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Sample records for acyl-coa oxidase aco

  1. RNA interference of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid oxidase (ACO1 and ACO2) genes expression prolongs the shelf life of Eksotika (Carica papaya L.) papaya fruit.

    PubMed

    Sekeli, Rogayah; Abdullah, Janna Ong; Namasivayam, Parameswari; Muda, Pauziah; Abu Bakar, Umi Kalsom; Yeong, Wee Chien; Pillai, Vilasini

    2014-06-19

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of using RNA interference in down regulating the expression of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid oxidase gene in Eksotika papaya. One-month old embryogenic calli were separately transformed with Agrobacterium strain LBA 4404 harbouring the three different RNAi pOpOff2 constructs bearing the 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid oxidase gene. A total of 176 putative transformed lines were produced from 15,000 calli transformed, selected, then regenerated on medium supplemented with kanamycin. Integration and expression of the targeted gene in putatively transformed lines were verified by PCR and real-time RT-PCR. Confined field evaluation of a total of 31 putative transgenic lines planted showed a knockdown expression of the targeted ACO1 and ACO2 genes in 13 lines, which required more than 8 days to achieve the full yellow colour (Index 6). Fruits harvested from lines pRNAiACO2 L2-9 and pRNAiACO1 L2 exhibited about 20 and 14 days extended post-harvest shelf life to reach Index 6, respectively. The total soluble solids contents of the fruits ranged from 11 to 14° Brix, a range similar to fruits from non-transformed, wild type seed-derived plants.

  2. A novel phylogeny and morphological reconstruction of the PIN genes and first phylogeny of the ACC-oxidases (ACOs).

    PubMed

    Clouse, Ronald M; Carraro, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    The PIN and ACO gene families present interesting questions about the evolution of plant physiology, including testing hypotheses about the ecological drivers of their diversification and whether unrelated genes have been recruited for similar functions. The PIN-formed proteins contribute to the polar transport of auxin, a hormone which regulates plant growth and development. PIN loci are categorized into groups according to their protein length and structure, as well as subcellular localization. An interesting question with PIN genes is the nature of the ancestral form and location. ACOs are members of a superfamily of oxygenases and oxidases that catalyze the last step of ethylene synthesis, which regulates many aspects of the plant life cycle. We used publicly available PIN and ACO sequences to conduct phylogenetic analyses. Third codon positions of these genes in monocots have a high GC content, which could be historical but is more likely due to a mutational bias. Thus, we developed methods to extract phylogenetic information from nucleotide sequences while avoiding this convergent feature. One method consisted in using only A-T transformations, and another used only the first and second codon positions for serine, which can only take A or T and G or C, respectively. We also conducted tree-searches for both gene families using unaligned amino acid sequences and dynamic homology. PIN genes appear to have diversified earlier than ACOs, with monocot and dicot copies more mixed in the phylogeny. However, gymnosperm PINs appear to be derived and not closely related to those from primitive plants. We find strong support for a long PIN gene ancestor with short forms subsequently evolving one or more times. ACO genes appear to have diversified mostly since the dicot-monocot split, as most genes cluster into a small number of monocot and dicot clades when the tree is rooted by genes from mosses. Gymnosperm ACOs were recovered as closely related and derived.

  3. A novel phylogeny and morphological reconstruction of the PIN genes and first phylogeny of the ACC-oxidases (ACOs)

    PubMed Central

    Clouse, Ronald M.; Carraro, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    The PIN and ACO gene families present interesting questions about the evolution of plant physiology, including testing hypotheses about the ecological drivers of their diversification and whether unrelated genes have been recruited for similar functions. The PIN-formed proteins contribute to the polar transport of auxin, a hormone which regulates plant growth and development. PIN loci are categorized into groups according to their protein length and structure, as well as subcellular localization. An interesting question with PIN genes is the nature of the ancestral form and location. ACOs are members of a superfamily of oxygenases and oxidases that catalyze the last step of ethylene synthesis, which regulates many aspects of the plant life cycle. We used publicly available PIN and ACO sequences to conduct phylogenetic analyses. Third codon positions of these genes in monocots have a high GC content, which could be historical but is more likely due to a mutational bias. Thus, we developed methods to extract phylogenetic information from nucleotide sequences while avoiding this convergent feature. One method consisted in using only A-T transformations, and another used only the first and second codon positions for serine, which can only take A or T and G or C, respectively. We also conducted tree-searches for both gene families using unaligned amino acid sequences and dynamic homology. PIN genes appear to have diversified earlier than ACOs, with monocot and dicot copies more mixed in the phylogeny. However, gymnosperm PINs appear to be derived and not closely related to those from primitive plants. We find strong support for a long PIN gene ancestor with short forms subsequently evolving one or more times. ACO genes appear to have diversified mostly since the dicot-monocot split, as most genes cluster into a small number of monocot and dicot clades when the tree is rooted by genes from mosses. Gymnosperm ACOs were recovered as closely related and derived. PMID

  4. A novel phylogeny and morphological reconstruction of the PIN genes and first phylogeny of the ACC-oxidases (ACOs).

    PubMed

    Clouse, Ronald M; Carraro, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    The PIN and ACO gene families present interesting questions about the evolution of plant physiology, including testing hypotheses about the ecological drivers of their diversification and whether unrelated genes have been recruited for similar functions. The PIN-formed proteins contribute to the polar transport of auxin, a hormone which regulates plant growth and development. PIN loci are categorized into groups according to their protein length and structure, as well as subcellular localization. An interesting question with PIN genes is the nature of the ancestral form and location. ACOs are members of a superfamily of oxygenases and oxidases that catalyze the last step of ethylene synthesis, which regulates many aspects of the plant life cycle. We used publicly available PIN and ACO sequences to conduct phylogenetic analyses. Third codon positions of these genes in monocots have a high GC content, which could be historical but is more likely due to a mutational bias. Thus, we developed methods to extract phylogenetic information from nucleotide sequences while avoiding this convergent feature. One method consisted in using only A-T transformations, and another used only the first and second codon positions for serine, which can only take A or T and G or C, respectively. We also conducted tree-searches for both gene families using unaligned amino acid sequences and dynamic homology. PIN genes appear to have diversified earlier than ACOs, with monocot and dicot copies more mixed in the phylogeny. However, gymnosperm PINs appear to be derived and not closely related to those from primitive plants. We find strong support for a long PIN gene ancestor with short forms subsequently evolving one or more times. ACO genes appear to have diversified mostly since the dicot-monocot split, as most genes cluster into a small number of monocot and dicot clades when the tree is rooted by genes from mosses. Gymnosperm ACOs were recovered as closely related and derived. PMID

  5. The final step of the ethylene biosynthesis pathway in turnip tops (Brassica rapa): molecular characterization of the 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate oxidase BrACO1 throughout zygotic embryogenesis and germination of heterogeneous seeds.

    PubMed

    Del Carmen Rodríguez-Gacio, María; Nicolás, Carlos; Matilla, Angel Jesús

    2004-05-01

    In a previous report from the present authors, it was shown that the 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) oxidation may play a crucial role during zygotic embryogenesis of turnip tops seeds. The present study was performed to elucidate the contribution of the silique-wall and seeds in ethylene production during this developmental process. ACC content in the silique wall is only higher than in seeds during the middle phases of zygotic embryogenesis. The ACC-oxidase (ACO) activity peaks in the silique-wall and seeds during the onset of embryogenesis, declining gradually afterwards, being undetectable during desiccation period. Using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, one cDNA clone coding for an ACO and called BrACO1, was isolated. The deduced protein for BrACO1 has a molecular weight of 36.8 kDa and a high homology with other crucifer ACOs. The heterologous expression of this cDNA confirmed that BrACO1 is an ACO. The expression of this gene was high during the first phases of silique-wall development, low during the middle phases and undetectable during desiccation. By contrast, BrACO1 transcript was accumulated only in the earliest phases of seed embryogenesis and may participate in the highest ACO activity and ethylene production by seeds at the beginning of embryogenesis. Finally, in this work a correlation between the heterogeneity of Brassica rapa L. cv. Rapa seeds and the ability to oxidize the ACC to ethylene has been demonstrated.

  6. An ACC Oxidase Gene Essential for Cucumber Carpel Development.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huiming; Sun, Jinjing; Li, Shuai; Cui, Qingzhi; Zhang, Huimin; Xin, Fengjiao; Wang, Huaisong; Lin, Tao; Gao, Dongli; Wang, Shenhao; Li, Xia; Wang, Donghui; Zhang, Zhonghua; Xu, Zhihong; Huang, Sanwen

    2016-09-01

    Sex determination in plants gives rise to unisexual flowers that facilitate outcrossing and enhance genetic diversity. In cucumber and melon, ethylene promotes carpel development and arrests stamen development. Five sex-determination genes have been identified, including four encoding 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) synthase that catalyzes the rate-limiting step in ethylene biosynthesis, and a transcription factor gene CmWIP1 that corresponds to the Mendelian locus gynoecious in melon and is a negative regulator of femaleness. ACC oxidase (ACO) converts ACC into ethylene; however, it remains elusive which ACO gene in the cucumber genome is critical for sex determination and how CmWIP1 represses development of female flowers. In this study, we discovered that mutation in an ACO gene, CsACO2, confers androecy in cucumber that bears only male flowers. The mutation disrupts the enzymatic activity of CsACO2, resulting in 50% less ethylene emission from shoot tips. CsACO2 was expressed in the carpel primordia and its expression overlapped with that of CsACS11 in female flowers at key stages for sex determination, presumably providing sufficient ethylene required for proper CsACS2 expression. CmACO3, the ortholog of CsACO2, showed a similar expression pattern in the carpel region, suggesting a conserved function of CsACO2/CmACO3. We demonstrated that CsWIP1, the ortholog of CmWIP1, could directly bind the promoter of CsACO2 and repress its expression. Taken together, we propose a presumably conserved regulatory module consisting of WIP1 transcription factor and ACO controls unisexual flower development in cucumber and melon.

  7. An ACC Oxidase Gene Essential for Cucumber Carpel Development.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huiming; Sun, Jinjing; Li, Shuai; Cui, Qingzhi; Zhang, Huimin; Xin, Fengjiao; Wang, Huaisong; Lin, Tao; Gao, Dongli; Wang, Shenhao; Li, Xia; Wang, Donghui; Zhang, Zhonghua; Xu, Zhihong; Huang, Sanwen

    2016-09-01

    Sex determination in plants gives rise to unisexual flowers that facilitate outcrossing and enhance genetic diversity. In cucumber and melon, ethylene promotes carpel development and arrests stamen development. Five sex-determination genes have been identified, including four encoding 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) synthase that catalyzes the rate-limiting step in ethylene biosynthesis, and a transcription factor gene CmWIP1 that corresponds to the Mendelian locus gynoecious in melon and is a negative regulator of femaleness. ACC oxidase (ACO) converts ACC into ethylene; however, it remains elusive which ACO gene in the cucumber genome is critical for sex determination and how CmWIP1 represses development of female flowers. In this study, we discovered that mutation in an ACO gene, CsACO2, confers androecy in cucumber that bears only male flowers. The mutation disrupts the enzymatic activity of CsACO2, resulting in 50% less ethylene emission from shoot tips. CsACO2 was expressed in the carpel primordia and its expression overlapped with that of CsACS11 in female flowers at key stages for sex determination, presumably providing sufficient ethylene required for proper CsACS2 expression. CmACO3, the ortholog of CsACO2, showed a similar expression pattern in the carpel region, suggesting a conserved function of CsACO2/CmACO3. We demonstrated that CsWIP1, the ortholog of CmWIP1, could directly bind the promoter of CsACO2 and repress its expression. Taken together, we propose a presumably conserved regulatory module consisting of WIP1 transcription factor and ACO controls unisexual flower development in cucumber and melon. PMID:27403533

  8. Characteristics of Rural Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs) – A Survey of Medicare ACOs with Rural Presence.

    PubMed

    Salako, Abiodun; Zhu, Xi; MacKinney, A Clinton; Ullrich, Fred; Mueller, Keith

    2015-05-01

    Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs) are groups of health care providers, principally physicians and hospitals, who develop a new entity that contracts to provide coordinated care to assigned patients with the goal of improving quality of care while controlling costs. Section 3022 of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 created the Medicare Shared Savings Program (SSP). The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) implements this program and has approved SSP contracts in five cycles since 2011, including some that participated in a special demonstration project that provided advance payment (as a forgivable loan). A new ACO Investment Model (AIM) program starts in 2015 that provides initial investment capital and variable monthly payments to ACO participants in rural and underserved areas who may not have access to the capital needed for successful ACO formation and operation. CMS also contracted with 32 organizations under a special demonstration project, "Pioneer ACOs" (as of November 16, 2014, there were 19 remaining).8 At the time of the research reported in this brief, there were 455 Medicare ACOs (Pioneer and SSP). While there is growing literature about ACOs, much remains to be learned about ACO development in rural areas. A previous RUPRI Center policy brief 2 examined the formation of four rural ACOs. The authors found that prior experience with risk sharing and provider integration facilitated ACO formation. This brief expands on the earlier brief by describing the findings of a survey of 27 rural ACOs, focusing on characteristics important to their formation and operation. Prospective rural ACO participants can draw from the experiences of predecessors, and the survey findings can inform policy discussions about ACO formation and operation. Key Findings from 27 Respondents. (1) Sixteen rural ACOs were formed by pre-existing integrated delivery networks. (2) Physician groups played a more prominent role than other participant

  9. Including Language Access into Medicaid ACO Design.

    PubMed

    Gershon, Rachel; Morris, Lisa; Ferguson, Warren

    2016-09-01

    Quality health care relies upon communication in a patient's preferred language. Language access in health care occurs when individuals are: (1) Welcomed by providers regardless of language ability; and (2) Offered quality language services as part of their care. Federal law generally requires access to health care and quality language services for deaf and Limited English Proficient (LEP) patients in health care settings, but these patients still find it hard to access health care and quality language services.Meanwhile, several states are implementing Medicaid Accountable Care Organization (ACO) initiatives to reduce health care costs and improve health care quality. Alternative payment methods used in these initiatives can give Accountable Care Organizations more flexibility to design linguistically accessible care, but they can also put ACOs at increased financial risk for the cost of care. If these new payment methods do not account for differences in patient language needs, ACO initiatives could have the unintended consequence of rewarding ACOs who do not reach out to deaf and LEP communities or offer quality language services.We reviewed public documents related to Medicaid ACO initiatives in six states. Some of these documents address language access. More could be done, however, to pay for language access efforts. This article describes Medicaid ACO initiatives and explores how different payment tools could be leveraged to reward ACOs for increased access to care and quality language services. We find that a combination of payment tools might be helpful to encourage both access and quality. PMID:27587453

  10. Molecular characterization and expression analysis of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate oxidase homologs from potato under abiotic and biotic stresses.

    PubMed

    Nie, Xianzhou; Singh, Rudra P; Tai, George C C

    2002-10-01

    In this work, we report cloning of two full-length 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate oxidase (ACO) cDNAs (ACO1 and ACO2) from potato (Solanum tuberosum) and their expression in potato tissues. The sequence data indicate that the two cDNAs share a high degree of homology with each other, and with known ACO genes from other plant species, including monocots and dicots. However, these potato genes lack homology at the 5' and 3' ends, despite similarities in their open reading frames and encoded amino acids. Phylogenetic analysis places them in two subfamilies of ACOs. The genes are tissue specific: expression is high in leaves and low in roots and tubers. In sprouts and tubers, ACO1 is induced by heat (40 degrees C) and cold (0 degrees C) stresses, whereas ACO2 is induced only by cold (0 degrees C). ACO1 is markedly induced in leaves by wounding, soil-flooding, and exogenous application of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC). In contrast, ACO2 induction is lower under these treatments. ACO1 and ACO2 are regulated very differently in potato leaves with respect to senescence. ACO2 expression is unaffected by senescence, whereas that of ACO1 is closely related to the age and senescence in both attached and detached leaves. Exogenous ACC not only induces ACO1, but also accelerates leaf senescence. ACO1 transcripts are induced significantly in leaves, stems, and tubers in the Potato virus A (PVA)-resistant potato cultivar Shepody when graft inoculated with PVA. PMID:12416623

  11. Global Transcriptomic Analysis of Targeted Silencing of Two Paralogous ACC Oxidase Genes in Banana

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Yan; Kuan, Chi; Chiu, Chien-Hsiang; Chen, Xiao-Jing; Do, Yi-Yin; Huang, Pung-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Among 18 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) oxidase homologous genes existing in the banana genome there are two genes, Mh-ACO1 and Mh-ACO2, that participate in banana fruit ripening. To better understand the physiological functions of Mh-ACO1 and Mh-ACO2, two hairpin-type siRNA expression vectors targeting both the Mh-ACO1 and Mh-ACO2 were constructed and incorporated into the banana genome by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. The generation of Mh-ACO1 and Mh-ACO2 RNAi transgenic banana plants was confirmed by Southern blot analysis. To gain insights into the functional diversity and complexity between Mh-ACO1 and Mh-ACO2, transcriptome sequencing of banana fruits using the Illumina next-generation sequencer was performed. A total of 32,093,976 reads, assembled into 88,031 unigenes for 123,617 transcripts were obtained. Significantly enriched Gene Oncology (GO) terms and the number of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) with GO annotation were ‘catalytic activity’ (1327, 56.4%), ‘heme binding’ (65, 2.76%), ‘tetrapyrrole binding’ (66, 2.81%), and ‘oxidoreductase activity’ (287, 12.21%). Real-time RT-PCR was further performed with mRNAs from both peel and pulp of banana fruits in Mh-ACO1 and Mh-ACO2 RNAi transgenic plants. The results showed that expression levels of genes related to ethylene signaling in ripening banana fruits were strongly influenced by the expression of genes associated with ethylene biosynthesis. PMID:27681726

  12. High fat fed heart failure animals have enhanced mitochondrial function and acyl-coa dehydrogenase activities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have previously shown that administration of high fat in heart failure (HF) increased mitochondrial respiration and did not alter left ventricular (LV) function. PPARalpha is a nuclear transcription factor that activates expression of genes involved in fatty acid uptake and utilization. We hypoth...

  13. Navigating the road ahead: lessons from a pioneer ACO.

    PubMed

    James, Michael H

    2012-08-01

    Genesys PHO in Flint, Mich., is one of 32 ACOs participating in the Pioneer ACO Model initiative administered by the CMS. Genesys PHO' experience suggests that successful ACOs will invest physicians with decision power and focus on strengthening the physician-patient relationship, restoring patients' trust in physicians, and allocating the right human resources to the effort. Organizations that are considering an ACO strategy should evaluate the risk structures of their proposed contracts and their provider groups' willingness to accept the contractual level of risk.

  14. Cost-outcomes focus is essential for ACO success.

    PubMed

    Greenspun, Harry; Bercik, William

    2013-02-01

    To succeed under value-based payment, accountable care organizations (ACOs) must be able to link, analyze, and compare clinical and administrative data from across their constituent organizations. ACOs require a precise costing methodology, such as activity-based costing, to be able to manage costs effectively and gain critical insight into which service lines are delivering value from a clinical and financial standpoint. To support informed strategic decision-making, ACOs also require ready access to integrated patient encounter data to be able to perform the sophisticated modeling of predictive analytics.

  15. Cost-outcomes focus is essential for ACO success.

    PubMed

    Greenspun, Harry; Bercik, William

    2013-02-01

    To succeed under value-based payment, accountable care organizations (ACOs) must be able to link, analyze, and compare clinical and administrative data from across their constituent organizations. ACOs require a precise costing methodology, such as activity-based costing, to be able to manage costs effectively and gain critical insight into which service lines are delivering value from a clinical and financial standpoint. To support informed strategic decision-making, ACOs also require ready access to integrated patient encounter data to be able to perform the sophisticated modeling of predictive analytics. PMID:23413676

  16. A fifth member of the tomato 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) oxidase gene family harbours a leucine zipper and is anaerobically induced.

    PubMed

    Sell, Simone; Hehl, Reinhard

    2005-02-01

    Using the leucine zipper domain of a small anaerobically induced bZIP transcription factor in a yeast two hybrid screen, anaerobically induced genes were identified. One peptide corresponds to an anaerobically induced IDS4-like protein that maybe involved in G-protein signaling. Surprisingly, another interacting peptide corresponds to a novel anaerobically induced 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) oxidase, designated ACO5. ACO5 harbours a leucine zipper and transcription is mainly induced in fruits and to a lesser extend in leaves. The role of ACO5 in the low oxygen response of tomato is discussed. PMID:16040352

  17. Identification and molecular characterization of the aco genes encoding the Pelobacter carbinolicus acetoin dehydrogenase enzyme system.

    PubMed Central

    Oppermann, F B; Steinbüchel, A

    1994-01-01

    Use of oligonucleotide probes, which were deduced from the N-terminal sequences of the purified enzyme components, identified the structural genes for the alpha and beta subunits of E1 (acetoin:2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol oxidoreductase), E2 (dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase), and E3 (dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase) of the Pelobacter carbinolicus acetoin dehydrogenase enzyme system, which were designated acoA, acoB, acoC, and acoL, respectively. The nucleotide sequences of acoA (979 bp), acoB (1,014 bp), acoC (1,353 bp), and acoL (1,413 bp) as well as of acoS (933 bp), which encodes a protein with an M(r) of 34,421 exhibiting 64.7% amino acid identity to the Escherichia coli lipA gene product, were determined. These genes are clustered on a 6.1-kbp region. Heterologous expression of acoA, acoB, acoC, acoL, and acoS in E. coli was demonstrated. The amino acid sequences deduced from acoA, acoB, acoC, and acoL for E1 alpha (M(r), 34,854), E1 beta (M(r), 36,184), E2 (M(r), 47,281), and E3 (M(r), 49,394) exhibited striking similarities to the amino acid sequences of the components of the Alcaligenes eutrophus acetoin-cleaving system. Homologies of up to 48.7% amino acid identity to the primary structures of the enzyme components of various 2-oxo acid dehydrogenase complexes also were found. In addition, the respective genes of the 2-oxo acid dehydrogenase complexes and of the acetoin dehydrogenase enzyme system were organized very similarly, indicating a close relationship of the P. carbinolicus acetoin dehydrogenase enzyme system to 2-oxo acid dehydrogenase complexes. Images PMID:8110297

  18. Characterizing the population of Asteroids in Cometary Orbits (ACOs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tancredi, Gonzalo; Licandro, Javier; Alí-Lagoa, Victor; Martino, Silvia; Vieira Monteiro, Filipe; Silva, Jose Sergio; Lazzaro, Daniela

    2015-08-01

    The classification criterion between asteroids and comets has evolved in recent decades, but the main phenomenological distinction remains unchanged: comets are active objects as they present gas and dust ejection from the surface at some point of their orbits, while asteroids are inert objects as they do not show any kind of large scale gas and dust ejection.To identify the transitional objects several classification schemes based on the orbital elements have been used. They are usually based on the Tisserand’s parameter (TJ). Tancredi (2014) presents a much more restrictive criterion to identify ACOs that ensured that the objects have a dynamical evolution similar to the population of periodic comets. After applying the criteriaa to the sample of over half a million asteroids already discovered, we obtain 316 ACOs that are further classified in subclasses similar to the cometary classification: 203 objects belong to the Jupiter Family group; 72 objects are classified as Centaurs; and 56 objects have Halley Type Orbits (also known as Damocloids). These are the best-known extinct/dormant comets candidates from a dynamical point of view.We study the physical properties of this sample of ACOs. Two results will be presented:- We look for the ACOs detected by the NASA’s WISE and by fitting a thermal model to their observations, we derive: the effective diameter, beaming parameter and the visible geometric albedo, using the method described in Al-Lagoa et al (2013). We obtain these parameters for 37 of 203 ACOs in JFC orbits and 13 of 56 Damocloids. We also compute the Cumulative Size Distribution (CSDs) of these populations and compare them with the CSDs of JF Comets and Centaurs.- We have been monitoring the observable ACOs since 12/2014 up to 06/2015. Every other month we select all the ACOs with elongations >90deg and estimated magnitudes V<21. We try to observe them with the 1m IMPACTON telescope of the Observatório Astronômico do Sertão de Itaparica (OASI

  19. Multiobjective Optimization of Evacuation Routes in Stadium Using Superposed Potential Field Network Based ACO

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Shengwu; Zong, Xinlu

    2013-01-01

    Multiobjective evacuation routes optimization problem is defined to find out optimal evacuation routes for a group of evacuees under multiple evacuation objectives. For improving the evacuation efficiency, we abstracted the evacuation zone as a superposed potential field network (SPFN), and we presented SPFN-based ACO algorithm (SPFN-ACO) to solve this problem based on the proposed model. In Wuhan Sports Center case, we compared SPFN-ACO algorithm with HMERP-ACO algorithm and traditional ACO algorithm under three evacuation objectives, namely, total evacuation time, total evacuation route length, and cumulative congestion degree. The experimental results show that SPFN-ACO algorithm has a better performance while comparing with HMERP-ACO algorithm and traditional ACO algorithm for solving multi-objective evacuation routes optimization problem. PMID:23861678

  20. 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-Carboxylate Oxidase Activity Limits Ethylene Biosynthesis in Rumex palustris during Submergence

    PubMed Central

    Vriezen, Wim H.; Hulzink, Raymond; Mariani, Celestina; Voesenek, Laurentius A.C.J.

    1999-01-01

    Submergence strongly stimulates petiole elongation in Rumex palustris, and ethylene accumulation initiates and maintains this response in submerged tissues. cDNAs from R. palustris corresponding to a 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) oxidase gene (RP-ACO1) were isolated from elongating petioles and used to study the expression of the corresponding gene. An increase in RP-ACO1 messenger was observed in the petioles and lamina of elongating leaves 2 h after the start of submergence. ACC oxidase enzyme activity was measured in homogenates of R. palustris shoots, and a relevant increase was observed within 12 h under water with a maximum after 24 h. We have shown previously that the ethylene production rate of submerged shoots does not increase significantly during the first 24 h of submergence (L.A.C.J. Voesenek, M. Banga, R.H. Thier, C.M. Mudde, F.M. Harren, G.W.M. Barendse, C.W.P.M. Blom [1993] Plant Physiol 103: 783–791), suggesting that under these conditions ACC oxidase activity is inhibited in vivo. We found evidence that this inhibition is caused by a reduction of oxygen levels. We hypothesize that an increased ACC oxidase enzyme concentration counterbalances the reduced enzyme activity caused by low oxygen concentration during submergence, thus sustaining ethylene production under these conditions. Therefore, ethylene biosynthesis seems to be limited at the level of ACC oxidase activity rather than by ACC synthase in R. palustris during submergence. PMID:10482674

  1. The opportunities and challenges of the MSSP ACO program: a report from the field.

    PubMed

    Mostashari, Farzad; Broome, Travis

    2016-09-01

    In this article, we seek to provide the first detailed description of a Medicare Shared Savings Program (MSSP) accountable care organization (ACO)'s actions and results to help increase understanding of the challenges and opportunities facing ACOs, and in particular, those comprised of a network of independent practices. Whether ACOs have been successful in delivering value has been the subject of much debate and speculation. What has been missing from this discussion is a look at the program from the frontlines and those who are launching and running MSSP ACOs. We hope to fill that gap. PMID:27662219

  2. Exogenously induced expression of ethylene biosynthesis, ethylene perception, phospholipase D, and Rboh-oxidase genes in broccoli seedlings.

    PubMed

    Jakubowicz, Małgorzata; Gałgańska, Hanna; Nowak, Witold; Sadowski, Jan

    2010-07-01

    In higher plants, copper ions, hydrogen peroxide, and cycloheximide have been recognized as very effective inducers of the transcriptional activity of genes encoding the enzymes of the ethylene biosynthesis pathway. In this report, the transcriptional patterns of genes encoding the 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate synthases (ACSs), 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate oxidases (ACOs), ETR1, ETR2, and ERS1 ethylene receptors, phospholipase D (PLD)-alpha1, -alpha2, -gamma1, and -delta, and respiratory burst oxidase homologue (Rboh)-NADPH oxidase-D and -F in response to these inducers in Brassica oleracea etiolated seedlings are shown. ACS1, ACO1, ETR2, PLD-gamma1, and RbohD represent genes whose expression was considerably affected by all of the inducers used. The investigations were performed on the seedlings with (i) ethylene insensitivity and (ii) a reduced level of the PLD-derived phosphatidic acid (PA). The general conclusion is that the expression of ACS1, -3, -4, -5, -7, and -11, ACO1, ETR1, ERS1, and ETR2, PLD-gamma 1, and RbohD and F genes is undoubtedly under the reciprocal cross-talk of the ethylene and PA(PLD) signalling routes; both signals affect it in concerted or opposite ways depending on the gene or the type of stimuli. The results of these studies on broccoli seedlings are in agreement with the hypothesis that PA may directly affect the ethylene signal transduction pathway via an inhibitory effect on CTR1 (constitutive triple response 1) activity.

  3. Characterization of transcriptional profiles of MA-ACS1 and MA-ACO1 genes in response to ethylene, auxin, wounding, cold and different photoperiods during ripening in banana fruit.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Swarup Roy; Roy, Sujit; Sengupta, Dibyendu N

    2008-12-01

    The ripening-specific genes MA-ACS1 (Musa acuminata ACC synthase1) and MA-ACO1 (M. acuminata ACC oxidase 1) are regulated in response to a wide variety of factors. Here, we have studied the differential transcript accumulation pattern and protein levels of MA-ACS1 and MA-ACO1 genes in response to ethylene, auxin, wounding and low temperature in preclimacteric banana fruit. We have shown that exogenous application of ethylene and auxin induced the expression of MA-ACS1, while MA-ACO1 showed marginal expression following ethylene treatment in preclimacteric stage. Auxin did not induce MA-ACO1 expression. Thus, auxin-treated banana fruits showed lower ethylene production rate as compared to ethylene-treated fruits. Conversely, wounding and cold treatment down-regulated the expression of both the genes and thus inhibited ethylene production. Furthermore, we have detected a GCC-box putative ethylene-responsive element (ERE)- and an auxin-responsive element (ARE)-specific DNA-binding activity in the banana pulp and studied the ethylene and auxin responsive characteristics of the GCC-box and ARE (TGTCTC) containing synthetic promoter fragments. In addition, we have detected an enhanced ethylene production rate and expression level of MA-ACS1 and MA-ACO1 genes along with a strong GCC-box-specific DNA-binding activity following exposure to constant dark period for 8d at the preclimacteric stage. Together, our study provides interesting information about the regulation of expression of MA-ACS1 and MA-ACO1 genes in response to various factors during ripening in banana fruit, which may have physiological relevance concerning ethylene biosynthesis during post-harvest conditions. PMID:18554749

  4. Characterization of transcriptional profiles of MA-ACS1 and MA-ACO1 genes in response to ethylene, auxin, wounding, cold and different photoperiods during ripening in banana fruit.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Swarup Roy; Roy, Sujit; Sengupta, Dibyendu N

    2008-12-01

    The ripening-specific genes MA-ACS1 (Musa acuminata ACC synthase1) and MA-ACO1 (M. acuminata ACC oxidase 1) are regulated in response to a wide variety of factors. Here, we have studied the differential transcript accumulation pattern and protein levels of MA-ACS1 and MA-ACO1 genes in response to ethylene, auxin, wounding and low temperature in preclimacteric banana fruit. We have shown that exogenous application of ethylene and auxin induced the expression of MA-ACS1, while MA-ACO1 showed marginal expression following ethylene treatment in preclimacteric stage. Auxin did not induce MA-ACO1 expression. Thus, auxin-treated banana fruits showed lower ethylene production rate as compared to ethylene-treated fruits. Conversely, wounding and cold treatment down-regulated the expression of both the genes and thus inhibited ethylene production. Furthermore, we have detected a GCC-box putative ethylene-responsive element (ERE)- and an auxin-responsive element (ARE)-specific DNA-binding activity in the banana pulp and studied the ethylene and auxin responsive characteristics of the GCC-box and ARE (TGTCTC) containing synthetic promoter fragments. In addition, we have detected an enhanced ethylene production rate and expression level of MA-ACS1 and MA-ACO1 genes along with a strong GCC-box-specific DNA-binding activity following exposure to constant dark period for 8d at the preclimacteric stage. Together, our study provides interesting information about the regulation of expression of MA-ACS1 and MA-ACO1 genes in response to various factors during ripening in banana fruit, which may have physiological relevance concerning ethylene biosynthesis during post-harvest conditions.

  5. Isolation and characterization of a potato cDNA corresponding to a 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) oxidase gene differentially activated by stress.

    PubMed

    Zanetti, María Eugenia; Terrile, María Cecilia; Arce, Débora; Godoy, Andrea Verónica; Segundo, Blanca San; Casalongué, Claudia

    2002-12-01

    1-Aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) oxidase enzyme catalyses the final step in ethylene biosynthesis, converting 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid to ethylene. A cDNA clone encoding an ACC oxidase, ST-ACO3, was isolated from potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) by differential screening of a Fusarium eumartii infected-tuber cDNA library. The deduced amino acid sequence exhibited similarity to other ACC oxidase proteins from several plants species. Northern blot analysis revealed that the ST-ACO3 mRNA level increased in potato tubers upon inoculation with F. eumartii, as well as after treatment with salicylic acid and indole-3-acetic acid, suggesting a cross-talk between different signalling pathways involved in the defence response of potato tubers against F. eumartii attack.

  6. First national survey of ACOs finds that physicians are playing strong leadership and ownership roles.

    PubMed

    Colla, Carrie H; Lewis, Valerie A; Shortell, Stephen M; Fisher, Elliott S

    2014-06-01

    The extent to which physicians lead, own, and govern accountable care organizations (ACOs) is unknown. However, physicians' involvement in ACOs will influence how clinicians and patients perceive the ACO model, how effective these organizations are at improving quality and costs, and how future ACOs will be organized. From October 2012 to May 2013 we fielded the National Survey of Accountable Care Organizations, the first such survey of public and private ACOs. We found that 51 percent of ACOs were physician-led, with another 33 percent jointly led by physicians and hospitals. In 78 percent of ACOs, physicians constituted a majority of the governing board, and physicians owned 40 percent of ACOs. The broad reach of physician leadership has important implications for the future evolution of ACOs. It seems likely that the challenge of fundamentally changing care delivery as the country moves away from fee-for-service payment will not be accomplished without strong, effective leadership from physicians. PMID:24889945

  7. SamACO: variable sampling ant colony optimization algorithm for continuous optimization.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiao-Min; Zhang, Jun; Chung, Henry Shu-Hung; Li, Yun; Liu, Ou

    2010-12-01

    An ant colony optimization (ACO) algorithm offers algorithmic techniques for optimization by simulating the foraging behavior of a group of ants to perform incremental solution constructions and to realize a pheromone laying-and-following mechanism. Although ACO is first designed for solving discrete (combinatorial) optimization problems, the ACO procedure is also applicable to continuous optimization. This paper presents a new way of extending ACO to solving continuous optimization problems by focusing on continuous variable sampling as a key to transforming ACO from discrete optimization to continuous optimization. The proposed SamACO algorithm consists of three major steps, i.e., the generation of candidate variable values for selection, the ants' solution construction, and the pheromone update process. The distinct characteristics of SamACO are the cooperation of a novel sampling method for discretizing the continuous search space and an efficient incremental solution construction method based on the sampled values. The performance of SamACO is tested using continuous numerical functions with unimodal and multimodal features. Compared with some state-of-the-art algorithms, including traditional ant-based algorithms and representative computational intelligence algorithms for continuous optimization, the performance of SamACO is seen competitive and promising.

  8. 42 CFR 425.502 - Calculating the ACO quality performance score.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Calculating the ACO quality performance score. 425... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM (CONTINUED) MEDICARE SHARED SAVINGS PROGRAM Quality Performance Standards and Reporting § 425.502 Calculating the ACO quality performance score. (a)...

  9. 42 CFR 425.502 - Calculating the ACO quality performance score.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Calculating the ACO quality performance score. 425... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM (CONTINUED) MEDICARE SHARED SAVINGS PROGRAM Quality Performance Standards and Reporting § 425.502 Calculating the ACO quality performance score. (a)...

  10. 42 CFR 425.306 - Participation agreement and exclusivity of ACO participant TINs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... participant TINs. 425.306 Section 425.306 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT... participant TINs. (a) For purposes of the Shared Savings Program, each ACO participant TIN is required to commit to a participation agreement with CMS. (b) Each ACO participant TIN upon which...

  11. 42 CFR 425.306 - Participation agreement and exclusivity of ACO participant TINs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... participant TINs. 425.306 Section 425.306 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT... participant TINs. (a) For purposes of the Shared Savings Program, each ACO participant TIN is required to commit to a participation agreement with CMS. (b) Each ACO participant TIN upon which...

  12. 42 CFR 425.306 - Participation agreement and exclusivity of ACO participant TINs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... participant TINs. 425.306 Section 425.306 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT... participant TINs. (a) For purposes of the Shared Savings Program, each ACO participant TIN is required to commit to a participation agreement with CMS. (b) Each ACO participant TIN upon which...

  13. Report on the 10th International Conference of the Asian Clinical Oncology Society (ACOS 2012).

    PubMed

    Kim, Yeul Hong; Yang, Han-Kwang; Kim, Tae Won; Lee, Jung Shin; Seong, Jinsil; Lee, Woo Yong; Ahn, Yong Chan; Lim, Ho Yeong; Won, Jong-Ho; Park, Kyong Hwa; Cho, Kyung Sam

    2013-04-01

    The 10th International Conference of the Asian Clinical Oncology Society (ACOS 2012) in conjunction with the 38th Annual Meeting of the Korean Cancer Association, was held on June 13 to 15 (3 days) 2012 at COEX Convention and Exhibition Center in Seoul, Korea. ACOS has a 20-year history starting from the first conference in Osaka, Japan, which was chaired by Prof. Tetsuo Taguchi and the ACOS conferences have since been conducted in Asian countries every 2 years. Under the theme of "Work Together to Make a Difference for Cancer Therapy in Asia", the 10th ACOS was prepared to discuss various subjects through a high-quality academic program, exhibition, and social events. The ACOS 2012 Committee was composed of the ACOS Organizing Committee, Honorary Advisors, Local Advisors, and ACOS 2012 Organizing Committee. The comprehensive academic program had a total of 92 sessions (3 Plenary Lectures, 1 Award Lectures, 1 Memorial Lectures, 9 Special Lectures, 15 Symposia, 1 Debate & Summary Sessions, 1 Case Conferences, 19 Educational Lectures, 1 Research & Development Session, 18 Satellite Symposia, 9 Meet the Professors, 14 Oral Presentations) and a total 292 presentations were delivered throughout the entire program. Amongst Free Papers, 462 research papers (110 oral presentations and 352 poster presentations) were selected to be presented. This conference was the largest of all ACOS conferences in its scale with around 1,500 participants from 30 countries. Furthermore, despite strict new financial policies and requirements governing fundraising alongside global economic stagnation, a total of 14 companies participated as sponsors and an additional 35 companies purchased 76 exhibition booths. Lastly, the conference social events provided attendees with a variety of opportunities to experience and enjoy Korea's rich culture and traditions during the Opening Ceremony, Welcome Reception, Invitee Dinner, Banquet, and Closing Ceremony. Overall, ACOS 2012 reinforced and promoted

  14. Layered ACO-OFDM for intensity-modulated direct-detection optical wireless transmission.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi; Qian, Chen; Guo, Xuhan; Wang, Zhaocheng; Cunningham, David G; White, Ian H

    2015-05-01

    Layered asymmetrically clipped optical orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (ACO-OFDM) with high spectral efficiency is proposed in this paper for optical wireless transmission employing intensity modulation with direct detection. In contrast to the conventional ACO-OFDM, which only utilizes odd subcarriers for modulation, leading to an obvious spectral efficiency loss, in layered ACO-OFDM, the subcarriers are divided into different layers and modulated by different kinds of ACO-OFDM, which are combined for simultaneous transmission. In this way, more subcarriers are used for data transmission and the spectral efficiency is improved. An iterative receiver is also proposed for layered ACO-OFDM, where the negative clipping distortion of each layer is subtracted once it is detected so that the signals from different layers can be recovered. Theoretical analysis shows that the proposed scheme can improve the spectral efficiency by up to 2 times compared with conventional ACO-OFDM approaches with the same modulation order. Meanwhile, simulation results confirm a considerable signal-to-noise ratio gain over ACO-OFDM at the same spectral efficiency. PMID:25969323

  15. Physicians' Participation In ACOs Is Lower In Places With Vulnerable Populations Than In More Affluent Communities.

    PubMed

    Yasaitis, Laura C; Pajerowski, William; Polsky, Daniel; Werner, Rachel M

    2016-08-01

    Early evidence suggested that accountable care organizations (ACOs) could improve health care quality while constraining costs, and ACOs are expanding throughout the United States. However, if disadvantaged patients have unequal access to physicians who participate in ACOs, that expansion may exacerbate health care disparities. We examined the relationship between physicians' participation in both Medicare and commercial ACOs across the country and the sociodemographic characteristics of their likely patient populations. Physicians' participation in ACOs varied widely across hospital referral regions, from nearly 0 percent to over 85 percent. After we adjusted for individual physician and practice characteristics, we found that physicians who practiced in ZIP Code Tabulation Areas where a higher percentage of the population was black, living in poverty, uninsured, or disabled or had less than a high school education-compared to other areas-had significantly lower rates of ACO participation than other physicians. Our findings suggest that vulnerable populations' access to physicians participating in ACOs may not be as great as access for other groups, which could exacerbate existing disparities in health care quality. PMID:27503961

  16. Hospitals Participating In ACOs Tend To Be Large And Urban, Allowing Access To Capital And Data.

    PubMed

    Colla, Carrie H; Lewis, Valerie A; Tierney, Emily; Muhlestein, David B

    2016-03-01

    Relationships between physicians and hospitals have changed considerably over the past decade, as hospitals and physician groups have integrated and new public and private payment policies have created financial interdependence. The extent to which accountable care organizations (ACOs) involve hospitals in their operations may prove to be vitally important, because managing hospital care is a key part of improving health care quality and lowering cost growth. Using primary data on ACO composition and capabilities paired with hospital characteristics, we found that 20 percent of US hospitals were part of an ACO in 2014. Hospitals that were in urban areas, were nonprofit, or had a smaller share of Medicare patients were more likely to participate in ACOs, compared to hospitals that were in more rural areas, were for-profit or government owned, or had a larger share of Medicare patients, respectively. Qualitative data identified the following advantages of including a hospital in an ACO: the availability of start-up capital, advanced data sharing, and engagement of providers across the care continuum. Although the 63 percent of ACOs that included hospitals offered more comprehensive services compared to ACOs without hospitals, we found no differences between the two groups in their ability to manage hospital-related aspects of patient care.

  17. CHARACTERISTICS OF POLYPHENOL OXIDASES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polyphenol oxidase (PPO, EC 1.14.18.1 or EC 1.10.3.1) catalyzes the oxidation of o-diphenols to o-quinones. Highly reactive o-quinones couple with phenolics and specific amino acids on proteins to form the characteristic browning products in many wounded fruits, vegetables, and leaf tissues of plant...

  18. ACOs in real life: a reflection on the Medicare Shared Savings Program.

    PubMed

    Behm, Craig R

    2015-01-01

    The Medicare Shared Savings Program introduced Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs) as one potential method for meeting the often-cited triple aim of better individual care, improved population health, and lower cost. Built on concepts originating from HMOs and then Medicare Advantage plans, ACOs provide incentives based on total cost of care rather than any individual provider's cost. Early quality and cost results are mixed, and, more importantly, so is physician response. The ACO program still has potential to be a bright spot for the future of healthcare, but until there is widespread physician engagement, achieving the triple aim is likely to remain elusive.

  19. The Impact Of Medicare ACOs On Improving Integration And Coordination Of Physical And Behavioral Health Care.

    PubMed

    Fullerton, Catherine A; Henke, Rachel M; Crable, Erica; Hohlbauch, Andriana; Cummings, Nicholas

    2016-07-01

    The accountable care organization (ACO) model holds the promise of reducing costs and improving the quality of care by realigning payment incentives to focus on health outcomes instead of service volume. One key to managing the total cost of care is improving care coordination for and treatment of people with behavioral health disorders. We examined qualitative data from ninety organizations participating in Medicare ACO demonstration programs from 2012 through 2015 to determine whether and how they focused on behavioral health care. These ACOs had mixed degrees of engagement in improving behavioral health care for their populations. The biggest challenges included a lack of behavioral health care providers, data availability, and sustainable financing models. Nonetheless, we found substantial interest in integrating behavioral health care into primary care across a majority of the ACOs. PMID:27385242

  20. The Impact Of Medicare ACOs On Improving Integration And Coordination Of Physical And Behavioral Health Care.

    PubMed

    Fullerton, Catherine A; Henke, Rachel M; Crable, Erica; Hohlbauch, Andriana; Cummings, Nicholas

    2016-07-01

    The accountable care organization (ACO) model holds the promise of reducing costs and improving the quality of care by realigning payment incentives to focus on health outcomes instead of service volume. One key to managing the total cost of care is improving care coordination for and treatment of people with behavioral health disorders. We examined qualitative data from ninety organizations participating in Medicare ACO demonstration programs from 2012 through 2015 to determine whether and how they focused on behavioral health care. These ACOs had mixed degrees of engagement in improving behavioral health care for their populations. The biggest challenges included a lack of behavioral health care providers, data availability, and sustainable financing models. Nonetheless, we found substantial interest in integrating behavioral health care into primary care across a majority of the ACOs.

  1. A pheromone-rate-based analysis on the convergence time of ACO algorithm.

    PubMed

    Huang, Han; Wu, Chun-Guo; Hao, Zhi-Feng

    2009-08-01

    Ant colony optimization (ACO) has widely been applied to solve combinatorial optimization problems in recent years. There are few studies, however, on its convergence time, which reflects how many iteration times ACO algorithms spend in converging to the optimal solution. Based on the absorbing Markov chain model, we analyze the ACO convergence time in this paper. First, we present a general result for the estimation of convergence time to reveal the relationship between convergence time and pheromone rate. This general result is then extended to a two-step analysis of the convergence time, which includes the following: 1) the iteration time that the pheromone rate spends on reaching the objective value and 2) the convergence time that is calculated with the objective pheromone rate in expectation. Furthermore, four brief ACO algorithms are investigated by using the proposed theoretical results as case studies. Finally, the conclusions of the case studies that the pheromone rate and its deviation determine the expected convergence time are numerically verified with the experiment results of four one-ant ACO algorithms and four ten-ant ACO algorithms. PMID:19380276

  2. CACONET: Ant Colony Optimization (ACO) Based Clustering Algorithm for VANET.

    PubMed

    Aadil, Farhan; Bajwa, Khalid Bashir; Khan, Salabat; Chaudary, Nadeem Majeed; Akram, Adeel

    2016-01-01

    A vehicular ad hoc network (VANET) is a wirelessly connected network of vehicular nodes. A number of techniques, such as message ferrying, data aggregation, and vehicular node clustering aim to improve communication efficiency in VANETs. Cluster heads (CHs), selected in the process of clustering, manage inter-cluster and intra-cluster communication. The lifetime of clusters and number of CHs determines the efficiency of network. In this paper a Clustering algorithm based on Ant Colony Optimization (ACO) for VANETs (CACONET) is proposed. CACONET forms optimized clusters for robust communication. CACONET is compared empirically with state-of-the-art baseline techniques like Multi-Objective Particle Swarm Optimization (MOPSO) and Comprehensive Learning Particle Swarm Optimization (CLPSO). Experiments varying the grid size of the network, the transmission range of nodes, and number of nodes in the network were performed to evaluate the comparative effectiveness of these algorithms. For optimized clustering, the parameters considered are the transmission range, direction and speed of the nodes. The results indicate that CACONET significantly outperforms MOPSO and CLPSO. PMID:27149517

  3. CACONET: Ant Colony Optimization (ACO) Based Clustering Algorithm for VANET

    PubMed Central

    Bajwa, Khalid Bashir; Khan, Salabat; Chaudary, Nadeem Majeed; Akram, Adeel

    2016-01-01

    A vehicular ad hoc network (VANET) is a wirelessly connected network of vehicular nodes. A number of techniques, such as message ferrying, data aggregation, and vehicular node clustering aim to improve communication efficiency in VANETs. Cluster heads (CHs), selected in the process of clustering, manage inter-cluster and intra-cluster communication. The lifetime of clusters and number of CHs determines the efficiency of network. In this paper a Clustering algorithm based on Ant Colony Optimization (ACO) for VANETs (CACONET) is proposed. CACONET forms optimized clusters for robust communication. CACONET is compared empirically with state-of-the-art baseline techniques like Multi-Objective Particle Swarm Optimization (MOPSO) and Comprehensive Learning Particle Swarm Optimization (CLPSO). Experiments varying the grid size of the network, the transmission range of nodes, and number of nodes in the network were performed to evaluate the comparative effectiveness of these algorithms. For optimized clustering, the parameters considered are the transmission range, direction and speed of the nodes. The results indicate that CACONET significantly outperforms MOPSO and CLPSO. PMID:27149517

  4. MGA trajectory planning with an ACO-inspired algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceriotti, Matteo; Vasile, Massimiliano

    2010-11-01

    Given a set of celestial bodies, the problem of finding an optimal sequence of swing-bys, deep space manoeuvres (DSM) and transfer arcs connecting the elements of the set is combinatorial in nature. The number of possible paths grows exponentially with the number of celestial bodies. Therefore, the design of an optimal multiple gravity assist (MGA) trajectory is a NP-hard mixed combinatorial-continuous problem. Its automated solution would greatly improve the design of future space missions, allowing the assessment of a large number of alternative mission options in a short time. This work proposes to formulate the complete automated design of a multiple gravity assist trajectory as an autonomous planning and scheduling problem. The resulting scheduled plan will provide the optimal planetary sequence and a good estimation of the set of associated optimal trajectories. The trajectory model consists of a sequence of celestial bodies connected by two-dimensional transfer arcs containing one DSM. For each transfer arc, the position of the planet and the spacecraft, at the time of arrival, are matched by varying the pericentre of the preceding swing-by, or the magnitude of the launch excess velocity, for the first arc. For each departure date, this model generates a full tree of possible transfers from the departure to the destination planet. Each leaf of the tree represents a planetary encounter and a possible way to reach that planet. An algorithm inspired by ant colony optimization (ACO) is devised to explore the space of possible plans. The ants explore the tree from departure to destination adding one node at the time: every time an ant is at a node, a probability function is used to select a feasible direction. This approach to automatic trajectory planning is applied to the design of optimal transfers to Saturn and among the Galilean moons of Jupiter. Solutions are compared to those found through more traditional genetic-algorithm techniques.

  5. Crystallization of Mitochondrial Cytochrome Oxidase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozawa, Takayuki; Tanaka, Masashi; Wakabayashi, Takashi

    1982-12-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase (ferrocytochrome c:oxygen oxidoreductase, EC 1.9.3.1) was purified from beef heart mitochondria. By washing the oxidase with detergent on a hydrophobic interaction column, phospholipids were depleted to the level of 1 mol of cardiolipin per mol of heme a. Hydrophobic impurities and partially denatured oxidase were separated from the intact oxidase on an affinity column with cytochrome c as the specific ligand. The final preparation of the oxidase contained seven distinct polypeptides. The molecular weight of the oxidase was estimated to be 130,000 from its specific heme a and copper content and from the subunit composition. Crystals of the oxidase were obtained by slow removal of the detergent from the buffer in which the oxidase was dissolved. The needle-shaped crystals were 100 μ m in average length and 5 μ m in width, and they strongly polarized visible light. Electron diffraction patterns were obtained with an unstained glutaraldehyde-fixed single crystal by electron microscopy using 1,000-kV electrons. From electron micrographs and the diffraction patterns of the crystal, it was concluded that the crystal is monoclinic in the space group P21, with unit cell dimensions a = 92 angstrom, b = 84 angstrom, and c = 103 angstrom, and α =β 90 degrees, γ = 126 degrees.

  6. A Few Thoughts about ACO Antitrust Issues from a Local Enforcement Perspective.

    PubMed

    Foote, Kathleen E; Varanini, Emilio E

    2015-08-01

    Accountable care organizations (ACOs), joint ventures of commercial insurers and various groups of medical providers such as physicians, specialists, and hospitals whose development in California has been quickened by the Affordable Care Act, carry with them both promise and pitfalls. On the positive side of the ledger, ACOs may improve the quality of medical care even as they lower the costs of that care. On the negative side of the ledger, ACOs may lead to a gain in market power for their participations, allowing those participants to increase the prices they charge to commercial insurers. It is thus a key question for antitrust enforcers to figure out how to separate the sheep from the goats. This article, representing our personal views as state antitrust enforcers in the California attorney general's office, offers our reflection on a number of ACO articles and studies in this special issue through the prism of this key question and sets out a number of additional issues that we believe warrant study in conjunction with ACOs. PMID:26124293

  7. Complementary DNA cloning of the pear 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid oxidase gene and agrobacterium-mediated anti-sense genetic transformation.

    PubMed

    Qi, Jing; Dong, Zhen; Zhang, Yu-Xing

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to genetically modify plantlets of the Chinese yali pear to reduce their expression of ripening-associated 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid oxidase (ACO) and therefore increase the shelf-life of the fruit. Primers were designed with selectivity for the conserved regions of published ACO gene sequences, and yali complementary DNA (cDNA) cloning was performed by reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The obtained cDNA fragment contained 831 base pairs, encoding 276 amino acid residues, and shared no less than 94% nucleotide sequence identity with other published ACO genes. The cDNA fragment was inversely inserted into a pBI121 expression vector, between the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter and the nopaline synthase terminator, in order to construct the anti‑sense expression vector of the ACO gene; it was transfected into cultured yali plants using Agrobacterium LBA4404. Four independent transgenic lines of pear plantlets were obtained and validated by PCR analysis. A Southern blot assay revealed that there were three transgenic lines containing a single copy of exogenous gene and one line with double copies. The present study provided germplasm resources for the cultivation of novel storage varieties of pears, therefore providing a reference for further applications of anti‑sense RNA technology in the genetic improvement of pears and other fruit.

  8. NADPH Oxidase and Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Hernandes, Marina S; Britto, Luiz R G

    2012-01-01

    NADPH oxidase (Nox) is a unique, multi-protein, electron transport system that produces large amounts of superoxide via the reduction of molecular oxygen. Nox-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) are known to be involved in a variety of physiological processes, including host defense and signal transduction. However, over the past decade, the involvement of (Nox)-dependent oxidative stress in the pathophysiology of several neurodegenerative diseases has been increasingly recognized. ROS produced by Nox proteins contribute to neurodegenerative diseases through distinct mechanisms, such as oxidation of DNA, proteins, lipids, amino acids and metals, in addition to activation of redox-sensitive signaling pathways. In this review, we discuss the recent literature on Nox involvement in neurodegeneration, focusing on Parkinson and Alzheimer diseases. PMID:23730256

  9. PCMHs, ACOs, and medication management: lessons learned from early research partnerships.

    PubMed

    Schnur, Evan S; Adams, Alex J; Klepser, Donald G; Doucette, William R; Scott, David M

    2014-02-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act has greatly accelerated the formation of team-based models of care delivery, primarily accountable care organizations (ACOs) and patient-centered medical homes (PCMHs).  Many have written about the need to incorporate medication management services into these systems in order to improve care and reduce total health care costs. Two primary ways of doing so have emerged: (1) an embedded model, whereby pharmacists are employed directly by a physician practice, or (2) a "virtual care team" model, whereby a PCMH or ACO develops an arrangement with external pharmacists in community settings to provide coordinated services.

  10. Few ACOs pursue innovative models that integrate care for mental illness and substance abuse with primary care.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Valerie A; Colla, Carrie H; Tierney, Katherine; Van Citters, Arica D; Fisher, Elliott S; Meara, Ellen

    2014-10-01

    Accountable care organizations (ACOs) may be well positioned to increase the focus on managing behavioral health conditions (mental health and substance abuse) through the integration of behavioral health treatment and primary care. We used a mixed-methods research design to examine the extent to which ACOs are clinically, organizationally, and financially integrating behavioral health care and primary care. We used data from 257 respondents to the National Survey of Accountable Care Organizations, a nationally representative survey of ACOs. The data were supplemented with semistructured, in-depth interviews with clinical leaders at sixteen ACOs purposively sampled to represent the spectrum of behavioral health integration. We found that most ACOs hold responsibility for some behavioral health care costs, and 42 percent include behavioral health specialists among their providers. However, integration of behavioral health care and primary care remains low, with most ACOs pursuing traditional fragmented approaches to physical and behavioral health care and only a minority implementing innovative models. Contract design and contextual factors appear to influence the extent to which ACOs integrate behavioral health care. Nevertheless, the ACO model has the potential to create opportunities for improving behavioral health care and integrating it with primary care.

  11. Decreased expression of the mitochondrial metabolic enzyme aconitase (ACO2) is associated with poor prognosis in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Mai, Cong; Wei, Yong-li; Zhao, Jing-jing; Hu, Yu-min; Zeng, Zhao-lei; Yang, Jing; Lu, Wen-hua; Xu, Rui-hua; Huang, Peng

    2013-06-01

    Alterations in energy metabolism play a major role in cancer development. Aconitase (ACO2) is an essential enzyme located in the mitochondria and catalyzes the interconversion of citrate and isocitrate in the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Recent studies suggest that the expression of ACO2 may be altered in certain types of cancer. The purpose of this study was to examine ACO2 expression in clinical tumor specimens from patients with gastric cancer and to evaluate the clinical relevance of ACO2 expression in gastric cancer. A total of 456 paraffin-embedded gastric cancer tissues and 30 pairs of freshly frozen tissues were used in this study. Real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, western blotting, and immunohistochemical staining were performed to measure ACO2 expression in tumor tissues and matched adjacent non-tumorous tissues. The results showed that the expression of ACO2 was significantly down-regulated in gastric cancer tissues compared with matched adjacent nontumorous tissues and was associated with clinical stage (p = 0.001), T classification (p = 0.027), N classification (p = 0.012), M classification (p = 0.002), and pathological differentiation states (p = 0.036). Patients with lower ACO2 expression had a shorter survival time than those with higher ACO2 expression. Univariate and multivariate analyses indicated that ACO2 expression functions as an independent prognostic factor (p < 0.001). Our data suggested that ACO2 could play an important role in gastric cancer and may potentially serve as a prognostic biomarker. PMID:23550275

  12. Indole-3-ethanol Oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Percival, Frank W.; Purves, William K.; Vickery, Larry E.

    1973-01-01

    We report the further characterization of indole-3-ethanol oxidase from cucumber seedlings. The effects of various inhibitors suggest that the enzyme may be a flavoprotein with a metal ion and sulfhydryl groups required for full activity. Indole-3-acetaldehyde, a product of the reaction, inhibits the enzyme. This inhibition is overcome by O2 but not by indole-3-ethanol, indicating that the kinetic mechanism of the enzyme is a ping-pong Bi-Bi. The enzyme undergoes cooperative interactions with indoleethanol, yielding Hill coefficients as high as 2.96. Gibberellins are without effect on the enzyme, but it is inhibited by several acidic indoles possessing growth-promoting activity and by two synthetic auxins, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid and 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid. Increasing concentrations of indoleacetic acid (IAA) brought about a slight reduction in the indoleethanol concentration producing halfmaximal velocity. Increasing levels of indoleethanol decreased the concentration of IAA required for half-maximal inhibition. At low concentrations of indoleethanol, low levels of IAA activated rather than inhibited. The effect of IAA was not overcome at higher levels of indoleethanol. These results may be interpreted as showing that IAA is a noncompetitive inhibitor which binds to that conformation of the enzyme which also binds indoleethanol. The significance of these interactions for the regulation of IAA biosynthesis is discussed. PMID:16658401

  13. 42 CFR 425.500 - Measures to assess the quality of care furnished by an ACO.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM (CONTINUED) MEDICARE SHARED SAVINGS PROGRAM Quality Performance Standards and Reporting § 425.500 Measures to assess the quality of care furnished by an ACO. (a) General. CMS establishes quality performance measures to assess the quality of...

  14. 42 CFR 425.500 - Measures to assess the quality of care furnished by an ACO.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM (CONTINUED) MEDICARE SHARED SAVINGS PROGRAM Quality Performance Standards and Reporting § 425.500 Measures to assess the quality of care furnished by an ACO. (a) General. CMS establishes quality performance measures to assess the quality of...

  15. Glutathione Regulates 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-Carboxylate Synthase Transcription via WRKY33 and 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-Carboxylate Oxidase by Modulating Messenger RNA Stability to Induce Ethylene Synthesis during Stress.

    PubMed

    Datta, Riddhi; Kumar, Deepak; Sultana, Asma; Hazra, Saptarshi; Bhattacharyya, Dipto; Chattopadhyay, Sharmila

    2015-12-01

    Glutathione (GSH) plays a fundamental role in plant defense-signaling network. Recently, we have established the involvement of GSH with ethylene (ET) to combat environmental stress. However, the mechanism of GSH-ET interplay still remains unexplored. Here, we demonstrate that GSH induces ET biosynthesis by modulating the transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulations of its key enzymes, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate synthase (ACS) and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate oxidase (ACO). Transgenic Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants with enhanced GSH content (AtECS) exhibited remarkable up-regulation of ACS2, ACS6, and ACO1 at transcript as well as protein levels, while they were down-regulated in the GSH-depleted phytoalexin deficient2-1 (pad2-1) mutant. We further observed that GSH induced ACS2 and ACS6 transcription in a WRKY33-dependent manner, while ACO1 transcription remained unaffected. On the other hand, the messenger RNA stability for ACO1 was found to be increased by GSH, which explains our above observations. In addition, we also identified the ACO1 protein to be a subject for S-glutathionylation, which is consistent with our in silico data. However, S-glutathionylation of ACS2 and ACS6 proteins was not detected. Further, the AtECS plants exhibited resistance to necrotrophic infection and salt stress, while the pad2-1 mutant was sensitive. Exogenously applied GSH could improve stress tolerance in wild-type plants but not in the ET-signaling mutant ethylene insensitive2-1, indicating that GSH-mediated resistance to these stresses occurs via an ET-mediated pathway. Together, our investigation reveals a dual-level regulation of ET biosynthesis by GSH during stress.

  16. Prokaryotic orthologues of mitochondrial alternative oxidase and plastid terminal oxidase.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Allison E; Amirsadeghi, Sasan; Vanlerberghe, Greg C

    2003-12-01

    The mitochondrial alternative oxidase (AOX) and the plastid terminal oxidase (PTOX) are two similar members of the membrane-bound diiron carboxylate group of proteins. AOX is a ubiquinol oxidase present in all higher plants, as well as some algae, fungi, and protists. It may serve to dampen reactive oxygen species generation by the respiratory electron transport chain. PTOX is a plastoquinol oxidase in plants and some algae. It is required in carotenoid biosynthesis and may represent the elusive oxidase in chlororespiration. Recently, prokaryotic orthologues of both AOX and PTOX proteins have appeared in sequence databases. These include PTOX orthologues present in four different cyanobacteria as well as an AOX orthologue in an alpha-proteobacterium. We used PCR, RT-PCR and northern analyses to confirm the presence and expression of the PTOX gene in Anabaena variabilis PCC 7120. An extensive phylogeny of newly found prokaryotic and eukaryotic AOX and PTOX proteins supports the idea that AOX and PTOX represent two distinct groups of proteins that diverged prior to the endosymbiotic events that gave rise to the eukaryotic organelles. Using multiple sequence alignment, we identified residues conserved in all AOX and PTOX proteins. We also provide a scheme to readily distinguish PTOX from AOX proteins based upon differences in amino acid sequence in motifs around the conserved iron-binding residues. Given the presence of PTOX in cyanobacteria, we suggest that this acronym now stand for plastoquinol terminal oxidase. Our results have implications for the photosynthetic and respiratory metabolism of these prokaryotes, as well as for the origin and evolution of eukaryotic AOX and PTOX proteins.

  17. [Alternative oxidase in industrial fungi].

    PubMed

    Gu, Shuai; Liu, Qiang; He, Hao; Li, Shuang

    2015-01-01

    Filamentous fungi have been used in industrial fermentation extensively. Based on non-phosphorylating electron transport process, alternative respiration pathway (ARP) acts as an energy overflow, which can balance carbon metabolism and electron transport, allow the continuance of tricarboxylic acid cycle without the formation of ATP, and permit the turnover of carbon skeletons. Alternative respiration pathway also plays an important role in the stress response of fungi and the physiological function of conditioned pathogen. Alternative oxidase (AOX) is the terminal oxidase responsible for the activity of alternative respiration pathway, which exists widely in higher plants, parts of fungi and algae. Owing to the property that alternative oxidase (AOX) is sensitive to salicylhydroxamic acid (SHAM) and insensitive to conventional inhibitors of cytochrome respiration, alternative respiration pathway by AOX is also named as cyanide-resistant respiration (CRR). In recent years, the study of the alternative respiration pathway and alternative oxidase has been a hot topic in the area involving cellular respiration metabolism. In this review we summarized the latest research advances about the functions of alternative respiration pathway and alternative oxidase in industrial fungi.

  18. Hordeum vulgare Seedlings Amine Oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Cogoni, Antonina; Piras, Carla; Farci, Raffaele; Melis, Antonello; Floris, Giovanni

    1990-01-01

    Although no amine oxidase could be detected in crude extracts, the enzyme has been purified to apparent homogeneity from Hordeum vulgare seedlings using ammonium sulfate precipitation and chromatography on DEAE cellulose, Hydroxylapatite, and Sephadex G200 columns. Gel filtration experiments indicate a molecular weight of about 150,000. The pH optimum of the enzyme was found to be 7.5 in potassium phosphate buffer. The spectrum of ultraviolet and visible regions were similar to Cuamine oxidase from Leguminosae. PMID:16667542

  19. Expression of alternative oxidase in tomato

    SciTech Connect

    Kakefuda, M.; McIntosh, L. )

    1990-05-01

    Tomato fruit ripening is characterized by an increase in ethylene biosynthesis, a burst in respiration (i.e. the climacteric), fruit softening and pigmentation. As whole tomatoes ripened from mature green to red, there was an increase in the alternative oxidase capacity. Aging pink tomato slices for 24 and 48 hrs also showed an increase of alternative oxidase and cytochrome oxidase capacities. Monoclonal antibodies prepared to the Sauromatum guttatum alternative oxidase were used to follow the appearance of alternative oxidase in tomato fruits. There is a corresponding increase in a 36kDa protein with an increase in alternative oxidase capacity. Effects of ethylene and norbornadiene on alternative oxidase capacity were also studied. We are using an alternative oxidase cDNA clone from potato to study the expression of mRNA in ripening and wounded tomatoes to determine if the gene is transcriptionally regulated.

  20. Application of GA, PSO, and ACO algorithms to path planning of autonomous underwater vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghababa, Mohammad Pourmahmood; Amrollahi, Mohammad Hossein; Borjkhani, Mehdi

    2012-09-01

    In this paper, an underwater vehicle was modeled with six dimensional nonlinear equations of motion, controlled by DC motors in all degrees of freedom. Near-optimal trajectories in an energetic environment for underwater vehicles were computed using a numerical solution of a nonlinear optimal control problem (NOCP). An energy performance index as a cost function, which should be minimized, was defined. The resulting problem was a two-point boundary value problem (TPBVP). A genetic algorithm (GA), particle swarm optimization (PSO), and ant colony optimization (ACO) algorithms were applied to solve the resulting TPBVP. Applying an Euler-Lagrange equation to the NOCP, a conjugate gradient penalty method was also adopted to solve the TPBVP. The problem of energetic environments, involving some energy sources, was discussed. Some near-optimal paths were found using a GA, PSO, and ACO algorithms. Finally, the problem of collision avoidance in an energetic environment was also taken into account.

  1. Acetate utilization is inhibited by benzoate in Alcaligenes eutrophus: evidence for transcriptional control of the expression of acoE coding for acetyl coenzyme A synthetase.

    PubMed Central

    Ampe, F; Lindley, N D

    1995-01-01

    During batch growth of Alcaligenes eutrophus on benzoate-acetate mixtures, benzoate was the preferred substrate, with acetate consumption being delayed until the rate of benzoate consumption had diminished. This effect was attributed to a transcriptional control of the synthesis of acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) synthetase, an enzyme necessary for the entry of acetate into the central metabolic pathways, rather than to a biochemical modulation of the activity of this enzyme. Analysis of a 2.4-kb mRNA transcript hybridizing with the A. eutrophus acoE gene confirmed this repression effect. In a benzoate-limited chemostat culture, derepression was observed, with no increase in the level of expression following an acetate pulse. Benzoate itself was not the signal triggering the repression of acetyl-CoA synthetase. This role was played by catechol, which transiently accumulated in the medium when high specific rates of benzoate consumption were reached. The lack of rapid inactivation of the functional acetyl-CoA synthetase after synthesis has been stopped enables A. eutrophus to retain the capacity to metabolize acetate for prolonged periods while conserving minimal protein expenditure. PMID:7592330

  2. Tailoring Systems Engineering Processes in a Conceptual Design Environment: A Case Study at NASA Marshall Spaceflight Center's ACO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulqueen, John; Maples, C. Dauphne; Fabisinski, Leo, III

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of Systems Engineering as it is applied in a conceptual design space systems department at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Marshall Spaceflight Center (MSFC) Advanced Concepts Office (ACO). Engineering work performed in the NASA MFSC's ACO is targeted toward the Exploratory Research and Concepts Development life cycle stages, as defined in the International Council on Systems Engineering (INCOSE) System Engineering Handbook. This paper addresses three ACO Systems Engineering tools that correspond to three INCOSE Technical Processes: Stakeholder Requirements Definition, Requirements Analysis, and Integration, as well as one Project Process Risk Management. These processes are used to facilitate, streamline, and manage systems engineering processes tailored for the earliest two life cycle stages, which is the environment in which ACO engineers work. The role of systems engineers and systems engineering as performed in ACO is explored in this paper. The need for tailoring Systems Engineering processes, tools, and products in the ever-changing engineering services ACO provides to its customers is addressed.

  3. [Integration of different T-DNA structures of ACC oxidase gene into carnation genome extended cut flower vase-life differently].

    PubMed

    Yu, Yi-Xun; Bao, Man-Zhu

    2004-09-01

    The cultivar 'Master' of carnation (Dianthus caryophyllus L.) was transformed with four T-DNA structures containing sense, antisense, sense direct repeat and antisense direct repeat gene of ACC oxidase mediated by Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Southern blotting detection showed that foreign gene was integrated into the carnation genome and 14 transgenic lines were obtained. The transgenic plants were transplanted to soil and grew normally in greenhouse. Of the 12 transgenic lines screened, the cut flower vase life of 8 transgenic lines is up to 11 days and the longest one is 12.8 days while the vase life of the control is 5.8 days under 25 degrees C. The vase life of 2 lines out of 3 with single sense ACO gene is same as that of the control, while the vase life of 3 lines out of 4 with single antisense ACO gene is prolonged. The vase life of cut flowers of 5 lines with direct repeat ACO genes is all prolonged by about 6 days, while the vase life of 3 out of 7 lines with single ACO gene is same as that of the control. During the senescence of cut flowers, the ethylene production of the most of the transgenic lines decreased significantly, and the production of ethylene is not detectable in lines T456, T556 and T575. The results of the research demonstrate that antisense foreign gene inhibits expression of endogenesis gene more significantly than sense one. Both sense direct repeat and antisense direct repeat foreign genes can suppress endogenous gene expression more significantly comparing to single foreign genes. The transgenic lines obtained from this research are useful to minimize carnation cut flower transportation and storage expenses.

  4. Glutathione Regulates 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-Carboxylate Synthase Transcription via WRKY33 and 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-Carboxylate Oxidase by Modulating Messenger RNA Stability to Induce Ethylene Synthesis during Stress1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Deepak; Hazra, Saptarshi; Chattopadhyay, Sharmila

    2015-01-01

    Glutathione (GSH) plays a fundamental role in plant defense-signaling network. Recently, we have established the involvement of GSH with ethylene (ET) to combat environmental stress. However, the mechanism of GSH-ET interplay still remains unexplored. Here, we demonstrate that GSH induces ET biosynthesis by modulating the transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulations of its key enzymes, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate synthase (ACS) and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate oxidase (ACO). Transgenic Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants with enhanced GSH content (AtECS) exhibited remarkable up-regulation of ACS2, ACS6, and ACO1 at transcript as well as protein levels, while they were down-regulated in the GSH-depleted phytoalexin deficient2-1 (pad2-1) mutant. We further observed that GSH induced ACS2 and ACS6 transcription in a WRKY33-dependent manner, while ACO1 transcription remained unaffected. On the other hand, the messenger RNA stability for ACO1 was found to be increased by GSH, which explains our above observations. In addition, we also identified the ACO1 protein to be a subject for S-glutathionylation, which is consistent with our in silico data. However, S-glutathionylation of ACS2 and ACS6 proteins was not detected. Further, the AtECS plants exhibited resistance to necrotrophic infection and salt stress, while the pad2-1 mutant was sensitive. Exogenously applied GSH could improve stress tolerance in wild-type plants but not in the ET-signaling mutant ethylene insensitive2-1, indicating that GSH-mediated resistance to these stresses occurs via an ET-mediated pathway. Together, our investigation reveals a dual-level regulation of ET biosynthesis by GSH during stress. PMID:26463088

  5. Incorporation of copper into lysyl oxidase.

    PubMed

    Kosonen, T; Uriu-Hare, J Y; Clegg, M S; Keen, C L; Rucker, R B

    1997-10-01

    Lysyl oxidase is a copper-dependent enzyme involved in extracellular processing of collagens and elastin. Although it is known that copper is essential for the functional activity of the enzyme, there is little information on the incorporation of copper. In the present study we examined the insertion of copper into lysyl oxidase using 67Cu in cell-free transcription/translation assays and in normal skin fibroblast culture systems. When a full-length lysyl oxidase cDNA was used as a template for transcription/translation reactions in vitro, unprocessed prolysyl oxidase appeared to bind copper. To examine further the post-translational incorporation of copper into lysyl oxidase, confluent skin fibroblasts were incubated with inhibitors of protein synthesis (cycloheximide, 10 microg/ml), glycosylation (tunicamycin, 10 microg/ml), protein secretion (brefeldin A, 10 microg/ml) and prolysyl oxidase processing (procollagen C-peptidase inhibitor, 2.5 microg/ml) together with 300 microCi of carrier-free 67Cu. It was observed that protein synthesis was a prerequisite for copper incorporation, but inhibition of glycosylation by tunicamycin did not affect the secretion of 67Cu as lysyl oxidase. Brefeldin A inhibited the secretion of 67Ci-labelled lysyl oxidase by 46%, but the intracellular incorporation of copper into lysyl oxidase was not affected. In addition, the inhibition of the extracellular proteolytic processing of prolysyl oxidase to lysyl oxidase had minimal effects on the secretion of protein-bound 67Cu. Our results indicate that, similar to caeruloplasmin processing [Sato and Gitlin (1991) J. Biol. Chem. 266, 5128-5134], copper is inserted into prolysyl oxidase independently of glycosylation. PMID:9355764

  6. Identification of acoR, a regulatory gene for the expression of genes essential for acetoin catabolism in Alcaligenes eutrophus H16.

    PubMed Central

    Krüger, N; Steinbüchel, A

    1992-01-01

    Two hundred thirty-nine base pairs upstream from acoXABC, which encodes the Alcaligenes eutrophus H16 structural genes essential for cleavage of acetoin, the 2,004-bp acoR gene was identified. acoR encodes a protein of 668 amino acids with a molecular mass of 72.9 kDa. The amino acid sequence deduced from acoR exhibited homologies to the primary structures of transcriptional activators such as NifA of Azotobacter vinelandii, NtrC of Klebsiella pneumoniae, and HoxA of A. eutrophus. Striking similarities to the central domain of these proteins and the presence of a typical nucleotide-binding site (GETGSGK) as well as of a C-terminal helix-turn-helix motif as a DNA-binding site were revealed. Between acoR and acoXABC, two different types of sequences with dual rotational symmetry [CAC-(N11 to N18)-GTG and TGT-(N10 to N14)-ACA] were found; these sequences are similar to NtrC and NifA upstream activator sequences, respectively. Determination of the N-terminal amino acid sequence of an acoR'-'lacZ gene fusion identified the translational start of acoR. S1 nuclease protection assay identified the transcriptional start site 109 bp upstream of acoR. The promoter region (TTGCGC-N18-TACATT) resembled the sigma 70 consensus sequence of Escherichia coli. Analysis of an acoR'-'lacZ fusion and primer extension studies revealed that acoR was expressed at a low level under all culture conditions, whereas acoXABC was expressed only in acetoin-grown cells. The insertions of Tn5 in six transposon-induced acetoin-negative mutants of A. eutrophus were mapped within acoR. On the basis of these studies, it is probable that AcoR represents a regulatory protein which is required for sigma 54-dependent transcription of acoXABC. Images PMID:1378052

  7. Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors: Clinical Review

    PubMed Central

    Remick, Ronald A.; Froese, Colleen

    1990-01-01

    Monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) are effective antidepressant agents. They are increasingly and effectively used in a number of other psychiatric and non-psychiatric medical syndromes. Their potential for serious toxicity (i.e., hypertensive reaction) is far less than original reports suggest, and newer reversible substrate-specific MAOIs may offer even less toxicity. The author reviews the pharmacology, mechanism of action, clinical indications, and dosing strategies of MAOIs. The common MAOI side-effects (hypotension, weight gain, sexual dysfunction, insomnia, daytime sedation, myoclonus, and hypertensive episodes) are described and management techniques suggested. Recent clinical developments involving MAOIs are outlined. PMID:21233984

  8. Glucose oxidase activity of actinomycetes.

    PubMed

    St Vlahov, S

    1978-01-01

    The ability of 311 actiomycete, belonging to 12 species to produce glucose oxidase was studied. It was found that 174 of them formed exoenzymes on solid medium and 133 in liquid medium. The composition of the nutrient medium has an essential effect on the amount of enzyme formed. Strains with considerably higher activity form a greater amount of exoenzymes on soya meal medium and on synthetic medium with KNO2. The highest activity of the culture liquid of some strains was observed between the 6th and 7th day of cultivation. During this phase of growth the highest productivity of the biomas was established. PMID:76424

  9. Immunological comparison of sulfite oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Pollock, V.; Barber, M.J. )

    1991-03-11

    Polyclonal antibodies (rabbit), elicited against FPLC-purified chicken and rat liver sulfite oxidase (SO), have been examined for inhibition and binding to purified chicken (C), rat (R), bovine (B), alligator (A) and shark (S) liver enzymes. Anti-CSO IgG cross-reacted with all five enzymes, with varying affinities, in the order CSO=ASO{gt}RSO{gt}BSO{gt}SSO. Anti-ROS IgG also cross-reacted with all five enzymes in the order RSO{gt}CSO=ASO{gt}BSO{gt}SSO. Anti-CSO IgG inhibited sulfite:cyt. c reductase (S:CR), sulfite:ferricyanide reductase (S:FR) and sulfite:dichlorophenolindophenol reductase (S:DR) activities of CSO to different extents (S:CR{gt}S:FR=S:DR). Similar differential inhibition was found for anti-ROS IgG and RSO S:CR, S:FR and S:DR activities. Anti-CSO IgG inhibited S:CR activities in the order CSO=ASO{much gt}SSO{gt}BSO. RSO was uninhibited. For anti-RSO IgG the inhibition order was RSO{gt}SSO{gt}BSO{gt}ASO. CSO was uninhibited. Anti-CSO and RSO IgGs partially inhibited Chlorella nitrate reductase (NR). Minor cross-reactivity was found for xanthine oxidase. Common antigenic determinants for all five SO's and NR are indicated.

  10. Mitochondrial Cytochrome c Oxidase Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Rak, Malgorzata; Bénit, Paule; Chrétien, Dominique; Bouchereau, Juliette; Schiff, Manuel; El-Khoury, Riyad; Tzagoloff, Alexander; Rustin, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    As with other mitochondrial respiratory chain components, marked clinical and genetic heterogeneity is observed in patients with a cytochrome c oxidase deficiency. This constitutes a considerable diagnostic challenge and raises a number of puzzling questions. So far, pathological mutations have been reported in more than 30 genes, in both mitochondrial and nuclear DNA, affecting either structural subunits of the enzyme or proteins involved in its biogenesis. In this review, we discuss the possible causes of the discrepancy between the spectacular advances made in the identification of the molecular bases of cytochrome oxidase deficiency and the lack of any efficient treatment in diseases resulting from such deficiencies. This brings back many unsolved questions related to the frequent delay of clinical manifestation, variable course and severity, and tissue-involvement often associated with these diseases. In this context, we stress the importance to study different models of these diseases, but also discuss the limitations encountered in most available disease models. In the future, with the possible exception of replacement therapy using genes, cells or organs, a better understanding of underlying mechanism(s) of these mitochondrial diseases is presumably required to develop efficient therapy. PMID:26846578

  11. 42 CFR 425.608 - Determining first year performance for ACOs beginning April 1 or July 1, 2012.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Determining first year performance for ACOs... windows. (i) The first window will be the first 12 months used for interim payment calculation. (ii) The second window will be CY2013. (4) Expenditures for the first performance year are the sum of...

  12. Changes in Health Care Spending and Quality for Medicare Beneficiaries Associated with a Commercial ACO Contract

    PubMed Central

    McWilliams, J. Michael; Landon, Bruce E.; Chernew, Michael E.

    2013-01-01

    Importance In a multi-payer system, new payment incentives implemented by one insurer for an accountable care organization (ACO) may affect spending and quality of care for another insurer’s enrollees served by the ACO. Such “spillover” effects reflect the extent of organizational efforts to reform care delivery and can contribute to the total impact of ACOs. Objective We examined whether the Blue Cross Blue Shield (BCBS) of Massachusetts’ Alternative Quality Contract (AQC), an early commercial ACO initiative associated with reduced spending and improved quality for BCBS enrollees, was also associated with changes in spending and quality for Medicare beneficiaries, who were not covered by the AQC. Design and Exposure Quasi-experimental comparisons from 2007–2010 of Medicare beneficiaries served by 11 provider organizations entering the AQC in 2009 or 2010 (intervention group) vs. beneficiaries served by other providers (control group). Using a difference-in-differences approach, we estimated changes in spending and quality for the intervention group in the first and second years of exposure to the AQC relative to concurrent changes for the control group. Regression and propensity-score methods were used to adjust for differences in sociodemographic and clinical characteristics. Participants and Setting Elderly fee-for-service Medicare beneficiaries in Massachusetts (1,761,325 person-years). Main Outcome Measures The primary outcome was total quarterly medical spending per beneficiary. Secondary outcomes included spending by setting and type of service, 5 process measures of quality, potentially avoidable hospitalizations, and 30-day readmissions. Results Before entering the AQC, total quarterly spending for the intervention group was $150 (95% CI, $25–$274) higher than for the control group and rose at a similar rate. In year 2 of the intervention group’s exposure to the AQC, this difference was reduced to $51 (95% CI, −$109–$210; P=0

  13. Structural Insights into Sulfite Oxidase Deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Karakas,E.; Wilson, H.; Graf, T.; Xiang, S.; Jaramillo-Busquets, S.; Rajagopalan, K.; Kisker, C.

    2005-01-01

    Sulfite oxidase deficiency is a lethal genetic disease that results from defects either in the genes encoding proteins involved in molybdenum cofactor biosynthesis or in the sulfite oxidase gene itself. Several point mutations in the sulfite oxidase gene have been identified from patients suffering from this disease worldwide. Although detailed biochemical analyses have been carried out on these mutations, no structural data could be obtained because of problems in crystallizing recombinant human and rat sulfite oxidases and the failure to clone the chicken sulfite oxidase gene. We synthesized the gene for chicken sulfite oxidase de novo, working backward from the amino acid sequence of the native chicken liver enzyme by PCR amplification of a series of 72 overlapping primers. The recombinant protein displayed the characteristic absorption spectrum of sulfite oxidase and exhibited steady state and rapid kinetic parameters comparable with those of the tissue-derived enzyme. We solved the crystal structures of the wild type and the sulfite oxidase deficiency-causing R138Q (R160Q in humans) variant of recombinant chicken sulfite oxidase in the resting and sulfate-bound forms. Significant alterations in the substrate-binding pocket were detected in the structure of the mutant, and a comparison between the wild type and mutant protein revealed that the active site residue Arg-450 adopts different conformations in the presence and absence of bound sulfate. The size of the binding pocket is thereby considerably reduced, and its position relative to the cofactor is shifted, causing an increase in the distance of the sulfur atom of the bound sulfate to the molybdenum.

  14. Human lysyl oxidase-like 2.

    PubMed

    Moon, Hee-Jung; Finney, Joel; Ronnebaum, Trey; Mure, Minae

    2014-12-01

    Lysyl oxidase like-2 (LOXL2) belongs to the lysyl oxidase (LOX) family, which comprises Cu(2+)- and lysine tyrosylquinone (LTQ)-dependent amine oxidases. LOXL2 is proposed to function similarly to LOX in the extracellular matrix (ECM) by promoting crosslinking of collagen and elastin. LOXL2 has also been proposed to regulate extracellular and intracellular cell signaling pathways. Dysregulation of LOXL2 has been linked to many diseases, including cancer, pro-oncogenic angiogenesis, fibrosis and heart diseases. In this review, we will give an overview of the current understandings and hypotheses regarding the molecular functions of LOXL2.

  15. An alternative oxidase monoclonal antibody recognises a highly conserved sequence among alternative oxidase subunits.

    PubMed

    Finnegan, P M; Wooding, A R; Day, D A

    1999-03-19

    The alternative oxidase is found in the inner mitochondrial membranes of plants and some fungi and protists. A monoclonal antibody raised against the alternative oxidase from the aroid lily Sauromatum guttatum has been used extensively to detect the enzyme in these organisms. Using an immunoblotting strategy, the antibody binding site has been localised to the sequence RADEAHHRDVNH within the soybean alternative oxidase 2 protein. Examination of sequence variants showed that A2 and residues C-terminal to H7 are required for recognition by the monoclonal antibody raised against the alternative oxidase. The recognition sequence is highly conserved among all alternative oxidase proteins and is absolutely conserved in 12 of 14 higher plant sequences, suggesting that this antibody will continue to be extremely useful in studying the expression and synthesis of the alternative oxidase.

  16. Prokaryotic origins for the mitochondrial alternative oxidase and plastid terminal oxidase nuclear genes.

    PubMed

    Finnegan, Patrick M; Umbach, Ann L; Wilce, Jackie A

    2003-12-18

    The mitochondrial alternative oxidase is a diiron carboxylate quinol oxidase (Dox) found in plants and some fungi and protists, but not animals. The plastid terminal oxidase is distantly related to alternative oxidase and is most likely also a Dox protein. Database searches revealed that the alpha-proteobacterium Novosphingobium aromaticivorans and the cyanobacteria Nostoc sp. PCC7120, Synechococcus sp. WH8102 and Prochlorococcus marinus subsp. pastoris CCMP1378 each possess a Dox homolog. Each prokaryotic protein conforms to the current structural models of the Dox active site and phylogenetic analyses suggest that the eukaryotic Dox genes arose from an ancestral prokaryotic gene.

  17. Regulation of NADPH oxidases in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Leonardo F; Laitano, Orlando

    2016-09-01

    The only known function of NAD(P)H oxidases is to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS). Skeletal muscles express three isoforms of NAD(P)H oxidases (Nox1, Nox2, and Nox4) that have been identified as critical modulators of redox homeostasis. Nox2 acts as the main source of skeletal muscle ROS during contractions, participates in insulin signaling and glucose transport, and mediates the myocyte response to osmotic stress. Nox2 and Nox4 contribute to skeletal muscle abnormalities elicited by angiotensin II, muscular dystrophy, heart failure, and high fat diet. Our review addresses the expression and regulation of NAD(P)H oxidases with emphasis on aspects that are relevant to skeletal muscle. We also summarize: i) the most widely used NAD(P)H oxidases activity assays and inhibitors, and ii) studies that have defined Nox enzymes as protagonists of skeletal muscle redox homeostasis in a variety of health and disease conditions. PMID:27184955

  18. Activation of polyphenol oxidase of chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Tolbert, N E

    1973-02-01

    Polyphenol oxidase of leaves is located mainly in chloroplasts isolated by differential or sucrose density gradient centrifugation. This activity is part of the lamellar structure that is not lost on repeated washing of the plastids. The oxidase activity was stable during prolonged storage of the particles at 4 C or -18 C. The Km (dihydroxyphenylalanine) for spinach leaf polyphenol oxidase was 7 mm by a spectrophotometric assay and 2 mm by the manometric assay. Polyphenol oxidase activity in the leaf peroxisomal fraction, after isopycnic centrifugation on a linear sucrose gradient, did not coincide with the peroxisomal enzymes but was attributed to proplastids at nearly the same specific density.Plants were grouped by the latency properties for polyphenol oxidase in their isolated chloroplasts. In a group including spinach, Swiss chard, and beet leaves the plastids immediately after preparation from fresh leaves required a small amount of light for maximal rates of oxidation of dihydroxyphenylalanine. Polyphenol oxidase activity in the dark or light increased many fold during aging of these chloroplasts for 1 to 5 days. Soluble polyphenol oxidase of the cytoplasm was not so stimulated. Chloroplasts prepared from stored leaves were also much more active than from fresh leaves. Maximum rates of dihydroxyphenylalanine oxidation were 2 to 6 mmoles x mg(-1) chlorophyll x hr(-1). Equal stimulation of latent polyphenol oxidase in fresh or aged chloroplasts in this group was obtained by either light, an aged trypsin digest, 3-(4-chlorophenyl)-1, 1-dimethylurea, or antimycin A. A variety of other treatments did not activate or had little effect on the oxidase, including various peptides, salts, detergents, and other proteolytic enzymes.Activation of latent polyphenol oxidase in spinach chloroplasts by trypsin amounted to as much as 30-fold. The trypsin activation occurred even after the trypsin had been treated with 10% trichloroacetic acid, 1.0 n HCl or boiled for 30

  19. Azide inhibition of urate oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Gabison, Laure; Colloc’h, Nathalie; Prangé, Thierry

    2014-01-01

    The inhibition of urate oxidase (UOX) by azide was investigated by X-ray diffraction techniques and compared with cyanide inhibition. Two well characterized sites for reagents are present in the enzyme: the dioxygen site and the substrate-binding site. To examine the selectivity of these sites towards azide inhibition, several crystallization conditions were developed. UOX was co-crystallized with azide (N3) in the presence or absence of either uric acid (UA, the natural substrate) or 8-azaxanthine (8AZA, a competitive inhibitor). In a second set of experiments, previously grown orthorhombic crystals of the UOX–UA or UOX–8AZA complexes were soaked in sodium azide solutions. In a third set of experiments, orthorhombic crystals of UOX with the exchangeable ligand 8-nitroxanthine (8NXN) were soaked in a solution containing uric acid and azide simultaneously (competitive soaking). In all assays, the soaking periods were either short (a few hours) or long (one or two months). These different experimental conditions showed that one or other of the sites, or the two sites together, could be inhibited. This also demonstrated that azide not only competes with dioxygen as cyanide does but also competes with the substrate for its enzymatic site. A model in agreement with experimental data would be an azide in equilibrium between two sites, kinetically in favour of the dioxygen site and thermodynamically in favour of the substrate-binding site. PMID:25005084

  20. Heme/copper terminal oxidases

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson-Miller, S.; Babcock, G.T.

    1996-11-01

    Spatially well-organized electron-transfer reactions in a series of membrane-bound redox proteins form the basis for energy conservation in both photosynthesis and respiration. The membrane-bound nature of the electron-transfer processes is critical, as the free energy made available in exergonic redox chemistry is used to generate transmembrane proton concentration and electrostatic potential gradients. These gradients are subsequently used to drive ATP formation, which provides the immediate energy source for constructive cellular processes. The terminal heme/copper oxidases in respiratory electron-transfer chains illustrate a number of the thermodynamic and structural principles that have driven the development of respiration. This class of enzyme reduces dioxygen to water, thus clearing the respiratory system of low-energy electrons so that sustained electron transfer and free-energy transduction can occur. By using dioxygen as the oxidizing substrate, free-energy production per electron through the chain is substantial, owing to the high reduction potential of O{sub 2} (0.815 V at pH 7). 122 refs.

  1. Essential function of Aco2, a fusion protein of aconitase and mitochondrial ribosomal protein bL21, in mitochondrial translation in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Jung, Soo-Jin; Seo, Youngdae; Lee, Kyung-Chang; Lee, Daeyoup; Roe, Jung-Hye

    2015-03-24

    A possible interaction between aconitase and a mitochondrial ribosomal protein was suggested in a genome-wide interactome study. In fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the aco2(+) gene encodes a fusion protein between aconitase and a putative mitochondrial ribosomal protein bL21 (Mrpl49). Two types of aco2(+) transcripts are generated via alternative poly (A) site selection, producing both a single aconitase domain protein and the fusion form. The bL21-fused Aco2 protein resides in mitochondria as well as in the cytosol and the nucleus. The viability defect of aco2 mutation is complemented not by the aconitase domain but by the bL21 domain, which enables mitochondrial translation.

  2. Comparison of AC/O3-BAC and O3-BAC processes for removing organic pollutants in secondary effluent.

    PubMed

    Li, Laisheng; Zhu, Wanpeng; Zhang, Pengyi; Zhang, Zulin; Wu, Honghai; Han, Wenya

    2006-03-01

    AC (activated carbon)/O3-BAC (biological activated carbon) process was employed to treat secondary effluent and compared to O3-BAC process. The effects of ozone dosages and empty bed contact time (EBCT) in BAC on dissolved organic carbon (DOC) removal were investigated. The results showed that the presence of AC improved ozone utilization and biodegradability of the effluent. DOC removal increased with ozone dosage and EBCT in BAC, however, 3 mg l(-1) ozone dosage with 15 min oxidation time and 15 min EBCT in BAC were more economical and efficient. For DOC removal, AC/O3-BAC was more efficient than O3-BAC and its synergetic effect was more than that in O3-BAC process. The biomass of the subsequent BAC unit in AC/O3-BAC process was more than that in O3-BAC process and much more than that in BAC alone. Except for organic pollutants with molecular weight (MW) >10 kDa, those of other MW range were decomposed much more by AC/O3 process than by O3 process. GC/MS analysis showed that dibutyl phthalate, bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate, 4-bromo-3-chloroaniline, 2-propanone-ethylhydrazone and phenol derivatives were prevalent organic compounds in the secondary effluent. Some aromatic compounds, such as 4-bromo-3-chloroaniline and 2,4-dichloro-benzenamine disappeared after AC/O3 treatment. However, some small molecules were generated, after further biological treatment by BAC, the kinds and concentration of organic compounds were greatly reduced. PMID:16087215

  3. Eight reasons payer interoperability and data sharing are essential in ACOs. Interoperability standards could be a prerequisite to measuring care.

    PubMed

    Mookencherry, Shefali

    2012-01-01

    It makes strategic and business sense for payers and providers to collaborate on how to take substantial cost out of the healthcare delivery system. Acting independently, neither medical groups, hospitals nor health plans have the optimal mix of resources and incentives to significantly reduce costs. Payers have core assets such as marketing, claims data, claims processing, reimbursement systems and capital. It would be cost prohibitive for all but the largest providers to develop these capabilities in order to compete directly with insurers. Likewise, medical groups and hospitals are positioned to foster financial interdependence among providers and coordinate the continuum of patient illnesses and care settings. Payers and providers should commit to reasonable clinical and cost goals, and share resources to minimize expenses and financial risks. It is in the interest of payers to work closely with providers on risk-management strategies because insurers need synergy with ACOs to remain cost competitive. It is in the interest of ACOs to work collaboratively with payers early on to develop reasonable and effective performance benchmarks. Hence, it is essential to have payer interoperability and data sharing integrated in an ACO model. PMID:22352172

  4. The Norma cluster (ACO3627) - II. The near-infrared Ks-band luminosity function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skelton, R. E.; Woudt, P. A.; Kraan-Korteweg, R. C.

    2009-07-01

    A deep Ks-band photometric catalogue of galaxies at the core of the rich, nearby Norma cluster (ACO3627) is presented. The survey covers about 45 × 45arcmin2 (slightly less than 1/3 Abell radius), which corresponds to ~0.8h-270Mpc2 at the adopted distance (vCMB/H0) of 70h-170Mpc of this cluster. The survey is estimated to be complete to a magnitude of . This extends into the dwarf regime, 6 mag below . The catalogue contains 390 objects, 235 of which are classified as likely or definite galaxies and 155 as candidate galaxies. The Ks-band luminosity function (LF) is constructed from the photometric sample, using a spectroscopic subsample to correct for fore and background contamination. We fit a Schechter function with a characteristic magnitude of and faint-end slope of α = -1.26 +/- 0.10 to the data. The shape of the LF is similar to those found in previous determinations of the cluster LF, in both optical and near-infrared. The Schechter parameters agree well with those of recent field LFs, suggesting that the shape of both the bright-end and the faint-end slopes are relatively insensitive to environment.

  5. ACO-zeotype iron aluminum phosphates with variable Al/Fe ratios controlled by F⁻ ions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanyan; Li, Yi; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Jingzhe; Yan, Yan; Li, Jiyang; Yu, Jihong; Wang, Jincheng; Xu, Ruren

    2011-03-01

    Three new iron aluminum phosphates |(C(2)H(10)N(2))(4)|[Fe(8 - x)Al(x)F(x)(H(2)O)(2 - x)(PO(4))(8)]·2H(2)O (χ = 1.64, 1.33, 0.80) with ACO-zeotype structures denoted as FeAPO-CJ66(a), FeAPO-CJ66(b), and FeAPO-CJ66(c), respectively, have been synthesized in the fluoride ion system. Their framework structures are made of double 4-ring (D4R) building units formed by the alternating connection of Fe(Al)O(4)F(O) trigonal bipyramids and PO(4) tetrahedra, which possess 3D intersecting 8-ring channels running along the [001], [010], and [100] directions. Fluoride ions or water molecules reside in the center of D4Rs, and diprotonated ethylenediamine cations and water molecules are occluded in the free space of channels to stabilize the whole structure. Notably, the Al/Fe ratios in the frameworks can be effectively controlled from 1/3.9 to 1/5.0 to 1/9.0 by adjusting the amounts of phosphoric acid and hydrofluoric acid added to the initial reaction mixture. Mössbauer and magnetic measurements show that the Fe ions in the compounds are bivalent and undergo antiferromagnetic ordering at room temperature.

  6. NASA GES DISC support of CO2 Data from OCO-2, ACOS, and AIRS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wei, Jennifer C; Vollmer, Bruce E.; Savtchenko, Andrey K.; Hearty, Thomas J; Albayrak, Rustem Arif; Deshong, Barbara E.

    2013-01-01

    NASA Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Centers (GES DISC) is the data center assigned to archive and distribute current AIRS, ACOS data and data from the upcoming OCO-2 mission. The GES DISC archives and supports data containing information on CO2 as well as other atmospheric composition, atmospheric dynamics, modeling and precipitation. Along with the data stewardship, an important mission of GES DISC is to facilitate access to and enhance the usability of data as well as to broaden the user base. GES DISC strives to promote the awareness of science content and novelty of the data by working with Science Team members and releasing news articles as appropriate. Analysis of events that are of interest to the general public, and that help in understanding the goals of NASA Earth Observing missions, have been among most popular practices.Users have unrestricted access to a user-friendly search interface, Mirador, that allows temporal, spatial, keyword and event searches, as well as an ontology-driven drill down. Variable subsetting, format conversion, quality screening, and quick browse, are among the services available in Mirador. The majority of the GES DISC data are also accessible through OPeNDAP (Open-source Project for a Network Data Access Protocol) and WMS (Web Map Service). These services add more options for specialized subsetting, format conversion, image viewing and contributing to data interoperability.

  7. NADPH oxidases: new actors in thyroid cancer?

    PubMed

    Ameziane-El-Hassani, Rabii; Schlumberger, Martin; Dupuy, Corinne

    2016-08-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is a crucial substrate for thyroid peroxidase, a key enzyme involved in thyroid hormone synthesis. However, as a potent oxidant, H2O2 might also be responsible for the high level of oxidative DNA damage observed in thyroid tissues, such as DNA base lesions and strand breakages, which promote chromosomal instability and contribute to the development of tumours. Although the role of H2O2 in thyroid hormone synthesis is well established, its precise mechanisms of action in pathological processes are still under investigation. The NADPH oxidase/dual oxidase family are the only oxidoreductases whose primary function is to produce reactive oxygen species. As such, the function and expression of these enzymes are tightly regulated. Thyrocytes express dual oxidase 2, which produces most of the H2O2 for thyroid hormone synthesis. Thyrocytes also express dual oxidase 1 and NADPH oxidase 4, but the roles of these enzymes are still unknown. Here, we review the structure, expression, localization and function of these enzymes. We focus on their potential role in thyroid cancer, which is characterized by increased expression of these enzymes. PMID:27174022

  8. Xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity of alkyl gallates.

    PubMed

    Masuoka, Noriyoshi; Nihei, Ken-ichi; Kubo, Isao

    2006-08-01

    A series (C1-C12) of alkyl gallates was examined for their effects on the activity of xanthine oxidase. Octyl (C8), decyl (C10), and dodecyl (C12) gallates competitively inhibited uric acid formation generated by xanthine oxidase, and the inhibition increased upon increasing the alkyl chain length. Interestingly, neither menthyl nor bornyl gallates inhibited uric acid formation. These data indicate that the hydrophobic alkyl portion is associated with the xanthine-binding site in the Mo-binding domain. It is likely that the linear alkyl portion interacts with the hydrophobic domain close to the binding site, and the hydrophobic interaction is crucial to inhibit the xanthine oxidase reaction. On the other hand, all of gallic acid and its esters equally suppress superoxide anion generation catalyzed by xanthine oxidase at low concentration. The suppression is not due to scavenging activity of these gallates but due to reduction of xanthine oxidase by these gallates. The reduced enzyme catalyzes the reaction to generate hydrogen peroxide and uric acid.

  9. Mitochondrial targeting of human protoporphyrinogen oxidase.

    PubMed

    Davids, Lester M; Corrigall, Anne V; Meissner, Peter N

    2006-05-01

    Variegate porphyria is an autosomal dominant disorder of heme metabolism resulting from a deficiency in protoporphyrinogen oxidase, an enzyme located on the inner mitochondrial membrane. This study examined the effect of three South African VP-causing mutations (H20P, R59W, R168C) on mitochondrial targeting. Only H20P did not target, and of eight protoporphyrinogen oxidase-GFP chimeric fusion proteins created, N-terminal residues 1-17 were found to be the minimal protoporphyrinogen oxidase sequence required for efficient mitochondrial targeting. Removal of this N-terminal sequence displayed mitochondrial localization, suggesting internal mitochondrial targeting signals. In addition, six constructs were engineered to assess the effect of charge and helicity on mitochondrial targeting of the protein. Of those engineered, only the PPOX20/H20P-GFP construct abolished mitochondrial targeting, presumably through disruption of the protoporphyrinogen oxidase alpha-helix. Based on our results we propose a mechanism for protoporphyrinogen oxidase targeting to the mitochondrion.

  10. Immunoblot analyses of the elicited Sanguinaria canadensis enzyme, dihydrobenzophenanthridine oxidase: evidence for resolution from a polyphenol oxidase isozyme.

    PubMed

    Ignatov, A; Neuman, M C; Barg, R; Krueger, R J; Coscia, C J

    1997-11-15

    In our initial purification of dihydrobenzophenanthridine oxidase from Sanguinaria canadensis plant cell cultures, we reported that our most purified preparations contained a major band at 77 kDa and minor lower Mr bands. Here we present evidence on highly purified dihydrobenzophenanthridine oxidase from elicited S. canadensis cultures to indicate that this enzyme is the 77-kDa protein and that lower Mr bands include an isozyme(s) of the polyphenol oxidase family that copurifies with it. An antibody raised against the 77-kDa protein and an anti-polyphenol oxidase antibody that recognizes a 70-kDa band were used to monitor chromatographic fractions by immunoblot analysis of the oxidases. Oxidase-containing eluates from DEAE-Sephadex, CM, and HiTrap blue were compared to corresponding flow-through fractions. Bands at 77 and 88 kDa were detected with anti-dihydrobenzophenanthridine oxidase antibody in eluates displaying high dihydrobenzophenanthridine oxidase activity. Polyphenol oxidase specific activity and immunoreactivity partitioned both in flow-through and eluate fractions of the CM and HiTrap columns. Estimation of the dihydrobenzophenanthridine oxidase and polyphenol oxidase specific activities for each step showed increasing enrichment of alkaloidal enzyme accompanied by variable dihydrobenzophenanthridine oxidase/polyphenol oxidase activity ratios. Taken together these observations indicate that the dihydrobenzophenanthridine and polyphenol oxidases have Mr values of 77 and 70 kDa, respectively, and the two enzymes are different entities.

  11. Xanthine oxidase inhibitors from Brandisia hancei.

    PubMed

    Kong, L D; Wolfender, J L; Cheng, C H; Hostettmann, K; Tan, R X

    1999-12-01

    Xanthine oxidase is a key enzyme associated with the incidence of hyperuricemia-related disorders. Repeated chromatography of the enzyme inhibitory part of the water extract of the twigs and leaves of Brandisia hancei (Scrophulariaceae) gave a flavone luteolin, an iridoid glycoside mussaenoside, two beta-sitosterol glycosides daucosterol and beta-sitosterol gentiobioside, and five phenylethanoids arenarioside, brandioside, acteoside, 2'-O-acetylacteoside and isoacteoside. Luteolin and isoacteoside inhibited the xanthine oxidase (XO, EC 1.2.3.2) with the IC50 values at 7.83 and 45.48 microM, respectively. Isoacteoside was found to be the first phenylethanoid that decreased substantially the formation of uric acid by inhibiting competitively xanthine oxidase (Ki value: 10.08 microM). Furthermore, the study suggested that the caffeoylation of the 6'-hydroxyl group of the phenylethanoids was essential for the enzyme inhibitory action.

  12. ALTERNATIVE OXIDASE: From Gene to Function.

    PubMed

    Vanlerberghe, Greg C.; McIntosh, Lee

    1997-06-01

    Plants, some fungi, and protists contain a cyanide-resistant, alternative mitochondrial respiratory pathway. This pathway branches at the ubiquinone pool and consists of an alternative oxidase encoded by the nuclear gene Aox1. Alternative pathway respiration is only linked to proton translocation at Complex 1 (NADH dehydrogenase). Alternative oxidase expression is influenced by stress stimuli-cold, oxidative stress, pathogen attack-and by factors constricting electron flow through the cytochrome pathway of respiration. Control is exerted at the levels of gene expression and in response to the availability of carbon and reducing potential. Posttranslational control involves reversible covalent modification of the alternative oxidase and activation by specific carbon metabolites. This dynamic system of coarse and fine control may function to balance upstream respiratory carbon metabolism and downstream electron transport when these coupled processes become imbalanced as a result of changes in the supply of, or demand for, carbon, reducing power, and ATP.

  13. Changes in oxidative stress in transgenic RNAi ACO1 tomato fruit during ripening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eglous, Najat Mohamed; Ali, Zainon Mohd; Hassan, Maizom; Zainal, Zamri

    2013-11-01

    Tomato (Solanum Lycopersicum L.) is the second most cultivated vegetable in the world and widely used as a system for studying the role of ethylene during fruit ripening. Our objective was to study the oxidative stress and antioxidative metabolism during ripening of non transgenic tomato and transgenic line-21 tomato which reduced ethylene. The line-21 of transgenic tomato plants (RNAi ACO1) had lower ethylene production and longer shelf-life more than 32 days as compared to the wild-type fruits which have very short shelf-life. In this study, tomato fruit were divided into five different stages (MG: mature green 5%, B: breaker 25%, T: turning 50%, O: orange75%, RR: red ripe100%). The activity of lipoxygenase (LOX) and lipid peroxidation (MDA) were measured to assess changes in oxidative stress. The LOX activity and MDA content decreased significantly obtaining 2.6-fold and 1.2-fold, respectively, as compared to the wild type fruit. However, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activities were increased to 1.9 and 1.2 folds from the mature green to the fully ripe stage in transgenic tomatoes. Furthermore, the wild type tomato increases 1.3 in SOD and 1.6 in CAT activities. The overall results indicate that the wild type tomato fruit showed a faster rate of ripening, parallel to decline in the rate of enzymatic antioxidative systems as compared to the transgenic line-21 tomato fruit. In addition, the results show that the antioxidant capacity is improved during the ripening process and is accompanied by an increase in the oxidative stress.

  14. Structure–function characterization reveals new catalytic diversity in the galactose oxidase and glyoxal oxidase family

    PubMed Central

    Yin, DeLu (Tyler); Urresti, Saioa; Lafond, Mickael; Johnston, Esther M.; Derikvand, Fatemeh; Ciano, Luisa; Berrin, Jean-Guy; Henrissat, Bernard; Walton, Paul H.; Davies, Gideon J.; Brumer, Harry

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol oxidases, including carbohydrate oxidases, have a long history of research that has generated fundamental biological understanding and biotechnological applications. Despite a long history of study, the galactose 6-oxidase/glyoxal oxidase family of mononuclear copper-radical oxidases, Auxiliary Activity Family 5 (AA5), is currently represented by only very few characterized members. Here we report the recombinant production and detailed structure–function analyses of two homologues from the phytopathogenic fungi Colletotrichum graminicola and C. gloeosporioides, CgrAlcOx and CglAlcOx, respectively, to explore the wider biocatalytic potential in AA5. EPR spectroscopy and crystallographic analysis confirm a common active-site structure vis-à-vis the archetypal galactose 6-oxidase from Fusarium graminearum. Strikingly, however, CgrAlcOx and CglAlcOx are essentially incapable of oxidizing galactose and galactosides, but instead efficiently catalyse the oxidation of diverse aliphatic alcohols. The results highlight the significant potential of prospecting the evolutionary diversity of AA5 to reveal novel enzyme specificities, thereby informing both biology and applications. PMID:26680532

  15. Extracellular oxidases of the lignin-degrading fungus Panus tigrinus.

    PubMed

    Cadimaliev, D A; Revin, V V; Atykyan, N A; Samuilov, V D

    2005-06-01

    Two extracellular oxidases (laccases) were isolated from the extracellular fluid of the fungus Panus (Lentinus) tigrinus cultivated in low-nitrogen medium supplemented with birch sawdust. The enzymes were purified by successive chromatography on columns with TEAE-cellulose and DEAE-Toyopearl 650M. Both oxidases catalyze oxidation of pyrocatechol and ABTS. Moreover, oxidase 1 also catalyzes oxidation of guaiacol, o-phenylenediamine, and syringaldazine. The enzymes have identical pH (7.0) and temperature (60-65 degrees C) optimums. Absorption spectra of the oxidases differ from the spectra of typical "blue" laccases and are similar to the spectrum of yellow oxidase. PMID:16038613

  16. NADPH oxidases in the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Belmondo, Simone; Calcagno, Cristina; Genre, Andrea; Puppo, Alain; Pauly, Nicolas; Lanfranco, Luisa

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Plant NADPH oxidases are the major source of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that plays key roles as both signal and stressor in several plant processes, including defense responses against pathogens. ROS accumulation in root cells during arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) development has raised the interest in understanding how ROS-mediated defense programs are modulated during the establishment of this mutualistic interaction. We have recently analyzed the expression pattern of 5 NADPH oxidase (also called RBOH) encoding genes in Medicago truncatula, showing that only one of them (MtRbohE) is specifically upregulated in arbuscule-containing cells. In line with this result, RNAi silencing of MtRbohE generated a strong alteration in root colonization, with a significant reduction in the number of arbusculated cells. On this basis, we propose that MtRBOHE-mediated ROS production plays a crucial role in the intracellular accommodation of arbuscules. PMID:27018627

  17. Lysyl oxidase isoforms in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Añazco, Carolina; Delgado-López, Fernando; Araya, Paulina; González, Ileana; Morales, Erik; Pérez-Castro, Ramón; Romero, Jacqueline; Rojas, Armando

    2016-09-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is the fifth most frequent cancer in the world and shows the highest incidence in Latin America and Asia. An increasing amount of evidence demonstrates that lysyl oxidase isoforms, a group of extracellular matrix crosslinking enzymes, should be considered as potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets in GC. In this review, we focus on the expression levels of lysyl oxidase isoforms, its functions and the clinical implications in GC. Finding novel proteins related to the processing of these extracellular matrix enzymes might be helpful in the design of new therapies, which, in combination with classic pharmacology, could be used to delay the progress of this aggressive cancer and offer a wider temporal window for clinical intervention. PMID:27564724

  18. Imaging Monoamine Oxidase in the Human Brain

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, J. S.; Volkow, N. D.; Wang, G-J.; Logan, Jean

    1999-11-10

    Positron emission tomography (PET) studies mapping monoamine oxidase in the human brain have been used to measure the turnover rate for MAO B; to determine the minimum effective dose of a new MAO inhibitor drug lazabemide and to document MAO inhibition by cigarette smoke. These studies illustrate the power of PET and radiotracer chemistry to measure normal biochemical processes and to provide information on the effect of drug exposure on specific molecular targets.

  19. Monoamine oxidase inhibitors from Gentiana lutea.

    PubMed

    Haraguchi, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Yasumasa; Kabbash, Amal; Fujioka, Toshihiro; Ishizu, Takashi; Yagi, Akira

    2004-08-01

    Three monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitors were isolated from Gentiana lutea. Their structures were elucidated to be 3-3''linked-(2'-hydroxy-4-O-isoprenylchalcone)-(2'''-hydroxy-4''-O-isoprenyldihydrochalcone) (1), 2-methoxy-3-(1,1'-dimethylallyl)-6a,10a-dihydrobenzo(1,2-c)chroman-6-one and 5-hydroxyflavanone. These compounds, and the hydrolysis product of 1, displayed competitive inhibitory properties against MAO-B which was more effective than MAO-A.

  20. Increased xanthine oxidase in the skin of preeclamptic women.

    PubMed

    Bainbridge, Shannon A; Deng, Jau-Shyong; Roberts, James M

    2009-05-01

    Xanthine oxioreductase is the holoenzyme responsible for terminal purine catabolism. Under conditions of metabolic stress or heightened proinflammatory cytokine production, this enzyme is preferentially in its oxidized form, xanthine oxidase, with catalytic action that generates uric acid and the free radical superoxide. As preeclampsia is characterized by heightened inflammation, oxidative stress, and hyperuricemia, it has been proposed that xanthine oxidase plays a pivotal role in this hypertensive disorder of pregnancy. We sought to determine whether xanthine oxidase protein content was higher in maternal tissue of preeclamptic mothers, compared to healthy pregnant controls, using immunohistochemical analysis of skin biopsies. We further compared xanthine oxidase immunoreactivity in skin biopsies from preeclamptic women and patients with several inflammatory conditions. In preeclamptic women, intense xanthine oxidase immunoreactivity was present within the epidermis. By contrast, only very faint xanthine oxidase staining was observed in skin biopsies from healthy pregnant controls. Further, a role for inflammation in the increase of xanthine oxidase was suggested by similar findings of heightened xanthine oxidase immunoreactivity in the skin biopsies from nonpregnant individuals diagnosed with conditions of systemic inflammation. The finding of increased xanthine oxidase in maternal tissue, most likely as the result of heightened maternal inflammation, suggests maternal xanthine oxidase as a source of free radical and uric acid generation in preeclampsia.

  1. Comparison of kinetic properties of amine oxidases from sainfoin and lentil and immunochemical characterization of copper/quinoprotein amine oxidases.

    PubMed

    Zajoncová, L; Frébort, I; Luhová, L; Sebela, M; Galuszka, P; Pec, P

    1999-01-01

    Kinetic properties of novel amine oxidase isolated from sainfoin (Onobrychis viciifolia) were compared to those of typical plant amine oxidase (EC 1.4.3.6) from lentil (Lens culinaris). The amine oxidase from sainfoin was active toward substrates, such as 1,5-diaminopentane (cadaverine) with K(m) of 0.09 mM and 1,4-diaminobutane (putrescine) with K(m) of 0.24 mM. The maximum rate of oxidation for cadaverine at saturating concentration was 2.7 fold higher than that of putrescine. The amine oxidase from lentil had the maximum rate for putrescine comparable to the rate of sainfoin amine oxidase with the same substrate. Both amine oxidases, like other plant Cu-amine oxidases, were inhibited by substrate analogs (1,5-diamino-3-pentanone, 1,4-diamino-2-butanone and aminoguanidine), Cu2+ chelating agents (diethyltriamine, 1,10-phenanthroline, 8-hydroxyquinoline, 2,2'-bipyridyl, imidazole, sodium cyanide and sodium azide), some alkaloids (L-lobeline and cinchonine), some lathyrogens (beta-aminopropionitrile and aminoacetonitrile) and other inhibitors (benzamide oxime, acetone oxime, hydroxylamine and pargyline). Tested by Ouchterlony's double diffusion in agarose gel, polyclonal antibodies against the amine oxidase from sainfoin, pea and grass pea cross-reacted with amine oxidases from several other Fabaceae and from barley (Hordeum vulgare) of Poaceae, while amine oxidase from the filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger did not cross-react at all. However, using Western blotting after SDS-PAGE with rabbit polyclonal antibodies against the amine oxidase from Aspergillus niger, some degree of similarity of plant amine oxidases from sainfoin, pea, field pea, grass pea, fenugreek, common melilot, white sweetclover and Vicia panonica with the A. niger amine oxidase was confirmed. PMID:10092944

  2. Pathological changes in platelet histamine oxidases in atopic eczema

    PubMed Central

    Ionescu, Gruia

    1993-01-01

    Increased plasma histamine levels were associated with significantly lowered diamine and type B monoamine oxidase activities in platelet-rich plasma of atopic eczema (AE) patients. The diamine oxidase has almost normal cofactor levels (pyridoxal phosphate and Cu2+) but the cofactor levels for type B monoamine oxidase (flavin adenine dinucleotide and Fe2+) are lowered. The biogenic amines putrescine, cadaverine, spermidine, spermine, tyramine and serotonin in the sera, as well as dopamine and epinephrine in EDTA-plasma were found to be normal. It is unlikely, therefore, that these amines are responsible for the decreased activities of monoamine and diamine oxidase in these patients. The most likely causative factors for the inhibition of the diamine oxidase are nicotine, alcohol, food additives and other environmental chemicals, or perhaps a genetic defect of the diamine oxidase. PMID:18475554

  3. In vitro antimalarial and xanthine oxidase inhibition of 2-Aminoanthraquinone.

    PubMed

    Rauf, Abdur; Khan, Rehan; Khan, Haroon; Jehan, Noor; Akram, Mohammad; Ahmad, Zarka; Muhammad, Naveed; Farooq, Umar; Khan, Ajmal

    2016-03-01

    In the present research study 2-Aminoanthraquinone were scrutinized for their antimalarial and Xanthine oxidase inhibitor potential. It demonstrated marked concentration dependent antimalarial activity with maximum effect of 89.06% and with IC50 of 34.17 µM. Regarding Xanthine oxidase inhibitor activity, it evoked significant effect with 57.45% activity with IC50 value of 81.57.19 μM. In conclusion, 2-Aminoanthraquinone showed potent antimalarial and xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity. PMID:27087090

  4. Source challenges resulting of the first applications of a UV storage ring FEL on Super-ACO

    SciTech Connect

    Couprie, M.E.; Bakker, R.; Nahon, L. |

    1995-12-31

    Since 1992, significant progresses were achieved on the Super-ACO (S-ACO) storage ring Free Electron Laser (FEL) in the UV. The operation at the nominal energy 800 MeV has several consequences: higher average power in the UV (25 mW at 60 mA and more recently 100 mW at 100 mA available for the users), 10 hours of lasing for the same injection of positrons, providing enough time for performing an user experiment, compatibility with the users of synchrotron radiation (SR) in the temporal structure mode for 120 mA with the possibility of closing the four insertion devices of S-ACO. The main difficulties to extend the FEL optical performances come from the small gain (2%), limiting a rapid extention of the spectral range (either in the laser mode or by coherent harmonic generation from the FEL itself in the undulator) or linewidth narrowing. The installation of a 500 MHz harmonic cavity for bunch length reduction and gain increase is under consideration{hor_ellipsis} The stability of the FEL temporal and spectral was systematically followed versus time, for various scales (from ns to half an hour) with different detectors. The stability of the laser source has been significantly improved with a longitudinal feedback system allowing the jitter of the 25 ps RMS laser micropulse to be reduced from 150-200 ps down to 10-20 ps. the intensity fluctuations to be damped down 1% and the spectral drift to be smaller than the resolution of the scanning Fabry-Perot (0.01{angstrom}) at perfect synchronism. The laser can work during more than 3 consecutive hours without readjustments. In addition, according to the ring current, the positron beam is submitted to coherent modes of synchrotron oscillations. Right now, a Pedersen type longitudinal feedback damps the dipolar modes of such oscillation. The quadrupolar modes in the 120-60 mA range leading to a rather unstable FEL are on the way to be damped with an additional feedback.

  5. Crystal Structure of a Two-domain Multicopper Oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Lawton, Thomas J.; Sayavedra-Soto, Luis A.; Arp, Daniel J.; Rosenzweig, Amy C.

    2009-01-01

    The two-domain multicopper oxidases are proposed to be key intermediates in the evolution of three-domain multicopper oxidases. A number of two-domain multicopper oxidases have been identified from genome sequences and are classified as type A, type B, or type C on the basis of the predicted location of the type 1 copper center. The crystal structure of blue copper oxidase, a type C two-domain multicopper oxidase from Nitrosomonas europaea, has been determined to 1.9 Å resolution. Blue copper oxidase is a trimer, of which each subunit comprises two cupredoxin domains. Each subunit houses a type 1 copper site in domain 1 and a type 2/type 3 trinuclear copper cluster at the subunit-subunit interface. The coordination geometry at the trinuclear copper site is consistent with reduction of the copper ions. Although the overall architecture of blue copper oxidase is similar to nitrite reductases, detailed structural alignments show that the fold and domain orientation more closely resemble the three-domain multicopper oxidases. These observations have important implications for the evolution of nitrite reductases and multicopper oxidases. PMID:19224923

  6. Hybridisations Of Simulated Annealing And Modified Simplex Algorithms On A Path Of Steepest Ascent With Multi-Response For Optimal Parameter Settings Of ACO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luangpaiboon, P.

    2009-10-01

    Many entrepreneurs face to extreme conditions for instances; costs, quality, sales and services. Moreover, technology has always been intertwined with our demands. Then almost manufacturers or assembling lines adopt it and come out with more complicated process inevitably. At this stage, products and service improvement need to be shifted from competitors with sustainability. So, a simulated process optimisation is an alternative way for solving huge and complex problems. Metaheuristics are sequential processes that perform exploration and exploitation in the solution space aiming to efficiently find near optimal solutions with natural intelligence as a source of inspiration. One of the most well-known metaheuristics is called Ant Colony Optimisation, ACO. This paper is conducted to give an aid in complicatedness of using ACO in terms of its parameters: number of iterations, ants and moves. Proper levels of these parameters are analysed on eight noisy continuous non-linear continuous response surfaces. Considering the solution space in a specified region, some surfaces contain global optimum and multiple local optimums and some are with a curved ridge. ACO parameters are determined through hybridisations of Modified Simplex and Simulated Annealing methods on the path of Steepest Ascent, SAM. SAM was introduced to recommend preferable levels of ACO parameters via statistically significant regression analysis and Taguchi's signal to noise ratio. Other performance achievements include minimax and mean squared error measures. A series of computational experiments using each algorithm were conducted. Experimental results were analysed in terms of mean, design points and best so far solutions. It was found that results obtained from a hybridisation with stochastic procedures of Simulated Annealing method were better than that using Modified Simplex algorithm. However, the average execution time of experimental runs and number of design points using hybridisations were

  7. Nox NADPH Oxidases and the Endoplasmic Reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Araujo, Thaís L.S.; Abrahão, Thalita B.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Understanding isoform- and context-specific subcellular Nox reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase compartmentalization allows relevant functional inferences. This review addresses the interplay between Nox NADPH oxidases and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), an increasingly evident player in redox pathophysiology given its role in redox protein folding and stress responses. Recent Advances: Catalytic/regulatory transmembrane subunits are synthesized in the ER and their processing includes folding, N-glycosylation, heme insertion, p22phox heterodimerization, as shown for phagocyte Nox2. Dual oxidase (Duox) maturation also involves the regulation by ER-resident Duoxa2. The ER is the activation site for some isoforms, typically Nox4, but potentially other isoforms. Such location influences redox/Nox-mediated calcium signaling regulation via ER targets, such as sarcoendoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA). Growing evidence suggests that Noxes are integral signaling elements of the unfolded protein response during ER stress, with Nox4 playing a dual prosurvival/proapoptotic role in this setting, whereas Nox2 enhances proapoptotic signaling. ER chaperones such as protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) closely interact with Noxes. PDI supports growth factor-dependent Nox1 activation and mRNA expression, as well as migration in smooth muscle cells, and PDI overexpression induces acute spontaneous Nox activation. Critical Issues: Mechanisms of PDI effects include possible support of complex formation and RhoGTPase activation. In phagocytes, PDI supports phagocytosis, Nox activation, and redox-dependent interactions with p47phox. Together, the results implicate PDI as possible Nox organizer. Future Directions: We propose that convergence between Noxes and ER may have evolutive roots given ER-related functional contexts, which paved Nox evolution, namely calcium signaling and pathogen killing. Overall, the interplay between

  8. Emission "Off-On" effect from europium complexes triggered by AcO anion: synthesis, characterization and sensing performance.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaogang; Zhang, Dong; Li, Jing

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, a series of Eu(III) complexes based on four diamine ligands and two diketone ligands were synthesized. Their single crystal structures were studied, where intermolecular π-π stacking was found. The photophysical parameters of these Eu(III) complexes were measured, along with their ligand triplet levels. The energy transfer mechanism between ligand and metal center was discussed in detail. Energy transfer roll-back was found in Eu(III) complexes owing large-conjugated diamine ligands, compromising emissive performance. This energy transfer roll-back, however, could be stopped by the presence of AcO anion, leading to Eu(III) complex emission enhancement. The sensing performance of such Eu(III) complexes was thus investigated in detail. High sensitivity and selectivity were observed.

  9. CO2 Measurements from Space: Lessons Learned from the Collaboration between the ACOS/OCO-2 and GOSAT Teams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crisp, D.; Eldering, A.; Gunson, M. R.

    2012-12-01

    The NASA Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO) and the Japanese Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT) were the first two missions designed to collect space-based observations of the column-averaged CO2 dry air mole fraction, XCO2, with the sensitivity, coverage, and resolution needed to quantify CO2 fluxes on regional scales over the globe. The OCO and GOSAT teams formed a close collaboration during the development phases of these missions. After the loss of OCO, the GOSAT project team invited the OCO team to contribute to the analysis of measurements collected by the GOSAT Thermal And Near infrared Sensor for carbon Observations-Fourier Transform Spectrometer (TANSO-FTS). NASA responded by reformulating the OCO science team under the Atmospheric CO2 Observations from Space (ACOS) task to exploit this opportunity. This collaboration is providing an independent GOSAT XCO2 product, and valuable insights into the retrieval algorithms, calibration methods, and validation techniques that are being developed to analyze data anticipated the NASA Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2). The ACOS/OCO-2 and GOSAT teams have conducted four, joint, vicarious calibration campaigns at Railroad Valley, Nevada to track the long-term radiometric performance of the TANSO-FTS instrument. The methods used in these campaigns evolved from those used to characterize the radiometric performance of high spatial resolution, imaging spectroradiometers. For TANSO-FTS, the conventional, surface based radiometric measurements have been augmented with surface and aircraft measurements of atmospheric temperature and trace gas profiles, as well as surface observations from MODIS and ASTER to characterize spatial variations of the surface reflectance within the (relatively large) sounding footprints. Similar methods will be needed for OCO-2. The ACOS/OCO-2 retrieval algorithm and associated data screening methods have been modified to estimate XCO2 from TANSO-FTS observations. Comparisons of TANSO

  10. NADPH Oxidase Promotes Neutrophil Extracellular Trap Formation in Pulmonary Aspergillosis

    PubMed Central

    Röhm, Marc; Grimm, Melissa J.; D'Auria, Anthony C.; Almyroudis, Nikolaos G.

    2014-01-01

    NADPH oxidase is a crucial enzyme in antimicrobial host defense and in regulating inflammation. Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is an inherited disorder of NADPH oxidase in which phagocytes are defective in generation of reactive oxidant intermediates. Aspergillus species are ubiquitous, filamentous fungi, which can cause invasive aspergillosis, a major cause of morbidity and mortality in CGD, reflecting the critical role for NADPH oxidase in antifungal host defense. Activation of NADPH oxidase in neutrophils can be coupled to the release of proteins and chromatin that comingle in neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), which can augment extracellular antimicrobial host defense. NETosis can be driven by NADPH oxidase-dependent and -independent pathways. We therefore undertook an analysis of whether NADPH oxidase was required for NETosis in Aspergillus fumigatus pneumonia. Oropharyngeal instillation of live Aspergillus hyphae induced neutrophilic pneumonitis in both wild-type and NADPH oxidase-deficient (p47phox−/−) mice which had resolved in wild-type mice by day 5 but progressed in p47phox−/− mice. NETs, identified by immunostaining, were observed in lungs of wild-type mice but were absent in p47phox−/− mice. Using bona fide NETs and nuclear chromatin decondensation as an early NETosis marker, we found that NETosis required a functional NADPH oxidase in vivo and ex vivo. In addition, NADPH oxidase increased the proportion of apoptotic neutrophils. Together, our results show that NADPH oxidase is required for pulmonary clearance of Aspergillus hyphae and generation of NETs in vivo. We speculate that dual modulation of NETosis and apoptosis by NADPH oxidase enhances antifungal host defense and promotes resolution of inflammation upon infection clearance. PMID:24549323

  11. Multicopper oxidase-1 orthologs from diverse insect species have ascorbate oxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Peng, Zeyu; Dittmer, Neal T; Lang, Minglin; Brummett, Lisa M; Braun, Caroline L; Davis, Lawrence C; Kanost, Michael R; Gorman, Maureen J

    2015-04-01

    Members of the multicopper oxidase (MCO) family of enzymes can be classified by their substrate specificity; for example, ferroxidases oxidize ferrous iron, ascorbate oxidases oxidize ascorbate, and laccases oxidize aromatic substrates such as diphenols. Our previous work on an insect multicopper oxidase, MCO1, suggested that it may function as a ferroxidase. This hypothesis was based on three lines of evidence: RNAi-mediated knock down of Drosophila melanogaster MCO1 (DmMCO1) affects iron homeostasis, DmMCO1 has ferroxidase activity, and DmMCO1 has predicted iron binding residues. In our current study, we expanded our focus to include MCO1 from Anopheles gambiae, Tribolium castaneum, and Manduca sexta. We verified that MCO1 orthologs have similar expression profiles, and that the MCO1 protein is located on the basal surface of cells where it is positioned to oxidize substrates in the hemolymph. In addition, we determined that RNAi-mediated knock down of MCO1 in A. gambiae affects iron homeostasis. To further characterize the enzymatic activity of MCO1 orthologs, we purified recombinant MCO1 from all four insect species and performed kinetic analyses using ferrous iron, ascorbate and two diphenols as substrates. We found that all of the MCO1 orthologs are much better at oxidizing ascorbate than they are at oxidizing ferrous iron or diphenols. This result is surprising because ascorbate oxidases are thought to be specific to plants and fungi. An analysis of three predicted iron binding residues in DmMCO1 revealed that they are not required for ferroxidase or laccase activity, but two of the residues (His374 and Asp380) influence oxidation of ascorbate. These two residues are conserved in MCO1 orthologs from insects and crustaceans; therefore, they are likely to be important for MCO1 function. The results of this study suggest that MCO1 orthologs function as ascorbate oxidases and influence iron homeostasis through an unknown mechanism. PMID:25701385

  12. Multicopper oxidase-1 orthologs from diverse insect species have ascorbate oxidase activity

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Zeyu; Dittmer, Neal T.; Lang, Minglin; Brummett, Lisa M.; Braun, Caroline L.; Davis, Lawrence C.; Kanost, Michael R.; Gorman, Maureen J.

    2015-01-01

    Members of the multicopper oxidase (MCO) family of enzymes can be classified by their substrate specificity; for example, ferroxidases oxidize ferrous iron, ascorbate oxidases oxidize ascorbate, and laccases oxidize aromatic substrates such as diphenols. Our previous work on an insect multicopper oxidase, MCO1, suggested that it may function as a ferroxidase. This hypothesis was based on three lines of evidence: RNAi-mediated knock down of Drosophila melanogaster MCO1 (DmMCO1) affects iron homeostasis, DmMCO1 has ferroxidase activity, and DmMCO1 has predicted iron binding residues. In our current study, we expanded our focus to include MCO1 from Anopheles gambiae, Tribolium castaneum, and Manduca sexta. We verified that MCO1 orthologs have similar expression profiles, and that the MCO1 protein is located on the basal surface of cells where it is positioned to oxidize substrates in the hemolymph. In addition, we determined that RNAi-mediated knock down of MCO1 in A. gambiae affects iron homeostasis. To further characterize the enzymatic activity of MCO1 orthologs, we purified recombinant MCO1 from all four insect species and performed kinetic analyses using ferrous iron, ascorbate and two diphenols as substrates. We found that all of the MCO1 orthologs are much better at oxidizing ascorbate than they are at oxidizing ferrous iron or diphenols. This result is surpring because ascorbate oxidases are thought to be specific to plants and fungi. An analysis of three predicted iron binding residues in DmMCO1 revealed that they are not required for ferroxidase or laccase activity, but two of the residues (His374 and Asp380) influence oxidation of ascorbate. These two residues are conserved in MCO1 orthologs from insects and crustaceans; therefore, they are likely to be important for MCO1 function. The results of this study suggest that MCO1 orthologs function as ascorbate oxidases and influence iron homeostasis through an unknown mechanism. PMID:25701385

  13. Dissecting the role of climacteric ethylene in kiwifruit (Actinidia chinensis) ripening using a 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid oxidase knockdown line.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Ross G; Gunaseelan, Kularajathevan; Wang, Mindy Y; Luo, Luke; Wang, Tianchi; Norling, Cara L; Johnston, Sarah L; Maddumage, Ratnasiri; Schröder, Roswitha; Schaffer, Robert J

    2011-07-01

    During climacteric fruit ripening, autocatalytic (Type II) ethylene production initiates a transcriptional cascade that controls the production of many important fruit quality traits including flavour production and softening. The last step in ethylene biosynthesis is the conversion of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) to ethylene by the enzyme ACC oxidase (ACO). Ten independent kiwifruit (Actinidia chinensis) lines were generated targeting suppression of fruit ripening-related ACO genes and the fruit from one of these lines (TK2) did not produce detectable levels of climacteric ethylene. Ripening behaviour in a population of kiwifruit at harvest is asynchronous, so a short burst of exogenous ethylene was used to synchronize ripening in TK2 and control fruit. Following such a treatment, TK2 and control fruit softened to an 'eating-ripe' firmness. Control fruit produced climacteric ethylene and softened beyond eating-ripe by 5 d. In contrast, TK2 fruit maintained an eating-ripe firmness for >25 d and total volatile production was dramatically reduced. Application of continuous exogenous ethylene to the ripening-arrested TK2 fruit re-initiated fruit softening and typical ripe fruit volatiles were detected. A 17 500 gene microarray identified 401 genes that changed after ethylene treatment, including a polygalacturonase and a pectate lyase involved in cell wall breakdown, and a quinone oxidoreductase potentially involved in volatile production. Many of the gene changes were consistent with the softening and flavour changes observed after ethylene treatment. However, a surprisingly large number of genes of unknown function were also observed, which could account for the unique flavour and textural properties of ripe kiwifruit.

  14. Endothelins and NADPH oxidases in the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Dammanahalli, Karigowda J; Sun, Zhongjie

    2008-01-01

    1. The endothelin (ET) system and NADPH oxidase play important roles in the regulation of cardiovascular function, as well as in the pathogenesis of hypertension and other cardiovascular diseases. 2. Endothelins activate NADPH oxidases and thereby increase superoxide production, resulting in oxidative stress and cardiovascular dysfunction. Thus, NADPH oxidases may mediate the role of endothelins in some cardiovascular diseases. However, the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in mediating ET-induced vasoconstriction and cardiovascular disease remains under debate, as evidenced by conflicting reports from different research teams. Conversely, activation of NADPH oxidase can stimulate ET secretion via ROS generation, which further enhances the cardiovascular effects of NADPH oxidase. However, little is known about how ROS activate the endothelin system. It seems that the relationship between ET-1 and ROS may vary with cardiovascular disorders. 3. Endothelins activate NADPH oxidase via the ET receptor-proline-rich tyrosine kinase-2 (Pyk2)-Rac1 pathway. Rac1 is an important regulator of NADPH oxidase. There is ample evidence supporting direct stimulation by Rac1 of NADPH oxidase activity. In addition, Rac1-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy is mediated by the generation of ROS.

  15. Characterization of ascorbate oxidase from Acremonium sp. HI-25.

    PubMed

    Hirose, J; Sakurai, T; Imamura, K; Watanabe, H; Iwamoto, H; Hiromi, K; Itoh, H; Shin, T; Murao, S

    1994-05-01

    The ascorbate oxidase obtained from a microorganism, Acremonium sp. HI-25 (molecular weight, 80 kDa; monomeric protein), was studied with respect to atomic absorption, EPR, absorption spectra, circular dichroism (CD) spectra, and steady-state kinetics. The enzyme was found to be a multicopper protein, containing four copper atoms of three kinds, types 1, 2, and 3 copper, in the ratio of 1:1:2. The EPR parameters of the type 1 and 2 copper atoms in the ascorbate oxidase are very similar to those in the case of the ascorbate oxidase obtained from cucumber, which is a dimeric protein. The apparent Km and kcat values for ascorbic acid of the ascorbate oxidase from Acremonium sp. HI-25 are almost the same as those of the monomeric unit of the ascorbate oxidase from cucumber. PMID:7961590

  16. The human lysyl oxidase-like 2 protein functions as an amine oxidase toward collagen and elastin.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Mi; Kim, Eun-Cheol; Kim, Youngho

    2011-01-01

    The lysyl oxidase-like 2 (LOXL2) protein is a human paralogue of lysyl oxidase (LOX) that functions as an amine oxidase for formation of lysine-derived cross-links found in collagen and elastin. In addition to the C-terminal domains characteristic to the LOX family members, LOXL2 contains four scavenger receptor cysteine-rich (SRCR) domains in the N-terminus. In order to assess the amine oxidase activity of LOXL2, we expressed a series of recombinant LOXL2 proteins with deletions in the SRCR domains, using an Escherichia coli expression system. All of the purified recombinant LOXL2 proteins, with or without the SRCR domains in the N-terminus, showed significant amine oxidase activity toward several different types of collagen and elastin in in vitro amine oxidase assays, indicating deletion of the SRCR domains does not interfere with amine oxidase activity of LOXL2. Further, amine oxidase activity of LOXL2 was not susceptible to inhibition by β-aminopropionitrile, an irreversible inhibitor of LOX, suggesting a different enzymatic mechanism between these two paralogues.

  17. Alternative oxidase and plastoquinol terminal oxidase in marine prokaryotes of the Sargasso Sea.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Allison E; Vanlerberghe, Greg C

    2005-04-11

    Alternative oxidase (AOX) represents a non-energy conserving branch in mitochondrial electron transport while plastoquinol terminal oxidase (PTOX) represents a potential branch in photosynthetic electron transport. Using a metagenomics dataset, we have uncovered numerous and diverse AOX and PTOX genes from the Sargasso Sea. Sequence similarity, synteny and phylogenetic analyses indicate that the large majority of these genes are from prokaryotes. AOX appears to be widely distributed among marine Eubacteria while PTOX is widespread among strains of cyanobacteria closely related to the high-light adapted Prochlorococcus marinus MED4, as well as Synechococcus. The wide distribution of AOX and PTOX in marine prokaryotes may have important implications for productivity in the world's oceans.

  18. Enzymatic polymerization of dihydroquercetin using bilirubin oxidase.

    PubMed

    Khlupova, M E; Vasil'eva, I S; Shumakovich, G P; Morozova, O V; Chertkov, V A; Shestakova, A K; Kisin, A V; Yaropolov, A I

    2015-02-01

    Dihydroquercetin (or taxifolin) is one of the most famous flavonoids and is abundant in Siberian larch (Larix sibirica). The oxidative polymerization of dihydroquercetin (DHQ) using bilirubin oxidase as a biocatalyst was investigated and some physicochemical properties of the products were studied. DHQ oligomers (oligoDHQ) with molecular mass of 2800 and polydispersity of 8.6 were obtained by enzymatic reaction under optimal conditions. The oligomers appeared to be soluble in dimethylsulfoxide, dimethylformamide, and methanol. UV-visible spectra of oligoDHQ in dimethylsulfoxide indicated the presence of highly conjugated bonds. The synthesized oligoDHQ was also characterized by FTIR and (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy. Comparison of NMR spectra of oligoDHQ with DHQ monomer and the parent flavonoids revealed irregular structure of a polymer formed via the enzymatic oxidation of DHQ followed by nonselective radical polymerization. As compared with the monomer, oligoDHQ demonstrated higher thermal stability and high antioxidant activity.

  19. [NADPH oxidases, Nox: new isoenzymes family].

    PubMed

    Chuong Nguyen, Minh Vu; Lardy, Bernard; Paclet, Marie-Hélène; Rousset, Francis; Berthier, Sylvie; Baillet, Athan; Grange, Laurent; Gaudin, Philippe; Morel, Françoise

    2015-01-01

    NADPH oxidases, Nox, are a family of isoenzymes, composed of seven members, whose sole function is to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS). Although Nox catalyze the same enzymatic reaction, they acquired from a common ancestor during evolution, specificities related to their tissue expression, subcellular localization, activation mechanisms and regulation. Their functions could vary depending on the pathophysiological state of the tissues. Indeed, ROS are not only bactericidal weapons in phagocytes but also essential cellular signaling molecules and their overproduction is involved in chronic diseases and diseases of aging. The understanding of the mechanisms involved in the function of Nox and the emergence of Nox inhibitors, require a thorough knowledge of their nature and structure. The objectives of this review are to highlight, in a structure/function approach, the main similar and differentiated properties shared by the human Nox isoenzymes.

  20. Degradation of pentachlorophenol by potato polyphenol oxidase.

    PubMed

    Hou, Mei-Fang; Tang, Xiao-Yan; Zhang, Wei-De; Liao, Lin; Wan, Hong-Fu

    2011-11-01

    In this study, polyphenol oxidase (PPO) was extracted from commercial potatoes. Degradation of pentachlorophenol by potato PPO was investigated. The experimental results show that potato PPO is more active in weak acid than in basic condition and that the optimum pH for the reaction is 5.0. The degradation of pentachlorophenol by potato PPO reaches a maximum at 298 K. After reaction for 1 h, the removal of both pentachlorophenol and total organic carbon is >70% with 6.0 units/mL potato PPO at pH 5.0 and 298 K. Pentachlorophenol can be degraded through dechlorination and ring-opening by potato PPO. The work demonstrates that pentachlorophenol can be effectively eliminated by crude potato PPO. PMID:21967325

  1. Visualization of monoamine oxidase in human brain

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, J.S.; Volkow, N.D.; Wang, G.J.; Pappas, N.; Shea, C.; MacGregor, R.R.; Logan, J.

    1996-12-31

    Monoamine oxidase is a flavin enzyme which exists in two subtypes, MAO A and MAO B. In human brain MAO B predominates and is largely compartmentalized in cell bodies of serotonergic neurons and glia. Regional distribution of MAO B was determined by positron computed tomography with volunteers after the administration of deuterium substituted [11C]L-deprenyl. The basal ganglia and thalamus exhibited the greatest concentrations of MAO B with intermediate levels in the frontal cortex and cingulate gyrus while lowest levels were observed in the parietal and temporal cortices and cerebellum. We observed that brain MAO B increases with are in health normal subjects, however the increases were generally smaller than those revealed with post-mortem studies.

  2. Drugs related to monoamine oxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Fišar, Zdeněk

    2016-08-01

    Progress in understanding the role of monoamine neurotransmission in pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric disorders was made after the discovery of the mechanisms of action of psychoactive drugs, including monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitors. The increase in monoamine neurotransmitter availability, decrease in hydrogen peroxide production, and neuroprotective effects evoked by MAO inhibitors represent an important approach in the development of new drugs for the treatment of mental disorders and neurodegenerative diseases. New drugs are synthesized by acting as multitarget-directed ligands, with MAO, acetylcholinesterase, and iron chelation as targets. Basic information is summarized in this paper about the drug-induced regulation of monoaminergic systems in the brain, with a focus on MAO inhibition. Desirable effects of MAO inhibition include increased availability of monoamine neurotransmitters, decreased oxidative stress, decreased formation of neurotoxins, induction of pro-survival genes and antiapoptotic factors, and improved mitochondrial functions.

  3. NADPH Oxidases in Lung Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, Karen; Hecker, Louise; Luckhardt, Tracy R.; Cheng, Guangjie

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The evolution of the lungs and circulatory systems in vertebrates ensured the availability of molecular oxygen (O2; dioxygen) for aerobic cellular metabolism of internal organs in large animals. O2 serves as the physiologic terminal acceptor of mitochondrial electron transfer and of the NADPH oxidase (Nox) family of oxidoreductases to generate primarily water and reactive oxygen species (ROS), respectively. Recent advances: The purposeful generation of ROS by Nox family enzymes suggests important roles in normal physiology and adaptation, most notably in host defense against invading pathogens and in cellular signaling. Critical issues: However, there is emerging evidence that, in the context of chronic stress and/or aging, Nox enzymes contribute to the pathogenesis of a number of lung diseases. Future Directions: Here, we review evolving functions of Nox enzymes in normal lung physiology and emerging pathophysiologic roles in lung disease. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 2838–2853. PMID:24093231

  4. ROS signalling, NADPH oxidases and cancer.

    PubMed

    Landry, William D; Cotter, Thomas G

    2014-08-01

    ROS (reactive oxygen species) have long been regarded as a series of destructive molecules that have a detrimental effect on cell homoeostasis. In support of this are the myriad antioxidant defence systems nearly all eukaryotic cells have that are designed to keep the levels of ROS in check. However, research data emerging over the last decade have demonstrated that ROS can influence a range of cellular events in a manner similar to that seen for traditional second messenger molecules such as cAMP. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) appears to be the main ROS with such signalling properties, and this molecule has been shown to affect a wide range of cellular functions. Its localized synthesis by the Nox (NADPH oxidase) family of enzymes and how these enzymes are regulated is of particular interest to those who work in the field of tumour biology.

  5. POLYAMINE OXIDASE 1 from rice (Oryza sativa) is a functional ortholog of Arabidopsis POLYAMINE OXIDASE 5

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Taibo; Wook Kim, Dong; Niitsu, Masaru; Berberich, Thomas; Kusano, Tomonobu

    2014-01-01

    POLYAMINE OXIDASE 1 (OsPAO1), from rice (Oryza sativa), and POLYAMINE OXIDASE 5 (AtPAO5), from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), are enzymes sharing high identity at the amino acid level and with similar characteristics, such as polyamine specificity and pH preference; furthermore, both proteins localize to the cytosol. A loss-of-function Arabidopsis mutant, Atpao5–2, was hypersensitive to low doses of exogenous thermospermine but this phenotype could be rescued by introduction of the wild-type AtPAO5 gene. Introduction of OsPAO1, under the control of a constitutive promoter, into Atpao5–2 mutants also restored normal thermospermine sensitivity, allowing growth in the presence of low levels of thermospermine, along with a concomitant decrease in thermospermine content in plants. By contrast, introduction of OsPAO3, which encodes a peroxisome-localized polyamine oxidase, into Atpao5–2 plants could not rescue any of the mutant phenotypes in the presence of thermospermine. These results suggest that OsPAO1 is the functional ortholog of AtPAO5. PMID:25763711

  6. Stability of spermine oxidase to thermal and chemical denaturation: comparison with bovine serum amine oxidase.

    PubMed

    Cervelli, Manuela; Leonetti, Alessia; Cervoni, Laura; Ohkubo, Shinji; Xhani, Marla; Stano, Pasquale; Federico, Rodolfo; Polticelli, Fabio; Mariottini, Paolo; Agostinelli, Enzo

    2016-10-01

    Spermine oxidase (SMOX) is a flavin-containing enzyme that specifically oxidizes spermine to produce spermidine, 3-aminopropanaldehyde and hydrogen peroxide. While no crystal structure is available for any mammalian SMOX, X-ray crystallography showed that the yeast Fms1 polyamine oxidase has a dimeric structure. Based on this scenario, we have investigated the quaternary structure of the SMOX protein by native gel electrophoresis, which revealed a composite gel band pattern, suggesting the formation of protein complexes. All high-order protein complexes are sensitive to reducing conditions, showing that disulfide bonds were responsible for protein complexes formation. The major gel band other than the SMOX monomer is the covalent SMOX homodimer, which was disassembled by increasing the reducing conditions, while being resistant to other denaturing conditions. Homodimeric and monomeric SMOXs are catalytically active, as revealed after gel staining for enzymatic activity. An engineered SMOX mutant deprived of all but two cysteine residues was prepared and characterized experimentally, resulting in a monomeric species. High-sensitivity differential scanning calorimetry of SMOX was compared with that of bovine serum amine oxidase, to analyse their thermal stability. Furthermore, enzymatic activity assays and fluorescence spectroscopy were used to gain insight into the unfolding process. PMID:27295021

  7. Plastid terminal oxidase 2 (PTOX2) is the major oxidase involved in chlororespiration in Chlamydomonas

    PubMed Central

    Houille-Vernes, Laura; Rappaport, Fabrice; Wollman, Francis-André; Alric, Jean; Johnson, Xenie

    2011-01-01

    By homology with the unique plastid terminal oxidase (PTOX) found in plants, two genes encoding oxidases have been found in the Chlamydomonas genome, PTOX1 and PTOX2. Here we report the identification of a knockout mutant of PTOX2. Its molecular and functional characterization demonstrates that it encodes the oxidase most predominantly involved in chlororespiration in this algal species. In this mutant, the plastoquinone pool is constitutively reduced under dark-aerobic conditions, resulting in the mobile light-harvesting complexes being mainly, but reversibly, associated with photosystem I. Accordingly, the ptox2 mutant shows lower fitness than wild type when grown under phototrophic conditions. Single and double mutants devoid of the cytochrome b6f complex and PTOX2 were used to measure the oxidation rates of plastoquinols via PTOX1 and PTOX2. Those lacking both the cytochrome b6f complex and PTOX2 were more sensitive to light than the single mutants lacking either the cytochrome b6f complex or PTOX2, which discloses the role of PTOX2 under extreme conditions where the plastoquinone pool is overreduced. A model for chlororespiration is proposed to relate the electron flow rate through these alternative pathways and the redox state of plastoquinones in the dark. This model suggests that, in green algae and plants, the redox poise results from the balanced accumulation of PTOX and NADPH dehydrogenase. PMID:22143777

  8. Polyphenol Oxidase Activity Expression in Ralstonia solanacearum

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Romero, Diana; Solano, Francisco; Sanchez-Amat, Antonio

    2005-01-01

    Sequencing of the genome of Ralstonia solanacearum revealed several genes that putatively code for polyphenol oxidases (PPOs). To study the actual expression of these genes, we looked for and detected all kinds of PPO activities, including laccase, cresolase, and catechol oxidase activities, in cellular extracts of this microorganism. The conditions for the PPO assays were optimized for the phenolic substrate, pH, and sodium dodecyl sulfate concentration used. It was demonstrated that three different PPOs are expressed. The genes coding for the enzymes were unambiguously correlated with the enzymatic activities detected by generation of null mutations in the genes by using insertional mutagenesis with a suicide plasmid and estimating the changes in the levels of enzymatic activities compared to the levels in the wild-type strain. The protein encoded by the RSp1530 locus is a multicopper protein with laccase activity. Two other genes, RSc0337 and RSc1501, code for nonblue copper proteins exhibiting homology to tyrosinases. The product of RSc0337 has strong tyrosine hydroxylase activity, and it has been shown that this enzyme is involved in melanin synthesis by R. solanacearum. The product of the RSc1501 gene is an enzyme that shows a clear preference for oxidation of o-diphenols. Preliminary characterization of the mutants obtained indicated that PPOs expressed by R. solanacearum may participate in resistance to phenolic compounds since the mutants exhibited higher sensitivity to l-tyrosine than the wild-type strain. These results suggest a possible role in the pathogenic process to avoid plant resistance mechanisms involving the participation of phenolic compounds. PMID:16269713

  9. Dephenolization of industrial wastewaters catalyzed by polyphenol oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Atlow, S.C.; Bonadonna-Aparo, L.; Klibanov, A.M.

    1984-01-01

    A new enzymatic method for the removal of phenols from industrial aqueous effluents has been developed. The method uses the enzyme polyphenol oxidase which oxidizes phenols to the corresponding o-quinones; the latter then undergo a nonenzymatic polymerization to form water-insoluble aggregates. Therefore, the enzyme in effect precipitates phenols from water. Polyphenol oxidase has been found to nearly completely dephenolize solutions of phenol in the concentration range from 0.01 to 1.0 g/L. The enzymatic treatment is effective over a wide range of pH and temperature; a crude preparation of polyphenol oxidase (mushroom extract) is as effective as a purified, commercially obtained version. In addition to phenol itself, polyphenol oxidase is capable of precipitating from water a number of substituted phenols (cresols, chlorophenols, naphthol, etc.). Also, even pollutants which are unreactive towards polyphenol oxidase can be enzymatically coprecipitated with phenol. The polyphenol oxidase treatment has been successfully used to dephenolize two different real industrial wastewater samples, from a plant producing triarylphosphates and from a coke plant. The advantage of the polyphenol oxidase dephenolization over the peroxidase-catalyzed one previously elaborated by the authors is that the former enzyme uses molecular oxygen instead of costly hydrogen peroxide (used by peroxidase) as an oxidant.

  10. Current status of NADPH oxidase research in cardiovascular pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Rodiño-Janeiro, Bruno K; Paradela-Dobarro, Beatriz; Castiñeiras-Landeira, María Isabel; Raposeiras-Roubín, Sergio; González-Juanatey, José R; Álvarez, Ezequiel

    2013-01-01

    The implications of reactive oxygen species in cardiovascular disease have been known for some decades. Rationally, therapeutic antioxidant strategies combating oxidative stress have been developed, but the results of clinical trials have not been as good as expected. Therefore, to move forward in the design of new therapeutic strategies for cardiovascular disease based on prevention of production of reactive oxygen species, steps must be taken on two fronts, ie, comprehension of reduction-oxidation signaling pathways and the pathophysiologic roles of reactive oxygen species, and development of new, less toxic, and more selective nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase inhibitors, to clarify both the role of each NADPH oxidase isoform and their utility in clinical practice. In this review, we analyze the value of NADPH oxidase as a therapeutic target for cardiovascular disease and the old and new pharmacologic agents or strategies to prevent NADPH oxidase activity. Some inhibitors and different direct or indirect approaches are available. Regarding direct NADPH oxidase inhibition, the specificity of NADPH oxidase is the focus of current investigations, whereas the chemical structure-activity relationship studies of known inhibitors have provided pharmacophore models with which to search for new molecules. From a general point of view, small-molecule inhibitors are preferred because of their hydrosolubility and oral bioavailability. However, other possibilities are not closed, with peptide inhibitors or monoclonal antibodies against NADPH oxidase isoforms continuing to be under investigation as well as the ongoing search for naturally occurring compounds. Likewise, some different approaches include inhibition of assembly of the NADPH oxidase complex, subcellular translocation, post-transductional modifications, calcium entry/release, electron transfer, and genetic expression. High-throughput screens for any of these activities could provide new

  11. Immobilization of Pichia pastoris cells containing alcohol oxidase activity

    PubMed Central

    Maleknia, S; Ahmadi, H; Norouzian, D

    2011-01-01

    Background and Objectives The attempts were made to describe the development of a whole cell immobilization of P. pastoris by entrapping the cells in polyacrylamide gel beads. The alcohol oxidase activity of the whole cell Pichia pastoris was evaluated in comparison with yeast biomass production. Materials and Methods Methylotrophic yeast P. pastoris was obtained from Collection of Standard Microorganisms, Department of Bacterial Vaccines, Pasteur Institute of Iran (CSMPI). Stock culture was maintained on YPD agar plates. Alcohol oxidase was strongly induced by addition of 0.5% methanol as the carbon source. The cells were harvested by centrifugation then permeabilized. Finally the cells were immobilized in polyacrylamide gel beads. The activity of alcohol oxidase was determined by method of Tane et al. Results At the end of the logarithmic phase of cell culture, the alcohol oxidase activity of the whole cell P. Pastoris reached the highest level. In comparison, the alcohol oxidase activity was measured in an immobilized P. pastoris when entrapped in polyacrylamide gel beads. The alcohol oxidase activity of cells was induced by addition of 0.5% methanol as the carbon source. The cells were permeabilized by cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and immobilized. CTAB was also found to increase the gel permeability. Alcohol oxidase activity of immobilized cells was then quantitated by ABTS/POD spectrophotometric method at OD 420. There was a 14% increase in alcohol oxidase activity in immobilized cells as compared with free cells. By addition of 2-butanol as a substrate, the relative activity of alcohol oxidase was significantly higher as compared with other substrates added to the reaction media. Conclusion Immobilization of cells could eliminate lengthy and expensive procedures of enzyme separation and purification, protect and stabilize enzyme activity, and perform easy separation of the enzyme from the reaction media. PMID:22530090

  12. CotA, a multicopper oxidase from Bacillus pumilus WH4, exhibits manganese-oxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Su, Jianmei; Bao, Peng; Bai, Tenglong; Deng, Lin; Wu, Hui; Liu, Fan; He, Jin

    2013-01-01

    Multicopper oxidases (MCOs) are a family of enzymes that use copper ions as cofactors to oxidize various substrates. Previous research has demonstrated that several MCOs such as MnxG, MofA and MoxA can act as putative Mn(II) oxidases. Meanwhile, the endospore coat protein CotA from Bacillus species has been confirmed as a typical MCO. To study the relationship between CotA and the Mn(II) oxidation, the cotA gene from a highly active Mn(II)-oxidizing strain Bacillus pumilus WH4 was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli strain M15. The purified CotA contained approximately four copper atoms per molecule and showed spectroscopic properties typical of blue copper oxidases. Importantly, apart from the laccase activities, the CotA also displayed substantial Mn(II)-oxidase activities both in liquid culture system and native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The optimum Mn(II) oxidase activity was obtained at 53°C in HEPES buffer (pH 8.0) supplemented with 0.8 mM CuCl2. Besides, the addition of o-phenanthroline and EDTA both led to a complete suppression of Mn(II)-oxidizing activity. The specific activity of purified CotA towards Mn(II) was 0.27 U/mg. The Km, Vmax and kcat values towards Mn(II) were 14.85±1.17 mM, 3.01×10(-6)±0.21 M·min(-1) and 0.32±0.02 s(-1), respectively. Moreover, the Mn(II)-oxidizing activity of the recombinant E. coli strain M15-pQE-cotA was significantly increased when cultured both in Mn-containing K liquid medium and on agar plates. After 7-day liquid cultivation, M15-pQE-cotA resulted in 18.2% removal of Mn(II) from the medium. Furthermore, the biogenic Mn oxides were clearly observed on the cell surfaces of M15-pQE-cotA by scanning electron microscopy. To our knowledge, this is the first report that provides the direct observation of Mn(II) oxidation with the heterologously expressed protein CotA, Therefore, this novel finding not only establishes the foundation for in-depth study of Mn(II) oxidation mechanisms, but also offers a

  13. CotA, a Multicopper Oxidase from Bacillus pumilus WH4, Exhibits Manganese-Oxidase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Su, Jianmei; Bao, Peng; Bai, Tenglong; Deng, Lin; Wu, Hui; Liu, Fan; He, Jin

    2013-01-01

    Multicopper oxidases (MCOs) are a family of enzymes that use copper ions as cofactors to oxidize various substrates. Previous research has demonstrated that several MCOs such as MnxG, MofA and MoxA can act as putative Mn(II) oxidases. Meanwhile, the endospore coat protein CotA from Bacillus species has been confirmed as a typical MCO. To study the relationship between CotA and the Mn(II) oxidation, the cotA gene from a highly active Mn(II)-oxidizing strain Bacillus pumilus WH4 was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli strain M15. The purified CotA contained approximately four copper atoms per molecule and showed spectroscopic properties typical of blue copper oxidases. Importantly, apart from the laccase activities, the CotA also displayed substantial Mn(II)-oxidase activities both in liquid culture system and native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The optimum Mn(II) oxidase activity was obtained at 53°C in HEPES buffer (pH 8.0) supplemented with 0.8 mM CuCl2. Besides, the addition of o-phenanthroline and EDTA both led to a complete suppression of Mn(II)-oxidizing activity. The specific activity of purified CotA towards Mn(II) was 0.27 U/mg. The Km, Vmax and kcat values towards Mn(II) were 14.85±1.17 mM, 3.01×10−6±0.21 M·min−1 and 0.32±0.02 s−1, respectively. Moreover, the Mn(II)-oxidizing activity of the recombinant E. coli strain M15-pQE-cotA was significantly increased when cultured both in Mn-containing K liquid medium and on agar plates. After 7-day liquid cultivation, M15-pQE-cotA resulted in 18.2% removal of Mn(II) from the medium. Furthermore, the biogenic Mn oxides were clearly observed on the cell surfaces of M15-pQE-cotA by scanning electron microscopy. To our knowledge, this is the first report that provides the direct observation of Mn(II) oxidation with the heterologously expressed protein CotA, Therefore, this novel finding not only establishes the foundation for in-depth study of Mn(II) oxidation mechanisms, but also offers a

  14. Multilayered Polyelectrolyte Microcapsules: Interaction with the Enzyme Cytochrome C Oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Pastorino, Laura; Dellacasa, Elena; Noor, Mohamed R.; Soulimane, Tewfik; Bianchini, Paolo; D'Autilia, Francesca; Antipov, Alexei; Diaspro, Alberto; Tofail, Syed A. M.; Ruggiero, Carmelina

    2014-01-01

    Cell-sized polyelectrolyte capsules functionalized with a redox-driven proton pump protein were assembled for the first time. The interaction of polyelectrolyte microcapsules, fabricated by electrostatic layer-by-layer assembly, with cytochrome c oxidase molecules was investigated. We found that the cytochrome c oxidase retained its functionality, that the functionalized microcapsules interacting with cytochrome c oxidase were permeable and that the permeability characteristics of the microcapsule shell depend on the shell components. This work provides a significant input towards the fabrication of an integrated device made of biological components and based on specific biomolecular functions and properties. PMID:25372607

  15. NADPH oxidase deficiency in X-linked chronic granulomatous disease.

    PubMed Central

    Hohn, D C; Lehrer, R I

    1975-01-01

    We measured the cyanide-insensitive pyridine nucleotide oxidase activity of fractionated resting and phagocytic neutrophils from 11 normal donors, 1 patient with hereditary deficiency of myeloperoxidase, and 7 patients with X-linked chronic granulomatous disease (CGD). When measured under optimal conditions (at pH 5.5 and in the presence of 0.5 mM Mn++), NADPH oxidase activity increased fourfold with phagocytosis and was six-fold higher than with NADH. Phagocytic neutrophils from patients with CGD were markedly deficient in NADPH oxidase activity. Images PMID:235560

  16. Identification of yeasts from clinical specimens by oxidase test.

    PubMed

    Kumar, S; Arora, B S; Mathur, M D

    2000-10-01

    A total of 100 yeasts and yeast like fungi isolates from clinical specimens were negative for oxidase production on Sabouraud dextrose agar. When grown on Columbia agar, chocolate agar, tryptose agar, Mueller-Hinton agar, brain heart infusion and a medium resembling Sabouraud's dextrose agar but with starch instead of dextrose, all the isolate of Candida albicans (55), C. guilliermondii (6), C. parapsilosis (14), C. tropicalis (6), C. pseudotropicalis (6) and Crytococcus neoformans (2) were positive for oxidase producation. Torulopsis glabrata (2), Saccharomyces cervisiae (2) and two out of seven isolates of C. krusei were negative for oxidase test. PMID:11344606

  17. Banana Transcription Factor MaERF11 Recruits Histone Deacetylase MaHDA1 and Represses the Expression of MaACO1 and Expansins during Fruit Ripening.

    PubMed

    Han, Yan-Chao; Kuang, Jian-Fei; Chen, Jian-Ye; Liu, Xun-Cheng; Xiao, Yun-Yi; Fu, Chang-Chun; Wang, Jun-Ning; Wu, Ke-Qiang; Lu, Wang-Jin

    2016-06-01

    Phytohormone ethylene controls diverse developmental and physiological processes such as fruit ripening via modulation of ethylene signaling pathway. Our previous study identified that ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTOR11 (MaERF11), a transcription factor in the ethylene signaling pathway, negatively regulates the ripening of banana, but the mechanism for the MaERF11-mediated transcriptional regulation remains largely unknown. Here we showed that MaERF11 has intrinsic transcriptional repression activity in planta. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses demonstrated that MaERF11 binds to promoters of three ripening-related Expansin genes, MaEXP2, MaEXP7 and MaEXP8, as well as an ethylene biosynthetic gene MaACO1, via the GCC-box motif. Furthermore, expression patterns of MaACO1, MaEXP2, MaEXP7, and MaEXP8 genes are correlated with the changes of histone H3 and H4 acetylation level during fruit ripening. Moreover, we found that MaERF11 physically interacts with a histone deacetylase, MaHDA1, which has histone deacetylase activity, and the interaction significantly strengthens the MaERF11-mediated transcriptional repression of MaACO1 and Expansins Taken together, these findings suggest that MaERF11 may recruit MaHDA1 to its target genes and repress their expression via histone deacetylation. PMID:27208241

  18. Temporal and spectral evolution of a storage ring FEL source: Experimental results on Super-ACO and new theoretical approach

    SciTech Connect

    Hara, T.; Couprie, M.E. ||

    1995-12-31

    The Super-ACO FEL source in UV is now used for applications like a time-resolved fluorescence in biology and two colors experiments coupling FEL and Synchrotron Radiation, which are naturally synchronized. The stability of the FEL is then a critical issue for the users. Detailed experimental studies conducted on the temporal characteristics of the laser micropulse showed various phenomena, such as a longitudinal micropulse jitter and a deformation of a longitudinal micropulse distribution. A similar analysis has been performed on the laser spectral evolution with a scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer, showing a spectrum narrowing, and a wavelength drift. A longitudinal feedback system developed after the first user experiment, allowed to reduce significantly the longitudinal jitter, the intensity fluctuation and the spectral drift. Nevertheless, the stability of the FEL is very dependent on any perturbation, and the observed phenomena can not be described by former models like super-mode assuming a stationary regime. A new theoretical model has then been developed, in order to simulate dynamic behaviors. A simple iterative method is employed to obtain the laser spectrum. The access to the temporal distribution requires additional complexity, because the Fourier transformation has to be performed for each pass. The comparison between the experimental data and the simulation results will be given.

  19. Beyond brown: polyphenol oxidases as enzymes of plant specialized metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    Most cloned and/or characterized plant polyphenol oxidases (PPOs) have catechol oxidase activity (i.e., they oxidize o-diphenols to o-quinones) and are localized or predicted to be localized to plastids. As a class, they have broad substrate specificity and are associated with browning of produce and other plant materials. Because PPOs are often induced by wounding or pathogen attack, they are most generally believed to play important roles in plant defense responses. However, a few well-characterized PPOs appear to have very specific roles in the biosynthesis of specialized metabolites via both tyrosinase (monophenol oxidase) and catechol oxidase activities. Here we detail a few examples of these and explore the possibility that there may be many more “biosynthetic” PPOs. PMID:25642234

  20. Isolation of oxidase-negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa from sputum culture.

    PubMed Central

    Hampton, K D; Wasilauskas, B L

    1979-01-01

    Two isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa lacking characteristic indophenol oxidase were recovered from a sputum specimen. A discussion of the characteristic biochemical tests and antibiograms along with a possible explanation for this phenomenon is presented. PMID:225349

  1. Cytotoxicity of polyamines to Amoeba proteus: role of polyamine oxidase.

    PubMed

    Schenkel, E; Dubois, J G; Helson-Cambier, M; Hanocq, M

    1996-02-01

    It has been shown that oxidation of polyamines by polyamine oxidases can produce toxic compounds (H2O2, aldehydes, ammonia) and that the polyamine oxidase-polyamine system is implicated, in vitro, in the death of several parasites. Using Amoeba proteus as an in vitro model, we studied the cytotoxicity to these cells of spermine, spermidine, their acetyl derivatives, and their hypothetical precursors. Spermine and N1-acetylspermine were more toxic than emetine, an amoebicidal reference drug. Spermine presented a short-term toxicity, but a 48-h contact time was necessary for the high toxicity of spermidine. The uptake by Amoeba cells of the different polyamines tested was demonstrated. On the other hand, a high polyamine oxidase activity was identified in Amoeba proteus crude extract. Spermine (theoretical 100%) and N1-acetylspermine (64%) were the best substrates at pH 9.5, while spermidine, its acetyl derivatives, and putrescine were very poorly oxidized by this enzyme (3-20%). Spermine oxidase activity was inhibited by phenylhydrazine (nil) and isoniazid (approximately 50%). Mepacrine did not inhibit the enzyme activity at pH 8. Neither monoamine nor diamine oxidase activity (approximately 10%) was found. It must be emphasized that spermine, the best enzyme substrate, is the most toxic polyamine. This finding suggests that knowledge of polyamine oxidase specificity can be used to modulate the cytotoxicity of polyamine derivatives. Amoeba proteus was revealed as a simple model for investigation of the connection between cytotoxicity and enzyme activity.

  2. Cytotoxicity of polyamines to Amoeba proteus: role of polyamine oxidase.

    PubMed

    Schenkel, E; Dubois, J G; Helson-Cambier, M; Hanocq, M

    1996-02-01

    It has been shown that oxidation of polyamines by polyamine oxidases can produce toxic compounds (H2O2, aldehydes, ammonia) and that the polyamine oxidase-polyamine system is implicated, in vitro, in the death of several parasites. Using Amoeba proteus as an in vitro model, we studied the cytotoxicity to these cells of spermine, spermidine, their acetyl derivatives, and their hypothetical precursors. Spermine and N1-acetylspermine were more toxic than emetine, an amoebicidal reference drug. Spermine presented a short-term toxicity, but a 48-h contact time was necessary for the high toxicity of spermidine. The uptake by Amoeba cells of the different polyamines tested was demonstrated. On the other hand, a high polyamine oxidase activity was identified in Amoeba proteus crude extract. Spermine (theoretical 100%) and N1-acetylspermine (64%) were the best substrates at pH 9.5, while spermidine, its acetyl derivatives, and putrescine were very poorly oxidized by this enzyme (3-20%). Spermine oxidase activity was inhibited by phenylhydrazine (nil) and isoniazid (approximately 50%). Mepacrine did not inhibit the enzyme activity at pH 8. Neither monoamine nor diamine oxidase activity (approximately 10%) was found. It must be emphasized that spermine, the best enzyme substrate, is the most toxic polyamine. This finding suggests that knowledge of polyamine oxidase specificity can be used to modulate the cytotoxicity of polyamine derivatives. Amoeba proteus was revealed as a simple model for investigation of the connection between cytotoxicity and enzyme activity. PMID:8882384

  3. Confirmation of a blocked amino terminus of sulfhydryl oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Janolino, V.G.; Morrison-Rowe, S.J.; Swaisgood, H.E. )

    1990-09-01

    The isolation of sulfhydryl oxidase from bovine milk in a suitably pure form for sequencing was carried out by transient covalent affinity chromatography of diafiltered whey using cysteinylsuccinamidopropyl-glass as matrix. The glutathione-eluted proteins were separated by SDS-PAGE. By radiolabeling the affinity chromatography-purified enzyme with ({sup 14}C)iodoacetate before subjecting to SDS-PAGE, the sulfhydryl oxidase band was identified, because sulfhydryl oxidase is known to be inactivated by alkylation of one sulfhydryl group per mole. The results confirmed that sulfhydryl oxidase corresponds to the 85 ({plus minus} 5)-kDa band observed on SDS-PAGE. The protein band corresponding to radiolabeled sulfhydryl oxidase was recovered from SDS-PAGE gels by electrophoretic elution and by electroblotting on polyvinylidene difluoride membrane and subjected to gas phase sequencing. Precautions were taken during electrophoretic elution to prevent reactions that result in N-terminal blocking. Both methods of protein recovery yielded negative results when subjected to sequence analysis indicating that the N-terminus of sulfhydryl oxidase is blocked.

  4. Chronic monoamine oxidase-B inhibitor treatment blocks monoamine oxidase-A enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Bartl, Jasmin; Müller, Thomas; Grünblatt, Edna; Gerlach, Manfred; Riederer, Peter

    2014-04-01

    Patients with Parkinson's disease receive selective irreversible monoamine oxidase (MAO)-B inhibitors, but their effects on MAO-A activity are not known during long-term application. We determined MAO-A inhibition in plasma samples from patients with MAO-B inhibitor intake or without MAO-B inhibitor treatment and from healthy controls. We detected a 70 % reduction of MAO-A activity in patients with MAO-B inhibitor therapy in comparison to the other groups. Our results suggest that treatment with MAO-B inhibitor may also influence MAO-A activity in vivo, when administered daily.

  5. MONOAMINE OXIDASE: RADIOTRACER DEVELOPMENT AND HUMAN STUDIES.

    SciTech Connect

    FOWLER,J.S.; LOGAN,J.; VOLKOW,N.D.; WANG,G.J.; MACGREGOR,R.R.; DING,Y.S.

    2000-09-28

    PET is uniquely capable of providing information on biochemical transformations in the living human body. Although most of the studies of monoamine oxidase (MAO) have focused on measurements in the brain, the role of peripheral MAO as a phase 1 enzyme for the metabolism of drugs and xenobiotics is gaining attention (Strolin Benedetti and Tipton, 1998; Castagnoli et al., 1997.). MAO is well suited for this role because its concentration in organs such as kidneys, liver and digestive organs is high sometimes exceeding that in the brain. Knowledge of the distribution of the MAO subtypes within different organs and different cells is important in determining which substrates (and which drugs and xenobiotics) have access to which MAO subtypes. The highly variable subtype distribution with different species makes human studies even more important. In addition, the deleterious side effects of combining MAO inhibitors with other drugs and with foodstuffs makes it important to know the MAO inhibitory potency of different drugs both in the brain and in peripheral organs (Ulus et al., 2000). Clearly PET can play a role in answering these questions, in drug research and development and in discovering some of the factors which contribute to the highly variable MAO levels in different individuals.

  6. Origin and evolution of lysyl oxidases.

    PubMed

    Grau-Bové, Xavier; Ruiz-Trillo, Iñaki; Rodriguez-Pascual, Fernando

    2015-05-29

    Lysyl oxidases (LOX) are copper-dependent enzymes that oxidize primary amine substrates to reactive aldehydes. The best-studied role of LOX enzymes is the remodeling of the extracellular matrix (ECM) in animals by cross-linking collagens and elastin, although intracellular functions have been reported as well. Five different LOX enzymes have been identified in mammals, LOX and LOX-like (LOXL) 1 to 4, showing a highly conserved catalytic carboxy terminal domain and more divergence in the rest of the sequence. Here we have surveyed a wide selection of genomes in order to infer the evolutionary history of LOX. We identified LOX proteins not only in animals, but also in many other eukaryotes, as well as in bacteria and archaea - which reveals a pre-metazoan origin for this gene family. LOX genes expanded during metazoan evolution resulting in two superfamilies, LOXL2/L3/L4 and LOX/L1/L5. Considering the current knowledge on the function of mammalian LOX isoforms in ECM remodeling, we propose that LOXL2/L3/L4 members might have preferentially been involved in making cross-linked collagen IV-based basement membrane, whereas the diversification of LOX/L1/L5 forms contributed to chordate/vertebrate-specific ECM innovations, such as elastin and fibronectin. Our work provides a novel view on the evolution of this family of enzymes.

  7. Monoamine oxidase: radiotracer chemistry and human studies.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Joanna S; Logan, Jean; Shumay, Elena; Alia-Klein, Nelly; Wang, Gene-Jack; Volkow, Nora D

    2015-03-01

    Monoamine oxidase (MAO) oxidizes amines from both endogenous and exogenous sources thereby regulating the concentration of neurotransmitter amines such as serotonin, norepinephrine, and dopamine as well as many xenobiotics. MAO inhibitor drugs are used in the treatment of Parkinson's disease and in depression stimulating the development of radiotracer tools to probe the role of MAO in normal human biology and in disease. Over the past 30 years since the first radiotracers were developed and the first positron emission tomography (PET) images of MAO in humans were carried out, PET studies of brain MAO in healthy volunteers and in patients have identified different variables that have contributed to different MAO levels in brain and in peripheral organs. MAO radiotracers and PET have also been used to study the current and developing MAO inhibitor drugs including the selection of doses for clinical trials. In this article, we describe the following: (1) the development of MAO radiotracers; (2) human studies including the relationship of brain MAO levels to genotype, personality, neurological, and psychiatric disorders; and (3) examples of the use of MAO radiotracers in drug research and development. We will conclude with outstanding needs to improve the radiotracers that are currently used and possible new applications.

  8. Inhibition of monoamine oxidase by benzoxathiolone analogues.

    PubMed

    Mostert, Samantha; Petzer, Anél; Petzer, Jacobus P

    2016-02-15

    Inhibitors of the monoamine oxidase (MAO) enzymes are considered useful therapeutic agents, and are used in the clinic for the treatment of depressive illness and Parkinson's disease. In addition, MAO inhibitors are also under investigation for the treatment of certain cardiovascular pathologies and as possible aids to smoking cessation. In an attempt to discover novel classes of compounds that inhibit the MAOs, the current study examines the human MAO inhibitory properties of a small series of 2H-1,3-benzoxathiol-2-one analogues. The results show that the benzoxathiolones are potent MAO-B inhibitors with IC50 values ranging from 0.003 to 0.051 μM. Although the benzoxathiolones are selective for the MAO-B isoform, two compounds display good MAO-A inhibition with IC50 values of 0.189 and 0.424 μM. Dialysis studies show that a selected compound inhibits the MAOs reversibly. It may thus be concluded that the benzoxathiolone class is suitable for the design and development of MAO-B inhibitors, and that in some instances good MAO-A inhibition may also be achieved.

  9. Monoamine oxidase inhibitory activities of heterocyclic chalcones.

    PubMed

    Minders, Corné; Petzer, Jacobus P; Petzer, Anél; Lourens, Anna C U

    2015-11-15

    Studies have shown that natural and synthetic chalcones (1,3-diphenyl-2-propen-1-ones) possess monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibition activities. Of particular importance to the present study is a report that a series of furanochalcones acts as MAO-B selective inhibitors. Since the effect of heterocyclic substitution, other than furan (and more recently thiophene, piperidine and quinoline) on the MAO inhibitory properties of the chalcone scaffold remains unexplored, the aim of this study was to synthesise and evaluate further heterocyclic chalcone analogues as inhibitors of the human MAOs. For this purpose, heterocyclic chalcone analogues that incorporate pyrrole, 5-methylthiophene, 5-chlorothiophene and 6-methoxypyridine substitution were examined. Seven of the nine synthesised compounds exhibited IC50 values <1 μM for the inhibition of MAO-B, with all compounds exhibiting higher affinities for MAO-B compared to the MAO-A isoform. The most potent MAO-B inhibitor (4h) displays an IC50 value of 0.067 μM while the most potent MAO-A inhibitor (4e) exhibits an IC50 value of 3.81 μM. It was further established that selected heterocyclic chalcones are reversible and competitive MAO inhibitors. 4h, however, may exhibit tight-binding to MAO-B, a property linked to its thiophene moiety. We conclude that high potency chalcones such as 4h represent suitable leads for the development of MAO-B inhibitors for the treatment of Parkinson's disease and possibly other neurodegenerative disorders.

  10. Origin and evolution of lysyl oxidases

    PubMed Central

    Grau-Bové, Xavier; Ruiz-Trillo, Iñaki; Rodriguez-Pascual, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Lysyl oxidases (LOX) are copper-dependent enzymes that oxidize primary amine substrates to reactive aldehydes. The best-studied role of LOX enzymes is the remodeling of the extracellular matrix (ECM) in animals by cross-linking collagens and elastin, although intracellular functions have been reported as well. Five different LOX enzymes have been identified in mammals, LOX and LOX-like (LOXL) 1 to 4, showing a highly conserved catalytic carboxy terminal domain and more divergence in the rest of the sequence. Here we have surveyed a wide selection of genomes in order to infer the evolutionary history of LOX. We identified LOX proteins not only in animals, but also in many other eukaryotes, as well as in bacteria and archaea – which reveals a pre-metazoan origin for this gene family. LOX genes expanded during metazoan evolution resulting in two superfamilies, LOXL2/L3/L4 and LOX/L1/L5. Considering the current knowledge on the function of mammalian LOX isoforms in ECM remodeling, we propose that LOXL2/L3/L4 members might have preferentially been involved in making cross-linked collagen IV-based basement membrane, whereas the diversification of LOX/L1/L5 forms contributed to chordate/vertebrate-specific ECM innovations, such as elastin and fibronectin. Our work provides a novel view on the evolution of this family of enzymes. PMID:26024311

  11. Xanthine oxidase inhibitory lanostanoids from Ganoderma tsugae.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kai-Wei; Chen, Yen-Ting; Yang, Shyh-Chyun; Wei, Bai-Luh; Hung, Chi-Feng; Lin, Chun-Nan

    2013-09-01

    Two new lanostanoids, 3α-acetoxy-22-oxo-5α-lanosta-8,24-dien-21-oic acid, named tsugaric acid D (1) and 16α-hydroxy-3-oxo-5α-lanosta-6,8,24(24(1))-trien-21-oic acid, named tsugaric acid E (2) were isolated from the fruit bodies of Ganoderma tsugae. The structures 1 and 2 were determined by spectroscopic methods. Compound 1 and known compounds 3 and 6 exhibited significant inhibitory effects on xanthine oxidase (XO) activity with an IC50 values of 90.2±24.2, 116.1±3.0, and 181.9±5.8 μM, respectively. Known compound 5 was able to protect human keratinocytes against damage induced by UVB light, which showed 5 could protect keratinocytes from photodamage. The 1 and 5 μM 1 combined with 5 μM cisplatin, respectively, enhanced the cytotoxicity induced by cisplatin. It suggested that 1 and 5 μM 1 combined with low dose of cisplatin may enhance the therapeutic efficacy of cisplatin and reduce side effect and cisplatin resistant.

  12. Leflunomide, a Reversible Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Petzer, Jacobus P; Petzer, Anél

    2016-01-01

    A screening study aimed at identifying inhibitors of the enzyme, monoamine oxidase (MAO), among clinically used drugs have indicated that the antirheumatic drug, leflunomide, is an inhibitor of both MAO isoforms. Leflunomide inhibits human MAO-A and MAO-B and exhibits IC50 values of 19.1 μM and 13.7 μM, respectively. The corresponding Ki values are 17.7 μM (MAO-A) and 10.1 μM (MAO-B). Dialyses of mixtures of the MAO enzymes and leflunomide show that inhibition of the MAOs by leflunomide is reversible. The principal metabolite of leflunomide, teriflunomide (A77 1726), in contrast is not an MAO inhibitor. This study concludes that, although leflunomide is only moderately potent as an MAO inhibitor, isoxazole derivatives may represent a general class of MAO inhibitors and this heterocycle may find application in MAO inhibitor design. In this respect, MAO inhibitors are used in the clinic for the treatment of depressive illness and Parkinson's disease, and are under investigation as therapy for certain types of cancer, Alzheimer's disease and age-related impairment of cardiac function. PMID:26299850

  13. Monoamine oxidase: Radiotracer chemistry and human studies

    DOE PAGES

    Fowler, Joanna S.; Logan, Jean; Shumay, Elena; Alia-Klein, Nelly; Wang, Gene-Jack; Volkow, Nora D.

    2015-03-01

    Monoamine oxidase (MAO) oxidizes amines from both endogenous and exogenous sources thereby regulating the concentration of neurotransmitter amines such as serot onin, norepinephrine and dopamine as well as many xenobiotics. MAO inhibitor drugs are used in the treatment of Parkinson’s disease and in depression stimulating the development of radiotracer tools to probe the role of MAO in normal human biology and in disease. Over the past 30 since the first radiotracers were developed and the first PET images of MAO in humans were carried out, PET studies of brain MAO in healthy volunteers and in patients have identified different variablesmore » which have contributed to different MAO levels in brain and in peripheral organs. MAO radiotracers and PET have also been used to study the current and developing MAO inhibitor drugs including the selection of doses for clinical trials. In this article, we describe (1) the development of MAO radiotracers; (2) human studies including the relationship of brain MAO levels to genotype, personality, neurological and psychiatric disorders; (3) examples of the use of MAO radiotracers in drug research and development. We will conclude with outstanding needs to improve the radiotracers which are currently used and possible new applications.« less

  14. Monoamine oxidase: Radiotracer chemistry and human studies

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, Joanna S.; Logan, Jean; Shumay, Elena; Alia-Klein, Nelly; Wang, Gene-Jack; Volkow, Nora D.

    2015-03-01

    Monoamine oxidase (MAO) oxidizes amines from both endogenous and exogenous sources thereby regulating the concentration of neurotransmitter amines such as serot onin, norepinephrine and dopamine as well as many xenobiotics. MAO inhibitor drugs are used in the treatment of Parkinson’s disease and in depression stimulating the development of radiotracer tools to probe the role of MAO in normal human biology and in disease. Over the past 30 since the first radiotracers were developed and the first PET images of MAO in humans were carried out, PET studies of brain MAO in healthy volunteers and in patients have identified different variables which have contributed to different MAO levels in brain and in peripheral organs. MAO radiotracers and PET have also been used to study the current and developing MAO inhibitor drugs including the selection of doses for clinical trials. In this article, we describe (1) the development of MAO radiotracers; (2) human studies including the relationship of brain MAO levels to genotype, personality, neurological and psychiatric disorders; (3) examples of the use of MAO radiotracers in drug research and development. We will conclude with outstanding needs to improve the radiotracers which are currently used and possible new applications.

  15. Crystallization of beef heart cytochrome c oxidase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, Shinya; Shinzawa, Kyoko; Tsukihara, Tomitake; Abe, Toshio; Caughey, Winslow S.

    1991-03-01

    The three-dimensional structure of cytochrome c oxidase, a complex (multimetal, multisubunit) membrane protein is critical to elucidation of the mechanism of the enzymic reactions and their control. Our recent developments in the crystallization of the enzyme isolated from beef hearts are presented. The crystals appeared more readily at higher protein concentration, lower ionic strength, higher detergent concentration (Brij-35) and lower temperature. Large crystals were obtained by changing one of these parameters to the crystallization point as slowly as possible, keeping the other parameters constant. Increasing the detergent concentration was the most successful method, producing green crystals of the resting oxidized form as hexagonal bipyramids with typical dimensions of 0.6 mm. The usual procedures for crystallization of water soluble proteins, such as increasing ionic strength by vapor diffusion, were not applicable for this enzyme. Crystals of the resting oxidized enzyme belong to a space group of P6 2 or P6 4 with cell dimensions, a = b = 208.7 Å and c = 282.3 Å. The Patterson function shows that the crystal exhibited a non-crystallographic two-fold axis parallel to the c-axis in the asymmetric unit.

  16. Existence of aa3-type ubiquinol oxidase as a terminal oxidase in sulfite oxidation of Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans.

    PubMed

    Sugio, Tsuyoshi; Hisazumi, Tomohiro; Kanao, Tadayoshi; Kamimura, Kazuo; Takeuchi, Fumiaki; Negishi, Atsunori

    2006-07-01

    It was found that Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans has sulfite:ubiquinone oxidoreductase and ubiquinol oxidase activities in the cells. Ubiquinol oxidase was purified from plasma membranes of strain NB1-3 in a nearly homogeneous state. A purified enzyme showed absorption peaks at 419 and 595 nm in the oxidized form and at 442 and 605 nm in the reduced form. Pyridine ferrohaemochrome prepared from the enzyme showed an alpha-peak characteristic of haem a at 587 nm, indicating that the enzyme contains haem a as a component. The CO difference spectrum of ubiquinol oxidase showed two peaks at 428 nm and 595 nm, and a trough at 446 nm, suggesting the existence of an aa(3)-type cytochrome in the enzyme. Ubiquinol oxidase was composed of three subunits with apparent molecular masses of 57 kDa, 34 kDa, and 23 kDa. The optimum pH and temperature for ubiquinol oxidation were pH 6.0 and 30 degrees C. The activity was completely inhibited by sodium cyanide at 1.0 mM. In contrast, the activity was inhibited weakly by antimycin A(1) and myxothiazol, which are inhibitors of mitochondrial bc(1) complex. Quinone analog 2-heptyl-4-hydoroxyquinoline N-oxide (HOQNO) strongly inhibited ubiquinol oxidase activity. Nickel and tungstate (0.1 mM), which are used as a bacteriostatic agent for A. thiooxidans-dependent concrete corrosion, inhibited ubiquinol oxidase activity 100 and 70% respectively.

  17. Monoamine oxidase and agitation in psychiatric patients.

    PubMed

    Nikolac Perkovic, Matea; Svob Strac, Dubravka; Nedic Erjavec, Gordana; Uzun, Suzana; Podobnik, Josip; Kozumplik, Oliver; Vlatkovic, Suzana; Pivac, Nela

    2016-08-01

    Subjects with schizophrenia or conduct disorder display a lifelong pattern of antisocial, aggressive and violent behavior and agitation. Monoamine oxidase (MAO) is an enzyme involved in the degradation of various monoamine neurotransmitters and neuromodulators and therefore has a role in various psychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders and pathological behaviors. Platelet MAO-B activity has been associated with psychopathy- and aggression-related personality traits, while variants of the MAOA and MAOB genes have been associated with diverse clinical phenotypes, including aggressiveness, antisocial problems and violent delinquency. The aim of the study was to evaluate the association of platelet MAO-B activity, MAOB rs1799836 polymorphism and MAOA uVNTR polymorphism with severe agitation in 363 subjects with schizophrenia and conduct disorder. The results demonstrated significant association of severe agitation and smoking, but not diagnosis or age, with platelet MAO-B activity. Higher platelet MAO-B activity was found in subjects with severe agitation compared to non-agitated subjects. Platelet MAO-B activity was not associated with MAOB rs1799836 polymorphism. These results suggested the association between increased platelet MAO-B activity and severe agitation. No significant association was found between severe agitation and MAOA uVNTR or MAOB rs1799836 polymorphism, revealing that these individual polymorphisms in MAO genes are not related to severe agitation in subjects with schizophrenia and conduct disorder. As our study included 363 homogenous Caucasian male subjects, our data showing this negative genetic association will be a useful addition to future meta-analyses. PMID:26851573

  18. Sulfide inhibition of and metabolism by cytochrome c oxidase.

    PubMed

    Nicholls, Peter; Marshall, Doug C; Cooper, Chris E; Wilson, Mike T

    2013-10-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), a classic cytochrome c oxidase inhibitor, is also an in vitro oxidase substrate and an in vivo candidate hormonal ('gasotransmitter') species affecting sleep and hibernation. H2S, nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO) share some common features. All are low-molecular-mass physiological effectors and also oxidase inhibitors, capable of binding more than one enzyme site, and each is an oxidizable 'substrate'. The oxidase oxidizes CO to CO2, NO to nitrite and sulfide to probable persulfide species. Mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase in an aerobic steady state with ascorbate and cytochrome c is rapidly inhibited by sulfide in a biphasic manner. At least two successive inhibited species are involved, probably partially reduced. The oxidized enzyme, in the absence of turnover, occurs in at least two forms: the 'pulsed' and 'resting' states. The pulsed form reacts aerobically with sulfide to form two intermediates, 'P' and 'F', otherwise involved in the reaction of oxygen with reduced enzyme. Sulfide can directly reduce the oxygen-reactive a3CuB binuclear centre in the pulsed state. The resting enzyme does not undergo such a step, but only a very slow one-electron reduction of the electron-transferring haem a. In final reactivation phases, both the steady-state inhibition of catalysis and the accumulation of P and F states are reversed by slow sulfide oxidation. A model for this complex reaction pattern is presented. PMID:24059525

  19. Crystal Structure of Alcohol Oxidase from Pichia pastoris

    PubMed Central

    Valerius, Oliver; Feussner, Ivo; Ficner, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    FAD-dependent alcohol oxidases (AOX) are key enzymes of methylotrophic organisms that can utilize lower primary alcohols as sole source of carbon and energy. Here we report the crystal structure analysis of the methanol oxidase AOX1 from Pichia pastoris. The crystallographic phase problem was solved by means of Molecular Replacement in combination with initial structure rebuilding using Rosetta model completion and relaxation against an averaged electron density map. The subunit arrangement of the homo-octameric AOX1 differs from that of octameric vanillyl alcohol oxidase and other dimeric or tetrameric alcohol oxidases, due to the insertion of two large protruding loop regions and an additional C-terminal extension in AOX1. In comparison to other alcohol oxidases, the active site cavity of AOX1 is significantly reduced in size, which could explain the observed preference for methanol as substrate. All AOX1 subunits of the structure reported here harbor a modified flavin adenine dinucleotide, which contains an arabityl chain instead of a ribityl chain attached to the isoalloxazine ring. PMID:26905908

  20. Forage polyphenol oxidase and ruminant livestock nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Michael R. F.

    2014-01-01

    Polyphenol oxidase (PPO) is predominately associated with the detrimental effect of browning fruit and vegetables, however, interest within PPO containing forage crops (crops to be fed to animals) has grown since the browning reaction was associated with reduced nitrogen (N) losses in silo and the rumen. The reduction in protein breakdown in silo of red clover (high PPO forage) increased the quality of protein, improving N-use efficiency [feed N into product N (e.g., Milk): NUE] when fed to ruminants. A further benefit of red clover silage feeding is a significant reduction in lipolysis (cleaving of glycerol-based lipid) in silo and an increase in the deposition of beneficial C18 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) in animal products, which has also been linked to PPO activity. PPOs protection of plant protein and glycerol based-PUFA in silo is related to the deactivation of plant proteases and lipases. This deactivation occurs through PPO catalyzing the conversion of diphenols to quinones which bind with cellular nucleophiles such as protein reforming a protein-bound phenol (PBP). If the protein is an enzyme (e.g., protease or lipase) the complexing denatures the enzyme. However, PPO is inactive in the anaerobic rumen and therefore any subsequent protection of plant protein and glycerol based-PUFA in the rumen must be as a result of events that occurred to the forage pre-ingestion. Reduced activity of plant proteases and lipases would have little effect on NUE and glycerol based-PUFA in the rumen due to the greater concentration of rumen microbial proteases and lipases. The mechanism for PPOs protection of plant protein in the rumen is a consequence of complexing plant protein, rather than protease deactivation per se. These complexed proteins reduce protein digestibility in the rumen and subsequently increase undegraded dietary protein flow to the small intestine. The mechanism for protecting glycerol-based PUFA has yet to be fully elucidated but may be associated

  1. Expression of alternative oxidase in Drosophila ameliorates diverse phenotypes due to cytochrome oxidase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Kemppainen, Kia K.; Rinne, Juho; Sriram, Ashwin; Lakanmaa, Matti; Zeb, Akbar; Tuomela, Tea; Popplestone, Anna; Singh, Satpal; Sanz, Alberto; Rustin, Pierre; Jacobs, Howard T.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is a significant factor in human disease, ranging from systemic disorders of childhood to cardiomyopathy, ischaemia and neurodegeneration. Cytochrome oxidase, the terminal enzyme of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, is a frequent target. Lower eukaryotes possess alternative respiratory-chain enzymes that provide non-proton-translocating bypasses for respiratory complexes I (single-subunit reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide dehydrogenases, e.g. Ndi1 from yeast) or III + IV [alternative oxidase (AOX)], under conditions of respiratory stress or overload. In previous studies, it was shown that transfer of yeast Ndi1 or Ciona intestinalis AOX to Drosophila was able to overcome the lethality produced by toxins or partial knockdown of complex I or IV. Here, we show that AOX can provide a complete or substantial rescue of a range of phenotypes induced by global or tissue-specific knockdown of different cIV subunits, including integral subunits required for catalysis, as well as peripheral subunits required for multimerization and assembly. AOX was also able to overcome the pupal lethality produced by muscle-specific knockdown of subunit CoVb, although the rescued flies were short lived and had a motility defect. cIV knockdown in neurons was not lethal during development but produced a rapidly progressing locomotor and seizure-sensitivity phenotype, which was substantially alleviated by AOX. Expression of Ndi1 exacerbated the neuronal phenotype produced by cIV knockdown. Ndi1 expressed in place of essential cI subunits produced a distinct residual phenotype of delayed development, bang sensitivity and male sterility. These findings confirm the potential utility of alternative respiratory chain enzymes as tools to combat mitochondrial disease, while indicating important limitations thereof. PMID:24293544

  2. Regulation of Ascorbate Oxidase Expression in Pumpkin by Auxin and Copper 1

    PubMed Central

    Esaka, Muneharu; Fujisawa, Kouichi; Goto, Miwa; Kisu, Yasutomo

    1992-01-01

    Ascorbate oxidase expression in pumpkin (Cucurbita spp.) tissues was studied. Specific ascorbate oxidase activities in pumpkin leaf and stem tissues were about 2 and 1.5 times that in the fruit tissues, respectively. In seeds, little ascorbate oxidase activity was detected. Northern blot analyses showed an abundant ascorbate oxidase mRNA in leaf and stem tissues. Fruit tissues had lower levels of ascorbate oxidase mRNA than leaf and stem tissues. Ascorbate oxidase mRNA was not detected in seeds. Specific ascorbate oxidase activity gradually increased during early seedling growth of pumpkin seeds. The increase was accompanied by an increase in ascorbate oxidase mRNA. When ascorbate oxidase activity in developing pumpkin fruits was investigated, the activities in immature fruits that are rapidly growing at 0, 2, 4, and 7 d after anthesis were much higher than those in mature fruits at 14 and 30 d after anthesis. The specific activity and mRNA of ascorbate oxidase markedly increased after inoculation of pumpkin fruit tissues into Murashige and Skoog's culture medium in the presence of an auxin such as 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) but not in the absence of 2,4-D. In the presence of 10 mg/L of 2,4-D, ascorbate oxidase mRNA was the most abundant. Thus, ascorbate oxidase is induced by 2,4-D. These results indicate that ascorbate oxidase is involved in cell growth. In pumpkin callus, ascorbate oxidase activity could be markedly increased by adding copper. Furthermore, immunological blotting showed that the amount of ascorbate oxidase protein was also increased by adding copper. However, northern blot analyses showed that ascorbate oxidase mRNA was not increased by adding copper. We suggest that copper may control ascorbate oxidase expression at translation or at a site after translation. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:16652952

  3. Characterization of wheat germin (oxalate oxidase) expressed by Pichia pastoris

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Heng-Yen; Whittaker, Mei M.; Bouveret, Romaric; Berna, Anne; Bernier, Francois; Whittaker, James W. . E-mail: jim@ebs.ogi.edu

    2007-05-18

    High-level secretory expression of wheat (Triticum aestivum) germin/oxalate oxidase was achieved in Pichia pastoris fermentation cultures as an {alpha}-mating factor signal peptide fusion, based on the native wheat cDNA coding sequence. The oxalate oxidase activity of the recombinant enzyme is substantially increased (7-fold) by treatment with sodium periodate, followed by ascorbate reduction. Using these methods, approximately 1 g (4 x 10{sup 4} U) of purified, activated enzyme was obtained following eight days of induction of a high density Pichia fermentation culture, demonstrating suitability for large-scale production of oxalate oxidase for biotechnological applications. Characterization of the recombinant protein shows that it is glycosylated, with N-linked glycan attached at Asn47. For potential biomedical applications, a nonglycosylated (S49A) variant was also prepared which retains essentially full enzyme activity, but exhibits altered protein-protein interactions.

  4. Studies on the active site of pig plasma amine oxidase.

    PubMed Central

    Collison, D; Knowles, P F; Mabbs, F E; Rius, F X; Singh, I; Dooley, D M; Cote, C E; McGuirl, M

    1989-01-01

    Amine oxidase from pig plasma (PPAO) has two bound Cu2+ ions and at least one pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) moiety as cofactors. It is shown that recovery of activity by copper-depleted PPAO is linear with respect to added Cu2+ ions. Recovery of e.s.r. and optical spectral characteristics of active-site copper parallel the recovery of catalytic activity. These results are consistent with both Cu2+ ions contributing to catalysis. Further e.s.r. studies indicate that the two copper sites in PPAO, unlike those in amine oxidases from other sources, are chemically distinct. These comparative studies establish that non-identity of the Cu2+ ions in PPAO is not a requirement for amine oxidase activity. It is shown through the use of a new assay procedure that there are two molecules of PQQ bound per molecule of protein in PPAO; only the more reactive of these PQQ moieties is required for activity. PMID:2559715

  5. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of chicken sulfite oxidase crystals

    SciTech Connect

    George, G.N.; Pickering, I.J.; Kisker, C.

    1999-05-17

    Sulfite oxidase catalyzes the physiologically vital oxidation of sulfite to sulfate. Recently, the crystal structure of chicken sulfite oxidase has been reported at 1.9 {angstrom} resolution. In contrast to the information available from previous X-ray absorption spectroscopic studies, the active site indicated by crystallography was a mono-oxo species. Because of this the possibility that the crystals did in fact contain a reduced molybdenum species was considered in the crystallographic work. The authors report herein an X-ray absorption spectroscopic study of polycrystalline sulfite oxidase prepared in the same manner as the previous single-crystal samples, and compare this with data for frozen solutions of oxidized and reduced enzyme.

  6. The use of galactose oxidase in lipid labeling

    SciTech Connect

    Radin, N.S.; Evangelatos, G.P.

    1981-03-01

    Galactose oxidase can be used to oxidize the terminal carbon atom of lipids containing galactose or N-acetylgalactosamine, and the resultant aldehyde group can be reduced back to the original carbinol with radioactive borohydride. The efficiency of the first reaction has been investigated systematically by using (6-/sup 3/H)galactosyl ceramide as substrate and measuring the amount of radioactive water formed. This enabled us to establish that the addition of catalase and peroxidase greatly speeded the oxidation, that phosphate and PIPES buffers were the best among those tested, that the reaction continued for 24 hr without a second addition of galactose oxidase, and that the optimum concentration of organic solvent (tetrahydrofuran) was 50%. The suggestion if made that a similar set of variables be studied for each lipid or nonlipid by the same basic technique: labeling by the oxidase/borohydride method and use of the resultant compound as substrate.

  7. Composition of partially purified NADPH oxidase from pig neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Bellavite, P; Jones, O T; Cross, A R; Papini, E; Rossi, F

    1984-01-01

    The superoxide (O2.-)-forming enzyme NADPH oxidase from pig neutrophils was solubilized and partially purified by gel-filtration chromatography. The purification procedure allowed the separation of NADPH oxidase activity from NADH-dependent cytochrome c reductase and 2,6-dichlorophenol-indophenol reductase activities. O2.-forming activity was co-purified with cytochrome b-245 and was associated with phospholipids. However, active fractions endowed with cytochrome b were devoid of ubiquinone and contained only little FAD. The cytochrome b/FAD ratio was 1.13:1 in the crude solubilized extract and increased to 18.95:1 in the partially purified preparations. Most of FAD was associated with fractions containing NADH-dependent oxidoreductases. These results are consistent with the postulated role of cytochrome b in O2.-formation by neutrophil NADPH oxidase, but raise doubts about the participation of flavoproteins in this enzyme activity. PMID:6439185

  8. Improved operational stability of peroxidases by coimmobilization with glucose oxidase.

    PubMed

    van de Velde, F; Lourenço, N D; Bakker, M; van Rantwijk, F; Sheldon, R A

    2000-08-01

    The operational stability of peroxidases was considerably enhanced by generating hydrogen peroxide in situ from glucose and oxygen. For example, the total turnover number of microperoxidase-11 in the oxidation of thioanisole was increased sevenfold compared with that obtained with continuous addition of H(2)O(2). Coimmobilization of peroxidases with glucose oxidase into polyurethane foams afforded heterogeneous biocatalysts in which the hydrogen peroxide is formed inside the polymeric matrix from glucose and oxygen. The total turnover number of chloroperoxidase in the oxidation of thioanisole and cis-2-heptene was increased to new maxima of 250. 10(3) and 10. 10(3), respectively, upon coimmobilization with glucose oxidase. Soybean peroxidase, which normally shows only classical peroxidase activity, was transformed into an oxygen-transfer catalyst when coimmobilized with glucose oxidase. The combination catalyst mediated the enantioselective oxidation of thioanisole [50% ee (S)] with 210 catalyst turnovers. PMID:10861408

  9. The mechanism of cytochrome C oxidase inhibition by nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Fernando; Cadenas, Enrique

    2007-01-01

    The basic biochemistry of the inhibition of cytochrome oxidase by NO is reviewed. Three possible mechanisms that include the binding of NO to the fully reduced Fe(a3)-Cu(B) site, to the semi-reduced Fe(a3)-Cu(B) site, and to the fully oxidized Fe(a3)-Cu(B) site are confronted with the experimental data. Mathematical models are used to facilitate the analysis and to solve puzzling observations concerning the NO inhibition of cytochrome oxidase. It is concluded that the inhibition of cytochrome oxidase by NO is mixed, having both competitive and uncompetitive components, but under physiological electron flows the competitive component is largely predominant. The physiological and pathological relevance of this inhibition is briefly discussed.

  10. Oxidation of polymines by diamine oxidase from human seminal plasma.

    PubMed Central

    Hölttä, E; Pulkkinen, P; Elfving, K; Jänne, J

    1975-01-01

    1. Diamine oxidase [amine-oxygen oxidoreductase (deaminating)(pyridoxal-containing), EC 1.4.3.6] was purified from human seminal plasma more than 1,700-fold. The enzyme appeared to be homogeneous on polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis at two different pH values. 2. The general properties of the enzyme were comparable with those described for other diamine oxidases from different mammalian sources. The molecular weight of the enzyme was calculated to be about 182,000. 3. The enzyme had highest affinity for diamines, but polyamines spermidine and spermine were also degraded at concentrations that can be considered physiological in human semen. 3. The possible degradation of spermine by diamine oxidase in human semen in vivo may give rise to the formation of cytotoxic aldehydes that conceivably can influence the motility and survival of the spermatozoa. PMID:239684

  11. A Conserved Steroid Binding Site in Cytochrome c Oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, Ling; Mills, Denise A.; Buhrow, Leann; Hiser, Carrie; Ferguson-Miller, Shelagh

    2010-09-02

    Micromolar concentrations of the bile salt deoxycholate are shown to rescue the activity of an inactive mutant, E101A, in the K proton pathway of Rhodobacter sphaeroides cytochrome c oxidase. A crystal structure of the wild-type enzyme reveals, as predicted, deoxycholate bound with its carboxyl group at the entrance of the K path. Since cholate is a known potent inhibitor of bovine oxidase and is seen in a similar position in the bovine structure, the crystallographically defined, conserved steroid binding site could reveal a regulatory site for steroids or structurally related molecules that act on the essential K proton path.

  12. Functional characterization of gibberellin oxidases from cucumber, Cucumis sativus L.

    PubMed

    Pimenta Lange, Maria João; Liebrandt, Anja; Arnold, Linda; Chmielewska, Sara-Miriam; Felsberger, André; Freier, Eduard; Heuer, Monika; Zur, Doreen; Lange, Theo

    2013-06-01

    Cucurbits have been used widely to elucidate gibberellin (GA) biosynthesis. With the recent availability of the genome sequence for the economically important cucurbit Cucumis sativus, sequence data became available for all genes potentially involved in GA biosynthesis for this species. Sixteen cDNAs were cloned from root and shoot of 3-d to 7-d old seedlings and from mature seeds of C. sativus. Two cDNAs code for GA 7-oxidases (CsGA7ox1, and -2), five for GA 20-oxidases (CsGA20ox1, -2, -3, -4, and -5), four for GA 3-oxidases (CsGA3ox1, -2, -3, and -4), and another five for GA 2-oxidases (CsGA2ox1, -2, -3, -4, and -5). Their enzymatic activities were investigated by heterologous expression of the cDNAs in Escherichia coli and incubation of the cell lysates with (14)C-labelled, D2-labelled, or unlabelled GA-substrates. The two GA 7-oxidases converted GA12-aldehyde to GA12 efficiently. CsGA7ox1 converted GA12 to GA14, to 15α-hydroxyGA12, and further to 15α-hydroxyGA14. CsGA7ox2 converted GA12 to its 12α-hydroxylated analogue GA111. All five GA 20-oxidases converted GA12 to GA9 as a major product, and to GA25 as a minor product. The four GA 3-oxidases oxidized the C19-GA GA9 to GA4 as the only product. In addition, three of them (CsGA3ox2, -3, and -4) converted the C20-GA GA12 to GA14. The GA 2-oxidases CsGA2ox1, -2, -3, and -4 oxidized the C19-GAs GA9 and GA4 to GA34 and GA51, respectively. CsGA2ox2, -3, and -4 converted GA51 and GA34 further to respective GA-catabolites. In addition to C19-GAs, CsGA2ox4 also converted the C20-GA GA12 to GA110. In contrast, CsGA2ox5 oxidized only the C20 GA12 to GA110 as the sole product. As shown for CsGA20ox1 and CsGA3ox1, similar reactions were catalysed with 13-hydroxlyated GAs as substrates. It is likely that these enzymes are also responsible for the biosynthesis of 13-hydroxylated GAs in vivo that occur at low levels in cucumber.

  13. Colloidal properties of biomacromolecular solutions: Towards urate oxidase crystal design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonneté, Françoise

    2013-02-01

    Crystallization of biological macromolecules is governed by weak interaction forces, attractive and repulsive. Knowledge of solution properties, via second virial coefficient measurements, makes it possible to select physico-chemical parameters that govern and control phase diagrams and thus to grow crystals for specific applications (bio-crystallography or pharmaceutical processes). We highlight here with urate oxidase a salting-in effect that increases its solubility and the depletion effect of amphiphilic polymer, at a polymer concentration above its cmc, in order to grow diffracting crystals of urate oxidase. These two effects were used to grow crystals for high pressure crystallography and in a purification process.

  14. Expression of terminal oxidases under nutrient-starved conditions in Shewanella oneidensis: detection of the A-type cytochrome c oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Le Laz, Sébastien; kpebe, Arlette; Bauzan, Marielle; Lignon, Sabrina; Rousset, Marc; Brugna, Myriam

    2016-01-01

    Shewanella species are facultative anaerobic bacteria that colonize redox-stratified habitats where O2 and nutrient concentrations fluctuate. The model species Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 possesses genes coding for three terminal oxidases that can perform O2 respiration: a bd-type quinol oxidase and cytochrome c oxidases of the cbb3-type and the A-type. Whereas the bd- and cbb3-type oxidases are routinely detected, evidence for the expression of the A-type enzyme has so far been lacking. Here, we investigated the effect of nutrient starvation on the expression of these terminal oxidases under different O2 tensions. Our results reveal that the bd-type oxidase plays a significant role under nutrient starvation in aerobic conditions. The expression of the cbb3-type oxidase is also modulated by the nutrient composition of the medium and increases especially under iron-deficiency in exponentially growing cells. Most importantly, under conditions of carbon depletion, high O2 and stationary-growth, we report for the first time the expression of the A-type oxidase in S. oneidensis, indicating that this terminal oxidase is not functionally lost. The physiological role of the A-type oxidase in energy conservation and in the adaptation of S. oneidensis to redox-stratified environments is discussed. PMID:26815910

  15. Expression of terminal oxidases under nutrient-starved conditions in Shewanella oneidensis: detection of the A-type cytochrome c oxidase.

    PubMed

    Le Laz, Sébastien; Kpebe, Arlette; Bauzan, Marielle; Lignon, Sabrina; Rousset, Marc; Brugna, Myriam

    2016-01-01

    Shewanella species are facultative anaerobic bacteria that colonize redox-stratified habitats where O2 and nutrient concentrations fluctuate. The model species Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 possesses genes coding for three terminal oxidases that can perform O2 respiration: a bd-type quinol oxidase and cytochrome c oxidases of the cbb3-type and the A-type. Whereas the bd- and cbb3-type oxidases are routinely detected, evidence for the expression of the A-type enzyme has so far been lacking. Here, we investigated the effect of nutrient starvation on the expression of these terminal oxidases under different O2 tensions. Our results reveal that the bd-type oxidase plays a significant role under nutrient starvation in aerobic conditions. The expression of the cbb3-type oxidase is also modulated by the nutrient composition of the medium and increases especially under iron-deficiency in exponentially growing cells. Most importantly, under conditions of carbon depletion, high O2 and stationary-growth, we report for the first time the expression of the A-type oxidase in S. oneidensis, indicating that this terminal oxidase is not functionally lost. The physiological role of the A-type oxidase in energy conservation and in the adaptation of S. oneidensis to redox-stratified environments is discussed. PMID:26815910

  16. Diiron centre mutations in Ciona intestinalis alternative oxidase abolish enzymatic activity and prevent rescue of cytochrome oxidase deficiency in flies

    PubMed Central

    Andjelković, Ana; Oliveira, Marcos T.; Cannino, Giuseppe; Yalgin, Cagri; Dhandapani, Praveen K.; Dufour, Eric; Rustin, Pierre; Szibor, Marten; Jacobs, Howard T.

    2015-01-01

    The mitochondrial alternative oxidase, AOX, carries out the non proton-motive re-oxidation of ubiquinol by oxygen in lower eukaryotes, plants and some animals. Here we created a modified version of AOX from Ciona instestinalis, carrying mutations at conserved residues predicted to be required for chelation of the diiron prosthetic group. The modified protein was stably expressed in mammalian cells or flies, but lacked enzymatic activity and was unable to rescue the phenotypes of flies knocked down for a subunit of cytochrome oxidase. The mutated AOX transgene is thus a potentially useful tool in studies of the physiological effects of AOX expression. PMID:26672986

  17. Structural Changes and Proton Transfer in Cytochrome c Oxidase.

    PubMed

    Vilhjálmsdóttir, Jóhanna; Johansson, Ann-Louise; Brzezinski, Peter

    2015-08-27

    In cytochrome c oxidase electron transfer from cytochrome c to O2 is linked to transmembrane proton pumping, which contributes to maintaining a proton electrochemical gradient across the membrane. The mechanism by which cytochrome c oxidase couples the exergonic electron transfer to the endergonic proton translocation is not known, but it presumably involves local structural changes that control the alternating proton access to the two sides of the membrane. Such redox-induced structural changes have been observed in X-ray crystallographic studies at residues 423-425 (in the R. sphaeroides oxidase), located near heme a. The aim of the present study is to investigate the functional effects of these structural changes on reaction steps associated with proton pumping. Residue Ser425 was modified using site-directed mutagenesis and time-resolved spectroscopy was used to investigate coupled electron-proton transfer upon reaction of the oxidase with O2. The data indicate that the structural change at position 425 propagates to the D proton pathway, which suggests a link between redox changes at heme a and modulation of intramolecular proton-transfer rates.

  18. Beyond brown: polyphenol oxidases as enzymes of plant specialized metabolism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most cloned and/or characterized plant polyphenol oxidases (PPOs) have catecholase activity (i.e., they oxidize o-diphenols to o-quinones) and are localized or predicted to be localized to plastids. As a class, they have broad substrate specificity and are associated with browning of produce and oth...

  19. Polyphenol oxidase activity in co-ensiled temperate grasses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polyphenol oxidase (PPO) and its o-diphenol substrates have been shown to effectively decrease proteolytic activity during the ensiling of forages such as red clover. Orchardgrass and smooth bromegrass both contain high levels of PPO activity, but lack appropriate levels of o-diphenols to adequately...

  20. Platinum Nanoparticles: Efficient and Stable Catechol Oxidase Mimetics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi; Wu, Haohao; Chong, Yu; Wamer, Wayne G; Xia, Qingsu; Cai, Lining; Nie, Zhihong; Fu, Peter P; Yin, Jun-Jie

    2015-09-01

    Although enzyme-like nanomaterials have been extensively investigated over the past decade, most research has focused on the peroxidase-like, catalase-like, or SOD-like activity of these nanomaterials. Identifying nanomaterials having oxidase-like activities has received less attention. In this study, we demonstrate that platinum nanoparticles (Pt NPs) exhibit catechol oxidase-like activity, oxidizing polyphenols into the corresponding o-quinones. Four unique approaches are employed to demonstrate the catechol oxidase-like activity exerted by Pt NPs. First, UV-vis spectroscopy is used to monitor the oxidation of polyphenols catalyzed by Pt NPs. Second, the oxidized products of polyphenols are identified by ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) separation followed by high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) identification. Third, electron spin resonance (ESR) oximetry techniques are used to confirm the O2 consumption during the oxidation reaction. Fourth, the intermediate products of semiquinone radicals formed during the oxidation of polyphenols are determined by ESR using spin stabilization. These results indicate Pt NPs possess catechol oxidase-like activity. Because polyphenols and related bioactive substances have been explored as potent antioxidants that could be useful for the prevention of cancer and cardiovascular diseases, and Pt NPs have been widely used in the chemical industry and medical science, it is essential to understand the potential effects of Pt NPs for altering or influencing the antioxidant activity of polyphenols.

  1. Energy-Dependent Reversal of the Cytochrome Oxidase Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wikstrom, Marten

    1981-07-01

    Energization of isolated rat liver mitochondria with ATP under conditions in which cytochrome c is poised in a highly oxidized state shifts the state of cytochrome oxidase (cytochrome c oxidase; ferrocytochrome c:oxygen oxidoreductase, EC 1.9.3.1) from fully oxidized to two new spectroscopically distinguishable states depending on the applied phosphorylation potential and redox potential at cytochrome c. Both new states are spectrally similar or identical to two previously described intermediates in the reaction between reduced enzyme and O2. The data suggest that the energy-dependent transitions are due to reversed electron transfer from water to ferricytochrome c linked to accumulation of intermediates of O2 reduction at the catalytic heme a3/copper center. Titrations with redox potential indicate that each transition is a one-electron step, a finding that would identify the second observed compound as enzyme-bound peroxide or its equivalent. This is consistent with this compound being spectrally identical to ``Compound C,'' previously described as the reaction product between half-reduced oxidase (two electrons) and O2. On the basis of these data a catalytic scheme of O2 reduction is proposed for the heme a3/copper center of cytochrome oxidase.

  2. Molecular dynamics in cytochrome c oxidase Moessbauer spectra deconvolution

    SciTech Connect

    Bossis, Fabrizio; Palese, Luigi L.

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} Cytochrome c oxidase molecular dynamics serve to predict Moessbauer lineshape widths. {yields} Half height widths are used in modeling of Lorentzian doublets. {yields} Such spectral deconvolutions are useful in detecting the enzyme intermediates. -- Abstract: In this work low temperature molecular dynamics simulations of cytochrome c oxidase are used to predict an experimentally observable, namely Moessbauer spectra width. Predicted lineshapes are used to model Lorentzian doublets, with which published cytochrome c oxidase Moessbauer spectra were simulated. Molecular dynamics imposed constraints to spectral lineshapes permit to obtain useful information, like the presence of multiple chemical species in the binuclear center of cytochrome c oxidase. Moreover, a benchmark of quality for molecular dynamic simulations can be obtained. Despite the overwhelming importance of dynamics in electron-proton transfer systems, limited work has been devoted to unravel how much realistic are molecular dynamics simulations results. In this work, molecular dynamics based predictions are found to be in good agreement with published experimental spectra, showing that we can confidently rely on actual simulations. Molecular dynamics based deconvolution of Moessbauer spectra will lead to a renewed interest for application of this approach in bioenergetics.

  3. Platinum Nanoparticles: Efficient and Stable Catechol Oxidase Mimetics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi; Wu, Haohao; Chong, Yu; Wamer, Wayne G; Xia, Qingsu; Cai, Lining; Nie, Zhihong; Fu, Peter P; Yin, Jun-Jie

    2015-09-01

    Although enzyme-like nanomaterials have been extensively investigated over the past decade, most research has focused on the peroxidase-like, catalase-like, or SOD-like activity of these nanomaterials. Identifying nanomaterials having oxidase-like activities has received less attention. In this study, we demonstrate that platinum nanoparticles (Pt NPs) exhibit catechol oxidase-like activity, oxidizing polyphenols into the corresponding o-quinones. Four unique approaches are employed to demonstrate the catechol oxidase-like activity exerted by Pt NPs. First, UV-vis spectroscopy is used to monitor the oxidation of polyphenols catalyzed by Pt NPs. Second, the oxidized products of polyphenols are identified by ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) separation followed by high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) identification. Third, electron spin resonance (ESR) oximetry techniques are used to confirm the O2 consumption during the oxidation reaction. Fourth, the intermediate products of semiquinone radicals formed during the oxidation of polyphenols are determined by ESR using spin stabilization. These results indicate Pt NPs possess catechol oxidase-like activity. Because polyphenols and related bioactive substances have been explored as potent antioxidants that could be useful for the prevention of cancer and cardiovascular diseases, and Pt NPs have been widely used in the chemical industry and medical science, it is essential to understand the potential effects of Pt NPs for altering or influencing the antioxidant activity of polyphenols. PMID:26305170

  4. IRON REGULATES XANTHINE OXIDASE ACTIVITY IN THE LUNG

    EPA Science Inventory

    The iron chelator deferoxamine has been reported to inhibit both xanthine oxidase (XO) and xanthine dehydrogenase activity, but the relationship of this effect to the availability of iron in the cellular and tissue environment remains unexplored. XO and total xanthine oxidoreduct...

  5. Purification of gibberellin sub 53 -oxidase from spinach

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, T.M.; Zeevaart, J.A.D. )

    1989-04-01

    Spinach is a long-day rosette plants, in which stem growth is mediated by gibberellins. It has been shown that two enzymatic steps, GA{sub 53}-oxidase and GA{sub 19}-oxidase, are controlled by light. To develop an understanding into this light regulation, purification of GA{sub 53}-oxidase has been undertaken. The original assay relied on the HPLC separation of the product and substrate, but was considered too slow for the development of a purification scheme. A TLC system was developed which in conjunction with improvements to the assay conditions was sensitive and gave rapid results. The partial purification of the GA{sub 53}-oxidase is achieved by a high speed centrifugation, 40-55% ammonium sulfate precipitation, an hydroxyapatite column, Sephadex G-100 column and an anion exchange FPLC column, Mono Q HR10/10, yielding 1000-fold purification and 15% recovery. Monoclonal antibodies to the protein will be raised and used to further characterize the enzyme.

  6. 21 CFR 866.2420 - Oxidase screening test for gonorrhea.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Oxidase screening test for gonorrhea. 866.2420 Section 866.2420 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices § 866.2420...

  7. 21 CFR 866.2420 - Oxidase screening test for gonorrhea.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Oxidase screening test for gonorrhea. 866.2420 Section 866.2420 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices § 866.2420...

  8. 21 CFR 866.2420 - Oxidase screening test for gonorrhea.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Oxidase screening test for gonorrhea. 866.2420 Section 866.2420 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices § 866.2420...

  9. 21 CFR 866.2420 - Oxidase screening test for gonorrhea.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Oxidase screening test for gonorrhea. 866.2420 Section 866.2420 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices § 866.2420...

  10. 21 CFR 866.2420 - Oxidase screening test for gonorrhea.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Oxidase screening test for gonorrhea. 866.2420 Section 866.2420 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices § 866.2420...

  11. NADPH oxidases in Eukaryotes: red algae provide new hints!

    PubMed

    Hervé, Cécile; Tonon, Thierry; Collén, Jonas; Corre, Erwan; Boyen, Catherine

    2006-03-01

    The red macro-alga Chondrus crispus is known to produce superoxide radicals in response to cell-free extracts of its green algal pathogenic endophyte Acrochaete operculata. So far, no enzymes involved in this metabolism have been isolated from red algae. We report here the isolation of a gene encoding a homologue of the respiratory burst oxidase gp91(phox) in C. crispus, named Ccrboh. This single copy gene encodes a polypeptide of 825 amino acids. Search performed in available genome and EST algal databases identified sequences showing common features of NADPH oxidases in other algae such as the red unicellular Cyanidioschyzon merolae, the economically valuable red macro-alga Porphyra yezoensis and the two diatoms Phaeodactylum tricornutum and Thalassiosira pseudonana. Domain organization and phylogenetic relationships with plant, animal, fungal and algal NADPH oxidase homologues were analyzed. Transcription analysis of the C. crispus gene revealed that it was over-transcribed during infection of C. crispus gametophyte by the endophyte A. operculata, and after incubation in presence of atrazine, methyl jasmonate and hydroxyperoxides derived from C20 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). These results also illustrate the interest of exploring the red algal lineage for gaining insight into the deep evolution of NADPH oxidases in Eukaryotes.

  12. Lead optimization of isocytosine-derived xanthine oxidase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Bajaj, Komal; Burudkar, Sandeep; Shah, Pranay; Keche, Ashish; Ghosh, Usha; Tannu, Prashant; Khanna, Smriti; Srivastava, Ankita; Deshmukh, Nitin J; Dixit, Amol; Ahire, Yogesh; Damre, Anagha; Nemmani, Kumar V S; Kulkarni-Almeida, Asha; B-Rao, Chandrika; Sharma, Rajiv; Sivaramakrishnan, H

    2013-02-01

    We report our attempts at improving the oral efficacy of low-nanomolar inhibitors of xanthine oxidase from isocytosine series through chemical modifications. Our lead compound had earlier shown good in vivo efficacy when administered intraperitoneally but not orally. Several modifications are reported here which achieved more than twofold improvement in exposure. A compound with significant improvement in oral efficacy was also obtained.

  13. [Synthesis and localization of L-lactate oxidase in yeasts].

    PubMed

    Arinbasarova, A Iu; Biriukova, E N; Suzina, N E; Medentsev, A G

    2014-01-01

    Conditions for L-lactate oxidase synthesis by the yeast Yarrowia lpolytica were investigated. The enzyme was found to be synthesized during growth on L-lactate in the exponential growth phase. L-lactate oxidase synthesis was observed, also on glucose after adaptation to stress conditions (oxidative or thermal stress) r during the stationary growth phase after glucose consumption. The cells grown on L-lactate exhibited high levels of antioxidant enzymes (catalase, superoxide dismutase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, and glutathione reductase), which exceeded those of glucose-grown cells. The ultrastructure of L-lactate-grown cellsand of those grown on glucose and adapted to various stress.conditions was also found to besimilar, with increased mitochondria, elevated number and size ofperoxisomes, and formation of lipid and polyphosphate inclusions. In order to determine the intracellular localization of L-lactate oxidase, the cells were disintegrated by the lytic enzyme complex from Helix pomatia. Centrifugation of the homogenate in Percoll gradient resulted in the isolation of purified fractions of the native mitochondria and peroxisomes. L-Lactate oxidase was shown to be localized in peroxisomes. PMID:25844463

  14. Alternative oxidase and uncoupling protein: thermogenesis versus cell energy balance.

    PubMed

    Jarmuszkiewicz, W; Sluse-Goffart, C M; Vercesi, A E; Sluse, F E

    2001-04-01

    The physiological role of an alternative oxidase and an uncoupling protein in plant and protists is discussed in terms of thermogenesis and energy metabolism balance in the cell. It is concluded that thermogenesis is restricted not only by a lower-limit size but also by a kinetically-limited stimulation of the mitochondrial respiratory chain.

  15. Reducing peanut allergens by high pressure combined with polyphenol oxidase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polyphenol oxidase (PPO) has been shown to reduce major peanut allergens (Ara h 1 and Ara h 2). Because high pressure (HP) can increase enzyme activity, we postulated that further reduction of peanut allergens can be achieved through HP combined with PPO. Peanut extracts were treated with each of th...

  16. CHARACTERISTICS OF POLYPHENOL OXIDASES FROM RED CLOVER (TRIFOLIUM PRATENSE)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polyphenol oxidase (PPO, EC 1.14.18.1 or EC 1.10.3.1) catalyzes the oxidation of o-diphenols to o-quinones which cause browning reactions in many wounded fruits, vegetables, and plants including the forage crop red clover (Trifolium pratense). Production of o-quinones in red clover inhibits post-har...

  17. Pig kidney diamine oxidase. A new method of purification.

    PubMed

    Floris, G; Fadda, M B

    1979-07-15

    Diamine oxidase has been purified from pig kidney by a new method to rapidly obtain larger amounts of pure enzyme with a good yield. The enzyme obtained gives only one band in SDS gel electrophoresis. The specific activity and the absorption spectra were identical to those of already preparations homogeneous reported by different methods of purification. PMID:121960

  18. Inheritance of polyphenol oxidase activity in wheat breeding lines derived from matings of low polyphenol oxidase parents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polyphenol oxidase (PPO) in grain plays a major role in time-dependent discoloration of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) products, especially fresh noodles. Breeding wheat cultivars with low or nil PPO activity can reduce the undesirable product darkening. The low PPO line PI 117635 was crossed to two...

  19. Supramolecular organization of cytochrome c oxidase- and alternative oxidase-dependent respiratory chains in the filamentous fungus Podospora anserina.

    PubMed

    Krause, Frank; Scheckhuber, Christian Q; Werner, Alexandra; Rexroth, Sascha; Reifschneider, Nicole H; Dencher, Norbert A; Osiewacz, Heinz D

    2004-06-18

    To elucidate the molecular basis of the link between respiration and longevity, we have studied the organization of the respiratory chain of a wild-type strain and of two long-lived mutants of the filamentous fungus Podospora anserina. This established aging model is able to respire by either the standard or the alternative pathway. In the latter pathway, electrons are directly transferred from ubiquinol to the alternative oxidase and thus bypass complexes III and IV. We show that the cytochrome c oxidase pathway is organized according to the mammalian "respirasome" model (Schägger, H., and Pfeiffer, K. (2000) EMBO J. 19, 1777-1783). In contrast, the alternative pathway is composed of distinct supercomplexes of complexes I and III (i.e. I(2) and I(2)III(2)), which have not been described so far. Enzymatic analysis reveals distinct functional properties of complexes I and III belonging to either cytochrome c oxidase- or alternative oxidase-dependent pathways. By a gentle colorless-native PAGE, almost all of the ATP synthases from mitochondria respiring by either pathway were preserved in the dimeric state. Our data are of significance for the understanding of both respiratory pathways as well as lifespan control and aging.

  20. Replacement of a terminal cytochrome c oxidase by ubiquinol oxidase during the evolution of acetic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Matsutani, Minenosuke; Fukushima, Kota; Kayama, Chiho; Arimitsu, Misato; Hirakawa, Hideki; Toyama, Hirohide; Adachi, Osao; Yakushi, Toshiharu; Matsushita, Kazunobu

    2014-10-01

    The bacterial aerobic respiratory chain has a terminal oxidase of the heme-copper oxidase superfamily, comprised of cytochrome c oxidase (COX) and ubiquinol oxidase (UOX); UOX evolved from COX. Acetobacter pasteurianus, an α-Proteobacterial acetic acid bacterium (AAB), produces UOX but not COX, although it has a partial COX gene cluster, ctaBD and ctaA, in addition to the UOX operon cyaBACD. We expressed ctaB and ctaA genes of A. pasteurianus in Escherichia coli and demonstrated their function as heme O and heme A synthases. We also found that the absence of ctaD function is likely due to accumulated mutations. These COX genes are closely related to other α-Proteobacterial COX proteins. However, the UOX operons of AAB are closely related to those of the β/γ-Proteobacteria (γ-type UOX), distinct from the α/β-Proteobacterial proteins (α-type UOX), but different from the other γ-type UOX proteins by the absence of the cyoE heme O synthase. Thus, we suggest that A. pasteurianus has a functional γ-type UOX but has lost the COX genes, with the exception of ctaB and ctaA, which supply the heme O and A moieties for UOX. Our results suggest that, in AAB, COX was replaced by β/γ-Proteobacterial UOX via horizontal gene transfer, while the COX genes, except for the heme O/A synthase genes, were lost. PMID:24862920

  1. Evidence for pyrroloquinolinequinone as the carbonyl cofactor in lysyl oxidase by absorption and resonance Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Williamson, P R; Moog, R S; Dooley, D M; Kagan, H M

    1986-12-15

    The present study investigated the possibility that pyrroloquinolinequinone (PQQ), an aromatic carbonyl recently indicated to be the carbonyl cofactor in bovine plasma amine oxidase, may also be present at the active site of lysyl oxidase. The absorption and resonance Raman spectra of the phenylhydrazones of bovine plasma amine oxidase, of peptides derived from the active site of bovine aorta lysyl oxidase, and of PQQ were very similar, indicating that the carbonyl cofactor of lysyl oxidase is PQQ or a compound which closely resembles PQQ.

  2. Amino acid oxidase of leukocytes in relation to H2O2-mediated bacterial killing

    PubMed Central

    Eckstein, Marlene R.; Baehner, Robert L.; Nathan, David G.

    1971-01-01

    D-Amino acid oxidase and L-amino acid oxidase have been measured in sucrose homogenates of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) obtained from guinea pigs and humans. Subcellular distribution patterns and studies on latency indicate that these oxidases are soluble enzymes. Their hydrogen peroxide-generating capacity was verified. Chronic granulomatous disease PMN, which lack a respiratory burst and fail to generate H2O2 during phagocytosis and do not kill catalase positive bacteria, had peroxide-generating amino acid oxidase activity equal to that found in PMN homogenates from patients with bacterial infections. The precise metabolic and bactericidal role of amino acid oxidases in PMN remains uncertain. PMID:4397948

  3. Consistent Evaluation of ACOS-GOSAT, BESD-SCIAMACHY, CarbonTracker, and MACC Through Comparisons to TCCON

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulawik, Susan; Wunch, Debra; O’Dell, Christopher; Frankenberg, Christian; Reuter, Maximilian; Chevallier, Frederic; Oda, Tomohiro; Sherlock, Vanessa; Buchwitz, Michael; Osterman, Greg; Miller, Charles E.; Iraci, Laura T.; Wolf, Joyce

    2016-01-01

    Consistent validation of satellite CO2 estimates is a prerequisite for using multiple satellite CO2 measurements for joint flux inversion, and for establishing an accurate long-term atmospheric CO2 data record. Harmonizing satellite CO2 measurements is particularly important since the differences in instruments, observing geometries, sampling strategies, etc. imbue different measurement characteristics in the various satellite CO2 data products. We focus on validating model and satellite observation attributes that impact flux estimates and CO2 assimilation, including accurate error estimates, correlated and random errors, overall biases, biases by season and latitude, the impact of coincidence criteria, validation of seasonal cycle phase and amplitude, yearly growth, and daily variability. We evaluate dry-air mole fraction (X(sub CO2)) for Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT) (Atmospheric CO2 Observations from Space, ACOS b3.5) and SCanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY (SCIAMACHY) (Bremen Optimal Estimation DOAS, BESD v2.00.08) as well as the CarbonTracker (CT2013b) simulated CO2 mole fraction fields and the Monitoring Atmospheric Composition and Climate (MACC) CO2 inversion system (v13.1) and compare these to Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON) observations (GGG2012/2014). We find standard deviations of 0.9, 0.9, 1.7, and 2.1 parts per million vs. TCCON for CT2013b, MACC, GOSAT, and SCIAMACHY, respectively, with the single observation errors 1.9 and 0.9 times the predicted errors for GOSAT and SCIAMACHY, respectively. We quantify how satellite error drops with data averaging by interpreting according to (error(sup 2) equals a(sup 2) plus b(sup 2) divided by n (with n being the number of observations averaged, a the systematic (correlated) errors, and b the random (uncorrelated) errors). a and b are estimated by satellites, coincidence criteria, and hemisphere. Biases at individual stations have year

  4. Consistent evaluation of ACOS-GOSAT, BESD-SCIAMACHY, CarbonTracker, and MACC through comparisons to TCCON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulawik, Susan; Wunch, Debra; O'Dell, Christopher; Frankenberg, Christian; Reuter, Maximilian; Oda, Tomohiro; Chevallier, Frederic; Sherlock, Vanessa; Buchwitz, Michael; Osterman, Greg; Miller, Charles E.; Wennberg, Paul O.; Griffith, David; Morino, Isamu; Dubey, Manvendra K.; Deutscher, Nicholas M.; Notholt, Justus; Hase, Frank; Warneke, Thorsten; Sussmann, Ralf; Robinson, John; Strong, Kimberly; Schneider, Matthias; De Mazière, Martine; Shiomi, Kei; Feist, Dietrich G.; Iraci, Laura T.; Wolf, Joyce

    2016-02-01

    Consistent validation of satellite CO2 estimates is a prerequisite for using multiple satellite CO2 measurements for joint flux inversion, and for establishing an accurate long-term atmospheric CO2 data record. Harmonizing satellite CO2 measurements is particularly important since the differences in instruments, observing geometries, sampling strategies, etc. imbue different measurement characteristics in the various satellite CO2 data products. We focus on validating model and satellite observation attributes that impact flux estimates and CO2 assimilation, including accurate error estimates, correlated and random errors, overall biases, biases by season and latitude, the impact of coincidence criteria, validation of seasonal cycle phase and amplitude, yearly growth, and daily variability. We evaluate dry-air mole fraction (XCO2) for Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT) (Atmospheric CO2 Observations from Space, ACOS b3.5) and SCanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY (SCIAMACHY) (Bremen Optimal Estimation DOAS, BESD v2.00.08) as well as the CarbonTracker (CT2013b) simulated CO2 mole fraction fields and the Monitoring Atmospheric Composition and Climate (MACC) CO2 inversion system (v13.1) and compare these to Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON) observations (GGG2012/2014). We find standard deviations of 0.9, 0.9, 1.7, and 2.1 ppm vs. TCCON for CT2013b, MACC, GOSAT, and SCIAMACHY, respectively, with the single observation errors 1.9 and 0.9 times the predicted errors for GOSAT and SCIAMACHY, respectively. We quantify how satellite error drops with data averaging by interpreting according to error2 = a2 + b2/n (with n being the number of observations averaged, a the systematic (correlated) errors, and b the random (uncorrelated) errors). a and b are estimated by satellites, coincidence criteria, and hemisphere. Biases at individual stations have year-to-year variability of ˜ 0.3 ppm, with biases larger than the TCCON

  5. Aurone synthase is a catechol oxidase with hydroxylase activity and provides insights into the mechanism of plant polyphenol oxidases.

    PubMed

    Molitor, Christian; Mauracher, Stephan Gerhard; Rompel, Annette

    2016-03-29

    Tyrosinases and catechol oxidases belong to the family of polyphenol oxidases (PPOs). Tyrosinases catalyze theo-hydroxylation and oxidation of phenolic compounds, whereas catechol oxidases were so far defined to lack the hydroxylation activity and catalyze solely the oxidation of o-diphenolic compounds. Aurone synthase from Coreopsis grandiflora (AUS1) is a specialized plant PPO involved in the anabolic pathway of aurones. We present, to our knowledge, the first crystal structures of a latent plant PPO, its mature active and inactive form, caused by a sulfation of a copper binding histidine. Analysis of the latent proenzyme's interface between the shielding C-terminal domain and the main core provides insights into its activation mechanisms. As AUS1 did not accept common tyrosinase substrates (tyrosine and tyramine), the enzyme is classified as a catechol oxidase. However, AUS1 showed hydroxylase activity toward its natural substrate (isoliquiritigenin), revealing that the hydroxylase activity is not correlated with the acceptance of common tyrosinase substrates. Therefore, we propose that the hydroxylase reaction is a general functionality of PPOs. Molecular dynamics simulations of docked substrate-enzyme complexes were performed, and a key residue was identified that influences the plant PPO's acceptance or rejection of tyramine. Based on the evidenced hydroxylase activity and the interactions of specific residues with the substrates during the molecular dynamics simulations, a novel catalytic reaction mechanism for plant PPOs is proposed. The presented results strongly suggest that the physiological role of plant catechol oxidases were previously underestimated, as they might hydroxylate their--so far unknown--natural substrates in vivo.

  6. Aurone synthase is a catechol oxidase with hydroxylase activity and provides insights into the mechanism of plant polyphenol oxidases.

    PubMed

    Molitor, Christian; Mauracher, Stephan Gerhard; Rompel, Annette

    2016-03-29

    Tyrosinases and catechol oxidases belong to the family of polyphenol oxidases (PPOs). Tyrosinases catalyze theo-hydroxylation and oxidation of phenolic compounds, whereas catechol oxidases were so far defined to lack the hydroxylation activity and catalyze solely the oxidation of o-diphenolic compounds. Aurone synthase from Coreopsis grandiflora (AUS1) is a specialized plant PPO involved in the anabolic pathway of aurones. We present, to our knowledge, the first crystal structures of a latent plant PPO, its mature active and inactive form, caused by a sulfation of a copper binding histidine. Analysis of the latent proenzyme's interface between the shielding C-terminal domain and the main core provides insights into its activation mechanisms. As AUS1 did not accept common tyrosinase substrates (tyrosine and tyramine), the enzyme is classified as a catechol oxidase. However, AUS1 showed hydroxylase activity toward its natural substrate (isoliquiritigenin), revealing that the hydroxylase activity is not correlated with the acceptance of common tyrosinase substrates. Therefore, we propose that the hydroxylase reaction is a general functionality of PPOs. Molecular dynamics simulations of docked substrate-enzyme complexes were performed, and a key residue was identified that influences the plant PPO's acceptance or rejection of tyramine. Based on the evidenced hydroxylase activity and the interactions of specific residues with the substrates during the molecular dynamics simulations, a novel catalytic reaction mechanism for plant PPOs is proposed. The presented results strongly suggest that the physiological role of plant catechol oxidases were previously underestimated, as they might hydroxylate their--so far unknown--natural substrates in vivo. PMID:26976571

  7. Aurone synthase is a catechol oxidase with hydroxylase activity and provides insights into the mechanism of plant polyphenol oxidases

    PubMed Central

    Molitor, Christian; Mauracher, Stephan Gerhard

    2016-01-01

    Tyrosinases and catechol oxidases belong to the family of polyphenol oxidases (PPOs). Tyrosinases catalyze the o-hydroxylation and oxidation of phenolic compounds, whereas catechol oxidases were so far defined to lack the hydroxylation activity and catalyze solely the oxidation of o-diphenolic compounds. Aurone synthase from Coreopsis grandiflora (AUS1) is a specialized plant PPO involved in the anabolic pathway of aurones. We present, to our knowledge, the first crystal structures of a latent plant PPO, its mature active and inactive form, caused by a sulfation of a copper binding histidine. Analysis of the latent proenzyme’s interface between the shielding C-terminal domain and the main core provides insights into its activation mechanisms. As AUS1 did not accept common tyrosinase substrates (tyrosine and tyramine), the enzyme is classified as a catechol oxidase. However, AUS1 showed hydroxylase activity toward its natural substrate (isoliquiritigenin), revealing that the hydroxylase activity is not correlated with the acceptance of common tyrosinase substrates. Therefore, we propose that the hydroxylase reaction is a general functionality of PPOs. Molecular dynamics simulations of docked substrate–enzyme complexes were performed, and a key residue was identified that influences the plant PPO’s acceptance or rejection of tyramine. Based on the evidenced hydroxylase activity and the interactions of specific residues with the substrates during the molecular dynamics simulations, a novel catalytic reaction mechanism for plant PPOs is proposed. The presented results strongly suggest that the physiological role of plant catechol oxidases were previously underestimated, as they might hydroxylate their—so far unknown—natural substrates in vivo. PMID:26976571

  8. Phenol oxidase activity in secondary transformed peat-moorsh soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Styła, K.; Szajdak, L.

    2009-04-01

    The chemical composition of peat depends on the geobotanical conditions of its formation and on the depth of sampling. The evolution of hydrogenic peat soils is closely related to the genesis of peat and to the changes in water conditions. Due to a number of factors including oscillation of ground water level, different redox potential, changes of aerobic conditions, different plant communities, and root exudes, and products of the degradation of plant remains, peat-moorsh soils may undergo a process of secondary transformation conditions (Sokolowska et al. 2005; Szajdak et al. 2007). Phenol oxidase is one of the few enzymes able to degrade recalcitrant phenolic materials as lignin (Freeman et al. 2004). Phenol oxidase enzymes catalyze polyphenol oxidation in the presence of oxygen (O2) by removing phenolic hydrogen or hydrogenes to from radicals or quinines. These products undergo nucleophilic addition reactions in the presence or absence of free - NH2 group with the eventual production of humic acid-like polymers. The presence of phenol oxidase in soil environments is important in the formation of humic substances a desirable process because the carbon is stored in a stable form (Matocha et al. 2004). The investigations were carried out on the transect of peatland 4.5 km long, located in the Agroecological Landscape Park host D. Chlapowski in Turew (40 km South-West of Poznań, West Polish Lowland). The sites of investigation were located along Wyskoć ditch. The following material was taken from four chosen sites marked as Zbechy, Bridge, Shelterbelt and Hirudo in two layers: cartel (0-50cm) and cattle (50-100cm). The object of this study was to characterize the biochemical properties by the determination of the phenol oxidize activity in two layers of the four different peat-moors soils used as meadow. The phenol oxidase activity was determined spectrophotometrically by measuring quinone formation at λmax=525 nm with catechol as substrate by method of Perucci

  9. Engineering Human Urate Oxidase: Towards Reactivating It as an Important Therapeutic Enzyme.

    PubMed

    Dabbagh, Fatemeh; Ghoshoon, Mohammad B; Hemmati, Shiva; Zamani, Mozhdeh; Mohkam, Milad; Ghasemi, Younes

    2015-01-01

    Urate oxidase is considered as an important therapeutic enzyme used to control hyperuricemia. In spite of widespread distribution in numerous (micro)organisms, active urate oxidase is absent in higher primates (humans and apes) due to gene mutations. Considering the therapeutic significance of urate oxidase, further understanding on the inactivation process of the enzyme during primate evolution is critical. This study, therefore, aims to express genetically modified human urate oxidase in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris. Accordingly, the genetically modified human urate oxidase was successfully expressed intracellularly and extracellularly under the control of an alcohol oxidase promoter and was subjected to the enzyme activity assay. The results demonstrated that reactivating the non-functional human urate oxidase gene fully or even moderately by simply replacing the premature stop codons is impossible. This finding confirms the idea that a number of successive loss-of-function missense mutations occurred during evolution, making higher primates functional uricase-deficit and vulnerable to hyperuricemic disorders.

  10. Role of reactive oxygen species produced by NADPH oxidase in gibberellin biosynthesis during barley seed germination.

    PubMed

    Kai, Kyohei; Kasa, Shinsuke; Sakamoto, Masatsugu; Aoki, Nozomi; Watabe, Gaku; Yuasa, Takashi; Iwaya-Inoue, Mari; Ishibashi, Yushi

    2016-05-01

    NADPH oxidase catalyzes the production of the superoxide anion (O2(-)), a reactive oxygen species (ROS), and regulates the germination of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.). Diphenyleneiodonium (DPI) chloride, an NADPH oxidase inhibitor, delayed barley germination, and exogenous H2O2 (an ROS) partially rescued it. Six enzymes, ent-copalyl diphosphate synthase (CPS), ent-kaurene synthase (KS), ent-kaurene oxidase (KO), ent-kaurenoic acid oxidase (KAO), GA20-oxidase (GA20ox) and GA3-oxidase (GA3ox), catalyze the transformation of trans-geranylgeranyl diphosphate to active gibberellin, which promotes germination. Exogenous H2O2 promoted the expressions of HvKAO1 and HvGA3ox1 in barley embryos. These results suggest that ROS produced by NADPH oxidase are involved in gibberellin biosynthesis through the regulation of HvKAO1 and HvGA3ox1.

  11. Role of reactive oxygen species produced by NADPH oxidase in gibberellin biosynthesis during barley seed germination.

    PubMed

    Kai, Kyohei; Kasa, Shinsuke; Sakamoto, Masatsugu; Aoki, Nozomi; Watabe, Gaku; Yuasa, Takashi; Iwaya-Inoue, Mari; Ishibashi, Yushi

    2016-05-01

    NADPH oxidase catalyzes the production of the superoxide anion (O2(-)), a reactive oxygen species (ROS), and regulates the germination of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.). Diphenyleneiodonium (DPI) chloride, an NADPH oxidase inhibitor, delayed barley germination, and exogenous H2O2 (an ROS) partially rescued it. Six enzymes, ent-copalyl diphosphate synthase (CPS), ent-kaurene synthase (KS), ent-kaurene oxidase (KO), ent-kaurenoic acid oxidase (KAO), GA20-oxidase (GA20ox) and GA3-oxidase (GA3ox), catalyze the transformation of trans-geranylgeranyl diphosphate to active gibberellin, which promotes germination. Exogenous H2O2 promoted the expressions of HvKAO1 and HvGA3ox1 in barley embryos. These results suggest that ROS produced by NADPH oxidase are involved in gibberellin biosynthesis through the regulation of HvKAO1 and HvGA3ox1. PMID:27110861

  12. Spectroscopic and genetic evidence for two heme-Cu-containing oxidases in Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed Central

    Shapleigh, J P; Hill, J J; Alben, J O; Gennis, R B

    1992-01-01

    It has recently become evident that many bacterial respiratory oxidases are members of a superfamily that is related to the eukaryotic cytochrome c oxidase. These oxidases catalyze the reduction of oxygen to water at a heme-copper binuclear center. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy has been used to examine the heme-copper-containing respiratory oxidases of Rhodobacter sphaeroides Ga. This technique monitors the stretching frequency of CO bound at the oxygen binding site and can be used to characterize the oxidases in situ with membrane preparations. Oxidases that have a heme-copper binuclear center are recognizable by FTIR spectroscopy because the bound CO moves from the heme iron to the nearby copper upon photolysis at low temperature, where it exhibits a diagnostic spectrum. The FTIR spectra indicate that the binuclear center of the R. sphaeroides aa3-type cytochrome c oxidase is remarkably similar to that of the bovine mitochondrial oxidase. Upon deletion of the ctaD gene, encoding subunit I of the aa3-type oxidase, substantial cytochrome c oxidase remains in the membranes of aerobically grown R. sphaeroides. This correlates with a second wild-type R. sphaeroides is grown photosynthetically, the chromatophore membranes lack the aa3-type oxidase but have this second heme-copper oxidase. Subunit I of the heme-copper oxidase superfamily contains the binuclear center. Amino acid sequence alignments show that this subunit is structurally very highly conserved among both eukaryotic and prokaryotic species. The polymerase chain reaction was used to show that the chromosome of R. sphaeroides contains at least one other gene that is a homolog of ctaD, the gene encoding subunit I of the aa3-type cytochrome c oxidase.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images PMID:1313003

  13. Oxygen reactivity of mammalian sulfite oxidase provides a concept for the treatment of sulfite oxidase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Belaidi, Abdel A; Röper, Juliane; Arjune, Sita; Krizowski, Sabina; Trifunovic, Aleksandra; Schwarz, Guenter

    2015-07-15

    Mammalian sulfite oxidase (SO) is a dimeric enzyme consisting of a molybdenum cofactor- (Moco) and haem-containing domain and catalyses the oxidation of toxic sulfite to sulfate. Following sulfite oxidation, electrons are passed from Moco via the haem cofactor to cytochrome c, the terminal electron acceptor. In contrast, plant SO (PSO) lacks the haem domain and electrons shuttle from Moco to molecular oxygen. Given the high similarity between plant and mammalian SO Moco domains, factors that determine the reactivity of PSO towards oxygen, remained unknown. In the present study, we generated mammalian haem-deficient and truncated SO variants and demonstrated their oxygen reactivity by hydrogen peroxide formation and oxygen-consumption studies. We found that intramolecular electron transfer between Moco and haem showed an inverse correlation to SO oxygen reactivity. Haem-deficient SO variants exhibited oxygen-dependent sulfite oxidation similar to PSO, which was confirmed further using haem-deficient human SO in a cell-based assay. This finding suggests the possibility to use oxygen-reactive SO variants in sulfite detoxification, as the loss of SO activity is causing severe neurodegeneration. Therefore we evaluated the potential use of PEG attachment (PEGylation) as a modification method for future enzyme substitution therapies using oxygen-reactive SO variants, which might use blood-dissolved oxygen as the electron acceptor. PEGylation has been shown to increase the half-life of other therapeutic proteins. PEGylation resulted in the modification of up to eight surface-exposed lysine residues of SO, an increased conformational stability and similar kinetic properties compared with wild-type SO. PMID:26171830

  14. Oxygen reactivity of mammalian sulfite oxidase provides a concept for the treatment of sulfite oxidase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Belaidi, Abdel A; Röper, Juliane; Arjune, Sita; Krizowski, Sabina; Trifunovic, Aleksandra; Schwarz, Guenter

    2015-07-15

    Mammalian sulfite oxidase (SO) is a dimeric enzyme consisting of a molybdenum cofactor- (Moco) and haem-containing domain and catalyses the oxidation of toxic sulfite to sulfate. Following sulfite oxidation, electrons are passed from Moco via the haem cofactor to cytochrome c, the terminal electron acceptor. In contrast, plant SO (PSO) lacks the haem domain and electrons shuttle from Moco to molecular oxygen. Given the high similarity between plant and mammalian SO Moco domains, factors that determine the reactivity of PSO towards oxygen, remained unknown. In the present study, we generated mammalian haem-deficient and truncated SO variants and demonstrated their oxygen reactivity by hydrogen peroxide formation and oxygen-consumption studies. We found that intramolecular electron transfer between Moco and haem showed an inverse correlation to SO oxygen reactivity. Haem-deficient SO variants exhibited oxygen-dependent sulfite oxidation similar to PSO, which was confirmed further using haem-deficient human SO in a cell-based assay. This finding suggests the possibility to use oxygen-reactive SO variants in sulfite detoxification, as the loss of SO activity is causing severe neurodegeneration. Therefore we evaluated the potential use of PEG attachment (PEGylation) as a modification method for future enzyme substitution therapies using oxygen-reactive SO variants, which might use blood-dissolved oxygen as the electron acceptor. PEGylation has been shown to increase the half-life of other therapeutic proteins. PEGylation resulted in the modification of up to eight surface-exposed lysine residues of SO, an increased conformational stability and similar kinetic properties compared with wild-type SO.

  15. NADPH oxidase-derived reactive oxygen species in cardiac pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Cave, Alison; Grieve, David; Johar, Sofian; Zhang, Min; Shah, Ajay M

    2005-01-01

    Chronic heart failure, secondary to left ventricular hypertrophy or myocardial infarction, is a condition with increasing morbidity and mortality. Although the mechanisms underlying the development and progression of this condition remain a subject of intense interest, there is now growing evidence that redox-sensitive pathways play an important role. This article focuses on the involvement of reactive oxygen species derived from a family of superoxide-generating enzymes, termed NADPH oxidases (NOXs), in the pathophysiology of ventricular hypertrophy, the accompanying interstitial fibrosis and subsequent heart failure. In particular, the apparent ability of the different NADPH oxidase isoforms to define the response of a cell to a range of physiological and pathophysiological stimuli is reviewed. If confirmed, these data would suggest that independently targeting different members of the NOX family may hold the potential for therapeutic intervention in the treatment of cardiac disease. PMID:16321803

  16. Tyrosinase versus Catechol Oxidase: One Asparagine Makes the Difference.

    PubMed

    Solem, Even; Tuczek, Felix; Decker, Heinz

    2016-02-18

    Tyrosinases mediate the ortho-hydroxylation and two-electron oxidation of monophenols to ortho-quinones. Catechol oxidases only catalyze the oxidation of diphenols. Although it is of significant interest, the origin of the functional discrimination between tyrosinases and catechol oxidases has been unclear. Recently, it has been postulated that a glutamate and an asparagine bind and activate a conserved water molecule towards deprotonation of monophenols. Here we demonstrate for the first time that a polyphenoloxidase, which exhibits only diphenolase activity, can be transformed to a tyrosinase by mutation to introduce an asparagine. The asparagine and a conserved glutamate are necessary to properly orient the conserved water in order to abstract a proton from the monophenol. These results provide direct evidence for the crucial importance of a proton shuttle for tyrosinase activity of type 3 copper proteins, allowing a consistent understanding of their different chemical reactivities. PMID:26773413

  17. Involvement of NADH Oxidase in Biofilm Formation in Streptococcus sanguinis

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Xiuchun; Shi, Xiaoli; Shi, Limei; Liu, Jinlin; Stone, Victoria; Kong, Fanxiang; Kitten, Todd; Xu, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Biofilms play important roles in microbial communities and are related to infectious diseases. Here, we report direct evidence that a bacterial nox gene encoding NADH oxidase is involved in biofilm formation. A dramatic reduction in biofilm formation was observed in a Streptococcus sanguinis nox mutant under anaerobic conditions without any decrease in growth. The membrane fluidity of the mutant bacterial cells was found to be decreased and the fatty acid composition altered, with increased palmitic acid and decreased stearic acid and vaccenic acid. Extracellular DNA of the mutant was reduced in abundance and bacterial competence was suppressed. Gene expression analysis in the mutant identified two genes with altered expression, gtfP and Idh, which were found to be related to biofilm formation through examination of their deletion mutants. NADH oxidase-related metabolic pathways were analyzed, further clarifying the function of this enzyme in biofilm formation. PMID:26950587

  18. Alternative oxidase expression in aged potato tuber slices

    SciTech Connect

    Hiser, C.; Herdies, L.; McIntosh, L. )

    1989-04-01

    Higher plant mitochondria posses a cyanide-resistant, hydroxamate-sensitive alternative pathway of electron transport that does not conserve energy. Aging of potato tuber slices for 24 hours leads to the development of an alternative pathway capacity. We have shown that a monoclonal antibody raised against the alternative pathway terminal oxidase of Sauromatum guttatum crossreacts with a protein of similar size in aged potato slice mitochondria. This protein was partially purified and characterized by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, and its relative levels parallel the rise in cyanide-resistant respiration. We are using a putative clone of the S. guttatum alternative oxidase gene to isolate the equivalent gene from potato and to examine its expression.

  19. Cloning and expression of the potato alternative oxidase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Hiser, C.; McIntosh, L. Michigan State Univ., East Lansing )

    1990-05-01

    Mitochondria from 24-hour-aged potato slices possess an alternative path capacity and a 36kD protein not present in fresh potato mitochondria. This 36kD protein was identified by a monoclonal antibody against the Sauromatum guttatum alternative oxidase. These results suggest de novo synthesis of the 36kD protein during the aging process. To investigate this phenomenon, a clone containing a potato alternative oxidase gene was isolated from a cDNA library using the S. guttatum gene as a probe. This clone shows areas of high homology to the S. guttatum gene. Norther blots of RNA from fresh and 24-hour-aged potato slices are being probed with the potato gene to examine its expression in relation to the appearance of the 36kD protein.

  20. Structures and Mechanism of the Monoamine Oxidase Family

    PubMed Central

    Gaweska, Helena; Fitzpatrick, Paul F.

    2011-01-01

    Members of the monoamine oxidase family of flavoproteins catalyze the oxidation of primary and secondary amines, polyamines, amino acids, and methylated lysine side chains in proteins. The enzymes have similar overall structures, with conserved FAD-binding domains and varied substrate-binding sites. Multiple mechanisms have been proposed for the catalytic reactions of these enzymes. The present review compares the structures of different members of the family and the various mechanistic proposals. PMID:22022344

  1. Characterization of two brassinosteroid C-6 oxidase genes in pea.

    PubMed

    Jager, Corinne E; Symons, Gregory M; Nomura, Takahito; Yamada, Yumiko; Smith, Jennifer J; Yamaguchi, Shinjiro; Kamiya, Yuji; Weller, James L; Yokota, Takao; Reid, James B

    2007-04-01

    C-6 oxidation genes play a key role in the regulation of biologically active brassinosteroid (BR) levels in the plant. They control BR activation, which involves the C-6 oxidation of 6-deoxocastasterone (6-DeoxoCS) to castasterone (CS) and in some cases the further conversion of CS to brassinolide (BL). C-6 oxidation is controlled by the CYP85A family of cytochrome P450s, and to date, two CYP85As have been isolated in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), two in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), one in rice (Oryza sativa), and one in grape (Vitis vinifera). We have now isolated two CYP85As (CYP85A1 and CYP85A6) from pea (Pisum sativum). However, unlike Arabidopsis and tomato, which both contain one BR C-6 oxidase that converts 6-DeoxoCS to CS and one BR C-6 Baeyer-Villiger oxidase that converts 6-DeoxoCS right through to BL, the two BR C-6 oxidases in pea both act principally to convert 6-DeoxoCS to CS. The isolation of these two BR C-6 oxidation genes in pea highlights the species-specific differences associated with C-6 oxidation. In addition, we have isolated a novel BR-deficient mutant, lke, which blocks the function of one of these two BR C-6 oxidases (CYP85A6). The lke mutant exhibits a phenotype intermediate between wild-type plants and previously characterized pea BR mutants (lk, lka, and lkb) and contains reduced levels of CS and increased levels of 6-DeoxoCS. To date, lke is the only mutant identified in pea that blocks the latter steps of BR biosynthesis and it will therefore provide an excellent tool to further examine the regulation of BR biosynthesis and the relative biological activities of CS and BL in pea. PMID:17322341

  2. Studies of GA sub 53 oxidase from spinach

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, T.; Zeevaart, J.A.D. )

    1990-05-01

    GA{sub 53} oxidase was purified 1,750-fold with 1% recovery of activity from spinach after exposure to 8 long days. This preparation was injected into balb/c mice and hybridomas from spleen cells were produced. Upon preliminary screening by immunoprecipitation of enzyme activity, three positive cell lines were selected. These are being cloned to select a true monoclonal antibody cell line. This antibody will be used to study the light/dark regulation of this enzyme.

  3. Crystal Structures of Intermediates in the Nitroalkane Oxidase Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Heroux, A.; Bozinovski, D; Valley, M; Fitzpatrick, P; Orville, A

    2009-01-01

    The flavoenzyme nitroalkane oxidase is a member of the acyl-CoA dehydrogenase superfamily. Nitroalkane oxidase catalyzes the oxidation of neutral nitroalkanes to nitrite and the corresponding aldehydes or ketones. Crystal structures to 2.2 {angstrom} resolution or better of enzyme complexes with bound substrates and of a trapped substrate-flavin adduct are described. The D402N enzyme has no detectable activity with neutral nitroalkanes. The structure of the D402N enzyme crystallized in the presence of 1-nitrohexane or 1-nitrooctane shows the presence of the substrate in the binding site. The aliphatic chain of the substrate extends into a tunnel leading to the enzyme surface. The oxygens of the substrate nitro group interact both with amino acid residues and with the 2'-hydroxyl of the FAD. When nitroalkane oxidase oxidizes nitroalkanes in the presence of cyanide, an electrophilic flavin imine intermediate can be trapped (Valley, M. P., Tichy, S. E., and Fitzpatrick, P. F. (2005) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 127, 2062-2066). The structure of the enzyme trapped with cyanide during oxidation of 1-nitrohexane shows the presence of the modified flavin. A continuous hydrogen bond network connects the nitrogen of the CN-hexyl-FAD through the FAD 2'-hydroxyl to a chain of water molecules extending to the protein surface. Together, our complementary approaches provide strong evidence that the flavin cofactor is in the appropriate oxidation state and correlates well with the putative intermediate state observed within each of the crystal structures. Consequently, these results provide important structural descriptions of several steps along the nitroalkane oxidase reaction cycle.

  4. NADPH oxidase-dependent acid production in airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Schwarzer, Christian; Machen, Terry E; Illek, Beate; Fischer, Horst

    2004-08-27

    The purpose of this study was to determine the role of NADPH oxidase in H(+) secretion by airway epithelia. In whole cell patch clamp recordings primary human tracheal epithelial cells (hTE) and the human serous gland cell line Calu-3 expressed a functionally similar zinc-blockable plasma membrane H(+) conductance. However, the rate of H(+) secretion of confluent epithelial monolayers measured in Ussing chambers was 9-fold larger in hTE compared with Calu-3. In hTE H(+) secretion was blocked by mucosal ZnCl(2) and the NADPH oxidase blockers acetovanillone and 4-(2-aminoethyl)benzenesulfonyl fluoride (AEBSF), whereas these same blockers had no effect in Calu-3. We determined levels of transcripts for the NADPH oxidase transmembrane isoforms (Nox1 through -5, Duox1 and -2, and p22(phox)) and found Duox1, -2, and p22(phox) to be highly expressed in hTE, as well as the intracellular subunits p40(phox), p47(phox), and p67(phox). In contrast, Calu-3 lacked transcripts for Duox1, p40(phox), and p47(phox). Anti-Duox antibody staining resulted in prominent apical staining in hTE but no significant staining in Calu-3. When treated with amiloride to block the Na(+)/H(+) exchanger, intracellular pH in hTE acidified at significantly higher rates than in Calu-3, and treatment with AEBSF blocked acidification. These data suggest a role for an apically located Duox-based NADPH oxidase during intracellular H(+) production and H(+) secretion, but not in H(+) conduction.

  5. The Escherichia coli CydX protein is a member of the CydAB cytochrome bd oxidase complex and is required for cytochrome bd oxidase activity.

    PubMed

    VanOrsdel, Caitlin E; Bhatt, Shantanu; Allen, Rondine J; Brenner, Evan P; Hobson, Jessica J; Jamil, Aqsa; Haynes, Brittany M; Genson, Allyson M; Hemm, Matthew R

    2013-08-01

    Cytochrome bd oxidase operons from more than 50 species of bacteria contain a short gene encoding a small protein that ranges from ∼30 to 50 amino acids and is predicted to localize to the cell membrane. Although cytochrome bd oxidases have been studied for more than 70 years, little is known about the role of this small protein, denoted CydX, in oxidase activity. Here we report that Escherichia coli mutants lacking CydX exhibit phenotypes associated with reduced oxidase activity. In addition, cell membrane extracts from ΔcydX mutant strains have reduced oxidase activity in vitro. Consistent with data showing that CydX is required for cytochrome bd oxidase activity, copurification experiments indicate that CydX interacts with the CydAB cytochrome bd oxidase complex. Together, these data support the hypothesis that CydX is a subunit of the CydAB cytochrome bd oxidase complex that is required for complex activity. The results of mutation analysis of CydX suggest that few individual amino acids in the small protein are essential for function, at least in the context of protein overexpression. In addition, the results of analysis of the paralogous small transmembrane protein AppX show that the two proteins could have some overlapping functionality in the cell and that both have the potential to interact with the CydAB complex.

  6. Polyphenol oxidase and peroxidase in fruits and vegetables.

    PubMed

    Vámos-Vigyázó, L

    1981-01-01

    Polyphenol oxidases and peroxidases are among the most studied enzymes in fruits and vegetables. Owing to the deleterious effects of discoloration and off-flavor formation induced by their actions, these enzymes have not ceased to be a matter of concern to food technologists, while their versatility as catalyst and their diversity as protein present a challenge to the biochemist. This article gives an account on the present state of knowledge in this field. The occurrence of polyphenol oxidases and peroxidases in food and food raw materials, and their role and importance in food processing are briefly outlined. Results of biochemical research including catalytic properties, substrate specificity, susceptibility towards pH and temperature, action of inhibitors, isolation, purification, and characteristics of the enzymes are given, with special emphasis on recent achievements based on high resolution separation and isoenzyme techniques. Finally, the behavior of polyphenol oxidase and peroxidase in selected major groups of fruits and vegetables is discussed. Some contradictions found in the literature are pointed out and some questions that have not been given the necessary attention by researchers so far are mentioned.

  7. Potential xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity of endophytic Lasiodiplodia pseudotheobromae.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Neha; Saxena, Sanjai

    2014-07-01

    Xanthine oxidase is considered as a potential target for treatment of hyperuricemia. Hyperuricemia is predisposing factor for gout, chronic heart failure, atherosclerosis, tissue injury, and ischemia. To date, only two inhibitors of xanthine oxidase viz. allopurinol and febuxostat have been clinically approved for used as drugs. In the process of searching for new xanthine oxidase inhibitors, we screened culture filtrates of 42 endophytic fungi using in vitro qualitative and quantitative XO inhibitory assays. The qualitative assay exhibited potential XO inhibition by culture filtrates of four isolates viz. #1048 AMSTITYEL, #2CCSTITD, #6AMLWLS, and #96 CMSTITNEY. The XO inhibitory activity was present only in the chloroform extract of the culture filtrates. Chloroform extract of culture filtrate #1048 AMSTITYEL exhibited the highest inhibition of XO with an IC50 value of 0.61 μg ml(-1) which was better than allopurinol exhibiting an IC50 of 0.937 μg ml(-1) while febuxostat exhibited a much lower IC50 of 0.076 μg ml(-1). Further, molecular phylogenetic tools and morphological studies were used to identify #1048 AMSTITYEL as Lasiodiplodia pseudotheobromae. This is the first report of an endophytic Lasiodiplodia pseudotheobromae from Aegle marmelos exhibiting potential XO Inhibitory activity.

  8. Androgen receptor and monoamine oxidase polymorphism in wild bonobos.

    PubMed

    Garai, Cintia; Furuichi, Takeshi; Kawamoto, Yoshi; Ryu, Heungjin; Inoue-Murayama, Miho

    2014-12-01

    Androgen receptor gene (AR), monoamine oxidase A gene (MAOA) and monoamine oxidase B gene (MAOB) have been found to have associations with behavioral traits, such as aggressiveness, and disorders in humans. However, the extent to which similar genetic effects might influence the behavior of wild apes is unclear. We examined the loci AR glutamine repeat (ARQ), AR glycine repeat (ARG), MAOA intron 2 dinucleotide repeat (MAin2) and MAOB intron 2 dinucleotide repeat (MBin2) in 32 wild bonobos, Pan paniscus, and compared them with those of chimpanzees, Pan troglodytes, and humans. We found that bonobos were polymorphic on the four loci examined. Both loci MAin2 and MBin2 in bonobos showed a higher diversity than in chimpanzees. Because monoamine oxidase influences aggressiveness, the differences between the polymorphisms of MAin2 and MBin2 in bonobos and chimpanzees may be associated with the differences in aggression between the two species. In order to understand the evolution of these loci and AR, MAOA and MAOB in humans and non-human primates, it would be useful to conduct future studies focusing on the potential association between aggressiveness, and other personality traits, and polymorphisms documented in bonobos. PMID:25606465

  9. Quantitative analysis of phenol oxidase activity in insect hemolymph.

    PubMed

    Sorrentino, Richard Paul; Small, Chiyedza N; Govind, Shubha

    2002-04-01

    We describe a simple, inexpensive, and robust protocol for the quantification of phenol oxidase activity in insect hemolymph. Discrete volumes of hemolymph from Drosophila melanogaster larvae are applied to pieces of filter paper soaked in an L-3, 4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) solution. Phenol oxidase present in the samples catalyzes melanin synthesis from the L-DOPA precursor, resulting in the appearance of a roughly circular melanized spot on the filter paper. The filter paper is then scanned and analyzed with image-processing software. Each pixel in an image is assigned a grayscale value. The mean of the grayscale values for a circular region of pixels at the center of the image of each spot is used to compute a melanization index (MI) value, the computation is based on a comparison to an external standard (India ink). Numerical MI values for control and experimental larvae can then be pooled and subjected to statistical analysis. This protocol was used to evaluate phenol oxidase activity in larvae of different backgrounds: wild-type, lozenge, hopscotch(Tumorous-lethal) (which induces the formation of large melanotic tumors), and body-color mutations ebony and yellow. Our results demonstrate that this assay is sensitive enough for use in genetic screens with D. melanogaster and could conceivably be used for evaluation of MI from hemolymph of other insects.

  10. Elicitation of dihydrobenzophenanthridine oxidase in Sanguinaria canadensis cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Ignatov, A; Clark, W G; Cline, S D; Psenak, M; Krueger, J; Coscia, C J

    1996-12-01

    Dihydrobenzophenanthridine (DHBP) oxidase catalyses the last step in the biogenesis of the benzo[c]phenanthridine alkaloid sanguinarine. Addition of autoclaved fungal preparations or putative plant defence signalling intermediates (jasmonic acid (JA), methyl jasmonate (MeJ), acetylsalicylic acid (ASA)) to Sanguinaria canadensis cell suspension cultures elicited an increase in the activity of DHBP oxidase. MeJ and ASA were better inducers of oxidase activity than were the fungal elicitor and JA. Enzyme-specific activity could be induced in a dose- and time-dependent manner up to 4- to 14-fold, respectively, when cells were treated with MeJ or with ASA. A change in total enzyme activity in cultured cells was observed only at the highest concentration of MeJ and not at any level of ASA tested. The results suggest that MeJ and ASA may play a role in the S. canadensis defence against pathogens by eliciting the enzymes involved in the synthesis of the phytoalexin benzophenanthridine alkaloids.

  11. Essential role of lysyl oxidases in notochord development

    PubMed Central

    Gansner, John M.; Mendelsohn, Bryce A.; Hultman, Keith A.; Johnson, Stephen L.; Gitlin, Jonathan D.

    2007-01-01

    Recent studies reveal a critical role for copper in the development of the zebrafish notochord, suggesting that specific cuproenzymes are required for the structural integrity of the notochord sheath. We now demonstrate that β-aminopropionitrile, a known inhibitor of the copper-dependent lysyl oxidases, causes notochord distortion in the zebrafish embryo identical to that seen in copper deficiency. Characterization of the zebrafish lysyl oxidase genes reveals eight unique sequences, several of which are expressed in the developing notochord. Specific gene knockdown demonstrates that loss of loxl1 results in notochord distortion, and that loxl1 and loxl5b have overlapping roles in notochord formation. Interestingly, while notochord abnormalities are not observed following partial knockdown of loxl1 or loxl5b alone, in each case this markedly sensitizes developing embryos to notochord distortion if copper availability is diminished. Likewise, partial knockdown of the lysyl oxidase substrate col2a1 results in notochord distortion when combined with reduced copper availability or partial knockdown of loxl1 or loxl5b. These data reveal a complex interplay of gene expression and nutrient availability critical to notochord development. They also provide insight into specific genetic and nutritional factors that may play a role in the pathogenesis of structural birth defects of the axial skeleton. PMID:17543297

  12. Towards a structural elucidation of the alternative oxidase in plants.

    PubMed

    Albury, Mary S; Elliott, Catherine; Moore, Anthony L

    2009-12-01

    In addition to the conventional cytochrome c oxidase, mitochondria of all plants studied to date contain a second cyanide-resistant terminal oxidase or alternative oxidase (AOX). The AOX is located in the inner mitochondrial membrane and branches from the cytochrome pathway at the level of the quinone pool. It is non-protonmotive and couples the oxidation of ubiquinone to the reduction of oxygen to water. For many years, the AOX was considered to be confined to plants, fungi and a small number of protists. Recently, it has become apparent that the AOX occurs in wide range of organisms including prokaryotes and a moderate number of animal species. In this paper, we provide an overview of general features and current knowledge available about the AOX with emphasis on structure, the active site and quinone-binding site. Characterisation of the AOX has advanced considerably over recent years with information emerging about the role of the protein, regulatory regions and functional sites. The large number of sequences available is now enabling us to obtain a clearer picture of evolutionary origins and diversity.

  13. Monoamine oxidases in major depressive disorder and alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Jeremy; Johnson, Shakevia; Ou, Xiao-Ming

    2012-06-01

    Monoamine oxidases play an integral role in brain function. Both monoamine oxidase A (MAO-A) and monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B) regulate neurochemistry by degrading monoamine neurotransmitters (serotonin, dopamine, and norepinephrine). Any alteration in MAO levels can have devastating effects on the brain and behavior by lowering or raising neurotransmitter levels and producing toxic reactive oxygen species. In this review article, MAO is examined in terms of function and genetic organization, with special focus on recent discoveries related to the transcriptional regulation of MAO. In recent studies, transcriptional regulation involves a repressor protein, R1, for MAO-A and an activator protein, KLF11 (a Krüppel-like factor; also referred to as transforming growth factor-beta early inducible gene 2, TIEG2), for both MAO-A and MAO-B, by binding to Sp/KLF sites in the core promoters of MAO and regulating MAO gene expression. Furthermore, KLF11 may influence MAO-B expression and augment glyceraldehyde-3 phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) to upregulate MAO-B transcription upon exposure to ethanol. Finally, we review recent progress in MAO research and highlight the roles that MAOs play in several psychiatric conditions, including chronic stress, major depressive disorder and alcohol dependence. Further research in this area is needed to better understand MAOs, their transcription factors and signaling pathways in psychiatric illnesses in order to develop new strategies for pharmacological advancement.

  14. Partial inactivation of cytochrome c oxidase by nonpolar mercurial reagents

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, A.J.; Auer, H.E.

    1980-01-25

    Purified beef heart cytochrome c oxidase is inactivated to the extent of 35 to 50% by the nonpolar mercurial reagents mercuric chloride and ethylmercuric chloride. The inactivation is complete within 5 min. In titrations of activity, the plateau level of inactivation is attained at added ethylmercuric chloride:heme a ratios of about 1:1. Up to 3 mercury atoms/heme a are bound to the oxidase, although only the first of these affects its enzymatic activity. Incubation of the ethylmercury-modified oxidase with sulfhydryl compounds reverses the inactivation, with 2,3-dimercaptopropanol being most effective of the reagents tested. Spectrophotometric and polarographic assays of enzymatic activity show that K/sub m/ values for the native and the ethylmercury-modified enzymes are practically indistinguishable, and that the partial inactivation observed for the latter is reflected exclusively in a lower value of V/sub max/ compared to that of the native enzyme. Based on these results, we propose that ethylmercuric chloride reacts with a single crucial--SH group per heme a, and that electron transfer processes in the modified product are partially inhibited.

  15. Potential xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity of endophytic Lasiodiplodia pseudotheobromae.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Neha; Saxena, Sanjai

    2014-07-01

    Xanthine oxidase is considered as a potential target for treatment of hyperuricemia. Hyperuricemia is predisposing factor for gout, chronic heart failure, atherosclerosis, tissue injury, and ischemia. To date, only two inhibitors of xanthine oxidase viz. allopurinol and febuxostat have been clinically approved for used as drugs. In the process of searching for new xanthine oxidase inhibitors, we screened culture filtrates of 42 endophytic fungi using in vitro qualitative and quantitative XO inhibitory assays. The qualitative assay exhibited potential XO inhibition by culture filtrates of four isolates viz. #1048 AMSTITYEL, #2CCSTITD, #6AMLWLS, and #96 CMSTITNEY. The XO inhibitory activity was present only in the chloroform extract of the culture filtrates. Chloroform extract of culture filtrate #1048 AMSTITYEL exhibited the highest inhibition of XO with an IC50 value of 0.61 μg ml(-1) which was better than allopurinol exhibiting an IC50 of 0.937 μg ml(-1) while febuxostat exhibited a much lower IC50 of 0.076 μg ml(-1). Further, molecular phylogenetic tools and morphological studies were used to identify #1048 AMSTITYEL as Lasiodiplodia pseudotheobromae. This is the first report of an endophytic Lasiodiplodia pseudotheobromae from Aegle marmelos exhibiting potential XO Inhibitory activity. PMID:24801403

  16. [Respiratory oxidases: the enzymes which use most of the oxygen which living things breathe].

    PubMed

    Toledo-Cuevas, E M

    1997-01-01

    The respiratory oxidases are the last enzymes of the aerobic respiratory chain. They catalize the reduction of molecular oxygen to water, with generation of an electrochemical gradient useful for the energy demanding cellular processes. Most of the oxidases belong to the heme-copper superfamily. They possess a heme-copper center, constituted of a high spin heme and a CuB center, where the reduction of oxygen takes place and probably where the link to proton pumping is located. The superfamily is divided in two classes: the quinol- and the cytochrome c-oxidases. The latter are divided in the aa3 and the cbb3-type cytochrome c oxidases. The main difference between quinol- and the aa3-type cytochrome c-oxidases is the CuA center, which is absent in the quinol oxidases. The cbb3-type cytochrome oxidases have the binuclear center, but lack the CuA center. They also does not have the classical subunits II and III. These differences seem not to affect the oxygen reduction or the proton pumping. Probably the oxidases have evolved from some denitrification enzymes and prior the photosynthetic process. Also is possible that the cbb3-type cytochrome oxidases or others very similar have been the first oxidases to appear. PMID:10932727

  17. Proton transfer in ba(3) cytochrome c oxidase from Thermus thermophilus.

    PubMed

    von Ballmoos, Christoph; Adelroth, Pia; Gennis, Robert B; Brzezinski, Peter

    2012-04-01

    The respiratory heme-copper oxidases catalyze reduction of O(2) to H(2)O, linking this process to transmembrane proton pumping. These oxidases have been classified according to the architecture, location and number of proton pathways. Most structural and functional studies to date have been performed on the A-class oxidases, which includes those that are found in the inner mitochondrial membrane and bacteria such as Rhodobacter sphaeroides and Paracoccus denitrificans (aa(3)-type oxidases in these bacteria). These oxidases pump protons with a stoichiometry of one proton per electron transferred to the catalytic site. The bacterial A-class oxidases use two proton pathways (denoted by letters D and K, respectively), for the transfer of protons to the catalytic site, and protons that are pumped across the membrane. The B-type oxidases such as, for example, the ba(3) oxidase from Thermus thermophilus, pump protons with a lower stoichiometry of 0.5 H(+)/electron and use only one proton pathway for the transfer of all protons. This pathway overlaps in space with the K pathway in the A class oxidases without showing any sequence homology though. Here, we review the functional properties of the A- and the B-class ba(3) oxidases with a focus on mechanisms of proton transfer and pumping.

  18. Alkylamino derivatives of 4-aminomethylpyridine as inhibitors of copper-containing amine oxidases.

    PubMed

    Bertini, Vincenzo; Buffoni, Franca; Ignesti, Giovanni; Picci, Nevio; Trombino, Sonia; Iemma, Francesca; Alfei, Silvana; Pocci, Marco; Lucchesini, Francesco; De Munno, Angela

    2005-02-10

    The first substratelike, reversible inhibitors of different copper amine oxidases (CAOs) with IC50 (M) as low as 2.0 x 10(-8) corresponding to derivatives of 4-aminomethylpyridine with alkoxy (1a-d), alkylthio (2a,b), and alkylamino (3a-e, 4a-j) groups in the positions 3 and 5 have been prepared and studied. The inhibitors 1a-d are active on benzylamine oxidase and semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase and are very selective with respect to diamine oxidase, lysyl oxidase, and monoamine oxidases. The inhibitors 2a,b are selective for benzylamine oxidase whereas 2a is also a new type of good substrate of diamine oxidase. The inhibitors 3a-e and 4a-j are substratelike, reversible, nonselective inhibitors of various CAOs including pea seedling amine oxidase and Hansenula polymorpha amine oxidase, whose enzymatic sites are known from X-ray structure determinations. The inhibitors 3b,c and 4b,c are excellent substratelike tools for studies correlating CAOs that afford crystals suitable for X-ray structure determinations with CAOs from mammals.

  19. Cyanide-insensitive quinol oxidase (CIO) from Gluconobacter oxydans is a unique terminal oxidase subfamily of cytochrome bd.

    PubMed

    Miura, Hiroshi; Mogi, Tatsushi; Ano, Yoshitaka; Migita, Catharina T; Matsutani, Minenosuke; Yakushi, Toshiharu; Kita, Kiyoshi; Matsushita, Kazunobu

    2013-06-01

    Cyanide-insensitive terminal quinol oxidase (CIO) is a subfamily of cytochrome bd present in bacterial respiratory chain. We purified CIO from the Gluconobacter oxydans membranes and characterized its properties. The air-oxidized CIO showed some or weak peaks of reduced haemes b and of oxygenated and ferric haeme d, differing from cytochrome bd. CO- and NO-binding difference spectra suggested that haeme d serves as the ligand-binding site of CIO. Notably, the purified CIO showed an extraordinary high ubiquinol-1 oxidase activity with the pH optimum of pH 5-6. The apparent Vmax value of CIO was 17-fold higher than that of G. oxydans cytochrome bo3. In addition, compared with Escherichia coli cytochrome bd, the quinol oxidase activity of CIO was much more resistant to cyanide, but sensitive to azide. The Km value for O2 of CIO was 7- to 10-fold larger than that of G. oxydans cytochrome bo3 or E. coli cytochrome bd. Our results suggest that CIO has unique features attributable to the structure and properties of the O2-binding site, and thus forms a new sub-group distinct from cytochrome bd. Furthermore, CIO of acetic acid bacteria may play some specific role for rapid oxidation of substrates under acidic growth conditions.

  20. Detection and substrate selectivity of new microbial D-amino acid oxidases.

    PubMed

    Gabler; Hensel; Fischer

    2000-11-01

    In order to screen for new microbial D-amino acid oxidase activities a selective and sensitive peroxidase/o-dianisidine assay, detecting the formation of hydrogen peroxide was developed. Catalase, which coexists with oxidases in the peroxisomes or the microsomes and, which competes with peroxidase for hydrogen peroxide, was completely inhibited by o-dianisidine up to a catalase activity of 500 nkat ml(-)(1). Thus, using the peroxidase/o-dianisidine assay and employing crude extracts of microorganisms in a microplate reader, a detection sensitivity for oxidase activity of 0.6 nkat ml(-)(1) was obtained.Wild type colonies which were grown on a selective medium containing D-alanine as carbon, energy and nitrogen source were examined for D-amino acid oxidase activity by the peroxidase/o-dianisidine assay. The oxidase positive colonies possessing an apparent oxidase activity > 2 nkat g dry biomass(-)(1) were isolated. Among them three new D-amino acid oxidase-producers were found and identified as Fusarium oxysporum, Verticilium lutealbum and Candida parapsilosis. The best new D-amino oxidase producer was the fungus F. oxysporum with a D-amino acid oxidase activity of about 900 nkat g dry biomass(-)(1) or 21 nkat mg protein(-)(1). With regard to the use as a biocatalytic tool in biotechnology the substrate specificities of the three new D-amino acid oxidases were compared with those of the known D-amino acid oxidases from Trigonopsis variabilis, Rhodotorula gracilis and pig kidney under the same conditions. All six D-amino acid oxidases accepted the D-enantiomers of alanine, valine, leucine, proline, phenylalanine, serine and glutamine as substrates and, except for the D-amino acid oxidase from V. luteoalbum, D-tryptophane, D-tyrosine, D-arginine and D-histidine were accepted as well. The relative highest activities (>95%) were measured versus D-alanine (C. parapsilosis, F. oxysporum, T. variabilis), D-methionine (V. luteoalbum, R. gracilis), D-valine (T. variabilis, R

  1. Methanol and ethanol oxidase respiratory chains of the methylotrophic acetic acid bacterium, Acetobacter methanolicus.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, K; Takahashi, K; Takahashi, M; Ameyama, M; Adachi, O

    1992-06-01

    Acetobacter methanolicus is a unique acetic acid bacterium which has a methanol oxidase respiratory chain, as seen in methylotrophs, in addition to its ethanol oxidase respiratory chain. In this study, the relationship between methanol and ethanol oxidase respiratory chains was investigated. The organism is able to grow by oxidizing several carbon sources, including methanol, glycerol, and glucose. Cells grown on methanol exhibited a high methanol-oxidizing activity and contained large amounts of methanol dehydrogenase and soluble cytochromes c. Cells grown on glycerol showed higher oxygen uptake rate and dehydrogenase activity with ethanol but little methanol-oxidizing activity. Furthermore, two different terminal oxidases, cytochrome c and ubiquinol oxidases, have been shown to be involved in the respiratory chain; cytochrome c oxidase predominates in cells grown on methanol while ubiquinol oxidase predominates in cells grown on glycerol. Both terminal oxidases could be solubilized from the membranes and separated from each other. The cytochrome c oxidase and the ubiquinol oxidase have been shown to be a cytochrome co and a cytochrome bo, respectively. Methanol-oxidizing activity was diminished by several treatments that disrupt the integrity of the cells. The activity of the intact cells was inhibited with NaCl and/or EDTA, which disturbed the interaction between methanol dehydrogenase and cytochrome c. Ethanol-oxidizing activity in the membranes was inhibited with 2-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline N-oxide, which inhibited ubiquinol oxidase but not cytochrome c oxidase. Alcohol dehydrogenase has been purified from the membranes of glycerol-grown cells and shown to reduce ubiquinone-10 as well as a short side-chain homologue in detergent solution.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. A biochemical approach to study the role of the terminal oxidases in aerobic respiration in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Le Laz, Sébastien; Kpebe, Arlette; Bauzan, Marielle; Lignon, Sabrina; Rousset, Marc; Brugna, Myriam

    2014-01-01

    The genome of the facultative anaerobic γ-proteobacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 encodes for three terminal oxidases: a bd-type quinol oxidase and two heme-copper oxidases, a A-type cytochrome c oxidase and a cbb 3-type oxidase. In this study, we used a biochemical approach and directly measured oxidase activities coupled to mass-spectrometry analysis to investigate the physiological role of the three terminal oxidases under aerobic and microaerobic conditions. Our data revealed that the cbb 3-type oxidase is the major terminal oxidase under aerobic conditions while both cbb 3-type and bd-type oxidases are involved in respiration at low-O2 tensions. On the contrary, the low O2-affinity A-type cytochrome c oxidase was not detected in our experimental conditions even under aerobic conditions and would therefore not be required for aerobic respiration in S. oneidensis MR-1. In addition, the deduced amino acid sequence suggests that the A-type cytochrome c oxidase is a ccaa 3-type oxidase since an uncommon extra-C terminal domain contains two c-type heme binding motifs. The particularity of the aerobic respiratory pathway and the physiological implication of the presence of a ccaa 3-type oxidase in S. oneidensis MR-1 are discussed.

  3. The Terminal Oxidase Cytochrome bd Promotes Sulfide-resistant Bacterial Respiration and Growth.

    PubMed

    Forte, Elena; Borisov, Vitaliy B; Falabella, Micol; Colaço, Henrique G; Tinajero-Trejo, Mariana; Poole, Robert K; Vicente, João B; Sarti, Paolo; Giuffrè, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) impairs mitochondrial respiration by potently inhibiting the heme-copper cytochrome c oxidase. Since many prokaryotes, including Escherichia (E.) coli, generate H2S and encounter high H2S levels particularly in the human gut, herein we tested whether bacteria can sustain sulfide-resistant O2-dependent respiration. E. coli has three respiratory oxidases, the cyanide-sensitive heme-copper bo3 enzyme and two bd oxidases much less sensitive to cyanide. Working on the isolated enzymes, we found that, whereas the bo3 oxidase is inhibited by sulfide with half-maximal inhibitory concentration IC50 = 1.1 ± 0.1 μM, under identical experimental conditions both bd oxidases are insensitive to sulfide up to 58 μM. In E. coli respiratory mutants, both O2-consumption and aerobic growth proved to be severely impaired by sulfide when respiration was sustained by the bo3 oxidase alone, but unaffected by ≤200 μM sulfide when either bd enzyme acted as the only terminal oxidase. Accordingly, wild-type E. coli showed sulfide-insensitive respiration and growth under conditions favouring the expression of bd oxidases. In all tested conditions, cyanide mimicked the functional effect of sulfide on bacterial respiration. We conclude that bd oxidases promote sulfide-resistant O2-consumption and growth in E. coli and possibly other bacteria. The impact of this discovery is discussed. PMID:27030302

  4. The Terminal Oxidase Cytochrome bd Promotes Sulfide-resistant Bacterial Respiration and Growth

    PubMed Central

    Forte, Elena; Borisov, Vitaliy B.; Falabella, Micol; Colaço, Henrique G.; Tinajero-Trejo, Mariana; Poole, Robert K.; Vicente, João B.; Sarti, Paolo; Giuffrè, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) impairs mitochondrial respiration by potently inhibiting the heme-copper cytochrome c oxidase. Since many prokaryotes, including Escherichia (E.) coli, generate H2S and encounter high H2S levels particularly in the human gut, herein we tested whether bacteria can sustain sulfide-resistant O2-dependent respiration. E. coli has three respiratory oxidases, the cyanide-sensitive heme-copper bo3 enzyme and two bd oxidases much less sensitive to cyanide. Working on the isolated enzymes, we found that, whereas the bo3 oxidase is inhibited by sulfide with half-maximal inhibitory concentration IC50 = 1.1 ± 0.1 μM, under identical experimental conditions both bd oxidases are insensitive to sulfide up to 58 μM. In E. coli respiratory mutants, both O2-consumption and aerobic growth proved to be severely impaired by sulfide when respiration was sustained by the bo3 oxidase alone, but unaffected by ≤200 μM sulfide when either bd enzyme acted as the only terminal oxidase. Accordingly, wild-type E. coli showed sulfide-insensitive respiration and growth under conditions favouring the expression of bd oxidases. In all tested conditions, cyanide mimicked the functional effect of sulfide on bacterial respiration. We conclude that bd oxidases promote sulfide-resistant O2-consumption and growth in E. coli and possibly other bacteria. The impact of this discovery is discussed. PMID:27030302

  5. Xanthine oxidase-catalyzed crosslinking of cell membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Girotti, A W; Thomas, J P; Jordan, J E

    1986-12-01

    Isolated erythrocyte membranes exposed to protease-free xanthine oxidase plus xanthine and ferric iron undergo lipid peroxidation and protein crosslinking (appearance of high molecular weight aggregates on sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) gel electrophoresis). Spectrin is more susceptible to crosslinking than the other polypeptides. Thiol-reducible bonds (disulfides) as well as nonreducible bonds are generated, the former type relatively rapidly (detected within 10-20 min) and the latter type more slowly (usually detected after 1 h). Reducible crosslinking is inhibited by catalase, but not by superoxide dismutase, desferrioxamine, butylated hydroxyltoluene, and mannitol; whereas nonreducible crosslinking, like free radical lipid peroxidation, is inhibited by all of these agents except mannitol. Zinc(II) also inhibits lipid peroxidation, but stimulates disulfide bond formation to the virtual exclusion of all other crosslinking. Our results indicate that disulfide formation is dependent on H2O2, but not O2- or iron. However, O2-, H2O2, and iron are all required for lipid peroxidation and nondisulfide crosslinking, suggesting the intermediacy of OH generated via the iron-catalyzed Haber-Weiss reaction. The possible role of malonaldehyde (MDA, a by-product of lipid peroxidation) in the latter type of crosslinking was examined. Solubilized samples of xanthine/xanthine oxidase-treated membranes showed a strong visible fluorescence (emission maximum 450 nm; excitation 390 nm). This resembled the fluorescence of membranes treated with authentic MDA, which forms conjugated imine linkages between amino groups. Fluorescence scanning of SDS gels from MDA-treated membranes showed a strong signal coincident with crosslinked proteins and also one in the low molecular weight, nonprotein region, suggestive of aminolipid conjugates. Similar scanning on xanthine/xanthine oxidase-reacted membranes indicated that all fluorescence is associated with the lipid fraction. Thus, nonreducible

  6. Alternative oxidase: distribution, induction, properties, structure, regulation, and functions.

    PubMed

    Rogov, A G; Sukhanova, E I; Uralskaya, L A; Aliverdieva, D A; Zvyagilskaya, R A

    2014-12-01

    The respiratory chain in the majority of organisms with aerobic type metabolism features the concomitant existence of the phosphorylating cytochrome pathway and the cyanide- and antimycin A-insensitive oxidative route comprising a so-called alternative oxidase (AOX) as a terminal oxidase. In this review, the history of AOX discovery is described. Considerable evidence is presented that AOX occurs widely in organisms at various levels of organization and is not confined to the plant kingdom. This enzyme has not been found only in Archaea, mammals, some yeasts and protists. Bioinformatics research revealed the sequences characteristic of AOX in representatives of various taxonomic groups. Based on multiple alignments of these sequences, a phylogenetic tree was constructed to infer their possible evolution. The ways of AOX activation, as well as regulatory interactions between AOX and the main respiratory chain are described. Data are summarized concerning the properties of AOX and the AOX-encoding genes whose expression is either constitutive or induced by various factors. Information is presented on the structure of AOX, its active center, and the ubiquinone-binding site. The principal functions of AOX are analyzed, including the cases of cell survival, optimization of respiratory metabolism, protection against excess of reactive oxygen species, and adaptation to variable nutrition sources and to biotic and abiotic stress factors. It is emphasized that different AOX functions complement each other in many instances and are not mutually exclusive. Examples are given to demonstrate that AOX is an important tool to overcome the adverse aftereffects of restricted activity of the main respiratory chain in cells and whole animals. This is the first comprehensive review on alternative oxidases of various organisms ranging from yeasts and protists to vascular plants.

  7. The Role of Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors in Current Psychiatric Practice

    PubMed Central

    Fiedorowicz, Jess G.; Swartz, Karen L.

    2007-01-01

    The use of monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) by psychiatrists has declined over the past several decades with the expansion of psychiatrists’ pharmacologic armamentarium. This trend has also been driven by concern about food and drug interactions and side effects, as well as waning physician experience with these medications. Many psychiatrists, in fact, never prescribe MAOIs. Recent research has liberalized the MAOI diet and identified symptom presentations more likely to respond to these medications. Thus, clinicians must continue to familiarize themselves with the properties of and indications for prescribing MAOIs. PMID:15552546

  8. Dopamine-beta-hydroxylase, monoamine oxidase, and schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    DeLisi, L E; Wise, C D; Potkin, S G; Zalcman, S; Phelps, B H; Lovenberg, W; Wyatt, R J

    1980-12-01

    Plasma dopamine-beta-hydroxylase (DBH) activity was studied in two different populations of chronic schizophrenic patients and assayed by two independent laboratories. No significant difference between schizophrenic patients and normal controls was found although in both groups chronic undifferentiated schizophrenics with paranoid features had a trend towards lower DBH activity than the other patients and controls. In addition, DBH and monoamine oxidase (MAO) activities were studied in 13 schizophrenic patients and available first degree-relatives. There was no association of low MAO and low DBH activities within the schizophrenic families.

  9. Reductive trapping of substrate to bovine plasma amine oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Hartmann, C.; Klinman, J.P.

    1987-01-25

    Plasma amine oxidases catalyze the oxidative deamination of amines to aldehydes, followed by a 2e- reduction of O/sub 2/ to H/sub 2/O/sub 2/. Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ), previously believed to be restricted to prokaryotes, has recently been proposed to be the cofactor undergoing reduction in the first half-reaction of bovine plasma amine oxidase (Ameyama, M., Hayashi, U., Matsushita, K., Shinagawa, E., and Adachi, O. (1984) Agric. Biol. Chem. 48, 561-565; Lobenstein-Verbeek, C. L., Jongejan, J. A., Frank, J., and Duine, J. A. (1984) FEBS Lett. 170, 305-309). This result is unexpected, since model studies with PQQ implicate Schiff's base formation between a reactive carbonyl and substrates, whereas experiments with bovine plasma amine oxidase have failed to provide evidence for a carbonyl cofactor. We have, therefore, re-examined putative adducts between substrate and enzyme-bound cofactor, employing a combination of (/sup 14/C)benzylamine and (/sup 3/H)NaCNBH/sub 3/. The use of the relatively weak reductant, NaCNBH/sub 3/, affords Schiff's base specificity and permits the study of enzyme below pH 7.0. As we show, enzyme can only be inactivated by NaCNBH/sub 3/ in the presence of substrate, leading to the incorporation of 1 mol of (/sup 14/C)benzylamine/mol of enzyme subunit at complete inactivation. By contrast, we are unable to detect any labeling with (/sup 3/H)NaCNBH/sub 3/, analogous to an earlier study with (/sup 3/H)NaCNBH/sub 4/ (Suva, R. H., and Abeles, R. H. (1978) Biochemistry 17, 3538-3545). We conclude, first, that our inability to obtain adducts containing both carbon 14 and tritium rules out the reductive trapping either of amine substrate with pyridoxal phosphate or of aldehyde product with a lysyl side chain and, second, that the observed pattern of labeling is fully consistent with the presence of PQQ at the active site of bovine plasma amine oxidase.

  10. Functions of the hydrophilic channels in protonmotive cytochrome c oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Rich, Peter R.; Maréchal, Amandine

    2013-01-01

    The structures and functions of hydrophilic channels in electron-transferring membrane proteins are discussed. A distinction is made between proton channels that can conduct protons and dielectric channels that are non-conducting but can dielectrically polarize in response to the introduction of charge changes in buried functional centres. Functions of the K, D and H channels found in A1-type cytochrome c oxidases are reviewed in relation to these ideas. Possible control of function by dielectric channels and their evolutionary relation to proton channels is explored. PMID:23864498

  11. Xanthine oxidase inhibitors from Vietnamese Blumea balsamifera L.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Mai Thanh Thi; Nguyen, Nhan Trung

    2012-08-01

    From the MeOH extract of the aerial part of Blumea balsamifera L., a new dihydroflavonol, (2R,3S)-(-)-4'-O-methyldihydroquercetin (1), together with seven known compounds has been isolated. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic data. Compounds 1-4 and 6-8 displayed significant xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity in a concentration-dependent manner, and compounds 1, 6 and 8 showed more potent inhibitory activity, with IC₅₀ values ranging from 0.23 to 1.91 µM, than that of a positive control allopurinol (IC₅₀ 2.50 µM). PMID:22821854

  12. 9-Benzoyl 9-deazaguanines as potent xanthine oxidase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Marili V N; Barbosa, Alexandre F; da Silva, Júlia F; dos Santos, Deborah A; Vanzolini, Kenia L; de Moraes, Marcela C; Corrêa, Arlene G; Cass, Quezia B

    2016-01-15

    A novel potent xanthine oxidase inhibitor, 3-nitrobenzoyl 9-deazaguanine (LSPN451), was selected from a series of 10 synthetic derivatives. The enzymatic assays were carried out using an on-flow bidimensional liquid chromatography (2D LC) system, which allowed the screening¸ the measurement of the kinetic inhibition constant and the characterization of the inhibition mode. This compound showed a non-competitive inhibition mechanism with more affinity for the enzyme-substrate complex than for the free enzyme, and inhibition constant of 55.1±9.80 nM, about thirty times more potent than allopurinol. Further details of synthesis and enzymatic studies are presented herein.

  13. Expression of ACO1, ERS1 and ERF1 genes in harvested bananas in relation to heat-induced defense against Colletotrichum musae.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiangfei; Wang, Aiping; Zhu, Shijiang; Zhang, Lubin

    2011-09-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the connection between heat-induced ethylene signal changes and enhanced disease resistance. Heat enhanced ripening and elevated MaACO1 expression in naturally ripened bananas (NRB), while it delayed ripening and reduced MaACO1expression in the ethephon-treated bananas (ETB). However, in both cases, heat reduced lesion sizes infected by Colletotrichum musae. This indicates that heat-induced disease resistance in bananas was independent of ripening rate. The expression of MaERS1 gene was inhibited by heat treatment in both NRB and ETB, implying that heat as a physical signal could be sensed by banana fruits through the inhibition of ethylene receptor gene expression. The intensity of MaERF1 transcript signals was elevated in heated bananas, suggesting that the enhanced accumulation of MaERF1 transcript following heat treatment could play an important role in activation of the defense system. In ETB, inhibition of JA biosynthesis by application of IBU down-regulated the expression of MaERF and significantly weakened disease resistance, suggesting involvement of endogenous JA in induction of the gene expression, which was reconfirmed by the fact that exposure to exogenous MeJA following the combination of heat plus IBU treatment restored part of the gene expression. On the other hand, in NRB, application of IBU elevated level of MaERF1 expression at 24h and enhanced disease resistance, suggesting that, when banana was not exposed to ethephon, the expression of MaERF1 gene was not JA dependent, which was verified by the fact that MeJA application did not enhance MaERF1 gene expression. In conclusion, heat-induced disease resistance in harvested bananas could involve down-regulation of MaERS1 expression and up-regulation of MaERF1 expression and JA pathway could be involved in heat activation of the defense system in bananas exposed to ethephon. PMID:21511361

  14. Expression of ACO1, ERS1 and ERF1 genes in harvested bananas in relation to heat-induced defense against Colletotrichum musae.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiangfei; Wang, Aiping; Zhu, Shijiang; Zhang, Lubin

    2011-09-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the connection between heat-induced ethylene signal changes and enhanced disease resistance. Heat enhanced ripening and elevated MaACO1 expression in naturally ripened bananas (NRB), while it delayed ripening and reduced MaACO1expression in the ethephon-treated bananas (ETB). However, in both cases, heat reduced lesion sizes infected by Colletotrichum musae. This indicates that heat-induced disease resistance in bananas was independent of ripening rate. The expression of MaERS1 gene was inhibited by heat treatment in both NRB and ETB, implying that heat as a physical signal could be sensed by banana fruits through the inhibition of ethylene receptor gene expression. The intensity of MaERF1 transcript signals was elevated in heated bananas, suggesting that the enhanced accumulation of MaERF1 transcript following heat treatment could play an important role in activation of the defense system. In ETB, inhibition of JA biosynthesis by application of IBU down-regulated the expression of MaERF and significantly weakened disease resistance, suggesting involvement of endogenous JA in induction of the gene expression, which was reconfirmed by the fact that exposure to exogenous MeJA following the combination of heat plus IBU treatment restored part of the gene expression. On the other hand, in NRB, application of IBU elevated level of MaERF1 expression at 24h and enhanced disease resistance, suggesting that, when banana was not exposed to ethephon, the expression of MaERF1 gene was not JA dependent, which was verified by the fact that MeJA application did not enhance MaERF1 gene expression. In conclusion, heat-induced disease resistance in harvested bananas could involve down-regulation of MaERS1 expression and up-regulation of MaERF1 expression and JA pathway could be involved in heat activation of the defense system in bananas exposed to ethephon.

  15. Identification and biochemical characterization of polyamine oxidases in amphioxus: Implications for emergence of vertebrate-specific spermine and acetylpolyamine oxidases.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huihui; Liu, Baobao; Li, Hongyan; Zhang, Shicui

    2016-01-10

    Polyamine oxidases (PAOs) have been identified in a wide variety of animals, as well as in fungi and plant. Generally, plant PAOs oxidize spermine (Spm), spermidine (Spd) and their acetylated derivatives, N(1)-acetylspermine (N(1)-Aspm) and N(1)-acetylspermidine (N(1)-Aspd), while yeast PAOs oxidize Spm, N(1)-Aspm and N(1)-Aspd, but not Spd. By contrast, two different enzymes, namely spermine oxidase (SMO) and acetylpolyamine oxidase (APAO), specifically catalyze the oxidation of Spm and N(1)-Aspm/N(1)-Aspd, respectively. However, our knowledge on the biochemical and structural characterization of PAOs remains rather limited, and their evolutionary history is still enigmatic. In this study, two amphioxus (Branchiostoma japonicum) PAO genes, named Bjpao1 and Bjpao2, were cloned and characterized. Both Bjpao1 and Bjpao2 displayed distinct tissue-specific expression patterns. Notably, rBjPAO1 oxidized both spermine and spermidine, but not N(1)-acetylspermine, whereas rBjPAO2 oxidizes both spermidine and N(1)-acetylspermine, but not spermine. To understand structure-function relationship, the enzymatic activities of mutant BjPAOs that were generated by site-directed mutagenesis and expressed in E. coli were examined, The results indicate that the residues H64, K301 and T460 in rBjPAO1, and H69, K315 and T467 in rBjPAO2 were all involved in substrate binding and enzyme catalytic activity to some extent. Based on our results and those of others, a model depicting the divergent evolution and functional specialization of vertebrate SMO and APAO genes is proposed.

  16. Identification and biochemical characterization of polyamine oxidases in amphioxus: Implications for emergence of vertebrate-specific spermine and acetylpolyamine oxidases.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huihui; Liu, Baobao; Li, Hongyan; Zhang, Shicui

    2016-01-10

    Polyamine oxidases (PAOs) have been identified in a wide variety of animals, as well as in fungi and plant. Generally, plant PAOs oxidize spermine (Spm), spermidine (Spd) and their acetylated derivatives, N(1)-acetylspermine (N(1)-Aspm) and N(1)-acetylspermidine (N(1)-Aspd), while yeast PAOs oxidize Spm, N(1)-Aspm and N(1)-Aspd, but not Spd. By contrast, two different enzymes, namely spermine oxidase (SMO) and acetylpolyamine oxidase (APAO), specifically catalyze the oxidation of Spm and N(1)-Aspm/N(1)-Aspd, respectively. However, our knowledge on the biochemical and structural characterization of PAOs remains rather limited, and their evolutionary history is still enigmatic. In this study, two amphioxus (Branchiostoma japonicum) PAO genes, named Bjpao1 and Bjpao2, were cloned and characterized. Both Bjpao1 and Bjpao2 displayed distinct tissue-specific expression patterns. Notably, rBjPAO1 oxidized both spermine and spermidine, but not N(1)-acetylspermine, whereas rBjPAO2 oxidizes both spermidine and N(1)-acetylspermine, but not spermine. To understand structure-function relationship, the enzymatic activities of mutant BjPAOs that were generated by site-directed mutagenesis and expressed in E. coli were examined, The results indicate that the residues H64, K301 and T460 in rBjPAO1, and H69, K315 and T467 in rBjPAO2 were all involved in substrate binding and enzyme catalytic activity to some extent. Based on our results and those of others, a model depicting the divergent evolution and functional specialization of vertebrate SMO and APAO genes is proposed. PMID:26367330

  17. Alternative oxidase in animals: unique characteristics and taxonomic distribution.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Allison E; Vanlerberghe, Greg C; Staples, James F

    2009-08-01

    Alternative oxidase (AOX), a ubiquinol oxidase, introduces a branch point into the respiratory electron transport chain, bypassing complexes III and IV and resulting in cyanide-resistant respiration. Previously, AOX was thought to be limited to plants and some fungi and protists but recent work has demonstrated the presence of AOX in most kingdoms of life, including animals. In the present study we identified AOX in 28 animal species representing nine phyla. This expands the known taxonomic distribution of AOX in animals by 10 species and two phyla. Using bioinformatics we found AOX gene sequences in members of the animal phyla Porifera, Placozoa, Cnidaria, Mollusca, Annelida, Nematoda, Echinodermata, Hemichordata and Chordata. Using reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with degenerate primers designed to recognize conserved regions of animal AOX, we demonstrated that AOX genes are transcribed in several animals from different phyla. An analysis of full-length AOX sequences revealed an amino acid motif in the C-terminal region of the protein that is unique to animal AOXs. Animal AOX also lacks an N-terminal cysteine residue that is known to be important for AOX enzyme regulation in plants. We conclude that the presence of AOX is the ancestral state in animals and hypothesize that its absence in some lineages, including vertebrates, is due to gene loss events. PMID:19648408

  18. Purification and biochemical characterization of pyruvate oxidase from Lactobacillus plantarum.

    PubMed

    Sedewitz, B; Schleifer, K H; Götz, F

    1984-10-01

    Pyruvate oxidase (EC 1.2.3.3) was isolated and characterized from Lactobacillus plantarum. The enzyme catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate in the presence of phosphate and oxygen, yielding acetyl phosphate, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen peroxide. This pyruvate oxidase is a flavoprotein, with the relatively tightly bound cofactors flavin adenine dinucleotide, thiamine pyrophosphate, and a divalent metal ion, with Mn2+ being the most effective. The enzyme is only slightly inhibited by EDTA, implying that the enzyme-bound metal ion is poorly accessible to EDTA. Only under relatively drastic conditions, such as acid ammonium sulfate precipitation, could a colorless and entirely inactive apoenzyme be obtained. A partial reactivation of the enzyme was only possible by the combined addition of flavin adenine dinucleotide, thiamine pyrophosphate, and MnSO4. The enzyme has a molecular weight of ca. 260,000 and consists of four subunits with apparently identical molecular weights of 68,000. For catalytic activity the optimum pH is 5.7, and the optimum temperature is 30 degrees C. The Km values for pyruvate, phosphate, and arsenate are 0.4, 2.3, and 1.2 mM, respectively. The substrate specificity revealed that the enzyme reacts also with certain aldehydes and that phosphate can be replaced by arsenate. In addition to oxygen, several artificial compounds can function as electron acceptors.

  19. A Broad Distribution of the Alternative Oxidase in Microsporidian Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Bryony A. P.; Elliot, Catherine; Burri, Lena; Kido, Yasutoshi; Kita, Kiyoshi; Moore, Anthony L.; Keeling, Patrick J.

    2010-01-01

    Microsporidia are a group of obligate intracellular parasitic eukaryotes that were considered to be amitochondriate until the recent discovery of highly reduced mitochondrial organelles called mitosomes. Analysis of the complete genome of Encephalitozoon cuniculi revealed a highly reduced set of proteins in the organelle, mostly related to the assembly of iron-sulphur clusters. Oxidative phosphorylation and the Krebs cycle proteins were absent, in keeping with the notion that the microsporidia and their mitosomes are anaerobic, as is the case for other mitosome bearing eukaryotes, such as Giardia. Here we provide evidence opening the possibility that mitosomes in a number of microsporidian lineages are not completely anaerobic. Specifically, we have identified and characterized a gene encoding the alternative oxidase (AOX), a typically mitochondrial terminal oxidase in eukaryotes, in the genomes of several distantly related microsporidian species, even though this gene is absent from the complete genome of E. cuniculi. In order to confirm that these genes encode functional proteins, AOX genes from both A. locustae and T. hominis were over-expressed in E. coli and AOX activity measured spectrophotometrically using ubiquinol-1 (UQ-1) as substrate. Both A. locustae and T. hominis AOX proteins reduced UQ-1 in a cyanide and antimycin-resistant manner that was sensitive to ascofuranone, a potent inhibitor of the trypanosomal AOX. The physiological role of AOX microsporidia may be to reoxidise reducing equivalents produced by glycolysis, in a manner comparable to that observed in trypanosomes. PMID:20169184

  20. Xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity of some Indian medical plants.

    PubMed

    Umamaheswari, Muthuswamy; AsokKumar, Kuppusamy; Somasundaram, Arumugam; Sivashanmugam, Thirumalaisamy; Subhadradevi, Varadharajan; Ravi, Thenvungal Kochupapy

    2007-02-12

    Xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity was assayed from six species belonging to different families traditionally used for the treatment of gout and related symptoms by indigenous people of India. The aqueous, methanol-water mixture and methanolic extract of these plants were used for the experiment. Of the 18 extracts assayed, 14 extracts demonstrated xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity at 100 microg/ml, among which 10 extracts showed an inhibition greater than 50% and IC(50) values below 100 microg/ml. The methanolic extracts of Coccinia grandis, Datura metel, Strychnos nux-vomica and Vitex negundo showed more than 50% inhibition, hence, they were screened for their in vivo hypouricaemic activity against potassium oxonate-induced hyperuricaemia in mice. Methanolic extracts of Coccinia grandis and Vitex negundo showed a significant decrease in the serum urate level (3.90+/-0.07 mg/dl, P<0.001) and (6.26+/-0.06 mg/dl, P<0.01), respectively, when compared to hyperuricaemic control (11.42+/-0.14 mg/dl). This effect is almost similar to the serum urate level of allopurinol (3.89+/-0.07 mg/dl).

  1. Lysyl oxidase propeptide inhibits smooth muscle cell signaling and proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Hurtado, Paola A.; Vora, Siddharth; Sume, Siddika Selva; Yang, Dan; Hilaire, Cynthia St.; Guo Ying; Palamakumbura, Amitha H.; Schreiber, Barbara M.; Ravid, Katya; Trackman, Philip C.

    2008-02-01

    Lysyl oxidase is required for the normal biosynthesis and maturation of collagen and elastin. It is expressed by vascular smooth muscle cells, and its increased expression has been previously found in atherosclerosis and in models of balloon angioplasty. The lysyl oxidase propeptide (LOX-PP) has more recently been found to have biological activity as a tumor suppressor, and it inhibits Erk1/2 Map kinase activation. We reasoned that LOX-PP may have functions in normal non-transformed cells. We, therefore, investigated its effects on smooth muscle cells, focusing on important biological processes mediated by Erk1/2-dependent signaling pathways including proliferation and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) expression. In addition, we investigated whether evidence for accumulation of LOX-PP could be found in vivo in a femoral artery injury model. Recombinant LOX-PP was expressed and purified, and was found to inhibit primary rat aorta smooth muscle cell proliferation and DNA synthesis by more than 50%. TNF-{alpha}-stimulated MMP-9 expression and Erk1/2 activation were both significantly inhibited by LOX-PP. Immunohistochemistry studies carried out with affinity purified anti-LOX-PP antibody showed that LOX-PP epitopes were expressed at elevated levels in vascular lesions of injured arteries. These novel data suggest that LOX-PP may provide a feedback control mechanism that serves to inhibit properties associated with the development of vascular pathology.

  2. Iron regulates xanthine oxidase activity in the lung.

    PubMed

    Ghio, Andrew J; Kennedy, Thomas P; Stonehuerner, Jacqueline; Carter, Jacqueline D; Skinner, Kelly A; Parks, Dale A; Hoidal, John R

    2002-09-01

    The iron chelator deferoxamine has been reported to inhibit both xanthine oxidase (XO) and xanthine dehydrogenase activity, but the relationship of this effect to the availability of iron in the cellular and tissue environment remains unexplored. XO and total xanthine oxidoreductase activity in cultured V79 cells was increased with exposure to ferric ammonium sulfate and inhibited by deferoxamine. Lung XO and total xanthine oxidoreductase activities were reduced in rats fed an iron-depleted diet and increased in rats supplemented with iron, without change in the ratio of XO to total oxidoreductase. Intratracheal injection of an iron salt or silica-iron, but not aluminum salts or silica-zinc, significantly increased rat lung XO and total xanthine oxidoreductase activities, immunoreactive xanthine oxidoreductase, and the concentration of urate in bronchoalveolar fluid. These results suggest the possibility that the production of uric acid, a major chelator of iron in extracellular fluid, is directly influenced by iron-mediated regulation of the expression and/or activity of its enzymatic source, xanthine oxidase.

  3. Oxidative Half-reaction of Arabidopsis thaliana Sulfite Oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Robert S.; Hänsch, Robert; Mendel, Ralf R.; Hille, Russ

    2009-01-01

    Vertebrate forms of the molybdenum-containing enzyme sulfite oxidase possess a b-type cytochrome prosthetic group that accepts reducing equivalents from the molybdenum center and passes them on to cytochrome c. The plant form of the enzyme, on the other hand, lacks a prosthetic group other than its molybdenum center and utilizes molecular oxygen as the physiological oxidant. Hydrogen peroxide is the ultimate product of the reaction. Here, we present data demonstrating that superoxide is produced essentially quantitatively both in the course of the reaction of reduced enzyme with O2 and during steady-state turnover and only subsequently decays (presumably noncatalytically) to form hydrogen peroxide. Rapid-reaction kinetic studies directly following the reoxidation of reduced enzyme demonstrate a linear dependence of the rate constant for the reaction on [O2] with a second-order rate constant of kox = 8.7 × 104 ± 0.5 × 104 m−1s−1. When the reaction is carried out in the presence of cytochrome c to follow superoxide generation, biphasic time courses are observed, indicating that a first equivalent of superoxide is generated in the oxidation of the fully reduced Mo(IV) state of the enzyme to Mo(V), followed by a slower oxidation of the Mo(V) state to Mo(VI). The physiological implications of plant sulfite oxidase as a copious generator of superoxide are discussed. PMID:19875441

  4. Alternative oxidase in animals: unique characteristics and taxonomic distribution.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Allison E; Vanlerberghe, Greg C; Staples, James F

    2009-08-01

    Alternative oxidase (AOX), a ubiquinol oxidase, introduces a branch point into the respiratory electron transport chain, bypassing complexes III and IV and resulting in cyanide-resistant respiration. Previously, AOX was thought to be limited to plants and some fungi and protists but recent work has demonstrated the presence of AOX in most kingdoms of life, including animals. In the present study we identified AOX in 28 animal species representing nine phyla. This expands the known taxonomic distribution of AOX in animals by 10 species and two phyla. Using bioinformatics we found AOX gene sequences in members of the animal phyla Porifera, Placozoa, Cnidaria, Mollusca, Annelida, Nematoda, Echinodermata, Hemichordata and Chordata. Using reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with degenerate primers designed to recognize conserved regions of animal AOX, we demonstrated that AOX genes are transcribed in several animals from different phyla. An analysis of full-length AOX sequences revealed an amino acid motif in the C-terminal region of the protein that is unique to animal AOXs. Animal AOX also lacks an N-terminal cysteine residue that is known to be important for AOX enzyme regulation in plants. We conclude that the presence of AOX is the ancestral state in animals and hypothesize that its absence in some lineages, including vertebrates, is due to gene loss events.

  5. Evolution of the primate cytochrome c oxidase subunit II gene.

    PubMed

    Adkins, R M; Honeycutt, R L

    1994-03-01

    We examined the nucleotide and amino acid sequence variation of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit II (COII) gene from 25 primates (4 hominoids, 8 Old World monkeys, 2 New World monkeys, 2 tarsiers, 7 lemuriforms, 2 lorisiforms). Marginal support was found for three phylogenetic conclusions: (1) sister-group relationship between tarsiers and a monkey/ape clade, (2) placement of the aye-aye (Daubentonia) sister to all other strepsirhine primates, and (3) rejection of a sister-group relationship of dwarf lemurs (i.e., Cheirogaleus) with lorisiform primates. Stronger support was found for a sister-group relationship between the ring-tail lemur (Lemur catta) and the gentle lemurs (Hapalemur). In congruence with previous studies on COII, we found that the monkeys and apes have undergone a nearly two-fold increase in the rate of amino acid replacement relative to other primates. Although functionally important amino acids are generally conserved among all primates, the acceleration in amino acid replacements in higher primates is associated with increased variation in the amino terminal end of the protein. Additionally, the replacement of two carboxyl-bearing residues (glutamate and aspartate) at positions 114 and 115 may provide a partial explanation for the poor enzyme kinetics in cross-reactions between the cytochromes c and cytochrome c oxidases of higher primates and other mammals. PMID:8006990

  6. Functionalized Polyacrylonitrile Nanofibrous Membranes for Covalent Immobilization of Glucose Oxidase.

    PubMed

    Manuel, James; Kim, Miso; Dharela, Rohini; Chauhan, Ghanshyam S; Fapyane, Deby; Lee, Soo-Jin; Chang, In Seop; Kang, Seo-Hee; Kim, Seon-Won; Ahn, Jou-Hyeon

    2015-01-01

    Nanofibrous membrane (NFM) with uniform morphology and large surface area was prepared from 10% solution of polyacrylonitrile (PAN) in N,N-dimethylformamide by electrospinning technique. NFM was chemically modified for use as a support for the immobilization of glucose oxidase. Chemical modification of NFM was carried out by two different methods. In the first method, the cyano groups of PAN were modified to amino groups by a two-step process, while in the second method the carboxylic groups were generated first and then further reacted with hexamethylene diamine to create a reactive spacer arm for the immobilization of enzyme. Scanning electron microscopy studies showed that the surface morphology of NFM was not changed by chemical modification and its mechanical strength was improved. The immobilized glucose oxidase (GOx) retained 54 and 60% of its original activity up to 25 cycles with the PAN NFMs modified by the first and the second method, respectively. The GOx-immobilized NFM from the second method showed promising performance with higher enzyme immobilization, activity retention, and favorable kinetic parameters. PMID:26301308

  7. Partial purification and characterization of polyphenol oxidase from persimmon.

    PubMed

    Navarro, José L; Tárrega, Amparo; Sentandreu, Miguel A; Sentandreu, Enrique

    2014-08-15

    Activity of polyphenol oxidase (PPO) from "Rojo Brillante" persimmon (Diospyros kaki L.) fruits was characterized. Crude extracts were used for characterization of enzyme activity and stability at different temperatures (60, 70 and 80 °C), pHs (from 3.5 to 7.5) and substrate concentrations (catechol from 0 to 0.5M). Maximum enzyme activity was reached at pH 5.5 and 55 °C. Enzyme stability was higher than PPO activities found in other natural sources, since above pH 5.5 the minimum time needed to achieve an enzyme inactivation of 90% was 70 min at 80 °C. However, at pH 4.0 the enzyme stability decreased, reaching inactivation levels above 90% after 10 min even at 60 °C. Thus it was concluded that acidification can circumvent browning problems caused by PPO activity. Moreover, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the enriched extract revealed the presence of at least four bands with strong oxidase activity, suggesting the existence of different PPO isoforms.

  8. Identification and characterization of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum NADPH oxidases.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyo-jin; Chen, Changbin; Kabbage, Mehdi; Dickman, Martin B

    2011-11-01

    Numerous studies have shown both the detrimental and beneficial effects of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in animals, plants, and fungi. These organisms utilize controlled generation of ROS for signaling, pathogenicity, and development. Here, we show that ROS are essential for the pathogenic development of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, an economically important fungal pathogen with a broad host range. Based on the organism's completed genome sequence, we identified two S. sclerotiorum NADPH oxidases (SsNox1 and SsNox2), which presumably are involved in ROS generation. RNA interference (RNAi) was used to examine the function of SsNox1 and SsNox2. Silencing of SsNox1 expression indicated a central role for this enzyme in both virulence and pathogenic (sclerotial) development, while inactivation of the SsNox2 gene resulted in limited sclerotial development, but the organism remained fully pathogenic. ΔSsnox1 strains had reduced ROS levels, were unable to develop sclerotia, and unexpectedly correlated with significantly reduced oxalate production. These results are in accordance with previous observations indicating that fungal NADPH oxidases are required for pathogenic development and are consistent with the importance of ROS regulation in the successful pathogenesis of S. sclerotiorum. PMID:21890677

  9. Banana Transcription Factor MaERF11 Recruits Histone Deacetylase MaHDA1 and Represses the Expression of MaACO1 and Expansins during Fruit Ripening1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yan-Chao; Kuang, Jian-Fei; Xiao, Yun-Yi; Fu, Chang-Chun; Wang, Jun-Ning

    2016-01-01

    Phytohormone ethylene controls diverse developmental and physiological processes such as fruit ripening via modulation of ethylene signaling pathway. Our previous study identified that ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTOR11 (MaERF11), a transcription factor in the ethylene signaling pathway, negatively regulates the ripening of banana, but the mechanism for the MaERF11-mediated transcriptional regulation remains largely unknown. Here we showed that MaERF11 has intrinsic transcriptional repression activity in planta. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses demonstrated that MaERF11 binds to promoters of three ripening-related Expansin genes, MaEXP2, MaEXP7 and MaEXP8, as well as an ethylene biosynthetic gene MaACO1, via the GCC-box motif. Furthermore, expression patterns of MaACO1, MaEXP2, MaEXP7, and MaEXP8 genes are correlated with the changes of histone H3 and H4 acetylation level during fruit ripening. Moreover, we found that MaERF11 physically interacts with a histone deacetylase, MaHDA1, which has histone deacetylase activity, and the interaction significantly strengthens the MaERF11-mediated transcriptional repression of MaACO1 and Expansins. Taken together, these findings suggest that MaERF11 may recruit MaHDA1 to its target genes and repress their expression via histone deacetylation. PMID:27208241

  10. Pea (Pisum sativum) diamine oxidase contains pyrroloquinoline quinone as a cofactor.

    PubMed

    Glatz, Z; Kovár, J; Macholán, L; Pec, P

    1987-03-01

    Diamine oxidase was prepared from pea (Pisum sativum) seedlings by a new purification procedure involving two h.p.l.c. steps. We studied the optical and electrochemical properties of the homogeneous enzyme and also analysed the hydrolysed protein by several methods. The data presented here suggest that the carbonyl cofactor of diamine oxidase is firmly bound pyrroloquinoline quinone.

  11. Hydroxychavicol: a potent xanthine oxidase inhibitor obtained from the leaves of betel, Piper betle.

    PubMed

    Murata, Kazuya; Nakao, Kikuyo; Hirata, Noriko; Namba, Kensuke; Nomi, Takao; Kitamura, Yoshihisa; Moriyama, Kenzo; Shintani, Takahiro; Iinuma, Munekazu; Matsuda, Hideaki

    2009-07-01

    The screening of Piperaceous plants for xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity revealed that the extract of the leaves of Piper betle possesses potent activity. Activity-guided purification led us to obtain hydroxychavicol as an active principle. Hydroxychavicol is a more potent xanthine oxidase inhibitor than allopurinol, which is clinically used for the treatment of hyperuricemia.

  12. The hemibiotrophic cacao pathogen Moniliophthora perniciosa depends on a mitochondrial alternative oxidase for biotrophic development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The mitochondrial alternative oxidase (AOX) is a non-energy conserving ubiquinol oxidase found in most fungal genomes studied to date. With the development of fungicides containing cytochrome-dependent respiratory chain (CRC) inhibitors, a strong interest in studying AOX functions in phytopathogenic...

  13. Xanthine oxidase-catalyzed metabolism of 2-nitrofluorene, a carcinogenic air pollutant, in rat skin.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Osamu; Kitamura, Shigeyuki; Ohashi, Koji; Sugihara, Kazumi; Ohta, Shigeru

    2003-04-01

    The reductive metabolism of 2-nitrofluorene, a carcinogenic air pollutant, in rat skin microsomes and cytosol was investigated. 2-Nitrofluorene was reduced to the corresponding amine by the microsomes with NADPH and by the cytosol with 2-hydroxypyrimidine or 4-hydroxypyrimidine under anaerobic conditions. The cytosolic activity was much higher than that of skin microsomes. The 2- or 4-hydroxypyrimidine-linked nitroreductase activity was inhibited by oxypurinol and (+/-)-8-(3-methoxy-4-phenylsulfinylphenyl) pyrazolo[1,5-a]-1,3,5-triazine-4(1H)-one (BOF-4272), inhibitors of xanthine oxidase, but not by menadione, chlorpromazine and isovanillin, inhibitors of aldehyde oxidase. When skin cytosol was applied to a DEAE-cellulose column, the fractions containing xanthine oxidase exhibited a marked 2-hydroxypyrimidine-linked nitroreductase activity. In contrast, the aldehyde oxidase fraction showed little activity. Nitroreductase fractions obtained by ion exchange chromatography showed a band in Western blotting analysis using anti-rat xanthine oxidase. Moreover, the xanthine oxidase fraction exhibited a significant nitroreductase activity in the presence of 2-hydroxypyrimidine, 4-hydroxypyrimidine or hypoxanthine, and these activities were inhibited by inhibitors of xanthine oxidase. These results indicated that reduction of 2-nitrofluorene in the skin was mainly catalyzed by xanthine oxidase. PMID:12642461

  14. Safety assessment of bacterial choline oxidase protein introduced in transgenic crops for tolerance against abiotic stress.

    PubMed

    Singh, Abinav K; Singh, Bhanu P; Prasad, G B K S; Gaur, Shailendra N; Arora, Naveen

    2008-12-24

    Genetically modified crops have resistance to abiotic stress by introduction of choline oxidase protein. In the present study, the safety of choline oxidase protein derived from Arthrobacter globiformis was assessed for toxicity and allergenicity. The protein was stable at 90 degrees C for 1 h. Toxicity studies of choline oxidase in mice showed no significant difference (p > 0.05) from control in terms of growth, body weight, food consumption, and blood biochemical indices. Histology of gut tissue of mice fed protein showed normal gastric mucosal lining and villi in jejunum and ileum sections. Specific IgE in serum and IL-4 release in splenic culture supernatant were low in choline oxidase treated mice, comparable to control. Intravenous challenge with choline oxidase did not induce any adverse reaction, unlike ovalbumin group mice. Histology of lung tissues from choline oxidase sensitized mice showed normal airways, whereas ovalbumin-sensitized mice showed inflamed airways with eosinophilic infiltration and bronchoconstriction. ELISA carried out with food allergic patients' sera revealed no significant IgE affinity with choline oxidase. Also, choline oxidase did not show any symptoms of toxicity and allergenicity in mice.

  15. Cytoplasmic CopZ-Like Protein and Periplasmic Rusticyanin and AcoP Proteins as Possible Copper Resistance Determinants in Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans ATCC 23270

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, Claudio A.; von Bernath, Diego; Martínez-Bussenius, Cristóbal; Castillo, Rodrigo A.

    2015-01-01

    Acidophilic organisms, such as Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, possess high-level resistance to copper and other metals. A. ferrooxidans contains canonical copper resistance determinants present in other bacteria, such as CopA ATPases and RND efflux pumps, but these components do not entirely explain its high metal tolerance. The aim of this study was to find other possible copper resistance determinants in this bacterium. Transcriptional expression of A. ferrooxidans genes coding for a cytoplasmic CopZ-like copper-binding chaperone and the periplasmic copper-binding proteins rusticyanin and AcoP, which form part of an iron-oxidizing supercomplex, was found to increase when the microorganism was grown in the presence of copper. All of these proteins conferred more resistance to copper when expressed heterologously in a copper-sensitive Escherichia coli strain. This effect was absent when site-directed-mutation mutants of these proteins with altered copper-binding sites were used in this metal sensitivity assay. These results strongly suggest that the three copper-binding proteins analyzed here are copper resistance determinants in this extremophile and contribute to the high-level metal resistance of this industrially important biomining bacterium. PMID:26637599

  16. Cytoplasmic CopZ-Like Protein and Periplasmic Rusticyanin and AcoP Proteins as Possible Copper Resistance Determinants in Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans ATCC 23270.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Claudio A; von Bernath, Diego; Martínez-Bussenius, Cristóbal; Castillo, Rodrigo A; Jerez, Carlos A

    2016-02-01

    Acidophilic organisms, such as Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, possess high-level resistance to copper and other metals. A. ferrooxidans contains canonical copper resistance determinants present in other bacteria, such as CopA ATPases and RND efflux pumps, but these components do not entirely explain its high metal tolerance. The aim of this study was to find other possible copper resistance determinants in this bacterium. Transcriptional expression of A. ferrooxidans genes coding for a cytoplasmic CopZ-like copper-binding chaperone and the periplasmic copper-binding proteins rusticyanin and AcoP, which form part of an iron-oxidizing supercomplex, was found to increase when the microorganism was grown in the presence of copper. All of these proteins conferred more resistance to copper when expressed heterologously in a copper-sensitive Escherichia coli strain. This effect was absent when site-directed-mutation mutants of these proteins with altered copper-binding sites were used in this metal sensitivity assay. These results strongly suggest that the three copper-binding proteins analyzed here are copper resistance determinants in this extremophile and contribute to the high-level metal resistance of this industrially important biomining bacterium. PMID:26637599

  17. Cox26 is a novel stoichiometric subunit of the yeast cytochrome c oxidase.

    PubMed

    Levchenko, Maria; Wuttke, Jan-Moritz; Römpler, Katharina; Schmidt, Bernhard; Neifer, Klaus; Juris, Lisa; Wissel, Mirjam; Rehling, Peter; Deckers, Markus

    2016-07-01

    The cytochrome c oxidase (COX) is the terminal enzyme of the respiratory chain. The complex accepts electrons from cytochrome c and passes them onto molecular oxygen. This process contributes to energy capture in the form of a membrane potential across the inner membrane. The enzyme complex assembles in a stepwise process from the three mitochondria-encoded core subunits Cox1, Cox2 and Cox3, which associate with nuclear-encoded subunits and cofactors. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the cytochrome c oxidase associates with the bc1-complex into supercomplexes, allowing efficient energy transduction. Here we report on Cox26 as a protein found in respiratory chain supercomplexes containing cytochrome c oxidase. Our analyses reveal Cox26 as a novel stoichiometric structural subunit of the cytochrome c oxidase. A loss of Cox26 affects cytochrome c oxidase activity and respirasome organization.

  18. An extracellular quinoprotein oxidase that catalyzes conversion of enacyloxin IVa to enacyloxin IIa.

    PubMed

    Oyama, R; Watanabe, T; Hanzawa, H; Sano, T; Sugiyama, T; Izaki, K

    1994-10-01

    A new extracellular quinoprotein oxidase named enacyloxin oxidase (ENX oxidase), which is involved in biosynthesis of ENX IIa, a congener of ENX, was found in the culture supernatant of Frateuria sp. W-315 and purified as a homogeneous protein on SDS-PAGE. ENX oxidase was shown to have a molecular mass of 73 kDa by SDS-PAGE and 79 kDa by gel filtration. The enzyme was inhibited by various carbonyl reagents and the activity was stimulated by addition of PQQ. This is the first report on a quinoprotein oxidase that is secreted into the culture medium in the logarithmic growth phase, and acts for biosynthesis of the antibiotic.

  19. Rcf1 mediates cytochrome oxidase assembly and respirasome formation, revealing heterogeneity of the enzyme complex.

    PubMed

    Vukotic, Milena; Oeljeklaus, Silke; Wiese, Sebastian; Vögtle, F Nora; Meisinger, Chris; Meyer, Helmut E; Zieseniss, Anke; Katschinski, Doerthe M; Jans, Daniel C; Jakobs, Stefan; Warscheid, Bettina; Rehling, Peter; Deckers, Markus

    2012-03-01

    The terminal enzyme of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, cytochrome oxidase, transfers electrons to molecular oxygen, generating water. Within the inner mitochondrial membrane, cytochrome oxidase assembles into supercomplexes, together with other respiratory chain complexes, forming so-called respirasomes. Little is known about how these higher oligomeric structures are attained. Here we report on Rcf1 and Rcf2 as cytochrome oxidase subunits in S. cerevisiae. While Rcf2 is specific to yeast, Rcf1 is a conserved subunit with two human orthologs, RCF1a and RCF1b. Rcf1 is required for growth in hypoxia and complex assembly of subunits Cox13 and Rcf2, as well as for the oligomerization of a subclass of cytochrome oxidase complexes into respirasomes. Our analyses reveal that the cytochrome oxidase of mitochondria displays intrinsic heterogeneity with regard to its subunit composition and that distinct forms of respirasomes can be formed by complex variants.

  20. [Molecular docking analysis of xanthine oxidase inhibition by constituents of cichory].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xue-jie; Lin, Zhi-jian; Zhang, Bing; Zhu, Chun-sheng; Niu, Hong-juan; Zhou, Yue; Nie, An-zheng; Wang, Yu

    2015-10-01

    Human xanthine oxidase is considered to be a target for therapy of hyperuricemia. Cichorium intybus is a Chinese plant medicine which widely used in Xinjiang against various diseases. In order to screen the inhibitors of xanthine oxidase from C. intybus and to explore main pharmacological actions of cichory a compound collection of C. intybus was built via consulting related references about chemical research on cichory. The three-dimensional crystal structure of xanthine oxidase (PDB code: 1N5X) from Protein Data Bank was downloaded.. Autodock 4.2 was employed to screen the inhibitors of xanthine oxidase from cichory 70 compounds were found to possess quite low binding free energy comparing with TEI (febuxostat). C. intybus contains constituents possessing potential inhibitive activity against xanthine oxidase. It can explain the main pharmacological actions of cichory which can significantly lower the level of serum uric acid. PMID:26975108

  1. The oxidase activity of vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1) is essential for function.

    PubMed

    Noonan, Thomas; Lukas, Susan; Peet, Gregory W; Pelletier, Josephine; Panzenbeck, Mark; Hanidu, Adedayo; Mazurek, Suzanne; Wasti, Ruby; Rybina, Irina; Roma, Teresa; Kronkaitis, Anthony; Shoultz, Alycia; Souza, Donald; Jiang, Huiping; Nabozny, Gerald; Modis, Louise Kelly

    2013-01-01

    Vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases and is suggested to play a role in immune cell trafficking. It is not clear whether this effect is mediated by the oxidase activity or by other features of the protein such as direct adhesion. In order to study the role of VAP-1 oxidase activity in vivo, we have generated mice carrying an oxidase activity-null VAP-1 protein. We demonstrate that the VAP-1 oxidase null mutant mice have a phenotype similar to the VAP-1 null mice in animal models of sterile peritonitis and antibody induced arthritis suggesting that the oxidase activity is responsible for the inflammatory function of VAP-1.

  2. Low-temperature kinetics of the reaction of oxygen and solubilized cytochrome oxidase.

    PubMed Central

    Chance, B; Saronio, C; Leigh, J S; Ingledew, W J; King, T E

    1978-01-01

    The reaction of solubilized cytochrome oxidase in the fully reduced state with O2 at low temperatures reveals components with characteristics similar to those observed with the membrane-bound oxidase, namely compounds A and B, which are proposed to be 'oxy' and 'peroxy' compounds respectively. Similar species are identified in both solubilized and membrane-bound oxidases; the reaction velocity constant for the reation with O2 and the dissociation constant are decreased 2-3-fold in the solubilied preparation as compared with the membrane-bound species, owing to decreased reactivity towards O2 in the former. The oxidase prepared in the mixed-valence state shows the distinctive absorption band characteristic of compound C, identified in the membrane-bound oxidase. The assignment of the alpha, beta, gamma and near-i.r. absorption bands to possible valence states of these compounds is made. PMID:208516

  3. NADPH Oxidase 1 and Its Derived Reactive Oxygen Species Mediated Tissue Injury and Repair

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Xiu-Jun; Peng, Ying-Bo; Hu, Yi-Ping; Shi, You-Zhen; Yao, Min; Zhang, Xiong

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species are mostly viewed to cause oxidative damage to various cells and induce organ dysfunction after ischemia-reperfusion injury. However, they are also considered as crucial molecules for cellular signal transduction in biology. NADPH oxidase, whose only function is reactive oxygen species production, has been extensively investigated in many cell types especially phagocytes. The deficiency of NADPH oxidase extends the process of inflammation and delays tissue repair, which causes chronic granulomatous disease in patients. NADPH oxidase 1, one member of the NADPH oxidase family, is not only constitutively expressed in a variety of tissues, but also induced to increase expression in both mRNA and protein levels under many circumstances. NADPH oxidase 1 and its derived reactive oxygen species are suggested to be able to regulate inflammation reaction, cell proliferation and migration, and extracellular matrix synthesis, which contribute to the processes of tissue injury and repair. PMID:24669283

  4. Expression and Chloroplast Targeting of Cholesterol Oxidase in Transgenic Tobacco Plants

    PubMed Central

    Corbin, David R.; Grebenok, Robert J.; Ohnmeiss, Thomas E.; Greenplate, John T.; Purcell, John P.

    2001-01-01

    Cholesterol oxidase represents a novel type of insecticidal protein with potent activity against the cotton boll weevil (Anthonomus grandis grandis Boheman). We transformed tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants with the cholesterol oxidase choM gene and expressed cytosolic and chloroplast-targeted versions of the ChoM protein. Transgenic leaf tissues expressing cholesterol oxidase exerted insecticidal activity against boll weevil larvae. Our results indicate that cholesterol oxidase can metabolize phytosterols in vivo when produced cytosolically or when targeted to chloroplasts. The transgenic plants exhibiting cytosolic expression accumulated low levels of saturated sterols known as stanols, and displayed severe developmental aberrations. In contrast, the transgenic plants expressing chloroplast-targeted cholesterol oxidase maintained a greater accumulation of stanols, and appeared phenotypically and developmentally normal. These results are discussed within the context of plant sterol distribution and metabolism. PMID:11457962

  5. [Molecular docking analysis of xanthine oxidase inhibition by constituents of cichory].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xue-jie; Lin, Zhi-jian; Zhang, Bing; Zhu, Chun-sheng; Niu, Hong-juan; Zhou, Yue; Nie, An-zheng; Wang, Yu

    2015-10-01

    Human xanthine oxidase is considered to be a target for therapy of hyperuricemia. Cichorium intybus is a Chinese plant medicine which widely used in Xinjiang against various diseases. In order to screen the inhibitors of xanthine oxidase from C. intybus and to explore main pharmacological actions of cichory a compound collection of C. intybus was built via consulting related references about chemical research on cichory. The three-dimensional crystal structure of xanthine oxidase (PDB code: 1N5X) from Protein Data Bank was downloaded.. Autodock 4.2 was employed to screen the inhibitors of xanthine oxidase from cichory 70 compounds were found to possess quite low binding free energy comparing with TEI (febuxostat). C. intybus contains constituents possessing potential inhibitive activity against xanthine oxidase. It can explain the main pharmacological actions of cichory which can significantly lower the level of serum uric acid.

  6. Digenic inheritance of mutations in the coproporphyrinogen oxidase and protoporphyrinogen oxidase genes in a unique type of porphyria.

    PubMed

    van Tuyll van Serooskerken, Anne Moniek; de Rooij, Felix W; Edixhoven, Annie; Bladergroen, Reno S; Baron, Jens M; Joussen, Sylvia; Merk, Hans F; Steijlen, Peter M; Poblete-Gutiérrez, Pamela; te Velde, Kornelis; Wilson, J H Paul; Koole, Rita H; van Geel, Michel; Frank, Jorge

    2011-11-01

    The simultaneous dysfunction of two enzymes within the heme biosynthetic pathway in a single patient is rare. Not more than 15 cases have been reported. A woman with a transient episode of severe photosensitivity showed a biochemical porphyrin profile suggestive of hereditary coproporphyria (HCP), whereas some of her relatives had a profile that was suggestive of variegate porphyria (VP). HCP and VP result from a partial enzymatic deficiency of coproporphyrinogen oxidase (CPOX) and protoporphyrinogen oxidase (PPOX), respectively. DNA analysis in the index patient revealed mutations in both the CPOX and PPOX genes, designated as c.557-15C>G and c.1289dupT, respectively. The CPOX mutation leads to a cryptic splice site resulting in retention of 14 nucleotides from intron 1 in the mRNA transcript. Both mutations encode null alleles and were associated with nonsense-mediated mRNA decay. Given the digenic inheritance of these null mutations, coupled with the fact that both HCP and VP can manifest with life-threatening acute neurovisceral attacks, the unusual aspect of this case is a relatively mild clinical phenotype restricted to dermal photosensitivity.

  7. Spatiotemporal Localization of d-Amino Acid Oxidase and d-Aspartate Oxidases during Development in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Saitoh, Yasuaki; Katane, Masumi; Kawata, Tomonori; Maeda, Kazuhiro; Sekine, Masae; Furuchi, Takemitsu; Kobuna, Hiroyuki; Sakamoto, Taro; Inoue, Takao; Arai, Hiroyuki; Nakagawa, Yasuhito

    2012-01-01

    Recent investigations have shown that a variety of d-amino acids are present in living organisms and that they possibly play important roles in physiological functions in the body. d-Amino acid oxidase (DAO) and d-aspartate oxidase (DDO) are degradative enzymes stereospecific for d-amino acids. They have been identified in various organisms, including mammals and the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, although the significance of these enzymes and the relevant functions of d-amino acids remain to be elucidated. In this study, we investigated the spatiotemporal localization of C. elegans DAO and DDOs (DDO-1, DDO-2, and DDO-3) and measured the levels of several d- and l-amino acids in wild-type C. elegans and four mutants in which each gene for DAO and the DDOs was partially deleted and thereby inactivated. Furthermore, several phenotypes of these mutant strains were characterized. The results reported in this study indicate that C. elegans DAO and DDOs are involved in egg-laying events and the early development of C. elegans. In particular, DDOs appear to play important roles in the development and maturation of germ cells. This work provides novel and useful insights into the physiological functions of these enzymes and d-amino acids in multicellular organisms. PMID:22393259

  8. Xanthine oxidase inhibition by febuxostat attenuates experimental atherosclerosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Johji; Busso, Nathalie; Ives, Annette; Matsui, Chieko; Tsujimoto, Syunsuke; Shirakura, Takashi; Tamura, Mizuho; Kobayashi, Tsunefumi; So, Alexander; Yamanaka, Yoshihiro

    2014-04-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease due to lipid deposition in the arterial wall. Multiple mechanisms participate in the inflammatory process, including oxidative stress. Xanthine oxidase (XO) is a major source of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and has been linked to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we show enhanced XO expression in macrophages in the atherosclerotic plaque and in aortic endothelial cells in ApoE(-/-) mice, and that febuxostat, a highly potent XO inhibitor, suppressed plaque formation, reduced arterial ROS levels and improved endothelial dysfunction in ApoE(-/-) mice without affecting plasma cholesterol levels. In vitro, febuxostat inhibited cholesterol crystal-induced ROS formation and inflammatory cytokine release in murine macrophages. These results demonstrate that in the atherosclerotic plaque, XO-mediated ROS formation is pro-inflammatory and XO-inhibition by febuxostat is a potential therapy for atherosclerosis.

  9. Resolution of thylakoid polyphenol oxidase and a protein kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Race, H.L.; Davenport, J.W.; Hind, G.

    1995-12-31

    The predominant protein kinase activity in octylglucoside (OG) extracts of spinach thylakoids has been attributed to a 64-kDa protein, tp64. Recent work calls into question the relation between tp64 and protein kinase activity, which were fractionated apart using fluid phase IEF and hydroxylapatite chromatography. Hind et al. sequenced tp64 from the cDNA and showed it to be a polyphenol oxidase (PPO) homolog. Its transit peptide indicates a location for the mature protein within the thylakoid lumen, where there is presumably no ATP and where it is remote from the presumed kinase substrates: the stromally exposed regions of integral PS-II membrane proteins. Here the authors suggest that the kinase is a 64-kDa protein distinct from tp64.

  10. Partial characterization of polyphenol oxidase activity in raspberry fruits.

    PubMed

    González, E M; de Ancos, B; Cano, M P

    1999-10-01

    A partial characterization of polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activity in raspberry fruits is described. Two early cultivars harvested in May/June (Heritage and Autumm Bliss) and two late cultivars harvested in October-November (Ceva and Rubi) were analyzed for PPO activity. Stable and highly active PPO extracts were obtained using insoluble poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP) and Triton X-100 in sodium phosphate, pH 7.0 buffer. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of raspberry extracts under nondenaturing conditions resolved in one band (R(f)()(1) = 0.25). Raspberry PPO activity has pH optima of 8.0 and 5.5, both with catechol (0.1 M). Maximum activity was with D-catechin (catecholase activity), followed by p-coumaric acid (cresolase activity). Heritage raspberry also showed PPO activity toward 4-methylcatechol. Ceva and Autumm Bliss raspberries showed the higher PPO activity using catechol as substrate.

  11. Traumatic brain injury and NADPH oxidase: a deep relationship.

    PubMed

    Angeloni, Cristina; Prata, Cecilia; Dalla Sega, Francesco Vieceli; Piperno, Roberto; Hrelia, Silvana

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) represents one of the major causes of mortality and disability in the world. TBI is characterized by primary damage resulting from the mechanical forces applied to the head as a direct result of the trauma and by the subsequent secondary injury due to a complex cascade of biochemical events that eventually lead to neuronal cell death. Oxidative stress plays a pivotal role in the genesis of the delayed harmful effects contributing to permanent damage. NADPH oxidases (Nox), ubiquitary membrane multisubunit enzymes whose unique function is the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), have been shown to be a major source of ROS in the brain and to be involved in several neurological diseases. Emerging evidence demonstrates that Nox is upregulated after TBI, suggesting Nox critical role in the onset and development of this pathology. In this review, we summarize the current evidence about the role of Nox enzymes in the pathophysiology of TBI.

  12. Xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity of Lychnophora species from Brazil ("Arnica").

    PubMed

    Filha, Z S Ferraz; Vitolo, I F; Fietto, L G; Lombardi, J A; Saúde-Guimarães, D A

    2006-08-11

    Twenty-two extracts from five Lychnophora species and one Lychnophoriopsis species, traditionally used in Brazil as analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and to treat bruise and rheumatism were examined for the inhibition of xanthine oxidase (XO), the enzyme that catalyses the metabolism of hypoxanthine and xanthine into uric acid. Sixteen extracts were tested. All of them were found to have excellent XO inhibitory activity, with inhibitions greater than 38% at 100 microg/mL in the assay mixture. The most active plants examined were Lychnophora trichocarpha, Lychnophora ericoides, Lychnophora staavioides and Lychnophoriopsis candelabrum, with inhibitions of 77%, 78%, 66% and 63% at 100 microg/mL, respectively, and IC(50) values of 6.16, 8.28, 33.97 and 37.70 microg/mL, respectively.

  13. Lysyl Oxidase (Lox) Gene Deficiency Affects Osteoblastic Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Pischon, N.; Mäki, J. M.; Weisshaupt, P.; Heng, N.; Palamakumbura, A. H.; N'Guessan, P.; Ding, A.; Radlanski, R.; Renz, H.; Bronckers, T. A. L. J. J.; Myllyharju, J.; Kielbassa, A.; Kleber, B. M.; Bernimoulin, J.-P.; Trackman, P.C.

    2010-01-01

    Lysyl oxidase (LOX) catalyzes cross-linking of elastin and collagen, which is essential for structural integrity and function of bone tissue. The present study examined the role of Lox gene deficiency for the osteoblast phenotype in primary calvarial osteoblasts from E18.5 Lox knockout (Lox-/-) and wild type (wt) (C57 BL/6) mice. Next to Lox gene depletion, mRNA expression of Lox isoforms, LOXL1-4, was significantly down-regulated in Lox-/- bone tissue. A significant decrease of DNA synthesis of Lox-/- osteoblasts compared to wt was found. Early stages of osteoblastic apoptosis studied by Annexin-V binding as well as later stages of DNA fragmentation were not affected. However, mineral nodule formation and osteoblastic differentiation were markedly decreased, as revealed by significant down-regulation of osteoblastic markers, type I collagen, BSP and Runx2/Cbfa1. PMID:19458888

  14. The NADPH oxidase Nox4 and aging in the heart.

    PubMed

    Ago, Tetsuro; Matsushima, Shouji; Kuroda, Junya; Zablocki, Daniela; Kitazono, Takanari; Sadoshima, Junichi

    2010-12-01

    Oxidative stress in mitochondria is believed to promote aging. Although passive leakage of electron from the mitochondrial electron transport chain has been considered as a major source of oxidative stress in the heart and the cardiomyocytes therein, enzymes actively producing reactive oxygen species may also exist in mitochondria. We have shown recently that Nox4, a member of the NADPH oxidase family, is localized on intracellular membranes, primarily at mitochondria, in cardiomyocytes. Mitochondrial expression of Nox4 is upregulated by cardiac stress and aging in the heart, where Nox4 could become a major source of oxidative stress. This raises an intriguing possibility that Nox4 may play an important role in mediating aging of the heart. Here we discuss the potential involvement of Nox4 in mitochondrial oxidative stress and aging in the heart.

  15. Xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity of Hungarian wild-growing mushrooms.

    PubMed

    Ványolós, Attila; Orbán-Gyapai, Orsolya; Hohmann, Judit

    2014-08-01

    Mushrooms represent a remarkable and yet largely unexplored source of new, biologically active natural products. In this work, we report on the xanthine oxidase (XO) inhibitory activity of 47 wild-growing mushrooms native to Hungary. Aqueous and organic (n-hexane, chloroform, and 50% methanol) extracts of selected mushrooms from different families were screened for their XO inhibitory activities. Among the 188 extracts investigated, the chloroform and 50% methanol fractions proved to be the most effective. Some species exhibited high inhibitory activity, e.g., Hypholoma fasciculare (IC50  =67.76 ± 11.05 µg/mL), Suillus grevillei (IC50  =13.28 ± 1.58 µg/mL), and Tricholoma populinum (IC50  =85.08 ± 15.02 µg/mL); others demonstrated moderate or weak activity. Additional studies are warranted to characterize the compounds responsible for the XO inhibitory activity of mushroom extracts.

  16. Chromenylchalcones with inhibitory effects on monoamine oxidase B.

    PubMed

    Jo, Geunhyeong; Ahn, Seunghyun; Kim, Bong-Gyu; Park, Hye Ri; Kim, Young Hwa; Choo, Hyun Ah; Koh, Dongsoo; Chong, Youhoon; Ahn, Joong-Hoon; Lim, Yoongho

    2013-12-15

    Structure-activity relationship (SAR) calculations were used to find monoamine oxidase-B (MAO-B) inhibitors by identifying pharmacophores exhibiting high inhibitory activities. Several such chromenylchalcones were designed and synthesized accordingly. Their inhibitory effects on MAO-B were determined using an HPLC-based method and an MAO-B enzyme assay kit. (E)-3-(6-Methoxy-2H-chromen-3-yl)-1-(2-methoxyphenyl)prop-2-en-1-one exhibited a half-maximal inhibitory concentration of 320 nM. Its molecular-level binding mode with the three-dimensional structure of MAO-B was elucidated using an in silico docking study. The chromenylchalcone scaffold, which is derived from natural products including isoflavonoids and chalcones, had not been previously reported as an MAO-B inhibitor.

  17. Isolation and characterization of sulfite oxidase from Alligator mississipiensis

    SciTech Connect

    Robbins, A.; Neame, P.J.; Barber, M.J. )

    1991-03-11

    Sulfite oxidase has been isolated from fresh alligator liver using ammonium sulfate and acetone fractionation, DEAE chromatography and FPLC on Mono Q. The enzyme is dimeric and exhibits a subunit M. Wt. of approximately 58 kDa, larger than that of chicken SO. EPR spectroscopy of the partially-reduced enzyme revealed a single Mo(V) species while visible spectroscopy revealed the presence of cytochrome b{sub 557}. Maximal activities were obtained at pH 8 and 9, respectively. K{sub m}'s for SO{sub 3}{sup 2 {minus}}, cyt. c and Fe(CN){sub 6}{sup 3 {minus}} were 23.5 uM, 2.9 uM and 8.0 uM, respectively. Sequencing of peptides obtained by endoprotease K digestion indicated regions of extensive sequence similarity to chicken and rat enzymes in both heme and Mo-pterin domains. Regions of sequence dissimilarity were also found.

  18. Traumatic Brain Injury and NADPH Oxidase: A Deep Relationship

    PubMed Central

    Prata, Cecilia; Vieceli Dalla Sega, Francesco; Piperno, Roberto; Hrelia, Silvana

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) represents one of the major causes of mortality and disability in the world. TBI is characterized by primary damage resulting from the mechanical forces applied to the head as a direct result of the trauma and by the subsequent secondary injury due to a complex cascade of biochemical events that eventually lead to neuronal cell death. Oxidative stress plays a pivotal role in the genesis of the delayed harmful effects contributing to permanent damage. NADPH oxidases (Nox), ubiquitary membrane multisubunit enzymes whose unique function is the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), have been shown to be a major source of ROS in the brain and to be involved in several neurological diseases. Emerging evidence demonstrates that Nox is upregulated after TBI, suggesting Nox critical role in the onset and development of this pathology. In this review, we summarize the current evidence about the role of Nox enzymes in the pathophysiology of TBI. PMID:25918580

  19. Biogenesis and Assembly of Eukaryotic Cytochrome c Oxidase Catalytic Core

    PubMed Central

    Soto, Ileana C.; Fontanesi, Flavia; Liu, Jingjing; Barrientos, Antoni

    2011-01-01

    Eukaryotic cytochrome c oxidase (COX) is the terminal enzyme of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. COX is a multimeric enzyme formed by subunits of dual genetic origin which assembly is intricate and highly regulated. The COX catalytic core is formed by three mitochondrial DNA encoded subunits, Cox1, Cox2 and Cox3, conserved in the bacterial enzyme. Their biogenesis requires the action of messenger-specific and subunit-specific factors which facilitate the synthesis, membrane insertion, maturation or assembly of the core subunits. The study of yeast strains and human cell lines from patients carrying mutations in structural subunits and COX assembly factors has been invaluable to identify these ancillary factors. Here we review the current state of knowledge of the biogenesis and assembly of the eukaryotic COX catalytic core and discuss the degree of conservation of the players and mechanisms operating from yeast to human. PMID:21958598

  20. Rational surface silane modification for immobilizing glucose oxidase.

    PubMed

    Tian, Feibao; Guo, Yi; Lin, Feifei; Zhang, Yumei; Yuan, Qipeng; Liang, Hao

    2016-06-01

    Glucose oxidase (GOx) has many significant applications in biosensor and biocatalysis. In this study, we firstly quantitatively analyzed the binding efficiency of (3-aminopropyl) trimethoxysilane (APTES) modified onto the surface of GOx. It was found that the contents of the grafted silane did not significantly influence the relative activities and tertiary structures of all surface modified GOxs. Immobilization ratio and relative activity of all instances of APTES modified GOx increased, compared with those of native enzyme. However, good stability of immobilized GOx at extreme pH and high temperature could only be obtained when modified protein with low binding silane content. At pH 2.0, the immobilized GOx with low binding content showed a more than 600% activity, compared to the free enzyme. Therefore, rational surface modification would be beneficial to improving the activity and stability of immobilized enzyme as well as increasing loading amount.

  1. Dual Role of the Plastid Terminal Oxidase in Tomato

    PubMed Central

    Shahbazi, Maryam; Gilbert, Matthias; Labouré, Anne-Marie; Kuntz, Marcel

    2007-01-01

    The plastid terminal oxidase (PTOX) is a plastoquinol oxidase whose absence in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) results in the ghost (gh) phenotype characterized by variegated leaves (with green and bleached sectors) and by carotenoid-deficient ripe fruit. We show that PTOX deficiency leads to photobleaching in cotyledons exposed to high light primarily as a consequence of reduced ability to synthesize carotenoids in the gh mutant, which is consistent with the known role of PTOX as a phytoene desaturase cofactor. In contrast, when entirely green adult leaves from gh were produced and submitted to photobleaching high light conditions, no evidence for a deficiency in carotenoid biosynthesis was obtained. Rather, consistent evidence indicates that the absence of PTOX renders the tomato leaf photosynthetic apparatus more sensitive to light via a disturbance of the plastoquinone redox status. Although gh fruit are normally bleached (most likely as a consequence of a deficiency in carotenoid biosynthesis at an early developmental stage), green adult fruit could be obtained and submitted to photobleaching high light conditions. Again, our data suggest a role of PTOX in the regulation of photosynthetic electron transport in adult green fruit, rather than a role principally devoted to carotenoid biosynthesis. In contrast, ripening fruit are primarily dependent on PTOX and on plastid integrity for carotenoid desaturation. In summary, our data show a dual role for PTOX. Its activity is necessary for efficient carotenoid desaturation in some organs at some developmental stages, but not all, suggesting the existence of a PTOX-independent pathway for plastoquinol reoxidation in association with phytoene desaturase. As a second role, PTOX is implicated in a chlororespiratory mechanism in green tissues. PMID:17873087

  2. Physiological role of alternative oxidase (from yeasts to plants).

    PubMed

    Rogov, A G; Zvyagilskaya, R A

    2015-04-01

    Mitochondria of all so far studied organisms, with the exception of Archaea, mammals, some yeasts, and protists, contain, along with the classical phosphorylating cytochrome pathway, a so-called cyanide-insensitive alternative oxidase (AOX) localized on the matrix side of the mitochondrial inner membrane, and electron transport through which is not coupled with ATP synthesis and energy accumulation. Mechanisms underlying plentiful functions of AOX in organisms at various levels of organization ranging from yeasts to plants are considered. First and foremost, AOX provides a chance of cell survival after inhibiting the terminal components of the main respiratory chain or losing the ability to synthesize these components. The vitally important role of AOX is obvious in thermogenesis of thermogenic plant organs where it becomes the only terminal oxidase with a very high activity, and the energy of substrate oxidation by this respiratory pathway is converted into heat, thus promoting evaporation of volatile substances attracting pollinating insects. AOX plays a fundamentally significant role in alleviating or preventing oxidative stress, thus ensuring the defense against a wide range of stresses and adverse environmental conditions, such as changes in temperature and light intensities, osmotic stress, drought, and attack by incompatible strains of bacterial pathogens, phytopathogens, or their elicitors. Participation of AOX in pathogen survival during its existence inside the host, in antivirus defense, as well as in metabolic rearrangements in plants during embryogenesis and cell differentiation is described. Examples are given to demonstrate that AOX might be an important tool to overcome the adverse aftereffects of restricted activity of the main respiratory chain in cells and whole animals.

  3. Physiological role of alternative oxidase (from yeasts to plants).

    PubMed

    Rogov, A G; Zvyagilskaya, R A

    2015-04-01

    Mitochondria of all so far studied organisms, with the exception of Archaea, mammals, some yeasts, and protists, contain, along with the classical phosphorylating cytochrome pathway, a so-called cyanide-insensitive alternative oxidase (AOX) localized on the matrix side of the mitochondrial inner membrane, and electron transport through which is not coupled with ATP synthesis and energy accumulation. Mechanisms underlying plentiful functions of AOX in organisms at various levels of organization ranging from yeasts to plants are considered. First and foremost, AOX provides a chance of cell survival after inhibiting the terminal components of the main respiratory chain or losing the ability to synthesize these components. The vitally important role of AOX is obvious in thermogenesis of thermogenic plant organs where it becomes the only terminal oxidase with a very high activity, and the energy of substrate oxidation by this respiratory pathway is converted into heat, thus promoting evaporation of volatile substances attracting pollinating insects. AOX plays a fundamentally significant role in alleviating or preventing oxidative stress, thus ensuring the defense against a wide range of stresses and adverse environmental conditions, such as changes in temperature and light intensities, osmotic stress, drought, and attack by incompatible strains of bacterial pathogens, phytopathogens, or their elicitors. Participation of AOX in pathogen survival during its existence inside the host, in antivirus defense, as well as in metabolic rearrangements in plants during embryogenesis and cell differentiation is described. Examples are given to demonstrate that AOX might be an important tool to overcome the adverse aftereffects of restricted activity of the main respiratory chain in cells and whole animals. PMID:25869356

  4. NADPH oxidase 2 plays a role in experimental corneal neovascularization.

    PubMed

    Chan, Elsa C; van Wijngaarden, Peter; Chan, Elsie; Ngo, Darleen; Wang, Jiang-Hui; Peshavariya, Hitesh M; Dusting, Gregory J; Liu, Guei-Sheung

    2016-05-01

    Corneal neovascularization, the growth of new blood vessels in the cornea, is a leading cause of vision impairment after corneal injury. Neovascularization typically occurs in response to corneal injury such as that caused by infection, physical trauma, chemical burns or in the setting of corneal transplant rejection. The NADPH oxidase enzyme complex is involved in cell signalling for wound-healing angiogenesis, but its role in corneal neovascularization has not been studied. We have now analysed the role of the Nox2 isoform of NADPH oxidase in corneal neovascularization in mice following chemical injury. C57BL/6 mice aged 8-14 weeks were cauterized with an applicator coated with 75% silver nitrate and 25% potassium nitrate for 8 s. Neovascularization extending radially from limbal vessels was observed in corneal whole-mounts from cauterized wild type mice and CD31+ vessels were identified in cauterized corneal sections at day 7. In contrast, in Nox2 knockout (Nox2 KO) mice vascular endothelial growth factor-A (Vegf-A), Flt1 mRNA expression, and the extent of corneal neovascularization were all markedly reduced compared with their wild type controls. The accumulation of Iba-1+ microglia and macrophages in the cornea was significantly less in Nox2 KO than in wild type mice. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that Nox2 is implicated in the inflammatory and neovascular response to corneal chemical injury in mice and clearly VEGF is a mediator of this effect. This work raises the possibility that therapies targeting Nox2 may have potential for suppressing corneal neovascularization and inflammation in humans. PMID:26814205

  5. Multicopper manganese oxidase accessory proteins bind Cu and heme.

    PubMed

    Butterfield, Cristina N; Tao, Lizhi; Chacón, Kelly N; Spiro, Thomas G; Blackburn, Ninian J; Casey, William H; Britt, R David; Tebo, Bradley M

    2015-12-01

    Multicopper oxidases (MCOs) catalyze the oxidation of a diverse group of metal ions and organic substrates by successive single-electron transfers to O2 via four bound Cu ions. MnxG, which catalyzes MnO2 mineralization by oxidizing both Mn(II) and Mn(III), is unique among multicopper oxidases in that it carries out two energetically distinct electron transfers and is tightly bound to accessory proteins. There are two of these, MnxE and MnxF, both approximately 12kDa. Although their sequences are similar to those found in the genomes of several Mn-oxidizing Bacillus species, they are dissimilar to those of proteins with known function. Here, MnxE and MnxF are co-expressed independent of MnxG and are found to oligomerize into a higher order stoichiometry, likely a hexamer. They bind copper and heme, which have been characterized by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), and UV-visible (UV-vis) spectrophotometry. Cu is found in two distinct type 2 (T2) copper centers, one of which appears to be novel; heme is bound as a low-spin species, implying coordination by two axial ligands. MnxE and MnxF do not oxidize Mn in the absence of MnxG and are the first accessory proteins to be required by an MCO. This may indicate that Cu and heme play roles in electron transfer and/or Cu trafficking.

  6. Cytochrome c oxidase: Evolution of control via nuclear subunit addition☆

    PubMed Central

    Pierron, Denis; Wildman, Derek E.; Hüttemann, Maik; Markondapatnaikuni, Gopi Chand; Aras, Siddhesh; Grossman, Lawrence I.

    2014-01-01

    According to theory, present eukaryotic cells originated from a beneficial association between two free-living cells. Due to this endosymbiotic event the pre-eukaryotic cell gained access to oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), which produces more than 15 times as much ATP as glycolysis. Because cellular ATP needs fluctuate and OXPHOS both requires and produces entities that can be toxic for eukaryotic cells such as ROS or NADH, we propose that the success of endosymbiosis has largely depended on the regulation of endosymbiont OXPHOS. Several studies have presented cytochrome c oxidase as a key regulator of OXPHOS; for example, COX is the only complex of mammalian OXPHOS with known tissue-specific isoforms of nuclear encoded subunits. We here discuss current knowledge about the origin of nuclear encoded subunits and the appearance of different isozymes promoted by tissue and cellular environments such as hypoxia. We also review evidence for recent selective pressure acting on COX among vertebrates, particularly in primate lineages, and discuss the unique pattern of co-evolution between the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. Finally, even though the addition of nuclear encoded subunits was a major event in eukaryotic COX evolution, this does not lead to emergence of a more efficient COX, as might be expected from an anthropocentric point of view, for the “higher” organism possessing large brains and muscles. The main function of these subunits appears to be “only” to control the activity of the mitochondrial subunits. We propose that this control function is an as yet underappreciated key point of evolution. Moreover, the importance of regulating energy supply may have caused the addition of subunits encoded by the nucleus in a process comparable to a “domestication scenario” such that the host tends to control more and more tightly the ancestral activity of COX performed by the mtDNA encoded subunits. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled

  7. NADPH oxidase signal transduces angiotensin II in hepatic stellate cells and is critical in hepatic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Bataller, Ramón; Schwabe, Robert F.; Choi, Youkyung H.; Yang, Liu; Paik, Yong Han; Lindquist, Jeffrey; Qian, Ting; Schoonhoven, Robert; Hagedorn, Curt H.; Lemasters, John J.; Brenner, David A.

    2003-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) is a pro-oxidant and fibrogenic cytokine. We investigated the role of NADPH oxidase in Ang II–induced effects in hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), a fibrogenic cell type. Human HSCs express mRNAs of key components of nonphagocytic NADPH oxidase. Ang II phosphorylated p47phox, a regulatory subunit of NADPH oxidase, and induced reactive oxygen species formation via NADPH oxidase activity. Ang II phosphorylated AKT and MAPKs and increased AP-1 DNA binding in a redox-sensitive manner. Ang II stimulated DNA synthesis, cell migration, procollagen α1(I) mRNA expression, and secretion of TGF-β1 and inflammatory cytokines. These effects were attenuated by N-acetylcysteine and diphenylene iodonium, an NADPH oxidase inhibitor. Moreover, Ang II induced upregulation of genes potentially involved in hepatic wound-healing response in a redox-sensitive manner, as assessed by microarray analysis. HSCs isolated from p47phox–/– mice displayed a blunted response to Ang II compared with WT cells. We also assessed the role of NADPH oxidase in experimental liver fibrosis. After bile duct ligation, p47phox–/– mice showed attenuated liver injury and fibrosis compared with WT counterparts. Moreover, expression of smooth muscle α-actin and expression of TGF-β1 were reduced in p47phox–/– mice. Thus, NADPH oxidase mediates the actions of Ang II on HSCs and plays a critical role in liver fibrogenesis. PMID:14597764

  8. Inhibition of peroxisomal fatty acyl-CoA oxidase by antimycin A.

    PubMed Central

    Vamecq, J; Schepers, L; Parmentier, G; Mannaerts, G P

    1987-01-01

    Peroxisomal fatty acyl-CoA oxidase was inhibited by micromolar concentrations of antimycin A, an inhibitor of mitochondrial respiration. The inhibition was observed with all three substrates tested, i.e. palmitoyl-CoA, trihydroxycoprostanoyl-CoA and hexadecanedioyl-CoA. The peroxisomal D-amino acid oxidase was also inhibited by antimycin, but the peroxisomal L-alpha-hydroxyacid oxidase and uric acid oxidase and the mitochondrial monoamine oxidase were not. The degree of inhibition of acyl-CoA oxidase by antimycin was strongly dependent on the amount of cellular protein present in the assay mixture: at a fixed antimycin concentration, the inhibition was gradually lost with increasing protein concentrations. At a fixed cellular protein concentration in the assay mixtures, the mitochondrial oxidation of glutamate or palmitoylcarnitine was inhibited at antimycin concentrations that were much lower than those required for the inhibition of fatty acyl-CoA oxidase. Our results, nevertheless, demonstrate that antimycin A must be used with caution, when it is added to homogenates or subcellular fractions in order to distinguish between mitochondrial and peroxisomal fatty acid oxidation. PMID:3435468

  9. The active form of cytochrome c oxidase: effects of detergent, the intact membrane, and radiation inactivation

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, D.A.; Suarez-Villafane, M.; Ferguson-Miller, S.

    1982-01-01

    Cytochrome oxidase is a multisubunit, intrinsic membrane protein with a complex function that includes oxidation of cytochrome c, reduction of oxygen and generation of a membrane potential. To clarify the relationship of its normal function to protein and membrane structure, we have examined the kinetic behavior of rat liver cytochrome oxidase in the intace inner mitochondrial membrane and in detergent solubilized states. Dissolution of rat liver mitochondrial membranes alters the kinetic parameters of the oxidase in a manner dependent in part on the dispersing agent, and characterized by a large increase in maximal activity which is not attributable to exposure of more oxidase or diminished affinity for cytochrome c. The most profound effect of solubilization of the membrane is seen on the low affinity reaction of cytochrome c, suggesting that the electron transfer pathway from this site to oxygen is sensitive to alterations in hydrophobic interactions within the oxidase. Purified rat liver and beef heart oxidase exists predominantly in a monodisperse, 300 kilodalton form in laurylmaltoside (Rosevear et al., 1980). However, a smaller, 130 kd species that exhibits high turnover rates equal to the 300 kd form is detected in some beef heart preparations, implying that the dimer may not be essential for high activity. Radiation inactivation studies on purified oxidase reveal a molecular weight for the functional unit of approx.70 kd. It is concluded that less than a complete set of subunits may be sufficient for both normal bindings of cytochrome c and rapid electron transfer to oxygen.

  10. Active form of cytochrome c oxidase: effects of detergent, the intact membrane, and radiation inactivation

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, D.A.; Suarez-Villafane, M.; Ferguson-Miller, S.

    1982-01-01

    Cytochrome oxidase is a multisubunit, intrinsic membrane protein with a complex function that includes oxidation of cytochrome c, reduction of oxygen and generation of a membrane potential. To clarify the relationship of its normal function to protein and membrane structure, we have examined the kinetic behavior of rat liver cytochrome oxidase in the intact inner mitochondrial membrane and in detergent solubilized states. Dissolution of rat liver mitochondrial membranes alters the kinetic parameters of the oxidase in a manner dependent in part on the dispersing agent, and characterized by a large increase in maximal activity which is not attributable to exposure of more oxidase or diminished affinity for cytochrome c. The most profound effect of solubilization of the membrane is seen on the low affinity reaction of cytochrome c, suggesting that the electron transfer pathway from this site to oxygen is sensitive to alterations in hydrophobic interactions within the oxidase. Purified rat liver and beef heart oxidase exists predominantly in a monodisperse, 300 kilodalton form in laurylmaltoside (Rosevear et al., 1980). However, a smaller, 130 kd species that exhibits high turnover rates equal to the 300 kd form is detected in some beef heart preparations, implying that the dimer may not be essential for high activity. Radiation inactivation studies on purified oxidase reveal a molecular weight for the functional unit of approx.70 kd. It is concluded that less than a complete set of subunits may be sufficient for both normal binding of cytochrome c and rapid electron transfer to oxygen.

  11. Partial purification of gibberellin oxidases from spinach leaves. [Spinacia oleracea L

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmour, S.J.; Bleecker, A.B.; Zeevaart, J.A.D.

    1987-09-01

    Four enzyme activities catalyzing the following oxidative steps in the gibberellin (GA) biosynthetic pathway have been extracted from spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) leaves after exposure to 8 long days: GA/sub 12/ ..-->.. GA/sub 53/ ..-->.. GA/sub 44/ ..-->.. GA/sub 19/ ..-->.. GA/sub 20/. Two of these, GA/sub 53/ oxidase and GA/sup 19/ oxidase, were separable from the other two, GA/sub 44/ oxidase and GA/sub 12/ 13-hydroxylase, by anion exchange high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Apparent molecular weights of the four enzymes as determined by gel filtration HLPL are: GA/sub 12/ 13-hydroxylase, 28,400; GA/sub 43/ oxidase, 42,500; GA/sub 44/ oxidase, 38,100; GA/sub 19/ oxidase, 39,500. GA/sub 44/ oxidase was purified approximately 100-fold in 0.3% yield by a combination of ammonium sulfate fractionation, anion exchange HPLC, phenyl-Sepharose chromatography and gel filtration HLPC.

  12. Vectorially oriented monolayers of the cytochrome c/cytochrome oxidase bimolecular complex.

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, A M; Blasie, J K; Bean, J C

    1998-01-01

    Vectorially oriented monolayers of yeast cytochrome c and its bimolecular complex with bovine heart cytochrome c oxidase have been formed by self-assembly from solution. Both quartz and Ge/Si multilayer substrates were chemical vapor deposited with an amine-terminated alkylsiloxane monolayer that was then reacted with a hetero-bifunctional cross-linking reagent, and the resulting maleimide endgroup surface then provided for covalent interactions with the naturally occurring single surface cysteine 102 of the yeast cytochrome c. The bimolecular complex was formed by further incubating these cytochrome c monolayers in detergent-solubilized cytochrome oxidase. The sequential formation of such monolayers and the vectorially oriented nature of the cytochrome oxidase was studied via meridional x-ray diffraction, which directly provided electron density profiles of the protein(s) along the axis normal to the substrate plane. The nature of these profiles is consistent with previous work performed on vectorially oriented monolayers of either cytochrome c or cytochrome oxidase alone. Furthermore, optical spectroscopy has indicated that the rate of binding of cytochrome oxidase to the cytochrome c monolayer is an order of magnitude faster than the binding of cytochrome oxidase to an amine-terminated surface that was meant to mimic the ring of lysine residues around the heme edge of cytochrome c, which are known to be involved in the binding of this protein to cytochrome oxidase. PMID:9512031

  13. Tyrosine codon corresponds to topa quinone at the active site of copper amine oxidases.

    PubMed

    Mu, D; Janes, S M; Smith, A J; Brown, D E; Dooley, D M; Klinman, J P

    1992-04-25

    The recently discovered organic cofactor of bovine serum amine oxidase, topa quinone, is an uncommon amino acid residue in the polypeptide backbone (Janes, S. M., Mu, D., Wemmer, D., Smith, A. J., Kaur, S., Maltby, D., Burlingame, A. L., and Klinman, J. P. (1990) Science 248, 981-987). The amine oxidase gene from the yeast Hansenula polymorpha has been cloned and sequenced (Bruinenberg, P. G., Evers, M., Waterham, H. R., Kuipers, J., Arnberg, A. C., and Geert, A. B. (1989) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1008, 157-167). In order to understand the incorporation of topa quinone in eukaryotes, we have isolated yeast amine oxidase from H. polymorpha. Following protocols established with bovine serum amine oxidase, yeast amine oxidase was derivatized with [14C]phenylhydrazine, followed by thermolytic digestion and isolation of a dominant radiolabeled peptide by high pressure liquid chromatography. Comparison of resonance Raman spectra for this peptide to spectra of a model compound demonstrates that topa quinone is the cofactor. By alignment of a DNA-derived yeast amine oxidase sequence with the topa quinone-containing peptide sequence, it is found that the tyrosine codon, UAC, corresponds to topa quinone in the mature protein. In a similar manner, alignment of a tryptic peptide from bovine serum amine oxidase implicates tyrosine as the precursor to topa quinone in mammals.

  14. Correlation between electrical properties and thermodynamic stability of ACoO{sub 3-{delta}} perovskites (A= La, Pr, Nd, Sm, Gd)

    SciTech Connect

    Scherrer, Barbara; Harvey, Ashley S.; Martynczuk, Julia; Gauckler, Ludwig J.; Tanasescu, Speranta; Teodorescu, Florina; Botea, Alina; Conder, Kazimierz; Grundy, A. Nicholas

    2011-08-15

    For perovskites with the general formula ACoO{sub 3-{delta}} (A = La, Pr, Nd, Sm, and Gd) the influence of the A-site cation on the electrical conductivity, electronic structure, thermodynamic stability, and oxygen stoichiometry was studied. The perovskite oxide powders were produced by a combined citric acid and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid complexing method. Ceramic specimens sintered at 1100 deg. C in air were single-phase perovskites. With increasing temperature, the electrical conductivity shows three discrete regimes. All compositions show semiconductivity up to a transition temperature of {approx}300 deg. C-450 deg. C and then behave like metallic conductors. The activation energies for the semiconductivity, as well as the transition temperatures to the metallic-like conduction, decrease monotonically with increasing pseudocubic lattice parameters, i.e., with increasing ionic radii of the A cation. This behavior correlates with decreasing oxygen nonstoichiometry and increased thermodynamic stability. The highest conductivity and the lowest activation energy of 0.66 eV were found for LaCoO{sub 3-{delta},} which also had the lowest semiconductor-metal transition temperature at 269 deg. C, the lowest oxygen nonstoichiometry of {delta}= 0.008, and the highest Gibbs free energy change for the decomposition reaction of 42.37 kJ/mol at 850 deg. C. GdCoO{sub 3-{delta}} had the highest oxygen nonstoichiometry with {delta}0.032, a high activation energy of 1.19 eV for the semiconductivity with a high transition temperature at 452 deg. C, and the lowest Gibbs free energy change of 26.54 kJ/mol at 850 deg. C. X-ray absorption spectroscopy data imply an increasing Co low-spin character with decreasing cation radius from La to Gd, while an increase in temperature increases the number of holes or Co 3d bandwidth. This correlates well with the electrical conductivity data.

  15. Andean evolution at the Guañacos and Chos Malal fold and thrust belts (36°30‧ 37°s)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folguera, Andrés; Ramos, Víctor A.; Zapata, Tomás; Spagnuolo, Mauro G.

    2007-10-01

    The Andes between 36°30' and 37°S represent a Cretaceous fold and thrust belt strongly reactivated in the late Miocene. Most of the features that absorbed Neogene shortening were already uplifted in the late Cretaceous, as revealed by field mapping and confirmed by previous fission track analysis. This Andean section is formed by two sectors: a western-inner sector generated by the closure of the upper Oligocene-lower Miocene intra-arc Cura Mallín basin between the middle and late Miocene (Guañacos fold and thrust belt), and an eastern-outer sector, where late Triassic-early Jurassic extensional depocenters were exhumed in two discrete phases of contraction, in the latest early Cretaceous and late Miocene to the Present, respectively (Chos Malal fold and thrust belt). Late Miocene deformation has not homogeneously reactivated Cretaceous compressive structures, being minimal south of 37°30'S through the eastern-outer sector (southern continuation of the Chos Malal fold and thrust belt). The reason for such an inhomogeneous deformational evolution seems to be related to the development of a late Miocene shallow subduction regime between 34°30' and 37°45'S, as it was proposed in previous studies. This shallow subduction zone is evidenced by the eastward expansion of the arc that was accompanied by the eastern displacement of the orogenic front at these latitudes. As a result, the Cretaceous fold and thrust belt were strongly reactivated north of 37°30'S producing the major topographic break along the Southern Central Andes.

  16. Management of Neonatal Respiratory Distress Syndrome Employing ACoRN Respiratory Sequence Protocol versus Early Nasal Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Niknafs, Pedram; Faghani, Asadallah; Afjeh, Seyed-Abolfazl; Moradinazer, Mehdi; Bahman-Bijari, Bahareh

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) is a common cause of respiratory distress in premature infants. This study was designed to evaluate two different RDS treatment protocols by comparing the outcomes. Methods: This study was a double center cross sectional study performed from June to December 2012. During that period, 386 neonates with RDS were hospitalized and treated according to two different therapeutic protocols so-called Acute Care of at-Risk Newborns (ACoRN) respiratory sequence protocol (group I) and Early Nasal Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (E-NCPAP) protocol (group II). The variables and main outcomes of this study were gestational age, birth weight, bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), pulmonary hemorrhage (PH), intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH), air leak and mortality rate (MR). Findings : Out of 386 infants, 202 infants were in group I (male 60.4%, female 39.6%, mean gestational age 316/7 weeks, mean birth weight=1688 grams) and group II included 184 infants (male 61.4%, female 38.6%, mean gestational age 32 weeks, mean birth weight 1787 grams), P= 0.07. The ratios of BPD of group I to group II and PH of group I to group two were not significant (P=0.63 and P=0.84, respectively). Air leak ratio in group I was higher than in group II (P=0.001). Although IVH ratio in group II was higher than in group I (P=0.01), grade III and IV IVH was higher in group I (30% vs. 4.6%). In case of MR, it was higher in group I than in group II (P=0.001). Conclusion: According to the findings the incidence of air leak, grade III and IV IVH and MR was less common in E-NCPAP protocol, so it may show the effectiveness of this protocol. The authors suggest that more researches are needed for more accurate results. PMID:25793046

  17. Polyphenol oxidase expression in potato (Solanum tuberosum) tubers inhibited to sprouting by treatment with iodine atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Eolini, Francesco; Hochkoeppler, Alejandro; Credi, Andrea; Rodríguez, Antonio Gonzàlez Vara Y; Poggi, Valeria

    2004-08-01

    Iodine-saturated atmosphere was found to inhibit the sprouting of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) tubers. The iodine concentration in tuber tissues increased as a function of exposure length, and the onset of inhibition of sprouting was found to depend on tubers genotype. During the time-course of the treatment, the transcription of polyphenol oxidases (EC 1.10.3.1 and EC 1.14.18.1) was undetectable in tuber peel, whereas in bud tissues featured an increase, followed by a decrease occurring simultaneously with the suppression of sprouting. The treatment of tubers with iodine strongly affected the expression of polyphenol oxidases at the transcriptional level. Polyphenol oxidase activity in buds poorly reflected the corresponding level of transcription; similarly, little differences were found among the enzyme isoforms expressed in buds as a function of length of exposure to iodine. These findings suggest that the induction of polyphenol oxidases mRNAs transcription could probe the inhibition of sprouting by iodine.

  18. Action of DCCD on the H+/O stoichiometry of mitoplast cytochrome c oxidase.

    PubMed

    Lehninger, A L; Reynafarje, B; Costa, L

    1985-01-01

    The mechanistic H+/O ejection stoichiometry of the cytochrome c oxidase reaction in rat liver mitoplasts is close to 4 at level flow when the reduced oxidase is pulsed with O2. Dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD) up to 30 nmol/mg protein fails to influence the rate of electron flow through the mitoplast oxidase, but inhibits H+ ejection. The inhibition of H+ ejection appears to be biphasic; ejection of 2-3 H+ per O is completely inhibited by very low DCCD, whereas inhibition of the remaining H+ ejection requires very much higher concentrations of DCCD. This effect suggests the occurrence of two types of H+ pumps in the native cytochrome oxidase of mitoplasts.

  19. NADPH oxidases are critical targets for prevention of ethanol-induced bone loss

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The molecular mechanisms through which chronic alcohol consumption induce bone loss and osteoporosis are largely unknown. Ethanol increases expression and activates NADPH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate) oxidase enzymes (Nox) in osteoblasts leading to accumulation of reactive oxygen spe...

  20. Polystyrene Attached Pt(IV)–Azomethine, Synthesis and Immobilization of Glucose Oxidase Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Sarı, Nurşen; Antepli, Esin; Nartop, Dilek; Yetim, Nurdan Kurnaz

    2012-01-01

    Modified polystyrene with Pt(IV)–azomethine (APS–Sch–Pt) was synthesized by means of condensation and demonstrated to be a promising enzyme support by studying the enzymatic properties of glucose oxidase enzyme (GOx) immobilized on it. The characteristics of the immobilized glucose oxidase (APS–Sch–Pt–GOx) enzyme showed two optimum pH values that were pH = 4.0 and pH = 7. The insertion of stable Pt(IV)–azomethine spacers between the polystyrene backbone and the immobilized GOx, (APS–Sch–Pt–GOx), increases the enzymes’ activity and improves their affinity towards the substrate even at pH = 4. The influence of temperature, reusability and storage capacity on the free and immobilized glucose oxidase enzyme was investigated. The storage stability of the immobilized glucose oxidase was shown to be eleven months in dry conditions at +4 °C. PMID:23109888

  1. Determination of human plasma xanthine oxidase activity by high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, T; Moriwaki, Y; Takahashi, S; Tsutsumi, Z; Yamakita, J; Nasako, Y; Hiroishi, K; Higashino, K

    1996-06-01

    An assay for human plasma xanthine oxidase activity was developed with pterin as the substrate and the separation of product (isoxanthopterin) by high-performance liquid chromatography with a fluorescence detector. The reaction mixture consists of 60 microliters of plasma and 240 microliters of 0.2 M Tris-HCl buffer (pH 9.0) containing 113 microM pterin. With this assay, the activity of plasma xanthine oxidase could be easily determined despite its low activity. As a result, it could be demonstrated that the intravenous administration of heparin or the oral administration of ethanol did not increase plasma xanthine oxidase activity in normal subjects, and also that plasma xanthine oxidase activity was higher in patients with hepatitis C virus infection than in healthy subjects or patients with gout. In addition, a single patient with von Gierke's disease showed a marked increase in the plasma activity of this enzyme, relative to that apparent in normal subjects. PMID:8811453

  2. Production of a new D-amino acid oxidase from the fungus Fusarium oxysporum.

    PubMed

    Gabler, M; Fischer, L

    1999-08-01

    The fungus Fusarium oxysporum produced a D-amino acid oxidase (EC 1. 4.3.3) in a medium containing glucose as the carbon and energy source and ammonium sulfate as the nitrogen source. The specific D-amino acid oxidase activity was increased up to 12.5-fold with various D-amino acids or their corresponding derivatives as inducers. The best inducers were D-alanine (2.7 microkat/g of dry biomass) and D-3-aminobutyric acid (2.6 microkat/g of dry biomass). The addition of zinc ions was necessary to permit the induction of peroxisomal D-amino acid oxidase. Bioreactor cultivations were performed on a 50-liter scale, yielding a volumetric D-amino acid oxidase activity of 17 microkat liter(-1) with D-alanine as an inducer. Under oxygen limitation, the volumetric activity was increased threefold to 54 microkat liter(-1) (3,240 U liter(-1)).

  3. Electron-microscopic cytochemical localization of diamine and polyamine oxidases in pea and maize tissues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slocum, R. D.; Furey MJ, 3. d.

    1991-01-01

    An electron-microscopic cytochemical method was used to localize diamine oxidase (DAO) in pea and polyamine oxidase (PAO) in maize (Zea mays L.). The method, based on the precipitation of amine-oxidase-generated H2O2 by CeCl3, was shown to be specific for DAO and PAO and permitted their localization in plant tissues with a high degree of resolution. Both enzymes are localized exclusively in the cell wall. Both DAO- and PAO-activity staining is most intense in the middle lamellar region of the wall and in cells exhibiting highly lignified walls. The oxidases could provide H2O2 for peroxidase-mediated cross-linking reactions in the cell wall and may, in this capacity, play a role in the regulation of plant growth.

  4. Intermediate dehydrogenase-oxidase form of xanthine oxidoreductase in rat liver.

    PubMed Central

    Kamiński, Z W; Jezewska, M M

    1979-01-01

    A spectrophotometric method for the determination of three forms of xanthine oxidoreductase, namely dehydrogenase (D), dehydrogenase-oxidase (D/O) and oxidase (O), is described. Enzymic fractions obtained from rat liver were found to contain either all three forms, or (under special conditions of preparation) only two forms, D and D/O. The conversion of form D leads to form D/O leads to form O in the presence of Cu2+ ions was shown. Form D/O acted with NAD+ as well as with O2 as electron acceptors, it exhibited greater affinity to NAD+ than to O2, and NAD+ abolished the oxidase activity of this form. Moreover, oxidase activity of form D/O was inhibited by NADH. These facts indicate that NAD+ and O2 compete for the same active site on the enzyme molecule. PMID:226081

  5. Dual oxidase regulates neutrophil recruitment in allergic airways.

    PubMed

    Chang, Sandra; Linderholm, Angela; Franzi, Lisa; Kenyon, Nicholas; Grasberger, Helmut; Harper, Richart

    2013-12-01

    Enhanced reactive oxygen species production in allergic airways is well described and correlates with increased airway contractions, inflammatory cell infiltration, goblet cell metaplasia, and mucus hypersecretion. There is also an abundance of interleukin-4/interleukin-13 (IL-4/IL-13)- or interleukin-5-secreting cells that are thought to be central to the pathogenesis of allergic asthma. We postulated that the dual oxidases (DUOX1 and DUOX2), members of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase family that release hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in the respiratory tract, are critical proteins in the pathogenesis of allergic airways. DUOX activity is regulated by cytokines, including IL-4 and IL-13, and DUOX-mediated H2O2 influences several important features of allergic asthma: mucin production, IL-8 secretion, and wound healing. The objective of this study was to establish the contribution of DUOXs to the development of allergic asthma in a murine model. To accomplish this goal, we utilized a DUOXA-deficient mouse model (Duoxa(-/-)) that lacked maturation factors for both DUOX1 and DUOX2. Our results are the first to demonstrate evidence of DUOX protein and DUOX functional activity in murine airway epithelium. We also demonstrate that DUOXA maturation factors are required for airway-specific H2O2 production and localization of DUOX to cilia of fully differentiated airway epithelial cells. We compared wild-type and Duoxa(-/-) mice in an ovalbumin exposure model to determine the role of DUOX in allergic asthma. In comparison to DUOX-intact mice, Duoxa(-/-) mice had reduced mucous cell metaplasia and lower levels of TH2 cytokine levels in bronchoalveolar fluid. In addition, increased airway resistance in response to methacholine was observed in Duoxa(+/+) mice, as expected, but was absent in Duoxa(-/-) mice. Surprisingly, Duoxa(-/-) mice had decreased influx of neutrophils in bronchoalveolar fluid and lung tissue sections associated with a lower level of the

  6. Heterodimer Formation of BnPKSA or BnPKSB with BnACOS5 Constitutes a Multienzyme Complex in Tapetal Cells and is Involved in Male Reproductive Development in Brassica napus.

    PubMed

    Qin, Maomao; Tian, Tiantian; Xia, Shengqian; Wang, Zhixin; Song, Liping; Yi, Bin; Wen, Jing; Shen, Jinxiong; Ma, Chaozhi; Fu, Tingdong; Tu, Jinxing

    2016-08-01

    Multienzyme associations localized to specific subcellular sites are involved in several critical functions in cellular metabolism, such as plant survival and reproduction. To date, few multienzyme complexes involved in male fertility have been examined in Brassica napus Here, we reported that in B. napus, the members of a multienzyme complex work in an interaction pattern different from that in Arabidopsis thaliana for sporopollenin biosynthesis. 7365A, a male-sterile mutant with a relatively smooth anther cuticle, was found to have a dramatic reduction in both cutin monomers and wax composition. Proteomic comparison between the mutant 7365A and wild-type 7365B showed down-regulation of three sporopollenin biosynthetic enzymes, namely BnPKSA, BnPKSB and BnTKPR; these enzymes were tightly co-expressed with BnACOS5. BnPKSA and BnPKSB showed similar expression patterns but distinct accumulation levels, suggesting that they had partially distinct functions during sporopollenin biosynthesis. In vitro and in vivo analyses demonstrated that BnPKSB directly interacted with BnPKSA and BnACOS5, but no such interactions were found in the present investigation for BnTKPR1. Interestingly, the interaction between PKSA and PKSB has not been discovered in Arabidopsis, which may indicate a new interaction representing an additional efficient regulation method in B. napus Taken together, we propose that BnPKSA and BnPKSB may comprise a heterodimer combined with BnACOS5, constituting a sporopollenin metabolon in tapetal cells that is related to male reproductive development in B. napus. PMID:27335346

  7. Evidence for methoxatin (pyrroloquinolinequinone) as the cofactor in bovine plasma amine oxidase from resonance Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Moog, R S; McGuirl, M A; Cote, C E; Dooley, D M

    1986-01-01

    Resonance Raman spectra of the 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine derivatives of bovine plasma amine oxidase [amine:oxygen oxidoreductase (deaminating) (copper-containing), EC 1.4.3.6] have been measured. Detailed comparisons to the spectra of the corresponding derivatives of methoxatin (pyrroloquinolinequinone), pyridoxal, and other aldehydes and diones provide further evidence that covalently bound methoxatin or a closely similar derivative is the organic cofactor in copper-containing amine oxidases. PMID:3464962

  8. Bovine serum amine oxidase: a mammalian enzyme having covalently bound PQQ as prosthetic group.

    PubMed

    Lobenstein-Verbeek, C L; Jongejan, J A; Frank, J; Duine, J A

    1984-05-21

    In addition to the metal ion, copper-containing amine oxidases possess an organic prosthetic group, the nature of which has long been controversial. We show here that in the case of bovine plasma amine oxidase, this second prosthetic group is covalently bound pyrroloquinoline quinone ( PQQ ). Until now the coenzyme PQQ has been found in several bacterial dehydrogenases. Thus the finding reported here is the first example of a quinoprotein oxidoreductase discovered in a eukaryotic organism.

  9. Identification of a xanthine oxidase-inhibitory component from Sophora flavescens using NMR-based metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Ryuichiro; Hasuike, Yuka; Hirabayashi, Moeka; Fukuda, Tatsuo; Okada, Yoshihito; Shirataki, Yoshiaki

    2013-10-01

    We demonstrate that NMR-based metabolomics studies can be used to identify xanthine oxidase-inhibitory compounds in the diethyl ether soluble fraction prepared from a methanolic extract of Sophora flavescens. Loading plot analysis, accompanied by direct comparison of 1H NMR spectraexhibiting characteristic signals, identified compounds exhibiting inhibitory activity. NMR analysis indicated that these characteristic signals were attributed to flavanones such as sophoraflavanone G and kurarinone. Sophoraflavanone G showed inhibitory activity towards xanthine oxidase in an in vitro assay. PMID:24354187

  10. Bifunctionalized mesoporous silica-supported gold nanoparticles: intrinsic oxidase and peroxidase catalytic activities for antibacterial applications.

    PubMed

    Tao, Yu; Ju, Enguo; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2015-02-11

    Bifunctionalized mesoporous silica-supported gold nanoparticles as oxidase and peroxidase mimics for antibacterial applications are demonstrated. For the first time, these mesoporous silica-supported gold nanoparticles are applied as oxidase and peroxidase mimics. Taking advantage of their prominent enzyme activities, the MSN-AuNPs show excellent antibacterial properties against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. Furthermore, MSN-AuNPs also exhibit outstanding performance in biofilm elimination . PMID:25655182

  11. New insight into the structure and function of the alternative oxidase.

    PubMed

    Berthold, D A; Andersson, M E; Nordlund, P

    2000-11-20

    The alternative oxidase is a ubiquinol oxidase found in plant mitochondria, as well as in the mitochondria of some fungi and protists. It catalyzes a cyanide-resistant reduction of oxygen to water without translocation of protons across the inner mitochondrial membrane, and thus functions as a non-energy-conserving member of the respiratory electron transfer chain. The active site of the alternative oxidase has been modelled as a diiron center within a four-helix bundle by Siedow et al. (FEBS Lett. 362 (1995) 10-14) and more recently by Andersson and Nordlund (FEBS Lett. 449 (1999) 17-22). The cloning of the Arabidopsis thaliana IMMUTANS (Im) gene, which encodes a plastid enzyme distantly related to the mitochondrial alternative oxidases (Wu et al. Plant Cell 11 (1999) 43-55; Carol et al. Plant Cell 11 (1999) 57-68), has now narrowed the range of possible ligands to the diiron center of the alternative oxidase. The Im protein sequence suggests a minor modification to the recent model of the active site of the alternative oxidase. This change moves an invariant tyrosine into a conserved hydrophobic pocket in the vicinity of the active site, in a position analogous to the long-lived tyrosine radical at the diiron center of ribonucleotide reductase, and similar to the tyrosines near the diiron center of bacterioferritin and rubrerythrin. The Im sequence and modified structural model yield a compelling picture of the alternative oxidase as a diiron carboxylate protein. The current status of the relationship of structure to function in the alternative oxidase is reviewed.

  12. Enzymatic characterization and in vivo function of five terminal oxidases in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Arai, Hiroyuki; Kawakami, Takuro; Osamura, Tatsuya; Hirai, Takehiro; Sakai, Yoshiaki; Ishii, Masaharu

    2014-12-01

    The ubiquitous opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa has five aerobic terminal oxidases: bo(3)-type quinol oxidase (Cyo), cyanide-insensitive oxidase (CIO), aa3-type cytochrome c oxidase (aa3), and two cbb(3)-type cytochrome c oxidases (cbb(3)-1and cbb(3)-2). These terminal oxidases are differentially regulated under various growth conditions and are thought to contribute to the survival of this microorganism in a wide variety of environmental niches. Here, we constructed multiple mutant strains of P. aeruginosa that express only one aerobic terminal oxidase to investigate the enzymatic characteristics and in vivo function of each enzyme. The Km values of Cyo, CIO, and aa3 for oxygen were similar and were 1 order of magnitude higher than those of cbb(3)-1 and cbb(3)-2, indicating that Cyo, CIO, and aa3 are low-affinity enzymes and that cbb(3)-1 and cbb(3)-2 are high-affinity enzymes. Although cbb(3)-1 and cbb(3)-2 exhibited different expression patterns in response to oxygen concentration, they had similar Km values for oxygen. Both cbb(3)-1 and cbb(3)-2 utilized cytochrome c4 as the main electron donor under normal growth conditions. The electron transport chains terminated by cbb(3)-1 and cbb(3)-2 generate a proton gradient across the cell membrane with similar efficiencies. The electron transport chain of aa3 had the highest proton translocation efficiency, whereas that of CIO had the lowest efficiency. The enzymatic properties of the terminal oxidases reported here are partially in agreement with their regulatory patterns and may explain the environmental adaptability and versatility of P. aeruginosa.

  13. Identification in Marinomonas mediterranea of a novel quinoprotein with glycine oxidase activity

    PubMed Central

    Campillo-Brocal, Jonatan Cristian; Lucas-Elio, Patricia; Sanchez-Amat, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Abstract A novel enzyme with lysine-epsilon oxidase activity was previously described in the marine bacterium Marinomonas mediterranea. This enzyme differs from other l-amino acid oxidases in not being a flavoprotein but containing a quinone cofactor. It is encoded by an operon with two genes lodA and lodB. The first one codes for the oxidase, while the second one encodes a protein required for the expression of the former. Genome sequencing of M. mediterranea has revealed that it contains two additional operons encoding proteins with sequence similarity to LodA. In this study, it is shown that the product of one of such genes, Marme_1655, encodes a protein with glycine oxidase activity. This activity shows important differences in terms of substrate range and sensitivity to inhibitors to other glycine oxidases previously described which are flavoproteins synthesized by Bacillus. The results presented in this study indicate that the products of the genes with different degrees of similarity to lodA detected in bacterial genomes could constitute a reservoir of different oxidases. PMID:23873697

  14. Modification of plasma membrane NADPH oxidase activity in cucumber seedling roots in response to cadmium stress.

    PubMed

    Jakubowska, Dagmara; Janicka-Russak, Małgorzata; Kabała, Katarzyna; Migocka, Magdalena; Reda, Małgorzata

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of cadmium on plasma membrane (PM) NADPH oxidase activity in cucumber roots. Plants were treated with cadmium for 1, 3 or 6 days. Some of the plants after 3-day exposure to cadmium were transferred to a medium without the heavy metal for the next 3 days. Treatment of plants with cadmium for 6 days stimulated the activity of NADPH oxidase. The highest stimulation of O2(•-) production by NADPH oxidase was observed in post-stressed plants, which was correlated with the stimulation of activity of PM H(+)-ATPase in the same conditions. In order to examine the effects of cadmium stresses on the expression level of genes encoding NADPH oxidase, putative cucumber homologs encoding RBOH proteins were selected and a real-time PCR assay was performed. NADPH is a substrate for oxidase; thus alterations in the activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase, NADP-isocitrate dehydrogenase and NADP-malic enzyme under cadmium stress were studied. The activity of NADPH dehydrogenases was increased under cadmium stress. The results indicate that PM NADPH oxidase could be involved in plants' response to cadmium stress by affecting the activity of PM H(+)-ATPase, and NADPH-generating enzymes could play important roles in this process.

  15. The voltage dependence of NADPH oxidase reveals why phagocytes need proton channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeCoursey, Thomas E.; Morgan, Deri; Cherny, Vladimir V.

    2003-04-01

    The enzyme NADPH oxidase in phagocytes is important in the body's defence against microbes: it produces superoxide anions (O2-, precursors to bactericidal reactive oxygen species). Electrons move from intracellular NADPH, across a chain comprising FAD (flavin adenine dinucleotide) and two haems, to reduce extracellular O2 to O2-. NADPH oxidase is electrogenic, generating electron current (Ie) that is measurable under voltage-clamp conditions. Here we report the complete current-voltage relationship of NADPH oxidase, the first such measurement of a plasma membrane electron transporter. We find that Ie is voltage-independent from -100mV to >0mV, but is steeply inhibited by further depolarization, and is abolished at about +190mV. It was proposed that H+ efflux mediated by voltage-gated proton channels compensates Ie, because Zn2+ and Cd2+ inhibit both H+ currents and O2- production. Here we show that COS-7 cells transfected with four NADPH oxidase components, but lacking H+ channels, produce O2- in the presence of Zn2+ concentrations that inhibit O2- production in neutrophils and eosinophils. Zn2+ does not inhibit NADPH oxidase directly, but through effects on H+ channels. H+ channels optimize NADPH oxidase function by preventing membrane depolarization to inhibitory voltages.

  16. Lysyl oxidase modulates the osteoblast differentiation of primary mouse calvaria cells.

    PubMed

    Sharma-Bhandari, Anjali; Park, Sun-Hyang; Kim, Ju-Young; Oh, Jaemin; Kim, Youngho

    2015-12-01

    Lysyl oxidase (LOX) is an extracellular amine oxidase that mediates the formation of collagen fibers. Thus far, five LOX family genes [LOX, lysyl oxidase-like (LOXL)1, LOXL2, LOXL3 and LOXL4] have been identified in humans, each encoding the characteristic C-terminal domains that are required for amine oxidase activity. During osteoblastogenesis, collagen fibers function as a three-dimensional scaffold for organizing mineral deposition. In this study, to assess the functional roles of the LOX family members in osteoblastogenesis, we investigated the temporal expression of these genes as a function of phenotypic development during the osteoblast differentiation of primary cultured mouse calvaria cells. Of the LOX family members, only LOX was prominently expressed during osteoblast differentiation. LOX expression was highest on day 9 of differentiation, as shown by RT-PCR and western blot analysis. The expression pattern of collagen, type I, alpha 2 (COL1A2), which encodes the α2-chain of mouse collagen type I, was similar to that of LOX. The total amine oxidase activity of the differentiating calvaria cells exhibited a temporal pattern that paralleled LOX expression, reaching the highest level on day 9 of differentiation. We also noted that the inhibition of the amine oxidase activity of LOX significantly suppressed both mineral nodule formation and the expression of osteoblast marker genes during the differentiation of primary calvaria cells. Taken together, these findings suggest that the LOX-mediated organization of collagen fibers in the extracellular matrix is an important regulator of osteoblastogenesis.

  17. A decade of crystallization drops: crystallization of the cbb3 cytochrome c oxidase from Pseudomonas stutzeri.

    PubMed

    Buschmann, Sabine; Richers, Sebastian; Ermler, Ulrich; Michel, Hartmut

    2014-04-01

    The cbb3 cytochrome c oxidases are distant members of the superfamily of heme copper oxidases. These terminal oxidases couple O2 reduction with proton transport across the plasma membrane and, as a part of the respiratory chain, contribute to the generation of an electrochemical proton gradient. Compared with other structurally characterized members of the heme copper oxidases, the recently determined cbb3 oxidase structure at 3.2 Å resolution revealed significant differences in the electron supply system, the proton conducting pathways and the coupling of O2 reduction to proton translocation. In this paper, we present a detailed report on the key steps for structure determination. Improvement of the protein quality was achieved by optimization of the number of lipids attached to the protein as well as the separation of two cbb3 oxidase isoenzymes. The exchange of n-dodecyl-β-D-maltoside for a precisely defined mixture of two α-maltosides and decanoylsucrose as well as the choice of the crystallization method had a most profound impact on crystal quality. This report highlights problems frequently encountered in membrane protein crystallization and offers meaningful approaches to improve crystal quality. PMID:24488923

  18. EPR studies of the mitochondrial alternative oxidase. Evidence for a diiron carboxylate center.

    PubMed

    Berthold, Deborah A; Voevodskaya, Nina; Stenmark, Pål; Gräslund, Astrid; Nordlund, Pär

    2002-11-15

    The alternative oxidase (AOX) is a ubiquinol oxidase found in the mitochondrial respiratory chain of plants as well as some fungi and protists. It has been predicted to contain a coupled diiron center on the basis of a conserved sequence motif consisting of the proposed iron ligands, four glutamate and two histidine residues. However, this prediction has not been experimentally verified. Here we report the high level expression of the Arabidopsis thaliana alternative oxidase AOX1a as a maltose-binding protein fusion in Escherichia coli. Reduction and reoxidation of a sample of isolated E. coli membranes containing the alternative oxidase generated an EPR signal characteristic of a mixed-valent Fe(II)/Fe(III) binuclear iron center. The high anisotropy of the signal, the low value of the g-average tensor, and a small exchange coupling (-J) suggest that the iron center is hydroxo-bridged. A reduced membrane preparation yielded a parallel mode EPR signal with a g-value of about 15. In AOX containing a mutation of a putative glutamate ligand of the diiron center (E222A or E273A) the EPR signals are absent. These data provide evidence for an antiferromagnetic-coupled binuclear iron center, and together with the conserved sequence motif, identify the alternative oxidase as belonging to the growing family of diiron carboxylate proteins. The alternative oxidase is the first integral membrane protein in this family, and adds a new catalytic activity (ubiquinol oxidation) to this group of enzymatically diverse proteins.

  19. Inhibitory action of NoxA1 on dual oxidase activity in airway cells.

    PubMed

    Pacquelet, Sandrine; Lehmann, Mandy; Luxen, Sylvia; Regazzoni, Karine; Frausto, Monika; Noack, Deborah; Knaus, Ulla G

    2008-09-01

    Imbalance between pro- and antioxidant mechanisms in the lungs can compromise pulmonary functions, including blood oxygenation, host defense, and maintenance of an anti-inflammatory environment. Thus, tight regulatory control of reactive oxygen species is critical for proper lung function. Increasing evidence supports a role for the NADPH oxidase dual oxidase (Duox) as an important source for regulated H2O2 production in the respiratory tract epithelium. In this study Duox expression, function, and regulation were investigated in a fully differentiated, mucociliary airway epithelium model. Duox-mediated H2O2 generation was dependent on calcium flux, which was required for dissociation of the NADPH oxidase regulatory protein Noxa1 from plasma membrane-bound Duox. A functional Duox1-based oxidase was reconstituted in model cell lines to permit mutational analysis of Noxa1 and Duox1. Although the activation domain of Noxa1 was not required for Duox function, mutation of a proline-rich domain in the Duox C terminus, a potential interaction motif for the Noxa1 Src homology domain 3, caused up-regulation of basal and stimulated H2O2 production. Similarly, knockdown of Noxa1 in airway cells increased basal H2O2 generation. Our data indicate a novel, inhibitory function for Noxa1 in Duox regulation. This represents a new paradigm for control of NADPH oxidase activity, where second messenger-promoted conformational change of the Nox structure promotes oxidase activation by relieving constraint induced by regulatory components.

  20. NADPH Oxidase as a Therapeutic Target for Neuroprotection against Ischaemic Stroke: Future Perspectives.

    PubMed

    McCann, Sarah K; Roulston, Carli L

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress caused by an excess of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is known to contribute to stroke injury, particularly during reperfusion, and antioxidants targeting this process have resulted in improved outcomes experimentally. Unfortunately these improvements have not been successfully translated to the clinical setting. Targeting the source of oxidative stress may provide a superior therapeutic approach. The NADPH oxidases are a family of enzymes dedicated solely to ROS production and pre-clinical animal studies targeting NADPH oxidases have shown promising results. However there are multiple factors that need to be considered for future drug development: There are several homologues of the catalytic subunit of NADPH oxidase. All have differing physiological roles and may contribute differentially to oxidative damage after stroke. Additionally, the role of ROS in brain repair is largely unexplored, which should be taken into consideration when developing drugs that inhibit specific NADPH oxidases after injury. This article focuses on the current knowledge regarding NADPH oxidase after stroke including in vivo genetic and inhibitor studies. The caution required when interpreting reports of positive outcomes after NADPH oxidase inhibition is also discussed, as effects on long term recovery are yet to be investigated and are likely to affect successful clinical translation. PMID:24961415

  1. Involvement of phospholipase D and NADPH-oxidase in salicylic acid signaling cascade.

    PubMed

    Kalachova, Tetiana; Iakovenko, Oksana; Kretinin, Sergii; Kravets, Volodymyr

    2013-05-01

    Salicylic acid is associated with the primary defense responses to biotic stress and formation of systemic acquired resistance. However, molecular mechanisms of early cell reactions to phytohormone application are currently undisclosed. The present study investigates the participation of phospholipase D and NADPH-oxidase in salicylic acid signal transduction cascade. The activation of lipid signaling enzymes within 15 min of salicylic acid application was shown in Arabidopsis thaliana plants by measuring the phosphatidic acid accumulation. Adding of primary alcohol (1-butanol) to the incubation medium led to phosphatidylbutanol accumulation as a result of phospholipase D (PLD) action in wild-type and NADPH-oxidase RbohD deficient plants. Salicylic acid induced rapid increase in NADPH-oxidase activity in histochemical assay with nitroblue tetrazolium but the reaction was not observed in presence of 1-butanol and NADPH-oxidase inhibitor diphenylene iodide (DPI). The further physiological effect of salicylic acid and inhibitory analysis of the signaling cascade were made in the guard cell model. Stomatal closure induced by salicylic acid was inhibited by 1-butanol and DPI treatment. rbohD transgenic plants showed impaired stomatal reaction upon phytohormone effect, while the reaction to H2O2 did not differ from that of wild-type plants. Thus a key role of NADPH-oxidase D-isoform in the process of stomatal closure in response to salicylic acid has been postulated. It has enabled to predict a cascade implication of PLD and NADPH oxidase to salicylic acid signaling pathway.

  2. NADPH oxidase of human dendritic cells: role in Candida albicans killing and regulation by interferons, dectin-1 and CD206.

    PubMed

    Donini, Marta; Zenaro, Elena; Tamassia, Nicola; Dusi, Stefano

    2007-05-01

    Human monocyte-derived DC express the enzyme NADPH oxidase, responsible for ROS production. We show that Candida albicans did not activate NADPH oxidase in DC, and was poorly killed by these cells. However, Candida-killing activity increased upon DC stimulation with the NADPH oxidase activator PMA and was further enhanced by DC treatment with IFN-alpha or IFN-gamma. This fungicidal activity took place at high DC-to-Candida ratio, but decreased at low DC-to-yeast ratio, when Candida inhibited the NADPH oxidase by contrasting the assembly of the enzyme on DC plasma membrane. The NADPH oxidase inhibitor diphenyliodonium chloride abrogated the PMA-dependent DC candidacidal capacity. Engagement of beta-glucan receptor dectin-1 induced NADPH oxidase activation in DC that was depressed by mannose-binding receptor CD206 co-stimulation. Candida was internalized by DC through mannose-binding receptors, but not through dectin-1, thus explaining why Candida did not elicit NADPH oxidase activity. Our results indicate that NADPH oxidase is involved in DC Candida-killing activity, which is increased by IFN. However, Candida escapes the oxidative damage by inhibiting NADPH oxidase and by entering DC through receptors not involved in NADPH oxidase activation. PMID:17407098

  3. The Synthesis and Evaluation of C7-Substituted α-Tetralone Derivatives as Inhibitors of Monoamine Oxidase.

    PubMed

    Legoabe, Lesetja J; Petzer, Anél; Petzer, Jacobus P

    2015-10-01

    Based on a previous report that α-tetralone (3,4-dihydro-2H-naphthalen-1-one) is a promising scaffold for the design of highly potent inhibitors of the enzyme, monoamine oxidase, the present study investigates the monoamine oxidase inhibitory properties of a synthetic series of fifteen C7-substituted α-tetralone derivatives. Arylalkyloxy substitution on C7 of the α-tetralone moiety yielded compounds with high inhibition potencies toward the human monoamine oxidase-B isoform with all compounds possessing IC50 values in the submicromolar range (0.00089-0.047 μm). The C7-substituted α-tetralones also were highly potent monoamine oxidase-A inhibitors with thirteen (of fifteen) compounds possessing IC50 values in the submicromolar range (0.010-0.741 μm). The α-tetralones were, however, in each instance selective for monoamine oxidase-B over the monoamine oxidase-A isoform. Dialyses of enzyme-inhibitor mixtures show that, while a representative inhibitor acts as a reversible monoamine oxidase-A inhibitor, inhibition of monoamine oxidase-B is not readily reversed by dialysis. Using a molecular modeling approach, possible binding orientations and interactions of selected α-tetralones with the active sites of the monoamine oxidases are also proposed. This study suggests that C7-substituted α-tetralones are promising monoamine oxidase inhibitors and may represent lead compounds for the development of therapies for Parkinson's disease and depression.

  4. Microwave radiation effects on the thermally driven oxidase of erythrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Keil, J.L.; Erwin, D.N.

    1986-01-01

    Sheep red blood cells (SRBCs) were labelled with a concanavalin A-luminol-bovine serum albumin conjugate specific for the transmembrane anion transport protein (Band 3) and exposed to 2450-MHz continuous-wave microwave radiation at an average specific absorption rate of 91W/kg for 10 min. The temperature was held constant at 25, 37, 40, 42, or 45C with an airflow heat-exchange system. Following exposure to microwave or air heating, the decrease in residual base-activated chemiluminescence (CL) of the SRBCs was measured as an indication of infield oxidase activity. Air heating resulted in a significant decrease in residual CL at temperatures above 37C (74% decrease at 45C). Microwave radiation inhibited the decline in residual CL above 37C. At 45C the inhibition was 40%. The results suggest microwave radiation either reversibly altered the thermodynamics of oxygen binding to haemoglobin or failed to energize a significant portion of the haemoglobin molecules in each sample to the thermal threshold of haemoglobin autoxidation.

  5. Oxygen dependent pyruvate oxidase expression and production in Streptococcus sanguinis

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Lan-yan; Itzek, Andreas; Chen, Zhi-yun; Kreth, Jens

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize the oxygen dependent regulation of pyruvate oxidase (SpxB) gene expression and protein production in Streptococcus sanguinis (S. sanguinis). SpxB is responsible for the generation of growth-inhibiting amounts of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) able to antagonize cariogenic Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans). Furthermore, the ecological consequence of H2O2 production was investigated in its self-inhibiting ability towards the producing strain. Expression of spxB was determined with quantitative Real-Time RT-PCR and a fluorescent expression reporter strain. Protein abundance was investigated with FLAG epitope engineered in frame on the C-terminal end of SpxB. Self inhibition was tested with an antagonism plate assay. The expression and protein abundance decreased in cells grown under anaerobic conditions. S. sanguinis was resistant against its own produced H2O2, while cariogenic S. mutans was inhibited in its growth. The results suggest that S. sanguinis produces H2O2 as antimicrobial substance to inhibit susceptible niche competing species like S. mutans during initial biofilm formation, when oxygen availability allows for spxB expression and Spx production. PMID:21485312

  6. 2-Benzylidene-1-indanone derivatives as inhibitors of monoamine oxidase.

    PubMed

    Nel, Magdalena S; Petzer, Anél; Petzer, Jacobus P; Legoabe, Lesetja J

    2016-10-01

    In the present study, a series of twenty-two 2-benzylidene-1-indanone derivatives were synthesised and evaluated as inhibitors of recombinant human monoamine oxidase (MAO) A and B. The 2-benzylidene-1-indanone derivatives are structurally related to a series of benzylideneindanone derivatives which has previously been found to be MAO-B inhibitors. This study finds that the 2-benzylidene-1-indanones are MAO-B specific inhibitors with IC50 values <2.74μM. Among the compounds evaluated, twelve compounds exhibited IC50<0.1μM and may be considered as high potency inhibitors. The 2-benzylidene-1-indanone derivatives also inhibited MAO-A with the most potent inhibition exhibited by 5g (IC50=0.131μM). An analysis of the structure-activity relationships for MAO-B inhibition show that substitution on the A-ring with a 5-hydroxy group and on the B-ring with halogens and the methyl group yield high potency inhibition. It may therefore be concluded that 2-benzylidene-1-indanone analogues are promising leads for design of therapies for disorders such as Parkinson's disease. PMID:27578245

  7. Nox family NADPH oxidases: Molecular mechanisms of activation.

    PubMed

    Brandes, Ralf P; Weissmann, Norbert; Schröder, Katrin

    2014-11-01

    NADPH oxidases of the Nox family are important enzymatic sources of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Numerous homologue-specific mechanisms control the activity of this enzyme family involving calcium, free fatty acids, protein-protein interactions, intracellular trafficking, and posttranslational modifications such as phosphorylation, acetylation, or sumoylation. After a brief review on the classic pathways of Nox activation, this article will focus on novel mechanisms of homologue-specific activity control and on cell-specific aspects which govern Nox activity. From these findings of the recent years it must be concluded that the activity control of Nox enzymes is much more complex than anticipated. Moreover, depending on the cellular activity state, Nox enzymes are selectively activated or inactivated. The complex upstream signaling aspects of these events make the development of "intelligent" Nox inhibitors plausible, which selectively attenuate disease-related Nox-mediated ROS formation without altering physiological signaling ROS. This approach might be of relevance for Nox-mediated tissue injury in ischemia-reperfusion and inflammation and also for chronic Nox overactivation as present in cancer initiation and cardiovascular disease.

  8. Characterization of polyphenol oxidase activity in Ataulfo mango.

    PubMed

    Cheema, Summervir; Sommerhalter, Monika

    2015-03-15

    Crude extracts of Ataulfo exhibited polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activity with pyrogallol, 3-methylcatechol, catechol, gallic acid, and protocatechuic acid. The substrate dependent pH optima ranged from pH 5.4 to 6.4 with Michaelis-Menten constants between 0.84 ± 0.09 and 4.6 ± 0.7 mM measured in MES or phosphate buffers. The use of acetate buffers resulted in larger Michaelis-Menten constants, up to 14.62 ± 2.03 mM. Sodium ascorbate, glutathione, and kojic acid are promising inhibitors to prevent enzymatic browning in Ataulfo. PPO activity increased with ripeness and was always higher in the skin compared to the pulp. Sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) enhanced PPO activity, with pulp showing a stronger increase than skin. SDS-PAGE gels stained for catecholase activity showed multiple bands, with the most prominent bands at apparent molecular weights of 53, 112, and 144 kDa.

  9. Reducing peanut allergens by high pressure combined with polyphenol oxidase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Si-Yin; Houska, Milan; Reed, Shawndrika

    2013-12-01

    Polyphenol oxidase (PPO) has been shown to reduce major peanut allergens. Since high pressure (HP) can increase enzyme activity, we postulated that further reduction of peanut allergens can be achieved through HP combined with PPO. Peanut extracts containing caffeic acid were treated with each of the following: (1) HP; (2) HP+PPO; (3) PPO; and (4) none. HP was conducted at 300 and 500 MPa, each for 3 and 10 min, 37 °C. After treatment, SDS-PAGE was performed and allergenic capacity (IgE binding) was determined colorimetrically in inhibition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and Western blots, using a pooled plasma from peanut-allergic patients. Data showed that HP alone had no effect on major peanut allergens. However, HP at 500 MPa combined with PPO (HP500/PPO) induced a higher (approximately twofold) reduction of major peanut allergens and IgE binding than PPO alone or HP300/PPO. There was no difference between treatment times. We concluded that HP500/PPO at 3-min enhanced a twofold reduction of the allergenic capacity of peanut extracts, as compared to PPO itself.

  10. Substrate inhibition competes with halide inhibition in polyphenol oxidase.

    PubMed

    Lim, Giselle Grace Fernando; Imura, Yuki; Yoshimura, Etsuro

    2012-10-01

    Polyphenol oxidase (PPO) is a ubiquitous enzyme important in the food industry. Although PPO activity followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics at catechol concentrations of up to 1 mM, it slowly decreased at catechol concentrations above 2 mM. This result indicated that in addition to the active site (site A), the enzyme possesses a second catechol-binding site (site B) that exerts an inhibitory effect on PPO activity. Halides inhibit PPO activity in such a way that substrate inhibition is lessened when halide concentration is increased. Furthermore, elevated concentrations of catechol diminished the degree of inhibition by halides. These findings suggest that halides also bind to site B to inhibit PPO activity. A steady-state kinetic analysis demonstrated that the dissociation constant between catechol and PPO depended on the binding of halides to site B. The dissociation constants were greatest when chloride bound to the site. Bromide and iodide yielded lower dissociation constants, in that order. These data indicate that the binding of halide to site B modulated the structure of site A, thereby exerting an inhibitory effect.

  11. Purification and characterization of polyphenol oxidase from rape flower.

    PubMed

    Sun, Han-Ju; Wang, Jing; Tao, Xue-Ming; Shi, Juan; Huang, Mei-Ying; Chen, Zhe

    2012-01-25

    The purification and partial enzymology characteristics of polyphenol oxidase (PPO) from rape flower were studied. After preliminary treatments, the crude enzyme solution was in turn purified with ammonium sulfate, dialysis, and Sephadex G-75 gel chromatography. The optimal conditions and stability of PPO were examined at different pH values and temperatures. Subsequently, PPO was also characterized by substrate (catechol) concentrations, inhibitors, kinetic parameters, and molecular weight. Results showed that the optimal pH for PPO activity was 5.5 in the presence of catechol and that PPO was relatively stable at pH 3.5-5.5. PPO was moderately stable at temperatures from 60 to 70 °C, whereas it was easily denatured at 80-90 °C. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, sodium chloride, and calcium chloride had little inhibitive effects on PPO, whereas citric acid, sodium sulfite, and ascorbic acid had strongly inhibitive effects. The Michaelis-Menten constant (K(m)) and maximal reaction velocity (V(max)) of PPO were 0.767 mol/L and 0.519 Ab/min/mL of the crude PPO solution, respectively. PPO was finally purified to homogeneity with a purification factor of 4.41-fold and a recovery of 12.41%. Its molecular weight was 60.4 kDa, indicating that the PPO is a dimer. The data obtained in this research may help to prevent the enzymatic browning of rape flower during its storage and processing.

  12. Polyphenol oxidase as a biochemical seed defense mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Fuerst, E. Patrick; Okubara, Patricia A.; Anderson, James V.; Morris, Craig F.

    2014-01-01

    Seed dormancy and resistance to decay are fundamental survival strategies, which allow a population of seeds to germinate over long periods of time. Seeds have physical, chemical, and biological defense mechanisms that protect their food reserves from decay-inducing organisms and herbivores. Here, we hypothesize that seeds also possess enzyme-based biochemical defenses, based on induction of the plant defense enzyme, polyphenol oxidase (PPO), when wild oat (Avena fatua L.) caryopses and seeds were challenged with seed-decaying Fusarium fungi. These studies suggest that dormant seeds are capable of mounting a defense response to pathogens. The pathogen-induced PPO activity from wild oat was attributed to a soluble isoform of the enzyme that appeared to result, at least in part, from proteolytic activation of a latent PPO isoform. PPO activity was also induced in wild oat hulls (lemma and palea), non-living tissues that cover and protect the caryopsis. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that seeds possess inducible enzyme-based biochemical defenses arrayed on the exterior of seeds and these defenses represent a fundamental mechanism of seed survival and longevity in the soil. Enzyme-based biochemical defenses may have broader implications since they may apply to other defense enzymes as well as to a diversity of plant species and ecosystems. PMID:25540647

  13. Electrical communication between glucose oxidase and different ferrocenylalkanethiol chain lengths

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, S.; Bar, G.; Cutts, R.W.; Zawodzinski, T.A. Jr.; Chow, J.T.; Ferraris, J.P.

    1995-12-31

    We describe the factors affecting the electron transfer process between the different components of a self-assembled mixed monolayer. The system is comprised of mixed monolayers containing aminoalkanethiols (AMATs) and ferrocenylakanethiols (FATs) of variable chain lengths. We study the effects of different ratio of the two mixed monolayer components on the permeability of the monolayer toward a Ru(NH{sub 3}{sub 6}Cl{sub 3} redox probe. In order to study the electrical communication between the enzyme and the mediator molecules, the enzyme glucose oxidase (GOx) was attached to the AMAT sites to create a biosensor device. The relative efficiency of a biosensor of each chain-length combination of FAT and AMAT was examined. In light of this comparison, we consider the critical factors for efficient electron transfer between the ferrocene mediator and the GOx redox active site immobilized as part of the surface-confined system. We find that the biosensor response is greatest when the enzyme and the FATs are attached to the surface with different alkane chain lengths. We also find strong evidence for the existence of domains of FAT and AMAT in the mixed monolayer system.

  14. 3-Coumaranone derivatives as inhibitors of monoamine oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Van Dyk, Adriaan S; Petzer, Jacobus P; Petzer, Anél; Legoabe, Lesetja J

    2015-01-01

    The present study examines the monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitory properties of a series of 20 3-coumaranone [benzofuran-3(2H)-one] derivatives. The 3-coumaranone derivatives are structurally related to series of α-tetralone and 1-indanone derivatives, which have recently been shown to potently inhibit MAO, with selectivity for MAO-B (in preference to the MAO-A isoform). 3-Coumaranones are similarly found to selectively inhibit human MAO-B with half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values of 0.004–1.05 µM. Nine compounds exhibited IC50<0.05 µM for the inhibition of MAO-B. For the inhibition of human MAO-A, IC50 values ranged from 0.586 to >100 µM, with only one compound possessing an IC50<1 µM. For selected 3-coumaranone derivatives, it is established that MAO-A and MAO-B inhibition are reversible since dialysis of enzyme–inhibitor mixtures almost completely restores enzyme activity. On the basis of the selectivity profiles and potent action, it may be concluded that the 3-coumaranone derivatives are suitable leads for the development of selective MAO-B inhibitors as potential treatment for disorders such as Parkinson’s disease and Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:26491258

  15. Monoamine oxidase A mediates prostate tumorigenesis and cancer metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jason Boyang; Shao, Chen; Li, Xiangyan; Li, Qinlong; Hu, Peizhen; Shi, Changhong; Li, Yang; Chen, Yi-Ting; Yin, Fei; Liao, Chun-Peng; Stiles, Bangyan L.; Zhau, Haiyen E.; Shih, Jean C.; Chung, Leland W.K.

    2014-01-01

    Tumors from patients with high-grade aggressive prostate cancer (PCa) exhibit increased expression of monoamine oxidase A (MAOA), a mitochondrial enzyme that degrades monoamine neurotransmitters and dietary amines. Despite the association between MAOA and aggressive PCa, it is unclear how MAOA promotes PCa progression. Here, we found that MAOA functions to induce epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and stabilize the transcription factor HIF1α, which mediates hypoxia through an elevation of ROS, thus enhancing growth, invasiveness, and metastasis of PCa cells. Knockdown and overexpression of MAOA in human PCa cell lines indicated that MAOA induces EMT through activation of VEGF and its coreceptor neuropilin-1. MAOA-dependent activation of neuropilin-1 promoted AKT/FOXO1/TWIST1 signaling, allowing FOXO1 binding at the TWIST1 promoter. Importantly, the MAOA-dependent HIF1α/VEGF-A/FOXO1/TWIST1 pathway was activated in high-grade PCa specimens, and knockdown of MAOA reduced or even eliminated prostate tumor growth and metastasis in PCa xenograft mouse models. Pharmacological inhibition of MAOA activity also reduced PCa xenograft growth in mice. Moreover, high MAOA expression in PCa tissues correlated with worse clinical outcomes in PCa patients. These findings collectively characterize the contribution of MAOA in PCa pathogenesis and suggest that MAOA has potential as a therapeutic target in PCa. PMID:24865426

  16. Polyphenol oxidases from latex of Hevea brasiliensis: purification and characterization.

    PubMed

    Wititsuwannakul, Dhirayos; Chareonthiphakorn, Nopphakaew; Pace, Mario; Wititsuwannakul, Rapepun

    2002-09-01

    Polyphenol oxidase (PPO) was isolated from the B-serum obtained after repetitive freeze-thawing of the bottom fraction isolated from ultracentrifuged fresh latex. The B-serum was subjected to acetone precipitation and CM-Sepharose chromatography, affording two PPOs, PPO-I and PPO-II, which, upon SDS-PAGE, were 32 and 34 kDa, respectively. Both PPOs possessed the same pI (9.2), optimum pH (7) and optimum temperature (35-45 degrees C). They are stable up to 60 degrees C and active at broad pH ranges from 4-9. The K(m) values of PPO-I for dopamine, L-dopa and catechol as substrates are 2.08, 8.33 and 9.09 mM, while those for PPO-II are 2.12, 4.76 and 7.14 mM, respectively. Among various PPO inhibitors tested, 4-hexylresorcinol was the most potent. Anionic detergents were among the most effective activators of the enzymes, while cationic and nonionic detergents showed little and no effect on the PPO activities, respectively. PMID:12169303

  17. cDNA cloning and expression of potato polyphenol oxidase.

    PubMed

    Hunt, M D; Eannetta, N T; Yu, H; Newman, S M; Steffens, J C

    1993-01-01

    Polyphenol oxidases (PPOs) of plants are copper metalloproteins which catalyze the oxidation of mono- and o-diphenols to o-diquinones. Although PPOs are believed to be primarily responsible for the deleterious browning of many fruit and vegetable crops and are thought to be involved in plant-pest interactions, direct evidence for these roles is lacking. We report the cloning of two PPO cDNAs from Solanum tuberosum leaves. These cDNAs exhibit 97% and 98% sequence similarity at the DNA and deduced amino acid levels, respectively. Putative copper-binding regions of both cDNAs are very similar to those of mammalian, bacterial and Neurospora tyrosinases. Both leaf PPO cDNAs appear to encode polypeptides which are processed to a mature molecular weight of 57,000. In potato leaves, petioles, roots, and flowers, PPO is encoded by ca. 2 kb transcripts. Leaf PPO mRNA is developmentally regulated and only detectable in young foliage. In contrast, the protein profile of immunologically detectable PPO remains constant from the apical node through the eleventh leaf node. PMID:7678763

  18. Brain monoamine oxidase A activity predicts trait aggression.

    PubMed

    Alia-Klein, Nelly; Goldstein, Rita Z; Kriplani, Aarti; Logan, Jean; Tomasi, Dardo; Williams, Benjamin; Telang, Frank; Shumay, Elena; Biegon, Anat; Craig, Ian W; Henn, Fritz; Wang, Gene-Jack; Volkow, Nora D; Fowler, Joanna S

    2008-05-01

    The genetic deletion of monoamine oxidase A (MAO A), an enzyme that breaks down the monoamine neurotransmitters norepinephrine, serotonin, and dopamine, produces aggressive phenotypes across species. Therefore, a common polymorphism in the MAO A gene (MAOA, Mendelian Inheritance in Men database number 309850, referred to as high or low based on transcription in non-neuronal cells) has been investigated in a number of externalizing behavioral and clinical phenotypes. These studies provide evidence linking the low MAOA genotype and violent behavior but only through interaction with severe environmental stressors during childhood. Here, we hypothesized that in healthy adult males the gene product of MAO A in the brain, rather than the gene per se, would be associated with regulating the concentration of brain amines involved in trait aggression. Brain MAO A activity was measured in vivo in healthy nonsmoking men with positron emission tomography using a radioligand specific for MAO A (clorgyline labeled with carbon 11). Trait aggression was measured with the multidimensional personality questionnaire (MPQ). Here we report for the first time that brain MAO A correlates inversely with the MPQ trait measure of aggression (but not with other personality traits) such that the lower the MAO A activity in cortical and subcortical brain regions, the higher the self-reported aggression (in both MAOA genotype groups) contributing to more than one-third of the variability. Because trait aggression is a measure used to predict antisocial behavior, these results underscore the relevance of MAO A as a neurochemical substrate of aberrant aggression. PMID:18463263

  19. Monoamine oxidases as sources of oxidants in the heart

    PubMed Central

    Kaludercic, Nina; Mialet-Perez, Jeanne; Paolocci, Nazareno; Parini, Angelo; Di Lisa, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress can be generated at several sites within the mitochondria. Among these, monoamine oxidases (MAO) have been described as a prominent source. MAO are mitochondrial flavoenzymes responsible for the oxidative deamination of catecholamines, serotonin and biogenic amines, and during this process they generate H2O2 and aldehyde intermediates. The role of MAO in cardiovascular pathophysiology has only recently gathered some attention since it has been demonstrated that both H2O2 and aldehydes may target mitochondrial function and consequently affect function and viability of the myocardium. In the present review, we will discuss the role of MAO in catecholamine and serotonin clearance and cycling in relation to cardiac structure and function. The relevant contribution of each MAO isoform (MAO-A or -B) will be discussed in relation to mitochondrial dysfunction and myocardial injury. Finally, we will examine both beneficial effects of their pharmacological or genetic inhibition along with potential adverse effects observed at baseline in MAO knockout mice, as well as the deleterious effects following their over-expression specifically at cardiomyocyte level. PMID:24412580

  20. Upregulation of Mitochondrial Content in Cytochrome c Oxidase Deficient Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Kogot-Levin, Aviram; Saada, Ann; Leibowitz, Gil; Soiferman, Devorah; Douiev, Liza; Raz, Itamar; Weksler-Zangen, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Cytochrome-c-oxidase (COX) deficiency is a frequent cause of mitochondrial disease and is associated with a wide spectrum of clinical phenotypes. We studied mitochondrial function and biogenesis in fibroblasts derived from the Cohen (CDs) rat, an animal model of COX deficiency. COX activity in CDs-fibroblasts was 50% reduced compared to control rat fibroblasts (P<0.01). ROS-production in CDs fibroblasts increased, along with marked mitochondrial fragmentation and decreased mitochondrial membrane-potential, indicating mitochondrial dysfunction. Surprisingly, cellular ATP content, oxygen consumption rate (OCR) and the extracellular acidification rate (ECAR) were unchanged. To clarify the discrepancy between mitochondrial dysfunction and ATP production, we studied mitochondrial biogenesis and turnover. The content of mitochondria was higher in CDs-fibroblasts. Consistently, AMPK activity and the expression of NRF1-target genes, NRF2 and PGC1-α that mediate mitochondrial biogenesis were increased (P<0.01 vs control fibroblast). In CDs-fibrobalsts, the number of autophagosomes (LC3+ puncta) containing mitochondria in CDs fibroblasts was similar to that in control fibroblasts, suggesting that mitophagy was intact. Altogether, our findings demonstrate that mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress are associated with an increase in mitochondrial biogenesis, resulting in preservation of ATP generation. PMID:27780242

  1. Cytochrome c Oxidase Inhibition by Anesthetics: Thermodynamic Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanderkooi, Garret; Chazotte, Brad

    1982-06-01

    The thermodynamic parameters that characterize the inhibition of cytochrome c oxidase activity, in rat liver submitochondrial particles, by n-butanol, tetracaine, and dibucaine were obtained. Three equilibria were assumed in order to account for the data: for the interaction of inhibitor with the native state of the enzyme, for the interaction of inhibitor with the thermally (reversibly) denatured state, and for the change between the native and thermally denatured states. Inhibition results from interaction with both the native and denatured states but, because the interaction is stronger with the denatured than with the native state, the native/denatured equilibrium is shifted to the right by the anesthetics. The enthalpies of interaction are -2.3, -4.7, and 3.7 kcal/mol (1 cal = 4.18 J) for the native state and -10, -6, and -14 kcal/mol for the denatured state, for n-butanol, tetracaine, and dibucaine, respectively. These values are much smaller than the previous estimates obtained by using the assumption that anesthetics interact only with the thermally denatured state of enzymes (e.g., -81 kcal/mol for tetracaine inhibition of luciferase). Our results suggest that local anesthetics inhibit enzyme activity by causing a reversible perturbation of protein conformation. The magnitude of the perturbation is much smaller (in energetic terms) than that which accompanies thermal denaturation.

  2. The Cox3p assembly module of yeast cytochrome oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Su, Chen-Hsien; McStay, Gavin P.; Tzagoloff, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Yeast cytochrome oxidase (COX) was previously inferred to assemble from three modules, each containing one of the three mitochondrially encoded subunits and a different subset of the eight nuclear gene products that make up this respiratory complex. Pull-down assays of pulse-labeled mitochondria enabled us to characterize Cox3p subassemblies that behave as COX precursors and contain Cox4p, Cox7p, and Cox13p. Surprisingly, Cox4p is a constituent of two other complexes, one of which was previously proposed to be an intermediate of Cox1p biogenesis. This suggests that Cox4p, which contacts Cox1p and Cox3p in the holoenzyme, can be incorporated into COX by two alternative pathways. In addition to subunits of COX, some Cox3p intermediates contain Rcf1p, a protein associated with the supercomplex that stabilizes the interaction of COX with the bc1 (ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductase) complex. Finally, our results indicate that although assembly of the Cox1p module is not contingent on the presence of Cox3p, the converse is not true, as none of the Cox3p subassemblies were detected in a mutant blocked in translation of Cox1p. These studies support our proposal that Cox3p and Cox1p are separate assembly modules with unique compositions of ancillary factors and subunits derived from the nuclear genome. PMID:24478450

  3. [Increasing activity of a monoamine oxidase by random mutation].

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuejun; Ma, Yuanhui; Shao, Jianhua; Lai, Dunyue; Wang, Zhiguo; Chen, Zhenming

    2014-01-01

    The monoamine oxidase mutant A-1 (F210V/L213C) from Aspergillus niger showed some catalytic activity on mexiletine. To futher improve its activity, the mutant was subjected to directed evolution with MegaWHOP PCR (Megaprimer PCR of Whole Plasmid) and selection employing a high-throughput agar plate-based colorimetric screen. This approach led to the identification of a mutant ep-1, which specific activity was 189% of that for A-1. The ep-1 also showed significantly improved enantioselectivity, with the E value increased from 101 to 282; its kinetic k(cat)/K(m) value increased from 0.001 51 mmol/(L x s) to 0.002 89 mmol/(L x s), suggesting that catalytic efficiency of ep-1 had been improved. The mutant showed obviously higher specific activities on 7 of all tested 11 amines substrates, and the others were comparable. Sequence analysis revealed that there was a new mutation T162A on ep-1. The molecular dynamics simulation indicated that T162A may affect the secondary structure of the substrate channel and expand the binding pocket. PMID:24818485

  4. NADPH oxidase deficiency underlies dysfunction of aged CD8+ Tregs

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Zhenke; Shimojima, Yasuhiro; Shirai, Tsuyoshi; Li, Yinyin; Ju, Jihang; Yang, Zhen; Tian, Lu; Goronzy, Jörg J.

    2016-01-01

    Immune aging results in progressive loss of both protective immunity and T cell–mediated suppression, thereby conferring susceptibility to a combination of immunodeficiency and chronic inflammatory disease. Here, we determined that older individuals fail to generate immunosuppressive CD8+CCR7+ Tregs, a defect that is even more pronounced in the age-related vasculitic syndrome giant cell arteritis. In young, healthy individuals, CD8+CCR7+ Tregs are localized in T cell zones of secondary lymphoid organs, suppress activation and expansion of CD4 T cells by inhibiting the phosphorylation of membrane-proximal signaling molecules, and effectively inhibit proliferative expansion of CD4 T cells in vitro and in vivo. We identified deficiency of NADPH oxidase 2 (NOX2) as the molecular underpinning of CD8 Treg failure in the older individuals and in patients with giant cell arteritis. CD8 Tregs suppress by releasing exosomes that carry preassembled NOX2 membrane clusters and are taken up by CD4 T cells. Overexpression of NOX2 in aged CD8 Tregs promptly restored suppressive function. Together, our data support NOX2 as a critical component of the suppressive machinery of CD8 Tregs and suggest that repairing NOX2 deficiency in these cells may protect older individuals from tissue-destructive inflammatory disease, such as large-vessel vasculitis. PMID:27088800

  5. The pea gene NA encodes ent-kaurenoic acid oxidase.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Sandra E; Elliott, Robert C; Helliwell, Chris A; Poole, Andrew T; Reid, James B

    2003-01-01

    The gibberellin (GA)-deficient dwarf na mutant in pea (Pisum sativum) has severely reduced internode elongation, reduced root growth, and decreased leaflet size. However, the seeds develop normally. Two genes, PsKAO1 and PsKAO2, encoding cytochrome P450 monooxygenases of the subfamily CYP88A were isolated. Both PsKAO1 and PsKAO2 had ent-kaurenoic acid oxidase (KAO) activity, catalyzing the three steps of the GA biosynthetic pathway from ent-kaurenoic acid to GA(12) when expressed in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). In addition to the intermediates ent-7alpha-hydroxykaurenoic acid and GA(12)-aldehyde, some additional products of the pea KAO activity were detected, including ent-6alpha,7alpha-dihydroxykaurenoic acid and 7beta-hydroxykaurenolide. The NA gene encodes PsKAO1, because in two independent mutant alleles, na-1 and na-2, PsKAO1 had altered sequences and the five-base deletion in PsKAO1 associated with the na-1 allele cosegregated with the dwarf na phenotype. PsKAO1 was expressed in the stem, apical bud, leaf, pod, and root, organs in which GA levels have previously been shown to be reduced in na plants. PsKAO2 was expressed only in seeds and this may explain the normal seed development and normal GA biosynthesis in seeds of na plants.

  6. Genetic mapping of polyphenol oxidase in tetraploid wheat.

    PubMed

    Simeone, Rosanna; Pasqualone, Antonella; Clodoveo, Maria Lisa; Blanco, Antonio

    2002-01-01

    Pasta colour is one of the main factors influencing pasta quality. It is the product of a desirable yellow component, an undesirable brown component and, under some drying conditions, a red component. The brown colour depends on enzymatic and chemical factors. Polyphenol oxidase (PPO; E.C. 1.14.18.1) is one of the enzymatic factors. It is mainly localised in the peripheral part of the wheat kernel, and is involved in the oxidation of endogenous wheat phenolic compounds resulting in the production of highly coloured products. Therefore, a knowledge of the genetic control of PPO activity could enable the developing of better strategies in breeding programs to reduce pasta darkening. The aim of this study was to map the gene(s) affecting PPO activity using a set of recombinant inbred (RI) lines, derived from a cross between Triticum turgidum L. var. durum cultivar Messapia and the accession MG4343 of Triticum turgidum L. var. dicoccoides. After performing linkage analysis, the gene for high PPO activity was mapped on the long arm of the chromosome 2A and its characteristic was found highly associated to the RFLP marker Xutv1427-2A, with a value of LOD equal to 29.84. The identification of molecular markers linked to loci controlling the PPO activity may potentially accelerate wheat breeding since the selection of plants can be carried out by genotype rather than phenotype.

  7. Monoamine oxidases and alcoholism. II. Studies in alcoholic families

    SciTech Connect

    Suarez, B.K.; Hampe, C.L.; Parsian, A.; Cloninger, C.R.

    1995-10-09

    Thirty-five alcoholic families have been studied to investigate the relationship between DNA markers at the monoamine oxidase (MAO) loci and (1) platelet activity levels and (2) alcoholism. A quantitative linkage analysis failed to reveal any evidence that the variation in activity levels cosegregates with the DNA markers. A sib-pair analysis did not reveal a significant excess of MAO haplotype sharing among alcoholic sibs, although the deviation from random sharing was in the direction consistent with an X-linked component. A reanalysis of platelet MAO activity levels in a subset of these families revealed that the lower levels previously found in alcoholics is more likely due to the differences between males and females. Only among males and only when a {open_quotes}broad{close_quotes} definition of alcoholism is used (and MAO activity levels are transformed to normality) does it appear that alcoholics have depressed activities compared to nonalcoholics. Finally, when the confounding due to gender difference is removed, no differences between type I and type II alcoholics are found in these families. 63 refs., 6 tabs.

  8. Structural and spectroscopic studies of a model for catechol oxidase.

    PubMed

    Smith, Sarah J; Noble, Christopher J; Palmer, Randahl C; Hanson, Graeme R; Schenk, Gerhard; Gahan, Lawrence R; Riley, Mark J

    2008-05-01

    A binuclear copper complex, [Cu2(BPMP) (OAc)2][ClO4] x H2O, has been prepared using the binucleating ligand 2,6-bis[bis(pyridin-2-ylmethylamino)methyl]-4-methylphenol (H-BPMP). The X-ray crystal structure reveals the copper centers to have a five-coordinate square pyramidal geometry, with the acetate ligands bound terminally. The bridging phenolate occupies the apical position of the square-based pyramids and magnetic susceptibility, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and variable-temperature variable-field magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) measurements indicate that the two centers are very weakly antiferromagnetically coupled (J = -0.6 cm(-1)). Simulation of the dipole-dipole-coupled EPR spectrum showed that in solution the Cu-O-Cu angle was increased from 126 degrees to 160 degrees and that the internuclear distance was larger than that observed crystallographically. The high-resolution spectroscopic information obtained has been correlated with a detailed ligand-field analysis to gain insight into the electronic structure of the complex. Symmetry arguments have been used to demonstrate that the sign of the MCD is characteristic of the tetragonally elongated environment. The complex also displays catecholase activity (k(cat) = 15 +/- 1.5 min(-1), K(M) = 6.4 +/- 1.8 mM), which is compared with other dicopper catechol oxidase models. PMID:18188615

  9. A capillary electrophoresis assay for recombinant Bacillus subtilis protoporphyrinogen oxidase.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ying; Sun, Lu; Xi, Zhen; Yang, Guang-Fu; Jiang, Dong-Qing; Yan, Xiu-Ping; Yang, Xing; Li, He-Yang

    2008-12-15

    Protoporphyrinogen oxidase (PPO) is a flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)-containing enzyme in the tetrapyrrole biosynthetic pathway that leads to the formation of both heme and chlorophylls, which has been identified as one of the most important action targets of commercial herbicides. The literature reports gave different PPO-catalytic kinetic parameters for the substrate protoporphyrinogen IX (K(m) of 0.1 to 10.4 miocroM) with different sources of PPO using fluorescent or HPLC methods. Herein we assayed the enzymatic activity of recombinant Bacillus subtilis PPO by using capillary electrophoresis (CE), a method with high separation efficiency, easy automation, and low sample consumption. The Michaelis constant and maximum reaction velocity were determined as 7.0+/-0.6 miocroM and 0.38+/-0.02 miocromol min(-1)miocrog(-1), respectively. The interaction between PPO and acifluorfen, a commercial PPO-inhibiting herbicide, was measured as the inhibition constant 186.9+/-9.3 miocroM EM, Cyrillic. The relationship between cofactor FAD and PPO activity can also be quantitatively studied by this CE method. The CE method used here should also be a convenient, reliable method for PPO study.

  10. Human sulfite oxidase electrochemistry on gold nanoparticles modified electrode.

    PubMed

    Frasca, Stefano; Rojas, Oscar; Salewski, Johannes; Neumann, Bettina; Stiba, Konstanze; Weidinger, Inez M; Tiersch, Brigitte; Leimkühler, Silke; Koetz, Joachim; Wollenberger, Ulla

    2012-10-01

    The present study reports a facile approach for sulfite biosensing, based on enhanced direct electron transfer of a human sulfite oxidase (hSO) immobilized on a gold nanoparticles modified electrode. The spherical core shell AuNPs were prepared via a new method by reduction of HAuCl(4) with branched poly(ethyleneimine) in an ionic liquids resulting particles with a diameter less than 10nm. These nanoparticles were covalently attached to a mercaptoundecanoic acid modified Au-electrode where then hSO was adsorbed and an enhanced interfacial electron transfer and electrocatalysis was achieved. UV/Vis and resonance Raman spectroscopy, in combination with direct protein voltammetry, are employed for the characterization of the system and reveal no perturbation of the structural integrity of the redox protein. The proposed biosensor exhibited a quick steady-state current response, within 2 s, a linear detection range between 0.5 and 5.4 μM with a high sensitivity (1.85 nA μM(-1)). The investigated system provides remarkable advantages in the possibility to work at low applied potential and at very high ionic strength. Therefore these properties could make the proposed system useful in the development of bioelectronic devices and its application in real samples.

  11. 2-acetylphenol analogs as potent reversible monoamine oxidase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Legoabe, Lesetja J; Petzer, Anél; Petzer, Jacobus P

    2015-01-01

    Based on a previous report that substituted 2-acetylphenols may be promising leads for the design of novel monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitors, a series of C5-substituted 2-acetylphenol analogs (15) and related compounds (two) were synthesized and evaluated as inhibitors of human MAO-A and MAO-B. Generally, the study compounds exhibited inhibitory activities against both MAO-A and MAO-B, with selectivity for the B isoform. Among the compounds evaluated, seven compounds exhibited IC50 values <0.01 µM for MAO-B inhibition, with the most selective compound being 17,000-fold selective for MAO-B over the MAO-A isoform. Analyses of the structure–activity relationships for MAO inhibition show that substitution on the C5 position of the 2-acetylphenol moiety is a requirement for MAO-B inhibition, and the benzyloxy substituent is particularly favorable in this regard. This study concludes that C5-substituted 2-acetylphenol analogs are potent and selective MAO-B inhibitors, appropriate for the design of therapies for neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson’s disease. PMID:26203229

  12. 3-Coumaranone derivatives as inhibitors of monoamine oxidase.

    PubMed

    Van Dyk, Adriaan S; Petzer, Jacobus P; Petzer, Anél; Legoabe, Lesetja J

    2015-01-01

    The present study examines the monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitory properties of a series of 20 3-coumaranone [benzofuran-3(2H)-one] derivatives. The 3-coumaranone derivatives are structurally related to series of α-tetralone and 1-indanone derivatives, which have recently been shown to potently inhibit MAO, with selectivity for MAO-B (in preference to the MAO-A isoform). 3-Coumaranones are similarly found to selectively inhibit human MAO-B with half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values of 0.004-1.05 µM. Nine compounds exhibited IC50<0.05 µM for the inhibition of MAO-B. For the inhibition of human MAO-A, IC50 values ranged from 0.586 to >100 µM, with only one compound possessing an IC50<1 µM. For selected 3-coumaranone derivatives, it is established that MAO-A and MAO-B inhibition are reversible since dialysis of enzyme-inhibitor mixtures almost completely restores enzyme activity. On the basis of the selectivity profiles and potent action, it may be concluded that the 3-coumaranone derivatives are suitable leads for the development of selective MAO-B inhibitors as potential treatment for disorders such as Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease.

  13. Indanones as high-potency reversible inhibitors of monoamine oxidase.

    PubMed

    Mostert, Samantha; Petzer, Anél; Petzer, Jacobus P

    2015-05-01

    Recent reports document that α-tetralone (3,4-dihydro-2H-naphthalen-1-one) is an appropriate scaffold for the design of high-potency monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitors. Based on the structural similarity between α-tetralone and 1-indanone, the present study involved synthesis of 34 1-indanone and related indane derivatives as potential inhibitors of recombinant human MAO-A and MAO-B. The results show that C6-substituted indanones are particularly potent and selective MAO-B inhibitors, with IC50 values ranging from 0.001 to 0.030 μM. C5-Substituted indanone and indane derivatives are comparatively weaker MAO-B inhibitors. Although the 1-indanone and indane derivatives are selective inhibitors of the MAO-B isoform, a number of homologues are also potent MAO-A inhibitors, with three homologues possessing IC50 values <0.1 μM. Dialysis of enzyme-inhibitor mixtures further established a selected 1-indanone as a reversible MAO inhibitor with a competitive mode of inhibition. It may be concluded that 1-indanones are promising leads for the design of therapies for neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric disorders such as Parkinson's disease and depression.

  14. Inhibition of Monoamine Oxidase by Anithiactins from Streptomyces sp.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun Woo; Jung, Won Kyeong; Kim, Hee Jung; Jeong, Yu Seok; Nam, Sang-Jip; Kang, Heonjoong; Kim, Hoon

    2015-09-01

    Monoamine oxidase (MAO) is found in most cell types and catalyzes the oxidation of monoamines. Three anithiactins (A-C, modified 2-phenylthiazoles) isolated from Streptomyces sp. were tested for inhibitory activity of two isoforms, MAO-A and MAO-B. Anithiactin A was effective and selective for the inhibition of MAO-A, with an IC50 value of 13.0 µM; however, it was not effective for the inhibition of MAO-B. Anithiactins B and C were weaker inhibitors for MAO-A and MAO-B. Anithiactin A was a reversible and competitive inhibitor for MAO-A with a Ki value of 1.84 µM. The hydrophobic methyl substituent in anithiactin A may play an important role in the inhibition of MAO-A. It is suggested that anithiactin A is a selective reversible inhibitor for MAO-A, with moderate potency, and can be considered a new potential lead compound for further development of novel reversible inhibitors for MAO-A.

  15. Monoamine oxidase A (MAO A) inhibitors decrease glioma progression.

    PubMed

    Kushal, Swati; Wang, Weijun; Vaikari, Vijaya Pooja; Kota, Rajesh; Chen, Kevin; Yeh, Tzu-Shao; Jhaveri, Niyati; Groshen, Susan L; Olenyuk, Bogdan Z; Chen, Thomas C; Hofman, Florence M; Shih, Jean C

    2016-03-22

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is an aggressive brain tumor which is currently treated with temozolomide (TMZ). Tumors usually become resistant to TMZ and recur; no effective therapy is then available. Monoamine Oxidase A (MAO A) oxidizes monoamine neurotransmitters resulting in reactive oxygen species which cause cancer. This study shows that MAO A expression is increased in human glioma tissues and cell lines. MAO A inhibitors, clorgyline or the near-infrared-dye MHI-148 conjugated to clorgyline (NMI), were cytotoxic for glioma and decreased invasion in vitro. Using the intracranial TMZ-resistant glioma model, clorgyline or NMI alone or in combination with low-dose TMZ reduced tumor growth and increased animal survival. NMI was localized specifically to the tumor. Immunocytochemistry studies showed that the MAO A inhibitor reduced proliferation, microvessel density and invasion, and increased macrophage infiltration. In conclusion, we have identified MAO A inhibitors as potential novel stand-alone drugs or as combination therapy with low dose TMZ for drug-resistant gliomas. NMI can also be used as a non-invasive imaging tool. Thus has a dual function for both therapy and diagnosis.

  16. 2-acetylphenol analogs as potent reversible monoamine oxidase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Legoabe, Lesetja J; Petzer, Anél; Petzer, Jacobus P

    2015-01-01

    Based on a previous report that substituted 2-acetylphenols may be promising leads for the design of novel monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitors, a series of C5-substituted 2-acetylphenol analogs (15) and related compounds (two) were synthesized and evaluated as inhibitors of human MAO-A and MAO-B. Generally, the study compounds exhibited inhibitory activities against both MAO-A and MAO-B, with selectivity for the B isoform. Among the compounds evaluated, seven compounds exhibited IC50 values <0.01 µM for MAO-B inhibition, with the most selective compound being 17,000-fold selective for MAO-B over the MAO-A isoform. Analyses of the structure-activity relationships for MAO inhibition show that substitution on the C5 position of the 2-acetylphenol moiety is a requirement for MAO-B inhibition, and the benzyloxy substituent is particularly favorable in this regard. This study concludes that C5-substituted 2-acetylphenol analogs are potent and selective MAO-B inhibitors, appropriate for the design of therapies for neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease.

  17. NADPH Oxidase-Dependent Superoxide Production in Plant Reproductive Tissues.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Quesada, María J; Traverso, José Á; Alché, Juan de Dios

    2016-01-01

    In the life cycle of a flowering plant, the male gametophyte (pollen grain) produced in the anther reaches the stigmatic surface and initiates the pollen-pistil interaction, an important step in plant reproduction, which ultimately leads to the delivery of two sperm cells to the female gametophyte (embryo sac) inside the ovule. The pollen tube undergoes a strictly apical expansion characterized by a high growth rate, whose targeting should be tightly regulated. A continuous exchange of signals therefore takes place between the haploid pollen and diploid tissue of the pistil until fertilization. In compatible interactions, theses processes result in double fertilization to form a zygote (2n) and the triploid endosperm. Among the large number of signaling mechanisms involved, the redox network appears to be particularly important. Respiratory burst oxidase homologs (Rbohs) are superoxide-producing enzymes involved in a broad range of processes in plant physiology. In this study, we review the latest findings on understanding Rboh activity in sexual plant reproduction, with a particular focus on the male gametophyte from the anther development stages to the crowning point of fertilization. Rboh isoforms have been identified in both the male and female gametophyte and have proven to be tightly regulated. Their role at crucial points such as proper growth of pollen tube, self-incompatibility response and eventual fertilization is discussed.

  18. Coenzyme-like ligands for affinity isolation of cholesterol oxidase.

    PubMed

    Xin, Yu; Lu, Liushen; Wang, Qing; Zhang, Ling; Tong, Yanjun; Wang, Wu

    2016-05-15

    Two coenzyme-like chemical ligands were designed and synthesized for affinity isolation of cholesterol oxidase (COD). To simulate the structure of natural coenzyme of COD (flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)), on Sepharose beads, 5-aminouracil, cyanuric chloride and 1, 4-butanediamine were composed and then modified. The COD gene from Brevibacterium sp. (DQ345780) was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3), and then the sorbents were applied to adsorption analysis with the pure enzyme. Subsequently, the captured enzyme was applied to SDS-PAGE and activity analysis. As calculated, the theoretical maximum adsorption (Qmax) of the two affinity sorbents (RL-1 and RL-2) were ∼83.5 and 46.3mg/g wet gel; and the desorption constant Kd of the two sorbents were ∼6.02×10(-4) and 1.19×10(-4)μM. The proteins after cell lysis were applied to affinity isolation, and then after one step of affinity binding on the two sorbents, the protein recoveries of RL-1 and RL-2 were 9.2% and 9.7%; the bioactivity recoveries were 92.7% and 91.3%, respectively. SDS-PAGE analysis revealed that the purities of COD isolated with the two affinity sorbents were approximately 95%. PMID:26856529

  19. Xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity of Vietnamese medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Mai Thanh Thi; Awale, Suresh; Tezuka, Yasuhiro; Tran, Quan Le; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Kadota, Shigetoshi

    2004-09-01

    Among 288 extracts, prepared from 96 medicinal plants used in Vietnamese traditional medicine to treat gout and related symptoms, 188 demonstrated xanthine oxidase (XO) inhibitory activity at 100 microg/ml, with 46 having greater than 50% inhibition. At 50 microg/ml, 168 of the extracts were active, with 21 possessing more than 50% inhibition. At 25 microg/ml, 146 extracts exhibited inhibitory activity, with 8 showing over 50% inhibition, while 126 extracts presented activity at 10 microg/ml, with 2 having greater than 50% inhibition. The MeOH extracts of Artemisia vulgaris, Caesalpinia sappan (collected at the Seven-Mountain area), Blumea balsamifera (collected in Lam Dong province), Chrysanthemum sinense and MeOH-H(2)O extract of Tetracera scandens (Khanh Hoa province) exhibited strong XO inhibitory activity with IC(50) values less than 20 microg/ml. The most active extract was the MeOH extract of the flower of C. sinense with an IC(50) value of 5.1 microg/ml. Activity-guided fractionation of the MeOH extract led to the isolation of caffeic acid (1), luteolin (2), eriodictyol (3), and 1,5-di-O-caffeoylquinic acid (4). All these compounds showed significant XO inhibitory activity in a concentration-dependent manner, and the activity of 2 was more potent (IC(50) 1.3 microM) than the clinically used drug, allopurinol (IC(50) 2.5 microM). PMID:15340229

  20. NADPH Oxidase-Dependent Superoxide Production in Plant Reproductive Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Quesada, María J.; Traverso, José Á.; Alché, Juan de Dios

    2016-01-01

    In the life cycle of a flowering plant, the male gametophyte (pollen grain) produced in the anther reaches the stigmatic surface and initiates the pollen–pistil interaction, an important step in plant reproduction, which ultimately leads to the delivery of two sperm cells to the female gametophyte (embryo sac) inside the ovule. The pollen tube undergoes a strictly apical expansion characterized by a high growth rate, whose targeting should be tightly regulated. A continuous exchange of signals therefore takes place between the haploid pollen and diploid tissue of the pistil until fertilization. In compatible interactions, theses processes result in double fertilization to form a zygote (2n) and the triploid endosperm. Among the large number of signaling mechanisms involved, the redox network appears to be particularly important. Respiratory burst oxidase homologs (Rbohs) are superoxide-producing enzymes involved in a broad range of processes in plant physiology. In this study, we review the latest findings on understanding Rboh activity in sexual plant reproduction, with a particular focus on the male gametophyte from the anther development stages to the crowning point of fertilization. Rboh isoforms have been identified in both the male and female gametophyte and have proven to be tightly regulated. Their role at crucial points such as proper growth of pollen tube, self-incompatibility response and eventual fertilization is discussed. PMID:27066025

  1. Characterization of polyphenol oxidase activity in Ataulfo mango.

    PubMed

    Cheema, Summervir; Sommerhalter, Monika

    2015-03-15

    Crude extracts of Ataulfo exhibited polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activity with pyrogallol, 3-methylcatechol, catechol, gallic acid, and protocatechuic acid. The substrate dependent pH optima ranged from pH 5.4 to 6.4 with Michaelis-Menten constants between 0.84 ± 0.09 and 4.6 ± 0.7 mM measured in MES or phosphate buffers. The use of acetate buffers resulted in larger Michaelis-Menten constants, up to 14.62 ± 2.03 mM. Sodium ascorbate, glutathione, and kojic acid are promising inhibitors to prevent enzymatic browning in Ataulfo. PPO activity increased with ripeness and was always higher in the skin compared to the pulp. Sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) enhanced PPO activity, with pulp showing a stronger increase than skin. SDS-PAGE gels stained for catecholase activity showed multiple bands, with the most prominent bands at apparent molecular weights of 53, 112, and 144 kDa. PMID:25308684

  2. Salivary Ceruloplasmin Ferroxidase & Oxidase Activities in Celiac Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Hathama R.; Ghadhban, Jasim M.; Abudal Kadhum, Zahraa I.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to evaluate salivary ferroxidase ceruloplasmin activities in celiac patients with different histopathological severity. This study included 75 celiac patients with different mean age (18.68 ± 11.13) year, who had positive screen for celiac antibodies, and who had gastrointestinal symptoms. In order to simplify the comparison with the healthy control group, celiac patients were divided into two groups according to their histopathological severity: severe (marsh IIIa, b, c) & less severe (marsh 0, I). All these patients have been evaluating for salivary ceruloplasmin (Cp) concentration and Cp ferroxidase activities. To confirm the presence of the enzymatic activity of this protein, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was carried out and then stained for Cp ferroxidase, as well as for Cp oxidase activity. Furthermore, the concentrations of salivary total protein, albumin, and globulin were measured in the studied groups. A significant increase (p<0.05) in salivary concentration of ceruloplasmin was found in all above mentioned patients groups in comparison to that of the control group, except for total villous atrophy (marsh IIIc) patients subgroup. Salivary Cp ferroxidase activity revealed statistically significant decrease among the patient groups as well as between them and the control group. The result of salivary total protein and globulin showed presence a significant increase (p<0.05) in comparison to that of the control group. Meanwhile albumin levels was found to increase non-significantly (p=0.186). PMID:23675269

  3. Monoamine oxidase A gene (MAOA) predicts behavioral aggression following provocation.

    PubMed

    McDermott, Rose; Tingley, Dustin; Cowden, Jonathan; Frazzetto, Giovanni; Johnson, Dominic D P

    2009-02-17

    Monoamine oxidase A gene (MAOA) has earned the nickname "warrior gene" because it has been linked to aggression in observational and survey-based studies. However, no controlled experimental studies have tested whether the warrior gene actually drives behavioral manifestations of these tendencies. We report an experiment, synthesizing work in psychology and behavioral economics, which demonstrates that aggression occurs with greater intensity and frequency as provocation is experimentally manipulated upwards, especially among low activity MAOA (MAOA-L) subjects. In this study, subjects paid to punish those they believed had taken money from them by administering varying amounts of unpleasantly hot (spicy) sauce to their opponent. There is some evidence of a main effect for genotype and some evidence for a gene by environment interaction, such that MAOA is less associated with the occurrence of aggression in a low provocation condition, but significantly predicts such behavior in a high provocation situation. This new evidence for genetic influences on aggression and punishment behavior complicates characterizations of humans as "altruistic" punishers and supports theories of cooperation that propose mixed strategies in the population. It also suggests important implications for the role of individual variance in genetic factors contributing to everyday behaviors and decisions.

  4. Oxidation reaction by xanthine oxidase: theoretical study of reaction mechanism.

    PubMed

    Amano, Tatsuo; Ochi, Noriaki; Sato, Hirofumi; Sakaki, Shigeyoshi

    2007-07-01

    The oxidation process by molybdenum-containing enzyme, xanthine oxidase, is theoretically studied with a model complex representing the reaction center and a typical benchmark substrate, formamide. Comparisons were systematically made among reaction mechanisms proposed previously. In the concerted and stepwise mechanisms that were theoretically discussed previously, the oxidation reaction takes place with a moderate activation barrier. However, the product is less stable than the reactant complex, which indicates that these mechanisms are unlikely. Moreover, the product of the concerted mechanism is not consistent with the isotope experimental result. In addition to those mechanisms, another mechanism initiated by the deprotonation of the active site was newly investigated here. In the transition state of this reaction, the carbon atom of formamide interacts with the oxo ligand of the Mo center and the hydrogen atom is moving from the carbon atom to the thioxo ligand. This reaction takes place with a moderate activation barrier and considerably large exothermicity. Furthermore, the product by this mechanism is consistent with the isotope experimental result. Also, our computations clearly show that the deprotonation of the active site occurs with considerable exothermicity in the presence of glutamic acid and substrate. The intermediate of the stepwise mechanism could not be optimized in the case of the deprotonated active site. From all these results, it should be concluded that the one-step mechanism with the deprotonated active site is the most plausible.

  5. Inhibition of apple polyphenol oxidase activity by sodium chlorite.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shengmin; Luo, Yaguang; Feng, Hao

    2006-05-17

    Sodium chlorite (SC) was shown to have strong efficacy both as a sanitizer to reduce microbial growth on produce and as a browning inhibitor on fresh-cut apples in previous experiments. This study was undertaken to investigate the inhibitory effect of SC on polyphenol oxidase (PPO) and the associated mechanisms. The experiment showed that SC had a strong inhibition of apple PPO. The extent of inhibition was influenced by SC concentration and pH. Inhibition was most prominent at pH 4.5, at which approximately 30% of enzyme activity was lost in the presence of 10 mM SC, followed closely by that at pH 4.0 with a 26% reduction in PPO activity. The inhibition mode was determined using Dixon and Lineweaver-Burk plots, which established SC to be a mixed inhibitor of apple PPO for the oxidation of catechol. Preincubation of PPO with 8 mM SC for 8 min caused a maximum of 46% activity reduction compared to noninhibited control. However, preincubation of SC with catechol for 8 min resulted in no additional loss of PPO activity. These findings provide further evidence that the inhibition of PPO activity by SC is due to the inhibition of the enzyme itself rather than removal of the substrate.

  6. Physiological and pathological implications of semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase.

    PubMed

    Yu, Peter H; Wright, Shannon; Fan, Ellen H; Lun, Zhao-Rong; Gubisne-Harberle, Diana

    2003-04-11

    Semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase (SSAO) catalyzes the deamination of primary amines. Such deamination has been shown capable of regulating glucose transport in adipose cells. It has been independently discovered that the primary structure of vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1) is identical to SSAO. VAP-1 regulates leukocyte migration and is related to inflammation. Increased serum SSAO activities have been found in patients with diabetic mellitus, vascular disorders and Alzheimer's disease. The SSAO-catalyzed deamination of endogenous substrates, that is, methylamine and aminoacetone, led to production of toxic formaldehyde and methylglyoxal, hydrogen peroxide and ammonia, respectively. These highly reactive aldehydes have been shown to initiate protein cross-linkage, exacerbate advanced glycation of proteins and cause endothelial injury. Hydrogen peroxide contributes to oxidative stress. 14C-methylamine is converted to 14C-formaldehyde, which then forms labeled long-lasting protein adduct in rodents. Chronic methylamine treatment increased the excretion of malondialdehyde and microalbuminuria, and enhanced the formation of fatty streaks in C57BL/6 mice fed with an atherogenic diet. Treatment with selective SSAO inhibitor reduces atherogenesis in KKAy diabetic mice fed with high-cholesterol diet. Aminoguanidine, which blocks advanced glycation and reduces nephropathy in animals, is in fact more potent at inhibiting SSAO than its effect on glycation. It suggests that SSAO is involved in vascular disorders under certain pathological conditions. Although SSAO has been known for several decades, its physiological and pathological implications are just beginning to be recognized.

  7. Genetic mapping of polyphenol oxidase in tetraploid wheat.

    PubMed

    Simeone, Rosanna; Pasqualone, Antonella; Clodoveo, Maria Lisa; Blanco, Antonio

    2002-01-01

    Pasta colour is one of the main factors influencing pasta quality. It is the product of a desirable yellow component, an undesirable brown component and, under some drying conditions, a red component. The brown colour depends on enzymatic and chemical factors. Polyphenol oxidase (PPO; E.C. 1.14.18.1) is one of the enzymatic factors. It is mainly localised in the peripheral part of the wheat kernel, and is involved in the oxidation of endogenous wheat phenolic compounds resulting in the production of highly coloured products. Therefore, a knowledge of the genetic control of PPO activity could enable the developing of better strategies in breeding programs to reduce pasta darkening. The aim of this study was to map the gene(s) affecting PPO activity using a set of recombinant inbred (RI) lines, derived from a cross between Triticum turgidum L. var. durum cultivar Messapia and the accession MG4343 of Triticum turgidum L. var. dicoccoides. After performing linkage analysis, the gene for high PPO activity was mapped on the long arm of the chromosome 2A and its characteristic was found highly associated to the RFLP marker Xutv1427-2A, with a value of LOD equal to 29.84. The identification of molecular markers linked to loci controlling the PPO activity may potentially accelerate wheat breeding since the selection of plants can be carried out by genotype rather than phenotype. PMID:12378236

  8. Reye's syndrome: salicylate and mitochondrial monoamine oxidase function

    SciTech Connect

    Faraj, B.A.; Caplan, D.; Lolies, P.

    1986-03-01

    It has been suggested that aspirin is somehow linked with the onset of Reye's syndrome (RS). A general feature of Reye's syndrome is severe impairment of mitochondrial monoamine oxidase (MAO) function. The main objective of this investigation was to study the effect of salicylate on platelet mitochondrial MAO activity in three groups: group A (healthy children, n = 21) and group C (healthy adults, n = 10). Platelet MAO was measured by radio-enzymatic technique with /sup 14/C-tyramine as a substrate. The results showed that salicyclate (10 mM) had a 20 to 60 percent inhibitory effect on platelet MAO function in only 1, 3 and 2 of the subjects in group A, B and C. Furthermore, there was an association between low enzyme activity and salicylate MAO inhibitory effect in these subjects. These preliminary findings suggest that salicylate may induce deterioration in mitochondrial function in susceptible individuals and that the assessment of salicylate MAO inhibitory effect may identify those who may be at risk to develop aspirin poisoning and Reye's syndrome.

  9. Immobilization of glucose oxidase in alginate-chitosan microcapsules.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xia; Zhu, Ke-Xue; Zhou, Hui-Ming

    2011-01-01

    In order to improve its stability and catalytic rate in flour, the immobilization of glucose oxidase (GOX) was investigated in this work. The enzyme was encapsulated in calcium alginate-chitosan microspheres (CACM) using an emulsification-internal gelation-GOX adsorption-chitosan coating method. The interaction between alginate and chitosan was confirmed by infrared spectroscopy (IR). The resultant CACM in wet state, whose morphology was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), was spherical with a mean diameter of about 26 μm. The GOX load, encapsulation efficiency and activity of the CACM-GOX were influenced by concentration of chitosan, encapsulation time and encapsulation pH. The highest total enzymatic activity and encapsulation efficiency was achieved when the pH of the adsorption medium was near the isoelectric point (pI) of GOX, approximately pH 4.0. In addition, the molecular weight of chitosan also evidently influenced the encapsulation efficiency. Storage stabilities of GOX samples were investigated continuously over two months and the retained activity of CACM-GOX was 70.4%, markedly higher than the 7.5% of free enzyme. The results reveal the great potential of CACM-GOX as a flour improver.

  10. Characterization of ent-kaurene oxidase activity from Gibberella fujikuroi.

    PubMed

    Ashman, P J; Mackenzie, A; Bramley, P M

    1990-11-01

    Cell extracts of wild-type and mutant strains of Gibberella fujikuroi were assayed for kaurene oxidase activity, using ent-[3H]kaurene as the substrate. Extracts from strain SG78 exhibited the highest specific activity, and were used in subsequent experiments. The microsomal enzyme activity was solubilized with buffers or salt solutions at a concentration of 400 mM. Both the soluble and microsomal preparations showed characteristic cytochrome P-450 spectra, ligand binding spectra with the substrate and with the plant growth regulator, paclobutrazol, and inhibition of enzymic activity by carbon monoxide. The addition of 20% glycerol to the extraction buffer stabilized the activity to some extent. Loss of enzymic activity on storage was accompanied by conversion of P-450 to P-420. Michaelis-Menten kinetic parameters for the membrane-bound and soluble enzyme have been estimated, as have constants for the binding of ent-kaurene and paclobutrazol to the P-450 and P-420 forms of the protein.

  11. Xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity of extracts prepared from Polygonaceae species.

    PubMed

    Orbán-Gyapai, Orsolya; Lajter, Ildikó; Hohmann, Judit; Jakab, Gusztáv; Vasas, Andrea

    2015-03-01

    The xanthine oxidase (XO) inhibitory activity of aqueous and organic extracts of 27 selected species belonging in five genera (Fallopia, Oxyria, Persicaria, Polygonum and Rumex) of the family Polygonaceae occurring in the Carpathian Basin were tested in vitro. From different plant parts (aerial parts, leaves, flowers, fruits and roots), a total of 196 extracts were prepared by subsequent extraction with methanol and hot H2O and solvent-solvent partition of the MeOH extract yielding n-hexane, chloroform and 50% MeOH subextracts. It was found that the chloroform subextracts and/or the remaining 50% MeOH extracts of Fallopia species (F. bohemica, F. japonica and F. sachalinensis), Rumex species (R. acetosa, R. acetosella, R. alpinus, R. conglomeratus, R. crispus, R. hydrolapathus, R. pulcher, R. stenophyllus, R. thyrsiflorus, R. obtusifolius subsp. subalpinus, R. patientia) and Polygonum bistorta, Polygonum hydropiper, Polygonum lapathifolium and Polygonum viviparum demonstrated the highest XO inhibitory activity (>85% inhibition) at 400 µg/mL. The IC50 values of the active extracts were also determined. On the basis of the results, these plants, and especially P. hydropiper and R. acetosella, are considered worthy of activity-guided phytochemical investigations.

  12. Monoamine Oxidase-A Occupancy by Moclobemide and Phenelzine: Implications for the Development of Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Chiuccariello, Lina; Cooke, Robert G; Miler, Laura; Levitan, Robert D; Baker, Glen B; Kish, Stephen J; Kolla, Nathan J; Rusjan, Pablo M; Houle, Sylvain; Wilson, Alan A

    2016-01-01

    Background: Monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) are being developed for major depressive disorder, Alzheimer’s, and Parkinson’s Disease. Newer MAOIs have minimal sensitivity to tyramine, but a key limitation for optimizing their development is that standards for in vivo monoamine oxidase-A (MAO-A) occupancy in humans are not well established. The objectives were to determine the dose-occupancy relationship of moclobemide and the occupancy of phenelzine at typical clinical dosing. Methods: Major depressive episode (MDE) subjects underwent [11C]harmine positron emission tomography scanning prior to and following 6 weeks of treatment with moclobemide or phenelzine. Results: Mean brain MAO-A occupancies were 74.23±8.32% for moclobemide at 300–600mg daily (n = 11), 83.75±5.52% for moclobemide at 900–1200mg daily (n = 9), and 86.82±6.89% for phenelzine at 45–60mg daily (n = 4). The regional dose-occupancy relationship of moclobemide fit a hyperbolic function [F(x) = a(x/[b + x]); F(1,18) = 5.57 to 13.32, p = 0.002 to 0.03, mean ‘a’: 88.62±2.38%, mean ‘b’: 69.88±4.36 mg]. Multivariate analyses of variance showed significantly greater occupancy of phenelzine (45–60mg) and higher-dose moclobemide (900–1200mg) compared to lower-dose moclobemide [300–600mg; F(7,16) = 3.94, p = 0.01]. Conclusions: These findings suggest that for first-line MDE treatment, daily moclobemide doses of 300–600mg correspond to a MAO-A occupancy of 74%, whereas for treatment-resistant MDE, either phenelzine or higher doses of moclobemide correspond to a MAO-A occupancy of at least 84%. Therefore, novel MAO inhibitor development should aim for similar thresholds. The findings provide a rationale in treatment algorithm design to raise moclobemide doses to inhibit more MAO-A sites, but suggest switching from high-dose moclobemide to phenelzine is best justified by binding to additional targets. PMID:26316187

  13. On the oxygen reactivity of flavoprotein oxidases: an oxygen access tunnel and gate in brevibacterium sterolicum cholesterol oxidase.

    PubMed

    Piubelli, Luciano; Pedotti, Mattia; Molla, Gianluca; Feindler-Boeckh, Susanne; Ghisla, Sandro; Pilone, Mirella S; Pollegioni, Loredano

    2008-09-01

    The flavoprotein cholesterol oxidase from Brevibacterium sterolicum (BCO) possesses a narrow channel that links the active center containing the flavin to the outside solvent. This channel has been proposed to serve for the access of dioxygen; it contains at its "bottom" a Glu-Arg pair (Glu-475-Arg-477) that was found by crystallographic studies to exist in two forms named "open" and "closed," which in turn was suggested to constitute a gate functioning in the control of oxygen access. Most mutations of residues that flank the channel have minor effects on the oxygen reactivity. Mutations of Glu-311, however, cause a switch in the basic kinetic mechanism of the reaction of reduced BCO with dioxygen; wild-type BCO and most mutants show a saturation behavior with increasing oxygen concentration, whereas for Glu-311 mutants a linear dependence is found that is assumed to reflect a "simple" second order process. This is taken as support for the assumption that residue Glu-311 finely tunes the Glu-475-Arg-477 pair, forming a gate that functions in modulating the access/reactivity of dioxygen.

  14. NADPH Oxidase 1 and NADPH Oxidase 4 Have Opposite Prognostic Effects for Patients with Hepatocellular Carcinoma after Hepatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Sang Yun; Paik, Yong-Han; Yang, Jung Wook; Lee, Min Ju; Bae, Hyunsik; Park, Cheol-Keun

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase (NOX)-mediated reactive oxygen species contribute to various liver diseases, including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Uncertainties remain regarding the prognostic relevance of NOX1 and NOX4 protein expression in HCC. Methods NOX1 and NOX4 protein expression was examined by using immunohistochemistry in tumor tissue from 227 HCC patients who underwent hepatectomy. Results High immunoreactivity for NOX1 was observed in 197 (86.8%) of the 227 HCC cases and low immunoreactivity for NOX4 in 112 (49.3%). NOX1 and NOX4 proteins had opposite prognostic effects. High NOX1 expression was an independent predictor of both shorter recurrence-free survival (RFS) (p<0.01) and shorter overall survival (OS) (p=0.01). Low NOX4 expression was an independent predictor of both shorter RFS (p<0.01) and shorter OS (p=0.01). Subgroup analysis showed that, among patients with normal α-fetoprotein levels, patients with tumor size ≤5.0 cm and patients in Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer stage A, high NOX1 expression had unfavorable effects on RFS, whereas low NOX4 expression had unfavorable effects on both RFS and OS. Conclusions These findings demonstrated that NOX1 and NOX4 protein expression had opposite prognostic effects for HCC patients. Moreover, both proteins had prognostic value in HCC patients with normal α-fetoprotein levels or with early-stage HCC. PMID:27282266

  15. Direct Identification of a Bacterial Manganese(II) Oxidase, the Multicopper Oxidase MnxG, from Spores of Several Different Marine Bacillus Species▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Dick, Gregory J.; Torpey, Justin W.; Beveridge, Terry J.; Tebo, Bradley M.

    2008-01-01

    Microorganisms catalyze the formation of naturally occurring Mn oxides, but little is known about the biochemical mechanisms of this important biogeochemical process. We used tandem mass spectrometry to directly analyze the Mn(II)-oxidizing enzyme from marine Bacillus spores, identified as an Mn oxide band with an in-gel activity assay. Nine distinct peptides recovered from the Mn oxide band of two Bacillus species were unique to the multicopper oxidase MnxG, and one peptide was from the small hydrophobic protein MnxF. No other proteins were detected in the Mn oxide band, indicating that MnxG (or a MnxF/G complex) directly catalyzes biogenic Mn oxide formation. The Mn(II) oxidase was partially purified and found to be resistant to many proteases and active even at high concentrations of sodium dodecyl sulfate. Comparative analysis of the genes involved in Mn(II) oxidation from three diverse Bacillus species revealed a complement of conserved Cu-binding regions not present in well-characterized multicopper oxidases. Our results provide the first direct identification of a bacterial enzyme that catalyzes Mn(II) oxidation and suggest that MnxG catalyzes two sequential one-electron oxidations from Mn(II) to Mn(III) and from Mn(III) to Mn(IV), a novel type of reaction for a multicopper oxidase. PMID:18165363

  16. Production of the carbonate radical anion during xanthine oxidase turnover in the presence of bicarbonate.

    PubMed

    Bonini, Marcelo G; Miyamoto, Sayuri; Di Mascio, Paolo; Augusto, Ohara

    2004-12-10

    Xanthine oxidase is generally recognized as a key enzyme in purine catabolism, but its structural complexity, low substrate specificity, and specialized tissue distribution suggest other functions that remain to be fully identified. The potential of xanthine oxidase to generate superoxide radical anion, hydrogen peroxide, and peroxynitrite has been extensively explored in pathophysiological contexts. Here we demonstrate that xanthine oxidase turnover at physiological pH produces a strong one-electron oxidant, the carbonate radical anion. The radical was shown to be produced from acetaldehyde oxidation by xanthine oxidase in the presence of catalase and bicarbonate on the basis of several lines of evidence such as oxidation of both dihydrorhodamine 123 and 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide and chemiluminescence and isotope labeling/mass spectrometry studies. In the case of xanthine oxidase acting upon xanthine and hypoxanthine as substrates, carbonate radical anion production was also evidenced by the oxidation of 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide and of dihydrorhodamine 123 in the presence of uricase. The results indicated that Fenton chemistry occurring in the bulk solution is not necessary for carbonate radical anion production. Under the conditions employed, the radical was likely to be produced at the enzyme active site by reduction of a peroxymonocarbonate intermediate whose formation and reduction is facilitated by the many xanthine oxidase redox centers. In addition to indicating that the carbonate radical anion may be an important mediator of the pathophysiological effects of xanthine oxidase, the results emphasize the potential of the bicarbonate-carbon dioxide pair as a source of biological oxidants. PMID:15448145

  17. Complement-dependent NADPH oxidase enzyme activation in renal ischemia/reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Simone, S; Rascio, F; Castellano, G; Divella, C; Chieti, A; Ditonno, P; Battaglia, M; Crovace, A; Staffieri, F; Oortwijn, B; Stallone, G; Gesualdo, L; Pertosa, G; Grandaliano, G

    2014-09-01

    NADPH oxidase plays a central role in mediating oxidative stress during heart, liver, and lung ischemia/reperfusion injury, but limited information is available about NADPH oxidase in renal ischemia/reperfusion injury. Our aim was to investigate the activation of NADPH oxidase in a swine model of renal ischemia/reperfusion damage. We induced renal ischemia/reperfusion in 10 pigs, treating 5 of them with human recombinant C1 inhibitor, and we collected kidney biopsies before ischemia and 15, 30, and 60 min after reperfusion. Ischemia/reperfusion induced a significant increase in NADPH oxidase 4 (NOX-4) expression at the tubular level, an upregulation of NOX-2 expression in infiltrating monocytes and myeloid dendritic cells, and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine synthesis along with a marked upregulation of NADPH-dependent superoxide generation. This burden of oxidative stress was associated with an increase in tubular and interstitial expression of the myofibroblast marker α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA). Interestingly, NOX-4 and NOX-2 expression and the overall NADPH oxidase activity as well as α-SMA expression and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine synthesis were strongly reduced in C1-inhibitor-treated animals. In vitro, when we incubated tubular cells with the anaphylotoxin C3a, we observed an enhanced NADPH oxidase activity and α-SMA protein expression, which were both abolished by NOX-4 silencing. In conclusion, our findings suggest that NADPH oxidase is activated during ischemia/reperfusion in a complement-dependent manner and may play a potential role in the pathogenesis of progressive renal damage in this setting.

  18. Characterization of a cytochrome a1 that functions as a ubiquinol oxidase in Acetobacter aceti.

    PubMed

    Fukaya, M; Tayama, K; Tamaki, T; Ebisuya, H; Okumura, H; Kawamura, Y; Horinouchi, S; Beppu, T

    1993-07-01

    The terminal oxidase for ethanol oxidation in Acetobacter aceti was purified as a complex consisting of four subunits (subunits I, II, III, and IV) with molecular masses of 72, 34, 21, and 13 kDa, respectively. Spectrophotometric analysis and catalytic properties determined with the purified enzyme showed that it belonged to a family of cytochrome a1 (ba)-type ubiquinol oxidases. A polymerase chain reaction with two oligonucleotides designed for amino acid sequences that are conserved in subunit I of the aa3-type cytochrome c oxidases from various origins and of an Escherichia coli o (bo)-type ubiquinol oxidase was used for cloning the cytochrome a1 gene. A 0.5-kb fragment thus amplified was used as the probe to clone a 4.5-kb KpnI fragment that contained a putative open reading frame for the whole subunit I gene. The molecular weight and amino acid composition of the product of this open reading frame (cyaA) were the same as those of the purified protein from A. aceti. The amino acid sequence of CyaA was homologous to that of subunit I of the E. coli o-type ubiquinol oxidase. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the region neighboring the cyaA gene revealed that the genes (cyaB, cyaC, and cyaD) encoding the other three subunits (subunits II, III, and IV) were clustered upstream and downstream of the cyaA gene in the order cyaB, cyaA, cyaC, and cyaD and with the same transcription polarity, forming an operon. As expected from the enzymatic properties, CyaB, CyaC, and CyaD showed great similarity in amino acid sequence to the corresponding sununits of the E. coli o-type ubiquinol oxidase and as(3)-type cytochrome c oxidases.

  19. Complement-dependent NADPH oxidase enzyme activation in renal ischemia/reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Simone, S; Rascio, F; Castellano, G; Divella, C; Chieti, A; Ditonno, P; Battaglia, M; Crovace, A; Staffieri, F; Oortwijn, B; Stallone, G; Gesualdo, L; Pertosa, G; Grandaliano, G

    2014-09-01

    NADPH oxidase plays a central role in mediating oxidative stress during heart, liver, and lung ischemia/reperfusion injury, but limited information is available about NADPH oxidase in renal ischemia/reperfusion injury. Our aim was to investigate the activation of NADPH oxidase in a swine model of renal ischemia/reperfusion damage. We induced renal ischemia/reperfusion in 10 pigs, treating 5 of them with human recombinant C1 inhibitor, and we collected kidney biopsies before ischemia and 15, 30, and 60 min after reperfusion. Ischemia/reperfusion induced a significant increase in NADPH oxidase 4 (NOX-4) expression at the tubular level, an upregulation of NOX-2 expression in infiltrating monocytes and myeloid dendritic cells, and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine synthesis along with a marked upregulation of NADPH-dependent superoxide generation. This burden of oxidative stress was associated with an increase in tubular and interstitial expression of the myofibroblast marker α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA). Interestingly, NOX-4 and NOX-2 expression and the overall NADPH oxidase activity as well as α-SMA expression and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine synthesis were strongly reduced in C1-inhibitor-treated animals. In vitro, when we incubated tubular cells with the anaphylotoxin C3a, we observed an enhanced NADPH oxidase activity and α-SMA protein expression, which were both abolished by NOX-4 silencing. In conclusion, our findings suggest that NADPH oxidase is activated during ischemia/reperfusion in a complement-dependent manner and may play a potential role in the pathogenesis of progressive renal damage in this setting. PMID:25017967

  20. Neovascularization in an arterio-venous loop-containing tissue engineering chamber: role of NADPH oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, F; Zhang, G; Hashimoto, I; Kumar, B S; Bortolotto, S; Morrison, W A; Dusting, G J

    2008-01-01

    Using an in vivo arterio-venous loop-containing tissue-engineering chamber, we have created a variety of vascularized tissue blocks, including functional myocardium. The viability of the transplanted cells is limited by the rate of neovascularization in the chamber. A Nox2-containing nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase is thought to have a critical role in ischaemic angiogenesis. In this study we investigated whether NADPH oxidase is involved in the neovascularization process in the tissue-engineering chamber. New blood vessels originating from the venous and the arterial ends of the loop could be identified after 3 days, and the vessel density (by lectin staining) peaked after 7 days and was maintained for at least 14 days. This was accompanied by granulation tissue formation and concomitant increase in the mRNA level of Nox4 NADPH oxidase. Although the total level of Nox2 mRNA in the chamber tissue decreased from day 3 to day 7, immunohistochemistry identified a strong expression of Nox2 in the endothelial cells of the new vessels. In human microvascular endothelial cells, the NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin reduced NADPH oxidase activity and inhibited the angiogenic responses in vitro. Local treatment with the NADPH oxidase inhibitors apocynin or gp91ds-tat peptide significantly suppressed the vessel growth in the chamber. In conclusion, NADPH oxidase-dependent redox signalling is important for neovascularization in this novel tissue-engineering chamber in vivo, and boosting this signalling might be a new approach to extending vascularization and tissue growth. PMID:19012731

  1. Intracellular lysyl oxidase: Effect of a specific inhibitor on nuclear mass in proliferating cells

    SciTech Connect

    Saad, Fawzy A.; Torres, Marie; Wang, Hao; Graham, Lila

    2010-06-11

    LOX, the principal enzyme involved in crosslinking of collagen, was the first of several lysyl oxidase isotypes to be characterized. Its active form was believed to be exclusively extracellular. Active LOX was later reported to be present in cell nuclei; its function there is unknown. LOX expression opposes the effect of mutationally activated Ras, which is present in about 30% of human cancers. The mechanism of LOX in countering the action of Ras is also unknown. In the present work, assessment of nuclear protein for possible effects of lysyl oxidase activity led to the discovery that proliferating cells dramatically increase their nuclear protein content when exposed to BAPN ({beta}-aminopropionitrile), a highly specific lysyl oxidase inhibitor that reportedly blocks LOX inhibition of Ras-induced oocyte maturation. In three cell types (PC12 cells, A7r5 smooth muscle cells, and NIH 3T3 fibroblasts), BAPN caused a 1.8-, 1.7-, and 2.1-fold increase in total nuclear protein per cell, respectively, affecting all major components in both nuclear matrix and chromatin fractions. Since nuclear size is correlated with proliferative status, enzyme activity restricting nuclear growth may be involved in the lysyl oxidase tumor suppressive effect. Evidence is also presented for the presence of apparent lysyl oxidase isotype(s) containing a highly conserved LOX active site sequence in the nuclei of PC12 cells, which do not manufacture extracellular lysyl oxidase substrates. Results reported here support the hypothesis that nuclear lysyl oxidase regulates nuclear growth, and thereby modulates cell proliferation.

  2. The intimate and controversial relationship between voltage-gated proton channels and the phagocyte NADPH oxidase.

    PubMed

    DeCoursey, Thomas E

    2016-09-01

    One of the most fascinating and exciting periods in my scientific career entailed dissecting the symbiotic relationship between two membrane transporters, the Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate reduced form (NADPH) oxidase complex and voltage-gated proton channels (HV 1). By the time I entered this field, there had already been substantial progress toward understanding NADPH oxidase, but HV 1 were known only to a tiny handful of cognoscenti around the world. Having identified the first proton currents in mammalian cells in 1991, I needed to find a clear function for these molecules if the work was to become fundable. The then-recent discoveries of Henderson, Chappell, and colleagues in 1987-1988 that led them to hypothesize interactions of both molecules during the respiratory burst of phagocytes provided an excellent opportunity. In a nutshell, both transporters function by moving electrical charge across the membrane: NADPH oxidase moves electrons and HV 1 moves protons. The consequences of electrogenic NADPH oxidase activity on both membrane potential and pH strongly self-limit this enzyme. Fortunately, both consequences specifically activate HV 1, and HV 1 activity counteracts both consequences, a kind of yin-yang relationship. Notwithstanding a decade starting in 1995 when many believed the opposite, these are two separate molecules that function independently despite their being functionally interdependent in phagocytes. The relationship between NADPH oxidase and HV 1 has become a paradigm that somewhat surprisingly has now extended well beyond the phagocyte NADPH oxidase - an industrial strength producer of reactive oxygen species (ROS) - to myriad other cells that produce orders of magnitude less ROS for signaling purposes. These cells with their seven NADPH oxidase (NOX) isoforms provide a vast realm of mechanistic obscurity that will occupy future studies for years to come. PMID:27558336

  3. Alternative oxidase in the branched mitochondrial respiratory network: an overview on structure, function, regulation, and role.

    PubMed

    Sluse, F E; Jarmuszkiewicz, W

    1998-06-01

    Plants and some other organisms including protists possess a complex branched respiratory network in their mitochondria. Some pathways of this network are not energy-conserving and allow sites of energy conservation to be bypassed, leading to a decrease of the energy yield in the cells. It is a challenge to understand the regulation of the partitioning of electrons between the various energy-dissipating and -conserving pathways. This review is focused on the oxidase side of the respiratory chain that presents a cyanide-resistant energy-dissipating alternative oxidase (AOX) besides the cytochrome pathway. The known structural properties of AOX are described including transmembrane topology, dimerization, and active sites. Regulation of the alternative oxidase activity is presented in detail because of its complexity. The alternative oxidase activity is dependent on substrate availability: total ubiquinone concentration and its redox state in the membrane and O2 concentration in the cell. The alternative oxidase activity can be long-term regulated (gene expression) or short-term (post-translational modification, allosteric activation) regulated. Electron distribution (partitioning) between the alternative and cytochrome pathways during steady-state respiration is a crucial measurement to quantitatively analyze the effects of the various levels of regulation of the alternative oxidase. Three approaches are described with their specific domain of application and limitations: kinetic approach, oxygen isotope differential discrimination, and ADP/O method (thermokinetic approach). Lastly, the role of the alternative oxidase in non-thermogenic tissues is discussed in relation to the energy metabolism balance of the cell (supply in reducing equivalents/demand in energy and carbon) and with harmful reactive oxygen species formation.

  4. Expression of NADPH oxidase by trophoblast cells: potential implications for the postimplanting mouse embryo.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Sara Z; Lorenzon, Aline R; Vieira, Juliana S; Rocha, Clarissa R R; Bandeira, Clara; Hoshida, Mara S; Lopes, Lucia Rosseti; Bevilacqua, Estela

    2012-02-01

    Cytochemical localization of hydrogen peroxide-generating sites suggests NADPH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide 3-phosphate [reduced form]) oxidase expression at the maternal-fetal interface. To explore this possibility, we have characterized the expression and activity of the NADPH oxidase complex in trophoblast cells during the postimplantation period. Implantation sites and ectoplacental cones (EPCs) from 7.5-gestational day embryos from CD1 mice were used as a source for expression analyses of NADPH oxidase catalytic and regulatory subunits. EPCs grown in primary culture were used to investigate the production of superoxide anion through dihydroxyethidium oxidation in confocal microscopy and immunohistochemical assays. NADPH subunits Cybb (gp91phox), Cyba (p22phox), Ncf4 (p40phox), Ncf1 (p47phox), Ncf2 (p67phox), and Rac1 were expressed by trophoblast cells. The fundamental subunits of membrane CYBB and cytosolic NCF2 were markedly upregulated after phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) treatment, as detected by quantitative real-time PCR, Western blotting, and immunohistochemistry. Fluorescence microscopy imaging showed colocalization of cytosolic and plasma membrane NADPH oxidase subunits mainly after PMA treatment, suggesting assembly of the complex after enzyme activation. Cultured EPCs produced superoxide in a NADPH-dependent manner, associating the NADPH oxidase-mediated superoxide production with postimplantation trophoblast physiology. NADPH-oxidase cDNA subunit sequencing showed a high degree of homology between the trophoblast and neutrophil isoforms of the oxidase, emphasizing a putative role for reactive oxygen species production in phagocytic activity and innate immune responses. PMID:22075471

  5. Expression of ascorbic acid oxidase in zucchini squash (Cucurbita pepo L. )

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Liangshiou; Varner, J.E. )

    1991-05-01

    The expression of ascorbic acid oxidase was studied in zuchini squash (Cucurbita pepo L.), one of the most abundant natural sources of the enzyme. In the developing fruit, specific activity of ascorbic acid oxidase was highest between 4 and 6 days after anthesis. Protein and mRNA levels followed the same trend as enzyme activity. Highest growth rate of the fruit occurred before 6 days after anthesis. Within a given fruit, ascorbic acid oxidase activity was higher in young leaves, and very low in old leaves. Within a given leaf, enzyme activity was highest in the fast-growing region (approximately the lower third of the blade), and lowest in the central placental region. In leaf tissue, ascorbic acid oxidase activity was higher in young leaves, and very low in old leaves. Within a given leaf, enzyme activity was highest in the fast-growing region (approximately the lower third of the blade), and lowest in the slow-growing region (near leaf apex). High expression of ascorbic acid oxidase at a stage when rapid growth is occurring (in both fruits and leaves), and localization of the enzyme in the fruit epidermis, where cells are under greatest tension during rapid growth in girth, suggest that ascorbic acid oxidase might be involved in reorganization of the cell wall to allow for expansion. Based on the known chemistry of dehydroascorbic acid, the end product of the ascorbic acid oxidase-catalyzed reaction, the authors have proposed several hypotheses to explain how dehydroascorbic acid might cause cell wall loosening.

  6. Purification and characterization of methylamine oxidase induced in Aspergillus niger AKU 3302.

    PubMed

    Frébort, I; Matsushita, K; Toyama, H; Lemr, K; Yamada, M; Adachi, O

    1999-01-01

    Crude extract of Aspergillus niger AKU 3302 mycelia incubated with methylamine showed a single amine oxidase activity band in a developed polyacrylamide gel that weakly cross-reacted with the antibody against a copper/topa quinone-containing amine oxidase (AO-II) from the same strain induced by n-butylamine. Since the organism cannot grow on methylamine and the already known quinoprotein amine oxidases of the organism cannot catalyze oxidation of methylamine, the organism was forced to produce another enzyme that could oxidize methylamine when the mycelia were incubated with methylamine. The enzyme was separated and purified from the already known two quinoprotein amine oxidases formed in the same mycelia. The purified enzyme showed a sharp symmetric sedimentation peak in analytical ultracentrifugation showing S20,w0 of 6.5s. The molecular mass of 133 kDa estimated by gel chromatography and 66.6 kDa found by SDS-PAGE confirmed the dimeric structure of the enzyme. The purified enzyme was pink in color with an absorption maximum at 494 nm. The enzyme readily oxidized methylamine, n-hexylamine, and n-butylamine, but not benzylamine, histamine, or tyramine, favorite substrates for the already known two quinoprotein amine oxidases. Inactivation by carbonyl reagents and copper chelators suggested the presence of a copper/topa quinone cofactor. Spectrophotometric titration by p-nitrophenylhydrazine showed one reactive carbonyl group per subunit and redox-cyclic quinone staining confirmed the presence of a quinone cofactor. pH-dependent shift of the absorption spectrum of the enzyme-p-nitrophenylhydrazone (469 nm at neutral to 577 nm at alkaline pH) supported the identity of the cofactor with topaquinone. Nothern blot analysis indicated that the methylamine oxidase encoding gene is largely different from the already known amine oxidase in the organism.

  7. Redox-controlled proton gating in bovine cytochrome c oxidase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousseau, Denis

    2015-03-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase is the terminal enzyme in the electron transfer chain of essentially all organisms that utilize oxygen to generate energy. It reduces oxygen to water and harnesses the energy to pump protons across the mitochondrial membrane in eukaryotes and the plasma membrane in prokaryotes. The mechanism by which proton pumping is coupled to the oxygen reduction reaction remains unresolved, owing to the difficulty of visualizing proton movement within the massive membrane-associated protein matrix. Here, with a novel hydrogen/deuterium exchange resonance Raman spectroscopy method, we have identified two critical elements of the proton pump: a proton loading site near the propionate groups of heme a, which is capable of transiently storing protons uploaded from the negative-side of the membrane prior to their release into the positive-side of the membrane and a conformational gate that controls proton translocation in response to the change in the redox state of heme a. These findings form the basis for a postulated molecular model describing a detailed mechanism by which unidirectional proton translocation is coupled to electron transfer from heme a to heme a3, associated with oxygen chemistry occurring in the heme a3 site, during enzymatic turnover. Each time heme a undergoes an oxidation-reduction transition a proton is translocated across the membrane accounting for the observation that two protons are translocated during the oxidative phase of the enzymatic cycle and two more are translocated during the reductive phase. This work was done in collaboration with Drs. Tsuyoshi Egawa and Syun-Ru Yeh. This work was supported the National Institutes of Health Grant GM098799 to D.L.R and National Science Foundation Grant NSF 0956358 to S.-R.Y.

  8. Import, targeting, and processing of a plant polyphenol oxidase.

    PubMed Central

    Sommer, A; Ne'eman, E; Steffens, J C; Mayer, A M; Harel, E

    1994-01-01

    A tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum L.) gene encoding a precursor of polyphenol oxidase (PPO) was transcribed and translated in vitro. The import, targeting, and processing of the [35S]methionine-labeled precursor protein (pPPO) were studied in isolated chloroplasts. The protein was routed to the thylakoid lumen in two steps. The 67-kD precursor was first imported into the stroma in an ATP-dependent step. It was processed to a 62-kD intermediate by a stromal peptidase. Translocation into the lumen was light dependent and involved processing of the 62-kD to the 59-kD mature form. The mature polypeptide was soluble in the lumen and not bound to thylakoids. This two-step targeting pattern was observed in plastids from a variety of plants including pea (Pisum sativum L.), tomato, and maize (Zea mays L.). The ratio between the intermediate and mature forms observed depended on the plant species, leaf age, growth conditions, and illumination regime to which the plants had been subjected. Cu2+ was not required for pPPO import or processing. Furthermore, low concentrations of Cu2+ (1-5 microM) markedly inhibited the first import step. Tentoxin specifically inhibited pPPO import, leaving the precursor bound to the envelope membrane. The two-step routing of pPPO into chloroplasts, typical of thylakoid lumen proteins, is consistent with the two-domain structure of the transit peptide and appears to be a feature of all plant PPO genes isolated so far. No evidence was found for unorthodox routing mechanisms, which have been suggested to be involved in the import of plant PPOs. The two-step routing may account for some of the multiplicity of PPO observed in vivo. PMID:7972497

  9. Molecular cloning and characterisation of banana fruit polyphenol oxidase.

    PubMed

    Gooding, P S; Bird, C; Robinson, S P

    2001-09-01

    Polyphenol oxidase (PPO; EC 1.10.3.2) is the enzyme thought to be responsible for browning in banana [Musa cavendishii (AAA group, Cavendish subgroup) cv. Williams] fruit. Banana flesh was high in PPO activity throughout growth and ripening. Peel showed high levels of activity early in development but activity declined until ripening started and then remained constant. PPO activity in fruit was not substantially induced after wounding or treatment with 5-methyl jasmonate. Banana flowers and unexpanded leaf roll had high PPO activities with lower activities observed in mature leaves, roots and stem. Four different PPO cDNA clones were amplified from banana fruit (BPO1, BPO11, BPO34 and BPO35). Full-length cDNA and genomic clones were isolated for the most abundant sequence (BPO1) and the genomic clone was found to contain an 85-bp intron. Introns have not been previously found in PPO genes. Northern analysis revealed the presence of BPO1 mRNA in banana flesh early in development but little BPO1 mRNA was detected at the same stage in banana peel. BPO11 transcript was only detected in very young flesh and there was no detectable expression of BPO34 or BPO35 in developing fruit samples. PPO transcripts were also low throughout ripening in both flesh and peel. BPO1 transcripts were readily detected in flowers, stem, roots and leaf roll samples but were not detected in mature leaves. BPO11 showed a similar pattern of expression to BPO1 in these tissues but transcript levels were much lower. BPO34 and BPO35 mRNAs were only detected at a low level in flowers and roots and BPO34 transcript was detected in mature leaves, the only clone to do so. The results suggest that browning of banana fruit during ripening results from release of pre-existing PPO enzyme, which is synthesised very early in fruit development.

  10. Insomnia, platelet serotonin and platelet monoamine oxidase in chronic alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Nenadic Sviglin, Korona; Nedic, Gordana; Nikolac, Matea; Mustapic, Maja; Muck-Seler, Dorotea; Borovecki, Fran; Pivac, Nela

    2011-08-18

    Insomnia is a common sleep disorder frequently occurring in chronic alcoholic patients. Neurobiological basis of insomnia, as well as of alcoholism, is associated with disrupted functions of the main neurotransmitter systems, including the serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) system. Blood platelets are considered a limited peripheral model for the central 5-HT neurons, since both platelets and central 5-HT synaptosomes have similar dynamics of 5-HT. Platelet 5-HT concentration and platelet monoamine oxidase type B (MAO-B) are assumed to represent biomarkers for particular symptoms and behaviors in psychiatric disorders. The hypothesis of this study was that platelet 5-HT concentration and platelet MAO-B activity will be altered in chronic alcoholic patients with insomnia compared to comparable values in patients without insomnia. The study included 498 subjects: 395 male and 103 female medication-free patients with alcohol dependence and 502 healthy control subjects: 325 men and 177 women. The effects of early, middle and late insomnia (evaluated using the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale), as well as sex, age and smoking on platelet 5-HT concentration and platelet MAO-B activity were evaluated using one-way ANOVA and multiple regression analysis by the stepwise method. Platelet 5-HT concentration, but not platelet MAO-B activity, was significantly reduced in alcoholic patients with insomnia compared to patients without insomnia. Multiple regression analysis revealed that platelet 5-HT concentration was affected by middle insomnia, smoking and sex, while platelet MAO activity was affected only by sex and age. The present and previous data suggest that platelet 5-HT concentration might be used, after controlling for sex and smoking, as a biomarker for insomnia in alcoholism, PTSD and in rotating shift workers.

  11. Alternative oxidase involvement in Daucus carota somatic embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Frederico, António Miguel; Campos, Maria Doroteia; Cardoso, Hélia Guerra; Imani, Jafargholi; Arnholdt-Schmitt, Birgit

    2009-12-01

    Plant alternative oxidase (AOX) is a mitochondrial inner membrane enzyme involved in alternative respiration. The critical importance of the enzyme during acclimation upon stress of plant cells is not fully understood and is still an issue of intensive research and discussion. Recently, a role of AOX was suggested for the ability of plant cells to change easily its fate upon stress. In order to get new insights about AOX involvement in cell reprogramming, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and inhibitor studies were performed during cell redifferentiation and developmental stages of Daucus carota L. somatic embryogenesis. Transcript level analysis shows that D. carota AOX genes (DcAOX1a and DcAOX2a) are differentially expressed during somatic embryogenesis. DcAOX1a shows lower expression levels, being mainly down-regulated, whereas DcAOX2a presented a large up-regulation during initiation of the realization phase of somatic embryogenesis. However, when globular embryos start to develop, both genes are down-regulated, being this state transient for DcAOX2a. In addition, parallel studies were performed using salicylhydroxamic acid (SHAM) in order to inhibit AOX activity during the realization phase of somatic embryogenesis. Embryogenic cells growing in the presence of the inhibitor were unable to develop embryogenic structures and its growth rate was diminished. This effect was reversible and concentration dependent. The results obtained contribute to the hypothesis that AOX activity supports metabolic reorganization as an essential part of cell reprogramming and, thus, enables restructuring and de novo cell differentiation.

  12. Inhibition of polyphenol oxidases activity by various dipeptides.

    PubMed

    Girelli, Anna M; Mattei, Enrico; Messina, Antonella; Tarola, Anna M

    2004-05-19

    In an effort to develop natural and nontoxic inhibitors on the activity of mushroom polyphenol oxidase (PPO) the effect of various glycyl-dipeptides (GlyAsp, GlyGly, GlyHis, GlyLeu, GlyLys, GlyPhe, GlyPro, GlyTyr) was investigated. The inhibition study with dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) as substrate is based on separation of the enzymatic reaction components by reversed phase HPLC and the UV detection of the dopachrome formed. The results have evidenced that several of tested dipeptides inhibited PPO activity in the range of 20-40% while GlyPro and GlyLeu had no effect. The study has also permitted the characterization of the following kinetic pattern: a linear-mixed-type mechanism for GlyAsp, GlyGly, GlyLys, and GlyPhe and a hyperbolic-mixed-type for GlyTyr. It was not possible to identify the inhibition mechanism for GlyHis, although it affects PPO activity. In addition the effects of GlyAsp, GlyLys and GlyHis were evaluated for lessening the browning of fresh Golden Delicious apple and Irish White Skinned potato. The effectiveness of such inhibitors was determined by the difference between the colors observed in the dipeptide-treated sample and the controls using the color space CIE-Lab system. The % browning inhibition on potato (20-50%) was greater than of apple (20-30%) by the all tested dipeptides. Only GlyLys presented the significant value of 50%.

  13. Inhibition of polyphenol oxidases activity by various dipeptides.

    PubMed

    Girelli, Anna M; Mattei, Enrico; Messina, Antonella; Tarola, Anna M

    2004-05-19

    In an effort to develop natural and nontoxic inhibitors on the activity of mushroom polyphenol oxidase (PPO) the effect of various glycyl-dipeptides (GlyAsp, GlyGly, GlyHis, GlyLeu, GlyLys, GlyPhe, GlyPro, GlyTyr) was investigated. The inhibition study with dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) as substrate is based on separation of the enzymatic reaction components by reversed phase HPLC and the UV detection of the dopachrome formed. The results have evidenced that several of tested dipeptides inhibited PPO activity in the range of 20-40% while GlyPro and GlyLeu had no effect. The study has also permitted the characterization of the following kinetic pattern: a linear-mixed-type mechanism for GlyAsp, GlyGly, GlyLys, and GlyPhe and a hyperbolic-mixed-type for GlyTyr. It was not possible to identify the inhibition mechanism for GlyHis, although it affects PPO activity. In addition the effects of GlyAsp, GlyLys and GlyHis were evaluated for lessening the browning of fresh Golden Delicious apple and Irish White Skinned potato. The effectiveness of such inhibitors was determined by the difference between the colors observed in the dipeptide-treated sample and the controls using the color space CIE-Lab system. The % browning inhibition on potato (20-50%) was greater than of apple (20-30%) by the all tested dipeptides. Only GlyLys presented the significant value of 50%. PMID:15137808

  14. Computer simulation of water in cytochrome c oxidase.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xuehe; Medvedev, Dmitry M; Swanson, Jessica; Stuchebrukhov, Alexei A

    2003-03-01

    Statistical mechanics and molecular dynamics simulations have been carried out to study the distribution and dynamics of internal water molecules in bovine heart cytochrome c oxidase (CcO). CcO is found to be capable of holding plenty of water, which in subunit I alone amounts to about 165 molecules. The dynamic characterization of these water molecules is carried out. The nascent water molecules produced in the redox reaction at the heme a(3)-CuB binuclear site form an intriguing chain structure. The chain begins at the position of Glu242 at the end of the D channel, and has a fork structure, one branch of which leads to the binuclear center, and the other to the propionate d of heme a(3). The branch that leads to the binuclear center has dynamic access both to the site where the formation of water occurs, and to delta-nitrogen of His291. From the binuclear center, the chain continues to run into the K channel. The stability of this hydrogen bond network is examined dynamically. The catalytic site is located at the hydrophobic region, and the nascent water molecules are produced at the top of the energy hill. The energy gradient is utilized as the mechanism of water removal from the protein. The water exit channels are explored using high-temperature dynamics simulations. Two putative channels for water exit from the catalytic site have been identified. One is leading directly toward Mg(2+) site. However, this channel is only open when His291 is dissociated from CuB. If His291 is bound to CuB, the only channel for water exit is the one that originates at E242 and leads toward the middle of the membrane. This is the same channel that is presumably used for oxygen supply. PMID:12615353

  15. Import, targeting, and processing of a plant polyphenol oxidase.

    PubMed

    Sommer, A; Ne'eman, E; Steffens, J C; Mayer, A M; Harel, E

    1994-08-01

    A tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum L.) gene encoding a precursor of polyphenol oxidase (PPO) was transcribed and translated in vitro. The import, targeting, and processing of the [35S]methionine-labeled precursor protein (pPPO) were studied in isolated chloroplasts. The protein was routed to the thylakoid lumen in two steps. The 67-kD precursor was first imported into the stroma in an ATP-dependent step. It was processed to a 62-kD intermediate by a stromal peptidase. Translocation into the lumen was light dependent and involved processing of the 62-kD to the 59-kD mature form. The mature polypeptide was soluble in the lumen and not bound to thylakoids. This two-step targeting pattern was observed in plastids from a variety of plants including pea (Pisum sativum L.), tomato, and maize (Zea mays L.). The ratio between the intermediate and mature forms observed depended on the plant species, leaf age, growth conditions, and illumination regime to which the plants had been subjected. Cu2+ was not required for pPPO import or processing. Furthermore, low concentrations of Cu2+ (1-5 microM) markedly inhibited the first import step. Tentoxin specifically inhibited pPPO import, leaving the precursor bound to the envelope membrane. The two-step routing of pPPO into chloroplasts, typical of thylakoid lumen proteins, is consistent with the two-domain structure of the transit peptide and appears to be a feature of all plant PPO genes isolated so far. No evidence was found for unorthodox routing mechanisms, which have been suggested to be involved in the import of plant PPOs. The two-step routing may account for some of the multiplicity of PPO observed in vivo. PMID:7972497

  16. Characterizing the proton loading site in cytochrome c oxidase.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jianxun; Gunner, M R

    2014-08-26

    Cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) uses the energy released by reduction of O2 to H2O to drive eight charges from the high pH to low pH side of the membrane, increasing the electrochemical gradient. Four electrons and protons are used for chemistry, while four more protons are pumped. Proton pumping requires that residues on a pathway change proton affinity through the reaction cycle to load and then release protons. The protonation states of all residues in CcO are determined in MultiConformational Continuum Electrostatics simulations with the protonation and redox states of heme a, a3, Cu(B), Y288, and E286 used to define the catalytic cycle. One proton is found to be loaded and released from residues identified as the proton loading site (PLS) on the P-side of the protein in each of the four CcO redox states. Thus, the same proton pumping mechanism can be used each time CcO is reduced. Calculations with structures of Rhodobacter sphaeroides, Paracoccus denitrificans, and bovine CcO derived by crystallography and molecular dynamics show the PLS functions similarly in different CcO species. The PLS is a cluster rather than a single residue, as different structures show 1-4 residues load and release protons. However, the proton affinity of the heme a3 propionic acids primarily determines the number of protons loaded into the PLS; if their proton affinity is too low, less than one proton is loaded.

  17. Oxalate oxidases and differentiating surface structure in wheat: germins.

    PubMed Central

    Lane, B G

    2000-01-01

    Oxalate oxidases (OXOs) have been found to be concentrated in the surface tissues of wheat embryos and grains: germin is concentrated in root and leaf sheaths that surround germinated embryos; pseudogermin (OXO-psi) is concentrated in the epidermis and bracts that 'encircle' mature grains. Most strikingly, the epidermal accumulation of OXO-psi was found to presage the transition of a delicate 'skin', similar to the fragile epidermis of human skin, into the tough shell (the miller's 'beeswing') that is typical of mature wheat grains. A narrow range of oxalate concentration (1--2 mM) in the hydrated tissues of major crop cereals (barley, maize, oat, rice, rye and wheat) contrasted with wide variations in their OXO expression, e.g. cold-tolerant and cold-sensitive varieties of maize have similar oxalate contents but the former was found to contain approx. 20-fold more germin than did the latter. Well-known OXOs in sorghum, a minor cereal, and beet, a dicotyledon, were found to have little antigenic relatedness to the germins, but the beet enzyme did share some of the unique stability properties that are peculiar to the germin-like OXOs that are found only in the major crop cereals. Their concentration in surface structures of domesticated wheat suggests a biochemical role for germin-like OXOs: programmed cell death in surface tissues might be a constitutive as well as an adaptive form of differentiation that helps to produce refractory barriers against tissue invasion by predators. Incidental to the principal investigation, and using an OXO assay (oxalate-dependent release of CO(2)) that did not rely on detecting H(2)O(2), which is often fully degraded in cell extracts, it was found that OXO activity in soluble extracts of wheat was manifested only in standard solution assays if the extract was pretreated in a variety of ways, which included preincubation with pepsin or highly substituted glucuronogalactoarabinoxylans (cell-wall polysaccharides). PMID:10861243

  18. The inhibition of monoamine oxidase by phenformin and pentamidine.

    PubMed

    Barkhuizen, M; Petzer, A; Petzer, J P

    2014-09-01

    A computational study has suggested that phenformin, an oral hypoglycaemic drug, may bind to the active sites of the monoamine oxidase (MAO) A and B enzymes. The present study therefore investigates the MAO inhibitory properties of phenformin. Pentamidine, a structurally related diamidine compound, has previously been reported to be a MAO inhibitor and was included in this study as a reference compound. Using recombinant human MAO-A and MAO-B, this study finds that phenformin acts as a moderately potent MAO-A selective inhibitor with an IC50 value of 41 µM. Pentamidine, on the other hand, potently inhibits both MAO-A and MAO-B with IC50 values of 0.61 μM and 0.22 μM, respectively. An examination of the recoveries of the enzymatic activities after dilution and dialysis of the enzyme-inhibitor complexes shows that both compounds interact reversibly with the MAO enzymes. A kinetic analysis suggests that pentamidine acts as a competitive inhibitor with estimated Ki values of 0.41 μM and 0.22 μM for the inhibition of MAO-A and MAO-B, respectively. Phenformin also exhibited a competitive mode of MAO-A inhibition with an estimated Ki value of 65 µM. This study concludes that biguanide and amidine functional groups are most likely important structural features for the inhibition of the MAOs by phenformin and pentamidine, and compounds containing these and closely related functional groups should be considered as potential MAO inhibitors. Furthermore, the biguanide and amidine functional groups may act as useful moieties in the future design of MAO inhibitors.

  19. NADPH Oxidase and the Cardiovascular Toxicity Associated with Smoking

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mikyung; Han, Chang-ho

    2014-01-01

    Smoking is one of the most serious but preventable causes of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Key aspects of pathological process associated with smoking include endothelial dysfunction, a prothrombotic state, inflammation, altered lipid metabolism, and hypoxia. Multiple molecular events are involved in smokinginduced CVD. However, the dysregulations of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and metabolism mainly contribute to the development of diverse CVDs, and NADPH oxidase (NOX) has been established as a source of ROS responsible for the pathogenesis of CVD. NOX activation and resultant ROS production by cigarette smoke (CS) treatment have been widely observed in isolated blood vessels and cultured vascular cells, including endothelial and smooth muscle cells. NOX-mediated oxidative stress has also been demonstrated in animal studies. Of the various NOX isoforms, NOX2 has been reported to mediate ROS generation by CS, but other isoforms were not tested thoroughly. Of the many CS constituents, nicotine, methyl vinyl ketone, and α,β-unsaturated aldehydes, such as, acrolein and crotonaldehyde, appear to be primarily responsible for NOX-mediated cytotoxicity, but additional validation will be needed. Human epidemiological studies have reported relationships between polymorphisms in the CYBA gene encoding p22phox, a catalytic subunit of NOX and susceptibility to smoking-related CVDs. In particular, G allele carriers of A640G and -930A/G polymorphisms were found to be vulnerable to smoking-induced cardiovascular toxicity, but results for C242T studies are conflicting. On the whole, evidence implicates the etiological role of NOX in smoking-induced CVD, but the clinical relevance of NOX activation by smoking and its contribution to CVD require further validation in human studies. A detailed understanding of the role of NOX would be helpful to assess the risk of smoking to human health, to define high-risk subgroups, and to develop strategies to prevent or treat

  20. Xanthine Oxidase and Cardiovascular Risk in Obese Children

    PubMed Central

    Tam, Harrison K.; Kelly, Aaron S.; Metzig, Andrea M.; Steinberger, Julia

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Pathological mechanisms of how childhood obesity leads to increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) are not fully characterized. Oxidative-stress–related enzymes, such as xanthine oxidase (XO), have been linked to obesity, endothelial dysfunction, and CVD in adults, but little is known about this pathway in children. The aim of this study was to determine whether differential XO activity is associated with endothelial dysfunction, CVD risk factors, or cytokine levels. Methods: Fasting plasma samples were obtained from obese (BMI ≥95th percentile; n=20) and age- and gender-matched healthy weight (BMI >5th and <85th percentile; n=22) children and adolescents (mean age, 12±3 years) to quantify XO activity. In addition, fasting cholesterol, insulin, glucose, blood pressure, endothelial function, and cytokine levels were assessed. Results: We observed a 3.8-fold increase in plasma XO activity in obese, compared to healthy weight, children (118±21 vs. 31±9 nU/mg of protein; p<0.001). Plasma XO activity was correlated with BMI z-score (r=0.41), waist circumference (r=0.41), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (r=−0.32), oxidized low-density lipoprotein (r=0.57), adiponectin (r=−0.53), and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (r=−0.59). Conclusion: XO activity is highly elevated in obese children and correlates with CVD risk factors, suggesting that XO may play a role in increasing cardiovascular risk early in life in the context of obesity. PMID:24568669

  1. How Hydrogen Peroxide Is Metabolized by Oxidized Cytochrome c Oxidase

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In the absence of external electron donors, oxidized bovine cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) exhibits the ability to decompose excess H2O2. Depending on the concentration of peroxide, two mechanisms of degradation were identified. At submillimolar peroxide concentrations, decomposition proceeds with virtually no production of superoxide and oxygen. In contrast, in the millimolar H2O2 concentration range, CcO generates superoxide from peroxide. At submillimolar concentrations, the decomposition of H2O2 occurs at least at two sites. One is the catalytic heme a3–CuB center where H2O2 is reduced to water. During the interaction of the enzyme with H2O2, this center cycles back to oxidized CcO via the intermediate presence of two oxoferryl states. We show that at pH 8.0 two molecules of H2O2 react with the catalytic center accomplishing one cycle. In addition, the reactions at the heme a3–CuB center generate the surface-exposed lipid-based radical(s) that participates in the decomposition of peroxide. It is also found that the irreversible decline of the catalytic activity of the enzyme treated with submillimolar H2O2 concentrations results specifically from the decrease in the rate of electron transfer from heme a to the heme a3–CuB center during the reductive phase of the catalytic cycle. The rates of electron transfer from ferrocytochrome c to heme a and the kinetics of the oxidation of the fully reduced CcO with O2 were not affected in the peroxide-modified CcO. PMID:24840065

  2. Aromatic stacking interactions govern catalysis in aryl-alcohol oxidase.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Patricia; Hernández-Ortega, Aitor; Lucas, Fátima; Carro, Juan; Herguedas, Beatriz; Borrelli, Kenneth W; Guallar, Victor; Martínez, Angel T; Medina, Milagros

    2015-08-01

    Aryl-alcohol oxidase (AAO, EC 1.1.3.7) generates H2 O2 for lignin degradation at the expense of benzylic and other π system-containing primary alcohols, which are oxidized to the corresponding aldehydes. Ligand diffusion studies on Pleurotus eryngii AAO showed a T-shaped stacking interaction between the Tyr92 side chain and the alcohol substrate at the catalytically competent position for concerted hydride and proton transfers. Bi-substrate kinetics analysis revealed that reactions with 3-chloro- or 3-fluorobenzyl alcohols (halogen substituents) proceed via a ping-pong mechanism. However, mono- and dimethoxylated substituents (in 4-methoxybenzyl and 3,4-dimethoxybenzyl alcohols) altered the mechanism and a ternary complex was formed. Electron-withdrawing substituents resulted in lower quantum mechanics stacking energies between aldehyde and the tyrosine side chain, contributing to product release, in agreement with the ping-pong mechanism observed in 3-chloro- and 3-fluorobenzyl alcohol kinetics analysis. In contrast, the higher stacking energies when electron donor substituents are present result in reaction of O2 with the flavin through a ternary complex, in agreement with the kinetics of methoxylated alcohols. The contribution of Tyr92 to the AAO reaction mechanism was investigated by calculation of stacking interaction energies and site-directed mutagenesis. Replacement of Tyr92 by phenylalanine does not alter the AAO kinetic constants (on 4-methoxybenzyl alcohol), most probably because the stacking interaction is still possible. However, introduction of a tryptophan residue at this position strongly reduced the affinity for the substrate (i.e. the pre-steady state Kd and steady-state Km increase by 150-fold and 75-fold, respectively), and therefore the steady-state catalytic efficiency, suggesting that proper stacking is impossible with this bulky residue. The above results confirm the role of Tyr92 in substrate binding, thus governing the kinetic mechanism

  3. How hydrogen peroxide is metabolized by oxidized cytochrome c oxidase.

    PubMed

    Jancura, Daniel; Stanicova, Jana; Palmer, Graham; Fabian, Marian

    2014-06-10

    In the absence of external electron donors, oxidized bovine cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) exhibits the ability to decompose excess H2O2. Depending on the concentration of peroxide, two mechanisms of degradation were identified. At submillimolar peroxide concentrations, decomposition proceeds with virtually no production of superoxide and oxygen. In contrast, in the millimolar H2O2 concentration range, CcO generates superoxide from peroxide. At submillimolar concentrations, the decomposition of H2O2 occurs at least at two sites. One is the catalytic heme a3-CuB center where H2O2 is reduced to water. During the interaction of the enzyme with H2O2, this center cycles back to oxidized CcO via the intermediate presence of two oxoferryl states. We show that at pH 8.0 two molecules of H2O2 react with the catalytic center accomplishing one cycle. In addition, the reactions at the heme a3-CuB center generate the surface-exposed lipid-based radical(s) that participates in the decomposition of peroxide. It is also found that the irreversible decline of the catalytic activity of the enzyme treated with submillimolar H2O2 concentrations results specifically from the decrease in the rate of electron transfer from heme a to the heme a3-CuB center during the reductive phase of the catalytic cycle. The rates of electron transfer from ferrocytochrome c to heme a and the kinetics of the oxidation of the fully reduced CcO with O2 were not affected in the peroxide-modified CcO.

  4. The physiologic role of alternative oxidase in Ustilago maydis.

    PubMed

    Juárez, Oscar; Guerra, Guadalupe; Velázquez, Isabel; Flores-Herrera, Oscar; Rivera-Pérez, R E; Pardo, Juan P

    2006-10-01

    Alternative oxidase (AOX) is a ubiquitous respiratory enzyme found in plants, fungi, protists and some bacterial species. One of the major questions about this enzyme is related to its metabolic role(s) in cellular physiology, due to its capacity to bypass the proton-pumping cytochrome pathway, and as a consequence it has great energy-wasting potential. In this study, the physiological role and regulatory mechanisms of AOX in the fungal phytopathogen Ustilago maydis were studied. We found evidence for at least two metabolic functions for AOX in this organism, as a major part of the oxidative stress-handling machinery, a well-described issue, and as part of the mechanisms that increase the metabolic plasticity of the cell, a role that might be valuable for organisms exposed to variations in temperature, nutrient source and availability, and biotic or abiotic factors that limit the activity of the cytochrome pathway. Experiments under different culture conditions of ecological significance for this organism revealed that AOX activity is modified by the growth stage of the culture, amino acid availability and growth temperature. In addition, nucleotide content, stimulation of AOX by AMP and respiratory rates obtained after inhibition of the cytochrome pathway showed that fungal/protist AOX is activated under low-energy conditions, in contrast to plant AOX, which is activated under high-energy conditions. An estimation of the contribution of AOX to cell respiration was performed by comparing the steady-state concentration of adenine nucleotides, the mitochondrial membrane potential, and the respiratory rate.

  5. Predicting Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitory Activity through Ligand-Based Models

    PubMed Central

    Vilar, Santiago; Ferino, Giulio; Quezada, Elias; Santana, Lourdes; Friedman, Carol

    2013-01-01

    The evolution of bio- and cheminformatics associated with the development of specialized software and increasing computer power has produced a great interest in theoretical in silico methods applied in drug rational design. These techniques apply the concept that “similar molecules have similar biological properties” that has been exploited in Medicinal Chemistry for years to design new molecules with desirable pharmacological profiles. Ligand-based methods are not dependent on receptor structural data and take into account two and three-dimensional molecular properties to assess similarity of new compounds in regards to the set of molecules with the biological property under study. Depending on the complexity of the calculation, there are different types of ligand-based methods, such as QSAR (Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship) with 2D and 3D descriptors, CoMFA (Comparative Molecular Field Analysis) or pharmacophoric approaches. This work provides a description of a series of ligand-based models applied in the prediction of the inhibitory activity of monoamine oxidase (MAO) enzymes. The controlled regulation of the enzymes’ function through the use of MAO inhibitors is used as a treatment in many psychiatric and neurological disorders, such as depression, anxiety, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease. For this reason, multiple scaffolds, such as substituted coumarins, indolylmethylamine or pyridazine derivatives were synthesized and assayed toward MAO-A and MAO-B inhibition. Our intention is to focus on the description of ligand-based models to provide new insights in the relationship between the MAO inhibitory activity and the molecular structure of the different inhibitors, and further study enzyme selectivity and possible mechanisms of action. PMID:23231398

  6. Aromatic stacking interactions govern catalysis in aryl-alcohol oxidase.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Patricia; Hernández-Ortega, Aitor; Lucas, Fátima; Carro, Juan; Herguedas, Beatriz; Borrelli, Kenneth W; Guallar, Victor; Martínez, Angel T; Medina, Milagros

    2015-08-01

    Aryl-alcohol oxidase (AAO, EC 1.1.3.7) generates H2 O2 for lignin degradation at the expense of benzylic and other π system-containing primary alcohols, which are oxidized to the corresponding aldehydes. Ligand diffusion studies on Pleurotus eryngii AAO showed a T-shaped stacking interaction between the Tyr92 side chain and the alcohol substrate at the catalytically competent position for concerted hydride and proton transfers. Bi-substrate kinetics analysis revealed that reactions with 3-chloro- or 3-fluorobenzyl alcohols (halogen substituents) proceed via a ping-pong mechanism. However, mono- and dimethoxylated substituents (in 4-methoxybenzyl and 3,4-dimethoxybenzyl alcohols) altered the mechanism and a ternary complex was formed. Electron-withdrawing substituents resulted in lower quantum mechanics stacking energies between aldehyde and the tyrosine side chain, contributing to product release, in agreement with the ping-pong mechanism observed in 3-chloro- and 3-fluorobenzyl alcohol kinetics analysis. In contrast, the higher stacking energies when electron donor substituents are present result in reaction of O2 with the flavin through a ternary complex, in agreement with the kinetics of methoxylated alcohols. The contribution of Tyr92 to the AAO reaction mechanism was investigated by calculation of stacking interaction energies and site-directed mutagenesis. Replacement of Tyr92 by phenylalanine does not alter the AAO kinetic constants (on 4-methoxybenzyl alcohol), most probably because the stacking interaction is still possible. However, introduction of a tryptophan residue at this position strongly reduced the affinity for the substrate (i.e. the pre-steady state Kd and steady-state Km increase by 150-fold and 75-fold, respectively), and therefore the steady-state catalytic efficiency, suggesting that proper stacking is impossible with this bulky residue. The above results confirm the role of Tyr92 in substrate binding, thus governing the kinetic mechanism

  7. A subset of N-substituted phenothiazines inhibits NADPH oxidases.

    PubMed

    Seredenina, Tamara; Chiriano, Gianpaolo; Filippova, Aleksandra; Nayernia, Zeynab; Mahiout, Zahia; Fioraso-Cartier, Laetitia; Plastre, Olivier; Scapozza, Leonardo; Krause, Karl-Heinz; Jaquet, Vincent

    2015-09-01

    NADPH oxidases (NOXs) constitute a family of enzymes generating reactive oxygen species (ROS) and are increasingly recognized as interesting drug targets. Here we investigated the effects of 10 phenothiazine compounds on NOX activity using an extensive panel of assays to measure production of ROS (Amplex red, WST-1, MCLA) and oxygen consumption. Striking differences between highly similar phenothiazines were observed. Two phenothiazines without N-substitution, including ML171, did not inhibit NOX enzymes, but showed assay interference. Introduction of an aliphatic amine chain on the N atom of the phenothiazine B ring (promazine) conferred inhibitory activity toward NOX2, NOX4, and NOX5 but not NOX1 and NOX3. Addition of an electron-attracting substituent in position 2 of the C ring extended the inhibitory activity to NOX1 and NOX3, with thioridazine being the most potent inhibitor. In contrast, the presence of a methylsulfoxide group at the same position (mesoridazine) entirely abolished NOX-inhibitory activity. A cell-free NOX2 assay suggested that inhibition by N-substituted phenothiazines was not due to competition with NADPH. A functional implication of NOX-inhibitory activity of thioridazine was demonstrated by its ability to block redox-dependent myofibroblast differentiation. Our results demonstrate that NOX-inhibitory activity is not a common feature of all antipsychotic phenothiazines and that substitution on the B-ring nitrogen is crucial for the activity, whereas that on the second position of the C ring modulates it. Our findings contribute to a better understanding of NOX pharmacology and might pave the path to discovery of more potent and selective NOX inhibitors.

  8. NADPH Oxidases in Heart Failure: Poachers or Gamekeepers?

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Min; Perino, Alessia; Ghigo, Alessandra; Hirsch, Emilio

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Oxidative stress is involved in the pathogenesis of heart failure but clinical antioxidant trials have been unsuccessful. This may be because effects of reactive oxygen species (ROS) depend upon their source, location, and concentration. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase (Nox) proteins generate ROS in a highly regulated fashion and modulate several components of the heart failure phenotype. Recent Advances: Two Nox isoforms, Nox2 and Nox4, are expressed in the heart. Studies using gene-modified mice deficient in Nox2 activity indicate that Nox2 activation contributes to angiotensin II–induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, atrial fibrillation, and the development of interstitial fibrosis but may also positively modulate physiological excitation-contraction coupling. Nox2 contributes to myocyte death under stress situations and plays important roles in postmyocardial infarction remodeling, in part by modulating matrix metalloprotease activity. In contrast to Nox2, Nox4 is constitutively active at a low level and induces protective effects in the heart under chronic stress, for example, by maintaining myocardial capillary density. However, high levels of Nox4 could have detrimental effects. Critical Issues: The effects of Nox proteins during the development of heart failure likely depend upon the isoform, activation level, and cellular distribution, and may include beneficial as well as detrimental effects. More needs to be learnt about the precise regulation of abundance and biochemical activity of these proteins in the heart as well as the downstream signaling pathways that they regulate. Future Directions: The development of specific approaches to target individual Nox isoforms and/or specific cell types may be important for the achievement of therapeutic efficacy in heart failure. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 1024–1041. PMID:22747566

  9. Structure-Based Alteration of Substrate Specificity and Catalytic Activity of Sulfite Oxidase from Sulfite Oxidation to Nitrate Reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, James A.; Wilson, Heather L.; Rajagopalan, K.V.

    2012-04-18

    Eukaryotic sulfite oxidase is a dimeric protein that contains the molybdenum cofactor and catalyzes the metabolically essential conversion of sulfite to sulfate as the terminal step in the metabolism of cysteine and methionine. Nitrate reductase is an evolutionarily related molybdoprotein in lower organisms that is essential for growth on nitrate. In this study, we describe human and chicken sulfite oxidase variants in which the active site has been modified to alter substrate specificity and activity from sulfite oxidation to nitrate reduction. On the basis of sequence alignments and the known crystal structure of chicken sulfite oxidase, two residues are conserved in nitrate reductases that align with residues in the active site of sulfite oxidase. On the basis of the crystal structure of yeast nitrate reductase, both positions were mutated in human sulfite oxidase and chicken sulfite oxidase. The resulting double-mutant variants demonstrated a marked decrease in sulfite oxidase activity but gained nitrate reductase activity. An additional methionine residue in the active site was proposed to be important in nitrate catalysis, and therefore, the triple variant was also produced. The nitrate reducing ability of the human sulfite oxidase triple mutant was nearly 3-fold greater than that of the double mutant. To obtain detailed structural data for the active site of these variants, we introduced the analogous mutations into chicken sulfite oxidase to perform crystallographic analysis. The crystal structures of the Mo domains of the double and triple mutants were determined to 2.4 and 2.1 {angstrom} resolution, respectively.

  10. A Role for Reactive Oxygen Species Produced by NADPH Oxidases in the Embryo and Aleurone Cells in Barley Seed Germination

    PubMed Central

    Ishibashi, Yushi; Kasa, Shinsuke; Sakamoto, Masatsugu; Aoki, Nozomi; Kai, Kyohei; Yuasa, Takashi; Hanada, Atsushi; Yamaguchi, Shinjiro; Iwaya-Inoue, Mari

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) promote the germination of several seeds, and antioxidants suppress it. However, questions remain regarding the role and production mechanism of ROS in seed germination. Here, we focused on NADPH oxidases, which produce ROS. After imbibition, NADPH oxidase mRNAs were expressed in the embryo and in aleurone cells of barley seed; these expression sites were consistent with the sites of ROS production in the seed after imbibition. To clarify the role of NADPH oxidases in barley seed germination, we examined gibberellic acid (GA) / abscisic acid (ABA) metabolism and signaling in barley seeds treated with diphenylene iodonium chloride (DPI), an NADPH oxidase inhibitor. DPI significantly suppressed germination, and suppressed GA biosynthesis and ABA catabolism in embryos. GA, but not ABA, induced NADPH oxidase activity in aleurone cells. Additionally, DPI suppressed the early induction of α-amylase by GA in aleurone cells. These results suggest that ROS produced by NADPH oxidases promote GA biosynthesis in embryos, that GA induces and activates NADPH oxidases in aleurone cells, and that ROS produced by NADPH oxidases induce α-amylase in aleurone cells. We conclude that the ROS generated by NADPH oxidases regulate barley seed germination through GA / ABA metabolism and signaling in embryo and aleurone cells. PMID:26579718

  11. Crystal Structure of a Two-domain Multicopper Oxidase: Implications for the Evolution of Multicooper Blue Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Lawton, Thomas J.; Sayavedra-Soto, Luis A.; Arp, Daniel J.; Rosenzweig, Amy C.

    2009-06-01

    The two-domain multicopper oxidases are proposed to be key intermediates in the evolution of three-domain multicopper oxidases. A number of two-domain multicopper oxidases have been identified from genome sequences and are classified as type A, type B, or type C on the basis of the predicted location of the type 1 copper center. The crystal structure of blue copper oxidase, a type C two-domain multicopper oxidase from Nitrosomonas europaea, has been determined to 1.9 A resolution. Blue copper oxidase is a trimer, of which each subunit comprises two cupredoxin domains. Each subunit houses a type 1 copper site in domain 1 and a type 2/type 3 trinuclear copper cluster at the subunit-subunit interface. The coordination geometry at the trinuclear copper site is consistent with reduction of the copper ions. Although the overall architecture of blue copper oxidase is similar to nitrite reductases, detailed structural alignments show that the fold and domain orientation more closely resemble the three-domain multicopper oxidases. These observations have important implications for the evolution of nitrite reductases and multicopper oxidases.

  12. A Role for Reactive Oxygen Species Produced by NADPH Oxidases in the Embryo and Aleurone Cells in Barley Seed Germination.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Yushi; Kasa, Shinsuke; Sakamoto, Masatsugu; Aoki, Nozomi; Kai, Kyohei; Yuasa, Takashi; Hanada, Atsushi; Yamaguchi, Shinjiro; Iwaya-Inoue, Mari

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) promote the germination of several seeds, and antioxidants suppress it. However, questions remain regarding the role and production mechanism of ROS in seed germination. Here, we focused on NADPH oxidases, which produce ROS. After imbibition, NADPH oxidase mRNAs were expressed in the embryo and in aleurone cells of barley seed; these expression sites were consistent with the sites of ROS production in the seed after imbibition. To clarify the role of NADPH oxidases in barley seed germination, we examined gibberellic acid (GA) / abscisic acid (ABA) metabolism and signaling in barley seeds treated with diphenylene iodonium chloride (DPI), an NADPH oxidase inhibitor. DPI significantly suppressed germination, and suppressed GA biosynthesis and ABA catabolism in embryos. GA, but not ABA, induced NADPH oxidase activity in aleurone cells. Additionally, DPI suppressed the early induction of α-amylase by GA in aleurone cells. These results suggest that ROS produced by NADPH oxidases promote GA biosynthesis in embryos, that GA induces and activates NADPH oxidases in aleurone cells, and that ROS produced by NADPH oxidases induce α-amylase in aleurone cells. We conclude that the ROS generated by NADPH oxidases regulate barley seed germination through GA / ABA metabolism and signaling in embryo and aleurone cells.

  13. A Role for Reactive Oxygen Species Produced by NADPH Oxidases in the Embryo and Aleurone Cells in Barley Seed Germination.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Yushi; Kasa, Shinsuke; Sakamoto, Masatsugu; Aoki, Nozomi; Kai, Kyohei; Yuasa, Takashi; Hanada, Atsushi; Yamaguchi, Shinjiro; Iwaya-Inoue, Mari

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) promote the germination of several seeds, and antioxidants suppress it. However, questions remain regarding the role and production mechanism of ROS in seed germination. Here, we focused on NADPH oxidases, which produce ROS. After imbibition, NADPH oxidase mRNAs were expressed in the embryo and in aleurone cells of barley seed; these expression sites were consistent with the sites of ROS production in the seed after imbibition. To clarify the role of NADPH oxidases in barley seed germination, we examined gibberellic acid (GA) / abscisic acid (ABA) metabolism and signaling in barley seeds treated with diphenylene iodonium chloride (DPI), an NADPH oxidase inhibitor. DPI significantly suppressed germination, and suppressed GA biosynthesis and ABA catabolism in embryos. GA, but not ABA, induced NADPH oxidase activity in aleurone cells. Additionally, DPI suppressed the early induction of α-amylase by GA in aleurone cells. These results suggest that ROS produced by NADPH oxidases promote GA biosynthesis in embryos, that GA induces and activates NADPH oxidases in aleurone cells, and that ROS produced by NADPH oxidases induce α-amylase in aleurone cells. We conclude that the ROS generated by NADPH oxidases regulate barley seed germination through GA / ABA metabolism and signaling in embryo and aleurone cells. PMID:26579718

  14. Alternative Oxidase Expression in the Mouse Enables Bypassing Cytochrome c Oxidase Blockade and Limits Mitochondrial ROS Overproduction

    PubMed Central

    El-Khoury, Riyad; Dufour, Eric; Rak, Malgorzata; Ramanantsoa, Nelina; Grandchamp, Nicolas; Csaba, Zsolt; Duvillié, Bertrand; Bénit, Paule; Gallego, Jorge; Gressens, Pierre; Sarkis, Chamsy; Jacobs, Howard T.; Rustin, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Cyanide-resistant non-phosphorylating respiration is known in mitochondria from plants, fungi, and microorganisms but is absent in mammals. It results from the activity of an alternative oxidase (AOX) that conveys electrons directly from the respiratory chain (RC) ubiquinol pool to oxygen. AOX thus provides a bypath that releases constraints on the cytochrome pathway and prevents the over-reduction of the ubiquinone pool, a major source of superoxide. RC dysfunctions and deleterious superoxide overproduction are recurrent themes in human pathologies, ranging from neurodegenerative diseases to cancer, and may be instrumental in ageing. Thus, preventing RC blockade and excess superoxide production by means of AOX should be of considerable interest. However, because of its energy-dissipating properties, AOX might produce deleterious effects of its own in mammals. Here we show that AOX can be safely expressed in the mouse (MitAOX), with major physiological parameters being unaffected. It neither disrupted the activity of other RC components nor decreased oxidative phosphorylation in isolated mitochondria. It conferred cyanide-resistance to mitochondrial substrate oxidation and decreased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production upon RC blockade. Accordingly, AOX expression was able to support cyanide-resistant respiration by intact organs and to afford prolonged protection against a lethal concentration of gaseous cyanide in whole animals. Taken together, these results indicate that AOX expression in the mouse is innocuous and permits to overcome a RC blockade, while reducing associated oxidative insult. Therefore, the MitAOX mice represent a valuable tool in order to investigate the ability of AOX to counteract the panoply of mitochondrial-inherited diseases originating from oxidative phosphorylation defects. PMID:23300486

  15. Aldehyde Oxidase Functions as a Superoxide Generating NADH Oxidase: An Important Redox Regulated Pathway of Cellular Oxygen Radical Formation

    PubMed Central

    Kundu, Tapan K.; Velayutham, Murugesan; Zweier, Jay L.

    2012-01-01

    The enzyme aldehyde oxidase (AO) is a member of the molybdenum hydroxylase family that includes xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR); however, its physiological substrates and functions remain unclear. Moreover, little is known about its role in cellular redox stress. Utilizing electron paramagnetic resonance spin trapping we measured the role of AO in the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) through the oxidation of NADH, and the effects of inhibitors of AO on NADH-mediated superoxide ( O2•−) generation. NADH was found to be a good substrate for AO with apparent Km and Vmax values of 29μM and 12 nmol min−1 mg−1, respectively. From O2•− generation measurements by cytochrome c reduction the apparent Km and Vmax values of NADH for AO were 11 μM and 15 nmol min−1 mg−1, respectively. With NADH oxidation by AO, ≥65% of the total electron flux led to O2•− generation. Diphenyleneiodonium completely inhibited AO-mediated O2•− production confirming that this occurs at the FAD site. Inhibitors of this NADH-derived O2•− generation were studied with amidone the most potent exerting complete inhibition at 100 μM concentration, while 150 μM menadione, raloxifene or β-estradiol led to 81%, 46% or 26% inhibition, respectively. From the kinetic data, the levels of AO and NADH, O2•− production was estimated to be ~89 and ~4 nM/s in liver and heart, respectively, much higher than that estimated for XOR under similar conditions. Owing to the ubiquitous distribution of NADH, aldehydes, and other endogenous AO substrates, AO is predicted to have an important role in cellular redox stress and related disease pathogenesis. PMID:22404107

  16. The Occurrence of Glycolate Dehydrogenase and Glycolate Oxidase in Green Plants

    PubMed Central

    Frederick, Sue Ellen; Gruber, Peter J.; Tolbert, N. E.

    1973-01-01

    Homogenates of various lower land plants, aquatic angiosperms, and green algae were assayed for glycolate oxidase, a peroxisomal enzyme present in green leaves of higher plants, and for glycolate dehydrogenase, a functionally analogous enzyme characteristic of certain green algae. Green tissues of all lower land plants examined (including mosses, liverworts, ferns, and fern allies), as well as three freshwater aquatic angiosperms, contained an enzyme resembling glycolate oxidase, in that it oxidized l- but not d-lactate in addition to glycolate, and was insensitive to 2 mm cyanide. Many of the green algae (including Chlorella vulgaris, previously claimed to have glycolate oxidase) contained an enzyme resembling glycolate dehydrogenase, in that it oxidized d- but not l-lactate, and was inhibited by 2 mm cyanide. Other green algae had activity characteristic of glycolate oxidase and, accordingly, showed a substantial glycolate-dependent O2 uptake. It is pointed out that this distribution pattern of glycolate oxidase and glycolate dehydrogenase among the green plants may have phylogenetic significance. Activities of catalase, a marker enzyme for peroxisomes, were also determined and were generally lower in the algae than in the land plants or aquatic angiosperms. Among the algae, however, there were no consistent correlations between levels of catalase and the type of enzyme which oxidized glycolate. PMID:16658555

  17. Dimer interface of bovine cytochrome c oxidase is influenced by local posttranslational modifications and lipid binding

    PubMed Central

    Liko, Idlir; Degiacomi, Matteo T.; Mohammed, Shabaz; Yoshikawa, Shinya; Schmidt, Carla; Robinson, Carol V.

    2016-01-01

    Bovine cytochrome c oxidase is an integral membrane protein complex comprising 13 protein subunits and associated lipids. Dimerization of the complex has been proposed; however, definitive evidence for the dimer is lacking. We used advanced mass spectrometry methods to investigate the oligomeric state of cytochrome c oxidase and the potential role of lipids and posttranslational modifications in its subunit interfaces. Mass spectrometry of the intact protein complex revealed that both the monomer and the dimer are stabilized by large lipid entities. We identified these lipid species from the purified protein complex, thus implying that they interact specifically with the enzyme. We further identified phosphorylation and acetylation sites of cytochrome c oxidase, located in the peripheral subunits and in the dimer interface, respectively. Comparing our phosphorylation and acetylation sites with those found in previous studies of bovine, mouse, rat, and human cytochrome c oxidase, we found that whereas some acetylation sites within the dimer interface are conserved, suggesting a role for regulation and stabilization of the dimer, phosphorylation sites were less conserved and more transient. Our results therefore provide insights into the locations and interactions of lipids with acetylated residues within the dimer interface of this enzyme, and thereby contribute to a better understanding of its structure in the natural membrane. Moreover dimeric cytochrome c oxidase, comprising 20 transmembrane, six extramembrane subunits, and associated lipids, represents the largest integral membrane protein complex that has been transferred via electrospray intact into the gas phase of a mass spectrometer, representing a significant technological advance. PMID:27364008

  18. Role of IAA-Oxidase in Abscission Control in Cotton 123

    PubMed Central

    Schwertner, Harvey A.; Morgan, Page W.

    1966-01-01

    The potential role of indoleactic acid (IAA)-oxidase as an in vivo abscission regulating system in the cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) cotyledonary explant was investigated. Phenols (usually monophenols), which are cofactors of cotton IAA-oxidase in vitro, accelerated abscission. Phenols (usually orthodihydroxyphenols), which inhibit cotton IAA-oxidase in vitro, inhibited abscission. Inhibition or stimulation of abscission was accomplished by phenols both with and without IAA. Results were similar when treatments were applied as lanolin pastes to the cut petiole ends or as solutions in which explants were submerged. An abscission accelerating phenol stimulated the decarboxylation of IAA-1-14C by explants and an abscission inhibiting phenol inhibited the decarboxylation of IAA-1-14C. The mechanism of abscission regulation by the phenolic compounds was concluded to involve auxin destruction via IAA-oxidase. In addition to the direct relationship of this study to abscission, the results support the more general hypothesis that IAA-oxidase acts in vivo to regulate auxin levels. PMID:16656432

  19. Comparative modeling of the latent form of a plant catechol oxidase using a molluskan hemocyanin structure.

    PubMed

    Gerdemann, Carsten; Eicken, Christoph; Galla, Hans Joachim; Krebs, Bernt

    2002-04-10

    The structure of the precursor form of catechol oxidase from sweet potatoes (Ipomoea batatas) has been modeled on the basis of the 3D structural data of mature catechol oxidase [Nat. Struct. Biol. 5 (1998) 1084] and of hemocyanin from giant octopus (Octopus dofleini) [J. Mol. Biol. 278 (1998) 855]. A C-terminal extension peptide is found in the cDNA sequence but not in the purified, mature form of catechol oxidase. Superimposition of the 3D structures of the native hemocyanin and catechol oxidase reveals a close relationship except for an additional C-terminal domain only found in the hemocyanin structure. As sequence alignment shows good homology this domain of the hemocyanin structure was used as a template to model the 3D structure of the C-terminal extension peptide of catechol oxidase. As hemocyanins show no or only weak catecholase activity due to this domain this indicates an inhibitory function of this extension peptide. Beside this possible shielding function for the precursor form, evidence for a function in copper-uptake also increases due to the location of three histidine residues in the model. PMID:11931976

  20. Spinach thylakoid polyphenol oxidase isolation, activation, and properties of the native chloroplast enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Golbeck, J.H.; Cammarata, K.V.

    1981-05-01

    Polyphenol oxidase activity (E.C. 1.14,18.1) has been found in two enzyme species isolated from thylakoid membranes of spinach chloroplasts. The proteins were released from the membrane by sonication and purified >900-fold by ammonium sulfate precipitation, gel filtration, and ion-exchange chromatography. The enzymes appear to be the tetramer and monomer of a subunit with a molecular weight of 42,500 as determined by lithium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis. Sonication releases polyphenol oxidase from the membrane largely in the latent state. In the absence of added fatty acids, the isolated enzyme spontaneously, but slowly, activates with time. Purified polyphenol oxidase utilizes o-diphenols as substrates and shows no detectable levels of monophenol or p-diphenol oxidase activities. Suitable substrates include chlorogenic acid, catechol, caffeic acid, pyrogallol, and dopamine; however, the enzyme is substrate-inhibited by the last four at concentrations near their K/sub m/. A large seasonal variation in polyphenol oxidase activity may result from a decrease in enzyme content rather than inhibition of the enzyme present.

  1. Amyloid-β peptide binds to cytochrome C oxidase subunit 1.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Zimbron, Luis Fernando; Luna-Muñoz, Jose; Mena, Raul; Vazquez-Ramirez, Ricardo; Kubli-Garfias, Carlos; Cribbs, David H; Manoutcharian, Karen; Gevorkian, Goar

    2012-01-01

    Extracellular and intraneuronal accumulation of amyloid-beta aggregates has been demonstrated to be involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the precise mechanism of amyloid-beta neurotoxicity is not completely understood. Previous studies suggest that binding of amyloid-beta to a number of macromolecules has deleterious effects on cellular functions. Mitochondria were found to be the target for amyloid-beta, and mitochondrial dysfunction is well documented in AD. In the present study we have shown for the first time that Aβ 1-42 bound to a peptide comprising the amino-terminal region of cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1. Phage clone, selected after screening of a human brain cDNA library expressed on M13 phage and bearing a 61 amino acid fragment of cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1, bound to Aβ 1-42 in ELISA as well as to Aβ aggregates present in AD brain. Aβ 1-42 and cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 co-immunoprecipitated from mitochondrial fraction of differentiated human neuroblastoma cells. Likewise, molecular dynamics simulation of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 and the Aβ 1-42 peptide complex resulted in a reliable helix-helix interaction, supporting the experimental results. The interaction between Aβ 1-42 and cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 may explain, in part, the diminished enzymatic activity of respiratory chain complex IV and subsequent neuronal metabolic dysfunction observed in AD.

  2. NADPH Oxidase as a Therapeutic Target for Oxalate Induced Injury in Kidneys

    PubMed Central

    Peck, Ammon B.; Khan, Saeed R.

    2013-01-01

    A major role of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase family of enzymes is to catalyze the production of superoxides and other reactive oxygen species (ROS). These ROS, in turn, play a key role as messengers in cell signal transduction and cell cycling, but when they are produced in excess they can lead to oxidative stress (OS). Oxidative stress in the kidneys is now considered a major cause of renal injury and inflammation, giving rise to a variety of pathological disorders. In this review, we discuss the putative role of oxalate in producing oxidative stress via the production of reactive oxygen species by isoforms of NADPH oxidases expressed in different cellular locations of the kidneys. Most renal cells produce ROS, and recent data indicate a direct correlation between upregulated gene expressions of NADPH oxidase, ROS, and inflammation. Renal tissue expression of multiple NADPH oxidase isoforms most likely will impact the future use of different antioxidants and NADPH oxidase inhibitors to minimize OS and renal tissue injury in hyperoxaluria-induced kidney stone disease. PMID:23840917

  3. Superoxide radicals scavenging and xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity of magnesium lithospermate B from Salvia miltiorrhiza.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoyu; Chen, Ruohua; Shang, Yanjun; Jiao, Binghua; Huang, Caiguo

    2009-06-01

    In this study we investigated the superoxide radicals scavenging effect and xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity by magnesium lithospermate B, which was originally isolated from the roots of Salvia miltiorrhiza (also named Danshen or Dansham), an important herb in Oriental medicine. Superoxide radicals were generated both in beta-NADH/PMS system and xanthine/ xanthine oxidase system. Magnesium lithospermate B significantly inhibited the reduction of NBT induced by superoxide radicals with an IC(50) of 29.8 microg/mL and 4.06 microg/mL respectively in the two systems. Further study suggested that magnesium lithospermate B can directly inhibit xanthine oxidase and exhibits competitive inhibition. Magnesium lithospermate B was also found to have the hypouricemic activity in vivo against potassium oxonate-induced hyperuricaemia in mice. After oral administration of magnesium lithospermate B at doses of 10, 20 and 30 mg/kg, there was a significant decrease in the serum urate level when compared to the hyperuricemia control. In addition, magnesium lithospermate B significantly protected HL-60 cells from superoxide radicals-induced apoptosis in the xanthine/ xanthine oxidase reactions. This study provided evidence that magnesium lithospermate B exhibits direct superoxide radicals scavenging and xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity.

  4. Projection structure of the cytochrome bo ubiquinol oxidase from Escherichia coli at 6 A resolution.

    PubMed Central

    Gohlke, U; Warne, A; Saraste, M

    1997-01-01

    The haem-copper cytochrome oxidases are terminal catalysts of the respiratory chains in aerobic organisms. These integral membrane protein complexes catalyse the reduction of molecular oxygen to water and utilize the free energy of this reaction to generate a transmembrane proton gradient. Quinol oxidase complexes such as the Escherichia coli cytochrome bo belong to this superfamily. To elucidate the similarities as well as differences between ubiquinol and cytochrome c oxidases, we have analysed two-dimensional crystals of cytochrome bo by cryo-electron microscopy. The crystals diffract beyond 5 A. A projection map was calculated to a resolution of 6 A. All four subunits can be identified and single alpha-helices are resolved within the density for the protein complex. The comparison with the three-dimensional structure of cytochrome c oxidase shows the clear structural similarity within the common functional core surrounding the metal-binding sites in subunit I. It also indicates subtle differences which are due to the distinct subunit composition. This study can be extended to a three-dimensional structure analysis of the quinol oxidase complex by electron image processing of tilted crystals. PMID:9135135

  5. Redox-Dependent Conformational Changes in Cytochrome c Oxidase Suggest a Gating Mechanism for Proton Uptake

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, Ling; Liu, Jian; Mills, Denise A.; Proshlyakov, Denis A.; Hiser, Carrie; Ferguson-Miller, Shelagh

    2009-08-05

    A role for conformational change in the coupling mechanism of cytochrome c oxidase is the subject of controversy. Relatively small conformational changes have been reported in comparisons of reduced and oxidized crystal structures of bovine oxidase but none in bacterial oxidases. Comparing the X-ray crystal structures of the reduced (at 2.15 {angstrom} resolution) and oxidized forms of cytochrome c oxidase from Rhodobacter sphaeroides, we observe a displacement of heme a3 involving both the porphyrin ring and the hydroxyl farnesyl tail, accompanied by protein movements in nearby regions, including the mid part of helix VIII of subunit I which harbors key residues of the K proton uptake path, K362 and T359. The conformational changes in the reduced form are reversible upon reoxidation. They result in an opening of the top of the K pathway and more ordered waters being resolved in that region, suggesting an access path for protons into the active site. In all high-resolution structures of oxidized R. sphaeroides cytochrome c oxidase, a water molecule is observed in the hydrophobic region above the top of the D path, strategically positioned to facilitate the connection of residue E286 of subunit I to the active site or to the proton pumping exit path. In the reduced and reduced plus cyanide structures, this water molecule disappears, implying disruption of proton conduction from the D path under conditions when the K path is open, thus providing a mechanism for alternating access to the active site.

  6. The C-terminal region controls correct folding of genus Trametes pyranose 2-oxidases.

    PubMed

    Maresová, Helena; Palyzová, Andrea; Kyslík, Pavel

    2007-06-30

    The pyranose 2-oxidases from Trametes ochracea and Trametes pubescens share markedly similar amino acid sequences with identity of 93.4%. When expressed from the recombinant plasmids based on the same vector in the Escherichia coli host strain BL21(DE3) at higher growth temperatures, they differ strikingly in the formation of the inclusion bodies. Upon overexpression in the cultures performed at 28 degrees C, the specific activity of pyranose 2-oxidase from T. pubescens was eight times higher than that from T. ochracea: 93% of pyranose 2-oxidase from T. ochracea and only 15% of that from T. pubescens was present in the form of inclusion bodies. To ascertain the cause of this difference, both cloned genes were shuffled. Site-directed recombination of p2o cDNAs revealed that DNA constructs ending with 3' end of p2o cDNA from T. pubescens code for proteins that are folded into an active form to the greater extent, regardless of the gene expression level. "In silicio" analysis of physico-chemical properties of the protein sequences of pyranose 2-oxidases revealed that the sequence of amino acid residues 368-430, constituting the small, head domain of pyranose 2-oxidase from T. pubescens, affects positively the enzyme folding at higher cultivation temperatures. The domain differs in six amino acid residues from that of T. ochracea.

  7. A new methodology for the determination of enzyme activity based on carbon nanotubes and glucose oxidase.

    PubMed

    Yeşiller, Gülden; Sezgintürk, Mustafa Kemal

    2015-11-10

    In this research, a novel enzyme activity analysis methodology is introduced as a new perspective for this area. The activity of elastase enzyme, which is a digestive enzyme mostly of found in the digestive system of vertebrates, was determined by an electrochemical device composed of carbon nanotubes and a second enzyme, glucose oxidase, which was used as a signal generator enzyme. In this novel methodology, a complex bioactive layer was constructed by using carbon nanotubes, glucose oxidase and a supporting protein, gelatin on a solid, conductive substrate. The activity of elastase was determined by monitoring the hydrolysis rate of elastase enzyme in the bioactive layer. As a result of this hydrolysis of elastase, glucose oxidase was dissociated from the bioactive layer, and following this the electrochemical signal due to glucose oxidase was decreased. The progressive elastase-catalyzed digestion of the bioactive layer containing glucose oxidase decreased the layer's enzymatic efficiency, resulting in a decrease of the glucose oxidation current as a function of the enzyme activity. The ratio of the decrease was correlated to elastase activity level. In this study, optimization experiments of bioactive components and characterization of the resulting new electrochemical device were carried out. A linear calibration range from 0.0303U/mL to 0.0729U/mL of elastase was reported. Real sample analyses were also carried out by the new electrochemical device. PMID:26257292

  8. NADPH Oxidase Biology and the Regulation of Tyrosine Kinase Receptor Signaling and Cancer Drug Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Paletta-Silva, Rafael; Rocco-Machado, Nathália; Meyer-Fernandes, José Roberto

    2013-01-01

    The outdated idea that reactive oxygen species (ROS) are only dangerous products of cellular metabolism, causing toxic and mutagenic effects on cellular components, is being replaced by the view that ROS have several important functions in cell signaling. In aerobic organisms, ROS can be generated from different sources, including the mitochondrial electron transport chain, xanthine oxidase, myeloperoxidase, and lipoxygenase, but the only enzyme family that produces ROS as its main product is the NADPH oxidase family (NOX enzymes). These transfer electrons from NADPH (converting it to NADP−) to oxygen to make O2•−. Due to their stability, the products of NADPH oxidase, hydrogen peroxide, and superoxide are considered the most favorable ROS to act as signaling molecules. Transcription factors that regulate gene expression involved in carcinogenesis are modulated by NADPH oxidase, and it has emerged as a promising target for cancer therapies. The present review discusses the mechanisms by which NADPH oxidase regulates signal transduction pathways in view of tyrosine kinase receptors, which are pivotal to regulating the hallmarks of cancer, and how ROS mediate the cytotoxicity of several cancer drugs employed in clinical practice. PMID:23434665

  9. Fluorescence quenching study of quercetin interaction with bovine milk xanthine oxidase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasoulzadeh, Farzaneh; Jabary, Hamideh Nadjarpour; Naseri, Abdolhossein; Rashidi, Mohammad-Reza

    2009-02-01

    Quercetin is a natural flavonoid with many important therapeutic properties. The interaction of this polyphenolic compound bovine milk xanthine oxidase as one of its major target proteins was studied using fluorescence quenching method for the first time. It was found that the fluorescence quenching of xanthine oxidase occurs through a static mechanism. The results revealed the presence of a single binding site on xanthine oxidase with the binding constant value equals to 1.153 × 10 4 l mol -1 at 310 K and pH 7.4. The thermodynamic parameters were also calculated at different temperatures. The enthalpy and entropy changes were found as -10.661 kJ mol -1 and +43.321 J mol -1 K -1 indicating that both hydrogen binding and hydrophobic are involved in the interaction of this polyphenolic natural compound with xanthine oxidase. The results may provide a ground for further studies with different flavonoids to find a safe alternative for allopurinol, the only xanthine oxidase inhibitor with clinical application.

  10. A new methodology for the determination of enzyme activity based on carbon nanotubes and glucose oxidase.

    PubMed

    Yeşiller, Gülden; Sezgintürk, Mustafa Kemal

    2015-11-10

    In this research, a novel enzyme activity analysis methodology is introduced as a new perspective for this area. The activity of elastase enzyme, which is a digestive enzyme mostly of found in the digestive system of vertebrates, was determined by an electrochemical device composed of carbon nanotubes and a second enzyme, glucose oxidase, which was used as a signal generator enzyme. In this novel methodology, a complex bioactive layer was constructed by using carbon nanotubes, glucose oxidase and a supporting protein, gelatin on a solid, conductive substrate. The activity of elastase was determined by monitoring the hydrolysis rate of elastase enzyme in the bioactive layer. As a result of this hydrolysis of elastase, glucose oxidase was dissociated from the bioactive layer, and following this the electrochemical signal due to glucose oxidase was decreased. The progressive elastase-catalyzed digestion of the bioactive layer containing glucose oxidase decreased the layer's enzymatic efficiency, resulting in a decrease of the glucose oxidation current as a function of the enzyme activity. The ratio of the decrease was correlated to elastase activity level. In this study, optimization experiments of bioactive components and characterization of the resulting new electrochemical device were carried out. A linear calibration range from 0.0303U/mL to 0.0729U/mL of elastase was reported. Real sample analyses were also carried out by the new electrochemical device.

  11. Fibromodulin Interacts with Collagen Cross-linking Sites and Activates Lysyl Oxidase*

    PubMed Central

    Bihan, Dominique; Bonna, Arkadiusz; Rubin, Kristofer; Farndale, Richard W.

    2016-01-01

    The hallmark of fibrotic disorders is a highly cross-linked and dense collagen matrix, a property driven by the oxidative action of lysyl oxidase. Other fibrosis-associated proteins also contribute to the final collagen matrix properties, one of which is fibromodulin. Its interactions with collagen affect collagen cross-linking, packing, and fibril diameter. We investigated the possibility that a specific relationship exists between fibromodulin and lysyl oxidase, potentially imparting a specific collagen matrix phenotype. We mapped the fibromodulin-collagen interaction sites using the collagen II and III Toolkit peptide libraries. Fibromodulin interacted with the peptides containing the known collagen cross-linking sites and the MMP-1 cleavage site in collagens I and II. Interestingly, the interaction sites are closely aligned within the quarter-staggered collagen fibril, suggesting a multivalent interaction between fibromodulin and several collagen helices. Furthermore, we detected an interaction between fibromodulin and lysyl oxidase (a major collagen cross-linking enzyme) and mapped the interaction site to 12 N-terminal amino acids on fibromodulin. This interaction also increases the activity of lysyl oxidase. Together, the data suggest a fibromodulin-modulated collagen cross-linking mechanism where fibromodulin binds to a specific part of the collagen domain and also forms a complex with lysyl oxidase, targeting the enzyme toward specific cross-linking sites. PMID:26893379

  12. Timing of electron and proton transfer in the ba(3) cytochrome c oxidase from Thermus thermophilus.

    PubMed

    von Ballmoos, Christoph; Lachmann, Peter; Gennis, Robert B; Ädelroth, Pia; Brzezinski, Peter

    2012-06-01

    Heme-copper oxidases are membrane-bound proteins that catalyze the reduction of O(2) to H(2)O, a highly exergonic reaction. Part of the free energy of this reaction is used for pumping of protons across the membrane. The ba(3) oxidase from Thermus thermophilus presumably uses a single proton pathway for the transfer of substrate protons used during O(2) reduction as well as for the transfer of the protons that are pumped across the membrane. The pumping stoichiometry (0.5 H(+)/electron) is lower than that of most other (mitochondrial-like) oxidases characterized to date (1 H(+)/electron). We studied the pH dependence and deuterium isotope effect of the kinetics of electron and proton transfer reactions in the ba(3) oxidase. The results from these studies suggest that the movement of protons to the catalytic site and movement to a site located some distance from the catalytic site [proposed to be a "proton-loading site" (PLS) for pumped protons] are separated in time, which allows individual investigation of these reactions. A scenario in which the uptake and release of a pumped proton occurs upon every second transfer of an electron to the catalytic site would explain the decreased proton pumping stoichiometry compared to that of mitochondrial-like oxidases.

  13. Fibromodulin Interacts with Collagen Cross-linking Sites and Activates Lysyl Oxidase.

    PubMed

    Kalamajski, Sebastian; Bihan, Dominique; Bonna, Arkadiusz; Rubin, Kristofer; Farndale, Richard W

    2016-04-01

    The hallmark of fibrotic disorders is a highly cross-linked and dense collagen matrix, a property driven by the oxidative action of lysyl oxidase. Other fibrosis-associated proteins also contribute to the final collagen matrix properties, one of which is fibromodulin. Its interactions with collagen affect collagen cross-linking, packing, and fibril diameter. We investigated the possibility that a specific relationship exists between fibromodulin and lysyl oxidase, potentially imparting a specific collagen matrix phenotype. We mapped the fibromodulin-collagen interaction sites using the collagen II and III Toolkit peptide libraries. Fibromodulin interacted with the peptides containing the known collagen cross-linking sites and the MMP-1 cleavage site in collagens I and II. Interestingly, the interaction sites are closely aligned within the quarter-staggered collagen fibril, suggesting a multivalent interaction between fibromodulin and several collagen helices. Furthermore, we detected an interaction between fibromodulin and lysyl oxidase (a major collagen cross-linking enzyme) and mapped the interaction site to 12 N-terminal amino acids on fibromodulin. This interaction also increases the activity of lysyl oxidase. Together, the data suggest a fibromodulin-modulated collagen cross-linking mechanism where fibromodulin binds to a specific part of the collagen domain and also forms a complex with lysyl oxidase, targeting the enzyme toward specific cross-linking sites.

  14. Amyloid-β Peptide Binds to Cytochrome C Oxidase Subunit 1

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez-Zimbron, Luis Fernando; Luna-Muñoz, Jose; Mena, Raul; Vazquez-Ramirez, Ricardo; Kubli-Garfias, Carlos; Cribbs, David H.; Manoutcharian, Karen; Gevorkian, Goar

    2012-01-01

    Extracellular and intraneuronal accumulation of amyloid-beta aggregates has been demonstrated to be involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the precise mechanism of amyloid-beta neurotoxicity is not completely understood. Previous studies suggest that binding of amyloid-beta to a number of macromolecules has deleterious effects on cellular functions. Mitochondria were found to be the target for amyloid-beta, and mitochondrial dysfunction is well documented in AD. In the present study we have shown for the first time that Aβ 1–42 bound to a peptide comprising the amino-terminal region of cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1. Phage clone, selected after screening of a human brain cDNA library expressed on M13 phage and bearing a 61 amino acid fragment of cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1, bound to Aβ 1–42 in ELISA as well as to Aβ aggregates present in AD brain. Aβ 1–42 and cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 co-immunoprecipitated from mitochondrial fraction of differentiated human neuroblastoma cells. Likewise, molecular dynamics simulation of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 and the Aβ 1–42 peptide complex resulted in a reliable helix-helix interaction, supporting the experimental results. The interaction between Aβ 1–42 and cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 may explain, in part, the diminished enzymatic activity of respiratory chain complex IV and subsequent neuronal metabolic dysfunction observed in AD. PMID:22927926

  15. Effect of dietary protein and iron on the fractional turnover rate of rat liver xanthine oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Cherry, D.M.; Amy, N.K.

    1987-12-01

    Rat liver xanthine oxidase activity is regulated in response to dietary protein and iron. To investigate whether the change in activity was mediated by a change in the rate of protein degradation, we measured the fractional turnover rate using the double-isotope technique with (/sup 3/H)- and (/sup 14/C)leucine and calculated the apparent half-life of xanthine oxidase in rats fed diets containing either 20 or 5% casein with either 35 or 5 mg iron/kg diet. Under control conditions, xanthine oxidase had an apparent half-life of 4.8 d and approximately 65% of the enzyme subunits were active. Rats fed diets with low dietary protein had lower xanthine oxidase activity, but the enzyme had a slower fractional turnover rate, resulting in an apparent half-life of 6.4 d, and only 15-20% of the enzyme was active. The apparent half-life of xanthine oxidase increased to 7.5 d in rats fed diets with low dietary iron, but dietary iron did not affect the specific activity of the enzyme or the percentage of active subunits. These results suggest that the loss of enzyme activity is not due to loss of enzyme protein by increased degradation, but rather to inactivation of the enzyme.

  16. Hydrogen peroxide generation by monoamine oxidases in rat white adipocytes: role on cAMP production.

    PubMed

    Raimondi, L; Banchelli, G; Sgromo, L; Pirisino, R; Ner, M; Parini, A; Cambon, C

    2000-05-01

    In rat, white adipocytes monoamine oxidases (EC 1.4.3.4.) generate hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)). Recent studies suggested that, in addition to its toxic features, H(2)O(2) may behave as a cell second messenger. In the present study, using fluorimetric and chemiluminescence (CL) assays, we showed that tyramine degradation by monoamine oxidases in intact adipocytes resulted in the concentration-dependent generation of H(2)O(2). In addition, we found that, in the presence of low tyramine concentrations, forskolin-dependent cAMP production was significantly increased as compared to that of the control and this increase was prevented by the monoamine oxidase inhibitor pargyline or by the H(2)O(2) trapping system homovanillic acid-peroxidase. Finally, we demonstrated that tyramine degradation by monoamine oxidases increased the ability of isoproterenol to induce cell lipolysis. Taken together, these data suggest that H(2)O(2) produced during substrate degradation by monoamine oxidases may participate in the regulation of adipocyte metabolism.

  17. Novel deletion in a patient with an isolated peroxisoml acyl-CoA oxidase deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Poll-The, B.T.; Fournier, B.; Clevers, H.; Wanders, R.J.A.

    1994-09-01

    Disorders with defective peroxisome assembly are associated with multiple peroxisomal enzymatic abnormalities. Besides these diseases patients have been described suspected of having a single enzyme defect in the peroxisomal {beta}-oxidation pathway. Laboratory findings for these patients include elevated plasma very long chain fatty acids (VLCFA) and impaired VLCFA oxidation in fibroblasts. Complementation analysis between these patients and those with a proven single enzyme deficiency, using peroxisomal {beta}-oxidation of VLCFA as the criterion for complementation, has been used to show whether the patients are deficient in acyl-CoA oxidase, peroxisomal trifunctional protein or thiolase activity. Fibroblasts from a patient showing the clinical and biochemical abnormalities of isolated acyl-CoA oxidase deficiency (using cell complementation) were analyzed at the molecular level. Isolation of RNA from patient`s fibroblasts was followed by random reverse transcription of RNA and PCR amplification. PCR products were blotted and hybridized with the human acyl-CoA oxidase cDNA. A fragment 150 bp shorter than normal was found. Upon sequencing, exon 7 was found to be deleted leading to a frameshift in the acyl-CoA oxidase mRNA. Southern blot analysis of the patient`s DNA did not reveal any deletion in contrast to two siblings previously reported as having a deletion of at least 17 kb in the acyl-CoA oxidase gene.

  18. Metabolism of an alkyl polyamine analog by a polyamine oxidase from the microsporidian Encephalitozoon cuniculi.

    PubMed

    Bacchi, Cyrus J; Yarlett, Nigel; Faciane, Evangeline; Bi, Xiangdong; Rattendi, Donna; Weiss, Louis M; Woster, Patrick M

    2009-06-01

    Encephalitozoon cuniculi is a microsporidium responsible for systemic illness in mammals. In the course of developing leads to new therapy for microsporidiosis, we found that a bis(phenylbenzyl)3-7-3 analog of spermine, 1,15-bis{N-[o-(phenyl)benzylamino}-4,12-diazapentadecane (BW-1), was a substrate for an E. cuniculi amine oxidase activity. The primary natural substrate for this oxidase activity was N'-acetylspermine, but BW-1 had activity comparable to that of the substrate. As the sole substrate, BW-1 gave linear reaction rates over 15 min and K(m) of 2 microM. In the presence of N'-acetylspermine, BW-1 acted as a competitive inhibitor of oxidase activity and may be a subversive substrate, resulting in increased peroxide production. By use of (13)C-labeled BW-1 as a substrate and nuclear magnetic resonance analysis, two products were determined to be oxidative metabolites, a hydrated aldehyde or dicarboxylate and 2(phenyl)benzylamine. These products were detected after exposure of (13)C-labeled BW-1 to E. cuniculi preemergent spore preparations and to uninfected host cells. In previous studies, BW-1 was curative in a rodent model of infection with E. cuniculi. The results in this study demonstrate competitive inhibition of oxidase activity by BW-1 and support further studies of this oxidase activity by the parasite and host.

  19. Comparative modeling of the latent form of a plant catechol oxidase using a molluskan hemocyanin structure.

    PubMed

    Gerdemann, Carsten; Eicken, Christoph; Galla, Hans Joachim; Krebs, Bernt

    2002-04-10

    The structure of the precursor form of catechol oxidase from sweet potatoes (Ipomoea batatas) has been modeled on the basis of the 3D structural data of mature catechol oxidase [Nat. Struct. Biol. 5 (1998) 1084] and of hemocyanin from giant octopus (Octopus dofleini) [J. Mol. Biol. 278 (1998) 855]. A C-terminal extension peptide is found in the cDNA sequence but not in the purified, mature form of catechol oxidase. Superimposition of the 3D structures of the native hemocyanin and catechol oxidase reveals a close relationship except for an additional C-terminal domain only found in the hemocyanin structure. As sequence alignment shows good homology this domain of the hemocyanin structure was used as a template to model the 3D structure of the C-terminal extension peptide of catechol oxidase. As hemocyanins show no or only weak catecholase activity due to this domain this indicates an inhibitory function of this extension peptide. Beside this possible shielding function for the precursor form, evidence for a function in copper-uptake also increases due to the location of three histidine residues in the model.

  20. The cytochrome bd oxidase of Escherichia coli prevents respiratory inhibition by endogenous and exogenous hydrogen sulfide.

    PubMed

    Korshunov, Sergey; Imlay, Karin R C; Imlay, James A

    2016-07-01

    When sulfur compounds are scarce or difficult to process, Escherichia coli adapts by inducing the high-level expression of sulfur-compound importers. If cystine then becomes available, the cystine is rapidly overimported and reduced, leading to a burgeoning pool of intracellular cysteine. Most of the excess cysteine is exported, but some is adventitiously degraded, with the consequent release of sulfide. Sulfide is a potent ligand of copper and heme moieties, raising the prospect that it interferes with enzymes. We observed that when cystine was provided and sulfide levels rose, E. coli became strictly dependent upon cytochrome bd oxidase for continued respiration. Inspection revealed that low-micromolar levels of sulfide inhibited the proton-pumping cytochrome bo oxidase that is regarded as the primary respiratory oxidase. In the absence of the back-up cytochrome bd oxidase, growth failed. Exogenous sulfide elicited the same effect. The potency of sulfide was enhanced when oxygen concentrations were low. Natural oxic-anoxic interfaces are often sulfidic, including the intestinal environment where E. coli dwells. We propose that the sulfide resistance of the cytochrome bd oxidase is a key trait that permits respiration in such habitats.

  1. Three-dimensional organization of three-domain copper oxidases: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhukhlistova, N. E.; Zhukova, Yu. N.; Lyashenko, A. V.; Zaĭtsev, V. N.; Mikhaĭlov, A. M.

    2008-01-01

    “Blue” copper-containing proteins are multidomain proteins that utilize a unique redox property of copper ions. Among other blue multicopper oxidases, three-domain oxidases belong to the group of proteins that exhibit a wide variety of compositions in amino acid sequences, functions, and occurrences in organisms. This paper presents a review of the data obtained from X-ray diffraction investigations of the three-dimensional structures of three-domain multicopper oxidases, such as the ascorbate oxidase catalyzing oxidation of ascorbate to dehydroascorbate and its three derivatives; the multicopper oxidase CueO (the laccase homologue); the laccases isolated from the basidiomycetes Coprinus cinereus, Trametes versicolor, Coriolus zonatus, Cerrena maxima, and Rigidoporus lignosus and the ascomycete Melanocarpus albomyces; and the bacterial laccases CotA from the endospore coats of Bacillus subtilis. A comparison of the molecular structures of the laccases of different origins demonstrates that, structurally, these objects are highly conservative. This obviously indicates that the catalytic activity of the enzymes under consideration is characterized by similar mechanisms.

  2. Antisense downregulation of polyphenol oxidase results in enhanced disease susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Thipyapong, Piyada; Hunt, Michelle D; Steffens, John C

    2004-11-01

    Polyphenol oxidases (PPOs; EC 1.14.18.1 or EC 1.10.3.2) catalyze the oxidation of phenolics to quinones, highly reactive intermediates whose secondary reactions are responsible for much of the oxidative browning that accompanies plant senescence, wounding, and responses to pathogens. To assess the impact of PPO expression on resistance to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato we introduced a chimeric antisense potato PPO cDNA into tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum L.). Oxidation of caffeic acid, the dominant o-diphenolic aglycone of tomato foliage, was decreased ca. 40-fold by antisense expression of PPO. All members of the PPO gene family were downregulated: neither immunoreactive PPO nor PPO-specific mRNA were detectable in the transgenic plants. In addition, the antisense PPO construct suppressed inducible increases in PPO activity. Downregulation of PPO in antisense plants did not affect growth, development, or reproduction of greenhouse-grown plants. However, antisense PPO expression dramatically increased susceptibility to P. syringae expressing the avirulence gene avrPto in both Pto and pto backgrounds. In a compatible (pto) interaction, plants constitutively expressing an antisense PPO construct exhibited a 55-fold increase in bacterial growth, three times larger lesion area, and ten times more lesions cm(-2) than nontransformed plants. In an incompatible (Pto) interaction, antisense PPO plants exhibited 100-fold increases in bacterial growth and ten times more lesions cm(-2) than nontransformed plants. Although it is not clear whether hypersusceptibility of antisense plants is due to low constitutive PPO levels or failure to induce PPO upon infection, these findings suggest a critical role for PPO-catalyzed phenolic oxidation in limiting disease development. As a preliminary effort to understand the role of induced PPO in limiting disease development, we also examined the response of PPO promoter::beta-glucuronidase constructs when plants are challenged with P

  3. Proton interactions in the resting form of cytochrome oxidase.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulos, P G; Walter, S A; Li, J W; Baker, G M

    1991-01-22

    The effect of pH on the near-UV absorption spectrum of cytochrome oxidase has been examined. Several lines of evidence implicate a proton binding site that can modulate the optical properties of cytochrome alpha 3 in the resting enzyme. Changing the pH within the range 6.5-10.5 was found to reversibly shift the position of the Soret band over an 11-nm range. The lower pH values caused a progressive blue shift in the Soret band, whereas the high-pH range promoted a gradual red shift. Limiting band positions were approximately 416 and 427 nm. The incubation time required to reach a stable band position varied somewhat as did the actual extent of the shift. In most cases, the shift was associated with an isosbestic point. A pH titration profile for the apparent equilibrium position of the Soret band was obtained. Nonlinear least-squares fitting to a scatter plot, assuming a single acid/base group, showed an apparent pKa of 7.8. Magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) spectra of the low-pH form at 416 nm, the high-pH form at 427 nm, and the cyanide derivative at 428 nm were compared. No evidence of a high-pH-dependent low-spin transition or a change in the redox state of cytochrome a3 was found, confirming earlier work [Baker, G. M., Noguchi, M., & Palmer, G. (1987) J. Biol. Chem. 262, 595-604]. Subtraction of ferricytochrome a [spectrum taken from Vanneste, W. H. (1966) Biochemistry 5, 838-848] from a series of blue-shifting spectra showed a band at 414 nm that progressively gained amplitude and a band at 430 nm that correspondingly lost amplitude. A series of red-shifting spectra showed the opposite behavior with a clear isosbestic point being evident in both cases. The difference extinction change at 414 and 430 nm depended linearly on the position of the Soret band, both showing a reversible dependence on pH. The 430-nm band is noted to be unusually red-shifted for high-spin ferric heme a. An additional, pH-insensitive band was observed at 408-410 nm which was eliminated

  4. Functional analysis of polyphenol oxidases by antisense/sense technology.

    PubMed

    Thipyapong, Piyada; Stout, Michael J; Attajarusit, Jutharat

    2007-01-01

    Polyphenol oxidases (PPOs) catalyze the oxidation of phenolics to quinones, the secondary reactions of which lead to oxidative browning and postharvest losses of many fruits and vegetables. PPOs are ubiquitous in angiosperms, are inducible by both biotic and abiotic stresses, and have been implicated in several physiological processes including plant defense against pathogens and insects, the Mehler reaction, photoreduction of molecular oxygen by PSI, regulation of plastidic oxygen levels, aurone biosynthesis and the phenylpropanoid pathway. Here we review experiments in which the roles of PPO in disease and insect resistance as well as in the Mehler reaction were investigated using transgenic tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) plants with modified PPO expression levels (suppressed PPO and overexpressing PPO). These transgenic plants showed normal growth, development and reproduction under laboratory, growth chamber and greenhouse conditions. Antisense PPO expression dramatically increased susceptibility while PPO overexpression increased resistance of tomato plants to Pseudomonas syringae. Similarly, PPO-overexpressing transgenic plants showed an increase in resistance to various insects, including common cutworm (Spodoptera litura (F.)), cotton bollworm (Helicoverpa armigera (Hübner)) and beet army worm (Spodoptera exigua (Hübner)), whereas larvae feeding on plants with suppressed PPO activity had higher larval growth rates and consumed more foliage. Similar increases in weight gain, foliage consumption, and survival were also observed with Colorado potato beetles (Leptinotarsa decemlineata (Say)) feeding on antisense PPO transgenic tomatoes. The putative defensive mechanisms conferred by PPO and its interaction with other defense proteins are discussed. In addition, transgenic plants with suppressed PPO exhibited more favorable water relations and decreased photoinhibition compared to nontransformed controls and transgenic plants overexpressing PPO, suggesting

  5. The kinetic behavior of chicken liver sulfite oxidase.

    PubMed

    Brody, M S; Hille, R

    1999-05-18

    A comprehensive kinetic study of sulfite oxidase has been undertaken over the pH range 6.0-10.0, including conventional steady-state work as well as rapid kinetic studies of both the reaction of oxidized enzyme with sulfite and reduced enzyme with cytochrome c (III). A comparison of the pH dependence of kcat, kred, and kox indicates that kred is principally rate limiting above pH 7, but that below this pH the pH dependence of kcat is influenced by that of kox. The pH independence of kred is consistent with our previous proposal concerning the reaction mechanism, in which attack of the substrate lone pair of electrons on a Mo(VI)O2 unit initiates the catalytic sequence. The pH dependence of kred/Kdsulfite indicates that a group on the enzyme having a pKa of approximately 9.3 must be deprotonated for effective reaction of oxidized enzyme with sulfite, possibly Tyr 322, which from the crystal structure of the enzyme constitutes part of the substrate binding site. There is no evidence for the HSO3-/SO32- pKa of approximately 7 in the pH profile for kred/Kdsulfite, suggesting that enzyme is able to oxidize the two equally well. By contrast, kcat/Kmsulfite and kred/Kdsulfite exhibit distinct pH dependence (the former is bell-shaped, the latter sigmoidal), again consistent with the oxidative half-reaction contributing to the kinetic barrier to catalysis at low pH. The pH dependence of kcat/Km(cyt c) (reflecting the second-order rate of reaction of free enzyme with free cytochrome) is bell-shaped and closely resembles that of kox/Kd(cyt c), reflecting the importance of the oxidative half-reaction in the low substrate concentration regime. The pH profile for kox/Kd(cyt c) indicates that two groups with a pKa of approximately 8 are involved in the reaction of free reduced enzyme with cytochrome c, one of which must be deprotonated and the other protonated. These results are consistent with the known electrostatic nature of the interaction of cytochrome c with its

  6. Cytochrome C oxidase activity in germinating Phaseolus vulgaris l. seeds: Effects of carbon monoxide

    SciTech Connect

    Caughey, W.S. ); Sowa, S.; Roos, E.E.

    1989-04-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase is a key bioenergetic enzyme required for seed germination. The enzyme was isolated from 2-day germinating beans and biochemically compared to its bovine heart counterpart. Carbon monoxide, which binds to the heme a{sub 3} site of cytochrome c oxidase, we used to probe O{sub 2} utilization activity in isolated enzyme, mitochondrial particles, and whole seeds. Bean seeds under 80% CO/20% O{sub 2} exhibited 46% growth inhibition as determined by root length. Reversible, dose-dependent partial inhibition of bean seed mitochondrial respiration was observed in the presence of CO; heart mitochondria had a more sensitive, less reversible response. Effects of CO on bean and bovine heart enzyme were similar. The close correlation of CO effects observed on seedling growth, mitochondrial respiration and cytochrome oxidase activity indicate an important role for this enzyme during the early stages of seed germination.

  7. Inhibition of the alternative oxidase stimulates H2O2 production in plant mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Popov, V N; Simonian, R A; Skulachev, V P; Starkov, A A

    1997-09-22

    The hypothesis that a non-coupled alternative oxidase of plant mitochondria operates as an antioxygen defence mechanism [Purvis, A.C. and Shewfelt, R.L., Physiol. Plant. 88 (1993) 712-718; Skulachev, V.P., Biochemistry (Moscow) 59 (1994) 1433-1434] has been confirmed in experiments on isolated soybean and pea cotyledon mitochondria. It is shown that inhibitors of the alternative oxidase, salicyl hydroxamate and propyl gallate strongly stimulate H2O2 production by these mitochondria oxidizing succinate. Effective concentrations of the inhibitors proved to be the same as those decreasing the cyanide-resistant respiration. The inhibitors proved to be ineffective in stimulating H2O2 formation in rat liver mitochondria lacking the alternative oxidase.

  8. Snake Venom L-Amino Acid Oxidases: Trends in Pharmacology and Biochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Izidoro, Luiz Fernando M.; Sobrinho, Juliana C.; Mendes, Mirian M.; Costa, Tássia R.; Grabner, Amy N.; Rodrigues, Veridiana M.; da Silva, Saulo L.; Zanchi, Fernando B.; Zuliani, Juliana P.; Fernandes, Carla F. C.; Calderon, Leonardo A.; Stábeli, Rodrigo G.; Soares, Andreimar M.

    2014-01-01

    L-amino acid oxidases are enzymes found in several organisms, including venoms of snakes, where they contribute to the toxicity of ophidian envenomation. Their toxicity is primarily due to enzymatic activity, but other mechanisms have been proposed recently which require further investigation. L-amino acid oxidases exert biological and pharmacological effects, including actions on platelet aggregation and the induction of apoptosis, hemorrhage, and cytotoxicity. These proteins present a high biotechnological potential for the development of antimicrobial, antitumor, and antiprotozoan agents. This review provides an overview of the biochemical properties and pharmacological effects of snake venom L-amino acid oxidases, their structure/activity relationship, and supposed mechanisms of action described so far. PMID:24738050

  9. Simultaneous production of catalase, glucose oxidase and gluconic acid by Aspergillus niger mutant.

    PubMed

    Fiedurek, J; Gromada, A; Pielecki, J

    1998-01-01

    The production of gluconic acid, extracellular glucose oxidase and catalase in submerged culture by a number of biochemical mutants has been evaluated. Optimization of stirrer speed, time cultivation and buffering action of some chemicals on glucose oxidase, catalase and gluconic acid production by the most active mutant, AM-11, grown in a 3-L glass bioreactor was investigated. Three hundred rpm appeared to be optimum to ensure good growth and best glucose oxidase production, but gluconic acid or catalase activity obtained maximal value at 500 or 900 rpm, respectively. Significant increase of dissolved oxygen concentration in culture (16-21%) and extracellular catalase activity were obtained when the traditional aeration was employed together with automatic dosed hydrogen peroxide.

  10. Time dependent inhibition of xanthine oxidase in irradiated solutions of folic acid, aminopterin and methotrexate

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, K.; Pilot, T.F.; Meany, J.E. )

    1990-01-01

    The xanthine oxidase catalyzed oxidation of hypoxanthine was followed by monitoring the formation of uric acid at 290 nm. Inhibition of xanthine oxidase occurs in aqueous solutions of folic acid methotrexate and aminopterin. These compounds are known to dissociate upon exposure to ultraviolet light resulting in the formation of their respective 6-formylpteridine derivatives. The relative rates of dissociation were monitored spectrophotometrically by determining the absorbance of their 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine derivatives at 500 nm. When aqueous solutions of folic acid, aminopterin and methotrexate were exposed to uv light, a direct correlation was observed between the concentrations of the 6-formylpteridine derivatives existing in solution and the ability of these solutions to inhibit xanthine oxidase. The relative potency of the respective photolysis products were estimated.

  11. Cytochrome cbb3 of Thioalkalivibrio is a Na+-pumping cytochrome oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Muntyan, Maria S.; Cherepanov, Dmitry A.; Malinen, Anssi M.; Bloch, Dmitry A.; Sorokin, Dimitry Y.; Severina, Inna I.; Ivashina, Tatiana V.; Lahti, Reijo; Muyzer, Gerard; Skulachev, Vladimir P.

    2015-01-01

    Cytochrome c oxidases (Coxs) are the basic energy transducers in the respiratory chain of the majority of aerobic organisms. Coxs studied to date are redox-driven proton-pumping enzymes belonging to one of three subfamilies: A-, B-, and C-type oxidases. The C-type oxidases (cbb3 cytochromes), which are widespread among pathogenic bacteria, are the least understood. In particular, the proton-pumping machinery of these Coxs has not yet been elucidated despite the availability of X-ray structure information. Here, we report the discovery of the first (to our knowledge) sodium-pumping Cox (Scox), a cbb3 cytochrome from the extremely alkaliphilic bacterium Thioalkalivibrio versutus. This finding offers clues to the previously unknown structure of the ion-pumping channel in the C-type Coxs and provides insight into the functional properties of this enzyme. PMID:26056262

  12. Purification and spectroscopic studies on catechol oxidase from lemon balm (Melissa officinalis).

    PubMed

    Rompel, Annette; Büldt-Karentzopoulos, Klaudia; Molitor, Christian; Krebs, Bernt

    2012-09-01

    A catechol oxidase from lemon balm (Melissa officinalis) moCO which only catalyzes the oxidation of catechols to quinones without hydroxylating tyrosine was purified. The molecular mass of the M. officinalis enzyme of 39,370 Da was obtained by MALDI mass spectrometry and the isoelectric point was determined to be 3.4. Addition of 2 eq. H(2)O(2) to the enzyme leads to oxy catechol oxidase. In the UV/Vis spectrum two new absorption bands occur at 343 nm (ε=8510 M(-1)cm(-1)) and 580 nm (ε=580 M(-1)cm(-1)) due to O(2)(2-)Cu (II) charge transfer transitions in accordance with the oxy forms of other type 3 copper proteins. The N-terminal sequence has been determined by Edman degradation to NPVQAPELDKCGTAT, exhibiting a proline at the second and sixth position conserved in other polyphenol oxidases. PMID:22727580

  13. Microfluidic Devices Integrating Microcavity Surface-Plasmon-Resonance Sensors: Glucose Oxidase Binding-Activity Detection

    PubMed Central

    Amarie, Dragos; Alileche, Abdelkrim; Dragnea, Bogdan; Glazier, James A.

    2010-01-01

    We have developed miniature (≈1 μm diameter) microcavity surface-plasmon-resonance sensors (MSPRS), integrated them with microfluidics and tested their sensitivity to refractive-index changes. We tested their biosensing capability by distinguishing the interaction of glucose oxidase (Mr 160 kDa) with its natural substrate (β-D-glucose, Mr 180 Da) from its interactions with non-specific substrates (L-glucose, D-mannose and 2-deoxy-D-glucose). We ran the identical protocol we had used with the MSPRS on a Biacore 3000 instrument using their bare gold chip. Only the MSPRS was able to detect β-D-glucose binding to glucose oxidase. Each MSPRS can detect the binding to its surface of fewer than 35,000 glucose-oxidase molecules (representing 9.6 fg or 60 zmol of protein), about 106 times fewer than classical surface-plasmon-resonance biosensors. PMID:19968248

  14. Deletion of glucose oxidase changes the pattern of organic acid production in Aspergillus carbonarius.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lei; Lübeck, Mette; Lübeck, Peter S

    2014-01-01

    Aspergillus carbonarius has potential as a cell factory for the production of different organic acids. At pH 5.5, A.carbonarius accumulates high amounts of gluconic acid when it grows on glucose based medium whereas at low pH, it produces citric acid. The conversion of glucose to gluconic acid is carried out by secretion of the enzyme, glucose oxidase. In this work, the gene encoding glucose oxidase was identified and deleted from A. carbonarius with the aim of changing the carbon flux towards other organic acids. The effect of genetic engineering was examined by testing glucose oxidase deficient (Δgox) mutants for the production of different organic acids in a defined production medium. The results obtained showed that the gluconic acid accumulation was completely inhibited and increased amounts of citric acid, oxalic acid and malic acid were observed in the Δgox mutants.

  15. Purification and spectroscopic studies on catechol oxidase from lemon balm (Melissa officinalis).

    PubMed

    Rompel, Annette; Büldt-Karentzopoulos, Klaudia; Molitor, Christian; Krebs, Bernt

    2012-09-01

    A catechol oxidase from lemon balm (Melissa officinalis) moCO which only catalyzes the oxidation of catechols to quinones without hydroxylating tyrosine was purified. The molecular mass of the M. officinalis enzyme of 39,370 Da was obtained by MALDI mass spectrometry and the isoelectric point was determined to be 3.4. Addition of 2 eq. H(2)O(2) to the enzyme leads to oxy catechol oxidase. In the UV/Vis spectrum two new absorption bands occur at 343 nm (ε=8510 M(-1)cm(-1)) and 580 nm (ε=580 M(-1)cm(-1)) due to O(2)(2-)Cu (II) charge transfer transitions in accordance with the oxy forms of other type 3 copper proteins. The N-terminal sequence has been determined by Edman degradation to NPVQAPELDKCGTAT, exhibiting a proline at the second and sixth position conserved in other polyphenol oxidases.

  16. QSAR and SAR studies on the reduction of some aromatic nitro compounds by xanthine oxidase.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Mamta; Thakur, Abhilash; Balasubramanian, Krishnan

    2006-01-01

    This work describes QSAR and SAR studies on the reduction of 27 aromatic nitro compounds by xanthine oxidase using both distance-based topological indices and quantum molecular descriptors along with indicator parameters. The application of a multiple linear regression analysis indicated that a combination of distance-based topological indices with the ad hoc molecular descriptors and the indicator parameters yielded a statistically significant model for the activity, log K (the reduction of aromatic nitro compounds by xanthine oxidase). The final selection of a potential aromatic nitro compound for the reduction by xanthine oxidase is made by quantum molecular modeling. We have found that, among the various parameters, the quantum Mulliken charge parameters on the fourth atom or para position relative to the nitro group correlated best with the activity.

  17. Modification of the redox state of cytochrome c oxidase of rice due to certain stress treatments.

    PubMed

    Dhage, A R; Desai, B B; Naik, R M; Munjal, S V; Naik, M S

    1992-10-01

    The redox state of cytochrome alpha 3 during in situ respiration of leaves of 20-day-old rice seedlings was assessed by in vivo aerobic assay of nitrate reductase, after 1 min exposure to carbon monoxide. Different stress treatments like water and salt stresses, disintegration of leaf tissues and darkness modified the redox state of cytochrome c oxidase. The dark treatment altered the redox state of cytochrome oxidase from reduced to the oxidized state, as judged by its reaction with CO in CO-sensitive rice cultivar. The water and salt stresses as well as the disintegration of leaf tissue on the contrary altered cytochrome oxidase from the oxidized to its reduced state in CO-insensitive cultivars; probably by changing the cellular integrity, turgidity and structure of mitochondrial membrane, and also due to decreased mitochondrial energization.

  18. LAP6/POLYKETIDE SYNTHASE A and LAP5/POLYKETIDE SYNTHASE B Encode Hydroxyalkyl α-Pyrone Synthases Required for Pollen Development and Sporopollenin Biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung Soo; Grienenberger, Etienne; Lallemand, Benjamin; Colpitts, Che C.; Kim, Sun Young; Souza, Clarice de Azevedo; Geoffroy, Pierrette; Heintz, Dimitri; Krahn, Daniel; Kaiser, Markus; Kombrink, Erich; Heitz, Thierry; Suh, Dae-Yeon; Legrand, Michel; Douglas, Carl J.

    2010-01-01

    Plant type III polyketide synthases (PKSs) catalyze the condensation of malonyl-CoA units with various CoA ester starter molecules to generate a diverse array of natural products. The fatty acyl-CoA esters synthesized by Arabidopsis thaliana ACYL-COA SYNTHETASE5 (ACOS5) are key intermediates in the biosynthesis of sporopollenin, the major constituent of exine in the outer pollen wall. By coexpression analysis, we identified two Arabidopsis PKS genes, POLYKETIDE SYNTHASE A (PKSA) and PKSB (also known as LAP6 and LAP5, respectively) that are tightly coexpressed with ACOS5. Recombinant PKSA and PKSB proteins generated tri-and tetraketide α-pyrone compounds in vitro from a broad range of potential ACOS5-generated fatty acyl-CoA starter substrates by condensation with malonyl-CoA. Furthermore, substrate preference profile and kinetic analyses strongly suggested that in planta substrates for both enzymes are midchain- and ω-hydroxylated fatty acyl-CoAs (e.g., 12-hydroxyoctadecanoyl-CoA and 16-hydroxyhexadecanoyl-CoA), which are the products of sequential actions of anther-specific fatty acid hydroxylases and acyl-CoA synthetase. PKSA and PKSB are specifically and transiently expressed in tapetal cells during microspore development in Arabidopsis anthers. Mutants compromised in expression of the PKS genes displayed pollen exine layer defects, and a double pksa pksb mutant was completely male sterile, with no apparent exine. These results show that hydroxylated α-pyrone polyketide compounds generated by the sequential action of ACOS5 and PKSA/B are potential and previously unknown sporopollenin precursors. PMID:21193570

  19. Role of Valine 464 in the Flavin Oxidation Reaction Catalyzed by Choline Oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Finnegan, Steffan; Agniswamy, Johnson; Weber, Irene T.; Gadda, Giovanni

    2010-11-03

    The oxidation of reduced flavin cofactors by oxygen is a very important reaction that is central to the chemical versatility of hundreds of flavoproteins classified as monooxygenases and oxidases. These enzymes are characterized by bimolecular rate constants {ge} 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} s{sup -1} and produce water and hydrogen peroxide, respectively. A hydrophobic cavity close to the reactive flavin C(4a) atom has been previously identified in the 3D structure of monooxygenases but not in flavoprotein oxidases. In the present study, we have investigated by X-ray crystallography, mutagenesis, steady-state, and rapid reaction approaches the role of Val464, which is <6 {angstrom} from the flavin C(4a) atom in choline oxidase. The 3D structure of the Val464Ala enzyme was essentially identical to that of the wild-type enzyme as shown by X-ray crystallography. Time-resolved anaerobic substrate reduction of the enzymes showed that replacement of Val464 with alanine or threonine did not affect the reductive half-reaction. Steady-state and rapid kinetics as well as enzyme-monitored turnovers indicated that the oxidative half-reaction in the Ala464 and Thr464 enzymes was decreased by 50-fold with respect to the wild-type enzyme. We propose that the side chain of Val464 in choline oxidase provides a nonpolar site that is required to guide oxygen in proximity of the C(4a) atom of the flavin, where it will subsequently react via electrostatic catalysis. Visual analysis of available structures suggests that analogous nonpolar sites are likely present in most flavoprotein oxidases. Mechanistic considerations provide rationalization for the differences between sites in monooxygenases and oxidases.

  20. Microglial NADPH oxidase activation mediates rod cell death in the retinal degeneration in rd mice.

    PubMed

    Zeng, H; Ding, M; Chen, X-X; Lu, Q

    2014-09-01

    Accumulating evidence supports that nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase contributes to microglia-mediated neurotoxicity in the CNS neurodegenerative diseases. Several studies, including ours, suggest that microglial activation is involved in the retinal degeneration in the animal models of retinitis pigmentosa (RP). In the present study, we investigated the activation of NADPH oxidase in the rod degeneration in rd mice and further explored its role in the microglia-mediated photoreceptor apoptosis. Expression of gp91phox protein, a major subunit of NAPDH oxidase in the whole retina of rd mice at postnatal days (P) 8, 10, 12, 14, 16 and 18 was assessed by western blot analysis. Location of gp91phox in the rd retina at each age group and its cellular source were studied by immunohistochemical analysis and double labeling respectively. The generation of superoxide radicals in the rd retinas was demonstrated by intraperitoneal injection of hydroethidine. Apocynin was applied intraperitoneally in the rd mice from P8 to P14 to inhibit the activity of NAPDH oxidase and the outer nuclear layer (ONL) thickness was measured before and after apocynin treatment. Our results demonstrated that during the rod degenerative process, the expression of gp91phox started to increase in the outer part of rd retina at P10 and reached a peak at P14. Double labeling of gp91phox with CD11b showed co-localization of gp91phox in the retinal microglial cells. Increasing generation of superoxide radicals visualized by hydroethidine was noted at P8 and reached a peak at P14. Apocynin markedly reduced the production of superoxide radicals and preserved the rod cells. The results suggested that NADPH oxidase might play an important role in the rod degeneration in the rd mice. Inhibition of NAPDH oxidase could be a possible approach to treat RP in the early degenerative stage.

  1. Isoprenoid metabolism is required for stimulation of the respiratory burst oxidase of HL-60 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Bokoch, G M; Prossnitz, V

    1992-01-01

    The formation of oxygen radicals by phagocytic cells occurs through the activation of a multiple-component NADPH oxidase system. An unidentified low molecular weight GTP-binding protein has been proposed to modulate the activity of the NADPH oxidase. The low molecular weight GTP-binding proteins undergo posttranslational processing, including an initial covalent incorporation of an isoprenyl group. To test whether such an isoprenylation reaction might be required for the activity of the oxidase, we utilized compactin and lovastatin as inhibitors of the isoprenylation pathway. Treatment of DMSO-differentiated HL-60 cells with compactin produced a concentration-dependent inhibition of O2- formation in response to FMLP or phorbol myristate acetate. Cell viability was not affected nor was normal differentiation of the HL-60 cells into a neutrophil-like cell. The inhibitory effect of compactin was specifically prevented by addition of exogenous mevalonic acid to the HL-60 cells, indicating that the inhibitory effects of the drug were due to blockade of the pathway leading to isoprenoid synthesis. Addition of cholesterol, ubiquinone, or dolichol, which are also downstream products of the isoprenoid pathway, did not override the inhibitory effects of the drug. Subcellular fractions were prepared from compactin-treated cells, and the location of the compactin-sensitive factor was determined by complementation analysis in a cell-free NADPH oxidase system. The inhibited factor was localized to the HL-60 cytosol. These data suggest that an isoprenoid pathway intermediate is necessary for activation of the phagocyte NADPH oxidase. This is likely to represent the requirement for an isoprenoid moiety in the posttranslational modification of a low molecular weight GTP-binding protein. Our studies provide support for the involvement of such a low molecular weight GTP-binding protein in NADPH oxidase activation. Images PMID:1310693

  2. Apocynin is not an inhibitor of vascular NADPH oxidases but an antioxidant.

    PubMed

    Heumüller, Sabine; Wind, Sven; Barbosa-Sicard, Eduardo; Schmidt, Harald H H W; Busse, Rudi; Schröder, Katrin; Brandes, Ralf P

    2008-02-01

    A large body of literature suggest that vascular reduced nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidases are important sources of reactive oxygen species. Many studies, however, relied on data obtained with the inhibitor apocynin (4'-hydroxy-3'methoxyacetophenone). Because the mode of action of apocynin, however, is elusive, we determined its mechanism of inhibition on vascular NADPH oxidases. In HEK293 cells overexpressing NADPH oxidase isoforms (Nox1, Nox2, or Nox4), apocynin failed to inhibit superoxide anion generation detected by lucigenin chemiluminescence. In contrast, apocynin interfered with the detection of reactive oxygen species in assay systems selective for hydrogen peroxide or hydroxyl radicals. Importantly, apocynin interfered directly with the detection of peroxides but not superoxide, if generated by xanthine/xanthine oxidase or nonenzymatic systems. In leukocytes, apocynin is a prodrug that is activated by myeloperoxidase, a process that results in the formation of apocynin dimers. Endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells failed to form these dimers and, therefore, are not able to activate apocynin. Dimer formation was, however, observed in Nox-overexpressing HEK293 cells when myeloperoxidase was supplemented. As a consequence, apocynin should only inhibit NADPH oxidase in leukocytes, whereas in vascular cells, the compound could act as an antioxidant. Indeed, in vascular smooth muscle cells, the activation of the redox-sensitive kinases p38-mitogen-activate protein kinase, Akt, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 by hydrogen peroxide and by the intracellular radical generator menadione was prevented in the presence of apocynin. These observations indicate that apocynin predominantly acts as an antioxidant in endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells and should not be used as an NADPH oxidase inhibitor in vascular systems. PMID:18086956

  3. Transcriptional changes of gibberellin oxidase genes in grapevines with or without gibberellin application during inflorescence development.

    PubMed

    Jung, Chan Jin; Hur, Youn Young; Jung, Sung-Min; Noh, Jung-Ho; Do, Gyung-Ran; Park, Seo-June; Nam, Jong-Chul; Park, Kyo-Sun; Hwang, Hae-Sung; Choi, Doil; Lee, Hee Jae

    2014-03-01

    The concept that gibberellin (GA) application on seeded grapevines induces seedlessness has been known for decades in viticulture. GA was applied to inflorescence clusters of seeded diploid grapevine cultivar 'Tamnara' (Vitis spp.) at 14 days before full bloom (DBF). Morphological and molecular effects of GA application were examined on the induction of parthenocarpic fruit development. With GA application, ovaries were enlarged and pollen tube growth was completely inhibited. Vitis GA oxidase enzymes, key determinants for GA level, were characterized through phylogenetic analysis with Arabidopsis GA oxidase enzymes. Five VvGA 20-oxidase (VvGA20ox), three VvGA 3-oxidase (VvGA3ox), and nine VvGA 2-oxidase (VvGA2ox) family proteins, and one VvGA methyltransferase (VvGAMT) and one Vitis cytochrome P450 714A1 proteins were identified, and their expression patterns were analyzed during inflorescence development from 14 DBF to 5 days after full bloom (DAF). VvGA2ox1, VvGA20ox3, and VvGA3ox2 were the most abundantly expressed genes in each gene family at 7, 5, and 2 DBF, respectively. Following GA application at 14 DBF inducing seedlessness, GA catabolic genes such as VvGAMT2, VvGA2ox3, and VvGA2ox4 were up-regulated at 12 DBF, full bloom, and 5 DAF, respectively. Conversely, most GA biosynthetic genes, VvGA20oxs and VvGA3oxs, were down-regulated at near full bloom, and the timing of their peak expression was changed. These results suggest that GA application at pre-bloom changes the GA biosynthesis into GA catabolic pathway at near full bloom by altering the transcription level and timing of GA oxidase genes during grapevine inflorescence development.

  4. [Ceruloplasmin, hephaestin and zyklopen: the three multicopper oxidases important for human iron metabolism].

    PubMed

    Wierzbicka, Diana; Gromadzka, Grazyna

    2014-01-01

    Multi-copper oxidases are a group of proteins which demonstrate enzymatic activity and are capable of oxidizing their substrates with the concomitant reduction of dioxygen to two water molecules. For some multi-copper oxidases there has been demonstrated ferroxidase activity which is related to their specific structure characterized by the presence of copper centres and iron-binding sites. Three multi-copper oxidases have been included in this group: ceruloplasmin, hephaestin and zyklopen. Multi-copper oxidases which are expressed in different tissues are capable of oxidizing a wide spectrum of substrates. Multi-copper oxidases are capable of oxidizing a wide spectrum of substrates. Ceruloplasmin exhibits antioxidant activity as well as being involved in many other biological processes. The observations of phenotypic effects of absence or low expression of multi-copper ferroxidase-coding genes suggest that the main role of these proteins is taking part in iron metabolism. The main role of ceruloplasmin in iron turnover is oxidizing Fe2+ into Fe3+, a process which is essential for iron binding to transferrin (the main iron-transporting protein), as well as to ferritin (the main iron-storage protein). The function of hephaestin as ferroxidase is essential for iron binding to apotransferrin in the lamina propria of the intestinal mucosa, a process that is important for further transport of iron to the liver by the portal vein. Available data indicate that zyklopen is responsible for the placental iron transport. The presence of three multi-copper oxidases with ferroxidase activity emphasizes the significance of oxidation for iron metabolism. The distribution of multi-copper ferroxidases in many tissues ensures the proper iron turnover in the body as well as preventing toxic effects related to the presence of Fe2+ ions. These ions contribute to generation of free radicals, including the highly reactive hydroxyl radical, through the Fenton and Haber-Weiss reactions

  5. The kinetics of electron transfer between pseudomonas aeruginosa cytochrome c-551 and its oxidase.

    PubMed Central

    Silvestrini, M C; Tordi, M G; Colosimo, A; Antonini, E; Brunori, M

    1982-01-01

    The redox reaction between cytochrome c-551 and its oxidase from the respiratory chain of pseudomonas aeruginosa was studied by rapid-mixing techniques at both pH7 and 9.1. The electron transfer in the direction of cytochrome c-551 reduction, starting with the oxidase in the reduced and CO-bound form, is monophasic, and the governing bimolecular rate constants are 1.3(+/- 0.2) x 10(7) M-1 . s-1 at pH 9.1 and 4 (+/- 1) x 10(6) M-1 . s-1 at pH 7.0. In the opposite direction, i.e. mixing the oxidized oxidase with the reduced cytochrome c-551 in the absence of O2, both a lower absorbance change and a more complex kinetic pattern were observed. With oxidized azurin instead of oxidized cytochrome c-551 the oxidation of the c haem in the CO-bound oxidase is also monophasic, and the second-order rate constant is 2 (+/- 0.7) x 10(6) M-1 . s-1 at pH 9.1. The redox potential of the c haem in the oxidase, as obtained from kinetic titrations of the completely oxidized enzyme with reduced azurin as the variable substrate, is 288 mV at pH 7.0 and 255 mV at pH 9.1. This is in contrast with the very high affinity observed in similar titrations performed with both oxidized azurin and oxidized cytochrome c-551 starting from the CO derivative of the reduced oxidase. It is concluded that: (i) azurin and cytochrome c-551 are not equally efficient in vitro as reducing substrates of the oxidase in the respiratory chain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa; (ii) CO ligation to the d1 haem in the oxidase induces a large decrease (at least 80 mV) in the redox potential of the c-haem moiety. Images Fig. 1. PMID:6288000

  6. Study of structure and functional states of alcohol oxidase by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strekal, Nataliya D.; Maskevich, Sergei A.; Artsukevich, Irina M.; Kivach, Leonid N.; Chernikevich, Ivan P.

    1995-01-01

    The SERS spectra of alcohol oxidase purified from Pichia Pastoris and Candida Boidinii adsorbed on silver electrode were obtained. The effect of stabilization of protein by NaN3 was studied by SERS of flavin adenine dinucleitide released from flavoprotein near the Ag surface. The dissociation of falvin from flavoprotein in N3-anion from and in neutral form independence on functional state of protein has been supposed. The association of protein oligomers and the peculiarities of quaternary structure are discussed as a reason of different SERS behavior of alcohol oxidase from various different sources.

  7. Targeting NADPH Oxidase Decreases Oxidative Stress in the Transgenic Sickle Cell Mouse Penis

    PubMed Central

    Musicki, Biljana; Liu, Tongyun; Sezen, Sena F.; Burnett, Arthur L.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a state of chronic vasculopathy characterized by endothelial dysfunction and increased oxidative stress, but the sources and mechanisms responsible for reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in the penis are unknown. Aims We evaluated whether SCD activates NADPH oxidase, induces endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) uncoupling, and decreases antioxidants in the SCD mouse penis. We further tested the hypothesis that targeting NADPH oxidase decreases oxidative stress in the SCD mouse penis. Methods SCD transgenic (sickle) mice were used as an animal model of SCD. Hemizygous (hemi) mice served as controls. Mice received an NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin (10 mM in drinking water) or vehicle. Penes were excised at baseline for molecular studies. Markers of oxidative stress (4-hydroxy-2-nonenal [HNE]), sources of ROS (eNOS uncoupling and NADPH oxidase subunits p67phox, p47phox, and gp91phox), and enzymatic antioxidants (superoxide dismutase [SOD]1, SOD2, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase-1 [GPx1]) were measured by Western blot in penes. Main Outcome Measures Sources of ROS, oxidative stress, and enzymatic antioxidants in the SCD penis. Results Relative to hemi mice, SCD increased (P < 0.05) protein expression of NADPH oxidase subunits p67phox, p47phox, and gp91phox, 4-HNE-modified proteins, induced eNOS uncoupling, and reduced Gpx1 expression in the penis. Apocynin treatment of sickle mice reversed (P < 0.05) the abnormalities in protein expressions of p47phox, gp91phox (but not p67phox) and 4-HNE, but only slightly (P > 0.05) prevented eNOS uncoupling in the penis. Apocynin treatment of hemi mice did not affect any of these parameters. Conclusion NADPH oxidase and eNOS uncoupling are sources of oxidative stress in the SCD penis; decreased GPx1 further contributes to oxidative stress. Inhibition of NADPH oxidase upregulation decreases oxidative stress, implying a major role for NADPH oxidase as a ROS source and a

  8. Role of NADPH Oxidase in Metabolic Disease-Related Renal Injury: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Su, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome has been linked to an increased risk of chronic kidney disease. The underlying pathogenesis of metabolic disease-related renal injury remains obscure. Accumulating evidence has shown that NADPH oxidase is a major source of intrarenal oxidative stress and is upregulated by metabolic factors leading to overproduction of ROS in podocytes, endothelial cells, and mesangial cells in glomeruli, which is closely associated with the initiation and progression of glomerular diseases. This review focuses on the role of NADPH oxidase-induced oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of metabolic disease-related renal injury. Understanding of the mechanism may help find potential therapeutic strategies.

  9. Oxygen biosensor based on bilirubin oxidase immobilized on a nanostructured gold electrode.

    PubMed

    Pita, Marcos; Gutierrez-Sanchez, Cristina; Toscano, Miguel D; Shleev, Sergey; De Lacey, Antonio L

    2013-12-01

    Gold disk electrodes modified with gold nanoparticles have been used as a scaffold for the covalent immobilization of bilirubin oxidase. The nanostructured bioelectrodes were tested as mediator-less biosensors for oxygen in a buffer that mimics the content and the composition of human physiological fluids. Chronoamperometry measurements showed a detection limit towards oxygen of 6 ± 1 μM with a linear range of 6-300 μM, i.e. exceeding usual physiological ranges of oxygen in human tissues and fluids. The biosensor presented is the first ever-reported oxygen amperometric biosensor based on direct electron transfer of bilirubin oxidase. PMID:23973738

  10. Childhood encephalomyopathy with cytochrome c oxidase deficiency, ataxia, muscle wasting, and mental impairment.

    PubMed

    Angelini, C; Bresolin, N; Pegolo, G; Bet, L; Rinaldo, P; Trevisan, C; Vergani, L

    1986-08-01

    The son of third cousins was normal until age 2 when he had difficulty walking. At age 8 there was limb weakness, ataxia, loss of tendon reflexes, dislalia, and he was mildly retarded. During fasting, urinary organic acid excretion was abnormally high. Cytochrome c oxidase activity in muscle was 7% of the normal mean. The enzyme in platelets was 16% of controls with a decreased cytochrome aa3 peak. These data suggest an autosomal recessive transmission of this variant of cytochrome c oxidase deficiency.

  11. Role of NADPH Oxidase in Metabolic Disease-Related Renal Injury: An Update.

    PubMed

    Wan, Cheng; Su, Hua; Zhang, Chun

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome has been linked to an increased risk of chronic kidney disease. The underlying pathogenesis of metabolic disease-related renal injury remains obscure. Accumulating evidence has shown that NADPH oxidase is a major source of intrarenal oxidative stress and is upregulated by metabolic factors leading to overproduction of ROS in podocytes, endothelial cells, and mesangial cells in glomeruli, which is closely associated with the initiation and progression of glomerular diseases. This review focuses on the role of NADPH oxidase-induced oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of metabolic disease-related renal injury. Understanding of the mechanism may help find potential therapeutic strategies. PMID:27597884

  12. Oscillations in the peroxidase-oxidase reaction: a comparison of different peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Kummer, U; Valeur, K R; Baier, G; Wegmann, K; Olsen, L F

    1996-04-17

    The nonlinear behavior of the peroxidase-oxidase reaction was studied using structurally different peroxidases. For the first time sustained oscillations with peroxidases other than horseradish peroxidase in a single-enzyme system were observed. All peroxidases that showed significant oxidase activity were able to generate sustained oscillations. When adjusting the overall reaction rate, either of the two modifiers 2,4-dichlorophenol or Methylene blue could be omitted from the reaction. Due to the observation of different enzyme intermediates when using different peroxidases, we conclude that the mechanisms responsible for oscillatory kinetics may vary from one peroxidase to the other.

  13. Role of NADPH Oxidase in Metabolic Disease-Related Renal Injury: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Su, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome has been linked to an increased risk of chronic kidney disease. The underlying pathogenesis of metabolic disease-related renal injury remains obscure. Accumulating evidence has shown that NADPH oxidase is a major source of intrarenal oxidative stress and is upregulated by metabolic factors leading to overproduction of ROS in podocytes, endothelial cells, and mesangial cells in glomeruli, which is closely associated with the initiation and progression of glomerular diseases. This review focuses on the role of NADPH oxidase-induced oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of metabolic disease-related renal injury. Understanding of the mechanism may help find potential therapeutic strategies. PMID:27597884

  14. Valencene oxidase CYP706M1 from Alaska cedar (Callitropsis nootkatensis).

    PubMed

    Cankar, Katarina; van Houwelingen, Adèle; Goedbloed, Miriam; Renirie, Rokus; de Jong, René M; Bouwmeester, Harro; Bosch, Dirk; Sonke, Theo; Beekwilder, Jules

    2014-03-18

    (+)-Nootkatone is a natural sesquiterpene ketone used in grapefruit and citrus flavour compositions. It occurs in small amounts in grapefruit and is a major component of Alaska cedar (Callitropsis nootkatensis) heartwood essential oil. Upon co-expression of candidate cytochrome P450 enzymes from Alaska cedar in yeast with a valencene synthase, a C. nootkatensis valencene oxidase (CnVO) was identified to produce trans-nootkatol and (+)-nootkatone. Formation of (+)-nootkatone was detected at 144±10μg/L yeast culture. CnVO belongs to a new subfamily of the CYP706 family of cytochrome P450 oxidases. PMID:24530525

  15. Impact of pyranose oxidase from Trametes multicolor, glucose oxidase from Aspergillus niger and hydrogen peroxide on protein agglomeration in wheat flour gluten-starch separation.

    PubMed

    Decamps, Karolien; Gryp, Glenn; Joye, Iris J; Courtin, Christophe M; Delcour, Jan A

    2014-04-01

    The impact of pyranose oxidase (P₂O), glucose oxidase (GO) and H₂O₂ on gluten agglomeration during wheat flour gluten-starch separation was studied. Analysis of gluten aggregate sizes in batter formed from wheat flour dough revealed that increasing levels of oxidising agents gradually decreased the tendency of gluten proteins to form large gluten aggregates. Low enzyme levels increased arabinoxylan (AX) and starch retention on the sieves, due to physical incorporation of AX and starch in the gluten aggregates. Higher enzyme levels increased retention of starch and AX on the smaller and larger sieves, respectively. Extensive oxidation leads to physical incorporation of AX and starch granules in the small gluten aggregates. AX is also crosslinked and hence more easily retained on the top sieves. Our results confirm that the size of gluten aggregates and the level of AX crosslinking and AX and starch incorporation in gluten proteins depend on the concentration of H₂O₂.

  16. Copper-Containing Amine Oxidases and FAD-Dependent Polyamine Oxidases Are Key Players in Plant Tissue Differentiation and Organ Development.

    PubMed

    Tavladoraki, Paraskevi; Cona, Alessandra; Angelini, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    Plant polyamines are catabolized by two classes of amine oxidases, the copper amine oxidases (CuAOs) and the flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)-dependent polyamine oxidases (PAOs). These enzymes differ to each other in substrate specificity, catalytic mechanism and subcellular localization. CuAOs and PAOs contribute to several physiological processes both through the control of polyamine homeostasis and as sources of biologically-active reaction products. CuAOs and PAOs have been found at high level in the cell-wall of several species belonging to Fabaceae and Poaceae families, respectively, especially in tissues fated to undertake extensive wall loosening/stiffening events and/or in cells undergoing programmed cell death (PCD). Apoplastic CuAOs and PAOs have been shown to play a key role as a source of H2O2 in light- or developmentally-regulated differentiation events, thus influencing cell-wall architecture and maturation as well as PCD. Moreover, growing evidence suggests a key role of intracellular CuAOs and PAOs in several facets of plant development. Here, we discuss recent advances in understanding the contribution of different CuAOs/PAOs, as well as their cross-talk with different intracellular and apoplastic metabolic pathways, in tissue differentiation and organ development. PMID:27446096

  17. Plant and animal glycolate oxidases have a common eukaryotic ancestor and convergently duplicated to evolve long-chain 2-hydroxy acid oxidases.

    PubMed

    Esser, Christian; Kuhn, Anke; Groth, Georg; Lercher, Martin J; Maurino, Veronica G

    2014-05-01

    Glycolate oxidase (GOX) is a crucial enzyme of plant photorespiration. The encoding gene is thought to have originated from endosymbiotic gene transfer between the eukaryotic host and the cyanobacterial endosymbiont at the base of plantae. However, animals also possess GOX activities. Plant and animal GOX belong to the gene family of (L)-2-hydroxyacid-oxidases ((L)-2-HAOX). We find that all (L)-2-HAOX proteins in animals and archaeplastida go back to one ancestral eukaryotic sequence; the sole exceptions are green algae of the chlorophyta lineage. Chlorophyta replaced the ancestral eukaryotic (L)-2-HAOX with a bacterial ortholog, a lactate oxidase that may have been obtained through the primary endosymbiosis at the base of plantae; independent losses of this gene may explain its absence in other algal lineages (glaucophyta, rhodophyta, and charophyta). We also show that in addition to GOX, plants possess (L)-2-HAOX proteins with different specificities for medium- and long-chain hydroxyacids (lHAOX), likely involved in fatty acid and protein catabolism. Vertebrates possess lHAOX proteins acting on similar substrates as plant lHAOX; however, the existence of GOX and lHAOX subfamilies in both plants and animals is not due to shared ancestry but is the result of convergent evolution in the two most complex eukaryotic lineages. On the basis of targeting sequences and predicted substrate specificities, we conclude that the biological role of plantae (L)-2-HAOX in photorespiration evolved by co-opting an existing peroxisomal protein. PMID:24408912

  18. Copper-Containing Amine Oxidases and FAD-Dependent Polyamine Oxidases Are Key Players in Plant Tissue Differentiation and Organ Development

    PubMed Central

    Tavladoraki, Paraskevi; Cona, Alessandra; Angelini, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    Plant polyamines are catabolized by two classes of amine oxidases, the copper amine oxidases (CuAOs) and the flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)-dependent polyamine oxidases (PAOs). These enzymes differ to each other in substrate specificity, catalytic mechanism and subcellular localization. CuAOs and PAOs contribute to several physiological processes both through the control of polyamine homeostasis and as sources of biologically-active reaction products. CuAOs and PAOs have been found at high level in the cell-wall of several species belonging to Fabaceae and Poaceae families, respectively, especially in tissues fated to undertake extensive wall loosening/stiffening events and/or in cells undergoing programmed cell death (PCD). Apoplastic CuAOs and PAOs have been shown to play a key role as a source of H2O2 in light- or developmentally-regulated differentiation events, thus influencing cell-wall architecture and maturation as well as PCD. Moreover, growing evidence suggests a key role of intracellular CuAOs and PAOs in several facets of plant development. Here, we discuss recent advances in understanding the contribution of different CuAOs/PAOs, as well as their cross-talk with different intracellular and apoplastic metabolic pathways, in tissue differentiation and organ development. PMID:27446096

  19. Plant and animal glycolate oxidases have a common eukaryotic ancestor and convergently duplicated to evolve long-chain 2-hydroxy acid oxidases.

    PubMed

    Esser, Christian; Kuhn, Anke; Groth, Georg; Lercher, Martin J; Maurino, Veronica G

    2014-05-01

    Glycolate oxidase (GOX) is a crucial enzyme of plant photorespiration. The encoding gene is thought to have originated from endosymbiotic gene transfer between the eukaryotic host and the cyanobacterial endosymbiont at the base of plantae. However, animals also possess GOX activities. Plant and animal GOX belong to the gene family of (L)-2-hydroxyacid-oxidases ((L)-2-HAOX). We find that all (L)-2-HAOX proteins in animals and archaeplastida go back to one ancestral eukaryotic sequence; the sole exceptions are green algae of the chlorophyta lineage. Chlorophyta replaced the ancestral eukaryotic (L)-2-HAOX with a bacterial ortholog, a lactate oxidase that may have been obtained through the primary endosymbiosis at the base of plantae; independent losses of this gene may explain its absence in other algal lineages (glaucophyta, rhodophyta, and charophyta). We also show that in addition to GOX, plants possess (L)-2-HAOX proteins with different specificities for medium- and long-chain hydroxyacids (lHAOX), likely involved in fatty acid and protein catabolism. Vertebrates possess lHAOX proteins acting on similar substrates as plant lHAOX; however, the existence of GOX and lHAOX subfamilies in both plants and animals is not due to shared ancestry but is the result of convergent evolution in the two most complex eukaryotic lineages. On the basis of targeting sequences and predicted substrate specificities, we conclude that the biological role of plantae (L)-2-HAOX in photorespiration evolved by co-opting an existing peroxisomal protein.

  20. Activity of Monoamine Oxidase in the Nigrostriatal System at Presymptomatic and Early Symptomatic Stages of Parkinsonism in Mice.

    PubMed

    Khakimova, G R; Kozina, E A; Buneeva, O A; Aksenova, L N; Medvedev, A E; Ugryumov, M V

    2015-08-01

    Activities of monoamine oxidases A and B were examined on the models of presymptomatic and early symptomatic stages of Parkinson's disease developed in mice treated with MPTP, a specific neurotoxin affecting dopaminergic neurons. Activity of monoamine oxidases A, the key enzyme of dopamine degradation, is increased in neuronal somas during the symptomatic stage, and it is augmented in the axons during both stages. Neuronal activity of monoamine oxidases A is higher during the symptomatic stage than that during the presymptomatic stage, which can explain depletion of intercellular dopamine and appearance of motor disturbances. Activity of monoamine oxidase B in the striatum is reduced during the presymptomatic stage, but returns to the control level during the symptomatic stage. Variation in monoamine oxidase activity seems to reflect the compensatory mechanisms triggered in degrading nigrostriatal dopaminergic system.