Science.gov

Sample records for acyl-coa starter units

  1. Involvement of glutamate mutase in the biosynthesis of the unique starter unit of the macrolactam polyketide antibiotic vicenistatin.

    PubMed

    Ogasawara, Yasushi; Kakinuma, Katsumi; Eguchi, Tadashi

    2005-07-01

    The macrolactam antibiotic vicenistatin, produced in Streptomyces halstedii HC34, is biosynthesized by the polyketide pathway, using a unique 3-methylaspartate-derived molecule as starter unit. The vinI gene in the vicenistatin biosynthetic gene cluster encoding glutamate mutase, which rearranges glutamate to 3-methylaspartate, was disrupted. The vinI disruption completely abolished the production of vicenistatin, while the disruptant recovered the production of vicenistatin when 3-methylaspartate was added to the culture. These results indicate that vinI is essential for the 3-methylaspartate formation in the vicenistatin biosynthesis. Furthermore, the mutant accumulated new vicenistatin derivatives (desmethylvicenistatins), which lacked a methyl group in the starter unit. The desmethylvicenistatins were shown by feeding experiments to be derived from aspartate instead of 3-methylaspartate as the starter unit. These results indicate that the vicenistatin polyketide synthase can accept alternative starter units toward the production of novel polyketides. PMID:16161486

  2. A natural protecting group strategy to carry an amino acid starter unit in the biosynthesis of macrolactam polyketide antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Shinohara, Yuji; Kudo, Fumitaka; Eguchi, Tadashi

    2011-11-16

    Macrolactam antibiotics are an important class of macrocyclic polyketides that contain a unique nitrogen-containing starter unit. In the present study, a set of starter biosynthetic enzymes in the macrolactam antibiotic vicenistatin was characterized. We found that the protection-deprotection strategy of the aminoacyl-ACP intermediate was critical in this system. On the basis of bioinformatics, the described pathway is also proposed as a common method for carrying amino acids in the biosynthesis of other macrolactam antibiotics. PMID:22010945

  3. Beyond celery and starter culture: advances in natural/organic curing processes in the United States.

    PubMed

    Sebranek, J G; Jackson-Davis, A L; Myers, K L; Lavieri, N A

    2012-11-01

    Over the past 10years there has been ongoing development of curing processes with natural ingredients designed to meet consumer demand and regulatory requirements for natural and organic processed meats. Initially, these processes utilized celery concentrates with a high nitrate content combined with a nitrate-reducing starter culture. Subsequent advances included celery concentrates with the nitrate converted to nitrite by suppliers. Further, as questions developed concerning reduced concentration of preservatives and the microbiological safety of these processed meats, additional advances have resulted in a wide variety of ingredients and processes designed to provide supplementary antimicrobial effects for improved product safety.

  4. Silent Starters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Emma

    2011-01-01

    The "silent starter" is an idea that the author was reminded of during Christopher Martin's session at the ATM conference in 2011, entitled "Big Ideas". This was a nice idea for introducing, or practising mappings, but it was not the first time the author had encountered this powerful teaching tool. The idea is best explained with an example, and…

  5. Smart Starter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    A NASA-developed technology provides an effective and economical method of starting standard three phase motors. Firing Circuits, Inc. uses the power factor controller in its Wattstop Reduced Voltage AC Motor Starters. The power factor controller matches voltage with a motor's actual need by continuously sensing shifts between voltage and circuit. Energy savings range from 8 to 65 percent. Wattstops are used on cranes, hoists, conveyors, fans, as well as in papermaking, woodworking, metalworking, and many other applications.

  6. Energy Management Curriculum Starter Kit

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, W.C.

    1987-02-01

    The Energy Management Curriculum Starter Kit was designed to help engineering educators develop and teach energy management courses. Montana State University and Oklahoma State University courses are embodied in the model curriculum given. The curricula offered at many other universities throughout the United States are also presented. The kit was designed specifically to train engineering students to be good energy managers. Courses at both the undergraduate and postgraduate level are presented.

  7. Biochemical and Structural Characterization of Germicidin Synthase: Analysis of a Type III Polyketide Synthase That Employs Acyl-ACP as a Starter Unit Donor

    SciTech Connect

    Chemler, Joseph A.; Buchholz, Tonia J.; Geders, Todd W.; Akey, David L.; Rath, Christopher M.; Chlipala, George E.; Smith, Janet L.; Sherman, David H.

    2012-08-10

    Germicidin synthase (Gcs) from Streptomyces coelicolor is a type III polyketide synthase (PKS) with broad substrate flexibility for acyl groups linked through a thioester bond to either coenzyme A (CoA) or acyl carrier protein (ACP). Germicidin synthesis was reconstituted in vitro by coupling Gcs with fatty acid biosynthesis. Since Gcs has broad substrate flexibility, we directly compared the kinetic properties of Gcs with both acyl-ACP and acyl-CoA. The catalytic efficiency of Gcs for acyl-ACP was 10-fold higher than for acyl-CoA, suggesting a strong preference toward carrier protein starter unit transfer. The 2.9 {angstrom} germicidin synthase crystal structure revealed canonical type III PKS architecture along with an unusual helical bundle of unknown function that appears to extend the dimerization interface. A pair of arginine residues adjacent to the active site affect catalytic activity but not ACP binding. This investigation provides new and surprising information about the interactions between type III PKSs and ACPs that will facilitate the construction of engineered systems for production of novel polyketides.

  8. School Starters' Early Structure Sense

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lüken, Miriam M.

    2012-01-01

    I analyse low and high achieving children's competences regarding pattern and structure at the beginning of formal schooling comparatively. The aim is to evaluate the range of school starters' early structure sense. The results suggest overall high pre-instructional competences which, however, differ strongly between the mathematical high and low…

  9. High fat fed heart failure animals have enhanced mitochondrial function and acyl-coa dehydrogenase activities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have previously shown that administration of high fat in heart failure (HF) increased mitochondrial respiration and did not alter left ventricular (LV) function. PPARalpha is a nuclear transcription factor that activates expression of genes involved in fatty acid uptake and utilization. We hypoth...

  10. Effects of Leuconostoc mesenteroides starter cultures on microbial communities and metabolites during kimchi fermentation.

    PubMed

    Jung, Ji Young; Lee, Se Hee; Lee, Hyo Jung; Seo, Hye-Young; Park, Wan-Soo; Jeon, Che Ok

    2012-02-15

    Kimchi fermentation usually relies upon the growth of naturally-occurring various heterofermentative lactic acid bacteria (LAB). This sometimes makes it difficult to produce kimchi with uniform quality. The use of Leuconostoc mesenteroides as a starter has been considered to produce commercial fermented kimchi with uniform and good quality in Korea. In this study, a combination of a barcoded pyrosequencing strategy and a (1)H NMR technique was used to investigate the effects of Leu. mesenteroides strain B1 as a starter culture for kimchi fermentation. Baechu (Chinese cabbage) and Chonggak (radish) kimchi with and without Leu. mesenteroides inoculation were prepared, respectively and their characteristics that included pH, cell number, bacterial community, and metabolites were monitored periodically for 40 days. Barcoded pyrosequencing analysis showed that the numbers of bacterial operational taxonomic units (OTU) in starter kimchi decreased more quickly than that in non-starter kimchi. Members of the genera Leuconostoc, Lactobacillus, and Weissella were dominant LAB regardless of the kimchi type or starter inoculation. Among the three genera, Leuconostoc was the most abundant, followed by Lactobacillus and Weissella. The use of Leu. mesenteroides as a starter increased the Leuconostoc proportions and decreased the Lactobacillus proportions in both type of kimchi during kimchi fermentation. However, interestingly, the use of the kimchi starter more highly maintained the Weissella proportions of starter kimchi compared to that in the non-starter kimchi until fermentation was complete. Metabolite analysis using the (1)H NMR technique showed that both Baechu and Chonggak kimchi with the starter culture began to consume free sugars earlier and produced a little greater amounts of lactic and acetic acids and mannitol. Metabolite analysis demonstrated that kimchi fermentation using Leu. mesenteroides as a starter was completed earlier with more production of kimchi

  11. 7 CFR 58.406 - Starter facility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., GENERAL SPECIFICATIONS FOR APPROVED PLANTS AND STANDARDS FOR GRADES OF DAIRY PRODUCTS 1 General... movement techniques shall be provided for the propagation and handling of starter cultures. All...

  12. Hand-actuated engine starter

    SciTech Connect

    Lindstrom, F.B.

    1987-01-27

    This patent describes a hand-actuated starter for an internal combustion engine wherein a first clutch member is journalled on a first shaft and a second clutch member is mounted on an engine shaft. The first clutch member has a pulley and is axially displaceable with respect to the second clutch member in response to rotation of the pulley, the first shaft and first clutch member having first and second mutually engaging bearing surfaces respectively. The improvement described here is wherein one of the surfaces has threads and the other of the surfaces has a helical groove and a helical spring in the groove positioned to engage the threads. The spring is radially displaceable in the groove.

  13. Crankshaft position sensing with combined starter alternator

    SciTech Connect

    Brandenburg, L.R.; Miller, J.M.

    2000-06-13

    A crankshaft position sensing apparatus is described for use with an engine having a combined starter/alternator assembly. The crankshaft position sensing apparatus includes a tone ring with a sensor and bandpass filter, having a cylinder identification input from a camshaft sensor, and a gain limiter. The sensing apparatus mounts near the rotor of the combined starter/alternator assembly. The filtered crankshaft position signal can then be input into a vehicle system controller and an inner loop controller. The starter/alternator assembly in combination with an internal combustion engine is particularly useful for a hybrid electric vehicle system.

  14. Crankshaft position sensing with combined starter alternator

    DOEpatents

    Brandenburg, Larry Raymond; Miller, John Michael

    2000-06-13

    A crankshaft position sensing apparatus for use with an engine (16) having a combined starter/alternator assembly (18). The crankshaft position sensing apparatus includes a tone ring (38) with a sensor (36) and bandpass filter (46), having a cylinder identification input from a camshaft sensor (48), and a gain limiter (54). The sensing apparatus mounts near the rotor (30) of the combined starter/alternator assembly (18). The filtered crankshaft position signal can then be input into a vehicle system controller (58) and an inner loop controller (60). The starter/alternator assembly (18) in combination with an internal combustion engine is particularly useful for a hybrid electric vehicle system.

  15. Trust and adolescent sports: starters vs nonstarters.

    PubMed

    McGowan, S J; McGowan, R W

    1991-12-01

    Confirming earlier research, starters in basketball were found to be less trusting than nonstarters among junior high school boys (n = 12) and girls (n = 18). Researchers should explore the etiology of these differences.

  16. Impulse noise generated by starter pistols

    PubMed Central

    Meinke, Deanna K.; Finan, Donald S.; Soendergaard, Jacob; Flamme, Gregory A.; Murphy, William J.; Lankford, James E.; Stewart, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study describes signals generated by .22 and .32 caliber starter pistols in the context of noise-induced hearing loss risk for sports officials and athletes. Design Acoustic comparison of impulses generated from typical .22 and .32 caliber starter pistols firing blanks were made to impulses generated from comparable firearms firing both blanks and live rounds. Acoustic characteristics are described in terms of directionality and distance from the shooter in a simulated outdoor running track. Metrics include peak sound pressure levels (SPL), A-weighted equivalent 8-hour level (LeqA8), and maximum permissible number of individual shots, or maximum permissible exposures (MPE) for the unprotected ear. Results Starter pistols produce peak SPLs above 140 dB. The numbers of MPEs are as few as five for the .22-caliber starter pistol, and somewhat higher (≤25) for the .32-caliber pistol. Conclusion The impulsive sounds produced by starter pistols correspond to MPE numbers that are unacceptably small for unprotected officials and others in the immediate vicinity of the shooter. At the distances included in this study, the risk to athletes appears to be low (when referencing exposure criteria for adults), but the sound associated with the starter pistol will contribute to the athlete’s overall noise exposure. PMID:23373743

  17. Effects of inoculation of commercial starter cultures on the quality and histamine accumulation in fermented sausages.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xinhui; Ren, Hongyang; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Yin; Bai, Ting; Li, Junxia; Zhu, Wenyou

    2015-02-01

    To meet the requirements of high-quality safe products, starter cultures are used to produce fermented sausages. The effects of 3 commercial starter cultures, namely SM-194, T-SPX, and SM-181, on histamine accumulation and quality parameters including microbial quality, pH, water activity, and total volatile base nitrogen, as well as the color and texture properties, were evaluated during the fermentation and ripening of fermented sausages. Although initial counts of Escherichia coli, Enterobacteriaceae, and Pseudomonas were similar in the 4 batches, the growth of these microorganisms was significantly inhibited (P < 0.05) in batches SM-194, T-SPX, and SM-181 throughout the fermentation and ripening period. The counts of E. coli, Enterobacteriaceae, and Pseudomonas increased to maximum levels of 3.89, 4.41, and 5.15 log10 colony forming units/g in the control sausages, respectively. At the end of ripening, the levels of histamine were 8.85, 0.32, 7.82, and 3.18 mg/kg for batches C, SM-194, T-SPX, and SM-181, respectively. The results revealed that commercial starter cultures, particularly starter cultures SM-194 and SM-181, made a great contribution to histamine reduction. In addition, batches inoculated with starter cultures showed a stronger acidification and lower level of total volatile base nitrogen than the control sample during production (P < 0.05). In conclusion, it seems that the inoculation of commercial starter cultures, particularly starter cultures SM-194 and SM-181, contributes to improving microbial quality, hygienic quality and food safety of fermented sausages.

  18. From Good to Great: Discussion Starter Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Great Teachers and Leaders, 2014

    2014-01-01

    In the report "From Good to Great: Exemplary Teachers Share Perspectives on Increasing Teacher Effectiveness across the Career Continuum," (See full report in ERIC at ED555657) National and State Teachers of the Year shared their views on what helped them become great teachers. This accompanying "Discussion Starter Tool" builds…

  19. 7 CFR 58.331 - Starter distillate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Specifications for Dairy Plants Approved for USDA Inspection and Grading Service 1 Quality Specifications for Raw Material § 58.331 Starter distillate. The refined flavor components when used to flavor butter and related products. It shall be of food grade quality, free of extraneous material and prepared in accordance...

  20. School Starters' Vision--An Educational Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilhelmsen, Gunvor B

    2016-01-01

    Although good visual capacity is essential for children's learning, we have limited understanding of the various visual functions among school starters. In order to extend this knowledge, a small-scale study was undertaken involving 24 preschool children age 5-6 years who completed a test battery originally designed for visual impairment…

  1. 7 CFR 58.415 - Starter vats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Starter vats. 58.415 Section 58.415 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS UNDER THE AGRICULTURAL MARKETING ACT OF 1946 AND THE...

  2. 7 CFR 58.406 - Starter facility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Starter facility. 58.406 Section 58.406 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS UNDER...

  3. 7 CFR 58.406 - Starter facility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Starter facility. 58.406 Section 58.406 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS UNDER...

  4. 7 CFR 58.406 - Starter facility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Starter facility. 58.406 Section 58.406 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS UNDER...

  5. 7 CFR 58.406 - Starter facility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Starter facility. 58.406 Section 58.406 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS UNDER...

  6. 21 CFR 184.1848 - Starter distillate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... this ingredient as generally recognized as safe (GRAS) as a direct human food ingredient is based upon... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Starter distillate. 184.1848 Section 184.1848 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD...

  7. 21 CFR 184.1848 - Starter distillate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... this ingredient as generally recognized as safe (GRAS) as a direct human food ingredient is based upon... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Starter distillate. 184.1848 Section 184.1848 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD...

  8. 21 CFR 184.1848 - Starter distillate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... this ingredient as generally recognized as safe (GRAS) as a direct human food ingredient is based upon... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Starter distillate. 184.1848 Section 184.1848 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD...

  9. 21 CFR 184.1848 - Starter distillate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... ingredient as generally recognized as safe (GRAS) as a direct human food ingredient is based upon the... agent and adjuvant as defined in § 170.3(o)(12) of this chapter. (2) The ingredient is used in food at... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Starter distillate. 184.1848 Section 184.1848...

  10. Dallas area rapid transit LRT starter line assessment study design. Final research report

    SciTech Connect

    Shunk, G.A.; Turnbull, K.F.; Lindquist, N.F.

    1995-03-01

    Light rail transit (LRT) systems have recently been implemented in a number of urban areas throughout the United States and additional projects are in various stages of planning and development. Questions have been raised concerning the impact of these systems on ridership levels, transit operating costs, regional mobility, land use, economic development, energy, air quality, congestion levels, and other factors. The implementation of the Dallas Area Rapid Transit (DART) LRT starter line provides the opportunity to assess the impact of an LRT system in a Southwestern city in the United States. This research project was undertaken to assist with the development of a comprehensive study design for assessing the effects of the DART LRT starter line. To accomplish this objective, a review was conducted of before-and-after studies of recent LRT, heavy rail, and high-occupancy vehicle (HOV) projects. The goals and objectives of the DART system were also reviewed and existing transportation-related data collection activities in the Dallas area were examined. This information was used to develop a preliminary study design for assessing the effects of the DART LRT starter line. This report documents the review of recent before-and-after studies and presents the preliminary study design for assessing the effects of the DART LRT starter line.

  11. Genomic insights into high exopolysaccharide-producing dairy starter bacterium Streptococcus thermophilus ASCC 1275

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Qinglong; Tun, Hein Min; Leung, Frederick Chi-Ching; Shah, Nagendra P.

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus thermophilus ASCC 1275 (ST 1275), a typical dairy starter bacterium, yields the highest known amount (~1,000 mg/L) of exopolysaccharide (EPS) in milk among the species of S. thermophilus. The addition of this starter in milk fermentation exhibited texture modifying properties for fermented dairy foods such as yogurt and cheese in the presence of EPS as its important metabolite. In this genomic study, a novel eps gene cluster for EPS assembly of repeating unit has been reported. It contains two-pair epsC-epsD genes which are assigned to determine the chain length of EPS. This also suggests this organism produces two types of EPSs – capsular and ropy EPS, as observed in our previous studies. Additionally, ST 1275 appears to exhibit effective proteolysis system and sophisticated stress response systems to stressful conditions, and has the highest number of four separate CRISPR/Cas loci. These features may be conducive to milk adaptation of this starter and against undesirable bacteriophage infections which leads to failure of milk fermentation. Insights into the genome of ST 1275 suggest that this strain may be a model high EPS-producing dairy starter. PMID:24827399

  12. Flow cytometric viability assessment of lactic acid bacteria starter cultures produced by fluidized bed drying.

    PubMed

    Bensch, Gerald; Rüger, Marc; Wassermann, Magdalena; Weinholz, Susann; Reichl, Udo; Cordes, Christiana

    2014-06-01

    For starter culture production, fluidized bed drying is an efficient and cost-effective alternative to the most frequently used freeze drying method. However, fluidized bed drying also poses damaging or lethal stress to bacteria. Therefore, investigation of impact of process variables and conditions on viability of starter cultures produced by fluidized bed drying is of major interest. Viability of bacteria is most frequently assessed by plate counting. While reproductive growth of cells can be characterized by the number of colony-forming units, it cannot provide the number of viable-but-nonculturable cells. However, in starter cultures, these cells still contribute to the fermentation during food production. In this study, flow cytometry was applied to assess viability of Lactobacillus plantarum starter cultures by membrane integrity analysis using SYBR®Green I and propidium iodide staining. The enumeration method established allowed for rapid, precise and sensitive determination of viable cell concentration, and was used to investigate effects of fluidized bed drying and storage on viability of L. plantarum. Drying caused substantial membrane damage on cells, most likely due to dehydration and oxidative stress. Nevertheless, high bacterial survival rates were obtained, and granulates contained in the average 2.7 × 10(9) viable cells/g. Furthermore, increased temperatures reduced viability of bacteria during storage. Differences in results of flow cytometry and plate counting suggested an occurrence of viable-but-nonculturable cells during storage. Overall, flow cytometric viability assessment is highly feasible for rapid routine in-process control in production of L. plantarum starter cultures, produced by fluidized bed drying.

  13. Starter for inductively coupled plasma tube

    DOEpatents

    Hull, Donald E.; Bieniewski, Thomas M.

    1988-01-01

    A starter assembly is provided for use with an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) tube to reliably initate a plasma at internal pressures above about 30 microns. A conductive probe is inserted within the inductor coil about the tube and insulated from the tube shield assembly. A capacitive circuit is arranged for momentarily connecting a high voltage radio-frequency generator to the probe while simultaneously energizing the coil. When the plasma is initiated the probe is disconnected from the generator and electrically connected to the shield assembly for operation.

  14. Starter for inductively coupled plasma tube

    DOEpatents

    Hull, D.E.; Bieniewski, T.M.

    1988-08-23

    A starter assembly is provided for use with an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) tube to reliably initiate a plasma at internal pressures above about 30 microns. A conductive probe is inserted within the inductor coil about the tube and insulated from the tube shield assembly. A capacitive circuit is arranged for momentarily connecting a high voltage radio-frequency generator to the probe while simultaneously energizing the coil. When the plasma is initiated the probe is disconnected from the generator and electrically connected to the shield assembly for operation. 1 fig.

  15. 7 CFR 58.330 - Butter starter cultures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Butter starter cultures. 58.330 Section 58.330..., GENERAL SPECIFICATIONS FOR APPROVED PLANTS AND STANDARDS FOR GRADES OF DAIRY PRODUCTS 1 General... Material § 58.330 Butter starter cultures. Harmless bacterial cultures when used in the development...

  16. 7 CFR 58.330 - Butter starter cultures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Butter starter cultures. 58.330 Section 58.330 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Material § 58.330 Butter starter cultures. Harmless bacterial cultures when used in the development...

  17. 7 CFR 58.330 - Butter starter cultures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Butter starter cultures. 58.330 Section 58.330 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Material § 58.330 Butter starter cultures. Harmless bacterial cultures when used in the development...

  18. 7 CFR 58.330 - Butter starter cultures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Butter starter cultures. 58.330 Section 58.330 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Material § 58.330 Butter starter cultures. Harmless bacterial cultures when used in the development...

  19. 7 CFR 58.330 - Butter starter cultures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Butter starter cultures. 58.330 Section 58.330 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Material § 58.330 Butter starter cultures. Harmless bacterial cultures when used in the development...

  20. Electronic starter device for fluorescent lamps. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-06-01

    Due to silicon supplier failures to produce the 03/04 triac silicon as specified in the original proposal, the direction of the starter program was migrated to use available off the shelf power semiconductors. This had unexpected positive side effects including a reduction in component price, improved quality, and the refocus of engineering efforts to concentrate on the Super ASIC core technology. The starter program has begun shipments employing this new architecture, and is being well received both in the US and abroad. In its present form, the starter meets original cost projections within 20%. Work is continuing on the 0.8 micron ASIC, which will allow for the starter to sell below $1.00 in volume. Even at the slightly higher price, interest is strong in replacing the low performance glow starter for small fluorescent applications with a high performance alternative.

  1. Starter cultures for cereal based foods.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Markus J

    2014-02-01

    Fermented cereals play a significant role in human nutrition in all parts of the world where cereals grow. These fermentations are started spontaneously or there have been traditional techniques developed in order to keep starter cultures for these processes alive. With the growing impact of industrial microbiology during 20th century this traditional starter culture propagation was replaced often, especially in the dairy industry, by the use of pure, frozen or freeze-dried cultures grown on microbial media. In contrast to the production of ethanol from cereals, in sourdough a pasteurization step before inoculation is avoided due to gelatinization of starch and inactivation of endogenous enzymes. Therefore cultures must be competitive to the relatively high microbial load of the cereal raw materials and well adapted to the specific ecology determined by the kind of cereal and the process conditions. Less adapted cultures could be used, but then the process of back-slopping of cultures is limited. Although cereal fermentations take the biggest volume among fermented foods, only for sourdoughs commercial cultures are available.

  2. Production of wheat bread without preservatives using sourdough starters

    PubMed Central

    Denkova, Rositsa; Ilieva, Svetla; Denkova, Zapryana; Georgieva, Ljubka; Yordanova, Mariya; Nikolova, Dilyana; Evstatieva, Yana

    2014-01-01

    In order for the beneficial effects of sourdough application in breadmaking to take place a proper selection of lactic acid bacteria species and strains, an appropriate technology and effective control of the purity and activity of the selected cultures. Four symbiotic starters for sourdough for the production of bread were developed and probated in a production laboratory using the selected strains Lactobacillus brevis LBRZ7, L. buchneri LBRZ6, L. plantarum X2, L. paracasei RN5, L. sanfranciscensis R and L. fermentum LBRH10 and the probiotic strain Propionibacterium freudenreichii ssp. shermanii NBIMCC 327. The starter sourdoughs that include Propionibacterium freudenreichii ssp. shermanii NBIMCC 327 had greater antimicrobial activity against saprophytic microorganisms: Bacillus subtilis, B. mesentericus, Aspergillus niger, Penicillium sp. and Rhizopus sp., but none of them inhibited the growth of bakery yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae. It was established that in order to prevent bacterial spoilage 10% of the selected starter sourdoughs had to be added in the breadmaking process, while for prevention of mold spoilage the necessary amount of starter sourdough had to be between 15% and 20%.The application of the developed starters for the production of wheat bread guarantees longer shelf life and no adverse alterations in the features of the final bread. PMID:26019574

  3. Use of Protein Hydrolysates in Industrial Starter Culture Fermentations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ummadi, Madhavi (Soni); Curic-Bawden, Mirjana

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have been used as starter cultures for fermenting foods long before the importance of microorganisms were recognized. The most important group of LAB are the lactococci, lactobacilli, streptococci, and pediococci. Additionally, bifidobacteria have been included as a probiotic, providing added value to the product. Since the genera involved are so diverse, the nutritional requirements (energy, carbon and nitrogen sources) differ significantly between and within species. Designing an optimum fermentation medium for production of active and vigorous LAB starter cultures and probiotics requires selecting the right raw ingredients, especially protein hydrolysates that can provide adequate nutrients for growth and viability. This chapter attempts to describe the application of various commercial protein hydrolysates used for production of dairy and meat starter cultures, with special emphasis on meeting the nitrogen requirements of industrially important LAB species.

  4. Biodiversity of Lactobacillus helveticus bacteriophages isolated from cheese whey starters.

    PubMed

    Zago, Miriam; Bonvini, Barbara; Rossetti, Lia; Meucci, Aurora; Giraffa, Giorgio; Carminati, Domenico

    2015-05-01

    Twenty-one Lactobacillus helveticus bacteriophages, 18 isolated from different cheese whey starters and three from CNRZ collection, were phenotypically and genetically characterised. A biodiversity between phages was evidenced both by host range and molecular (RAPD-PCR) typing. A more detailed characterisation of six phages showed similar structural protein profiles and a relevant genetic biodiversity, as shown by restriction enzyme analysis of total DNA. Latent period, burst time and burst size data evidenced that phages were active and virulent. Overall, data highlighted the biodiversity of Lb. helveticus phages isolated from cheese whey starters, which were confirmed to be one of the most common phage contamination source in dairy factories. More research is required to further unravel the ecological role of Lb. helveticus phages and to evaluate their impact on the dairy fermentation processes where whey starter cultures are used.

  5. Biodiversity of Lactobacillus helveticus bacteriophages isolated from cheese whey starters.

    PubMed

    Zago, Miriam; Bonvini, Barbara; Rossetti, Lia; Meucci, Aurora; Giraffa, Giorgio; Carminati, Domenico

    2015-05-01

    Twenty-one Lactobacillus helveticus bacteriophages, 18 isolated from different cheese whey starters and three from CNRZ collection, were phenotypically and genetically characterised. A biodiversity between phages was evidenced both by host range and molecular (RAPD-PCR) typing. A more detailed characterisation of six phages showed similar structural protein profiles and a relevant genetic biodiversity, as shown by restriction enzyme analysis of total DNA. Latent period, burst time and burst size data evidenced that phages were active and virulent. Overall, data highlighted the biodiversity of Lb. helveticus phages isolated from cheese whey starters, which were confirmed to be one of the most common phage contamination source in dairy factories. More research is required to further unravel the ecological role of Lb. helveticus phages and to evaluate their impact on the dairy fermentation processes where whey starter cultures are used. PMID:25827218

  6. 30 CFR 75.819 - Motor-starter enclosures; barriers and interlocks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Motor-starter enclosures; barriers and...-Voltage Distribution High-Voltage Longwalls § 75.819 Motor-starter enclosures; barriers and interlocks. Compartment separation and cover interlock switches for motor-starter enclosures must be maintained...

  7. 30 CFR 75.819 - Motor-starter enclosures; barriers and interlocks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Motor-starter enclosures; barriers and...-Voltage Distribution High-Voltage Longwalls § 75.819 Motor-starter enclosures; barriers and interlocks. Compartment separation and cover interlock switches for motor-starter enclosures must be maintained...

  8. Performance Analysis of Apollo Navigational Starter Routine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivanov, Stoyan I.; Holt, Greg

    2010-01-01

    The focus of this project is to recreate and analyze the effectiveness of the original Apollo Starter Routine (ASR) which was used to generate the state vector of the Apollo spacecraft based on a series of radiometric observations. The original Apollo navigation software is unavailable in a modern programming language and the original coding has not been preserved. This necessitates its recreation using the original software documentation. Space Shuttle navigation software does not typically use the ASR or an algorithm like it since the Shuttle s state vector is easily deduced from GPS information or other sources. However, this tactic will be ineffective when trying to determine the state vector of a craft approaching, departing or in orbit around the Moon since the GPS network faces the surface of the Earth, not outer space. The recreation of the ASR from the original documentation is therefore vital as a simulation baseline for the navigation software under development for the Constellation program. The algorithms that make up the ASR will be extracted from the original documentation and adapted for and then implemented in a modern programming language; the majority of it will be coded in Matlab. The ASR s effectiveness will then be tested using simulated tracking data. The ability of the ASR to handle realistically noisy data and the accuracy with which it generates state vectors were analyzed. The ASR proved to be robust enough to process data with range and angle noise as large as 10,000 meters and 10(exp -6) radians together and 300,000 meters and 5x10(exp -4) radians separately at Lunar distances. The ASR was able to handle marginally more noise at distances closer to the Earth where the angle noise was less significant. The ASR is capable of effectively processing 40-80 data points gathered at a rate of one per 20 seconds at close Earth orbit and up to 28-40 data points gathered at a rate of one per minute at distant Earth orbit and Lunar orbit.

  9. Sodium reduction in starter-free Queso Fresco

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Creating lower sodium Queso Fresco (QF) for health conscious consumers is a challenge when this high-moisture, higher pH, starter-free cheese relies on high salt levels to control the microflora and to obtain its signature salty taste. In phase 1, QF made from pasteurized, homogenized bovine milk wi...

  10. Functional properties of selected starter cultures for sour maize bread.

    PubMed

    Edema, Mojisola O; Sanni, Abiodun I

    2008-06-01

    This paper focuses on the functional properties of maize sour-dough microflora selected and tested for their use as starter cultures for sour maize bread. Lactic acid bacteria and yeasts isolated from spontaneously fermented maize dough were selected based on dominance during fermentation and presence at the end of fermentation. Functional properties examined included acidification, leavening and production of some antimicrobial compounds in the fermenting matrix. The organisms previously identified as Lactobacillus plantarum, Lb. brevis, Lb. fermentum, Lb. acidophilus, Pediococcus acidilactici, Leuconostoc mesenteroides and Leuconostoc dextranicum and Saccharomyces cerevisiae were used singly and as mixed cultures in the fermentation (fermentation time: 12h at 28+/-2 degrees C) of maize meal (particle size >0.2mm). The pH fell from an initial value of 5.62-3.05 in maize meals fermented with Lb. plantarum; 4.37 in L. dextranicum+S. cerevisiae compared with the value for the control (no starter) of 4.54. Significant differences (P starters were inoculated compared with the control (no starter) except for leavening. Bivariate correlations at 0.01 levels (two-tailed) showed that significant correlations existed among pH and production of antimicrobial compounds in the fermenting meals, the highest correlation being between production of diacetyl and acid (0.694), a positive correlation indicating that production of both antimicrobial compounds increase together with time. Antimicrobial activities of the fermented maize dough were confirmed by their abilities to inhibit the growth of Salmonella typhi, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Aspergillus flavus from an initial inoculum concentration of 7 log cfu ml(-1)) for test bacteria and zone of inhibition of up to 1.33 cm for aflatoxigenic A. flavus. The findings of this study form a database for further studies on the

  11. Grana Padano cheese whey starters: microbial composition and strain distribution.

    PubMed

    Rossetti, Lia; Fornasari, Maria Emanuela; Gatti, Monica; Lazzi, Camilla; Neviani, Erasmo; Giraffa, Giorgio

    2008-09-30

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the species composition and the genotypic strain heterogeneity of dominant lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolated from whey starter cultures used to manufacture Grana Padano cheese. Twenty-four Grana Padano cheese whey starters collected from dairies located over a wide geographic production area in the north of Italy were analyzed. Total thermophilic LAB streptococci and lactobacilli were quantified by agar plate counting. Population structure of the dominant and metabolically active LAB species present in the starters was profiled by reverse transcriptase, length heterogeneity-PCR (RT-LH-PCR), a culture-independent technique successfully applied to study whey starter ecosystems. The dominant bacterial species were Lactobacillus helveticus, Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis, Streptococcus thermophilus, and Lactobacillus fermentum. Diversity in the species composition allowed the whey cultures to be grouped into four main typologies, the one containing L. helveticus, L. delbrueckii subsp. lactis, and S. thermophilus being the most frequent one (45% of the cultures analyzed), followed by that containing only the two lactobacilli (40%). Only a minor fraction of the cultures contained L. helveticus alone (4%) or all the four LAB species (11%). Five hundred and twelve strains were isolated from the 24 cultures and identified by M13-PCR fingerprinting coupled with 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Most of the strains were L. helveticus (190 strains; 37% of the total), L delbrueckii subsp. lactis (90 strains; 18%) and S. thermophilus (215 strains; 42%). This result was in good agreement with the qualitative whey starter composition observed by RT-LH-PCR. M13-PCR fingerprinting indicated a markedly low infra-species diversity, i.e. the same biotypes were often found in more than one culture. The distribution of the biotypes into the different cultures was mainly dairy plant-specific rather than correlated with the different production areas

  12. Effect of passion fruit seed meal on growth performance, carcass, and blood characteristics in starter pigs.

    PubMed

    Fachinello, Marcelise Regina; Pozza, Paulo Cesar; Moreira, Ivan; Carvalho, Paulo Levi Oliveira; Castilha, Leandro Dalcin; Pasquetti, Tiago Junior; Esteves, Lucas Antonio Costa; Huepa, Laura Marcela Diaz

    2015-10-01

    Two experiments were carried out in Paraná State, Brazil, to evaluate the nutritional value of passion fruit seed meal (PFM) and to study the effect of PFM on growth performance, carcass, and blood characteristics in starter pigs (Topigs 20 × Tybor). In experiment 1, 25 castrated males, averaging 19.1-kg body weight, were individually fed in a completely randomized block design, consisting of five treatments and five replicates and an experimental period that lasted 14 days. In experiment 2, a total of 60 pigs (30 females and 30 castrated males) were distributed in a randomized block design with five treatments, six replications, and two animals per experimental unit and 90 days of experimentation. For both experiments, the same PFM inclusion rates were used in the experimental diets, namely, 0, 4, 8, 12, and 16 %. The metabolizable energy of PFM was estimated to be 15.0 MJ/kg. Inclusion of PFM at any level did not affect average daily gain, daily feed intake, feed/gain ratio, backfat thickness, loin depth, and plasma or blood components. It is concluded that passion fruit seed meal for swine in the starting phase can be added at a rate of up to 16 % in the diet without any negative effects on growth performance, carcass, and blood characteristics in starter commercial line pigs.

  13. Development of a dynamometer for an integrated-starter-generator (ISG) motor used in electric vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zai-zhou; Zhang, Cheng-ning; Song, Qiang; Zhang, Chun-xiang

    2008-12-01

    Hybrid-Electric Vehicle (HEV) which combined the electric motor with auxiliary power unit in a car driven is introduced. Characteristic of Hybrid-Electric Vehicle are different from the other vehicle, in the structure of Hybrid-Electric Vehicle, Integrated Starter Generator (ISG) electrical system can achieve high efficient performance of driving and generating electricity simultaneously. These systems adopt the sum torque through engine and generator, the motor connected transmission through engine. According to the requirements of different conditions, the torque of motor and transmission are compound in various forms to achieve optimal driving efficiency.This study developed a dynamometer to measure the relationship between locked torques with temperature rises of an Integrated Starter Generator motor used in electrical vehicles. The dynamometer adopted an AC motor to obtain the relationship between drive and load functions, which developed in this study can perform real-time measurements and storage of measured data obtained from the dynamometer. Experiments for measuring temperature rise of ISG motor were performed at three different conditions, namely 56 Nm locked rotor torques and 18.8A locked rotor current; 57.1Nm constant torque at 1050rpm; constant power with 14.3Nm and 4050rpm, respectively. Based on the theory of temperature rise, the temperature rises of motor are 14K, 33.1K, and 16.01K for the tested cases respectively. Measured results show that the performance of motor system is satisfied with the design.

  14. Evolutionary engineering to enhance starter culture performance in food fermentations.

    PubMed

    Bachmann, Herwig; Pronk, Jack T; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Teusink, Bas

    2015-04-01

    Microbial starter cultures are essential for consistent product quality and functional properties such as flavor, texture, pH or the alcohol content of various fermented foods. Strain improvement programs to achieve desired properties in starter cultures are diverse, but developments in next-generation sequencing lead to an increased interest in evolutionary engineering of desired phenotypes. We here discuss recent developments of strain selection protocols and how computational approaches can assist such experimental design. Furthermore the analysis of evolved phenotypes and possibilities with complex consortia are highlighted. Studies carried out with mainly yeast and lactic acid bacteria demonstrate the power of evolutionary engineering to deliver strains with novel phenotypes as well as insight into underlying mechanisms.

  15. [Peak sound pressure levels of gunshots from starter's pistols].

    PubMed

    Rothschild, M A; Dieker, L; Prante, H; Maschke, C

    1998-12-01

    Starter's pistols are often bought for self-defense, but can also be used for criminal activities (e.g. assaults, etc.). When a starter's pistol is loaded with blank cartridges and is fired, a powerful shooting noise results. The level of the noise produced is high enough to cause acoustic trauma. For legal examinations and giving an expert opinion further information is needed about the power of such noise. We examined how high peak sound pressure levels were of the gunshots of blank cartridges and whether there existed any directional characteristics from the noise emissions. In all, 15 different models of starter's pistols of 8 different calibres were examined. In addition to blank cartridges, 8 mm tear gas cartridges were also examined. Four transducers were situated in the horizontal plane around the muzzle: 0 degree (shooting direction), 45 degrees, 90 degrees, and 180 degrees (towards the firer). The distances between the transducers and the muzzle were 25 cm, 50 cm, 100 cm, and 200 cm. At a distance of 1 m and in the 0 degree shooting direction the peak sound pressure levels of nearly all weapons tested exceeded 160 dB. At a shooting distance of 25 cm the peak sound pressure levels reached 181 dB. In addition, we observed a directional characteristic concerning the emission of noise: pistols produced higher peak sound pressure levels to the front than backwards towards the firer. PMID:10023593

  16. Microbial ecosystems of traditional fermented meat products: The importance of indigenous starters.

    PubMed

    Talon, R; Leroy, S; Lebert, I

    2007-09-01

    This paper reviews the diversity of microbiota, both in the environment and in traditional fermented European sausages. The environments of processing units were colonised at variable levels by resident spoilage and technological microbiota, with sporadic contamination by pathogenic microbiota. Several critical points were identified such as the machines, the tables and the knives - knowledge crucial for the improvement of cleaning and disinfecting practices. Traditionally fermented sausages generally did not present a sanitary risk. The great diversity of lactic acid bacteria and staphylococci was linked to manufacturing practices. Development of indigenous starters is very promising because it enables sausages to be produced with both high sanitary and sensory qualities. Our increasing knowledge of the genomes of technological bacteria will allow a better understanding of their physiology in sausages.

  17. Functional implications of the microbial community structure of undefined mesophilic starter cultures

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This review describes the recent advances made in the studies of the microbial community of complex and undefined cheese starter cultures. We report on work related to the composition of the cultures at the level of genetic lineages, on the presence and activity of bacteriophages and on the population dynamics during cheese making and during starter culture propagation. Furthermore, the link between starter composition and starter functionality will be discussed. Finally, recent advances in predictive metabolic modelling of the multi-strain cultures will be discussed in the context of microbe-microbe interactions. PMID:25185941

  18. Inhibitory activity of a nisin-producing starter culture on Listeria innocua in raw ewes milk Manchego cheese.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, E; Gaya, P; Nuñez, M; Medina, M

    1998-01-01

    The inhibitory activity of nisin-producing Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis ESI 515 on the survival of Listeria innocua during ripening of raw ewes milk Manchego cheese was investigated. After 60 days of ripening, counts of L. innocua in cheese were 4.08 log units lower than the control when Lc. lactis subsp. lactis ESI 515 was used as a single-strain starter. Nisin activity was detected in cheeses manufactured with Lc. lactis subsp. lactis ESI 515 throughout the ripening period. PMID:9580244

  19. Effects on Escherichia coli O157:H7 and meat starter cultures of bovine lactoferrin in broth and microencapsulated lactoferrin in dry sausage batters.

    PubMed

    Al-Nabulsi, Anas A; Holley, Richard A

    2007-01-01

    The effects of lactoferrin (LF) alone or with various chelating agents on the growth of 5 strains of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and 7 meat starter cultures were evaluated. E.coli O157:H7 and starter cultures were grown at 13 or 26 degrees C in Lauria (LB) or All Purpose Tween (APT) broths, respectively, with both broths being supplemented with 2.9% NaCl. LF alone prevented the growth of E. coli O157:H7 strains 0627 and 0628 but other strains grew. The antimicrobial effectiveness of LF was enhanced by EDTA but LF alone did not affect the growth of meat starter cultures in broth. However, when LF plus EDTA and sodium bicarbonate (SB) were used the growth of all meat starter cultures except Lactobacillus curvatus was reduced. During dry sausage manufacture with L. curvatus and Staphylococcus carnosus starter cultures the effects of LF, unencapsulated or microencapsulated in paste-like and dried powder forms, in sausage batters with or without EDTA and SB, on the viability of E. coli O157:H7 were examined. The reduction of E. coli O157:H7 during sausage manufacture was significantly enhanced (p<0.05) by all LF treatments. The largest reduction (4.2 log units) was obtained with unencapsulated LF. However, some of the apparent reduction in E.coli O157:H7 numbers with all treatments was due to cell injury rather than lethality, since significantly greater numbers were recovered on APT agar overlaid with the selective medium cefixime-tellurite Sorbitol McConkey agar (ct-SMAC) than on ct-SMAC alone. The narrow spectrum of LF activity and induction of injury rather than inactivation of E. coli O157:H7 limit the effectiveness of this agent against the pathogen in fermented meats.

  20. Construction monitoring activities in the ESF starter tunnel

    SciTech Connect

    Pott, J.; Carlisle, S.

    1994-05-01

    In situ design verification activities am being conducted in the North Ramp Starter Tunnel of the Yucca Mountain Project Exploratory Studies Facility. These activities include: monitoring the peak particle velocities and evaluating the damage to the rock mass associated with construction blasting, assessing the rock mass quality surrounding the tunnel, monitoring the performance of the installed ground support, and monitoring the stability of the tunnel. In this paper, examples of the data that have been collected and preliminary conclusions from the data are presented.

  1. Suitability of a new mixed-strain starter for manufacturing uncooked raw ewe's milk cheeses.

    PubMed

    Feutry, Fabienne; Torre, Paloma; Arana, Ines; Garcia, Susana; Pérez Elortondo, Francisco J; Berthier, Françoise

    2016-06-01

    Most raw milk Ossau-Iraty cheeses are currently manufactured on-farm using the same commercial streptococcal-lactococcal starter (S1). One way to enhance the microbial diversity that gives raw milk its advantages for cheese-making is to formulate new starters combining diverse, characterized strains. A new starter (OI) combining 6 raw milk strains of lactococci, recently isolated and characterized, was tested in parallel with the current starter by making 12 Ossau-Iraty raw milk cheeses at 3 farmhouses under the conditions prevailing at each farm. Compliance of the sensory characteristics with those expected by the Ossau-Iraty professionals, physicochemical parameters and coliforms were quantified at key manufacturing steps. The new starter OI gave cheeses having proper compliance but having lower compliance than the S1 cheeses under most manufacturing conditions, while managing coliform levels equally well as starter S1. This lower compliance relied more on the absence of Streptococcus thermophilus in starter OI, than on the nature of the lactoccocal strains present in starter OI. The study also shows that variations in 5 technological parameters during the first day of manufacture, within the range of values applied in the 3 farmhouses, are powerful tools for diversifying the scores for the sensory characteristics investigated. PMID:26919818

  2. 49 CFR 571.102 - Standard No. 102; Transmission shift position sequence, starter interlock, and transmission...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... position sequence, a starter interlock, and for a braking effect of automatic transmissions, to reduce the... 49 Transportation 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Standard No. 102; Transmission shift position sequence, starter interlock, and transmission braking effect. 571.102 Section 571.102 Transportation...

  3. Suitability of a new mixed-strain starter for manufacturing uncooked raw ewe's milk cheeses.

    PubMed

    Feutry, Fabienne; Torre, Paloma; Arana, Ines; Garcia, Susana; Pérez Elortondo, Francisco J; Berthier, Françoise

    2016-06-01

    Most raw milk Ossau-Iraty cheeses are currently manufactured on-farm using the same commercial streptococcal-lactococcal starter (S1). One way to enhance the microbial diversity that gives raw milk its advantages for cheese-making is to formulate new starters combining diverse, characterized strains. A new starter (OI) combining 6 raw milk strains of lactococci, recently isolated and characterized, was tested in parallel with the current starter by making 12 Ossau-Iraty raw milk cheeses at 3 farmhouses under the conditions prevailing at each farm. Compliance of the sensory characteristics with those expected by the Ossau-Iraty professionals, physicochemical parameters and coliforms were quantified at key manufacturing steps. The new starter OI gave cheeses having proper compliance but having lower compliance than the S1 cheeses under most manufacturing conditions, while managing coliform levels equally well as starter S1. This lower compliance relied more on the absence of Streptococcus thermophilus in starter OI, than on the nature of the lactoccocal strains present in starter OI. The study also shows that variations in 5 technological parameters during the first day of manufacture, within the range of values applied in the 3 farmhouses, are powerful tools for diversifying the scores for the sensory characteristics investigated.

  4. Characterization of a Leuconostoc bacteriophage infecting flavor producers of cheese starter cultures.

    PubMed

    Kleppen, Hans Petter; Nes, Ingolf F; Holo, Helge

    2012-09-01

    Dairy siphovirus φLmd1, which infects starter culture isolate Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. dextranicum A1, showed resistance to pasteurization and was able to grow on 3 of the 4 commercial starter cultures tested. Its 26,201-bp genome was similar to that of Leuconostoc phage of vegetable origin but not to those of dairy phages infecting Lactococcus.

  5. Fluorescent Method for Monitoring Cheese Starter Permeabilization and Lysis

    PubMed Central

    Bunthof, Christine J.; van Schalkwijk, Saskia; Meijer, Wilco; Abee, Tjakko; Hugenholtz, Jeroen

    2001-01-01

    A fluorescence method to monitor lysis of cheese starter bacteria using dual staining with the LIVE/DEAD BacLight bacterial viability kit is described. This kit combines membrane-permeant green fluorescent nucleic acid dye SYTO 9 and membrane-impermeant red fluorescent nucleic acid dye propidium iodide (PI), staining damaged membrane cells fluorescent red and intact cells fluorescent green. For evaluation of the fluorescence method, cells of Lactococcus lactis MG1363 were incubated under different conditions and subsequently labeled with SYTO 9 and PI and analyzed by flow cytometry and epifluorescence microscopy. Lysis was induced by treatment with cell wall-hydrolyzing enzyme mutanolysin. Cheese conditions were mimicked by incubating cells in a buffer with high protein, potassium, and magnesium, which stabilizes the cells. Under nonstabilizing conditions a high concentration of mutanolysin caused complete disruption of the cells. This resulted in a decrease in the total number of cells and release of cytoplasmic enzyme lactate dehydrogenase. In the stabilizing buffer, mutanolysin caused membrane damage as well but the cells disintegrated at a much lower rate. Stabilizing buffer supported permeabilized cells, as indicated by a high number of PI-labeled cells. In addition, permeable cells did not release intracellular aminopeptidase N, but increased enzyme activity was observed with the externally added and nonpermeable peptide substrate lysyl-p-nitroanilide. Finally, with these stains and confocal scanning laser microscopy the permeabilization of starter cells in cheese could be analyzed. PMID:11526032

  6. Commercial bacterial starter cultures for fermented foods of the future.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Egon Bech

    2002-09-15

    Starter cultures for fermented foods are today developed mainly by design rather than by screening. The design principles are based on knowledge of bacterial metabolism and physiology as well as on the interaction with the food product. In the genomics era, we will obtain a wealth of data making design on a rational basis even simpler. The design tools available are food grade tools for genetic, metabolic and protein engineering and an increased use of laboratory automation and high throughput screening methods. The large body of new data will influence the future patterns of regulation. It is currently difficult to predict in what direction the future regulatory requirements will influence innovation in the food industry. It can either become a promoting force for the practical use of biotechnology to make better and safer products, or it can be limiting the use of starter cultures to a few strains with official approval. Successful cultures based on modern technology is expected to be launched in the areas of: probiotics, bioprotection, general improvement of yield and performance for the existing culture market and probably the introduction of cultures for fermenting other food products. A scientific basis for dramatic innovations that could transform the culture industry is currently being established.

  7. Selection of functional lactic acid bacteria as starter cultures for the fermentation of Korean leek (Allium tuberosum Rottler ex Sprengel.).

    PubMed

    Yang, Jaesik; Ji, Yosep; Park, Hyunjoon; Lee, Jieun; Park, Soyoung; Yeo, Soyoung; Shin, Hyunkil; Holzapfel, Wilhelm H

    2014-11-17

    The purpose of this research was to find safe and suitable starter cultures for the fermentation of Korean leek (Allium tuberosum Rottler), also known as garlic chives or Oriental garlic. This traditional herb has several functional properties and a strong flavour; its leaves are used as food material. Eighteen strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were isolated from well-fermented leek kimchi. Controlled fermentation of the leek leaves was conducted with 2 strains (Weissella confusa LK4 and Lactobacillus plantarum LK8), selected as potential starter cultures on the basis of their safety properties, and on the pH, total titratable acidity (TTA), and viable cell numbers [colony forming units (CFUml(-1))] achieved during the fermentation. Microbial dynamics was also followed during fermentation by using PCR-DGGE (Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis) on DNA level. To analyse bioactive compounds such as thiols and allicin (diallyl thiosulfinates), the total flavonoid and polyphenolic contents were determined by colorimetric methods. Functional properties were assessed on the basis of anti-oxidative capacities by determining the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical-scavenging effect, and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP). W. confusa LK4 rapidly increased during the first stage of leek fermentation, and was mainly responsible for accelerated fermentation during the early period in contrast to L. plantarum LK8, a stronger acid producer during the later stages of fermentation. After 48 h fermentation, leeks fermented with W. confusa LK4 showed the highest radical scavenging effects and reducing ability. The detectable amount of allicin of fermented leeks decreased relative to the change in pH, whereas the concentration of thiols significantly increased. Total flavonoid and poly-phenolic contents changed during fermentation and showed correlation with anti-oxidant effects. We therefore suggest the suitability of W. confusa LK4 as a potential starter

  8. The Use of Lactic Acid Bacteria Starter Cultures during the Processing of Fermented Cereal-based Foods in West Africa: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Soro-Yao, Amenan Anastasie; Brou, Kouakou; Amani, Georges; Thonart, Philippe; Djè, Koffi Marcelin

    2014-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are the primary microorganisms used to ferment maize-, sorghum- or millet-based foods that are processed in West Africa. Fermentation contributes to desirable changes in taste, flavour, acidity, digestibility and texture in gruels (ogi, baca, dalaki), doughs (agidi, banku, komé) or steam-cooked granulated products (arraw, ciacry, dégué). Similar to other fermented cereal foods that are available in Africa, these products suffer from inconsistent quality. The use of LAB starter cultures during cereal dough fermentation is a subject of increasing interest in efforts to standardise this step and guaranty product uniformity. However, their use by small-scale processing units or small agro-food industrial enterprises is still limited. This review aims to illustrate and discuss major issues that influence the use of LAB starter cultures during the processing of fermented cereal foods in West Africa. PMID:27073601

  9. Bacterial and fungal diversity in the starter production process of Fen liquor, a traditional Chinese liquor.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Ran; Ma, En-Bo; Yan, Liang-Zhen; Meng, Han; Du, Xiao-Wei; Quan, Zhe-Xue

    2013-08-01

    Fermented foods and beverages are important parts of human diet. Fen liquor, a Chinese liquor is a fermented beverage that uses a traditional fermentation process. Starters are the main microbial source and also provide nutrients for microorganisms during fermentation. In this study, starters of Fen liquor were produced through a complex traditional fermentation process. To investigate the community structure and the composition of microorganisms in the starter production process, bacterial 16S rRNA and fungal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions were sequenced using clone libraries and pyrosequencing, respectively. There was much higher diversity among the bacteria than among the fungi in the starter production process. Bacteria on the surface of the starters belonged mostly to the Lactobacillaceae family, while members of the Bacillacae family were dominant in the interior of the samples that lacked access to air and water. In the fungi population, diversity was high only in the raw material. In all other samples, nearly all of the fungal sequences were from Pichia kudriavzevii, a member of the Saccharomycetaceae family. Nearly all samples showed similar fungal community structures, indicating that there was little change in the fungal community. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to reveal the whole process of the starter production of Chinese traditional liquor. The findings obtained in this study provide new insights into understanding the composition of the microbial community during the traditional Chinese liquor starter production process and information about the production process control and monitoring. PMID:23990293

  10. Control of Biogenic Amines in Fermented Sausages: Role of Starter Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Latorre-Moratalla, M.L.; Bover-Cid, Sara; Veciana-Nogués, M.T.; Vidal-Carou, M.C.

    2012-01-01

    Biogenic amines show biological activity and exert undesirable physiological effects when absorbed at high concentrations. Biogenic amines are mainly formed by microbial decarboxylation of amino acids and thus are usually present in a wide range of foods, fermented sausages being one of the major biogenic amine sources. The use of selected starter cultures is one of the best technological measures to control aminogenesis during meat fermentation. Although with variable effectiveness, several works show the ability of some starters to render biogenic amine-free sausages. In this paper, the effect of different starter culture is reviewed and the factors determining their performance discussed. PMID:22586423

  11. Traditionally produced sauerkraut as source of autochthonous functional starter cultures.

    PubMed

    Beganović, Jasna; Kos, Blaženka; Leboš Pavunc, Andreja; Uroić, Ksenija; Jokić, Mladen; Šušković, Jagoda

    2014-01-01

    Spontaneous sauerkraut fermentation was performed at industrial scale in "Prehrana Inc.", Varaždin, in order to select autochthonous lactic acid bacteria (LAB) which were evaluated according probiotic criteria and tested for their capacity as probiotic starter cultures. At the end of the spontaneous sauerkraut fermentation, total LAB counts reached 9.0×10(5) CFU/ml. This underlines that the need for addition of the well characterised probiotic cultures, in appropriate viable cell counts, would be valuable in probiotic sauerkraut production. Phenotypic characterisation through API 50 CHL and SDS-PAGE of cell protein patterns revealed that Lactobacillus plantarum is predominant LAB strain in homofermentative phase of fermentation. Autochthonous LAB isolates SF1, SF2, SF4, SF9 and SF15 were selected based on the survival in in vitro gastrointestinal tract conditions. RAPD fingerprints indicated that the selected autochthonous LAB were distinct from one another. All of the strains efficiently inhibited the growth of indicator strains and satisfied technological properties such as acidification rate, tolerance to NaCl and viability during freeze-drying. Strains Lb. paraplantarum SF9 and Lb. brevis SF15, identified by AFLP DNA fingerprints, have shown the best properties to be applied as probiotic starter cultures, because of their highest adhesion to Caco-2 cells and expression of specific, protective S-layer proteins of 45 kDa in size. With addition of these strains, probiotic attribute of the sauerkraut will be achieved, including health promoting, nutritional, technological and economic advantages in large scale industrial sauerkraut production. PMID:24797236

  12. Use of a Genetically Enhanced, Pediocin-Producing Starter Culture, Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis MM217, To Control Listeria monocytogenes in Cheddar Cheese

    PubMed Central

    Buyong, Nurliza; Kok, Jan; Luchansky, John B.

    1998-01-01

    Cheddar cheese was prepared with Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis MM217, a starter culture which contains pMC117 coding for pediocin PA-1. About 75 liters of pasteurized milk (containing ca. 3.6% fat) was inoculated with strain MM217 (ca. 106 CFU per ml) and a mixture of three Listeria monocytogenes strains (ca. 103 CFU per ml). The viability of the pathogen and the activity of pediocin in the cheese were monitored at appropriate intervals throughout the manufacturing process and during ripening at 8°C for 6 months. In control cheese made with the isogenic, non-pediocin-producing starter culture L. lactis subsp. lactis MM210, the counts of the pathogen increased to about 107 CFU per g after 2 weeks of ripening and then gradually decreased to about 103 CFU per g after 6 months. In the experimental cheese made with strain MM217, the counts of L. monocytogenes decreased to 102 CFU per g within 1 week of ripening and then decreased to about 10 CFU per g within 3 months. The average titer of pediocin in the experimental cheese decreased from approximately 64,000 arbitrary units (AU) per g after 1 day to 2,000 AU per g after 6 months. No pediocin activity (<200 AU per g) was detected in the control cheese. Also, the presence of pMC117 in strain MM217 did not alter the cheese-making quality of the starter culture, as the rates of acid production, the pH values, and the levels of moisture, NaCl, and fat of the control cheese and the experimental cheese were similar. Our data revealed that pediocin-producing starter cultures have significant potential for protecting natural cheese against L. monocytogenes. PMID:9835572

  13. 30 CFR 75.819 - Motor-starter enclosures; barriers and interlocks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Underground High-Voltage Distribution High-Voltage Longwalls § 75.819 Motor-starter enclosures; barriers and...

  14. 30 CFR 75.819 - Motor-starter enclosures; barriers and interlocks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Underground High-Voltage Distribution High-Voltage Longwalls § 75.819 Motor-starter enclosures; barriers and...

  15. 30 CFR 75.819 - Motor-starter enclosures; barriers and interlocks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Underground High-Voltage Distribution High-Voltage Longwalls § 75.819 Motor-starter enclosures; barriers and...

  16. Effect of natural starters used for sourdough bread in Morocco on phytate biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Chaoui, A; Faid, M; Belhcen, R

    2003-01-01

    Phytase activity was studied in natural sourdough bread starters to determine physicochemical characteristics (phytic acid hydrolysis, dough rising capacity and pH) in the flour and during sourdough fermentation. Fermentation microorganisms (yeasts and lactic acid bacteria) were also characterized. Results showed a decrease of phytic acid in sourdoughs started with traditional starters, and wide variation in phytase activity. Microorganism counts were high at the end of fermentation, indicating higher fermenting activity of the starters. Yeast populations showed wide variation and lactic acid bacteria had high counts in the fermentation. Phytase activity was demonstrated in starter cultures made of lactic acid bacteria and yeast isolates, the most interesting of which were Saccharomyces cerevisiae combined with Lactobacillus plantarum and Leuconostoc mesenteroides.

  17. Development of buckwheat and teff sourdoughs with the use of commercial starters.

    PubMed

    Moroni, Alice V; Arendt, Elke K; Morrissey, John P; Dal Bello, Fabio

    2010-08-15

    In this study we investigated the suitability of commercial starters for the production of gluten free sourdoughs. For this purpose, four different laboratory scale sourdoughs were developed from the flours buckwheat or teff. Two different starters (SA, SB) were used to start the fermentations, which were carried out under two technological conditions. Sourdoughs were propagated by back-slopping until the stability was reached. The composition of the stable sourdoughs was investigated by culture dependent techniques and the development of the dominant biota was monitored by PCR-DGGE. Unique and complex LAB and yeasts communities were detected in each sourdough, comprising strains which originated from the flours. The competitiveness of the starter LAB varied according to the substrate and the fermentation conditions applied. Among the LAB present in both SA and SB, L. helveticus and L. paracasei strains did not persist in buckwheat or teff sourdoughs. Lc. argentinum was competitive only in buckwheat sourdoughs, whereas L. reuteri persisted only in teff sourdough. L. fermentum and L. helveticus present in both starters dominated only the sourdoughs fermented at the higher temperature. Remarkably, the starter yeasts were outcompeted by spontaneous yeast strains, i.e. Kazachstania barnetti and Saccharomyces cerevisiae in teff sourdoughs, whereas no yeasts were isolated from buckwheat sourdoughs. The isolation of autochthonous LAB and yeasts from the stable teff and buckwheat sourdoughs indicates that both flours represent an important reservoir for the isolation of novel and competitive starters for the production of gluten free sourdough bread.

  18. Microbial community dynamics in thermophilic undefined milk starter cultures.

    PubMed

    Parente, Eugenio; Guidone, Angela; Matera, Attilio; De Filippis, Francesca; Mauriello, Gianluigi; Ricciardi, Annamaria

    2016-01-18

    Model undefined thermophilic starter cultures were produced from raw milk of nine pasta-filata cheesemaking plants using a selective procedure based on pasteurization and incubation at high temperature with the objective of studying the microbial community dynamics and the variability in performances under repeated (7-13) reproduction cycles with backslopping. The traditional culture-dependent approach, based on random isolation and molecular characterization of isolates was coupled to the determination of pH and the evaluation of the ability to produce acid and fermentation metabolites. Moreover, a culture-independent approach based on amplicon-targeted next-generation sequencing was employed. The microbial diversity was evaluated by 16S rRNA gene sequencing (V1-V3 regions), while the microdiversity of Streptococcus thermophilus populations was explored by using novel approach based on sequencing of partial amplicons of the phosphoserine phosphatase gene (serB). In addition, the occurrence of bacteriophages was evaluated by qPCR and by multiplex PCR. Although it was relatively easy to select for a community dominated by thermophilic lactic acid bacteria (LAB) within a single reproduction cycle, final pH, LAB populations and acid production activity fluctuated over reproduction cycles. Both culture-dependent and -independent methods showed that the cultures were dominated by either S. thermophilus or Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis or by both species. Nevertheless, subdominant mesophilic species, including lactococci and spoilage organisms, persisted at low levels. A limited number of serB sequence types (ST) were present in S. thermophilus populations. L. delbrueckii and Lactococcus lactis bacteriophages were below the detection limit of the method used and high titres of cos type S. thermophilus bacteriophages were detected in only two cases. In one case a high titre of bacteriophages was concurrent with a S. thermophilus biotype shift in the culture

  19. Microbial community dynamics in thermophilic undefined milk starter cultures.

    PubMed

    Parente, Eugenio; Guidone, Angela; Matera, Attilio; De Filippis, Francesca; Mauriello, Gianluigi; Ricciardi, Annamaria

    2016-01-18

    Model undefined thermophilic starter cultures were produced from raw milk of nine pasta-filata cheesemaking plants using a selective procedure based on pasteurization and incubation at high temperature with the objective of studying the microbial community dynamics and the variability in performances under repeated (7-13) reproduction cycles with backslopping. The traditional culture-dependent approach, based on random isolation and molecular characterization of isolates was coupled to the determination of pH and the evaluation of the ability to produce acid and fermentation metabolites. Moreover, a culture-independent approach based on amplicon-targeted next-generation sequencing was employed. The microbial diversity was evaluated by 16S rRNA gene sequencing (V1-V3 regions), while the microdiversity of Streptococcus thermophilus populations was explored by using novel approach based on sequencing of partial amplicons of the phosphoserine phosphatase gene (serB). In addition, the occurrence of bacteriophages was evaluated by qPCR and by multiplex PCR. Although it was relatively easy to select for a community dominated by thermophilic lactic acid bacteria (LAB) within a single reproduction cycle, final pH, LAB populations and acid production activity fluctuated over reproduction cycles. Both culture-dependent and -independent methods showed that the cultures were dominated by either S. thermophilus or Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis or by both species. Nevertheless, subdominant mesophilic species, including lactococci and spoilage organisms, persisted at low levels. A limited number of serB sequence types (ST) were present in S. thermophilus populations. L. delbrueckii and Lactococcus lactis bacteriophages were below the detection limit of the method used and high titres of cos type S. thermophilus bacteriophages were detected in only two cases. In one case a high titre of bacteriophages was concurrent with a S. thermophilus biotype shift in the culture

  20. Application of novel starter cultures for sourdough bread production.

    PubMed

    Plessas, S; Alexopoulos, A; Mantzourani, I; Koutinas, A; Voidarou, C; Stavropoulou, E; Bezirtzoglou, E

    2011-12-01

    Sourdough application has been extensively increased in the last years due to the consumers demand for food consumption without the addition of chemical preservatives. Several starter cultures have been applied in sourdough bread making targeting the increase of bread self-life and the improvement of sensorial character. More specific, Lactobacillus acidophilus and Lactobacillus sakei as single and mixed cultures were used for sourdough bread making. Various sourdough breads were produced with the addition of sourdough perviously prepared with 10% w/w L. acidophilus, 10% w/w L. sakei and 5% w/w L. acidophilus and 5% w/w L. sakei at the same time. Various chemical parameters were determined such as lactic acid, total titratable acidity and pH. The results revealed that the produced sourdough bread made with sourdough containing the mixed culture was preserved for more days (12 days) than all the other breads produced in the frame of this study, since it contained lactic acid in higher concentrations. The respective total titratable acidity varied between 10.5 and 11 ml NaOH N/10. The same sourdough bread had a firmer texture, better aroma, flavor and overall quality compared to other sourdough breads examined in this study, as shown by sensory evaluation tests and results obtained through SPME GC-MS analysis, which revealed significant differences among the different bread types.

  1. Genomic analysis of dairy starter culture Streptococcus thermophilus MTCC 5461.

    PubMed

    Prajapati, Jashbhai B; Nathani, Neelam M; Patel, Amrutlal K; Senan, Suja; Joshi, Chaitanya G

    2013-04-01

    The lactic acid bacterium Streptococcus thermophilus is widely used as a starter culture for the production of dairy products. Whole-genome sequencing is expected to utilize the genetic basis behind the metabolic functioning of lactic acid bacterium (LAB), for development of their use in biotechnological and probiotic applications. We sequenced the whole genome of Streptococcus thermophilus MTCC 5461, the strain isolated from a curd source, by 454 GS-FLX titanium and Ion Torrent PGM. We performed comparative genome analysis using the local BLAST and RDP for 16S rDNA comparison and by the RAST server for functional comparison against the published genome sequence of Streptococcus thermophilus CNRZ 1066. The whole genome size of S. thermophilus MTCC 5461 is of 1.73Mb size with a GC content of 39.3%. Streptococcal virulence-related genes are either inactivated or absent in the strain. The genome possesses coding sequences for features important for a probiotic organism such as adhesion, acid tolerance, bacteriocin production, and lactose utilization, which was found to be conserved among the strains MTCC 5461 and CNRZ 1066. Biochemical analysis revealed the utilization of 17 sugars by the bacterium, where the presence of genes encoding enzymes involved in metabolism for 16 of these 17 sugars were confirmed in the genome. This study supports the facts that the strain MTCC 5461 is nonpathogenic and harbors essential features that can be exploited for its probiotic potential.

  2. Anti-Listeria starters: in vitro selection and production plant evaluation.

    PubMed

    Raimondi, Stefano; Popovic, Mina; Amaretti, Alberto; Di Gioia, Diana; Rossi, Maddalena

    2014-05-01

    Anti-Listeria bacterial starters are highly demanded by the meat industry. Novel bioprotective anti-Listeria starters were searched among Lactobacillus species strains isolated from artisanal sausages. The screening confirmed that anti-Listeria activity is a strain-specific property and yielded only 1 strain (of 36) exhibiting a satisfactory level of inhibition, L. delbrueckii WC0286. This strain was compared with two commercial bioprotective starters, SafePro B-SF-43 and SafePro B-LC-20, in a model simulating in vitro the first step of the fermentation process. The presence of the bioprotective starters did not modify the pH in such a way that could affect the safety or organoleptic properties of the product. Both SafePro B-SF-43 and SafePro B-LC-20 effected an important reduction of Listeria counts (0.56 and 0.72 log CFU g(-1), respectively, in 72 h), while the anti-Listeria effect of L. delbrueckii WC0286 was minor (0.15 log CFU g(-1)). These results discouraged the utilization of L. delbrueckii WC0286 for a challenge test in a pilot salami production, in favor of the best-performing bioprotective starter, SafePro B-LC-20. The test confirmed that SafePro B-LC-20 did not alter the acidification trend of sausages and was capable of inhibiting Listeria, which decreased by 1.21 log CFU g(-1). This information is relevant to address research activity toward the development of new bioprotective starters. The data herein presented demonstrate that the efficacy in Listeria control of potentially bioprotective bacterial starters requires further validation in real meat matrixes, possibly by using in vitro meat fermentation experiments to narrow down the list of candidates before pilot scale challenge tests.

  3. Biological value of bone-precipitated dicalcium phosphate in turkey starter diets.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, T W; Douglas, J H; Lapjatupon, W; Struwe, F J; Gonzalez, N J

    1994-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the relative biological value (RBV) of phosphorus from two bone-precipitated dicalcium phosphates (DCP-BP) in turkey starter diets. An estimated 40,000 metric tons of DCP-BP are produced annually in the United States as a by-product of gelatin production. The two DCP-BP sources were compared to commercial feed phosphates. Two bioassay experiments of 21-d duration were conducted with female turkeys. Phosphate sources were each fed at three levels (.18, .24, and .36% added total phosphorus) in a corn-soybean meal diet. Calcium level was maintained constant at 1.0% in all diets by adjusting the level of ground limestone. Four replicate pens of six poults were randomly assigned at 1 d of age to each level of each phosphorus source in each bioassay. The reference standard was United States Pharmacopeia (USP) grade calcium phosphate, dibasic dihydrate. Data representing three response criteria (weight gain, gain:feed ratio, and tibia ash percentage at 21 d) were combined to calculate a biological value (BV) for each test source and the reference standard phosphate. A RBV was then computed for each test source. The RBV of the two DCP-BP sources were 98.8 and 99.1, as compared to 100.0 for the reference standard, and 86.7, 87.1, and 88.4 for three commercial, thermochemically produced defluorinated phosphates. The RBV of one commercial mono-dicalcium phosphate, and three di-monocalcium phosphates were: 96.4, and 91.2, 94.7, and 101.5, respectively. The two DCP-BP sources compared favorably to commercial feed phosphates, and would be satisfactory supplements in diets for starting chicks, poults, pigs, and other species.

  4. Performance changes in NBA basketball players vary in starters vs. nonstarters over a competitive season.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Adam M; Hoffman, Jay R; Rogowski, Joseph P; Burgos, William; Manalo, Edwin; Weise, Keon; Fragala, Maren S; Stout, Jeffrey R

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare starters (S) with nonstarters (NS), on their ability to maintain strength, power, and quickness during a competitive National Basketball Association (NBA) season. Twelve NBA players were assessed at the beginning and end of the competitive season. However, because of trades and injury, only 7 (S = 4, NS = 3) players (28.2 ± 3.4 years; 200.9 ± 9.4 cm; 104.7 ± 13.9 kg; 7.2 ± 1.9% body fat) participated in both testing sessions and underwent analysis. Anthropometric performance (repetitive vertical jump power [VJP], squat power [SQT power], and reaction time) and subjective feelings of energy, focus, alertness, and fatigue were recorded during each testing session. Results were interpreted using magnitude-based statistics to make inferences on true differences between starters and nonstarters using the unequal variances t-statistic. Starters played an average of 27.8 ± 6.9 minutes per game and nonstarters played an average of 11.3 ± 7.0 minutes per game. During the course of the season, changes in VJP indicated that starters were likely to increase VJP (Δ = 77.3 ± 78.1 W) compared to nonstarters (Δ= -160.0 ± 151.0 W). There also appeared to be a possible beneficial effect on maintaining reaction time in starters (Δ = 0.005 ± 0.074 seconds) compared with nonstarters (Δ = 0.047 ± 0.073 seconds). In addition, no clear differences in ΔSQT power were seen between starters (Δ = 110.8 ± 141.4 W) and nonstarters (Δ = 143.5 ± 24.7 W). Changes in subjective feelings of energy indicated that starters were very likely to maintain their energy over the course of a season. It also appeared possible that starters were able to have a more positive response to subjective measures of fatigue and alertness than nonstarters, with only trivial differences between starters and nonstarters in regards to maintaining focus. Results of this study suggest that NBA players may enhance lower-body power, repetitive jump ability, and

  5. Sensory quality of Camembert-type cheese: Relationship between starter cultures and ripening molds.

    PubMed

    Galli, Bruno Domingues; Martin, José Guilherme Prado; da Silva, Paula Porrelli Moreira; Porto, Ernani; Spoto, Marta Helena Fillet

    2016-10-01

    Starter cultures and ripening molds used in the manufacture of moldy cheese aimed at obtaining characteristic flavors and textures considerably differ among dairy industries. Thus, the study of variables inherent to the process and their influence on sensory patterns in cheese can improve the standardization and control of the production process. The aim of this work was to study the influence of three different variables on the sensory quality of Camembert-type cheese: type of lactic bacteria, type of ripener molds and inoculation method. Batches of Camembert-type cheese were produced using O or DL-type mesophilic starter culture, ripened with Penicillium camemberti or Penicillium candidum and mold inoculation was made directly into the milk or by spraying. All batches were sensorially evaluated using Quantitative Descriptive Analysis (QDA) with panelists trained for various attributes. Among the combinations analyzed, those resulting in more typical Camembert-type cheese were those using O-type mesophilic starter culture and P. candidum maturation mold directly applied into the milk or sprayed and those using DL-type mesophilic starter and P. camemberti ripener mold applied by surface spraying. These results demonstrate, therefore, that the combination of different ripener molds, inoculation methods and starter cultures directly influences the sensory quality of Camembert-type cheese, modifying significantly its texture, appearance, aroma and taste. PMID:27382958

  6. Die Starter: A New System to Manage Early Feasibility in Sheet Metal Forming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narainen, Rodrigue; Porzner, Harald

    2016-08-01

    Die Starter, a new system developed by ESI Group, allows the user to drastically reduce the number of iterations during the early tool process feasibility. This innovative system automatically designs the first quick die face, generating binder and addendum surfaces (NURBS surfaces) by taking account the full die process. Die Starter also improves the initial die face based on feasibility criteria (avoiding splits, wrinkles) by automatically generating the geometrical modifications of the binder and addendum and the bead restraining forces with minimal material usage. This paper presents a description of the new system and the methodology of Die Starter. Some industrial examples are presented from the part geometry to final die face including automatic developed flanges, part on binder and inner binder.

  7. Evaluation of genetic polymorphism among Lactobacillus rhamnosus non-starter Parmigiano Reggiano cheese strains.

    PubMed

    Bove, Claudio Giorgio; De Dea Lindner, Juliano; Lazzi, Camilla; Gatti, Monica; Neviani, Erasmo

    2011-01-01

    Parmigiano Reggiano (PR) is an Italian cooked, long-ripened cheese made with unheated cow's milk and natural whey starter. The microflora is involved in the manufacturing of this cheese, arising from the natural whey starter, the raw milk and the environment. Molecular studies have shown that mesophilic non-starter lactic acid bacteria (NSLAB) are the dominant microflora present during the ripening of PR. In this study, a characterisation of Lactobacillus rhamnosus isolated from a single PR manufacturing and ripening process is reported, using a combination of genotypic fingerprinting techniques (RAPD-PCR and REP-PCR). The intraspecies heterogeneity evidenced for 66 strains is correlated to their abilities to adapt to specific environmental and technological conditions. The detection of biotypes that correlate with specific moments in cheese ripening or differential development throughout this process suggests that these strains may have specific roles closely linked to their peculiar technological properties.

  8. Short communication: Protection of lyophilized milk starter Lactobacillus casei Zhang by glutathione.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Juan; Liu, Qian; Chen, Wei; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian

    2016-03-01

    Lyophilization is considered an effective way to preserve the activity of milk starters, such as lactic acid bacteria, in which proper protective agents play key roles. In this study, Lactobacillus casei Zhang, a probiotic bacterium applied as a milk starter in China, was used to investigate the effects of various cryoprotectants according to cell survival rate and physiological characteristics. The result showed a significant survival improvement to 86.6% when glutathione (GSH) was added as an ideal cryoprotectant. Further study revealed that GSH plays a key role on maintaining higher unsaturation ratio of cell membrane and shorter chain length of saturated fatty acids. In this case, the intact cell structure can be obtained. These findings will contribute not only to deepen the understanding of cells during lyophilization but also to improve the industrial performance of certain milk starters such as L. casei Zhang by application of GSH as cryoprotectant. PMID:26723115

  9. Digestive development in neonatal dairy calves with either whole or ground oats in the calf starter.

    PubMed

    Suarez-Mena, F X; Heinrichs, A J; Jones, C M; Hill, T M; Quigley, J D

    2015-05-01

    A series of 3 trials was conducted to determine effects of whole or ground oats in starter grain on reticulorumen fermentation and digestive system development of preweaned calves. Male Holstein calves (43.1±2.3kg at birth; n=8, 9, and 7 for trials 1, 2, and 3, respectively) were housed in individual pens in a heated facility; bedding was covered with landscape fabric to prevent consumption of bedding by the calves. In trials 1 and 2 only, calves were fitted with rumen cannulas by wk 2 of life. In all trials, a fixed amount of starter (containing 25% oats either ground and in the pellet or whole) was offered daily; orts were fed through the cannula in trials 1 and 2. Calves were randomly assigned to an all-pelleted starter or pellets plus whole oats. Rumen contents (trials 1 and 2) were sampled weekly at -8, -4, 0, 2, 4, 8, and 12 h after grain feeding for determination of pH and volatile fatty acids. Calves were killed 3 wk (trial 1) or 4 wk (trials 2 and 3) after grain was offered; organs were harvested, emptied, rinsed, and weighed to gauge digestive organ development. Starter intake was not different between treatments. Weekly measurements of rumen digesta pH did not change and only subtle changes were observed in molar proportions of individual volatile fatty acids. Molar proportion of butyrate and pH linearly decreased with age, whereas acetate proportion increased. Reticulorumen weight and papillae length tended to be greater for calves fed pelleted starter, whereas abomasum weight was greater for calves fed pellets plus whole oats. Fecal particle size and starch content were greater for calves fed pellets plus whole oats. Under the conditions of this study, physical form of oats in starter grain did not affect rumen fermentation measurements; greater rumen weight and papillae length in calves fed pelleted starter may be the result of greater nutrient availability of ground oats. Under the conditions of this study with young calves on treatments for <4 wk

  10. Developments in the design and performance of automotive starter batteries 1975-1985

    SciTech Connect

    Manders, J.E.

    1983-11-01

    The Automotive Starter Battery is undergoing a metamorphosis in response to the needs for reduced component weight and lower in-service maintenance. Revision of rating standards and developments in machine technology has allowed battery design engineers to stretch the capabilities of the lead-acid system. This paper traces the development of automotive starter batteries through the seventies, describes the major recent innovations and indicates additional design changes which should allow this system to meet the challenges of the mid to late eighties.

  11. Viability of Staphylococcus xylosus isolated from artisanal sausages for application as starter cultures in meat products

    PubMed Central

    Fiorentini, Ângela Maria; Sawitzki, Maristela Cortez; Bertol, Teresinha Marisa; Sant’Anna, Ernani S.

    2009-01-01

    Viability of Staphylococcus xylosus isolated from artisanal sausages for application as starter cultures in meat products Viability of Staphylococcus xylosus strains AD1 and U5 isolated from natural fermented sausages was investigated as starter cultures in fermented sausages produced in the South Region of Brazil. The study demonstrated that the Staphylococcus xylosus strains AD1 and U5 showed significant growth during fermentation, stability over freeze-dried process, negative reaction for staphylococcal enterotoxins and viability for using as a single-strain culture or associated with lactic acid bacteria for production of fermented sausages. PMID:24031331

  12. Winter wheat starter nitrogen management: a preplant soil nitrate test and site specific nitrogen loss potential

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Managing highly variable residual nitrate-nitrogen (NO3-N) following corn (Zea mays L.) is difficult because it can supply starter nitrogen (N) for winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), and/or be leached into water resources during the fall-winter water-recharge season in the Humid East. A series of...

  13. Big Foot to the Rescue or Story Starters: A Component of Whole Language.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marley, Bernard M.; Marley, Linda G.

    The creative writing process, like any writing process, begins with a prewriting activity. Story starters are one such activity which teachers can use to begin the creative writing process with their students. For example, large cartoon-like characters made on an opaque projector can be used to initiate discussion. The second step requires a…

  14. Impact of high pressure processing on the quality traits of starter-free Queso Fresco

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Queso Fresco (QF), a popular high-moisture, high-pH Hispanic cheese sold in the U.S., underwent high- pressure processing (HPP) to determine if this process, which has the potential to improve the safety of cheese, would alter its quality traits. Starter-free rennet-set QF (manufactured from pasteur...

  15. Breeding Strategy To Generate Robust Yeast Starter Cultures for Cocoa Pulp Fermentations

    PubMed Central

    Meersman, Esther; Steensels, Jan; Paulus, Tinneke; Struyf, Nore; Saels, Veerle; Mathawan, Melissa; Koffi, Jean; Vrancken, Gino

    2015-01-01

    Cocoa pulp fermentation is a spontaneous process during which the natural microbiota present at cocoa farms is allowed to ferment the pulp surrounding cocoa beans. Because such spontaneous fermentations are inconsistent and contribute to product variability, there is growing interest in a microbial starter culture that could be used to inoculate cocoa pulp fermentations. Previous studies have revealed that many different fungi are recovered from different batches of spontaneous cocoa pulp fermentations, whereas the variation in the prokaryotic microbiome is much more limited. In this study, therefore, we aimed to develop a suitable yeast starter culture that is able to outcompete wild contaminants and consistently produce high-quality chocolate. Starting from specifically selected Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, we developed robust hybrids with characteristics that allow them to efficiently ferment cocoa pulp, including improved temperature tolerance and fermentation capacity. We conducted several laboratory and field trials to show that these new hybrids often outperform their parental strains and are able to dominate spontaneous pilot scale fermentations, which results in much more consistent microbial profiles. Moreover, analysis of the resulting chocolate showed that some of the cocoa batches that were fermented with specific starter cultures yielded superior chocolate. Taken together, these results describe the development of robust yeast starter cultures for cocoa pulp fermentations that can contribute to improving the consistency and quality of commercial chocolate production. PMID:26150457

  16. Acetic acid bacteria in traditional balsamic vinegar: phenotypic traits relevant for starter cultures selection.

    PubMed

    Gullo, Maria; Giudici, Paolo

    2008-06-30

    This review focuses on acetic acid bacteria in traditional balsamic vinegar process. Although several studies are available on acetic acid bacteria ecology, metabolism and nutritional requirements, their activity as well as their technological traits in homemade vinegars as traditional balsamic vinegar is not well known. The basic technology to oxidise cooked grape must to produce traditional balsamic vinegar is performed by the so called "seed-vinegar" that is a microbiologically undefined starter culture obtained from spontaneous acetification of previous raw material. Selected starter cultures are the main technological improvement in order to innovate traditional balsamic vinegar production but until now they are rarely applied. To develop acetic acid bacteria starter cultures, selection criteria have to take in account composition of raw material, acetic acid bacteria metabolic activities, applied technology and desired characteristics of the final product. For traditional balsamic vinegar, significative phenotypical traits of acetic acid bacteria have been highlighted. Basic traits are: ethanol preferred and efficient oxidation, fast rate of acetic acid production, tolerance to high concentration of acetic acid, no overoxidation and low pH resistance. Specific traits are tolerance to high sugar concentration and to a wide temperature range. Gluconacetobacter europaeus and Acetobacter malorum strains can be evaluated to develop selected starter cultures since they show one or more suitable characters.

  17. The production of glucans via glucansucrases from Lactobacillus satsumensis isolated from a fermented beverage starter culture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several starter cultures used in the production of fermented beverages were screened for lactic acid bacteria that produced water-insoluble polysaccharides from sucrose. The strain producing the greatest amount was identified as Lactobacillus satsumensis by its 16S RNA sequence. This strain produc...

  18. Effect of proteolytic starter cultures as leavening agents of pizza dough.

    PubMed

    Pepe, O; Villani, F; Oliviero, D; Greco, T; Coppola, S

    2003-08-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and yeasts were selected on the basis of in vitro proteolytic activity against wheat gluten protein and then assayed as leavening agents for pizza dough. Trials were carried out to compare a proteolytic starter (Prt(+)), consisting of Lactobacillus sakei T56, Weissella paramesenteroides A51 and Candida krusei G271, and a non-proteolytic starter (Prt(-)), consisting of Lb. sakei T58, W. paramesenteroides A58 and Saccharomyces cerevisiae T22. The proteolytic activity of the starter cultures was monitored immediately after mixing of the dough and throughout the fermentation process. The proteolytic activity was assessed by analysing the salt-soluble protein (SSP) and the dioxane-soluble protein (DSP) fractions of the pizza dough by discontinuous SDS-PAGE. Only the Prt(+) starter exhibited considerable qualitative and quantitative changes in the electrophoretic patterns of the protein fractions extracted. After the fermentation, the Prt(+) and Prt(-) doughs were tested to evaluate the influence of the proteolytic activity on the mechanical properties of the dough before and after baking. Indications emerged suggesting an influence of the proteolytic activity on the viscoelasticity of pizza dough. The pizza dough with Prt(+) strains showed an increase in viscous properties during the fermentation as compared with the Prt(-) dough. Moreover, an increase in the firmness of the crumb was observed in Prt(+) baked pizza dough.

  19. Breeding Strategy To Generate Robust Yeast Starter Cultures for Cocoa Pulp Fermentations.

    PubMed

    Meersman, Esther; Steensels, Jan; Paulus, Tinneke; Struyf, Nore; Saels, Veerle; Mathawan, Melissa; Koffi, Jean; Vrancken, Gino; Verstrepen, Kevin J

    2015-09-01

    Cocoa pulp fermentation is a spontaneous process during which the natural microbiota present at cocoa farms is allowed to ferment the pulp surrounding cocoa beans. Because such spontaneous fermentations are inconsistent and contribute to product variability, there is growing interest in a microbial starter culture that could be used to inoculate cocoa pulp fermentations. Previous studies have revealed that many different fungi are recovered from different batches of spontaneous cocoa pulp fermentations, whereas the variation in the prokaryotic microbiome is much more limited. In this study, therefore, we aimed to develop a suitable yeast starter culture that is able to outcompete wild contaminants and consistently produce high-quality chocolate. Starting from specifically selected Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, we developed robust hybrids with characteristics that allow them to efficiently ferment cocoa pulp, including improved temperature tolerance and fermentation capacity. We conducted several laboratory and field trials to show that these new hybrids often outperform their parental strains and are able to dominate spontaneous pilot scale fermentations, which results in much more consistent microbial profiles. Moreover, analysis of the resulting chocolate showed that some of the cocoa batches that were fermented with specific starter cultures yielded superior chocolate. Taken together, these results describe the development of robust yeast starter cultures for cocoa pulp fermentations that can contribute to improving the consistency and quality of commercial chocolate production.

  20. Preparation of a Lactobacillus plantarum starter culture for cucumber fermentations that can meet kosher guidelines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A method is described for growth of a Lactobacillus plantarum starter culture in jars of commercially available pasteurized fresh-pack kosher dill cucumbers so that jars can be used to inoculate commercial scale cucumber fermentation tanks. A procedure is also described to transfer lactic acid bacte...

  1. Acetic acid bacteria in traditional balsamic vinegar: phenotypic traits relevant for starter cultures selection.

    PubMed

    Gullo, Maria; Giudici, Paolo

    2008-06-30

    This review focuses on acetic acid bacteria in traditional balsamic vinegar process. Although several studies are available on acetic acid bacteria ecology, metabolism and nutritional requirements, their activity as well as their technological traits in homemade vinegars as traditional balsamic vinegar is not well known. The basic technology to oxidise cooked grape must to produce traditional balsamic vinegar is performed by the so called "seed-vinegar" that is a microbiologically undefined starter culture obtained from spontaneous acetification of previous raw material. Selected starter cultures are the main technological improvement in order to innovate traditional balsamic vinegar production but until now they are rarely applied. To develop acetic acid bacteria starter cultures, selection criteria have to take in account composition of raw material, acetic acid bacteria metabolic activities, applied technology and desired characteristics of the final product. For traditional balsamic vinegar, significative phenotypical traits of acetic acid bacteria have been highlighted. Basic traits are: ethanol preferred and efficient oxidation, fast rate of acetic acid production, tolerance to high concentration of acetic acid, no overoxidation and low pH resistance. Specific traits are tolerance to high sugar concentration and to a wide temperature range. Gluconacetobacter europaeus and Acetobacter malorum strains can be evaluated to develop selected starter cultures since they show one or more suitable characters. PMID:18177968

  2. A qualified presumption of safety approach for the safety assessment of Grana Padano whey starters.

    PubMed

    Rossetti, Lia; Carminati, Domenico; Zago, Miriam; Giraffa, Giorgio

    2009-03-15

    A Qualified Presumption of Safety (QPS) approach was applied to dominant lactic acid bacteria (LAB) associated with Grana Padano cheese whey starters. Thirty-two strains belonging to Lactobacillus helveticus, Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis, Streptococcus thermophilus, and Lactobacillus fermentum, and representing the overall genotypic LAB diversity associated with 24 previously collected whey starters [Rossetti, L., Fornasari, M.E., Gatti, M., Lazzi, C., Neviani, E., Giraffa, G., 2008. Grana Padano cheese whey starters: microbial composition and strain distribution. International Journal of Food Microbiology 127, 168-171], were analyzed. All L. helveticus, L. delbrueckii subsp. lactis, and S. thermophilus isolates were susceptible to four (i.e. vancomycin, gentamicin, tetracycline, and erythromycin) of the clinically most relevant antibiotics. One L. fermentum strain displayed phenotypic resistance to tetracycline (Tet(R)), with MIC of 32 microg/ml, and gentamycin (Gm(R)), with MIC of 32 microg/ml. PCR was applied to this strain to test the presence of genes tet(L), tet(M), tet(S), and aac(6')-aph(2')-Ia, which are involved in horizontal transfer of Tet(R) and Gm(R), respectively but no detectable amplification products were observed. According to QPS criteria, we conclude that Grana cheese whey starters do not present particular safety concerns. PMID:19187995

  3. Story Starters on the Aztecs, Incas, and Mayas. A Creative Writing Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henrich, Steve; Henrich, Jean

    Designed to supplement an established language arts and social studies program, this books deals with the Aztecs, Incas, and Mayas of Latin America. All of the "Story Starter" books are intended to give a variety of vocabulary and story ideas to help with the writing process. Each of the books is divided into four main sections: (1) an…

  4. Expanding Opportunity for All: How Can We Increase Community College Student Completion? A Choicework Discussion Starter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Public Agenda, 2015

    2015-01-01

    Although over 80 percent of the 1.5 million students who enter community colleges each year indicate they intend to attain a bachelor's degree or higher, less than 40 percent earn any form of college credential within six years. This discussion starter is designed to help both higher education professionals and the average citizen work through how…

  5. Inoculation of starter cultures in a semi-dry coffee (Coffea arabica) fermentation process.

    PubMed

    Evangelista, Suzana Reis; Miguel, Maria Gabriela da Cruz Pedrozo; Cordeiro, Cecília de Souza; Silva, Cristina Ferreira; Pinheiro, Ana Carla Marques; Schwan, Rosane Freitas

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of yeasts as starter cultures in coffee semi-dry processing. Arabica coffee was inoculated with one of the following starter cultures: Saccharomyces cerevisiae UFLA YCN727, S. cerevisiae UFLA YCN724, Candida parapsilosis UFLA YCN448 and Pichia guilliermondii UFLA YCN731. The control was not inoculated with a starter culture. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) was used to assess the microbial population, and organic acids and volatile compounds were quantified by HPLC and HS-SPME/GC, respectively. Sensory analyses were evaluated using the Temporal Dominance of Sensations (TDS). DGGE analysis showed that the inoculated yeasts were present throughout the fermentation. Other yeast species were also detected, including Debaryomyces hansenii, Cystofilobasidium ferigula and Trichosporon cavernicola. The bacterial population was diverse and was composed of the following genera: Weissella, Leuconostoc, Gluconobacter, Pseudomonas, Pantoea, Erwinia and Klebsiella. Butyric and propionic acids, were not detected in any treatment A total of 47 different volatiles compounds have been identified. The coffee inoculated with yeast had a caramel flavor that was not detected in the control, as assessed by TDS. The use of starter cultures during coffee fermentation is an interesting alternative for obtaining a beverage quality with distinctive flavor. PMID:25084650

  6. It's Gettin' Hot in Here: Breeding Robust Yeast Starter Cultures for Cocoa Fermentation.

    PubMed

    Papalexandratou, Zoi; Nielsen, Dennis S

    2016-03-01

    Cocoa beans have to undergo post-harvest fermentation and drying to develop the typical 'cocoa flavor' associated with chocolate. Yeasts play a pivotal role during the fermentation but are generally outcompeted early in the process. Meersman and colleagues describe an elegant breeding-based approach to generate robust yeast starter cultures for cocoa fermentation. PMID:26803379

  7. Effects of yogurt starter cultures on the survival of Lactobacillus acidophilus.

    PubMed

    Ng, Elizabeth W; Yeung, Marie; Tong, Phillip S

    2011-01-31

    Recognized to confer health benefits to consumers, probiotics such as Lactobacillus acidophilus are commonly incorporated into fermented dairy products worldwide; among which yogurt is a popular delivery vehicle. To materialize most of the putative health benefits associated with probiotics, an adequate amount of viable cells must be delivered at the time of consumption. However, the loss in their viabilities during refrigerated storage has been demonstrated previously. This study focused on the effects of yogurt starter cultures on the survival of five strains of L. acidophilus, with emphases on low pH and acid production. Differential survival behavior between L. acidophilus strains was further analyzed. To this end, viable cell counts of L. acidophilus were determined weekly during 4°C storage in various types of yogurts made with Streptococcus thermophilus alone, L. delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus alone, both species of the starter cultures, or glucono-delta-lactone (GDL). All yogurt types, except for pasteurized yogurts, were co-fermented with L. acidophilus. Yogurt filtrate was analyzed for the presence of any inhibitory substance and for the amount of hydrogen peroxide. Multiplication of L. acidophilus was not affected by the starter cultures as all strains reached high level on day 0 of the storage period. Throughout the 28-day storage period, cell counts of L. acidophilus PIM703 and SBT2062 remained steady (~6 × 10(7)CFU/g) in yogurts made with both starter cultures, whereas those of ATCC 700396 and NCFM were reduced by a maximum of 3 and 4.6 logs, respectively. When starter cultures were replaced by GDL, all strains survived well, suggesting that a low pH was not a critical factor dictating their survival. In addition, the filtrate collected from yogurts made with starter cultures appeared to have higher inhibitory activities against L. acidophilus than that made with GDL. The presence of viable starter cultures was necessary to adversely affect the

  8. The importance of calf sensory and physical preferences for starter concentrates during pre- and postweaning periods.

    PubMed

    Terré, M; Devant, M; Bach, A

    2016-09-01

    We performed 3 studies to evaluate the effects of feed sensory and form preferences in young calves on performance and rumen fermentation dynamics. In experiment 1, starter feeds containing wheat and soybean meal; wheat and canola meal; and oats and soybean meal were evaluated in 63 calves (9±0.9 d old). In experiment 2, 37 crossbreed female calves were used from 4 to 45 d of age (weaning) in a cafeteria study consisting of 4 different presentations of the same starter feed: meal, pellet, pellet mixed with whole-cereal grains (WHG), and pellet mixed with steamed-rolled cereal grains (SRG). In experiment 3, 63 Holstein male calves (10±1.03 d old) were randomly distributed to 2 treatments that consisted of feeding a pellet concentrate mixed with whole corn and barely grains (WHG) or the same pellet concentrate mixed with steamed-rolled corn and barley grains (SRG). In experiment 1, animals in all 3 treatments had similar intake and performance, and we found no differences in rumen fermentation parameters. In experiment 2, during the first week of study, calves had a greater preference for WHG; after the first week, calves had a greater preference for SRG. In experiment 3, starter concentrate intake was greater in WHG than in SRG concentrates between wk 5 and weaning. However, we observed no differences in growth or gain-to-feed ratio. Calves offered WHG concentrates had greater rumen pH and tended to have lower total rumen volatile fatty acid concentrations than those offered SRG concentrates. We concluded that preweaned calves preferred concentrates based on pellets mixed with steamed-rolled grains. When calves could not choose their starter feed, pellets mixed with steamed-rolled grains reduced concentrate intake and rumen pH compared to pellets mixed with whole grains, but performance was not impaired. Formulating starter concentrates according to calves' sensory and physical preferences had little effect on performance. PMID:27289146

  9. Tuning Chocolate Flavor through Development of Thermotolerant Saccharomyces cerevisiae Starter Cultures with Increased Acetate Ester Production.

    PubMed

    Meersman, Esther; Steensels, Jan; Struyf, Nore; Paulus, Tinneke; Saels, Veerle; Mathawan, Melissa; Allegaert, Leen; Vrancken, Gino; Verstrepen, Kevin J

    2015-11-20

    Microbial starter cultures have extensively been used to enhance the consistency and efficiency of industrial fermentations. Despite the advantages of such controlled fermentations, the fermentation involved in the production of chocolate is still a spontaneous process that relies on the natural microbiota at cocoa farms. However, recent studies indicate that certain thermotolerant Saccharomyces cerevisiae cultures can be used as starter cultures for cocoa pulp fermentation. In this study, we investigate the potential of specifically developed starter cultures to modulate chocolate aroma. Specifically, we developed several new S. cerevisiae hybrids that combine thermotolerance and efficient cocoa pulp fermentation with a high production of volatile flavor-active esters. In addition, we investigated the potential of two strains of two non-Saccharomyces species that produce very large amounts of fruity esters (Pichia kluyveri and Cyberlindnera fabianii) to modulate chocolate aroma. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis of the cocoa liquor revealed an increased concentration of various flavor-active esters and a decrease in spoilage-related off-flavors in batches inoculated with S. cerevisiae starter cultures and, to a lesser extent, in batches inoculated with P. kluyveri and Cyb. fabianii. Additionally, GC-MS analysis of chocolate samples revealed that while most short-chain esters evaporated during conching, longer and more-fat-soluble ethyl and acetate esters, such as ethyl octanoate, phenylethyl acetate, ethyl phenylacetate, ethyl decanoate, and ethyl dodecanoate, remained almost unaffected. Sensory analysis by an expert panel confirmed significant differences in the aromas of chocolates produced with different starter cultures. Together, these results show that the selection of different yeast cultures opens novel avenues for modulating chocolate flavor.

  10. Evaluation of Freeze-Dried Kefir Coculture as Starter in Feta-Type Cheese Production

    PubMed Central

    Kourkoutas, Y.; Kandylis, P.; Panas, P.; Dooley, J. S. G.; Nigam, P.; Koutinas, A. A.

    2006-01-01

    The use of freeze-dried kefir coculture as a starter in the production of feta-type cheese was investigated. Maturation of the produced cheese at 4°C was monitored for up to 70 days, and the effects of the starter culture, the salting method, and the ripening process on quality characteristics were studied. The use of kefir coculture as a starter led to increased lactic acid concentrations and decreased pH values in the final product associated with significantly higher conversion rates compared to salted rennet cheese. Determination of bacterial diversity at the end of the ripening process in salted kefir and rennet cheeses by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis technology, based on both DNA and RNA analyses, suggested a potential species-specific inhibition of members of the genera Staphylococcus and Psychrobacter by kefir coculture. The main active microbial associations in salted kefir cheese appeared to be members of the genera Pseudomonas and Lactococcus, while in salted rennet cheese, Oxalobacteraceae, Janthinobacterium, Psychrobacter, and Pseudomonas species were noted. The effect of the starter culture on the production of aroma-related compounds responsible for cheese flavor was also studied by the solid-phase microextraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry technique. Kefir coculture also appeared to extend the shelf life of unsalted cheese. Spoilage of kefir cheese was observed on the 9th and 20th days of preservation at 10 and 5°C, respectively, while spoilage in the corresponding rennet cheese was detected on the 7th and 16th days. Microbial counts during preservation of both types of unsalted cheese increased steadily and reached similar levels, with the exception of staphylococci, which were significantly lower in unsalted kefir cheese. All types of cheese produced with kefir as a starter were approved and accepted by the panel during the preliminary sensory evaluation compared to commercial feta-type cheese. PMID:16957238

  11. Tuning Chocolate Flavor through Development of Thermotolerant Saccharomyces cerevisiae Starter Cultures with Increased Acetate Ester Production

    PubMed Central

    Meersman, Esther; Steensels, Jan; Struyf, Nore; Paulus, Tinneke; Saels, Veerle; Mathawan, Melissa; Allegaert, Leen; Vrancken, Gino

    2015-01-01

    Microbial starter cultures have extensively been used to enhance the consistency and efficiency of industrial fermentations. Despite the advantages of such controlled fermentations, the fermentation involved in the production of chocolate is still a spontaneous process that relies on the natural microbiota at cocoa farms. However, recent studies indicate that certain thermotolerant Saccharomyces cerevisiae cultures can be used as starter cultures for cocoa pulp fermentation. In this study, we investigate the potential of specifically developed starter cultures to modulate chocolate aroma. Specifically, we developed several new S. cerevisiae hybrids that combine thermotolerance and efficient cocoa pulp fermentation with a high production of volatile flavor-active esters. In addition, we investigated the potential of two strains of two non-Saccharomyces species that produce very large amounts of fruity esters (Pichia kluyveri and Cyberlindnera fabianii) to modulate chocolate aroma. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis of the cocoa liquor revealed an increased concentration of various flavor-active esters and a decrease in spoilage-related off-flavors in batches inoculated with S. cerevisiae starter cultures and, to a lesser extent, in batches inoculated with P. kluyveri and Cyb. fabianii. Additionally, GC-MS analysis of chocolate samples revealed that while most short-chain esters evaporated during conching, longer and more-fat-soluble ethyl and acetate esters, such as ethyl octanoate, phenylethyl acetate, ethyl phenylacetate, ethyl decanoate, and ethyl dodecanoate, remained almost unaffected. Sensory analysis by an expert panel confirmed significant differences in the aromas of chocolates produced with different starter cultures. Together, these results show that the selection of different yeast cultures opens novel avenues for modulating chocolate flavor. PMID:26590272

  12. Game Related Statistics Discriminating Between Starters and Nonstarters Players in Women'S National Basketball Association League (WNBA).

    PubMed

    Gòmez, Miguel-Ángel; Lorenzo, Alberto; Ortega, Enrique; Sampaio, Jaime; Ibàñez, Sergio-José

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify the game-related statistics that allow discriminating between starters and nonstarter players in women's basketball when related to winning or losing games and best or worst teams. The sample comprised all 216 regular season games from the 2005 Women's National Basketball Association League (WNBA). The game-related statistics included were 2- and 3- point field-goals (both successful and unsuccessful), free-throws (both successful and unsuccessful), defensive and offensive rebounds, assists, blocks, fouls, steals, turnovers and minutes played. Results from multivariate analysis showed that when best teams won, the discriminant game-related statistics were successful 2-point field-goals (SC = 0.47), successful free-throws (SC = 0.44), fouls (SC = -0.41), assists (SC = 0.37), and defensive rebounds (SC = 0.37). When the worst teams won, the discriminant game-related statistics were successful 2-point field- goals (SC = 0.37), successful free-throws (SC = 0.45), assists (SC = 0.58), and steals (SC = 0.35). The results showed that the successful 2-point field-goals, successful free-throws and the assists were the most powerful variables discriminating between starters and nonstarters. These specific characteristics helped to point out the importance of starters' players shooting and passing ability during competitions. Key pointsThe players' game-related statistical profile varied according to team status, game outcome and team quality in women's basketball.The results of this work help to point out the different player's performance described in women's basketball compared with men's basketball.The results obtained enhance the importance of starters and nonstarters contribution to team's performance in different game contexts.Results showed the power of successful 2-point field-goals, successful free-throws and assists discriminating between starters and nonstarters in all the analyses.

  13. Novel starter cultures to inhibit biogenic amines accumulation during fish sauce fermentation.

    PubMed

    Zaman, Muhammad Zukhrufuz; Abu Bakar, Fatimah; Jinap, S; Bakar, Jamilah

    2011-01-31

    Bacteria with amine oxidase activity have become a particular interest to reduce biogenic amines concentration in food products such as meat and fish sausages. However, little information is available regarding the application of these bacteria in fish sauce. Hence, our study was aimed to investigate the effect of such starter cultures in reducing biogenic amines accumulation during fish sauce fermentation. Staphylococcus carnosus FS19 and Bacillus amyloliquefaciens FS05 isolated from fish sauce which possess amine oxidase activity were used as starter cultures in this study. Fermentation was held for 120 days at 35 °C. The pH value increased in all samples, while salt concentration remained constant throughout fermentation. Aerobic bacteria count was significantly lower (p < 0.05) in the control than in inoculated samples as a result of starter cultures addition. However, it decreased during fermentation due to the growth inhibition by high salt concentration. Proteolytic bacterial count decreased during fermentation with no significant difference (p > 0.05) among samples. These bacteria hydrolyzed protein in anchovy to produce free amino acid precursors for amines formation by decarboxylase bacteria. The presence of biogenic amines producing bacteria in this study was considered to be indigenous from raw material or contamination during fermentation, since our cultures were negative histamine producers. Amino acid histidine, arginine, lysine and tyrosine concentration decreased at different rates during fermentation as they were converted into their respective amines. In general, biogenic amines concentration namely histamine, putrescine, cadaverine and tyramine increased throughout fermentation. However, their concentrations were markedly higher (p < 0.05) in the control (without starter cultures) as compared to the samples treated with starter cultures. Histamine concentration was reduced by 27.7% and 15.4% by Staphylococcus carnosus FS19 and Bacillus

  14. Straw particle size in calf starters: Effects on digestive system development and rumen fermentation.

    PubMed

    Suarez-Mena, F X; Heinrichs, A J; Jones, C M; Hill, T M; Quigley, J D

    2016-01-01

    Two trials were conducted to determine effects of straw particle size in calf starter on rumen fermentation and development in calves. Holstein calves (n=17 in trial 1; n=25 in trial 2) were housed in individual pens; bedding (wood shavings) was covered with landscape fabric to completely avoid consumption of bedding. Milk replacer was fed at 12% of birth body weight per day and water offered free choice. Calves were randomly assigned to 4 treatments differing in geometric mean particle length (Xgm) of straw comprising 5% of starter dry matter. Straw was provided within the pellet at manufacture (PS; 0.82 mm Xgm) or mixed with the pellet at time of feeding at Xgm of 3.04 (SS), 7.10 (MS), or 12.7 (LS) mm. Calves (n=12; 3/treatment) in trial 1 were fitted with a rumen cannula by wk 2 of age. A fixed amount of starter that was adjusted with age and orts were fed through the cannula in cannulated calves. Calves were euthanized 6 wk after starter was offered (9 and 7 wk of age for trials 1 and 2, respectively). Rumen digesta pH linearly decreased with age, whereas volatile fatty acid concentration increased with age. Overall pH had a cubic trend with SS lower than that of PS and MS. Molar proportion of acetate decreased with age whereas propionate proportion increased. Overall molar proportions of volatile fatty acids were not affected by diet. Fecal Xgm was not different in spite of changes in diet particle size and rumen digesta of PS being greater than SS, MS, and LS at slaughter. Fecal pH and starch concentration were not affected by diet; however, pH decreased whereas starch content increased with age. Weight of stomach compartments, rumen papillae length and width, and rumen wall thickness did not differ between diets. Omasum weight as a percentage of body weight at harvest linearly decreased as straw particle size increased. Under the conditions of this study, modifying straw particle length in starter grain resulted in minimal rumen fermentation parameter

  15. Diacetyl levels and volatile profiles of commercial starter distillates and selected dairy foods.

    PubMed

    Rincon-Delgadillo, M I; Lopez-Hernandez, A; Wijaya, I; Rankin, S A

    2012-03-01

    Starter distillates (SDL) are used as ingredients in the formulation of many food products such as cottage cheese, margarine, vegetable oil spreads, processed cheese, and sour cream to increase the levels of naturally occurring buttery aroma associated with fermentation. This buttery aroma results, in part, from the presence of the vicinal dicarbonyl, diacetyl, which imparts a high level of buttery flavor notes and is a key component of SDL. Diacetyl (2,3-butanedione) is a volatile product of citrate metabolism produced by certain bacteria, including Lactococcus lactis ssp. diacetylactis and Leuconostoc citrovorum. In the United States, SDL are regarded as generally recognized as safe ingredients, whereby usage in food products is limited by good manufacturing practices. Recently, diacetyl has been implicated as a causative agent in certain lung ailments in plant workers; however, little is published about the volatile composition of SDL and the levels of diacetyl or other flavoring components in finished dairy products. The objective of this work was to characterize the volatile compounds of commercial SDL and to quantitate levels of diacetyl and other Flavor and Extract Manufacturers Association-designated high-priority flavoring components found in 18 SDL samples and 24 selected dairy products. Headspace volatiles were assessed using a solid-phase microextraction and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. In addition to diacetyl (ranging from 1.2 to 22,000 μg/g), 40 compounds including 8 organic acids, 4 alcohols, 3 aldehydes, 7 esters, 3 furans, 10 ketones, 2 lactones, 2 sulfur-containing compounds, and 1 terpene were detected in the SDL. A total of 22 food samples were found to contain diacetyl ranging from 4.5 to 2,700 μg/100g. Other volatile compounds, including acetaldehyde, acetic acid, acetoin, benzaldehyde, butyric acid, formic acid, furfural, 2,3-heptanedione, 2,3-pentanedione, and propanoic acid, were also identified and quantified in SDL

  16. Growth promoting effects of prebiotic yeast cell wall products in starter broilers under an immune stress and Clostridium perfringens challenge

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was designed to investigate the growth promoting effects of supplementing different sources and concentrations of prebiotic yeast cell wall (YCW) products containing mannanoligosaccharides in starter broilers under an immune stress and Clostridium perfringens challenge. Through a series ...

  17. Effect of rate of addition of starter culture on textural characteristics of buffalo milk Feta type cheese during ripening.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sanjeev; Kanawjia, S K; Kumar, Suryamani; Khatkar, Sunil

    2014-04-01

    The effect of rate of addition of starter culture on textural characteristics of buffalo milk Feta type cheese was investigated during ripening period up to two months. The textural characteristics of buffalo milk Feta type cheese in terms of hardness, cohesiveness, springiness, gumminess and chewiness were analyzed by using textural profile analyzer. The maximum hardness was found with cheese made using 1% culture, while the minimum was found with 2% culture. The cohesiveness and springiness decreased as the level of addition of starter culture increased. The chewiness of cheese also decreased, as the rate of addition of starter culture increased for cheese making. In addition to this, yield, moisture, fat, FDM, protein, salt and S/M of fresh buffalo milk Feta type cheese increased with the increase in rate of addition of starter culture; however, TS of experimental cheeses decreased. PMID:24741179

  18. Hand's Academy Challenge: Some Starter Questions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Michael Hand has recently challenged certain religious organisations that run Academies in the United Kingdom to devise and pursue their own faith-based curricula in their schools. In this short article I examine some of the problems Hand's challenge might encounter, including whether religious conceptions of worthwhile activities and of…

  19. Escherichia coli phytase improves growth performance of starter, grower, and finisher pigs fed phosphorus-deficient diets.

    PubMed

    Jendza, J A; Dilger, R N; Adedokun, S A; Sands, J S; Adeola, O

    2005-08-01

    Corn-soybean meal-based diets, consisting of a high-P control (HPC) containing supplemental dicalcium phosphate (DCP), a basal diet containing no DCP, and the basal diet plus Escherichia coli phytase at 500 or 1,000 phytase units per kilogram (FTU/kg; as-fed basis) were fed to evaluate growth performance in starter, grower, and finisher pigs. Pigs were blocked by weight and gender, such that average weight across treatments was similar, with equal numbers of barrows and gilts receiving each treatment in each block. In Exp. 1, 48 pigs with an average initial BW of 11 kg, housed individually, with 12 pens per diet, were used to evaluate growth performance over 3 wk. Overall ADG and G:F were increased linearly (P < 0.05) by dietary phytase addition. Final BW and plasma P concentrations at 3 wk also increased linearly (P < 0.05). In Exp. 2, 128 pigs with an average initial BW of 23 kg, housed four pigs per pen, with eight pens per diet, were used to evaluate growth performance over 6 wk. A linear increase in response to phytase was noted for ADG and G:F in all three 2-wk periods, as well as overall (P < 0.05). Percentage of bone ash also showed a linear increase (P < 0.01). In Exp. 3, 160 pigs (53 kg), housed five pigs per pen, with eight pens per diet, were used to evaluate growth performance over 6 wk. A linear increase was detected for final BW, as well as ADG and G:F in the first and second 2-wk periods, and overall (P < 0.01). Twenty-four 15-kg individually housed pigs were used to evaluate total-tract nutrient digestibility in Exp. 4. Daily absorption of P linearly increased (P < 0.05) with phytase supplementation. Results of this research indicate that E. coli phytase is effective in liberating phytate P for uptake and utilization by starter, grower, and finisher pigs.

  20. Evaluation of Mixed Probiotic Starter Cultures Isolated from Kimchi on Physicochemical and Functional Properties, and Volatile Compounds of Fermented Hams

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Seung Seok

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of mixed starter cultures isolated from kimchi on physicochemical properties, functionality and flavors of fermented ham. Physicochemical properties, microbial counts, shear force, cholesterol contents and volatile compounds of fermented ham were investigated during processing (curing and ripening time). Curing process for 7 d increased saltiness, however, decreased hunter color values (L, a, and b values). Ripening process for 21 d increased most parameters, such as saltiness, color values, weight loss, shear force and cholesterol content due to the drying process. The mixed starter culture had higher lactic acid bacteria than the commercial one. While eight volatile compounds were identified from fermented hams during curing process, total fiftyeight volatile compounds were identified from fermented hams during ripening process. The main volatile compounds were alcohols, esters and furans. However, no differences in volatile compounds were observed between two batches. Fermented hams (batch B) manufactured with probiotic starter culture (LPP) had higher sensory score in texture, color and overall acceptability than counterparts (batch A), while the opposite trend was observed in flavor. Therefore, mixed probiotic starter culture isolated from kimchi might be used as a starter culture to be able to replace with commercial starter culture (LK-30 plus) for the manufacture of fermented ham. PMID:27499673

  1. The Use of Lactic Acid Bacteria Starter Culture in the Production of Nunu, a Spontaneously Fermented Milk Product in Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Tano-Debrah, Kwaku; Parkouda, Charles; Jespersen, Lene

    2014-01-01

    Nunu, a spontaneously fermented yoghurt-like product, is produced and consumed in parts of West Africa. A total of 373 predominant lactic acid bacteria (LAB) previously isolated and identified from Nunu product were assessed in vitro for their technological properties (acidification, exopolysaccharides production, lipolysis, proteolysis and antimicrobial activities). Following the determination of technological properties, Lactobacillus fermentum 22-16, Lactobacillus plantarum 8-2, Lactobacillus helveticus 22-7, and Leuconostoc mesenteroides 14-11 were used as single and combined starter cultures for Nunu fermentation. Starter culture fermented Nunu samples were assessed for amino acids profile and rate of acidification and were subsequently evaluated for consumer acceptability. For acidification properties, 82%, 59%, 34%, and 20% of strains belonging to Lactobacillus helveticus, L. plantarum, L. fermentum, and Leu. mesenteriodes, respectively, demonstrated fast acidification properties. High proteolytic activity (>100 to 150 μg/mL) was observed for 50% Leu. mesenteroides, 40% L. fermentum, 41% L. helveticus, 27% L. plantarum, and 10% Ent. faecium species. In starter culture fermented Nunu samples, all amino acids determined were detected in Nunu fermented with single starters of L. plantarum and L. helveticus and combined starter of L. fermntum and L. helveticus. Consumer sensory analysis showed varying degrees of acceptability for Nunu fermented with the different starter cultures. PMID:26904646

  2. Evaluation of Mixed Probiotic Starter Cultures Isolated from Kimchi on Physicochemical and Functional Properties, and Volatile Compounds of Fermented Hams.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Joo; Park, Sung Yong; Lee, Hong Chul; Yoo, Seung Seok; Oh, Sejong; Kim, Kwang Hyun; Chin, Koo Bok

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of mixed starter cultures isolated from kimchi on physicochemical properties, functionality and flavors of fermented ham. Physicochemical properties, microbial counts, shear force, cholesterol contents and volatile compounds of fermented ham were investigated during processing (curing and ripening time). Curing process for 7 d increased saltiness, however, decreased hunter color values (L, a, and b values). Ripening process for 21 d increased most parameters, such as saltiness, color values, weight loss, shear force and cholesterol content due to the drying process. The mixed starter culture had higher lactic acid bacteria than the commercial one. While eight volatile compounds were identified from fermented hams during curing process, total fiftyeight volatile compounds were identified from fermented hams during ripening process. The main volatile compounds were alcohols, esters and furans. However, no differences in volatile compounds were observed between two batches. Fermented hams (batch B) manufactured with probiotic starter culture (LPP) had higher sensory score in texture, color and overall acceptability than counterparts (batch A), while the opposite trend was observed in flavor. Therefore, mixed probiotic starter culture isolated from kimchi might be used as a starter culture to be able to replace with commercial starter culture (LK-30 plus) for the manufacture of fermented ham. PMID:27499673

  3. LAP6/POLYKETIDE SYNTHASE A and LAP5/POLYKETIDE SYNTHASE B Encode Hydroxyalkyl α-Pyrone Synthases Required for Pollen Development and Sporopollenin Biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung Soo; Grienenberger, Etienne; Lallemand, Benjamin; Colpitts, Che C.; Kim, Sun Young; Souza, Clarice de Azevedo; Geoffroy, Pierrette; Heintz, Dimitri; Krahn, Daniel; Kaiser, Markus; Kombrink, Erich; Heitz, Thierry; Suh, Dae-Yeon; Legrand, Michel; Douglas, Carl J.

    2010-01-01

    Plant type III polyketide synthases (PKSs) catalyze the condensation of malonyl-CoA units with various CoA ester starter molecules to generate a diverse array of natural products. The fatty acyl-CoA esters synthesized by Arabidopsis thaliana ACYL-COA SYNTHETASE5 (ACOS5) are key intermediates in the biosynthesis of sporopollenin, the major constituent of exine in the outer pollen wall. By coexpression analysis, we identified two Arabidopsis PKS genes, POLYKETIDE SYNTHASE A (PKSA) and PKSB (also known as LAP6 and LAP5, respectively) that are tightly coexpressed with ACOS5. Recombinant PKSA and PKSB proteins generated tri-and tetraketide α-pyrone compounds in vitro from a broad range of potential ACOS5-generated fatty acyl-CoA starter substrates by condensation with malonyl-CoA. Furthermore, substrate preference profile and kinetic analyses strongly suggested that in planta substrates for both enzymes are midchain- and ω-hydroxylated fatty acyl-CoAs (e.g., 12-hydroxyoctadecanoyl-CoA and 16-hydroxyhexadecanoyl-CoA), which are the products of sequential actions of anther-specific fatty acid hydroxylases and acyl-CoA synthetase. PKSA and PKSB are specifically and transiently expressed in tapetal cells during microspore development in Arabidopsis anthers. Mutants compromised in expression of the PKS genes displayed pollen exine layer defects, and a double pksa pksb mutant was completely male sterile, with no apparent exine. These results show that hydroxylated α-pyrone polyketide compounds generated by the sequential action of ACOS5 and PKSA/B are potential and previously unknown sporopollenin precursors. PMID:21193570

  4. Aminogenesis control in fermented sausages manufactured with pressurized meat batter and starter culture.

    PubMed

    Latorre-Moratalla, M L; Bover-Cid, S; Aymerich, T; Marcos, B; Vidal-Carou, M C; Garriga, M

    2007-03-01

    The application of high hydrostatic pressure (200MPa) to meat batter just before sausage fermentation and the inoculation of starter culture were studied to improve the safety and quality of traditional Spanish fermented sausages (fuet and chorizo). Higher amounts of biogenic amines were formed in chorizo than in fuet. Without interfering with the ripening performance in terms of acidification, drying and proteolysis, hydrostatic pressure prevented enterobacteria growth but did not affect Gram-positive bacteria significantly. Subsequently, a strong inhibition of diamine (putrescine and cadaverine) accumulation was observed, but that of tyramine was not affected. The inoculated decarboxylase-negative strains, selected from indigenous bacteria of traditional sausages, were resistant to the HHP treatment, being able to lead the fermentation process, prevent enterococci development and significantly reduce enterobacteria counts. In sausages manufactured with either non-pressurized or pressurized meat batter, starter culture was the most protective measure against the accumulation of tyramine and both diamines.

  5. Correlation between volatile profiles of Italian fermented sausages and their size and starter culture.

    PubMed

    Montanari, Chiara; Bargossi, Eleonora; Gardini, Aldo; Lanciotti, Rosalba; Magnani, Rudy; Gardini, Fausto; Tabanelli, Giulia

    2016-02-01

    The aroma profiles of 10 traditional Italian fermented sausages were evaluated. The volatile organic compounds (VOCs) obtained by solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatograph-mass spectrometry were analysed using principal component analysis (PCA) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA). PCA allowed an acceptable separation but some sausage typologies were not well separated. On the other hand, the supervised approach of LDA allowed a clear grouping of the samples in relation to sausage size and starter culture. In spite of the extreme variability of the volatile profiles of the sausage typologies, this work showed the influence of diameter on VOC profile. The differences observed can be related to the effects that some fundamental physicochemical characteristics (such as water loss kinetics and oxygen availability) have on the results of ripening processes. Differences in VOC profiles were also observed due to the lactic acid bacteria used as starter cultures, with differences mainly attributable to compounds deriving from pyruvate metabolism. PMID:26304405

  6. Correlation between volatile profiles of Italian fermented sausages and their size and starter culture.

    PubMed

    Montanari, Chiara; Bargossi, Eleonora; Gardini, Aldo; Lanciotti, Rosalba; Magnani, Rudy; Gardini, Fausto; Tabanelli, Giulia

    2016-02-01

    The aroma profiles of 10 traditional Italian fermented sausages were evaluated. The volatile organic compounds (VOCs) obtained by solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatograph-mass spectrometry were analysed using principal component analysis (PCA) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA). PCA allowed an acceptable separation but some sausage typologies were not well separated. On the other hand, the supervised approach of LDA allowed a clear grouping of the samples in relation to sausage size and starter culture. In spite of the extreme variability of the volatile profiles of the sausage typologies, this work showed the influence of diameter on VOC profile. The differences observed can be related to the effects that some fundamental physicochemical characteristics (such as water loss kinetics and oxygen availability) have on the results of ripening processes. Differences in VOC profiles were also observed due to the lactic acid bacteria used as starter cultures, with differences mainly attributable to compounds deriving from pyruvate metabolism.

  7. Investigation of hazards associated with plastic bonded starter mix manufacturing processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    An investigation to determine the hazards potential evaluation of plastic bonded starter mix (PBSM) production processes and the application to the M18 and M7A3 grenades is reported. The investigation indicated: (1) the materials with the greatest hazards characteristics, (2) process operating stations most likely to initiate hazardous conditions, (3) the test program required to examine ignition characteristics and process hazards, and (4) the method of handling the accumulated information from testing and safety analyses.

  8. Effect of sodium butyrate supplementation in milk replacer and starter diet on rumen development in calves.

    PubMed

    Gorka, P; Kowalski, Z M; Pietrzak, P; Kotunia, A; Kiljanczyk, R; Flaga, J; Holst, J J; Guilloteau, P; Zabielski, R

    2009-10-01

    Rumen development is an important factor determining early solid feed intake and performance in cattle. A popular trend towards early weaning of newborn dairy calves necessitated looking for ways of accelerating the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) development. The present study aimed to determine the effect of sodium butyrate (NaB) supplementation in milk replacer and starter diet on rumen development in rearing calves. Fourteen bull calves (5-day-old) were randomly allocated to two groups: Control (C) and NaB. The later received 0.3 % NaB in milk replacer and starter diet. Animals were in experiment up to age of 26 days. Addition of NaB to milk replacer and starter diet had no effect on daily growth rate, but reduced the weight loss observed in C calves in first 11 days of age. Additionally, the NaB calves weighed more at the end of the study and tended to have higher growth rate in the whole trial period (P<0.15). The NaB calves showed a tendency toward higher reticulorumen weight (P=0.13) and higher reticulorumen weight expressed as a percent of whole stomach weight (P=0.02) as compared to control. Histometry analysis indicated larger rumen papillae length and width (P<0.01) in NaB group, and no change in muscle layer thickness, as compared to control. Plasma glucagon-like peptide-2 relative increase was higher in NaB group than in C group, and may be involved in rumen development. In conclusion, supplementation of the diet (milk replacer and starter diet) with NaB may enhance rumen development in neonatal calves.

  9. Microbiological and fermentative properties of baker's yeast starter used in breadmaking.

    PubMed

    Reale, A; Di Renzo, T; Succi, M; Tremonte, P; Coppola, R; Sorrentino, E

    2013-08-01

    This study assessed the levels of microbial contaminants in liquid, compressed and dry commercial baker's yeasts used as starters in breadmaking. Eumycetes, Enterobacteriaceae, total and fecal coliforms, Bacillus spp., and lactic acid bacteria (LAB), in particular enterococci, were quantified. Results obtained in this study highlighted that baker's yeast could represent a potential vehicle of spoilage and undesirable microorganisms into the baking environment, even if these do not influence the leavening activity in the dough, as ascertained by rheofermentometer analysis. Different microbial groups, such as spore-forming bacteria and moulds, were found in baker's yeast starters. Moreover, different species of LAB, which are considered the main contaminants in large-scale yeast fermentations, were isolated and identified by Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE) and 16S rDNA sequencing. The most recurrent species were Lactobacillus plantarum, Enterococcus faecalis, and Enterococcus durans, isolated from both compressed and dry starters, whereas strains belonging to Leuconostoc and Pediococcus genera were found only in dry ones. Nested-Polymerase Chain Reaction (Nested-PCR) and Randomly Amplified Polymorphic DNA-PCR (RAPD-PCR) were also used to highlight the biodiversity of the different commercial yeast strains, and to ascertain the culture purity.

  10. Impact of yeast starter formulations on the production of volatile compounds during wine fermentation.

    PubMed

    Romano, Patrizia; Pietrafesa, Rocchina; Romaniello, Rossana; Zambuto, Marianna; Calabretti, Antonella; Capece, Angela

    2015-01-01

    The most diffused starter formulation in winemaking is actually represented by active dry yeast (ADY). Spray-drying has been reported as an appropriate preservation method for yeast and other micro-organisms. Despite the numerous advantages of this method, the high air temperatures used can negatively affect cell viability and the fermentative performance of dried cells. In the present study, 11 wine S. cerevisiae strains (both indigenous and commercial) were submitted to spray-drying; different process conditions were tested in order to select the conditions allowing the highest strain survival. The strains exhibited high variability for tolerance to spray-drying treatment. Selected strains were tested in fermentation at laboratory scale in different formulations (free fresh cells, free dried cells, immobilized fresh cells and immobilized dried cells), in order to assess the influence of starter formulation on fermentative fitness of strains and aromatic quality of wine. The analysis of volatile fraction in the experimental wines produced by selected strains in different formulations allowed identification of > 50 aromatic compounds (alcohols, esters, ketones, aldehydes and terpenes). The results obtained showed that the starter formulation significantly influenced the content of volatile compounds. In particular, the wines obtained by strains in dried forms (as both free and immobilized cells) contained higher numbers of volatile compounds than wines obtained from fresh cells.

  11. Selection of starter cultures for idli batter fermentation and their effect on quality of idlis.

    PubMed

    Sridevi, J; Halami, Prakash M; Vijayendra, S V N

    2010-10-01

    Idli batter samples were prepared using lactic starter cultures like Pediococcus pentosaceus (Pp), Enterococcus faecium MTCC 5153 (Ef), Ent. faecium (IB2 Ef-IB2), individually, along with the yeast culture, Candida versatilis (Cv). Idli batter prepared using Ef and Ef-IB2 cultures gave better results, when evaluated for the rise in batter volume (80 ml), level of CO2 production (23.8%), titratable acidity 2.4-3.5% (lactic acid) and pH 4.3-4.4. Storage stability of batter made with selected starter cultures was determined by analyzing the idlis prepared using the batter stored for 1 and 5 days for texture, nutrient composition and sensory quality. Slight variations in the results were seen among the idlis of different combination of cultures, whereas these results are better than that of the idlis made using naturally fermented idli batter. Sensory profile of idlis prepared using starter cultures had a higher score (3.9-4.4) compared to the control (3.6) for overall acceptability.

  12. Application of starter cultures to table olive fermentation: an overview on the experimental studies

    PubMed Central

    Corsetti, Aldo; Perpetuini, Giorgia; Schirone, Maria; Tofalo, Rosanna; Suzzi, Giovanna

    2012-01-01

    Table olives are one of the oldest fermented foods and are considered as an important component of the Mediterranean diet, since their richness in monounsaturated fats (primarily oleic acid) and phenolic compounds may function as antioxidants in the human body; in the Western world they represent one of the most popular fermented vegetables but, despite its economic significance, table olive fermentation is still craft-based and empirical. In particular, such a type of fermentation results from the competitive activities among indigenous, contaminating microorganisms, the microbial balance depending on several intrinsic (pH, water activity, diffusion of nutrients from the drupe, and level of anti-microbial compounds) and extrinsic (temperature, oxygen availability, and salt concentration) factors. At present, to reduce the risk of spoilage and to achieve a more predictable process there is an increasing interest in developing starter cultures for table olives fermentation. Anyway, the application of starter cultures in the field of table olives is quite far from reaching the diffusion as it has in other sectors of food industry (e.g., dairy products and alcoholic beverages). This review focuses on experimental researches devoted to studying starter cultures for possible application to table olive fermentation both at artisan and industrial level. PMID:22833739

  13. Secondary Metabolites from Penicillium roqueforti, A Starter for the Production of Gorgonzola Cheese

    PubMed Central

    Giardini, Alberto; Soncini, Gabriella

    2014-01-01

    The presence of mold in food, although necessary for production, can involve the presence of secondary metabolites, which are sometimes toxic. Penicillium roqueforti is a common saprophytic fungus but it is also the essential fungus used in the production of Roquefort cheese and other varieties of blue cheese containing internal mold. The study was conducted on industrial batches of Penicillium roqueforti starters used in the production of the Gorgonzola cheese, with the aim to verify the production of secondary metabolites. Nine Penicillium roqueforti strains were tested. The presence of roquefortine C, PR toxin and mycophenolic acid was tested first in vitro, then on bread-like substrate and lastly in vivo in nine cheese samples produced with the same starters and ready to market. In vitro, only Penicillium out of nine produced roquefortine C, four starters showed mycophenolic acid production, while no significant amounts of PR toxin were detected. In the samples grown on bread-like substrate, Penicillium did not produce secondary metabolites, likewise with each cheese samples tested. To protect consumers’ health and safety, the presence of mycotoxins needs to be verified in food which is widely consumed, above all for products protected by the protected denomination of origin (DOP) label (i.e. a certificate guaranteeing the geographic origin of the product), such as Gorgonzola cheese. PMID:27800360

  14. Selection of starter cultures for idli batter fermentation and their effect on quality of idlis.

    PubMed

    Sridevi, J; Halami, Prakash M; Vijayendra, S V N

    2010-10-01

    Idli batter samples were prepared using lactic starter cultures like Pediococcus pentosaceus (Pp), Enterococcus faecium MTCC 5153 (Ef), Ent. faecium (IB2 Ef-IB2), individually, along with the yeast culture, Candida versatilis (Cv). Idli batter prepared using Ef and Ef-IB2 cultures gave better results, when evaluated for the rise in batter volume (80 ml), level of CO2 production (23.8%), titratable acidity 2.4-3.5% (lactic acid) and pH 4.3-4.4. Storage stability of batter made with selected starter cultures was determined by analyzing the idlis prepared using the batter stored for 1 and 5 days for texture, nutrient composition and sensory quality. Slight variations in the results were seen among the idlis of different combination of cultures, whereas these results are better than that of the idlis made using naturally fermented idli batter. Sensory profile of idlis prepared using starter cultures had a higher score (3.9-4.4) compared to the control (3.6) for overall acceptability. PMID:23572685

  15. Optimizing the selection process of yeast starter cultures by preselecting strains dominating spontaneous fermentations.

    PubMed

    Pulvirenti, Andrea; Rainieri, Sandra; Boveri, Silvio; Giudici, Paolo

    2009-03-01

    We propose an efficient and time-saving strategy for starter culture selection. Our approach is based on the accomplishment of 3 phases: (i) the selection of yeast strains dominating spontaneous fermentations, (ii) the selection among the dominant strains of those showing the best technological characteristics, and (iii) the final selection among good technological strains of those showing the desired qualitative traits. We applied this approach to wine fermentations, even though the same strategy has the potential to be employed for the selection of any type of starter culture. We isolated and identified yeast strains at the mid- and final stages of 6 spontaneous fermentations carried out in 3 different Spanish wineries. We identified all strains as Saccharomyces cerevisiae by restriction fragment length polymorphism of the ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacer region, and subsequently distinguished each strain by analyzing the polymorphism of the inter-delta regions. Strains that were detected both at the mid- and final stages of the fermentation were considered dominant. Four dominant strains were finally selected and tested in pilot-scale fermentation, and their performance was compared with that of a commercial wine strain. All dominant strains showed good fitness and resulted suitable to be employed as starter cultures. One of the dominant strains isolated in this study is currently commercialized.

  16. Mifepristone for the prevention of breakthrough bleeding in new starters of depo-medroxyprogesterone acetate.

    PubMed

    Jain, John K; Nicosia, Antonia F; Nucatola, Deborah L; Lu, Jing J; Kuo, John; Felix, Juan C

    2003-11-01

    Depo-medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) is an effective injectable contraceptive with worldwide availability. However, it is associated with a high incidence of breakthrough bleeding (BTB) during the first 6 months of use which often leads to discontinuation. Mifepristone is a progesterone receptor antagonist that has been demonstrated to decrease BTB caused by the levonorgestrel subdermal implant (Norplant). The purpose of this study was to determine if mifepristone would decrease BTB in new starters of DMPA. Twenty regularly cycling women who were new starters of DMPA were randomized to receive 50 mg of mifepristone or placebo every 2 weeks for 24 weeks. Percent days of BTB and number of cycles with bleeding intervals > or =8 and > or =14 days were evaluated using daily bleeding diaries. Ovulation was determined by measuring thrice-weekly urinary metabolites of estrogen and progesterone. Endometrial concentrations of ER and PR were determined by immunohistochemistry. Mifepristone significantly decreased the percent days of BTB and the number of cycles with prolonged bleeding intervals when compared to placebo. No subject ovulated in either group. ER immunostaining increased and PR immunostaining decreased after mifepristone treatment. In conclusion, a 50 mg dose of mifepristone taken every 2 weeks decreases the incidence of BTB in new starters of DMPA. This effect may be due to modulation of endometrial estrogen and progesterone receptors.

  17. Impact of yeast starter formulations on the production of volatile compounds during wine fermentation.

    PubMed

    Romano, Patrizia; Pietrafesa, Rocchina; Romaniello, Rossana; Zambuto, Marianna; Calabretti, Antonella; Capece, Angela

    2015-01-01

    The most diffused starter formulation in winemaking is actually represented by active dry yeast (ADY). Spray-drying has been reported as an appropriate preservation method for yeast and other micro-organisms. Despite the numerous advantages of this method, the high air temperatures used can negatively affect cell viability and the fermentative performance of dried cells. In the present study, 11 wine S. cerevisiae strains (both indigenous and commercial) were submitted to spray-drying; different process conditions were tested in order to select the conditions allowing the highest strain survival. The strains exhibited high variability for tolerance to spray-drying treatment. Selected strains were tested in fermentation at laboratory scale in different formulations (free fresh cells, free dried cells, immobilized fresh cells and immobilized dried cells), in order to assess the influence of starter formulation on fermentative fitness of strains and aromatic quality of wine. The analysis of volatile fraction in the experimental wines produced by selected strains in different formulations allowed identification of > 50 aromatic compounds (alcohols, esters, ketones, aldehydes and terpenes). The results obtained showed that the starter formulation significantly influenced the content of volatile compounds. In particular, the wines obtained by strains in dried forms (as both free and immobilized cells) contained higher numbers of volatile compounds than wines obtained from fresh cells. PMID:25100258

  18. Penicillium salamii strain ITEM 15302: A new promising fungal starter for salami production.

    PubMed

    Magistà, D; Ferrara, M; Del Nobile, M A; Gammariello, D; Conte, A; Perrone, G

    2016-08-16

    Traditional sausages are often considered of superior quality to sausages inoculated with commercial starter cultures and this is partially due to the action of the typical house microflora. Penicillium nalgiovense is the species commonly used as starter culture for dry-cured meat production. Recently a new species, Penicillium salamii, was described as typical colonizer during salami seasoning. In order to understand its contribution to the seasoning process, two different experiments on curing of fresh pork sausages were conducted using P. salamii ITEM 15302 in comparison with P. nalgiovense ITEM 15292 at small and industrial scale, and the dry-cured sausages were subjected to sensory analyses. Additionally, proteolytic and lipolytic in vitro assays were performed on both strains. P. salamii ITEM 15302 proved to be a fast growing mould on dry-cured sausage casings, well adapted to the seasoning process, with high lipolytic and proteolytic enzymatic activity that confers typical sensory characteristics to meat products. Therefore, P. salamii ITEM 15302 was shown to be a good candidate as new starter for meat industry. PMID:27183229

  19. Performance and Metabolism of Calves Fed Starter Feed Containing Sugarcane Molasses or Glucose Syrup as a Replacement for Corn.

    PubMed

    Oltramari, C E; Nápoles, G G O; De Paula, M R; Silva, J T; Gallo, M P C; Pasetti, M H O; Bittar, C M M

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of replacing corn grain for sugar cane molasses (MO) or glucose syrup (GS) in the starter concentrate on performance and metabolism of dairy calves. Thirty-six individually housed Holstein male calves were blocked according to weight and date of birth and assigned to one of the starter feed treatments, during an 8 week study: i) starter containing 65% corn with no MO or GS (0MO); ii) starter containing 60% corn and 5% MO (5MO); iii) starter containing 55% corn and 10% MO (10MO); and iv) starter containing 60% corn and 5% GS (5GS). Animals received 4 L of milk replacer daily (20 crude protein, 16 ether extract, 12.5% solids), divided in two meals (0700 and 1700 h). Starter and water were provided ad libitum. Starter intake and fecal score were monitored daily until animals were eight weeks old. Body weight and measurements (withers height, hip width and heart girth) were measured weekly before the morning feeding. From the second week of age, blood samples were collected weekly, 2 h after the morning feeding, for glucose, β-hydroxybutyrate and lactate determination. Ruminal fluid was collected at 4, 6, and 8 weeks of age using an oro-ruminal probe and a suction pump for determination of pH and short-chain fatty acids (SCFA). At the end of the eighth week, animals were harvested to evaluate development of the proximal digestive tract. The composition of the starter did not affect (p>0.05) concentrate intake, weight gain, fecal score, blood parameters, and rumen development. However, treatment 5MO showed higher (p<0.05) total concentration of SCFAs, acetate and propionate than 0MO, and these treatments did not differ from 10MO and 5GS (p>0.05). Thus, it can be concluded that the replacement of corn by 5% or 10% sugar cane molasses or 5% GS on starter concentrate did not impact performance, however it has some positive effects on rumen fermentation which may be beneficial for calves with a developing rumen. PMID

  20. Performance and Metabolism of Calves Fed Starter Feed Containing Sugarcane Molasses or Glucose Syrup as a Replacement for Corn.

    PubMed

    Oltramari, C E; Nápoles, G G O; De Paula, M R; Silva, J T; Gallo, M P C; Pasetti, M H O; Bittar, C M M

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of replacing corn grain for sugar cane molasses (MO) or glucose syrup (GS) in the starter concentrate on performance and metabolism of dairy calves. Thirty-six individually housed Holstein male calves were blocked according to weight and date of birth and assigned to one of the starter feed treatments, during an 8 week study: i) starter containing 65% corn with no MO or GS (0MO); ii) starter containing 60% corn and 5% MO (5MO); iii) starter containing 55% corn and 10% MO (10MO); and iv) starter containing 60% corn and 5% GS (5GS). Animals received 4 L of milk replacer daily (20 crude protein, 16 ether extract, 12.5% solids), divided in two meals (0700 and 1700 h). Starter and water were provided ad libitum. Starter intake and fecal score were monitored daily until animals were eight weeks old. Body weight and measurements (withers height, hip width and heart girth) were measured weekly before the morning feeding. From the second week of age, blood samples were collected weekly, 2 h after the morning feeding, for glucose, β-hydroxybutyrate and lactate determination. Ruminal fluid was collected at 4, 6, and 8 weeks of age using an oro-ruminal probe and a suction pump for determination of pH and short-chain fatty acids (SCFA). At the end of the eighth week, animals were harvested to evaluate development of the proximal digestive tract. The composition of the starter did not affect (p>0.05) concentrate intake, weight gain, fecal score, blood parameters, and rumen development. However, treatment 5MO showed higher (p<0.05) total concentration of SCFAs, acetate and propionate than 0MO, and these treatments did not differ from 10MO and 5GS (p>0.05). Thus, it can be concluded that the replacement of corn by 5% or 10% sugar cane molasses or 5% GS on starter concentrate did not impact performance, however it has some positive effects on rumen fermentation which may be beneficial for calves with a developing rumen.

  1. Performance and Metabolism of Calves Fed Starter Feed Containing Sugarcane Molasses or Glucose Syrup as a Replacement for Corn

    PubMed Central

    Oltramari, C. E.; Nápoles, G. G. O.; De Paula, M. R.; Silva, J. T.; Gallo, M. P. C.; Pasetti, M. H. O.; Bittar, C. M. M.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of replacing corn grain for sugar cane molasses (MO) or glucose syrup (GS) in the starter concentrate on performance and metabolism of dairy calves. Thirty-six individually housed Holstein male calves were blocked according to weight and date of birth and assigned to one of the starter feed treatments, during an 8 week study: i) starter containing 65% corn with no MO or GS (0MO); ii) starter containing 60% corn and 5% MO (5MO); iii) starter containing 55% corn and 10% MO (10MO); and iv) starter containing 60% corn and 5% GS (5GS). Animals received 4 L of milk replacer daily (20 crude protein, 16 ether extract, 12.5% solids), divided in two meals (0700 and 1700 h). Starter and water were provided ad libitum. Starter intake and fecal score were monitored daily until animals were eight weeks old. Body weight and measurements (withers height, hip width and heart girth) were measured weekly before the morning feeding. From the second week of age, blood samples were collected weekly, 2 h after the morning feeding, for glucose, β-hydroxybutyrate and lactate determination. Ruminal fluid was collected at 4, 6, and 8 weeks of age using an oro-ruminal probe and a suction pump for determination of pH and short-chain fatty acids (SCFA). At the end of the eighth week, animals were harvested to evaluate development of the proximal digestive tract. The composition of the starter did not affect (p>0.05) concentrate intake, weight gain, fecal score, blood parameters, and rumen development. However, treatment 5MO showed higher (p<0.05) total concentration of SCFAs, acetate and propionate than 0MO, and these treatments did not differ from 10MO and 5GS (p>0.05). Thus, it can be concluded that the replacement of corn by 5% or 10% sugar cane molasses or 5% GS on starter concentrate did not impact performance, however it has some positive effects on rumen fermentation which may be beneficial for calves with a developing rumen. PMID

  2. Addition of enzyme to starter and grower diets for ducks.

    PubMed

    Hong, D; Burrows, H; Adeola, O

    2002-12-01

    The growth performance and nutrient utilization responses of White Pekin ducks to a commercial enzyme preparation were investigated. The enzyme contained 4,000 units amylase, 12,000 units protease, and 1,600 units xylanase per gram. Twelve pens of 10 ducks were fed diets based on corn and soybean meal and wheat middlings. The diets contained the enzyme mixture at 0, 0.375, or 0.5 g/kg in a growth study for 42 d. At the end of growth study, four ducks from each of eight pens per diet were retained and continued their respective diets containing 2.5 g Cr2O3/kg for 7 d. Intestinal content was sampled to determine ileal digestibilities of energy, nitrogen, and amino acids. One duck from each pen was selected at the end of the growth study and was fitted with retainer rings around the vent for the attachment of an excreta collection apparatus; these ducks were maintained on their respective diets containing 2.5 g Cr2O3/ kg to determine dietary nitrogen, amino acids, and energy retention. Results from the performance study showed a 6 to 8% increase (P < 0.05) in BW gain for birds fed diets containing the enzyme. There was also an enzyme-related improvement in feed efficiency (P < 0.05) over the 42-d study. Ileal nitrogen digestibility was highest (P < 0.05) for ducks fed diets containing the enzyme preparation at 0.5 g/kg, but ileal digestibility of energy was not affected by enzyme supplementation of diets. Apparent nitrogen retention was greater (P < 0.05) in ducks that received enzyme at 0.5 g/kg diet than in ducks fed diets without the enzyme. Energy retention (AME and AMEn) of diets was not affected by the addition of enzyme to diets. Excreta amino acid digestibilities were found to be consistently higher than ileal estimates. The mean ileal amino acid digestibility coefficients in diets with enzyme at 0, 0.375, and 0.5 g/kg were 86.94, 88.82, and 88.87%, respectively. The addition of enzyme improved (P < 0.05) ileal amino acid digestibility and apparent amino acid

  3. Lactic Acid Bacterial Starter Culture with Antioxidant and γ-Aminobutyric Acid Biosynthetic Activities Isolated from Flatfish-Sikhae Fermentation.

    PubMed

    Won, Yeong Geol; Yu, Hyun-Hee; Chang, Young-Hyo; Hwang, Han-Joon

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study is to select a lactic acid bacterial strain as a starter culture for flatfish-Sikhae fermentation and to evaluate its suitability for application in a food system. Four strains of lactic acid bacteria isolated from commercial flatfish-Sikhae were identified and selected as starter culture candidates through investigation of growth rates, salt tolerance, food safety, and functional properties such as antioxidative and antimicrobial activities. The fermentation properties of the starter candidates were also examined in food systems prepared with these strains (candidate batch) in comparison with a spontaneous fermentation process without starter culture (control batch) at 15°C. The results showed that the candidate YG331 batch had better fermentation properties such as viable cell count, pH, and acidity than the other experimental batches, including the control batch. The results are expressed according to selection criteria based on a preliminary sensory evaluation and physiochemical investigation. Also, only a small amount of histamine was detected with the candidate YG331 batch. The radical scavenging activity of the candidate batches was better compared with the control batch, and especially candidate YG331 batch showed the best radical scavenging activity. Also, we isolated another starter candidate (identified as Lactobacillus brevis PM03) with γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-producing activity from commercial flatfish-Sikhae products. The sensory scores of the candidate YG331 batch were better than those of the other experimental batches in terms of flavor, color, and overall acceptance. In this study, we established selection criteria for the lactic acid bacterial starter for the flatfish-Sikhae production and finally selected candidate YG331 as the most suitable starter.

  4. Invited review: Microbial evolution in raw-milk, long-ripened cheeses produced using undefined natural whey starters.

    PubMed

    Gatti, Monica; Bottari, Benedetta; Lazzi, Camilla; Neviani, Erasmo; Mucchetti, Germano

    2014-02-01

    The robustness of the starter culture during cheese fermentation is enhanced by the presence of a rich consortium of microbes. Natural starters are consortia of microbes undoubtedly richer than selected starters. Among natural starters, natural whey starters (NWS) are the most common cultures currently used to produce different varieties of cheeses. Undefined NWS are typically used for Italian cooked, long-ripened, extra-hard, raw milk cheeses, such as Parmigiano Reggiano and Grana Padano. Together with raw milk microbiota, NWS are responsible for most cheese characteristics. The microbial ecology of these 2 cheese varieties is based on a complex interaction among starter lactic acid bacteria (SLAB) and nonstarter lactic acid bacteria (NSLAB), which are characterized by their different abilities to grow in a changing substrate. This review aims to summarize the latest findings on Parmigiano Reggiano and Grana Padano to better understand the dynamics of SLAB, which mainly arise from NWS, and NSLAB, which mainly arise from raw milk, and their possible role in determining the characteristics of these cheeses. The review is presented in 4 main sections. The first summarizes the main microbiological and chemical properties of the ripened cheese as determined by cheese-making process variables, as these variables may affect microbial growth. The second describes the microbiota of raw milk as affected by specific milk treatments, from milking to the filling of the cheese milk vat. The third describes the microbiota of NWS, and the fourth reviews the knowledge available on microbial dynamics from curd to ripened cheese. As the dynamics and functionality of complex undefined NWS is one of the most important areas of focus in current food microbiology research, this review may serve as a good starting point for implementing future studies on microbial diversity and functionality of undefined cheese starter cultures.

  5. Multichannel electrochemical microbial detection unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkins, J. R.; Young, R. N.; Boykin, E. H.

    1978-01-01

    The paper describes the design and capabilities of a compact multichannel electrochemical unit devised to detect and automatically indicate detection time length of bacteria. By connecting this unit to a strip-chart recorder, a permanent record is obtained of the end points and growth curves for each of eight channels. The experimental setup utilizing the multichannel unit consists of a test tube (25 by 150 mm) containing a combination redox electrode plus 18 ml of lauryl tryptose broth and positioned in a 35-C water bath. Leads from the electrodes are connected to the multichannel unit, which in turn is connected to a strip-chart recorder. After addition of 2.0 ml of inoculum to the test tubes, depression of the push-button starter activates the electronics, timer, and indicator light for each channel. The multichannel unit is employed to test tenfold dilutions of various members of the Enterobacteriaceae group, and a typical dose-response curve is presented.

  6. Staphylococcus aureus growth and survival during curding of Manchego type cheese produced with normal and subnormal starter activity.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Lucia, E; Goyache, J; Blanco, J L; Vadillo, S; Garayzabal, J F; Suarez, G

    1987-04-01

    Manchego type cheese was manufactured from milk from cows, goats and ewes artificially contaminated with 2 X 10(4) S. aureus cells ml. Lactic starter culture was added to the milk at the rate of 1.0 or 0.1% (v/v). the industrial process of Manchego type cheese manufacture was imitated. Cheeses were analyzed for both staphylococcal and non-staphylococcal total aerobic counts, as well as for the pH and enterotoxin production. Growth differences in staphylococcal counts in cheeses prepared with both starter concentrations were seen only after the brine treatment, the counts were 10 times greater with the 0.1% starter. Nevertheless, with the 1% starter culture the staphylococcal counts did not decrease from the moment of inoculation remaining high after brine treatment. For a similar inoculum, the strains used responded in a different manner, the highest values corresponding to strains FRI-100, S6 and FRI-472, and the lowest to FRI-137 and FRI-361. No differences in pH were seen between batches prepared with both starter concentrations. PMID:3590995

  7. Discriminative game-related statistics between basketball starters and nonstarters when related to team quality and game outcome.

    PubMed

    Sampaio, Jaime; Ibáñez, Sergio; Lorenzo, Alberto; Gómez, Miguel

    2006-10-01

    The aim of the present paper was to examine the differences in game-related statistics between basketball players who are selected for the starting five of the team (starters) and those who are not (nonstarters) when related to game outcome (winning and losing) and team quality (best teams, teams classified for the playoffs; and worst teams, teams who miss playoff classification). Archival data were gathered for all 2002-2003 regular season games from the Portuguese Professional League (N = 156). Discriminant analysis was used to identify the game-related statistics that differentiate between starters and nonstarters and interpreted by the examination of the structure coefficients (SC). When the best teams won the games, results described differences between starters and nonstarters with an emphasis on defensive rebounds (SC = .32), assists (SC = .32) and committed fouls (SC = -.68). When the worst teams won the games, results described differences between starters and nonstarters with an emphasis on 2-point field goals successful (SC = .47) and unsuccessful (SC = .48), defensive rebounds (SC =.39), successful free throws (SC =.32), and committed fouls (SC = -.55). An also important finding was that, in best teams, the nonstarters' performance was worse in the games that the team lost, whereas in worst teams, it was the starters' performance that was worse in the games that the team lost.

  8. Competitiveness and antibacterial potential of bacteriocin-producing starter cultures in different types of fermented sausages.

    PubMed

    Ravyts, Frédéric; Barbuti, Silvana; Frustoli, Maria Angela; Parolari, Giovanni; Saccani, Giovanna; De Vuyst, Luc; Leroy, Frédéric

    2008-09-01

    Application of bacteriocin-producing starter cultures of lactic acid bacteria in fermented sausage production contributes to food safety. This is sometimes hampered by limited efficacy in situ and by uncertainty about strain dependency and universal applicability for different sausage types. In the present study, a promising antilisterial-bacteriocin producer, Lactobacillus sakei CTC 494, was applied as a coculture in addition to commercial fermentative starters in different types of dry-fermented sausages. The strain was successful in both Belgian-type sausage and Italian salami that were artificially contaminated with about 3.5 log CFU g(-1) of Listeria monocytogenes. After completion of the production process, this led to listerial reductions of up to 1.4 and 0.6 log CFU g(-1), respectively. In a control sausage, containing only the commercial fermentative starter, the reduction was limited to 0.8 log CFU g(-1) for the Belgian-type recipe, where pH decreased from 5.9 to 4.9, whereas an increase of 0.2 log CFU g(-1) was observed for Italian salami, in which the pH rose from 5.7 to 5.9 after an initial decrease to pH 5.3. In a Cacciatore recipe inoculated with 5.5 log CFU g(-1) of L. monocytogenes and in the presence of L. sakei CTC 494, there was a listerial reduction of 1.8 log CFU g(-1) at the end of the production process. This was superior to the effect obtained with the control sausage (0.8 log CFU g(-1)). Two commercial antilisterial cultures yielded reductions of 1.2 and 1.5 log CFU g(-1). Moreover, repetitive DNA sequence-based PCR fingerprinting demonstrated the competitive superiority of L. sakei CTC 494.

  9. Robustness of Lactobacillus plantarum starters during daily propagation of wheat flour sourdough type I.

    PubMed

    Minervini, Fabio; De Angelis, Maria; Di Cagno, Raffaella; Pinto, Daniela; Siragusa, Sonya; Rizzello, Carlo Giuseppe; Gobbetti, Marco

    2010-10-01

    This study aimed at investigating the robustness of selected sourdough strains of Lactobacillus plantarum. Seven strains were singly used as sourdough type I starters under daily back-slopping propagation (ten days) using wheat flour. Cell numbers of presumptive lactic acid bacteria varied slightly (median values of 9.13-9.46 log cfu g(-1)) between and within started sourdoughs, as well as the acidifying activity (median values of 1.24-1.33). After three days also the control sourdough (unstarted) had the same values. As shown by RAPD-PCR analysis, five (DB200, 3DM, G10C3, 12H1 and LP20) out of seven strains maintained elevated cell numbers (ca. 9 log cfu g(-1)) throughout ten days. The other two strains progressively decreased to less than 5 log cfu g(-1). As identified by partial sequencing of 16S rRNA and recA genes, L. plantarum (11 isolates), pediococci (7), Lactobacillus casei (3) and Lactobacillus rossiae (2) dominated the flour microbiota. Monitoring of lactic acid bacteria during sourdough propagation was carried out by culture dependent approach and using PCR-DGGE (Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis). Except for the sourdough started with L. plantarum LP20, in all other sourdoughs at least one autochthonous strain of L. plantarum emerged. All emerging strains of L. plantarum showed different RAPD-PCR profiles. L. rossiae and Pediococcus pentosaceus were only found in the control and sourdough started with strain 12H1. The characterization of the catabolic profiles of sourdoughs (Biolog System) showed that sourdoughs containing persistent starters behaved similarly and their profiles were clearly differentiated from the others. One persistent strain (DB200) of L. plantarum and Lactobacillus sanfranciscensis LS44, previously shown to be persistent (Siragusa et al., 2009), were used as the mixed starter to produce a wheat flour sourdough. Both strains cohabited and dominated during ten days of propagation.

  10. Fermentation profile of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida tropicalis as starter cultures on barley malt medium.

    PubMed

    Alloue-Boraud, Wazé Aimée Mireille; N'Guessan, Kouadio Florent; Djeni, N'Dédé Théodore; Hiligsmann, Serge; Djè, Koffi Marcellin; Delvigne, Franck

    2015-08-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae C8-5 and Candida tropicalis F0-5 isolated from traditional sorghum beer were tested for kinetic parameters on barley malt extract, YPD (863 medium) and for alcohol production. The results showed that C. tropicalis has the highest maximum growth rate and the lowest doubling time. Values were 0.22 and 0.32 h(-1) for maximum growth rate, 3 h 09 min and 2 h 09 min for doubling time respectively on barley malt extract and YPD. On contrary, glucose consumption was the fastest with S. cerevisiae (-0.36 and -0.722 g/l/h respectively on barley malt extract and YPD). When these two yeasts were used as starters in pure culture and co-culture at proportion of 1:1 and 2:1 (cell/cell) for barley malt extract fermentation, we noticed that maltose content increased first from 12.12 g/l to 13.62-16.46 g/l and then decreased. The highest increase was obtained with starter C. tropicalis + S. cerevisiae 2:1. On contrary, glucose content decreased throughout all the fermentation process. For all the starters used, the major part of the ethanol was produced at 16 h of fermentation. Values obtained in the final beers were 11.4, 11.6, 10.4 and 10.9 g/l for fermentation conducted with S. cerevisiae, C. tropicalis, C. tropicalis + S. cerevisiae 1:1 and C. tropicalis + S. cerevisiae 2:1. Cell viability measurement during the fermentation by using flow cytometry revealed that the lowest mean channel fluorescence for FL3 (yeast rate of death) was obtained with C. tropicalis + S. cerevisiae 2:1 after 48 h of fermentation.

  11. Effects of Leuconostoc mesenteroides starter culture on fermentation of cabbage with reduced salt concentrations.

    PubMed

    Johanningsmeier, Suzanne; McFeeters, Roger F; Fleming, Henry P; Thompson, Roger L

    2007-06-01

    Sauerkraut fermentations rely upon selection of naturally occurring lactic acid bacteria by addition of 2.0% to 2.25% granulated sodium chloride (NaCl) to shredded cabbage. Excess brine generated is a waste product with high levels of organic material (BOD) and nonbiodegradable NaCl. The objective was to determine whether addition of Leuconostoc mesenteroides starter culture to reduced-salt cabbage fermentations would yield sauerkraut with reproducible and acceptable chemical composition and sensory qualities. Shredded cabbage was salted with 0.5%, 1.0%, or 2.0% NaCl (wt/wt) at 2 starter culture levels, none or L. mesenteroides strain LA 81, ATCC 8293 (10(6) CFU/g). Fermentation products were quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography, and pH was measured during the initial stages of fermentation and after 10 mo storage at 18 degrees C. A trained descriptive sensory panel used category scales to rate the flavor and texture of selected sauerkrauts. A modified Kramer shear test was used to measure firmness. Cabbage fermented with L. mesenteroides consistently resulted in sauerkraut with firm texture and reduced off-flavors across all salt levels (P < 0.05). Conversely, sauerkraut quality was highly variable, with softening and off-flavors occurring as salt concentrations were decreased in natural fermentations (P < 0.05). Fermentations were rapid, with a more uniform decline in pH when starter culture was added. L. mesenteroides addition to cabbage fermentations ensured that texture and flavor quality were retained, while allowing 50% NaCl reduction. Application of this technology to commercial sauerkraut production could improve the uniformity of fermentations and substantially reduce generation of nonbiodegradable chloride waste.

  12. Metabolomic assessment of fermentative capability of soybean starter treated with high pressure.

    PubMed

    Ko, Bong-Kuk; Kim, Ki Myong; Hong, Young-Shick; Lee, Cherl-Ho

    2010-08-11

    Meju, a brick of dried fermented soybean naturally inoculated with microorganisms, is a starter used for producing traditional Korean fermented soybean products such as soybean paste (doenjang) and soy sauce (ganjang). In order to reduce aging time during production of soybean paste and soy sauce, high pressure (HP) treatment was applied to the meju starter at 500 MPa of pressure for 10 min at 15 degrees C. Fermentative behaviors of normal and HP-treated meju were assessed and compared through physicochemical and (1)H NMR-based metabolomic analysis. All mejues were incubated for 3 weeks at 30 degrees C. At 1 week of incubation, total bacterial population decreased mainly due to a reduction of water content by spontaneous evaporation during the incubation period. As the incubation time increased, glutamate, proline, betain, choline, and phosphocholine levels increased in both normal and HP-treated mejues, indicating that microorganisms in the mejues synthesize these metabolites to endure intracellular hyperosmotic stress induced by the reduction in water content. Through 3 weeks of incubation, the amino-type nitrogen contents and neutral protease activities in HP-treated meju were significantly higher (p < 0.05) than in normal meju, even though total bacterial content in HP-treated meju was 2 or 3 times lower. Moreover, marked increases in glycerol, acetate, tyrosine, and choline levels were observed in HP-treated meju compared to normal meju. In particular, higher levels of tyrosine in HP-treated meju were consistent with the increased neutral protease activities compared to normal meju, indicating an improvement in enzyme stability with HP treatment. These findings highlight a new or better understanding of the influence of the HP or physical treatments on fermentative products in food processing, such as those associated with soybean paste and soy sauce, regarding metabolic behaviors in fermentative starter induced by HP treatment. PMID:20681663

  13. Growth and activity of Bulgarian yogurt starter culture in iron-fortified milk.

    PubMed

    Simova, Emilina; Ivanov, Galin; Simov, Zhelyazko

    2008-10-01

    Bulgarian yogurts were manufactured and fortified with 8, 15 and 27 mg of iron kg(-1) of yogurt. The growth and acidifying activity of the starter culture bacteria Streptococcus thermophilus 13a and Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus 2-11 were monitored during milk fermentation and over 15 days of yogurt storage at 4 degrees C. Fortifying milk with iron did not affect significantly the growth of the starter culture during manufacture and storage of yogurt. Counts of yogurt bacteria at the end of fermentation of iron-fortified milks were between 2.1 x 10(10) and 4.6 x 10(10) CFU ml(-1), which were not significantly different from numbers in unfortified yogurts. In all batches of yogurt, the viable cell counts of S. thermophilus 13a were approximately three times higher than those of L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus 2-11. Greater decrease in viable cell count over 15 days of storage was observed for S. thermophilus 13a compared to L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus 2-11. Intensive accumulation of lactic acid was observed during incubation of milk and all batches reached pH 4.5 +/- 0.1 after 3.0 h. At the end of fermentation process, lactic acid concentrations in iron-fortified yogurts were between 6.9 +/- 0.4 and 7.3 +/- 0.5 g l(-1). The acidifying activity of starter culture bacteria in the control and iron-fortified milks was similar. There was no increase in oxidized, metallic and bitter off-flavors in iron-fortified yogurts compared to the control. Iron-fortified yogurts did not differ significantly in their sensorial, chemical and microbiological characteristics with unfortified yogurt, suggesting that yogurt is a suitable vehicle for iron fortification and that the ferrous lactate is an appropriate iron source for yogurt fortification.

  14. Performance and plasma metabolites of dairy calves fed starter containing sodium butyrate, calcium propionate or sodium monensin.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, L S; Bittar, C M M

    2011-02-01

    This study was conducted to examine the influence of supplementation of sodium butyrate, sodium monensin or calcium propionate in a starter diet on the performance and selected plasma metabolites (plasma glucose, non-esterified fatty acids and β-hydroxybutyrate) of Holstein calves during pre- and post-weaning periods. Twenty-four newborn Holstein calves were housed in individual hutches until 10 weeks of life, receiving water free choice, and fed four liters of milk daily. Calves were blocked according to weight and date of birth, and allocated to one of the following treatments, according to the additive in the starter: (i) sodium butyrate (150 g/kg); (ii) sodium monensin (30 mg/kg); and (iii) calcium propionate (150 g/kg). During 10 weeks, calves received starter ad libitum, while coast cross hay (Cynodon dactylon (L.) pers.) was offered after weaning, which occurred at the 8th week of age. Weekly, calves were weighted and evaluated for body measurements. Blood samples were taken weekly after the fourth week of age, 2 hours after the morning feeding, for determination of plasma metabolites. No differences were observed among treatments for starter or hay intake, BW and daily gain of the animals. Mean concentrations of selected plasma metabolites were similar in calves fed a starter supplemented with sodium butyrate, sodium monensin and calcium propionate. There was significant reduction in the concentrations of plasma glucose as calves aged. The inclusion of sodium butyrate, calcium propionate or sodium monensin as additives in starter feeds resulted in equal animal performance, before and after weaning, suggesting that sodium monensin may be replaced by organic acid salts.

  15. Short communication: Effect of calf starter on rumen pH of Holstein dairy calves at weaning.

    PubMed

    Laarman, A H; Oba, M

    2011-11-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of feeding calf starter on rumen pH of dairy calves during weaning transition. Twenty Holstein bull calves were paired into 10 blocks by starting date of the study and body weight, and fed either milk replacer and hay (MR) or MR, hay, and a commercial texturized calf starter (MR+S) in a randomized complete block design. All calves were fed 750 g/d of milk replacer as the basal diet. Calves on MR+S treatment were also fed a calf starter ad libitum to maintain similar energy intake between calves within blocks, and MR calves were fed additional milk replacer that was equivalent to energy from calf starter intake. When MR+S calves consumed a calf starter at 680 g/d for 3 consecutive d, rumen pH of a MR+S calf and his MR counterpart was measured continuously for 3 d using a small ruminant rumen pH measurement system. Treatment did not affect minimum pH, mean pH, maximum pH, standard deviation of mean pH, and duration or area under pH 5.8, indicating that calf starter consumption did not appear to affect rumen pH. However, hay intake was negatively correlated to area under pH 5.8, with a breakpoint at 0.080 kg/d intake, suggesting hay intake might play an important role in mitigating ruminal acidosis in dairy calves during weaning transition.

  16. Bacterial species associated with traditional starter cultures used for fermented bamboo shoot production in Manipur state of India.

    PubMed

    Jeyaram, K; Romi, W; Singh, Th Anand; Devi, A Ranjita; Devi, S Soni

    2010-09-30

    Soidon is a non-salted acidic fermented food prepared from the succulent bamboo shoot tip of Schizostachyum capitatum Munro by using a traditional liquid starter called "soidon mahi" in Manipur state of India. In this study, 163 bacterial isolates associated with this starter samples were identified and their population distribution was investigated by amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA), 16S rDNA sequencing and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis. This acidic starter (pH 4.5+/-0.15) was dominated by a characteristic association of Bacillus and lactic acid bacteria (LAB) together. The population distribution of dominant species were Bacillus subtilis 29.3%, Bacillus cereus 35.7%, Bacillus pumilus 2.6%, Lactobacillus brevis 9.6%, Lactobacillus plantarum 5.1%, Carnobacterium sp. 11.9%, Enterococcus faecium 1.2% and Pseudomonas fluorescens 4.6%. Alarming population load (10(6)-10(7)cfu/ml) of B. cereus in 87% of starter samples studied should raise concern regarding biosafety of soidon consumption. PCR amplification of 16S-23S rDNA intergenic transcribed spacer (ITS) region and ITS-RFLP profiles revealed a high diversity with eight subgroups in B. subtilis, five subgroups in B. cereus and three subgroups in L. brevis isolates. The most abundant B. subtilis subgroup IB.1 distributed in most of the samples showed very less clonal variability during RAPD analysis. The molecular methods used in this study identified the dominant strains of Bacillus and LAB distributed in most of the starter samples. These dominant strains of B. subtilis, L. brevis and L. plantarum would allow for developing a defined starter culture for the production of quality soidon.

  17. Effect of hydrostatic high-pressure processing on the chemical, functional, and rheological properties of starter-free Queso Fresco.

    PubMed

    Van Hekken, D L; Tunick, M H; Farkye, N Y; Tomasula, P M

    2013-10-01

    Queso Fresco (QF), a popular high-moisture, high-pH Hispanic-style cheese sold in the United States, underwent high-pressure processing (HPP), which has the potential to improve the safety of cheese, to determine the effects of this process on quality traits of the cheese. Starter-free, rennet-set QF (manufactured from pasteurized, homogenized milk, milled before hooping, and not pressed) was cut into 4.5- × 4.5- × 15-cm blocks and double vacuum packaged. Phase 1 of the research examined the effects of hydrostatic HPP on the quality traits of fresh QF that had been warmed to a core temperature of 20 or 40 °C; processed at 200, 400, or 600 MPa for 5, 10, or 20 min; and stored at 4 °C for 6 to 8d. Phase 2 examined the long-term effects of HPP on quality traits when QF was treated at 600 MPa for 3 or 10 min, and stored at 4 or 10 °C for up to 12 wk. Warming the QF to 40 °C before packaging and exposure to high pressure resulted in loss of free whey from the cheese into the package, lower moisture content, and harder cheese. In phase 2, the control QF, regardless of aging temperature, was significantly softer than HPP cheeses over the 12 wk of storage. Hardness, fracture stress, and fracture rigidity increased with length of exposure time and storage temperature, with minor changes in the other properties. Queso Fresco remained a bright white, weak-bodied cheese that crumbled and did not melt upon heating. Although high pressures or long processing times may be required for the elimination of pathogens, cheese producers must be aware that HPP altered the rheological properties of QF and caused wheying-off in cheeses not pressed before packaging.

  18. Development of a multiplex real time PCR to detect thermophilic lactic acid bacteria in natural whey starters.

    PubMed

    Bottari, Benedetta; Agrimonti, Caterina; Gatti, Monica; Neviani, Erasmo; Marmiroli, Nelson

    2013-01-01

    A multiplex real time PCR (mRealT-PCR) useful to rapidly screen microbial composition of thermophilic starter cultures for hard cooked cheeses and to compare samples with potentially different technological properties was developed. Novel primers directed toward pheS gene were designed and optimized for multiple detection of Lactobacillus helveticus, Lactobacillus delbrueckii, Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus fermentum. The assay was based on SYBR Green chemistry followed by melting curves analysis. The method was then evaluated for applications in the specific detection of the 4 lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in 29 different natural whey starters for Parmigiano Reggiano cheese production. The results obtained by mRealT-PCR were also compared with those obtained on the same samples by Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization (FISH) and Length-Heterogeneity PCR (LH-PCR). The mRealT-PCR developed in this study, was found to be effective for analyzing species present in the samples with an average sensitivity down to less than 600 copies of DNA and therefore sensitive enough to detect even minor LAB community members of thermophilic starter cultures. The assay was able to describe the microbial population of all the different natural whey starter samples analyzed, despite their natural variability. A higher number of whey starter samples with S. thermophilus and L. fermentum present in their microbial community were revealed, suggesting that these species could be more frequent in Parmigiano Reggiano natural whey starter samples than previously shown. The method was more effective than LH-PCR and FISH and, considering that these two techniques have to be used in combination to detect the less abundant species, the mRealT-PCR was also faster. Providing a single step sensitive detection of L. helveticus, L. delbrueckii, S. thermophilus and L. fermentum, the developed mRealT-PCR could be used for screening thermophilic starter cultures and to follow the presence of

  19. The relative effect of milk base, starter, and process on yogurt texture: a review.

    PubMed

    Sodini, Isabelle; Remeuf, Florent; Haddad, Samia; Corrieu, Georges

    2004-01-01

    Yogurt is a milk curd produced all over the world, obtained by a lactic fermentation of a milk base enriched with milk proteins, and sometimes sugars and thickeners. One of the most important sensorial attributes for yogurt is texture, which could be assessed by sensory or instrumental analysis. A lot of work has been published in studying the contribution of milk base, starter, and process on yogurt texture in order to develop new textures, or simply to reduce fat content, or the level of addition of protein and thickener in milk. However, these studies are limited to only a few factors. The topic of this review was to synthesize the data of literature, with the aim of extracting and classifying factors on the basis of their influence on yogurt texture. Three factors, milk base heating, starter, and yogurt shearing after fermentation, respectively, play a key role in the elaboration of texture. The control of these three parameters allows the improvement of the textural attributes of yogurts by 2 to 15 times.

  20. Microbial ecology studies of spontaneous fermentation: starter culture selection for prickly pear wine production.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Lerma, G K; Gutiérrez-Moreno, K; Cárdenas-Manríquez, M; Botello-Álvarez, E; Jiménez-Islas, H; Rico-Martínez, R; Navarrete-Bolaños, J L

    2011-08-01

    A procedure for designing starter cultures for fermentation is illustrated for prickly pear wine production. The illustration includes kinetic studies on inoculated and spontaneous fermentation, microorganism identification studies based on molecular biology tools, and microbial ecology studies, which led to the selection of strains that are capable of synthesizing alcohol and desirable volatile compounds. Results show that a mixed starter inoculum containing Pichia fermentans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae leads to a fermented product that contains 8.37% alcohol (v/v). The gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis shows the presence of 9 major volatile compounds (Isobutanol, Isopentanol, Ethyl acetate, Isoamyl acetate, Ethyl octanoate, Ethyl decanoate, Ethyl 9-decanoate, β-Phenylethyl acetate, and Phenylethyl alcohol) that have ethereal, fruity, aromatic notes that are considered to be essential for a fine wine flavor. These compounds harmonically synergize with the alcohol to produce a fermented product with a unique flavor and taste. Several assays using the mixed culture show that the process is stable, predictable, controllable, and reproducible. Moreover, the results show that a mixed culture leads to a broader range of aromatic products than that produced by a single, pure culture. Therefore, we conclude that combinations of Saccharomyces strains and non-Saccharomyces strains can be used to obtain high-quality fermented beverages from prickly pear juice. PMID:22417507

  1. A very high speed switched-reluctance starter-generator for aircraft engine applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacMinn, Stephen R.; Jones, William D.

    An electric direct-drive gearless starter-generator has been designed and built for an aircraft engine application. The system is based on a switched-reluctance motor, which was chosen for its simplicity, robustness, high-speed capability, and efficiency. The overall system configuration and the design of the switched-reluctance motor and its solid-state power converter are described. When operating as engine starter, the motor produces torque to spin the engine up to its light-off speed. Following light-off, the motor continues to produce torque to assist the engine in accelerating to idle speed. When the engine is running, the machine generates electrical power to supply engine and vehicle loads up to a peak operating speed of 50,000 rev/min. Key issues in the machine design are reliability, high speed, power density, and cost. Test results have verified that the system can meet the torque and generated-power requirements over its entire operating range.

  2. Rapid detection of bacteriophages in starter culture using water-in-oil-in-water emulsion microdroplets.

    PubMed

    Wang, Min S; Nitin, Nitin

    2014-10-01

    Bacteriophage contamination of starter culture and raw material poses a major problem in the fermentation industry. In this study, a rapid detection of lytic phage contamination in starter culture using water-in-oil-in-water (W/O/W) emulsion microdroplets was described. A model bacteria with varying concentrations of lytic phages were encapsulated in W/O/W emulsion microdroplets using a simple needle-in-tube setup. The detection of lytic phage contamination was accomplished in 1 h using the propidium iodide labeling of the phage-infected bacteria inside the W/O/W emulsion microdroplets. Using this approach, a detection limit of 10(2) PFU/mL of phages was achieved quantitatively, while 10(4) PFU/mL of phages could be detected qualitatively based on visual comparison of the fluorescence images. Given the simplicity and sensitivity of this approach, it is anticipated that this method can be adapted to any strains of bacteria and lytic phages that are commonly used for fermentation, and has potential for a rapid detection of lytic phage contamination in the fermentation industry.

  3. Short communication: Effect of inclusion rate of microencapsulated sodium butyrate in starter mixture for dairy calves.

    PubMed

    Wanat, P; Górka, P; Kowalski, Z M

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of different inclusion rates of microencapsulated sodium butyrate (M-SB) in the starter mixture (SM) on performance of dairy calves. Forty female Holstein calves with a mean (± SD) age of 12.8 (± 1.5) d were allocated to 1 of 4 treatments (10 calves/treatment) and fed SM without (M-SB-0) or with 0.3% (M-SB-0.3), 0.6% (M-SB-0.6), or 0.9% (M-SB-0.9) of M-SB (as fed) during a 49-d period of milk replacer feeding. The milk replacer was fed at 670 g/d divided into 2 equal meals. Starter mixture with or without M-SB was offered for ad libitum consumption beginning on the first day of the trial. Body weight of calves was recorded weekly, whereas intakes of milk replacer and SM and fecal fluidity were recorded daily. Intake of SM decreased linearly with increasing M-SB inclusion rate. Average daily gain decreased and body weight gain tended to decrease linearly with increasing amounts of M-SB in SM, but feed efficiency was not affected. Fecal score and number of days with diarrhea increased cubically with increasing M-SB inclusion rate in SM. Under the conditions of the current study, supplementation of SM with M-SB had a negative effect on performance of calves.

  4. Antifungal starter culture for packed bread: influence of two storage conditions.

    PubMed

    Gerez, Carla L; Fornaguera, María J; Obregozo, Mariano D; Font de Valdez, Graciela; Torino, María I

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we analyzed the conservation of a semi-liquid bio-preserver (SL778) developed with Lactobacillus plantarum CRL 778, a lactic acid bacterium (LAB) having antifungal activity. The characteristics of the SL778 starter remained stable during a 14-day storage at 4°C. At -20°C, cell viability and organic acid concentration showed a significant (p<0.05) decrease after 7 days. These differences observed between the storage temperatures tested were reflected in the acidification activity of SL778 during dough fermentation. However, SL778 maintained its antifungal efficacy up to a 14-day storage at both temperatures. Sensory attributes (acidic and spicy tastes and acidic smell) of breads manufactured with starter SL778 (stored at 4 or -20°C) were evaluated. No undesirable difference was detected with respect to bread control without SL778 and bread manufactured with SL778 (stored at 4 or -20°C). In conclusion, the SL778 semi-liquid bio-preserver can be stored at 4 or -20°C without modifying its antifungal activity during 14 days. PMID:25896466

  5. Antifungal starter culture for packed bread: influence of two storage conditions.

    PubMed

    Gerez, Carla L; Fornaguera, María J; Obregozo, Mariano D; Font de Valdez, Graciela; Torino, María I

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we analyzed the conservation of a semi-liquid bio-preserver (SL778) developed with Lactobacillus plantarum CRL 778, a lactic acid bacterium (LAB) having antifungal activity. The characteristics of the SL778 starter remained stable during a 14-day storage at 4°C. At -20°C, cell viability and organic acid concentration showed a significant (p<0.05) decrease after 7 days. These differences observed between the storage temperatures tested were reflected in the acidification activity of SL778 during dough fermentation. However, SL778 maintained its antifungal efficacy up to a 14-day storage at both temperatures. Sensory attributes (acidic and spicy tastes and acidic smell) of breads manufactured with starter SL778 (stored at 4 or -20°C) were evaluated. No undesirable difference was detected with respect to bread control without SL778 and bread manufactured with SL778 (stored at 4 or -20°C). In conclusion, the SL778 semi-liquid bio-preserver can be stored at 4 or -20°C without modifying its antifungal activity during 14 days.

  6. Patagonian red wines: selection of Lactobacillus plantarum isolates as potential starter cultures for malolactic fermentation.

    PubMed

    Bravo-Ferrada, Bárbara Mercedes; Hollmann, Axel; Delfederico, Lucrecia; Valdés La Hens, Danay; Caballero, Adriana; Semorile, Liliana

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate fifty-three Lactobacillus plantarum isolates obtained from a Patagonian red wine, molecularly identified and typified using RAPD analysis, in order to select starter cultures for malolactic fermentation (MLF). The results obtained suggest a considerable genetic diversity, taking into account that all L. plantarum isolates were obtained from one cellar and one vintage. Based on the capacity to tolerate a concentration of 14 % ethanol in MRS broth for 2 days, eight isolates were selected for the subsequent analysis. The incidence of various wine stress factors (ethanol, acid pH, lysozyme and sulfur dioxide) on isolates growth was studied. Besides, glucosidase and tannase activities were evaluated, and the presence of genes involved in the synthesis of biogenic amines was examined by PCR. A previously characterized indigenous Oenococcus oeni strain was included with comparative purposes. Differences in technologically relevant characteristics were observed among the eight L. plantarum selected isolates, revealing an isolate-dependent behavior. Detectable glucosidase and tannase activities were found in all isolates. The presence of genes encoding histidine and tyrosine descarboxylases and putrescine carbamoyltransferase was not detected. The ability of L. plantarum isolates to grow and consume L-malic acid in simulated laboratory-scale vinifications revealed that two of them could be considered as possible MLF starter cultures for Patagonian red wines. These isolates will be subjected to further analysis, for a final winery technological characterization.

  7. Whey valorisation: a complete and novel technology development for dairy industry starter culture production.

    PubMed

    Koutinas, Athanasios A; Papapostolou, Harris; Dimitrellou, Dimitra; Kopsahelis, Nikolaos; Katechaki, Eleftheria; Bekatorou, Argyro; Bosnea, Loulouda A

    2009-08-01

    Whey is the major by-product of the dairy industry, produced in large quantities and usually disposed off causing major environmental pollution, due to its high organic load that makes treatment cost prohibitive. This paper comprises a contribution on the valorisation of this high polluting liquid waste of the dairy industry, based on research for the production of novel dairy starter cultures using whey as raw material. Starter cultures are used for cheese ripening in order to: (i) accelerate ripening, (ii) improve quality and (iii) increase shelf-life. The developed technology involves biomass production from whey followed by thermal drying of cultures. Specifically, Kluyveromyces marxianus, Lactobacillus bulgaricus and kefir yeasts were thermally dried, and their efficiency in lactose and milk whey fermentations was studied. The most suitable culture regarding its technological properties was kefir, which was used for cheese ripening in freeze-dried and thermally dried form. Besides the reduction of production cost, which is an essential requirement for the food industry, the use of thermally dried kefir displayed several other advantages such as acceleration of ripening, increase of shelf-life, and improvement of hard-type cheese quality.

  8. Anti-Obesity Effects of Starter Fermented Kimchi on 3T3-L1 Adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyung-Hee; Song, Jia-Le; Park, Eui-Seong; Ju, Jaehyun; Kim, Hee-Young; Park, Kun-Young

    2015-01-01

    The anti-obesity effects of starter (Leuconostoc mesenteroides+Lactobacillus plantarum) fermented kimchi on 3T3-L1 adipocyte were studied using naturally fermented kimchi (NK), a functional kimchi (FK, NK supplemented with green tea), and FK supplemented with added starters (FKS). Oil red O staining and cellular levels of triglyceride (TG) and glycerol were used to evaluate the in vitro anti-obesity effects of these kimchis in 3T3-L1 cells. The expressions of adipogenesis/lipogenesis-related genes of peroxisome proliferator-active receptor (PPAR)-γ, CCAAT/enhance-binding protein (C/EBP)-α, and fatty acid synthase (FAS) were determined by RT-PCR. Kimchis, especially FKS, markedly decreased TG levels and increased levels of intracellular glycerol and lipid lipolysis. In addition, FKS also reduced the mRNA levels of PPAR-γ, C/EBP-α, and FAS, which are related to adipogenesis/lipogenesis in 3T3-L1 cells. These results suggest the anti-obesity effects of FKS were to due to enhanced lipolysis and reduced adipogenesis/lipogenesis in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. PMID:26770918

  9. Motor Starters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1986-01-01

    The power factor controller (PFC) was invented by a NASA engineer. It matches voltage with a motor's actual need by sensing shifts in the relationship between voltage and current flow. With the device, power can be trimmed as much as 65%. Intellinet adopted this technology and designed "soft start" and "load-responsive" control modes to start engines gradually and recycle voltage without reducing motor speed. Other features are lower motor heat and faster fault identification.

  10. Interactions between the physical form of starter (mashed versus textured) and corn silage provision on performance, rumen fermentation, and structural growth of Holstein calves.

    PubMed

    Mirzaei, M; Khorvash, M; Ghorbani, G R; Kazemi-Bonchenari, M; Riasi, A; Soltani, A; Moshiri, B; Ghaffari, M H

    2016-02-01

    Introducing forage in the young calf diet during the milk-feeding period stimulates rumen development. It was hypothesized that performance in dairy calves would depend on forage provision and starter physical form such that the textured starter (TS) feed with corn silage (CS) supplementation would benefit calf performance. This study evaluates the effects of the physical form of starter diets and CS supplementation on performance, rumen fermentation characteristics, and structural growth of dairy calves. Forty-eight 3-d-old Holstein dairy calves with a mean starting BW of 42.1 kg (SD 2.4) were used in a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement with the factors dietary CS level (0 or 15% on DM basis) and physical form of starter (mashed vs. textured). Individually housed calves were randomly assigned ( = 12 calves per treatment: 6 males and 6 females) to 4 treatments: 1) a mashed starter (MS) feed with no CS (MS-NCS), 2) a MS feed with CS (MS-CS), 3) a TS feed with no CS (TS-NCS), and 4) a TS feed with CS (TS-CS). The calves had ad libitum access to water and starter throughout the study. All calves were weaned on d 56 of age and remained in the study until d 66. The interaction of the physical form of the starter and CS provision was significant ( < 0.01) for the starter intake, with the greatest intake for TS-CS treatment during the preweaning and overall periods. Regardless of the physical form of starter, starter intake, ADG, weaning BW, final BW, ruminal pH, the molar proportion of acetate, and the acetate-to-propionate ratio were greater ( < 0.01) for CS-supplemented calves compared with unsupplemented calves. No interaction ( > 0.05) was detected between the physical form of starter and CS provision with respect to the rumen fermentation parameters and body measurements. Total rumen VFA concentration and the molar proportion of propionate were greater ( < 0.01) in calves fed TS compared with MS-fed calves. In conclusion, independent of the physical form of starter

  11. Evaluation of Bacillus spp. as dough starters for Adhirasam - A traditional rice based fermented food of Southern India

    PubMed Central

    Anisha, Anvar Hussain Noorul; Anandham, Rangasamy; Kwon, Soon Woo; Gandhi, Pandiyan Indira; Gopal, Nellaiappan Olaganathan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Adhirasam is a cereal based, doughnut shaped, deep fried dessert consumed in the southern regions of India. The dough used to prepare adhirasam is fermented and contains rice flour and jaggery. The aim of the present study was to characterize the cultivable bacteria associated with this fermented dough and to identify a suitable starter culture for the production of quality adhirasam. In total, one hundred and seventy bacterial isolates were recovered from de Man Rogosa Sharp (MRS) agar, nutrient agar, lysogeny agar and tryptic soy agar media. Out of the 170 bacterial isolates, sixteen isolates were selected based on their ability to tolerate glucose and sucrose. All the bacterial isolates tolerated 15% glucose and 30% sucrose. Analyses of 16S rDNA gene sequences of the bacterial isolates showed that the dominant cultivable bacteria were members of the genus Bacillus. These strains were further used as starters and tested for their ability to ferment rice flour with jaggery to produce adhirasam dough. Organoleptic evaluation was carried out to choose the best starter strain. Adhirasam prepared from Bacillus subtilis isolates S4-P11, S2-G2-A1 and S1-G15, Bacillus tequilensis isolates S2-H16, S3-P9, S3-G10 and Bacillus siamensis isolate S2-G13 were highly acceptable to consumers. Adhirasam prepared using these starter cultures had superior product characteristics such as softness in texture, flavor and enhanced aroma and sweet taste. PMID:26691480

  12. Effect of hydrostatic high-pressure processing on the chemical, functional, and rheological properties of starter-free Queso Fresco

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Queso Fresco (QF), a popular high-moisture, high-pH Hispanic-style cheese sold in the U.S., underwent high-pressure processing (HPP), which has the potential to improve the safety of cheese, to determine the effects of this process on quality traits of the cheese. Starter-free rennet-set QF (manufa...

  13. Evaluation of Bacillus spp. as dough starters for Adhirasam - A traditional rice based fermented food of Southern India.

    PubMed

    Anisha, Anvar Hussain Noorul; Anandham, Rangasamy; Kwon, Soon Woo; Gandhi, Pandiyan Indira; Gopal, Nellaiappan Olaganathan

    2015-01-01

    Adhirasam is a cereal based, doughnut shaped, deep fried dessert consumed in the southern regions of India. The dough used to prepare adhirasam is fermented and contains rice flour and jaggery. The aim of the present study was to characterize the cultivable bacteria associated with this fermented dough and to identify a suitable starter culture for the production of quality adhirasam. In total, one hundred and seventy bacterial isolates were recovered from de Man Rogosa Sharp (MRS) agar, nutrient agar, lysogeny agar and tryptic soy agar media. Out of the 170 bacterial isolates, sixteen isolates were selected based on their ability to tolerate glucose and sucrose. All the bacterial isolates tolerated 15% glucose and 30% sucrose. Analyses of 16S rDNA gene sequences of the bacterial isolates showed that the dominant cultivable bacteria were members of the genus Bacillus. These strains were further used as starters and tested for their ability to ferment rice flour with jaggery to produce adhirasam dough. Organoleptic evaluation was carried out to choose the best starter strain. Adhirasam prepared from Bacillus subtilis isolates S4-P11, S2-G2-A1 and S1-G15, Bacillus tequilensis isolates S2-H16, S3-P9, S3-G10 and Bacillus siamensis isolate S2-G13 were highly acceptable to consumers. Adhirasam prepared using these starter cultures had superior product characteristics such as softness in texture, flavor and enhanced aroma and sweet taste. PMID:26691480

  14. Linezolid in the Starter Combination for Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis: Time to Move on to Group Four?

    PubMed Central

    Grard, Soazic; Catho, Gaud; Valour, Florent; Bouaziz, Anissa; Perpoint, Thomas; Braun, Evelyne; Biron, François; Miailhes, Patrick; Ferry, Tristan; Chidiac, Christian; Souquet, Pierre-Jean; Couraud, Sébastien; Lina, Gérard; Goutelle, Sylvain; Veziris, Nicolas; Dumitrescu, Oana; Ader, Florence

    2015-01-01

    Linezolid (LNZ), a group 5 antituberculous drug (unclear efficacy), was used in the starter regimens of 23 adults with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. The LNZ-containing regimens were effective in achieving culture conversions and relapse-free outcomes. The most frequent LNZ-related side effect was neuropathy. We propose that LNZ should be reclassified among bactericidal second-line drugs. PMID:26719846

  15. Benzoic Acid Production with Respect to Starter Culture and Incubation Temperature during Yogurt Fermentation using Response Surface Methodology.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hyung-Seok; Lee, Na-Kyoung; Jeon, Hye-Lin; Eom, Su Jin; Yoo, Mi-Young; Lim, Sang-Dong; Paik, Hyun-Dong

    2016-01-01

    Benzoic acid is occasionally used as a raw material supplement in food products and is sometimes generated during the fermentation process. In this study, the production of naturally occurring yogurt preservatives was investigated for various starter cultures and incubation temperatures, and considered food regulations. Streptococcus thermophilus, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus paracasei, Lactobacillus reuteri, Lactobacillus plantarum, Bifidobacterium longum, Bifidobacterium lactis, Bifidobacterium bifidum, Bifidobacterium infantis, and Bifidobacterium breve were used as yogurt starter cultures in commercial starters. Among these strains, L. rhamnosus and L. paracasei showed the highest production of benzoic acid. Therefore, the use of L. rhamnosus, L. paracasei, S. thermophilus, and different incubation temperatures were examined to optimize benzoic acid production. Response surface methodology (RSM) based on a central composite design was performed for various incubation temperatures (35-44℃) and starter culture inoculum ratios (0-0.04%) in a commercial range of dairy fermentation processes. The optimum conditions were 0.04% L. rhamnosus, 0.01% L. paracasei, 0.02% S. thermophilus, and 38.12℃, and the predicted and estimated concentrations of benzoic acid were 13.31 and 13.94 mg/kg, respectively. These conditions maximized naturally occurring benzoic acid production during the yogurt fermentation process, and the observed production levels satisfied regulatory guidelines for benzoic acid in dairy products. PMID:27433115

  16. The effect of microbial starter composition on cassava chips fermentation for the production of fermented cassava flour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kresnowati, M. T. A. P.; Listianingrum, Zaenudin, Ahmad; Trihatmoko, Kharisrama

    2015-12-01

    The processing of cassava into fermented cassava flour (fercaf) or the widely known as modified cassava flour (mocaf) presents an alternative solution to improve the competitiveness of local foods and to support national food security. However, the mass production of fercaf is being limited by several problems, among which is the availability of starter cultures. This paper presents the mapping of the effect of microbial starter compositions on the nutritional content of fercaf in order to obtain the suitable nutritional composition. Based on their enzymatic activities, the combination of Lactobacillus plantarum, Bacillus subtilis, and Aspergillus oryzae were tested during the study. In addition, commercial starter was also tested. During the fermentation, the dynamics in microbial population were measured as well as changes in cyanogenic glucoside content. The microbial starter composition was observed to affect the dynamics in microbial populationcynaogenic glucoside content of the produced fercaf. In general, steady state microbial population was reached within 12 hours of fermentation. Cyanogenic glucoside was observed to decrease along the fermentation.

  17. Scale-up of thermally dried kefir production as starter culture for hard-type cheese making: an economic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Koutinas, Athanasios A; Bekatorou, Argyro; Katechaki, Eleftheria; Dimitrellou, Dimitra; Kopsahelis, Nikolaos; Papapostolou, Harris; Panas, Panayiotis; Sideris, Kostas; Kallis, Mihalis; Bosnea, Loulouda A; Koliopoulos, Dionisis; Sotiropoulos, Panayiotis; Panteli, Ageliki; Kourkoutas, Yiannis; Kanellaki, Maria; Soupioni, Magdalini

    2010-03-01

    This paper concerns the effect of thermal-drying methodology on the investment cost for dried kefir cells production in order to be used as starter culture in cheese manufacturing. Kefir cells were produced at pilot plant scale using a 250-L bioreactor and whey as the main substrate. Kefir cells were subsequently dried in a thermal dryer at 38 degrees C and used as a starter culture in industrial-scale production of hard-type cheeses. The use of thermally dried kefir as starter culture accelerated ripening of cheeses by increasing both lipolysis and fermentation rate as indicated by the ethanol, lactic acid, and glycerol formation. Additionally, it reduced coliforms and enterobacteria as ripening proceeded. This constituted the basis of developing an economic study in which industrial-scale production of thermally dried kefir starter culture is discussed. The industrial design involved a three-step process using three bioreactors of 100, 3,000, and 30,000 L for a plant capacity of 300 kg of thermally dried kefir culture per day. The cost of investment was estimated at 238,000 euro, which is the 46% of the corresponding cost using freeze-drying methodology. Production cost was estimated at 4.9 euro/kg of kefir biomass for a 300-kg/day plant capacity, which is the same as with the corresponding cost of freeze-dried cells. However, the estimated added value is up to 10.8 x 10(9) euro within the European Union.

  18. Nonnativeness in Near-Native Child L2 Starters of Japanese: Age and the Acquisition of Relative Clauses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nishikawa, Tomomi

    2014-01-01

    Many age-related second language (L2) studies have confirmed that young children have a better chance to become nativelike in L2 acquisition than adults. The current study investigated whether age effects exist in the L2 acquisition of Japanese and whether nativelike proficiency is guaranteed for early child L2 starters after constant target…

  19. Benzoic Acid Production with Respect to Starter Culture and Incubation Temperature during Yogurt Fermentation using Response Surface Methodology

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Mi-Young; Lim, Sang-Dong

    2016-01-01

    Benzoic acid is occasionally used as a raw material supplement in food products and is sometimes generated during the fermentation process. In this study, the production of naturally occurring yogurt preservatives was investigated for various starter cultures and incubation temperatures, and considered food regulations. Streptococcus thermophilus, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus paracasei, Lactobacillus reuteri, Lactobacillus plantarum, Bifidobacterium longum, Bifidobacterium lactis, Bifidobacterium bifidum, Bifidobacterium infantis, and Bifidobacterium breve were used as yogurt starter cultures in commercial starters. Among these strains, L. rhamnosus and L. paracasei showed the highest production of benzoic acid. Therefore, the use of L. rhamnosus, L. paracasei, S. thermophilus, and different incubation temperatures were examined to optimize benzoic acid production. Response surface methodology (RSM) based on a central composite design was performed for various incubation temperatures (35-44℃) and starter culture inoculum ratios (0-0.04%) in a commercial range of dairy fermentation processes. The optimum conditions were 0.04% L. rhamnosus, 0.01% L. paracasei, 0.02% S. thermophilus, and 38.12℃, and the predicted and estimated concentrations of benzoic acid were 13.31 and 13.94 mg/kg, respectively. These conditions maximized naturally occurring benzoic acid production during the yogurt fermentation process, and the observed production levels satisfied regulatory guidelines for benzoic acid in dairy products. PMID:27433115

  20. Effect of Selected Starter Cultures on Physical, Chemical and Microbiological Characteristics and Biogenic Amine Content in Protected Geographical Indication Ciauscolo Salami

    PubMed Central

    Ranucci, David; Loschi, Anna Rita; Miraglia, Dino; Stocchi, Roberta; Rea, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the biogenic amine (BA) content of Ciauscolo salami made with and without the use of a selected started culture. Two batches of salami were made following the guidelines of the Protected Geographical Indications: with and without adding a commercial starter culture made of Lactobacillus plantarum and Staphylococcus xylosus. Six samples of salami per batch were collected at different ripening times (0, 15, 30, 45 and 60 days) for physical, chemical and microbiological analyses and for the determination of BA content. No differences were recorded for physical, chemical and microbiological analyses except for Staphylococcus spp. count at the time of casing (T0) and total volatile basic nitrogen (TVBN) from 30 days (T2) to the end of the ripening time (60 days, T4). After 60 days of ripening, the use of selected starter culture significantly affected the amount of putrescine (195.15 vs 164.43 mg/100 g in salami without and with starters, respectively), cadaverine (96.95 vs 104.40 mg/100 g in salami without and with starters, respectively), histamine (81.94 vs 69.89 mg/100 g in salami without and with starters, respectively), and spermine (36.88 vs 33.57 mg/100 g in salami without and with starters, respectively). Despite significantly higher values of TVBN, the use of selected starter culture determined no significant effects on the BA content of the products. PMID:27800431

  1. Characterization of lactic acid bacteria isolated from Italian Bella di Cerignola table olives: selection of potential multifunctional starter cultures.

    PubMed

    Bevilacqua, Antonio; Altieri, Clelia; Corbo, Maria Rosaria; Sinigaglia, Milena; Ouoba, Labia Irène Ivette

    2010-10-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (19 isolates) from Bella di Cerignola Italian table olives were investigated for their technological and probiotic properties for the selection of multifunctional starter cultures for table olives. The bacteria were first identified by phenotyping and genotyping, then characterized for the production of biogenic amines, growth at different pH, NaCl concentrations, and temperatures. The potentiality of the bacteria to have some probiotic properties (antimicrobial activity against foodborne pathogens, survival in low pH and in the presence of bile salts, ability to adhere to the mammalian cells model IPEC-J2) was also investigated. Eighteen of the studied isolates were identified as Lactobacillus plantarum and one as Enterococcus faecalis. All bacteria were able to grow at a range of pH between 4.0 and 10.0 as well as in media supplemented with 2.5 to 7.5% of NaCl and 0.3% bile salts and survived in MRS broth acidified at pH 2.5; moreover, they inhibited significantly Escherichia coli O157:H7. The adhesion to IPEC-J2 cells was in general low to moderate (5.3 to 8.3%); however, 2 isolates of L. plantarum (c16 and c19) showed interesting higher adhesion values (up to 16%). Our results suggest that at least 3 isolates could be possible multifunctional starters for Bella di Cerignola olives: L. plantarum 16 and 19 for mainly their probiotic properties and L. plantarum 10 for mainly its technological characteristics. Practical Application: A functional starter is a microorganism exerting benefits on human health (probiotic) and able to guide a fermentation (starter). The main goal of this article was to select a functional starter for table olives.

  2. Effect of added proteinases and level of starter culture on the formation of biogenic amines in raw milk Manchego cheese.

    PubMed

    Fernández-García, E; Tomillo, J; Núñez, M

    1999-11-15

    The influence of two proteinases (Bacillus subtilis neutral proteinase and Micrococcus sp. cysteine proteinase) and two starter culture levels (0.1% and 1%) on biogenic amine formation has been studied in raw ewes' milk Manchego cheese. Amino acid decarboxylating micro-organisms were determined on tyrosine enriched selective media. Biogenic amines were analysed by capillary electrophoresis in citrate buffer at pH 3.6. Addition of proteinases and level of starter culture did not influence the population of micro-organisms with amino acid decarboxylating activity, which represented on average 1% of the bacterial population in 30-day-old cheeses. Tyramine and histamine were detected in all batches of cheese from day 30. Concentrations of tyramine and histamine were higher in cheeses made from milk with neutral proteinase (up to 356 and 284 mg kg(-1), respectively, after 90 days) than in cheeses made from milk with cysteine proteinase (up to 269 and 189 mg kg(-1), respectively) or with no proteinase added (up to 305 and 226 mg kg(-1), respectively). Formation of tyramine and histamine was also favoured in cheeses made with 1% starter culture with respect to cheeses made with only 0.1% starter culture, probably due to the higher pH values of the former cheeses. After 90 days of ripening, concentrations of 10-20 mg kg(-1) phenylethylamine were observed in 9 of the 12 batches, and levels < 10 mg kg(-1) tryptamine were only detected in 3 batches, with no significant relationship between the concentration of these amines and proteinase addition or level of starter culture. PMID:10733250

  3. Performance changes in National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I women basketball players during a competitive season: starters vs. nonstarters.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Adam M; Hoffman, Jay R; Scallin-Perez, Jennifer R; Stout, Jeffrey R; Fragala, Maren S

    2012-12-01

    The effects of playing time on performance changes were examined in National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I women basketball players. Twelve basketball players (age = 20.6 ± 1.5 years; height = 178.0 ± 8.2 cm; weight = 74.1 ± 8.1 kg) were assessed before (PRE) and at the end of the regular basketball season (POST). Assessments included squat power; vertical jump (VJ) power; 20-second lower-body reaction test; 3 line drills; and subjective measures of energy, focus, fatigue, and alertness. Pre- to postseason comparisons were made between starters (28.3 ± 5.2 minutes per game) and nonstarters (NSs) (8.3 ± 5.3 minutes per game). Data were analyzed for clinical significance using an approach based on the magnitude of change. Results revealed that starters were likely to have greater increases in absolute VJ peak power and relative VJ peak power (87.9 and 90.7%, respectively) and they were likely (81.6%) to have a greater average squat power than NSs. Subjective measures of energy, focus, and alertness were possibly (72.9%), very likely (97.3%), and likely (79.2%) to be lower in starters compared with NSs, respectively. Other performance measures showed unclear differences between starters and NSs. Pearson's product-moment correlation analysis revealed significant (p < 0.05) inverse correlations between playing time and Δ focus (r = -0.79) among all players. In conclusion, significant improvements in VJ performance and average squat power were seen in starters compared with NSs, despite greater decreases in energy, focus, and alertness. In this study, the monitoring of sport-specific performance changes pre and post season showed that performance measures can be maintained throughout an National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I women basketball season.

  4. NIST energy related inventions: Electronic starter device for fluorescent lamps. Interim report, August--October, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, S.A.

    1997-12-01

    From the Scope of Work document which accompanied the original proposal, three silicon devices were anticipated for development, simulation, and quality assurance fabrication. The status of these are in the same format as the Scope of Work...Attachment-A-: Task 1--design and simulation; Task 2--prototype tooling; Task 3--test engineering; Task 4--product tooling; Task 5--package tooling/manufacturing design and assembly. It is felt the program will meet it`s stated goals of producing a low cost, high performance fluorescent lamp starter which will lower the acquisition and operating cost of fluorescent technology...thus saving significant amounts of energy. The likelihood of success is even greater, now that the TN22 component has been qualified. The challenges of creating a custom ASIC, while still significant, are within the skill and expertise level or the assigned engineers.

  5. Starter cultures and cattle feed manipulation enhance conjugated linoleic acid concentrations in Cheddar cheese.

    PubMed

    Mohan, M S; Anand, S; Kalscheur, K F; Hassan, A N; Hippen, A R

    2013-04-01

    Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) is a fatty acid (FA) that provides several health benefits to humans. The feeding of fish oil-supplemented diets to dairy cows has been extensively studied as a means to improve the CLA content in milk. Several studies have also been conducted on the ability of many microorganisms to produce CLA by utilizing substrates containing linoleic acid. In the present study, the dietary manipulated milk was used in combination with the CLA-producing culture to manufacture Cheddar cheese. The two diets fed to cattle were control and treatment diets to obtain control and treatment milk, respectively. The treatment diet containing fish oil (0.75% of dry matter) was fed to 32 dairy cows grouped in a pen for 18 d to increase the total CLA content in milk. Treatment milk had a CLA content of 1.60 g/100g of FA compared with 0.58 g/100g of FA in control milk obtained by feeding the control diet. A 2 × 2 factorial design with 3 replicates was used to test the combined effect of the CLA-producing starter culture of Lactococcus lactis (CI4b) versus a commercial CLA nonproducing cheese starter as the control culture, and type of milk (control vs. treatment milk) on CLA content in Cheddar cheese. Chemical composition (moisture, salt, fat, and protein) was not affected by the type of culture used. However, the age of the cheese affected the sensory properties and microbiological counts in the different treatments. Ripening with the CI4b culture was found to be effective in further enhancing the CLA content. The CI4b cheeses made from control milk and treatment milk contained 1.09 and 2.41 (±0.18) g of total CLA/100g of FA after 1 mo of ripening, which increased to 1.44 and 2.61 (±0.18) g of total CLA/100g of FA after 6 mo of ripening, respectively. The use of treatment milk resulted in an increase in the CLA isomers (trans-7,cis-9+cis-9,trans-11, trans-9,cis-11+cis-10,trans-12, trans-10,cis-12, cis-9,cis-11, trans-11,cis-13, cis-11,cis-13, trans-11,trans

  6. Dipeptidase activity and growth of heat-treated commercial dairy starter culture.

    PubMed

    Garbowska, Monika; Pluta, Antoni; Berthold-Pluta, Anna

    2015-03-01

    Growing expectations of consumers of fermented dairy products urge the search for novel solutions that would improve their organoleptic properties and in the case of rennet cheeses-that would also accelerate their ripening process. The aim of this study was to determine the peptidolytic activities and growth of heat-treated commercial culture of lactic acid bacteria. The analyzed culture was characterized by a relatively high peptidolytic activity. The growth of bacterial culture subjected to heat treatment at 50-80 °C for 15 s, 10 and 3 min was delayed by a few or 10-20 h compared to the control culture. Based on the results achieved, it may be concluded that in the production of rennet cheeses, the application of additional, fermentation-impaired starter cultures (via heating for ten or so minutes) may serve to accelerate their ripening and to improve their sensory attributes.

  7. Final report for the 1996 Engineer Starters Program (Pre-Freshmen Enrichment Program)

    SciTech Connect

    Sharpe, L. Jr.

    1996-08-15

    This report has been developed for the North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University College of Engineering, Department of Energy and other foundations/corporations sponsoring the 1996 Engineer Starters Program and for general information. The College of Engineering conducted its Annual outreach program for Middle and High School students from July 8 to August 2, 1996. The continuing primary goal of this program is to expose youth to the various challenging opportunities in the Mathematics and Science based careers, Engineering and Technology. The curriculum for the summer of 1996 included: Mathematics; Science; Computers; Graphics; Problem Solving; Career Explorations; Communications; Field Trips to Manufacturing Plants/Industries; and Engineering Projects/Designs. The 1996 program included rising seventh through tenth graders. Parental involvement was instituted as a vital component of the summer experiences. The primary objective is to increase the number of minorities entering engineering and science professions.

  8. Effect of rotation speed on the temperature of starter alternator machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Hamdy; Harmand, Souad

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents a study on the effect of rotation speed on the temperature distribution of starter alternator machine. The effect of the outer conditions of the machine on its temperature is also studied. The numerical solution of the thermal model of the machine is solved by using a nodal approach during a numerical code (SAME). This code is established at our laboratory and is written by MATLAB. The results show that when the rotation speed of the machine increases, the temperature of the machine increases. They also show that increasing the rotation speed of the machine more than five times increases the power loss from the machine three times and the maximum temperature difference of the machine about 40 %.

  9. Microbiota of table olive fermentations and criteria of selection for their use as starters

    PubMed Central

    Heperkan, Dilek

    2013-01-01

    Fermentation is one of the oldest methods for preserving of olives applied worldwide for thousands of years. However, olive processing is a speculative area where whether olives are fermented products or pickled products produced by organic acids and salt. Although lactobacilli and yeasts play a major role in the process, literature survey indicates that lactobacilli are less relevant at least in some types of natural green olives during fermentation. There have been significant advances recently in understanding the process to produce olives, especially the role of lactic acid bacteria and yeasts including biofilm formation on olive surfaces by these organisms. The purpose of this paper is to review the latest developments regarding the microbiota of olives on the basis of olive types, their role on the fermentation process, the interaction between both group of microorganisms and the olive surface, the possibility to use starter cultures and the criteria to select appropriate cultures. PMID:23781216

  10. Starter cultures and cattle feed manipulation enhance conjugated linoleic acid concentrations in Cheddar cheese.

    PubMed

    Mohan, M S; Anand, S; Kalscheur, K F; Hassan, A N; Hippen, A R

    2013-04-01

    Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) is a fatty acid (FA) that provides several health benefits to humans. The feeding of fish oil-supplemented diets to dairy cows has been extensively studied as a means to improve the CLA content in milk. Several studies have also been conducted on the ability of many microorganisms to produce CLA by utilizing substrates containing linoleic acid. In the present study, the dietary manipulated milk was used in combination with the CLA-producing culture to manufacture Cheddar cheese. The two diets fed to cattle were control and treatment diets to obtain control and treatment milk, respectively. The treatment diet containing fish oil (0.75% of dry matter) was fed to 32 dairy cows grouped in a pen for 18 d to increase the total CLA content in milk. Treatment milk had a CLA content of 1.60 g/100g of FA compared with 0.58 g/100g of FA in control milk obtained by feeding the control diet. A 2 × 2 factorial design with 3 replicates was used to test the combined effect of the CLA-producing starter culture of Lactococcus lactis (CI4b) versus a commercial CLA nonproducing cheese starter as the control culture, and type of milk (control vs. treatment milk) on CLA content in Cheddar cheese. Chemical composition (moisture, salt, fat, and protein) was not affected by the type of culture used. However, the age of the cheese affected the sensory properties and microbiological counts in the different treatments. Ripening with the CI4b culture was found to be effective in further enhancing the CLA content. The CI4b cheeses made from control milk and treatment milk contained 1.09 and 2.41 (±0.18) g of total CLA/100g of FA after 1 mo of ripening, which increased to 1.44 and 2.61 (±0.18) g of total CLA/100g of FA after 6 mo of ripening, respectively. The use of treatment milk resulted in an increase in the CLA isomers (trans-7,cis-9+cis-9,trans-11, trans-9,cis-11+cis-10,trans-12, trans-10,cis-12, cis-9,cis-11, trans-11,cis-13, cis-11,cis-13, trans-11,trans

  11. Tomato response to starter fertilizer, polyethylene mulch, and level of soil phosphorus

    SciTech Connect

    Grubinger, V.P.; Minotti, P.L.; Wien, H.C.; Turner, A.D. . Dept. of Fruit and Vegetable Science)

    1993-03-01

    Unmulched and polyethylene-mulched tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) were grown with and without starter fertilizer (SF) in four field experiments. The field varied as to residual P level and the amount of P incorporated before planting. No benefits from SF were obtained on a soil with high residual P that was moderately fertilized with P before transplanting or on a soil with low residual P that was heavily fertilized with P. A positive effect from SF was observed only when residual P was low and no P was broadcast, and this was true in mulched and unmulched plots. No significant SF by mulch interaction was obtained in these experiments even though mulching consistently increased shoot P concentrations and fruit yield. The mulch was beneficial even under conditions where unmulched tomato leaves contained 0.4% P 3 weeks after transplanting, indicating that factors in addition to improved P nutrition are also involved in the mulch effect.

  12. Fate of Lactococcus lactis starter cultures during late ripening in cheese models.

    PubMed

    Ruggirello, Marianna; Cocolin, Luca; Dolci, Paola

    2016-10-01

    The presence of Lactococcus lactis, commonly employed as starter culture, was, recently, highlighted and investigated during late cheese ripening. Thus, the main goal of the present study was to assess the persistence and viability of this microorganism throughout manufacturing and ripening of model cheeses. Eight commercial starters, constituted of L. lactis subsp. lactis and L. lactis subsp. cremoris, were inoculated in pasteurized milk in order to manufacture miniature cheeses, ripened for six months. Samples were analysed at different steps (milk after inoculum, curd after cutting, curd after pressing and draining, cheese immediately after salting and cheese at 7, 15, 30, 60, 90, 120, 150 and 180 days of ripening) and submitted to both culture-dependent (traditional plating on M17) and -independent analysis (reverse transcription-quantitative PCR). On the basis of direct RNA analysis, L. lactis populations were detected in all miniature cheeses up to the sixth month of ripening, confirming the presence of viable cells during the whole ripening process, including late stages. Noteworthy, L. lactis was detected by RT-qPCR in cheese samples also when traditional plating failed to indicate its presence. This discrepancy could be explain with the fact that lactococci, during ripening process, enter in a stressed physiological state (viable not culturable, VNC), which might cause their inability to grow on synthetic medium despite their viability in cheese matrix. Preliminary results obtained by "resuscitation" assays corroborated this hypothesis and 2.5% glucose enrichment was effective to recover L. lactis cells in VNC state. The capability of L. lactis to persist in late ripening, and the presence of VNC cells which are known to shift their catabolism to peptides and amino acids consumption, suggests a possible technological role of this microorganism in cheese ripening with a possible impact on flavour formation. PMID:27375251

  13. Selection of autochthonous strains as starter cultures for fermented fish products.

    PubMed

    Speranza, Barbara; Racioppo, Angela; Bevilacqua, Antonio; Beneduce, Luciano; Sinigaglia, Milena; Corbo, Maria Rosaria

    2015-01-01

    This paper was the 1st research focusing on the design of a halophilic lactic starter for the production of fermented fish products using a quantitative approach, based on the evaluation of the growth index and acidification score, as well as on the use of a multivariate approach to select the most promising strains. Fifty-nine strains were randomly selected from salted fish and phenotypically characterized through Gram staining, catalase activity, glucose metabolism, H2 S and indole production, nitrate reduction, citrate utilization, and hydrolysis of arginine, esculin, casein, gelatin, starch, Tween 80, and urea. Then the Gram positive isolates (44 out of 59) were studied for their growth at different temperatures (10, 25, 40, and 55 °C), salt (0%, 20%, and 30%), pHs (4.5 and 9.5), and acidification score in lab medium. Data were modelled through growth index and used as input to run a preliminary cluster analysis and a principal component analysis. Three promising strains were selected, identified as members of the genus Pediococcus and used for the validation at laboratory level through the assessment of their performances in the production of a fermented fish sauce. The results were really promising as their use not only reduced the fermentation time (2 d) but also improved the microbiological quality of the final product. This paper represents a 1st report on the use of a simple step-by-step methodology to select promising halophilic strains for the optimization of a starter for fish-fermented products.

  14. A high-throughput cheese manufacturing model for effective cheese starter culture screening.

    PubMed

    Bachmann, H; Kruijswijk, Z; Molenaar, D; Kleerebezem, M; van Hylckama Vlieg, J E T

    2009-12-01

    Cheese making is a process in which enzymatic coagulation of milk is followed by protein separation, carbohydrate removal, and an extended bacterial fermentation. The number of variables in this complex process that influence cheese quality is so large that the developments of new manufacturing protocols are cumbersome. To reduce screening costs, several models have been developed to miniaturize the cheese manufacturing process. However, these models are not able to accommodate the throughputs required for systematic screening programs. Here, we describe a protocol that allows the parallel manufacturing of approximately 600 cheeses in individual cheese vats each with individual process specifications. Protocols for the production of miniaturized Gouda- and Cheddar-type cheeses have been developed. Starting with as little as 1.7 mL of milk, miniature cheeses of about 170 mg can be produced and they closely resemble conventionally produced cheese in terms of acidification profiles, moisture and salt contents, proteolysis, flavor profiles, and microstructure. Flavor profiling of miniature cheeses manufactured with and without mixed-strain adjunct starter cultures allowed the distinguishing of the different cheeses. Moreover, single-strain adjunct starter cultures engineered to overexpress important flavor-related enzymes revealed effects similar to those described in industrial cheese. Benchmarking against industrial cheese produced from the same raw materials established a good correlation between their proteolytic degradation products and their flavor profiles. These miniature cheeses, referred to as microcheeses, open new possibilities to study many aspects of cheese production, which will not only accelerate product development but also allow a more systematic approach to investigate the complex biochemistry and microbiology of cheese making.

  15. Acceleration of Thai fish sauce fermentation using proteinases and bacterial starter cultures.

    PubMed

    Yongsawatdigul, J; Rodtong, S; Raksakulthai, N

    2007-11-01

    A means to accelerate fish sauce fermentation without adversely affecting fish sauce quality was investigated. Starter cultures prepared from Virgibacillus sp. SK33, Virgibacillus sp. SK37, and Staphylococcus sp. SK1-1-5 were added separately to anchovy that was hydrolyzed by 0.25% Alcalase at 60 degrees C for 2 h followed by 0.5% Flavourzyme at 50 degrees C for 4 h. The mixtures were then adjusted to contain 25% solar salt and incubated at 35 degrees C for 4 mo. alpha-Amino contents of all inoculated samples were higher than the control (without the addition of starter culture) during the course of fermentation. After 4-mo fermentation, the samples inoculated with Staphylococcus sp. SK1-1-5 contained the highest alpha-amino content of 733.37 +/- 13.89 mM while that of the control was 682.67 +/- 3.33 mM. Amino acid profiles of inoculated samples showed similar patterns to that of commercial product fermented for 12 mo, with glutamic, aspartic, and lysine being predominant amino acids. Virgibacillus sp. SK33 appeared to decrease histamine content of fish sauce by 50% when compared to the control. Volatile compounds analyzed by GC-MS of all inoculated samples fermented for 4 mo exhibited a similar pattern to those of the 12-mo-old commercial product. Samples inoculated with Staphylococcus sp. SK1-1-5 produced higher levels of volatile fatty acids and showed similar sensory characteristics to the commercial fish sauce fermented for 12 mo. Staphylococcus sp. SK1-1-5 is a potential strain that can be applied to produce fish sauce with overall sensory characteristics of traditional fish sauce in shorter time. PMID:18034732

  16. Selection of autochthonous strains as starter cultures for fermented fish products.

    PubMed

    Speranza, Barbara; Racioppo, Angela; Bevilacqua, Antonio; Beneduce, Luciano; Sinigaglia, Milena; Corbo, Maria Rosaria

    2015-01-01

    This paper was the 1st research focusing on the design of a halophilic lactic starter for the production of fermented fish products using a quantitative approach, based on the evaluation of the growth index and acidification score, as well as on the use of a multivariate approach to select the most promising strains. Fifty-nine strains were randomly selected from salted fish and phenotypically characterized through Gram staining, catalase activity, glucose metabolism, H2 S and indole production, nitrate reduction, citrate utilization, and hydrolysis of arginine, esculin, casein, gelatin, starch, Tween 80, and urea. Then the Gram positive isolates (44 out of 59) were studied for their growth at different temperatures (10, 25, 40, and 55 °C), salt (0%, 20%, and 30%), pHs (4.5 and 9.5), and acidification score in lab medium. Data were modelled through growth index and used as input to run a preliminary cluster analysis and a principal component analysis. Three promising strains were selected, identified as members of the genus Pediococcus and used for the validation at laboratory level through the assessment of their performances in the production of a fermented fish sauce. The results were really promising as their use not only reduced the fermentation time (2 d) but also improved the microbiological quality of the final product. This paper represents a 1st report on the use of a simple step-by-step methodology to select promising halophilic strains for the optimization of a starter for fish-fermented products. PMID:25492526

  17. Effects of feeding a calf starter on molecular adaptations in the ruminal epithelium and liver of Holstein dairy calves.

    PubMed

    Laarman, A H; Ruiz-Sanchez, A L; Sugino, T; Guan, L L; Oba, M

    2012-05-01

    The objective of this study was to elucidate the effect of feeding a calf starter on the volatile fatty acid (VFA) profile in the rumen and on expression of genes involved in epithelial intracellular pH regulation, butyrate metabolism, and hepatic urea cycle during the weaning transition. Twenty Holstein bull calves were fed either milk replacer and hay (MR) or milk replacer, hay, and a commercial texturized calf starter (MR+S) in a randomized complete block design. All calves were fed 750 g/d of milk replacer as the basal diet. Calves on the MR+S treatment were also fed starter ad libitum, and the energy intake of calves within blocks was maintained by supplementing the MR group with extra milk replacer that was equivalent to the energy intake from calf starter. Calves were killed 3 d after they consumed 680 g/d of calf starter for 3 consecutive days. Calves fed MR+S had higher VFA concentrations in the rumen (99.1±8.1 vs. 64.6±8.6 mM) and a higher molar proportion of butyrate (15.6±1.7 vs. 7.9±1.9%) than calves fed MR. Relative abundance of mRNA for monocarboxylate transporter isoform 1 was higher (1.45 vs. 0.53), and that of Na(+)/H(+) exchanger isoform 3 (0.37 vs. 0.82) and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl synthase isoform 1 (0.40 vs. 0.94) lower for the MR+S treatment compared with the MR treatment. In the liver, relative mRNA abundances of argininosuccinate synthetase isoform 1 (2.67 vs. 1.56), argininosuccinate lyase (1.44 vs. 0.99), and arginase isoform 1 (3.21 vs. 1.74) were greater for MR+S than for MR calves. Calf starter consumption appeared to increase fermentation in the rumen and affected expression of genes involved in cholesterol synthesis and intracellular pH regulation in ruminal epithelium, and those involved in urea cycle in the liver.

  18. Whey starter for Grana Padano cheese: effect of technological parameters on viability and composition of the microbial community.

    PubMed

    Santarelli, M; Gatti, M; Lazzi, C; Bernini, V; Zapparoli, G A; Neviani, E

    2008-03-01

    This work aimed to investigate the effects of thermal treatments and yeast extract addition on the composition of the microbial community of natural whey starters for Grana Padano cheese. Different natural whey starter samples were held at 4 degrees C for 24 h (cooling treatment), or at -20 degrees C for 24 h (freezing treatment) to evaluate the possibility of conservation, or at 54 degrees C for 1 h (heat treatment) to evaluate the effect of the temperature commonly used during curd cooking. Separately, another set of samples was enriched with 0.3, 0.5, and 1.0% (wt/vol) of yeast extract to study its effect on the growth of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in the starter. The new approach in this study is the use of 2 culture-independent methods: length heterogeneity (LH)-reverse transcription (RT)-PCR and fluorescence microscopy. These techniques allowed us to easily, quickly, and reproducibly assess metabolically active LAB in the control and treated samples. The LH-RT-PCR technique distinguished microorganisms based on natural variations in the length of 16S rRNA amplified by RT-PCR, as analyzed by using an automatic gene sequencer. Fluorescence microscopy counts were performed by using a Live/Dead BacLight bacterial viability kit. The repeatability of LH-RT-PCR showed that this technique has great potential to reveal changes in the microbial community of natural whey starters for Grana Padano cheese. All species showed low sensitivity to cold (4 degrees C). However, after the freezing (-20 degrees C) and heating (54 degrees C) treatments, different behaviors of the species were reported, with significant changes in their viability and relative composition. Heating treatment during curd cooking profoundly affected the viability and composition of the community that remained in the cheese and that consequently modified the microbial population. At the same time, this treatment produced the selection of LAB in whey and could be considered as the first step in natural

  19. Inhibition of Listeria monocytogenes and Escherichia coli O157:H7 in liquid broth medium and during processing of fermented sausage using autochthonous starter cultures.

    PubMed

    Pragalaki, T; Bloukas, J G; Kotzekidou, P

    2013-11-01

    The antimicrobial effect of two autochthonous starter cultures of Lactobacillus sakei was evaluated in vitro (in liquid broth medium) and in situ assays. The inactivation of foodborne pathogens Listeria monocytogenes (serotype 4ab No 10) and Escherichia coli O157:H7 ATCC 43888 was investigated during the production of fermented sausage according to a typical Greek recipe using L. sakei strains as starter cultures. The inactivation kinetics were modeled using GInaFiT, a freeware tool to assess microbial survival curves. By the end of the ripening period, the inhibition of L. monocytogenes was significant in treatments with L. sakei 8416 and L. sakei 4413 compared to the control treatment. A 2.2-log reduction of the population of E. coli O157:H7 resulted from the autochthonous starter culture L. sakei 4413 during sausage processing. The use of the autochthonous starter cultures constitutes an additional improvement to the microbial safety by reducing foodborne pathogens. PMID:23793080

  20. Inhibition of Listeria monocytogenes and Escherichia coli O157:H7 in liquid broth medium and during processing of fermented sausage using autochthonous starter cultures.

    PubMed

    Pragalaki, T; Bloukas, J G; Kotzekidou, P

    2013-11-01

    The antimicrobial effect of two autochthonous starter cultures of Lactobacillus sakei was evaluated in vitro (in liquid broth medium) and in situ assays. The inactivation of foodborne pathogens Listeria monocytogenes (serotype 4ab No 10) and Escherichia coli O157:H7 ATCC 43888 was investigated during the production of fermented sausage according to a typical Greek recipe using L. sakei strains as starter cultures. The inactivation kinetics were modeled using GInaFiT, a freeware tool to assess microbial survival curves. By the end of the ripening period, the inhibition of L. monocytogenes was significant in treatments with L. sakei 8416 and L. sakei 4413 compared to the control treatment. A 2.2-log reduction of the population of E. coli O157:H7 resulted from the autochthonous starter culture L. sakei 4413 during sausage processing. The use of the autochthonous starter cultures constitutes an additional improvement to the microbial safety by reducing foodborne pathogens.

  1. Evaluation of an autochthonous starter culture on the production of a traditional dry fermented sausage from Chaco (Argentina) at a small-scale facility.

    PubMed

    Palavecino Prpich, Noelia Z; Garro, Oscar A; Romero, Mara; Judis, María A; Cayré, María E; Castro, Marcela P

    2016-05-01

    The performance of a mixed starter culture, SAS-1, comprised of the autochthonous strains Lactobacillus sakei ACU-2 and Staphylococcus vitulinus ACU-10, was evaluated into the production process of a traditional dry sausage. Microbiological, physicochemical and sensory analyses were carried out to accomplish this goal. Results showed an improvement in performance through the introduction of SAS-1; adding mixed starter culture rapidly decreased pH, inhibited the growth of contaminant microorganisms and enhanced the beneficial ones, diminished TBARS, and highlighted color and aroma attributes. However, most influential organoleptic descriptors among consumer acceptance were not affected by the addition of the starter. This starter culture would represent a valuable tool to improve the homogeneity of artisanal manufacture of this traditional food.

  2. Application' and validation of autochthonous lactic acid bacteria starter cultures for controlled leek fermentations and their influence on the antioxidant properties of leek.

    PubMed

    Wouters, D; Bernaert, N; Anno, N; Van Droogenbroeck, B; De Loose, M; Van Bockstaele, E; De Vuyst, L

    2013-07-15

    Leek (Allium ampeloprasum var. porrum) is one of Belgium's most important outdoor vegetables, mainly cultivated for its white shaft. Fermentation of leek offers opportunities in view of biomass valorization and product diversification. This study deals with the implementation and validation of starter cultures to perform controlled leek fermentations and to ensure a high quality of the end-products. Therefore, a thorough study of the fermentation microbiology and the influence of three starter culture strains (Lactobacillus plantarum IMDO 788, Lactobacillus sakei IMDO 1358, and Leuconostoc mesenteroides IMDO 1347) on the metabolite kinetics of leek fermentation and antioxidant properties of leek was performed. Overall, the application of lactic acid bacteria starter cultures resulted in a fast prevalence of the species involved, coupled to an accelerated acidification. Of the three starter cultures tested, the mixed starter culture of L. plantarum IMDO 788 and L. mesenteroides IMDO 1347 was most promising, as its application resulted in fermented leek of good microbiological quality and in a more extensive carbohydrate consumption, whereby diverse end-metabolites were produced. However, high residual fructose concentrations allowed yeast outgrowth, resulting in increased ethanol and glycerol concentrations, and indicated the lack of a prevailing strictly heterofermentative LAB species. The antioxidant capacity of fermented leek samples, as measured with the oxygen radical absorbance capacity assay, increased when starter cultures were used, whereas with regard to 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl free radical scavenging activity, only leek fermented with L. sakei IMDO 1358 scored higher than spontaneously fermented leek. The total phenolic content was not influenced by the use of starter cultures, while the S-alk(en)yl-L-cysteine sulfoxides content decreased strongly. A preliminary sensory analysis revealed that the spontaneously fermented leek and the one obtained

  3. Application' and validation of autochthonous lactic acid bacteria starter cultures for controlled leek fermentations and their influence on the antioxidant properties of leek.

    PubMed

    Wouters, D; Bernaert, N; Anno, N; Van Droogenbroeck, B; De Loose, M; Van Bockstaele, E; De Vuyst, L

    2013-07-15

    Leek (Allium ampeloprasum var. porrum) is one of Belgium's most important outdoor vegetables, mainly cultivated for its white shaft. Fermentation of leek offers opportunities in view of biomass valorization and product diversification. This study deals with the implementation and validation of starter cultures to perform controlled leek fermentations and to ensure a high quality of the end-products. Therefore, a thorough study of the fermentation microbiology and the influence of three starter culture strains (Lactobacillus plantarum IMDO 788, Lactobacillus sakei IMDO 1358, and Leuconostoc mesenteroides IMDO 1347) on the metabolite kinetics of leek fermentation and antioxidant properties of leek was performed. Overall, the application of lactic acid bacteria starter cultures resulted in a fast prevalence of the species involved, coupled to an accelerated acidification. Of the three starter cultures tested, the mixed starter culture of L. plantarum IMDO 788 and L. mesenteroides IMDO 1347 was most promising, as its application resulted in fermented leek of good microbiological quality and in a more extensive carbohydrate consumption, whereby diverse end-metabolites were produced. However, high residual fructose concentrations allowed yeast outgrowth, resulting in increased ethanol and glycerol concentrations, and indicated the lack of a prevailing strictly heterofermentative LAB species. The antioxidant capacity of fermented leek samples, as measured with the oxygen radical absorbance capacity assay, increased when starter cultures were used, whereas with regard to 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl free radical scavenging activity, only leek fermented with L. sakei IMDO 1358 scored higher than spontaneously fermented leek. The total phenolic content was not influenced by the use of starter cultures, while the S-alk(en)yl-L-cysteine sulfoxides content decreased strongly. A preliminary sensory analysis revealed that the spontaneously fermented leek and the one obtained

  4. Commercial ripening starter microorganisms inoculated into cheese milk do not successfully establish themselves in the resident microbial ripening consortia of a South german red smear cheese.

    PubMed

    Goerges, Stefanie; Mounier, Jérôme; Rea, Mary C; Gelsomino, Roberto; Heise, Valeska; Beduhn, Rüdiger; Cogan, Timothy M; Vancanneyt, Marc; Scherer, Siegfried

    2008-04-01

    Production of smear-ripened cheese critically depends on the surface growth of multispecies microbial consortia comprising bacteria and yeasts. These microorganisms often originate from the cheese-making facility and, over many years, have developed into rather stable, dairy-specific associations. While commercial smear starters are frequently used, it is unclear to what degree these are able to establish successfully within the resident microbial consortia. Thus, the fate of the smear starters of a German Limburger cheese subjected to the "old-young" smearing technique was investigated during ripening. The cheese milk was supplemented with a commercial smear starter culture containing Debaryomyces hansenii, Galactomyces geotrichum, Arthrobacter arilaitensis, and Brevibacterium aurantiacum. Additionally, the cheese surface was inoculated with an extremely stable in-house microbial consortium. A total of 1,114 yeast and 1,201 bacterial isolates were identified and differentiated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Furthermore, mitochondrial DNA restriction fragment length polymorphism, random amplified polymorphic DNA, repetitive PCR, and pulsed field gel electrophoresis analyses were used to type selected isolates below the species level. The D. hansenii starter strain was primarily found early in the ripening process. The G. geotrichum starter strain in particular established itself after relocation to a new ripening room. Otherwise, it occurred at low frequencies. The bacterial smear starters could not be reisolated from the cheese surface at all. It is concluded that none of the smear starter strains were able to compete significantly and in a stable fashion against the resident microbial consortia, a result which might have been linked to the method of application. This finding raises the issue of whether addition of starter microorganisms during production of this type of cheese is actually necessary.

  5. The influence of douchi starter cultures on the composition of extractive components, microbiological activity, and sensory properties of fermented fish pastes.

    PubMed

    Kasankala, Ladislaus M; Xiong, Youling L; Chen, Jie

    2011-01-01

    Three experiments were conducted to test the hypothesis that douchi cultures could serve as a potential starter for enhancing the quality attributes of fermented silver carp meat. In experiment 1, an active, prefermented douchi culture was incorporated into a fish paste to aid in the fish fermentation (30 d) and facilitate biochemical production of extractive flavor components (PRF). In experiment 2, a fully fermented (30 d) douchi was added to a fish paste and the mixture was fermented for 30 d (PSF). In experiment 3, a fish paste without the douchi culture was fermented for 30 d (CF). Total extracted free amino acids increased by 68.0, 68.6, and 78.8% (P < 0.05) from their initial levels to 2930, 2422, and 1573 mg/mL after 30 d of fermentation for PRF, PSF, and CF fish pastes, respectively, of which, glutamic acid, aspartic acid, alanine, lysine, and leucine were the major amino acids (>100 mg/mL). The concentrations of both formaldehyde-reactive nitrogen and ammonia nitrogen extractives increased significantly (P < 0.05) during fermentation, following the order of PRF > PSF > CF. Low amounts of biogenic amines (<25 ppm) were produced in all samples. Sensory panel evaluation showed that PRF fish pastes had desirable aroma and taste. The douchi-inoculated fermentation could be a novel technique for expanding the utilization, consumption, and the economic values of silver carp meats. Practical Application: Douchi, a fermented soybean product, is a traditional food flavoring ingredient commonly used in China, Japan, and other Asian countries. It is also used in many Chinese cuisines in the United States. On the other hand, fermented seafood made from freshwater fish such as silver carp is known to contain bioactive components believed to promote health. The findings from the present study indicated that douchi as a novel starter can be used to produce fermented silver carp fish pastes with excellent flavor and consumer acceptability. The results may be applicable to

  6. The influence of douchi starter cultures on the composition of extractive components, microbiological activity, and sensory properties of fermented fish pastes.

    PubMed

    Kasankala, Ladislaus M; Xiong, Youling L; Chen, Jie

    2011-01-01

    Three experiments were conducted to test the hypothesis that douchi cultures could serve as a potential starter for enhancing the quality attributes of fermented silver carp meat. In experiment 1, an active, prefermented douchi culture was incorporated into a fish paste to aid in the fish fermentation (30 d) and facilitate biochemical production of extractive flavor components (PRF). In experiment 2, a fully fermented (30 d) douchi was added to a fish paste and the mixture was fermented for 30 d (PSF). In experiment 3, a fish paste without the douchi culture was fermented for 30 d (CF). Total extracted free amino acids increased by 68.0, 68.6, and 78.8% (P < 0.05) from their initial levels to 2930, 2422, and 1573 mg/mL after 30 d of fermentation for PRF, PSF, and CF fish pastes, respectively, of which, glutamic acid, aspartic acid, alanine, lysine, and leucine were the major amino acids (>100 mg/mL). The concentrations of both formaldehyde-reactive nitrogen and ammonia nitrogen extractives increased significantly (P < 0.05) during fermentation, following the order of PRF > PSF > CF. Low amounts of biogenic amines (<25 ppm) were produced in all samples. Sensory panel evaluation showed that PRF fish pastes had desirable aroma and taste. The douchi-inoculated fermentation could be a novel technique for expanding the utilization, consumption, and the economic values of silver carp meats. Practical Application: Douchi, a fermented soybean product, is a traditional food flavoring ingredient commonly used in China, Japan, and other Asian countries. It is also used in many Chinese cuisines in the United States. On the other hand, fermented seafood made from freshwater fish such as silver carp is known to contain bioactive components believed to promote health. The findings from the present study indicated that douchi as a novel starter can be used to produce fermented silver carp fish pastes with excellent flavor and consumer acceptability. The results may be applicable to

  7. Effects of different physical forms of wheat grain in corn-based starter on performance of young Holstein dairy calves.

    PubMed

    Pezhveh, N; Ghorbani, G R; Rezamand, P; Khorvash, M

    2014-10-01

    The objective of the present study was to examine the effects of partially replacing corn with 2 forms of wheat grain on daily intake of starter feed, average daily gain, feed efficiency, rumen pH, fecal score, weaning weight, skeletal growth, and blood metabolites of dairy calves. Thirty-two male and female Holstein dairy calves (n=8 calves per treatment) were used in a completely randomized block design. At d 3 of age, individually housed calves were randomly allocated to different treatments consisting of a starter diet with 60% ground corn (control), a starter diet with 60% whole corn, a starter diet with 30% ground corn plus 30% ground wheat (GCGW), and a starter with 30% ground corn plus 30% whole wheat (GCWW), with all other components in a meal form. All calves had free access to water and feed throughout the study period and received 4 L of milk replacer/d from d 3 to 50 and 2 L/d from d 50 to 52; weaning occurred at the end of d 52. Feed intake was recorded daily and body weight and skeletal growth measures were recorded on d 10 and every 10 d thereafter. Rumen pH was measured on d 30, 45, and 60. Blood sample were collected on d 30 and every 10 d thereafter through d 70. Data were analyzed using MIXED procedures of SAS (SAS Institute Inc., Cary, NC). Over the experimental period (d 1-70), the starter intake for the GCWW group was significantly different from the control group, but not different from the other groups. Calves fed whole wheat had a significantly greater average daily gain compared with other groups over the experimental period (d 1-70). Feed efficiency was only better in calves fed the GCWW diet than the GCGW group for postweaning and overall periods. No differences were observed for preweaning in body length, hip height, or withers height among the treatments; however, differences were significant in heart girth and body barrel. Postweaning, some of the body measurements were greater in calves fed the GCWW and GCGW starter diets. Blood

  8. Selection of lactic acid bacteria isolated from Tunisian cereals and exploitation of the use as starters for sourdough fermentation.

    PubMed

    Mamhoud, Asma; Nionelli, Luana; Bouzaine, Taroub; Hamdi, Moktar; Gobbetti, Marco; Rizzello, Carlo Giuseppe

    2016-05-16

    Wheat bread is the most popular staple food consumed in Tunisia and, despite the niche production of some typical breads (e.g. Tabouna, Mlawi, Mtabga), the major part is currently produced with baker's yeast at industrial or, mainly, at artisanal level, while the use of sourdough fermentation is rarely reported. Considering the growing national demand for cereal baked goods, it can be hypothesized that sourdough fermentation through the use of selected lactic acid bacteria as starters could improve the overall quality and the diversification of local products. Different cereal grains were collected from the regions of Ariana, Bizerta, Beja Nabeul, and Seliana, and the autochthonous lactic acid bacteria were isolated, identified, characterized and selected on the basis of the kinetics of acidification, the proteolytic activity, and the quotient of fermentation. Lactobacillus curvatus MA2, Pediococcus pentosaceus OA2, and Pediococcus acidilactici O1A1 were used together as mixed starter to obtain a selected sourdough. According to the backslopping procedure, a type I sourdough was made from a Tunisian flour (spontaneous sourdough). Compared to the use of the spontaneous sourdough, the one obtained with selected and mixed starters by a unique fermentation step, favored the increase of the concentrations of organic acids, phenols, and total free amino acids, the most suitable quotient of fermentation, and the most intense phytase and antioxidant activities, that increased ca. 20% compared to the control. Moreover, the selected starters improved the in vitro protein digestibility (ca. 82% when selected sourdough was used), textural and sensory features of the breads, as determined by textural profile analysis and panel test, respectively. This study aimed at exploiting the potential of selected autochthonous lactic acid bacteria and extending the use of a sourdough (type II), thanks to the set-up of a two-step fermentation protocol designed for application at the

  9. Microbiology of Cheddar cheese made with different fat contents using a Lactococcus lactis single-strain starter.

    PubMed

    Broadbent, J R; Brighton, C; McMahon, D J; Farkye, N Y; Johnson, M E; Steele, J L

    2013-07-01

    Flavor development in low-fat Cheddar cheese is typified by delayed or muted evolution of desirable flavor and aroma, and a propensity to acquire undesirable meaty-brothy or burnt-brothy off-flavor notes early in ripening. The biochemical basis for these flavor deficiencies is unclear, but flavor production in bacterial-ripened cheese is known to rely on microorganisms and enzymes present in the cheese matrix. Lipid removal fundamentally alters cheese composition, which can modify the cheese microenvironment in ways that may affect growth and enzymatic activity of starter or nonstarter lactic acid bacteria (NSLAB). Additionally, manufacture of low-fat cheeses often involves changes to processing protocols that may substantially alter cheese redox potential, salt-in-moisture content, acid content, water activity, or pH. However, the consequences of these changes on microbial ecology and metabolism remain obscure. The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of fat content on population dynamics of starter bacteria and NSLAB over 9 mo of aging. Duplicate vats of full fat, 50% reduced-fat, and low-fat (containing <6% fat) Cheddar cheeses were manufactured at 3 different locations with a single-strain Lactococcus lactis starter culture using standardized procedures. Cheeses were ripened at 8°C and sampled periodically for microbiological attributes. Microbiological counts indicated that initial populations of nonstarter bacteria were much lower in full-fat compared with low-fat cheeses made at all 3 sites, and starter viability also declined at a more rapid rate during ripening in full-fat compared with 50% reduced-fat and low-fat cheeses. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of cheese bacteria showed that the NSLAB fraction of all cheeses was dominated by Lactobacillus curvatus, but a few other species of bacteria were sporadically detected. Thus, changes in fat level were correlated with populations of different bacteria, but did not appear to

  10. Valine, isoleucine, arginine and glycine supplementation of low-protein diets for broiler chickens during the starter and grower phases.

    PubMed

    Ospina-Rojas, I C; Murakami, A E; Duarte, C R A; Eyng, C; Oliveira, C A L; Janeiro, V

    2014-01-01

    1. Two experiments were performed to study the supplementation of valine, isoleucine, arginine and glycine (Val, Ile, Arg, Gly) in low-protein diets for broiler chickens in the starter (1-21 d; Exp. 1) and grower (22-42 d; Exp. 2) phases. 2. A low-crude protein (CP) diet was formulated to meet the requirements of all amino acids (AA) supplied by the control diet except for Val, Ile, Arg and Gly. The other experimental diets were obtained by the isolated or combined supplementation of the studied AA in the low-CP diet. 3. Growth, serum parameters and litter characteristics were taken in both of the experiments. Carcass measurements were taken in Experiment 2. 4. In the starter and grower phases, low-CP diets without supplementation resulted in birds with a poorer weight gain and feed conversion than those of the birds that received the control diet. 5. In the starter phase, individual supplementation with Val and Gly, but not Ile and Arg, restored the weight gain of the birds, while diets with the addition of Val + Gly, Val + Ile + Arg, Val + Ile + Gly and Val + Ile + Arg + Gly restored their feed conversion. 6. In the grower phase, weight gain was re-established at the same rate as the control diet for the diets supplemented with Val + Ile, Val + Ile + Arg, Val + Ile + Gly and Val + Ile + Arg + Gly. However, the feed conversion was restored only in birds that received the diet supplemented with all studied AA. 7. The supplementation of Val and Gly in low-CP diets was sufficient to avoid adverse effects in the performance and serum parameters of broilers in the starter phase. However, birds in the grower phase required the combined supplementation of Val, Ile, Arg and Gly, to prevent compromised performance.

  11. Forage and sugar in dairy calves' starter diet and their interaction on performance, weaning age and rumen fermentation.

    PubMed

    Beiranvand, H; Ghorbani, G R; Khorvash, M; Kazemi-Bonchenari, M

    2014-06-01

    The effects of sugar and forage inclusion in calves' starter and their interaction on animal performance and rumen fermentation parameters were investigated. Twenty-eight neonatal Holstein male calves 3 days of age with average body weights of 42 ± 4 kg were allocated to four different treatments. All calves were fed a similar basal diet consisting of milk and concentrate. The experimental treatments were: (i) basal diet with no supplementation (Control, hereafter designated by C), (ii) basal diet plus 5% granular sugar cane (Sugar, designated by S), (iii) basal diet plus 5% forage (Forage, designated by F) and (iv) basal diet plus 5% forage with 5% granular sugar cane (F × S). Supplement ingredients were used on a dry matter (DM) basis. Rumen fluid parameters were measured twice on days 35 and 70 of the study period. The calves were weaned when they could consume 1 kg of starter for three consecutive days. The results show that starter intake was not affected by treatment; however, the lowest ADG was observed with calves in the sugar treatment. Weaning age was affected by treatments, and forage showed to reduce milk consumption period down to its shortest. Forage-sugar interaction was found to have no effects on animal performance. The structural body indices as well as the health status of the calves were similar in different treatments. Rumen pH did not differ among the treatment groups. Among the rumen parameters, total VFA concentration and molar proportions of butyrate and propionate did not exhibit any significant differences among the treatments. However, ruminal acetate concentration decreased in calves that fed sugar cane during the early weeks of the study period. Comparison of forage and sugar included in the starter diets revealed that forage reduced weaning age, while sugar cane had a negative effect on calves' performance.

  12. Inhibitory effect of essential oils against Lactobacillus rhamnosus and starter culture in fermented milk during its shelf-life period.

    PubMed

    Moritz, Cristiane Mengue Feniman; Rall, Vera Lúcia Mores; Saeki, Margarida Júri; Júnior, Ary Fernandes

    2012-07-01

    The use of essential oils in foods has attracted great interest, due to their antagonistic action against pathogenic microorganisms. However, this action is undesirable for probiotic foods, as products containing Lactobacillus rhamnosus. The aim of the present study was to measure the sensitivity profile of L. rhamnosus and a yogurt starter culture in fermented milk, upon addition of increasing concentrations of cinnamon, clove and mint essential oils. Essential oils were prepared by steam distillation, and chemically characterised by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and determination of density. Survival curves were obtained from counts of L. rhamnosus and the starter culture (alone and in combination), upon addition of 0.04% essential oils. In parallel, titratable acidity was monitored over 28 experimental days. Minimum inhibitory concentration values, obtained using the microdilution method in Brain Heart Infusion medium, were 0.025, 0.2 and 0.4% for cinnamon, clove and mint essential oils, respectively. Cinnamon essential oil had the highest antimicrobial activity, especially against the starter culture, interfering with lactic acid production. Although viable cell counts of L. rhamnosus were lower following treatment with all 3 essential oils, relative to controls, these results were not statistically significant; in addition, cell counts remained greater than the minimum count of 10(8)CFU/mL required for a product to be considered a probiotic. Thus, although use of cinnamon essential oil in yogurt makes starter culture fermentation unfeasible, it does not prevent the application of L. rhamnosus to probiotic fermented milk. Furthermore, clove and mint essential oil caused sublethal stress to L. rhamnosus.

  13. Selection of lactic acid bacteria isolated from Tunisian cereals and exploitation of the use as starters for sourdough fermentation.

    PubMed

    Mamhoud, Asma; Nionelli, Luana; Bouzaine, Taroub; Hamdi, Moktar; Gobbetti, Marco; Rizzello, Carlo Giuseppe

    2016-05-16

    Wheat bread is the most popular staple food consumed in Tunisia and, despite the niche production of some typical breads (e.g. Tabouna, Mlawi, Mtabga), the major part is currently produced with baker's yeast at industrial or, mainly, at artisanal level, while the use of sourdough fermentation is rarely reported. Considering the growing national demand for cereal baked goods, it can be hypothesized that sourdough fermentation through the use of selected lactic acid bacteria as starters could improve the overall quality and the diversification of local products. Different cereal grains were collected from the regions of Ariana, Bizerta, Beja Nabeul, and Seliana, and the autochthonous lactic acid bacteria were isolated, identified, characterized and selected on the basis of the kinetics of acidification, the proteolytic activity, and the quotient of fermentation. Lactobacillus curvatus MA2, Pediococcus pentosaceus OA2, and Pediococcus acidilactici O1A1 were used together as mixed starter to obtain a selected sourdough. According to the backslopping procedure, a type I sourdough was made from a Tunisian flour (spontaneous sourdough). Compared to the use of the spontaneous sourdough, the one obtained with selected and mixed starters by a unique fermentation step, favored the increase of the concentrations of organic acids, phenols, and total free amino acids, the most suitable quotient of fermentation, and the most intense phytase and antioxidant activities, that increased ca. 20% compared to the control. Moreover, the selected starters improved the in vitro protein digestibility (ca. 82% when selected sourdough was used), textural and sensory features of the breads, as determined by textural profile analysis and panel test, respectively. This study aimed at exploiting the potential of selected autochthonous lactic acid bacteria and extending the use of a sourdough (type II), thanks to the set-up of a two-step fermentation protocol designed for application at the

  14. Contribution of starter cultures to the proteolytic process of a fermented non-dried whole muscle ham product.

    PubMed

    Scannell, Amalia G M; Kenneally, Paul M; Arendt, Elke K

    2004-06-01

    Porcine longissimus dorsi muscles were cured by brine injection. Curing brine containing 15% (w/v) NaCl, 1.33% (w/v) glucose, 750 ppm sodium nitrite, and appropriate levels of either Lactobacillus sakei LAD, L. sakei LAD plus Kocuria varians FT4 (formally Micrococcus varians), L. sakei LAD plus papain and GDL (glucono-delta-lactone) plus K. varians FT4, was injected to the muscle at a pumping rate 15% w/v. The effect of these treatments on the proteolysis in the ham system was compared to a control ham, produced without starter culture and containing GDL acidulant to control pH and antibiotics to reduce the contribution of background microflora. Hydrolysis of sarcoplasmic and myofibrillar protein fractions was evaluated by SDS-PAGE and reverse phase-HPLC. Hams with different treatments were also investigated for differences in amino acid profile, protein and non-protein nitrogen level, colour, pH, water activity and moisture and microbiological evolution. There was no significant difference in the gross compositional analysis of any of the treatments compared to the control. There was no significant difference (p>0.05) in the protein content, non-protein nitrogen level, SDS-PAGE and free amino acid analysis between the control ham and ham inoculated with proteolytic starter culture. However, it was observed that hams containing starter cultures exhibited decreases in certain peptide fractions and corresponding increases in some free amino acids compared to the uninoculated control. It can be concluded that, while the principle mechanisms resulting in the proteolysis of this non-dried ham product involve the activity of endogeneous cathepsins, the addition of proteolytic starter cultures influence the amino acid profile thereby potentially enhancing the sensorial attributes of the ham. PMID:15135960

  15. Microbiology of Cheddar cheese made with different fat contents using a Lactococcus lactis single-strain starter.

    PubMed

    Broadbent, J R; Brighton, C; McMahon, D J; Farkye, N Y; Johnson, M E; Steele, J L

    2013-07-01

    Flavor development in low-fat Cheddar cheese is typified by delayed or muted evolution of desirable flavor and aroma, and a propensity to acquire undesirable meaty-brothy or burnt-brothy off-flavor notes early in ripening. The biochemical basis for these flavor deficiencies is unclear, but flavor production in bacterial-ripened cheese is known to rely on microorganisms and enzymes present in the cheese matrix. Lipid removal fundamentally alters cheese composition, which can modify the cheese microenvironment in ways that may affect growth and enzymatic activity of starter or nonstarter lactic acid bacteria (NSLAB). Additionally, manufacture of low-fat cheeses often involves changes to processing protocols that may substantially alter cheese redox potential, salt-in-moisture content, acid content, water activity, or pH. However, the consequences of these changes on microbial ecology and metabolism remain obscure. The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of fat content on population dynamics of starter bacteria and NSLAB over 9 mo of aging. Duplicate vats of full fat, 50% reduced-fat, and low-fat (containing <6% fat) Cheddar cheeses were manufactured at 3 different locations with a single-strain Lactococcus lactis starter culture using standardized procedures. Cheeses were ripened at 8°C and sampled periodically for microbiological attributes. Microbiological counts indicated that initial populations of nonstarter bacteria were much lower in full-fat compared with low-fat cheeses made at all 3 sites, and starter viability also declined at a more rapid rate during ripening in full-fat compared with 50% reduced-fat and low-fat cheeses. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of cheese bacteria showed that the NSLAB fraction of all cheeses was dominated by Lactobacillus curvatus, but a few other species of bacteria were sporadically detected. Thus, changes in fat level were correlated with populations of different bacteria, but did not appear to

  16. Inhibitory effect of essential oils against Lactobacillus rhamnosus and starter culture in fermented milk during its shelf-life period

    PubMed Central

    Moritz, Cristiane Mengue Feniman; Rall, Vera Lúcia Mores; Saeki, Margarida Júri; Júnior, Ary Fernandes

    2012-01-01

    The use of essential oils in foods has attracted great interest, due to their antagonistic action against pathogenic microorganisms. However, this action is undesirable for probiotic foods, as products containing Lactobacillus rhamnosus. The aim of the present study was to measure the sensitivity profile of L. rhamnosus and a yogurt starter culture in fermented milk, upon addition of increasing concentrations of cinnamon, clove and mint essential oils. Essential oils were prepared by steam distillation, and chemically characterised by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and determination of density. Survival curves were obtained from counts of L. rhamnosus and the starter culture (alone and in combination), upon addition of 0.04% essential oils. In parallel, titratable acidity was monitored over 28 experimental days. Minimum inhibitory concentration values, obtained using the microdilution method in Brain Heart Infusion medium, were 0.025, 0.2 and 0.4% for cinnamon, clove and mint essential oils, respectively. Cinnamon essential oil had the highest antimicrobial activity, especially against the starter culture, interfering with lactic acid production. Although viable cell counts of L. rhamnosus were lower following treatment with all 3 essential oils, relative to controls, these results were not statistically significant; in addition, cell counts remained greater than the minimum count of 108CFU/mL required for a product to be considered a probiotic. Thus, although use of cinnamon essential oil in yogurt makes starter culture fermentation unfeasible, it does not prevent the application of L. rhamnosus to probiotic fermented milk. Furthermore, clove and mint essential oil caused sublethal stress to L. rhamnosus. PMID:24031939

  17. Microbial evolution of traditional mountain cheese and characterization of early fermentation cocci for selection of autochtonous dairy starter strains.

    PubMed

    Carafa, Ilaria; Clementi, Francesca; Tuohy, Kieran; Franciosi, Elena

    2016-02-01

    The microbial population of Traditional Mountain (TM) cheese was investigated and characterized for the selection of cocci suitable for developing new starter cultures. Samples of milk, curd and cheese at different ripening times were enumerated in selective culture media and 640 colonies were isolated from curd and cheese after 24 h of ripening. The Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) isolated from M17 were clustered into 231 biotypes by RAPD-PCR analysis and identified as Lactococcus lactis, Streptococcus thermophilus and Enterococcus faecalis. Forty percent of enterococci showed the in vitro ability to inhibit raw milk resident coliforms, but they were excluded as possible starters due to the presence of associated risk factors. All lactococci and streptococci were tested for their technological properties; 4 Lc. lactis subsp. lactis and 2 Sc. thermophilus which were fast acidifiers and did not produce unpleasant flavours were subjected to the freeze-drying stability test. Lc. lactis subsp. lactis biotype 68 and Sc. thermophilus biotype 93 showed the best technological properties and may be appropriate for cheese production. This work gave evidence of the high biodiversity of TM-cheese autochthonous biotypes which could be used as starter cultures for the improvement of TM-cheese technology. PMID:26678135

  18. Proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry for the study of the production of volatile compounds by bakery yeast starters.

    PubMed

    Makhoul, Salim; Romano, Andrea; Cappellin, Luca; Spano, Giuseppe; Capozzi, Vittorio; Benozzi, Elisabetta; Märk, Tilmann D; Aprea, Eugenio; Gasperi, Flavia; El-Nakat, Hanna; Guzzo, Jean; Biasioli, Franco

    2014-09-01

    The aromatic impact of bakery yeast starters is currently receiving considerable attention. The flavor characteristics of the dough and the finished products are usually evaluated by gas chromatography and sensory analysis. The limit of both techniques resides in their low-throughput character. In the present work, proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS), coupled to a time-of-flight mass analyzer, was employed, for the first time, to measure the volatile fractions of dough and bread, and to monitor Saccharomyces cerevisiae volatile production in a fermented food matrix. Leavening was performed on small-scale (1 g) dough samples inoculated with different commercial yeast strains. The leavened doughs were then baked, and volatile profiles were determined during leavening and after baking. The experimental setup included a multifunctional autosampler, which permitted the follow-up of the leavening process on a small scale with a typical throughput of 500 distinct data points in 16 h. The system allowed to pinpoint differences between starter yeast strains in terms of volatile emission kinetics, with repercussions on the final product (i.e. the corresponding micro-loaves). This work demonstrates the applicability of PTR-MS for the study of volatile organic compound production during bread-making, for the automated and online real-time monitoring of the leavening process, and for the characterization and selection of bakery yeast starters in view of their production of volatile compounds.

  19. Microbial evolution of traditional mountain cheese and characterization of early fermentation cocci for selection of autochtonous dairy starter strains.

    PubMed

    Carafa, Ilaria; Clementi, Francesca; Tuohy, Kieran; Franciosi, Elena

    2016-02-01

    The microbial population of Traditional Mountain (TM) cheese was investigated and characterized for the selection of cocci suitable for developing new starter cultures. Samples of milk, curd and cheese at different ripening times were enumerated in selective culture media and 640 colonies were isolated from curd and cheese after 24 h of ripening. The Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) isolated from M17 were clustered into 231 biotypes by RAPD-PCR analysis and identified as Lactococcus lactis, Streptococcus thermophilus and Enterococcus faecalis. Forty percent of enterococci showed the in vitro ability to inhibit raw milk resident coliforms, but they were excluded as possible starters due to the presence of associated risk factors. All lactococci and streptococci were tested for their technological properties; 4 Lc. lactis subsp. lactis and 2 Sc. thermophilus which were fast acidifiers and did not produce unpleasant flavours were subjected to the freeze-drying stability test. Lc. lactis subsp. lactis biotype 68 and Sc. thermophilus biotype 93 showed the best technological properties and may be appropriate for cheese production. This work gave evidence of the high biodiversity of TM-cheese autochthonous biotypes which could be used as starter cultures for the improvement of TM-cheese technology.

  20. Potential antimicrobial and antiproliferative activities of autochthonous starter cultures and protease EPg222 in dry-fermented sausages.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Margarita; Ruiz-Moyano, Santiago; Benito, María José; Martín, Alberto; Hernández, Alejandro; Córdoba, María de Guía

    2016-05-18

    This work studied the presence of nitrogen compounds with bioactive properties in Iberian pork sausages that were manufactured using different autochthonous starter cultures (Pediococcus acidilactici MS200 and Staphylococcus vitulus RS34) and protease EPg222. Nitrogen compounds were extracted and evaluated for their antimicrobial effect against spoilage and pathogenic bacteria, such as Bacillus cereus, Escherichia coli, Salmonella choleraesuis, Staphylococcus aureus and Listeria monocytogenes, and antiproliferative activity on the HT-29 colon adenocarcinoma cell line. Dry-fermented sausages elaborated with starter cultures P200S34 and protease EPg222 generate extracts that cause inhibition of the growth of pathogens reaching 25% inhibition of Bacillus cereus, making this a promising tool for biocontrol in the meat industry. On the other hand, the inoculation of well-adapted starter cultures with high proteolytic activity also increased the antiproliferative activity of these extracts, around 45% inhibition at 72 h, mainly due to an increase in free amino acids, such as Lys and Pro, but also small peptides. PMID:27112426

  1. Effects of pure starter cultures on physico-chemical and sensory quality of dry fermented Chinese-style sausage.

    PubMed

    Rai, Krishna P; Zhang, Chunhui; Xia, Wen Shui

    2010-03-01

    Dry fermented Chinese-style sausages prepared in laboratory inoculating with Lactobacillus casei subsp. casei-1.001, Pediococcus pentosaceus-ATCC 33316, Staphylococcus xylosus-12 and without starter culture randomly sampled at 0, 3, 10, and 24 days of ripening were analyzed for physico-chemical and sensory qualities. A significant (p<0.05) decrease in moisture content of sausage during ripening was observed, whereas other major chemical parameters remained unchanged. The microbial fermentation resulted in decreased pH and nitrite but increased non protein nitrogen and total volatile basic nitrogen in the products. Starter cultures except P. Pentosaceous-ATCC 33316, used in the sausage failed to suppress rancidity in ripened product as indicated by a significant (p<0.05) rise in thiobarbituric acid. The lightness (L) and yellowness (b) in the colour of all sausages decreased with ripening time, meanwhile the redness (a) increased significantly (p<0.05) in sausages inoculated with cultures L. casei subsp. casei-1.001 and S. xylosus-12. The texture profile of sausages was almost similar except for P. Pentosaceous-ATCC 33316, which showed significantly (p<0.05) lower hardness and gumminess. Based on the sensory and physico-chemical quality criteria, S. xylosus-12 could be used as a starter culture to produce dry fermented Chinese-style sausage of high quality.

  2. Effects of pure starter cultures on physico-chemical and sensory quality of dry fermented Chinese-style sausage.

    PubMed

    Rai, Krishna P; Zhang, Chunhui; Xia, Wen Shui

    2010-03-01

    Dry fermented Chinese-style sausages prepared in laboratory inoculating with Lactobacillus casei subsp. casei-1.001, Pediococcus pentosaceus-ATCC 33316, Staphylococcus xylosus-12 and without starter culture randomly sampled at 0, 3, 10, and 24 days of ripening were analyzed for physico-chemical and sensory qualities. A significant (p<0.05) decrease in moisture content of sausage during ripening was observed, whereas other major chemical parameters remained unchanged. The microbial fermentation resulted in decreased pH and nitrite but increased non protein nitrogen and total volatile basic nitrogen in the products. Starter cultures except P. Pentosaceous-ATCC 33316, used in the sausage failed to suppress rancidity in ripened product as indicated by a significant (p<0.05) rise in thiobarbituric acid. The lightness (L) and yellowness (b) in the colour of all sausages decreased with ripening time, meanwhile the redness (a) increased significantly (p<0.05) in sausages inoculated with cultures L. casei subsp. casei-1.001 and S. xylosus-12. The texture profile of sausages was almost similar except for P. Pentosaceous-ATCC 33316, which showed significantly (p<0.05) lower hardness and gumminess. Based on the sensory and physico-chemical quality criteria, S. xylosus-12 could be used as a starter culture to produce dry fermented Chinese-style sausage of high quality. PMID:23572623

  3. Effects of raw milk and starter feed on intake and body composition of Holstein × Gyr male calves up to 64 days of age.

    PubMed

    Silva, A L; Marcondes, M I; Detmann, E; Machado, F S; Valadares Filho, S C; Trece, A S; Dijkstra, J

    2015-04-01

    The objective was to evaluate the effect of supplying different levels of raw milk, alone or in combination, with access to a starter feed, on the intake, digestibility, daily gain, N balance, and body composition of Holstein × Gyr crossbred suckling calves until 64 d of age. Thirty-nine male calves aged 4 d with an average initial live weight of 36 ± 1.0 kg were used. Five calves were defined as a reference group and slaughtered at 4 d of age to estimate the initial body composition of the animals. The other calves were distributed according to a completely randomized design in a 3 × 2 factorial arrangement consisting of 3 levels of milk (2, 4, or 8 L/d) and 2 levels of starter feed (presence or absence in diet). At 15 and 45 d of age, 4 animals from each treatment were subjected to digestibility trials with total collection of feces and urine and sampling of feeds. At 64 d of age, all animals were slaughtered and their body tissues were sampled for analyses. Total dry matter and nutrient intake increased linearly and starter intake decreased linearly in response to the supply of increasing amounts of milk. The digestibility coefficient of organic matter was not affected by the inclusion of starter feed and increased linearly as milk supply was elevated. Daily gain was greater at increased milk supply levels and also greater when starter was supplied, without any interaction between milk supply level and the presence or absence of starter. Fecal N excretion and N retention were higher in the animals fed starter feed. Fecal N excretion was not affected by milk levels, whereas N retention was affected. Body protein and ash contents decreased linearly according to increased milk allowance. In contrast, fat body content increased linearly according to milk supply. The presence of starter feed in the diet was responsible for the increased body fat content, but had no effect on protein or ash content. In conclusion, weight gain and N retention in calves up to 64 d of

  4. The cocoa bean fermentation process: from ecosystem analysis to starter culture development.

    PubMed

    De Vuyst, L; Weckx, S

    2016-07-01

    Cocoa bean fermentation is still a spontaneous curing process to facilitate drying of nongerminating cocoa beans by pulp removal as well as to stimulate colour and flavour development of fermented dry cocoa beans. As it is carried out on farm, cocoa bean fermentation is subjected to various agricultural and operational practices and hence fermented dry cocoa beans of variable quality are obtained. Spontaneous cocoa bean fermentations carried out with care for approximate four days are characterized by a succession of particular microbial activities of three groups of micro-organisms, namely yeasts, lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and acetic acid bacteria (AAB), which results in well-fermented fully brown cocoa beans. This has been shown through a plethora of studies, often using a multiphasic experimental approach. Selected strains of several of the prevailing microbial species have been tested in appropriate cocoa pulp simulation media to unravel their functional roles and interactions as well as in small plastic vessels containing fresh cocoa pulp-bean mass to evaluate their capacity to dominate the cocoa bean fermentation process. Various starter cultures have been proposed for successful fermentation, encompassing both cocoa-derived and cocoa nonspecific strains of (hybrid) yeasts, LAB and AAB, some of which have been implemented on farms successfully.

  5. Synthesis and utilisation of folate by yoghurt starter cultures and probiotic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Crittenden, R G; Martinez, N R; Playne, M J

    2003-02-15

    Thirty-two bacterial isolates from species commonly used in yoghurts and fermented milks were examined for their ability to synthesise or utilise folate during fermentation of skim milk. The organisms examined included the traditional yoghurt starter cultures, Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus, and probiotic lactobacilli, bifidobacteria, and Enterococcus faecium. Folate was synthesised by S. thermophilus, bifidobacteria, and E. faecium. S. thermophilus was the dominant producer, elevating folate levels in skim milk from 11.5 ng g(-1) to between 40 and 50 ng g(-1). Generally, lactobacilli depleted the available folate in the skim milk. Fermentations with mixed cultures showed that folate production and utilisation by the cultures was additive. Fermentations using a combination of Bifidobacterium animalis and S. thermophilus resulted in a six-fold increase in folate concentration. Although increased folate levels in yoghurts and fermented milks are possible through judicious selection of inoculum species, the folate levels remain relatively low in terms of recommended daily allowance. PMID:12423923

  6. In vitro determination of volatile compound development during starter culture-controlled fermentation of Cucurbitaceae cotyledons.

    PubMed

    Kamda, Aristide Guillaume Silapeux; Ramos, Cíntia Lacerda; Fokou, Elie; Duarte, Whasley Ferreira; Mercy, Achu; Germain, Kansci; Dias, Disney Ribeiro; Schwan, Rosane Freitas

    2015-01-01

    The effects of Lactobacillus plantarum UFLA CH3, Pediococcus acidilactici UFLA BFFCX 27.1, and Torulaspora delbrueckii UFLA FFT2.4 inoculation on the volatile compound profile of fermentation of Cucumeropsis mannii cotyledons were investigated. Different microbial associations were used as starters. All associations displayed the ability to ferment the cotyledons as judged by lowering the pH from 6.4 to 4.4-5 within 24h and increasing organic acids such as lactate and acetate. The population of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and yeasts increased during fermentation. In the fermentation performed without inoculation (control), the LAB and yeast populations were lower than those in inoculated assays at the beginning, but they reached similar populations after 48 h. The Enterobacteriaceae population decreased during the fermentation, and they were not detected at 48 h in the L. plantarum UFLA CH3 and P. acidilactici UFLA BFFCX 27.1 (LP+PA) and L. plantarum UFLA CH3, P. acidilactici UFLA BFFCX 27.1, and T. delbrueckii UFLA FFT2.4 (LP+PA+TD) samples. The assays inoculated with the yeast T. delbrueckii UFLA FFT2.4 exhibited the majority of volatile compounds (13 compounds) characterized by pleasant notes. The LP+PA+TD association seemed to be appropriate to ferment C. mannii cotyledons. It was able to control the Enterobacteriaceae population, and achieved high concentrations of esters and low concentrations of aldehydes and ketones.

  7. Indigenous Starter Cultures to Improve Quality of Artisanal Dry Fermented Sausages from Chaco (Argentina)

    PubMed Central

    Palavecino Prpich, Noelia Z.; Castro, Marcela P.; Cayré, María E.; Garro, Oscar A.; Vignolo, Graciela M.

    2015-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and coagulase negative cocci (CNC) were isolated from artisanal dry sausages sampled from the northeastern region of Chaco, Argentina. In order to evaluate their performance in situ and considering technological features of the isolated strains, two mixed selected autochthonous starter cultures (SAS) were designed: (i) SAS-1 (Lactobacillus sakei 487 + Staphylococcus vitulinus C2) and (ii) SAS-2 (L. sakei 442 + S. xylosus C8). Cultures were introduced into dry sausage manufacturing process at a local small-scale facility. Microbiological and physicochemical parameters were monitored throughout fermentation and ripening periods, while sensory attributes of the final products were evaluated by a trained panel. Lactic acid bacteria revealed their ability to colonize and adapt properly to the meat matrix, inhibiting the growth of spontaneous microflora and enhancing safety and hygienic profile of the products. Both SAS showed a beneficial effect on lipid oxidation and texture of the final products. Staphylococcus vitulinus C2, from SAS-1, promoted a better redness of the final product. Sensory profile revealed that SAS addition preserved typical sensory attributes. Introduction of these cultures could provide an additional tool to standardize manufacturing processes aiming to enhance safety and quality while keeping typical sensory attributes of regional dry fermented sausages. PMID:26955636

  8. Indigenous Starter Cultures to Improve Quality of Artisanal Dry Fermented Sausages from Chaco (Argentina).

    PubMed

    Palavecino Prpich, Noelia Z; Castro, Marcela P; Cayré, María E; Garro, Oscar A; Vignolo, Graciela M

    2015-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and coagulase negative cocci (CNC) were isolated from artisanal dry sausages sampled from the northeastern region of Chaco, Argentina. In order to evaluate their performance in situ and considering technological features of the isolated strains, two mixed selected autochthonous starter cultures (SAS) were designed: (i) SAS-1 (Lactobacillus sakei 487 + Staphylococcus vitulinus C2) and (ii) SAS-2 (L. sakei 442 + S. xylosus C8). Cultures were introduced into dry sausage manufacturing process at a local small-scale facility. Microbiological and physicochemical parameters were monitored throughout fermentation and ripening periods, while sensory attributes of the final products were evaluated by a trained panel. Lactic acid bacteria revealed their ability to colonize and adapt properly to the meat matrix, inhibiting the growth of spontaneous microflora and enhancing safety and hygienic profile of the products. Both SAS showed a beneficial effect on lipid oxidation and texture of the final products. Staphylococcus vitulinus C2, from SAS-1, promoted a better redness of the final product. Sensory profile revealed that SAS addition preserved typical sensory attributes. Introduction of these cultures could provide an additional tool to standardize manufacturing processes aiming to enhance safety and quality while keeping typical sensory attributes of regional dry fermented sausages.

  9. In vitro determination of volatile compound development during starter culture-controlled fermentation of Cucurbitaceae cotyledons.

    PubMed

    Kamda, Aristide Guillaume Silapeux; Ramos, Cíntia Lacerda; Fokou, Elie; Duarte, Whasley Ferreira; Mercy, Achu; Germain, Kansci; Dias, Disney Ribeiro; Schwan, Rosane Freitas

    2015-01-01

    The effects of Lactobacillus plantarum UFLA CH3, Pediococcus acidilactici UFLA BFFCX 27.1, and Torulaspora delbrueckii UFLA FFT2.4 inoculation on the volatile compound profile of fermentation of Cucumeropsis mannii cotyledons were investigated. Different microbial associations were used as starters. All associations displayed the ability to ferment the cotyledons as judged by lowering the pH from 6.4 to 4.4-5 within 24h and increasing organic acids such as lactate and acetate. The population of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and yeasts increased during fermentation. In the fermentation performed without inoculation (control), the LAB and yeast populations were lower than those in inoculated assays at the beginning, but they reached similar populations after 48 h. The Enterobacteriaceae population decreased during the fermentation, and they were not detected at 48 h in the L. plantarum UFLA CH3 and P. acidilactici UFLA BFFCX 27.1 (LP+PA) and L. plantarum UFLA CH3, P. acidilactici UFLA BFFCX 27.1, and T. delbrueckii UFLA FFT2.4 (LP+PA+TD) samples. The assays inoculated with the yeast T. delbrueckii UFLA FFT2.4 exhibited the majority of volatile compounds (13 compounds) characterized by pleasant notes. The LP+PA+TD association seemed to be appropriate to ferment C. mannii cotyledons. It was able to control the Enterobacteriaceae population, and achieved high concentrations of esters and low concentrations of aldehydes and ketones. PMID:25306300

  10. Selection of yeasts with multifunctional features for application as starters in natural black table olive processing.

    PubMed

    Bonatsou, S; Benítez, A; Rodríguez-Gómez, F; Panagou, E Z; Arroyo-López, F N

    2015-04-01

    Yeasts are unicellular eukaryotic microorganisms with a great importance in the elaboration on many foods and beverages. In the last years, researches have focused their attention to determine the favourable effects that these microorganisms could provide to table olive processing. In this context, the present study assesses, at laboratory scale, the potential technological (resistance to salt, lipase, esterase and β-glucosidase activities) and probiotic (phytase activity, survival to gastric and pancreatic digestions) features of 12 yeast strains originally isolated from Greek natural black table olive fermentations. The multivariate classification analysis carried out with all information obtained (a total of 336 quantitative input data), revealed that the most promising strains (clearly discriminated from the rest of isolates) were Pichia guilliermondii Y16 (which showed overall the highest resistance to salt and simulated digestions) and Wickerhamomyces anomalus Y18 (with the overall highest technological enzymatic activities), while the rest of strains were grouped together in two clearly differentiated clusters. Thus, this work opens the possibility for the evaluation of these two selected yeasts as multifunctional starters, alone or in combination with lactic acid bacteria, in real table olive fermentations.

  11. Metagenomic analysis of fungal diversity in Korean traditional wheat-based fermentation starter nuruk.

    PubMed

    Bal, Jyotiranjan; Yun, Suk-Hyun; Yeo, Soo-Hwan; Kim, Jung-Mi; Kim, Dae-Hyuk

    2016-12-01

    Nuruk, a traditional natural starter, is extensively used in the brewing of Makgeolli, one of Korea's most popular alcoholic beverages that has been recently gaining global popularity. Thus, the quality of traditional nuruk needs to be enhanced. The nuruk mycobiome greatly influences both fermentation process as well as palatability enhancement. Limitations of culture-dependent identification restrict an accurate analysis of fungal diversity and distribution in nuruks. 454 pyrosequencing of two traditional wheat-based nuruks, prepared at two representative temperature conditions revealed a total of 153 and 53 OTUs for nuruks A and B, respectively, from a total of 33,157 ITS sequences. Phylogenetic assignments indicated that nuruk A mycobiota was dominated by the genera Aspergillus and Mucorales, whereas nuruk B by Rhizomucor. Species-level identification indicated that Mucorales sp., Aspergillus candidus, and Aspergillus cibarius predominated in nuruk A mycoflora whereas Rhizomucor pusillus, Mucorales sp., and Thermoascus crustaceus in nuruk B. The alpha diversity indices suggest nuruk A mycobiota to be more diverse than that of nuruk B at almost all time points of fermentation. Resemblances of patterns of predominant species composition and succession between culture-dependent and -independent phylogenetic analysis creates the potential to reconstruct the nuruk mycobiome in vitro, which allows the establishment of a standard inoculum for scientific comparison. PMID:27554148

  12. Different substrates and starter inocula govern microbial community structures in biogas reactors.

    PubMed

    Satpathy, Preseela; Steinigeweg, Sven; Cypionka, Heribert; Engelen, Bert

    2016-01-01

    The influence of different starter inocula on the microbial communities in biogas batch reactors fed with fresh maize and maize silage as substrates was investigated. Molecular biological analysis by Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE) of 16S rRNA gene fragments showed that each inoculum bore specific microbial communities with varying predominant phylotypes. Both, bacterial and archaeal DGGE profiles displayed three distinct communities that developed depending on the type of inoculum. Although maize and silage are similar substrates, different communities dominated the lactate-rich silage compared to lactate-free fresh maize. Cluster analysis of DGGE gels showed the communities of the same substrates to be stable with their respective inoculum. Bacteria-specific DGGE analysis revealed a rich diversity with Firmicutes being predominant. The other abundant phylotypes were Bacteroidetes and Synergistetes. Archaea-specific DGGE analysis displayed less diverse community structures, identifying members of the Methanosarcinales as the dominant methanogens present in all the three biogas digesters. In general, the source of inoculum played a significant role in shaping microbial communities. Adaptability of the inoculum to the substrates fed also influenced community compositions which further impacted the rates of biogas production.

  13. Evaluation of a potential starter culture for enhance quality of coffee fermentation.

    PubMed

    Silva, Cristina Ferreira; Vilela, Danielle Marques; de Souza Cordeiro, Cecília; Duarte, Whasley Ferreira; Dias, Disney Ribeiro; Schwan, Rosane Freitas

    2013-02-01

    The coffee fermentation is characterized by the presence of different microorganisms belonging to the groups of bacteria, fungi and yeast. The objectives of this work were to select pectinolytic microorganisms isolated from coffee fermentations and evaluate their performance on coffee pulp culture medium. The yeasts and bacteria isolates were evaluated for their activity of polygalacturonase (PG), pectin lyase (PL) and pectin methylesterase (PME) and metabolites production. Among 127 yeasts isolates and 189 bacterial isolates, 15 were pre-selected based on their ability to produce PL and organic compounds. These isolates were strains identified as Bacillus cereus, Bacillus megaterium, Bacillus subtilis, Candida parapsilosis, Pichia caribbica, Pichia guilliermondii and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. When cultivated in Coffee peel and pulp media in single culture or two by two mixed inocula, different behavior concerning to PME, PL and PG were found. The two principal components PC1 and PC2 accounted for 45.27 and 32.02 % of the total variance. UFLA CN727 and UFLA CN731 strains were grouped in the positive part of PC1 being characterized by 1,2-propanediol, hexanoic acid, decanoic acid, nonanoic acid and ethyl acetate. The UFLA CN448 and UFLA CN724 strains were grouped in the negative part of PC1 and were mainly characterized by guaiacol, butyric acid and citronellol. S. cerevisiae UFLACN727, P. guilliermondii UFLACN731 and C. parapsilosis UFLACN448 isolates are promising candidates to be tested in future studies as coffee starter cultures.

  14. The cocoa bean fermentation process: from ecosystem analysis to starter culture development.

    PubMed

    De Vuyst, L; Weckx, S

    2016-07-01

    Cocoa bean fermentation is still a spontaneous curing process to facilitate drying of nongerminating cocoa beans by pulp removal as well as to stimulate colour and flavour development of fermented dry cocoa beans. As it is carried out on farm, cocoa bean fermentation is subjected to various agricultural and operational practices and hence fermented dry cocoa beans of variable quality are obtained. Spontaneous cocoa bean fermentations carried out with care for approximate four days are characterized by a succession of particular microbial activities of three groups of micro-organisms, namely yeasts, lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and acetic acid bacteria (AAB), which results in well-fermented fully brown cocoa beans. This has been shown through a plethora of studies, often using a multiphasic experimental approach. Selected strains of several of the prevailing microbial species have been tested in appropriate cocoa pulp simulation media to unravel their functional roles and interactions as well as in small plastic vessels containing fresh cocoa pulp-bean mass to evaluate their capacity to dominate the cocoa bean fermentation process. Various starter cultures have been proposed for successful fermentation, encompassing both cocoa-derived and cocoa nonspecific strains of (hybrid) yeasts, LAB and AAB, some of which have been implemented on farms successfully. PMID:26743883

  15. Ultrastructure of biofilms formed on barley kernels during malting with and without starter culture.

    PubMed

    Raulio, Mari; Wilhelmson, Annika; Salkinoja-Salonen, Mirja; Laitila, Arja

    2009-06-01

    Malted barley is a major raw material of beer, as well as distilled spirits and several food products. In the malting process, dry barley kernels are steeped in water which initiates germination and invigorates microbial growth on the kernels. In the present study, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) was used to visualize the microbial community within the tissues of barley kernels before and after the steeping, with and without Lactobacillus plantarum E76 added as a starter culture. The results show that the community of 10(8)cfu g(-1) on dry, stored barley kernels increased 5-10 fold during the steeping forming a dense biofilm of bacteria and fungi with slimy exopolymeric matrix. FESEM revealed that crevices between the outer epidermis and the testa of sound barley kernels were heavily colonized with microbes, whereas there were only few microbes on the outer surface of the husks, in the aleurone layer or in the endosperm underneath an intact testa layer. The microbes frequently possessed appendages forming bridging them to the kernel and the individual microbial cells to each other. The L. plantarum added to the steeping water reduced the amount of exopolymeric matrix in the biofilm and improved the wort filterability. PMID:19376468

  16. Compromised Lactobacillus helveticus starter activity in the presence of facultative heterofermentative Lactobacillus casei DPC6987 results in atypical eye formation in Swiss-type cheese.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, Daniel J; McSweeney, Paul L H; Cotter, Paul D; Giblin, Linda; Sheehan, Jeremiah J

    2016-04-01

    Nonstarter lactic acid bacteria are commonly implicated in undesirable gas formation in several varieties, including Cheddar, Dutch-, and Swiss-type cheeses, primarily due to their ability to ferment a wide variety of substrates. This effect can be magnified due to factors that detrimentally affect the composition or activity of starter bacteria, resulting in the presence of greater than normal amounts of fermentable carbohydrates and citrate. The objective of this study was to determine the potential for a facultatively heterofermentative Lactobacillus (Lactobacillus casei DPC6987) isolated from a cheese plant environment to promote gas defects in the event of compromised starter activity. A Swiss-type cheese was manufactured, at pilot scale and in triplicate, containing a typical starter culture (Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus helveticus) together with propionic acid bacteria. Lactobacillus helveticus populations were omitted in certain vats to mimic starter failure. Lactobacillus casei DPC6987 was added to each experimental vat at 4 log cfu/g. Cheese compositional analysis and X-ray computed tomography revealed that the failure of starter bacteria, in this case L. helveticus, coupled with the presence of a faculatively heterofermentative Lactobacillus (L. casei) led to excessive eye formation during ripening. The availability of excess amounts of lactose, galactose, and citrate during the initial ripening stages likely provided the heterofermentative L. casei with sufficient substrates for gas formation. The accrual of these fermentable substrates was notable in cheeses lacking the L. helveticus starter population. The results of this study are commercially relevant, as they demonstrate the importance of viability of starter populations and the control of specific nonstarter lactic acid bacteria to ensure appropriate eye formation in Swiss-type cheese. PMID:26805985

  17. Examination of the technological properties of newly isolated strains of the genus Lactobacillus and possibilities for their application in the composition of starters

    PubMed Central

    Denkova, Rositsa; Ilieva, Svetla; Denkova, Zapryana; Georgieva, Ljubka; Krastanov, Albert

    2014-01-01

    The ability of four Lactobacillus strains – Lactobacillus brevis LBRZ7 (isolated from fermented cabbage), Lactobacillus plantarum LBRZ12 (isolated from fermented cabbage), Lactobacillus fermentum LBRH9 (of human origin) and Lactobacillus casei ssp. rhamnosus LBRC11 (isolated from home-made cheese) – to grow in flour/water environment and to accumulate high concentrations of viable cells was examined. Two starters for sourdough were created for lab-scale production of wheat bread: a two-strain starter and a four-strain starter. Wheat bread with improved properties – greater loaf volume, enhanced flavour and softer and brighter crumb – was obtained from the 7% four-strain starter sourdough. The addition of sourdough in the production of wheat bread affected positively the technological and organoleptic characteristics of the final bread by inhibiting the growth of wild yeasts and mold and Bacillus spores without the addition of preservatives. The inclusion of 15% of the four-strain starter sourdough in the bread-making process led to enhanced safety and longer shelf life of the baked bread. PMID:26019534

  18. Two efficient nitrite-reducing Lactobacillus strains isolated from traditional fermented pork (Nanx Wudl) as competitive starter cultures for Chinese fermented dry sausage.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Li, Jiapeng; Zhou, Tong; Li, Jinchun; Yang, Junna; Chen, Wenhua; Xiong, Youling L

    2016-11-01

    Lactic acid bacteria isolated from traditional Dong pork product (Nanx Wudl) were investigated for their potential as starter cultures for Chinese fermented dry sausages. Based on preliminary screening, Lactobacillus plantarum CMRC6 and Lactobacillus sakei CMRC15, both showing excellent nitrite-reducing capacity, were used as single-strain starter cultures. For comparison, a commercial composite starter was also tested. In CMRC6 and CMRC15-inoculated sausages, lactic acid bacteria dominated the microflora and improved the microbiological safety by suppression of Enterobacteriaceae growth. Nitrite content of all inoculated sausages declined rapidly during ripening compared to non-inoculated. Texture profiles analysis showed inoculated sausages had more pronounced textural development during ripening. Sensory evaluation indicated CMRC6 and CMRC15-fermented sausages had comparable or more desirable organoleptic characteristics than sausage made with commercial starters. Therefore, CMRC6 and CMRC15 are promising candidates as multi-functional starter cultures for microbiological safety and residual nitrite control in gourmet Chinese dry sausage production. PMID:27395823

  19. Two efficient nitrite-reducing Lactobacillus strains isolated from traditional fermented pork (Nanx Wudl) as competitive starter cultures for Chinese fermented dry sausage.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Li, Jiapeng; Zhou, Tong; Li, Jinchun; Yang, Junna; Chen, Wenhua; Xiong, Youling L

    2016-11-01

    Lactic acid bacteria isolated from traditional Dong pork product (Nanx Wudl) were investigated for their potential as starter cultures for Chinese fermented dry sausages. Based on preliminary screening, Lactobacillus plantarum CMRC6 and Lactobacillus sakei CMRC15, both showing excellent nitrite-reducing capacity, were used as single-strain starter cultures. For comparison, a commercial composite starter was also tested. In CMRC6 and CMRC15-inoculated sausages, lactic acid bacteria dominated the microflora and improved the microbiological safety by suppression of Enterobacteriaceae growth. Nitrite content of all inoculated sausages declined rapidly during ripening compared to non-inoculated. Texture profiles analysis showed inoculated sausages had more pronounced textural development during ripening. Sensory evaluation indicated CMRC6 and CMRC15-fermented sausages had comparable or more desirable organoleptic characteristics than sausage made with commercial starters. Therefore, CMRC6 and CMRC15 are promising candidates as multi-functional starter cultures for microbiological safety and residual nitrite control in gourmet Chinese dry sausage production.

  20. Effect of pasteurization of Ewe's milk and use of a native starter culture on the volatile components and sensory characteristics of roncal cheese.

    PubMed

    Ortigosa, M; Torre, P; Izco, J M

    2001-06-01

    The effect of pasteurization of milk and use of a native starter culture on the volatile components and sensory characteristics of a Spanish ewe's-milk cheese were examined. Three cheese batches were made, one from raw milk, another from pasteurized milk, and a third from pasteurized milk with an added native starter culture in addition to the commercial starter. Cheeses were analyzed at 1, 120, and 240 d of ripening. Analysis of the volatile components was by purge and trap connected to a gas chromatograph with a mass spectrometer and disclosed a total of 76 components belonging to the following chemical families: hydrocarbons, fatty acids, esters, sulfur and carbonyl compounds, and, in particular, alcohols. Pasteurization lowered the levels of certain volatile components, especially alcohols, aldehydes, and ketones. The cheeses made from pasteurized milk showed lower scores for attributes of characteristic taste and aftertaste, as well as a characteristic aroma at 240 d of ripening. These results suggest that the components present in higher concentrations in the cheeses made from the raw milk were necessary for development of characteristic Roncal cheese aroma. The new native starter culture tested did not exert a significant effect on any of the parameters considered, with the exception of certain isolated components, for which higher or lower quantities were recorded in the cheeses made with that starter culture, although the differences did not have a definite effect on the sensory characteristics of the cheeses.

  1. Formation of biogenic amines in raw milk Hispánico cheese manufactured with proteinases and different levels of starter culture.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-García, E; Tomillo, J; Nuñez, M

    2000-11-01

    Two proteinases, a neutral proteinase from Bacillus subtilis and a cysteine proteinase from Micrococcus sp., were used to accelerate the ripening process of raw cow's milk Hispánico cheese, a semihard variety. Two levels (0.1% and 1%) of a commercial starter culture containing Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis and L. lactis subsp. cremoris were added for cheese manufacture. The influence of both factors, proteinase addition and level of starter culture, on the growth of amino acid-decarboxylating microorganisms and on the formation of biogenic amines during cheese ripening was investigated in duplicate experiments. The population of tyrosine decarboxylase-positive bacteria, which represented less than 1% of the total bacterial population in most cheese samples, and tyrosine decarboxylase-positive lactobacilli was not influenced by proteinase addition or level of starter culture. Tyramine was detected in all batches of cheese from day 30. Its concentration was significantly (P < 0.05) influenced by proteinase addition but not by the level of starter culture and increased with cheese age. After 90 days of ripening, 103 to 191 mg/kg of tyramine was found in the different cheese batches. Histamine was not detected until day 60 in cheese with neutral proteinase and 1% starter culture and until day 90 in the rest of the cheeses. The concentration of this amine did not exceed 20 mg/kg in any of the batches investigated. Phenylethylamine and tryptamine were not found in any of the samples.

  2. Effects of starter feeding and early weaning on GHR mRNA expression in liver and rumen of lambs from birth to 84 days of age.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fangbin; Li, Chong; Li, Fadi; Wang, Weimin; Wang, Xiaojuan; Liu, Ting; Ma, Zhiyuan; Li, Baosheng

    2016-01-01

    The growth hormone receptor (GHR) is associated with animal growth and development. To investigate such effects on GHR gene expression, a total of 102 Hu lambs were randomly allocated to one of three groups (Group 1: starter diet from 7 d of age, weaning at 56 d of age; Group 2: starter diet from 42 d of age, weaning at 56 d of age; Group 3: starter diet from 7 d of age; weaning at 28 d of age). Six lambs from each group were sacrificed every 14 d to investigate the effects of starter feeding and weaning age on GHR mRNA expression in the liver and rumen. The results revealed that GHR mRNA expression was significantly higher in the liver and rumen (p < 0.05) than in other tissues. Early starter feeding up-regulated hepatic GHR mRNA expression on days 14, 28, 42 and 56 and ruminal GHR mRNA expression on days 28, 42, 70, and 84 (p < 0.05). Early weaning up-regulated hepatic GHR mRNA expression on days 56, 70 and 84 and ruminal GHR mRNA expression on days 42, 56, 70 and 84 (p < 0.05). Dietary and weaning regimes and age affected the hepatic and ruminal GHR mRNA expression. PMID:27032032

  3. Effects of starter feeding and early weaning on GHR mRNA expression in liver and rumen of lambs from birth to 84 days of age.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fangbin; Li, Chong; Li, Fadi; Wang, Weimin; Wang, Xiaojuan; Liu, Ting; Ma, Zhiyuan; Li, Baosheng

    2016-01-01

    The growth hormone receptor (GHR) is associated with animal growth and development. To investigate such effects on GHR gene expression, a total of 102 Hu lambs were randomly allocated to one of three groups (Group 1: starter diet from 7 d of age, weaning at 56 d of age; Group 2: starter diet from 42 d of age, weaning at 56 d of age; Group 3: starter diet from 7 d of age; weaning at 28 d of age). Six lambs from each group were sacrificed every 14 d to investigate the effects of starter feeding and weaning age on GHR mRNA expression in the liver and rumen. The results revealed that GHR mRNA expression was significantly higher in the liver and rumen (p < 0.05) than in other tissues. Early starter feeding up-regulated hepatic GHR mRNA expression on days 14, 28, 42 and 56 and ruminal GHR mRNA expression on days 28, 42, 70, and 84 (p < 0.05). Early weaning up-regulated hepatic GHR mRNA expression on days 56, 70 and 84 and ruminal GHR mRNA expression on days 42, 56, 70 and 84 (p < 0.05). Dietary and weaning regimes and age affected the hepatic and ruminal GHR mRNA expression.

  4. Environmental Factors Affecting Microbiota Dynamics during Traditional Solid-state Fermentation of Chinese Daqu Starter.

    PubMed

    Li, Pan; Lin, Weifeng; Liu, Xiong; Wang, Xiaowen; Luo, Lixin

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the microbiota dynamics during two industrial-scale traditional solid-state fermentation (SSF) processes of Daqu starters. Similar evolution profiles of environmental parameters, enzymatic activities, microbial amounts, and communities were observed during the medium temperature SSF (MTSSF) and low temperature SSF (LTSSF) processes. Orders of Rickettsiales and Streptophyta only dominated the initial 2 days, and Eurotiales only predominated from days 10 to 24, however, phylotypes of Enterobacteriales, Lactobacillales, Bacillales, Saccharomycetales, and Mucorales both prevailed throughout the MTSSF and LTSSF processes. Nevertheless, the pH in MTSSF process on day 5 were 5.28, while in LTSSF process (4.87) significantly lower (P < 0.05). The glucoamylase activities in MTSSF process dropped from 902.71 to 394.33 mg glucose g(-1) h(-1) on days 5 to 24, while significantly lower (P < 0.05) in LTSSF process and decreased from 512.25 to 268.69 mg glucose g(-1) h(-1). The relative abundance of Enterobacteriales and Lactobacillales in MTSSF process constituted from 10.30 to 71.73% and 2.34 to 16.68%, while in LTSSF process ranged from 3.16 to 41.06% and 8.43 to 57.39%, respectively. The relative abundance of Eurotiales in MTSSF process on days 10 to 24 decreased from 36.10 to 28.63%, while obviously higher in LTSSF process and increased from 52.00 to 72.97%. Furthermore, lower bacterial richness but higher fungal richness were displayed, markedly differences in bacterial communities but highly similarities in fungal communities were exhibited, during MTSSF process comparatively to the LTSSF process. Canonical correspondence analysis revealed microbial structure transition happened at thermophilic stages under environmental stress of moisture, pH, acidity, and pile temperature. These profound understanding might help to effectively control the traditional Daqu SSF process by adjusting relevant environmental parameters. PMID:27540378

  5. Environmental Factors Affecting Microbiota Dynamics during Traditional Solid-state Fermentation of Chinese Daqu Starter

    PubMed Central

    Li, Pan; Lin, Weifeng; Liu, Xiong; Wang, Xiaowen; Luo, Lixin

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the microbiota dynamics during two industrial-scale traditional solid-state fermentation (SSF) processes of Daqu starters. Similar evolution profiles of environmental parameters, enzymatic activities, microbial amounts, and communities were observed during the medium temperature SSF (MTSSF) and low temperature SSF (LTSSF) processes. Orders of Rickettsiales and Streptophyta only dominated the initial 2 days, and Eurotiales only predominated from days 10 to 24, however, phylotypes of Enterobacteriales, Lactobacillales, Bacillales, Saccharomycetales, and Mucorales both prevailed throughout the MTSSF and LTSSF processes. Nevertheless, the pH in MTSSF process on day 5 were 5.28, while in LTSSF process (4.87) significantly lower (P < 0.05). The glucoamylase activities in MTSSF process dropped from 902.71 to 394.33 mg glucose g-1 h-1 on days 5 to 24, while significantly lower (P < 0.05) in LTSSF process and decreased from 512.25 to 268.69 mg glucose g-1 h-1. The relative abundance of Enterobacteriales and Lactobacillales in MTSSF process constituted from 10.30 to 71.73% and 2.34 to 16.68%, while in LTSSF process ranged from 3.16 to 41.06% and 8.43 to 57.39%, respectively. The relative abundance of Eurotiales in MTSSF process on days 10 to 24 decreased from 36.10 to 28.63%, while obviously higher in LTSSF process and increased from 52.00 to 72.97%. Furthermore, lower bacterial richness but higher fungal richness were displayed, markedly differences in bacterial communities but highly similarities in fungal communities were exhibited, during MTSSF process comparatively to the LTSSF process. Canonical correspondence analysis revealed microbial structure transition happened at thermophilic stages under environmental stress of moisture, pH, acidity, and pile temperature. These profound understanding might help to effectively control the traditional Daqu SSF process by adjusting relevant environmental parameters. PMID:27540378

  6. Use of autochthonous starters to ferment red and yellow peppers (Capsicum annum L.) to be stored at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Di Cagno, Raffaella; Surico, Rosalinda F; Minervini, Giovanna; De Angelis, Maria; Rizzello, Carlo G; Gobbetti, Marco

    2009-03-31

    Strains of Lactobacillus curvatus, Leuconostoc mesenteroides, Lactobacillus plantarum and Weissella confusa were identified from raw red and yellow peppers (RYPs) by partial 16S rRNA gene sequence and subjected to typing by Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA-Polymerase Chain Reaction (RAPD-PCR) analysis. L. plantarum PE21, L. curvatus PE4 and W. confusa PE36 were selected based on the kinetics of growth and acidification, and used as the autochthonous mixed starter for the fermentation of RYPs. A protocol which included blanching at 85 degrees C for 2 min, fermentation at 35 degrees C for 15 h in brine (1%, w/v), and heat treatment at 85 degrees C for 15 min, followed by storage at room temperature for 30 days with and without sunflower seeds oil was set up. Unstarted RYPs subjected to the same treatments were used as the control. Cell numbers of autochthonous starter in the RYPs were ca. 1000 times higher than presumptive lactic acid bacteria in unstarted RYPs. As shown by RAPD-PCR analysis, all three autochthonous strains persisted during processing and storage. Presumptive lactic acid bacteria found in started RYPs progressively decreased during storage, leading to a microbiota mainly consisting of autochthonous starters. Started RYPs showed rapid decrease of pH (<3.7), marked consumption of fermentable carbohydrates, and inhibition of total enterobacteria and yeasts. Unstarted RYPs were subjected to slight acidification (pH ca. 4.87) and considerable contamination by total enterobacteria and yeasts throughout storage. After 30 days of storage, started RYPs had significantly (P<0.05) higher firmness and colour indexes with respect to unstarted RYPs. The microbial and sensory features of started RYPs stored with sunflower seeds oil were almost similar to those of RYPs stored without suspending liquid.

  7. Selection of autochthonous Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains as wine starters using a polyphasic approach and ochratoxin A removal.

    PubMed

    Petruzzi, Leonardo; Bevilacqua, Antonio; Corbo, Maria Rosaria; Garofalo, Carmela; Baiano, Antonietta; Sinigaglia, Milena

    2014-07-01

    Over the last few years, the selection of autochthonous strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae as wine starters has been studied; however, researchers have not focused on the ability to remove ochratoxin A (OTA) as a possible trait to use in oenological characterization. In this article, a polyphasic approach, including yeast genotyping, evaluation of phenotypic traits, and fermentative performance in a model system (temperature, 25 and 30°C; sugar level, 200 and 250 g liter(-1)), was proposed as a suitable approach to select wine starters of S. cerevisiae from 30 autochthonous isolates from Uva di Troia cv., a red wine grape variety grown in the Apulian region (Southern Italy). The ability to remove OTA, a desirable trait to improve the safety of wine, was also assessed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The isolates, identified by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of the internal transcribed spacer region and DNA sequencing, were differentiated at strain level through the amplification of the interdelta region; 11 biotypes (I to XI) were identified and further studied. Four biotypes (II, III, V, VIII) were able to reduce OTA, with the rate of toxin removal from the medium (0.6 to 42.8%, wt/vol) dependent upon the strain and the temperature, and biotypes II and VIII were promising in terms of ethanol, glycerol, and volatile acidity production, as well as for their enzymatic and stress resistance characteristics. For the first time, the ability of S. cerevisiae to remove OTA during alcoholic fermentation was used as an additional trait in the yeast-selection program; the results could have application for evaluating the potential of autochthonous S. cerevisiae strains as starter cultures for the production of typical wines with improved quality and safety. PMID:24988024

  8. A New Starting Method of the Hybrid Power Filter for Wind Power Generation Systems with Soft Starter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Hiroaki; Hiraki, Eiji; Tanaka, Toshihiko

    This paper proposes a new method of starting the hybrid power filter for wind power generation systems with soft starter. In the proposed method, an active filter of the hybrid power filter behaves a resistor for the source current under the starting condition. Thus the inrush phenomena of the passive filter are perfectly suppressed. The basic principle of the proposed starting method is discussed, and then confirmed by digital computer simulation using PSCAD/EMTDC. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed starting method can overcome the inrush currents for the passive filter, building up the dc voltage of the active filter.

  9. Prevalence of antibiotic resistance in coagulase-negative staphylococci from spontaneously fermented meat products and safety assessment for new starters.

    PubMed

    Marty, Esther; Bodenmann, Chantal; Buchs, Jasmin; Hadorn, Ruedi; Eugster-Meier, Elisabeth; Lacroix, Christophe; Meile, Leo

    2012-10-01

    To provide new meat starter strains lacking antibiotic (AB) resistances, we explored the AB susceptibility in 116 coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (CNS) isolates from traditionally fermented sausages (n=40) manufactured with meat from conventional animal breeding, and from meat products (n=76) made from meat of animals raised in natural habitats under low- or no-antibiotic pressure. Less than 50% of these CNS isolates showed phenotypic resistances to at least one antibiotic (AB) by using microdilution assay. Resistances to penicillins and tetracycline were most often observed and could be traced back to blaZ and tet(K) genes. Prevalence of AB resistances was species-dependent and mainly found in isolates of Staphylococcus warneri (78%), Staphylococcus capitis (75%) and Staphylococcus epidermidis (67%), but only sporadically detected in Staphylococcus carnosus (27%) and Staphylococcus equorum (18%). AB resistances were more often observed in S. xylosus isolates originating from natural habitats compared to traditionally fermented sausages made from conventional meat. A selection of 101 isolates belonging to S. xylosus (n=63), S. carnosus (n=21) and S. equorum (n=17) were subsequently grouped by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) into strain clusters. No S. carnosus and only five S. xylosus strains were lacking AB resistances and exhibited a PFGE genotype different from commercial starters. These strains, together with 17 S. equorum strains, were further studied for safety and technological characteristics. The ability to produce biogenic amines was not detected in any strain. PCR amplifications for enterotoxin encoding genes seg-sej were detected in one, and for δ-hemolysin encoding gene hld in four S. equorum strains, but phenotypic hemolytic activity was visible for three S. xylosus and 15 S. equorum strains. Catalase and nitrate reductase activity was observed in all isolates tested; particularly S. equorum showed high nitrate reduction. In conclusion, we

  10. Use of a remote car starter in relation to smog and climate change perceptions: a population survey in Québec (Canada).

    PubMed

    Bélanger, Diane; Gosselin, Pierre; Valois, Pierre; Germain, Stéphane; Abdous, Belkacem

    2009-02-01

    Remote car starters encourage motorists to warm up their vehicles by idling the motor--thus increasing atmospheric pollutants, including several greenhouse gas (GHG) with impacts on public health. This study about climate change (CC) adaptation and mitigation actions examined perceptions on air pollution and climate change and individual characteristics associated with the use of a remote car starter. A telephone survey (n = 2,570; response rate: 70%) of adults living in Québec (Canada) measured the respondents' beliefs and current behaviours regarding CC. Approximately 32.9% (daily car users) and 27.4% (occasional users) reported using a remote car starter during winter. The odds of the use of a remote car starter was higher in the less densely populated central (OR: 1.5) and peripheral regions (OR: 2.7) compared to the urban centers (ex. Montreal). The odds was also higher in population with a mother tongue other than English or French (OR: 2.6) and francophones than anglophones (OR: 2.1), women than men (OR: 1.5), daily drivers than occasional ones (OR: 1.2), and respondents who at least sometimes consulted temperature/humidity reports than those who consulted them less often (OR: 1.5). In multivariate analysis, the perception of living in a region susceptible to winter smog, being aware of smog warnings, or the belief in the human contribution to CC did not significantly influence the use of a remote car starter. The use of remote car starters encourages idling which produces increased atmospheric pollution and GHG production and it should be more efficiently and vigorously managed by various activities. A five-minute daily reduction in idling is equivalent to reducing the total car emissions by 1.8%. This would constitute a "no-regrets" approach to CC as it can simultaneously reduce GHG, air pollution and their health impacts.

  11. Use of a Remote Car Starter in Relation to Smog and Climate Change Perceptions: A Population Survey in Québec (Canada)

    PubMed Central

    Bélanger, Diane; Gosselin, Pierre; Valois, Pierre; Germain, Stéphane; Abdous, Belkacem

    2009-01-01

    Remote car starters encourage motorists to warm up their vehicles by idling the motor – thus increasing atmospheric pollutants, including several greenhouse gas (GHG) with impacts on public health. This study about climate change (CC) adaptation and mitigation actions examined perceptions on air pollution and climate change and individual characteristics associated with the use of a remote car starter. A telephone survey (n = 2,570; response rate: 70%) of adults living in Québec (Canada) measured the respondents’ beliefs and current behaviours regarding CC. Approximately 32.9% (daily car users) and 27.4% (occasional users) reported using a remote car starter during winter. The odds of the use of a remote car starter was higher in the less densely populated central (OR: 1.5) and peripheral regions (OR: 2.7) compared to the urban centers (ex. Montreal). The odds was also higher in population with a mother tongue other than English or French (OR: 2.6) and francophones than anglophones (OR: 2.1), women than men (OR: 1.5), daily drivers than occasional ones (OR: 1.2), and respondents who at least sometimes consulted temperature/humidity reports than those who consulted them less often (OR: 1.5). In multivariate analysis, the perception of living in a region susceptible to winter smog, being aware of smog warnings, or the belief in the human contribution to CC did not significantly influence the use of a remote car starter. The use of remote car starters encourages idling which produces increased atmospheric pollution and GHG production and it should be more efficiently and vigorously managed by various activities. A five-minute daily reduction in idling is equivalent to reducing the total car emissions by 1.8%. This would constitute a “no-regrets” approach to CC as it can simultaneously reduce GHG, air pollution and their health impacts. PMID:19440410

  12. Polyphasic Screening, Homopolysaccharide Composition, and Viscoelastic Behavior of Wheat Sourdough from a Leuconostoc lactis and Lactobacillus curvatus Exopolysaccharide-Producing Starter Culture

    PubMed Central

    Palomba, Simona; Cavella, Silvana; Torrieri, Elena; Piccolo, Alessandro; Mazzei, Pierluigi; Blaiotta, Giuseppe; Ventorino, Valeria

    2012-01-01

    After isolation from different doughs and sourdoughs, 177 strains of lactic acid bacteria were screened at the phenotypic level for exopolysaccharide production on media containing different carbohydrate sources. Two exopolysaccharide-producing lactic acid bacteria (Lactobacillus curvatus 69B2 and Leuconostoc lactis 95A) were selected through quantitative analysis on solid media containing sucrose and yeast extract. The PCR detection of homopolysaccharide (gtf and lev) and heteropolysaccharide (epsA, epsB, epsD and epsE, and epsEFG) genes showed different distributions within species and strains of the lactic acid bacteria studied. Moreover, in some strains both homopolysaccharide and heteropolysaccharide genes were detected. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectra suggest that Lactobacillus curvatus 69B2 and Leuconostoc lactis 95A produced the same exopolysaccharide, which was constituted by a single repeating glucopyranosyl unit linked by an α-(1→6) glycosidic bond in a dextran-type carbohydrate. Microbial growth, acidification, and viscoelastic properties of sourdoughs obtained by exopolysaccharide-producing and nonproducing lactic acid bacterial strains were evaluated. Sourdough obtained after 15 h at 30°C with exopolysaccharide-producing lactic acid bacteria reached higher total titratable acidity as well as elastic and dissipative modulus curves with respect to the starter not producing exopolysaccharide, but they showed similar levels of pH and microbial growth. On increasing the fermentation time, no difference in the viscoelastic properties of exopolysaccharide-producing and nonproducing samples was observed. This study suggests that dextran-producing Leuconostoc lactis 95A and Lactobacillus curvatus 69B2 can be employed to prepare sourdough, and this would be particularly useful to improve the quality of baked goods while avoiding the use of commercially available hydrocolloids as texturizing additives. PMID:22307283

  13. Molecular Detection of Two Potential Probiotic Lactobacilli Strains and Evaluation of Their Performance as Starter Adjuncts in Yogurt Production

    PubMed Central

    Saxami, Georgia; Papadopoulou, Olga S.; Chorianopoulos, Nikos; Kourkoutas, Yiannis; Tassou, Chrysoula C.; Galanis, Alex

    2016-01-01

    A molecular method for efficient and accurate detection and identification of two potential probiotic lactobacilli strains isolated from fermented olives, namely Lactobacillus pentosus B281 and Lb. plantarum B282, was developed in the present study. Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis was performed, and strain specific primers were designed and applied in a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay. The specificity of the assay was tested and successfully confirmed in 27 and 22 lactobacilli strains for Lb. pentosus B281 and Lb. plantarum B282, respectively. Moreover, the two strains were used as starter cultures in yogurt production. Cell enumeration followed by multiplex PCR analysis demonstrated that the two strains were present in yogurt samples at levels ≥6 log CFU/g even after 35 days of storage at 4 °C. Microbiological analysis showed that lactobacilli and streptococci were present within usual levels, whereas enterobacteriaceae and yeast/mold counts were not detected as expected. Although the pH values of the novel products were slightly lower than the control ones, the yogurt containing the probiotic cultures scored similar values compared to the control in a series of sensory tests. Overall, these results demonstrated the possible use of the two strains as starter adjuncts in the production of yogurt with potential probiotic properties. PMID:27153065

  14. Starter Culture Selection for Making Chinese Sesame-Flavored Liquor Based on Microbial Metabolic Activity in Mixed-Culture Fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Qun; Ling, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Selection of a starter culture with excellent viability and metabolic activity is important for inoculated fermentation of traditional food. To obtain a suitable starter culture for making Chinese sesame-flavored liquor, the yeast and bacterium community structures were investigated during spontaneous and solid-state fermentations of this type of liquor. Five dominant species in spontaneous fermentation were identified: Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Pichia membranaefaciens, Issatchenkia orientalis, Bacillus licheniformis, and Bacillus amyloliquefaciens. The metabolic activity of each species in mixed and inoculated fermentations of liquor was investigated in 14 different cocultures that used different combinations of these species. The relationships between the microbial species and volatile metabolites were analyzed by partial least-squares (PLS) regression analysis. We found that S. cerevisiae was positively correlated to nonanal, and B. licheniformis was positively associated with 2,3-butanediol, isobutyric acid, guaiacol, and 4-vinyl guaiacol, while I. orientalis was positively correlated to butyric acid, isovaleric acid, hexanoic acid, and 2,3-butanediol. These three species are excellent flavor producers for Chinese liquor. Although P. membranaefaciens and B. amyloliquefaciens were not efficient flavor producers, the addition of them alleviated competition among the other three species and altered their growth rates and flavor production. As a result, the coculture of all five dominant species produced the largest amount of flavor compounds. The result indicates that flavor producers and microbial interaction regulators are important for inoculated fermentation of Chinese sesame-flavored liquor. PMID:24814798

  15. Microbiological Analyses of Traditional Alcoholic Beverage (Chhang) and its Starter (Balma) Prepared by Bhotiya Tribe of Uttarakhand, India.

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, Kailash N; Jain, Kavish Kumar; Kumar, Sandeep; Kuhad, Ramesh Chander

    2016-03-01

    Present article depicts microbiology of starter (Balma) used in traditional solid-state fermentation of alcoholic beverage (Chhang) by Bhotiya tribe of Uttarakhand. It also highlights the importance of herbs in Balma preparation and kinetics of lactic acid and ethanol fermentation under Chhang preparation using Balma. Balma contains 214 × 10(6) cfu/g yeasts, 2.54 × 10(6) cfu/g lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and 1.4 × 10(6) cfu/g other mesophilic bacteria. ITS sequence analysis revealed a rich diversity of yeast comprising of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Saccharomycopsis fibuligera and Saccharomycopsis malanga in Balma. 16S rDNA sequence analysis revealed Lactobacillus pentosus and Pediococcus pentosaceus among LAB, while amylolytic Bacillus subtilis and B. aerophilus among other bacteria in Balma. Based on the results, it is speculated that herbs such as Inula cuspidata, Micromeria biflora, Origanum vulgare, Rubus sp. and Thymus linearis used earlier by Bhotiya in Balma preparation contribute as a source of yeasts, LAB and amylolytic bacilli. Study also demonstrates that Bhotiya tribe is rational in preparation of starter as they have circumvented the need of plants by using previous year Balma as inoculum and possibility of deficient quality of Balma due to weak colonization of phyllosphere and rhizosphere microbiota. Results suggest that simultaneous saccharification and lactic acid-ethanol fermentation take place in traditional cereal based Chhang fermentation system of Bhotiya. PMID:26843694

  16. Characterization of Active Dry Wine Yeast During Starter Culture (Pied de Cuve) Preparation for Sparkling Wine Production.

    PubMed

    Benucci, Ilaria; Liburdi, Katia; Cerreti, Martina; Esti, Marco

    2016-08-01

    The preparation of yeast starter culture (Pied de Cuve) for producing sparkling wine with the traditional method is a key factor for manufacturing a good Prise de mousse. In this paper, the evolution of total yeast population, its viability during Pied de Cuve preparation, and the pressure profile during the 2nd fermentation in 2 different base wines made from Bombino bianco and Chardonnay grapes were investigated using 4 different commercial active dried yeasts. The study proves that despite the initial differences observed throughout the acclimatization phase, all the tested strains showed similar results on either the total population (from 8.2 × 10(7) cells/mL to 1.3 × 10(8) cells/mL) or cellular viability (from 70% to 84%). Independently from the base wine tested, the kinetic of sugar consumption was faster during the gradual acclimatization to the alcoholic medium (phase II) and slower during the preparation of starter culture in active growth phase (phase III). During both of these phases Saccharomyces cerevisiae bayanus Vitilevure DV10(®) (Station œnotechnique de Champagne) proved to have a higher sugar consumption rate than the other strains. During the Prise de mousse, S. cerevisiae bayanus Lalvin EC-1118(®) (Lallemand) reached the maximum pressure increase within time in both base wines.

  17. Molecular Detection of Two Potential Probiotic Lactobacilli Strains and Evaluation of Their Performance as Starter Adjuncts in Yogurt Production.

    PubMed

    Saxami, Georgia; Papadopoulou, Olga S; Chorianopoulos, Nikos; Kourkoutas, Yiannis; Tassou, Chrysoula C; Galanis, Alex

    2016-01-01

    A molecular method for efficient and accurate detection and identification of two potential probiotic lactobacilli strains isolated from fermented olives, namely Lactobacillus pentosus B281 and Lb. plantarum B282, was developed in the present study. Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis was performed, and strain specific primers were designed and applied in a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay. The specificity of the assay was tested and successfully confirmed in 27 and 22 lactobacilli strains for Lb. pentosus B281 and Lb. plantarum B282, respectively. Moreover, the two strains were used as starter cultures in yogurt production. Cell enumeration followed by multiplex PCR analysis demonstrated that the two strains were present in yogurt samples at levels ≥6 log CFU/g even after 35 days of storage at 4 °C. Microbiological analysis showed that lactobacilli and streptococci were present within usual levels, whereas enterobacteriaceae and yeast/mold counts were not detected as expected. Although the pH values of the novel products were slightly lower than the control ones, the yogurt containing the probiotic cultures scored similar values compared to the control in a series of sensory tests. Overall, these results demonstrated the possible use of the two strains as starter adjuncts in the production of yogurt with potential probiotic properties. PMID:27153065

  18. Comparative metabolic profiling to investigate the contribution of O. oeni MLF starter cultures to red wine composition.

    PubMed

    Malherbe, Sulette; Tredoux, Andreas G J; Nieuwoudt, Hélène H; du Toit, Maret

    2012-03-01

    In this research work we investigated changes in volatile aroma composition associated with four commercial Oenococcus oeni malolactic fermentation (MLF) starter cultures in South African Shiraz and Pinotage red wines. A control wine in which MLF was suppressed was included. The MLF progress was monitored by use of infrared spectroscopy. Gas chromatographic analysis and capillary electrophoresis were used to evaluate the volatile aroma composition and organic acid profiles, respectively. Significant strain-specific variations were observed in the degradation of citric acid and production of lactic acid during MLF. Subsequently, compounds directly and indirectly resulting from citric acid metabolism, namely diacetyl, acetic acid, acetoin, and ethyl lactate, were also affected depending on the bacterial strain used for MLF. Bacterial metabolic activity increased concentrations of the higher alcohols, fatty acids, and total esters, with a larger increase in ethyl esters than in acetate esters. Ethyl lactate, diethyl succinate, ethyl octanoate, ethyl 2-methylpropanoate, and ethyl propionate concentrations were increased by MLF. In contrast, levels of hexyl acetate, isoamyl acetate, 2-phenylethyl acetate, and ethyl acetate were reduced or remained unchanged, depending on the strain and cultivar evaluated. Formation of ethyl butyrate, ethyl propionate, ethyl 2-methylbutryate, and ethyl isovalerate was related to specific bacterial strains used, indicating possible differences in esterase activity. A strain-specific tendency to reduce total aldehyde concentrations was found at the completion of MLF, although further investigation is needed in this regard. This study provided insight into metabolism in O. oeni starter cultures during MLF in red wine. PMID:22120647

  19. Production of potential probiotic Spanish-style green table olives at pilot plant scale using multifunctional starters.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Gómez, F; Romero-Gil, V; Bautista-Gallego, J; García-García, P; Garrido-Fernández, A; Arroyo-López, F N

    2014-12-01

    This work evaluates the use of two multifunctional starters of Lactobacillus pentosus species (TOMC LAB2 and TOMC LAB4) during elaboration of Manzanilla olive fruits processed according to the Spanish-style. Data show that the use of inocula at the onset of fermentation led to a proper acidification and sugar consumption of brines compared to the spontaneous process, obtaining in a shorter period of time the maximum population for lactic acid bacteria. Both inoculated L. pentosus strains were recovered at high frequencies at the end of fermentation on the olive surface, which was corroborated by RAPD-PCR analysis. In situ observation of olive epidermis slices by scanning electron microscopy revealed a strong aggregation and adhesion between microorganisms, which reached population levels of approximately 6 and 7 log10 cfu/cm(2) for yeasts and lactic acid bacteria, respectively. Enterobacteriaceae on the olive surface were also found at the onset of fermentation (∼9 log10 cfu/cm(2)), but they declined during the process and were below the detection limit at the end of fermentation. Results obtained in this study show the advantage of using multifunctional starters with the ability to adhere to the olive epidermis because, ultimately, the fruits are the food ingested by consumers. PMID:25084674

  20. Characterization and Technological Features of Autochthonous Coagulase-Negative Staphylococci as Potential Starters for Portuguese Dry Fermented Sausages.

    PubMed

    Semedo-Lemsaddek, Teresa; Carvalho, Laura; Tempera, Carolina; Fernandes, Maria H; Fernandes, Maria J; Elias, Miguel; Barreto, António S; Fraqueza, Maria J

    2016-05-01

    The manufacture of dry fermented sausages is an important part of the meat industry in Southern European countries. These products are usually produced in small shops from a mixture of pork, fat, salt, and condiments and are stuffed into natural casings. Meat sausages are slowly cured through spontaneous fermentation by autochthonous microbiota present in the raw materials or introduced during manufacturing. The aim of this work was to evaluate the technological and safety features of coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) isolated from Portuguese dry fermented meat sausages in order to select autochthonous starters. Isolates (n = 104) obtained from 2 small manufacturers were identified as Staphylococcus xylosus, Staphylococcus equorum, Staphylococcus saprophyticus, and Staphylococcus carnosus. Genomically diverse isolates (n = 82) were selected for further analysis to determine the ability to produce enzymes (for example, nitrate-reductases, proteases, lipases) and antibiotic susceptibility. Autochthonous CNS producing a wide range of enzymes and showing low antibioresistance were selected as potential starters for future use in the production of dry fermented meat sausages.

  1. Microbial Ecophysiology of Whey Biomethanation: Comparison of Carbon Transformation Parameters, Species Composition, and Starter Culture Performance in Continuous Culture

    PubMed Central

    Chartrain, M.; Bhatnagar, L.; Zeikus, J. G.

    1987-01-01

    Changes in lactose concentration and feed rate altered bacterial growth and population levels in a whey-processing chemostat. The bacterial population and methane production levels increased in relation to increased lactose concentrations comparable to those in raw whey (6%) and converted over 96% of the substrate to methane, carbon dioxide, and cells. Sequential increases in the chemostat dilution rate demonstrated excellent biomethanation performance at retention times as low as 25 h. Retention times shorter than 25 h caused prevalent bacterial populations and methane production to decrease, and intermediary carbon metabolites accumulated in the following order: acetate, butyrate, propionate, lactate, ethanol, and lactose. Bacterial species dominated in the chemostat as a function of their enhanced substrate uptake and growth kinetic properties. The substrate uptake kinetic properties displayed by the mixed chemostat population were equivalent to those of individual species measured in pure culture, whereas the growth kinetic properties of species in mixed culture were better than those measured in pure culture. A designed starter culture consisting of Leuconostoc mesenteroides, Desulfovibrio vulgaris, Methanosarcina barkeri, and Methanobacterium formicicum displayed biomethanation performance, which was similar to that of a diverse adapted mixed-culture inoculum, in a continuous contact digestor system to which 10 g of dry whey per liter was added. Preserved starter cultures were developed and used as inocula for the start-up of a continuous anaerobic digestion process that was effective for biomethanation of raw whey at a retention time of 100 h. Images PMID:16347341

  2. Genotypic and technological characterization of Leuconostoc isolates to be used as adjunct starters in Manchego cheese manufacture.

    PubMed

    Nieto-Arribas, Pedro; Seseña, Susana; Poveda, Justa M; Palop, Llanos; Cabezas, Lourdes

    2010-02-01

    Twenty-seven Leuconostoc (Ln.) isolates from Manchego cheese were characterized by phenotypic and genotypic methods, and their technological abilities studied in order to test their potential use as dairy starter components. While phenotypic diversity was evaluated by studying the biochemical characteristics of technological interest (i.e. acidifying and aminopeptidase activities), genotypic diversity was evidenced by using Randomly Amplified Polymorphic DNA-Polymerase Chain Reaction (RAPD-PCR). Additional technological abilities such as lipolytic, proteolytic and autolytic activities, salt and pH tolerance and production of dextran, flavour compounds and biogenic amines, were investigated. The marked differences among strains reflected the existing biodiversity in naturally fermented products. After statistically evaluating their performance, strains C0W2, belonging to Ln. lactis, and C16W5 and N2W5, belonging to Ln. mesenteroides subsp. dextranicum, revealed the best properties to be used in mixed dairy starter cultures. This study evidences the fact that natural environments can be considered as a proper source of useful strains, for the dairy industry. PMID:19913697

  3. Molecular Detection of Two Potential Probiotic Lactobacilli Strains and Evaluation of Their Performance as Starter Adjuncts in Yogurt Production.

    PubMed

    Saxami, Georgia; Papadopoulou, Olga S; Chorianopoulos, Nikos; Kourkoutas, Yiannis; Tassou, Chrysoula C; Galanis, Alex

    2016-05-04

    A molecular method for efficient and accurate detection and identification of two potential probiotic lactobacilli strains isolated from fermented olives, namely Lactobacillus pentosus B281 and Lb. plantarum B282, was developed in the present study. Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis was performed, and strain specific primers were designed and applied in a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay. The specificity of the assay was tested and successfully confirmed in 27 and 22 lactobacilli strains for Lb. pentosus B281 and Lb. plantarum B282, respectively. Moreover, the two strains were used as starter cultures in yogurt production. Cell enumeration followed by multiplex PCR analysis demonstrated that the two strains were present in yogurt samples at levels ≥6 log CFU/g even after 35 days of storage at 4 °C. Microbiological analysis showed that lactobacilli and streptococci were present within usual levels, whereas enterobacteriaceae and yeast/mold counts were not detected as expected. Although the pH values of the novel products were slightly lower than the control ones, the yogurt containing the probiotic cultures scored similar values compared to the control in a series of sensory tests. Overall, these results demonstrated the possible use of the two strains as starter adjuncts in the production of yogurt with potential probiotic properties.

  4. Characterization of Active Dry Wine Yeast During Starter Culture (Pied de Cuve) Preparation for Sparkling Wine Production.

    PubMed

    Benucci, Ilaria; Liburdi, Katia; Cerreti, Martina; Esti, Marco

    2016-08-01

    The preparation of yeast starter culture (Pied de Cuve) for producing sparkling wine with the traditional method is a key factor for manufacturing a good Prise de mousse. In this paper, the evolution of total yeast population, its viability during Pied de Cuve preparation, and the pressure profile during the 2nd fermentation in 2 different base wines made from Bombino bianco and Chardonnay grapes were investigated using 4 different commercial active dried yeasts. The study proves that despite the initial differences observed throughout the acclimatization phase, all the tested strains showed similar results on either the total population (from 8.2 × 10(7) cells/mL to 1.3 × 10(8) cells/mL) or cellular viability (from 70% to 84%). Independently from the base wine tested, the kinetic of sugar consumption was faster during the gradual acclimatization to the alcoholic medium (phase II) and slower during the preparation of starter culture in active growth phase (phase III). During both of these phases Saccharomyces cerevisiae bayanus Vitilevure DV10(®) (Station œnotechnique de Champagne) proved to have a higher sugar consumption rate than the other strains. During the Prise de mousse, S. cerevisiae bayanus Lalvin EC-1118(®) (Lallemand) reached the maximum pressure increase within time in both base wines. PMID:27376497

  5. Characterization and Technological Features of Autochthonous Coagulase-Negative Staphylococci as Potential Starters for Portuguese Dry Fermented Sausages.

    PubMed

    Semedo-Lemsaddek, Teresa; Carvalho, Laura; Tempera, Carolina; Fernandes, Maria H; Fernandes, Maria J; Elias, Miguel; Barreto, António S; Fraqueza, Maria J

    2016-05-01

    The manufacture of dry fermented sausages is an important part of the meat industry in Southern European countries. These products are usually produced in small shops from a mixture of pork, fat, salt, and condiments and are stuffed into natural casings. Meat sausages are slowly cured through spontaneous fermentation by autochthonous microbiota present in the raw materials or introduced during manufacturing. The aim of this work was to evaluate the technological and safety features of coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) isolated from Portuguese dry fermented meat sausages in order to select autochthonous starters. Isolates (n = 104) obtained from 2 small manufacturers were identified as Staphylococcus xylosus, Staphylococcus equorum, Staphylococcus saprophyticus, and Staphylococcus carnosus. Genomically diverse isolates (n = 82) were selected for further analysis to determine the ability to produce enzymes (for example, nitrate-reductases, proteases, lipases) and antibiotic susceptibility. Autochthonous CNS producing a wide range of enzymes and showing low antibioresistance were selected as potential starters for future use in the production of dry fermented meat sausages. PMID:27095684

  6. Effect of Aqueous Extract of Telfairia occidentalis Leaf on the Performance and Haematological Indices of Starter Broilers

    PubMed Central

    P. N., Onu

    2012-01-01

    This experiment was conducted to determine the effect of aqueous extract of Telfairia occidentalis (Fluted Pumpkin) leaf on the performance and haematological indices of starter broilers. A total of 200, 8-day-old broiler chicks were randomly allotted to five (5) treatments, each with 4 replicate groups containing 10 chicks and fed with standard starter broiler diets. Telfaria occidentalis leaves extract (FPLE) was added at 0, 40, 80, 120, and 160 mL/litre of drinking water. Growth performance and haematological indices were evaluated. Results showed that there was significant (P < 0.05) difference in weight gain, feed conversion, and protein efficiency ratios of the birds among the treatments. Birds fed 80 ml FPLE/litre of water had significantly the highest weight gain and the best feed conversion and protein efficiency ratios. There was no significant (P > 0.05) variations in the feed and water intakes of the birds. Results also show no significant (P > 0.05) difference in haematological indices of birds among the treatments. The results of this study indicate that, for enhanced weight gain and feed conversion efficiency, birds should be fed 80 mL FPLE/litre of water. PMID:23738128

  7. Iranian wheat flours from rural and industrial mills: Exploitation of the chemical and technology features, and selection of autochthonous sourdough starters for making breads.

    PubMed

    Pontonio, Erica; Nionelli, Luana; Curiel, José Antonio; Sadeghi, Alireza; Di Cagno, Raffaella; Gobbetti, Marco; Rizzello, Carlo Giuseppe

    2015-05-01

    This study aimed at describing the main chemical and technology features of eight Iranian wheat flours collected from industrial and artisanal mills. Their suitability for bread making was investigated using autochthonous sourdough starters. Chemical analyses showed high concentration of fibers and ash, and technology aptitude for making breads. As shown through 2-DE analyses, gliadin and glutenin subunits were abundant and varied among the flours. According to the back slopping procedure, type I sourdoughs were prepared from Iranian flours, and lactic acid bacteria were typed and identified. Strains of Pediococcus pentosaceus, Weissella cibaria, Weissella confusa, and Leuconostoc citreum were the most abundant. Based on the kinetics of growth and acidification, quotient of fermentation and concentration of total free amino acids, lactic acid bacteria were selected and used as sourdough mixed starters for bread making. Compared to spontaneous fermentation, sourdoughs fermented with selected and mixed starters favored the increase of the concentrations of organic acids and total free amino acids, the most suitable quotient of fermentation, and the most intense phytase and antioxidant activities. Although the high concentration of fibers, selected and mixed starters improved the textural features of the breads. This study might had contribute to the exploitation of the potential of Iranian wheat flours and to extend the use of sourdough, showing positive technology, nutritional and, probably, economic repercussions.

  8. Iranian wheat flours from rural and industrial mills: Exploitation of the chemical and technology features, and selection of autochthonous sourdough starters for making breads.

    PubMed

    Pontonio, Erica; Nionelli, Luana; Curiel, José Antonio; Sadeghi, Alireza; Di Cagno, Raffaella; Gobbetti, Marco; Rizzello, Carlo Giuseppe

    2015-05-01

    This study aimed at describing the main chemical and technology features of eight Iranian wheat flours collected from industrial and artisanal mills. Their suitability for bread making was investigated using autochthonous sourdough starters. Chemical analyses showed high concentration of fibers and ash, and technology aptitude for making breads. As shown through 2-DE analyses, gliadin and glutenin subunits were abundant and varied among the flours. According to the back slopping procedure, type I sourdoughs were prepared from Iranian flours, and lactic acid bacteria were typed and identified. Strains of Pediococcus pentosaceus, Weissella cibaria, Weissella confusa, and Leuconostoc citreum were the most abundant. Based on the kinetics of growth and acidification, quotient of fermentation and concentration of total free amino acids, lactic acid bacteria were selected and used as sourdough mixed starters for bread making. Compared to spontaneous fermentation, sourdoughs fermented with selected and mixed starters favored the increase of the concentrations of organic acids and total free amino acids, the most suitable quotient of fermentation, and the most intense phytase and antioxidant activities. Although the high concentration of fibers, selected and mixed starters improved the textural features of the breads. This study might had contribute to the exploitation of the potential of Iranian wheat flours and to extend the use of sourdough, showing positive technology, nutritional and, probably, economic repercussions. PMID:25583343

  9. Microbiota Dynamics Associated with Environmental Conditions and Potential Roles of Cellulolytic Communities in Traditional Chinese Cereal Starter Solid-State Fermentation.

    PubMed

    Li, Pan; Liang, Hebin; Lin, Wei-Tie; Feng, Feng; Luo, Lixin

    2015-08-01

    Traditional Chinese solid-state fermented cereal starters contain highly complex microbial communities and enzymes. Very little is known, however, about the microbial dynamics related to environmental conditions, and cellulolytic communities have never been proposed to exist during cereal starter fermentation. In this study, we performed Illumina MiSeq sequencing combined with PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis to investigate microbiota, coupled with clone library construction to trace cellulolytic communities in both fermentation stages. A succession of microbial assemblages was observed during the fermentation of starters. Lactobacillales and Saccharomycetales dominated the initial stages, with a continuous decline in relative abundance. However, thermotolerant and drought-resistant Bacillales, Eurotiales, and Mucorales were considerably accelerated during the heating stages, and these organisms dominated until the end of fermentation. Enterobacteriales were consistently ubiquitous throughout the process. For the cellulolytic communities, only the genera Sanguibacter, Beutenbergia, Agrobacterium, and Erwinia dominated the initial fermentation stages. In contrast, stages at high incubation temperature induced the appearance and dominance of Bacillus, Aspergillus, and Mucor. The enzymatic dynamics of amylase and glucoamylase also showed a similar trend, with the activities clearly increased in the first 7 days and subsequently decreased until the end of fermentation. Furthermore, β-glucosidase activity continuously and significantly increased during the fermentation process. Evidently, cellulolytic potential can adapt to environmental conditions by changes in the community structure during the fermentation of starters.

  10. Effect of the inoculation of a starter culture and vacuum packaging during the resting stage on sensory traits of dry-cured ham.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Molinero, F; Arnau, J

    2008-12-01

    The effects of the inoculation of a mixed starter culture and vacuum packaging (during resting stage) on odour, appearance, texture and flavour of dry-cured ham were studied. After salting, half of the 36 processed hams were inoculated with a commercial starter culture containing lactic-acid bacteria, Gram-positive catalase-positive cocci and yeasts. Nine hams per group (inoculated and non-inoculated) remained vacuum-packaged during resting. External odour during the process, as well as appearance of the cut surface, texture and flavour on semimembranosus and biceps femoris of the final product were assessed. Vacuum packaging during resting caused an increase in white film and feedstuff flavour, as well as a decrease in aged flavour, hardness, fibrousness and overall liking. The use of the starter culture brought about an increase in feedstuff flavour, a decrease in sweetness, aged flavour, nutty flavour and overall liking and, only in vacuum-packaged hams, the development of a floral flavour, but had no significant effect on texture descriptors. The starter culture studied is considered inappropriate for the production of traditional Spanish dry-cured ham regardless of the type of resting used. PMID:22063839

  11. Development of a cleaner, durable and ash-less biobased firelogs from grass clippings and other agricultural derived residues with plant wax as a binder and starter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The invention describes the development of a firelong, mini-firelog, stove pellet and fire-starter comprised of all-natural renewable resources. Besides being totally biobased, developed logs have several distinct advantages. The developed product utilizes renewable biomass as a raw material, prod...

  12. Enhancement of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in Nham (Thai fermented pork sausage) using starter cultures of Lactobacillus namurensis NH2 and Pediococcus pentosaceus HN8.

    PubMed

    Ratanaburee, Anussara; Kantachote, Duangporn; Charernjiratrakul, Wilawan; Sukhoom, Ampaitip

    2013-10-15

    The aim was to produce Nham that was enriched with γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA); therefore two GABA producing lactic acid bacteria (Pediococcus pentosaceus HN8 and Lactobacillus namurensis NH2) were used as starter cultures. By using the central composite design (CCD) we showed that addition of 0.5% monosodium glutamate (MSG) together with an inoculum size of roughly 6logCFU/g of each of the two strains produced a maximal amounts of GABA (4051 mg/kg) in the 'GABA Nham' product. This was higher than any current popular commercial Nham product by roughly 8 times. 'GABA Nham' with the additions of both starters and MSG (TSM) supported maximum populations of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) with a minimum of yeasts and no staphylococci or molds when compared to the controls that had no addition of any starters or MSG (TNN), or only the addition of MSG (TNM), or with only the starter (TSN). Based on proximate analysis among the Nham sets, 'GABA Nham' was low in fat, carbohydrate and energy although its texture and color were slightly different from the control (TNN). However, sensory evaluations of 'GABA Nham' were more acceptable than the controls and commercial Nham products for all tested parameters. Hence, a unique novel 'GABA Nham' fermented pork sausage was successfully developed.

  13. Lactobacillus plantarum and Pediococcus pentosaceus starter cultures as a tool for microflora management in malting and for enhancement of malt processability.

    PubMed

    Laitila, Arja; Sweins, Hannele; Vilpola, Arvi; Kotaviita, Erja; Olkku, Juhani; Home, Silja; Haikara, Auli

    2006-05-31

    Lactobacillus plantarum VTT E-78076 (E76) and Pediococcus pentosaceus VTT E-90390 (E390) starter cultures were added to the steeping water of normal malting barley in order to balance the microbial community and to enhance malt processability. In this study, we also investigated the effects of lactic acid-acidified MRS-spent medium (MRS-LA) on malting performance. Malting trials with five different two-row barley varieties were carried out in 25 kg pilot scale. The starter cultures promoted yeast growth during malting and restricted the growth of harmful bacteria and Fusarium fungi. Furthermore, they had positive effects on malt characteristics. Reduction in wort viscosity and beta-glucan content and enhanced xylanase and microbial beta-glucanase activities were observed. Starter cultures notably improved lautering performance. Some of the beneficial effects were due to the lactic acid and low pH, as similar effects were obtained with MRS-LA. Starter cultures offer a tool for tailoring of malt properties. PMID:16719505

  14. The Critical Period for Second Language Pronunciation: Is There Such a Thing? Ten Case Studies of Late Starters who Attained a Native-like Hebrew Accent

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abu-Rabia, Salim; Kehat, Simona

    2004-01-01

    This paper investigates the critical period hypothesis (CPH) for the acquisition of a second language sound system (phonology) in a naturalistic setting. Ten cases of successful late-starters with a native-like Hebrew pronunciation are presented in an effort to determine possible variables that may account for their exceptional accomplishment. The…

  15. Lactobacillus plantarum and Pediococcus pentosaceus starter cultures as a tool for microflora management in malting and for enhancement of malt processability.

    PubMed

    Laitila, Arja; Sweins, Hannele; Vilpola, Arvi; Kotaviita, Erja; Olkku, Juhani; Home, Silja; Haikara, Auli

    2006-05-31

    Lactobacillus plantarum VTT E-78076 (E76) and Pediococcus pentosaceus VTT E-90390 (E390) starter cultures were added to the steeping water of normal malting barley in order to balance the microbial community and to enhance malt processability. In this study, we also investigated the effects of lactic acid-acidified MRS-spent medium (MRS-LA) on malting performance. Malting trials with five different two-row barley varieties were carried out in 25 kg pilot scale. The starter cultures promoted yeast growth during malting and restricted the growth of harmful bacteria and Fusarium fungi. Furthermore, they had positive effects on malt characteristics. Reduction in wort viscosity and beta-glucan content and enhanced xylanase and microbial beta-glucanase activities were observed. Starter cultures notably improved lautering performance. Some of the beneficial effects were due to the lactic acid and low pH, as similar effects were obtained with MRS-LA. Starter cultures offer a tool for tailoring of malt properties.

  16. Microbiota Dynamics Associated with Environmental Conditions and Potential Roles of Cellulolytic Communities in Traditional Chinese Cereal Starter Solid-State Fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Pan; Liang, Hebin; Lin, Wei-Tie; Feng, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Traditional Chinese solid-state fermented cereal starters contain highly complex microbial communities and enzymes. Very little is known, however, about the microbial dynamics related to environmental conditions, and cellulolytic communities have never been proposed to exist during cereal starter fermentation. In this study, we performed Illumina MiSeq sequencing combined with PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis to investigate microbiota, coupled with clone library construction to trace cellulolytic communities in both fermentation stages. A succession of microbial assemblages was observed during the fermentation of starters. Lactobacillales and Saccharomycetales dominated the initial stages, with a continuous decline in relative abundance. However, thermotolerant and drought-resistant Bacillales, Eurotiales, and Mucorales were considerably accelerated during the heating stages, and these organisms dominated until the end of fermentation. Enterobacteriales were consistently ubiquitous throughout the process. For the cellulolytic communities, only the genera Sanguibacter, Beutenbergia, Agrobacterium, and Erwinia dominated the initial fermentation stages. In contrast, stages at high incubation temperature induced the appearance and dominance of Bacillus, Aspergillus, and Mucor. The enzymatic dynamics of amylase and glucoamylase also showed a similar trend, with the activities clearly increased in the first 7 days and subsequently decreased until the end of fermentation. Furthermore, β-glucosidase activity continuously and significantly increased during the fermentation process. Evidently, cellulolytic potential can adapt to environmental conditions by changes in the community structure during the fermentation of starters. PMID:26002897

  17. INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT "FIELD MEASUREMENT TECHNOLOGIES FOR TOTAL PETROLEUM HYDROCARBONS IN SOIL" CHEMETRICS, INC., AND AZUR ENVIRONMENTAL LTD REMEDIAID TOTAL PETROLEUM HYDROCARBON STARTER KIT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The RemediAidTm Total Petroleum Hydrocarbon Starter Kit (RemediAidTm kit) developed by CHEMetries, Inc. (CHEMetrics), and AZUR Environmental Ltd was demonstrated under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation Program in June 2000 at the ...

  18. Exceptional Lexical Skills but Executive Language Deficits in School Starters and Young Adults with Turners Syndrome: Implications for X Chromosome Effects on Brain Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Temple, Christine M.; Shephard, Elizabeth E.

    2012-01-01

    TS school starters had enhanced receptive and expressive language on standardised assessment (CELF-P) and enhanced rhyme judgements, spoonerisms, and lexical decision, indicating enhanced phonological skills and word representations. There was marginal but consistent advantage across lexico-semantic tasks. On executive tasks, speeded naming of…

  19. Effect of varying the salt and fat content in Cheddar cheese on aspects of the performance of a commercial starter culture preparation during ripening.

    PubMed

    Yanachkina, Palina; McCarthy, Catherine; Guinee, Tim; Wilkinson, Martin

    2016-05-01

    Production of healthier reduced-fat and reduced-salt cheeses requires careful selection of starter bacteria, as any substantial alterations to cheese composition may prompt changes in the overall performance of starters during cheese ripening. Therefore, it is important to assess the effect of compositional alterations on the individual strain response during cheese ripening for each optimised cheese matrix. In the current study, the effect of varying fat and salt levels in Cheddar cheese on the performance of a commercial Lactococcus lactis culture preparation, containing one L. lactis subsp. lactis strain and one L. lactis subsp. cremoris strain was investigated. Compositional variations in fat or salt levels did not affect overall starter viability, yet reduction of fat by 50% significantly delayed non-starter lactic acid bacteria (NSLAB) populations at the initial ripening period. In comparison to starter viability, starter autolysis, as measured by release of intracellular lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) or post-proline dipeptidyl aminopeptidase (Pep X) into cheese juices, decreased significantly with lower salt addition levels in full-fat Cheddar. Conversely, reducing fat content of cheese resulted in a significantly higher release of intracellular Pep X, and to a lesser extent intracellular LDH, into juices over ripening. Flow cytometry (FCM) indicated that the permeabilised and dead cell sub-populations were generally lower in juices from cheeses with reduced salt content, however no significant differences were observed between different salt and fat treatments. Interestingly, fat reductions by 30 and 50% in cheeses with reduced or half added salt contents appeared to balance out the effect of salt, and enhanced cell permeabilisation, cell death, and also cell autolysis in these variants. Overall, this study has highlighted that alterations in both salt and fat levels in cheese influence certain aspects of starter performance during ripening, including

  20. Subsequent growth performance and digestive physiology of broilers fed on starter diets containing spray-dried porcine plasma as a substitute for meat meal.

    PubMed

    Beski, S S M; Swick, R A; Iji, P A

    2015-01-01

    A 4 × 2 factorial experiment was conducted to investigate the effect of inclusion of spray-dried porcine plasma (SDPP), in lieu of meat meal, in the starter diet on performance and digestive physiology of broiler chickens between hatch and 35 d of age. Four levels of SDPP (0, 5, 10 or 20 g/kg) were included in the starter diets in lieu of meat meal on either wheat- or maize-based diets. Over the first 10 d, and throughout the 35-d experimental period, birds gained more body weight with increasing concentrations of SDPP regardless to the type of grain used. Inclusion of SDPP in the starter diet markedly improved feed per gain in the starter phase and across the 35-d study. There was no significant effect of the type of grain and its interaction with SDPP on the body weight gain and feed per gain for the two assessed periods. At d 10, the relative weight of the gizzard+proventriculus, spleen and liver increased with increasing concentrations of SDPP. At 24 d of age, the grain and SDPP inclusion significantly interacted, depressing the weight of bursa and spleen in birds that received the highest concentration of SDPP in the maize-based diet. Birds fed on the maize-based diets had higher relative weight of pancreas than those on the wheat-based diets. Increasing concentrations of SDPP in the starter diet improved the activities of maltase, sucrase and alkaline phosphatase at 24 d of age. The interaction of grain and SDPP concentration was significant for sucrase activity in birds on the wheat-based diets. Chickens on maize-based diets had higher alkaline phosphatase and maltase activities than those on wheat-based diets. Chicks that were offered SDPP-containing starter diets had longer villi, deeper crypts and lower villi/crypt than the control at 24 d of age regardless of the grain type used. Furthermore, longer villi and larger villi/crypt were found in chicken groups fed on wheat-based diets than those on maize-based diets. Chickens on maize-based diets had higher

  1. Determining optimum age of Holstein dairy calves when adding chopped alfalfa hay to meal starter diets based on measures of growth and performance.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, S M; Ghorbani, G R; Rezamand, P; Khorvash, M

    2016-04-01

    The present study was conducted to determine the optimum age of Holstein dairy calves for an effective inclusion of alfalfa hay (AH) in starter feed on performance, apparent digestibility and feeding behavior. A total of 40 Holstein dairy calves (20 female and 20 male) were used in a completely randomized design in which calves were randomly assigned to one of four different dietary treatments including control (CON) calves fed starter feed without any forage and three treatments consisting of the same starter feed plus 15% chopped AH fed when calves were at the 2nd (AH2), 4th (AH4) or 6th (AH6) week of age. Calves were individually housed and bedded with sand that was replaced every other day. Feed and water were available ad libitum throughout the experiment. Calves were fed milk at 10% of birth BW twice daily until d 57. The study concluded when calves were 73 days old. Starter intake was recorded daily and BW was measured weekly. Data were analyzed as a complete randomized design by MIXED procedures of SAS. Results demonstrate that calves receiving AH treatments numerically consumed more starter feed (0.62 v. 0.78, 0.71 and 0.65 kg/day for CON, AH2, AH4 and AH6, respectively) and had greater average daily gain (ADG) compared with CON (0.48 v. 0.57, 0.49 and 0.49 kg/day for CON, AH2, AH4 and AH6), although the significant difference was observed only between AH2 and CON. Among AH treatments, calves in AH2 had better performance than AH6 in several cases including starter intake, ADG. No detectable differences were observed, however, in apparent dry matter, organic matter or CP digestibility among treatments. Ruminal pH and NH3 concentrations, measured on weeks 4, 6, 8 and 10, were lower for calves fed CON compared with other treatments, with ammonia concentrations decreasing over time. Calves in the AH treatments spent more time eating and ruminating compared with CON. Calves fed CON, however, spent more time on laying down compared with other treatments

  2. Inclusion of tallow and soybean oil to calf starters fed to dairy calves from birth to four months of age on calf performance and digestion.

    PubMed

    Hill, T M; Bateman, H G; Aldrich, J M; Quigley, J D; Schlotterbeck, R L

    2015-07-01

    Energy demands for calves can increase during periods of heat and cold stress. One way to potentially increase energy intake is to increase the energy density of the feed with fat. Trial 1a compared a control starter with no added fat or oil (CON) to starters with 2% tallow (TAL) and 2% soybean oil (SBO). Starters were 20% crude protein (CP) and 45 to 47% starch. Male Holstein calves that were initially 3 to 5d of age were fed a 27% CP, 17% fat milk replacer at 0.66kg of dry matter daily and fully weaned by 42d of a 56-d trial. Trial 1b estimated the digestion of the diets (employed chromic oxide as an indigestible digesta flow marker) using a subset of 5 weaned calves per treatment between d 52 and 56. Trial 2 used Holstein calves initially 59 to 61d of age fed starters CON and SBO blended with 5% chopped grass hay over a 56-d trial. Trial 3 used Holstein calves initially 59 to 61d of age fed starters CON and TAL blended with 5% chopped grass hay over a 56-d trial. Treatments were compared using repeated measures (where appropriate) in a completely randomized design. In trials 1a and 1b, preplanned contrasts compared CON versus TAL and CON versus SBO. Compared with CON, calves fed SBO had reduced starter intake, average daily gain, and digestion of dry matter, organic matter, and CP before 8wk of age. Compared with CON, calves fed SBO had reduced average daily gain and change in hip width from 2 to 4 mo of age. Compared with CON, calves fed TAL had reduced average daily gain and tended to have reduced change in hip width from 2 to 4 mo of age. Calculated metabolizable energy intake was not increased in any trial by added fat or oil. Tallow and soybean oil inclusion at 2% of the starter feed was not advantageous for calf growth before 4 mo of age.

  3. Effect of varying the salt and fat content in Cheddar cheese on aspects of the performance of a commercial starter culture preparation during ripening.

    PubMed

    Yanachkina, Palina; McCarthy, Catherine; Guinee, Tim; Wilkinson, Martin

    2016-05-01

    Production of healthier reduced-fat and reduced-salt cheeses requires careful selection of starter bacteria, as any substantial alterations to cheese composition may prompt changes in the overall performance of starters during cheese ripening. Therefore, it is important to assess the effect of compositional alterations on the individual strain response during cheese ripening for each optimised cheese matrix. In the current study, the effect of varying fat and salt levels in Cheddar cheese on the performance of a commercial Lactococcus lactis culture preparation, containing one L. lactis subsp. lactis strain and one L. lactis subsp. cremoris strain was investigated. Compositional variations in fat or salt levels did not affect overall starter viability, yet reduction of fat by 50% significantly delayed non-starter lactic acid bacteria (NSLAB) populations at the initial ripening period. In comparison to starter viability, starter autolysis, as measured by release of intracellular lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) or post-proline dipeptidyl aminopeptidase (Pep X) into cheese juices, decreased significantly with lower salt addition levels in full-fat Cheddar. Conversely, reducing fat content of cheese resulted in a significantly higher release of intracellular Pep X, and to a lesser extent intracellular LDH, into juices over ripening. Flow cytometry (FCM) indicated that the permeabilised and dead cell sub-populations were generally lower in juices from cheeses with reduced salt content, however no significant differences were observed between different salt and fat treatments. Interestingly, fat reductions by 30 and 50% in cheeses with reduced or half added salt contents appeared to balance out the effect of salt, and enhanced cell permeabilisation, cell death, and also cell autolysis in these variants. Overall, this study has highlighted that alterations in both salt and fat levels in cheese influence certain aspects of starter performance during ripening, including

  4. Changes in exercise performance and hormonal concentrations over a big ten soccer season in starters and nonstarters.

    PubMed

    Kraemer, William J; French, Duncan N; Paxton, Nigel J; Häkkinen, Keijo; Volek, Jeff S; Sebastianelli, Wayne J; Putukian, Margot; Newton, Robert U; Rubin, Martyn R; Gómez, Ana L; Vescovi, Jason D; Ratamess, Nicholas A; Fleck, Steven J; Lynch, J Michael; Knuttgen, Howard G

    2004-02-01

    As a consequence of the physiological demands experienced during a competitive soccer season, the antagonistic relationship between anabolic and catabolic processes can affect performance. Twenty-five male collegiate soccer players were studied throughout a season (11 weeks) to investigate the effects of long-term training and competition. Subjects were grouped as starters (S; n = 11) and nonstarters (NS; n = 14). Measures of physical performance, body composition, and hormonal concentrations (testosterone [T] and cortisol [C]) were assessed preseason (T1) and 5 times throughout the season (T2-T6). Starters and NS participated in 83.06% and 16.95% of total game time, respectively. Nonstarters had a significant increase (+1.6%) in body fat at T6 compared to T1. Isokinetic strength of the knee extensors (1.05 rad.sec(-1)) significantly decreased in both S (-12%) and NS (-10%; p < or = 0.05) at T6. Significant decrements in sprint speed (+4.3%) and vertical jump (-13.8%) were found at T5 in S only. Though within normal ranges (10.4-41.6 nmol.L(-1)), concentrations of T at T1 were low for both groups, but increased significantly by T6. Concentrations of C were elevated in both groups, with concentrations at the high end of the normal range (normal range 138-635 nmol.L(-1)) at T1 and T4 in NS and T4 in S, with both groups remaining elevated at T6. Data indicate that players entering the season with low circulating concentrations of T and elevated levels of C can experience reductions in performance during a season, with performance decrements exacerbated in starters over nonstarters. Soccer players should therefore have a planned program of conditioning that does not result in an acute overtraining phenomenon prior to preseason (e.g., young players trying to get in shape quickly in the 6 to 8 weeks in the summer prior to reporting for preseason camp). The detrimental effects of inappropriate training do not appear to be unloaded during the season and catabolic

  5. Effects of the Essential Oil from Origanum vulgare L. on Survival of Pathogenic Bacteria and Starter Lactic Acid Bacteria in Semihard Cheese Broth and Slurry.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Geany Targino; de Carvalho, Rayssa Julliane; de Sousa, Jossana Pereira; Tavares, Josean Fechine; Schaffner, Donald; de Souza, Evandro Leite; Magnani, Marciane

    2016-02-01

    This study assessed the inhibitory effects of the essential oil from Origanum vulgare L. (OVEO) on Staphylococcus aureus, Listeria monocytogenes, and a mesophilic starter coculture composed of lactic acid bacteria (Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis and L. lactis subsp. cremoris) in Brazilian coalho cheese systems. The MIC of OVEO was 2.5 μl/ml against both S. aureus and L. monocytogenes and 0.6 μl/ml against the tested starter coculture. In cheese broth containing OVEO at 0.6 μl/ml, no decrease in viable cell counts (VCC) of both pathogenic bacteria was observed, whereas the initial VCC of the starter coculture decreased approximately 1.0 log CFU/ml after 24 h of exposure at 10°C. OVEO at 1.25 and 2.5 μl/ml caused reductions of up to 2.0 and 2.5 log CFU/ml in S. aureus and L. monocytogenes, respectively, after 24 h of exposure in cheese broth. At these same concentrations, OVEO caused a greater decrease of initial VCC of the starter coculture following 4 h of exposure. Higher concentrations of OVEO were required to decrease the VCC of all target bacteria in semisolid coalho cheese slurry compared with cheese broth. The VCC of Lactococcus spp. in coalho cheese slurry containing OVEO were always lower than those of pathogenic bacteria under the same conditions. These results suggest that the concentrations of OVEO used to control pathogenic bacteria in semihard cheese should be carefully evaluated because of its inhibitory effects on the growth of starter lactic acid cultures used during the production of the product.

  6. Effects of the Essential Oil from Origanum vulgare L. on Survival of Pathogenic Bacteria and Starter Lactic Acid Bacteria in Semihard Cheese Broth and Slurry.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Geany Targino; de Carvalho, Rayssa Julliane; de Sousa, Jossana Pereira; Tavares, Josean Fechine; Schaffner, Donald; de Souza, Evandro Leite; Magnani, Marciane

    2016-02-01

    This study assessed the inhibitory effects of the essential oil from Origanum vulgare L. (OVEO) on Staphylococcus aureus, Listeria monocytogenes, and a mesophilic starter coculture composed of lactic acid bacteria (Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis and L. lactis subsp. cremoris) in Brazilian coalho cheese systems. The MIC of OVEO was 2.5 μl/ml against both S. aureus and L. monocytogenes and 0.6 μl/ml against the tested starter coculture. In cheese broth containing OVEO at 0.6 μl/ml, no decrease in viable cell counts (VCC) of both pathogenic bacteria was observed, whereas the initial VCC of the starter coculture decreased approximately 1.0 log CFU/ml after 24 h of exposure at 10°C. OVEO at 1.25 and 2.5 μl/ml caused reductions of up to 2.0 and 2.5 log CFU/ml in S. aureus and L. monocytogenes, respectively, after 24 h of exposure in cheese broth. At these same concentrations, OVEO caused a greater decrease of initial VCC of the starter coculture following 4 h of exposure. Higher concentrations of OVEO were required to decrease the VCC of all target bacteria in semisolid coalho cheese slurry compared with cheese broth. The VCC of Lactococcus spp. in coalho cheese slurry containing OVEO were always lower than those of pathogenic bacteria under the same conditions. These results suggest that the concentrations of OVEO used to control pathogenic bacteria in semihard cheese should be carefully evaluated because of its inhibitory effects on the growth of starter lactic acid cultures used during the production of the product. PMID:26818985

  7. Evaluation of Two Lactic Acid Bacteria Starter Cultures for the Fermentation of Natural Black Table Olives (Olea europaea L cv Kalamon).

    PubMed

    Papadelli, Marina; Zoumpopoulou, Georgia; Georgalaki, Marina; Anastasiou, Rania; Manolopoulou, Eugenia; Lytra, Ioanna; Papadimitriou, Konstantinos; Tsakalidou, Effie

    2015-01-01

    The production of Greek-style natural black table olives remains an empirical process relying on spontaneous fermentation despite its economic significance. For this reason producers often resort to increased NaCl concentration of the brine to secure quality of the product. In this study we employ two lactic acid bacteria Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. mesenteroides Lm139 and Lactobacillus pentosus DSM 16366 as starters in separate laboratory low salinity fermentations of "Kalamon" cultivar olives, processed according to the Greek-style method. L. mesenteroides subsp. mesenteroides Lm139 was previously isolated from Kalamon olives laboratory spontaneous fermentations, while L. pentosus DSM 16366 was isolated from fermenting green olives prepared according to the Spanish-style method. Spontaneous olives fermentation was also performed as a control. Microbiological and physicochemical analyses of the brines revealed that the use of the starters had a significant effect on the olives fermentation, leading to a faster acidification due to the more efficient consumption of soluble sugars in the brines. The final pH value reached by each starter culture used indicates a successful lactic fermentation. The production of lactic acid by the starters and the concomitant drop of the pH value proved to inhibit enterobacteria in a shorter period of time compared to the spontaneous fermentation. Concluding, the use of either of the two lactic acid bacteria as starters in Greek-style Kalamon olives fermentation could lead to a more controllable fermentation at lower salinities. The resulting product could be of higher quality with extended shelf-life while being at the same time safer for the consumer.

  8. In vitro fermentation studies for selection and evaluation of Bacillus strains as starter cultures for the production of okpehe, a traditional African fermented condiment.

    PubMed

    Oguntoyinbo, Folarin A; Sanni, Abiodun I; Franz, Charles M A P; Holzapfel, Wilhelm H

    2007-01-25

    Selected Bacillus and Enterococcus strains, isolated from traditional okpehe fermentations, were studied for their suitability as starter cultures in laboratory-scale fermentations of Prosopis africana seeds for the production of okpehe, a traditional fermented vegetable product of Nigeria. The strains were selected on the basis of highest proteolytic activity, as determined with the APIZYM (BioMerieux) test. The choice of starter strains was narrowed to Bacillus subtilis strains BFE 5301 and BFE 5372. These were determined as the best starter combination because of rapid growth, high amylolytic and proteolytic activities, high levels of polyglutamic acid production by strain BFE 5372, as well as bacteriocin production by strain BFE 5301. Other mixed culture fermentations did not yield sensorically acceptable products. Although a monoculture fermentation, using only B. subtilis strain BFE 5372, produced okpehe with very good sensory characteristics, the growth of B. cereus could be detected after 48 h fermentation, indicating that this starter did not sufficiently contribute to product safety. Mixed culture fermentation with the combination of bacteriocin-producing starter B. subtilis BFE 5301 and the non-bacteriocin-producing B. subtilis BFE 5372, produced a product with good sensory characteristics, in which growth of B. cereus was delayed. The bacteriocin produced by B. subtilis strain BFE 5301 was identified as subtilisin, using subtilisin-specific primers and PCR amplification of the subtilisin gene. The bacteriocin was heat-stable at 100 degrees C for 10 min and exhibited highest activity at pH values lower or equal to pH 6.0. The bacteriocin was sensitive to the proteolytic enzymes trypsin and alpha-chymotrypsin at concentrations of 10 mg/ml.

  9. Selection of aroma compounds for the differentiation of wines obtained by fermenting musts with starter cultures of commercial yeast strains.

    PubMed

    Vararu, Florin; Moreno-García, Jaime; Zamfir, Cătălin-Ioan; Cotea, Valeriu V; Moreno, Juan

    2016-04-15

    Nine wines obtained by fermenting Aligoté musts with individual starter cultures of eight Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strains and with the indigenous microbiota were compared in terms of their composition in minor volatile aroma compounds. An easy handle methodology Stir-Bar-Sorptive-Adsorption, Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry based, permits the identification of 49 aroma compounds. The rearrangement of these aroma compounds in six chemical families permits the establishment of a finger printing for each wine. Eighteen aroma compounds that exhibit a high differentiation power (p⩽0.05) were selected for chemometric analysis. The Principal Component Analysis carried out with these aroma compounds reveal that the first two principal components explain 53.8% and 17.2% of the total variance, respectively, allowing the establishment of nine different groups, in accordance with the wine types obtained. These results reveal analytical differences among the wines that are not recognized by sensorial analysis. PMID:26616963

  10. Selection of aroma compounds for the differentiation of wines obtained by fermenting musts with starter cultures of commercial yeast strains.

    PubMed

    Vararu, Florin; Moreno-García, Jaime; Zamfir, Cătălin-Ioan; Cotea, Valeriu V; Moreno, Juan

    2016-04-15

    Nine wines obtained by fermenting Aligoté musts with individual starter cultures of eight Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strains and with the indigenous microbiota were compared in terms of their composition in minor volatile aroma compounds. An easy handle methodology Stir-Bar-Sorptive-Adsorption, Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry based, permits the identification of 49 aroma compounds. The rearrangement of these aroma compounds in six chemical families permits the establishment of a finger printing for each wine. Eighteen aroma compounds that exhibit a high differentiation power (p⩽0.05) were selected for chemometric analysis. The Principal Component Analysis carried out with these aroma compounds reveal that the first two principal components explain 53.8% and 17.2% of the total variance, respectively, allowing the establishment of nine different groups, in accordance with the wine types obtained. These results reveal analytical differences among the wines that are not recognized by sensorial analysis.

  11. Direct transfer of starter substrates from type I fatty acid synthase to type III polyketide synthases in phenolic lipid synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Miyanaga, Akimasa; Funa, Nobutaka; Awakawa, Takayoshi; Horinouchi, Sueharu

    2008-01-01

    Alkylresorcinols and alkylpyrones, which have a polar aromatic ring and a hydrophobic alkyl chain, are phenolic lipids found in plants, fungi, and bacteria. In the Gram-negative bacterium Azotobacter vinelandii, phenolic lipids in the membrane of dormant cysts are essential for encystment. The aromatic moieties of the phenolic lipids in A. vinelandii are synthesized by two type III polyketide synthases (PKSs), ArsB and ArsC, which are encoded by the ars operon. However, details of the synthesis of hydrophobic acyl chains, which might serve as starter substrates for the type III polyketide synthases (PKSs), were unknown. Here, we show that two type I fatty acid synthases (FASs), ArsA and ArsD, which are members of the ars operon, are responsible for the biosynthesis of C22–C26 fatty acids from malonyl-CoA. In vivo and in vitro reconstitution of phenolic lipid synthesis systems with the Ars enzymes suggested that the C22–C26 fatty acids produced by ArsA and ArsD remained attached to the ACP domain of ArsA and were transferred hand-to-hand to the active-site cysteine residues of ArsB and ArsC. The type III PKSs then used the fatty acids as starter substrates and carried out two or three extensions with malonyl-CoA to yield the phenolic lipids. The phenolic lipids in A. vinelandii were thus found to be synthesized solely from malonyl-CoA by the four members of the ars operon. This is the first demonstration that a type I FAS interacts directly with a type III PKS through substrate transfer. PMID:18199837

  12. Selection of lactic acid bacteria from Brazilian kefir grains for potential use as starter or probiotic cultures.

    PubMed

    Zanirati, Débora Ferreira; Abatemarco, Mário; Sandes, Sávio Henrique de Cicco; Nicoli, Jacques Robert; Nunes, Álvaro Cantini; Neumann, Elisabeth

    2015-04-01

    Brazilian kefir is a homemade fermented beverage that is obtained by incubating milk or a brown sugar solution with kefir grains that contribute their different microbiological compositions. It is highly important to isolate and characterize microorganisms from Brazilian kefir grains to obtain starter cultures for the industrial production of a standardized commercial kefir. Thus, the present study aimed to isolate lactic acid bacteria from eight kefir grains that were propagated in milk or sugar solutions from five different locations in Brazil and to select Lactobacillus isolates based on desirable in vitro probiotic properties. One hundred eight isolates from both substrates were identified by amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis and/or 16S rRNA gene sequencing and were determined to belong to the following 11 species from the genera: Lactococcus, Leuconostoc, Lactobacillus (L.), and Oenococcus. Leuconostoc mesenteroides, Lactobacillus kefiri, and Lactobacillus kefiranofaciens were isolated only from milk grains, whereas Lactobacillus perolens, Lactobacillus parafarraginis, Lactobacillus diolivorans, and Oenococcus oeni were isolated exclusively from sugar water grains. When the microbial compositions of four kefir grains were evaluated with culture-independent analyses, L. kefiranofaciens was observed to predominant in milk grains, whereas Lactobacillus hilgardii was most abundant in sugar water kefir. Unfortunately, L. hilgardii was not isolated from any grain, although this bacteria was detected with a culture-independent methodology. Fifty-two isolated Lactobacilli were tested for gastric juice and bile salt tolerance, antagonism against pathogens, antimicrobial resistance, and surface hydrophobicity. Three Lactobacillus strains (L. kefiranofaciens 8U, L. diolivorans 1Z, and Lactobacillus casei 17U) could be classified as potential probiotics. In conclusion, several lactic acid bacteria that could be used in combination with yeasts as starter

  13. Behavior of Listeria monocytogenes and Staphylococcus aureus in yogurt fermented with a bacteriocin-producing thermophilic starter.

    PubMed

    Benkerroum, Noreddine; Oubel, Hafida; Mimoun, Lamiae Ben

    2002-05-01

    Streptococcus salivarius subsp. thermophilus B producing a bacteriocin active against Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 7644 and Staphylococcus aureus SAD 30 was isolated from bakery yeast. The bacteriocin was partially purified by an adsorption/desorption technique, and its spectrum of action was compared to that of a neutralized cell-free supernatant (CFS). Although the CFS inhibited a number of gram-positive and -negative bacteria of health and spoilage significance, the spectrum of action of the partially purified bacteriocin was limited to gram-positive bacteria. L. monocytogenes was the most sensitive to both preparations. The bacteriocin-producing streptococcal strain was used in combination with a Bac- Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus CY strain isolated from commercial yogurt to assess the effectiveness of the resulting thermophilic starter in controlling L. monocytogenes and S. aureus in yogurt during fermentation and storage at refrigeration (ca. 7 degrees C) or abuse (ca. 22 degrees C) temperature. Yogurt samples were contaminated with L. monocytogenes or S. aureus to the approximate levels of 10(3) and 10(6) CFU/ml of milk, respectively. The results showed that in situ bacteriocin production was more active against L. monocytogenes than against S. aureus in vitro and in contaminated samples. While L. monocytogenes leveled off below the detectable limit in a 1-ml sample of yogurt within 24 h of processing, S. aureus survived in Bac+ and Bac- samples during 10 days of storage at room temperature (ca. 22 degrees C). Use of a Bac+ starter resulted in a 5-day extension of the shelf life.

  14. Direct transfer of starter substrates from type I fatty acid synthase to type III polyketide synthases in phenolic lipid synthesis.

    PubMed

    Miyanaga, Akimasa; Funa, Nobutaka; Awakawa, Takayoshi; Horinouchi, Sueharu

    2008-01-22

    Alkylresorcinols and alkylpyrones, which have a polar aromatic ring and a hydrophobic alkyl chain, are phenolic lipids found in plants, fungi, and bacteria. In the Gram-negative bacterium Azotobacter vinelandii, phenolic lipids in the membrane of dormant cysts are essential for encystment. The aromatic moieties of the phenolic lipids in A. vinelandii are synthesized by two type III polyketide synthases (PKSs), ArsB and ArsC, which are encoded by the ars operon. However, details of the synthesis of hydrophobic acyl chains, which might serve as starter substrates for the type III polyketide synthases (PKSs), were unknown. Here, we show that two type I fatty acid synthases (FASs), ArsA and ArsD, which are members of the ars operon, are responsible for the biosynthesis of C(22)-C(26) fatty acids from malonyl-CoA. In vivo and in vitro reconstitution of phenolic lipid synthesis systems with the Ars enzymes suggested that the C(22)-C(26) fatty acids produced by ArsA and ArsD remained attached to the ACP domain of ArsA and were transferred hand-to-hand to the active-site cysteine residues of ArsB and ArsC. The type III PKSs then used the fatty acids as starter substrates and carried out two or three extensions with malonyl-CoA to yield the phenolic lipids. The phenolic lipids in A. vinelandii were thus found to be synthesized solely from malonyl-CoA by the four members of the ars operon. This is the first demonstration that a type I FAS interacts directly with a type III PKS through substrate transfer.

  15. Selection of Lactobacillus plantarum strains to use as starters in fermented table olives: Oleuropeinase activity and phage sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Zago, Miriam; Lanza, Barbara; Rossetti, Lia; Muzzalupo, Innocenzo; Carminati, Domenico; Giraffa, Giorgio

    2013-05-01

    Fermented table olives (Olea europaea L.) are largely diffused in the Mediterranean area. Olives are picked at different stages of maturity and after harvesting, processed to eliminate the characteristic bitterness caused by the presence of the oleuropein glucoside and to become suitable for human consumption. The spontaneous fermentation of table olives mainly depends on lactic acid bacteria (LAB), and in particular on Lactobacillus plantarum which plays an important role in the degradation of oleuropein. The hydrolysis of oleuropein is attributed to the β-glucosidase and esterase activities of the indigenous LAB microflora. This study investigated the potential of L. plantarum strains isolated from dairy products and olives to be used as starters for fermented table olives. Forty-nine strains were typed by RAPD-PCR and investigated for the presence of the β-glucosidase (bglH) gene. The full sequence of the bglH gene was carried out. All the 49 L. plantarum strains were also tested for phage resistance. A total of six strains were selected on the basis of genotypic polymorphism, bglH gene sequence analysis, and phage resistance profile. These strains were further characterized to assess the acidifying capability, the growth at different temperatures, the tolerance to different NaCl concentrations, and the oleuropeinolytic activity. Although further characterizations are required, especially concerning the influence on sensory properties, L. plantarum proved to have the potential to be used as a debittering and fermentative agent in starter culture for fermented table olives. PMID:23498181

  16. Development of quantitative PCR and metagenomics-based approaches for strain quantification of a defined mixed-strain starter culture.

    PubMed

    Johansen, Pernille; Vindeløv, Jannik; Arneborg, Nils; Brockmann, Elke

    2014-05-01

    Although the strain composition of mixed cultures may hugely affect production of various fermented foods, such as e.g. cheese, tools for investigating it have so far been limited. In this study, two new approaches for quantification of seven Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris strains (S1-S7) in a defined mixed-strain starter culture were developed and verified. By mapping NGS reads from 47 sequenced L. lactis strains to de novo assembly contigs of the seven strains, two strain-specific sequence regions (SEQ1 and SEQ2) were identified for each strain for qPCR primer design (A1 and A2). The qPCR assays amplified their strain-specific sequence region target efficiently. Additionally, high reproducibility was obtained in a validation sample containing equal amounts of the seven strains, and assay-to-assay coefficients of variance (CVs) for six (i.e. S1, S2, S4-S7) of the seven strains correlated to the inter-plate CVs. Hence, at least for six strains, the qPCR assay design approach was successful. The metagenomics-based approach quantified the seven strains based on average coverage of SEQ1 and SEQ2 by mapping sequencing reads from the validation sample to the strain-specific sequence regions. Average coverages of the SEQ1 and SEQ2 in the metagenomics data showed CVs of ≤17.3% for six strains (i.e. S1-S4, S6, S7). Thus, the metagenomics-based quantification approach was considered successful for six strains, regardless of the strain-specific sequence region used. When comparing qPCR- and metagenomics-based quantifications of the validation sample, the identified strain-specific sequence regions were considered suitable and applicable for quantification at a strain level of defined mixed-strain starter cultures.

  17. Determining the impact of varying levels of cherry powder and starter culture on quality and sensory attributes of indirectly cured, emulsified cooked sausages.

    PubMed

    Terns, Matthew J; Milkowski, Andrew L; Rankin, Scott A; Sindelar, Jeffrey J

    2011-06-01

    Indirect curing is a process that utilizes ingredients high in naturally occurring nitrate and a nitrate reducing bacterial starter culture (SC) to provide quality and sensory attributes similar to nitrite-added cured meats. The objective of this study was to determine the effects varying concentrations of starter culture and the addition of cherry powder (CP) had on improving quality and sensory attributes of indirectly cured sausages. Four treatments (TRTs) (TRT 1: low SC+no CP; TRT 2: low SC+CP; TRT 3: high SC+no CP; and TRT 4: high SC+CP) and a sodium nitrite-added (156 ppm) control were investigated. Residual nitrite levels throughout storage declined most rapidly in TRTs 2 and 4 (P<0.05). Few differences existed between TRTs and C for pH, objective color, or cured pigment concentrations. Consumer sensory panel scores revealed all treatment combinations were comparable (P>0.05) to the C for all sensory attributes.

  18. Compositional and biochemical changes during cold storage of starter-free fresh cheeses made from ultra-high-pressure homogenised milk.

    PubMed

    Zamora, A; Juan, B; Trujillo, A J

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of using ultra-high pressure homogenisation (UHPH) on the composition and biochemistry of starter-free fresh cheeses and to monitor their evolution during cold storage as an alternative to conventional treatments applied in the production of fresh cheese such as conventional pasteurisation and homogenisation-pasteurisation. Although both homogenisation treatments increased cheese moisture content, cheeses from UHPH-treated milk showed lower moisture loss during storage than those from conventionally homogenised-pasteurised milk. Lipolysis and proteolysis levels in cheeses from UHPH-treated milk were lower than those from conventionally treated milk samples. Although, oxidation was found to be the major drawback, in general terms, high quality starter-free fresh cheeses were obtained from UHPH-treated milk. PMID:25624253

  19. Compositional and biochemical changes during cold storage of starter-free fresh cheeses made from ultra-high-pressure homogenised milk.

    PubMed

    Zamora, A; Juan, B; Trujillo, A J

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of using ultra-high pressure homogenisation (UHPH) on the composition and biochemistry of starter-free fresh cheeses and to monitor their evolution during cold storage as an alternative to conventional treatments applied in the production of fresh cheese such as conventional pasteurisation and homogenisation-pasteurisation. Although both homogenisation treatments increased cheese moisture content, cheeses from UHPH-treated milk showed lower moisture loss during storage than those from conventionally homogenised-pasteurised milk. Lipolysis and proteolysis levels in cheeses from UHPH-treated milk were lower than those from conventionally treated milk samples. Although, oxidation was found to be the major drawback, in general terms, high quality starter-free fresh cheeses were obtained from UHPH-treated milk.

  20. Growth and gas formation by Lactobacillus wasatchensis, a novel obligatory heterofermentative nonstarter lactic acid bacterium, in Cheddar-style cheese made using a Streptococcus thermophilus starter.

    PubMed

    Ortakci, Fatih; Broadbent, Jeffery R; Oberg, Craig J; McMahon, Donald J

    2015-11-01

    A novel slow-growing, obligatory heterofermentative, nonstarter lactic acid bacterium (NSLAB), Lactobacillus wasatchensis WDC04, was studied for growth and gas production in Cheddar-style cheese made using Streptococcus thermophilus as the starter culture. Cheesemaking trials were conducted using S. thermophilus alone or in combination with Lb. wasatchensis deliberately added to cheese milk at a level of ~10(4) cfu/mL. Resulting cheeses were ripened at 6 or 12°C. At d 1, starter streptococcal numbers were similar in both cheeses (~10(9) cfu/g) and fast-growing NSLAB lactobacilli counts were below detectable levels (<10(2) cfu/g). As expected, Lactobacillus wasatchensis counts were 3×10(5) cfu/g in cheeses inoculated with this bacterium and below enumeration limits in the control cheese. Starter streptococci decreased over time at both storage temperatures but declined more rapidly at 12°C, especially in cheese also containing Lb. wasatchensis. Populations of fast-growing NSLAB and the slow-growing Lb. wasatchensis reached 5×10(7) and 2×10(8) cfu/g, respectively, after 16 wk of storage at 12°C. Growth of NSLAB coincided with a reduction in galactose concentration in the cheese from 0.6 to 0.1%. Levels of galactose at 6°C had similar decrease. Gas formation and textural defects were only observed in cheese with added Lb. wasatchensis ripened at 12°C. Use of S. thermophilus as starter culture resulted in galactose accumulation that Lb. wasatchensis can use to produce CO2, which contributes to late gas blowing in Cheddar-style cheeses, especially when the cheese is ripened at elevated temperature.

  1. Genetic diversity in the lactose operons of Lactobacillus helveticus strains and its relationship to the role of these strains as commercial starter cultures.

    PubMed

    Callanan, M J; Beresford, T P; Ross, R P

    2005-03-01

    Two novel insertion sequence elements, ISLhe1 and ISLhe15, were located upstream of the genes encoding the beta-galactosidase enzyme in Lactobacillus helveticus commercial starter strains. Strains with the IS982 family element, ISLhe1, demonstrated reduced beta-galactosidase activity compared to the L. helveticus type strain, whereas strains with the ISLhe15 element expressed beta-galactosidase in the absence of lactose. PMID:15746373

  2. Growth and gas formation by Lactobacillus wasatchensis, a novel obligatory heterofermentative nonstarter lactic acid bacterium, in Cheddar-style cheese made using a Streptococcus thermophilus starter.

    PubMed

    Ortakci, Fatih; Broadbent, Jeffery R; Oberg, Craig J; McMahon, Donald J

    2015-11-01

    A novel slow-growing, obligatory heterofermentative, nonstarter lactic acid bacterium (NSLAB), Lactobacillus wasatchensis WDC04, was studied for growth and gas production in Cheddar-style cheese made using Streptococcus thermophilus as the starter culture. Cheesemaking trials were conducted using S. thermophilus alone or in combination with Lb. wasatchensis deliberately added to cheese milk at a level of ~10(4) cfu/mL. Resulting cheeses were ripened at 6 or 12°C. At d 1, starter streptococcal numbers were similar in both cheeses (~10(9) cfu/g) and fast-growing NSLAB lactobacilli counts were below detectable levels (<10(2) cfu/g). As expected, Lactobacillus wasatchensis counts were 3×10(5) cfu/g in cheeses inoculated with this bacterium and below enumeration limits in the control cheese. Starter streptococci decreased over time at both storage temperatures but declined more rapidly at 12°C, especially in cheese also containing Lb. wasatchensis. Populations of fast-growing NSLAB and the slow-growing Lb. wasatchensis reached 5×10(7) and 2×10(8) cfu/g, respectively, after 16 wk of storage at 12°C. Growth of NSLAB coincided with a reduction in galactose concentration in the cheese from 0.6 to 0.1%. Levels of galactose at 6°C had similar decrease. Gas formation and textural defects were only observed in cheese with added Lb. wasatchensis ripened at 12°C. Use of S. thermophilus as starter culture resulted in galactose accumulation that Lb. wasatchensis can use to produce CO2, which contributes to late gas blowing in Cheddar-style cheeses, especially when the cheese is ripened at elevated temperature. PMID:26364109

  3. Microbial Diversity of a Camembert-Type Cheese Using Freeze-Dried Tibetan Kefir Coculture as Starter Culture by Culture-Dependent and Culture-Independent Methods

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Jun; Guo, Qizhen; Wu, Yan; Li, Yunfei

    2014-01-01

    The biochemical changes occurring during cheese ripening are directly and indirectly dependent on the microbial associations of starter cultures. Freeze-dried Tibetan kefir coculture was used as a starter culture in the Camembert-type cheese production for the first time. Therefore, it's necessary to elucidate the stability, organization and identification of the dominant microbiota presented in the cheese. Bacteria and yeasts were subjected to culture-dependent on selective media and culture-independent polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis and sequencing of dominant bands to assess the microbial structure and dynamics through ripening. In further studies, kefir grains were observed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) methods. A total of 147 bacteria and 129 yeasts were obtained from the cheese during ripening. Lactobacillus paracasei represents the most commonly identified lactic acid bacteria isolates, with 59 of a total of 147 isolates, followed by Lactococcus lactis (29 isolates). Meanwhile, Kazachstania servazzii (51 isolates) represented the mainly identified yeast isolate, followed by Saccharomyces cerevisiae (40 isolates). However, some lactic acid bacteria detected by sequence analysis of DGGE bands were not recovered by plating. The yeast S. cerevisiae and K. servazzii are described for the first time with kefir starter culture. SEM showed that the microbiota were dominated by a variety of lactobacilli (long and curved) cells growing in close association with a few yeasts in the inner portion of the grain and the short lactobacilli were observed along with yeast cells on the exterior portion. Results indicated that conventional culture method and PCR-DGGE should be combined to describe in maximal detail the microbiological composition in the cheese during ripening. The data could help in the selection of appropriate commercial starters for Camembert-type cheese. PMID:25360757

  4. Safety and technological characterization of Staphylococcus equorum isolates from jeotgal, a Korean high-salt-fermented seafood, for starter development.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Do-Won; Han, Seulhwa; Lee, Jong-Hoon

    2014-10-01

    To select starters for jeotgal, a traditional Korean high-salt-fermented seafood, the safety and technological properties of its predominant bacteria isolates, which were identified as Staphylococcus equorum, were assessed. Among the 185 S. equorum isolates from jeotgal, 126 ampicillin-sensitive strains were subjected to assessments for antibiotic susceptibility and safety hazards. Sixty-six out of the 126 S. equorum strains exhibited phenotypic resistances to at least one antibiotic, and their prevailing resistances were to penicillin G (34.1%), erythromycin (9.5%) and trimethoprim (9.5%). Twenty-four S. equorum strains expressed resistance to at least two antibiotics. The lnuA for lincomycin (four strains) and pbp for β-lactam (three strains) were amplified by PCR. α-Hemolytic activity was not detected from the 126 strains, and 87 strains presented δ-hemolytic activity. Among the 87 strains, three strains exhibited β-hemolytic activity. Thirty-seven strains formed a biofilm. A hemolysin gene homologous to that of Staphylococcus epidermidis was amplified from an S. equorum strain with β-hemolytic activity by PCR; however, no PCR product homologous to the previously known staphylococcal enterotoxin genes was amplified. Thirty-nine S. equorum strains cleared all of the tested safety hazards and were adopted for technological property assessments. Among these strains, 16 strains exhibited protease, lipase and nitrate reductase activities, and seven strains did not produce four types of biogenic amines. Five biogenic amine non-producers exhibited three enzyme activities. Most of the strains could grow on the agar with 20% NaCl, and 13 strains maintained growth at the 25% NaCl condition. S. equorum KS1039, which is the most applicable strain that covers the safety and technological requirements for jeotgal, can grow at the 25% NaCl condition. Through this research study, we reconfirmed the necessity of characterization in the functionality and safety of S. equorum

  5. Safety and technological characterization of Staphylococcus equorum isolates from jeotgal, a Korean high-salt-fermented seafood, for starter development.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Do-Won; Han, Seulhwa; Lee, Jong-Hoon

    2014-10-01

    To select starters for jeotgal, a traditional Korean high-salt-fermented seafood, the safety and technological properties of its predominant bacteria isolates, which were identified as Staphylococcus equorum, were assessed. Among the 185 S. equorum isolates from jeotgal, 126 ampicillin-sensitive strains were subjected to assessments for antibiotic susceptibility and safety hazards. Sixty-six out of the 126 S. equorum strains exhibited phenotypic resistances to at least one antibiotic, and their prevailing resistances were to penicillin G (34.1%), erythromycin (9.5%) and trimethoprim (9.5%). Twenty-four S. equorum strains expressed resistance to at least two antibiotics. The lnuA for lincomycin (four strains) and pbp for β-lactam (three strains) were amplified by PCR. α-Hemolytic activity was not detected from the 126 strains, and 87 strains presented δ-hemolytic activity. Among the 87 strains, three strains exhibited β-hemolytic activity. Thirty-seven strains formed a biofilm. A hemolysin gene homologous to that of Staphylococcus epidermidis was amplified from an S. equorum strain with β-hemolytic activity by PCR; however, no PCR product homologous to the previously known staphylococcal enterotoxin genes was amplified. Thirty-nine S. equorum strains cleared all of the tested safety hazards and were adopted for technological property assessments. Among these strains, 16 strains exhibited protease, lipase and nitrate reductase activities, and seven strains did not produce four types of biogenic amines. Five biogenic amine non-producers exhibited three enzyme activities. Most of the strains could grow on the agar with 20% NaCl, and 13 strains maintained growth at the 25% NaCl condition. S. equorum KS1039, which is the most applicable strain that covers the safety and technological requirements for jeotgal, can grow at the 25% NaCl condition. Through this research study, we reconfirmed the necessity of characterization in the functionality and safety of S. equorum

  6. Complex microbiota of a Chinese "Fen" liquor fermentation starter (Fen-Daqu), revealed by culture-dependent and culture-independent methods.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiao-Wei; Yan, Zheng; Han, Bei-Zhong; Zwietering, Marcel H; Samson, Robert A; Boekhout, Teun; Robert Nout, M J

    2012-09-01

    Daqu is a traditional fermentation starter that is used for Chinese liquor production. Although partly mechanized, its manufacturing process has remained traditional. We investigated the microbial diversity of Fen-Daqu, a starter for light-flavour liquor, using combined culture-dependent and culture-independent approaches (PCR-DGGE). A total of 190 microbial strains, comprising 109 bacteria and 81 yeasts and moulds, were isolated and identified on the basis of the sequences of their 16S rDNA (bacteria) and 26S rDNA and ITS regions (fungi). DGGE of DNA extracted from Daqu was used to complement the culture-dependent method in order to include non-culturable microbes. Both approaches revealed that Bacillus licheniformis was an abundant bacterial species, and Saccharomycopsis fibuligera, Wickerhamomyces anomalus, and Pichia kudriavzevii were the most common yeasts encountered in Fen-Daqu. Six genera of moulds (Absidia, Aspergillus, Mucor, Rhizopus, Rhizomucor and Penicillium) were found. The potential function of these microorganisms in starters for alcoholic fermentation is discussed. In general the culture-based findings overlapped with those obtained by DGGE by a large extent. However, Weissella cibaria, Weissella confusa, Staphylococcus saprophyticus, Enterobacter aerogenes, Lactobacillus sanfranciscensis, Lactobacillus lactis, and Bacillus megaterium were only revealed by DGGE. PMID:22608236

  7. Quantification of viable bacterial starter cultures of Virgibacillus sp. and Tetragenococcus halophilus in fish sauce fermentation by real-time quantitative PCR.

    PubMed

    Udomsil, Natteewan; Chen, Shu; Rodtong, Sureelak; Yongsawatdigul, Jirawat

    2016-08-01

    Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) methods were developed for the quantification of Virgibacillus sp. SK37 and Tetragenococcus halophilus MS33, which were added as starter cultures in fish sauce fermentation. The PCR assays were coupled with propidium monoazide (PMA) treatment of samples to selectively quantify viable cells and integrated with exogenous recombinant Escherichia coli cells to control variabilities in analysis procedures. The qPCR methods showed species-specificity for both Virgibacillus halodenitrificans and T. halophilus as evaluated using 6 reference strains and 28 strains of bacteria isolated from fish sauce fermentation. The qPCR efficiencies were 101.1% for V. halodenitrificans and 90.2% for T. halophilus. The quantification limits of the assays were 10(3) CFU/mL and 10(2) CFU/mL in fish sauce samples with linear correlations over 4 Logs for V. halodenitrificans and T. halophilus, respectively. The matrix effect was not observed when evaluated using fish sauce samples fermented for 1-6 months. The developed PMA-qPCR methods were successfully applied to monitor changes of Virgibacillus sp. SK37 and T. halophilus MS33 in a mackerel fish sauce fermentation model where culture-dependent techniques failed to quantify the starter cultures. The results demonstrated the usability of the methods as practical tools for monitoring the starter cultures in fish sauce fermentation. PMID:27052702

  8. Effect of dissolved oxygen on redox potential and milk acidification by lactic acid bacteria isolated from a DL-starter culture.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Nadja; Werner, Birgit Brøsted; Vogensen, Finn Kvist; Jespersen, Lene

    2015-03-01

    Milk acidification by DL-starter cultures [cultures containing Lactococcus lactis diacetylactis (D) and Leuconostoc (L) species] depends on the oxidation-reduction (redox) potential in milk; however, the mechanisms behind this effect are not completely clear. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of dissolved oxygen on acidification kinetics and redox potential during milk fermentation by lactic acid bacteria (LAB). Fermentations were conducted by single strains isolated from mixed DL-starter culture, including Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis, Lactococcus lactis ssp. cremoris, and Leuconostoc mesenteroides ssp. cremoris, by the DL-starter culture, and by the type strains. High and low levels of oxygen were produced by flushing milk with oxygen or nitrogen, respectively. The kinetics of milk acidification was characterized by the maximum rate and time of acidification (Vamax and Tamax), the maximum rate and time of reduction (Vrmax and Trmax), the minimum redox potential (Eh7 final), and time of reaching Eh7 final (Trfinal). Variations in kinetic parameters were observed at both the species and strain levels. Two of the Lc. lactis ssp. lactis strains were not able to lower redox potential to negative values. Kinetic parameters of the DL-starter culture were comparable with the best acidifying and reducing strains, indicating their additive effects. Acidification curves were mostly diauxic at all oxygen levels, displaying 2 maxima of acidification rate: before (aerobic maximum) and after (anaerobic maximum) oxygen depletion. The redox potential decreased concurrently with oxygen consumption and continued to decrease at slower rate until reaching the final values, indicating involvement of both oxygen and microbiological activity in the redox state of milk. Oxygen flushing had a negative effect on reduction and acidification capacity of tested LAB. Reduction was significantly delayed at high initial oxygen, exhibiting longer Trmax, Trfinal, or both

  9. Effects of starch content of calf starter on growth and rumen pH in Holstein calves during the weaning transition.

    PubMed

    Laarman, A H; Sugino, T; Oba, M

    2012-08-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of substituting high fiber byproducts for dry ground corn in calf starter on growth and rumen pH during the weaning transition. Holstein bull calves were raised on an intensified nursing program using milk replacer containing 26% CP and 18% fat. Calves were fed a texturized calf starter containing either dry ground corn at 18.8% of dry matter (DM; CRN), beet pulp replacing dry ground corn at 10.2% dietary DM (BP), or triticale dried distillers grains with solubles replacing dry ground corn and high-protein feedstuffs at 18.6% of dietary DM (DDGS) in the pellet; treatment calf starters differed only in the pellet portion. Starch concentrations of CRN, BP, and DDGS were 35.3, 33.4, and 31.4%, respectively. After a calf consumed 2.50 kg of starter for 3 consecutive days, a small ruminant rumen pH data logger was inserted orally and rumen pH was measured continuously for 4d. Calves were then killed and rumen fluid was sampled to determine volatile fatty acid profile. No difference was found in overall average daily gain or growth rates of hip height, withers height, and heart girth. During the weaning transition, rate of increase in calf starter intake was greater for calves fed DDGS compared with those fed CRN (87.7 vs. 77.5 g/d), but lower for calves fed BP compared with CRN (68.1 vs. 77.5 g/d). The area under pH 5.8 (470 vs. 295 min × pH/d) or pH 5.2 (72.7 vs. 16.4 min × pH/d) was greater for calves fed DDGS than those fed CRN. Rumen pH profile was not affected by BP treatment compared with CRN, but calves fed BP tended to have greater water intake than those fed CRN (6.6 vs. 5.8 L/d). Volatile fatty acid profile was not affected by treatment with the exception of molar proportion of butyrate, which tended to be lower for calves fed BP compared with those fed CRN (15.0 vs. 16.6%). Hay intake was positively correlated to mean rumen pH for calves used in this study (r=0.48). Decreasing dietary starch

  10. Evaluation of geotechnical monitoring data from the ESF North Ramp Starter Tunnel, April 1994 to June 1995. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    This report presents the results of instrumentation measurements and observations made during construction of the North Ramp Starter Tunnel (NRST) of the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF). The information in this report was developed as part of the Design Verification Study, Section 8.3.1.15.1.8 of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Plan (DOE 1988). The ESF is being constructed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to evaluate the feasibility of locating a potential high-level nuclear waste repository on lands within and adjacent to the Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nye County, Nevada. The Design Verification Studies are performed to collect information during construction of the ESF that will be useful for design and construction of the potential repository. Four experiments make up the Design Verification Study: Evaluation of Mining Methods, Monitoring Drift Stability, Monitoring of Ground Support Systems, and The Air Quality and Ventilation Experiment. This report describes Sandia National Laboratories` (SNL) efforts in the first three of these experiments in the NRST.

  11. Characterization of the CW starter plasma RF matching network for operating the SNS H⁻ ion source with lower H₂ flows.

    PubMed

    Han, B X; Stockli, M P; Kang, Y; Piller, C; Murray, S N; Pennisi, T R; Santana, M; Welton, R F

    2016-02-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source H(-) ion source is operated with a pulsed 2-MHz RF (50-60 kW) to produce the 1-ms long, ∼50 mA H(-) beams at 60 Hz. A continuous low power (∼300 W) 13.56-MHz RF plasma, which is initially ignited with a H2 pressure bump, serves as starter plasma for the pulsed high power 2-MHz RF discharges. To reduce the risk of plasma outages at lower H2 flow rates which is desired for improved performance of the following radio frequency quadrupole, the 13.56-MHz RF matching network was characterized over a broad range of its two tuning capacitors. The H-α line intensity of the 13.56-MHz RF plasma and the reflected power of the 13.56-MHz RF were mapped against the capacitor settings. Optimal tunes for the maximum H-α intensity are consistent with the optimal tunes for minimum reflected power. Low limits of the H2 flow rate not causing plasma outages were explored within the range of the map. A tune region that allows lower H2 flow rate has been identified, which differs from the optimal tune for global minimum reflected power that was mostly used in the past. PMID:26932025

  12. Microbiota dynamics related to environmental conditions during the fermentative production of Fen-Daqu, a Chinese industrial fermentation starter.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiao-Wei; Yan, Zheng; Nout, M J Robert; Smid, Eddy J; Zwietering, Marcel H; Boekhout, Teun; Han, Jian-Shu; Han, Bei-Zhong

    2014-07-16

    Chinese Daqu is used as a starter for liquor and vinegar fermentations. It is produced by solid state fermentation of cereal-pulse mixtures. A succession of fungi, lactic acid bacteria and Bacillus spp. was observed during the production of Daqu. Mesophilic bacteria followed by fungi, dominated the first phase of fermentation. Next, lactic acid bacteria increased in relative abundance, resulting in an increase of the acidity of Daqu. At the final stages of fermentation, Bacillus spp. and thermophilic fungi became the dominant groups, possibly due to their tolerance to low water activity and high temperature. Both culture-dependent and culture-independent analyses confirmed that Bacillus spp. were ubiquitous throughout the process. Yeast species such as Wickerhamomyces anomalus, Saccharomycopsis fibuligera and Pichia kudriavzevii were present throughout almost the entire fermentation process, but the zygomycetous fungus Lichtheimia corymbifera proliferated only during the final stages of fermentation. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) revealed the significance of acidity, moisture content and temperature in correlation with the composition of the microbial communities at different stages. PMID:24863368

  13. Diversity and antibiotic susceptibility of autochthonous dairy enterococci isolates: are they safe candidates for autochthonous starter cultures?

    PubMed Central

    Terzić-Vidojević, Amarela; Veljović, Katarina; Begović, Jelena; Filipić, Brankica; Popović, Dušanka; Tolinački, Maja; Miljković, Marija; Kojić, Milan; Golić, Nataša

    2015-01-01

    Enterococci represent the most controversial group of dairy bacteria. They are found to be the main constituent of many traditional Mediterranean dairy products and contribute to their characteristic taste and flavor. On the other hand, during the last 50 years antibiotic-resistant enterococci have emerged as leading causes of nosocomial infections worldwide. The aim of this study was to determine the diversity, technological properties, antibiotic susceptibility and virulence traits of 636 enterococci previously isolated from 55 artisan dairy products from 12 locations in the Western Balkan countries (WBC) of Serbia, Croatia and Bosnia and Herzegovina. All strains were identified both by microbiological and molecular methods. The predominant species was Enterococcus durans, followed by Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium. Over 44% of the isolates were resistant to ciprofloxacin and erythromycin, while 26.2% of the isolates were multi-resistant to three or more antibiotics belonging to different families. 185 isolates (29.1%) were susceptible to all 13 of the antibiotics tested. The antibiotic-susceptible isolates were further tested for possible virulence genes and the production of biogenic amines. Finally, five enterococci isolates were found to be antibiotic susceptible with good technological characteristics and without virulence traits or the ability to produce biogenic amines, making them possible candidates for biotechnological application as starter cultures in the dairy industry. PMID:26441888

  14. Minimum Bactericidal Concentration of Phenols Extracted from Oil Vegetation Water on Spoilers, Starters and Food-Borne Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Cardazzo, Barbara; Balzan, Stefania; Carraro, Lisa; Taticchi, Agnese; Montemurro, Filomena; Novelli, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the in vitro effect of phenols extracted from oil vegetation water (PEOW) on several food-borne strains. Antibacterial activity of PEOW was based on the minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) on microtitre assay. The taxa tested were: Staphylococcus (n. 5), Listeria (n. 4), Escherichia (n. 2), Salmonella (n. 1), Pseudomonas (n. 3), Lactobacillus (n. 2) and Pediococcus (n. 1). S. aureus and L. monocytogens showed the lowest level of resistance to PEOW (MBC=1.5-3 mg/mL). In contrast, the Gram negative strains (e.g. S. Typhimurium and Pseudomonas spp.) were in some cases unaffected by the tested doses and the MBCs ranged between 6 to 12 mg/mL. Starter cultures were dramatically reduced on growth (e.g. Staphylococcus xylosus; 0.75 mg/mL MBC). The thresholds for pathogenic strains could be considered for further applications of PEOW in food models (e.g. shelf life or challenge test studies). PMID:27800388

  15. Thermal inactivation of the frozen thawed traditional meat starter culture, Pediococcus pentosaceus, in a meat model system.

    PubMed

    Raccach, M; Tilley, H R

    2006-04-01

    The equation, y((t))=y((0))e(kt), was fitted (R=0.9281, 0.9220 and 0.9117, respectively) to thermal inactivation data (55, 60 and 65°C) of the traditional meat starter culture Pediococcus pentosaceus (10(7)cfu/ml) in a meat model system. The population reduction constant ('k') increased (about 2.5- and 3-fold) with an increase in the treatment temperature (from 55 to 60°C and from 60 to 65°C, respectively). The Q(10) (55-65°C) for 'k' was 7.63. Thermal treatments of 19.1, 9.0 and 3.1min (55, 60 and 65°C, respectively) reduced the population of P. pentosaceus by 2.0 logs. The value of 'k' and the duration of the thermal treatment played an important role in the extent of the inactivation of the culture. The "zero inactivation" temperature (T(0)) for P. pentosaceus was 49.9°C. About 5 logs of the culture would be destroyed at 63 and 68°C within about 15.5 and 6.5min, respectively.

  16. Hydrolytic activity of Virgibacillus sp. SK37, a starter culture of fish sauce fermentation, and its cell-bound proteinases.

    PubMed

    Sinsuwan, Sornchai; Rodtong, Sureelak; Yongsawatdigul, Jirawat

    2012-08-01

    Fish sauce production relies on a natural fermentation process requiring 12-18 months for process completion. Virgibacillus sp. SK37 has been shown to be a potential strain for fish sauce acceleration. However, hydrolytic activity of proteinases bound at cell surface of this strain has not been well elucidated. Addition of 0.2 % CaCl(2) (w/w) in conjunction with starter cultures of Virgibacillus sp. SK 37 increased protein hydrolysis as measured by α-amino group content throughout fermentation (P < 0.05). Cell-bound proteinases from Virgibacillus sp. SK 37 were extracted into a free form by incubating the washed cells in Ca(2+)-free buffer at 37 °C for 2 h. Cell-bound proteinases revealed molecular mass of 19, 20, 22, 32, 34, and 44 kDa based on a synthetic peptide zymogram. The proteinases showed subtilisin-like serine characteristics with the highest activity at 50 °C and pH 8 and 11. Activity of the extracted proteinases increased ~4 times at ≥100 mM CaCl(2). In addition, CaCl(2) enhanced thermal stability of the extracted proteinases. Enzymes showed proteolytic activity in either the absence or presence of 10 and 25 % NaCl toward fish muscle, soy protein isolate, and casein substrates. Cell-bound proteinases were likely to play an important role in protein hydrolysis during fish sauce fermentation. PMID:22806191

  17. Manufacture and characterization of kefir made from cow and buffalo milk, using kefir grain and starter culture.

    PubMed

    Gul, O; Mortas, M; Atalar, I; Dervisoglu, M; Kahyaoglu, T

    2015-03-01

    The microbiological and chemical characteristics as well as organic and amino acid profiles of kefir samples made from cow and buffalo milks fermented by kefir grains and starter culture were investigated during storage for 21 d at 4°C. After incubation, lactic, acetic, and citric acid concentrations showed a difference among the samples due to milk type and production methods. Storage time had little effect on the organic acid values of kefir samples. As compared with cow milk kefir, buffalo milk kefir had higher numbers of microorganisms, except lactobacilli, at the end of storage. Whereas pH and titratable acidity exhibited similar changes during storage in all kefir samples, ethanol levels were significantly increased in buffalo milk kefir samples. Glutamic acid was the major amino acid at all sampling times for all samples. Tyrosine, serine, histidine, alanine, methionine, and lysine concentrations were determined to be different in all samples depending on milk type. In general, due to the higher microbial population (especially yeast), kefir made from buffalo milk may be preferred.

  18. Antiviral Potential of Selected Starter Cultures, Bacteriocins and D,L-Lactic Acid.

    PubMed

    Lange-Starke, Anett; Petereit, A; Truyen, U; Braun, P G; Fehlhaber, K; Albert, T

    2014-03-01

    The antiviral potential of selected bacteria species [lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and micrococcaceae] was examined. By this, the effect of their cell-free supernatants as well as of certain species-related metabolites (sakacin A, nisin, and lactic acid) was investigated on different viruses after exposure at 24 °C for 3 days. Viruses were incubated with supernatants and metabolites in a dilution ratio of 1:10. Data for antiviral effects towards murine norovirus S99 (MNV), influenza A virus A/WSN/33 (H1N1), Newcastle disease virus Montana (NDV) and feline herpesvirus KS 285 (FHV) were generated in vitro simulating pH and temperature conditions according to raw sausage fermentations. Investigations showed no antiviral effect of sakacin A and nisin on MNV, H1N1, FHV and NDV. Furthermore, the antiviral potential of D,L-lactic acid was determined for MNV and H1N1. At raw sausage-related pH values (5.0-6.2) it could be shown that the virus titre for MNV and H1N1 was reduced by a maximum of 3.25 log and 2.5 log units, respectively. In addition, 29 culture supernatants of different bacteria species, mainly LAB and staphylococci, were tested for their antiviral activity against MNV. Only the cell-free supernatant of a Lb. curvatus strain showed a higher virus titre reduction of MNV by 1.25 log units compared to the control. Further studies on the characterisation of this cell-free supernatant were carried out, however, the antiviral substance could not be identified so far. PMID:24297091

  19. Effects of feed access after hatch and inclusion of fish oil and medium chain fatty acids in a pre-starter diet on broiler chicken growth performance and humoral immunity.

    PubMed

    Lamot, D M; van der Klein, S A S; van de Linde, I B; Wijtten, P J A; Kemp, B; van den Brand, H; Lammers, A

    2016-09-01

    Delayed feed and water access is known to impair growth performance of day old broiler chickens. Although effects of feed access on growth performance and immune function of broilers have been examined before, effects of dietary composition and its potential interaction with feed access are hardly investigated. This experiment aimed to determine whether moment of first feed and water access after hatch and pre-starter composition (0 to 7 days) affect growth rate and humoral immune function in broiler chickens. Direct fed chickens received feed and water directly after placement in the grow-out facility, whilst delayed fed chickens only after 48 h. Direct and delayed fed chickens received a control pre-starter diet, or a diet containing medium chain fatty acids (MCFA) or fish oil. At 21 days, chickens were immunized by injection of sheep red blood cells. The mortality rate depended on an interaction between feed access and pre-starter composition (P=0.014). Chickens with direct feed access fed the control pre-starter diet had a higher risk for mortality than chickens with delayed feed access fed the control pre-starter diet (16.4% v. 4.2%) whereas the other treatment groups were in-between. BW gain and feed intake till 25 days in direct fed chickens were higher compared with delayed fed chickens, whilst gain to feed ratio was lower. Within the direct fed chickens, the control pre-starter diet resulted in the highest BW at 28 days and the MCFA pre-starter diet the lowest (Δ=2.4%), whereas this was opposite for delayed fed chickens (Δ=3.0%; P=0.033). Provision of MCFA resulted in a 4.6% higher BW gain and a higher gain to feed ratio compared with other pre-starter diets, but only during the period it was provided (2 to 7 days). Minor treatment effects were found for humoral immune response by measuring immunoglobulins, agglutination titers, interferon gamma (IFN- γ ), and complement activity. Concluding, current inclusion levels of fish oil (5 g/kg) and MCFA (30 g

  20. Effect of supplemental dietary leucine and immune system stimulation on whole-body nitrogen utilization in starter pigs.

    PubMed

    Rudar, M; Zhu, C L; de Lange, C F M

    2016-06-01

    The increase in circulating pro-inflammatory cytokines following an immune challenge (e.g., with bacterial lipopolysaccharide [LPS]) causes a disruption in normal AA metabolism and increases visceral protein synthesis at the expense of muscle protein synthesis. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of supplemental dietary Leu on the dynamics of whole body nitrogen (N) retention in starter pigs before and after immune system stimulation (ISS) induced by LPS. A total of 28 starter pigs (14.46 ± 0.73 kg BW) were assigned to isoenergetic and isonitrogenous diets formulated to supply essential AA 10% above estimated requirements for maximum whole-body protein deposition (PD) and to contain increasing amounts of Leu: CON (1.36% SID Leu); LEU-M (2.04% SID Leu); and LEU-H (2.72% SID Leu). Pigs were housed in metabolic crates, scale-fed every 4 h based on BW, and adjusted to dietary treatments for 5 d. The 108-h N-balance experiment was divided into two periods: prechallenge (before LPS challenge; six 12-h collections) and challenge (after LPS challenge; three 12-h collections) periods. In both periods, blood was collected to determine plasma AA and urea N concentrations. At the start of the challenge period, one-half of the pigs fed CON and all pigs fed LEU-M and LEU-H were challenged with LPS (ISS+; 30 µg/kg injected intramuscularly); the remaining pigs fed CON were injected with saline (ISS-). Whole-body N retention was determined during subsequent 12-h collections. Plasma free Leu concentration increased linearly with increasing Leu content in the diet before LPS was administered (CON, 124 µmol/L; LEU-M, 185 µmol/L; LEU-H, 227 µmol/L; < 0.01). During the prechallenge period, N retention was lower in pigs fed LEU-M ( < 0.01) and there was no difference between pigs fed CON and LEU-H (7.91, 7.18, and 7.71 g/12 h for CON, LEU-M, and LEU-H, respectively). During the challenge period, N retention in pigs fed CON was higher in ISS- than ISS+ (5.37 vs. 3

  1. Application of Impedance Microbiology for Evaluating Potential Acidifying Performances of Starter Lactic Acid Bacteria to Employ in Milk Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Bancalari, Elena; Bernini, Valentina; Bottari, Benedetta; Neviani, Erasmo; Gatti, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Impedance microbiology is a method that enables tracing microbial growth by measuring the change in the electrical conductivity. Different systems, able to perform this measurement, are available in commerce and are commonly used for food control analysis by mean of measuring a point of the impedance curve, defined “time of detection.” With this work we wanted to find an objective way to interpret the metabolic significance of impedance curves and propose it as a valid approach to evaluate the potential acidifying performances of starter lactic acid bacteria to be employed in milk transformation. To do this it was firstly investigated the possibility to use the Gompertz equation to describe the data coming from the impedance curve obtained by mean of BacTrac 4300®. Lag time (λ), maximum specific M% rate (μmax), and maximum value of M% (Yend) have been calculated and, given the similarity of the impedance fitted curve to the bacterial growth curve, their meaning has been interpreted. Potential acidifying performances of eighty strains belonging to Lactobacillus helveticus, Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, Lactococcus lactis, and Streptococcus thermophilus species have been evaluated by using the kinetics parameters, obtained from Excel add-in DMFit version 2.1. The novelty and importance of our findings, obtained by means of BacTrac 4300®, is that they can also be applied to data obtained from other devices. Moreover, the meaning of λ, μmax, and Yend that we have extrapolated from Modified Gompertz equation and discussed for lactic acid bacteria in milk, can be exploited also to other food environment or other bacteria, assuming that they can give a curve and that curve is properly fitted with Gompertz equation. PMID:27799925

  2. Use of Lactobacillus plantarum LPCO10, a Bacteriocin Producer, as a Starter Culture in Spanish-Style Green Olive Fermentations

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Barba, J. L.; Cathcart, D. P.; Warner, P. J.; Jiménez-Díaz, R.

    1994-01-01

    Bacteriocin-producing Lactobacillus plantarum LPCO10 and its non-bacteriocin-producing, bacteriocinimmune derivative, L. plantarum 55-1, were evaluated separately for growth and persistence in natural Spanish-style green olive fermentations. Both strains were genetically marked and selectively enumerated using antibiotic-containing media. Plasmid profile and bacteriocin production (bac+) were used as additional markers. When olive brines were inoculated at 105 CFU/ml, the parent strain, LPCO10, proliferated to dominate the epiphytic microflora, sharing high population levels with other spontaneously occurring lactobacilli and persisting throughout the fermentation (12 weeks). In contrast, the derivative strain could not be isolated after 7 weeks. Stability of both plasmid profile and bac+ (LPCO10 strain) or bac- (55-1 strain) phenotype was shown by L. plantarum LPCO10 and L. plantarum 55-1 isolated throughout the fermentation. Bacteriocin activity could be found in the L. plantarum LPCO10-inoculated brines only after ammonium sulfate precipitation and concentration (20 times) of the final brine. Spontaneously occurring lactobacilli and lactic coccus populations, which were isolated from each of the fermenting brines studied during this investigation, were shown to be sensitive to the bacteriocins produced by L. plantarum LPCO10 when tested by the drop diffusion test. The declines in both pH and glucose levels throughout the fermentative process were similar in L. plantarum LPCO10- and in L. plantarum 55-1-inoculated brines and were comparable to the declines in the uninoculated brines. However, the final concentration of lactic acid in L. plantarum LPCO10-inoculated brines was higher than in the L. plantarum 55-1-inoculated brines and uninoculated brines. These results indicated that L. plantarum LPCO10 may be useful as a starter culture to control the lactic acid fermentation of Spanish-style green olives. PMID:16349291

  3. Inoculated fermentation of green olives with potential probiotic Lactobacillus pentosus and Lactobacillus plantarum starter cultures isolated from industrially fermented olives.

    PubMed

    Blana, Vasiliki A; Grounta, Athena; Tassou, Chrysoula C; Nychas, George-John E; Panagou, Efstathios Z

    2014-04-01

    The performance of two strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB), namely Lactobacillus pentosus B281 and Lactobacillus plantarum B282, previously isolated from industrially fermented table olives and screened in vitro for probiotic potential, was investigated as starter cultures in Spanish style fermentation of cv. Halkidiki green olives. Fermentation was undertaken at room temperature in two different initial salt concentrations (8% and 10%, w/v, NaCl) in the brines. The strains were inoculated as single and combined cultures and the dynamics of their population on the surface of olives was monitored for a period of 114 days. The survival of inoculated strains on olives was determined using Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE). Both probiotic strains successfully colonized the olive surface at populations ranged from 6.0 to 7.0 log CFU/g throughout fermentation. PFGE analysis revealed that L. pentosus B281 presented higher colonization in both salt levels at the end of fermentation (81.2% and 93.3% in 8% and 10% NaCl brines, respectively). For L. plantarum B282 a high survival rate (83.3%) was observed in 8% NaCl brines, but in 10% NaCl the strain could not colonize the surface of olives. L. pentosus B281 also dominated over L. plantarum B282 in inoculated fermentations when the two strains were used as combined culture. The biochemical profile (pH, organic acids, volatile compounds) attained during fermentation and the sensory analysis of the final product indicated a typical lactic acid fermentation process of green olives.

  4. Time-dependent correlation of the microbial community and the metabolomics of traditional barley nuruk starter fermentation.

    PubMed

    Ponnusamy, Kannan; Lee, Sarah; Lee, Choong Hwan

    2013-01-01

    The microbial community and the metabolites of barley nuruk were studied to determine the time-dependent correlation between the fermentation of microbes and metabolites. Samples were analyzed by a polyphasic approach based on culture-dependent, culture-independent (PCR-DGGE and qPCR analysis), and metabolite analysis using GC-MS. Barley nuruk consists of varying amounts of bacteria, yeasts, and molds. The PCR-DGGE results showed that only one phylotype, Aspergillus oryzae, was predominant throughout fermentation, reaching a maximum on day 9. The bacterial load was higher on day 6 of fermentation, and then gradually decreased because of increased fungal activity. The shift in fungal and bacterial diversity observed by DGGE was further confirmed by qPCR analysis. In addition, microbes closely related to Pantoea agglomerans and Saccharomycopsis fibuligera appeared to play key roles in the fermentation of barley nuruk. GC-MS analysis combined with multivariate analysis, including PCA, PLS-DA, and OPLS-DA, showed fermentation time-dependent metabolite patterns. A total of 21 metabolites, including organic acids, amino acids, sugars, and sugar alcohols, were identified. In particular, glycerol, malic acid, fructose, glucose, sucrose, and maltose were produced at the early fermentation stages (0-6 d), whereas glutamine, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, mannitol, and xylitol were produced during the latter stages of fermentation (9-18 d). Mixed culture fermentation was found throughout the natural fermentation of barley nuruk starter. Most likely, A. oryzae had a major role in saccharification, along with other mixed cultures.

  5. Impact of NaCl reduction in Danish semi-hard Samsoe cheeses on proliferation and autolysis of DL-starter cultures.

    PubMed

    Søndergaard, Lise; Ryssel, Mia; Svendsen, Carina; Høier, Erik; Andersen, Ulf; Hammershøj, Marianne; Møller, Jean R; Arneborg, Nils; Jespersen, Lene

    2015-11-20

    Reduction of sodium chloride (NaCl) in cheese manufacturing is a challenge for the dairy industry. NaCl has a profound role on microbial development influencing cheese sensory and technological properties. The purpose of this work was to investigate how proliferation, distribution and autolysis of two commercial DL-starter cultures (C1 and C2) used in the production of Danish semi-hard Samsoe cheeses were affected by reduced NaCl levels. Cheeses containing <0.3% (unsalted), 2.3% (reduced-salt) and 3.4% (normal-salted) (w/v) NaCl in moisture were produced and analyzed during 12 weeks of ripening. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB), distribution of bacteria as single cells or microcolonies, their viability in the cheeses and cell autolysis were monitored during ripening, as well as the impact of NaCl content and autolysis on the formation of free amino acids (FAA). Reduction of NaCl resulted in higher LAB counts at the early stages of ripening, with differences between the two DL-starter cultures. The unsalted cheeses produced with C1 had retained a significantly higher number of the initial LAB counts (cfu/g) after 1 and 2 weeks of ripening (i.e. 58% and 71%), compared to the normal-salted cheeses (i.e. 22% and 21%), whereas no significant difference was found between the reduced-salt (i.e. 31% and 35%) and normal-salted cheeses. At the later stages of ripening (i.e. 7 and 11 weeks) NaCl had no significant influence. For cheeses produced with C2, a significant influence of NaCl was only found in cheeses ripened for 7 weeks, where the unsalted and reduced-salt cheeses had retained a significantly higher number of the initial LAB counts (cfu/g) (i.e. 39% and 38%), compared to the normal-salted cheeses (i.e. 21%). In the Samsoe cheeses, bacteria were organized as single cells, in groups of 2-3 cells or in groups of ≥4 cells. During ripening the decrease in the number of viable bacteria was mainly due to a reduction in the number of viable bacteria organized in groups of ≥4

  6. Bacteriocin production by strain Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus BB18 during continuous prefermentation of yogurt starter culture and subsequent batch coagulation of milk.

    PubMed

    Simova, E D; Beshkova, D M; Angelov, M P; Dimitrov, Zh P

    2008-06-01

    By screening for bacteriocin-producing lactic acid bacteria of 1,428 strains isolated from authentic Bulgarian dairy products, Lb. bulgaricus BB18 strain obtained from kefir grain was selected. Out of 11 yogurt starters containing Lb. bulgaricus BB18 and S. thermophilus strains resistant to bacteriocin secreted by Lb. bulgaricus BB18 a yogurt culture (S. thermophilus 11A+Lb. bulgaricus BB18) with high growth and bacteriocinogenic activity in milk was selected. Continuous (pH-stat 5.7) prefermentation processes were carried out in milk at 37 degrees C in a 2l MBR bioreactor (MBR AG, Zurich, Switzerland) with an IMCS controller for agitation speed, temperature, dissolved oxygen, CO2 and pH. Prefermented milk with pH 5.7 coagulated in a thermostat at 37 degrees C until pH 4.8-4.9. S. thermophilus 11A and Lb. bulgaricus BB18 grew independently in a continuous mode at similar and sufficiently high-dilution rates (D=1.83 h(-1)-S. thermophilus 11A; D=1.80 h(-1)-Lb. bulgaricus BB18). The yogurt cultures developed in a stream at a high-dilution rate (D=2.03-2.28 h(-1)). The progress of both processes (growth and bacteriocin production) depended on the initial ratio between the two microorganisms. The continuous prefermentation process promoted conditions for efficient fermentation and bacteriocinogenesis of the starter culture during the batch process: strong reduction of the times for bacteriocin production and coagulation of milk (to 4.5-5.0 h); high cell productivity (lactobacilli-4x10(12) CFU ml(-1), streptococci-6x10(12) CFU ml(-1)); high productivity of bacteriocins (4,500 BU ml(-1))-1.7 times higher than the bacteriocinogenic activity of the batch starter culture.

  7. Comparative inhibitory effects of Thymus vulgaris L. essential oil against Staphylococcus aureus, Listeria monocytogenes and mesophilic starter co-culture in cheese-mimicking models.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, Rayssa Julliane; de Souza, Geanny Targino; Honório, Vanessa Gonçalves; de Sousa, Jossana Pereira; da Conceição, Maria Lúcia; Maganani, Marciane; de Souza, Evandro Leite

    2015-12-01

    In the present study, we assessed the effects of Thymus vulgaris L. essential oil (TVEO) on Staphylococcus aureus and Listeria monocytogenes, pathogenic bacteria frequently associated with fresh or low-ripened cheeses (e.g., Brazilian coalho cheese), and on a starter co-culture comprising Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis and L. lactis subsp. cremoris, which are commonly used for the production of different cheeses. To measure these effects, we determined the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and assessed bacterial cell viability over time in (coalho) cheese-based broth and in a semi-solid (coalho) cheese model at 10 °C. The MIC for TVEO was 2.5 μL/mL against S. aureus and L. monocytogenes, while the MIC was 1.25 μL/mL against the starter co-culture. The TVEO (5 and 2.5 μL/mL) sharply reduced the viable counts of all assayed bacteria in cheese broth over 24 h; although, at 5 μL/mL, TVEO more severely affected the viability of the starter co-culture compared with pathogenic bacteria. The addition of 1.25 μL/g of TVEO in the semi-solid cheese model did not reduce the viable counts of all assayed bacteria. At 2.5 μL/g, TVEO slightly decreased the viable counts of S. aureus, L. monocytogenes and Lactococcus spp. in the semi-solid cheese model over 72 h. The final counts of Lactococcus spp. in a semi-solid cheese model containing 2.5 μL/mL TVEO were lower than those of pathogenic bacteria under the same conditions. These results suggest that the doses of TVEO used to control pathogenic bacteria in fermented dairy products, especially in low-ripened cheeses, should be cautiously considered for potential negative effects on the growth and survival of starter cultures.

  8. Comparative inhibitory effects of Thymus vulgaris L. essential oil against Staphylococcus aureus, Listeria monocytogenes and mesophilic starter co-culture in cheese-mimicking models.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, Rayssa Julliane; de Souza, Geanny Targino; Honório, Vanessa Gonçalves; de Sousa, Jossana Pereira; da Conceição, Maria Lúcia; Maganani, Marciane; de Souza, Evandro Leite

    2015-12-01

    In the present study, we assessed the effects of Thymus vulgaris L. essential oil (TVEO) on Staphylococcus aureus and Listeria monocytogenes, pathogenic bacteria frequently associated with fresh or low-ripened cheeses (e.g., Brazilian coalho cheese), and on a starter co-culture comprising Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis and L. lactis subsp. cremoris, which are commonly used for the production of different cheeses. To measure these effects, we determined the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and assessed bacterial cell viability over time in (coalho) cheese-based broth and in a semi-solid (coalho) cheese model at 10 °C. The MIC for TVEO was 2.5 μL/mL against S. aureus and L. monocytogenes, while the MIC was 1.25 μL/mL against the starter co-culture. The TVEO (5 and 2.5 μL/mL) sharply reduced the viable counts of all assayed bacteria in cheese broth over 24 h; although, at 5 μL/mL, TVEO more severely affected the viability of the starter co-culture compared with pathogenic bacteria. The addition of 1.25 μL/g of TVEO in the semi-solid cheese model did not reduce the viable counts of all assayed bacteria. At 2.5 μL/g, TVEO slightly decreased the viable counts of S. aureus, L. monocytogenes and Lactococcus spp. in the semi-solid cheese model over 72 h. The final counts of Lactococcus spp. in a semi-solid cheese model containing 2.5 μL/mL TVEO were lower than those of pathogenic bacteria under the same conditions. These results suggest that the doses of TVEO used to control pathogenic bacteria in fermented dairy products, especially in low-ripened cheeses, should be cautiously considered for potential negative effects on the growth and survival of starter cultures. PMID:26338117

  9. Effect of long-term impact-loading on mass, size, and estimated strength of humerus and radius of female racquet-sports players: a peripheral quantitative computed tomography study between young and old starters and controls.

    PubMed

    Kontulainen, Saija; Sievänen, Harri; Kannus, Pekka; Pasanen, Matti; Vuori, Ilkka

    2003-02-01

    Bone characteristics of the humeral shaft and distal radius were measured from 64 female tennis and squash players and their 27 age-, height-, and weight-matched controls with peripheral quantitative tomography (pQCT) and dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). The players were divided into two groups according to the starting age of their tennis or squash training (either before or after menarche) to examine the possible differences in the loading-induced changes in bone structure and volumetric density. The following pQCT variables were used: bone mineral content, total cross-sectional area of bone (TotA), cross-sectional area of the marrow cavity (CavA) and that of the cortical bone (CoA), cortical wall thickness (CWT), volumetric density of the cortical bone (CoD) and trabecular bone (TrD), and torsional bone strength index for the shaft (BSIt) and compressional bone strength index for the bone end (BSIc). These bone strength indices were compared with the DXA-derived areal bone mineral density (aBMD) to assess how well the latter represents the effect of mechanical loading on apparent bone strength. At the humeral shaft, the loaded arm's greater bone mineral content (an average 19% side-to-side difference in young starters and 9% in old starters), was caused by an enlarged cortex (CoA; side-to-side differences 20% and 9%, respectively). The loaded humerus seemed to have grown periosteally (the CavA did not differ between the sites), leading to 26% and 11% side-to-side BSIt differences in the young and old starters, respectively. CoD was equal between the arms (-1% difference in both player groups). The side-to-side differences in the young starters' bone mineral content, CoA, TotA, CWT, and BSIt were 8-22% higher than those of the controls and 8-14% higher than those of the old starters. Old starters' bone mineral content, CoA, and BSIt side-to-side differences were 6-7% greater than those in the controls. The DXA-derived side-to-side aBMD difference was 7

  10. Effect of long-term impact-loading on mass, size, and estimated strength of humerus and radius of female racquet-sports players: a peripheral quantitative computed tomography study between young and old starters and controls.

    PubMed

    Kontulainen, Saija; Sievänen, Harri; Kannus, Pekka; Pasanen, Matti; Vuori, Ilkka

    2002-12-01

    Bone characteristics of the humeral shaft and distal radius were measured from 64 female tennis and squash players and their 27 age-, height-, and weight-matched controls with peripheral quantitative tomography (pQCT) and DXA. The players were divided into two groups according to the starting age of their tennis or squash training (either before or after menarche) to examine the possible differences in the loading-induced changes in bone structure and volumetric density. The used pQCT variables were bone mineral content (BMC), total cross-sectional area (TotA) of bone, cross-sectional area of the marrow cavity (CavA) and that of the cortical bone (CoA), cortical wall thickness (CWT), volumetric density of the cortical bone (CoD) and trabecular bone (TrD), and torsional bone strength index (BSIt) for the shaft, and compressional bone strength index (BSIc) for the bone end. These bone strength indices were compared with the DXA-derived areal bone mineral density (aBMD) to assess how well the latter represents the effect of mechanical loading on apparent bone strength. At the humeral shaft, the loaded arm's greater BMC (an average 19% side-to-side difference in young starters and 9% in old starters) was caused by an enlarged cortex (CoA; side-to-side differences 20% and 9%, respectively). The loaded humerus seemed to have grown periosteally (the CavA did not differ between the sites) leading to 26% and 11% side-to-side BSIt difference in the young and old starters, respectively. CoD was equal between the arms (-1% difference in both player groups). The side-to-side differences in the young starters' BMC, CoA, TotA, CWT, and BSIt were 8-22% higher than those of the controls and 8-14% higher than those of the old starters. Old starters' BMC, CoA, and BSIt side-to-side differences were 6-7% greater than those in the controls. The DXA-derived side-to-side aBMD difference was 7% greater in young starters compared with that of the old starters and 14% compared with that in

  11. Impact of curd milling on the chemical, functional, and rheological properties of starter-free Queso Fresco.

    PubMed

    Van Hekken, D L; Tunick, M H; Leggett, L N; Tomasula, P M

    2012-10-01

    The manufacture of Queso Fresco (QF), a high-moisture fresh Mexican cheese that is popular in the Americas, varies from country to country, with many manufacturers milling the curd before forming the cheese block to disrupt the protein matrix and ensure the crumbly nature of the QF. Because this traditional milling step does take time and may be an unnecessary point of microbial contamination, this study was undertaken to determine whether the curd-milling step could be omitted without altering the chemical, functional, and textural properties of the QF. Starter culture-free, rennet-set QF was prepared from pasteurized, homogenized milk. Curds were cooked at 39°C for 30 min, wet salted at 1.45 g of NaCl/100 g of milk, chilled, and divided into 4 portions. Curds were not milled or were subjected to coarse, medium, or fine milling and hand-packed into molds. After 12h at 4°C, the cheese was divided, vacuum packaged, and stored at 4°C for up to 8 wk. Fresh QF contained 57.3 ± 1.2% moisture, 20.9±0.8% fat, 16.0 ± 1.3% protein, 2.61 ± 0.15% lactose, and 2.25 ± 0.22% salt and had a pH of 6.36 ± 0.03%. Moisture decreased over the 8 wk of storage, whereas the fat level tended to increase. All cheeses lost 1.3 to 1.7% of their weight in whey during the first week after manufacture, and the weight gradually increased to 2.1% (nonmilled) to 3.2% (milled) by wk 8. Milling did result in QF that were softer, less chewy, and less rigid and with lower viscoelastic properties than nonmilled cheeses. Sensory panelists differentiate the finely milled QF from the other treatments, but they detected no significant differences among the nonmilled, coarsely milled, and medium-milled QF. Milling of the curd did not affect the ability of Listeria monocytogenes to grow on the cheese surface. Results from this study indicate that the milling step, which lengthens the manufacturing time, does increase wheying off during storage and results in a more fragile protein matrix. Cheese

  12. Molecular identification of yeast species associated with 'Hamei'--a traditional starter used for rice wine production in Manipur, India.

    PubMed

    Jeyaram, K; Singh, W Mohendro; Capece, Angela; Romano, Patrizia

    2008-05-31

    In Manipur state of North-Eastern India, wine from glutinous rice using traditional solid state starter called 'Hamei' is particularly interesting because of its unique flavour. A total of 163 yeast isolates were obtained from fifty four 'Hamei' samples collected from household rice wine preparations in tribal villages of Manipur. Molecular identification of yeast species was carried out by analysis of the restriction digestion pattern generated from PCR amplified internal transcribed spacer region along with 5.8S rRNA gene (ITS1-5.8S-ITS2). Seventeen different restriction profiles were obtained from the size of PCR products and the restriction analysis with three endonucleases (Hae III, Cfo I and Hinf I). Nine groups were identified as S. cerevisiae, Pichia anomala, Trichosporon sp., Candida tropicalis, Pichia guilliermondi, Candida parapsilosis, Torulaspora delbrueckii, Pichia fabianii and Candida montana by comparing this ITS-RFLP profile with type strains of common wine yeasts, published data and insilico analysis of ITS sequence data available in CBS yeast database. ITS-RFLP profile of eight groups was not matching with available database of 288 common wine yeast species. The most frequent yeast species associated with 'Hamei' were S. cerevisiae (32.5%), P. anomala (41.7%) and Trichosporon sp. (8%). The identity of major groups was confirmed by additional restriction digestion of ITS region with Hind III, EcoRI, Dde I and Msp I. The genetic diversity of industrially important S. cerevisiae group was investigated using Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE). Although most of the 53 strains of S. cerevisiae examined were exhibited a common species specific pattern, a distinct degree of chromosomal length polymorphism and variable number of chromosomal DNA fragments were observed with in the species. Cluster analysis showed seven major karyotypes (K1-K7) with more than 83% similarity. The karyotype pattern K1 was the most frequent (67.9%) among the strains from

  13. Extension of Tosèla cheese shelf-life using non-starter lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Settanni, Luca; Franciosi, Elena; Cavazza, Agostino; Cocconcelli, Pier Sandro; Poznanski, Elisa

    2011-08-01

    Six strains of non-starter lactic acid bacteria (NSLAB) were used to extend the shelf-life of the fresh cheese Tosèla manufactured with pasteurised cows' milk. The acidification kinetics of three Lactobacillus paracasei, one Lactobacillus rhamnosus and two Streptococcus macedonicus were studied in synthetic milk medium. Lb. paracasei NdP78 and NdP88 and S. macedonicus NdP1 and PB14-1 showed an interesting acidifying capacity and were further characterised for growth in UHT milk and production of antimicrobial compounds. Lb. paracasei NdP78 and S. macedonicus NdP1 grew more than 2 log cycles in 6 h. Lb. paracasei NdP78 was also found to produce a bacteriocin-like inhibitory substance (BLIS) active against Listeria monocytogenes. The four NSLAB strains (singly or in combination) were used to produce experimental pilot-scale cheeses which were compared by a panel. The cheese manufactured with the mixed culture Lb. paracasei NdP78 - S. macedonicus NdP1 was the most appreciated for its sensory properties. The cheeses produced at factory-scale showed higher concentrations of lactobacilli (7.90 log CFU/g) and streptococci (6.10 log CFU/g), but a lower development of coliforms (3.10 log CFU/g) and staphylococci (2.78 log CFU/g) than control cheese (4.86, 4.89, 4.93 and 5.00 log CFU/g of lactobacilli, streptococci, coliforms and staphylococci, respectively) processed without NSLAB addition. The food pathogens Salmonella spp. and Listeria monocytogenes were never detected. The dominance of the species inoculated was demonstrated by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), whereas strain recognition was evaluated by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD)-PCR. From the results obtained, Lb. paracasei NdP78 and S. macedonicus NdP1 were able to persist during the storage of Tosèla cheese and their combination influenced positively the sensory characteristics and shelf-life of the final product.

  14. Modelling the effect of lactic acid bacteria from starter- and aroma culture on growth of Listeria monocytogenes in cottage cheese.

    PubMed

    Østergaard, Nina Bjerre; Eklöw, Annelie; Dalgaard, Paw

    2014-10-01

    Four mathematical models were developed and validated for simultaneous growth of mesophilic lactic acid bacteria from added cultures and Listeria monocytogenes, during chilled storage of cottage cheese with fresh- or cultured cream dressing. The mathematical models include the effect of temperature, pH, NaCl, lactic- and sorbic acid and the interaction between these environmental factors. Growth models were developed by combining new and existing cardinal parameter values. Subsequently, the reference growth rate parameters (μref at 25°C) were fitted to a total of 52 growth rates from cottage cheese to improve model performance. The inhibiting effect of mesophilic lactic acid bacteria from added cultures on growth of L. monocytogenes was efficiently modelled using the Jameson approach. The new models appropriately predicted the maximum population density of L. monocytogenes in cottage cheese. The developed models were successfully validated by using 25 growth rates for L. monocytogenes, 17 growth rates for lactic acid bacteria and a total of 26 growth curves for simultaneous growth of L. monocytogenes and lactic acid bacteria in cottage cheese. These data were used in combination with bias- and accuracy factors and with the concept of acceptable simulation zone. Evaluation of predicted growth rates of L. monocytogenes in cottage cheese with fresh- or cultured cream dressing resulted in bias-factors (Bf) of 1.07-1.10 with corresponding accuracy factor (Af) values of 1.11 to 1.22. Lactic acid bacteria from added starter culture were on average predicted to grow 16% faster than observed (Bf of 1.16 and Af of 1.32) and growth of the diacetyl producing aroma culture was on average predicted 9% slower than observed (Bf of 0.91 and Af of 1.17). The acceptable simulation zone method showed the new models to successfully predict maximum population density of L. monocytogenes when growing together with lactic acid bacteria in cottage cheese. 11 of 13 simulations of L

  15. Modelling the effect of lactic acid bacteria from starter- and aroma culture on growth of Listeria monocytogenes in cottage cheese.

    PubMed

    Østergaard, Nina Bjerre; Eklöw, Annelie; Dalgaard, Paw

    2014-10-01

    Four mathematical models were developed and validated for simultaneous growth of mesophilic lactic acid bacteria from added cultures and Listeria monocytogenes, during chilled storage of cottage cheese with fresh- or cultured cream dressing. The mathematical models include the effect of temperature, pH, NaCl, lactic- and sorbic acid and the interaction between these environmental factors. Growth models were developed by combining new and existing cardinal parameter values. Subsequently, the reference growth rate parameters (μref at 25°C) were fitted to a total of 52 growth rates from cottage cheese to improve model performance. The inhibiting effect of mesophilic lactic acid bacteria from added cultures on growth of L. monocytogenes was efficiently modelled using the Jameson approach. The new models appropriately predicted the maximum population density of L. monocytogenes in cottage cheese. The developed models were successfully validated by using 25 growth rates for L. monocytogenes, 17 growth rates for lactic acid bacteria and a total of 26 growth curves for simultaneous growth of L. monocytogenes and lactic acid bacteria in cottage cheese. These data were used in combination with bias- and accuracy factors and with the concept of acceptable simulation zone. Evaluation of predicted growth rates of L. monocytogenes in cottage cheese with fresh- or cultured cream dressing resulted in bias-factors (Bf) of 1.07-1.10 with corresponding accuracy factor (Af) values of 1.11 to 1.22. Lactic acid bacteria from added starter culture were on average predicted to grow 16% faster than observed (Bf of 1.16 and Af of 1.32) and growth of the diacetyl producing aroma culture was on average predicted 9% slower than observed (Bf of 0.91 and Af of 1.17). The acceptable simulation zone method showed the new models to successfully predict maximum population density of L. monocytogenes when growing together with lactic acid bacteria in cottage cheese. 11 of 13 simulations of L

  16. Expression of the catalase gene katA in starter culture Lactobacillus plantarum TISTR850 tolerates oxidative stress and reduces lipid oxidation in fermented meat product.

    PubMed

    Noonpakdee, W; Sitthimonchai, S; Panyim, S; Lertsiri, S

    2004-09-01

    The catalase gene katA of Lactobacillus sakei SR911 was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli UM2 and Lactobacillus plantarum TISTR850 under strong lactococcal promoter P59 in E. coli-lactococcus expression vector pIL1020. The L. plantarum TISTR850 is a catalase-deficient strain isolated from local fermented meat product. The recombinant L. plantarum TISTR850 was shown to decompose hydrogen peroxide, and catalase activity approximately three times higher that of natural catalase-producing strain L. sakei SR911. The recombinant protein was also detected by in situ activity staining of the catalase enzyme. The recombinant L. plantarum TISTR850 did not accumulate hydrogen peroxide under glucose-limited aerobic conditions and remained viable after 60 h of incubation. The recombinant and host strain L. plantarum TISTR850 were used as starter cultures in the fermented meat product, and lipid oxidation was monitored over a 7-day storage at 20 degrees C determined as thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) value. The lipid oxidation level in the fermented meat product seeded with the catalase genetically modified starter culture L. plantarum TISTR850 was significantly lower than that of the natural catalase-deficient strain.

  17. Evaluation of Leuconostoc citreum HO12 and Weissella koreensis HO20 isolated from kimchi as a starter culture for whole wheat sourdough.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyejung; Kim, Yeo-Won; Hwang, Inyoung; Kim, Jeongho; Yoon, Sun

    2012-10-15

    Leuconostoc citreum HO12 and Weissella koreensis HO20 isolated from kimchi were evaluated as starter cultures in the making of whole wheat sourdough bread. After 24h of fermentation at 25 °C, both lactobacilli grew to the final cell numbers of ca. 10(9)cfu/g dough, and both doughs had similar pHs and total titratable acidities. In addition, the fermentation quotient of the dough with Lc. citreum HO12 was slightly lower than that of the dough with W. koreensis HO20 (1.6 versus 2.8). Sourdoughs and bread with 50% sourdough produced with the starter cultures exhibited consistent ability to retard the growth of bread spoilage fungi (Penicillium roqueforti and Aspergillus niger) and rope-forming bacterium (Bacillus subtilis). Sourdough breads underwent a significant reduction in bread firming during storage. It seems that both lactobacilli have the potential to improve the shelf-life of wheat bread. The results indicate that the selected lactobacilli have unique fermentation characteristics and produce sourdough breads with overall satisfactory quality.

  18. Effect of diacetyl on controlling Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Typhimurium in the presence of starter culture in a laboratory medium and during meat fermentation.

    PubMed

    Kang, D H; Fung, D Y

    1999-09-01

    Diacetyl is a flavor compound that possesses antimicrobial activity and is found in several dairy products. The effect of diacetyl on controlling the growth of two foodborne pathogens, Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Typhimurium, when grown with Pediococcus acidilactici as a meat starter culture was evaluated in a laboratory medium and during salami fermentation. Diacetyl (50 ppm) added to each mixed culture system strongly inhibited the growth of E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Typhimurium in the laboratory medium (brain heart infusion, 2.3% of NaCl, 0.75% of dextrose) (P < 0.05). During meat fermentation, the growth of E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Typhimurium was inhibited significantly by addition of diacetyl (300 ppm) (P < 0.05) after 24 h fermentation. However, the acid production and growth of P. acidilactici were not affected by the addition of diacetyl (P > 0.05). After 24 h meat fermentation, about a 1.0-log CFU/g difference occurred in numbers of each foodborne pathogen mixed with P. acidilactici (P < 0.05) with and without 300 ppm diacetyl. Diacetyl and the acid produced by the meat starter culture reduced the growth of the two foodborne pathogens during salami fermentation. These results suggest that diacetyl can be used as a food ingredient during meat fermentation to control E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Typhimurium without harmful effects on the growth and acid production of P. acidilactici. PMID:10492469

  19. In-vitro microbial production of conjugated linoleic acid by probiotic L. plantarum strains: Utilization as a functional starter culture in sucuk fermentation.

    PubMed

    Özer, Cem O; Kılıç, Birol; Kılıç, Gülden Başyiğit

    2016-04-01

    Twenty-three probiotic Lactobacillus plantarum strains were screened in-vitro to determine their ability to produce conjugated linoleic acid (CLA). L. plantarum AA1-2 and L. plantarum AB20-961 were identified as potential strains for CLA production. Optimum conditions for these strains to produce high levels of CLA were determined by evaluating the amount of added hydrolyzed sunflower oil (HSO) and initial pH levels in a nutrient medium. The highest CLA production was obtained in medium with pH6.0 and 2% HSO (P<0.05). Those strains were then used as starter culture in sucuk fermentation. Five sucuk treatments included a control (no starter culture), two sucuk groups with L. plantarum AA1-2 at the initial pH of 5.8 or 6.0 and two sucuk groups with L. plantarum AB20-961 at the initial pH of 5.8 or 6.0. Results indicate that L. plantarum AB20-961 produced higher amount of CLA in sucuk at initial pH of 5.8 and 6.0 levels during first 24h of fermentation compared with other groups. CLA isomer concentration decreased in all sucuk groups during the rest of the fermentation period (P<0.05) and remained quite stable during the storage. This study demonstrated that probiotic L. plantarum AB20-961 can be used in sucuk manufacturing without posing any quality problems.

  20. Evaluation of Leuconostoc citreum HO12 and Weissella koreensis HO20 isolated from kimchi as a starter culture for whole wheat sourdough.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyejung; Kim, Yeo-Won; Hwang, Inyoung; Kim, Jeongho; Yoon, Sun

    2012-10-15

    Leuconostoc citreum HO12 and Weissella koreensis HO20 isolated from kimchi were evaluated as starter cultures in the making of whole wheat sourdough bread. After 24h of fermentation at 25 °C, both lactobacilli grew to the final cell numbers of ca. 10(9)cfu/g dough, and both doughs had similar pHs and total titratable acidities. In addition, the fermentation quotient of the dough with Lc. citreum HO12 was slightly lower than that of the dough with W. koreensis HO20 (1.6 versus 2.8). Sourdoughs and bread with 50% sourdough produced with the starter cultures exhibited consistent ability to retard the growth of bread spoilage fungi (Penicillium roqueforti and Aspergillus niger) and rope-forming bacterium (Bacillus subtilis). Sourdough breads underwent a significant reduction in bread firming during storage. It seems that both lactobacilli have the potential to improve the shelf-life of wheat bread. The results indicate that the selected lactobacilli have unique fermentation characteristics and produce sourdough breads with overall satisfactory quality. PMID:23442676

  1. Novel starters for old processes: use of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains isolated from artisanal sourdough for craft beer production at a brewery scale.

    PubMed

    Marongiu, Antonella; Zara, Giacomo; Legras, Jean-Luc; Del Caro, Alessandra; Mascia, Ilaria; Fadda, Costantino; Budroni, Marilena

    2015-01-01

    The deliberate inoculation of yeast strains isolated from food matrices such as wine or bread, could allow the transfer of novel properties to beer. In this work, the feasibility of the use of baker's yeast strains as starters for craft beer production has been evaluated at laboratory and brewery scale. Nine out of 12 Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains isolated from artisanal sourdoughs metabolized 2 % maltose, glucose and trehalose and showed growth rates and cell populations higher than those of the brewer's strain Safbrew-S33. Analysis of allelic variation at 12 microsatellite loci clustered seven baker's strains and Safbrew-S33 in the main group of bread isolates. Chemical analyses of beers produced at a brewery scale showed significant differences among the beers produced with the baker's strain S38 or Safbrew-S33, while no significant differences were observed when S38 or the brewer's strain Safbrew-F2 was used for re-fermentation. The sensory profile of beers obtained with S38 or the brewer's yeasts did not show significant differences, thus suggesting that baker's strains of S. cerevisiae could represent a reservoir of biodiversity for the selection of starter strains for craft beer production. PMID:25387611

  2. Novel starters for old processes: use of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains isolated from artisanal sourdough for craft beer production at a brewery scale.

    PubMed

    Marongiu, Antonella; Zara, Giacomo; Legras, Jean-Luc; Del Caro, Alessandra; Mascia, Ilaria; Fadda, Costantino; Budroni, Marilena

    2015-01-01

    The deliberate inoculation of yeast strains isolated from food matrices such as wine or bread, could allow the transfer of novel properties to beer. In this work, the feasibility of the use of baker's yeast strains as starters for craft beer production has been evaluated at laboratory and brewery scale. Nine out of 12 Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains isolated from artisanal sourdoughs metabolized 2 % maltose, glucose and trehalose and showed growth rates and cell populations higher than those of the brewer's strain Safbrew-S33. Analysis of allelic variation at 12 microsatellite loci clustered seven baker's strains and Safbrew-S33 in the main group of bread isolates. Chemical analyses of beers produced at a brewery scale showed significant differences among the beers produced with the baker's strain S38 or Safbrew-S33, while no significant differences were observed when S38 or the brewer's strain Safbrew-F2 was used for re-fermentation. The sensory profile of beers obtained with S38 or the brewer's yeasts did not show significant differences, thus suggesting that baker's strains of S. cerevisiae could represent a reservoir of biodiversity for the selection of starter strains for craft beer production.

  3. Effect of L- or DL-methionine Supplementation on Nitrogen Retention, Serum Amino Acid Concentrations and Blood Metabolites Profile in Starter Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Q. Y.; Zeng, Z. K.; Zhang, Y. X.; Long, S. F.; Piao, X. S.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the current study was to evaluate the effect of supplementation of either L-methionine (L-Met) or DL-methionine (DL-Met) to diets of starter pigs on nitrogen (N) balance, metabolism, and serum amino acid profile. Eighteen crossbred (Duroc×Landrace×Yorkshire) barrows weighing 15.45±0.88 kg were randomly allotted to 1 of 3 diets with 6 pigs per treatment. The diets included a basal diet (Met-deficient diet) containing 0.24% standardized ileal digestibility Met with all other essential nutrients meeting the pig’s requirements. The other two diets were produced by supplementing the basal diet with 0.12% DL-Met or L-Met. The experiment lasted for 18 days, consisting of a 13-day adaptation period to the diets followed by a 5-day experimental period. Pigs were fed ad libitum and free access to water throughout the experiment. Results showed that the supplementation of either L-Met or DL-Met improved N retention, and serum methionine concentration, and decreased N excretion compared with basal diet (p<0.01). The N retention of pigs fed diets supplemented with the same inclusion levels of DL-Met or L-Met were not different (p>0.05). In conclusion, on equimolar basis DL-Met and L-Met are equally bioavailable as Met sources for starter pigs. PMID:26954214

  4. Proteolytic and ACE-inhibitory activities of probiotic yogurt containing non-viable bacteria as affected by different levels of fat, inulin and starter culture.

    PubMed

    Shakerian, Mansour; Razavi, Seyed Hadi; Ziai, Seyed Ali; Khodaiyan, Faramarz; Yarmand, Mohammad Saeid; Moayedi, Ali

    2015-04-01

    In this study, the effects of fat (0.5 %, 3.2 % and 5.0 %), inulin (0.0 and 1.0 %) and starter culture (0.0 %, 0.5 %, 1.0 % and 1.5 %) on the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitory activity of probiotic yogurt containing non-viable bacteria were assessed. Proteolytic activities of bacteria were also investigated. Yogurts were prepared either using a sole yogurt commercial culture including Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus delbrueckii subs. bulgaricus or bifidobacterium animalis BB-12 and Lactobacillus acidophilus La5 in addition to yogurt culture. Relative degrees of proteolysis were found to be considerably higher in yogurt samples than UHT milk as the control. Both regular and probiotic yogurts showed considerable ACE-inhibitory activities. Results showed that degree of proteolysis was not influenced by different fat contents, while was increased by high concentration of starter culture (1.5 % w/w) and reduced by inulin (1 % w/w). ACE-inhibitory activities of yogurt were also negatively affected by the presence of inulin and high levels of fat (5 % w/w). Moreover, yogurt containing probiotic bacteria showed higher inhibitory against ACE in comparison to the yogurt prepared with non-probiotic strains.

  5. Concerning Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wadlinger, Robert L.

    1983-01-01

    SI units come in two distinct types: fundamental (kilogram, meter) and descriptive (atom, molecule). Proper/improper uses of atom/molecule from historical cases are presented followed by a re-introduction of a light "wave (cycle)" unit and the clearly defined photon model which is deduced. Also examines omission of the fundamental unit "radon."…

  6. Validation of a calf-side β-hydroxybutyrate test and its utility for estimation of starter intake in dairy calves around weaning.

    PubMed

    Deelen, S M; Leslie, K E; Steele, M A; Eckert, E; Brown, H E; DeVries, T J

    2016-09-01

    Recent research suggests that circulating β-hydroxybutyrate (BHB) levels may be a meaningful indicator of grain intake and rumen development in pre-ruminant calves. As such, BHB levels may be a surrogate measure of rumen function to contribute to minimal weaning stress during the transition from liquid to solid feed. The primary objective of this study was to determine the optimal cut-point of circulating BHB levels that would be predictive of sufficient grain intake and rumen development for a successful transition from liquid to solid feed at the time of weaning. An additional objective was to validate the Precision Xtra (Abbott Diabetes Care, Abingdon, UK) calf-side test for determination of BHB in whole blood in calves around weaning, as compared with the gold standard laboratory method. A total of 20 Holstein female calves were randomly assigned at birth to be weaned at 6 wk (n=10) or 8 wk (n=10) of age. Milk replacer (mixed at 150 g/L) was offered at 1.2kg/calf per d in 2 meals until a 1-wk step down, when milk meals were reduced by 50% 1 wk before weaning. Daily measurements included the intakes of starter grain, chopped straw, and water. Weekly measurements included body weight and blood BHB, until 70 d of life. To assess digestive tract development, rumen fluid samples were taken before and after weaning (d 35, 49, and 63) and analyzed for ruminal short-chain fatty acids. Whole blood was collected by jugular venipuncture, and BHB was determined by the Precision Xtra test at calf-side. In addition, serum was separated from a clotted sample, frozen, and stored until laboratory analysis was performed. Laboratory BHB results were correlated with both the Precision Xtra test (r=0.95) and starter intake over 1 d (r=0.89), a 3-d average (r=0.90), and a 7-d average (r=0.90). Additionally, laboratory BHB results were associated with total ruminal volatile fatty acids (r=0.82), ruminal butyrate (r=0.77), and body weight (r=0.69). A receiver operating characteristic

  7. Validation of a calf-side β-hydroxybutyrate test and its utility for estimation of starter intake in dairy calves around weaning.

    PubMed

    Deelen, S M; Leslie, K E; Steele, M A; Eckert, E; Brown, H E; DeVries, T J

    2016-09-01

    Recent research suggests that circulating β-hydroxybutyrate (BHB) levels may be a meaningful indicator of grain intake and rumen development in pre-ruminant calves. As such, BHB levels may be a surrogate measure of rumen function to contribute to minimal weaning stress during the transition from liquid to solid feed. The primary objective of this study was to determine the optimal cut-point of circulating BHB levels that would be predictive of sufficient grain intake and rumen development for a successful transition from liquid to solid feed at the time of weaning. An additional objective was to validate the Precision Xtra (Abbott Diabetes Care, Abingdon, UK) calf-side test for determination of BHB in whole blood in calves around weaning, as compared with the gold standard laboratory method. A total of 20 Holstein female calves were randomly assigned at birth to be weaned at 6 wk (n=10) or 8 wk (n=10) of age. Milk replacer (mixed at 150 g/L) was offered at 1.2kg/calf per d in 2 meals until a 1-wk step down, when milk meals were reduced by 50% 1 wk before weaning. Daily measurements included the intakes of starter grain, chopped straw, and water. Weekly measurements included body weight and blood BHB, until 70 d of life. To assess digestive tract development, rumen fluid samples were taken before and after weaning (d 35, 49, and 63) and analyzed for ruminal short-chain fatty acids. Whole blood was collected by jugular venipuncture, and BHB was determined by the Precision Xtra test at calf-side. In addition, serum was separated from a clotted sample, frozen, and stored until laboratory analysis was performed. Laboratory BHB results were correlated with both the Precision Xtra test (r=0.95) and starter intake over 1 d (r=0.89), a 3-d average (r=0.90), and a 7-d average (r=0.90). Additionally, laboratory BHB results were associated with total ruminal volatile fatty acids (r=0.82), ruminal butyrate (r=0.77), and body weight (r=0.69). A receiver operating characteristic

  8. Charter Starters Training Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northwest Regional Educational Lab., Portland, OR.

    This guide is intended to assist the trainer in planning and conducting leadership training for charter-school founders and operators. There are five core content areas for leadership development: Start-Up Logistics, Regulatory Issues, Assessment and Accountability, Governance and Management, and Community Relations. Suggestions and activities for…

  9. DC arc weld starter

    DOEpatents

    Campiotti, Richard H.; Hopwood, James E.

    1990-01-01

    A system for starting an arc for welding uses three DC power supplies, a high voltage supply for initiating the arc, an intermediate voltage supply for sustaining the arc, and a low voltage welding supply directly connected across the gap after the high voltage supply is disconnected.

  10. The ESL Starter Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virginia Commonwealth Univ., Richmond. Virginia Adult Education and Literacy Resource Center.

    The kit is intended for teachers beginning to teach English as a Second Language (ESL). The first part offers some ideas for testing, registering, and placing students according to their needs and goals. A sample registration form, placement test, list of commercially-available tests, and sample needs assessments are included here. The second…

  11. Lactic acid microbiota identification in water, raw milk, endogenous starter culture, and fresh Minas artisanal cheese from the Campo das Vertentes region of Brazil during the dry and rainy seasons.

    PubMed

    Castro, R D; Oliveira, L G; Sant'Anna, F M; Luiz, L M P; Sandes, S H C; Silva, C I F; Silva, A M; Nunes, A C; Penna, C F A M; Souza, M R

    2016-08-01

    Minas artisanal cheese, produced in the Campo das Vertentes region of Brazil, is made from raw milk and endogenous starter cultures. Although this cheese is of great historical and socioeconomic importance, little information is available about its microbiological and physical-chemical qualities, or about its beneficial microbiota. This work was aimed at evaluating the qualities of the cheese and the components used for its production, comparing samples collected during the dry and rainy seasons. We also conducted molecular identification and isolated 50 samples of lactic acid bacteria from cheese (n=21), water (n=3), raw milk (n=9), and endogenous starter culture (n=17). The microbiological quality of the cheese, water, raw milk, and endogenous starter culture was lower during the rainy period, given the higher counts of coagulase-positive Staphylococcus and total and thermotolerant coliforms. Enterococcus faecalis was the lactic acid bacteria isolated most frequently (42.86%) in cheese samples, followed by Lactococcus lactis (28.57%) and Lactobacillus plantarum (14.29%). Lactobacillus brevis (5.88%), Enterococcus pseudoavium (5.88%), Enterococcus durans (5.88%), and Aerococcus viridans (5.88%) were isolated from endogenous starter cultures and are described for the first time in the literature. The lactic acid bacteria identified in the analyzed cheeses may inhibit undesirable microbiota and contribute to the safety and flavor of the cheese, but this needs to be evaluated in future research.

  12. Lactic acid microbiota identification in water, raw milk, endogenous starter culture, and fresh Minas artisanal cheese from the Campo das Vertentes region of Brazil during the dry and rainy seasons.

    PubMed

    Castro, R D; Oliveira, L G; Sant'Anna, F M; Luiz, L M P; Sandes, S H C; Silva, C I F; Silva, A M; Nunes, A C; Penna, C F A M; Souza, M R

    2016-08-01

    Minas artisanal cheese, produced in the Campo das Vertentes region of Brazil, is made from raw milk and endogenous starter cultures. Although this cheese is of great historical and socioeconomic importance, little information is available about its microbiological and physical-chemical qualities, or about its beneficial microbiota. This work was aimed at evaluating the qualities of the cheese and the components used for its production, comparing samples collected during the dry and rainy seasons. We also conducted molecular identification and isolated 50 samples of lactic acid bacteria from cheese (n=21), water (n=3), raw milk (n=9), and endogenous starter culture (n=17). The microbiological quality of the cheese, water, raw milk, and endogenous starter culture was lower during the rainy period, given the higher counts of coagulase-positive Staphylococcus and total and thermotolerant coliforms. Enterococcus faecalis was the lactic acid bacteria isolated most frequently (42.86%) in cheese samples, followed by Lactococcus lactis (28.57%) and Lactobacillus plantarum (14.29%). Lactobacillus brevis (5.88%), Enterococcus pseudoavium (5.88%), Enterococcus durans (5.88%), and Aerococcus viridans (5.88%) were isolated from endogenous starter cultures and are described for the first time in the literature. The lactic acid bacteria identified in the analyzed cheeses may inhibit undesirable microbiota and contribute to the safety and flavor of the cheese, but this needs to be evaluated in future research. PMID:27289151

  13. Microbiological characterization of traditional dough fermentation starter (Jiaozi) for steamed bread making by culture-dependent and culture-independent methods.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhijian; Li, Haifeng; Bian, Ke

    2016-10-01

    In this study, the microbial composition of two types of Jiaozi (a dough fermentation starter in making steamed bread) was investigated using both culture-dependent and culture-independent (PCR-DGGE) methods. The numbers of the cultivable bacteria on MRS at 30°C and yeast on YPD at 28°C in the maize flour Jiaozi (MFJ) were 9.21±0.16 Log CFU/g and 9.18±0.05 Log CFU/g, respectively, which were higher than that in the rice flour Jiaozi (RFJ) (P<0.05). A total of 140 bacteria and 124 yeasts were isolated and identified on the basis of the sequences of their 16S rRNA gene and ITS region. The culture-dependent method showed that Acetobacter tropicalis and Enterococcus durans were the predominant bacteria strains in MFJ, and accounted for 45.7% and 25.7% of the bacteria, and Lactobacillus plantarum and Pediococcus pentosaceus represented 12.8% and 8.6%. In the RFJ sample, the most prominent isolate was P. pentosaceus (38.6%), followed by L. plantarum (24.3%), A. tropicalis (22.8%), and E. durans (5.7%). P. pentosaceus and L. plantarum were also detected in both starters by PCR-DGGE, while some bacteria species such as A. tropicalis and E. durans, recovered as pure cultures, were not detected by direct PCR-DGGE. On the other hand, Lactobacillus brevis, Weissella sp. and Lactobacillus alimentarius detected by PCR-DGGE were not recovered in any of the media and conditions used. In the MFJ sample, the isolated main yeast species were identified as Wickerhamomyces anomalus (67.2%), Saccharomyces cerevisiae (27.9%) and Torulaspora delbrueckii (4.9%). In addition to S. cerevisiae (42.9%), W. anomalus (27.0%) and T. delbrueckii (7.9%), Saccharomycopsis fibuligera was also identified as the predominant isolate in RFJ samples and accounted for 22.2%. PCR-DGGE also indicated the presence of W. anomalus and S. cerevisiae in both MFJ and RFJ starters and S. fibuligera was also detected in RFJ, but T. delbrueckii was not detected in both samples. PMID:27351835

  14. Unit Cells

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olsen, Robert C.; Tobiason, Fred L.

    1975-01-01

    Describes the construction of unit cells using clear plastic cubes which can be disassembled, and one inch cork balls of various colors, which can be cut in halves, quarters, or eighths, and glued on the inside face of the cube, thus simulating a unit cell. (MLH)

  15. UNIT, PETROLOGY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Louisiana Arts and Science Center, Baton Rouge.

    THIS TEACHER'S GUIDE FOR A UNIT ON PETROLOGY IS SUITABLE FOR ADAPTATION AT EITHER THE UPPER ELEMENTARY OR THE JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL LEVELS. THE UNIT BEGINS WITH A STORY THAT INTRODUCES VOLCANIC ACTION AND IGNEOUS ROCK FORMATION. SELECTED CONCEPTS ARE LISTED FOLLOWED BY SUGGESTED ACTIVITIES. A BIBLIOGRAPHY, FILM LIST, VOCABULARY LIST, AND QUESTION AND…

  16. UNIT, ALASKA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Louisiana Arts and Science Center, Baton Rouge.

    THE UNIT DESCRIBED IN THIS BOOKLET DEALS WITH THE GEOGRAPHY OF ALASKA. THE UNIT IS PRESENTED IN OUTLINE FORM. THE FIRST SECTION DEALS PRINCIPALLY WITH THE PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY OF ALASKA. DISCUSSED ARE (1) THE SIZE, (2) THE MAJOR LAND REGIONS, (3) THE MOUNTAINS, VOLCANOES, GLACIERS, AND RIVERS, (4) THE NATURAL RESOURCES, AND (5) THE CLIMATE. THE…

  17. Ultra-high pressure homogenisation of milk: technological aspects of cheese-making and microbial shelf life of a starter-free fresh cheese.

    PubMed

    Zamora, Anna; Ferragut, Victoria; Quevedo, Joan Miquel; Guamis, Buenaventura; Trujillo, Antonio-José

    2012-05-01

    Fresh cheeses from pasteurised (80 °C for 15 s), homogenised-pasteurised (15 + 3 MPa at 60 °C; 80 °C for 15 s) or ultra-high pressure homogenised milks (300 MPa and inlet temperature of 30 °C) were produced in order to evaluate different technological aspects during cheese-making and to study their microbial shelf life. Although the coagulation properties of milk were enhanced by ultra-high pressure homogenisation (UHPH), the cheese-making properties were somewhat altered; both conventional homogenisation and UHPH of milk provoked some difficulties at cutting the curd due to crumbling and improper curd matting due to poor cohesion of the grains. Cheese-milk obtained by UHPH showed a higher microbiological quality than milk obtained by conventional treatments. Starter-free fresh cheeses made from UHPH-treated milk showed less syneresis during storage and longer microbiological shelf-life than those from conventionally treated milk samples.

  18. In-vitro microbial production of conjugated linoleic acid by probiotic L. plantarum strains: Utilization as a functional starter culture in sucuk fermentation.

    PubMed

    Özer, Cem O; Kılıç, Birol; Kılıç, Gülden Başyiğit

    2016-04-01

    Twenty-three probiotic Lactobacillus plantarum strains were screened in-vitro to determine their ability to produce conjugated linoleic acid (CLA). L. plantarum AA1-2 and L. plantarum AB20-961 were identified as potential strains for CLA production. Optimum conditions for these strains to produce high levels of CLA were determined by evaluating the amount of added hydrolyzed sunflower oil (HSO) and initial pH levels in a nutrient medium. The highest CLA production was obtained in medium with pH6.0 and 2% HSO (P<0.05). Those strains were then used as starter culture in sucuk fermentation. Five sucuk treatments included a control (no starter culture), two sucuk groups with L. plantarum AA1-2 at the initial pH of 5.8 or 6.0 and two sucuk groups with L. plantarum AB20-961 at the initial pH of 5.8 or 6.0. Results indicate that L. plantarum AB20-961 produced higher amount of CLA in sucuk at initial pH of 5.8 and 6.0 levels during first 24h of fermentation compared with other groups. CLA isomer concentration decreased in all sucuk groups during the rest of the fermentation period (P<0.05) and remained quite stable during the storage. This study demonstrated that probiotic L. plantarum AB20-961 can be used in sucuk manufacturing without posing any quality problems. PMID:26720888

  19. Performance of two potential probiotic Lactobacillus strains from the olive microbiota as starters in the fermentation of heat shocked green olives.

    PubMed

    Argyri, Anthoula A; Nisiotou, Aspasia A; Mallouchos, Athanasios; Panagou, Efstathios Z; Tassou, Chrysoula C

    2014-02-01

    The performance of two potential probiotic Lactobacillus strains from olive microbiota, namely L. pentosus B281 and L. plantarum B282 was assessed as starter cultures in Spanish-style fermentation of heat shocked green olives cv. Halkidiki. Two different initial salt levels were studied, 10% (w/v) and 8% (w/v) NaCl, and the brines were inoculated with (a) L. pentosus B281, (b) L. plantarum B282, and (c) a mixture of both strains. A spontaneous fermentation was also taken into account as control treatment. Prior to brining, olives were heat shocked at 80 °C for 10 min to reduce the level of the indigenous microbiota on olive drupes and facilitate the dominance of the inoculated cultures. Microbiological, physicochemical and sensory analyses were conducted throughout fermentation. The composition of LAB population and the evolution of added inocula were assessed by Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE). The final population of LAB was maintained above 6 log cycles in olive flesh. Both L. pentosus B281 and L. plantarum B282 were able to dominate over indigenous LAB, albeit strain B281 exhibited higher recovery percentages (100 or 94.7% for B281 and 58.8% or 55.0% for B282 in 10% or 8% NaCl, respectively). L. pentosus B281 also dominated over L. plantarum B282, when the two strains were co-inoculated in olive fermentations. The sensory assessment showed higher preference for inoculated fermentations of L. pentosus and L. plantarum separately in 8% NaCl, followed by the L. plantarum in 10% NaCl. The present study showed that probiotic strains L. pentosus B281 and L. plantarum B282, may offer a great potential for use as functional starter cultures in olive fermentation and deliver a promising probiotic food to the consumer.

  20. Genotypic and technological diversity of Brevibacterium linens strains for use as adjunct starter cultures in 'Pecorino di Filiano' cheese ripened in two different environments.

    PubMed

    Bonomo, Maria Grazia; Cafaro, Caterina; Salzano, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Twenty-two Brevibacterium linens strains isolated from 'Pecorino di Filiano' cheese ripened in two different environments (natural cave and storeroom) were characterized and differentiated for features of technological interest and by genotypic methods, in order to select strains with specific features to be used as surface starter cultures. Results showed significant differences among strains on the basis of physiological and technological features, indicating heterogeneity within the species. A middle-low level of proteolytic activity was observed in 27.3 % of strains, while a small group (9.1 %) showed a high ability. Lipolytic activity was observed at three different temperatures and the highest value was detected at 20 °C with 13.6 % of strains, while an increase in temperature produced a slightly lower lipolysis in all strains. The evaluation of diacetyl production revealed that only 22.8 % of strains showed this ability, and most of them were isolated from product ripened in the natural cave. All strains exhibited only leu-aminopeptidase activity, with values more elevated in strains coming from the natural cave product. The combined analysis of genotypic results with the data obtained by the features of technological interest study established that the random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) clusters obtained were composed not only of different genotypes but of different profiles based on technological properties too. This study demonstrated the importance of the ripening environment that affects the typical features of the artisanal product, leading to the selection of a specific surface microflora. Characterized strains could be associated within surface starters to standardize the production process of cheese, but preserving its typical organoleptic and sensory characteristics and improving the quality of the final product.

  1. Effect of Novel Starter Culture on Reduction of Biogenic Amines, Quality Improvement, and Sensory Properties of Doenjang, a Traditional Korean Soybean Fermented Sauce Variety.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Shruti; Lee, Jong Suk; Park, Hae-Kyong; Yoo, Jung-Ah; Hong, Sung-Yong; Kim, Jong-Kyu; Kim, Myunghee

    2015-08-01

    To select appropriate microorganisms as starter cultures for the reliable and reproducible fermentation of soybean fermented products of Korean Doenjang, various ratios of fungi (Aspergillus oryzae J, Mucor racemosus 15, M. racemosus 42) combined with Bacillus subtilis TKSP 24 were selected as either single, double, or multiple Meju strains for commercial mass production of Doenjang, followed by analysis of sensory characteristics. In the sensory evaluation, Doenjang BAM15-1 and BAM42-1, which were fermented with multiple strains (1:1:1), showed the highest sensory scores as compared to control. Based on sensory characteristics, 6 Doenjang samples were subjected to quantitative determination of amino acids, free sugars, and organic acids (volatile and nonvolatile) contents, followed by determination of biogenic amines. Total sweet taste amino acid contents were highest in BAM15-1 and BAM42-1 samples (333.7 and 295.8 mg/100 g, respectively) and similar that of control (391.1 mg/100 g). Samples BAM15-1 and BAM42-1 showed the relatively high volatile and nonvolatile organic acid contents (154.24, 192.26, and 71.31, 82.42 mg/100 g, respectively). In addition, BAM15-1 and BAM42-1 showed negligible biogenic amine formation, ranging from 0.00 to 1.02 and 0.00 to 3.92 mg/100 g, respectively. These findings indicate that determination of food components along with sensory and quality attributes using multiple microbial Meju strains as a starter culture may provide substantial results on improved quality fermented Doenjang products.

  2. Diversity and evolution of the microbial populations during manufacture and ripening of Casín, a traditional Spanish, starter-free cheese made from cow's milk.

    PubMed

    Alegría, Angel; Alvarez-Martín, Pablo; Sacristán, Noelia; Fernández, Elena; Delgado, Susana; Mayo, Baltasar

    2009-11-30

    Classical culturing and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) techniques have been used for studying the microbial diversity and dynamics of the traditional Spanish Casín cheese during manufacturing and ripening. As with other starter-free cheeses made from raw milk, the microbial diversity of Casín was shown to be high by both culturing and DGGE analyses. The culture technique showed that lactic acid bacteria (LAB) species constituted the majority of the microbial populations. Of the 14 bacterial species identified, Lactococcus garvieae was predominant in the three-day-old cheese sample, although it was replaced by Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis at day 30. As expected, the DGGE profiles obtained were complex, consisting, depending on the sample, in five to ten different amplification bands. Among these, a band corresponding to Streptococcus thermophilus was observed throughout the whole manufacturing process. This species had never been identified from traditional Spanish cheeses previously. Culturing and molecular methods showed high populations of undesirable microorganisms, arguing for a required improvement in the hygiene of Casín manufacture. Random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD) profiling suggested that the L. garvieae and L. lactis populations were composed of one and five strains, respectively. In addition, only a single L. lactis RAPD pattern was stably maintained from day three to day 30, indicating high succession of strains along ripening. After a thoroughly characterisation, strains of the two Lactococcus species could be used in designing specific starter cultures for Casín. Additional species (such as Lactobacillus plantarum and Corynebacterium variabile) might be included as adjunct cultures.

  3. Photosynthetic units.

    PubMed

    Schmid, G H; Gaffron, H

    1968-08-01

    Leaf tissues of aurea mutants of tobacco and Lespedeza have been shown to have higher photosynthetic capacity per molecule of chlorophyll, a higher saturation intensity, a simpler lamellar structure, and the same quantum yield as their dark green parents. Here we report on the values of photosynthetic units for both types of plants and some algae. The unit has been assumed to be about as uniform and steady in the plant world as the quantum efficiency. The number on which all theoretical discussions have been based so far is 2400 per O(2) evolved or CO(2) reduced. With dark green plants and algae our determinations of units by means of 40 microsec flashes superimposed on a steady rate of background photosynthesis at 900 ergs cm(-2) sec(-1) of red light yielded mostly numbers between 2000 and 2700. However, the photosynthetic unit turned out to be very variable, even in these objects. In aurea mutants the unit was distinctly smaller, averaging 600 chl/CO(2). By choosing the right combination of colors for flash and background light, units as low as 300 chl/CO(2) or 40 chl/e(-) could be measured consistently. We found five well-defined groups of units composed of multiples of its smallest member. These new findings are discussed in terms of structural entities that double or divide under the influence of far-red light.

  4. [Conservation Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Education Agency, Austin.

    Instructional units deal with each aspect of conservation: forests, wildlife, rangelands, water, minerals, and soil. The area of the secondary school curriculum with which each is correlated is indicated. Lists of general and specific objectives are followed by suggested teaching procedures, including ideas for introducing the topic, questions to…

  5. [Conservation Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Education Agency, Austin.

    Each of the six instructional units deals with one aspect of conservation: forests, water, rangeland, minerals (petroleum), and soil. The area of the elementary school curriculum with which each correlates is indicated. Lists of general and specific objectives are followed by suggested teaching procedures, including ideas for introducing the…

  6. Effects of Dietary Forage and Calf Starter Diet on Ruminal pH and Bacteria in Holstein Calves during Weaning Transition

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yo-Han; Nagata, Rie; Ohtani, Natsuki; Ichijo, Toshihiro; Ikuta, Kentaro; Sato, Shigeru

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the relationship between ruminal pH and bacteria in calves fed calf starter with and without forage during weaning transition. First, 16 Holstein bull calves were obtained from dairy farms and equipped with rumen cannulas by cannulation surgery. Then, calves (73.5 ± 4.2 kg; mean ± SE) were assigned to groups fed calf starter either with forage (HAY, n = 8) or without forage (CON, n = 8), and all calves were weaned at 8 weeks of age. Ruminal pH was measured continuously, and rumen fluid samples were collected at 7, 8, 9, and 11 weeks of age, namely −1, 0, 1, and 3 weeks after weaning, respectively, to assess volatile fatty acid concentrations and bacterial DNA. The 24-h mean ruminal pH was significantly (P < 0.05) different between the two groups. Diurnal changes in the 1-h mean ruminal pH were observed throughout the study in the HAY group; however, they were not observed at 0 and 1 weeks after weaning in the CON group. Moreover, the HAY group had significantly (P < 0.05) higher proportions of acetate and butyrate and lower proportion of propionate, and significantly (P < 0.05) lower ruminal acetate-to-propionate ratios were observed in the CON group. The ruminal bacterial diversity indices decreased after −1 week in both groups and increased at 0 and 1 weeks after weaning in the HAY and CON groups, respectively. From the 454 pyrosequencing analysis, significant differences (P < 0.05) were observed in the relative abundance of several phyla (Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria, and Tenericutes) and one genus (Prevotella) between the two groups. From quantitative real-time PCR analysis, the HAY group had the higher copy numbers of cellulolytic bacteria (Ruminococcus flavefaciens and Ruminococcus albus) compared with the CON group. This study demonstrated that feeding of dietary forage alleviates subacute ruminal acidosis due to diurnal changes in ruminal pH. Furthermore, changes in ruminal pH affect the ruminal bacterial diversity and relative

  7. Exploitation of Albanian wheat cultivars: characterization of the flours and lactic acid bacteria microbiota, and selection of starters for sourdough fermentation.

    PubMed

    Nionelli, Luana; Curri, Nertila; Curiel, José Antonio; Di Cagno, Raffaella; Pontonio, Erica; Cavoski, Ivana; Gobbetti, Marco; Rizzello, Carlo Giuseppe

    2014-12-01

    Six Albanian soft and durum wheat cultivars were characterized based on chemical and technological features, showing different attitudes for bread making. Gliadin and glutenin fractions were selectively extracted from flours, and subjected to two-dimensional electrophoresis. Linja 7 and LVS flours showed the best characteristics, and abundance of high molecular weight (HMW)-glutenins. Type I sourdoughs were prepared through back slopping procedure, and the lactic acid bacteria were typed and identified. Lactobacillus plantarum and Leuconostoc mesenteroides were the predominant species. Thirty-eight representative isolates were singly used for sourdough fermentation of soft and durum wheat Albanian flours and their selection was carried out based on growth and acidification, quotient of fermentation, and proteolytic activity. Two different pools of lactic acid bacteria were designed to ferment soft or durum wheat flours. Sourdough fermentation with mixed and selected starters positively affected the quotient of fermentation, concentration of free amino acids, profile of phenolic acids, and antioxidant and phytase activities. This study provided the basis to exploit the potential of wheat Albanian flours based on an integrated approach, which considered the characterization of the flours and the processing conditions.

  8. The kinetics of the arginine deiminase pathway in the meat starter culture Lactobacillus sakei CTC 494 are pH-dependent.

    PubMed

    Rimaux, T; Vrancken, G; Pothakos, V; Maes, D; De Vuyst, L; Leroy, F

    2011-05-01

    Lactobacillus sakei is frequently present as the dominant lactic acid bacterium in spontaneously fermented meat products, demonstrating its competitiveness in and adaptation to the meat environment. Since meat is generally low in carbohydrate content, the ability to utilize other energy sources to generate ATP, such as arginine via the arginine deiminase (ADI) pathway, represents a competitive benefit. In this study, the kinetics of growth and arginine conversion capabilities of Lb. sakei CTC 494 were analyzed, and a model was set up to describe the influence of pH on growth and arginine conversion. A series of in vitro batch fermentations using reconstituted MRS medium at different constant pH values (pH 4.50-pH 7.75) was performed. Arginine conversion through the ADI pathway, which was activated from the stationary growth phase on, resulted in the production of both citrulline and ornithine for all pH conditions tested. However, the pattern and the ratio of the end-products of the ADI pathway were influenced by pH. For certain pH values (between pH 5.0 and 6.5), a further conversion of citrulline into ornithine was found when all arginine was depleted. Characterization of responses of the ADI pathway in Lb. sakei CTC 494 to environmental conditions will allow a better understanding and control of this important starter culture in meat fermentations. PMID:21356470

  9. Comparative study of quality characteristics of meju, a Korean soybean fermentation starter, made by soybeans germinated under dark and light conditions.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ung Kyu; Bajpai, Vivek K

    2010-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of dark and light conditions on the quality characteristics of whole soybean meju, a Koran soybean fermentation starter, made by germinated soybeans. The sprouting rates of soybeans under dark and light conditions after 24h were 25.6+/-1.2% and 20.5+/-1.5%, respectively and reaching to a level of 99.4+/-0.4% and 98.9+/-0.5%, respectively at 60h. The pH, moisture contents and amino-type nitrogen contents had no significant differences under dark and light conditions, however, the contents were significantly different as compared to control. Also there was a significant difference in the color change values of whole soybean meju under dark and light conditions. The compositions of total organic acids in MNG, MGD and MGL were noted to be 942.2+/-111.0, 1075+/-120.2 and 1019+/-108.1mg%, respectively. However, no significant differences were observed in free amino acid contents of MNG, MGD and MGL. It was observed that isoflavone contents were significantly differed in MGD and MGL as compared to MNG.

  10. Microbiological and Physicochemical Characterization of Small-Scale Cocoa Fermentations and Screening of Yeast and Bacterial Strains To Develop a Defined Starter Culture

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Gilberto Vinícius de Melo; Miguel, Maria Gabriela da Cruz Pedrozo; Ramos, Cíntia Lacerda

    2012-01-01

    Spontaneous cocoa bean fermentations performed under bench- and pilot-scale conditions were studied using an integrated microbiological approach with culture-dependent and culture-independent techniques, as well as analyses of target metabolites from both cocoa pulp and cotyledons. Both fermentation ecosystems reached equilibrium through a two-phase process, starting with the simultaneous growth of the yeasts (with Saccharomyces cerevisiae as the dominant species) and lactic acid bacteria (LAB) (Lactobacillus fermentum and Lactobacillus plantarum were the dominant species), which were gradually replaced by the acetic acid bacteria (AAB) (Acetobacter tropicalis was the dominant species). In both processes, a sequence of substrate consumption (sucrose, glucose, fructose, and citric acid) and metabolite production kinetics (ethanol, lactic acid, and acetic acid) similar to that of previous, larger-scale fermentation experiments was observed. The technological potential of yeast, LAB, and AAB isolates was evaluated using a polyphasic study that included the measurement of stress-tolerant growth and fermentation kinetic parameters in cocoa pulp media. Overall, strains L. fermentum UFLA CHBE8.12 (citric acid fermenting, lactic acid producing, and tolerant to heat, acid, lactic acid, and ethanol), S. cerevisiae UFLA CHYC7.04 (ethanol producing and tolerant to acid, heat, and ethanol), and Acetobacter tropicalis UFLA CHBE16.01 (ethanol and lactic acid oxidizing, acetic acid producing, and tolerant to acid, heat, acetic acid, and ethanol) were selected to form a cocktail starter culture that should lead to better-controlled and more-reliable cocoa bean fermentation processes. PMID:22636007

  11. Influence of Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1 on post-acidification, metabolite formation and survival of starter bacteria in set-yoghurt.

    PubMed

    Settachaimongkon, Sarn; van Valenberg, Hein J F; Gazi, Inge; Nout, M J Robert; van Hooijdonk, Toon C M; Zwietering, Marcel H; Smid, Eddy J

    2016-10-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the growth and survival of the model probiotic strain Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1 in co-culture with traditional yoghurt starters and to investigate the impact of preculturing on their survival and metabolite formation in set-yoghurt. L. plantarum WCFS1 was precultured under sublethal stress conditions (combinations of elevated NaCl and low pH) in a batch fermentor before inoculation in milk. Adaptive responses of L. plantarum WCFS1 were evaluated by monitoring bacterial population dynamics, milk acidification and changes in volatile and non-volatile metabolite profiles of set-yoghurt. The results demonstrated that sublethal preculturing did not significantly affect survival of L. plantarum WCFS1. On the other hand, incorporation of sublethally precultured L. plantarum WCFS1 significantly impaired the survival of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus which consequently reduced the post-acidification of yoghurt during refrigerated storage. A complementary metabolomics approach using headspace SPME-GC/MS and (1)H NMR combined with multivariate statistical analysis revealed substantial impact of sublethally precultured L. plantarum WCFS1 on the metabolite profiles of set-yoghurt. This study provides insight in the technological implications of non-dairy model probiotic strain L. plantarum WCFS1, such as its good stability in fermented milk and the inhibitory effect on post-acidification. PMID:27375240

  12. Microbiological and physicochemical characterization of small-scale cocoa fermentations and screening of yeast and bacterial strains to develop a defined starter culture.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Gilberto Vinícius de Melo; Miguel, Maria Gabriela da Cruz Pedrozo; Ramos, Cíntia Lacerda; Schwan, Rosane Freitas

    2012-08-01

    Spontaneous cocoa bean fermentations performed under bench- and pilot-scale conditions were studied using an integrated microbiological approach with culture-dependent and culture-independent techniques, as well as analyses of target metabolites from both cocoa pulp and cotyledons. Both fermentation ecosystems reached equilibrium through a two-phase process, starting with the simultaneous growth of the yeasts (with Saccharomyces cerevisiae as the dominant species) and lactic acid bacteria (LAB) (Lactobacillus fermentum and Lactobacillus plantarum were the dominant species), which were gradually replaced by the acetic acid bacteria (AAB) (Acetobacter tropicalis was the dominant species). In both processes, a sequence of substrate consumption (sucrose, glucose, fructose, and citric acid) and metabolite production kinetics (ethanol, lactic acid, and acetic acid) similar to that of previous, larger-scale fermentation experiments was observed. The technological potential of yeast, LAB, and AAB isolates was evaluated using a polyphasic study that included the measurement of stress-tolerant growth and fermentation kinetic parameters in cocoa pulp media. Overall, strains L. fermentum UFLA CHBE8.12 (citric acid fermenting, lactic acid producing, and tolerant to heat, acid, lactic acid, and ethanol), S. cerevisiae UFLA CHYC7.04 (ethanol producing and tolerant to acid, heat, and ethanol), and Acetobacter tropicalis UFLA CHBE16.01 (ethanol and lactic acid oxidizing, acetic acid producing, and tolerant to acid, heat, acetic acid, and ethanol) were selected to form a cocktail starter culture that should lead to better-controlled and more-reliable cocoa bean fermentation processes.

  13. Genotyping of starter cultures of Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus pumilus for fermentation of African locust bean (Parkia biglobosa) to produce Soumbala.

    PubMed

    Ouoba, Labia Irène Ivette; Diawara, Bréhima; Amoa-Awua, Wisdom kofi; Traoré, Alfred Sababénedyo; Møller, Peter Lange

    2004-01-15

    Bacillus spp. are the predominant microorganisms in fermented African locust bean called Soumbala in Burkina Faso. Ten strains selected as potential starter cultures were characterised by PCR amplification of the16S-23S rDNA intergenic transcribed spacer (ITS-PCR), restriction fragment length polymorphism of the ITS-PCR (ITS-PCR RFLP), pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and sequencing of the 968-1401 region of the 16S rDNA. In previous studies, the isolates were identified by phenotyping as Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus pumilus. The phenotyping was repeated as a reference in the present study. The ITS-PCR and ITS-PCR RLFP allowed a typing at species level. The PFGE was more discriminative and allowed a typing at strain level. Full agreement with the phenotyping was observed in all cases. The sequencing of the 16S rDNA allowed the identification at species level with an identity from 97% to 100% comparing the sequences to those from the GenBank databases. The desired cultures of B. subtilis and B. pumilus from African locust bean fermentation were distinguished by ITS-PCR and ITS-PCR RLFP from Bacillus cereus and Bacillus sphaericus which sometimes occur in the beginning of the fermentation.

  14. The kinetics of the arginine deiminase pathway in the meat starter culture Lactobacillus sakei CTC 494 are pH-dependent.

    PubMed

    Rimaux, T; Vrancken, G; Pothakos, V; Maes, D; De Vuyst, L; Leroy, F

    2011-05-01

    Lactobacillus sakei is frequently present as the dominant lactic acid bacterium in spontaneously fermented meat products, demonstrating its competitiveness in and adaptation to the meat environment. Since meat is generally low in carbohydrate content, the ability to utilize other energy sources to generate ATP, such as arginine via the arginine deiminase (ADI) pathway, represents a competitive benefit. In this study, the kinetics of growth and arginine conversion capabilities of Lb. sakei CTC 494 were analyzed, and a model was set up to describe the influence of pH on growth and arginine conversion. A series of in vitro batch fermentations using reconstituted MRS medium at different constant pH values (pH 4.50-pH 7.75) was performed. Arginine conversion through the ADI pathway, which was activated from the stationary growth phase on, resulted in the production of both citrulline and ornithine for all pH conditions tested. However, the pattern and the ratio of the end-products of the ADI pathway were influenced by pH. For certain pH values (between pH 5.0 and 6.5), a further conversion of citrulline into ornithine was found when all arginine was depleted. Characterization of responses of the ADI pathway in Lb. sakei CTC 494 to environmental conditions will allow a better understanding and control of this important starter culture in meat fermentations.

  15. Technological characterization and probiotic traits of yeasts isolated from Altamura sourdough to select promising microorganisms as functional starter cultures for cereal-based products.

    PubMed

    Perricone, Marianne; Bevilacqua, Antonio; Corbo, Maria Rosaria; Sinigaglia, Milena

    2014-04-01

    The main topic of this research was to select some suitable functional starter cultures for cereal-based food or beverages. This aim was achieved through a step-by step approach focused on the technological characterization, as well as on the evaluation of the probiotic traits of yeasts; the technological characterization relied on the assessment of enzymatic activities (catalase, urease, β-glucosidase), growth under various conditions (pH, temperature, addition of salt, lactic and acetic acids) and leavening ability. The results of this step were used as input data for a Principal Component Analysis; thus, the most technologically relevant 18 isolates underwent a second selection for their probiotic traits (survival at pH 2.5 and with bile salts added, antibiotic resistance, antimicrobial activity towards foodborne pathogens, hydrophobic properties and biofilm production) and were identified through genotyping. Two isolates (Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain 2 and S. cerevisiae strain 4) were selected and analyzed in the last step for the simulation of the gastric transit; these isolates showed a trend similar to S. cerevisiae var. boulardii ATCC MYA-796, a commercial probiotic yeast used as control.

  16. Taxonomic structure of the yeasts and lactic acid bacteria microbiota of pineapple (Ananas comosus L. Merr.) and use of autochthonous starters for minimally processing.

    PubMed

    Di Cagno, Raffaella; Cardinali, Gainluigi; Minervini, Giovanna; Antonielli, Livio; Rizzello, Carlo Giuseppe; Ricciuti, Patrizia; Gobbetti, Marco

    2010-05-01

    Pichia guilliermondii was the only identified yeast in pineapple fruits. Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactobacillus rossiae were the main identified species of lactic acid bacteria. Typing of lactic acid bacteria differentiated isolates depending on the layers. L. plantarum 1OR12 and L. rossiae 2MR10 were selected within the lactic acid bacteria isolates based on the kinetics of growth and acidification. Five technological options, including minimal processing, were considered for pineapple: heating at 72 degrees C for 15 s (HP); spontaneous fermentation without (FP) or followed by heating (FHP), and fermentation by selected autochthonous L. plantarum 1OR12 and L. rossiae 2MR10 without (SP) or preceded by heating (HSP). After 30 days of storage at 4 degrees C, HSP and SP had a number of lactic acid bacteria 1000 to 1,000,000 times higher than the other processed pineapples. The number of yeasts was the lowest in HSP and SP. The Community Level Catabolic Profiles of processed pineapples indirectly confirmed the capacity of autochthonous starters to dominate during fermentation. HSP and SP also showed the highest antioxidant activity and firmness, the better preservation of the natural colours and were preferred for odour and overall acceptability.

  17. Tailoring the probiotic potential of non-starter Lactobacillus strains from ripened Parmigiano Reggiano cheese by in vitro screening and principal component analysis.

    PubMed

    Solieri, Lisa; Bianchi, Aldo; Mottolese, Giovanni; Lemmetti, Federico; Giudici, Paolo

    2014-04-01

    Non-starter lactic acid bacteria (NSLAB) inhabiting fermented food have been recently revised as source of probiotic strains. Here, we in vitro assessed the potential probiotic aptitude of a de-replicated set of NSLAB previously isolated from long ripened Parmigiano Reggiano cheeses (22 Lactobacillus rhamnosus, 18 Lactobacillus paracasei, 3 Lactobacillus casei, 2 Lactobacillus harbinensis, and 2 Lactobacillus fermentum). Most strains showed moderate to good resistance to biological barriers, including bile salts, lysozyme, and simulated gastric and pancreatic juices. Antimicrobial susceptibility tests against seven antimicrobials belonging to different categories showed that most strains are susceptible towards all the antibiotics, with the exception of vancomycin and streptomycin. The strains lost the streptomycin resistance when assayed on agar medium containing 0.5% bile salts, suggesting that detergent-like properties of cholic acids increase membrane permeability and mediate streptomycin susceptibility. No isolate showed bile salt hydrolase (BSH) activities, supporting that bile salts resistance and BSH activity are unpaired traits. Finally, NSLAB strains had moderate to high auto-aggregative and hydrophobic phenotypes, whereas two subsets of 22 and 8 strains co-aggregated with Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica s. typhimurium, respectively. A multivariate analysis was effective to segregate one L. casei and two L. rhamnosus strains showing physiological characteristics compatible with probiotic properties.

  18. Diversity and dynamic of lactic acid bacteria strains during aging of a long ripened hard cheese produced from raw milk and undefined natural starter.

    PubMed

    Pogačić, Tomislav; Mancini, Andrea; Santarelli, Marcela; Bottari, Benedetta; Lazzi, Camilla; Neviani, Erasmo; Gatti, Monica

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to explore diversity and dynamic of indigenous LAB strains associated with a long ripened hard cheese produced from raw milk and undefined natural starter such as PDO Grana Padano cheese. Samples of milk, curd, natural whey culture and cheeses (2nd, 6th, 9th and 13th months of ripening) were collected from 6 cheese factories in northern Italy. DNA was extracted from each sample and from 194 LAB isolates. tRNA(Ala)-23S rDNA-RFLP was applied to identify isolates. Strain diversity was assessed by (GTG)5 rep-PCR and RAPD(P1)-PCR. Finally, culture-independent LH-PCR (V1-V2 16S-rDNA), was considered to explore structure and dynamic of the microbiota. Grana Padano LAB were represented mainly by Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus paracasei, Lactobacillus delbrueckii, Lactobacillus helveticus and Pediococcus acidilactici, while the structure and dynamic of microbiota at different localities was specific. The strength of this work is to have focused the study on isolates coming from more than one cheese factories rather than a high number of isolates from one unique production. We provided a valuable insight into inter and intraspecies diversity of typical LAB strains during ripening of traditional PDO Grana Padano, contributing to the understanding of specific microbial ecosystem of this cheese.

  19. Technological characterization and probiotic traits of yeasts isolated from Altamura sourdough to select promising microorganisms as functional starter cultures for cereal-based products.

    PubMed

    Perricone, Marianne; Bevilacqua, Antonio; Corbo, Maria Rosaria; Sinigaglia, Milena

    2014-04-01

    The main topic of this research was to select some suitable functional starter cultures for cereal-based food or beverages. This aim was achieved through a step-by step approach focused on the technological characterization, as well as on the evaluation of the probiotic traits of yeasts; the technological characterization relied on the assessment of enzymatic activities (catalase, urease, β-glucosidase), growth under various conditions (pH, temperature, addition of salt, lactic and acetic acids) and leavening ability. The results of this step were used as input data for a Principal Component Analysis; thus, the most technologically relevant 18 isolates underwent a second selection for their probiotic traits (survival at pH 2.5 and with bile salts added, antibiotic resistance, antimicrobial activity towards foodborne pathogens, hydrophobic properties and biofilm production) and were identified through genotyping. Two isolates (Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain 2 and S. cerevisiae strain 4) were selected and analyzed in the last step for the simulation of the gastric transit; these isolates showed a trend similar to S. cerevisiae var. boulardii ATCC MYA-796, a commercial probiotic yeast used as control. PMID:24290622

  20. United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    1987-01-01

    This summary of the people, geography, history, economy, government, defense and foreign affairs of the United Kingdom includes England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland. The area contains 56.4 million inhabitants, with a negligible growth rate, one of the most densely populated regions in Europe, especially so in the southeast portion of England. The history of British unification, colonial expansion and industrialization is presented. Currently the British colonies are becoming independent members of the Commonwealth, retaining many British institutions, such as the parliamentary system of government. Slower economic growth recently has prompted privatization of previously nationalized industries by the conservative government in power. Britain's only natural resources are coal and North Sea oil and gas; her economy depends on manufacturing. Britain donates significant funds to developing countries, 70% of that going to Commonwealth nations. Her present military emphasis is on Europe and NATO commitments.

  1. Short communication: Effect of canola meal use as a protein source in a starter mixture on feeding behavior and performance of calves during the weaning transition.

    PubMed

    Hadam, D; Kański, J; Burakowska, K; Penner, G B; Kowalski, Z M; Górka, P

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of canola meal use as a protein source in a starter mixture (SM) on feeding behavior and performance of calves during weaning transition. A total of 36 female Holstein calves of a mean age 14.9±1.6 d and body weight 40.1±4.2 kg (mean ± SD) were allocated to 1 of 3 treatments differing in the main source of protein for the SM (12 calves per treatment): (1) soybean meal (TSBM); (2) soybean meal and canola meal (TSBM/TCM); and (3) canola meal (TCM). The SM was offered for ad libitum consumption beginning on the first day of the study, whereas milk replacer (MR) was fed in amounts equal to 900 g (as fed) per day from d 1 to 35 and 450 g/d from d 36 to 42 of the study. Calves were completely weaned on d 43 of the study (57.9±1.6 d of age; mean ± SD), and their performance was monitored for an additional 2 wk. Calf body weight was recorded weekly, and MR and SM intake and fecal fluidity were recorded daily. Feeding behavior of calves during weaning transition, including frequency (no./d), time (min/d), and rate (g/min) of eating the SM as well as frequency and time of drinking water, was monitored on 6 calves per treatment for 2 consecutive days before MR step-down (d 34-35), at MR step-down (d 41-42), and after weaning (d 48-49 of study). Starter mixture intake tended to be higher for TSBM calves as compared with TSBM/TCM calves from d 1 to 35 of the study but was not different between TSBM and TCM calves and was not different between treatments in the whole study period. Calves from TCM treatment had reduced average daily gain (ADG) and feed efficiency (g of ADG/kg of dry matter intake) and a higher fecal score in the period from d 1 to 35 of the study and had lower feed efficiency and tended to have lower ADG in the whole study period as compared with TSBM calves. Average daily gain and feed efficiency did not differ between TSBM and TSBM/TCM calves. Frequency of eating the SM and drinking water as well as time

  2. Supplementation with fruit and okara soybean by-products and amaranth flour increases the folate production by starter and probiotic cultures.

    PubMed

    Albuquerque, Marcela Albuquerque Cavalcanti de; Bedani, Raquel; Vieira, Antônio Diogo Silva; LeBlanc, Jean Guy; Saad, Susana Marta Isay

    2016-11-01

    The ability of two starter cultures (Streptococcus (S.) thermophilus ST-M6 and St. thermophilus TA-40) and eleven probiotic cultures (St. thermophilus TH-4, Lactobacillus (Lb.) acidophilus LA-5, Lb. fermentum PCC, Lb. reuteri RC-14, Lb. paracasei subsp. paracasei, Lb. casei 431, Lb. paracasei subsp. paracasei F19, Lb. rhamnosus GR-1, and Lb. rhamnosus LGG, Bifidobacterium (B.) animalis subsp. lactis BB-12, B. longum subsp. longum BB-46, and B. longum subsp. infantis BB-02) to produce folate in a modified MRS broth (mMRS) supplemented with different fruit (passion fruit, acerola, orange, and mango) and okara soybean by-products and amaranth flour was investigated. Initially, the folate content of each vegetable substrate was determined: passion fruit by-product showed the lowest folate content (8±2ng/mL) and okara the highest (457±22ng/mL). When the orange by-product and amaranth flour were added to mMRS, all strains were able to increase folate production after 24h of fermentation. B. longum subsp infantis BB-02 produced the highest concentrations (1223±116ng/mL) in amaranth flour. Okara was the substrate that had the lowest impact on the folate production by all strains evaluated. Lb. acidophilus LA-5 (297±36ng/mL) and B. animalis subsp. lactis BB-12 (237±23ng/mL) were also able to produce folate after growth in mMRS containing acerola and orange by-products, respectively. The results of this study demonstrate that folate production is not only strain-dependent but also influenced by the addition of different substrates in the growth media. PMID:27442847

  3. Supplementation with fruit and okara soybean by-products and amaranth flour increases the folate production by starter and probiotic cultures.

    PubMed

    Albuquerque, Marcela Albuquerque Cavalcanti de; Bedani, Raquel; Vieira, Antônio Diogo Silva; LeBlanc, Jean Guy; Saad, Susana Marta Isay

    2016-11-01

    The ability of two starter cultures (Streptococcus (S.) thermophilus ST-M6 and St. thermophilus TA-40) and eleven probiotic cultures (St. thermophilus TH-4, Lactobacillus (Lb.) acidophilus LA-5, Lb. fermentum PCC, Lb. reuteri RC-14, Lb. paracasei subsp. paracasei, Lb. casei 431, Lb. paracasei subsp. paracasei F19, Lb. rhamnosus GR-1, and Lb. rhamnosus LGG, Bifidobacterium (B.) animalis subsp. lactis BB-12, B. longum subsp. longum BB-46, and B. longum subsp. infantis BB-02) to produce folate in a modified MRS broth (mMRS) supplemented with different fruit (passion fruit, acerola, orange, and mango) and okara soybean by-products and amaranth flour was investigated. Initially, the folate content of each vegetable substrate was determined: passion fruit by-product showed the lowest folate content (8±2ng/mL) and okara the highest (457±22ng/mL). When the orange by-product and amaranth flour were added to mMRS, all strains were able to increase folate production after 24h of fermentation. B. longum subsp infantis BB-02 produced the highest concentrations (1223±116ng/mL) in amaranth flour. Okara was the substrate that had the lowest impact on the folate production by all strains evaluated. Lb. acidophilus LA-5 (297±36ng/mL) and B. animalis subsp. lactis BB-12 (237±23ng/mL) were also able to produce folate after growth in mMRS containing acerola and orange by-products, respectively. The results of this study demonstrate that folate production is not only strain-dependent but also influenced by the addition of different substrates in the growth media.

  4. The pentose moiety of adenosine and inosine is an important energy source for the fermented-meat starter culture Lactobacillus sakei CTC 494.

    PubMed

    Rimaux, T; Vrancken, G; Vuylsteke, B; De Vuyst, L; Leroy, F

    2011-09-01

    The genome sequence of Lactobacillus sakei 23K has revealed that the species L. sakei harbors several genes involved in the catabolism of energy sources other than glucose in meat, such as glycerol, arginine, and nucleosides. In this study, a screening of 15 L. sakei strains revealed that arginine, inosine, and adenosine could be used as energy sources by all strains. However, no glycerol catabolism occurred in any of the L. sakei strains tested. A detailed kinetic analysis of inosine and adenosine catabolism in the presence of arginine by L. sakei CTC 494, a fermented-meat starter culture, was performed. It showed that nucleoside catabolism occurred as a mixed-acid fermentation in a pH range (pH 5.0 to 6.5) relevant for sausage fermentation. This resulted in the production of a mixture of acetic acid, formic acid, and ethanol from ribose, while the nucleobase (hypoxanthine and adenine in the case of fermentations with inosine and adenosine, respectively) was excreted into the medium stoichiometrically. This indicates that adenosine deaminase activity did not take place. The ratios of the different fermentation end products did not vary with environmental pH, except for the fermentation with inosine at pH 5.0, where lactic acid was produced too. In all cases, no other carbon-containing metabolites were found; carbon dioxide was derived only from arginine catabolism. Arginine was cometabolized in all cases and resulted in the production of both citrulline and ornithine. Based on these results, a pathway for inosine and adenosine catabolism in L. sakei CTC 494 was presented, whereby both nucleosides are directly converted into their nucleobase and ribose, the latter entering the heterolactate pathway. The present study revealed that the pentose moiety (ribose) of the nucleosides inosine and adenosine is an effective fermentable substrate for L. sakei. Thus, the ability to use these energy sources offers a competitive advantage for this species in a meat environment.

  5. Lipolysis, proteolysis and formation of volatile components during ripening of a fermented sausage with Pediococcus pentosaceus and Staphylococcus xylosus as starter cultures.

    PubMed

    Johansson, G; Berdagué, J L; Larsson, M; Tran, N; Borch, E

    1994-01-01

    Bacterial growth, formation of acids, lipolysis, proteolysis, fat oxidation, formation of volatile compounds and flavour characteristics were followed during ripening and storage of a fermented sausage. The starter culture used was composed of Pediococcus pentosaceus and Staphylococcus xylosus. The number of Pediococcus sp. increased by 1.5 log cfu/g during the first day of processing and remained constant at this level for 3 weeks. The corresponding initial increase in the numbers of Staphylococcus sp., 0.4 log cfu/g, was followed by a rapid decrease in the viable numbers. Lactic acid, mainly d-lactic acid, and acetic acid were formed during ripening. The triglycerides were hydrolysed to 1,2-diglycerides and free fatty acids at the beginning of ripening, followed by the formation of 1,3-diglycerides and monoglycerides, indicating lipolytic activity. Moreover, the nonprotein nitrogen increased during ripening as a result of the proteolytic activity. Most of the changes with respect to pH, formation of d-lactic acid, acetic acid, peroxides and flavour development occurred during the initial 3 days of ripening, when growth of Pediococcus sp. and Staphylococcus sp. occurred. Lipolysis as well as proteolysis continued after this initial period. The volatile compounds identified belonged to several chemical families, viz. aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, aldehydes, ketones, alcohols, phenols, carboxylic acids, esters, nitrogen compounds, sulphur compounds, chloride compounds, terpenes and furans. Many of the volatile compounds probably originated from smoke and seasoning (onion/garlic and pepper), while others were a result of the activities of muscle enzymes and bacteria. PMID:22059658

  6. Exposure to phthalates in 5-6 years old primary school starters in Germany--a human biomonitoring study and a cumulative risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Koch, Holger M; Wittassek, Matthias; Brüning, Thomas; Angerer, Jürgen; Heudorf, Ursel

    2011-06-01

    We determined the internal exposure of 111 German primary school starters by analyzing urinary metabolites of six phthalates: butyl benzyl phthalate (BBzP), di-iso-butyl phthalate (DiBP), di-n-butyl phthalate (DnBP), di (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), di-iso-nonyl phthalate (DiNP) and di-iso-decylphthalate (DiDP). From the urinary metabolite levels, we calculated daily intakes and related these values to Tolerable Daily Intake (TDI) values. By introducing the concept of a relative cumulative Tolerable Daily Intake (TDI(cum)) value, we tried to account for the cumulative exposure to several of the above-mentioned phthalates. The TDI(cum) was derived as follows: the daily intake (DI) calculated from the metabolite level was divided by the TDI for each phthalate; this ratio was multiplied by 100% indicating the TDI percentage for which the DI accounted. Finally the % TDIs of the different phthalates were totalled to get the TDI(cum). A TDI(cum) above 100% is a potential cause for concern. We confirmed the ubiquitous exposure of the children to all phthalates investigated. Exposures were within range of levels previously reported for GerES, albeit slightly lower. Regarding daily intakes, two children exceeded the TDI for DnBP, whereas one child closely approached the TDI for DEHP. 24% of the children exceeded the TDI(cum) for the three most critical phthalates: DEHP, DnBP and DiBP. Furthermore, 54% of the children had total exposures that used up more than 50% the TDI(cum). Therefore, the overall exposure to a number of phthalates, and the knowledge that these phthalates (and other anti-androgens) act in a dose-additive manner, urgently warrants a cumulative risk assessment approach.

  7. The Pentose Moiety of Adenosine and Inosine Is an Important Energy Source for the Fermented-Meat Starter Culture Lactobacillus sakei CTC 494▿

    PubMed Central

    Rimaux, T.; Vrancken, G.; Vuylsteke, B.; De Vuyst, L.; Leroy, F.

    2011-01-01

    The genome sequence of Lactobacillus sakei 23K has revealed that the species L. sakei harbors several genes involved in the catabolism of energy sources other than glucose in meat, such as glycerol, arginine, and nucleosides. In this study, a screening of 15 L. sakei strains revealed that arginine, inosine, and adenosine could be used as energy sources by all strains. However, no glycerol catabolism occurred in any of the L. sakei strains tested. A detailed kinetic analysis of inosine and adenosine catabolism in the presence of arginine by L. sakei CTC 494, a fermented-meat starter culture, was performed. It showed that nucleoside catabolism occurred as a mixed-acid fermentation in a pH range (pH 5.0 to 6.5) relevant for sausage fermentation. This resulted in the production of a mixture of acetic acid, formic acid, and ethanol from ribose, while the nucleobase (hypoxanthine and adenine in the case of fermentations with inosine and adenosine, respectively) was excreted into the medium stoichiometrically. This indicates that adenosine deaminase activity did not take place. The ratios of the different fermentation end products did not vary with environmental pH, except for the fermentation with inosine at pH 5.0, where lactic acid was produced too. In all cases, no other carbon-containing metabolites were found; carbon dioxide was derived only from arginine catabolism. Arginine was cometabolized in all cases and resulted in the production of both citrulline and ornithine. Based on these results, a pathway for inosine and adenosine catabolism in L. sakei CTC 494 was presented, whereby both nucleosides are directly converted into their nucleobase and ribose, the latter entering the heterolactate pathway. The present study revealed that the pentose moiety (ribose) of the nucleosides inosine and adenosine is an effective fermentable substrate for L. sakei. Thus, the ability to use these energy sources offers a competitive advantage for this species in a meat environment

  8. Taxonomic Characterization, Evaluation of Toxigenicity, and Saccharification Capability of Aspergillus Section Flavi Isolates from Korean Traditional Wheat-Based Fermentation Starter Nuruk

    PubMed Central

    Bal, Jyotiranjan; Yun, Suk-Hyun; Chun, Jeesun; Kim, Beom-Tae

    2016-01-01

    The most economically important species used in a wide range of fermentation industries throughout Asia belong to Aspergillus section Flavi, which are morphologically and phylogenetically indistinguishable, with a few being toxigenic and therefore a major concern. They are frequently isolated from Korean fermentation starters, such as nuruk and meju. The growing popularity of traditional Korean alcoholic beverages has led to a demand for their quality enhancement, therefore requiring selection of efficient non-toxigenic strains to assist effective fermentation. This study was performed to classify the most efficient strains of Aspergillus section Flavi isolated from various types of traditional wheat nuruk, based on a polyphasic approach involving molecular and biochemical evaluation. A total of 69 strains were isolated based on colony morphology and identified as Aspergillus oryzae/flavus based on internal transcribed spacer and calmodulin gene sequencing. Interestingly, none were toxigenic based on PCR amplification of intergenic regions of the aflatoxin cluster genes norB-cypA and the absence of aflatoxin in the culture supernatants by thin-layer chromatography analysis. Saccharification capability of the isolates, assessed through α-amylase and glucoamylase activities, revealed that two isolates, TNA24 and TNA15, showed the highest levels of activity. Although the degrees of variation in α-amylase and glucoamylase activities among the isolates were higher, there were only slight differences in acid protease activity among the isolates with two, TNA28 and TNA36, showing the highest activities. Furthermore, statistical analyses showed that α-amylase activity was positively correlated with glucoamylase activity (p < 0.001), and therefore screening for either was sufficient to predict the saccharifying capacity of the Aspergillus strain. PMID:27790066

  9. Termination unit

    DOEpatents

    Traeholt, Chresten [Frederiksberg, DK; Willen, Dag [Klagshamn, SE; Roden, Mark [Newnan, GA; Tolbert, Jerry C [Carrollton, GA; Lindsay, David [Carrollton, GA; Fisher, Paul W [Heiskell, TN; Nielsen, Carsten Thidemann [Jaegerspris, DK

    2014-01-07

    This invention relates to a termination unit comprising an end-section of a cable. The end section of the cable defines a central longitudinal axis and comprising end-parts of N electrical phases, an end-part of a neutral conductor and a surrounding thermally insulation envelope adapted to comprising a cooling fluid. The end-parts of the N electrical phases and the end-part of the neutral conductor each comprising at least one electrical conductor and being arranged in the cable concentrically around a core former with a phase 1 located relatively innermost, and phase N relatively outermost in the cable, phase N being surrounded by the neutral conductor, electrical insulation being arrange between neighboring electrical phases and between phase N and the neutral conductor, and wherein the end-parts of the neutral conductor and the electrical phases each comprise a contacting surface electrically connected to at least one branch current lead to provide an electrical connection: The contacting surfaces each having a longitudinal extension, and being located sequentially along the longitudinal extension of the end-section of the cable. The branch current leads being individually insulated from said thermally insulation envelope by individual electrical insulators.

  10. Termination unit

    DOEpatents

    Traeholt, Chresten; Willen, Dag; Roden, Mark; Tolbert, Jerry C.; Lindsay, David; Fisher, Paul W.; Nielsen, Carsten Thidemann

    2016-05-03

    Cable end section comprises end-parts of N electrical phases/neutral, and a thermally-insulation envelope comprising cooling fluid. The end-parts each comprises a conductor and are arranged with phase 1 innermost, N outermost surrounded by the neutral, electrical insulation being between phases and N and neutral. The end-parts comprise contacting surfaces located sequentially along the longitudinal extension of the end-section. A termination unit has an insulating envelope connected to a cryostat, special parts at both ends comprising an adapter piece at the cable interface and a closing end-piece terminating the envelope in the end-section. The special parts houses an inlet and/or outlet for cooling fluid. The space between an inner wall of the envelope and a central opening of the cable is filled with cooling fluid. The special part at the end connecting to the cryostat houses an inlet or outlet, splitting cooling flow into cable annular flow and termination annular flow.

  11. The fate of indigenous microbiota, starter cultures, Escherichia coli, Listeria innocua and Staphylococcus aureus in Danish raw milk and cheeses determined by pyrosequencing and quantitative real time (qRT)-PCR.

    PubMed

    Masoud, Wafa; Vogensen, Finn K; Lillevang, Søren; Abu Al-Soud, Waleed; Sørensen, Søren J; Jakobsen, Mogens

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of this work was to study the bacterial communities in raw milk and in Danish raw milk cheeses using pyrosequencing of tagged amplicons of the V3 and V4 regions of the 16S rDNA and cDNA. Furthermore, the effects of acidification and ripening starter cultures, cooking temperatures and rate of acidification on survival of added Escherichia coli, Listeria innocua and Staphylococcus aureus in cheeses at different stages of ripening were studied by pyrosequencing and quantitative real time (qRT)-PCR. A high diversity of bacterial species was detected in raw milk. Lactococcus lactis, Streptococcus thermophilus, Lactobacillus casei and Lactobacillus rhamnosus were the main bacteria detected in raw milk and cheeses. Bacteria belonging to the genera Brevibacterium, Staphylococcus, Escherichia, Weissella, Leuconostoc, Pediococcus were also detected in both 16S rDNA and cDNA obtained from raw milk and cheeses. E. coli, which was added to milk used for production of some cheeses, was detected in both DNA and RNA extracted from cheeses at different stages of ripening showing the highest percentage of the total sequence reads at 7 days of ripening and decreased again in the later ripening stages. Growth of E. coli in cheeses appeared to be affected by the cooking temperature and the rate of acidification but not by the ripening starter cultures applied or the indigenous microbiota of raw milk. Growth of L. innocua and S. aureus added to milks was inhibited in all cheeses at different stages of ripening. The use of 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing and qRT-PCR allows a deeper understanding of the behavior of indigenous microbiota, starter cultures and pathogenic bacteria in raw milk and cheeses.

  12. Influence of starter culture and a protease on the generation of ACE-inhibitory and antioxidant bioactive nitrogen compounds in Iberian dry-fermented sausage "salchichón".

    PubMed

    Fernández, Margarita; Benito, María J; Martín, Alberto; Casquete, Rocío; Córdoba, Juan J; Córdoba, María G

    2016-03-01

    The effect of the addition of an autochthonous starter culture and the protease EPg222 on the generation of angiotensin-I-converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitory and antioxidant compounds by the dry-fermented sausage "salchichón" was investigated. Sausages were prepared with purified EPg222 and Pediococcus acidilactici MS200 and Staphylococcus vitulus RS34 as the starter culture (P200S34), separately and together, ripened for 90 days, and compared to a control batch. Among the ripening time points (20, 35, 65, 90 days) studied, batches inoculated with EPg222 had higher nitrogen compound concentrations at 63 days of ripening. ACE-inhibitory and antioxidant activities were also highest in both batches with EPg222 at 63 days of ripening, and these activities were stable in most cases after in vitro simulated gastrointestinal digestion. These activities were correlated with the most relevant compounds detected by HLPC-ESI-MS. The principal components analysis (PCA) linked the P200S34 + EPg222 batch with the major compounds identified. The antioxidant activity was higher at 63 days of ripening, especially in highly proteolytic batches, such as P200S34 + EPg222. The ACE-inhibitory activity was not associated with any of the major compounds. The use of the enzyme EPg222 in association with the starter culture P200S34 in the preparation of dry-cured meat products could be of great importance due to their demonstrated ability to produce compounds with high biological activity, such as ACE-inhibitory and antioxidant activity.

  13. Influence of starter culture and a protease on the generation of ACE-inhibitory and antioxidant bioactive nitrogen compounds in Iberian dry-fermented sausage "salchichón".

    PubMed

    Fernández, Margarita; Benito, María J; Martín, Alberto; Casquete, Rocío; Córdoba, Juan J; Córdoba, María G

    2016-03-01

    The effect of the addition of an autochthonous starter culture and the protease EPg222 on the generation of angiotensin-I-converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitory and antioxidant compounds by the dry-fermented sausage "salchichón" was investigated. Sausages were prepared with purified EPg222 and Pediococcus acidilactici MS200 and Staphylococcus vitulus RS34 as the starter culture (P200S34), separately and together, ripened for 90 days, and compared to a control batch. Among the ripening time points (20, 35, 65, 90 days) studied, batches inoculated with EPg222 had higher nitrogen compound concentrations at 63 days of ripening. ACE-inhibitory and antioxidant activities were also highest in both batches with EPg222 at 63 days of ripening, and these activities were stable in most cases after in vitro simulated gastrointestinal digestion. These activities were correlated with the most relevant compounds detected by HLPC-ESI-MS. The principal components analysis (PCA) linked the P200S34 + EPg222 batch with the major compounds identified. The antioxidant activity was higher at 63 days of ripening, especially in highly proteolytic batches, such as P200S34 + EPg222. The ACE-inhibitory activity was not associated with any of the major compounds. The use of the enzyme EPg222 in association with the starter culture P200S34 in the preparation of dry-cured meat products could be of great importance due to their demonstrated ability to produce compounds with high biological activity, such as ACE-inhibitory and antioxidant activity. PMID:27441267

  14. Comparative Phenotypic and Molecular Genetic Profiling of Wild Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis Strains of the L. lactis subsp. lactis and L. lactis subsp. cremoris Genotypes, Isolated from Starter-Free Cheeses Made of Raw Milk▿

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Elena; Alegría, Ángel; Delgado, Susana; Martín, M. Cruz; Mayo, Baltasar

    2011-01-01

    Twenty Lactococcus lactis strains with an L. lactis subsp. lactis phenotype isolated from five traditional cheeses made of raw milk with no added starters belonging to the L. lactis subsp. lactis and L. lactis subsp. cremoris genotypes (lactis and cremoris genotypes, respectively; 10 strains each) were subjected to a series of phenotypic and genetic typing methods, with the aims of determining their phylogenetic relationships and suitability as starters. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis of intact genomes digested with SalI and SmaI proved that all strains were different except for three isolates of the cremoris genotype, which showed identical PFGE profiles. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) analysis using internal sequences of seven loci (namely, atpA, rpoA, pheS, pepN, bcaT, pepX, and 16S rRNA gene) revealed considerable intergenotype nucleotide polymorphism, although deduced amino acid changes were scarce. Analysis of the MLST data for the present strains and others from other dairy and nondairy sources showed that all of them clustered into the cremoris or lactis genotype group, by using both independent and combined gene sequences. These two groups of strains also showed distinctive carbohydrate fermentation and enzyme activity profiles, with the strains in the cremoris group showing broader profiles. However, the profiles of resistance/susceptibility to 16 antibiotics were very similar, showing no atypical resistance, except for tetracycline resistance in three identical cremoris genotype isolates. The numbers and concentrations of volatile compounds produced in milk by the strains belonging to these two groups were clearly different, with the cremoris genotype strains producing higher concentrations of more branched-chain, derived compounds. Together, the present results support the idea that the lactis and cremoris genotypes of phenotypic Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis actually represent true subspecies. Some strains of the two subspecies

  15. Short Note on Units: Planetary Units

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huggins, Elisha

    2010-01-01

    While the emphasis on SI units in introductory physics textbooks has mercifully eliminated the use of English units, the exclusion of other systems of units is not necessary. For years physicists have simplified calculations by doing things like setting [h-bar] = c = 1. We could not imagine putting 4[pi][epsilon][subscript 0] into the formulas for…

  16. Vision Screening For Head Starters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foley, Celia

    To determine which children in the Head Start program may have vision problems, Head Start teachers and staff do vision "screening." This booklet demonstrates how to do the screening using the Snellen "E Chart." Trouble signs that the test administrator should be aware of are listed, and vision scores are explained simply. Amblyopia is defined,…

  17. "Madeline." A Literature Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holzschuher, Cynthia

    Intended as a an aid to elementary school teachers, this handbook presents a literature unit based on the children's book, "Madeline" (Ludwig Bemelmans). It begins with sample lesson plans, a unit planner, getting to know the book and author, and suggestions for using the unit activities. Next, a section offers unit activities focusing on language…

  18. Effects of different limestone particle sizes in the diet of broiler breeders post molting on their performance, egg quality, incubation results, and pre-starter performance of their progeny.

    PubMed

    Bueno, I J M; Surek, D; Rocha, C; Schramm, V G; Muramatsu, K; Dahlke, F; Maiorka, A

    2016-04-01

    An experiment was conducted to test the hypothesis that a coarse limestone diet improves productivity, reproductive performance and the calcium utilization of molted broiler breeders. In total, 640 broiler breeder females, 73-week-old and sixty-four 27-week-old cockerels, Cobb 500, were evaluated during 10 weeks, according to a randomized block design composed of 4 treatments with 8 replicates each. Treatments consisted of diets with the inclusion of 100% fine limestone-fine PS (0.2 mm GMD-geometric mean diameter); PS1: 30% fine limestone+70% limestone with 1.0 mm GMD; PS2: 30% fine limestone+70% limestone with 2.0 mm GMD; and PS3: 30% fine limestone+70% limestone with 3.0 mm GMD. Calcium retention in the gizzard of the breeders, bone characteristics, and breeder performance, egg characteristics, eggshell quality, incubation performance, chick quality and yield, chick pre-starter live performance, and chick bone characteristics were determined. There was no significant difference (P>0.05) in the rate of lay, percentage of non-settable eggs, egg weight, egg shape index, egg specific gravity, eggshell weight, thickness, and percentage hatchability and egg weight loss of broiler breeders fed with diets with different limestone particle sizes. The chick quality and yield, chick pre-starter live performance, and chick bone characteristics were not affected (P>0.05) by any of the limestone particle sizes. It was concluded that live and reproductive performance parameters of broiler breeders post molting is not affected by limestone particle size in the feed. PMID:26769267

  19. A Winter Survival Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Ronald E.

    1979-01-01

    The article is a condensation of materials from the winter survival unit of a Canadian snow ecology course. The unit covers: cold physiology, frostbite, snowblindness, hypothermia, winter campout, and survival strategies. (SB)

  20. United Cerebral Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... be sure to follow us on Twitter . United Cerebral Palsy UCP educates, advocates and provides support services to ... Partners Merz Logo Sprint Relay Copyright © 2015 United Cerebral Palsy 1825 K Street NW Suite 600 Washington, DC ...

  1. Unit commitment literature synopsis

    SciTech Connect

    Sheble, G.B. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering); Fahd, G.N. )

    1994-02-01

    Several optimization techniques have been applied to the solution of the thermal unit commitment problem. They range from heuristics such as complete enumeration to the more sophisticated ones such as Augmented LaGrangian. The heuristics have even reappeared as expert systems. The problem to solve is the optimal scheduling of generating units over a short-term horizon, typically 168 hours. This paper is an overview of the literature in the unit commitment field over the past twenty five years.

  2. 31 CFR 515.321 - United States; continental United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false United States; continental United... General Definitions § 515.321 United States; continental United States. The term United States means the United States and all areas under the jurisdiction or authority thereof, including the Trust Territory...

  3. 31 CFR 535.321 - United States; continental United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false United States; continental United... General Definitions § 535.321 United States; continental United States. The term United States means the United States and all areas under the jurisdiction or authority thereof including the Trust Territory...

  4. 31 CFR 515.321 - United States; continental United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false United States; continental United... General Definitions § 515.321 United States; continental United States. The term United States means the United States and all areas under the jurisdiction or authority thereof, including the Trust Territory...

  5. 31 CFR 535.321 - United States; continental United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false United States; continental United... General Definitions § 535.321 United States; continental United States. The term United States means the United States and all areas under the jurisdiction or authority thereof including the Trust Territory...

  6. 31 CFR 515.321 - United States; continental United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false United States; continental United... General Definitions § 515.321 United States; continental United States. The term United States means the United States and all areas under the jurisdiction or authority thereof, including the Trust Territory...

  7. 31 CFR 535.321 - United States; continental United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false United States; continental United... General Definitions § 535.321 United States; continental United States. The term United States means the United States and all areas under the jurisdiction or authority thereof including the Trust Territory...

  8. 31 CFR 535.321 - United States; continental United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false United States; continental United... General Definitions § 535.321 United States; continental United States. The term United States means the United States and all areas under the jurisdiction or authority thereof including the Trust Territory...

  9. 31 CFR 515.321 - United States; continental United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false United States; continental United... General Definitions § 515.321 United States; continental United States. The term United States means the United States and all areas under the jurisdiction or authority thereof, including the Trust Territory...

  10. 31 CFR 500.321 - United States; continental United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false United States; continental United... General Definitions § 500.321 United States; continental United States. The term United States means the United States and all areas under the jurisdiction or authority thereof, including U.S. trust...

  11. 31 CFR 515.321 - United States; continental United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false United States; continental United... General Definitions § 515.321 United States; continental United States. The term United States means the United States and all areas under the jurisdiction or authority thereof, including the Trust Territory...

  12. 31 CFR 535.321 - United States; continental United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false United States; continental United... General Definitions § 535.321 United States; continental United States. The term United States means the United States and all areas under the jurisdiction or authority thereof including the Trust Territory...

  13. Commercial Carpentry: Instructional Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diehl, Donald W.; Penner, Wayman R.

    This manual contains instructional materials which measure student performance on commercial carpentry behavioral objectives; criterion-referenced evaluation instruments are also included. Each of the manual's eleven sections consists of one or more units of instruction. Each instructional unit includes behavioral objectives, suggested activities…

  14. REACH. Refrigeration Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snow, Rufus; And Others

    As a part of the REACH (Refrigeration, Electro-Mechanical, Air-Conditioning, Heating) electromechanical cluster, this student manual contains individualized instructional units in the area of refrigeration. The instructional units focus on refrigeration fundamentals, tubing and pipe, refrigerants, troubleshooting, window air conditioning, and…

  15. Units of Word Recognition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santa, Carol M.; And Others

    Both psychologists and reading specialists have been interested in whether words are processed letter by letter or in larger units. A reaction time paradigm was used to evaluate these options with interest focused on potential units of word recognition which might be functional within single syllable words. The basic paradigm involved presenting…

  16. REACH. Air Conditioning Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrison, Joe; And Others

    As a part of the REACH (Refrigeration, Electro-Mechanical, Air-Conditioning, Heating) electromechanical cluster, this student manual contains individualized instructional units in the area of air conditioning. The instructional units focus on air conditioning fundamentals, window air conditioning, system and installation, troubleshooting and…

  17. State hydrologic unit maps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Seaber, P.R.; Kapinos, F.P.; Knapp, G.L.

    1984-01-01

    A set of maps depicting approved boundaries of, and numerical codes for, river-basin units of the United States has been developed by the U.S. Geological Survey. These ' State Hydrologic Unit Maps ' are four-color maps that present information on drainage, culture, hydrography, and hydrologic boundaries and codes: (1) the 21 major water-resources regions and the 222 subregions designated by the U.S. Water Resources Council; (2) the 352 accounting units of the U.S. Geological Survey 's National Water Data Network; and (3) the 2,149 cataloging units of the U.S. Geological Survey 's Catalog of Information on Water Data. The maps are plotted on the Geological Survey State base-map series at a scale of 1:500,000 and, except for Alaska, depict hydrologic unit boundaries for all drainage basins greater than 700 mi squared (1,813 km squared). A complete list of all the hydrologic units, along with their drainage areas, their names, and the names of the States or outlying areas in which they reside, is contained in the report. These maps and associated codes provide a standardized base for use by water-resources organizations in locating, storing, retrieving, and exchanging hydrologic data. The Hydrologic Unit Codes shown on the maps have been approved as a Federal Information Processing Standard for use by the Federal establishment. (USGS)

  18. Mobile glazing unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, J. W.

    1981-01-01

    Unit programs thermal cycle from 100 to 2,300 F for firing ceramic gglaze coatings on refractory surfaces in any attitude and position. Device includes control console, heater assembly, protective cover, and manipulator boom; boom places heater next to surface to be fired. Unit is industrially useful for in situ repair of ceramics and curing individual refractory blocks during furnace maintenance.

  19. The United Nations University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salam, Abdus

    1973-01-01

    Reports the progress already made toward the establishment of a postgraduate international university under United Nations auspices. The resolution adopted by the U.N. General Assembly provides a concise statement of the nature and aims of the United Nations University, which is likely to start operating in 1974. (JR)

  20. Labour Studies Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, Eric; And Others

    The nine units highlight the history, activities, values, and aspirations of the Canadian labor force. The program's purpose is to help secondary school social studies students develop a more objective appreciation of labor and of labor's role in Canadian social history. The first unit, "Union Today," analyzes contemporary union activity and…

  1. Neighbors United for Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westhoff, Wayne W.; Corvin, Jaime; Virella, Irmarie

    2009-01-01

    Modeled upon the ecclesiastic community group concept of Latin America to unite and strengthen the bond between the Church and neighborhoods, a community-based organization created Vecinos Unidos por la Salud (Neighbors United for Health) to bring health messages into urban Latino neighborhoods. The model is based on five tenants, and incorporates…

  2. Camp Unit Design Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hultsman, John T.; Cottrell, Richard L.

    This document provides a set of generalized guidelines for the design of units in large family campgrounds. Managers of recreational lands have two responsibilities and goals: to protect the natural resources, and to provide an enjoyable experience for users. With these goals in mind, unique variables to each unit such as shade, site aesthetics,…

  3. Quantities, Units, and Symbols.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Royal Society, London (England).

    This booklet provides a reference to the quantities, units, and their symbols which are used in physical science. It is a revision of a 1969 report and takes account of the progress which has been made in obtaining international agreement on the definitions, names, and symbols for units and on the rules for the expression of relations involving…

  4. Associative list processing unit

    DOEpatents

    Hemmert, Karl Scott; Underwood, Keith D.

    2013-01-29

    An associative list processing unit and method comprising employing a plurality of prioritized cell blocks and permitting inserts to occur in a single clock cycle if all of the cell blocks are not full. Also, an associative list processing unit and method comprising employing a plurality of prioritized cell blocks and using a tree of prioritized multiplexers descending from the plurality of cell blocks.

  5. Composite stabilizer unit

    DOEpatents

    Ebaugh, Larry R.; Sadler, Collin P.; Carter, Gary D.

    1992-01-01

    An improved fin stabilized projectile including multiple stabilizer fins upon a stabilizer unit situated at the aft end of the projectile is provided, the improvement wherein the stabilizer fins are joined into the stabillizer unit by an injection molded engineering grade polymer.

  6. Navy closes Antarctic unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    After 42 years as a key participant in the United States Antarctic Program (USAP), the U.S. Navy held a ceremony on February 20 to commemorate the closing of its Naval Antarctic Support Unit stationed in New Zealand. The Navy originally had announced its decision to "disestablish" the unit in 1993, citing new global priorities with the end of the Cold War.The Navy will continue to provide limited flight support to the USAP through the end of the 1998-1999 austral research season.

  7. Associative list processing unit

    DOEpatents

    Hemmert, Karl Scott; Underwood, Keith D

    2014-04-01

    An associative list processing unit and method comprising employing a plurality of prioritized cell blocks and permitting inserts to occur in a single clock cycle if all of the cell blocks are not full.

  8. Exothermic brazing units

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mc Caig, J. C.

    1971-01-01

    Units are used for repairing and assembling stainless steel tubing. Heat generated by chemical reaction is used to melt brazing alloy and bonded area is not contaminated by the reactants or by-products of the reaction.

  9. Electrosurgical unit analyzers.

    PubMed

    1998-07-01

    Electrosurgical unit (ESU) analyzers automate the testing and inspection of the output circuits and safety features of ESUs. They perform testing that would otherwise require several other pieces of equipment, as well as considerably more time and greater technician expertise. They are used largely by clinical engineering departments for routine inspection and preventive maintenance (IPM) procedures and, less often, for accident investigations and troubleshooting. In this Evaluation, we tested three ESU analyzers from three suppliers. We rated all three analyzers Acceptable and ranked them in two groupings. In ranking the units, we placed the greatest weight on ease of use for routine ESU inspections, and gave additional consideration to versatility for advanced applications such as ESU research. The unit in Group 1 was the easiest to use, especially for infrequent users. The units in Group 2 were satisfactory but require more frequent use to maintain proficiency and to avoid user errors. PMID:9689540

  10. Insects: An Interdisciplinary Unit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leger, Heather

    2007-01-01

    The author talks about an interdisciplinary unit on insects, and presents activities that can help students practice communication skills (interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational) and learn about insects with hands-on activities.

  11. Illuminance of neonatal units.

    PubMed

    Robinson, J; Moseley, M J; Fielder, A R

    1990-07-01

    We have measured the illuminance (brightness) of seven neonatal units during both the day and the night. When the units were lit solely by fluorescent tubes the mean illuminance was 348 lux (range 192-690). During the day the mean illuminance was 470 lux (range 236-905). The high dependency regions in four of the seven units were significantly brighter than the corresponding low dependency nurseries at all times. In two of these units there is a policy of reducing the amount of artificial light in the low dependency areas at night, and in these the normal mean illuminance was 50 lux. We have measured the general levels of illumination to which a neonate might be exposed; the ocular exposure to light of a neonate depends, however, on both physical and biological factors and more research is required before an accurate estimate can be made.

  12. UnitedHealth Group

    Cancer.gov

    UnitedHealth Group provides accessible and affordable services, improved quality of care, coordinated health care efforts, and a supportive environment for shared decision making between patients and their physicians.

  13. California Groundwater Units

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Tyler D.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    The California Groundwater Units dataset classifies and delineates areas within the State of California into one of three groundwater-based polygon units: (1) those areas previously defined as alluvial groundwater basins or subbasins, (2) highland areas that are adjacent to and topographically upgradient of groundwater basins, and (3) highland areas not associated with a groundwater basin, only a hydrogeologic province. In total, 938 Groundwater Units are represented. The Groundwater Units dataset relates existing groundwater basins with their newly delineated highland areas which can be used in subsequent hydrologic studies. The methods used to delineate groundwater-basin-associated highland areas are similar to those used to delineate a contributing area (such as for a lake or water body); the difference is that highland areas are constrained to the immediately surrounding upslope (upstream) area. Upslope basins have their own delineated highland. A geoprocessing tool was created to facilitate delineation of highland areas for groundwater basins and subbasins and is available for download.

  14. Voltage verification unit

    DOEpatents

    Martin, Edward J.

    2008-01-15

    A voltage verification unit and method for determining the absence of potentially dangerous potentials within a power supply enclosure without Mode 2 work is disclosed. With this device and method, a qualified worker, following a relatively simple protocol that involves a function test (hot, cold, hot) of the voltage verification unit before Lock Out/Tag Out and, and once the Lock Out/Tag Out is completed, testing or "trying" by simply reading a display on the voltage verification unit can be accomplished without exposure of the operator to the interior of the voltage supply enclosure. According to a preferred embodiment, the voltage verification unit includes test leads to allow diagnostics with other meters, without the necessity of accessing potentially dangerous bus bars or the like.

  15. United Leukodystrophy Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Benefit Drawing to … Read More » Research Grant Applications Now Being Solicited The United Leukodystrophy Foundation is soliciting grant applications to support … Read More » Dr. Matalon Wins ULF Service Award Congratulations to Dr. Reuben Matalon ...

  16. Water sample filtration unit

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Skougstad, M.W.; Scarbro, G.F.

    1968-01-01

    A readily portable, all plastic, pressure filtration unit is described which greatly facilitates rapid micropore membrane field filtration of up to several liters of water with a minimum risk of inorganic chemical alteration or contamination of the sample. The unit accommodates standard 10.2-cm. (4-inch) diameter filters. The storage and carrying case serves as a convenient filter stand for both field and laboratory use.

  17. Hydrologic unit maps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Seaber, Paul R.; Kapinos, F. Paul; Knapp, George L.

    1987-01-01

    A set of maps depicting approved boundaries of, and numerical codes for, river-basin units of the United States has been developed by the U.S . Geological Survey. These 'Hydrologic Unit Maps' are four-color maps that present information on drainage, culture, hydrography, and hydrologic boundaries and codes of (1) the 21 major water-resources regions and the 222 subregions designated by the U.S . Water Resources Council, (2) the 352 accounting units of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water Data Network, and (3) the 2,149 cataloging units of the U.S . Geological Survey's 'Catalog of information on Water Data:' The maps are plotted on the Geological Survey State base-map series at a scale of 1 :500,000 and, except for Alaska, depict hydrologic unit boundaries for all drainage basins greater than 700 square miles (1,813 square kilometers). A complete list of all the hydrologic units, along with their drainage areas, their names, and the names of the States or outlying areas in which they reside, is contained in the report. These maps and associated codes provide a standardized base for use by water-resources organizations in locating, storing, retrieving, and exchanging hydrologic data, in indexing and inventorying hydrologic data and information, in cataloging water-data acquisition activities, and in a variety of other applications. Because the maps have undergone extensive review by all principal Federal, regional, and State water-resource agencies, they are widely accepted for use in planning and describing water-use and related land-use activities, and in geographically organizing hydrologic data . Examples of these uses are given in the report . The hydrologic unit codes shown on the maps have been approved as a Federal Information Processing Standard for use by the Federal establishment.

  18. Battery thermal management unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Nicholas A.

    1989-03-01

    A battery warming device has been designed which uses waste heat from an operating internal combustion engine to warm a battery. A portion of the waste heat is stored in the sensible and latent heat of a phase change type material for use in maintaining the battery temperature after the engine is shut off. The basic design of the device consists of a Phase Change Material (PCM) reservoir and a simple heat exchanger connected to the engineer's cooling system. Two types of units were built, tested and field trialed. A strap-on type which was strapped to the side of an automotive battery and was intended for the automotive after-market and a tray type on which a battery or batteries sat. This unit was intended for the heavy duty truck market. It was determined that both types of units increased the average cranking power of the batteries they were applied to. Although there were several design problems with the units such as the need for an automatic thermostatically controlled bypass valve, the overall feeling is that there is a market opportunity for both the strap-on and tray type battery warming units.

  19. The clinical skills unit.

    PubMed Central

    Bligh, J.

    1995-01-01

    Clinical skills units offer exciting and innovative ways of learning about clinical skills. Links between theoretical knowledge and clinical practice are appropriate for both undergraduate and postgraduate training. Students and doctors can practice and acquire technical and examination skills in a standardised and protected environment without being concerned about the distress such learning may cause real patients. Models and simulators used in skills units are being developed to keep pace with demand, with a corresponding increase in standards of quality and durability. As undergraduate medical courses respond to the demands of modern clinical practice the use of such facilities will increase. This paper describes the functions of skills units and provides practical examples of educational strategies in use. Images p731-a p731-b p731-c p731-d PMID:8552536

  20. Three conceptual units for behavior

    PubMed Central

    Moxley, Roy

    1987-01-01

    Three generic units for behavior are examined in terms of their background: an if-then unit for stimulus and response (S-R), a holistic unit for Kantor's behavior segment, and an AB-because-of-C unit for Skinner's three-term contingency. The units are distinguished in terms of their respective historical backgrounds, causal modes, advantages, and disadvantages. The ways in which these units may be compatible are discussed. PMID:22477957

  1. TRW utility demonstration unit

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The TRW Advanced Entrained Coal Combustor Demonstration Project consists of retrofitting Orange and Rockland (O R) Utility Corporation's Lovett Plant Unit No. 3 with four (4) slagging combustors which will allow the gas/oil unit to fire 2.5% sulfur coal. The slagging combustor process will provide NO{sub x} and SO{sub x} emissions that meet NSPS and New York State Environmental Standards. During this report period, activity continued to address the total program funding shortfall. Ideas and responsibilities for further evaluation have been put forward to reduce the shortfall. In addition, an effort aimed at gaining additional program sponsorships, was initiated.

  2. Unit train loadout innovations

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, J.A.L.; Gardner, T.G.

    1993-12-31

    A number of material handling related innovations developed by the coal, rail, and ancillary-type industries are allowing coal mining companies to be highly productive in a very competitive energy market. New technology is rapidly leading to fully automated loading, weighing, identification (reading), and quality control systems for equally new unit trains. The important innovations that have improved in-motion, unit-train coal loading include batch loading systems and coupled-in-motion weighing-feed back systems; top-off loading systems; radio-frequency car tagging (identification); and high speed coupled-in-motion weighing scales.

  3. Standardized ileal amino acid digestibility of expeller-extracted canola meal subjected to different processing conditions for starter and grower broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Toghyani, M; Rodgers, N; Iji, P A; Swick, R A

    2015-05-01

    Six expeller-extracted canola meal (ECM) samples produced under different seed conditioning temperatures (90, 95, or 100°C) and screw torques in the second press (low or high) were evaluated in a 3 × 2 factorial arrangement of treatments to determine the effect of processing on standardized ileal amino acid digestibility (SID) in 10 and 24-day-old broilers. A nitrogen-free diet was fed to determine ileal endogenous amino acid flow. Each diet was fed for 5 d to 6 replicate cages of 10 or 7 chicks, and ileal samples were collected at 10 and 24 d, respectively. The endogenous flow (mg/kg DM intake) of CP and all amino acids except Cys decreased (P < 0.01) with age. Conditioning temperature by screw torque interactions were detected (P < 0.05) for apparent ileal digestibility (AID) of CP, Arg, Ile, Lys, Phe, Thr, Ala, Asp, Glu, Pro ,and Ser at d 10, and the same trend was observed at d 24 except for Ile, Phe, Ala, and Pro (P > 0.05). Meals processed under medium conditioning temperature (95°C) at either low or high screw torque had the greatest (P < 0.05) AID of CP and total amino acids. The SID values followed a similar pattern as AID at both ages. When corrected for endogenous losses, the average AID of total amino acids improved approximately 3.5 and 2.0 units, at 10 and 24 d, respectively. The AID and SID values increased (P < 0.05) with age for most AA, but the effect of age was not consistent between ECMs. A negative correlation was detected between NDF and neutral detergent-insoluble nitrogen (NDIN) content of the meals and SID values of Lys at d 24 (r = -0.79, r = -0.76; P = 0.001, respectively). Processing conditions affected CP and amino acid digestibility, likely because of alterations to the chemical composition of ECM and formation of indigestible complexes of amino acids with fiber. The AID and SID values increased with age independent of meal processing conditions.

  4. SI Units to be Used in Place of Imperial Units and Old Metric Units

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Australian Science Teachers Journal, 1975

    1975-01-01

    A table lists the following quantities in imperial units, old metric units, and SI units: mass, force, energy, torque, power, pressure, temperature, thermal conductivity, frequency, dynamic viscosity, and kinematic viscosity. (MLH)

  5. Unitized paramagnetic salt thermometer

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham, B.M.

    1982-06-01

    The details of construction and assembly of a cerous magnesium nitrate (CMN) paramagnetic thermometer are presented. The thermometer is a small unit consisting of a primary, two secondaries, the salt pill, and thermal links. The thermometer calibration changes very little on successive coolings and is reliable to 35 mK. A typical calibration curve is also presented.

  6. Creative Construction: Unit Blocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Child Care, 1999

    1999-01-01

    Describes the use of unit blocks with young children in early childhood education (ECE) settings to expand all areas of the curriculum. Discusses the origin of blocks in ECE programs, presents developmental stages of block play, describes children's building styles, and makes recommendations for getting started in block play for children of…

  7. Women's Rights Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Helen; Weigel, Margaret

    Designed for use in the intermediate grades, this interdisciplinary unit helps students examine traditional and modern roles of women. Fourteen lessons focus on women's activities in colonial America, reasons for women's discontent, the women's rights movement of the 1800's, changes in the roles of women, enfranchisement of women, women's role…

  8. Gemini facility calibration unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsay-Howat, Suzanne K.; Harris, John W.; Gostick, David C.; Laidlaw, Ken; Kidd, Norrie; Strachan, Mel; Wilson, Ken

    2000-08-01

    High-quality, efficient calibration instruments is a pre- requisite for the modern observatory. Each of the Gemini telescopes will be equipped with identical facility calibration units (GCALs) designed to provide wavelength and flat-field calibrations for the suite of instruments. The broad range of instrumentation planned for the telescopes heavily constrains the design of GCAL. Short calibration exposures are required over wavelengths from 0.3micrometers to 5micrometers , field sizes up to 7 arcminutes and spectral resolution from R-5 to 50,000. The output from GCAL must mimic the f-16 beam of the telescope and provide a uniform illumination of the focal plane. The calibration units are mounted on the Gemini Instrument Support Structure, two meters from the focal pane, necessitating the use of large optical components. We will discuss the opto-mechanical design of the Gemini calibration unit, with reference to those feature which allow these stringent requirements to be met. A novel reflector/diffuser unit replaces the integration sphere more normally found in calibration systems. The efficiency of this system is an order of magnitude greater than for an integration sphere. A system of two off-axis mirrors reproduces the telescope pupil and provides the 7 foot focal plane. The results of laboratory test of the uniformity and throughput of the GCAL will be presented.

  9. Teletype test unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Couch, R. H.; Beall, H. C.

    1979-01-01

    Device may be used to facilitate testing and fault isolation in teletype and modem systems that are used for communication by people who having hearing disabilities. Unit uses CMOS digital integrated circuitry which may be operated from relatively inexpensive battery of any voltage from 3 to 18 volts.

  10. United States East Coast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    MODIS captured this true-color image of clear skies over the eastern United States on December 22, 2001. To the northeast the country is blanketed with snow, but in this image only the higher elevations of the Appalachian Mountains in eastern West Virginia are dusted with white. Rod dots in Georgia indicate MODIS' detection of fires.

  11. Wyoming Indians, Unit II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Terry

    This unit on Wyoming Indians provides concepts, activities, Indian stories, and resources for elementary school students. Indian values and contributions are summarized. Concepts include the incorrectness of the term "Indian," the Indians' democratic society and sophisticated culture, historical events, and conflicts with whites over the land.…

  12. Planter unit test stand

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A planter test stand was developed to evaluate individual row-crop metering units in early 2013. This test stand provided the ability to quantify actual seed metering in terms of population, seed spacing, skips, and multiples over a range of meter RPMs and vacuum pressures. Preliminary data has been...

  13. Wyoming Government, Unit VII.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Terry

    This unit on Wyoming government presents concepts, activities, and stories for elementary school students. Concepts stress that the functions of government are determined according to the demands, needs, and traditions of the people; each part of government has a special function; as citizens, we should be loyal to the underlying concepts of our…

  14. Flexible sucker rod unit

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, L.F.

    1987-02-03

    This patent describes a deep well having: a. an education tube with an inside diameter extending from the surface of the earth to far below the surface, b. a reciprocating pump housing attached to the bottom of the education tube, c. pump jack means at the surface for reciprocating the pump, d. a light sucker rod connected to the pump jack means and extending into the education tube, and e. a series of heavy sinker bars having a large cross sectional area in the education tube connecting the light sucker rod to the pump; f. an improved integral metal flexible rod unit interconnecting the sinker bars comprising in combination with the above: g. a coupling on each end of the integral metal flexible rod unit connecting the flexible rod unit to the contiguous sinker bar, h. a segment which is flexible as compared to the sinker bars connecting one of the couplings to i. an integral metal bearing adjacent to the other of the couplings, the bearing having j. a cylindrical surface with k. a diameter i. only slightly smaller than the inside diameter of the education tube thereby forming a sliding fit therewith, and ii. greater than the diameter of any other portion of the flexible rod unit and the sinker bar, and l. grooves in the cylindrical surface for the passage of fluid between in the education tube around the bearing.

  15. Line Replaceable Unit Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oepomo, T.; Prouty, T. V.

    1982-01-01

    Shuttle LRU (Line Replaceable Unit) Analysis Program (SLAP) aids in evaluation of LRU interface voltages in Shuttle orbiter electrical system. Slap includes reduced model of Shuttle LRU circuit. Although primarily intended for analysis of Shuttle LRU's SLAP could be adapted for voltage analysis in other situations.

  16. Sickle Cell Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canipe, Stephen L.

    Included in this high school biology unit on sickle cell anemia are the following materials: a synopsis of the history of the discovery and the genetic qualities of the disease; electrophoresis diagrams comparing normal, homozygous and heterozygous conditions of the disease; and biochemical characteristics and population genetics of the disease. A…

  17. Consumer Mathematics. Teaching Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Instruction, Raleigh.

    GRADES OR AGES: Secondary school. SUBJECT MATTER: Consumer mathematics including--money management, transportation, probability, swindles and gyps, insurance, housing, taxes, consumer credit, banks, savings, and investments. ORGANIZATION AND PHYSICAL APPEARANCE: The guide is divided into ten parallel units, one for each of the above areas, which…

  18. Theme Unit: Veggie Power.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flagg, Ann

    2000-01-01

    Presents a selection of activities for a cross-curricular unit based on vegetables. Activities address vocabulary, language arts, social studies, and health education. A student reproducible presents a tossed salad game. Game cards can be incorporated into the other activities. A poster describes plant parts that are edible. A sidebar offers…

  19. Outdoorsman, Unit II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Dept. of Agriculture, Edmonton.

    The second of three units of the 4-H Outdoorsman Program introduces more advanced camping and survival techniques for 4-H members in British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba. Backpacking, finding food in the wild, making a fire without matches, lashing techniques, axemanship, finding your way (with and without a compass), making a…

  20. Prefixes as Processing Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laudanna, Alessandro; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Two experiments assessed the performance of subjects on prefixed nonwords resulting from the incorrect combination of a prefix and a real word in Italian. The results support the view that prefixes may be represented as units of access or representation in the mental lexicon. (41 references) (MDM)

  1. NOVA SCIENCE UNIT 14.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1964

    THE MAJOR CONCEPT OF THE UNIT IS THAT SOMETHING MUST BE DONE TO PARTICLES IN ORDER TO STUDY THEM. ATOMS ARE COMPOSED OF TWO KINDS OF CHARGED PARTICLES--PROTONS AND ELECTRONS. ANY DIFFERENCE IN THEIR NUMBERS RESULTS IN A CHARGED BODY. IF ENOUGH CHARGED BODIES ARE PRODUCED, THEY WILL AFFECT CHARGE DETECTORS. CONCLUSIONS CAN BE DRAWN FROM THE…

  2. Borehole seismic unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seavey, R. W.

    1982-05-01

    Fracture orientation can be measured by using a triaxial geophone package located at the fracture interval within the wellbore. Seismic signals produced by the fracture can be recorded and measured to determine the direction of the fracture. A description of a borehole seismic unit and procedures to accomplish this task are reported.

  3. Theme Unit: Mayflower Math.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhodes, Mackie

    2001-01-01

    This Thanksgiving theme unit has students learn about mathematics and history by studying the voyage of the Mayflower. Students can study how many children sailed on the Mayflower, how big the ship was, and how long the voyage was. They can also solve Mayflower word problems and create recipes of food the Pilgrims would have eaten. An instructor…

  4. Whale Teaching Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peninsula Humane Society, San Mateo, CA.

    Materials in this teaching unit are designed to foster an interest in whale preservation among intermediate grade and junior high school students. Several readings provide background information on various types of whales and the economic value of whales. Student activities include a true and false game, a crossword, and a mobile. A resource list…

  5. Social Studies Resource Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bemiss, Clair W.

    Based on the premise that fundamental solutions to environmental problems must include social solutions, these three resource units are designed to study the interrelation of man and nature as part of the social studies curriculum. A series of inquiry questions are posed with the intent of stimulating students to find solutions to our…

  6. Theme Unit. Horse Sense.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flagg, Ann

    1999-01-01

    This integrated, cross-curricular theme unit has children become immersed in the equine world as they broaden their vocabulary, participate in hands-on science and math, explore art, become aware of the horse's important role in history, and learn about good grooming. A student reproducible, a poetry poster, and a poster on the coloring of horses…

  7. Outdoorsman, Unit III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Dept. of Agriculture, Edmonton.

    The third and final unit of the 4-H Outdoorsman Program covers the most advanced and challenging campcraft skills for 4-H members in British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba. Survival camping (including building shelters and finding food), in-depth map-reading and orienteering, game management, hiking themes and recordkeeping are all…

  8. Gloucester Marine Biology Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shearer, Sonja; And Others

    Objectives and activities for a field trip study of the seacoast environment of Gloucester, Massachusetts, are outlined in this guide. One phase of a six-week tenth grade biology unit, the field trip features study of tidal pool and salt marsh ecosystems. Specific objectives of the trip relate to observation and identification of various forms of…

  9. Insects. Thematic Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gosnell, Kathee

    This book is a captivating whole-language thematic unit about the study of insects, relating it to our understanding of the past and our hopes for using our knowledge in the present to balance the ecosystem in the future. It contains a wide variety of lesson ideas and reproducible pages designed for use with intermediate students. At its core,…

  10. [Environmental Education Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minneapolis Independent School District 275, Minn.

    Two of these three pamphlets describe methods of teaching young elementary school children the principles of sampling. Tiles of five colors are added to a tub and children sample these randomly; using the tiles as units for a graph, they draw a representation of the population. Pooling results leads to a more reliable sample. Practice is given in…

  11. Units that Make It Simple.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rayner-Canham, Geoffrey

    1985-01-01

    The International System of Units (SI) or the metric system contains related units which make science simpler for students and teachers. By emphasizing descriptive units, requiring unit use throughout calculations, and using negative exponents, teachers can help students have a better understanding of energy, pressure, and mass concepts. (DH)

  12. 77 FR 48542 - United States

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-14

    ... Antitrust Division United States v. SG Interests I, Ltd., et al.; Public Comments and Response on the... United States hereby publishes below the United States' Response to Public Comments on the proposed Final Judgment in United States v. SG Interests I, Ltd. et. al., Civil Action No. 12-cv-000395- RPM-MEH,...

  13. Contamination analysis unit

    DOEpatents

    Gregg, Hugh R.; Meltzer, Michael P.

    1996-01-01

    The portable Contamination Analysis Unit (CAU) measures trace quantifies of surface contamination in real time. The detector head of the portable contamination analysis unit has an opening with an O-ring seal, one or more vacuum valves and a small mass spectrometer. With the valve closed, the mass spectrometer is evacuated with one or more pumps. The O-ring seal is placed against a surface to be tested and the vacuum valve is opened. Data is collected from the mass spectrometer and a portable computer provides contamination analysis. The CAU can be used to decontaminate and decommission hazardous and radioactive surface by measuring residual hazardous surface contamination, such as tritium and trace organics It provides surface contamination data for research and development applications as well as real-time process control feedback for industrial cleaning operations and can be used to determine the readiness of a surface to accept bonding or coatings.

  14. Contamination analysis unit

    DOEpatents

    Gregg, H.R.; Meltzer, M.P.

    1996-05-28

    The portable Contamination Analysis Unit (CAU) measures trace quantities of surface contamination in real time. The detector head of the portable contamination analysis unit has an opening with an O-ring seal, one or more vacuum valves and a small mass spectrometer. With the valve closed, the mass spectrometer is evacuated with one or more pumps. The O-ring seal is placed against a surface to be tested and the vacuum valve is opened. Data is collected from the mass spectrometer and a portable computer provides contamination analysis. The CAU can be used to decontaminate and decommission hazardous and radioactive surfaces by measuring residual hazardous surface contamination, such as tritium and trace organics. It provides surface contamination data for research and development applications as well as real-time process control feedback for industrial cleaning operations and can be used to determine the readiness of a surface to accept bonding or coatings. 1 fig.

  15. Laser color recording unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, E.

    1984-05-01

    A color recording unit was designed for output and control of digitized picture data within computer controlled reproduction and picture processing systems. In order to get a color proof picture of high quality similar to a color print, together with reduced time and material consumption, a photographic color film material was exposed pixelwise by modulated laser beams of three wavelengths for red, green and blue light. Components of different manufacturers for lasers, acousto-optic modulators and polygon mirrors were tested, also different recording methods as (continuous tone mode or screened mode and with a drum or flatbed recording principle). Besides the application for the graphic arts - the proof recorder CPR 403 with continuous tone color recording with a drum scanner - such a color hardcopy peripheral unit with large picture formats and high resolution can be used in medicine, communication, and satellite picture processing.

  16. Thermal insulated glazing unit

    DOEpatents

    Selkowitz, Stephen E.; Arasteh, Dariush K.; Hartmann, John L.

    1991-01-01

    An improved insulated glazing unit is provided which can attain about R5 to about R10 thermal performance at the center of the glass while having dimensions about the same as those of a conventional double glazed insulated glazing unit. An outer glazing and inner glazing are sealed to a spacer to form a gas impermeable space. One or more rigid, non-structural glazings are attached to the inside of the spacer to divide the space between the inner and outer glazings to provide insulating gaps between glazings of from about 0.20 inches to about 0.40 inches. One or more glazing surfaces facing each thermal gap are coated with a low emissivity coating. Finally, the thermal gaps are filled with a low conductance gas such as krypton gas.

  17. Thermal insulated glazing unit

    DOEpatents

    Selkowitz, S.E.; Arasteh, D.K.; Hartmann, J.L.

    1988-04-05

    An improved insulated glazing unit is provided which can attain about R5 to about R10 thermal performance at the center of the glass while having dimensions about the same as those of a conventional double glazed insulated glazing unit. An outer glazing and inner glazing are sealed to a spacer to form a gas impermeable space. One or more rigid, non-structural glazings are attached to the inside of the spacer to divide the space between the inner and outer glazings to provide insulating gaps between glazings of from about 0.20 inches to about 0.40 inches. One or more glazing surfaces facing each thermal gap are coated with a low emissivity coating. Finally, the thermal gaps are filled with a low conductance gas such as krypton gas. 2 figs.

  18. Regenerable biocide delivery unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colombo, Gerald V.; Jolly, Clifford D.; Sauer, Richard L.

    1991-01-01

    The Microbial Check Valve (MCV) is used on the Space Shuttle to impart an iodine residual to the drinking water to maintain microbial control. Approximately twenty MCV locations have been identified in the Space Station Freedom design, each with a 90-day life. This translates to 2400 replacement units in 30 years of operation. An in situ regeneration concept has been demonstrated that will reduce this replacement requirement to less than 300 units based on data to date. A totally automated system will result in significant savings in crew time, resupply requirements, and replacement costs. An additional feature of the device is the ability to provide a concentrated biocide source (200 mg/liter of I2) that can be used to superiodinate systems routinely or after a microbial upset.

  19. Planetary gear unit

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, S.

    1986-10-07

    This patent describes a planetary gear unit for the transmission of a motor vehicle, comprising: a first planetary gear unit which includes a pinion shaft, a planet pinion rotatably mounted on the pinion shaft, a sun gear engaging the planet pinion, and an arm member supporting the pinion shaft and having an extending portion extending to a point adjacent the sun gear; a thrust washer contacting the arm member, the thrust washer having radiating conduit means formed on a contacting surface thereof so as to communicate an inner circumference of the extending portion of the arm member with the pinion shaft, the pinion shaft having a conduit formed therein so as to communicate with the radiating conduit means with an inner surface of the planet pinion wherein the radiating conduit means further comprises uniform spaced bevel surfaces and grooves in communication with the bevel surfaces.

  20. Laser system preset unit

    DOEpatents

    Goodwin, William L.

    1977-01-01

    An electronic circuit is provided which may be used to preset a digital display unit of a Zeeman-effect layer interferometer system which derives distance measurements by comparing a reference signal to a Doppler signal generated at the output of the interferometer laser head. The circuit presets dimensional offsets in the interferometer digital display by electronically inducing a variation in either the Doppler signal or the reference signal, depending upon the direction of the offset, to achieve the desired display preset.

  1. Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauman, William; Lambert, Winifred; Wheeler, Mark; Barrett, Joe; Watson, Leela

    2007-01-01

    This report summarizes the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) activities for the second quarter of Fiscal Year 2007 (January - March 2007). Tasks reported on are: Obiective Lightning Probability Tool, Peak Wind Tool for General Forecasting, Situational Lightning Climatologies for Central Florida, Anvil Threat Corridor Forecast Tool in AWIPS, Volume Averaqed Heiqht lnteq rated Radar Reflectivity (VAHIRR), Tower Data Skew-t Tool, and Weather Research and Forecastini (WRF) Model Sensitivity Study

  2. Bipartite units of nonlocality

    SciTech Connect

    Forster, Manuel; Wolf, Stefan

    2011-10-15

    Imagine a task in which a group of separated players aim to simulate a statistic that violates a Bell inequality. Given measurement choices the players shall announce an output based solely on the results of local operations--which they can discuss before the separation--on shared random data and shared copies of a so-called unit correlation. In the first part of this paper we show that in such a setting the simulation of any bipartite correlation, not containing the possibility of signaling, can be made arbitrarily accurate by increasing the number of shared Popescu-Rohrlich (PR) boxes. This establishes the PR box as a simple asymptotic unit of bipartite nonlocality. In the second part we study whether this property extends to the multipartite case. More generally, we ask if it is possible for separated players to asymptotically reproduce any nonsignaling statistic by local operations on bipartite unit correlations. We find that nonadaptive strategies are limited by a constant accuracy and that arbitrary strategies on n resource correlations make a mistake with a probability greater or equal to c/n, for some constant c.

  3. Radiation quantities and units

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-04-15

    This report supersedes ICRU Report 19. Since ICRU Report 19 was published, a number of discussions have taken place between members of the Report Committee on Fundamental Quantities and Units and other workers in the field. Some of these discussions have resulted in the acceptance of certain modifications in the material set out in Report 19 and these modifications are incorporated in the current report. In addition, there has been some expansion and rearrangement of the material in the earlier report. In line, with providing more didactic material and useful source material for other ICRU reports, the general considerations in subsection 1.A of Report 19 have been expanded and placed in a separate subsection. The additional material includes discussions of four terms that are used in this document - quantity, unit, stochastic, and non-stochastic - along with a brief discussion of the mathematical formalism used in ICRU reports. As in ICRU Report 19, the definitions of quantities and units specifically designed for radiation protection (Part B) are separated from those of the general quantities (Part A). The inclusion of the index concept outlined in ICRU Report 25(4) required an extension of Part B.

  4. Power-processing unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wessel, Frank J. (Inventor); Hancock, Donald J. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    Power-processing unit uses AC buses (30, 32) to supply all current dependent needs such as connections (54, 56) to an ion thruster through an inductor (88) and the primary of a transformer (90), to assure limited currents to such loads. Where temperature control is also required, such as to the main discharge vaporizer heater connection (36, 38), switches (100, 102) are serially connected with inductor (96) and the primary of transformer (98). Temperature sensor (104) controls the switches (100, 102) for temperature regulation.

  5. Intensive Care Unit Psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Monks, Richard C.

    1984-01-01

    Patients who become psychotic in intensive care units are usually suffering from delirium. Underlying causes of delirium such as anxiety, sleep deprivation, sensory deprivation and overload, immobilization, an unfamiliar environment and pain, are often preventable or correctable. Early detection, investigation and treatment may prevent significant mortality and morbidity. The patient/physician relationship is one of the keystones of therapy. More severe cases may require psychopharmacological measures. The psychotic episode is quite distressing to the patient and family; an educative and supportive approach by the family physician may be quite helpful in patient rehabilitation. PMID:21279016

  6. Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauman, William H., Jr.; Crawford, Winifred; Short, David; Barrett, Joe; Watson, Leela

    2008-01-01

    This report summarizes the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) activities for the second quarter of Fiscal Year 2008 (January - March 2008). Projects described are: (1) Peak Wind Tool for User Launch Commit Criteria (LCC), (2) Peak Wind Tool for General Forecasting, (3) Situational Lightning Climatologies for Central Florida. Phase III, (4) Volume Averaged Height Integrated Radar Reflectivity (VAHIRR), (5) Impact of Local Sensors, (6) Radar Scan Strategies for the PAFB WSR-74C Replacement and (7) WRF Wind Sensitivity Study at Edwards Air Force Base.

  7. Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauman, William; Crawford, Winifred; Barrett, Joe; Watson, Leela; Wheeler, Mark

    2010-01-01

    This report summarizes the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) activities for the first quarter of Fiscal Year 2010 (October - December 2009). A detailed project schedule is included in the Appendix. Included tasks are: (1) Peak Wind Tool for User Launch Commit Criteria (LCC), (2) Objective Lightning Probability Tool, Phase III, (3) Peak Wind Tool for General Forecasting, Phase II, (4) Upgrade Summer Severe Weather Tool in Meteorological Interactive Data Display System (MIDDS), (5) Advanced Regional Prediction System (ARPS) Data Analysis System (ADAS) Update and Maintainability, (5) Verify 12-km resolution North American Model (MesoNAM) Performance, and (5) Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) Graphical User Interface.

  8. Space Flyer Unit (SFU)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ninomiya, T.; Kuriki, K.

    1991-01-01

    The DSN (Deep Space Network) mission support requirements for the Space Flyer Unit (SFU) are summarized. The SFU is an unmanned, reusable, and retrievable free-flying platform for multipurpose use. The SFU spacecraft will carry seven individual experiments to be completed during its mission period. The mission objectives are outlined and the DSN support requirements are defined through the presentation of tables and narratives describing the spacecraft flight profile; DSN support coverage; frequency assignments; support parameters for telemetry, command and support systems; and tracking support responsibility.

  9. Toxic Hazards Research Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macewen, J. D.; Vernot, E. H.

    1971-01-01

    The activities of the Toxic Hazards Research Unit (THRU) for the period of June 1970 through May 1971 reviewed. Modification of the animal exposure facilities primarily for improved human safety but also for experimental integrity and continuity are discussed. Acute toxicity experiments were conducted on hydrogen fluoride (HF), hydrogen chloride (HCl), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and hydrogen cyanide (HCN) both singly and in combination with carbon dioxide (CO). Additional acute toxicity experiments were conducted on oxygen difluoride (OF2) and chlorine pentafluoride (ClF5). Subacute toxicity studies were conducted on methylisobutylketone and dichloromethane (methylene dichloride). The interim results of further chronic toxicity experiments on monomethylhydrazine (MMH) are also described.

  10. Unite and fight.

    PubMed

    Carlisle, D

    10% of Uganda's population is thought to be infected with HIV, with the level of HIV infection reaching 25% in some subpopulations. In the face of such extensive HIV infection, the government of Uganda officially sanctioned the provision of AIDS education, and a campaign to mobilize communities against HIV/AIDS was launched in 1989. Uganda's President Yoweri Museveni wanted to get everyone talking about HIV and AIDS, and to know how to prevent contracting HIV. Over the period 1991-96, HIV prevalence among pregnant women fell from over 12% to just over 8%, and studies indicate that 80-90% of people now know and understand the need to use safer sex practices when having sexual intercourse. 60,000 boy and girl scouts are involved in the Unite project to disseminate safer sex messages among Uganda's youth. Focusing upon abstinence, behavior change, and condoms, the scouts take safer sex messages into schools and churches, where they educate their peers through poetry and traditional songs and dances in dramas about AIDS. The Unite project is funded by the scouting movement in Britain. The materials with which scouts and scout leaders were trained were developed with the assistance of health professionals.

  11. Unite and fight.

    PubMed

    Carlisle, D

    10% of Uganda's population is thought to be infected with HIV, with the level of HIV infection reaching 25% in some subpopulations. In the face of such extensive HIV infection, the government of Uganda officially sanctioned the provision of AIDS education, and a campaign to mobilize communities against HIV/AIDS was launched in 1989. Uganda's President Yoweri Museveni wanted to get everyone talking about HIV and AIDS, and to know how to prevent contracting HIV. Over the period 1991-96, HIV prevalence among pregnant women fell from over 12% to just over 8%, and studies indicate that 80-90% of people now know and understand the need to use safer sex practices when having sexual intercourse. 60,000 boy and girl scouts are involved in the Unite project to disseminate safer sex messages among Uganda's youth. Focusing upon abstinence, behavior change, and condoms, the scouts take safer sex messages into schools and churches, where they educate their peers through poetry and traditional songs and dances in dramas about AIDS. The Unite project is funded by the scouting movement in Britain. The materials with which scouts and scout leaders were trained were developed with the assistance of health professionals. PMID:9423469

  12. 21 CFR 184.1848 - Starter distillate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... a medium consisting of skim milk usually fortified with about 0.1 percent citric acid: Streptococcus... formate, ethyl acetate, acetone, ethyl alcohol, 2-butanone, acetic acid, and acetoin. (b) The...

  13. A Starter's Guide to Artificial Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McConnell, Barry A.; McConnell, Nancy J.

    1988-01-01

    Discussion of the history and development of artificial intelligence (AI) highlights a bibliography of introductory books on various aspects of AI, including AI programing; problem solving; automated reasoning; game playing; natural language; expert systems; machine learning; robotics and vision; critics of AI; and representative software. (LRW)

  14. Secondary Social Studies Starters and Extensions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beardsley, Donna A.

    This paper discusses the book, "Guide to Social Studies Teaching in Secondary Schools," (Leonard S. Kenworthy), as a social studies teaching resource containing activities and ideas. The paper notes that Kenworthy defines motivation in two different ways: in its inclusive sense, motivation is everything that teachers understand about teaching; in…

  15. 7 CFR 58.415 - Starter vats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... AGRICULTURAL MARKETING ACT OF 1946 AND THE EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION ACT (CONTINUED) GRADING AND INSPECTION... shall be constructed according to the applicable 3-A Sanitary Standards. The vats shall be in...

  16. Sporopollenin Biosynthetic Enzymes Interact and Constitute a Metabolon Localized to the Endoplasmic Reticulum of Tapetum Cells[W

    PubMed Central

    Lallemand, Benjamin; Erhardt, Mathieu; Heitz, Thierry; Legrand, Michel

    2013-01-01

    The sporopollenin polymer is the major constituent of exine, the outer pollen wall. Recently fatty acid derivatives have been shown to be the precursors of sporopollenin building units. ACYL-COA SYNTHETASE, POLYKETIDE SYNTHASE A (PKSA) and PKSB, TETRAKETIDE α-PYRONE REDUCTASE1 (TKPR1) and TKPR2 have been demonstrated to be involved in sporopollenin biosynthesis in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Here all these sporopollenin biosynthetic enzymes but TKPR2 have been immunolocalized to endoplasmic reticulum of anther tapetal cells. Pull-down experiments demonstrated that tagged recombinant proteins interacted to form complexes whose constituents were characterized by immunoblotting. In vivo protein interactions were evidenced by yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) two-hybrid analysis and by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy/Förster resonance energy transfer studies in transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana, which were used to test the possibility that the enzymes interact to form a biosynthetic metabolon. Various pairs of proteins fused to two distinct fluorochromes were coexpressed in N. benthamiana leaf tissues and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy/Förster resonance energy transfer measurements demonstrated that proteins interacted pairwise in planta. Taken together, these results suggest the existence of a sporopollenin metabolon. PMID:23632852

  17. First Grade Social Studies Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park Forest Public Schools District 163, IL.

    The main idea of this unit--that many different kinds of families live in the United States and are alike in some ways but different in others--is shaped through an examination of families in three cultural and physical settings. This teaching guide for the unit provides highly detailed suggestions for learning experiences and multimedia…

  18. Creative Coin Combinations. Unit Plans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United States Mint (Dept. of Treasury), Washington, DC.

    This unit of study for grades K-2 focuses on counting coins and coin equivalencies up to 50 cents, making use of a literature connection. The unit provides key words; recommends subject areas and approximate length of time; poses an essential question or problem; provides a unit introduction; notes four individual lessons ((1) For Sale!; (2)…

  19. What's It Worth? Unit Plans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United States Mint (Dept. of Treasury), Washington, DC.

    This hands-on coin unit is for students in grades 1-2. Students play games and work with coin manipulatives to practice coin and value recognition, finding coin combinations, and adding coins. The unit provides keywords; recommends subject areas and approximate length of time; poses an essential question or problem; provides a unit introduction;…

  20. Using SI Units in Mechanics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meriam, J. L.

    This paper provides an historical account of the development of the International System of Units (SI), a complete listing of these units, and rules concerning their use and proper abbreviation. Ambiguities concerning the use of the system are explained. Appendices contain conversion factors for U.S. - British to SI units along with several…