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Sample records for acyl-coa synthetase activity

  1. High fat fed heart failure animals have enhanced mitochondrial function and acyl-coa dehydrogenase activities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have previously shown that administration of high fat in heart failure (HF) increased mitochondrial respiration and did not alter left ventricular (LV) function. PPARalpha is a nuclear transcription factor that activates expression of genes involved in fatty acid uptake and utilization. We hypoth...

  2. [Studies on regulation of glutamine synthetase activity from Streptomyces lincolnensis].

    PubMed

    Jin, Z; Jiao, R; Mao, Y

    2001-08-01

    Glutamine synthetase in crude extracts from Streptomyces lincolnensis growing under different nitrogen sources were studied. The results showed that NH4+ in high concentration repressed the biosynthesis of the enzyme. To determine whether Streptomyces lincolnensis has undergone covalent modification, a comparison of the glutamine synthetase isolated from cells grown on different nitrogen sources was made. No significant difference was observed in specific activity, pH optima, divalent cation response, and ultraviolet absorption spectra. Glutamine synthetase activity was not influenced by ammonia shock or snake venom phosphodiesterase treatment. Under these conditions, the activity of glutamine synthetase from K. aerogenes was markedly changed. There was therefore no evidence for enzymatic adenylylation of glutamine synthetase from Streptomyces lincolnensis. Glutamine synthetase was subject to feedback inhibition by end products of glutamine metabolism. Cumulative feedback inhibition of the Mn(2+)-dependent glutamine synthetase activity was demonstrated. These results suggest that glutamine synthetase from Streptomyces lincolnensis is an allosteric enzyme. PMID:12552916

  3. [Regulation of glucosamine synthetase activity by cholesterol and hydrocortisone].

    PubMed

    Sharaev, P N; Ivanov, V G; Bogdanov, N G

    1988-09-01

    The effects of cholesterol and hydrocortisone (cortisol) on the activity of purified glucosamine synthetase from rat liver was studied in vitro. It was found that the enzyme activity is increased by cholesterol and inhibited by hydrocortisone. These steroids block the allosteric effect of vitamin K1 on the enzyme. There is evidence testifying to the allosteric type of cholesterol and hydrocortisone effects on glucosamine synthetase. PMID:3203113

  4. Changes in the activity levels of glutamine synthetase, glutaminase and glycogen synthetase in rats subjected to hypoxic stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vats, P.; Mukherjee, A. K.; Kumria, M. M. L.; Singh, S. N.; Patil, S. K. B.; Rangnathan, S.; Sridharan, K.

    Exposure to high altitude causes loss of body mass and alterations in metabolic processes, especially carbohydrate and protein metabolism. The present study was conducted to elucidate the role of glutamine synthetase, glutaminase and glycogen synthetase under conditions of chronic intermittent hypoxia. Four groups, each consisting of 12 male albino rats (Wistar strain), were exposed to a simulated altitude of 7620 m in a hypobaric chamber for 6 h per day for 1, 7, 14 and 21 days, respectively. Blood haemoglobin, blood glucose, protein levels in the liver, muscle and plasma, glycogen content, and glutaminase, glutamine synthetase and glycogen synthetase activities in liver and muscle were determined in all groups of exposed and in a group of unexposed animals. Food intake and changes in body mass were also monitored. There was a significant reduction in body mass (28-30%) in hypoxia-exposed groups as compared to controls, with a corresponding decrease in food intake. There was rise in blood haemoglobin and plasma protein in response to acclimatisation. Over a three-fold increase in liver glycogen content was observed following 1 day of hypoxic exposure (4.76+/-0.78 mg.g-1 wet tissue in normal unexposed rats; 15.82+/-2.30 mg.g-1 wet tissue in rats exposed to hypoxia for 1 day). This returned to normal in later stages of exposure. However, there was no change in glycogen synthetase activity except for a decrease in the 21-days hypoxia-exposed group. There was a slight increase in muscle glycogen content in the 1-day exposed group which declined significantly by 56.5, 50.6 and 42% following 7, 14, and 21 days of exposure, respectively. Muscle glycogen synthetase activity was also decreased following 21 days of exposure. There was an increase in glutaminase activity in the liver and muscle in the 7-, 14- and 21-day exposed groups. Glutamine synthetase activity was higher in the liver in 7- and 14-day exposed groups; this returned to normal following 21 days of exposure

  5. Activity of formylphosphate in the reaction catalyzed by formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase

    SciTech Connect

    Jahansouz, H.; Kofron, J.L.; Smithers, G.W.; Himes, R.H.; Reed, G.H.

    1986-05-01

    Formylphosphate (FP), a putative enzyme-bound intermediate in the reaction catalyzed by N/sup 10/-formylH/sub 4/folate synthetase, was synthesized from formylfluoride and Pi. Measurement of hydrolysis rates by /sup 31/P NMR showed that FP is very unstable with a half-life of 48 min at 20/sup 0/C and pH 7. At pH 7 hydrolysis occurs with O-P bond cleavage as shown by /sup 18/O incorporation from /sup 18/O-H/sub 2/O into Pi. The substrate activity of FP was tested in the reaction catalyzed by N/sup 10/-formylH/sub 4/folate synthetase isolated from Clostridium cylindrosporum. MgATP + H/sub 4/folate + HCOO/sup -/ in equilibrium MgADP + Pi +N/sup 10/-formylH/sub 4/folate FP supports the reaction in both the forward and reverse directions. Thus, N/sup 10/-formylH/sub 4/folate is produced from H/sub 4/-folate and FP but only if ADP is present, and ATP is produced from FP and ADP but only if H/sub 4/folate is present. The requirements for H/sub 4/folate in the synthesis of ATP from ADP and FP and for ADP in the synthesis of N/sup 10/-formylH/sub 4/folate from FP and H/sub 4/folate, are consistent with past kinetic and isotope exchange studies which showed that the reaction proceeds by a sequential mechanism and that all three substrates must be present for any reaction to occur.

  6. In situ autoradiographic detection of folylpolyglutamate synthetase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Sussman, D.J.; Milman, G.; Osborne, C.; Shane, B.

    1986-11-01

    The enzyme folylpolyglutamate synthetase (FPGS) catalyzes the conversion of folate (pteroylmonoglutamate) to the polyglutamate forms (pteroylpolyglutamates) that are required for folate retention by mammalian cells. A rapid in situ autoradiographic assay for FPGS was developed which is based on the folate cofactor requirement of thymidylate synthase. Chinese hamster AUX B1 mutant cells lack FPGS activity and are unable to accumulate folate. As a result, the conversion of (6-/sup 3/H)deoxyuridine to thymidine via the thymidylate synthase reaction is impaired in AUX B1 cells and no detectable label is incorporated into DNA. In contrast, FPGS in wild-type Chinese hamster CHO cells causes folate retention and enables the incorporation of (6-/sup 3/H)deoxyuridine into DNA. Incorporation may be detected by autoradiography of monolayer cultures or of colonies replica plated onto polyester discs. Introduction of Escherichia coli FPGS into AUX B1 cells restores the activity of the thymidylate synthase pathway and demonstrates that the E. coli FPGS enzyme can provide pteroylpolyglutamates which functions in mammalian cells.

  7. Critical Evaluation of the Changes in Glutamine Synthetase Activity in Models of Cerebral Stroke.

    PubMed

    Jeitner, Thomas M; Battaile, Kevin; Cooper, Arthur J L

    2015-12-01

    The following article addresses some seemingly paradoxical observations concerning cerebral glutamine synthetase in ischemia-reperfusion injury. In the brain, this enzyme is predominantly found in astrocytes and catalyzes part of the glutamine-glutamate cycle. Glutamine synthetase is also thought to be especially sensitive to inactivation by the oxygen- and nitrogen-centered radicals generated during strokes. Despite this apparent sensitivity, glutamine synthetase specific activity is elevated in the affected tissues during reperfusion. Given the central role of the glutamine-glutamate cycle in the brain, we sought to resolve these conflicting observations with the view of providing an alternative perspective for therapeutic intervention in stroke.

  8. Regulation of active site coupling in glutamine-dependent NAD[superscript +] synthetase

    SciTech Connect

    LaRonde-LeBlanc, Nicole; Resto, Melissa; Gerratana, Barbara

    2009-05-21

    NAD{sup +} is an essential metabolite both as a cofactor in energy metabolism and redox homeostasis and as a regulator of cellular processes. In contrast to humans, Mycobacterium tuberculosis NAD{sup +} biosynthesis is absolutely dependent on the activity of a multifunctional glutamine-dependent NAD{sup +} synthetase, which catalyzes the ATP-dependent formation of NAD{sup +} at the synthetase domain using ammonia derived from L-glutamine in the glutaminase domain. Here we report the kinetics and structural characterization of M. tuberculosis NAD{sup +} synthetase. The kinetics data strongly suggest tightly coupled regulation of the catalytic activities. The structure, the first of a glutamine-dependent NAD{sup +} synthetase, reveals a homooctameric subunit organization suggesting a tight dependence of catalysis on the quaternary structure, a 40-{angstrom} intersubunit ammonia tunnel and structural elements that may be involved in the transfer of information between catalytic sites.

  9. Regulation of the activity of the Bacillus licheniformis A5 glutamine synthetase.

    PubMed

    Donohue, T J; Bernlohr, R W

    1981-10-01

    The regulation of glutamine synthetase activity by positive and negative effectors of enzyme activity singularly and in combinations was studied by using a homogeneous enzyme preparation from Bacillus licheniformis A5. Phosphorylribosyl pyrophosphate at concentrations greater than 2mM stimulated glutamine synthetase activity by approximately 70%. The concentration of phosphorylribosyl pyrophosphate required for half-maximal stimulation of enzyme activity was 0.4 mM. Results obtained from studies of fractional inhibition of glutamine synthetase activity were consistent with the presence of one allosteric site for glutamine binding (apparent I0.5, 2.2mM) per active enzyme unit at a glutamate concentration of 50 mM. At a glutamate concentration of 30 mM or less, the data were consistent with the enzyme containing two binding sites for glutamine (one of which was an allosteric site with an apparent I0.5 of 0.4 mM). Bases on an analysis of the response of glutamine synthetase activity to positive and negative effectors in vitro and to the intracellular concentration of these effectors in vivo, the primary modulators of glutamine synthetase activity in B. licheniformis A5 appear to be glutamine and alanine (apparent I0.5, 5.2mM). PMID:6169702

  10. Effect of estrogen administration on rat liver 2-5A synthetase activity.

    PubMed

    Smekens, M; Dumont, J E; Degeyter, A; Galand, P

    1986-08-01

    Interferon-induced 2-5A synthetase is also present in various cells and tissues in the absence of any interferon treatment. The activity of this enzyme, which synthesizes a series of oligoadenylates, ppp(A2'p)n5'A (collectively referred to as 2-5A), was previously shown to vary with the growth status of liver tissue i.e., it decreased before and during the peak of DNA synthesis activity induced in rat liver by a two third hepatectomy. In the course of studies aimed at testing the hypothesis that 2-5A synthetase activity might exert negative control on normal cell growth and multiplication, we show here that a treatment of ovariectomized rats with a single dose of estradiol-17beta (100 micrograms/100 g body weight) induced a transient increase in the [3H]thymidine labelling index in the liver after 24 h and markedly decreased the 2-5A synthetase activity. A time course study revealed that 2-5A synthetase activity started to decrease after 3 h, reaching a minimal value (10% of the control level) after 12 h, then slowly increased to come back to control level at 48 h. These results, together with our similar data on regenerating liver, suggest that low 2-5A synthetase activity is permissive for acquisition of proliferative 'competence' by G0 cells. PMID:3730433

  11. [Inhibition of glutamine synthetase activity by biologically active derivatives of glutamic acid].

    PubMed

    Firsova, N A; Selivanova, K M; Alekseeva, L V; Evstigneeva, Z G

    1986-05-01

    The inhibition of activity of glutamine synthetase from Chlorella and porcine brain by 4-hydroxy-D-4-fluoro-D,L- and 4-amino-D,L-glutamic acids diastereoisomers was studied. Each compound was shown to exert the same inhibiting effect on glutamine synthetase from both sources. In case of threo-4-hydroxy-D-glutamic acid the inhibition of the Chlorella enzyme was of a competitive and of a completely mixed type. The enzyme inhibition by 4-fluoro-D, L-glutamic acids seemed to be of a completely non-competitive type. The Ki values for all inhibition reactions were determined. A comparison of biochemical parameters and biological activity revealed that the most effective inhibitors of the enzyme exert a most potent antitumour and antiviral action.

  12. Diffuse glutamine synthetase overexpression restricted to areas of peliosis in a β-catenin-activated hepatocellular adenoma: a potential pitfall in glutamine synthetase interpretation.

    PubMed

    Berry, Ryan S; Gullapalli, Rama R; Wu, Jin; Morris, Katherine; Hanson, Joshua A

    2014-08-01

    Hepatocellular adenomas have recently been classified into four subtypes based on molecular findings: hepatocyte nuclear factor 1α (HNF1α) inactivated, inflammatory/telangiectatic, β-catenin activated, and unclassifiable. β-catenin-activated adenomas have the potential for malignant transformation and are thus important to recognize. Diffuse glutamine synthetase immunohistochemical positivity has been shown to be a reliable surrogate marker for β-catenin activation, though variations in staining patterns may be difficult to interpret. We report a case of a peliotic adenoma that was morphologically consistent with a β-catenin wild-type hepatocellular adenoma but harbored a β-catenin mutation by molecular analysis. The tumor lacked nuclear β-catenin positivity and demonstrated a hitherto undescribed pattern of glutamine synthetase overexpression restricted to areas of peliosis with mostly negative staining in non-peliotic areas. This pattern was initially interpreted as physiologic and may represent a potential pitfall in glutamine synthetase interpretation.

  13. Activation of 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase activity on induction of HL-60 leukemia cell differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, E L; Nilson, L A

    1989-01-01

    A 27-fold increase in 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase activity, an enzyme associated with the antiproliferative actions of interferon (IFN), was observed after treatment of HL-60 human leukemia cells with dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), an inducer of granulocytic differentiation of the cells. Enzyme activity was elevated after 24 h of exposure to DMSO, was maximal at 48 hours, and declined thereafter. A comparable increase was observed after treatment with 1 U of alpha interferon (IFN-alpha) per ml or 8 U of beta interferon (IFN-beta) per ml. Elevated levels of expression of other IFN-inducible genes, including type I histocompatibility antigen (HLA-B) mRNA and 2',5'-oligoadenylate phosphodiesterase activity, were also observed with DMSO treatment. DMSO-treated HL-60 cells had an increased amount of a 1.8-kilobase mRNA for oligoadenylate [oligo(A)] synthetase when compared with that of control cells; both DMSO- and IFN-treated HL-60 cells also expressed 1.6-, 3.4-, and 4.3-kilobase mRNA. The increase in both oligo(A) synthetase activity and mRNA levels was inhibited by polyclonal antiserum to human IFN-alpha; however, no IFN-alpha mRNA could be detected in the cells. Antiserum to IFN-beta or gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) had no effect on oligo(A) synthetase expression or activity nor was there any detectable IFN-beta 1 or IFN-beta 2 mRNA in the cells. The anti-IFN-alpha serum did not block the elevation of HLA-B mRNA in DMSO-treated cells. These observations suggest that the increased expression of oligo(A) synthetase in DMSO-treated cells may be mediated by the release of an IFN-alpha-like factor; however, the levels of any IFN-alpha mRNA produced in the cells were extremely low. Images PMID:2476665

  14. Activation of chitin synthetase in permeabilized cells of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant lacking proteinase B.

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, M P; Correa, J U; Cabib, E

    1982-01-01

    Digitonin treatment at 30 degrees C of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant lacking proteinase B permeabilized the cells and caused rapid and extensive activation of chitin synthetase in situ. The same result was obtained with a mutant generally defective in vacuolar proteases. By lowering the temperature and using different permeabilization procedures, we showed that increases in permeability and activation are distinct processes. Activation was inhibited by the protease inhibitors antipain and leupeptin, but by pepstatin or chymostatin. Metal chelators were also inhibitory, and their effect was reversed by the addition of Ca2+ but not by Mg2+. Antipain added together with Ca2+ after incubation of the cells in the presence of a chelating agent prevented reversal of inhibition, a result that was interpreted as indicating that antipain acts either on the same step affected by Ca2+ or on a subsequent step. Efforts to obtain activation in cell-free extracts were unsuccessful, but it was possible to extract the synthetase, once activated, by breaking permeabilized cells with glass beads. Treatment of the cell-free extracts with trypsin led not only to increased activity of chitin synthetase, but also to a change in the pH-activity curve and a diminished requirement by the enzyme for free N-acetylglucosamine. These observations suggest that the modification undergone by the synthetase during endogenous activation is different from that brought about by trypsin treatment. Images PMID:6216245

  15. Effects of univalent cations on the activity of particulate starch synthetase.

    PubMed

    Nitsos, R E; Evans, H J

    1969-09-01

    An investigation was made to determine the univalent cation requirements of starch synthetase from a variety of plant species of economic importance. The particulate enzyme from sweet corn was shown to have an absolute requirement for potassium, with the optimum activation occurring at 0.05 M KCl. Rubidium, cesium, and ammonium were 80% as effective as potassium while sodium and lithium were respectively 21% and 8% as effective as potassium. The K(A) for potassium was determined to be 6 mM. In the case of the particulate starch synthetase from wheat, bush beans, field corn, soybeans, peas, or potatoes, considerable stimulation of enzyme activity was obtained by the addition of potassium to the reaction mixture. In these studies, low enzyme activity was observed in the absence of added potassium, but the content of endogenous univalent cations in the reactions may be sufficient to account for the activities observed. Anions of various types had no effect on starch synthetase activity. Divalent cations produced slight activation in the presence or absence of potassium. All efforts to show a potassium requirement for glycogen synthetase from rat liver have been negative.

  16. Effect of treatment on erythrocyte phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase and glutathione reductase activity in patients with primary gout.

    PubMed Central

    Braven, J; Hardwell, T R; Hickling, P; Whittaker, M

    1986-01-01

    The activities of erythrocyte phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate (PRPP) synthetase and glutathione reductase (GTR) were studied in 26 patients with primary gout who were receiving no treatment or treatment with either allopurinol or azapropazone, and compared with the activity in a group of healthy controls. The activity of PRPP synthetase was significantly higher in the gout group and was not influenced by either drug. No significant difference in the activity of GTR was observed. The failure of either drug to suppress the increased activity of PRPP synthetase associated with gout is discussed. PMID:3024593

  17. Phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase activity affects growth and riboflavin production in Ashbya gossypii

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez, Alberto; Santos, María A; Revuelta, José L

    2008-01-01

    Background Phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate (PRPP) is a central compound for cellular metabolism and may be considered as a link between carbon and nitrogen metabolism. PRPP is directly involved in the de novo and salvage biosynthesis of GTP, which is the immediate precursor of riboflavin. The industrial production of this vitamin using the fungus Ashbya gossypii is an important biotechnological process that is strongly influenced by substrate availability. Results Here we describe the characterization and manipulation of two genes of A. gossypii encoding PRPP synthetase (AGR371C and AGL080C). We show that the AGR371C and AGL080C gene products participate in PRPP synthesis and exhibit inhibition by ADP. We also observed a major contribution of AGL080C to total PRPP synthetase activity, which was confirmed by an evident growth defect of the Δagl080c strain. Moreover, we report the overexpression of wild-type and mutant deregulated isoforms of Agr371cp and Agl080cp that significantly enhanced the production of riboflavin in the engineered A. gossypii strains. Conclusion It is shown that alterations in PRPP synthetase activity have pleiotropic effects on the fungal growth pattern and that an increase in PRPP synthetase enzymatic activity can be used to enhance riboflavin production in A. gossypii. PMID:18782443

  18. Active site nanospace of aminoacyl tRNA synthetase: difference between the class I and class II synthetases.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Saheb; Choudhury, Kaberi; Banik, Sindrila Dutta; Nandi, Nilashis

    2014-03-01

    The present work is aimed at understanding the origin of the difference in the molecular organization of the active site nanospaces of the class I and class II aminoacyl tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) which are tunnel-like structures. The active site encloses the cognate amino acid (AA) and the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) to carry out aminoacylation reaction. Comparison of the structures of the active site of the class I and class II (aaRSs) shows that the nanodimensional tunnels are curved in opposite directions in the two classes. We investigated the origin of this difference using quantum mechanical computation of electrostatic potential (ESP) of substrates, surrounding residues and ions, using Atoms in Molecule (AIM) Theory and charge population analysis. We show that the difference is principally due to the variation in the spatial charge distribution of ATP in the two classes which correspond to extended and bent conformations of ATP. The present computation shows that the most feasible pathway for nucleophilic attack to alphaP is oppositely directed for class I and class II aaRSs. The available crystal structures show that the cognate AA is indeed located along the channel favorable for nucleophilic attack as predicted by the ESP analysis. It is also shown that the direction of the channel changes its orientation when the orientation of ATP is changed from extended to a bent like structure. We further used the AIM theory to confirm the direction of the approach of AA in each case and the results corroborate the results from the ESP analysis. The opposite curvatures of the active site nanospaces in class I and class II aaRSs are related with the influence of the charge distributions of the extended and bent conformations of ATP, respectively. The results of the computation of electrostatic potential by successive addition of active site residues show that their roles on the reaction are similar in both classes despite the difference in the organization of the

  19. Characterisation of Drosophila CMP-sialic acid synthetase activity reveals unusual enzymatic properties

    PubMed Central

    Mertsalov, Ilya B.; Novikov, Boris N.; Scott, Hilary; Dangott, Lawrence; Panin, Vladislav M.

    2016-01-01

    CMP-sialic acid synthetase (CSAS) is a key enzyme of the sialylation pathway. CSAS produces the activated sugar donor, CMP-sialic acid, which serves as a substrate for sialyltransferases to modify glycan termini with sialic acid. Unlike other animal CMP-Sia synthetases that normally localize in the nucleus, Drosophila melanogaster CSAS (DmCSAS) localizes in the cell secretory compartment, predominantly in the Golgi, which suggests that this enzyme has properties distinct from those of its vertebrate counterparts. To test this hypothesis, we purified recombinant DmCSAS and characterised its activity in vitro. Our experiments revealed several unique features of this enzyme. DmCSAS displays specificity for N-acetylneuraminic acid as a substrate, shows preference for lower pH and can function with a broad range of metal cofactors. When tested at a pH corresponding to the Golgi compartment, the enzyme showed significant activity with several metal cations, including Zn2+, Fe2+, Co2+ and Mn2+, while the activity with Mg2+ was found to be low. Protein sequence analysis and site-specific mutagenesis identified an aspartic acid residue that is necessary for enzymatic activity and predicted to be involved in coordinating a metal cofactor. DmCSAS enzymatic activity was found to be essential in vivo for rescuing the phenotype of DmCSAS mutants. Finally, our experiments revealed a steep dependence of the enzymatic activity on temperature. Taken together, our results indicate that DmCSAS underwent evolutionary adaptation to pH and ionic environment different from that of counterpart synthetases in vertebrates. Our data also suggest that environmental temperatures can regulate Drosophila sialylation, thus modulating neural transmission. PMID:27114558

  20. The bifunctional active site of s-adenosylmethionine synthetase. Roles of the active site aspartates.

    PubMed

    Taylor, J C; Markham, G D

    1999-11-12

    S-Adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) synthetase catalyzes the biosynthesis of AdoMet in a unique enzymatic reaction. Initially the sulfur of methionine displaces the intact tripolyphosphate chain (PPP(i)) from ATP, and subsequently PPP(i) is hydrolyzed to PP(i) and P(i) before product release. The crystal structure of Escherichia coli AdoMet synthetase shows that the active site contains four aspartate residues. Aspartate residues Asp-16* and Asp-271 individually provide the sole protein ligand to one of the two required Mg(2+) ions (* denotes a residue from a second subunit); aspartates Asp-118 and Asp-238* are proposed to interact with methionine. Each aspartate has been changed to an uncharged asparagine, and the metal binding residues were also changed to alanine, to assess the roles of charge and ligation ability on catalytic efficiency. The resultant enzyme variants all structurally resemble the wild type enzyme as indicated by circular dichroism spectra and are tetramers. However, all have k(cat) reductions of approximately 10(3)-fold in AdoMet synthesis, whereas the MgATP and methionine K(m) values change by less than 3- and 8-fold, respectively. In the partial reaction of PPP(i) hydrolysis, mutants of the Mg(2+) binding residues have >700-fold reduced catalytic efficiency (k(cat)/K(m)), whereas the D118N and D238*N mutants are impaired less than 35-fold. The catalytic efficiency for PPP(i) hydrolysis by Mg(2+) site mutants is improved by AdoMet, like the wild type enzyme. In contrast AdoMet reduces the catalytic efficiency for PPP(i) hydrolysis by the D118N and D238*N mutants, indicating that the events involved in AdoMet activation are hindered in these methionyl binding site mutants. Ca(2+) uniquely activates the D271A mutant enzyme to 15% of the level of Mg(2+), in contrast to the approximately 1% Ca(2+) activation of the wild type enzyme. This indicates that the Asp-271 side chain size is a discriminator between the activating ability of Ca(2+) and the

  1. Loss of editing activity during the evolution of mitochondrial phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase.

    PubMed

    Roy, Hervé; Ling, Jiqiang; Alfonzo, Juan; Ibba, Michael

    2005-11-18

    Accurate selection of amino acids is essential for faithful translation of the genetic code. Errors during amino acid selection are usually corrected by the editing activity of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases such as phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetases (PheRS), which edit misactivated tyrosine. Comparison of cytosolic and mitochondrial PheRS from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae suggested that the organellar protein might lack the editing activity. Yeast cytosolic PheRS was found to contain an editing site, which upon disruption abolished both cis and trans editing of Tyr-tRNA(Phe). Wild-type mitochondrial PheRS lacked cis and trans editing and could synthesize Tyr-tRNA(Phe), an activity enhanced in active site variants with improved tyrosine recognition. Possible trans editing was investigated in isolated mitochondrial extracts, but no such activity was detected. These data indicate that the mitochondrial protein synthesis machinery lacks the tyrosine proofreading activity characteristic of cytosolic translation. This difference between the mitochondria and the cytosol suggests that either organellar protein synthesis quality control is focused on another step or that translation in this compartment is inherently less accurate than in the cytosol. PMID:16162501

  2. Xylan synthetase activity in differentiated xylem cells of sycamore trees (Acer pseudoplatanus).

    PubMed

    Dalessandro, G; Northcote, D H

    1981-01-01

    Particulate enzymic preparations obtained from homogenates of differentiated xylem cells isolated from sycamore trees, catalyzed the formation of a radioactive xylan in the presence of UDP-D-[U-(14)C]xylose as substrate. The synthesized xylan was not dialyzable through Visking cellophane tubing. Successive extraction with cold water, hot water and 5% NaOH dissolved respectively 15, 5 and 80% of the radioactive polymer. Complete acid hydrolysis of the water-insoluble polysaccharide synthesized from UDP-D-[U-(14)C]xylose released all the radioactivity as xylose. β-1,4-Xylodextrins, degree of polymerization 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6, were obtained by partial acid hydrolysis (fuming HCl or 0.1 M HCl) of radioactive xylan. The polymer was hydrolysed to xylose, xylobiose and xylotriose by Driselase which contains 1,4-β xylanase activities. Methylation and then hydrolysis of the xylan released two methylated sugars which were identified as di-O-methyl[(14)C]xylose and tri-O-methyl-[(14)C]xylose, suggesting a 1→4-linked polymer. The linkage was confirmed by periodate oxidation studies. The apparent Km value of the synthetase for UDP-D-xylose was 0.4 mM. Xylan synthetase activity was not potentiated in the presence of a detergent. The enzymic activity was stimulated by Mg(2+) and Mn(2+) ions, although EDTA in the range of concentrations between 0.01 and 1 mM did not affect the reaction rate. It appears that the xylan synthetase system associated with membranes obtained from differentiated xylem cells of sycamore trees may serve for catalyzing the in vivo synthesis of the xylan main chain during the biogenesis of the plant cell wall.

  3. Bacterial expression of catalytically active fragments of the multifunctional enzyme enniatin synthetase.

    PubMed

    Haese, A; Pieper, R; von Ostrowski, T; Zocher, R

    1994-10-14

    Enniatin synthetase catalyzes the biosynthesis of N-methylated cyclohexadepsipeptides. The 347 kDa enzyme is encoded by the esyn1 gene of Fusarium scirpi and contains two domains (EA and EB) homologous to each other and to regions of other microbial peptide synthetases. Parts of the esyn1 gene were subcloned in frame to a small lacZ gene portion of Escherichia coli expression vectors. Overproduced recombinant proteins showed a high tendency towards inclusion body formation and could be only partially dissolved in 8 M urea or 6 M guanidine hydrochloride. After renaturation, a 121 kDa recombinant protein representing the N-terminal conserved domain EA of enniatin synthetase was shown to activate D-hydroxyisolvaleric acid via adenylation. Similarly, a 158 kDa recombinant protein comprising the C-terminal conserved domain EB catalyzed the activation of the substrate amino acid (e.g. L-valine). Moreover, this protein could be photolabeled with S-[methyl-14C]adenosyl-L-methionine, (AdoMet) indicating the presence of the methyltransferase. Both functions, L-valine activation and AdoMet binding, could be assigned to a 108 kDa recombinant protein encompassing the A and the M segment of domain EB. The fact that a 65 kDa recombinant protein representing the M portion could be photolabeled, indicated the localization of the methyltransferase in this region. Three deletion mutants of the 65 kDa protein were shown to be inactive with respect to UV-induced AdoMet labeling. PMID:7932733

  4. Human Tyr-tRNA synthetase is a potent PARP-1 activating effector target for resveratrol

    PubMed Central

    Sajish, Mathew; Schimmel, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Resveratrol (RSV) is reported to extend life span1,2 and provide cardio-neuro-protective3, anti-diabetic4, and anti-cancer effects3,5 by initiating a stress response2 that induces survival genes. Because human tyrosyl tRNA synthetase (TyrRS) translocates to the nucleus under stress conditions6, we considered the possibility that the tyrosine-like phenolic ring of RSV might fit into the active site pocket to effect a nuclear role. Here we present a 2.1Å co-crystal structure of RSV bound to the active site of TyrRS. RSV nullified the catalytic activity and redirected TyrRS to a nuclear function, stimulating NAD+-dependent auto-poly-ADP-ribosylation of PARP-1. Downstream activation of key stress signaling pathways were causally connected to TyrRS-PARP-1-NAD+ collaboration. This collaboration was also demonstrated in the mouse, and was specifically blocked in vivo by a RSV-displacing tyrosyl adenylate analog. In contrast to functionally diverse tRNA synthetase catalytic nulls created by alternative splicing events that ablate active sites7, here a non-spliced TyrRS catalytic null reveals a new PARP-1- and NAD+-dependent dimension to the physiological mechanism of RSV. PMID:25533949

  5. Discovery of amide (peptide) bond synthetic activity in Acyl-CoA synthetase.

    PubMed

    Abe, Tomoko; Hashimoto, Yoshiteru; Hosaka, Hideaki; Tomita-Yokotani, Kaori; Kobayashi, Michihiko

    2008-04-25

    Acyl-CoA synthetase, which is one of the acid-thiol ligases (EC 6.2.1), plays key roles in metabolic and regulatory processes. This enzyme forms a carbon-sulfur bond in the presence of ATP and Mg(2+), yielding acyl-CoA thioesters from the corresponding free acids and CoA. This enzyme belongs to the superfamily of adenylate-forming enzymes, whose three-dimensional structures are analogous to one another. We here discovered a new reaction while studying the short-chain acyl-CoA synthetase that we recently reported (Hashimoto, Y., Hosaka, H., Oinuma, K., Goda, M., Higashibata, H., and Kobayashi, M. (2005) J. Biol. Chem. 280, 8660-8667). When l-cysteine was used as a substrate instead of CoA, N-acyl-l-cysteine was surprisingly detected as a reaction product. This finding demonstrated that the enzyme formed a carbon-nitrogen bond (EC 6.3.1 acid-ammonia (or amide) ligase (amide synthase); EC 6.3.2 acid-amino acid ligase (peptide synthase)) comprising the amino group of the cysteine and the carboxyl group of the acid. N-Acyl-d-cysteine, N-acyl-dl-homocysteine, and N-acyl-l-cysteine methyl ester were also synthesized from the corresponding cysteine analog substrates by the enzyme. Furthermore, this unexpected enzyme activity was also observed for acetyl-CoA synthetase and firefly luciferase, indicating the generality of the new reaction in the superfamily of adenylate-forming enzymes.

  6. The bifunctional active site of S-adenosylmethionine synthetase. Roles of the basic residues.

    PubMed

    Taylor, J C; Markham, G D

    2000-02-11

    S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) synthetase catalyzes a unique two-step enzymatic reaction leading to formation of the primary biological alkylating agent. The crystal structure of Escherichia coli AdoMet synthetase shows that the active site, which lies between two subunits, contains four lysines and one histidine as basic residues. In order to test the proposed charge and hydrogen bonding roles in catalytic function, each lysine has been changed to an uncharged methionine or alanine, and the histidine has been altered to asparagine. The resultant enzyme variants are all tetramers like the wild type enzyme; however, circular dichroism spectra show reductions in helix content for the K245*M and K269M mutants. (The asterisk denotes that the residue is in the second subunit.) Four mutants have k(cat) reductions of approximately 10(3)-10(4)-fold in AdoMet synthesis; however, the k(cat) of K165*M variant is only reduced 2-fold. In each mutant, there is a smaller catalytic impairment in the partial reaction of tripolyphosphate hydrolysis. The K165*A enzyme has a 100-fold greater k(cat) for tripolyphosphate hydrolysis than the wild type enzyme, but this mutant is not activated by AdoMet in contrast to the wild type enzyme. The properties of these mutants require reassessment of the catalytic roles of these residues. PMID:10660564

  7. Neddylation requires glycyl-tRNA synthetase to protect activated E2.

    PubMed

    Mo, Zhongying; Zhang, Qian; Liu, Ze; Lauer, Janelle; Shi, Yi; Sun, Litao; Griffin, Patrick R; Yang, Xiang-Lei

    2016-08-01

    Neddylation is a post-translational modification that controls the cell cycle and proliferation by conjugating the ubiquitin-like protein NEDD8 to specific targets. Here we report that glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GlyRS), an essential enzyme in protein synthesis, also plays a critical role in neddylation. In human cells, knockdown of GlyRS, but not knockdown of a different tRNA synthetase, decreased the global level of neddylation and caused cell-cycle abnormality. This function of GlyRS is achieved through direct interactions with multiple components of the neddylation pathway, including NEDD8, E1, and E2 (Ubc12). Using various structural and functional approaches, we show that GlyRS binds the APPBP1 subunit of E1 and captures and protects activated E2 (NEDD8-conjugated Ubc12) before the activated E2 reaches a downstream target. Therefore, GlyRS functions as a chaperone that critically supports neddylation. This function is probably conserved in all eukaryotic GlyRS enzymes and may contribute to the strong association of GlyRS with cancer progression. PMID:27348078

  8. 2'-phosphodiesterase and 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase activities in the lowest metazoans, sponge [porifera].

    PubMed

    Saby, Emilie; Poulsen, Jesper Buchhave; Justesen, Just; Kelve, Merike; Uriz, Maria Jesus

    2009-01-01

    Sponges [porifera], the most ancient metazoans, contain modules related to the vertebrate immune system, including the 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase (OAS). The components of the antiviral 2',5'-oligoadenylate (2-5A) system (OAS, 2'-Phosphodiesterase (2'-PDE) and RNAse L) of vertebrates have not all been identified in sponges. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that in addition to the OAS activity, sponges possess a 2'-PDE activity, which highlights the probable existence of a premature 2-5A system. Indeed, Suberites domuncula and Crella elegans exhibited this 2-5A degrading activity. Upon this finding, two out of three elements forming the 2-5A system have been found in sponges, only a endoribonuclease, RNAse L or similar, has to be found. We suspect the existence of a complex immune system in sponges, besides the self/non-self recognition system and the use of phagocytosis and secondary metabolites against pathogens.

  9. Prostaglandin endoperoxide synthetase and the activation of benzo(a)pyrene to reactive metabolites in vivo in guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Garattini, E.; Coccia, P.; Romano, M.; Jiritano, L.; Noseda, A.; Salmona, M.

    1984-11-01

    The role of prostaglandin endoperoxide synthetase in the in vivo activation of benzo(a)pyrene to reactive metabolites capable of interacting irreversibly with cellular macromolecules was studied in guinea pig liver, lung, kidney, spleen, small intestine, colon, and brain. DNA and protein covalent binding experiments were made after systemic administration of acetylsalicylic acid (200 mg/kg) followed by radiolabeled benzo(a)pyrene (4 microgram/kg). Results are compared with a control situation in which the prostaglandin endoperoxide synthetase inhibitor (acetylsalicylic acid) was not administered. No decrease in the level of DNA or protein benzo(a)pyrene-derived covalent binding was observed in any of the tissues studied.

  10. Activity of interferon-dependent 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase in rat lymphoid cells under transformed environment conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostapchenko, L. I.; Mikhailik, I. V.; Prokopova, K. V.

    It is detected that interferon-dependent 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase is a sensitive index of immunocompetent cells functional state under transformed environment conditions. Microgravitation and ionising radiation induce increase of investigated enzyme activity in rat lymphocytes, which can be a result of lymphoid cells compensatory mechanisms starting in response to stress factors action. Administration of interferon inductors permits to stimulate the 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase, which enables one to correct pathological changes in the cells and to intensify adaptive reactions of immune systems.

  11. Barley chloroplast glutamine synthetase activity is not affected by CO sub 2 -concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Avila, C.; Forde, B.; Wallsgrove, R. )

    1990-05-01

    It has been reported that when photorespiration is suppressed by raising the concentration of CO{sub 2}, the expression of the chloroplast glutamine synthetase (GS2) gene in pea leaves is reduced (Plant Cell, 1, 241). We have examined this effect in barley (Hordeum vulgare), and confirm that plants grown continuously in 0.8% CO{sub 2}, or transferred to such conditions after growth in air, appear to have a reduced GS2 mRNA abundance. However, we were unable to detect any significant difference in the extractable GS2 activity, or any change in amount of GS2 protein (judged by Western blots). Whatever controls are operating on gS2 mRNA expression in response to changes is external CO{sub 2}, they do not affect the activity or amount of the enzyme in barley.

  12. Active site coupling in Plasmodium falciparum GMP synthetase is triggered by domain rotation.

    PubMed

    Ballut, Lionel; Violot, Sébastien; Shivakumaraswamy, Santosh; Thota, Lakshmi Prasoona; Sathya, Manu; Kunala, Jyothirmai; Dijkstra, Bauke W; Terreux, Raphaël; Haser, Richard; Balaram, Hemalatha; Aghajari, Nushin

    2015-11-23

    GMP synthetase (GMPS), a key enzyme in the purine biosynthetic pathway performs catalysis through a coordinated process across two catalytic pockets for which the mechanism remains unclear. Crystal structures of Plasmodium falciparum GMPS in conjunction with mutational and enzyme kinetic studies reported here provide evidence that an 85° rotation of the GATase domain is required for ammonia channelling and thus for the catalytic activity of this two-domain enzyme. We suggest that conformational changes in helix 371-375 holding catalytic residues and in loop 376-401 along the rotation trajectory trigger the different steps of catalysis, and establish the central role of Glu374 in allostery and inter-domain crosstalk. These studies reveal the mechanism of domain rotation and inter-domain communication, providing a molecular framework for the function of all single polypeptide GMPSs and form a solid basis for rational drug design targeting this therapeutically important enzyme.

  13. Active site coupling in Plasmodium falciparum GMP synthetase is triggered by domain rotation

    PubMed Central

    Ballut, Lionel; Violot, Sébastien; Shivakumaraswamy, Santosh; Thota, Lakshmi Prasoona; Sathya, Manu; Kunala, Jyothirmai; Dijkstra, Bauke W.; Terreux, Raphaël; Haser, Richard; Balaram, Hemalatha; Aghajari, Nushin

    2015-01-01

    GMP synthetase (GMPS), a key enzyme in the purine biosynthetic pathway performs catalysis through a coordinated process across two catalytic pockets for which the mechanism remains unclear. Crystal structures of Plasmodium falciparum GMPS in conjunction with mutational and enzyme kinetic studies reported here provide evidence that an 85° rotation of the GATase domain is required for ammonia channelling and thus for the catalytic activity of this two-domain enzyme. We suggest that conformational changes in helix 371–375 holding catalytic residues and in loop 376–401 along the rotation trajectory trigger the different steps of catalysis, and establish the central role of Glu374 in allostery and inter-domain crosstalk. These studies reveal the mechanism of domain rotation and inter-domain communication, providing a molecular framework for the function of all single polypeptide GMPSs and form a solid basis for rational drug design targeting this therapeutically important enzyme. PMID:26592566

  14. Acetoacetyl-CoA synthetase activity is controlled by a protein acetyltransferase with unique domain organization in Streptomyces lividans.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Alex C; Escalante-Semerena, Jorge C

    2013-01-01

    GCN5-type N-acetyltransferases (GNATs) are enzymes that catalyse the transfer of the acetyl group from acetyl-CoA to a primary amine. GNATs are conserved in all domains of life. Some members of this family of enzymes acetylate the side-chain of specific lysine residues in proteins of diverse function. In bacteria, GNAT-catalysed protein acetylation regulates carbon metabolism, RNA metabolism and transcriptional regulation. Metabolic regulation in Streptomyces species is of interest due to the role of these organisms in natural product synthesis. Here we identify SlPatA, a GNAT in Streptomyces lividans with unique domain organization, and a new acetylation target, namely acetoacetyl-CoA synthetase (SlAacS). The latter has homologues in all domains of life. In vitro and in vivo evidence show that SlAacS is a bona fide acetoacetyl-CoA synthetase. SlPatA acetylates SlAacS more efficiently than it does acetyl-CoA synthetase, an enzyme known to be under acetylation control. SlPatA acetylates SlAacS at the active-site residue Lys617 and acetylation inactivates SlAacS. Acetylated SlAacS was deacetylated by a sirtuin-type protein deacetylase. SlAacS acetylation/deacetylation may represent a conserved mechanism for regulation of acetoacetyl-CoA synthetase activity in all domains of life.

  15. Purification of isopenicillin N synthetase.

    PubMed Central

    Pang, C P; Chakravarti, B; Adlington, R M; Ting, H H; White, R L; Jayatilake, G S; Baldwin, J E; Abraham, E P

    1984-01-01

    Isopenicillin N synthetase was extracted from Cephalosporium acremonium and purified about 200-fold. The product showed one major protein band, coinciding with synthetase activity, when subjected to electrophoresis in polyacrylamide gel. An isopenicillin N synthetase from Penicillium chrysogenum was purified about 70-fold by similar procedures. The two enzymes resemble each other closely in their Mr, in their mobility on electrophoresis in polyacrylamide gel and in their requirement for Fe2+ and ascorbate for maximum activity. Preliminary experiments have shown that a similar isopenicillin N synthetase can be extracted from Streptomyces clavuligerus. PMID:6435606

  16. Substrate activity of synthetic formyl phosphate in the reaction catalyzed by formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase

    SciTech Connect

    Smithers, G.W.; Jahansouz, H.; Kofron, J.L.; Himes, R.H.; Reed, G.H.

    1987-06-30

    Formyl phosphate, a putative enzyme-bound intermediate in the reaction catalyzed by formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase (EC 6.3.4.3), was synthesized from formyl fluoride and inorganic phosphate, and the product was characterized by /sup 31/P, /sup 1/H, and /sup 13/C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Measurement of hydrolysis rates by /sup 31/P NMR indicates that formyl phosphate is particularly labile, with a half-life of 48 min in a buffered neutral solution at 20 /sup 0/C. At pH 7, hydrolysis occurs with P-O bond cleavage, as demonstrated by /sup 18/O incorporation from H/sub 2//sup 18/O into P/sub i/, while at pH 1 and pH 13 hydrolysis occurs with C-O bond cleavage. The substrate activity of formyl phosphate was tested in the reaction catalyzed by formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase isolated from Clostridium cylindrosporum. Formyl phosphate supports the reaction in both the forward and reverse directions. Thus, N/sup 10/-formyltetrahydrofolate is produced from tetrahydrofolate and formyl phosphate in a reaction mixture that contains enzyme, Mg(II), and ADP, and ATP is produced from formyl phosphate and ADP with enzyme, Mg(II), and tetrahydrofolate present. The requirements for ADP and for tetrahydrofolate as cofactors in these reactions are consistent with previous steady-state kinetic and isotope exchange studies, which demonstrated that all substrate subsites must be occupied prior to catalysis. The k/sub cat/ values for both the forward and reverse directions, with formyl phosphate as the substrate, are much lower than those for the normal forward and reverse reactions. Kinetic analysis of the formyl phosphate supported reactions indicates that the low steady-state rates observed for the synthetic intermediate are most likely due to the sequential nature of the normal reaction.

  17. Large-scale filament formation inhibits the activity of CTP synthetase

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Rachael M; Bitbol, Anne-Florence; Lorestani, Alexander; Charles, Emeric J; Habrian, Chris H; Hansen, Jesse M; Li, Hsin-Jung; Baldwin, Enoch P; Wingreen, Ned S; Kollman, Justin M; Gitai, Zemer

    2014-01-01

    CTP Synthetase (CtpS) is a universally conserved and essential metabolic enzyme. While many enzymes form small oligomers, CtpS forms large-scale filamentous structures of unknown function in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. By simultaneously monitoring CtpS polymerization and enzymatic activity, we show that polymerization inhibits activity, and CtpS's product, CTP, induces assembly. To understand how assembly inhibits activity, we used electron microscopy to define the structure of CtpS polymers. This structure suggests that polymerization sterically hinders a conformational change necessary for CtpS activity. Structure-guided mutagenesis and mathematical modeling further indicate that coupling activity to polymerization promotes cooperative catalytic regulation. This previously uncharacterized regulatory mechanism is important for cellular function since a mutant that disrupts CtpS polymerization disrupts E. coli growth and metabolic regulation without reducing CTP levels. We propose that regulation by large-scale polymerization enables ultrasensitive control of enzymatic activity while storing an enzyme subpopulation in a conformationally restricted form that is readily activatable. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03638.001 PMID:25030911

  18. Structural Analysis of the Active Site Geometry of N[superscript 5]-Carboxyaminoimidazole Ribonucleotide Synthetase from Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Thoden, James B.; Holden, Hazel M.; Firestine, Steven M.

    2009-09-11

    N{sub 5}-Carboxyaminoimidazole ribonucleotide synthetase (N{sub 5}-CAIR synthetase) converts 5-aminoimidazole ribonucleotide (AIR), MgATP, and bicarbonate into N{sub 5}-CAIR, MgADP, and P{sub i}. The enzyme is required for de novo purine biosynthesis in microbes yet is not found in humans suggesting that it represents an ideal and unexplored target for antimicrobial drug design. Here we report the X-ray structures of N{sub 5}-CAIR synthetase from Escherichia coli with either MgATP or MgADP/P{sub i} bound in the active site cleft. These structures, determined to 1.6-{angstrom} resolution, provide detailed information regarding the active site geometry before and after ATP hydrolysis. In both structures, two magnesium ions are observed. Each of these is octahedrally coordinated, and the carboxylate side chain of Glu238 bridges them. For the structure of the MgADP/P{sub i} complex, crystals were grown in the presence of AIR and MgATP. No electron density was observed for AIR, and the electron density corresponding to the nucleotide clearly revealed the presence of ADP and P{sub i} rather than ATP. The bound P{sub i} shifts by approximately 3 {angstrom} relative to the {gamma}-phosphoryl group of ATP and forms electrostatic interactions with the side chains of Arg242 and His244. Since the reaction mechanism of N{sub 5}-CAIR synthetase is believed to proceed via a carboxyphosphate intermediate, we propose that the location of the inorganic phosphate represents the binding site for stabilization of this reactive species. Using the information derived from the two structures reported here, coupled with molecular modeling, we propose a catalytic mechanism for N{sub 5}-CAIR synthetase.

  19. Effects of the chitin synthetase inhibitor plumbagin and its 2-demethyl derivative juglone on insect ecdysone 20-monooxygenase activity.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, M J; Smith, S L

    1988-12-01

    The chitin synthetase inhibitor plumbagin and its 2-demethyl derivative juglone were found to inhibit in a dose-response fashion the cytochrome P-450 dependent ecdysone 20-monooxygenase activity associated with adult female Aedes aegypti, wandering stage larvae of Drosophila melanogaster, and fat body and midgut from last instar larvae of Manduca sexta. The concentration of these naphthoquinones required to elicit a 50% inhibition of the steroid hydroxylase activity in all the insects was approximately 1 x 10(-4) M.

  20. Glutamine synthetase activity and glutamate uptake in hippocampus and frontal cortex in portal hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, Gabriela Beatriz; Fernández, María Alejandra; Roselló, Diego Martín; Tomaro, María Luján; Balestrasse, Karina; Lemberg, Abraham

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To study glutamine synthetase (GS) activity and glutamate uptake in the hippocampus and frontal cortex (FC) from rats with prehepatic portal vein hypertension. METHODS: Male Wistar rats were divided into sham-operated group and a portal hypertension (PH) group with a regulated stricture of the portal vein. Animals were sacrificed by decapitation 14 d after portal vein stricture. GS activity was determined in the hippocampus and FC. Specific uptake of radiolabeled L-glutamate was studied using synaptosome-enriched fractions that were freshly prepared from both brain areas. RESULTS: We observed that the activity of GS increased in the hippocampus of PH rats, as compared to control animals, and decreased in the FC. A significant decrease in glutamate uptake was found in both brain areas, and was more marked in the hippocampus. The decrease in glutamate uptake might have been caused by a deficient transport function, significantly and persistent increase in this excitatory neurotransmitter activity. CONCLUSION: The presence of moderate ammonia blood levels may add to the toxicity of excitotoxic glutamate in the brain, which causes alterations in brain function. Portal vein stricture that causes portal hypertension modifies the normal function in some brain regions. PMID:19533812

  1. Assessment of glutamine synthetase activity by [13N]ammonia uptake in living rat brain.

    PubMed

    Momosaki, Sotaro; Ito, Miwa; Tonomura, Misato; Abe, Kohji

    2015-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) plays an important role in glutamate neurotransmission or neurological disorder in the brain. [(13) N]Ammonia blood flow tracer has been reported to be metabolically trapped in the brain via the glutamate-glutamine pathway. The present study investigated the effect of an inhibitor of GS on [(13) N]ammonia uptake in order to clarify the feasibility of measuring GS activity in the living brain. l-Methionine sulfoximine (MSO), a selective GS inhibitor was microinjected into the ipsilateral striatum in rats. [(13) N]Ammonia uptake was quantified by autoradiography method as well as small animal positron emission tomography (PET) scans. The GS activity of the brain homogenate was assayed from the γ-glutamyl transferase reaction. Autoradiograms showed a decrease of [(13) N]ammonia radioactivity on the MSO-injected side compared with the saline-injected side of the striatum. This reduction could be detected with a small animal PET scanner. MSO had no effect on cerebral blood flow measured by uptake of [(15) O]H2 O. The reduction of [(13) N]ammonia uptake was closely related to the results of GS activity assay. These results indicated that [(13) N]ammonia may enable measurement of GS activity in the living brain.

  2. Synthesis and in vitro/in vivo Evaluation of the Antitrypanosomal Activity of 3-Bromoacivicin, a Potent CTP Synthetase Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Conti, Paola; Pinto, Andrea; Wong, Pui E; Major, Louise L; Tamborini, Lucia; Iannuzzi, Maria C; De Micheli, Carlo; Barrett, Michael P; Smith, Terry K

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The first convenient synthesis of enantiomerically pure (αS,5S)-α-amino-3-bromo-4,5-dihydroisoxazol-5-yl acetic acid (3-bromoacivicin) is described. We demonstrate that 3-bromoacivicin is a CTP synthetase inhibitor three times as potent as its 3-chloro analogue, the natural antibiotic acivicin. Because CTP synthetase was suggested to be a potential drug target in African trypanosomes, the in vitro/in vivo antitrypanosomal activity of 3-bromoacivicin was assessed in comparison with acivicin. Beyond expectation, we observed a 12-fold enhancement in the in vitro antitrypanosomal activity, while toxicity against mammalian cells remained unaffected. Despite its good in vitro activity and selectivity, 3-bromoacivicin proved to be trypanostatic and failed to completely eradicate the infection when tested in vivo at its maximum tolerable dose. PMID:21275056

  3. Broad-spectrum antiviral and cytocidal activity of cyclopentenylcytosine, a carbocyclic nucleoside targeted at CTP synthetase.

    PubMed

    De Clercq, E; Murase, J; Marquez, V E

    1991-06-15

    Cyclopentenylcytosine (Ce-Cyd) is a broad-spectrum antiviral agent active against DNA viruses [herpes (cytomegalo), pox (vaccinia)], (+)RNA viruses [picorna (polio, Coxsackie, rhino), toga (Sindbis, Semliki forest), corona], (-)RNA viruses [orthomyxo (influenza), paramyxo (parainfluenza, measles), arena (Junin, Tacaribe), rhabdo (vesicular stomatitis)] and (+/-)RNA viruses (reo). Ce-Cyd is a more potent antiviral agent than its saturated counterpart, cyclopentylcytosine (carbodine, C-Cyd). Ce-Cyd also has potent cytocidal activity against a number of tumor cell lines. The putative target enzyme for both the antiviral and antitumor action of Ce-Cyd is assumed to be the CTP synthetase that converts UTP to CTP. In keeping with this hypothesis was the finding that the antiviral and cytocidal effects of Ce-Cyd are readily reversed by Cyd and, to a lesser extent, Urd, but not by other nucleosides such as dThd or dCyd. In contrast, pyrazofurin and 6-azauridine, two nucleoside analogues that are assumed to interfere with OMP decarboxylase, another enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of pyrimidine ribonucleotides, potentiate the cytocidal activity of Ce-Cyd. Ce-Cyd should be further pursued, as such and in combination with OMP decarboxylase inhibitors, for its therapeutic potential in the treatment of both viral and neoplastic diseases. PMID:1710119

  4. Ethylene-Induced Increase in Glutamine Synthetase Activity and mRNA Levels in Hevea brasiliensis Latex Cells.

    PubMed Central

    Pujade-Renaud, V.; Clement, A.; Perrot-Rechenmann, C.; Prevot, J. C.; Chrestin, H.; Jacob, J. L.; Guern, J.

    1994-01-01

    Ethylene, used as a stimulant of latex production in Hevea brasiliensis, significantly activates the regenerating metabolism within the laticiferous cells. In this context, attention was focused on glutamine synthetase (GS; EC 6.3.1.2), a key enzyme in nitrogen metabolism. A specific and significant activation of the cytosolic glutamine synthetase (GScyt) in the laticiferous cells after ethylene treatment parallels the increase of latex yield. A marked accumulation of the corresponding mRNA was found, but in contrast, a slight and variable increase of the polypeptide level is at the limit of detection by western blotting. The GS response to ethylene might be mediated by ammonia that increases in latex cytosol following ethylene treatment. The physiological significance for such a regulation by ethylene of the GScyt is discussed in terms of the nitrogen requirement for protein synthesis associated with latex regeneration. PMID:12232192

  5. Aminolaevulinate synthetase of Micrococcus denitrificans. Purification and properties of the enzyme, and the effect of growth conditions on the enzyme activity in cells.

    PubMed

    Tait, G H

    1973-02-01

    1. 5-Aminolaevulinate synthetase was detected in extracts of the non-photosynthetic bacterium Micrococcus denitrificans. 2. Activity is high in cells grown anaerobically in a defined nitrate medium, but is low in cells grown in an iron-deficient medium, and in cells grown aerobically. 3. Aminolaevulinate synthetase was purified extensively; it has a molecular weight of about 68000; apparent K(m) values for glycine, succinyl-CoA and pyridoxal phosphate are 12mm, 10mum and 11mum respectively; 2mum-haemin and 14mum-protoporphyrin inhibit by 50%. 4. The low activity of aminolaevulinate synthetase in iron-deficient cells increases on adding iron salts to cells only under conditions where protein synthesis can occur. 5. In defined nitrate medium with a high Ca(2+) concentration anaerobic growth yield is higher, but aminolaevulinate synthetase activity is lower than in cells grown in the medium with a low Ca(2+) concentration. In medium made from AnalaR constituents, growth yield is low and aminolaevulinate synthetase activity is high even in the presence of high concentrations of Ca(2+); on adding Cu(2+) (0.1mum) to the medium growth yield and aminolaevulinate synthetase activity become the same as in non-AnalaR medium. 6. Cells incubated under conditions where protein synthesis does not occur but where electron transport does, lose their aminolaevulinate synthetase activity rapidly. 7. The activities of aminolaevulinate dehydratase and succinic thiokinase do not change under any of the conditions of growth examined. 8. The possible mechanisms controlling aminolaevulinate synthetase activity and the role of this enzyme in controlling the synthesis of haem in this organism are discussed. PMID:4722442

  6. Enzymatically active 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetases are widely distributed among Metazoa, including protostome lineage.

    PubMed

    Päri, Mailis; Kuusksalu, Anne; Lopp, Annika; Kjaer, Karina Hansen; Justesen, Just; Kelve, Merike

    2014-02-01

    2',5'-Oligoadenylate synthetases (OASs) belong to the nucleotidyl transferase family together with poly(A) polymerases, CCA-adding enzymes and the recently discovered cyclic-GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS). Mammalian OASs have been thoroughly characterized as components of the interferon-induced antiviral system. The OAS activity and the respective genes were also discovered in marine sponges where the interferon system is absent. In this study the recombinant OASs from several multicellular animals and their closest unicellular relative, a choanoflagellate, were expressed in a bacterial expression system and their enzymatic activities were examined. We demonstrated 2-5A synthesizing activities of OASs from the marine sponge Tedania ignis, a representative of the phylogenetically oldest metazoan phylum (Porifera), from an invertebrate of the protostome lineage, the mollusk Mytilus californianus (Mollusca), and from a vertebrate species, a cartilaginous fish Leucoraja erinacea (Chordata). However, the expressed proteins from an amphibian, the salamander Ambystoma mexicanum (Chordata), and from a protozoan, the marine choanoflagellate Monosiga brevicollis (Choanozoa), did not show 2-5A synthesizing activity. Differently from other studied OASs, OAS from the marine sponge T. ignis was able to catalyze the formation of oligomers having both 2',5'- and 3',5'-phosphodiester linkages. Our data suggest that OASs from sponges and evolutionarily higher animals have similar activation mechanisms which still include different affinities and possibly different structural requirements for the activating RNAs. Considering their 2'- and 3'-specificities, sponge OASs could represent a link between evolutionarily earlier nucleotidyl transferases and 2'-specific OASs from higher animals.

  7. Enzymatically active 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetases are widely distributed among Metazoa, including protostome lineage.

    PubMed

    Päri, Mailis; Kuusksalu, Anne; Lopp, Annika; Kjaer, Karina Hansen; Justesen, Just; Kelve, Merike

    2014-02-01

    2',5'-Oligoadenylate synthetases (OASs) belong to the nucleotidyl transferase family together with poly(A) polymerases, CCA-adding enzymes and the recently discovered cyclic-GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS). Mammalian OASs have been thoroughly characterized as components of the interferon-induced antiviral system. The OAS activity and the respective genes were also discovered in marine sponges where the interferon system is absent. In this study the recombinant OASs from several multicellular animals and their closest unicellular relative, a choanoflagellate, were expressed in a bacterial expression system and their enzymatic activities were examined. We demonstrated 2-5A synthesizing activities of OASs from the marine sponge Tedania ignis, a representative of the phylogenetically oldest metazoan phylum (Porifera), from an invertebrate of the protostome lineage, the mollusk Mytilus californianus (Mollusca), and from a vertebrate species, a cartilaginous fish Leucoraja erinacea (Chordata). However, the expressed proteins from an amphibian, the salamander Ambystoma mexicanum (Chordata), and from a protozoan, the marine choanoflagellate Monosiga brevicollis (Choanozoa), did not show 2-5A synthesizing activity. Differently from other studied OASs, OAS from the marine sponge T. ignis was able to catalyze the formation of oligomers having both 2',5'- and 3',5'-phosphodiester linkages. Our data suggest that OASs from sponges and evolutionarily higher animals have similar activation mechanisms which still include different affinities and possibly different structural requirements for the activating RNAs. Considering their 2'- and 3'-specificities, sponge OASs could represent a link between evolutionarily earlier nucleotidyl transferases and 2'-specific OASs from higher animals. PMID:24184688

  8. Liver glutamine synthetase activity is markedly reduced in chronic ethanol-fed micropigs

    SciTech Connect

    Olin, K.L.; Zidenberg-Cherr, S.; Villanueva, J.; Halsted, C.H.; Keen, C.L. )

    1992-02-26

    The authors have reported that chronic ethanol (Et) feeding in the micropig results in changes in antioxidant defense including reductions in liver CuZnSOD and GSHPX activities, in vitamin E and A levels, and increases in liver MnSOD activity. Despite these alterations, liver mitochondria (mit) and microsome (mic) TBARS were lower in Et-fed than control (C) pigs. The significance of lower TBARS is unclear since the saturated to PUFA ratio was higher in mit and mic from Et than from C pigs. Thus in the current study they measured a non-lipid target of oxidative damage. Glutamine synthetase (GS) activity was measured as this protein is an excellent marker for oxidative damage due to the sensitivity of histidine residues to free radicals at the active site. Micropigs were fed high PUFA diets containing 40% of kcals as either Et or cornstarch (C) and 34% of kcals as corn oil. After 12 mo pigs were killed and livers removed. Fatty infiltration, inflammation and necrosis were observed in livers from Et pigs by 5 mo; collagen infiltration was apparent in 2 pigs by 12 mo. Et pigs had GS activities that were 90% lower than C pigs. The finding that liver Mn levels were higher in Et than in C pigs suggests that the low GS activity is not due to a reduction in Mn availability, although a shift in the distribution of Mn from GS to MnSOD may be involved. These data support the idea that chronic Et feeding is associated with oxidative damage and underscore the need to evaluate non-lipid targets as markers for oxidative damage.

  9. Glycyl-tRNA synthetase specifically binds to the poliovirus IRES to activate translation initiation

    PubMed Central

    Andreev, Dmitri E.; Hirnet, Juliane; Terenin, Ilya M.; Dmitriev, Sergey E.; Niepmann, Michael; Shatsky, Ivan N.

    2012-01-01

    Adaptation to the host cell environment to efficiently take-over the host cell's machinery is crucial in particular for small RNA viruses like picornaviruses that come with only small RNA genomes and replicate exclusively in the cytosol. Their Internal Ribosome Entry Site (IRES) elements are specific RNA structures that facilitate the 5′ end-independent internal initiation of translation both under normal conditions and when the cap-dependent host protein synthesis is shut-down in infected cells. A longstanding issue is which host factors play a major role in this internal initiation. Here, we show that the functionally most important domain V of the poliovirus IRES uses tRNAGly anticodon stem–loop mimicry to recruit glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GARS) to the apical part of domain V, adjacent to the binding site of the key initiation factor eIF4G. The binding of GARS promotes the accommodation of the initiation region of the IRES in the mRNA binding site of the ribosome, thereby greatly enhancing the activity of the IRES at the step of the 48S initiation complex formation. Moonlighting functions of GARS that may be additionally needed for other events of the virus–host cell interaction are discussed. PMID:22373920

  10. Resveratrol Prevents Retinal Dysfunction by Regulating Glutamate Transporters, Glutamine Synthetase Expression and Activity in Diabetic Retina.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Kaihong; Yang, Na; Wang, Duozi; Li, Suping; Ming, Jian; Wang, Jing; Yu, Xuemei; Song, Yi; Zhou, Xue; Yang, Yongtao

    2016-05-01

    This study investigated the effects of resveratrol (RSV) on retinal functions, glutamate transporters (GLAST) and glutamine synthetase (GS) expression in diabetic rats retina, and on glutamate uptake, GS activity, GLAST and GS expression in high glucose-cultured Müller cells. The electroretinogram was used to evaluate retinal functions. Müller cells cultures were prepared from 5- to 7-day-old Sprague-Dawley rats. The expression of GLAST and GS was examined by qRT-PCR, ELISA and western-blotting. Glutamate uptake was measured as (3)H-glutamate contents of the lysates. GS activity was assessed by a spectrophotometric assay. 1- to 7-month RSV administrations (5 and 10 mg/kg/day) significantly alleviated hyperglycemia and weight loss in diabetic rats. RSV administrations also significantly attenuated diabetes-induced decreases in amplitude of a-wave in rod response, decreases in amplitude of a-, and b-wave in cone and rod response and decreases in amplitude of OP2 in oscillatory potentials. 1- to 7-month RSV treatments also significantly inhibited diabetes-induced delay in OP2 implicit times in scotopic 3.0 OPS test. The down-regulated mRNA and protein expression of GLAST and GS in diabetic rats retina was prevented by RSV administrations. In high glucose-treated cultures, Müller cells' glutamate uptake, GS activity, GLAST and GS expression were decreased significantly compared with normal control cultures. RSV (10, 20, and 30 mmol/l) significantly inhibited the HG-induced decreases in glutamate uptake, GS activity, GLAST and GS expression (at least P < 0.05). These beneficial results suggest that RSV may be considered as a therapeutic option to prevent from diabetic retinopathy.

  11. Enhancement of lysyl-tRNA synthetase activity in the Enterobacteriaceae

    SciTech Connect

    Hickey, E.W.; Hirshfield, I.

    1987-05-01

    Lysyl-tRNA synthetase (LRS) in E. coli is coded by two genes, one constitutive, and the other inducible; the latter is a cell stress protein. To determine if this system is wide spread in prokaryotes, the inducibility of LRS was first tested in eight members of the Enterobacteriaceae using cultural conditions known to induce the enzyme in E. coli K-12. Uninduced control cultures were grown to an O.D. of 0.2 at 580 nm in a supplemented minimal medium (SMM), pH 7.0 at 37/sup 0/C. Induction stimuli include: growth in SMM with 3mM Gly-L-Leu; growth in SMM as above, but with the initial pH adjusted to 5.0; or growth in Difco AC Broth to early stationary phase with a concomitant drop in the pH of the medium below 5.5. LRS activity was assayed in whole-cell sonic extracts by the aminoacylation of crude E. coli tRNA by /sup 14/C-lysine at pH 7.8 for three minutes. When E. aerogenes, K. pneumoniae, C. freundii, and S. typhimurium were grown in AC Broth, LRS activity was enhanced 2 to 4 fold. The enzyme is induced 2 to 4 fold in C. freundii and S. typhimurium upon growth at pH 5.0, whereas E. coli, K.; pneumoniae, and E. aerogenes show only a 1.5 fold induction. The peptide Gly-L-Leu enhanced LRS activity only in E. coli. LRS was not found to be inducible in S. marcescens, M. morganii, P. mirabilis, or P. vulgaris by any of the stimuli.

  12. Three promoters regulate the transcriptional activity of the human holocarboxylase synthetase gene1,2

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Mengna; Malkaram, Sridhar A.; Zempleni, Janos

    2013-01-01

    Holocarboxylase synthetase (HLCS) is the only protein biotin ligase in the human proteome. HLCS-dependent biotinylation of carboxylases plays crucial roles in macronutrient metabolism. HLCS appears to be an essential part of multiprotein complexes in the chromatin that cause gene repression and contribute toward genome stability. Consistent with these essential functions, HLCS knockdown causes strong phenotypes including shortened life span and low stress resistance in Drosophila melanogaster, and de-repression of long-terminal repeats in humans, other mammalian cell lines, and Drosophila. Despite previous observations that the expression of HLCS depends on biotin status in rats and in human cell lines, little is known about the regulation of HLCS expression. The goal of this study was to identify promoters that regulate the expression of the human HLCS gene. Initially, the human HLCS locus was interrogated in silico using predictors of promoters including sequences of HLCS mRNA and expressed sequence tags, CpG islands, histone marks denoting transcriptionally poised chromatin, transcription factor binding sites, and DNaseI hypersensitive regions. Our predictions revealed three putative HLCS promoters, denoted P1, P2, and P3. Promoters lacked a TATA box, which is typical for housekeeping genes. When the three promoters were cloned into a luciferase reporter plasmid, reporter gene activity was at least three times background noise in human breast, colon, and kidney cell lines; activities consistently followed the pattern P1> >P3>P2. Promoter activity depended on the concentration of biotin in culture media, but the effect was moderate. We conclude that we have identified promoters in the human HLCS gene. PMID:24075901

  13. Elucidation of the active conformation of the APS-kinase domain of human PAPS synthetase 1.

    PubMed

    Sekulic, Nikolina; Dietrich, Kristen; Paarmann, Ingo; Ort, Stephan; Konrad, Manfred; Lavie, Arnon

    2007-03-23

    Bifunctional human PAPS synthetase (PAPSS) catalyzes, in a two-step process, the formation of the activated sulfate carrier 3'-phosphoadenosine 5'-phosphosulfate (PAPS). The first reaction involves the formation of the 5'-adenosine phosphosulfate (APS) intermediate from ATP and inorganic sulfate. APS is then further phosphorylated on its 3'-hydroxyl group by an additional ATP molecule to generate PAPS. The former reaction is catalyzed by the ATP-sulfurylase domain and the latter by the APS-kinase domain. Here, we report the structure of the APS-kinase domain of PAPSS isoform 1 (PAPSS1) representing the Michaelis complex with the products ADP-Mg and PAPS. This structure provides a rare glimpse of the active conformation of an enzyme catalyzing phosphoryl transfer without resorting to substrate analogs, inactivating mutations, or catalytically non-competent conditions. Our structure shows the interactions involved in the binding of the magnesium ion and PAPS, thereby revealing residues critical for catalysis. The essential magnesium ion is observed bridging the phosphate groups of the products. This function of the metal ion is made possible by the DGDN-loop changing its conformation from that previously reported, and identifies these loop residues unambiguously as a Walker B motif. Furthermore, the second aspartate residue of this motif is the likely candidate for initiating nucleophilic attack on the ATP gamma-phosphate group by abstracting the proton from the 3'-hydroxyl group of the substrate APS. We report the structure of the APS-kinase domain of human PAPSS1 in complex with two APS molecules, demonstrating the ability of the ATP/ADP-binding site to bind APS. Both structures reveal extended N termini that approach the active site of the neighboring monomer. Together, these results significantly increase our understandings of how catalysis is achieved by APS-kinase.

  14. Loss of (2'-5')oligoadenylate synthetase activity by production of antisense RNA results in lack of protection by interferon from viral infections

    SciTech Connect

    De Benedetti, A.; Pytel, B.A.; Baglioni, C.

    1987-02-01

    An expression vector was constructed that carries part of the human BK papovavirus with 0.5 kilobases of (2'-5')oligoadenylate (2-5A) synthetase cDNA inserted in inverted orientation downstream from the virion proteins (VP) promoter and the neomycin-resistance gene neo under the control of a simian virus 40 promoter. Cells transfected with this vector and selected for resistance to the neomycin derivative G418 synthesized RNA complementary to 2-5A synthetase mRNA. These cells lacked 2-5A synthetase activity, and the enzyme was not inducible by interferon. In contrast, 2-5A synthetase was induced in cells transfected with a control vector without the cDNA insert. Such cells were protected by interferon from RNA viruses, whereas cells lacking 2-5A synthetase were not protected from encephalomyocarditis virus, vesicular stomatitis virus, and Sindbis virus but were fully protected from influenza virus. These findings show that a high level of 2-5A synthetase is required for interferon-induced protection from the cytoplasmic RNA viruses tested.

  15. Loss of (2'-5')oligoadenylate synthetase activity by production of antisense RNA results in lack of protection by interferon from viral infections.

    PubMed Central

    De Benedetti, A; Pytel, B A; Baglioni, C

    1987-01-01

    An expression vector was constructed that carries part of the human BK papovavirus with 0.5 kilobases of (2'-5')oligoadenylate (2-5A) synthetase cDNA inserted in inverted orientation downstream from the virion proteins (VP) promoter and the neomycin-resistance gene neo under the control of a simian virus 40 promoter. Cells transfected with this vector and selected for resistance to the neomycin derivative G418 synthesized RNA complementary to 2-5A synthetase mRNA. These cells lacked 2-5A synthetase activity, and the enzyme was not inducible by interferon. In contrast, 2-5A synthetase was induced in cells transfected with a control vector without the cDNA insert. Such cells were protected by interferon from RNA viruses, whereas cells lacking 2-5A synthetase were not protected from encephalomyocarditis virus, vesicular stomatitis virus, and Sindbis virus but were fully protected from influenza virus. These findings show that a high level of 2-5A synthetase is required for interferon-induced protection from the cytoplasmic RNA viruses tested. Images PMID:2433688

  16. The active site loop of S-adenosylmethionine synthetase modulates catalytic efficiency.

    PubMed

    Taylor, John C; Takusagawa, Fusao; Markham, George D

    2002-07-30

    Crystallographic studies of Escherichia coli S-adenosylmethionine synthetase (ATP:L-methionine S-adenosyltransferase, MAT) have defined a flexible polypeptide loop that can gate access to the active site without contacting the substrates. The influence of the length and sequence of this active site loop on catalytic efficiency has been characterized in a mutant in which the E. coli MAT sequence (DRADPLEQ) has been replaced with the distinct sequence of the corresponding region of the otherwise highly homologous rat liver enzyme (HDLRNEEDV). Four additional mutants in which the entire DRADPLEQ sequence was replaced by five, six, seven, or eight glycines have been studied to unveil the effects of loop length and the influence of side chains. In all of the mutants, the maximal rate of S-adenosylmethionine formation (k(cat)) is diminished by more than 200-fold whereas the rate of hydrolysis of the tripolyphosphate intermediate is decreased by less than 3-fold. Thus, the function of the loop is localized to the first step in the overall reaction. The K(m) for methionine increases in all of the oligoglycine mutants, whereas the K(m) values for ATP are not substantially different. The k(cat) for the wild-type enzyme is decreased by increases in solution microviscosity with 55% of the maximal dependence. Thus, a diffusional event is coupled to the chemical step of AdoMet formation, which is known to be rate-limiting. The results indicate that a conformational change, possibly loop closure, is associated with AdoMet synthesis. The data integrate a previously discovered conformational change associated with PPP(i) binding to the E x AdoMet complex into the reaction sequence, reflecting a difference in protein conformation in the E x AdoMet x PPP(i) complex whether it is formed from the E x ATP x methionine complex or from binding of exogenous PPP(i). The temperature dependence of the k(cat) for S-adenosylmethionine formation shows that the removal of the side chains in the

  17. Rheb Protein Binds CAD (Carbamoyl-phosphate Synthetase 2, Aspartate Transcarbamoylase, and Dihydroorotase) Protein in a GTP- and Effector Domain-dependent Manner and Influences Its Cellular Localization and Carbamoyl-phosphate Synthetase (CPSase) Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Tatsuhiro; Akasu, Hitomi; Shimono, Wataru; Matsu, Chisa; Fujiwara, Yuki; Shibagaki, Yoshio; Heard, Jeffrey J.; Tamanoi, Fuyuhiko; Hattori, Seisuke

    2015-01-01

    Rheb small GTPases, which consist of Rheb1 and Rheb2 (also known as RhebL1) in mammalian cells, are unique members of the Ras superfamily and play central roles in regulating protein synthesis and cell growth by activating mTOR. To gain further insight into the function of Rheb, we carried out a search for Rheb-binding proteins and found that Rheb binds to CAD protein (carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase 2, aspartate transcarbamoylase, and dihydroorotase), a multifunctional enzyme required for the de novo synthesis of pyrimidine nucleotides. CAD binding is more pronounced with Rheb2 than with Rheb1. Rheb binds CAD in a GTP- and effector domain-dependent manner. The region of CAD where Rheb binds is located at the C-terminal region of the carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase domain and not in the dihydroorotase and aspartate transcarbamoylase domains. Rheb stimulated carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase activity of CAD in vitro. In addition, an elevated level of intracellular UTP pyrimidine nucleotide was observed in Tsc2-deficient cells, which was attenuated by knocking down of Rheb. Immunostaining analysis showed that expression of Rheb leads to increased accumulation of CAD on lysosomes. Both a farnesyltransferase inhibitor that blocks membrane association of Rheb and knockdown of Rheb mislocalized CAD. These results establish CAD as a downstream effector of Rheb and suggest a possible role of Rheb in regulating de novo pyrimidine nucleotide synthesis. PMID:25422319

  18. Increase of xylan synthetase activity during xylem differentiation of the vascular cambium of sycamore and poplar trees.

    PubMed

    Dalessandro, G; Northcote, D H

    1981-01-01

    The activity of a β-(1-4)-xylan synthetase, a membrane-bound enzymic system, was measured in particulate enzymic preparations (1,000 g and 1,000-100,000 g pellets) obtained from homogenates of cambial cells, differentiating xylem cells and differentiated xylem cells isolated from actively growing trees of sycamore (Acer pseudoplatamus) and poplar (Populus robusta). The specific activity (nmol of xylan formed min(-1) mg(-1) of protein) as well as the activity calculated on a per cell basis (nmol of xylan formed min(-1) cell(-1)) of this enzymic system, markedly increased as cells differentiate from the vascular cambium to xylem. This increase is closely correlated with the enhanced deposition of xylan occurring during the formation of secondary thickening. The possible control of xylan synthesis during the biogenesis of plant cell wall is discussed.

  19. Inhibitors of methionyl-tRNA synthetase have potent activity against Giardia intestinalis trophozoites.

    PubMed

    Ranade, Ranae M; Zhang, Zhongsheng; Gillespie, J Robert; Shibata, Sayaka; Verlinde, Christophe L M J; Hol, Wim G J; Fan, Erkang; Buckner, Frederick S

    2015-11-01

    The methionyl-tRNA synthetase (MetRS) is a novel drug target for the protozoan pathogen Giardia intestinalis. This protist contains a single MetRS that is distinct from the human cytoplasmic MetRS. A panel of MetRS inhibitors was tested against recombinant Giardia MetRS, Giardia trophozoites, and mammalian cell lines. The best compounds inhibited trophozoite growth at 500 nM (metronidazole did so at ∼5,000 nM) and had low cytotoxicity against mammalian cells, indicating excellent potential for further development as anti-Giardia drugs. PMID:26324270

  20. [Allosteric regulation of glucosamine synthetase activity by naphthoquinone derivatives and ethyl ester of di-(4-oxycumarinyl-3)-acetic acid].

    PubMed

    Sharaev, P N; Bogdanov, N G; Sarycheva, I K; Zhukova, E E

    1981-02-01

    The effects of derivatives of naphthoquinone, e.g. 2-methyl-3-phytyl-1,4-naphthoquinone (vitamin K1), 2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone (vitamin K3), 3-dihydro-2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone-2-sodium sulfonate (vicasol), derivatives of naphthohydroxyquinone, e.g. 2-methyl-1,4-naphthohydroxyquinone 1-monoacetate, 2-methyl-1,4-naphthohydroxyquinone 1,4-diacetate and the oxycumarine derivative di-(4-oxycumarinyl-3)-acetate ethyl ester (pelentan) on the activity of purified glutamine synthetase (EC 5.3.1.19) from rat liver were studied. The enzyme activity was increased under effects of vitamins K1 and K3 and was inhibited by pelentan. The data obtained are indicative of the allosteric effect of these compounds on the enzyme. PMID:7195738

  1. Quantitative structure-activity relationship studies of a series of sulfa drugs as inhibitors of Pneumocystis carinii dihydropteroate synthetase.

    PubMed

    Johnson, T; Khan, I A; Avery, M A; Grant, J; Meshnick, S R

    1998-06-01

    Sulfone and sulfanilamide sulfa drugs have been shown to inhibit dihydropteroate synthetase (DHPS) isolated from Pneumocystis carinii. In order to develop a pharmacophoric model for this inhibition, quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR) for sulfa drugs active against DHPS have been studied. Accurate 50% inhibitory concentrations were collected for 44 analogs, and other parameters, such as partition coefficients and molar refractivity, were calculated. Conventional multiple regression analysis of these data did not provide acceptable QSAR. However, three-dimensional QSAR provided by comparative molecular field analysis did give excellent results. Upon removal of poorly correlated analogs, a data set of 36 analogs, all having a common NHSO2 group, provided a cross-validated r2 value of 0.699 and conventional r2 value of 0.964. The resulting pharmacophore model should be useful for understanding and predicting the binding of DHPS by new sulfa drugs.

  2. Activation of D-tyrosine by Bacillus stearothermophilus tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase: 2. Cooperative binding of ATP is limited to the initial turnover of the enzyme.

    PubMed

    Sheoran, Anita; First, Eric A

    2008-05-01

    The activation of D-tyrosine by tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase has been investigated using single and multiple turnover kinetic methods. In the presence of saturating concentrations of D-tyrosine, the activation reaction displays sigmoidal kinetics with respect to ATP concentration under single turnover conditions. In contrast, when the kinetics for the activation reaction are monitored using a steady-state (multiple turnover) pyrophosphate exchange assay, Michaelis-Menten kinetics are observed. Previous investigations indicated that activation of l-tyrosine by the K233A variant of Bacillus stearothermophilus tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase displays sigmoidal kinetics similar to those observed for activation of d-tyrosine by the wild-type enzyme. Kinetic analyses indicate that the sigmoidal behavior of the d-tyrosine activation reaction is not enhanced when Lys-233 is replaced by alanine. This supports the hypothesis that the mechanistic basis for the sigmoidal behavior is the same for both d-tyrosine activation by wild-type tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase and activation of l-tyrosine by the K233A variant. The observed sigmoidal behavior presents a paradox, as tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase displays an extreme form of negative cooperativity, known as "half-of-the-sites reactivity," with respect to tyrosine binding and tyrosyl-adenylate formation. We propose that the binding of D-tyrosine weakens the affinity with which ATP binds to the functional subunit in tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase. This allows ATP to bind initially to the nonfunctional subunit, inducing a conformational change in the enzyme that enhances the affinity of the functional subunit for ATP. The observation that sigmoidal kinetics are observed only under single turnover conditions suggests that this conformational change is stable over multiple rounds of catalysis. PMID:18319246

  3. The 2'-5'-oligoadenylate synthetase in the lowest metazoa: isolation, cloning, expression and functional activity in the sponge Lubomirskia baicalensis.

    PubMed

    Schröder, Heinz C; Natalio, Filipe; Wiens, Matthias; Tahir, Muhammad Nawaz; Shukoor, Mohammed Ibrahim; Tremel, Wolfgang; Belikov, Sergey I; Krasko, Anatoli; Müller, Werner E G

    2008-02-01

    Aquatic animals, especially filter feeders such as sponges [phylum Porifera], are exposed to a higher viral load than terrestrial species. Until now, the antiviral defense system in the evolutionary oldest multicellular organisms, sponges, is not understood. One powerful protection of vertebrates against virus infection is mediated by the interferon (IFN)-inducible 2'-5'-oligoadenylate synthetase [(2-5)A synthetase] system. In the present study we cloned from the freshwater sponge Lubomirskia baicalensis a cDNA encoding a 314 aa long ORF with a calculated size of 35748Da, a putative (2-5)A synthetase, and raised antibodies against the recombinant protein. The native enzyme was identified in a crude extract from L. baicalensis by application of a novel separation procedure based on polymer coated ferromagnetic nanoparticles. The particles were derivatized with a synthetic double-stranded RNA [dsRNA], synthetic poly(I:C), a known allosteric activator of the latent (2-5)A synthetase. These particles were used to separate a single 35kDa protein from a crude extract of L. baicalensis, which cross-reacted with antibodies raised against the sponge enzyme. In situ hybridization studies revealed that highest expression of the gene is seen in cells surrounding the aquiferous canals. Finally primmorphs, an in vitro cell culture system, from L. baicalensis were exposed to poly(I:C); they responded to this dsRNA with an increased expression of the (2-5)A synthetase gene already after a 1-day incubation period. We conclude that sponges contain the (2-5)A synthetase antiviral protection system.

  4. Active JNK-dependent secretion of Drosophila Tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase by loser cells recruits haemocytes during cell competition.

    PubMed

    Casas-Tintó, Sergio; Lolo, Fidel-Nicolás; Moreno, Eduardo

    2015-12-11

    Cell competition is a process by which the slow dividing cells (losers) are recognized and eliminated from growing tissues. Loser cells are extruded from the epithelium and engulfed by the haemocytes, the Drosophila macrophages. However, how macrophages identify the dying loser cells is unclear. Here we show that apoptotic loser cells secrete Tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase (TyrRS), which is best known as a core component of the translational machinery. Secreted TyrRS is cleaved by matrix metalloproteinases generating MiniTyr and EMAP fragments. EMAP acts as a guiding cue for macrophage migration in the Drosophila larvae, as it attracts the haemocytes to the apoptotic loser cells. JNK signalling and Kish, a component of the secretory pathway, are autonomously required for the active secretion of TyrRS by the loser cells. Altogether, this mechanism guarantees effective removal of unfit cells from the growing tissue.

  5. Active JNK-dependent secretion of Drosophila Tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase by loser cells recruits haemocytes during cell competition.

    PubMed

    Casas-Tintó, Sergio; Lolo, Fidel-Nicolás; Moreno, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Cell competition is a process by which the slow dividing cells (losers) are recognized and eliminated from growing tissues. Loser cells are extruded from the epithelium and engulfed by the haemocytes, the Drosophila macrophages. However, how macrophages identify the dying loser cells is unclear. Here we show that apoptotic loser cells secrete Tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase (TyrRS), which is best known as a core component of the translational machinery. Secreted TyrRS is cleaved by matrix metalloproteinases generating MiniTyr and EMAP fragments. EMAP acts as a guiding cue for macrophage migration in the Drosophila larvae, as it attracts the haemocytes to the apoptotic loser cells. JNK signalling and Kish, a component of the secretory pathway, are autonomously required for the active secretion of TyrRS by the loser cells. Altogether, this mechanism guarantees effective removal of unfit cells from the growing tissue. PMID:26658841

  6. Leucyl-tRNA synthetase activates Vps34 in amino acid-sensing mTORC1 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Mee-Sup; Son, Kook; Arauz, Edwin; Han, Jung Min; Kim, Sunghoon; Chen, Jie

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Amino acid availability activates signaling by the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) complex 1, mTORC1, a master regulator of cell growth. The class III PI-3-kinase Vps34 mediates amino acid signaling to mTORC1 by regulating lysosomal translocation and activation of the phospholipase PLD1. Here we identify leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LRS) as a leucine sensor for the activation of Vps34-PLD1 upstream of mTORC1. LRS is necessary for amino acid-induced Vps34 activation, cellular PI(3)P level increase, PLD1 activation, and PLD1 lysosomal translocation. Leucine binding but not tRNA charging activity of LRS is required for this regulation. Moreover, LRS physically interacts with Vps34 in amino acid-stimulatable non-autophagic complexes. Finally, purified LRS protein activates Vps34 kinase in vitro in a leucine-dependent manner. Collectively, our findings provide compelling evidence for a direct role of LRS in amino acid activation of Vps34 via a non-canonical mechanism, and fill a gap in the amino acid-sensing mTORC1 signaling network. PMID:27477288

  7. Conversion of UMP, an allosteric inhibitor of carbamyl phosphate synthetase, to an activator by modification of the UMP ribose moiety.

    PubMed

    Boettcher, B; Meister, A

    1981-06-25

    UMP is known to be an allosteric inhibitor of carbamyl phosphate synthetase, whereas IMP activates the enzyme. Surprisingly, dialdehyde UMP (prepared by periodate oxidation of UMP) was found to be a potent activator of the enzyme. Dialdehyde IMP, like IMP, produced activation. The corresponding dialcohol analogs of UMP and IMP (prepared by borohydride reduction of the dialdehyde analogs) had no effect on activity. These nucleotide interactions were further characterized by sedimentation velocity studies and by examination of the effects of inorganic phosphate on enzymatic activity. Although UMP promotes formation of an enzyme dimer, and IMP promotes formation of a tetramer (Powers, S. G., Meister, A., and Haschemeyer, R. H. (1980) J. Biol. Chem. 255, 1554-1558), the dialdehyde analogs of UMP and IMP both promote formation of mixed species. Low levels (less than 10 mM) of inorganic phosphate decrease the extent of activation by IMP, dialdehyde IMP, and dialdehyde UMP, but increase the extent of inhibition by UMP. The marked activation observed with dialdehyde UMP, and other considerations, suggest that the binding sites on the enzyme for IMP and UMP may overlap substantially. The findings also suggest that physiological levels of inorganic phosphate function in the modulation of the allosteric regulation of this enzyme by nucleotides. PMID:7240186

  8. Total Glutamine Synthetase Activity during Soybean Nodule Development Is Controlled at the Level of Transcription and Holoprotein Turnover.

    PubMed Central

    Temple, S. J.; Kunjibettu, S.; Roche, D.; Sengupta-Gopalan, C.

    1996-01-01

    Gln synthetase (GS) catalyzes the ATP-dependent condensation of ammonia with glutamate to yield Gln. In higher plants GS is an octameric enzyme and the subunits are encoded by members of a small multigene family. In soybeans (Glycine max), following the onset of N2 fixation there is a dramatic increase in GS activity in the root nodules. GS activity staining of native polyacrylamide gels containing nodule and root extracts showed a common band of activity (GSrs). The nodules also contained a slower-migrating, broad band of enzyme activity (GSns). The GSns activity band is a complex of many isozymes made up of different proportions of two kinds of GS subunits: GSr and GSn. Root nodules formed following inoculation with an Nif- strain of Bradyrhizobium japonicum showed the presence of GS isoenzymes (GSns1) with low enzyme activity, which migrated more slowly than GSns. Gsns1 is most likely made up predominantly of GSn subunits. Our data suggest that, whereas the class I GS genes encoding the GSr subunits are regulated by the availability of NH3, the class II GS genes coding for the GSn subunits are developmentally regulated. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that the GSns1 isozymes in the Nif- nodules are relatively more labile. Our overall conclusion is that GSns activity in soybean nodules is regulated by N2 fixation both at the level of transcription and at the level of holoprotein stability. PMID:12226474

  9. [The activity of 2',5'-oligoadenylate-synthetase in rat spleen lymphocytes in the chronic ethanol intoxication and administration of zinc acetate].

    PubMed

    Chaĭka, V O; Kompanets', I V; Hadiliia, O P; Kharchenko, O I; Ostapchenko, L I

    2010-01-01

    It was shown that the activity of interferon-induced enzyme 2',5'-oligoadenylate-synthetase is suppressed in rat spleen lymphocytes under the chronic alcohol intoxication. The values of enzyme activity were minimal under the long-term action of etanol (21 day). The combined administration of zinc acetate and etanol to rats causes the increase of enzyme activity, the effect is most expressed on the late stages of alcohol intoxication development.

  10. Acetate Activation in Methanosaeta thermophila: Characterization of the Key Enzymes Pyrophosphatase and Acetyl-CoA Synthetase

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Stefanie; Welte, Cornelia; Deppenmeier, Uwe

    2012-01-01

    The thermophilic methanogen Methanosaeta thermophila uses acetate as sole substrate for methanogenesis. It was proposed that the acetate activation reaction that is needed to feed acetate into the methanogenic pathway requires the hydrolysis of two ATP, whereas the acetate activation reaction in Methanosarcina sp. is known to require only one ATP. As these organisms live at the thermodynamic limit that sustains life, the acetate activation reaction in Mt. thermophila seems too costly and was thus reevaluated. It was found that of the putative acetate activation enzymes one gene encoding an AMP-forming acetyl-CoA synthetase was highly expressed. The corresponding enzyme was purified and characterized in detail. It catalyzed the ATP-dependent formation of acetyl-CoA, AMP, and pyrophosphate (PPi) and was only moderately inhibited by PPi. The breakdown of PPi was performed by a soluble pyrophosphatase. This enzyme was also purified and characterized. The pyrophosphatase hydrolyzed the major part of PPi (KM = 0.27 ± 0.05 mM) that was produced in the acetate activation reaction. Activity was not inhibited by nucleotides or PPi. However, it cannot be excluded that other PPi-dependent enzymes take advantage of the remaining PPi and contribute to the energy balance of the cell. PMID:22927778

  11. Tissue-specific changes of glutamine synthetase activity in oats after rhizosphere infestation by Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, T.J.; Temple, S.; Sengupta-Gopalan, C.

    1996-05-15

    Oats (Avena sativa L. lodi) tolerant of rhizosphere infestation by Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci when challenged by the pathogen experience tissue-specific alterations of ammonia assimilatory capabilities. Altered ammonia assimilatory potentials between root and leaf tissue result from selective inactivation of glutamine synthetase (GS) by the toxin Tabtoxinine-B-lactam (TBL). Root GS is sensitive and leaf GSs are resistant to TBL inactivation. With prolonged challenge by the pathogen root GS activity decreases but leaf GS specific activity increase. Higher leaf GS activity is due to decreased rates of degradation rather than increased GS synthesis. Higher leaf GS activity and elevated levels of GS polypeptide appear to result from a limited interaction between GS and TBL leading to the accumulation of a less active but more stable GS holoenzyme. Tolerant challenged oats besides surviving rhizosphere infestation, experience enhanced growth. A strong correlation exists between leaf GS activity and whole plant fresh weight, suggesting that tissue-specific changes in ammonia assimilatory capability provides the plant a more efficient mechanism for uptake and utilization of nitrogen.

  12. Glutamine synthetase activity fuels nucleotide biosynthesis and supports growth of glutamine-restricted glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Tardito, Saverio; Oudin, Anaïs; Ahmed, Shafiq U; Fack, Fred; Keunen, Olivier; Zheng, Liang; Miletic, Hrvoje; Sakariassen, Per Øystein; Weinstock, Adam; Wagner, Allon; Lindsay, Susan L; Hock, Andreas K; Barnett, Susan C; Ruppin, Eytan; Mørkve, Svein Harald; Lund-Johansen, Morten; Chalmers, Anthony J; Bjerkvig, Rolf; Niclou, Simone P; Gottlieb, Eyal

    2015-12-01

    L-Glutamine (Gln) functions physiologically to balance the carbon and nitrogen requirements of tissues. It has been proposed that in cancer cells undergoing aerobic glycolysis, accelerated anabolism is sustained by Gln-derived carbons, which replenish the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle (anaplerosis). However, it is shown here that in glioblastoma (GBM) cells, almost half of the Gln-derived glutamate (Glu) is secreted and does not enter the TCA cycle, and that inhibiting glutaminolysis does not affect cell proliferation. Moreover, Gln-starved cells are not rescued by TCA cycle replenishment. Instead, the conversion of Glu to Gln by glutamine synthetase (GS; cataplerosis) confers Gln prototrophy, and fuels de novo purine biosynthesis. In both orthotopic GBM models and in patients, (13)C-glucose tracing showed that GS produces Gln from TCA-cycle-derived carbons. Finally, the Gln required for the growth of GBM tumours is contributed only marginally by the circulation, and is mainly either autonomously synthesized by GS-positive glioma cells, or supplied by astrocytes.

  13. Intestinal acyl-CoA synthetase 5: activation of long chain fatty acids and behind.

    PubMed

    Klaus, Christina; Jeon, Min Kyung; Kaemmerer, Elke; Gassler, Nikolaus

    2013-11-14

    The intestinal mucosa is characterized by a high complexity in terms of structure and functions and allows for a controlled demarcation towards the gut lumen. On the one hand it is responsible for pulping and selective absorption of alimentary substances ensuring the immunological tolerance, on the other hand it prevents the penetration of micro-organisms as well as bacterial outgrowth. The continuous regeneration of surface epithelia along the crypt-villus-axis in the small intestine is crucial to assuring these various functions. The core phenomena of intestinal epithelia regeneration comprise cell proliferation, migration, differentiation, and apoptosis. These partly contrarily oriented processes are molecularly balanced through numerous interacting signaling pathways like Wnt/β-catenin, Notch and Hedgehog, and regulated by various modifying factors. One of these modifiers is acyl-CoA synthetase 5 (ACSL5). It plays a key role in de novo lipid synthesis, fatty acid degradation and membrane modifications, and regulates several intestinal processes, primarily through different variants of protein lipidation, e.g., palmitoylation. ACSL5 was shown to interact with proapoptotic molecules, and besides seems to inhibit proliferation along the crypt-villus-axis. Because of its proapoptotic and antiproliferative characteristics it could be of significant relevance for intestinal homeostasis, cellular disorder and tumor development. PMID:24259967

  14. Glutamine synthetase activity fuels nucleotide biosynthesis and supports growth of glutamine-restricted glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Tardito, Saverio; Oudin, Anaïs; Ahmed, Shafiq U; Fack, Fred; Keunen, Olivier; Zheng, Liang; Miletic, Hrvoje; Sakariassen, Per Øystein; Weinstock, Adam; Wagner, Allon; Lindsay, Susan L; Hock, Andreas K; Barnett, Susan C; Ruppin, Eytan; Mørkve, Svein Harald; Lund-Johansen, Morten; Chalmers, Anthony J; Bjerkvig, Rolf; Niclou, Simone P; Gottlieb, Eyal

    2015-12-01

    L-Glutamine (Gln) functions physiologically to balance the carbon and nitrogen requirements of tissues. It has been proposed that in cancer cells undergoing aerobic glycolysis, accelerated anabolism is sustained by Gln-derived carbons, which replenish the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle (anaplerosis). However, it is shown here that in glioblastoma (GBM) cells, almost half of the Gln-derived glutamate (Glu) is secreted and does not enter the TCA cycle, and that inhibiting glutaminolysis does not affect cell proliferation. Moreover, Gln-starved cells are not rescued by TCA cycle replenishment. Instead, the conversion of Glu to Gln by glutamine synthetase (GS; cataplerosis) confers Gln prototrophy, and fuels de novo purine biosynthesis. In both orthotopic GBM models and in patients, (13)C-glucose tracing showed that GS produces Gln from TCA-cycle-derived carbons. Finally, the Gln required for the growth of GBM tumours is contributed only marginally by the circulation, and is mainly either autonomously synthesized by GS-positive glioma cells, or supplied by astrocytes. PMID:26595383

  15. Glutamine Synthetase activity fuels nucleotide biosynthesis and supports growth of glutamine-restricted glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Tardito, Saverio; Oudin, Anaïs; Ahmed, Shafiq U.; Fack, Fred; Keunen, Olivier; Zheng, Liang; Miletic, Hrvoje; Sakariassen, Per Øystein; Weinstock, Adam; Wagner, Allon; Lindsay, Susan L.; Hock, Andreas K.; Barnett, Susan C.; Ruppin, Eytan; Mørkve, Svein Harald; Lund-Johansen, Morten; Chalmers, Anthony J.; Bjerkvig, Rolf; Niclou, Simone P.; Gottlieb, Eyal

    2015-01-01

    L-Glutamine (Gln) functions physiologically to balance tissue requirements of carbon and nitrogen. It has been proposed that in cancer cells undergoing aerobic glycolysis, accelerated anabolism is sustained by Gln-derived carbons, which replenish the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle (anaplerosis). However, it is shown here that in glioblastoma (GBM) cells, almost half of the Gln-derived glutamate (Glu) is secreted and does not enter the TCA cycle and, that inhibiting glutaminolysis does not affect proliferation. Moreover, Gln-starved cells are not rescued by TCA cycle replenishment. Instead, the conversion of Glu to Gln by Glutamine Synthetase (GS) (cataplerosis) confers Gln prototrophy, and fuels de novo purine biosynthesis. In both orthotopic GBM models and in patients, 13C-glucose tracing showed that GS produces Gln from TCA cycle-derived carbons. Finally, while it is contributed only marginally by the circulation, the Gln required for the growth of GBM tumours is either autonomously synthesized by GS-positive glioma cells, or supplied by astrocytes. PMID:26595383

  16. Chlamydia trachomatis growth and development requires the activity of host Long-chain Acyl-CoA Synthetases (ACSLs).

    PubMed

    Recuero-Checa, Maria A; Sharma, Manu; Lau, Constance; Watkins, Paul A; Gaydos, Charlotte A; Dean, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    The obligate-intracellular pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis (Ct) has undergone considerable genome reduction with consequent dependence on host biosynthetic pathways, metabolites and enzymes. Long-chain acyl-CoA synthetases (ACSLs) are key host-cell enzymes that convert fatty acids (FA) into acyl-CoA for use in metabolic pathways. Here, we show that the complete host ACSL family [ACSL1 and ACSL3-6] translocates into the Ct membrane-bound vacuole, termed inclusion, and remains associated with membranes of metabolically active forms of Ct throughout development. We discovered that three different pharmacologic inhibitors of ACSL activity independently impede Ct growth in a dose-dependent fashion. Using an FA competition assay, host ACSLs were found to activate Ct branched-chain FAs, suggesting that one function of the ACSLs is to activate Ct FAs and host FAs (recruited from the cytoplasm) within the inclusion. Because the ACSL inhibitors can deplete lipid droplets (LD), we used a cell line where LD synthesis was switched off to evaluate whether LD deficiency affects Ct growth. In these cells, we found no effect on growth or on translocation of ACSLs into the inclusion. Our findings support an essential role for ACSL activation of host-cell and bacterial FAs within the inclusion to promote Ct growth and development, independent of LDs. PMID:26988341

  17. Chlamydia trachomatis growth and development requires the activity of host Long-chain Acyl-CoA Synthetases (ACSLs).

    PubMed

    Recuero-Checa, Maria A; Sharma, Manu; Lau, Constance; Watkins, Paul A; Gaydos, Charlotte A; Dean, Deborah

    2016-03-18

    The obligate-intracellular pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis (Ct) has undergone considerable genome reduction with consequent dependence on host biosynthetic pathways, metabolites and enzymes. Long-chain acyl-CoA synthetases (ACSLs) are key host-cell enzymes that convert fatty acids (FA) into acyl-CoA for use in metabolic pathways. Here, we show that the complete host ACSL family [ACSL1 and ACSL3-6] translocates into the Ct membrane-bound vacuole, termed inclusion, and remains associated with membranes of metabolically active forms of Ct throughout development. We discovered that three different pharmacologic inhibitors of ACSL activity independently impede Ct growth in a dose-dependent fashion. Using an FA competition assay, host ACSLs were found to activate Ct branched-chain FAs, suggesting that one function of the ACSLs is to activate Ct FAs and host FAs (recruited from the cytoplasm) within the inclusion. Because the ACSL inhibitors can deplete lipid droplets (LD), we used a cell line where LD synthesis was switched off to evaluate whether LD deficiency affects Ct growth. In these cells, we found no effect on growth or on translocation of ACSLs into the inclusion. Our findings support an essential role for ACSL activation of host-cell and bacterial FAs within the inclusion to promote Ct growth and development, independent of LDs.

  18. Chlamydia trachomatis growth and development requires the activity of host Long-chain Acyl-CoA Synthetases (ACSLs)

    PubMed Central

    Recuero-Checa, Maria A.; Sharma, Manu; Lau, Constance; Watkins, Paul A.; Gaydos, Charlotte A.; Dean, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    The obligate-intracellular pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis (Ct) has undergone considerable genome reduction with consequent dependence on host biosynthetic pathways, metabolites and enzymes. Long-chain acyl-CoA synthetases (ACSLs) are key host-cell enzymes that convert fatty acids (FA) into acyl-CoA for use in metabolic pathways. Here, we show that the complete host ACSL family [ACSL1 and ACSL3–6] translocates into the Ct membrane-bound vacuole, termed inclusion, and remains associated with membranes of metabolically active forms of Ct throughout development. We discovered that three different pharmacologic inhibitors of ACSL activity independently impede Ct growth in a dose-dependent fashion. Using an FA competition assay, host ACSLs were found to activate Ct branched-chain FAs, suggesting that one function of the ACSLs is to activate Ct FAs and host FAs (recruited from the cytoplasm) within the inclusion. Because the ACSL inhibitors can deplete lipid droplets (LD), we used a cell line where LD synthesis was switched off to evaluate whether LD deficiency affects Ct growth. In these cells, we found no effect on growth or on translocation of ACSLs into the inclusion. Our findings support an essential role for ACSL activation of host-cell and bacterial FAs within the inclusion to promote Ct growth and development, independent of LDs. PMID:26988341

  19. Thiophenecarboxamide Derivatives Activated by EthA Kill Mycobacterium tuberculosis by Inhibiting the CTP Synthetase PyrG

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Giorgia; Chiarelli, Laurent R.; Esposito, Marta; Makarov, Vadim; Bellinzoni, Marco; Hartkoorn, Ruben C.; Degiacomi, Giulia; Boldrin, Francesca; Ekins, Sean; de Jesus Lopes Ribeiro, Ana Luisa; Marino, Leonardo B.; Centárová, Ivana; Svetlíková, Zuzana; Blaško, Jaroslav; Kazakova, Elena; Lepioshkin, Alexander; Barilone, Nathalie; Zanoni, Giuseppe; Porta, Alessio; Fondi, Marco; Fani, Renato; Baulard, Alain R.; Mikušová, Katarína; Alzari, Pedro M.; Manganelli, Riccardo; de Carvalho, Luiz Pedro S.; Riccardi, Giovanna; Cole, Stewart T.; Pasca, Maria Rosalia

    2015-01-01

    Summary To combat the emergence of drug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, new antitubercular agents and novel drug targets are needed. Phenotypic screening of a library of 594 hit compounds uncovered two leads that were active against M. tuberculosis in its replicating, non-replicating, and intracellular states: compounds 7947882 (5-methyl-N-(4-nitrophenyl)thiophene-2-carboxamide) and 7904688 (3-phenyl-N-[(4-piperidin-1-ylphenyl)carbamothioyl]propanamide). Mutants resistant to both compounds harbored mutations in ethA (rv3854c), the gene encoding the monooxygenase EthA, and/or in pyrG (rv1699) coding for the CTP synthetase, PyrG. Biochemical investigations demonstrated that EthA is responsible for the activation of the compounds, and by mass spectrometry we identified the active metabolite of 7947882, which directly inhibits PyrG activity. Metabolomic studies revealed that pharmacological inhibition of PyrG strongly perturbs DNA and RNA biosynthesis, and other metabolic processes requiring nucleotides. Finally, the crystal structure of PyrG was solved, paving the way for rational drug design with this newly validated drug target. PMID:26097035

  20. The toxic effects of diethyl phthalate on the activity of glutamine synthetase in greater duckweed (Spirodela polyrhiza L.).

    PubMed

    Cheng, Tai-Sheng

    2012-11-15

    The toxic effects of diethyl phthalate (DEP), a potent allelochemical, on the enzyme activity and polypeptide accumulation of glutamine synthetase (GS) in greater duckweed were investigated. In our previous studies, DEP induced oxidative responses at concentrations from 0.5 to 2 mM in greater duckweed and the antioxidant enzymes played important roles in the defense strategy against DEP stress. In this study, DAB-H(2)O(2) and NBT stain for superoxide radicals (O(2)(·-)), lipid peroxidation, HSP70, and ammonia accumulation in DEP-treated duckweed tissues revealed adverse effect of DEP in plant growth. Biochemical analysis and physiological methods were combined to investigate GS activity and polypeptide accumulation under DEP-induced stress. The results showed that GS activity was reduced with the increasing concentration of DEP, indicative of enhanced toxic effect. Immunoblot analysis with chloroplast soluble fractions indicated that the chloroplastic GS (GS2) polypeptide from greater duckweed was degraded under DEP stress conditions. The response of GS2 to the DEP stress may be modulated by means of redox change in plant tissues, chloroplasts, and chloroplast lysates. The results suggest that DEP is toxic to the greater duckweed by inhibition of the GS isoenzymes in nitrogen assimilation and the GS2 plays important roles in the adaptation strategy against DEP toxicity.

  1. Reduced glutamine synthetase activity plays a role in control of photosynthetic responses to high light in barley leaves.

    PubMed

    Brestic, Marian; Zivcak, Marek; Olsovska, Katarina; Shao, Hong-Bo; Kalaji, Hazem M; Allakhverdiev, Suleyman I

    2014-08-01

    The chloroplastic glutamine synthetase (GS, EC 6.3.1.2) activity was previously shown to be the limiting step of photorespiratory pathway. In our experiment, we examined the photosynthetic high-light responses of the GS2-mutant of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) with reduced GS activity, in comparison to wild type (WT). The biophysical methods based on slow and fast chlorophyll fluorescence induction, P700 absorbance, and gas exchange measurements were employed. Despite the GS2 plants had high basal fluorescence (F0) and low maximum quantum yield (Fv/Fm), the CO2 assimilation rate, the PSII and PSI actual quantum yields were normal. On the other hand, in high light conditions the GS2 had much higher non-photochemical quenching (NPQ), caused both by enhanced capacity of energy-dependent quenching and disconnection of PSII antennae from reaction centers (RC). GS2 leaves also maintained the PSII redox poise (QA(-)/QA total) at very low level; probably this was reason why the observed photoinhibitory damage was not significantly above WT. The analysis of fast chlorophyll fluorescence induction uncovered in GS2 leaves substantially lower RC to antenna ratio (RC/ABS), low PSII/PSI ratio (confirmed by P700 records) as well as low PSII excitonic connectivity.

  2. Entamoeba lysyl-tRNA Synthetase Contains a Cytokine-Like Domain with Chemokine Activity towards Human Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jung Min; Kim, Sunghoon; Celada, Antonio; Ribas de Pouplana, Lluís

    2011-01-01

    Immunological pressure encountered by protozoan parasites drives the selection of strategies to modulate or avoid the immune responses of their hosts. Here we show that the parasite Entamoeba histolytica has evolved a chemokine that mimics the sequence, structure, and function of the human cytokine HsEMAPII (Homo sapiens endothelial monocyte activating polypeptide II). This Entamoeba EMAPII-like polypeptide (EELP) is translated as a domain attached to two different aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRS) that are overexpressed when parasites are exposed to inflammatory signals. EELP is dispensable for the tRNA aminoacylation activity of the enzymes that harbor it, and it is cleaved from them by Entamoeba proteases to generate a standalone cytokine. Isolated EELP acts as a chemoattractant for human cells, but its cell specificity is different from that of HsEMAPII. We show that cell specificity differences between HsEMAPII and EELP can be swapped by site directed mutagenesis of only two residues in the cytokines' signal sequence. Thus, Entamoeba has evolved a functional mimic of an aaRS-associated human cytokine with modified cell specificity. PMID:22140588

  3. Activation of AMP-activated protein kinase signaling pathway by adiponectin and insulin in mouse adipocytes: requirement of acyl-CoA synthetases FATP1 and Acsl1 and association with an elevation in AMP/ATP ratio.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qingqing; Gauthier, Marie-Soleil; Sun, Lei; Ruderman, Neil; Lodish, Harvey

    2010-11-01

    Adiponectin activates AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in adipocytes, but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Here we tested the hypothesis that AMP, generated in activating fatty acids to their CoA derivatives, catalyzed by acyl-CoA synthetases, is involved in AMPK activation by adiponectin. Moreover, in adipocytes, insulin affects the subcellular localization of acyl-CoA synthetase FATP1. Thus, we also tested whether insulin activates AMPK in these cells and, if so, whether it activates through a similar mechanism. We examined these hypotheses by measuring the AMP/ATP ratio and AMPK activation on adiponectin and insulin stimulation and after knocking down acyl-CoA synthetases in adipocytes. We show that adiponectin activation of AMPK is accompanied by an ∼2-fold increase in the cellular AMP/ATP ratio. Moreover, FATP1 and Acsl1, the 2 major acyl-CoA synthetase isoforms in adipocytes, are essential for AMPK activation by adiponectin. We also show that after 40 min. insulin activated AMPK in adipocytes, which was coupled with a 5-fold increase in the cellular AMP/ATP ratio. Knockdown studies show that FATP1 and Acsl1 are required for these processes, as well as for stimulation of long-chain fatty acid uptake by adiponection and insulin. These studies demonstrate that a change in cellular energy state is associated with AMPK activation by both adiponectin and insulin, which requires the activity of FATP1 and Acsl1.

  4. Changes in polyamines, inorganic ions and glutamine synthetase activity in response to nitrogen availability and form in red spruce (Picea rubens).

    PubMed

    Serapiglia, Michelle J; Minocha, Rakesh; Minocha, Subhash C

    2008-12-01

    We analyzed effects of nitrogen availability and form on growth rates, concentrations of polyamines and inorganic ions and glutamine synthetase activity in in-vitro-cultured red spruce (Picea rubens Sarg.) cells. Growth rates, concentrations of polyamines and glutamine synthetase activity declined when either the amount of nitrate or the total amount of N in the culture medium was reduced. When total N in the medium was increased, cell mass increased without significant changes in glutamine synthetase activity or polyamine concentration. Reductions in the amount of nitrate or total N in the culture medium resulted in increased accumulations of Ca, Mn and Zn in the cells, and K accumulation decreased in response to decreasing nitrate:ammonium ratios. The data indicate that changes in total N availability as well as the forms of N play important roles in the physiological responses of in-vitro-grown red spruce cells that mimic the observed responses of forest trees to soil N deficiency and N fertilization.

  5. Vertebrate Acyl CoA synthetase family member 4 (ACSF4-U26) is a β-alanine-activating enzyme homologous to bacterial non-ribosomal peptide synthetase.

    PubMed

    Drozak, Jakub; Veiga-da-Cunha, Maria; Kadziolka, Beata; Van Schaftingen, Emile

    2014-03-01

    Mammalian ACSF4-U26 (Acyl CoA synthetase family member 4), a protein of unknown function, comprises a putative adenylation domain (AMP-binding domain) similar to those of bacterial non-ribosomal peptide synthetases, a putative phosphopantetheine attachment site, and a C-terminal PQQDH (pyrroloquinoline quinone dehydrogenase)-related domain. Orthologues comprising these three domains are present in many eukaryotes including plants. Remarkably, the adenylation domain of plant ACSF4-U26 show greater identity with Ebony, the insect enzyme that ligates β-alanine to several amines, than with vertebrate or insect ACSF4-U26, and prediction of its specificity suggests that it activates β-alanine. In the presence of ATP, purified mouse recombinant ACSF4-U26 progressively formed a covalent bond with radiolabelled β-alanine. The bond was not formed in a point mutant lacking the phosphopantetheine attachment site. Competition experiments with various amino acids indicated that the reaction was almost specific for β-alanine, and a KM of ~ 5 μm was calculated for this reaction. The loaded enzyme was used to study the formation of a potential end product. Among the 20 standard amino acids, only cysteine stimulated unloading of the enzyme. This effect was mimicked by cysteamine and dithiothreitol, and was unaffected by absence of the PQQDH-related domain, suggesting that β-alanine transfer onto thiols is catalysed by the ACSF4-U26 adenylation domain, but is physiologically irrelevant. We conclude that ACSF4-U26 is a β-alanine-activating enzyme, and hypothesize that it is involved in a rare intracellular reaction, possibly an infrequent post-translational or post-transcriptional modification.

  6. A bridge between the aminoacylation and editing domains of leucyl-tRNA synthetase is crucial for its synthetic activity

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Qian; Zhou, Xiao-Long; Hu, Qin-Hua; Lei, Hui-Yan; Fang, Zhi-Peng; Yao, Peng; Wang, En-Duo

    2014-01-01

    Leucyl-tRNA synthetases (LeuRSs) catalyze the linkage of leucine with tRNALeu. LeuRS contains a catalysis domain (aminoacylation) and a CP1 domain (editing). CP1 is inserted 35 Å from the aminoacylation domain. Aminoacylation and editing require CP1 to swing to the coordinated conformation. The neck between the CP1 domain and the aminoacylation domain is defined as the CP1 hairpin. The location of the CP1 hairpin suggests a crucial role in the CP1 swing and domain–domain interaction. Here, the CP1 hairpin of Homo sapiens cytoplasmic LeuRS (hcLeuRS) was deleted or substituted by those from other representative species. Lack of a CP1 hairpin led to complete loss of aminoacylation, amino acid activation, and tRNA binding; however, the mutants retained post-transfer editing. Only the CP1 hairpin from Saccharomyces cerevisiae LeuRS (ScLeuRS) could partly rescue the hcLeuRS functions. Further site-directed mutagenesis indicated that the flexibility of small residues and the charge of polar residues in the CP1 hairpin are crucial for the function of LeuRS. PMID:25051973

  7. The mode of action and the structure of a herbicide in complex with its target: binding of activated hydantocidin to the feedback regulation site of adenylosuccinate synthetase.

    PubMed Central

    Fonné-Pfister, R; Chemla, P; Ward, E; Girardet, M; Kreuz, K E; Honzatko, R B; Fromm, H J; Schär, H P; Grütter, M G; Cowan-Jacob, S W

    1996-01-01

    (+)-Hydantocidin, a recently discovered natural spironucleoside with potent herbicidal activity, is shown to be a proherbicide that, after phosphorylation at the 5' position, inhibits adenylosuccinate synthetase, an enzyme involved in de novo purine synthesis. The mode of binding of hydantocidin 5'-monophosphate to the target enzyme was analyzed by determining the crystal structure of the enzyme-inhibitor complex at 2.6-A resolution. It was found that adenylosuccinate synthetase binds the phosphorylated compound in the same fashion as it does adenosine 5'-monophosphate, the natural feedback regulator of this enzyme. This work provides the first crystal structure of a herbicide-target complex reported to date. Images Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8790347

  8. Phosphorylation of eukaryotic aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases

    SciTech Connect

    Pendergast, A.M.

    1986-01-01

    The phosphorylation of the highly purified aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase complex from rabbit reticulocytes was examined. The synthetase complex contained, in addition to eight aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, three unidentified proteins and was free of endogenous protein kinase activity. Incubation of the complex with casein kinase I in the presence of ATP resulted in the phosphorylation of four synthetases, the glutamyl-, isoleucyl-, methionyl-, and lysyl-tRNA synthetases. Phosphorylation by casein kinase I altered binding to tRNA-Sepharose such that the phosphorylated complex eluted at 190 mM NaCl instead of the 275 mM salt observed for the nonphosphorylated form. Phosphorylation by casein kinase I resulted in a significant inhibition of aminoacylation with the four synthetases; the activities of the nonphosphorylated synthetases were unchanged. One of the unidentified proteins in the complex (M/sub r/ 37,000) was also an excellent substrate for casein kinase I. A comparison of the properties and two-dimensional phosphopeptide pattern of this protein with that of casein kinase I suggest that the 37,000 dalton protein in the synthetase complex is an inactive form of casein kinase I. Two other protein kinases were shown to phosphorylate aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases in the complex. The phosphorylation of threonyl-tRNA synthetase was also investigated. Five aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases in the high molecular weight complex were shown to be phosphorylated in rabbit reticulocytes following labeling with (/sup 32/P)orthophosphate.

  9. Subependymal giant cell astrocytoma: a lesion with activated mTOR pathway and constant expression of glutamine synthetase.

    PubMed

    Buccoliero, Anna Maria; Caporalini, Chiara; Giordano, Flavio; Mussa, Federico; Scagnet, Mirko; Moscardi, Selene; Baroni, Gianna; Genitori, Lorenzo; Taddei, Gian Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Subependymal giant-cell astrocytoma (SEGA) is a rare tumor associated with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC). TSC mainly involves the central nervous system (CNS) where SEGA, subependymal nodules, and cortical tubers may be present. First studies suggested the astrocytic nature of SEGA while successive studies demonstrated the mixed glio-neuronal nature. There are similarities between TSC-associated CNS lesions and type IIb focal cortical dysplasia (FCD). In all these pathologies, mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway activation has been demonstrated. Recent data evidenced that balloon cells in FCD IIb express glutamine synthetase (GS). GS is involved in the clearance of glutamate. Cells expressing GS might exert an antiepileptic role. We evaluated by immunohistochemistry the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), neurofilaments (NF), and GS expression and the mTOR status (mTOR and phosphorylated ribosomal protein S6) in 16 SEGAs and 2 cortical tubers. Our purpose was to emphasize the mixed nature of SEGA and to further investigate the similarities between TSC-related CNS lesions (in particular SEGA) and FCD IIb. We confirm the glio-neuronal nature and the common activation of the mTOR pathway in SEGAs. In addition, we report for the first time that these tumors, analogously to FCD IIb, commonly express GS. Notably, the expression of mTOR, phosphorylated ribosomal protein S6, and GS was restricted to gemistocytic-like GFAP-negative cells. GS expression and mTOR pathway activation were also documented in cortical tubers. Further studies are necessary to understand the significance of GS expression in SEGAs as well as in cortical tubers. PMID:27390104

  10. Subependymal giant cell astrocytoma: a lesion with activated mTOR pathway and constant expression of glutamine synthetase.

    PubMed

    Buccoliero, Anna Maria; Caporalini, Chiara; Giordano, Flavio; Mussa, Federico; Scagnet, Mirko; Moscardi, Selene; Baroni, Gianna; Genitori, Lorenzo; Taddei, Gian Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Subependymal giant-cell astrocytoma (SEGA) is a rare tumor associated with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC). TSC mainly involves the central nervous system (CNS) where SEGA, subependymal nodules, and cortical tubers may be present. First studies suggested the astrocytic nature of SEGA while successive studies demonstrated the mixed glio-neuronal nature. There are similarities between TSC-associated CNS lesions and type IIb focal cortical dysplasia (FCD). In all these pathologies, mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway activation has been demonstrated. Recent data evidenced that balloon cells in FCD IIb express glutamine synthetase (GS). GS is involved in the clearance of glutamate. Cells expressing GS might exert an antiepileptic role. We evaluated by immunohistochemistry the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), neurofilaments (NF), and GS expression and the mTOR status (mTOR and phosphorylated ribosomal protein S6) in 16 SEGAs and 2 cortical tubers. Our purpose was to emphasize the mixed nature of SEGA and to further investigate the similarities between TSC-related CNS lesions (in particular SEGA) and FCD IIb. We confirm the glio-neuronal nature and the common activation of the mTOR pathway in SEGAs. In addition, we report for the first time that these tumors, analogously to FCD IIb, commonly express GS. Notably, the expression of mTOR, phosphorylated ribosomal protein S6, and GS was restricted to gemistocytic-like GFAP-negative cells. GS expression and mTOR pathway activation were also documented in cortical tubers. Further studies are necessary to understand the significance of GS expression in SEGAs as well as in cortical tubers.

  11. Sequence and Phylogenetic Analysis of FAD Synthetase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, Luisa; Frago, Susana; Martínez-Júlvez, Marta; Medina, Milagros

    2006-08-01

    An evolutionary analysis of the sequences available till now for FAD synthetases has been carried out. Several identical conserved residues have been observed along the sequences of all the FAD synthetases analyzed, which might correlate with role for these residues in the catalytic activity of the enzyme. Phylogenetic analysis shows that FAD synthetase sequences can be organized in two main clusters. One of them mainly contains temperature, pressure or pH resistant organisms, whereas in the other one organisms with pathogenic character can be found.

  12. CMT2D neuropathy is linked to the neomorphic binding activity of glycyl-tRNA synthetase

    PubMed Central

    He, Weiwei; Bai, Ge; Zhou, Huihao; Wei, Na; White, Nicholas M.; Lauer, Janelle; Liu, Huaqing; Shi, Yi; Dumitru, Calin Dan; Lettieri, Karen; Shubayev, Veronica; Jordanova, Albena; Guergueltcheva, Velina; Griffin, Patrick R.; Burgess, Robert W.; Pfaff, Samuel L.; Yang, Xiang-Lei

    2015-01-01

    Summary Selective neuronal loss is a hallmark of neurodegenerative diseases, which counter-intuitively are often caused by mutations in widely-expressed genes1. Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) diseases are the most common hereditary peripheral neuropathies, for which there are no effective therapies2,3. A subtype of the diseases—CMT2D—is caused by dominant mutations in GARS, encoding the ubiquitously expressed enzyme glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GlyRS). Despite the broad requirement of GlyRS for protein biosynthesis in all cells, mutations in this gene cause a selective degeneration of peripheral axons leading to deficits in distal motor function4. How mutations in GlyRS (GlyRSCMT2D) are linked to motor neuron vulnerability has remained elusive. Here we report that GlyRSCMT2D acquires a neomorphic binding activity that directly antagonizes an essential signaling pathway for motor neuron survival. We find that CMT2D mutations alter the conformation of GlyRS, enabling GlyRSCMT2D to bind the Neuropilin 1 (Nrp1) receptor. This aberrant interaction competitively interferes with the binding of the cognate ligand vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) to Nrp1. Genetic reduction of Nrp1 in mice worsens CMT2D symptoms, whereas enhanced expression of VEGF improves motor function. These findings link the selective pathology of CMT2D to the neomorphic binding activity of GlyRSCMT2D that antagonizes the VEGF/Nrp1 interaction, and indicate the VEGF/Nrp1 signaling axis is an actionable target for treating CMT2D. PMID:26503042

  13. Radioimmune assay of human platelet prostaglandin synthetase

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, G.J.; Machuga, E.T.

    1982-02-01

    Normal platelet function depends, in part, on platelet PG synthesis. PG synthetase (cyclo-oxygenase) catalyzes the first step in PG synthesis, the formation of PGH/sub 2/ from arachidonic acid. Inhibition of the enzyme by ASA results in an abnormality in the platelet release reaction. Patients with pparent congenital abnormalities in the enzyme have been described, and the effects have been referred to as ''aspirin-like'' defects of the platelet function. These patients lack platelet PG synthetase activity, but the actual content of PG synthetase protein in these individuals' platelets is unknown. Therefore an RIA for human platelet PG synthetase would provide new information, useful in assessing the aspirin-like defects of platelet function. An RIA for human platelet PG synthetase is described. The assay utilizes a rabbit antibody directed against the enzyme and (/sup 125/I)-labelled sheep PG synthetase as antigen. The human platelet enzyme is assayed by its ability to inhibit precipitation of the (/sup 125/I)antigen. The assay is sensitive to 1 ng of enzyme. By the immune assay, human platelets contain approximately 1200 ng of PG synethetase protein per 1.5 mg of platelet protein (approximately 10/sup 9/ platelets). This content corresponds to 10,000 enzyme molecules per platelet. The assay provides a rapid and convenient assay for the human platelet enzyme, and it can be applied to the assessment of patients with apparent platelet PG synthetase (cyclo-oxygenase) deficiency.

  14. Peroxynitrite-induced thymocyte apoptosis: the role of caspases and poly (ADP-ribose) synthetase (PARS) activation.

    PubMed Central

    Virág, L; Scott, G S; Cuzzocrea, S; Marmer, D; Salzman, A L; Szabó, C

    1998-01-01

    The mechanisms by which immature thymocyte apoptosis is induced during negative selection are poorly defined. Reports demonstrated that cross-linking of T-cell receptor leads to stromal cell activation, expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and, subsequently, to thymocyte apoptosis. Therefore we examined, whether NO directly or indirectly, through peroxynitrite formation, causes thymocyte apoptosis. Immuno-histochemical detection of nitrotyrosine revealed in vivo peroxynitrite formation in the thymi of naive mice. Nitrotyrosine, the footprint of peroxynitrite, was predominantly found in the corticomedullary junction and the medulla of naive mice. In the thymi of mice deficient in the inducible isoform of nitric oxide synthase, considerably less nitrotyrosine was found. Exposure of thymocytes in vitro to low concentrations (10 microM) of peroxynitrite led to apoptosis, whereas higher concentrations (50 microM) resulted in intense cell death with the characteristics of necrosis. We also investigated the effect of poly (ADP-ribose) synthetase (PARS) inhibition on thymocyte apoptosis. Using the PARS inhibitor 3-aminobenzamide (3-AB), or thymocytes from PARS-deficient animals, we established that PARS determines the fate of thymocyte death. Suppression of cellular ATP levels, and the cellular necrosis in response to peroxynitrite were prevented by PARS inhibition. Therefore, in the absence of PARS, cells are diverted towards the pathway of apoptotic cell death. Similar results were obtained with H2O2 treatment, while apoptosis induced by non-oxidative stimuli such as dexamethasone or anti-FAS antibody was unaffected by PARS inhibition. In conclusion, we propose that peroxynitrite-induced apoptosis may play a role in the process of thymocyte negative selection. Furthermore, we propose that the physiological role of PARS cleavage by apopain during apoptosis may serve as an energy-conserving step, enabling the cell to complete the process of apoptosis

  15. Induction of arginosuccinate synthetase (ASS) expression affects the antiproliferative activity of arginine deiminase (ADI) in melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Manca, Antonella; Sini, Maria Cristina; Izzo, Francesco; Ascierto, Paolo A; Tatangelo, Fabiana; Botti, Gerardo; Gentilcore, Giusy; Capone, Marilena; Mozzillo, Nicola; Rozzo, Carla; Cossu, Antonio; Tanda, Francesco; Palmieri, Giuseppe

    2011-06-01

    Arginine deiminase (ADI), an arginine-degrading enzyme, has been used in the treatment of tumours sensitive to arginine deprivation, such as malignant melanoma (MM) and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Endogenous production of arginine is mainly dependent on activity of ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC) and argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS) enzymes. We evaluated the effect of ADI treatment on OTC and ASS expression in a series of melanoma cell lines. Twenty-five primary melanoma cell lines and normal fibroblasts as controls underwent cell proliferation assays and Western blot analyses in the presence or absence of ADI. Tissue sections from primary MMs (N = 20) and HCCs (N = 20) were investigated by immunohistochemistry for ASS expression. Overall, 21/25 (84%) MM cell lines presented a cell growth inhibition by ADI treatment; none of them presented constitutive detectable levels of the ASS protein. However, 7/21 (33%) ADI-sensitive melanoma cell lines presented markedly increased expression levels of the ASS protein following ADI treatment, with a significantly higher IC50 median value. Growth was not inhibited and the IC50 was not reached among the remaining 4/25 (16%) MM cell lines; all of them showed constitutive ASS expression. The OTC protein was found expressed in all melanoma cell lines before and after the ADI treatment. Lack of ASS immunostaining was observed in all analyzed in vivo specimens. Our findings suggest that response to ADI treatment in melanoma is significantly correlated with the ability of cells to express ASS either constitutively at basal level (inducing drug resistance) or after the treatment (reducing sensitivity to ADI).

  16. Enhanced activity of acetyl CoA synthetase adsorbed on smart microgel: an implication for precursor biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Nidhi Chandrama; Tripathi, Bijay Prakash; Müller, Martin; Stamm, Manfred; Ionov, Leonid

    2015-01-28

    Acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl CoA) is an essential precursor molecule for synthesis of metabolites such as the polyketide-based drugs (tetracycline, mitharamycin, Zocor, etc.) fats, lipids, and cholesterol. Acetyl CoA synthetase (Acs) is one of the enzymes that catalyzes acetyl CoA synthesis, and this enzyme is essentially employed for continuous supply of the acetyl CoA for the production of these metabolites. To achieve reusable and a more robust entity of the enzyme, we carried out the immobilization of Acs on poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-poly(ethylenimine) (PNIPAm-PEI) microgels via adsorption. Cationic PNIPAm-PEI microgel was synthesized by one-step graft copolymerization of NIPAm and N,N-methylene bis-acrylamide (MBA) from PEI. Adsorption studies of Acs on microgel indicated high binding of enzymes, with a maximum binding capacity of 286 μg/mg of microgel for Acs was achieved. The immobilized enzymes showed improved biocatalytic efficiency over free enzymes, beside this, the reaction parameters and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy studies indicated no significant changes in the enzyme structure after immobilization. This thoroughly characterized enzyme bioconjugate was further immobilized on an ultrathin membrane to assess the same reaction in flow through condition. Bioconjugate was covalently immobilized on a thin layer of preformed microgel support upon polyethylene terephthalate (PET) track etched membrane. The prepared membrane was used in a dead end filtration device to monitor the bioconversion efficiency and operational stability of cross-linked bioconjugate. The membrane reactor showed consistent operational stability and maintained >70% of initial activity after 7 consecutive operation cycles. PMID:25561344

  17. Phosphorylation and activation of hamster carbamyl phosphate synthetase II by cAMP-dependent protein kinase. A novel mechanism for regulation of pyrimidine nucleotide biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Carrey, E A; Campbell, D G; Hardie, D G

    1985-12-30

    The trifunctional protein CAD, which contains the first three enzyme activities of pyrimidine nucleotide biosynthesis (carbamyl phosphate synthetase II, aspartate transcarbamylase and dihydro-orotase), is phosphorylated stoichiometrically by cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase. Phosphorylation activates the ammonia-dependent carbamyl phosphate synthetase activity of the complex by reducing the apparent Km for ATP. This effect is particularly marked in the presence of the allosteric feedback inhibitor, UTP, when the apparent Km is reduced by greater than 4-fold. Inhibition by physiological concentrations of UTP is substantially relieved by phosphorylation. Cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase phosphorylates two serine residues on the protein termed sites 1 and 2, and the primary structures of tryptic peptides containing these sites have been determined: Site 1: Arg-Leu-Ser(P)-Ser-Phe-Val-Thr-Lys Site 2: Ile-His-Arg-Ala-Ser(P)-Asp-Pro-Gly-Leu-Pro-Ala-Glu-Glu-Pro-Lys During the phosphorylation reaction, activation of the carbamyl phosphate synthetase shows a better correlation with occupancy of site 1 rather than site 2. Both phosphorylation and activation can be reversed using purified preparations of the catalytic subunits of protein phosphatases 1- and -2A, and inactivation also correlates better with dephosphorylation of site 1 rather than site 2. We believe this to be the first report that a key enzyme in nucleotide biosynthesis is regulated in a significant manner by reversible covalent modification. The physiological role of this phosphorylation in the stimulation of cell proliferation by growth factors and other mitogens is discussed. PMID:4092695

  18. Glucocorticoid receptor-mediated induction of glutamine synthetase in skeletal muscle cells in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Max, Stephen R.; Thomas, John W.; Banner, Carl; Vitkovic, Ljubisa; Konagaya, Masaaki

    1987-01-01

    The regulation by glucocorticoids of glutamine synthetase in L6 muscle cells in culture is studied. Glutamine synthetase activity was strikingly enhanced by dexamethasone. The dexamethasone-mediated induction of glutamine synthetase activity was blocked by RU38486, a glucocorticoid antagonist, indicating the involvement of intracellular glucocorticoid receptors in the induction process. RU38486 alone was without effect. Northern blot analysis revealed that dexamethasone-mediated enhancement of glutamine synthetase activity involves increased levels of glutamine synthetase mRNA. Glucocorticoids regulate the expression of glutamine synthetase mRNA in cultured muscle cells via interaction with intracellular receptors. Such regulation may be relevant to control of glutamine production by muscle.

  19. Long chain acyl-CoA synthetases and other acyl activating enzymes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proper synthesis and breakdown of molecules containing carboxylic acids is a vital part of metabolism in all living organisms. Given the relatively inert chemical nature of many carboxylic acids, activation is a necessary step prior to use in the various anabolic and catabolic pathways that utilize...

  20. Conformational dynamics of the active site loop of S-adenosylmethionine synthetase illuminated by site-directed spin labeling.

    PubMed

    Taylor, John C; Markham, George D

    2003-07-15

    S-adenosylmethionine synthetase (ATP: L-methionine S-adenosyltransferase, methionine adenosyltransferase, a.k.a. MAT) is one of numerous enzymes that have a flexible polypeptide loop that moves to gate access to the active site in a motion that is closely coupled to catalysis. Crystallographic studies of this tetrameric enzyme have shown that the loop is closed in the absence of bound substrates. However, the loop must open to allow substrate binding and a variety of data indicate that the loop is closed during the catalytic steps. Previous kinetic studies indicate that during turnover loop motion occurs on a time scale of 10(-2)s, ca. 10-fold faster than chemical transformations and turnover. Site-directed spin labeling has been used to introduce nitroxide groups at two positions in the loop to illuminate how the motion of the loop is affected by substrate binding. The two loop mutants constructed, G105C and D107C, retain wild type levels of MAT activity; attachment of a methanethiosulfonate spin label to convert the cysteine to the "R1" residue reduced the k(cat) only for the labeled D107R1 form (7-fold). The K(m) value for methionine increased 2- to 4-fold for the cysteine mutants and 2- to 7-fold for the labeled proteins, whereas the K(m) for ATP was changed by at most 2-fold. EPR spectra for both labeled proteins are nearly identical and show the presence of two major spin label environments with rotational diffusion rates differing by approximately 10-fold; the slower rate is ca. 4-fold faster than the estimated protein rotational rate. The spectra are not altered by addition of substrates or products. At both positions the less mobile conformation constitutes ca. 65% of the total species, indicating an equilibrium that only slightly favors one form, that in which the label is more immobilized. The equilibrium constant that relates the two forms is comparable to the equilibrium constant of 1.5 for a conformational change that was previously deduced from the

  1. Dexamethasone regulates glutamine synthetase expression in rat skeletal muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Max, Stephen R.; Konagaya, Masaaki; Konagaya, Yoko; Thomas, John W.; Banner, Carl; Vitkovic, Ljubisa

    1986-01-01

    The regulation of glutamine synthetase by glucocorticoids in rat skeletal muscles was studied. Administration of dexamethasone strikingly enhanced glutamine synthetase activity in plantaris and soleus muscles. The dexamethasone-mediated induction of glutamine synthetase activity was blocked to a significant extent by orally administered RU38486, a glucocorticoid antagonist, indicating the involvement of intracellular glucocorticoid receptors in the induction. Northern blot analysis revealed that dexamethasone-mediated enhancement of glutamine synthetase activity involves dramatically increased levels of glutamine synthetase mRNA. The induction of glutamine synthetase was selective in that glutaminase activity of soleus and plantaris muscles was not increased by dexamethasone. Furthermore, dexamethasone treatment resulted in only a small increase in glutamine synthetase activity in the heart. Accordingly, there was only a slight change in glutamine synthetase mRNA level in this tissue. Thus, glucocorticoids regulate glutamine synthetase gene expression in rat muscles at the transcriptional level via interaction with intracellular glutamine production by muscle and to mechanisms underlying glucocorticoid-induced muscle atrophy.

  2. Physical location of the site for N-acetyl-L-glutamate, the allosteric activator of carbamoyl phosphate synthetase, in the 20-kilodalton COOH-terminal domain.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Aparicio, L B; Guadalajara, A M; Rubio, V

    1989-04-01

    Mammalian liver mitochondrial carbamoyl phosphate synthetase, a polypeptide of 160 kDa, is activated allosterically by N-acetyl-L-glutamate. The analogue of this activator N-(chloroacetyl)-L-[14C]glutamate has been found to serve as a photoaffinity label for this enzyme. The specificity was demonstrated by the drastic reduction in the radioactivity bound to the protein when (a) an excess of unlabeled acetylglutamate was present during the irradiation and (b) the enzyme was replaced by pyruvate kinase, an enzyme that is not affected by acetylglutamate. The labeling was due to the photoactivation of the chloroacetyl group since there was no labeling under equal conditions with acetyl[14C]glutamate. To localize the binding site, limited proteolysis was used. Trypsin cleaves carbamoyl phosphate synthetase into complementary NH2- and COOH-terminal fragments of about 140 and 20 kDa, respectively [Powers-Lee, S. G., & Corina, K. (1986) J. Biol. Chem. 261, 15349-15352], but only the latter was found to be labeled. Similarly, of the various fragments generated by elastase, only two, of 20 and 120 kDa, contain the COOH terminus [see Powers-Lee and Corina (1986) above] and were found to be labeled. Thus, the binding site for acetylglutamate is within 20 kDa from the COOH terminus. This excludes the possibility that the acetylglutamate binding site evolved from an ancestral substrate site for glutamine: this substrate binds to the small subunit of the Escherichia coli enzyme, which is homologous to the NH2-terminal domain of the rat liver enzyme. Exhaustive tryptic digestion of photolabeled carbamoyl phosphate synthetase yielded a single radioactive peak, suggesting that the labeling is restricted to a single minimal tryptic peptide. PMID:2742825

  3. A gene-type-specific enhancer regulates the carbamyl phosphate synthetase I promoter by cooperating with the proximal GAG activating element.

    PubMed Central

    Goping, I S; Lamontagne, S; Shore, G C; Nguyen, M

    1995-01-01

    The rat carbamyl phosphate synthetase I gene is expressed in two cell types: hepatocytes and epithelial cells of the intestinal mucosa. The proximal promoter contains a single activating element, GAG, two repressor elements (sites I and III) and an anti-repressor element (site II). Although these elements together exhibit the potential for complex regulation, they are unable to confer tissue-specific promoter activity. Here we have identified a cell-type-specific enhancer that lies 10 kilobases upstream of the promoter. Unexpectedly, the enhancer also functioned in a gene-type-specific manner. The enhancer stimulated promoter activity exclusively through the proximal GAG element. Abrogation of GAG, either directly by mutation of GAG or indirectly by sites I and III repressors, abolished enhancer activation. Conversely, activation of the heterologous thymidine kinase promoter by the enhancer required the introduction of GAG. The requirement for GAG, therefore, functions to constrain the enhancer to a specific target promoter. PMID:7784176

  4. Mechanism of activation of phenylalanine and synthesis of P1, P4-bis(5'-adenosyl) tetraphosphate by yeast phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase.

    PubMed

    Harnett, S P; Lowe, G; Tansley, G

    1985-06-01

    The activation of L-phenylalanine by yeast phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase using adenosine 5'-[(S)-alpha-17O,alpha,alpha-18O2]triphosphate is shown to proceed with inversion of configuration at P alpha of ATP. This observation taken together with the lack of positional isotope exchange when adenosine 5'-[beta,beta-18O2]triphosphate is incubated with the enzyme in the absence of phenylalanine and in the presence of the competitive inhibitor phenylalaninol indicates that activation of phenylalanine occurs by a direct "in-line" adenylyl-transfer reaction. In the presence of Zn2+, yeast phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase also catalyzes the phenylalanine-dependent hydrolysis of ATP to AMP and the synthesis of P1,P4-bis(5'-adenosyl) tetraphosphate (Ap4A). With adenosine 5'-[(S)-alpha-17O,alpha,alpha-18O2]triphosphate, the formation of AMP and Ap4A is shown to occur with inversion and retention of configuration, respectively. It is concluded that phenylalanyl adenylate is an intermediate in both processes, Zn2+ promoting AMP formation by hydrolytic cleavage of the C-O bond and Ap4A formation by displacement at phosphorus of phenylalanine by ATP. PMID:3893531

  5. Capsaicin, nonivamide and trans-pellitorine decrease free fatty acid uptake without TRPV1 activation and increase acetyl-coenzyme A synthetase activity in Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Rohm, Barbara; Riedel, Annett; Ley, Jakob P; Widder, Sabine; Krammer, Gerhard E; Somoza, Veronika

    2015-01-01

    Red pepper and its major pungent component, capsaicin, have been associated with hypolipidemic effects in rats, although mechanistic studies on the effects of capsaicin and/or structurally related compounds on lipid metabolism are scarce. In this work, the effects of capsaicin and its structural analog nonivamide, the aliphatic alkamide trans-pellitorine and vanillin as the basic structural element of all vanilloids on the mechanisms of intestinal fatty acid uptake in differentiated intestinal Caco-2 cells were studied. Capsaicin and nonivamide were found to reduce fatty acid uptake, with IC₅₀ values of 0.49 μM and 1.08 μM, respectively. trans-Pellitorine was shown to reduce fatty acid uptake by 14.0±2.14% at 100 μM, whereas vanillin was not effective, indicating a pivotal role of the alkyl chain with the acid amide group in fatty acid uptake by Caco-2 cells. This effect was associated neither with the activation of the transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1 (TRPV1) or the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) nor with effects on paracellular transport or glucose uptake. However, acetyl-coenzyme A synthetase activity increased (p<0.05) in the presence of 10 μM capsaicin, nonivamide or trans-pellitorine, pointing to an increased fatty acid biosynthesis that might counteract the decreased fatty acid uptake.

  6. A non-radioactive assay for selenophosphate synthetase activity using recombinant pyruvate pyrophosphate dikinase from Thermus thermophilus HB8.

    PubMed

    Kamada, Saho; Okugochi, Takahiro; Asano, Kaori; Tobe, Ryuta; Mihara, Hisaaki; Nemoto, Michiko; Inagaki, Kenji; Tamura, Takashi

    2016-10-01

    Biosynthesis of selenocysteine-containing proteins requires monoselenophosphate, a selenium-donor intermediate generated by selenophosphate synthetase (Sephs). A non-radioactive assay was developed as an alternative to the standard [8-(14)C] AMP-quantifying assay. The product, AMP, was measured using a recombinant pyruvate pyrophosphate dikinase from Thermus thermophilus HB8. The KM and kcat for Sephs2-Sec60Cys were determined to be 26 μM and 0.352 min(-1), respectively. PMID:27405844

  7. Formation of a catalytically active complex between tRNAAsp and aspartyl-tRNA synthetase from yeast in high concentrations of ammonium sulphate.

    PubMed

    Giegé, R; Lorber, B; Ebel, J P; Moras, D; Thierry, J C; Jacrot, B; Zaccai, G

    1982-05-01

    The interactions of yeast tRNAAsp with cognate aspartyl-tRNA synthetase have been studied in high concentrations of either sodium chloride or ammonium sulphate by fluorescence titration and small-angle neutron scattering. In solutions containing more than 1M NaCl no complex is formed and enzymatic activity is abolished. In strong contrast, however, the physical measurements showed the formation of a two-to-one tRNA-enzyme complex, with high affinity, in 1.6 M (NH4)2SO4. Aminoacylation assays under the same salt conditions showed the enzymatic fixation of aspartic acid to tRNAAsp to occur at an appreciable rate. The present study emphasizes that the effects of salts on protein-nucleic acid interactions do not depend only on ionic strength but also on the nature of the salt. This study has allowed a rational approach to the crystallisation of a functional tRNAAsp-aspartyl-tRNA synthetase complex (Giegé, Lorber, Ebel, Thierry and Moras (1980) C.R. Acad. Sci. Paris, série D, 291, 393-396). PMID:7049254

  8. Identification, Expression and IAA-Amide Synthetase Activity Analysis of Gretchen Hagen 3 in Papaya Fruit (Carica papaya L.) during Postharvest Process

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kaidong; Wang, Jinxiang; Li, Haili; Zhong, Jundi; Feng, Shaoxian; Pan, Yaoliang; Yuan, Changchun

    2016-01-01

    Auxin plays essential roles in plant development. Gretchen Hagen 3 (GH3) genes belong to a major auxin response gene family and GH3 proteins conjugate a range of acylsubstrates to alter the levels of hormones. Currently, the role of GH3 genes in postharvest physiological regulation of ripening and softening processes in papaya fruit is unclear. In this study, we identified seven CpGH3 genes in a papaya genome database. The CpGH3.1a, CpGH3.1b, CpGH3.5, CpGH3.6, and CpGH3.9 proteins were identified as indole-3-acetic acid (IAA)-specific amido synthetases. We analyzed the changes in IAA-amido synthetase activity using aspartate as a substrate for conjugation and found a large increase (over 5-fold) during the postharvest stages. Ascorbic acid (AsA) application can extend the shelf life of papaya fruit. Our data showed that AsA treatment regulates postharvest fruit maturation processes by promoting endogenous IAA levels. Our findings demonstrate the important role of GH3 genes in the regulation of auxin-associated postharvest physiology in papaya. PMID:27812360

  9. Loss of long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase isoform 1 impairs cardiac autophagy and mitochondrial structure through mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 activation.

    PubMed

    Grevengoed, Trisha J; Cooper, Daniel E; Young, Pamela A; Ellis, Jessica M; Coleman, Rosalind A

    2015-11-01

    Because hearts with a temporally induced knockout of acyl-CoA synthetase 1 (Acsl1(T-/-)) are virtually unable to oxidize fatty acids, glucose use increases 8-fold to compensate. This metabolic switch activates mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), which initiates growth by increasing protein and RNA synthesis and fatty acid metabolism, while decreasing autophagy. Compared with controls, Acsl1(T-/-) hearts contained 3 times more mitochondria with abnormal structure and displayed a 35-43% lower respiratory function. To study the effects of mTORC1 activation on mitochondrial structure and function, mTORC1 was inhibited by treating Acsl1(T-/-) and littermate control mice with rapamycin or vehicle alone for 2 wk. Rapamycin treatment normalized mitochondrial structure, number, and the maximal respiration rate in Acsl1(T-/-) hearts, but did not improve ADP-stimulated oxygen consumption, which was likely caused by the 33-51% lower ATP synthase activity present in both vehicle- and rapamycin-treated Acsl1(T-/-) hearts. The turnover of microtubule associated protein light chain 3b in Acsl1(T-/-) hearts was 88% lower than controls, indicating a diminished rate of autophagy. Rapamycin treatment increased autophagy to a rate that was 3.1-fold higher than in controls, allowing the formation of autophagolysosomes and the clearance of damaged mitochondria. Thus, long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase isoform 1 (ACSL1) deficiency in the heart activated mTORC1, thereby inhibiting autophagy and increasing the number of damaged mitochondria. PMID:26220174

  10. The freshwater Amazonian stingray, Potamotrygon motoro, up-regulates glutamine synthetase activity and protein abundance, and accumulates glutamine when exposed to brackish (15 per thousand) water.

    PubMed

    Ip, Y K; Loong, A M; Ching, B; Tham, G H Y; Wong, W P; Chew, S F

    2009-12-01

    This study aimed to examine whether the stenohaline freshwater stingray, Potamotrygon motoro, which lacks a functional ornithine-urea cycle, would up-regulate glutamine synthetase (GS) activity and protein abundance, and accumulate glutamine during a progressive transfer from freshwater to brackish (15 per thousand) water with daily feeding. Our results revealed that, similar to other freshwater teleosts, P. motoro performed hyperosmotic regulation, with very low urea concentrations in plasma and tissues, in freshwater. In 15 per thousand water, it was non-ureotelic and non-ureoosmotic, acting mainly as an osmoconformer with its plasma osmolality, [Na+] and [Cl-] comparable to those of the external medium. There were significant increases in the content of several free amino acids (FAAs), including glutamate, glutamine and glycine, in muscle and liver, but not in plasma, indicating that FAAs could contribute in part to cell volume regulation. Furthermore, exposure of P. motoro to 15 per thousand water led to up-regulation of GS activity and protein abundance in both liver and muscle. Thus, our results indicate for the first time that, despite the inability to synthesize urea and the lack of functional carbamoyl phosphate synthetase III (CPS III) which uses glutamine as a substrate, P. motoro retained the capacity to up-regulate the activity and protein expression of GS in response to salinity stress. Potamotrygon motoro was not nitrogen (N) limited when exposed to 15 per thousand water with feeding, and there were no significant changes in the amination and deamination activities of hepatic glutamate dehydrogenase. In contrast, P. motoro became N limited when exposed to 10 per thousand water with fasting and could not survive well in 15 per thousand water without food.

  11. Nitrogen excretion and expression of carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase III activity and mRNA in extrahepatic tissues of largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides).

    PubMed

    Kong, H; Edberg, D D; Korte, J J; Salo, W L; Wright, P A; Anderson, P M

    1998-02-15

    Low levels of all of the enzymes required for urea synthesis via the urea cycle, including mitochondrial glutamine- and acetylglutamate-dependent carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase III (CPSase III) and cytosolic glutamine synthetase, are known to be present in liver of the teleost fish largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides). The levels of these enzymes are higher than those in most other teleosts, but they are significantly lower than the levels present in liver of ureoosmotic elasmobranchs. The purpose of this study was to assess the physiological role of CPSase III in the context of urea synthesis in adult bass. The results showed that urea-N accounts for about 30% of the total nitrogen (ammonia-N plus urea-N) excreted under control conditions. The rate of urea-N excretion did not increase in response to exposure to 1 mM NH4Cl (3 days) or 0.25 mM NH4Cl (12 days) in the external water, except for a transient increase after a day or two of exposure. CPSase III activity in liver also did not increase in response to exposure to ammonia. Adult largemouth bass, while apparently ureogenic, are primarily ammonotelic and remain so even in the presence of relatively high concentrations of ammonia in the external environment. The total units of CPSase III activity in liver are not sufficient to account for the quantity of urea that is excreted. However, CPSase III and ornithine carbamoyltransferase (OCTase) activities were found to be present in intestinal tissue and, unexpectedly, in muscle tissue. The total units of CPSase III and OCTase in muscle, intestine, and liver appear to be sufficient to account for the observed rate of urea excretion. The sequence of CPSase III cDNA was determined, which permitted the use of ribonuclease protection assays to demonstrate the presence of CPSase III mRNA in these tissues.

  12. Location of the binding site for the allosteric activator IMP in the COOH-terminal domain of Escherichia coli carbamyl phosphates synthetase.

    PubMed

    Bueso, J; Lusty, C J; Rubio, V

    1994-09-15

    Using UV-irradiation we cross-linked IMP, the allosteric activator of E. coli carbamyl phosphate synthetase (a heterodimer of 117.7 and 41.4 kDa subunits), to the large subunit of the enzyme. As in the native enzyme-IMP complex, the cross-linked complex was resistant to attack by trypsin. Thus, IMP is attached to its normal site and induces the normal conformational changes. Limited digestion of the [3H]IMP-labeled enzyme with V8 staphylococcal protease or with trypsin in the presence of SDS, and NH2-terminal sequencing, showed that [3H]IMP is cross-linked to the COOH-terminal 20 kDa domain of the large subunit, downstream of residue 912, supporting the proposal that this domain is specialized in effector binding and regulation. PMID:8093025

  13. Human holocarboxylase synthetase with a start site at methionine-58 is the predominant nuclear variant of this protein and has catalytic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Bao, Baolong; Wijeratne, Subhashinee S.K.; Rodriguez-Melendez, Rocio; Zempleni, Janos

    2011-08-19

    Highlights: {yields} Unambiguous evidence is provided that methionine-58 serves as an in-frame alternative translation site for holocarboxylase synthetase (HLCS58). {yields} Full-length HLCS and HLCS58 enter the nucleus, but HLCS58 is the predominant variant. {yields} HLCS58 has biological activity as biotin protein ligase. -- Abstract: Holocarboxylase synthetase (HLCS) catalyzes the covalent binding of biotin to both carboxylases in extranuclear structures and histones in cell nuclei, thereby mediating important roles in intermediary metabolism, gene regulation, and genome stability. HLCS has three putative translational start sites (methionine-1, -7, and -58), but lacks a strong nuclear localization sequence that would explain its participation in epigenetic events in the cell nucleus. Recent evidence suggests that small quantities of HLCS with a start site in methionine-58 (HLCS58) might be able to enter the nuclear compartment. We generated the following novel insights into HLCS biology. First, we generated a novel HLCS fusion protein vector to demonstrate that methionine-58 is a functional translation start site in human cells. Second, we used confocal microscopy and western blots to demonstrate that HLCS58 enters the cell nucleus in meaningful quantities, and that full-length HLCS localizes predominantly in the cytoplasm but may also enter the nucleus. Third, we produced recombinant HLCS58 to demonstrate its biological activity toward catalyzing the biotinylation of both carboxylases and histones. Collectively, these observations are consistent with roles of HLCS58 and full-length HLCS in nuclear events. We conclude this report by proposing a novel role for HLCS in epigenetic events, mediated by physical interactions between HLCS and other chromatin proteins as part of a larger multiprotein complex that mediates gene repression.

  14. Identification of 2'-5'-Oligoadenylate Synthetase-Like Gene in Goose: Gene Structure, Expression Patterns, and Antiviral Activity Against Newcastle Disease Virus.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chao; Liu, Fei; Chen, Shun; Wang, Mingshu; Jia, Renyong; Zhu, Dekang; Liu, Mafeng; Sun, Kunfeng; Yang, Qiao; Wu, Ying; Chen, Xiaoyue; Cheng, Anchun

    2016-09-01

    2'-5'-oligoadenylate synthetase-like (OASL) is a kind of antiviral protein induced by interferons (IFNs), which plays an important role in the IFNs-mediated antiviral signaling pathway. In this study, we cloned and identified OASL in the Chinese goose for the first time. Goose 2'-5'-oligoadenylate synthetase-like (goOASL), including an ORF of 1527bp, encoding a protein of 508 amino acids. GoOASL protein contains 3 conserved motifs: nucleotidyltransferase (NTase) domain, 2'-5'-oligoadenylate synthetase (OAS) domain, and 2 ubiquitin-like (UBL) repeats. The tissue distribution profile of goOASL in 2-week-old gosling and adult goose were identified by Real-Time quantitative PCR, which revealed that the highest level of goOASL mRNA transcription was detected in the blood of adult goose and gosling. The mRNA transcription level of goOASL was upregulated in all tested tissues of duck Tembusu virus (DTMUV)-infected 3-day-old goslings, compared with control groups. Furthermore, using the stimulus Poly(I: C), ODN2006, R848, and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) as well as the viral pathogens DTMUV, H9N2 avian influenza virus (AIV), and gosling plague virus (GPV) to treat goose peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) for 6 h, goOASL transcripts level was significantly upregulated in all treated groups. To further investigate the antiviral activity of goOASL, pcDNA3.1(+)-goOASL-His plasmid was constructed, and goOASL was expressed by the goose embryo fibroblast cells (GEFs) transfected with pcDNA3.1(+)-goOASL-His. Our research data suggested that Newcastle disease virus (NDV) replication (viral copies and viral titer) in GEFs was significantly reduced by the overexpression of goOASL protein. These data were meaningful for the antiviral immunity research of goose and shed light on the future prevention of NDV in fowl. PMID:27576097

  15. Characterization of Cereulide Synthetase, a Toxin-Producing Macromolecular Machine

    PubMed Central

    Alonzo, Diego A.; Magarvey, Nathan A.; Schmeing, T. Martin

    2015-01-01

    Cereulide synthetase is a two-protein nonribosomal peptide synthetase system that produces a potent emetic toxin in virulent strains of Bacillus cereus. The toxin cereulide is a depsipeptide, as it consists of alternating aminoacyl and hydroxyacyl residues. The hydroxyacyl residues are derived from keto acid substrates, which cereulide synthetase selects and stereospecifically reduces with imbedded ketoreductase domains before incorporating them into the growing depsipeptide chain. We present an in vitro biochemical characterization of cereulide synthetase. We investigate the kinetics and side chain specificity of α-keto acid selection, evaluate the requirement of an MbtH-like protein for adenylation domain activity, assay the effectiveness of vinylsulfonamide inhibitors on ester-adding modules, perform NADPH turnover experiments and evaluate in vitro depsipeptide biosynthesis. This work also provides biochemical insight into depsipeptide-synthesizing nonribosomal peptide synthetases responsible for other bioactive molecules such as valinomycin, antimycin and kutzneride. PMID:26042597

  16. Nitrate reductase, nitrite reductase, glutamine synthetase, and glutamate synthase expression and activity in response to different nitrogen sources in nitrogen-starved wheat seedlings.

    PubMed

    Balotf, Sadegh; Kavoosi, Gholamreza; Kholdebarin, Bahman

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the expression and activity of nitrate reductase (NR, EC 1.7.1.1), nitrite reductase (NiR, EC 1.7.2.2), glutamine synthetase (GS, EC 6.3.1.2), and glutamate synthase (GOGAT, EC 1.4.7.1) in response to potassium nitrate, ammonium chloride, and ammonium nitrate in nitrogen-starved wheat seedlings. Plants were grown in standard nutrient solution for 17 days and then subjected to nitrogen starvation for 7 days. The starved plants were supplied with potassium nitrate ammonium nitrate and ammonium chloride (50 mM) for 4 days and the leaves were harvested. The relative expression of NR, NiR, GS, and GOGAT as well as the enzyme activities were investigated. Nitrogen starvation caused a significant decrease both in transcript levels and in NR, NiR, GS, and GOGAT activities. Potassium nitrate and ammonium nitrate treatments restored NR, NiR, GS, and GOGAT expressions and activities. Ammonium chloride increased only the expressions and activities of GS and GOGAT in a dose-dependent manner. The results of our study highlight the differential effects between the type and the amount of nitrogen salts on NR, NiR, GS, and GOGAT activities in wheat seedlings while potassium nitrate being more effective.

  17. Effects of detergents on retinyl ester synthetase and all-trans:11-CIS retinoid isomerase activities in homogenates of bovine retinal pigment epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, H.; Furr, H.C.; Olson, J.A. )

    1990-02-26

    (11,12-{sup 3}H) all-trans Retinol and various detergents were added to homogenates of fresh bovine retinal pigment epithelium. After dark incubation for 40 minutes at 37{degrees}C, the retinoids were extracted and analyzed by a high resolution HPLC method. The detergents showed different effects on the retinyl ester synthetase (RES) and all-trans:11 cis retinoid isomerase (RI) activities. The detergent CHAPS (0.3%) almost totally destroyed RI activity without reducing RES activity. The same concentration of sodium dodecyl sulfate and Nonidet P-40 significantly reduced RES activity and totally destroyed RI activity. RES and RI activities were unaffected by 0.3% Mega 8, a nonionic detergent, but were inhibited by 1% Mega 8. Thus, because of these differential effects of detergents, RES and RI probably are different enzymes rather than a single multifunctional enzyme. Because isomerization was always inhibited more than esterification, our findings also accord with the esterification/isomerization mechanism recently reported by Rando et al.

  18. Comparative Biochemical and Immunological Studies of Bacterial Glutamine Synthetases

    PubMed Central

    Tronick, Steven R.; Ciardi, Joseph E.; Stadtman, E. R.

    1973-01-01

    Antisera prepared against adenylylated and unadenylylated Escherichia coli glutamine synthetase cross-reacted with the glutamine synthetases from a number of gram-negative bacteria and one gram-variable species as demonstrated by immunodiffusion and inhibition of enzyme activity. In contrast, the antisera did not cross-react with the glutamine synthetases from gram-positive bacteria (with one exception) nor with the synthetases of higher organisms. Modification of the various glutamine synthetases by covalent attachment of adenosine 5′-monophosphate (or other nucleotides) was tested for by determining whether or not snake venom phosphodiesterase altered catalytic activity in a manner similar to its effect on adenylylated E. coli glutamine synthetase. Only the activity of the glutamine synthetases from gram-negative bacteria grown with specific levels of nitrogen sources could be altered by snake venom phosphodiesterase. In addition, a relative order of antigenic homology between cross-reacting enzymes was suggested based on the patterns of spur formation in the immunodiffusion assay. Images PMID:4125585

  19. Identification of a residue crucial for the angiostatic activity of human mini tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase by focusing on its molecular evolution

    PubMed Central

    Nakamoto, Terumasa; Miyanokoshi, Miki; Tanaka, Tomoaki; Wakasugi, Keisuke

    2016-01-01

    Human tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase (TrpRS) exists in two forms: a full-length TrpRS and a mini TrpRS. We previously found that human mini, but not full-length, TrpRS is an angiostatic factor. Moreover, it was shown that the interaction between mini TrpRS and the extracellular domain of vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin is crucial for its angiostatic activity. However, the molecular mechanism of the angiostatic activity of human mini TrpRS is only partly understood. In the present study, we investigated the effects of truncated (mini) form of TrpRS proteins from human, bovine, or zebrafish on vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-stimulated chemotaxis of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). We show that both human and bovine mini TrpRSs inhibited VEGF-induced endothelial migration, whereas zebrafish mini TrpRS did not. Next, to identify residues crucial for the angiostatic activity of human mini TrpRS, we prepared several site-directed mutants based on amino acid sequence alignments among TrpRSs from various species and demonstrated that a human mini K153Q TrpRS mutant cannot inhibit VEGF-stimulated HUVEC migration and cannot bind to the extracellular domain of VE-cadherin. Taken together, we conclude that the Lys153 residue of human mini TrpRS is a VE-cadherin binding site and is therefore crucial for its angiostatic activity. PMID:27094087

  20. Antiviral activity of human oligoadenylate synthetases-like (OASL) is mediated by enhancing retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jianzhong; Zhang, Yugen; Ghosh, Arundhati; Cuevas, Rolando A.; Forero, Adriana; Dhar, Jayeeta; Ibsen, Mikkel Søes; Schmid-Burgk, Jonathan Leo; Schmidt, Tobias; Ganapathiraju, Madhavi K.; Fujita, Takashi; Hartmann, Rune; Barik, Sailen; Hornung, Veit; Coyne, Carolyn B.; Sarkar, Saumendra N.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Virus infection is sensed in the cytoplasm by retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I, also known as DDX58), which requires RNA and polyubiquitin binding to induce type I interferon (IFN), and activate cellular innate immunity. We show that the human IFN-inducible oligoadenylate synthetases-like (OASL) protein had antiviral activity and mediated RIG-I activation by mimicking polyubiquitin. Loss of OASL expression reduced RIG-I signaling and enhanced virus replication in human cells. Conversely, OASL expression suppressed replication of a number of viruses in a RIG-I-dependent manner and enhanced RIG-I-mediated IFN induction. OASL interacted and colocalized with RIG-I, and through its C-terminal ubiquitin-like domain specifically enhanced RIG-I signaling. Bone marrow derived macrophages from mice deficient for Oasl2 showed that among the two mouse orthologs of human OASL; Oasl2 is functionally similar to human OASL. Our findings show a mechanism by which human OASL contributes to host antiviral responses by enhancing RIG-I activation. PMID:24931123

  1. Biphasic effect of IL-1beta on the activity of argininosuccinate synthetase in Caco-2 cells. Involvement of nitric oxide production.

    PubMed

    Brasse-Lagnel, Carole; Lavoinne, Alain; Fairand, Alain; Vavasseur, Karine; Deniel, Nicolas; Husson, Annie

    2006-06-01

    The expression of the argininosuccinate synthetase gene (ASS), the limiting enzyme of arginine synthesis, was previously shown to be rapidly induced by a short-term (4 h) exposure to IL-1beta in Caco-2 cells [Biochimie, 2005, 403-409]. The present report shows that, by contrast, a long-term (24 h) exposure to IL-1beta inhibited the ASS activity despite an increase in both specific mRNA level and protein amount, demonstrating a post-translational effect. Concerning the mechanism involved, we demonstrate that the inhibiting effect is linked to the production of nitric oxide (NO) induced by IL-1beta. Indeed, the inhibiting effect of IL-1beta was totally blocked in the presence of l-NMMA, an inhibitor of the inducible nitric oxide synthase, or by culturing the cells in an arginine-deprived medium. Moreover, a decrease in the ASS activity was induced by culturing the cells in the presence of SNAP, a NO donor. Conversely, blocking the action of NO by antioxidant agents, the stimulatory effect of IL-1beta on ASS activity was restored, as measured at 24 h. Finally, such an inhibiting effect of NO on ASS activity may be related, at least in part, to S-nitrosylation of the protein. The physiological relevance of the antagonistic effects of IL-1beta and NO on ASS is discussed.

  2. Genetics Home Reference: carbamoyl phosphate synthetase I deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    Skip to main content Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Enable Javascript for addthis links to activate. ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions carbamoyl phosphate synthetase I deficiency ...

  3. A Deoxynivalenol-Activated Methionyl-tRNA Synthetase Gene from Wheat Encodes a Nuclear Localized Protein and Protects Plants Against Fusarium Pathogens and Mycotoxins.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Dong-Yun; Yi, Shu-Yuan; Liu, Rong-Jing; Qu, Bo; Huang, Tao; He, Wei-Jie; Li, Cheng; Li, He-Ping; Liao, Yu-Cai

    2016-06-01

    Fusarium graminearum is the fungal pathogen that causes globally important diseases of cereals and produces mycotoxins such as deoxynivalenol (DON). Owing to the dearth of available sources of resistance to Fusarium pathogens, characterization of novel genes that confer resistance to mycotoxins and mycotoxin-producing fungi is vitally important for breeding resistant crop varieties. In this study, a wheat methionyl-tRNA synthetase (TaMetRS) gene was identified from suspension cell cultures treated with DON. It shares conserved aminoacylation catalytic and tRNA anticodon binding domains with human MetRS and with the only previously characterized plant MetRS, suggesting that it functions in aminoacylation in the cytoplasm. However, the TaMetRS comprises a typical nuclear localization signal and cellular localization studies with a TaMetRS::GFP fusion protein showed that TaMetRS is localized in the nucleus. Expression of TaMetRS was activated by DON treatment and by infection with a DON-producing F. graminearum strain in wheat spikes. No such activation was observed following infection with a non-DON-producing F. graminearum strain. Expression of TaMetRS in Arabidopsis plants conferred significant resistance to DON and F. graminearum. These results indicated that this DON-activated TaMetRS gene may encode a novel type of MetRS in plants that has a role in defense and detoxification.

  4. Evolution of lanthipeptide synthetases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qi; Yu, Yi; Vélasquez, Juan E.; van der Donk, Wilfred A.

    2012-01-01

    Lanthionine-containing peptides (lanthipeptides) are a family of ribosomally synthesized and posttranslationally modified peptides containing (methyl)lanthionine residues. Here we present a phylogenomic study of the four currently known classes of lanthipeptide synthetases (LanB and LanC for class I, LanM for class II, LanKC for class III, and LanL for class IV). Although they possess very similar cyclase domains, class II–IV synthetases have evolved independently, and LanB and LanC enzymes appear to not always have coevolved. LanM enzymes from various phyla that have three cysteines ligated to a zinc ion (as opposed to the more common Cys-Cys-His ligand set) cluster together. Most importantly, the phylogenomic data suggest that for some scaffolds, the ring topology of the final lanthipeptides may be determined in part by the sequence of the precursor peptides and not just by the biosynthetic enzymes. This notion was supported by studies with two chimeric peptides, suggesting that the nisin and prochlorosin biosynthetic enzymes can produce the correct ring topologies of epilancin 15X and lacticin 481, respectively. These results highlight the potential of lanthipeptide synthetases for bioengineering and combinatorial biosynthesis. Our study also demonstrates unexplored areas of sequence space that may be fruitful for genome mining. PMID:23071302

  5. A facile reproducible radioimmunoassay of the mixed metabolites of prostaglandins E, suitable for measurement of relative differences of phospholipase/prostaglandin synthetase activity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Fretland, D J; Cammarata, P S

    1984-04-01

    A relatively simple, reproducible, radioimmunoassay for the mixed metabolites of prostaglandins E (U-PGE-M) in rat and human urine is described. Results of the assay of treated versus control urine extracts correlate well with differences expected from treatments known to alter in vivo phospholipase/prostaglandin synthetase activity. Cross-reactivity of heterogeneous metabolite antiserum with 5 available endogenous prostaglandins and a single metabolite was determined and showed little or no cross reaction. Sensitivity, within-assay precision, interassay reproducibility, and parallelism were also determined and found acceptable. Excretion rates of U-PGE-M by rats and humans were determined, and statistically significant differences could be shown, although absolute values were smaller than estimated absolute values obtained from mass-spectrometric measurements of single, purified metabolites. Normal human male excretion rates differed significantly from those of females. Injection of prostaglandin E1 caused a significant rise in U-PGE-M excretion in rats whereas aspirin and indomethacin caused it to fall. U-PGE-M excretion rates of spontaneous hypertensive rats were significantly less than rates of normotensive controls. Adrenalectomy resulted in excretion of significantly larger amounts of U-PGE-M than in normal or sham-operated controls. A screen of clinically active pharmacological agents and hormones gave results consistent with previously published reports. PMID:6427792

  6. Two Activities of Long-Chain Acyl-Coenzyme A Synthetase Are Involved in Lipid Trafficking between the Endoplasmic Reticulum and the Plastid in Arabidopsis1

    PubMed Central

    Jessen, Dirk; Roth, Charlotte; Wiermer, Marcel

    2015-01-01

    In plants, fatty acids are synthesized within the plastid and need to be distributed to the different sites of lipid biosynthesis within the cell. Free fatty acids released from the plastid need to be converted to their corresponding coenzyme A thioesters to become metabolically available. This activation is mediated by long-chain acyl-coenzyme A synthetases (LACSs), which are encoded by a family of nine genes in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). So far, it has remained unclear which of the individual LACS activities are involved in making plastid-derived fatty acids available to cytoplasmic glycerolipid biosynthesis. Because of its unique localization at the outer envelope of plastids, LACS9 was regarded as a candidate for linking plastidial fatty export and cytoplasmic use. However, data presented in this study show that LACS9 is involved in fatty acid import into the plastid. The analyses of mutant lines revealed strongly overlapping functions of LACS4 and LACS9 in lipid trafficking from the endoplasmic reticulum to the plastid. In vivo labeling experiments with lacs4 lacs9 double mutants suggest strongly reduced synthesis of endoplasmic reticulum-derived lipid precursors, which are required for the biosynthesis of glycolipids in the plastids. In conjunction with this defect, double-mutant plants accumulate significant amounts of linoleic acid in leaf tissue. PMID:25540329

  7. Neuroprotection Promoted by Guanosine Depends on Glutamine Synthetase and Glutamate Transporters Activity in Hippocampal Slices Subjected to Oxygen/Glucose Deprivation.

    PubMed

    Dal-Cim, Tharine; Martins, Wagner C; Thomaz, Daniel T; Coelho, Victor; Poluceno, Gabriela Godoy; Lanznaster, Débora; Vandresen-Filho, Samuel; Tasca, Carla I

    2016-05-01

    Guanosine (GUO) has been shown to act as a neuroprotective agent against glutamatergic excitotoxicity by increasing glutamate uptake and decreasing its release. In this study, a putative effect of GUO action on glutamate transporters activity modulation was assessed in hippocampal slices subjected to oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD), an in vitro model of brain ischemia. Slices subjected to OGD showed increased excitatory amino acids release (measured by D-[(3)H]aspartate release) that was prevented in the presence of GUO (100 µM). The glutamate transporter blockers, DL-TBOA (10 µM), DHK (100 µM, selective inhibitor of GLT-1), and sulfasalazine (SAS, 250 µM, Xc(-) system inhibitor) decreased OGD-induced D-aspartate release. Interestingly, DHK or DL-TBOA blocked the decrease in glutamate release induced by GUO, whereas SAS did not modify the GUO effect. GUO protected hippocampal slices from cellular damage by modulation of glutamate transporters, however selective blockade of GLT-1 or Xc- system only did not affect this protective action of GUO. OGD decreased hippocampal glutamine synthetase (GS) activity and GUO recovered GS activity to control levels without altering the kinetic parameters of GS activity, thus suggesting GUO does not directly interact with GS. Additionally, the pharmacological inhibition of GS activity with methionine sulfoximine abolished the effect of GUO in reducing D-aspartate release and cellular damage evoked by OGD. Altogether, results in hippocampal slices subjected to OGD show that GUO counteracts the release of excitatory amino acids, stimulates the activity of GS, and decreases the cellular damage by modulation of glutamate transporters activity.

  8. Identity between palmitoyl-CoA synthetase and arachidonoyl-CoA synthetase in human platelet?

    PubMed Central

    Bakken, A M; Farstad, M; Holmsen, H

    1991-01-01

    Apparent Km values have been determined for the substrates ATP, CoA and fatty acids for the long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase (EC 6.2.1.3) reaction in lysates of human blood platelets. The apparent Km for ATP was higher for saturated fatty acids (C12:0 to C18:0) than for unsaturated acids (C18:1 to C22:6). Other apparent Km values were very similar for all long-chain fatty acids tested. Palmitic acid inhibited the formation of [14C]arachidonoyl-CoA, and arachidonic acid inhibited the formation of [14C]palmitoyl-CoA, with [14C]arachidonate or [14C]palmitate respectively as substrate. After chromatography of Triton X-100-extracted platelet protein in several systems (hydroxyapatite, DEAE-Sepharose, Sephacryl S-200 HR, CoA-Sepharose, Sephadex G-100 and AcA 34), both arachidonoyl-CoA synthetase and palmitoyl-CoA synthetase activities were eluted together in the various protein peaks, and with approximately the same ratio of activities in all peaks. After some purification steps (DEAE-Sepharose and Sephacryl S-200 HR), the acyl-CoA synthetase activity was up to 37 nmol/min per mg of protein with [14C]palmitate as substrate, and up to 116 nmol/min per mg of protein with [14C]arachidonate as substrate. The purification was respectively about 8- and 10-fold. The results indicate that palmitoyl-CoA (or unspecific) synthetase and arachidonoyl-CoA (or specific) synthetase are in fact the same enzyme, in agreement with previously reported results from this laboratory. PMID:1848073

  9. Rotavirus Controls Activation of the 2′-5′-Oligoadenylate Synthetase/RNase L Pathway Using at Least Two Distinct Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Tacuba, Liliana; Rojas, Margarito; Arias, Carlos F.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The innate immune response is the first line of defense of the host cell against a viral infection. In turn, viruses have evolved a wide variety of strategies to hide from, and to directly antagonize, the host innate immune pathways. One of these pathways is the 2′-5′-oligoadenylate synthetase (OAS)/RNase L pathway. OAS is activated by double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) to produce 2′-5′ oligoadenylates, which are the activators of RNase L; this enzyme degrades viral and cellular RNAs, restricting viral infection. It has been recently found that the carboxy-terminal domain (CTD) of rotavirus VP3 has a 2′-5′-phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity that is able to functionally substitute for the PDE activity of the mouse hepatitis virus ns2 protein. This particular phosphodiesterase cleaves the 2′-5′-phosphodiester bond of the oligoadenylates, antagonizing the OAS/RNase L pathway. However, whether this activity of VP3 is relevant during the replication cycle of rotavirus is not known. Here, we demonstrate that after rotavirus infection the OAS/RNase L complex becomes activated; however, the virus is able to control its activity using at least two distinct mechanisms. A virus-cell interaction that occurs during or before rotavirus endocytosis triggers a signal that prevents the early activation of RNase L, while later on the control is taken by the newly synthesized VP3. Cosilencing the expression of VP3 and RNase L in infected cells yields viral infectious particles at levels similar to those obtained in control infected cells, where no genes were silenced, suggesting that the capping activity of VP3 is not essential for the formation of infectious viral particles. IMPORTANCE Rotaviruses represent an important cause of severe gastroenteritis in the young of many animal species, including humans. In this work, we have found that the OAS/RNase L pathway is activated during rotavirus infection, but the virus uses two different strategies to prevent the

  10. Serine 948 and threonine 1042 are crucial residues for allosteric regulation of Escherichia coli carbamoylphosphate synthetase and illustrate coupling effects of activation and inhibition pathways.

    PubMed

    Delannay, S; Charlier, D; Tricot, C; Villeret, V; Piérard, A; Stalon, V

    1999-03-01

    Escherichia coli carbamoylphosphate synthetase (CPSase) is a key enzyme in the pyrimidine nucleotides and arginine biosynthetic pathways. The enzyme harbors a complex regulation, being activated by ornithine and inosine 5'-monophosphate (IMP), and inhibited by UMP. CPSase mutants obtained by in vivo mutagenesis and selected on the basis of particular phenotypes have been characterized kinetically. Two residues, serine 948 and threonine 1042, appear crucial for allosteric regulation of CPSase. When threonine 1042 is replaced by an isoleucine residue, the enzyme displays a greatly reduced activation by ornithine. The T1042I mutated enzyme is still sensitive to UMP and IMP, although the effects of both regulators are reduced. When serine 948 is replaced by phenylalanine, the enzyme becomes insensitive to UMP and IMP, but is still activated by ornithine, although to a reduced extent. When correlating these observations to the structural data recently reported, it becomes clear that both mutations, which are located in spatially distinct regions corresponding respectively to the ornithine and the UMP/IMP binding sites, have coupled effects on the enzyme regulation. These results provide an illustration that coupling of regulatory pathways occurs within the allosteric subunit of E. coli CPSase. In addition, other mutants have been characterized, which display altered affinities for the different CPSase substrates and also slightly modified properties towards the allosteric effectors: P165S, P170L, A182V, P360L, S743N, T800F and G824D. Kinetic properties of these modified enzymes are also presented here and correlated to the crystal structure of E. coli CPSase and to the phenotype of the mutants. PMID:10047492

  11. FOXO1 activates glutamine synthetase gene in mouse skeletal muscles through a region downstream of 3'-UTR: possible contribution to ammonia detoxification.

    PubMed

    Kamei, Yasutomi; Hattori, Maki; Hatazawa, Yukino; Kasahara, Tomomi; Kanou, Masanobu; Kanai, Sayaka; Yuan, Xunmei; Suganami, Takayoshi; Lamers, Wouter H; Kitamura, Tadahiro; Ogawa, Yoshihiro

    2014-09-15

    Skeletal muscle is a reservoir of energy in the form of protein, which is degraded under catabolic conditions, resulting in the formation of amino acids and ammonia as a byproduct. The expression of FOXO1, a forkhead-type transcription factor, increases during starvation and exercise. In agreement, transgenic FOXO1-Tg mice that overexpress FOXO1 in skeletal muscle exhibit muscle atrophy. The aim of this study was to examine the role of FOXO1 in amino acid metabolism. The mRNA and protein expressions of glutamine synthetase (GS) were increased in skeletal muscle of FOXO1-Tg mice. Fasting induced FOXO1 and GS expression in wild-type mice but hardly increased GS expression in muscle-specific FOXO1 knockout (FOXO1-KO) mice. Activation of FOXO1 also increased GS mRNA and protein expression in C2C12 myoblasts. Using a transient transfection reporter assay, we observed that FOXO1 activated the GS reporter construct. Mutation of a putative FOXO1-binding consensus sequence in the downstream genomic region of GS decreased basal and FOXO1-dependent reporter activity significantly. A chromatin immunoprecipitation assay showed that FOXO1 was recruited to the 3' region of GS in C2C12 myoblasts. These results suggest that FOXO1 directly upregulates GS expression. GS is considered to mediate ammonia clearance in skeletal muscle. In agreement, an intravenous ammonia challenge increased blood ammonia concentrations to a twofold higher level in FOXO1-KO than in wild-type mice, demonstrating that the capacity for ammonia disposal correlated inversely with the expression of GS in muscle. These data indicate that FOXO1 plays a role in amino acid metabolism during protein degradation in skeletal muscle. PMID:25074987

  12. FOXO1 activates glutamine synthetase gene in mouse skeletal muscles through a region downstream of 3'-UTR: possible contribution to ammonia detoxification.

    PubMed

    Kamei, Yasutomi; Hattori, Maki; Hatazawa, Yukino; Kasahara, Tomomi; Kanou, Masanobu; Kanai, Sayaka; Yuan, Xunmei; Suganami, Takayoshi; Lamers, Wouter H; Kitamura, Tadahiro; Ogawa, Yoshihiro

    2014-09-15

    Skeletal muscle is a reservoir of energy in the form of protein, which is degraded under catabolic conditions, resulting in the formation of amino acids and ammonia as a byproduct. The expression of FOXO1, a forkhead-type transcription factor, increases during starvation and exercise. In agreement, transgenic FOXO1-Tg mice that overexpress FOXO1 in skeletal muscle exhibit muscle atrophy. The aim of this study was to examine the role of FOXO1 in amino acid metabolism. The mRNA and protein expressions of glutamine synthetase (GS) were increased in skeletal muscle of FOXO1-Tg mice. Fasting induced FOXO1 and GS expression in wild-type mice but hardly increased GS expression in muscle-specific FOXO1 knockout (FOXO1-KO) mice. Activation of FOXO1 also increased GS mRNA and protein expression in C2C12 myoblasts. Using a transient transfection reporter assay, we observed that FOXO1 activated the GS reporter construct. Mutation of a putative FOXO1-binding consensus sequence in the downstream genomic region of GS decreased basal and FOXO1-dependent reporter activity significantly. A chromatin immunoprecipitation assay showed that FOXO1 was recruited to the 3' region of GS in C2C12 myoblasts. These results suggest that FOXO1 directly upregulates GS expression. GS is considered to mediate ammonia clearance in skeletal muscle. In agreement, an intravenous ammonia challenge increased blood ammonia concentrations to a twofold higher level in FOXO1-KO than in wild-type mice, demonstrating that the capacity for ammonia disposal correlated inversely with the expression of GS in muscle. These data indicate that FOXO1 plays a role in amino acid metabolism during protein degradation in skeletal muscle.

  13. Dependence of in vivo glutamine synthetase activity on ammonia concentration in rat brain studied by 1H - 15N heteronuclear multiple-quantum coherence-transfer NMR.

    PubMed Central

    Kanamori, K; Ross, B D; Kuo, E L

    1995-01-01

    The dependence of the in vivo rate of glutamine synthesis on the substrate ammonia concentration was studied in rat brain by 1H-15N heteronuclear multiple-quantum coherence-transfer NMR in combination with biochemical techniques. In vivo rates were measured at various steady-state blood and brain ammonia concentrations within the ranges 0.4-0.55 mumol/g and 0.86-0.98 mumol/g respectively, after low-rate intravenous 15NH4+ infusion (isotope chase). The rate of glutamine synthesis at steady state was determined from the change in brain [5-15N]glutamine levels during isotope chase, observed selectively through the amide proton by NMR, and 15N enrichments of brain glutamine and of blood and brain ammonia measured byN gas chromatography-MS. The in vivo rate (v) was 3.3-4.5 mumol/h per g of brain at blood ammonia concentrations (s) of 0.40-0.55 mumol/g. A linear increase of 1/v with 1/s permitted estimation of the in vivo glutamine synthetase (GS) activity at a physiological blood ammonia concentration to be 0.4-2.1 mumol/h per g. The observed ammonia-dependence strongly suggests that, under physiological conditions, in vivo GS activity is kinetically limited by sub-optimal in situ concentrations of ammonia as well as glutamate and ATP. Comparison of the observed in vivo GS activity with the reported in vivo rates of glutaminase and of gamma-aminobutyrate (GABA) synthesis suggests that, under mildly hyperammonaemic conditions, glutamine is synthesized at a sufficiently high rate to serve as a precursor of GABA, but glutaminase-catalysed hydrolysis of glutamine is too slow to be the sole provider of glutamate used for GABA synthesis. PMID:7487913

  14. Phosphorylation of five aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases in reticulocytes and identification of the protein kinases phosphorylating threonyl-tRNA synthetase from rat liver

    SciTech Connect

    Pendergast, A.M.; Traugh, J.A.

    1986-05-01

    Five aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases in the high molecular weight complex were phosphorylated in rabbit reticulocytes following labeling with /sup 32/P. The five synthetases phosphorylated were the glutamyl-, glutaminyl-, lysyl-, aspartyl- and methionyl-tRNA synthetases. In addition, a 37,000 dalton protein, associated with the synthetase complex and tentatively identified as casein kinase I, was also phosphorylated in intact cells. Phosphoamino acid analysis of the proteins indicated all of the phosphate was on seryl residues. Incubation of reticulocytes with /sup 32/P in the presence of 8-bromo-cAMP and o, the 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine resulted in a six-fold increase in phosphorylation of the glutaminyl-tRNA synthetase, a two-fold increase in phosphorylation of the aspartyl-tRNA synthetase, and a 50 to 60% decrease in phosphorylation of the glutamyl-, methionyl- and lysyl-tRNA synthetases and the M/sub r/ 37,000 protein. When the site(s) on the glutaminyl-tRNA synthetase phosphorylated in response to 8-bromo-cAMP was analyzed by two-dimensional tryptic phosphopeptide mapping, a single phosphopeptide was observed which was identical to that obtained in vitro upon phosphorylation with the cAMP-dependent protein kinase. Also, the authors identify here, the protein kinases phosphorylating threonyl-tRNA synthetase from rat liver. They are protease activated kinase I, the cAMP-dependent protein kinase and protein kinase C.

  15. Argininosuccinate synthetase mRNA and activity are induced by immunostimulants in vascular smooth muscle. Role in the regeneration or arginine for nitric oxide synthesis.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Y; Campbell, E B; Gross, S S

    1994-04-01

    Nitric oxide synthase produces NO, citrulline, water, and NADP at the expense of arginine, NADPH, and dioxygen. While citrulline has been considered to be an inert by-product of the high output inducible isoform of NO synthase (iNOS), we show here that immunostimulants induce a metabolic pathway in vascular smooth muscle cells, which enables them to regenerate arginine from citrulline. Regeneration of arginine from citrulline is accomplished by two urea cycle enzymes: arginino-succinate synthetase (AS) and argininosuccinate lyase (AL). Whereas AL is constitutive to vascular smooth muscle cells, AS mRNA and enzyme activity is markedly induced in cells by treatment with bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The induction of AS mRNA and activity by LPS follows a time course which mirrors that for iNOS but lags 1-2 h behind. As shown for iNOS, interferon-gamma does not itself induce AS but is synergistic with LPS. AS induction is suppressed by glucocorticoids, actinomycin D, and, to a lesser extent, cycloheximide. On the other hand, AS induction is unaffected by an excess of citrulline or the inhibitor of iNOS, N omega-methyl-L-arginine. Our results show the urea cycle enzymes AS and AL confer cells with the capacity to produce NO without a need for exogenous arginine. In conjunction with NOS, citric acid cycle enzymes that covert fumarate to oxaloacetate (fumarase and malate dehydrogenase) and oxaloacetate to aspartate (aspartate transaminase), AS and AL form a novel arginine-citrulline cycle that enables high output NO production by cells. PMID:7511585

  16. The mitochondrial tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase of Podospora anserina is a bifunctional enzyme active in protein synthesis and RNA splicing.

    PubMed Central

    Kämper, U; Kück, U; Cherniack, A D; Lambowitz, A M

    1992-01-01

    The Neurospora crassa mitochondrial tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase (mt tyrRS), which is encoded by the nuclear gene cyt-18, functions not only in aminoacylation but also in the splicing of group I introns. Here, we isolated the cognate Podospora anserina mt tyrRS gene, designated yts1, by using the N. crassa cyt-18 gene as a hybridization probe. DNA sequencing of the P. anserina gene revealed an open reading frame (ORF) of 641 amino acids which has significant similarity to other tyrRSs. The yts1 ORF is interrupted by two introns, one near its N terminus at the same position as the single intron in the cyt-18 gene and the other downstream in a region corresponding to the nucleotide-binding fold. The P. anserina yts1+ gene transformed the N. crassa cyt-18-2 mutant at a high frequency and rescued both the splicing and protein synthesis defects. Furthermore, the YTS1 protein synthesized in Escherichia coli was capable of splicing the N. crassa mt large rRNA intron in vitro. Together, these results indicate that YTS1 is a bifunctional protein active in both splicing and protein synthesis. The P. anserina YTS1 and N. crassa CYT-18 proteins share three blocks of amino acids that are not conserved in bacterial or yeast mt tyrRSs which do not function in splicing. One of these blocks corresponds to the idiosyncratic N-terminal domain shown previously to be required for splicing activity of the CYT-18 protein. The other two are located in the putative tRNA-binding domain toward the C terminus of the protein and also appear to be required for splicing. Since the E. coli and yeast mt tyrRSs do not function in splicing, the adaptation of the Neurospora and Podospora spp. mt tyrRSs to function in splicing most likely occurred after the divergence of their common ancestor from yeast. Images PMID:1531084

  17. Cytosolic Glutamine Synthetase Gln1;2 Is the Main Isozyme Contributing to GS1 Activity and Can Be Up-Regulated to Relieve Ammonium Toxicity1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    Cytosolic GS1 (Gln synthetase) is central for ammonium assimilation in plants. High ammonium treatment enhanced the expression of the GS1 isogene Gln-1;2 encoding a low-affinity high-capacity GS1 protein in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) shoots. Under the same conditions, the expression of the high-affinity low-capacity isoform Gln-1;1 was reduced. The expression of Gln-1;3 did not respond to ammonium treatment while Gln-1;4 and Gln-1;5 isogenes in all cases were expressed at a very low level. Gln-2 was highly expressed in shoots but only at a very low level in roots. To investigate the specific functions of the two isogenes Gln-1;1 and Gln-1;2 in shoots for ammonium detoxification, single and double knock-out mutants were grown under standard N supply or with high ammonium provision. Phenotypes of the single mutant gln1;1 were similar to the wild type, while growth of the gln1;2 single mutant and the gln1;1:gln1;2 double mutant was significantly impaired irrespective of N regime. GS1 activity was significantly reduced in both gln1;2 and gln1;1:gln1;2. Along with this, the ammonium content increased while that of Gln decreased, showing that Gln-1;2 was essential for ammonium assimilation and amino acid synthesis. We conclude that Gln-1;2 is the main isozyme contributing to shoot GS1 activity in vegetative growth stages and can be up-regulated to relieve ammonium toxicity. This reveals, to our knowledge, a novel shoot function of Gln-1;2 in Arabidopsis shoots. PMID:27231101

  18. Accurate Detection of Adenylation Domain Functions in Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetases by an Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay System Using Active Site-directed Probes for Adenylation Domains.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Fumihiro; Miyamoto, Kengo; Konno, Sho; Kasai, Shota; Kakeya, Hideaki

    2015-12-18

    A significant gap exists between protein engineering and enzymes used for the biosynthesis of natural products, largely because there is a paucity of strategies that rapidly detect active-site phenotypes of the enzymes with desired activities. Herein, we describe a proof-of-concept study of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) system for the adenylation (A) domains in nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) using a combination of active site-directed probes coupled to a 5'-O-N-(aminoacyl)sulfamoyladenosine scaffold with a biotin functionality that immobilizes probe molecules onto a streptavidin-coated solid support. The recombinant NRPSs have a C-terminal His-tag motif that is targeted by an anti-6×His mouse antibody as the primary antibody and a horseradish peroxidase-linked goat antimouse antibody as the secondary antibody. These probes can selectively capture the cognate A domains by ligand-directed targeting. In addition, the ELISA technique detected A domains in the crude cell-free homogenates from the Escherichia coli expression systems. When coupled with a chromogenic substrate, the antibody-based ELISA technique can visualize probe-protein binding interactions, which provides accurate readouts of the A-domain functions in NRPS enzymes. To assess the ELISA-based engineering of the A domains of NRPSs, we reprogramed 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB)-activating enzyme EntE toward salicylic acid (Sal)-activating enzymes and investigated a correlation between binding properties for probe molecules and enzyme catalysts. We generated a mutant of EntE that displayed negligible loss in the kcat/Km value with the noncognate substrate Sal and a corresponding 48-fold decrease in the kcat/Km value with the cognate substrate DHB. The resulting 26-fold switch in substrate specificity was achieved by the replacement of a Ser residue in the active site of EntE with a Cys toward the nonribosomal codes of Sal-activating enzymes. Bringing a laboratory ELISA technique

  19. Extracellular 2'5'-oligoadenylate synthetase 2 mediates T-cell receptor CD3-ζ chain down-regulation via caspase-3 activation in oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Dar, Asif A; Pradhan, Trupti N; Kulkarni, Dakshayni P; Shah, Sagar U; Rao, Kanury V; Chaukar, Devendra A; D'Cruz, Anil K; Chiplunkar, Shubhada V

    2016-02-01

    Decreased expression of CD3-ζ chain, an adaptor protein associated with T-cell signalling, is well documented in patients with oral cancer, but the mechanistic justifications are fragmentary. Previous studies in patients with oral cancer have shown that decreased expression of CD3-ζ chain was associated with decreased responsiveness of T cells. Tumours are known to induce localized as well as systemic immune suppression. This study provides evidence that oral tumour-derived factors promote immune suppression by down-regulating CD3-ζ chain expression. 2'5'-Oligoadenylate synthetase 2 (OAS2) was identified by the proteomic approach and our results established a causative link between CD3-ζ chain down-regulation and OAS2 stimulation. The surrogate situation was established by over-expressing OAS2 in a HEK293 cell line and cell-free supernatant was collected. These supernatants when incubated with T cells resulted in down-regulation of CD3-ζ chain, which shows that the secreted OAS2 is capable of regulating CD3-ζ chain expression. Incubation of T cells with cell-free supernatants of oral tumours or recombinant human OAS2 (rh-OAS2) induced caspase-3 activation, which resulted in CD3-ζ chain down-regulation. Caspase-3 inhibition/down-regulation using pharmacological inhibitor or small interfering RNA restored down-regulated CD3-ζ chain expression in T cells induced by cell-free tumour supernatant or rh-OAS2. Collectively these results show that OAS2 leads to impairment in CD3-ζ chain expression, so offering an explanation that might be applicable to the CD3-ζ chain deficiency observed in cancer and diverse disease conditions. PMID:26595239

  20. The crab-eating frog, Rana cancrivora, up-regulates hepatic carbamoyl phosphate synthetase I activity and tissue osmolyte levels in response to increased salinity.

    PubMed

    Wright, Patricia; Anderson, Paul; Weng, Lei; Frick, Natasha; Wong, Wei Peng; Ip, Yuen Kwong

    2004-07-01

    The crab-eating frog Rana cancrivora is one of only a handful of amphibians worldwide that tolerate saline waters. They typically inhabit brackish water of mangrove forests of Southeast Asia, but live happily in freshwater and can be acclimated to 75% seawater (25 ppt) or higher. We report here that after transfer of juvenile R. cancrivora from freshwater (1 ppt) to brackish water (10 -->20 or 20 -->25 ppt; 4-8 d) there was a significant increase in the specific activity of the key hepatic ornithine urea cycle enzyme (OUC), carbamoyl phosphate synthetase I (CPSase I). At 20 ppt, plasma, liver and muscle urea levels increased by 22-, 21-, and 11-fold, respectively. As well, muscle total amino acid levels were significantly elevated by 6-fold, with the largest changes occurring in glycine and beta-alanine levels. In liver, taurine levels were 5-fold higher in frogs acclimated to 20 ppt. There were no significant changes in urea or ammonia excretion rates to the environment. As well, the rate of urea influx (J(in) (urea)) and efflux (J(out) (urea)) across the ventral pelvic skin did not differ between frogs acclimated to 1 versus 20 ppt. Taken together, these findings suggest that acclimation to saline water involves the up-regulation of hepatic urea synthesis, which in turn contributes to the dramatic rise in tissue urea levels. The lack of change in urea excretion rates, despite the large increase in tissue-to-water gradients further indicates that mechanisms must be in place to prevent excessive loss of urea in saline waters, but these mechanisms do not include cutaneous urea uptake. Also, amino acid accumulation may contribute to an overall rise in the osmolarity of the muscle tissue, but relative to urea, the contribution is small. PMID:15229866

  1. Extracellular 2'5'-oligoadenylate synthetase 2 mediates T-cell receptor CD3-ζ chain down-regulation via caspase-3 activation in oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Dar, Asif A; Pradhan, Trupti N; Kulkarni, Dakshayni P; Shah, Sagar U; Rao, Kanury V; Chaukar, Devendra A; D'Cruz, Anil K; Chiplunkar, Shubhada V

    2016-02-01

    Decreased expression of CD3-ζ chain, an adaptor protein associated with T-cell signalling, is well documented in patients with oral cancer, but the mechanistic justifications are fragmentary. Previous studies in patients with oral cancer have shown that decreased expression of CD3-ζ chain was associated with decreased responsiveness of T cells. Tumours are known to induce localized as well as systemic immune suppression. This study provides evidence that oral tumour-derived factors promote immune suppression by down-regulating CD3-ζ chain expression. 2'5'-Oligoadenylate synthetase 2 (OAS2) was identified by the proteomic approach and our results established a causative link between CD3-ζ chain down-regulation and OAS2 stimulation. The surrogate situation was established by over-expressing OAS2 in a HEK293 cell line and cell-free supernatant was collected. These supernatants when incubated with T cells resulted in down-regulation of CD3-ζ chain, which shows that the secreted OAS2 is capable of regulating CD3-ζ chain expression. Incubation of T cells with cell-free supernatants of oral tumours or recombinant human OAS2 (rh-OAS2) induced caspase-3 activation, which resulted in CD3-ζ chain down-regulation. Caspase-3 inhibition/down-regulation using pharmacological inhibitor or small interfering RNA restored down-regulated CD3-ζ chain expression in T cells induced by cell-free tumour supernatant or rh-OAS2. Collectively these results show that OAS2 leads to impairment in CD3-ζ chain expression, so offering an explanation that might be applicable to the CD3-ζ chain deficiency observed in cancer and diverse disease conditions.

  2. Biosynthetic engineering of nonribosomal peptide synthetases.

    PubMed

    Kries, Hajo

    2016-09-01

    From the evolutionary melting pot of natural product synthetase genes, microorganisms elicit antibiotics, communication tools, and iron scavengers. Chemical biologists manipulate these genes to recreate similarly diverse and potent biological activities not on evolutionary time scales but within months. Enzyme engineering has progressed considerably in recent years and offers new screening, modelling, and design tools for natural product designers. Here, recent advances in enzyme engineering and their application to nonribosomal peptide synthetases are reviewed. Among the nonribosomal peptides that have been subjected to biosynthetic engineering are the antibiotics daptomycin, calcium-dependent antibiotic, and gramicidin S. With these peptides, incorporation of unnatural building blocks and modulation of bioactivities via various structural modifications have been successfully demonstrated. Natural product engineering on the biosynthetic level is not a reliable method yet. However, progress in the understanding and manipulation of biosynthetic pathways may enable the routine production of optimized peptide drugs in the near future. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Peptide synthetase gene in Trichoderma virens.

    PubMed

    Wilhite, S E; Lumsden, R D; Straney, D C

    2001-11-01

    Trichoderma virens (synonym, Gliocladium virens), a deuteromycete fungus, suppresses soilborne plant diseases caused by a number of fungi and is used as a biocontrol agent. Several traits that may contribute to the antagonistic interactions of T. virens with disease-causing fungi involve the production of peptide metabolites (e.g., the antibiotic gliotoxin and siderophores used for iron acquisition). We cloned a 5,056-bp partial cDNA encoding a putative peptide synthetase (Psy1) from T. virens using conserved motifs found within the adenylate domain of peptide synthetases. Sequence similarities with conserved motifs of the adenylation domain, acyl transfer, and two condensation domains support identification of the Psy1 gene as a gene that encodes a peptide synthetase. Disruption of the native Psy1 gene through gene replacement was used to identify the function of this gene. Psy1 disruptants produced normal amounts of gliotoxin but grew poorly under low-iron conditions, suggesting that Psy1 plays a role in siderophore production. Psy1 disruptants cannot produce the major T. virens siderophore dimerum acid, a dipetide of acylated N(delta)-hydroxyornithine. Biocontrol activity against damping-off diseases caused by Pythium ultimum and Rhizoctonia solani was not reduced by the Psy1 disruption, suggesting that iron competition through dimerum acid production does not contribute significantly to disease suppression activity under the conditions used.

  4. Peptide Synthetase Gene in Trichoderma virens

    PubMed Central

    Wilhite, S. E.; Lumsden, R. D.; Straney, D. C.

    2001-01-01

    Trichoderma virens (synonym, Gliocladium virens), a deuteromycete fungus, suppresses soilborne plant diseases caused by a number of fungi and is used as a biocontrol agent. Several traits that may contribute to the antagonistic interactions of T. virens with disease-causing fungi involve the production of peptide metabolites (e.g., the antibiotic gliotoxin and siderophores used for iron acquisition). We cloned a 5,056-bp partial cDNA encoding a putative peptide synthetase (Psy1) from T. virens using conserved motifs found within the adenylate domain of peptide synthetases. Sequence similarities with conserved motifs of the adenylation domain, acyl transfer, and two condensation domains support identification of the Psy1 gene as a gene that encodes a peptide synthetase. Disruption of the native Psy1 gene through gene replacement was used to identify the function of this gene. Psy1 disruptants produced normal amounts of gliotoxin but grew poorly under low-iron conditions, suggesting that Psy1 plays a role in siderophore production. Psy1 disruptants cannot produce the major T. virens siderophore dimerum acid, a dipetide of acylated Nδ-hydroxyornithine. Biocontrol activity against damping-off diseases caused by Pythium ultimum and Rhizoctonia solani was not reduced by the Psy1 disruption, suggesting that iron competition through dimerum acid production does not contribute significantly to disease suppression activity under the conditions used. PMID:11679326

  5. Mutational analysis of the (p)ppGpp synthetase activity of the Rel enzyme of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Bag, Satyabrata; Das, Bhabatosh; Dasgupta, Shreya; Bhadra, Rupak K

    2014-08-01

    Rel(Mtb), a GTP pyrophosphokinase encoded by the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) genome, catalyzes synthesis of (p)ppGpp from ATP and GDP(GTP) and its hydrolysis to GDP(GTP) and pyrophosphate to mediate stringent response, which helps bacteria to survive during nutrient limitation. Like other members of Rel_Spo homologs, Rel(Mtb) has four distinct domains: HD, Rel_Spo (RSD), TGS and ACT. The N-terminal HD and RSD are responsible for (p)ppGpp hydrolysis and synthesis, respectively. In this study, we have dissected the rel(Mtb) gene function and determined the minimal region essential for (p)ppGpp synthetic activity. The Rel(Mtb) and its truncated derivatives were expressed from an arabinose inducible promoter (P(BAD)), and in vivo functional analyses were done in a (p)ppGpp null Escherichia coli strain. Our results indicate that only 243 amino acids (188-430 residues) containing fragment are sufficient for Rel(Mtb) (p)ppGpp synthetic activity. The results were further confirmed by in vitro assays using purified proteins. We further characterized the RSD of Rel(Mtb) by substituting several conserved amino acids with structurally related residues and identified six such residues, which appeared to be critical for maintaining its catalytic activity. Furthermore, we have also extended our analysis to an RSD encoding gene rv1366 of Mtb, and experimental results indicated that the encoded protein Rv1366 is unable to synthesize (p)ppGpp.

  6. Evolution of RNA-protein interactions: non-specific binding led to RNA splicing activity of fungal mitochondrial tyrosyl-tRNA synthetases.

    PubMed

    Lamech, Lilian T; Mallam, Anna L; Lambowitz, Alan M

    2014-12-01

    The Neurospora crassa mitochondrial tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase (mtTyrRS; CYT-18 protein) evolved a new function as a group I intron splicing factor by acquiring the ability to bind group I intron RNAs and stabilize their catalytically active RNA structure. Previous studies showed: (i) CYT-18 binds group I introns by using both its N-terminal catalytic domain and flexibly attached C-terminal anticodon-binding domain (CTD); and (ii) the catalytic domain binds group I introns specifically via multiple structural adaptations that occurred during or after the divergence of Peziomycotina and Saccharomycotina. However, the function of the CTD and how it contributed to the evolution of splicing activity have been unclear. Here, small angle X-ray scattering analysis of CYT-18 shows that both CTDs of the homodimeric protein extend outward from the catalytic domain, but move inward to bind opposite ends of a group I intron RNA. Biochemical assays show that the isolated CTD of CYT-18 binds RNAs non-specifically, possibly contributing to its interaction with the structurally different ends of the intron RNA. Finally, we find that the yeast mtTyrRS, which diverged from Pezizomycotina fungal mtTyrRSs prior to the evolution of splicing activity, binds group I intron and other RNAs non-specifically via its CTD, but lacks further adaptations needed for group I intron splicing. Our results suggest a scenario of constructive neutral (i.e., pre-adaptive) evolution in which an initial non-specific interaction between the CTD of an ancestral fungal mtTyrRS and a self-splicing group I intron was "fixed" by an intron RNA mutation that resulted in protein-dependent splicing. Once fixed, this interaction could be elaborated by further adaptive mutations in both the catalytic domain and CTD that enabled specific binding of group I introns. Our results highlight a role for non-specific RNA binding in the evolution of RNA-binding proteins.

  7. Evolution of RNA-Protein Interactions: Non-Specific Binding Led to RNA Splicing Activity of Fungal Mitochondrial Tyrosyl-tRNA Synthetases

    PubMed Central

    Lamech, Lilian T.; Mallam, Anna L.; Lambowitz, Alan M.

    2014-01-01

    The Neurospora crassa mitochondrial tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase (mtTyrRS; CYT-18 protein) evolved a new function as a group I intron splicing factor by acquiring the ability to bind group I intron RNAs and stabilize their catalytically active RNA structure. Previous studies showed: (i) CYT-18 binds group I introns by using both its N-terminal catalytic domain and flexibly attached C-terminal anticodon-binding domain (CTD); and (ii) the catalytic domain binds group I introns specifically via multiple structural adaptations that occurred during or after the divergence of Peziomycotina and Saccharomycotina. However, the function of the CTD and how it contributed to the evolution of splicing activity have been unclear. Here, small angle X-ray scattering analysis of CYT-18 shows that both CTDs of the homodimeric protein extend outward from the catalytic domain, but move inward to bind opposite ends of a group I intron RNA. Biochemical assays show that the isolated CTD of CYT-18 binds RNAs non-specifically, possibly contributing to its interaction with the structurally different ends of the intron RNA. Finally, we find that the yeast mtTyrRS, which diverged from Pezizomycotina fungal mtTyrRSs prior to the evolution of splicing activity, binds group I intron and other RNAs non-specifically via its CTD, but lacks further adaptations needed for group I intron splicing. Our results suggest a scenario of constructive neutral (i.e., pre-adaptive) evolution in which an initial non-specific interaction between the CTD of an ancestral fungal mtTyrRS and a self-splicing group I intron was “fixed” by an intron RNA mutation that resulted in protein-dependent splicing. Once fixed, this interaction could be elaborated by further adaptive mutations in both the catalytic domain and CTD that enabled specific binding of group I introns. Our results highlight a role for non-specific RNA binding in the evolution of RNA-binding proteins. PMID:25536042

  8. Active site mutants of Escherichia coli dethiobiotin synthetase: effects of mutations on enzyme catalytic and structural properties.

    PubMed

    Yang, G; Sandalova, T; Lohman, K; Lindqvist, Y; Rendina, A R

    1997-04-22

    Five active site residues, Thr11, Glu12, Lys15, Lys37, and Ser41, implicated by the protein crystal structure studies of Escherichia coli DTBS, were mutated to determine their function in catalysis and substrate binding. Nine mutant enzymes, T11V, E12A, E12D, K15Q, K37L, K37Q, K37R, S41A, and S41C, were overproduced in an E. coli strain lacking a functional endogenous DTBS gene and purified to homogeneity. Replacement of Thr11 with valine resulted in a 24,000-fold increase in the Km(ATP) with little or no change in the Kd(ATP), KM(DAPA) and DTBS k(cat), suggesting an essential role for this residue in the steady-state affinity for ATP. The two Glu12 mutants showed essentially wild-type DTBS activity (slightly elevated k(cat)'s). Unlike wild-type DTBS, E12A had the same apparent KM(DAPA) at subsaturating and saturating ATP concentrations, indicating a possible role for Glu12 in the binding synergy between DAPA and ATP. The mutations in Lys15 and Lys37 resulted in loss of catalytic activity (0.01% and <0.9% of wild-type DTBS k(cat) for K15Q and the Lys37 mutant enzymes, respectively) and higher KM's for both DAPA (40-fold and >100-fold higher than wild-type for the K15Q and Lys37 mutant enzymes, respectively) and ATP (1800-fold and >10-fold higher than wild-type for K15Q and the K37 mutant enzymes, respectively). These results strongly suggest that Lys15 and Lys37 are crucial to both catalysis and substrate binding. S41A and S41C had essentially the same k(cat) as wild-type and had moderate increases in the DAPA and ATP KM and Kd (ATP) values. Replacement of Ser41 with cysteine resulted in larger effects than replacement with alanine. These data suggest that the H-bond between N7 of DAPA and the Ser41 side chain is not very important for catalysis. The catalytic behavior of these mutant enzymes was also studied by pulse-chase experiments which produced results consistent with the steady-state kinetic analyses. X-ray crystallographic studies of four mutant enzymes, S

  9. Characterization of inhibitors acting at the synthetase site of Escherichia coli asparagine synthetase B.

    PubMed

    Boehlein, S K; Nakatsu, T; Hiratake, J; Thirumoorthy, R; Stewart, J D; Richards, N G; Schuster, S M

    2001-09-18

    Asparagine synthetase catalyzes the ATP-dependent formation of L-asparagine from L-aspartate and L-glutamine, via a beta-aspartyl-AMP intermediate. Since interfering with this enzyme activity might be useful for treating leukemia and solid tumors, we have sought small-molecule inhibitors of Escherichia coli asparagine synthetase B (AS-B) as a model system for the human enzyme. Prior work showed that L-cysteine sulfinic acid competitively inhibits this enzyme by interfering with L-aspartate binding. Here, we demonstrate that cysteine sulfinic acid is also a partial substrate for E. coli asparagine synthetase, acting as a nucleophile to form the sulfur analogue of beta-aspartyl-AMP, which is subsequently hydrolyzed back to cysteine sulfinic acid and AMP in a futile cycle. While cysteine sulfinic acid did not itself constitute a clinically useful inhibitor of asparagine synthetase B, these results suggested that replacing this linkage by a more stable analogue might lead to a more potent inhibitor. A sulfoximine reported recently by Koizumi et al. as a competitive inhibitor of the ammonia-dependent E. coli asparagine synthetase A (AS-A) [Koizumi, M., Hiratake, J., Nakatsu, T., Kato, H., and Oda, J. (1999) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 121, 5799-5800] can be regarded as such a species. We found that this sulfoximine also inhibited AS-B, effectively irreversibly. Unlike either the cysteine sulfinic acid interaction with AS-B or the sulfoximine interaction with AS-A, only AS-B productively engaged in asparagine synthesis could be inactivated by the sulfoximine; free enzyme was unaffected even after extended incubation with the sulfoximine. Taken together, these results support the notion that sulfur-containing analogues of aspartate can serve as platforms for developing useful inhibitors of AS-B. PMID:11551215

  10. Part I. Cobalt thiolate complexes modeling the active site of cobalt nitrile hydratase. Part II. Formation of inorganic nanoparticles on protein scaffolding in Escherichia coli glutamine synthetase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kung, Irene Yuk Man

    Part I. A series of novel cobalt dithiolate complexes with mixed imine/amine ligand systems is presented here as electronic and structural models for the active site in the bacterial enzyme class, nitrile hydratase (NHase). Pentadentate cobalt(II) complexes with S2N 3 ligand environments are first studied as precursors to the more relevant cobalt(III) complexes. Adjustment of the backbone length by removal of a methylene group increases the reactivity of the system; whereas reduction of the two backbone imine bonds to allow free rotation about those bonds may decrease reactivity. Reactivity change due to the replacement of the backbone amine proton with a more sterically challenging methyl group is not yet clear. Upon oxidation, the monocationic pentadentate cobalt(III) complex, 1b, shows promising reactivity similar to that of NHase. The metal's open coordination site allows reversible binding of the endogenous, monoanionic ligands, N 3- and NCS-. Oxygenation of the thiolate sulfur atoms by exposure to O2 and H2O 2 produces sulfenate and sulfinate ligands in complex 8, which resembles the crystal structure of "deactivated" Fe NHase. However, its lack of reactivity argues against the oxygenated enzyme structure as the active form. Six-coordinate cobalt(III) complexes with S2N4 amine/amine ligand systems are also presented as analogues of previously reported iron(III) compounds, which mimic the spectroscopic properties of Fe NHase. The cobalt complexes do not seem to similarly model Co NHase. However, the S = 0 cobalt(III) center can be spectroscopically silent and difficult to detect, making comparison with synthetic models using common techniques hard. Part II. Dodecameric Escherichia coli glutamine synthetase mutant, E165C, stacks along its six-fold axis to produce tubular nanostructures in the presence of some divalent metal ions, as does the wild type enzyme. The centrally located, engineered Cys-165 residues appear to bind to various species and may serve as

  11. The MurE synthetase from Thermotoga maritima is endowed with an unusual D-lysine adding activity.

    PubMed

    Boniface, Audrey; Bouhss, Ahmed; Mengin-Lecreulx, Dominique; Blanot, Didier

    2006-06-01

    The peptidoglycan of Thermotoga maritima, an extremely thermophilic eubacterium, was shown to contain no diaminopimelic acid and approximate amounts of both enantiomers of lysine (Huber, R., Langworthy, T. A., König, H., Thomm, M., Woese, C. R., Sleytr, U. B., and Stetter, K. O. (1986) Arch. Microbiol. 144, 324-333). To assess the possible involvement of the MurE activity in the incorporation of D-lysine, the murE gene from this organism was cloned in Escherichia coli, and the corresponding protein was purified as the C-terminal His6-tagged form. In vitro assays showed that D-lysine and meso-diaminopimelic acid were added to UDP-N-acetylmuramoyl-dipeptide with 25 and 10% efficiencies, respectively, relative to L-lysine. The purified enzyme was used to synthesize the L- and D-lysine-containing UDP-N-acetylmuramoyl-tripeptides; chemical analysis revealed an unusual structure for the D-lysine-containing nucleotide, namely acylation of the epsilon-amino function of D-lysine by the D-glutamyl residue. In vitro assays with MurF and MraY enzymes from T. maritima showed that this novel nucleotide was not a substrate for MurF but that it could be directly processed into tripeptide lipid I by MraY, thereby substantiating the role of MurE in the incorporation of D-lysine into peptidoglycan.

  12. Benadrostin, new inhibitor of poly(ADP-ribose) synthetase, produced by actinomycetes. I. Taxonomy, production, isolation, physico-chemical properties and biological activities.

    PubMed

    Aoyagi, T; Yoshida, S; Harada, S; Okuyama, A; Nakayama, C; Yoshida, T; Hamada, M; Takeuchi, T; Umezawa, H

    1988-08-01

    Benadrostin, a new inhibitor of poly(ADP-ribose) synthetase was discovered in the fermentation broth of Streptomyces flavovirens MH499-O'F1. It was purified by chromatography followed by solvent extraction and then isolated as colorless prisms. Benadrostin has the molecular formula of C8H5NO4. It was competitive with the substrate, and the inhibition constant (Ki) was 34 microM. PMID:3139601

  13. Anti-proliferative activity of L-651,582 correlates with calcium-mediated regulation of nucleotide metabolism at phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase

    SciTech Connect

    Hupe, D.J.; Behrens, N.D.; Boltz, R. )

    1990-09-01

    L-651,582, 5-amino-(4-(4-chlorobenzoyl)-3,5-dichlorobenzyl)-1, 2,3-triazole-4-carboxamide, is an antiproliferative and antiparasitic agent which inhibits nucleotide metabolism in mammalian cells. The drug equivalently inhibited 3H-hypoxanthine, 14C-adenine, and 14C-formate incorporation into nucleotide pools in Madin-Darby bovine kidney (MDBK) cells, suggesting depletion of the supply of phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate, (PRPP), required for each of these independent pathways. Inhibition of nucleotide metabolism correlated with inhibition of proliferation for three cell types with differing sensitivities toward the drug. L-651,582 inhibited incorporation of 3H-hypoxanthine into nucleotide pools with either glucose, uridine, or ribose as carbon source suggesting a block at PRPP synthetase, rather than a block in a pathway supplying ribose-5-phosphate. PRPP synthetase was not inhibited directly by the compound, indicating regulation of the enzyme in intact cells. Drug treatment did not kill cells but reduced the fraction of cells in S and G2/M while increasing the population in G1. Inhibition of uptake of 45Ca was demonstrated at concentrations identical to those required for inhibition of nucleotide metabolism or proliferation. Inhibition of cellular PRPP biosynthesis rates were also observed using EGTA to lower calcium levels. These data suggest a previously unrecognized link between calcium entry, the regulation of nucleotide biosynthesis at PRPP synthetase, and the rate of proliferation of mammalian cells.

  14. Rosiglitazone Inhibits Acyl-CoA Synthetase Activity and Fatty Acid Partitioning to Diacylglycerol and Triacylglycerol via a Peroxisome Proliferator–Activated Receptor-γ–Independent Mechanism in Human Arterial Smooth Muscle Cells and Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Askari, Bardia; Kanter, Jenny E.; Sherrid, Ashley M.; Golej, Deidre L.; Bender, Andrew T.; Liu, Joey; Hsueh, Willa A.; Beavo, Joseph A.; Coleman, Rosalind A.; Bornfeldt, Karin E.

    2010-01-01

    Rosiglitazone is an insulin-sensitizing agent that has recently been shown to exert beneficial effects on atherosclerosis. In addition to peroxisome proliferator–activated receptor (PPAR)-γ, rosiglitazone can affect other targets, such as directly inhibiting recombinant long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase (ACSL)-4 activity. Because it is unknown if ACSL4 is expressed in vascular cells involved in atherosclerosis, we investigated the ability of rosiglitazone to inhibit ACSL activity and fatty acid partitioning in human and murine arterial smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and macrophages. Human and murine SMCs and human macrophages expressed Acsl4, and rosiglitazone inhibited Acsl activity in these cells. Furthermore, rosiglitazone acutely inhibited partitioning of fatty acids into phospholipids in human SMCs and inhibited fatty acid partitioning into diacylglycerol and triacylglycerol in human SMCs and macrophages through a PPAR-γ–independent mechanism. Conversely, murine macrophages did not express ACSL4, and rosiglitazone did not inhibit ACSL activity in these cells, nor did it affect acute fatty acid partitioning into cellular lipids. Thus, rosiglitazone inhibits ACSL activity and fatty acid partitioning in human and murine SMCs and in human macrophages through a PPAR-γ–independent mechanism likely to be mediated by ACSL4 inhibition. Therefore, rosiglitazone might alter the biological effects of fatty acids in these cells and in atherosclerosis. PMID:17259370

  15. The N Terminus of Pro-endothelial Monocyte-activating Polypeptide II (EMAP II) Regulates Its Binding with the C Terminus, Arginyl-tRNA Synthetase, and Neurofilament Light Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Haiming; Malinin, Nikolay L.; Awasthi, Niranjan; Schwarz, Roderich E.; Schwarz, Margaret A.

    2015-01-01

    Pro-endothelial monocyte-activating polypeptide II (EMAP II), one component of the multi-aminoacyl tRNA synthetase complex, plays multiple roles in physiological and pathological processes of protein translation, signal transduction, immunity, lung development, and tumor growth. Recent studies have determined that pro-EMAP II has an essential role in maintaining axon integrity in central and peripheral neural systems where deletion of the C terminus of pro-EMAP II has been reported in a consanguineous Israeli Bedouin kindred suffering from Pelizaeus-Merzbacher-like disease. We hypothesized that the N terminus of pro-EMAP II has an important role in the regulation of protein-protein interactions. Using a GFP reporter system, we defined a putative leucine zipper in the N terminus of human pro-EMAP II protein (amino acid residues 1–70) that can form specific strip-like punctate structures. Through GFP punctum analysis, we uncovered that the pro-EMAP II C terminus (amino acids 147–312) can repress GFP punctum formation. Pulldown assays confirmed that the binding between the pro-EMAP II N terminus and its C terminus is mediated by a putative leucine zipper. Furthermore, the pro-EMAP II 1–70 amino acid region was identified as the binding partner of arginyl-tRNA synthetase, a polypeptide of the multi-aminoacyl tRNA synthetase complex. We also determined that the punctate GFP pro-EMAP II 1–70 amino acid aggregate colocalizes and binds to the neurofilament light subunit protein that is associated with pathologic neurofilament network disorganization and degeneration of motor neurons. These findings indicate the structure and binding interaction of pro-EMAP II protein and suggest a role of this protein in pathological neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25724651

  16. Regulation of glutamine synthetase, aspartokinase, and total protein turnover in Klebsiella aerogenes.

    PubMed

    Fulks, R M; Stadtman, E R

    1985-12-13

    When suspensions of Klebsiella aerogenes are incubated in a nitrogen-free medium there is a gradual decrease in the levels of acid-precipitable protein and of aspartokinase III (lysine-sensitive) and aspartokinase I (threonine-sensitive) activities. In contrast, the level of glutamine synthetase increases slightly and then remains constant. Under these conditions, the glutamine synthetase and other proteins continue to be synthesized as judged by the incorporation of [14C]leucine into the acid-precipitable protein fraction and into protein precipitated by anti-glutamine synthetase antibodies, by the fact that growth-inhibiting concentrations of chloramphenicol also inhibit the incorporation of [14C]leucine into protein and into protein precipitated by anti-glutamine synthetase antibody, and by the fact that chloramphenicol leads to acceleration in the loss of aspartokinases I and III and promotes a net decrease in the level of glutamine synthetase and its cross-reactive protein. The loss of aspartokinases I and III in cell suspensions is stimulated by glucose and is inhibited by 2,4-dinitrophenol. Glucose also stimulates the loss of aspartokinases and glutamine synthetase in the presence of chloramphenicol. Cell-free extracts of K. aerogenes catalyze rapid inactivation of endogenous glutamine synthetase as well as exogenously added pure glutamine synthetase. This loss of glutamine synthetase is not associated with a loss of protein that cross-reacts with anti-glutamine synthetase antibodies. The inactivation of glutamine synthetase in extracts is not due to adenylylation. It is partially prevented by sulfhydryl reagents, Mn2+, antimycin A, 2,4-dinitrophenol, EDTA, anaerobiosis and by dialysis. Following 18 h dialysis, the capacity of extracts to catalyze inactivation of glutamine synthetase is lost but can be restored by the addition of Fe2+ (or Ni2+) together with ATP (or other nucleoside di- and triphosphates. After 40-60 h dialysis Fe3+ together with NADH (but

  17. Comparison of ent-kaurene synthetase A and B activities in cell-free extracts from young tomato fruits of wild-type, and dwarf gib-1 and gib-3 tomato plants

    SciTech Connect

    Bensen, R.J.; Zeevaart, J.A.D. )

    1990-05-01

    The non-allelic gib-1 and gib-3 tomato (Lycopersion esculentum Mill.) mutants are gibberellin deficient and exhibit a dwarfed gowth habit. Previous work has shown that this dwarfed growth pattern can be reversed by the application of a number of gibberellins and their precursors, including ent-kaurene. This indicates that the mutants are blocked in gibberellin biosynthesis at a step prior to ent-kaurene metabolism. The normal accumulation of carotenoids observed in these mutants suggests a fully functional isoprenoid pathway. Ent-kaurene is synthesized from the isoprenoid geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate in a two-step process with copalyl pyrophosphate as an interemediate. In vitro assays using young fruit extracts from gib-1 plants, indicated a reduced ability for synthesis of copalyl pyrophosphate from geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate, and thus a reduced ent-kaurene synthetase A activity. Similarly, gib-3 extracts demonstrated a reduced ability to synthesize ent-kaurene from copalyl pyrophosphate, and thus a reduced ent-kaurene synthetase B activity. These results establish the site of the mutation in gib-1 and gib-3 tomatoes as being in the enzymatic conversion of geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate to copalyl pyrophosphate, and copalyl pyrophosphate to ent-kaurene, respectively.

  18. Glutamine synthetase in liver of the American alligator, Alligator mississippiensis.

    PubMed

    Smith, D D; Campbell, J W

    1987-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase was shown to be localized in liver mitochondria of the American alligator, Alligator mississippiensis, by immunofluorescent staining of frozen liver sections and by the detection of enzymatic activity and immunoreactive protein in the mitochondrial fraction following subcellular fractionation of liver tissue by differential centrifugation. The primary translation product of alligator liver glutamine synthetase mRNA was shown to have an Mr = 45,000 which is similar if not identical in size to that of the mature subunit. This mRNA was found to be heterogeneous in size with a major form corresponding to 2.8-3.0 kb and a lesser form corresponding to around 2 kb. Both are in excess of the size required to code for the glutamine synthetase subunit. The synthesis and presumably the mitochondrial import of glutamine synthetase in alligator liver are thus very similar to the same processes in avian liver. Despite the excretion of a high percentage of nitrogen as ammonia, the demonstration of a mitochondrial glutamine synthetase indicates the alligator has the typical avian-type uricotelic ammonia-detoxification system in liver. This suggests that the transition to uricotelism occurred in the sauropsid line of evolution and has persisted through both the lepidosaurian (snakes, lizards) and archosaurian (dinosaurs, crocodilians, birds) lines.

  19. Effect of Liver Damage and Hyperbaric Oxygenation on Glutamine Synthetase of Hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Savilov, P N; Yakovlev, V N

    2016-01-01

    Activity of glutamine synthetase in the hepatocytes of healthy animals and animals with chronic CCl4-induced hepatitis was studied on white mature female rats after liver resection (15-20% of organ weight) and hyperbaric oxygenation (3 atm, 50 min, 3 times). Surgically operated left and non-operated middle lobes of the liver were analyzed on day 3 after liver resection and exposure to hyperbaric oxygenation. On day 65 of CCl4 poisoning, activity of glutamine synthetase decreased in both lobes and did not recover on day 3 after toxin cessation. Liver resection under conditions of CCl4-induced hepatitis restored reduced activity of glutamine synthetase in both liver lobes to the normal level. In healthy rats, the increase in glutamine synthetase activity after liver resection was found only in the middle lobe of the liver. Hyperbaric oxygenation enhanced the stimulatory effect of liver resection on glutamine synthetase activity in hepatocytes during chronic CCl4-induced hepatitis. In healthy animals with liver resection, activity of glutamine synthetase did not change after hyperbaric oxygenation, while normally oxygenation inhibited glutamine synthetase activity.

  20. Determinants within the C-terminal domain of Streptomyces lividans acetyl-CoA synthetase that block acetylation of its active site lysine in vitro by the protein acetyltransferase (Pat) enzyme.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Alex C; Escalante-Semerena, Jorge C

    2014-01-01

    Reversible lysine acetylation (RLA) is a widespread regulatory mechanism that modulates the function of proteins involved in diverse cellular processes. A strong case has been made for RLA control exerted by homologues of the Salmonella enterica protein acetyltransferase (SePat) enzyme on the broadly distributed AMP-forming CoA ligase (a.k.a. acyl-CoA synthetases) family of metabolic enzymes, with acetyl-CoA synthetase (Acs) being the paradigm in the field. Here we investigate why the Acs homologue in Streptomyces lividans (SlAcs) is poorly acetylated in vitro by the S. lividans protein acetyltransferase (SlPat) enzyme. Chimeras of S. enterica Acs (SeAcs) and S. lividans Acs (SlAcs) constructed during the course of this work were acetylated by SlPatA in vitro, retained most of their activity, and were under RLA control in a heterologous host. We identified SeAcs residues N- and C-terminal to the target lysine that when introduced into SlAcs, rendered the latter under RLA control. These results lend further support to the idea that Pat enzymes interact with extensive surfaces of their substrates. Finally, we suggest that acetylation of SlAcs depends on factors or conditions other than those present in our in vitro system. We also discuss possible explanations why SlAcs is not controlled by RLA as defined in other bacterial species.

  1. Butachlor impact on protein, free amino acid and glutamine contents, and on activity levels of aminotransferases, glutamate dehydrogenase and glutamine synthetase in the fresh water snail, Pila globosa (Swainson).

    PubMed

    Rajyalakshmi, T; Srinivas, T; Swamy, K V; Mohan, P M

    1996-08-01

    Biochemical changes followed in the freshwater snail Pila globosa (Swainson) during exposure to sublethal concentrations of the herbicide butachlor (26.6 ppm) in the ambient medium, at 3,6,12,24 and 48 h intervals, were marked by a significant decrease in total and soluble proteins, and an increase in free amino acids in foot and hepatopancreas up to 12 h before gradually recovering. Aminotransferase activities and glutamine content decreased during the early periods of exposure, while glutamate dehydrogenase activity increased. After an initial elevation, glutamate synthetase activity decreased at later intervals. Maximum effect of butachlor on the enzymes was seen after 12 h exposure. The extent of increase or decrease in different parameters examined varied between the two tissues studied. These changes are discussed in relation to the toxic stress of butachlor.

  2. Variant human phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase altered in regulatory and catalytic functions.

    PubMed Central

    Becker, M A; Raivio, K O; Bakay, B; Adams, W B; Nyhan, W L

    1980-01-01

    An inherited, structurally abnormal and superactive form of the enzyme 5-phosphoribosyl 1-pyrophosphate (PP-ribose-P) synthetase (EC 2.7.6.1) has been characterized in fibroblasts cultured from a 14-yr-old male (S.M.) with clinical manifestations of uric acid overproduction present since infancy. PP-ribose-P synthetase from the cells of this child showed four- to fivefold greater than normal resistance to purine nucleotide (ADP and GDP) feedback inhibition of enzyme activity and hyperbolic rather than sigmoidal inorganic phosphate (Pi) activation in incompletely dialyzed extracts. Excessive maximal velocity of the enzyme reaction catalyzed by the mutant enzyme was indicated by: enzyme activities twice those of normal at all concentrations of Pi in chromatographed fibroblast extracts; normal affinity constants for substrates and for the activator, Mg2+; and twofold greater than normal activity per immunoreactive enzyme molecule. The mutant enzyme thus possessed deficient regulatory and superactive catalytic properties, two mechanisms previously demonstrated individually to underlie the excessive PPRribose-P and uric acid synthesis of affected members of families with superactive PP-ribose-P synthetases. Increased PP-ribose-P concentration (4-fold) and generation (2.7-fold) and enhanced rates of PP-ribose-P dependent purine synthetic reactions, including purine synthesis de novo, in S.M. fibroblasts confirmed the functional significance of this patient's mutant enzyme. Diminished stability of the variant PP-ribose-P synthetase was manifested in vitro by increased thermal lability and in vivo by deficiency of enzyme activity at Pi concentrations greater than 0.3 mM in hemolysates and by an accelerated, age-related decrement in enzyme activity in lysates of erythrocytes separated by specific density. Despite the diminished amount of PP-ribose-P synthetase in the S.M. erythrocyte population, S.M. erythrocytes had increased PP-ribose-P concentration and increased rates

  3. Recurrent Isolated Neonatal Hemolytic Anemia: Think About Glutathione Synthetase Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Signolet, Isabelle; Chenouard, Rachel; Oca, Florine; Barth, Magalie; Reynier, Pascal; Denis, Marie-Christine; Simard, Gilles

    2016-09-01

    Hemolytic anemia (HA) of the newborn should be considered in cases of rapidly developing, severe, or persistent hyperbilirubinemia. Several causes of corpuscular hemolysis have been described, among which red blood cell enzyme defects are of particular concern. We report a rare case of red blood cell enzyme defect in a male infant, who presented during his first months of life with recurrent and isolated neonatal hemolysis. All main causes were ruled out. At 6.5 months of age, the patient presented with gastroenteritis requiring hospitalization; fortuitously, urine organic acid chromatography revealed a large peak of 5-oxoproline. Before the association between HA and 5-oxoprolinuria was noted, glutathione synthetase deficiency was suspected and confirmed by a low glutathione synthetase concentration and a collapse of glutathione synthetase activity in erythrocytes. Moreover, molecular diagnosis revealed 2 mutations in the glutathione synthetase gene: a previously reported missense mutation (c.[656A>G]; p.[Asp219Gly]) and a mutation not yet described in the binding site of the enzyme (c.[902T>C]; p.[Leu301Pro]). However, 15 days later, a control sample revealed no signs of 5-oxoprolinuria and the clinical history discovered administration of acetaminophen in the 48 hours before hospitalization. Thus, in this patient, acetaminophen exposure allowed the diagnosis of a mild form of glutathione synthetase deficiency, characterized by isolated HA. Early diagnosis is important because treatment with bicarbonate, vitamins C and E, and elimination of trigger factors are recommended to improve long-term outcomes. Glutathione synthetase deficiency should be screened for in cases of unexplained newborn HA. PMID:27581854

  4. Novel Reaction of Succinyl Coenzyme A (Succinyl-CoA) Synthetase: Activation of 3-Sulfinopropionate to 3-Sulfinopropionyl-CoA in Advenella mimigardefordensis Strain DPN7T during Degradation of 3,3′-Dithiodipropionic Acid ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Schürmann, Marc; Wübbeler, Jan Hendrik; Grote, Jessica; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    The sucCD gene of Advenella mimigardefordensis strain DPN7T encodes a succinyl coenzyme A (succinyl-CoA) synthetase homologue (EC 6.2.1.4 or EC 6.2.1.5) that recognizes, in addition to succinate, the structural analogues 3-sulfinopropionate (3SP) and itaconate as substrates. Accumulation of 3SP during 3,3′-dithiodipropionic acid (DTDP) degradation was observed in Tn5::mob-induced mutants of A. mimigardefordensis strain DPN7T disrupted in sucCD and in the defined deletion mutant A. mimigardefordensis ΔsucCD. These mutants were impaired in growth with DTDP and 3SP as the sole carbon source. Hence, it was proposed that the succinyl-CoA synthetase homologue in A. mimigardefordensis strain DPN7T activates 3SP to the corresponding CoA-thioester (3SP-CoA). The putative genes coding for A. mimigardefordensis succinyl-CoA synthetase (SucCDAm) were cloned and heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3)/pLysS. Purification and characterization of the enzyme confirmed its involvement during degradation of DTDP. 3SP, the cleavage product of DTDP, was converted into 3SP-CoA by the purified enzyme, as demonstrated by in vitro enzyme assays. The structure of 3SP-CoA was verified by using liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry. SucCDAm is Mg2+ or Mn2+ dependent and unspecific regarding ATP or GTP. In kinetic studies the enzyme showed highest enzyme activity and substrate affinity with succinate (Vmax = 9.85 ± 0.14 μmol min−1 mg−1, Km = 0.143 ± 0.001 mM). In comparison to succinate, activity with 3SP was only ca. 1.2% (Vmax = 0.12 ± 0.01 μmol min−1 mg−1) and the affinity was 6-fold lower (Km = 0.818 ± 0.046 mM). Based on the present results, we conclude that SucCDAm is physiologically associated with the citric acid cycle but is mandatory for the catabolic pathway of DTDP and its degradation intermediate 3SP. PMID:21515777

  5. Biosynthetic engineering of nonribosomal peptide synthetases.

    PubMed

    Kries, Hajo

    2016-09-01

    From the evolutionary melting pot of natural product synthetase genes, microorganisms elicit antibiotics, communication tools, and iron scavengers. Chemical biologists manipulate these genes to recreate similarly diverse and potent biological activities not on evolutionary time scales but within months. Enzyme engineering has progressed considerably in recent years and offers new screening, modelling, and design tools for natural product designers. Here, recent advances in enzyme engineering and their application to nonribosomal peptide synthetases are reviewed. Among the nonribosomal peptides that have been subjected to biosynthetic engineering are the antibiotics daptomycin, calcium-dependent antibiotic, and gramicidin S. With these peptides, incorporation of unnatural building blocks and modulation of bioactivities via various structural modifications have been successfully demonstrated. Natural product engineering on the biosynthetic level is not a reliable method yet. However, progress in the understanding and manipulation of biosynthetic pathways may enable the routine production of optimized peptide drugs in the near future. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27465074

  6. Polyspecific pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetases from directed evolution.

    PubMed

    Guo, Li-Tao; Wang, Yane-Shih; Nakamura, Akiyoshi; Eiler, Daniel; Kavran, Jennifer M; Wong, Margaret; Kiessling, Laura L; Steitz, Thomas A; O'Donoghue, Patrick; Söll, Dieter

    2014-11-25

    Pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetase (PylRS) and its cognate tRNA(Pyl) have emerged as ideal translation components for genetic code innovation. Variants of the enzyme facilitate the incorporation >100 noncanonical amino acids (ncAAs) into proteins. PylRS variants were previously selected to acylate N(ε)-acetyl-Lys (AcK) onto tRNA(Pyl). Here, we examine an N(ε)-acetyl-lysyl-tRNA synthetase (AcKRS), which is polyspecific (i.e., active with a broad range of ncAAs) and 30-fold more efficient with Phe derivatives than it is with AcK. Structural and biochemical data reveal the molecular basis of polyspecificity in AcKRS and in a PylRS variant [iodo-phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase (IFRS)] that displays both enhanced activity and substrate promiscuity over a chemical library of 313 ncAAs. IFRS, a product of directed evolution, has distinct binding modes for different ncAAs. These data indicate that in vivo selections do not produce optimally specific tRNA synthetases and suggest that translation fidelity will become an increasingly dominant factor in expanding the genetic code far beyond 20 amino acids.

  7. Polyspecific pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetases from directed evolution

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Li-Tao; Wang, Yane-Shih; Nakamura, Akiyoshi; Eiler, Daniel; Kavran, Jennifer M.; Wong, Margaret; Kiessling, Laura L.; Steitz, Thomas A.; O’Donoghue, Patrick; Söll, Dieter

    2014-01-01

    Pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetase (PylRS) and its cognate tRNAPyl have emerged as ideal translation components for genetic code innovation. Variants of the enzyme facilitate the incorporation >100 noncanonical amino acids (ncAAs) into proteins. PylRS variants were previously selected to acylate Nε-acetyl-Lys (AcK) onto tRNAPyl. Here, we examine an Nε-acetyl-lysyl-tRNA synthetase (AcKRS), which is polyspecific (i.e., active with a broad range of ncAAs) and 30-fold more efficient with Phe derivatives than it is with AcK. Structural and biochemical data reveal the molecular basis of polyspecificity in AcKRS and in a PylRS variant [iodo-phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase (IFRS)] that displays both enhanced activity and substrate promiscuity over a chemical library of 313 ncAAs. IFRS, a product of directed evolution, has distinct binding modes for different ncAAs. These data indicate that in vivo selections do not produce optimally specific tRNA synthetases and suggest that translation fidelity will become an increasingly dominant factor in expanding the genetic code far beyond 20 amino acids. PMID:25385624

  8. Genetic and Immunological Studies of Bacteriophage T4 Thymidylate Synthetase

    PubMed Central

    Krauss, S. W.; Stollar, B. D.; Friedkin, M.

    1973-01-01

    Thymidylate synthetase, which appears after infection of Escherichia coli with bacteriophage T4, has been partially purified. The phage enzyme is immunologically distinct from the host enzyme and has a molecular weight of 50,000 in comparison to 68,000 for the host enzyme. A system has been developed to characterize T4 td mutants previously known to have impaired expression of phage thymidylate synthetase. For this system, an E. coli host lacking thymidylate synthetase was isolated. Known genetic suppressors were transduced into this host. The resulting isogenic hosts were infected with phage T4 td mutants. The specific activities and amounts of cross-reacting material induced by several different types of phage mutants under conditions of suppression or non-suppression have been examined. The results show that the phage carries the structural gene specifying the thymidylate synthetase which appears after phage infection, and that the combination of plaque morphology, enzyme activity assays, and an assay for immunologically cross-reacting material provides a means for identifying true amber mutants of the phage gene. Images PMID:4575286

  9. Effect of thromboxane synthetase inhibitor on feline infectious peritonitis in cats.

    PubMed

    Watari, T; Kaneshima, T; Tsujimoto, H; Ono, K; Hasegawa, A

    1998-05-01

    Two cats with abdominal effusion and anorexia were diagnosed as feline infectious peritonitis (FIP). We tried to evaluate the effect of thromboxane (Tx) synthetase inhibitor, ozagrel hydrochloride, on the progression of symptoms and clinicopathologic data characteristic to FIP. After administration of Tx synthetase inhibitor, improvement of appetite and activity, decreases of peritoneal effusion, reduction of leukocyte number to normal level, and improvement of hyper gamma-globulinemia were found in 2 cats with FIP. These findings suggest that the vasculitis in FIP can be successfully treated with Tx synthetase inhibitor which inhibits platelet aggregation.

  10. The MTCY428.08 Gene of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Codes for NAD+ Synthetase

    PubMed Central

    Cantoni, Rita; Branzoni, Manuela; Labò, Monica; Rizzi, Menico; Riccardi, Giovanna

    1998-01-01

    The product of the MTCY428.08 gene of Mycobacterium tuberculosis shows sequence homology with several NAD+ synthetases. The MTCY428.08 gene was cloned into the expression vectors pGEX-4T-1 and pET-15b. Expression in Escherichia coli led to overproduction of glutathione S-transferase fused and His6-tagged gene products, which were enzymatically assayed for NAD synthetase activity. Our results demonstrate that the MTCY428.08 gene of M. tuberculosis is the structural gene for NAD+ synthetase. PMID:9620974

  11. Altering the Enantioselectivity of Tyrosyl-tRNA Synthetase by Insertion of a Stereospecific Editing Domain.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Charles J; First, Eric A

    2016-03-15

    Translation of mRNAs by the ribosome is stereospecific, with only l-amino acids being incorporated into the nascent polypeptide chain. This stereospecificity results from the exclusion of d-amino acids at three steps during protein synthesis: (1) the aminoacylation of tRNA by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, (2) binding of aminoacyl-tRNAs to EF-Tu, and (3) recognition of aminoacyl-tRNAs by the ribosome. As a first step toward incorporating d-amino acids during protein synthesis, we have altered the enantioselectivity of tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase. This enzyme is unusual among aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, as it can aminoacylate tRNA with d-tyrosine (albeit at a reduced rate compared to l-tyrosine). To change the enantioselectivity of tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase, we introduced the post-transfer editing domain from Pyrococcus horikoshii phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase into the connective polypeptide 1 (CP1) domain of Geobacillus stearothermophilus tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase (henceforth designated TyrRS-FRSed). We show that the phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase editing domain is stereospecific, hydrolyzing l-Tyr-tRNA(Tyr), but not d-Tyr-tRNA(Tyr). We further show that inserting the phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase editing domain into the CP1 domain of tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase decreases the activity of the synthetic site in tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase. This decrease in activity is critical, as it prevents the rate of synthesis from overwhelming the ability of the editing domain to hydrolyze the l-Tyr-tRNA(Tyr) product. Overall, inserting the phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase editing domain results in a 2-fold shift in the enantioselectivity of tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase toward the d-Tyr-tRNA(Tyr) product. When a 4-fold excess of d-tyrosine is used, approximately 40% of the tRNA(Tyr) is aminoacylated with d-tyrosine. PMID:26890980

  12. Kinetics profiling of gramicidin S synthetase A, a member of nonribosomal peptide synthetases.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xun; Li, Hao; Alfermann, Jonas; Mootz, Henning D; Yang, Haw

    2014-12-23

    Nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS) incorporate assorted amino acid substrates into complex natural products. The substrate is activated via the formation of a reactive aminoacyl adenylate and is subsequently attached to the protein template via a thioester bond. The reactive nature of such intermediates, however, leads to side reactions that also break down the high-energy anhydride bond. The off-pathway kinetics or their relative weights compared to that of the on-pathway counterpart remains generally elusive. Here, we introduce multiplatform kinetics profiling to quantify the relative weights of on- and off-pathway reactions. Using the well-defined stoichiometry of thioester formation, we integrate a mass spectrometry (MS) kinetics assay, a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) assay, and an ATP-pyrophosphate (PPi) exchange assay to map out a highly efficient on-pathway kinetics profile of the substrate activation and intermediate uploading (>98% relative weight) for wide-type gramicidin S synthetase A (GrsA) and a 87% rate profile for a cysteine-free GrsA mutant. Our kinetics profiling approach complements the existing enzyme-coupled byproduct-release assays, unraveling new mechanistic insights of substrate activation/channeling in NRPS enzymes.

  13. Post-transcriptional regulation of S-adenosylmethionine synthetase from its stored mRNA in germinated wheat embryos.

    PubMed

    Mathur, M; Saluja, D; Sachar, R C

    1991-06-24

    About 2-3-fold stimulation of S-adenosylmethionine synthetase was witnessed in germinated wheat embryos (48 h). The enhancement of enzyme activity was significantly inhibited by cycloheximide and amino acid analogues. Simultaneous addition of corresponding amino acids alleviated the inhibitory effect of amino acid analogues. Conclusive proof for the de novo synthesis of S-adenosylmethionine synthetase was obtained by labelling this enzyme with [35SO4]2- in vivo. Thus de novo enzyme synthesis seemed necessary for the rise in activity of AdoMet synthetase in wheat embryos. Curiously, blocking of transcription with cordycepin failed to repress the de novo synthesis of AdoMet synthetase in germinated wheat embryos. We envisage the presence of stored mRNA for AdoMet synthetase in wheat embryos. Thus the regulation of this enzyme occurs at the post-transcriptional level. L-Methionine, which is one of the substrates of AdoMet synthetase, stimulated the enzyme activity (2-2.4-fold) over that observed in control germinated embryos. L-Methionine promotes increased de novo synthesis of AdoMet synthetase. Preincubation of enzyme fraction with L-Methionine failed to activate or stabilize the activity of AdoMet synthetase. Three isozymes of AdoMet synthetase were physically separated by DE-52 ion-exchange chromatography. One of the isozymes of AdoMet synthetase has been purified (1529-fold) to electrophoretic homogeneity by resorting to phenyl Sepharose and ATP Sepharose affinity chromatography. The purified enzyme catalyzed the synthesis of S-adenosylmethionine and also exhibited tripolyphosphatase activity. The reaction product of the purified enzyme was chemically and enzymatically characterized as S-adenosylmethionine. The molecular weight of the native enzyme is 174,000 and that of its subunit is 84,000 as determined on SDS-PAGE. Thus the native enzyme seems to be dimeric in nature. PMID:1648405

  14. Function of the major synthetase subdomains of carbamyl-phosphate synthetase.

    PubMed

    Guy, H I; Evans, D R

    1996-06-01

    The amidotransferase domain (GLNase) of mammalian carbamyl-phosphate synthetase II hydrolyzes glutamine and transfers ammonia to the synthetase domain where carbamyl phosphate is formed in a three-step reaction sequence. The synthetase domain consists of two homologous subdomains, CPS.A and CPS.B. Recent studies suggest that CPS.A catalyzes the initial ATP dependent-activation of bicarbonate, whereas CPS.B uses a second ATP to form carbamyl phosphate. To establish the function of these substructural elements, we have cloned and expressed the mammalian protein and its subdomains in Escherichia coli. Recombinant CPSase (GLNase-CPS.A-CPS.B) was found to be fully functional. Two other proteins were made; the first consisted of only GLNase and CPS.A, whereas the second lacked CPS.A and had the GLNase domain fused directly to CPS.B. Remarkably, both proteins catalyzed the entire series of reactions involved in glutamine-dependent carbamyl phosphate synthesis. The stoichiometry, like that of the native enzyme, was 2 mol of ATP utilized per mol of carbamyl phosphate formed. GLN-CPS.B is allosterically regulated, whereas GLN-CPS.A was insensitive to effectors, a result consistent with evidence showing that allosteric effectors bind to CPS.B. These properties are not peculiar to the mammalian protein, because the separately cloned CPS.A subdomain of the E. coli enzyme was also found to catalyze carbamyl phosphate synthesis. Gel filtration chromatography and chemical cross-linking studies showed that these molecules are dimers, a structural organization that may be a prerequisite for the overall reaction. Thus, the homologous CPS.A and CPS.B subdomains are functionally equivalent, although in the native enzyme they may have different functions resulting from their juxtaposition relative to the other components in the complex. PMID:8662713

  15. Effect of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on the acyl-CoA synthetase activity toward medium-chain, long-chain and polyunsaturated fatty acids in mitochondria of mouse liver and brain.

    PubMed

    Kasuya, Fumiyo; Kazuhiro, Misumi; Tatsuya, Hasegawa; Nakamoto, Kazuo; Tokuyama, Shogo; Masuyama, Teiichi

    2013-02-01

    Effect of eleven non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on the acyl-CoA synthetase activities toward octanoic, palmitic, arachidonic and docosahexaenoic acids was evaluated in mouse liver and brain mitochondria. The drugs tested were aspirin, salicylic acid, diflunisal, mefenamic acid, indomethacin, etodolac, ibuprofen, ketoprofen, naproxen, loxoprofen, flurbiprofen. In mouse liver mitochondria, diflunisal and mefenamic acid exhibited the inhibitory activities not only for octanoic acid (IC(50) = 78.7 and 64.7 µM) and but also for palmitic acid (IC(50) = 236.5 and 284.4 µM), respectively. Aspirin was an inhibitor for the activation of octanoic acid only (IC(50) = 411.0 µM). In the brain, mefenamic acid and diflunisal inhibited strongly palmitoyl-CoA formation (IC(50) = 57.3 and 114.0 µM), respectively. The activation of docosahexaenoic acid in brain was sensitive to inhibition by diflunisal and mefenamic acid compared with liver.

  16. Identification of the glutamine synthetase adenylyltransferase of Azospirillum brasilense.

    PubMed

    Van Dommelen, Anne; Spaepen, Stijn; Vanderleyden, Jozef

    2009-04-01

    Glutamine synthetase, a key enzyme in nitrogen metabolism of both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, is strictly regulated. One means of regulation is the modulation of activity through adenylylation catalyzed by adenylyltransferases. Using PCR primers based on conserved sequences in glutamine synthetase adenylyltransferases, we amplified part of the glnE gene of Azospirillum brasilense Sp7. The complete glnE sequence of A. brasilense Sp245 was retrieved from the draft genome sequence of this organism (http://genomics.ornl.gov/research/azo/). Adenylyltransferase is a bifunctional enzyme consisting of an N-terminal domain responsible for deadenylylation activity and a C-terminal domain responsible for adenylylation activity. Both domains are partially homologous to each other. Residues important for catalytic activity were present in the deduced amino acid sequence of the A. brasilense Sp245 glnE sequence. A glnE mutant was constructed in A. brasilense Sp7 by inserting a kanamycin resistance cassette between the two active domains of the enzyme. The resulting mutant was unable to adenylylate the glutamine synthetase enzyme and was impaired in growth when shifted from nitrogen-poor to nitrogen-rich medium.

  17. Energetics of S-adenosylmethionine synthetase catalysis.

    PubMed

    McQueney, M S; Anderson, K S; Markham, G D

    2000-04-18

    S-adenosylmethionine synthetase (ATP:L-methionine S-adenosyltransferase) catalyzes the only known route of biosynthesis of the primary biological alkylating agent. The internal thermodynamics of the Escherichia coli S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) synthetase catalyzed formation of AdoMet, pyrophosphate (PP(i)), and phosphate (P(i)) from ATP, methionine, and water have been determined by a combination of pre-steady-state kinetics, solvent isotope incorporation, and equilibrium binding measurements in conjunction with computer modeling. These studies provided the rate constants for substrate binding, the two chemical interconversion steps [AdoMet formation and subsequent tripolyphosphate (PPP(i)) hydrolysis], and product release. The data demonstrate the presence of a kinetically significant isomerization of the E.AdoMet.PP(i).P(i) complex before product release. The free energy profile for the enzyme-catalyzed reaction under physiological conditions has been constructed using these experimental values and in vivo concentrations of substrates and products. The free energy profile reveals that the AdoMet formation reaction, which has an equilibrium constant of 10(4), does not have well-balanced transition state and ground state energies. In contrast, the subsequent PPP(i) hydrolytic reaction is energetically better balanced. The thermodynamic profile indicates the use of binding energies for catalysis of AdoMet formation and the necessity for subsequent PPP(i) hydrolysis to allow enzyme turnover. Crystallographic studies have shown that a mobile protein loop gates access to the active site. The present kinetic studies indicate that this loop movement is rapid with respect to k(cat) and with respect to substrate binding at physiological concentrations. The uniformly slow binding rates of 10(4)-10(5) M(-)(1) s(-)(1) for ligands with different structures suggest that loop movement may be an intrinsic property of the protein rather than being ligand induced. PMID:10757994

  18. Genetic Validation of Aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetases as Drug Targets in Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    Kalidas, Savitha; Cestari, Igor; Monnerat, Severine; Li, Qiong; Regmi, Sandesh; Hasle, Nicholas; Labaied, Mehdi; Parsons, Marilyn; Stuart, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) is an important public health threat in sub-Saharan Africa. Current drugs are unsatisfactory, and new drugs are being sought. Few validated enzyme targets are available to support drug discovery efforts, so our goal was to obtain essentiality data on genes with proven utility as drug targets. Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) are known drug targets for bacterial and fungal pathogens and are required for protein synthesis. Here we survey the essentiality of eight Trypanosoma brucei aaRSs by RNA interference (RNAi) gene expression knockdown, covering an enzyme from each major aaRS class: valyl-tRNA synthetase (ValRS) (class Ia), tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase (TrpRS-1) (class Ib), arginyl-tRNA synthetase (ArgRS) (class Ic), glutamyl-tRNA synthetase (GluRS) (class 1c), threonyl-tRNA synthetase (ThrRS) (class IIa), asparaginyl-tRNA synthetase (AsnRS) (class IIb), and phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase (α and β) (PheRS) (class IIc). Knockdown of mRNA encoding these enzymes in T. brucei mammalian stage parasites showed that all were essential for parasite growth and survival in vitro. The reduced expression resulted in growth, morphological, cell cycle, and DNA content abnormalities. ThrRS was characterized in greater detail, showing that the purified recombinant enzyme displayed ThrRS activity and that the protein localized to both the cytosol and mitochondrion. Borrelidin, a known inhibitor of ThrRS, was an inhibitor of T. brucei ThrRS and showed antitrypanosomal activity. The data show that aaRSs are essential for T. brucei survival and are likely to be excellent targets for drug discovery efforts. PMID:24562907

  19. Effect of heat shock on poly(ADP-ribose) synthetase and DNA repair in Drosophila cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nolan, N.L.; Kidwell, W.R.

    1982-04-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) synthetase, a chromatin-bound enzyme which attaches polyanionic chains of ADP-ribose to nuclear proteins, was found to be temperature sensitive in intact Drosophila melanogaster cells. The synthetase was completely inactivated by heat-shocking the cells at 37/sup 0/C for 5 min, a condition which had no appreciable effect on the subsequent growth of Drosophila cells at their physiological temperature. The heat-shock effect on synthetase was reversible; enzyme activity began to reappear about 2 hr post heat shock. During the 2-hr interval when poly(ADP-ribose) synthetase was absent, the cells were competent in repair of ..gamma..-ray-induced DNA strand breaks as shown by DNA sedimentation studies on alkaline sucrose gradients. It is thus concluded that poly(ADP-ribose) synthesis is unnecessary for repair of DNA strand breaks introduced by irradiation. The same conclusion was reached from the fact that two inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose) synthetase 3-aminobenzamide and 5-methylnicotinamide, failed to block repair of ..gamma..-ray-induced DNA chain breaks even though both inhibitors reduced the amount of poly(ADP-ribose) synthesized in cells by 50-75%. Although it was found that the repair of DNA strand breaks is independent of poly(ADP-ribose) synthesis, irradiation does activate the synthetase in control cells, as shown by radioimmunoassay of poly(ADP-ribose) levels.

  20. CTP synthetase and its role in phospholipid synthesis in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yu-Fang; Carman, George M.

    2008-01-01

    CTP synthetase is a cytosolic-associated glutamine amidotransferase enzyme that catalyzes the ATP-dependent transfer of the amide nitrogen from glutamine to the C-4 position of UTP to form CTP. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the reaction product CTP is an essential precursor of all membrane phospholipids that are synthesized via the Kennedy (CDP-choline and CDP-ethanolamine branches) and CDP-diacylglycerol pathways. The URA7 and URA8 genes encode CTP synthetase in S. cerevisiae, and the URA7 gene is responsible for the majority of CTP synthesized in vivo. The CTP synthetase enzymes are allosterically regulated by CTP product inhibition. Mutations that alleviate this regulation result in an elevated cellular level of CTP and an increase in phospholipid synthesis via the Kennedy pathway. The URA7-encoded enzyme is phosphorylated by protein kinases A and C, and these phosphorylations stimulate CTP synthetase activity and increase cellular CTP levels and the utilization of the Kennedy pathway. The CTPS1 and CTPS2 genes that encode human CTP synthetase enzymes are functionally expressed in S. cerevisiae, and rescue the lethal phenotype of the ura7Δ ura8Δ double mutant that lacks CTP synthetase activity. The expression in yeast has revealed that the human CTPS1-encoded enzyme is also phosphorylated and regulated by protein kinases A and C. PMID:18439916

  1. Tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase: the first crystallization of a human mitochondrial aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnefond, Luc; Frugier, Magali; Touzé, Elodie; Lorber, Bernard; Florentz, Catherine; Giegé, Richard Rudinger-Thirion, Joëlle; Sauter, Claude

    2007-04-01

    Crystals of human mitochondrial tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase lacking the C-terminal S4-like domain diffract to 2.7 Å resolution and are suitable for structure determination. Human mitochondrial tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase and a truncated version with its C-terminal S4-like domain deleted were purified and crystallized. Only the truncated version, which is active in tyrosine activation and Escherichia coli tRNA{sup Tyr} charging, yielded crystals suitable for structure determination. These tetragonal crystals, belonging to space group P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2, were obtained in the presence of PEG 4000 as a crystallizing agent and diffracted X-rays to 2.7 Å resolution. Complete data sets could be collected and led to structure solution by molecular replacement.

  2. Neurospora crassa mutants deficient in asparagine synthetase.

    PubMed Central

    MacPhee, K G; Nelson, R E; Schuster, S M

    1983-01-01

    Neurospora crassa mutants deficient in asparagine synthetase were selected by using the procedure of inositol-less death. Complementation tests among the 100 mutants isolated suggested that their alterations were genetically allelic. Recombination analysis with strain S1007t, an asparagine auxotroph, indicated that the mutations were located near or within the asn gene on linkage group V. In vitro assays with a heterokaryon indicated that the mutation was dominant. Thermal instability of cell extracts from temperature-sensitive strains in an in vitro asparagine synthetase assay determined that the mutations were in the structural gene(s) for asparagine synthetase. PMID:6137480

  3. Actinobacterial Acyl Coenzyme A Synthetases Involved in Steroid Side-Chain Catabolism

    PubMed Central

    Casabon, Israël; Swain, Kendra; Crowe, Adam M.

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial steroid catabolism is an important component of the global carbon cycle and has applications in drug synthesis. Pathways for this catabolism involve multiple acyl coenzyme A (CoA) synthetases, which activate alkanoate substituents for β-oxidation. The functions of these synthetases are poorly understood. We enzymatically characterized four distinct acyl-CoA synthetases from the cholate catabolic pathway of Rhodococcus jostii RHA1 and the cholesterol catabolic pathway of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Phylogenetic analysis of 70 acyl-CoA synthetases predicted to be involved in steroid metabolism revealed that the characterized synthetases each represent an orthologous class with a distinct function in steroid side-chain degradation. The synthetases were specific for the length of alkanoate substituent. FadD19 from M. tuberculosis H37Rv (FadD19Mtb) transformed 3-oxo-4-cholesten-26-oate (kcat/Km = 0.33 × 105 ± 0.03 × 105 M−1 s−1) and represents orthologs that activate the C8 side chain of cholesterol. Both CasGRHA1 and FadD17Mtb are steroid-24-oyl-CoA synthetases. CasG and its orthologs activate the C5 side chain of cholate, while FadD17 and its orthologs appear to activate the C5 side chain of one or more cholesterol metabolites. CasIRHA1 is a steroid-22-oyl-CoA synthetase, representing orthologs that activate metabolites with a C3 side chain, which accumulate during cholate catabolism. CasI had similar apparent specificities for substrates with intact or extensively degraded steroid nuclei, exemplified by 3-oxo-23,24-bisnorchol-4-en-22-oate and 1β(2′-propanoate)-3aα-H-4α(3″-propanoate)-7aβ-methylhexahydro-5-indanone (kcat/Km = 2.4 × 105 ± 0.1 × 105 M−1 s−1 and 3.2 × 105 ± 0.3 × 105 M−1 s−1, respectively). Acyl-CoA synthetase classes involved in cholate catabolism were found in both Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria. Overall, this study provides insight into the physiological roles of acyl-CoA synthetases in steroid catabolism and

  4. Hemolytic anemia and metabolic acidosis: think about glutathione synthetase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Ben Ameur, Salma; Aloulou, Hajer; Nasrallah, Fehmi; Kamoun, Thouraya; Kaabachi, Naziha; Hachicha, Mongia

    2015-02-01

    Glutathione synthetase deficiency (GSSD) is a rare disorder of glutathione metabolism with varying clinical severity. Patients may present with hemolytic anemia alone or together with acidosis and central nervous system impairment. Diagnosis is made by clinical presentation and detection of elevated concentrations of 5-oxoproline in urine and low glutathione synthetase activity in erythrocytes or cultured skin fibroblasts. The prognosis seems to depend on early diagnosis and treatment. We report a 4 months old Tunisian male infant who presented with severe metabolic acidosis with high anion gap and hemolytic anemia. High level of 5-oxoproline was detected in her urine and diagnosis of GSSD was made. Treatment consists of the correction of acidosis, blood transfusion, and supplementation with antioxidants. He died of severe metabolic acidosis and sepsis at the age of 15 months.

  5. Inhibition of recombinant Pneumocystis carinii dihydropteroate synthetase by sulfa drugs.

    PubMed

    Hong, Y L; Hossler, P A; Calhoun, D H; Meshnick, S R

    1995-08-01

    Forty-four sulfa drugs were screened against crude preparations of recombinant Pneumocystis carinii dihydropteroate synthetase. The apparent Michaelis-Menten constants (Km) for p-aminobenzoic acid and 7,8-dihydro-6-hydroxymethylpterin pyrophosphate were 0.34 +/- 0.02 and 2.50 +/- 0.71 microM, respectively. Several sulfa drugs, including sulfathiazole, sulfachlorpyridazine, sulfamethoxypyridazine, and sulfathiourea, inhibited dihydropteroate synthetase approximately as well as sulfamethoxazole, as determined by the concentrations which cause 50% inhibition and/or by Ki. For all sulfones and sulfonamides tested, unsubstituted p-amino groups were necessary for activity, and sulfonamides containing an N1-heterocyclic substituent were found to be the most effective inhibitors. Folate biosynthesis in isolated intact P. carinii was approximately equally sensitive to inhibition by sulfamethoxazole, sulfachlorpyridazine, sulfamethoxypyridazine, sulfisoxazole, and sulfathiazole. Two of these drugs, sulfamethoxypyridazine and sulfisoxazole, are known to be less toxic than sulfamethoxazole and should be further evaluated for the treatment of P. carinii pneumonia.

  6. Gene encoding plant asparagine synthetase

    DOEpatents

    Coruzzi, Gloria M.; Tsai, Fong-Ying

    1993-10-26

    The identification and cloning of the gene(s) for plant asparagine synthetase (AS), an important enzyme involved in the formation of asparagine, a major nitrogen transport compound of higher plants is described. Expression vectors constructed with the AS coding sequence may be utilized to produce plant AS; to engineer herbicide resistant plants, salt/drought tolerant plants or pathogen resistant plants; as a dominant selectable marker; or to select for novel herbicides or compounds useful as agents that synchronize plant cells in culture. The promoter for plant AS, which directs high levels of gene expression and is induced in an organ specific manner and by darkness, is also described. The AS promoter may be used to direct the expression of heterologous coding sequences in appropriate hosts.

  7. The effect of portacaval anastomosis on the expression of glutamine synthetase and ornithine aminotransferase in perivenous hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Robin; Levillain, Oliver; Brosnan, John T; Araneda, Silvia; Brosnan, Margaret E

    2013-05-01

    There is functional zonation of metabolism across the liver acinus, with glutamine synthetase restricted to a narrow band of cells around the terminal hepatic venules. Portacaval anastomosis, where there is a major rerouting of portal blood flow from the portal vein directly to the vena cava bypassing the liver, has been reported to result in a marked decrease in the activity of glutamine synthetase. It is not known whether this represents a loss of perivenous hepatocytes or whether there is a specific loss of glutamine synthetase. To answer this question, we have determined the activity of glutamine synthetase and another enzyme from the perivenous compartment, ornithine aminotransferase, as well as the immunochemical localization of both glutamine synthetase and ornithine aminotransferase in rats with a portacaval shunt. The portacaval shunt caused a marked decrease in glutamine synthetase activity and an increase in ornithine aminotransferase activity. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that the glutamine synthetase and ornithine aminotransferase proteins maintained their location in the perivenous cells. These results indicate that there is no generalized loss of perivenous hepatocytes, but rather, there is a significant alteration in the expression of these proteins and hence metabolism in this cell population. PMID:23656379

  8. The effect of portacaval anastomosis on the expression of glutamine synthetase and ornithine aminotransferase in perivenous hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Robin; Levillain, Oliver; Brosnan, John T; Araneda, Silvia; Brosnan, Margaret E

    2013-05-01

    There is functional zonation of metabolism across the liver acinus, with glutamine synthetase restricted to a narrow band of cells around the terminal hepatic venules. Portacaval anastomosis, where there is a major rerouting of portal blood flow from the portal vein directly to the vena cava bypassing the liver, has been reported to result in a marked decrease in the activity of glutamine synthetase. It is not known whether this represents a loss of perivenous hepatocytes or whether there is a specific loss of glutamine synthetase. To answer this question, we have determined the activity of glutamine synthetase and another enzyme from the perivenous compartment, ornithine aminotransferase, as well as the immunochemical localization of both glutamine synthetase and ornithine aminotransferase in rats with a portacaval shunt. The portacaval shunt caused a marked decrease in glutamine synthetase activity and an increase in ornithine aminotransferase activity. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that the glutamine synthetase and ornithine aminotransferase proteins maintained their location in the perivenous cells. These results indicate that there is no generalized loss of perivenous hepatocytes, but rather, there is a significant alteration in the expression of these proteins and hence metabolism in this cell population.

  9. Regulation of the stability of poly(I)xpoly(C)-induced human fibroblast interferon mRNA: selective inactivation of interferon mRNA and lack of involvement of 2',5'-oligo(A) synthetase activation during the shutoff of interferon production.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, P B; Gupta, S L

    1980-06-01

    The inactivation of interferon mRNA during the shutoff phase of interferon production in poly(I)xpoly(C)-induced human fibroblast cultures is selective. We have determined that the shutoff of interferon production, which takes place from 3 to 8 hr after the beginning of induction, is not associated with an appreciable declined in the rate of bulk cellular protein synthesis or of cellular protein secretion. While the amount of translatable interferon mRNA declined markedly during the shutoff phase, the level of translatable bulk cellular mRNA and the stability of [3H]uridine-labeled mRNA were unaffected. Superinduction with actinomycin D selectively stabilized interferon mRNA with no apparent effect on the stability of bulk cellular mRNA. Furthermore, an activation of the 2',5'-oligo(A) synthetase/endonuclease system does not appear to be involved in the shutoff phenomenon. Uninduced FS-4 cells contained a low basal level of 2'5'-oligo(A) synthetase activity, which was unchanged in poly(I)xpoly(C)-induced cells during the shutoff phase. Treatment of FS-4 cells with interferon for 16-18 hr prior to induction increased the enzyme activity by approximately 200-fold. However, this did not inhibit interferon production after induction with poly(I)xpoly(C) alone or after superinduction with cycloheximide or actinomycin D or both. Furthermore, the rates of decay of interferon production were comparable in cells with either a basal or an increased level of 2',5'-oligo(A) synthetase. Thus a 200-fold increase in 2',5'-oligo(A) synthetase level did not affect either the stability of interferon mRNA or the efficacy of interferon superinduction by metabolic inhibitors.

  10. Elevated hepatic gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase activity and abnormal sulfate levels in liver and muscle tissue may explain abnormal cysteine and glutathione levels in SIV-infected rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Gross, A; Hack, V; Stahl-Hennig, C; Dröge, W

    1996-11-20

    To establish whether the low cysteine and glutathione levels in HIV-infected patients and SIV-infected rhesus macaques may be consequences of an abnormal cysteine catabolism, we analyzed sulfate and glutathione levels in macaques. Muscle tissue (m. vastus lateralis and m. gastrocnemius) of SIV-infected macaques (n = 25) had higher sulfate and lower glutathione and glutamate levels than that of uninfected controls (n =9). Hepatic tissue, in contrast, showed decreased sulfate and glutathione disulfide (GSSG) levels, and increased gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase (gamma-GCS) activity. These findings suggest drainage of the cysteine pool by increased cysteine catabolism in skeletal muscle tissue, and by increased hepatic glutathione biosynthesis. Cachectic macaques also showed increased urea levels and decreased glutamine/urea ratios in the liver, which are obviously related to the abnormal urea excretion and negative nitrogen balance commonly observed in cachexia. As urea production and net glutamine synthesis in the liver are strongly influenced by proton-generating processes, the abnormal hepatic urea production may be the direct consequence of the cysteine deficiency and the decreased catabolic conversion of cysteine into sulfate and protons in the liver.

  11. Adenine nucleotides as allosteric effectors of pea seed glutamine synthetase.

    PubMed

    Knight, T J; Langston-Unkefer, P J

    1988-08-15

    The effects of adenine nucleotides on pea seed glutamine synthetase (EC 6.3.1.2) activity were examined as a part of our investigation of the regulation of this octameric plant enzyme. Saturation curves for glutamine synthetase activity versus ATP with ADP as the changing fixed inhibitor were not hyperbolic; greater apparent Vmax values were observed in the presence of added ADP than the Vmax observed in the absence of ADP. Hill plots of data with ADP present curved upward and crossed the plot with no added ADP. The stoichiometry of adenine nucleotide binding to glutamine synthetase was examined. Two molecules of [gamma-32P]ATP were bound per subunit in the presence of methionine sulfoximine. These ATP molecules were bound at an allosteric site and at the active site. One molecule of either [gamma-32P]ATP or [14C]ADP bound per subunit in the absence of methionine sulfoximine; this nucleotide was bound at an allosteric site. ADP and ATP compete for binding at the allosteric site, although ADP was preferred. ADP binding to the allosteric site proceeded in two kinetic phases. A Vmax value of 1.55 units/mg was measured for glutamine synthetase with one ADP tightly bound per enzyme subunit; a Vmax value of 0.8 unit/mg was measured for enzyme with no adenine nucleotide bound at the allosteric site. The enzyme activation caused by the binding of ADP to the allosteric sites was preceded by a lag phase, the length of which was dependent on the ADP concentration. Enzyme incubated in 10 mM ADP bound approximately 4 mol of ADP/mol of native enzyme before activation was observed; the activation was complete when 7-8 mol of ADP were bound per mol of the octameric, native enzyme. The Km for ATP (2 mM) was not changed by ADP binding to the allosteric sites. ADP was a simple competitive inhibitor (Ki = 0.05 mM) of ATP for glutamine synthetase with eight molecules of ADP tightly bound to the allosteric sites of the octamer. Binding of ATP to the allosteric sites led to marked

  12. Turnover of bacterial glutamine synthetase: oxidative inactivation precedes proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Levine, R L; Oliver, C N; Fulks, R M; Stadtman, E R

    1981-04-01

    We partially purified a preparation from Escherichia coli that proteolytically degrades the enzyme glutamine synthetase [L-glutamate:ammonia ligase (ADP-forming), EC 6.3.1.2]. The degradation is at least a two-step process. First, the glutamine synthetase undergoes an oxidative modification. This modification leads to loss of catalytic activity and also renders the protein susceptible to proteolytic attack in the second step. The oxidative step displays characteristics of a mixed-function oxidation, requiring both molecular oxygen and a reduced nucleotide. This step can also be catalyzed by a purified, mammalian cytochrome P-450 system, as well as by a model system consisting of ascorbic acid and oxygen. Catalase blocks this oxidative modification step. Thus, the overall process of proteolytic degradation can be observed only if care is taken to remove catalase activity from the extracts. The inactivation reaction is dependent on the state of adenylylation of the glutamine synthetase, suggesting that this a physiologically important reaction. If so, then mixed-function oxidases are now implicated in the process of intracellular protein turnover.

  13. Turnover of bacterial glutamine synthetase: oxidative inactivation precedes proteolysis.

    PubMed Central

    Levine, R L; Oliver, C N; Fulks, R M; Stadtman, E R

    1981-01-01

    We partially purified a preparation from Escherichia coli that proteolytically degrades the enzyme glutamine synthetase [L-glutamate:ammonia ligase (ADP-forming), EC 6.3.1.2]. The degradation is at least a two-step process. First, the glutamine synthetase undergoes an oxidative modification. This modification leads to loss of catalytic activity and also renders the protein susceptible to proteolytic attack in the second step. The oxidative step displays characteristics of a mixed-function oxidation, requiring both molecular oxygen and a reduced nucleotide. This step can also be catalyzed by a purified, mammalian cytochrome P-450 system, as well as by a model system consisting of ascorbic acid and oxygen. Catalase blocks this oxidative modification step. Thus, the overall process of proteolytic degradation can be observed only if care is taken to remove catalase activity from the extracts. The inactivation reaction is dependent on the state of adenylylation of the glutamine synthetase, suggesting that this a physiologically important reaction. If so, then mixed-function oxidases are now implicated in the process of intracellular protein turnover. Images PMID:6113590

  14. Structure of the prolyl-tRNA synthetase from the eukaryotic pathogen Giardia lamblia

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, Eric T.; Kim, Jessica E.; Napuli, Alberto J.; Verlinde, Christophe L. M. J.; Fan, Erkang; Zucker, Frank H.; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Buckner, Frederick S.; Hol, Wim G. J.; Merritt, Ethan A.

    2012-09-01

    The structure of Giardia prolyl-tRNA synthetase cocrystallized with proline and ATP shows evidence for half-of-the-sites activity, leading to a corresponding mixture of reaction substrates and product (prolyl-AMP) in the two active sites of the dimer. The genome of the human intestinal parasite Giardia lamblia contains only a single aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase gene for each amino acid. The Giardia prolyl-tRNA synthetase gene product was originally misidentified as a dual-specificity Pro/Cys enzyme, in part owing to its unexpectedly high off-target activation of cysteine, but is now believed to be a normal representative of the class of archaeal/eukaryotic prolyl-tRNA synthetases. The 2.2 Å resolution crystal structure of the G. lamblia enzyme presented here is thus the first structure determination of a prolyl-tRNA synthetase from a eukaryote. The relative occupancies of substrate (proline) and product (prolyl-AMP) in the active site are consistent with half-of-the-sites reactivity, as is the observed biphasic thermal denaturation curve for the protein in the presence of proline and MgATP. However, no corresponding induced asymmetry is evident in the structure of the protein. No thermal stabilization is observed in the presence of cysteine and ATP. The implied low affinity for the off-target activation product cysteinyl-AMP suggests that translational fidelity in Giardia is aided by the rapid release of misactivated cysteine.

  15. Phosphorylation of Human CTP Synthetase 1 by Protein Kinase A: IDENTIFICATION OF Thr455 AS A MAJOR SITE OF PHOSPHORYLATION*

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Mal-Gi; Carman, George M.

    2007-01-01

    CTP synthetase is an essential enzyme that generates the CTP required for the synthesis of nucleic acids and membrane phospholipids. In this work, we examined the phosphorylation of the human CTPS1-encoded CTP synthetase 1 by protein kinase A. CTP synthetase 1 was expressed and purified from a Saccharomyces cerevisiae ura7Δ ura8Δ double mutant that lacks CTP synthetase activity. Using purified CTP synthetase 1 as a substrate, protein kinase A activity was time- and dose-dependent. The phosphorylation, which primarily occurred on a threonine residue, was accompanied by a 50% decrease in CTP synthetase 1 activity. The synthetic peptide LGKRRTLFQT that contains the protein kinase A motif for Thr455 was a substrate for protein kinase A. A Thr455 to Ala (T455A) mutation in CTP synthetase 1 was constructed by site-directed mutagenesis and was expressed and purified from the S. cerevisiae ura7Δ ura8Δ mutant. The T455A mutation caused a 78% decrease in protein kinase A phosphorylation, and the loss of the phosphothreonine residue and a major phosphopeptide that were present in the purified wild type enzyme phosphorylated by protein kinase A. The CTP synthetase 1 activity of the T455A mutant enzyme was 2-fold higher than the wild type enzyme. In addition, the T455A mutation caused a 44% decrease in the amount of human CTP synthetase 1 that was phosphorylated in S. cerevisiae cells, and this was accompanied by a 2.5-fold increase in the cellular concentration of CTP and a 1.5-fold increase in the choline-dependent synthesis of phosphatidylcholine. PMID:17189248

  16. Light induces changes in activities of Na+/K+-ATPase, H+/K+-ATPase and glutamine synthetase in tissues involved directly or indirectly in light-enhanced calcification in the giant clam, Tridacna squamosa

    PubMed Central

    Ip, Yuen K.; Ching, Biyun; Hiong, Kum C.; Choo, Celine Y. L.; Boo, Mel V.; Wong, Wai P.; Chew, Shit F.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of 12 h of exposure to light, as compared with 12 h of exposure to darkness (control), on enzymatic activities of transporters involved in the transport of NH+4 or H+, and activities of enzymes involved in converting NH+4 to glutamate/glutamine in inner mantle, outer mantle, and ctenidia of the giant clam, Tridacna squamosa. Exposure to light resulted in a significant increase in the effectiveness of NH+4 in substitution for K+ to activate Na+/K+-ATPase (NKA), manifested as a significant increase in the Na+/NH+4-activated-NKA activity in the inner mantle. However, similar phenomena were not observed in the extensible outer mantle, which contained abundant symbiotic zooxanthellae. Hence, during light-enhanced calcification, H+ released from CaCO3 deposition could react with NH3 to form NH+4 in the extrapallial fluid, and NH+4 could probably be transported into the shell-facing inner mantle epithelium through NKA. Light also induced an increase in the activity of glutamine synthetase, which converts NH+4 and glutamate to glutamine, in the inner mantle. Taken together, these results explained observations reported elsewhere that light induced a significant increase in pH and a significant decrease in ammonia concentration in the extrapallial fluid, as well as a significant increase in the glutamine concentration in the inner mantle, of T. squamosa. Exposure of T. squamosa to light also led to a significant decrease in the N-ethylmaleimide (NEM)-sensitive-V-H+-ATPase (VATPase) in the inner mantle, and significant increases in the Na+/K+-activated-NKA, H+/NH+4-activated-H+/K+-ATPase, and NEM-sensitive-VATPase activities in ctenidia, indicating that light-enhanced calcification might perturb Na+ homeostasis and acid/base balance in the hemolymph, and might involve the active uptake of NH+4 from the environment. This is the first report on light having direct enhancing effects on activities of certain transporters

  17. Light induces changes in activities of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase, H(+)/K(+)-ATPase and glutamine synthetase in tissues involved directly or indirectly in light-enhanced calcification in the giant clam, Tridacna squamosa.

    PubMed

    Ip, Yuen K; Ching, Biyun; Hiong, Kum C; Choo, Celine Y L; Boo, Mel V; Wong, Wai P; Chew, Shit F

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of 12 h of exposure to light, as compared with 12 h of exposure to darkness (control), on enzymatic activities of transporters involved in the transport of NH(+) 4 or H(+), and activities of enzymes involved in converting NH(+) 4 to glutamate/glutamine in inner mantle, outer mantle, and ctenidia of the giant clam, Tridacna squamosa. Exposure to light resulted in a significant increase in the effectiveness of NH(+) 4 in substitution for K(+) to activate Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase (NKA), manifested as a significant increase in the Na(+)/NH(+) 4-activated-NKA activity in the inner mantle. However, similar phenomena were not observed in the extensible outer mantle, which contained abundant symbiotic zooxanthellae. Hence, during light-enhanced calcification, H(+) released from CaCO3 deposition could react with NH3 to form NH(+) 4 in the extrapallial fluid, and NH(+) 4 could probably be transported into the shell-facing inner mantle epithelium through NKA. Light also induced an increase in the activity of glutamine synthetase, which converts NH(+) 4 and glutamate to glutamine, in the inner mantle. Taken together, these results explained observations reported elsewhere that light induced a significant increase in pH and a significant decrease in ammonia concentration in the extrapallial fluid, as well as a significant increase in the glutamine concentration in the inner mantle, of T. squamosa. Exposure of T. squamosa to light also led to a significant decrease in the N-ethylmaleimide (NEM)-sensitive-V-H(+)-ATPase (VATPase) in the inner mantle, and significant increases in the Na(+)/K(+)-activated-NKA, H(+)/NH(+) 4-activated-H(+)/K(+)-ATPase, and NEM-sensitive-VATPase activities in ctenidia, indicating that light-enhanced calcification might perturb Na(+) homeostasis and acid/base balance in the hemolymph, and might involve the active uptake of NH(+) 4 from the environment. This is the first report on light having direct

  18. Recurrent adenylation domain replacement in the microcystin synthetase gene cluster

    PubMed Central

    Fewer, David P; Rouhiainen, Leo; Jokela, Jouni; Wahlsten, Matti; Laakso, Kati; Wang, Hao; Sivonen, Kaarina

    2007-01-01

    Background Microcystins are small cyclic heptapeptide toxins produced by a range of distantly related cyanobacteria. Microcystins are synthesized on large NRPS-PKS enzyme complexes. Many structural variants of microcystins are produced simulatenously. A recombination event between the first module of mcyB (mcyB1) and mcyC in the microcystin synthetase gene cluster is linked to the simultaneous production of microcystin variants in strains of the genus Microcystis. Results Here we undertook a phylogenetic study to investigate the order and timing of recombination between the mcyB1 and mcyC genes in a diverse selection of microcystin producing cyanobacteria. Our results provide support for complex evolutionary processes taking place at the mcyB1 and mcyC adenylation domains which recognize and activate the amino acids found at X and Z positions. We find evidence for recent recombination between mcyB1 and mcyC in strains of the genera Anabaena, Microcystis, and Hapalosiphon. We also find clear evidence for independent adenylation domain conversion of mcyB1 by unrelated peptide synthetase modules in strains of the genera Nostoc and Microcystis. The recombination events replace only the adenylation domain in each case and the condensation domains of mcyB1 and mcyC are not transferred together with the adenylation domain. Our findings demonstrate that the mcyB1 and mcyC adenylation domains are recombination hotspots in the microcystin synthetase gene cluster. Conclusion Recombination is thought to be one of the main mechanisms driving the diversification of NRPSs. However, there is very little information on how recombination takes place in nature. This study demonstrates that functional peptide synthetases are created in nature through transfer of adenylation domains without the concomitant transfer of condensation domains. PMID:17908306

  19. A Rationally Engineered Misacylating Aminoacyl-Trna Synthetase

    SciTech Connect

    Bullock, T.L.; Rodriguez-Hernandez, A.; Corigliano, E.M.; Perona, J.J.

    2009-05-12

    Information transfer from nucleic acid to protein is mediated by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, which catalyze the specific pairings of amino acids with transfer RNAs. Despite copious sequence and structural information on the 22 tRNA synthetase families, little is known of the enzyme signatures that specify amino acid selectivities. Here, we show that transplanting a conserved arginine residue from glutamyl-tRNA synthetase (GluRS) to glutaminyl-tRNA synthetase (GlnRS) improves the K{sub M} of GlnRS for noncognate glutamate. Two crystal structures of this C229R GlnRS mutant reveal that a conserved twin-arginine GluRS amino acid identity signature cannot be incorporated into GlnRS without disrupting surrounding protein structural elements that interact with the tRNA. Consistent with these findings, we show that cumulative replacement of other primary binding site residues in GlnRS, with those of GluRS, only slightly improves the ability of the GlnRS active site to accommodate glutamate. However, introduction of 22 amino acid replacements and one deletion, including substitution of the entire primary binding site and two surface loops adjacent to the region disrupted in C229R, improves the capacity of Escherichia coli GlnRS to synthesize misacylated Glu-tRNA{sup Gln} by 16,000-fold. This hybrid enzyme recapitulates the function of misacylating GluRS enzymes found in organisms that synthesize Gln-tRNA{sup Gln} by an alternative pathway. These findings implicate the RNA component of the contemporary GlnRS-tRNA{sup Gln} complex in mediating amino acid specificity. This role for tRNA may persist as a relic of primordial cells in which the evolution of the genetic code was driven by RNA-catalyzed amino acid-RNA pairing.

  20. Effects of experimental hypo- and hyperthyroidism on hepatic long-chain fatty acyl-CoA synthetase and hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Dang, A Q; Faas, F H; Carter, W J

    1989-07-01

    The effects of T3 treatment and thyroidectomy on rat liver microsomal long-chain fatty acyl-CoA (LCFA-CoA) synthetase and LCFA-CoA hydrolase activities were determined. Hyperthyroid rats had a 36-42% decrease in LCFA-CoA synthetase with no change in hydrolase activity. This may contribute to the redirection of fatty acids from esterification to oxidation reactions in hyperthyroidism. Thyroidectomized rats had a 40-44% decrease in synthetase and a 27-42% decrease in LCFA-CoA hydrolase activity. The decrease in both LCFA-CoA synthetase and hydrolase activities in hypothyroidism may indicate that the LCFA-CoA turnover in this futile cycle is decreased in the liver.

  1. Cysteinyl-tRNA synthetase: determination of the last E. coli aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase primary structure.

    PubMed Central

    Eriani, G; Dirheimer, G; Gangloff, J

    1991-01-01

    The gene coding for E. coli cysteinyl-tRNA synthetase (cysS) was isolated by complementation of a strain deficient in cysteinyl-tRNA synthetase activity at high temperature (43 degrees C). Sequencing of a 2.1 kbp DNA fragment revealed an open reading frame of 1383 bp coding for a protein of 461 amino acid residues with a Mr of 52,280, a value in close agreement with that observed for the purified protein, which behaves as a monomer. The sequence of CysRS bears the canonical His-Ile- Gly -His (HIGH) and Lys-Met-Ser-Lys-Ser (KMSKS) motifs characteristic of the group of enzymes containing a Rossmann fold; furthermore, it shows striking homologies with MetRS (an homodimer of 677 residues) and to a lesser extent with Ile-, Leu-, and ValRS (monomers of 939, 860, and 951 residues respectively). With its monomeric state and smaller size, CysRS is probably more closely related to the primordial aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase from which all have diverged. Images PMID:2014166

  2. Lysyl-tRNA synthetase from Bacillus stearothermophilus: the Trp314 residue is shielded in a non-polar environment and is responsible for the fluorescence changes observed in the amino acid activation reaction.

    PubMed

    Takita, Teisuke; Nakagoshi, Makoto; Inouye, Kuniyo; Tonomura, Ben'ichiro

    2003-01-24

    Three Trp variants of lysyl-tRNA synthetase from Bacillus stearothermophilus, in which either one or both of the two Trp residues within the enzyme (Trp314 and Trp332) were substituted by a Phe residue, were produced by site-directed mutagenesis without appreciable loss of catalytic activity. The following two phenomena were observed with W332F and with the wild-type enzyme, but not with W314F: (1) the addition of L-lysine alone decreased the protein fluorescence of the enzyme, but the addition of ATP alone did not; (2) the subsequent addition of ATP after the addition of excess L-lysine restored the fluorescence to its original level. Fluorometry under various conditions and UV-absorption spectroscopy revealed that Trp314, which was about 20A away from the lysine binding site and was shielded in a non-polar environment, was solely responsible for the fluorescence changes of the enzyme in the L-lysine activation reaction. Furthermore, the microenvironmental conditions around the residue were made more polar upon the binding of L-lysine, though its contact with the solvent was still restricted. It was suggested that Trp314 was located in a less polar environment than was Trp332, after comparison of the wavelengths at the peaks of fluorescence emission and of the relative fluorescence quantum yields. Trp332 was thought, based on the fluorescence quenching by some perturbants and the chemical modification with N-bromosuccinimide, to be on the surface of the enzyme, whereas Trp314 was buried inside. The UV absorption difference spectra induced by the L-lysine binding indicated that the state of Trp314, including its electrostatic environment, changed during the process, but Trp332 did not change. The increased fluorescence from Trp314 at acidic pH compared with that at neutral pH suggests that carboxylate(s) are in close proximity to the Trp314 residue. PMID:12507472

  3. Effect of glucose deprivation on rat glutamine synthetase in cultured astrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Rosier, F; Lambert, D; Mertens-Strijthagen, M

    1996-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase was purified from the cerebral cortex of adult rats and characterized. Polyclonal rabbit antibodies were raised against the enzyme, purified and their specific anti-(glutamine synthetase) activity determined. A primary astroglial culture was prepared from newborn Sprague-Dawley rats. Astrocytes at different ages of development were incubated in the presence and absence of glucose. In glucose-deprived conditions the specific activity of glutamine synthetase decreased. This decrease was more pronounced in 8-day-old than in 21-day-old cultures. Kinetic analysis demonstrated that the reduction in activity was mainly related to a decrease in Vmax. By immunoprecipitation, it was shown that the number of enzyme molecules in astrocytes was decreased in glucose-deprived conditions. On addition of glucose, a total recovery of glutamine synthetase was obtained after 36 h in 8-day-old culture. Rates of degradation and synthesis were investigated. When compared with an incubation in the presence of glucose, glucose deprivation increased enzyme turnover, as estimated from the first-order disappearance of radioactivity from glutamine synthetase. Synthesis rate was estimated from the incorporation of [35S]methionine during a 2 h incubation period and was decreased in glucose-deprived conditions. Trichloroacetate-precipitable proteins changed only slightly in the experimental conditions, and total protein did not vary significantly during the experimental period. A mathematical model is presented which attempts to integrate degradation and synthesis in our experimental model. PMID:8615836

  4. Preparation of the multienzyme system gramicidin S-synthetase 2 with an aqueous three-phase system.

    PubMed

    Kirchner, A; Simonis, M; von Döhren, H

    1987-06-19

    The distribution of gramicidin S-synthetase activity from disrupted cells suspended in aqueous two- and three-phase systems was investigated. An optimized three-phase system containing 5% dextran, 8% Ficoll, 11% PEG and 6.7% disrupted cells was found to be effective in extracting gramicidin S-synthetase activity. The activity yield achieved was higher in comparison to other preparation methods, and the subsequent purification steps were greatly facilitated. The time needed for the preparation of the labile gramicidin S-synthetase was considerably reduced. The combination of the aqueous phase extraction with chromatographic methods yielded 19 mg gramicidin S-synthetase 2 in essentially pure form from 30 g (wet weight) of cells.

  5. Inhibition of Dihydropteroate Synthetase from Escherichia coli by Sulfones and Sulfonamides

    PubMed Central

    McCullough, Jerry L.; Maren, Thomas H.

    1973-01-01

    The inhibitory action of various diphenylsulfones and sulfonamides on dihydropteroate synthetase partially purified from Escherichia coli was examined. 4,4′-Diaminodiphenylsulfone (DDS; I50 = 2 × 10−5 M) and the monosubstituted derivatives 4-amino-4′-formamidodiphenylsulfone (I50 = 5.8 × 10−5 M) and 4-amino-4′-acetamidodiphenylsulfone (I50 = 5.2 × 10−5 M) were effective inhibitors of dihydropteroate synthetase activity. Disubstitution of the arylamine groups of DDS (4,4′-diformamidodiphenylsulfone and 4,4′-diacetamidodiphenylsulfone) resulted in complete loss of inhibitory activity. Both DDS (KI = 5.9 × 10−6 M) and sulfadiazine (KI = 2.5 × 10−6 M) were found to be competitive inhibitors of dihydropteroate synthetase. These findings are discussed in regard to the Bell and Roblin theory of structure-activity relationships for p-aminobenzoic acid antagonists. PMID:4597736

  6. Allosteric dominance in carbamoyl phosphate synthetase.

    PubMed

    Braxton, B L; Mullins, L S; Raushel, F M; Reinhart, G D

    1999-02-01

    A linked-function analysis of the allosteric responsiveness of carbamoyl phosphate synthetase (CPS) from E. coli was performed by following the ATP synthesis reaction at low carbamoyl phosphate concentration. All three allosteric ligands, ornithine, UMP, and IMP, act by modifying the affinity of CPS for the substrate MgADP. Individually ornithine strongly promotes, and UMP strongly antagonizes, the binding of MgADP. IMP causes only a slight inhibition at 25 degreesC. When both ornithine and UMP were varied, models which presume a mutually exclusive binding relationship between these ligands do not fit the data as well as does one which allows both ligands (and substrate) to bind simultaneously. The same result was obtained with ornithine and IMP. By contrast, the actions of UMP and IMP together must be explained with a competitive model, consistent with previous reports that UMP and IMP bind to the same site. When ornithine is bound to the enzyme, its activation dominates the effects when either UMP or IMP is also bound. The relationship of this observation to the structure of CPS is discussed. PMID:9931004

  7. Mechanism of USP7/HAUSP activation by its C-terminal ubiquitin-like domain and allosteric regulation by GMP-synthetase.

    PubMed

    Faesen, Alex C; Dirac, Annette M G; Shanmugham, Anitha; Ovaa, Huib; Perrakis, Anastassis; Sixma, Titia K

    2011-10-01

    The ubiquitin-specific protease USP7/HAUSP regulates p53 and MDM2 levels, and cellular localization of FOXO4 and PTEN, and hence is critically important for their role in cellular processes. Here we show how the 64 kDa C-terminal region of USP7 can positively regulate deubiquitinating activity. We present the crystal structure of this USP7/HAUSP ubiquitin-like domain (HUBL) comprised of five ubiquitin-like (Ubl) domains organized in 2-1-2 Ubl units. The last di-Ubl unit, HUBL-45, is sufficient to activate USP7, through binding to a "switching" loop in the catalytic domain, which promotes ubiquitin binding and increases activity 100-fold. This activation can be enhanced allosterically by the metabolic enzyme GMPS. It binds to the first three Ubl domains (HUBL-123) and hyperactivates USP7 by stabilization of the HUBL-45-dependent active state. PMID:21981925

  8. Inhibition of Pneumocystis carinii dihydropteroate synthetase by sulfa drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Merali, S; Zhang, Y; Sloan, D; Meshnick, S

    1990-01-01

    A new reversed-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography assay procedure for dihydropteroate synthetase (DHPS) that involves the elution of the enzyme incubation solution with a series of three solvents of decreasing polarity (ammonium phosphate buffer, 10% methanol, and 50% methanol) was designed. By this procedure DHPS was detected in Escherichia coli and Pneumocystis carinii with specific activities of 450 and 14 U/mg, respectively. A comparison of the effects of five sulfa drugs on P. carinii DHPS activity revealed that dapsone is the most potent of these drugs. PMID:2203302

  9. Mammalian long-chain acyl-CoA synthetases.

    PubMed

    Soupene, Eric; Kuypers, Frans A

    2008-05-01

    Acyl-CoA synthetase enzymes are essential for de novo lipid synthesis, fatty acid catabolism, and remodeling of membranes. Activation of fatty acids requires a two-step reaction catalyzed by these enzymes. In the first step, an acyl-AMP intermediate is formed from ATP. AMP is then exchanged with CoA to produce the activated acyl-CoA. The release of AMP in this reaction defines the superfamily of AMP-forming enzymes. The length of the carbon chain of the fatty acid species defines the substrate specificity for the different acyl-CoA synthetases (ACS). On this basis, five sub-families of ACS have been characterized. The purpose of this review is to report on the large family of mammalian long-chain acyl-CoA synthetases (ACSL), which activate fatty acids with chain lengths of 12 to 20 carbon atoms. Five genes and several isoforms generated by alternative splicing have been identified and limited information is available on their localization. The structure of these membrane proteins has not been solved for the mammalian ACSLs but homology to a bacterial form, whose structure has been determined, points at specific structural features that are important for these enzymes across species. The bacterial form acts as a dimer and has a conserved short motif, called the fatty acid Gate domain, that seems to determine substrate specificity. We will discuss the characterization and identification of the different spliced isoforms, draw attention to the inconsistencies and errors in their annotations, and their cellular localizations. These membrane proteins act on membrane-bound substrates probably as homo- and as heterodimer complexes but have often been expressed as single recombinant isoforms, apparently purified as monomers and tested in Triton X-100 micelles. We will argue that such studies have failed to provide an accurate assessment of the activity and of the distinct function of these enzymes in mammalian cells.

  10. Peptides from aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases can cure the defects due to mutations in mt tRNA genes.

    PubMed

    Francisci, Silvia; Montanari, Arianna; De Luca, Cristina; Frontali, Laura

    2011-11-01

    Recent results from several laboratories have confirmed that human and yeast leucyl- and valyl-tRNA synthetases can rescue the respiratory defects due to mutations in mitochondrial tRNA genes. In this report we show that this effect cannot be ascribed to the catalytic activity per se and that isolated domains of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases and even short peptides thereof have suppressing effects.

  11. Acetyl-CoA synthetase is activated as part of the PDH-bypass in the oleaginous green alga Chlorella desiccata

    PubMed Central

    Avidan, Omri; Pick, Uri

    2015-01-01

    In a recent study, it has been shown that biosynthesis of triacylglycerol (TAG) in the oleaginous green alga Chlorella desiccata is preceded by a large increase in acetyl-coenzyme A (Ac-CoA) levels and by upregulation of plastidic pyruvate dehydrogenase (ptPDH). It was proposed that the capacity to accumulate high TAG critically depends on enhanced production of Ac-CoA. In this study, two alternative Ac-CoA producers—plastidic Ac-CoA synthase (ptACS) and ATP citrate lyase (ACL)—are shown to be upregulated prior to TAG accumulation under nitrogen deprivation in the oleaginous species C. desiccata, but not in the moderate TAG accumulators Dunaliella tertiolecta and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Measurements of endogenous acetate production and of radiolabelled acetate incorporation into lipids are consistent with the upregulation of ptACS, but suggest that its contribution to the overall TAG biosynthesis is negligible. Induction of ACS and production of endogenous acetate are correlated with activation of alcohol dehydrogenase, suggesting that the upregulation of ptACS is associated with activation of PDH-bypass in C. desiccata. It is proposed that activation of the PDH-bypass in C. desiccata is needed to enable a high rate of lipid biosynthesis under nitrogen deprivation by controlling the level of pyruvate reaching ptPHD and/or mtPDH. This may be an important parameter for massive TAG accumulation in microalgae. PMID:26357883

  12. Acetyl-CoA synthetase is activated as part of the PDH-bypass in the oleaginous green alga Chlorella desiccata.

    PubMed

    Avidan, Omri; Pick, Uri

    2015-12-01

    In a recent study, it has been shown that biosynthesis of triacylglycerol (TAG) in the oleaginous green alga Chlorella desiccata is preceded by a large increase in acetyl-coenzyme A (Ac-CoA) levels and by upregulation of plastidic pyruvate dehydrogenase (ptPDH). It was proposed that the capacity to accumulate high TAG critically depends on enhanced production of Ac-CoA. In this study, two alternative Ac-CoA producers-plastidic Ac-CoA synthase (ptACS) and ATP citrate lyase (ACL)-are shown to be upregulated prior to TAG accumulation under nitrogen deprivation in the oleaginous species C. desiccata, but not in the moderate TAG accumulators Dunaliella tertiolecta and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Measurements of endogenous acetate production and of radiolabelled acetate incorporation into lipids are consistent with the upregulation of ptACS, but suggest that its contribution to the overall TAG biosynthesis is negligible. Induction of ACS and production of endogenous acetate are correlated with activation of alcohol dehydrogenase, suggesting that the upregulation of ptACS is associated with activation of PDH-bypass in C. desiccata. It is proposed that activation of the PDH-bypass in C. desiccata is needed to enable a high rate of lipid biosynthesis under nitrogen deprivation by controlling the level of pyruvate reaching ptPHD and/or mtPDH. This may be an important parameter for massive TAG accumulation in microalgae.

  13. Properties of Kaurene Synthetase from Marah macrocarpus1

    PubMed Central

    Frost, Russell G.; West, Charles A.

    1977-01-01

    The kaurene synthetase from immature seeds of Marah macrocarpus (Greene) Greene was partially purified from cell-free homogenates of endosperm by a combination of QAE-Sephadex A-25 chromatography and hydroxyapatite chromatography and freed of contaminating phosphatase activity. The two catalytic activities associated with kaurene synthetase, the cyclization of geranylgeranyl-pyrophosphate to copalyl-pyrophosphate (activity A) and the cyclization of copalyl-pyrophosphate to ent-kaurene (activity B), were not even partially resolved from one another during these procedures. Both activities had identical elution profiles from a calibrated Sepharose 4B column corresponding to a molecular weight less than that of ovalbumin (45,000). The A and B activities had pH optima of 7.3 and 6.9, respectively. Both activities required millimolar concentrations of the following divalent cations in the order: Mg2+ > Mn2+ > Co2+. Activities A and B were both sensitive to inhibition by Hg2+, Cu2+, p-hydroxymercuribenzoate, and N-ethylmaleimide, but activity B was much more sensitive than activity A. The average value of Km′ (apparent Km in the absence of substrate inhibition) for geranylgeranyl-pyrophosphate was 1.6 μm. Values of 0.5 and 0.6 μm were obtained for Km′ and Km, respectively, for copalyl-pyrophosphate. The Vm′ values for the two activities were similar: 12 and 9 pmol/minute·μg protein for activities A and B, respectively. N,N-Dimethylaminoethyl-2,2-diphenylpentanoate (SKF-525A) and N,N-dimethylaminoethyl-2,2-diphenylphentyl ether (SKF-3301A), tributyl-2,4-dichlorobenzylphosphonium chloride (Phosfon D), tributyl-2,4-dichlorobenzylammonium chloride (Phosfon S), 2′-isopropyl-4′-(trimethylammonium chloride)-5′-methylphenyl piperidine-1-carboxylate (Amo-1618), 2-(N,N-dimethyl-N-heptylammonium bromide)-p-methan-1-ol (Q-58), and 2-(N,N-dimethyl-N-octylammonium bromide)-p-methan-1-ol (Q-64), at concentrations from 1 to 5 μm, were effective inhibitors of kaurene

  14. Novel subunit-subunit interactions in the structure of glutamine synthetase.

    PubMed

    Almassy, R J; Janson, C A; Hamlin, R; Xuong, N H; Eisenberg, D

    We present an atomic model for glutamine synthetase, an enzyme of central importance in bacterial nitrogen metabolism, from X-ray crystallography. The 12 identical subunits are arranged as the carbon atoms in two face-to-face benzene rings, with unusual subunit contacts. Our model, which places the active sites at the subunit interfaces, suggests a mechanism for the main functional role of glutamine synthetase: how the enzyme regulates the rate of synthesis of glutamine in response to covalent modification and feedback inhibition. PMID:2876389

  15. Characterization of carbamoyl phosphate synthetase of Streptomyces spp.

    PubMed

    Vaishnav, P; Randev, S; Jatiani, S; Aggarwal, S; Keharia, H; Vyas, P R; Nareshkumar, G; Archana, G

    2000-09-01

    Carbamoyl phosphate synthetase (CPS) activity in Streptomyces lividans was repressed (70%) by addition of arginine and uracil in the growth medium. Enzyme activity was also inhibited by UMP and activated by ornithine and IMP. Pattern of inhibition and activation was similar irrespective of whether the cells were grown in medium supplemented with arginine or with uracil. A mutant of S. coelicolor with dual auxotrophy for arginine and uracil possessed only about 20% of CPS activity compared to the wild-type strain. An activity staining protocol has been developed for CPS enzyme. Using this method a single CPS band has been observed in the crude extracts of Escherichia coli as well as in S. lividans. Taken together, our results supported the conclusion that Streptomyces species might possess a single CPS enzyme unlike other gram-positive bacteria, which show the presence of two pathway-specific isozymes (Bacillus) or none (Lactobacillus and Leuconostoc). PMID:12561954

  16. Genetics Home Reference: holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... important for the effective use of biotin, a B vitamin found in foods such as liver, egg yolks, and milk. Holocarboxylase synthetase attaches biotin to certain enzymes that are essential for the normal production and breakdown of proteins, fats, and carbohydrates in ...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: glutathione synthetase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... PubMed Njålsson R. Glutathione synthetase deficiency. Cell Mol Life Sci. 2005 Sep;62(17):1938-45. Review. Citation on PubMed Ristoff E, Larsson A. Inborn errors in the metabolism of glutathione. Orphanet J Rare Dis. 2007 Mar 30;2:16. Review. Citation on PubMed or ...

  18. Crystal structure of glycyl-tRNA synthetase from Thermus thermophilus.

    PubMed Central

    Logan, D T; Mazauric, M H; Kern, D; Moras, D

    1995-01-01

    The sequence and crystal structure at 2.75 A resolution of the homodimeric glycyl-tRNA synthetase from Thermus thermophilus, the first representative of the last unknown class II synthetase subgroup, have been determined. The three class II synthetase sequence motifs are present but the structure was essential for identification of motif 1, which does not possess the proline previously believed to be an essential class II invariant. Nevertheless, crucial contacts with the active site of the other monomer involving motif 1 are conserved and a more comprehensive description of class II now becomes possible. Each monomer consists of an active site strongly resembling that of the aspartyl and seryl enzymes, a C-terminal anticodon recognition domain of 100 residues and a third domain unusually inserted between motifs 1 and 2 almost certainly interacting with the acceptor arm of tRNA(Gly). The C-terminal domain has a novel five-stranded parallel-antiparallel beta-sheet structure with three surrounding helices. The active site residues most probably responsible for substrate recognition, in particular in the Gly binding pocket, can be identified by inference from aspartyl-tRNA synthetase due to the conserved nature of the class II active site. Images PMID:7556056

  19. Mutational analysis of the N-methyltransferase domain of the multifunctional enzyme enniatin synthetase.

    PubMed

    Hacker, C; Glinski, M; Hornbogen, T; Doller, A; Zocher, R

    2000-10-01

    N-Methylcyclopeptides like cyclosporins and enniatins are synthesized by multifunctional enzymes representing hybrid systems of peptide synthetases and S-adenosyl-l-methionine (AdoMet)-dependent N-methyltransferases. The latter constitute a new family of N-methyltransferases sharing high homology within procaryotes and eucaryotes. Here we describe the mutational analysis of the N-methyltransferase domain of enniatin synthetase from Fusarium scirpi to gain insight into the assembly of the AdoMet-binding site. The role of four conserved motifs (I, (2085)VLEIGTGSGMIL; II/Y, (2105)SYVGLDPS; IV, (2152)DLVVFNSVVQYFTPPEYL; and V, (2194)ATNGHFLAARA) in cofactor binding as measured by photolabeling was studied. Deletion of the first 21 N-terminal amino acid residues of the N-methyltransferase domain did not affect AdoMet binding. Further shortening close to motif I resulted in loss of binding activity. Truncation of 38 amino acids from the C terminus and also internal deletions containing motif V led to complete loss of AdoMet-binding activity. Point mutations converting the conserved Tyr(223) (corresponding to position 2106 in enniatin synthetase) in motif II/Y (close to motif I) into Val, Ala, and Ser, respectively, strongly diminished AdoMet binding, whereas conversion of this residue to Phe restored AdoMet-binding activity to approximately 70%, indicating that Tyr(223) is important for AdoMet binding and that the aromatic Tyr(223) may be crucial for AdoMet binding in N-methylpeptide synthetases.

  20. Regulation of the intersubunit ammonia tunnel in Mycobacterium tuberculosis glutamine-dependent NAD[superscript +] synthetase

    SciTech Connect

    Chuenchor, Watchalee; Doukov, Tzanko I.; Resto, Melissa; Chang, Andrew; Gerratana, Barbara

    2012-08-31

    Glutamine-dependent NAD{sup +} synthetase is an essential enzyme and a validated drug target in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (mtuNadE). It catalyses the ATP-dependent formation of NAD{sup +} from NaAD{sup +} (nicotinic acid-adenine dinucleotide) at the synthetase active site and glutamine hydrolysis at the glutaminase active site. An ammonia tunnel 40 {angstrom} (1 {angstrom} = 0.1 nm) long allows transfer of ammonia from one active site to the other. The enzyme displays stringent kinetic synergism; however, its regulatory mechanism is unclear. In the present paper, we report the structures of the inactive glutaminase C176A variant in an apo form and in three synthetase-ligand complexes with substrates (NaAD{sup +}/ATP), substrate analogue {l_brace}NaAD{sup +}/AMP-CPP (adenosine 5'-[{alpha},{beta}-methylene]triphosphate){r_brace} and intermediate analogues (NaAD{sup +}/AMP/PPi), as well as the structure of wild-type mtuNadE in a product complex (NAD{sup +}/AMP/PPi/glutamate). This series of structures provides snapshots of the ammonia tunnel during the catalytic cycle supported also by kinetics and mutagenesis studies. Three major constriction sites are observed in the tunnel: (i) at the entrance near the glutaminase active site; (ii) in the middle of the tunnel; and (iii) at the end near the synthetase active site. Variation in the number and radius of the tunnel constrictions is apparent in the crystal structures and is related to ligand binding at the synthetase domain. These results provide new insight into the regulation of ammonia transport in the intermolecular tunnel of mtuNadE.

  1. Mistranslation and its control by tRNA synthetases

    PubMed Central

    Schimmel, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Aminoacyl tRNA synthetases are ancient proteins that interpret the genetic material in all life forms. They are thought to have appeared during the transition from the RNA world to the theatre of proteins. During translation, they establish the rules of the genetic code, whereby each amino acid is attached to a tRNA that is cognate to the amino acid. Mistranslation occurs when an amino acid is attached to the wrong tRNA and subsequently is misplaced in a nascent protein. Mistranslation can be toxic to bacteria and mammalian cells, and can lead to heritable mutations. The great challenge for nature appears to be serine-for-alanine mistranslation, where even small amounts of this mistranslation cause severe neuropathologies in the mouse. To minimize serine-for-alanine mistranslation, powerful selective pressures developed to prevent mistranslation through a special editing activity imbedded within alanyl-tRNA synthetases (AlaRSs). However, serine-for-alanine mistranslation is so challenging that a separate, genome-encoded fragment of the editing domain of AlaRS is distributed throughout the Tree of Life to redundantly prevent serine-to-alanine mistranslation. Detailed X-ray structural and functional analysis shed light on why serine-for-alanine mistranslation is a universal problem, and on the selective pressures that engendered the appearance of AlaXps at the base of the Tree of Life. PMID:21930589

  2. Mammalian folylpoly-. gamma. -glutamate synthetase. 3. Specificity for folate analogues

    SciTech Connect

    George, S.; Cichowicz, D.J.; Shane, B.

    1987-01-27

    A variety of folate analogues were synthesized to explore the specificity of the folate binding site of hog liver folypolyglutamate synthetase and the requirements for catalysis. Modifications of the internal and terminal glutamate moieties of folate cause large drops in on rates and/or affinity for the protein. The only exceptions are glutamine, homocysteate, and ornithine analogues, indicating a less stringent specificity around the delta-carbon of glutamate. It is proposed that initial folate binding to the enzyme involves low-affinity interactions at a pterin and a glutamate site and that the first glutamate bound is the internal residue adjacent to the benzoyl group. Processive movement of the polyglutamate chain through the glutamate site and a possible conformational change in the protein when the terminal residue is bound would result in tight binding and would position the ..gamma..-carboxyl of the terminal glutamate in the correct position for catalysis. The 4-amino substitution of folate increases the on rate for monoglutamate derivatives but severely impairs catalysis with diglutamate derivatives. Pteroylornithine derivatives are the first potent and specific inhibitors of folylpolyglutamate synthetase to be identified and may act as analogues of reaction intermediates. Other folate derivatives with tetrahedral chemistry replacing the peptide bond, such as pteroyl-..gamma..-glutamyl-(psi,CH/sub 2/-NH)-glutamate, retain affinity for the protein but are considerably less effective inhibitors than the ornithine derivatives. Enzyme activity was assayed using (/sup 14/C)glutamate.

  3. Inhibition of recombinant Pneumocystis carinii dihydropteroate synthetase by sulfa drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Y L; Hossler, P A; Calhoun, D H; Meshnick, S R

    1995-01-01

    Forty-four sulfa drugs were screened against crude preparations of recombinant Pneumocystis carinii dihydropteroate synthetase. The apparent Michaelis-Menten constants (Km) for p-aminobenzoic acid and 7,8-dihydro-6-hydroxymethylpterin pyrophosphate were 0.34 +/- 0.02 and 2.50 +/- 0.71 microM, respectively. Several sulfa drugs, including sulfathiazole, sulfachlorpyridazine, sulfamethoxypyridazine, and sulfathiourea, inhibited dihydropteroate synthetase approximately as well as sulfamethoxazole, as determined by the concentrations which cause 50% inhibition and/or by Ki. For all sulfones and sulfonamides tested, unsubstituted p-amino groups were necessary for activity, and sulfonamides containing an N1-heterocyclic substituent were found to be the most effective inhibitors. Folate biosynthesis in isolated intact P. carinii was approximately equally sensitive to inhibition by sulfamethoxazole, sulfachlorpyridazine, sulfamethoxypyridazine, sulfisoxazole, and sulfathiazole. Two of these drugs, sulfamethoxypyridazine and sulfisoxazole, are known to be less toxic than sulfamethoxazole and should be further evaluated for the treatment of P. carinii pneumonia. PMID:7486915

  4. Asparagine Synthesis in Pea Leaves, and the Occurrence of an Asparagine Synthetase Inhibitor 1

    PubMed Central

    Joy, Kenneth W.; Ireland, Robert J.; Lea, Peter J.

    1983-01-01

    Asparagine is present in the mature leaves of young pea (Pisum sativum cv Little Marvel) seedlings, and is synthesized in detached shoots. This accumulation and synthesis is greatly enhanced by darkening. In detached control shoots, [14C]aspartate was metabolized predominantly to organic acids and, as other workers have shown, there was little labeling of asparagine (after 5 hours, 3.1% of metabolized label). Addition of the aminotransferase inhibitor aminooxyacetate decreased the flow of aspartate carbon to organic acids and enhanced (about 3-fold) the labeling of asparagine. The same treatment applied to darkened shoots resulted in a substantial conversion of [14C]aspartate to asparagine, over 10-fold greater than in control shoots (66% of metabolized label), suggesting that aspartate is the normal precursor of asparagine. Only traces of glutamine-dependent asparagine synthetase activity could be detected in pea leaf or root extracts; activity was not enhanced by sulfhydryl reagents, oxidizing conditions, or protease inhibitors. Asparagine synthetase is readily extracted from lupin cotyledons, but yield was greatly reduced by extraction in the presence of pea leaf tissue; pea leaf homogenates contained an inhibitor which produced over 95% inhibition of an asparagine synthetase preparation from lupin cotyledons. The inhibitor was heat stable, with a low molecular weight. Presence of an inhibitor may prevent detection of asparagine synthetase in pea extracts and in Asparagus, where a cyanide-dependent pathway has been proposed to account for asparagine synthesis: an inhibitor with similar properties was present in Asparagus shoot tissue. PMID:16663168

  5. Identification of pantoate kinase and phosphopantothenate synthetase from Methanospirillum hungatei.

    PubMed

    Katoh, Hiroki; Tamaki, Hideyuki; Tokutake, Yuka; Hanada, Satoshi; Chohnan, Shigeru

    2013-04-01

    Pantothenate synthetase (PanC) and pantothenate kinase which function in the canonical coenzyme A (CoA) biosynthetic pathway cannot be found in most archaea. COG1829 and COG1701 intrinsic to archaea were proposed as the candidate proteins for producing 4'-phosphopantothenate instead, and the COG1701 protein from Methanosarcina mazei was assigned as PanC. Meanwhile, the Thermococcus kodakarensis COG1829 and COG1701 proteins were biochemically identified as novel enzymes, i.e., pantoate kinase (PoK) and phosphopantothenate synthetase (PPS). In this study, the functions of Mhun_0831 (COG1829) and Mhun_0832 (COG1701) from Methanospirillum hungatei were identified, and the recombinant enzymes were partially characterized. Plasmids simultaneously possessing the two genes encoding Mhun_0831 and Mhun_0832 complemented the poor growth of the temperature-sensitive Escherichia coli pantothenate kinase mutant ts9. The recombinant Mhun_0831 and Mhun_0832 expressed in E. coli cells exhibited PoK and PPS activities, respectively, being in accord with the functions of T. kodakarensis proteins. The PoK activity was most active at pH 8.5 and 40°C, and accepted ATP and UTP as a phosphate donor. Although CoA did not affect the PoK activity, the end product considerably accelerated the PPS activity. The homologs of both proteins are widely conserved in most archaeal genomes. Taken together, our findings indicate that archaea can synthesize CoA through the unique pathway involving PoK and PPS, in addition to the canonical one that the order Thermoplasmatales employs.

  6. Bisphosphonic acids as effective inhibitors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis glutamine synthetase.

    PubMed

    Kosikowska, Paulina; Bochno, Marta; Macegoniuk, Katarzyna; Forlani, Giuseppe; Kafarski, Paweł; Berlicki, Łukasz

    2016-12-01

    Inhibition of glutamine synthetase (GS) is one of the most promising strategies for the discovery of novel drugs against tuberculosis. Forty-three bisphosphonic and bis-H-phosphinic acids of various scaffolds, bearing aromatic substituents, were screened against recombinant GS from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Most of the studied compounds exhibited activities in micromolar range, with N-(3,5-dichlorophenyl)-2-aminoethylidenebisphoshonic acid, N-(3,5-difluorophenyl)-2-aminoethylidene-bisphoshonic acid and N-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1-hydroxy-1,1-ethanebisphosphonic acid showing the highest potency with kinetic parameters similar to the reference compound - L-methionine-S-sulfoximine. Moreover, these inhibitors were found to be much more effective against pathogen enzyme than against the human ortholog. Thus, with the bone-targeting properties of the bisphosphonate compounds in mind, this activity/selectivity profile makes these compounds attractive agents for the treatment of bone tuberculosis.

  7. Pseudomonas syringae Phytotoxins: Mode of Action, Regulation, and Biosynthesis by Peptide and Polyketide Synthetases

    PubMed Central

    Bender, Carol L.; Alarcón-Chaidez, Francisco; Gross, Dennis C.

    1999-01-01

    Coronatine, syringomycin, syringopeptin, tabtoxin, and phaseolotoxin are the most intensively studied phytotoxins of Pseudomonas syringae, and each contributes significantly to bacterial virulence in plants. Coronatine functions partly as a mimic of methyl jasmonate, a hormone synthesized by plants undergoing biological stress. Syringomycin and syringopeptin form pores in plasma membranes, a process that leads to electrolyte leakage. Tabtoxin and phaseolotoxin are strongly antimicrobial and function by inhibiting glutamine synthetase and ornithine carbamoyltransferase, respectively. Genetic analysis has revealed the mechanisms responsible for toxin biosynthesis. Coronatine biosynthesis requires the cooperation of polyketide and peptide synthetases for the assembly of the coronafacic and coronamic acid moieties, respectively. Tabtoxin is derived from the lysine biosynthetic pathway, whereas syringomycin, syringopeptin, and phaseolotoxin biosynthesis requires peptide synthetases. Activation of phytotoxin synthesis is controlled by diverse environmental factors including plant signal molecules and temperature. Genes involved in the regulation of phytotoxin synthesis have been located within the coronatine and syringomycin gene clusters; however, additional regulatory genes are required for the synthesis of these and other phytotoxins. Global regulatory genes such as gacS modulate phytotoxin production in certain pathovars, indicating the complexity of the regulatory circuits controlling phytotoxin synthesis. The coronatine and syringomycin gene clusters have been intensively characterized and show potential for constructing modified polyketides and peptides. Genetic reprogramming of peptide and polyketide synthetases has been successful, and portions of the coronatine and syringomycin gene clusters could be valuable resources in developing new antimicrobial agents. PMID:10357851

  8. Role of Jo-1 in the Immunopathogenesis of the Anti-synthetase Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ascherman, Dana P

    2015-09-01

    Histidyl-tRNA synthetase (HRS = Jo-1) represents a key autoantibody target in the anti-synthetase syndrome that is marked by myositis as well as extra-muscular organ complications including interstitial lung disease (ILD). Over the last 25 years, a wealth of clinical, epidemiological, genetic, and experimental data have collectively supported a role for Jo-1 in mediating deleterious cell-mediated, adaptive immune responses contributing to the disease phenotype of the anti-synthetase syndrome. Complementing these studies, more recent work suggests that unique, non-enzymatic functional properties of Jo-1 also endow this antigen with the capacity to activate components of the innate immune system, particularly cell surface as well as endosomal Toll-like receptors and their downstream signaling pathways. Combining these facets of Jo-1-mediated immunity now supports a more integrated model of disease pathogenesis that should lead to improved therapeutic targeting in the anti-synthetase syndrome and related subsets of idiopathic inflammatory myopathy.

  9. Prostaglandin synthetase and prostacyclin synthetase in mature rat skeletal muscles: immunohistochemical localisation to arterioles, tendons and connective tissues.

    PubMed Central

    McLennan, I S; Macdonald, R E

    1991-01-01

    Mature skeletal muscles produce appreciable quantities of prostacyclin (PGI2) and smaller amounts of PGF2 alpha and PGE2, but the sources of these prostaglandins within skeletal muscle are unknown. Monoclonal antibodies to prostaglandin synthetase and prostacyclin synthetase were used to determine which muscle cells produce prostaglandins. The antibody to prostacyclin synthetase stained the tendon, fascia, epimysium and the arteries leading to the muscles. The endothelia of arterioles were also stained in the tibialis anterior and cremaster but not in the soleus muscles. Only trace levels of immunoreactivity were observed with the antibody to prostaglandin synthetase in normal muscles. However, immunoreactivity was observed in the muscles of rats that had been pretreated with aspirin, a drug that inhibits and stabilises prostaglandin synthetase. In muscles of the aspirin-treated rats, all cell types that were stained by the antiprostacyclin synthetase also reacted weakly with the antibody to prostaglandin synthetase. In addition, some cells in the endomysium were strongly stained with the antiprostaglandin synthetase but not with the antiprostacyclin synthetase. We conclude that (1) at least one aspect of the regulation of blood flow in the microcirculation of slow muscles is different from that of fast muscles, (2) that the tendon and connective tissue is the major source of PGI2 in mature skeletal muscles, and (3) that the prostaglandin-dependent effects of insulin and some other stimuli on skeletal muscle may be mediated by the muscle's arterioles or connective tissue. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:1810931

  10. Oncogenic Myc Induces Expression of Glutamine Synthetase through Promoter Demethylation.

    PubMed

    Bott, Alex J; Peng, I-Chen; Fan, Yongjun; Faubert, Brandon; Zhao, Lu; Li, Jinyu; Neidler, Sarah; Sun, Yu; Jaber, Nadia; Krokowski, Dawid; Lu, Wenyun; Pan, Ji-An; Powers, Scott; Rabinowitz, Joshua; Hatzoglou, Maria; Murphy, Daniel J; Jones, Russell; Wu, Song; Girnun, Geoffrey; Zong, Wei-Xing

    2015-12-01

    c-Myc is known to promote glutamine usage by upregulating glutaminase (GLS), which converts glutamine to glutamate that is catabolized in the TCA cycle. Here we report that in a number of human and murine cells and cancers, Myc induces elevated expression of glutamate-ammonia ligase (GLUL), also termed glutamine synthetase (GS), which catalyzes the de novo synthesis of glutamine from glutamate and ammonia. This is through upregulation of a Myc transcriptional target thymine DNA glycosylase (TDG), which promotes active demethylation of the GS promoter and its increased expression. Elevated expression of GS promotes cell survival under glutamine limitation, while silencing of GS decreases cell proliferation and xenograft tumor growth. Upon GS overexpression, increased glutamine enhances nucleotide synthesis and amino acid transport. These results demonstrate an unexpected role of Myc in inducing glutamine synthesis and suggest a molecular connection between DNA demethylation and glutamine metabolism in Myc-driven cancers.

  11. Studies on the control of hexosamine biosynthesis by glucosamine synthetase

    PubMed Central

    Winterburn, P. J.; Phelps, C. F.

    1971-01-01

    1. The nature of the feedback inhibition of hexosamine biosynthesis on rat liver glucosamine synthetase (l-glutamine–d-fructose 6-phosphate aminotransferase, EC 2.6.1.16) by UDP-N-acetylglucosamine was investigated in detail. 2. Further modifiers of physiological importance are described. Glucose 6-phosphate and AMP potentiated the UDP-N-acetylglucosamine inhibition, and UTP behaved as an activator. These three compounds only exerted their action when the feedback inhibitor was bound to the enzyme. 3. ATP also inhibited the enzyme. 4. The actions of these various effectors are discussed in kinetic terms. 5. An interpretation of these findings with reference to the regulation of hexosamine biosynthesis is presented. PMID:5114979

  12. Antitumor/Antifungal Celecoxib Derivative AR-12 is a Non-Nucleoside Inhibitor of the ANL-Family Adenylating Enzyme Acetyl CoA Synthetase

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    AR-12/OSU-03012 is an antitumor celecoxib-derivative that has progressed to Phase I clinical trial as an anticancer agent and has activity against a number of infectious agents including fungi, bacteria and viruses. However, the mechanism of these activities has remained unclear. Based on a chemical-genetic profiling approach in yeast, we have found that AR-12 is an ATP-competitive, time-dependent inhibitor of yeast acetyl coenzyme A synthetase. AR-12-treated fungal cells show phenotypes consistent with the genetic reduction of acetyl CoA synthetase activity, including induction of autophagy, decreased histone acetylation, and loss of cellular integrity. In addition, AR-12 is a weak inhibitor of human acetyl CoA synthetase ACCS2. Acetyl CoA synthetase activity is essential in many fungi and parasites. In contrast, acetyl CoA is primarily synthesized by an alternate enzyme, ATP-citrate lyase, in mammalian cells. Taken together, our results indicate that AR-12 is a non-nucleoside acetyl CoA synthetase inhibitor and that acetyl CoA synthetase may be a feasible antifungal drug target. PMID:27088128

  13. Retinal Vasculitis in Anti-Synthetase Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Christopher P; Pecen, Paula E; Baynes, Kimberly; Ehlers, Justis P; Srivastava, Sunil K

    2016-09-01

    A 31-year-old woman with a history of anti-synthetase syndrome-related myositis and interstitial lung disease presented with acute-onset blurry vision and rash on her hands and feet. Visual acuity was hand motion in her right eye and 20/40 in her left eye. Dilated fundus exam showed extensive retinal vasculitis, diffuse intraretinal hemorrhages, and subretinal fluid. Optical coherence tomography revealed significant macular thickening, and fluorescein angiography revealed vascular leakage with peripheral nonperfusion. Aggressive systemic immunosuppression was initiated, with gradual resolution of her disease during 8 months of follow-up. [Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging Retina. 2016;47:874-879.].

  14. Retinal Vasculitis in Anti-Synthetase Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Christopher P; Pecen, Paula E; Baynes, Kimberly; Ehlers, Justis P; Srivastava, Sunil K

    2016-09-01

    A 31-year-old woman with a history of anti-synthetase syndrome-related myositis and interstitial lung disease presented with acute-onset blurry vision and rash on her hands and feet. Visual acuity was hand motion in her right eye and 20/40 in her left eye. Dilated fundus exam showed extensive retinal vasculitis, diffuse intraretinal hemorrhages, and subretinal fluid. Optical coherence tomography revealed significant macular thickening, and fluorescein angiography revealed vascular leakage with peripheral nonperfusion. Aggressive systemic immunosuppression was initiated, with gradual resolution of her disease during 8 months of follow-up. [Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging Retina. 2016;47:874-879.]. PMID:27631486

  15. Transformation of Bacillus Subtilis with cloned thymidylate synthetases

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, Edward M.

    1980-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis carries two genes, thyA and thyB, each encoding different protein products, with thymidylate synthetase (TSase) activity. Either of these genes alone is sufficient for thymidine independence in B. subtilis. In addition there exist two B. subtilis temperate bacteriophages which upon infection of thymine requiring auxotrophs results in conversion of the organism to thymine independence. Chimeric plasmids selected for Thy/sup +/ transforming activity in E. coli were constructed and then used as a source of defined highly enriched DNA with which to transform competent B. subtilis. These plasmids were studied for their: (1) abiility to transform B. subtilis to thymine independence; (2) site of integration within the B. subtilis chromosome upon transformation; (3) phenotype of Thy/sup +/ plasmid generated transformants; and (4) nucleotide sequence homology among the cloned DNA fragments conferring thymine independence. Plasmids containing the two bacteriophage thy genes displayed the phenotype associated with thyA, whereas the plasmids containing the cloned B. subtilis chromosomal genes displayed the phenotype associated with thyB. Utilizing similar technology, the ability of an entirely foreign hybred bacterial plasmiid to transform B. subtilis was examined. In this case the gene from E. coli encoding thymidylate synthetase was cloned in the plasmid pBR322. The resulting chimeric plasmid was effective in transforming both E. coli and B. subtilis to thymine prototrophy. Uncloned linear E. coli chromosomal DNA was unable to transform thymine requiring strains of B. subtilis to thymine independence. Although the Thy/sup +/ transformants of E. coli contained plasmid DNA, the Thy/sup +/ transformants derived from the transformation of B. subtilis did not contain detectable extrachromosomal DNA. Instead the DNA from the chimeric plasmid was integrated into the chromosome of B. subtilis. (ERB)

  16. Periportal zonation of the cytosolic acetyl-CoA synthetase of male rat liver.

    PubMed

    Knudsen, C T; Immerdal, L; Grunnet, N; Quistorff, B

    1992-02-15

    Several important metabolic functions of the mammalian liver have been shown to be located in zones with respect to the complex microcirculation of the organ. The zonal distribution of the cytosolic component of the acetyl-CoA synthetase activity has been investigated using the dual-digitonin-pulse-perfusion technique, which allows highly zone-selective sampling of cytosol from the periportal and perivenous zone of rat liver. Approximately 80% of the cytosolic enzymes are eluted from the hepatocytes in the periportal and perivenous sub-zones affected by digitonin, while less than 1% of the glutamate dehydrogenase activity (a marker enzyme of the mitochondrial compartment) is eluted. A twofold higher activity of the cytosolic form of acetyl-CoA synthetase is found in the periportal zone compared to the perivenous zone in fed male rats. Following a fasting/refeeding transition, this activity gradient is abolished in a manner similar to that observed for the enzyme acetyl-CoA carboxylase. Since the latter enzyme is utilizing the product of acetyl-CoA synthetase, acetyl-CoA, the similarity in the observed regulation suggests a functional coupling between cytosolic acetate activation and fatty-acid synthesis.

  17. Reassimilation of Photorespiratory Ammonium in Lotus japonicus Plants Deficient in Plastidic Glutamine Synthetase.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Delgado, Carmen M; García-Calderón, Margarita; Márquez, Antonio J; Betti, Marco

    2015-01-01

    It is well established that the plastidic isoform of glutamine synthetase (GS2) is the enzyme in charge of photorespiratory ammonium reassimilation in plants. The metabolic events associated to photorespiratory NH4(+) accumulation were analyzed in a Lotus japonicus photorespiratory mutant lacking GS2. The mutant plants accumulated high levels of NH4(+) when photorespiration was active, followed by a sudden drop in the levels of this compound. In this paper it was examined the possible existence of enzymatic pathways alternative to GS2 that could account for this decline in the photorespiratory ammonium. Induction of genes encoding for cytosolic glutamine synthetase (GS1), glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and asparagine synthetase (ASN) was observed in the mutant in correspondence with the diminishment of NH4(+). Measurements of gene expression, polypeptide levels, enzyme activity and metabolite levels were carried out in leaf samples from WT and mutant plants after different periods of time under active photorespiratory conditions. In the case of asparagine synthetase it was not possible to determine enzyme activity and polypeptide content; however, an increased asparagine content in parallel with the induction of ASN gene expression was detected in the mutant plants. This increase in asparagine levels took place concomitantly with an increase in glutamine due to the induction of cytosolic GS1 in the mutant, thus revealing a major role of cytosolic GS1 in the reassimilation and detoxification of photorespiratory NH4(+) when the plastidic GS2 isoform is lacking. Moreover, a diminishment in glutamate levels was observed, that may be explained by the induction of NAD(H)-dependent GDH activity.

  18. Crystal structure of a human aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase cytokine.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiang-Lei; Skene, Robert J; McRee, Duncan E; Schimmel, Paul

    2002-11-26

    The 20 aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases catalyze the first step of protein synthesis and establish the rules of the genetic code through aminoacylation reactions. Biological fragments of two human enzymes, tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase (TyrRS) and tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase, connect protein synthesis to cell-signaling pathways including angiogenesis. Alternative splicing or proteolysis produces these fragments. The proangiogenic N-terminal fragment mini-TyrRS has IL-8-like cytokine activity that, like other CXC cytokines, depends on a Glu-Leu-Arg motif. Point mutations in this motif abolish cytokine activity. The full-length native TyrRS lacks cytokine activity. No structure has been available for any mammalian tRNA synthetase that, in turn, might give insight into why mini-TyrRS and not TyrRS has cytokine activities. Here, the structure of human mini-TyrRS, which contains both the catalytic and the anticodon recognition domain, is reported to a resolution of 1.18 A. The critical Glu-Leu-Arg motif is located on an internal alpha-helix of the catalytic domain, where the guanidino side chain of R is part of a hydrogen-bonding network tethering the anticodon-recognition domain back to the catalytic site. Whereas the catalytic domains of the human and bacterial enzymes superimpose, the spatial disposition of the anticodon recognition domain relative to the catalytic domain is unique in mini-TyrRS relative to the bacterial orthologs. This unique orientation of the anticodon-recognition domain can explain why the fragment mini-TyrRS, and not full-length native TyrRS, is active in cytokine-signaling pathways. PMID:12427973

  19. Inhibition of human glutamine synthetase by L-methionine-S,R-sulfoximine-relevance to the treatment of neurological diseases.

    PubMed

    Jeitner, Thomas M; Cooper, Arthur J L

    2014-12-01

    At high concentrations, the glutamine synthetase inhibitor L-methionine-S,R-sulfoximine (MSO) is a convulsant, especially in dogs. Nevertheless, sub-convulsive doses of MSO are neuroprotective in rodent models of hyperammonemia, acute liver disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and suggest MSO may be clinically useful. Previous work has also shown that much lower doses of MSO are required to produce convulsions in dogs than in primates. Evidence from the mid-20th century suggests that humans are also less sensitive. In the present work, the inhibition of recombinant human glutamine synthetase by MSO is shown to be biphasic-an initial reversible competitive inhibition (K i 1.19 mM) is followed by rapid irreversible inactivation. This K i value for the human enzyme accounts, in part, for relative insensitivity of primates to MSO and suggests that this inhibitor could be used to safely inhibit glutamine synthetase activity in humans.

  20. Structural basis for the binding of succinate to succinyl-CoA synthetase.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ji; Fraser, Marie E

    2016-08-01

    Succinyl-CoA synthetase catalyzes the only step in the citric acid cycle that provides substrate-level phosphorylation. Although the binding sites for the substrates CoA, phosphate, and the nucleotides ADP and ATP or GDP and GTP have been identified, the binding site for succinate has not. To determine this binding site, pig GTP-specific succinyl-CoA synthetase was crystallized in the presence of succinate, magnesium ions and CoA, and the structure of the complex was determined by X-ray crystallography to 2.2 Å resolution. Succinate binds in the carboxy-terminal domain of the β-subunit. The succinate-binding site is near both the active-site histidine residue that is phosphorylated in the reaction and the free thiol of CoA. The carboxy-terminal domain rearranges when succinate binds, burying this active site. However, succinate is not in position for transfer of the phosphoryl group from phosphohistidine. Here, it is proposed that when the active-site histidine residue has been phosphorylated by GTP, the phosphohistidine displaces phosphate and triggers the movement of the carboxylate of succinate into position to be phosphorylated. The structure shows why succinyl-CoA synthetase is specific for succinate and does not react appreciably with citrate nor with the other C4-dicarboxylic acids of the citric acid cycle, fumarate and oxaloacetate, but shows some activity with L-malate.

  1. Structural basis for the binding of succinate to succinyl-CoA synthetase.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ji; Fraser, Marie E

    2016-08-01

    Succinyl-CoA synthetase catalyzes the only step in the citric acid cycle that provides substrate-level phosphorylation. Although the binding sites for the substrates CoA, phosphate, and the nucleotides ADP and ATP or GDP and GTP have been identified, the binding site for succinate has not. To determine this binding site, pig GTP-specific succinyl-CoA synthetase was crystallized in the presence of succinate, magnesium ions and CoA, and the structure of the complex was determined by X-ray crystallography to 2.2 Å resolution. Succinate binds in the carboxy-terminal domain of the β-subunit. The succinate-binding site is near both the active-site histidine residue that is phosphorylated in the reaction and the free thiol of CoA. The carboxy-terminal domain rearranges when succinate binds, burying this active site. However, succinate is not in position for transfer of the phosphoryl group from phosphohistidine. Here, it is proposed that when the active-site histidine residue has been phosphorylated by GTP, the phosphohistidine displaces phosphate and triggers the movement of the carboxylate of succinate into position to be phosphorylated. The structure shows why succinyl-CoA synthetase is specific for succinate and does not react appreciably with citrate nor with the other C4-dicarboxylic acids of the citric acid cycle, fumarate and oxaloacetate, but shows some activity with L-malate. PMID:27487822

  2. Terminal Synthesis of Xanthommatin in DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER. III. Mutational Pleiotropy and Pigment Granule Association of Phenoxazinone Synthetase

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, John P.; Forrest, Hugh S.; Kulkarni, Anil D.

    1973-01-01

    Phenoxazinone synthetase, which catalyzes the condensation of 3-hydroxykynurenine to xanthommatin, the brown eye pigment of Drosophila, is shown to exist in association with a particle which resembles the cytologically defined Type I pigment granule. Several classical eye color mutants (v, cn, st, ltd, cd, w), including two which effect other enzymes in the xanthommatin pathway (v, cn), have low levels of phenoxazinone synthetase activity and disrupt the normal association of the enzyme with the pigment granule. A model is proposed depicting several structural and enzymatic interrelationships involved in the developmental control of xanthommatin synthesis in Drosophila. PMID:4631600

  3. Regulation of carbamoyl phosphate synthetase by MAP kinase.

    PubMed

    Graves, L M; Guy, H I; Kozlowski, P; Huang, M; Lazarowski, E; Pope, R M; Collins, M A; Dahlstrand, E N; Earp, H S; Evans, D R

    2000-01-20

    The de novo synthesis of pyrimidine nucleotides is required for mammalian cells to proliferate. The rate-limiting step in this pathway is catalysed by carbamoyl phosphate synthetase (CPS II), part of the multifunctional enzyme CAD. Here we describe the regulation of CAD by the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase cascade. When phosphorylated by MAP kinase in vitro or activated by epidermal growth factor in vivo, CAD lost its feedback inhibition (which is dependent on uridine triphosphate) and became more sensitive to activation (which depends upon phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate). Both these allosteric regulatory changes favour biosynthesis of pyrimidines for growth. They were accompanied by increased epidermal growth factor-dependent phosphorylation of CAD in vivo and were prevented by inhibition of MAP kinase. Mutation of a consensus MAP kinase phosphorylation site abolished the changes in CAD allosteric regulation that were stimulated by growth factors. Finally, consistent with an effect of MAP kinase signalling on CPS II activity, epidermal growth factor increased cellular uridine triphosphate and this increase was reversed by inhibition of MAP kinase. Hence these studies may indicate a direct link between activation of the MAP kinase cascade and de novo biosynthesis of pyrimidine nucleotides. PMID:10659854

  4. Molecular definition of bovine argininosuccinate synthetase deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Dennis, J A; Healy, P J; Beaudet, A L; O'Brien, W E

    1989-01-01

    Citrullinemia is an inborn error of metabolism due to deficiency of the urea cycle enzyme, argininosuccinate synthetase [L-citrulline:L-aspartate ligase (AMP-forming), EC 6.3.4.5]. The disease was first described in humans but was recently reported in dairy cattle in Australia. Here we report the nucleotide sequence of the normal bovine cDNA for argininosuccinate synthetase and the mutation present in animals with citrullinemia. Analysis of DNA from affected animals by Southern blotting did not readily identify the mutation in the bovine gene. RNA (Northern) blotting revealed a major reduction in the steady-state amount of mRNA in the liver of affected animals to less than 5% of controls. The bovine cDNA was cloned and sequenced and revealed 96% identity with the deduced human sequence at the amino acid level. Starting with mutant bovine liver, the mRNA was reverse-transcribed; the cDNA product was amplified with the polymerase chain reaction, cloned, and sequenced. The sequence revealed a C----T transition converting arginine-86 (CGA) to a nonsense codon (TGA). A second C----T transition represented a polymorphism in proline-175 (CCC----CCT). The mutation and the polymorphism were confirmed by amplification of genomic DNA and demonstration with restriction endonuclease enzymes of both the loss of an Ava II site in DNA from mutant animals at codon 86 and the presence or absence of a Dde I site at codon 175. The loss of the Ava II site can be used for rapid, economical, nonradioactive detection of heterozygotes for bovine citrullinemia. Images PMID:2813370

  5. Directed evolution of adenylosuccinate synthetase from Bacillus subtilis and its application in metabolic engineering.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoyue; Wang, Guanglu; Li, Xinli; Fu, Jing; Chen, Tao; Wang, Zhiwen; Zhao, Xueming

    2016-08-10

    Adenylosuccinate synthetase (EC. 6.3.4.4) encoded by purA in Bacillus subtilis, catalyzing the first step of the conversion of IMP to AMP, plays an important role in flux distribution in the purine biosynthetic pathway. In this study, we described the use of site saturation mutagenesis to obtain a desired enzyme activity of adenylosuccinate synthetase and its application in flux regulation. Based on sequence alignment and structural modeling, a library of enzyme variants was created by a semi-rational evolution strategy in position Thr238 and Pro242. Other than purA deletion, the leaky mutation purA(P242N) partially reduced the flux towards AMP derived from IMP and increased the riboflavin synthesis precursor GTP, while also kept the requirement of ATP synthesis for cell growth. PurA(P242N) was introduced into an inosine-producing strain and resulted in an approximately 4.66-fold increase in inosine production, from 0.088±0.009g/L to 0.41±0.051g/L, in minimal medium without hypoxanthine accumulation. These results underline that the directed evolution of adenylosuccinate synthetase could tailor its activities and adjust metabolic flux. This mutation may provide a promising application in purine-based product accumulation, like inosine, guanosine and folate which are directly stemming from purine pathway in B. subtilis. PMID:27234879

  6. Beneficial consequences of a selective glutamine synthetase inhibitor in oats and legumes

    SciTech Connect

    Langston-Unkefer, P.J.; Knight, T.J.; Sengupta-Gopalan, C.

    1988-01-01

    We report on the effects of administering a unique glutamine synthetase inhibitor to cereals and N/sub 2/-fixing legumes. A bacterium (Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci) delivers this inhibitor to provide extended treatment periods; we inoculated the root systems of oat and legume plants with pv. tabaci to provide for delivery of this inhibitor to their root or root/nodule systems. Inoculation of legumes is accompanied by increased plant growth, total plant nitrogen, nodulation, and nitrogen fixation activity. Inoculation of the oats is accompanied by either of two results depending upon the genotype of the oat plant. One result is inhibition of plant growth followed by plant death as consequences of the loss of all of the glutamine synthetase activities in the plant and the subsequent accumulation of ammonia and cessation of nitrate uptake. The second and opposite result is observed in a small population of oats screened from a commercial cultivar and includes increased plant growth and leaf protein. The effects of this inhibitor can be beneficial when applied to appropriate plant material. In an attempt to effectively communicate these findings to the reader, we first introduce the inhibitor (a novel amino acid) and its bacterial delivery systems, the target of the inhibitor (glutamine synthetase-catalyzed ammonia assimilation), and the two different nitrogen economics in the legume and cereal plants used experimentally. The physiological, biochemical, and molecular genetic consequences of the inhibitor action in cereals and legumes, as we presently understand them, are then presented. 18 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.,

  7. Versatility of acyl-acyl carrier protein synthetases.

    PubMed

    Beld, Joris; Finzel, Kara; Burkart, Michael D

    2014-10-23

    The acyl carrier protein (ACP) requires posttranslational modification with a 4'-phosphopantetheine arm for activity, and this thiol-terminated modification carries cargo between enzymes in ACP-dependent metabolic pathways. We show that acyl-ACP synthetases (AasSs) from different organisms are able to load even, odd, and unnatural fatty acids onto E. coli ACP in vitro. Vibrio harveyi AasS not only shows promiscuity for the acid substrate, but also is active upon various alternate carrier proteins. AasS activity also extends to functional activation in living organisms. We show that exogenously supplied carboxylic acids are loaded onto ACP and extended by the E. coli fatty acid synthase, including unnatural fatty acid analogs. These analogs are further integrated into cellular lipids. In vitro characterization of four different adenylate-forming enzymes allowed us to disambiguate CoA-ligases and AasSs, and further in vivo studies show the potential for functional application in other organisms. PMID:25308274

  8. p53-Dependent DNA damage response sensitive to editing-defective tRNA synthetase in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Song, Youngzee; Shi, Yi; Carland, Tristan M; Lian, Shanshan; Sasaki, Tomoyuki; Schork, Nicholas J; Head, Steven R; Kishi, Shuji; Schimmel, Paul

    2016-07-26

    Brain and heart pathologies are caused by editing defects of transfer RNA (tRNA) synthetases, which preserve genetic code fidelity by removing incorrect amino acids misattached to tRNAs. To extend understanding of the broader impact of synthetase editing reactions on organismal homeostasis, and based on effects in bacteria ostensibly from small amounts of mistranslation of components of the replication apparatus, we investigated the sensitivity to editing of the vertebrate genome. We show here that in zebrafish embryos, transient overexpression of editing-defective valyl-tRNA synthetase (ValRS(ED)) activated DNA break-responsive H2AX and p53-responsive downstream proteins, such as cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor p21, which promotes cell-cycle arrest at DNA damage checkpoints, and Gadd45 and p53R2, with pivotal roles in DNA repair. In contrast, the response of these proteins to expression of ValRS(ED) was abolished in p53-deficient fish. The p53-activated downstream signaling events correlated with suppression of abnormal morphological changes caused by the editing defect and, in adults, reversed a shortened life span (followed for 2 y). Conversely, with normal editing activities, p53-deficient fish have a normal life span and few morphological changes. Whole-fish deep sequencing showed genomic mutations associated with the editing defect. We suggest that the sensitivity of p53 to expression of an editing-defective tRNA synthetase has a critical role in promoting genome integrity and organismal homeostasis.

  9. Purification and characterization of beef pancreatic asparagine synthetase.

    PubMed

    Luehr, C A; Schuster, S M

    1985-03-01

    Bovine pancreatic asparagine synthetase has been partially purified using ammonium sulfate fractionation, DEAE ion-exchange, Cibacron Blue affinity chromatography, and HPLC anion-exchange chromatography to a specific activity of 170 nmol asparagine produced min-1 mg protein-1, or 1400-fold, from a crude homogenate. Using HPLC size exclusion chromatography, an apparent molecular weight of 110,000-120,000 was determined. An aspartyl-adenylate intermediate was found to occur by demonstrating an 18O transfer from [18O]Asp to AMP that was detected with 31P NMR. A number of divalent metals were found to be able to replace magnesium with retention of activity, but none produced as high an activity as Mg2+, and the stoichiometry of the ATP/Mg2+ ratio was found to be 1. The chloride ion was found to stimulate the glutamine-dependent and glutaminase reactions, but the ammonia-dependent reaction was inhibited. Chloride appeared to be a competitive inhibitor with respect to ammonia and produced negative cooperativity. PMID:2858178

  10. Oxidative inactivation of glutamine synthetase from the cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, G; Haehnel, W; Böger, P

    1997-01-01

    In crude extracts of the cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis, glutamine synthetase (GS) could be effectively inactivated by the addition of NADH. GS inactivation was completed within 30 min. Both the inactivated GS and the active enzyme were isolated. No difference between the two enzyme forms was seen in sodium dodecyl sulfate-gels, and only minor differences were detectable by UV spectra, which excludes modification by a nucleotide. Mass spectrometry revealed that the molecular masses of active and inactive GS are equal. While the Km values of the substrates were unchanged, the Vmax values of the inactive GS were lower, reflecting the inactivation factor in the crude extract. This result indicates that the active site was affected. From the crude extract, a fraction mediating GS inactivation could be enriched by ammonium sulfate precipitation and gel filtration. GS inactivation by this fraction required the presence of NAD(P)H, Fe3+, and oxygen. In the absence of the GS-inactivating fraction, GS could be inactivated by Fe2+ and H2O2. The GS-inactivating fraction produced Fe2+ and H2O2, using NADPH, Fe3+, and oxygen. Accordingly, the inactivating fraction was inhibited by catalase and EDTA. This GS-inactivating system of Anabaena is similar to that described for oxidative GS inactivation in Escherichia coli. We conclude that GS inactivation by NAD(P)H is caused by irreversible oxidative damage and is not due to a regulatory mechanism of nitrogen assimilation. PMID:9006027

  11. Inhibition of Plant Asparagine Synthetase by Monoterpene Cineoles1

    PubMed Central

    Romagni, Joanne G.; Duke, Stephen O.; Dayan, Franck E.

    2000-01-01

    Asparagine (Asn) synthetase (AS) is the key enzyme in Asn biosynthesis and plays an important role in nitrogen mobilization. Despite its important physiological function, little research has been done documenting inhibitors of plant AS. Plant growth inhibition caused by the natural monoterpene 1,4-cineole and its structurally related herbicide cinmethylin was reversed 65% and 55%, respectively, by providing 100 μm Asn exogenously. Reversion of the phytotoxic effect was dependent on the concentration of Asn. The presence of either 1,4-cineole or cinmethylin stimulated root uptake of [14C]Asn by lettuce (Lactuca sativa) seedlings. Although the physiological responses suggested that both compounds affected Asn biosynthesis, biochemical analysis of AS activity showed that the natural monoterpene was a potent inhibitor (I50 = approximately 0.5 μm) of the enzyme, whereas the commercial product was not inhibitory up to levels of 10 mm. Analysis of the putative metabolite, 2-hydroxy-1,4-cineole, showed that the cis-enantiomer was much more active than the trans-enantiomer, suggesting that the hydroxyl group was involved in the specific ligand/active site interaction. This is the first report that AS is a suitable herbicide target site, and that cinmethylin is apparently a proherbicide that requires metabolic bioactivation via cleavage of the benzyl-ether side chain. PMID:10859202

  12. Glutamine synthetase gene expression during the regeneration of the annelid Enchytraeus japonensis.

    PubMed

    Niva, Cintia Carla; Lee, Jae Min; Myohara, Maroko

    2008-01-01

    Enchytraeus japonensis is a highly regenerative oligochaete annelid that can regenerate a complete individual from a small body fragment in 4-5 days. In our previous study, we performed complementary deoxyribonucleic acid subtraction cloning to isolate genes that are upregulated during E. japonensis regeneration and identified glutamine synthetase (gs) as one of the most abundantly expressed genes during this process. In the present study, we show that the full-length sequence of E. japonensis glutamine synthetase (EjGS), which is the first reported annelid glutamine synthetase, is highly similar to other known class II glutamine synthetases. EjGS shows a 61-71% overall amino acid sequence identity with its counterparts in various other animal species, including Drosophila and mouse. We performed detailed expression analysis by in situ hybridization and reveal that strong gs expression occurs in the blastemal regions of regenerating E. japonensis soon after amputation. gs expression was detectable at the cell layer covering the wound and was found to persist in the epidermal cells during the formation and elongation of the blastema. Furthermore, in the elongated blastema, gs expression was detectable also in the presumptive regions of the brain, ventral nerve cord, and stomodeum. In the fully formed intact head, gs expression was also evident in the prostomium, brain, the anterior end of the ventral nerve cord, the epithelium of buccal and pharyngeal cavities, the pharyngeal pad, and in the esophageal appendages. In intact E. japonensis tails, gs expression was found in the growth zone in actively growing worms but not in full-grown individuals. In the nonblastemal regions of regenerating fragments and in intact worms, gs expression was also detected in the nephridia, chloragocytes, gut epithelium, epidermis, spermatids, and oocytes. These results suggest that EjGS may play roles in regeneration, nerve function, cell proliferation, nitrogenous waste excretion

  13. Differential inactivation of alfalfa nodule glutamine synthetases by tabtoxinine-. beta. -lactam. [Pseudomonas syringae

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, T.J.; Unkefer, P.J.

    1987-04-01

    The presence of the pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci within the rhizosphere of nodulated alfalfa plants results in an increase in N/sub 2/-fixation potential and growth, but a 40-50% decrease in nodule glutamine synthetase (GS) activity, as compared to nodulated control plants. Tabtoxinine-..beta..-Lactam an exocellular toxin produced by Pseudomonas syringae pv tabaci irreversibly inhibits glutamine synthetase. Partial purification of nodule GS by DEAE-cellulose chromatography reveals two enzyme forms are present (GS/sub n1/ and GS/sub n2/). In vitro inactivation of the two glutamine synthetases associated with the nodule indicates a differential sensitivity to T-..beta..-L. The nodule specific GS/sub n1/ is much less sensitive to T-..beta..-L than the GS/sub n2/ enzyme, which was found to coelute with the root enzyme (GS/sub r/). However, both GS/sub n1/ and GS/sub n2/ are rapidly inactivated by methionine sulfoximine, another irreversible inhibitor of GS.

  14. Examination of the mechanism of sucrose synthetase by positional isotope exchange.

    PubMed

    Singh, A N; Hester, L S; Raushel, F M

    1987-02-25

    The mechanism of the sucrose synthetase reaction has been probed by the technique of positional isotope exchange. [beta-18O2, alpha beta-18O]UDP-Glc has been synthesized starting from oxygen-18-labeled phosphate and the combined activities of carbamate kinase, hexokinase, phosphoglucomutase, and uridine diphosphoglucose pyrophosphorylase. The oxygen-18 at the alpha beta-bridge position of the labeled UDP-Glc has been shown to cause a 0.014 ppm upfield chemical shift in the 31P NMR spectrum of both the alpha- and beta-phosphorus atoms in UDP-Glc relative to the unlabeled compound. The chemical shift induced by each of the beta-nonbridge oxygen-18 atoms was 0.030 ppm. Incubation of [beta-18O2, alpha beta-18O]UDP-Glc with sucrose synthetase in the presence and absence of 2,5-anhydromannitol did not result in any significant exchange of an oxygen-18 from the beta-nonbridge position to the anomeric oxygen of the glucose moiety. It can thus be concluded that either sucrose synthetase does not catalyze the cleavage of the scissile carbon-oxygen bond of UDP-Glc in the absence of fructose or, alternatively, the beta-phosphoryl group of the newly formed UDP is rotationally immobilized. PMID:2950088

  15. Examination of the mechanism of sucrose synthetase by positional isotope exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, A.N.; Hester, L.S.; Raushel, F.M.

    1987-02-25

    The mechanism of the sucrose synthetase reaction has been probed by the technique of positional isotope exchange. (beta-/sup 18/O/sub 2/, alpha beta-/sup 18/O)UDP-Glc has been synthesized starting from oxygen-18-labeled phosphate and the combined activities of carbamate kinase, hexokinase, phosphoglucomutase, and uridine diphosphoglucose pyrophosphorylase. The oxygen-18 at the alpha beta-bridge position of the labeled UDP-Glc has been shown to cause a 0.014 ppm upfield chemical shift in the 31P NMR spectrum of both the alpha- and beta-phosphorus atoms in UDP-Glc relative to the unlabeled compound. The chemical shift induced by each of the beta-nonbridge oxygen-18 atoms was 0.030 ppm. Incubation of (beta-/sup 18/O/sub 2/, alpha beta-/sup 18/O)UDP-Glc with sucrose synthetase in the presence and absence of 2,5-anhydromannitol did not result in any significant exchange of an oxygen-18 from the beta-nonbridge position to the anomeric oxygen of the glucose moiety. It can thus be concluded that either sucrose synthetase does not catalyze the cleavage of the scissile carbon-oxygen bond of UDP-Glc in the absence of fructose or, alternatively, the beta-phosphoryl group of the newly formed UDP is rotationally immobilized.

  16. Brucella melitensis Methionyl-tRNA-Synthetase (MetRS), a Potential Drug Target for Brucellosis

    PubMed Central

    Ranade, Ranae M.; Zhang, Zhongsheng; Dranow, David M.; Myers, Janette B.; Choi, Ryan; Nakazawa Hewitt, Steve; Edwards, Thomas E.; Davies, Douglas R.; Lorimer, Donald; Boyle, Stephen M.; Barrett, Lynn K.; Buckner, Frederick S.; Fan, Erkang; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.

    2016-01-01

    We investigated Brucella melitensis methionyl-tRNA-synthetase (BmMetRS) with molecular, structural and phenotypic methods to learn if BmMetRS is a promising target for brucellosis drug development. Recombinant BmMetRS was expressed, purified from wild type Brucella melitensis biovar Abortus 2308 strain ATCC/CRP #DD-156 and screened by a thermal melt assay against a focused library of one hundred previously classified methionyl-tRNA-synthetase inhibitors of the blood stage form of Trypanosoma brucei. Three compounds showed appreciable shift of denaturation temperature and were selected for further studies on inhibition of the recombinant enzyme activity and cell viability against wild type B. melitensis strain 16M. BmMetRS protein complexed with these three inhibitors resolved into three-dimensional crystal structures and was analyzed. All three selected methionyl-tRNA-synthetase compounds inhibit recombinant BmMetRS enzymatic functions in an aminoacylation assay at varying concentrations. Furthermore, growth inhibition of B. melitensis strain 16M by the compounds was shown. Inhibitor-BmMetRS crystal structure models were used to illustrate the molecular basis of the enzyme inhibition. Our current data suggests that BmMetRS is a promising target for brucellosis drug development. However, further studies are needed to optimize lead compound potency, efficacy and safety as well as determine the pharmacokinetics, optimal dosage, and duration for effective treatment. PMID:27500735

  17. Substrate Specificity of the Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase PvdD from Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Ackerley, David F.; Caradoc-Davies, Tom T.; Lamont, Iain L.

    2003-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 secretes a siderophore, pyoverdinePAO, which contains a short peptide attached to a dihydroxyquinoline moiety. Synthesis of this peptide is thought to be catalyzed by nonribosomal peptide synthetases, one of which is encoded by the pvdD gene. The first module of pvdD was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and the protein product was purified. l-Threonine, one of the amino acid residues in pyoverdinePAO, was an effective substrate for the recombinant protein in ATP-PPi exchange assays, showing that PvdD has peptide synthetase activity. Other amino acids, including d-threonine, l-serine, and l-allo-threonine, were not effective substrates, indicating that PvdD has a high degree of substrate specificity. A three-dimensional modeling approach enabled us to identify amino acids that are likely to be critical in determining the substrate specificity of PvdD and to explore the likely basis of the high substrate selectivity. The approach described here may be useful for analysis of other peptide synthetases. PMID:12700264

  18. Brucella melitensis Methionyl-tRNA-Synthetase (MetRS), a Potential Drug Target for Brucellosis.

    PubMed

    Ojo, Kayode K; Ranade, Ranae M; Zhang, Zhongsheng; Dranow, David M; Myers, Janette B; Choi, Ryan; Nakazawa Hewitt, Steve; Edwards, Thomas E; Davies, Douglas R; Lorimer, Donald; Boyle, Stephen M; Barrett, Lynn K; Buckner, Frederick S; Fan, Erkang; Van Voorhis, Wesley C

    2016-01-01

    We investigated Brucella melitensis methionyl-tRNA-synthetase (BmMetRS) with molecular, structural and phenotypic methods to learn if BmMetRS is a promising target for brucellosis drug development. Recombinant BmMetRS was expressed, purified from wild type Brucella melitensis biovar Abortus 2308 strain ATCC/CRP #DD-156 and screened by a thermal melt assay against a focused library of one hundred previously classified methionyl-tRNA-synthetase inhibitors of the blood stage form of Trypanosoma brucei. Three compounds showed appreciable shift of denaturation temperature and were selected for further studies on inhibition of the recombinant enzyme activity and cell viability against wild type B. melitensis strain 16M. BmMetRS protein complexed with these three inhibitors resolved into three-dimensional crystal structures and was analyzed. All three selected methionyl-tRNA-synthetase compounds inhibit recombinant BmMetRS enzymatic functions in an aminoacylation assay at varying concentrations. Furthermore, growth inhibition of B. melitensis strain 16M by the compounds was shown. Inhibitor-BmMetRS crystal structure models were used to illustrate the molecular basis of the enzyme inhibition. Our current data suggests that BmMetRS is a promising target for brucellosis drug development. However, further studies are needed to optimize lead compound potency, efficacy and safety as well as determine the pharmacokinetics, optimal dosage, and duration for effective treatment. PMID:27500735

  19. Alternative splicing creates two new architectures for human tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zhiyi; Xu, Zhiwen; Liu, Xiaotian; Lo, Wing-Sze; Ye, Fei; Lau, Ching-Fun; Wang, Feng; Zhou, Jie J; Nangle, Leslie A; Yang, Xiang-Lei; Zhang, Mingjie; Schimmel, Paul

    2016-02-18

    Many human tRNA synthetases evolved alternative functions outside of protein synthesis. These functions are associated with over 200 splice variants (SVs), most of which are catalytic nulls that engender new biology. While known to regulate non-translational activities, little is known about structures resulting from natural internal ablations of any protein. Here, we report analysis of two closely related, internally deleted, SVs of homodimeric human tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase (TyrRS). In spite of both variants ablating a portion of the catalytic core and dimer-interface contacts of native TyrRS, each folded into a distinct stable structure. Biochemical and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis showed that the internal deletion of TyrRSΔE2-4 SV gave an alternative, neomorphic dimer interface 'orthogonal' to that of native TyrRS. In contrast, the internal C-terminal splice site of TyrRSΔE2-3 prevented either dimerization interface from forming, and yielded a predominantly monomeric protein. Unlike ubiquitous TyrRS, the neomorphs showed clear tissue preferences, which were distinct from each other. The results demonstrate a sophisticated structural plasticity of a human tRNA synthetase for architectural reorganizations that are preferentially elicited in specific tissues. PMID:26773056

  20. Identification of the reactive cysteinyl residue and ATP binding site in Bacillus cereus glutamine synthetase by chemical modification.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Y; Itoh, M; Tanaka, E; Kimura, K

    1990-02-01

    Bacillus cereus glutamine synthetase was modified by reaction with a fluorescent SH reagent, N-[[(iodoacetyl)amino]ethyl]-5-naphthylamine-1-sulfonic acid (IAEDANS), or an ATP analog, 5'-p-fluorosulfonylbenzoyladenosine (FSBA). The locations of the specific binding sites of these reagents were identified. IAEDANS inactivated Mg2(+)-dependent activity and activated Mn2(+)-dependent activity. FSBA inactivated only Mn2(+)-dependent activity. Mg2+ plus Mn2(+)-dependent activity was inactivated by IAEDANS or FSBA. Amino acid sequence analysis of the single AEDANS-labeled proteolytic fragment showed the cysteinyl residue at position 306 to be the site of modification. Cys 306 is one of three cysteines that are unique to Bacillus glutamine synthetase. The result suggested that the cysteine has a role in the active site of the enzyme. We also report that the amino acid residue modified by FSBA was the lysyl residue at position 43.

  1. The prokaryotic FAD synthetase family: a potential drug target.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Ana; Ferreira, Patricia; Martínez-Júlvez, Marta; Medina, Milagros

    2013-01-01

    Disruption of cellular production of the flavin cofactors, flavin adenine mononucleotide (FMN) and flavin adenine dinucleotide(FAD) will prevent the assembly of a large number of flavoproteins and flavoenzymes involved in key metabolic processes in all types of organisms. The enzymes responsible for FMN and FAD production in prokaryotes and eukaryotes exhibit various structural characteristics to catalyze the same chemistry, a fact that converts the prokaryotic FAD synthetase (FADS) in a potential drug target for the development of inhibitors endowed with anti-pathogenic activity. The first step before searching for selective inhibitors of FADS is to understand the structural and functional mechanisms for the riboflavin kinase and FMN adenylyltransferase activities of the prokaryotic enzyme, and particularly to identify their differential functional characteristics with regard to the enzymes performing similar functions in other organisms, particularly humans. In this paper, an overview of the current knowledge of the structure-function relationships in prokaryotic FADS has been presented, as well as of the state of the art in the use of these enzymes as drug targets.

  2. Chitin synthetase in encysting Giardia lamblia and Entamoeba invadens

    SciTech Connect

    Das, S.; Gillin, F.D.

    1987-05-01

    Giardia lamblia (Gl) and Entamoeba invadens (Ei) are protozoan parasites with two morphologic stages in their life cycles. Motile trophozoites colonize the intestine of humans and reptiles respectively. Water resistant cysts, which can survive outside the host, transmit infection. In vitro cyst formation of Ei from trophozoites has been reported, and the authors have recently induced in vitro encystation of Gl. Although the cyst walls of both parasites contain chitin, it synthesis by encysting trophozoites has not been reported. The authors now show that encystation conditions greatly increase chitin synthetase (CS) specific activity (incorporation of /sup 3/H GlcNAc from UDP-GlcNAc into TCA-or alcohol-precipitable material). Extracts of encysting Gl incorporated 3.6 nmol/mg protein in 5 hr compared to < 0.005 in controls. Extracts of encysting Fi incorporated 4.8 n mol/mg protein, compared to 1.7 in the control. CS activity of both parasites requires preformed chitin. The Gl enzyme requires a reducing agent, is inhibited by digitonin and the CS inhibitors, polyoxin D and Nikkomycin, but not by tunicamycin. The product is digested by chitinase. Ei enzyme does not require a reducing agent and is stimulated by 1 mg/ml digitonin, but inhibited by higher concentrations. These studies demonstrate CS enzymes which may play important roles in encystation of Gl and Ei.

  3. Aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetases in the Bacterial World.

    PubMed

    Giegé, Richard; Springer, Mathias

    2016-05-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) are modular enzymes globally conserved in the three kingdoms of life. All catalyze the same two-step reaction, i.e., the attachment of a proteinogenic amino acid on their cognate tRNAs, thereby mediating the correct expression of the genetic code. In addition, some aaRSs acquired other functions beyond this key role in translation. Genomics and X-ray crystallography have revealed great structural diversity in aaRSs (e.g., in oligomery and modularity, in ranking into two distinct groups each subdivided in 3 subgroups, by additional domains appended on the catalytic modules). AaRSs show huge structural plasticity related to function and limited idiosyncrasies that are kingdom or even species specific (e.g., the presence in many Bacteria of non discriminating aaRSs compensating for the absence of one or two specific aaRSs, notably AsnRS and/or GlnRS). Diversity, as well, occurs in the mechanisms of aaRS gene regulation that are not conserved in evolution, notably between distant groups such as Gram-positive and Gram-negative Bacteria. The review focuses on bacterial aaRSs (and their paralogs) and covers their structure, function, regulation, and evolution. Structure/function relationships are emphasized, notably the enzymology of tRNA aminoacylation and the editing mechanisms for correction of activation and charging errors. The huge amount of genomic and structural data that accumulated in last two decades is reviewed, showing how the field moved from essentially reductionist biology towards more global and integrated approaches. Likewise, the alternative functions of aaRSs and those of aaRS paralogs (e.g., during cell wall biogenesis and other metabolic processes in or outside protein synthesis) are reviewed. Since aaRS phylogenies present promiscuous bacterial, archaeal, and eukaryal features, similarities and differences in the properties of aaRSs from the three kingdoms of life are pinpointed throughout the review and

  4. Glutamine Synthetase of Nicotiana plumbaginifolia1

    PubMed Central

    Tingey, Scott V.; Coruzzi, Gloria M.

    1987-01-01

    We have characterized the distinct forms of glutamine synthetase (GS) which are present in leaves and roots of Nicotiana plumbaginifolia. Mature leaves contain a single GS polypeptide (44 kilodaltons in size) which is localized to the stroma of intact chloroplasts. In contrast, the GS polypeptide in roots is distinct in size (38 kilodaltons) and charge. A lectin stain of leaf soluble protein indicates that the size difference of these mature GS polypeptides is not the result of posttranslational glycosylation. cDNA clones encoding a GS mRNA of N. plumbaginifolia were characterized and used as molecular probes to examine GS transcripts in leaves and roots. GS mRNA hybrid-selected from leaves or roots translated in vitro into distinct GS primary translation products (49 or 38 kilodaltons). The 49 kilodalton GS primary translation product, specific to leaf poly(A)RNA is proposed to be a precursor to the mature 44 kilodalton chloroplast stromal GS polypeptide. The 38 kilodalton GS primary translation product encoded by root GS mRNA, corresponds in size to the polypeptide encoded by the GS cDNA clones characterized. Southern blot analysis of nuclear DNA indicates that there are several different genomic fragments encoding GS in N. plumbaginifolia. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 PMID:16665445

  5. Modulation of 2{prime}-5{prime} oligoadenylate synthetase by environmental stress in the marine sponge Geodia cydonium

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, H.C.; Wiens, M.; Mueller, W.E.G.; Kuusksalu, A.; Kelve, M.

    1997-07-01

    Recently the authors established the presence of relatively high amounts of 2{prime}-5{prime} oligoadenylates (2{prime}-5{prime} A) and 2{prime}-5{prime} oligoadenylate synthetase (2{prime}-5{prime} A synthetase) in the marine sponge Geodia cydonium. Here they determined by applying radioimmunoassay and high-performance liquid chromatographical methods that the concentration of 2{prime}-5{prime} A synthetase change following exposure of G. cydonium tissue to environmental stress. The 2{prime}-5{prime} A content and the activity of 2{prime}-5{prime} A synthetase, present in crude sponge extract, increase by up to three-fold after treating sponge cubes for 2 h with natural stressors including heat shock (26 C), cold shock (6 C), pH shock (pH 6), and hypertonic shock and subsequent incubation for 18 h under ambient conditions (16 C). No response was observed after exposure of sponges to an alkaline (pH 10) or hypotonic environment. Similar changes have been found for the expression of heat shock protein HSP70 in G. cydonium. These results show that 2{prime}-5{prime} A in sponges may be useful as a novel biomarker for environmental monitoring.

  6. The proofreading of hydroxy analogues of leucine and isoleucine by leucyl-tRNA synthetases from E. coli and yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Englisch, S; Englisch, U; von der Haar, F; Cramer, F

    1986-01-01

    Three analogues each of leucine and isoleucine carrying hydroxy groups in gamma- or delta- or gamma- and delta-position have been synthesized, and tested in the aminoacylation by leucyl-tRNA synthetases from E. coli and yeast. Hydrolytic proofreading, as proposed in the chemical proofreading model, of these analogues and of homocysteine should result in a lactonisation of these compounds and therefore provide information regarding the proofreading mechanism of the two leucyl-tRNA synthetases. Leucyl-tRNA synthetase from E. coli shows a high initial substrate discrimination. Only two analogues, gamma-hydroxyleucine and homocysteine are activated and transferred to tRNALeu where a post-transfer proofreading occurs. Lactonisation of gamma-hydroxyleucine and homocysteine could be detected. Leucyl-tRNA synthetase from yeast has a relatively poor initial discrimination of these substrates, which is compensated by a very effective pre-transfer proofreading on the aminoacyl-adenylate level. No lactonisation nor mischarged tRNALeu is detectable. Images PMID:3534789

  7. Uneven spread of cis- and trans-editing aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase domains within translational compartments of P. falciparum.

    PubMed

    Khan, Sameena; Sharma, Arvind; Jamwal, Abhishek; Sharma, Vinay; Pole, Anil Kumar; Thakur, Kamal Kishor; Sharma, Amit

    2011-01-01

    Accuracy of aminoacylation is dependent on maintaining fidelity during attachment of amino acids to cognate tRNAs. Cis- and trans-editing protein factors impose quality control during protein translation, and 8 of 36 Plasmodium falciparum aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase (aaRS) assemblies contain canonical putative editing modules. Based on expression and localization profiles of these 8 aaRSs, we propose an asymmetric distribution between the parasite cytoplasm and its apicoplast of putative editing-domain containing aaRSs. We also show that the single copy alanyl- and threonyl-tRNA synthetases are dually targeted to parasite cytoplasm and apicoplast. This bipolar presence of two unique synthetases presents opportunity for inhibitor targeting their aminoacylation and editing activities in twin parasite compartments. We used this approach to identify specific inhibitors against the alanyl- and threonyl-tRNA synthetases. Further development of such inhibitors may lead to anti-parasitics which simultaneously block protein translation in two key parasite organelles, a strategy of wider applicability for pathogen control.

  8. Structural modeling of tissue-specific mitochondrial alanyl-tRNA synthetase (AARS2) defects predicts differential effects on aminoacylation

    PubMed Central

    Euro, Liliya; Konovalova, Svetlana; Asin-Cayuela, Jorge; Tulinius, Már; Griffin, Helen; Horvath, Rita; Taylor, Robert W.; Chinnery, Patrick F.; Schara, Ulrike; Thorburn, David R.; Suomalainen, Anu; Chihade, Joseph; Tyynismaa, Henna

    2015-01-01

    The accuracy of mitochondrial protein synthesis is dependent on the coordinated action of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (mtARSs) and the mitochondrial DNA-encoded tRNAs. The recent advances in whole-exome sequencing have revealed the importance of the mtARS proteins for mitochondrial pathophysiology since nearly every nuclear gene for mtARS (out of 19) is now recognized as a disease gene for mitochondrial disease. Typically, defects in each mtARS have been identified in one tissue-specific disease, most commonly affecting the brain, or in one syndrome. However, mutations in the AARS2 gene for mitochondrial alanyl-tRNA synthetase (mtAlaRS) have been reported both in patients with infantile-onset cardiomyopathy and in patients with childhood to adulthood-onset leukoencephalopathy. We present here an investigation of the effects of the described mutations on the structure of the synthetase, in an effort to understand the tissue-specific outcomes of the different mutations. The mtAlaRS differs from the other mtARSs because in addition to the aminoacylation domain, it has a conserved editing domain for deacylating tRNAs that have been mischarged with incorrect amino acids. We show that the cardiomyopathy phenotype results from a single allele, causing an amino acid change R592W in the editing domain of AARS2, whereas the leukodystrophy mutations are located in other domains of the synthetase. Nevertheless, our structural analysis predicts that all mutations reduce the aminoacylation activity of the synthetase, because all mtAlaRS domains contribute to tRNA binding for aminoacylation. According to our model, the cardiomyopathy mutations severely compromise aminoacylation whereas partial activity is retained by the mutation combinations found in the leukodystrophy patients. These predictions provide a hypothesis for the molecular basis of the distinct tissue-specific phenotypic outcomes. PMID:25705216

  9. Dihydrofolate synthetase and folylpolyglutamate synthetase: direct evidence for intervention of acyl phosphate intermediates

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, R.V.; Shane, B.; McGuire, J.J.; Coward, J.K.

    1988-12-13

    The transfer of /sup 17/O and/or /sup 18/O from (COOH-/sup 17/O or -/sup 18/O) enriched substrates to inorganic phosphate (P/sub i/) has been demonstrated for two enzyme-catalyzed reactions involved in folate biosynthesis and glutamylation. COOH-/sup 18/O-labeled folate, methotrexate, and dihydropteroate, in addition to (/sup 17/O)-glutamate, were synthesized and used as substrates for folylpolyglutamate synthetase (FPGS) isolated from Escherichia coli, hog liver, and rat liver and for dihydrofolate synthetase (DHFS) isolated from E. coli. P/sub i/ was purified from the reaction mixtures and converted to trimethyl phosphate (TMP), which was then analyzed for /sup 17/O and /sup 18/O enrichment by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and/or mass spectroscopy. In the reactions catalyzed by the E. coli enzymes, both NMR and quantitative mass spectral analyses established that transfer of the oxygen isotope from the substrate /sup 18/O-enriched carboxyl group to P/sub i/ occurred, thereby providing strong evidence for an acyl phosphate intermediate in both the FPGS- and DHFS-catalyzed reactions. Similar oxygen-transfer experiments were carried out by use of two mammalian enzymes. The small amounts of P/sub i/ obtained from reactions catalyzed by these less abundant FPGS proteins precluded the use of NMR techniques. However, mass spectral analysis of the TMP derived from the mammalian FPGS-catalyzed reactions showed clearly that /sup 18/O transfer had occurred.

  10. The aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jiongming; Marygold, Steven J; Gharib, Walid H; Suter, Beat

    2015-01-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) ligate amino acids to their cognate tRNAs, allowing them to decode the triplet code during translation. Through different mechanisms aaRSs also perform several non-canonical functions in transcription, translation, apoptosis, angiogenesis and inflammation. Drosophila has become a preferred system to model human diseases caused by mutations in aaRS genes, to dissect effects of reduced translation or non-canonical activities, and to study aminoacylation and translational fidelity. However, the lack of a systematic annotation of this gene family has hampered such studies. Here, we report the identification of the entire set of aaRS genes in the fly genome and we predict their roles based on experimental evidence and/or orthology. Further, we propose a new, systematic and logical nomenclature for aaRSs. We also review the research conducted on Drosophila aaRSs to date. Together, our work provides the foundation for further research in the fly aaRS field. PMID:26761199

  11. Carbamoyl phosphate synthetase: a crooked path from substrates to products.

    PubMed

    Raushel, F M; Thoden, J B; Reinhart, G D; Holden, H M

    1998-10-01

    The formation of carbamoyl phosphate is catalyzed by a single enzyme using glutamine, bicarbonate and two molecules of ATP via a reaction mechanism that requires a minimum of four consecutive reactions and three unstable intermediates. The recently determined X-ray crystal structure of carbamoyl phosphate synthetase has revealed the location of three separate active sites connected by two molecular tunnels that run through the interior of the protein. It has been demonstrated that the amidotransferase domain within the small subunit of the enzyme from Escherichia coli hydrolyzes glutamine to ammonia via a thioester intermediate with Cys269. The ammonia migrates through the interior of the protein, where it reacts with carboxy phosphate to produce the carbamate intermediate. The carboxy phosphate intermediate is formed by the phosphorylation of bicarbonate by ATP at a site contained within the amino-terminal half of the large subunit. The carbamate intermediate is transported through the interior of the protein to a second site within the carboxy-terminal half of the large subunit, where it is phosphorylated by another ATP to yield the final product, carbamoyl phosphate. The entire journey from substrate to product covers a distance of nearly 100 A. PMID:9818189

  12. Secondary NAD+ deficiency in the inherited defect of glutamine synthetase.

    PubMed

    Hu, Liyan; Ibrahim, Khalid; Stucki, Martin; Frapolli, Michele; Shahbeck, Noora; Chaudhry, Farrukh A; Görg, Boris; Häussinger, Dieter; Penberthy, W Todd; Ben-Omran, Tawfeg; Häberle, Johannes

    2015-11-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) deficiency is an ultra-rare inborn error of amino acid metabolism that has been described in only three patients so far. The disease is characterized by neonatal onset of severe encephalopathy, low levels of glutamine in blood and cerebrospinal fluid, chronic moderate hyperammonemia, and an overall poor prognosis in the absence of an effective treatment. Recently, enteral glutamine supplementation was shown to be a safe and effective therapy for this disease but there are no data available on the long-term effects of this intervention. The amino acid glutamine, severely lacking in this disorder, is central to many metabolic pathways in the human organism and is involved in the synthesis of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) starting from tryptophan or niacin as nicotinate, but not nicotinamide. Using fibroblasts, leukocytes, and immortalized peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) from a patient carrying a GLUL gene point mutation associated with impaired GS activity, we tested whether glutamine deficiency in this patient results in NAD(+) depletion and whether it can be rescued by supplementation with glutamine, nicotinamide or nicotinate. The present study shows that congenital GS deficiency is associated with NAD(+) depletion in fibroblasts, leukocytes and PBSC, which may contribute to the severe clinical phenotype of the disease. Furthermore, it shows that NAD(+) depletion can be rescued by nicotinamide supplementation in fibroblasts and leukocytes, which may open up potential therapeutic options for the treatment of this disorder.

  13. The aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jiongming; Marygold, Steven J; Gharib, Walid H; Suter, Beat

    2015-01-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) ligate amino acids to their cognate tRNAs, allowing them to decode the triplet code during translation. Through different mechanisms aaRSs also perform several non-canonical functions in transcription, translation, apoptosis, angiogenesis and inflammation. Drosophila has become a preferred system to model human diseases caused by mutations in aaRS genes, to dissect effects of reduced translation or non-canonical activities, and to study aminoacylation and translational fidelity. However, the lack of a systematic annotation of this gene family has hampered such studies. Here, we report the identification of the entire set of aaRS genes in the fly genome and we predict their roles based on experimental evidence and/or orthology. Further, we propose a new, systematic and logical nomenclature for aaRSs. We also review the research conducted on Drosophila aaRSs to date. Together, our work provides the foundation for further research in the fly aaRS field. PMID:26761199

  14. Purification and some kinetic properties of rat liver glucosamine synthetase

    PubMed Central

    Winterburn, P. J.; Phelps, C. F.

    1971-01-01

    1. Glucosamine synthetase (l-glutamine–d-fructose 6-phosphate aminotransferase, EC 2.6.1.16) was purified about 300-fold from rat liver by two techniques. One procedure utilized the protective action of fructose 6-phosphate and gave a relatively stable preparation, the other yielded an unstable enzyme (half-life of about 20h), free of contaminant activities, on which kinetic experiments were performed. Although the properties of the two preparations showed slight differences, the unstabilized form could be converted into the stabilized form. 2. During preparation the enzyme retained its sensitivity to the feedback inhibitor, UDP-N-acetylglucosamine. 3. The reversibility of the enzyme-catalysed reaction could not be demonstrated. There was no apparent requirement for a cofactor. 4. The pH optimum was at 7.5, at which pH the reaction obeyed a Ping Pong Bi Bi rate equation. At pH values outside the range 6.9–7.6 and at temperatures below 29°C the velocity was described by an ordered Bi Bi rate equation. 5. The molecular weight of the enzyme, determined by two procedures, was 360000–400000. 6. The aminotransferase was unable to utilize ammonia as a substrate. PMID:4255955

  15. Antimalarial Benzoxaboroles Target Plasmodium falciparum Leucyl-tRNA Synthetase.

    PubMed

    Sonoiki, Ebere; Palencia, Andres; Guo, Denghui; Ahyong, Vida; Dong, Chen; Li, Xianfeng; Hernandez, Vincent S; Zhang, Yong-Kang; Choi, Wai; Gut, Jiri; Legac, Jennifer; Cooper, Roland; Alley, M R K; Freund, Yvonne R; DeRisi, Joseph; Cusack, Stephen; Rosenthal, Philip J

    2016-08-01

    There is a need for new antimalarials, ideally with novel mechanisms of action. Benzoxaboroles have been shown to be active against bacteria, fungi, and trypanosomes. Therefore, we investigated the antimalarial activity and mechanism of action of 3-aminomethyl benzoxaboroles against Plasmodium falciparum Two 3-aminomethyl compounds, AN6426 and AN8432, demonstrated good potency against cultured multidrug-resistant (W2 strain) P. falciparum (50% inhibitory concentration [IC50] of 310 nM and 490 nM, respectively) and efficacy against murine Plasmodium berghei infection when administered orally once daily for 4 days (90% effective dose [ED90], 7.4 and 16.2 mg/kg of body weight, respectively). To characterize mechanisms of action, we selected parasites with decreased drug sensitivity by culturing with stepwise increases in concentration of AN6426. Resistant clones were characterized by whole-genome sequencing. Three generations of resistant parasites had polymorphisms in the predicted editing domain of the gene encoding a P. falciparum leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LeuRS; PF3D7_0622800) and in another gene (PF3D7_1218100), which encodes a protein of unknown function. Solution of the structure of the P. falciparum LeuRS editing domain suggested key roles for mutated residues in LeuRS editing. Short incubations with AN6426 and AN8432, unlike artemisinin, caused dose-dependent inhibition of [(14)C]leucine incorporation by cultured wild-type, but not resistant, parasites. The growth of resistant, but not wild-type, parasites was impaired in the presence of the unnatural amino acid norvaline, consistent with a loss of LeuRS editing activity in resistant parasites. In summary, the benzoxaboroles AN6426 and AN8432 offer effective antimalarial activity and act, at least in part, against a novel target, the editing domain of P. falciparum LeuRS.

  16. Cofactor requirements and reconstitution of microcin B17 synthetase: a multienzyme complex that catalyzes the formation of oxazoles and thiazoles in the antibiotic microcin B17.

    PubMed

    Milne, J C; Roy, R S; Eliot, A C; Kelleher, N L; Wokhlu, A; Nickels, B; Walsh, C T

    1999-04-13

    In the maturation of the Escherichia coli antibiotic Microcin B17 (MccB17), the McbA prepro-antibiotic is modified post-translationally by the multimeric microcin synthetase complex (composed of the McbB, -C, and -D proteins), which cyclizes four cysteines and four serines to thiazoles and oxazoles, respectively. Herein, we report the purification of individual subunits of MccB17 synthetase as fusions to maltose binding protein (MBP), and the in vitro reconstitution of heterocyclization activity. Preliminary characterization of each subunit reveals McbB to be a zinc-containing protein that may catalyze the initial cyclodehydration step, and McbC to contain flavin, consistent with an anticipated role for a dehydrogenase. We have previously demonstrated that McbD is a regulated ATPase/GTPase that may function as a conformational switch. Photolabeling experiments with the McbA propeptide now identify McbD as the initial site of substrate recognition. Heterocyclization activity was reconstituted only by combining all three subunits, demonstrating that each protein is required for heterocycle formation. Titration assays indicate that the subunits bind to each other with at least micromolar affinities, although McbD affords activity only after the MBP tag is proteolytically removed. Subunit competition assays with an McbDD147A mutant, which yields a catalytically deficient synthetase in vivo, show it to be defective in complex formation, whereas the McbBC181A/C184A double mutant, which is also inactive, competitively inhibits reconstitution by native McbB. Addition of the HtpG chaperone (originally shown to copurify with MccB17 synthetase), does not stimulate synthetase reconstitution or heterocyclization activity in vitro. A model for synthetase activity is proposed.

  17. The McbB component of microcin B17 synthetase is a zinc metalloprotein.

    PubMed

    Zamble, D B; McClure, C P; Penner-Hahn, J E; Walsh, C T

    2000-12-26

    The microcin B17 synthetase converts glycine, serine, and cysteine residues in a polypeptide precursor into oxazoles and thiazoles during the maturation of the Escherichia coli antibiotic Microcin B17. This multimeric enzyme is composed of three subunits (McbB, McbC, and McbD), and it employs both ATP and FMN as cofactors. The McbB subunit was purified as a fusion with the maltose-binding protein (MBP), and metal analysis revealed that this protein binds 0.91+/-0.17 zinc atoms. Upon incubation of MBP-McbB with excess zinc, the stoichiometry increased to two atoms of zinc bound, but metal binding to the second site resulted in a decrease in the heterocyclization activity when MBP-McbB was reconstituted with the other components of the synthetase. Apo-protein was prepared by using p-hydroxymercuriphenylsulfonic acid (PMPS), and loss of the metal caused a severe reduction in enzymatic activity. However, if dithiothreitol was added to the PMPS reactions within a few minutes, enzymatic activity was retained and MBP-McbB could be reconstituted with zinc. Spectroscopic analysis of the cobalt-containing protein and extended X-ray absorption fine structure analysis of the zinc-containing protein both provide evidence for a tetrathiolate coordination sphere. Site-directed mutants of MBP-McbB as well as the synthetase tagged with the calmodulin-binding peptide were constructed. Activity assays and metal analysis were used to determine which of the six cysteines in McbB are metal ligands. These results suggest that the zinc cofactor in McbB plays a structural role.

  18. The glutamine synthetase gene family in Populus

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Glutamine synthetase (GS; EC: 6.3.1.2, L-glutamate: ammonia ligase ADP-forming) is a key enzyme in ammonium assimilation and metabolism of higher plants. The current work was undertaken to develop a more comprehensive understanding of molecular and biochemical features of GS gene family in poplar, and to characterize the developmental regulation of GS expression in various tissues and at various times during the poplar perennial growth. Results The GS gene family consists of 8 different genes exhibiting all structural and regulatory elements consistent with their roles as functional genes. Our results indicate that the family members are organized in 4 groups of duplicated genes, 3 of which code for cytosolic GS isoforms (GS1) and 1 which codes for the choroplastic GS isoform (GS2). Our analysis shows that Populus trichocarpa is the first plant species in which it was observed the complete GS family duplicated. Detailed expression analyses have revealed specific spatial and seasonal patterns of GS expression in poplar. These data provide insights into the metabolic function of GS isoforms in poplar and pave the way for future functional studies. Conclusions Our data suggest that GS duplicates could have been retained in order to increase the amount of enzyme in a particular cell type. This possibility could contribute to the homeostasis of nitrogen metabolism in functions associated to changes in glutamine-derived metabolic products. The presence of duplicated GS genes in poplar could also contribute to diversification of the enzymatic properties for a particular GS isoform through the assembly of GS polypeptides into homo oligomeric and/or hetero oligomeric holoenzymes in specific cell types. PMID:21867507

  19. Oxygen-dependent inactivation of gramicidin S synthetase in Bacillus brevis.

    PubMed Central

    Friebel, T E; Demain, A L

    1977-01-01

    Incorporation of L-[14C]ornithine into gramicidin S by crude, unfractionated lysozyme extracts of Bacillus brevis ATCC 9999 was shown to represent the activity of the gramicidin synthetase complex. Frozen-thawed cells were the source of active extracts, but when cells were shaken in air at 37 degrees C, they rapidly lost activity in a first-order reaction with a half-life of 13 min. Protease inhibitors and inhibitors of energy metabolism had no effect on the inactivation process in frozen-thawed cells. Stabilization was achieved when the cells were shaken in nitrogen or helium instead of air. The addition of dithiothreitol produced a moderate degree of stabilization. The L-ornithine- and D-phenylalanine-activating activities of the gramicidin S synthetase complex were also lost during aeration of the cells. Crude cell-free extracts also lost activity when they were shaken in oxygen, but, in this case, inactivation was slower (half-life of 80 min). Nitrogen also stabilized these cell-free extracts. PMID:68033

  20. L-arginine recognition by yeast arginyl-tRNA synthetase.

    PubMed Central

    Cavarelli, J; Delagoutte, B; Eriani, G; Gangloff, J; Moras, D

    1998-01-01

    The crystal structure of arginyl-tRNA synthetase (ArgRS) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a class I aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase (aaRS), with L-arginine bound to the active site has been solved at 2.75 A resolution and refined to a crystallographic R-factor of 19.7%. ArgRS is composed predominantly of alpha-helices and can be divided into five domains, including the class I-specific active site. The N-terminal domain shows striking similarity to some completely unrelated proteins and defines a module which should participate in specific tRNA recognition. The C-terminal domain, which is the putative anticodon-binding module, displays an all-alpha-helix fold highly similar to that of Escherichia coli methionyl-tRNA synthetase. While ArgRS requires tRNAArg for the first step of the aminoacylation reaction, the results show that its presence is not a prerequisite for L-arginine binding. All H-bond-forming capability of L-arginine is used by the protein for the specific recognition. The guanidinium group forms two salt bridge interactions with two acidic residues, and one H-bond with a tyrosine residue; these three residues are strictly conserved in all ArgRS sequences. This tyrosine is also conserved in other class I aaRS active sites but plays several functional roles. The ArgRS structure allows the definition of a new framework for sequence alignments and subclass definition in class I aaRSs. PMID:9736621

  1. Determination of 2-5A synthetase and 2-5A phosphodiesterase in neuroblastoma cells by analytical capillary isotachophoresis: effects of cytokines and comparison with radioenzymatic methods.

    PubMed

    Bruchelt, G; Büdenbender, M; Schmidt, K H; Birk, A; Treuner, J; Niethammer, D

    1994-01-01

    2-5A Synthetase and 2-5A phosphodiesterase were determined by analytical capillary isotachophoresis in comparison to radioenzymatic methods. By means of isotachophoretic analysis, a frequently used radioenzymatic 2-5A synthetase assay was optimized and the results of both assays were compared. Using the isotachophoretic assay the influence of interferon-related cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-2) on 2-5A synthetase induction in neuroblastoma cells was estimated. In contrast to mononuclear blood cells, the tumor necrosis factor induced 2-5A synthetase in these cells. 2-5A Phosphodiesterase was determined using an isotachophoretic assay and a radioenzymatic method. Degradation of A2'p5'A2'p5'A (trimeric form of 2-5A core) was measured by isotachophoresis whereas degradation of a mixture of phosphorus-32 labeled 2-5A cores was registered by radioenzymatic assay. Activity of 2-5A phosphodiesterase was only insignificantly enhanced by interferon in mononuclear blood and neuroblastoma cells. In contrast to the radioenzymatic assays, an accurate determination of 2-5A synthetase as well as of 2-5A phosphodiesterase is possible using the isotachophoretic method because the reactions are followed by measuring the substrates ATP and A2'p5'A2'p5'A, respectively.

  2. Total glutamine synthetase levels in cerebrospinal fluid of Alzheimer's disease patients are unchanged.

    PubMed

    Timmer, Nienke M; Herbert, Megan K; Claassen, Jurgen A H R; Kuiperij, H Bea; Verbeek, Marcel M

    2015-03-01

    Decreased cerebral protein and activity levels of glutamine synthetase (GS) have been reported for Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. Using a recently established method, we quantified total GS levels in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from AD patients and control subjects. Furthermore, we investigated if total GS levels in CSF could differentiate AD from frontotemperal dementia and dementia with Lewy bodies patients. As we found no significantly altered total GS levels in any of the patient groups compared with control subjects, we conclude that levels of total GS in CSF have no diagnostic value for AD, dementia with Lewy bodies, or frontotemperal dementia.

  3. Lipoic acid synthetase deficiency causes neonatal-onset epilepsy, defective mitochondrial energy metabolism, and glycine elevation.

    PubMed

    Mayr, Johannes A; Zimmermann, Franz A; Fauth, Christine; Bergheim, Christa; Meierhofer, David; Radmayr, Doris; Zschocke, Johannes; Koch, Johannes; Sperl, Wolfgang

    2011-12-01

    Lipoic acid is an essential prosthetic group of four mitochondrial enzymes involved in the oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate, α-ketoglutarate, and branched chain amino acids and in the glycine cleavage. Lipoic acid is synthesized stepwise within mitochondria through a process that includes lipoic acid synthetase. We identified the homozygous mutation c.746G>A (p.Arg249His) in LIAS in an individual with neonatal-onset epilepsy, muscular hypotonia, lactic acidosis, and elevated glycine concentration in plasma and urine. Investigation of the mitochondrial energy metabolism showed reduced oxidation of pyruvate and decreased pyruvate dehydrogenase complex activity. A pronounced reduction of the prosthetic group lipoamide was found in lipoylated proteins.

  4. MbtH-like proteins as integral components of bacterial nonribosomal peptide synthetases.

    PubMed

    Felnagle, Elizabeth A; Barkei, John J; Park, Hyunjun; Podevels, Angela M; McMahon, Matthew D; Drott, Donald W; Thomas, Michael G

    2010-10-19

    The biosynthesis of many natural products of clinical interest involves large, multidomain enzymes called nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs). In bacteria, many of the gene clusters coding for NRPSs also code for a member of the MbtH-like protein superfamily, which are small proteins of unknown function. Using MbtH-like proteins from three separate NRPS systems, we show that these proteins copurify with the NRPSs and influence amino acid activation. As a consequence, MbtH-like proteins are integral components of NRPSs.

  5. Biochemical and Crystallographic Analysis of Substrate Binding and Conformational Changes in Acetyl-CoA Synthetase

    SciTech Connect

    Reger,A.; Carney, J.; Gulick, A.

    2007-01-01

    The adenylate-forming enzymes, including acyl-CoA synthetases, the adenylation domains of non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS), and firefly luciferase, perform two half-reactions in a ping-pong mechanism. We have proposed a domain alternation mechanism for these enzymes whereby, upon completion of the initial adenylation reaction, the C-terminal domain of these enzymes undergoes a 140{sup o} rotation to perform the second thioester-forming half-reaction. Structural and kinetic data of mutant enzymes support this hypothesis. We present here mutations to Salmonella enterica acetyl-CoA synthetase (Acs) and test the ability of the enzymes to catalyze the complete reaction and the adenylation half-reaction. Substitution of Lys609 with alanine results in an enzyme that is unable to catalyze the adenylate reaction, while the Gly524 to leucine substitution is unable to catalyze the complete reaction yet catalyzes the adenylation half-reaction with activity comparable to the wild-type enzyme. The positions of these two residues, which are located on the mobile C-terminal domain, strongly support the domain alternation hypothesis. We also present steady-state kinetic data of putative substrate-binding residues and demonstrate that no single residue plays a dominant role in dictating CoA binding. We have also created two mutations in the active site to alter the acyl substrate specificity. Finally, the crystallographic structures of wild-type Acs and mutants R194A, R584A, R584E, K609A, and V386A are presented to support the biochemical analysis.

  6. Trans-oligomerization of duplicated aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases maintains genetic code fidelity under stress.

    PubMed

    Rubio, Miguel Ángel; Napolitano, Mauro; Ochoa de Alda, Jesús A G; Santamaría-Gómez, Javier; Patterson, Carl J; Foster, Andrew W; Bru-Martínez, Roque; Robinson, Nigel J; Luque, Ignacio

    2015-11-16

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) play a key role in deciphering the genetic message by producing charged tRNAs and are equipped with proofreading mechanisms to ensure correct pairing of tRNAs with their cognate amino acid. Duplicated aaRSs are very frequent in Nature, with 25,913 cases observed in 26,837 genomes. The oligomeric nature of many aaRSs raises the question of how the functioning and oligomerization of duplicated enzymes is organized. We characterized this issue in a model prokaryotic organism that expresses two different threonyl-tRNA synthetases, responsible for Thr-tRNA(Thr) synthesis: one accurate and constitutively expressed (T1) and another (T2) with impaired proofreading activity that also generates mischarged Ser-tRNA(Thr). Low zinc promotes dissociation of dimeric T1 into monomers deprived of aminoacylation activity and simultaneous induction of T2, which is active for aminoacylation under low zinc. T2 either forms homodimers or heterodimerizes with T1 subunits that provide essential proofreading activity in trans. These findings evidence that in organisms with duplicated genes, cells can orchestrate the assemblage of aaRSs oligomers that meet the necessities of the cell in each situation. We propose that controlled oligomerization of duplicated aaRSs is an adaptive mechanism that can potentially be expanded to the plethora of organisms with duplicated oligomeric aaRSs.

  7. Trans-oligomerization of duplicated aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases maintains genetic code fidelity under stress

    PubMed Central

    Rubio, Miguel Ángel; Napolitano, Mauro; Ochoa de Alda, Jesús A. G.; Santamaría-Gómez, Javier; Patterson, Carl J.; Foster, Andrew W.; Bru-Martínez, Roque; Robinson, Nigel J.; Luque, Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) play a key role in deciphering the genetic message by producing charged tRNAs and are equipped with proofreading mechanisms to ensure correct pairing of tRNAs with their cognate amino acid. Duplicated aaRSs are very frequent in Nature, with 25,913 cases observed in 26,837 genomes. The oligomeric nature of many aaRSs raises the question of how the functioning and oligomerization of duplicated enzymes is organized. We characterized this issue in a model prokaryotic organism that expresses two different threonyl-tRNA synthetases, responsible for Thr-tRNAThr synthesis: one accurate and constitutively expressed (T1) and another (T2) with impaired proofreading activity that also generates mischarged Ser-tRNAThr. Low zinc promotes dissociation of dimeric T1 into monomers deprived of aminoacylation activity and simultaneous induction of T2, which is active for aminoacylation under low zinc. T2 either forms homodimers or heterodimerizes with T1 subunits that provide essential proofreading activity in trans. These findings evidence that in organisms with duplicated genes, cells can orchestrate the assemblage of aaRSs oligomers that meet the necessities of the cell in each situation. We propose that controlled oligomerization of duplicated aaRSs is an adaptive mechanism that can potentially be expanded to the plethora of organisms with duplicated oligomeric aaRSs. PMID:26464444

  8. Regulation of Nodule Glutamine Synthetase by CO2 Levels in Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) 1

    PubMed Central

    Ortega, José-Luis; Sánchez, Federico; Soberón, Mario; Flores, Miguel Lara

    1992-01-01

    Nodulated bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) plants were grown for 17 days after infection in normal (0.02%) CO2 and from day 8 to 17 in high (0.1%) CO2 in order to increase nitrogen fixation and define how nodule glutamine synthetase (GS) isoforms are regulated by the ammonia derived from the bacteroid. Nitrogenase activity was detected by day 10, and by day 17 activity was over twofold higher in 0.1% of CO2 compared with plants grown in 0.02% CO2 and inoculated with Rhizobium wild-type strain CE3. Likewise, plant fresh weight increased in response to increased CO2, particularly in plants inoculated with the Rhizobium phaseoli mutant strain CFN037. Glutamine synthetase specific activity increased 2.5- to 6.5-fold from day 11 to 17. However, increased CO2 did not appear to have an effect on GS specific activity. Analysis of the nodule GS polypeptide composition revealed that the γ polypeptide was significantly reduced in response to high CO2, whereas the β polypeptide was not affected. The significance of this result in relation to the regulation of GS isoforms and their role in the assimilation of ammonia in the nodule is discussed in this paper. ImagesFigure 4 PMID:16668681

  9. Trans-oligomerization of duplicated aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases maintains genetic code fidelity under stress.

    PubMed

    Rubio, Miguel Ángel; Napolitano, Mauro; Ochoa de Alda, Jesús A G; Santamaría-Gómez, Javier; Patterson, Carl J; Foster, Andrew W; Bru-Martínez, Roque; Robinson, Nigel J; Luque, Ignacio

    2015-11-16

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) play a key role in deciphering the genetic message by producing charged tRNAs and are equipped with proofreading mechanisms to ensure correct pairing of tRNAs with their cognate amino acid. Duplicated aaRSs are very frequent in Nature, with 25,913 cases observed in 26,837 genomes. The oligomeric nature of many aaRSs raises the question of how the functioning and oligomerization of duplicated enzymes is organized. We characterized this issue in a model prokaryotic organism that expresses two different threonyl-tRNA synthetases, responsible for Thr-tRNA(Thr) synthesis: one accurate and constitutively expressed (T1) and another (T2) with impaired proofreading activity that also generates mischarged Ser-tRNA(Thr). Low zinc promotes dissociation of dimeric T1 into monomers deprived of aminoacylation activity and simultaneous induction of T2, which is active for aminoacylation under low zinc. T2 either forms homodimers or heterodimerizes with T1 subunits that provide essential proofreading activity in trans. These findings evidence that in organisms with duplicated genes, cells can orchestrate the assemblage of aaRSs oligomers that meet the necessities of the cell in each situation. We propose that controlled oligomerization of duplicated aaRSs is an adaptive mechanism that can potentially be expanded to the plethora of organisms with duplicated oligomeric aaRSs. PMID:26464444

  10. Purification and characterization of recombinant Plasmodium falciparum adenylosuccinate synthetase expressed in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Jayalakshmi, R; Sumathy, K; Balaram, Hemalatha

    2002-06-01

    Most parasitic protozoa lack the de novo purine biosynthetic pathway and rely exclusively on the salvage pathway for their purine nucleotide requirements. Enzymes of the salvage pathway are, therefore, candidate drug targets. We have cloned the Plasmodium falciparum adenylosuccinate synthetase gene. In the parasite, adenylosuccinate synthetase is involved in the synthesis of AMP from IMP formed during the salvage of the purine base, hypoxanthine. The gene was shown to code for a functionally active protein by functional complementation in a purA mutant strain of Escherichia coli, H1238. This paper reports the conditions for hyperexpression of the recombinant protein in E. coli BL21(DE3) and purification of the protein to homogeneity. The enzyme was found to require the presence of dithiothreitol during the entire course of the purification for activity. Glycerol and EDTA were found to stabilize enzyme activity during storage. The specific activity of the purified protein was 1143.6 +/- 36.8 mUnits/mg. The K(M)s for the three substrates, GTP, IMP, and aspartate, were found to be 4.8 microM, 22.8 microM, and 1.4 mM, respectively. The enzyme was a dimer on gel filtration in buffers of low ionic strength but equilibrated between a monomer and a dimer in buffers of increased ionic strength.

  11. Tissue Distribution of Glutamate Synthase and Glutamine Synthetase in Rice Leaves 1

    PubMed Central

    Yamaya, Tomoyuki; Hayakawa, Toshihiko; Tanasawa, Keisuke; Kamachi, Kazunari; Mae, Tadahiko; Ojima, Kunihiko

    1992-01-01

    To further explore the function of NADH-dependent glutamate synthase (GOGAT), the tissue distribution of NADH-GOGAT protein and activity was investigated in rice (Oryza sativa L.) leaves. The distributions of ferredoxin (Fd)-dependent GOGAT, plastidic glutamine synthetase, and cytosolic glutamine synthetase proteins were also determined in the same tissues. High levels of NADH-GOGAT protein (33.1 μg protein/g fresh weight) and activity were detected in the 10th leaf blade before emergence. The unexpanded, nongreen portion of the 9th leaf blade contained more than 50% of the NADH-GOGAT protein and activity per gram fresh weight when compared with the 10th leaf. The expanding, green portion of the 9th leaf blade outside of the sheath contained a slightly lower abundance of NADH-GOGAT protein than the nongreen portion of the 9th blade on a fresh weight basis. The fully expanded leaf blades at positions lower than the 9th leaf had decreased NADH-GOGAT levels as a function of increasing age, and the oldest, 5th blade contained only 4% of the NADH-GOGAT protein compared with the youngest 10th leaf blade. Fd-GOGAT protein, on the other hand, was the major form of GOGAT in the green tissues, and the highest amount of Fd-GOGAT protein (111 μg protein/g fresh weight) was detected in the 7th leaf blade. In the nongreen 10th leaf blade, the content of Fd-GOGAT protein was approximately 7% of that found in the 7th leaf blade. In addition, the content of NADH-GOGAT protein in the 10th leaf blade was about 4 times higher than that of Fd-GOGAT protein. The content of plastidic glutamine synthetase polypeptide was also the highest in the 7th leaf blade (429 μg/g fresh weight) and lowest in nongreen blades and sheaths. On the other hand, the relative abundance of the cytosolic glutamine synthetase polypeptide was the highest in the oldest leaf blade, decreasing to 10 to 20% of that value in young, nongreen leaves. These results suggest that NADH-GOGAT is important for the

  12. Nanomolar inhibitors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis glutamine synthetase 1: synthesis, biological evaluation and X-ray crystallographic studies.

    PubMed

    Couturier, Cédric; Silve, Sandra; Morales, Renaud; Pessegue, Bernard; Llopart, Sylvie; Nair, Anil; Bauer, Armin; Scheiper, Bodo; Pöverlein, Christoph; Ganzhorn, Axel; Lagrange, Sophie; Bacqué, Eric

    2015-04-01

    A series of imidazo[1,2-a]indeno[1,2-e]pyrazin-4-ones that potently inhibit M. tuberculosis glutamine synthetase (GlnA1) has been identified by high throughput screening. Exploration of this series was performed owing to a short chemistry program. Despite possibly nanomolar inhibitions, none of these compounds was active on whole cell Mtb, suggesting that GlnA1 may not be a suitable target to find new anti-tubercular drugs.

  13. The importance of cytosolic glutamine synthetase in nitrogen assimilation and recycling

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, S.M.; Habash, D.Z.

    2009-07-02

    Glutamine synthetase assimilates ammonium into amino acids, thus it is a key enzyme for nitrogen metabolism. The cytosolic isoenzymes of glutamine synthetase assimilate ammonium derived from primary nitrogen uptake and from various internal nitrogen recycling pathways. In this way, cytosolic glutamine synthetase is crucial for the remobilization of protein-derived nitrogen. Cytosolic glutamine synthetase is encoded by a small family of genes that are well conserved across plant species. Members of the cytosolic glutamine synthetase gene family are regulated in response to plant nitrogen status, as well as to environmental cues, such as nitrogen availability and biotic/abiotic stresses. The complex regulation of cytosolic glutamine synthetase at the transcriptional to post-translational levels is key to the establishment of a specific physiological role for each isoenzyme. The diverse physiological roles of cytosolic glutamine synthetase isoenzymes are important in relation to current agricultural and ecological issues.

  14. Further characterization of Escherichia coli alanyl-tRNA synthetase.

    PubMed

    Sood, S M; Slattery, C W; Filley, S J; Wu, M X; Hill, K A

    1996-04-15

    Selected physical and thermodynamic parameters for Escherichia coli alanyl-tRNA synthetase (AlaRS) have been determined primarily to assess the quaternary structure of this enzyme. The extinction coefficient (epsilon) at 280 nm was determined experimentally to be 0.71 ml mg-1 cm-1, and the partial specific volume (nu) was calculated from the amino acid composition to be 0.73 ml g-1. From viscosity experiments the intrinsic viscosity (eta) of AlaRS was extrapolated to be 3.4 ml g-1 and the degree of hydration (delta 1) estimated to be 0.67 gH2O g(-1)(AlaRS). Laser light-scattering studies indicated some heterogeneity; a radius of 6.3 nm was calculated for the major fraction with a diffusion coefficient (D20,W) of 3.89 x 10(-7) cm2 s-1. In 50 mM Hepes, pH 7.5, 20 mM KCl, 2 mM 2-mercaptoethanol and at a protein concentration of 4.2 mg ml-1 the sedimentation coefficient (S20,W) was 6.36 S; this value increased slightly when the protein concentration was decreased. The combination of S20,W and D20,W under these conditions yielded a molecular weight of approximately 186,000 Da, corresponding to a dimer. The S20,W was virtually independent of temperature in the range of 10-37 degrees C, while an Arrhenius plot of aminoacylation activity was biphasic. The isoelectric point was determined experimentally to be 4.9. Sedimentation equilibrium data were best fit to a decamer association complex in which dimeric AlaRS is the predominant species at 25 degrees C. PMID:8645007

  15. Structural homologies with ATP- and folate-binding enzymes in the crystal structure of folylpolyglutamate synthetase

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiaolin; Bognar, Andrew L.; Baker, Edward N.; Smith, Clyde A.

    1998-01-01

    Folylpolyglutamate synthetase, which is responsible for the addition of a polyglutamate tail to folate and folate derivatives, is an ATP-dependent enzyme isolated from eukaryotic and bacterial sources, where it plays a key role in the retention of the intracellular folate pool. Here, we report the 2.4-Å resolution crystal structure of the MgATP complex of the enzyme from Lactobacillus casei. The structural analysis reveals that folylpolyglutamate synthetase is a modular protein consisting of two domains, one with a typical mononucleotide-binding fold and the other strikingly similar to the folate-binding enzyme dihydrofolate reductase. We have located the active site of the enzyme in a large interdomain cleft adjacent to an ATP-binding P-loop motif. Opposite this site, in the C domain, a cavity likely to be the folate binding site has been identified, and inspection of this cavity and the surrounding protein structure suggests that the glutamate tail of the substrate may project into the active site. A further feature of the structure is a well defined Ω loop, which contributes both to the active site and to interdomain interactions. The determination of the structure of this enzyme represents the first step toward the elucidation of the molecular mechanism of polyglutamylation of folates and antifolates. PMID:9618466

  16. Required allosteric effector site for N-acetylglutamate on carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase I.

    PubMed

    McCudden, C R; Powers-Lee, S G

    1996-07-26

    Carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase I (CPSase I) catalyzes the entry and rate-limiting step in the urea cycle, the pathway by which mammals detoxify ammonia. One facet of CPSase I regulation is a requirement for N-acetylglutamate (AGA), which induces an active enzyme conformation and does not participate directly in the chemical reaction. We have utilized labeling with carbodiimide-activated [14C]AGA to identify peptides 120-127, 234-237, 625-630, and 1351-1356 as potentially being near the binding site for AGA. Identification of peptide 1351-1356 confirms the previous demonstration (Rodriquez-Aparicio, L. B., Guadalajara, A. M., and Rubio, V.(1989) Biochemistry 28, 3070-3074) that the C-terminal region is involved in binding AGA. Identification of peptides 120-127 and 234-237 constitutes the first evidence that the N-terminal region of the synthetase is involved in ligand binding. Since peptides 631-638 and 1327-1348 have been identified near the ATP site of CPSase I (Potter, M. D., and Powers-Lee, S. G.(1992) J. Biol. Chem. 267, 2023-2031), the present finding of involvement of peptides 625-630 and 1351-1356 at an "allosteric" activator site was unexpected. The idea that portions of the AGA effector site might be derived from an ancestral glutamine substrate site via a gene duplication and diversification event was considered. PMID:8663466

  17. Analogs of natural aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase inhibitors clear malaria in vivo.

    PubMed

    Novoa, Eva Maria; Camacho, Noelia; Tor, Anna; Wilkinson, Barrie; Moss, Steven; Marín-García, Patricia; Azcárate, Isabel G; Bautista, José M; Mirando, Adam C; Francklyn, Christopher S; Varon, Sònia; Royo, Miriam; Cortés, Alfred; Ribas de Pouplana, Lluís

    2014-12-23

    Malaria remains a major global health problem. Emerging resistance to existing antimalarial drugs drives the search for new antimalarials, and protein translation is a promising pathway to target. Here we explore the potential of the aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase (ARS) family as a source of antimalarial drug targets. First, a battery of known and novel ARS inhibitors was tested against Plasmodium falciparum cultures, and their activities were compared. Borrelidin, a natural inhibitor of threonyl-tRNA synthetase (ThrRS), stands out for its potent antimalarial effect. However, it also inhibits human ThrRS and is highly toxic to human cells. To circumvent this problem, we tested a library of bioengineered and semisynthetic borrelidin analogs for their antimalarial activity and toxicity. We found that some analogs effectively lose their toxicity against human cells while retaining a potent antiparasitic activity both in vitro and in vivo and cleared malaria from Plasmodium yoelii-infected mice, resulting in 100% mice survival rates. Our work identifies borrelidin analogs as potent, selective, and unexplored scaffolds that efficiently clear malaria both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:25489076

  18. Structural Insights into the Polyphyletic Origins of Glycyl tRNA Synthetases.

    PubMed

    Valencia-Sánchez, Marco Igor; Rodríguez-Hernández, Annia; Ferreira, Ruben; Santamaría-Suárez, Hugo Aníbal; Arciniega, Marcelino; Dock-Bregeon, Anne-Catherine; Moras, Dino; Beinsteiner, Brice; Mertens, Haydyn; Svergun, Dmitri; Brieba, Luis G; Grøtli, Morten; Torres-Larios, Alfredo

    2016-07-01

    Glycyl tRNA synthetase (GlyRS) provides a unique case among class II aminoacyl tRNA synthetases, with two clearly widespread types of enzymes: a dimeric (α2) species present in some bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes; and a heterotetrameric form (α2β2) present in most bacteria. Although the differences between both types of GlyRS at the anticodon binding domain level are evident, the extent and implications of the variations in the catalytic domain have not been described, and it is unclear whether the mechanism of amino acid recognition is also dissimilar. Here, we show that the α-subunit of the α2β2 GlyRS from the bacterium Aquifex aeolicus is able to perform the first step of the aminoacylation reaction, which involves the activation of the amino acid with ATP. The crystal structure of the α-subunit in the complex with an analog of glycyl adenylate at 2.8 Å resolution presents a conformational arrangement that properly positions the cognate amino acid. This work shows that glycine is recognized by a subset of different residues in the two types of GlyRS. A structural and sequence analysis of class II catalytic domains shows that bacterial GlyRS is closely related to alanyl tRNA synthetase, which led us to define a new subclassification of these ancient enzymes and to propose an evolutionary path of α2β2 GlyRS, convergent with α2 GlyRS and divergent from AlaRS, thus providing a possible explanation for the puzzling existence of two proteins sharing the same fold and function but not a common ancestor.

  19. Structural Insights into the Polyphyletic Origins of Glycyl tRNA Synthetases*♦

    PubMed Central

    Valencia-Sánchez, Marco Igor; Rodríguez-Hernández, Annia; Ferreira, Ruben; Santamaría-Suárez, Hugo Aníbal; Arciniega, Marcelino; Dock-Bregeon, Anne-Catherine; Moras, Dino; Beinsteiner, Brice; Brieba, Luis G.; Grøtli, Morten

    2016-01-01

    Glycyl tRNA synthetase (GlyRS) provides a unique case among class II aminoacyl tRNA synthetases, with two clearly widespread types of enzymes: a dimeric (α2) species present in some bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes; and a heterotetrameric form (α2β2) present in most bacteria. Although the differences between both types of GlyRS at the anticodon binding domain level are evident, the extent and implications of the variations in the catalytic domain have not been described, and it is unclear whether the mechanism of amino acid recognition is also dissimilar. Here, we show that the α-subunit of the α2β2 GlyRS from the bacterium Aquifex aeolicus is able to perform the first step of the aminoacylation reaction, which involves the activation of the amino acid with ATP. The crystal structure of the α-subunit in the complex with an analog of glycyl adenylate at 2.8 Å resolution presents a conformational arrangement that properly positions the cognate amino acid. This work shows that glycine is recognized by a subset of different residues in the two types of GlyRS. A structural and sequence analysis of class II catalytic domains shows that bacterial GlyRS is closely related to alanyl tRNA synthetase, which led us to define a new subclassification of these ancient enzymes and to propose an evolutionary path of α2β2 GlyRS, convergent with α2 GlyRS and divergent from AlaRS, thus providing a possible explanation for the puzzling existence of two proteins sharing the same fold and function but not a common ancestor. PMID:27226617

  20. p53-Dependent DNA damage response sensitive to editing-defective tRNA synthetase in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Song, Youngzee; Shi, Yi; Carland, Tristan M; Lian, Shanshan; Sasaki, Tomoyuki; Schork, Nicholas J; Head, Steven R; Kishi, Shuji; Schimmel, Paul

    2016-07-26

    Brain and heart pathologies are caused by editing defects of transfer RNA (tRNA) synthetases, which preserve genetic code fidelity by removing incorrect amino acids misattached to tRNAs. To extend understanding of the broader impact of synthetase editing reactions on organismal homeostasis, and based on effects in bacteria ostensibly from small amounts of mistranslation of components of the replication apparatus, we investigated the sensitivity to editing of the vertebrate genome. We show here that in zebrafish embryos, transient overexpression of editing-defective valyl-tRNA synthetase (ValRS(ED)) activated DNA break-responsive H2AX and p53-responsive downstream proteins, such as cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor p21, which promotes cell-cycle arrest at DNA damage checkpoints, and Gadd45 and p53R2, with pivotal roles in DNA repair. In contrast, the response of these proteins to expression of ValRS(ED) was abolished in p53-deficient fish. The p53-activated downstream signaling events correlated with suppression of abnormal morphological changes caused by the editing defect and, in adults, reversed a shortened life span (followed for 2 y). Conversely, with normal editing activities, p53-deficient fish have a normal life span and few morphological changes. Whole-fish deep sequencing showed genomic mutations associated with the editing defect. We suggest that the sensitivity of p53 to expression of an editing-defective tRNA synthetase has a critical role in promoting genome integrity and organismal homeostasis. PMID:27402763

  1. CMP-Sialic Acid Synthetase: The Point of Constriction in the Sialylation Pathway.

    PubMed

    Sellmeier, Melanie; Weinhold, Birgit; Münster-Kühnel, Anja

    2015-01-01

    Sialoglycoconjugates form the outermost layer of animal cells and play a crucial role in cellular communication processes. An essential step in the biosynthesis of sialylated glycoconjugates is the activation of sialic acid to the monophosphate diester CMP-sialic acid. Only the activated sugar is transported into the Golgi apparatus and serves as a substrate for the linkage-specific sialyltransferases. Interference with sugar activation abolishes sialylation and is embryonic lethal in mammals. In this chapter we focus on the enzyme catalyzing the activation of sialic acid, the CMP-sialic acid synthetase (CMAS), and compare the enzymatic properties of CMASs isolated from different species. Information concerning the reaction mechanism and active site architecture is included. Moreover, the unusual nuclear localization of vertebrate CMASs as well as the biotechnological application of bacterial CMAS enzymes is addressed.

  2. The regulation of Escherichia coli glutamine synthetase revisited: role of 2-ketoglutarate in the regulation of glutamine synthetase adenylylation state.

    PubMed

    Jiang, P; Peliska, J A; Ninfa, A J

    1998-09-15

    The regulation of Escherichia coli glutamine synthetase (GS) by reversible adenylylation has provided one of the classical paradigms for signal transduction by cyclic cascades. Yet, many mechanistic features of this regulation remain to be elucidated. We examined the regulation of GS adenylylation state in a reconstituted system containing GS, adenylyltransferase (ATase), the PII signal transduction protein that controls ATase, and the uridylyltransferase/uridylyl-removing enzyme (UTase/UR), which has a role in regulating PII. In this reconstituted bicyclic cascade system, the adenylylation state of GS was regulated reciprocally by the small molecule effectors 2-ketoglutarate and glutamine at physiological effector concentrations. By examination of the individual regulatory monocycles and comparison to the bicyclic system and existing data, we could deduce that the only sensors of 2-ketoglutarate were PII and PII-UMP. At physiological conditions, we observed that the main role of 2-ketoglutarate in bringing about the deadenylylation of GS was to inhibit GS adenylylation, and this was due to the allosteric regulation of PII activity. Glutamine acted as an allosteric regulator of both ATase and UTase/UR. We also compared the regulation of GS adenylylation state to the regulation of phosphorylation state of the transcription factor NRI (NtrC) in a reconstituted bicyclic system containing NRI, the bifunctional kinase/phosphatase NRII (NtrB), PII, and the UTase/UR. This comparison indicated that, at a fixed 2-ketoglutarate concentration, the regulation of GS adenylylation state by glutamine was sharper and occurred at a higher concentration than did the regulation of NRI phosphorylation. The possible biological implications of this regulatory arrangement are discussed. PMID:9737857

  3. Computational Sampling and Simulation Based Assessment of Novel Mycobacterium tuberculosis Glutamine Synthetase Inhibitors: Study Involving Structure Based Drug Design and Free Energy Perturbation.

    PubMed

    Suryadevara, Priyanka; Yogeeswari, Perumal; Soni, Vijay; Devi, Parthiban Brindha; Nandicoori, Vinay Kumar; Sriram, Dharmarajan

    2016-01-01

    The highly persistent nature of Mycobacterium tuberculosis can be attributed to its lipophilic cell wall which acts as a major barrier in the process of drug discovery against tuberculosis. Glutamine synthetase plays a major role in nitrogen metabolism and cell wall biosynthesis of pathogenic mycobacteria. The current review focuses on the structural and functional aspects of Mtb glutamine synthetase and an overview of its reported inhibitors till date. Also in the present study, we employed a computational structure based drug design protocol for identifying novel inhibitors against Mtb glutamine synthetase (MtbGS). A total of 12 hits were identified based on e-pharmacophore related search and virtual screening, which were further tested for their in vitro MtbGS inhibitory activity. Three compounds (compound 6, 1 and 12) were found with IC50 less than 5 µM, of which compound 6 being top active with IC50 of 2.124 µM. Differential scanning fluorimetry studies were employed so as to measure the thermal stability of the protein complexed with the most active compound. Also the protein complexes with top three active compounds were subjected for molecular dynamics simulations to study their binding pattern and stabilization effect. The solvation free energies were also determined for these compounds, undertaking free energy perturbation studies, which can be used further for lead optimization in the process of anti-tubercular drug discovery targeting Mtb glutamine synthetase.

  4. Acyl CoA synthetase 5 (ACSL5) ablation in mice increases energy expenditure and insulin sensitivity and delays fat absorption

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: The family of acyl-CoA synthetase enzymes (ACSL) activates fatty acids within cells to generate long chain fatty acyl CoA (FACoA). The differing metabolic fates of FACoAs such as incorporation into neutral lipids, phospholipids, and oxidation pathways are differentially regulated by the ...

  5. Characterization of the Suillus grevillei quinone synthetase GreA supports a nonribosomal code for aromatic α-keto acids.

    PubMed

    Wackler, Barbara; Lackner, Gerald; Chooi, Yit Heng; Hoffmeister, Dirk

    2012-08-13

    The gene greA was cloned from the genome of the basidiomycete Suillus grevillei. It encodes a monomodular natural product biosynthesis protein composed of three domains for adenylation, thiolation, and thioesterase and, hence, is reminiscent of a nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS). GreA was biochemically characterized in vitro. It was identified as atromentin synthetase and therefore represents one of only a limited number of biochemically characterized NRPS-like enzymes which accept an aromatic α-keto acid. Specificity-conferring amino acid residues--collectively referred to as the nonribosomal code--were predicted for the primary sequence of the GreA adenylation domain and were an unprecedented combination for aromatic α-keto acids. Plausible support for this new code came from in silico simulation of the adenylation domain structure. According to the model, the predicted residues line the active site and, therefore, very likely contribute to substrate specificity.

  6. Functional Characterization of PyrG, an Unusual Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase Module from the Pyridomycin Biosynthetic Pathway.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tingting; Li, Lili; Brock, Nelson L; Deng, Zixin; Lin, Shuangjun

    2016-08-01

    Pyridomycin is an antimycobacterial cyclodepsipeptide assembled by a nonribosomal peptide synthetase/polyketide synthase hybrid system. Analysis of its cluster revealed a nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) module, PyrG, that contains two tandem adenylation domains and a PKS-type ketoreductase domain. In this study, we biochemically validated that the second A domain recognizes and activates α-keto-β-methylvaleric acid (2-KVC) as the native substrate; the first A domain was not functional but might play a structural role. The KR domain catalyzed the reduction of the 2-KVC tethered to the peptidyl carrier protein of PyrG in the presence of the MbtH family protein, PyrH. PyrG was demonstrated to recognize many amino acids. This substrate promiscuity provides the potential to generate pyridomycin analogues with various enolic acids moiety; this is important for binding InhA, a critical enzyme for cell-wall biosynthesis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

  7. Amino acid binding by the class I aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases: role for a conserved proline in the signature sequence.

    PubMed Central

    Burbaum, J. J.; Schimmel, P.

    1992-01-01

    Although partial or complete three-dimensional structures are known for three Class I aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, the amino acid-binding sites in these proteins remain poorly characterized. To explore the methionine binding site of Escherichia coli methionyl-tRNA synthetase, we chose to study a specific, randomly generated methionine auxotroph that contains a mutant methionyl-tRNA synthetase whose defect is manifested in an elevated Km for methionine (Barker, D.G., Ebel, J.-P., Jakes, R.C., & Bruton, C.J., 1982, Eur. J. Biochem. 127, 449-457), and employed the polymerase chain reaction to sequence this mutant synthetase directly. We identified a Pro 14 to Ser replacement (P14S), which accounts for a greater than 300-fold elevation in Km for methionine and has little effect on either the Km for ATP or the kcat of the amino acid activation reaction. This mutation destabilizes the protein in vivo, which may partly account for the observed auxotrophy. The altered proline is found in the "signature sequence" of the Class I synthetases and is conserved. This sequence motif is 1 of 2 found in the 10 Class I aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases and, in the known structures, it is in the nucleotide-binding fold as part of a loop between the end of a beta-strand and the start of an alpha-helix. The phenotype of the mutant and the stability and affinity for methionine of the wild-type and mutant enzymes are influenced by the amino acid that is 25 residues beyond the C-terminus of the signature sequence.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1304356

  8. Regulation of an Escherichia coli/mammalian chimeric carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase.

    PubMed

    Sahay, N; Guy, H I; Liu, X; Evans, D R

    1998-11-20

    Carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase (CPSase) consists of a 120-kDa synthetase domain (CPS) that makes carbamoyl phosphate from ATP, bicarbonate, and ammonia usually produced by a separate glutaminase domain. CPS is composed of two subdomains, CPS.A and CPS.B. Although CPS.A and CPS.B have specialized functions in intact CPSase, the separately cloned subdomains can catalyze carbamoyl phosphate synthesis. This report describes the construction of a 58-kDa chimeric CPSase composed of Escherichia coli CPS.A catalytic subdomains and the mammalian regulatory subdomain. The catalytic parameters are similar to those of the E. coli enzyme, but the activity is regulated by the mammalian effectors and protein kinase A phosphorylation. The chimera has a single site that binds phosphoribosyl 5'-pyrophosphate (PRPP) with a dissociation constant of 25 microM. The dissociation constant for UTP of 0.23 mM was inferred from its effect on PRPP binding. Thus, the regulatory subdomain is an exchangeable ligand binding module that can control both CPS.A and CPS.B domains, and the pathway for allosteric signal transmission is identical in E. coli and mammalian CPSase. A deletion mutant that truncates the polypeptide within a postulated regulatory sequence is as active as the parent chimera but is insensitive to effectors. PRPP and UTP bind to the mutant, suggesting that the carboxyl half of the subdomain is essential for transmitting the allosteric signal but not for ligand binding. PMID:9813025

  9. Sirtuin-dependent reversible lysine acetylation of glutamine synthetases reveals an autofeedback loop in nitrogen metabolism.

    PubMed

    You, Di; Yin, Bin-Cheng; Li, Zhi-Hai; Zhou, Ying; Yu, Wen-Bang; Zuo, Peng; Ye, Bang-Ce

    2016-06-14

    In cells of all domains of life, reversible lysine acetylation modulates the function of proteins involved in central cellular processes such as metabolism. In this study, we demonstrate that the nitrogen regulator GlnR of the actinomycete Saccharopolyspora erythraea directly regulates transcription of the acuA gene (SACE_5148), which encodes a Gcn5-type lysine acetyltransferase. We found that AcuA acetylates two glutamine synthetases (GlnA1 and GlnA4) and that this lysine acetylation inactivated GlnA4 (GSII) but had no significant effect on GlnA1 (GSI-β) activity under the conditions tested. Instead, acetylation of GlnA1 led to a gain-of-function that modulated its interaction with the GlnR regulator and enhanced GlnR-DNA binding. It was observed that this regulatory function of acetylated GSI-β enzymes is highly conserved across actinomycetes. In turn, GlnR controls the catalytic and regulatory activities (intracellular acetylation levels) of glutamine synthetases at the transcriptional and posttranslational levels, indicating an autofeedback loop that regulates nitrogen metabolism in response to environmental change. Thus, this GlnR-mediated acetylation pathway provides a signaling cascade that acts from nutrient sensing to acetylation of proteins to feedback regulation. This work presents significant new insights at the molecular level into the mechanisms underlying the regulation of protein acetylation and nitrogen metabolism in actinomycetes. PMID:27247389

  10. Reaction Mechanism of Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Glutamine Synthetase Using Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Calculations.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Cátia; Ramos, Maria J; Fernandes, Pedro Alexandrino

    2016-06-27

    This paper is devoted to the understanding of the reaction mechanism of mycobacterium tuberculosis glutamine synthetase (mtGS) with atomic detail, using computational quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods at the ONIOM M06-D3/6-311++G(2d,2p):ff99SB//B3LYP/6-31G(d):ff99SB level of theory. The complete reaction undergoes a three-step mechanism: the spontaneous transfer of phosphate from ATP to glutamate upon ammonium binding (ammonium quickly loses a proton to Asp54), the attack of ammonia on phosphorylated glutamate (yielding protonated glutamine), and the deprotonation of glutamine by the leaving phosphate. This exothermic reaction has an activation free energy of 21.5 kcal mol(-1) , which is consistent with that described for Escherichia coli glutamine synthetase (15-17 kcal mol(-1) ). The participating active site residues have been identified and their role and energy contributions clarified. This study provides an insightful atomic description of the biosynthetic reaction that takes place in this enzyme, opening doors for more accurate studies for developing new anti-tuberculosis therapies.

  11. Reaction Mechanism of Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Glutamine Synthetase Using Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Calculations.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Cátia; Ramos, Maria J; Fernandes, Pedro Alexandrino

    2016-06-27

    This paper is devoted to the understanding of the reaction mechanism of mycobacterium tuberculosis glutamine synthetase (mtGS) with atomic detail, using computational quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods at the ONIOM M06-D3/6-311++G(2d,2p):ff99SB//B3LYP/6-31G(d):ff99SB level of theory. The complete reaction undergoes a three-step mechanism: the spontaneous transfer of phosphate from ATP to glutamate upon ammonium binding (ammonium quickly loses a proton to Asp54), the attack of ammonia on phosphorylated glutamate (yielding protonated glutamine), and the deprotonation of glutamine by the leaving phosphate. This exothermic reaction has an activation free energy of 21.5 kcal mol(-1) , which is consistent with that described for Escherichia coli glutamine synthetase (15-17 kcal mol(-1) ). The participating active site residues have been identified and their role and energy contributions clarified. This study provides an insightful atomic description of the biosynthetic reaction that takes place in this enzyme, opening doors for more accurate studies for developing new anti-tuberculosis therapies. PMID:27225077

  12. Biosynthesis of Branched-Chain Amino Acids in Schizosaccharomyces pombe: Properties of Acetohydroxy Acid Synthetase1

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Roderick A.; Satyanarayana, T.; Kaplan, J. G.

    1973-01-01

    The regulatory properties of acetohydroxy acid synthetase (AHAS), the first enzyme in the biosynthetic pathway to valine and the second in the isoleucine pathway, were investigated in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. The enzyme was partially purified from crude extracts by protamine sulfate treatment, ammonium sulfate fractionation, and gel filtration through Sephadex G-25. AHAS from S. pombe is unique in that its activity shows a single peak around pH 6.5; high sensitivity to feedback inhibition by valine at this pH (Ki = 0.1 mM) indicates that the enzyme is involved in valine biosynthesis. Pyruvate saturation kinetics of AHAS extracted from cells grown on glycerol as sole carbon and energy source were normal and hyperbolic. In contrast, the enzyme from glucose-grown cells exhibited sigmoidal saturation kinetics, an effect which disappeared when the synthetase from such cells was partially purified. This phenomenon was shown to be due to competition for pyruvate between AHAS and pyruvate decarboxylase; the latter enzyme is present in large amounts in cells fermenting glucose. Valine inhibition is noncompetitive in nature, and this effector exhibits homotropic cooperative effects; isoleucine is a less-potent inhibitor of AHAS activity. Mercurial treatment reversibly desensitized the enzyme to valine inhibition. On the basis of these data, the S. pombe AHAS appears to be an allosteric regulatory enzyme with the properties of a negative V system. PMID:4698210

  13. Catalytic mechanism and allosteric regulation of an oligomeric (p)ppGpp synthetase by an alarmone.

    PubMed

    Steinchen, Wieland; Schuhmacher, Jan S; Altegoer, Florian; Fage, Christopher D; Srinivasan, Vasundara; Linne, Uwe; Marahiel, Mohamed A; Bange, Gert

    2015-10-27

    Nucleotide-based second messengers serve in the response of living organisms to environmental changes. In bacteria and plant chloroplasts, guanosine tetraphosphate (ppGpp) and guanosine pentaphosphate (pppGpp) [collectively named "(p)ppGpp"] act as alarmones that globally reprogram cellular physiology during various stress conditions. Enzymes of the RelA/SpoT homology (RSH) family synthesize (p)ppGpp by transferring pyrophosphate from ATP to GDP or GTP. Little is known about the catalytic mechanism and regulation of alarmone synthesis. It also is unclear whether ppGpp and pppGpp execute different functions. Here, we unravel the mechanism and allosteric regulation of the highly cooperative alarmone synthetase small alarmone synthetase 1 (SAS1) from Bacillus subtilis. We determine that the catalytic pathway of (p)ppGpp synthesis involves a sequentially ordered substrate binding, activation of ATP in a strained conformation, and transfer of pyrophosphate through a nucleophilic substitution (SN2) reaction. We show that pppGpp-but not ppGpp-positively regulates SAS1 at an allosteric site. Although the physiological significance remains to be elucidated, we establish the structural and mechanistic basis for a biological activity in which ppGpp and pppGpp execute different functional roles.

  14. The Enterococcal Cytolysin Synthetase Coevolves with Substrate for Stereoselective Lanthionine Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Tang, Weixin; Thibodeaux, Gabrielle N; van der Donk, Wilfred A

    2016-09-16

    Stereochemical control is critical in natural product biosynthesis. For ribosomally synthesized and post-translationally modified peptides (RiPPs), the mechanism(s) by which stereoselectivity is achieved is still poorly understood. In this work, we focused on the stereoselective lanthionine synthesis in lanthipeptides, a major class of RiPPs formed by the addition of Cys residues to dehydroalanine (Dha) or dehydrobutyrine (Dhb). Nonenzymatic cyclization of the small subunit of a virulence lanthipeptide, the enterococcal cytolysin, resulted in the native modified peptide as the major product, suggesting that both regioselectivity and stereoselectivity are inherent to the dehydrated peptide sequence. These results support previous computational studies that a Dhx-Dhx-Xxx-Xxx-Cys motif (Dhx = Dha or Dhb; Xxx = any amino acid except Dha, Dhb, and Cys) preferentially cyclizes by attack on the Re face of Dha or Dhb. Characterization of the stereochemistry of the products formed enzymatically with substrate mutants revealed that the lanthionine synthetase actively reinforces Re face attack. These findings support the hypothesis of substrate-controlled selectivity in lanthionine synthesis but also reveal likely coevolution of substrates and lanthionine synthetases to ensure the stereoselective synthesis of lanthipeptides with defined biological activities. PMID:27348535

  15. Catalytic mechanism and allosteric regulation of an oligomeric (p)ppGpp synthetase by an alarmone

    PubMed Central

    Steinchen, Wieland; Schuhmacher, Jan S.; Altegoer, Florian; Fage, Christopher D.; Srinivasan, Vasundara; Linne, Uwe; Marahiel, Mohamed A.; Bange, Gert

    2015-01-01

    Nucleotide-based second messengers serve in the response of living organisms to environmental changes. In bacteria and plant chloroplasts, guanosine tetraphosphate (ppGpp) and guanosine pentaphosphate (pppGpp) [collectively named “(p)ppGpp”] act as alarmones that globally reprogram cellular physiology during various stress conditions. Enzymes of the RelA/SpoT homology (RSH) family synthesize (p)ppGpp by transferring pyrophosphate from ATP to GDP or GTP. Little is known about the catalytic mechanism and regulation of alarmone synthesis. It also is unclear whether ppGpp and pppGpp execute different functions. Here, we unravel the mechanism and allosteric regulation of the highly cooperative alarmone synthetase small alarmone synthetase 1 (SAS1) from Bacillus subtilis. We determine that the catalytic pathway of (p)ppGpp synthesis involves a sequentially ordered substrate binding, activation of ATP in a strained conformation, and transfer of pyrophosphate through a nucleophilic substitution (SN2) reaction. We show that pppGpp—but not ppGpp—positively regulates SAS1 at an allosteric site. Although the physiological significance remains to be elucidated, we establish the structural and mechanistic basis for a biological activity in which ppGpp and pppGpp execute different functional roles. PMID:26460002

  16. β-Lactam formation by a non-ribosomal peptide synthetase during antibiotic biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Gaudelli, Nicole M.; Long, Darcie H.; Townsend, Craig A.

    2014-01-01

    Non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) are giant enzymes comprised of modules that house repeated sets of functional domains, which select, activate and couple amino acids drawn from a pool of nearly 500 potential building blocks.1 The structurally and stereochemically diverse peptides generated in this manner underlie the biosynthesis of a large sector of natural products. Many of their derived metabolites are bioactive such as the antibiotics vancomycin, bacitracin, daptomycin and the β-lactam-containing penicillins, cephalosporins and nocardicins. Although penicillins and cephalosporins are synthesised from a classically derived NRPS tripeptide (from ACVS, δ-(L-α-aminoadipyl)–L-cysteinyl–D-valine synthetase)2, we now report an unprecedented NRPS activity to both assemble a serine-containing peptide and mediate its cyclisation to the critical β-lactam ring of the nocardicin family of antibiotics. A histidine-rich condensation (C) domain, which typically carries out peptide bond formation during product assembly, was found to also synthesise the embedded 4-membered ring. Here, a mechanism is proposed and supporting experiments are described, which is distinct from the pathways that have evolved to the three other β-lactam antibiotic families: penicillin/cephalosporins, clavams and carbapenems. These findings raise the possibility that β-lactam rings can be regio- and stereospecifically integrated into engineered peptides for application as, for example, targeted protease inactivators.3,4 PMID:25624104

  17. Urea synthesis in the African lungfish Protopterus dolloi--hepatic carbamoyl phosphate synthetase III and glutamine synthetase are upregulated by 6 days of aerial exposure.

    PubMed

    Chew, Shit F; Ong, Tan F; Ho, Lilian; Tam, Wai L; Loong, Ai M; Hiong, Kum C; Wong, Wai P; Ip, Yuen K

    2003-10-01

    Like the marine ray Taeniura lymma, the African lungfish Protopterus dolloi possesses carbamoyl phosphate III (CPS III) in the liver and not carbamoyl phosphate I (CPS I), as in the mouse Mus musculus or as in other African lungfish reported elsewhere. However, similar to other African lungfish and tetrapods, hepatic arginase of P. dolloi is present mainly in the cytosol. Glutamine synthetase activity is present in both the mitochondrial and cytosolic fractions of the liver of P. dolloi. Therefore, we conclude that P. dolloi is a more primitive extant lungfish, which is intermediate between aquatic fish and terrestrial tetrapods, and represents a link in the fish-tetrapod continuum. During 6 days of aerial exposure, the ammonia excretion rate in P. dolloi decreased significantly to 8-16% of the submerged control. However, there were no significant increases in ammonia contents in the muscle, liver or plasma of specimens exposed to air for 6 days. These results suggest that (1). endogenous ammonia production was drastically reduced and (2). endogenous ammonia was detoxified effectively into urea. Indeed, there were significant decreases in glutamate, glutamine and lysine levels in the livers of fish exposed to air, which led to a decrease in the total free amino acid content. This indirectly confirms that the specimen had reduced its rates of proteolysis and/or amino acid catabolism to suppress endogenous ammonia production. Simultaneously, there were significant increases in urea levels in the muscle (8-fold), liver (10.5-fold) and plasma (12.6-fold) of specimens exposed to air for 6 days. Furthermore, there was an increase in the hepatic ornithine-urea cycle (OUC) capacity, with significant increases in the activities of CPS III (3.8-fold), argininosuccinate synthetase + lyase (1.8-fold) and, more importantly, glutamine synthetase (2.2-fold). This is the first report on the upregulation of OUC capacity and urea synthesis rate in an African lungfish exposed to air

  18. Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases are multivalent suppressors of defects due to human equivalent mutations in yeast mt tRNA genes.

    PubMed

    Montanari, Arianna; De Luca, Cristina; Frontali, Laura; Francisci, Silvia

    2010-09-01

    The use of the yeast model for the study of the molecular and cellular effects of the pathogenic base substitutions in human mitochondrial tRNA genes has recently been validated by the finding that the suppressing factors identified in yeast (the mitochondrial protein elongation factor EF-Tu and the cognate aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase) have suppressing activities also in human cells. In this paper we report a detailed analysis of the cross-suppressing activities of valyl- and leucyl-tRNA synthetases on different tRNA mutants. Glycerol growth, respiration, Northern analysis consistently show that similar suppressing effects can be obtained by these two yeast synthetases and by the orthologous human enzymes. As a whole the present data indicate that the suppression by mt aa-RS is probably not related to the enzyme activities per se, and may be due to a stabilizing chaperon-like effect of the synthetase molecules on the tRNA structure altered by the mutations.

  19. Crystal Structure and Function of 5-Formaminoimidazole-4-carboxamide Ribonucleotide Synthetase from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yang; White, Robert H.; Ealick, Steven E.

    2008-08-06

    Purine biosynthesis requires 10 enzymatic steps in higher organisms, while prokaryotes require an additional enzyme for step 6. In most organisms steps 9 and 10 are catalyzed by the purH gene product, a bifunctional enzyme with both 5-formaminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide (FAICAR) synthase and inosine monophosphate (IMP) cyclohydrolase activity. Recently it was discovered that Archaea utilize different enzymes to catalyze steps 9 and 10. An ATP-dependent FAICAR synthetase is encoded by the purP gene, and IMP cyclohydrolase is encoded by the purO gene. We have determined the X-ray crystal structures of FAICAR synthetase from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii complexed with various ligands, including the tertiary substrate complex and product complex. The enzyme belongs to the ATP grasp superfamily and is predicted to use a formyl phosphate intermediate formed by an ATP-dependent phosphorylation. In addition, we have determined the structures of a PurP orthologue from Pyrococcus furiosus, which is functionally unclassified, in three crystal forms. With approximately 50% sequence identity, P. furiosus PurP is structurally homologous to M. jannaschii PurP. A phylogenetic analysis was performed to explore the possible role of this functionally unclassified PurP.

  20. [Modification of phenylalanyl-tRNA-synthetase from Escherichia coli MRE600 by adenosine-5'-trimetaphosphate].

    PubMed

    Khodyreva, S N; Nevinskiĭ, G A; Ankilova, V N; Lavrik, O I

    1983-01-01

    Modification of phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase from E. coli MRE600 by adenosine-5'-trimetaphosphate, phosphorylating analog of ATP was shown to bring about the enzyme inactivation in the reactions of tRNA aminoacylation and ATP-[32P]pyrophosphate exchange. ATP when added in the reaction mixture protects the enzyme against inactivation in both reactions and decreases the level of covalent attachment of the analog. Phenylalanine has no protective effect. tRNA exhibits slight protective effect. Adenosine-5'-trimetaphosphate modifies both types (alpha and beta) of subunits of phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase which is of alpha 2 beta 2 structure. ATP protects both types of the enzyme subunits against the covalent attachment of the analog. Disposition of the ATP-binding centers in the contact region of the nonequivalent subunits of the enzyme was proposed. The level of covalent attachment of the analog to the enzyme exceeds the number of the enzyme active sites that may be a consequence of the other nucleotide-binding center labeling. PMID:6361520

  1. Cocrystal Structures of Glycyl-tRNA Synthetase in Complex with tRNA Suggest Multiple Conformational States in Glycylation*

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Xiangjing; Hao, Zhitai; Tian, Qingnan; Zhang, Zhemin; Zhou, Chun; Xie, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases are an ancient enzyme family that specifically charges tRNA molecules with cognate amino acids for protein synthesis. Glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GlyRS) is one of the most intriguing aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases due to its divergent quaternary structure and abnormal charging properties. In the past decade, mutations of human GlyRS (hGlyRS) were also found to be associated with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. However, the mechanisms of traditional and alternative functions of hGlyRS are poorly understood due to a lack of studies at the molecular basis. In this study we report crystal structures of wild type and mutant hGlyRS in complex with tRNA and with small substrates and describe the molecular details of enzymatic recognition of the key tRNA identity elements in the acceptor stem and the anticodon loop. The cocrystal structures suggest that insertions 1 and 3 work together with the active site in a cooperative manner to facilitate efficient substrate binding. Both the enzyme and tRNA molecules undergo significant conformational changes during glycylation. A working model of multiple conformations for hGlyRS catalysis is proposed based on the crystallographic and biochemical studies. This study provides insights into the catalytic pathway of hGlyRS and may also contribute to our understanding of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. PMID:24898252

  2. Impaired protein translation in Drosophila models for Charcot–Marie–Tooth neuropathy caused by mutant tRNA synthetases

    PubMed Central

    Niehues, Sven; Bussmann, Julia; Steffes, Georg; Erdmann, Ines; Köhrer, Caroline; Sun, Litao; Wagner, Marina; Schäfer, Kerstin; Wang, Guangxia; Koerdt, Sophia N.; Stum, Morgane; RajBhandary, Uttam L.; Thomas, Ulrich; Aberle, Hermann; Burgess, Robert W.; Yang, Xiang-Lei; Dieterich, Daniela; Storkebaum, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Dominant mutations in five tRNA synthetases cause Charcot–Marie–Tooth (CMT) neuropathy, suggesting that altered aminoacylation function underlies the disease. However, previous studies showed that loss of aminoacylation activity is not required to cause CMT. Here we present a Drosophila model for CMT with mutations in glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GARS). Expression of three CMT-mutant GARS proteins induces defects in motor performance and motor and sensory neuron morphology, and shortens lifespan. Mutant GARS proteins display normal subcellular localization but markedly reduce global protein synthesis in motor and sensory neurons, or when ubiquitously expressed in adults, as revealed by FUNCAT and BONCAT. Translational slowdown is not attributable to altered tRNAGly aminoacylation, and cannot be rescued by Drosophila Gars overexpression, indicating a gain-of-toxic-function mechanism. Expression of CMT-mutant tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase also impairs translation, suggesting a common pathogenic mechanism. Finally, genetic reduction of translation is sufficient to induce CMT-like phenotypes, indicating a causal contribution of translational slowdown to CMT. PMID:26138142

  3. Cocrystal structures of glycyl-tRNA synthetase in complex with tRNA suggest multiple conformational states in glycylation.

    PubMed

    Qin, Xiangjing; Hao, Zhitai; Tian, Qingnan; Zhang, Zhemin; Zhou, Chun; Xie, Wei

    2014-07-18

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases are an ancient enzyme family that specifically charges tRNA molecules with cognate amino acids for protein synthesis. Glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GlyRS) is one of the most intriguing aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases due to its divergent quaternary structure and abnormal charging properties. In the past decade, mutations of human GlyRS (hGlyRS) were also found to be associated with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. However, the mechanisms of traditional and alternative functions of hGlyRS are poorly understood due to a lack of studies at the molecular basis. In this study we report crystal structures of wild type and mutant hGlyRS in complex with tRNA and with small substrates and describe the molecular details of enzymatic recognition of the key tRNA identity elements in the acceptor stem and the anticodon loop. The cocrystal structures suggest that insertions 1 and 3 work together with the active site in a cooperative manner to facilitate efficient substrate binding. Both the enzyme and tRNA molecules undergo significant conformational changes during glycylation. A working model of multiple conformations for hGlyRS catalysis is proposed based on the crystallographic and biochemical studies. This study provides insights into the catalytic pathway of hGlyRS and may also contribute to our understanding of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

  4. Glutamine synthetase gene evolution: A good molecular clock

    SciTech Connect

    Pesole, G.; Lanvave, C.; Saccone, C. ); Bozzetti, M.P. ); Preparata, G. )

    1991-01-15

    Glutamine synthetase gene evolution in various animals, plants, and bacteria was evaluated by a general stationary Markov model. The evolutionary process proved to be unexpectedly regular even for a time span as long as that between the divergence of prokaryotes from eukaryotes. This enabled us to draw phylogenetic trees for species whose phylogeny cannot be easily reconstructed from the fossil record. The calculation of the times of divergence of the various organelle-specific enzymes led us to hypothesize that the pea and bean chloroplast genes for these enzymes originated from the duplication of nuclear genes as a result of the different metabolic needs of the various species. The data indicate that the duplication of plastid glutamine synthetase genes occurred long after the endosymbiotic events that produced the organelles themselves.

  5. Glutathione production by recombinant Escherichia coli expressing bifunctional glutathione synthetase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dezheng; Wang, Cheng; Wu, Hui; Li, Zhimin; Ye, Qin

    2016-01-01

    Glutathione (GSH) is an important bioactive substance applied widely in pharmaceutical and food industries. Due to the strong product inhibition in the GSH biosynthetic pathway, high levels of intracellular content, yield and productivity of GSH are difficult to achieve. Recently, a novel bifunctional GSH synthetase was identified to be less sensitive to GSH. A recombinant Escherichia coli strain expressing gshF encoding the bifunctional glutathione synthetase of Streptococcus thermophilus was constructed for GSH production. In this study, efficient GSH production using this engineered strain was investigated. The cultivation process was optimized by controlling dissolved oxygen (DO), amino acid addition and glucose feeding. 36.8 mM (11.3 g/L) GSH were formed at a productivity of 2.06 mM/h when the amino acid precursors (75 mM each) were added and glucose was supplied as the sole carbon and energy source. PMID:26586402

  6. Glutamine synthetase gene evolution: a good molecular clock.

    PubMed Central

    Pesole, G; Bozzetti, M P; Lanave, C; Preparata, G; Saccone, C

    1991-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase (EC 6.3.1.2) gene evolution in various animals, plants, and bacteria was evaluated by a general stationary Markov model. The evolutionary process proved to be unexpectedly regular even for a time span as long as that between the divergence of prokaryotes from eukaryotes. This enabled us to draw phylogenetic trees for species whose phylogeny cannot be easily reconstructed from the fossil record. Our calculation of the times of divergence of the various organelle-specific enzymes led us to hypothesize that the pea and bean chloroplast genes for these enzymes originated from the duplication of nuclear genes as a result of the different metabolic needs of the various species. Our data indicate that the duplication of plastid glutamine synthetase genes occurred long after the endosymbiotic events that produced the organelles themselves. PMID:1671172

  7. Aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetase Complexes in Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Havrylenko, Svitlana; Mirande, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases are essential enzymes for interpreting the genetic code. They are responsible for the proper pairing of codons on mRNA with amino acids. In addition to this canonical, translational function, they are also involved in the control of many cellular pathways essential for the maintenance of cellular homeostasis. Association of several of these enzymes within supramolecular assemblies is a key feature of organization of the translation apparatus in eukaryotes. It could be a means to control their oscillation between translational functions, when associated within a multi-aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase complex (MARS), and nontranslational functions, after dissociation from the MARS and association with other partners. In this review, we summarize the composition of the different MARS described from archaea to mammals, the mode of assembly of these complexes, and their roles in maintenance of cellular homeostasis. PMID:25807264

  8. Transforming growth factor beta 1 enhances expression of 50 kDa protein related to 2'-5' oligoadenylate synthetase in human sperm cells.

    PubMed

    Naz, R K; Kumar, R

    1991-01-01

    Human cellular polypeptide factors, namely interferon-alpha, interferon-gamma transforming growth factor (TGF)-alpha, and TGF-beta 1, were analyzed for their effect on motility of human sperm cells. Both interferons caused an inhibition of sperm cell motility due to direct cytotoxic effects without inducing 2'-5' oligoadenylate [2-5(A)]synthetase activity. TGF-alpha affected neither motility nor the levels of 2-5(A) synthetase in sperm cells. TGF-beta 1 had no affect on sperm motility, yet it caused an induction of 2-5(A)synthetase activity. Western immunoblot analysis of TGF-beta 1-treated sperm indicated an enhancement of a 50 kDa protein. Metabolic labeling of sperm cells revealed biosynthesis of one major protein of 50 kDa and at least five minor proteins in the range of 30-92 kDa; the level of 50 kDa protein increased after treatment with TGF-beta 1. The treatment of sperm cells with TGF-beta 1 did not affect their penetration in zona-free hamster eggs (SPA). These results indicate that TGF-beta 1 enhances expression of a 50 kDa protein related to 2-5(A) synthetase in human sperm cells along with other minor proteins, and this increase does not affect sperm motility and SPA.

  9. Construction of hybrid peptide synthetases for the production of alpha-l-aspartyl-l-phenylalanine, a precursor for the high-intensity sweetener aspartame.

    PubMed

    Duerfahrt, Thomas; Doekel, Sascha; Sonke, Theo; Quaedflieg, Peter J L M; Marahiel, Mohamed A

    2003-11-01

    Microorganisms produce a large number of pharmacologically and biotechnologically important peptides by using nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs). Due to their modular arrangement and their domain organization NRPSs are particularly suitable for engineering recombinant proteins for the production of novel peptides with interesting properties. In order to compare different strategies of domain assembling and module fusions we focused on the selective construction of a set of peptide synthetases that catalyze the formation of the dipeptide alpha-l-aspartyl-l-phenylalanine (Asp-Phe), the precursor of the high-intensity sweetener alpha-l-aspartyl-l-phenylalanine methyl ester (aspartame). The de novo design of six different Asp-Phe synthetases was achieved by fusion of Asp and Phe activating modules comprising adenylation, peptidyl carrier protein and condensation domains. Product release was ensured by a C-terminally fused thioesterase domains and quantified by HPLC/MS analysis. Significant differences of enzyme activity caused by the fusion strategies were observed. Two forms of the Asp-Phe dipeptide were detected, the expected alpha-Asp-Phe and the by-product beta-Asp-Phe. Dependent on the turnover rates ranging from 0.01-0.7 min-1, the amount of alpha-Asp-Phe was between 75 and 100% of overall product, indicating a direct correlation between the turnover numbers and the ratios of alpha-Asp-Phe to beta-Asp-Phe. Taken together these results provide useful guidelines for the rational construction of hybrid peptide synthetases.

  10. Expression of glutamine synthetase in balloon cells: a basis of their antiepileptic role?

    PubMed

    Buccoliero, Anna Maria; Barba, Carmen; Giordano, Flavio; Baroni, Gianna; Genitori, Lorenzo; Guerrini, Renzo; Taddei, Gian Luigi

    2015-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase is an enzyme involved in the clearance of glutamate, the most potent excitatory neurotransmitter. We studied the immunohistochemical expression of glutamine synthetase in neocortical samples from 5 children who underwent surgery for pharmacoresistant epilepsy and a histological diagnosis of focal cortical dysplasia IIb. In all cases, balloon cells, but not dysmorphic neurons, were immunopositive for glutamine synthetase. This finding suggests that balloon cells can be involved in the neutralization of glutamate and play a protective anti-seizure role.

  11. Functional expansion of human tRNA synthetases achieved by structural inventions.

    PubMed

    Guo, Min; Schimmel, Paul; Yang, Xiang-Lei

    2010-01-21

    Known as an essential component of the translational apparatus, the aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase family catalyzes the first step reaction in protein synthesis, that is, to specifically attach each amino acid to its cognate tRNA. While preserving this essential role, tRNA synthetases developed other roles during evolution. Human tRNA synthetases, in particular, have diverse functions in different pathways involving angiogenesis, inflammation and apoptosis. The functional diversity is further illustrated in the association with various diseases through genetic mutations that do not affect aminoacylation or protein synthesis. Here we review the accumulated knowledge on how human tRNA synthetases used structural inventions to achieve functional expansions.

  12. Complete set of orthogonal 21st aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase-amber, ochre and opal suppressor tRNA pairs: concomitant suppression of three different termination codons in an mRNA in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Köhrer, Caroline; Sullivan, Eric L.; RajBhandary, Uttam L.

    2004-01-01

    We describe the generation of a complete set of orthogonal 21st synthetase-amber, ochre and opal suppressor tRNA pairs including the first report of a 21st synthetase-ochre suppressor tRNA pair. We show that amber, ochre and opal suppressor tRNAs, derived from Escherichia coli glutamine tRNA, suppress UAG, UAA and UGA termination codons, respectively, in a reporter mRNA in mammalian cells. Activity of each suppressor tRNA is dependent upon the expression of E.coli glutaminyl-tRNA synthetase, indicating that none of the suppressor tRNAs are aminoacylated by any of the twenty aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases in the mammalian cytoplasm. Amber, ochre and opal suppressor tRNAs with a wide range of activities in suppression (increases of up to 36, 156 and 200-fold, respectively) have been generated by introducing further mutations into the suppressor tRNA genes. The most active suppressor tRNAs have been used in combination to concomitantly suppress two or three termination codons in an mRNA. We discuss the potential use of these 21st synthetase-suppressor tRNA pairs for the site-specific incorporation of two or, possibly, even three different unnatural amino acids into proteins and for the regulated suppression of amber, ochre and opal termination codons in mammalian cells. PMID:15576346

  13. Mutation affecting regulation of synthesis of acetohydroxy acid synthetase in Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, J H; Henderson, E K

    1975-01-01

    Altered regulation of synthesis of acetohydroxy acid synthetase (AHAS) was previously reported in a mutant of Escherichia coli strain K-12. The mutant strain, growing in minimal medium, exhibits a partial growth limiatation and derepression of AHAS, owing to deficient synthesis of isoleucine. The genetic lesion (ilvE503) causing the isoleucine limitation was shown to cause derepression of a valine-sensitive AHAS activity. The derepression effect of the ilvE503 mutation upon synthesis of AHAS was conclusively demonstrated by introducing both the ilvE503 allele and an altered AHAS (ilv-521) into the same cell. Evidence is presented that suggests the presence of multiple genetic regions for synthesis and control of the valine-sensitive AHAS activity. PMID:1089632

  14. CDP-diacylglycerol synthetase-controlled phosphoinositide availability limits VEGFA signaling and vascular morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Weijun; Pham, Van N.; Stratman, Amber N.; Castranova, Daniel; Kamei, Makoto; Kidd, Kameha R.; Lo, Brigid D.; Shaw, Kenna M.; Torres-Vazquez, Jesus; Mikelis, Constantinos M.; Gutkind, J. Silvio; Davis, George E.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms that regulate angiogenesis and translating these into effective therapies are of enormous scientific and clinical interests. In this report, we demonstrate the central role of CDP-diacylglycerol synthetase (CDS) in the regulation of VEGFA signaling and angiogenesis. CDS activity maintains phosphoinositide 4,5 bisphosphate (PIP2) availability through resynthesis of phosphoinositides, whereas VEGFA, mainly through phospholipase Cγ1, consumes PIP2 for signal transduction. Loss of CDS2, 1 of 2 vertebrate CDS enzymes, results in vascular-specific defects in zebrafish in vivo and failure of VEGFA-induced angiogenesis in endothelial cells in vitro. Absence of CDS2 also results in reduced arterial differentiation and reduced angiogenic signaling. CDS2 deficit-caused phenotypes can be successfully rescued by artificial elevation of PIP2 levels, and excess PIP2 or increased CDS2 activity can promote excess angiogenesis. These results suggest that availability of CDS-controlled resynthesis of phosphoinositides is essential for angiogenesis. PMID:22649102

  15. Non-standard amino acid recognition by Escherichia coli leucyl-tRNA synthetase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinis, S. A.; Fox, G. E.

    1997-01-01

    Recombinant E. coli leucyl-tRNA synthetase was screened for amino acid-dependent pyrophosphate exchange activity using noncognate aliphatic amino acids including norvaline, homocysteine, norleucine, methionine, and homoserine. [32P]-labeled reaction products were separated by thin layer chromatography using a novel solvent system and then quantified by phosphorimaging. Norvaline which differs from leucine by only one methyl group stimulated pyrophosphate exchange activity as did both homocysteine and norleucine to a lesser extent. The KM parameters for leucine and norvaline were measured to be 10 micromoles and 1.5 mM, respectively. Experiments are in progress to determine if norvaline is transferred to tRNA(Leu) and/or edited by a pre- or post-transfer mechanism.

  16. Functional and Structural Analysis of the Siderophore Synthetase AsbB through Reconstitution of the Petrobactin Biosynthetic Pathway from Bacillus anthracis*

    PubMed Central

    Nusca, Tyler D.; Kim, Youngchang; Maltseva, Natalia; Lee, Jung Yeop; Eschenfeldt, William; Stols, Lucy; Schofield, Michael M.; Scaglione, Jamie B.; Dixon, Shandee D.; Oves-Costales, Daniel; Challis, Gregory L.; Hanna, Philip C.; Pfleger, Brian F.; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Sherman, David H.

    2012-01-01

    Petrobactin, a mixed catechol-carboxylate siderophore, is required for full virulence of Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax. The asbABCDEF operon encodes the biosynthetic machinery for this secondary metabolite. Here, we show that the function of five gene products encoded by the asb operon is necessary and sufficient for conversion of endogenous precursors to petrobactin using an in vitro system. In this pathway, the siderophore synthetase AsbB catalyzes formation of amide bonds crucial for petrobactin assembly through use of biosynthetic intermediates, as opposed to primary metabolites, as carboxylate donors. In solving the crystal structure of the B. anthracis siderophore biosynthesis protein B (AsbB), we disclose a three-dimensional model of a nonribosomal peptide synthetase-independent siderophore (NIS) synthetase. Structural characteristics provide new insight into how this bifunctional condensing enzyme can bind and adenylate multiple citrate-containing substrates followed by incorporation of both natural and unnatural polyamine nucleophiles. This activity enables formation of multiple end-stage products leading to final assembly of petrobactin. Subsequent enzymatic assays with the nonribosomal peptide synthetase-like AsbC, AsbD, and AsbE polypeptides show that the alternative products of AsbB are further converted to petrobactin, verifying previously proposed convergent routes to formation of this siderophore. These studies identify potential therapeutic targets to halt deadly infections caused by B. anthracis and other pathogenic bacteria and suggest new avenues for the chemoenzymatic synthesis of novel compounds. PMID:22408253

  17. Isolation and characterization of rat liver microsomal R-ibuprofenoyl-CoA synthetase.

    PubMed

    Brugger, R; García Alía, B; Reichel, C; Waibel, R; Menzel, S; Brune, K; Geisslinger, G

    1996-10-11

    Microsomal long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase (EC 6.1.2.3.) has been suggested to be involved in the stereoselective formation of the CoA thioester of ibuprofen. In this study, we demonstrated that the microsomal enzyme from rat liver responsible for palmitoyl-CoA synthesis also catalyzes the formation of R-ibuprofenoyl-CoA in a Mg(2+)- and ATP-dependent process. Long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase from rat liver microsomes was purified to homogeneity as evidenced by SDS-gel electrophoresis. Simultaneous measurements of palmitoyl-CoA and R-ibuprofenoyl-CoA formation with HPLC in various fractions and purification steps during protein isolation revealed a high correlation between both activities. The purification procedure included solubilization of the microsomes obtained from rat livers with Triton X-100 and subsequent chromatography of the 100,000 x g supernatant on blue-sepharose, hydroxyapatite, and phosphocellulose. The purified enzyme exhibited an apparent molecular weight of 72 kDa as estimated by SDS gel electrophoresis, with specific activities of 71 nmol.min-1.mg-1 protein and 901 nmol.min-1.mg-1 protein for formation of R-ibuprofenoyl-CoA and palmitoyl-CoA, respectively. Palmitoyl-CoA formation catalyzed by the purified enzyme exhibited biphasic kinetics indicative of two isoforms, a high-affinity (KM 0.13 +/- 0.11 microM), low-capacity form and a low-affinity (KM 81 +/- 11.5 microM), high-capacity form. In contrast, measurement of R-ibuprofenoyl-CoA synthesis over a concentration range from 5 to 3000 microM showed the participation of a single CoA ligase with a KM of 184 +/- 19 microM, corresponding to the low-affinity isoform of palmitoyl-CoA synthesis with a marked enantioselectivity towards the R-form of ibuprofen. R-ibuprofenoyl-CoA formation of the enzyme preparation was inhibited by palmitic acid (KI 13.5 +/- 0.5 microM) and S-ibuprofen (KI 405 +/- 10 microM). In summary, these data give strong evidence for the identity of R-ibuprofenoyl-CoA and long

  18. Murine bubblegum orthologue is a microsomal very long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase.

    PubMed Central

    Fraisl, Peter; Forss-Petter, Sonja; Zigman, Mihaela; Berger, Johannes

    2004-01-01

    It has been suggested that a gene termed bubblegum (Bgm), encoding an acyl-CoA synthetase, could be involved in the pathogenesis of the inherited neurodegenerative disorder X-ALD (X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy). The precise function of the ALDP (ALD protein) still remains unclear. Aldp deficiency in mammals and Bgm deficiency in Drosophila led to accumulation of VLCFAs (very long-chain fatty acids). As a first step towards studying this interaction in wild-type versus Aldp-deficient mice, we analysed the expression pattern of the murine orthologue of the Bgm gene. In contrast with the ubiquitously expressed Ald gene, Bgm expression is restricted to the tissues that are affected by X-ALD such as brain, testis and adrenals. During mouse brain development, Bgm mRNA was first detected by Northern-blot analysis on embryonic day 18 and increased steadily towards adulthood, whereas the highest level of Ald mRNA was found on embryonic day 12 and decreased gradually during differentiation. Protein fractionation and confocal laser imaging of Bgm-green fluorescent protein fusion proteins revealed a microsomal localization that was different from peroxisomes (where Aldp is detected), endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi. Mouse Bgm showed acyl-CoA synthetase activity towards a VLCFA substrate in addition to LCFAs, and this activity was enriched in the microsomal compartment. Speculating that Bgm expression could be regulated by Ald deficiency, we compared the abundance of Bgm mRNA in wild-type and Ald knockout mice but observed no difference. Although mouse Bgm is capable of activating VLCFA, we conclude that a direct interaction between the mouse Bgm and the Aldp seems unlikely. PMID:14516277

  19. Response of transgenic poplar overexpressing cytosolic glutamine synthetase to phosphinothricin.

    PubMed

    Pascual, María Belén; Jing, Zhong Ping; Kirby, Edward G; Cánovas, Francisco M; Gallardo, Fernando

    2008-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) is the main enzyme involved in ammonia assimilation in plants and is the target of phosphinothricin (PPT), an herbicide commonly used for weed control in agriculture. As a result of the inhibition of GS, PPT also blocks photorespiration, resulting in the depletion of leaf amino acid pools leading to the plant death. Hybrid transgenic poplar (Populus tremula x P. alba INRA clone 7171-B4) overexpressing cytosolic GS is characterized by enhanced vegetative growth [Gallardo, F., Fu, J., Cantón, F.R., García-Gutiérrez, A., Cánovas, F.M., Kirby, E.G., 1999. Expression of a conifer glutamine synthetase gene in transgenic poplar. Planta 210, 19-26; Fu, J., Sampalo, R., Gallardo, F., Cánovas, F.M., Kirby, E.G., 2003. Assembly of a cytosolic pine glutamine synthetase holoenzyme in leaves of transgenic poplar leads to enhanced vegetative growth in young plants. Plant Cell Environ. 26, 411-418; Jing, Z.P., Gallardo, F., Pascual, M.B., Sampalo, R., Romero, J., Torres de Navarra, A., Cánovas, F.M., 2004. Improved growth in a field trial of transgenic hybrid poplar overexpressing glutamine synthetase. New Phytol. 164, 137-145], increased photosynthetic and photorespiratory capacities [El-Khatib, R.T., Hamerlynck, E.P., Gallardo, F., Kirby, E.G., 2004. Transgenic poplar characterized by ectopic expression of a pine cytosolic glutamine synthetase gene exhibits enhanced tolerance to water stress. Tree Physiol. 24, 729-736], enhanced tolerance to water stress (El-Khatib et al., 2004), and enhanced nitrogen use efficiency [Man, H.-M., Boriel, R., El-Khatib, R.T., Kirby, E.G., 2005. Characterization of transgenic poplar with ectopic expression of pine cytosolic glutamine synthetase under conditions of varying nitrogen availability. New Phytol. 167, 31-39]. In vitro plantlets of GS transgenic poplar exhibited enhanced resistance to PPT when compared with non-transgenic controls. After 30 days exposure to PPT at an equivalent dose of 275 g ha(-1), growth

  20. CMT-associated mutations in glycyl- and tyrosyl-tRNA synthetases exhibit similar pattern of toxicity and share common genetic modifiers in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Ermanoska, Biljana; Motley, William W.; Leitão-Gonçalves, Ricardo; Asselbergh, Bob; Lee, LaTasha H.; De Rijk, Peter; Sleegers, Kristel; Ooms, Tinne; Godenschwege, Tanja A.; Timmerman, Vincent; Fischbeck, Kenneth H.; Jordanova, Albena

    2014-01-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases are ubiquitously expressed proteins that charge tRNAs with their cognate amino acids. By ensuring the fidelity of protein synthesis, these enzymes are essential for viability of every cell. Yet, mutations in six tRNA synthetases specifically affect the peripheral nerves and cause Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT). The CMT-causing mutations in tyrosyl- and glycyl-tRNA synthetases (YARS and GARS, respectively) alter the activity of the proteins in a range of ways (some mutations do not impact charging function, while others abrogate it), making a loss of function in tRNA charging unlikely to be the cause of disease pathology. It is currently unknown which cellular mechanisms are triggered by the mutant enzymes and how this leads to neurodegeneration. Here, by expressing two pathogenic mutations (G240R, P234KY) in Drosophila, we generated a model for GARS-associated neuropathy. We observed compromised viability, and behavioral, electrophysiological and morphological impairment in flies expressing the cytoplasmic isoform of mutant GARS. Their features recapitulated several hallmarks of CMT pathophysiology and were similar to the phenotypes identified in our previously described Drosophila model of YARS-associated neuropathy. Furthermore, CG8316 and CG15599 – genes identified in a retinal degeneration screen to modify mutant YARS, also modified the mutant GARS phenotypes. Our study presents genetic evidence for common mutant-specific interactions between two CMT-associated aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, lending support for a shared mechanism responsible for the synthetase-induced peripheral neuropathies. PMID:24807208

  1. Glutamine Triggers Acetylation-Dependent Degradation of Glutamine Synthetase via the Thalidomide Receptor Cereblon.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, T Van; Lee, J Eugene; Sweredoski, Michael J; Yang, Seung-Joo; Jeon, Seung-Je; Harrison, Joseph S; Yim, Jung-Hyuk; Lee, Sang Ghil; Handa, Hiroshi; Kuhlman, Brian; Jeong, Ji-Seon; Reitsma, Justin M; Park, Chul-Seung; Hess, Sonja; Deshaies, Raymond J

    2016-03-17

    Cereblon (CRBN), a substrate receptor for the cullin-RING ubiquitin ligase 4 (CRL4) complex, is a direct protein target for thalidomide teratogenicity and antitumor activity of immunomodulatory drugs (IMiDs). Here we report that glutamine synthetase (GS) is an endogenous substrate of CRL4(CRBN). Upon exposing cells to high glutamine concentration, GS is acetylated at lysines 11 and 14, yielding a degron that is necessary and sufficient for binding and ubiquitylation by CRL4(CRBN) and degradation by the proteasome. Binding of acetylated degron peptides to CRBN depends on an intact thalidomide-binding pocket but is not competitive with IMiDs. These findings reveal a feedback loop involving CRL4(CRBN) that adjusts GS protein levels in response to glutamine and uncover a new function for lysine acetylation. PMID:26990986

  2. Cross-linking with diimidates of glutamine synthetase from Bacillus stearothermophilus.

    PubMed

    Sekiguchi, T; Oshiro, S; Goingo, E M; Nosoh, Y

    1979-08-01

    Glutamine synthetase [EC 6.3.2.1] from Bacillus stearothermophilus was modified with diethyl malonimidate (DEM), dimethyl adipimidate (DMA), and dimethyl suberimidate (DMS). DMA modified most epsilon-amino groups. On modification with DMA, formation of 3 to 4 cross-links/subunit resulted in a large increase in thermostability. The activity, allosteric properties and fluorescence spectrum of the enzyme were not changed on cross-linking. The SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoretic profiles of DEM-, DMA-, and DMS-modified enzymes suggested that the interaction berween six subunits in each of the two hexagonal rings of the protein are heterologous and are different from those between the piled subunits on different rings. PMID:39071

  3. Glutamine Triggers Acetylation-Dependent Degradation of Glutamine Synthetase via the Thalidomide Receptor Cereblon.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, T Van; Lee, J Eugene; Sweredoski, Michael J; Yang, Seung-Joo; Jeon, Seung-Je; Harrison, Joseph S; Yim, Jung-Hyuk; Lee, Sang Ghil; Handa, Hiroshi; Kuhlman, Brian; Jeong, Ji-Seon; Reitsma, Justin M; Park, Chul-Seung; Hess, Sonja; Deshaies, Raymond J

    2016-03-17

    Cereblon (CRBN), a substrate receptor for the cullin-RING ubiquitin ligase 4 (CRL4) complex, is a direct protein target for thalidomide teratogenicity and antitumor activity of immunomodulatory drugs (IMiDs). Here we report that glutamine synthetase (GS) is an endogenous substrate of CRL4(CRBN). Upon exposing cells to high glutamine concentration, GS is acetylated at lysines 11 and 14, yielding a degron that is necessary and sufficient for binding and ubiquitylation by CRL4(CRBN) and degradation by the proteasome. Binding of acetylated degron peptides to CRBN depends on an intact thalidomide-binding pocket but is not competitive with IMiDs. These findings reveal a feedback loop involving CRL4(CRBN) that adjusts GS protein levels in response to glutamine and uncover a new function for lysine acetylation.

  4. Glutamine synthetase desensitizes differentiated adipocytes to proinflammatory stimuli by raising intracellular glutamine levels.

    PubMed

    Palmieri, Erika Mariana; Spera, Iolanda; Menga, Alessio; Infantino, Vittoria; Iacobazzi, Vito; Castegna, Alessandra

    2014-12-20

    The role of glutamine synthetase (GS) during adipocyte differentiation is unclear. Here, we assess the impact of GS on the adipocytic response to a proinflammatory challenge at different differentiation stages. GS expression at the late stages of differentiation desensitized mature adipocytes to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) by increasing intracellular glutamine levels. Furthermore, LPS-activated mature adipocytes were unable to produce inflammatory mediators; LPS sensitivity was rescued following GS inhibition and the associated drop in intracellular glutamine levels. The ability of adipocytes to differentially respond to LPS during differentiation negatively correlates to GS expression and intracellular glutamine levels. Hence, modulation of intracellular glutamine levels by GS expression represents an endogenous mechanism through which mature adipocytes control the inflammatory response.

  5. A radiochemical assay for argininosuccinate synthetase with [U-14C]aspartate.

    PubMed

    Ratner, S

    1983-12-01

    A simple and sensitive radiochemical procedure to assay argininosuccinate synthetase activity in crude tissue homogenates and lysates of cultured cells is described. The new method depends on the location of 14C, uniformly, in the four carbons of aspartate. On incubation in the presence of excess of L-[U-14C]aspartate, L-citrulline, ATP, and an ATP-generating system, argininosuccinase and arginase, the [14C]fumarate formed is measured as the sum of malate and fumarate. After acidification the latter two acids are separated from [14C]aspartate on a small Dowex-50 column by elution with a few milliliters of water; the unutilized amino acid substrates remain on the column. With a specific radioactivity of 9 X 10(4) cpm, 1 to 2 nmol of product can be accurately measured under kinetically optimum conditions. PMID:6660522

  6. Inhibition of Long Chain Fatty Acyl-CoA Synthetase (ACSL) and Ischemia Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Prior, Allan M.; Zhang, Man; Blakeman, Nina; Datta, Palika; Pham, Hung; Young, Lindon H.; Weis, Margaret T.; Hua, Duy H.

    2014-01-01

    Various triacsin C analogs, containing different alkenyl chains and carboxylic acid bioisoteres including 4-aminobenzoic acid, isothiazolidine dioxide, hydroxylamine, hydroxytriazene, and oxadiazolidine dione, were synthesized and their inhibitions of long chain fatty acyl-CoA synthetase (ACSL) were examined. Two methods, a cell-based assay of ACSL activity and an in situ [14C]-palmitate incorporation into extractable lipids were used to study the inhibition. Using an in vivo leukocyte recruitment inhibition protocol, the translocation of one or more cell adhesion molecules from the cytoplasm to the plasma membrane on either the endothelium or leukocyte or both was inhibited by inhibitors 1, 9, and triacsin C. The results suggest that inhibition of ACSL may attenuate the vascular inflammatory component associated with ischemia reperfusion injury and lead to a decrease of infarct expansion. PMID:24480468

  7. Bimodular Peptide Synthetase SidE Produces Fumarylalanine in the Human Pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus

    PubMed Central

    Steinchen, Wieland; Lackner, Gerald; Yasmin, Sabiha; Schrettl, Markus; Dahse, Hans-Martin

    2013-01-01

    The filamentous mold Aspergillus fumigatus causes invasive aspergillosis, a potentially life-threatening infectious disease, in humans. The sidE gene encodes a bimodular peptide synthetase and was shown previously to be strongly upregulated during initiation of murine lung infection. In this study, we characterized the two adenylation domains of SidE with the ATP-[32P]pyrophosphate exchange assay in vitro, which identified fumarate and l-alanine, respectively, as the preferred substrates. Using full-length holo-SidE, fumarylalanine (FA) formation was observed in vitro. Furthermore, FA was identified in A. fumigatus culture supernatants under inducing conditions, unless sidE was genetically inactivated. As FA is structurally related to established pharmaceutical products exerting immunomodulatory activity, this work may contribute to our understanding of the virulence of A. fumigatus. PMID:23974138

  8. Structural basis for full-spectrum inhibition of translational functions on a tRNA synthetase

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Pengfei; Yu, Xue; Jeong, Seung Jae; Mirando, Adam; Chen, Kaige; Chen, Xin; Kim, Sunghoon; Francklyn, Christopher S.; Guo, Min

    2015-01-01

    The polyketide natural product borrelidin displays antibacterial, antifungal, antimalarial, anticancer, insecticidal and herbicidal activities through the selective inhibition of threonyl-tRNA synthetase (ThrRS). How borrelidin simultaneously attenuates bacterial growth and suppresses a variety of infections in plants and animals is not known. Here we show, using X-ray crystal structures and functional analyses, that a single molecule of borrelidin simultaneously occupies four distinct subsites within the catalytic domain of bacterial and human ThrRSs. These include the three substrate-binding sites for amino acid, ATP and tRNA associated with aminoacylation, and a fourth ‘orthogonal’ subsite created as a consequence of binding. Thus, borrelidin competes with all three aminoacylation substrates, providing a potent and redundant mechanism to inhibit ThrRS during protein synthesis. These results highlight a surprising natural design to achieve the quadrivalent inhibition of translation through a highly conserved family of enzymes. PMID:25824639

  9. Chemical Probes Allow Structural Insight into the Condensation Reaction of Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetases.

    PubMed

    Bloudoff, Kristjan; Alonzo, Diego A; Schmeing, T Martin

    2016-03-17

    Nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) synthesize a vast variety of small molecules, including antibiotics, antitumors, and immunosuppressants. The NRPS condensation (C) domain catalyzes amide bond formation, the central chemical step in nonribosomal peptide synthesis. The catalytic mechanism and substrate determinants of the reaction are under debate. We developed chemical probes to structurally study the NRPS condensation reaction. These substrate analogs become covalently tethered to a cysteine introduced near the active site, to mimic covalent substrate delivery by carrier domains. They are competent substrates in the condensation reaction and behave similarly to native substrates. Co-crystal structures show C domain-substrate interactions, and suggest that the catalytic histidine's principle role is to position the α-amino group for nucleophilic attack. Structural insight provided by these co-complexes also allowed us to alter the substrate specificity profile of the reaction with a single point mutation.

  10. Fluorine-19 nuclear magnetic resonance and biochemical characterization of fluorotyrosine-labeled-thymidylate-synthetase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosson, Dan; Lewis, Charles A.; Ellis, Paul D.; Dunlap, R. Bruce

    1994-03-01

    Fluorotyrosine has been incorporated into thymidylate synthetase from Lactobacillus casei by growth of the bacterium in media containing 3-fluorotyrosine. The enzyme exhibited a specific activity 70% of that of the normal enzyme and formed a covalent binary complex with pyrimidine nucleotides, as well as a covalent ternary complex with 5-fluorodeoxyuridylate and 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate. 19F nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy has been used to follow the formation of these complexes. 5-Fluorodeoxyuridylate, dUMP, dTMP and dCMP produced identical conformational changes in the enzyme as monitored by the fluorotyrosyl resonances. Ternary complex formation of the fluorotyrosine-containing enzyme with 5-fluorodeoxyuridylate and 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate resulted in further spectral changes.

  11. A Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase-derived Iron(III) Complex from the Pathogenic Fungus Aspergillus fumigatus

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Wen-Bing; Baccile, Joshua A.; Bok, Jin Woo; Chen, Yiming; Keller, Nancy P.; Schroeder, Frank C.

    2013-01-01

    Small molecules (SMs) play central roles as virulence factors of pathogenic fungi and bacteria; however, genomic analyses suggest that the majority of microbial SMs have remained uncharacterized. Based on microarray analysis followed by comparative metabolomics of overexpression/knockout mutants we identified a tryptophan-derived iron(III)-complex, hexadehydroastechrome (HAS), as the major product of the cryptic has non-ribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) gene cluster in the human pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus. Activation of the has cluster created a highly virulent A. fumigatus strain that increased mortality of infected mice. Comparative metabolomics of different mutant strains allowed to propose a pathway for HAS biosynthesis and further revealed cross-talk with another NRPS pathway producing the anti-cancer fumitremorgins. PMID:23360537

  12. Plant growth is influenced by glutamine synthetase-catalyzed nitrogen metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Langston-Unkefer, P.J.

    1991-06-11

    Ammonia assimilation has been implicated as participating in regulation of nitrogen fixation in free-living bacteria. In fact, these simple organisms utilize an integrated regulation of carbon and nitrogen metabolism; we except to observe an integration of nitrogen and carbon fixation in plants; how could these complex systems grow efficiently and compete in the ecosystem without coordinating these two crucial activities We have been investigating the role of ammonia assimilation regulating the complex symbiotic nitrogen fixation of legumes. Just as is observed in the simple bacterial systems, perturbation of ammonia assimilation in legumes results in increased overall nitrogen fixation. The perturbed plants have increased growth and total nitrogen fixation capability. Because we have targeted the first enyzme in ammonia assimilation, glutamine synthetase, this provides a marker that could be used to assist selection or screening for increased biomass yield. 45 refs., 4 tabs.

  13. Methods and composition for the production of orthogonal tRNA-aminoacyltRNA synthetase pairs

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei; Anderson, John Christopher; Chin, Jason; Liu, David R.; Magliery, Thomas J.; Meggers, Eric L.; Mehl, Ryan Aaron; Pastrnak, Miro; Santoro, Steven William; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2008-04-08

    This invention provides compositions and methods for generating components of protein biosynthetic machinery including orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases. Methods for identifying orthogonal pairs are also provided. These components can be used to incorporate unnatural amino acids into proteins in vivo.

  14. Methods and composition for the production of orthogonal tRNA-aminoacyltRNA synthetase pairs

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei; Anderson, John Christopher; Chin, Jason; Liu, David R.; Magliery, Thomas J.; Meggers, Eric L.; Mehl, Ryan Aaron; Pastrnak, Miro; Santoro, Steven William; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2012-05-22

    This invention provides compositions and methods for generating components of protein biosynthetic machinery including orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases. Methods for identifying orthogonal pairs are also provided. These components can be used to incorporate unnatural amino acids into proteins in vivo.

  15. Methods and compositions for the production of orthogonal tRNA-aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase pairs

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei; Anderson, John Christopher; Chin, Jason W.; Liu, David R.; Magliery, Thomas J.; Meggers, Eric L.; Mehl, Ryan Aaron; Pastrnak, Miro; Santoro, Stephen William; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2011-09-06

    This invention provides compositions and methods for generating components of protein biosynthetic machinery including orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases. Methods for identifying orthogonal pairs are also provided. These components can be used to incorporate unnatural amino acids into proteins in vivo.

  16. Methods and composition for the production of orthogonal tRNA-aminoacyltRNA synthetase pairs

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei; Anderson, John Christopher; Chin, Jason; Liu, David R.; Magliery, Thomas J.; Meggers, Eric L.; Mehl, Ryan Aaron; Pastrnak, Miro; Santoro, Stephen William; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2010-05-11

    This invention provides compositions and methods for generating components of protein biosynthetic machinery including orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases. Methods for identifying orthogonal pairs are also provided. These components can be used to incorporate unnatural amino acids into proteins in vivo.

  17. Caspase-dependent cleavage of carbamoyl phosphate synthetase II during apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Min; Kozlowski, Piotr; Collins, Matthew; Wang, Yanhong; Haystead, Timothy A; Graves, Lee M

    2002-03-01

    Carbamoyl phosphate synthetase II (CPSII) is part of carbamoyl phosphate synthetase/aspartate transcarbamoylase/dihydroorotase (CAD), a multienzymatic protein required for the de novo synthesis of pyrimidine nucleotides and cell growth. Herein, we identify CAD as a substrate for caspase-3 degradation in both in vitro and in vivo models of apoptosis. Withdrawal of interleukin-3 or incubation with staurosporine (STS) or doxorubicin (Dox) resulted in proteolytic cleavage of CAD in a myeloid precursor cell line (32D) or in a cell line over-expressing CAD. The rapid decline in the CPSII activity paralleled the degradation of CAD and preceded the appearance of Annexin-V-stained apoptotic cells and DNA fragmentation. These events correlated closely with the activation of caspase-3 in these cells and were prevented by the cell-permeable caspase inhibitor N-benzyloxycarbonyl-Asp-Glu-Val-Asp fluoromethyl ketone. Moreover, the incubation of purified CAD with recombinant caspase-3 in vitro generated CAD fragments that were similar to those obtained in vivo. Edman sequencing revealed that two of the major caspase-3 cleavage sites occurred at the sequences EAVD/G and VACD/G within the catalytic (B2) and allosteric (B3) domains of CAD, thus providing a potential mechanism for the rapid inactivation of CPSII during apoptosis. Consistent with this, an enhanced loss of the intracellular pyrimidines (UTP and CTP) was observed in response to STS or DOX-induced apoptosis. Therefore, these studies show that CAD is a novel target for caspase-dependent regulation during apoptosis and suggest that the selective inactivation of pyrimidine nucleotide synthesis accompanies the process of apoptosis. PMID:11854437

  18. Distinctive properties and expression profiles of glutamine synthetase from a plant symbiotic fungus.

    PubMed Central

    Montanini, Barbara; Betti, Marco; Márquez, Antonio J; Balestrini, Raffaella; Bonfante, Paola; Ottonello, Simone

    2003-01-01

    The nucleotide sequences reported in this paper have been submitted to the GenBank(R)/EBI Nucleotide Sequence Databases with accession numbers AF462037 (glutamine synthetase) and AF462032 (glutamate synthase). Nitrogen retrieval and assimilation by symbiotic ectomycorrhizal fungi is thought to play a central role in the mutualistic interaction between these organisms and their plant hosts. Here we report on the molecular characterization of the key N-assimilation enzyme glutamine synthetase from the mycorrhizal ascomycete Tuber borchii (TbGS). TbGS displayed a strong positive co-operativity ( n =1.7+/-0.29) and an unusually high S(0.5) value (54+/-16 mM; S(0.5) is the substrate concentration value at which v =(1/2) V (max)) for glutamate, and a correspondingly low sensitivity towards inhibition by the glutamate analogue herbicide phosphinothricin. The TbGS mRNA, which is encoded by a single-copy gene in the Tuber genome, was up-regulated in N-starved mycelia and returned to basal levels upon resupplementation of various forms of N, the most effective of which was nitrate. Both responses were accompanied by parallel variations of TbGS protein amount and glutamine synthetase activity, thus indicating that TbGS levels are primarily controlled at the pre-translational level. As revealed by a comparative analysis of the TbGS mRNA and of the mRNAs for the metabolically related enzymes glutamate dehydrogenase and glutamate synthase, TbGS is not only the sole messenger that positively responds to N starvation, but also the most abundant under N-limiting conditions. A similar, but even more discriminating expression pattern, with practically undetectable glutamate dehydrogenase mRNA levels, was observed in fruitbodies. The TbGS mRNA was also found to be expressed in symbiosis-engaged hyphae, with distinctively higher hybridization signals in hyphae that were penetrating among and within root cells. PMID:12683951

  19. The evolution of Class II Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases and the first code.

    PubMed

    Smith, Temple F; Hartman, Hyman

    2015-11-30

    Class II Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases are a set of very ancient multi domain proteins. The evolution of the catalytic domain of Class II synthetases can be reconstructed from three peptidyl-hairpins. Further evolution from this primordial catalytic core leads to a split of the Class II synthetases into two divisions potentially associated with the operational code. The earliest form of this code likely coded predominantly Glycine (Gly), Proline (Pro), Alanine (Ala) and "Lysine"/Aspartic acid (Lys/Asp). There is a paradox in these synthetases beginning with a hairpin structure before the Genetic Code existed. A resolution is found in the suggestion that the primordial Aminoacyl synthetases formed in a transition from a Thioester world to a Phosphate ester world. PMID:26472323

  20. Chitin synthetases in Candida albicans: a review on their subcellular distribution and biological function.

    PubMed

    Martínez, J P; Gozalbo, D

    1994-09-01

    In the light of recent genetic advances, some results regarding chitin biosynthetic activities are reviewed in this paper. Genes coding for distinct enzymes displaying chitin synthetase activities have been characterized in Saccharomyces cerevisiae as well as in other fungal species including Candida albicans. Several activities seem to exist in the cells: (i) one zymogenic, located in cytoplasmic vesicles called chitosomes, although the presence of other types of vesicles with zymogenic activity cannot be completely discarded, and (ii) plasma membrane associated activities (the active enzyme and probably two distinct pools of zymogenic activity). Possible relationships between these activities, if any, remain to be determined. These multiplicity of enzymes is not surprising taking into account that chitin biosynthesis is required during very well defined temporal and spatial events of the cell cycle. A general repair function for one of the chitin biosynthetic activities is proposed as a possible salvage mechanism to warrant cell survival after wall damage has been caused, since chitin appears to be the most suitable polymer to carry out this function due to its particular physico-chemical properties.

  1. Regulation of Escherichia coli carbamyl phosphate synthetase. Evidence for overlap of the allosteric nucleotide binding sites.

    PubMed

    Boettcher, B; Meister, A

    1982-12-10

    Regulation of Escherichia coli carbamyl phosphate synthetase by UMP and IMP was examined in studies with various analogs of these nucleotides. Whereas UMP inhibits enzyme activity, the arabinose analog of UMP was found to be an activator. dUMP neither activates nor inhibits, but binds to the enzyme in a manner similar to UMP as evaluated by direct binding studies, sedimentation behavior, and ultraviolet difference spectral measurements. dUMP decreases inhibition by UMP and activation by IMP, but has no effect on activation by L-ornithine. The findings are in accord with the view that IMP and UMP bind to the same region of the enzyme; a possible general model for such overlapping binding sites is considered. Additional evidence is presented that inorganic phosphate can modulate regulation of the activity by nucleotides. Phosphate (and arsenate) markedly increase inhibition by UMP, decrease activation by IMP, but do not affect activation by L-ornithine. The extent of activation by IMP and by L-ornithine and that of inhibition by UMP are decreased when Mg2+ concentrations are increased relative to a fixed concentration of ATP. The findings suggest that the allosteric effectors may affect affinity of the enzyme for divalent metal ions as well as, as previously shown, the affinity of the enzyme for Mg-ATP. PMID:6754720

  2. MS_RHII-RSD, a dual-function RNase HII-(p)ppGpp synthetase from Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    PubMed

    Murdeshwar, Maya S; Chatterji, Dipankar

    2012-08-01

    In the noninfectious soil saprophyte Mycobacterium smegmatis, intracellular levels of the stress alarmones guanosine tetraphosphate and guanosine pentaphosphate, together termed (p)ppGpp, are regulated by the enzyme Rel(Msm). This enzyme consists of a single, bifunctional polypeptide chain that is capable of both synthesizing and hydrolyzing (p)ppGpp. The rel(Msm) knockout strain of M. smegmatis (Δrel(Msm)) is expected to show a (p)ppGpp null [(p)ppGpp(0)] phenotype. Contrary to this expectation, the strain is capable of synthesizing (p)ppGpp in vivo. In this study, we identify and functionally characterize the open reading frame (ORF), MSMEG_5849, that encodes a second functional (p)ppGpp synthetase in M. smegmatis. In addition to (p)ppGpp synthesis, the 567-amino-acid-long protein encoded by this gene is capable of hydrolyzing RNA·DNA hybrids and bears similarity to the conventional RNase HII enzymes. We have classified this protein as actRel(Msm) in accordance with the recent nomenclature proposed and have named it MS_RHII-RSD, indicating the two enzymatic activities present [RHII, RNase HII domain, originally identified as domain of unknown function 429 (DUF429), and RSD, RelA_SpoT nucleotidyl transferase domain, the SYNTH domain responsible for (p)ppGpp synthesis activity]. MS_RHII-RSD is expressed and is constitutively active in vivo and behaves like a monofunctional (p)ppGpp synthetase in vitro. The occurrence of the RNase HII and (p)ppGpp synthetase domains together on the same polypeptide chain is suggestive of an in vivo role for this novel protein as a link connecting the essential life processes of DNA replication, repair, and transcription to the highly conserved stress survival pathway, the stringent response.

  3. Chemical modification of cysteine and tyrosine residues in formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase from Clostridium thermoaceticum

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, J.I.; Ljungdahl, L.G.

    1982-04-01

    The chemical modification of cysteine and tyrosine residues in formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase from Clostridium thermoaceticum has been examined relative to enzymatic activity and reactivity of these groups in the native protein. 4,4'-Dipyridyl disulfide, dansylaziridine, and fluorescein mercuric acetate all reacted with just one of six sulfhydryls per enzyme subunit, resulting in activities of 100, 95 and 70%, respectively. The K/sub m/ values for MgATP, formate, and tetrahydrofolate were unaltered in the modified enzymes. ATP did produce a 2.5-fold reduction in the rate of reaction between the enzyme and 4,4'-dipyridyl disulfide. Tetranitromethane reacted most rapidly with a single sulfhydryl group per subunit to produce a 20 to 30% loss in activity. Subsequent additions of tetranitromethane modified 2.2 tyrosines per subunit which was proportional to the loss of the remaining enzymatic activity. Folic acid, a competitive inhibitor, protected against modification of the tyrosines and the associated activity losses; however, the oxidation of the single sulfhydryl group and the initial 20 to 30% activity loss were unaffected. In the presence of folic acid, higher concentrations of tetranitromethane produced a loss of the remaining activity proportional to the modification of 1.2 tyrosines per subunit. It is proposed that at least 1 tyrosine critical for enzymatic activity is located at or near the folic acid/tetrahydrofolate binding site.

  4. Holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency pre and post newborn screening.

    PubMed

    Donti, Taraka R; Blackburn, Patrick R; Atwal, Paldeep S

    2016-06-01

    Holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorder of biotin metabolism resulting in multiple carboxylase deficiency. The typical presentation described in the medical literature is of neonatal onset within hours to weeks of birth with emesis, hypotonia, lethargy, seizures, metabolic ketolactic acidosis, hyperammonemia, developmental delay, skin rash and alopecia. The condition is screened for by newborn screening (NBS) tandem mass spectroscopy by elevated hydroxypentanoylcarnitine on dried blood spots. Urine organic acid profile may demonstrate elevated lactic, 3-OH isovaleric, 3-OH propionic, 3-MCC, methylcitric acids, and tiglylglycine consistent with loss of function of the above carboxylases. Here we describe a cohort of patients, 2 diagnosed pre-NBS and 3 post-NBS with broad differences in initial presentation and phenotype. In addition, prior to the advent of NBS, there are isolated reports of late-onset holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency in the medical literature, which describe patients diagnosed between 1 and 8 years of life, however to our knowledge there are no reports of late-onset HCLS being missed by NBS. Also we report two cases, each with novel pathogenic variants HCLS, diagnosed at age 3 years and 21 months respectively. The first patient had a normal newborn screen whilst the second had an abnormal newborn screen but was misdiagnosed as 3-methylcrotonylcarboxylase (3-MCC) deficiency and subsequently lost to follow-up until they presented again with severe metabolic acidosis.

  5. Novel insights into regulation of asparagine synthetase in conifers.

    PubMed

    Canales, Javier; Rueda-López, Marina; Craven-Bartle, Blanca; Avila, Concepción; Cánovas, Francisco M

    2012-01-01

    Asparagine, a key amino acid for nitrogen storage and transport in plants, is synthesized via the ATP-dependent reaction catalyzed by the enzyme asparagine synthetase (AS; EC 6.3.5.4). In this work, we present the molecular analysis of two full-length cDNAs that encode asparagine synthetase in maritime pine (Pinus pinaster Ait.), PpAS1, and PpAS2. Phylogenetic analyses of the deduced amino acid sequences revealed that both genes are class II AS, suggesting an ancient origin of these genes in plants. A comparative study of PpAS1 and PpAS2 gene expression profiles showed that PpAS1 gene is highly regulated by developmental and environmental factors, while PpAS2 is expressed constitutively. To determine the molecular mechanisms underpinning the differential expression of PpAS1, the promoter region of the gene was isolated and putative binding sites for MYB transcription factors were identified. Gel mobility shift assays showed that a MYB protein from Pinus taeda (PtMYB1) was able to interact with the promoter region of PpAS1. Furthermore, transient expression analyses in pine cells revealed a negative effect of PtMYB1 on PpAS1 expression. The potential role of MYB factors in the transcriptional regulation of PpAS1 in vascular cells is discussed.

  6. Holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency pre and post newborn screening.

    PubMed

    Donti, Taraka R; Blackburn, Patrick R; Atwal, Paldeep S

    2016-06-01

    Holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorder of biotin metabolism resulting in multiple carboxylase deficiency. The typical presentation described in the medical literature is of neonatal onset within hours to weeks of birth with emesis, hypotonia, lethargy, seizures, metabolic ketolactic acidosis, hyperammonemia, developmental delay, skin rash and alopecia. The condition is screened for by newborn screening (NBS) tandem mass spectroscopy by elevated hydroxypentanoylcarnitine on dried blood spots. Urine organic acid profile may demonstrate elevated lactic, 3-OH isovaleric, 3-OH propionic, 3-MCC, methylcitric acids, and tiglylglycine consistent with loss of function of the above carboxylases. Here we describe a cohort of patients, 2 diagnosed pre-NBS and 3 post-NBS with broad differences in initial presentation and phenotype. In addition, prior to the advent of NBS, there are isolated reports of late-onset holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency in the medical literature, which describe patients diagnosed between 1 and 8 years of life, however to our knowledge there are no reports of late-onset HCLS being missed by NBS. Also we report two cases, each with novel pathogenic variants HCLS, diagnosed at age 3 years and 21 months respectively. The first patient had a normal newborn screen whilst the second had an abnormal newborn screen but was misdiagnosed as 3-methylcrotonylcarboxylase (3-MCC) deficiency and subsequently lost to follow-up until they presented again with severe metabolic acidosis. PMID:27114915

  7. Probing the allosteric mechanism in pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetase using energy-weighted network formalism.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Moitrayee; Vishveshwara, Saraswathi

    2011-07-19

    Pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetase (PylRS) is an atypical enzyme responsible for charging tRNA(Pyl) with pyrrolysine, despite lacking precise tRNA anticodon recognition. This dimeric protein exhibits allosteric regulation of function, like any other tRNA synthetases. In this study we examine the paths of allosteric communication at the atomic level, through energy-weighted networks of Desulfitobacterium hafniense PylRS (DhPylRS) and its complexes with tRNA(Pyl) and activated pyrrolysine. We performed molecular dynamics simulations of the structures of these complexes to obtain an ensemble conformation-population perspective. Weighted graph parameters relevant to identifying key players and ties in the context of social networks such as edge/node betweenness, closeness index, and the concept of funneling are explored in identifying key residues and interactions leading to shortest paths of communication in the structure networks of DhPylRS. Further, the changes in the status of important residues and connections and the costs of communication due to ligand induced perturbations are evaluated. The optimal, suboptimal, and preexisting paths are also investigated. Many of these parameters have exhibited an enhanced asymmetry between the two subunits of the dimeric protein, especially in the pretransfer complex, leading us to conclude that encoding of function goes beyond the sequence/structure of proteins. The local and global perturbations mediated by appropriate ligands and their influence on the equilibrium ensemble of conformations also have a significant role to play in the functioning of proteins. Taking a comprehensive view of these observations, we propose that the origin of many functional aspects (allostery and half-sites reactivity in the case of DhPylRS) lies in subtle rearrangements of interactions and dynamics at a global level.

  8. Comparison of histidine recognition in human and trypanosomatid histidyl-tRNA synthetases

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Cho Yeow; Wetzel, Allan B; de van der Schueren, Will J.; Hol, Wim G. J.

    2014-01-01

    As part of a project aimed at obtaining selective inhibitors and drug-like compounds targeting tRNA synthetases from trypanosomatids, we have elucidated the crystal structure of human cytosolic histidyl-tRNA synthetase (Hs-cHisRS) in complex with histidine in order to be able to compare human and parasite enzymes. The resultant structure of Hs-cHisRS·His represents the substrate-bound state (H-state) of the enzyme. It provides an interesting opportunity to compare with ligand-free and imidazole-bound structures Hs-cHisRS published recently, both of which represent the ligand-free state (F-state) of the enzyme. The H-state Hs-cHisRS undergoes conformational changes in active site residues and several conserved motif of HisRS, compared to F-state structures. The histidine forms eight hydrogen bonds with HisRS of which six engage the amino and carboxylate groups of this amino acid. The availability of published imidazole-bound structure provides a unique opportunity to dissect the structural roles of individual chemical groups of histidine. Remarkably, the analysis revealed the importance of the amino and carboxylate groups, of the histidine in leading to these dramatic conformational changes of the H-state. Further, comparison with previously published trypanosomatid HisRS structures reveals a pocket in the F-state of the parasite enzyme that may provide opportunities for developing specific inhibitors of Trypanosoma brucei HisRS. PMID:25151410

  9. A minimalist mitochondrial threonyl-tRNA synthetase exhibits tRNA-isoacceptor specificity during proofreading

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiao-Long; Ruan, Zhi-Rong; Wang, Meng; Fang, Zhi-Peng; Wang, Yong; Chen, Yun; Liu, Ru-Juan; Eriani, Gilbert; Wang, En-Duo

    2014-01-01

    Yeast mitochondria contain a minimalist threonyl-tRNA synthetase (ThrRS) composed only of the catalytic core and tRNA binding domain but lacking the entire editing domain. Besides the usual tRNAThr2, some budding yeasts, such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, also contain a non-canonical tRNAThr1 with an enlarged 8-nucleotide anticodon loop, reprograming the usual leucine CUN codons to threonine. This raises interesting questions about the aminoacylation fidelity of such ThrRSs and the possible contribution of the two tRNAThrs during editing. Here, we found that, despite the absence of the editing domain, S. cerevisiae mitochondrial ThrRS (ScmtThrRS) harbors a tRNA-dependent pre-transfer editing activity. Remarkably, only the usual tRNAThr2 stimulated pre-transfer editing, thus, establishing the first example of a synthetase exhibiting tRNA-isoacceptor specificity during pre-transfer editing. We also showed that the failure of tRNAThr1 to stimulate tRNA-dependent pre-transfer editing was due to the lack of an editing domain. Using assays of the complementation of a ScmtThrRS gene knockout strain, we showed that the catalytic core and tRNA binding domain of ScmtThrRS co-evolved to recognize the unusual tRNAThr1. In combination, the results provide insights into the tRNA-dependent editing process and suggest that tRNA-dependent pre-transfer editing takes place in the aminoacylation catalytic core. PMID:25414329

  10. Thermodynamic analysis reveals a temperature-dependent change in the catalytic mechanism of bacillus stearothermophilus tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Gyanesh; First, Eric A

    2009-02-13

    Catalysis of tRNA(Tyr) aminoacylation by tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase can be divided into two steps. In the first step, tyrosine is activated by ATP to form the tyrosyl-adenylate intermediate. In the second step, the tyrosyl moiety is transferred to the 3' end of tRNA. To investigate the roles that enthalpic and entropic contributions play in catalysis by Bacillus stearothermophilus tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase (TyrRS), the temperature dependence for the activation of tyrosine and subsequent transfer to tRNA(Tyr) has been determined using single turnover kinetic methods. A van't Hoff plot for binding of ATP to the TyrRS.Tyr complex reveals three distinct regions. Particularly striking is the change occurring at 25 degrees C, where the values of DeltaH(0) and DeltaS(0) go from -144 kJ/mol and -438 J/mol K below 25 degrees C to +137.9 kJ/mol and +507 J/mol K above 25 degrees C. Nonlinear Eyring and van't Hoff plots are also observed for formation of the TyrRS.[Tyr-ATP](double dagger) and TyrRS.Tyr-AMP complexes. Comparing the van't Hoff plots for the binding of ATP to tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase in the absence and presence of saturating tyrosine concentrations indicates that the temperature-dependent changes in DeltaH(0) and DeltaS(0) for the binding of ATP only occur when tyrosine is bound to the enzyme. Previous investigations revealed a similar synergistic interaction between the tyrosine and ATP substrates when the "KMSKS" signature sequence is deleted or replaced by a nonfunctional sequence. We propose that the temperature-dependent changes in DeltaH(0) and DeltaS(0) are because of the KMSKS signature sequence being conformationally constrained and unable to disrupt this synergistic interaction below 25 degrees C. PMID:19098308

  11. Cloning and biochemical characterization of indole-3-acetic acid-amino acid synthetase PsGH3 from pea.

    PubMed

    Ostrowski, Maciej; Mierek-Adamska, Agnieszka; Porowińska, Dorota; Goc, Anna; Jakubowska, Anna

    2016-10-01

    Phytohormone conjugation is one of the mechanisms that maintains a proper hormonal homeostasis and that is necessary for the realization of physiological responses. Gretchen Hagen 3 (GH3) acyl acid amido synthetases convert indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) to IAA-amino acid conjugates by ATP-dependent reactions. IAA-aspartate (IAA-Asp) exists as a predominant amide conjugate of auxin in pea tissues and acts as an intermediate during IAA catabolism. Here we report a novel recombinant indole-3-acetic acid-amido synthetase in Pisum sativum. In silico analysis shows that amino acid sequence of PsGH3 has the highest homology to Medicago truncatula GH3.3. The recombinant His-tag-PsGH3 fusion protein has been obtained in E. coli cells and is a soluble monomeric polypeptide with molecular mass of 69.18 kDa. The PsGH3 was purified using Ni(2+)-affinity chromatography and native PAGE. Kinetic analysis indicates that the enzyme strongly prefers IAA and L-aspartate as substrates for conjugation revealing Km(ATP) = 0.49 mM, Km(L-Asp) = 2.2 mM, and Km(IAA) = 0.28 mM. Diadenosine pentaphosphate (Ap5A) competes with ATP for catalytic site and diminishes the PsGH3 affinity toward ATP approximately 1.11-fold indicating Ki = 8.5 μM. L-Tryptophan acts as an inhibitor of IAA-amido synthesizing activity by competition with L-aspartate. Inorganic pyrophosphatase (PPase) hydrolyzing pyrophosphate to two phosphate ions, potentiates IAA-Asp synthetase activity of PsGH3. Our results demonstrate that PsGH3 is a novel enzyme that is involved in auxin metabolism in pea seeds.

  12. Application of a Propionyl Coenzyme A Synthetase for Poly(3-Hydroxypropionate-co-3-Hydroxybutyrate) Accumulation in Recombinant Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Valentin, Henry E.; Mitsky, Timothy A.; Mahadeo, Debbie A.; Tran, Minhtien; Gruys, Kenneth J.

    2000-01-01

    The genetic operon for propionic acid degradation in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium contains an open reading frame designated prpE which encodes a propionyl coenzyme A (propionyl-CoA) synthetase (A. R. Horswill and J. C. Escalante-Semerena, Microbiology 145:1381–1388, 1999). In this paper we report the cloning of prpE by PCR, its overexpression in Escherichia coli, and the substrate specificity of the enzyme. When propionate was utilized as the substrate for PrpE, a Km of 50 μM and a specific activity of 120 μmol · min−1 · mg−1 were found at the saturating substrate concentration. PrpE also activated acetate, 3-hydroxypropionate (3HP), and butyrate to their corresponding coenzyme A esters but did so much less efficiently than propionate. When prpE was coexpressed with the polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) biosynthetic genes from Ralstonia eutropha in recombinant E. coli, a PHA copolymer containing 3HP units accumulated when 3HP was supplied with the growth medium. To compare the utility of acyl-CoA synthetases to that of an acyl-CoA transferase for PHA production, PHA-producing recombinant strains were constructed to coexpress the PHA biosynthetic genes with prpE, with acoE (an acetyl-CoA synthetase gene from R. eutropha [H. Priefert and A. Steinbüchel, J. Bacteriol. 174:6590–6599, 1992]), or with orfZ (an acetyl-CoA:4-hydroxybutyrate-CoA transferase gene from Clostridium propionicum [H. E. Valentin, S. Reiser, and K. J. Gruys, Biotechnol. Bioeng. 67:291–299, 2000]). Of the three enzymes, PrpE and OrfZ enabled similar levels of 3HP incorporation into PHA, whereas AcoE was significantly less effective in this capacity. PMID:11097899

  13. Mutagenesis and chemical rescue indicate residues involved in beta-aspartyl-AMP formation by Escherichia coli asparagine synthetase B.

    PubMed

    Boehlein, S K; Walworth, E S; Richards, N G; Schuster, S M

    1997-05-01

    Site-directed mutagenesis and kinetic studies have been employed to identify amino acid residues involved in aspartate binding and transition state stabilization during the formation of beta-aspartyl-AMP in the reaction mechanism of Escherichia coli asparagine synthetase B (AS-B). Three conserved amino acids in the segment defined by residues 317-330 appear particularly crucial for enzymatic activity. For example, when Arg-325 is replaced by alanine or lysine, the resulting mutant enzymes possess no detectable asparagine synthetase activity. The catalytic activity of the R325A AS-B mutant can, however, be restored to about 1/6 of that of wild-type AS-B by the addition of guanidinium HCl (GdmHCl). Detailed kinetic analysis of the rescued activity suggests that Arg-325 is involved in stabilization of a pentacovalent intermediate leading to the formation beta-aspartyl-AMP. This rescue experiment is the second example in which the function of a critical arginine residue that has been substituted by mutagenesis is restored by GdmHCl. Mutation of Thr-322 and Thr-323 also produces enzymes with altered kinetic properties, suggesting that these threonines are involved in aspartate binding and/or stabilization of intermediates en route to beta-aspartyl-AMP. These experiments are the first to identify residues outside of the N-terminal glutamine amide transfer domain that have any functional role in asparagine synthesis.

  14. Fat Metabolism in Higher Plants. XXXIV. Development of Fatty Acid Synthetase as a Function of Protein Synthesis in Aging Potato Tuber Slices

    PubMed Central

    Willemot, Claude; Stumpf, P. K.

    1967-01-01

    Experiments with inhibitors of protein synthesis (actinomycin D, puromycin, actidione) showed that the increase and the change in fatty acid synthetase activity, observed during the aging of potato disks, were accompanied by and related to a temporary rise in the rate of protein and RNA synthesis. These results concur with the earlier suggestion by Click and Hackett that the aging process involves a type of derepression. A possible course of events during aging, and possible derepression mechanisms are suggested and discussed. PMID:6045298

  15. The antimicrobial natural product chuangxinmycin and some synthetic analogues are potent and selective inhibitors of bacterial tryptophanyl tRNA synthetase.

    PubMed

    Brown, Murray J; Carter, Paul S; Fenwick, Ashley S; Fosberry, Andrew P; Hamprecht, Dieter W; Hibbs, Martin J; Jarvest, Richard L; Mensah, Lucy; Milner, Peter H; O'Hanlon, Peter J; Pope, Andrew J; Richardson, Christine M; West, Andrew; Witty, David R

    2002-11-01

    The antimicrobial natural product chuangxinmycin has been found to be a potent and selective inhibitor of bacterial tryptophanyl tRNA synthetase (WRS). A number of analogues have been synthesised. The interaction with WRS appears to be highly constrained, as only sterically smaller analogues afforded significant inhibition. The only analogue to show inhibition comparable to chuangxinmycin also had antibacterial activity. WRS inhibition may contribute to the antibacterial action of chuangxinmycin.

  16. Characterization of the acetyl-CoA synthetase of Acetobacter aceti.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, J; Ettlinger, L

    1976-12-20

    The acetate activating system of Acetobacter aceti has been studied. The enzyme responsible, acetyl-CoA synthetase, has been purified about 500-fold from crude cell extracts and was approximately 85% pure as judged by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in sodium dodecyl sulphate. The purified enzyme showed optimal activity at pH 7.6 in both Tris-HCL and potassium phosphate buffers. In its purest form, the enzyme was stable at 4 degrees-C but denatured upon freezing. The Km values for CoA, ATP and acetate were found to be 0.104 mM, 0.36 mM and 0.25 mM respectively; propionate and acrylate were also activated by the enzyme but not butyrate, isobutyrate or valerate. GTP, UTP, CTP and ADP could not replace ATP in the reaction, and cysteine or pantetheine failed to replace CoA. The cationic requirements were studied and of the divalent cations tested, only Mn2+ could significantly replace Mg2+ in the reaction; K+ and NH4+ stimulated enzyme activity but inhibited at high concentrations; Na+ was a poor activator, but did not inhibit at higher concentrations. The effect of a number of glucose and other metabolites on enzyme activity has been tested. PMID:12800

  17. Characterization of the acetyl-CoA synthetase of Acetobacter aceti.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, J; Ettlinger, L

    1976-12-20

    The acetate activating system of Acetobacter aceti has been studied. The enzyme responsible, acetyl-CoA synthetase, has been purified about 500-fold from crude cell extracts and was approximately 85% pure as judged by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in sodium dodecyl sulphate. The purified enzyme showed optimal activity at pH 7.6 in both Tris-HCL and potassium phosphate buffers. In its purest form, the enzyme was stable at 4 degrees-C but denatured upon freezing. The Km values for CoA, ATP and acetate were found to be 0.104 mM, 0.36 mM and 0.25 mM respectively; propionate and acrylate were also activated by the enzyme but not butyrate, isobutyrate or valerate. GTP, UTP, CTP and ADP could not replace ATP in the reaction, and cysteine or pantetheine failed to replace CoA. The cationic requirements were studied and of the divalent cations tested, only Mn2+ could significantly replace Mg2+ in the reaction; K+ and NH4+ stimulated enzyme activity but inhibited at high concentrations; Na+ was a poor activator, but did not inhibit at higher concentrations. The effect of a number of glucose and other metabolites on enzyme activity has been tested.

  18. Cryptosporidium and Toxoplasma Parasites Are Inhibited by a Benzoxaborole Targeting Leucyl-tRNA Synthetase

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ru-Juan; Lukarska, Maria; Gut, Jiri; Bougdour, Alexandre; Touquet, Bastien; Wang, En-Duo; Li, Xianfeng; Alley, M. R. K.; Freund, Yvonne R.; Rosenthal, Philip J.; Hakimi, Mohamed-Ali

    2016-01-01

    The apicomplexan parasites Cryptosporidium and Toxoplasma are serious threats to human health. Cryptosporidiosis is a severe diarrheal disease in malnourished children and immunocompromised individuals, with the only FDA-approved drug treatment currently being nitazoxanide. The existing therapies for toxoplasmosis, an important pathology in immunocompromised individuals and pregnant women, also have serious limitations. With the aim of developing alternative therapeutic options to address these health problems, we tested a number of benzoxaboroles, boron-containing compounds shown to be active against various infectious agents, for inhibition of the growth of Cryptosporidium parasites in mammalian cells. A 3-aminomethyl benzoxaborole, AN6426, with activity in the micromolar range and with activity comparable to that of nitazoxanide, was identified and further characterized using biophysical measurements of affinity and crystal structures of complexes with the editing domain of Cryptosporidium leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LeuRS). The same compound was shown to be active against Toxoplasma parasites, with the activity being enhanced in the presence of norvaline, an amino acid that can be mischarged by LeuRS. Our observations are consistent with AN6426 inhibiting protein synthesis in both Cryptosporidium and Toxoplasma by forming a covalent adduct with tRNALeu in the LeuRS editing active site and suggest that further exploitation of the benzoxaborole scaffold is a valid strategy to develop novel, much needed antiparasitic agents. PMID:27431220

  19. Argininosuccinate synthetase regulates hepatic AMPK linking protein catabolism and ureagenesis to hepatic lipid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Madiraju, Anila K.; Alves, Tiago; Zhao, Xiaojian; Cline, Gary W.; Zhang, Dongyan; Bhanot, Sanjay; Samuel, Varman T.; Kibbey, Richard G.; Shulman, Gerald I.

    2016-01-01

    A key sensor of cellular energy status, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), interacts allosterically with AMP to maintain an active state. When active, AMPK triggers a metabolic switch, decreasing the activity of anabolic pathways and enhancing catabolic processes such as lipid oxidation to restore the energy balance. Unlike oxidative tissues, in which AMP is generated from adenylate kinase during states of high energy demand, the ornithine cycle enzyme argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS) is a principle site of AMP generation in the liver. Here we show that ASS regulates hepatic AMPK, revealing a central role for ureagenesis flux in the regulation of metabolism via AMPK. Treatment of primary rat hepatocytes with amino acids increased gluconeogenesis and ureagenesis and, despite nutrient excess, induced both AMPK and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) phosphorylation. Antisense oligonucleotide knockdown of hepatic ASS1 expression in vivo decreased liver AMPK activation, phosphorylation of ACC, and plasma β-hydroxybutyrate concentrations. Taken together these studies demonstrate that increased amino acid flux can activate AMPK through increased AMP generated by ASS, thus providing a novel link between protein catabolism, ureagenesis, and hepatic lipid metabolism. PMID:27247419

  20. Cryptosporidium and Toxoplasma Parasites Are Inhibited by a Benzoxaborole Targeting Leucyl-tRNA Synthetase.

    PubMed

    Palencia, Andrés; Liu, Ru-Juan; Lukarska, Maria; Gut, Jiri; Bougdour, Alexandre; Touquet, Bastien; Wang, En-Duo; Li, Xianfeng; Alley, M R K; Freund, Yvonne R; Rosenthal, Philip J; Hakimi, Mohamed-Ali; Cusack, Stephen

    2016-10-01

    The apicomplexan parasites Cryptosporidium and Toxoplasma are serious threats to human health. Cryptosporidiosis is a severe diarrheal disease in malnourished children and immunocompromised individuals, with the only FDA-approved drug treatment currently being nitazoxanide. The existing therapies for toxoplasmosis, an important pathology in immunocompromised individuals and pregnant women, also have serious limitations. With the aim of developing alternative therapeutic options to address these health problems, we tested a number of benzoxaboroles, boron-containing compounds shown to be active against various infectious agents, for inhibition of the growth of Cryptosporidium parasites in mammalian cells. A 3-aminomethyl benzoxaborole, AN6426, with activity in the micromolar range and with activity comparable to that of nitazoxanide, was identified and further characterized using biophysical measurements of affinity and crystal structures of complexes with the editing domain of Cryptosporidium leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LeuRS). The same compound was shown to be active against Toxoplasma parasites, with the activity being enhanced in the presence of norvaline, an amino acid that can be mischarged by LeuRS. Our observations are consistent with AN6426 inhibiting protein synthesis in both Cryptosporidium and Toxoplasma by forming a covalent adduct with tRNA(Leu) in the LeuRS editing active site and suggest that further exploitation of the benzoxaborole scaffold is a valid strategy to develop novel, much needed antiparasitic agents.

  1. Production of Non-Ribosomal Peptide Synthetase (NRPS)- Dependent Siderophore by Aeromonas Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Amsaveni, Ramasamy; Sureshkumar, Muthusamy; Aravinth, Arthanari; Mary, Joseph Reshma; Vivekanandhan, Govindasami

    2016-01-01

    Background: Aeromonas species are Gram-negative ubiquitous bacteria, facultative anaerobic rods that infect both invertebrates and vertebrates. Various fish species develop hemorrhagic disease and furunculosis due to Aeromonas spp. Aeromonas strains generate certain active compounds such as siderophores, which are the final products of non-ribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) activity. The present study attempted to investigate the prevalence of Aeromonas isolates in marketed fish sources. We also examined the siderophore production ability of these isolates. Methods: Among the molecular tools, 16S rRNA analysis was used to identify Aeromonas species and their epidemiological distributions. The hemolytic activity of the strains and biochemical assays were used to confirm the identity of the isolates. We also determined the chemical nature of siderophores in these strains. Results: A total of seven Aeromonas isolates obtained from fish were included to determine the siderophore production. Of 7 isolates, 4 produced siderophore, and their chemical nature was also determined. The siderophore produced by Aeromonas was invariably found to be of hydroxamate. Four Aeromonas isolates were selected for PCR identification of NRPS-encoding gene. The conserved sequence was present in all four selected isolates. Furthermore, siderophores were qualitatively tested for their antibacterial activity against pathogenic bacteria and a significant level of inhibitory activity was observed in siderophores from the four isolates. Conclusion: Our results showed the ability of the isolated strains in production of siderophores with a high level of activity against Salmonella paratyphi. These siderophores could find applications in biomedical industries. PMID:27155016

  2. Argininosuccinate synthetase regulates hepatic AMPK linking protein catabolism and ureagenesis to hepatic lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Madiraju, Anila K; Alves, Tiago; Zhao, Xiaojian; Cline, Gary W; Zhang, Dongyan; Bhanot, Sanjay; Samuel, Varman T; Kibbey, Richard G; Shulman, Gerald I

    2016-06-14

    A key sensor of cellular energy status, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), interacts allosterically with AMP to maintain an active state. When active, AMPK triggers a metabolic switch, decreasing the activity of anabolic pathways and enhancing catabolic processes such as lipid oxidation to restore the energy balance. Unlike oxidative tissues, in which AMP is generated from adenylate kinase during states of high energy demand, the ornithine cycle enzyme argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS) is a principle site of AMP generation in the liver. Here we show that ASS regulates hepatic AMPK, revealing a central role for ureagenesis flux in the regulation of metabolism via AMPK. Treatment of primary rat hepatocytes with amino acids increased gluconeogenesis and ureagenesis and, despite nutrient excess, induced both AMPK and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) phosphorylation. Antisense oligonucleotide knockdown of hepatic ASS1 expression in vivo decreased liver AMPK activation, phosphorylation of ACC, and plasma β-hydroxybutyrate concentrations. Taken together these studies demonstrate that increased amino acid flux can activate AMPK through increased AMP generated by ASS, thus providing a novel link between protein catabolism, ureagenesis, and hepatic lipid metabolism. PMID:27247419

  3. Cryptosporidium and Toxoplasma Parasites Are Inhibited by a Benzoxaborole Targeting Leucyl-tRNA Synthetase.

    PubMed

    Palencia, Andrés; Liu, Ru-Juan; Lukarska, Maria; Gut, Jiri; Bougdour, Alexandre; Touquet, Bastien; Wang, En-Duo; Li, Xianfeng; Alley, M R K; Freund, Yvonne R; Rosenthal, Philip J; Hakimi, Mohamed-Ali; Cusack, Stephen

    2016-10-01

    The apicomplexan parasites Cryptosporidium and Toxoplasma are serious threats to human health. Cryptosporidiosis is a severe diarrheal disease in malnourished children and immunocompromised individuals, with the only FDA-approved drug treatment currently being nitazoxanide. The existing therapies for toxoplasmosis, an important pathology in immunocompromised individuals and pregnant women, also have serious limitations. With the aim of developing alternative therapeutic options to address these health problems, we tested a number of benzoxaboroles, boron-containing compounds shown to be active against various infectious agents, for inhibition of the growth of Cryptosporidium parasites in mammalian cells. A 3-aminomethyl benzoxaborole, AN6426, with activity in the micromolar range and with activity comparable to that of nitazoxanide, was identified and further characterized using biophysical measurements of affinity and crystal structures of complexes with the editing domain of Cryptosporidium leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LeuRS). The same compound was shown to be active against Toxoplasma parasites, with the activity being enhanced in the presence of norvaline, an amino acid that can be mischarged by LeuRS. Our observations are consistent with AN6426 inhibiting protein synthesis in both Cryptosporidium and Toxoplasma by forming a covalent adduct with tRNA(Leu) in the LeuRS editing active site and suggest that further exploitation of the benzoxaborole scaffold is a valid strategy to develop novel, much needed antiparasitic agents. PMID:27431220

  4. Testis-specific transcription initiation sites of rat farnesyl pyrophosphate synthetase mRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Teruya, J H; Kutsunai, S Y; Spear, D H; Edwards, P A; Clarke, C F

    1990-01-01

    A variety of rat tissues were screened at low stringency with a rat farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP) synthetase cDNA. In testis, an FPP synthetase-related RNA was detected that was larger than the liver FPP synthetase mRNA and was present at very high levels comparable with liver FPP synthetase RNA levels obtained from rats fed diets supplemented with cholestyramine and mevinolin. Sequence analysis of testis cDNA clones, together with primer extension and S1 nuclease experiments, indicated that testis FPP synthetase transcripts contain an extended 5' untranslated region. The 5' extension contained one or two out-of-frame upstream ATGs, depending on the site of transcription initiation. Protein in vitro translation studies indicated that the extended 5' untranslated region may play a role in regulating the translation of the FPP synthetase polypeptide in rat testis. Southern blot analysis with a probe containing both testis and liver 5' untranslated sequences provided evidence that both liver and testis transcripts derive from the same gene. The data suggest that an upstream testis-specific promoter results in the abundant production of FPP synthetase transcripts that are translated at low efficiency; another promoter functions in liver and other somatic tissues and directs the regulated synthesis of shorter discrete transcripts. Images PMID:2325654

  5. Induction of fatty acid synthetase and acetyl-CoA carboxylase by isolated rat liver cells.

    PubMed

    Porter, J W; Swenson, T L

    1983-01-01

    Current studies on the synthesis of long-chain fatty acids by isolated rat liver cells are largely concerned with the regulation of the activity of previously existing acetyl-CoA carboxylase and fatty acid synthetase, and with the regulation of the quantity of these enzymes. These studies have required the development of methods for obtaining high yields of viable hepatocytes that respond to hormonal treatment. Such methods have been developed over the past 10-15 years through the efforts of several laboratories. These studies have also required the development of a method to determine whether a change in the activity of an enzyme is due to a modification of preexisting enzyme or to a change in quantity of that enzyme. The most satisfactory method to use for such studies is immunotitration of enzyme activity. In recent years studies on the regulation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase have largely centered upon the effect of phosphorylation-dephosphorylation on the activity of this enzyme and whether glucagon inhibits the activity of this enzyme through this process. Much data from a number of laboratories have suggested that glucagon regulates the activity of this enzyme through phosphorylation-dephosphorylation. However, several of these studies involved the use of crude systems in which competing enzymes and substrates that can significantly interfere with acetyl-CoA carboxylase activity measurements were still present. Hence, a confirmation of these studies needs to be carried out under conditions in which the effects of competing enzymes and substrates are eliminated. Studies on changes in quantity of acetyl-CoA carboxylase and fatty acid synthetase have shown that these enzymes are induced by the fasting and refeeding of animals. They have also shown that insulin stimulates (10- to 30-fold) the induction of these enzymes. This induction appears to be due to a change in the quantity of translatable mRNA which may, in turn, be due to a change in the rate of

  6. R-loop induced stress response by second (p)ppGpp synthetase in Mycobacterium smegmatis: functional and domain interdependence.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Sushma; Petchiappan, Anushya; Singh, Albel; Bhatt, Apoorva; Chatterji, Dipankar

    2016-10-01

    Persistent R-loops lead to replicative stress due to RNA polymerase stalling and DNA damage. RNase H enzymes facilitate the organisms to survive in the hostile condition by removing these R-loops. MS_RHII-RSD was previously identified to be the second (p)ppGpp synthetase in Mycobacterium smegmatis. The unique presence of an additional RNase HII domain raises an important question regarding the significance of this bifunctional protein. In this report, we demonstrate its ability to hydrolyze R-loops in Escherichia coli exposed to UV stress. MS_RHII-RSD gene expression was upregulated under UV stress, and this gene deleted strain showed increased R-loop accumulation as compared to the wild type. The domains in isolation are known to be inactive, and the full length protein is required for its function. Domain interdependence studies using active site mutants reveal the necessity of a hexamer form with high alpha helical content. In previous studies, bacterial RNase type HI has been mainly implicated in R-loop hydrolysis, but in this study, the RNase HII domain containing protein showed the activity. The prospective of this differential RNase HII activity is discussed. This is the first report to implicate a (p)ppGpp synthetase protein in R-loop-induced stress response.

  7. The role of the C8 proton of ATP in the regulation of phosphoryl transfer within kinases and synthetases

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The kinome comprises functionally diverse enzymes, with the current classification indicating very little about the extent of conserved regulatory mechanisms associated with phosphoryl transfer. The apparent Km of the kinases ranges from less than 0.4 μM to in excess of 1000 μM for ATP. It is not known how this diverse range of enzymes mechanistically achieves the regulation of catalysis via an affinity range for ATP varying by three-orders of magnitude. Results We have demonstrated a previously undiscovered mechanism in kinase and synthetase enzymes where the overall rate of reaction is regulated via the C8-H of ATP. Using ATP deuterated at the C8 position (C8D-ATP) as a molecular probe it was shown that the C8-H plays a direct role in the regulation of the overall rate of reaction in a range of kinase and synthetase enzymes. Using comparative studies on the effect of the concentration of ATP and C8D-ATP on the activity of the enzymes we demonstrated that not only did C8D-ATP give a kinetic isotope effect (KIE) but the KIE's obtained are clearly not secondary KIE effects as the magnitude of the KIE in all cases was at least 2 fold and in most cases in excess of 7 fold. Conclusions Kinase and synthetase enzymes utilise C8D-ATP in preference to non-deuterated ATP. The KIE obtained at low ATP concentrations is clearly a primary KIE demonstrating strong evidence that the bond to the isotopically substituted hydrogen is being broken. The effect of the ATP concentration profile on the KIE was used to develop a model whereby the C8H of ATP plays a role in the overall regulation of phosphoryl transfer. This role of the C8H of ATP in the regulation of substrate binding appears to have been conserved in all kinase and synthetase enzymes as one of the mechanisms associated with binding of ATP. The induction of the C8H to be labile by active site residues coordinated to the ATP purine ring may play a significant role in explaining the broad range of Km associated

  8. The CcmFH complex is the system I holocytochrome c synthetase: engineering cytochrome c maturation independent of CcmABCDE.

    PubMed

    San Francisco, Brian; Sutherland, Molly C; Kranz, Robert G

    2014-03-01

    Cytochrome c maturation (ccm) in many bacteria, archaea and plant mitochondria requires eight membrane proteins, CcmABCDEFGH, called system I. This pathway delivers and attaches haem covalently to two cysteines (of Cys-Xxx-Xxx-Cys-His) in the cytochrome c. All models propose that CcmFH facilitates covalent attachment of haem to the apocytochrome; namely, that it is the synthetase. However, holocytochrome c synthetase activity has not been directly demonstrated for CcmFH. We report formation of holocytochromes c by CcmFH and CcmG, a periplasmic thioredoxin, independent of CcmABCDE (we term this activity CcmFGH-only). Cytochrome c produced in the absence of CcmABCDE is indistinguishable from cytochrome c produced by the full system I, with a cleaved signal sequence and two covalent bonds to haem. We engineered increased cytochrome c production by CcmFGH-only, with yields approaching those from the full system I. Three conserved histidines in CcmF (TM-His1, TM-His2 and P-His1) are required for activity, as are the conserved cysteine pairs in CcmG and CcmH. Our findings establish that CcmFH is the system I holocytochrome c synthetase. Although we discuss why this engineering would likely not replace the need for CcmABCDE in nature, these results provide unique mechanistic and evolutionary insights into cytochrome c biosynthesis.

  9. Bacterial and eukaryotic phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetases catalyze misaminoacylation of tRNA(Phe) with 3,4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine.

    PubMed

    Moor, Nina; Klipcan, Liron; Safro, Mark G

    2011-10-28

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases exert control over the accuracy of translation by selective pairing the correct amino acids with their cognate tRNAs, and proofreading the misacylated products. Here we show that three existing, structurally different phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetases-human mitochondrial (HsmtPheRS), human cytoplasmic (HsctPheRS), and eubacterial from Thermus thermophilus (TtPheRS), catalyze mischarging of tRNA(Phe) with an oxidized analog of tyrosine-L-dopa. The lowest level of L-dopa discrimination over the cognate amino acid, exhibited by HsmtPheRS, is comparable to that of tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase. HsmtPheRS and TtPheRS complexes with L-dopa revealed in the active sites an electron density shaping this ligand. HsctPheRS and TtPheRS possessing editing activity are capable of hydrolyzing the exogenous L-dopa-tRNA(Phe) as efficiently as Tyr-tRNA(Phe). However, editing activity of PheRS does not guarantee reduction of the aminoacylation error rate to escape misincorporation of L-dopa into polypeptide chains.

  10. Use of genomics to identify bacterial undecaprenyl pyrophosphate synthetase: cloning, expression, and characterization of the essential uppS gene.

    PubMed

    Apfel, C M; Takács, B; Fountoulakis, M; Stieger, M; Keck, W

    1999-01-01

    The prenyltransferase undecaprenyl pyrophosphate synthetase (di-trans,poly-cis-decaprenylcistransferase; EC 2.5.1.31) was purified from the soluble fraction of Escherichia coli by TSK-DEAE, ceramic hydroxyapatite, TSK-ether, Superdex 200, and heparin-Actigel chromatography. The protein was labeled with the photolabile analogue of the farnesyl pyrophosphate analogue (E, E)-[1-3H]-(2-diazo-3-trifluoropropionyloxy)geranyl diphosphate and was detected on a sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel as a protein with an apparent molecular mass of 29 kDa. This protein band was cut out from the gel, trypsin digested, and subjected to matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometric analysis. Comparison of the experimental data with computer-simulated trypsin digest data for all E. coli proteins yielded a single match with a protein of unassigned function (SWISS-PROT Q47675; YAES_ECOLI). Sequences with strong similarity indicative of homology to this protein were identified in 25 bacterial species, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and in Caenorhabditis elegans. The homologous genes (uppS) were cloned from E. coli, Haemophilus influenzae, and Streptococcus pneumoniae, expressed in E. coli as amino-terminal His-tagged fusion proteins, and purified over a Ni2+ affinity column. An untagged version of the E. coli uppS gene was also cloned and expressed, and the protein purified in two chromatographic steps. We were able to detect Upp synthetase activity for all purified enzymes. Further, biochemical characterization revealed no differences between the recombinant untagged E. coli Upp synthetase and the three His-tagged fusion proteins. All enzymes were absolutely Triton X-100 and MgCl2 dependent. With the use of a regulatable gene disruption system, we demonstrated that uppS is essential for growth in S. pneumoniae R6. PMID:9882662

  11. Reculation of folylpolyglutamate synthetase in extracts of H35 hepatoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, T.B.; Galivan, J.; Nair, M.G. )

    1987-05-01

    Folylpolyglutamate synthetase (FPGS) in extracts of H35 hepatoma cells was assayed using 250 {mu}M methotrexate (MTX) as the substrate under conditions where ({sup 3}H)glutamate incorporation was linear with respect to time and rotein concentration. Extracts from confluent cultures with reduced cellular folates exhibited nearly 1.7-fold higher FPGS specific activity than extracts of control cultures (600 pmol/hr/mg). Extracts of rapidly dividing cells (72 hrs) showed nearly a 2.3-fold increase. The addition of reduced exogenous folates such as folinic acid and 5-methyltetrahydrofolate (20 {mu}M, 24 hrs) to confluent cultures of folate-depleted cells typically lowered the FPGS activity in the resultant extracts by 40%, while a 42-hour exclusion of methionine from the media reduced the activity by half. The combination of methionine exclusion and folate addition for 42 hrs resulted in 75% lower FPGS activity vs extracts of control cultures of folate-depleted cells. These data suggest that the change sin the glutamylation rate of MTX in whole cells due to culture conditions such as folate restriction, reduced folate addition, methionine exclusion, and growth state are at least in part a consequence of alterations in FPGS activity. Using MTX or N{sup 10}-propargyl-5,8-dideazafolic acid (CB3717) as the starting substrate under appropriate assay conditions, FPGS from extracts catalyzed the formation of similar polyglutamate products as seen in analogous whole cell experiments.

  12. Expression of glutathione and gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase mRNA is Jun dependent.

    PubMed

    Sekhar, K R; Meredith, M J; Kerr, L D; Soltaninassab, S R; Spitz, D R; Xu, Z Q; Freeman, M L

    1997-05-29

    The gene GLCLC encodes the catalytic subunit of gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase (glutamate-cysteine ligase E.C. 6.3.2.2), the rate limiting enzyme for glutathione synthesis. When HepG2 cells were exposed to the serine/threonine phosphatase inhibitor okadaic acid (OA), increased expression of GLCLC was observed, as was the development of resistance to xenobiotic induced GSH depletion. Okadaic acid is known to activate both NF-kappaB and AP-1 activity. Inhibition of NF-kappaB activity by overexpression of an IkappaB alpha transdominant inhibitor or exposure to the protease inhibitor TLCK did not inhibit the OA mediated increase in GLCLC transcripts. Fibroblasts derived from a mouse containing a c-Jun null mutation exhibited diminished AP-1 binding activity, reduced levels of GLCLC message, and a correspondingly low GSH concentration compared to wild type cells. When the null cells, which express Jun B and Jun D, were exposed to OA, AP-1 binding activity increased, as did expression of GLCLC message. These results indicate that AP-1 transcription factors participate in the regulation of glutathione metabolism.

  13. Site-directed mutagenesis of Glu-297 from the alpha-polypeptide of Phaseolus vulgaris glutamine synthetase alters kinetic and structural properties and confers resistance to L-methionine sulfoximine.

    PubMed

    Clemente, M T; Márquez, A J

    1999-07-01

    In this paper we examine the functionality of Glu-297 from the alpha-polypeptide of Phaseolus vulgaris glutamine synthetase (EC 6.3.1.2). For this purpose, the gln alpha cDNA was recombinantly expressed in Escherichia coli, and site-directed mutants constructed, in which this residue was replaced by alanine. The level of glutamine synthetase transferase catalytic activity in the mutant strain was 70-fold lower while biosynthetic activity remained practically unaffected. Kinetic parameters for both enzyme activities were not greatly altered except for the Km for ammonium in biosynthetic activity, which increased 100-fold. A similar result was reported when mutagenizing Glu-327 from E. coli glutamine synthetase, a residue shown to be present at the active site. This suggests that the Glu residue mutated in the higher-plant enzyme could develop a similar catalytic role to that of bacteria. Another characteristic feature of the mutant protein was its higher resistance to inhibition of the biosynthetic activity by L-methionine sulfoximine, a typical inhibitor of glutamine synthetase. In addition, we show that immunoreactivity of the glutamine synthetase mutant protein, both under native and denaturing conditions, is similar to the wild type, indicating that no deep conformational changes were produced as a consequence of the introduced mutation. However, structural changes in the active site can be predicted from alterations detected in the behaviour of the mutant protein towards affinity chromatography on 2',5'-ADP-Sepharose, as compared to the wild type. Nevertheless, complementation of an E. coli glnA mutation indicated that the E297A mutant enzyme was physiologically functional.

  14. Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase inhibitors as potential antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Vondenhoff, Gaston H M; Van Aerschot, Arthur

    2011-11-01

    Increasing resistance to antibiotics is a major problem worldwide and provides the stimulus for development of new bacterial inhibitors with preferably different modes of action. In search for new leads, several new bacterial targets are being exploited beside the use of traditional screening methods. Hereto, inhibition of bacterial protein synthesis is a long-standing validated target. Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) play an indispensable role in protein synthesis and their structures proved quite conserved in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. However, some divergence has occurred allowing the development of selective aaRS inhibitors. Following an outline on the action mechanism of aaRSs, an overview will be given of already existing aaRS inhibitors, which are largely based on mimics of the aminoacyl-adenylates, the natural reaction intermediates. This is followed by a discussion on more recent developments in the field and the bioavailability problem.

  15. Astrocyte glutamine synthetase: pivotal in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Rose, Christopher F; Verkhratsky, Alexei; Parpura, Vladimir

    2013-12-01

    The multifunctional properties of astrocytes signify their importance in brain physiology and neurological function. In addition to defining the brain architecture, astrocytes are primary elements of brain ion, pH and neurotransmitter homoeostasis. GS (glutamine synthetase), which catalyses the ATP-dependent condensation of ammonia and glutamate to form glutamine, is an enzyme particularly found in astrocytes. GS plays a pivotal role in glutamate and glutamine homoeostasis, orchestrating astrocyte glutamate uptake/release and the glutamate-glutamine cycle. Furthermore, astrocytes bear the brunt of clearing ammonia in the brain, preventing neurotoxicity. The present review depicts the central function of astrocytes, concentrating on the importance of GS in glutamate/glutamine metabolism and ammonia detoxification in health and disease.

  16. Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases in medicine and disease

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Peng; Fox, Paul L

    2013-01-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (ARSs) are essential and ubiquitous ‘house-keeping’ enzymes responsible for charging amino acids to their cognate tRNAs and providing the substrates for global protein synthesis. Recent studies have revealed a role of multiple ARSs in pathology, and their potential use as pharmacological targets and therapeutic reagents. The ongoing discovery of genetic mutations in human ARSs is increasing exponentially and can be considered an important determinant of disease etiology. Several chemical compounds target bacterial, fungal and human ARSs as antibiotics or disease-targeting medicines. Remarkably, ongoing exploration of noncanonical functions of ARSs has shown important contributions to control of angiogenesis, inflammation, tumourigenesis and other important physiopathological processes. Here, we summarize the roles of ARSs in human diseases and medicine, focusing on the most recent and exciting discoveries. PMID:23427196

  17. p59OASL, a 2'-5' oligoadenylate synthetase like protein: a novel human gene related to the 2'-5' oligoadenylate synthetase family.

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, R; Olsen, H S; Widder, S; Jorgensen, R; Justesen, J

    1998-01-01

    The 2'-5' oligoadenylate synthetases form a well conserved family of interferon induced proteins, presumably present throughout the mammalian class. Using the Expressed Sequence Tag databases, we have identified a novel member of this family. This protein, which we named p59 2'-5' oligoadenylate synthetase-like protein (p59OASL), shares a highly conserved N-terminal domain with the known forms of 2'-5' oligoadenylate synthetases, but differs completely in its C-terminal part. The C-terminus of p59OASL is formed of two domains of ubiquitin-like sequences. Here we present the characterisation of a full-length cDNA clone, the genomic sequence and the expression pattern of this gene. We have addressed the evolution of the 2'-5' oligoadenylate synthetase gene family, in the light of both this new member and new 2'-5' oligoadenylate synthetase sequence data from other species, which have recently appeared in the databases. PMID:9722630

  18. Structure of Prolyl-tRNA Synthetase-Halofuginone Complex Provides Basis for Development of Drugs against Malaria and Toxoplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Jain, Vitul; Yogavel, Manickam; Oshima, Yoshiteru; Kikuchi, Haruhisa; Touquet, Bastien; Hakimi, Mohamed-Ali; Sharma, Amit

    2015-05-01

    The Chinese herb Dichroa febrifuga has traditionally treated malaria-associated fever. Its active component febrifugine (FF) and derivatives such as halofuginone (HF) are potent anti-malarials. Here, we show that FF-based derivatives arrest parasite growth by direct interaction with and inhibition of the protein translation enzyme prolyl-tRNA synthetase (PRS). Dual administration of inhibitors that target different tRNA synthetases suggests high utility of these drug targets. We reveal the ternary complex structure of PRS-HF and adenosine 5'-(β,γ-imido)triphosphate where the latter facilitates HF integration into the PRS active site. Structural analyses also highlight spaces within the PRS architecture for HF derivatization of its quinazolinone, but not piperidine, moiety. We also show a remarkable ability of HF to kill the related human parasite Toxoplasma gondii, suggesting wider HF efficacy against parasitic PRSs. Hence, our cell-, enzyme-, and structure-based data on FF-based inhibitors strengthen the case for their inclusion in anti-malarial and anti-toxoplasmosis drug development efforts.

  19. Identification of Lethal Mutations in Yeast Threonyl-tRNA Synthetase Revealing Critical Residues in Its Human Homolog*

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, Zhi-Rong; Fang, Zhi-Peng; Ye, Qing; Lei, Hui-Yan; Eriani, Gilbert; Zhou, Xiao-Long; Wang, En-Duo

    2015-01-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) are a group of ancient enzymes catalyzing aminoacylation and editing reactions for protein biosynthesis. Increasing evidence suggests that these critical enzymes are often associated with mammalian disorders. Therefore, complete determination of the enzymes functions is essential for informed diagnosis and treatment. Here, we show that a yeast knock-out strain for the threonyl-tRNA synthetase (ThrRS) gene is an excellent platform for such an investigation. Saccharomyces cerevisiae ThrRS has a unique modular structure containing four structural domains and a eukaryote-specific N-terminal extension. Using randomly mutated libraries of the ThrRS gene (thrS) and a genetic screen, a set of loss-of-function mutants were identified. The mutations affected the synthetic and editing activities and influenced the dimer interface. The results also highlighted the role of the N-terminal extension for enzymatic activity and protein stability. To gain insights into the pathological mechanisms induced by mutated aaRSs, we systematically introduced the loss-of-function mutations into the human cytoplasmic ThrRS gene. All mutations induced similar detrimental effects, showing that the yeast model could be used to study pathology-associated point mutations in mammalian aaRSs. PMID:25416776

  20. Mammalian folylpoly-. gamma. -glutamate synthetase. 4. In vitro and in vivo metabolism of folates and analogues and regulation of folate homeostasis

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, J.D.; Cichowicz, D.J.; George, S.; Lawler, Ann; Shane, B.

    1987-01-27

    The regulation of folate and folate analogue metabolism was studied in vitro by using purified hog liver folylpolyglutamate synthetase as a model system and in vivo in cultured mammalian cells. The types of folylpolyglutamates that accumulate in vivo in hog liver, and changes in cellular folate levels and folylpolyglutamate distributions caused by physiological and nutritional factors such as changes in growth rates and methionine, folate, and vitamin B/sub 12/ status, can be mimicked in vitro by using purified enzyme. (/sup 3/H)Folylpolyglutamate distributions can be explained solely in terms of the substrate specificity of folylpolyglutamate synthetase and can be modeled by using kinetic parameters obtained with purified enzyme. Low levels of folylpolyglutamate synthetase activity are normally required for the cellular metabolism of folates to retainable polyglutamate forms, and consequently folate retention and concentration, while higher levels of activity are required for the synthesis of the long chain length derivatives that are found in mammalian tissues. The synthesis of very long chain derivatives, which requires tetrahydrofolate polyglutamates as substrates, is a very slow process in vivo. The slow metabolism of 5-methyltetrahydrofolate to retainable polyglutamate forms causes the decreased tissue retention of folate in B/sub 12/ deficiency. Although cellular folylpolyglutamate distributions change in response to nutritional and physiological modulations, it is unlikely that these changes play a regulatory role in one-carbon metabolism as folate distributions respond only slowly.

  1. Conformational changes involving ammonia tunnel formation and allosteric control in GMP synthetase.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Justin C; Gudihal, Ravidra; Burgner, John W; Pedley, Anthony M; Zwierko, Alexander T; Davisson, V Jo; Linger, Rebecca S

    2014-03-01

    GMP synthetase is the glutamine amidotransferase that catalyzes the final step in the guanylate branch of de novo purine biosynthesis. Conformational changes are required to efficiently couple distal active sites in the protein; however, the nature of these changes has remained elusive. Structural information derived from both limited proteolysis and sedimentation velocity experiments support the hypothesis of nucleotide-induced loop- and domain-closure in the protein. These results were combined with information from sequence conservation and precedents from other glutamine amidotransferases to develop the first structural model of GMPS in a closed, active state. In analyzing this Catalytic model, an interdomain salt bridge was identified residing in the same location as seen in other triad glutamine amidotransferases. Using mutagenesis and kinetic analysis, the salt bridge between H186 and E383 was shown to function as a connection between the two active sites. Mutations at these residues uncoupled the two half-reactions of the enzyme. The chemical events of nucleotide binding initiate a series of conformational changes that culminate in the establishment of a tunnel for ammonia as well as an activated glutaminase catalytic site. The results of this study provide a clearer understanding of the allostery of GMPS, where, for the first time, key substrate binding and interdomain contacts are modeled and analyzed. PMID:24434004

  2. Glutamine synthetase in Durum Wheat: Genotypic Variation and Relationship with Grain Protein Content.

    PubMed

    Nigro, Domenica; Fortunato, Stefania; Giove, Stefania L; Paradiso, Annalisa; Gu, Yong Q; Blanco, Antonio; de Pinto, Maria C; Gadaleta, Agata

    2016-01-01

    Grain protein content (GPC), is one of the most important trait in wheat and its characterized by a very complex genetic control. The identification of wheat varieties with high GPC (HGPC), as well as the characterization of central enzymes involved in these processes, are important for more sustainable agricultural practices. In this study, we focused on Glutamine synthetase (GS) as a candidate to study GPC in wheat. We analyzed GS expression and its enzymatic activity in different tissues and phenological stages in 10 durum wheat genotypes with different GPC. Although each genotype performed quite differently from the others, both because their genetic variability and their adaptability to specific environmental conditions, the highest GS activity and expression were found in genotypes with HGPC and vice versa the lowest ones in genotypes with low GPC (LGPC). Moreover, in genotypes contrasting in GPC bred at different nitrogen regimes (0, 60, 140 N Unit/ha) GS behaved differently in diverse organs. Nitrogen supplement increased GS expression and activity in roots of all genotypes, highlighting the key role of this enzyme in nitrogen assimilation and ammonium detoxification in roots. Otherwise, nitrogen treatments decreased GS expression and activity in the leaves of HGPC genotypes and did not affect GS in the leaves of LGPC genotypes. Finally, no changes in GS and soluble protein content occurred at the filling stage in the caryopses of all analyzed genotypes.

  3. Glutamine synthetase in Durum Wheat: Genotypic Variation and Relationship with Grain Protein Content.

    PubMed

    Nigro, Domenica; Fortunato, Stefania; Giove, Stefania L; Paradiso, Annalisa; Gu, Yong Q; Blanco, Antonio; de Pinto, Maria C; Gadaleta, Agata

    2016-01-01

    Grain protein content (GPC), is one of the most important trait in wheat and its characterized by a very complex genetic control. The identification of wheat varieties with high GPC (HGPC), as well as the characterization of central enzymes involved in these processes, are important for more sustainable agricultural practices. In this study, we focused on Glutamine synthetase (GS) as a candidate to study GPC in wheat. We analyzed GS expression and its enzymatic activity in different tissues and phenological stages in 10 durum wheat genotypes with different GPC. Although each genotype performed quite differently from the others, both because their genetic variability and their adaptability to specific environmental conditions, the highest GS activity and expression were found in genotypes with HGPC and vice versa the lowest ones in genotypes with low GPC (LGPC). Moreover, in genotypes contrasting in GPC bred at different nitrogen regimes (0, 60, 140 N Unit/ha) GS behaved differently in diverse organs. Nitrogen supplement increased GS expression and activity in roots of all genotypes, highlighting the key role of this enzyme in nitrogen assimilation and ammonium detoxification in roots. Otherwise, nitrogen treatments decreased GS expression and activity in the leaves of HGPC genotypes and did not affect GS in the leaves of LGPC genotypes. Finally, no changes in GS and soluble protein content occurred at the filling stage in the caryopses of all analyzed genotypes. PMID:27468287

  4. Glutamine synthetase in Durum Wheat: Genotypic Variation and Relationship with Grain Protein Content

    PubMed Central

    Nigro, Domenica; Fortunato, Stefania; Giove, Stefania L.; Paradiso, Annalisa; Gu, Yong Q.; Blanco, Antonio; de Pinto, Maria C.; Gadaleta, Agata

    2016-01-01

    Grain protein content (GPC), is one of the most important trait in wheat and its characterized by a very complex genetic control. The identification of wheat varieties with high GPC (HGPC), as well as the characterization of central enzymes involved in these processes, are important for more sustainable agricultural practices. In this study, we focused on Glutamine synthetase (GS) as a candidate to study GPC in wheat. We analyzed GS expression and its enzymatic activity in different tissues and phenological stages in 10 durum wheat genotypes with different GPC. Although each genotype performed quite differently from the others, both because their genetic variability and their adaptability to specific environmental conditions, the highest GS activity and expression were found in genotypes with HGPC and vice versa the lowest ones in genotypes with low GPC (LGPC). Moreover, in genotypes contrasting in GPC bred at different nitrogen regimes (0, 60, 140 N Unit/ha) GS behaved differently in diverse organs. Nitrogen supplement increased GS expression and activity in roots of all genotypes, highlighting the key role of this enzyme in nitrogen assimilation and ammonium detoxification in roots. Otherwise, nitrogen treatments decreased GS expression and activity in the leaves of HGPC genotypes and did not affect GS in the leaves of LGPC genotypes. Finally, no changes in GS and soluble protein content occurred at the filling stage in the caryopses of all analyzed genotypes. PMID:27468287

  5. Degenerate Connective Polypeptide 1 (CP1) Domain from Human Mitochondrial Leucyl-tRNA Synthetase*

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Qing; Wang, Meng; Fang, Zhi-Peng; Ruan, Zhi-Rong; Ji, Quan-Quan; Zhou, Xiao-Long; Wang, En-Duo

    2015-01-01

    The connective polypeptide 1 (CP1) editing domain of leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LeuRS) from various species either harbors a conserved active site to exclude tRNA mis-charging with noncognate amino acids or is evolutionarily truncated or lost because there is no requirement for high translational fidelity. However, human mitochondrial LeuRS (hmtLeuRS) contains a full-length but degenerate CP1 domain that has mutations in some residues important for post-transfer editing. The significance of such an inactive CP1 domain and a translational accuracy mechanism with different noncognate amino acids are not completely understood. Here, we identified the essential role of the evolutionarily divergent CP1 domain in facilitating hmtLeuRS's catalytic efficiency and endowing enzyme with resistance to AN2690, a broad-spectrum drug acting on LeuRSs. In addition, the canonical core of hmtLeuRS is not stringent for noncognate norvaline (Nva) and valine (Val). hmtLeuRS has a very weak tRNA-independent pre-transfer editing activity for Nva, which is insufficient to remove mis-activated Nva. Moreover, hmtLeuRS chimeras fused with a functional CP1 domain from LeuRSs of other species, regardless of origin, showed restored post-transfer editing activity and acquired fidelity during aminoacylation. This work offers a novel perspective on the role of the CP1 domain in optimizing aminoacylation efficiency. PMID:26272616

  6. Occurrence of Only One Form of Glutamine Synthetase in the Green Alga Monoraphidium braunii.

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Fernandez, J. M.; Lopez-Ruiz, A.; Toribio, F.; Roldan, J. M.; Diez, J.

    1994-01-01

    Anion-exchange chromatography of crude extracts from the green alga Monoraphidium braunii yielded two glutamine synthetase (GS) activities. The ratio of activities was markedly different when crude extracts were subjected to various processing conditions but was not influenced by environmental factors of cell cultures. However, high performance liquid chromatography anion-exchange chromatograms showed only one GS if the crude extracts were processed immediately after cell disruption. Moreover, standard chromatography of crude extracts obtained in the absence of dithioerythritol, a reductant generally used in disruption buffers, yielded a single activity peak. Enzyme samples from the two activities obtained in the presence of dithioerythritol were purified for physicochemical characterization and antibody production. Both enzyme samples exhibited similar reactions to different inactivating agents and were undistinguishable by size-exclusion chromatography and native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Additionally, the two GS preparations showed absolute antigenic identity as demonstrated by immunodiffusion and immunoblotting experiments. Immunocytochemistry of M. braunii cryosections evidenced a chloroplast-specific distribution of the enzyme, which rules out the existence of a cytoplasmic counterpart. All these results support the proposal that M. braunii possesses only one form of GS. PMID:12232093

  7. Diversity of Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetases Involved in the Biosynthesis of Lipopeptide Biosurfactants

    PubMed Central

    Roongsawang, Niran; Washio, Kenji; Morikawa, Masaaki

    2011-01-01

    Lipopeptide biosurfactants (LPBSs) consist of a hydrophobic fatty acid portion linked to a hydrophilic peptide chain in the molecule. With their complex and diverse structures, LPBSs exhibit various biological activities including surface activity as well as anti-cellular and anti-enzymatic activities. LPBSs are also involved in multi-cellular behaviors such as swarming motility and biofilm formation. Among the bacterial genera, Bacillus (Gram-positive) and Pseudomonas (Gram-negative) have received the most attention because they produce a wide range of effective LPBSs that are potentially useful for agricultural, chemical, food, and pharmaceutical industries. The biosynthetic mechanisms and gene regulation systems of LPBSs have been extensively analyzed over the last decade. LPBSs are generally synthesized in a ribosome-independent manner with megaenzymes called nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs). Production of active-form NRPSs requires not only transcriptional induction and translation but also post-translational modification and assemblage. The accumulated knowledge reveals the versatility and evolutionary lineage of the NRPSs system. This review provides an overview of the structural and functional diversity of LPBSs and their different biosynthetic mechanisms in Bacillus and Pseudomonas, including both typical and unique systems. Finally, successful genetic engineering of NRPSs for creating novel lipopeptides is also discussed. PMID:21339982

  8. Regulation of Glutamate Dehydrogenase and Glutamine Synthetase in Avocado Fruit during Development and Ripening.

    PubMed Central

    Loulakakis, K. A.; Roubelakis-Angelakis, K. A.; Kanellis, A. K.

    1994-01-01

    The activity, protein, and isoenzymic profiles of glutamate de-hydrogenase (GDH) and glutamine synthetase (GS) were studied during development and ripening of avocado (Percea americana Mill. cv Hass) fruit. During fruit development, the activity and protein content of both GDH and GS remained relatively constant. In contrast, considerable changes in these enzymes were observed during ripening of avocado fruit. The specific activity of GDH increased about 4-fold, coincident with a similar increase in GDH protein content and mRNA levels. On the other hand, GS specific activity showed a decline at the end of the ripening process. On the isoenzymic profile of GDH, changes in the prevalence of the seven isoenzymes were found, with a predominance of the more cathodal isoenzymes in the unripe and of the most anodal isoenzymes in the ripe fruit. Two-dimensional electrophoresis revealed that avocado fruit GDH consists of two subunits whose association gives rise to seven isoenzymes. The results support the view that the predominance of the more anodal isoenzymes in the overripe fruit was due to the accumulation of the [alpha]-polypeptide. PMID:12232322

  9. Regulation of Glutamate Dehydrogenase and Glutamine Synthetase in Avocado Fruit during Development and Ripening.

    PubMed

    Loulakakis, K. A.; Roubelakis-Angelakis, K. A.; Kanellis, A. K.

    1994-09-01

    The activity, protein, and isoenzymic profiles of glutamate de-hydrogenase (GDH) and glutamine synthetase (GS) were studied during development and ripening of avocado (Percea americana Mill. cv Hass) fruit. During fruit development, the activity and protein content of both GDH and GS remained relatively constant. In contrast, considerable changes in these enzymes were observed during ripening of avocado fruit. The specific activity of GDH increased about 4-fold, coincident with a similar increase in GDH protein content and mRNA levels. On the other hand, GS specific activity showed a decline at the end of the ripening process. On the isoenzymic profile of GDH, changes in the prevalence of the seven isoenzymes were found, with a predominance of the more cathodal isoenzymes in the unripe and of the most anodal isoenzymes in the ripe fruit. Two-dimensional electrophoresis revealed that avocado fruit GDH consists of two subunits whose association gives rise to seven isoenzymes. The results support the view that the predominance of the more anodal isoenzymes in the overripe fruit was due to the accumulation of the [alpha]-polypeptide.

  10. Inhibition of glutamine synthetase in the central nucleus of the amygdala induces anhedonic behavior and recurrent seizures in a rat model of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Gruenbaum, Shaun E; Wang, Helen; Zaveri, Hitten P; Tang, Amber B; Lee, Tih-Shih W; Eid, Tore; Dhaher, Roni

    2015-10-01

    The prevalence of depression and suicide is increased in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE); however, the underlying mechanism remains unknown. Anhedonia, a core symptom of depression that is predictive of suicide, is common in patients with MTLE. Glutamine synthetase, an astrocytic enzyme that metabolizes glutamate and ammonia to glutamine, is reduced in the amygdala in patients with epilepsy and depression and in suicide victims. Here, we sought to develop a novel model of anhedonia in MTLE by testing the hypothesis that deficiency in glutamine synthetase in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) leads to epilepsy and comorbid anhedonia. Nineteen male Sprague-Dawley rats were implanted with an osmotic pump infusing either the glutamine synthetase inhibitor methionine sulfoximine [MSO (n=12)] or phosphate buffered saline [PBS (n=7)] into the right CeA. Seizure activity was monitored by video-intracranial electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings for 21days after the onset of MSO infusion. Sucrose preference, a measure of anhedonia, was assessed after 21days. Methionine sulfoximine-infused rats exhibited recurrent seizures during the monitoring period and showed decreased sucrose preference over days when compared with PBS-infused rats (p<0.01). Water consumption did not differ between the PBS-treated group and the MSO-treated group. Neurons were lost in the CeA, but not the medial amygdala, lateral amygdala, basolateral amygdala, or the hilus of the dentate gyrus, in the MSO-treated rats. The results suggest that decreased glutamine synthetase activity in the CeA is a possible common cause of anhedonia and seizures in TLE. We propose that the MSO CeA model can be used for mechanistic studies that will lead to the development and testing of novel drugs to prevent seizures, depression, and suicide in patients with TLE.

  11. Inhibition of glutamine synthetase in the central nucleus of the amygdala induces anhedonic behavior and recurrent seizures in a rat model of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Gruenbaum, Shaun E.; Wang, Helen; Zaveri, Hitten P.; Tang, Amber B.; Lee, Tih-Shih W.; Eid, Tore; Dhaher, Roni

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of depression and suicide is increased in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE); however, the underlying mechanism remains unknown. Anhedonia, a core symptom of depression that is predictive of suicide, is common in patients with MTLE. Glutamine synthetase, an astrocytic enzyme that metabolizes glutamate and ammonia to glutamine, is reduced in the amygdala in patients with epilepsy and depression and in suicide victims. Here, we sought to develop a novel model of anhedonia in MTLE by testing the hypothesis that deficiency in glutamine synthetase in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) leads to epilepsy and comorbid anhedonia. Nineteen male Sprague–Dawley rats were implanted with an osmotic pump infusing either the glutamine synthetase inhibitor methionine sulfoximine [MSO (n = 12)] or phosphate buffered saline [PBS (n = 7)] into the right CeA. Seizure activity was monitored by video-intracranial electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings for 21 days after the onset of MSO infusion. Sucrose preference, a measure of anhedonia, was assessed after 21 days. Methionine sulfoximine-infused rats exhibited recurrent seizures during the monitoring period and showed decreased sucrose preference over days when compared with PBS-infused rats (p < 0.01). Water consumption did not differ between the PBS-treated group and the MSO-treated group. Neurons were lost in the CeA, but not the medial amygdala, lateral amygdala, basolateral amygdala, or the hilus of the dentate gyrus, in the MSO-treated rats. The results suggest that decreased glutamine synthetase activity in the CeA is a possible common cause of anhedonia and seizures in TLE. We propose that the MSO CeA model can be used for mechanistic studies that will lead to the development and testing of novel drugs to prevent seizures, depression, and suicide in patients with TLE. PMID:26262937

  12. Crystal structures of three protozoan homologs of tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase.

    PubMed

    Merritt, Ethan A; Arakaki, Tracy L; Gillespie, Robert; Napuli, Alberto J; Kim, Jessica E; Buckner, Frederick S; Van Voorhis, Wesley C; Verlinde, Christophe L M J; Fan, Erkang; Zucker, Frank; Hol, Wim G J

    2011-05-01

    Tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase (TrpRS) is an essential enzyme that is recognizably conserved across all forms of life. It is responsible for activating and attaching tryptophan to a cognate tRNA(Trp) molecule for use in protein synthesis. In some eukaryotes this original core function has been supplemented or modified through the addition of extra domains or the expression of variant TrpRS isoforms. The three TrpRS structures from pathogenic protozoa described here represent three illustrations of this malleability in eukaryotes. The Cryptosporidium parvum genome contains a single TrpRS gene, which codes for an N-terminal domain of uncertain function in addition to the conserved core TrpRS domains. Sequence analysis indicates that this extra domain, conserved among several apicomplexans, is related to the editing domain of some AlaRS and ThrRS. The C. parvum enzyme remains fully active in charging tRNA(Trp) after truncation of this extra domain. The crystal structure of the active, truncated enzyme is presented here at 2.4Å resolution. The Trypanosoma brucei genome contains separate cytosolic and mitochondrial isoforms of TrpRS that have diverged in their respective tRNA recognition domains. The crystal structure of the T. brucei cytosolic isoform is presented here at 2.8Å resolution. The Entamoeba histolytica genome contains three sequences that appear to be TrpRS homologs. However one of these, whose structure is presented here at 3.0Å resolution, has lost the active site motifs characteristic of the Class I aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase catalytic domain while retaining the conserved features of a fully formed tRNA(Trp) recognition domain. The biological function of this variant E. histolytica TrpRS remains unknown, but, on the basis of a completely conserved tRNA recognition region and evidence for ATP but not tryptophan binding, it is tempting to speculate that it may perform an editing function. Together with a previously reported structure of an unusual Trp

  13. Localization of the site for the nucleotide effectors of Escherichia coli carbamoyl phosphate synthetase using site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Mora, P; Rubio, V; Fresquet, V; Cervera, J

    1999-03-01

    Replacement by alanine of Ser-948, Thr-974 and Lys-954 of Escherichia coli carbamoyl phosphate synthetase (CPS) shows that these residues are involved in binding the allosteric inhibitor UMP and the activator IMP. The mutant CPSs are active in vivo and in vitro and exhibit normal activation by ornithine, but the modulation by both UMP and IMP is either lost or diminished. The results demonstrate that the sites for UMP and IMP overlap and that the activator ornithine binds elsewhere. Since the mutated residues were found in the crystal structure of CPS near a bound phosphate, Ser-948, Thr-974 and Lys-954 bind the phosphate moiety of UMP and IMP. PMID:10100629

  14. Evidence for two immunologically distinct acetyl-coenzyme A synthetases in yeast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Satyanarayana, T.; Mandel, A. D.; Klein, H. P.

    1974-01-01

    Evidence is presented that clearly establishes the presence of two acetyl-CoA synthetases in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, one elaborated under 'aerobic' conditions, the other under 'nonaerobic' conditions. The antibody produced by each enzyme is immunologically specific.

  15. Identification of the regulatory domain of the mammalian multifunctional protein CAD by the construction of an Escherichia coli hamster hybrid carbamyl-phosphate synthetase.

    PubMed

    Liu, X; Guy, H I; Evans, D R

    1994-11-01

    Carbamyl-phosphate synthetases from different organisms have similar catalytic mechanisms and amino acid sequences, but their structural organization, sub-unit structure, and mode of regulation can be very different. Escherichia coli carbamyl-phosphate synthetase (CPSase), a monofunctional protein consisting of amido-transferase and synthetase subunits, is allosterically inhibited by UMP and activated by NH3, IMP, and ornithine. In contrast, mammalian CPSase II, part of the large multifunctional polypeptide, CAD, is inhibited by UTP and activated by 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP). Previous photoaffinity labeling studies of E. coli CPSase showed that allosteric effectors bind near the carboxyl-terminal end of the synthetase subunit. This region of the molecule may be a regulatory subdomain common to all CPSases. An E. coli mammalian hybrid CPSase gene has been constructed and expressed in E. coli. The hybrid consists of the E. coli CPSase synthetase catalytic subdomains, residues 1-900 of the 1073 residue polypeptide, fused to the amino-terminal end of the putative 190-residue regulatory subdomain of the mammalian protein. The hybrid CPSase had normal activity, but was no longer regulated by the prokaryotic allosteric effectors. Instead, the glutamine- and ammonia-dependent CPSase activities and both ATP-dependent partial reactions were activated by PRPP and inhibited by UTP, indicating that the binding sites of both of these ligands are located in a regulatory region at the carboxyl-terminal end of the CPSase domain of CAD. The apparent ligand dissociation constants and extent of inhibition by UTP are similar in the hybrid and the wild type mammalian protein, but PRPP binds 4-fold more weakly to the hybrid. The allosteric ligands affected the steady state kinetic parameters of the hybrid differently, suggesting that while the linkage between the catalytic and regulatory subdomains has been preserved, there may be qualitative differences in interdomain

  16. Lack of protective effect of thromboxane synthetase inhibitor (CGS-13080) on single dose radiated canine intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Barter, J.F.; Marlow, D.; Kamath, R.K.; Harbert, J.; Torrisi, J.R.; Barnes, W.A.; Potkul, R.K.; Newsome, J.T.; Delgado, G. )

    1991-03-01

    The effect of a thromboxane A2 synthetase inhibitor (CGS-13080) on canine intestine was studied using a single dose of radiation, and radioactive microspheres were used to determine resultant blood flow. Thromboxane A2 causes vasospasm and platelet aggregation and may play a dominant role in radiation injury. However, there was no effect on the intestinal blood flow diminution occurring after radiation in this laboratory model using this thromboxane A2 synthetase inhibitor.

  17. Lincosamide Synthetase—A Unique Condensation System Combining Elements of Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase and Mycothiol Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Janata, Jiri; Kadlcik, Stanislav; Koberska, Marketa; Ulanova, Dana; Kamenik, Zdenek; Novak, Petr; Kopecky, Jan; Novotna, Jitka; Radojevic, Bojana; Plhackova, Kamila; Gazak, Radek; Najmanova, Lucie

    2015-01-01

    In the biosynthesis of lincosamide antibiotics lincomycin and celesticetin, the amino acid and amino sugar units are linked by an amide bond. The respective condensing enzyme lincosamide synthetase (LS) is expected to be an unusual system combining nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) components with so far unknown amino sugar related activities. The biosynthetic gene cluster of celesticetin was sequenced and compared to the lincomycin one revealing putative LS coding ORFs shared in both clusters. Based on a bioassay and production profiles of S. lincolnensis strains with individually deleted putative LS coding genes, the proteins LmbC, D, E, F and V were assigned to LS function. Moreover, the newly recognized N-terminal domain of LmbN (LmbN-CP) was also assigned to LS as a NRPS carrier protein (CP). Surprisingly, the homologous CP coding sequence in celesticetin cluster is part of ccbZ gene adjacent to ccbN, the counterpart of lmbN, suggesting the gene rearrangement, evident also from still active internal translation start in lmbN, and indicating the direction of lincosamide biosynthesis evolution. The in vitro test with LmbN-CP, LmbC and the newly identified S. lincolnensis phosphopantetheinyl transferase Slp, confirmed the cooperation of the previously characterized NRPS A-domain LmbC with a holo-LmbN-CP in activation of a 4-propyl-L-proline precursor of lincomycin. This result completed the functional characterization of LS subunits resembling NRPS initiation module. Two of the four remaining putative LS subunits, LmbE/CcbE and LmbV/CcbV, exhibit low but significant homology to enzymes from the metabolism of mycothiol, the NRPS-independent system processing the amino sugar and amino acid units. The functions of particular LS subunits as well as cooperation of both NRPS-based and NRPS-independent LS blocks are discussed. The described condensing enzyme represents a unique hybrid system with overall composition quite dissimilar to any other known enzyme system

  18. The identification of new cytosolic glutamine synthetase and asparagine synthetase genes in barley (Hordeum vulgare L.), and their expression during leaf senescence.

    PubMed

    Avila-Ospina, Liliana; Marmagne, Anne; Talbotec, Joël; Krupinska, Karin; Masclaux-Daubresse, Céline

    2015-04-01

    Glutamine synthetase and asparagine synthetase are two master enzymes involved in ammonium assimilation in plants. Their roles in nitrogen remobilization and nitrogen use efficiency have been proposed. In this report, the genes coding for the cytosolic glutamine synthetases (HvGS1) and asparagine synthetases (HvASN) in barley were identified. In addition to the three HvGS1 and two HvASN sequences previously reported, two prokaryotic-like HvGS1 and three HvASN cDNA sequences were identified. Gene structures were then characterized, obtaining full genomic sequences. The response of the five HvGS1 and five HvASN genes to leaf senescence was then studied. Developmental senescence was studied using primary and flag leaves. Dark-exposure or low-nitrate conditions were also used to trigger stress-induced senescence. Well-known senescence markers such as the chlorophyll and Rubisco contents were monitored in order to characterize senescence levels in the different leaves. The three eukaryotic-like HvGS1_1, HvGS1_2, and HvGS1_3 sequences showed the typical senescence-induced reduction in gene expression described in many plant species. By contrast, the two prokaryotic-like HvGS1_4 and HvGS1_5 sequences were repressed by leaf senescence, similar to the HvGS2 gene, which encodes the chloroplast glutamine synthetase isoenzyme. There was a greater contrast in the responses of the five HvASN and this suggested that these genes are needed for N remobilization in senescing leaves only when plants are well fertilized with nitrate. Responses of the HvASN sequences to dark-induced senescence showed that there are two categories of asparagine synthetases, one induced in the dark and the other repressed by the same conditions. PMID:25697791

  19. The identification of new cytosolic glutamine synthetase and asparagine synthetase genes in barley (Hordeum vulgare L.), and their expression during leaf senescence.

    PubMed

    Avila-Ospina, Liliana; Marmagne, Anne; Talbotec, Joël; Krupinska, Karin; Masclaux-Daubresse, Céline

    2015-04-01

    Glutamine synthetase and asparagine synthetase are two master enzymes involved in ammonium assimilation in plants. Their roles in nitrogen remobilization and nitrogen use efficiency have been proposed. In this report, the genes coding for the cytosolic glutamine synthetases (HvGS1) and asparagine synthetases (HvASN) in barley were identified. In addition to the three HvGS1 and two HvASN sequences previously reported, two prokaryotic-like HvGS1 and three HvASN cDNA sequences were identified. Gene structures were then characterized, obtaining full genomic sequences. The response of the five HvGS1 and five HvASN genes to leaf senescence was then studied. Developmental senescence was studied using primary and flag leaves. Dark-exposure or low-nitrate conditions were also used to trigger stress-induced senescence. Well-known senescence markers such as the chlorophyll and Rubisco contents were monitored in order to characterize senescence levels in the different leaves. The three eukaryotic-like HvGS1_1, HvGS1_2, and HvGS1_3 sequences showed the typical senescence-induced reduction in gene expression described in many plant species. By contrast, the two prokaryotic-like HvGS1_4 and HvGS1_5 sequences were repressed by leaf senescence, similar to the HvGS2 gene, which encodes the chloroplast glutamine synthetase isoenzyme. There was a greater contrast in the responses of the five HvASN and this suggested that these genes are needed for N remobilization in senescing leaves only when plants are well fertilized with nitrate. Responses of the HvASN sequences to dark-induced senescence showed that there are two categories of asparagine synthetases, one induced in the dark and the other repressed by the same conditions.

  20. Discovery of potent anti-tuberculosis agents targeting leucyl-tRNA synthetase.

    PubMed

    Gudzera, Olga I; Golub, Andriy G; Bdzhola, Volodymyr G; Volynets, Galyna P; Lukashov, Sergiy S; Kovalenko, Oksana P; Kriklivyi, Ivan A; Yaremchuk, Anna D; Starosyla, Sergiy A; Yarmoluk, Sergiy M; Tukalo, Michail A

    2016-03-01

    Tuberculosis is a serious infectious disease caused by human pathogen bacteria Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Bacterial drug resistance is a very significant medical problem nowadays and development of novel antibiotics with different mechanisms of action is an important goal of modern medical science. Leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LeuRS) has been recently clinically validated as antimicrobial target. Here we report the discovery of small-molecule inhibitors of M. tuberculosis LeuRS. Using receptor-based virtual screening we have identified six inhibitors of M. tuberculosis LeuRS from two different chemical classes. The most active compound 4-{[4-(4-Bromo-phenyl)-thiazol-2-yl]hydrazonomethyl}-2-methoxy-6-nitro-phenol (1) inhibits LeuRS with IC50 of 6μM. A series of derivatives has been synthesized and evaluated in vitro toward M. tuberculosis LeuRS. It was revealed that the most active compound 2,6-Dibromo-4-{[4-(4-nitro-phenyl)-thiazol-2-yl]-hydrazonomethyl}-phenol inhibits LeuRS with IC50 of 2.27μM. All active compounds were tested for antimicrobial effect against M. tuberculosis H37Rv. The compound 1 seems to have the best cell permeability and inhibits growth of pathogenic bacteria with IC50=10.01μM and IC90=13.53μM.

  1. The binding of inosine monophosphate to Escherichia coli carbamoyl phosphate synthetase.

    PubMed

    Thoden, J B; Raushel, F M; Wesenberg, G; Holden, H M

    1999-08-01

    Carbamoyl phosphate synthetase (CPS) from Escherichia coli catalyzes the formation of carbamoyl phosphate, which is subsequently employed in both the pyrimidine and arginine biosynthetic pathways. The reaction mechanism is known to proceed through at least three highly reactive intermediates: ammonia, carboxyphosphate, and carbamate. In keeping with the fact that the product of CPS is utilized in two competing metabolic pathways, the enzyme is highly regulated by a variety of effector molecules including potassium and ornithine, which function as activators, and UMP, which acts as an inhibitor. IMP is also known to bind to CPS but the actual effect of this ligand on the activity of the enzyme is dependent upon both temperature and assay conditions. Here we describe the three-dimensional architecture of CPS with bound IMP determined and refined to 2.1 A resolution. The nucleotide is situated at the C-terminal portion of a five-stranded parallel beta-sheet in the allosteric domain formed by Ser(937) to Lys(1073). Those amino acid side chains responsible for anchoring the nucleotide to the polypeptide chain include Lys(954), Thr(974), Thr(977), Lys(993), Asn(1015), and Thr(1017). A series of hydrogen bonds connect the IMP-binding pocket to the active site of the large subunit known to function in the phosphorylation of the unstable intermediate, carbamate. This structural analysis reveals, for the first time, the detailed manner in which CPS accommodates nucleotide monophosphate effector molecules within the allosteric domain. PMID:10428826

  2. Dissection of the conduit for allosteric control of carbamoyl phosphate synthetase by ornithine.

    PubMed

    Pierrat, Olivier A; Javid-Majd, Farah; Raushel, Frank M

    2002-04-01

    Ornithine is an allosteric activator of carbamoyl phosphate synthetase (CPS) from Escherichia coli. Nine amino acids in the vicinity of the binding sites for ornithine and potassium were mutated to alanine, glutamine, or lysine. The residues E783, T1042, and T1043 were found to be primarily responsible for the binding of ornithine to CPS, while E783 and E892, located within the carbamate domain of the large subunit, were necessary for the transmission of the allosteric signals to the active site. In the K loop for the binding of the monovalent cation potassium, only E761 was crucial for the exhibition of the allosteric effects of ornithine, UMP, and IMP. The mutations H781K and S792K altered significantly the allosteric properties of ornithine, UMP, and IMP, possibly by modifying the conformation of the K-loop structure. Overall, these mutations affected the allosteric properties of ornithine and IMP more than those of UMP. The mutants S792K and D1041A altered the allosteric regulation by ornithine and IMP in a similar way, suggesting common features in the activation mechanism exhibited by these two effectors. PMID:11913967

  3. Physiological Studies of Glutamine Synthetases I and III from Synechococcus sp. WH7803 Reveal Differential Regulation.

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Martín, María Agustina; Díez, Jesús; García-Fernández, José M

    2016-01-01

    The marine picocyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. WH7803 possesses two glutamine synthetases (GSs; EC 6.3.1.2), GSI encoded by glnA and GSIII encoded by glnN. This is the first work addressing the physiological regulation of both enzymes in a marine cyanobacterial strain. The increase of GS activity upon nitrogen starvation was similar to that found in other model cyanobacteria. However, an unusual response was found when cells were grown under darkness: the GS activity was unaffected, reflecting adaptation to the environment where they thrive. On the other hand, we found that GSIII did not respond to nitrogen availability, in sharp contrast with the results observed for this enzyme in other cyanobacteria thus far studied. These features suggest that GS activities in Synechococcus sp. WH7803 represent an intermediate step in the evolution of cyanobacteria, in a process of regulatory streamlining where GSI lost the regulation by light, while GSIII lost its responsiveness to nitrogen. This is in good agreement with the phylogeny of Synechococcus sp. WH7803 in the context of the marine cyanobacterial radiation. PMID:27446010

  4. Physiological Studies of Glutamine Synthetases I and III from Synechococcus sp. WH7803 Reveal Differential Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Domínguez-Martín, María Agustina; Díez, Jesús; García-Fernández, José M.

    2016-01-01

    The marine picocyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. WH7803 possesses two glutamine synthetases (GSs; EC 6.3.1.2), GSI encoded by glnA and GSIII encoded by glnN. This is the first work addressing the physiological regulation of both enzymes in a marine cyanobacterial strain. The increase of GS activity upon nitrogen starvation was similar to that found in other model cyanobacteria. However, an unusual response was found when cells were grown under darkness: the GS activity was unaffected, reflecting adaptation to the environment where they thrive. On the other hand, we found that GSIII did not respond to nitrogen availability, in sharp contrast with the results observed for this enzyme in other cyanobacteria thus far studied. These features suggest that GS activities in Synechococcus sp. WH7803 represent an intermediate step in the evolution of cyanobacteria, in a process of regulatory streamlining where GSI lost the regulation by light, while GSIII lost its responsiveness to nitrogen. This is in good agreement with the phylogeny of Synechococcus sp. WH7803 in the context of the marine cyanobacterial radiation. PMID:27446010

  5. Comparative properties of glutamine synthetases I and II in Rhizobium and Agrobacterium spp.

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, R L; Keister, D L

    1980-01-01

    Some properties of glutamine synthetase I (GSI) and GSII are described for a fast-growing Rhizobium sp. (Rhizobium trifolii T1), a slow-growing Rhizobium sp. (Rhizobium japonicum USDA 83), and Agrobacterium tumefaciens C58. GSII of the fast-growing Rhizobium sp. and GSII of the Agrobacterium sp. were considerably more heat labile than GSII of the slow-growing Rhizobium sp. As previously shown in R. japonicum 61A76, GSI became adenylylated rapidly in all species tested in response to ammonium. GSII activity disappeared within one generation of growth in two of the strains, but the disappearance of GSII activity required two generations in another. Isoactivity points for transferase assay, which were derived from the pH curves of adenylylated GSI and deadenylylated GSI, were approximately pH 7.8 for both R. trifolii and A. tumefaciens. No isoactivity point was found for R. japonicum under the standard assay conditions used. When the feedback inhibitor glycine was used to inhibit differentially the adenylylated GSI and deadenylylated GSI of R. japonicum, an isoactivity point was observed at pH 7.3. Thus, the transferase activity of GSI could be determined independent of the state of adenylation. A survey of 23 strains of bacteria representing 11 genera indicated that only Rhizobium spp. and Agrobacterium spp. contained GSII. Thus, this enzyme appears to be unique for the Rhizobiaceae. PMID:6107288

  6. Detection of polyketide synthase and nonribosomal peptide synthetase biosynthetic genes from antimicrobial coral-associated actinomycetes.

    PubMed

    Li, Jie; Dong, Jun-De; Yang, Jian; Luo, Xiong-Ming; Zhang, Si

    2014-10-01

    The diversity and properties of actinobacteria, predominant residents in coral holobionts, have been rarely documented. In this study, we aimed to explore the species diversity, antimicrobial activities and biosynthetic potential of culturable actinomycetes within the tissues of the scleractinian corals Porites lutea, Galaxea fascicularis and Acropora millepora from the South China Sea. A total of 70 strains representing 13 families and 15 genera of actinobacteria were isolated. The antimicrobial activity and biosynthetic potential of fifteen representative filamentous actinomycetes were estimated. Crude fermentation extracts of 6 strains exhibited comparable or greater activities against Vibrio alginolyticus than ciprofloxacin. Seven of the 15 actinomycetes strains possess type I polyketide synthases (PKS-I) and/or nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS) genes. Nine tested strains possess type II polyketide synthases (PKS-II). Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that these PKS and NRPS gene screening positive strains belong to genera Nocardiopsis, Pseudonocardia, Streptomyces, Micromonospora, Amycolatopsis and Prauserella. One PKS-I and four NRPS fragments showed <70% similarity to their closest relatives, which suggested the novelty of these genes. This study helps uncover the genetic capacity of stony coral-associated actinomycetes to produce bioactive molecules.

  7. Discovery of Novel Oral Protein Synthesis Inhibitors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis That Target Leucyl-tRNA Synthetase

    PubMed Central

    Palencia, Andrés; Li, Xianfeng; Bu, Wei; Choi, Wai; Ding, Charles Z.; Easom, Eric E.; Feng, Lisa; Hernandez, Vincent; Houston, Paul; Liu, Liang; Meewan, Maliwan; Mohan, Manisha; Rock, Fernando L.; Sexton, Holly; Zhang, Suoming; Zhou, Yasheen; Wan, Baojie; Wang, Yuehong; Franzblau, Scott G.; Woolhiser, Lisa; Gruppo, Veronica; Lenaerts, Anne J.; O'Malley, Theresa; Parish, Tanya; Cooper, Christopher B.; Waters, M. Gerard; Ma, Zhenkun; Ioerger, Thomas R.; Sacchettini, James C.; Rullas, Joaquín; Angulo-Barturen, Iñigo; Pérez-Herrán, Esther; Mendoza, Alfonso; Barros, David; Cusack, Stephen; Plattner, Jacob J.

    2016-01-01

    The recent development and spread of extensively drug-resistant and totally drug-resistant resistant (TDR) strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis highlight the need for new antitubercular drugs. Protein synthesis inhibitors have played an important role in the treatment of tuberculosis (TB) starting with the inclusion of streptomycin in the first combination therapies. Although parenteral aminoglycosides are a key component of therapy for multidrug-resistant TB, the oxazolidinone linezolid is the only orally available protein synthesis inhibitor that is effective against TB. Here, we show that small-molecule inhibitors of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (AARSs), which are known to be excellent antibacterial protein synthesis targets, are orally bioavailable and effective against M. tuberculosis in TB mouse infection models. We applied the oxaborole tRNA-trapping (OBORT) mechanism, which was first developed to target fungal cytoplasmic leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LeuRS), to M. tuberculosis LeuRS. X-ray crystallography was used to guide the design of LeuRS inhibitors that have good biochemical potency and excellent whole-cell activity against M. tuberculosis. Importantly, their good oral bioavailability translates into in vivo efficacy in both the acute and chronic mouse models of TB with potency comparable to that of the frontline drug isoniazid. PMID:27503647

  8. Origin and Evolution of Glutamyl-prolyl tRNA Synthetase WHEP Domains Reveal Evolutionary Relationships within Holozoa

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Partho Sarothi; Fox, Paul L.

    2014-01-01

    Repeated domains in proteins that have undergone duplication or loss, and sequence divergence, are especially informative about phylogenetic relationships. We have exploited divergent repeats of the highly structured, 50-amino acid WHEP domains that join the catalytic subunits of bifunctional glutamyl-prolyl tRNA synthetase (EPRS) as a sequence-informed repeat (SIR) to trace the origin and evolution of EPRS in holozoa. EPRS is the only fused tRNA synthetase, with two distinct aminoacylation activities, and a non-canonical translation regulatory function mediated by the WHEP domains in the linker. Investigating the duplications, deletions and divergence of WHEP domains, we traced the bifunctional EPRS to choanozoans and identified the fusion event leading to its origin at the divergence of ichthyosporea and emergence of filozoa nearly a billion years ago. Distribution of WHEP domains from a single species in two or more distinct clades suggested common descent, allowing the identification of linking organisms. The discrete assortment of choanoflagellate WHEP domains with choanozoan domains as well as with those in metazoans supported the phylogenetic position of choanoflagellates as the closest sister group to metazoans. Analysis of clustering and assortment of WHEP domains provided unexpected insights into phylogenetic relationships amongst holozoan taxa. Furthermore, observed gaps in the transition between WHEP domain groupings in distant taxa allowed the prediction of undiscovered or extinct evolutionary intermediates. Analysis based on SIR domains can provide a phylogenetic counterpart to palaentological approaches of discovering “missing links” in the tree of life. PMID:24968216

  9. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray characterization of a human mitochondrial phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, Inna; Kessler, Naama; Moor, Nina; Klipcan, Liron; Koc, Emine; Templeton, Paul; Spremulli, Linda; Safro, Mark

    2007-09-01

    The expression, purification and crystallization of recombinant human mitochondrial phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase (mitPheRS) are reported. Diffraction data were collected to 2.2 Å resolution and the mitPheRS structure was solved using the molecular-replacement method. Human monomeric mitochondrial phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase (mitPheRS) is an enzyme that catalyzes the charging of tRNA with the cognate amino acid phenylalanine. Human mitPheRS is a chimera of the bacterial α-subunit of PheRS and the B8 domain of its β-subunit. Together, the α-subunit and the ‘RNP-domain’ (B8 domain) at the C-terminus form the minimal structural set to construct an enzyme with phenylalanylation activity. The recombinant human mitPheRS was purified to homogeneity and crystallized in complex with phenylalanine and ATP. The crystals diffracted to 2.2 Å resolution and belonged to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 55, b = 90, c = 96 Å.

  10. Identification of the nuclear export signals that regulate the intracellular localization of the mouse CMP-sialic acid synthetase

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, Akiko; Sato, Chihiro; Kitajima, Ken. E-mail: kitajima@agr.nagoya-u.ac.jp

    2007-03-30

    The CMP-sialic acid synthetase (CSS) catalyzes the activation of sialic acid (Sia) to CMP-Sia which is a donor substrate of sialyltransferases. The vertebrate CSSs are usually localized in nucleus due to the nuclear localization signal (NLS) on the molecule. In this study, we first point out that a small, but significant population of the mouse CMP-sialic acid synthetase (mCSS) is also present in cytoplasm, though mostly in nucleus. As a mechanism for the localization in cytoplasm, we first identified two nuclear export signals (NESs) in mCSS, based on the localization studies of the potential NES-deleted mCSS mutants as well as the potential NES-tagged eGFP proteins. These two NESs are conserved among mammalian and fish CSSs, but not present in the bacterial or insect CSS. These results suggest that the intracellular localization of vertebrate CSSs is regulated by not only the NLS, but also the NES sequences.

  11. Discovery of Novel Oral Protein Synthesis Inhibitors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis That Target Leucyl-tRNA Synthetase.

    PubMed

    Palencia, Andrés; Li, Xianfeng; Bu, Wei; Choi, Wai; Ding, Charles Z; Easom, Eric E; Feng, Lisa; Hernandez, Vincent; Houston, Paul; Liu, Liang; Meewan, Maliwan; Mohan, Manisha; Rock, Fernando L; Sexton, Holly; Zhang, Suoming; Zhou, Yasheen; Wan, Baojie; Wang, Yuehong; Franzblau, Scott G; Woolhiser, Lisa; Gruppo, Veronica; Lenaerts, Anne J; O'Malley, Theresa; Parish, Tanya; Cooper, Christopher B; Waters, M Gerard; Ma, Zhenkun; Ioerger, Thomas R; Sacchettini, James C; Rullas, Joaquín; Angulo-Barturen, Iñigo; Pérez-Herrán, Esther; Mendoza, Alfonso; Barros, David; Cusack, Stephen; Plattner, Jacob J; Alley, M R K

    2016-10-01

    The recent development and spread of extensively drug-resistant and totally drug-resistant resistant (TDR) strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis highlight the need for new antitubercular drugs. Protein synthesis inhibitors have played an important role in the treatment of tuberculosis (TB) starting with the inclusion of streptomycin in the first combination therapies. Although parenteral aminoglycosides are a key component of therapy for multidrug-resistant TB, the oxazolidinone linezolid is the only orally available protein synthesis inhibitor that is effective against TB. Here, we show that small-molecule inhibitors of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (AARSs), which are known to be excellent antibacterial protein synthesis targets, are orally bioavailable and effective against M. tuberculosis in TB mouse infection models. We applied the oxaborole tRNA-trapping (OBORT) mechanism, which was first developed to target fungal cytoplasmic leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LeuRS), to M. tuberculosis LeuRS. X-ray crystallography was used to guide the design of LeuRS inhibitors that have good biochemical potency and excellent whole-cell activity against M. tuberculosis Importantly, their good oral bioavailability translates into in vivo efficacy in both the acute and chronic mouse models of TB with potency comparable to that of the frontline drug isoniazid. PMID:27503647

  12. Site-specific incorporation of redox active amino acids into proteins

    DOEpatents

    Alfonta, Lital; Schultz, Peter G.; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2009-02-24

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate redox active amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with redox active amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  13. Site-specific incorporation of redox active amino acids into proteins

    DOEpatents

    Alfonta; Lital , Schultz; Peter G. , Zhang; Zhiwen

    2010-10-12

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate redox active amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with redox active amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  14. Site-specific incorporation of redox active amino acids into proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Alfonta, Lital; Schultz, Peter G.; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2012-02-14

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate redox active amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with redox active amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  15. Site-specific incorporation of redox active amino acids into proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Alfonta, Lital; Schultz, Peter G.; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2011-08-30

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate redox active amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with redox active amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  16. The activity of uridine diphosphate glucose–d-fructose 6-phosphate 2-glucosyltransferase in leaves

    PubMed Central

    Hawker, J. S.

    1967-01-01

    1. By using EDTA in reaction mixtures it was possible to determine the activity of sucrose phosphate synthetase in freshly prepared leaf extracts without the complications caused by sucrose phosphatase. 2. EDTA was found also to increase the activity of sucrose phosphate synthetase by as much as 100%. 3. High sucrose phosphate synthetase activities were found in leaf preparations in which sucrose phosphatase was inhibited by EDTA. By contrast with previous reports, the activities were sufficient to allow sucrose synthesis in leaves during photosynthesis to occur via sucrose phosphate. 4. Sugar-cane plants having different rates of photosynthesis also had different activities of sucrose phosphate synthetase in their leaves. 5. It is suggested that the activity of sucrose phosphate synthetase in leaves may play a role in the control of the rate of photosynthesis. PMID:16742569

  17. Acetate utilization is inhibited by benzoate in Alcaligenes eutrophus: evidence for transcriptional control of the expression of acoE coding for acetyl coenzyme A synthetase.

    PubMed Central

    Ampe, F; Lindley, N D

    1995-01-01

    During batch growth of Alcaligenes eutrophus on benzoate-acetate mixtures, benzoate was the preferred substrate, with acetate consumption being delayed until the rate of benzoate consumption had diminished. This effect was attributed to a transcriptional control of the synthesis of acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) synthetase, an enzyme necessary for the entry of acetate into the central metabolic pathways, rather than to a biochemical modulation of the activity of this enzyme. Analysis of a 2.4-kb mRNA transcript hybridizing with the A. eutrophus acoE gene confirmed this repression effect. In a benzoate-limited chemostat culture, derepression was observed, with no increase in the level of expression following an acetate pulse. Benzoate itself was not the signal triggering the repression of acetyl-CoA synthetase. This role was played by catechol, which transiently accumulated in the medium when high specific rates of benzoate consumption were reached. The lack of rapid inactivation of the functional acetyl-CoA synthetase after synthesis has been stopped enables A. eutrophus to retain the capacity to metabolize acetate for prolonged periods while conserving minimal protein expenditure. PMID:7592330

  18. Carbamoyl phosphate synthetase: an amazing biochemical odyssey from substrate to product.

    PubMed

    Holden, H M; Thoden, J B; Raushel, F M

    1999-10-30

    Carbamoyl phosphate synthetase (CPS) catalyzes one of the most remarkable reactions ever described in biological chemistry, in which carbamoyl phosphate is produced from one molecule of bicarbonate, two molecules of Mg2+ ATP, and one molecule of either glutamine or ammonia. The carbamoyl phosphate so produced is utilized in the synthesis of arginine and pyrimidine nucleotides. It is also employed in the urea cycle in most terrestrial vertebrates. Due to its large size, its important metabolic role, and the fact that it is highly regulated, CPS has been the focus of intensive investigation for nearly 40 years. Numerous enzymological, biochemical, and biophysical studies by a variety of investigators have led to a quite detailed understanding of CPS. Perhaps one of the most significant advances on this topic within the last 2 years has been the successful X-ray crystallographic analysis of CPS from Escherichia coli. Quite unexpectedly, this structural investigation revealed that the three active sites on the protein are widely separated from one another. Furthermore, these active sites are connected by a molecular tunnel with a total length of approximately 100 A, suggesting that CPS utilizes this channel to facilitate the translocation of reaction intermediates from one site to another. In this review, we highlight the recent biochemical and X-ray crystallographic results that have led to a more complete understanding of this finely tuned instrument of catalysis. PMID:11212301

  19. Physiological and Kinetic Studies with Anthranilate Synthetase of Bacillus alvei1

    PubMed Central

    Catena, Anthony; DeMoss, R. D.

    1970-01-01

    Anthranilate synthetase from Bacillus alvei was partially purified by ammonium sulfate fractionation and was stabilized by glycerol. The reaction mechanism of the enzyme was found to be sequential with respect to substrate, and the enzyme formed a hydroxamic acid in the absence of Mg++. The Km for chorismic acid was 1.25 × 10−4m, and the Km for l-glutamine was 5.5 × 10−4m. Enzyme activity was inhibited by tryptophan noncompetitively with respect to chorismic acid and uncompetitively with respect to l-glutamine. An analysis of the inhibition patterns indicated that tryptophan may act as a dead end inhibitor and bind at the catalytic site. Enzyme activity could be completely inhibited in vitro and in vivo under the appropriate conditions, and enzyme synthesis was sensitive to repression by tryptophan. A sedimentation coefficient of 5.5S and an estimated molecular weight of 90,000 were obtained for the enzyme. PMID:5413822

  20. Oxidative stress diverts tRNA synthetase to nucleus for protection against DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Wei, Na; Shi, Yi; Truong, Lan N; Fisch, Kathleen M; Xu, Tao; Gardiner, Elisabeth; Fu, Guangsen; Hsu, Yun-Shiuan Olivia; Kishi, Shuji; Su, Andrew I; Wu, Xiaohua; Yang, Xiang-Lei

    2014-10-23

    Tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase (TyrRS) is known for its essential aminoacylation function in protein synthesis. Here we report a function for TyrRS in DNA damage protection. We found that oxidative stress, which often downregulates protein synthesis, induces TyrRS to rapidly translocate from the cytosol to the nucleus. We also found that angiogenin mediates or potentiates this stress-induced translocalization. The nuclear-localized TyrRS activates transcription factor E2F1 to upregulate the expression of DNA damage repair genes such as BRCA1 and RAD51. The activation is achieved through direct interaction of TyrRS with TRIM28 to sequester this vertebrate-specific epigenetic repressor and its associated HDAC1 from deacetylating and suppressing E2F1. Remarkably, overexpression of TyrRS strongly protects against UV-induced DNA double-strand breaks in zebrafish, whereas restricting TyrRS nuclear entry completely abolishes the protection. Therefore, oxidative stress triggers an essential cytoplasmic enzyme used for protein synthesis to translocate to the nucleus to protect against DNA damage.

  1. Overexpression of a glutamine synthetase gene affects growth and development in sorghum.

    PubMed

    Urriola, Jazmina; Rathore, Keerti S

    2015-06-01

    Nitrogen is a primary macronutrient in plants, and nitrogen fertilizers play a critical role in crop production and yield. In this study, we investigated the effects of overexpressing a glutamine synthetase (GS) gene on nitrogen metabolism, and plant growth and development in sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L., Moench). GS catalyzes the ATP dependent reaction between ammonia and glutamate to produce glutamine. A 1,071 bp long coding sequence of a sorghum cytosolic GS gene (Gln1) under the control of the maize ubiquitin (Ubq) promoter was introduced into sorghum immature embryos by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Progeny of the transformants exhibited higher accumulation of the Gln1 transcripts and up to 2.2-fold higher GS activity compared to the non-transgenic controls. When grown under optimal nitrogen conditions, these Gln1 transgenic lines showed greater tillering and up to 2.1-fold increase in shoot vegetative biomass. Interestingly, even under greenhouse conditions, we observed a seasonal component to both these parameters and the grain yield. Our results, showing that the growth and development of sorghum Gln1 transformants are also affected by N availability and other environmental factors, suggest complexity of the relationship between GS activity and plant growth and development. A better understanding of other control points and the ability to manipulate these will be needed to utilize the transgenic technology to improve nitrogen use efficiency of crop plants.

  2. Cancer association study of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase signaling network in glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-Wan; Kwon, Changhyuk; Liu, Juinn-Lin; Kim, Se Hoon; Kim, Sunghoon

    2012-01-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (ARSs) and ARS-interacting multifunctional proteins (AIMPs) exhibit remarkable functional versatility beyond their catalytic activities in protein synthesis. Their non-canonical functions have been pathologically linked to cancers. Here we described our integrative genome-wide analysis of ARSs to show cancer-associated activities in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most aggressive malignant primary brain tumor. We first selected 23 ARS/AIMPs (together referred to as ARSN), 124 cancer-associated druggable target genes (DTGs) and 404 protein-protein interactors (PPIs) of ARSs using NCI's cancer gene index. 254 GBM affymetrix microarray data in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) were used to identify the probe sets whose expression were most strongly correlated with survival (Kaplan-Meier plots versus survival times, log-rank t-test <0.05). The analysis identified 122 probe sets as survival signatures, including 5 of ARSN (VARS, QARS, CARS, NARS, FARS), and 115 of DTGs and PPIs (PARD3, RXRB, ATP5C1, HSP90AA1, CD44, THRA, TRAF2, KRT10, MED12, etc). Of note, 61 survival-related probes were differentially expressed in three different prognosis subgroups in GBM patients and showed correlation with established prognosis markers such as age and phenotypic molecular signatures. CARS and FARS also showed significantly higher association with different molecular networks in GBM patients. Taken together, our findings demonstrate evidence for an ARSN biology-dominant contribution in the biology of GBM.

  3. Over-expression of cytosolic glutamine synthetase increases photosynthesis and growth at low nitrogen concentrations.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, S I; Allen, D J; Ortiz-Lopez, A; Hernández, G

    2001-05-01

    Nitrogen, which is a major limiting nutrient for plant growth, is assimilated as ammonium by the concerted action of glutamine synthetase (GS) and glutamate synthase (GOGAT). GS catalyses the critical incorporation of inorganic ammonium into the amino acid glutamine. Two types of GS isozymes, located in the cytosol (GS1) and in the chloroplast (GS2) have been identified in plants. Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) transformants, over-expressing GS1 driven by the constitutive CaMV 35S promoter were analysed. GS in leaves of GS-5 and GS-8 plants was up-regulated, at the level of RNA and proteins. These transgenic plants had six times higher leaf GS activity than controls. Under optimum nitrogen fertilization conditions there was no effect of GS over-expression on photosynthesis or growth. However, under nitrogen starvation the GS transgenics had c. 70% higher shoot and c. 100% greater root dry weight as well as 50% more leaf area than low nitrogen controls. This was achieved by the maintenance of photosynthesis at rates indistinguishable from plants under high nitrogen, while photosynthesis in control plants was inhibited by 40-50% by nitrogen deprivation. It was demonstrated that manipulation of GS activity has the potential to maintain crop photosynthetic productivity while reducing nitrogen fertilization and the concomitant pollution. PMID:11432923

  4. Novel nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) genes sequenced from intertidal mudflat bacteria.

    PubMed

    Tambadou, Fatoumata; Lanneluc, Isabelle; Sablé, Sophie; Klein, Géraldine L; Doghri, Ibtissem; Sopéna, Valérie; Didelot, Sandrine; Barthélémy, Cyrille; Thiéry, Valérie; Chevrot, Romain

    2014-08-01

    Nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS) are actively sought out, due to pharmacologically important activities of their metabolites. In marine environment, the most prevalent nonribosomal peptide antibiotic producers are sponges inhabiting microorganisms. Conversely, strains from marine sediments and more especially from intertidal mudflats have not been extensively screened for the presence of new NRPS. In this study, for the first time, a collection of one hundred intertidal mudflat bacterial isolates (Marennes-Oléron Bay, France) was assessed for (1) the presence of NRPS genes by degenerated PCR targeting conserved adenylation domains and (2) for their production of antimicrobial molecules. (1) Bacteria with adenylation domains (14 strains) were identified by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis and grouped into Firmicutes (one strain) and Proteobacteria (13 strains). In silico analysis of the NRPS amino acid sequences (n = 7) showed 41-58% ID with sequences found in the NCBI database. Three new putative adenylation domain signatures were found. (2) The culture supernatant of one of these strains, identified as a Bacillus, was shown to strongly inhibit the growth of Staphylococcus aureus, S. epidermidis, and Enterococcus faecalis. This study portends that the intertidal mudflat niche could be of interest for the discovery of new NRPS genes and antimicrobial producing strains. PMID:25039651

  5. Expression of glutamine synthetase in the mouse kidney: localization in multiple epithelial cell types and differential regulation by hypokalemia.

    PubMed

    Verlander, Jill W; Chu, Diana; Lee, Hyun-Wook; Handlogten, Mary E; Weiner, I David

    2013-09-01

    Renal glutamine synthetase catalyzes the reaction of NH4+ with glutamate, forming glutamine and decreasing the ammonia available for net acid excretion. The purpose of the present study was to determine glutamine synthetase's specific cellular expression in the mouse kidney and its regulation by hypokalemia, a common cause of altered renal ammonia metabolism. Glutamine synthetase mRNA and protein were present in the renal cortex and in both the outer and inner stripes of the outer medulla. Immunohistochemistry showed glutamine synthetase expression throughout the entire proximal tubule and in nonproximal tubule cells. Double immunolabel with cell-specific markers demonstrated glutamine synthetase expression in type A intercalated cells, non-A, non-B intercalated cells, and distal convoluted tubule cells, but not in principal cells, type B intercalated cells, or connecting segment cells. Hypokalemia induced by feeding a nominally K+ -free diet for 12 days decreased glutamine synthetase expression throughout the entire proximal tubule and in the distal convoluted tubule and simultaneously increased glutamine synthetase expression in type A intercalated cells in both the cortical and outer medullary collecting duct. We conclude that glutamine synthetase is widely and specifically expressed in renal epithelial cells and that the regulation of expression differs in specific cell populations. Glutamine synthetase is likely to mediate an important role in renal ammonia metabolism.

  6. Structural mechanism of sensing long dsRNA via a noncatalytic domain in human oligoadenylate synthetase 3

    PubMed Central

    Donovan, Jesse; Whitney, Gena; Rath, Sneha; Korennykh, Alexei

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian innate immune system uses several sensors of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) to develop the interferon response. Among these sensors are dsRNA-activated oligoadenylate synthetases (OAS), which produce signaling 2′,5′-linked RNA molecules (2-5A) that activate regulated RNA decay in mammalian tissues. Different receptors from the OAS family contain one, two, or three copies of the 2-5A synthetase domain, which in several instances evolved into pseudoenzymes. The structures of the pseudoenzymatic domains and their roles in sensing dsRNA are unknown. Here we present the crystal structure of the first catalytically inactive domain of human OAS3 (hOAS3.DI) in complex with a 19-bp dsRNA, determined at 2.0-Å resolution. The conformation of hOAS3.DI is different from the apo- and the dsRNA-bound states of the catalytically active homolog, OAS1, reported previously. The unique conformation of hOAS3.DI disables 2-5A synthesis by placing the active site residues nonproductively, but favors the binding of dsRNA. Biochemical data show that hOAS3.DI is essential for activation of hOAS3 and serves as a dsRNA-binding module, whereas the C-terminal domain DIII carries out catalysis. The location of the dsRNA-binding domain (DI) and the catalytic domain (DIII) at the opposite protein termini makes hOAS3 selective for long dsRNA. This mechanism relies on the catalytic inactivity of domain DI, revealing a surprising role of pseudoenzyme evolution in dsRNA surveillance. PMID:25775560

  7. Glutamic acid gamma-monohydroxamate and hydroxylamine are alternate substrates for Escherichia coli asparagine synthetase B.

    PubMed

    Boehlein, S K; Schuster, S M; Richards, N G

    1996-03-01

    Escherichia coli asparagine synthetase B (AS-B) catalyzes the synthesis of asparagine from aspartic acid and glutamine in an ATP-dependent reaction. The ability of this enzyme to employ hydroxylamine and L-glutamic acid gamma-monohydroxamate (LGH) as alternative substrates in place of ammonia and L-glutamine, respectively, has been investigated. The enzyme is able to function as an amidohydrolase, liberating hydroxylamine from LGH with high catalytic efficiency, as measured by k(cat)/K(M). In addition, the kinetic parameters determined for hydroxylamine in AS-B synthetase activity are very similar to those of ammonia. Nitrogen transfer from LGH to yield aspartic acid beta-monohydroxamate is also catalyzed by AS-B. While such an observation has been made for a few members of the trpG amidotransferase family, our results appear to be the first demonstration that nitrogen transfer can occur from glutamine analogs in a purF amidotransferase. However, k(cat)/K(M) for the ATP-dependent transfer of hydroxylamine from LGH to aspartic acid is reduced 3-fold relative to that for glutamine-dependent asparagine synthesis. Further, the AS-B mutant in which asparagine is replaced by alanine (N74A) can also use hydroxylamine as an alternate substrate to ammonia and catalyze the hydrolysis of LGH. The catalytic efficiencies (k(cat)/K(M)) of nitrogen transfer from LGH and L-glutamine to beta-aspartyl-AMP are almost identical for the N74A AS-B mutant. These observations support the proposal that Asn-74 plays a role in catalyzing glutamine-dependent nitrogen transfer. We interpret our kinetic data as further evidence against ammonia-mediated nitrogen transfer from glutamine in the purF amidotransferase AS-B. These results are consistent with two alternate chemical mechanisms that have been proposed for this reaction [Boehlein, S. K., Richards, N. G. J., Walworth, E. S., & Schuster, S. M. (1994) J. Biol. Chem. 269, 26789-26795].

  8. New isoforms and assembly of glutamine synthetase in the leaf of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaochun; Wei, Yihao; Shi, Lanxin; Ma, Xinming; Theg, Steven M

    2015-11-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS; EC 6.3.1.2) plays a crucial role in the assimilation and re-assimilation of ammonia derived from a wide variety of metabolic processes during plant growth and development. Here, three developmentally regulated isoforms of GS holoenzyme in the leaf of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) seedlings are described using native-PAGE with a transferase activity assay. The isoforms showed different mobilities in gels, with GSII>GSIII>GSI. The cytosolic GSI was composed of three subunits, GS1, GSr1, and GSr2, with the same molecular weight (39.2kDa), but different pI values. GSI appeared at leaf emergence and was active throughout the leaf lifespan. GSII and GSIII, both located in the chloroplast, were each composed of a single 42.1kDa subunit with different pI values. GSII was active mainly in green leaves, while GSIII showed brief but higher activity in green leaves grown under field conditions. LC-MS/MS experiments revealed that GSII and GSIII have the same amino acid sequence, but GSII has more modification sites. With a modified blue native electrophoresis (BNE) technique and in-gel catalytic activity analysis, only two GS isoforms were observed: one cytosolic and one chloroplastic. Mass calibrations on BNE gels showed that the cytosolic GS1 holoenzyme was ~490kDa and likely a dodecamer, and the chloroplastic GS2 holoenzyme was ~240kDa and likely a hexamer. Our experimental data suggest that the activity of GS isoforms in wheat is regulated by subcellular localization, assembly, and modification to achieve their roles during plant development.

  9. New isoforms and assembly of glutamine synthetase in the leaf of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaochun; Wei, Yihao; Shi, Lanxin; Ma, Xinming; Theg, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS; EC 6.3.1.2) plays a crucial role in the assimilation and re-assimilation of ammonia derived from a wide variety of metabolic processes during plant growth and development. Here, three developmentally regulated isoforms of GS holoenzyme in the leaf of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) seedlings are described using native-PAGE with a transferase activity assay. The isoforms showed different mobilities in gels, with GSII>GSIII>GSI. The cytosolic GSI was composed of three subunits, GS1, GSr1, and GSr2, with the same molecular weight (39.2kDa), but different pI values. GSI appeared at leaf emergence and was active throughout the leaf lifespan. GSII and GSIII, both located in the chloroplast, were each composed of a single 42.1kDa subunit with different pI values. GSII was active mainly in green leaves, while GSIII showed brief but higher activity in green leaves grown under field conditions. LC-MS/MS experiments revealed that GSII and GSIII have the same amino acid sequence, but GSII has more modification sites. With a modified blue native electrophoresis (BNE) technique and in-gel catalytic activity analysis, only two GS isoforms were observed: one cytosolic and one chloroplastic. Mass calibrations on BNE gels showed that the cytosolic GS1 holoenzyme was ~490kDa and likely a dodecamer, and the chloroplastic GS2 holoenzyme was ~240kDa and likely a hexamer. Our experimental data suggest that the activity of GS isoforms in wheat is regulated by subcellular localization, assembly, and modification to achieve their roles during plant development. PMID:26307137

  10. Differential expression of argininosuccinate synthetase in serous and non-serous ovarian carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Cheon, Dong-Joo; Walts, Ann E; Beach, Jessica A; Lester, Jenny; Bomalaski, John S; Walsh, Christine S; Ruprecht Wiedemeyer, W; Karlan, Beth Y; Orsulic, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    The current standard of care for epithelial ovarian cancer does not discriminate between different histologic subtypes (serous, clear cell, endometrioid and mucinous) despite the knowledge that ovarian carcinoma subtypes do not respond uniformly to conventional platinum/taxane-based chemotherapy. Exploiting addictions and vulnerabilities in cancers with distinguishable molecular features presents an opportunity to develop individualized therapies that may be more effective than the current 'one size fits all' approach. One such opportunity is arginine depletion therapy with pegylated arginine deiminase, which has shown promise in several cancer types that exhibit low levels of argininosuccinate synthetase including hepatocellular and prostate carcinoma and melanoma. Based on the high levels of argininosuccinate synthetase previously observed in ovarian cancers, these tumours have been considered unlikely candidates for arginine depletion therapy. However, argininosuccinate synthetase levels have not been evaluated in the individual histologic subtypes of ovarian carcinoma. The current study is the first to examine the expression of argininosuccinate synthetase at the mRNA and protein levels in large cohorts of primary and recurrent ovarian carcinomas and ovarian cancer cell lines. We show that the normal fallopian tube fimbria and the majority of primary high-grade and low-grade serous ovarian carcinomas express high levels of argininosuccinate synthetase, which tend to further increase in recurrent tumours. In contrast to the serous subtype, non-serous ovarian carcinoma subtypes (clear cell, endometrioid and mucinous) frequently lack detectable argininosuccinate synthetase expression. The in vitro sensitivity of ovarian cancer cell lines to arginine depletion with pegylated arginine deiminase was inversely correlated with argininosuccinate synthetase expression. Our data suggest that the majority of serous ovarian carcinomas are not susceptible to therapeutic

  11. Elaborate uORF/IRES features control expression and localization of human glycyl-tRNA synthetase

    PubMed Central

    Alexandrova, Jana; Paulus, Caroline; Rudinger-Thirion, Joëlle; Jossinet, Fabrice; Frugier, Magali

    2015-01-01

    The canonical activity of glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GARS) is to charge glycine onto its cognate tRNAs. However, outside translation, GARS also participates in many other functions. A single gene encodes both the cytosolic and mitochondrial forms of GARS but 2 mRNA isoforms were identified. Using immunolocalization assays, in vitro translation assays and bicistronic constructs we provide experimental evidence that one of these mRNAs tightly controls expression and localization of human GARS. An intricate regulatory domain was found in its 5′-UTR which displays a functional Internal Ribosome Entry Site and an upstream Open Reading Frame. Together, these elements hinder the synthesis of the mitochondrial GARS and target the translation of the cytosolic enzyme to ER-bound ribosomes. This finding reveals a complex picture of GARS translation and localization in mammals. In this context, we discuss how human GARS expression could influence its moonlighting activities and its involvement in diseases. PMID:26327585

  12. Synthesis and biological evaluation of CTP synthetase inhibitors as potential agents for the treatment of African trypanosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Tamborini, Lucia; Pinto, Andrea; Smith, Terry K; Major, Louise L; Iannuzzi, Maria C; Cosconati, Sandro; Marinelli, Luciana; Novellino, Ettore; Lo Presti, Leonardo; Wong, Pui E; Barrett, Michael P; De Micheli, Carlo; Conti, Paola

    2012-09-01

    Acivicin analogues with an increased affinity for CTP synthetase (CTPS) were designed as potential new trypanocidal agents. The inhibitory activity against CTPS can be improved by increasing molecular complexity, by inserting groups able to establish additional interactions with the binding pocket of the enzyme. This strategy has been pursued with the synthesis of α-amino-substituted analogues of Acivicin and N1-substituted pyrazoline derivatives. In general, there is direct correlation between the enzymatic activity and the in vitro anti-trypanosomal efficacy of the derivatives studied here. However, this cannot be taken as a general rule, as other important factors may play a role, notably the ability of uptake/diffusion of the molecules into the trypanosomes. PMID:22865834

  13. Synthesis and biological evaluation of CTP synthetase inhibitors as new potential agents for the treatment of African Trypanosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Tamborini, L.

    2013-01-01

    Acivicin analogues with an increased affinity for CTP synthetase (CTPS) were designed as potential new trypanocidal agents. The inhibitory activity against CTPS can be improved by increasing the molecular complexity, by inserting groups able to establish additional interaction with the binding pocket of the enzyme. This strategy has been pursued with the synthesis of α-amino-substituted analogues of Acivicin and N1-substituted-pyrazoline derivatives. In general, there is a direct correlation between the enzymatic activity and the in vitro anti-trypanosomal efficacy of the derivatives studied here. However, this cannot be taken as a general rule, since other important factors may play a role, notably the ability of uptake / diffusion of the molecules into the trypanosomes. PMID:22865834

  14. Glutamine synthetase predicts adjuvant TACE response in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bo; Liu, Kai; Zhang, Jian; Dong, Liwei; Jin, Zhichao; Zhang, Xinji; Xue, Feng; He, Jia

    2015-01-01

    Background: Adjuvant transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) is associated with better outcome and reduced tumor recurrence in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between glutamine synthetase (GS) expression and survival of HCC patients after postoperative adjuvant TACE. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed 554 HCC patients in two independent cohorts who underwent curative resection. Immunohistochemistry assay was used to investigate the expression of GS protein and evaluate the association with survival and the response to adjuvant TACE. Results: In training cohort, patients with low GS expression who received postoperative adjuvant TACE showed a better overall survival (OS) (P<0.001) and less early phase recurrence (P=0.016). Adjuvant TACE was an independent prognostic factor for 5-year OS (HR=0.408, 95% CI 0.261-0.639, P<0.001) and early phase recurrence (HR=0.592, 95% CI 0.376-0.931, P=0.023). The same result was confirmed in validation cohort. Patients with high GS expression in both cohorts did not have a significant response to adjuvant TACE in OS and early phase recurrence. Conclusions: GS status in tumor might be a useful tool in the selection of HCC patients who would be likely to benefit from postoperative adjuvant TACE. PMID:26884995

  15. Expression, purification, and characterization of recombinant human glutamine synthetase.

    PubMed Central

    Listrom, C D; Morizono, H; Rajagopal, B S; McCann, M T; Tuchman, M; Allewell, N M

    1997-01-01

    A bacterial expression system has been engineered for human glutamine synthetase (EC 6.3.1.2) that produces approximately 60 mg of enzyme (20% of the bacterial soluble protein) and yields approx. 8 mg of purified enzyme per litre of culture. The recombinant enzyme was purified 5-fold to apparent homogeneity and characterized. It has a subunit molecular mass of approx. 45000 Da. The Vmax value obtained using a radioactive assay with ammonia and l-[G-3H]glutamic acid as substrates was 15.9 micromol/min per mg, 40% higher than that obtained in the colorimetric assay (9.9 micromol/min per mg) with hydroxylamine replacing ammonia as a substrate. Km values for glutamate were 3.0 mM and 3.5 mM, and for ATP they were 2.0 mM and 2. 9 mM for the radioactive and spectrophotometric assays respectively. The Km for ammonia in the radioactive assay was 0.15 mM. The midpoint of thermal inactivation was 49.7 degrees C. Hydroxylamine, Mg(II) and Mg(II)-ATP stabilized the enzyme against thermal inactivation, whereas ATP promoted inactivation. The pure enzyme is stable for several months in storage and provides a source for additional studies, including X-ray crystallography. PMID:9359847

  16. Allosteric regulation of monocyclic interconvertible enzyme cascade systems: use of Escherichia coli glutamine synthetase as an experimental model.

    PubMed

    Rhee, S G; Park, R; Chock, P B; Stadtman, E R

    1978-07-01

    The interconversion of Escherichia coli glutamine synthetase [L-glutamate:ammonia ligase (ADP-forming), EC 6.3.1.2] between its adenylylated and unadenylylated forms has been used to verify the prediction derived from a theoretical analysis of the steady-state functions of a model for a monocyclic interconvertible enzyme cascade system [Stadtman, E. R. & Chock, P. B. (1977) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 74, 2761-2770]. Because glutamine and alpha-ketoglutarate are multifunctional effectors and because three active enzyme complexes are involved in both adenylylation and deadenylylation of glutamine synthetase, at least 28 constants are required to describe the glutamine synthetase monocyclic cascade. Of these, 22 constants were determined experimentally and 6 were estimated via computer curve fitting. Despite the complexity, when both adenylylation and deadenylylation reactions are functioning, the number of adenylyl groups bound per mole of enzyme, n, assumes a steady-state level as is predicted by the model. This n value is determined by the mole fraction of P(IIA)-given by ([P(IIA)]/([P(IIA)] + [P(IID)])-and the ratio of glutamine to alpha-ketoglutarate (P(IID) and P(IID) are the unmodified and the uridylylated forms of the P(II) regulatory protein). In the presence of 0.5 mM glutamine and 2 mM alpha-ketoglutarate, the value of n increases as a nearly hyperbolic function in response to increasing mole fractions of P(IIA). When the constant level of alpha-ketoglutarate is gradually increased to 40 muM, the hyperbolic function converts slowly to a parabolic function. When the P(IIA) mole fraction was maintained at 0.6 and alpha-ketoglutarate levels were varied from 1 mM to 4 muM, an 800-fold increase in signal amplification was observed with respect to glutamine activation. In addition, because glutamine activates the adenylylation and inhibits the deadenylylation reaction, a sensitivity index of 2.1 (corresponding to a Hill number of 1.5) was obtained for the

  17. Knockout mutants as a tool to identify the subunit composition of Arabidopsis glutamine synthetase isoforms.

    PubMed

    Dragićević, Milan; Todorović, Slađana; Bogdanović, Milica; Filipović, Biljana; Mišić, Danijela; Simonović, Ana

    2014-06-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) is a key enzyme in nitrogen assimilation, which catalyzes the formation of glutamine from ammonia and glutamate. Plant GS isoforms are multimeric enzymes, recently shown to be decamers. The Arabidopsis genome encodes five cytosolic (GS1) proteins labeled as GLN1;1 through GLN1;5 and one chloroplastic (GS2) isoform, GLN2;0. However, as many as 11 GS activity bands were resolved from different Arabidopsis tissues by Native PAGE and activity staining. Western analysis showed that all 11 isoforms are composed exclusively of 40 kDa GS1 subunits. Of five GS1 genes, only GLN1;1, GLN1;2 and GLN1;3 transcripts accumulated to significant levels in vegetative tissues, indicating that only subunits encoded by these three genes produce the 11-band zymogram. Even though the GS2 gene also had significant expression, the corresponding activity was not detected, probably due to inactivation. To resolve the subunit composition of 11 active GS1 isoforms, homozygous knockout mutants deficient in the expression of different GS1 genes were selected from the progeny of T-DNA insertional SALK and SAIL lines. Comparison of GS isoenzyme patterns of the selected GS1 knockout mutants indicated that all of the detected isoforms consist of varying proportions of GLN1;1, GLN1;2 and GLN1;3 subunits, and that GLN1;1 and GLN1;3, as well as GLN1;2 and GLN1;3 and possibly GLN1;1 and GLN1;2 proteins combine in all proportions to form active homo- and heterodecamers.

  18. Argininosuccinate Synthetase Is a Functional Target for a Snake Venom Anti-hypertensive Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Guerreiro, Juliano R.; Lameu, Claudiana; Oliveira, Eduardo F.; Klitzke, Clécio F.; Melo, Robson L.; Linares, Edlaine; Augusto, Ohara; Fox, Jay W.; Lebrun, Ivo; Serrano, Solange M. T.; Camargo, Antonio C. M.

    2009-01-01

    Bj-BPP-10c is a bioactive proline-rich decapeptide, part of the C-type natriuretic peptide precursor, expressed in the brain and in the venom gland of Bothrops jararaca. We recently showed that Bj-BPP-10c displays a strong, sustained anti-hypertensive effect in spontaneous hypertensive rats (SHR), without causing any effect in normotensive rats, by a pharmacological effect independent of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition. Therefore, we hypothesized that another mechanism should be involved in the peptide activity. Here we used affinity chromatography to search for kidney cytosolic proteins with affinity for Bj-BPP-10c and demonstrate that argininosuccinate synthetase (AsS) is the major protein binding to the peptide. More importantly, this interaction activates the catalytic activity of AsS in a dose-de pend ent manner. AsS is recognized as an important player of the citrulline-NO cycle that represents a potential limiting step in NO synthesis. Accordingly, the functional interaction of Bj-BPP-10c and AsS was evidenced by the following effects promoted by the peptide: (i) increase of NO metabolite production in human umbilical vein endothelial cell culture and of arginine in human embryonic kidney cells and (ii) increase of arginine plasma concentration in SHR. Moreover, α-methyl-dl-aspartic acid, a specific AsS inhibitor, significantly reduced the anti-hypertensive activity of Bj-BPP-10c in SHR. Taken together, these results suggest that AsS plays a role in the anti-hypertensive action of Bj-BPP-10c. Therefore, we propose the activation of AsS as a new mechanism for the anti-hypertensive effect of Bj-BPP-10c in SHR and AsS as a novel target for the therapy of hypertension-related diseases. PMID:19491403

  19. Genetic identification of essential indels and domains in carbamoyl phosphate synthetase II of Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Fox, Barbara A; Ristuccia, Jessica G; Bzik, David J

    2009-04-01

    New treatments need to be developed for the significant human diseases of toxoplasmosis and malaria to circumvent problems with current treatments and drug resistance. Apicomplexan parasites causing these lethal diseases are deficient in pyrimidine salvage, suggesting that selective inhibition of de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis can lead to a severe loss of uridine 5'-monophosphate (UMP) and thymidine 5'-monophosphate (dTMP) pools, thereby inhibiting parasite RNA and DNA synthesis. Disruption of Toxoplasma gondii carbamoyl phosphate synthetase II (CPSII) induces a severe uracil auxotrophy with no detectable parasite replication in vitro and complete attenuation of virulence in mice. Here we show that a CPSII cDNA minigene efficiently complements the uracil auxotrophy of CPSII-deficient mutants, restoring parasite growth and virulence. Our complementation assays reveal that engineered mutations within, or proximal to, the catalytic triad of the N-terminal glutamine amidotransferase (GATase) domain inactivate the complementation activity of T. gondii CPSII and demonstrate a critical dependence on the apicomplexan CPSII GATase domain in vivo. Surprisingly, indels present within the T. gondii CPSII GATase domain as well as the C-terminal allosteric regulatory domain are found to be essential. In addition, several mutations directed at residues implicated in allosteric regulation in Escherichia coli CPS either abolish or markedly suppress complementation and further define the functional importance of the allosteric regulatory region. Collectively, these findings identify novel features of T. gondii CPSII as potential parasite-selective targets for drug development. PMID:18992249

  20. Glutamine synthetase in Medicago truncatula, unveiling new secrets of a very old enzyme.

    PubMed

    Seabra, Ana R; Carvalho, Helena G

    2015-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) catalyzes the first step at which nitrogen is brought into cellular metabolism and is also involved in the reassimilation of ammonium released by a number of metabolic pathways. Due to its unique position in plant nitrogen metabolism, GS plays essential roles in all aspects of plant development, from germination to senescence, and is a key component of nitrogen use efficiency (NUE) and plant yield. Understanding the mechanisms regulating GS activity is therefore of utmost importance and a great effort has been dedicated to understand how GS is regulated in different plant species. The present review summarizes exciting recent developments concerning the structure and regulation of GS isoenzymes, using the model legume Medicago truncatula. These include the understanding of the structural determinants of both the cytosolic and plastid located isoenzymes, the existence of a seed-specific GS gene unique to M. truncatula and closely related species and the discovery that GS isoenzymes are regulated by nitric oxide at the post-translational level. The data is discussed and integrated with the potential roles of the distinct GS isoenzymes within the whole plant context. PMID:26284094

  1. In vitro characterization of the NAD+ synthetase NadE1 from Herbaspirillum seropedicae.

    PubMed

    Laskoski, Kerly; Santos, Adrian R S; Bonatto, Ana C; Pedrosa, Fábio O; Souza, Emanuel M; Huergo, Luciano F

    2016-05-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide synthetase enzyme (NadE) catalyzes the amination of nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide (NaAD) to form NAD(+). This reaction represents the last step in the majority of the NAD(+) biosynthetic routes described to date. NadE enzymes typically use either glutamine or ammonium as amine nitrogen donor, and the reaction is energetically driven by ATP hydrolysis. Given the key role of NAD(+) in bacterial metabolism, NadE has attracted considerable interest as a potential target for the development of novel antibiotics. The plant-associative nitrogen-fixing bacteria Herbaspirillum seropedicae encodes two putative NadE, namely nadE1 and nadE2. The nadE1 gene is linked to glnB encoding the signal transduction protein GlnB. Here we report the purification and in vitro characterization of H. seropedicae NadE1. Gel filtration chromatography analysis suggests that NadE1 is an octamer. The NadE1 activity was assayed in vitro, and the Michaelis-Menten constants for substrates NaAD, ATP, glutamine and ammonium were determined. Enzyme kinetic and in vitro substrate competition assays indicate that H. seropedicae NadE1 uses glutamine as a preferential nitrogen donor.

  2. In vitro characterization of the NAD+ synthetase NadE1 from Herbaspirillum seropedicae.

    PubMed

    Laskoski, Kerly; Santos, Adrian R S; Bonatto, Ana C; Pedrosa, Fábio O; Souza, Emanuel M; Huergo, Luciano F

    2016-05-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide synthetase enzyme (NadE) catalyzes the amination of nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide (NaAD) to form NAD(+). This reaction represents the last step in the majority of the NAD(+) biosynthetic routes described to date. NadE enzymes typically use either glutamine or ammonium as amine nitrogen donor, and the reaction is energetically driven by ATP hydrolysis. Given the key role of NAD(+) in bacterial metabolism, NadE has attracted considerable interest as a potential target for the development of novel antibiotics. The plant-associative nitrogen-fixing bacteria Herbaspirillum seropedicae encodes two putative NadE, namely nadE1 and nadE2. The nadE1 gene is linked to glnB encoding the signal transduction protein GlnB. Here we report the purification and in vitro characterization of H. seropedicae NadE1. Gel filtration chromatography analysis suggests that NadE1 is an octamer. The NadE1 activity was assayed in vitro, and the Michaelis-Menten constants for substrates NaAD, ATP, glutamine and ammonium were determined. Enzyme kinetic and in vitro substrate competition assays indicate that H. seropedicae NadE1 uses glutamine as a preferential nitrogen donor. PMID:26802007

  3. Acyl-CoA synthetase 1 deficiency alters cardiolipin species and impairs mitochondrial function

    PubMed Central

    Grevengoed, Trisha J.; Martin, Sarah A.; Katunga, Lalage; Cooper, Daniel E.; Anderson, Ethan J.; Murphy, Robert C.; Coleman, Rosalind A.

    2015-01-01

    Long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase 1 (ACSL1) contributes more than 90% of total cardiac ACSL activity, but its role in phospholipid synthesis has not been determined. Mice with an inducible knockout of ACSL1 (Acsl1T−/−) have impaired cardiac fatty acid oxidation and rely on glucose for ATP production. Because ACSL1 exhibited a strong substrate preference for linoleate, we investigated the composition of heart phospholipids. Acsl1T−/− hearts contained 83% less tetralinoleoyl-cardiolipin (CL), the major form present in control hearts. A stable knockdown of ACSL1 in H9c2 rat cardiomyocytes resulted in low incorporation of linoleate into CL and in diminished incorporation of palmitate and oleate into other phospholipids. Overexpression of ACSL1 in H9c2 and HEK-293 cells increased incorporation of linoleate into CL and other phospholipids. To determine whether increasing the content of linoleate in CL would improve mitochondrial respiratory function in Acsl1T−/− hearts, control and Acsl1T−/− mice were fed a high-linoleate diet; this diet normalized the amount of tetralinoleoyl-CL but did not improve respiratory function. Thus, ACSL1 is required for the normal composition of several phospholipid species in heart. Although ACSL1 determines the acyl-chain composition of heart CL, a high tetralinoleoyl-CL content may not be required for normal function. PMID:26136511

  4. Structure of human carbamoyl phosphate synthetase: deciphering the on/off switch of human ureagenesis

    PubMed Central

    de Cima, Sergio; Polo, Luis M.; Díez-Fernández, Carmen; Martínez, Ana I.; Cervera, Javier; Fita, Ignacio; Rubio, Vicente

    2015-01-01

    Human carbamoyl phosphate synthetase (CPS1), a 1500-residue multidomain enzyme, catalyzes the first step of ammonia detoxification to urea requiring N-acetyl-L-glutamate (NAG) as essential activator to prevent ammonia/amino acids depletion. Here we present the crystal structures of CPS1 in the absence and in the presence of NAG, clarifying the on/off-switching of the urea cycle by NAG. By binding at the C-terminal domain of CPS1, NAG triggers long-range conformational changes affecting the two distant phosphorylation domains. These changes, concerted with the binding of nucleotides, result in a dramatic remodeling that stabilizes the catalytically competent conformation and the building of the ~35 Å-long tunnel that allows migration of the carbamate intermediate from its site of formation to the second phosphorylation site, where carbamoyl phosphate is produced. These structures allow rationalizing the effects of mutations found in patients with CPS1 deficiency (presenting hyperammonemia, mental retardation and even death), as exemplified here for some mutations. PMID:26592762

  5. The Effect of Nitrogen Nutrition on the Cellular Localization of Glutamine Synthetase Isoforms in Barley Roots.

    PubMed Central

    Peat, L. J.; Tobin, A. K.

    1996-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) was detected by immunogold localization in the cytosol and plastids of roots of 7-d-old barley (Hordeum vulgare L. cv Klaxon) seedlings grown in the presence or absence of NO3- (15 mM) or NH4+ (30 mM). The number of GS polypeptides changed during root development, and this was affected by N nutrition. There was no evidence of a NO3--inducible root plastid GS.In apical 5- to 10-mm regions of the root the concentration of immunogold labeling of cytosolic GS was higher in the cortical parenchyma than in the vascular cells of the stele, irrespective of N nutrition. This labeling was at least 50% higher in both cell types in N-free compared with N-grown (either NO3- or NH4+) seedlings. In contrast, GS specific activity was highest in roots of NO3--grown seedlings. It is suggested that this indicates the presence of inactive GS in roots grown without N. This study has identified both cell- and development-specific responses of GS to N nutrition. PMID:12226350

  6. Structure of human carbamoyl phosphate synthetase: deciphering the on/off switch of human ureagenesis.

    PubMed

    de Cima, Sergio; Polo, Luis M; Díez-Fernández, Carmen; Martínez, Ana I; Cervera, Javier; Fita, Ignacio; Rubio, Vicente

    2015-01-01

    Human carbamoyl phosphate synthetase (CPS1), a 1500-residue multidomain enzyme, catalyzes the first step of ammonia detoxification to urea requiring N-acetyl-L-glutamate (NAG) as essential activator to prevent ammonia/amino acids depletion. Here we present the crystal structures of CPS1 in the absence and in the presence of NAG, clarifying the on/off-switching of the urea cycle by NAG. By binding at the C-terminal domain of CPS1, NAG triggers long-range conformational changes affecting the two distant phosphorylation domains. These changes, concerted with the binding of nucleotides, result in a dramatic remodeling that stabilizes the catalytically competent conformation and the building of the ~35 Å-long tunnel that allows migration of the carbamate intermediate from its site of formation to the second phosphorylation site, where carbamoyl phosphate is produced. These structures allow rationalizing the effects of mutations found in patients with CPS1 deficiency (presenting hyperammonemia, mental retardation and even death), as exemplified here for some mutations. PMID:26592762

  7. Induced nitric oxide synthetase and peroxiredoxin expression in intramucosal poorly differentiated gastric cancer of young patients.

    PubMed

    Hirahashi, Minako; Koga, Yutaka; Kumagai, Reiko; Aishima, Shinichi; Taguchi, Kenichi; Oda, Yoshinao

    2014-04-01

    To investigate the relationship between oxidative stress and gastric carcinogenesis of poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma in young patients, we analyzed the surgically resected specimens of 22 young patients (21-30 years) and 29 older patients (41-72 years) with intramucosal gastric cancer of the poorly differentiated type. We used immunohistochemical staining to evaluate the expression of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8OHdG), induced nitric oxide synthetase (iNOS), and antioxidant enzymes (thioredoxin [TRX] and peroxiredoxin [PRDX1, 2 and 3]). We assessed these proteins in the cancer, noncancerous gastric foveolar epithelium and noncancerous mucosal neck. In both the young and older patient groups, the 8OHdG and TRX expressions were gradually increased in cancer cells compared with the noncancerous foveolar epithelial cells and the noncancerous mucosal neck cells (P < 0.001). Although the iNOS and PRDXs expressions were increased in the noncancerous mucosal neck cells compared with the noncancerous foveolar epithelial cells, regardless of age (P < 0.001), the iNOS and PRDX2 expression in the cancer cells were significantly reduced in the young patients compared with the older patients (P < 0.001, P < 0.05). In conclusion, the reduced expression of iNOS or PRDX2 may play an important role in the carcinogenesis of gastric cancer associated with Helicobacter pylori-induced chronic active gastritis in young patients.

  8. Plant nutritional status modulates glutamine synthetase levels in ripe tomatoes (Solanum lycopersicum cv. Micro-Tom).

    PubMed

    Scarpeci, Telma E; Marro, Martin L; Bortolotti, Santiago; Boggio, Silvana B; Valle, Estela M

    2007-02-01

    Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fruit ripening implies that chloroplastic proteins are degraded and new proteins are synthesized. Supplementary nutrition is frequently required when tomato plants begin to fruit and continues until the end of the plant's life cycle. Ammonium assimilation is crucial in these fruit maturation and ripening processes. Glutamine synthetase (GS; EC 6.3.1.2), the main ammonium-fixing enzyme in plants, could not be detected in red fruits of several tomato varieties when growing under standard nutrition. In this paper, we analyze the influence of the nutritional status on the ammonium assimilation capacity of ripe tomato (cv. Micro-Tom) fruit. For this purpose, GS expression and protein profiles were followed in mature green and red fruits harvested from plants grown under standard or supplemented nutrition. Under standard nutrient regime (weekly supplied with 0.5 x Hoagland solution) GS activity was found in chloroplasts (GS2) of mature green fruits, but it was not detected either in the chromoplasts or in the cytosol of red fruits. When plants were shifted to a supplemented nutritional regime (daily supplied with 0.5 x Hoagland solution), GS was found in red fruits. Also, cytosolic transcripts (gs1) preferentially accumulated in red fruits under high nutrition. These results indicate that mature green Micro-Tom fruits assimilate ammonia through GS2 under standard nutrition, while ripe red fruits accumulate GS1 under high nutrition, probably in order to assimilate the extra N-compounds made available through supplemented nutrition.

  9. Glutamine synthetase in the phloem plays a major role in controlling proline production

    PubMed Central

    Brugiere, N; Dubois, F; Limami, AM; Lelandais, M; Roux, Y; Sangwan, RS; Hirel, B

    1999-01-01

    To inhibit expression specifically in the phloem, a 274-bp fragment of a cDNA (Gln1-5) encoding cytosolic glutamine synthetase (GS1) from tobacco was placed in the antisense orientation downstream of the cytosolic Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase promoter of Nicotiana plumbaginifolia. After Agrobacterium-mediated transformation, two transgenic N. tabacum lines exhibiting reduced levels of GS1 mRNA and GS activity in midribs, stems, and roots were obtained. Immunogold labeling experiments allowed us to verify that the GS protein content was markedly decreased in the phloem companion cells of transformed plants. Moreover, a general decrease in proline content in the transgenic plants in comparison with wild-type tobacco was observed when plants were forced to assimilate large amounts of ammonium. In contrast, no major changes in the concentration of amino acids used for nitrogen transport were apparent. A (15)NH(4)(+)-labeling kinetic over a 48-hr period confirmed that in leaves of transgenic plants, the decrease in proline production was directly related to glutamine availability. After 2 weeks of salt treatment, the transgenic plants had a pronounced stress phenotype, consisting of wilting and bleaching in the older leaves. We conclude that GS in the phloem plays a major role in regulating proline production consistent with the function of proline as a nitrogen source and as a key metabolite synthesized in response to water stress. PMID:10521528

  10. Glutamine Synthetase Sensitivity to Oxidative Modification during Nutrient Starvation in Prochlorococcus marinus PCC 9511.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Baena, Guadalupe; Domínguez-Martín, María Agustina; Donaldson, Robert P; García-Fernández, José Manuel; Diez, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase plays a key role in nitrogen metabolism, thus the fine regulation of this enzyme in Prochlorococcus, which is especially important in the oligotrophic oceans where this marine cyanobacterium thrives. In this work, we studied the metal-catalyzed oxidation of glutamine synthetase in cultures of Prochlorococcus marinus strain PCC 9511 subjected to nutrient limitation. Nitrogen deprivation caused glutamine synthetase to be more sensitive to metal-catalyzed oxidation (a 36% increase compared to control, non starved samples). Nutrient starvation induced also a clear increase (three-fold in the case of nitrogen) in the concentration of carbonyl derivatives in cell extracts, which was also higher (22%) upon addition of the inhibitor of electron transport, DCMU, to cultures. Our results indicate that nutrient limitations, representative of the natural conditions in the Prochlorococcus habitat, affect the response of glutamine synthetase to oxidative inactivating systems. Implications of these results on the regulation of glutamine synthetase by oxidative alteration prior to degradation of the enzyme in Prochlorococcus are discussed. PMID:26270653

  11. Affinity chromatography of aminoacyl-transfer ribonucleic acid synthetases. Small organic ligands.

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, C M; Knowles, J R

    1977-01-01

    The usefulness of affinity chromatography for the purification of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases was explored by using column ligands derived from the corresponding amino acid and aminoalkyladenylate, a non-labile analogue of the aminoacyladenylate reaction intermediate. Four modes of attachment of the aminoalkyladenylate to Sepharose were studied. The interaction between amino acid derivatives and the corresponding aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases is too weak to allow their use as ligands for affinity chromatography. Attachment of the aminoalkyladenylate via the alpha-nitrogen atom of the amino acid or via C-8 of the nucleotide abolishes synthetase binding, and immobilization via the oxidized ribose ring is only marginally useful. However, attachment of the aminoalkyladenylate to the matrix via N-6 of the nucleotide allows strong and specific synthetase binding, and the use of such columns permits the isolation of homogeneous synthetase from crude mixtures. The effect of non-specific adsorption and the utility of pre-columns and of specific substrate elution are investigated and discussed. Images Fig. 4. Fig. 7. PMID:597251

  12. Glutamine Synthetase Sensitivity to Oxidative Modification during Nutrient Starvation in Prochlorococcus marinus PCC 9511.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Baena, Guadalupe; Domínguez-Martín, María Agustina; Donaldson, Robert P; García-Fernández, José Manuel; Diez, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase plays a key role in nitrogen metabolism, thus the fine regulation of this enzyme in Prochlorococcus, which is especially important in the oligotrophic oceans where this marine cyanobacterium thrives. In this work, we studied the metal-catalyzed oxidation of glutamine synthetase in cultures of Prochlorococcus marinus strain PCC 9511 subjected to nutrient limitation. Nitrogen deprivation caused glutamine synthetase to be more sensitive to metal-catalyzed oxidation (a 36% increase compared to control, non starved samples). Nutrient starvation induced also a clear increase (three-fold in the case of nitrogen) in the concentration of carbonyl derivatives in cell extracts, which was also higher (22%) upon addition of the inhibitor of electron transport, DCMU, to cultures. Our results indicate that nutrient limitations, representative of the natural conditions in the Prochlorococcus habitat, affect the response of glutamine synthetase to oxidative inactivating systems. Implications of these results on the regulation of glutamine synthetase by oxidative alteration prior to degradation of the enzyme in Prochlorococcus are discussed.

  13. Glutamine Synthetase Sensitivity to Oxidative Modification during Nutrient Starvation in Prochlorococcus marinus PCC 9511

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Baena, Guadalupe; Domínguez-Martín, María Agustina; Donaldson, Robert P.; García-Fernández, José Manuel; Diez, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase plays a key role in nitrogen metabolism, thus the fine regulation of this enzyme in Prochlorococcus, which is especially important in the oligotrophic oceans where this marine cyanobacterium thrives. In this work, we studied the metal-catalyzed oxidation of glutamine synthetase in cultures of Prochlorococcus marinus strain PCC 9511 subjected to nutrient limitation. Nitrogen deprivation caused glutamine synthetase to be more sensitive to metal-catalyzed oxidation (a 36% increase compared to control, non starved samples). Nutrient starvation induced also a clear increase (three-fold in the case of nitrogen) in the concentration of carbonyl derivatives in cell extracts, which was also higher (22%) upon addition of the inhibitor of electron transport, DCMU, to cultures. Our results indicate that nutrient limitations, representative of the natural conditions in the Prochlorococcus habitat, affect the response of glutamine synthetase to oxidative inactivating systems. Implications of these results on the regulation of glutamine synthetase by oxidative alteration prior to degradation of the enzyme in Prochlorococcus are discussed. PMID:26270653

  14. Substrate specificity of mammalian folylpolyglutamate synthetase for 5,10-dideazatetrahydrofolate analogs.

    PubMed

    Habeck, L L; Mendelsohn, L G; Shih, C; Taylor, E C; Colman, P D; Gossett, L S; Leitner, T A; Schultz, R M; Andis, S L; Moran, R G

    1995-08-01

    The metabolism of 5,10-dideazatetrahydrofolate (DDATHF [lometrexol]) to polyglutamate derivatives by folylpoly-gamma-glutamate synthetase (FPGS) plays a central role in the activity of this compound as an antineoplastic agent. The availability of a series of DDATHF derivatives differing in structure throughout the molecule has allowed a study of the structural requirements for substrate activity with mouse liver and hog liver FPGS. Kinetics of the polyglutamation reaction in vitro have been related to the potency of these compounds as inhibitors of the growth of human CEM leukemic cells. The structure-activity relationships for enzyme from both sources were nearly identical. FPGS from both species showed a broad acceptance for structural changes in the pyridopyrimidine ring, in the phenyl group, and in the intermediate bridge region, with structural changes in these regions being reflected in changes in Km for FPGS but much more modest alterations in Vmax. The data suggested that the phenyl ring was not contributing to any pi-pi hydrophobic interactions. It appeared to function primarily in maintaining a favorable distance between the pyridopyrimidine ring and the glutamate side chain. The lowest Km values were found for DDATHF analogs in which there were small alterations at the 10 position, e.g., 5-deazatetrahydrofolate, 10-methyl-DDATHF, and 10-formyl-5-deazatetrahydrofolate; the first-order rate constants for these substrates were the highest in this series, an indication of the efficiency of polyglutamation at low substrate concentrations. After correction for the intrinsic inhibitory activity of the parent DDATHF analog as an inhibitor of the target enzyme, the first-order rate constants for FPGS were found to be predictive of the potency of tumor cell growth inhibition for most of the compounds in this structural series.

  15. Molecular Mechanisms of Glutamine Synthetase Mutations that Lead to Clinically Relevant Pathologies

    PubMed Central

    Frieg, Benedikt; Görg, Boris; Homeyer, Nadine; Keitel, Verena; Häussinger, Dieter; Gohlke, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) catalyzes ATP-dependent ligation of ammonia and glutamate to glutamine. Two mutations of human GS (R324C and R341C) were connected to congenital glutamine deficiency with severe brain malformations resulting in neonatal death. Another GS mutation (R324S) was identified in a neurologically compromised patient. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the impairment of GS activity by these mutations have remained elusive. Molecular dynamics simulations, free energy calculations, and rigidity analyses suggest that all three mutations influence the first step of GS catalytic cycle. The R324S and R324C mutations deteriorate GS catalytic activity due to loss of direct interactions with ATP. As to R324S, indirect, water-mediated interactions reduce this effect, which may explain the suggested higher GS residual activity. The R341C mutation weakens ATP binding by destabilizing the interacting residue R340 in the apo state of GS. Additionally, the mutation is predicted to result in a significant destabilization of helix H8, which should negatively affect glutamate binding. This prediction was tested in HEK293 cells overexpressing GS by dot-blot analysis: Structural stability of H8 was impaired through mutation of amino acids interacting with R341, as indicated by a loss of masking of an epitope in the glutamate binding pocket for a monoclonal anti-GS antibody by L-methionine-S-sulfoximine; in contrast, cells transfected with wild type GS showed the masking. Our analyses reveal complex molecular effects underlying impaired GS catalytic activity in three clinically relevant mutants. Our findings could stimulate the development of ATP binding-enhancing molecules by which the R324S mutant can be repaired extrinsically. PMID:26836257

  16. Enzymatic characterization of two acetyl-CoA synthetase genes from Populus trichocarpa.

    PubMed

    Cao, Shan; Li, Hui; Yao, Xiaoyun; Li, Lihong; Jiang, Luyao; Zhang, Qiang; Zhang, Jiaxue; Liu, Di; Lu, Hai

    2016-01-01

    The acetyl-CoA synthetase (ACS) family is a subfamily of adenylate-forming enzymes, which has a close evolutionary relationship with the 4-coumarate:CoA ligase (4CL) family. In this study, two ACS genes were cloned from Populus trichocarpa and were named PtrACS1 and PtrACS2. Bioinformatics characterization of PtrACS1 and PtrACS2 showed that they contained the key ACS residues and a putative peroxisome targeting sequence 1 (PTS1) at the end of the C-terminal sequence. Real-time PCR results showed that PtrACS1 and PtrACS2 were expressed in the phloem, xylem, leaves, and roots of one-year-old P. trichocarpa, but were expressed primarily in the leaves. The ACS enzyme activity was higher in leaves than other tissues in P. trichocarpa. Two overexpressed recombinant proteins showed no catalytic activity toward the substrates of 4CL, but did have notable catalytic activity toward sodium acetate and substrates of ACS. The relative activities of PtrACS1 and PtrACS2 were 194.16 ± 11.23 and 422.25 ± 21.69 μM min(-1) mg(-1), respectively. The K m and V max of PtrACS1 were 0.25 mM and 698.85 μM min(-1) mg(-1), while those for PtrACS2 were 0.72 mM and 245.96 μM min(-1) mg(-1), respectively. Our results revealed that both proteins belong to the ACS family, and provide a theoretical foundation for the identification and functional analysis of members of the adenylate-forming enzyme superfamily. PMID:27390658

  17. Molecular Mechanisms of Glutamine Synthetase Mutations that Lead to Clinically Relevant Pathologies.

    PubMed

    Frieg, Benedikt; Görg, Boris; Homeyer, Nadine; Keitel, Verena; Häussinger, Dieter; Gohlke, Holger

    2016-02-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) catalyzes ATP-dependent ligation of ammonia and glutamate to glutamine. Two mutations of human GS (R324C and R341C) were connected to congenital glutamine deficiency with severe brain malformations resulting in neonatal death. Another GS mutation (R324S) was identified in a neurologically compromised patient. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the impairment of GS activity by these mutations have remained elusive. Molecular dynamics simulations, free energy calculations, and rigidity analyses suggest that all three mutations influence the first step of GS catalytic cycle. The R324S and R324C mutations deteriorate GS catalytic activity due to loss of direct interactions with ATP. As to R324S, indirect, water-mediated interactions reduce this effect, which may explain the suggested higher GS residual activity. The R341C mutation weakens ATP binding by destabilizing the interacting residue R340 in the apo state of GS. Additionally, the mutation is predicted to result in a significant destabilization of helix H8, which should negatively affect glutamate binding. This prediction was tested in HEK293 cells overexpressing GS by dot-blot analysis: Structural stability of H8 was impaired through mutation of amino acids interacting with R341, as indicated by a loss of masking of an epitope in the glutamate binding pocket for a monoclonal anti-GS antibody by L-methionine-S-sulfoximine; in contrast, cells transfected with wild type GS showed the masking. Our analyses reveal complex molecular effects underlying impaired GS catalytic activity in three clinically relevant mutants. Our findings could stimulate the development of ATP binding-enhancing molecules by which the R324S mutant can be repaired extrinsically.

  18. A second glutamine synthetase gene with expression in the gills of the gulf toadfish (opsanus beta)

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, Patrick J.; Mayer, Gregory D.; Medina, Monica; Bernstein, Matthew L.; Barimo, John F.; Mommsen, Thomas P.

    2003-05-08

    Enzyme and molecular biology approaches were used to more completely characterize the expression of the nitrogen metabolism enzyme glutamine synthetase [GSase; L-glutamate: ammonia ligase (ADP-forming), E.C. 6.3.1.2] in a variety of tissues of the gulf toadfish (Opsanus beta) subjected to unconfined (ammonotelic) and confined (ureotelic) conditions. Enzymological results demonstrate that while weight-specific GSase activities rank in the order of brain > liver > stomach {approx} kidney > intestine > gill> heart/spleen > muscle, when tissue mass is used to calculate a glutamine synthetic potential, the liver has the greatest, followed by muscle > stomach and intestine with minor contributions from the remaining tissues. Additionally, during confinement stress, GSase activity only increases significantly in liver (5-fold) and muscle (2-fold), tissues which previously showed significant expression of the other enzymes of urea synthesis. RT PCR and RACE PCR revealed the presence of a second GSas e cDNA from gill tissue that appears to share relatively low nucleotide and amino acid sequence similarity ({approx}73 percent) with the original GSase cloned from liver, and furthermore lacks a mitochondrial leader targeting sequence. RT PCR and restriction digestion experiments demonstrated that mRNA from the original ''liver'' GSase is expressed in all tissues examined (liver, gill, stomach, intestine, kidney, brain and muscle), whereas the new ''gill'' form shows expression primarily in the gill. Enzyme activities of gill GSase also exhibit a different subcellular compartmentation with apparent exclusive expression in the soluble compartment, whereas other tissues expressing the ''liver'' form show both cytoplasmic and mitochondrial activities. Finally, phylogenetic analysis of a number of GSases demonstrates that the toadfish gill GSase has a greater affinity for a clade that includes the Xenopus GSase genes and one of two Fugu GSase genes, than it has for a clade

  19. Structural Insights into the Catalytic Mechanism of Escherichia coli Selenophosphate Synthetase

    SciTech Connect

    Noinaj, Nicholas; Wattanasak, Rut; Lee, Duck-Yeon; Wally, Jeremy L.; Piszczek, Grzegorz; Chock, P. Boon; Stadtman, Thressa C.; Buchanan, Susan K.

    2012-03-26

    Selenophosphate synthetase (SPS) catalyzes the synthesis of selenophosphate, the selenium donor for the biosynthesis of selenocysteine and 2-selenouridine residues in seleno-tRNA. Selenocysteine, known as the 21st amino acid, is then incorporated into proteins during translation to form selenoproteins which serve a variety of cellular processes. SPS activity is dependent on both Mg{sup 2+} and K{sup +} and uses ATP, selenide, and water to catalyze the formation of AMP, orthophosphate, and selenophosphate. In this reaction, the gamma phosphate of ATP is transferred to the selenide to form selenophosphate, while ADP is hydrolyzed to form orthophosphate and AMP. Most of what is known about the function of SPS has derived from studies investigating Escherichia coli SPS (EcSPS) as a model system. Here we report the crystal structure of the C17S mutant of SPS from E. coli (EcSPS{sup C17S}) in apo form (without ATP bound). EcSPS{sup C17S} crystallizes as a homodimer, which was further characterized by analytical