophaga, Adephaga and Polyphaga excl. the series Elateriformia, Scarabaeiformia, Staphyliniformia and the superfamily Curculionoidea) encompasses 80 families (according to the previously accepted family-level systematic framework) and approximately 13,000 species. Tabulations included a complete list of the families dealt with, the number of species in each, the names of all involved specialists, and, when possible, an estimate of the gaps in terms of total number of species at an European level. A list of some recent useful references is appended. Most families included in the Coleoptera 2 Section have been updated in the most recent release of the Fauna Europaea index, or are ready to be updated as soon as the FaEu data management environment completes its migration from Zoological Museum Amsterdam to Berlin Museum für Naturkunde

  13. Genome-wide comparison of AP2/ERF superfamily genes between Gossypium arboreum and G. raimondii.

    PubMed

    Lei, Z P; He, D H; Xing, H Y; Tang, B S; Lu, B X

    2016-01-01

    The APETALA2/ethylene response factor (AP2/ERF) transcription factor superfamily is known to regulate diverse processes of plant development and stress responses. We conducted a genome-wide analysis of the AP2/ERF gene in Gossypium arboreum and G. raimondii. Using RPSBLAST and HMMsearch, a total of 271 and 269 AP2/ERF genes were identified in the G. arboreum and G. raimondii genomes, respectively. A phylogenetic analysis classified diploid Gossypium spp AP2/ERF genes into 4 families and 16 subfamilies. Orthologous genes predominated the terminal branch of the phylogenetic tree. Physical mapping showed at least 30% of AP2/ERF genes clustered together. A high level of intra- and inter-species collinearity involving AP2/ERF genes was observed, indicating common (before species divergence) or parallel (after species divergence) segmental duplications, along with tandem duplications, resulting in the species-specific expansion of AP2/ERF genes in diploid Gossypium species. Motif analyses of the AP2/ERF proteins revealed that motif arrangements were highly diverse among subfamilies, but shared by orthologous gene pairs. An examination of nucleotide divergence of AP2/ERF coding regions identified small and non-significant sequence differences among orthologs. Expression profiling of AP2/ERF orthologous gene pairs showed similar abundance levels of orthologous copies between G. arboreum and G. raimondii. Thus, cotton species possess abundant and diverse AP2/ERF genes, resulting from tandem and segmental duplications. Protein and nucleotide sequence and mRNA expression analyses revealed symmetrical evolution, indicating that most AP2/ ERF genes may not have undergone significant biochemical and morphological divergence between sister species. Our study provides detailed insights into the evolutionary characteristics and functional importance of AP2/ERF genes, and could aid in the genetic improvement of agriculturally significant crops in this genus. PMID:27525884

  14. Hydroxyatrazine N-Ethylaminohydrolase (AtzB): an Amidohydrolase Superfamily Enzyme Catalyzing Deamination and Dechlorination▿

    PubMed Central

    Seffernick, Jennifer L.; Aleem, Asma; Osborne, Jeffrey P.; Johnson, Gilbert; Sadowsky, Michael J.; Wackett, Lawrence P.

    2007-01-01

    Hydroxyatrazine [2-(N-ethylamino)-4-hydroxy-6-(N-isopropylamino)-1,3,5-triazine] N-ethylaminohydrolase (AtzB) is the sole enzyme known to catalyze the hydrolytic conversion of hydroxyatrazine to N-isopropylammelide. AtzB, therefore, serves as the point of intersection of multiple s-triazine biodegradative pathways and is completely essential for microbial growth on s-triazine herbicides. Here, atzB was cloned from Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP and its product was purified to homogeneity and characterized. AtzB was found to be dimeric, with subunit and holoenzyme molecular masses of 52 kDa and 105 kDa, respectively. The kcat and Km of AtzB with hydroxyatrazine as a substrate were 3 s−1 and 20 μM, respectively. Purified AtzB had a 1:1 zinc-to-subunit stoichiometry. Sequence analysis revealed that AtzB contained the conserved mononuclear amidohydrolase superfamily active-site residues His74, His76, His245, Glu248, His280, and Asp331. An intensive in vitro investigation into the substrate specificity of AtzB revealed that 20 of the 51 compounds tested were substrates for AtzB; this allowed for the identification of specific substrate structural features required for catalysis. Substrates required a monohydroxylated s-triazine ring with a minimum of one primary or secondary amine substituent and either a chloride or amine leaving group. AtzB catalyzed both deamination and dechlorination reactions with rates within a range of one order of magnitude. This differs from AtzA and TrzN, which do not catalyze deamination reactions, and AtzC, which is not known to catalyze dechlorination reactions. PMID:17660279

  15. Conserved evolutionary units in the heme-copper oxidase superfamily revealed by novel homologous protein families

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Jimin; Li, Wenlin; Kinch, Lisa N; Grishin, Nick V

    2014-01-01

    The heme-copper oxidase (HCO) superfamily includes HCOs in aerobic respiratory chains and nitric oxide reductases (NORs) in the denitrification pathway. The HCO/NOR catalytic subunit has a core structure consisting of 12 transmembrane helices (TMHs) arranged in three-fold rotational pseudosymmetry, with six conserved histidines for heme and metal binding. Using sensitive sequence similarity searches, we detected a number of novel HCO/NOR homologs and named them HCO Homology (HCOH) proteins. Several HCOH families possess only four TMHs that exhibit the most pronounced similarity to the last four TMHs (TMHs 9–12) of HCOs/NORs. Encoded by independent genes, four-TMH HCOH proteins represent a single evolutionary unit (EU) that relates to each of the three homologous EUs of HCOs/NORs comprising TMHs 1–4, TMHs 5–8, and TMHs 9–12. Single-EU HCOH proteins could form homotrimers or heterotrimers to maintain the general structure and ligand-binding sites defined by the HCO/NOR catalytic subunit fold. The remaining HCOH families, including NnrS, have 12-TMHs and three EUs. Most three-EU HCOH proteins possess two conserved histidines and could bind a single heme. Limited experimental studies and genomic context analysis suggest that many HCOH proteins could function in the denitrification pathway and in detoxification of reactive molecules such as nitric oxide. HCO/NOR catalytic subunits exhibit remarkable structural similarity to the homotrimers of MAPEG (membrane-associated proteins in eicosanoid and glutathione metabolism) proteins. Gene duplication, fusion, and fission likely play important roles in the evolution of HCOs/NORs and HCOH proteins. PMID:24931479

  16. Evolutionary Dynamics of the Cellulose Synthase Gene Superfamily in Grasses1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Schwerdt, Julian G.; Wright, Frank; Oehme, Daniel; Wagner, John M.; Shirley, Neil J.; Burton, Rachel A.; Schreiber, Miriam; Zimmer, Jochen; Marshall, David F.; Waugh, Robbie; Fincher, Geoffrey B.

    2015-01-01

    Phylogenetic analyses of cellulose synthase (CesA) and cellulose synthase-like (Csl) families from the cellulose synthase gene superfamily were used to reconstruct their evolutionary origins and selection histories. Counterintuitively, genes encoding primary cell wall CesAs have undergone extensive expansion and diversification following an ancestral duplication from a secondary cell wall-associated CesA. Selection pressure across entire CesA and Csl clades appears to be low, but this conceals considerable variation within individual clades. Genes in the CslF clade are of particular interest because some mediate the synthesis of (1,3;1,4)-β-glucan, a polysaccharide characteristic of the evolutionarily successful grasses that is not widely distributed elsewhere in the plant kingdom. The phylogeny suggests that duplication of either CslF6 and/or CslF7 produced the ancestor of a highly conserved cluster of CslF genes that remain located in syntenic regions of all the grass genomes examined. A CslF6-specific insert encoding approximately 55 amino acid residues has subsequently been incorporated into the gene, or possibly lost from other CslFs, and the CslF7 clade has undergone a significant long-term shift in selection pressure. Homology modeling and molecular dynamics of the CslF6 protein were used to define the three-dimensional dispositions of individual amino acids that are subject to strong ongoing selection, together with the position of the conserved 55-amino acid insert that is known to influence the amounts and fine structures of (1,3;1,4)-β-glucans synthesized. These wall polysaccharides are attracting renewed interest because of their central roles as sources of dietary fiber in human health and for the generation of renewable liquid biofuels. PMID:25999407

  17. Functional identification of incorrectly annotated prolidases from the amidohydrolase superfamily of enzymes.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Dao Feng; Patskovsky, Yury; Xu, Chengfu; Meyer, Amanda J; Sauder, J Michael; Burley, Stephen K; Almo, Steven C; Raushel, Frank M

    2009-05-01

    The substrate profiles for two proteins from Caulobacter crescentus CB15 (Cc2672 and Cc3125) and one protein (Sgx9359b) derived from a DNA sequence ( gi|44368820 ) isolated from the Sargasso Sea were determined using combinatorial libraries of dipeptides and N-acyl derivatives of amino acids. These proteins are members of the amidohydrolase superfamily and are currently misannotated in NCBI as catalyzing the hydrolysis of l-Xaa-l-Pro dipeptides. Cc2672 was shown to catalyze the hydrolysis of l-Xaa-l-Arg/Lys dipeptides and the N-acetyl and N-formyl derivatives of lysine and arginine. This enzyme will also hydrolyze longer peptides that terminate in either lysine or arginine. The N-methyl phosphonate derivative of l-lysine was a potent competitive inhibitor of Cc2672 with a K(i) value of 120 nM. Cc3125 was shown to catalyze the hydrolysis of l-Xaa-l-Arg/Lys dipeptides but will not hydrolyze tripeptides or the N-formyl and N-acetyl derivatives of lysine or arginine. The substrate profile for Sgx9359b is similar to that of Cc2672 except that compounds with a C-terminal lysine are not recognized as substrates. The X-ray structure of Sgx9359b was determined to a resolution of 2.3 A. The protein folds as a (beta/alpha)(8)-barrel and self-associates to form a homooctamer. The active site is composed of a binuclear metal center similar to that found in phosphotriesterase and dihydroorotase. In one crystal form, arginine was bound adventitiously to the eight active sites within the octamer. The orientation of the arginine in the active site identified the structural determinants for recognition of the alpha-carboxylate and the positively charged side chains of arginine-containing substrates. This information was used to identify 18 other bacterial sequences that possess identical or similar substrate profiles. PMID:19281183

  18. NADP+-Preferring d-Lactate Dehydrogenase from Sporolactobacillus inulinus

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lingfeng; Xu, Xiaoling; Wang, Limin; Ma, Yanhe

    2015-01-01

    Hydroxy acid dehydrogenases, including l- and d-lactate dehydrogenases (L-LDH and D-LDH), are responsible for the stereospecific conversion of 2-keto acids to 2-hydroxyacids and extensively used in a wide range of biotechnological applications. A common feature of LDHs is their high specificity for NAD+ as a cofactor. An LDH that could effectively use NADPH as a coenzyme could be an alternative enzymatic system for regeneration of the oxidized, phosphorylated cofactor. In this study, a d-lactate dehydrogenase from a Sporolactobacillus inulinus strain was found to use both NADH and NADPH with high efficiencies and with a preference for NADPH as its coenzyme, which is different from the coenzyme utilization of all previously reported LDHs. The biochemical properties of the D-LDH enzyme were determined by X-ray crystal structural characterization and in vivo and in vitro enzymatic activity analyses. The residue Asn174 was demonstrated to be critical for NADPH utilization. Characterization of the biochemical properties of this enzyme will contribute to understanding of the catalytic mechanism and provide referential information for shifting the coenzyme utilization specificity of 2-hydroxyacid dehydrogenases. PMID:26150461

  19. KINETIC PROPERTIES OF MALIC DEHYDROGENASE FROM THREE CULTIVARS OF RICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Temperature induced changes in the kinetics of the enzyme malic dehydrogenase (MON) were investigated in three cultivars of rice(Oryza sativa L.). Cultivars, included IR74, SWAT2, and N22. Plants were grown in a controlled environment chamber for 29 days, at 31 degrees C day/25 d...

  20. Efficiency of superoxide anions in the inactivation of selected dehydrogenases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodacka, Aleksandra; Serafin, Eligiusz; Puchala, Mieczyslaw

    2010-09-01

    The most ubiquitous of the primary reactive oxygen species, formed in all aerobes, is the superoxide free radical. It is believed that the superoxide anion radical shows low reactivity and in oxidative stress it is regarded mainly as an initiator of more reactive species such as rad OH and ONOO -. In this paper, the effectiveness of inactivation of selected enzymes by radiation-generated superoxide radicals in comparison with the effectiveness of the other products of water radiolysis is examined. We investigate three enzymes: glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). We show that the direct contribution of the superoxide anion radical to GAPDH and ADH inactivation is significant. The effectiveness of the superoxide anion in the inactivation of GAPDH and ADG was only 2.4 and 2.8 times smaller, respectively, in comparison with hydroxyl radical. LDH was practically not inactivated by the superoxide anion. Despite the fact that the studied dehydrogenases belong to the same class of enzymes (oxidoreductases), all have a similar molecular weight and are tetramers, their susceptibility to free-radical damage varies. The differences in the radiosensitivity of the enzymes are not determined by the basic structural parameters analyzed. A significant role in inactivation susceptibility is played by the type of amino acid residues and their localization within enzyme molecules.

  1. 21 CFR 862.1380 - Hydroxybutyric dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hydroxybutyric dehydrogenase test system. 862.1380 Section 862.1380 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry...

  2. Mutants of Escherichia coli deficient in the fermentative lactate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed Central

    Mat-Jan, F; Alam, K Y; Clark, D P

    1989-01-01

    Mutants of Escherichia coli deficient in the fermentative NAD-linked lactate dehydrogenase (ldh) have been isolated. These mutants showed no growth defects under anaerobic conditions unless present together with a defect in pyruvate formate lyase (pfl). Double mutants (pfl ldh) were unable to grow anaerobically on glucose or other sugars even when supplemented with acetate, whereas pfl mutants can do so. The ldh mutation was found to map at 30.5 min on the E. coli chromosome. The ldh mutant FMJ39 showed no detectable lactate dehydrogenase activity and produced no lactic acid from glucose under anaerobic conditions as estimated by in vivo nuclear magnetic resonance measurements. We also found that in wild-type strains the fermentative lactate dehydrogenase was conjointly induced by anaerobic conditions and an acidic pH. Despite previous findings that phosphate concentrations affect the proportion of lactic acid produced during fermentation, we were unable to find any intrinsic effect of phosphate on lactate dehydrogenase activity, apart from the buffering effect of this ion. PMID:2644194

  3. 21 CFR 862.1445 - Lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system. 862.1445 Section 862.1445 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  4. 21 CFR 862.1445 - Lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system. 862.1445 Section 862.1445 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  5. 21 CFR 862.1445 - Lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system. 862.1445 Section 862.1445 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1445 Lactate...

  6. 21 CFR 862.1445 - Lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system. 862.1445 Section 862.1445 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1445 Lactate...

  7. Genetics Home Reference: 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... step that metabolizes groups of fats called medium-chain fatty acids and short-chain fatty acids. Mutations in the HADH gene lead ... a shortage of 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase. Medium-chain and short-chain fatty acids cannot be metabolized ...

  8. 21 CFR 862.1445 - Lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system. 862.1445 Section 862.1445 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1445 Lactate...

  9. Molecular cloning of gluconobacter oxydans DSM 2003 xylitol dehydrogenase gene

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi, H. Mir Mohammad; Ahmadi, R.; Aghaabdollahian, S.; Mofid, M.R.; Ghaemi, Y.; Abedi, D.

    2011-01-01

    Due to the widespread applications of xylitol dehydrogenase, an enzyme used for the production of xylitol, the present study was designed for the cloning of xylitol dehydrogenase gene from Glcunobacter oxydans DSM 2003. After extraction of genomic DNA from this bacterium, xylitol dehydrogenase gene was replicated using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The amplified product was entered into pTZ57R cloning vector by T/A cloning method and transformation was performed by heat shocking of the E. coli XL1-blue competent cells. Following plasmid preparation, the cloned gene was digested out and ligated into the expression vector pET-22b(+). Electrophoresis of PCR product showed a 789 bp band. Recombinant plasmid (rpTZ57R) was then constructed. This plasmid was double digested with XhoI and EcoRI resulting in 800 bp and 2900 bp bands. The obtained insert was ligated into pET-22b(+) vector and its orientation was confirmed with XhoI and BamHI restriction enzymes. In conclusion, in the present study the recombinant expression vector containing xylitol dehydrogenase gene has been constructed and can be used for the production of this enzyme in high quantities. PMID:22110522

  10. Succinate dehydrogenase is the regulator of respiration in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Travis; Weinrick, Brian; Vilchèze, Catherine; Berney, Michael; Tufariello, Joanne; Cook, Gregory M; Jacobs, William R

    2014-11-01

    In chronic infection, Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacilli are thought to enter a metabolic program that provides sufficient energy for maintenance of the protonmotive force, but is insufficient to meet the demands of cellular growth. We sought to understand this metabolic downshift genetically by targeting succinate dehydrogenase, the enzyme which couples the growth processes controlled by the TCA cycle with the energy production resulting from the electron transport chain. M. tuberculosis contains two operons which are predicted to encode succinate dehydrogenase enzymes (sdh-1 and sdh-2); we found that deletion of Sdh1 contributes to an inability to survive long term stationary phase. Stable isotope labeling and mass spectrometry revealed that Sdh1 functions as a succinate dehydrogenase during aerobic growth, and that Sdh2 is dispensable for this catalysis, but partially overlapping activities ensure that the loss of one enzyme can incompletely compensate for loss of the other. Deletion of Sdh1 disturbs the rate of respiration via the mycobacterial electron transport chain, resulting in an increased proportion of reduced electron carrier (menaquinol) which leads to increased oxygen consumption. The loss of respiratory control leads to an inability to recover from stationary phase. We propose a model in which succinate dehydrogenase is a governor of cellular respiration in the adaptation to low oxygen environments. PMID:25412183

  11. 21 CFR 864.7360 - Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase... § 864.7360 Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay. (a) Identification. An erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay is a device used to measure the activity of the enzyme...

  12. 21 CFR 864.7360 - Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase... § 864.7360 Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay. (a) Identification. An erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay is a device used to measure the activity of the enzyme...

  13. Oxidative DNA damage induced by benz[a]anthracene dihydrodiols in the presence of dihydrodiol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Seike, Kazuharu; Murata, Mariko; Hirakawa, Kazutaka; Deyashiki, Yoshihiro; Kawanishi, Shosuke

    2004-11-01

    Tobacco smoke and polluted air are risk factors for lung cancer and contain many kinds of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) including benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) and benz[a]anthracene (BA). BA, as well as B[a]P, is assessed as probably carcinogenic to humans (IARC group 2A). BA is metabolized to several dihydrodiols. Dihydrodiol dehydrogenase (DD), a member of the aldo-keto reductase superfamily, catalyzes NAD(P)+-linked oxidation of dihydrodiols of aromatic hydrocarbons to corresponding catechols. To clarify the role of DD on PAH carcinogenesis, we examined oxidative DNA damage induced by trans-dihydrodiols of BA and B[a]P treated with DD using 32P-5'-end-labeled DNA fragments obtained from the human p53 tumor suppressor gene. In addition, we investigated the formation of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG), an indicator of oxidative DNA damage, in calf thymus DNA by using HPLC with an electrochemical detector. DD-catalyzed BA-1,2-dihydrodiol caused Cu(II)-mediated DNA damage including 8-oxodG formation in the presence of NAD+. BA-1,2-dihydrodiol induced a Fpg sensitive and piperidine labile G lesion at the 5'-ACG-3' sequence complementary to codon 273 of the human p53 tumor suppressor gene, which is known as a hotspot. DNA damage was inhibited by catalase and bathocuproine, suggesting the involvement of H2O2 and Cu(I). The observation of NADH production by UV-visible spectroscopy suggested that DD catalyzed BA-1,2-dihydrodiol most efficiently to the corresponding catechol among the PAH-dihydrodiols tested. A time-of-flight mass spectroscopic study showed that the catechol form of BA-1,2-dihydrodiol formed after DD treatment. In conclusion, BA-1,2-dihydrodiol can induce DNA damage more efficiently than B[a]P-7,8-dihydrodiol and other BA-dihydrodiols in the presence of DD. The reaction mechanism on oxidative DNA damage may be explained by theoretical calculations with an enthalpy change of dihydrodiols and oxidation potential of their catechol forms. DD

  14. Spatial variability of the dehydrogenase activity in forest soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Błońska, Ewa; Lasota, Jarosław

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the spatial variability of the dehydrogenase activity (DH) in forest soils using geostatistics. We have studied variability soil dehydrogenase and their relationship with variability of some physic-chemical properties. Two study areas (A and B) were set up in southern Poland in the Zlotoryja Forest District. Study areas were covered by different types of vegetation (A- broadleaf forest with beech, ash and sycamore), B- coniferous forest with Norway spruce). The soils were classified as Dystric Cambisols (WRB 2006). The samples for laboratory testing were collected from 49 places on each areas. 15 cm of surface horizon of soil were taken (with previously removed litter). Dehydrogenase activity was marked with Lenhard's method according to the Casida procedure. Soil pH, nitrogen (N) and soil organic carbon (C) content (by LECO CNS 2000 carbon analyzer) was marked. C/N ratio was calculated. Particle size composition was determined using laser diffraction. Statistical analysis were performed using STATISTICA 10 software. Geostatistical analysis and mapping were done by application of GS 9+ (Gamma Design) and Surfer 11 (Golden Software). The activity of DH ranged between 5,02 and 71,20 mg TPP• kg-1 •24 h-1 on the A area and between 0,94 and 16,47 mg TPP• kg-1 •24 h-1. Differences in spatial variability of the analised features were noted. The variability of dehydrogenase activity on the A study area was described by an exponential model, whereas on the B study area the spatial correlation has not been noted. The relationship of dehydrogenase activity with the remaining parameters of soil was noted only in the case of A study area. The variability of organic carbon content on the A and B study areas were described by an exponential model. The variability of nitrogen content on both areas were described by an spherical model.

  15. Discovery of a Distinct Superfamily of Kunitz-Type Toxin (KTT) from Tarantulas

    PubMed Central

    Diao, Jian-Bo; Jiang, Li-Ping; Tang, Xing; Liang, Song-Ping

    2008-01-01

    Background Kuntiz-type toxins (KTTs) have been found in the venom of animals such as snake, cone snail and sea anemone. The main ancestral function of Kunitz-type proteins was the inhibition of a diverse array of serine proteases, while toxic activities (such as ion-channel blocking) were developed under a variety of Darwinian selection pressures. How new functions were grafted onto an old protein scaffold and what effect Darwinian selection pressures had on KTT evolution remains a puzzle. Principal Findings Here we report the presence of a new superfamily of KTTs in spiders (Tarantulas: Ornithoctonus huwena and Ornithoctonus hainana), which share low sequence similarity to known KTTs and is clustered in a distinct clade in the phylogenetic tree of KTT evolution. The representative molecule of spider KTTs, HWTX-XI, purified from the venom of O. huwena, is a bi-functional protein which is a very potent trypsin inhibitor (about 30-fold more strong than BPTI) as well as a weak Kv1.1 potassium channel blocker. Structural analysis of HWTX-XI in 3-D by NMR together with comparative function analysis of 18 expressed mutants of this toxin revealed two separate sites, corresponding to these two activities, located on the two ends of the cone-shape molecule of HWTX-XI. Comparison of non-synonymous/synonymous mutation ratios (ω) for each site in spider and snake KTTs, as well as PBTI like body Kunitz proteins revealed high Darwinian selection pressure on the binding sites for Kv channels and serine proteases in snake, while only on the proteases in spider and none detected in body proteins, suggesting different rates and patterns of evolution among them. The results also revealed a series of key events in the history of spider KTT evolution, including the formation of a novel KTT family (named sub-Kuntiz-type toxins) derived from the ancestral native KTTs with the loss of the second disulfide bridge accompanied by several dramatic sequence modifications. Conclusions

  16. Functional identification and structure determination of two novel prolidases from cog1228 in the amidohydrolase superfamily .

    PubMed

    Xiang, Dao Feng; Patskovsky, Yury; Xu, Chengfu; Fedorov, Alexander A; Fedorov, Elena V; Sisco, Abby A; Sauder, J Michael; Burley, Stephen K; Almo, Steven C; Raushel, Frank M

    2010-08-10

    Two uncharacterized enzymes from the amidohydrolase superfamily belonging to cog1228 were cloned, expressed, and purified to homogeneity. The two proteins, Sgx9260c ( gi|44242006 ) and Sgx9260b ( gi|44479596 ), were derived from environmental DNA samples originating from the Sargasso Sea. The catalytic function and substrate profiles for Sgx9260c and Sgx9260b were determined using a comprehensive library of dipeptides and N-acyl derivative of l-amino acids. Sgx9260c catalyzes the hydrolysis of Gly-l-Pro, l-Ala-l-Pro, and N-acyl derivatives of l-Pro. The best substrate identified to date is N-acetyl-l-Pro with a value of k(cat)/K(m) of 3 x 10(5) M(-1) s(-1). Sgx9260b catalyzes the hydrolysis of l-hydrophobic l-Pro dipeptides and N-acyl derivatives of l-Pro. The best substrate identified to date is N-propionyl-l-Pro with a value of k(cat)/K(m) of 1 x 10(5) M(-1) s(-1). Three-dimensional structures of both proteins were determined by X-ray diffraction methods (PDB codes 3MKV and 3FEQ ). These proteins fold as distorted (beta/alpha)(8)-barrels with two divalent cations in the active site. The structure of Sgx9260c was also determined as a complex with the N-methylphosphonate derivative of l-Pro (PDB code 3N2C ). In this structure the phosphonate moiety bridges the binuclear metal center, and one oxygen atom interacts with His-140. The alpha-carboxylate of the inhibitor interacts with Tyr-231. The proline side chain occupies a small substrate binding cavity formed by residues contributed from the loop that follows beta-strand 7 within the (beta/alpha)(8)-barrel. A total of 38 other proteins from cog1228 are predicted to have the same substrate profile based on conservation of the substrate binding residues. The structure of an evolutionarily related protein, Cc2672 from Caulobacter crecentus, was determined as a complex with the N-methylphosphonate derivative of l-arginine (PDB code 3MTW ). PMID:20604542

  17. Functional Identification and Structure Determination of Two Novel Prolidases from cog1228 in the Amidohydrolase Superfamily

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, Dao Feng; Patskovsky, Yury; Xu, Chengfu; Fedorov, Alexander A.; Fedorov, Elena V.; Sisco, Abby A.; Sauder, J. Michael; Burley, Stephen K.; Almo, Steven C.; Raushel, Frank M.

    2010-12-07

    Two uncharacterized enzymes from the amidohydrolase superfamily belonging to cog1228 were cloned, expressed, and purified to homogeneity. The two proteins, Sgx9260c (gi|44242006) and Sgx9260b (gi|44479596), were derived from environmental DNA samples originating from the Sargasso Sea. The catalytic function and substrate profiles for Sgx9260c and Sgx9260b were determined using a comprehensive library of dipeptides and N-acyl derivative of L-amino acids. Sgx9260c catalyzes the hydrolysis of Gly-L-Pro, L-Ala-L-Pro, and N-acyl derivatives of L-Pro. The best substrate identified to date is N-acetyl-L-Pro with a value of k{sub cat}/K{sub m} of 3 x 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}. Sgx9260b catalyzes the hydrolysis of L-hydrophobic L-Pro dipeptides and N-acyl derivatives of L-Pro. The best substrate identified to date is N-propionyl-L-Pro with a value of k{sub cat}/K{sub m} of 1 x 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}. Three-dimensional structures of both proteins were determined by X-ray diffraction methods (PDB codes 3MKV and 3FEQ). These proteins fold as distorted ({beta}/{alpha})8-barrels with two divalent cations in the active site. The structure of Sgx9260c was also determined as a complex with the N-methylphosphonate derivative of L-Pro (PDB code 3N2C). In this structure the phosphonate moiety bridges the binuclear metal center, and one oxygen atom interacts with His-140. The {alpha}-carboxylate of the inhibitor interacts with Tyr-231. The proline side chain occupies a small substrate binding cavity formed by residues contributed from the loop that follows {beta}-strand 7 within the ({beta}/{alpha})8-barrel. A total of 38 other proteins from cog1228 are predicted to have the same substrate profile based on conservation of the substrate binding residues. The structure of an evolutionarily related protein, Cc2672 from Caulobacter crecentus, was determined as a complex with the N-methylphosphonate derivative of L-arginine (PDB code 3MTW).

  18. Biochemistry and Crystal Structure of Ectoine Synthase: A Metal-Containing Member of the Cupin Superfamily.

    PubMed

    Widderich, Nils; Kobus, Stefanie; Höppner, Astrid; Riclea, Ramona; Seubert, Andreas; Dickschat, Jeroen S; Heider, Johann; Smits, Sander H J; Bremer, Erhard

    2016-01-01

    Ectoine is a compatible solute and chemical chaperone widely used by members of the Bacteria and a few Archaea to fend-off the detrimental effects of high external osmolarity on cellular physiology and growth. Ectoine synthase (EctC) catalyzes the last step in ectoine production and mediates the ring closure of the substrate N-gamma-acetyl-L-2,4-diaminobutyric acid through a water elimination reaction. However, the crystal structure of ectoine synthase is not known and a clear understanding of how its fold contributes to enzyme activity is thus lacking. Using the ectoine synthase from the cold-adapted marine bacterium Sphingopyxis alaskensis (Sa), we report here both a detailed biochemical characterization of the EctC enzyme and the high-resolution crystal structure of its apo-form. Structural analysis classified the (Sa)EctC protein as a member of the cupin superfamily. EctC forms a dimer with a head-to-tail arrangement, both in solution and in the crystal structure. The interface of the dimer assembly is shaped through backbone-contacts and weak hydrophobic interactions mediated by two beta-sheets within each monomer. We show for the first time that ectoine synthase harbors a catalytically important metal co-factor; metal depletion and reconstitution experiments suggest that EctC is probably an iron-dependent enzyme. We found that EctC not only effectively converts its natural substrate N-gamma-acetyl-L-2,4-diaminobutyric acid into ectoine through a cyclocondensation reaction, but that it can also use the isomer N-alpha-acetyl-L-2,4-diaminobutyric acid as its substrate, albeit with substantially reduced catalytic efficiency. Structure-guided site-directed mutagenesis experiments targeting amino acid residues that are evolutionarily highly conserved among the extended EctC protein family, including those forming the presumptive iron-binding site, were conducted to functionally analyze the properties of the resulting EctC variants. An assessment of enzyme activity

  19. Evolution of Enzymatic Activities in the Enolase Superfamily: D-Tartrate Dehydratase from Bradyrhizobium japonicum

    SciTech Connect

    Yew,W.; Fedorov, A.; Fedorov, E.; Wood, B.; Almo, S.; Gerlt, J.

    2006-01-01

    We focus on the assignment of function to and elucidation of structure-function relationships for a member of the mechanistically diverse enolase superfamily encoded by the Bradyrhizobium japonicum genome (bll6730; GI:27381841). As suggested by sequence alignments, the active site contains the same functional groups found in the active site of mandelate racemase (MR) that catalyzes a 1,1-proton transfer reaction: two acid/base catalysts, Lys 184 at the end of the second {beta}-strand, and a His 322-Asp 292 dyad at the ends of the seventh and sixth -strands, respectively, as well as ligands for an essential Mg{sup 2+}, Asp 213, Glu 239, and Glu 265 at the ends of the third, fourth, and fifth {beta}-strands, respectively. We screened a library of 46 acid sugars and discovered that only D-tartrate is dehydrated, yielding oxaloacetate as product. The kinetic constants (k{sub cat} = 7.3 s{sup -1}; k{sub cat}/K{sub M} = 8.5 x 10{sup 4} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}) are consistent with assignment of the D-tartrate dehydratase (TarD) function. The kinetic phenotypes of mutants as well as the structures of liganded complexes are consistent with a mechanism in which Lys 184 initiates the reaction by abstraction of the {alpha}-proton to generate a Mg{sup 2+}-stabilized enediolate intermediate, and the vinylogous -elimination of the 3-OH group is general acid-catalyzed by the His 322, accomplishing the anti-elimination of water. The replacement of the leaving group by solvent-derived hydrogen is stereorandom, suggesting that the enol tautomer of oxaloacetate is the product; this expectation was confirmed by its observation by {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy. Thus, the TarD-catalyzed reaction is a 'simple' extension of the two-step reaction catalyzed by MR: base-catalyzed proton abstraction to generate a Mg{sup 2+}-stabilized enediolate intermediate followed by acid-catalyzed decomposition of that intermediate to yield the product.

  20. Biochemistry and Crystal Structure of Ectoine Synthase: A Metal-Containing Member of the Cupin Superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Höppner, Astrid; Riclea, Ramona; Seubert, Andreas; Dickschat, Jeroen S.; Heider, Johann; Smits, Sander H. J.; Bremer, Erhard

    2016-01-01

    Ectoine is a compatible solute and chemical chaperone widely used by members of the Bacteria and a few Archaea to fend-off the detrimental effects of high external osmolarity on cellular physiology and growth. Ectoine synthase (EctC) catalyzes the last step in ectoine production and mediates the ring closure of the substrate N-gamma-acetyl-L-2,4-diaminobutyric acid through a water elimination reaction. However, the crystal structure of ectoine synthase is not known and a clear understanding of how its fold contributes to enzyme activity is thus lacking. Using the ectoine synthase from the cold-adapted marine bacterium Sphingopyxis alaskensis (Sa), we report here both a detailed biochemical characterization of the EctC enzyme and the high-resolution crystal structure of its apo-form. Structural analysis classified the (Sa)EctC protein as a member of the cupin superfamily. EctC forms a dimer with a head-to-tail arrangement, both in solution and in the crystal structure. The interface of the dimer assembly is shaped through backbone-contacts and weak hydrophobic interactions mediated by two beta-sheets within each monomer. We show for the first time that ectoine synthase harbors a catalytically important metal co-factor; metal depletion and reconstitution experiments suggest that EctC is probably an iron-dependent enzyme. We found that EctC not only effectively converts its natural substrate N-gamma-acetyl-L-2,4-diaminobutyric acid into ectoine through a cyclocondensation reaction, but that it can also use the isomer N-alpha-acetyl-L-2,4-diaminobutyric acid as its substrate, albeit with substantially reduced catalytic efficiency. Structure-guided site-directed mutagenesis experiments targeting amino acid residues that are evolutionarily highly conserved among the extended EctC protein family, including those forming the presumptive iron-binding site, were conducted to functionally analyze the properties of the resulting EctC variants. An assessment of enzyme activity

  1. A Survey of the ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) Gene Superfamily in the Salmon Louse (Lepeophtheirus salmonis)

    PubMed Central

    Heumann, Jan; Taggart, John B.; Gharbi, Karim; Bron, James E.; Bekaert, Michaël; Sturm, Armin

    2015-01-01

    Salmon lice, Lepeophtheirus salmonis (Krøyer, 1837), are fish ectoparasites causing significant economic damage in the mariculture of Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar Linnaeus, 1758. The control of L. salmonis at fish farms relies to a large extent on treatment with anti-parasitic drugs. A problem related to chemical control is the potential for development of resistance, which in L. salmonis is documented for a number of drug classes including organophosphates, pyrethroids and avermectins. The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) gene superfamily is found in all biota and includes a range of drug efflux transporters that can confer drug resistance to cancers and pathogens. Furthermore, some ABC transporters are recognised to be involved in conferral of insecticide resistance. While a number of studies have investigated ABC transporters in L. salmonis, no systematic analysis of the ABC gene family exists for this species. This study presents a genome-wide survey of ABC genes in L. salmonis for which, ABC superfamily members were identified through homology searching of the L. salmonis genome. In addition, ABC proteins were identified in a reference transcriptome of the parasite generated by high-throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) of a multi-stage RNA library. Searches of both genome and transcriptome allowed the identification of a total of 33 genes / transcripts coding for ABC proteins, of which 3 were represented only in the genome and 4 only in the transcriptome. Eighteen sequences were assigned to ABC subfamilies known to contain drug transporters, i.e. subfamilies B (4 sequences), C (11) and G (2). The results suggest that the ABC gene family of L. salmonis possesses fewer members than recorded for other arthropods. The present survey of the L. salmonis ABC gene superfamily will provide the basis for further research into potential roles of ABC transporters in the toxicity of salmon delousing agents and as potential mechanisms of drug resistance. PMID:26418738

  2. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of Sfh3, a member of the Sec14 protein superfamily

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Jihui; Schaaf, Gabriel; Bankaitis, Vytas A.; Ortlund, Eric A.; Pathak, Manish C.

    2012-03-26

    Sec14 is the major phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns)/phosphatidylcholine (PtdCho) transfer protein in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and is the founding member of the Sec14 protein superfamily. Recent functional data suggest that Sec14 functions as a nanoreactor for PtdCho-regulated presentation of PtdIns to PtdIns kinase to affect membrane trafficking. Extrapolation of this concept to other members of the Sec14 superfamily suggests a mechanism by which a comprehensive cohort of Sec14-like nanoreactors sense correspondingly diverse pools of lipid metabolites. In turn, metabolic information is translated to signaling circuits driven by phosphoinositide metabolism. Sfh3, one of five Sec14 homologs in yeast, exhibits several interesting functional features, including its unique localization to lipid particles and microsomes. This localization forecasts novel regulatory interfaces between neutral lipid metabolism and phosphoinositide signaling. To launch a detailed structural and functional characterization of Sfh3, the recombinant protein was purified to homogeneity, diffraction-quality crystals were produced and a native X-ray data set was collected to 2.2 {angstrom} resolution. To aid in phasing, SAD X-ray diffraction data were collected to 1.93 {angstrom} resolution from an SeMet-labeled crystal at the Southeast Regional Collaborative Access Team at the Advanced Photon Source. Here, the cloning and purification of Sfh3 and the preliminary diffraction of Sfh3 crystals are reported, enabling structural analyses that are expected to reveal novel principles governing ligand binding and functional specificity for Sec14-superfamily proteins.

  3. Site-directed mutagenesis maps interactions that enhance cognate and limit promiscuous catalysis by an alkaline phosphatase superfamily phosphodiesterase.

    PubMed

    Wiersma-Koch, Helen; Sunden, Fanny; Herschlag, Daniel

    2013-12-23

    Catalytic promiscuity, an evolutionary concept, also provides a powerful tool for gaining mechanistic insights into enzymatic reactions. Members of the alkaline phosphatase (AP) superfamily are highly amenable to such investigation, with several members having been shown to exhibit promiscuous activity for the cognate reactions of other superfamily members. Previous work has shown that nucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase (NPP) exhibits a >10⁶-fold preference for the hydrolysis of phosphate diesters over phosphate monoesters, and that the reaction specificity is reduced 10³-fold when the size of the substituent on the transferred phosphoryl group of phosphate diester substrates is reduced to a methyl group. Here we show additional specificity contributions from the binding pocket for this substituent (herein termed the R' substituent) that account for an additional ~250-fold differential specificity with the minimal methyl substituent. Removal of four hydrophobic side chains suggested on the basis of structural inspection to interact favorably with R' substituents decreases phosphate diester reactivity 10⁴-fold with an optimal diester substrate (R' = 5'-deoxythymidine) and 50-fold with a minimal diester substrate (R' = CH₃). These mutations also enhance the enzyme's promiscuous phosphate monoesterase activity by nearly an order of magnitude, an effect that is traced by mutation to the reduction of unfavorable interactions with the two residues closest to the nonbridging phosphoryl oxygen atoms. The quadruple R' pocket mutant exhibits the same activity toward phosphate diester and phosphate monoester substrates that have identical leaving groups, with substantial rate enhancements of ~10¹¹-fold. This observation suggests that the Zn²⁺ bimetallo core of AP superfamily enzymes, which is equipotent in phosphate monoester and diester catalysis, has the potential to become specialized for the hydrolysis of each class of phosphate esters via addition

  4. Eukaryotic aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) genes: human polymorphisms, and recommended nomenclature based on divergent evolution and chromosomal mapping.

    PubMed

    Vasiliou, V; Bairoch, A; Tipton, K F; Nebert, D W

    1999-08-01

    As currently being performed with an increasing number of superfamilies, a standardized gene nomenclature system is proposed here, based on divergent evolution, using multiple alignment analysis of all 86 eukaryotic aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) amino-acid sequences known at this time. The ALDHs represent a superfamily of NAD(P)(+)-dependent enzymes having similar primary structures that oxidize a wide spectrum of endogenous and exogenous aliphatic and aromatic aldehydes. To date, a total of 54 animal, 15 plant, 14 yeast, and three fungal ALDH genes or cDNAs have been sequenced. These ALDHs can be divided into a total of 18 families (comprising 37 subfamilies), and all nonhuman ALDH genes are named here after the established human ALDH genes, when possible. An ALDH protein from one gene family is defined as having approximately < or = 40% amino-acid identity to that from another family. Two members of the same subfamily exhibit approximately > or = 60% amino-acid identity and are expected to be located at the same subchromosomal site. For naming each gene, it is proposed that the root symbol 'ALDH' denoting 'aldehyde dehydrogenase' be followed by an Arabic number representing the family and, when needed, a letter designating the subfamily and an Arabic number denoting the individual gene within the subfamily; all letters are capitalized in all mammals except mouse and fruit fly, e.g. 'human ALDH3A1 (mouse, Drosophila Aldh3a1).' It is suggested that the Human Gene Nomenclature Guidelines (http://++www.gene.ucl.ac.uk/nomenclature/guidelines.h tml) be used for all species other than mouse and Drosophila. Following these guidelines, the gene is italicized, whereas the corresponding cDNA, mRNA, protein or enzyme activity is written with upper-case letters and without italics, e.g. 'human, mouse or Drosophila ALDH3A1 cDNA, mRNA, or activity'. If an orthologous gene between species cannot be identified with certainty, sequential naming of these genes will be carried out

  5. The mechanisms of fast and slow transport in neurons: identification and characterization of the new kinesin superfamily motors.

    PubMed

    Hirokawa, N

    1997-10-01

    Progress in the identification and characterization of new carboxy-terminal motor domain type kinesin superfamily proteins (KIFs)-KIFC2, 16 new KIFs and KIF-associated protein 3 (KAP3)-has provided further insight into the molecular mechanisms of organelle transport in neurons. Developments in molecular and cellular biophysics and recombinant adenovirus infection techniques combined with transgenic mice technology have enhanced the visualization of moving forms of cytoskeletal proteins during slow transport. The results of these studies strongly support the subunit transport theory. PMID:9384541

  6. Molecular phylogeny of the kelch-repeat superfamily reveals an expansion of BTB/kelch proteins in animals

    PubMed Central

    Prag, Soren; Adams, Josephine C

    2003-01-01

    Background The kelch motif is an ancient and evolutionarily-widespread sequence motif of 44–56 amino acids in length. It occurs as five to seven repeats that form a β-propeller tertiary structure. Over 28 kelch-repeat proteins have been sequenced and functionally characterised from diverse organisms spanning from viruses, plants and fungi to mammals and it is evident from expressed sequence tag, domain and genome databases that many additional hypothetical proteins contain kelch-repeats. In general, kelch-repeat β-propellers are involved in protein-protein interactions, however the modest sequence identity between kelch motifs, the diversity of domain architectures, and the partial information on this protein family in any single species, all present difficulties to developing a coherent view of the kelch-repeat domain and the kelch-repeat protein superfamily. To understand the complexity of this superfamily of proteins, we have analysed by bioinformatics the complement of kelch-repeat proteins encoded in the human genome and have made comparisons to the kelch-repeat proteins encoded in other sequenced genomes. Results We identified 71 kelch-repeat proteins encoded in the human genome, whereas 5 or 8 members were identified in yeasts and around 18 in C. elegans, D. melanogaster and A. gambiae. Multiple domain architectures were identified in each organism, including previously unrecognised forms. The vast majority of kelch-repeat domains are predicted to form six-bladed β-propellers. The most prevalent domain architecture in the metazoan animal genomes studied was the BTB/kelch domain organisation and we uncovered 3 subgroups of human BTB/kelch proteins. Sequence analysis of the kelch-repeat domains of the most robustly-related subgroups identified differences in β-propeller organisation that could provide direction for experimental study of protein-binding characteristics. Conclusion The kelch-repeat superfamily constitutes a distinct and evolutionarily

  7. The alcohol dehydrogenase isoenzyme alcohol dehydrogenase IV as a candidate marker of Helicobacter pylori infection

    PubMed Central

    Laniewska-Dunaj, Magdalena; Strumnik, Anna; Szmitkowski, Maciej

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with decreased alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) activity in the gastric mucosa. The decrease in gastric ADH activity depends on the severity of inflammation and mucosal injury. This damage can be a reason of the release of enzyme from gastric mucosa and leads to the increase of the ADH activity in the sera of patients with H. pylori infection. Material and methods Serum samples were taken from 140 patients with H. pylori infection. Total ADH activity was measured by photometric method with p-nitrosodimethylaniline as a substrate and ALDH activity by the fluorometric method with 6-methoxy-2-naphtaldehyde. For the measurement of the activity of class I and II isoenzymes we employed the fluorometric methods, with class-specific fluorogenic substrates. The activity of class III ADH was measured by the photometric method with n-octanol and class IV with m-nitrobenzaldehyde as a substrate. Results The activity of ADH IV in the serum of patients with H. pylori infection increased about 42% (7.86 mU/l) in the comparison to the control level (4.52 mU/l). Total activity of ADH was 1105 mU/l in patients group and 682 mU/l in control. The diagnostic sensitivity for ADH IV was 88%, specificity 90%, positive and negative predictive values were 91% and 84% respectively. Area under ROC curve for ADH IV was 0.84. Conclusions Helicobacter pylori infection of gastric mucosa is reflected in the serum by significant increase of class IV and total ADH activity. The results suggest a potential role for ADH IV as a marker of H. pylori infection. PMID:25395946

  8. Succinate dehydrogenase subunit D and succinate dehydrogenase subunit B mutation analysis in canine phaeochromocytoma and paraganglioma.

    PubMed

    Holt, D E; Henthorn, P; Howell, V M; Robinson, B G; Benn, D E

    2014-07-01

    Phaeochromocytomas (PCs) are tumours of the adrenal medulla chromaffin cells. Paragangliomas (PGLs) arise in sympathetic ganglia (previously called extra-adrenal PCs) or in non-chromaffin parasympathetic ganglia cells that are usually non-secretory. Parenchymal cells from these tumours have a common embryological origin from neural crest ectoderm. Several case series of canine PCs and PGLs have been published and a link between the increased incidence of chemoreceptor neoplasia in brachycephalic dog breeds and chronic hypoxia has been postulated. A similar link to hypoxia in man led to the identification of germline heterozygous mutations in the gene encoding succinate dehydrogenase subunit D (SDHD) and subsequently SDHA, SDHB and SDHC in similar tumours. We investigated canine PCs (n = 6) and PGLs (n = 2) for SDHD and SDHB mutations and in one PGL found a somatic SDHD mutation c.365A>G (p.Lys122Arg) in exon 4, which was not present in normal tissue from this brachycephalic dog. Two PCs were heterozygous for both c.365A>G (p.Lys122Arg) mutation and an exon 3 silent variant c.291G>A. We also identified the heterozygous SDHB exon 2 mutation c.113G>A (p.Arg38Gln) in a PC. These results illustrate that genetic mutations may underlie tumourigenesis in canine PCs and PGLs. The spontaneous nature of these canine diseases and possible association of PGLs with hypoxia in brachycephalic breeds may make them an attractive model for studying the corresponding human tumours. PMID:24813157

  9. Regulation of human dihydrodiol dehydrogenase by Michael acceptor xenobiotics.

    PubMed

    Ciaccio, P J; Jaiswal, A K; Tew, K D

    1994-06-01

    A human oxidoreductase (H-37) that is overexpressed in ethacrynic acid-resistant HT29 colon cells (Ciaccio, P. J., Stuart, J.E., and Tew, K.D. (1993) Mol. Pharmacol. 43, 845-853) has been identified as a dihydrodiol dehydrogenase. Translated protein from a dihydrodiol dehydrogenase cDNA isolated from a library prepared from ethacrynic acid-resistant HT29 cell poly(A+) RNA was recognized by anti-H-37 IgG and was identical in molecular weight with H-37. The isolated cDNA was identical in both nucleotide and amino acid sequences with the recently cloned liver dihydrodiol dehydrogenase (Stolz, A., Hammond, L., Lou, H., Takikawa, H., Ronk, M., and Shively, J.E. (1993) J. Biol. Chem. 268, 10448-10457). Using this cDNA as probe, we have examined its induction by Michael acceptors. The steady state dihydrodiol dehydrogenase mRNA level in the ethacrynic acid-resistant line was increased 30-fold relative to that of wild-type cells. Twenty-four hour treatment of wild-type cells with ethacrynic acid or dimethyl maleate increased mRNA 10-fold and 5-fold, respectively. These changes are accompanied by both increased protein expression and increased NADP-dependent 1-acenaphthenol oxidative activity in cell cytosol. In gel shift assays, compared to wild type controls, increased binding of NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase human antioxidant response element (hARE) DNA to redox labile protein complexes present in treated and resistant cell nuclear extract was observed. Ethacrynic acid induced CAT activity 2-fold in Hepa1 cells stably transfected with NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase hARE-tk-CAT chimeric gene construct. Thus, dihydrodiol dehydrogenase protein is inducible by de novo synthesis from mRNA by structurally related monofunctional inducer Michael acceptors. Altered in vitro binding of nuclear protein to the hARE is indirect evidence for the involvement of an element similar to hARE in the regulation of dihydrodiol dehydrogenase by these agents. PMID:7515059

  10. Enhancement of L-3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase activity and circulating ketone body levels by pantethine. Relevance to dopaminergic injury

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The administration of the ketone bodies hydroxybutyrate and acetoacetate is known to exert a protective effect against metabolic disorders associated with cerebral pathologies. This suggests that the enhancement of their endogenous production might be a rational therapeutic approach. Ketone bodies are generated by fatty acid beta-oxidation, a process involving a mitochondrial oxido-reductase superfamily, with fatty acid-CoA thioesters as substrates. In this report, emphasis is on the penultimate step of the process, i.e. L-3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase activity. We determined changes in enzyme activity and in circulating ketone body levels in the MPTP mouse model of Parkinson's disease. Since the active moiety of CoA is pantetheine, mice were treated with pantethine, its naturally-occurring form. Pantethine has the advantage of being known as an anti-inflammatory and hypolipidemic agent with very few side effects. Results We found that dehydrogenase activity and circulating ketone body levels were drastically reduced by the neurotoxin MPTP, whereas treatment with pantethine overcame these adverse effects. Pantethine prevented dopaminergic neuron loss and motility disorders. In vivo and in vitro experiments showed that the protection was associated with enhancement of glutathione (GSH) production as well as restoration of respiratory chain complex I activity and mitochondrial ATP levels. Remarkably, pantethine treatment boosted the circulating ketone body levels in MPTP-intoxicated mice, but not in normal animals. Conclusions These finding demonstrate the feasibility of the enhancement of endogenous ketone body production and provide a promising therapeutic approach to Parkinson's disease as well as, conceivably, to other neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:20416081

  11. Structural basis for cellobiose dehydrogenase action during oxidative cellulose degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Tien-Chye; Kracher, Daniel; Gandini, Rosaria; Sygmund, Christoph; Kittl, Roman; Haltrich, Dietmar; Hällberg, B. Martin; Ludwig, Roland; Divne, Christina

    2015-07-01

    A new paradigm for cellulose depolymerization by fungi focuses on an oxidative mechanism involving cellobiose dehydrogenases (CDH) and copper-dependent lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMO); however, mechanistic studies have been hampered by the lack of structural information regarding CDH. CDH contains a haem-binding cytochrome (CYT) connected via a flexible linker to a flavin-dependent dehydrogenase (DH). Electrons are generated from cellobiose oxidation catalysed by DH and shuttled via CYT to LPMO. Here we present structural analyses that provide a comprehensive picture of CDH conformers, which govern the electron transfer between redox centres. Using structure-based site-directed mutagenesis, rapid kinetics analysis and molecular docking, we demonstrate that flavin-to-haem interdomain electron transfer (IET) is enabled by a haem propionate group and that rapid IET requires a closed CDH state in which the propionate is tightly enfolded by DH. Following haem reduction, CYT reduces LPMO to initiate oxygen activation at the copper centre and subsequent cellulose depolymerization.

  12. [Cooperative properties of D-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase].

    PubMed

    Nagradova, N K

    1977-03-01

    The structure of the active center of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and the arrangement of subunits in the tetrameric molecule is delineated. The mechanism of cooperative effects in the oligomer is considered, and the involvement of various regions of the active center and of different-subunit contact area in the realization of the cooperative phenomena is discussed. A special attention is paid to the effect of NAD+ bound to one of the subunits of the tetramer on the structure of an adjacent subunit and to the problem of the participation of the coenzyme in the creation of anion-binding sites of the enzyme. The conditions of reversible dissociation of the tetrameric apoenzyme molecule into dimers are depicted, and the role of NAD+ in the organization of the quaternary structure of the dehydrogenase is discussed. The problem of catalytic activity of the dimeric form of the enzyme is argued. PMID:193581

  13. Novel Xylose Dehydrogenase in the Halophilic Archaeon Haloarcula marismortui†

    PubMed Central

    Johnsen, Ulrike; Schönheit, Peter

    2004-01-01

    During growth of the halophilic archaeon Haloarcula marismortui on d-xylose, a specific d-xylose dehydrogenase was induced. The enzyme was purified to homogeneity. It constitutes a homotetramer of about 175 kDa and catalyzed the oxidation of xylose with both NADP+ and NAD+ as cosubstrates with 10-fold higher affinity for NADP+. In addition to d-xylose, d-ribose was oxidized at similar kinetic constants, whereas d-glucose was used with about 70-fold lower catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km). With the N-terminal amino acid sequence of the subunit, an open reading frame (ORF)—coding for a 39.9-kDA protein—was identified in the partially sequenced genome of H. marismortui. The function of the ORF as the gene designated xdh and coding for xylose dehydrogenase was proven by its functional overexpression in Escherichia coli. The recombinant enzyme was reactivated from inclusion bodies following solubilization in urea and refolding in the presence of salts, reduced and oxidized glutathione, and substrates. Xylose dehydrogenase showed the highest sequence similarity to glucose-fructose oxidoreductase from Zymomonas mobilis and other putative bacterial and archaeal oxidoreductases. Activities of xylose isomerase and xylulose kinase, the initial reactions of xylose catabolism of most bacteria, could not be detected in xylose-grown cells of H. marismortui, and the genes that encode them, xylA and xylB, were not found in the genome of H. marismortui. Thus, we propose that this first characterized archaeal xylose dehydrogenase catalyzes the initial step in xylose degradation by H. marismortui. PMID:15342590

  14. Reappraisal of the regulation of lactococcal L-lactate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    van Niel, Ed W J; Palmfeldt, Johan; Martin, Rani; Paese, Marco; Hahn-Hägerdal, Bärbel

    2004-03-01

    Lactococcal lactate dehydrogenases (LDHs) are coregulated at the substrate level by at least two mechanisms: the fructose-1,6-biphosphate/phosphate ratio and the NADH/NAD ratio. Among the Lactococcus lactis species, there are strains that are predominantly regulated by the first mechanism (e.g., strain 65.1) or by the second mechanism (e.g., strain NCDO 2118). A more complete model of the kinetics of the regulation of lactococcal LDH is discussed. PMID:15006814

  15. Characterization of Flavin-Containing Opine Dehydrogenase from Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Seiya; Sueda, Rui; Fukumori, Fumiyasu; Watanabe, Yasuo

    2015-01-01

    Opines, in particular nopaline and octopine, are specific compounds found in crown gall tumor tissues induced by infections with Agrobacterium species, and are synthesized by well-studied NAD(P)H-dependent dehydrogenases (synthases), which catalyze the reductive condensation of α-ketoglutarate or pyruvate with L-arginine. The corresponding genes are transferred into plant cells via a tumor-inducing (Ti) plasmid. In addition to the reverse oxidative reaction(s), the genes noxB-noxA and ooxB-ooxA are considered to be involved in opine catabolism as (membrane-associated) oxidases; however, their properties have not yet been elucidated in detail due to the difficulties associated with purification (and preservation). We herein successfully expressed Nox/Oox-like genes from Pseudomonas putida in P. putida cells. The purified protein consisted of different α-, β-, and γ-subunits encoded by the OdhA, OdhB, and OdhC genes, which were arranged in tandem on the chromosome (OdhB-C-A), and exhibited dehydrogenase (but not oxidase) activity toward nopaline in the presence of artificial electron acceptors such as 2,6-dichloroindophenol. The enzyme contained FAD, FMN, and [2Fe-2S]-iron sulfur as prosthetic groups. On the other hand, the gene cluster from Bradyrhizobium japonicum consisted of OdhB1-C-A-B2, from which two proteins, OdhAB1C and OdhAB2C, appeared through the assembly of each β-subunit together with common α- and γ-subunits. A poor phylogenetic relationship was detected between OdhB1 and OdhB2 in spite of them both functioning as octopine dehydrogenases, which provided clear evidence for the acquisition of novel functions by “subunit-exchange”. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to have examined flavin-containing opine dehydrogenase. PMID:26382958

  16. A guide to 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Adamski, J; Jakob, F J

    2001-01-22

    17beta-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (17beta-HSD) are pivotal in controlling the biological potency of steroid hormones by catalyzing oxidation or reduction at position 17. Several 17beta-HSDs may as well metabolize further substrates including alcohols, bile acids, fatty acids and retinols. This review summarizes recent progress in the field of 17beta-HSD research provides an update of nomenclature. PMID:11165003

  17. Drosophila alcohol dehydrogenase: developmental studies on cryptic variant lines.

    PubMed

    Miglani, G S; Ampy, F R

    1981-10-01

    Thirty-five cryptic variant lines were used to examine the mechanisms involved in genetic modulation of alcohol metabolism in Drosophila. Late third-instar larval, preemergence pupal, and adult stages cultured at 18 and 28 C were examined. Spectrophotometric analyses for native alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) activity and residual ADH activity after treatment with guanidine hydrochloride and heat were performed. Differential response of cryptic variants to treatment with the denaturants during development suggested that this variation may have an adaptive significance. PMID:6800354

  18. The enzymatic nature of an anonymous protein sequence cannot reliably be inferred from superfamily level structural information alone.

    PubMed

    Roche, Daniel Barry; Brüls, Thomas

    2015-05-01

    As the largest fraction of any proteome does not carry out enzymatic functions, and in order to leverage 3D structural data for the annotation of increasingly higher volumes of sequence data, we wanted to assess the strength of the link between coarse grained structural data (i.e., homologous superfamily level) and the enzymatic versus non-enzymatic nature of protein sequences. To probe this relationship, we took advantage of 41 phylogenetically diverse (encompassing 11 distinct phyla) genomes recently sequenced within the GEBA initiative, for which we integrated structural information, as defined by CATH, with enzyme level information, as defined by Enzyme Commission (EC) numbers. This analysis revealed that only a very small fraction (about 1%) of domain sequences occurring in the analyzed genomes was found to be associated with homologous superfamilies strongly indicative of enzymatic function. Resorting to less stringent criteria to define enzyme versus non-enzyme biased structural classes or excluding highly prevalent folds from the analysis had only modest effect on this proportion. Thus, the low genomic coverage by structurally anchored protein domains strongly associated to catalytic activities indicates that, on its own, the power of coarse grained structural information to infer the general property of being an enzyme is rather limited. PMID:25559918

  19. BAHD superfamily of acyl-CoA dependent acyltransferases in Populus and Arabidopsis: bioinformatics and gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, X.; Liu, C.

    2009-04-03

    Plant acyl-CoA dependent acyltransferases constitute a large specific protein superfamily, named BAHD. Using the conserved sequence motifs of BAHD members, we searched the genome sequences of Populus and Arabidopsis, and identified, respectively, 94- and 61-putative genes. Subsequently, we analyzed the phylogeny, gene structure, and chromosomal distribution of BAHD members of both species; then, we profiled expression patterns of BAHD genes by 'in silico' northern- and microarray-analyses based on public databases, and by RT-PCR. While our genomic- and bioinformatic- analyses provided full sets of BAHD superfamily genes, and cleaned up a few existing annotation errors, importantly it led to our recognizing several unique Arabidopsis BAHD genes that inversely overlapped with their neighboring genes on the genome, and disclosing a potential natural anti-sense regulation for gene expressions. Systemic gene-expression profiling of BAHD members revealed distinct tissue-specific/preferential expression patterns, indicating their diverse biological functions. Our study affords a strong knowledge base for understanding BAHD members evolutionary relationships and gene functions implicated in plant growth, development and metabolism.

  20. Cation channels of the transient receptor potential superfamily: their role in physiological and pathophysiological processes of smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, Alexander; Chubanov, Vladimir; Kalwa, Hermann; Rost, Benjamin R; Gudermann, Thomas

    2006-12-01

    Smooth muscle cells (SMC) are essential components of many tissues of the body. Ion channels regulate their membrane potential, the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) and their contractility. Among the ion channels expressed in SMC cation channels of the transient receptor potential (TRP) superfamily allow the entry of Na(+), Ca(2+) and Mg(2+). Members of the TRP superfamily are essential constituents of tonically active channels (TAC), receptor-operated channels (ROC), store-operated channels (SOC) and stretch-activated channels (SAC). This review focusses on TRP channels (TRPC1, TRPC3, TRPC4, TRPC5, TRPC6, TRPC7, TRPV2, TRPV4, TRPM4, TRPM7, TRPP2) whose physiological functions in SMC were dissected by downregulating channel activity in isolated tissues or by the analysis of gene-deficient mouse models. Their possible functional role and physiological regulation as homomeric or heteromeric channels in SMC are discussed. Moreover, TRP channels may also be responsible for pathophysiological processes involving SMC-like airway hyperresponsiveness and pulmonary hypertension. Therefore, they present important drug targets for future pharmacological interventions. PMID:16842858

  1. Characterization of a putative NsrR homologue in Streptomyces venezuelae reveals a new member of the Rrf2 superfamily.

    PubMed

    Munnoch, John T; Martinez, Ma Teresa Pellicer; Svistunenko, Dimitri A; Crack, Jason C; Le Brun, Nick E; Hutchings, Matthew I

    2016-01-01

    Members of the Rrf2 superfamily of transcription factors are widespread in bacteria but their functions are largely unexplored. The few that have been characterized in detail sense nitric oxide (NsrR), iron limitation (RirA), cysteine availability (CymR) and the iron sulfur (Fe-S) cluster status of the cell (IscR). In this study we combined ChIP- and dRNA-seq with in vitro biochemistry to characterize a putative NsrR homologue in Streptomyces venezuelae. ChIP-seq analysis revealed that rather than regulating the nitrosative stress response like Streptomyces coelicolor NsrR, Sven6563 binds to a conserved motif at a different, much larger set of genes with a diverse range of functions, including a number of regulators, genes required for glutamine synthesis, NADH/NAD(P)H metabolism, as well as general DNA/RNA and amino acid/protein turn over. Our biochemical experiments further show that Sven6563 has a [2Fe-2S] cluster and that the switch between oxidized and reduced cluster controls its DNA binding activity in vitro. To our knowledge, both the sensing domain and the putative target genes are novel for an Rrf2 protein, suggesting Sven6563 represents a new member of the Rrf2 superfamily. Given the redox sensitivity of its Fe-S cluster we have tentatively named the protein RsrR for Redox sensitive response Regulator. PMID:27605472

  2. Characterization of a putative NsrR homologue in Streptomyces venezuelae reveals a new member of the Rrf2 superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Munnoch, John T.; Martinez, Ma Teresa Pellicer; Svistunenko, Dimitri A.; Crack, Jason C.; Le Brun, Nick E.; Hutchings, Matthew I.

    2016-01-01

    Members of the Rrf2 superfamily of transcription factors are widespread in bacteria but their functions are largely unexplored. The few that have been characterized in detail sense nitric oxide (NsrR), iron limitation (RirA), cysteine availability (CymR) and the iron sulfur (Fe-S) cluster status of the cell (IscR). In this study we combined ChIP- and dRNA-seq with in vitro biochemistry to characterize a putative NsrR homologue in Streptomyces venezuelae. ChIP-seq analysis revealed that rather than regulating the nitrosative stress response like Streptomyces coelicolor NsrR, Sven6563 binds to a conserved motif at a different, much larger set of genes with a diverse range of functions, including a number of regulators, genes required for glutamine synthesis, NADH/NAD(P)H metabolism, as well as general DNA/RNA and amino acid/protein turn over. Our biochemical experiments further show that Sven6563 has a [2Fe-2S] cluster and that the switch between oxidized and reduced cluster controls its DNA binding activity in vitro. To our knowledge, both the sensing domain and the putative target genes are novel for an Rrf2 protein, suggesting Sven6563 represents a new member of the Rrf2 superfamily. Given the redox sensitivity of its Fe-S cluster we have tentatively named the protein RsrR for Redox sensitive response Regulator. PMID:27605472

  3. A Putative Cell Surface Receptor for White Spot Syndrome Virus Is a Member of a Transporter Superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Huai-Ting; Leu, Jiann-Horng; Huang, Po-Yu; Chen, Li-Li

    2012-01-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV), a large enveloped DNA virus, can cause the most serious viral disease in shrimp and has a wide host range among crustaceans. In this study, we identified a surface protein, named glucose transporter 1 (Glut1), which could also interact with WSSV envelope protein, VP53A. Sequence analysis revealed that Glut1 is a member of a large superfamily of transporters and that it is most closely related to evolutionary branches of this superfamily, branches that function to transport this sugar. Tissue tropism analysis showed that Glut1 was constitutive and highly expressed in almost all organs. Glut1's localization in shrimp cells was further verified and so was its interaction with Penaeus monodon chitin-binding protein (PmCBP), which was itself identified to interact with an envelope protein complex formed by 11 WSSV envelope proteins. In vitro and in vivo neutralization experiments using synthetic peptide contained WSSV binding domain (WBD) showed that the WBD peptide could inhibit WSSV infection in primary cultured hemocytes and delay the mortality in shrimps challenged with WSSV. These findings have important implications for our understanding of WSSV entry. PMID:22427993

  4. Mass spectrometry analysis and transcriptome sequencing reveal glowing squid crystal proteins are in the same superfamily as firefly luciferase.

    PubMed

    Gimenez, Gregory; Metcalf, Peter; Paterson, Neil G; Sharpe, Miriam L

    2016-01-01

    The Japanese firefly squid Hotaru-ika (Watasenia scintillans) produces intense blue light from photophores at the tips of two arms. These photophores are densely packed with protein microcrystals that catalyse the bioluminescent reaction using ATP and the substrate coelenterazine disulfate. The squid is the only organism known to produce light using protein crystals. We extracted microcrystals from arm tip photophores and identified the constituent proteins using mass spectrometry and transcriptome libraries prepared from arm tip tissue. The crystals contain three proteins, wsluc1-3, all members of the ANL superfamily of adenylating enzymes. They share 19 to 21% sequence identity with firefly luciferases, which produce light using ATP and the unrelated firefly luciferin substrate. We propose that wsluc1-3 form a complex that crystallises inside the squid photophores, and that in the crystal one or more of the proteins catalyses the production of light using coelenterazine disulfate and ATP. These results suggest that ANL superfamily enzymes have independently evolved in distant species to produce light using unrelated substrates. PMID:27279452

  5. Evolution of plant virus movement proteins from the 30K superfamily and of their homologs integrated in plant genomes

    SciTech Connect

    Mushegian, Arcady R.; Elena, Santiago F.

    2015-02-15

    Homologs of Tobacco mosaic virus 30K cell-to-cell movement protein are encoded by diverse plant viruses. Mechanisms of action and evolutionary origins of these proteins remain obscure. We expand the picture of conservation and evolution of the 30K proteins, producing sequence alignment of the 30K superfamily with the broadest phylogenetic coverage thus far and illuminating structural features of the core all-beta fold of these proteins. Integrated copies of pararetrovirus 30K movement genes are prevalent in euphyllophytes, with at least one copy intact in nearly every examined species, and mRNAs detected for most of them. Sequence analysis suggests repeated integrations, pseudogenizations, and positive selection in those provirus genes. An unannotated 30K-superfamily gene in Arabidopsis thaliana genome is likely expressed as a fusion with the At1g37113 transcript. This molecular background of endopararetrovirus gene products in plants may change our view of virus infection and pathogenesis, and perhaps of cellular homeostasis in the hosts. - Highlights: • Sequence region shared by plant virus “30K” movement proteins has an all-beta fold. • Most euphyllophyte genomes contain integrated copies of pararetroviruses. • These integrated virus genomes often include intact movement protein genes. • Molecular evidence suggests that these “30K” genes may be selected for function.

  6. RXLR effector reservoir in two Phytophthora species is dominated by a single rapidly evolving superfamily with more than 700 members

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Rays H. Y.; Tripathy, Sucheta; Govers, Francine; Tyler, Brett M.

    2008-01-01

    Pathogens secrete effector molecules that facilitate the infection of their hosts. A number of effectors identified in plant pathogenic Phytophthora species possess N-terminal motifs (RXLR-dEER) required for targeting these effectors into host cells. Here, we bioinformatically identify >370 candidate effector genes in each of the genomes of P. sojae and P. ramorum. A single superfamily, termed avirulence homolog (Avh) genes, accounts for most of the effectors. The Avh proteins show extensive sequence divergence but are all related and likely evolved from a common ancestor by rapid duplication and divergence. More than half of the Avh proteins contain conserved C-terminal motifs (termed W, Y, and L) that are usually arranged as a module that can be repeated up to eight times. The Avh genes belong to the most rapidly evolving part of the genome, and they are nearly always located at synteny breakpoints. The superfamily includes all experimentally identified oomycete effector and avirulence genes, and its rapid pace of evolution is consistent with a role for Avh proteins in interaction with plant hosts. PMID:18344324

  7. Crystal structure and potential physiological role of zebra fish thioesterase superfamily member 2 (fTHEM2)

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Shanshan; Li, Han; Gao, Feng; Zhou, Ying

    2015-08-07

    Thioesterase superfamily member 2 (THEM2) is an essential protein for mammalian cell proliferation. It belongs to the hotdog-fold thioesterase superfamily and catalyzes hydrolysis of thioester bonds of acyl-CoA in vitro, while its in vivo function remains unrevealed. In this study, Zebra fish was selected as a model organism to facilitate the investigations on THEM2. First, we solved the crystal structure of recombinant fTHEM2 at the resolution of 1.80 Å, which displayed a similar scaffolding as hTHEM2. Second, functional studies demonstrated that fTHEM2 is capable of hydrolyzing palmitoyl-CoA in vitro. In addition, injection of morpholino against fTHEM2 at one-cell stage resulted in distorted early embryo development, including delayed cell division, retarded development and increased death rate. The above findings validated our hypothesis that fTHEM2 could serve as an ideal surrogate for studying the physiological functions of THEM2. - Highlights: • The crystal structure of recombinant fTHEM2 is presented. • fTHEM2 is capable of hydrolyzing palmitoyl-CoA. • The influence of fTHEM2 on early embryo development is demonstrated.

  8. Crystal structure and potential physiological role of zebra fish thioesterase superfamily member 2 (fTHEM2).

    PubMed

    Yu, Shanshan; Li, Han; Gao, Feng; Zhou, Ying

    2015-08-01

    Thioesterase superfamily member 2 (THEM2) is an essential protein for mammalian cell proliferation. It belongs to the hotdog-fold thioesterase superfamily and catalyzes hydrolysis of thioester bonds of acyl-CoA in vitro, while its in vivo function remains unrevealed. In this study, Zebra fish was selected as a model organism to facilitate the investigations on THEM2. First, we solved the crystal structure of recombinant fTHEM2 at the resolution of 1.80 Å, which displayed a similar scaffolding as hTHEM2. Second, functional studies demonstrated that fTHEM2 is capable of hydrolyzing palmitoyl-CoA in vitro. In addition, injection of morpholino against fTHEM2 at one-cell stage resulted in distorted early embryo development, including delayed cell division, retarded development and increased death rate. The above findings validated our hypothesis that fTHEM2 could serve as an ideal surrogate for studying the physiological functions of THEM2. PMID:26067557

  9. A Disulfide Stabilized β-Sandwich Defines the Structure of a New Cysteine Framework M-Superfamily Conotoxin.

    PubMed

    Kancherla, Aswani K; Meesala, Srinu; Jorwal, Pooja; Palanisamy, Ramasamy; Sikdar, Sujit K; Sarma, Siddhartha P

    2015-08-21

    The structure of a new cysteine framework (-C-CC-C-C-C-) "M"-superfamily conotoxin, Mo3964, shows it to have a β-sandwich structure that is stabilized by inter-sheet cross disulfide bonds. Mo3964 decreases outward K(+) currents in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons and increases the reversal potential of the NaV1.2 channels. The structure of Mo3964 (PDB ID: 2MW7 ) is constructed from the disulfide connectivity pattern, i.e., 1-3, 2-5, and 4-6, that is hitherto undescribed for the "M"-superfamily conotoxins. The tertiary structural fold has not been described for any of the known conus peptides. NOE (549), dihedral angle (84), and hydrogen bond (28) restraints, obtained by measurement of (h3)JNC' scalar couplings, were used as input for structure calculation. The ensemble of structures showed a backbone root mean square deviation of 0.68 ± 0.18 Å, with 87% and 13% of the backbone dihedral (ϕ, ψ) angles lying in the most favored and additional allowed regions of the Ramachandran map. The conotoxin Mo3964 represents a new bioactive peptide fold that is stabilized by disulfide bonds and adds to the existing repertoire of scaffolds that can be used to design stable bioactive peptide molecules. PMID:25961405

  10. Mass spectrometry analysis and transcriptome sequencing reveal glowing squid crystal proteins are in the same superfamily as firefly luciferase

    PubMed Central

    Gimenez, Gregory; Metcalf, Peter; Paterson, Neil G.; Sharpe, Miriam L.

    2016-01-01

    The Japanese firefly squid Hotaru-ika (Watasenia scintillans) produces intense blue light from photophores at the tips of two arms. These photophores are densely packed with protein microcrystals that catalyse the bioluminescent reaction using ATP and the substrate coelenterazine disulfate. The squid is the only organism known to produce light using protein crystals. We extracted microcrystals from arm tip photophores and identified the constituent proteins using mass spectrometry and transcriptome libraries prepared from arm tip tissue. The crystals contain three proteins, wsluc1–3, all members of the ANL superfamily of adenylating enzymes. They share 19 to 21% sequence identity with firefly luciferases, which produce light using ATP and the unrelated firefly luciferin substrate. We propose that wsluc1–3 form a complex that crystallises inside the squid photophores, and that in the crystal one or more of the proteins catalyses the production of light using coelenterazine disulfate and ATP. These results suggest that ANL superfamily enzymes have independently evolved in distant species to produce light using unrelated substrates. PMID:27279452

  11. Evolutionary Expansion of the Amidohydrolase Superfamily in Bacteria in Response to the Synthetic Compounds Molinate and Diuron

    PubMed Central

    Sugrue, Elena; Fraser, Nicholas J.; Hopkins, Davis H.; Carr, Paul D.; Khurana, Jeevan L.; Oakeshott, John G.; Scott, Colin

    2015-01-01

    The amidohydrolase superfamily has remarkable functional diversity, with considerable structural and functional annotation of known sequences. In microbes, the recent evolution of several members of this family to catalyze the breakdown of environmental xenobiotics is not well understood. An evolutionary transition from binuclear to mononuclear metal ion coordination at the active sites of these enzymes could produce large functional changes such as those observed in nature, but there are few clear examples available to support this hypothesis. To investigate the role of binuclear-mononuclear active-site transitions in the evolution of new function in this superfamily, we have characterized two recently evolved enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of the synthetic herbicides molinate (MolA) and phenylurea (PuhB). In this work, the crystal structures, mutagenesis, metal ion analysis, and enzyme kinetics of both MolA and PuhB establish that these enzymes utilize a mononuclear active site. However, bioinformatics and structural comparisons reveal that the closest putative ancestor of these enzymes had a binuclear active site, indicating that a binuclear-mononuclear transition has occurred. These proteins may represent examples of evolution modifying the characteristics of existing catalysts to satisfy new requirements, specifically, metal ion rearrangement leading to large leaps in activity that would not otherwise be possible. PMID:25636851

  12. Evolutionary expansion of the amidohydrolase superfamily in bacteria in response to the synthetic compounds molinate and diuron.

    PubMed

    Sugrue, Elena; Fraser, Nicholas J; Hopkins, Davis H; Carr, Paul D; Khurana, Jeevan L; Oakeshott, John G; Scott, Colin; Jackson, Colin J

    2015-04-01

    The amidohydrolase superfamily has remarkable functional diversity, with considerable structural and functional annotation of known sequences. In microbes, the recent evolution of several members of this family to catalyze the breakdown of environmental xenobiotics is not well understood. An evolutionary transition from binuclear to mononuclear metal ion coordination at the active sites of these enzymes could produce large functional changes such as those observed in nature, but there are few clear examples available to support this hypothesis. To investigate the role of binuclear-mononuclear active-site transitions in the evolution of new function in this superfamily, we have characterized two recently evolved enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of the synthetic herbicides molinate (MolA) and phenylurea (PuhB). In this work, the crystal structures, mutagenesis, metal ion analysis, and enzyme kinetics of both MolA and PuhB establish that these enzymes utilize a mononuclear active site. However, bioinformatics and structural comparisons reveal that the closest putative ancestor of these enzymes had a binuclear active site, indicating that a binuclear-mononuclear transition has occurred. These proteins may represent examples of evolution modifying the characteristics of existing catalysts to satisfy new requirements, specifically, metal ion rearrangement leading to large leaps in activity that would not otherwise be possible. PMID:25636851

  13. Biochemical mechanisms of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Morelli, A; Benatti, U; Gaetani, G F; De Flora, A

    1978-01-01

    A solid-phase radioimmunoassay for human glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (D-glucose-6-phosphate: NADP+ 1-oxidoreductase; EC 1.1.1.49) was developed that allowed the specific activity of this enzyme protein to be measured in lysates from whole erythrocyte populations, in lysates from erythrocytes of different ages, and in purified samples. The enzyme was highly purified from erythrocytes of single donors by a simple procedure of affinity chromatography with insolubilized adenosine 2',5'-bisphosphate. These techniques were used in an attempt to elucidate the molecular mechanisms leading to deficiency of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity in two genetic variants of the enzyme, i.e., the Mediterranean and the Seattle-like variants. The results indicate that the lowered activity of erythrocytes containing the Mediterranean variant of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase is related to an enhanced rate of degradation of a catalytically defective protein synthesized at a nearly normal rate. Synthesis of a normally functioning protein and an increased breakdown of it are involved in the Seattle-like variant of the enzyme. Images PMID:273924

  14. Pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency: molecular basis for intrafamilial heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Fujii, T; Van Coster, R N; Old, S E; Medori, R; Winter, S; Gubits, R M; Matthews, P M; Brown, R M; Brown, G K; Dahl, H H

    1994-07-01

    Two half-brothers and their mother had symptomatic pyruvate dehydrogenase complex deficiency. The infants had severe congenital lactic acidosis, seizures, and apneic spells and died at the ages 3 and 4 months. The mother was less symptomatic with mental retardation, truncal ataxia, and dysarthria. The residual pyruvate dehydrogenase activities in cultured skin fibroblasts from the 2 infants and their mother were 7, 15, and 10% of control values. Immunoblot analysis showed negligible amounts of E1 alpha and E1 beta subunits of the complex. Northern blot analysis for the E1 alpha subunit showed normal results. In the 2 sons, complementary DNA sequence analysis revealed a cytosine to thymine mutation in exon 4, resulting in a change of arginine 127 to tryptophan in the E1 alpha subunit. Restriction enzyme analysis of the polymerase chain reaction product representing exon 4 of the E1 alpha gene revealed that the mother was a heterozygotes. Complementary DNA restriction analysis and methylation analysis of the X chromosome DXS255 loci revealed skewed activation of the mutant allele, consistent with the deficient pyruvate dehydrogenase activity in the mother's fibroblasts. The milder maternal phenotype is consistent with variable X-inactivation patterns in different organs of female heterozygotes. PMID:8024267

  15. A glycolate dehydrogenase in the mitochondria of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Bari, Rafijul; Kebeish, Rashad; Kalamajka, Rainer; Rademacher, Thomas; Peterhänsel, Christoph

    2004-03-01

    The fixation of molecular O2 by the oxygenase activity of Rubisco leads to the formation of phosphoglycolate in the chloroplast that is further metabolized in the process of photorespiration. The initial step of this pathway is the oxidation of glycolate to glyoxylate. Whereas in higher plants this reaction takes place in peroxisomes and is dependent on oxygen as a co-factor, most algae oxidize glycolate in the mitochondria using organic co-factors. The identification and characterization of a novel glycolate dehydrogenase in Arabidopsis thaliana is reported here. The enzyme is dependent on organic co-factors and resembles algal glycolate dehydrogenases in its enzymatic properties. Mutants of E. coli incapable of glycolate oxidation can be complemented by overexpression of the Arabidopsis open reading frame. The corresponding RNA accumulates preferentially in illuminated leaves, but was also found in other tissues investigated. A fusion of the N-terminal part of the Arabidopsis glycolate dehydrogenase to red fluorescent protein accumulates in mitochondria when overexpressed in the homologous system. Based on these results it is proposed that the basic photorespiratory system of algae is conserved in higher plants. PMID:14966218

  16. Functional Analysis of a Mosquito Short Chain Dehydrogenase Cluster

    PubMed Central

    Mayoral, Jaime G.; Leonard, Kate T.; Defelipe, Lucas A.; Turjansksi, Adrian G.; Nouzova, Marcela; Noriegal, Fernando G.

    2013-01-01

    The short chain dehydrogenases (SDR) constitute one the oldest and largest families of enzymes with over 46,000 members in sequence databases. About 25% of all known dehydrogenases belong to the SDR family. SDR enzymes have critical roles in lipid, amino acid, carbohydrate, hormone and xenobiotic metabolism as well as in redox sensor mechanisms. This family is present in archaea, bacteria, and eukaryota, emphasizing their versatility and fundamental importance for metabolic processes. We identified a cluster of eight SDRs in the mosquito Aedes aegypti (AaSDRs). Members of the cluster differ in tissue specificity and developmental expression. Heterologous expression produced recombinant proteins that had diverse substrate specificities, but distinct from the conventional insect alcohol (ethanol) dehydrogenases. They are all NADP+-dependent and they have S-enantioselectivity and preference for secondary alcohols with 8–15 carbons. Homology modeling was used to build the structure of AaSDR1 and two additional cluster members. The computational study helped explain the selectivity towards the (10S)-isomers as well as the reduced activity of AaSDR4 and AaSDR9 for longer isoprenoid substrates. Similar clusters of SDRs are present in other species of insects, suggesting similar selection mechanisms causing duplication and diversification of this family of enzymes. PMID:23238893

  17. Novel yeast cell dehydrogenase activity assay in situ.

    PubMed

    Berłowska, Joanna; Kregiel, Dorota; Klimek, Leszek; Orzeszyna, Bartosz; Ambroziak, Wojciech

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this research was to develop a suitable method of succinate dehydrogenase activity assay in situ for different industrial yeast strains. For this purpose different compounds: EDTA, Triton X-100, sodium deoxycholate, digitonin, nystatin and beta-mercaptoethanol were used. The permeabilization process was controlled microscopically by primuline staining. Enzyme assay was conducted in whole yeast cells with Na-succinate as substrate, phenazine methosulfate (PMS) as electron carrier and in the presence one of two different tetrazolium salts: tetrazolium blue chloride (BT) or cyanoditolyl tetrazolium chloride (CTC) reduced during the assay. In comparabile studies of yeast vitality the amount of intracellular ATP was determined according to luciferin/luciferase method. During the succinate dehydrogenase assay in intact yeast cells without permeabilization, BT formazans were partially visualized in the cells, but CTC formazans appeared to be totally extracellular or associated with the plasma membrane. Under these conditions there was no linear relationship between formazan color intensity signal and yeast cell density. From all chemical compounds tested, only digitonin was effective in membrane permeabilization without negative influence on cell morphology. Furthermore, with digitonin-treated cells a linear relationship between formazan color intensity signal and yeast cell number was noticed. Significant decreasing of succinate dehydrogenase activity and ATP content were observed during aging of the tested yeast strains. PMID:17419290

  18. Isocitrate Dehydrogenase and Glutamate Synthesis in Acetobacter suboxydans1

    PubMed Central

    Greenfield, Seymour; Claus, G. W.

    1969-01-01

    Acetobacter suboxydans is an obligate aerobe for which an operative tricarboxylic acid cycle has not been demonstrated. Glutamate synthesis has been reported to occur by mechanisms other than those utilizing isocitrate dehydrogenase, a tricarboxylic acid cycle enzyme not previously detected in this organism. We have recovered α-ketoglutarate and glutamate from a system containing citrate, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD), a divalent cation, pyridoxal phosphate, an amino donor, and dialyzed, cell-free extract. Aconitase activity was readily detected in these extracts, but isocitrate dehydrogenase activity, measured by NAD reduction, was masked by a cyanide-resistant, particulate, reduced NAD oxidase. Isocitrate dehydrogenase activity could be demonstrated after centrifuging the extracts at 150,000 × g for 3 hr and treating the supernatant fluid with 2-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline N-oxide. It is concluded that A. suboxydans can utilize the conventional tricarboxylic acid cycle enzymes to convert citrate to α-ketoglutarate which can then undergo a transamination to glutamate. Images PMID:5361215

  19. Asp295 stabilizes the active-site loop structure of pyruvate dehydrogenase, facilitating phosphorylation of Ser292 by pyruvate dehydrogenase-kinase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have developed an invitro system for detailed analysis of reversible phosphorylation of the plant mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, comprising recombinant Arabidopsis thaliana a2b2-hetero tetrameric pyruvate dehydrogenase (E1) plus A.thaliana E1-kinase (AtPDK). Upon addition of MgATP...

  20. X-linked glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and autosomal 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGD) polymorphisms in baboons

    SciTech Connect

    VandeBerg, J.L.; Aivaliotis, M.J.; Samollow, P.B. )

    1992-12-01

    Electrophoretic polymorphisms of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGD) were examined in captive colonies of five subspecies of baboons (Papio hamadryas). Phenotype frequencies and family data verified the X-linked inheritance of the G6PD polymorphism. Insufficient family data were available to confirm autosomal inheritance of the 6PGD polymorphism, but the electrophoretic patterns of variant types (putative heterozygotes) suggested the codominant expression of alleles at an autosomal locus. Implications of the G6PD polymorphism are discussed with regard to its utility as a marker system for research on X-chromosome inactivation during baboon development and for studies of clonal cell proliferation and/or cell selection during the development of atherosclerotic lesions in the baboon model. 61 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.